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Sample records for differentiation complex edc-encoded

  1. Immunolocalization of a Histidine-Rich Epidermal Differentiation Protein in the Chicken Supports the Hypothesis of an Evolutionary Developmental Link between the Embryonic Subperiderm and Feather Barbs and Barbules

    PubMed Central

    Alibardi, Lorenzo; Holthaus, Karin Brigit; Sukseree, Supawadee; Hermann, Marcela; Tschachler, Erwin

    2016-01-01

    The morphogenesis of feathers is a complex process that depends on a tight spatiotemporal regulation of gene expression and assembly of the protein components of mature feathers. Recent comparative genomics and gene transcription studies have indicated that genes within the epidermal differentiation complex (EDC) encode numerous structural proteins of cornifying skin cells in amniotes including birds. Here, we determined the localization of one of these proteins, termed EDMTFH (Epidermal Differentiation Protein starting with a MTF motif and rich in Histidine), which belongs to a group of EDC-encoded proteins rich in aromatic amino acid residues. We raised an antibody against an EDMTFH-specific epitope and performed immunohistochemical investigations by light microscopy and immunogold labeling by electron microscopy of chicken embryos at days 14–18 of development. EDMTFH was specifically present in the subperiderm, a transient layer of the embryonic epidermis, and in barbs and barbules of feathers. In the latter, it partially localized to bundles of so-called feather beta-keratins (corneous beta-proteins, CBPs). Cells of the embryonic periderm, the epidermis proper, and the feather sheath were immunonegative for EDMTFH. The results of this study indicate that EDMTFH may contribute to the unique mechanical properties of feathers and define EDMTFH as a common marker of the subperiderm and the feather barbules. This expression pattern of EDMTFH resembles that of epidermal differentiation cysteine-rich protein (EDCRP) and feather CBPs and is in accordance with the hypothesis that a major part of the cyclically regenerating feather follicle is topologically, developmentally and evolutionarily related to the embryonic subperiderm. PMID:27936131

  2. Immunolocalization of a Histidine-Rich Epidermal Differentiation Protein in the Chicken Supports the Hypothesis of an Evolutionary Developmental Link between the Embryonic Subperiderm and Feather Barbs and Barbules.

    PubMed

    Alibardi, Lorenzo; Holthaus, Karin Brigit; Sukseree, Supawadee; Hermann, Marcela; Tschachler, Erwin; Eckhart, Leopold

    2016-01-01

    The morphogenesis of feathers is a complex process that depends on a tight spatiotemporal regulation of gene expression and assembly of the protein components of mature feathers. Recent comparative genomics and gene transcription studies have indicated that genes within the epidermal differentiation complex (EDC) encode numerous structural proteins of cornifying skin cells in amniotes including birds. Here, we determined the localization of one of these proteins, termed EDMTFH (Epidermal Differentiation Protein starting with a MTF motif and rich in Histidine), which belongs to a group of EDC-encoded proteins rich in aromatic amino acid residues. We raised an antibody against an EDMTFH-specific epitope and performed immunohistochemical investigations by light microscopy and immunogold labeling by electron microscopy of chicken embryos at days 14-18 of development. EDMTFH was specifically present in the subperiderm, a transient layer of the embryonic epidermis, and in barbs and barbules of feathers. In the latter, it partially localized to bundles of so-called feather beta-keratins (corneous beta-proteins, CBPs). Cells of the embryonic periderm, the epidermis proper, and the feather sheath were immunonegative for EDMTFH. The results of this study indicate that EDMTFH may contribute to the unique mechanical properties of feathers and define EDMTFH as a common marker of the subperiderm and the feather barbules. This expression pattern of EDMTFH resembles that of epidermal differentiation cysteine-rich protein (EDCRP) and feather CBPs and is in accordance with the hypothesis that a major part of the cyclically regenerating feather follicle is topologically, developmentally and evolutionarily related to the embryonic subperiderm.

  3. Paired Pulse Voltammetry for differentiating complex analytes

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Dong Pyo; Kim, Inyong; Chang, Su-Youne; Min, Hoon Ki; Arora, Kanika; Marsh, Michale P.; Hwang, Sun-Chul; Kimble, Christopher J.; Bennet, Kevin E.

    2012-01-01

    Although fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) has contributed to important advances in neuroscience research, the technique is encumbered by significant analytical challenges. Confounding factors such as pH change and transient effects at the microelectrode surface make it difficult to discern the analytes represented by complex voltammograms. Here we introduce paired-pulse voltammetry (PPV), that mitigates the confounding factors and simplifies the analytical task. PPV consists of a selected binary waveform with a specific time gap between each of its two comprising pulses, such that each binary wave is repeated, while holding the electrode at a negative potential between the waves. This allows two simultaneous yet very different voltammograms (primary and secondary) to be obtained, each corresponding to the two pulses in the binary waveform. PPV was evaluated in the flow cell to characterize three different analytes, (dopamine, adenosine, and pH changes). The peak oxidation current decreased by approximately 50%, 80%, and 4% for dopamine, adenosine, and pH, in the secondary voltammogram compared with primary voltammogram, respectively. Thus, the influence of pH changes could be virtually eliminated using the difference between the primary and secondary voltammograms in the PPV technique, which discriminates analytes on the basis of their adsorption characteristics to the carbon fiber electrode. These results demonstrate that PPV can be effectively used for differentiating complex analytes. PMID:22299131

  4. A complex Noether approach for variational partial differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naz, R.; Mahomed, F. M.

    2015-10-01

    Scalar complex partial differential equations which admit variational formulations are studied. Such a complex partial differential equation, via a complex dependent variable, splits into a system of two real partial differential equations. The decomposition of the Lagrangian of the complex partial differential equation in the real domain is shown to yield two real Lagrangians for the split system. The complex Maxwellian distribution, transonic gas flow, Maxwellian tails, dissipative wave and Klein-Gordon equations are considered. The Noether symmetries and gauge terms of the split system that correspond to both the Lagrangians are constructed by the Noether approach. In the case of coupled split systems, the same Noether symmetries are obtained. The Noether symmetries for the uncoupled split systems are different. The conserved vectors of the split system which correspond to both the Lagrangians are compared to the split conserved vectors of the complex partial differential equation for the examples. The split conserved vectors of the complex partial differential equation are the same as the conserved vectors of the split system of real partial differential equations in the case of coupled systems. Moreover a Noether-like theorem for the split system is proved which provides the Noether-like conserved quantities of the split system from knowledge of the Noether-like operators. An interesting result on the split characteristics and the conservation laws is shown as well. The Noether symmetries and gauge terms of the Lagrangian of the split system with the split Noether-like operators and gauge terms of the Lagrangian of the given complex partial differential equation are compared. Folklore suggests that the split Noether-like operators of a Lagrangian of a complex Euler-Lagrange partial differential equation are symmetries of the Lagrangian of the split system of real partial differential equations. This is not the case. They are proved to be the same if the

  5. The increasingly complex regulation of adipocyte differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Poulos, Sylvia P; Dodson, Michael V; Culver, Melinda F

    2015-01-01

    Adipose (AD) tissue development and function relies on the ability of adipocytes to proliferate and differentiate into lipid-containing cells that also have endocrine function. Research suggests that certain conditions can induce AD tissue stem cells to differentiate into various cell types and that the microenvironment of the cell, including the extracellular matrix (ECM), is essential in maintaining cell and tissue function. This review provides an overview of factors involved in the proliferation and differentiation of adipocytes. A brief review of the numerous factors that influence PPARγ, the transcription factor thought to be the master regulator of adipocyte differentiation, provides context of established pathways that regulate adipogenesis. Thought provoking findings from research with hypoxia that is supported by earlier research that vascular development is related to adipogenesis are reviewed. Finally, our understanding of the critical role of the ECM and environment in adipogenesis is discussed and compared with studies that suggest that adipocytes may dedifferentiate and can convert into other cell types. PMID:26645953

  6. Sample Complexity Bounds for Differentially Private Learning

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhuri, Kamalika; Hsu, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    This work studies the problem of privacy-preserving classification – namely, learning a classifier from sensitive data while preserving the privacy of individuals in the training set. In particular, the learning algorithm is required in this problem to guarantee differential privacy, a very strong notion of privacy that has gained significant attention in recent years. A natural question to ask is: what is the sample requirement of a learning algorithm that guarantees a certain level of privacy and accuracy? We address this question in the context of learning with infinite hypothesis classes when the data is drawn from a continuous distribution. We first show that even for very simple hypothesis classes, any algorithm that uses a finite number of examples and guarantees differential privacy must fail to return an accurate classifier for at least some unlabeled data distributions. This result is unlike the case with either finite hypothesis classes or discrete data domains, in which distribution-free private learning is possible, as previously shown by Kasiviswanathan et al. (2008). We then consider two approaches to differentially private learning that get around this lower bound. The first approach is to use prior knowledge about the unlabeled data distribution in the form of a reference distribution chosen independently of the sensitive data. Given such a reference , we provide an upper bound on the sample requirement that depends (among other things) on a measure of closeness between and the unlabeled data distribution. Our upper bound applies to the non-realizable as well as the realizable case. The second approach is to relax the privacy requirement, by requiring only label-privacy – namely, that the only labels (and not the unlabeled parts of the examples) be considered sensitive information. An upper bound on the sample requirement of learning with label privacy was shown by Chaudhuri et al. (2006); in this work, we show a lower bound. PMID:25285183

  7. The coquaternion algebra and complex partial differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimiev, Stancho; Konstantinov, Mihail; Todorov, Vladimir

    2009-11-01

    In this paper we consider the problem of differentiation of coquaternionic functions. Let us recall that coquaternions are elements of an associative non-commutative real algebra with zero divisor, introduced by James Cockle (1849) under the name of split-quaternions or coquaternions. Developing two type complex representations for Cockle algebra (complex and paracomplex ones) we present the problem in a non-commutative form of the δ¯-type holomorphy. We prove that corresponding differentiable coquaternionic functions, smooth and analytic, satisfy PDE of complex, and respectively of real variables. Applications for coquaternionic polynomials are sketched.

  8. Integrator complex plays an essential role in adipose differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Otani, Yuichiro; Nakatsu, Yusuke; Sakoda, Hideyuki; Fukushima, Toshiaki; Fujishiro, Midori; Kushiyama, Akifumi; Okubo, Hirofumi; Tsuchiya, Yoshihiro; Ohno, Haruya; Takahashi, Shin-Ichiro; Nishimura, Fusanori; Kamata, Hideaki; Katagiri, Hideki; Asano, Tomoichiro

    2013-05-03

    Highlights: •IntS6 and IntS11 are subunits of the Integrator complex. •Expression levels of IntS6 and IntS11 were very low in 3T3-L1 fibroblast. •IntS6 and IntS11 were upregulated during adipose differentiation. •Suppression of IntS6 or IntS11 expression inhibited adipose differentiation. -- Abstract: The dynamic process of adipose differentiation involves stepwise expressions of transcription factors and proteins specific to the mature fat cell phenotype. In this study, it was revealed that expression levels of IntS6 and IntS11, subunits of the Integrator complex, were increased in 3T3-L1 cells in the period when the cells reached confluence and differentiated into adipocytes, while being reduced to basal levels after the completion of differentiation. Suppression of IntS6 or IntS11 expression using siRNAs in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes markedly inhibited differentiation into mature adipocytes, based on morphological findings as well as mRNA analysis of adipocyte-specific genes such as Glut4, perilipin and Fabp4. Although Pparγ2 protein expression was suppressed in IntS6 or IntS11-siRNA treated cells, adenoviral forced expression of Pparγ2 failed to restore the capacity for differentiation into mature adipocytes. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that increased expression of Integrator complex subunits is an indispensable event in adipose differentiation. Although further study is necessary to elucidate the underlying mechanism, the processing of U1, U2 small nuclear RNAs may be involved in cell differentiation steps.

  9. A Change In Nuclear Pore Complex Composition Regulates Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    D’Angelo, Maximiliano A.; Gomez-Cavazos, J. Sebastian; Mei, Arianna; Lackner, Daniel H.; Hetzer, Martin W.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) are built from ~30 different proteins called nucleoporins. Previous studies have shown that several Nups exhibit cell-type-specific expression and that mutations in NPC components result in tissue-specific diseases. Here we show that a specific change in NPC composition is required for both myogenic and neuronal differentiation. The transmembrane nucleoporin Nup210 is absent in proliferating myoblasts and embryonic stem (ES) cells but becomes expressed and incorporated into NPCs during cell differentiation. Preventing Nup210 production by RNAi blocks myogenesis and the differentiation of ES cells into neuroprogenitors. We found that the addition of Nup210 to NPCs does not affect nuclear transport but is required for the induction of genes that are essential for cell differentiation. Our results identify a single change in NPC composition as an essential step in cell differentiation and establish a role for Nup210 in gene expression regulation and cell fate determination. PMID:22264802

  10. Differential physiological roles of ESCRT complexes in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Wan; Sung, Hyun; Shin, Donghyuk; Shen, Haihong; Ahnn, Joohong; Lee, Sun-Kyung; Lee, Sangho

    2011-06-01

    Endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) complexes are involved in endosomal trafficking to the lysosome, cytokinesis, and viral budding. Extensive genetic, biochemical, and structural studies on the ESCRT system have been carried out in yeast and mammalian systems. However, the question of how the ESCRT system functions at the whole organism level has not been fully explored. In C. elegans, we performed RNAi experiments to knock-down gene expression of components of the ESCRT system and profiled their effects on protein degradation and endocytosis of YP170, a yolk protein. Targeted RNAi knock-down of ESCRT-I (tsg-101 and vps-28) and ESCRT-III (vps-24, and vps-32.2) components interfered with protein degradation while knock-down of ESCRT-II (vps-25 and vps-36) and ESCRT-III (vps-20 and vps-24) components hampered endocytosis. In contrast, the knockdown of vps-37, another ESCRT-I component, showed no defect in either YP170 uptake or degradation. Depletion of at least one component from each complex - ESCRT-0 (hgrs-1), ESCRT-I (tsg-101, vps-28, and vps-37), ESCRT-II (vps-36), ESCRT-III (vps-24), and Vps4 (vps-4) - resulted in abnormal distribution of embryos in the uterus of worms, possibly due to abnormal ovulation, fertilization, and egglaying. These results suggest differential physiological roles of ESCRT-0, -I, -II, and -III complexes in the context of the whole organism, C. elegans.

  11. Optimal control of complex networks based on matrix differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guoqi; Ding, Jie; Wen, Changyun; Pei, Jing

    2016-09-01

    Finding the key node set to be connected to external control sources so as to minimize the energy for controlling a complex network, known as the minimum-energy control problem, is of critical importance but remains open. We address this critical problem where matrix differentiation is involved. To this end, the differentiation of energy/cost function with respect to the input matrix is obtained based on tensor analysis, and the Hessian matrix is compressed from a fourth-order tensor. Normalized projected gradient method (NPGM) normalized projected trust-region method (NPTM) are proposed with established convergence property. We show that NPGM is more computationally efficient than NPTM. Simulation results demonstrate satisfactory performance of the algorithms, and reveal important insights as well. Two interesting phenomena are observed. One is that the key node set tends to divide elementary paths equally. The other is that the low-degree nodes may be more important than hubs from a control point of view, indicating that controlling hub nodes does not help to lower the control energy. These results suggest a way of achieving optimal control of complex networks, and provide meaningful insights for future researches.

  12. A note on the Dirichlet problem for model complex partial differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashyralyev, Allaberen; Karaca, Bahriye

    2016-08-01

    Complex model partial differential equations of arbitrary order are considered. The uniqueness of the Dirichlet problem is studied. It is proved that the Dirichlet problem for higher order of complex partial differential equations with one complex variable has infinitely many solutions.

  13. A Class of Practically Nowhere Differentiable Functions on the Complex Plane

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hetzel, Andrew J.

    2006-01-01

    This note could find classroom use in an introductory course on complex analysis. Using some of the most significant theorems from complex analysis, the main result provides a simple method for transforming many elementary functions (defined on the complex plane) into everywhere continuous functions that are differentiable only on a nowhere dense…

  14. Stochastic Computational Approach for Complex Nonlinear Ordinary Differential Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junaid, Ali Khan; Muhammad, Asif Zahoor Raja; Ijaz Mansoor, Qureshi

    2011-02-01

    We present an evolutionary computational approach for the solution of nonlinear ordinary differential equations (NLODEs). The mathematical modeling is performed by a feed-forward artificial neural network that defines an unsupervised error. The training of these networks is achieved by a hybrid intelligent algorithm, a combination of global search with genetic algorithm and local search by pattern search technique. The applicability of this approach ranges from single order NLODEs, to systems of coupled differential equations. We illustrate the method by solving a variety of model problems and present comparisons with solutions obtained by exact methods and classical numerical methods. The solution is provided on a continuous finite time interval unlike the other numerical techniques with comparable accuracy. With the advent of neuroprocessors and digital signal processors the method becomes particularly interesting due to the expected essential gains in the execution speed.

  15. Differential Expression of Cysteine Dioxygenase 1 in Complex Karyotype Liposarcomas

    PubMed Central

    Shaker, Mohammed; Pascarelli, Kara M; Plantinga, Matthew J; Love, Miles A; Lazar, Alexander J; Ingram, Davis R; von Mehren, Margaret; Lev, Dina; Kipling, David; Broccoli, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    Altered cysteine dioxygenase 1 (CDO1) gene expression has been observed in several cancers but has not yet been investigated in liposarcomas. The aim of this study was to evaluate CDO1 expression in a cohort of liposarcomas and to determine its association with clinicopathological features. Existing microarray data indicated variable CDO1 expression in liposarcoma subtypes. CDO1 mRNA from a larger cohort of liposarcomas was quantified by real time-PCR, and CDO1 protein expression was determined by immunohistochemistry (IHC) in more than 300 tumor specimens. Well-differentiated liposarcomas (WDLSs) had significantly higher CDO1 gene expression and protein levels than dedifferentiated liposarcomas (DDLSs) (P < 0.001). Location of the tumor was not predictive of the expression level of CDO1 mRNA in any histological subtype of liposarcoma. Recurrent tumors did not show any difference in CDO1 expression when compared to primary tumors. CDO1 expression was upregulated as human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) undergo differentiation into mature adipocytes. Our results suggest that CDO1 is a marker of liposarcoma progression and adipogenic differentiation. PMID:24741338

  16. Effects of differential habitat warming on complex communities.

    PubMed

    Tunney, Tyler D; McCann, Kevin S; Lester, Nigel P; Shuter, Brian J

    2014-06-03

    Food webs unfold across a mosaic of micro and macro habitats, with each habitat coupled by mobile consumers that behave in response to local environmental conditions. Despite this fundamental characteristic of nature, research on how climate change will affect whole ecosystems has overlooked (i) that climate warming will generally affect habitats differently and (ii) that mobile consumers may respond to this differential change in a manner that may fundamentally alter the energy pathways that sustain ecosystems. This reasoning suggests a powerful, but largely unexplored, avenue for studying the impacts of climate change on ecosystem functioning. Here, we use lake ecosystems to show that predictable behavioral adjustments to local temperature differentials govern a fundamental structural shift across 54 food webs. Data show that the trophic pathways from basal resources to a cold-adapted predator shift toward greater reliance on a cold-water refuge habitat, and food chain length increases, as air temperatures rise. Notably, cold-adapted predator behavior may substantially drive this decoupling effect across the climatic range in our study independent of warmer-adapted species responses (for example, changes in near-shore species abundance and predator absence). Such modifications reflect a flexible food web architecture that requires more attention from climate change research. The trophic pathway restructuring documented here is expected to alter biomass accumulation, through the regulation of energy fluxes to predators, and thus potentially threatens ecosystem sustainability in times of rapid environmental change.

  17. E-Index for Differentiating Complex Dynamic Traits

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Jiandong; Sun, Jianfeng; Wang, Jianxin

    2016-01-01

    While it is a daunting challenge in current biology to understand how the underlying network of genes regulates complex dynamic traits, functional mapping, a tool for mapping quantitative trait loci (QTLs) and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), has been applied in a variety of cases to tackle this challenge. Though useful and powerful, functional mapping performs well only when one or more model parameters are clearly responsible for the developmental trajectory, typically being a logistic curve. Moreover, it does not work when the curves are more complex than that, especially when they are not monotonic. To overcome this inadaptability, we therefore propose a mathematical-biological concept and measurement, E-index (earliness-index), which cumulatively measures the earliness degree to which a variable (or a dynamic trait) increases or decreases its value. Theoretical proofs and simulation studies show that E-index is more general than functional mapping and can be applied to any complex dynamic traits, including those with logistic curves and those with nonmonotonic curves. Meanwhile, E-index vector is proposed as well to capture more subtle differences of developmental patterns. PMID:27064292

  18. Differentiating morphology, form, and meaning: neural correlates of morphological complexity.

    PubMed

    Bozic, Mirjana; Marslen-Wilson, William D; Stamatakis, Emmanuel A; Davis, Matthew H; Tyler, Lorraine K

    2007-09-01

    The role of morphological structure in word recognition raises issues about the nature and structure of the language system. One major issue is whether morphological factors provide an independent principle for lexical organization and processing, or whether morphological effects can be reduced to the joint contribution of form and meaning. The independence of form, meaning, and morphological structure can be directly investigated using derivationally complex words, because derived words can share form but need not share meaning (e.g., archer-arch). We used an event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging paradigm to investigate priming between pairs of words that potentially shared a stem, where this link was either semantically transparent (e.g., bravely-brave) or opaque (e.g., archer-arch). These morphologically related pairs were contrasted with identity priming (e.g., mist-mist) and priming for pairs of words that shared only form (e.g., scandal-scan) or meaning (e.g., accuse-blame). Morphologically related words produced significantly reduced activation in left frontal regions, whether the pairs were semantically transparent or opaque. The effect was not found for any of the control conditions (identity, form, or meaning). Morphological effects were observed separately from processing form and meaning and we propose that they reflect segmentation of complex derived words, a process triggered by surface morphological structure of complex words.

  19. Differentiation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex by PCR amplification of genomic regions of difference.

    PubMed

    Warren, R M; Gey van Pittius, N C; Barnard, M; Hesseling, A; Engelke, E; de Kock, M; Gutierrez, M C; Chege, G K; Victor, T C; Hoal, E G; van Helden, P D

    2006-07-01

    Differentiation of members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex by conventional mycobacteriological methods is time consuming, making surveillance of species-specific disease difficult. A two-step, multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method based on genomic regions of difference (RD1, RD1(mic), RD2(seal), RD4, RD9 and RD12) was developed for the differentiation of M. canettii, M. tuberculosis, M. africanum, M. microti, M. pinnipedii, M. caprae, M. bovis and M. bovis BCG. The size of the respective multiplex PCR amplification products corresponded to the presence of the different M. tuberculosis complex members. This method allows for rapid differentiation, making it suitable for routine laboratories and surveillance purposes.

  20. Differentiating elements of the soil-vegetation complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumgardner, M. F.

    1972-01-01

    The application of remote sensing to study soil-vegetation systems requires quantification and precise location of ground observation data such that they can be correlated with multispectral aerial acquired data. Griddling and sampling of an area for exact identification in a known address on magnetic tape containing multispectral scanner data produces quantitative physico-chemical parameters and the energy which is radiating from within the soil-vegetation complex of an area. Example classifications and spectral mappings of soils made from multispectral scanner data are included.

  1. Linguistic Complexity, Schematic Representations, and Differential Item Functioning for English Language Learners in Math Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martiniello, Maria

    2009-01-01

    This article examines nonmathematical linguistic complexity as a source of differential item functioning (DIF) in math word problems for English language learners (ELLs). Specifically, this study investigates the relationship between item measures of linguistic complexity, nonlinguistic forms of representation and DIF measures based on item…

  2. Complex and differential glial responses in Alzheimer's disease and ageing.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, José J; Butt, Arthur M; Gardenal, Emanuela; Parpura, Vladimir; Verkhratsky, Alexei

    2016-01-01

    Glial cells and their association with neurones are fundamental for brain function. The emergence of complex neurone-glial networks assures rapid information transfer, creating a sophisticated circuitry where both types of neural cells work in concert, serving different activities. All glial cells, represented by astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, microglia and NG2-glia, are essential for brain homeostasis and defence. Thus, glia are key not only for normal central nervous system (CNS) function, but also to its dysfunction, being directly associated with all forms of neuropathological processes. Therefore, the progression and outcome of neurological and neurodegenerative diseases depend on glial reactions. In this review, we provide a concise account of recent data obtained from both human material and animal models demonstrating the pathological involvement of glia in neurodegenerative processes, including Alzheimer's disease (AD), as well as physiological ageing.

  3. Multiplex-PCR for differentiation of Mycobacterium bovis from Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex.

    PubMed

    Spositto, F L E; Campanerut, P A Z; Ghiraldi, L D; Leite, C Q F; Hirata, M H; Hirata, R D C; Siqueira, V L D; Cardoso, R Fressatti

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated a multiplex-PCR to differentiate Mycobacterium bovis from M. tuberculosis Complex (MTC) by one step amplification based on simultaneous detection of pncA 169 C > G change in M. bovis and the IS6110 present in MTC species. Our findings showed the proposed multiplex-PCR is a very useful tool for complementation in differentiating M. bovis from other cultured MTC species.

  4. The Painlevé test for nonlinear system of differential equations with complex chaotic behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsegel’nik, V.

    2017-01-01

    The Painlevé-analysis was performed for solutions of nonlinear third-order autonomous system of differential equations with quadratic nonlinearities on their right-hand sides. At certain values of two constant parameters incorporated into the system, the latter exhibits complex chaotic behavior. When the parameters attain the values corresponding to complex chaotic behavior, the system was found not to possess the Painlevé property.

  5. Value Differentiation in Adolescence: The Role of Age and Cultural Complexity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniel, Ella; Schiefer, David; Mollering, Anna; Benish-Weisman, Maya; Boehnke, Klaus; Knafo, Ariel

    2012-01-01

    Living in complex social worlds, individuals encounter discordant values across life contexts, potentially resulting in different importance of values across contexts. Value differentiation is defined here as the degree to which values receive different importance depending on the context in which they are considered. Early and mid-adolescents (N…

  6. The Impact of Mitochondrial Complex Inhibition on mESC Differentiation

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Impact of Mitochondrial Complex Inhibition on mESC Differentiation JE Royland, SH Warren, S Jeffay, MR Hoopes, HP Nichols, ES Hunter U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Integrated Systems Toxicology Division, Research Triangle Park, NC The importance of mitochondrial funct...

  7. Exosome complex orchestrates developmental signaling to balance proliferation and differentiation during erythropoiesis

    PubMed Central

    McIver, Skye C; Katsumura, Koichi R; Davids, Elsa; Liu, Peng; Kang, Yoon-A; Yang, David; Bresnick, Emery H

    2016-01-01

    Since the highly conserved exosome complex mediates the degradation and processing of multiple classes of RNAs, it almost certainly controls diverse biological processes. How this post-transcriptional RNA-regulatory machine impacts cell fate decisions and differentiation is poorly understood. Previously, we demonstrated that exosome complex subunits confer an erythroid maturation barricade, and the erythroid transcription factor GATA-1 dismantles the barricade by transcriptionally repressing the cognate genes. While dissecting requirements for the maturation barricade in Mus musculus, we discovered that the exosome complex is a vital determinant of a developmental signaling transition that dictates proliferation/amplification versus differentiation. Exosome complex integrity in erythroid precursor cells ensures Kit receptor tyrosine kinase expression and stem cell factor/Kit signaling, while preventing responsiveness to erythropoietin-instigated signals that promote differentiation. Functioning as a gatekeeper of this developmental signaling transition, the exosome complex controls the massive production of erythroid cells that ensures organismal survival in homeostatic and stress contexts. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17877.001 PMID:27543448

  8. Differentiating Types of Wide-Complex Tachycardia to Determine Appropriate Treatment in the Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    deSouza, Ian S; Peterson, Alanna C; Marill, Keith A

    2015-07-01

    Wide-complex tachycardia is a rare disease entity among patients presenting to the emergency department. However, due to its potential life-threatening nature, emergency clinicians must know how to assess and manage this condition. Wide-complex tachycardia encompasses a range of cardiac dysrhythmias, some of which can be difficult to distinguish and may require specific treatment approaches. This review summarizes the etiology and pathophysiology of wide-complex tachycardia, describes the differential diagnosis, and presents an evidence-based approach to identification of the different types of tachycardias through the use of a thorough history and physical examination, vagal maneuvers, electrocardiography, and adenosine. The treatment options and disposition for patients with various wide-complex tachycardias are also discussed, with attention to special circumstances and select controversial/contemporary topics.

  9. Differentiating inclusion complexes from host molecules by tapping-mode atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Botella, S; Martin, M A; del Castillo, B; Vázquez, L

    1996-01-01

    Tapping-mode atomic force microscopy imaging under different cantilever vibration amplitudes has been used to differentiate the host beta-cyclodextrin nanotubes from retinal/beta-cyclodextrin inclusion complex nanotubes. It was observed that both compounds were deformed differently by the applied probe force because of their different local rigidity. This change in the elasticity properties can be explained as a consequence of the inclusion process. This method shows that tapping-mode atomic force microscopy is an useful tool to map soft sample elasticity properties and to distinguish inclusion complexes from their host molecules on the basis of their different mechanical response. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 PMID:8804591

  10. Stimulation of preadipocyte differentiation by steroid through targeting of an HDAC1 complex.

    PubMed

    Wiper-Bergeron, Nadine; Wu, Dongmei; Pope, Louise; Schild-Poulter, Caroline; Haché, Robert J G

    2003-05-01

    Glucocorticoids potentiate the early steps of preadipocyte differentiation and promote obesity in Cushing's syndrome and during prolonged steroid therapy. We show that glucocorticoids stimulate 3T3 L1 preadipocyte differentiation through a non-transcriptional mechanism mediated through the ligand-binding domain of the glucocorticoid receptor. This enhanced the onset of CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBPalpha) expression by potentiating its initial transcriptional activation by C/EBPbeta. In the absence of steroid, C/EBPbeta associated with a transcriptional corepressor complex containing mSin3A and histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1), but lacking HDAC2 and RbAp46/48. HDAC1/mSin3A were recruited to the C/EBPalpha promoter with C/EBPbeta and promoted the deacetylation of histone H4. Steroid induced the specific depletion of this corepressor by targeting the HDAC1 within the complex for degradation through the 26S proteasome. Treatment with histone deacetylase inhibitors replaced the effects of steroid treatment on preadipocyte differentiation and C/EBPalpha expression, while overexpression of HDAC1 abrogated the stimulatory effects of steroid. Recapitulation of the glucocorticoid effect by progestin treatment in the presence of the progesterone receptor ligand-binding domain suggests a conserved mechanism relevant to many aspects of steroid-mediated differentiation.

  11. Pronounced fixation, strong population differentiation and complex population history in the Canary Islands blue tit subspecies complex.

    PubMed

    Hansson, Bengt; Ljungqvist, Marcus; Illera, Juan-Carlos; Kvist, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Evolutionary molecular studies of island radiations may lead to insights in the role of vicariance, founder events, population size and drift in the processes of population differentiation. We evaluate the degree of population genetic differentiation and fixation of the Canary Islands blue tit subspecies complex using microsatellite markers and aim to get insights in the population history using coalescence based methods. The Canary Island populations were strongly genetically differentiated and had reduced diversity with pronounced fixation including many private alleles. In population structure models, the relationship between the central island populations (La Gomera, Tenerife and Gran Canaria) and El Hierro was difficult to disentangle whereas the two European populations showed consistent clustering, the two eastern islands (Fuerteventura and Lanzarote) and Morocco weak clustering, and La Palma a consistent unique lineage. Coalescence based models suggested that the European mainland forms an outgroup to the Afrocanarian population, a split between the western island group (La Palma and El Hierro) and the central island group, and recent splits between the three central islands, and between the two eastern islands and Morocco, respectively. It is clear that strong genetic drift and low level of concurrent gene flow among populations have shaped complex allelic patterns of fixation and skewed frequencies over the archipelago. However, understanding the population history remains challenging; in particular, the pattern of extreme divergence with low genetic diversity and yet unique genetic material in the Canary Island system requires an explanation. A potential scenario is population contractions of a historically large and genetically variable Afrocanarian population, with vicariance and drift following in the wake. The suggestion from sequence-based analyses of a Pleistocene extinction of a substantial part of North Africa and a Pleistocene/Holocene eastward

  12. Genetic and ecotypic differentiation in a Californian plant polyploid complex (Grindelia, Asteraceae).

    PubMed

    Moore, Abigail J; Moore, William L; Baldwin, Bruce G

    2014-01-01

    Studies of ecotypic differentiation in the California Floristic Province have contributed greatly to plant evolutionary biology since the pioneering work of Clausen, Keck, and Hiesey. The extent of gene flow and genetic differentiation across interfertile ecotypes that span major habitats in the California Floristic Province is understudied, however, and is important for understanding the prospects for local adaptation to evolve or persist in the face of potential gene flow across populations in different ecological settings. We used microsatellite data to examine local differentiation in one of these lineages, the Pacific Coast polyploid complex of the plant genus Grindelia (Asteraceae). We examined 439 individuals in 10 different populations. The plants grouped broadly into a coastal and an inland set of populations. The coastal group contained plants from salt marshes and coastal bluffs, as well as a population growing in a serpentine grassland close to the coast, while the inland group contained grassland plants. No evidence for hybridization was found at the single location where adjacent populations of the two groups were sampled. In addition to differentiation along ecotypic lines, there was also a strong signal of local differentiation, with the plants grouping strongly by population. The strength of local differentiation is consistent with the extensive morphological variation observed across populations and the history of taxonomic confusion in the group. The Pacific Clade of Grindelia and other young Californian plant groups warrant additional analysis of evolutionary divergence along the steep coast-to-inland climatic gradient, which has been associated with local adaptation and ecotype formation since the classic studies of Clausen, Keck, and Hiesey.

  13. Genetic and Ecotypic Differentiation in a Californian Plant Polyploid Complex (Grindelia, Asteraceae)

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Abigail J.; Moore, William L.; Baldwin, Bruce G.

    2014-01-01

    Studies of ecotypic differentiation in the California Floristic Province have contributed greatly to plant evolutionary biology since the pioneering work of Clausen, Keck, and Hiesey. The extent of gene flow and genetic differentiation across interfertile ecotypes that span major habitats in the California Floristic Province is understudied, however, and is important for understanding the prospects for local adaptation to evolve or persist in the face of potential gene flow across populations in different ecological settings. We used microsatellite data to examine local differentiation in one of these lineages, the Pacific Coast polyploid complex of the plant genus Grindelia (Asteraceae). We examined 439 individuals in 10 different populations. The plants grouped broadly into a coastal and an inland set of populations. The coastal group contained plants from salt marshes and coastal bluffs, as well as a population growing in a serpentine grassland close to the coast, while the inland group contained grassland plants. No evidence for hybridization was found at the single location where adjacent populations of the two groups were sampled. In addition to differentiation along ecotypic lines, there was also a strong signal of local differentiation, with the plants grouping strongly by population. The strength of local differentiation is consistent with the extensive morphological variation observed across populations and the history of taxonomic confusion in the group. The Pacific Clade of Grindelia and other young Californian plant groups warrant additional analysis of evolutionary divergence along the steep coast-to-inland climatic gradient, which has been associated with local adaptation and ecotype formation since the classic studies of Clausen, Keck, and Hiesey. PMID:24755840

  14. Genetic differentiation in the Agave deserti (Agavaceae) complex of the Sonoran desert.

    PubMed

    Navarro-Quezada, A; González-Chauvet, R; Molina-Freaner, F; Eguiarte, L E

    2003-03-01

    The Agave deserti complex, comprising A. deserti, A. cerulata and A. subsimplex, represents a group of species and subspecies with a near allopatric distribution and clear differences in morphology. Genetic differentiation and taxonomic status with respect to spatial distribution of 14 populations of the complex were analyzed in an effort to understand the evolution and speciation process within the genus. Allelic frequencies, levels of genetic variation, expected heterozygosity (H(S)), proportion of polymorphic loci (P), and genetic differentiation (theta and Nei's genetic distance) were estimated using 41 putative RAPD loci. All three species show high levels of genetic variation (H(S)=0.12-0.29, P=63.4-95.1), and low genetic differentiation between populations and species (theta populations=0.14+/-0.02 (SE); G(st)=0.11+/-0.02). Accordingly, gene flow among populations was estimated as high by three different methods (N(m)=2.91-6.14). Nei's genetic distances between the three species were low compared to the values obtained from other Agavaceae, and there was no clear correlation with taxonomic divisions. In a UPGMA analysis, A. subsimplex and A. cerulata formed exclusive monospecific clusters, whereas the A. deserti populations appear in more than one cluster together with other species. The results were consistent with a pattern of genetic isolation by distance.

  15. Differential Network Analysis Reveals Evolutionary Complexity in Secondary Metabolism of Rauvolfia serpentina over Catharanthus roseus

    PubMed Central

    Pathania, Shivalika; Bagler, Ganesh; Ahuja, Paramvir S.

    2016-01-01

    Comparative co-expression analysis of multiple species using high-throughput data is an integrative approach to determine the uniformity as well as diversification in biological processes. Rauvolfia serpentina and Catharanthus roseus, both members of Apocyanacae family, are reported to have remedial properties against multiple diseases. Despite of sharing upstream of terpenoid indole alkaloid pathway, there is significant diversity in tissue-specific synthesis and accumulation of specialized metabolites in these plants. This led us to implement comparative co-expression network analysis to investigate the modules and genes responsible for differential tissue-specific expression as well as species-specific synthesis of metabolites. Toward these goals differential network analysis was implemented to identify candidate genes responsible for diversification of metabolites profile. Three genes were identified with significant difference in connectivity leading to differential regulatory behavior between these plants. These genes may be responsible for diversification of secondary metabolism, and thereby for species-specific metabolite synthesis. The network robustness of R. serpentina, determined based on topological properties, was also complemented by comparison of gene-metabolite networks of both plants, and may have evolved to have complex metabolic mechanisms as compared to C. roseus under the influence of various stimuli. This study reveals evolution of complexity in secondary metabolism of R. serpentina, and key genes that contribute toward diversification of specific metabolites. PMID:27588023

  16. TDP-43 regulates the microprocessor complex activity during in vitro neuronal differentiation.

    PubMed

    Di Carlo, Valerio; Grossi, Elena; Laneve, Pietro; Morlando, Mariangela; Dini Modigliani, Stefano; Ballarino, Monica; Bozzoni, Irene; Caffarelli, Elisa

    2013-12-01

    TDP-43 (TAR DNA-binding protein 43) is an RNA-binding protein implicated in RNA metabolism at several levels. Even if ubiquitously expressed, it is considered as a neuronal activity-responsive factor and a major signature for neurological pathologies, making the comprehension of its activity in the nervous system a very challenging issue. TDP-43 has also been described as an accessory component of the Drosha-DGCR8 (DiGeorge syndrome critical region gene 8) microprocessor complex, which is crucially involved in basal and tissue-specific RNA processing events. In the present study, we exploited in vitro neuronal differentiation systems to investigate the TDP-43 demand for the microprocessor function, focusing on both its canonical microRNA biosynthetic activity and its alternative role as a post-transcriptional regulator of gene expression. Our findings reveal a novel role for TDP-43 as an essential factor that controls the stability of Drosha protein during neuronal differentiation, thus globally affecting the production of microRNAs. We also demonstrate that TDP-43 is required for the Drosha-mediated regulation of Neurogenin 2, a master gene orchestrating neurogenesis, whereas post-transcriptional control of Dgcr8, another Drosha target, resulted to be TDP-43-independent. These results implicate a previously uncovered contribution of TDP-43 in regulating the abundance and the substrate specificity of the microprocessor complex and provide new insights into TDP-43 as a key player in neuronal differentiation.

  17. Engineering complex tissue-like microgel arrays for evaluating stem cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Guermani, Enrico; Shaki, Hossein; Mohanty, Soumyaranjan; Mehrali, Mehdi; Arpanaei, Ayyoob; Gaharwar, Akhilesh K.; Dolatshahi-Pirouz, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Development of tissue engineering scaffolds with native-like biology and microarchitectures is a prerequisite for stem cell mediated generation of off-the-shelf-tissues. So far, the field of tissue engineering has not full-filled its grand potential of engineering such combinatorial scaffolds for engineering functional tissues. This is primarily due to the many challenges associated with finding the right microarchitectures and ECM compositions for optimal tissue regeneration. Here, we have developed a new microgel array to address this grand challenge through robotic printing of complex stem cell-laden microgel arrays. The developed microgel array platform consisted of various microgel environments that where composed of native-like cellular microarchitectures resembling vascularized and bone marrow tissue architectures. The feasibility of our array system was demonstrated through localized cell spreading and osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) into complex tissue-like structures. In summary, we have developed a tissue-like microgel array for evaluating stem cell differentiation within complex and heterogeneous cell microenvironments. We anticipate that the developed platform will be used for high-throughput identification of combinatorial and native-like scaffolds for tissue engineering of functional organs. PMID:27465860

  18. Genetic Differentiation and Relationships of Populations in the Cycas balansae Complex (Cycadaceae) and its Conservation Implications

    PubMed Central

    XIAO, LONG-QIAN; GONG, XUN

    2006-01-01

    • Background and Aims The Cycas balansae complex is arguably a controversial group with regard to species delineation. Some taxonomists recognize a single polymorphic species while others distinguish five narrowly defined ones. The unresolved taxonomy has the potential to bring about significant problems for species conservation. Thus, an investigation to examine the genetic diversity and differentiation in the C. balansae complex was performed to determine the relationship of populations and to test whether the morphologically defined segregations represent genetically distinct units. • Methods Inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers were employed to assess the genetic diversity in the C. balansae complex with a sample of 158 individuals from all extant populations in China. • Key Results ISSR markers revealed low genetic diversity in all populations studied (HE and HO averaged 0·0639 and 0·0798 at the population level, respectively). Phenetic analysis showed that the C. balansae complex grouped into five clusters closely corresponding to the narrowly defined C. balansae, C. parvula, C. shiwandashanica, C. tanqingii and C. simplicipinna. • Conclusions ISSR data suggest that the C. balansae complex has evolved into five genetically distinct units. These might be derived from a relatively widespread common ancestor through multiple vicariant events including geographical isolation resulting from the collision of the Indian plate with the Eurasian plate and from Pleistocene glaciations. In conservation, attention should be paid to each genetic unit. PMID:16517547

  19. Multiple evolutionary processes drive the patterns of genetic differentiation in a forest tree species complex

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Rebecca C; Steane, Dorothy A; Lavery, Martyn; Vaillancourt, René E; Potts, Brad M

    2013-01-01

    Forest trees frequently form species complexes, complicating taxonomic classification and gene pool management. This is certainly the case in Eucalyptus, and well exemplified by the Eucalyptus globulus complex. This ecologically and economically significant complex comprises four taxa (sspp. bicostata, globulus, maidenii, pseudoglobulus) that are geographically and morphologically distinct, but linked by extensive “intergrade” populations. To resolve their genetic affinities, nine microsatellites were used to genotype 1200 trees from throughout the natural range of the complex in Australia, representing 33 morphological core and intergrade populations. There was significant spatial genetic structure (FST = 0.10), but variation was continuous. High genetic diversity in southern ssp. maidenii indicates that this region is the center of origin. Genetic diversity decreases and population differentiation increases with distance from this area, suggesting that drift is a major evolutionary process. Many of the intergrade populations, along with other populations morphologically classified as ssp. pseudoglobulus or ssp. globulus, belong to a “cryptic genetic entity” that is genetically and geographically intermediate between core ssp. bicostata, ssp. maidenii, and ssp. globulus. Geography, rather than morphology, therefore, is the best predictor of overall genetic affinities within the complex and should be used to classify germplasm into management units for conservation and breeding purposes. PMID:23403692

  20. Characterization of latex-antineoplastic drug complexes by differential scanning calorimetry and microphotography.

    PubMed

    Gallardo, V; Ruiz, M A; Morales, E; Zouaki, J; Campos, J; Conejo-García, A; Gallo, M A; Espinosa, A

    2006-12-01

    Choline kinase inhibitors have recently been identified as potentially useful antitumoral agents. Here we determine the best conditions for obtaining drug-polymer complexes with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), and JCR791B, a new drug representing a significant advance in the development of new molecules to inhibit tumour proliferation. As polymers we used the cellulose derivatives Aquacoat and Aquateric. The variables in the adsorption process measured were time to adsorbent-adsorbate equilibrium, pH and concentration. The drug-polymer complexes were characterized by differential scanning calorimetry and microphotography. Our results show that adsorption of 5-FU and JCR was similar with both polymers although slightly greater with Aquacoat. The chemical structure of the drug and its solubility in water and oil are fundamental characteristics that determine the performance of polymers as drug carriers able to provide controlled release.

  1. Magnetic Exchange Couplings in Heterodinuclear Complexes Based on Differential Local Spin Rotations.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Rajendra P; Phillips, Jordan J; Peralta, Juan E

    2016-04-12

    We analyze the performance of a new method for the calculation of magnetic exchange coupling parameters for the particular case of heterodinuclear transition metals complexes of Cu, Ni, and V. This method is based on a generalized perturbative approach which uses differential local spin rotations via formal Lagrange multipiers (Phillips, J. J.; Peralta, J. E. J. Chem. Phys. 2013, 138, 174115). The reliability of the calculated couplings has been assessed by comparing with results from traditional energy differences with different density functional approximations and with experimental values. Our results show that this method to calculate magnetic exchange couplings can be reliably used for heteronuclear transition metal complexes, and at the same time, that it is independent from the different mapping schemes used in energy difference methods.

  2. Treatment with at Homeopathic Complex Medication Modulates Mononuclear Bone Marrow Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Cesar, Beatriz; Abud, Ana Paula R.; de Oliveira, Carolina C.; Cardoso, Francolino; Bernardi, Raffaello Popa Di; Guimarães, Fernando S. F.; Gabardo, Juarez; de Freitas Buchi, Dorly

    2011-01-01

    A homeopathic complex medication (HCM), with immunomodulatory properties, is recommended for patients with depressed immune systems. Previous studies demonstrated that the medication induces an increase in leukocyte number. The bone marrow microenvironment is composed of growth factors, stromal cells, an extracellular matrix and progenitor cells that differentiate into mature blood cells. Mice were our biological model used in this research. We now report in vivo immunophenotyping of total bone marrow cells and ex vivo effects of the medication on mononuclear cell differentiation at different times. Cells were examined by light microscopy and cytokine levels were measured in vitro. After in vivo treatment with HCM, a pool of cells from the new marrow microenvironment was analyzed by flow cytometry to detect any trend in cell alteration. The results showed decreases, mainly, in CD11b and TER-119 markers compared with controls. Mononuclear cells were used to analyze the effects of ex vivo HCM treatment and the number of cells showing ring nuclei, niche cells and activated macrophages increased in culture, even in the absence of macrophage colony-stimulating factor. Cytokines favoring stromal cell survival and differentiation in culture were induced in vitro. Thus, we observe that HCM is immunomodulatory, either alone or in association with other products. PMID:19736221

  3. A Ubiquitin Ligase Complex Regulates Caspase Activation During Sperm Differentiation in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Arama, Eli; Bader, Maya; Rieckhof, Gabrielle E; Steller, Hermann

    2007-01-01

    In both insects and mammals, spermatids eliminate their bulk cytoplasm as they undergo terminal differentiation. In Drosophila, this process of dramatic cellular remodeling requires apoptotic proteins, including caspases. To gain further insight into the regulation of caspases, we screened a large collection of sterile male flies for mutants that block effector caspase activation at the onset of spermatid individualization. Here, we describe the identification and characterization of a testis-specific, Cullin-3–dependent ubiquitin ligase complex that is required for caspase activation in spermatids. Mutations in either a testis-specific isoform of Cullin-3 (Cul3Testis), the small RING protein Roc1b, or a Drosophila orthologue of the mammalian BTB-Kelch protein Klhl10 all reduce or eliminate effector caspase activation in spermatids. Importantly, all three genes encode proteins that can physically interact to form a ubiquitin ligase complex. Roc1b binds to the catalytic core of Cullin-3, and Klhl10 binds specifically to a unique testis-specific N-terminal Cullin-3 (TeNC) domain of Cul3Testis that is required for activation of effector caspase in spermatids. Finally, the BIR domain region of the giant inhibitor of apoptosis–like protein dBruce is sufficient to bind to Klhl10, which is consistent with the idea that dBruce is a substrate for the Cullin-3-based E3-ligase complex. These findings reveal a novel role of Cullin-based ubiquitin ligases in caspase regulation. PMID:17880263

  4. Monocyte-to-macrophage differentiation: synthesis and secretion of a complex extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Chang, Mary Y; Chan, Christina K; Braun, Kathleen R; Green, Pattie S; O'Brien, Kevin D; Chait, Alan; Day, Anthony J; Wight, Thomas N

    2012-04-20

    Although monocyte- and macrophage-derived molecules are known to promote extracellular matrix (ECM) disruption and destabilization, it is less appreciated that they also synthesize molecules contributing to ECM formation, stabilization, and function. We have identified and characterized the synthesis of proteoglycans and related proteins, some not previously known to be associated with macrophages. Proteoglycan extracts of [(35)S]sulfate- and (35)S-trans amino acid-radiolabeled culture media from THP-1 monocytes induced to differentiate by treatment with phorbol myristate acetate revealed three major proteins of ~25, 90, and 100 kDa following chondroitin ABC lyase digestion. The 25-kDa protein was predominant for monocytes, whereas the 90- and 100-kDa proteins were predominant for macrophages. Tandem mass spectrometry identified (i) the 25-kDa core protein as serglycin, (ii) the 90-kDa core protein as inter-α-inhibitor heavy chain 2 (IαIHC2), and (iii) the 100-kDa core as amyloid precursor-like protein 2 (APLP2). Differentiation was also associated with (i) a >500-fold increase in mRNA for TNF-stimulated gene-6, an essential cofactor for heavy chain-mediated matrix stabilization; (ii) a >800-fold increase in mRNA for HAS2, which is responsible for hyaluronan synthesis; and (iii) a 3-fold increase in mRNA for versican, which interacts with hyaluronan. Biochemical evidence is also presented for an IαIHC2-APLP2 complex, and immunohistochemical staining of human atherosclerotic lesions demonstrates similar staining patterns for APLP2 and IαIHC2 with macrophages, whereas serglycin localizes to the underlying glycosaminoglycan-rich region. These findings indicate that macrophages synthesize many of the molecules participating in ECM formation and function, suggesting a novel role for these molecules in the differentiation of macrophages in the development of atherosclerosis.

  5. Differential responses of IGF-I molecular complexes to military operational field training.

    PubMed

    Nindl, Bradley C; Castellani, John W; Young, Andrew J; Patton, John F; Khosravi, M Javad; Diamandi, Anastasia; Montain, Scott J

    2003-09-01

    Insulin-like growth factor (IGF) I and IGF binding proteins (IGFBPs) modulate metabolic activity and tissue repair and are influenced by nutritional status. IGF-I circulates in free, ternary [IGF-I + IGFBP-3 + acid labile subunit (ALS)], and binary (IGF-I + IGFBP) molecular complexes, and the relative proportions regulate IGF-I extravascular shifting and bioavailability. This study examined the hypothesis that sustained physical activity and sleep deprivation superimposed on a short-term energy deficit would alter the IGFBP concentrations and alter the proportions of IGF-I circulating in ternary vs. binary molecular complexes. Components of the IGF-I system (total and free IGF-I; IGFBP-1, -3, and ALS; nonternary IGF-I and IGFBP-3), biomarkers of metabolic and nutritional status (transferrin, ferritin, prealbumin, glucose, free fatty acids, glycerol, beta-hydroxybutyrate), and body composition were measured in 12 men (22 +/- 3 yr, 87 +/- 8 kg, 183 +/- 7 cm, 20 +/- 5% body fat) on days 1, 3, and 4 during a control and experimental (Exp) period. During Exp, subjects performed prolonged work (energy expenditure of approximately 4500 kcal/day) with caloric (1600 kcal/day) and sleep (6.2 h total) restriction. IGF-I and IGFBP-3 were measured by immunoassay before and after immunoaffinity depletion of ALS-based complexes (i.e., ternary complex removal). Exp produced losses in body mass (-3.0%), lowered total IGF-I (-24%), free IGF-I (-42%), IGFBP-3 (-6%), nonternary IGF-I (-27%), and IGFBP-3 (-16%), and increased IGFBP-1 (256%). No Exp effects were observed for ALS. No changes were observed in the proportion of IGF-I circulating in free ( approximately 1.2%), ternary ( approximately 87.4%), or nonternary ( approximately 11.4%) molecular complexes. During Exp, glucose concentrations were lower on day 3, but days 1 and 4 were statistically similar. In conclusion, during a short-term energy deficit in young, healthy men, 1). IGF-I system components differentially respond

  6. Assessment of genetic markers for species differentiation within the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex.

    PubMed Central

    Liébana, E; Aranaz, A; Francis, B; Cousins, D

    1996-01-01

    It is important to correctly identify species within the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex because of the zoonotic implications of bovine tuberculosis, especially in developing countries. We assessed the use of various genetic markers for species-specific identification of mycobacteria from the M. tuberculosis complex. A multiplex PCR designed for detection of the mtp40 and IS1081 elements was optimized and evaluated in 339 mycobacterial strains from different animal and geographic origins. The host range of the IS6110, MPB70, and 16S rRNA genes was also studied by PCR in all the strains. Finally, the usefulness of the genetic markers was compared by an immunoperoxidase test for specific identification of Mycobacterium bovis strains. The mtp40 sequence was detected in 87 of the 91 strains of M. tuberculosis and in 9 of the 11 Mycobacterium africanum strains but not in any of the M. bovis or Mycobacterium microti strains, indicating that the mtp40 element was also found in all of the M. tuberculosis complex strains isolated from seals. This organism is considered to be a true seal pathogen, but its origin is essentially unknown. The finding of the mtp40 element in the strains from seals suggests a closer relationship of these strains with a human origin than to an animal origin. The mtp40 element was not found in any other mycobacterial species included in the study. As a result of this study, we suggest that biochemical tests or alternate genetic markers are still needed to differentiate M. tuberculosis from M. africanum when these species coexist as causative agents of tuberculosis. The immunoperoxidase test worked well for the identification of M. bovis strains. We also report, for the first time, PCR amplification of the repetitive element IS6110 in an isolate of Mycobacterium ulcerans and an isolate of Mycobacterium gilvum, which emphasizes the need for further investigation of the host range of this sequence. PMID:8815111

  7. Analysis of E-box DNA binding during myeloid differentiation reveals complexes that contain Mad but not Max.

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, K M; Birnie, G D

    1997-01-01

    It has been shown that during myeloid differentiation the levels of mad1 mRNA are induced before the loss of c-Myc protein. This suggests that inactivation of the differentiation-blocking activity of c-Myc might not occur primarily through the loss of Myc protein, but through an increase in the levels of its antagonist, Mad1. To investigate this question we have analysed the levels of mad1 mRNA during differentiation of myeloid leukaemic HL60 cells. Although levels of mad1 mRNA were moderately increased after induction with phorbol ester, we also found that differentiation could be achieved with other inducers without any concomitant up-regulation of mad1 mRNA. In addition, analysis of E-box DNA binding revealed that, although Myc-Max complexes were lost rapidly after differentiation induction, formation of Mad1-containing complexes only occurred during the later stages of the differentiation programme. Further analysis of these Mad-containing complexes revealed that they were also unlikely to have the capacity to antagonize c-Myc function, as they did not contain Max. Therefore these data suggest that an increase in the levels of mad1 mRNA or the formation of a Mad-Max complex are unlikely to be essential or determining events for myeloid differentiation. In addition, the discovery of DNA-binding complexes that contain Mad1, but not Max, opens up this transcription factor network to include other Max-like proteins or proteins of an unrelated nature. PMID:9224632

  8. Differential proteolytic activation of factor VIII-von Willebrand factor complex by thrombin

    SciTech Connect

    Hill-Eubanks, D.C.; Parker, C.G.; Lollar, P. )

    1989-09-01

    Blood coagulation factor VIII (fVIII) is a plasma protein that is decreased or absent in hemophilia A. It is isolated as a mixture of heterodimers that contain a variably sized heavy chain and a common light chain. Thrombin catalyzes the activation of fVIII in a reaction that is associated with cleavages in both types of chain. The authors isolated a serine protease from Bothrops jararacussu snake venom that catalyzes thrombin-like heavy-chain cleavage but not light-chain cleavage in porcine fVIII as judged by NaDodSO{sub 4}/PAGE and N-terminal sequence analysis. Using a plasma-free assay of the ability of activated {sup 125}I-fVIII to function as a cofactor in the activation of factor X by factor IXa, they found that fVIII is activated by the venom enzyme. The venom enzyme-activated fVIII was isolated in stable form by cation-exchange HPLC. von Willebrand factor inhibited venom enzyme-activated fVIII but not thrombin-activated fVIII. These results suggest that the binding of fVIII to von Willebrand factor depends on the presence of an intact light chain and that activated fVIII must dissociate from von Willebrand factor to exert its cofactor effect. Thus, proteolytic activation of fVIII-von Willebrand factor complex appears to be differentially regulated by light-chain cleavage to dissociate the complex and heavy-chain cleavage to activate the cofactor function.

  9. Laser thermal therapy monitoring using complex differential variance in optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Lo, William C. Y.; Uribe-Patarroyo, Néstor; Nam, Ahhyun S.; Villiger, Martin; Vakoc, Benjamin J.; Bouma, Brett E.

    2016-01-01

    Conventional thermal therapy monitoring techniques based on temperature are often invasive, limited by point sampling, and are indirect measures of tissue injury, while techniques such as magnetic resonance and ultrasound thermometry are limited by their spatial resolution. The visualization of the thermal coagulation zone at high spatial resolution is particularly critical to the precise delivery of thermal energy to epithelial lesions. In this work, an integrated thulium laser thermal therapy monitoring system was developed based on complex differential variance (CDV), which enables the 2D visualization of the dynamics of the thermal coagulation process at high spatial and temporal resolution with an optical frequency domain imaging system. With proper calibration to correct for noise, the CDV-based technique was shown to accurately delineate the thermal coagulation zone, which is marked by the transition from high CDV upon heating to a significantly reduced CDV once the tissue is coagulated, in 3 different tissue types ex vivo: skin, retina, and esophagus. The ability to delineate thermal lesions in multiple tissue types at high resolution opens up the possibility of performing microscopic image-guided procedures in a vast array of epithelial applications ranging from dermatology, ophthalmology, to gastroenterology and beyond. PMID:27623742

  10. Tuning the electrical properties of the heart by differential trafficking of KATP ion channel complexes

    PubMed Central

    Arakel, Eric C.; Brandenburg, Sören; Uchida, Keita; Zhang, Haixia; Lin, Yu-Wen; Kohl, Tobias; Schrul, Bianca; Sulkin, Matthew S.; Efimov, Igor R.; Nichols, Colin G.; Lehnart, Stephan E.; Schwappach, Blanche

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The copy number of membrane proteins at the cell surface is tightly regulated. Many ion channels and receptors present retrieval motifs to COPI vesicle coats and are retained in the early secretory pathway. In some cases, the interaction with COPI is prevented by binding to 14-3-3 proteins. However, the functional significance of this antagonism between COPI and 14-3-3 in terminally differentiated cells is unknown. Here, we show that ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP) channels, which are composed of Kir6.2 and SUR1 subunits, are stalled in the Golgi complex of ventricular, but not atrial, cardiomyocytes. Upon sustained β-adrenergic stimulation, which leads to activation of protein kinase A (PKA), SUR1-containing channels reach the plasma membrane of ventricular cells. We show that PKA-dependent phosphorylation of the C-terminus of Kir6.2 decreases binding to COPI and, thereby, silences the arginine-based retrieval signal. Thus, activation of the sympathetic nervous system releases this population of KATP channels from storage in the Golgi and, hence, might facilitate the adaptive response to metabolic challenges. PMID:24569881

  11. Identification and comparative analysis of the epidermal differentiation complex in snakes

    PubMed Central

    Brigit Holthaus, Karin; Mlitz, Veronika; Strasser, Bettina; Tschachler, Erwin; Alibardi, Lorenzo; Eckhart, Leopold

    2017-01-01

    The epidermis of snakes efficiently protects against dehydration and mechanical stress. However, only few proteins of the epidermal barrier to the environment have so far been identified in snakes. Here, we determined the organization of the Epidermal Differentiation Complex (EDC), a cluster of genes encoding protein constituents of cornified epidermal structures, in snakes and compared it to the EDCs of other squamates and non-squamate reptiles. The EDC of snakes displays shared synteny with that of the green anole lizard, including the presence of a cluster of corneous beta-protein (CBP)/beta-keratin genes. We found that a unique CBP comprising 4 putative beta-sheets and multiple cysteine-rich EDC proteins are conserved in all snakes and other squamates investigated. Comparative genomics of squamates suggests that the evolution of snakes was associated with a gene duplication generating two isoforms of the S100 fused-type protein, scaffoldin, the origin of distinct snake-specific EDC genes, and the loss of other genes that were present in the EDC of the last common ancestor of snakes and lizards. Taken together, our results provide new insights into the evolution of the skin in squamates and a basis for the characterization of the molecular composition of the epidermis in snakes. PMID:28345630

  12. Identification and comparative analysis of the epidermal differentiation complex in snakes.

    PubMed

    Brigit Holthaus, Karin; Mlitz, Veronika; Strasser, Bettina; Tschachler, Erwin; Alibardi, Lorenzo; Eckhart, Leopold

    2017-03-27

    The epidermis of snakes efficiently protects against dehydration and mechanical stress. However, only few proteins of the epidermal barrier to the environment have so far been identified in snakes. Here, we determined the organization of the Epidermal Differentiation Complex (EDC), a cluster of genes encoding protein constituents of cornified epidermal structures, in snakes and compared it to the EDCs of other squamates and non-squamate reptiles. The EDC of snakes displays shared synteny with that of the green anole lizard, including the presence of a cluster of corneous beta-protein (CBP)/beta-keratin genes. We found that a unique CBP comprising 4 putative beta-sheets and multiple cysteine-rich EDC proteins are conserved in all snakes and other squamates investigated. Comparative genomics of squamates suggests that the evolution of snakes was associated with a gene duplication generating two isoforms of the S100 fused-type protein, scaffoldin, the origin of distinct snake-specific EDC genes, and the loss of other genes that were present in the EDC of the last common ancestor of snakes and lizards. Taken together, our results provide new insights into the evolution of the skin in squamates and a basis for the characterization of the molecular composition of the epidermis in snakes.

  13. Deconvolution of complex differential scanning calorimetry profiles for protein transitions under kinetic control.

    PubMed

    Toledo-Núñez, Citlali; Vera-Robles, L Iraís; Arroyo-Maya, Izlia J; Hernández-Arana, Andrés

    2016-09-15

    A frequent outcome in differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) experiments carried out with large proteins is the irreversibility of the observed endothermic effects. In these cases, DSC profiles are analyzed according to methods developed for temperature-induced denaturation transitions occurring under kinetic control. In the one-step irreversible model (native → denatured) the characteristics of the observed single-peaked endotherm depend on the denaturation enthalpy and the temperature dependence of the reaction rate constant, k. Several procedures have been devised to obtain the parameters that determine the variation of k with temperature. Here, we have elaborated on one of these procedures in order to analyze more complex DSC profiles. Synthetic data for a heat capacity curve were generated according to a model with two sequential reactions; the temperature dependence of each of the two rate constants involved was determined, according to the Eyring's equation, by two fixed parameters. It was then shown that our deconvolution procedure, by making use of heat capacity data alone, permits to extract the parameter values that were initially used. Finally, experimental DSC traces showing two and three maxima were analyzed and reproduced with relative success according to two- and four-step sequential models.

  14. Differentiating the mTOR inhibitors everolimus and sirolimus in the treatment of tuberous sclerosis complex.

    PubMed

    MacKeigan, Jeffrey P; Krueger, Darcy A

    2015-12-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is a genetic autosomal dominant disorder characterized by benign tumor-like lesions, called hamartomas, in multiple organ systems, including the brain, skin, heart, kidneys, and lung. These hamartomas cause a diverse set of clinical problems based on their location and often result in epilepsy, learning difficulties, and behavioral problems. TSC is caused by mutations within the TSC1 or TSC2 genes that inactivate the genes' tumor-suppressive function and drive hamartomatous cell growth. In normal cells, TSC1 and TSC2 integrate growth signals and nutrient inputs to downregulate signaling to mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), an evolutionarily conserved serine-threonine kinase that controls cell growth and cell survival. The molecular connection between TSC and mTOR led to the clinical use of allosteric mTOR inhibitors (sirolimus and everolimus) for the treatment of TSC. Everolimus is approved for subependymal giant cell astrocytomas and renal angiomyolipomas in patients with TSC. Sirolimus, though not approved for TSC, has undergone considerable investigation to treat various aspects of the disease. Everolimus and sirolimus selectively inhibit mTOR signaling with similar molecular mechanisms, but with distinct clinical profiles. This review differentiates mTOR inhibitors in TSC while describing the molecular mechanisms, pathogenic mutations, and clinical trial outcomes for managing TSC.

  15. Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 is involved in differentiation of regenerating myofibers in vivo.

    PubMed

    Miyabara, Elen H; Conte, Talita C; Silva, Meiricris T; Baptista, Igor L; Bueno, Carlos; Fiamoncini, Jarlei; Lambertucci, Rafael H; Serra, Carmen S; Brum, Patricia C; Pithon-Curi, Tania; Curi, Rui; Aoki, Marcelo S; Oliveira, Antonio C; Moriscot, Anselmo S

    2010-11-01

    This work was undertaken to provide further insight into the role of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) in skeletal muscle regeneration, focusing on myofiber size recovery. Rats were treated or not with rapamycin, an mTORC1 inhibitor. Soleus muscles were then subjected to cryolesion and analyzed 1, 10, and 21 days later. A decrease in soleus myofiber cross-section area on post-cryolesion days 10 and 21 was accentuated by rapamycin, which was also effective in reducing protein synthesis in these freeze-injured muscles. The incidence of proliferating satellite cells during regeneration was unaltered by rapamycin, although immunolabeling for neonatal myosin heavy chain (MHC) was weaker in cryolesion+rapamycin muscles than in cryolesion-only muscles. In addition, the decline in tetanic contraction of freeze-injured muscles was accentuated by rapamycin. This study indicates that mTORC1 plays a key role in the recovery of muscle mass and the differentiation of regenerating myofibers, independently of necrosis and satellite cell proliferation mechanisms.

  16. Myofibroblast differentiation and its functional properties are inhibited by nicotine and e-cigarette via mitochondrial OXPHOS complex III

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Wei; Lerner, Chad; Sundar, Isaac K.; Rahman, Irfan

    2017-01-01

    Nicotine is the major stimulant in tobacco products including e-cigarettes. Fibroblast to myofibroblast differentiation is a key process during wound healing and is dysregulated in lung diseases. The role of nicotine and e-cigarette derived nicotine on cellular functions including profibrotic response and other functional aspects is not known. We hypothesized that nicotine and e-cigarettes affect myofibroblast differentiation, gel contraction, and wound healing via mitochondria stress through nicotinic receptor-dependent mechanisms. To test the hypothesis, we exposed human lung fibroblasts with various doses of nicotine and e-cigarette condensate and determined myofibroblast differentiation, mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), wound healing, and gel contraction at different time points. We found that both nicotine and e-cigarette inhibit myofibroblast differentiation as shown by smooth muscle actin and collagen type I, alpha 1 abundance. Nicotine and e-cigarette inhibited OXPHOS complex III accompanied by increased MitoROS, and this effect was augmented by complex III inhibitor antimycin A. These mitochondrial associated effects by nicotine resulted in inhibition of myofibroblast differentiation. These effects were associated with inhibition of wound healing and gel contraction suggesting that nicotine is responsible for dysregulated repair during injurious responses. Thus, our data suggest that nicotine causes dysregulated repair by inhibition of myofibroblast differentiation via OXPHOS pathway. PMID:28256533

  17. Differentiation of Species Combined into the Burkholderia cepacia Complex and Related Taxa on the Basis of Their Fatty Acid Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Krejčí, Eva; Kroppenstedt, Reiner M.

    2006-01-01

    Using the established commercial system Sherlock (MIDI, Inc.), cellular fatty acid methyl ester analysis for differentiation among Burkholderia cepacia complex species was proven. The identification key based on the diagnostic fatty acids is able to discern phenotypically related Ralstonia pickettii and Pandoraea spp. and further distinguish Burkholderia pyrrocinia, Burkholderia ambifaria, and Burkholderia vietnamiensis. PMID:16517920

  18. Differentiation in the Trochulus hispidus complex and related taxa (Pulmonata: Hygromiidae): morphology, ecology and their relation to phylogeography

    PubMed Central

    Duda, Michael; Kruckenhauser, Luise; Sattmann, Helmut; Harl, Josef; Jaksch, Katharina; Haring, Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    In this study we investigated the morphology and ecology of representatives of the taxonomically ambiguous genus Trochulus. The main focus was on the T. hispidus complex, which comprises several genetically highly divergent mitochondrial clades, as determined in a parallel molecular genetic study. We analysed shell morphology and anatomical traits and asked whether the clades are differentiated in these characters. In addition, the related species T. oreinos and T. striolatus were investigated and compared with the T. hispidus complex. Finally, we compared the ecological requirements of the taxa. Among the genetic clades of the T. hispidus complex there was no clear morphological differentiation and geographic populations could not be distinguished based on their morphology. The investigated characters of the genital anatomy did not allow discrimination of any of the T. hispidus clades and were not even diagnostic for the group as a whole. The morphotype of T. sericeus is present in all clades and thus cannot be assigned to a genetic group or any specific population. Thus, our morphological data do not provide evidence that any of the mitochondrial T. hispidus clades represent separate species. Concerning interspecific delimitation, the T. hispidus complex was clearly differentiated from T. striolatus and T. oreinos by shell morphological and anatomical characters, e.g. sculpture of shell surface and details of the penis. Finally, the habitat of T. oreinos is different from those of the other two species. In contrast to the lack of correspondence between genetic and morphological differentiation within the T. hispidus complex, related species display intraspecific morphological differentiation corresponding with mitochondrial clades: within T. striolatus there was a slight morphological differentiation between the subspecies T. s. striolatus, T. s. juvavensis and T. s. danubialis. The two subspecies of T. oreinos could be discriminated by a small but consistent

  19. Detection and differentiation of neutral organic compounds by 19F NMR with a tungsten calix[4]arene imido complex.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yanchuan; Swager, Timothy M

    2013-12-18

    Fluorinated tungsten calix[4]arene imido complexes were synthesized and used as receptors to detect and differentiate neutral organic compounds. It was found that the binding of specific neutral organic molecules to the tungsten centers induces an upfield shift of the fluorine atom appended on the arylimido group, the extent of which is highly dependent on electronic and steric properties. We demonstrate that the specific bonding and size-selectivity of calix[4]arene tungsten-imido complex combined with (19)F NMR spectroscopy is a powerful new method for the analysis of complex mixtures.

  20. The Lsm1-7-Pat1 complex promotes viral RNA translation and replication by differential mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Jungfleisch, Jennifer; Chowdhury, Ashis; Alves-Rodrigues, Isabel; Tharun, Sundaresan; Díez, Juana

    2015-08-01

    The Lsm1-7-Pat1 complex binds to the 3' end of cellular mRNAs and promotes 3' end protection and 5'-3' decay. Interestingly, this complex also specifically binds to cis-acting regulatory sequences of viral positive-strand RNA genomes promoting their translation and subsequent recruitment from translation to replication. Yet, how the Lsm1-7-Pat1 complex regulates these two processes remains elusive. Here, we show that Lsm1-7-Pat1 complex acts differentially in these processes. By using a collection of well-characterized lsm1 mutant alleles and a system that allows the replication of Brome mosaic virus (BMV) in yeast we show that the Lsm1-7-Pat1 complex integrity is essential for both, translation and recruitment. However, the intrinsic RNA-binding ability of the complex is only required for translation. Consistent with an RNA-binding-independent function of the Lsm1-7-Pat1 complex on BMV RNA recruitment, we show that the BMV 1a protein, the sole viral protein required for recruitment, interacts with this complex in an RNA-independent manner. Together, these results support a model wherein Lsm1-7-Pat1 complex binds consecutively to BMV RNA regulatory sequences and the 1a protein to promote viral RNA translation and later recruitment out of the host translation machinery to the viral replication complexes.

