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Sample records for diffraction resolution studies

  1. Synchrotron X-Ray Reciprocal Space Mapping, Topography and Diffraction Resolution Studies of Macromolecular Crystal Quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boggon, T. J.; Helliwell, J. R.; Judge, Russell A.; Siddons, D. P.; Snell, Edward H.; Stojanoff, V.

    2000-01-01

    A comprehensive study of microgravity and ground grown chicken egg white lysozyme crystals is presented using synchrotron X-ray reciprocal space mapping, topography techniques and diffraction resolution. Microgravity crystals displayed, on average, reduced intrinsic mosaicities but no differences in terms of stress over their earth grown counterparts. Topographic analysis revealed that in the microgravity case the majority of the crystal was contributing to the peak of the reflection at the appropriate Bragg angle. In the earth case at the diffraction peak only a small volume of the crystal contributed to the intensity. The techniques prove to be highly complementary with the reciprocal space mapping providing a quantitative measure of the crystal mosaicity and stress (or variation in lattice spacing) and topography providing a qualitative overall assessment of the crystal in terms of its X-ray diffraction properties. Structural data collection was also carried out both at the synchrotron and in the laboratory.

  2. Study of the spatial resolution of laser thermochemical technology for recording diffraction microstructures

    SciTech Connect

    Veiko, V P; Korol'kov, V I; Poleshchuk, A G; Sametov, A R; Shakhno, E A; Yarchuk, M V

    2011-07-31

    The thermochemical method for recording data, which is based on local laser oxidation of a thin metal film with subsequent etching of the unirradiated region, is an alternative to laser photolithography and direct laser removal of the film material. This recording technology is characterised by the absence of thermal and hydrodynamic image distortions, as in the case of laser ablation, and the number of necessary technological operations is much smaller as compared with the photomask preparation in classical photolithography. The main field of application of the thermochemical technology is the fabrication of diffraction optical elements (DOEs), which are widely used in printers, bar-code readers, CD and DVD laser players, etc. The purpose of this study is to increase the resolution of thermochemical data recording on thin chromium films. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

  3. High-Resolution Infrared and Electron-Diffraction Studies of Trimethylenecyclopropane ([3]-Radialene)

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Corey; Holmes, Joshua; Nibler, Joseph W.; Hedberg, Kenneth; White, James D.; Hedberg, Lise; Weber, Alfons; Blake, Thomas A.

    2013-05-16

    Combined high-resolution spectroscopic, electron-diffraction, and quantum theoretical methods are particularly advantageous for small molecules of high symmetry and can yield accurate structures that reveal subtle effects of electron delocalization on molecular bonds. The smallest of the radialene compounds, trimethylenecyclopropane, [3]-radialene, has been synthesized and examined in the gas phase by these methods. The first high-resolution infrared spectra have been obtained for this molecule of D3h symmetry, leading to an accurate B0 rotational constant value of 0.1378629(8) cm-1, within 0.5% of the value obtained from electronic structure calculations (density functional theory (DFT) B3LYP/cc-pVTZ). This result is employed in an analysis of electron-diffraction data to obtain the rz bond lengths (in Å): C-H = 1.072 (17), C-C = 1.437 (4), and C=C = 1.330 (4). The analysis does not lead to an accurate value of the HCH angle; however, from comparisons of theoretical and experimental angles for similar compounds, the theoretical prediction of 117.5° is believed to be reliable to within 2°. The effect of electron delocalization in radialene is to reduce the single C-C bond length by 0.07 Å compared to that in cyclopropane.

  4. Feasibility study of high-resolution coherent diffraction microscopy using synchrotron x rays focused by Kirkpatrick-Baez mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Yukio; Nishino, Yoshinori; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Mimura, Hidekazu; Tsutsumi, Ryosuke; Kubo, Hideto; Yamauchi, Kazuto

    2009-04-15

    High-flux coherent x rays are necessary for the improvement of the spatial resolution in coherent x-ray diffraction microscopy (CXDM). In this study, high-resolution CXDM using Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) mirrors is proposed, and the mirrors are designed for experiments of the transmission scheme at SPring-8. Both the photon density and spatial coherence of synchrotron x rays focused by the KB mirrors are investigated by wave optical simulation. The KB mirrors can produce nearly diffraction-limited two-dimensional focusing x rays of approx1 mum in size at 8 keV. When the sample size is less than approx1 mum, the sample can be illuminated with full coherent x rays by adjusting the cross-slit size set between the source and the mirrors. From the estimated photon density at the sample position, the feasibility of CXDM with a sub-1-nm spatial resolution is suggested. The present ultraprecise figuring process enables us to fabricate mirrors for carrying out high-resolution CXDM experiments.

  5. High-resolution neutron diffraction study of CuNCN: New evidence of structure anomalies at low temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, Philipp; Houben, Andreas; Dronskowski, Richard; Tchougréeff, Andrei L.

    2013-12-14

    Copper carbodiimide (CuNCN) is the nitrogen-containing analogue of cupric oxide. Based on high-resolution neutron-diffraction data, CuNCN's lattice parameters are derived as a function of the temperature. In accordance with a recent synchrotron study, a clear trend in the cell parameter a is observed accompanying the changing magnetic behavior. With decreasing temperature, a slowly decreases to a minimum at ∼100 K after which it rises again. The same trend—albeit more pronounced—is observed for the c lattice parameter at ∼35 K. The herein presented neutron powder-diffraction data also support the conjectured sequence of transitions from the high-temperature one-dimensional resonating valence-bond (RVB) state to a transient two-dimensional RVB state and eventually, at lowest temperatures, into another two-dimensional RVB state, presumably the ground state.

  6. High-resolution neutron diffraction study of CuNCN: new evidence of structure anomalies at low temperature.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Philipp; Houben, Andreas; Tchougréeff, Andrei L; Dronskowski, Richard

    2013-12-14

    Copper carbodiimide (CuNCN) is the nitrogen-containing analogue of cupric oxide. Based on high-resolution neutron-diffraction data, CuNCN's lattice parameters are derived as a function of the temperature. In accordance with a recent synchrotron study, a clear trend in the cell parameter a is observed accompanying the changing magnetic behavior. With decreasing temperature, a slowly decreases to a minimum at ~100 K after which it rises again. The same trend-albeit more pronounced-is observed for the c lattice parameter at ~35 K. The herein presented neutron powder-diffraction data also support the conjectured sequence of transitions from the high-temperature one-dimensional resonating valence-bond (RVB) state to a transient two-dimensional RVB state and eventually, at lowest temperatures, into another two-dimensional RVB state, presumably the ground state.

  7. High Resolution Powder Diffraction and Structure Determination

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, D. E.

    1999-04-23

    It is clear that high-resolution synchrotrons X-ray powder diffraction is a very powerful and convenient tool for material characterization and structure determination. Most investigations to date have been carried out under ambient conditions and have focused on structure solution and refinement. The application of high-resolution techniques to increasingly complex structures will certainly represent an important part of future studies, and it has been seen how ab initio solution of structures with perhaps 100 atoms in the asymmetric unit is within the realms of possibility. However, the ease with which temperature-dependence measurements can be made combined with improvements in the technology of position-sensitive detectors will undoubtedly stimulate precise in situ structural studies of phase transitions and related phenomena. One challenge in this area will be to develop high-resolution techniques for ultra-high pressure investigations in diamond anvil cells. This will require highly focused beams and very precise collimation in front of the cell down to dimensions of 50 {micro}m or less. Anomalous scattering offers many interesting possibilities as well. As a means of enhancing scattering contrast it has applications not only to the determination of cation distribution in mixed systems such as the superconducting oxides discussed in Section 9.5.3, but also to the location of specific cations in partially occupied sites, such as the extra-framework positions in zeolites, for example. Another possible application is to provide phasing information for ab initio structure solution. Finally, the precise determination of f as a function of energy through an absorption edge can provide useful information about cation oxidation states, particularly in conjunction with XANES data. In contrast to many experiments at a synchrotron facility, powder diffraction is a relatively simple and user-friendly technique, and most of the procedures and software for data analysis

  8. Study of the oxidation of W(110) by full-solid-angle photoelectron diffraction with chemical state and time resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Ynzunza, R. X.; Palomares, F. J.; Tober, E. D.; Wang, Z.; Morais, J.; Denecke, R.; Daimon, H.; Chen, Y.; Hussain, Z; Liesengang, J.; Van Hove, M. A.; Fadley, C. S.

    1997-04-01

    The brightness of third-generation synchrotron radiation from beamline 9.3.2 at the Advanced Light Source has been combined with the high-intensities and energy resolutions possible with its advanced photoelectron spectrometer/diffractometer experimental station in order to study the time dependence of the oxidation of the W(110) surface. This has been done via chemical-state-resolved core-level photoelectron spectroscopy and diffraction. This system has been studied previously by other methods such as LEED and STM, but several questions remain as to the basic kinetics of oxidation and the precise adsorption structures involved. By studying the decay and growth with time of various peaks in the W 4f{sub 7/2} photoelectron spectra, it should be possible to draw quantitative conclusions concerning the reaction kinetics involved. The authors have also measured full-solid-angle photoelectron diffraction patterns for the two oxygen-induced W states, and these should permit fully defining the different structures involved in this oxidation process.

  9. High-resolution x-ray diffraction study of the heavy-fermion compound YbBiPt

    SciTech Connect

    Ueland, B. G.; Saunders, S. M.; Bud'ko, S. L.; Schmiedeshoff, G. M.; Canfield, P. C.; Kreyssig, A.; Goldman, A. I.

    2015-11-30

    In this study, YbBiPt is a heavy-fermion compound possessing significant short-range antiferromagnetic correlations below a temperature of T*=0.7K, fragile antiferromagnetic order below TN = 0.4K, a Kondo temperature of TK ≈ 1K, and crystalline-electric-field splitting on the order of E/kB = 1 – 10K. Whereas the compound has a face-centered-cubic lattice at ambient temperature, certain experimental data, particularly those from studies aimed at determining its crystalline-electric-field scheme, suggest that the lattice distorts at lower temperature. Here, we present results from high-resolution, high-energy x-ray diffraction experiments which show that, within our experimental resolution of ≈ 6 – 10 × 10–5 Å, no structural phase transition occurs between T = 1.5 and 50 K. In combination with results from dilatometry measurements, we further show that the compound's thermal expansion has a minimum at ≈ 18 K and a region of negative thermal expansion for 9 ≲ T ≲ 18 K. Despite diffraction patterns taken at 1.6 K which indicate that the lattice is face-centered cubic and that the Yb resides on a crystallographic site with cubic point symmetry, we demonstrate that the linear thermal expansion may be modeled using crystalline-electric-field level schemes appropriate for Yb3+ residing on a site with either cubic or less than cubic point symmetry.

  10. High-resolution x-ray diffraction study of the heavy-fermion compound YbBiPt

    DOE PAGES

    Ueland, B. G.; Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA; Saunders, S. M.; Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA; Bud'ko, S. L.; Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA; Schmiedeshoff, G. M.; Canfield, P. C.; Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA; Kreyssig, A.; et al

    2015-11-30

    In this study, YbBiPt is a heavy-fermion compound possessing significant short-range antiferromagnetic correlations below a temperature of T*=0.7K, fragile antiferromagnetic order below TN = 0.4K, a Kondo temperature of TK ≈ 1K, and crystalline-electric-field splitting on the order of E/kB = 1 – 10K. Whereas the compound has a face-centered-cubic lattice at ambient temperature, certain experimental data, particularly those from studies aimed at determining its crystalline-electric-field scheme, suggest that the lattice distorts at lower temperature. Here, we present results from high-resolution, high-energy x-ray diffraction experiments which show that, within our experimental resolution of ≈ 6 – 10 × 10–5 Å,more » no structural phase transition occurs between T = 1.5 and 50 K. In combination with results from dilatometry measurements, we further show that the compound's thermal expansion has a minimum at ≈ 18 K and a region of negative thermal expansion for 9 ≲ T ≲ 18 K. Despite diffraction patterns taken at 1.6 K which indicate that the lattice is face-centered cubic and that the Yb resides on a crystallographic site with cubic point symmetry, we demonstrate that the linear thermal expansion may be modeled using crystalline-electric-field level schemes appropriate for Yb3+ residing on a site with either cubic or less than cubic point symmetry.« less

  11. High-resolution x-ray diffraction study of the heavy-fermion compound YbBiPt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueland, B. G.; Saunders, S. M.; Bud'Ko, S. L.; Schmiedeshoff, G. M.; Canfield, P. C.; Kreyssig, A.; Goldman, A. I.

    YbBiPt is a heavy-fermion compound possessing significant short-range antiferromagnetic correlations below T* = 0 . 7 K, fragile antiferromagnetic order below TN = 0 . 4 K, a Kondo temperature of TK ~ 1 K, and crystalline-electric-field splitting (CEF) on the order of E /kB = 1 - 10 K. Its lattice is face-centered cubic at ambient temperature, but certain data, particularly those from studies aimed at determining the CEF level scheme, suggest that the lattice distorts at lower temperature. Here, we present results from high-energy x-ray diffraction experiments which show that, within our experimental resolution of ~ 6 - 10 ×10-5 Å, no structural phase transition occurs between 1 . 5 and 50 K. Despite this result, we demonstrate that the compound's thermal expansion may be modeled using CEF level schemes appropriate for Yb3+ residing on a site with either cubic or less than cubic point symmetry. Work at the Ames Laboratory was supported by the US DOE, BES, DMSE, under Contract No. DE-AC02-07CH11358. Work at Occidental College was supported by the NSF under DMR-1408598. This research used resources at the Advanced Photon Source a US DOE, Office of Science, User Facility.

  12. The effect of substrate topology on smectic liquid crystal alignment: A high-resolution x-ray diffraction study

    SciTech Connect

    Smela, E.

    1992-01-01

    Surface topography is theoretically predicted to affect liquid crystal alignment through mechanical interactions: elastic deformations of the director are energetically unfavorable, causing the molecules to realign to minimize the distortion energy. Octylcyanobiphenyl (8CB), a bilayer smecticA liquid crystal at room temperature, was deposited on gratings, grids, and flat surfaces, and was studied using high resolution x-ray diffraction at shallow angles of incidence. One surface of the film was in contact with air and the other was in contact with a treated glass or silicon substrate. At the air interface, surface tension forces caused the liquid crystal molecules to align perpendicularly with respect to the plane of the substrate. Competing with the LC-air interface, which is a strong aligner, a grating at the LC-substrate interface produced distortions in the smectic layering which resulted in excess elastic energy and favored alignment parallel to the substrate and the grooves. The results show that in films less than approximately 30 [mu]m thick, the homeotropic orientation was maintained throughout the film due to the constraint of perpendicular alignment at the air interface. However, for thicker films on gratings, Bragg scattering from molecules lying parallel to the grooves was observed. The free air surface was thus the strongest aligning force, followed by the surface topology, while surface anchoring was not found to play a role.

  13. Phase coexistence in NaTaO3 at room temperature; a high resolution neutron powder diffraction study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, Kevin S.; Kennedy, Brendan J.

    2015-05-01

    Room temperature high resolution neutron powder diffraction data, measured in time-of-flight, from two independent samples of NaTaO3 shows the presence of phase coexistence of two orthorhombic structures with space groups Pbnm, and Cmcm. The failure of earlier work to recognise the extent of the hysteresis associated with the high temperature (∼763 K on heating) Cmcm - Pbnm phase transition, that extends down to room temperature, and probably to 0 K, is due to data having been collected at too low a real-space resolution to characterise the diagnostic pseudocubic fundamental and superlattice reflection multiplicities. The phase fraction of the Cmcm phase increases with increasing temperature from 45 weight % at 298 K, to 74 weight % at 758 K. Throughout the whole temperature interval 298 K-758 K, the volume per formula unit of the Cmcm phase exceeds that of the Pbnm phase by an almost constant ∼0.01 Å3 suggesting the addition of pressure would supress the volume fraction of the higher temperature phase. The crystal structure of both phases, determined from data collected at 298 K, are reported, with the atomic displacement parameters of the Cmcm phase being significantly larger than those associated with the Pbnm phase, probably reflecting a high degree of thermal and static disorder.

  14. Atomic Resolution Coherent Diffractive Imaging and Ultrafast Science

    SciTech Connect

    Zuo, Jian-min

    2011-01-12

    A major scientific challenge is determining the 3-D atomic structure of small nanostructures, including single molecules. Coherent diffractive imaging (CDI) is a promising approach. Recent progress has demonstrated coherent diffraction patterns can be recorded from individual nanostructures and phased to reconstruct their structure. However, overcoming the dose limit imposed by radiation damage is a major obstacle toward the full potential of CDI. One approach is to use ultrafast x-ray or electron pulses. In electron diffraction, amplitudes recorded in a diffraction pattern are unperturbed by lens aberrations, defocus, and other microscope resolution-limiting factors. Sub-A signals are available beyond the information limit of direct imaging. Significant contrast improvement is obtained compared to high-resolution electron micrographs. progress has also been made in developing time-resolved electron diffraction and imaging for the study of ultrafast dynamic processes in materials. This talk will cover these crosscutting issues and the convergence of electron and x-ray diffraction techniques toward structure determination of single molecules.

  15. High-resolution neutron powder diffraction study on the phase transitions in BaPbO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, W.T. Visser, D.; Knight, K.S.; IJdo, D.J.W.

    2007-05-15

    Phase transitions that occurred in perovskite BaPbO{sub 3} have been investigated using high-resolution time-of-flight neutron powder diffraction. The structure at room temperature is orthorhombic (space group Imma), which is derived from the cubic aristotype by tilting the PbO{sub 6} octahedra around the two-fold axis (tilt system a {sup 0} b {sup -} b {sup -}). The orthorhombic structure shows anisotropic line broadening attributed to the presence of micro twins. At above about 573 K, BaPbO{sub 3} undergoes a discontinuous phase transition to a tetragonal structure (space group I4/mcm) with the tilting of the PbO{sub 6} octahedra being about the four-fold axis of the cubic aristotype (tilt system a {sup 0} a {sup 0} c {sup -}). With further increasing the temperature, BaPbO{sub 3} experiences a continuous phase transition to a simple cubic structure (space group Pm3-barm) at above about 673 K. The later phase transition is characterised by a critical exponent of {beta}=0.36, depicted by the three-dimensional Heisenberg universality class. The earlier reported Imma{sup {yields}}I2/m phase transition above room temperature has not been observed. - Graphical abstract: Temperature dependence of the octahedral tilting angles in BaPbO{sub 3}. The continuous line in tetragonal phase region is the fit to the expression: {phi}=A(T {sub c}-T) {sup {beta}} with the fitted values of T {sub c}=658(1) K, {beta}=0.36(2) and A=1.1(1). The shaded area indicates the possible two-phase region.

  16. Calcium binding in. alpha. -amylases: An X-ray diffraction study at 2. 1- angstrom resolution of two enzymes from Aspergillus

    SciTech Connect

    Boel, E.; Jensen, V.J.; Petersen, S.B.; Thim, L. Woldike, H.F. ); Brady, L.; Brzozowski, AM.; Derewenda, Z.; Dodson, G.G.; Swift, H. )

    1990-07-03

    X-ray diffraction analysis (at 2.1-{angstrom} resolution) of an acid alpha-amylase from Aspergillus niger allowed a detailed description of the stereochemistry of the calcium-binding sites. The primary site (which is essential in maintaining proper folding around the active site) contains a tightly bound Ca{sup 2+} with an unusually high number of eight ligands. A secondary binding site was identified at the bottom of the substrate binding cleft; it involves the residues presumed to play a catalytic role (Asp206 and Glu230). This explains the inhibitory effect of calcium observed at higher concentrations. Neutral Aspergillus oryzae (TAKA) {alpha}-amylase was also refined in a new crystal at 2.1-{angstrom} resolution. The structure of this homologous (over 80%) enzyme and addition kinetic studies support all the structural conclusions regarding both calcium-binding sites.

  17. Sub-diffraction limit resolution in microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Ming (Inventor); Chen, Weinong (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A method and apparatus for visualizing sub-micron size particles employs a polarizing microscope wherein a focused beam of polarized light is projected onto a target, and a portion of the illuminating light is blocked from reaching the specimen, whereby to produce a shadow region, and projecting diffracted light from the target onto the shadow region.

  18. The High Resolution Powder Diffraction Beam Line at ESRF

    PubMed Central

    Fitch, A. N.

    2004-01-01

    The optical design and performance of the high-resolution powder diffraction beam line BM16 at ESRF are discussed and illustrated. Some recent studies carried out on BM16 are described, including crystal structure solution and refinement, anomalous scattering, in situ measurements, residual strain in engineering components, investigation of microstructure, and grazing-incidence diffraction from surface layers. The beam line is built on a bending magnet, and operates in the energy range from 5 keV to 40 keV. After the move to an undulator source in 2002, it will benefit from an extented energy range up to 60 keV and increased flux and resolution. It is anticipated that enhancements to the data quality will be achieved, leading to the solution of larger crystal structures, and improvements in the accuracy of refined structures. The systematic exploitation of anisotropic thermal expansion will help reduce the effects of peak overlap in the analysis of powder diffraction data. PMID:27366602

  19. Microbeam High Angular Resolution Diffraction Applied to Optoelectronic Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Kazimirov, A.; Bilderback, D. H.; Sirenko, A. A.; Cai, Z.-H.; Lai, B.

    2007-01-19

    Collimating perfect crystal optics in a combination with the X-ray focusing optics has been applied to perform high angular resolution microbeam diffraction and scattering experiments on micron-size optoelectronic devices produced by modern semiconductor technology. At CHESS, we used capillary optics and perfect Si/Ge crystal(s) arrangement to perform X-ray standing waves, high angular-resolution diffraction and high resolution reciprocal space mapping analysis. At the APS, 2ID-D microscope beamline, we employed a phase zone plate producing a beam with the size of 240 nm in the horizontal plane and 350 nm in the vertical (diffraction) plane and a perfect Si (004) analyzer crystal to perform diffraction analysis of selectively grown InGaAsP and InGaAlAs-based waveguides with arc sec angular resolution.

  20. [Solving resolution of diffraction gratings using coefficients of Zernike polynomials].

    PubMed

    Yu, Hai-li; Qi, Xiang-dong; Bayanheshig; Tang, Yu-guo

    2012-01-01

    It is hard and costly to test resolution directly, because the focal length of testing equipment could be nearly ten meters. Solving resolution by diffraction wavefront aberration indirectly is an effective solution to this problem. A normalization model of solving resolution using fitting coefficients of Zernike polynomials was established based on the spectral imaging theory of Fourier optics. The relationship between resolution and wavefront aberration of diffraction gratings was illustrated by this model. Finally, a new method of testing resolution using fitting coefficients of Zernike polynomials was proposed. According to this method, the resolution of a grating is tested by ZYGO interferometer indirectly. Compared with direct method, results indicate that the error of indirect method is less than 4.22%, and this method could be an effective way to avoid the difficulty of direct method to solve resolution. Meanwhile, this method can be used in ZYGO interferometer to solve resolution by wavefront testing easily.

  1. The Collection of High-Resolution Electron Diffraction Data

    PubMed Central

    Gonen, Tamir

    2013-01-01

    A number of atomic-resolution structures of membrane proteins (better than 3Å resolution) have been determined recently by electron crystallography. While this technique was established more than 40 years ago, it is still in its infancy with regard to the two-dimensional (2D) crystallization, data collection, data analysis, and protein structure determination. In terms of data collection, electron crystallography encompasses both image acquisition and electron diffraction data collection. Other chapters in this volume outline protocols for image collection and analysis. This chapter, however, outlines detailed protocols for data collection by electron diffraction. These include microscope setup, electron diffraction data collection, and troubleshooting. PMID:23132060

  2. Prospects of high-resolution resonant X-ray inelastic scattering studies on solid materials, liquids and gases at diffraction-limited storage rings

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, Thorsten; de Groot, Frank M. F.; Rubensson, Jan-Erik

    2014-01-01

    The spectroscopic technique of resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) will particularly profit from immensely improved brilliance of diffraction-limited storage rings (DLSRs). In RIXS one measures the intensities of excitations as a function of energy and momentum transfer. DLSRs will allow for pushing the achievable energy resolution, signal intensity and the sampled spot size to new limits. With RIXS one nowadays probes a broad range of electronic systems reaching from simple molecules to complex materials displaying phenomena like peculiar magnetism, two-dimensional electron gases, superconductivity, photovoltaic energy conversion and heterogeneous catalysis. In this article the types of improved RIXS studies that will become possible with X-ray beams from DLSRs are envisioned. PMID:25177995

  3. High-resolution electron-energy-loss spectroscopy and photoelectron-diffraction studies of the geometric structure of adsorbates on single-crystal metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenblatt, D.H.

    1982-11-01

    Two techniques which have made important contributions to the understanding of surface phenomena are high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and photoelectron diffraction (PD). EELS is capable of directly measuring the vibrational modes of clean and adsorbate covered metal surfaces. In this work, the design, construction, and performance of a new EELS spectrometer are described. These results are discussed in terms of possible structures of the O-Cu(001) system. Recommendations for improvements in this EELS spectrometer and guidelines for future spectrometers are given. PD experiments provide accurate quantitative information about the geometry of atoms and molecules adsorbed on metal surfaces. The technique has advantages when used to study disordered overlayers, molecular overlayers, multiple site systems, and adsorbates which are weak electron scatterers. Four experiments were carried out which exploit these advantages.

  4. Microbeam X-Ray Standing Wave and High Resolution Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Kazimirov, A.; Bilderback, D.H.; Huang, R.; Sirenko, A.

    2004-05-12

    Post-focusing collimating optics are introduced as a tool to condition X-ray microbeams for the use in high-resolution X-ray diffraction and scattering techniques. As an example, a one-bounce imaging capillary and miniature Si(004) channel-cut crystal were used to produce a microbeam with 10 {mu}m size and an ultimate angular resolution of 2.5 arc sec. This beam was used to measure the strain in semiconductor microstructures by using X-ray high resolution diffraction and standing wave techniques to {delta}d/d < 5x10-4.

  5. High-resolution diffraction grating interferometric transducer of linear displacements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Ping; Xia, Haojie; Fei, Yetai

    2016-01-01

    A high-resolution transducer of linear displacements is presented. The system is based on semiconductor laser illumination and a diffraction grating applied as a length master. The theory of the optical method is formulated using Doppler description. The relationship model among the interference strips, measurement errors, grating deflection around the X, Y and Z axes and translation along the Z axis is built. The grating interference strips' direction and space is not changed with movement along the X (direction of grating movement), Y (direction of grating line), Z axis, and the direction and space has a great effect when rotating around the X axis. Moreover the space is little affected by deflection around the Z axis however the direction is changed dramatically. In addition, the strips' position shifted rightward or downwards respectively for deflection around the X or Y axis. Because the emitted beams are separated on the grating plane, the tilt around the X axis error of the stage during motion will lead to the optical path difference of the two beams resulting in phase shift. This study investigates the influence of the tilt around the X axis error. Experiments show that after yaw error compensation, the high-resolution diffraction grating interferometric transducer readings can be significantly improved. The error can be reduced from +/-80 nm to +/-30 nm in maximum.

  6. Compact high-resolution Littrow conical diffraction spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qinghua

    2016-06-20

    This paper presents a compact high-resolution Littrow conical diffraction spectrometer (LCDS) that includes an echelle grating for horizontally dispersing the incident light beam into several high diffraction orders, a prism for vertically separating the overlapping diffraction orders, and a shared focusing lens used for both the incident and dispersed beams. The unique design of the optics enables the LCDS to give high dispersion on the detector without requiring a large field of view and, therefore, to achieve the benefits of high spectral resolution and compactness. The use of the Littrow conical diffraction coupled with the shared focusing lens makes the LCDS more compact. The formulas of the footprint of the dispersed spectra are derived, and the numerical simulation is given. The design calculations for application of the LCDS to an optical coherence tomography system are illustrated by an example.

  7. Study of optical Laue diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Chakravarthy, Giridhar E-mail: aloksharan@email.com; Allam, Srinivasa Rao E-mail: aloksharan@email.com; Satyanarayana, S. V. M. E-mail: aloksharan@email.com; Sharan, Alok E-mail: aloksharan@email.com

    2014-10-15

    We present the study of the optical diffraction pattern of one and two-dimensional gratings with defects, designed using desktop pc and printed on OHP sheet using laser printer. Gratings so prepared, using novel low cost technique provides good visual aid in teaching. Diffraction pattern of the monochromatic light (632.8nm) from the grating so designed is similar to that of x-ray diffraction pattern of crystal lattice with point defects in one and two-dimensions. Here both optical and x-ray diffractions are Fraunhofer. The information about the crystalline lattice structure and the defect size can be known.

  8. Preliminary neutron and ultrahigh-resolution X-ray diffraction studies of the aspartic proteinase endothiapepsin cocrystallized with a gem-diol inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Tuan, Han-Fang; Erskine, Peter; Langan, Paul; Cooper, Jon; Coates, Leighton

    2007-12-01

    Three data sets have been collected on endothiapepsin complexed with the gem-diol inhibitor PD-135,040: a high-resolution synchrotron X-ray data set, a room-temperature X-ray data set and a neutron diffraction data set. Until recently, it has been impossible to grow large protein crystals of endothiapepsin with any gem-diol inhibitor that are suitable for neutron diffraction. Endothiapepsin has been cocrystallized with the gem-diol inhibitor PD-135,040 in a low solvent-content (39%) unit cell, which is unprecedented for this enzyme–inhibitor complex and enables ultrahigh-resolution (1.0 Å) X-ray diffraction data to be collected. This atomic resolution X-ray data set will be used to deduce the protonation states of the catalytic aspartate residues. A room-temperature neutron data set has also been collected for joint refinement with a room-temperature X-ray data set in order to locate the H/D atoms at the active site.

  9. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies to near-atomic resolution of dihydrodipicolinate synthase from methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    SciTech Connect

    Burgess, Benjamin R.; Dobson, Renwick C. J. Dogovski, Con; Jameson, Geoffrey B.; Parker, Michael W.; Perugini, Matthew A.

    2008-07-01

    Dihydrodipicolinate synthase (DHDPS), an enzyme of the lysine-biosynthetic pathway, is a promising target for antibiotic development against pathogenic bacteria. Here, the expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary diffraction analysis to 1.45 Å resolution of DHDPS from methicillin-resistant S. aureus is reported. In recent years, dihydrodipicolinate synthase (DHDPS; EC 4.2.1.52) has received considerable attention from both mechanistic and structural viewpoints. DHDPS is part of the diaminopimelate pathway leading to lysine, coupling (S)-aspartate-β-semialdehyde with pyruvate via a Schiff base to a conserved active-site lysine. In this paper, the cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of DHDPS from methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, an important bacterial pathogen, are reported. The enzyme was crystallized in a number of forms, predominantly from PEG precipitants, with the best crystal diffracting to beyond 1.45 Å resolution. The space group was P1 and the unit-cell parameters were a = 65.4, b = 67.6, c = 78.0 Å, α = 90.1, β = 68.9, γ = 72.3°. The crystal volume per protein weight (V{sub M}) was 2.34 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1}, with an estimated solvent content of 47% for four monomers per asymmetric unit. The structure of the enzyme will help to guide the design of novel therapeutics against the methicillin-resistant S. aureus pathogen.

  10. Super-resolution optical telescopes with local light diffraction shrinkage.

    PubMed

    Wang, Changtao; Tang, Dongliang; Wang, Yanqin; Zhao, Zeyu; Wang, Jiong; Pu, Mingbo; Zhang, Yudong; Yan, Wei; Gao, Ping; Luo, Xiangang

    2015-01-01

    Suffering from giant size of objective lenses and infeasible manipulations of distant targets, telescopes could not seek helps from present super-resolution imaging, such as scanning near-field optical microscopy, perfect lens and stimulated emission depletion microscopy. In this paper, local light diffraction shrinkage associated with optical super-oscillatory phenomenon is proposed for real-time and optically restoring super-resolution imaging information in a telescope system. It is found that fine target features concealed in diffraction-limited optical images of a telescope could be observed in a small local field of view, benefiting from a relayed metasurface-based super-oscillatory imaging optics in which some local Fourier components beyond the cut-off frequency of telescope could be restored. As experimental examples, a minimal resolution to 0.55 of Rayleigh criterion is obtained, and imaging complex targets and large targets by superimposing multiple local fields of views are demonstrated as well. This investigation provides an access for real-time, incoherent and super-resolution telescopes without the manipulation of distant targets. More importantly, it gives counterintuitive evidence to the common knowledge that relayed optics could not deliver more imaging details than objective systems. PMID:26677820

  11. Super-resolution optical telescopes with local light diffraction shrinkage

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Changtao; Tang, Dongliang; Wang, Yanqin; Zhao, Zeyu; Wang, Jiong; Pu, Mingbo; Zhang, Yudong; Yan, Wei; Gao, Ping; Luo, Xiangang

    2015-01-01

    Suffering from giant size of objective lenses and infeasible manipulations of distant targets, telescopes could not seek helps from present super-resolution imaging, such as scanning near-field optical microscopy, perfect lens and stimulated emission depletion microscopy. In this paper, local light diffraction shrinkage associated with optical super-oscillatory phenomenon is proposed for real-time and optically restoring super-resolution imaging information in a telescope system. It is found that fine target features concealed in diffraction-limited optical images of a telescope could be observed in a small local field of view, benefiting from a relayed metasurface-based super-oscillatory imaging optics in which some local Fourier components beyond the cut-off frequency of telescope could be restored. As experimental examples, a minimal resolution to 0.55 of Rayleigh criterion is obtained, and imaging complex targets and large targets by superimposing multiple local fields of views are demonstrated as well. This investigation provides an access for real-time, incoherent and super-resolution telescopes without the manipulation of distant targets. More importantly, it gives counterintuitive evidence to the common knowledge that relayed optics could not deliver more imaging details than objective systems. PMID:26677820

  12. Super-resolution optical telescopes with local light diffraction shrinkage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Changtao; Tang, Dongliang; Wang, Yanqin; Zhao, Zeyu; Wang, Jiong; Pu, Mingbo; Zhang, Yudong; Yan, Wei; Gao, Ping; Luo, Xiangang

    2015-12-01

    Suffering from giant size of objective lenses and infeasible manipulations of distant targets, telescopes could not seek helps from present super-resolution imaging, such as scanning near-field optical microscopy, perfect lens and stimulated emission depletion microscopy. In this paper, local light diffraction shrinkage associated with optical super-oscillatory phenomenon is proposed for real-time and optically restoring super-resolution imaging information in a telescope system. It is found that fine target features concealed in diffraction-limited optical images of a telescope could be observed in a small local field of view, benefiting from a relayed metasurface-based super-oscillatory imaging optics in which some local Fourier components beyond the cut-off frequency of telescope could be restored. As experimental examples, a minimal resolution to 0.55 of Rayleigh criterion is obtained, and imaging complex targets and large targets by superimposing multiple local fields of views are demonstrated as well. This investigation provides an access for real-time, incoherent and super-resolution telescopes without the manipulation of distant targets. More importantly, it gives counterintuitive evidence to the common knowledge that relayed optics could not deliver more imaging details than objective systems.

  13. Super-resolution optical telescopes with local light diffraction shrinkage.

    PubMed

    Wang, Changtao; Tang, Dongliang; Wang, Yanqin; Zhao, Zeyu; Wang, Jiong; Pu, Mingbo; Zhang, Yudong; Yan, Wei; Gao, Ping; Luo, Xiangang

    2015-12-18

    Suffering from giant size of objective lenses and infeasible manipulations of distant targets, telescopes could not seek helps from present super-resolution imaging, such as scanning near-field optical microscopy, perfect lens and stimulated emission depletion microscopy. In this paper, local light diffraction shrinkage associated with optical super-oscillatory phenomenon is proposed for real-time and optically restoring super-resolution imaging information in a telescope system. It is found that fine target features concealed in diffraction-limited optical images of a telescope could be observed in a small local field of view, benefiting from a relayed metasurface-based super-oscillatory imaging optics in which some local Fourier components beyond the cut-off frequency of telescope could be restored. As experimental examples, a minimal resolution to 0.55 of Rayleigh criterion is obtained, and imaging complex targets and large targets by superimposing multiple local fields of views are demonstrated as well. This investigation provides an access for real-time, incoherent and super-resolution telescopes without the manipulation of distant targets. More importantly, it gives counterintuitive evidence to the common knowledge that relayed optics could not deliver more imaging details than objective systems.

  14. High Resolution X-ray Diffraction Studies of MBE-Grown HgCdTe Layers on Bulk-Grown CdZnTe Substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amarasinghe, Priyanthi M.; Qadri, Syed B.; Wijewarnasuriya, Priyalal S.

    2015-08-01

    The structural properties of molecular beam epitaxially (MBE)-grown Hg1- x Cd x Te epilayers on CdZnTe (211) substrate have been investigated using high-resolution x-ray topography and rocking curves. High-resolution x-ray diffraction 2 θ- θ scans of (422) reflections were utilized in calculating the out-of-plane lattice parameters of the HgCdTe layer and the CdZnTe substrate. The lattice strain of the HgCdTe layer was evaluated using the in-plane measurements of the (311) reflection. Etching seemed to improve the surface of the substrate by removing any damage caused by polishing or any post-processing. In spite of some localized line dislocations, a remarkable quality of the MBE-grown HgCdTe layer was observed. The full width at half maximum values of the HgCdTe layer and the CdZnTe substrate were determined as 43 arc-s and 16.2 arc-s, respectively.

  15. The Influence of Surface Morphology and Diffraction Resolution of Canavalin Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plomp, M.; Thomas, B. R.; Day, J. S.; McPherson, A.; Chernov, A. A.; Malkin, A.

    2003-01-01

    Canavalin crystals grown from material purified and not purified by High Performance Liquid Chromatography were studied by atomic force microscopy and x-ray diffraction. After purification, resolution was improved from 2.55Angstroms to 2.22Angstroms and jagged isotropic spiral steps transformed into regular, well polygonized steps.

  16. High-Resolution X-ray Diffraction Studies of ZnSnAs2 Epitaxial Films Nearly Lattice-matched to InP Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asubar, Joel T.; Agatsuma, Yuji; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Shin`Ichi; Jinbo, Yoshio; Uchitomi, Naotaka

    2010-01-01

    ZnSnAs2 epitaxial films were grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on nearly lattice matched InP substrates. Four samples namely samples A, B, C, and D were prepared at different growth times of 15, 30, 50, and 83 mins, respectively, using the optimum growth conditions earlier reported to obtain samples of different values of thickness for the purpose of structural characterization using High-Resolution X-ray Diffraction (HR-XRD). HR-XRD investigations revealed unrelaxed lattice constant a⊥ values along the growth direction of 5.8991 Å, 5.8991 Å, 5.8886 Å, and 5.8928 Åfor samples A, B, C, and D, respectively. Reciprocal Space Mapping on one of the samples indicates pseudomorphic growth with respect to the InP substrate. The absence of full-width at half maximum (FWHM) broadening of the of the HR-XRD rocking curves with increasing thickness of the samples suggests that all the epitaxial films in this work are pseudomorphic with the InP substrate. Assuming a Poisson ratio ν of 1/3, the corrected values of the lattice constant, i.e. values of the free-standing lattice constant afs, were calculated to be 5.8840 Å, 5.8840 Å, 5.8788 Å, and 5.8809 Åfor samples A, B, C, and D. These results suggest that the elongation due to the pseudomorphic growth is substantial in the computation of the true lattice constant of ZnSnAs2 epitaxial films.

  17. Field studies in geophysical diffraction tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Witten, A.J.; Stevens, S.S.; King, W.C.; Ursic, J.R.

    1992-07-01

    Geophysical diffraction tomography (GDT) is a quantitative, high- resolution technique for subsurface imaging. This method has been used in a number of shallow applications to image buried waste, trenches, soil strata, tunnels, synthetic magma chambers, and the buried skeletal remains of seismosaurus, the longest dinosaur ever discovered. The theory associated with the GDT inversion and implementing software have been developed for acoustic and scalar electromagnetic waves for bistatic and monostatic measurements in cross-borehole, offset vertical seismic profiling and reflection geometries. This paper presents an overview of some signal processing algorithms, a description of the instrumentation used in field studies, and selected imaging results.

  18. Field studies in geophysical diffraction tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Witten, A.J.; Stevens, S.S. ); King, W.C. . Dept. of Geography and Environmental Engineering); Ursic, J.R. . Region V)

    1992-01-01

    Geophysical diffraction tomography (GDT) is a quantitative, high- resolution technique for subsurface imaging. This method has been used in a number of shallow applications to image buried waste, trenches, soil strata, tunnels, synthetic magma chambers, and the buried skeletal remains of seismosaurus, the longest dinosaur ever discovered. The theory associated with the GDT inversion and implementing software have been developed for acoustic and scalar electromagnetic waves for bistatic and monostatic measurements in cross-borehole, offset vertical seismic profiling and reflection geometries. This paper presents an overview of some signal processing algorithms, a description of the instrumentation used in field studies, and selected imaging results.