  1. A-type Lamins Form Distinct Filamentous Networks with Differential Nuclear Pore Complex Associations.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wei; Chojnowski, Alexandre; Boudier, Thomas; Lim, John S Y; Ahmed, Sohail; Ser, Zheng; Stewart, Colin; Burke, Brian

    2016-10-10

    The nuclear lamina is a universal feature of metazoan nuclear envelopes (NEs) [1]. In mammalian cells, it appears as a 10-30 nm filamentous layer at the nuclear face of the inner nuclear membrane (INM) and is composed primarily of A- and B-type lamins, members of the intermediate filament family [2]. While providing structural integrity to the NE, the lamina also represents an important signaling and regulatory platform [3]. Two A-type lamin isoforms, lamins A and C (LaA and LaC), are expressed in most adult human cells. Encoded by a single gene, these proteins are largely identical, diverging only in their C-terminal tail domains. By contrast with that of LaC, the unique LaA tail undergoes extensive processing, including farnesylation and endo-proteolysis [4, 5]. However, functional differences between LaA and LaC are still unclear. Compounding this uncertainty, the structure of the lamina remains ill defined. In this study, we used BioID, an in vivo proximity-labeling method to identify differential interactors of A-type lamins [6]. One of these, Tpr, a nuclear pore complex (NPC) protein, is highlighted by its selective association with LaC. By employing superresolution microscopy, we demonstrate that this Tpr association is mirrored in enhanced interaction of LaC with NPCs. Further superresolution studies visualizing both endogenous A- and B-type lamins have allowed us to construct a nanometer-scale model of the mammalian nuclear lamina. Our data indicate that different A- and B-type lamin species assemble into separate filament networks that together form an extended composite structure at the nuclear periphery providing attachment sites for NPCs, thereby regulating their distribution.

  2. Cyclin-dependent kinase complexes in developing maize endosperm: evidence for differential expression and functional specialization.

    PubMed

    Dante, Ricardo A; Sabelli, Paolo A; Nguyen, Hong N; Leiva-Neto, João T; Tao, Yumin; Lowe, Keith S; Hoerster, George J; Gordon-Kamm, William J; Jung, Rudolf; Larkins, Brian A

    2014-02-01

    Endosperm development in maize (Zea mays L.) and related cereals comprises a cell proliferation stage followed by a period of rapid growth coupled to endoreduplication. Regulation of the cell cycle in developing endosperm is poorly understood. We have characterized various subunits of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) complexes, master cell cycle regulators in all eukaryotes. A-, B-, and D-type cyclins as well as A- and B-type cyclin-dependent kinases were characterized with respect to their RNA and protein expression profiles. Two main patterns were identified: one showing expression throughout endosperm development, and another characterized by a sharp down-regulation with the onset of endoreduplication. Cyclin CYCB1;3 and CYCD2;1 proteins were distributed in the cytoplasm and nucleus of cells throughout the endosperm, while cyclin CYCD5 protein was localized in the cytoplasm of peripheral cells. CDKB1;1 expression was strongly associated with cell proliferation. Expression and cyclin-binding patterns suggested that CDKA;1 and CDKA;3 are at least partially redundant. The kinase activity associated with the cyclin CYCA1 was highest during the mitotic stage of development, while that associated with CYCB1;3, CYCD2;1 and CYCD5 peaked at the mitosis-to-endoreduplication transition. A-, B- and D-type cyclins were more resistant to proteasome-dependent degradation in endoreduplicating than in mitotic endosperm extracts. These results indicated that endosperm development is characterized by differential expression and activity of specific cyclins and CDKs, and suggested that endoreduplication is associated with reduced cyclin proteolysis via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway.

  3. Differential virulence and disease progression following Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex infection of the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus).

    PubMed

    Via, Laura E; Weiner, Danielle M; Schimel, Daniel; Lin, Philana Ling; Dayao, Emmanuel; Tankersley, Sarah L; Cai, Ying; Coleman, M Teresa; Tomko, Jaime; Paripati, Praveen; Orandle, Marlene; Kastenmayer, Robin J; Tartakovsky, Michael; Rosenthal, Alexander; Portevin, Damien; Eum, Seok Yong; Lahouar, Saher; Gagneux, Sebastien; Young, Douglas B; Flynn, Joanne L; Barry, Clifton E

    2013-08-01

    Existing small-animal models of tuberculosis (TB) rarely develop cavitary disease, limiting their value for assessing the biology and dynamics of this highly important feature of human disease. To develop a smaller primate model with pathology similar to that seen in humans, we experimentally infected the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) with diverse strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis of various pathogenic potentials. These included recent isolates of the modern Beijing lineage, the Euro-American X lineage, and M. africanum. All three strains produced fulminant disease in this animal with a spectrum of progression rates and clinical sequelae that could be monitored in real time using 2-deoxy-2-[(18)F]fluoro-d-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT). Lesion pathology at sacrifice revealed the entire spectrum of lesions observed in human TB patients. The three strains produced different rates of progression to disease, various extents of extrapulmonary dissemination, and various degrees of cavitation. The majority of live births in this species are twins, and comparison of results from siblings with different infecting strains allowed us to establish that the infection was highly reproducible and that the differential virulence of strains was not simply host variation. Quantitative assessment of disease burden by FDG-PET/CT provided an accurate reflection of the pathology findings at necropsy. These results suggest that the marmoset offers an attractive small-animal model of human disease that recapitulates both the complex pathology and spectrum of disease observed in humans infected with various M. tuberculosis strain clades.

  4. Tolerance and autoimmunity to erythroid differentiation (B-G) major histocompatibility complex alloantigens of the chicken

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    Hematopoietic chimeras were produced at four different stages of ontogeny between two allogeneic strains of chickens. All chimeras produced by parabiosis at day 12 of embryogenesis and the majority (83%) of the ones produced at day 15 by intravenous injection of allogeneic stem cells remained healthy, chimeric, and specifically tolerant at both the humoral and cell-mediated level throughout a long examination period. Chimeras generated at day 17 of embryogenesis demonstrated specific unresponsiveness at the cell-mediated level but produced specific anti-donor alloantibodies directed against erythrocyte-associated major histocompatibility complex (MHC) (B-G) antigens. These chimeras and a minority (17%) of the chimeras generated at day 15 of embryogenesis developed severe antibody-mediated autoimmune hemolytic anemia after the 5th mo of age and succumbed to massive bursal lymphomas and metastases by the 10th mo of age. The immunological and pathological characteristics of these birds appear to reflect an autoimmune state rather than one of tolerance. Erythroid chimeras generated at day 21 of ontogenic development displayed normal levels of GVH reactivity. These birds were eventually able to eliminate the chimeric state and remained healthy until deliberately killed. These results show that there is a critical period in embryogenesis during which the induction of allogeneic erythrocytic chimerism leads to the development, in adult life, of severe autoimmune anemia, B cell lymphomas, and death. B-G MHC antigens are erythroid differentiation antigens of the chicken. Polymorphic determinants on B-G antigens appear to be important cross-reactive determinants (with environmental bacteria), against which a high background immunity exists. Evidence is presented that the immune response to B-G antigens is responsible for the development of autoimmunity and other pathological events that follow and that tolerance to class I MHC antigens (B-F antigens) shared by lymphocytes

  5. Recent Positive Selection in Genes of the Mammalian Epidermal Differentiation Complex Locus

    PubMed Central

    Goodwin, Zane A.; de Guzman Strong, Cristina

    2017-01-01

    The epidermal differentiation complex (EDC) is the most rapidly evolving locus in the human genome compared to that of the chimpanzee. Yet the EDC genes that are undergoing positive selection across mammals and in humans are not known. We sought to identify the positively selected genetic variants and determine the evolutionary events of the EDC using mammalian-wide and clade-specific branch- and branch-site likelihood ratio tests and a genetic algorithm (GA) branch test. Significant non-synonymous substitutions were found in filaggrin, SPRR4, LELP1, and S100A2 genes across 14 mammals. By contrast, we identified recent positive selection in SPRR4 in primates. Additionally, the GA branch test discovered lineage-specific evolution for distinct EDC genes occurring in each of the nodes in the 14-mammal phylogenetic tree. Multiple instances of positive selection for FLG, TCHHL1, SPRR4, LELP1, and S100A2 were noted among the primate branch nodes. Branch-site likelihood ratio tests further revealed positive selection in specific sites in SPRR4, LELP1, filaggrin, and repetin across 14 mammals. However, in addition to continuous evolution of SPRR4, site-specific positive selection was also found in S100A11, KPRP, SPRR1A, S100A7L2, and S100A3 in primates and filaggrin, filaggrin2, and S100A8 in great apes. Very recent human positive selection was identified in the filaggrin2 L41 site that was present in Neanderthal. Together, our results identifying recent positive selection in distinct EDC genes reveal an underappreciated evolution of epidermal skin barrier function in primates and humans. PMID:28119736

  6. Linear ubiquitin chain assembly complex coordinates late thymic T-cell differentiation and regulatory T-cell homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Teh, Charis E.; Lalaoui, Najoua; Jain, Reema; Policheni, Antonia N.; Heinlein, Melanie; Alvarez-Diaz, Silvia; Sheridan, Julie M.; Rieser, Eva; Deuser, Stefanie; Darding, Maurice; Koay, Hui-Fern; Hu, Yifang; Kupresanin, Fiona; O'Reilly, Lorraine A.; Godfrey, Dale I.; Smyth, Gordon K.; Bouillet, Philippe; Strasser, Andreas; Walczak, Henning; Silke, John; Gray, Daniel H. D.

    2016-01-01

    The linear ubiquitin chain assembly complex (LUBAC) is essential for innate immunity in mice and humans, yet its role in adaptive immunity is unclear. Here we show that the LUBAC components HOIP, HOIL-1 and SHARPIN have essential roles in late thymocyte differentiation, FOXP3+ regulatory T (Treg)-cell development and Treg cell homeostasis. LUBAC activity is not required to prevent TNF-induced apoptosis or necroptosis but is necessary for the transcriptional programme of the penultimate stage of thymocyte differentiation. Treg cell-specific ablation of HOIP causes severe Treg cell deficiency and lethal immune pathology, revealing an ongoing requirement of LUBAC activity for Treg cell homeostasis. These data reveal stage-specific requirements for LUBAC in coordinating the signals required for T-cell differentiation. PMID:27857075

  7. Identification and Ultrastructural Characterization of a Novel Nuclear Degradation Complex in Differentiating Lens Fiber Cells

    PubMed Central

    Costello, M. Joseph; Brennan, Lisa A.; Gilliland, Kurt O.; Johnsen, Sönke; Kantorow, Marc

    2016-01-01

    An unresolved issue in structural biology is how the encapsulated lens removes membranous organelles to carry out its role as a transparent optical element. In this ultrastructural study, we establish a mechanism for nuclear elimination in the developing chick lens during the formation of the organelle-free zone. Day 12–15 chick embryo lenses were examined by high-resolution confocal light microscopy and thin section transmission electron microscopy (TEM) following fixation in 10% formalin and 4% paraformaldehyde, and then processing for confocal or TEM as described previously. Examination of developing fiber cells revealed normal nuclei with dispersed chromatin and clear nucleoli typical of cells in active ribosome production to support protein synthesis. Early signs of nuclear degradation were observed about 300 μm from the lens capsule in Day 15 lenses where the nuclei display irregular nuclear stain and prominent indentations that sometimes contained a previously undescribed macromolecular aggregate attached to the nuclear envelope. We have termed this novel structure the nuclear excisosome. This complex by confocal is closely adherent to the nuclear envelope and by TEM appears to degrade the outer leaflet of the nuclear envelope, then the inner leaflet up to 500 μm depth. The images suggest that the nuclear excisosome separates nuclear membrane proteins from lipids, which then form multilamellar assemblies that stain intensely in confocal and in TEM have 5 nm spacing consistent with pure lipid bilayers. The denuded nucleoplasm then degrades by condensation and loss of structure in the range 600 to 700 μm depth producing pyknotic nuclear remnants. None of these stages display any classic autophagic vesicles or lysosomes associated with nuclei. Uniquely, the origin of the nuclear excisosome is from filopodial-like projections of adjacent lens fiber cells that initially contact, and then appear to fuse with the outer nuclear membrane. These filopodial

  8. Neuropilin-1 forms complexes with vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 during megakaryocytic differentiation of UT-7/TPO cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ohsaka, Akimichi; Hirota-Komatsu, Satoko; Shibata, Miki; Komatsu, Norio

    2009-12-25

    We investigated whether the gene expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its receptors (VEGFR and neuropilin-1 [NRP-1]) could be specifically regulated during the megakaryocytic differentiation of human thrombopoietin (TPO)-dependent UT-7/TPO cells. Undifferentiated UT-7/TPO cells expressed a functional VEGFR-2, leading to VEGF binding and VEGF{sub 165}-induced tyrosine phosphorylation, cell proliferation, and apoptosis inhibition. The megakaryocytic differentiation of UT-7/TPO cells on treatment with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) was accompanied by a marked up-regulation of NRP-1 mRNA and protein expression and by an increase in VEGF-binding activity, which was mainly mediated by VEGFR-2. VEGF{sub 165} promoted the formation of complexes containing NRP-1 and VEGFR-2 in undifferentiated UT-7/TPO cells in a dose-dependent manner. Unlike human umbilical vein endothelial cells, PMA-differentiated UT-7/TPO cells exhibited complex formation between NRP-1 and VEGFR-2 even in the absence of VEGF{sub 165}. These findings suggest that NRP-1-VEGFR-2-complex formation may contribute to effective cellular functions mediated by VEGF{sub 165} in megakaryocytic cells.

  9. The CUL4-DDB1 ubiquitin ligase complex controls adult and embryonic stem cell differentiation and homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jie; Buckley, Shannon M; Cimmino, Luisa; Guillamot, Maria; Strikoudis, Alexandros; Cang, Yong; Goff, Stephen P; Aifantis, Iannis

    2015-01-01

    Little is known on post-transcriptional regulation of adult and embryonic stem cell maintenance and differentiation. Here we characterize the role of Ddb1, a component of the CUL4-DDB1 ubiquitin ligase complex. Ddb1 is highly expressed in multipotent hematopoietic progenitors and its deletion leads to abrogation of both adult and fetal hematopoiesis, targeting specifically transiently amplifying progenitor subsets. However, Ddb1 deletion in non-dividing lymphocytes has no discernible phenotypes. Ddb1 silencing activates Trp53 pathway and leads to significant effects on cell cycle progression and rapid apoptosis. The abrogation of hematopoietic progenitor cells can be partially rescued by simultaneous deletion of Trp53. Conversely, depletion of DDB1 in embryonic stem cell (ESC) leads to differentiation albeit negative effects on cell cycle and apoptosis. Mass spectrometry reveals differing protein interactions between DDB1 and distinct DCAFs, the substrate recognizing components of the E3 complex, between cell types. Our studies identify CUL4-DDB1 complex as a novel post-translational regulator of stem and progenitor maintenance and differentiation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07539.001 PMID:26613412

  10. Differential diagnosis of hyperkalemia: an update to a complex problem

    PubMed Central

    Eleftheriadis, T; Leivaditis, K; Antoniadi, G; Liakopoulos, V

    2012-01-01

    Hyperkalemia is a relative common and sometimes life threatening electorlyte disorder. Although its symptomatic treatment is relatively easy, since precise therapeutic algorithms are available, its differential diagnosis is more complicated. The present review aims to unfold the differential diagnosis of hypekalemia using a pathophysiological, albeit clinically useful, approach. The basic elements of potassium homeostasis are provided, the causes of hyperkalemia are categorized and analysed and finally the required for the diferrential diagnosis laboratory tests are mentioned. PMID:23935306

  11. Evolution of heterogeneous genome differentiation across multiple contact zones in a crow species complex.

    PubMed

    Vijay, Nagarjun; Bossu, Christen M; Poelstra, Jelmer W; Weissensteiner, Matthias H; Suh, Alexander; Kryukov, Alexey P; Wolf, Jochen B W

    2016-10-31

    Uncovering the genetic basis of species diversification is a central goal in evolutionary biology. Yet, the link between the accumulation of genomic changes during population divergence and the evolutionary forces promoting reproductive isolation is poorly understood. Here, we analysed 124 genomes of crow populations with various degrees of genome-wide differentiation, with parallelism of a sexually selected plumage phenotype, and ongoing hybridization. Overall, heterogeneity in genetic differentiation along the genome was best explained by linked selection exposed on a shared genome architecture. Superimposed on this common background, we identified genomic regions with signatures of selection specific to independent phenotypic contact zones. Candidate pigmentation genes with evidence for divergent selection were only partly shared, suggesting context-dependent selection on a multigenic trait architecture and parallelism by pathway rather than by repeated single-gene effects. This study provides insight into how various forms of selection shape genome-wide patterns of genomic differentiation as populations diverge.

  12. Evolution of heterogeneous genome differentiation across multiple contact zones in a crow species complex

    PubMed Central

    Vijay, Nagarjun; Bossu, Christen M.; Poelstra, Jelmer W.; Weissensteiner, Matthias H.; Suh, Alexander; Kryukov, Alexey P.; Wolf, Jochen B. W.

    2016-01-01

    Uncovering the genetic basis of species diversification is a central goal in evolutionary biology. Yet, the link between the accumulation of genomic changes during population divergence and the evolutionary forces promoting reproductive isolation is poorly understood. Here, we analysed 124 genomes of crow populations with various degrees of genome-wide differentiation, with parallelism of a sexually selected plumage phenotype, and ongoing hybridization. Overall, heterogeneity in genetic differentiation along the genome was best explained by linked selection exposed on a shared genome architecture. Superimposed on this common background, we identified genomic regions with signatures of selection specific to independent phenotypic contact zones. Candidate pigmentation genes with evidence for divergent selection were only partly shared, suggesting context-dependent selection on a multigenic trait architecture and parallelism by pathway rather than by repeated single-gene effects. This study provides insight into how various forms of selection shape genome-wide patterns of genomic differentiation as populations diverge. PMID:27796282

  13. Complex interplays in immune T-cell differentiation and developmental fate determination.

    PubMed

    Duc, Huynh Thien

    2011-08-01

    Aspects relevant to immune T-cell differentiation and fate determination have been examined and discussed in the context of transcription factors, initiating cytokines in association with cognate antigen activation. It appears that the differentiation optional program, in light of recent results related to genetic as well as epigenetic mechanisms, is not predetermined and irreversibly fixed; rather, there is some degree of flexibility allowing the manipulation of remodeling the already differentiated effector cell subsets/lineages. From the progress obtained it will be possible, in the near future, to tailor and obtain various well-defined and efficient immune effector cell subsets/cell lineages for translational applications in autoimmunity, infectious diseases, graft rejection as well as cancer in safe conditions.

  14. The complexity of bone architecture: A tool to differentiate bone diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saparin, Peter I.; Gowin, Wolfgang; Kurths, Jürgen; Felsenberg, Dieter

    2000-02-01

    We introduce a generalization of symbolic dynamics to analyze two-dimensional objects and propose measures of complexity to quantify the structure of symbol encoded images. This technique is applied to evaluate the architecture of human cancellous bone by analyzing computed tomography images of vertebrae acquired from specimens and in vivo. The pixels of the preprocessed images are encoded using a mixture of static and dynamic encoding. The architecture of encoded cancellous bone is evaluated as a whole using measures of complexity. A set of new parameters are introduced to quantify the different aspects of structure: complexity and degree of disorder of the architecture as a whole, or spatial arrangements of hard or soft elements of the bone separately. It is found that the complexity of the bone structure relates to its density exponentially. Normal bone has a complex ordered structure, while the architecture during the initial stage of bone loss is characterized by lower complexity and a maximal level of disorder. Increased bone loss leads again to ordered structure, however, its complexity is minimal. This phenomenon was observed in a series of osteoporotic specimens as well as in vivo in patients treated with fluor, and hormone replacement therapy. We found that different bone diseases demonstrate distinctive features captured by the measurements of complexity of the bone's structural composition. It is shown that the application of the proposed technique leads to new insights for understanding of the bone's response on medical treatment and provide important additional information for the diagnostics of bone diseases.

  15. Differential susceptibility of mitochondrial complex II to inhibition by oxaloacetate in brain and heart.

    PubMed

    Stepanova, Anna; Shurubor, Yevgeniya; Valsecchi, Federica; Manfredi, Giovanni; Galkin, Alexander

    2016-09-01

    Mitochondrial Complex II is a key mitochondrial enzyme connecting the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and the electron transport chain. Studies of complex II are clinically important since new roles for this enzyme have recently emerged in cell signalling, cancer biology, immune response and neurodegeneration. Oxaloacetate (OAA) is an intermediate of the TCA cycle and at the same time is an inhibitor of complex II with high affinity (Kd~10(-8)M). Whether or not OAA inhibition of complex II is a physiologically relevant process is a significant, but still controversial topic. We found that complex II from mouse heart and brain tissue has similar affinity to OAA and that only a fraction of the enzyme in isolated mitochondrial membranes (30.2±6.0% and 56.4±5.6% in the heart and brain, respectively) is in the free, active form. Since OAA could bind to complex II during isolation, we established a novel approach to deplete OAA in the homogenates at the early stages of isolation. In heart, this treatment significantly increased the fraction of free enzyme, indicating that OAA binds to complex II during isolation. In brain the OAA-depleting system did not significantly change the amount of free enzyme, indicating that a large fraction of complex II is already in the OAA-bound inactive form. Furthermore, short-term ischemia resulted in a dramatic decline of OAA in tissues, but it did not change the amount of free complex II. Our data show that in brain OAA is an endogenous effector of complex II, potentially capable of modulating the activity of the enzyme.

  16. Jmjd2c facilitates the assembly of essential enhancer-protein complexes at the onset of embryonic stem cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Harman, Jennifer L.; Karimlou, Donja; Weavers, Lauren; Fritsch, Lauriane; Bou-Kheir, Tony; Bell, Emma; del Valle Torres, Ignacio; Niakan, Kathy K.; Fisher, Cynthia; Joshi, Onkar; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G.; Curry, Edward; Ait-Si-Ali, Slimane; Jørgensen, Helle F.

    2017-01-01

    Jmjd2 H3K9 demethylases cooperate in promoting mouse embryonic stem cell (ESC) identity. However, little is known about their importance at the exit of ESC pluripotency. Here, we reveal that Jmjd2c facilitates this process by stabilising the assembly of mediator-cohesin complexes at lineage-specific enhancers. Functionally, we show that Jmjd2c is required in ESCs to initiate appropriate gene expression programs upon somatic multi-lineage differentiation. In the absence of Jmjd2c, differentiation is stalled at an early post-implantation epiblast-like stage, while Jmjd2c-knockout ESCs remain capable of forming extra-embryonic endoderm derivatives. Dissection of the underlying molecular basis revealed that Jmjd2c is re-distributed to lineage-specific enhancers during ESC priming for differentiation. Interestingly, Jmjd2c-bound enhancers are co-occupied by the H3K9-methyltransferase G9a (also known as Ehmt2), independently of its H3K9-modifying activity. Loss of Jmjd2c abrogates G9a recruitment and further destabilises loading of the mediator and cohesin components Med1 and Smc1a at newly activated and poised enhancers in ESC-derived epiblast-like cells. These findings unveil Jmjd2c and G9a as novel enhancer-associated factors, and implicate Jmjd2c as a molecular scaffold for the assembly of essential enhancer-protein complexes with an impact on timely gene activation. PMID:28087629

  17. On obtaining spectrally accurate solutions of linear differential equations with complex interfaces using the immersed interface method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Sudipta; Saha, Sandeep

    2016-11-01

    Numerical solution of engineering problems with interfacial discontinuities requires exact implementation of the jump conditions else the accuracy deteriorates significantly; particularly, achieving spectral accuracy has been limited due to complex interface geometry and Gibbs phenomenon. We adopt a novel implementation of the immersed-interface method that satisfies the jump conditions at the interfaces exactly, in conjunction with the Chebyshev-collocation method. We consider solutions to linear second order ordinary and partial differential equations having a discontinuity in their zeroth and first derivatives across an interface traced by a complex curve. The solutions obtained demonstrate the ability of the proposed method to achieve spectral accuracy for discontinuous solutions across tortuous interfaces. The solution methodology is illustrated using two model problems: (i) an ordinary differential equation with jump conditions forced by an infinitely differentiable function, (ii) Poisson's equation having a discontinuous solution across interfaces that are ellipses of varying aspect ratio. The use of more polynomials in the direction of the major axis than the minor axis of the ellipse increases the convergence rate of the solution.

  18. Landscape complexity differentially benefits generalist fourth, over specialized third, trophic level natural enemies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The differential loss of higher trophic levels in the face of natural habitat loss can result in the disruption of important ecosystem services such as pollination and biological control. Landscape- level conservation biological control aims to mitigate these negative impacts by conserving or resto...

  19. Solving Second-Order Ordinary Differential Equations without Using Complex Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kougias, Ioannis E.

    2009-01-01

    Ordinary differential equations (ODEs) is a subject with a wide range of applications and the need of introducing it to students often arises in the last year of high school, as well as in the early stages of tertiary education. The usual methods of solving second-order ODEs with constant coefficients, among others, rely upon the use of complex…

  20. Complex I assembly into supercomplexes determines differential mitochondrial ROS production in neurons and astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Le Douce, Juliette; Logan, Angela; James, Andrew M.; Bonvento, Gilles; Murphy, Michael P.; Bolaños, Juan P.

    2016-01-01

    Neurons depend on oxidative phosphorylation for energy generation, whereas astrocytes do not, a distinctive feature that is essential for neurotransmission and neuronal survival. However, any link between these metabolic differences and the structural organization of the mitochondrial respiratory chain is unknown. Here, we investigated this issue and found that, in neurons, mitochondrial complex I is predominantly assembled into supercomplexes, whereas in astrocytes the abundance of free complex I is higher. The presence of free complex I in astrocytes correlates with the severalfold higher reactive oxygen species (ROS) production by astrocytes compared with neurons. Using a complexomics approach, we found that the complex I subunit NDUFS1 was more abundant in neurons than in astrocytes. Interestingly, NDUFS1 knockdown in neurons decreased the association of complex I into supercomplexes, leading to impaired oxygen consumption and increased mitochondrial ROS. Conversely, overexpression of NDUFS1 in astrocytes promoted complex I incorporation into supercomplexes, decreasing ROS. Thus, complex I assembly into supercomplexes regulates ROS production and may contribute to the bioenergetic differences between neurons and astrocytes. PMID:27799543

  1. Correcting for differential transcript coverage reveals a strong relationship between alternative splicing and organism complexity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lu; Bush, Stephen J; Tovar-Corona, Jaime M; Castillo-Morales, Atahualpa; Urrutia, Araxi O

    2014-06-01

    What at the genomic level underlies organism complexity? Although several genomic features have been associated with organism complexity, in the case of alternative splicing, which has long been proposed to explain the variation in complexity, no such link has been established. Here, we analyzed over 39 million expressed sequence tags available for 47 eukaryotic species with fully sequenced genomes to obtain a comparable index of alternative splicing estimates, which corrects for the distorting effect of a variable number of transcripts per species--an important obstacle for comparative studies of alternative splicing. We find that alternative splicing has steadily increased over the last 1,400 My of eukaryotic evolution and is strongly associated with organism complexity, assayed as the number of cell types. Importantly, this association is not explained as a by-product of covariance between alternative splicing with other variables previously linked to complexity including gene content, protein length, proteome disorder, and protein interactivity. In addition, we found no evidence to suggest that the relationship of alternative splicing to cell type number is explained by drift due to reduced N(e) in more complex species. Taken together, our results firmly establish alternative splicing as a significant predictor of organism complexity and are, in principle, consistent with an important role of transcript diversification through alternative splicing as a means of determining a genome's functional information capacity.

  2. Cilium transition zone proteome reveals compartmentalization and differential dynamics of ciliopathy complexes

    PubMed Central

    Moreira-Leite, Flavia; Varga, Vladimir; Gull, Keith

    2016-01-01

    The transition zone (TZ) of eukaryotic cilia and flagella is a structural intermediate between the basal body and the axoneme that regulates ciliary traffic. Mutations in genes encoding TZ proteins (TZPs) cause human inherited diseases (ciliopathies). Here, we use the trypanosome to identify TZ components and localize them to TZ subdomains, showing that the Bardet-Biedl syndrome complex (BBSome) is more distal in the TZ than the Meckel syndrome (MKS) complex. Several of the TZPs identified here have human orthologs. Functional analysis shows essential roles for TZPs in motility, in building the axoneme central pair apparatus and in flagellum biogenesis. Analysis using RNAi and HaloTag fusion protein approaches reveals that most TZPs (including the MKS ciliopathy complex) show long-term stable association with the TZ, whereas the BBSome is dynamic. We propose that some Bardet-Biedl syndrome and MKS pleiotropy may be caused by mutations that impact TZP complex dynamics. PMID:27519801

  3. Proteasome involvement in a complex cascade mediating SigT degradation during differentiation of Streptomyces coelicolor.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xu-Ming; Ren, Ni-Ni; Sun, Ning; Wang, Feng; Zhou, Ri-Cheng; Tang, Yi; Li, Yong-Quan

    2014-02-14

    In Streptomyces coelicolor, the ECF sigma factor SigT negatively regulates cell differentiation, and is degraded by ClpP protease in a dual positive feedback manner. Here we further report that the proteasome is required for degradation of SigT, but not for degradation of its anti-sigma factor RstA, and RstA can protect SigT from degradation independent of the proteasome. Meanwhile, deletion of the proteasome showed reduced production of secondary metabolites, and the fermentation medium from wild type could promote SigT degradation. Furthermore, overexpression of redD or actII-orf4 in the proteasome-deficiency mutant resulted in SigT degradation and over-production of both undecylprodigiosin and actinorhodin. Therefore the proteasome is required for SigT degradation by affecting the production of secondary metabolites during cell differentiation.

  4. Genetic diversity and differentiation in Camellia reticulata (Theaceae) polyploid complex revealed by ISSR and ploidy.

    PubMed

    Wang, B-Y; Ruan, Z-Y

    2012-03-06

    Camellia reticulata is a well-known ornamental and oil plant that is endemic to southwest China. This species shows three cell ploidies, i.e., diploidy, tetraploidy and hexaploidy. We made the first investigation of genetic diversity and differentiation of natural populations of C. reticulata, and 114 individuals from 6 populations were sampled. Cytogeography results showed that ploidy is invariable within populations and evenly distributed. A relatively high level of genetic diversity was found in C. reticulata, both at the species level (PPB = 88.89%; H = 0.2809; I = 0.4278) and at the population level (mean PPB = 42.13%; mean H = 0.14; mean I = 0.21). We found a relatively low degree of differentiation among ploidies (G(ST) = 0.2384; AMOVA = 10.26%) and a relatively high degree of differentiation among populations (G(CS) = 0.3807; AMOVA = 48.75%). The high genetic diversity can be explained by its biological character, wide distribution and ploidies, and the special genetic structure can be ascribed to polyploid origin from hybridization with different Camellia spp. This information will be useful for the introduction, conservation and further studies of C. reticulata and related species.

  5. Three RNA binding proteins form a complex to promote differentiation of germline stem cell lineage in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Chen, Di; Wu, Chan; Zhao, Shaowei; Geng, Qing; Gao, Yu; Li, Xin; Zhang, Yang; Wang, Zhaohui

    2014-11-01

    In regenerative tissues, one of the strategies to protect stem cells from genetic aberrations, potentially caused by frequent cell division, is to transiently expand the stem cell daughters before further differentiation. However, failure to exit the transit amplification may lead to overgrowth, and the molecular mechanism governing this regulation remains vague. In a Drosophila mutagenesis screen for factors involved in the regulation of germline stem cell (GSC) lineage, we isolated a mutation in the gene CG32364, which encodes a putative RNA-binding protein (RBP) and is designated as tumorous testis (tut). In tut mutant, spermatogonia fail to differentiate and over-amplify, a phenotype similar to that in mei-P26 mutant. Mei-P26 is a TRIM-NHL tumor suppressor homolog required for the differentiation of GSC lineage. We found that Tut binds preferentially a long isoform of mei-P26 3'UTR, and is essential for the translational repression of mei-P26 reporter. Bam and Bgcn are both RBPs that have also been shown to repress mei-P26 expression. Our genetic analyses indicate that tut, bam, or bgcn is required to repress mei-P26 and to promote the differentiation of GSCs. Biochemically, we demonstrate that Tut, Bam, and Bgcn can form a physical complex in which Bam holds Tut on its N-terminus and Bgcn on its C-terminus. Our in vivo and in vitro evidence illustrate that Tut acts with Bam, Bgcn to accurately coordinate proliferation and differentiation in Drosophila germline stem cell lineage.

  6. Three RNA Binding Proteins Form a Complex to Promote Differentiation of Germline Stem Cell Lineage in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Shaowei; Geng, Qing; Gao, Yu; Li, Xin; Zhang, Yang; Wang, Zhaohui

    2014-01-01

    In regenerative tissues, one of the strategies to protect stem cells from genetic aberrations, potentially caused by frequent cell division, is to transiently expand the stem cell daughters before further differentiation. However, failure to exit the transit amplification may lead to overgrowth, and the molecular mechanism governing this regulation remains vague. In a Drosophila mutagenesis screen for factors involved in the regulation of germline stem cell (GSC) lineage, we isolated a mutation in the gene CG32364, which encodes a putative RNA-binding protein (RBP) and is designated as tumorous testis (tut). In tut mutant, spermatogonia fail to differentiate and over-amplify, a phenotype similar to that in mei-P26 mutant. Mei-P26 is a TRIM-NHL tumor suppressor homolog required for the differentiation of GSC lineage. We found that Tut binds preferentially a long isoform of mei-P26 3′UTR, and is essential for the translational repression of mei-P26 reporter. Bam and Bgcn are both RBPs that have also been shown to repress mei-P26 expression. Our genetic analyses indicate that tut, bam, or bgcn is required to repress mei-P26 and to promote the differentiation of GSCs. Biochemically, we demonstrate that Tut, Bam, and Bgcn can form a physical complex in which Bam holds Tut on its N-terminus and Bgcn on its C-terminus. Our in vivo and in vitro evidence illustrate that Tut acts with Bam, Bgcn to accurately coordinate proliferation and differentiation in Drosophila germline stem cell lineage. PMID:25412508

  7. DIFFERENTIATION OF THE JUNCTIONAL COMPLEX OF SURFACE CELLS IN THE DEVELOPING FUNDULUS BLASTODERM

    PubMed Central

    Lentz, Thomas L.; Trinkaus, J. P.

    1971-01-01

    The structure of the junctional complex between surface cells was investigated in blastula, mid gastrula, late gastrula, and early embryo of the teleost fish Fundulus heteroclitus. In blastulae, the intercellular complex is simple and consists of an apical region where the adjacent membranes are closely apposed (40–60 A) and in places touch, an intermediate zone with a wider intercellular space (> 100 A), and incipient desmosomes. In gastrulae, there are frequent points of fusion of membranes along the apical zone of the complex. Dilatations and an increased number of desmosomes in different stages of development are found along the intermediate zone. In mid gastrula, a close or gap junction with an intercellular space of 20 A occurs below the level of the desmosomes. In late gastrula, the gap junction is reduced in extent and desmosomes are better developed. In the early embryo, the basic organization of the complex is the same, although the deeply situated close junctions are no longer apparent and desmosomes and their associated system of filaments are well developed. At this time, the junctional complex is comparable to that of many epithelia and consists of an apical zonula occludens, a short zonula adherens, and deeply situated maculae adherentes. PMID:5545331

  8. A (Not Really) Complex Method for Finding Solutions to Linear Differential Equations. Modules and Monographs in Undergraduate Mathematics and Its Applications Project. UMAP Unit 497.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uebelacker, James W.

    This module considers ordinary linear differential equations with constant coefficients. The "complex method" used to find solutions is discussed, with numerous examples. The unit includes both problem sets and an exam, with answers provided for both. (MP)

  9. Differential evolution based on the node degree of its complex network: Initial study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skanderova, Lenka; Zelinka, Ivan

    2016-06-01

    In this paper is reported our progress in the synthesis of two partially different areas of research: complex networks and evolutionary computation. Ideas and results reported and mentioned here are based on our previous results and experiments. The main core of our participation is an evolutionary algorithm performance improvement by means of complex network use. Complex network is related to the evolutionary dynamics and reflect it. We report here our latest results as well as propositions on further research that is in process in our group (http://navy.cs.vsb.cz/). Only the main ideas and results are reported here, for more details it is recommended to read related literature of our previous research and results.

  10. Bound anions differentially stabilize multiprotein complexes in the absence of bulk solvent.

    PubMed

    Han, Linjie; Hyung, Suk-Joon; Mayers, Jonathan J S; Ruotolo, Brandon T

    2011-07-27

    The combination of ion mobility separation with mass spectrometry is an emergent and powerful structural biology tool, capable of simultaneously assessing the structure, topology, dynamics, and composition of large protein assemblies within complex mixtures. An integral part of the ion mobility-mass spectrometry measurement is the ionization of intact multiprotein complexes and their removal from bulk solvent. This process, during which a substantial portion of protein structure and organization is likely to be preserved, imposes a foreign environment on proteins that may cause structural rearrangements to occur. Thus, a general means must be identified to stabilize protein structures in the absence of bulk solvent. Our approach to this problem involves the protection of protein complex structure through the addition of salts in solution prior to desorption/ionization. Anionic components of the added salts bind to the complex either in solution or during the electrospray process, and those that remain bound in the gas phase tend to have high gas phase acidities. The resulting 'shell' of counterions is able to carry away excess energy from the protein complex ion upon activation and can result in significant structural stabilization of the gas-phase protein assembly overall. By using ion mobility-mass spectrometry, we observe both the dissociation and unfolding transitions for four tetrameric protein complexes bound to populations of 12 different anions using collisional activation. The data presented here quantifies, for the first time, the influence of a large range of counterions on gas-phase protein structure and allows us to rank and classify counterions as structure stabilizers in the absence of bulk solvent. Our measurements indicate that tartrate, citrate, chloride, and nitrate anions are among the strongest stabilizers of gas-phase protein structure identified in this screen. The rank order determined by our data is substantially different when compared to

  11. Writing Development in Four Genres from Grades Three to Seven: Syntactic Complexity and Genre Differentiation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beers, Scott F.; Nagy, William E.

    2011-01-01

    Two measures of syntactic complexity, clauses per T-unit and words per clause, were used to examine differences among four genres of text--narrative, descriptive, compare/contrast, and persuasive--written by the same two cohorts (83 students in grades three and five and 96 students in grades five and seven) on two occasions 2 years apart as part…

  12. Differential proteomic profiling unveils new molecular mechanisms associated with mitochondrial complex III deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Morán, María; López-Bernardo, Elia; Cadenas, Susana; Hidalgo, Beatriz; Sánchez, Ricardo; Seneca, Sara; Arenas, Joaquín; Martín, Miguel A.; Ugalde, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    We have analyzed the cellular pathways and metabolic adaptations that take place in primary skin fibroblasts from patients with mutations in BCS1L, a major genetic cause of mitochondrial complex III enzyme deficiency. Mutant fibroblasts exhibited low oxygen consumption rates and intracellular ATP levels, indicating that the main altered molecular event probably is a limited respiration-coupled ATP production through the OXPHOS system. Two-dimensional DIGE and MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry analyses unambiguously identified 39 proteins whose expression was significantly altered in complex III-deficient fibroblasts. Extensive statistical and cluster analyses revealed a protein profile characteristic for the BCS1L mutant fibroblasts that included alterations in energy metabolism, cell signaling and gene expression regulation, cytoskeleton formation and maintenance, and intracellular stress responses. The physiological validation of the predicted functional adaptations of human cultured fibroblasts to complex III deficiency confirmed the up-regulation of glycolytic enzyme activities and the accumulation of branched-chain among other amino acids, suggesting the activation of anaerobic glycolysis and cellular catabolic states, in particular protein catabolism, together with autophagy as adaptive responses to mitochondrial respiratory chain dysfunction and ATP deficiency. Our data point to an overall metabolic and genetic reprogramming that could contribute to explain the clinical manifestations of complex III deficiency in patients. PMID:25239759

  13. Differential Disadvantage of Anglophone Weak Readers Due to English Orthographic Complexity and Cognitive Processing Weakness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galletly, Susan A.; Knight, Bruce Allen

    2011-01-01

    The highly regular orthographies (spelling systems) of many nations expedite literacy development, and their children experience a rapid transition from early literacy (learning to read and write) to sophisticated literacy (reading and writing to learn). In contrast, English orthographic complexity impedes literacy development, particularly for…

  14. Differential Relations between Facets of Complex Problem Solving and Students' Immigration Background

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sonnleitner, Philipp; Brunner, Martin; Keller, Ulrich; Martin, Romain

    2014-01-01

    Whereas the assessment of complex problem solving (CPS) has received increasing attention in the context of international large-scale assessments, its fairness in regard to students' cultural background has gone largely unexplored. On the basis of a student sample of 9th-graders (N = 299), including a representative number of immigrant students (N…

  15. Differential response of continental stock complexes of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) to the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedland, Kevin D.; Shank, Burton V.; Todd, Christopher D.; McGinnity, Philip; Nye, Janet A.

    2014-05-01

    Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar, in the North Atlantic are managed as a set of population complexes distributed in North America and Europe. In recent years, these complexes have experienced reduced marine survival and many populations within the complexes are at risk, especially those at the southern ends of the species amphi-Atlantic range. Atlantic salmon is an anadromous fish dividing its life history between residence in freshwater and the marine environment. The freshwater portion of the life history includes spawning and the rearing of juveniles where in-river production has tended to be relatively stable, whereas the first year at sea, termed the post-smolt year, is characterized by more variable rates of mortality. Although their habitats are widely separated geographically along the North Atlantic seaboards, strong recruitment coherence exists between North American and European stock complexes. This recruitment coherence is correlated with ocean temperature variation associated with the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO). The North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) appears to be relatively unimportant as a driver of salmon abundance. The mechanism determining the link between AMO-related thermal variation and abundance appears to differ fundamentally for the two continental stock groupings. Whereas ocean climate variability during the first springtime months of juvenile salmon migration to sea appears to be important to the survival of North American stocks, summer climate variation appears to be central to adult recruitment variation for European stocks. This contrast in seasonal effects appears to be related to the varying roles of predation pressure and size-related mortality on the continental stock complexes. The anticipated warming due to global climate change will impose thermal conditions on salmon populations outside historical context and challenge the ability of many populations to persist.

  16. Differential expression in normal-adenoma-carcinoma sequence suggests complex molecular carcinogenesis in colon.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seungkoo; Bang, Seunghyun; Song, Kyuyoung; Lee, Inchul

    2006-10-01

    The majority of colon cancers develop from pre-existing adenomas. We analyzed the expression profiles in the sequence of normal colon crypts, adenomas and early-stage carcinomas using microdissected cells from tubular adenomas with foci of malignant transformation. Differentially expressed genes were detected between normal-adenoma and adenoma-carcinoma, and were grouped according to the patterns of expression changes in the sequence. Down-regulated genes in the sequence included PLA2G2A, TSPAN1, PDCD4, FCGBP, AATK, EPLIN, FABP1, AGR2, MTUS1, TSC1, galectin 4 and MT1F. PLA2G2A has been shown to suppress colon tumorigenesis in mice, but the pathobiological role in humans has been controversial. Our data showed continuous down-regulation of PLA2G2A in the sequence supporting an implication in human colon cancer. Tumor suppressor and/ or proapoptotic activities have also been reported in other genes. Up-regulated genes included ribosomal proteins, IER3 and TPR. TGF-beta2 and matrix metalloproteinase 23B were up-regulated in carcinoma but not in adenoma, supporting the pathobiological roles in malignant transformation. Differentially expressed genes partly coincided with those in the adenoma-carcinoma sequence of the stomach, which was published previously, suggesting a partial overlap between the adenoma-carcinoma sequences of the colon and stomach.

  17. Genetic evidence for complexity in ethnic differentiation and history in East Africa.

    PubMed

    Poloni, Estella S; Naciri, Yamama; Bucho, Rute; Niba, Régine; Kervaire, Barbara; Excoffier, Laurent; Langaney, André; Sanchez-Mazas, Alicia

    2009-11-01

    The Afro-Asiatic and Nilo-Saharan language families come into contact in Western Ethiopia. Ethnic diversity is particularly high in the South, where the Nilo-Saharan Nyangatom and the Afro-Asiatic Daasanach dwell. Despite their linguistic differentiation, both populations rely on a similar agripastoralist mode of subsistence. Analysis of mitochondrial DNA extracted from Nyangatom and Daasanach archival sera revealed high levels of diversity, with most sequences belonging to the L haplogroups, the basal branches of the mitochondrial phylogeny. However, in sharp contrast with other Ethiopian populations, only 5% of the Nyangatom and Daasanach sequences belong to haplogroups M and N. The Nyangatom and Daasanach were found to be significantly differentiated, while each of them displays close affinities with some Tanzanian populations. The strong genetic structure found over East Africa was neither associated with geography nor with language, a result confirmed by the analysis of 6711 HVS-I sequences of 136 populations mainly from Africa. Processes of migration, language shift and group absorption are documented by linguists and ethnographers for the Nyangatom and Daasanach, thus pointing to the probably transient and plastic nature of these ethnic groups. These processes, associated with periods of isolation, could explain the high diversity and strong genetic structure found in East Africa.

  18. Macroorganization of Chlorophyll a/b light-harvesting complex in thylakoids and aggregates: information from circular differential scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Garab, G.; Faludi-Daniel, A.; Sutherland, J.C.; Hind, G.

    1988-04-05

    Circular dichroism (CD) and magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) spectra were recorded for spinach thylakoids and for isolated, aggregated chlorophyll a/b light-harvesting pigment-protein complex, in random and magnetically aligned states of orientation at room and low temperatures. The shape and magnitude of the CD signal of most bands strongly depended on the orientation of the thylakoid membranes or the aggregated pigment-protein complex. In both thylakoids and aggregated light-harvesting complexes, however, the MCD spectra of the two different orientations were almost identical. Random and magnetically aligned samples exhibited anomalous, large CD signals outside the bands of pigment absorbance. Lack of similarity between the corresponding MCD and CD spectra showed that the large CD signals are not produced as a distortion of CD of absorbance by light scattering. Instead, these anomalous spectral features are believed to originate in differential selective scattering of circularly polarized light. The results lead to the conclusion that the light-harvesting pigment-protein complex in thylakoid grana forms a helical macroarray with dimensions commensurate with the wavelengths of the anomalous circular dichroism signals. A hypothesis is put forward suggesting a role for these macrodomains in granal organization.

  19. G1/S Inhibitors and the SWI/SNF Complex Control Cell-Cycle Exit during Muscle Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ruijtenberg, Suzan; van den Heuvel, Sander

    2015-07-16

    The transition from proliferating precursor cells to post-mitotic differentiated cells is crucial for development, tissue homeostasis, and tumor suppression. To study cell-cycle exit during differentiation in vivo, we developed a conditional knockout and lineage-tracing system for Caenorhabditis elegans. Combined lineage-specific gene inactivation and genetic screening revealed extensive redundancies between previously identified cell-cycle inhibitors and the SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complex. Muscle precursor cells missing either SWI/SNF or G1/S inhibitor function could still arrest cell division, while simultaneous inactivation of these regulators caused continued proliferation and a C. elegans tumor phenotype. Further genetic analyses support that SWI/SNF acts in concert with hlh-1 MyoD, antagonizes Polycomb-mediated transcriptional repression, and suppresses cye-1 Cyclin E transcription to arrest cell division of muscle precursors. Thus, SWI/SNF and G1/S inhibitors provide alternative mechanisms to arrest cell-cycle progression during terminal differentiation, which offers insight into the frequent mutation of SWI/SNF genes in human cancers.

  20. PCR-based Methodologies Used to Detect and Differentiate the Burkholderia pseudomallei complex: B. pseudomallei, B. mallei, and B. thailandensis.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Woan; March, Jordon K; Bunnell, Annette J; O'Neill, Kim L; Robison, Richard A

    2014-01-01

    Methods for the rapid detection and differentiation of the Burkholderia pseudomallei complex comprising B. pseudomallei, B. mallei, and B. thailandensis, have been the topic of recent research due to the high degree of phenotypic and genotypic similarities of these species. B. pseudomallei and B. mallei are recognized by the CDC as tier 1 select agents. The high mortality rates of glanders and melioidosis, their potential use as bioweapons, and their low infectious dose, necessitate the need for rapid and accurate detection methods. Although B. thailandensis is generally avirulent in mammals, this species displays very similar phenotypic characteristics to that of B. pseudomallei. Optimal identification of these species remains problematic, due to the difficulty in developing a sensitive, selective, and accurate assay. The development of PCR technologies has revolutionized diagnostic testing and these detection methods have become popular due to their speed, sensitivity, and accuracy. The purpose of this review is to provide a comprehensive overview and evaluation of the advancements in PCR-based detection and differentiation methodologies for the B. pseudomallei complex, and examine their potential uses in diagnostic and environmental testing.

  1. Improvement of MALDI-TOF MS profiling for the differentiation of species within the Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-Acinetobacter baumannii complex.

    PubMed

    Šedo, Ondrej; Nemec, Alexandr; Křížová, Lenka; Kačalová, Magdaléna; Zdráhal, Zbyněk

    2013-12-01

    MALDI-TOF MS is currently becoming the method of choice for rapid identification of bacterial species in routine diagnostics. Yet, this method suffers from the inability to differentiate reliably between some closely related bacterial species including those of the Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-Acinetobacter baumannii (ACB) complex, namely A. baumannii and Acinetobacter nosocomialis. In the present study, we evaluated a protocol which was different from that used in the Bruker Daltonics identification system (MALDI BioTyper) to improve species identification using a taxonomically precisely defined set of 105 strains representing the four validly named species of the ACB complex. The novel protocol is based on the change in matrix composition from alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (saturated solution in water:acetonitrile:trifluoroacetic acid, 47.5:50:2.5, v/v) to ferulic acid (12.5mgml(-1) solution in water:acetonitrile:formic acid 50:33:17, v/v), while the other steps of sample processing remain unchanged. Compared to the standard protocol, the novel one extended the range of detected compounds towards higher molecular weight, produced signals with better mass resolution, and allowed the detection of species-specific signals. As a result, differentiation of A. nosocomialis and A. baumannii strains by cluster analysis was improved and 13 A. nosocomialis strains, assigned erroneously or ambiguously by using the standard protocol, were correctly identified.

  2. Optimization of complex slater-type functions with analytic derivative methods for describing photoionization differential cross sections.

    PubMed

    Matsuzaki, Rei; Yabushita, Satoshi

    2017-05-05

    The complex basis function (CBF) method applied to various atomic and molecular photoionization problems can be interpreted as an L2 method to solve the driven-type (inhomogeneous) Schrödinger equation, whose driven term being dipole operator times the initial state wave function. However, efficient basis functions for representing the solution have not fully been studied. Moreover, the relation between their solution and that of the ordinary Schrödinger equation has been unclear. For these reasons, most previous applications have been limited to total cross sections. To examine the applicability of the CBF method to differential cross sections and asymmetry parameters, we show that the complex valued solution to the driven-type Schrödinger equation can be variationally obtained by optimizing the complex trial functions for the frequency dependent polarizability. In the test calculations made for the hydrogen photoionization problem with five or six complex Slater-type orbitals (cSTOs), their complex valued expansion coefficients and the orbital exponents have been optimized with the analytic derivative method. Both the real and imaginary parts of the solution have been obtained accurately in a wide region covering typical molecular regions. Their phase shifts and asymmetry parameters are successfully obtained by extrapolating the CBF solution from the inner matching region to the asymptotic region using WKB method. The distribution of the optimized orbital exponents in the complex plane is explained based on the close connection between the CBF method and the driven-type equation method. The obtained information is essential to constructing the appropriate basis sets in future molecular applications. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Snail/Slug-YAP/TAZ Complexes Control Skeletal Stem Cell Self-Renewal and Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yi; Feinberg, Tamar; Keller, Evan T.; Li, Xiao-Yan; Weiss, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived skeletal stem/stromal cell (SSC) self-renewal and function are critical to skeletal development, homeostasis and repair. Nevertheless, the mechanisms controlling SSC behavior, particularly bone formation, remain ill-defined. Using knockout mouse models that target the zinc-finger transcription factors, Snail, Slug or Snail and Slug combined, a regulatory axis has been uncovered wherein Snail and Slug cooperatively control SSC self-renewal, osteoblastogenesis and bone formation. Mechanistically, Snail/Slug regulate SSC function by forming complexes with the transcriptional co-activators, YAP and TAZ, in tandem with the inhibition of the Hippo pathway-dependent regulation of YAP/TAZ signaling cascades. In turn, the Snail/Slug-YAP/TAZ axis activates a series of YAP/TAZ/TEAD and Runx2 downstream targets that control SSC homeostasis and osteogenesis. Together, these results demonstrate that SSCs mobilize Snail/Slug-YAP/TAZ complexes to control stem cell function. PMID:27479603

  4. Differential inhibition/inactivation of mitochondrial complex I implicates its alteration in malignant cells.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, A; Bera, S; Ghosal, S; Ray, S; Basu, A; Ray, M

    2011-09-01

    Methylglyoxal strongly inhibited mitochondrial respiration of a wide variety of malignant tissues including sarcoma of mice, whereas no such significant effect was noted on mitochondrial respiration of normal tissues with the exception of cardiac cells. This inhibition by methylglyoxal was found to be at the level of mitochondrial complex I (NADH dehydrogenase) of the electron transport chain. L-Lactaldehyde, which is structurally and metabolically related to methylglyoxal, could protect against this inhibition. NADH dehydrogenase of submitochondrial particles of malignant and cardiac cells was inhibited by methylglyoxal. This enzyme of these cells was also inactivated by methylglyoxal. The possible involvement of lysine residue(s) for the activity of NADH dehydrogenase was also investigated by using lysine-specific reagents trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS) and pyridoxal 5' phosphate (PP). Inactivation of NADH dehydrogenase by both TNBS and PP convincingly demonstrated the involvement of lysine residue(s) for the activity of the sarcoma and cardiac enzymes, whereas both TNBS and PP failed to inactivate the enzymes of skeletal muscle and liver. Together these studies demonstrate a specific effect of methylglyoxal on mitochondrial complex I of malignant cells and importantly some distinct alteration of this complex in cancer cells.

  5. Hydraulic Transients in the Long Diversion-Type Hydropower Station with a Complex Differential Surge Tank

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiaodong; Zhang, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Based on the theory of hydraulic transients and the method of characteristics (MOC), a mathematic model of the differential surge tank with pressure-reduction orifices (PROs) and overflow weirs for transient calculation is proposed. The numerical model of hydraulic transients is established using the data of a practical hydropower station; and the probable transients are simulated. The results show that successive load rejection is critical for calculating the maximum pressure in spiral case and the maximum rotating speed of runner when the bifurcated pipe is converging under the surge tank in a diversion-type hydropower station; the pressure difference between two sides of breast wall is large during transient conditions, and it would be more serious when simultaneous load rejections happen after load acceptance; the reasonable arrangement of PROs on breast wall can effectively decrease the pressure difference. PMID:25133213

  6. Hydraulic transients in the long diversion-type hydropower station with a complex differential surge tank.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaodong; Zhang, Jian; Zhou, Ling

    2014-01-01

    Based on the theory of hydraulic transients and the method of characteristics (MOC), a mathematic model of the differential surge tank with pressure-reduction orifices (PROs) and overflow weirs for transient calculation is proposed. The numerical model of hydraulic transients is established using the data of a practical hydropower station; and the probable transients are simulated. The results show that successive load rejection is critical for calculating the maximum pressure in spiral case and the maximum rotating speed of runner when the bifurcated pipe is converging under the surge tank in a diversion-type hydropower station; the pressure difference between two sides of breast wall is large during transient conditions, and it would be more serious when simultaneous load rejections happen after load acceptance; the reasonable arrangement of PROs on breast wall can effectively decrease the pressure difference.

  7. Differential diagnosis of Hispanic children referred for autism spectrum disorders: complex issues.

    PubMed

    Overton, Terry; Fielding, Cheryl; Garcia de Alba, Roman

    2007-11-01

    This study examines the decision-making process used for differential diagnosis of a sample of Hispanic children referred for autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Of the sample of 28 children, 18 were diagnosed with ASDs. Of the 10 children who were not diagnosed with ASDs, 80% were found to have multiple diagnostic labels or comorbidities. Mann-Whitney U analyses determined the differences between the children with the most severe social impairment, children with less severe social impairment and the non-autistic children on several domains commonly used to assess ASDs. These analyses indicated significant differences in some characteristics of the children in the sample. Based on these results, a decision-tree for the diagnosis of children with and without ASDs with comorbid disorders was developed.

  8. Is it a tic or Tourette's? Clues for differentiating simple from more complex tic disorders.

    PubMed

    Evidente, V G

    2000-10-01

    Tics are characterized by sterotyped, purposeless, and irregularly repetitive movements and usually can be classified as chronic motor or vocal tic disorders, transient tic disorders, or Tourette's syndrome. The latter is a complex disorder associated with multiple tics and often accompanied by other conditions, such as ADHD and obsessive-compulsive disorder. Treatment can be difficult, and drug therapy should begin with agents least likely to cause problems for the patient. Education of the patient and family and support from the physician and other care providers are essential elements of effective management.

  9. Role of AKAP 149-PKA-PDE4A complex in cell survival and cell differentiation processes.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Araujo, A; Tobío, A; Alfonso, A; Botana, L M

    2014-08-01

    The cellular localization of A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs), protein kinase A (PKAs) and phosphodiesterases (PDEs) is a key step to the spatiotemporal regulation of the second messenger adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP). In this paper the cellular distribution of the mitochondrial AKAP 149-PKA-PDE4A complex and its implications in the cell death induced by YTX treatment, a known PDE modulator, was studied. K-562 cell line was incubated with YTX for 24 or 48 h. Under these conditions AKAP 149, PKA and type-4A PDE (PDE4A) levels were measured in the cytosol, in the plasma membrane and in the nucleus. Apoptotic hallmarks were also measured after the same conditions. In addition, YTX effect on cell viability was checked after AKAP 149 and PDE4A silencing. The results obtained show a decrease in AKAP 149-PKA-PDE4A levels in cytosol after YTX exposure. 24h after the toxin addition, the complex expression increased in the plasma membrane and after 48 h in the nucleus domain. Furthermore Bcl-2 levels were decreased and the expression of caspase 3 together with caspase 8 activity were increased after 24h of toxin incubation but not after 48 h. These results suggest apoptotic cell death at 24h and a non-apoptotic cell death after 48 h. When AKAP 149 and PDE4A were silenced YTX did not induce cellular death. In summary, AKAP 149-PKA-PDE4A complex localization is related with YTX effect in K-562 cell line. When this complex is mainly located in the plasma membrane apoptosis is activated while when the complex is in the nuclear domain non-apoptotic cellular death or cellular differentiation is activated. Therefore AKAP 149-PKA-PDE4A distribution and integrity have a key role in cellular survival.

  10. Members of the Candida parapsilosis Complex and Candida albicans are Differentially Recognized by Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Estrada-Mata, Eine; Navarro-Arias, María J.; Pérez-García, Luis A.; Mellado-Mojica, Erika; López, Mercedes G.; Csonka, Katalin; Gacser, Attila; Mora-Montes, Héctor M.

    2016-01-01

    The systemic infections caused by members of the Candida parapsilosis complex are currently associated to high morbility and mortality rates, and are considered as relevant as those caused by Candida albicans. Since the fungal cell wall is the first point of contact with the host cells, here we performed a comparison of this organelle in members of the C. parapsilosis complex, and its relevance during interaction with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). We found that the wall of the C. parapsilosis complex members is similar in composition, but differs to that from C. albicans, with less mannan content and more β-glucan and porosity levels. Furthermore, lectin-based analysis showed increased chitin and β1,3-glucan exposure at the surface of C. parapsilosis sensu lato when compared to C. albicans. Yeast cells of members of the C. parapsilosis complex stimulated more cytokine production by human PBMCs than C. albicans cells; and this significantly changed upon removal of O-linked mannans, indicating this wall component plays a significant role in cytokine stimulation by C. parapsilosis sensu lato. When inner wall components were exposed on the wall surface, C. parapsilosis sensu stricto and C. metapsilosis, but not C. orthopsilosis, stimulated higher cytokine production. Moreover, we found a strong dependency on β1,3-glucan recognition for the members of the C. parapsilosis complex, but not for live C. albicans cells; whereas TLR4 was required for TNFα production by the three members of the complex, and stimulation of IL-6 by C. orthopsilosis. Mannose receptor had a significant role during TNFα and IL-1β stimulation by members of the complex. Finally, we demonstrated that purified N- and O-mannans from either C. parapsilosis sensu lato or C. albicans are capable to block the recognition of these pathogens by human PBMCs. Together; our results suggest that the innate immune recognition of the members of the C. parapsilosis complex is differential

  11. Differential adsorption of complex organic molecules isomers at interstellar ice surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lattelais, M.; Bertin, M.; Mokrane, H.; Romanzin, C.; Michaut, X.; Jeseck, P.; Fillion, J.-H.; Chaabouni, H.; Congiu, E.; Dulieu, F.; Baouche, S.; Lemaire, J.-L.; Pauzat, , F.; Pilmé, J.; Minot, C.; Ellinger, Y.

    2011-08-01

    Context. Over 20 of the ~150 different species detected in the interstellar and circumstellar media have also been identified in icy environments. For most of the species observed so far in the interstellar medium (ISM), the most abundant isomer of a given generic chemical formula is the most stable one (minimum energy principle - MEP) with few exceptions such as, for example, CH3COOH/HCOOCH3 and CH3CH2OH/CH3OCH3, whose formation is thought to occur on the icy mantles of interstellar grains. Aims: We investigate whether differences found in the compositions of molecular ices and the surrounding gas phase could originate from differences between the adsorption of one isomer from that of another at the ice surface. Methods: We performed a coherent and concerted theoretical/experimental study of the adsorption energies of the four molecules mentioned above, i.e. acetic acid (AA)/methyl formate (MF) and ethanol (EtOH)/dimethyl ether (DME) on the surface of water ice at low temperature. The question was first addressed theoretically at LCT using solid state periodic density functional theory (DFT) to represent the organized solid support. The experimental determination of the ice/molecule interaction energies was then carried out independently by two teams at LPMAA and LERMA/LAMAp using temperature programmed desorption (TPD) under an ultra-high vacuum (UHV) between 70 and 160 K. Results: For each pair of isomers, theory and experiments both agree that the most stable isomer (AA or EtOH) interacts more efficiently with the water ice than the higher energy isomer (MF or DME). This differential adsorption can be clearly seen in the different desorption temperatures of the isomers. It is not related to their intrinsic stability but instead to both AA and EtOH producing more and stronger hydrogen bonds with the ice surface. Conclusions: We show that hydrogen bonding may play an important role in the release of organic species from grains and propose that, depending on the

  12. Does aging impair first impression accuracy? Differentiating emotion recognition from complex social inferences.

    PubMed

    Krendl, Anne C; Rule, Nicholas O; Ambady, Nalini

    2014-09-01

    Young adults can be surprisingly accurate at making inferences about people from their faces. Although these first impressions have important consequences for both the perceiver and the target, it remains an open question whether first impression accuracy is preserved with age. Specifically, could age differences in impressions toward others stem from age-related deficits in accurately detecting complex social cues? Research on aging and impression formation suggests that young and older adults show relative consensus in their first impressions, but it is unknown whether they differ in accuracy. It has been widely shown that aging disrupts emotion recognition accuracy, and that these impairments may predict deficits in other social judgments, such as detecting deceit. However, it is unclear whether general impression formation accuracy (e.g., emotion recognition accuracy, detecting complex social cues) relies on similar or distinct mechanisms. It is important to examine this question to evaluate how, if at all, aging might affect overall accuracy. Here, we examined whether aging impaired first impression accuracy in predicting real-world outcomes and categorizing social group membership. Specifically, we studied whether emotion recognition accuracy and age-related cognitive decline (which has been implicated in exacerbating deficits in emotion recognition) predict first impression accuracy. Our results revealed that emotion recognition accuracy did not predict first impression accuracy, nor did age-related cognitive decline impair it. These findings suggest that domains of social perception outside of emotion recognition may rely on mechanisms that are relatively unimpaired by aging.

  13. Reproductive isolation and patterns of genetic differentiation in a cryptic butterfly species complex.

    PubMed

    Dincă, V; Wiklund, C; Lukhtanov, V A; Kodandaramaiah, U; Norén, K; Dapporto, L; Wahlberg, N; Vila, R; Friberg, M

    2013-10-01

    Molecular studies of natural populations are often designed to detect and categorize hidden layers of cryptic diversity, and an emerging pattern suggests that cryptic species are more common and more widely distributed than previously thought. However, these studies are often decoupled from ecological and behavioural studies of species divergence. Thus, the mechanisms by which the cryptic diversity is distributed and maintained across large spatial scales are often unknown. In 1988, it was discovered that the common Eurasian Wood White butterfly consisted of two species (Leptidea sinapis and Leptidea reali), and the pair became an emerging model for the study of speciation and chromosomal evolution. In 2011, the existence of a third cryptic species (Leptidea juvernica) was proposed. This unexpected discovery raises questions about the mechanisms preventing gene flow and about the potential existence of additional species hidden in the complex. Here, we compare patterns of genetic divergence across western Eurasia in an extensive data set of mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequences with behavioural data on inter- and intraspecific reproductive isolation in courtship experiments. We show that three species exist in accordance with both the phylogenetic and biological species concepts and that additional hidden diversity is unlikely to occur in Europe. The Leptidea species are now the best studied cryptic complex of butterflies in Europe and a promising model system for understanding the formation of cryptic species and the roles of local processes, colonization patterns and heterospecific interactions for ecological and evolutionary divergence.

  14. Differential identity of Filopodia and Tunneling Nanotubes revealed by the opposite functions of actin regulatory complexes

    PubMed Central

    Delage, Elise; Cervantes, Diégo Cordero; Pénard, Esthel; Schmitt, Christine; Syan, Sylvie; Disanza, Andrea; Scita, Giorgio; Zurzolo, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    Tunneling Nanotubes (TNTs) are actin enriched filopodia-like protrusions that play a pivotal role in long-range intercellular communication. Different pathogens use TNT-like structures as “freeways” to propagate across cells. TNTs are also implicated in cancer and neurodegenerative diseases, making them promising therapeutic targets. Understanding the mechanism of their formation, and their relation with filopodia is of fundamental importance to uncover their physiological function, particularly since filopodia, differently from TNTs, are not able to mediate transfer of cargo between distant cells. Here we studied different regulatory complexes of actin, which play a role in the formation of both these structures. We demonstrate that the filopodia-promoting CDC42/IRSp53/VASP network negatively regulates TNT formation and impairs TNT-mediated intercellular vesicle transfer. Conversely, elevation of Eps8, an actin regulatory protein that inhibits the extension of filopodia in neurons, increases TNT formation. Notably, Eps8-mediated TNT induction requires Eps8 bundling but not its capping activity. Thus, despite their structural similarities, filopodia and TNTs form through distinct molecular mechanisms. Our results further suggest that a switch in the molecular composition in common actin regulatory complexes is critical in driving the formation of either type of membrane protrusion. PMID:28008977

  15. Development of a new MLST scheme for differentiation of Fusarium solani Species Complex (FSSC) isolates.

    PubMed

    Debourgogne, Anne; Gueidan, Cécile; Hennequin, Christophe; Contet-Audonneau, Nelly; de Hoog, Sybren; Machouart, Marie

    2010-09-01

    Fungi belonging to the Fusarium solani Species Complex (FSSC) are well known plant pathogens. In addition to being the causative agent of some superficial infections, FSSC has recently emerged as a group of common opportunistic moulds, mainly in patients with haematological malignancies. Molecular typing methods are essential in order to better understand the epidemiology of such opportunistic agents with the final goal of preventing contamination. A three-locus typing scheme has thus been developed for FSSC; based on polymorphisms in the domains of the ITS, EF-1 alpha, and RPB2 genes. This method is now considered to be a useful reference for phylogenetic and taxonomic studies. In other significant clinical fungi (e.g., Candida sp., Cryptococcus neoformans, and Aspergillus fumigatus), genes coding for metabolic enzymes have been widely used and proven to be very informative for diagnosis and epidemiology. The contribution of these genes has never been evaluated for Fusarium sp. and more specifically for F. solani Species Complex. Here, we have evaluated the contribution of 25 genes for diagnosis and epidemiological purposes. We then report a new five-locus MLST scheme useful for diagnosis and typing of clinical FSSC isolates. The method has been validated on 51 epidemiologically unrelated strains of FSSC and presents a high power of discrimination calculated at 0.991.

  16. Transcriptional Regulation of Arabidopsis Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 Coordinates Cell-Type Proliferation and Differentiation[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Pu, Li; Turco, Gina; Morao, Ana Karina; Kim, Dahae

    2016-01-01

    Spatiotemporal regulation of transcription is fine-tuned at multiple levels, including chromatin compaction. Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2) catalyzes the trimethylation of Histone 3 at lysine 27 (H3K27me3), which is the hallmark of a repressive chromatin state. Multiple PRC2 complexes have been reported in Arabidopsis thaliana to control the expression of genes involved in developmental transitions and maintenance of organ identity. Here, we show that PRC2 member genes display complex spatiotemporal gene expression patterns and function in root meristem and vascular cell proliferation and specification. Furthermore, PRC2 gene expression patterns correspond with vascular and nonvascular tissue-specific H3K27me3-marked genes. This tissue-specific repression via H3K27me3 regulates the balance between cell proliferation and differentiation. Using enhanced yeast one-hybrid analysis, upstream regulators of the PRC2 member genes are identified, and genetic analysis demonstrates that transcriptional regulation of some PRC2 genes plays an important role in determining PRC2 spatiotemporal activity within a developing organ. PMID:27650334

  17. Molecular differentiation of three closely related members of the mosquito species complex, Anopheles moucheti, by mitochondrial and ribosomal DNA polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Kengne, P; Antonio-Nkondjio, C; Awono-Ambene, H P; Simard, F; Awolola, T S; Fontenille, D

    2007-06-01

    Distinction between members of the equatorial Africa malaria vector Anopheles moucheti (Evans) s.l. (Diptera: Culicidae) has been based mainly on doubtful morphological features. To determine the level of genetic differentiation between the three morphological forms of this complex, we investigated molecular polymorphism in the gene encoding for mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase b (CytB) and in the ribosomal internal transcribed spacers (ITS1 and ITS2). The three genomic regions revealed sequence differences between the three morphological forms similar in degree to the differences shown previously for members of other anopheline species groups or complexes (genetic distance d = 0.047-0.05 for CytB, 0.084-0.166 for ITS1 and 0.03-0.05 for ITS2). Using sequence variation in the ITS1 region, we set up a diagnostic polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for rapid and reliable identification of each subspecies within the An. moucheti complex. Specimens of An. moucheti s.l. collected in Cameroon, the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Uganda and Nigeria were successfully identified, demonstrating the general applicability of this technique.