  19. Precision glass molding of high-resolution diffractive optical elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prater, Karin; Dukwen, Julia; Scharf, Toralf; Herzig, Hans P.; Plöger, Sven; Hermerschmidt, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    The demand of high resolution diffractive optical elements (DOE) is growing. Smaller critical dimensions allow higher deflection angles and can fulfill more demanding requirements, which can only be met by using electron-beam lithography. Replication techniques are more economical, since the high cost of the master can be distributed among a larger number of replicas. The lack of a suitable mold material for precision glass molding has so far prevented an industrial use. Glassy Carbon (GC) offers a high mechanical strength and high thermal strength. No anti-adhesion coatings are required in molding processes. This is clearly an advantage for high resolution, high aspect ratio microstructures, where a coating with a thickness between 10 nm and 200 nm would cause a noticeable rounding of the features. Electron-beam lithography was used to fabricate GC molds with highest precision and feature sizes from 250 nm to 2 μm. The master stamps were used for precision glass molding of a low Tg glass L-BAL42 from OHARA. The profile of the replicated glass is compared to the mold with the help of SEM images. This allows discussion of the max. aspect-ratio and min. feature size. To characterize optical performances, beamsplitting elements are fabricated and their characteristics were investigated, which are in excellent agreement to theory.

  20. High-resolution neutron and X-ray diffraction room-temperature studies of an H-FABP-oleic acid complex: study of the internal water cluster and ligand binding by a transferred multipolar electron-density distribution.

    PubMed

    Howard, E I; Guillot, B; Blakeley, M P; Haertlein, M; Moulin, M; Mitschler, A; Cousido-Siah, A; Fadel, F; Valsecchi, W M; Tomizaki, Takashi; Petrova, T; Claudot, J; Podjarny, A

    2016-03-01

    Crystal diffraction data of heart fatty acid binding protein (H-FABP) in complex with oleic acid were measured at room temperature with high-resolution X-ray and neutron protein crystallography (0.98 and 1.90 Å resolution, respectively). These data provided very detailed information about the cluster of water molecules and the bound oleic acid in the H-FABP large internal cavity. The jointly refined X-ray/neutron structure of H-FABP was complemented by a transferred multipolar electron-density distribution using the parameters of the ELMAMII library. The resulting electron density allowed a precise determination of the electrostatic potential in the fatty acid (FA) binding pocket. Bader's quantum theory of atoms in molecules was then used to study interactions involving the internal water molecules, the FA and the protein. This approach showed H⋯H contacts of the FA with highly conserved hydrophobic residues known to play a role in the stabilization of long-chain FAs in the binding cavity. The determination of water hydrogen (deuterium) positions allowed the analysis of the orientation and electrostatic properties of the water molecules in the very ordered cluster. As a result, a significant alignment of the permanent dipoles of the water molecules with the protein electrostatic field was observed. This can be related to the dielectric properties of hydration layers around proteins, where the shielding of electrostatic interactions depends directly on the rotational degrees of freedom of the water molecules in the interface. PMID:27006775

  1. High-resolution neutron and X-ray diffraction room-temperature studies of an H-FABP-oleic acid complex: study of the internal water cluster and ligand binding by a transferred multipolar electron-density distribution.

    PubMed

    Howard, E I; Guillot, B; Blakeley, M P; Haertlein, M; Moulin, M; Mitschler, A; Cousido-Siah, A; Fadel, F; Valsecchi, W M; Tomizaki, Takashi; Petrova, T; Claudot, J; Podjarny, A

    2016-03-01

    Crystal diffraction data of heart fatty acid binding protein (H-FABP) in complex with oleic acid were measured at room temperature with high-resolution X-ray and neutron protein crystallography (0.98 and 1.90 Å resolution, respectively). These data provided very detailed information about the cluster of water molecules and the bound oleic acid in the H-FABP large internal cavity. The jointly refined X-ray/neutron structure of H-FABP was complemented by a transferred multipolar electron-density distribution using the parameters of the ELMAMII library. The resulting electron density allowed a precise determination of the electrostatic potential in the fatty acid (FA) binding pocket. Bader's quantum theory of atoms in molecules was then used to study interactions involving the internal water molecules, the FA and the protein. This approach showed H⋯H contacts of the FA with highly conserved hydrophobic residues known to play a role in the stabilization of long-chain FAs in the binding cavity. The determination of water hydrogen (deuterium) positions allowed the analysis of the orientation and electrostatic properties of the water molecules in the very ordered cluster. As a result, a significant alignment of the permanent dipoles of the water molecules with the protein electrostatic field was observed. This can be related to the dielectric properties of hydration layers around proteins, where the shielding of electrostatic interactions depends directly on the rotational degrees of freedom of the water molecules in the interface.

  2. A GUINIER CAMERA FOR SR POWDER DIFFRACTION: HIGH RESOLUTION AND HIGH THROUGHPUT.

    SciTech Connect

    SIDDONS,D.P.; HULBERT, S.L.; STEPHENS, P.W.

    2006-05-28

    The paper describe a new powder diffraction instrument for synchrotron radiation sources which combines the high throughput of a position-sensitive detector system with the high resolution normally only provided by a crystal analyzer. It uses the Guinier geometry which is traditionally used with an x-ray tube source. This geometry adapts well to the synchrotron source, provided proper beam conditioning is applied. The high brightness of the SR source allows a high resolution to be achieved. When combined with a photon-counting silicon microstrip detector array, the system becomes a powerful instrument for radiation-sensitive samples or time-dependent phase transition studies.

  3. High throughput screening of ligand binding to macromolecules using high resolution powder diffraction

    DOEpatents

    Von Dreele, Robert B.; D'Amico, Kevin

    2006-10-31

    A process is provided for the high throughput screening of binding of ligands to macromolecules using high resolution powder diffraction data including producing a first sample slurry of a selected polycrystalline macromolecule material and a solvent, producing a second sample slurry of a selected polycrystalline macromolecule material, one or more ligands and the solvent, obtaining a high resolution powder diffraction pattern on each of said first sample slurry and the second sample slurry, and, comparing the high resolution powder diffraction pattern of the first sample slurry and the high resolution powder diffraction pattern of the second sample slurry whereby a difference in the high resolution powder diffraction patterns of the first sample slurry and the second sample slurry provides a positive indication for the formation of a complex between the selected polycrystalline macromolecule material and at least one of the one or more ligands.

  4. On the optimum resolution of transmission-electron backscattered diffraction (t-EBSD).

    PubMed

    van Bremen, R; Ribas Gomes, D; de Jeer, L T H; Ocelík, V; De Hosson, J Th M

    2016-01-01

    The work presented aims at determining the optimum physical resolution of the transmission-electron backscattered diffraction (t-EBSD) technique. The resolution depends critically on intrinsic factors such as the density, atomic number and thickness of the specimen but also on the extrinsic experimental set-up of the electron beam voltage, specimen tilt and detector position. In the present study, the so-called physical resolution of a typical t-EBSD set-up was determined with the use of Monte Carlo simulations and confronted to experimental findings. In the case of a thin Au film of 20 nm, the best resolution obtained was 9 nm whereas for a 100 nm Au film the best resolution was 66 nm. The precise dependence of resolution on thickness was found to vary differently depending on the specific elements involved. This means that the resolution of each specimen should be determined individually. Experimentally the median probe size of the t-EBSD for a 140 nm thick AuAg specimen was measured to be 87 nm. The first and third quartiles of the probe size measurements were found to be 60 nm and 118 nm. Simulation of this specimen resulted in a resolution of 94 nm which fits between these quartiles.

  5. High-resolution neutron and X-ray diffraction room-temperature studies of an H-FABP–oleic acid complex: study of the internal water cluster and ligand binding by a transferred multipolar electron-density distribution

    PubMed Central

    Howard, E. I.; Guillot, B.; Blakeley, M. P.; Haertlein, M.; Moulin, M.; Mitschler, A.; Cousido-Siah, A.; Fadel, F.; Valsecchi, W. M.; Tomizaki, Takashi; Petrova, T.; Claudot, J.; Podjarny, A.

    2016-01-01

    Crystal diffraction data of heart fatty acid binding protein (H-FABP) in complex with oleic acid were measured at room temperature with high-resolution X-ray and neutron protein crystallography (0.98 and 1.90 Å resolution, respectively). These data provided very detailed information about the cluster of water molecules and the bound oleic acid in the H-FABP large internal cavity. The jointly refined X-ray/neutron structure of H-FABP was complemented by a transferred multipolar electron-density distribution using the parameters of the ELMAMII library. The resulting electron density allowed a precise determination of the electrostatic potential in the fatty acid (FA) binding pocket. Bader’s quantum theory of atoms in molecules was then used to study interactions involving the internal water molecules, the FA and the protein. This approach showed H⋯H contacts of the FA with highly conserved hydrophobic residues known to play a role in the stabilization of long-chain FAs in the binding cavity. The determination of water hydrogen (deuterium) positions allowed the analysis of the orientation and electrostatic properties of the water molecules in the very ordered cluster. As a result, a significant alignment of the permanent dipoles of the water molecules with the protein electrostatic field was observed. This can be related to the dielectric properties of hydration layers around proteins, where the shielding of electrostatic interactions depends directly on the rotational degrees of freedom of the water molecules in the interface. PMID:27006775

  6. Studies on X-ray diffraction microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Huijie

    This dissertation includes three main parts: studies on coherence requirements for the diffraction microscopy experiments, ice formation on frozen-hydrated sample during data collection, and centering of the diffraction data sets. These three subjects are all in support of our groups overall goal of high resolution 3D imaging of frozen hydrated eukaryotic cells via x-ray diffraction microscopy. X-ray diffraction microscopy requires coherent illumination. However, the actual degree of coherence at some beamlines has never been tested. In research on coherence, our first aim is to determine the transverse coherence width at the sample plane at BL 9.0.1 at the Advanced Light Source in Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. An analytical calculation of the coherence at the sample plane is presented. Experimental diffraction patterns of pinhole-pair samples were also taken at the beamline to determine the coherence. Due to the irregular shape of the pinholes and other optics complexity, it was very difficult to fit the data with known theoretical equations as it was traditionally done with 1D data. However, we found out that the auto-correlation function shows clearly three spots. Theoretical calculation have been carried out to show that the degree of coherence can be obtained from the intensities of the three spots. These results are compared with the results from the analytical calculation. We then perform a simulation, showing the required transverse coherence width for reconstructing samples with a given size. Ice accumulation has been a major problem in X-ray diffraction microscopy with frozen hydrated samples. Since the ice structure is different from point to point, we cannot subtract the scattering from ice, nor assume a completely "empty" region outside the finite support constraint area as required for reconstruction. Ice forms during the sample preparation and transfer. However, from the tests we did in September 2007, we found that the ice layer thickens

  7. High resolution electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) data from calcite biominerals in recent gastropod shells.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Huerta, Alberto; Dauphin, Yannicke; Cuif, Jean Pierre; Cusack, Maggie

    2011-04-01

    Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) is a microscopy technique that reveals in situ crystallographic information. Currently, it is widely used for the characterization of geological materials and in studies of biomineralization. Here, we analyze high resolution EBSD data from biogenic calcite in two mollusk taxa, Concholepas and Haliotis, previously used in the understanding of complex biomineralization and paleoenvironmental studies. Results indicate that Concholepas has less ordered prisms than in Haliotis, and that in Concholepas the level of order is not homogenous in different areas of the shell. Overall, the usefulness of data integration obtained from diffraction intensity and crystallographic orientation maps, and corresponding pole figures, is discussed as well as its application to similar studies.

  8. High Resolution Triple Axis X-Ray Diffraction Analysis of II-VI Semiconductor Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volz, H. M.; Matyi, R. J.

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this research program is to develop methods of structural analysis based on high resolution triple axis X-ray diffractometry (HRTXD) and to carry out detailed studies of defect distributions in crystals grown in both microgravity and ground-based environments. HRTXD represents a modification of the widely used double axis X-ray rocking curve method for the characterization of grown-in defects in nearly perfect crystals. In a double axis rocking curve experiment, the sample is illuminated by a monochromatic X-ray beam and the diffracted intensity is recorded by a fixed, wide-open detector. The intensity diffracted by the sample is then monitored as the sample is rotated through the Bragg reflection condition. The breadth of the peak, which is often reported as the full angular width at half the maximum intensity (FWHM), is used as an indicator of the amount of defects in the sample. This work has shown that high resolution triple axis X-ray diffraction is an effective tool for characterizing the defect structure in semiconductor crystals, particularly at high defect densities. Additionally, the technique is complimentary to X-ray topography for defect characterization in crystals.

  9. High resolution light diffraction tomography: nearfield measurements of 10 MHz continuous wave ultrasound

    PubMed

    Almqvist; Holm; Jansson; Persson; Lindstrom

    1999-06-01

    Light diffraction tomography is an ultrasound measurement method that offers possibilities to make high spatial resolution measurements. The aim of this study was to investigate the spatial resolution of light diffraction tomography by characterizing the complex pressure and phase patterns 0.5-1 mm from the surface of a 5 mm diameter 10 MHz ultrasound transducer. Three different transducers were measured with a detection width of 5 microm, sample distances of 20-40 microm and 50-100 projections/180 degrees. They were excited with a 10 Vpp CW-signal. To verify the results the optical measurements were compared with 75 microm diameter hydrophone measurements and with theoretical calculations. The light diffraction tomography results show very good agreement with the hydrophone measurements and pressure peaks separated 160 microm were resolved. Comparison with the theoretical calculation shows that small distortions, caused by defects in the matching layer or in the piezo-electric disc, disturb the symmetric ring-pattern characteristic of an ideal piston source. PMID:10499805

  10. Conical diffraction illumination opens the way for low phototoxicity super-resolution imaging

    PubMed Central

    Caron, Julien; Fallet, Clément; Tinevez, Jean-Yves; Moisan, Lionel; Braitbart, L Philippe (Ori); Sirat, Gabriel Y; Shorte, Spencer L

    2014-01-01

    We present a new technology for super-resolution fluorescence imaging, based on conical diffraction. Conical diffraction is a linear, singular phenomenon, taking place when a laser beam is diffracted through a biaxial crystal. We use conical diffraction in a thin biaxial crystal to generate illumination patterns that are more compact than the classical Gaussian beam, and use them to generate a super-resolution imaging modality. While there already exist several super-resolution modalities, our technology (biaxial super-resolution: BSR) is distinguished by the unique combination of several performance features. Using BSR super-resolution data are achieved using low light illumination significantly less than required for classical confocal imaging, which makes BSR ideal for live-cell, long-term time-lapse super-resolution imaging. Furthermore, no specific sample preparation is required, and any fluorophore can be used. Perhaps most exciting, improved resolution BSR-imaging resolution enhancement can be achieved with any type of objective no matter the magnification, numerical aperture, working distance, or the absence or presence of immersion medium. In this article, we present the first implementation of BSR modality on a commercial confocal microscope. We acquire and analyze validation data, showing high quality super-resolved images of biological objects, and demonstrate the wide applicability of the technology. We report live-cell super-resolution imaging over a long period, and show that the light dose required for super-resolution imaging is far below the threshold likely to generate phototoxicity. PMID:25482642

  11. High-resolution ab initio three-dimensional x-ray diffraction microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Chapman, Henry N.; Barty, Anton; Marchesini, Stefano; Noy, Aleksandr; Hau-Riege, Stefan P.; Cui, Congwu; Howells, Malcolm R.; Rosen, Rachel; He, Haifeng; Spence, John C. H.; et al

    2006-01-01

    Coherent x-ray diffraction microscopy is a method of imaging nonperiodic isolated objects at resolutions limited, in principle, by only the wavelength and largest scattering angles recorded. We demonstrate x-ray diffraction imaging with high resolution in all three dimensions, as determined by a quantitative analysis of the reconstructed volume images. These images are retrieved from the three-dimensional diffraction data using no a priori knowledge about the shape or composition of the object, which has never before been demonstrated on a nonperiodic object. We also construct two-dimensional images of thick objects with greatly increased depth of focus (without loss of transverse spatialmore » resolution). These methods can be used to image biological and materials science samples at high resolution with x-ray undulator radiation and establishes the techniques to be used in atomic-resolution ultrafast imaging at x-ray free-electron laser sources.« less

  12. High-resolution ab initio Three-dimensional X-ray Diffraction Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, H N; Barty, A; Marchesini, S; Noy, A; Cui, C; Howells, M R; Rosen, R; He, H; Spence, J H; Weierstall, U; Beetz, T; Jacobsen, C; Shapiro, D

    2005-08-19

    Coherent X-ray diffraction microscopy is a method of imaging non-periodic isolated objects at resolutions only limited, in principle, by the largest scattering angles recorded. We demonstrate X-ray diffraction imaging with high resolution in all three dimensions, as determined by a quantitative analysis of the reconstructed volume images. These images are retrieved from the 3D diffraction data using no a priori knowledge about the shape or composition of the object, which has never before been demonstrated on a non-periodic object. We also construct 2D images of thick objects with infinite depth of focus (without loss of transverse spatial resolution). These methods can be used to image biological and materials science samples at high resolution using X-ray undulator radiation, and establishes the techniques to be used in atomic-resolution ultrafast imaging at X-ray free-electron laser sources.

  13. High-resolution ab initio three-dimensional x-ray diffraction microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, Henry N.; Barty, Anton; Marchesini, Stefano; Noy, Aleksandr; Hau-Riege, Stefan P.; Cui, Congwu; Howells, Malcolm R.; Rosen, Rachel; He, Haifeng; Spence, John C. H.; Weierstall, Uwe; Beetz, Tobias; Jacobsen, Chris; Shapiro, David

    2006-01-01

    Coherent x-ray diffraction microscopy is a method of imaging nonperiodic isolated objects at resolutions limited, in principle, by only the wavelength and largest scattering angles recorded. We demonstrate x-ray diffraction imaging with high resolution in all three dimensions, as determined by a quantitative analysis of the reconstructed volume images. These images are retrieved from the three-dimensional diffraction data using no a priori knowledge about the shape or composition of the object, which has never before been demonstrated on a nonperiodic object. We also construct two-dimensional images of thick objects with greatly increased depth of focus (without loss of transverse spatial resolution). These methods can be used to image biological and materials science samples at high resolution with x-ray undulator radiation and establishes the techniques to be used in atomic-resolution ultrafast imaging at x-ray free-electron laser sources.

  14. High-resolution ab initio three-dimensional x-ray diffraction microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Henry N; Barty, Anton; Marchesini, Stefano; Noy, Aleksandr; Hau-Riege, Stefan P; Cui, Congwu; Howells, Malcolm R; Rosen, Rachel; He, Haifeng; Spence, John C H; Weierstall, Uwe; Beetz, Tobias; Jacobsen, Chris; Shapiro, David

    2006-05-01

    Coherent x-ray diffraction microscopy is a method of imaging nonperiodic isolated objects at resolutions limited, in principle, by only the wavelength and largest scattering angles recorded. We demonstrate x-ray diffraction imaging with high resolution in all three dimensions, as determined by a quantitative analysis of the reconstructed volume images. These images are retrieved from the three-dimensional diffraction data using no a priori knowledge about the shape or composition of the object, which has never before been demonstrated on a nonperiodic object. We also construct two-dimensional images of thick objects with greatly increased depth of focus (without loss of transverse spatial resolution). These methods can be used to image biological and materials science samples at high resolution with x-ray undulator radiation and establishes the techniques to be used in atomic-resolution ultrafast imaging at x-ray free-electron laser sources.

  15. High Resolution X-Ray Diffraction of Macromolecules with Synchrotron Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stojanoff, Vivian; Boggon, Titus; Helliwell, John R.; Judge, Russell; Olczak, Alex; Snell, Edward H.; Siddons, D. Peter; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We recently combined synchrotron-based monochromatic X-ray diffraction topography methods with triple axis diffractometry and rocking curve measurements: high resolution X-ray diffraction imaging techniques, to better understand the quality of protein crystals. We discuss these methods in the light of results obtained on crystals grown under different conditions. These non destructive techniques are powerful tools in the characterization of the protein crystals and ultimately will allow to improve, develop, and understand protein crystal growth. High resolution X-ray diffraction imaging methods will be discussed in detail in light of recent results obtained on Hen Egg White Lysozyme crystals and other proteins.

  16. High-resolution x-ray diffraction measurements of SiGe/Si structures

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan-Sweet, J.L.; Mooney, P.M.; Stephenson, G.B.

    1995-09-01

    High-resolution x-ray diffraction is an excellent probe of strain relaxation in complex SiGe structures. The high flux provided by synchrotron sources enables one to make extensive reciprocal space map measurements and evaluate many samples. The diffraction peak positions of each layer in a step-graded structure, measured for two different reflections, yield quantitative values for the relaxation and alloy composition in the layer. Grazing-incidence diffraction allows one to determine the in-plane structure of very thin layers, which have thickness-broadened peaks at conventional diffraction geometries. They demonstrate the power of these techniques with two examples.

  17. Resolution of aplanatic systems with various semiapertures, viewed from the two sides of the diffracting aperture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Hanming; Chen, Jiabi; Zhuang, Songlin

    2006-11-01

    With the vector plane-wave spectrum and stationary phase method, a rigorous vector diffraction model of an aplanatic system when the polarized point source is at an arbitrary location on the optical axis is presented. The computer simulation is used to discuss in detail the effects of various angular semiapertures on the object and image sides on the resolution. Results show that angular semiapertures on the object and image sides have an obvious effect on the resolution and image fields, which indicates that the classical Wolf theory [Proc. R. Soc. London, Ser. A253, 358 (1959)] cannot be applied to the study of imaging properties of an aplanatic system when the point source is not located at infinity in the direction of the axis.

  18. Resolution of aplanatic systems with various semiapertures, viewed from the two sides of the diffracting aperture.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hanming; Chen, Jiabi; Zhuang, Songlin

    2006-11-01

    With the vector plane-wave spectrum and stationary phase method, a rigorous vector diffraction model of an aplanatic system when the polarized point source is at an arbitrary location on the optical axis is presented. The computer simulation is used to discuss in detail the effects of various angular semiapertures on the object and image sides on the resolution. Results show that angular semiapertures on the object and image sides have an obvious effect on the resolution and image fields, which indicates that the classical Wolf theory [Proc. R. Soc. London, Ser. A253, 358 (1959)] cannot be applied to the study of imaging properties of an aplanatic system when the point source is not located at infinity in the direction of the axis.

  19. Low-cost high-resolution diffractive position sensors for X-by-wire applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tupinier, L.; Marroux, O.; Ndao, M.; Kress, B.; Meyrueis, P.

    2006-04-01

    We are proposing a novel method to implement high resolution optical position sensors for automotive and other applications. Grating diffractive incremental encoders (both linear and rotation) are already becoming commodity products now, and include a read-out grating and a ruling grating [3]. We are implementing out high resolution incremental and/or absolute position encoders with a single diffractive substrate, replicated in mass in plastic. The diffractive structures are here much more complex than standard linear gratings. These new optical position sensors can achieve high absolute resolution without need of electronic interpolation, therefore being potentially very fast and accurate. Furthermore, due to the nature of these diffractive optical elements (surface relief elements), they are very cheaply replicated in mass by either polymers embossing or injection moulding.

  20. k-Microscopy: resolution beyond the diffraction limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geissbuehler, Matthias; Lasser, Theo; Leitgeb, Rainer A.

    2008-02-01

    We present a novel Fourier domain method for microscopic imaging - so-called k-microscopy - with lateral resolution independent of the detection numerical aperture. The concept is based on sample illumination by a lateral fringe-pattern of varying spatial frequency, which probes the lateral spatial frequency or k- spectrum of the sample structure. The illumination pattern is realized by interference of two collimated coherent beams. Wavelength tuning is employed for modulation of the fringe spacing. The uniqueness of the proposed system is that a single point detector is sufficient to collect the total light corresponding to a particular position in the sample k-space. By shifting the phase of the interference pattern, we get full access to the complex frequencies. An inverse Fourier transformation of the acquired band in the frequency- or k-space will reconstruct the sample. The resulting lateral resolution will be defined by the temporal coherence length associated with the detected light source spectrum as well as by the illumination angle. The feasibility of the concept has been demonstrated in 1D.

  1. Surface diffusion studies by optical diffraction techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, X.D.

    1992-11-01

    The newly developed optical techniques have been combined with either second harmonic (SH) diffraction or linear diffraction off a monolayer adsorbate grating for surface diffusion measurement. Anisotropy of surface diffusion of CO on Ni(l10) was used as a demonstration for the second harmonic dim reaction method. The linear diffraction method, which possesses a much higher sensitivity than the SH diffraction method, was employed to study the effect of adsorbate-adsorbate interaction on CO diffusion on Ni(l10) surface. Results showed that only the short range direct CO-CO orbital overlapping interaction influences CO diffusion but not the long range dipole-dipole and CO-NI-CO interactions. Effects of impurities and defects on surface diffusion were further explored by using linear diffraction method on CO/Ni(110) system. It was found that a few percent S impurity can alter the CO diffusion barrier height to a much higher value through changing the Ni(110) surface. The point defects of Ni(l10) surface seem to speed up CO diffusion significantly. A mechanism with long jumps over multiple lattice distance initiated by CO filled vacancy is proposed to explain the observed defect effect.

  2. Quantitative coherent diffractive imaging of an integrated circuit at a spatial resolution of 20 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbey, Brian; Williams, Garth J.; Pfeifer, Mark A.; Clark, Jesse N.; Putkunz, Corey T.; Torrance, Angela; McNulty, Ian; Levin, T. M.; Peele, Andrew G.; Nugent, Keith A.

    2008-11-01

    The complex transmission function of an integrated circuit is reconstructed at 20 nm spatial resolution using coherent diffractive imaging. A quantitative map is made of the exit surface wave emerging from void defects within the circuit interconnect. Assuming a known index of refraction for the substrate allows the volume of these voids to be estimated from the phase retardation in this region. Sample scanning and tomography of extended objects using coherent diffractive imaging is demonstrated.

  3. High-resolution x-ray diffraction microscopy of specifically labeled yeast cells

    DOE PAGES

    Nelson, Johanna; Huang, Xiaojing; Steinbrener, Jan; Shapiro, David; Kirz, Janos; Marchesini, Stephano; Neiman, Aaron M.; Turner, Joshua J.; Jacobsen, Chris

    2010-04-20

    X-ray diffraction microscopy complements other x-ray microscopy methods by being free of lens-imposed radiation dose and resolution limits, and it allows for high-resolution imaging of biological specimens too thick to be viewed by electron microscopy. We report here the highest resolution (11-13 nm) x-ray diffraction micrograph of biological specimens, and a demonstration of molecular-specific gold labeling at different depths within cells via through-focus propagation of the reconstructed wavefield. The lectin concanavalin A conjugated to colloidal gold particles was used to label the α-mannan sugar in the cell wall of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Cells were plunge-frozen in liquid ethane andmore » freeze-dried, after which they were imaged whole using x-ray diffraction microscopy at 750 eV photon energy.« less

  4. High-resolution x-ray diffraction microscopy of specifically labeled yeast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Johanna; Huang, Xiaojing; Steinbrener, Jan; Shapiro, David; Kirz, Janos; Marchesini, Stephano; Neiman, Aaron M.; Turner, Joshua J.; Jacobsen, Chris

    2010-04-20

    X-ray diffraction microscopy complements other x-ray microscopy methods by being free of lens-imposed radiation dose and resolution limits, and it allows for high-resolution imaging of biological specimens too thick to be viewed by electron microscopy. We report here the highest resolution (11-13 nm) x-ray diffraction micrograph of biological specimens, and a demonstration of molecular-specific gold labeling at different depths within cells via through-focus propagation of the reconstructed wavefield. The lectin concanavalin A conjugated to colloidal gold particles was used to label the α-mannan sugar in the cell wall of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Cells were plunge-frozen in liquid ethane and freeze-dried, after which they were imaged whole using x-ray diffraction microscopy at 750 eV photon energy.

  5. Polarization sensitive ultrafast mid-IR pump probe micro-spectrometer with diffraction limited spatial resolution.

    PubMed

    Kaucikas, M; Barber, J; Van Thor, J J

    2013-04-01

    A setup of ultrafast transient infrared IR spectrometer is described in this paper that employed Schwarzschild objectives to focus the probe beam to a diffraction limited spot. Thus measurements were performed with very high spatial resolution in the mid-IR spectral region. Furthermore, modulating the polarization of the probe light enabled detecting transient dichroism of the sample. These capabilities of the setup were applied to study transient absorption of Photosystem II core complex and to image an organized film of methylene blue chloride dye. Moreover, a study of noise sources in a pump probe measurement is presented. The predicted noise level of the current setup was 8.25 μOD in 10(4) acquisitions and compared very well with the experimental observation of 9.6 μOD.

  6. X-ray fiber diffraction studies on flagellar axonemes.

    PubMed

    Oiwa, Kazuhiro; Kamimura, Shinji; Iwamoto, Hiroyuki

    2009-01-01

    Eukaryotic cilia and flagella are highly ordered and precisely assembled cellular organelles. Here, to understand the mechanism of the orderly undulations of cilia and flagella, we shall draw a blueprint of their core structures and supporting scaffolds, that is, axonemes, and we shall describe the dynamic structural changes of components of the organelles. Small-angle X-ray scattering and diffraction are among the principal tools used to study protein polymers. These methods are now well established as indispensable tools that complement electron microscopy, providing information on the structure and dynamics of biological materials at atomic resolution in near-physiological environments. For instance, X-ray diffraction studies of skeletal muscles have contributed greatly to our understanding of the structure and molecular mechanisms of muscles. However, owing to the minute size and low diffracting power of axonemes, few attempts at X-ray diffraction of axonemes have been reported. The advent of third-generation synchrotron radiation facilities now makes these attempts feasible, because we now have stable and intense X-rays that enable us to obtain diffractions from the axonemes. In this chapter, we provide a concise practical guide to this new avenue for structural analysis of axonemes. PMID:20409782

  7. Beating the Rayleigh limit: orbital-angular-momentum-based super-resolution diffraction tomography.

    PubMed

    Li, Lianlin; Li, Fang

    2013-09-01

    This paper reports a super-resolution imaging approach based on orbital-angular-momentum diffraction tomography (OAM-DT), which makes an important breakthrough on the Rayleigh limit associated with conventional diffraction tomography (DT) technique. It is well accepted that orbital-angular momentum (OAM) provides additional electromagnetic degrees of freedom. This concept has been widely applied in science and technology. In this paper we revisit the DT problem extended with OAM, and demonstrate theoretically and numerically that there is no physical limit on imaging resolution with OAM-DT. The physical mechanism behind it is that either the near field or superoscillation of the transmitter is employed to super-resolve probed objects. This super-resolution OAM-DT imaging paradigm does not require near-field measurement, a subtle focusing lens, or complicated postprocessing, etc., thus providing an approach to realize the wave-field imaging of universal objects with subwavelength resolution.

  8. Neutron powder diffraction study of perdeuterodimethyl sulfone.

    PubMed

    Ibberson, R M

    2007-05-01

    The crystal structure of perdeuterodimethyl sulfone, (CD(3))(2)SO(2) or C(2)D(6)O(2)S, has been refined at 4.5 K against high-resolution neutron powder diffraction data. The structure determined previously by Sands [Z. Kristallogr. (1963), 119, 245-251] at ambient temperature is shown to remain down to liquid helium temperature, and at 4.5 K the S-C and S-O bond distances are 1.441 (2) and 1.760 (2) A, respectively. The molecules are distorted tetrahedra with C(2v) point symmetry (crystallographic symmetry m2m for S and m for C, O and one D atom) and are linked through a network of weak hydrogen bonds in the C-centred orthorhombic structure.

  9. DNA hydration studied by neutron fiber diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, W.; Forsyth, V.T.; Mahendrasingam, A.; Langan, P.; Pigram, W.J.

    1994-12-31

    The development of neutron high angle fiber diffraction to investigate the location of water around the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) double-helix is described. The power of the technique is illustrated by its application to the D and A conformations of DNA using the single crystal diffractometer, D19, at the Institute Laue-Langevin, Grenoble and the time of flight diffractometer, SXD, at the Rutherford Appleton ISIS Spallation Neutron Source. These studies show the existence of bound water closely associated with the DNA. The patterns of hydration in these two DNA conformations are quite distinct and are compared to those observed in X-ray single crystal studies of two-stranded oligodeoxynucleotides. Information on the location of water around the DNA double-helix from the neutron fiber diffraction studies is combined with that on the location of alkali metal cations from complementary X-ray high angle fiber diffraction studies at the Daresbury Laboratory SRS using synchrotron radiation. These analyses emphasize the importance of viewing DNA, water and ions as a single system with specific interactions between the three components and provide a basis for understanding the effect of changes in the concentration of water and ions in inducing conformations] transitions in the DNA double-helix.

  10. High spatial resolution X-ray and gamma ray imaging system using diffraction crystals

    DOEpatents

    Smither, Robert K.

    2011-05-17

    A method and a device for high spatial resolution imaging of a plurality of sources of x-ray and gamma-ray radiation are provided. The device comprises a plurality of arrays, with each array comprising a plurality of elements comprising a first collimator, a diffracting crystal, a second collimator, and a detector.

  11. Very High Resolution Solar X-ray Imaging Using Diffractive Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, B. R.; Skinner, G. K.; Li, M. J.; Shih, A. Y.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the development of X-ray diffractive optics for imaging solar flares with better than 0.1 arcsec angular resolution. X-ray images with this resolution of the greater than or equal to 10 MK plasma in solar active regions and solar flares would allow the cross-sectional area of magnetic loops to be resolved and the coronal flare energy release region itself to be probed. The objective of this work is to obtain X-ray images in the iron-line complex at 6.7 keV observed during solar flares with an angular resolution as fine as 0.1 arcsec - over an order of magnitude finer than is now possible. This line emission is from highly ionized iron atoms, primarily Fe xxv, in the hottest flare plasma at temperatures in excess of approximately equal to 10 MK. It provides information on the flare morphology, the iron abundance, and the distribution of the hot plasma. Studying how this plasma is heated to such high temperatures in such short times during solar flares is of critical importance in understanding these powerful transient events, one of the major objectives of solar physics.We describe the design, fabrication, and testing of phase zone plate X-ray lenses with focal lengths of approximately equal to 100 m at these energies that would be capable of achieving these objectives. We show how such lenses could be included on a two-spacecraft formation-flying mission with the lenses on the spacecraft closest to the Sun and an X-ray imaging array on the second spacecraft in the focal plane approximately equal to 100 m away. High resolution X-ray images could be obtained when the two spacecraft are aligned with the region of interest on the Sun. Requirements and constraints for the control of the two spacecraft are discussed together with the overall feasibility of such a formation-flying mission.

  12. Transformation of nanodiamond into carbon onions: A comparative study by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, electron energy-loss spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, small-angle x-ray scattering, and ultraviolet Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mykhaylyk, Oleksandr O.; Solonin, Yurii M.; Batchelder, David N.; Brydson, Rik

    2005-04-01

    The structural properties of both nanodiamond particles synthesized by detonation and the products of their transformation into carbon onions via vacuum annealing at 1000 and 1500°C have been studied using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), electron energy-loss spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction (XRD), small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS), and Raman spectroscopy. The advantages of UV Raman spectroscopy over visible Raman spectroscopy for the analysis of these carbon nanomaterials are demonstrated. It was found that the synthesized nanodiamond particles have a composite core-shell structure comprising an ordered diamond core covered by a disordered (amorphous) outer shell formed by the mixed sp2/sp3 bonding of carbon atoms. The observed structure of the nanodiamond particles are comparable with the structure of the bucky diamond clusters comprising a diamond core and a reconstructed surface which stabilizes the cluster at the average diameter of ˜30Å, as predicted recently from theoretical studies. Assuming a spherical shape for the particles and employing a two-step boundary model of electron density distribution developed in this work to describe the SAXS patterns produced by the core-shell structure of the nanodiamond particles, it was evaluated that the average diameter of the core is ˜30Å and the average thickness of the shell is ˜8Å; values which are in agreement with results obtained from HRTEM and XRD measurements. A discrepancy between these results and average diamond crystallite size obtained from Raman spectra by applying the phonon confinement model (35-45Å ) is discussed. It is hypothesized from analysis of broadening of the XRD diamond peaks that at the nanoscale under influence of the particle shape, which is not strictly of a cubic (or spherical) symmetry, a slight hexagonal distortion of the cubic diamond structure appears in the nanodiamond particles. The transformation of the nanodiamond into carbon onions proceeds from

  13. 7 Å Resolution in Protein 2-Dimentional-Crystal X-Ray Diffraction at Linac Coherent Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Pedrini, Bill; Tsai, Ching-Ju; Capitani, Guido; Padeste, Celestino; Hunter, Mark; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; Barty, Anton; Benner, Henry; Boutet, Sebastien; Feld, Geoffrey K.; Hau-Riege, Stefan; Kirian, Rick; Kupitz, Christopher; Messerschmidt, Marc; Ogren, John I.; Pardini, Tommaso; Segelke, Brent; Williams, Garth J.; Spence , John C.; Abela, Rafael; Coleman, Matthew A.; Evans, James E.; Schertler, Gebhard; Frank, Matthias; Li, Xiao-Dan

    2014-06-09

    Membrane proteins arranged as two-dimensional (2D) crystals in the lipid en- vironment provide close-to-physiological structural information, which is essential for understanding the molecular mechanisms of protein function. X-ray diffraction from individual 2D crystals did not represent a suitable investigation tool because of radiation damage. The recent availability of ultrashort pulses from X-ray Free Electron Lasers (X-FELs) has now provided a mean to outrun the damage. Here we report on measurements performed at the LCLS X-FEL on bacteriorhodopsin 2D crystals mounted on a solid support and kept at room temperature. By merg- ing data from about a dozen of single crystal diffraction images, we unambiguously identified the diffraction peaks to a resolution of 7 °A, thus improving the observable resolution with respect to that achievable from a single pattern alone. This indicates that a larger dataset will allow for reliable quantification of peak intensities, and in turn a corresponding increase of resolution. The presented results pave the way to further X-FEL studies on 2D crystals, which may include pump-probe experiments at subpicosecond time resolution.

  14. 7 Å resolution in protein two-dimensional-crystal X-ray diffraction at Linac Coherent Light Source

    PubMed Central

    Pedrini, Bill; Tsai, Ching-Ju; Capitani, Guido; Padeste, Celestino; Hunter, Mark S.; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; Barty, Anton; Benner, W. Henry; Boutet, Sébastien; Feld, Geoffrey K.; Hau-Riege, Stefan P.; Kirian, Richard A.; Kupitz, Christopher; Messerschmitt, Marc; Ogren, John I.; Pardini, Tommaso; Segelke, Brent; Williams, Garth J.; Spence, John C. H.; Abela, Rafael; Coleman, Matthew; Evans, James E.; Schertler, Gebhard F. X.; Frank, Matthias; Li, Xiao-Dan

    2014-01-01

    Membrane proteins arranged as two-dimensional crystals in the lipid environment provide close-to-physiological structural information, which is essential for understanding the molecular mechanisms of protein function. Previously, X-ray diffraction from individual two-dimensional crystals did not represent a suitable investigational tool because of radiation damage. The recent availability of ultrashort pulses from X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) has now provided a means to outrun the damage. Here, we report on measurements performed at the Linac Coherent Light Source XFEL on bacteriorhodopsin two-dimensional crystals mounted on a solid support and kept at room temperature. By merging data from about a dozen single crystal diffraction images, we unambiguously identified the diffraction peaks to a resolution of 7 Å, thus improving the observable resolution with respect to that achievable from a single pattern alone. This indicates that a larger dataset will allow for reliable quantification of peak intensities, and in turn a corresponding increase in the resolution. The presented results pave the way for further XFEL studies on two-dimensional crystals, which may include pump–probe experiments at subpicosecond time resolution. PMID:24914166

  15. 7 Å resolution in protein two-dimensional-crystal X-ray diffraction at Linac Coherent Light Source.

    PubMed

    Pedrini, Bill; Tsai, Ching-Ju; Capitani, Guido; Padeste, Celestino; Hunter, Mark S; Zatsepin, Nadia A; Barty, Anton; Benner, W Henry; Boutet, Sébastien; Feld, Geoffrey K; Hau-Riege, Stefan P; Kirian, Richard A; Kupitz, Christopher; Messerschmitt, Marc; Ogren, John I; Pardini, Tommaso; Segelke, Brent; Williams, Garth J; Spence, John C H; Abela, Rafael; Coleman, Matthew; Evans, James E; Schertler, Gebhard F X; Frank, Matthias; Li, Xiao-Dan

    2014-07-17

    Membrane proteins arranged as two-dimensional crystals in the lipid environment provide close-to-physiological structural information, which is essential for understanding the molecular mechanisms of protein function. Previously, X-ray diffraction from individual two-dimensional crystals did not represent a suitable investigational tool because of radiation damage. The recent availability of ultrashort pulses from X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) has now provided a means to outrun the damage. Here, we report on measurements performed at the Linac Coherent Light Source XFEL on bacteriorhodopsin two-dimensional crystals mounted on a solid support and kept at room temperature. By merging data from about a dozen single crystal diffraction images, we unambiguously identified the diffraction peaks to a resolution of 7 Å, thus improving the observable resolution with respect to that achievable from a single pattern alone. This indicates that a larger dataset will allow for reliable quantification of peak intensities, and in turn a corresponding increase in the resolution. The presented results pave the way for further XFEL studies on two-dimensional crystals, which may include pump-probe experiments at subpicosecond time resolution.

  16. 7 Å resolution in protein two-dimensional-crystal X-ray diffraction at Linac Coherent Light Source.

    PubMed

    Pedrini, Bill; Tsai, Ching-Ju; Capitani, Guido; Padeste, Celestino; Hunter, Mark S; Zatsepin, Nadia A; Barty, Anton; Benner, W Henry; Boutet, Sébastien; Feld, Geoffrey K; Hau-Riege, Stefan P; Kirian, Richard A; Kupitz, Christopher; Messerschmitt, Marc; Ogren, John I; Pardini, Tommaso; Segelke, Brent; Williams, Garth J; Spence, John C H; Abela, Rafael; Coleman, Matthew; Evans, James E; Schertler, Gebhard F X; Frank, Matthias; Li, Xiao-Dan

    2014-07-17

    Membrane proteins arranged as two-dimensional crystals in the lipid environment provide close-to-physiological structural information, which is essential for understanding the molecular mechanisms of protein function. Previously, X-ray diffraction from individual two-dimensional crystals did not represent a suitable investigational tool because of radiation damage. The recent availability of ultrashort pulses from X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) has now provided a means to outrun the damage. Here, we report on measurements performed at the Linac Coherent Light Source XFEL on bacteriorhodopsin two-dimensional crystals mounted on a solid support and kept at room temperature. By merging data from about a dozen single crystal diffraction images, we unambiguously identified the diffraction peaks to a resolution of 7 Å, thus improving the observable resolution with respect to that achievable from a single pattern alone. This indicates that a larger dataset will allow for reliable quantification of peak intensities, and in turn a corresponding increase in the resolution. The presented results pave the way for further XFEL studies on two-dimensional crystals, which may include pump-probe experiments at subpicosecond time resolution. PMID:24914166

  17. High resolution X-ray diffraction imaging of lead tin telluride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steiner, Bruce; Dobbyn, Ronald C.; Black, David; Burdette, Harold; Kuriyama, Masao; Spal, Richard; Simchick, Richard; Fripp, Archibald

    1991-01-01

    High resolution X-ray diffraction images of two directly comparable crystals of lead tin telluride, one Bridgman-grown on Space Shuttle STS 61A and the other terrestrially Bridgman-grown under similar conditions from identical material, present different subgrain structure. In the terrestrial, sample 1 the appearance of an elaborate array of subgrains is closely associated with the intrusion of regions that are out of diffraction in all of the various images. The formation of this elaborate subgrain structure is inhibited by growth in microgravity.

  18. Toward atomic resolution diffractive imaging of isolated molecules with X-ray free-electron lasers.

    PubMed

    Stern, S; Holmegaard, L; Filsinger, F; Rouzée, A; Rudenko, A; Johnsson, P; Martin, A V; Barty, A; Bostedt, C; Bozek, J; Coffee, R; Epp, S; Erk, B; Foucar, L; Hartmann, R; Kimmel, N; Kühnel, K-U; Maurer, J; Messerschmidt, M; Rudek, B; Starodub, D; Thøgersen, J; Weidenspointner, G; White, T A; Stapelfeldt, H; Rolles, D; Chapman, H N; Küpper, J

    2014-01-01

    We give a detailed account of the theoretical analysis and the experimental results of an X-ray-diffraction experiment on quantum-state selected and strongly laser-aligned gas-phase ensembles of the prototypical large asymmetric rotor molecule 2,5-diiodobenzonitrile, performed at the Linac Coherent Light Source [Phys. Rev. Lett.112, 083002 (2014)]. This experiment is the first step toward coherent diffractive imaging of structures and structural dynamics of isolated molecules at atomic resolution, i.e., picometers and femtoseconds, using X-ray free-electron lasers.

  19. Toward atomic resolution diffractive imaging of isolated molecules with X-ray free-electron lasers.

    PubMed

    Stern, S; Holmegaard, L; Filsinger, F; Rouzée, A; Rudenko, A; Johnsson, P; Martin, A V; Barty, A; Bostedt, C; Bozek, J; Coffee, R; Epp, S; Erk, B; Foucar, L; Hartmann, R; Kimmel, N; Kühnel, K-U; Maurer, J; Messerschmidt, M; Rudek, B; Starodub, D; Thøgersen, J; Weidenspointner, G; White, T A; Stapelfeldt, H; Rolles, D; Chapman, H N; Küpper, J

    2014-01-01

    We give a detailed account of the theoretical analysis and the experimental results of an X-ray-diffraction experiment on quantum-state selected and strongly laser-aligned gas-phase ensembles of the prototypical large asymmetric rotor molecule 2,5-diiodobenzonitrile, performed at the Linac Coherent Light Source [Phys. Rev. Lett.112, 083002 (2014)]. This experiment is the first step toward coherent diffractive imaging of structures and structural dynamics of isolated molecules at atomic resolution, i.e., picometers and femtoseconds, using X-ray free-electron lasers. PMID:25415561

  20. Competing orbital ordering in RVO{sub 3} compounds: High-resolution x-ray diffraction and thermal expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Sage, M. H.; Blake, G. R.; Palstra, T. T. M.; Marquina, C.

    2007-11-15

    We report evidence for the phase coexistence of orbital orderings of different symmetry in RVO{sub 3} compounds with intermediate-size rare earths. Through a study by high-resolution x-ray powder diffraction and thermal expansion, we show that the competing orbital orderings are associated with the magnitude of the VO{sub 6} octahedral tilting and magnetic exchange striction in these compounds and that the phase-separated state is stabilized by lattice strains.

  1. Pinhole diffraction holography for fabrication of high-resolution Fresnel zone plates.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Sankha S; Solak, Harun H; David, Christian; van der Veen, J Friso

    2014-01-27

    Fresnel zone plates (FZPs) play an essential role in high spatial resolution x-ray imaging and analysis of materials in many fields. These diffractive lenses are commonly made by serial writing techniques such as electron beam or focused ion beam lithography. Here we show that pinhole diffraction holography has potential to generate FZP patterns that are free from aberrations and imperfections that may be present in alternative fabrication techniques. In this presented method, FZPs are fabricated by recording interference pattern of a spherical wave generated by diffraction through a pinhole, illuminated with coherent plane wave at extreme ultraviolet (EUV) wavelength. Fundamental and practical issues involved in formation and recording of the interference pattern are considered. It is found that resolution of the produced FZP is directly related to the diameter of the pinhole used and the pinhole size cannot be made arbitrarily small as the transmission of EUV or x-ray light through small pinholes diminishes due to poor refractive index contrast found between materials in these spectral ranges. We also find that the practical restrictions on exposure time due to the light intensity available from current sources directly imposes a limit on the number of zones that can be printed with this method. Therefore a trade-off between the resolution and the FZP diameter exists. Overall, we find that this method can be used to fabricate aberration free FZPs down to a resolution of about 10 nm. PMID:24515148

  2. High resolution diameter estimation of microthin wires by a novel 3D diffraction model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyas, Khushi; Lolla, Kameswara Rao

    2011-08-01

    Micro-thin wires are of significant importance to academia, research laboratories as well as industries engaged in micro-fabrication of products related to diverse fields like micromechanics, bio-instrumentation, optoelectronics etc. Critical dimension metrology of such wires often demands diameter estimation with tight tolerances. Amongst other measurement techniques, Optical Diffractometry under Fraunhofer approximation has emerged over years as a nondestructive, robust and precise technique for on-line diameter estimation of thin wires. However, it is observed that existing Fraunhofer models invariably result in experimental overestimation of wire diameter, leading to unacceptable error performances particularly for diameters below 50 μm. In this paper, a novel diffraction model based on Geometric theory is proposed and demonstrated to theoretically quantify this diameter overestimation. The proposed model utilizes hitherto unused paths-ways for the two lateral rays that contribute to the first diffraction minimum. Based the 3-D geometry of the suggested model, a new 'diffraction formulation' is proposed. The theoretical analysis reveals the following. For diffraction experiment, the Actual diameter of the diffracting wire is a function of four parameters: source wavelength 'λ', axial distance 'z', diffraction angle corresponding to first diffraction minimum 'θd' and a newly defined characteristic parameter 'm'. The analysis reveals further that the proposed characteristic parameter 'm' varies non-linearly with diameter and presents a dependence only on the experimentally measured diffraction angle 'θd'. Based on the proposed model, the communication reports for the first time, a novel diameter-inversion procedure which, not only corrects for the overestimated but also facilitates wire diameter-inversion with high resolution. Micro-thin metallic wires having diameters spanning the range 1-50 μm are examined. Experimental results are obtained that

  3. Dedicated High-Resolution Powder Diffraction Beamline at the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Peter L.; Beno, Mark A.; Shu Deming; Ramanathan, Mohan; Mitchell, John F.; Jorgensen, James D.; Von Dreele, Robert B.

    2004-05-12

    A high-resolution x-ray powder diffraction beamline that exploits the high flux, high energy resolution, and precise energy tuning of the third-generation synchrotron source will be built at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). The goal is to establish a high-resolution high-throughput dedicated powder instrument at the APS to serve the powder community. We describe design of the instrument that is able to measure a complete high-resolution powder pattern in one hour or less, uses automation to optimize throughput, has the ability to readily tune over a wide range of x-ray energies quickly and easily covering important absorption edges for resonant data measurements, and has the ability to accommodate various environmental devices for high-temperature, low-temperature or time-resolved data collection.

  4. Neutron diffraction studies of viral fusion peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradshaw, Jeremy P.; J. M. Darkes, Malcolm; Katsaras, John; Epand, Richard M.

    2000-03-01

    Membrane fusion plays a vital role in a large and diverse number of essential biological processes. Despite this fact, the precise molecular events that occur during fusion are still not known. We are currently engaged on a study of membrane fusion as mediated by viral fusion peptides. These peptides are the N-terminal regions of certain viral envelope proteins that mediate the process of fusion between the viral envelope and the membranes of the host cell during the infection process. As part of this study, we have carried out neutron diffraction measurements at the ILL, BeNSC and Chalk River, on a range of viral fusion peptides. The peptides, from simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), influenza A and feline leukaemia virus (FeLV), were incorporated into stacked phospholipid bilayers. Some of the peptides had been specifically deuterated at key amino acids. Lamellar diffraction data were collected and analysed to yield information on the peptide conformation, location and orientation relative to the bilayer.

  5. High resolution x-ray and gamma ray imaging using diffraction lenses with mechanically bent crystals

    DOEpatents

    Smither, Robert K.

    2008-12-23

    A method for high spatial resolution imaging of a plurality of sources of x-ray and gamma-ray radiation is provided. High quality mechanically bent diffracting crystals of 0.1 mm radial width are used for focusing the radiation and directing the radiation to an array of detectors which is used for analyzing their addition to collect data as to the location of the source of radiation. A computer is used for converting the data to an image. The invention also provides for the use of a multi-component high resolution detector array and for narrow source and detector apertures.

  6. Super-resolution of dense nanoscale emitters beyond the diffraction limit using spatial and temporal information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barsic, Anthony; Piestun, Rafael

    2013-06-01

    We propose a super-resolution technique for dense clusters of blinking emitters. The method relies on two basic assumptions: the emitters are statistically independent and a model of the imaging system is known. We numerically analyze the performance limits of the method as a function of emitter density and noise level. Numerical simulations show that five closely packed emitters can be resolved and localized to a precision of 17 nm. The experimental resolution of five quantum dots located within a diffraction-limited spot confirms the applicability of this approach. Statistical tests validate the independence of our quantum dots separated by nanoscale distances.

  7. Structural anomalies in undoped Gallium Arsenide observed in high resolution diffraction imaging with monochromatic synchrotron radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steiner, B.; Kuriyama, M.; Dobbyn, R. C.; Laor, U.; Larson, D.; Brown, M.

    1988-01-01

    Novel, streak-like disruption features restricted to the plane of diffraction have recently been observed in images obtained by synchrotron radiation diffraction from undoped, semi-insulating gallium arsenide crystals. These features were identified as ensembles of very thin platelets or interfaces lying in (110) planes, and a structural model consisting of antiphase domain boundaries was proposed. We report here the other principal features observed in high resolution monochromatic synchrotron radiation diffraction images: (quasi) cellular structure; linear, very low-angle subgrain boundaries in (110) directions, and surface stripes in a (110) direction. In addition, we report systematic differences in the acceptance angle for images involving various diffraction vectors. When these observations are considered together, a unifying picture emerges. The presence of ensembles of thin (110) antiphase platelet regions or boundaries is generally consistent not only with the streak-like diffraction features but with the other features reported here as well. For the formation of such regions we propose two mechanisms, operating in parallel, that appear to be consistent with the various defect features observed by a variety of techniques.

  8. Nanometres-resolution Kikuchi patterns from materials science specimens with transmission electron forward scatter diffraction in the scanning electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Brodusch, N; Demers, H; Gauvin, R

    2013-04-01

    A charge-coupled device camera of an electron backscattered diffraction system in a scanning electron microscope was positioned below a thin specimen and transmission Kikuchi patterns were collected. Contrary to electron backscattered diffraction, transmission electron forward scatter diffraction provides phase identification and orientation mapping at the nanoscale. The minimum Pd particle size for which a Kikuchi diffraction pattern was detected and indexed reliably was 5.6 nm. An orientation mapping resolution of 5 nm was measured at 30 kV. The resolution obtained with transmission electron forward scatter diffraction was of the same order of magnitude than that reported in electron nanodiffraction in the transmission electron microscope. An energy dispersive spectrometer X-ray map and a transmission electron forward scatter diffraction orientation map were acquired simultaneously. The high-resolution chemical, phase and orientation maps provided at once information on the chemical form, orientation and coherency of precipitates in an aluminium-lithium 2099 alloy.

  9. Ultrafast electron diffraction optimized for studying structural dynamics in thin films and monolayers

    PubMed Central

    Badali, D. S.; Gengler, R. Y. N.; Miller, R. J. D.

    2016-01-01

    A compact electron source specifically designed for time-resolved diffraction studies of free-standing thin films and monolayers is presented here. The sensitivity to thin samples is achieved by extending the established technique of ultrafast electron diffraction to the “medium” energy regime (1–10 kV). An extremely compact design, in combination with low bunch charges, allows for high quality diffraction in a lensless geometry. The measured and simulated characteristics of the experimental system reveal sub-picosecond temporal resolution, while demonstrating the ability to produce high quality diffraction patterns from atomically thin samples. PMID:27226978

  10. High resolution coherent diffractive imaging with a table-top extreme ultraviolet source

    SciTech Connect

    Vu Le, Hoang Ba Dinh, Khuong; Hannaford, Peter; Van Dao, Lap

    2014-11-07

    We demonstrate a resolution of 45 nm with a sample size down to 3 μm × 3 μm is achieved in a short exposure time of 2 s, from the diffraction pattern generated by a table-top high harmonic source at around 30 nm. By using a narrow-bandwidth focusing mirror, the diffraction pattern's quality is improved and the required exposure time is significantly reduced. In order to obtain a high quality of the reconstructed image, the ratio of the beam size to the sample size and the curvature of the focused beam need to be considered in the reconstruction process. This new experimental scheme is very promising for imaging sub-10 nm scale objects with a table-top source based on a small inexpensive femtosecond laser system.

  11. Far-field Imaging of Non-fluorescent Species with Sub-diffraction Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Pu; Slipchenko, Mikhail N.; Mitchell, James; Yang, Chen; Potma, Eric O.; Xu, Xianfan; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2013-01-01

    Super-resolution optical microscopy is opening a new window to unveil the unseen details on the nanoscopic scale. Current far-field super-resolution techniques rely on fluorescence as the read-out1–5. Here, we demonstrate a scheme for breaking the diffraction limit in far-field imaging of non-fluorescent species by using spatially controlled saturation of electronic absorption. Our method is based on a pump-probe process where a modulated pump field perturbs the charge-carrier density in a sample, thus modulating the transmission of a probe field. A doughnut shape laser beam is then added to transiently saturate the electronic transition in the periphery of the focal volume, thus the induced modulation in the sequential probe pulse only occurs at the focal center. By raster scanning the three collinearly aligned beams, high-speed sub-diffraction-limited imaging of graphite nano-platelets was performed. This technique potentially enables super-resolution imaging of nano-materials and non-fluorescent chromophores, which may remain out of reach for fluorescence-based methods. PMID:24436725

  12. Fluvial suspended sediment characteristics by high-resolution, surrogate metrics of turbidity, laser-diffraction, acoustic backscatter, and acoustic attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landers, Mark Newton

    Sedimentation is a primary and growing environmental, engineering, and agricultural issue around the world. However, collection of the data needed to develop solutions to sedimentation issues has declined by about three-fourths since 1983. Suspended-sediment surrogates have the potential to obtain sediment data using methods that are more accurate, of higher spatial and temporal resolution, and with less manually intensive, costly, and hazardous methods. The improved quality of sediment data from high-resolution surrogates may inform improved understanding and solutions to sedimentation problems. The field experiments for this research include physical samples of suspended sediment collected concurrently with surrogate metrics from instruments including 1.2, 1.5, and 3.0 megahertz frequency acoustic doppler current profilers, a nephelometric turbidity sensor, and a laser-diffraction particle size analyzer. This comprehensive data set was collected over five storms in 2009 and 2010 at Yellow River near Atlanta, Georgia. Fluvial suspended sediment characteristics in this study can be determined by high-resolution surrogate parameters of turbidity, laser-diffraction and acoustics with model errors 33% to 49% lower than traditional methods using streamflow alone. Hysteresis in sediment-turbidity relations for single storm events was observed and quantitatively related to PSD changes of less than 10 microns in the fine silt to clay size range. Suspended sediment particle size detection (PSD) is significantly correlated with ratios of measured acoustic attenuation at different frequencies; however the data do not fit the theoretical relations. Using both relative acoustic backscatter (RB) and acoustic attenuation as explanatory variables results in a significantly improved model of suspended sediment compared with traditional sonar equations using only RB. High resolution PSD data from laser diffraction provide uniquely valuable information; however the size detection

  13. High resolution diffraction imaging of crystals grown in microgravity and closely related terrestrial crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steiner, B.; Dobbyn, R.; Black, D.; Burdette, H.; Kuriyama, M.; Spal, R.; Vandenberg, L.; Fripp, A.; Simchick, R.; Lal, R.

    1991-01-01

    Irregularities found in three crystals grown in space, in four crystals grown entirely on the ground were examined and compared. Irregularities were observed in mercuric iodide, lead tin telluride, triglycine sulfate, and gallium arsenide by high resolution synchrotron x radiation diffraction imaging. Radiation detectors made from mercuric iodide crystals grown in microgravity were reported to perform far better than conventional detectors grown from the same material under full gravity. Effort is now underway to reproduce these 'space' crystals, optimize their properties, and extend comparable superiority to other types of materials.

  14. High resolution neutron diffraction crystallographic investigation of Oxide Dispersion Strengthened steels of interest for fusion technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppola, R.; Rodriguez-Carvajal, J.; Wang, M.; Zhang, G.; Zhou, Z.

    2014-12-01

    High resolution neutron diffraction measurements have been carried out to characterize the crystallographic phases present in different Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) steels of interest for fusion technology. The different lattice structures, Im3m for the ferritic ODS and Fm3m for the austenitic ODS, are resolved showing line anisotropy effects possibly correlated with differences in dislocation densities and texture. Many contributions from minority phases are detected well above the background noise; none of the expected crystallographic phases, such as M23C6 and including Y2O3, fits them, but the TiN phase is identified in accordance with results of other microstructural techniques.

  15. Novel techniques for detection and imaging of spin related phenomena: Towards sub-diffraction limited resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfe, Christopher Stuart

    The idea that the spin degree of freedom of particles can be used to store and transport information has revolutionized the data storage industry and inspired a huge amount of research activity. Spin electronics, or spintronics, provides a plethora of potential improvements to conventional charge electronics that include increased functionality and energy efficiency. Scientists studying spintronics will need a multitude of characterization tools to sensitively detect spins in new materials and devices. There are already a handful of powerful techniques to image spin-related phenomena, but each has limitations. Magnetic resonance force microscopy, for example, offers sensitive detection of spin moments that are localized or nearly so but requires a high vacuum, cryogenic environment. Magnetometry based on nitrogen vacancy centers in diamond is a powerful approach, but requires the nitrogen vacancy center to be in very close contact to the spin system being studied to be able to measure the field generated by the system. Spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy provides perhaps the best demonstrated spatial resolution, but typically requires ultrahigh vacuum conditions and is limited to studying the surface of a sample. Traditional optical techniques such as Faraday or Kerr microscopy are limited in spatial resolution by the optical diffraction limit. In this dissertation I will present three new techniques we have developed to address some of these issues and to provide the community with new tools to help push forward spintronics and magnetism related research. I will start by presenting the first experimental demonstration of scanned spin-precession microscopy. This technique has the potential to turn any spin-sensitive detection technique into an imaging platform by providing the groundwork for incorporating a magnetic field gradient with that technique, akin to magnetic resonance imaging, and the mathematical tools to analyze the data and extract the local

  16. Strain mapping at nanometer resolution using advanced nano-beam electron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozdol, V. B.; Gammer, C.; Jin, X. G.; Ercius, P.; Ophus, C.; Ciston, J.; Minor, A. M.

    2015-06-01

    We report on the development of a nanometer scale strain mapping technique by means of scanning nano-beam electron diffraction. Only recently possible due to fast acquisition with a direct electron detector, this technique allows for strain mapping with a high precision of 0.1% at a lateral resolution of 1 nm for a large field of view reaching up to 1 μm. We demonstrate its application to a technologically relevant strain-engineered GaAs/GaAsP hetero-structure and show that the method can even be applied to highly defected regions with substantial changes in local crystal orientation. Strain maps derived from atomically resolved scanning transmission electron microscopy images were used to validate the accuracy, precision and resolution of this versatile technique.

  17. Strain mapping at nanometer resolution using advanced nano-beam electron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Ozdol, V. B.; Ercius, P.; Ophus, C.; Ciston, J.; Gammer, C. E-mail: aminor@lbl.gov; Jin, X. G.; Minor, A. M. E-mail: aminor@lbl.gov

    2015-06-22

    We report on the development of a nanometer scale strain mapping technique by means of scanning nano-beam electron diffraction. Only recently possible due to fast acquisition with a direct electron detector, this technique allows for strain mapping with a high precision of 0.1% at a lateral resolution of 1 nm for a large field of view reaching up to 1 μm. We demonstrate its application to a technologically relevant strain-engineered GaAs/GaAsP hetero-structure and show that the method can even be applied to highly defected regions with substantial changes in local crystal orientation. Strain maps derived from atomically resolved scanning transmission electron microscopy images were used to validate the accuracy, precision and resolution of this versatile technique.

  18. Improving spatial resolution of convergent beam electron diffraction strain mapping in silicon microstructures

    SciTech Connect

    Armigliato, A.; Balboni, R.; Frabboni, S.

    2005-02-07

    Despite the use of nanometer-sized probes in field emission transmission electron microscopes, the spatial resolution in strain analysis performed by convergent beam electron diffraction is limited in one direction by the need for tilting the cross-sectional sample in the electron microscope off the vertical <110> direction. We demonstrate that it is possible to improve this resolution by using the <340> zone axis, instead of the <230> one, which has recently become of common use in the analysis of silicon microdevices. Quantitative strain information with good sensitivity and accuracy can be obtained in the new axis. An example of application to the two-dimensional strain mapping in shallow trench isolation structures, obtained with a scanning attachment and a high-angle annular dark-field detector, is reported.

  19. The Effect of Ionic Liquids on Protein Crystallization and X-ray Diffraction Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Judge, Russell A.; Takahashi, Sumiko; Longenecker, Kenton L.; Fry, Elizabeth H.; Abad-Zapatero, Cele; Chiu, Mark L.

    2009-09-08

    Ionic liquids exhibit a variety of properties that make them attractive solvents for biomaterials. Given the potential for productive interaction between ionic liquids and biological macromolecules, we investigated the use of ionic liquids as precipitating agents and additives for protein crystallization for six model proteins (lysozyme, catalase, myoglobin, trypsin, glucose isomerase, and xylanase). The ionic liquids produced changes in crystal morphology and mediated significant increases in crystal size in some cases. Crystals grown using ionic liquids as precipitating agents or as additives provided X-ray diffraction resolution similar to or better than that obtained without ionic liquids. Based upon the experiments performed with model proteins, the ionic liquids were used as additives for the crystallization of the poorly diffracting monoclonal antibody 106.3 Fab in complex with the B-type natriuretic peptide (5-13). The ionic liquids improved the crystallization behavior and provided improved diffraction resulting in the determination of the structure. Ionic liquids should be considered as useful additives for the crystallization of other proteins.

  20. Small angle detectors for study diffractive processes with CMS

    SciTech Connect

    Albrow, M.; Bell, A. J.; d'Enterria, D.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Los, S.; Mokhov, N.; Murray, M.; Penzo, A.; Popescu, S.; Ronzhin, A.; Samoylenko, V. D.; Sobol, A.; Veres, G.

    2014-10-22

    The approach and detectors for diffractive physics based on two current projects—Forward Shower Counter (FSC) and Proton Precision Spectrometer (PPS) are presented. FSC system consists of six (3+3) Stations of scintillator counters, which surround closely the beam pipes along 59 m < |z| < 140 m from IP5 on both plus (+) and minus (-) sides. These will detect showers from very forward particles with rapidity 7.5 < |η| < 10 interacting in the beam pipe and surrounding material. FSC allow measurements of single diffraction: p+p → p+G+X (where G is rapidity gap) for lower masses and double diffraction p+p → X+G+X with a large central rapidity gap. The counters can also be used for beam real-time monitoring and will make an invaluable contribution to the understanding of the background environment and its topology. PPS is designed for study the central exclusive production pp → p+X+p, where the + signs denote the absence of hadronic activity (that is, the presence of a rapidity gap) between the outgoing protons and the decay products of the central system X. The precise measurement of the kinematical parameters of the outgoing protons enables to study the properties of the central state X. In PPS part we consider the detector for high precision timing of these protons—QUARTIC. It consists of L-shape bars with quartz or sapphire radiator. The time resolution of the QUARTIC prototypes achieved ≈ 10 ps.

  1. High resolution electron diffraction analysis of structural changes associated with the photocycle of bacteriorhodopsin

    SciTech Connect

    Han, B. -G.

    1994-04-01

    Changes in protein structure that occur during the formation of the M photointermediate of bacteriorhodopsin can be directly visualized by electron diffraction techniques. Samples containing a high percentage of the M intermediate were trapped by rapidly cooling the crystals with liquid nitrogen following illumination with filtered green light at 240K and 260K respectively. Difference Fourier projection maps for M minus bR at two temperatures and for M{sub 260K} minus M{sub 240K} are presented. While it is likely that a unique M-substate is trapped when illuminated at 260K produces a mixture of the M{sub 240K} substate and a second M-substate which may have a protein structure similar to the N-intermediate. The diffraction data clearly show that statistically significant structural changes occur upon formation of the M{sub 240K} specimen and then further upon formation of the second substate which is present in the mixture that is produced at 260K. A preliminary 3-D difference map, based on data collected with samples tilted up to 30{degree}, has been constructed at a resolution of 3.5{angstrom} parallel to the membrane plane and a resolution of 8.5{angstrom} perpendicular to the membrane. The data have been analyzed by a number of different criteria to ensure that the differences seen reflect real conformation changes at a level which is significantly above the noise in the map. Furthermore, a comparison of the positions of specific backbone and side-chain groups relative to significant difference peaks suggests that it will be necessary to further refine the atomic resolution model before it will be possible to interpret the changes in chemical structure that occur in the protein at this stage of the photocycle.

  2. Super-resolution imaging and tracking of protein-protein interactions in sub-diffraction cellular space.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhen; Xing, Dong; Su, Qian Peter; Zhu, Yun; Zhang, Jiamei; Kong, Xinyu; Xue, Boxin; Wang, Sheng; Sun, Hao; Tao, Yile; Sun, Yujie

    2014-07-17

    Imaging the location and dynamics of individual interacting protein pairs is essential but often difficult because of the fluorescent background from other paired and non-paired molecules, particularly in the sub-diffraction cellular space. Here we develop a new method combining bimolecular fluorescence complementation and photoactivated localization microscopy for super-resolution imaging and single-molecule tracking of specific protein-protein interactions. The method is used to study the interaction of two abundant proteins, MreB and EF-Tu, in Escherichia coli cells. The super-resolution imaging shows interesting distribution and domain sizes of interacting MreB-EF-Tu pairs as a subpopulation of total EF-Tu. The single-molecule tracking of MreB, EF-Tu and MreB-EF-Tu pairs reveals intriguing localization-dependent heterogonous dynamics and provides valuable insights to understanding the roles of MreB-EF-Tu interactions.

  3. Super-resolution imaging and tracking of protein–protein interactions in sub-diffraction cellular space

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhen; Xing, Dong; Su, Qian Peter; Zhu, Yun; Zhang, Jiamei; Kong, Xinyu; Xue, Boxin; Wang, Sheng; Sun, Hao; Tao, Yile; Sun, Yujie

    2014-01-01

    Imaging the location and dynamics of individual interacting protein pairs is essential but often difficult because of the fluorescent background from other paired and non-paired molecules, particularly in the sub-diffraction cellular space. Here we develop a new method combining bimolecular fluorescence complementation and photoactivated localization microscopy for super-resolution imaging and single-molecule tracking of specific protein–protein interactions. The method is used to study the interaction of two abundant proteins, MreB and EF-Tu, in Escherichia coli cells. The super-resolution imaging shows interesting distribution and domain sizes of interacting MreB–EF-Tu pairs as a subpopulation of total EF-Tu. The single-molecule tracking of MreB, EF-Tu and MreB–EF-Tu pairs reveals intriguing localization-dependent heterogonous dynamics and provides valuable insights to understanding the roles of MreB–EF-Tu interactions. PMID:25030837

  4. Super-resolution imaging and tracking of protein-protein interactions in sub-diffraction cellular space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhen; Xing, Dong; Su, Qian Peter; Zhu, Yun; Zhang, Jiamei; Kong, Xinyu; Xue, Boxin; Wang, Sheng; Sun, Hao; Tao, Yile; Sun, Yujie

    2014-07-01

    Imaging the location and dynamics of individual interacting protein pairs is essential but often difficult because of the fluorescent background from other paired and non-paired molecules, particularly in the sub-diffraction cellular space. Here we develop a new method combining bimolecular fluorescence complementation and photoactivated localization microscopy for super-resolution imaging and single-molecule tracking of specific protein-protein interactions. The method is used to study the interaction of two abundant proteins, MreB and EF-Tu, in Escherichia coli cells. The super-resolution imaging shows interesting distribution and domain sizes of interacting MreB-EF-Tu pairs as a subpopulation of total EF-Tu. The single-molecule tracking of MreB, EF-Tu and MreB-EF-Tu pairs reveals intriguing localization-dependent heterogonous dynamics and provides valuable insights to understanding the roles of MreB-EF-Tu interactions.

  5. Study of titanate nanotubes by X-ray and electron diffraction and electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Brunatova, Tereza; Popelkova, Daniela; Wan, Wei; Oleynikov, Peter; Danis, Stanislav; Zou, Xiaodong; Kuzel, Radomir

    2014-01-15

    The structure of titanate nanotubes (Ti-NTs) was studied by a combination of powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), electron diffraction and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). Ti-NTs are prepared by hydrothermal treatment of TiO{sub 2} powder. The structure is identified by powder X-ray diffraction as the one based on the structure of H{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 5}·H{sub 2}O phase. The same structure is obtained by projected potential from HRTEM through-focus image series. The structure is verified by simulated PXRD pattern with the aid of the Debye formula. The validity of the model is tested by computing Fourier transformation of a single nanotube which is proportional to measured electron diffraction intensities. A good agreement of this calculation with measured precession electron diffraction data is achieved. - Highlights: • Titanate nanotubes were prepared by hydrothermal method. • X-ray powder diffraction indicated their structure based on that of H{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 5}·H{sub 2}O. • Structural model was created with the aid of high-resolution electron microscopy. • The model was verified with electron diffraction data. • X-ray powder diffraction pattern was calculated with the aid of the Debye formula.

  6. Time of flight Laue fiber diffraction studies of perdeuterated DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Forsyth, V.T.; Whalley, M.A.; Mahendrasingam, A.; Fuller, W.

    1994-12-31

    The diffractometer SXD at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory ISIS pulsed neutron source has been used to record high resolution time-of-flight Laue fiber diffraction data from DNA. These experiments, which are the first of their kind, were undertaken using fibers of DNA in the A conformation and prepared using deuterated DNA in order to minimis incoherent background scattering. These studies complement previous experiments on instrument D19 at the Institute Laue Langevin using monochromatic neutrons. Sample preparation involved drawing large numbers of these deuterated DNA fibers and mounting them in a parallel array. The strategy of data collection is discussed in terms of camera design, sample environment and data collection. The methods used to correct the recorded time-of-flight data and map it into the final reciprocal space fiber diffraction dataset are also discussed. Difference Fourier maps showing the distribution of water around A-DNA calculated on the basis of these data are compared with results obtained using data recorded from hydrogenated A-DNA on D19. Since the methods used for sample preparation, data collection and data processing are fundamentally different for the monochromatic and Laue techniques, the results of these experiments also afford a valuable opportunity to independently test the data reduction and analysis techniques used in the two methods.

  7. Neutron diffraction study of U-10 wt% Mo alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seong, Baek-Seok; Lee, Chang-Hee; Lee, Jeong-Soo; Shim, Hae-Seop; Lee, Jin-Ho; Kim, Ki Hwan; Kim, Chang Kyu; Em, Vyacheslav

    2000-01-01

    The structural properties of a U-10 wt% Mo powder sample prepared by the centrifugal atomization method were investigated by the Rietveld total profile analysis method. The high resolution neutron powder diffractometer at the HANARO research reactor in Taejon, Korea, was used for a series of neutron diffraction pattern measurements for the study. The sample was synthesized by the centrifugal atomization method and was found to consist of two γ-U solid solution phases having identical bcc structures, but slightly different lattice dimensions, and accordingly different Mo content. When the sample was annealed for 10 h at 600°C, the two solid solution phases with different Mo contents merged into a uniform single phased γ-U solid solution. The diffraction pattern of the annealed sample showed two additional weak reflections, which could be indexed as a super lattice structure U 3Mo derived from the bcc cell by a /1 1 0/-1 1 0/0 0 1/ type lattice transformation. The disorder-order phase transition leading to the formation of ordered metastable phase U 3Mo should be of the first-order.

  8. An assessment of the resolution limitation due to radiation-damage in X-ray diffraction microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Howells, M. R.; Beetz, T.; Chapman, H. N.; Cui, C.; Holton, J. M.; Jacobsen, C. J.; Kirz, J.; Lima, E.; Marchesini, S.; Miao, H.; et al

    2008-11-17

    X-ray diffraction microscopy (XDM) is a new form of x-ray imaging that is being practiced at several third-generation synchrotron-radiation x-ray facilities. Nine years have elapsed since the technique was first introduced and it has made rapid progress in demonstrating high-resolution three-dimensional imaging and promises few-nm resolution with much larger samples than can be imaged in the transmission electron microscope. Both life- and materials-science applications of XDM are intended, and it is expected that the principal limitation to resolution will be radiation damage for life science and the coherent power of available x-ray sources for material science. In this paper wemore » address the question of the role of radiation damage. We use a statistical analysis based on the so-called "dose fractionation theorem" of Hegerl and Hoppe to calculate the dose needed to make an image of a single life-science sample by XDM with a given resolution. We find that for simply-shaped objects the needed dose scales with the inverse fourth power of the resolution and present experimental evidence to support this finding. To determine the maximum tolerable dose we have assembled a number of data taken from the literature plus some measurements of our own which cover ranges of resolution that are not well covered otherwise. The conclusion of this study is that, based on the natural contrast between protein and water and "Rose-criterion" image quality, one should be able to image a frozen-hydrated biological sample using XDM at a resolution of about 10 nm.« less

  9. An assessment of the resolution limitation due to radiation-damage in X-ray diffraction microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Howells, M. R.; Beetz, T.; Chapman, H. N.; Cui, C.; Holton, J. M.; Jacobsen, C. J.; Kirz, J.; Lima, E.; Marchesini, S.; Miao, H.; Sayre, D.; Shapiro, D. A.; Spence, J. C.H.; Starodub, D.

    2008-11-17

    X-ray diffraction microscopy (XDM) is a new form of x-ray imaging that is being practiced at several third-generation synchrotron-radiation x-ray facilities. Nine years have elapsed since the technique was first introduced and it has made rapid progress in demonstrating high-resolution three-dimensional imaging and promises few-nm resolution with much larger samples than can be imaged in the transmission electron microscope. Both life- and materials-science applications of XDM are intended, and it is expected that the principal limitation to resolution will be radiation damage for life science and the coherent power of available x-ray sources for material science. In this paper we address the question of the role of radiation damage. We use a statistical analysis based on the so-called "dose fractionation theorem" of Hegerl and Hoppe to calculate the dose needed to make an image of a single life-science sample by XDM with a given resolution. We find that for simply-shaped objects the needed dose scales with the inverse fourth power of the resolution and present experimental evidence to support this finding. To determine the maximum tolerable dose we have assembled a number of data taken from the literature plus some measurements of our own which cover ranges of resolution that are not well covered otherwise. The conclusion of this study is that, based on the natural contrast between protein and water and "Rose-criterion" image quality, one should be able to image a frozen-hydrated biological sample using XDM at a resolution of about 10 nm.

  10. Metalenses at visible wavelengths: Diffraction-limited focusing and subwavelength resolution imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khorasaninejad, Mohammadreza; Chen, Wei Ting; Devlin, Robert C.; Oh, Jaewon; Zhu, Alexander Y.; Capasso, Federico

    2016-06-01

    Subwavelength resolution imaging requires high numerical aperture (NA) lenses, which are bulky and expensive. Metasurfaces allow the miniaturization of conventional refractive optics into planar structures. We show that high-aspect-ratio titanium dioxide metasurfaces can be fabricated and designed as metalenses with NA = 0.8. Diffraction-limited focusing is demonstrated at wavelengths of 405, 532, and 660 nm with corresponding efficiencies of 86, 73, and 66%. The metalenses can resolve nanoscale features separated by subwavelength distances and provide magnification as high as 170×, with image qualities comparable to a state-of-the-art commercial objective. Our results firmly establish that metalenses can have widespread applications in laser-based microscopy, imaging, and spectroscopy.

  11. Compact high-resolution spectrographs for large and extremely large telescopes: using the diffraction limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, J. Gordon; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss

    2012-09-01

    As telescopes get larger, the size of a seeing-limited spectrograph for a given resolving power becomes larger also, and for ELTs the size will be so great that high resolution instruments of simple design will be infeasible. Solutions include adaptive optics (but not providing full correction for short wavelengths) or image slicers (which give feasible but still large instruments). Here we develop the solution proposed by Bland-Hawthorn and Horton: the use of diffraction-limited spectrographs which are compact even for high resolving power. Their use is made possible by the photonic lantern, which splits a multi-mode optical fiber into a number of single-mode fibers. We describe preliminary designs for such spectrographs, at a resolving power of R ~ 50,000. While they are small and use relatively simple optics, the challenges are to accommodate the longest possible fiber slit (hence maximum number of single-mode fibers in one spectrograph) and to accept the beam from each fiber at a focal ratio considerably faster than for most spectrograph collimators, while maintaining diffraction-limited imaging quality. It is possible to obtain excellent performance despite these challenges. We also briefly consider the number of such spectrographs required, which can be reduced by full or partial adaptive optics correction, and/or moving towards longer wavelengths.