  18. Proteomics-based study on asthenozoospermia: differential expression of proteasome alpha complex.

    PubMed

    Siva, Archana Bharadwaj; Kameshwari, Duvvuri Butchi; Singh, Vaibhav; Pavani, Kadupu; Sundaram, Curam Sreenivasacharlu; Rangaraj, Nandini; Deenadayal, Mamata; Shivaji, Sisinthy

    2010-07-01

    With a view to understand the molecular basis of sperm motility, we have tried to establish the human sperm proteome by two-dimensional PAGE MALDI MS/MS analysis. We report identification of 75 different proteins in the human spermatozoa. Comparative proteome analysis was carried out for asthenozoospermic and normozoospermic patients to understand the molecular basis of sperm motility. Analysis revealed eight proteins (including one unidentified) with altered intensity between the groups. Differential proteins distributed into three functional groups: 'energy and metabolism' (triose-phosphate isomerase, glycerol kinase 2, testis specific isoform and succinyl-CoA:3-ketoacid co-enzyme A transferase 1, mitochondrial precursor); 'movement and organization' (tubulin beta 2C and tektin 1) and 'protein turnover, folding and stress response' (proteasome alpha 3 subunit and heat shock-related 70 kDa protein 2). It was interesting to note that although the proteins falling in the functional group of 'energy and metabolism' are higher in the asthenozoospermic patients, the other two functional groups contain proteins, which are higher in the normozoospermic samples. Validation of results carried out for proteasome alpha 3 subunit by immunoblotting and confocal microscopy, confirmed significant changes in intensity of proteasome alpha 3 subunit in asthenozoospermic samples when compared with normozoospermic controls. Significant positive correlation too was found between proteasome alpha 3 subunit levels and rapid, linear progressive motility of the spermatozoa. In our understanding, this data would contribute appreciably to the presently limited information available about the proteins implicated in human sperm motility.

  19. Genetic differentiation and admixture between sibling allopolyploids in the Dactylorhiza majalis complex

    PubMed Central

    Balao, F; Tannhäuser, M; Lorenzo, M T; Hedrén, M; Paun, O

    2016-01-01

    Allopolyploidization often happens recurrently, but the evolutionary significance of its iterative nature is not yet fully understood. Of particular interest are the gene flow dynamics and the mechanisms that allow young sibling polyploids to remain distinct while sharing the same ploidy, heritage and overlapping distribution areas. By using eight highly variable nuclear microsatellites, newly reported here, we investigate the patterns of divergence and gene flow between 386 polyploid and 42 diploid individuals, representing the sibling allopolyploids Dactylorhiza majalis s.s. and D. traunsteineri s.l. and their parents at localities across Europe. We make use in our inference of the distinct distribution ranges of the polyploids, including areas in which they are sympatric (that is, the Alps) or allopatric (for example, Pyrenees with D. majalis only and Britain with D. traunsteineri only). Our results show a phylogeographic signal, but no clear genetic differentiation between the allopolyploids, despite the visible phenotypic divergence between them. The results indicate that gene flow between sibling Dactylorhiza allopolyploids is frequent in sympatry, with potential implications for the genetic patterns across their entire distribution range. Limited interploidal introgression is also evidenced, in particular between D. incarnata and D. traunsteineri. Altogether the allopolyploid genomes appear to be porous for introgression from related diploids and polyploids. We conclude that the observed phenotypic divergence between D. majalis and D. traunsteineri is maintained by strong divergent selection on specific genomic areas with strong penetrance, but which are short enough to remain undetected by genotyping dispersed neutral markers. PMID:26604189

  20. Genetic differentiation and admixture between sibling allopolyploids in the Dactylorhiza majalis complex.

    PubMed

    Balao, F; Tannhäuser, M; Lorenzo, M T; Hedrén, M; Paun, O

    2016-04-01

    Allopolyploidization often happens recurrently, but the evolutionary significance of its iterative nature is not yet fully understood. Of particular interest are the gene flow dynamics and the mechanisms that allow young sibling polyploids to remain distinct while sharing the same ploidy, heritage and overlapping distribution areas. By using eight highly variable nuclear microsatellites, newly reported here, we investigate the patterns of divergence and gene flow between 386 polyploid and 42 diploid individuals, representing the sibling allopolyploids Dactylorhiza majalis s.s. and D. traunsteineri s.l. and their parents at localities across Europe. We make use in our inference of the distinct distribution ranges of the polyploids, including areas in which they are sympatric (that is, the Alps) or allopatric (for example, Pyrenees with D. majalis only and Britain with D. traunsteineri only). Our results show a phylogeographic signal, but no clear genetic differentiation between the allopolyploids, despite the visible phenotypic divergence between them. The results indicate that gene flow between sibling Dactylorhiza allopolyploids is frequent in sympatry, with potential implications for the genetic patterns across their entire distribution range. Limited interploidal introgression is also evidenced, in particular between D. incarnata and D. traunsteineri. Altogether the allopolyploid genomes appear to be porous for introgression from related diploids and polyploids. We conclude that the observed phenotypic divergence between D. majalis and D. traunsteineri is maintained by strong divergent selection on specific genomic areas with strong penetrance, but which are short enough to remain undetected by genotyping dispersed neutral markers.

  1. Cryptic diversity and ecosystem functioning: a complex tale of differential effects on decomposition.

    PubMed

    De Meester, N; Gingold, R; Rigaux, A; Derycke, S; Moens, T

    2016-10-01

    Marine ecosystems are experiencing accelerating population and species loss. Some ecosystem functions are decreasing and there is growing interest in the link between biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. The role of cryptic (morphologically identical but genetically distinct) species in this biodiversity-ecosystem functioning link is unclear and has not yet been formally tested. We tested if there is a differential effect of four cryptic species of the bacterivorous nematode Litoditis marina on the decomposition process of macroalgae. Bacterivorous nematodes can stimulate or slow down bacterial activity and modify the bacterial assemblage composition. Moreover, we tested if interspecific interactions among the four cryptic species influence the decomposition process. A laboratory experiment with both mono- and multispecific nematode cultures was conducted, and loss of organic matter and the activity of two key extracellular enzymes for the degradation of phytodetritus were assessed. L. marina mainly influenced qualitative aspects of the decomposition process rather than its overall rate: an effect of the nematodes on the enzymatic activities became manifest, although no clear nematode effect on bulk organic matter weight loss was found. We also demonstrated that species-specific effects on the decomposition process existed. Combining the four cryptic species resulted in high competition, with one dominant species, but without complete exclusion of other species. These interspecific interactions translated into different effects on the decomposition process. The species-specific differences indicated that each cryptic species may play an important and distinct role in ecosystem functioning. Functional differences may result in coexistence among very similar species.

  2. Complex N-glycan number and degree of branching cooperate to regulate cell proliferation and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Lau, Ken S; Partridge, Emily A; Grigorian, Ani; Silvescu, Cristina I; Reinhold, Vernon N; Demetriou, Michael; Dennis, James W

    2007-04-06

    The number of N-glycans (n) is a distinct feature of each glycoprotein sequence and cooperates with the physical properties of the Golgi N-glycan-branching pathway to regulate surface glycoprotein levels. The Golgi pathway is ultrasensitive to hexosamine flux for the production of tri- and tetra-antennary N-glycans, which bind to galectins and form a molecular lattice that opposes glycoprotein endocytosis. Glycoproteins with few N-glycans (e.g., TbetaR, CTLA-4, and GLUT4) exhibit enhanced cell-surface expression with switch-like responses to increasing hexosamine concentration, whereas glycoproteins with high numbers of N-glycans (e.g., EGFR, IGFR, FGFR, and PDGFR) exhibit hyperbolic responses. Computational and experimental data reveal that these features allow nutrient flux stimulated by growth-promoting high-n receptors to drive arrest/differentiation programs by increasing surface levels of low-n glycoproteins. We have identified a mechanism for metabolic regulation of cellular transition between growth and arrest in mammals arising from apparent coevolution of N-glycan number and branching.

  3. Differential effects of a complex organochlorine mixture on the proliferation of breast cancer cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Aube, Michel; Larochelle, Christian; Ayotte, Pierre

    2011-04-15

    Organochlorine compounds (OCs) are a group of persistent chemicals that accumulate in fatty tissues with age. Although OCs has been tested individually for their capacity to induce breast cancer cell proliferation, few studies examined the effect of complex mixtures that comprise compounds frequently detected in the serum of women. We constituted such an OC mixture containing 15 different components in environmentally relevant proportions and assessed its proliferative effects in four breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7, T47D, CAMA-1, MDAMB231) and in non-cancerous CV-1 cells. We also determined the capacity of the mixture to modulate cell cycle stage of breast cancer cells and to induce estrogenic and antiandrogenic effects using gene reporter assays. We observed that low concentrations of the mixture (100x10{sup 3} and 50x10{sup 3} dilutions) stimulated the proliferation of MCF-7 cells while higher concentrations (10x10{sup 3} and 5x10{sup 3} dilutions) had the opposite effect. In contrast, the mixture inhibited the proliferation of non-hormone-dependent cell lines. The mixture significantly increased the number of MCF-7 cells entering the S phase, an effect that was blocked by the antiestrogen ICI 182,780. Low concentrations of the mixture also caused an increase in CAMA-1 cell proliferation but only in the presence estradiol and dihydrotestosterone (p<0.05 at the 50x10{sup 3} dilution). DDT analogs and polychlorinated biphenyls all had the capacity to stimulate the proliferation of CAMA-1 cells in the presence of sex steroids. Reporter gene assays further revealed that the mixture and several of its constituents (DDT analogs, aldrin, dieldrin, {beta}-hexachlorocyclohexane, toxaphene) induced estrogenic effects, whereas the mixture and several components (DDT analogs, aldrin, dieldrin and PCBs) inhibited the androgen signaling pathway. Our results indicate that the complex OC mixture increases the proliferation of MCF-7 cells due to its estrogenic potential. The

  4. The Novel mTOR Complex 1/2 Inhibitor P529 Inhibits Human Lung Myofibroblast Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Keith T; Torr, Elizabeth E; Bernau, Ksenija; Leet, Jonathan; Sherris, David; Sandbo, Nathan

    2017-01-11

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a progressive and deadly disorder with very few therapeutic options. Palomid 529 (8-(1-hydroxyethyl)-2-methoxy-3-(4-methoxybenzyloxy)-benzo[c]chromen-6-one; P529) is a novel dual inhibitor of mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1/2 (mTORC1/2). In these studies, we investigated the effect of P529 on TGF-β-dependent signaling and myofibroblast differentiation. TGF-β-induced phosphorylation of the mTORC1 targets, p70 S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E binding protein 1 (4E-BP1), were both dose dependently inhibited by P529 in human lung fibroblasts with maximal inhibition occurring between 10-20 µM. mTORC2-mediated phosphorylation of Akt at the S473 site was partially inhibited with a similar dose dependency, as was TGF-β-induced myofibroblast differentiation. Protein levels of TGF-β-induced fibronectin and collagen were similarly decreased by P529. At this dose, there was also inhibition of mRNA transcript levels for Col1 and α-SMA, suggesting inhibition of transcriptional activation. However, there was no effect of P529 on canonical TGF-β-induced Smad signaling, as assessed by receptor-associated Smad2/3 phosphorylation, Smad2/3/4 translocation, or Smad-driven gene expression, as assessed by Smad-binding element driven luciferase. Conversely, activation of mTORC1/2 signaling was dependent on TGF-β type I receptor (ALK5) signaling and on Smad2/3 expression. P529 treatment disrupted TGF-β-induced actin stress fiber formation during myofibroblast differentiation, the deposition of new extracellular fibronectin matrix, and linear wound closure by fibroblasts. Likewise, mTOR knockdown inhibited TGF-β-induced myofibroblast differentiation. In conclusion, P529 inhibits TGF-β-induced myofibroblast differentiation, actin stress fiber formation, and matrix protein expression and deposition. Inhibition of mTORC1/2 by P529 may be a promising approach to inhibit in vivo fibrosis. This article is

  5. Differentiation of complex vapor mixtures using versatile DNA-carbon nanotube chemical sensor arrays.

    PubMed

    Kybert, Nicholas J; Lerner, Mitchell B; Yodh, Jeremy S; Preti, George; Johnson, A T Charlie

    2013-03-26

    Vapor sensors based on functionalized carbon nanotubes (NTs) have shown great promise, with high sensitivity conferred by the reduced dimensionality and exceptional electronic properties of the NT. Critical challenges in the development of NT-based sensor arrays for chemical detection include the demonstration of reproducible fabrication methods and functionalization schemes that provide high chemical diversity to the resulting sensors. Here, we outline a scalable approach to fabricating arrays of vapor sensors consisting of NT field effect transistors functionalized with single-stranded DNA (DNA-NT). DNA-NT sensors were highly reproducible, with responses that could be described through equilibrium thermodynamics. Target analytes were detected even in large backgrounds of volatile interferents. DNA-NT sensors were able to discriminate between highly similar molecules, including structural isomers and enantiomers. The sensors were also able to detect subtle variations in complex vapors, including mixtures of structural isomers and mixtures of many volatile organic compounds characteristic of humans.

  6. Transducin Duplicates in the Zebrafish Retina and Pineal Complex: Differential Specialisation after the Teleost Tetraploidisation

    PubMed Central

    Lagman, David; Callado-Pérez, Amalia; Franzén, Ilkin E.

    2015-01-01

    Gene duplications provide raw materials that can be selected for functional adaptations by evolutionary mechanisms. We describe here the results of 350 million years of evolution of three functionally related gene families: the alpha, beta and gamma subunits of transducins, the G protein involved in vision. Early vertebrate tetraploidisations resulted in separate transducin heterotrimers: gnat1/gnb1/gngt1 for rods, and gnat2/gnb3/gngt2 for cones. The teleost-specific tetraploidisation generated additional duplicates for gnb1, gnb3 and gngt2. We report here that the duplicates have undergone several types of subfunctionalisation or neofunctionalisation in the zebrafish. We have found that gnb1a and gnb1b are co-expressed at different levels in rods; gnb3a and gnb3b have undergone compartmentalisation restricting gnb3b to the dorsal and medial retina, however, gnb3a expression was detected only at very low levels in both larvae and adult retina; gngt2b expression is restricted to the dorsal and medial retina, whereas gngt2a is expressed ventrally. This dorsoventral distinction could be an adaptation to protect the lower part of the retina from intense light damage. The ontogenetic analysis shows earlier onset of expression in the pineal complex than in the retina, in accordance with its earlier maturation. Additionally, gnb1a but not gnb1b is expressed in the pineal complex, and gnb3b and gngt2b are transiently expressed in the pineal during ontogeny, thus showing partial temporal subfunctionalisation. These retina-pineal distinctions presumably reflect their distinct functional roles in vision and circadian rhythmicity. In summary, this study describes several functional differences between transducin gene duplicates resulting from the teleost-specific tetraploidisation. PMID:25806532

  7. Transducin duplicates in the zebrafish retina and pineal complex: differential specialisation after the teleost tetraploidisation.

    PubMed

    Lagman, David; Callado-Pérez, Amalia; Franzén, Ilkin E; Larhammar, Dan; Abalo, Xesús M

    2015-01-01

    Gene duplications provide raw materials that can be selected for functional adaptations by evolutionary mechanisms. We describe here the results of 350 million years of evolution of three functionally related gene families: the alpha, beta and gamma subunits of transducins, the G protein involved in vision. Early vertebrate tetraploidisations resulted in separate transducin heterotrimers: gnat1/gnb1/gngt1 for rods, and gnat2/gnb3/gngt2 for cones. The teleost-specific tetraploidisation generated additional duplicates for gnb1, gnb3 and gngt2. We report here that the duplicates have undergone several types of subfunctionalisation or neofunctionalisation in the zebrafish. We have found that gnb1a and gnb1b are co-expressed at different levels in rods; gnb3a and gnb3b have undergone compartmentalisation restricting gnb3b to the dorsal and medial retina, however, gnb3a expression was detected only at very low levels in both larvae and adult retina; gngt2b expression is restricted to the dorsal and medial retina, whereas gngt2a is expressed ventrally. This dorsoventral distinction could be an adaptation to protect the lower part of the retina from intense light damage. The ontogenetic analysis shows earlier onset of expression in the pineal complex than in the retina, in accordance with its earlier maturation. Additionally, gnb1a but not gnb1b is expressed in the pineal complex, and gnb3b and gngt2b are transiently expressed in the pineal during ontogeny, thus showing partial temporal subfunctionalisation. These retina-pineal distinctions presumably reflect their distinct functional roles in vision and circadian rhythmicity. In summary, this study describes several functional differences between transducin gene duplicates resulting from the teleost-specific tetraploidisation.

  8. Unsplit complex frequency shifted perfectly matched layer for second-order wave equation using auxiliary differential equations.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yingjie; Zhang, Jinhai; Yao, Zhenxing

    2015-12-01

    The complex frequency shifted perfectly matched layer (CFS-PML) can improve the absorbing performance of PML for nearly grazing incident waves. However, traditional PML and CFS-PML are based on first-order wave equations; thus, they are not suitable for second-order wave equation. In this paper, an implementation of CFS-PML for second-order wave equation is presented using auxiliary differential equations. This method is free of both convolution calculations and third-order temporal derivatives. As an unsplit CFS-PML, it can reduce the nearly grazing incidence. Numerical experiments show that it has better absorption than typical PML implementations based on second-order wave equation.

  9. Persistent Complex Bereavement Disorder Symptom Domains Relate Differentially to PTSD and Depression: A Study of War-Exposed Bosnian Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Claycomb, Meredith A; Charak, Ruby; Kaplow, Julie; Layne, Christopher M; Pynoos, Robert; Elhai, Jon D

    2016-10-01

    Persistent Complex Bereavement Disorder (PCBD) is a newly proposed diagnosis placed in the Appendix of the 5th edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) as an invitation for further research. To date, no studies have examined the dimensionality of PCBD or explored whether different PCBD criteria domains relate in similar, versus differential, ways to other psychological conditions common to war-exposed bereaved youth, including symptoms of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and depression. We evaluated the dimensionality of proposed PCBD B and C symptom domains, and their respective relations with measures of PTSD and depression, in 1142 bereaved Bosnian adolescents exposed to the 1992-1995 Bosnian civil war. Instruments included the UCLA PTSD Reaction Index, the Depression Self-Rating Scale, and the UCLA Grief Screening Scale (a prototype measure of PCBD symptoms). We investigated potential differences in grief, PTSD, and depression scores as a function of cause of death. We then examined hypothesized differential relations between PCBD B and C symptom domain subscales and selected external correlates, specifically measures of depression and the four-factor emotional numbing model of PTSD. Results of both analyses provide preliminary evidence of a multidimensional structure for PCBD in this population, in that the PCBD Criterion C subscale score covaried more strongly with each of the four PTSD factors and with depression than did PCBD Criterion B. We conclude by discussing theoretical, methodological, clinical, and policy-related implications linked to the ongoing study of essential features of PCBD.

  10. Differential Response of Coral Assemblages to Thermal Stress Underscores the Complexity in Predicting Bleaching Susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Chou, Loke Ming; Toh, Tai Chong; Toh, Kok Ben; Ng, Chin Soon Lionel; Cabaitan, Patrick; Tun, Karenne; Goh, Eugene; Afiq-Rosli, Lutfi; Taira, Daisuke; Du, Rosa Celia Poquita; Loke, Hai Xin; Khalis, Aizat; Li, Jinghan; Song, Tiancheng

    2016-01-01

    Coral bleaching events have been predicted to occur more frequently in the coming decades with global warming. The susceptibility of corals to bleaching during thermal stress episodes is dependent on many factors and an understanding of these underlying drivers is crucial for conservation management. In 2013, a mild bleaching episode ensued in response to elevated sea temperature on the sediment-burdened reefs in Singapore. Surveys of seven sites highlighted variable bleaching susceptibility among coral genera-Pachyseris and Podabacia were the most impacted (31% of colonies of both genera bleached). The most susceptible genera such as Acropora and Pocillopora, which were expected to bleach, did not. Susceptibility varied between less than 6% and more than 11% of the corals bleached, at four and three sites respectively. Analysis of four of the most bleached genera revealed that a statistical model that included a combination of the factors (genus, colony size and site) provided a better explanation of the observed bleaching patterns than any single factor alone. This underscored the complexity in predicting the coral susceptibility to future thermal stress events and the importance of monitoring coral bleaching episodes to facilitate more effective management of coral reefs under climate change.

  11. Differential Response of Coral Assemblages to Thermal Stress Underscores the Complexity in Predicting Bleaching Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Toh, Kok Ben; Ng, Chin Soon Lionel; Cabaitan, Patrick; Tun, Karenne; Goh, Eugene; Afiq-Rosli, Lutfi; Taira, Daisuke; Du, Rosa Celia Poquita; Loke, Hai Xin; Khalis, Aizat; Li, Jinghan; Song, Tiancheng

    2016-01-01

    Coral bleaching events have been predicted to occur more frequently in the coming decades with global warming. The susceptibility of corals to bleaching during thermal stress episodes is dependent on many factors and an understanding of these underlying drivers is crucial for conservation management. In 2013, a mild bleaching episode ensued in response to elevated sea temperature on the sediment-burdened reefs in Singapore. Surveys of seven sites highlighted variable bleaching susceptibility among coral genera–Pachyseris and Podabacia were the most impacted (31% of colonies of both genera bleached). The most susceptible genera such as Acropora and Pocillopora, which were expected to bleach, did not. Susceptibility varied between less than 6% and more than 11% of the corals bleached, at four and three sites respectively. Analysis of four of the most bleached genera revealed that a statistical model that included a combination of the factors (genus, colony size and site) provided a better explanation of the observed bleaching patterns than any single factor alone. This underscored the complexity in predicting the coral susceptibility to future thermal stress events and the importance of monitoring coral bleaching episodes to facilitate more effective management of coral reefs under climate change. PMID:27438593

  12. A Powerful Statistical Method for Identifying Differentially Methylated Markers in Complex Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Surin; Wang, Tao

    2013-01-01

    DNA methylation is an important epigenetic modification that regulates transcriptional expression and plays an important role in complex diseases, such as cancer. Genome-wide methylation patterns have unique features and hence require the development of new analytic approaches. One important feature is that methylation levels in disease tissues often differ from those in normal tissues with respect to both average and variability. In this paper, we propose a new score test to identify methylation markers of disease. This approach simultaneously utilizes information from the first and second moments of methylation distribution to improve statistical efficiency. Because the proposed score test is derived from a generalized regression model, it can be used for analyzing both categorical and continuous disease phenotypes, and for adjusting for covariates. We evaluate the performance of the proposed method and compare it to other tests including the most commonly-used t-test through simulations. The simulation results show that the validity of the proposed method is robust to departures from the normal assumption of methylation levels and can be substantially more powerful than the t-test in the presence of heterogeneity of methylation variability between disease and normal tissues. We demonstrate our approach by analyzing the methylation dataset of an ovarian cancer study and identify novel methylation loci not identified by the t-test. PMID:23424113

  13. Identification of Chlamydia trachomatis outer membrane complex proteins by differential proteomics.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoyun; Afrane, Mary; Clemmer, David E; Zhong, Guangming; Nelson, David E

    2010-06-01

    The extracellular chlamydial infectious particle, or elementary body (EB), is enveloped by an intra- and intermolecular cysteine cross-linked protein shell called the chlamydial outer membrane complex (COMC). A few abundant proteins, including the major outer membrane protein and cysteine-rich proteins (OmcA and OmcB), constitute the overwhelming majority of COMC proteins. The identification of less-abundant COMC proteins has been complicated by limitations of proteomic methodologies and the contamination of COMC fractions with abundant EB proteins. Here, we used parallel liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analyses of Chlamydia trachomatis serovar L2 434/Bu EB, COMC, and Sarkosyl-soluble EB fractions to identify proteins enriched or depleted from COMC. All well-described COMC proteins were specifically enriched in the COMC fraction. In contrast, multiple COMC-associated proteins found in previous studies were strongly enriched in the Sarkosyl-soluble fraction, suggesting that these proteins are not COMC components or are not stably associated with COMC. Importantly, we also identified novel proteins enriched in COMC. The list of COMC proteins identified in this study has provided reliable information for further understanding chlamydial protein secretion systems and modeling COMC and EB structures.

  14. Differential cellular expression of neurotrophins in cortical tubers of the tuberous sclerosis complex.

    PubMed

    Kyin, R; Hua, Y; Baybis, M; Scheithauer, B; Kolson, D; Uhlmann, E; Gutmann, D; Crino, P B

    2001-10-01

    Neurotrophins and their receptors modulate cerebral cortical development. Tubers in the tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) are characterized histologically by disorganized cortical cytoarchitecture and thus, we hypothesized that expression of neurotrophin mRNAs and proteins might be altered in tubers. Using in situ transcription and mRNA amplification to probe cDNA arrays, we found that neurotrophin-3 (NT3) and trkB mRNA expression were reduced whereas neurotrophin-4 (NT4) and trkC mRNA expression were increased in whole tuber sections. Alterations in mRNA abundance were defined in single microdissected dysplastic neurons (DNs) and giant cells (GCs). NT3 mRNA expression was reduced in GCs and trkB mRNA expression was reduced in DNs. NT4 mRNA expression was increased in DNs and trkC mRNA expression was increased in both DNs and GCs. In three patients, TSC2 locus mutations were confirmed and the mean tuberin mRNA expression levels was reduced across all nine cases. Consistent with these observations, NT3 mRNA expression was reduced but trkC mRNA expression was increased in vitro in human NTera2 neurons (NT2N) transfected with a tuberin antisense construct that reduced tuberin expression. Western analysis of tuber homogenates and computer-assisted densitometry of immunolabeled sections confirmed the neurotrophin mRNA expression data in whole sections and single neurotrophin immunoreactive cells. We conclude that alterations in NT4/trkB and NT3/trkC expression may contribute to tuber formation during brain development as downstream effects of the hamartin and tuberin pathway in TSC.

  15. Differential association of protein subunits with the human RNase MRP and RNase P complexes.

    PubMed

    Welting, Tim J M; Kikkert, Bastiaan J; van Venrooij, Walther J; Pruijn, Ger J M

    2006-07-01

    RNase MRP is a eukaryotic endoribonuclease involved in nucleolar and mitochondrial RNA processing events. RNase MRP is a ribonucleoprotein particle, which is structurally related to RNase P, an endoribonuclease involved in pre-tRNA processing. Most of the protein components of RNase MRP have been reported to be associated with RNase P as well. In this study we determined the association of these protein subunits with the human RNase MRP and RNase P particles by glycerol gradient sedimentation and coimmunoprecipitation. In agreement with previous studies, RNase MRP sedimented at 12S and 60-80S. In contrast, only a single major peak was observed for RNase P at 12S. The analysis of individual protein subunits revealed that hPop4 (also known as Rpp29), Rpp21, Rpp20, and Rpp25 only sedimented in 12S fractions, whereas hPop1, Rpp40, Rpp38, and Rpp30 were also found in 60-80S fractions. In agreement with their cosedimentation with RNase P RNA in the 12S peak, coimmunoprecipitation with VSV-epitope-tagged protein subunits revealed that hPop4, Rpp21, and in addition Rpp14 preferentially associate with RNase P. These data show that hPop4, Rpp21, and Rpp14 may not be associated with RNase MRP. Furthermore, Rpp20 and Rpp25 appear to be associated with only a subset of RNase MRP particles, in contrast to hPop1, Rpp40, Rpp38, and Rpp30 (and possibly also hPop5), which are probably associated with all RNase MRP complexes. Our data are consistent with a transient association of Rpp20 and Rpp25 with RNase MRP, which may be inversely correlated to its involvement in pre-rRNA processing.

  16. Differential effects of zinc and magnesium ions on mineralization activity of phosphatidylserine calcium phosphate complexes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Licia N Y; Genge, Brian R; Wuthier, Roy E

    2009-07-01

    Mg(2+) and Zn(2+) are present in the mineral of matrix vesicles (MVs) and biological apatites, and are known to influence the onset and progression of mineral formation by amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) and hydroxyapatite (HAP). However, neither has been studied systematically for its effect on mineral formation by phosphatidylserine-Ca(2+)-Pi complexes (PS-CPLX), an important constituent of the MV nucleation core. Presented here are studies on the effects of increasing levels of Mg(2+) and Zn(2+) on the process of mineral formation, either when present in synthetic cartilage lymph (SCL), or when incorporated during the formation of PS-CPLX. Pure HAP and PS-CPLX proved to be powerful nucleators, but ACP took much longer to induce mineral formation. In SCL, Mg(2+) and Zn(2+) had significantly different inhibitory effects on the onset and amount of mineral formation; HAP and PS-CPLX were less affected than ACP. Mg(2+) and Zn(2+) caused similar reductions in the rate and length of rapid mineral formation, but Zn(2+) was a more potent inhibitor on a molar basis. When incorporated into PS-CPLX, Mg(2+) and Zn(2+) caused significantly different effects than when present in SCL. Even low, subphysiological levels of Mg(2+) altered the inherent structure of PS-CPLX and markedly reduced its ability to induce and propagate mineral formation. Incorporated Zn(2+) caused significantly less effect, low (<20 microM) levels causing almost no inhibition. Levels of Zn(2+) present in MVs do not appear to inhibit their nucleational activity.

  17. Platelet-derived growth factor receptors form complexes with neuropilin-1 during megakaryocytic differentiation of thrombopoietin-dependent UT-7/TPO cells.

    PubMed

    Ohsaka, Akimichi; Hirota-Komatsu, Satoko; Araki, Marito; Komatsu, Norio

    2015-04-10

    Neuropilin-1 (NRP-1) is involved in angiogenesis, but the role of NRP-1 in megakaryocytopoiesis is not yet fully understood. In this study, we investigated whether thrombopoietin (TPO) regulates the expression of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and its receptors (PDGFRs) on TPO-dependent UT-7/TPO cells and whether PDGFRs and NRP-1 on UT-7/TPO cells form complexes during megakaryocytic differentiation. When UT-7/TPO cells were starved of TPO for 24 h and then stimulated with 5 ng/ml TPO, the expression of PDGF-B, PDGFRα, and PDGFRβ were significantly up-regulated after the addition of TPO. TPO also induced tyrosine phosphorylation of PDGFRα but not PDGFRβ, and promoted the formation of PDGFRαβ heterodimer complexes. Furthermore, megakaryocytic differentiation of UT-7/TPO cells on treatment with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) was accompanied by a marked up-regulation of PDGFRβ and NRP-1 protein expression, complex formation between PDGFRs and NRP-1, PDGFRαβ heterodimer complexes, and an increase in PDGF-BB-binding activity. Immunocytochemistry confirmed complex formation between PDGFRs and NRP-1 and PDGFRαβ heterodimer complexes in PMA-differentiated UT-7/TPO cells. Our observations suggest that NRP-1 is involved in megakaryocytopoiesis through complex formation with PDGFRs, and that NRP-1-PDGFR-complexes may contribute to effective cellular functions mediated by TPO and PDGF in megakaryocytic cells.

  18. Heteromeric complexes of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) family members, including Hsp70B′, in differentiated human neuronal cells

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Ari M.; Mok, Philip; Xiao, Dawn; Khalouei, Sam

    2010-01-01

    Human neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis have been termed “protein misfolding disorders.” Upregulation of heat shock proteins that target misfolded aggregation-prone proteins has been proposed as a potential therapeutic strategy to counter neurodegenerative disorders. The heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) family is well characterized for its cytoprotective effects against cell death and has been implicated in neuroprotection by overexpression studies. HSP70 family members exhibit sequence and structural conservation. The significance of the multiplicity of HSP70 proteins is unknown. In this study, coimmunoprecipitation was employed to determine if association of HSP70 family members occurs, including Hsp70B′ which is present in the human genome but not in mouse and rat. Heteromeric complexes of Hsp70B′, Hsp70, and Hsc70 were detected in differentiated human SH-SY5Y neuronal cells. Hsp70B′ also formed complexes with Hsp40 suggesting a common co-chaperone for HSP70 family members. PMID:20084477

  19. cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) complexes probed by complementary differential scanning fluorimetry and ion mobility–mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Dominic P.; Vonderach, Matthias; Ferries, Samantha; Brownridge, Philip J.; Eyers, Claire E.; Eyers, Patrick A.

    2016-01-01

    cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) is an archetypal biological signaling module and a model for understanding the regulation of protein kinases. In the present study, we combine biochemistry with differential scanning fluorimetry (DSF) and ion mobility–mass spectrometry (IM–MS) to evaluate effects of phosphorylation and structure on the ligand binding, dynamics and stability of components of heteromeric PKA protein complexes in vitro. We uncover dynamic, conformationally distinct populations of the PKA catalytic subunit with distinct structural stability and susceptibility to the physiological protein inhibitor PKI. Native MS of reconstituted PKA R2C2 holoenzymes reveals variable subunit stoichiometry and holoenzyme ablation by PKI binding. Finally, we find that although a ‘kinase-dead’ PKA catalytic domain cannot bind to ATP in solution, it interacts with several prominent chemical kinase inhibitors. These data demonstrate the combined power of IM–MS and DSF to probe PKA dynamics and regulation, techniques that can be employed to evaluate other protein-ligand complexes, with broad implications for cellular signaling. PMID:27444646

  20. Complexity.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Hernández, J Jaime

    2006-01-01

    It is difficult to define complexity in modeling. Complexity is often associated with uncertainty since modeling uncertainty is an intrinsically difficult task. However, modeling uncertainty does not require, necessarily, complex models, in the sense of a model requiring an unmanageable number of degrees of freedom to characterize the aquifer. The relationship between complexity, uncertainty, heterogeneity, and stochastic modeling is not simple. Aquifer models should be able to quantify the uncertainty of their predictions, which can be done using stochastic models that produce heterogeneous realizations of aquifer parameters. This is the type of complexity addressed in this article.

  1. PCR-Based Method To Differentiate the Subspecies of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex on the Basis of Genomic Deletions

    PubMed Central

    Huard, Richard C.; de Oliveira Lazzarini, Luiz Claudio; Butler, W. Ray; van Soolingen, Dick; Ho, John L.

    2003-01-01

    The classical Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MtbC) subspecies include Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Mycobacterium africanum (subtypes I and II), Mycobacterium bovis (along with the attenuated M. bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin [BCG]), and Mycobacterium microti; increasingly recognized MtbC groupings include Mycobacterium bovis subsp. caprae and “Mycobacterium tuberculosis subsp. canettii.” Previous investigations have documented each MtbC subspecies as a source of animal and/or human tuberculosis. However, study of these organisms is hindered by the lack of a single protocol that quickly and easily differentiates all of the MtbC groupings. Towards this end we have developed a rapid, simple, and reliable PCR-based MtbC typing method that makes use of MtbC chromosomal region-of-difference deletion loci. Here, seven primer pairs (which amplify within the loci 16S rRNA, Rv0577, IS1561′, Rv1510, Rv1970, Rv3877/8, and Rv3120) were run in separate but simultaneous reactions. Each primer pair either specifically amplified a DNA fragment of a unique size or failed, depending upon the source mycobacterial DNA. The pattern of amplification products from all of the reactions, visualized by agarose gel electrophoresis, allowed immediate identification either as MtbC composed of M. tuberculosis (or M. africanum subtype II), M. africanum subtype I, M. bovis, M. bovis BCG, M. caprae, M. microti, or “M. canettii” or as a Mycobacterium other than MtbC (MOTT). This MtbC PCR typing panel provides an advanced approach to determine the subspecies of MtbC isolates and to differentiate them from clinically important MOTT species. It has proven beneficial in the management of Mycobacterium collections and may be applied for practical clinical and epidemiological use. PMID:12682155

  2. Complex interplay between neutral and adaptive evolution shaped differential genomic background and disease susceptibility along the Italian peninsula

    PubMed Central

    Sazzini, Marco; Gnecchi Ruscone, Guido Alberto; Giuliani, Cristina; Sarno, Stefania; Quagliariello, Andrea; De Fanti, Sara; Boattini, Alessio; Gentilini, Davide; Fiorito, Giovanni; Catanoso, Mariagrazia; Boiardi, Luigi; Croci, Stefania; Macchioni, Pierluigi; Mantovani, Vilma; Di Blasio, Anna Maria; Matullo, Giuseppe; Salvarani, Carlo; Franceschi, Claudio; Pettener, Davide; Garagnani, Paolo; Luiselli, Donata

    2016-01-01

    The Italian peninsula has long represented a natural hub for human migrations across the Mediterranean area, being involved in several prehistoric and historical population movements. Coupled with a patchy environmental landscape entailing different ecological/cultural selective pressures, this might have produced peculiar patterns of population structure and local adaptations responsible for heterogeneous genomic background of present-day Italians. To disentangle this complex scenario, genome-wide data from 780 Italian individuals were generated and set into the context of European/Mediterranean genomic diversity by comparison with genotypes from 50 populations. To maximize possibility of pinpointing functional genomic regions that have played adaptive roles during Italian natural history, our survey included also ~250,000 exomic markers and ~20,000 coding/regulatory variants with well-established clinical relevance. This enabled fine-grained dissection of Italian population structure through the identification of clusters of genetically homogeneous provinces and of genomic regions underlying their local adaptations. Description of such patterns disclosed crucial implications for understanding differential susceptibility to some inflammatory/autoimmune disorders, coronary artery disease and type 2 diabetes of diverse Italian subpopulations, suggesting the evolutionary causes that made some of them particularly exposed to the metabolic and immune challenges imposed by dietary and lifestyle shifts that involved western societies in the last centuries. PMID:27582244

  3. Differential targeting of the E-Cadherin/β-Catenin complex by gram-positive probiotic lactobacilli improves epithelial barrier function.

    PubMed

    Hummel, Stephanie; Veltman, Katharina; Cichon, Christoph; Sonnenborn, Ulrich; Schmidt, M Alexander

    2012-02-01

    The intestinal ecosystem is balanced by dynamic interactions between resident and incoming microbes, the gastrointestinal barrier, and the mucosal immune system. However, in the context of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), where the integrity of the gastrointestinal barrier is compromised, resident microbes contribute to the development and perpetuation of inflammation and disease. Probiotic bacteria have been shown to exert beneficial effects, e.g., enhancing epithelial barrier integrity. However, the mechanisms underlying these beneficial effects are only poorly understood. Here, we comparatively investigated the effects of four probiotic lactobacilli, namely, Lactobacillus acidophilus, L. fermentum, L. gasseri, and L. rhamnosus, in a T84 cell epithelial barrier model. Results of DNA microarray experiments indicating that lactobacilli modulate the regulation of genes encoding in particular adherence junction proteins such as E-cadherin and β-catenin were confirmed by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR). Furthermore, we show that epithelial barrier function is modulated by Gram-positive probiotic lactobacilli via their effect on adherence junction protein expression and complex formation. In addition, incubation with lactobacilli differentially influences the phosphorylation of adherence junction proteins and the abundance of protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms such as PKCδ that thereby positively modulates epithelial barrier function. Further insight into the underlying molecular mechanisms triggered by these probiotics might also foster the development of novel strategies for the treatment of gastrointestinal diseases (e.g., IBD).

  4. Differential distribution of proteins expressed in companion cells in the sieve element-companion cell complex of rice plants.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Akari; Fujimaki, Syu; Mori, Tomoko; Suzui, Nobuo; Ishiyama, Keiki; Hayakawa, Toshihiko; Yamaya, Tomoyuki; Fujiwara, Toru; Yoneyama, Tadakatsu; Hayashi, Hiroaki

    2005-11-01

    Sieve tubes are comprised of sieve elements, enucleated cells that are incapable of RNA and protein synthesis. The proteins in sieve elements are supplied from the neighboring companion cells through plasmodesmata. In rice plants, it was unclear whether or not all proteins produced in companion cells had the same distribution pattern in the sieve element-companion cell complex. In this study, the distribution pattern of four proteins, beta-glucuronidase (GUS), green fluorescent protein (GFP), thioredoxin h (TRXh) and glutathione S-transferase (GST) were analyzed. The foreign proteins GUS and GFP were expressed in transgenic rice plants under the control of the TRXh gene promoter (PTRXh), a companion cell-specific promoter. Analysis of leaf cross-sections of PTRXh-GUS and PTRXh-GFP plants indicated high accumulation of GUS and GFP, respectively, in companion cells rather than in sieve elements. GUS and GFP were also detected in phloem sap collected from leaf sheaths of the transgenic rice plants, suggesting these proteins could enter sieve elements. Relative amounts of GFP and endogenous phloem proteins, TRXh and GST, in phloem sap and total leaf extracts were compared. Compared to TRXh and GST, GFP content was higher in total leaf extracts, but lower in phloem sap, suggesting that GFP accumulated mainly in companion cells rather than in sieve elements. On the other hand, TRXh and GST appeared to accumulate in sieve elements rather than in companion cells. These results indicate the evidence for differential distribution of proteins between sieve elements and companion cells in rice plants.

  5. Differential expression of estrogen receptor alpha in the embryonic adrenal-kidney-gonadal complex of the oviparous lizard, Calotes versicolor (Daud.).

    PubMed

    Inamdar, L S; Khodnapur, B S; Nindi, R S; Dasari, S; Seshagiri, P B

    2015-09-01

    Estrogen signalling is critical for ovarian differentiation in reptiles with temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD). To elucidate the involvement of estrogen in this process, adrenal-kidney-gonadal (AKG) expression of estrogen receptor (ERα) was studied at female-producing temperature (FPT) in the developing embryos of the lizard, Calotes versicolor which exhibits a distinct pattern of TSD. The eggs of this lizard were incubated at 31.5±0.5°C (100% FPT). The torso of embryos containing adrenal-kidney-gonadal complex (AKG) was collected during different stages of development and subjected to Western blotting and immunohistochemistry analysis. The ERα antibody recognized two protein bands with apparent molecular weight ∼55 and ∼45kDa in the total protein extracts of embryonic AKG complex of C. versicolor. The observed results suggest the occurrence of isoforms of ERα. The differential expression of two different protein isoforms may reveal their distinct role in cell proliferation during gonadal differentiation. This is the first report to reveal two isoforms of the ERα in a reptile during development. Immunohistochemical studies reveal a weak, but specific, cytoplasmic ERα immunostaining exclusively in the AKG during late thermo-sensitive period suggesting the responsiveness of AKG to estrogens before gonadal differentiation at FPT. Further, cytoplasmic as well as nuclear expression of ERα in the medulla and in oogonia of the cortex (faint activity) at gonadal differentiation stage suggests that the onset of gonadal estrogen activity coincides with sexual differentiation of gonad. Intensity and pattern of the immunoreactions of ERα in the medullary region at FPT suggest endogenous production of estrogen which may act in a paracrine fashion to induce neighboring cells into ovarian differentiation pathway.

  6. DNA–PKcs–SIN1 complexation mediates low-dose X-ray irradiation (LDI)-induced Akt activation and osteoblast differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Yong; Fang, Shi-ji; Zhu, Li-juan; Zhu, Lun-qing; Zhou, Xiao-zhong

    2014-10-24

    Highlights: • LDI increases ALP activity, promotes type I collagen (Col I)/Runx2 mRNA expression. • LDI induces DNA–PKcs activation, which is required for osteoblast differentiation. • Akt activation mediates LDI-induced ALP activity and Col I/Runx2 mRNA increase. • DNA–PKcs–SIN1 complexation mediates LDI-induced Akt Ser-473 phosphorylation. • DNA–PKcs–SIN1 complexation is important for osteoblast differentiation. - Abstract: Low-dose irradiation (LDI) induces osteoblast differentiation, however the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. In this study, we explored the potential role of DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA–PKcs)–Akt signaling in LDI-induced osteoblast differentiation. We confirmed that LDI promoted mouse calvarial osteoblast differentiation, which was detected by increased alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity as well as mRNA expression of type I collagen (Col I) and runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2). In mouse osteoblasts, LDI (1 Gy) induced phosphorylation of DNA–PKcs and Akt (mainly at Ser-473). The kinase inhibitors against DNA–PKcs (NU-7026 and NU-7441) or Akt (LY294002, perifosine and MK-2206), as well as partial depletion of DNA–PKcs or Akt1 by targeted-shRNA, dramatically inhibited LDI-induced Akt activation and mouse osteoblast differentiation. Further, siRNA-knockdown of SIN1, a key component of mTOR complex 2 (mTORC2), also inhibited LDI-induced Akt Ser-473 phosphorylation as well as ALP activity increase and Col I/Runx2 expression in mouse osteoblasts. Co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP) assay results demonstrated that LDI-induced DNA–PKcs–SIN1 complexation, which was inhibited by NU-7441 or SIN1 siRNA-knockdown in mouse osteoblasts. In summary, our data suggest that DNA–PKcs–SIN1 complexation-mediated Akt activation (Ser-473 phosphorylation) is required for mouse osteoblast differentiation.

  7. Critical roles of mTOR Complex 1 and 2 for T follicular helper cell differentiation and germinal center responses.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jialong; Lin, Xingguang; Pan, Yun; Wang, Jinli; Chen, Pengcheng; Huang, Hongxiang; Xue, Hai-Hui; Gao, Jimin; Zhong, Xiao-Ping

    2016-09-30

    T follicular helper (Tfh) cells play critical roles for germinal center responses and effective humoral immunity. We report here that mTOR in CD4 T cells is essential for Tfh differentiation. In Mtor(f/f)-Cd4Cre mice, both constitutive and inducible Tfh differentiation is severely impaired, leading to defective germinal center B cell formation and antibody production. Moreover, both mTORC1 and mTORC2 contribute to Tfh and GC B cell development but may do so via distinct mechanisms. mTORC1 mainly promotes CD4 T cell proliferation to reach the cell divisions necessary for Tfh differentiation, while Rictor/mTORC2 regulates Tfh differentiation by promoting Akt activation and TCF1 expression without grossly influencing T cell proliferation. Together, our results reveal crucial but distinct roles for mTORC1 and mTORC2 in CD4 T cells during Tfh differentiation and germinal center responses.

  8. Differential and quantitative molecular analysis of ischemia complexity reduction by isotopic labeling of proteins using a neural embryonic stem cell model.

    PubMed

    Schrattenholz, A; Wozny, W; Klemm, M; Schroer, K; Stegmann, W; Cahill, M A

    2005-03-15

    The analysis of rapid changes of protein expression in living systems in response to insults requires rigorous methods of complexity reduction. To control dynamic pattern of hundreds or even thousands of protein isoforms, we applied a novel method of differential molecular analysis to a cellular model which is suited to study ischemia. Neural derivatives of murine embryonic stem cells were exposed to chemical ischemia. The model was used to obtain starting material for a quantitative differential proteomics analysis. Fractionation of phosphoproteins from these samples and subsequent identification by mass spectrometry of differential proteins provide proof of principle of how novel molecular analytical tools provide new insight into the network of neuroprotective molecular events during specific situations of neuronal stress and related pharmaceutical intervention. Our results indicate a particular role of an isoform of the acidic calcium-independent phospholipase A2 in this type of insult.

  9. The CCR4-NOT complex mediates deadenylation and degradation of stem cell mRNAs and promotes planarian stem cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Solana, Jordi; Gamberi, Chiara; Mihaylova, Yuliana; Grosswendt, Stefanie; Chen, Chen; Lasko, Paul; Rajewsky, Nikolaus; Aboobaker, A Aziz

    2013-01-01

    Post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms are of fundamental importance to form robust genetic networks, but their roles in stem cell pluripotency remain poorly understood. Here, we use freshwater planarians as a model system to investigate this and uncover a role for CCR4-NOT mediated deadenylation of mRNAs in stem cell differentiation. Planarian adult stem cells, the so-called neoblasts, drive the almost unlimited regenerative capabilities of planarians and allow their ongoing homeostatic tissue turnover. While many genes have been demonstrated to be required for these processes, currently almost no mechanistic insight is available into their regulation. We show that knockdown of planarian Not1, the CCR4-NOT deadenylating complex scaffolding subunit, abrogates regeneration and normal homeostasis. This abrogation is primarily due to severe impairment of their differentiation potential. We describe a stem cell specific increase in the mRNA levels of key neoblast genes after Smed-not1 knock down, consistent with a role of the CCR4-NOT complex in degradation of neoblast mRNAs upon the onset of differentiation. We also observe a stem cell specific increase in the frequency of longer poly(A) tails in these same mRNAs, showing that stem cells after Smed-not1 knock down fail to differentiate as they accumulate populations of transcripts with longer poly(A) tails. As other transcripts are unaffected our data hint at a targeted regulation of these key stem cell mRNAs by post-transcriptional regulators such as RNA-binding proteins or microRNAs. Together, our results show that the CCR4-NOT complex is crucial for stem cell differentiation and controls stem cell-specific degradation of mRNAs, thus providing clear mechanistic insight into this aspect of neoblast biology.

  10. The CCR4-NOT Complex Mediates Deadenylation and Degradation of Stem Cell mRNAs and Promotes Planarian Stem Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Solana, Jordi; Gamberi, Chiara; Mihaylova, Yuliana; Grosswendt, Stefanie; Chen, Chen; Lasko, Paul; Rajewsky, Nikolaus; Aboobaker, A. Aziz

    2013-01-01

    Post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms are of fundamental importance to form robust genetic networks, but their roles in stem cell pluripotency remain poorly understood. Here, we use freshwater planarians as a model system to investigate this and uncover a role for CCR4-NOT mediated deadenylation of mRNAs in stem cell differentiation. Planarian adult stem cells, the so-called neoblasts, drive the almost unlimited regenerative capabilities of planarians and allow their ongoing homeostatic tissue turnover. While many genes have been demonstrated to be required for these processes, currently almost no mechanistic insight is available into their regulation. We show that knockdown of planarian Not1, the CCR4-NOT deadenylating complex scaffolding subunit, abrogates regeneration and normal homeostasis. This abrogation is primarily due to severe impairment of their differentiation potential. We describe a stem cell specific increase in the mRNA levels of key neoblast genes after Smed-not1 knock down, consistent with a role of the CCR4-NOT complex in degradation of neoblast mRNAs upon the onset of differentiation. We also observe a stem cell specific increase in the frequency of longer poly(A) tails in these same mRNAs, showing that stem cells after Smed-not1 knock down fail to differentiate as they accumulate populations of transcripts with longer poly(A) tails. As other transcripts are unaffected our data hint at a targeted regulation of these key stem cell mRNAs by post-transcriptional regulators such as RNA-binding proteins or microRNAs. Together, our results show that the CCR4-NOT complex is crucial for stem cell differentiation and controls stem cell-specific degradation of mRNAs, thus providing clear mechanistic insight into this aspect of neoblast biology. PMID:24367277

  11. Mutations within the LINC-HELLP non-coding RNA differentially bind ribosomal and RNA splicing complexes and negatively affect trophoblast differentiation.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, Marie; Visser, Allerdien; Buabeng, Kwadwo M L; Poutsma, Ankie; van der Schors, Roel C; Oudejans, Cees B M

    2015-10-01

    LINC-HELLP, showing chromosomal linkage with the pregnancy-specific HELLP syndrome in Dutch families, reduces differentiation from a proliferative to an invasive phenotype of first-trimester extravillous trophoblasts. Here we show that mutations in LINC-HELLP identified in HELLP families negatively affect this trophoblast differentiation either by inducing proliferation rate or by causing cell cycle exit as shown by a decrease in both proliferation and invasion. As LincRNAs predominantly function through interactions with proteins, we identified the directly interacting proteins using chromatin isolation by RNA purification followed by protein mass spectrometry. We found 22 proteins predominantly clustering in two functional networks, i.e. RNA splicing and the ribosome. YBX1, PCBP1, PCBP2, RPS6 and RPL7 were validated, and binding to these proteins was influenced by the HELLP mutations carried. Finally, we show that the LINC-HELLP transcript levels are significantly upregulated in plasma of women in their first trimester of pregnancy compared with non-pregnant women, whereas this upregulation seems absent in a pilot set of patients later developing pregnancy complications, indicative of its functional significance in vivo.

  12. Erythroid differentiation of mouse erythroleukemia cells results in reorganization of protein-DNA complexes in the mouse beta maj globin promoter but not its distal enhancer.

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, P M; Shen, C K

    1993-01-01

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) induction of mouse erythroleukemia (MEL) cells represents a well-defined in vitro system of terminal erythroid differentiation. We have studied the molecular mechanisms of transcriptional activation of the mouse beta maj globin gene during MEL cell differentiation by analyzing nuclear factor-DNA interactions in vivo at the gene's upstream promoter and a distal enhancer, 5'HS-2. Genomic footprinting data indicate that three motifs, CAC, NF-E2/AP1, and GATA-1, of the 5'HS-2 enhancer are bound with nuclear factors in MEL cells both prior to and after DMSO induction. No obvious conformational change of these nuclear factor-DNA complexes could be detected upon terminal differentiation of MEL cells. On the other hand, DMSO induction of MEL cells leads to the formation of specific nuclear factor-DNA complexes at several transcriptional regulatory elements of the mouse beta maj globin upstream promoter. Our genomic footprinting data have interesting implications with respect to the molecular mechanisms of transcriptional regulation and chromatin change of the mouse beta maj globin gene during erythroid differentiation. Images PMID:8423777

  13. Usefulness of the GenoType MTBC Assay for Differentiating Species of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex in Cultures Obtained from Clinical Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Elvira; Weizenegger, Michael; Fahr, Anne-Marie; Rüsch-Gerdes, Sabine

    2004-01-01

    A novel DNA strip assay, GenoType MTBC, was evaluated for differentiation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex species from 77 positive liquid cultures in clinical practice. Species identification (M. tuberculosis [71 strains], Mycobacterium bovis subsp. bovis [5 strains], and Mycobacterium africanum subtype I [1 strain]) results were identical to conventional results. The sensitivity was slightly higher for this test than for the AccuProbe assay. PMID:15365028

  14. MiRNA-Mediated Regulation of the SWI/SNF Chromatin Remodeling Complex Controls Pluripotency and Endodermal Differentiation in Human ESCs.

    PubMed

    Wade, Staton L; Langer, Lee F; Ward, James M; Archer, Trevor K

    2015-10-01

    MicroRNAs and chromatin remodeling complexes represent powerful epigenetic mechanisms that regulate the pluripotent state. miR-302 is a strong inducer of pluripotency, which is characterized by a distinct chromatin architecture. This suggests that miR-302 regulates global chromatin structure; however, a direct relationship between miR-302 and chromatin remodelers has not been established. Here, we provide data to show that miR-302 regulates Brg1 chromatin remodeling complex composition in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) through direct repression of the BAF53a and BAF170 subunits. With the subsequent overexpression of BAF170 in hESCs, we show that miR-302's inhibition of BAF170 protein levels can affect the expression of genes involved in cell proliferation. Furthermore, miR-302-mediated repression of BAF170 regulates pluripotency by positively influencing mesendodermal differentiation. Overexpression of BAF170 in hESCs led to biased differentiation toward the ectoderm lineage during EB formation and severely hindered directed definitive endoderm differentiation. Taken together, these data uncover a direct regulatory relationship between miR-302 and the Brg1 chromatin remodeling complex that controls gene expression and cell fate decisions in hESCs and suggests that similar mechanisms are at play during early human development.

  15. Ski Regulates Muscle Terminal Differentiation by Transcriptional Activation of Myog in a Complex with Six1 and Eya3*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hong; Stavnezer, Ed

    2009-01-01

    Overexpression of the Ski pro-oncogene has been shown to induce myogenesis in non-muscle cells, to promote muscle hypertrophy in postnatal mice, and to activate transcription of muscle-specific genes. However, the precise role of Ski in muscle cell differentiation and its underlying molecular mechanism are not fully understood. To elucidate the involvement of Ski in muscle terminal differentiation, two retroviral systems were used to achieve conditional overexpression or knockdown of Ski in satellite cell-derived C2C12 myoblasts. We found that enforced expression of Ski promoted differentiation, whereas loss of Ski severely impaired it. Compromised terminal differentiation in the absence of Ski was likely because of the failure to induce myogenin (Myog) and p21 despite normal expression of MyoD. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and transcriptional reporter experiments showed that Ski occupied the endogenous Myog regulatory region and activated transcription from the Myog regulatory region upon differentiation. Transactivation of Myog was largely dependent on a MEF3 site bound by Six1, not on the binding site of MyoD or MEF2. Activation of the MEF3 site required direct interaction of Ski with Six1 and Eya3 mediated by the evolutionarily conserved Dachshund homology domain of Ski. Our results indicate that Ski is necessary for muscle terminal differentiation and that it exerts this role, at least in part, through its association with Six1 and Eya3 to regulate the Myog transcription. PMID:19008232

  16. Critical roles of mTOR Complex 1 and 2 for T follicular helper cell differentiation and germinal center responses

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jialong; Lin, Xingguang; Pan, Yun; Wang, Jinli; Chen, Pengcheng; Huang, Hongxiang; Xue, Hai-Hui; Gao, Jimin; Zhong, Xiao-Ping

    2016-01-01

    T follicular helper (Tfh) cells play critical roles for germinal center responses and effective humoral immunity. We report here that mTOR in CD4 T cells is essential for Tfh differentiation. In Mtorf/f-Cd4Cre mice, both constitutive and inducible Tfh differentiation is severely impaired, leading to defective germinal center B cell formation and antibody production. Moreover, both mTORC1 and mTORC2 contribute to Tfh and GC B cell development but may do so via distinct mechanisms. mTORC1 mainly promotes CD4 T cell proliferation to reach the cell divisions necessary for Tfh differentiation, while Rictor/mTORC2 regulates Tfh differentiation by promoting Akt activation and TCF1 expression without grossly influencing T cell proliferation. Together, our results reveal crucial but distinct roles for mTORC1 and mTORC2 in CD4 T cells during Tfh differentiation and germinal center responses. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17936.001 PMID:27690224

  17. Ephrin B1 regulates bone marrow stromal cell differentiation and bone formation by influencing TAZ transactivation via complex formation with NHERF1.

    PubMed

    Xing, Weirong; Kim, Jonghyun; Wergedal, Jon; Chen, Shin-Tai; Mohan, Subburaman

    2010-02-01

    Mutations of ephrin B1 in humans result in craniofrontonasal syndrome. Because little is known of the role and mechanism of action of ephrin B1 in bone, we examined the function of osteoblast-produced ephrin B1 in vivo and identified the molecular mechanism by which ephrin B1 reverse signaling regulates bone formation. Targeted deletion of the ephrin B1 gene in type 1alpha2 collagen-producing cells resulted in severe calvarial defects, decreased bone size, bone mineral density, and trabecular bone volume, caused by impairment in osterix expression and osteoblast differentiation. Coimmunoprecipitation of the TAZ complex with TAZ-specific antibody revealed a protein complex containing ephrin B1, PTPN13, NHERF1, and TAZ in bone marrow stromal (BMS) cells. Activation of ephrin B1 reverse signaling with soluble EphB2-Fc led to a time-dependent increase in TAZ dephosphorylation and shuttling from cytoplasm to nucleus. Treatment of BMS cells with exogenous EphB2-Fc resulted in a 4-fold increase in osterix expression as determined by Western blotting. Disruption of TAZ expression using specific lentivirus small hairpin RNA (shRNA) decreased TAZ mRNA by 80% and ephrin B1 reverse signaling-mediated increases in osterix mRNA by 75%. Knockdown of NHERF1 expression reduced basal levels of osterix expression by 90% and abolished ephrin B1-mediated induction of osterix expression. We conclude that locally produced ephrin B1 mediates its effects on osteoblast differentiation by a novel molecular mechanism in which activation of reverse signaling leads to dephosphorylation of TAZ and subsequent release of TAZ from the ephrin B1/NHERF1/TAZ complex to translocate to the nucleus to induce expression of the osterix gene and perhaps other osteoblast differentiation genes. Our findings provide strong evidence that ephrin B1 reverse signaling in osteoblasts is critical for BMS cell differentiation and bone formation.

  18. The dependance of neuronal reactions of the sensorimotor cortex to a simultaneous complex stimulus upon the level of differentiation of its components.

    PubMed

    Yunatov YuA; Perfil'ev, S N; Cherenkova, L V

    1993-01-01

    The change in the neuronal activity of the sensorimotor area of the cerebral cortex of the cat was investigated in awake animals as a function of the level of differentiation of the components of a simultaneous heteromodal complex stimulus. Two groups of neurons in the sensorimotor cortex were distinguished on the basis of the character of this relationship and a number of other parameters. It was shown that the parameters of the reactions of all neurons recorded to the positive conditional stimulus following the consolidation of the conditioned motoric reaction are established first. Such parameters of the responses as degree of manifestation, intensity, duration, and the length of the latent period changed in the process of development. The reactions of neurons of both groups to inhibitory signals were stabilized only after the consolidation of the differentiation skill. In the process only the pattern of the discharge changed in the neurons of the first group, while in the neurons of the second group, the degree of manifestation of the response, its sign, duration, and length of the latent period could vary. Fluctuations in the level of differentiation following the development of the inhibitory conditioned reactions had an effect only on the responses of the neurons of the second group to the components of the complex.

  19. Quantum state-resolved differential cross sections for complex-forming chemical reactions: Asymmetry is the rule, symmetry the exception

    SciTech Connect

    Larrégaray, Pascal Bonnet, Laurent

    2015-10-14

    We argue that statistical theories are generally unable to accurately predict state-resolved differential cross sections for triatomic bimolecular reactions studied in beam experiments, even in the idealized limit where the dynamics are fully chaotic. The basic reason is that quenching of interferences between partial waves is less efficient than intuitively expected, especially around the poles.

  20. Evaluation of the p-nitro-alpha-acetylamino-beta-hydroxypropiophenone differential test for identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex.

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, M A; Doerr, K A; Hempel, H O; Goodman, N L; Roberts, G D

    1985-01-01

    The p-nitro-alpha-acetylamino-beta-hydroxypropiophenone (NAP) differential test for the identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis recovered from clinical specimens was evaluated by two laboratories and found to be a rapid and accurate procedure with a specificity exceeding 99%. PMID:3921563

  1. VPS37 isoforms differentially modulate the ternary complex formation of ALIX, ALG-2, and ESCRT-I.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Mayumi; Katsuyama, Angela M; Shibata, Hideki; Maki, Masatoshi

    2013-01-01

    The endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) system comprises a series of protein complexes that play essential roles in multivesicular body (MVB) sorting of ubiquitylated membrane proteins, enveloped RNA virus budding, and cytokinesis in mammalian cells. The complex, named ESCRT-I, consists of four subunits (TSG101, VPS28, VPS37, and MVB12). There are four VPS37 isoforms. We have reported that ALIX (an ALG-2-interacting protein and accessory protein in the ESCRT system) is physically linked with TSG101 by ALG-2 in a Ca²⁺-dependent manner, but the role of ALG-2 as an adaptor protein for the ESCRT-I complex remains unknown. To characterize this adaptor function, initially we investigated the binding of ALG-2 to ESCRT-I complexes containing each one of the four different VPS37 isoforms by two approaches: first, Far-Western blot analysis with biotin-labeled ALG-2 probe, and second, a pulldown assay to determine the binding of the four recombinant ESCRT-I complexes to Strep-tagged ALG-2 after co-expression in HEK293T cells. VPS37B and VPS37C appeared to interact with ALG-2 in a stronger manner than TSG101 does. The results of in vitro binding assays using purified recombinant proteins indicated that ALG-2 functions as a Ca²⁺-dependent adaptor protein that bridges ALIX and ESCRT-I to form a ternary complex, ESCRT-I/ALIX/ALG-2.

  2. CXCR4 undergoes complex lineage and inducing agent-dependent dissociation of expression and functional responsiveness to SDF-1alpha during myeloid differentiation.

    PubMed

    Gupta, S K; Pillarisetti, K; Aiyar, N

    2001-09-01

    The CXC chemokine SDF-1 and its receptor CXCR4 mediate myelopoiesis, presumably by regulating the homing of hematopoietic progenitor cells. We used the inducible HL-60 cell line as a model system for comparative analysis of CXCR4 expression during differential maturation into the granulocytic or monocytic phenotypes. Five different measures of CXCR4 expression and functional coupling: mRNA and surface expression, SDF-1-mediated [(35)S]GTPgammaS binding, calcium flux, and chemotaxis were examined simultaneously. Granulocytic differentiation with dimethyl sulfoxide induced surface expression of CXCR4 as well as SDF-1-mediated [(35)S]GTPgammaS binding and chemotaxis, whereas calcium flux was attenuated by twofold to threefold in HL-60 cells. Conversely, monocytic differentiation with vitamin D(3) inhibited surface expression and SDF-1-mediated chemotaxis, even as it induced [(35)S]GTPgammaS binding and calcium flux by more than twofold. Sodium butyrate up-regulated all parameters of CXCR4 expression studied. Together, these results demonstrate that CXCR4 expression undergoes complex regulation at multiple checkpoints, with the likely involvement of different G-proteins for signal transduction during cellular differentiation and following activation with SDF-1.

  3. Differentiation of frogs from two populations belonging to the Pelophylax esculentus complex by LC-MS/MS comparison of their skin peptidomes.

    PubMed

    Samgina, Tatiana Yu; Artemenko, Konstantin A; Bergquist, Jonas; Trebse, Polonca; Torkar, Gregor; Tolpina, Miriam D; Lebedev, Albert T

    2017-03-01

    LC-MS/MS was applied to establish the composition of the skin peptidome of a Slovenian green frog belonging to the Pelophylax esculentus complex. As this was similar to the peptidome of the Moscow population of Pelophylax ridibundus, it allowed us to identify the Slovenian frog from the Pelophylax esculentus complex as Pelophylax ridibundus. The sequences of six new peptides from the brevinin 2 family are reported for the first time on the basis of manual interpretation of their tandem mass spectra. The structural similarity of the brevinin 2 peptides from the Moscow and Slovenian populations of Pelophylax ridibundus enables peptides from this family to be utilized as biomarkers for Pelophylax ridibundus inter- and intraspecies differentiation, and the proposed approach can be used as an analytical tool for differentiating the corresponding species and populations. The potential biological activities of the novel peptides were estimated by 2D mass mapping. The results allowed us to classify all of the available peptides belonging to the brevinin 2 family. Graphical Abstract Intraspecies identification within the green frog complex.

  4. Adaptive Differentiation in Seedling Traits in a Hybrid Pine Species Complex, Pinus densata and Its Parental Species, on the Tibetan Plateau

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Jingxiang; Mao, Jian-Feng; Zhao, Wei; Xing, Fangqian; Chen, Xinyu; Liu, Hao; Xing, Zhen; Wang, Xiao-Ru; Li, Yue

    2015-01-01

    Evidence from molecular genetics demonstrates that Pinus densata is a natural homoploid hybrid originating from the parent species Pinus tabuliformis and Pinus yunnanensis, and ecological selection may have played a role in the speciation of P. densata. However, data on differentiation in adaptive traits in the species complex are scarce. In this study, we performed a common garden test on 16 seedling traits to examine the differences between P. densata and its parental species in a high altitude environment. We found that among the 16 analyzed traits, 15 were significantly different among the species. Pinus tabuliformis had much earlier bud set and a relatively higher bud set ratio but poorer seedling growth, and P. yunnanensis had opposite responses for the same traits. P. densata had the greatest fitness with higher viability and growth rates than the parents. The relatively high genetic contribution of seedling traits among populations suggested that within each species the evolutionary background is complex. The correlations between the seedling traits of a population within a species and the environmental factors indicated different impacts of the environment on species evolution. The winter temperature is among the most important climate factors that affected the fitness of the three pine species. Our investigation provides empirical evidence on adaptive differentiation among this pine species complex at seedling stages. PMID:25757072

  5. Adaptive differentiation in seedling traits in a hybrid pine species complex, Pinus densata and its parental species, on the Tibetan Plateau.

    PubMed

    Meng, Jingxiang; Mao, Jian-Feng; Zhao, Wei; Xing, Fangqian; Chen, Xinyu; Liu, Hao; Xing, Zhen; Wang, Xiao-Ru; Li, Yue

    2015-01-01

    Evidence from molecular genetics demonstrates that Pinus densata is a natural homoploid hybrid originating from the parent species Pinus tabuliformis and Pinus yunnanensis, and ecological selection may have played a role in the speciation of P. densata. However, data on differentiation in adaptive traits in the species complex are scarce. In this study, we performed a common garden test on 16 seedling traits to examine the differences between P. densata and its parental species in a high altitude environment. We found that among the 16 analyzed traits, 15 were significantly different among the species. Pinus tabuliformis had much earlier bud set and a relatively higher bud set ratio but poorer seedling growth, and P. yunnanensis had opposite responses for the same traits. P. densata had the greatest fitness with higher viability and growth rates than the parents. The relatively high genetic contribution of seedling traits among populations suggested that within each species the evolutionary background is complex. The correlations between the seedling traits of a population within a species and the environmental factors indicated different impacts of the environment on species evolution. The winter temperature is among the most important climate factors that affected the fitness of the three pine species. Our investigation provides empirical evidence on adaptive differentiation among this pine species complex at seedling stages.

  6. Differential effects of buffer pH on Ca2+-induced ROS emission with inhibited mitochondrial complexes I and III

    PubMed Central

    Lindsay, Daniel P.; Camara, Amadou K. S.; Stowe, David F.; Lubbe, Ryan; Aldakkak, Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Excessive mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) emission is a critical component in the etiology of ischemic injury. Complex I and complex III of the electron transport chain are considered the primary sources of ROS emission during cardiac ischemia and reperfusion (IR) injury. Several factors modulate ischemic ROS emission, such as an increase in extra-matrix Ca2+, a decrease in extra-matrix pH, and a change in substrate utilization. Here we examined the combined effects of these factors on ROS emission from respiratory complexes I and III under conditions of simulated IR injury. Guinea pig heart mitochondria were suspended in experimental buffer at a given pH and incubated with or without CaCl2. Mitochondria were then treated with either pyruvate, a complex I substrate, followed by rotenone, a complex I inhibitor, or succinate, a complex II substrate, followed by antimycin A, a complex III inhibitor. H2O2 release rate and matrix volume were compared with and without adding CaCl2 and at pH 7.15, 6.9, or 6.5 with pyruvate + rotenone or succinate + antimycin A to simulate conditions that may occur during in vivo cardiac IR injury. We found a large increase in H2O2 release with high [CaCl2] and pyruvate + rotenone at pH 6.9, but not at pHs 7.15 or 6.5. Large increases in H2O2 release rate also occurred at each pH with high [CaCl2] and succinate + antimycin A, with the highest levels observed at pH 7.15. The increases in H2O2 release were associated with significant mitochondrial swelling, and both H2O2 release and swelling were abolished by cyclosporine A, a desensitizer of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP). These results indicate that ROS production by complex I and by complex III is differently affected by buffer pH and Ca2+ loading with mPTP opening. The study suggests that changes in the levels of cytosolic Ca2+ and pH during IR alter the relative amounts of ROS produced at mitochondrial respiratory complex I and complex III. PMID

  7. Dynamic casting of a graben complex: Syn-sedimentary infill and differential subsidence during the permo-carboniferous; Peace River Embayment, western Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Barclay, J.E. Univ. of Calgary, Alberta ); Krause, F.F. ); Campbell, R.R. Calamity Resources, Calgary, Alberta )

    1991-03-01

    The Carboniferous Stoddart Group and Permian Belloy Formation record infill of a long-lived graben complex in the center of the Peace River Embayment. The Dawson Creek Graben Complex began down-dropping during deposition of the Rundle Group and Golata Formation and reached its maximum during Kiskatinaw time. The overlying Taylor Flat Formation shows graben filling and graben decay; whereas the flat Permian Belloy Formation beds within and beyond graben limits indicate tectonic stability. The complex comprised the larger Fort St. John Graben and satellite Hines Creek, Whitelaw, and Cindy grabens. The grabens consist of kilometer-scale horst and graben blocks bounded by normal faults. The internal blocks subsided at various rates, with differential subsidence occurring in the form of horsts subsiding slower than neighboring grabens. Syn- and post-depositional growth-type normal faults controlled formation and bed thickness, as did inter- and intra-formation unconformities. From these observations, a structural/stratigraphic model can be constructed that explains the complex stratigraphy and depositional interpretations. This model describes a basin dominated by tectonic controls rather than global sea-level events. Syn- and post-sedimentary growth-type block faulting, differential subsidence of fault blocks, sedimentary infill, and unconformity truncation were the major controls on the basin. The model provides an analog to grabens and block-faulted basins of growth-faulted basins occurring elsewhere. The implications of the model to petroleum exploration are that all beds can be correlated by assuming that beds were essentially flat-lying prior to and during faulting. The combination of the block-faulted character and complex facies changes provides many structural and stratigraphic petroleum traps.