  12. Geometrically necessary dislocation densities in olivine obtained using high-angular resolution electron backscatter diffraction.

    PubMed

    Wallis, David; Hansen, Lars N; Ben Britton, T; Wilkinson, Angus J

    2016-09-01

    Dislocations in geological minerals are fundamental to the creep processes that control large-scale geodynamic phenomena. However, techniques to quantify their densities, distributions, and types over critical subgrain to polycrystal length scales are limited. The recent advent of high-angular resolution electron backscatter diffraction (HR-EBSD), based on diffraction pattern cross-correlation, offers a powerful new approach that has been utilised to analyse dislocation densities in the materials sciences. In particular, HR-EBSD yields significantly better angular resolution (<0.01°) than conventional EBSD (~0.5°), allowing very low dislocation densities to be analysed. We develop the application of HR-EBSD to olivine, the dominant mineral in Earth's upper mantle by testing (1) different inversion methods for estimating geometrically necessary dislocation (GND) densities, (2) the sensitivity of the method under a range of data acquisition settings, and (3) the ability of the technique to resolve a variety of olivine dislocation structures. The relatively low crystal symmetry (orthorhombic) and few slip systems in olivine result in well constrained GND density estimates. The GND density noise floor is inversely proportional to map step size, such that datasets can be optimised for analysing either short wavelength, high density structures (e.g. subgrain boundaries) or long wavelength, low amplitude orientation gradients. Comparison to conventional images of decorated dislocations demonstrates that HR-EBSD can characterise the dislocation distribution and reveal additional structure not captured by the decoration technique. HR-EBSD therefore provides a highly effective method for analysing dislocations in olivine and determining their role in accommodating macroscopic deformation. PMID:27337604

  13. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction study of porcine carboxypeptidase B

    SciTech Connect

    Akparov, V. Kh.; Timofeev, V. I. Kuranova, I. P.

    2015-05-15

    Crystals of porcine pancreatic carboxypeptidase B have been grown in microgravity by the capillary counter-diffusion method through a gel layer. The X-ray diffraction study showed that the crystals belong to sp. gr. P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2 and have the following unit-cell parameters: a = b = 79.58 Å, c = 100.51 Å; α = β = γ = 90.00°. The X-ray diffraction data set suitable for the determination of the three-dimensional structure at atomic resolution was collected from one of the grown crystals at the SPring 8 synchrotron facility to 0.98 Å resolution.

  14. Neutron diffraction studies of natural glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, A.C.; Erwin Desa, J.A.; Weeks, R.A.; Sinclair, R.N.; Bailey, D.K.

    1983-08-01

    A neutron diffraction investigation has been carried out of the structures of several naturally occurring glasses, viz. Libyan Desert glass, a Fulgurite, Wabar glass, Lechatelierite from Canon Diablo, a Tektite, Obsidian (3 samples), and Macusani glass. Libyan Desert sand has also been examined, together with crystalline ..cap alpha..-quartz and ..cap alpha..-cristobalite. A comparison of data for the natural glasses and synthetic vitreous silica (Spectrosil B) in both reciprocal and real space allows a categorisation into Silicas, which closely resemble synthetic vitreous silica, and Silicates, for which the resemblance to silica is consistently less striking. The data support the view that Libyan Desert glass and sand have a common origin, while the Tektite has a structure similar to that of volcanic glasses.

  15. Classification and averaging of random orientation single macromolecular diffraction patterns at atomic resolution.

    PubMed

    Bortel, G; Faigel, G; Tegze, M

    2009-05-01

    Single molecule imaging experiments at future X-ray free electron laser sources will provide large number of random 3D oriented diffraction patterns with low counting statistics. Grouping of this vast amount of data into classes of similar orientations and averaging must be performed before their orientation and structure reconstruction can take place. Classification algorithms performing all-pair pattern comparisons scale badly with the number of patterns in terms of their computing requirements, which presents a problem in case of improving resolution and decreasing signal to noise ratios. We describe an algorithm performing significantly less pattern comparisons and render classification possible in such cases. The invariance of patterns against rotation of the object about the primary beam axis is also exploited to decrease the number of classes and improve the quality of class averages. This work is the first, which demonstrates that it is possible to classify a dataset with realistic target parameters: 10 keV photon energy, 10(12) photons/pulse, 100 x 100 nm2 focusing, 538 kDa protein, 2.4 A resolution, 10(6) patterns, approximately 3 x 10(4) classes, <1 degree misorientation within classes. The effects of molecular symmetry and its consequences on classification are also analyzed.

  16. First results from IRENI - Rapid diffraction-limited high resolution imaging across the mid-infrared bandwidth

    SciTech Connect

    Nasse, Michael J.; Mattson, Eric; Hirschmugl, Carol

    2010-02-03

    First results from IRENI, a new beamline at the Synchrotron Radiation Center, demonstrate that synchrotron chemical imaging, which combines the characteristics of bright, stable, broadband synchrotron source with a multi-element detector, produces diffraction-limited images at all wavelengths simultaneously. A single cell of Micrasterias maintained in a flow cell has been measured, and results show high quality spectra and images demonstrating diffraction limited, and therefore wavelength-dependent, spatial resolution.

  17. Diffraction Ellipsometry Studies on Insect Flight Muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Sui

    Characterization of the orientation and distribution of myosin cross-bridge at rigor, relax, low ionic strength (36 mM) and activation (pCa 4.3) conditions are of great interest since these states have been proposed to be transient steps in the cyclical interaction of myosin heads with actin during contraction. Measurements sensitive to the cross-bridge orientation in chemically skinned single muscle fibers of the insect, Lethocerus collossicus have been performed under various physiological conditions using laser diffraction ellipsometry. Determination of both the total birefringence, Deltan, and the differential field ratio, rm DFR (defined as {E_parallel -E_|over E_parallel-E _|}),is necessary for complete characterization of the optical polarization state. For rigor insect fiber, the birefringence value was close to the value we obtained from chemically skinned frog muscle fibers. However, the differential field ratio, DFR, was a negative value for insect fiber, while we always measured a positive value from frog muscle fibers. Polarization states of light diffracted from fibers exhibited a dependence on configurations of structural proteins at different conditions: fluid index matching using o-toluidine, alpha -chymotrypsin cleavage, KCl myosin extraction, rigor state, relaxed state, exogenous S-1 binding on rigor fiber, low ionic strength state, activation state at resting or stretched length. Results of our data analysis suggested that: (1) the negative DFR value of the insect flight muscle was contributed by alpha-actinin arranged perpendicular to the fiber axis in the Z-line, (2) in rigor fiber, 70% of myosin heads are doubly bound (45^circ and 90^ circ) while the rest of 30% are in single head binding configuration (90^circ), (3) myosin heads are randomly oriented in relaxed fiber, (4) mean axial angle is about 62^ circ for exogenous myosin heads binding on rigor fiber, (5) at low ionic strength, 25% of the total myosin heads are weakly attached to actin

  18. Combining time of flight and diffraction tomography for high resolution breast imaging: initial in vivo results (L).

    PubMed

    Huthwaite, P; Simonetti, F; Duric, N

    2012-09-01

    Ultrasound tomography (UST) is being developed to address the limitations of mammography in breast cancer detection. Central to the success of UST is the possibility of obtaining high-resolution images of tissue mechanical properties across the whole breast. A recent paper [Huthwaite and Simonetti, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 130, 1721-1734 (2011)] made use of a numerical phantom to demonstrate that sufficient image resolution can be obtained by simply treating refraction and diffraction effects in consecutive steps through the combination of ray-based time of flight and diffraction tomography. This letter presents the first experimental demonstration of the method using phantom and invivo data from a cancer patient. PMID:22978851

  19. High-speed detector for time-resolved diffraction studies

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Bipin; Miller, Stuart R.; Bhandari, Harish B.; Graceffa, Rita; Irving, Thomas C.; Nagarkar, Vivek V.

    2013-01-01

    There are a growing number of high brightness synchrotron sources that require high-frame-rate detectors to provide the time-scales required for performing time-resolved diffraction experiments. We report on the development of a very high frame rate CMOS X-ray detector for time-resolved muscle diffraction and time-resolved solution scattering experiments. The detector is based on a low-afterglow scintillator, provides a megapixel resolution with frame rates of up to 120,000 frames per second, an effective pixel size of 64 µm, and can be adapted for various X-ray energies. The paper describes the detector design and initial results of time-resolved diffraction experiments on a synchrotron beamline. PMID:24489595

  20. High-speed detector for time-resolved diffraction studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Bipin; Miller, Stuart R.; Bhandari, Harish B.; Graceffa, Rita; Irving, Thomas C.; Nagarkar, Vivek V.

    2013-03-01

    There are a growing number of high brightness synchrotron sources that require high-frame-rate detectors to provide the time-scales required for performing time-resolved diffraction experiments. We report on the development of a very high frame rate CMOS X-ray detector for time-resolved muscle diffraction and time-resolved solution scattering experiments. The detector is based on a low-afterglow scintillator, provides a megapixel resolution with frame rates of up to 120,000 frames per second, an effective pixel size of 64 um, and can be adapted for various X-ray energies. The paper describes the detector design and initial results of time-resolved diffraction experiments on a synchrotron beamline.

  1. Breaking the diffraction-limited resolution barrier in fiber-optical two-photon fluorescence endoscopy by an azimuthally-polarized beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Min; Kang, Hong; Li, Xiangping

    2014-01-01

    Although fiber-optical two-photon endoscopy has been recognized as a potential high-resolution diagnostic and therapeutic procedure in vivo, its resolution is limited by the optical diffraction nature to a few micrometers due to the low numerical aperture of an endoscopic objective. On the other hand, stimulated emission depletion (STED) achieved by a circularly-polarized vortex beam has been used to break the diffraction-limited resolution barrier in a bulky microscope. It has been a challenge to apply the STED principle to a fiber-optical two-photon endoscope as a circular polarization state cannot be maintained due to the birefringence of a fiber. Here, we demonstrate the first fiber-optical STED two-photon endoscope using an azimuthally-polarized beam directly generated from a double-clad fiber. As such, the diffraction-limited resolution barrier of fiber-optical two-photon endoscopy can be broken by a factor of three. Our new accomplishment has paved a robust way for high-resolution in vivo biomedical studies.

  2. X-ray powder diffraction study of polytetrafluoroethylene

    SciTech Connect

    Lebedev, Yu. A. Korolev, Yu. M.; Polikarpov, V. M.; Ignat'eva, L. N.; Antipov, E. M.

    2010-07-15

    Samples of polytetrafluoroethylene were studied by X-ray diffraction. A quantitative X-ray powder diffraction analysis of three components of the polymer was performed for the first time. All samples of polytetrafluoroethylene were found to be three-phase and consist of one crystalline and two amorphous phases. One of the amorphous phases is composed of low-molecular-weight products. The structure of the latter phase was established for the first time by X-ray diffraction methods and computer simulation.

  3. Diffraction and Imaging Study of Imperfections of Protein Crystals with Coherent X-rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Z. W.; Thomas, B. R.; Chernov, A. A.; Chu, Y. S.; Lai, B.

    2004-01-01

    High angular-resolution x-ray diffraction and phase contrast x-ray imaging were combined to study defects and perfection of protein crystals. Imperfections including line defects, inclusions and other microdefects were observed in the diffraction images of a uniformly grown lysozyme crystal. The observed line defects carry distinct dislocation features running approximately along the <110> growth front and have been found to originate mostly in a central growth area and occasionally in outer growth regions. Slow dehydration led to the broadening of a fairly symmetric 4 4 0 rocking curve by a factor of approximately 2.6, which was primarily attributed to the dehydration-induced microscopic effects that are clearly shown in diffraction images. X-ray imaging and diffraction characterization of the quality of apoferritin crystals will also be discussed in the presentation.

  4. Diffractive control of 3D multifilamentation in fused silica with micrometric resolution.

    PubMed

    Mendoza-Yero, Omel; Carbonell-Leal, Miguel; Doñate-Buendía, Carlos; Mínguez-Vega, Gladys; Lancis, Jesús

    2016-07-11

    We show that a simple diffractive phase element (DPE) can be used to manipulate at will the positions and energy of multiple filaments generated in fused silica under femtosecond pulsed illumination. The method allows obtaining three-dimensional distributions of controlled filaments whose separations can be in the order of few micrometers. With such small distances we are able to study the mutual coherence among filaments from the resulted interference pattern, without needing a two-arm interferometer. The encoding of the DPE into a phase-only spatial light modulator (SLM) provides an extra degree of freedom to the optical set-up, giving more versatility for implementing different DPEs in real time. Our proposal might be particularly suited for applications at which an accurate manipulation of multiple filaments is required. PMID:27410807

  5. Improved strain precision with high spatial resolution using nanobeam precession electron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Rouviere, Jean-Luc Martin, Yannick; Denneulin, Thibaud; Cooper, David

    2013-12-09

    NanoBeam Electron Diffraction is a simple and efficient technique to measure strain in nanostructures. Here, we show that improved results can be obtained by precessing the electron beam while maintaining a few nanometer probe size, i.e., by doing Nanobeam Precession Electron Diffraction (N-PED). The precession of the beam makes the diffraction spots more uniform and numerous, making N-PED more robust and precise. In N-PED, smaller probe size and better precision are achieved by having diffraction disks instead of diffraction dots. Precision in the strain measurement better than 2 × 10{sup −4} is obtained with a probe size approaching 1 nm in diameter.

  6. Crystal structure of human tooth enamel studied by neutron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouladdiaf, Bachir; Rodriguez-Carvajal, Juan; Goutaudier, Christelle; Ouladdiaf, Selma; Grosgogeat, Brigitte; Pradelle, Nelly; Colon, Pierre

    2015-02-01

    Crystal structure of human tooth enamel was investigated using high-resolution neutron powder diffraction. Excellent agreement between observed and refined patterns is obtained, using the hexagonal hydroxyapatite model for the tooth enamel, where a large hydroxyl deficiency ˜70% is found in the 4e site. Rietveld refinements method combined with the difference Fourier maps have revealed, however, that the hydroxyl ions are not only disordered along the c-axis but also within the basal plane. Additional H ions located at the 6h site and forming HPO42- anions were found.

  7. High-pressure neutron diffraction studies at LANSCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yusheng; Zhang, Jianzhong; Xu, Hongwu; Lokshin, Konstantin A.; He, Duanwei; Qian, Jiang; Pantea, Cristian; Daemen, Luke L.; Vogel, Sven C.; Ding, Yang; Xu, Jian

    2010-06-01

    The development of neutron diffraction under extreme pressure ( P) and temperature ( T) conditions is highly valuable to condensed matter physics, crystal chemistry, materials science, and earth and planetary sciences. We have incorporated a 500-ton press TAP-98 into the HiPPO diffractometer at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) to conduct in situ high- P- T neutron diffraction experiments. We have developed a large gem-crystal anvil cell, ZAP, to conduct neutron diffraction experiments at high P. The ZAP cell can be used to integrate multiple experimental techniques such as neutron diffraction, laser spectroscopy, and ultrasonic interferometery. More recently, we have developed high- P low- T gas/liquid cells in conjunction with neutron diffraction. These techniques enable in situ and real-time examination of gas uptake/release processes and allow accurate, time-dependent determination of changes in crystal structure and related reaction kinetics. We have successfully used these techniques to study the equations of state, structural phase transitions, and thermo-mechanical properties of metals, ceramics, and minerals. We have conducted researches on the formation/decomposition kinetics of methane, CO2 and hydrogen hydrate clathrates, and hydrogen/CO2 adsorption of inclusion compounds such as metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). The aim of our research is to accurately map out phase relations and determine structural parameters (lattice constants, atomic positions, atomic thermal parameters, bond lengths, bond angles, etc.) in the P- T- X space. We are developing further high- P- T technology with a new 2000-ton press, TAPLUS-2000, and a ZIA (Deformation-DIA type) cubic anvil package to routinely achieve pressures up to 20 GPa and temperatures up to 2000 K. The design of a dedicated high- P neutron beamline, LAPTRON, is also underway for simultaneous high- P- T neutron diffraction, ultrasonic, calorimetry, radiography, and tomography studies. Studies based

  8. Measurement method for roll angular displacement with a high resolution by using diffraction gratings and a heterodyne interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Shanzhi; Wang, Zhao; Gao, Jianmin; Guo, Junjie

    2014-04-15

    The roll angle measurement is difficult to be achieved directly using a typical commercial interferometer due to its low sensitivity in axial direction, where the axial direction is orthogonal to the plane of the roll angular displacement. A roll angle measurement method combined diffraction gratings with a laser heterodyne interferometer is discussed in this paper. The diffraction grating placed in the plane of a roll angular displacement and the interferometer arranged in the plane's orthogonal direction, constitute the measurement pattern for the roll angle with high resolution. The roll angular displacement, considered as the linear, can be tested precisely when the corresponding angle is very small. Using the proposed method, the angle roll measurement obtains the high resolution of 0.002{sup ″}. Experiment has proved its feasibility and practicability.

  9. Measurement method for roll angular displacement with a high resolution by using diffraction gratings and a heterodyne interferometer.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shanzhi; Wang, Zhao; Gao, Jianmin; Guo, Junjie

    2014-04-01

    The roll angle measurement is difficult to be achieved directly using a typical commercial interferometer due to its low sensitivity in axial direction, where the axial direction is orthogonal to the plane of the roll angular displacement. A roll angle measurement method combined diffraction gratings with a laser heterodyne interferometer is discussed in this paper. The diffraction grating placed in the plane of a roll angular displacement and the interferometer arranged in the plane's orthogonal direction, constitute the measurement pattern for the roll angle with high resolution. The roll angular displacement, considered as the linear, can be tested precisely when the corresponding angle is very small. Using the proposed method, the angle roll measurement obtains the high resolution of 0.002″. Experiment has proved its feasibility and practicability.

  10. An evaluation of the clinical potential of tissue diffraction studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speller, R.; Abuchi, S.; Zheng, Y.; Vassiljev, N.; Konstantinidis, A.; Griffiths, J.

    2015-09-01

    Medical imaging is a long established part of patient management in the treatment of disease. However, in most cases it only provides anatomical detail and does not provide any form of tissue characterisation. This is particularly true for X-ray imaging. Recent studies on tissue diffraction have shown that true molecular signatures can be derived for different tissue types. Breast cancer samples and liver tissue have been studied. It has been shown that diffraction profiles can be traced away from the primary tumour in excised breast tissue samples and that potentially 3mm fat nodules in liver tissue can be identified in patients at acceptable doses.

  11. Structural anomalies in undoped gallium arsenide observed in high-resolution diffraction imaging with monochromatic synchrotron radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steiner, B.; Kuriyama, M.; Dobbyn, R. C.; Laor, U.; Larson, D.

    1989-01-01

    Novel, streak-like disruption features restricted to the plane of diffraction have recently been observed in images obtained by synchrotron radiation diffraction from undoped, semi-insulating gallium arsenide crystals. These features were identified as ensembles of very thin platelets or interfaces lying in (110) planes, and a structural model consisting of antiphase domain boundaries was proposed. We report here the other principal features observed in high resolution monochromatic synchrotron radiation diffraction images: (quasi) cellular structure; linear, very low-angle subgrain boundaries in (110) directions, and surface stripes in a (110) direction. In addition, we report systematic differences in the acceptance angle for images involving various diffraction vectors. When these observations are considered together, a unifying picture emerges. The presence of ensembles of thin (110) antiphase platelet regions or boundaries is generally consistent not only with the streak-like diffraction features but with the other features reported here as well. For the formation of such regions we propose two mechanisms, operating in parallel, that appear to be consistent with the various defect features observed by a variety of techniques.

  12. High Pressure X-Ray Diffraction Studies of Nanocrystalline Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palosz, B.; Stel'makh, S.; Grzanka, E.; Gierlotka, S.; Palosz, W.

    2004-01-01

    Experimental evidence obtained for a variety of nanocrystalline materials suggest that the crystallographic structure of a very small size particle deviates from that in the bulk crystals. In this paper we show the effect of the surface of nanocrystals on their structure by the analysis of generation and distribution of macro- and micro-strains at high pressures and their dependence on the grain size in nanocrystalline powders of Sic. We studied the structure of Sic nanocrystals by in-situ high-pressure powder diffraction technique using synchrotron and neutron sources and hydrostatic or isostatic pressure conditions. The diffraction measurements were done in HASYLAB at DESY using a Diamond Anvil Cell (DAC) in the energy dispersive geometry in the diffraction vector range up to 3.5 - 4/A and under pressures up to 50 GPa at room temperature. In-situ high pressure neutron diffraction measurements were done at LANSCE in Los Alamos National Laboratory using the HIPD and HIPPO diffractometers with the Paris-Edinburgh and TAP-98 cells, respectively, in the diffraction vector range up to 26 Examination of the response of the material to external stresses requires nonstandard methodology of the materials characterization and description. Although every diffraction pattern contains a complete information on macro- and micro-strains, a high pressure experiment can reveal only those factors which contribute to the characteristic diffraction patterns of the crystalline phases present in the sample. The elastic properties of powders with the grain size from several nm to micrometers were examined using three methodologies: (l), the analysis of positions and widths of individual Bragg reflections (used for calculating macro- and micro-strains generated during densification) [I], (2). the analysis of the dependence of the experimental apparent lattice parameter, alp, on the diffraction vector Q [2], and (3), the atomic Pair Distribution Function (PDF) technique [3]. The results

  13. Real-time, high-resolution x-ray diffraction measurements on shocked crystals at a synchrotron facility.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Y M; Turneaure, Stefan J; Perkins, K; Zimmerman, K; Arganbright, N; Shen, G; Chow, P

    2012-12-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory was used to obtain real-time, high-resolution x-ray diffraction measurements to determine the microscopic response of shock-compressed single crystals. Disk shaped samples were subjected to plane shock wave compression by impacting them with half-inch diameter, flat-faced projectiles. The projectiles were accelerated to velocities ranging between 300 and 1200 m/s using a compact powder gun designed specifically for use at a synchrotron facility. The experiments were designed to keep the sample probed volume under uniaxial strain and constant stress for a duration longer than the 153.4 ns spacing between x-ray bunches. X-rays from a single pulse (<100 ps duration) out of the periodic x-ray pulses emitted by the synchrotron were used for the diffraction measurements. A synchronization and x-ray detection technique was developed to ensure that the measured signal was obtained unambiguously from the desired x-ray pulse incident on the sample while the sample was in a constant uniaxial strain state. The synchronization and x-ray detection techniques described can be used for a variety of x-ray measurements on shock compressed solids and liquids at the APS. Detailed procedures for applying the Bragg-Brentano parafocusing approach to single crystals at the APS are presented. Analytic developments to determine the effects of crystal substructure and non-ideal geometry on the diffraction pattern position and shape are presented. Representative real-time x-ray diffraction data, indicating shock-induced microstructural changes, are presented for a shock-compressed Al(111) sample. The experimental developments presented here provided, in part, the impetus for the Dynamic Compression Sector (DCS) currently under development at the APS. Both the synchronization∕x-ray detection methods and the analysis equations for high-resolution single crystal x-ray diffraction can be used at the DCS.

  14. Real-time, high-resolution x-ray diffraction measurements on shocked crystals at a synchrotron facility

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Y. M.; Turneaure, Stefan J.; Perkins, K.; Zimmerman, K.; Arganbright, N.; Shen, G.; Chow, P.

    2012-12-15

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory was used to obtain real-time, high-resolution x-ray diffraction measurements to determine the microscopic response of shock-compressed single crystals. Disk shaped samples were subjected to plane shock wave compression by impacting them with half-inch diameter, flat-faced projectiles. The projectiles were accelerated to velocities ranging between 300 and 1200 m/s using a compact powder gun designed specifically for use at a synchrotron facility. The experiments were designed to keep the sample probed volume under uniaxial strain and constant stress for a duration longer than the 153.4 ns spacing between x-ray bunches. X-rays from a single pulse (<100 ps duration) out of the periodic x-ray pulses emitted by the synchrotron were used for the diffraction measurements. A synchronization and x-ray detection technique was developed to ensure that the measured signal was obtained unambiguously from the desired x-ray pulse incident on the sample while the sample was in a constant uniaxial strain state. The synchronization and x-ray detection techniques described can be used for a variety of x-ray measurements on shock compressed solids and liquids at the APS. Detailed procedures for applying the Bragg-Brentano parafocusing approach to single crystals at the APS are presented. Analytic developments to determine the effects of crystal substructure and non-ideal geometry on the diffraction pattern position and shape are presented. Representative real-time x-ray diffraction data, indicating shock-induced microstructural changes, are presented for a shock-compressed Al(111) sample. The experimental developments presented here provided, in part, the impetus for the Dynamic Compression Sector (DCS) currently under development at the APS. Both the synchronization/x-ray detection methods and the analysis equations for high-resolution single crystal x-ray diffraction can be used at the DCS.

  15. Beamline P02.1 at PETRA III for high-resolution and high-energy powder diffraction.

    PubMed

    Dippel, Ann-Christin; Liermann, Hanns-Peter; Delitz, Jan Torben; Walter, Peter; Schulte-Schrepping, Horst; Seeck, Oliver H; Franz, Hermann

    2015-05-01

    Powder X-ray diffraction techniques largely benefit from the superior beam quality provided by high-brilliance synchrotron light sources in terms of photon flux and angular resolution. The High Resolution Powder Diffraction Beamline P02.1 at the storage ring PETRA III (DESY, Hamburg, Germany) combines these strengths with the power of high-energy X-rays for materials research. The beamline is operated at a fixed photon energy of 60 keV (0.207 Å wavelength). A high-resolution monochromator generates the highly collimated X-ray beam of narrow energy bandwidth. Classic crystal structure determination in reciprocal space at standard and non-ambient conditions are an essential part of the scientific scope as well as total scattering analysis using the real space information of the pair distribution function. Both methods are complemented by in situ capabilities with time-resolution in the sub-second regime owing to the high beam intensity and the advanced detector technology for high-energy X-rays. P02.1's efficiency in solving chemical and crystallographic problems is illustrated by presenting key experiments that were carried out within these fields during the early stage of beamline operation.

  16. Beamline P02.1 at PETRA III for high-resolution and high-energy powder diffraction

    PubMed Central

    Dippel, Ann-Christin; Liermann, Hanns-Peter; Delitz, Jan Torben; Walter, Peter; Schulte-Schrepping, Horst; Seeck, Oliver H.; Franz, Hermann

    2015-01-01

    Powder X-ray diffraction techniques largely benefit from the superior beam quality provided by high-brilliance synchrotron light sources in terms of photon flux and angular resolution. The High Resolution Powder Diffraction Beamline P02.1 at the storage ring PETRA III (DESY, Hamburg, Germany) combines these strengths with the power of high-energy X-rays for materials research. The beamline is operated at a fixed photon energy of 60 keV (0.207 Å wavelength). A high-resolution monochromator generates the highly collimated X-ray beam of narrow energy bandwidth. Classic crystal structure determination in reciprocal space at standard and non-ambient conditions are an essential part of the scientific scope as well as total scattering analysis using the real space information of the pair distribution function. Both methods are complemented by in situ capabilities with time-resolution in the sub-second regime owing to the high beam intensity and the advanced detector technology for high-energy X-rays. P02.1’s efficiency in solving chemical and crystallographic problems is illustrated by presenting key experiments that were carried out within these fields during the early stage of beamline operation. PMID:25931084

  17. Feasibility studies of the diffractive bremsstrahlung measurement at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chwastowski, Janusz J.; Czekierda, Sabina; Kycia, Radosław; Staszewski, Rafał; Turnau, Jacek; Trzebiński, Maciej

    2016-06-01

    Feasibility studies of an observation of the exclusive diffractive bremsstrahlung in proton-proton scattering at the centre of mass energy 13 TeV at the LHC are reported. These studies aim at the dedicated data taking periods with low instantaneous luminosity delivered by the LHC where the pile-up interactions can be neglected. A simplified approach to the photon and the scattered proton energy reconstruction is used. The background influence is discussed.

  18. A study of X-ray multiple diffraction by means of section topography.

    PubMed

    Kohn, V G; Smirnova, I A

    2015-09-01

    The results of theoretical and experimental study are presented for the question of how the X-ray multiple diffraction in a silicon single crystal influences the interference fringes of section topography for the 400 reflection in the Laue case. Two different cases of multiple diffraction are discovered for zero and very small values of the azimuthal angle for the sample in the form of a plate with the surface normal to the 001 direction. The cases are seen on the same topogram without rotation of the crystal. Accurate computer simulations of the section topogram for the case of X-ray multiple diffraction are performed for the first time. It is shown that the structure of interference fringes on the section topogram in the region of multiple diffraction becomes more complicated. It has a very sharp dependence on the azimuthal angle. The experiment is carried out using a laboratory source under conditions of low resolution over the azimuthal angle. Nevertheless, the characteristic inclination of the interference fringes on the tails of the multiple diffraction region is easily seen. This phenomenon corresponds completely to the computer simulations. PMID:26317194

  19. High resolution synchrotron X-radiation diffraction imaging of crystals grown in microgravity and closely related terrestrial crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steiner, Bruce; Dobbyn, Ronald C.; Black, David; Burdette, Harold; Kuriyama, Masao; Fripp, Archibald; Simchik, Richard

    1991-01-01

    Irregularities in three crystals grown in space and in four terrestrial crystals grown under otherwise comparable conditions have been observed in high resolution diffraction imaging. The images provide important new clues to the nature and origins of irregularities in each crystal. For two of the materials, mercuric iodide and lead tin telluride, more than one phase (an array of non-diffracting inclusions) was observed in terrestrial samples; but the formation of these multiple phases appears to have been suppressed in directly comparable crystals grown in microgravity. The terrestrial seed crystal of triglycine sulfate displayed an unexpected layered structure, which propagated during directly comparable space growth. Terrestrial Bridgman regrowth of gallium arsenide revealed a mesoscopic structure substantially different from that of the original Czochralski material. A directly comparable crystal is to be grown shortly in space.

  20. Diffraction-limited spatial resolution of circumstellar shells at 10 microns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloemhof, E. E.; Townes, C. H.; Vanderwyck, A. H. B.

    1983-01-01

    A new spatial array instrument provided diffraction-limited mid-infrared intensity profiles of the type-M supergiant stars alpha Orionis and alpha Scorpii, both of which are known to exhibit excess 10 microns radiation due to the presence of circumstellar dust shells. In the case of alpha Ori, there is a marked asymmetry in the dust distribution, with peak intensity of dust emission a distance of 0.9 inches from the star.

  1. Combined X-ray and neutron fibre diffraction studies of biological and synthetic polymers.

    SciTech Connect

    Parrot, I. M.; Urban, Volker S; Gardner, K. H.; Forsyth, V. T.

    2005-04-01

    The fibrous state is a natural one for polymer molecules which tend to assume regular helical conformations rather than the globular structures characteristic of many proteins. Fibre diffraction therefore has broad application to the study of a wide range of biological and synthetic polymers. The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the general scope of the method and in particular to demonstrate the impact of a combined approach involving both X-ray and neutron diffraction methods. While the flux of modern X-ray synchrotron radiation sources allows high quality datasets to be recorded with good resolution within a very short space of time, neutron studies can provide unique information through the ability to locate hydrogen or deuterium atoms that are often difficult or impossible to locate using X-ray methods. Furthermore, neutron fibre diffraction methods can, through the ability to selectively label specific parts of a structure, be used to highlight novel aspects of polymer structure that can not be studied using X-rays. Two examples are given. The first describes X-ray and neutron diffraction studies of conformational transitions in DNA. The second describes structural studies of the synthetic high-performance polymer poly(p-phenylene terephthalamide) (PPTA), known commercially as Kevlar{reg_sign} or Twaron{reg_sign}.

  2. X-RAY DIFFRACTION STUDIES ON FROG MUSCLES

    PubMed Central

    Spiegel-Adolf, M.; Henny, G. C.; Ashkenaz, E. W.

    1944-01-01

    1. X-ray diffraction studies of sartorius muscles of Rana pipiens were made in a new x-ray diffraction camera which permits exposures of 3 to 6 minutes. The object-film distance can be varied from 20 to 80 mm; the muscle inside the camera can be electrically stimulated while contracting isotonically or isometrically, and can be observed by a special device. After exposures up to 30 minutes (approximately 40,830 r) muscles are still alive and responsive. 2. Contrary to the x-ray diffraction pattern of powdered dry muscle, which pattern consists of two rings corresponding to spacings of 4.46 Å.u. and 9.66 Å.u., both moist and dried whole sartorius muscle show signs of orientation in both rings, consisting of two equatorial streaks (wet) or points (dry) and meridional sickles. The moist muscle shows in addition a diffuse water ring. The spacings corresponding to the orientation points and elliptical structure show only slight differences in moist and dried samples. Through statistical computations based on two different series consisting of thirteen moist and twenty-eight dried samples, and nine muscles before and after drying, it was shown that only the divergence in the smaller spacing has some real significance, which indicates that most water of the moist muscle is bound intermolecularly. Upon resoaking of dried muscle the x-ray diffraction pattern of the moist muscle is restored. 3. Stretching of muscle by weights below the breaking point produces an additional well defined diffraction line, corresponding to a spacing of 4.32 Å.u. A similar diffraction line can be produced in frog tendon upon stretching. 4. The influence of heat on the x-ray diffraction pattern of muscle depends upon the maximum temperature and the length of action; 5 minutes at 50° C. markedly reduces the orientation of the sample; 5 minutes' immersion in boiling Ringer's solution destroys the orientation and produces a ring corresponding to a spacing of 5.3 to 5.5 Å.u. in the moist and

  3. X-ray diffraction studies of shocked lunar analogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanss, R. E.

    1979-01-01

    The X-ray diffraction experiments on shocked rock and mineral analogs of particular significance to lunar geology are described. Materials naturally shocked by meteorite impact, nuclear-shocked, or artificially shocked in a flat plate accelerator were utilized. Four areas were outlined for investigation: powder diffractometer studies of shocked single crystal silicate minerals (quartz, orthoclase, oligoclase, pyroxene), powder diffractometer studies of shocked polycrystalline monomineralic samples (dunite), Debye-Scherrer studies of single grains of shocked granodiorite, and powder diffractometer studies of shocked whole rock samples. Quantitative interpretation of peak shock pressures experienced by materials found in lunar or terrestrial impact structures is presented.

  4. IR performance study of an adaptive coded aperture "diffractive imaging" system employing MEMS "eyelid shutter" technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahalanobis, A.; Reyner, C.; Patel, H.; Haberfelde, T.; Brady, David; Neifeld, Mark; Kumar, B. V. K. Vijaya; Rogers, Stanley

    2007-09-01

    Adaptive coded aperture sensing is an emerging technology enabling real time, wide-area IR/visible sensing and imaging. Exploiting unique imaging architectures, adaptive coded aperture sensors achieve wide field of view, near-instantaneous optical path repositioning, and high resolution while reducing weight, power consumption and cost of air- and space born sensors. Such sensors may be used for military, civilian, or commercial applications in all optical bands but there is special interest in diffraction imaging sensors for IR applications. Extension of coded apertures from Visible to the MWIR introduces the effects of diffraction and other distortions not observed in shorter wavelength systems. A new approach is being developed under the DARPA/SPO funded LACOSTE (Large Area Coverage Optical search-while Track and Engage) program, that addresses the effects of diffraction while gaining the benefits of coded apertures, thus providing flexibility to vary resolution, possess sufficient light gathering power, and achieve a wide field of view (WFOV). The photonic MEMS-Eyelid "sub-aperture" array technology is currently being instantiated in this DARPA program to be the heart of conducting the flow (heartbeat) of the incoming signal. However, packaging and scalability are critical factors for the MEMS "sub-aperture" technology which will determine system efficacy as well as military and commercial usefulness. As larger arrays with 1,000,000+ sub-apertures are produced for this LACOSTE effort, the available Degrees of Freedom (DOF) will enable better spatial resolution, control and refinement on the coding for the system. Studies (SNR simulations) will be performed (based on the Adaptive Coded Aperture algorithm implementation) to determine the efficacy of this diffractive MEMS approach and to determine the available system budget based on simulated bi-static shutter-element DOF degradation (1%, 5%, 10%, 20%, etc..) trials until the degradation level where it is

  5. The structure of tellurite glass: A combined NMR, neutron diffraction, and x-ray diffraction study

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin, J. C.; Tagg, S. L.; Zwanzier, J. W.; Shastri, S. D.; Haeffner, D. R.

    2000-04-04

    Models are presented of sodium tellurite glasses in the composition range (Na{sub 2}0){sub x}-(TeO{sub 2}){sub 1{minus}x}. 0.1 < x < 0.3. The models combine self-consistently data from three different and complementary sources: sodium-23 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), neutron diffraction, and x-ray diffraction. The models were generated using the Reverse Monte Carlo algorithm, modified to include NMR data in addition to diffraction data. The presence in the models of all five tellurite polyhedra consistent with the Te{sup +4} oxidation state were found to be necessary to achieve agreement with the data. The distribution of polyhedra among these types varied from a predominance of highly bridged species at low sodium content, to polyhedra with one or zero bridging oxygen at high sodium content. The models indicate that the sodium cations themselves form sodium oxide clusters particularly at the x = 0.2 composition.

  6. Research of the new optical diffractive super-resolution element of the two-photon microfabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Peng; Zhu, Yu; Duan, Guanghong

    2006-11-01

    The new optical diffractive superresolution element (DSE) is being applied to improve the microfabrication radial superresolution in the two-photon three-dimension (3D) microfabrication system, which appeared only a few years ago and can provide the ability to confine photochemical and physical reactions to the order of laser wavelength in three dimensions. The design method of the DSE is that minimizing M if the lowest limit S l of the S and the highest limit G u of the G is set, where Liu [1] explained the definition of the S, M and G. Simulation test result proved that the microfabrication radial superresolution can be improved by the new optical DSE. The phenomenon can only be interpreted as the intensity of high-order and side of the zero-order diffraction peaks have been clapped under the twophoton absorption (TPA) polymerization threshold. In a word the polymerized volume can be chosen because the S l and the G u is correspondingly adjustable, even if the laser wavelength, objective lens and the photosensitive resin is fixed for a given two-photon microfabrication system. That means the radial superresolution of the two-photon microfabrication can be chosen.

  7. Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction studies on celestite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yen-Hua; Yu, Shu-Cheng; Huang, Eugene; Lee, Pei-Lun

    2010-10-01

    High-pressure Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction studies of celestite (SrSO 4) were carried out in a diamond anvil cell at room temperature. Variation in the Raman vibrational frequency and change of lattice parameters with pressure indicate that a transformation occurs in celestite. This transformation caused an adjustment in the Sr-O polyhedra that affected the stretching-force constant of SO 4. Moreover, compressibilities along the crystallographic axes decreased in the order a to c to b. From the compression data, the bulk modulus of the celestite was 87 GPa. Both X-ray and Raman data show that the transition in celestite is reversible.

  8. An electron diffraction study of alkali chloride vapors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mawhorter, R. J.; Fink, M.; Hartley, J. G.

    1985-01-01

    A study of monomers and dimers of the four alkali chlorides NaCl, KCl, RbCl, and CsCl in the vapor phase using the counting method of high energy electron diffraction is reported. Nozzle temperatures from 850-960 K were required to achieve the necessary vapor pressures of approximately 0.01 torr. Using harmonic calculations for the monomer and dimer 1 values, a consistent set of structures for all four molecules was obained. The corrected monomer distances reproduce the microwave values very well. The experiment yields information on the amount of dimer present in the vapor, and these results are compared with thermodynamic values.

  9. Diffractive telescope for protoplanetary disks study in UV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roux, W.; Koechlin, L.

    2015-12-01

    The direct observation of exoplanetary systems and their environment remains a technological challenge: on the one hand, because of the weak luminosity of objects surrounding the central star, and on the other hand, because of their small size compared to the distance from Earth. The fresnel imager is a concept of space telescope based on focusing by diffraction, developed by our team in Institut de Recherche en Astrophysique et Planétologie (IRAP). Its high photometric dynamics and its low angular resolution make it a competitive candidate. Currently we propose a space mission on board the International Space Station (ISS), observing in the ultraviolet band, in order to validate its capabilities in space and so increase the Technological Readiness Level (TRL), anticipating a larger mission in the future. To reach this goal, we have to provide some evolutions, like improving the design of Fresnel arrays or conceive a new chromatism corrector. This paper presents the evolutions for the ISS prototype and its possible applications like protoplanetary disks imaging.