  8. Transcriptomic Analysis of Liquid Non-Sporulating Streptomyces coelicolor Cultures Demonstrates the Existence of a Complex Differentiation Comparable to That Occurring in Solid Sporulating Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Yagüe, Paula; Rodríguez-García, Antonio; López-García, María Teresa; Rioseras, Beatriz; Martín, Juan Francisco; Sánchez, Jesús; Manteca, Angel

    2014-01-01

    Streptomyces species produce many clinically relevant secondary metabolites and exhibit a complex development that includes hyphal differentiation and sporulation in solid cultures. Industrial fermentations are usually performed in liquid cultures, conditions in which Streptomyces strains generally do not sporulate, and it was traditionally assumed that no differentiation took place. The aim of this work was to compare the transcriptomes of S. coelicolor growing in liquid and solid cultures, deepening the knowledge of Streptomyces differentiation. Microarrays demonstrated that gene expression in liquid and solid cultures were comparable and data indicated that physiological differentiation was similar for both conditions. Eighty-six percent of all transcripts showed similar abundances in liquid and solid cultures, such as those involved in the biosynthesis of actinorhodin (actVA, actII-4) and undecylprodigiosin (redF); activation of secondary metabolism (absR1, ndsA); genes regulating hydrophobic cover formation (aerial mycelium) (bldB, bldC, bldM, bldN, sapA, chpC, chpD, chpE, chpH, ramA, ramC, ramS); and even some genes regulating early stages of sporulation (wblA, whiG, whiH, whiJ). The two most important differences between transcriptomes from liquid and solid cultures were: first, genes related to secondary metabolite biosynthesis (CDA, CPK, coelichelin, desferrioxamine clusters) were highly up-regulated in liquid but not in solid cultures; and second, genes involved in the final stages of hydrophobic cover/spore maturation (chpF, rdlA, whiE, sfr) were up-regulated in solid but not in liquid cultures. New information was also provided for several non-characterized genes differentially expressed in liquid and solid cultures which might be regulating, at least in part, the metabolic and developmental differences observed between liquid and solid cultures. PMID:24466012

  9. Transcriptomic analysis of liquid non-sporulating Streptomyces coelicolor cultures demonstrates the existence of a complex differentiation comparable to that occurring in solid sporulating cultures.

    PubMed

    Yagüe, Paula; Rodríguez-García, Antonio; López-García, María Teresa; Rioseras, Beatriz; Martín, Juan Francisco; Sánchez, Jesús; Manteca, Angel

    2014-01-01

    Streptomyces species produce many clinically relevant secondary metabolites and exhibit a complex development that includes hyphal differentiation and sporulation in solid cultures. Industrial fermentations are usually performed in liquid cultures, conditions in which Streptomyces strains generally do not sporulate, and it was traditionally assumed that no differentiation took place. The aim of this work was to compare the transcriptomes of S. coelicolor growing in liquid and solid cultures, deepening the knowledge of Streptomyces differentiation. Microarrays demonstrated that gene expression in liquid and solid cultures were comparable and data indicated that physiological differentiation was similar for both conditions. Eighty-six percent of all transcripts showed similar abundances in liquid and solid cultures, such as those involved in the biosynthesis of actinorhodin (actVA, actII-4) and undecylprodigiosin (redF); activation of secondary metabolism (absR1, ndsA); genes regulating hydrophobic cover formation (aerial mycelium) (bldB, bldC, bldM, bldN, sapA, chpC, chpD, chpE, chpH, ramA, ramC, ramS); and even some genes regulating early stages of sporulation (wblA, whiG, whiH, whiJ). The two most important differences between transcriptomes from liquid and solid cultures were: first, genes related to secondary metabolite biosynthesis (CDA, CPK, coelichelin, desferrioxamine clusters) were highly up-regulated in liquid but not in solid cultures; and second, genes involved in the final stages of hydrophobic cover/spore maturation (chpF, rdlA, whiE, sfr) were up-regulated in solid but not in liquid cultures. New information was also provided for several non-characterized genes differentially expressed in liquid and solid cultures which might be regulating, at least in part, the metabolic and developmental differences observed between liquid and solid cultures.

  10. Differential inhibition of mitochondrial respiratory complexes by inhalation of combustion smoke and carbon monoxide, in vivo, in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Lee, Heung M; Hallberg, Lance M; Greeley, George H; Englander, Ella W

    2010-08-01

    Combustion smoke contains gases and particulates, which act via hypoxia and cytotoxicity producing mechanisms to injure cells and tissues. While carbon monoxide (CO) is the major toxicant in smoke, its toxicity is exacerbated in the presence of other compounds. Here, we examined modulations of mitochondrial and cytosolic energy metabolism by inhalation of combustion smoke versus CO, in vivo, in the rat brain. Measurements revealed reduced activities of respiratory chain (RC) complexes, with greater inhibition by smoke than equivalent CO in ambient air. In the case of RC complex IV, inhibition by CO and smoke was similar--suggesting that complex IV inhibition is primarily by the action of CO. In contrast, inhibition of complexes I and III was greater by smoke. Increases in cytosolic lactate dehydrogenase and pyruvate kinase activities accompanied inhibition of RC complexes, likely reflecting compensatory increases in cytosolic energy production. Together, the data provide new insights into the mechanisms of smoke inhalation-induced perturbations of brain energetics, which impact neuronal function and contribute to the development of neuropathologies in survivors of exposures to CO and combustion smoke.

  11. [Differential diagnosis and treatment of complex renal cysts detected by ultrasound screening of the abdominal cavity organs].

    PubMed

    Ukhal', M I; Ukhal', E M; Kvasha, A N

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound screening of the abdominal cavity organs was performed in 98 patients, and renal cysts were revealed in 31 patientsare. 11 (26,6%) of 31 patients had renal cysts with complex structure. In 4 patients, complex cysts were located in parapelvic zone, in 7 patients - in different parts of the renal parenchyma. Pharmaco-Doppler sonography and computed tomography with bolus contrast enhancement in 7 patients with complex parenchymal cysts had revealed indirect signs of a malignant process - septums, thickening of the walls of cysts and septums, foci of calcination, increased blood circulation in the thickened renal cyst walls, venous stasis on the periphery of cysts and renal medulla, increasing the density of the thickened walls. Results of morphological studies have confirmed the presence of a malignant process in 5 of these 7 patients. In 4 patients with parapelvic cysts malignant process in ectomized layers was not revealed.

  12. A review of sleepwalking (somnambulism): the enigma of neurophysiology and polysomnography with differential diagnosis of complex partial seizures.

    PubMed

    Hughes, John R

    2007-12-01

    The goal of this report is to review all aspects of sleepwalking (SW), also known as somnambulism. Various factors seem to initiate SW, especially drugs, stress, and sleep deprivation. As an etiology, heredity is important, but other conditions include thyrotoxicosis, stress, and herpes simplex encephalitis. Psychological characteristics of sleepwalkers often include aggression, anxiety, panic disorder, and hysteria. Polysomnographic characteristics emphasize abnormal deep sleep associated with arousal and slow wave sleep fragmentation. In the differential diagnosis, the EEG is important to properly identify a seizure disorder, rather than SW. Associated disorders are Tourette's syndrome, sleep-disordered breathing, and migraine. Various kinds of treatment are discussed, as are legal considerations, especially murder during sleepwalking.

  13. The Dictyostelium prestalk inducer differentiation-inducing factor-1 (DIF-1) triggers unexpectedly complex global phosphorylation changes

    PubMed Central

    Sugden, Chris; Urbaniak, Michael D.; Araki, Tsuyoshi; Williams, Jeffrey G.

    2015-01-01

    Differentiation-inducing factor-1 (DIF-1) is a polyketide that induces Dictyostelium amoebae to differentiate as prestalk cells. We performed a global quantitative screen for phosphorylation changes that occur within the first minutes after addition of DIF-1, using a triple-label SILAC approach. This revealed a new world of DIF-1–controlled signaling, with changes in components of the MAPK and protein kinase B signaling pathways, components of the actinomyosin cytoskeletal signaling networks, and a broad range of small GTPases and their regulators. The results also provide evidence that the Ca2+/calmodulin–dependent phosphatase calcineurin plays a role in DIF-1 signaling to the DimB prestalk transcription factor. At the global level, DIF-1 causes a major shift in the phosphorylation/dephosphorylation equilibrium toward net dephosphorylation. Of interest, many of the sites that are dephosphorylated in response to DIF-1 are phosphorylated in response to extracellular cAMP signaling. This accords with studies that suggest an antagonism between the two inducers and also with the rapid dephosphorylation of the cAMP receptor that we observe in response to DIF-1 and with the known inhibitory effect of DIF-1 on chemotaxis to cAMP. All MS data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001555. PMID:25518940

  14. FfVel1 and FfLae1, components of a velvet-like complex in Fusarium fujikuroi, affect differentiation, secondary metabolism and virulence

    PubMed Central

    Wiemann, Philipp; Brown, Daren W.; Kleigrewe, Karin; Bok, Jin Woo; Keller, Nancy P.; Humpf, Hans-Ulrich; Tudzynski, Bettina

    2010-01-01

    Summary Besides industrially produced gibberellins (GAs), Fusarium fujikuroi is able to produce additional secondary metabolites such as the pigments bikaverin and neurosporaxanthin and the mycotoxins fumonisins and fusarin C. The global regulation of these biosynthetic pathways is only poorly understood. Recently, the velvet complex containing VeA and several other regulatory proteins was shown to be involved in global regulation of secondary metabolism and differentiation in Aspergillus nidulans. Here we report on the characterization of two components of the F. fujikuroi velvet-like complex, FfVel1 and FfLae1. The gene encoding this first reported LaeA ortholog outside the class of Eurotiomycetidae is upregulated in ΔFfvel1 microarray-studies and FfLae1 interacts with FfVel1 in the nucleus. Deletion of Ffvel1 and Fflae1 revealed for the first time that velvet can simultaneously act as positive (GAs, fumonisins and fusarin C) and negative (bikaverin) regulator of secondary metabolism, and that both components affect conidiation and virulence of F. fujikuroi. Furthermore, the velvet-like protein FfVel2 revealed similar functions regarding conidiation, secondary metabolism and virulence as FfVel1. Cross genus complementation studies of velvet complex component mutants between Fusarium, Aspergillus and Penicillium support an ancient origin for this complex which has undergone a divergence in specific functions mediating development and secondary metabolism. PMID:20572938

  15. Diversity and endemism in deglaciated areas: ploidy, relative genome size and niche differentiation in the Galium pusillum complex (Rubiaceae) in Northern and Central Europe

    PubMed Central

    Kolář, Filip; Lučanová, Magdalena; Vít, Petr; Urfus, Tomáš; Chrtek, Jindřich; Fér, Tomáš; Ehrendorfer, Friedrich; Suda, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims Plants endemic to areas covered by ice sheets during the last glaciation represent paradigmatic examples of rapid speciation in changing environments, yet very few systems outside the harsh arctic zone have been comprehensively investigated so far. The Galium pusillum aggregate (Rubiaceae) is a challenging species complex that exhibits a marked differentiation in boreal parts of Northern Europe. As a first step towards understanding its evolutionary history in deglaciated regions, this study assesses cytological variation and ecological preferences of the northern endemics and compares the results with corresponding data for species occurring in neighbouring unglaciated parts of Central and Western Europe. Methods DNA flow cytometry was used together with confirmatory chromosome counts to determine ploidy levels and relative genome sizes in 1158 individuals from 181 populations. A formalized analysis of habitat preferences was applied to explore niche differentiation among species and ploidy levels. Key Results The G. pusillum complex evolved at diploid and tetraploid levels in Northern Europe, in contrast to the high-polyploid evolution of most other northern endemics. A high level of eco-geographic segregation was observed between different species (particularly along gradients of soil pH and competition) which is unusual for plants in deglaciated areas and most probably contributes to maintaining species integrity. Relative monoploid DNA contents of the species from previously glaciated regions were significantly lower than those of their counterparts from mostly unglaciated Central Europe, suggesting independent evolutionary histories. Conclusions The aggregate of G. pusillum in Northern Europe represents an exceptional case with a geographically vicariant and ecologically distinct diploid/tetraploid species endemic to formerly glaciated areas. The high level of interspecific differentiation substantially widens our perception of the

  16. Differential generation of superoxide radical by rat phagocytes stimulated with IgA and IgG immune complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, P.A.; Ward, P.A.; Johnson K.J.

    1986-03-01

    Rat glycogen elicited peritoneal neutrophils and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) marcophages were stimulated with preformed immune complexes consisting of monoclonal IgG anti-dinitorphenol linked bovine serum albumin (DNP-BSA) or monoclonal IgA anti-DNP-BSA. Superoxide (O/sub 2//sup tau/) was detected using superoxide dismutase inhibitable reduction of ferricytochrome C. Neutrophils (2 x 10/sup 6/) generated small (<2.3 nmole/30 min.) quantities of O/sub 2//sup tau/ when stimulated with IgA-DNP-BAS in the presence or absence of cytochalasin B (1.25 ..mu..g/ml). There was a 4 to 8-fold, dose-dependent increase in O/sub 2//sup tau/ generation by neutrophils stimulated with IgG-DNP-BSA. Cytochalasin B was required to generate this quantity (up to 7.7 nmol/30 min.) of O/sub 2//sup tau/. Whether stimulated with IgG-DNP-BSA or IgA-DNP-BSA, BAL macrophages (5 x 10/sup 5/) generated more O/sub 2//sup tau/ in the absence of cytochalasin B than in its presence. Increased O/sub 2//sup tau/ generation by the immune complex stimulated BAL macrophages was dose-dependent and increased to 6-fold with IgG-DNP-BSA stimulated cells and up to 4-fold with IgA-DNP-BSA stimulated cells. These data corroborate published in vivo studies suggesting that IgA immune complex mediated tissue injury may be mediated by macrophages and not neutrophils. These data also suggest that the mechanisms for immune complex induced O/sub 2//sup tau/ generation may vary depending both on the phagocyte as well as on the stimulus.

  17. Differentiation of strains in Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex by DNA sequence polymorphisms, including rapid identification of M. bovis BCG.

    PubMed Central

    Frothingham, R

    1995-01-01

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex includes M. tuberculosis, M. bovis, M. microti, and M. africanum. Seven strains of the M. tuberculosis complex were sequenced in a region of about 300 bp which contains multiple 15-bp tandem repeats and which is part of a 1,551-bp open reading frame. Four distinct sequences were obtained, each defining a sequevar. A sequevar includes the strain or strains with a given sequence. The type strain M. tuberculosis TMC 102 (H37Rv) was designated sequevar MED-G. When compared to MED-G, sequevar LONG had an insertion of one 15-bp tandem repeat and sequevar SHORT had a deletion of one tandem repeat. Sequevar MED-C had a G-->C substitution, coding for the conservative change Ser-->Thr. BanI cuts only sequevar MED-C at the site of the substitution. PCR-restriction enzyme analysis was used to determine the sequevars of 92 M. tuberculosis complex strains. All 23 M. bovis BCG strains belonged to sequevar MED-C. The M. africanum type strain was sequevar SHORT. The remaining 68 strains of M. tuberculosis, M. bovis (not BCG), and M. microti were sequevars LONG (3 strains) or MED-G (65 strains). PCR-restriction enzyme analysis was applied to reference strains and clinical isolates with a worldwide distribution. This method provides rapid, sensitive, and specific identification of the important vaccine strain M. bovis BCG. PMID:7790448

  18. Differential effects of lesions of the amygdala and prefrontal cortex on recognizing facial expressions of complex emotions.

    PubMed

    Shaw, P; Bramham, J; Lawrence, E J; Morris, R; Baron-Cohen, S; David, A S

    2005-09-01

    Humans can detect facial expressions of both simple, basic emotions and expressions reflecting more complex states of mind. The latter includes emotional expressions that regulate social interactions ("social expressions" such as looking hostile or friendly) and expressions that reflect the inner thought state of others ("cognitive expressions" such as looking pensive). To explore the neural substrate of this skill, we examined performance on a test of detection of such complex expressions in patients with lesions of the temporal lobe (n = 54) or frontal lobe (n = 31). Of the temporal group, 18 had unilateral focal lesions of the amygdala and of the frontal group, 14 patients had unilateral lesions of the ventromedial prefrontal cortex-two regions held to be pivotal in mediating social cognitive skills. Damage to either the left or right amygdala was associated with impairment in the recognition of both social and cognitive expressions, despite an intact ability to extract information relating to invariant physical attributes. Lesions to all of the right prefrontal cortex-not just the ventromedial portions-led to a specific deficit in recognizing complex social expressions with a negative valence. The deficit in the group with right prefrontal cortical damage may contribute to the disturbances in social behavior associated with such lesions. The results also suggest that the amygdala has a role in processing a wide range of emotional expressions.

  19. Differential binding partners of the Mis18α/β YIPPEE domains regulates the Mis18 complex recruitment to centromeres

    PubMed Central

    Knippler, Christina M.; Foltz, Daniel R.

    2016-01-01

    The Mis18 complex specifies the site of new CENP-A nucleosome assembly by recruiting the CENP-A specific assembly factor HJURP (Holliday junction recognition protein). The human Mis18 complex consists of Mis18α, Mis18β and Mis18 binding protein 1 (Mis18BP1/hsKNL2). Although Mis18α and Mis18β are highly homologous proteins, we find that their conserved YIPPEE domains mediate distinct interactions that are essential to link new CENP-A deposition to existing centromeres. We find that Mis18α directly interacts with the N-terminus of Mis18BP1; whereas, Mis18β directly interacts with CENP-C during G1 phase, revealing that these proteins have evolved to serve distinct functions in centromeres of higher eukaryotes. The N-terminus of Mis18BP1, containing both the Mis18α and CENP-C binding domains, is necessary and sufficient for centromeric localization. Therefore, the Mis18 complex contains dual CENP-C recognition motifs that are combinatorially required to generate robust centromeric localization that leads to CENP-A deposition. PMID:27239045

  20. Automating Embedded Analysis Capabilities and Managing Software Complexity in Multiphysics Simulation, Part II: Application to Partial Differential Equations

    DOE PAGES

    Pawlowski, Roger P.; Phipps, Eric T.; Salinger, Andrew G.; ...

    2012-01-01

    A template-based generic programming approach was presented in Part I of this series of papers [Sci. Program. 20 (2012), 197–219] that separates the development effort of programming a physical model from that of computing additional quantities, such as derivatives, needed for embedded analysis algorithms. In this paper, we describe the implementation details for using the template-based generic programming approach for simulation and analysis of partial differential equations (PDEs). We detail several of the hurdles that we have encountered, and some of the software infrastructure developed to overcome them. We end with a demonstration where we present shape optimization and uncertaintymore » quantification results for a 3D PDE application.« less

  1. Genetic differentiation of oak populations within the Quercus robur/Quercus petraea complex in Central and Eastern Europe.

    PubMed

    Gömöry, D; Yakovlev, I; Zhelev, P; Jedináková, J; Paule, L

    2001-05-01

    Genetic structure of 25 indigenous populations of sessile and pedunculate oaks (Quercus petraea and Q. robur), originating from three geographical regions: Slovakia, Bulgaria and the Republic Mari-El (Russia), was investigated using isozyme markers. Mean number of alleles per locus ranged between 1.8 and 2.6 in Q. robur populations and from 2.0 to 3.0 in Q. petraea populations; slightly higher expected heterozygosity values were found in Q. robur compared to Q. petraea. One locus, coding for a substrate-nonspecific dehydrogenase, differentiated the two species. The interspecific component of gene diversity was 46.7% at this locus, compared to 0.4-7.8% at the remaining loci.

  2. Differentiation of the DnaA-oriC subcomplex for DNA unwinding in a replication initiation complex.

    PubMed

    Ozaki, Shogo; Noguchi, Yasunori; Hayashi, Yasuhisa; Miyazaki, Erika; Katayama, Tsutomu

    2012-10-26

    In Escherichia coli, ATP-DnaA multimers formed on the replication origin oriC promote duplex unwinding, which leads to helicase loading. Based on a detailed functional analysis of the oriC sequence motifs, we previously proposed that the left half of oriC forms an ATP-DnaA subcomplex competent for oriC unwinding, whereas the right half of oriC forms a distinct ATP-DnaA subcomplex that facilitates helicase loading. However, the molecular basis for the functional difference between these ATP-DnaA subcomplexes remains unclear. By analyzing a series of novel DnaA mutants, we found that structurally distinct DnaA multimers form on each half of oriC. DnaA AAA+ domain residues Arg-227 and Leu-290 are specifically required for oriC unwinding. Notably, these residues are required for the ATP-DnaA-specific structure of DnaA multimers in complex with the left half of oriC but not for that with the right half. These results support the idea that the ATP-DnaA multimers formed on oriC are not uniform and that they can adopt different conformations. Based on a structural model, we propose that Arg-227 and Leu-290 play a crucial role in inter-ATP-DnaA interaction and are a prerequisite for the formation of unwinding-competent DnaA subcomplexes on the left half of oriC. These residues are not required for the interaction with DnaB, nucleotide binding, or regulatory DnaA-ATP hydrolysis, which further supports their important role in inter-DnaA interaction. The corresponding residues are evolutionarily conserved and are required for unwinding in the initial complexes of Thermotoga maritima, an ancient hyperthermophile. Therefore, our findings suggest a novel and common mechanism for ATP-DnaA-dependent activation of initial complexes.

  3. Geographical differentiation of the Euchiloglanis fish complex (Teleostei: Siluriformes) in the Hengduan Mountain Region, China: Phylogeographic evidence of altered drainage patterns.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanping; Ludwig, Arne; Peng, Zuogang

    2017-02-01

    The uplift of the Tibetan Plateau caused significant ecogeographical changes that had a major impact on the exchange and isolation of regional fauna and flora. Furthermore, Pleistocene glacial oscillations were linked to temporal large-scale landmass and drainage system reconfigurations near the Hengduan Mountain Region and might have facilitated speciation and promoted biodiversity in southwestern China. However, strong biotic evidence supporting this role is lacking. Here, we use the Euchiloglanis fish species complex as a model to demonstrate the compound effects of the Tibetan Plateau uplift and Pleistocene glacial oscillations on species formation in this region. The genetic structure and geographical differentiation of the Euchiloglanis complex in four river systems within the Hengduan Mountain Region were deduced using the cytochrome b (cyt b) gene and 10 microsatellite loci from 360 to 192 individuals, respectively. The results indicated that the populations were divided into four independently evolving lineages, in which the populations from the Qingyi River and Jinsha River formed two sub-lineages. Phylogenetic relationships were structured by geographical isolation, especially near drainage systems. Divergence time estimation analyses showed that the Euchiloglanis complex diverged from its sister clade Pareuchiloglanis sinensis at around 1.3 Million years ago (Ma). Within the Euchiloglanis complex, the divergence time between the Dadu-Yalong and Jinsha-Qingyi River populations occurred at 1.0 Ma. This divergence time was in concordance with recent geological events, including the Kun-Huang Movement (1.2-0.6 Ma) and the lag time (<2.0 Ma) of river incision in the Hengduan Mountain Region. Population expansion signals were detected from mismatched distribution analyses, and the expansion times were concurrent with Pleistocene glacier fluctuations. Therefore, current phylogeographic patterns of the Euchiloglanis fish complex in the Hengduan Mountain

  4. Evaluation of a rapid radiometric differentiation test for the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex by selective inhibition with p-nitro-alpha-acetylamino-beta-hydroxypropiophenone

    SciTech Connect

    Laszlo, A.; Siddiqi, S.H.

    1984-05-01

    This study is an evaluation of a rapid technique for the differentiation of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex from other mycobacteria, using p-nitro-alpha-acetylamino-beta- hydroxypropiophenone (NAP) as a selective inhibitory agent. A total of 416 coded cultures, 234 cultures belonging to the M. tuberculosis complex and 182 cultures belonging to 35 other mycobacterial species, were tested in two laboratories for p-nitro-alpha-acetylamino-beta- hydroxypropiophenone inhibition to concentrations of 5 and 10 micrograms of NAP per ml in Middlebrook 7H12 liquid medium. Two testing modes were compared: the indirect, in which a large bacterial inoculum was used from an isolated culture on a solid medium, and the direct, which used a small inoculum from 7H12 medium. A decrease or no increase in daily /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ output as measured by a BACTEC system was considered evidence of inhibition. The data presented show that a concentration of 5 micrograms of NAP per ml can effectively separate the M. tuberculosis complex from other mycobacterial species in 4 to 6 days. The direct test data show that, unlike other conventional biochemical tests, it does not require a heavy inoculum of mycobacteria and can therefore be performed soon after growth is detected by the radiometric method.

  5. Changes in Search Path Complexity and Length During Learning of a Virtual Water Maze: Age Differences and Differential Associations with Hippocampal Subfield Volumes.

    PubMed

    Daugherty, Ana M; Bender, Andrew R; Yuan, Peng; Raz, Naftali

    2016-06-01

    Impairment of hippocampus-dependent cognitive processes has been proposed to underlie age-related deficits in navigation. Animal studies suggest a differential role of hippocampal subfields in various aspects of navigation, but that hypothesis has not been tested in humans. In this study, we examined the association between volume of hippocampal subfields and age differences in virtual spatial navigation. In a sample of 65 healthy adults (age 19-75 years), advanced age was associated with a slower rate of improvement operationalized as shortening of the search path over 25 learning trials on a virtual Morris water maze task. The deficits were partially explained by greater complexity of older adults' search paths. Larger subiculum and entorhinal cortex volumes were associated with a faster decrease in search path complexity, which in turn explained faster shortening of search distance. Larger Cornu Ammonis (CA)1-2 volume was associated with faster distance shortening, but not in path complexity reduction. Age differences in regional volumes collectively accounted for 23% of the age-related variance in navigation learning. Independent of subfield volumes, advanced age was associated with poorer performance across all trials, even after reaching the asymptote. Thus, subiculum and CA1-2 volumes were associated with speed of acquisition, but not magnitude of gains in virtual maze navigation.

  6. Histone chaperones ASF1 and NAP1 differentially modulate removal of active histone marks by LID-RPD3 complexes during NOTCH silencing.

    PubMed

    Moshkin, Yuri M; Kan, Tsung Wai; Goodfellow, Henry; Bezstarosti, Karel; Maeda, Robert K; Pilyugin, Maxim; Karch, Francois; Bray, Sarah J; Demmers, Jeroen A A; Verrijzer, C Peter

    2009-09-24

    Histone chaperones are involved in a variety of chromatin transactions. By a proteomics survey, we identified the interaction networks of histone chaperones ASF1, CAF1, HIRA, and NAP1. Here, we analyzed the cooperation of H3/H4 chaperone ASF1 and H2A/H2B chaperone NAP1 with two closely related silencing complexes: LAF and RLAF. NAP1 binds RPD3 and LID-associated factors (RLAF) comprising histone deacetylase RPD3, histone H3K4 demethylase LID/KDM5, SIN3A, PF1, EMSY, and MRG15. ASF1 binds LAF, a similar complex lacking RPD3. ASF1 and NAP1 link, respectively, LAF and RLAF to the DNA-binding Su(H)/Hairless complex, which targets the E(spl) NOTCH-regulated genes. ASF1 facilitates gene-selective removal of the H3K4me3 mark by LAF but has no effect on H3 deacetylation. NAP1 directs high nucleosome density near E(spl) control elements and mediates both H3 deacetylation and H3K4me3 demethylation by RLAF. We conclude that histone chaperones ASF1 and NAP1 differentially modulate local chromatin structure during gene-selective silencing.

  7. Complex changes in the apoptotic and cell differentiation programs during initiation of the hair follicle response to chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Sharova, Tatyana Y; Poterlowicz, Krzysztof; Botchkareva, Natalia V; Kondratiev, Nikita A; Aziz, Ahmar; Spiegel, Jeffrey H; Botchkarev, Vladimir A; Sharov, Andrey A

    2014-12-01

    Chemotherapy has severe side effects in normal rapidly proliferating organs, such as hair follicles, and causes massive apoptosis in hair matrix keratinocytes followed by hair loss. To define the molecular signature of hair follicle response to chemotherapy, human scalp hair follicles cultured ex vivo were treated with doxorubicin (DXR), and global microarray analysis was performed 3 hours after treatment. Microarray data revealed changes in expression of 504 genes in DXR-treated hair follicles versus controls. Among these genes, upregulations of several tumor necrosis factor family of apoptotic receptors (FAS, TRAIL (tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand) receptors 1/2), as well as of a large number of keratin-associated protein genes, were seen after DXR treatment. Hair follicle apoptosis induced by DXR was significantly inhibited by either TRAIL-neutralizing antibody or caspase-8 inhibitor, thus suggesting a previously unreported role for TRAIL receptor signaling in mediating DXR-induced hair loss. These data demonstrate that the early phase of the hair follicle response to DXR includes upregulation of apoptosis-associated markers, as well as substantial reorganization of the terminal differentiation programs in hair follicle keratinocytes. These data provide an important platform for further studies toward the design of effective approaches for the management of chemotherapy-induced hair loss.

  8. Differential roles of the glycogen-binding domains of beta subunits in regulation of the Snf1 kinase complex.

    PubMed

    Mangat, Simmanjeet; Chandrashekarappa, Dakshayini; McCartney, Rhonda R; Elbing, Karin; Schmidt, Martin C

    2010-01-01

    Members of the AMP-activated protein kinase family, including the Snf1 kinase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, are activated under conditions of nutrient stress. AMP-activated protein kinases are heterotrimeric complexes composed of a catalytic alpha subunit and regulatory beta and gamma subunits. In this study, the role of the beta subunits in the regulation of Snf1 activity was examined. Yeasts express three isoforms of the AMP-activated protein kinase consisting of Snf1 (alpha), Snf4 (gamma), and one of three alternative beta subunits, either Sip1, Sip2, or Gal83. The Gal83 isoform of the Snf1 complex is the most abundant and was analyzed in the greatest detail. All three beta subunits contain a conserved domain referred to as the glycogen-binding domain. The deletion of this domain from Gal83 results in a deregulation of the Snf1 kinase, as judged by a constitutive activity independent of glucose availability. In contrast, the deletion of this homologous domain from the Sip1 and Sip2 subunits had little effect on Snf1 kinase regulation. Therefore, the different Snf1 kinase isoforms are regulated through distinct mechanisms, which may contribute to their specialized roles in different stress response pathways. In addition, the beta subunits are subjected to phosphorylation. The responsible kinases were identified as being Snf1 and casein kinase II. The significance of the phosphorylation is unclear since the deletion of the region containing the phosphorylation sites in Gal83 had little effect on the regulation of Snf1 in response to glucose limitation.

  9. Mutation of a Drosophila gamma tubulin ring complex subunit encoded by discs degenerate-4 differentially disrupts centrosomal protein localization

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, Vitor; Yamamoto, Rochele R.; Henderson, Daryl S.; Glover, David M.

    2000-01-01

    We have cloned the Drosophila gene discs degenerate-4 (dd4) and find that it encodes a component of the γ-tubulin ring complex (γTuRC) homologous to Spc98 of budding yeast. This provides the first opportunity to study decreased function of a member of the γ-tubulin ring complex, other than γ-tubulin itself, in a metazoan cell. γ-tubulin is no longer at the centrosomes but is dispersed throughout dd4 cells and yet bipolar metaphase spindles do form, although these have a dramatically decreased density of microtubules. Centrosomin (CNN) remains in broad discrete bodies but only at the focused poles of such spindles, whereas Asp (abnormal spindle protein) is always present at the presumptive minus ends of microtubules, whether or not they are focused. This is consistent with the proposed role of Asp in coordinating the nucleation of mitotic microtubule organizing centers. The centrosome associated protein CP190 is partially lost from the spindle poles in dd4 cells supporting a weak interaction with γ-tubulin, and the displaced protein accumulates in the vicinity of chromosomes. Electron microscopy indicates not only that the poles of dd4 cells have irregular amounts of pericentriolar material, but also that they can have abnormal centrioles. In six dd4 cells subjected to serial sectioning centrioles were missing from one of the two poles. This suggests that in addition to its role in nucleating cytoplasmic and spindle microtubules, the γTuRC is also essential to the structure of centrioles and the separation of centrosomes. PMID:11124805

  10. Differential expression of voltage-gated K+ currents in medial septum/diagonal band complex neurons exhibiting distinct firing phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Garrido-Sanabria, Emilio R; Perez-Cordova, Miriam G; Colom, Luis V

    2011-08-01

    The medial septum/diagonal band complex (MSDB) controls hippocampal excitability, rhythms and plastic processes. Medial septal neuronal populations display heterogeneous firing patterns. In addition, some of these populations degenerate during age-related disorders (e.g. cholinergic neurons). Thus, it is particularly important to examine the intrinsic properties of theses neurons in order to create new agents that effectively modulate hippocampal excitability and enhance memory processes. Here, we have examined the properties of voltage-gated, K(+) currents in electrophysiologically-identified neurons. These neurons were taken from young rat brain slices containing the MS/DB complex. Whole-cell, patch recordings of outward currents were obtained from slow firing, fast-spiking, regular-firing and burst-firing neurons. Slow firing neurons showed depolarization-activated K(+) current peaks and densities larger than in other neuronal subtypes. Slow firing total current exhibited an inactivating A-type current component that activates at subthreshold depolarization and was reliably blocked by high concentrations of 4-AP. In addition, slow firing neurons expressed a low-threshold delayed rectifier K(+) current component with slow inactivation and intermediate sensitivity to tetraethylammonium. Fast-spiking neurons exhibited the smaller I(K) and I(A) current densities. Burst and regular firing neurons displayed an intermediate firing phenotype with I(K) and I(A) current densities that were larger than the ones observed in fast-spiking neurons but smaller than the ones observed in slow-firing neurons. In addition, the prevalence of each current differed among electrophysiological groups with slow firing and regular firing neurons expressing mostly I(A) and fast spiking and bursting neurons exhibiting mostly delayer rectifier K(+) currents with only minimal contributions of the I(A). The pharmacological or genetic modulations of these currents constitute an important target

  11. Isolation and characterization of human and mouse ZIRTL, a member of the IRT1 family of transporters, mapping within the epidermal differentiation complex.

    PubMed

    Lioumi, M; Ferguson, C A; Sharpe, P T; Freeman, T; Marenholz, I; Mischke, D; Heizmann, C; Ragoussis, J

    1999-12-01

    We report the precise mapping and characterization of ZIRTL (zinc-iron regulated transporter-like) gene, the first mammalian member of an extensive family of divalent metal ion transporters, comprising IRT1 and ZIP1, ZIP2, ZIP3, and ZIP4 in plants and ZRT1 and ZRT2 in yeast. The human gene maps at the telomeric end of the epidermal differentiation complex (EDC), within chromosomal band 1q21, while the mouse gene maps within the mouse EDC, on mouse chromosome 3, between S100A9 and S100A13. The structure of the human gene has been determined, and message was detected in most adult and fetal tissues including the epidermis. The mouse gene is developmentally regulated and found expressed in fetal and adult suprabasal epidermis, osteoblasts, small intestine, and salivary gland.

  12. VERDANDI Is a Direct Target of the MADS Domain Ovule Identity Complex and Affects Embryo Sac Differentiation in Arabidopsis[W

    PubMed Central

    Matias-Hernandez, Luis; Battaglia, Raffaella; Galbiati, Francesca; Rubes, Marco; Eichenberger, Christof; Grossniklaus, Ueli; Kater, Martin M.; Colombo, Lucia

    2010-01-01

    In Arabidopsis thaliana, the three MADS box genes SEEDSTICK (STK), SHATTERPROOF1 (SHP1), and SHP2 redundantly regulate ovule development. Protein interaction studies have shown that a multimeric complex composed of the ovule identity proteins together with the SEPALLATA MADS domain proteins is necessary to determine ovule identity. Despite the extensive knowledge that has become available about these MADS domain transcription factors, little is known regarding the genes that they regulate. Here, we show that STK, SHP1, and SHP2 redundantly regulate VERDANDI (VDD), a putative transcription factor that belongs to the plant-specific B3 superfamily. The vdd mutant shows defects during the fertilization process resulting in semisterility. Analysis of the vdd mutant female gametophytes indicates that antipodal and synergid cell identity and/or differentiation are affected. Our results provide insights into the pathways regulated by the ovule identity factors and the role of the downstream target gene VDD in female gametophyte development. PMID:20581305

  13. Using Isomap to differentiate between anthropogenic and natural effects on groundwater dynamics in a complex geological setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boettcher, Steven; Merz, Christoph; Lischeid, Gunnar

    2015-04-01

    The water budget of many catchments has vastly changed throughout the last decades. Intensified land use and increased water withdrawal for drinking water production and irrigation are likely to intensify pressure on water resources. According to model predictions, changing rainfall intensity, duration and spatial distribution in conjunction with increasing temperatures will worsen the situation in the future. The current water resources management has to adapt to these negative developments and to account for competing demands and threats. Essential for successful management applications is the identification and the quantification of the cause-and-effect chains driving the hydrological behavior of a catchment on the scale of management. It needs to check direction and magnitude of intended effects of measures taken as well as to identify unintended side effects that interact with natural effects in heterogeneous environments (Wood et al., 1988; Bloschl and Sivapalan, 1995). Therefore, these tools have to be able to distinguish between natural and anthropogenic driven impacts, even in complex geological settings like the Pleistocene landscape of North-East Germany. This study presents an approach that utilizes monitoring data to detect and quantitatively describe the predominant processes or factors of an observed hydrological system. The multivariate data analysis involves a non-linear dimension reduction method called Isometric Feature Mapping (Isomap, Tenenbaum et al., 2000) to extract information about the causes for the observed dynamics. Ordination methods like Isomap are used to derive a meaningful low-dimensional representation of a complex, high-dimensional data set. The approach is based on the hypothesis, that the number of processes which explain the variance of the data is relative low although the intensity of the processes varies in time and space. Therefore, the results can be interpreted in reference to the effective hydrological processes which

  14. Complex permittivity measurement as a new noninvasive tool for monitoring in vitro tissue engineering and cell signature through the detection of cell proliferation, differentiation, and pretissue formation.

    PubMed

    Bagnaninchi, Pierre-Olivier; Dikeakos, Maria; Veres, Teodor; Tabrizian, Maryam

    2004-12-01

    In in vitro tissue engineering, microporous scaffolds are commonly used to promote cell proliferation and differentiation in three-dimensional structures. Classic measurement methods are particularly time consuming, difficult to handle, and destructive. In this study, a new nondestructive method based on complex permittivity measurement (CPM) is proposed to monitor and track the osteoblast and macrophage differentiation through their morphological variation upon cell attachment and proliferation inside the microporous scaffolds. CPM is performed using a vector network analyzer and a dielectric probe under sterile conditions in a laminar-flow hood. A suitable effective medium approximation (EMA) is applied to fit the data in order to extract the parameters of the different constituents. Our data show that the EMA depolarization factor can be monitored to assess the variation of cell morphology characterizing cell attachment. Discrimination between two batches of scaffolds seeded, respectively, with 2 million and 1 million osteoblast cells is possible; the ratio of their CPM-derived cell volume fractions is in agreement with the ratio of their cell seeding numbers. In addition, cell proliferation inside scaffolds seeded with osteoblasts cultured in alpha minimum essential medium and inside scaffolds seeded with osteoblasts cultured in alpha minimum essential medium supplemented to induce the formation of extracellular matrix is monitored via CPM over several days. CPM-determined cell volume fraction is compared to DNA assay cell counts. Extracellular matrix formation and cell presence was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. A set of three signature parameters (epsilon'mem, epsilon'cyt, kappa'cyt) characteristic of cell line is extracted from CPM. Distinct signatures are recorded for osteoblasts and macrophages, thus confirming the ability of CPM to discriminate between different cell types. This study demonstrates the potential of CPM as a diagnostic tool to

  15. Lanthanide(III)/actinide(III) differentiation in coordination of azine molecules to tris(cyclopentadienyl) complexes of cerium and uranium.

    PubMed

    Mehdoui, Thouraya; Berthet, Jean-Claude; Thuéry, Pierre; Ephritikhine, Michel

    2004-02-21

    Reaction of azine molecules L with the trivalent metallocenes [M(C5H4R)3](M = Ce, U; R = But, SiMe3) in toluene gave the Lewis base adducts [M(C5H4R)3(L)](L = pyridine, 3-picoline, 3,5-lutidine, 3-chloropyridine, pyridazine, pyrimidine, pyrazine, 3,5-dimethylpyrazine and s-triazine), except in the cases of M = U and L = 3-chloropyridine, pyridazine, pyrazine and s-triazine where oxidation of U(III) was found to occur. In the pairs of analogous compounds of Ce(III) and U(III), i.e.[M(C5H4But)3(L)](L = pyridine, picoline) and [M(C5H4SiMe3)3(L)](L = pyridine, lutidine, pyrimidine and dimethylpyrazine), the M-N and average M-C distances are longer for M = Ce than for M = U; however, within a series of azine adducts of the same metallocene, no significant variation is noted in the M-N and average M-C distances. The equilibria between [M(C5H4R)3], L and [M(C5H4R)3(L)] were studied by 1H NMR spectroscopy. The stability constants of the uranium complexes, KUL, are greater than those of the cerium counterparts, KCeL. The values of KML are much greater for R = SiMe3 than for R = But and a linear correlation is found between the logarithms of KML and the hydrogen-bond basicity pKHB scale of the azines. Thermodynamic parameters indicate that the enthalpy-entropy compensation effect holds for these complexation reactions. Competition reactions of [Ce(C5H4R)3] and [U(C5H4R)3] with L show that the selectivity of L in favour of U(III) increases with the [small pi] donor character of the metallocene and is proportional to the pi accepting ability of the azine molecule, measured by its reduction potential.

  16. Evaluation of a simple in-house test to presumptively differentiate Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex from nontuberculous mycobacteria by detection of p-nitrobenzoic acid metabolites.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guirong; Yu, Xia; Liang, Qian; Chen, Suting; Wilson, Stuart; Huang, Hairong

    2013-01-01

    The timely differentiation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC) and non-tubercular mycobacterium (NTM) species is urgently needed in patient care since the routine laboratory method is time consuming and cumbersome. An easy and cheap method which can successfully distinguish MTC from NTM was established and evaluated. 38 mycobacterial type and reference strains and 65 clinical isolates representing 10 species of mycobacterium were included in this study. Metabolites of p-nitrobenzoic acid (PNB) reduction were identified using liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS). A spectrophotometric method was developed to detect these metabolites, which was evaluated on a number of MTC and NTM species. All of the tested NTM species and strains reduced PNB to p-aminobenzoic acid (PABA), while none of the MTC strains showed a similar activity. Spectrophotometric detection of PABA had 100% sensitivity and specificity for MTC and NTM differentiation among the type strains and the clinical isolates tested. PABA was identified as one of the metabolites of PNB reduction. All the tested NTM species metabolized PNB to PABA whereas the MTC members lacked this activity. A simple, specific and cost-effective method based on PABA production was established in order to discriminate MTC from NTM from cultured organisms.

  17. Genome-wide analysis of histone methylation reveals chromatin state-based complex regulation of differential gene transcription and function of CD8 memory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Araki, Yasuto; Wang, Zhibin; Zang, Chongzhi; Wood, William H.; Schones, Dustin; Cui, Kairong; Roh, Tae-Young; Lhotsky, Brad; Wersto, Robert P.; Peng, Weiqun; Becker, Kevin G.; Zhao, Keji; Weng, Nan-ping

    2009-01-01

    Summary Memory lymphocytes are characterized by their ability to exhibit a rapid response to the recall antigen, in which differential transcription plays a significant role, yet the underlying mechanism is not understood. We report here a genome-wide analysis of histone methylation on two histone H3 lysine residues (H3K4me3 and H3K27me3) and gene expression profiles in naïve and memory CD8 T cells. We found that a general correlation exists between the levels of gene expression and the levels of H3K4me3 (positive correlation) and H3K27me3 (negative correlation) across the gene body. These correlations display four distinct modes: repressive, active, poised, and bivalent, reflecting different functions of these genes. Furthermore, a permissive chromatin state of each gene is established by a combination of different histone modifications. Our findings reveal a complex regulation by histone methylation in differential gene expression and suggest that histone methylation may be responsible for memory CD8 T cell function. PMID:19523850

  18. Genetic differentiation among distinct karyomorphs of the wolf fish Hoplias malabaricus species complex (Characiformes, Erythrinidae) and report of unusual hybridization with natural triploidy.

    PubMed

    Utsunomia, R; Alves, J C Pansonato; Paiva, L R S; Silva, G J Costa; Oliveira, C; Bertollo, L A C; Foresti, F

    2014-11-01

    In this study, genetic differentiation between karyomorphs A (2n = 42) and D (2n = 39/40) of the wolf fish Hoplias malabaricus, which is comprised of several cryptic species that present a wide variety of diploid chromosome numbers and sex chromosome systems, resulting in the identification of seven distinct karyomorphs (A-G), was investigated using a combination of molecular and cytogenetic tools. Deep sequence divergences for both karyomorphs were observed and indicate a long period of reproductive isolation between karyomorphs A and D. Additionally, one individual with 61 chromosomes was identified, which, as far as is known, is the first case of natural triploidy resulting from the hybridization between these highly differentiated karyomorphs of H. malabaricus. Molecular and cytogenetic analyses revealed that this allotriploid specimen carries two sets of maternal chromosomes from karyomorph D (2n = 40) and one set of chromosomes from karyomorph A (n = 21). Moreover, ribosomal sites and active nucleolus organizer regions from both parental contributors were found in the triploid hybrid. Considering the significant genetic distances between karyomorphs A and D, one of the primary reasons for the lack of recurrent reports of hybridization in the H. malabaricus species complex may be due to post-zygotic barriers, such as hybrid sterility or unviability.

  19. Differentiation in stag beetles, Neolucanus swinhoei complex (Coleoptera: Lucanidae): four major lineages caused by periodical Pleistocene glaciations and separation by a mountain range.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Cheng-Lung; Wan, Xia; Yeh, Wen-Bin

    2014-09-01

    Taxonomic debates on Neolucanus swinhoei complex consisting of N. swinhoei, N. doro doro, N. doro horaguchii, and N. euganiae, distributed exclusively in Taiwan, have been ongoing for several decades because of their overlapping morphological characters. To clarify their taxonomic status and phylogeographical history, we analyzed nine morphological characteristics and four molecular amplicons. Phylogenetic inferences based on COI+16S rDNA+wingless showed one eastern and three western lineages, with the latter consisting of one low-hill and two montane lineages. Intermingled DNA sequences from different populations within each lineage, many low FST values, and a high variance component between lineages indicate the possibility of gene flow among populations. However, positive relationships were observed between the genetic divergences of 16S rDNA and its FST values with geographic distance. A divergence estimation based on COI+16S revealed that these beetles might have originated from Asian mainland and differentiated into western and eastern lineages ca. 1Mya, with the differentiation of the western lineages occurring approximately 0.50-0.75Mya. Isolation by mountain ranges and limited flying capability of these beetles as well as populations retreat to and expansion from refugia in response to glaciation cycles have resulted in the current distribution of N. swinhoei complex. Although most morphological characters are variable and undistinguishable, multi-dimensional scaling analysis based on measurable characteristics could recognize hill N. swinhoei as a cluster distinct from the others. However, based on the realities of genetic admixture, shared phylogeographical history and overlapping characteristics, all of these stag beetles should be regarded as Neolucanus swinhoei Bates, 1866.

  20. Complexity and differential expression of carbohydrate epitopes associated with L-selectin recognition of high endothelial venules.

    PubMed Central

    Berg, E. L.; Mullowney, A. T.; Andrew, D. P.; Goldberg, J. E.; Butcher, E. C.

    1998-01-01

    Carbohydrate ligands for lymphocyte L-selectin are expressed on high endothelial venules (HEVs) in peripheral lymph nodes and sites of chronic inflammation and mediate the recruitment of lymphocytes from the blood into these tissues. In the mouse, these ligands, collectively termed the peripheral lymph node addressin (PNAd), have been shown to contain fucose, sialic acid, and sulfate and to include several HEV glycoproteins including GlyCAM-1, CD34, and MAdCAM-1. Monoclonal antibody (MAb) MECA-79, which binds a sulfate-dependent epitope, recognizes PNAd in both mouse and man. In humans, only CD34 has been identified among the glycoprotein species that react with MECA-79. Although P-selectin is highly expressed in tonsil HEVs, it was not found to react with MECA-79 or to support L-selectin-mediated lymphocyte rolling. To further characterize human PNAd, MAbs were developed against purified PNAd immunoisolated from human tonsil. MAbs JG-1, JG-5, JG-9, and JG-10, like MECA-79, bind HEVs in human tonsil and react similarly in Western blots, and JG-9 and JG-10 also block lymphocyte rolling on purified PNAd. In addition, by competitive ELISA on purified tonsil PNAd, all MAbs were found to react with overlapping epitopes. However, JG-1, JG-5, JG-9, and JG-10 do not recognize mouse PNAd, and unlike MECA-79, they recognize determinants that are sensitive to neuraminidase. Strikingly, the epitope recognized by JG-1, although abundant in tonsil and peripheral lymph node, is absent from appendix HEVs or HEVs in some samples of chronically inflamed skin, even though these HEVs are MECA-79 reactive. Moreover, although JG-5 and JG-9 react well with tonsil, peripheral lymph node, and inflamed skin HEVs, they react only with occasional endothelial cells in appendix tissues. These findings point to significant diversity in the carbohydrate determinants expressed by HEVs and recognized by L-selectin and demonstrate their differential representation in different sites in vivo. These

  1. Sall4 controls differentiation of pluripotent cells independently of the Nucleosome Remodelling and Deacetylation (NuRD) complex

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Anzy; Ralser, Meryem; Kloet, Susan L.; Loos, Remco; Nishinakamura, Ryuichi; Bertone, Paul; Vermeulen, Michiel

    2016-01-01

    Sall4 is an essential transcription factor for early mammalian development and is frequently overexpressed in cancer. Although it is reported to play an important role in embryonic stem cell (ESC) self-renewal, whether it is an essential pluripotency factor has been disputed. Here, we show that Sall4 is dispensable for mouse ESC pluripotency. Sall4 is an enhancer-binding protein that prevents precocious activation of the neural gene expression programme in ESCs but is not required for maintenance of the pluripotency gene regulatory network. Although a proportion of Sall4 protein physically associates with the Nucleosome Remodelling and Deacetylase (NuRD) complex, Sall4 neither recruits NuRD to chromatin nor influences transcription via NuRD; rather, free Sall4 protein regulates transcription independently of NuRD. We propose a model whereby enhancer binding by Sall4 and other pluripotency-associated transcription factors is responsible for maintaining the balance between transcriptional programmes in pluripotent cells. PMID:27471257

  2. Differential distribution and association of repeat DNA sequences in the lateral element of the synaptonemal complex in rat spermatocytes.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Hernández, Abrahan; Rincón-Arano, Héctor; Recillas-Targa, Félix; Ortiz, Rosario; Valdes-Quezada, Christian; Echeverría, Olga M; Benavente, Ricardo; Vázquez-Nin, Gerardo H

    2008-02-01

    The synaptonemal complex (SC) is an evolutionarily conserved structure that mediates synapsis of homologous chromosomes during meiotic prophase I. Previous studies have established that the chromatin of homologous chromosomes is organized in loops that are attached to the lateral elements (LEs) of the SC. The characterization of the genomic sequences associated with LEs of the SC represents an important step toward understanding meiotic chromosome organization and function. To isolate these genomic sequences, we performed chromatin immunoprecipitation assays in rat spermatocytes using an antibody against SYCP3, a major structural component of the LEs of the SC. Our results demonstrated the reproducible and exclusive isolation of repeat deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) sequences, in particular long interspersed elements, short interspersed elements, long terminal direct repeats, satellite, and simple repeats. The association of these repeat sequences to the LEs of the SC was confirmed by in situ hybridization of meiotic nuclei shown by both light and electron microscopy. Signals were also detected over the chromatin surrounding SCs and in small loops protruding from the lateral elements into the SC central region. We propose that genomic repeat DNA sequences play a key role in anchoring the chromosome to the protein scaffold of the SC.

  3. SMA observations of the W3(OH) complex: Dynamical differentiation between W3(H2O) and W3(OH)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Sheng-Li; Schilke, Peter; Wu, Jingwen; Liu, Tie; Wu, Yuefang; Sánchez-Monge, Álvaro; Liu, Ying

    2016-03-01

    We present Submillimeter Array observations of the HCN (3-2) and HCO+ (3-2) molecular lines towards the W3(H2O) and W3(OH) star-forming complexes. Infall and outflow motions in the W3(H2O) have been characterized by observing HCN and HCO+ transitions. High-velocity blue/red-shifted emission, tracing the outflow, show multiple knots, which might originate in episodic and precessing outflows. `Blue-peaked' line profiles indicate that gas is infalling on to the W3(H2O) dust core. The measured large mass accretion rate, 2.3 × 10-3 M⊙ yr-1, together with the small free-fall time-scale, 5 × 103 yr, suggest W3(H2O) is in an early evolutionary stage of the process of formation of high-mass stars. For the W3(OH), a two-layer model fit to the HCN and HCO+ spectral lines and Spizter/Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) images support that the W3(OH) H II region is expanding and interacting with the ambient gas, with the shocked neutral gas being expanding with an expansion time-scale of 6.4 × 103 yr. The observations suggest different kinematical time-scales and dynamical states for the W3(H2O) and W3(OH).

  4. Differential recruitment of the hippocampus, medial prefrontal cortex, and the human motion complex during path integration in humans.

    PubMed

    Wolbers, Thomas; Wiener, Jan M; Mallot, Hanspeter A; Büchel, Christian

    2007-08-29

    Path integration, the ability to sense self-motion for keeping track of changes in orientation and position, constitutes a fundamental mechanism of spatial navigation and a keystone for the development of cognitive maps. Whereas animal path integration is predominantly supported by the head-direction, grid, and place cell systems, the neural foundations are not well understood in humans. Here we used functional magnetic resonance imaging and a virtual rendition of a triangle completion paradigm to test whether human path integration recruits a cortical system similar to that of rodents and nonhuman primates. Participants traveled along two legs of a triangle before pointing toward the starting location. In accordance with animal models, stronger right hippocampal activation predicted more accurate updating of the starting location on a trial-by-trial basis. Moreover, between-subjects fluctuations in response consistency were negatively correlated with bilateral hippocampal and medial prefrontal activation, and bilateral recruitment of the human motion complex (hMT+) covaried with individual path integration capability. Given that these effects were absent in a perceptual control task, the present study provides the first evidence that visual path integration is related to the dynamic interplay of self-motion processing in hMT+, higher-level spatial processes in the hippocampus, and spatial working memory in medial prefrontal cortex.

  5. A Differential Genome-Wide Transcriptome Analysis: Impact of Cellular Copper on Complex Biological Processes like Aging and Development

    PubMed Central

    Servos, Jörg; Hamann, Andrea; Grimm, Carolin; Osiewacz, Heinz D.

    2012-01-01

    underlying mechanisms controlling complex biological processes like aging and development. PMID:23152891

  6. Abscisic Acid and Gibberellin Differentially Regulate Expression of Genes of the SNF1-Related Kinase Complex in Tomato Seeds1

    PubMed Central

    Bradford, Kent J.; Downie, A. Bruce; Gee, Oliver H.; Alvarado, Veria; Yang, Hong; Dahal, Peetambar

    2003-01-01

    The SNF1/AMP-activated protein kinase subfamily plays central roles in metabolic and transcriptional responses to nutritional or environmental stresses. In yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and mammals, activating and anchoring subunits associate with and regulate the activity, substrate specificity, and cellular localization of the kinase subunit in response to changing nutrient sources or energy demands, and homologous SNF1-related kinase (SnRK1) proteins are present in plants. We isolated cDNAs corresponding to the kinase (LeSNF1), regulatory (LeSNF4), and localization (LeSIP1 and LeGAL83) subunits of the SnRK1 complex from tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.). LeSNF1 and LeSNF4 complemented yeast snf1 and snf4 mutants and physically interacted with each other and with LeSIP1 in a glucose-dependent manner in yeast two-hybrid assays. LeSNF4 mRNA became abundant at maximum dry weight accumulation during seed development and remained high when radicle protrusion was blocked by abscisic acid (ABA), water stress, far-red light, or dormancy, but was low or undetected in seeds that had completed germination or in gibberellin (GA)-deficient seeds stimulated to germinate by GA. In leaves, LeSNF4 was induced in response to ABA or dehydration. In contrast, LeSNF1 and LeGAL83 genes were essentially constitutively expressed in both seeds and leaves regardless of the developmental, hormonal, or environmental conditions. Regulation of LeSNF4 expression by ABA and GA provides a potential link between hormonal and sugar-sensing pathways controlling seed development, dormancy, and germination. PMID:12857836

  7. Differential morphology of the superior olivary complex of Meriones unguiculatus and Monodelphis domestica revealed by calcium-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Bazwinsky-Wutschke, I; Härtig, W; Kretzschmar, R; Rübsamen, R

    2016-12-01

    In mammals, the superior olivary complex (SOC) of the brainstem is composed of nuclei that integrate afferent auditory originating from both ears. Here, the expression of different calcium-binding proteins in subnuclei of the SOC was studied in distantly related mammals, the Mongolian gerbil (Meriones unguiculatus) and the gray short-tailed opossum (Monodelphis domestica) to get a better understanding of the basal nuclear organization of the SOC. Combined immunofluorescence labeling of the calcium-binding proteins (CaBPs) parvalbumin, calbindin-D28k, and calretinin as well as pan-neuronal markers displayed characteristic distribution patterns highlighting details of neuronal architecture of SOC nuclei. Parvalbumin was found in almost all neurons of SOC nuclei in both species, while calbindin and calretinin were restricted to specific cell types and axonal terminal fields. In both species, calbindin displayed a ubiquitous and mostly selective distribution in neurons of the medial nucleus of trapezoid body (MNTB) including their terminal axonal fields in different SOC targets. In Meriones, calretinin and calbindin showed non-overlapping expression patterns in neuron somata and terminal fields throughout the SOC. In Monodelphis, co-expression of calbindin and calretinin was observed in the MNTB, and hence both CaBPs were also co-localized in terminal fields within the adjacent SOC nuclei. The distribution patterns of CaBPs in both species are discussed with respect to the intrinsic neuronal SOC circuits as part of the auditory brainstem system that underlie the binaural integrative processing of acoustic signals as the basis for localization and discrimination of auditory objects.

  8. Efficient Differentiation of Mycobacterium avium Complex Species and Subspecies by Use of Five-Target Multiplex PCR▿

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Sung Jae; Lee, Byung Soo; Koh, Won-Jung; Manning, Elizabeth J. B.; Anklam, Kelly; Sreevatsan, Srinand; Lambrecht, Randall S.; Collins, Michael T.

    2010-01-01

    Infections caused by the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) are on the rise in both human and veterinary medicine. A means of effectively discriminating among closely related yet pathogenetically diverse members of the MAC would enable better diagnosis and treatment as well as further our understanding of the epidemiology of these pathogens. In this study, a five-target multiplex PCR designed to discriminate MAC organisms isolated from liquid culture media was developed. This MAC multiplex was designed to amplify a 16S rRNA gene target common to all Mycobacterium species, a chromosomal target called DT1 that is unique to M. avium subsp. avium serotypes 2 and 3, to M. avium subsp. silvaticum, and to M. intracellulare, and three insertion sequences, IS900, IS901, and IS1311. The pattern of amplification results allowed determination of whether isolates were mycobacteria, whether they were members of the MAC, and whether they belonged to one of three major MAC subspecies, M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis, M. avium subsp. avium, and M. avium subsp. hominissuis. Analytical sensitivity was 10 fg of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis genomic DNA, 5 to 10 fg of M. avium subsp. avium genomic DNA, and 2 to 5 fg of DNA from other mycobacterial species. Identification accuracy of the MAC multiplex was evaluated by testing 53 bacterial reference strains consisting of 28 different mycobacterial species and 12 nonmycobacterial species. Identification accuracy in a clinical setting was evaluated for 223 clinical MAC isolates independently identified by other methods. Isolate identification agreement between the MAC multiplex and these comparison assays was 100%. The novel MAC multiplex is a rapid, reliable, and simple assay for discrimination of MAC species and subspecies in liquid culture media. PMID:20810779

  9. Statins in lymphangioleiomyomatosis. Simvastatin and atorvastatin induce differential effects on tuberous sclerosis complex 2-null cell growth and signaling.

    PubMed

    Atochina-Vasserman, Elena N; Goncharov, Dmitry A; Volgina, Alla V; Milavec, Megan; James, Melane L; Krymskaya, Vera P

    2013-11-01

    Mutations of the tumor suppressor genes tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC)1 and TSC2 cause pulmonary lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) and tuberous sclerosis (TS). Current rapamycin-based therapies for TS and LAM have a predominantly cytostatic effect, and disease progression resumes with therapy cessation. Evidence of RhoA GTPase activation in LAM-derived and human TSC2-null cells suggests that 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitor statins can be used as potential adjuvant agents. The goal of this study was to determine which statin (simvastatin or atorvastatin) is more effective in suppressing TSC2-null cell growth and signaling. Simvastatin, but not atorvastatin, showed a concentration-dependent (0.5-10 μM) inhibitory effect on mouse TSC2-null and human LAM-derived cell growth. Treatment with 10 μM simvastatin induced dramatic disruption of TSC2-null cell monolayer and cell rounding; in contrast, few changes were observed in cells treated with the same concentration of atorvastatin. Combined treatment of rapamycin with simvastatin but not with atorvastatin showed a synergistic growth-inhibitory effect on TSC2-null cells. Simvastatin, but not atorvastatin, inhibited the activity of prosurvival serine-threonine kinase Akt and induced marked up-regulation of cleaved caspase-3, a marker of cell apoptosis. Simvastatin, but not atorvastatin, also induced concentration-dependent inhibition of p42/p44 Erk and mTORC1. Thus, our data show growth-inhibitory and proapoptotic effects of simvastatin on TSC2-null cells compared with atorvastatin. These findings have translational significance for combinatorial therapeutic strategies of simvastatin to inhibit TSC2-null cell survival in TS and LAM.

  10. Survival, Differentiation, and Neuroprotective Mechanisms of Human Stem Cells Complexed With Neurotrophin-3-Releasing Pharmacologically Active Microcarriers in an Ex Vivo Model of Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Daviaud, Nicolas; Garbayo, Elisa; Sindji, Laurence; Martínez-Serrano, Alberto; Schiller, Paul C.

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell-based regenerative therapies hold great potential for the treatment of degenerative disorders such as Parkinson’s disease (PD). We recently reported the repair and functional recovery after treatment with human marrow-isolated adult multilineage inducible (MIAMI) cells adhered to neurotrophin-3 (NT3) releasing pharmacologically active microcarriers (PAMs) in hemiparkinsonian rats. In order to comprehend this effect, the goal of the present work was to elucidate the survival, differentiation, and neuroprotective mechanisms of MIAMI cells and human neural stem cells (NSCs), both adhering to NT3-releasing PAMs in an ex vivo organotypic model of nigrostriatal degeneration made from brain sagittal slices. It was shown that PAMs led to a marked increase in MIAMI cell survival and neuronal differentiation when releasing NT3. A significant neuroprotective effect of MIAMI cells adhering to PAMs was also demonstrated. NSCs barely had a neuroprotective effect and differentiated mostly into dopaminergic neuronal cells when adhering to PAM-NT3. Moreover, those cells were able to release dopamine in a sufficient amount to induce a return to baseline levels. Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay analyses identified vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and stanniocalcin-1 as potential mediators of the neuroprotective effect of MIAMI cells and NSCs, respectively. It was also shown that VEGF locally stimulated tissue vascularization, which might improve graft survival, without excluding a direct neuroprotective effect of VEGF on dopaminergic neurons. These results indicate a prospective interest of human NSC/PAM and MIAMI cell/PAM complexes in tissue engineering for PD. Significance Stem cell-based regenerative therapies hold great potential for the treatment of degenerative disorders such as Parkinson’s disease (PD). The present work elucidates and compares the survival, differentiation, and

  11. Differential impact of a complex environment on positive affect in an animal model of individual differences in emotionality.

    PubMed

    Perez-Sepulveda, J A; Flagel, S B; Garcia-Fuster, M J; Slusky, R J; Aldridge, J W; Watson, S; Akil, H

    2013-09-17

    Anhedonia, or the inability to experience positive feelings is a hallmark of depression. However, few animal models have relied on decreased positive affect as an index of susceptibility to depression. Rats emit frequency-modulated ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs), designated as "positive" calls in the 50-kHz range. USVs have been associated with pharmacological activation of motivational reward circuits. Here we utilized selectively-bred rats differing in "emotionality" to ask whether there are associated differences in USVs. Rats bred based on locomotor response to novelty and classified as bred High Responders (bHRs) or bred Low Responders (bLRs) exhibit inborn differences in response to environmental cues, stress responsiveness, and depression-like behavior. These animals also exhibit differences in anxiety-like behavior, which are reversed by exposure to environmental complexity (EC). Finally, these animals exhibit unique profiles of responsiveness to rewarding stimuli accompanied with distinct patterns of dopamine regulation. We investigated whether acute and chronic environmental manipulations impacted USVs in bHRs and bLRs. We found that, relative to bLRs, bHRs emitted significantly more 50-kHz USVs. However, if a bLR is accompanied by another bLR, there is a significant increase in 50-kHZ USVs emitted by this phenotype. bHRs emitted increases in 50-kHZ UVSs upon first exposure to EC, whereas bLRs showed a similar increase only after repeated exposure. bLRs' increase in positive affect after chronic EC was coupled with significant positive correlations between corticosterone levels and c-fos mRNA in the accumbens. Conversely, a decline in the rate of positive calls in bHRs after chronic EC was associated with a negative correlation between corticosterone and accumbens c-fos mRNA. These studies demonstrate that inborn differences in emotionality interact with the environment to influence positive affect and underscore the potential interaction between

  12. Musical rhythm and pitch: a differential effect on auditory dynamics as revealed by the N1/MMN/P3a complex.

    PubMed

    Sebastian Lelo de Larrea-Mancera, E; Rodríguez-Agudelo, Yaneth; Solís-Vivanco, Rodolfo

    2017-04-04

    Music represents a complex form of human cognition. To what extent our auditory system is attuned to music is yet to be clearly understood. Our principal aim was to determine whether the neurophysiological operations underlying pre-attentive auditory change detection (N1enhancement (N1e)/Mismatch Negativity (MMN)) and the subsequent involuntary attentional reallocation (P3a) towards infrequent sound omissions, are influenced by differences in musical content. Specifically, we intended to explore any interaction effects that rhythmic and pitch dimensions of musical organization may have over these processes. Results showed that both the N1e and MMN amplitudes were differentially influenced by rhythm and pitch dimensions. MMN latencies were shorter for musical structures containing both domains. This suggests some neurocognitive independence between pitch and rhythm domains, but also calls for further address on possible interactions between both of them at the level of early, automatic auditory detection. Furthermore, results demonstrate that the N1e reflects basic sensory memory processes. Lastly, we show that the involuntary switch of attention associated with the P3a reflects a general-purpose mechanism not modulated by musical features. Altogether, the N1e/MMN/P3a complex elicited by infrequent sound omissions revealed evidence of musical influence over early stages of auditory perception.

  13. Differential domain evolution and complex RNA processing in a family of paralogous EPB41 (protein 4.1) genes facilitates expression of diverse tissue-specific isoforms

    SciTech Connect

    Parra, Marilyn; Gee, Sherry; Chan, Nadine; Ryaboy, Dmitriy; Dubchak, Inna; Narla, Mohandas; Gascard, Philippe D.; Conboy, John G.

    2004-07-15

    The EPB41 (protein 4.1) genes epitomize the resourcefulness of the mammalian genome to encode a complex proteome from a small number of genes. By utilizing alternative transcriptional promoters and tissue-specific alternative pre-mRNA splicing, EPB41, EPB41L2, EPB41L3, and EPB41L1 encode a diverse array of structural adapter proteins. Comparative genomic and transcript analysis of these 140kb-240kb genes indicates several unusual features: differential evolution of highly conserved exons encoding known functional domains, interspersed with unique exons whose size and sequence variations contribute substantially to intergenic diversity: alternative first exons, most of which map far upstream of the coding regions; and complex tissue-specific alternative pre-mRNA splicing that facilitates synthesis of functionally different complements of 4.1 proteins in various cells. Understanding the splicing regulatory networks that control protein 4.1 expression will be critical to a full appreciation of the many roles of 4.1 proteins in normal cell biology and their proposed roles in human cancer.

  14. Human decidua-derived mesenchymal stem cells differentiate into functional alveolar type II-like cells that synthesize and secrete pulmonary surfactant complexes.

    PubMed

    Cerrada, Alejandro; de la Torre, Paz; Grande, Jesús; Haller, Thomas; Flores, Ana I; Pérez-Gil, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    Lung alveolar type II (ATII) cells are specialized in the synthesis and secretion of pulmonary surfactant, a lipid-protein complex that reduces surface tension to minimize the work of breathing. Surfactant synthesis, assembly and secretion are closely regulated and its impairment is associated with severe respiratory disorders. At present, well-established ATII cell culture models are not available. In this work, Decidua-derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells (DMSCs) have been differentiated into Alveolar Type II- Like Cells (ATII-LCs), which display membranous cytoplasmic organelles resembling lamellar bodies, the organelles involved in surfactant storage and secretion by native ATII cells, and accumulate disaturated phospholipid species, a surfactant hallmark. Expression of characteristic ATII cells markers was demonstrated in ATII-LCs at gene and protein level. Mimicking the response of ATII cells to secretagogues, ATII-LCs were able to exocytose lipid-rich assemblies, which displayed highly surface active capabilities, including faster interfacial adsorption kinetics than standard native surfactant, even in the presence of inhibitory agents. ATII-LCs could constitute a highly useful ex vivo model for the study of surfactant biogenesis and the mechanisms involved in protein processing and lipid trafficking, as well as the packing and storage of surfactant complexes.

  15. The VELVET Complex in the Gray Mold Fungus Botrytis cinerea: Impact of BcLAE1 on Differentiation, Secondary Metabolism, and Virulence.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Julia; Simon, Adeline; Cohrs, Kim C; Traeger, Stefanie; Porquier, Antoine; Dalmais, Bérengère; Viaud, Muriel; Tudzynski, Bettina

    2015-06-01

    Botrytis cinerea, the gray mold fungus, is an important plant pathogen. Field populations are characterized by variability with regard to morphology, the mode of reproduction (conidiation or sclerotia formation), the spectrum of secondary metabolites (SM), and virulence. Natural variation in bcvel1 encoding the ortholog of Aspergillus nidulans VeA, a member of the VELVET complex, was previously shown to affect light-dependent differentiation, the formation of oxalic acid (OA), and virulence. To gain broader insight into the B. cinerea VELVET complex, an ortholog of A. nidulans LaeA, BcLAE1, a putative interaction partner of BcVEL1, was studied. BcVEL1 but not its truncated versions interacts with BcLAE1 and BcVEL2 (VelB ortholog). In accordance with the expected common as well as specific functions of BcVEL1 and BcLAE1, the deletions of both genes result in similar though not identical phenotypes. Both mutants lost the ability to produce OA, to colonize the host tissue, and to form sclerotia. However, mutants differ with regard to aerial hyphae and conidia formation. Genome-wide expression analyses revealed that BcVEL1 and BcLAE1 have common and distinct target genes. Some of the genes that are underexpressed in both mutants, e.g., those encoding SM-related enzymes, proteases, and carbohydrate-active enzymes, may account for their reduced virulence.

  16. Differential involvement of Atg16L1 in Crohn disease and canonical autophagy: analysis of the organization of the Atg16L1 complex in fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Naonobu; Saitoh, Tatsuya; Kageyama, Shun; Akira, Shizuo; Noda, Takeshi; Yoshimori, Tamotsu

    2009-11-20

    A single nucleotide polymorphism in Atg16L1, an autophagy-related gene (ATG), is a risk factor for Crohn disease, a major form of chronic inflammatory bowel disease. However, it is still unknown how the Atg16L1 variant contributes to disease development. The Atg16L1 protein possesses a C-terminal WD repeat domain whose function is entirely unknown, and the Crohn disease-associated mutation (T300A) is within this domain. To elucidate the function of the WD repeat domain, we established an experimental system in which a WD repeat domain mutant of Atg16L1 is stably expressed in Atg16L1-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Using the system, we show that the Atg16L1 complex forms a dimeric complex and that the total Atg16L1 protein level is strictly maintained, possibly by the ubiquitin proteasome system. Furthermore, we show that an Atg16L1 WD repeat domain deletion and the T300A mutant have little impact on canonical autophagy and autophagy against Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. Therefore, we propose that Atg16L1 T300A is differentially involved in Crohn disease and canonical autophagy.

  17. The B cell coactivator Bob1 shows DNA sequence-dependent complex formation with Oct-1/Oct-2 factors, leading to differential promoter activation.

    PubMed

    Gstaiger, M; Georgiev, O; van Leeuwen, H; van der Vliet, P; Schaffner, W

    1996-06-03

    We have shown previously that both octamer binding transcription factors, namely the ubiquitous Oct-1 and the B cell-specific Oct-2A protein, can be enhanced in transcriptional activity by their association with the B cell-specific coactivator protein Bob1, also called OBF-1 or OCA-B. Here we study the structural requirements for ternary complex formation of DNA-Oct-Bob1 and coactivation function of Bob1. In analogy to DNA-bound transcription factors, Bob1 has a modular structure that includes an interaction domain (amino acids 1-65) and a C-terminal domain (amino acids 65-256), both important for transcriptional activation. A mutational analysis has resolved a region of seven amino acids (amino acids 26-32) in the N-terminus of Bob1 that are important for contacting the DNA binding POU domain of Oct-1 or Oct-2. In contrast to the viral coactivator VP16 (vmw65), which interacts with Oct-1 via the POU homeosubdomain, Bob1 association with Oct factors requires residues located in the POU-specific subdomain. Because the same residues are also involved in DNA recognition, we surmised that this association would affect the DNA binding specificity of the Oct-Bob1 complex compared with free Oct factors. While Oct-1 or Oct-2 bind to a large variety of octamer sequences, Bob1 ternary complex formation is indeed highly selective and occurs only in a subset of these sequences, leading to the differential coactivation of octamer-containing promoters. The results uncover a new level in selectivity that furthers our understanding in the regulation of cell type-specific gene expression.

  18. Differential inhibition of long interspersed element 1 by APOBEC3 does not correlate with high-molecular-mass-complex formation or P-body association.

    PubMed

    Niewiadomska, Anna Maria; Tian, Chunjuan; Tan, Lindi; Wang, Tao; Sarkis, Phuong Thi Nguyen; Yu, Xiao-Fang

    2007-09-01

    The human cytidine deaminase APOBEC3G (A3G) and other APOBEC3 proteins exhibit differential inhibitory activities against diverse endogenous retroelements and retroviruses, including Vif-deficient human immunodeficiency virus type 1. The potential inhibitory activity of human APOBEC proteins against long interspersed element 1 (LINE-1) has not been fully evaluated. Here, we demonstrate inhibition of LINE-1 by multiple human APOBEC3 cytidine deaminases, including previously unreported activity for A3DE and A3G. More ancient members of APOBEC, cytidine deaminases AID and APOBEC2, had no detectable activity against LINE-1. A3A, which did not form high-molecular-mass (HMM) complexes and interacted poorly with P bodies, was the most potent inhibitor of LINE-1. A3A specifically recognizes LINE-1 RNA but not the other cellular RNAs tested. However, in the presence of LINE-1, A3A became associated with HMM complexes containing LINE-1 RNA. The ability of A3A to recognize LINE-1 RNA required its catalytic domain and was important for its LINE-1 suppression. Although the mechanism of LINE-1 restriction did not seem to involve DNA editing, A3A inhibited the accumulation of nascent LINE-1 DNA, suggesting interference with LINE-1 reverse transcription and/or integration or intracellular movement of LINE-1 ribonucleoprotein. Thus, association with P bodies or cellular HMM complexes could not predict the potency of APOBEC3 anti-LINE-1 activities. The catalytic domain of APOBEC3 proteins may be important for proper folding and target factors such as RNA or protein interaction in addition to cytidine deamination.

  19. Differential induction of Leishmania donovani bi-subunit topoisomerase I-DNA cleavage complex by selected flavones and camptothecin: activity of flavones against camptothecin-resistant topoisomerase I.

    PubMed

    Das, Benu Brata; Sen, Nilkantha; Roy, Amit; Dasgupta, Somdeb Bose; Ganguly, Agneyo; Mohanta, Bikash Chandra; Dinda, Biswanath; Majumder, Hemanta K

    2006-01-01

    Emergence of the bi-subunit topoisomerase I in the kinetoplastid family (Trypanosoma and Leishmania) has brought a new twist in topoisomerase research related to evolution, functional conservation and preferential sensitivities to the specific inhibitors of type IB topoisomerase family. In the present study, we describe that naturally occurring flavones baicalein, luteolin and quercetin are potent inhibitors of the recombinant Leishmania donovani topoisomerase I. These compounds bind to the free enzyme and also intercalate into the DNA at a very high concentration (300 microM) without binding to the minor grove. Here, we show that inhibition of topoisomerase I by these flavones is due to stabilization of topoisomerase I-DNA cleavage complexes, which subsequently inhibit the religation step. Their ability to stabilize the covalent topoisomerase I-DNA complex in vitro and in living cells is similar to that of the known topoisomerase I inhibitor camptothecin (CPT). However, in contrast to CPT, baicalein and luteolin failed to inhibit the religation step when the drugs were added to pre-formed enzyme substrate binary complex. This differential mechanism to induce the stabilization of cleavable complex with topoisomerase I and DNA by these selected flavones and CPT led us to investigate the effect of baicalein and luteolin on CPT-resistant mutant enzyme LdTOP1Delta39LS lacking 1-39 amino acids of the large subunit [B. B. Das, N. Sen, S. B. Dasgupta, A. Ganguly and H. K. Majumder (2005) J. Biol. Chem. 280, 16335-16344]. Baicalein and luteolin stabilize duplex oligonucleotide cleavage with LdTOP1Delta39LS. This observation was further supported by the stabilization of in vivo cleavable complex by baicalein and luteolin with highly CPT-resistant L.donovani strain. Taken together, our data suggest that the interacting amino acid residues of topoisomerase I may be partially overlapping or different for flavones and CPT. This study illuminates new properties of the flavones

  20. Differential induction of Leishmania donovani bi-subunit topoisomerase I–DNA cleavage complex by selected flavones and camptothecin: activity of flavones against camptothecin-resistant topoisomerase I

    PubMed Central

    Das, Benu Brata; Sen, Nilkantha; Roy, Amit; Dasgupta, Somdeb Bose; Ganguly, Agneyo; Mohanta, Bikash Chandra; Dinda, Biswanath; Majumder, Hemanta K.

    2006-01-01

    Emergence of the bi-subunit topoisomerase I in the kinetoplastid family (Trypanosoma and Leishmania) has brought a new twist in topoisomerase research related to evolution, functional conservation and preferential sensitivities to the specific inhibitors of type IB topoisomerase family. In the present study, we describe that naturally occurring flavones baicalein, luteolin and quercetin are potent inhibitors of the recombinant Leishmania donovani topoisomerase I. These compounds bind to the free enzyme and also intercalate into the DNA at a very high concentration (300 µM) without binding to the minor grove. Here, we show that inhibition of topoisomerase I by these flavones is due to stabilization of topoisomerase I–DNA cleavage complexes, which subsequently inhibit the religation step. Their ability to stabilize the covalent topoisomerase I–DNA complex in vitro and in living cells is similar to that of the known topoisomerase I inhibitor camptothecin (CPT). However, in contrast to CPT, baicalein and luteolin failed to inhibit the religation step when the drugs were added to pre-formed enzyme substrate binary complex. This differential mechanism to induce the stabilization of cleavable complex with topoisomerase I and DNA by these selected flavones and CPT led us to investigate the effect of baicalein and luteolin on CPT-resistant mutant enzyme LdTOP1Δ39LS lacking 1–39 amino acids of the large subunit [B. B. Das, N. Sen, S. B. Dasgupta, A. Ganguly and H. K. Majumder (2005) J. Biol. Chem. 280, 16335–16344]. Baicalein and luteolin stabilize duplex oligonucleotide cleavage with LdTOP1Δ39LS. This observation was further supported by the stabilization of in vivo cleavable complex by baicalein and luteolin with highly CPT-resistant L.donovani strain. Taken together, our data suggest that the interacting amino acid residues of topoisomerase I may be partially overlapping or different for flavones and CPT. This study illuminates new properties of the flavones

  1. Complexity and Productivity Differentiation Models of Metallogenic Indicator Elements in Rocks and Supergene Media Around Daijiazhuang Pb-Zn Deposit in Dangchang County, Gansu Province

    SciTech Connect

    He, Jin-zhong Yao, Shu-zhen; Zhang, Zhong-ping; You, Guan-jin

    2013-03-15

    With the help of complexity indices, we quantitatively studied multifractals, frequency distributions, and linear and nonlinear characteristics of geochemical data for exploration of the Daijiazhuang Pb-Zn deposit. Furthermore, we derived productivity differentiation models of elements from thermodynamics and self-organized criticality of metallogenic systems. With respect to frequency distributions and multifractals, only Zn in rocks and most elements except Sb in secondary media, which had been derived mainly from weathering and alluviation, exhibit nonlinear distributions. The relations of productivity to concentrations of metallogenic elements and paragenic elements in rocks and those of elements strongly leached in secondary media can be seen as linear addition of exponential functions with a characteristic weak chaos. The relations of associated elements such as Mo, Sb, and Hg in rocks and other elements in secondary media can be expressed as an exponential function, and the relations of one-phase self-organized geological or metallogenic processes can be represented by a power function, each representing secondary chaos or strong chaos. For secondary media, exploration data of most elements should be processed using nonlinear mathematical methods or should be transformed to linear distributions before processing using linear mathematical methods.

  2. Potential of the reversed-inject differential flow modulator for comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography in the quantitative profiling and fingerprinting of essential oils of different complexity.

    PubMed

    Cordero, Chiara; Rubiolo, Patrizia; Cobelli, Luigi; Stani, Gianluca; Miliazza, Armando; Giardina, Matthew; Firor, Roger; Bicchi, Carlo

    2015-10-23

    In this study, the first capillary flow technology reverse-inject differential flow modulator was implemented with different column configurations (lengths, diameters and stationary phase coupling) and detector combinations (mass spectrometry--MS and flame ionization detection--FID) to evaluate its potential in the quantitative profiling and fingerprinting of medium-to-highly complex essential oils. In particular, a parallel dual-secondary column dual-detection configuration that has shown to improve the information potential also with thermally modulated GC × GC platforms (MS identification reliability and accurate FID quantitation), was tested. Several system performance parameters (separation measure SGC × GC, modulation ratio MR, separation space used and peak symmetry) were evaluated by analyzing a mixture of volatiles of interest in the flavor and fragrance field. The systems demonstrating the best chromatographic performance were selected for quantitative profiling of lavender and mint essential oils and fingerprinting of vetiver essential oil. Experimental results demonstrate that careful tuning of column dimensions and system configurations yields improved: (a) selectivity; (b) operable carrier gas linear velocities at close-to-optimal values; (c) (2)D separation power by extending the modulation period and (d) handling of overloaded peaks without dramatic losses in resolution and quantitative accuracy.

  3. The Protein Phosphatase-1/Inhibitor-2 Complex Differentially Regulates GSK-3 Dephosphorylation and Increases Sarcoplasmic/Endoplasmic Reticulum Calcium ATPase 2 Levels

    PubMed Central

    King, Taj D.; Gandy, Johanna C.; Bijur, Gautam N.

    2007-01-01

    The ubiquitously expressed protein glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3) is constitutively active, however its activity is markedly diminished following phosphorylation of Ser21 of GSK3α and Ser9 of GSK3β. Although several kinases are known to phosphorylate Ser21/9 of GSK3, for example Akt, relatively much less is known about the mechanisms that cause the dephosphorylation of GSK3 at Ser21/9. In the present study KCl-induced plasma membrane depolarization of SH-SY5Y cells, which increases intracellular calcium concentrations caused a transient decrease in the phosphorylation of Akt at Thr308 and Ser473, and GSK3 at Ser21/9. Overexpression of the selective protein phosphatase-1 inhibitor protein, inhibitor-2, increased basal GSK3 phosphorylation at Ser21/9 and significantly blocked the KCl-induced dephosphorylation of GSK3β, but not GSK3α. The phosphorylation of Akt was not affected by the overexpression of inhibitor-2. GSK3 activity is known to affect sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase 2 (SERCA2) levels. Overexpression of inhibitor-2 or treatment of cells with the GSK3 inhibitors lithium and SB216763 increased the levels of SERCA2. These results indicate that the protein phosphatase-1/inhibitor-2 complex differentially regulates GSK3 dephosphorylation induced by KCl and that GSK3 activity regulates SERCA2 levels. PMID:16987514

  4. Evaluation of three real-time PCR assays for differential identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex and nontuberculous mycobacteria species in liquid culture media.

    PubMed

    Jung, Yu Jung; Kim, Ji-Youn; Song, Dong Joon; Koh, Won-Jung; Huh, Hee Jae; Ki, Chang-Seok; Lee, Nam Yong

    2016-06-01

    We evaluated the analytical performance of M. tuberculosis complex (MTBC)/nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) PCR assays for differential identification of MTBC and NTM using culture-positive liquid media. Eighty-five type strains and 100 consecutive mycobacterial liquid media cultures (MGIT 960 system) were analyzed by a conventional PCR assay (MTB-ID(®) V3) and three real-time PCR assays (AdvanSure™ TB/NTM real-time PCR, AdvanSure; GENEDIA(®) MTB/NTM Detection Kit, Genedia; Real-Q MTB & NTM kit, Real-Q). The accuracy rates for reference strains were 89.4%, 100%, 98.8%, and 98.8% for the MTB-ID V3, AdvanSure, Genedia, and Real-Q assays, respectively. Cross-reactivity in the MTB-ID V3 assay was mainly attributable to non-mycobacterium Corynebacterineae species. The diagnostic performance was determined using clinical isolates grown in liquid media, and the overall sensitivities for all PCR assays were higher than 95%. In conclusion, the three real-time PCR assays showed better performance in discriminating mycobacterium species and non-mycobacterium Corynebacterineae species than the conventional PCR assay.

  5. Speciation analysis of aluminium(III) in natural waters and biological fluids by complexing with various catechols followed by differential pulse voltammetry detection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian; Bi, Shuping; Yang, Li; Gu, Xiaodong; Ma, Pengju; Gan, Ning; Wang, Xianlong; Long, Xiufeng; Zhang, Fuping

    2002-12-01

    The biological effects of aluminium have received much attention in recent years. Speciation of Al is of basic relevance as it concerns its reactivity and bioavailability. A differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) procedure is proposed for speciation analysis of Al(III) in natural waters and biological fluids using six catechols (L-dopa, dopamine, epinephrine, norepinephrine, caffeic acid and o-benzenediol) as electroactive ligands. The decrease of the DPV anodic peak current for each catechol ligand is linear with the increase of Al concentration. This speciation analysis idea is based on the measurement of the complexation capacity, namely, different affinities of Al(III) for catechols and organic ligands under two pH conditions. The labile monomeric Al fraction (mainly inorganic aluminium) is determined at pH 4.6, while the total monomeric Al fraction is determined at pH 8.5. The principle for Al(III) speciation analysis by an electrochemical method is discussed. This sensitive and simple fractionation method is successfully applied to the speciation analysis of Al in natural waters and the results agree well with those of Driscoll's method. The speciation analysis of Al in biological fluids is also explored and the results are compared with those obtained by ultrafiltration and dialysis. Compared with other speciation protocols the electrochemical method possesses some remarkable advantages: rapidity, high sensitivity, cheap instrumentation and a simple operation procedure.

  6. The differential effects of a complex protein drink versus isocaloric carbohydrate drink on performance indices following high-intensity resistance training: a two arm crossover design

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Post-workout nutrient timing and macronutrient selection are essential for recovery, glycogen replenishment and muscle protein synthesis (MPS). Performance repeatability, particularly after strenuous activity, can be influenced by substrate availability, recovery markers and perceived rate of exertion. This study compared the differential effects of a complex protein ready-to-drink beverage (VPX) and isocaloric carbohydrate beverage (iCHO) on performance—agility T-test, push-up test, 40-yard sprint, and rate of perceived exertion (RPE), following high-intensity resistance training (HIRT). Methods In a randomized, double blind two-arm crossover controlled trial, 15 subjects performed a 15–18 minute (2:1 work to rest) HIRT and then immediately drank one of the two treatments. After a 2-hour fast, subjects returned to execute the field tests and report RPE. The protocol was repeated one week later with the other treatment. Results There were no significant main effect differences in the agility T-test (p = 0.83), push-up (p = 0.21) sprint (p = 0.12), average agility RPE (p = 0.83), average push-up RPE (p = 0.81) or average sprint RPE (p = 0.66) between the two trials and the two treatments. The multivariate analysis yielded a cumulative significant interaction effect amongst the three performance variables after consuming VPX (p < 0.01). These results suggest a complex protein beverage is a better post-workout choice compared to an isocaloric carbohydrate beverage for repeated performance for activities that require multiple energy demands and athletic skills; however, this outcome was not observed for each single performance event or RPE. Conclusion When considering the collective physical effects of the agility T-test, push-up and sprint tests, a complex protein beverage may provide a recovery advantage as it relates to repeated-bout performance compared to an iCHO-only beverage. Additional research examining the chronic effects of post

  7. Comparison of differential pulse and alternating current polarography in the soft-modelling study of the complexation of Cd(II) by the fragment Cys-Gly and by the phytochelatin (gamma-Glu-Cys)2Gly.

    PubMed

    Garrigosa, Anna Maria; Ariño, Cristina; Díaz-Cruz, José Manuel; Esteban, Miquel

    2008-07-01

    A comparison of a differential pulse polarographic with a phase sensitive alternating current polarographic study of the Cd-Cys-Gly and Cd-PC(2) systems [PC(2) being a phytochelatin of general structure (gamma-Glu-Cys)(n)-Gly, with n = 2] has been performed. The chemometric multivariate curve resolution method with alternating least squares was applied in the experimental data analysis. The results obtained by both polarographic techniques have made it possible to find out the formation sequences of the complexes and their final stoichiometries. The alternating current polarograms compared with the differential pulse ones show some differences (a new signal and an important shift of peak potentials), which anyway are consistent with some of the conclusions obtained by differential pulse polarography. This fact implies that although the alternating current polarography results need some corrections before data treatment, they provide extra information that complements the conclusions achieved by differential pulse polarography.

  8. A Quadruplex Real-Time PCR Assay for the Rapid Detection and Differentiation of the Most Relevant Members of the B. pseudomallei Complex: B. mallei, B. pseudomallei, and B. thailandensis

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, Chinn-Woan; Thiriot, Joseph D.; Heder, Michael J.; March, Jordon K.; Drake, David S.; Lew, Cynthia S.; Bunnell, Annette J.; Moore, Emily S.; O'Neill, Kim L.; Robison, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    The Burkholderia pseudomallei complex classically consisted of B. mallei, B. pseudomallei, and B. thailandensis, but has now expanded to include B. oklahomensis, B. humptydooensis, and three unassigned Burkholderia clades. Methods for detecting and differentiating the B. pseudomallei complex has been the topic of recent research due to phenotypic and genotypic similarities of these species. B. mallei and B. pseudomallei are recognized as CDC Tier 1 select agents, and are the causative agents of glanders and melioidosis, respectively. Although B. thailandensis and B. oklahomensis are generally avirulent, both display similar phenotypic characteristics to that of B. pseudomallei. B. humptydooensis and the Burkholderia clades are genetically similar to the B. pseudomallei complex, and are not associated with disease. Optimal identification of these species remains problematic, and PCR-based methods can resolve issues with B. pseudomallei complex detection and differentiation. Currently, no PCR assay is available that detects the major species of the B. pseudomallei complex. A real-time PCR assay in a multiplex single-tube format was developed to simultaneously detect and differentiate B. mallei, B. pseudomallei, and B. thailandensis, and a common sequence found in B. pseudomallei, B. mallei, B. thailandensis, and B. oklahomensis. A total of 309 Burkholderia isolates and 5 other bacterial species were evaluated. The assay was 100% sensitive and specific, demonstrated sensitivity beyond culture and GC methods for the isolates tested, and is completed in about an hour with a detection limit between 2.6pg and 48.9pg of gDNA. Bioinformatic analyses also showed the assay is likely 100% specific and sensitive for all 84 fully sequenced B. pseudomallei, B. mallei, B. thailandensis, and B. oklahomensis strains currently available in GenBank. For these reasons, this assay could be a rapid and sensitive tool in the detection and differentiation for those species of the B

  9. Sex differences in prenatally programmed anxiety behaviour in rats: differential corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor mRNA expression in the amygdaloid complex.

    PubMed

    Brunton, Paula J; Donadio, Márcio V F; Russell, John A

    2011-11-01

    We recently reported that male, but not female, offspring born to mothers exposed to social stress during late gestation show heightened anxiety-type behaviour in adulthood. The amygdala organises anxious behaviour, which involves actions of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH). CRH gene expression and/or its release are increased in the amygdala in prenatally stressed (PNS) rats. CRH type 1 receptor (CRH-R1) mediates actions of CRH and urocortin I to promote anxiety-like behaviour, whereas the CRH type 2 receptor (CRH-R2) may mediate anxiolytic actions, through actions of urocortins 2 and 3. Here, using quantitative in situ hybridisation, we investigated whether altered CRH receptor mRNA expression in the amygdaloid nuclei may explain the sex differences in anxiety behaviour in adult male and female PNS rats. CRH-R1 mRNA expression was significantly greater in the central amygdala and basolateral amygdala (BLA) in male PNS rats compared with controls, with no change in the basomedial amygdala (BMA) or medial amygdala (MeA). In PNS females, CRH-R1 mRNA expression was greater than controls only in the MeA. Conversely, CRH-R2 mRNA expression was significantly lower in the BMA of male PNS rats compared with controls, but greater in female PNS rats, with no change in the BLA or MeA in either sex. The ratio of CRH-R1:CRH-R2 mRNA in the amygdaloid nuclei was generally increased in PNS males, but not in the PNS females. In conclusion, sex differences in anxiety-type behaviour in PNS rats may be explained by differential mRNA expression for CRH-R1 (pro-anxiogenic) and CRH-R2 (pro-anxiolytic) in the amygdaloid complex.

  10. Differential regulation of acid sphingomyelinase in macrophages stimulated with oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and oxidized LDL immune complexes: role in phagocytosis and cytokine release.

    PubMed

    Truman, Jean-Philip; Al Gadban, Mohammed M; Smith, Kent J; Jenkins, Russell W; Mayroo, Nalini; Virella, Gabriel; Lopes-Virella, Maria F; Bielawska, Alicja; Hannun, Yusuf A; Hammad, Samar M

    2012-05-01

    Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) and oxLDL-containing immune complexes (oxLDL-IC) contribute to the formation of lipid-laden macrophages (foam cells). Fcγ receptors mediate uptake of oxLDL-IC, whereas scavenger receptors internalize oxLDL. We have previously reported that oxLDL-IC, but not free oxLDL, activate macrophages and prolong their survival. Sphingomyelin is a major constituent of cell membranes and lipoprotein particles and acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase) hydrolyses sphingomyelin to generate the bioactive lipid ceramide. ASMase exists in two forms: lysosomal (L-ASMase) and secretory (S-ASMase). In this study we examined whether oxLDL and oxLDL-IC regulate ASMase differently, and whether ASMase mediates monocyte/macrophage activation and cytokine release. The oxLDL-IC, but not oxLDL, induced early and consistent release of catalytically active S-ASMase. The oxLDL-IC also consistently stimulated L-ASMase activity, whereas oxLDL induced a rapid transient increase in L-ASMase activity before it steadily declined below baseline. Prolonged exposure to oxLDL increased L-ASMase activity; however, activity remained significantly lower than that induced by oxLDL-IC. Further studies were aimed at defining the function of the activated ASMase. In response to oxLDL-IC, heat-shock protein 70B' (HSP70B') was up-regulated and localized with redistributed ASMase in the endosomal compartment outside the lysosome. Treatment with oxLDL-IC induced the formation and release of HSP70-containing and IL-1β-containing exosomes via an ASMase-dependent mechanism. Taken together, the results suggest that oxLDL and oxLDL-IC differentially regulate ASMase activity, and the pro-inflammatory responses to oxLDL-IC are mediated by prolonged activation of ASMase. These findings may contribute to increased understanding of mechanisms mediating macrophage involvement in atherosclerosis.

  11. Murine peptidoglycan recognition proteins PglyrpIalpha and PglyrpIbeta are encoded in the epidermal differentiation complex and are expressed in epidermal and hematopoietic tissues.

    PubMed

    Mathur, Punam; Murray, Beth; Crowell, Thomas; Gardner, Humphrey; Allaire, Normand; Hsu, Yen-Ming; Thill, Greg; Carulli, John P

    2004-06-01

    Peptidoglycan recognition proteins (PGRPs or PGLYRPs) are pattern recognition molecules that are found in insects and mammals and are critical for innate immune responses. PGRPs bind peptidoglycan, a ubiquitous component of bacterial cell walls, and are involved in killing bacteria, degrading peptidoglycan, and initiating host defense reactions. Relatively little is known about the four mammalian PGRPs. In this article, we report the sequences of mouse PglyrpIalpha and PglyrpIbeta and provide details of their expression in wild-type mouse tissues. PglyrpIalpha and PglyrpIbeta are encoded within the epidermal differentiation complex on mouse chromosome 3F. Both genes are expressed in epidermal and hematopoietic tissues. PglyrpIbeta is expressed in each of 16 tissues tested, while PglyrpIalpha expression is limited to fewer tissues, including the lung and spleen as well as several tissues of the digestive system. Both proteins are expressed in epithelial cells throughout the gut, and immunohistochemical staining shows expression in salivary glands, the squamous epithelium of the stomach, and the villi of the jejunum. Immunohistochemical staining further shows expression of both PglyrpIalpha and PglyrpIbeta in macrophages in the spleen. PglyrpIalpha is not expressed in resting RAW264.7 macrophage-like cells, but is induced by stimulation with lipopolysaccharide. PglyrpIbeta is constitutively expressed in RAW264.7 cells and is unaffected by lipopolysaccharide or peptidoglycan stimulation. Computational and experimental data suggest that these proteins are secreted. This work provides a step toward understanding the roles of PglyrpIalpha and PglyrpIbeta in host defense and chronic inflammatory conditions induced by bacteria or their components.

  12. Selective control of Pax7 expression by TNF-activated p38α/polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) signaling during muscle satellite cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Mozzetta, Chiara; Consalvi, Silvia; Saccone, Valentina; Forcales, Sonia V; Puri, Pier Lorenzo; Palacios, Daniela

    2011-01-15

    Muscle regeneration relies on adult muscle stem (satellite) cells. Inflammatory cues released within the regenerative microenvironment, such as TNFα, instruct different components of the satellite cell niche toward specialized tasks by regulating specific subsets of genes in each individual cell type. However, how regeneration cues are deciphered and interpreted by the multitude of cell types within the regenerative environment is unknown. We have recently identified an inflammation-activated signaling, consisting of p38α-mediated recruitment of polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) to the Pax7 promoter, in satellite cells. Here we show that p38α-PRC2 regulation of Pax7 expression is restricted to a discrete stage of satellite cell-mediated regeneration. In activated satellite cells, Pax7 locus shows a "bivalent" chromatin signature, with co-existence of H3-K27(3me) and H3-K4(3me), that appears to confer responsiveness to p38α-PRC2 signaling. p38α activation resolves bivalence to H3-K27(3me) which results in Pax7 repression, while p38α blockade promotes Pax7 expression by preventing PRC2-mediated H3-K27(3me) and leading to relative increase in H3-K4(3me). Interestingly, in satellite cell-derived myotubes Pax7 expression cannot be re-induced by p38α blockade, revealing a post-mitotic resistance of Pax7 gene to inflammatory cues. Likewise, in other cell types, such as muscle-derived fibroblasts, Pax7 locus is constitutively repressed by PRC2 and is unresponsive to p38α signaling. Finally, we show that Pax7 repression in embryonic stem cells is not directed by p38α signaling, although it is mediated by PRC2. This evidence indicates a cell type- and differentiation-stage specific control of Pax7 transcription by the p38α-PRC2.

  13. THOC5, a member of the mRNA export complex: a novel link between mRNA export machinery and signal transduction pathways in cell proliferation and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Tran, Doan D H; Koch, Alexandra; Tamura, Teruko

    2014-01-10

    Cell growth, differentiation, and commitment to a restricted lineage are guided by a timely expressed set of growth factor/cytokine receptors and their down-stream transcription factor genes. Transcriptional control mechanisms of gene expression during differentiation have been mainly studied by focusing on the cis- and trans-elements in promoters however, the role of mRNA export machinery during differentiation has not been adequately examined. THO (Suppressors of the transcriptional defects of hpr1 delta by overexpression) complex 5 (THOC5) is a member of THO complex which is a subcomplex of the transcription/export complex (TREX). THOC5 is evolutionarily conserved in higher eukaryotes, however the exact roles of THOC5 in transcription and mRNA export are still unclear. In this review, we focus on recently uncovered aspects of the role of THOC5 in signal transduction induced by extracellular stimuli. THOC5 is phosphorylated by several protein kinases at multiple residues upon extracellular stimuli. These include stimulation with growth factors/cytokines/chemokines, or DNA damage reagents. Furthermore, THOC5 is a substrate for several oncogenic tyrosine kinases, suggesting that THOC5 may be involved in cancer development. Recent THOC5 knockout mouse data reveal that THOC5 is an essential element in the maintenance of stem cells and growth factor/cytokine-mediated differentiation/proliferation. Furthermore, depletion of THOC5 influences less than 1% of total mRNA export in the steady state, however it influences more than 90% of growth factor/cytokine induced genes. THOC5, thereby contributes to the 3' processing and/or export of immediate-early genes induced by extracellular stimuli. These studies bring new insight into the link between the mRNA export complex and immediate-early gene response. The data from these studies also suggest that THOC5 may be a useful tool for studying stem cell biology, for modifying the differentiation processes and for cancer therapy.

  14. Bcl-xL Is Essential for the Survival and Function of Differentiated Neurons in the Cortex That Control Complex Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Ayumi; Swahari, Vijay; Plestant, Charlotte; Smith, Ikuko; McCoy, Eric; Smith, Spencer; Moy, Sheryl S.; Anton, E. S.

    2016-01-01

    conditionally deleted Bcl-xL in the brain and found that this did not result in widespread apoptosis in the proliferating progenitors. Instead, Bcl-xL deficiency induced apoptosis in a select population of differentiated neurons predominantly in the early postnatal stages. Importantly, these Bcl-xL-dependent neurons are not essential for survival of the organism but instead regulate complex behaviors. Our results show that the selective loss of these Bcl-xL-dependent neurons results in mice exhibiting severe neurobehavioral abnormalities, including self-injurious and risk-taking behaviors, hyperactivity, and learning and memory defects. PMID:27194326

  15. Stoichiometry of the heparin-Cu2+-glycine mixed-ligand complex according to differential thermal analysis and IR spectroscopy data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feofanova, M. A.; Frantseva, Yu. V.; Zhuravlev, E. V.; Baranova, N. V.; Ryasenskii, S. S.

    2015-02-01

    A method or the synthesis, isolation, and purification of a mixed-ligand complex of heparin with copper and glycine cations was suggested. The complex was studied by elemental, thermal, and spectral analyses. The elemental and crystalline hydrate compositions of the complex were determined and the molecular formula was suggested to be Na3CuHepGly · 2H2O.

  16. Characteristics of TCR/CD3 complex CD3{varepsilon} chains of regulatory CD4+ T (Treg) lymphocytes: role in Treg differentiation in vitro and impact on Treg in vivo.

    PubMed

    Rojo, Jose M; Ojeda, Gloria; Acosta, Yenny Y; Montes-Casado, Maria; Criado, Gabriel; Portolés, Pilar

    2014-03-01

    Tregs are anergic CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) T lymphocytes exerting active suppression to control immune and autoimmune responses. However, the factors in TCR recognition underlying Treg differentiation are unclear. Based on our previous data, we hypothesized that Treg TCR/CD3 antigen receptor complexes might differ from those of CD4(+)CD25(-) Tconv. Expression levels of TCR/CD3, CD3ε,ζ chains, or other molecules involved in antigen signaling and the characteristics of CD3ε chains were analyzed in thymus or spleen Treg cells from normal mice. Tregs had quantitative and qualitatively distinct TCR/CD3 complexes and CD3ε chains. They expressed significantly lower levels of the TCR/CD3 antigen receptor, CD3ε chains, TCR-ζ chain, or the CD4 coreceptor than Tconv. Levels of kinases, adaptor molecules involved in TCR signaling, and early downstream activation pathways were also lower in Tregs than in Tconv. Furthermore, TCR/CD3 complexes in Tregs were enriched in CD3ε chains conserving their N-terminal, negatively charged amino acid residues; this trait is linked to a higher activation threshold. Transfection of mutant CD3ε chains lacking these residues inhibited the differentiation of mature CD4(+)Foxp3(-) T lymphocytes into CD4(+)Foxp3(+) Tregs, and differences in CD3ε chain recognition by antibodies could be used to enrich for Tregs in vivo. Our results show quantitative and qualitative differences in the TCR/CD3 complex, supporting the hyporesponsive phenotype of Tregs concerning TCR/CD3 signals. These differences might reconcile avidity and flexible threshold models of Treg differentiation and be used to implement therapeutic approaches involving Treg manipulation.

  17. Novel Insights into Interleukin 6 (IL-6) Cis- and Trans-signaling Pathways by Differentially Manipulating the Assembly of the IL-6 Signaling Complex*

    PubMed Central

    Lacroix, Marine; Rousseau, François; Guilhot, Florence; Malinge, Pauline; Magistrelli, Giovanni; Herren, Suzanne; Jones, Simon A.; Jones, Gareth W.; Scheller, Jürgen; Lissilaa, Rami; Kosco-Vilbois, Marie; Johnson, Zoë; Buatois, Vanessa; Ferlin, Walter

    2015-01-01

    The IL-6 signaling complex is described as a hexamer, formed by the association of two IL-6·IL-6 receptor (IL-6R)·gp130 trimers, with gp130 being the signal transducer inducing cis- and trans-mediated signaling via a membrane-bound or soluble form of the IL-6R, respectively. 25F10 is an anti-mouse IL-6R mAb that binds to both membrane-bound IL-6R and soluble IL-6R with the unique property of specifically inhibiting trans-mediated signaling events. In this study, epitope mapping revealed that 25F10 interacts at site IIb of IL-6R but allows the binding of IL-6 to the IL-6R and the recruitment of gp130, forming a trimer complex. Binding of 25F10 to IL-6R prevented the formation of the hexameric complex obligate for trans-mediated signaling, suggesting that the cis- and trans-modes of IL-6 signaling adopt different mechanisms for receptor complex assembly. To study this phenomenon also in the human system, we developed NI-1201, a mAb that targets, in the human IL-6R sequence, the epitope recognized by 25F10 for mice. Interestingly, NI-1201, however, did not selectively inhibit human IL-6 trans-signaling, although both mAbs produced beneficial outcomes in conditions of exacerbated IL-6 as compared with a site I-directed mAb. These findings shed light on the complexity of IL-6 signaling. First, triggering cis- versus trans-mediated IL-6 signaling occurs via distinctive mechanisms for receptor complex assembly in mice. Second, the formation of the receptor complex leading to cis- and trans-signaling biology in mice and humans is different, and this should be taken into account when developing strategies to inhibit IL-6 clinically. PMID:26363066

  18. Differential salt-induced dissociation of the p53 protein complexes with circular and linear plasmid DNA substrates suggest involvement of a sliding mechanism.

    PubMed

    Šebest, Peter; Brázdová, Marie; Fojta, Miroslav; Pivoňková, Hana

    2015-01-30

    A study of the effects of salt conditions on the association and dissociation of wild type p53 with different ~3 kbp long plasmid DNA substrates (supercoiled, relaxed circular and linear, containing or lacking a specific p53 binding site, p53CON) using immunoprecipitation at magnetic beads is presented. Salt concentrations above 200 mM strongly affected association of the p53 protein to any plasmid DNA substrate. Strikingly different behavior was observed when dissociation of pre-formed p53-DNA complexes in increased salt concentrations was studied. While contribution from the p53CON to the stability of the p53-DNA complexes was detected between 100 and 170 mM KCl, p53 complexes with circular DNAs (but not linear) exhibited considerable resistance towards salt treatment for KCl concentrations as high as 2 M provided that the p53 basic C-terminal DNA binding site (CTDBS) was available for DNA binding. On the contrary, when the CTDBS was blocked by antibody used for immunoprecipitation, all p53-DNA complexes were completely dissociated from the p53 protein in KCl concentrations≥200 mM under the same conditions. These observations suggest: (a) different ways for association and dissociation of the p53-DNA complexes in the presence of the CTDBS; and (b) a critical role for a sliding mechanism, mediated by the C-terminal domain, in the dissociation process.

  19. Differential recall of derived and inflected word forms in working memory: examining the role of morphological information in simple and complex working memory tasks

    PubMed Central

    Service, Elisabet; Maury, Sini

    2015-01-01

    Working memory (WM) has been described as an interface between cognition and action, or a system for access to a limited amount of information needed in complex cognition. Access to morphological information is needed for comprehending and producing sentences. The present study probed WM for morphologically complex word forms in Finnish, a morphologically rich language. We studied monomorphemic (boy), inflected (boy+’s), and derived (boy+hood) words in three tasks. Simple span, immediate serial recall of words, in Experiment 1, is assumed to mainly rely on information in the focus of attention. Sentence span, a dual task combining sentence reading with recall of the last word (Experiment 2) or of a word not included in the sentence (Experiment 3) is assumed to involve establishment of a search set in long-term memory for fast activation into the focus of attention. Recall was best for monomorphemic and worst for inflected word forms with performance on derived words in between. However, there was an interaction between word type and experiment, suggesting that complex span is more sensitive to morphological complexity in derivations than simple span. This was explored in a within-subjects Experiment 4 combining all three tasks. An interaction between morphological complexity and task was replicated. Both inflected and derived forms increased load in WM. In simple span, recall of inflectional forms resulted in form errors. Complex span tasks were more sensitive to morphological load in derived words, possibly resulting from interference from morphological neighbors in the mental lexicon. The results are best understood as involving competition among inflectional forms when binding words from input into an output structure, and competition from morphological neighbors in secondary memory during cumulative retrieval-encoding cycles. Models of verbal recall need to be able to represent morphological as well as phonological and semantic information. PMID:25642181

  20. A Comprehensive Analysis of Chromoplast Differentiation Reveals Complex Protein Changes Associated with Plastoglobule Biogenesis and Remodeling of Protein Systems in Sweet Orange Flesh1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lun; Deng, Xiuxin

    2015-01-01

    Globular and crystalloid chromoplasts were observed to be region specifically formed in sweet orange (Citrus sinensis) flesh and converted from amyloplasts during fruit maturation, which was associated with the composition of specific carotenoids and the expression of carotenogenic genes. Subsequent isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ)-based quantitative proteomic analyses of purified plastids from the flesh during chromoplast differentiation and senescence identified 1,386 putative plastid-localized proteins, 1,016 of which were quantified by spectral counting. The iTRAQ values reflecting the expression abundance of three identified proteins were validated by immunoblotting. Based on iTRAQ data, chromoplastogenesis appeared to be associated with three major protein expression patterns: (1) marked decrease in abundance of the proteins participating in the translation machinery through ribosome assembly; (2) increase in abundance of the proteins involved in terpenoid biosynthesis (including carotenoids), stress responses (redox, ascorbate, and glutathione), and development; and (3) maintenance of the proteins for signaling and DNA and RNA. Interestingly, a strong increase in abundance of several plastoglobule-localized proteins coincided with the formation of plastoglobules in the chromoplast. The proteomic data also showed that stable functioning of protein import, suppression of ribosome assembly, and accumulation of chromoplast proteases are correlated with the amyloplast-to-chromoplast transition; thus, these processes may play a collective role in chromoplast biogenesis and differentiation. By contrast, the chromoplast senescence process was inferred to be associated with significant increases in stress response and energy supply. In conclusion, this comprehensive proteomic study identified many potentially new plastid-localized proteins and provides insights into the potential developmental and molecular mechanisms underlying chromoplast

  1. Comparison of platinum, palladium, and rhodium distributions in some layered intrusions with special reference to the late differentiates (upper zone) of the Bushveld complex, South Africa.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Page, N.J.; Von Gruenewaldt, G.; Haffty, J.; Aruscavage, P. J.

    1982-01-01

    The Stillwater, Fiskenaesset and Bushveld complexes have many similarities. The trends of the Pt/(Pt + Pd) and its correlation with Mg/(Mg + Fe2+) are presented. Presumably the Pt/(Pt + Pd) variations are related to changes in major mineral compositions. -K.A.R.

  2. The Differential Effects of Two Types of Task Repetition on the Complexity, Accuracy, and Fluency in Computer-Mediated L2 Written Production: A Focus on Computer Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amiryousefi, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Previous task repetition studies have primarily focused on how task repetition characteristics affect the complexity, accuracy, and fluency in L2 oral production with little attention to L2 written production. The main purpose of the study reported in this paper was to examine the effects of task repetition versus procedural repetition on the…

  3. Ancient DNA of the Extinct Lava Shearwater (Puffinus olsoni) from the Canary Islands Reveals Incipient Differentiation within the P. puffinus Complex

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Oscar; Illera, Juan Carlos; Rando, Juan Carlos; Gonzalez-Solis, Jacob; Alcover, Josep Antoni; Lalueza-Fox, Carles

    2010-01-01

    Background The loss of species during the Holocene was, dramatically more important on islands than on continents. Seabirds from islands are very vulnerable to human-induced alterations such as habitat destruction, hunting and exotic predators. For example, in the genus Puffinus (family Procellariidae) the extinction of at least five species has been recorded during the Holocene, two of them coming from the Canary Islands. Methodology/Principal Findings We used bones of the two extinct Canary shearwaters (P. olsoni and P. holeae) to obtain genetic data, for use in providing insights into the differentiation process within the genus Puffinus. Although mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) cytochrome b sequences were successfully retrieved from four Holocene specimens of the extinct Lava shearwater (P. olsoni) from Fuerteventura (Canary Islands), the P. holeae specimens yielded no DNA. Only one haplotype was detected in P. olsoni, suggesting a low genetic diversity within this species. Conclusions The phylogenetic analyses based on the DNA data reveal that: (i) the “Puffinus puffinus complex”, an assemblage of species defined using osteological characteristics (P. puffinus, P. olsoni, P. mauretanicus, P. yelkouan and probably P. holeae), shows unresolved phylogenetic relationships; (ii) despite the differences in body size and proportions, P. olsoni and the extant P. puffinus are sister species. Several hypotheses can be considered to explain the incipient differentiation between P. olsoni and P. puffinus. PMID:21209838

  4. Density functional theory investigations of the homoleptic tris(dithiolene) complexes [M(dddt)(3)](-q) (q = 3, 2 ; M = Nd(3+) and U(3+/4+)) related to lanthanide(III)/actinide(III) differentiation.

    PubMed

    Meskaldji, Samir; Belkhiri, Lotfi; Arliguie, Thérèse; Fourmigué, Marc; Ephritikhine, Michel; Boucekkine, Abdou

    2010-04-05

    The structures of the homoleptic lanthanide and actinide tris(dithiolene) complexes [M(dddt)(3)](q-) (q = 3, M = Nd(3+) and q = 3 or 2, M = U(3+/4+)) have been investigated using relativistic Density Functional Theory (DFT) computations including spin-orbit corrections coupled with the COnductor-like Screening Model (COSMO) for a realistic solvation approach. The dithiolene ligands are known to be very efficient at stabilizing metal high oxidation states. The aim of the work is to explain the peculiar symmetric folding of the three Mdddt metallacycles in these complexes, some of them existing under a polymeric form, in relation with the Ln(III)/An(III) differentiation. In the [M(dddt)(3)(py)](q-) species, where an additional pyridine ligand is linked to the metal center, the Mdddt moieties appear to be almost planar. The study brings to light the occurrence of a M...C=C interaction explaining the Mdddt folding of the [U(dddt)(3)](q-) uranium species, the metal 5f electrons playing a driving role. No such interaction appears in the case of the Nd(III) complex, and the folding of the rather flexible dddt ligands in the polymeric structure of this species should be mainly due to steric effects. Moreover, the analysis of the normal modes of vibration shows that the U(III) complex [U(dddt)(3)](3-), which has not yet been isolated, is thermodynamically stable. It appears that the X-ray characterized U(IV) complex [U(dddt)(3)](2-) should be less stable than the calculated U(III) complex in a polar solvent.

  5. Mechanisms Regulating Spermatogonial Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Mecklenburg, Jennifer M; Hermann, Brian P

    Mammalian spermatogenesis is a complex and highly ordered process by which male germ cells proceed through a series of differentiation steps to produce haploid flagellated spermatozoa. Underlying this process is a pool of adult stem cells, the spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs), which commence the spermatogenic lineage by undertaking a differentiation fate decision to become progenitor spermatogonia. Subsequently, progenitors acquire a differentiating spermatogonia phenotype and undergo a series of amplifying mitoses while becoming competent to enter meiosis. After spermatocytes complete meiosis, post-meiotic spermatids must then undergo a remarkable transformation from small round spermatids to a flagellated spermatozoa with extremely compacted nuclei. This chapter reviews the current literature pertaining to spermatogonial differentiation with an emphasis on the mechanisms controlling stem cell fate decisions and early differentiation events in the life of a spermatogonium.

  6. Differential Phosphatidylinositol-3-Kinase-Akt-mTOR Activation by Semliki Forest and Chikungunya Viruses Is Dependent on nsP3 and Connected to Replication Complex Internalization

    PubMed Central

    Biasiotto, Roberta; Eng, Kai; Neuvonen, Maarit; Götte, Benjamin; Rheinemann, Lara; Mutso, Margit; Utt, Age; Varghese, Finny; Balistreri, Giuseppe; Merits, Andres; Ahola, Tero; McInerney, Gerald M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Many viruses affect or exploit the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)-Akt-mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway, a crucial prosurvival signaling cascade. We report that this pathway was strongly activated in cells upon infection with the Old World alphavirus Semliki Forest virus (SFV), even under conditions of complete nutrient starvation. We mapped this activation to the hyperphosphorylated/acidic domain in the C-terminal tail of SFV nonstructural protein nsP3. Viruses with a deletion of this domain (SFV-Δ50) but not of other regions in nsP3 displayed a clearly delayed and reduced capacity of Akt stimulation. Ectopic expression of the nsP3 of SFV wild type (nsP3-wt), but not nsP3-Δ50, equipped with a membrane anchor was sufficient to activate Akt. We linked PI3K-Akt-mTOR stimulation to the intracellular dynamics of viral replication complexes, which are formed at the plasma membrane and subsequently internalized in a process blocked by the PI3K inhibitor wortmannin. Replication complex internalization was observed upon infection of cells with SFV-wt and SFV mutants with deletions in nsP3 but not with SFV-Δ50, where replication complexes were typically accumulated at the cell periphery. In cells infected with the closely related chikungunya virus (CHIKV), the PI3K-Akt-mTOR pathway was only moderately activated. Replication complexes of CHIKV were predominantly located at the cell periphery. Exchanging the hypervariable C-terminal tail of nsP3 between SFV and CHIKV induced the phenotype of strong PI3K-Akt-mTOR activation and replication complex internalization in CHIKV. In conclusion, infection with SFV but not CHIKV boosts PI3K-Akt-mTOR through the hyperphosphorylated/acidic domain of nsP3 to drive replication complex internalization. IMPORTANCE SFV and CHIKV are very similar in terms of molecular and cell biology, e.g., regarding replication and molecular interactions, but are strikingly different regarding pathology: CHIKV is a relevant human

  7. Gene Loss and Lineage-Specific Restriction-Modification Systems Associated with Niche Differentiation in the Campylobacter jejuni Sequence Type 403 Clonal Complex.

    PubMed

    Morley, Laura; McNally, Alan; Paszkiewicz, Konrad; Corander, Jukka; Méric, Guillaume; Sheppard, Samuel K; Blom, Jochen; Manning, Georgina

    2015-06-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is a highly diverse species of bacteria commonly associated with infectious intestinal disease of humans and zoonotic carriage in poultry, cattle, pigs, and other animals. The species contains a large number of distinct clonal complexes that vary from host generalist lineages commonly found in poultry, livestock, and human disease cases to host-adapted specialized lineages primarily associated with livestock or poultry. Here, we present novel data on the ST403 clonal complex of C. jejuni, a lineage that has not been reported in avian hosts. Our data show that the lineage exhibits a distinctive pattern of intralineage recombination that is accompanied by the presence of lineage-specific restriction-modification systems. Furthermore, we show that the ST403 complex has undergone gene decay at a number of loci. Our data provide a putative link between the lack of association with avian hosts of C. jejuni ST403 and both gene gain and gene loss through nonsense mutations in coding sequences of genes, resulting in pseudogene formation.

  8. Differential gear

    SciTech Connect

    Shibuya, K.; Hamada, T.; Masuda, K.; Shimada, K.

    1989-05-02

    A differential gear for permitting a difference in rotational speed between two output shafts is described, the differential gear including an input shaft and two output shafts. The improvement consists of means for limiting the difference in rotational speed between the two output shafts in response to the rotational speed of the input shaft, the rotational speed limiting means comprising a differential casing coupled to the input shaft and adapted to be rotated by the input shaft, a differential pinion shaft radially extending within the differential casing and rotatably mounted at its opposite ends in the differential casing. A plurality of differential pinion gears rotatably mounted on the differential pinion shaft is also included, and also a pair of side gears having a rotational axis common to that of the differential casing, wherein the side gears mesh with the differential pinion gears and the two output shafts are fixed to the side gears, the means for limiting the difference in rotational speed between the two output shafts comprising a weight means radially movable in the differential casing, the weight means limiting the difference in rotational speed between the two output shafts in response to the centrifugal force applied to the weight means, the weight means being slidably mounted on the differential pinion shaft and being biased radially inwardly.

  9. Assessing the effects of light on differentiation and virulence of the plant pathogen Botrytis cinerea: characterization of the White Collar Complex.

    PubMed

    Canessa, Paulo; Schumacher, Julia; Hevia, Montserrat A; Tudzynski, Paul; Larrondo, Luis F

    2013-01-01

    Organisms are exposed to a tough environment, where acute daily challenges, like light, can strongly affect several aspects of an individual's physiology, including pathogenesis. While several fungal models have been widely employed to understand the physiological and molecular events associated with light perception, various other agricultural-relevant fungi still remain, in terms of their responsiveness to light, in the dark. The fungus Botrytis cinerea is an aggressive pathogen able to cause disease on a wide range of plant species. Natural B. cinerea isolates exhibit a high degree of diversity in their predominant mode of reproduction. Thus, the majority of naturally occurring strains are known to reproduce asexually via conidia and sclerotia, and sexually via apothecia. Studies from the 1970's reported on specific developmental responses to treatments with near-UV, blue, red and far-red light. To unravel the signaling machinery triggering development--and possibly also connected with virulence--we initiated the functional characterization of the transcription factor/photoreceptor BcWCL1 and its partner BcWCL2, that form the White Collar Complex (WCC) in B. cinerea. Using mutants either abolished in or exhibiting enhanced WCC signaling (overexpression of both bcwcl1 and bcwcl2), we demonstrate that the WCC is an integral part of the mentioned machinery by mediating transcriptional responses to white light and the inhibition of conidiation in response to this stimulus. Furthermore, the WCC is required for coping with excessive light, oxidative stress and also to achieve full virulence. Although several transcriptional responses are abolished in the absence of bcwcl1, the expression of some genes is still light induced and a distinct conidiation pattern in response to daily light oscillations is enhanced, revealing a complex underlying photobiology. Though overlaps with well-studied fungal systems exist, the light-associated machinery of B. cinerea appears more

  10. Subunits of the Plastid ClpPR Protease Complex Have Differential Contributions to Embryogenesis, Plastid Biogenesis, and Plant Development in Arabidopsis[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jitae; Rudella, Andrea; Ramirez Rodriguez, Verenice; Zybailov, Boris; Olinares, Paul Dominic B.; van Wijk, Klaas J.

    2009-01-01

    The plastid ClpPR protease complex in Arabidopsis thaliana consists of five catalytic ClpP and four noncatalytic ClpR subunits. An extensive analysis of the CLPR family and CLPP5 is presented to address this complexity. Null alleles for CLPR2 and CLPR4 showed delayed embryogenesis and albino embryos, with seedling development blocked in the cotyledon stage; this developmental block was overcome under heterotrophic conditions, and seedlings developed into small albino to virescent seedlings. By contrast, null alleles for CLPP5 were embryo lethal. Thus, the ClpPR proteins make different functional contributions. To further test for redundancies and functional differences between the ClpR proteins, we overexpressed full-length cDNAs for ClpR1, R2, R3, R4 in clpr1, clpr2 and clpr4 mutants. This showed that overexpression of ClpR3 can complement for the loss of ClpR1, but not for the loss of ClpR2 or ClpR4, indicating that ClpR3 can functionally substitute ClpR1. By contrast, ClpR1, R2 and R4 could not substitute each other. Double mutants of weak CLPR1 and 2 alleles were seedling lethal, showing that a minimum concentration of different ClpR proteins is essential for Clp function. Microscopy and large-scale comparative leaf proteome analyses of a CLPR4 null allele demonstrate a central role of Clp protease in chloroplast biogenesis and protein homeostasis; substrates are discussed. Lack of transcriptional and translational feedback regulation within the CLPPR gene family indicates that regulation of Clp activity occurs through Clp complex assembly and substrate delivery. PMID:19525416

  11. Cell-type specific interaction of Neu differentiation factor (NDF/heregulin) with Neu/HER-2 suggests complex ligand-receptor relationships.

    PubMed Central

    Peles, E; Ben-Levy, R; Tzahar, E; Liu, N; Wen, D; Yarden, Y

    1993-01-01

    The Neu/HER-2 receptor tyrosine kinase is overexpressed in some types of human adenocarcinomas, including tumors of the breast and the ovary. A 44 kDa glycoprotein that elevates tyrosine phosphorylation of Neu has been isolated and named Neu differentiation factor (NDF), or heregulin. Here we show that NDF affects tyrosine phosphorylation of Neu in human tumor cells of breast, colon and neuronal origin, but not in ovarian cells that overexpress the receptor. By using monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to Neu, we found that the ovarian receptor is immunologically and biochemically similar to the mammary p185neu. Nevertheless, unlike breast-derived Neu, the ovarian protein did not display covalent cross-linking to radiolabeled NDF, and was devoid of ligand-induced association with phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase. Direct binding analysis showed that NDF binds with high affinity (Kd approximately 10(-9) M) to mammary cells, but its weak association with ovarian cells is probably mediated by heparin-like molecules. Similar to the endogenous receptor, the ectopically overexpressed Neu of mammary cells, but not of ovarian and fibroblastic cells, exhibited elevated levels of NDF-induced phosphorylation and covalent cross-linking of the radiolabeled factor. Taken together, our results imply that NDF binding to cells requires both Neu and an additional cellular component, whose identity is still unknown, but its tissue distribution is more restricted than the expression of the neu gene. Images PMID:8096177

  12. Differentiation of Staphylococcus argenteus (formerly: Staphylococcus aureus clonal complex 75) by mass spectrometry from S. aureus using the first strain isolated from a wild African great ape.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Dominik; Rickmeyer, Jasmin; Gajdiss, Mike; Thye, Thorsten; Lorenzen, Stephan; Reif, Marion; Josten, Michaele; Szekat, Christiane; Melo, Luís D R; Schmithausen, Ricarda M; Liégeois, Florian; Sahl, Hans-Georg; Gonzalez, Jean-Paul J; Nagel, Michael; Bierbaum, Gabriele

    2017-01-01

    The species Staphylococcus argenteus was separated recently from Staphylococcus aureus (Tong S.Y., F. Schaumburg, M.J. Ellington, J. Corander, B. Pichon, F. Leendertz, S.D. Bentley, J. Parkhill, D.C. Holt, G. Peters, and P.M. Giffard, 2015). The objective of this work was to characterise the genome of a non-human S. argenteus strain, which had been isolated from the faeces of a wild-living western lowland gorilla in Gabon, and analyse the spectrum of this species in matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). The full genome sequence revealed a scarcity of virulence genes and absence of resistance genes, indicating a decreased virulence potential compared to S. aureus and the human methicillin-resistant S. argenteus isolate MSHR1132(T). Spectra obtained by MALDI-TOF MS and the analysis of available sequences in the genome databases identified several MALDI-TOF MS signals that clearly differentiate S. argenteus, the closely related Staphylococcus schweitzeri and S. aureus. In conclusion, in the absence of biochemical tests that identify the three species, mass spectrometry should be employed as method of choice.

  13. In vitro effects of binuclear (η (6)-p-cymene)ruthenium(II) complex containing bridging bis(nicotinate)-polyethylene glycol ester ligand on differentiation pathways of murine Th lymphocytes activated by T cell mitogen.

    PubMed

    Momcilovic, Miljana; Eichhorn, Thomas; Blazevski, Jana; Schmidt, Harry; Kaluđerović, Goran N; Stosic-Grujicic, Stanislava

    2015-04-01

    T cell differentiation into distinct T helper (Th) subpopulations is crucial in governing acquired immune responses as well as some inflammatory and autoimmune disorders. This study investigated potential of the novel neutral binuclear ruthenium(II) complexes 1-8 with general formula [{RuCl2(η(6)-p-cym)}2μ-(N(∩)N)] (N(∩)N = bis(nicotinate)- and bis(iso-nicotinate)-polyethylene glycol esters; (3-py)COO(CH2CH2O) n CO(3-py) and (4-py)COO(CH2CH2O) n CO(4-py); n = 1-4), as well as [RuCl2(η(6)-p-cym)(nic)] (R1, nic = nicotinate) and [RuCl2(η(6)-p-cym)(inic)] (R2, inic = isonicotinate) as an immunomodulatory agents capable to direct Th cell differentiation. From all investigated complexes, [{RuCl2(η(6)-p-cym)}2μ-{(3-py)COO(CH2CH2O)4CO(3-py)}] (4) was selected for further study because it did not affect splenocyte viability (in concentration up to 50 μM), but significantly reduced secretion of representative Th1 cytokine, IFN-γ induced by T cell mitogen. Besides IFN-γ, 4 inhibited dose dependently expression and production of representative Th17 cytokine, IL-17, in these cells. Otherwise, the production of anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-4 and IL-10 was upregulated. Also, 4 significantly increased CD4(+)CD25(+)FoxP3(+) Treg cell frequency in the activated splenocytes. Moreover, ConA-induced expression of Th1 transcription factors, T-bet and STAT1, as well as of Th17-related protein STAT3 was attenuated upon exposure to 4, while the expression of Th2-related transcription factor GATA3 remained stable. In conclusion, ruthenium(II) complex 4 modulates immune system cell functions in vitro by inhibiting T cell differentiation towards pathogenic Th1/Th17 phenotype and inducing a regulatory phenotype characterized by IL-10 and IL-4 production, which may provide novel therapeutic opportunities for immune-inflammatory and/or autoimmune disorders.

  14. The study of the Bithorax-complex genes in patterning CCAP neurons reveals a temporal control of neuronal differentiation by Abd-B

    PubMed Central

    Moris-Sanz, M.; Estacio-Gómez, A.; Sánchez-Herrero, E.; Díaz-Benjumea, F. J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT During development, HOX genes play critical roles in the establishment of segmental differences. In the Drosophila central nervous system, these differences are manifested in the number and type of neurons generated by each neuroblast in each segment. HOX genes can act either in neuroblasts or in postmitotic cells, and either early or late in a lineage. Additionally, they can be continuously required during development or just at a specific stage. Moreover, these features are generally segment-specific. Lately, it has been shown that contrary to what happens in other tissues, where HOX genes define domains of expression, these genes are expressed in individual cells as part of the combinatorial codes involved in cell type specification. In this report we analyse the role of the Bithorax-complex genes – Ultrabithorax, abdominal-A and Abdominal-B – in sculpting the pattern of crustacean cardioactive peptide (CCAP)-expressing neurons. These neurons are widespread in invertebrates, express CCAP, Bursicon and MIP neuropeptides and play major roles in controlling ecdysis. There are two types of CCAP neuron: interneurons and efferent neurons. Our results indicate that Ultrabithorax and Abdominal-A are not necessary for specification of the CCAP-interneurons, but are absolutely required to prevent the death by apoptosis of the CCAP-efferent neurons. Furthermore, Abdominal-B controls by repression the temporal onset of neuropeptide expression in a subset of CCAP-efferent neurons, and a peak of ecdysone hormone at the end of larval life counteracts this repression. Thus, Bithorax complex genes control the developmental appearance of these neuropeptides both temporally and spatially. PMID:26276099

  15. Differential Modulation of Functional Dynamics and Allosteric Interactions in the Hsp90-Cochaperone Complexes with p23 and Aha1: A Computational Study

    PubMed Central

    Blacklock, Kristin; Verkhivker, Gennady M.

    2013-01-01

    Allosteric interactions of the molecular chaperone Hsp90 with a large cohort of cochaperones and client proteins allow for molecular communication and event coupling in signal transduction networks. The integration of cochaperones into the Hsp90 system is driven by the regulatory mechanisms that modulate the progression of the ATPase cycle and control the recruitment of the Hsp90 clientele. In this work, we report the results of computational modeling of allosteric regulation in the Hsp90 complexes with the cochaperones p23 and Aha1. By integrating protein docking, biophysical simulations, modeling of allosteric communications, protein structure network analysis and the energy landscape theory we have investigated dynamics and stability of the Hsp90-p23 and Hsp90-Aha1 interactions in direct comparison with the extensive body of structural and functional experiments. The results have revealed that functional dynamics and allosteric interactions of Hsp90 can be selectively modulated by these cochaperones via specific targeting of the regulatory hinge regions that could restrict collective motions and stabilize specific chaperone conformations. The protein structure network parameters have quantified the effects of cochaperones on conformational stability of the Hsp90 complexes and identified dynamically stable communities of residues that can contribute to the strengthening of allosteric interactions. According to our results, p23-mediated changes in the Hsp90 interactions may provide “molecular brakes” that could slow down an efficient transmission of the inter-domain allosteric signals, consistent with the functional role of p23 in partially inhibiting the ATPase cycle. Unlike p23, Aha1-mediated acceleration of the Hsp90-ATPase cycle may be achieved via modulation of the equilibrium motions that facilitate allosteric changes favoring a closed dimerized form of Hsp90. The results of our study have shown that Aha1 and p23 can modulate the Hsp90-ATPase activity

  16. ITS1, 5.8S and ITS2 secondary structure modelling for intra-specific differentiation among species of the Colletotrichum gloeosporioides sensu lato species complex.

    PubMed

    Rampersad, Sephra N

    2014-01-01

    The Colletotrichum gloeosporioides species complex is among the most destructive fungal plant pathogens in the world, however, identification of member species which are of quarantine importance is impacted by a number of factors that negatively affect species identification. Structural information of the rRNA marker may be considered to be a conserved marker which can be used as supplementary information for possible species identification. The difficulty in using ITS rDNA sequences for identification lies in the low level of sequence variation at the intra-specific level and the generation of artificially-induced sequence variation due to errors in polymerization of the ITS array during DNA replication. Type and query ITS sequences were subjected to sequence analyses prior to generation of predicted consensus secondary structures, including the pattern of nucleotide polymorphisms and number of indel haplotypes, GC content, and detection of artificially-induced sequence variation. Data pertaining to structure stability, the presence of conserved motifs in secondary structures and mapping of all sequences onto the consensus C. gloeosporioides sensu stricto secondary structure for ITS1, 5.8S and ITS2 markers was then carried out. Motifs that are evolutionarily conserved among eukaryotes were found for all ITS1, 5.8S and ITS2 sequences. The sequences exhibited conserved features typical of functional rRNAs. Generally, polymorphisms occurred within less conserved regions and were seen as bulges, internal and terminal loops or non-canonical G-U base-pairs within regions of the double stranded helices. Importantly, there were also taxonomic motifs and base changes that were unique to specific taxa and which may be used to support intra-specific identification of members of the C. gloeosporioides sensu lato species complex.

  17. SMA OBSERVATIONS OF THE W3(OH) COMPLEX: PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL DIFFERENTIATION BETWEEN W3(H{sub 2}O) AND W3(OH)

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, Sheng-Li; Schilke, Peter; Sánchez-Monge, Álvaro; Wu, Jingwen; Wu, Yuefang; Liu, Tie; Liu, Ying

    2015-04-10

    We report on the Submillimeter Array (SMA) observations of molecular lines at 270 GHz toward the W3(OH) and W3(H{sub 2}O) complex. Although previous observations already resolved the W3(H{sub 2}O) into two or three sub-components, the physical and chemical properties of the two sources are not well constrained. Our SMA observations clearly resolved the W3(OH) and W3(H{sub 2}O) continuum cores. Taking advantage of the line fitting tool XCLASS, we identified and modeled a rich molecular spectrum in this complex, including multiple CH{sub 3}CN and CH{sub 3}OH transitions in both cores. HDO, C{sub 2}H{sub 5}CN, O{sup 13}CS, and vibrationally excited lines of HCN, CH{sub 3}CN, and CH{sub 3}OCHO were only detected in W3(H{sub 2}O). We calculate gas temperatures and column densities for both cores. The results show that W3(H{sub 2}O) has higher gas temperatures and larger column densities than W3(OH) as previously observed, suggesting physical and chemical differences between the two cores. We compare the molecular abundances in W3(H{sub 2}O) to those in the Sgr B2(N) hot core, the Orion KL hot core, and the Orion Compact Ridge, and discuss the chemical origin of specific species. An east–west velocity gradient is seen in W3(H{sub 2}O), and the extension is consistent with the bipolar outflow orientation traced by water masers and radio jets. A north–south velocity gradient across W3(OH) is also observed. However, with current observations we cannot be assured whether the velocity gradients are caused by rotation, outflow, or radial velocity differences of the sub-components of W3(OH)

  18. Ctr9, a Key Component of the Paf1 Complex, Affects Proliferation and Terminal Differentiation in the Developing Drosophila Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Bahrampour, Shahrzad; Thor, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    The Paf1 protein complex (Paf1C) is increasingly recognized as a highly conserved and broadly utilized regulator of a variety of transcriptional processes. These include the promotion of H3K4 and H3K36 trimethylation, H2BK123 ubiquitination, RNA Pol II transcriptional termination, and also RNA-mediated gene silencing. Paf1C contains five canonical protein components, including Paf1 and Ctr9, which are critical for overall complex integrity, as well as Rtf1, Leo1, and Cdc73/Parafibromin(Hrpt2)/Hyrax. In spite of a growing appreciation for the importance of Paf1C from yeast and mammalian studies, there has only been limited work in Drosophila. Here, we provide the first detailed phenotypic study of Ctr9 function in Drosophila. We found that Ctr9 mutants die at late embryogenesis or early larval life, but can be partly rescued by nervous system reexpression of Ctr9. We observed a number of phenotypes in Ctr9 mutants, including increased neuroblast numbers, increased nervous system proliferation, as well as downregulation of many neuropeptide genes. Analysis of cell cycle and regulatory gene expression revealed upregulation of the E2f1 cell cycle factor, as well as changes in Antennapedia and Grainy head expression. We also found reduction of H3K4me3 modification in the embryonic nervous system. Genome-wide transcriptome analysis points to additional downstream genes that may underlie these Ctr9 phenotypes, revealing gene expression changes in Notch pathway target genes, cell cycle genes, and neuropeptide genes. In addition, we find significant effects on the gene expression of metabolic genes. These findings reveal that Ctr9 is an essential gene that is necessary at multiple stages of nervous system development, and provides a starting point for future studies of the Paf1C in Drosophila. PMID:27520958

  19. Lack of CAK complex accumulation at DNA damage sites in XP-B and XP-B/CS fibroblasts reveals differential regulation of CAK anchoring to core TFIIH by XPB and XPD helicases during nucleotide excision repair

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Qianzheng; Wani, Gulzar; Sharma, Nidhi; Wani, Altaf

    2012-01-01

    Transcription factor II H (TFIIH) is composed of core TFIIH and Cdk-activating kinase (CAK) complexes. Besides transcription, TFIIH also participates in nucleotide excision repair (NER), verifying DNA lesions through its helicase components XPB and XPD. The assembly state of TFIIH is known to be affected by truncation mutations in Xeroderma pigmentosum group G/Cockayne syndrome (XP-G/CS). Here, we showed that CAK component MAT1 was rapidly recruited to UV-induced DNA damage sites, co-localizing with core TFIIH component p62, and dispersed from the damage sites upon completion of DNA repair. While the core TFIIH-CAK association remained intact, MAT1 failed to accumulate at DNA damage sites in fibroblasts harboring XP-B or XP-B/CS mutations. Nevertheless, MAT1, XPD and XPC as well as XPG were able to accumulate at damage sites in XP-D fibroblasts, in which the core TFIIH-CAK association also remained intact. Interestingly, XPG recruitment was impaired in XP-B/CS fibroblasts derived from patients with mild phenotype, but persisted in XP-B/CS fibroblasts from severely affected patients resulting in a nonfunctional preincision complex. An examination of steady-state levels of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) indicated that UV-induced RNAPII phosphorylation was dramatically reduced in XP-B/CS fibroblasts. These results demonstrated that the CAK rapidly disassociates from the core TFIIH upon assembly of nonfunctional preincision complex in XP-B and XP-B/CS cells. The persistency of nonfunctional preincision complex correlates with the severity exhibited by XP-B patients. The results suggest that XPB and XPD helicases differentially regulate the anchoring of CAK to core TFIIH during damage verification step of NER. PMID:23083890

  20. Performance analysis of low-complexity adaptive frequency-domain equalization and MIMO signal processing for compensation of differential mode group delay in mode-division multiplexing communication systems using few-mode fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Yi; He, Xuan; Pan, Zhongqi

    2016-02-01

    Mode-division multiplexing (MDM) transmission systems utilizing few-mode fibers (FMF) have been intensively explored to sustain continuous traffic growth. The key challenges of MDM systems are inter-modal crosstalk due to random mode coupling (RMC), and largely-accumulated differential mode group delay (DMGD), whilst hinders mode-demultiplexer implementation. The adaptive multi-input multi-output (MIMO) frequency-domain equalization (FDE) can dynamically compensate DMGD using digital signal processing (DSP) algorithms. The frequency-domain least-mean squares (FD-LMS) algorithm has been universally adopted for high-speed MDM communications, mainly for its relatively low computational complexity. However, longer training sequence is appended for FD-LMS to achieve faster convergence, which incurs prohibitively higher system overhead and reduces overall throughput. In this paper, we propose a fast-convergent single-stage adaptive frequency-domain recursive least-squares (FD-RLS) algorithm with reduced complexity for DMGD compensation at MDM coherent receivers. The performance and complexity comparison of FD-RLS, with signal-PSD-dependent FD-LMS method and conventional FD-LMS approach, are performed in a 3000 km six-mode transmission system with 65 ps/km DMGD. We explore the convergence speed of three adaptive algorithms, including the normalized mean-square-error (NMSE) per fast Fourier transform (FFT) block at 14-30 dB OSNR. The fast convergence of FD-RLS is exploited at the expense of slightly-increased necessary tap numbers for MIMO equalizers, and it can partially save the overhead of training sequence. Furthermore, we demonstrate adaptive FD-RLS can also be used for chromatic dispersion (CD) compensation without increasing the filter tap length, thus prominently reducing the DSP implementation complexity for MDM systems.

  1. Differentiation of the gene clusters encoding botulinum neurotoxin type A complexes in Clostridium botulinum type A, Ab, and A(B) strains.

    PubMed

    Franciosa, Giovanna; Floridi, Francesca; Maugliani, Antonella; Aureli, Paolo

    2004-12-01

    We describe a strategy to identify the clusters of genes encoding components of the botulinum toxin type A (boNT/A) complexes in 57 strains of Clostridium botulinum types A, Ab, and A(B) isolated in Italy and in the United States from different sources. Specifically, we combined the results of PCR for detecting the ha33 and/or p47 genes with those of boNT/A PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. Three different type A toxin gene clusters were revealed; type A1 was predominant among the strains from the United States, whereas type A2 predominated among the Italian strains, suggesting a geographic distinction between strains. By contrast, no relationship between the toxin gene clusters and the clinical or food source of strains was evident. In two C. botulinum type A isolates from the United States, we recognized a third type A toxin gene cluster (designated type A3) which was similar to that previously described only for C. botulinum type A(B) and Ab strains. Total genomic DNA from the strains was subjected to pulsed-filed gel electrophoresis and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA analyses, and the results were consistent with the boNT/A gene clusters obtained.