  10. Ab initio simulation of diffractometer instrumental function for high-resolution X-ray diffraction1

    PubMed Central

    Mikhalychev, Alexander; Benediktovitch, Andrei; Ulyanenkova, Tatjana; Ulyanenkov, Alex

    2015-01-01

    Modeling of the X-ray diffractometer instrumental function for a given optics configuration is important both for planning experiments and for the analysis of measured data. A fast and universal method for instrumental function simulation, suitable for fully automated computer realization and describing both coplanar and noncoplanar measurement geometries for any combination of X-ray optical elements, is proposed. The method can be identified as semi-analytical backward ray tracing and is based on the calculation of a detected signal as an integral of X-ray intensities for all the rays reaching the detector. The high speed of calculation is provided by the expressions for analytical integration over the spatial coordinates that describe the detection point. Consideration of the three-dimensional propagation of rays without restriction to the diffraction plane provides the applicability of the method for noncoplanar geometry and the accuracy for characterization of the signal from a two-dimensional detector. The correctness of the simulation algorithm is checked in the following two ways: by verifying the consistency of the calculated data with the patterns expected for certain simple limiting cases and by comparing measured reciprocal-space maps with the corresponding maps simulated by the proposed method for the same diffractometer configurations. Both kinds of tests demonstrate the agreement of the simulated instrumental function shape with the measured data. PMID:26089760

  11. Probing of protein localization and shuttling in mitochondrial microcompartments by FLIM with sub-diffraction resolution.

    PubMed

    Söhnel, Anna-Carina; Kohl, Wladislaw; Gregor, Ingo; Enderlein, Jörg; Rieger, Bettina; Busch, Karin B

    2016-08-01

    The cell is metabolically highly compartmentalized. Especially, mitochondria host many vital reactions in their different microcompartments. However, due to their small size, these microcompartments are not accessible by conventional microscopy. Here, we demonstrate that time-correlated single-photon counting (TCSPC) fluorescence lifetime-imaging microscopy (FLIM) classifies not only mitochondria, but different microcompartments inside mitochondria. Sensor proteins in the matrix had a different lifetime than probes at membrane proteins. Localization in the outer and inner mitochondrial membrane could be distinguished by significant differences in the lifetime. The method was sensitive enough to monitor shifts in protein location within mitochondrial microcompartments. Macromolecular crowding induced by changes in the protein content significantly affected the lifetime, while oxidizing conditions or physiological pH changes had only marginal effects. We suggest that FLIM is a versatile and completive method to monitor spatiotemporal events in mitochondria. The sensitivity in the time domain allows for gaining substantial information about sub-mitochondrial localization overcoming diffraction limitation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi. PMID:27016377

  12. Probing of protein localization and shuttling in mitochondrial microcompartments by FLIM with sub-diffraction resolution.

    PubMed

    Söhnel, Anna-Carina; Kohl, Wladislaw; Gregor, Ingo; Enderlein, Jörg; Rieger, Bettina; Busch, Karin B

    2016-08-01

    The cell is metabolically highly compartmentalized. Especially, mitochondria host many vital reactions in their different microcompartments. However, due to their small size, these microcompartments are not accessible by conventional microscopy. Here, we demonstrate that time-correlated single-photon counting (TCSPC) fluorescence lifetime-imaging microscopy (FLIM) classifies not only mitochondria, but different microcompartments inside mitochondria. Sensor proteins in the matrix had a different lifetime than probes at membrane proteins. Localization in the outer and inner mitochondrial membrane could be distinguished by significant differences in the lifetime. The method was sensitive enough to monitor shifts in protein location within mitochondrial microcompartments. Macromolecular crowding induced by changes in the protein content significantly affected the lifetime, while oxidizing conditions or physiological pH changes had only marginal effects. We suggest that FLIM is a versatile and completive method to monitor spatiotemporal events in mitochondria. The sensitivity in the time domain allows for gaining substantial information about sub-mitochondrial localization overcoming diffraction limitation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi.

  13. Random vs realistic amorphous carbon models for high resolution microscopy and electron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Ricolleau, C. Alloyeau, D.; Le Bouar, Y.; Amara, H.; Landon-Cardinal, O.

    2013-12-07

    Amorphous carbon and amorphous materials in general are of particular importance for high resolution electron microscopy, either for bulk materials, generally covered with an amorphous layer when prepared by ion milling techniques, or for nanoscale objects deposited on amorphous substrates. In order to quantify the information of the high resolution images at the atomic scale, a structural modeling of the sample is necessary prior to the calculation of the electron wave function propagation. It is thus essential to be able to reproduce the carbon structure as close as possible to the real one. The approach we propose here is to simulate a realistic carbon from an energetic model based on the tight-binding approximation in order to reproduce the important structural properties of amorphous carbon. At first, we compare this carbon with the carbon obtained by randomly generating the carbon atom positions. In both cases, we discuss the limit thickness of the phase object approximation. In a second step, we show the influence of both carbons models on (i) the contrast of Cu, Ag, and Au single atoms deposited on carbon and (ii) the determination of the long-range order parameter in CoPt bimetallic nanoalloys.

  14. Synchrotron powder diffraction simplified: The high-resolution diffractometer at 11-BM at the Advanced Photon Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribaud, Lynn; Suchomel, Matthew; von Dreele, Robert; Toby, Brian

    2013-03-01

    Synchrotrons have revolutionized powder diffraction through higher resolution and sensitivity and much faster data collection. Few scientists beyond the synchrotron community make use of these capabilities. To help address this, the high resolution powder diffractometer beamline 11-BM at the APS offers rapid and easy mail-in access with world-class quality data 1. This instrument offers the highest resolution available in the Americas and is a free service for non-proprietary users 2. The instrument can collect a superb pattern in an hour, has an automated sample changer, and features variable temperature sample environments. Users of the mail-in program often receive their data within two weeks of sample receipt. The instrument is also available for on-site experiments requiring other conditions. Our poster will describe this instrument, highlight its capabilities, explain the types of measurements available, and discuss plans to improve access and available sample environments and collection protocols. More information about the 11-BM instrument and our mail-in program can be found at: http://11bm.xray.aps.anl.gov.

  15. Apparatus and method to achieve high-resolution microscopy with non-diffracting or refracting radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, Jr., Kenneth W.; Bingham, Philip R.; Hawari, Ayman I.

    2012-11-06

    An imaging system employing a coded aperture mask having multiple pinholes is provided. The coded aperture mask is placed at a radiation source to pass the radiation through. The radiation impinges on, and passes through an object, which alters the radiation by absorption and/or scattering. Upon passing through the object, the radiation is detected at a detector plane to form an encoded image, which includes information on the absorption and/or scattering caused by the material and structural attributes of the object. The encoded image is decoded to provide a reconstructed image of the object. Because the coded aperture mask includes multiple pinholes, the radiation intensity is greater than a comparable system employing a single pinhole, thereby enabling a higher resolution. Further, the decoding of the encoded image can be performed to generate multiple images of the object at different distances from the detector plane. Methods and programs for operating the imaging system are also disclosed.

  16. Neutron diffraction study of aluminous hydroxide δ-AlOOD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanpeteghem, C. B.; Sano, A.; Komatsu, K.; Ohtani, E.; Suzuki, A.

    2007-11-01

    We have determined the position of deuterium atoms in δ-AlOOD by neutron powder diffraction at ambient pressure. As previously reported by theoretical and experimental studies, the deuterium atoms are located in the tunnel formed by the chains of AlO6 octahedra. The data are best fit with the P21 nm structure, producing bond lengths of D O1 of 1.552(2) Å, O2 D of 1.020(2) Å and O1 O2 of 2.571(2). This study confirms that the hydrogen bond is asymmetric at ambient conditions in agreement with recent single-crystal synchrotron study for δ-AlOOH.

  17. Neutron powder diffraction study of sulfated zirconia catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Li, X.; Lager, G.A.; Loong, C.K.

    1997-07-01

    In situ neutron powder diffraction method was used to investigate the crystal structures, phase abundance and thermal stability of sulfated zirconia catalysts prepared by impregnation of hydrous zirconium oxide gels with 0.5 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solutions. The sample studied was precipitated at pH = 10 and dried for 5 h at 493 K, and then calcined at 853 K for 3 h. Diffraction data were collected in the temperature range 295-1273 K in an Ar atmosphere and analyzed using the Rietveld method. Only the metastable tetragonal phase was observed below 673 K. Above this temperature, the sample consisted of a mixture of tetragonal (T) and monoclinic (M) phases in the proportions (T:M wt%) 85:15 (1073 K) and 61:39 (1273 K). Surface modification by sulfation was found to retard the onset of the tetragonal-to-monoclinic transformation relative to pure zirconia. The decrease in peak-broadening at the higher temperatures reflects both an increase in crystallite size and a decrease in microstrain.

  18. X-ray Diffraction Studies of Striated Muscles

    SciTech Connect

    Squire, J.M.; Knupp, C.; Roessle, M.; Al-Khayat, H.A.; Irving, T.C.; Eakins, F.; Mok, N.-S.; Harford, J.J.; Reedy, M.K.

    2006-04-24

    In this short review a number of recent X-ray diffraction results on the highly ordered striated muscles in insects and in bony fish have been briefly described. What is clear is that this technique applied to muscles which are amenable to rigorous analysis, taken together with related data from other sources (e.g. protein crystallography, biochemistry, mechanics, computer modelling) can provide not only the best descriptions yet available on the myosin head organisations on different myosin filaments in the relaxed state, but can also show the sequence of molecular events that occurs in the contractile cycle, and may also help to explain such phenomena as stretch-activation. X-ray diffraction is clearly an enormously powerful tool in studies of muscle. It has already provided a wealth of detail on muscle ultrastructure; it is providing ever more fascinating insights into molecular events in the 50-year old sliding filament mechanism, and there remains a great deal more potential that is as yet untapped.

  19. Sub-diffraction-resolution fluorescence microscopy reveals a domain of the centrosome critical for pericentriolar material organization

    PubMed Central

    Mennella, V.; Keszthelyi, B.; McDonald, K.L.; Chhun, B.; Kan, F.; Rogers, G.C.; Huang, B; Agard, D.A.

    2013-01-01

    As the main microtubule-organizing center in animal cells, the centrosome has a fundamental role in cell function. Surrounding the centrioles, the Pericentriolar material (PCM) provides a dynamic platform for nucleating microtubules. While the PCM’s importance is established, its amorphous electron-dense nature has made it refractory to structural investigation. By using SIM and STORM sub-diffraction resolution microscopies to visualize proteins critical for centrosome maturation, we demonstrate that the PCM is organized into two major structural domains: a layer juxtaposed to the centriole wall, and proteins extending further away from the centriole organized in a matrix. Analysis of Pericentrin-like protein (Plp) reveals that its C-terminus is positioned at the centriole wall, it radiates outward into the matrix and is organized in clusters having quasi-nine-fold symmetry. By RNAi we show that Plp fibrils are required for interphase recruitment and proper mitotic assembly of the PCM matrix. PMID:23086239

  20. Determination of lattice parameters, strain state and composition in semipolar III-nitrides using high resolution X-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Frentrup, Martin Wernicke, Tim; Stellmach, Joachim; Kneissl, Michael; Hatui, Nirupam; Bhattacharya, Arnab

    2013-12-07

    In group-III-nitride heterostructures with semipolar or nonpolar crystal orientation, anisotropic lattice and thermal mismatch with the buffer or substrate lead to a complex distortion of the unit cells, e.g., by shearing of the lattice. This makes an accurate determination of lattice parameters, composition, and strain state under assumption of the hexagonal symmetry impossible. In this work, we present a procedure to accurately determine the lattice constants, strain state, and composition of semipolar heterostructures using high resolution X-ray diffraction. An analysis of the unit cell distortion shows that four independent lattice parameters are sufficient to describe this distortion. Assuming only small deviations from an ideal hexagonal structure, a linear expression for the interplanar distances d{sub hkl} is derived. It is used to determine the lattice parameters from high resolution X-ray diffraction 2ϑ-ω-scans of multiple on- and off-axis reflections via a weighted least-square fit. The strain and composition of ternary alloys are then evaluated by transforming the elastic parameters (using Hooke's law) from the natural crystal-fixed coordinate system to a layer-based system, given by the in-plane directions and the growth direction. We illustrate our procedure taking an example of (112{sup ¯}2) Al{sub κ}Ga{sub 1−κ}N epilayers with Al-contents over the entire composition range. We separately identify the in-plane and out-of-plane strains and discuss origins for the observed anisotropy.

  1. High-Pressure Neutron Diffraction Studies for Materials Sciences and Energy Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Y.; Los Alamos High Pressure Materials Research Team

    2013-05-01

    The development of neutron diffraction under extreme pressure (P) and temperature (T) conditions is highly valuable to condensed matter physics, crystal chemistry, materials sciences, as well as earth and planetary sciences. We have incorporated a 500-ton press TAP-98 into the HiPPO diffractometer at LANSCE to conduct in situ high P-T neutron diffraction experiments. We have worked out a large gem-crystal anvil cell, ZAP, to conduct neutron diffraction experiments at high-P and low-T. The ZAP cell can be used to integrate multiple experimental techniques such as neutron diffraction, laser spectroscopy, and ultrasonic interferometery. Recently, we have developed high-P low-T gas/fluid cells in conjunction with neutron diffraction and inelastic neutron scattering instruments. These techniques enable in-situ and real-time examination of gas uptake/release processes and allow high-resolution time-dependent determination of changes in crystal structure and related reaction kinetics. We have successfully used these techniques to study the equation of state, structural phase transition, and thermo-mechanical properties of metals, ceramics, and minerals. We have conducted researches on the formation of methane and hydrogen clathrates, and hydrogen adsorption of the inclusion compounds such as the recently discovered metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). The aim of our research is to accurately map phase diagram, lattice parameters, thermal parameters, bond lengths, bond angles, neighboring atomic environments, and phase stability in P-T-X space. We are currently developing further high P-T technology with a new "true" triaxial loading press, TAP_6x, to compress cubic sample package to achieve pressures up to 20 GPa and temperatures up to 2000 K in routine experiments. The implementation of TAP_6x300 with high-pressure neutron beamlines is underway for simultaneous high P-T neutron diffraction, ultrasonic, calorimetry, radiography, and tomography studies. Studies based on high

  2. The joint astrophysical plasmadynamic experiment (J-PEX) high-resolution EUV spectrometer: diffraction grating efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski, M. P.; Berendse, F. B.; Barbee, T. W., Jr.; Hunter, W. R.; Heidemann, K. F.; Lenke, R.; Seifert, A.; Cruddace, R. G.

    2006-06-01

    We have fabricated five new holographic ion-etched polymer-coated gratings for a reflight on a sounding rocket of the J-PEX high-resolution EUV spectrometer. The gratings are parabolic (nominal 2000-mm focal length), large (160 mm x 90 mm), and have a blazed groove profile of high density (3600 grooves/mm at the vertex). They have been coated with a high-reflectance multilayer of Mo/Si/C. Using an atomic force microscope, we examined grating topography before multilayer coating. The surface roughness is 2 angstrom rms and the blaze angle is near the target value of 2.4°. Using synchrotron radiation, we completed an efficiency calibration map of each multilayer-coated grating over the wavelength range 220-245 angstrom. At an angle of incidence of 5°, the average efficiency in the first inside order peaks near 234 angstrom. The average peak efficiency is 12.3 +/- 1.0% for Grating 1, 12.6 +/- 2.4% for Grating 2, 12.6 +/- 1.8% for Grating 3, 14.1 +/- 3.0% for Grating 4, and 13.0 +/- 1.0% for Grating 5. The derived groove efficiency averaged over all gratings is approximately 50%, which meets our goals. Refined models of the multilayer gratings are required to resolve remaining issues.

  3. Anomalous X-ray Diffraction Studies for Photovoltaic Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-06-22

    Anomalous X-ray Diffraction (AXRD) has become a useful technique in characterizing bulk and nanomaterials as it provides specific information about the crystal structure of materials. In this project we present the results of AXRD applied to materials for photovoltaic applications: ZnO loaded with Ga and ZnCo{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel. The X-ray diffraction data collected for various energies were plotted in Origin software. The peaks were fitted using different functions including Pseudo Voigt, Gaussian, and Lorentzian. This fitting provided the integrated intensity data (peaks area values), which when plotted as a function of X-ray energies determined the material structure. For the first analyzed sample, Ga was not incorporated into the ZnO crystal structure. For the ZnCo{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel Co was found in one or both tetrahedral and octahedral sites. The use of anomalous X-ray diffraction (AXRD) provides element and site specific information for the crystal structure of a material. This technique lets us correlate the structure to the electronic properties of the materials as it allows us to probe precise locations of cations in the spinel structure. What makes it possible is that in AXRD the diffraction pattern is measured at a number of energies near an X-ray absorption edge of an element of interest. The atomic scattering strength of an element varies near its absorption edge and hence the total intensity of the diffraction peak changes by changing the X-ray energy. Thus AXRD provides element specific structural information. This method can be applied to both crystalline and liquid materials. One of the advantages of AXRD in crystallography experiments is its sensitivity to neighboring elements in the periodic tables. This method is also sensitive to specific crystallographic phases and to a specific site in a phase. The main use of AXRD in this study is for transparent conductors (TCs) analysis. TCs are considered to be important materials because of their

  4. Super-resolution photoacoustic microscopy using photonic nanojets: a simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upputuri, Paul Kumar; Wen, Zhuo-Bin; Wu, Zhe; Pramanik, Manojit

    2014-11-01

    Optical resolution photoacoustic microscopy (ORPAM) is important for various biomedical applications, such as the study of cellular structures, microcirculation systems, and tumor angiogenesis. However, the lateral resolution of a conventional ORPAM is limited by optical diffraction. In this work, we report a simulation study to achieve subdiffraction-limited super-resolution in ORPAM using microspheres. Laser radiation is focused through a microsphere to generate a photonic nanojet, which provides the possibility to break the diffraction limit in ORPAM by reducing the size of the excitation volume. In our simulations using microspheres, we observed improvement in the lateral resolution up to ˜fourfold compared to conventional ORPAM. The method is simple, cost effective, and can provide far-field resolution. This approach may provide new opportunities for many biomedical imaging applications that require finer resolution.

  5. Diffraction study of protein crystals grown in cryoloops and micromounts.

    PubMed

    Berger, Michael A; Decker, Johannes H; Mathews, Irimpan I

    2010-12-01

    Protein crystals are usually grown in hanging or sitting drops and generally get transferred to a loop or micromount for cryocooling and data collection. This paper describes a method for growing crystals on cryoloops for easier manipulation of the crystals for data collection. This study also investigates the steps for the automation of this process and describes the design of a new tray for the method. The diffraction patterns and the structures of three proteins grown by both the new method and the conventional hanging-drop method are compared. The new setup is optimized for the automation of the crystal mounting process. Researchers could prepare nanolitre drops under ordinary laboratory conditions by growing the crystals directly in loops or micromounts. As has been pointed out before, higher levels of supersaturation can be obtained in very small volumes, and the new method may help in the exploration of additional crystallization conditions.

  6. The role of dislocations in varied olivine deformation mechanisms investigated using high-angular resolution electron backscatter diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallis, David; Hansen, Lars; Britton, Ben; Wilkinson, Angus

    2016-04-01

    Experimentally-derived flow laws can be used to predict the rheology of rocks deformed under natural conditions only if the same microphysical processes can be demonstrated to control the rate-limiting deformation mechanism in both cases. Olivine rheology may exert a principle control on the strength of the lithosphere, and therefore considerable research effort has been applied to assessing its rheology through experimental, geological, and geophysical approaches. Nonetheless, considerable uncertainty remains regarding the dominant deformation mechanisms in the upper mantle. This uncertainty arises in large part due to our limited understanding of the fundamental deformation processes associated with each mechanism. Future improvements to microphysical models of distinct deformation mechanisms require new insight into the contributions those fundamental processes to the macroscopic behaviour. The dynamics of dislocations is central to modelling viscous deformation of olivine, but characterisation techniques capable of constraining dislocation types, densities, and distributions over the critical grain to polycrystal length-scales have been lacking. High angular resolution electron backscatter diffraction (HR-EBSD), developed and increasingly applied in the material sciences, offers an approach capable of such analyses. HR-EBSD utilises diffraction pattern image cross-correlation to achieve dramatically improved angular resolution (~0.01°) of lattice orientation gradients compared to conventional Hough-based EBSD (~0.5°). This angular resolution allows very low densities (≥ 10^11 m^-2) of geometrically necessary dislocations (GND) to be resolved, facilitating analysis of a wide range of dislocation microstructures. We have developed the application of HR-EBSD to olivine and applied it to samples deformed both experimentally and naturally in grain-size sensitive and grain-size insensitive regimes. The results quantitatively highlight variations in the types and

  7. Quantitative energy-dispersive x-ray diffraction for identification of counterfeit medicines: a preliminary study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crews, Chiaki C. E.; O'Flynn, Daniel; Sidebottom, Aiden; Speller, Robert D.

    2015-06-01

    The prevalence of counterfeit and substandard medicines has been growing rapidly over the past decade, and fast, nondestructive techniques for their detection are urgently needed to counter this trend. In this study, energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction (EDXRD) combined with chemometrics was assessed for its effectiveness in quantitative analysis of compressed powder mixtures. Although EDXRD produces lower-resolution diffraction patterns than angular-dispersive X-ray diffraction (ADXRD), it is of interest for this application as it carries the advantage of allowing the analysis of tablets within their packaging, due to the higher energy X-rays used. A series of caffeine, paracetamol and microcrystalline cellulose mixtures were prepared with compositions between 0 - 100 weight% in 20 weight% steps (22 samples in total, including a centroid mixture), and were pressed into tablets. EDXRD spectra were collected in triplicate, and a principal component analysis (PCA) separated these into their correct positions in the ternary mixture design. A partial least-squares (PLS) regression model calibrated using this training set was validated using both segmented cross-validation, and with a test set of six samples (mixtures in 8:1:1 and 5⅓:2⅓:2⅓ ratios) - the latter giving a root-mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) of 1.30, 2.25 and 2.03 weight% for caffeine, paracetamol and cellulose respectively. These initial results are promising, with RMSEP values on a par with those reported in the ADXRD literature.

  8. A Quantitative Analysis of Room Temperature Recrystallization Kinetics in Electroplated Copper Films using High Resolution X-ray Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    A Ying; K Witt; J Jordan-Sweet; R Rosenberg; I Noyan

    2011-12-31

    Time-resolved in situ x-ray diffraction measurements were used to study the room-temperature recrystallization kinetics of electroplated copper thin films with thicknesses between 400 and 1000 nm. The thinnest films exhibited limited recrystallization and subsequent growth of grains, while recrystallized grains in the thicker films grew until all as-plated microstructure was consumed. For all films, recrystallized grains that belonged to the majority texture component, <111>, started growing after the shortest incubation time. These grains exhibited volumetric growth until they achieved the film thickness. After this point the growth mode became planar, with the <111>-type grains growing in the plane of the film. Grains with the <111> direction normal to the film surface started growing after the <111>-type grains switched to planar growth. However, the planar growth of this texture component finished at the same time as the growth of the <111> grains. Profile fitting of the 111 peak permitted the separation of the diffraction signals from recrystallized and as-plated grain populations. The average strains in these two populations, calculated from the peak position of the corresponding {l_brace}111{r_brace} reflections, were different, indicating a heterogeneous stress state within this texture component. The increasing volume fraction of recrystallized <111> grains with time was monitored via the variation in the diffracted intensity. This variation could be represented by the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov model.

  9. Overexpression, purification, crystallization and preliminary diffraction studies of the Protaminobacter rubrum sucrose isomerase SmuA

    SciTech Connect

    Ravaud, Stéphanie; Watzlawick, Hildegard; Haser, Richard; Mattes, Ralf; Aghajari, Nushin

    2006-01-01

    The P. rubrum sucrose isomerase SmuA, a key enzyme in the industrial production of isomaltulose, was crystallized and diffraction data were collected to 1.95 Å resolution. Palatinose (isomaltulose, α-d-glucosylpyranosyl-1,6-d-fructofuranose), a nutritional and acariogenic reducing sugar, is industrially obtained from sucrose by using immobilized cells of Protaminobacter rubrum that produce the sucrose isomerase SmuA. The isomerization of sucrose catalyzed by this enzyme also results in the formation of trehalulose (α-d-glucosylpyranosyl-1,1-d-fructofuranose) in smaller amounts and glucose, fructose and eventually isomaltose as by-products, which lower the yield of the reaction and complicate the recovery of palatinose. The determination of the three-dimensional structure of SmuA will provide a basis for rational protein-engineering studies in order to optimize the industrial production of palatinose. A recombinant form of the 67.3 kDa SmuA enzyme has been crystallized in the native state by the vapour-diffusion method. Crystals belong to the orthorhombic space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 61.6, b = 81.4, c = 135.6 Å, and diffract to 1.95 Å resolution on a synchrotron-radiation source.

  10. New Developments at the XMaS Beamline For Magnetic and High Resolution Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, P.B.J.; Bouchenoire, L.; Brown, S.D.; Mannix, D.; Paul, D.F.; Lucas, C.; Kervin, J.; Cooper, M.J.; Arakawa, P.; Laughon, G.

    2004-05-12

    We report here on a number of developments that include enhancements of the sample environment on the XMaS beamline and the flux available at low energy. A 4 Tesla superconducting magnet has been designed to fit within the Euler cradle of a six circle Huber diffractometer, allowing scattering in both horizontal and vertical planes. The geometry of the magnet allows the application of longitudinal, transverse horizontal, and vertical fields. A further conventional magnet ({approx} 0.1 T) to minimize air absorption at low energies ({approx} 3KeV) has been designed for two circle applications, such as reflectivity. A novel in-vacuum slit screen has been developed, also minimizing absorption at low energies. New equipment for performing in-situ studies of surfaces in the electrochemical environment has been developed to allow control of the solution and sample temperature over the region of -5C to 80C. Preliminary experiments on the surface reconstructions of Au(111) in an electrolyte have been performed, whilst commissioning at the same time a MAR CCD detector for the beamline.

  11. An X-ray diffraction study of titanium oxidation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiedemann, K. E.; Unnam, J.

    1984-01-01

    Titanium specimens of commercial purity were exposed at 1100 to 1400 F to laboratory air for times up to 100 hours. The extent of substrate contamination by interstitial oxygen was was determined by a new X-ray diffraction analysis involving transformation of X-ray diffraction intensity bands. The oxygen solid-solubility at the oxide-metal interfaces and its variation with time at temperature were also determined. Diffusion coefficients are deduced from the oxygen depth profiles.

  12. A Study of Detonation Propagation and Diffraction with Compliant Confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Banks, J; Schwendeman, D; Kapila, A; Henshaw, W

    2007-08-13

    A previous computational study of diffracting detonations with the ignition-and-growth model demonstrated that contrary to experimental observations, the computed solution did not exhibit dead zones. For a rigidly confined explosive it was found that while diffraction past a sharp corner did lead to a temporary separation of the lead shock from the reaction zone, the detonation re-established itself in due course and no pockets of unreacted material were left behind. The present investigation continues to focus on the potential for detonation failure within the ignition-and-growth (IG) model, but now for a compliant confinement of the explosive. The aim of the present paper is two fold. First, in order to compute solutions of the governing equations for multi-material reactive flow, a numerical method of solution is developed and discussed. The method is a Godunov-type, fractional-step scheme which incorporates an energy correction to suppress numerical oscillations that would occur near the material interface separating the reactive material and the inert confiner for standard conservative schemes. The numerical method uses adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) on overlapping grids, and the accuracy of solutions is well tested using a two-dimensional rate-stick problem for both strong and weak inert confinements. The second aim of the paper is to extend the previous computational study of the IG model by considering two related problems. In the first problem, the corner-turning configuration is re-examined, and it is shown that in the matter of detonation failure, the absence of rigid confinement does not affect the outcome in a material way; sustained dead zones continue to elude the model. In the second problem, detonations propagating down a compliantly confined pencil-shaped configuration are computed for a variety of cone angles of the tapered section. It is found, in accord with experimental observation, that if the cone angle is small enough, the detonation fails

  13. X-ray Diffraction Study of Molybdenum to 900 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Coppari, F.; Smith, R.; Eggert, J.; Boehly, T.; Collins, G. W.; Duffy, T. S.

    2013-12-01

    Molybdenum (Mo) is a transition metal that is important as a high-pressure standard. Its equation of state, structure, and melting behavior have been explored extensively in both experimental and theoretical studies. Melting data up to the Mbar pressure region from static compression experiments in the diamond anvil cell [Errandonea et al. 2004] are inconsistent with shock wave sound velocity measurements [Hixson et al., 1989]. There are also conflicting reports as to whether body-centered cubic (BCC) Mo transforms to a face-centered cubic (FCC), hexagonal close packed (HCP) or double hexagonal close packed (DHCP) structure at either high pressure or high pressure and temperature conditions [Belonoshko et al. 2008, Mikhaylushkin et al., 2008 and Cazorla et al., 2008]. Recently, a phase transition from BCC to the DHCP phase at 660 GPa and 0 K was predicted using the particle swam optimization (PSO) method (Wang et al, 2013). Here we report an x-ray diffraction study of dynamically compressed molybdenum. Experiments were conducted using the Omega laser at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics at the University of Rochester. Mo targets were either ramp or shock compressed using a laser drive. In ramp loading, the sample is compressed sufficiently slowly that a shock wave does not form. This results in lower temperatures, keeping the sample in the solid state to higher pressures. X-ray diffraction measurements were performed using quasi-monochromatic x-rays from a highly ionized He-α Cu source and image plate detectors. Upon ramp compression, we found no evidence of phase transition in solid Mo up to 900 GPa. The observed peaks can be assigned to the (110) and (200) or (220) reflections of BCC Mo up to the highest pressure, indicating that Mo does not melt under ramp loading to maximum pressure reached. Under shock loading, we did not observe any evidence for the solid-solid phase transformation around 210 GPa as reported in previous work (Hixson et al, 1989). The BCC

  14. X-ray diffraction study of crystalline barium titanate ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Zali, Nurazila Mat; Mahmood, Che Seman; Mohamad, Siti Mariam; Foo, Choo Thye; Murshidi, Julie Adrianny

    2014-02-12

    In this study, BaTiO{sub 3} ceramics have been prepared via solid-state reaction method. The powders were calcined for 2 hours at different temperatures ranging from 600°C to 1200°C. Using X-ray diffraction with a Rietveld analysis, the phase formation and crystal structure of the BaTiO{sub 3} powders were studied. Change in crystallite size and tetragonality as a function of calcination temperature were also discussed. It has been found that the formation of pure perovskite phase of BaTiO{sub 3} began at calcination condition of 1000 °C for 2 hours. The crystal structure of BaTiO{sub 3} formed is in the tetragonal structure. The second phases of BaCO{sub 3} and TiO{sub 2} existed with calcination temperature below 1000 °C. Purity, crystallite size and tetragonality of BaTiO{sub 3} powders were found to increase with increasing calcination temperature.

  15. Surface diffraction study of the hydrated hematite (1102) surface.

    SciTech Connect

    Tanwar, K. S.; Lo, C. S.; Eng, P. J.; Catalano, J. G.; Walko, D. A.; Brown, G. E., Jr.; Waychunas, G. A.; Chaka, A. M.; Trainor, T. P.; X-Ray Science Division; Univ. of Alaska Fairbanks; NIST; Univ. of Chicago; Stanford Univ.; LBNL; SSRL

    2007-01-01

    The structure of the hydroxylated {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3(1{bar 1}02)} surface prepared via a wet chemical and mechanical polishing (CMP) procedure was determined using X-ray crystal truncation rod diffraction. The experimentally determined surface model was compared with theoretical structures developed from density functional theory (DFT) calculations to identify the most likely protonation states of the surface (hydr)oxo moieties. The results show that the hydroxylated CMP-prepared surface differs from an ideal stoichiometric termination due to vacancies of the near surface bulk Fe sites. This result differs from previous ultra high vacuum studies where two stable terminations were observed: a stoichiometric (1 x 1) termination and a partially reduced (2 x 1) reconstructed surface. The complementary DFT studies suggest that hydroxylated surfaces are thermodynamically more stable than dehydroxylated surfaces in the presence of water. The results illustrate that the best fit surface model has predominantly three types of (hydr)oxo functional groups exposed at the surface at circumneutral pH: Fe-OH{sub 2}, Fe{sub 2}-OH, and Fe{sub 3}-O and provide a structural basis for interpreting the reactivity of model iron-(hydr)oxide surfaces under aqueous conditions.

  16. Crystals of a ternary complex of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase with a monoclonal antibody Fab fragment and double-stranded DNA diffract x-rays to 3.5-A resolution.

    PubMed Central

    Jacobo-Molina, A; Clark, A D; Williams, R L; Nanni, R G; Clark, P; Ferris, A L; Hughes, S H; Arnold, E

    1991-01-01

    Two crystal forms of complexes have been grown that contain human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase and a monoclonal antibody Fab fragment. One of the crystal forms (form II, space group P3112, a = 168.7 A, c = 220.3 A) diffracts x-rays to 3.5-A resolution and appears suitable for moderate-resolution structure determination. The form II crystals have the unusual property that their maximum resolution of diffraction and resistance to radiation damage are enhanced by either crystallization in the presence of or soaking with double-stranded DNA primer-template mimics. These crystals may permit structural studies of catalytically relevant complexes and eventually enable us to experimentally observe successive steps in the reverse transcription process. Images PMID:1720554

  17. Simple method for sub-diffraction resolution imaging of cellular structures on standard confocal microscopes by three-photon absorption of quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Sporbert, Anje; Cseresnyes, Zoltan; Heidbreder, Meike; Domaing, Petra; Hauser, Stefan; Kaltschmidt, Barbara; Kaltschmidt, Christian; Heilemann, Mike; Widera, Darius

    2013-01-01

    This study describes a simple technique that improves a recently developed 3D sub-diffraction imaging method based on three-photon absorption of commercially available quantum dots. The method combines imaging of biological samples via tri-exciton generation in quantum dots with deconvolution and spectral multiplexing, resulting in a novel approach for multi-color imaging of even thick biological samples at a 1.4 to 1.9-fold better spatial resolution. This approach is realized on a conventional confocal microscope equipped with standard continuous-wave lasers. We demonstrate the potential of multi-color tri-exciton imaging of quantum dots combined with deconvolution on viral vesicles in lentivirally transduced cells as well as intermediate filaments in three-dimensional clusters of mouse-derived neural stem cells (neurospheres) and dense microtubuli arrays in myotubes formed by stacks of differentiated C2C12 myoblasts.

  18. Neutron irradiated uranium silicides studied by neutron diffraction and Rietveld analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Birtcher, R.C.; Mueller, M.H.; Richardson, J.W. Jr.

    1990-11-01

    The irradiation behavior of high-density uranium silicides has been a matter of interest to the nuclear industry for use in high power or low enrichment applications. Transmission electron microscopy studies have found that heavy ion bombardment renders U{sub 3}Si and U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} amorphous at temperatures below about 250 C and that U{sub 3}Si becomes mechanically unstable suffering rapid growth by plastic flow. In this present work, crystallographic changes preceding amorphization by fission fragment damage have been studied by high-resolution neutron diffraction as a function of damage produced by uranium fission at room temperature. Initially, both silicides had tetragonal crystal structures. Crystallographic and amorphous phases were studied simultaneously by combining conventional Rietveld refinement of the crystallographic phases with Fourier-filtering analysis of the non-crystalline scattering component. 13 refs., 5 figs.

  19. Neutron diffraction studies for realtime leaching of catalytic Ni.

    PubMed

    Iles, Gail N; Devred, François; Henry, Paul F; Reinhart, Guillaume; Hansen, Thomas C

    2014-07-21

    The leaching of Al from intermetallic samples of Nickel Aluminium alloys to form Raney-type nickel catalysts is widely used in the hydrogenation industry, however, little is known of the leaching process itself. In this study, the leaching of Al was measured in realtime, in situ, using the high-flux powder neutron diffractometer, D20, at the Institut Laue-Langevin. Despite the liberation of hydrogen and effervescent nature of the reaction the transformation of the dry powder phases into Raney-type Ni was determined. Samples produced by gas-atomisation were found to leach faster than those produced using the cast and crushed technique. Regardless of processing route of the precursor powder, the formation of spongy-Ni occurs almost immediately, while Ni2Al3 and NiAl3 continue to transform over longer periods of time. Small-angle scattering and broadening of the diffraction peaks is an evidence for the formation of the smaller Ni particles. Understanding the kinetics of the leaching process will allow industry to refine production of catalysts for optimum manufacturing time while knowledge of leaching dynamics of powders produced by different manufacturing techniques will allow further tailoring of catalytic materials. PMID:25053313

  20. Neutron diffraction studies for realtime leaching of catalytic Ni

    SciTech Connect

    Iles, Gail N. Reinhart, Guillaume; Devred, François; Henry, Paul F. Hansen, Thomas C.

    2014-07-21

    The leaching of Al from intermetallic samples of Nickel Aluminium alloys to form Raney-type nickel catalysts is widely used in the hydrogenation industry, however, little is known of the leaching process itself. In this study, the leaching of Al was measured in realtime, in situ, using the high-flux powder neutron diffractometer, D20, at the Institut Laue-Langevin. Despite the liberation of hydrogen and effervescent nature of the reaction the transformation of the dry powder phases into Raney-type Ni was determined. Samples produced by gas-atomisation were found to leach faster than those produced using the cast and crushed technique. Regardless of processing route of the precursor powder, the formation of spongy-Ni occurs almost immediately, while Ni{sub 2}Al{sub 3} and NiAl{sub 3} continue to transform over longer periods of time. Small-angle scattering and broadening of the diffraction peaks is an evidence for the formation of the smaller Ni particles. Understanding the kinetics of the leaching process will allow industry to refine production of catalysts for optimum manufacturing time while knowledge of leaching dynamics of powders produced by different manufacturing techniques will allow further tailoring of catalytic materials.

  1. In situ time resolved synchrotron powder diffraction study of thaumasite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martucci, Annalisa; Cruciani, Giuseppe

    2006-12-01

    Structural changes during dehydration and subsequent decomposition in thaumasite Ca3Si(SO4)(CO3)(OH)6·12 H2O were studied by in situ synchrotron powder diffraction between 303 and 1,098 K. Evolution of the crystal structure was observed through 28 structure refinements, by full profile Rietveld analysis performed in the P63 space group, between 300 and 417 K, whereupon the thaumasite structure was observed to breakdown. Within this temperature range, the cell parameters of thaumasite increased as a function of temperature in a nearly linear fashion up to about 393 K, at which temperature, a slight slope change was observed. Above 400 K, the thermogravimetric analysis revealed that the dehydration process proceeded very rapidly while the refined occupancy of water molecules dropped below a critical level, leading to instability in the thaumasite structure. At a same time, a remarkable change in the unit cell parameters occurring at about 417 K indicated that the crystal structure of thaumasite collapsed on losing the crystallization water and it turned amorphous. This result indicated that the dehydration/decomposition of thaumasite was induced by the departure of the crystallization water. At about 950 K, anhydrite and cristobalite crystallized from the thaumasite glass.

  2. Neutron diffraction studies for realtime leaching of catalytic Ni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iles, Gail N.; Devred, François; Henry, Paul F.; Reinhart, Guillaume; Hansen, Thomas C.

    2014-07-01

    The leaching of Al from intermetallic samples of Nickel Aluminium alloys to form Raney-type nickel catalysts is widely used in the hydrogenation industry, however, little is known of the leaching process itself. In this study, the leaching of Al was measured in realtime, in situ, using the high-flux powder neutron diffractometer, D20, at the Institut Laue-Langevin. Despite the liberation of hydrogen and effervescent nature of the reaction the transformation of the dry powder phases into Raney-type Ni was determined. Samples produced by gas-atomisation were found to leach faster than those produced using the cast and crushed technique. Regardless of processing route of the precursor powder, the formation of spongy-Ni occurs almost immediately, while Ni2Al3 and NiAl3 continue to transform over longer periods of time. Small-angle scattering and broadening of the diffraction peaks is an evidence for the formation of the smaller Ni particles. Understanding the kinetics of the leaching process will allow industry to refine production of catalysts for optimum manufacturing time while knowledge of leaching dynamics of powders produced by different manufacturing techniques will allow further tailoring of catalytic materials.