  2. Differentiation of the Gene Clusters Encoding Botulinum Neurotoxin Type A Complexes in Clostridium botulinum Type A, Ab, and A(B) Strains

    PubMed Central

    Franciosa, Giovanna; Floridi, Francesca; Maugliani, Antonella; Aureli, Paolo

    2004-01-01

    We describe a strategy to identify the clusters of genes encoding components of the botulinum toxin type A (boNT/A) complexes in 57 strains of Clostridium botulinum types A, Ab, and A(B) isolated in Italy and in the United States from different sources. Specifically, we combined the results of PCR for detecting the ha33 and/or p47 genes with those of boNT/A PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. Three different type A toxin gene clusters were revealed; type A1 was predominant among the strains from the United States, whereas type A2 predominated among the Italian strains, suggesting a geographic distinction between strains. By contrast, no relationship between the toxin gene clusters and the clinical or food source of strains was evident. In two C. botulinum type A isolates from the United States, we recognized a third type A toxin gene cluster (designated type A3) which was similar to that previously described only for C. botulinum type A(B) and Ab strains. Total genomic DNA from the strains was subjected to pulsed-filed gel electrophoresis and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA analyses, and the results were consistent with the boNT/A gene clusters obtained. PMID:15574917

  3. Differentiation of pulmonary bacterial pathogens in cystic fibrosis by volatile metabolites emitted by their in vitro cultures: Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia and the Burkholderia cepacia complex.

    PubMed

    Dryahina, Kseniya; Sovová, Kristýna; Nemec, Alexandr; Španěl, Patrik

    2016-08-10

    As a contribution to the continuing search for breath biomarkers of lung and airways infection in patients with cystic fibrosis, CF, we have analysed the volatile metabolites released in vitro by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and other bacteria involved in respiratory infections in these patients, i.e. those belonging to the Burkholderia cepacia complex, Staphylococcus aureus or Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. These opportunistic pathogens are generally harmless to healthy people but they may cause serious infections in patients with severe underlying disease or impaired immunity such as CF patients. Volatile organic compounds emitted from the cultures of strains belonging to the above-mentioned four taxa were analysed by selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry. In order to minimize the effect of differences in media composition all strains were cultured in three different liquid media. Multivariate statistical analysis reveals that the four taxa can be well discriminated by the differences in the headspace VOC concentration profiles. The compounds that should be targeted in breath as potential biomarkers of airway infection were identified for each of these taxa of CF pathogens.

  4. Differential Gene Expression and Protein Phosphorylation as Factors Regulating the State of the Arabidopsis SNX1 Protein Complexes in Response to Environmental Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Brumbarova, Tzvetina; Ivanov, Rumen

    2016-01-01

    Endosomal recycling of plasma membrane proteins contributes significantly to the regulation of cellular transport and signaling processes. Members of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) SORTING NEXIN (SNX) protein family were shown to mediate the endosomal retrieval of transporter proteins in response to external challenges. Our aim is to understand the possible ways through which external stimuli influence the activity of SNX1 in the root. Several proteins are known to contribute to the function of SNX1 through direct protein–protein interaction. We, therefore, compiled a list of all Arabidopsis proteins known to physically interact with SNX1 and employed available gene expression and proteomic data for a comprehensive analysis of the transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of this interactome. The genes encoding SNX1-interaction partners showed distinct expression patterns with some, like FAB1A, being uniformly expressed, while others, like MC9 and BLOS1, were expressed in specific root zones and cell types. Under stress conditions known to induce SNX1-dependent responses, two genes encoding SNX1-interacting proteins, MC9 and NHX6, showed major gene-expression variations. We could also observe zone-specific transcriptional changes of SNX1 under iron deficiency, which are consistent with the described role of the SNX1 protein. This suggests that the composition of potential SNX1-containing protein complexes in roots is cell-specific and may be readjusted in response to external stimuli. On the level of post-transcriptional modifications, we observed stress-dependent changes in the phosphorylation status of SNX1, FAB1A, and CLASP. Interestingly, the phosphorylation events affecting SNX1 interactors occur in a pattern which is largely complementary to transcriptional regulation. Our analysis shows that transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation play distinct roles in SNX1-mediated endosomal recycling under external stress. PMID:27725825

  5. Energy transfer efficiency based on one-and two-photon FRET microscopy differentiates between clustered and random distribution of membrane-bound receptor-ligand complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallrabe, Horst; Elangovan, Masilamani; Burchard, Almut; Barroso, Margarida

    2002-06-01

    We are investigating membrane-based sorting processes in polarized epithelial MDCK cells, which most likely involves membrane microdomains. We have postulated that proteins contained in these microdomains, cluster, and to prove this, we have internalized differently fluorophore labeled pIgA-R ligands in MDCK cells, stably transfected with polymeric IgA receptors (pIgA-R), from opposite plasma membranes. Our previous work showed that these receptor-ligand complexes colocalize in the apical recycling endosome (ARE), underneath the apical plasma membrane. Quantitative one-photon confocal and 2-photon (2-P) FRET microscopy allowed us to calculate energy transfer efficiency (E%). Unquenched donor levels where established based on a novel algorithm, which corrects the FRET contamination of acceptor bleed-through and donor crosstalk. Using different emission filters also confirmed the veracity of the algorithm. 2-P FRET allows the selection of a specific donor wavelength, which does not precipitate acceptor bleed-through, a clear advantage over 1-P confocal microscopy. Results show that E% is independent of acceptor levels, an indication of a clustered distribution, as in random distribution E% rises with increasing acceptor levels. However, E% decreases with increasing donor and donor:acceptor ratio levels, which we have termed 'donor geometric exclusion', where some donors in a cluster block others from interacting with an acceptor. We submit that this is a second indicator for a clustered pattern, because in a random, dispersed situation donors are not likely to be in close proximity to have such an effect. We have developed a model explaining this phenomenon.

  6. Coexisting cryptic species of the Litoditis marina complex (Nematoda) show differential resource use and have distinct microbiomes with high intraspecific variability.

    PubMed

    Derycke, S; De Meester, N; Rigaux, A; Creer, S; Bik, H; Thomas, W K; Moens, T

    2016-05-01

    Differences in resource use or in tolerances to abiotic conditions are often invoked as potential mechanisms underlying the sympatric distribution of cryptic species. Additionally, the microbiome can provide physiological adaptations of the host to environmental conditions. We determined the intra- and interspecific variability of the microbiomes of three cryptic nematode species of the Litoditis marina species complex that co-occur, but show differences in abiotic tolerances. Roche 454 pyrosequencing of the microbial 16S rRNA gene revealed distinct bacterial communities characterized by a substantial diversity (85-513 OTUs) and many rare OTUs. The core microbiome of each species contained only very few OTUs (2-6), and four OTUs were identified as potentially generating tolerance to abiotic conditions. A controlled experiment in which nematodes from two cryptic species (Pm1 and Pm3) were fed with either an E. coli suspension or a bacterial mix was performed, and the 16S rRNA gene was sequenced using the MiSeq technology. OTU richness was 10-fold higher compared to the 454 data set and ranged between 1118 and 7864. This experiment confirmed the existence of species-specific microbiomes, a core microbiome with few OTUs, and high interindividual variability. The offered food source affected the bacterial community and illustrated different feeding behaviour between the cryptic species, with Pm3 exhibiting a higher degree of selective feeding than Pm1. Morphologically similar species belonging to the same feeding guild (bacterivores) can thus have substantial differences in their associated microbiomes and feeding strategy, which in turn may have important ramifications for biodiversity-ecosystem functioning relationships.

  7. Genetic diversity and differentiation of the rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) population in western Sichuan, China, based on the second exon of the major histocompatibility complex class II DQB (MhcMamu-DQB1) alleles

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstracts Background Rhesus macaques living in western Sichuan, China, have been separated into several isolated populations due to habitat fragmentation. Previous studies based on the neutral or nearly neutral markers (mitochondrial DNA or microsatellites) showed high levels of genetic diversity and moderate genetic differentiation in the Sichuan rhesus macaques. Variation at the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) loci is widely accepted as being maintained by balancing selection, even with a low level of neutral variability in some species. However, in small and isolated or bottlenecked populations, balancing selection may be overwhelmed by genetic drift. To estimate microevolutionary forces acting on the isolated rhesus macaque populations, we examined genetic variation at Mhc-DQB1 loci in 119 wild rhesus macaques from five geographically isolated populations in western Sichuan, China, and compared the levels of MHC variation and differentiation among populations with that previously observed at neutral microsatellite markers. Results 23 Mamu-DQB1 alleles were identified in 119 rhesus macaques in western Sichuan, China. These macaques exhibited relatively high levels of genetic diversity at Mamu-DQB1. The Hanyuan population presented the highest genetic variation, whereas the Heishui population was the lowest. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) and pairwise FST values showed moderate genetic differentiation occurring among the five populations at the Mhc-DQB1 locus. Non-synonymous substitutions occurred at a higher frequency than synonymous substitutions in the peptide binding region. Levels of MHC variation within rhesus macaque populations are concordant with microsatellite variation. On the phylogenetic tree for the rhesus and crab-eating macaques, extensive allele or allelic lineage sharing is observed betweenthe two species. Conclusions Phylogenetic analyses confirm the apparent trans-species model of evolution of the Mhc-DQB1 genes in these

  8. Heterogenous graft rejection pathways in class I major histocompatibility complex-disparate combinations and their differential susceptibility to immunomodulation induced by intravenous presensitization with relevant alloantigens

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    The present study investigates the heterogeneity of graft rejection pathways in class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-disparate combinations and the susceptibility of each pathway to immunomodulation induced by intravenous presensitization with alloantigens. Depletion of CD8+ T cells was induced by repeated administration of anti-CD8 monoclonal antibody. CD8+ T cell-depleted mice failed to generate anti- allo class I MHC cytotoxic T cell (CTL) responses but exhibited anti- allo class I MHC T cell responses, such as mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR)/IL-2 production, that were induced by CD4+ T cells. In contrast, donor-specific intravenous presensitization (DSP), as a model of donor- specific transfusion, induced almost complete elimination of CD4+ and CD8+ T cell-mediated MLR/IL-2 production, whereas this regimen did not affect the generation of CTL responses induced by DSP-resistant elements (CD8+ CTL precursors and CD4+ CTL helpers). Prolongation of skin graft survival was not induced by either of the above two regimens alone, but by the combination of these. Prolonged graft survival was obtained irrespective of whether the administration of anti-CD8 antibody capable of eliminating CTL was started before or after DSP. The combination of DSP with injection of anti-CD4 antibody also effectively prolonged graft survival. However, this was the case only when the injection of antibody was started before DSP, because such antibody administration was capable of inhibiting the generation of CTL responses by eliminating DSP-resistant CD4+ CTL helpers. These results indicate that (a) the graft rejection in class I-disparate combinations is induced by CD8+ CTL-involved and -independent pathways that are resistant and susceptible to DSP, respectively; (b) DSP contributes to, but is not sufficient for, the prolongation of graft survival; and (c) the suppression of graft rejection requires an additional treatment for reducing DSP-resistant CTL responses. The results are

  9. Trace Fear Conditioning Differentially Modulates Intrinsic Excitability of Medial Prefrontal Cortex-Basolateral Complex of Amygdala Projection Neurons in Infralimbic and Prelimbic Cortices.

    PubMed

    Song, Chenghui; Ehlers, Vanessa L; Moyer, James R

    2015-09-30

    Neuronal activity in medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) is critical for the formation of trace fear memory, yet the cellular mechanisms underlying these memories remain unclear. One possibility involves the modulation of intrinsic excitability within mPFC neurons that project to the basolateral complex of amygdala (BLA). The current study used a combination of retrograde labeling and in vitro whole-cell patch-clamp recordings to examine the effect of trace fear conditioning on the intrinsic excitability of layer 5 mPFC-BLA projection neurons in adult rats. Trace fear conditioning significantly enhanced the intrinsic excitability of regular spiking infralimbic (IL) projection neurons, as evidenced by an increase in the number of action potentials after current injection. These changes were also associated with a reduction in spike threshold and an increase in h current. In contrast, trace fear conditioning reduced the excitability of regular spiking prelimbic (PL) projection neurons, through a learning-related decrease of input resistance. Interestingly, the amount of conditioned freezing was (1) positively correlated with excitability of IL-BLA projection neurons after conditioning and (2) negatively correlated with excitability of PL-BLA projection neurons after extinction. Trace fear conditioning also significantly enhanced the excitability of burst spiking PL-BLA projection neurons. In both regions, conditioning-induced plasticity was learning specific (observed in conditioned but not in pseudoconditioned rats), flexible (reversed by extinction), and transient (lasted <10 d). Together, these data suggest that intrinsic plasticity within mPFC-BLA projection neurons occurs in a subregion- and cell-type-specific manner during acquisition, consolidation, and extinction of trace fear conditioning. Significance statement: Frontal lobe-related function is vital for a variety of important behaviors, some of which decline during aging. This study involves a novel

  10. Parp2 is required for the differentiation of post-meiotic germ cells: Identification of a spermatid-specific complex containing Parp1, Parp2, TP2 and HSPA2

    SciTech Connect

    Quenet, Delphine; Mark, Manuel; Govin, Jerome; Dorsselear, A. van; Schreiber, Valerie; Khochbin, Saadi; Dantzer, Francoise

    2009-10-01

    Spermiogenesis is a complex male germ cell post-meiotic differentiation process characterized by dramatic changes in chromatin structure and function, including chromatin condensation, transcriptional inhibition and the sequential replacement of histones by transition proteins and protamines. Recent advances, in mammalian cells, suggest a possible role of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation catalyzed by Parp1 and/or Parp2 in this process. We have recently reported severely compromised spermiogenesis in Parp2-deficient mice characterized by a marked delay in nuclear elongation whose molecular mechanisms remain however unknown. Here, using in vitro protein-protein interaction assays, we show that Parp2 interacts significantly with both the transition protein TP2 and the transition chaperone HSPA2, whereas Parp1 binds weakly to HSPA2. Parp2-TP2 interaction is partly mediated by poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation. Only Parp1 poly(ADP-ribosyl)ates HSPA2. In addition, a detailed analysis of spermatid maturation in Parp2-deficient mice, combining immunohistochemistry and electron microscopic approaches, reveals a loss of spermatids expressing TP2, a defect in chromatin condensation and abnormal formation of the manchette microtubules that, together, contribute to spermatid-specific cell death. In conclusion, we propose both Parps as new participants of a spermatid-specific protein complex involved in genome reorganization throughout spermiogenesis.

  11. The identification and differentiation of the Candida parapsilosis complex species by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism of the internal transcribed spacer region of the rDNA

    PubMed Central

    Barbedo, Leonardo Silva; Figueiredo-Carvalho, Maria Helena Galdino; Muniz, Mauro de Medeiros; Zancopé-Oliveira, Rosely Maria

    2016-01-01

    Currently, it is accepted that there are three species that were formerly grouped under Candida parapsilosis: C. para- psilosis sensu stricto, Candida orthopsilosis, andCandida metapsilosis. In fact, the antifungal susceptibility profiles and distinct virulence attributes demonstrate the differences in these nosocomial pathogens. An accurate, fast, and economical identification of fungal species has been the main goal in mycology. In the present study, we searched sequences that were available in the GenBank database in order to identify the complete sequence for the internal transcribed spacer (ITS)1-5.8S-ITS2 region, which is comprised of the forward and reverse primers ITS1 and ITS4. Subsequently, an in silico polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) was performed to differentiate the C. parapsilosis complex species. Ninety-eight clinical isolates from patients with fungaemia were submitted for analysis, where 59 isolates were identified as C. parapsilosis sensu stricto, 37 were identified as C. orthopsilosis, and two were identified as C. metapsilosis. PCR-RFLP quickly and accurately identified C. parapsilosis complex species, making this method an alternative and routine identification system for use in clinical mycology laboratories. PMID:27074256

  12. Differential games.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varaiya, P. P.

    1972-01-01

    General discussion of the theory of differential games with two players and zero sum. Games starting at a fixed initial state and ending at a fixed final time are analyzed. Strategies for the games are defined. The existence of saddle values and saddle points is considered. A stochastic version of a differential game is used to examine the synthesis problem.

  13. Differentiated Staffing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Dwight W.; Kline, Lloyd W.

    The traditional educational structure requires the teacher to be part bookkeeper, part clerical assistant, and part psychologist, among other roles, while his salary scale is based on length of service. Differentiated staffing offers ways of changing this pattern. The details of differentiated duties are largely a matter of local option and…

  14. Amplicon DNA melting analysis for the simultaneous detection of Brucella spp and Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. Potential use in rapid differential diagnosis between extrapulmonary tuberculosis and focal complications of brucellosis.

    PubMed

    Sanjuan-Jimenez, Rocio; Colmenero, Juan D; Bermúdez, Pilar; Alonso, Antonio; Morata, Pilar

    2013-01-01

    Some sites of extrapulmonary tuberculosis and focal complications of brucellosis are very difficult to differentiate clinically, radiologically, and even histopathologically. Conventional microbiological methods for the diagnosis of extrapulmonary tuberculosis and complicated brucellosis not only lack adequate sensitivity, they are also time consuming, which could lead to an unfavourable prognosis. The aim of this work was to develop a multiplex real-time PCR assay based on SYBR Green I to simultaneously detect Brucella spp and Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex and evaluate the efficacy of the technique with different candidate genes. The IS711, bcsp31 and omp2a genes were used for the identification of Brucella spp and the IS6110, senX3-regX3 and cfp31 genes were targeted for the detection of the M. tuberculosis complex. As a result of the different combinations of primers, nine different reactions were evaluated. A test was defined as positive only when the gene combinations were capable of co-amplifying both pathogens in a single reaction tube and showed distinguishable melting temperatures for each microorganism. According to the melting analysis, only three combinations of amplicons (senX3-regX3+bcsp31, senX3-regX3+IS711 and IS6110+IS711) were visible. Detection limits of senX3-regX3+bcsp31 and senX3-regX3+IS711 were of 2 and 3 genome equivalents for M. tuberculosis complex and Brucella while for IS6110+IS711 they were of 200 and 300 genome equivalents, respectively. The three assays correctly identified all the samples, showing negative results for the control patients. The presence of multicopy elements and GC content were the components most influencing the efficiency of the test; this should be taken into account when designing a multiplex-based SYBR Green I assay. In conclusion, multiplex real time PCR assays based on the targets senX3-regX3+bcsp31 and senX3-regX3+IS711 using SYBR Green I are highly sensitive and reproducible. This may therefore be a

  15. Mo-mineralized porphyries are relatively hydrous and differentiated: insights from the Permian-Triassic granitic complex in the Baituyingzi Mo-Cu district, eastern Inner Mongolia, NE China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yan; Liu, Jianming; Zeng, Qingdong; Wang, Jingbin; Wang, Yuwang; Hu, Ruizhong; Zhou, Lingli; Wu, Guanbin

    2016-12-01

    Mo-Cu mineralization in the Baituyingzi district of eastern Inner Mongolia occurs within a granitic complex. This paper presents and discusses zircon U-Pb ages and whole-rock geochemical and Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic data from the granitic complex as potential indicators for porphyry Mo fertility. The U-Pb ages indicate that five units of the granitic complex were emplaced between 265.2 ± 0.7 and 246.5 ± 1.0 Ma. Constrained by crosscutting dikes, Mo-Cu mineralization was probably related to the Baituyingzi monzogranite porphyry dated at 248.2 ± 0.64 Ma. The intrusions belong to high-K calc-alkaline to shoshonitic series that are characterized by highly fractionated rare earth element (REE) patterns and strong enrichments of large ion lithophile elements, relative to high-field strength elements. Apart from the ˜246-Ma dike that shows negative ɛNd (t) values (-14.9 to -13.1), the intrusions have ɛNd(t) values ranging from -3.9 to 1.0, relatively young depleted mantle model ages (811 to 1183 Ma), 206Pb/204Pb of 18.137-18.335, and 207Pb/204Pb of 15.591-15.625, which are consistent with a juvenile lower crustal origin. Among the intrusions, the ˜248-Ma porphyry and the ˜246-Ma dike show adakite-like characteristics (e.g., Sr/Y = 44.9-185) and listric-shaped REE patterns that indicate amphibole fractionation and a hydrous magma source. However, the porphyry exhibits a higher differentiation index (81.4-91.5) and a steeper REE profile (e.g., LaN/YbN = 25.6-87.0) than those of the ˜246-Ma dike, which suggests that it is highly differentiated. We propose that the complex was generated by the partial melting of juvenile mafic lower crust (containing minor old crustal relicts) that was triggered by collision between the North China Craton and Siberian Craton. As indicated by the Th/Nb, Th/Yb, Ba/Th, and Ba/La ratios of the intrusions, the crust may have been derived from the melting of the fertile mantle wedge that was metasomatized by various amounts of slab-derived fluids

  16. Differentiating Knowledge, Differentiating (Occupational) Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hordern, Jim

    2016-01-01

    This paper extends arguments for differentiating knowledge into conceptualisations of occupational practice. It is argued that specialised forms of knowledge and practice require recognition and differentiation in ways that many contemporary approaches to practice theory deny. Drawing on Hager's interpretation of MacIntyre, it is suggested that…

  17. DIFFERENTIAL ANALYZER

    DOEpatents

    Sorensen, E.G.; Gordon, C.M.

    1959-02-10

    Improvements in analog eomputing machines of the class capable of evaluating differential equations, commonly termed differential analyzers, are described. In general form, the analyzer embodies a plurality of basic computer mechanisms for performing integration, multiplication, and addition, and means for directing the result of any one operation to another computer mechanism performing a further operation. In the device, numerical quantities are represented by the rotation of shafts, or the electrical equivalent of shafts.

  18. Erythropoiesis: development and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Dzierzak, Elaine; Philipsen, Sjaak

    2013-04-01

    Through their oxygen delivery function, red blood cells are pivotal to the healthy existence of all vertebrate organisms. These cells are required during all stages of life--embryonic, fetal, neonatal, adolescent, and adult. In the adult, red blood cells are the terminally differentiated end-product cells of a complex hierarchy of hematopoietic progenitors that become progressively restricted to the erythroid lineage. During this stepwise differentiation process, erythroid progenitors undergo enormous expansion, so as to fulfill the daily requirement of ~2 × 10(11) new erythrocytes. How the erythroid lineage is made has been a topic of intense research over the last decades. Developmental studies show that there are two types of red blood cells--embryonic and adult. They develop from distinct hemogenic/hematopoietic progenitors in different anatomical sites and show distinct genetic programs. This article highlights the developmental and differentiation events necessary in the production of hemoglobin-producing red blood cells.

  19. Functional Differentiation of Antiporter-Like Polypeptides in Complex I; a Site-Directed Mutagenesis Study of Residues Conserved in MrpA and NuoL but Not in MrpD, NuoM, and NuoN

    PubMed Central

    Sperling, Eva; Górecki, Kamil; Drakenberg, Torbjörn

    2016-01-01

    It has long been known that the three largest subunits in the membrane domain (NuoL, NuoM and NuoN) of complex I are homologous to each other, as well as to two subunits (MrpA and MrpD) from a Na+/H+ antiporter, Mrp. MrpA and NuoL are more similar to each other and the same is true for MrpD and NuoN. This suggests a functional differentiation which was proven experimentally in a deletion strain model system, where NuoL could restore the loss of MrpA, but not that of MrpD and vice versa. The simplest explanation for these observations was that the MrpA and MrpD proteins are not antiporters, but rather single subunit ion channels that together form an antiporter. In this work our focus was on a set of amino acid residues in helix VIII, which are only conserved in NuoL and MrpA (but not in any of the other antiporter-like subunits.) and to compare their effect on the function of these two proteins. By combining complementation studies in B. subtilis and 23Na-NMR, response of mutants to high sodium levels were tested. All of the mutants were able to cope with high salt levels; however, all but one mutation (M258I/M225I) showed differences in the efficiency of cell growth and sodium efflux. Our findings showed that, although very similar in sequence, NuoL and MrpA seem to differ on the functional level. Nonetheless the studied mutations gave rise to interesting phenotypes which are of interest in complex I research. PMID:27391676

  20. [Complex system of differentiated prediction of strokes].

    PubMed

    Semak, A E; Misiuk, N S; Adamovich, V I; Plotnikov, Iu V; Khomasuridze, D O

    1987-01-01

    On the basis of the data on 2287 patients with cerebral strokes (CS) and 800 individuals without this disease, and using discriminant and probability methods, the authors have identified 158 supposed risk factors (RF) of CS development. They have also established the specificity of RFs which depends on the nature of CS, as well as ascertained the dependence of informative value of these factors on the size of samples and the degree of percentage reflection by the main demographic indicators of the studied population. RFs are classified as controllable and uncontrollable. The authors have selected 50 risk factors with 2-5 gradations ranging from the normal to the maximal pathology and reflecting various aspects of CS etiopathogenesis. This work has resulted in the creating of a mathematical model of SC development. On the basis of this model and using the Bayes' theorem the authors have developed a system intended for predicting CS and its nature by 50, 25, and 15 RFs which is implemented by means of universal, micro- or minicomputers and tables which make it possible to predict with a 88.8% accuracy the development of CS as well as to determine the most rational individual prophylaxis of threatening stroke which is achieved through an accurate balancing in the system of controllable and uncontrollable RFs.

  1. Food and social complexity at Çayönü Tepesi, southeastern Anatolia: Stable isotope evidence of differentiation in diet according to burial practice and sex in the early Neolithic

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Jessica; Grove, Matt; Özbek, Metin; Hongo, Hitomi

    2013-01-01

    The identification of early social complexity and differentiation in early village societies has been approached in the past most notably through the evaluation of rituals and architectural layouts. Such studies could be complemented by an approach that provides data about everyday behaviours of individuals. We took 540 human and animal bone samples for stable carbon and nitrogen isotope analysis from the Neolithic site of Çayönü Tepesi in southeastern Anatolia. The inhabitants at this site chose to bury their dead in two different ways at different times during its occupation: beneath the floors of their houses, but also inside a public mortuary building known as the Skull Building. This variation provides an opportunity using isotope methods to test whether there was evidence for structuring of daily activities (diet in this case) that might serve to reinforce this change in burial practice. We show that when the inhabitants of Çayönü Tepesi changed their architecture and operated different burial practices in conjunction, this coincided with other aspects of behaviour including socially-constituted food consumption practices, which served to reinforce social identities. PMID:24976671

  2. Linear ion trap MS(n) of enzymatically synthesized 13C-labeled fructans revealing differentiating fragmentation patterns of β (1-2) and β (1-6) fructans and providing a tool for oligosaccharide identification in complex mixtures.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Scott; Xue, Hong; Lane, Geoff; Villas-Boas, Silas; Rasmussen, Susanne

    2012-02-07

    Fructans are polymeric carbohydrates, which play important roles as plant reserve carbohydrates and stress protectants, and are beneficial for human health and animal production. Fructans are formed by the addition of β-d-fructofuranosyl units to sucrose, leading to very complex mixtures of 1-kestose based inulins, 6-kestose linked levans, and 6G-kestose derived neoseries inulins and levans in cool season grasses such as Lolium perenne. The identification of isomeric fructan oligomers in chromatographic analysis of crude plant extracts is often hampered by the lack of authentic standards, and unambiguous peak assignment usually requires time-consuming analyses of purified fructan oligomers. We have developed a LC-MS(n) method for the separation and detection of fructan isomers and present here evidence for specific MS(n) fragmentation patterns associated with β 1-2 (inulins) and β 2-6 (levans) fructans. LC-MS(n) analysis of (13)C labeled fructan oligomers produced by L. perenne fructosyltransferases expressed in yeast has enabled us to account for the observed fragmentation patterns in terms of preferential cleavage of the glycosidic bond between O- and fructose C2 in both inulins and levans and to differentiate reducing-end from nonreducing end cross ring cleavages in levans. We propose that higher order MS fragmentation patterns can be used to distinguish between the two major classes of fructan, i.e., inulins and levans, without the need for authentic standards.

  3. Crustal differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melekhova, E.; Blundy, J.

    2012-12-01

    Few erupted arc magmas are sufficiently primitive to be in equilibrium with mantle wedge peridotite, meaning a significant volume of arc crust must comprise plutonic cumulates formed during differentiation of primitive basalts. This cumulate material is typically not available for petrological study. A notable exception is the Lesser Antilles arc, which is renowned for the exceptional abundance and variety of cumulate xenoliths. Additionally, several Lesser Antilles islands erupt primitive basaltic magmas that are close to being in mantle equilibrium. The abundance of plutonic cumulate xenolith and presence of primitive basalts make the Lesser Antilles an ideal natural laboratory for understanding crust-building processes. Here we evaluate the chemical consequences of basalt differentiation in the mid to lower crust and uppermost mantle (10 to 30 km) by means of experiments on a primitive basalt from St. Vincent. The results were combined with compositional and textural observation of plutonic cumulate xenoliths from the island. Our goal was to constrain the conditions under which basalt differentiation can generate the observed chemical diversity of erupted magmas at St. Vincent and the compositions of minerals in cumulate xenoliths. Our experimental results show that it is possible to produce a wide compositional range of melts by differentiation at different depths and water contents from the same primitive source. The melts provide a close match to the full range of erupted lavas on the island. The cumulate assemblages, however, have a consistently lower pressure origin (6-10 km). They are formed by crystallisation of ascending melts generated in the deep crust. Phencocrysts in the lavas are distinct from those in cumulates, notably in the absence of amphibole. The phenocrysts demonstrably grew in response to crystallisation at very shallow depth, probably in sub-volcanic magma chambers. Thus St. Vincent shows clear evidence for polybaric crustal

  4. Transcriptome Analysis by Illumina High-Throughout Paired-End Sequencing Reveals the Complexity of Differential Gene Expression during In Vitro Plantlet Growth and Flowering in Amaranthus tricolor L.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shengcai; Kuang, Huaqin; Lai, Zhongxiong

    2014-01-01

    Amaranthus tricolor L. is a C4 plant, which is consumed as a major leafy vegetable in some tropical countries. Under conditions of high temperature and short daylight, Am. tricolor readily bolts and blooms, degrading leaf quality. A preliminary in vitro flowering study demonstrated that the flowering control pathway in Am. tricolor may differ from that of Arabidopsis. Nevertheless, no transcriptome analysis of the flowering process in Amaranthus has been conducted. To study Am. tricolor floral regulatory mechanisms, we conducted a large-scale transcriptome analysis—based on Illumina HiSeq sequencing of cDNA libraries generated from Am. tricolor at young seedling (YSS), adult seedling (ASS), flower bud (FBS), and flowering (FS) stages. A total of 99,312 unigenes were obtained. Using BLASTX, 43,088 unigenes (43.39%) were found to have significant similarity with accessions in Nr, Nt, and Swiss-Prot databases. Of these unigenes, 11,291 were mapped to 266 KEGG pathways. Further analysis of the four digital transcriptomes revealed that 735, 17,184, 274, and 206 unigenes were specifically expressed during YSS, ASS, FBS, and FS, respectively, with 59,517 unigenes expressed throughout the four stages. These unigenes were involved in many metabolic pathways related to in vitro flowering. Among these pathways, 259 unigenes were associated with ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis, indicating its importance for in vitro flowering in Am. tricolor. Other pathways, such as circadian rhythm and cell cycle, also had important roles. Finally, 26 unigenes were validated by qRT-PCR in samples from Am. tricolor at YSS, ASS, FBS, and FS; their differential expressions at the various stages indicate their possible roles in Am. tricolor growth and development, but the results were somewhat similar to Arabidopsis. Because unigenes involved in many metabolic pathways or of unknown function were revealed to regulate in vitro plantlet growth and flowering in Am. tricolor, the process appears to

  5. Multi-output differential technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bidare, Srinivas R.

    1997-01-01

    A differential is a very old and proven mechanical device that allows a single input to be split into two outputs having equal torque irrespective of the output speeds. A standard differential is capable of providing only two outputs from a single input. A recently patented multi-output differential technology known as `Plural-Output Differential' allows a single input to be split into many outputs. This new technology is the outcome of a systematic study of complex gear trains (Bidare 1992). The unique feature of a differential (equal torque at different speeds) can be applied to simplify the construction and operation of many complex mechanical devices that require equal torque's or forces at multiple outputs. It is now possible to design a mechanical hand with three or more fingers with equal torque. Since these finger are powered via a differential they are `mechanically intelligent'. A prototype device is operational and has been used to demonstrate the utility and flexibility of the design. In this paper we shall review two devices that utilize the new technology resulting in increased performance, robustness with reduced complexity and cost.

  6. Hepatocyte differentiation.

    PubMed

    Olsavsky Goyak, Katy M; Laurenzana, Elizabeth M; Omiecinski, Curtis J

    2010-01-01

    Increasingly, research suggests that for certain systems, animal models are insufficient for human toxicology testing. The development of robust, in vitro models of human toxicity is required to decrease our dependence on potentially misleading in vivo animal studies. A critical development in human toxicology testing is the use of human primary hepatocytes to model processes that occur in the intact liver. However, in order to serve as an appropriate model, primary hepatocytes must be maintained in such a way that they persist in their differentiated state. While many hepatocyte culture methods exist, the two-dimensional collagen "sandwich" system combined with a serum-free medium, supplemented with physiological glucocorticoid concentrations, appears to robustly maintain hepatocyte character. Studies in rat and human hepatocytes have shown that when cultured under these conditions, hepatocytes maintain many markers of differentiation including morphology, expression of plasma proteins, hepatic nuclear factors, phase I and II metabolic enzymes. Functionally, these culture conditions also preserve hepatic stress response pathways, such as the SAPK and MAPK pathways, as well as prototypical xenobiotic induction responses. This chapter will briefly review culture methodologies but will primarily focus on hallmark hepatocyte structural, expression and functional markers that characterize the differentiation status of the hepatocyte.

  7. Differential gearing

    SciTech Connect

    Tamiya, S.

    1986-07-29

    A differential for motor vehicles is described and the like comprising, an input drive shaft, a pair of coaxially spaced drive gears simultaneously driven by the input shaft in a same direction at a same speed of rotation about a common axis of rotation, a driven gear driven peripherally by the pair of drive gears for transmission of power from the input drive shaft, two coaxial opposed bevel sun gears having an axis of rotation concentric with an axis of rotation of the driven gear, two planetary gears disposed between the sun gears for differential driving thereof during turns of the vehicle to the right and to the left of each meshing with the sun gears for driving the suns gears. Each planetary gear has a separate axis of rotation carried by the driven gear disposed therein radially and symmetrically relative to the axis of rotation of the sun gears, and each sun gear having a respective power output shaft connected thereto for rotation therewith.

  8. Immune-privileged embryonic Swiss mouse STO and STO cell-derived progenitor cells: major histocompatibility complex and cell differentiation antigen expression patterns resemble those of human embryonic stem cell lines.

    PubMed

    Koch, Katherine S; Son, Kyung-Hwa; Maehr, Rene; Pellicciotta, Illenia; Ploegh, Hidde L; Zanetti, Maurizio; Sell, Stewart; Leffert, Hyam L

    2006-09-01

    Embryonic mouse STO (S, SIM; T, 6-thioguanine resistant; O, ouabain resistant) and 3(8)21-enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) cell lines exhibit long-term survival and hepatic progenitor cell behaviour after xenogeneic engraftment in non-immunosuppressed inbred rats, and were previously designated major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I- and class II-negative lines. To determine the molecular basis for undetectable MHC determinants, the expression and haplotype of H-2K, H-2D, H-2L and I-A proteins were reassessed by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), cDNA sequencing, RNA hybridization, immunoblotting, quantitative RT-PCR (QPCR), immunocytochemistry and flow cytometry. To detect cell differentiation (CD) surface antigens characteristic of stem cells, apoptotic regulation or adaptive immunity that might facilitate progenitor cell status or immune privilege, flow cytometry was also used to screen untreated and cytokine [interferon (IFN)-gamma]-treated cultures. Despite prior PCR genotyping analyses suggestive of H-2q haplotypes in STO, 3(8)21-EGFP and parental 3(8)21 cells, all three lines expressed H-2K cDNA sequences identical to those of d-haplotype BALB/c mice, as well as constitutive and cytokine-inducible H-2K(d) determinants. In contrast, apart from H-2L(d[LOW]) display in 3(8)21 cells, H-2Dd, H-2Ld and I-Ad determinants were undetectable. All three lines expressed constitutive and cytokine-inducible CD34; however, except for inducible CD117([LOW]) expression in 3(8)21 cells, no expression of CD45, CD117, CD62L, CD80, CD86, CD90.1 or CD95L/CD178 was observed. Constitutive and cytokine-inducible CD95([LOW]) expression was detected in STO and 3(8)21 cells, but not in 3(8)21-EGFP cells. MHC (class I(+[LOW])/class II-) and CD (CD34+/CD80-/CD86-/CD95L-) expression patterns in STO and STO cell-derived progenitor cells resemble patterns reported for human embryonic stem cell lines. Whether these patterns reflect associations with

  9. Symbolic Solution of Linear Differential Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinberg, R. B.; Grooms, R. G.

    1981-01-01

    An algorithm for solving linear constant-coefficient ordinary differential equations is presented. The computational complexity of the algorithm is discussed and its implementation in the FORMAC system is described. A comparison is made between the algorithm and some classical algorithms for solving differential equations.

  10. Differential diagnosis of feline pruritus.

    PubMed

    Foil, C S

    1988-09-01

    Pruritic skin diseases in the cat are best approached in a problem-oriented fashion. The presentations of pruritic skin disease in the cat include miliary dermatitis, pruritus of the head, scaling and crusting dermatoses, alopecia, erythroderma and exfoliation, eosinophilic granuloma complex, macular and pustular eruptions, and pruritic nodular dermatoses. There is a specific differential diagnosis for each presentation. A rational diagnostic plan, based on the likelihood of each disease in the differential diagnosis, may be formulated for each presentation of pruritus in the cat.

  11. Abnormalities of gonadal differentiation.

    PubMed

    Berkovitz, G D; Seeherunvong, T

    1998-04-01

    Gonadal differentiation involves a complex interplay of developmental pathways. The sex determining region Y (SRY) gene plays a key role in testis determination, but its interaction with other genes is less well understood. Abnormalities of gonadal differentiation result in a range of clinical problems. 46,XY complete gonadal dysgenesis is defined by an absence of testis determination. Subjects have female external genitalia and come to clinical attention because of delayed puberty. Individuals with 46,XY partial gonadal dysgenesis usually present in the newborn period for the valuation of ambiguous genitalia. Gonadal histology always shows an abnormality of seminiferous tubule formation. A diagnosis of 46,XY true hermaphroditism is made if the gonads contain well-formed testicular and ovarian elements. Despite the pivotal role of the SRY gene in testis development, mutations of SRY are unusual in subjects with a 46,XY karyotype and abnormal gonadal development. 46,XX maleness is defined by testis determination in an individual with a 46,XX karyotype. Most affected individuals have a phenotype similar to that of Klinefelter syndrome. In contrast, subjects with 46,XX true hermaphroditism usually present with ambiguous genitalia. The majority of subjects with 46,XX maleness have Y sequences including SRY in genomic DNA. However, only rare subjects with 46,XX true hermaphroditism have translocated sequences encoding SRY. Mosaicism and chimaerism involving the Y chromosome can also be associated with abnormal gonadal development. However, the vast majority of subjects with 45,X/46,XY mosaicism have normal testes and normal male external genitalia.

  12. Visualization by BiFC of different C/EBP{beta} dimers and their interaction with HP1{alpha} reveals a differential subnuclear distribution of complexes in living cells

    SciTech Connect

    Susperreguy, Sebastian; Prendes, Luciana P.; Desbats, Maria A.; Charo, Nancy L.; Brown, Karen; MacDougald, Ormond A.; Kerppola, Tom; Schwartz, Jessica; Piwien-Pilipuk, Graciela

    2011-04-01

    How the co-ordinated events of gene activation and silencing during cellular differentiation are influenced by spatial organization of the cell nucleus is still poorly understood. Little is known about the molecular mechanisms controlling subnuclear distribution of transcription factors, and their interplay with nuclear proteins that shape chromatin structure. Here we show that C/EBP{beta} not only associates with pericentromeric heterochromatin but also interacts with the nucleoskeleton upon induction of adipocyte differentiation of 3T3-L1 cells. Different C/EBP{beta} dimers localize in different nuclear domains. Using BiFC in living cells, we show that LAP (Liver Activating Protein) homodimers localize in euchromatin and heterochromatin. In contrast, LIP (Liver Inhibitory Protein) homodimers localize exclusively in heterochromatin. Importantly, their differential subnuclear distribution mirrors the site for interaction with HP1{alpha}. HP1{alpha} inhibits LAP transcriptional capacity and occupies the promoter of the C/EBP{beta}-dependent gene c/ebp{alpha} in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. When adipogenesis is induced, HP1{alpha} binding decreases from c/ebp{alpha} promoter, allowing transcription. Thus, the equilibrium among different pools of C/EBP{beta} associated with chromatin or nucleoskeleton, and dynamic changes in their interaction with HP1{alpha}, play key roles in the regulation of C/EBP target genes during adipogenesis.

  13. Linear Back-Drive Differentials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waydo, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Linear back-drive differentials have been proposed as alternatives to conventional gear differentials for applications in which there is only limited rotational motion (e.g., oscillation). The finite nature of the rotation makes it possible to optimize a linear back-drive differential in ways that would not be possible for gear differentials or other differentials that are required to be capable of unlimited rotation. As a result, relative to gear differentials, linear back-drive differentials could be more compact and less massive, could contain fewer complex parts, and could be less sensitive to variations in the viscosities of lubricants. Linear back-drive differentials would operate according to established principles of power ball screws and linear-motion drives, but would utilize these principles in an innovative way. One major characteristic of such mechanisms that would be exploited in linear back-drive differentials is the possibility of designing them to drive or back-drive with similar efficiency and energy input: in other words, such a mechanism can be designed so that a rotating screw can drive a nut linearly or the linear motion of the nut can cause the screw to rotate. A linear back-drive differential (see figure) would include two collinear shafts connected to two parts that are intended to engage in limited opposing rotations. The linear back-drive differential would also include a nut that would be free to translate along its axis but not to rotate. The inner surface of the nut would be right-hand threaded at one end and left-hand threaded at the opposite end to engage corresponding right- and left-handed threads on the shafts. A rotation and torque introduced into the system via one shaft would drive the nut in linear motion. The nut, in turn, would back-drive the other shaft, creating a reaction torque. Balls would reduce friction, making it possible for the shaft/nut coupling on each side to operate with 90 percent efficiency.

  14. Sumoylation differentially regulates Sp1 to control cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Lili; Ji, Wei-Ke; Hu, Xiao-Hui; Hu, Wen-Feng; Tang, Xiang-Cheng; Huang, Zhao-Xia; Li, Ling; Liu, Mugen; Xiang, Shi-Hua; Wu, Erxi; Woodward, Zachary; Liu, Yi-Zhi; Nguyen, Quan Dong; Li, David Wan-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian small ubiquitin-like modifiers (SUMOs) are actively involved in regulating differentiation of different cell types. However, the functional differences between SUMO isoforms and their mechanisms of action remain largely unknown. Using the ocular lens as a model system, we demonstrate that different SUMOs display distinct functions in regulating differentiation of epithelial cells into fiber cells. During lens differentiation, SUMO1 and SUMO2/3 displayed different expression, localization, and targets, suggesting differential functions. Indeed, overexpression of SUMO2/3, but not SUMO1, inhibited basic (b) FGF-induced cell differentiation. In contrast, knockdown of SUMO1, but not SUMO2/3, also inhibited bFGF action. Mechanistically, specificity protein 1 (Sp1), a major transcription factor that controls expression of lens-specific genes such as β-crystallins, was positively regulated by SUMO1 but negatively regulated by SUMO2. SUMO2 was found to inhibit Sp1 functions through several mechanisms: sumoylating it at K683 to attenuate DNA binding, and at K16 to increase its turnover. SUMO2 also interfered with the interaction between Sp1 and the coactivator, p300, and recruited a repressor, Sp3 to β-crystallin gene promoters, to negatively regulate their expression. Thus, stable SUMO1, but diminishing SUMO2/3, during lens development is necessary for normal lens differentiation. In support of this conclusion, SUMO1 and Sp1 formed complexes during early and later stages of lens development. In contrast, an interaction between SUMO2/3 and Sp1 was detected only during the initial lens vesicle stage. Together, our results establish distinct roles of different SUMO isoforms and demonstrate for the first time, to our knowledge, that Sp1 acts as a major transcription factor target for SUMO control of cell differentiation. PMID:24706897

  15. Complex visual hallucinations in the hemianopic field.

    PubMed Central

    Kölmel, H W

    1985-01-01

    From 120 patients with an homonymous hemianopia 16 experienced complex visual hallucinations in the hemianopic field. The brain lesion was located in the occipital lobe, though damage was not limited to this area. Complex hallucinations appeared after a latent period. They were weak in colour and stereotypical in appearance, which allowed differentiation from visual hallucinations of other causes. Different behaviour after saccadic eye movement differentiated between complex visual hallucinations in the hemianopic field and visual auras of an epileptic origin. PMID:3973619

  16. Three-dimensional mapping of differential amino acids of human, murine, canine and equine TLR4/MD-2 receptor complexes conferring endotoxic activation by lipid A, antagonism by Eritoran and species-dependent activities of Lipid IVA in the mammalian LPS sensor system.

    PubMed

    Scior, Thomas; Lozano-Aponte, Jorge; Figueroa-Vazquez, Vianihuini; Yunes-Rojas, Julian A; Zähringer, Ulrich; Alexander, Christian

    2013-01-01

    A literature review concerning the unexpected species differences of the vertebrate innate immune response to lipid IVA was published in CSBJ prior to the present computational study to address the unpaired activity-sequence correlation of prototypic E. coli -type lipid A and its precursor lipid IVA regarding human, murine, equine and canine species. To this end, their sequences and structures of hitherto known Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and myeloid differentiation factor 2 (MD-2) complexes were aligned and their differential side chain patterns studied. If required due to the lack of the corresponding X-ray crystallographic data, three-dimensional models of TLR4/MD-2/ligand complexes were generated using mono and dimeric crystal structures as templates and in silico docking of the prototypic ligands lipid A, lipid IVA and Eritoran. All differential amino acids were mapped to pinpoint species dependency on an atomic scale, i.e. the possible concert of mechanistically relevant side chains. In its most abstract and general form the three-dimensional (3D-) models devise a triangular interface or "wedge" where molecular interactions between TLR4, MD-2 and ligand itself take place. This study identifies two areas in the wedge related to either agonism or antagonism reflecting why ligands like lipid IVA can possess a species dependent dual activity. Lipid IVA represents an imperfect (underacylated and backbone-flipped), low affinity ligand of mammalian TLR4/MD-2 complexes. Its specific but weak antagonistic activity in the human system is in particular due to the loss of phosphate attraction in the wedge-shaped region conferred by nonhomologous residue changes when compared to crystal and modeled structures of the corresponding murine and equine TLR4/MD-2 complexes. The counter-TLR4/MD-2 unit was also taken into account since agonist-mediated dimerization in a defined m-shaped complex composed of two TLR4/MD-2/agonist subunits triggers intracellular signaling during the

  17. Differentiating phosphates by an Mg(2+) complex of the conjugate of calix[4]arene via the formation of ternary species and causing changes in the aggregation: spectroscopy, microscopy, and computational modeling.

    PubMed

    Nehra, Anita; Yarramala, Deepthi S; Hinge, Vijaya Kumar; Samanta, Kushal; Rao, Chebrolu Pulla

    2015-09-15

    A phenylene diimine capped conjugate of 1,3-calix[4]arene (L) was synthesized and characterized, and its Mg(2+) complex has been isolated and characterized. The chemo sensing ensemble of Mg(2+) bound L provides distinguishable features of response toward phosphates, viz., HPO4(2-), P2O7(4-), and AMP(2-) (Set A) and H2PO4(-), ATP(2-), and ADP(2-) (Set B). While the Set A shows the formation of ternary complex, the Set B does not exhibit any intermediate complex, but both show the release of Mg(2+) and L at different equivalents. The structures of {L + Mg(2+)} and its phosphate bound ternary complexes have been established by computational calculations, and the corresponding results agree well with the experimental ones. The microscopy studies show an aggregation-disaggregation phenomenon in the presence of different equivalents of phosphates in both of the sets. Using the fluorescence data, an INHIBIT logic gate has been built.

  18. Complexity Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Sandra L.; Anderson, Beth C.

    To determine whether consensus existed among teachers about the complexity of common classroom materials, a survey was administered to 66 pre-service and in-service kindergarten and prekindergarten teachers. Participants were asked to rate 14 common classroom materials as simple, complex, or super-complex. Simple materials have one obvious part,…

  19. Subelliptic Estimates for Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Guillemin, Victor; Sternberg, Shlomo

    1970-01-01

    New results are announced linking properties of the symbol module and characteristic variety of a differential complex with test estimates near the characteristic variety of the type considered by Hörmander (½-estimate). The first result is the invariance of the test estimates under pseudo-differential change of coordinates, and this leads to the introduction of a normal form for the complex in the neighborhood of a Cohen-MacCauley point of the symbol module. If the characteristic variety V is a manifold near the Cohen-MacCauley point (x0,ζ0) with parametrizing functions p1,...,pq, where q is the codimension of the characteristic variety in the complexified contangent bundle, the matrix [Formula: see text] of Poisson brackets defines invariantly a Hermitian form Q on the normal space to V at (x0,ζ0) when the dpζ(x0,ζ0) are used as basis, and the test estimates are satisfied at the ith stage of the complex if sig. Q (signature of Q) is ≥ n - i + 1 (n the dimension of the base manifold) or rank Q - sig. Q ≥ i + 1. Finally, conditions are given in order that, on a manifold with smooth boundary, the associated boundary complexes satisfy the ½-estimate. PMID:16591855

  20. The differential disease regulome

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Transcription factors in disease-relevant pathways represent potential drug targets, by impacting a distinct set of pathways that may be modulated through gene regulation. The influence of transcription factors is typically studied on a per disease basis, and no current resources provide a global overview of the relations between transcription factors and disease. Furthermore, existing pipelines for related large-scale analysis are tailored for particular sources of input data, and there is a need for generic methodology for integrating complementary sources of genomic information. Results We here present a large-scale analysis of multiple diseases versus multiple transcription factors, with a global map of over-and under-representation of 446 transcription factors in 1010 diseases. This map, referred to as the differential disease regulome, provides a first global statistical overview of the complex interrelationships between diseases, genes and controlling elements. The map is visualized using the Google map engine, due to its very large size, and provides a range of detailed information in a dynamic presentation format. The analysis is achieved through a novel methodology that performs a pairwise, genome-wide comparison on the cartesian product of two distinct sets of annotation tracks, e.g. all combinations of one disease and one TF. The methodology was also used to extend with maps using alternative data sets related to transcription and disease, as well as data sets related to Gene Ontology classification and histone modifications. We provide a web-based interface that allows users to generate other custom maps, which could be based on precisely specified subsets of transcription factors and diseases, or, in general, on any categorical genome annotation tracks as they are improved or become available. Conclusion We have created a first resource that provides a global overview of the complex relations between transcription factors and disease. As

  1. Automatic differentiation bibliography

    SciTech Connect

    Corliss, G.F.

    1992-07-01

    This is a bibliography of work related to automatic differentiation. Automatic differentiation is a technique for the fast, accurate propagation of derivative values using the chain rule. It is neither symbolic nor numeric. Automatic differentiation is a fundamental tool for scientific computation, with applications in optimization, nonlinear equations, nonlinear least squares approximation, stiff ordinary differential equation, partial differential equations, continuation methods, and sensitivity analysis. This report is an updated version of the bibliography which originally appeared in Automatic Differentiation of Algorithms: Theory, Implementation, and Application.

  2. Fast Differential Adder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arditti, Mort A.; Silva, Rosemary

    1993-01-01

    Differential adding circuit (or, equivalently, subtracting circuit) faster and consumes less power because it contains only one differential amplifier. Suitable for use in high-frequency-switching, high power-regulating circuit.

  3. Insights into the late-stage differentiation processes of the Catalão I carbonatite complex in Brazil: New Sr-Nd and C-O isotopic data in minerals from niobium ores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Ítalo L.; Brod, José A.; Cordeiro, Pedro F. O.; Dantas, Elton L.; Mancini, Luis H.

    2017-03-01

    The Late Cretaceous Catalão I carbonatite complex consists of ultramafic silicate rocks, phoscorites, nelsonites and carbonatites. The latest stages of the evolution of the complex are characterized by several nelsonite (magnetite-apatite rock) and carbonatite dykes, plugs and veins crosscutting earlier alkaline rocks. The interaction between the latter and late-stage carbonatites and/or carbo-hydrothermal fluids, converted the original dunites and bebedourites to metasomatic phlogopitites. Late-stage nelsonites (N1), pseudonelsonites (N2) and various types of dolomite carbonatites (DC) including norsethite-, magnesite- and/or monazite-bearing varieties show significant whole-rock Nd and Sr isotopic variations. To elucidate whether magmatic or metasomatic processes, or both, were responsible for these isotope variations we characterized the Nd and Sr isotope compositions of major mineral phases (i.e. apatite, dolomite, norsethite, pyrochlore and tetraferriphlogopite) in these late-stage rocks. Mineral isotope data recorded the same differences observed between N1 and N2 whole-rocks with N2 minerals showing more enriched isotopic signatures than minerals from N1. Sr isotopic disequilibrium among minerals from N2 pseudonelsonites and spatially related dolomite carbonatite pockets implies formation from batches of carbonate melts with distinct isotopic compositions. A detailed investigation of Nd and Sr isotopes from whole-rocks and minerals suggests that the most evolved rocks of the Catalão I complex probably derive from two different evolution paths. We propose that an earlier magmatic trend (path A) could be explained by several batches of immiscible and/or residual melts derived from carbonated-silicate parental magma (e.g. phlogopite picrite) contaminated with continental crust to a variable extent, in an AFCLI-like process. A second trend (path B) comprises highly variable 143Nd/144Ndi at nearly constant 87Sr/86Sri coupled with high δ18O in carbonates. This

  4. The Poly-cistronic miR-23-27-24 Complexes Target Endothelial Cell Junctions: Differential Functional and Molecular Effects of miR-23a and miR-23b

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jia; Zhao, Yang; Lu, Ying; Ritchie, William; Grau, Georges; Vadas, Mathew A; Gamble, Jennifer R

    2016-01-01

    The regulation of function of endothelial cell–cell junctions is fundamental in sustaining vascular integrity. The polycistronic microRNA (miR) complexes containing miR-23a-27a-24-2, and 23b-27b-24-1 are predicted to target the majority of major endothelial junctional proteins. We focus on miR-23a and miR-23b, and investigate the functional effects of these miRs on junctions. While miR-23a and 23b only differ by 1 nucleotide (g19) outside the seed region and thus are predicted to have the same targets, they function differently with miR-23a inhibiting permeability and miR-23b inhibiting angiogenesis. Both miRs target the junctional attractive molecule (tight junction protein 2) ZO-2 and the repulsive molecule junctional adhesion molecule C (JAM-C), although the inhibition of JAM-C by miR-23a is more profound than by miR-23b. The difference in potency is attributable to differences at g19 since a mutation of the t17, the g19 binding site of miR-23b in the 3′UTR of JAM-C restores identity. We also show that the pattern of expression of miR-23a and miR-23b and their targets are different. Thus, the paralogues miR-23a and miR-23b can have profoundly different effects on endothelial cell function due at least partially to selective effects on target proteins and differences in expression patterns of the miRs. This work exposes a hitherto unappreciated complexity in therapeutically targeting miRs. PMID:27741223

  5. Using Differentials to Differentiate Trigonometric and Exponential Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dray, Tevian

    2013-01-01

    Starting from geometric definitions, we show how differentials can be used to differentiate trigonometric and exponential functions without limits, numerical estimates, solutions of differential equations, or integration.

  6. Complex derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battiston, Stefano; Caldarelli, Guido; Georg, Co-Pierre; May, Robert; Stiglitz, Joseph

    2013-03-01

    The intrinsic complexity of the financial derivatives market has emerged as both an incentive to engage in it, and a key source of its inherent instability. Regulators now faced with the challenge of taming this beast may find inspiration in the budding science of complex systems.

  7. Designing Complexity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glanville, Ranulph

    2007-01-01

    This article considers the nature of complexity and design, as well as relationships between the two, and suggests that design may have much potential as an approach to improving human performance in situations seen as complex. It is developed against two backgrounds. The first is a world view that derives from second order cybernetics and radical…

  8. Complex odontoma.

    PubMed

    Preetha, A; Balikai, Bharati S; Sujatha, D; Pai, Anuradha; Ganapathy, K S

    2010-01-01

    Odontomas are hamartomatous lesions or malformations composed of mature enamel, dentin, and pulp. They may be compound or complex, depending on the extent of morphodifferentiation or their resemblance to normal teeth. The etiology of odontoma is unknown, although several theories have been proposed. This article describes a case of a large infected complex odontoma in the residual mandibular ridge, resulting in considerable mandibular expansion.

  9. The Signaling Pathways Involved in Chondrocyte Differentiation and Hypertrophic Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jianmei

    2016-01-01

    Chondrocytes communicate with each other mainly via diffusible signals rather than direct cell-to-cell contact. The chondrogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) is well regulated by the interactions of varieties of growth factors, cytokines, and signaling molecules. A number of critical signaling molecules have been identified to regulate the differentiation of chondrocyte from mesenchymal progenitor cells to their terminal maturation of hypertrophic chondrocytes, including bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), SRY-related high-mobility group-box gene 9 (Sox9), parathyroid hormone-related peptide (PTHrP), Indian hedgehog (Ihh), fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3), and β-catenin. Except for these molecules, other factors such as adenosine, O2 tension, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) also have a vital role in cartilage formation and chondrocyte maturation. Here, we outlined the complex transcriptional network and the function of key factors in this network that determine and regulate the genetic program of chondrogenesis and chondrocyte differentiation. PMID:28074096

  10. Cell complexes through time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klette, Reinhard

    2000-10-01

    The history of cell complexes is closely related to the birth and development of topology in general. Johann Benedict Listing (1802 - 1882) introduced the term 'topology' into mathematics in a paper published in 1847, and he also defined cell complexes for the first time in a paper published in 1862. Carl Friedrich Gauss (1777 - 1855) is often cited as the one who initiated these ideas, but he did not publish either on topology or on cell complexes. The pioneering work of Leonhard Euler (1707 - 1783) on graphs is also often cited as the birth of topology, and Euler's work was cited by Listing in 1862 as a stimulus for his research on cell complexes. There are different branches in topology which have little in common: point set topology, algebraic topology, differential topology etc. Confusion may arise if just 'topology' is specified, without clarifying the used concept. Topological subjects in mathematics are often related to continuous models, and therefore quite irrelevant to computer based solutions in image analysis. Compared to this, only a minority of topology publications in mathematics addresses discrete spaces which are appropriate for computer-based image analysis. In these cases, often the notion of a cell complex plays a crucial role. This paper briefly reports on a few of these publications. This paper is not intended to cover the very lively progress in cell complex studies within the context of image analysis during the last two decades. Basically it stops its historic review at the time when this subject in image analysis research gained speed in 1980 - 1990. As a general point of view, the paper indicates that image analysis contributes to a fusion of topological concepts, the geometric and the abstract cell structure approach and point set topology, which may lead towards new problems for the study of topologies defined on geometric or abstract cell complexes.

  11. Does Differentiation Have to Mean Different?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Richard

    2005-01-01

    Richard Harris questions common assumptions about differentiation. In particular, he encourages teachers to avoid accepting too readily the view that pupils of different abilities must be given different resources or activities. Instead he builds a more complex and inclusive model based on deliberate teacher decisions about where to place the…

  12. Control of Mammary Differentiation by Ras-Dependent Signal Transduction Pathways

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-01

    differentiation and apoptosis during pregnancy and lactation. These processes are initiated by a complex series of signals that include mammotrophic hormones...differentiation and apoptosis during pregnancy and lactation. These processes are initiated by a complex series of signals which include mammotrophic...differentiation will provide critical insight into control of this process in HCI I cells. Because inhibition of differentiation in HCI 1 cells

  13. Augmented nonlinear differentiator design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Xingling; Liu, Jun; Yang, Wei; Tang, Jun; Li, Jie

    2017-06-01

    This paper presents a sigmoid function based augmented nonlinear differentiator (AND) for calculating the noise-less time derivative from a noisy measurement. The prominent advantages of the present differentiation technique are: (i) compared to the existing tracking differentiators, better noise suppression ability can be achieved without appreciable delay; (ii) the enhanced noise-filtering mechanism not only can be applied to the designed differentiator, but also can be extended for improving noise-tolerance capability of the available differentiators. In addition, the convergence property and robustness performance against noises are investigated via singular perturbation theory and describing function method, respectively. Also, comparison with several classical differentiators is given to illustrate the superiority of AND in noise suppression. Finally, applications on autopilot design and displacement following for nonlinear mass spring mechanical system are given to demonstrate the effectiveness and applicability of the proposed AND technique.

  14. Bam and Bgcn in Drosophila germline stem cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Perinthottathil, Sreejith; Kim, Changsoo

    2011-01-01

    The female Drosophila reproductive organ, the ovary, has provided researchers with an incisive genetic system with which principle regulation of stem cell maintenance and differentiation has been delineated. An environmental niche regulates a stem cell's asymmetric self-renewal division that produces a daughter stem cell and a differentiated daughter cell, which further differentiate into eggs. A number of extrinsic and intrinsic factors have been identified that are required either for stem cell maintenance or differentiation. Bam/Bgcn complex plays a pivotal role in promoting stem cell differentiation. Recent papers suggest that Bam/Bgcn complex regulates translation of important maintenance factors and is also involved in the regulation of microRNA-dependent translational repression. Here, we focus on Bam and Bgcn repression of stem cell maintenance factors in the differentiation of germline stem cells (GSCs).

  15. Optimal control of motorsport differentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremlett, A. J.; Massaro, M.; Purdy, D. J.; Velenis, E.; Assadian, F.; Moore, A. P.; Halley, M.

    2015-12-01

    Modern motorsport limited slip differentials (LSD) have evolved to become highly adjustable, allowing the torque bias that they generate to be tuned in the corner entry, apex and corner exit phases of typical on-track manoeuvres. The task of finding the optimal torque bias profile under such varied vehicle conditions is complex. This paper presents a nonlinear optimal control method which is used to find the minimum time optimal torque bias profile through a lane change manoeuvre. The results are compared to traditional open and fully locked differential strategies, in addition to considering related vehicle stability and agility metrics. An investigation into how the optimal torque bias profile changes with reduced track-tyre friction is also included in the analysis. The optimal LSD profile was shown to give a performance gain over its locked differential counterpart in key areas of the manoeuvre where a quick direction change is required. The methodology proposed can be used to find both optimal passive LSD characteristics and as the basis of a semi-active LSD control algorithm.

  16. Parametrically defined differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polyanin, A. D.; Zhurov, A. I.

    2017-01-01

    The paper deals with nonlinear ordinary differential equations defined parametrically by two relations. It proposes techniques to reduce such equations, of the first or second order, to standard systems of ordinary differential equations. It obtains the general solution to some classes of nonlinear parametrically defined ODEs dependent on arbitrary functions. It outlines procedures for the numerical solution of the Cauchy problem for parametrically defined differential equations.

  17. Depolarizing differential Mueller matrices.

    PubMed

    Ortega-Quijano, Noé; Arce-Diego, José Luis

    2011-07-01

    The evolution of a polarized beam can be described by the differential formulation of Mueller calculus. The nondepolarizing differential Mueller matrices are well known. However, they only account for 7 out of the 16 independent parameters that are necessary to model a general anisotropic depolarizing medium. In this work we present the nine differential Mueller matrices for general depolarizing media, highlighting the physical implications of each of them. Group theory is applied to establish the relationship between the differential matrix and the set of transformation generators in the Minkowski space, of which Lorentz generators constitute a particular subgroup.

  18. Lung epithelial branching program antagonizes alveolar differentiation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Daniel R; Martinez Alanis, Denise; Miller, Rachel K; Ji, Hong; Akiyama, Haruhiko; McCrea, Pierre D; Chen, Jichao

    2013-11-05

    Mammalian organs, including the lung and kidney, often adopt a branched structure to achieve high efficiency and capacity of their physiological functions. Formation of a functional lung requires two developmental processes: branching morphogenesis, which builds a tree-like tubular network, and alveolar differentiation, which generates specialized epithelial cells for gas exchange. Much progress has been made to understand each of the two processes individually; however, it is not clear whether the two processes are coordinated and how they are deployed at the correct time and location. Here we show that an epithelial branching morphogenesis program antagonizes alveolar differentiation in the mouse lung. We find a negative correlation between branching morphogenesis and alveolar differentiation temporally, spatially, and evolutionarily. Gain-of-function experiments show that hyperactive small GTPase Kras expands the branching program and also suppresses molecular and cellular differentiation of alveolar cells. Loss-of-function experiments show that SRY-box containing gene 9 (Sox9) functions downstream of Fibroblast growth factor (Fgf)/Kras to promote branching and also suppresses premature initiation of alveolar differentiation. We thus propose that lung epithelial progenitors continuously balance between branching morphogenesis and alveolar differentiation, and such a balance is mediated by dual-function regulators, including Kras and Sox9. The resulting temporal delay of differentiation by the branching program may provide new insights to lung immaturity in preterm neonates and the increase in organ complexity during evolution.

  19. Transcriptional control of spermatogonial maintenance and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Song, Hye-Won; Wilkinson, Miles F

    2014-06-01

    Spermatogenesis is a multistep process that generates millions of spermatozoa per day in mammals. A key to this process is the spermatogonial stem cell (SSC), which has the dual property of continually renewing and undergoing differentiation into a spermatogonial progenitor that expands and further differentiates. In this review, we will focus on how these proliferative and early differentiation steps in mammalian male germ cells are controlled by transcription factors. Most of the transcription factors that have so far been identified as promoting SSC self-renewal (BCL6B, BRACHYURY, ETV5, ID4, LHX1, and POU3F1) are upregulated by glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF). Since GDNF is crucial for promoting SSC self-renewal, this suggests that these transcription factors are responsible for coordinating the action of GDNF in SSCs. Other transcription factors that promote SSC self-renewal are expressed independently of GDNF (FOXO1, PLZF, POU5F1, and TAF4B) and thus may act in non-GDNF pathways to promote SSC cell growth or survival. Several transcription factors have been identified that promote spermatogonial differentiation (DMRT1, NGN3, SOHLH1, SOHLH2, SOX3, and STAT3); some of these may influence the decision of an SSC to commit to differentiate while others may promote later spermatogonial differentiation steps. Many of these transcription factors regulate each other and act on common targets, suggesting they integrate to form complex transcriptional networks in self-renewing and differentiating spermatogonia.

  20. Genomic approaches to identifying transcriptional regulators of osteoblast differentiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stains, Joseph P.; Civitelli, Roberto

    2003-01-01

    Recent microarray studies of mouse and human osteoblast differentiation in vitro have identified novel transcription factors that may be important in the establishment and maintenance of differentiation. These findings help unravel the pattern of gene-expression changes that underly the complex process of bone formation.

  1. Differential Geometry Based Multiscale Models

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Guo-Wei

    2010-01-01

    Large chemical and biological systems such as fuel cells, ion channels, molecular motors, and viruses are of great importance to the scientific community and public health. Typically, these complex systems in conjunction with their aquatic environment pose a fabulous challenge to theoretical description, simulation, and prediction. In this work, we propose a differential geometry based multiscale paradigm to model complex macromolecular systems, and to put macroscopic and microscopic descriptions on an equal footing. In our approach, the differential geometry theory of surfaces and geometric measure theory are employed as a natural means to couple the macroscopic continuum mechanical description of the aquatic environment with the microscopic discrete atom-istic description of the macromolecule. Multiscale free energy functionals, or multiscale action functionals are constructed as a unified framework to derive the governing equations for the dynamics of different scales and different descriptions. Two types of aqueous macromolecular complexes, ones that are near equilibrium and others that are far from equilibrium, are considered in our formulations. We show that generalized Navier–Stokes equations for the fluid dynamics, generalized Poisson equations or generalized Poisson–Boltzmann equations for electrostatic interactions, and Newton's equation for the molecular dynamics can be derived by the least action principle. These equations are coupled through the continuum-discrete interface whose dynamics is governed by potential driven geometric flows. Comparison is given to classical descriptions of the fluid and electrostatic interactions without geometric flow based micro-macro interfaces. The detailed balance of forces is emphasized in the present work. We further extend the proposed multiscale paradigm to micro-macro analysis of electrohydrodynamics, electrophoresis, fuel cells, and ion channels. We derive generalized Poisson–Nernst–Planck equations that

  2. Differential geometry based multiscale models.

    PubMed

    Wei, Guo-Wei

    2010-08-01

    Large chemical and biological systems such as fuel cells, ion channels, molecular motors, and viruses are of great importance to the scientific community and public health. Typically, these complex systems in conjunction with their aquatic environment pose a fabulous challenge to theoretical description, simulation, and prediction. In this work, we propose a differential geometry based multiscale paradigm to model complex macromolecular systems, and to put macroscopic and microscopic descriptions on an equal footing. In our approach, the differential geometry theory of surfaces and geometric measure theory are employed as a natural means to couple the macroscopic continuum mechanical description of the aquatic environment with the microscopic discrete atomistic description of the macromolecule. Multiscale free energy functionals, or multiscale action functionals are constructed as a unified framework to derive the governing equations for the dynamics of different scales and different descriptions. Two types of aqueous macromolecular complexes, ones that are near equilibrium and others that are far from equilibrium, are considered in our formulations. We show that generalized Navier-Stokes equations for the fluid dynamics, generalized Poisson equations or generalized Poisson-Boltzmann equations for electrostatic interactions, and Newton's equation for the molecular dynamics can be derived by the least action principle. These equations are coupled through the continuum-discrete interface whose dynamics is governed by potential driven geometric flows. Comparison is given to classical descriptions of the fluid and electrostatic interactions without geometric flow based micro-macro interfaces. The detailed balance of forces is emphasized in the present work. We further extend the proposed multiscale paradigm to micro-macro analysis of electrohydrodynamics, electrophoresis, fuel cells, and ion channels. We derive generalized Poisson-Nernst-Planck equations that are

  3. Osteoblast Differentiation at a Glance

    PubMed Central

    Rutkovskiy, Arkady; Stensløkken, Kåre-Olav; Vaage, Ingvar Jarle

    2016-01-01

    Ossification is a tightly regulated process, performed by specialized cells called osteoblasts. Dysregulation of this process may cause inadequate or excessive mineralization of bones or ectopic calcification, all of which have grave consequences for human health. Understanding osteoblast biology may help to treat diseases such as osteogenesis imperfecta, calcific heart valve disease, osteoporosis, and many others. Osteoblasts are bone-building cells of mesenchymal origin; they differentiate from mesenchymal progenitors, either directly or via an osteochondroprogenitor. The direct pathway is typical for intramembranous ossification of the skull and clavicles, while the latter is a hallmark of endochondral ossification of the axial skeleton and limbs. The pathways merge at the level of preosteoblasts, which progress through 3 stages: proliferation, matrix maturation, and mineralization. Osteoblasts can also differentiate into osteocytes, which are stellate cells populating narrow interconnecting passages within the bone matrix. The key molecular switch in the commitment of mesenchymal progenitors to osteoblast lineage is the transcription factor cbfa/runx2, which has multiple upstream regulators and a wide variety of targets. Upstream is the Wnt/Notch system, Sox9, Msx2, and hedgehog signaling. Cofactors of Runx2 include Osx, Atf4, and others. A few paracrine and endocrine factors serve as coactivators, in particular, bone morphogenetic proteins and parathyroid hormone. The process is further fine-tuned by vitamin D and histone deacetylases. Osteoblast differentiation is subject to regulation by physical stimuli to ensure the formation of bone adequate for structural and dynamic support of the body. Here, we provide a brief description of the various stimuli that influence osteogenesis: shear stress, compression, stretch, micro- and macrogravity, and ultrasound. A complex understanding of factors necessary for osteoblast differentiation paves a way to introduction

  4. Lattice Boltzmann model for the complex Ginzburg-Landau equation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianying; Yan, Guangwu

    2010-06-01

    A lattice Boltzmann model with complex distribution function for the complex Ginzburg-Landau equation (CGLE) is proposed. By using multiscale technique and the Chapman-Enskog expansion on complex variables, we obtain a series of complex partial differential equations. Then, complex equilibrium distribution function and its complex moments are obtained. Based on this model, the rotation and oscillation properties of stable spiral waves and the breaking-up behavior of unstable spiral waves in CGLE are investigated in detail.

  5. Differentiating Instruction in a Whole-Group Setting (7-12): Taking the Easy First Steps into Differentiation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollas, Betty

    2007-01-01

    Applying concepts from lower grades, the author applies whole-group differentiation concepts to middle and high school, showing teachers how it is possible to differentiate within the whole-group setting in which many educators are comfortable. By allowing everyone to participate in the same activities at different levels of complexity or mastery,…

  6. Creating a Differentiated Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keck, Susan; Kinney, Scott C.

    2005-01-01

    Teachers who differentiate their instruction begin by developing a broad and thorough understanding of their students, all of whom enter classrooms with varying interests, readiness levels, talents, and knowledge. Gathering this data about students and using it to purposefully implement differentiated practices can be time consuming and…

  7. Automatic Differentiation Package

    SciTech Connect

    Gay, David M.; Phipps, Eric; Bratlett, Roscoe

    2007-03-01

    Sacado is an automatic differentiation package for C++ codes using operator overloading and C++ templating. Sacado provide forward, reverse, and Taylor polynomial automatic differentiation classes and utilities for incorporating these classes into C++ codes. Users can compute derivatives of computations arising in engineering and scientific applications, including nonlinear equation solving, time integration, sensitivity analysis, stability analysis, optimization and uncertainity quantification.

  8. Strategies for Differentiating Curricula.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Ronald S.; And Others

    Concentrating on strategies for processing information, this guide provides a collection of models and techniques appropriate for differentiating the content and instructional procedures in the classroom, and is designed for use with intermediate academically talented students. The guide is divided into four sections--Differentiated Questioning,…

  9. Conformal differential invariants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruglikov, Boris

    2017-03-01

    We compute the Hilbert polynomial and the Poincaré function counting the number of fixed jet-order differential invariants of conformal metric structures modulo local diffeomorphisms, and we describe the field of rational differential invariants separating generic orbits of the diffeomorphism pseudogroup action. This resolves the local recognition problem for conformal structures.

  10. Differentiating Instruction: Why Bother?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomlinson, Carol Ann

    2005-01-01

    In her more than 30 years of teaching, the author has practiced differentiation in her own classroom at all educational levels. Although she is well familiar with the vocabulary, research and reasoning behind it, the most compelling answer she can give for why differentiation matters in the middle grades comes from her personal experience as an…

  11. Differential Objective Function.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kino, Mary M.; And Others

    Item response theory (IRT) has been used extensively to study differential item functioning (dif) and to identify potentially biased items. The use of IRT for diagnostic purposes is less prevalent and has received comparatively less attention. This study addressed differential objective function (dof) to identify potentially biased content units.…

  12. Increasing Participation through Differentiation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christenson, Bridget; Wager, Anita A.

    2012-01-01

    One of the many challenges teachers face is trying to differentiate instruction so all students have equal opportunities to participate, learn, and engage. To provide guidelines for differentiated instruction in mathematics, staff from the Madison Metropolitan School District in Wisconsin created a pedagogical framework for teaching called…

  13. Chromosomal differentiation of cells

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 16, discusses the chromosomal differentiation of cells. The chromosomes of differentiated cells have been much less studies than those of meristematic or germline cells, probably because such cells do not usually divide spontaneously. However, in many cases they can be induced to undergo mitosis. 26 refs., 2 figs.

  14. Nonlinear differential equations

    SciTech Connect

    Dresner, L.

    1988-01-01

    This report is the text of a graduate course on nonlinear differential equations given by the author at the University of Wisconsin-Madison during the summer of 1987. The topics covered are: direction fields of first-order differential equations; the Lie (group) theory of ordinary differential equations; similarity solutions of second-order partial differential equations; maximum principles and differential inequalities; monotone operators and iteration; complementary variational principles; and stability of numerical methods. The report should be of interest to graduate students, faculty, and practicing scientists and engineers. No prior knowledge is required beyond a good working knowledge of the calculus. The emphasis is on practical results. Most of the illustrative examples are taken from the fields of nonlinear diffusion, heat and mass transfer, applied superconductivity, and helium cryogenics.

  15. Amorphic complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuhrmann, G.; Gröger, M.; Jäger, T.

    2016-02-01

    We introduce amorphic complexity as a new topological invariant that measures the complexity of dynamical systems in the regime of zero entropy. Its main purpose is to detect the very onset of disorder in the asymptotic behaviour. For instance, it gives positive value to Denjoy examples on the circle and Sturmian subshifts, while being zero for all isometries and Morse-Smale systems. After discussing basic properties and examples, we show that amorphic complexity and the underlying asymptotic separation numbers can be used to distinguish almost automorphic minimal systems from equicontinuous ones. For symbolic systems, amorphic complexity equals the box dimension of the associated Besicovitch space. In this context, we concentrate on regular Toeplitz flows and give a detailed description of the relation to the scaling behaviour of the densities of the p-skeletons. Finally, we take a look at strange non-chaotic attractors appearing in so-called pinched skew product systems. Continuous-time systems, more general group actions and the application to cut and project quasicrystals will be treated in subsequent work.

  16. Complex interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Régules, Sergio

    2016-04-01

    Complexity science - which describes phenomena such as collective and emergent behaviour - is the focus of a new centre where researchers are examining everything from the spread of influenza to what a healthy heartbeat looks like. Sergio de Régules reports.

  17. Complex Clouds

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    ...     View Larger Image The complex structure and beauty of polar clouds are highlighted by these images acquired ... corner, the edge of the Antarctic coastline and some sea ice can be seen through some thin, high cirrus clouds. The right-hand panel ...

  18. Researching Complexity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sumara, Dennis J.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses what Complexity Theory (presented as a rubric that collects theoretical understandings from a number of domains such as ecology, biology, neurology, and education) suggests about mind, selfhood, intelligence, and practices of reading, and the import of these reconceptualizations to reader-response researchers. Concludes that developing…

  19. Complex chemistry with complex compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichler, Robert; Asai, M.; Brand, H.; Chiera, N. M.; Di Nitto, A.; Dressler, R.; Düllmann, Ch. E.; Even, J.; Fangli, F.; Goetz, M.; Haba, H.; Hartmann, W.; Jäger, E.; Kaji, D.; Kanaya, J.; Kaneya, Y.; Khuyagbaatar, J.; Kindler, B.; Komori, Y.; Kraus, B.; Kratz, J. V.; Krier, J.; Kudou, Y.; Kurz, N.; Miyashita, S.; Morimoto, K.; Morita, K.; Murakami, M.; Nagame, Y.; Ooe, K.; Piguet, D.; Sato, N.; Sato, T. K.; Steiner, J.; Steinegger, P.; Sumita, T.; Takeyama, M.; Tanaka, K.; Tomitsuka, T.; Toyoshima, A.; Tsukada, K.; Türler, A.; Usoltsev, I.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Wang, Y.; Wiehl, N.; Wittwer, Y.; Yakushev, A.; Yamaki, S.; Yano, S.; Yamaki, S.; Qin, Z.

    2016-12-01

    In recent years gas-phase chemical studies assisted by physical pre-separation allowed for the investigation of fragile single molecular species by gas-phase chromatography. The latest success with the heaviest group 6 transactinide seaborgium is highlighted. The formation of a very volatile hexacarbonyl compound Sg(CO)6 was observed similarly to its lighter homologues molybdenum and tungsten. The interactions of these gaseous carbonyl complex compounds with quartz surfaces were investigated by thermochromatography. Second-generation experiments are under way to investigate the intramolecular bond between the central metal atom of the complexes and the ligands addressing the influence of relativistic effects in the heaviest compounds. Our contribution comprises some aspects of the ongoing challenging experiments as well as an outlook towards other interesting compounds related to volatile complex compounds in the gas phase.

  20. Non-differentiable variational principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cresson, Jacky

    2005-07-01

    We develop a calculus of variations for functionals which are defined on a set of non-differentiable curves. We first extend the classical differential calculus in a quantum calculus, which allows us to define a complex operator, called the scale derivative, which is the non-differentiable analogue of the classical derivative. We then define the notion of extremals for our functionals and obtain a characterization in term of a generalized Euler-Lagrange equation. We finally prove that solutions of the Schrödinger equation can be obtained as extremals of a non-differentiable variational principle, leading to an extended Hamilton's principle of least action for quantum mechanics. We compare this approach with the scale relativity theory of Nottale, which assumes a fractal structure of space-time.Résumé (Principes variationnels non différentiable). Nous développons un calcul des variations pour des fonctionnelles définies sur un ensemble de courbes non différentiables. Pour cela, nous étendons le calcul différentiel classique, en calcul appelé calcul quantique, qui nous permet de définir un opérateur à valeur complexes, appelé dérivée d'échelle, qui est l'analogue non différentiable de la dérivée usuelle. On définit alors la notion d'extremale pour ces fonctionnelles pour lesquelles nous obtenons une caractérisation via une équation d'Euler-Lagrange généralisée. On prouve enfin que les solutions de l'équation de Schrödinger peuvent s'obtenir comme solution d'un problème variationnel non différentiable, étendant ainsi le principe de moindre action de Hamilton au cadre de la mécanique quantique. On discute enfin la connexion entre ce travail et la théorie de la relativité d'échelle développée par Nottale, et qui suppose une structure fractale de l'espace-temps.

  1. First Theory Institute on Computational Differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Bischof, C.H.; Griewank, A.; Khademi, P.M.

    1993-12-31

    Computational differentiation (CD) is concerned with tools, techniques, and mathematics for generating, with little human effort, efficient and accurate derivative codes from programs written in such computer languages as C and Fortran. The primary purposes of the meeting were to explore the deep complexity issues that lie at the heart of the computation of derivatives from computer programs and to provide a forum for brainstorming on future research directions, including the applications of automatic differentiation (AD) in scientific computing and the development of AD tools.

  2. Unsteady subsonic and supersonic potential aerodynamics for complex configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morino, L.; Tseng, K.

    1977-01-01

    A recently developed general theory for unsteady compressible potential fluid dynamics for complex-configuration aircraft is reviewed. The method is based on a combination of the following techniques: Green's function method (to transform the differential equation into an integral differential-delay equation), finite element method (to transform the equation into a set of differential-delay equations in time), and the Laplace transform method (to transform the differential-delay equations into algebraic equations).

  3. The Corona Australis Complex.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaile, Roberta Anne

    What began as a HI study of the CrA star formation region has grown to incorporate the following: (1) a detailed investigation of the HI content of the CrA dark cloud; (2) an extensive molecular survey of the CrA dark cloud, from which the CrA molecular abundances were determined and compared to those of other Galactic environments; (3) an extensive HI survey of the CrA complex, which was compared to the established Galactic distributions in and near the region; (4) an examination of the extent and nature of the CrA IVCs, components of gas at intermediate, anomalous velocities; (5) an investigation of the correlations which may exist between the features of the CrA region; and (6) an evaluation of where the CrA complex fits within the framework of our understanding of the Galaxy. A review of our perceptions of the Galactic structure is contained in Chapter I. The established state of knowledge of the CrA dark cloud region--chiefly, that of a region of young and on-going star formation--is given in Chapter II. The observational studies of the CrA dark cloud region specifically are presented in Chapter III. The HI survey of the CrA complex is presented in Chapter IV, with the CrA IVCs results presented in Chapter V. A comparison of the CrA HI structure with nearby Galactic features suggests that the CrA complex--exemplified by the T_ {rm A} morphology given as a frontispiece and in Figure 4.1--is a coherently -moving HI structure falling subject to the Rayleigh-Taylor, Kelvin-Helmholtz, flute and Parker hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic instabilities under the Galactic gravitational and differential rotation forces. As the distance to the CrA IVCs still remains speculative, no definitive identity for the CrA IVCs was established. Considering the whole, the CrA complex was interpreted as a feature triggered by the Sco-Cen association, possibly a late-comer to the Lindblad Ring and possibly a result of the Tau-Gem events. The similarities with the Oph northern

  4. Managing Complexity

    SciTech Connect

    Chassin, David P.; Posse, Christian; Malard, Joel M.

    2004-08-01

    Physical analogs have shown considerable promise for understanding the behavior of complex adaptive systems, including macroeconomics, biological systems, social networks, and electric power markets. Many of today’s most challenging technical and policy questions can be reduced to a distributed economic control problem. Indeed, economically-based control of large-scale systems is founded on the conjecture that the price-based regulation (e.g., auctions, markets) results in an optimal allocation of resources and emergent optimal system control. This paper explores the state of the art in the use physical analogs for understanding the behavior of some econophysical systems and to deriving stable and robust control strategies for them. In particular we review and discussion applications of some analytic methods based on the thermodynamic metaphor according to which the interplay between system entropy and conservation laws gives rise to intuitive and governing global properties of complex systems that cannot be otherwise understood.

  5. Differentiating Science Instruction: Secondary science teachers' practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeng, Jennifer L.; Bell, Randy L.

    2015-09-01

    This descriptive study investigated the implementation practices of secondary science teachers who differentiate instruction. Participants included seven high school science teachers purposefully selected from four different schools located in a mid-Atlantic state. Purposeful selection ensured participants included differentiated instruction (DI) in their lesson implementation. Data included semi-structured interviews and field notes from a minimum of four classroom observations, selected to capture the variety of differentiation strategies employed. These data were analyzed using a constant-comparative approach. Each classroom observation was scored using the validated Differentiated Instruction Implementation Matrix-Modified, which captured both the extent to which critical indicators of DI were present in teachers' instruction and the performance levels at which they engaged in these components of DI. Results indicated participants implemented a variety of differentiation strategies in their classrooms with varying proficiency. Evidence suggested all participants used instructional modifications that required little advance preparation to accommodate differences in students' interests and learning profile. Four of the seven participants implemented more complex instructional strategies that required substantial advance preparation by the teacher. Most significantly, this study provides practical strategies for in-service science teachers beginning to differentiate instruction and recommendations for professional development and preservice science teacher education.

  6. Describing the complexity of systems: multivariable "set complexity" and the information basis of systems biology.

    PubMed

    Galas, David J; Sakhanenko, Nikita A; Skupin, Alexander; Ignac, Tomasz

    2014-02-01

    Context dependence is central to the description of complexity. Keying on the pairwise definition of "set complexity," we use an information theory approach to formulate general measures of systems complexity. We examine the properties of multivariable dependency starting with the concept of interaction information. We then present a new measure for unbiased detection of multivariable dependency, "differential interaction information." This quantity for two variables reduces to the pairwise "set complexity" previously proposed as a context-dependent measure of information in biological systems. We generalize it here to an arbitrary number of variables. Critical limiting properties of the "differential interaction information" are key to the generalization. This measure extends previous ideas about biological information and provides a more sophisticated basis for the study of complexity. The properties of "differential interaction information" also suggest new approaches to data analysis. Given a data set of system measurements, differential interaction information can provide a measure of collective dependence, which can be represented in hypergraphs describing complex system interaction patterns. We investigate this kind of analysis using simulated data sets. The conjoining of a generalized set complexity measure, multivariable dependency analysis, and hypergraphs is our central result. While our focus is on complex biological systems, our results are applicable to any complex system.

  7. Constructing Complexity: Using Reading Levels to Differentiate Reading Comprehension Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FitzPatrick, Declan

    2008-01-01

    The author remembers a class when he asked his students to discuss in small groups how Edgar Allan Poe suggests a judgment of the main character in "The Cask of Amontillado". During their discussion it became clear to the author that the students couldn't come to consensus because they had no grasp of the narrator's explanations of his motivations…

  8. When ICT Meets Schools: Differentiation, Complexity and Adaptability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tubin, Dorit

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to explore the interaction between information communication technology (ICT) and the school's organizational structure, and propose an analytical model based both on Luhmann's system theory and empirical findings. Design/methodology/approach: The approach of building a theory from a case study research along…

  9. Matrix Fourth-Complex Variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimiev, Stancho; Marinov, Marin S.; Stoev, Peter

    2009-11-01

    In the paper we consider quasi-cyclic hyper-complex variables which are naturally related to the partial differential equations with complex variables. In fact, we develop a matrix 4×4 generalization of the classical bicomplex numbers [1], [2]. We recall that a matrix 2×2 isomorphic type treatment of the classical bicomplex numbers was developed in [3]. Here we develop a matrix 4×4 generalization of the bicomplex numbers including some improvement of the papers [3] and [4]. Let us remark that a deep generalization of the considered ideas was sketch in [5] before us.

  10. Solving Ordinary Differential Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krogh, F. T.

    1987-01-01

    Initial-value ordinary differential equation solution via variable order Adams method (SIVA/DIVA) package is collection of subroutines for solution of nonstiff ordinary differential equations. There are versions for single-precision and double-precision arithmetic. Requires fewer evaluations of derivatives than other variable-order Adams predictor/ corrector methods. Option for direct integration of second-order equations makes integration of trajectory problems significantly more efficient. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  11. Maxillofacial esthesioneuroblastoma: A diagnostic complexity

    PubMed Central

    Raj, G Shyam; Rao, Guttikonda Venkateswara; Kumar, Manchikatla Praveen; Sudheerkanth, Kondamari

    2016-01-01

    Esthesioneuroblastoma is a rare malignant tumor of the sinonasal tract. Oral and maxillofacial pathologists rarely encounter this tumor in their daily practice. Because of their complex anatomic location, non-specific symptoms, varied histomorphology and unfamiliarity, most of the times, the tumor is diagnosed as benign tumor and thereby conservative treatment results in multiple recurrences. A recurrent case of esthesioneuroblastoma in a 24-year-old female patient describing the clinical, histopathological and immunohistochemical features along with differential diagnosis is discussed. PMID:27601839

  12. Maxillofacial esthesioneuroblastoma: A diagnostic complexity.

    PubMed

    Raj, G Shyam; Rao, Guttikonda Venkateswara; Kumar, Manchikatla Praveen; Sudheerkanth, Kondamari

    2016-01-01

    Esthesioneuroblastoma is a rare malignant tumor of the sinonasal tract. Oral and maxillofacial pathologists rarely encounter this tumor in their daily practice. Because of their complex anatomic location, non-specific symptoms, varied histomorphology and unfamiliarity, most of the times, the tumor is diagnosed as benign tumor and thereby conservative treatment results in multiple recurrences. A recurrent case of esthesioneuroblastoma in a 24-year-old female patient describing the clinical, histopathological and immunohistochemical features along with differential diagnosis is discussed.

  13. Nanotechnology for Stimulating Osteoprogenitor Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, A.; Bulstrode, N.W.; Whitaker, I.S.; Eastwood, D.M.; Dunaway, D.; Ferretti, P.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Bone is the second most transplanted tissue and due to its complex structure, metabolic demands and various functions, current reconstructive options such as foreign body implants and autologous tissue transfer are limited in their ability to restore defects. Most tissue engineering approaches target osteoinduction of osteoprogenitor cells by modifying the extracellular environment, using scaffolds or targeting intracellular signaling mechanisms or commonly a combination of all of these. Whilst there is no consensus as to what is the optimal cell type or approach, nanotechnology has been proposed as a powerful tool to manipulate the biomolecular and physical environment to direct osteoprogenitor cells to induce bone formation. Methods: Review of the published literature was undertaken to provide an overview of the use of nanotechnology to control osteoprogenitor differentiation and discuss the most recent developments, limitations and future directions. Results: Nanotechnology can be used to stimulate osteoprogenitor differentiation in a variety of way. We have principally classified research into nanotechnology for bone tissue engineering as generating biomimetic scaffolds, a vector to deliver genes or growth factors to cells or to alter the biophysical environment. A number of studies have shown promising results with regards to directing ostroprogenitor cell differentiation although limitations include a lack of in vivo data and incomplete characterization of engineered bone. Conclusion: There is increasing evidence that nanotechnology can be used to direct the fate of osteoprogenitor and promote bone formation. Further analysis of the functional properties and long term survival in animal models is required to assess the maturity and clinical potential of this. PMID:28217210

  14. Nitrogen control of chloroplast differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, G.W.

    1994-11-01

    This project was directed toward understanding how the availability of nitrogen affects the accumulation of chloroplast pigments and proteins that function in energy transduction and carbon metabolism. The availability of this nutrient most pervasively limits plant growth and agricultural productivity but the molecular and physiological consequences of nitrogen-deficiency are poorly understood. The model system for our studies of nitrogen-dependent regulation of chloroplast differentiation is the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii which is grown phototrophically in a continuous culture system. When 150 {mu}M nitrogen is provided at a dilution rate of 0.25 volumes of the growth medium per day, the cultures are sustained at a density of less than 10{sup 5} cells/ml and chlorophyll deficiency, the classical symptom of nitrogen-deficiency, becomes quite pronounced. We found that there is a concomitant loss of light-harvesting complexes and reduced levels of Photosystem II reaction center complexes while ATP synthetase and Photosystem I reaction centers are maintained at high levels. Moreover, reduced rates of chloroplast protein synthesis are due to differential effects on mRNA translation. In contrast, the deficiency of light-harvesting genes is due to marked reductions of the nuclear-encoded cab mRNAs. Although there is no significant reduction of the amounts of RuBPCase, we also detected substantial changes in the mRNA abundance of the alga`s two small subunit genes. All of the effects of nitrogen-limitation are readily reversible: greening of cells is completed within 24 hours after provision of 10 mM ammonium. During this time, the plastid translational constraints are disengaged and progressive changes in the abundance of nuclear transcripts occur, including a transient 30-fold elevation of {und cab} mRNAs.

  15. Complex Systems

    PubMed Central

    Goldberger, Ary L.

    2006-01-01

    Physiologic systems in health and disease display an extraordinary range of temporal behaviors and structural patterns that defy understanding based on linear constructs, reductionist strategies, and classical homeostasis. Application of concepts and computational tools derived from the contemporary study of complex systems, including nonlinear dynamics, fractals and “chaos theory,” is having an increasing impact on biology and medicine. This presentation provides a brief overview of an emerging area of biomedical research, including recent applications to cardiopulmonary medicine and chronic obstructive lung disease. PMID:16921107

  16. PC12 differentiation on biopolymer nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecchini, Marco; Bumma, Giorgia; Serresi, Michela; Beltram, Fabio

    2007-12-01

    The study of nervous system regeneration and axonal outgrowth control are relevant in several research areas, like neurophysiology or biomedical engineering. Among the elements that control neuron dynamics, the host substrate topography is a key parameter in determining cell differentiation. We present time-lapse experiments to analyze the differentiation dynamics of PC12 cells on nanopatterned biocompatible substrates. 200 nm depth gratings were fabricated on tissue-culture polystyrene substrates by nanoimprint lithography; different linewidths and pitches were compared down to 500 nm and 1000 nm, respectively. PC12 cells were cultured on these substrates and, following NGF administration to the medium, body morphology, cell movement and neuritogenesis were monitored at different time periods. In addition to demonstrating guided differentiation, our studies show complex time variations in body morphology and axon length, and guided cell movement. We show unstable synaptic connections and cell-body polarization, and the competition between topographical guidance and cell-cell interactions.

  17. Signal transduction and Th17 cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    O’Shea, John J.; Steward-Tharp, Scott M.; Laurence, Arian; Watford, Wendy T.; Wei, Lai; Adamson, Adewole S.; Fan, Samuel

    2009-01-01

    The paradigm of effector T helper cell differentiation into either Th1 or Th2 lineages has been notably shaken by the discovery of a third lineage of cells that selectively produce interleukin (IL)-17. Characterization of this new subset, referred to as Th17, has provided exciting new insights into immunoregulation, host defense and the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. Additionally, the discovery of this T cell subset has offered a fresh look at such concepts as lineage commitment and terminal differentiation. The transcriptional regulatory events and epigenetic modifications that control these processes are diverse and complex, and despite the rapid pace at which data continues to accumulate, many questions remain to be answered. Here we review our current understanding of the signaling pathways, molecular interactions and transcriptional events that lead to Th17 differentiation and effector function, as well as the epigenetic modifications that accompany them. PMID:19379825

  18. Circular Intensity Differential Scattering of chiral molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Bustamante, C.J.

    1980-12-01

    In this thesis a theory of the Circular Intensity Differential Scattering (CIDS) of chiral molecules as modelled by a helix oriented with respect to the direction of incidence of light is presented. It is shown that a necessary condition for the existence of CIDS is the presence of an asymmetric polarizability in the scatterer. The polarizability of the scatterer is assumed generally complex, so that both refractive and absorptive phenomena are taken into account.

  19. Cosmic Complexity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mather, John C.

    2012-01-01

    What explains the extraordinary complexity of the observed universe, on all scales from quarks to the accelerating universe? My favorite explanation (which I certainty did not invent) ls that the fundamental laws of physics produce natural instability, energy flows, and chaos. Some call the result the Life Force, some note that the Earth is a living system itself (Gaia, a "tough bitch" according to Margulis), and some conclude that the observed complexity requires a supernatural explanation (of which we have many). But my dad was a statistician (of dairy cows) and he told me about cells and genes and evolution and chance when I was very small. So a scientist must look for me explanation of how nature's laws and statistics brought us into conscious existence. And how is that seemll"!gly Improbable events are actually happening a!1 the time? Well, the physicists have countless examples of natural instability, in which energy is released to power change from simplicity to complexity. One of the most common to see is that cooling water vapor below the freezing point produces snowflakes, no two alike, and all complex and beautiful. We see it often so we are not amazed. But physlc!sts have observed so many kinds of these changes from one structure to another (we call them phase transitions) that the Nobel Prize in 1992 could be awarded for understanding the mathematics of their common features. Now for a few examples of how the laws of nature produce the instabilities that lead to our own existence. First, the Big Bang (what an insufficient name!) apparently came from an instability, in which the "false vacuum" eventually decayed into the ordinary vacuum we have today, plus the most fundamental particles we know, the quarks and leptons. So the universe as a whole started with an instability. Then, a great expansion and cooling happened, and the loose quarks, finding themselves unstable too, bound themselves together into today's less elementary particles like protons and

  20. Cosmic Complexity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mather, John C.

    2012-01-01

    What explains the extraordinary complexity of the observed universe, on all scales from quarks to the accelerating universe? My favorite explanation (which I certainty did not invent) ls that the fundamental laws of physics produce natural instability, energy flows, and chaos. Some call the result the Life Force, some note that the Earth is a living system itself (Gaia, a "tough bitch" according to Margulis), and some conclude that the observed complexity requires a supernatural explanation (of which we have many). But my dad was a statistician (of dairy cows) and he told me about cells and genes and evolution and chance when I was very small. So a scientist must look for me explanation of how nature's laws and statistics brought us into conscious existence. And how is that seemll"!gly Improbable events are actually happening a!1 the time? Well, the physicists have countless examples of natural instability, in which energy is released to power change from simplicity to complexity. One of the most common to see is that cooling water vapor below the freezing point produces snowflakes, no two alike, and all complex and beautiful. We see it often so we are not amazed. But physlc!sts have observed so many kinds of these changes from one structure to another (we call them phase transitions) that the Nobel Prize in 1992 could be awarded for understanding the mathematics of their common features. Now for a few examples of how the laws of nature produce the instabilities that lead to our own existence. First, the Big Bang (what an insufficient name!) apparently came from an instability, in which the "false vacuum" eventually decayed into the ordinary vacuum we have today, plus the most fundamental particles we know, the quarks and leptons. So the universe as a whole started with an instability. Then, a great expansion and cooling happened, and the loose quarks, finding themselves unstable too, bound themselves together into today's less elementary particles like protons and

  1. Superspace de Rham complex and relative cohomology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linch, William D.; Randall, Stephen

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the super-de Rham complex of five-dimensional superforms with N = 1 supersymmetry. By introducing a free supercommutative algebra of auxiliary variables, we show that this complex is equivalent to the Chevalley-Eilenberg complex of the translation supergroup with values in superfields. Each cocycle of this complex is defined by a Lorentz- and iso-spin-irreducible superfield subject to a set of constraints. Restricting to constant coefficients results in a subcomplex in which components of the cocycles are coboundaries while the constraints on the defining superfields span the cohomology. This reduces the computation of all of the superspace Bianchi identities to a single linear algebra problem the solution of which implies new features not present in the standard four-dimensional, N = 1 complex. These include splitting/joining in the complex and the existence of cocycles that do not correspond to irreducible supermultiplets of closed differential forms. Interpreting the five-dimensional de Rham complex as arising from dimensional reduction from the six-dimensional complex, we find a second five-dimensional complex associated to the relative de Rham complex of the embedding of the latter in the former. This gives rise to a second source of closed differential forms previously attributed to the phenomenon called "Weyl triviality".

  2. [Differential diagnosis of aortitis].

    PubMed

    Rousselin, C; Pontana, F; Puech, P; Lambert, M

    2016-04-01

    Aortitis are mainly described in inflammatory disorders such as Takayasu arteritis, giant cell arteritis or Behçet's disease. Aortitis is sometimes qualified as idiopathic. However, differential diagnoses must be searched since they need specific interventions. Infectious aortitis should be ruled out first as its rapid evolution and short-term poor prognosis makes it a therapeutic emergency. Furthermore, rarer differential diagnoses should be known as they require specific care that might sometimes differ from the treatment of inflammatory aortitis, such as retroperitoneal fibrosis mostly idiopathic but also secondary to neoplasia or malignant hemopathies. IgG4 related disease, Erdheim-Chester disease and inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm due to atherosclerosis are other differential diagnoses to mention in the presence of aortitis in order to adapt patients' care consequently.

  3. Troglitazone induces differentiation in Trypanosoma brucei

    SciTech Connect

    Denninger, Viola; Figarella, Katherine; Schoenfeld, Caroline; Brems, Stefanie; Busold, Christian; Lang, Florian; Hoheisel, Joerg; Duszenko, Michael . E-mail: michael.duszenko@uni-tuebingen.de

    2007-05-15

    Trypanosoma brucei, a protozoan parasite causing sleeping sickness, is transmitted by the tsetse fly and undergoes a complex lifecycle including several defined stages within the insect vector and its mammalian host. In the latter, differentiation from the long slender to the short stumpy form is induced by a yet unknown factor of trypanosomal origin. Here we describe that some thiazolidinediones are also able to induce differentiation. In higher eukaryotes, thiazolidinediones are involved in metabolism and differentiation processes mainly by binding to the intracellular receptor peroxisome proliferator activated receptor {gamma}. Our studies focus on the effects of troglitazone on bloodstream form trypanosomes. Differentiation was monitored using mitochondrial markers (membrane potential, succinate dehydrogenase activity, inhibition of oxygen uptake by KCN, amount of cytochrome transcripts), morphological changes (Transmission EM and light microscopy), and transformation experiments (loss of the Variant Surface Glycoprotein coat and increase of dihydroliponamide dehydrogenase activity). To further investigate the mechanisms responsible for these changes, microarray analyses were performed, showing an upregulation of expression site associated gene 8 (ESAG8), a potential differentiation regulator.

  4. Cross-differential amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hajimiri, Seyed-Ali (Inventor); Kee, Scott D. (Inventor); Aoki, Ichiro (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A cross-differential amplifier is provided. The cross-differential amplifier includes an inductor connected to a direct current power source at a first terminal. A first and second switch, such as transistors, are connected to the inductor at a second terminal. A first and second amplifier are connected at their supply terminals to the first and second switch. The first and second switches are operated to commutate the inductor between the amplifiers so as to provide an amplified signal while limiting the ripple voltage on the inductor and thus limiting the maximum voltage imposed across the amplifiers and switches.

  5. Cross-differential amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hajimiri, Seyed-Ali (Inventor); Kee, Scott D. (Inventor); Aoki, Ichiro (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A cross-differential amplifier is provided. The cross-differential amplifier includes an inductor connected to a direct current power source at a first terminal. A first and second switch, such as transistors, are connected to the inductor at a second terminal. A first and second amplifier are connected at their supply terminals to the first and second switch. The first and second switches are operated to commutate the inductor between the amplifiers so as to provide an amplified signal while limiting the ripple voltage on the inductor and thus limiting the maximum voltage imposed across the amplifiers and switches.

  6. Cross-differential amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hajimiri, Seyed-Ali (Inventor); Kee, Scott D. (Inventor); Aoki, Ichiro (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A cross-differential amplifier is provided. The cross-differential amplifier includes an inductor connected to a direct current power source at a first terminal. A first and second switch, such as transistors, are connected to the inductor at a second terminal. A first and second amplifier are connected at their supply terminals to the first and second switch. The first and second switches are operated to commutate the inductor between the amplifiers so as to provide an amplified signal while limiting the ripple voltage on the inductor and thus limiting the maximum voltage imposed across the amplifiers and switches.

  7. Cross-differential amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hajimiri, Seyed-Ali (Inventor); Kee, Scott D. (Inventor); Aoki, Ichiro (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A cross-differential amplifier is provided. The cross-differential amplifier includes an inductor connected to a direct current power source at a first terminal. A first and second switch, such as transistors, are connected to the inductor at a second terminal. A first and second amplifier are connected at their supply terminals to the first and second switch. The first and second switches are operated to commutate the inductor between the amplifiers so as to provide an amplified signal while limiting the ripple voltage on the inductor and thus limiting the maximum voltage imposed across the amplifiers and switches.

  8. Stochastic differential equations

    SciTech Connect

    Sobczyk, K. )

    1990-01-01

    This book provides a unified treatment of both regular (or random) and Ito stochastic differential equations. It focuses on solution methods, including some developed only recently. Applications are discussed, in particular an insight is given into both the mathematical structure, and the most efficient solution methods (analytical as well as numerical). Starting from basic notions and results of the theory of stochastic processes and stochastic calculus (including Ito's stochastic integral), many principal mathematical problems and results related to stochastic differential equations are expounded here for the first time. Applications treated include those relating to road vehicles, earthquake excitations and offshore structures.

  9. Embryonic determination and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ingram, V M; Keane, R W

    1980-04-01

    At the cellular level, development proceeds in a series of stages in which precursor cells are first restricted in their developmental potential (determination) and subsequently express their genetic information as specific tissues (differentiation). This paper discusses the problems encountered in seeking to understand the molecular mechanisms of thes processes and describes several model systems. A novel approach involves the inhibition of differentiation by virus transformation of the precursor cells in the chick primary mesenchyme, The transformed cells are cloned, grown to large numbers, and then analyzed biochemically.

  10. Tuberous sclerosis complex.

    PubMed

    Islam, Monica P; Roach, E Steve

    2015-01-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is a neurocutaneous syndrome that can affect the brain, skin, eyes, kidneys, heart, and lungs. TSC alters cellular proliferation and differentiation, resulting in hamartomas of various organs, tumor formation, and altered neuronal migration. The phenotype is highly variable. Most individuals have seizures, commonly including infantile spasms, and there is variable intellectual disability and autism. Neonates can present with cardiac failure due to intracardiac rhabdomyomas. The likelihood of renal angiomyolipomas increases with age, and renal disease is the most common cause of death in adults with TSC. Pulmonary involvement occurs predominantly in women and carries a high morbidity and mortality. TSC is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait, but spontaneous mutations are common. A mutation of either TSC1 on chromosome 9 or TSC2 on chromosome 16 leads to dysfunction of hamartin or tuberin, respectively. These two proteins form a functional complex that modulates the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. Medications that inhibit mTOR are being used to treat TSC-related tumors, and current studies are investigating whether these agents could alleviate other TSC complications. Consensus statements guide identification and optimal management of many of the TSC-related complications at diagnosis and throughout the lifespan. A multidisciplinary approach is necessary for optimal management of individuals with TSC.

  11. Differentiation: Transparent or Opaque?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schroeder-Davis, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    In the author's experience, when concerns about camouflaging differentiation occur, they tend to center around issues related to fear of stigmatizing students who are working ahead of (or behind) their age-peers. These fears often manifest in specific concerns about grouping arrangements, as well as the issues of fairness, grading, and confusion…

  12. Do Differential Equations Swing?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maruszewski, Richard F., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    One of the units of in a standard differential equations course is a discussion of the oscillatory motion of a spring and the associated material on forcing functions and resonance. During the presentation on practical resonance, the instructor may tell students that it is similar to when they take their siblings to the playground and help them on…

  13. Modelling by Differential Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaachoua, Hamid; Saglam, Ayse

    2006-01-01

    This paper aims to show the close relation between physics and mathematics taking into account especially the theory of differential equations. By analysing the problems posed by scientists in the seventeenth century, we note that physics is very important for the emergence of this theory. Taking into account this analysis, we show the…

  14. Environmental Attitudes Semantic Differential.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mehne, Paul R.; Goulard, Cary J.

    This booklet is an evaluation instrument which utilizes semantic differential data to assess environmental attitudes. Twelve concepts are included: regulated access to beaches, urban planning, dune vegetation, wetlands, future cities, reclaiming wetlands for building development, city parks, commercial development of beaches, existing cities,…

  15. Differential comparator cirucit

    DOEpatents

    Hickling, Ronald M.

    1996-01-01

    A differential comparator circuit for an Analog-to-Digital Converter (ADC) or other application includes a plurality of differential comparators and a plurality of offset voltage generators. Each comparator includes first and second differentially connected transistor pairs having equal and opposite voltage offsets. First and second offset control transistors are connected in series with the transistor pairs respectively. The offset voltage generators generate offset voltages corresponding to reference voltages which are compared with a differential input voltage by the comparators. Each offset voltage is applied to the offset control transistors of at least one comparator to set the overall voltage offset of the comparator to a value corresponding to the respective reference voltage. The number of offset voltage generators required in an ADC application can be reduced by a factor of approximately two by applying the offset voltage from each offset voltage generator to two comparators with opposite logical sense such that positive and negative offset voltages are produced by each offset voltage generator.

  16. Perceptual dimensions differentiate emotions.

    PubMed

    Cavanaugh, Lisa A; MacInnis, Deborah J; Weiss, Allen M

    2015-08-26

    Individuals often describe objects in their world in terms of perceptual dimensions that span a variety of modalities; the visual (e.g., brightness: dark-bright), the auditory (e.g., loudness: quiet-loud), the gustatory (e.g., taste: sour-sweet), the tactile (e.g., hardness: soft vs. hard) and the kinaesthetic (e.g., speed: slow-fast). We ask whether individuals use perceptual dimensions to differentiate emotions from one another. Participants in two studies (one where respondents reported on abstract emotion concepts and a second where they reported on specific emotion episodes) rated the extent to which features anchoring 29 perceptual dimensions (e.g., temperature, texture and taste) are associated with 8 emotions (anger, fear, sadness, guilt, contentment, gratitude, pride and excitement). Results revealed that in both studies perceptual dimensions differentiate positive from negative emotions and high arousal from low arousal emotions. They also differentiate among emotions that are similar in arousal and valence (e.g., high arousal negative emotions such as anger and fear). Specific features that anchor particular perceptual dimensions (e.g., hot vs. cold) are also differentially associated with emotions.

  17. Parametric Differentiation and Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Hongwei

    2009-01-01

    Parametric differentiation and integration under the integral sign constitutes a powerful technique for calculating integrals. However, this topic is generally not included in the undergraduate mathematics curriculum. In this note, we give a comprehensive review of this approach, and show how it can be systematically used to evaluate most of the…

  18. Analyticity without Differentiability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirillova, Evgenia; Spindler, Karlheinz

    2008-01-01

    In this article we derive all salient properties of analytic functions, including the analytic version of the inverse function theorem, using only the most elementary convergence properties of series. Not even the notion of differentiability is required to do so. Instead, analytical arguments are replaced by combinatorial arguments exhibiting…

  19. Molecular Typing and Differentiation

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this chapter, general background and bench protocols are provided for a number of molecular typing techniques in common use today. Methods for the molecular typing and differentiation of microorganisms began to be widely adopted following the development of the polymerase chai...

  20. Students' Understanding of Differentiation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orton, A.

    1983-01-01

    Investigated students' (N=110) understanding of elementary calculus using clinical interview method. Analysis of responses to tasks concerning differentiation and rate of change led to detailed data concerning degree of understanding attained and common errors/misconceptions. Implications for mathematics instruction are discussed. (This is a…

  1. [Cluster headache differential diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Guégan-Massardier, Evelyne; Laubier, Cécile

    2015-11-01

    Cluster headache is characterized by disabling stereotyped headache. Early diagnosis allows appropriate treatment, unfortunately diagnostic errors are frequent. The main differential diagnoses are other primary or essential headaches. Migraine, more frequent and whose diagnosis is carried by excess, trigeminal neuralgia or other trigemino-autonomic cephalgia. Vascular or tumoral underlying condition can mimic cluster headache, neck and brain imaging is recommended, ideally MRI.

  2. Complex-Valued Autoencoders

    PubMed Central

    Baldi, Pierre; Lu, Zhiqin

    2012-01-01

    Autoencoders are unsupervised machine learning circuits, with typically one hidden layer, whose learning goal is to minimize an average distortion measure between inputs and outputs. Linear autoencoders correspond to the special case where only linear transformations between visible and hidden variables are used. While linear autoencoders can be defined over any field, only real-valued linear autoencoders have been studied so far. Here we study complex-valued linear autoencoders where the components of the training vectors and adjustable matrices are defined over the complex field with the L2 norm. We provide simpler and more general proofs that unify the real-valued and complex-valued cases, showing that in both cases the landscape of the error function is invariant under certain groups of transformations. The landscape has no local minima, a family of global minima associated with Principal Component Analysis, and many families of saddle points associated with orthogonal projections onto sub-space spanned by sub-optimal subsets of eigenvectors of the covariance matrix. The theory yields several iterative, convergent, learning algorithms, a clear understanding of the generalization properties of the trained autoencoders, and can equally be applied to the hetero-associative case when external targets are provided. Partial results on deep architecture as well as the differential geometry of autoencoders are also presented. The general framework described here is useful to classify autoencoders and identify general properties that ought to be investigated for each class, illuminating some of the connections between autoencoders, unsupervised learning, clustering, Hebbian learning, and information theory. PMID:22622264

  3. Exact solutions to nonlinear delay differential equations of hyperbolic type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyazmin, Andrei V.; Sorokin, Vsevolod G.

    2017-01-01

    We consider nonlinear delay differential equations of hyperbolic type, including equations with varying transfer coefficients and varying delays. The equations contain one or two arbitrary functions of a single argument. We present new classes of exact generalized and functional separable solutions. All the solutions involve free parameters and can be suitable for solving certain model problems as well as testing numerical and approximate analytical methods for similar and more complex nonlinear differential-difference equations.

  4. Low Differential Pressure Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stout, Stephen J. (Inventor); Deyoe, Richard T. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A method and apparatus for evaluating low differential pressure transducers includes a pressure generator in the form of a piston-cylinder assembly having a piston that may be manually positioned precisely within the cylinder to change the volume and thus the pressure at respective sides of the piston. At one side of the piston the cylinder communicates with a first chamber and at the other side of the piston the cylinder communicates with a second chamber, the first and second chambers being formed within a common tank by a partition wall. The chambers each communicate with the transducer to be evaluated and a standard pre-calibrated transducer the transducers being connected fluidly in parallel so that a pressure differential between air in the two chambers resulting from movement of the piston within the cylinder is communicated to both the transducer to be evaluated and the standard transducer, and the outputs of the transducers is observed and recorded.

  5. Differential optoacoustic absorption detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shumate, M. S. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A differential optoacoustic absorption detector employed two tapered cells in tandem or in parallel. When operated in tandem, two mirrors were used at one end remote from the source of the beam of light directed into one cell back through the other, and a lens to focus the light beam into the one cell at a principal focus half way between the reflecting mirror. Each cell was tapered to conform to the shape of the beam so that the volume of one was the same as for the other, and the volume of each received maximum illumination. The axes of the cells were placed as close to each other as possible in order to connect a differential pressure detector to the cells with connecting passages of minimum length. An alternative arrangement employed a beam splitter and two lenses to operate the cells in parallel.

  6. Synchronization with propagation - The functional differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rǎsvan, Vladimir

    2016-06-01

    The structure represented by one or several oscillators couple to a one-dimensional transmission environment (e.g. a vibrating string in the mechanical case or a lossless transmission line in the electrical case) turned to be attractive for the research in the field of complex structures and/or complex behavior. This is due to the fact that such a structure represents some generalization of various interconnection modes with lumped parameters for the oscillators. On the other hand the lossless and distortionless propagation along transmission lines has generated several research in electrical, thermal, hydro and control engineering leading to the association of some functional differential equations to the basic initial boundary value problems. The present research is performed at the crossroad of the aforementioned directions. We shall associate to the starting models some functional differential equations - in most cases of neutral type - and make use of the general theorems for existence and stability of forced oscillations for functional differential equations. The challenges introduced by the analyzed problems for the general theory are emphasized, together with the implication of the results for various applications.

  7. Extracellular Matrix and Integrins in Embryonic Stem Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Han; Luo, Xie; Leighton, Jake

    2015-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are pluripotent cells with great therapeutic potentials. The in vitro differentiation of ESC was designed by recapitulating embryogenesis. Significant progress has been made to improve the in vitro differentiation protocols by toning soluble maintenance factors. However, more robust methods for lineage-specific differentiation and maturation are still under development. Considering the complexity of in vivo embryogenesis environment, extracellular matrix (ECM) cues should be considered besides growth factor cues. ECM proteins bind to cells and act as ligands of integrin receptors on cell surfaces. Here, we summarize the role of the ECM and integrins in the formation of three germ layer progenies. Various ECM–integrin interactions were found, facilitating differentiation toward definitive endoderm, hepatocyte-like cells, pancreatic beta cells, early mesodermal progenitors, cardiomyocytes, neuroectoderm lineages, and epidermal cells, such as keratinocytes and melanocytes. In the future, ECM combinations for the optimal ESC differentiation environment will require substantial study. PMID:26462244

  8. Higher-order automatic differentiation of mathematical functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charpentier, Isabelle; Dal Cappello, Claude

    2015-04-01

    Functions of mathematical physics such as the Bessel functions, the Chebyshev polynomials, the Gauss hypergeometric function and so forth, have practical applications in many scientific domains. On the one hand, differentiation formulas provided in reference books apply to real or complex variables. These do not account for the chain rule. On the other hand, based on the chain rule, the automatic differentiation has become a natural tool in numerical modeling. Nevertheless automatic differentiation tools do not deal with the numerous mathematical functions. This paper describes formulas and provides codes for the higher-order automatic differentiation of mathematical functions. The first method is based on Faà di Bruno's formula that generalizes the chain rule. The second one makes use of the second order differential equation they satisfy. Both methods are exemplified with the aforementioned functions.

  9. Differential auger spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Strongin, Myron; Varma, Matesh Narayan; Anne, Joshi

    1976-06-22

    Differential Auger spectroscopy method for increasing the sensitivity of micro-Auger spectroanalysis of the surfaces of dilute alloys, by alternately periodically switching an electron beam back and forth between an impurity free reference sample and a test sample containing a trace impurity. The Auger electrons from the samples produce representative Auger spectrum signals which cancel to produce an Auger test sample signal corresponding to the amount of the impurity in the test samples.

  10. Differential homogeneous immunosensor device

    DOEpatents

    Malmros, Mark K.; Gulbinski, III, Julian

    1990-04-10

    There is provided a novel method of testing for the presence of an analyte in a fluid suspected of containing the same. In this method, in the presence of the analyte, a substance capable of modifying certain characteristics of the substrate is bound to the substrate and the change in these qualities is measured. While the method may be modified for carrying out quantitative differential analyses, it eliminates the need for washing analyte from the substrate which is characteristic of prior art methods.

  11. Perturbed nonlinear differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, T. G.

    1974-01-01

    For perturbed nonlinear systems, a norm, other than the supremum norm, is introduced on some spaces of continuous functions. This makes possible the study of new types of behavior. A study is presented on a perturbed nonlinear differential equation defined on a half line, and the existence of a family of solutions with special boundedness properties is established. The ideas developed are applied to the study of integral manifolds, and examples are given.

  12. SIMULTANEOUS DIFFERENTIAL EQUATION COMPUTER

    DOEpatents

    Collier, D.M.; Meeks, L.A.; Palmer, J.P.

    1960-05-10

    A description is given for an electronic simulator for a system of simultaneous differential equations, including nonlinear equations. As a specific example, a homogeneous nuclear reactor system including a reactor fluid, heat exchanger, and a steam boiler may be simulated, with the nonlinearity resulting from a consideration of temperature effects taken into account. The simulator includes three operational amplifiers, a multiplier, appropriate potential sources, and interconnecting R-C networks.

  13. Lie Conformal Algebra Cohomology and the Variational Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Sole, Alberto; Kac, Victor G.

    2009-12-01

    We find an interpretation of the complex of variational calculus in terms of the Lie conformal algebra cohomology theory. This leads to a better understanding of both theories. In particular, we give an explicit construction of the Lie conformal algebra cohomology complex, and endow it with a structure of a {mathfrak{g}}-complex. On the other hand, we give an explicit construction of the complex of variational calculus in terms of skew-symmetric poly-differential operators.

  14. Compartmentalized function through cell differentiation in filamentous cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Flores, Enrique; Herrero, Antonia

    2010-01-01

    Within the wide biodiversity that is found in the bacterial world, Cyanobacteria represents a unique phylogenetic group that is responsible for a key metabolic process in the biosphere - oxygenic photosynthesis - and that includes representatives exhibiting complex morphologies. Many cyanobacteria are multicellular, growing as filaments of cells in which some cells can differentiate to carry out specialized functions. These differentiated cells include resistance and dispersal forms as well as a metabolically specialized form that is devoted to N(2) fixation, known as the heterocyst. In this Review we address cyanobacterial intercellular communication, the supracellular structure of the cyanobacterial filament and the basic principles that govern the process of heterocyst differentiation.

  15. Multistate differential transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Whalen, B.

    1987-09-01

    A multistate transmission is described having an input shaft and an output shaft comprising: a. planetary gear train means having a ring gear, planetary gears with planetary gear carrier, and a sun gear, the planetary gear train means connected to the output shaft; b. first bypass means connecting the input shaft to the planetary gear train means; c. differential transmission means for receiving its input from the input shaft and having means to adjust the torque and speed output infinitely variable over its range of operation for each state of the transmission; d. power return means for receiving the output of the differential transmission means; e. means including clutch operated speed reversing means for interconnecting the sun gear in the planetary gear train means with the power return means; f. the power return means including a first gear to receive the output of the differential transmission means; g. first multispeed transmission means connecting the means for supporting the carrier shaft to the first bypass means.

  16. Temperature differential detection device

    DOEpatents

    Girling, Peter M.

    1986-01-01

    A temperature differential detection device for detecting the temperature differential between predetermined portions of a container wall is disclosed as comprising a Wheatstone bridge circuit for detecting resistance imbalance with a first circuit branch having a first elongated wire element mounted in thermal contact with a predetermined portion of the container wall, a second circuit branch having a second elongated wire element mounted in thermal contact with a second predetermined portion of a container wall with the wire elements having a predetermined temperature-resistant coefficient, an indicator interconnected between the first and second branches remote from the container wall for detecting and indicating resistance imbalance between the first and second wire elements, and connector leads for electrically connecting the wire elements to the remote indicator in order to maintain the respective resistance value relationship between the first and second wire elements. The indicator is calibrated to indicate the detected resistance imbalance in terms of a temperature differential between the first and second wall portions.

  17. Temperature differential detection device

    DOEpatents

    Girling, P.M.

    1986-04-22

    A temperature differential detection device for detecting the temperature differential between predetermined portions of a container wall is disclosed as comprising a Wheatstone bridge circuit for detecting resistance imbalance with a first circuit branch having a first elongated wire element mounted in thermal contact with a predetermined portion of the container wall, a second circuit branch having a second elongated wire element mounted in thermal contact with a second predetermined portion of a container wall with the wire elements having a predetermined temperature-resistant coefficient, an indicator interconnected between the first and second branches remote from the container wall for detecting and indicating resistance imbalance between the first and second wire elements, and connector leads for electrically connecting the wire elements to the remote indicator in order to maintain the respective resistance value relationship between the first and second wire elements. The indicator is calibrated to indicate the detected resistance imbalance in terms of a temperature differential between the first and second wall portions. 2 figs.

  18. Differentially Private Distributed Sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Fink, Glenn A.

    2016-12-11

    The growth of the Internet of Things (IoT) creates the possibility of decentralized systems of sensing and actuation, potentially on a global scale. IoT devices connected to cloud networks can offer Sensing and Actuation as a Service (SAaaS) enabling networks of sensors to grow to a global scale. But extremely large sensor networks can violate privacy, especially in the case where IoT devices are mobile and connected directly to the behaviors of people. The thesis of this paper is that by adapting differential privacy (adding statistically appropriate noise to query results) to groups of geographically distributed sensors privacy could be maintained without ever sending all values up to a central curator and without compromising the overall accuracy of the data collected. This paper outlines such a scheme and performs an analysis of differential privacy techniques adapted to edge computing in a simulated sensor network where ground truth is known. The positive and negative outcomes of employing differential privacy in distributed networks of devices are discussed and a brief research agenda is presented.

  19. Is Titan Partially Differentiated?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitri, G.; Pappalardo, R. T.; Stevenson, D. J.

    2009-12-01

    The recent measurement of the gravity coefficients from the Radio Doppler data of the Cassini spacecraft has improved our knowledge of the interior structure of Titan (Rappaport et al. 2008 AGU, P21A-1343). The measured gravity field of Titan is dominated by near hydrostatic quadrupole components. We have used the measured gravitational coefficients, thermal models and the hydrostatic equilibrium theory to derive Titan's interior structure. The axial moment of inertia gives us an indication of the degree of the interior differentiation. The inferred axial moment of inertia, calculated using the quadrupole gravitational coefficients and the Radau-Darwin approximation, indicates that Titan is partially differentiated. If Titan is partially differentiated then the interior must avoid melting of the ice during its evolution. This suggests a relatively late formation of Titan to avoid the presence of short-lived radioisotopes (Al-26). This also suggests the onset of convection after accretion to efficiently remove the heat from the interior. The outer layer is likely composed mainly of water in solid phase. Thermal modeling indicates that water could be present also in liquid phase forming a subsurface ocean between an outer ice I shell and a high pressure ice layer. Acknowledgments: This work was conducted at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  20. Differential transimpedance amplifier circuit for correlated differential amplification

    DOEpatents

    Gresham, Christopher A.; Denton, M. Bonner; Sperline, Roger P.

    2008-07-22

    A differential transimpedance amplifier circuit for correlated differential amplification. The amplifier circuit increase electronic signal-to-noise ratios in charge detection circuits designed for the detection of very small quantities of electrical charge and/or very weak electromagnetic waves. A differential, integrating capacitive transimpedance amplifier integrated circuit comprising capacitor feedback loops performs time-correlated subtraction of noise.

  1. Histone deacetylase 9 is a negative regulator of adipogenic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Tapan K; Idelman, Gila; Blanco, Victor; Blomkalns, Andra L; Piegore, Mark G; Weintraub, Daniel S; Kumar, Santosh; Rajsheker, Srinivas; Manka, David; Rudich, Steven M; Tang, Yaoliang; Hui, David Y; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda; Olson, Eric N; Lingrel, Jerry B; Ho, Shuk-Mei; Weintraub, Neal L

    2011-08-05

    Differentiation of preadipocytes into mature adipocytes capable of efficiently storing lipids is an important regulatory mechanism in obesity. Here, we examined the involvement of histone deacetylases (HDACs) and histone acetyltransferases (HATs) in the regulation of adipogenesis. We find that among the various members of the HDAC and HAT families, only HDAC9 exhibited dramatic down-regulation preceding adipogenic differentiation. Preadipocytes from HDAC9 gene knock-out mice exhibited accelerated adipogenic differentiation, whereas HDAC9 overexpression in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes suppressed adipogenic differentiation, demonstrating its direct role as a negative regulator of adipogenesis. HDAC9 expression was higher in visceral as compared with subcutaneous preadipocytes, negatively correlating with their potential to undergo adipogenic differentiation in vitro. HDAC9 localized in the nucleus, and its negative regulation of adipogenesis segregates with the N-terminal nuclear targeting domain, whereas the C-terminal deacetylase domain is dispensable for this function. HDAC9 co-precipitates with USF1 and is recruited with USF1 at the E-box region of the C/EBPα gene promoter in preadipocytes. Upon induction of adipogenic differentiation, HDAC9 is down-regulated, leading to its dissociation from the USF1 complex, whereas p300 HAT is up-regulated to allow its association with USF1 and accumulation at the E-box site of the C/EBPα promoter in differentiated adipocytes. This reciprocal regulation of HDAC9 and p300 HAT in the USF1 complex is associated with increased C/EBPα expression, a master regulator of adipogenic differentiation. These findings provide new insights into mechanisms of adipogenic differentiation and document a critical regulatory role for HDAC9 in adipogenic differentiation through a deacetylase-independent mechanism.

  2. Stochastic transport through complex comb structures

    SciTech Connect

    Zaburdaev, V. Yu.; Popov, P. V.; Romanov, A. S.; Chukbar, K. V.

    2008-05-15

    A unified rigorous approach is used to derive fractional differential equations describing subdiffusive transport through comb structures of various geometrical complexity. A general nontrivial effect of the initial particle distribution on the subsequent evolution is exposed. Solutions having qualitative features of practical importance are given for joined structures with widely different fractional exponents.

  3. Putting Differentials Back into Calculus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dray, Tevian; Manogue, Corrine A.

    2010-01-01

    We argue that the use of differentials in introductory calculus courses is useful and provides a unifying theme, leading to a coherent view of the calculus. Along the way, we meet several interpretations of differentials, some better than others.

  4. Investigating Population History Using Temporal Genetic Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Skoglund, Pontus; Sjödin, Per; Skoglund, Tobias; Lascoux, Martin; Jakobsson, Mattias

    2014-01-01

    The rapid advance of sequencing technology, coupled with improvements in molecular methods for obtaining genetic data from ancient sources, holds the promise of producing a wealth of genomic data from time-separated individuals. However, the population-genetic properties of time-structured samples have not been extensively explored. Here, we consider the implications of temporal sampling for analyses of genetic differentiation and use a temporal coalescent framework to show that complex historical events such as size reductions, population replacements, and transient genetic barriers between populations leave a footprint of genetic differentiation that can be traced through history using temporal samples. Our results emphasize explicit consideration of the temporal structure when making inferences and indicate that genomic data from ancient individuals will greatly increase our ability to reconstruct population history. PMID:24939468

  5. Differential operator multiplication method for fractional differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Shaoqiang; Ying, Yuping; Lian, Yanping; Lin, Stephen; Yang, Yibo; Wagner, Gregory J.; Liu, Wing Kam

    2016-11-01

    Fractional derivatives play a very important role in modeling physical phenomena involving long-range correlation effects. However, they raise challenges of computational cost and memory storage requirements when solved using current well developed numerical methods. In this paper, the differential operator multiplication method is proposed to address the issues by considering a reaction-advection-diffusion equation with a fractional derivative in time. The linear fractional differential equation is transformed into an integer order differential equation by the proposed method, which can fundamentally fix the aforementioned issues for select fractional differential equations. In such a transform, special attention should be paid to the initial conditions for the resulting differential equation of higher integer order. Through numerical experiments, we verify the proposed method for both fractional ordinary differential equations and partial differential equations.

  6. On the Cohomology of Almost Complex Manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fino, Anna; Tomassini, Adriano

    2010-07-01

    We review some properties of two special types of almost complex structures, introduced by T.-J. Li and W. Zhang in [11], in relation to the existence of compatible symplectic structures and to the Hard Lefschetz condition. The two types of almost complex structures are defined respectively in terms of differential forms and currents. The paper is based on the results obtained in [9]. We give a new example of an 8-dimensional compact solvmanifold endowed with a C∞ pure and full almost complex structure calibrated by a symplectic form satisfying the Hard Lefschetz condition.

  7. Complex partial status epilepticus: a recurrent problem.

    PubMed Central

    Cockerell, O C; Walker, M C; Sander, J W; Shorvon, S D

    1994-01-01

    Twenty patients with complex partial status epilepticus were identified retrospectively from a specialist neurology hospital. Seventeen patients experienced recurrent episodes of complex partial status epilepticus, often occurring at regular intervals, usually over many years, and while being treated with effective anti-epileptic drugs. No unifying cause for the recurrences, and no common epilepsy aetiologies, were identified. In spite of the frequency of recurrence and length of history, none of the patients showed any marked evidence of cognitive or neurological deterioration. Complex partial status epilepticus is more common than is generally recognised, should be differentiated from other forms of non-convulsive status, and is often difficult to treat. PMID:8021671

  8. Complexity analysis of angiogenesis vasculature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahadevan, Vijay; Tyrell, James A.; Tong, Ricky T.; Brown, Edward B.; Jain, Rakesh K.; Roysam, Badrinath

    2005-04-01

    Tumor vasculature has a high degree of irregularity as compared to normal vasculature. The quantification of the morphometric complexity in tumor images can be useful in diagnosis. Also, it is desirable in several other medical applications to have an automated complexity analysis to aid in diagnosis and prognosis under treatment. e.g. in diabetic retinopathy and in arteriosclerosis. In addition, prior efforts at segmentation of the tumor vasculature using matched filtering, template matching and splines have been hampered by the irregularity of these vessels. We try to solve both problems by introducing a novel technique for vessel detection, followed by a tracing-independent complexity analysis based on a combination of ideas. First, the vessel cross-sectional profile is modeled using a continuous and everywhere differentiable family of super-Gaussian curves. This family generates rectangular profiles that can accurately localize the vessel boundaries in microvasculature images. Second, a robust non-linear regression algorithm based on M-estimators is used to estimate the parameters that optimally characterize the vessel"s shape. A framework for the quantitative analysis of the complexity of the vasculature based on the vessel detection is presented. A set of measures that quantify the complexity are proposed viz. Squared Error, Entropy-based and Minimum Description Length-based Shape Complexities. They are completely automatic and can deal with complexities of the entire vessel unlike existing tortuousity measures which deal only with vessel centerlines. The results are validated using carefully constructed phantom and real image data with ground truth information from an expert observer.

  9. DIFFERENTIAL FAULT SENSING CIRCUIT

    DOEpatents

    Roberts, J.H.

    1961-09-01

    A differential fault sensing circuit is designed for detecting arcing in high-voltage vacuum tubes arranged in parallel. A circuit is provided which senses differences in voltages appearing between corresponding elements likely to fault. Sensitivity of the circuit is adjusted to some level above which arcing will cause detectable differences in voltage. For particular corresponding elements, a group of pulse transformers are connected in parallel with diodes connected across the secondaries thereof so that only voltage excursions are transmitted to a thyratron which is biased to the sensitivity level mentioned.

  10. Differential homogeneous immunosensor device

    DOEpatents

    Malmros, M.K.; Gulbinski, J. III.

    1990-04-10

    There is provided a novel method of testing for the presence of an analyte in a fluid suspected of containing the same. In this method, in the presence of the analyte, a substance capable of modifying certain characteristics of the substrate is bound to the substrate and the change in these qualities is measured. While the method may be modified for carrying out quantitative differential analyses, it eliminates the need for washing the analyte from the substrate which is characteristic of prior art methods. 12 figs.

  11. Differentiating among penal states.

    PubMed

    Lacey, Nicola

    2010-12-01

    This review article assesses Loïc Wacquant's contribution to debates on penality, focusing on his most recent book, Punishing the Poor: The Neoliberal Government of Social Insecurity (Wacquant 2009), while setting its argument in the context of his earlier Prisons of Poverty (1999). In particular, it draws on both historical and comparative methods to question whether Wacquant's conception of 'the penal state' is adequately differentiated for the purposes of building the explanatory account he proposes; about whether 'neo-liberalism' has, materially, the global influence which he ascribes to it; and about whether, therefore, the process of penal Americanization which he asserts in his recent writings is credible.

  12. Differentiating spatial light modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armitage, D.

    1985-04-01

    A differentiating spatial light modulator device in which a photoreceptor and an electro-optic crystal are isolated by a dielectric mirror is discussed. The electro-optic crystal is configured to have low or zero longitudinal response, yet is sensitive to transverse electric fields. The fringe field generated by the photoreceptor (photodiode) modulates the crystal birefringence. Readout via a polarizing beamsplitter gives an output light related to the spatial gradient of the input light. In a liquid crystal embodiment of the invention, reversal of the applied voltage gives a driven off state which speeds the erasure. Storage is possible in the smectic liquid crystal phase.

  13. Perturbed nonlinear differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, T. G.

    1972-01-01

    The existence of a solution defined for all t and possessing a type of boundedness property is established for the perturbed nonlinear system y = f(t,y) + F(t,y). The unperturbed system x = f(t,x) has a dichotomy in which some solutions exist and are well behaved as t increases to infinity, and some solution exists and are well behaved as t decreases to minus infinity. A similar study is made for a perturbed nonlinear differential equation defined on a half line, R+, and the existence of a family of solutions with special boundedness properties is established. The ideas are applied to integral manifolds.

  14. Differentiating through Literature Circles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helgeson, John

    2017-01-01

    This article begins with an example of a typical middle-school experience with literature circles. Students read a common text and come prepared to share and discuss the text based on individual roles they are assigned. Teachers are using this practice to address the complexity levels of texts in order to help students develop the skills they need…

  15. Differential diagnosis of hyponatraemia.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Chris; Berl, Tomas; Tejedor, Alberto; Johannsson, Gudmundur

    2012-03-01

    The appropriate management of hyponatraemia is reliant on the accurate identification of the underlying cause of the hyponatraemia. In the light of evidence which has shown that the use of a clinical algorithm appears to improve accuracy in the differential diagnosis of hyponatraemia, the European Hyponatraemia Network considered the use of two algorithms. One was developed from a nephrologist's view of hyponatraemia, while the other reflected the approach of an endocrinologist. Both of these algorithms concurred on the importance of assessing effective blood volume status and the measurement of urine sodium concentration in the diagnostic process. To demonstrate the importance of accurate diagnosis to the correct treatment of hyponatraemia, special consideration was given to hyponatraemia in neurosurgical patients. The differentiation between the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH), acute adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) deficiency, fluid overload and cerebral salt-wasting syndrome was discussed. In patients with SIADH, fluid restriction has been the mainstay of treatment despite the absence of an evidence base for its use. An approach to using fluid restriction to raise serum tonicity in patients with SIADH and to identify patients who are likely to be recalcitrant to fluid restriction was also suggested.

  16. On State Complexes and Special Cube Complexes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Valerie J.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis presents the first steps toward a classification of non-positively curved cube complexes called state complexes. A "state complex" is a configuration space for a "reconfigurable system," i.e., an abstract system in which local movements occur in some discrete manner. Reconfigurable systems can be used to describe, for example,…

  17. Nanotechnology in the Regeneration of Complex Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Cassidy, John W.

    2015-01-01

    Modern medicine faces a growing crisis as demand for organ transplantations continues to far outstrip supply. By stimulating the body’s own repair mechanisms, regenerative medicine aims to reduce demand for organs, while the closely related field of tissue engineering promises to deliver “off-the-self” organs grown from patients’ own stem cells to improve supply. To deliver on these promises, we must have reliable means of generating complex tissues. Thus far, the majority of successful tissue engineering approaches have relied on macroporous scaffolds to provide cells with both mechanical support and differentiative cues. In order to engineer complex tissues, greater attention must be paid to nanoscale cues present in a cell’s microenvironment. As the extracellular matrix is capable of driving complexity during development, it must be understood and reproduced in order to recapitulate complexity in engineered tissues. This review will summarize current progress in engineering complex tissue through the integration of nanocomposites and biomimetic scaffolds. PMID:26097381

  18. [Veterinary dentistry (11). Feline gingivitis-stomatitis-pharyngitis complex. Chronic/recurrent stomatitis in cats].

    PubMed

    van Foreest, A

    1995-10-01

    This is the fourth article in a series on veterinary dentistry in cats. This article describes the clinical signs, possible investigations, and differential diagnosis of the gingivitis-stomatitis pharyngitis complex (GSP complex), a complex and frequently occurring disease. Strategies for the treatment of feline chronic stomatitis complex, which is frequently idiopathic, are presented.

  19. Solving Partial Differential Equations on Overlapping Grids

    SciTech Connect

    Henshaw, W D

    2008-09-22

    We discuss the solution of partial differential equations (PDEs) on overlapping grids. This is a powerful technique for efficiently solving problems in complex, possibly moving, geometry. An overlapping grid consists of a set of structured grids that overlap and cover the computational domain. By allowing the grids to overlap, grids for complex geometries can be more easily constructed. The overlapping grid approach can also be used to remove coordinate singularities by, for example, covering a sphere with two or more patches. We describe the application of the overlapping grid approach to a variety of different problems. These include the solution of incompressible fluid flows with moving and deforming geometry, the solution of high-speed compressible reactive flow with rigid bodies using adaptive mesh refinement (AMR), and the solution of the time-domain Maxwell's equations of electromagnetism.

  20. Differential-Coil Eddy-Current Material Sorter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nummelin, J.; Buckley, D.

    1985-01-01

    Small metal or other electrically conductive parts of same shape but different composition quickly sorted with differential-coil eddy-current sorter. Developed to distinguish between turbine blades of different alloys, hardnesses, and residual stress, sorter generally applicable to parts of simple and complex shape.

  1. Measurement of psychosexual differentiation.

    PubMed

    Zucker, Kenneth J

    2005-08-01

    Since the early 1990s, there has been a surge in interest in the study of infants, children, adolescents, and adults with physical intersex conditions or other congenital conditions that affect, among other things, the configuration of the external genitalia. Regarding psychologic evaluation, an important aspect of both short-term and long-term outcome concerns gender differentiation. This article provides an overview of various measures pertaining to gender identity, gender role, and sexual orientation that have been used in assessment studies of samples of either children and adults with gender identity disorder and/or children and adults with various physical intersex conditions. All of the measures have good psychometric quality although some have been studied more systematically than others. It is hoped that this overview will provide a template for the new generation of studies that are looking at both gender development and sexual orientation in people born with physical intersex conditions.

  2. Practical Differential Profiling

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz, M; De Supinski, B R

    2007-02-04

    Comparing performance profiles from two runs is an essential performance analysis step that users routinely perform. In this work we present eGprof, a tool that facilitates these comparisons through differential profiling inside gprof. We chose this approach, rather than designing a new tool, since gprof is one of the few performance analysis tools accepted and used by a large community of users. eGprof allows users to 'subtract' two performance profiles directly. It also includes callgraph visualization to highlight the differences in graphical form. Along with the design of this tool, we present several case studies that show how eGprof can be used to find and to study the differences of two application executions quickly and hence can aid the user in this most common step in performance analysis. We do this without requiring major changes on the side of the user, the most important factor in guaranteeing the adoption of our tool by code teams.

  3. Electron Transfer Reactivity on Novel Dirhenium and Dirhodium Tetraazaannulene Complexes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-01-01

    cyclic voltammetry and differential pulse polarography. Potentials are reported for the electrochemcial generation of pi cation and pi anion radicals of these complexes in the solvents dichloromethane and dimethylformamide. The potential differences between the pi radical reactions of the metallomacrocyclic complexes were compared to the potential differences of the pi radical reactions of the free macrocycles.