  3. Analytical study of diffraction effects in extremely large segmented telescopes.

    PubMed

    Yaitskova, Natalia; Dohlen, Kjetil; Dierickx, Philippe

    2003-08-01

    We present an analysis of the diffraction effects from a segmented aperture with a very large number of segments-prototype of the next generation of extremely large telescopes. This analysis is based on the point-spread-function analytical calculation for Keck-type hexagonal segmentation geometry. We concentrate on the effects that lead to the appearance of speckles and/or a regular pattern of diffraction peaks. These effects are related to random piston and tip-tilt errors on each segment, gaps between segments, and segment edge distortion. We deliver formulas and the typical numerical values for the Strehl ratio, the relative intensity of higher-order diffraction peaks, and the averaged intensity of speckles associated with each particular case of segmentation error. PMID:12938912

  4. Analytical study of diffraction effects in extremely large segmented telescopes.

    PubMed

    Yaitskova, Natalia; Dohlen, Kjetil; Dierickx, Philippe

    2003-08-01

    We present an analysis of the diffraction effects from a segmented aperture with a very large number of segments-prototype of the next generation of extremely large telescopes. This analysis is based on the point-spread-function analytical calculation for Keck-type hexagonal segmentation geometry. We concentrate on the effects that lead to the appearance of speckles and/or a regular pattern of diffraction peaks. These effects are related to random piston and tip-tilt errors on each segment, gaps between segments, and segment edge distortion. We deliver formulas and the typical numerical values for the Strehl ratio, the relative intensity of higher-order diffraction peaks, and the averaged intensity of speckles associated with each particular case of segmentation error.

  5. Investigations in space-related molecular biology. [cryo-electron microscopic and diffraction studies on terrestrial and extraterrestrial specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernandez-Moran, H.; Pritzker, A. N.

    1974-01-01

    Improved instrumentation and preparation techniques for high resolution, high voltage cryo-electron microscopic and diffraction studies on terrestrial and extraterrestrial specimens are reported. Computer correlated ultrastructural and biochemical work on hydrated and dried cell membranes and related biological systems provided information on membrane organization, ice crystal formation and ordered water, RNA virus linked to cancer, lunar rock samples, and organometallic superconducting compounds. Apollo 11, 12, 14, and 15 specimens were analyzed

  6. Crystal structure of Bi{sub 1-x}Tb{sub x}FeO{sub 3} from high-resolution neutron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Saxin, Stefan; Knee, Christopher S.

    2011-06-15

    Samples of Bi{sub 1-x}Tb{sub x}FeO{sub 3}, with x=0.05, 0.10, 0.15, 0.20 and 0.25, have been synthesised by solid state reaction. The crystal structures of the perovskite phases, characterised via Rietveld analysis of high resolution powder neutron diffraction data, reveal a structural transition from the R3c symmetry of the parent phase BiFeO{sub 3} to orthorhombic Pnma symmetry, which is complete for x=0.20. The x=0.10 and 0.15 samples are bi-phasic. The transition from a rhombohedral to orthorhombic unit cell is suggested to be driven by the dilution of the stereochemistry of the Bi{sup 3+} lone pair at the A-site. The G-type antiferromagnetic spin structure, the size of the ordered magnetic moment ({approx}3.8 {mu}{sub B}) and the T{sub N} ({approx}375 deg. C) are relatively insensitive to increasing Tb concentrations at the A-site. - Graphical abstract: High resolution neutron powder diffraction has been used to study the evolution of the RT crystal structure of Bi{sub 1-x}Tb{sub x}FeO{sub 3} (0.05{<=}x{<=}0.25) with terbium content. A transition from polar R3c to centrosymmetric Pnma symmetry is observed. The antiferromagnetic ordering temperature and size of the ordered magnetic moment are relatively insensitive to the change of crystal structure. Highlights: > Structural transition from polar R3c symmetry to non-polar Pnma symmetry occurs. > Behaviour is rationalised via dilution of the stereochemical nature of the Bi lone pair. > Magnetic properties are largely unaffected.

  7. A new method to do time resolved, x-ray diffraction studies: The rotating crystal Laue method

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, G.S.; Beno, M.A.

    1991-07-01

    In order to achieve the ultimate time resolution of a synchrotron source we propose a new experimental technique by which time dependent structural changes can be monitored on the time scale of synchrotron pulse widths. Samples will be studied by a rotating crystal Laue diffraction technique where we rapidly spin the sample and observe the diffraction pattern from a broad band of incident x-rays. A computer simulation is presented of the diffraction pattern time evolution using the parameters for an APS undulator of a phase change in the YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}x} superconductor. We will discuss the application of this and closely related techniques at other synchrotron sources including bending magnets and insertion devices at NSLS and CHESS. 11 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Classifying and assembling two-dimensional X-ray laser diffraction patterns of a single particle to reconstruct the three-dimensional diffraction intensity function: resolution limit due to the quantum noise

    SciTech Connect

    Tokuhisa, Atsushi; Taka, Junichiro; Kono, Hidetoshi; Go, Nobuhiro

    2012-05-01

    A new algorithm is developed for reconstructing the high-resolution three-dimensional diffraction intensity function of a globular biological macromolecule from many quantum-noise-limited two-dimensional X-ray laser diffraction patterns, each for an unknown orientation. The structural resolution is expressed as a function of the incident X-ray intensity and quantities characterizing the target molecule. A new two-step algorithm is developed for reconstructing the three-dimensional diffraction intensity of a globular biological macromolecule from many experimentally measured quantum-noise-limited two-dimensional X-ray laser diffraction patterns, each for an unknown orientation. The first step is classification of the two-dimensional patterns into groups according to the similarity of direction of the incident X-rays with respect to the molecule and an averaging within each group to reduce the noise. The second step is detection of common intersecting circles between the signal-enhanced two-dimensional patterns to identify their mutual location in the three-dimensional wavenumber space. The newly developed algorithm enables one to detect a signal for classification in noisy experimental photon-count data with as low as ∼0.1 photons per effective pixel. The wavenumber of such a limiting pixel determines the attainable structural resolution. From this fact, the resolution limit due to the quantum noise attainable by this new method of analysis as well as two important experimental parameters, the number of two-dimensional patterns to be measured (the load for the detector) and the number of pairs of two-dimensional patterns to be analysed (the load for the computer), are derived as a function of the incident X-ray intensity and quantities characterizing the target molecule.

  9. High resolution solar X-ray studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    Two high resolution solar X-ray payloads and their launches on Aerobee rockets with pointing system are described. The payloads included 5 to 25A X-ray spectrometers, multiaperture X-ray cameras, and command box attitude control inflight by means of a television image radioed to ground. Spatial resolution ranged from five arc minutes to ten arc seconds and spectral resolution ranged from 500 to 3000. Several laboratory tasks were completed in order to achieve the desired resolution. These included (1) development of techniques to align grid collimators, (2) studies of the spectrometric properties of crystals, (3) measurements of the absorption coefficients of various materials used in X-ray spectrometers, (4) evaluation of the performance of multiaperture cameras, and (5) development of facilities.

  10. Diffraction-Enhanced Imaging for studying pattern recognition in cranial ontogeny of bats and marsupials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocha, H. S.; Lopes, R. T.; Pessôa, L. M.; Hönnicke, M. G.; Tirao, G.; Cusatis, C.; Mazzaro, I.; Giles, C.

    2005-08-01

    The key to understanding evolution lies in the elucidation of mechanisms responsible for the observed underlying patterns and in the observation of sequences that emerge from those evolutionary landmarks. The comparative development can be used to access the derivation of form and the homology versus the convergence of evolution features. Phylogenetic and biological homologies are necessary to discern the evolutionary origins of these features. This work examined the patterns of cranial formation in pre-born bat specimens as well as post-born opossum by means of microradiography and Diffraction-Enhanced Radiography (DER) techniques. A direct conversion CCD camera was used to provide micrometer spatial resolution in order to acquire highly detailed density images. This technique allows the observation of structures, in early stages of development, which were impossible to be observed with traditional techniques, such as clearing and staining. Some cranial features have been described for adults in the literature, but the detailed description of the appearance sequence of those features in these species is still unknown and obscure. Microradiography and diffraction-enhanced imaging can improve quality of morphological detail analysis and permit the identification of anatomical landmarks that are useful in comparative studies and are still unknown in both species. In this study, we access evolution features in cranial morphology of bats and marsupials using both X-ray techniques.

  11. Neutron diffraction study of a nitrogen martensitic steel 0Kh16N4AB under load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumin, V. V.; Papushkin, I. V.; Bannykh, O. A.; Blinov, V. M.; Lukáš, P.

    2008-01-01

    An austenitic-martensitic nitrogen steel 0Kh16N4AB has been studied under load using high-resolution neutron diffraction analysis on an FSD neutron diffractometer at an IBR-2 reactor (Dubna) and on a diffractometer with a focusing monochromator on a reactor of the Nuclear Physics Institute (Czech Republic). Young's moduli calculated from different reflections of the martensite and austenite phases have been obtained. It has been found that the yield strength σ0.2 corresponding to the slip plane (111) of the austenite phase is anomalously low and that with increasing degree of uniaxial tension the width of lines (111)γ strongly grows. In the steel under consideration the plane (111) of the austenite phase appears to be an easy-slip plane that ensures the enhanced properties of the steel, i.e., the combination of a high ultimate strength (1600 MPa) with a high plasticity (δ = 16%).

  12. High-resolution diffraction from crystals of a membrane-protein complex: bacterial outer membrane protein OmpC complexed with the antibacterial eukaryotic protein lactoferrin

    SciTech Connect

    Sundara Baalaji, N.; Acharya, K. Ravi; Singh, T. P.; Krishnaswamy, S. E-mail: mkukrishna@rediffmail.com

    2005-08-01

    Crystals of the complex formed between the bacterial membrane protein OmpC and the antibacterial protein lactoferrin suitable for high-resolution structure determination have been obtained. The crystals belong to the hexagonal space group P6, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 116.3, c = 152.4 Å. Crystals of the complex formed between the outer membrane protein OmpC from Escherichia coli and the eukaryotic antibacterial protein lactoferrin from Camelus dromedarius (camel) have been obtained using a detergent environment. Initial data processing suggests that the crystals belong to the hexagonal space group P6, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 116.3, c = 152.4 Å, α = β = 90, γ = 120°. This indicated a Matthews coefficient (V{sub M}) of 3.3 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1}, corresponding to a possible molecular complex involving four molecules of lactoferrin and two porin trimers in the unit cell (4832 amino acids; 533.8 kDa) with 63% solvent content. A complete set of diffraction data was collected to 3 Å resolution at 100 K. Structure determination by molecular replacement is in progress. Structural study of this first surface-exposed membrane-protein complex with an antibacterial protein will provide insights into the mechanism of action of OmpC as well as lactoferrin.

  13. Identification of cellulose fibres belonging to Spanish cultural heritage using synchrotron high resolution X-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera, L. K.; Justo, A.; Duran, A.; de Haro, M. C. Jimenez; Franquelo, M. L.; Perez Rodríguez, J. L.

    2010-05-01

    A complete characterisation of fibres used in Spanish artwork is necessary to provide a complete knowledge of these natural fibres and their stage of degradation. Textile samples employed as painting supports on canvas and one sample of unprocessed plant material were chosen for this study. All the samples were investigated by synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction (SR-XRD). Flax and cotton have the Cellulose I structure. The values of the crystalline index (CI) were calculated for both types of fibres. The structure of Cellulose IV was associated with the unprocessed plant material. The information obtained by SR-XRD was confirmed by laboratory techniques including scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR).

  14. Structural studies of endohedral metallofullerenes by synchrotron radiation powder diffraction.

    PubMed

    Nishibori, E; Takata, M; Sakata, M; Shinohara, H

    1998-05-01

    The endohedral natures of the metallofullerenes Y@C(82) and Sc(2)@C(8)4 are described based on synchrotron radiation powder diffraction experiments. For structural analysis, a combination of the maximum-entropy method (MEM) and Rietveld refinement was employed to analyse the complicated powder pattern. The obtained MEM charge densities show a clear distinction of the endohedral natures of the mono- and dimetallofullerenes.

  15. Fresnel diffractive imaging: Experimental study of coherence and curvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitehead, L. W.; Williams, G. J.; Quiney, H. M.; Nugent, K. A.; Peele, A. G.; Paterson, D.; de Jonge, M. D.; McNulty, I.

    2008-03-01

    A Fresnel coherent diffractive imaging experiment is performed using a pinhole as a test object. The experimental parameters of the beam curvature and coherence length of the illuminating radiation are varied to investigate their effects on the reconstruction process. It is found that a sufficient amount of curvature across the sample strongly ameliorates the effects of low coherence, even when the sample size exceeds the coherence length.

  16. Crystallization and X-ray diffraction studies of glutathione S-transferase from Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishida, Motohiko; Harada, Shigeharu; Satow, Yoshinori; Inoue, Hideshi; Takahashi, Kenji

    1996-10-01

    Crystals of glutathione S-transferase from Escherichia coli have been obtained by use of polyethylene glycol 6000 as a precipitant. The crystallization was performed in the presence of a glutathione sulfonate inhibitor under the acidic condition, with combination of the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion and the macro-seeding procedures. The crystals are of a thin-plate shape with typical sizes of 1.0 × 0.5 × 0.1 mm, and are stable against X-ray irradiation. They belong to the space group P2 12 12 1 with cell parameters of a = 90.47 Å, b = 93.87 Å and c = 51.10 Å, and diffract X-rays at least up to 2.3 Å resolution. The solvent content is 48% in volume, when a homodimeric molecule of the enzyme is assumed to occupy an asymmetric unit of the crystal. The crystals are suitable for three-dimensional structural studies. Diffraction data of the native crystal have been collected.

  17. Crack nucleation using combined crystal plasticity modelling, high-resolution digital image correlation and high-resolution electron backscatter diffraction in a superalloy containing non-metallic inclusions under fatigue

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tiantian; Britton, Ben; Shollock, Barbara; Dunne, Fionn

    2016-01-01

    A crystal plasticity finite-element model, which explicitly and directly represents the complex microstructures of a non-metallic agglomerate inclusion within polycrystal nickel alloy, has been developed to study the mechanistic basis of fatigue crack nucleation. The methodology is to use the crystal plasticity model in conjunction with direct measurement at the microscale using high (angular) resolution-electron backscatter diffraction (HR-EBSD) and high (spatial) resolution-digital image correlation (HR-DIC) strain measurement techniques. Experimentally, this sample has been subjected to heat treatment leading to the establishment of residual (elastic) strains local to the agglomerate and subsequently loaded under conditions of low cyclic fatigue. The full thermal and mechanical loading history was reproduced within the model. HR-EBSD and HR-DIC elastic and total strain measurements demonstrate qualitative and quantitative agreement with crystal plasticity results. Crack nucleation by interfacial decohesion at the nickel matrix/agglomerate inclusion boundaries is observed experimentally, and systematic modelling studies enable the mechanistic basis of the nucleation to be established. A number of fatigue crack nucleation indicators are also assessed against the experimental results. Decohesion was found to be driven by interface tensile normal stress alone, and the interfacial strength was determined to be in the range of 1270–1480 MPa. PMID:27279765

  18. Crack nucleation using combined crystal plasticity modelling, high-resolution digital image correlation and high-resolution electron backscatter diffraction in a superalloy containing non-metallic inclusions under fatigue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tiantian; Jiang, Jun; Britton, Ben; Shollock, Barbara; Dunne, Fionn

    2016-05-01

    A crystal plasticity finite-element model, which explicitly and directly represents the complex microstructures of a non-metallic agglomerate inclusion within polycrystal nickel alloy, has been developed to study the mechanistic basis of fatigue crack nucleation. The methodology is to use the crystal plasticity model in conjunction with direct measurement at the microscale using high (angular) resolution-electron backscatter diffraction (HR-EBSD) and high (spatial) resolution-digital image correlation (HR-DIC) strain measurement techniques. Experimentally, this sample has been subjected to heat treatment leading to the establishment of residual (elastic) strains local to the agglomerate and subsequently loaded under conditions of low cyclic fatigue. The full thermal and mechanical loading history was reproduced within the model. HR-EBSD and HR-DIC elastic and total strain measurements demonstrate qualitative and quantitative agreement with crystal plasticity results. Crack nucleation by interfacial decohesion at the nickel matrix/agglomerate inclusion boundaries is observed experimentally, and systematic modelling studies enable the mechanistic basis of the nucleation to be established. A number of fatigue crack nucleation indicators are also assessed against the experimental results. Decohesion was found to be driven by interface tensile normal stress alone, and the interfacial strength was determined to be in the range of 1270-1480 MPa.

  19. Coincidence studies of diffraction structures in binary encounter electron spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, C.; Hagmann, S.; Richard, P.

    1994-12-31

    The authors have measured binary encounter electron (BEe) production in collisions of 0.3 MeV/u Cu{sup q+} (q=4,12) projectiles on H{sub 2} targets from 0 to 70 degrees with respect to the beam direction. Prominent features are the appearance of the BEe peak splitting and a very strong forward peaked angular distribution which are attributed to the diffractive scattering of the quasifree target electrons in the short range potential of the projectile. Using electron-projectile final charge state coincidence techniques, different collision reaction channels can be separated. Measurements of this type are being pursued.

  20. High Pressure X-ray Diffraction Study of Potassium Azide

    SciTech Connect

    C Ji; F Zhang; D Hong; H Zhu; J Wu; M Chyu; V Levitas; Y Ma

    2011-12-31

    Crystal structure and compressibility of potassium azide was investigated by in-situ synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction in a diamond anvil cell at room temperature up to 37.7 GPa. In the body-centered tetragonal (bct) phase, an anisotropic compressibility was observed with greater compressibility in the direction perpendicular to the plane containing N{sub 3}{sup -} ions than directions within that plane. The bulk modulus of the bct phase was determined to be 18.6(7) GPa. A pressure-induced phase transition may occur at 15.5 GPa.

  1. Synchrotron Radiation Diffraction Study of YbInCu4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utsumi, Yuki; Sato, Hitoshi; Moriyoshi, Chikako; Kuroiwa, Yoshihiro; Namatame, Hirofumi; Taniguchi, Masaki; Hiraoka, Koichi; Kojima, Kenichi; Sugimoto, Kunihisa

    2011-05-01

    The structural change of an YbInCu4 single crystal has been investigated associated with the first-order valence-transition at TV = 42 K using synchrotron radiation diffraction. The Yb-Cu and In-Cu interatomic distances abruptly increase below TV, following the lattice expansion with no change in the C15b-type crystal structure. We find that the distance between Cu ions forming the Cu4 cluster in the crystal is almost unchanged across the valence transition. No abrupt change in the thermal rotational motion of the Cu4 cluster is observed at TV.

  2. A neutron diffraction study of RMn2O5 multiferroics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radaelli, P. G.; Chapon, L. C.

    2008-10-01

    The magnetic properties of RMn2O5 multiferroics as obtained by unpolarized and polarized neutron diffraction experiments are reviewed. We discuss the qualitative features of the magnetic phase diagram in both zero magnetic field and in field and analyze the commensurate magnetic structure and its coupling to an applied electric field. The origin of ferroelectricity is discussed based on calculations of the ferroelectric polarization predicted by different microscopic coupling mechanisms (exchange-striction and cycloidal spin-orbit models). A minimal model containing a small set of parameters is also presented in order to understand the propagation of the magnetic structure along the c-direction.

  3. MOKE Diffraction Study of Magnetic Dot and Antidot Arrays.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimsditch, Marcos

    2003-03-01

    A beam of visible light, incident on a particle array with a submicron period, is diffracted. Extending conventional Magneto Optic Kerr Effect (MOKE) techniques to include the diffracted beams leads to a variety of 'hysteresis' loops. From these loops we show that it is possible to obtain information on the magnetic structure within a unit cell of the array. A brief review of the experimental technique, the theoretical interpretation of the results, and a brief summary of our earlier results on vortices in circular disks [1] and coherent domain formation in antidot arrays [2] will be given. The D-MOKE results from square Permalloy rings will then be presented and compared with micromagnetic simulations. Our results show that magnetization reversal in these ring structures, which is expected to be a jump between two onion states, actually occurs via intermediate, metastable states. For different directions of the applied field these intermediate states are a vortex state or a horseshoe state. A suitable field history allows these states to be quenched and observed using Magnetic Force Microscopy. Work at ANL supported by the US DOE BES Mater. Sci. under contract # W-31-109-ENG-38. [1] M. Grimsditch et al, Phys. Rev. B 65, 172419 (2002) [2] I. Guedes et al, Phys, Rev. B 66, 014434 (2002)

  4. Image reconstruction with sub-diffraction resolution in radio vision devices of millimeter and terahertz range using receiving arrays and image scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vystavkin, Alexander N.; Pestryakov, Andrey V.; Bankov, Sergey E.; Chebotarev, Vladimir M.

    2009-09-01

    The method of image reconstruction with sub-diffraction resolution in radio vision devices (RVD) of shortwave millimeter and terahertz frequency range is proposed. The method is based on image scanning using two-dimensional receiving element array of RVD when array and image move circularly in common plane relatively each to other (rotating or not rotating) with small eccentricity between their centers. The results of scanning are signals reading out by detectors of array receiving elements. Each signal is proportional to the integral of two functions product. One function is a perfect image field distribution of the observed object received by RVD without diffraction distortion. Another one is RVD optical (quasioptical) transfer function comprising beams delivering incident radiation to detectors of array. The second function takes into account whole received radiation beam paths from RVD input to each detector including the effect of diffraction and reciprocal circular scanning of array and image. The image of observed object itself can be found solving inverse ill-posed problem determined by mentioned above integral relations. The estimation using computer simulation has shown that proposed method permits to increase resolution up to ten times in comparison with the case of diffraction restriction. The method is aimed at radioastronomy telescopes and RVD's for the security, medical diagnostics and other systems.

  5. Fluid bilayer structure determination by the combined use of x-ray and neutron diffraction. I. Fluid bilayer models and the limits of resolution.

    PubMed Central

    Wiener, M C; White, S H

    1991-01-01

    This is the first in a series of papers concerned with methods for the determination of the structures of fluid phospholipid bilayers in the liquid-crystalline (L alpha) phase. The basic approach is the joint refinement of quasimolecular models (King and White, 1986. Biophys. J. 49:1047-1054) using x-ray and neutron diffraction data. We present here (a) the rationale for quasimolecular models, (b) the nature of the resolution problem for thermally disordered bilayers, and (c) an analysis of the resolution of experiments in which Gaussian functions are used to describe the distribution of submolecular components. We show that multilamellar liquid-crystalline bilayers are best described by the convolution of a perfect lattice function with a thermally disordered bilayer unit cell. Lamellar diffraction measurements on such a system generally yield only 5-10 orders of diffraction data from which transbilayer profiles of the unit cell can be constructed. The canonical resolution of these transbilayer profiles, defined as the Bragg spacing divided by the index of the highest recorded diffraction order, is typically 5-10 A. Using simple model calculations, we show that the canonical resolution is a measure of the widths of the distributions of constituents of the unit cell rather than a measure of the spatial separation of the distributions. The widths provide a measure of the thermal motion of the bilayer constituents which can be described by Gaussian functions. The equilibrium positions of the centers of the distributions can be determined with a precision of 0.1-0.5 A based upon typical experimental errors. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:2015381

  6. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of ferredoxin reductase from Leptospira interrogans

    SciTech Connect

    Nascimento, Alessandro S.; Ferrarezi, Thiago; Catalano-Dupuy, Daniela L.; Ceccarelli, Eduardo A.; Polikarpov, Igor

    2006-07-01

    Crystals adequate for X-ray diffraction analysis have been prepared from L. interrogans ferredoxin-NADP{sup +} reductase. Ferredoxin-NADP{sup +} reductase (FNR) is an FAD-containing enzyme that catalyzes electron transfer between NADP(H) and ferredoxin. Here, results are reported of the recombinant expression, purification and crystallization of FNR from Leptospira interrogans, a parasitic bacterium of animals and humans. The L. interrogans FNR crystals belong to a primitive monoclinic space group and diffract to 2.4 Å resolution at a synchrotron source.

  7. Neutron diffraction studies of amphipathic helices in phospholipid bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Bradshaw, J.P.; Gilchrist, P.J.; Duff, K.C.; Saxena, A.M.

    1994-12-31

    The structural feature which is thought to facilitate the interaction of many peptides with phospholipid bilayers is the ability to fold into an amphipathic helix. In most cases the exact location and orientation of this helix with respect to the membrane is not known, and may vary with factors such as pH and phospholipid content of the bilayer. The growing interest in this area is stimulated by indications that similar interactions can contribute to the binding of certain hormones to their cell-surface receptors. We have been using the techniques of neutron diffraction from stacked phospholipid bilayers in an attempt to investigate this phenomenon with a number of membrane-active peptides. Here we report some of our findings with three of these: the bee venom melittin; the hormone calcitonin; and a synthetic peptide representing the ion channel fragment of influenza A M2 protein.

  8. Powder neutron diffraction studies of a carbonate fluorapatite

    SciTech Connect

    Leventouri, Th.; Chakoumakos, B. C.; Moghaddam, H. Y.; Perdikatsis, V.

    2000-02-01

    Atomic positional disorder of a single-phase natural carbonate fluorapatite (francolite) is revealed from analysis of the atomic displacement parameters (ADPs) refined from neutron powder diffraction data as a function of temperature and carbonate content. The ADPs of the francolite show a strong disturbance at the P, O3, and F sites. When it is heat treated to partially or completely remove the carbonate, the ADPs as well as the other structural parameters resemble those of a fluorapatite (Harding pegmatite) that was measured under the same conditions. The various structural changes are consistent with a substitution mechanism whereby the planar carbonate group replaces a phosphate group and lies on the mirror plane of the apatite structure. (c) 2000 Materials Research Society.

  9. Combining Laue diffraction and molecular dynamics to study enzyme intermediates: Formation of the Michaelis complex in isocitrate dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Bash, P.A.; Stoddard, B.L.; Dean, A.

    1996-12-31

    Two separate techniques, Lane diffraction and computational molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, have been developed to allow the visualization and assessment of transient structural states and conformations motions in macromolecules. Recent studies on isocitrate dehydrogenase show that computational MD simulations of an enzymatic Michaelis complex are consistent with difference Fourier election-density maps of the same structure from a Lane experiment. The use of MD facilitates modeling of atoms into regions of experimental density that are poorly defined, due to missing and inaccurate low-resolution diffraction terms that degrade the X-ray scattering contribution from mobile atoms in the active site. The combination of these techniques is used to generate a model for the Michaelis complex of the enzyme isocitrate dehydrogenase with substrate isocitrate and coenzyme nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP). This concerted use of time-resolved X-ray crystallography and of MD simulations has clear importance for the study of enzyme dynamics and function.

  10. Femtosecond electron diffraction and spectroscopic studies of a solid state organic chemical reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jean-Ruel, Hubert

    Photochromic diarylethene molecules are excellent model systems for studying electrocyclic reactions, in addition to having important technological applications in optoelectronics. The photoinduced ring-closing reaction in a crystalline photochromic diarylethene derivative was fully resolved using the complementary techniques of transient absorption spectroscopy and femtosecond electron crystallography. These studies are detailed in this thesis, together with the associated technical developments which enabled them. Importantly, the time-resolved crystallographic investigation reported here represents a highly significant proof-of-principle experiment. It constitutes the first study directly probing the molecular structural changes associated with an organic chemical reaction with sub-picosecond temporal and atomic spatial resolution---to follow the primary motions directing chemistry. In terms of technological development, the most important advance reported is the implementation of a radio frequency rebunching system capable of producing femtosecond electron pulses of exceptional brightness. The temporal resolution of this newly developed electron source was fully characterized using laser ponderomotive scattering, confirming a 435 +/- 75 fs instrument response time with 0.20 pC bunches. The ultrafast spectroscopic and crystallographic measurements were both achieved by exploiting the photoreversibility of diarylethene. The transient absorption study was first performed, after developing a novel robust acquisition scheme for thermally irreversible reactions in the solid state. It revealed the formation of an open-ring excited state intermediate, following photoexcitation of the open-ring isomer with an ultraviolet laser pulse, with a time constant of approximately 200 fs. The actual ring closing was found to occur from this intermediate with a time constant of 5.3 +/- 0.3 ps. The femtosecond diffraction measurements were then performed using multiple crystal

  11. Diffraction studies applicable to 60-foot microwave research facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, R. F.

    1973-01-01

    The principal features of this document are the analysis of a large dual-reflector antenna system by vector Kirchhoff theory, the evaluation of subreflector aperture-blocking, determination of the diffraction and blockage effects of a subreflector mounting structure, and an estimate of strut-blockage effects. Most of the computations are for a frequency of 15.3 GHz, and were carried out using the IBM 360/91 and 360/95 systems at Goddard Space Flight Center. The FORTRAN 4 computer program used to perform the computations is of a general and modular type so that various system parameters such as frequency, eccentricity, diameter, focal-length, etc. can be varied at will. The parameters of the 60-foot NRL Ku-band installation at Waldorf, Maryland, were entered into the program for purposes of this report. Similar calculations could be performed for the NELC installation at La Posta, California, the NASA Wallops Station facility in Virginia, and other antenna systems, by a simple change in IBM control cards. A comparison is made between secondary radiation patterns of the NRL antenna measured by DOD Satellite and those obtained by analytical/numerical methods at a frequency of 7.3 GHz.

  12. Density functional and neutron diffraction studies of lithium polymer electrolytes.

    SciTech Connect

    Baboul, A. G.

    1998-06-26

    The structure of PEO doped with lithium perchlorate has been determined using neutron diffraction on protonated and deuterated samples. The experiments were done in the liquid state. Preliminary analysis indicates the Li-O distance is about 2.0 {angstrom}. The geometries of a series of gas phase lithium salts [LiCF{sub 3}SO{sub 3}, Li(CF{sub 3}SO{sub 2}){sub 2}N, Li(CF{sub 3}SO{sub 2}){sub 2}CH, LiClO{sub 4}, LiPF{sub 6}, LiAsF{sub 6}] used in polymer electrolytes have been optimized at B3LYP/6-31G(d) density functional level of theory. All local minima have been identified. For the triflate, imide, methanide, and perchlorate anions, the lithium cation is coordinated to two oxygens and have binding energies of ca 141 kcal/mol at the B3LYP/6-311+G(3df,2p)/B3LYP/6-31G* level of theory. For the hexafluoroarsenate and hexafluorophosphate the lithium cation is coordinated to three oxygens and have binding energies of ca. 136 kcal/mol.

  13. High spatial resolution, high energy synchrotron x-ray diffraction characterization of residual strains and stresses in laser shock peened Inconel 718SPF alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, Amrinder S.; Zhou, Zhong; Lienert, Ulrich; Almer, Jonathan; Lahrman, David F.; Mannava, S. R.; Qian, Dong; Vasudevan, Vijay K.

    2012-04-01

    Laser shock peening (LSP) is an advanced surface enhancement technique used to enhance the fatigue strength of metal parts by imparting deep compressive residual stresses. In the present study, LSP was performed on IN718 SPF alloy, a fine grained nickel-based superalloy, with three different power densities and depth resolved residual strain and stress characterization was conducted using high energy synchrotron x-ray diffraction in beam line 1-ID-C at the Advanced Photon Source at the Argonne National laboratory. A fine probe size and conical slits were used to non-destructively obtain data from specific gauge volumes in the samples, allowing for high-resolution strain measurements. The results show that LSP introduces deep compressive residual stresses and the magnitude and depth of these stresses depend on the energy density of the laser. The LSP induced residual stresses were also simulated using three-dimensional nonlinear finite element analysis, with employment of the Johnson-Cook model for describing the nonlinear materials constitutive behavior. Good agreement between the experimental and simulated data was obtained. These various results are presented and discussed.

  14. Deciphering Ni sequestration in soil ferromanganese nodules by combining x-ray fluorescence, absorption and diffraction at micrometer scales of resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Manceau, Alain; Tamura, Nobumichi; Marcus, Matthew A.; MacDowell, Alastair A.; Celestre, Richard S.; Sublett, Robert E.; Sposito, Garrison; Padmore, Howard A.

    2002-11-06

    X-ray microprobes are among the most important new analytical techniques to emerge from third generation synchrotron facilities. Here we show how X-ray fluorescence, diffraction, and absorption can be used in parallel to determine the structural form of trace elements in heterogeneous matrices at the micrometer-scale of resolution. Scanning X-ray microfluorescence (microSXRF) and microdiffraction (microSXRD) first are used to identify the host solid phase by mapping the distributions of elements and solid species, respectively. Micro-extended X-ray absorption fine structure (microEXAFS) spectroscopy is then used to determine the mechanism of trace element binding by the host phase at the molecular scale. To illustrate the complementary application of these three techniques, we studied how nickel is sequestered in soil ferromanganese nodules, an overwhelmingly complex natural matrix consisting of submicrometer to nanometer sized particles with varying structures and chemical composition s. We show that nickel substitutes for Mn3+ in the manganese layer of the MnO2-Al(OH)3 mixed-layer oxide lithiophorite. The affinity of Ni for lithiophorite was characteristic of micromodules sampled from soils across the U.S.A. and Europe. Since many natural and synthetic materials are heterogeneous at nanometer to micrometer scales, the synergistic use of microSXRF, microSXRD and microEXAFS is expected to have broad applications to earth and materials science.

  15. Equation of state and phase transition of deuterated ammonia monohydrate (ND3.D2O) measured by high-resolution neutron powder diffraction up to 500 MPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortes, A. Dominic; Suard, Emmanuelle; Lemée-Cailleau, Marie-Hélène; Pickard, Christopher J.; Needs, Richard J.

    2009-10-01

    We describe the results of a neutron powder diffraction study of perdeuterated ammonia monohydrate (AMH, ND3ṡD2O) carried out in the range 102resolution diffractometer at the Institut Laue-Langevin. This paper reports observations of the phase transformation from the low-pressure P212121 phase (AMH I) to the high-pressure Pbca phase (AMH II) at 351 MPa, and measurements which have allowed us to determine the volumetric and axial incompressibilities of both polymorphs. At 180 K, the fitted third order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state of AMH I has parameters, V0=248.00(2) Å3, K0=7.33(3) GPa with the first pressure derivative of K0 fixed at the value obtained in ab initio calculations, (∂K0/∂P)T=K0'=5.3; the implied value of the second derivative is therefore (∂2K0/∂P2)T=K0″=-0.94(1) GPa-1. At 351 MPa, we observed that the transition from AMH I to AMH II occurred over a period of 90 min, with an associated reduction in molar volume of 4.6% and an increase in the incompressibility of 19.6%.

  16. Purification, crystallization and preliminary diffraction studies of an ectromelia virus glutaredoxin

    SciTech Connect

    Bacik, John-Paul; Brigley, Angela M.; Channon, Lisa D.; Audette, Gerald F.; Hazes, Bart

    2005-06-01

    Ectromelia virus glutaredoxin has been crystallized in the presence of the reducing agent DTT. A diffraction data set has been collected and processed to 1.8 Å resolution. Ectromelia, vaccinia, smallpox and other closely related viruses of the orthopoxvirus genus encode a glutaredoxin gene that is not present in poxviruses outside of this genus. The vaccinia glutaredoxin O2L has been implicated as the reducing agent for ribonucleotide reductase and may thus play an important role in viral deoxyribonucleotide synthesis. As part of an effort to understand nucleotide metabolism by poxviruses, EVM053, the O2L ortholog of the ectromelia virus, has been crystallized. EVM053 crystallizes in space group C222{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 61.98, b = 67.57, c = 108.55 Å. Diffraction data have been processed to 1.8 Å resolution and a self-rotation function indicates that there are two molecules per asymmetric unit.

  17. Fraunhofer diffraction of atomic matter waves: electron transfer studies with a laser cooled target.

    PubMed

    van der Poel, M; Nielsen, C V; Gearba, M A; Andersen, N

    2001-09-17

    We have constructed an apparatus combining the experimental techniques of cold target recoil ion momentum spectroscopy and a laser cooled target. We measure angle differential cross sections in Li(+)+Na-->Li+Na(+) electron transfer collisions in the keV energy regime with a momentum resolution of 0.12 a.u. yielding an order of magnitude better angular resolution than previous measurements. We resolve Fraunhofer-type diffraction patterns in the differential cross sections. Good agreement with predictions of the semiclassical impact parameter method is obtained.

  18. X-ray diffraction study of highly purified human ceruloplasmin

    SciTech Connect

    Samygina, V. R.; Sokolov, A. V.; Pulina, M. O.; Bartunik, H. D.; Vasil'ev, V. B.

    2008-07-15

    The three-dimensional structure of ceruloplasmin (CP) with unoccupied labile metal-binding sites and the structure of CP containing Ni{sup 2+} in the labile sites were solved for the first time at 2.6 and 2.95 A resolution, respectively. Crystallization was performed with the use of storage-stable CP, which was prepared in the presence of proteinase inhibitors and purified from (pre)proteinases. Ceruloplasmin with Ni{sup 2+} crystallized in the orthorhombic space group, which had been earlier unknown for CP. Ceruloplasmin with the unoccupied labile sites crystallized in the trigonal crystal form. The differences in intermolecular contacts observed in the trigonal and orthorhombic crystal structures of CP are considered. The conformational changes attendant upon Ni{sup 2+} binding are described. It was suggested that the labile sites are multifunctional and can both bind metal ions potentially toxic to organisms and be involved in electron transfer from substrates to the active site.

  19. Electron microscope and low-angle x-ray diffraction studies of the nerve myelin sheath.

    PubMed

    FERNANDEZ-MORAN, H; FINEAN, J B

    1957-09-25

    1. A close correlation has been obtained between high resolution electron microscopy and low-angle x-ray diffraction studies of the myelin sheath of frog and rat peripheral and central nerves. Extensive studies were performed by application of both techniques to the same specimens, prepared for examination by OsO(4) or KMnO(4) fixation, and embedding either in methacrylate or in gelatin employing a new procedure. Controlled physical and chemical modifications of the myelin sheath prior to fixation were also investigated. 2. A correspondence was established between the layer spacings observed in electron micrographs and the fundamental radial repeating unit indicated by the low-angle x-ray diffraction patterns. The variations in relative intensities of the low-angle x-ray reflections could be related to the radial density distributions seen in the electron micrographs. 3. An analysis of the preparation procedures revealed that OsO(4) fixation introduces a greater shrinkage of the layer spacings and more pronounced changes in the density distribution within the layers than KMnO(4) fixation. The effects of methacrylate and gelatin embedding are described, and their relative merits considered in relation to the preservation of myelin structure by OsO(4) fixation. 4. The experimental modifications introduced by freezing and thawing of fresh whole nerve are described, particularly the enhancement of the intermediate lines and the dissociation of the layer components in the myelin sheath. A characteristic collapsing of the radial period of the sheath is observed after subjecting fresh nerve trunks to prolonged and intense ultracentrifugation. 5. Controlled extraction of fresh nerve with acetone at 0 degrees C., which preferentially removes cholesterol, produces characteristic, differentiated modifications of the myelin sheath structure. Electron microscopy reveals several types of modifications within a single preparation, including both expanded and collapsed layer

  20. HIGH RESOLUTION PHOTOEMISSION STUDIES OF COMPLEX MATERIALS.

    SciTech Connect

    JOHNSON,P.D.; VALLA,T.; FEDOROV,A.; REISFELD,G.; HULBERT,S.L.

    1999-10-13

    Recent instrumentation developments in photoemission are providing new insights into the physics of complex materials. With increased energy and momentum resolution, it has become possible to examine in detail different contributions to the self-energy or inverse lifetime of the photohole created in the photoexcitation process. Employing momentum distribution and energy distribution curves, a detailed study of the optimally doped cuprate, Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+{delta}}, shows that the material behaves like a non-Fermi liquid with no evidence for the quasi-particles characteristic of a Fermi liquid.

  1. High-resolution three-dimensional imaging of red blood cells parasitized by Plasmodium falciparum and in situ hemozoin crystals using optical diffraction tomography

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyoohyun; Yoon, HyeOk; Diez-Silva, Monica; Dao, Ming; Dasari, Ramachandra R.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. We present high-resolution optical tomographic images of human red blood cells (RBC) parasitized by malaria-inducing Plasmodium falciparum (Pf)-RBCs. Three-dimensional (3-D) refractive index (RI) tomograms are reconstructed by recourse to a diffraction algorithm from multiple two-dimensional holograms with various angles of illumination. These 3-D RI tomograms of Pf-RBCs show cellular and subcellular structures of host RBCs and invaded parasites in fine detail. Full asexual intraerythrocytic stages of parasite maturation (ring to trophozoite to schizont stages) are then systematically investigated using optical diffraction tomography algorithms. These analyses provide quantitative information on the structural and chemical characteristics of individual host Pf-RBCs, parasitophorous vacuole, and cytoplasm. The in situ structural evolution and chemical characteristics of subcellular hemozoin crystals are also elucidated. PMID:23797986

  2. High-resolution three-dimensional imaging of red blood cells parasitized by Plasmodium falciparum and in situ hemozoin crystals using optical diffraction tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyoohyun; Yoon, HyeOk; Diez-Silva, Monica; Dao, Ming; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Park, YongKeun

    2014-01-01

    We present high-resolution optical tomographic images of human red blood cells (RBC) parasitized by malaria-inducing Plasmodium falciparum (Pf)-RBCs. Three-dimensional (3-D) refractive index (RI) tomograms are reconstructed by recourse to a diffraction algorithm from multiple two-dimensional holograms with various angles of illumination. These 3-D RI tomograms of Pf-RBCs show cellular and subcellular structures of host RBCs and invaded parasites in fine detail. Full asexual intraerythrocytic stages of parasite maturation (ring to trophozoite to schizont stages) are then systematically investigated using optical diffraction tomography algorithms. These analyses provide quantitative information on the structural and chemical characteristics of individual host Pf-RBCs, parasitophorous vacuole, and cytoplasm. The in situ structural evolution and chemical characteristics of subcellular hemozoin crystals are also elucidated.

  3. Neutron scattering and diffraction instrument for structural study on biology in Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Niimura, Nobuo

    1994-12-31

    Neutron scattering and diffraction instruments in Japan which can be used for structural studies in biology are briefly introduced. Main specifications and general layouts of the instruments are shown.

  4. High-Resolution Scintimammography: A Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect

    Rachel F. Brem; Joelle M. Schoonjans; Douglas A. Kieper; Stan Majewski; Steven Goodman; Cahid Civelek

    2002-07-01

    This study evaluated a novel high-resolution breast-specific gamma camera (HRBGC) for the detection of suggestive breast lesions. Methods: Fifty patients (with 58 breast lesions) for whom a scintimammogram was clinically indicated were prospectively evaluated with a general-purpose gamma camera and a novel HRBGC prototype. The results of conventional and high-resolution nuclear studies were prospectively classified as negative (normal or benign) or positive (suggestive or malignant) by 2 radiologists who were unaware of the mammographic and histologic results. All of the included lesions were confirmed by pathology. Results: There were 30 benign and 28 malignant lesions. The sensitivity for detection of breast cancer was 64.3% (18/28) with the conventional camera and 78.6% (22/28) with the HRBGC. The specificity with both systems was 93.3% (28/30). For the 18 nonpalpable lesions, sensitivity was 55.5% (10/18) and 72.2% (13/18) with the general-purpose camera and the HRBGC, respectively. For lesions 1 cm, 7 of 15 were detected with the general-purpose camera and 10 of 15 with the HRBGC. Four lesions (median size, 8.5 mm) were detected only with the HRBGC and were missed by the conventional camera. Conclusion: Evaluation of indeterminate breast lesions with an HRBGC results in improved sensitivity for the detection of cancer, with greater improvement shown for nonpalpable and 1-cm lesions.

  5. Trapping the M sub 1 and M sub 2 substrates of bacteriorhodopsin for electron diffraction studies

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, G.A.

    1992-05-01

    Visible and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) absorption spectroscopies are used to observe protein conformational changes occuring during the bacteriorhodopsin photocycle. Spectroscopic measurements which define the conditions under which bacteriorhodopsin can be isolated and trapped in two distinct substates of the m intermediate of the photocycle, M{sub 1}, and M{sub 2}, are described. A protocol that can be used for high-resolution electron diffraction studies is presented that will trap glucose-embedded purple membrane in the M{sub 1}and M{sub 2} substates at greater than 90% concentration. It was discovered that glucose alone does not provide a fully hydrated environment for bacteriorhodopsin. Equilibration of glucose-embedded samples at high humidity can result in a physical state that is demonstrably closer to the native, fully hydrated state. An extension of the C-T Model of bacteriorhodopsin functionality (Fodor et al., 1988; Mathies et al., 1991) is proposed based on FTIR results and guided by published spectra from resonance Raman and FTIR work. 105 refs.

  6. Phase relations in KxFe2-ySe2 and the structure of superconducting KxFe2Se2 via high-resolution synchrotron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoemaker, Daniel P.; Chung, Duck Young; Claus, Helmut; Francisco, Melanie C.; Avci, Sevda; Llobet, Anna; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G.

    2012-11-01

    Superconductivity in iron selenides has experienced a rapid growth, but not without major inconsistencies in the reported properties. For alkali-intercalated iron selenides, even the structure of the superconducting phase is a subject of debate, in part because the onset of superconductivity is affected much more delicately by stoichiometry and preparation than in cuprate or pnictide superconductors. If high-quality, pure, superconducting intercalated iron selenides are ever to be made, the intertwined physics and chemistry must be explained by systematic studies of how these materials form and by and identifying the many coexisting phases. To that end, we prepared pure K2Fe4Se5 powder and superconductors in the KxFe2-ySe2 system, and examined differences in their structures by high-resolution synchrotron and single-crystal x-ray diffraction. We found four distinct phases: semiconducting K2Fe4Se5, a metallic superconducting phase KxFe2Se2 with x ranging from 0.38 to 0.58, the phase KFe1.6Se2 with full K occupancy and no Fe vacancy ordering, and a oxidized phase K0.51(5)Fe0.70(2)Se that forms the PbClF structure upon exposure to moisture. We find that the vacancy-ordered phase K2Fe4Se5 does not become superconducting by doping, but the distinct iron-rich minority phase KxFe2Se2 precipitates from single crystals upon cooling from above the vacancy ordering temperature. This coexistence of separate metallic and semiconducting phases explains a broad maximum in resistivity around 100 K. Further studies to understand the solubility of excess Fe in the KxFe2-ySe2 structure will shed light on the maximum fraction of superconducting KxFe2Se2 that can be obtained by solid state synthesis.

  7. Electron diffraction studies of molecular ordering and orientation in phospholipid monolayer domains.

    PubMed

    Hui, S W; Yu, H

    1993-01-01

    The molecular order and orientation of phase separated domains in monolayers of DP(Me)PE and DP(Me)2PE were determined by electron diffraction. Dark and bright fluorescent domains at the air-water interface were observed by fluorescence microscopy. The monolayers were transferred to Formvar coated electron microscope grids for electron diffraction studies. The positions of domains on the marker grids were recorded in fluorescence micrographs, which were used as guide maps to locate these domains in the electron microscope. Selected area electron diffraction patterns were obtained from predetermined areas within and outside the dark domains. Sharp hexagonal diffraction patterns were recorded from dark domains, and diffuse diffraction rings from bright areas in between dark domains. The diffraction results indicated that the dark domains and bright areas were comprised of lipid molecules in solid and fluid states, respectively. The orientation of diffraction patterns from adjacent locations within a dark domains changed gradually, indicating a continuous bending of the molecular packing lattice vector within these domains. Orientation directors in U-shaped DP(Me)2PE domains followed the turn of the arm; no vortex nor branching was indicated by electron diffraction. Directors branching from the "stem" of highly invaginated DP(Me)PE domains usually occurred at twinning angles of n pi/3 from the stem director, which would minimize packing defects in the development of thinner branches. Electron diffraction from local areas of individual domains proved that dark fluorescent domains were solid ones, and that pseudo-long range order existed in these solid domains.

  8. High-pressure X-ray diffraction studies on β-Ni(OH) 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garg, Nandini; Karmakar, S.; Sharma, Surinder M.; Busseto, E.; Sikka, S. K.

    2004-06-01

    Using in situ X-ray diffraction, we have investigated the high-pressure behavior of β-Ni(OH) 2 upto 10 GPa. No phase transformation was observed in this pressure range. Our studies show that the diffraction peaks show inherent broadening on increase of pressure. This suggests that H-lattice may be already disordered at ambient conditions and further increase in pressure may increase the lattice disorder as observed in Co(OH) 2 (Phys. Rev. B 66 (2002) 134301).

  9. High-resolution 2-D Bragg diffraction reveal heterogeneous domain transformation behavior in a bulk relaxor ferroelectric

    DOE PAGES

    Pramanick, Abhijit; Stoica, Alexandru D.; An, Ke

    2016-09-02

    In-situ measurement of fine-structure of neutron Bragg diffraction peaks from a relaxor single-crystal using a time-of-flight instrument reveals highly heterogeneous mesoscale domain transformation behavior under applied electric fields. We observed that only 25% of domains undergo reorienta- tion or phase transition contributing to large average strains, while at least 40% remain invariant and exhibit microstrains. Such insights could be central for designing new relaxor materials with better performance and longevity. The current experimental technique can also be applied to resolve com- plex mesoscale phenomena in other functional materials.

  10. Diffraction and imaging study of imperfections of crystallized lysozyme with coherent X-rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Z. W.; Chu, Y. S.; Lai, B.; Thomas, B. R.; Chernov, A. A.

    2004-01-01

    Phase-contrast X-ray diffraction imaging and high-angular-resolution diffraction combined with phase-contrast radiographic imaging were employed to characterize defects and perfection of a uniformly grown tetragonal lysozyme crystal in the symmetric Laue case. The full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) of a 4 4 0 rocking curve measured from the original crystal was approximately 16.7 arcsec and imperfections including line defects, inclusions and other microdefects were observed in the diffraction images of the crystal. The observed line defects carry distinct dislocation features running approximately along the <1 1 0> growth front and have been found to originate mostly in a central growth area and occasionally in outer growth regions. Inclusions of impurities or formations of foreign particles in the central growth region are resolved in the images with high sensitivity to defects. Slow dehydration led to the broadening of a fairly symmetric 4 4 0 rocking curve by a factor of approximately 2.6, which was primarily attributed to the dehydration-induced microscopic effects that are clearly shown in X-ray diffraction images. The details of the observed defects and the significant change in the revealed microstructures with drying provide insight into the nature of imperfections, nucleation and growth, and the properties of protein crystals.

  11. A multi-step strategy to obtain crystals of the dengue virus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase that diffract to high resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Yap, Thai Leong; Chen, Yen Liang; Xu, Ting; Wen, Daying; Vasudevan, Subhash G.; Lescar, Julien

    2007-02-01

    Crystals of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase catalytic domain from the dengue virus NS5 protein have been obtained using a strategy that included expression screening of naturally occurring serotype variants of the protein, the addition of divalent metal ions and crystal dehydration. These crystals diffract to 1.85 Å resolution and are thus suitable for a structure-based drug-design program. Dengue virus, a member of the Flaviviridae genus, causes dengue fever, an important emerging disease with several million infections occurring annually for which no effective therapy exists. The viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase NS5 plays an important role in virus replication and represents an interesting target for the development of specific antiviral compounds. Crystals that diffract to 1.85 Å resolution that are suitable for three-dimensional structure determination and thus for a structure-based drug-design program have been obtained using a strategy that included expression screening of naturally occurring serotype variants of the protein, the addition of divalent metal ions and crystal dehydration.

  12. Preparation, crystallization and X-ray diffraction analysis to 1.5 Å resolution of rat cysteine dioxygenase, a mononuclear iron enzyme responsible for cysteine thiol oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, Chad R.; Hao, Quan; Stipanuk, Martha H.

    2005-11-01

    Recombinant rat cysteine dioxygenase (CDO) has been expressed, purified and crystallized and X-ray diffraction data have been collected to 1.5 Å resolution. Cysteine dioxygenase (CDO; EC 1.13.11.20) is an ∼23 kDa non-heme iron metalloenzyme that is responsible for the oxidation of cysteine by O{sub 2}, yielding cysteinesulfinate. CDO catalyzes the first step in the conversion of cysteine to taurine, as well as the first step in the catabolism of cysteine to pyruvate plus sulfate. Recombinant rat CDO was heterologously expressed, purified and crystallized. The protein was expressed as a fusion protein bearing a polyhistidine tag to facilitate purification, a thioredoxin tag to improve solubility and a factor Xa cleavage site to permit removal of the entire N-terminus, leaving only the 200 amino acids inherent to the native protein. A multi-step purification scheme was used to achieve >95% purity of CDO. The optimal CDO crystals diffracted to 1.5 Å resolution and belonged to space group P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2 or P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 57.55, c = 123.06 Å, α = β = γ = 90°. CDO shows little homology to any other proteins; therefore, the structure of the enzyme will be determined by ab initio phasing using a selenomethionyl derivative.

  13. Crystallization and preliminary diffraction studies of CBM3b of cellobiohydrolase 9A from Clostridium thermocellum

    SciTech Connect

    Jindou, Sadanari; Petkun, Svetlana; Shimon, Linda; Bayer, Edward A.; Lamed, Raphael; Frolow, Felix

    2007-12-01

    The cloning, expression, purification and crystallization of the CBM3b module of cellobiohydrolase 9A from C. thermocellum is described. The crystals diffract to 2.68 Å. Family 3 carbohydrate-binding modules (CBM3s) are associated with the scaffoldin subunit of the multi-enzyme cellulosome complex and with the family 9 glycoside hydrolases, which are multimodular enzymes that act on plant cell-wall polysaccharides, notably cellulose. Here, the crystallization of CBM3b from cellobiohydrolase 9A is reported. The crystals are tetragonal and belong to space group P4{sub 1} or P4{sub 3}. X-ray diffraction data for CBM3b have been collected to 2.68 Å resolution on beamline ID14-4 at the ESRF.

  14. 18 CFR 5.14 - Formal study dispute resolution process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 31 CFR part 301. (h) To facilitate the delivery of information to the dispute resolution panel, the... resolution process. 5.14 Section 5.14 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY... PROCESS § 5.14 Formal study dispute resolution process. (a) Within 20 days of the Study Plan...

  15. High-energy x-ray diffraction study of pure amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Laaziri, K.; Kycia, S.; Roorda, S.; Chicoine, M.; Robertson, J.L.; Wang, J.; Moss, S.C.

    1999-11-01

    Medium and high-energy x-ray diffraction has been used to study the atomic structure of pure amorphous Si prepared by MeV Si implantation into crystalline silicon. Both as-implanted and annealed samples were studied. The inelastically scattered x rays were removed by fitting the energy spectrum for the scattered x rays. The atomic scattering factor of silicon, previously known reliably up to 20 {Angstrom}{sup {minus}1}, has been extended to 55 {Angstrom}{sup {minus}1}. The radial distribution function of amorphous Si, before and after annealing, has been determined through an unbiased Fourier transformation of the normalized scattering data. Gaussian fits to the first neighbor peak in these functions shows that scattering data out to at least 40 {Angstrom}{sup {minus}1} is required to reliably determine the radial distribution function. The first-shell coordination number increases from 3.79 to 3.88 upon thermal annealing at 600{degree}C, whereas that of crystalline Si determined from similar measurements on a Si powder analyzed using the same technique is 4.0. Amorphous Si is therefore under coordinated relative to crystalline Si. Noise in the distribution function, caused by statistical variations in the scattering data at high-momentum transfer, has been reduced without affecting the experimental resolution through filtering of the interference function after subtracting the contribution of the first-neighbor peak. The difference induced by thermal annealing in the remainder of the radial distribution functions, thus revealed, is much smaller than previously believed. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  16. Purification, crystallization, and preliminary X-ray diffraction study of purine nucleoside phosphorylase from E. coli

    SciTech Connect

    Abramchik, Yu. A. Timofeev, V. I. Zhukhlistova, N. E.; Muravieva, T. I.; Esipov, R. S.; Kuranova, I. P.

    2015-07-15

    Crystals of E. coli purine nucleoside phosphorylase were grown in microgravity by the capillary counter-diffusion method through a gel layer. The X-ray diffraction data set suitable for the determination of the three-dimensional structure at atomic resolution was collected from one crystal at the Spring-8 synchrotron facility to 0.99 Å resolution. The crystals belong to sp. gr. P2{sub 1} and have the following unit-cell parameters: a = 74.1 Å, b = 110.2 Å, c = 88.2 Å, α = γ = 90°, β = 111.08°. The crystal contains six subunits of the enzyme comprising a hexamer per asymmetric unit. The hexamer is the biological active form of E. coli. purine nucleoside phosphorylase.

  17. Misorientations in [001] magnetite thin films studied by electron backscatter diffraction and magnetic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koblischka-Veneva, A.; Koblischka, M. R.; Wei, J. D.; Zhou, Y.; Murphy, S.; Mücklich, F.; Hartmann, U.; Shvets, I. V.

    2007-05-01

    Magnetite thin films grown on [001] oriented MgO substrates are analyzed by means of electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) analysis and magnetic force microscopy in applied fields. The EBSD technique enables the crystallographic orientation of individual grains to be determined with a high spatial resolution up to 20nm on such ceramic samples. A high image quality of the recorded Kikuchi patterns was achieved enabling multiphase scans and high spatial resolution measurements. Upon annealing in air, the magnetic properties of the magnetite thin films were found to change considerably. Using the EBSD analysis, we find that misoriented grains remaining after the annealing step form small islands with a size of about 100nm. The size and distribution of these islands correspond well to the observations of antiferromagnetic pinning centers within the magnetic domain structures carried out by magnetic force microscopy on the same samples.

  18. Electron Diffraction Study of α-AlMnSi Crystals Along Non-Crystallographic Zone Axes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, G. L.; Bursill, L. A.

    The structure of crystalline α-AlMnSi is examined by electron diffraction. Six distinct zone axes are examined, including both normal crystallographic and non-crystallographic zone axes, allowing the space group symmetry of α-AlMnSi to be studied. A method for indexing the non-crystallographic zone axis diffraction patterns, which involve reflections from several nearby crystallographic zone axes, is described and applied to electron diffraction patterns of the quasi-5-fold, 3-fold and 2-fold axes of the icosahedral building units of cubic α-AlMnSi. These are compared with electron diffraction patterns from the corresponding 5-fold, 3-fold and 2-fold axes of the quasicrystalline phase i-AlMnSi, from which we may make some conclusions concerning the occupancies of the icosahedral units in i-AlMnSi. Electron diffraction patterns characteristic of Pmbar {3} were obtained for thicker specimens. However, for thin specimens, as used for HRTEM imaging, the electron diffraction patterns were characteristic of Imbar {3} space group symmetry. This unusual behaviour arises because the structural basis for the Pmbar {3} to Imbar {3} phase transition is a weak effect, involving changes in occupancy of the icosahedral structural elements located at the corners (double-MacKay icosahedra) and body-centers (MacKay icosahedra) of the cubic unit cell. The effects of changing the occupancies of the outer shells of the MI and DMI structural units on the diffraction intensities of the weak reflections were examined. Thus, calculation of the dynamical diffraction amplitudes shows that in fact the weak reflections characteristic of Pmbar {3} only develop sufficient intensity if two conditions are satisfied: namely (1) the crystal thickness exceeds approx. 50 nm and (2) if a significant proportion of Imbar {3} occupancies are included in the structural model. By fitting the observed thickness variation of the diffraction intensities we propose a new set of occupancies for

  19. X-ray diffraction study of A- plane non-polar InN epilayer grown by MOCVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moret, Matthieu; Briot, Olivier; Gil, Bernard

    2015-03-01

    Strong polarisation-induced electric fields in C-plane oriented nitrides semiconductor layers reduce the performance of devices. Eliminating the polarization fields can be achieved by growing nitrides along non polar direction. We have grown non polar A-plane oriented InN on R-plane (1‾102) nitridated sapphire substrate by MOCVD. We have studied the structural anisotropy observed in these layers by analyzing High Resolution XRay Diffraction rocking curve (RC) experiments as a function of the in-plane beam orientation. A-plane InN epilayer have a unique epitaxial relationship on R-Plane sapphire and show a strong structural anisotropy. Full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the InN(11‾20) XRD RC values are contained between 44 and 81 Arcmin. FWHM is smaller when the diffraction occurs along the [0001] and the largest FWHM values, of the (11‾20) RC, are obtained when the diffraction occurs along the [1‾100] in-plane direction. Atomic Force Microscopy imaging revealed morphologies with well organized crystallites. The grains are structured along a unique crystallographic orientation of InN, leading to larger domains in this direction. This structural anisotropy can be, in first approximation, attributed to the difference in the domain sizes observed. XRD reciprocal space mappings (RSM) were performed in asymmetrical configuration on (13‾40) and (2‾202) diffraction plane. RSM are measured with a beam orientation corresponding to a maximal and a minimal width of the (11‾20) Rocking curves, respectively. A simple theoretical model is exposed to interpret the RSM. We concluded that the dominant contribution to the anisotropy is due to the scattering coherence length anisotropy present in our samples.

  20. Expression, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of recombinant Clostridium perfringens β2-toxin

    SciTech Connect

    Gurjar, Abhijit A.; Yennawar, Neela H.; Yennawar, Hemant P.; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Hegde, Narasimha V.; Jayarao, Bhushan M.

    2007-06-01

    The cloning, expression, purification and crystallization of recombinant Clostridium perfringens β2-toxin is described. The crystals diffracted to 2.9 Å resolution. Clostridium perfringens is a Gram-positive sporulating anaerobic bacterium that is responsible for a wide spectrum of diseases in animals, birds and humans. The virulence of C. perfringens is associated with the production of several enterotoxins and exotoxins. β2-toxin is a 28 kDa exotoxin produced by C. perfringens. It is implicated in necrotic enteritis in animals and humans, a disease characterized by a sudden acute onset with lethal hemorrhagic mucosal ulceration. The recombinant expression, purification and crystallization of β2-toxin using the batch-under-oil technique are reported here. Native X-ray diffraction data were obtained to 2.9 Å resolution on a synchrotron beamline at the F2 station at Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS) using an ADSC Quantum-210 CCD detector. The crystals belong to space group R3, with a dimer in the asymmetric unit; the unit-cell parameters are a = b = 103.71, c = 193.48 Å, α = β = 90, γ = 120° using the hexagonal axis setting. A self-rotation function shows that the two molecules are related by a noncrystallographic twofold axis with polar angles ω = 90.0, ϕ = 210.3°.

  1. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction study of phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase from E. Coli

    SciTech Connect

    Timofeev, V. I. Abramchik, Yu. A. Zhukhlistova, N. E. Kuranova, I. P.

    2015-09-15

    Enzymes of the phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase family (PRPPS, EC 2.7.6.1) catalyze the formation of 5-phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate (5-PRPP) from adenosine triphosphate and ribose 5-phosphate. 5-Phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate is an important intermediate in the synthesis of purine, pyrimidine, and pyridine nucleotides, as well as of the amino acids histidine and tryptophan. The crystallization conditions for E. coli PRPPS were found by the vapor-diffusion technique and were optimized to apply the capillary counter-diffusion technique. The X-ray diffraction data set was collected from the crystals grown by the counter-diffusion technique using a synchrotron radiation source to 3.1-Å resolution. The crystals of PRPPS belong to sp. gr. P6{sub 3}22 and have the following unit-cell parameters: a = b = 104.44 Å, c = 124.98 Å, α = β = 90°, γ = 120°. The collected X-ray diffraction data set is suitable for the solution of the three-dimensional structure of PRPPS at 3.1-Å resolution.

  2. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of the glutaminyl cyclase from Carica papaya latex

    SciTech Connect

    Azarkan, Mohamed; Clantin, Bernard; Bompard, Coralie; Belrhali, Hassan; Baeyens-Volant, Danielle; Looze, Yvan; Wintjens, René

    2005-01-01

    The glutaminyl cyclase isolated from C. papaya latex has been crystallized using the hanging-drop method. Diffraction data have been collected at ESRF beamline BM14 and processed to 1.7 Å resolution. In living systems, the intramolecular cyclization of N-terminal glutamine residues is accomplished by glutaminyl cyclase enzymes (EC 2.3.2.5). While in mammals these enzymes are involved in the synthesis of hormonal and neurotransmitter peptides, the physiological role played by the corresponding plant enzymes still remains to be unravelled. Papaya glutaminyl cyclase (PQC), a 33 kDa enzyme found in the latex of the tropical tree Carica papaya, displays an exceptional resistance to chemical and thermal denaturation as well as to proteolysis. In order to elucidate its enzymatic mechanism and to gain insights into the structural determinants underlying its remarkable stability, PQC was isolated from papaya latex, purified and crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals belong to the orthorhombic space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 62.82, b = 81.23, c = 108.17 Å and two molecules per asymmetric unit. Diffraction data have been collected at ESRF beamline BM14 and processed to a resolution of 1.7 Å.

  3. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of l-rhamnose isomerase from Pseudomonas stutzeri

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Hiromi; Wayoon, Poonperm; Takada, Goro; Izumori, Ken; Kamitori, Shigehiro

    2006-06-01

    Recombinant l-rhamnose isomerase from P. stutzeri has been crystallized. Diffraction data have been collected to 2.0 Å resolution. l-Rhamnose isomerase from Pseudomonas stutzeri (P. stutzeril-RhI) catalyzes not only the reversible isomerization of l-rhamnose to l-rhamnulose, but also isomerization between various rare aldoses and ketoses. Purified His-tagged P. stutzeril-RhI was crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals belong to the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 74.3, b = 104.0, c = 107.0 Å, β = 106.8°. Diffraction data have been collected to 2.0 Å resolution. The molecular weight of the purified P. stutzeril-RhI with a His tag at the C-terminus was confirmed to be 47.7 kDa by MALDI–TOF mass-spectrometric analysis and the asymmetric unit is expected to contain four molecules.

  4. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction study of phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase from E. Coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timofeev, V. I.; Abramchik, Yu. A.; Zhukhlistova, N. E.; Kuranova, I. P.

    2015-09-01

    Enzymes of the phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase family (PRPPS, EC 2.7.6.1) catalyze the formation of 5-phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate (5-PRPP) from adenosine triphosphate and ribose 5-phosphate. 5-Phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate is an important intermediate in the synthesis of purine, pyrimidine, and pyridine nucleotides, as well as of the amino acids histidine and tryptophan. The crystallization conditions for E. coli PRPPS were found by the vapor-diffusion technique and were optimized to apply the capillary counter-diffusion technique. The X-ray diffraction data set was collected from the crystals grown by the counter-diffusion technique using a synchrotron radiation source to 3.1-Å resolution. The crystals of PRPPS belong to sp. gr. P6322 and have the following unit-cell parameters: a = b = 104.44 Å, c = 124.98 Å, α = β = 90°, γ = 120°. The collected X-ray diffraction data set is suitable for the solution of the three-dimensional structure of PRPPS at 3.1-Å resolution.

  5. Bulk crystal growth, and high-resolution x-ray diffraction results of LiZnP semiconductor material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montag, Benjamin W.; Reichenberger, Michael A.; Sunder, Madhana; Ugorowski, Philip B.; Nelson, Kyle A.; McGregor, Douglas S.

    2015-06-01

    Nowotny-Juza compounds continue to be explored as a candidate for solid-state neutron detectors. Such a device would have greater efficiency, in a compact form, than present day gas-filled 3He and 10BF3 detectors. The 6Li(n,t)4He reaction yields a total Q-value of 4.78 MeV, larger than 10B, an energy easily identified above background radiations. Hence, devices fabricated from semiconducting compounds containing either natural Li (nominally 7.5% 6Li) or enriched 6Li (usually 95% 6Li) may provide a semiconductor material for compact high efficiency neutron detectors. Starting material was synthesized by preparing equimolar portions of Li, Zn, and P sealed under vacuum (10-6 Torr) in quartz ampoules lined with boron nitride and subsequently reacted in a compounding furnace [1]. The synthesized material showed signs of high impurity levels from material and electrical property characterizations. A static vacuum sublimation in quartz was performed to help purify the synthesized material [2]. Bulk crystalline samples were grown from the purified material. An ingot 9.6 mm in diameter and 4.0 mm in length was harvested. Individual samples were characterized for crystallinity on a Bruker AXS Inc. D2 CRYSO, energy dispersive x-ray diffractometer, and a Bruker AXS D8 DISCOVER, high-resolution x-ray diffractometer with a 0.004° beam divergence. The (220) orientation was characterized as the main orientation with the D2 CRYSO, and confirmed with the D8 DISCOVER. An out-of-plane high-resolution rocking curve yielded a 0.417° full width at half maximum (FWHM) for the (220) LiZnP. In-plane ordering was confirmed by observation of the (311) orientation, where a rocking curve was collected with a FWHM of 0.294°.

  6. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of Seneca Valley Virus-001, a new member of the Picornaviridae family

    SciTech Connect

    Venkataraman, Sangita; Reddy, Seshidhar P.; Loo, Jackie; Idamakanti, Neeraja; Hallenbeck, Paul L.; Reddy, Vijay S.

    2008-04-01

    Seneca Valley Virus-001 of the Picornavirdae family was crystallized in the space group R3 and X-ray diffraction data was collected to a resolution of 2.3 Å. Rotation-function studies suggested the presence of two distict sets of 20 protomers that belong to two different virus particles in the crystallographic asymmetric unit. Seneca Valley Virus-001 (SVV-001) is a newly found species in the Picornaviridae family. SVV-001 is the first naturally occurring nonpathogenic picorna@@virus observed to mediate selective cytotoxicity towards tumor cells with neuroendocrine cancer features. The nonsegmented (+)ssRNA genome of SVV-001 shares closest sequence similarity to the genomes of the members of the Cardiovirus genus. However, based on the distinct characteristics of the genome organization and other biochemical properties, it has been suggested that SVV-001 represents a new genus, namely ‘Senecavirus’, in the Picornaviridae family. In order to understand the oncolytic properties of SVV-001, the native virus was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals belonged to space group R3, with unit-cell parameters (in the hexagonal setting) a = b = 311.5, c = 1526.4 Å. Although the SVV crystals diffracted to better than 2.3 Å resolution, the data quality is acceptable [I/σ(I) > 2.0] to 2.6 Å resolution. The unit-cell volume and the locked rotation-function analysis suggest that six particles could be accommodated in the unit cell, with two distinct sets of one third of a particle, each containing 20 protomers, occupying the crystallographic asymmetric unit.

  7. Combining 2 nm Spatial Resolution and 0.02% Precision for Deformation Mapping of Semiconductor Specimens in a Transmission Electron Microscope by Precession Electron Diffraction.

    PubMed

    Cooper, David; Bernier, Nicolas; Rouvière, Jean-Luc

    2015-08-12

    Precession electron diffraction has been used to provide accurate deformation maps of a device structure showing that this technique can provide a spatial resolution of better than 2 nm and a precision of better than 0.02%. The deformation maps have been fitted to simulations that account for thin specimen relaxation. By combining the experimental deformation maps and simulations, we have been able to separate the effects of the stressor and recessed sources and drains and show that the Si3N4 stressor increases the in-plane deformation in the silicon channel from 0.92 to 1.52 ± 0.02%. In addition, the stress in the deposited Si3N4 film has been calculated from the simulations, which is an important parameter for device design.

  8. High-resolution x-ray diffraction investigation of relaxation and dislocations in SiGe layers grown on (001), (011), and (111) Si substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Zhylik, A.; Benediktovich, A.; Ulyanenkov, A.; Guerault, H.; Myronov, M.; Dobbie, A.; Leadley, D. R.; Ulyanenkova, T.

    2011-06-15

    This work presents a detailed characterization, using high-resolution x-ray diffraction, of multilayered Si{sub 1-x}Ge{sub x} heterostructures grown on (001), (011), and (111) Si substrates by reduced pressure chemical vapor deposition. Reciprocal space mapping has been used to determine both the strain and Ge concentration depth profiles within each layer of the heterostructures after initially determining the crystallographic tilt of all the layers. Both symmetric and asymmetric reciprocal space maps were measured on each sample, and the evaluation was performed simultaneously for the whole data set. The ratio of misfit to threading dislocation densities has been estimated for each individual layer based on an analysis of diffuse x-ray scattering from the defects.

  9. Crystallization temperature determination of Itokawa particles by plagioclase thermometry with X-ray diffraction data obtained by a high-resolution synchrotron Gandolfi camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Masahiko; Nakamura, Tomoki; Noguchi, Takaaki; Nakato, Aiko; Ishida, Hatsumi; Yada, Toru; Shirai, Kei; Fujimura, Akio; Ishibashi, Yukihiro; Abe, Masanao; Okada, Tatsuaki; Ueno, Munetaka; Mukai, Toshifumi

    2014-02-01

    The crystallization temperatures of Itokawa surface particles recovered by the space probe Hayabusa were estimated by a plagioclase geothermometer using sodic plagioclase triclinicity. The Δ131-index required for the thermometer, which is the difference in X-ray diffraction peak positions between the 131 and 13¯1 reflections of plagioclase, was obtained by a high-resolution synchrotron Gandolfi camera developed for the third generation synchrotron radiation beamline, BL15XU at SPring-8. Crystallization temperatures were successfully determined from the Δ131-indices for four particles. The observed plagioclase crystallization temperatures were in a range from 655 to 660 °C. The temperatures indicate crystallization temperatures of plagioclases in the process of prograde metamorphism before the peak metamorphic stage.

  10. Low energy electron diffraction study of high index copper surfaces underneath graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chenfang; Tong, Nai; Yang, Weisheng; Zhao, Ruguang; Hu, Zonghai

    2015-08-01

    After growth of graphene by chemical vapour deposition on copper foil, Cu(4 1 0) facets were distinguished from Cu(1 0 0) facets using the low energy electron diffraction technique. Evolution of the diffraction patterns was studied after oxidation of the Cu substrate and subsequent annealing in ultrahigh vacuum. An ordered Cu(4 1 0)-O phase was then identified. The distinction between Cu(4 1 0) and Cu(4 1 0)-O is relevant in determination of the coupling between graphene and the substrate.

  11. Charge-density distribution and electrostatic flexibility of ZIF-8 based on high-resolution X-ray diffraction data and periodic calculations.

    PubMed

    Novaković, Sladjana B; Bogdanović, Goran A; Heering, Christian; Makhloufi, Gamall; Francuski, Djordje; Janiak, Christoph

    2015-03-16

    The electron-density distribution in a prototypical porous coordination polymer ZIF-8 has been obtained in an approach combining high-resolution X-ray diffraction data and Invariom refinement. In addition, the periodic quantum-chemical calculation has been used to describe the theoretical density features of ZIF-8 in the same geometry (m1) and also in a "high-pressure" form of ZIF-8 (m2) characterized by conformational change with respect to the methylimidazolate linker. A thorough comparison of the electronic and electrostatic properties in two limiting structural forms of ZIF-8 proposes additional aspects on diffusion and adsorption processes occurring within the framework. The dimensions of the four-membered (FM) and six-membered (SM) apertures of the β cage are reliably determined from the total electron-density distribution. The analysis shows that FM in m2 becomes competitive in size to the SM aperture and should be considered for the diffusion of small molecules and cations. Bader's topological analysis (quantum theory of atoms in molecules) shows similar properties of both ZIF-8 forms. On the other hand, analysis of their electrostatic properties reveals tremendous differences. The study suggests exceptional electrostatic flexibility of the ZIF-8 framework, where small conformational changes lead to a significantly different electrostatic potential (EP) distribution, a feature that could be important for the function and dynamics of the ZIF-8 framework. The cavity surface in m1 contains 38 distinct regions with moderately positive, negative, or neutral EP and weakly positive EP in the cavity volume. In contrast to m1, the m2 form displays only two regions of different EP, with the positive one taking the whole cavity surface and the strong negative one localized entirely in the FM apertures. The EP in the cavity volume is also more positive than that in m1. A pronounced influence of the linker reorientation on the EP of the ZIF-8 forms is related to the

  12. Method for studying the phase function in tunable diffraction optical elements

    SciTech Connect

    Paranin, V D; Tukmakov, K N

    2014-04-28

    A method for studying the phase function in tunable diffraction optical elements is proposed, based on measurement of the transmission of interelectrode gaps. The mathematical description of the method, which is approved experimentally, is developed. The instrumental error effects are analysed. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  13. Preliminary design of a zone plate based hard X-ray monochromatic diffraction nanoprobe for materials studies at APS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Zhonghou; Liu, Wenjun; Tischler, Jonathan Z.; Shu, Deming; Xu, Ruqing; Schmidt, Oliver

    2013-09-01

    Aiming at studies of the micro/nano-structures of a broad range materials and electronic devices, Advance Photon Source (APS) is developing a dedicated diffraction nanoprobe (DNP) beamline for the needs arising from a multidiscipline research community. As a part of the APS Upgrade Project, the planed facility, named Sub-micron 3-D Diffraction (S3DD) beamline1, integrates the K-B mirror based polychromatic Laue diffraction and the Fresnel zone-plate based monochromatic diffraction techniques that currently support 3D/2D microdiffraction programs at the 34-ID-E and 2-ID-D of the APS, respectively. Both diffraction nanoprobes are designed to have a 50-nm or better special resolution. The zone-plate based monochromatic DNP has been preliminarily designed and will be constructed at the sector 34-ID. It uses an APS-3.0-cm period or APS-3.3-cm period undulator, a liquid-nitrogen cooled mirror as its first optics, and a water cooled small gap silicon double-crystal monochromator with an energy range of 5-30 keV. A set of zone plates have been designed to optimize for focusing efficiency and the working distance based on the attainable beamline length and the beam coherence. To ensure the nanoprobe performance, high stiffness and high precision flexure stage systems have been designed or demonstrated for optics mounting and sample scanning, and high precision temperature control of the experimental station will be implemented to reduce thermal instability. Designed nanoprobe beamline has a good management on thermal power loading on optical components and allows high degree of the preservation of beam brilliance for high focal flux and coherence. Integrated with variety of X-ray techniques, planed facility provides nano-XRD capability with the maximum reciprocal space accessibility and allows micro/nano-spectroscopy studies with K-edge electron binding energies of most elements down to Vanadium in the periodic table. We will discuss the preliminary design of the zone

  14. Computer Simulations to Study Diffraction Effects of Stacking Faults in Beta-SiC: II. Experimental Verification. 2; Experimental Verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pujar, Vijay V.; Cawley, James D.; Levine, S. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Earlier results from computer simulation studies suggest a correlation between the spatial distribution of stacking errors in the Beta-SiC structure and features observed in X-ray diffraction patterns of the material. Reported here are experimental results obtained from two types of nominally Beta-SiC specimens, which yield distinct XRD data. These samples were analyzed using high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and the stacking error distribution was directly determined. The HRTEM results compare well to those deduced by matching the XRD data with simulated spectra, confirming the hypothesis that the XRD data is indicative not only of the presence and density of stacking errors, but also that it can yield information regarding their distribution. In addition, the stacking error population in both specimens is related to their synthesis conditions and it appears that it is similar to the relation developed by others to explain the formation of the corresponding polytypes.

  15. Crystallization and X-ray diffraction studies of a complete bacterial fatty-acid synthase type I

    PubMed Central

    Enderle, Mathias; McCarthy, Andrew; Paithankar, Karthik Shivaji; Grininger, Martin

    2015-01-01

    While a deep understanding of the fungal and mammalian multi-enzyme type I fatty-acid synthases (FAS I) has been achieved in recent years, the bacterial FAS I family, which is narrowly distributed within the Actinomycetales genera Mycobacterium, Corynebacterium and Nocardia, is still poorly understood. This is of particular relevance for two reasons: (i) although homologous to fungal FAS I, cryo-electron microscopic studies have shown that bacterial FAS I has unique structural and functional properties, and (ii) M. tuberculosis FAS I is a drug target for the therapeutic treatment of tuberculosis (TB) and therefore is of extraordinary importance as a drug target. Crystals of FAS I from C. efficiens, a homologue of M. tuberculosis FAS I, were produced and diffracted X-rays to about 4.5 Å resolution. PMID:26527268

  16. Crystallization and X-ray diffraction studies of a complete bacterial fatty-acid synthase type I.

    PubMed

    Enderle, Mathias; McCarthy, Andrew; Paithankar, Karthik Shivaji; Grininger, Martin

    2015-11-01

    While a deep understanding of the fungal and mammalian multi-enzyme type I fatty-acid synthases (FAS I) has been achieved in recent years, the bacterial FAS I family, which is narrowly distributed within the Actinomycetales genera Mycobacterium, Corynebacterium and Nocardia, is still poorly understood. This is of particular relevance for two reasons: (i) although homologous to fungal FAS I, cryo-electron microscopic studies have shown that bacterial FAS I has unique structural and functional properties, and (ii) M. tuberculosis FAS I is a drug target for the therapeutic treatment of tuberculosis (TB) and therefore is of extraordinary importance as a drug target. Crystals of FAS I from C. efficiens, a homologue of M. tuberculosis FAS I, were produced and diffracted X-rays to about 4.5 Å resolution.

  17. Neutron powder diffraction study of phase transitions in Sr{sub 2}SnO{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, W.T. . E-mail: w.fu@chem.leidenuniv.nl; Visser, D.; Knight, K.S.; IJdo, D.J.W.