  4. Vestigial-like 3 is an inhibitor of adipocyte differentiation.

    PubMed

    Halperin, Daniel S; Pan, Calvin; Lusis, Aldons J; Tontonoz, Peter

    2013-02-01

    Adipose differentiation is a complex process controlled by a network of transcription factors and co-regulators. We compared the global gene expression patterns of adipogenic and nonadipogenic clones of 3T3-F442A preadipocytes and identified the transcriptional cofactor, vestigial-like 3 (Vgll3), as an inhibitor of adipogenesis. Vgll3 expression is down-regulated during terminal adipocyte differentiation in vitro and negatively correlates with weight and total fat mass in vivo. Furthermore, enforced Vgll3 expression inhibits the differentiation of preadipocytes in vitro, whereas shRNA-mediated knockdown of Vgll3 expression promotes differentiation. Expression of Vgll3 promoted the expression of genes associated with bone and chondrocyte formation, suggesting that Vgll3 participates in the decision of mesenchymal cells to proceed down the adipocyte, bone, or cartilage lineages. The elucidation of factors involved in specification of the adipocyte phenotype may aid in the identification of new strategies for the treatment of metabolic disease.

  5. DSDs: genetics, underlying pathologies and psychosexual differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Arboleda, Valerie A.; Sandberg, David E.; Vilain, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian sex determination is the unique process whereby a single organ, the bipotential gonad, undergoes a developmental switch that promotes its differentiation into either a testis or an ovary. Disruptions of this complex genetic process during human development can manifest as disorders of sex development (DSDs). Sex development can be divided into two distinct processes: sex determination, in which the bipotential gonads form either testes or ovaries, and sex differentiation, in which the fully formed testes or ovaries secrete local and hormonal factors to drive differentiation of internal and external genitals, as well as extragonadal tissues such as the brain. DSDs can arise from a number of genetic lesions, which manifest as a spectrum of gonadal (gonadal dysgenesis to ovotestis) and genital (mild hypospadias or clitoromegaly to ambiguous genitalia) phenotypes. The physical attributes and medical implications associated with DSDs confront families of affected newborns with decisions, such as gender of rearing or genital surgery, and additional concerns, such as uncertainty over the child’s psychosexual development and personal wishes later in life. In this Review, we discuss the underlying genetics of human sex determination and focus on emerging data, genetic classification of DSDs and other considerations that surround gender development and identity in individuals with DSDs. PMID:25091731

  6. On Parameter Differentiation for Integral Representations of Associated Legendre Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohl, Howard S.

    2011-05-01

    For integral representations of associated Legendre functions in terms of modified Bessel functions, we establish justification for differentiation under the integral sign with respect to parameters. With this justification, derivatives for associated Legendre functions of the first and second kind with respect to the degree are evaluated at odd-half-integer degrees, for general complex-orders, and derivatives with respect to the order are evaluated at integer-orders, for general complex-degrees. We also discuss the properties of the complex function f: C\\{-1,1}→C given by f(z)=z/((z+1)1/2(z-1)1/2).

  7. Invertible linear ordinary differential operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chetverikov, Vladimir N.

    2017-03-01

    We consider invertible linear ordinary differential operators whose inversions are also differential operators. To each such operator we assign a numerical table. These tables are described in the elementary geometrical language. The table does not uniquely determine the operator. To define this operator uniquely some additional information should be added, as it is described in detail in this paper. The possibility of generalization of these results to partial differential operators is also discussed.

  8. Module Based Differential Coexpression Analysis Method for Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Lin; Zheng, Chun-Hou; Xia, Jun-Feng; Huang, De-Shuang

    2015-01-01

    More and more studies have shown that many complex diseases are contributed jointly by alterations of numerous genes. Genes often coordinate together as a functional biological pathway or network and are highly correlated. Differential coexpression analysis, as a more comprehensive technique to the differential expression analysis, was raised to research gene regulatory networks and biological pathways of phenotypic changes through measuring gene correlation changes between disease and normal conditions. In this paper, we propose a gene differential coexpression analysis algorithm in the level of gene sets and apply the algorithm to a publicly available type 2 diabetes (T2D) expression dataset. Firstly, we calculate coexpression biweight midcorrelation coefficients between all gene pairs. Then, we select informative correlation pairs using the “differential coexpression threshold” strategy. Finally, we identify the differential coexpression gene modules using maximum clique concept and k-clique algorithm. We apply the proposed differential coexpression analysis method on simulated data and T2D data. Two differential coexpression gene modules about T2D were detected, which should be useful for exploring the biological function of the related genes. PMID:26339648

  9. Forkhead Box C1 Regulates Human Primary Keratinocyte Terminal Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Liehua; Yang, Hengwen; Zhu, Leqing; Wang, Xiao; Edwards, Michael G.; Richers, Brittany; Leung, Donald Y. M.

    2016-01-01

    The epidermis serves as a critical protective barrier between the internal and external environment of the human body. Its remarkable barrier function is established through the keratinocyte (KC) terminal differentiation program. The transcription factors specifically regulating terminal differentiation remain largely unknown. Using a RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) profiling approach, we found that forkhead box c 1 (FOXC1) was significantly up-regulated in human normal primary KC during the course of differentiation. This observation was validated in human normal primary KC from several different donors and human skin biopsies. Silencing FOXC1 in human normal primary KC undergoing differentiation led to significant down-regulation of late terminal differentiation genes markers including epidermal differentiation complex genes, keratinization genes, sphingolipid/ceramide metabolic process genes and epidermal specific cell-cell adhesion genes. We further demonstrated that FOXC1 works down-stream of ZNF750 and KLF4, and upstream of GRHL3. Thus, this study defines FOXC1 as a regulator specific for KC terminal differentiation and establishes its potential position in the genetic regulatory network. PMID:27907090

  10. Chromatin Landscape Defined by Repressive Histone Methylation during Oligodendrocyte Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jia; Magri, Laura; Zhang, Fan; Marsh, Nidaa O.; Albrecht, Stefanie; Huynh, Jimmy L.; Kaur, Jasbir; Kuhlmann, Tanja; Zhang, Weijia; Slesinger, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    In many cell types, differentiation requires an interplay between extrinsic signals and transcriptional changes mediated by repressive and activating histone modifications. Oligodendrocyte progenitors (OPCs) are electrically responsive cells receiving synaptic input. The differentiation of these cells into myelinating oligodendrocytes is characterized by temporal waves of gene repression followed by activation of myelin genes and progressive decline of electrical responsiveness. In this study, we used chromatin isolated from rat OPCs and immature oligodendrocytes, to characterize the genome-wide distribution of the repressive histone marks, H3K9me3 and H3K27me3, during differentiation. Although both marks were present at the OPC stage, only H3K9me3 marks (but not H3K27me3) were found to be increased during differentiation, at genes related to neuronal lineage and regulation of membrane excitability. Consistent with these findings, the levels and activity of H3K9 methyltransferases (H3K9 HMT), but not H3K27 HMT, increased more prominently upon exposure to oligodendrocyte differentiating stimuli and were detected in stage-specific repressive protein complexes containing the transcription factors SOX10 or YY1. Silencing H3K9 HMT, but not H3K27 HMT, impaired oligodendrocyte differentiation and functionally altered the response of oligodendrocytes to electrical stimulation. Together, these results identify repressive H3K9 methylation as critical for gene repression during oligodendrocyte differentiation. PMID:25568127

  11. New Solutions of Three Nonlinear Space- and Time-Fractional Partial Differential Equations in Mathematical Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Ruo-Xia; Wang, Wei; Chen, Ting-Hua

    2014-11-01

    Motivated by the widely used ansätz method and starting from the modified Riemann—Liouville derivative together with a fractional complex transformation that can be utilized to transform nonlinear fractional partial differential equations to nonlinear ordinary differential equations, new types of exact traveling wave solutions to three important nonlinear space- and time-fractional partial differential equations are obtained simultaneously in terms of solutions of a Riccati equation. The results are new and first reported in this paper.

  12. Differentiating science instruction: Success stories of high school science teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeng, Jennifer Lynn Cunningham

    This study investigated the characteristics and practices of high school science teachers who differentiate instruction. Specifically teachers' beliefs about science teaching and student learning and how they planned for and implemented differentiated instruction in their classrooms were explored. Understanding how high school science teachers differentiate instruction fills a gap in the literature. Participants included 7 high school science teachers purposefully selected from 4 different schools located in three school districts in a mid-Atlantic state. Data was collected during the spring of 2010 and fall of 2011 and occurred in two phases. For all 7 participants, data included one one-hour semi-structured interview and field notes from a minimum of four 90-minute classroom observations. Each classroom observation was scored using the validated Differentiated Instruction Implementation Matrix-Modified (DIIM-M), which evaluated participants' proficiency in differentiating instruction. The DIIM-M was analyzed using descriptive statistics and triangulated with field notes. This analysis led to the identification of a single teacher, Diane, for in-depth case study. Case study data included approximately two hours of semi-structured interview responses, 37.5 hours of classroom observations of Diane's Ecology and Biology classes, relevant instructional materials, and other artifacts. This variety of data allowed for triangulation of the evidence. Data were analyzed using a constant comparative approach (Lincoln & Guba, 1985). Results indicated that Diane consistently integrated complex learning profile differentiation strategies; however, she differentiated less frequently for readiness and interest. Technology-enhanced formative assessment played an integral role in planning and implementing lessons differentiated for readiness. Diane's content knowledge, self-efficacy, administrative support, and alignment between beliefs and the philosophy of differentiated

  13. Identification of differentially expressed genes associated with differential body size in mandarin fish (Siniperca chuatsi).

    PubMed

    Tian, Changxu; Li, Ling; Liang, Xu-Fang; He, Shan; Guo, Wenjie; Lv, Liyuan; Wang, Qingchao; Song, Yi

    2016-08-01

    Body size is an obvious and important characteristic of fish. Mandarin fish Siniperca chuatsi (Basilewsky) is one of the most valuable perciform species widely cultured in China. Individual differences in body size are common in mandarin fish and significantly influence the aquaculture production. However, little is currently known about its genetic control. In this study, digital gene expression profiling and transcriptome sequencing were performed in mandarin fish with differential body size at 30 and 180 days post-hatch (dph), respectively. Body weight, total length and body length of fish with big-size were significantly higher than those with small-size at both 30 and 180 dph (P < 0.05). 2171 and 2014 differentially expressed genes were identified between small-size and big-size fish at 30 and 180 dph, respectively. RT quantitative PCR (qPCR) analysis showed that the differential expression of 10 selected genes in mandarin fish that went through the same training procedure. The genes were involved in the growth hormone-insulin-like growth factor axis, cell proliferation and differentiation, appetite control, glucose metabolism, reproduction and sexual size dimorphism pathways. This study will help toward a comprehensive understanding of the complexity of regulation of body size in mandarin fish individuals and provide valuable information for future research.

  14. Differential Susceptibility to the Environment: Are Developmental Models Compatible with the Evidence from Twin Studies?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Del Giudice, Marco

    2016-01-01

    According to models of differential susceptibility, the same neurobiological and temperamental traits that determine increased sensitivity to stress and adversity also confer enhanced responsivity to the positive aspects of the environment. Differential susceptibility models have expanded to include complex developmental processes in which genetic…

  15. Modeling Noisy Data with Differential Equations Using Observed and Expected Matrices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deboeck, Pascal R.; Boker, Steven M.

    2010-01-01

    Complex intraindividual variability observed in psychology may be well described using differential equations. It is difficult, however, to apply differential equation models in psychological contexts, as time series are frequently short, poorly sampled, and have large proportions of measurement and dynamic error. Furthermore, current methods for…

  16. Value-Differentiation and Self-Esteem among Majority and Immigrant Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniel, Ella; Boehnke, Klaus; Knafo-Noam, Ariel

    2016-01-01

    As they inhabit complex social worlds, adolescents often learn competing values, resulting in value-differentiation, within-individual variability in value importance across contexts. But what are the implications of value-differentiation across age groups and cultures? A study of 4007 adolescents aged 11 to 18 (M = 14.41, SD = 2.16), of three…

  17. Natural complexity, computational complexity and depth.

    PubMed

    Machta, J

    2011-09-01

    Depth is a complexity measure for natural systems of the kind studied in statistical physics and is defined in terms of computational complexity. Depth quantifies the length of the shortest parallel computation required to construct a typical system state or history starting from simple initial conditions. The properties of depth are discussed and it is compared with other complexity measures. Depth can only be large for systems with embedded computation.

  18. Autyomatic Differentiation of C/C++

    SciTech Connect

    Beata Winnicka, Boyana Norris

    2005-11-14

    Automatic differentiation (AD) tools mechanize the process of developing code for the computation of derivatives. AD avoids the inaccuracies inherent in numerical approximations. Furthermore, sophisticated AD algoirthms can often produce c ode that is more reliable and more efficient than code written by an expert programmer. ADIC is the first and only AD tool for C and C++ based on compiler technology. This compiler foundation makes possible analyses and optimizations not available in toos based on operator overloading. The earliest implementations of ADIC included support for ANSI C applications, ADIC 2.0 lverages EDG, a commercial C/C++ parser, to provide robust C++ differentiation support. Modern AD tools, including ADIC are implemented in a modular way, aiming to isolate language-dependent program analyses and semantic transformations. The component design leads to much higher implementation quality because the different components can be implemented by experts in each of the different domains involved. For example, a compiler expert can focus on parsing, canonicalizing, and unparising C and C++, while an expert in graph theory and algorithms can produce new differentiation modules without having to worry about the complexity of parsing and generating C++ code. Thsi separation of concerns was achieved through the use of language-independent program analysis interfaces (in collaboration with researcgers at Rice University) and a language-independent XML representation of the computational portions of programs (XAIF). In addition to improved robustness and faster development times, this design naturally enables the reuse of program analysis algorithms and differentiation modules in compiler-based AD tools for other languages. In fact, the analysis and differention components are used in both ADIC and the Open AD Fortran front-end (based on Rice's Open64 compiler.

  19. Networked differential GPS system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, K. Tysen (Inventor); Loomis, Peter V. W. (Inventor); Kalafus, Rudolph M. (Inventor); Sheynblat, Leonid (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An embodiment of the present invention relates to a worldwide network of differential GPS reference stations (NDGPS) that continually track the entire GPS satellite constellation and provide interpolations of reference station corrections tailored for particular user locations between the reference stations Each reference station takes real-time ionospheric measurements with codeless cross-correlating dual-frequency carrier GPS receivers and computes real-time orbit ephemerides independently. An absolute pseudorange correction (PRC) is defined for each satellite as a function of a particular user's location. A map of the function is constructed, with iso-PRC contours. The network measures the PRCs at a few points, so-called reference stations and constructs an iso-PRC map for each satellite. Corrections are interpolated for each user's site on a subscription basis. The data bandwidths are kept to a minimum by transmitting information that cannot be obtained directly by the user and by updating information by classes and according to how quickly each class of data goes stale given the realities of the GPS system. Sub-decimeter-level kinematic accuracy over a given area is accomplished by establishing a mini-fiducial network.

  20. Differential scanning calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Spink, Charles H

    2008-01-01

    Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) has emerged as a powerful experimental technique for determining thermodynamic properties of biomacromolecules. The ability to monitor unfolding or phase transitions in proteins, polynucleotides, and lipid assemblies has not only provided data on thermodynamic stability for these important molecules, but also made it possible to examine the details of unfolding processes and to analyze the characteristics of intermediate states involved in the melting of biopolymers. The recent improvements in DSC instrumentation and software have generated new opportunities for the study of the effects of structure and changes in environment on the behavior of proteins, nucleic acids, and lipids. This review presents some of the details of application of DSC to the examination of the unfolding of biomolecules. After a brief introduction to DSC instrumentation used for the study of thermal transitions, the methods for obtaining basic thermodynamic information from the DSC curve are presented. Then, using DNA unfolding as an example, methods for the analysis of the melting transition are presented that allow deconvolution of the DSC curves to determine more subtle characteristics of the intermediate states involved in unfolding. Two types of transitions are presented for analysis, the first example being the unfolding of two large synthetic polynucleotides, which display high cooperativity in the melting process. The second example shows the application of DSC for the study of the unfolding of a simple hairpin oligonucleotide. Details of the data analysis are presented in a simple spreadsheet format.

  1. Differential Synthetic Aperture Ladar

    SciTech Connect

    Stappaerts, E A; Scharlemann, E

    2005-02-07

    We report a differential synthetic aperture ladar (DSAL) concept that relaxes platform and laser requirements compared to conventional SAL. Line-of-sight translation/vibration constraints are reduced by several orders of magnitude, while laser frequency stability is typically relaxed by an order of magnitude. The technique is most advantageous for shorter laser wavelengths, ultraviolet to mid-infrared. Analytical and modeling results, including the effect of speckle and atmospheric turbulence, are presented. Synthetic aperture ladars are of growing interest, and several theoretical and experimental papers have been published on the subject. Compared to RF synthetic aperture radar (SAR), platform/ladar motion and transmitter bandwidth constraints are especially demanding at optical wavelengths. For mid-IR and shorter wavelengths, deviations from a linear trajectory along the synthetic aperture length have to be submicron, or their magnitude must be measured to that precision for compensation. The laser coherence time has to be the synthetic aperture transit time, or transmitter phase has to be recorded and a correction applied on detection.

  2. DNA methylation and differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Michalowsky, L A; Jones, P A

    1989-01-01

    The methylation of specific cytosine residues in DNA has been implicated in regulating gene expression and facilitating functional specialization of cellular phenotypes. Generally, the demethylation of certain CpG sites correlates with transcriptional activation of genes. 5-Azacytidine is an inhibitor of DNA methylation and has been widely used as a potent activator of suppressed genetic information. Treatment of cells with 5-azacytidine results in profound phenotypic alterations. The drug-induced hypomethylation of DNA apparently perturbs DNA-protein interactions that may consequently alter transcriptional activity and cell determination. The inhibitory effect of cytosine methylation may be exerted via altered DNA-protein interactions specifically or may be transduced by a change in the conformation of chromatin. Recent studies have demonstrated that cytosine methylation also plays a central role in parental imprinting, which in turn determines the differential expression of maternal and paternal genomes during embryogenesis. In other words, methylation is the mechanism whereby the embryo retains memory of the gametic origin of each component of genetic information. A memory of this type would probably persist during DNA replication and cell division as methylation patterns are stable and heritable. PMID:2466640

  3. Multiple symbol differential detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divsalar, Dariush (Inventor); Simon, Marvin K. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A differential detection technique for multiple phase shift keying (MPSK) signals is provided which uses a multiple symbol observation interval on the basis of which a joint decision is made regarding the phase of the received symbols. In accordance with the invention, a first difference phase is created between first and second received symbols. Next, the first difference phase is correlated with the possible values thereof to provide a first plurality of intermediate output signals. A second difference phase is next created between second and third received symbols. The second difference phase is correlated with plural possible values thereof to provide a second plurality of intermediate output signals. Next, a third difference phase is created between the first and third symbols. The third difference phase is correlated with plural possible values thereof to provide a third plurality of intermediate output signals. Each of the first plurality of intermediate outputs are combined with each of the second plurality of intermediate outputs and each of the third plurality of intermediate outputs to provide a plurality of possible output values. Finally, a joint decision is made by choosing from the plurality of possible output values the value which represents the best combined correlation of the first, second and third difference values with the possible values thereof.

  4. Making and Differentiating Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, G. J.

    2015-07-01

    The rocky planets formed by progressive aggregation of dust to make planetesimals which joined to make large objects called planetary embryos that finally accumulated into planets, one of which we live on. This chaotic process is complicated further by chemical changes with distance from the Sun, including differences in oxidation conditions and water concentration. Once the inner planets began to form, metallic iron sank to form cores, reacting with the rocky portions in the process. David C. Rubie (University of Bayreuth, Germany) and colleagues in Germany, France, and the United States put all this planetary action into an impressively thorough computer model of planet formation and differentiation. They show that the observed compositions of the Earth can be matched by simulations that include the Grand Tack (Jupiter and Saturn migrate inwards towards the Sun and then back out), and chemical gradients in the Solar System, with more reducing conditions near the Sun, more oxidizing farther from the Sun, and oxidizing and hydrated conditions even farther from the Sun. The study identifies other important variables, such as the extent to which metallic iron chemically equilibrated with the silicate making up the Earth's mantle, the pressure at which it happened, and the likelihood that Earth accreted heterogeneously.

  5. [Complexity of land ecosystem].

    PubMed

    Wu, Cifang; Chen, Meiqiu

    2002-06-01

    In recent years, complexity studies has become a new research region and been widely applied in engineering, biology, economy, management, military, police and sociology. In this paper, from the view of complex science, the main complexity characteristics of land ecosystem were described, furthermore, the application of fractal, chaos, and artificial neural network on the complexity of land ecosystem were also discussed.

  6. The Differentiated Classroom Observation Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassady, Jerrell C.; Neumeister, Kristie L. Speirs; Adams, Cheryll M.; Cross, Tracy L.; Dixon, Felicia A.; Pierce, Rebecca L.

    2004-01-01

    This article presents a new classroom observation scale that was developed to examine the differential learning activities and experiences of gifted children educated in regular classroom settings. The Differentiated Classroom Observation Scale (DCOS) is presented in total, with clarification of the coding practices and strategies. Although the…

  7. Cognitive Differentiation in Intergroup Perception

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephan, Walter G.

    1977-01-01

    Black, Chicano, and Anglo students from segregated and integrated schools perceived their ethnic groups as being less differentiated than outgroups. Students in integrated schools perceived outgroups as somewhat less differentiated than students in segregated schools. Intergroup contact, except between highly dissimilar groups, was not an…

  8. Intelligence Differentiation in Adult Samples.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abad, Francisco J.; Colom, Robert; Juan-Espinosa, Manuel; Garcia, Luis F.

    2003-01-01

    Results for 3,340 participants taking a battery of cognitive tests and an analysis of the Spanish standardization of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-III support the differentiation of intelligence across the range of ability, with WAIS-III results more supportive of the differentiation theory. (SLD)

  9. GPU-Accelerated Adjoint Algorithmic Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Gremse, Felix; Höfter, Andreas; Razik, Lukas; Kiessling, Fabian; Naumann, Uwe

    2016-03-01

    Many scientific problems such as classifier training or medical image reconstruction can be expressed as minimization of differentiable real-valued cost functions and solved with iterative gradient-based methods. Adjoint algorithmic differentiation (AAD) enables automated computation of gradients of such cost functions implemented as computer programs. To backpropagate adjoint derivatives, excessive memory is potentially required to store the intermediate partial derivatives on a dedicated data structure, referred to as the "tape". Parallelization is difficult because threads need to synchronize their accesses during taping and backpropagation. This situation is aggravated for many-core architectures, such as Graphics Processing Units (GPUs), because of the large number of light-weight threads and the limited memory size in general as well as per thread. We show how these limitations can be mediated if the cost function is expressed using GPU-accelerated vector and matrix operations which are recognized as intrinsic functions by our AAD software. We compare this approach with naive and vectorized implementations for CPUs. We use four increasingly complex cost functions to evaluate the performance with respect to memory consumption and gradient computation times. Using vectorization, CPU and GPU memory consumption could be substantially reduced compared to the naive reference implementation, in some cases even by an order of complexity. The vectorization allowed usage of optimized parallel libraries during forward and reverse passes which resulted in high speedups for the vectorized CPU version compared to the naive reference implementation. The GPU version achieved an additional speedup of 7.5 ± 4.4, showing that the processing power of GPUs can be utilized for AAD using this concept. Furthermore, we show how this software can be systematically extended for more complex problems such as nonlinear absorption reconstruction for fluorescence-mediated tomography.

  10. GPU-accelerated adjoint algorithmic differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gremse, Felix; Höfter, Andreas; Razik, Lukas; Kiessling, Fabian; Naumann, Uwe

    2016-03-01

    Many scientific problems such as classifier training or medical image reconstruction can be expressed as minimization of differentiable real-valued cost functions and solved with iterative gradient-based methods. Adjoint algorithmic differentiation (AAD) enables automated computation of gradients of such cost functions implemented as computer programs. To backpropagate adjoint derivatives, excessive memory is potentially required to store the intermediate partial derivatives on a dedicated data structure, referred to as the "tape". Parallelization is difficult because threads need to synchronize their accesses during taping and backpropagation. This situation is aggravated for many-core architectures, such as Graphics Processing Units (GPUs), because of the large number of light-weight threads and the limited memory size in general as well as per thread. We show how these limitations can be mediated if the cost function is expressed using GPU-accelerated vector and matrix operations which are recognized as intrinsic functions by our AAD software. We compare this approach with naive and vectorized implementations for CPUs. We use four increasingly complex cost functions to evaluate the performance with respect to memory consumption and gradient computation times. Using vectorization, CPU and GPU memory consumption could be substantially reduced compared to the naive reference implementation, in some cases even by an order of complexity. The vectorization allowed usage of optimized parallel libraries during forward and reverse passes which resulted in high speedups for the vectorized CPU version compared to the naive reference implementation. The GPU version achieved an additional speedup of 7.5 ± 4.4, showing that the processing power of GPUs can be utilized for AAD using this concept. Furthermore, we show how this software can be systematically extended for more complex problems such as nonlinear absorption reconstruction for fluorescence-mediated tomography.

  11. GPU-Accelerated Adjoint Algorithmic Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Gremse, Felix; Höfter, Andreas; Razik, Lukas; Kiessling, Fabian; Naumann, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    Many scientific problems such as classifier training or medical image reconstruction can be expressed as minimization of differentiable real-valued cost functions and solved with iterative gradient-based methods. Adjoint algorithmic differentiation (AAD) enables automated computation of gradients of such cost functions implemented as computer programs. To backpropagate adjoint derivatives, excessive memory is potentially required to store the intermediate partial derivatives on a dedicated data structure, referred to as the “tape”. Parallelization is difficult because threads need to synchronize their accesses during taping and backpropagation. This situation is aggravated for many-core architectures, such as Graphics Processing Units (GPUs), because of the large number of light-weight threads and the limited memory size in general as well as per thread. We show how these limitations can be mediated if the cost function is expressed using GPU-accelerated vector and matrix operations which are recognized as intrinsic functions by our AAD software. We compare this approach with naive and vectorized implementations for CPUs. We use four increasingly complex cost functions to evaluate the performance with respect to memory consumption and gradient computation times. Using vectorization, CPU and GPU memory consumption could be substantially reduced compared to the naive reference implementation, in some cases even by an order of complexity. The vectorization allowed usage of optimized parallel libraries during forward and reverse passes which resulted in high speedups for the vectorized CPU version compared to the naive reference implementation. The GPU version achieved an additional speedup of 7.5 ± 4.4, showing that the processing power of GPUs can be utilized for AAD using this concept. Furthermore, we show how this software can be systematically extended for more complex problems such as nonlinear absorption reconstruction for fluorescence-mediated tomography

  12. The Multiple Origins of Complex Multicellularity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knoll, Andrew H.

    2011-05-01

    Simple multicellularity has evolved numerous times within the Eukarya, but complex multicellular organisms belong to only six clades: animals, embryophytic land plants, florideophyte red algae, laminarialean brown algae, and two groups of fungi. Phylogeny and genomics suggest a generalized trajectory for the evolution of complex multicellularity, beginning with the co-optation of existing genes for adhesion. Molecular channels to facilitate cell-cell transfer of nutrients and signaling molecules appear to be critical, as this trait occurs in all complex multicellular organisms but few others. Proliferation of gene families for transcription factors and cell signals accompany the key functional innovation of complex multicellular clades: differentiated cells and tissues for the bulk transport of oxygen, nutrients, and molecular signals that enable organisms to circumvent the physical limitations of diffusion. The fossil records of animals and plants document key stages of this trajectory.

  13. The BRST complex of homological Poisson reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller-Lennert, Martin

    2017-02-01

    BRST complexes are differential graded Poisson algebras. They are associated with a coisotropic ideal J of a Poisson algebra P and provide a description of the Poisson algebra (P/J)^J as their cohomology in degree zero. Using the notion of stable equivalence introduced in Felder and Kazhdan (Contemporary Mathematics 610, Perspectives in representation theory, 2014), we prove that any two BRST complexes associated with the same coisotropic ideal are quasi-isomorphic in the case P = R[V] where V is a finite-dimensional symplectic vector space and the bracket on P is induced by the symplectic structure on V. As a corollary, the cohomology of the BRST complexes is canonically associated with the coisotropic ideal J in the symplectic case. We do not require any regularity assumptions on the constraints generating the ideal J. We finally quantize the BRST complex rigorously in the presence of infinitely many ghost variables and discuss the uniqueness of the quantization procedure.

  14. Differential Expression Analysis for Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Haynes, Winston A.; Higdon, Roger; Stanberry, Larissa; Collins, Dwayne; Kolker, Eugene

    2013-01-01

    Life science technologies generate a deluge of data that hold the keys to unlocking the secrets of important biological functions and disease mechanisms. We present DEAP, Differential Expression Analysis for Pathways, which capitalizes on information about biological pathways to identify important regulatory patterns from differential expression data. DEAP makes significant improvements over existing approaches by including information about pathway structure and discovering the most differentially expressed portion of the pathway. On simulated data, DEAP significantly outperformed traditional methods: with high differential expression, DEAP increased power by two orders of magnitude; with very low differential expression, DEAP doubled the power. DEAP performance was illustrated on two different gene and protein expression studies. DEAP discovered fourteen important pathways related to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and interferon treatment that existing approaches omitted. On the interferon study, DEAP guided focus towards a four protein path within the 26 protein Notch signalling pathway. PMID:23516350

  15. A novel EID family member, EID-3, inhibits differentiation and forms a homodimer or heterodimer with EID-2

    SciTech Connect

    Sasajima, Yuka; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Miyake, Satoshi; Yuasa, Yasuhito . E-mail: yuasa.monc@tmd.ac.jp

    2005-08-05

    The EID family members, i.e., E1A-like inhibitor of differentiation-1 (EID-1) and EID-1-like inhibitor of differentiation-2 (EID-2), were identified as negative regulators of cellular differentiation. EID-1 seems to inhibit differentiation by blocking histone acetyltransferase activity and EID-2 possibly inhibits differentiation through binding to class I histone deacetylases (HDACs). Here, we report a novel inhibitor of differentiation exhibiting homology with EID-2 termed EID-3 (EID-2-like inhibitor of differentiation-3). Like EID-2, EID-3 inhibited MyoD- and GR{alpha}-dependent transcription and blocked muscle differentiation in cultured cells by binding to class I HDACs. Unlike that of EID-2, the C-terminus, but not the N-terminus, of EID-3 was required for nuclear localization. EID-3 formed a homodimer or heterodimer with EID-2. These results suggest that EID-3 inhibits differentiation by blocking transcription as a complex in cells.

  16. Patient Power: Complex Issues Need Complex Answers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiener, Carolyn; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Discusses ethical and practical questions that arise in physician/patient interactions as a result of the rising prevalence of chronic illness, the growth of medical technology, and the increased differentiation of medical specialization. Issues considered include patients' rights, medical malpractice, informed consent, and the patient self-help…

  17. Description of DASSL: a differential/algebraic system solver

    SciTech Connect

    Petzold, L.R.

    1982-09-01

    This paper describes a new code DASSL, for the numerical solution of implicit systems of differential/algebraic equations. These equations are written in the form F(t,y,y') = 0, and they can include systems which are substantially more complex than standard form ODE systems y' = f(t,y). Differential/algebraic equations occur in several diverse applications in the physical world. We outline the algorithms and strategies used in DASSL, and explain some of the features of the code. In addition, we outline briefly what needs to be done to solve a problem using DASSL.

  18. In-fiber all-optical fractional differentiator.

    PubMed

    Cuadrado-Laborde, C; Andrés, M V

    2009-03-15

    We demonstrate that an asymmetrical pi phase-shifted fiber Bragg grating operated in reflection can provide the required spectral response for implementing an all-optical fractional differentiator. There are different (but equivalent) ways to design it, e.g., by using different gratings lengths and keeping the same index modulation depth at both sides of the pi phase shift, or vice versa. Analytical expressions were found relating the fractional differentiator order with the grating parameters. The device shows a good accuracy calculating the fractional time derivatives of the complex field of an arbitrary input optical waveform. The introduced concept is supported by numerical simulations.

  19. Altered macrophage differentiation and immune dysfunction in tumor development.

    PubMed

    Sica, Antonio; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2007-05-01

    Tumors require a constant influx of myelomonocytic cells to support the angiogenesis and stroma remodeling needed for their growth. This is mediated by tumor-derived factors, which cause sustained myelopoiesis and the accumulation and functional differentiation of myelomonocytic cells, most of which are macrophages, at the tumor site. An important side effect of the accumulation and functional differentiation of these cells is that they can induce lymphocyte dysfunction. A complete understanding of the complex interplay between neoplastic and myelomonocytic cells might offer novel targets for therapeutic intervention aimed at depriving tumor cells of important growth support and enhancing the antitumor immune response.

  20. Relations between harmonic analysis associated with two differential operators of different orders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Cheikh, Youssèf

    2003-04-01

    The transmutation operators were introduced by Delsarte and Lions to state relations between harmonic analysis (generalized translation operators, generalized convolution, generalized Fourier transform and generalized Paley-Wiener theorem) associated with two differential operators of the same order in the complex domain. In this paper, we discuss the analogous problem for differential operators having different orders. More precisely, we consider a suitable class of differential operators Lz in the complex domain and from harmonic analysis associated with Lz, we state the corresponding one associated with Lzn, n being an arbitrary positive integer. Our analysis is based on Ricci's decomposition. Some particular cases are singled out.

  1. Discovering new points of differentiation.

    PubMed

    MacMillan, I C; McGrath, R G

    1997-01-01

    Most profitable strategies are built on differentiation: offering customers something they value that competitors don't have. But most companies concentrate only on their products or services. In fact, a company can differentiate itself every point where it comes in contact with its customers--from the moment customers realize they need a product or service to the time when they dispose of it. The authors believe that if companies open up their thinking to their customer's entire experience with a product or service--the consumption chain--they can uncover opportunities to position their offerings in ways that neither they nor their competitors though possible. The authors show how even a mundane product such as candles can be successfully differentiated. By analyzing its customers' experiences and exploring various options, Blyth Industries, for example, has grown from a $2 million U.S. candle manufacturer into a global candle and accessory business with nearly $500 million in sales and a market value of $1.2 billion. Finding ways to differentiate one's company is a skill that can be nurtured, the authors contend. In this Manager's Tool Kit, they have designed a two-part approach that can help companies continually identify new points of differentiation and develop the ability to generate successful differentiation strategies. "Mapping the Consumption Chain" captures the customer's total experience with a product or service. "Analyzing Your Customer's Experience" shows managers how directed brainstorming about each step in the consumption chain can elicit numerous ways to differentiate any offering.

  2. Modeling Stem Cell Myogenic Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Rajiv S.; Spector, Alexander A.

    2017-01-01

    The process of stem cell myogenesis (transformation into skeletal muscle cells) includes several stages characterized by the expression of certain combinations of myogenic factors. The first part of this process is accompanied by cell division, while the second part is mainly associated with direct differentiation. The mechanical cues are known to enhance stem cell myogenesis, and the paper focuses on the stem cell differentiation under the condition of externally applied strain. The process of stem cell myogenic differentiation is interpreted as the interplay among transcription factors, targeted proteins and strain-generated signaling molecule, and it is described by a kinetic multi-stage model. The model parameters are optimally adjusted by using the available data from the experiment with adipose-derived stem cells subjected to the application of cyclic uniaxial strains of the magnitude of 10%. The modeling results predict the kinetics of the process of myogenic differentiation, including the number of cells in each stage of differentiation and the rates of differentiation from one stage to another for different strains from 4% to 16%. The developed model can help better understand the process of myogenic differentiation and the effects of mechanical cues on stem cell use in muscle therapies. PMID:28106095

  3. Complex networks analysis of language complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amancio, Diego R.; Aluisio, Sandra M.; Oliveira, Osvaldo N., Jr.; Costa, Luciano da F.

    2012-12-01

    Methods from statistical physics, such as those involving complex networks, have been increasingly used in the quantitative analysis of linguistic phenomena. In this paper, we represented pieces of text with different levels of simplification in co-occurrence networks and found that topological regularity correlated negatively with textual complexity. Furthermore, in less complex texts the distance between concepts, represented as nodes, tended to decrease. The complex networks metrics were treated with multivariate pattern recognition techniques, which allowed us to distinguish between original texts and their simplified versions. For each original text, two simplified versions were generated manually with increasing number of simplification operations. As expected, distinction was easier for the strongly simplified versions, where the most relevant metrics were node strength, shortest paths and diversity. Also, the discrimination of complex texts was improved with higher hierarchical network metrics, thus pointing to the usefulness of considering wider contexts around the concepts. Though the accuracy rate in the distinction was not as high as in methods using deep linguistic knowledge, the complex network approach is still useful for a rapid screening of texts whenever assessing complexity is essential to guarantee accessibility to readers with limited reading ability.

  4. ETO2 coordinates cellular proliferation and differentiation during erythropoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Goardon, Nicolas; Lambert, Julie A; Rodriguez, Patrick; Nissaire, Philippe; Herblot, Sabine; Thibault, Pierre; Dumenil, Dominique; Strouboulis, John; Romeo, Paul-Henri; Hoang, Trang

    2006-01-01

    The passage from proliferation to terminal differentiation is critical for normal development and is often perturbed in malignancies. To define the molecular mechanisms that govern this process during erythropoiesis, we have used tagging/proteomics approaches and characterized protein complexes nucleated by TAL-1/SCL, a basic helix–loop–helix transcription factor that specifies the erythrocytic lineage. In addition to known TAL-1 partners, GATA-1, E2A, HEB, LMO2 and Ldb1, we identify the ETO2 repressor as a novel component recruited to TAL-1 complexes through interaction with E2A/HEB. Ectopic expression and siRNA knockdown experiments in hematopoietic progenitor cells show that ETO2 actively represses erythroid TAL-1 target genes and governs the expansion of erythroid progenitors. At the onset of erythroid differentiation, a change in the stoichiometry of ETO2 within the TAL-1 complex activates the expression of known erythroid-specific TAL-1 target genes and of Gfi-1b and p21Cip, encoding two essential regulators of erythroid cell proliferation. These results suggest that the dynamics of ETO2 recruitment within nuclear complexes couple cell proliferation to cell differentiation and determine the onset of terminal erythroid maturation. PMID:16407974

  5. Radioisotope trithiol complexes

    DOEpatents

    Jurisson, Silvia S.; Cutler, Cathy S.; Degraffenreid, Anthony J.

    2016-08-30

    The present invention is directed to a series of stable radioisotope trithiol complexes that provide a simplified route for the direct complexation of radioisotopes present in low concentrations. In certain embodiments, the complex contains a linking domain configured to conjugate the radioisotope trithiol complex to a targeting vector. The invention is also directed to a novel method of linking the radioisotope to a trithiol compound to form the radioisotope trithiol complex. The inventive radioisotope trithiol complexes may be utilized for a variety of applications, including diagnostics and/or treatment in nuclear medicine.

  6. Evolution of biological complexity

    PubMed Central

    Adami, Christoph; Ofria, Charles; Collier, Travis C.

    2000-01-01

    To make a case for or against a trend in the evolution of complexity in biological evolution, complexity needs to be both rigorously defined and measurable. A recent information-theoretic (but intuitively evident) definition identifies genomic complexity with the amount of information a sequence stores about its environment. We investigate the evolution of genomic complexity in populations of digital organisms and monitor in detail the evolutionary transitions that increase complexity. We show that, because natural selection forces genomes to behave as a natural “Maxwell Demon,” within a fixed environment, genomic complexity is forced to increase. PMID:10781045

  7. Endometrial metaplasias and reactive changes: a spectrum of altered differentiation.

    PubMed

    Nicolae, Alina; Preda, Ovidiu; Nogales, Francisco F

    2011-02-01

    Endometrial metaplasias and changes (EMCs) are conditions frequently overlooked and misdiagnosed. The aim of this review is to update current issues and provide a classification with a practical clinicopathological approach. Hormonal or irritative stimuli are the main inducing factors of EMCs, although some metaplasias have a mutational origin. EMCs vary from reactive, degenerative lesions to those able to associate with malignancy or those having a preneoplastic potential. The most common types of EMCs are ciliated tubal metaplasia (CTM) and mucinous metaplasia (MM), which occur in simple and complex glands, and possibly these architectural changes hold the same prognostic significance as they do in hyperplastic endometrioid lesions. Immunohistochemically, CTM is positive for LhS28, bcl-2, PAX2 and p16(INK4A). Complex CTM is likely to be a precursor of ciliated endometrioid-type carcinomas. MMs should be evaluated architecturally, taking into account that their atypicality is minimal. The differentiation between complex MM and mucinous carcinoma may be extremely difficult. Surface complex, papillary MM in endometrial polyps can be considered as benign. Intestinal-type endometrial MM is rare and its presence should prompt further investigation of associated lesions in the endocervix. Endometrial squamous metaplasia (ESS) is often linked to chronic irritative situations. It should be differentiated from secondary involvement by a human papilomavirus-related cervical lesion. Morular metaplasia is a mutational phenomenon with a distinct phenotype that helps to differentiate it from ESS. Morules are benign, hormonally inert structures that are often markers of complex endometrioid glandular architecture, and they are associated with an attenuated malignancy. Endometrial reactive changes are commonly associated with desquamation or hormonal imbalance. The frequent, p16(INK4A) positive, benign surface papillary syncytial change may be misdiagnosed, in some cases, as

  8. Genre Complexes in Popular Music

    PubMed Central

    Childress, C. Clayton

    2016-01-01

    Recent work in the sociology of music suggests a declining importance of genre categories. Yet other work in this research stream and in the sociology of classification argues for the continued prevalence of genres as a meaningful tool through which creators, critics and consumers focus their attention in the topology of available works. Building from work in the study of categories and categorization we examine how boundary strength and internal differentiation structure the genre pairings of some 3 million musicians and groups. Using a range of network-based and statistical techniques, we uncover three musical “complexes,” which are collectively constituted by 16 smaller genre communities. Our analysis shows that the musical universe is not monolithically organized but rather composed of multiple worlds that are differently structured—i.e., uncentered, single-centered, and multi-centered. PMID:27203852

  9. Genre Complexes in Popular Music.

    PubMed

    Silver, Daniel; Lee, Monica; Childress, C Clayton

    2016-01-01

    Recent work in the sociology of music suggests a declining importance of genre categories. Yet other work in this research stream and in the sociology of classification argues for the continued prevalence of genres as a meaningful tool through which creators, critics and consumers focus their attention in the topology of available works. Building from work in the study of categories and categorization we examine how boundary strength and internal differentiation structure the genre pairings of some 3 million musicians and groups. Using a range of network-based and statistical techniques, we uncover three musical "complexes," which are collectively constituted by 16 smaller genre communities. Our analysis shows that the musical universe is not monolithically organized but rather composed of multiple worlds that are differently structured-i.e., uncentered, single-centered, and multi-centered.

  10. Short-term differential training decreases postural sway.

    PubMed

    James, Eric G

    2014-01-01

    Differential training has been shown to enhance motor learning in sports skills. In the present study differential training was applied to the minimization of postural sway. A differential training group performed 15 one minute practice trials, each with different postural movement instructions. A repetitive practice group performed 15 trials standing as still as possible for one minute. Pre- and post-tests were performed standing as still as possible in 1 and 2-leg stance. Accelerometry data were collected approximately at the level of the center of mass (COM) and at the head. The root mean square jerk (RMSJ) of movement at the COM and head was estimated for the anteroposterior and mediolateral axes of motion. A significant Group × Test interaction revealed that the differential training led to lower anteroposterior RMSJ on the post-test than on the Pre-test in both the 1 and 2-leg stance tasks. A significant Group × Effector × Test interaction revealed that the decrease in anteroposterior RMSJ with differential training occurred in the RMSJ of the head but not the COM. The repetitive practice did not lead to a significant change in anteroposterior RMSJ at either the COM or the head. Neither form of training led to a significant change in mediolateral RMSJ. The results indicated that differential training can enhance motor learning not only in complex sports skills but in relatively simple motor tasks such as maintaining quiet stance.

  11. Differentiation signatures in the Flora region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oszkiewicz, Dagmara; Kankiewicz, Paweł; Włodarczyk, Ireneusz; Kryszczyńska, Agnieszka

    2015-12-01

    Context. Most asteroid families are very homogeneous in physical properties. Some show greater diversity, however. The Flora family is the most intriguing of them. The Flora family is spread widely in the inner main belt, has a rich collisional history, and is one of the most taxonomically diverse regions in the main belt. As a result of its proximity to the asteroid (4) Vesta (the only currently known intact differentiated asteroid) and its family, migration between the two regions is possible. This dynamical path is one of the counter arguments to the hypothesis that there may be traces of a differentiated parent body other than Vesta in the inner main belt region. We here investigate the possibility that some of the V- and A-types (commonly interpreted as basaltoids and dunites - parts of the mantle and crust of differentiated parent bodies) in the Flora dynamical region are not dynamically connected to Vesta. Aims: The goal of this study is to investigate asteroids in the Flora dynamical region that may be witness to the differentiation of a parent body other than (4) Vesta. In particular, we aim at predicting which asteroids may be fragments of a differentiated body or bodies (taxonomical V-types). We also investigate their possible dynamical linkage to the nearby Vesta family. Methods: To predict the taxonomic types of asteroids we used the naive Bayes classifier. We studied their dynamical past through numerical integration including gravitational and Yarkovsky forces. Each asteroid was cloned, and average orbital elements were computed at each step. When possible, we used observationally constrained physical parameters for the thermal forces. Results: Most of the asteroids in the Flora region are predicted to originate from the S-complex (around 47.8%). Tens of asteroids with potentially differential origins are identified in the region, including 164 potential V-types. We investigated the dynamical evolution of selected objects to examine possible linkages

  12. A New Differential Logic-Compatible Multiple-Time Programmable Memory Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Yi-Hung; Yang, Hsiao-Lan; Lin, Wun-Jie; Lin, Chrong Jung; King, Ya-Chin

    2010-04-01

    This work presents a novel differential n-channel logic-compatible multiple-time programmable (MTP) memory cell. This cell features double sensing window by a differential pair of floating gates, and therefore increases the retention lifetime of the nonvolatile memory effectively. Also, a self-selective programming (SSP) method is innovated in writing one pair differential data by a single cell without increasing any design or process complexity in peripheral circuit. The differential cell is a promising MTP solution to challenge thin floating gate oxide below 70 Å for 90 nm complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) node and beyond.

  13. Rediscovering Signal Complexity as a Teleseismic Discriminant

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Steve R.; Anderson, Dale N.

    2009-02-20

    We re-examine the utility of teleseismic seismic complexity discriminants in a multivariate setting using United Kingdom array data. We measure a complexity discriminant taken on array beams by simply taking the logarithm of the ratio of the P wave coda signal to that of the first arriving direct P wave (βCF). The single station complexity discriminant shows marginal performance with shallow earthquakes having more complex signatures than those from explosions or deep earthquakes. However, when combined with the mb – Ms discriminant significant improvements are observed. In particular, signal complexity can be used to improve discrimination performance over mb – Ms alone as well improve differentiation between shallow and deep earthquakes. When complexity discriminants are combined with mb – Ms there is a tendency for explosions, shallow earthquakes and deep earthquakes to form three distinct populations. Importantly, multistation complexity discriminants have false alarm rates similar to those observed for network mb - Ms in support of predictions based on simulations of Bowers (1996).

  14. Doxorubicin Lipid Complex Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Doxorubicin lipid complex is used to treat ovarian cancer that has not improved or that has worsened after treatment with other medications. Doxorubicin lipid complex is also used to treat Kaposi's sarcoma ( ...

  15. Daunorubicin Lipid Complex Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Daunorubicin lipid complex is used to treat advanced Kaposi's sarcoma (a type of cancer that causes abnormal tissue to ... body) related to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Daunorubicin lipid complex is in a class of medications called ...

  16. Irinotecan Lipid Complex Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Irinotecan lipid complex is used in combination with other medications to treat pancreatic cancer that has spread to other ... worsened after treatment with other chemotherapy medications. Irinotecan lipid complex is in a class of antineoplastic medications ...

  17. Oligocyclopentadienyl transition metal complexes

    SciTech Connect

    de Azevedo, Cristina G.; Vollhardt, K. Peter C.

    2002-01-18

    Synthesis, characterization, and reactivity studies of oligocyclopentadienyl transition metal complexes, namely those of fulvalene, tercyclopentadienyl, quatercyclopentadienyl, and pentacyclopentadienyl(cyclopentadienyl) are the subject of this account. Thermal-, photo-, and redox chemistries of homo- and heteropolynuclear complexes are described.

  18. Vincristine Lipid Complex Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Vincristine lipid complex is used to treat a certain type of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL; a type ... at least two different treatments with other medications. Vincristine lipid complex is in a class of medications ...

  19. Chiral anomalies and differential geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Zumino, B.

    1983-10-01

    Some properties of chiral anomalies are described from a geometric point of view. Topics include chiral anomalies and differential forms, transformation properties of the anomalies, identification and use of the anomalies, and normalization of the anomalies. 22 references. (WHK)

  20. Role of Hox genes in stem cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Anne; Werheid, David F; Knapp, Silvana M; Tobiasch, Edda

    2015-04-26

    Hox genes are an evolutionary highly conserved gene family. They determine the anterior-posterior body axis in bilateral organisms and influence the developmental fate of cells. Embryonic stem cells are usually devoid of any Hox gene expression, but these transcription factors are activated in varying spatial and temporal patterns defining the development of various body regions. In the adult body, Hox genes are among others responsible for driving the differentiation of tissue stem cells towards their respective lineages in order to repair and maintain the correct function of tissues and organs. Due to their involvement in the embryonic and adult body, they have been suggested to be useable for improving stem cell differentiations in vitro and in vivo. In many studies Hox genes have been found as driving factors in stem cell differentiation towards adipogenesis, in lineages involved in bone and joint formation, mainly chondrogenesis and osteogenesis, in cardiovascular lineages including endothelial and smooth muscle cell differentiations, and in neurogenesis. As life expectancy is rising, the demand for tissue reconstruction continues to increase. Stem cells have become an increasingly popular choice for creating therapies in regenerative medicine due to their self-renewal and differentiation potential. Especially mesenchymal stem cells are used more and more frequently due to their easy handling and accessibility, combined with a low tumorgenicity and little ethical concerns. This review therefore intends to summarize to date known correlations between natural Hox gene expression patterns in body tissues and during the differentiation of various stem cells towards their respective lineages with a major focus on mesenchymal stem cell differentiations. This overview shall help to understand the complex interactions of Hox genes and differentiation processes all over the body as well as in vitro for further improvement of stem cell treatments in future regenerative

  1. Role of Hox genes in stem cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Seifert, Anne; Werheid, David F; Knapp, Silvana M; Tobiasch, Edda

    2015-01-01

    Hox genes are an evolutionary highly conserved gene family. They determine the anterior-posterior body axis in bilateral organisms and influence the developmental fate of cells. Embryonic stem cells are usually devoid of any Hox gene expression, but these transcription factors are activated in varying spatial and temporal patterns defining the development of various body regions. In the adult body, Hox genes are among others responsible for driving the differentiation of tissue stem cells towards their respective lineages in order to repair and maintain the correct function of tissues and organs. Due to their involvement in the embryonic and adult body, they have been suggested to be useable for improving stem cell differentiations in vitro and in vivo. In many studies Hox genes have been found as driving factors in stem cell differentiation towards adipogenesis, in lineages involved in bone and joint formation, mainly chondrogenesis and osteogenesis, in cardiovascular lineages including endothelial and smooth muscle cell differentiations, and in neurogenesis. As life expectancy is rising, the demand for tissue reconstruction continues to increase. Stem cells have become an increasingly popular choice for creating therapies in regenerative medicine due to their self-renewal and differentiation potential. Especially mesenchymal stem cells are used more and more frequently due to their easy handling and accessibility, combined with a low tumorgenicity and little ethical concerns. This review therefore intends to summarize to date known correlations between natural Hox gene expression patterns in body tissues and during the differentiation of various stem cells towards their respective lineages with a major focus on mesenchymal stem cell differentiations. This overview shall help to understand the complex interactions of Hox genes and differentiation processes all over the body as well as in vitro for further improvement of stem cell treatments in future regenerative

  2. Lymph Node Dissection for Differentiated Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mizrachi, Aviram; Shaha, Ashok R.

    2017-01-01

    Lymph node metastases in differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) have a wide spectrum of clinical significance. Several variables are taken under consideration when trying to decide on the optimal management of patients with DTC. Routine prophylactic central and/or lateral lymph node dissection is not advocated with exception of central neck dissection for locally advanced tumors. When regarding recurrent disease, foundations have been laid for clinicians to make accurate decisions as to when to perform surgery and when to continue maintaining the patient’s disease under observation. These complex decisions are determined based upon multiple factors, not only regarding the patient’s disease but also the patient’s comprehension of the procedure and apprehension levels. Nevertheless if the patient and/or clinician are emotionally keen to surgically remove the disease then the procedure should be considered. PMID:28117285

  3. 3D differential phase contrast microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Michael; Tian, Lei; Waller, Laura

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate 3D phase and absorption recovery from partially coherent intensity images captured with a programmable LED array source. Images are captured through-focus with four different illumination patterns. Using first Born and weak object approximations (WOA), a linear 3D differential phase contrast (DPC) model is derived. The partially coherent transfer functions relate the sample’s complex refractive index distribution to intensity measurements at varying defocus. Volumetric reconstruction is achieved by a global FFT-based method, without an intermediate 2D phase retrieval step. Because the illumination is spatially partially coherent, the transverse resolution of the reconstructed field achieves twice the NA of coherent systems and improved axial resolution. PMID:27867705

  4. 3D differential phase contrast microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Michael; Tian, Lei; Waller, Laura

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate three-dimensional (3D) optical phase and amplitude reconstruction based on coded source illumination using a programmable LED array. Multiple stacks of images along the optical axis are computed from recorded intensities captured by multiple images under off-axis illumination. Based on the first Born approximation, a linear differential phase contrast (DPC) model is built between 3D complex index of refraction and the intensity stacks. Therefore, 3D volume reconstruction can be achieved via a fast inversion method, without the intermediate 2D phase retrieval step. Our system employs spatially partially coherent illumination, so the transverse resolution achieves twice the NA of coherent systems, while axial resolution is also improved 2× as compared to holographic imaging.

  5. Classification and Differential Diagnosis of Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is a major cause of end-stage renal disease throughout the world in both developed and developing countries. This review briefly introduces the characteristic pathological changes of DN and Tervaert pathological classification, which divides DN into four classifications according to glomerular lesions, along with a separate scoring system for tubular, interstitial, and vascular lesions. Given the heterogeneity of the renal lesions and the complex mechanism underlying diabetic nephropathy, Tervaert classification has both significance and controversies in the guidance of diagnosis and prognosis. Applications and evaluations using Tervaert classification and indications for renal biopsy are summarized in this review according to recent studies. Meanwhile, differential diagnosis with another nodular glomerulopathy and the situation that a typical DN superimposed with a nondiabetic renal disease (NDRD) are discussed and concluded in this review. PMID:28316995

  6. Silicon isotope fractionation during magmatic differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savage, Paul S.; Georg, R. Bastian; Williams, Helen M.; Burton, Kevin W.; Halliday, Alex N.

    2011-10-01

    The Si isotopic composition of Earth's mantle is thought to be homogeneous (δ 30Si = -0.29 ± 0.08‰, 2 s.d.) and not greatly affected by partial melting and recycling. Previous analyses of evolved igneous material indicate that such rocks are isotopically heavy relative to the mantle. To understand this variation, it is necessary to investigate the degree of Si isotopic fractionation that takes place during magmatic differentiation. Here we report Si isotopic compositions of lavas from Hekla volcano, Iceland, which has formed in a region devoid of old, geochemically diverse crust. We show that Si isotopic composition varies linearly as a function of silica content, with more differentiated rocks possessing heavier isotopic compositions. Data for samples from the Afar Rift Zone, as well as various igneous USGS standards are collinear with the Hekla trend, providing evidence of a fundamental relationship between magmatic differentiation and Si isotopes. The effect of fractionation has been tested by studying cumulates from the Skaergaard Complex, which show that olivine and pyroxene are isotopically light, and plagioclase heavy, relative to the Si isotopic composition of the Earth's mantle. Therefore, Si isotopes can be utilised to model the competing effects of mafic and felsic mineral fractionation in evolving silicate liquids and cumulates. At an average SiO 2 content of ˜60 wt.%, the predicted δ 30Si value of the continental crust that should result from magmatic fractionation alone is -0.23 ± 0.05‰ (2 s.e.), barely heavier than the mantle. This is, at most, a maximum estimate, as this does not take into account weathered material whose formation drives the products toward lighter δ 30Si values. Mass balance calculations suggest that removal of continental crust of this composition from the upper mantle will not affect the Si isotopic composition of the mantle.

  7. Gene regulatory logic of dopaminergic neuron differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Flames, Nuria; Hobert, Oliver

    2009-01-01

    Dopamine signaling regulates a variety of complex behaviors and defects in dopaminergic neuron function or survival result in severe human pathologies, such as Parkinson's disease 1. The common denominator of all dopaminergic neurons is the expression of dopamine pathway genes, which code for a set of phylogenetically conserved proteins involved in dopamine synthesis and transport. Gene regulatory mechanisms that result in the activation of dopamine pathway genes and thereby ultimately determine the identity of dopaminergic neurons are poorly understood in any system studied to date 2. We show here that a simple cis-regulatory element, the DA motif, controls the expression of all dopamine pathway genes in all dopaminergic cell types in C. elegans. The DA motif is activated by the ETS transcription factor, AST-1. Loss of ast-1 results in the failure of all distinct dopaminergic neuronal subtypes to terminally differentiate. Ectopic expression of ast-1 is sufficient to activate the dopamine production pathway in some cellular contexts. Vertebrate dopaminergic pathway genes also contain phylogenetically conserved DA motifs that can be activated by the mouse ETS transcription factor Etv1/ER81 and a specific class of dopaminergic neurons fails to differentiate in mice lacking Etv1/ER81. Moreover, ectopic Etv1/ER81 expression induces dopaminergic fate marker expression in neuronal primary cultures. Mouse Etv1/ER81 can also functionally substitute for ast-1 in C.elegans. Our studies reveal an astoundingly simple and apparently conserved regulatory logic of dopaminergic neuron terminal differentiation and may provide new entry points into the diagnosis or therapy of conditions in which dopamine neurons are defective. PMID:19287374

  8. Crystallization of macromolecular complexes: combinatorial complex crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stura, Enrico A.; Graille, Marc; Charbonnier, Jean-Baptiste

    2001-11-01

    The usefulness of antibody complexation, as a way of increasing the chances of crystallization needs to be re-evaluated after many antibody complexes have been crystallized and their structure determined. It is somewhat striking that among these, only a small number is a complex with a large protein antigen. The problem is that the effort of raising, cleaving and purifying an Fab is rewarded only by an extra chance of getting crystals; depending on the relative likelihood of crystallization of the complexed and uncomplexed protein. The example of the complex between HIV gp120, CD4 and an Fab fragment from a neutralizing antibody suggests that further complexation of an antigen-antibody complex with a third protein could, by increasing the number of possible combinations, improve the likelihood of crystallization. We propose the use of Ig-binding proteins as a way of extending the method from HIV gp120 to all proteins for which there are monoclonal antibodies. We discuss this technique, combinatorial complex crystallization (CCC), as part of a multi-component system for the enhancement of crystallization of macromolecular complexes. The method makes use of single Ig-binding domains from Staphylococcus aureus protein A (SpA), Peptostreptococcus magnus protein L (PpL) and the streptococcal protein G (SpG). The generality of the method depends on the ability of these domains to interact with a large repertoire of antibodies without affecting antigen binding. There is strong evidence to suggest that these Ig-binding domains bind outside the antigen-combining site of the antibody without perturbing antigen binding. It is clear from the crystal structure of the single SpG domain complexed with an Fab that the interaction involves mainly the immunoglobulin CH1 domain, a region not involved in antigen recognition. We have recently determined the structure of the complex between a human Fab and the domain D from SpA and found that steric hindrance is unlikely even for large

  9. Continuously differentiable sample-spacing entropy estimation.

    PubMed

    Ozertem, Umut; Uysal, Ismail; Erdogmus, Deniz

    2008-11-01

    The insufficiency of using only second-order statistics and premise of exploiting higher order statistics of the data has been well understood, and more advanced objectives including higher order statistics, especially those stemming from information theory, such as error entropy minimization, are now being studied and applied in many contexts of machine learning and signal processing. In the adaptive system training context, the main drawback of utilizing output error entropy as compared to correlation-estimation-based second-order statistics is the computational load of the entropy estimation, which is usually obtained via a plug-in kernel estimator. Sample-spacing estimates offer computationally inexpensive entropy estimators; however, resulting estimates are not differentiable, hence, not suitable for gradient-based adaptation. In this brief paper, we propose a nonparametric entropy estimator that captures the desirable properties of both approaches. The resulting estimator yields continuously differentiable estimates with a computational complexity at the order of those of the sample-spacing techniques. The proposed estimator is compared with the kernel density estimation (KDE)-based entropy estimator in the supervised neural network training framework with computation time and performance comparisons.

  10. Differential detergent sensitivity of extracellular vesicle subpopulations.

    PubMed

    Osteikoetxea, Xabier; Sódar, Barbara; Németh, Andrea; Szabó-Taylor, Katalin; Pálóczi, Krisztina; Vukman, Krisztina V; Tamási, Viola; Balogh, Andrea; Kittel, Ágnes; Pállinger, Éva; Buzás, Edit Irén

    2015-10-14

    Extracellular vesicles (including exosomes, microvesicles and apoptotic bodies) are currently attracting rapidly increasing attention from various fields of biology due to their ability to carry complex information and act as autocrine, paracrine and even endocrine intercellular messengers. In the present study we investigated the sensitivity of size-based subpopulations of extracellular vesicles to different concentrations of detergents including sodium dodecyl sulphate, Triton X-100, Tween 20 and deoxycholate. We determined the required detergent concentration that lysed each of the vesicle subpopulations secreted by Jurkat, THP-1, MiaPaCa and U937 human cell lines. We characterized the vesicles by tunable resistive pulse sensing, flow cytometry and transmission electron microscopy. Microvesicles and apoptotic bodies were found to be more sensitive to detergent lysis than exosomes. Furthermore, we found evidence that sodium dodecyl sulphate and Triton X-100 were more effective in vesicle lysis at low concentrations than deoxycholate or Tween 20. Taken together, our data suggest that a combination of differential detergent lysis with tunable resistive pulse sensing or flow cytometry may prove useful for simple and fast differentiation between exosomes and other extracellular vesicle subpopulations as well as between vesicular and non-vesicular structures.

  11. Alternative splicing modulates stem cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Fu, Ru-Huei; Liu, Shih-Ping; Ou, Chen-Wei; Yu, Hsiu-Hui; Li, Kuo-Wei; Tsai, Chang-Hai; Shyu, Woei-Cherng; Lin, Shinn-Zong

    2009-01-01

    Stem cells have the surprising potential to develop into many different cell types. Therefore, major research efforts have focused on transplantation of stem cells and/or derived progenitors for restoring depleted diseased cells in degenerative disorders. Understanding the molecular controls, including alternative splicing, that arise during lineage differentiation of stem cells is crucial for developing stem cell therapeutic approaches in regeneration medicine. Alternative splicing to allow a single gene to encode multiple transcripts with different protein coding sequences and RNA regulatory elements increases genomic complexities. Utilizing differences in alternative splicing as a molecular marker may be more sensitive than simply gene expression in various degrees of stem cell differentiation. Moreover, alternative splicing maybe provide a new concept to acquire induced pluripotent stem cells or promote cell-cell transdifferentiation for restorative therapies and basic medicine researches. In this review, we highlight the recent advances of alternative splicing regulation in stem cells and their progenitors. It will hopefully provide much needed knowledge into realizing stem cell biology and related applications.

  12. Differentiating Concussion From Intracranial Pathology in Athletes.

    PubMed

    Cripps, Andrea; Livingston, Scott C

    2017-01-01

    Clinical Scenario: A cerebral concussion is a traumatically induced transient disturbance of brain function characterized by a complex pathophysiologic process and is classified as a subset of mild traumatic brain injury. The occurrence of intracranial lesions after sport-related head injury is relatively uncommon, but the possibility of serious intracranial injury (ICI) should be included in the differential diagnosis. ICIs are potentially life threatening and necessitate urgent medical management; therefore, prompt recognition and evaluation are critical to proper medical management. One of the primary objectives of the initial evaluation is to determine if the concussed athlete has an acute traumatic ICI. Athletic trainers must be able promptly recognize clinical signs and symptoms that will enable them to accurately differentiate between a concussion (ie, a closed head injury not associated with significant ICI) and an ICI. The identification of predictors of intracranial lesions is, however, relatively broad. Focused Clinical Question: Which clinical examination findings (ie, clinical signs and symptoms) indicate possible intracranial pathology in individuals with acute closed head injuries?

  13. [Sportsmen's groin. Definition, differential diagnostics and therapy].

    PubMed

    Muschaweck, U; Gollwitzer, H; Conze, J

    2015-02-01

    Groin pain in athletes is a common problem and can have extensive consequences for professional athletes. The anatomical and functional complexity of the groin as well as radiating pain from remote anatomical regions can make the differential diagnostic a challenge and requires special attention. As there are a wide variety of possible causes for groin pain, a multidisciplinary approach is required. The treating orthopedic surgeon needs to pay special attention to prearthritic hip deformities to avoid irreversible damage of the hip joint. By a meticulous patient history and identification of the pain character, followed by clinical, sonographic and radiographic investigations, a differential diagnosis can usually be achieved. Besides typical orthopedic causes pathological findings particularly in the area of the groin need to be considered, clarified and adequately treated; therefore, a clear terminology of the different diseases is necessary. Sportsmen's groin is not a hernia but should be perceived as a separate entity due to its typical pain character and detection of a measurable protrusion of the posterior wall of the inguinal canal by ultrasound.

  14. Multistage Spectral Relaxation Method for Solving the Hyperchaotic Complex Systems

    PubMed Central

    Saberi Nik, Hassan; Rebelo, Paulo

    2014-01-01

    We present a pseudospectral method application for solving the hyperchaotic complex systems. The proposed method, called the multistage spectral relaxation method (MSRM) is based on a technique of extending Gauss-Seidel type relaxation ideas to systems of nonlinear differential equations and using the Chebyshev pseudospectral methods to solve the resulting system on a sequence of multiple intervals. In this new application, the MSRM is used to solve famous hyperchaotic complex systems such as hyperchaotic complex Lorenz system and the complex permanent magnet synchronous motor. We compare this approach to the Runge-Kutta based ode45 solver to show that the MSRM gives accurate results. PMID:25386624

  15. Multistage spectral relaxation method for solving the hyperchaotic complex systems.

    PubMed

    Saberi Nik, Hassan; Rebelo, Paulo

    2014-01-01

    We present a pseudospectral method application for solving the hyperchaotic complex systems. The proposed method, called the multistage spectral relaxation method (MSRM) is based on a technique of extending Gauss-Seidel type relaxation ideas to systems of nonlinear differential equations and using the Chebyshev pseudospectral methods to solve the resulting system on a sequence of multiple intervals. In this new application, the MSRM is used to solve famous hyperchaotic complex systems such as hyperchaotic complex Lorenz system and the complex permanent magnet synchronous motor. We compare this approach to the Runge-Kutta based ode45 solver to show that the MSRM gives accurate results.

  16. A perturbative solution to metadynamics ordinary differential equation.

    PubMed

    Tiwary, Pratyush; Dama, James F; Parrinello, Michele

    2015-12-21

    Metadynamics is a popular enhanced sampling scheme wherein by periodic application of a repulsive bias, one can surmount high free energy barriers and explore complex landscapes. Recently, metadynamics was shown to be mathematically well founded, in the sense that the biasing procedure is guaranteed to converge to the true free energy surface in the long time limit irrespective of the precise choice of biasing parameters. A differential equation governing the post-transient convergence behavior of metadynamics was also derived. In this short communication, we revisit this differential equation, expressing it in a convenient and elegant Riccati-like form. A perturbative solution scheme is then developed for solving this differential equation, which is valid for any generic biasing kernel. The solution clearly demonstrates the robustness of metadynamics to choice of biasing parameters and gives further confidence in the widely used method.

  17. Genetic and epigenetic networks controlling T helper 1 cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Placek, Katarzyna; Coffre, Maryaline; Maiella, Sylvie; Bianchi, Elisabetta; Rogge, Lars

    2009-06-01

    Significant progress has been made during the past years in our understanding of the mechanisms that control the differentiation of naïve CD4(+) T cells into effector T-cell subsets with distinct functional properties. Previous work allowed the identification of key molecules involved in regulating this highly complex process, such as cytokines and their receptors, signal transducers and transcription factors. More recently, the emphasis of research in this field has been to elucidate how the multiplicity of signals is integrated to shape a T helper subset-specific gene-expression program controlling differentiation and effector functions. In this review we will highlight advances that have been made in unravelling the genetic and epigenetic networks controlling differentiation of naïve CD4(+) T cells into interferon-gamma(IFN-gamma)-secreting T helper type 1 (Th1) cells.

  18. Genetic and epigenetic networks controlling T helper 1 cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Placek, Katarzyna; Coffre, Maryaline; Maiella, Sylvie; Bianchi, Elisabetta; Rogge, Lars

    2009-01-01

    Significant progress has been made during the past years in our understanding of the mechanisms that control the differentiation of naïve CD4+ T cells into effector T-cell subsets with distinct functional properties. Previous work allowed the identification of key molecules involved in regulating this highly complex process, such as cytokines and their receptors, signal transducers and transcription factors. More recently, the emphasis of research in this field has been to elucidate how the multiplicity of signals is integrated to shape a T helper subset-specific gene-expression program controlling differentiation and effector functions. In this review we will highlight advances that have been made in unravelling the genetic and epigenetic networks controlling differentiation of naïve CD4+ T cells into interferon-γ(IFN-γ)-secreting T helper type 1 (Th1) cells. PMID:19476511

  19. The Calabi complex and Killing sheaf cohomology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khavkine, Igor

    2017-03-01

    It has recently been noticed that the degeneracies of the Poisson bracket of linearized gravity on constant curvature Lorentzian manifold can be described in terms of the cohomologies of a certain complex of differential operators. This complex was first introduced by Calabi and its cohomology is known to be isomorphic to that of the (locally constant) sheaf of Killing vectors. We review the structure of the Calabi complex in a novel way, with explicit calculations based on representation theory of GL(n) , and also some tools for studying its cohomology in terms of locally constant sheaves. We also conjecture how these tools would adapt to linearized gravity on other backgrounds and to other gauge theories. The presentation includes explicit formulas for the differential operators in the Calabi complex, arguments for its local exactness, discussion of generalized Poincaré duality, methods of computing the cohomology of locally constant sheaves, and example calculations of Killing sheaf cohomologies of some black hole and cosmological Lorentzian manifolds.

  20. PREFACE: Fractional Differentiation and its Applications (FDA08) Fractional Differentiation and its Applications (FDA08)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baleanu, Dumitru; Tenreiro Machado, J. A.

    2009-10-01

    The international workshop, Fractional Differentiation and its Applications (FDA08), held at Cankaya University, Ankara, Turkey on 5-7 November 2008, was the third in an ongoing series of conferences dedicated to exploring applications of fractional calculus in science, engineering, economics and finance. Fractional calculus, which deals with derivatives and integrals of any order, is now recognized as playing an important role in modeling multi-scale problems that span a wide range of time or length scales. Fractional calculus provides a natural link to the intermediate-order dynamics that often reflects the complexity of micro- and nanostructures through fractional-order differential equations. Unlike the more established techniques of mathematical physics, the methods of fractional differentiation are still under development; while it is true that the ideas of fractional calculus are as old as the classical integer-order differential operators, modern work is proceeding by both expanding the capabilities of this mathematical tool and by widening its range of applications. Hence, the interested reader will find papers here that focus on the underlying mathematics of fractional calculus, that extend fractional-order operators into new domains, and that apply well established methods to experimental and theoretical problems. The organizing committee invited presentations from experts representing the international community of scholars in fractional calculus and welcomed contributions from the growing number of researchers who are applying fractional differentiation to complex technical problems. The selection of papers in this topical issue of Physica Scripta reflects the success of the FDA08 workshop, with the emergence of a variety of novel areas of application. With these ideas in mind, the guest editors would like to honor the many distinguished scientists that have promoted the development of fractional calculus and, in particular, Professor George M