    2004-11-01

    The phase transitions in Sr{sub 2}SnO{sub 4} at high temperature have been studied using high resolution time-of-flight powder neutron diffraction. The room temperature structure of Sr{sub 2}SnO{sub 4} is orthorhombic (Pccn), which can be derived from the tetragonal K{sub 2}NiF{sub 4} structure by tilting the SnO{sub 6} octahedra along the tetragonal [100]{sub T}- and [010]{sub T}-axes with non-equal tilts. At the temperature of about 423K, it transforms to another orthorhombic structure (Bmab) characterized by the SnO{sub 6} octahedral tilt around the [110]{sub T}-axis. At still higher temperatures ({approx}573K) the structure was found to be tetragonal K{sub 2}NiF{sub 4}-type (I4/mmm)

  18. Purification, crystallization, preliminary X-ray diffraction and molecular-replacement studies of great cormorant (Phalacrocorax carbo) haemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Jagadeesan, G; Malathy, P; Gunasekaran, K; Harikrishna Etti, S; Aravindhan, S

    2014-11-01

    Haemoglobin is the iron-containing oxygen-transport metalloprotein that is present in the red blood cells of all vertebrates. In recent decades, there has been substantial interest in attempting to understand the structural basis and functional diversity of avian haemoglobins. Towards this end, purification, crystallization, preliminary X-ray diffraction and molecular-replacement studies have been carried out on cormorant (Phalacrocorax carbo) haemoglobin. Crystals were grown by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method using PEG 3350, NaCl and glycerol as precipitants. The crystals belonged to the trigonal system P3₁21, with unit-cell parameters a=b=55.64, c=153.38 Å, β=120.00°; a complete data set was collected to a resolution of 3.5 Å. Matthews coefficient analysis indicated that the crystals contained a half-tetramer in the asymmetric unit. PMID:25372822

  19. Fresnel Coherent Diffractive Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, G. J.; Quiney, H. M.; Dhal, B. B.; Tran, C. Q.; Nugent, K. A.; Peele, A. G.; Paterson, D.; de Jonge, M. D.

    2006-07-01

    We present an x-ray coherent diffractive imaging experiment utilizing a nonplanar incident wave and demonstrate success by reconstructing a nonperiodic gold sample at 24 nm resolution. Favorable effects of the curved beam illumination are identified.

  20. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of a beta-carbonic anhydrase from the red alga Porphyridium purpureum.

    PubMed

    Mitsuhashi, S; Mizushima, T; Yamashita, E; Miyachi, S; Tsukihara, T

    2000-02-01

    The beta-carbonic anhydrase from the red alga Porphyridium purpureum was heterologously expressed, purified and crystallized. The crystals belong to space group P2(1) (unit-cell parameters a = 63.8, b = 113.9, c = 73.8 A, beta = 104.1 degrees) with two subunits per asymmetric unit and diffract to 2.5 A resolution.

  1. Crystallization and X-ray diffraction studies of a complete bacterial fatty-acid synthase type I

    SciTech Connect

    Enderle, Mathias; McCarthy, Andrew; Paithankar, Karthik Shivaji; Grininger, Martin

    2015-10-23

    Bacterial and fungal type I fatty-acid synthases (FAS I) are evolutionarily connected, as bacterial FAS I is considered to be the ancestor of fungal FAS I. In this work, the production, crystallization and X-ray diffraction data analysis of a bacterial FAS I are reported. While a deep understanding of the fungal and mammalian multi-enzyme type I fatty-acid synthases (FAS I) has been achieved in recent years, the bacterial FAS I family, which is narrowly distributed within the Actinomycetales genera Mycobacterium, Corynebacterium and Nocardia, is still poorly understood. This is of particular relevance for two reasons: (i) although homologous to fungal FAS I, cryo-electron microscopic studies have shown that bacterial FAS I has unique structural and functional properties, and (ii) M. tuberculosis FAS I is a drug target for the therapeutic treatment of tuberculosis (TB) and therefore is of extraordinary importance as a drug target. Crystals of FAS I from C. efficiens, a homologue of M. tuberculosis FAS I, were produced and diffracted X-rays to about 4.5 Å resolution.

  2. Ice Recrystallization in a Solution of a Cryoprotector and Its Inhibition by a Protein: Synchrotron X-Ray Diffraction Study.

    PubMed

    Zakharov, Boris; Fisyuk, Alexander; Fitch, Andy; Watier, Yves; Kostyuchenko, Anastasia; Varshney, Dushyant; Sztucki, Michael; Boldyreva, Elena; Shalaev, Evgenyi

    2016-07-01

    Ice formation and recrystallization is a key phenomenon in freezing and freeze-drying of pharmaceuticals and biopharmaceuticals. In this investigation, high-resolution synchrotron X-ray diffraction is used to quantify the extent of disorder of ice crystals in binary aqueous solutions of a cryoprotectant (sorbitol) and a protein, bovine serum albumin. Ice crystals in more dilute (10 wt%) solutions have lower level of microstrain and larger crystal domain size than these in more concentrated (40 wt%) solutions. Warming the sorbitol-water mixtures from 100 to 228 K resulted in partial ice melting, with simultaneous reduction in the microstrain and increase in crystallite size, that is, recrystallization. In contrast to sorbitol solutions, ice crystals in the BSA solutions preserved both the microstrain and smaller crystallite size on partial melting, demonstrating that BSA inhibits ice recrystallization. The results are consistent with BSA partitioning into quasi-liquid layer on ice crystals but not with a direct protein-ice interaction and protein sorption on ice surface. The study shows for the first time that a common (i.e., not-antifreeze) protein can have a major impact on ice recrystallization and also presents synchrotron X-ray diffraction as a unique tool for quantification of crystallinity and disorder in frozen aqueous systems.

  3. Ice Recrystallization in a Solution of a Cryoprotector and Its Inhibition by a Protein: Synchrotron X-Ray Diffraction Study.

    PubMed

    Zakharov, Boris; Fisyuk, Alexander; Fitch, Andy; Watier, Yves; Kostyuchenko, Anastasia; Varshney, Dushyant; Sztucki, Michael; Boldyreva, Elena; Shalaev, Evgenyi

    2016-07-01

    Ice formation and recrystallization is a key phenomenon in freezing and freeze-drying of pharmaceuticals and biopharmaceuticals. In this investigation, high-resolution synchrotron X-ray diffraction is used to quantify the extent of disorder of ice crystals in binary aqueous solutions of a cryoprotectant (sorbitol) and a protein, bovine serum albumin. Ice crystals in more dilute (10 wt%) solutions have lower level of microstrain and larger crystal domain size than these in more concentrated (40 wt%) solutions. Warming the sorbitol-water mixtures from 100 to 228 K resulted in partial ice melting, with simultaneous reduction in the microstrain and increase in crystallite size, that is, recrystallization. In contrast to sorbitol solutions, ice crystals in the BSA solutions preserved both the microstrain and smaller crystallite size on partial melting, demonstrating that BSA inhibits ice recrystallization. The results are consistent with BSA partitioning into quasi-liquid layer on ice crystals but not with a direct protein-ice interaction and protein sorption on ice surface. The study shows for the first time that a common (i.e., not-antifreeze) protein can have a major impact on ice recrystallization and also presents synchrotron X-ray diffraction as a unique tool for quantification of crystallinity and disorder in frozen aqueous systems. PMID:27287516

  4. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of a catechol-O-methyltransferase/inhibitor complex

    SciTech Connect

    Rodrigues, M. L.; Bonifácio, M. J.; Soares-da-Silva, P.; Carrondo, M. A.; Archer, M.

    2005-01-01

    Catechol-O-methyltransferase has been co-crystallized with a novel inhibitor, which has potential therapeutic application in the Parkinson’s disease therapy. Inhibitors of the enzyme catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) are used as co-adjuvants in the therapy of Parkinson’s disease. A recombinant form of the soluble cytosolic COMT from rat has been co-crystallized with a new potent inhibitor, BIA 8-176 [(3,4-dihydroxy-2-nitrophenyl)phenylmethanone], by the vapour-diffusion method using PEG 6K as precipitant. Crystals diffract to 1.6 Å resolution on a synchrotron-radiation source and belong to the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 52.77, b = 79.63, c = 61.54 Å, β = 91.14°.

  5. In Situ Powder Diffraction Studies of Electrode Materials in Rechargeable Batteries.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Neeraj; Pang, Wei Kong; Guo, Zaiping; Peterson, Vanessa K

    2015-09-01

    The ability to directly track the charge carrier in a battery as it inserts/extracts from an electrode during charge/discharge provides unparalleled insight for researchers into the working mechanism of the device. This crystallographic-electrochemical information can be used to design new materials or modify electrochemical conditions to improve battery performance characteristics, such as lifetime. Critical to collecting operando data used to obtain such information in situ while a battery functions are X-ray and neutron diffractometers with sufficient spatial and temporal resolution to capture complex and subtle structural changes. The number of operando battery experiments has dramatically increased in recent years, particularly those involving neutron powder diffraction. Herein, the importance of structure-property relationships to understanding battery function, why in situ experimentation is critical to this, and the types of experiments and electrochemical cells required to obtain such information are described. For each battery type, selected research that showcases the power of in situ and operando diffraction experiments to understand battery function is highlighted and future opportunities for such experiments are discussed. The intention is to encourage researchers to use in situ and operando techniques and to provide a concise overview of this area of research.

  6. Crystallization and X-ray diffraction studies of cellobiose phosphorylase from Cellulomonas uda.

    PubMed

    Van Hoorebeke, Annelies; Stout, Jan; Kyndt, John; De Groeve, Manu; Dix, Ina; Desmet, Tom; Soetaert, Wim; Van Beeumen, Jozef; Savvides, Savvas N

    2010-03-01

    Disaccharide phosphorylases are able to catalyze both the synthesis and the breakdown of disaccharides and have thus emerged as attractive platforms for tailor-made sugar synthesis. Cellobiose phosphorylase from Cellulomonas uda (CPCuda) is an enzyme that belongs to glycoside hydrolase family 94 and catalyzes the reversible breakdown of cellobiose [beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1,4)-D-glucopyranose] to alpha-D-glucose-1-phosphate and D-glucose. Crystals of ligand-free recombinant CPCuda and of its complexes with substrates and reaction products yielded complete X-ray diffraction data sets to high resolution using synchrotron radiation but suffered from significant variability in diffraction quality. In at least one case an intriguing space-group transition from a primitive monoclinic to a primitive orthorhombic lattice was observed during data collection. The structure of CPCuda was determined by maximum-likelihood molecular replacement, thus establishing a starting point for an investigation of the structural and mechanistic determinants of disaccharide phosphorylase activity.

  7. Study of the spatial resolution for binary readout detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonamine, R.; Maerschalk, T.; Lentdecker, G. De

    2016-07-01

    Often the binary readout is proposed for high granularity detectors to reduce the generated data volume to be readout at the price of a somewhat reduced spatial resolution compared to an analogue readout. We have been studying single hit resolutions obtained with a binary readout using simulations as well as analytical approaches. In this note we show that the detector geometry could be optimized to offer an equivalent spatial resolution than with an analogue readout.

  8. Simultaneous fluorescence and phase imaging with extensions toward sub-diffraction resolution via structured-illumination (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Shwetadwip; Izatt, Joseph A.

    2016-03-01

    In the biological sciences, there is much emphasis on elucidating the functions of various biological components and processes. To do so, advances in general microscopy have yielded various imaging modalities to probe such processes under specific visualization and contrast requirements. Examples of modalities that are popularly integrated into conventional biological studies include fluorescent, dark-field, phase-contrast, and polarization-sensitive microscopies, with each modality offering unique insights into the biological function of the sample. Often times, however, a comprehensive understanding of biological phenomena requires the integration of the unique and separate visualizations of various modalities. Unfortunately, conventional microscopes typically support only one modality and rarely allow multiple modalities to be used in conjunction. Though high-end microscopes may support multimodal visualization, they often require either mechanical (and often manual) toggling, which obstruct real-time multimodal imaging, or simultaneous detection via multiple cameras, which dramatically increases the microscope's cost. Here, we present a one-shot technique that allows multiple imaging channels, of potentially different modalities, to be simultaneously detected by a single camera. We experimentally demonstrate this method on transparent cells that have been tagged for F-actin and nuclear fluorescence. Our multimodal system consists of 2-channel fluorescence and 1-channel quantitative-phase (QP) imaging, and clearly demonstrates ability for simultaneous fluorescent and QP visualization. Though we experimentally verify our framework using dual fluorescent/QP imaging, we emphasize that our framework for single-shot, simultaneous single-camera detection is applicable to an arbitrary number of widefield imaging modalities so long as they fulfill criteria for Fourier spectra separation, SNR, and detector dynamic range

  9. Thermoluminescence and X-ray diffraction studies on sliced ancient porcelain samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, P. L.; Yang, B.

    1999-09-01

    The thermal activation characteristics (TACs) of the sensitivity of the '110°C' peak in 14 sliced ancient Chinese porcelain samples are studied. Comparing with the TACs of natural quartz and synthetic mullite, the relation between the TACs and the composition of the sample is discussed with reference to the X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectra. It is suggested that in some cases, contribution of the porcelain components other than quartz to the TACs is not negligible.

  10. Theoretical study of the anisotropic diffraction of light waves by acoustic waves in lithium niobate crystals.

    PubMed

    Rouvaen, J M; Waxin, G; Gazalet, M G; Bridoux, E

    1990-03-20

    The anisotropic diffraction of light by high frequency longitudinal ultrasonic waves in the tangential phase matching configuration may present some definite advantages over the same interaction using transverse acoustic waves. A systematic search for favorable crystal cuts in lithium niobate was worked out. The main results of this study are reported here; they enable the choice of the best configuration for a given operating center frequency.

  11. X-ray diffraction studies of phase transformations in heavy-metal fluoride glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, N. P.; Doremus, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    Powder X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry studies of the crystallization properties of five ZrF4-based glass compositions have indicated that the crystalline phase in Zr-Ba-La-Pb fluoride glass is beta-BaZrF6; no such identification of crystal phases was obtainable, however, for the other glasses. Reversible polymorphic phase transformations occur in Zr-Ba-La-Li and Zr-Ba-La-Na fluoride glasses, upon heating to higher temperatures.

  12. Possibilities and limitations of synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction with double crystal and double multilayer monochromators for microscopic speciation studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Nolf, Wout; Jaroszewicz, Jakub; Terzano, Roberto; Lind, Ole Christian; Salbu, Brit; Vekemans, Bart; Janssens, Koen; Falkenberg, Gerald

    2009-08-01

    The performance of a combined microbeam X-ray fluorescence/X-ray powder diffraction (XRF/XRPD) measurement station at Hamburger Synchrotronstrahlungslabor (HASYLAB) Beamline L is discussed in comparison to that at European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) ID18F/ID22. The angular resolution in the X-ray diffractograms is documented when different combinations of X-ray source, optics and X-ray diffraction detectors are employed. Typical angular resolution values in the range 0.3-0.5° are obtained at the bending magnet source when a 'pink' beam form of excitation is employed. A similar setup at European Synchrotron Radiation Facility beamlines ID18F and ID22 allows to reach angular resolution values of 0.1-0.15°. In order to document the possibilities and limitations for speciation of metals in environmental materials by means of Hamburger Synchrotronstrahlungslabor Beamline L X-ray fluorescence/X-ray powder diffraction setup, two case studies are discussed, one involved in the identification of the crystal phases in which heavy metals such as chromium, iron, barium and lead are present in polluted soils of an industrial site (Val Basento, Italy) and another involved in the speciation of uranium in depleted uranium particles (Ceja Mountains, Kosovo). In the former case, the angular resolution is sufficient to allow identification of most crystalline phases present while in the latter case, it is necessary to dispose of an angular resolution of ca. 0.2° to distinguish between different forms of oxidized uranium.

  13. HIV-1 Nef protein: purification, crystallizations, and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies.

    PubMed

    Franken, P; Arold, S; Padilla, A; Bodeus, M; Hoh, F; Strub, M P; Boyer, M; Jullien, M; Benarous, R; Dumas, C

    1997-12-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus Nef protein accelerates virulent progression of AIDS by its interaction with specific cellular proteins involved in cellular activation and signal transduction. Here we report the purification and crystallization of the conserved core of HIV-1LAI Nef protein in the unliganded form and in complex with the wild-type SH3 domain of the P59fyn protein-tyrosine kinase. One-dimensional NMR experiments show that full-length protein and truncated fragment corresponding to the product of HIV-1 protease cleavage have a well-folded compact tertiary structure. The ligand-free HIV-1 Nefcore protein forms cubic crystals belonging to space group P23 with unit cell dimensions of a = b = c = 86.4 A. The Nef-Fyn SH3 cocrystals belong to the space group P6(1)22 or its enantiomorph, P6(5)22, with unit cell dimensions of a = b = 108.2 A and c = 223.7 A. Both crystal forms diffract to a resolution limit of 3.0 A resolution using synchrotron radiation, and are thus suitable for X-ray structure determination.

  14. Component analyses of urinary nanocrystallites of uric acid stone formers by combination of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, fast Fourier transformation, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xin-Yuan; Xue, Jun-Fa; Xia, Zhi-Yue; Ouyang, Jian-Ming

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed to analyse the components of nanocrystallites in urines of patients with uric acid (UA) stones. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), fast Fourier transformation (FFT) of HRTEM, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) were performed to analyse the components of these nanocrystallites. XRD and FFT showed that the main component of urinary nanocrystallites was UA, which contains a small amount of calcium oxalate monohydrate and phosphates. EDS showed the characteristic absorption peaks of C, O, Ca and P. The formation of UA stones was closely related to a large number of UA nanocrystallites in urine. A combination of HRTEM, FFT, EDS and XRD analyses could be performed accurately to analyse the components of urinary nanocrystallites.

  15. Neutron diffraction study of hydrogen-bond symmetrization in δ-AlOOD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sano-Furukawa, A.; Hattori, T.; Kuribayashi, T.

    2013-12-01

    δ-AlOOH, a high-pressure polymorph of diaspore, is an important hydrous mineral in the deep earth that has the ability to transport hydrogen into the lower mantle. Theoretical studies have pointed out that hydrogen would locate at the center between two oxygen atoms at high pressure, which is so called hydrogen-bond symmetrization [1]. It was also suggested that the symmetrization would trigger the increase of bulk modulus, which is one of the important parameters of minerals at high pressure. The transition of δ-AlOOH(D) at high pressure has been suggested by X-ray and neutron diffraction [2, 3]. X-ray diffraction study found that the axes a and b where the hydrogen bond is oriented become less compressible above 12 GPa in δ-AlOOD. Neutron diffraction study on δ-AlOOD up to 9.2 GPa showed the increase of O-D bond distance, that is considered as a precousor phenomena of the symmetrization. However, the pressure was insufficient to observe the symmetrization. To investigate the symmetrization of hydrogen bond directly, we conducted neutron diffraction experiments to 16.7 GPa at PLANET, MLF in J-PARC. Powder sample of δ-AlOOD was loaded in Paris-Edinburgh press with double-toroid sintered diamond anvils with methanol-ethanol mixture of pressure medium. In the experiments, the disappearance of 120 refrection was observed at 12.1 GPa, indicating the transition from P21nm to Pnnm, which can be attributed to the disorder of hydrogen bond or the symmtrization. Results of Rietveld refienment will be shown in the presentation. [1] Tsuchiya et al., Geophys. Res. Lett., 29, 1909, 2002. [2] Sano-Furukawa et al., Am. Mineral., 93, 1558-1567, 2008. [3] Sano-Furukawa et al., Am. Mineral., 94, 1255-1261, 2009.

  16. Neutron-diffraction study of the magnetic structure of PrCoAl 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schobinger-Papamantellos, P.; Wilkinson, C.; Tung, L. D.; Buschow, K. H. J.; McIntyre, G. J.

    2004-12-01

    The magnetic structure of PrCoAl4 has been studied by neutron diffraction from a single crystal. The Pr moments order at a temperature near to 20 K with a sine-wave longitudinal amplitude-modulated structure. The length of the wave vector q = (0 0qz) is almost temperature independent with qz = 0.4087 (5) , and only the first harmonic was observed down to 2 K. The amplitude of the wave, 2.05(3) μB/Pr atom at 2 K, is reduced compared to the Pr3+ free-ion moment value g JμB = 3.2μB , due to strong crystal-field effects. One difference between the present and previously reported neutron powder-diffraction results concerns the wave vector length. The reason for this may lie in the different magnetic microstructure (stacking faults) of the material depending on the thermochemical history of each sample.

  17. In-Situ Studies of Intercritically Austempered Ductile Iron Using Neutron Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Druschitz, Alan; Aristizabal, Ricardo; Druschitz, Edward; Hubbard, Camden R; Watkins, Thomas R; Walker, Larry R; Ostrander, M

    2012-01-01

    Intercritically austempered ductile irons hold promise for applications requiring fatigue durability, excellent castability, low production energy requirements, reduced greenhouse gas emissions and excellent machinability. In the present study, four different ductile iron alloys, containing manganese and nickel as the primary austenite-stabilizing elements, were heat treated to obtain different quantities of austenite in the final microstructure. This paper reports the microstructures and phases present in these alloys. Further, lattice strains and diffraction elastic constants in various crystallographic directions and the transformation characteristics of the austenite as a function of applied stress were determined using in-situ loading with neutron diffraction at the second generation Neutron Residual Stress Facility (NRSF2) at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL).

  18. Semiconductor surface and interface dynamics studied in real time by synchrotron x-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, Wolfgang; Ploog, Klaus H.

    2007-06-14

    We present an overview of in-situ experiments to study molecular beam epitaxial growth by x-ray diffraction and high-energy electron diffraction. The applicability of kinematic theory allows a quantitative evaluation of the surface kinetics on compound semiconductor surfaces; GaAs(001), InAs(001) and GaSb(001) are presented as examples. Both the growth in the layer-by-layer mode and the recovery can be analyzed in considerable detail. As an example of heteroepitaxy, the nucleation and relaxation of hexagonal MnAs on GaAs(001) is presented. We find an extremely anisotropic interface structure with a periodic array of misfit dislocations that can be quantitatively analyzed.

  19. Curious matrix effects: a computational, electron diffraction, and vibrational spectroscopic study of dysprosium triiodide.

    PubMed

    Varga, Zoltán; Groen, Cornelis Petrus; Kolonits, Mária; Hargittai, Magdolna

    2010-07-21

    The molecular and electronic structure of dysprosium triiodide, DyI(3), and its dimer, Dy(2)I(6), was determined by high level computations, gas-phase electron diffraction, and gas-phase infrared and matrix-isolation infrared and Raman spectroscopy. The free monomeric molecule is planar from all methods with an equilibrium bond length of 2.808(9) A; the thermal average bond length from electron diffraction is 2.828(6) A. The molecule forms complexes in the matrix-isolation experiments causing pyramidalisation of planar monomeric molecules. The likelihood of having both pyramidal and planar DyI(3) molecules in the matrix is discussed in order to explain certain features of the spectra. Our computations suggest that the dimer geometry depends on the occupation of the partially filled 4f orbitals. As this is the third molecule in the dysprosium trihalide series studied, trends in their electronic and molecular structures are presented and discussed.

  20. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies on structural transformations of porous coordination polymers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie-Peng; Liao, Pei-Qin; Zhou, Hao-Long; Lin, Rui-Biao; Chen, Xiao-Ming

    2014-08-21

    X-Ray single-crystal diffraction has been the most straightforward and important technique in structural determination of crystalline materials for understanding their structure-property relationships. This powerful tool can be used to directly visualize the precise and detailed structural information of porous coordination polymers or metal-organic frameworks at different states, which are unique for their flexible host frameworks compared with conventional adsorbents. With a series of selected recent examples, this review gives a brief overview of single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies and single-crystal to single-crystal transformations of porous coordination polymers under various chemical and physical stimuli such as solvent and gas sorption/desorption/exchange, chemical reaction and temperature change.

  1. Neutron and X-ray powder diffraction study of skutterudite thermoelectrics

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, H.; Kirkham, M. J.; Watkins, T. R.; Payzant, E. A.; Salvador, J. R.; Thompson, A. J.; Sharp, J.; Brown, D.; Miller, D.

    2016-02-17

    N- and p-type filled-skutterudite materials prepared for thermoelectric power generation modules were analyzed by neutron diffraction at the POWGEN beam line of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The skutterudite powders were processed by melt spinning, followed by ball milling and annealing. The n-type material consists of Ba–Yb–Co–Sb and the p-type material consists of Di–Fe–Ni–Sb or Di–Fe–Co–Sb (Di = didymium, an alloy of Pr and Nd). Powders for prototype module fabrication from General Motors and Marlow Industries were analyzed in this study. XRD and neutron diffraction studies confirm that both the n- and p-type materials have cubicmore » symmetry. Structural Rietveld refinements determined the lattice parameters and atomic parameters of the framework and filler atoms. The cage filling fraction was found to depend linearly on the lattice parameter, which in turn depends on the average framework atom size. Ultimately, this knowledge may allow the filling fraction of these skutterudite materials to be purposefully adjusted, thereby tuning the thermoelectric properties.« less

  2. On the magnetic structure of Er3Co: single-crystal neutron diffraction study

    SciTech Connect

    Gubkin, Andrey; Podlesnyak, Andrey A; Baranov, Nikolai

    2010-01-01

    The effect of the magnetic field applied along the main crystallographic directions on the magnetic structure of Er{sub 3}Co has been studied by means of single-crystal neutron diffraction technique. At zero field the compound exhibits a noncoplanar commensurate magnetic structure with ferromagnetic alignment of the Er magnetic-moment projections along the b axis in an orthorhombic unit cell. The present measurements revealed that the application of the magnetic field along the c direction [c {perpendicular} (ab)] leads to the pronounced metamagneticlike transition in the low-field region {mu}{sub 0}H < 1.2 T, although, the magnetization curve does not exhibit any anomalies. Combining the present single-crystal diffraction and magnetization data with the results of the previous powder neutron diffraction study [Gignoux et al., Solid State Commun. 8, 391 (1970)], we conclude that the nature of the magnetic ion, whether Kramers or non-Kramers, has a decisive effect on the commensurability of the magnetic structure of R{sub 3}Co. In particular, the commensurate magnetic structure observed in Er{sub 3}Co originate from the Kramers character of Er{sup 3+} ion in contrast to the incommensurate structures found earlier in R{sub 3}Co with R = Tb and Ho.

  3. Preparation, Crystallization and X-ray Diffraction Analysis to 1.5 A Resolution of Rat Cysteine Dioxygenase, a Mononuclear Iron Enzyme Responsible for Cysteine Thiol Oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons,C.; Hao, Q.; Stipanuk, M.

    2005-01-01

    Cysteine dioxygenase (CDO; EC 1.13.11.20) is an {approx}23 kDa non-heme iron metalloenzyme that is responsible for the oxidation of cysteine by O2, yielding cysteinesulfinate. CDO catalyzes the first step in the conversion of cysteine to taurine, as well as the first step in the catabolism of cysteine to pyruvate plus sulfate. Recombinant rat CDO was heterologously expressed, purified and crystallized. The protein was expressed as a fusion protein bearing a polyhistidine tag to facilitate purification, a thioredoxin tag to improve solubility and a factor Xa cleavage site to permit removal of the entire N-terminus, leaving only the 200 amino acids inherent to the native protein. A multi-step purification scheme was used to achieve >95% purity of CDO. The optimal CDO crystals diffracted to 1.5 Angstroms resolution and belonged to space group P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2 or P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 57.55, c = 123.06 Angstrom, {alpha} = {beta} = {gamma} = 90. CDO shows little homology to any other proteins; therefore, the structure of the enzyme will be determined by ab initio phasing using a selenomethionyl derivative.

  4. Synchrotron Powder X-ray Diffraction Study of the Structure and Dehydration Behavior of Sepiolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Post, J. E.; Bish, D. L.; Heaney, P. J.

    2006-05-01

    Sepiolite is a hydrous Mg-silicate clay mineral with fibrous morphology that typically occurs as fine-grained, poorly crystalline masses. It occurs in a wide variety of geological environments and has been mined for centuries because of its many uses, e.g. in the pharmaceutical, fertilizer, and pesticide industries. Its versatile functionality derives from the large surface area and microporosity that are characteristic of the material. In recent years, sepiolite has received considerable attention with regard to the adsorption of organics, for use as a support for catalysts, as a molecular sieve, and as an inorganic membrane for ultrafiltration. Because of its fine-grained and poorly crystalline nature, it has not been possible to study sepiolite's crystal structure using single-crystal X-ray diffraction methods, and consequently many details of the structure are still not well known. In this study, Rietveld refinements using synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction data were used to investigate the crystal structure and dehydration behavior of sepiolite from Durango, Mexico. The room- temperature (RT) sepiolite structure in air compares well with previous models but reveals an additional zeolitic water site. The RT structure under vacuum retained only ~1/8 of the zeolitic water and the volume decreased 1.3%. Real-time, temperature-resolved synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction data and Rietveld refinements were used to investigate the behavior of the sepiolite structure from 300 to 925 K. Rietveld refinements revealed that most of the zeolitic water is lost by ~390 K, accompanied by a decrease in the a and c unit-cell parameters. Above ~600 K the sepiolite structure folds as one-half of the crystallographically bound water is lost. Rietveld refinements of the "anhydrous" sepiolite structure reveal that, in general, unit-cell parameters a, b, â and volume steadily decrease with increasing temperature; there is an obvious change in slope at ~820 K suggesting a phase

  5. Higher Resolution for Water Resources Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumenil-Gates, L.

    2009-12-01

    The Earth system science community is providing an increasing range of science results for the benefit of achieving the Millennium Development Goals. In addressing questions such as reducing poverty and hunger, achieving sustainable global development, or by defining adaptation strategies for climate change, one of the key issues will be the quantitative description and understanding of the global water cycle, which will allow useful projections of available future water resources for several decades ahead. The quantities of global water cycle elements that we observe today - and deal with in hydrologic and atmospheric modeling - are already very different from the natural flows as human influence on the water cycle by storage, consumption and edifice has been going on for millennia, and climate change is expected to add more uncertainty. In this case Tony Blair’s comment that perhaps the most worrying problem is climate change does not cover the full story. We shall also have to quantify how the human demand for water resources and alterations of the various elements of the water cycle may proceed in the future: will there be enough of the precious water resource to sustain current and future demands by the various sectors involved? The topics that stakeholders and decision makers concerned with managing water resources are interested in cover a variety of human uses such as agriculture, energy production, ecological flow requirements to sustain biodiversity and ecosystem services, or human cultural aspects, recreation and human well-being - all typically most relevant at the regional or local scales, this being quite different from the relatively large-scale that the IPCC assessment addresses. Halfway through the Millennium process, the knowledge base of the global water cycle is still limited. The sustainability of regional water resources is best assessed through a research program that combines high-resolution climate and hydrologic models for expected

  6. Capability of X-ray diffraction for the study of microstructure of metastable thin films

    PubMed Central

    Rafaja, David; Wüstefeld, Christina; Dopita, Milan; Motylenko, Mykhaylo; Baehtz, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    Metastable phases are often used to design materials with outstanding properties, which cannot be achieved with thermodynamically stable compounds. In many cases, the metastable phases are employed as precursors for controlled formation of nanocomposites. This contribution shows how the microstructure of crystalline metastable phases and the formation of nanocomposites can be concluded from X-ray diffraction experiments by taking advantage of the high sensitivity of X-ray diffraction to macroscopic and microscopic lattice deformations and to the dependence of the lattice deformations on the crystallographic direction. The lattice deformations were determined from the positions and from the widths of the diffraction lines, the dependence of the lattice deformations on the crystallographic direction from the anisotropy of the line shift and the line broadening. As an example of the metastable system, the supersaturated solid solution of titanium nitride and aluminium nitride was investigated, which was prepared in the form of thin films by using cathodic arc evaporation of titanium and aluminium in a nitrogen atmosphere. The microstructure of the (Ti,Al)N samples under study was tailored by modifying the [Al]/[Ti] ratio in the thin films and the surface mobility of the deposited species. PMID:25485125

  7. A structural study of cyanotrichite from Dachang by conventional and automated electron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ventruti, Gennaro; Mugnaioli, Enrico; Capitani, Giancarlo; Scordari, Fernando; Pinto, Daniela; Lausi, Andrea

    2015-09-01

    The crystal structure of cyanotrichite, having general formula Cu4Al2(SO4)(OH)12·2H2O, from the Dachang deposit (China) was studied by means of conventional transmission electron microscopy, automated electron diffraction tomography (ADT) and synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD). ADT revealed the presence of two different cyanotrichite-like phases. The same phases were also recognized in the XRPD pattern, allowing the perfect indexing of all peaks leading, after refinement to the following cell parameters: (1) a = 12.417(2) Å, b = 2.907(1) Å, c = 10.157(1) Å and β = 98.12(1); (2) a = 12.660(2) Å, b = 2.897(1) Å, c = 10.162(1) Å and β = 92.42(1)°. Only for the former phase, labeled cyanotrichite-98, a partial structure, corresponding to the [Cu4Al2(OH){12/2+}] cluster, was obtained ab initio by direct methods in space group C2/ m on the basis of electron diffraction data. Geometric and charge-balance considerations allowed to reach the whole structure model for the cyanotrichite-98 phase. The sulfate group and water molecule result to be statistically disordered over two possible positions, but keeping the average structure consistent with the C-centering symmetry, in agreement with ADT results.

  8. Neutron diffraction on polymer nanocomposites - A tool for structural and orientation studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapalidis, A. A.; Katsaros, F. K.; Steriotis, Th A.; Kanellopoulos, N. K.; Dante, S.; Hauss, T.

    2012-02-01

    A series of Polyvinyl alcohol (Mowiol 5-88) - Bentonite nanocomposite films with predefined clay loading (up to 0-20%), were prepared via solvent casting technique. The developed films, due to the favourable polymer-particle interactions, revealed excellent dispersion of the clay particles in the polymer matrix and improved properties. Furthermore, the properties of PVA/clay nanocomposites as well as their structural changes as a function of the relative humidity were thoroughly investigated using neutron membrane diffraction experiments. The samples prior their measurement were equilibrated at different relative humidity levels (%RH) using either H2O or D2O. The application of contrast variation technique enabled us to investigate the contribution of both the polymer and the clay particles to the diffraction spectra. Thus, the use of H2O enlightened the low Q region, providing information about the structure of the inorganic phase and specifically the stacking of the clay platelets. The diffraction patterns in this region obtained from perpendicular and in-plane sample positions revealed that there is a specific orientation of bentonite plates, parallel to the film surface. This conclusion is in agreement with the results obtained from XRD and gas permeability technique, in which the well organized and dispersed impermeable inorganic layers, increase the resistance in flow through the nanocomposites film, acting as gas barriers. On the other hand, diffraction experiments on pre-equilibrated with D2O samples revealed the structural changes in polymeric matrix, due to hydration. The obtained peak revealed the presence of a new crystalline phase, presumably induced by the presence of the silicates, which is in agreement with DSC data reported in previous studies.

  9. Signature of dislocations and stacking faults of face-centred cubic nanocrystals in coherent X-ray diffraction patterns: a numerical study1

    PubMed Central

    Dupraz, Maxime; Beutier, Guillaume; Rodney, David; Mordehai, Dan; Verdier, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Crystal defects induce strong distortions in diffraction patterns. A single defect alone can yield strong and fine features that are observed in high-resolution diffraction experiments such as coherent X-ray diffraction. The case of face-centred cubic nanocrystals is studied numerically and the signatures of typical defects close to Bragg positions are identified. Crystals of a few tens of nanometres are modelled with realistic atomic potentials and ‘relaxed’ after introduction of well defined defects such as pure screw or edge dislocations, or Frank or prismatic loops. Diffraction patterns calculated in the kinematic approximation reveal various signatures of the defects depending on the Miller indices. They are strongly modified by the dissociation of the dislocations. Selection rules on the Miller indices are provided, to observe the maximum effect of given crystal defects in the initial and relaxed configurations. The effect of several physical and geometrical parameters such as stacking fault energy, crystal shape and defect position are discussed. The method is illustrated on a complex structure resulting from the simulated nanoindentation of a gold nanocrystal. PMID:26089755

  10. Time resolved in situ X-ray diffraction study of crystallisation processes of large pore nanoporous aluminophosphate materials.

    PubMed

    Simmance, Kerry; van Beek, Wouter; Sankar, Gopinathan

    2015-01-01

    Time resolved high-resolution X-ray powder diffraction was utilized to obtain detailed changes in the crystal structure parameters during the hydrothermal crystallization process of the nanoporous aluminophosphate AlPO-5 (AFI) structure. This in situ study offered not only the influence of metal ions on the onset of crystallization and estimation of the activation energy of the process, but also allowed us to determine in detail the changes in lattice parameters during this process. More importantly the time-resolved study clearly showed the lattice expansion in the divalent metal ions substituted system right from the on-set of crystallization process, compared to the one without any dopant ions, which suggest that an amorphous or poorly crystalline network is formed prior to crystallization that contains the large divalent ions (compared to Al(iii), the substituting element), which is in agreement with the combined XAS/XRD study reported earlier. A mechanism based on this and the earlier study is suggested. PMID:25683746

  11. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of maleylacetate reductase from Rhizobium sp. strain MTP-10005

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, Tomomi; Goda, Yuko; Yoshida, Masahiro; Oikawa, Tadao; Hata, Yasuo

    2008-08-01

    Maleylacetate reductase from Rhizobium sp. strain MTP-10005 has been crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method and microseeding. The crystals contained one dimeric molecule per asymmetric unit and diffracted to 1.79 Å resolution. Maleylacetate reductase (EC 1.3.1.32), which catalyzes the reduction of maleylacetate to 3-oxoadipate, plays an important role in the aerobic microbial catabolism of resorcinol. The enzyme has been crystallized at 293 K by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method supplemented with a microseeding technique, using ammonium sulfate as the precipitating agent. The crystal belonged to the monoclinic space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 56.85, b = 121.13, c = 94.09 Å, β = 101.48°, and contained one dimeric molecule in the asymmetric unit. It diffracted to 1.79 Å resolution.

  12. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction study of human ribosomal protein L10 core domain

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, Mitsuhiro; Kaminishi, Tatsuya; Kawazoe, Masahito; Shirouzu, Mikako; Takemoto, Chie; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Tanaka, Akiko; Sugano, Sumio; Yoshida, Takuya; Ohkubo, Tadayasu; Kobayashi, Yuji

    2007-11-01

    A truncated variant of human ribosomal protien L10 was prepared and crystallized. Diffraction data were collected to 2.5 Å resolution. Eukaryotic ribosomal protein L10 is an essential component of the large ribosomal subunit, which organizes the architecture of the aminoacyl-tRNA binding site. The human L10 protein is also called the QM protein and consists of 214 amino-acid residues. For crystallization, the L10 core domain (L10CD, Phe34–Glu182) was recombinantly expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. A hexagonal crystal of L10CD was obtained by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. The L10CD crystal diffracted to 2.5 Å resolution and belongs to space group P3{sub 1}21 or P3{sub 2}21.

  13. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of d-tagatose 3-epimerase from Pseudomonas cichorii

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Hiromi; Yamada, Mitsugu; Nishitani, Takeyori; Takada, Goro; Izumori, Ken; Kamitori, Shigehiro

    2007-02-01

    Recombinant d-tagatose 3-epimerase from P. cichorii was purified and crystallized. Diffraction data were collected to 2.5 Å resolution. d-Tagatose 3-epimerase (D-TE) from Pseudomonas cichorii catalyzes the epimerization of various ketohexoses at the C3 position. The epimerization of d-psicose has not been reported with epimerases other than P. cichorii D-TE and d-psicose 3-epimerase from Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Recombinant P. cichorii D-TE has been purified and crystallized. Crystals of P. cichorii D-TE were obtained by the sitting-drop method at room temperature. The crystal belongs to the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 76.80, b = 94.92, c = 91.73 Å, β = 102.82°. Diffraction data were collected to 2.5 Å resolution. The asymmetric unit is expected to contain four molecules.

  14. Crystal-structure analysis of four mineral samples of anhydrite, CaSO[subscript 4], using synchrotron high-resolution powder X-ray diffraction data

    SciTech Connect

    Antao, Sytle M.

    2014-05-28

    The crystal structures of four samples of anhydrite, CaSO{sub 4}, were obtained by Rietveld refinements using synchrotron high-resolution powder X-ray diffraction (HRPXRD) data and space group Amma. As an example, for one sample of anhydrite from Hants County, Nova Scotia, the unit-cell parameters are a = 7.00032(2), b = 6.99234(1), c = 6.24097(1) {angstrom}, and V = 305.487(1) {angstrom}{sup 3} with a > b. The eight-coordinated Ca atom has an average distance of 2.4667(4) {angstrom}. The tetrahedral SO{sub 4} group has two independent S-O distances of 1.484(1) to O1 and 1.478(1) {angstrom} to O2 and an average distance of 1.4810(5) {angstrom}. The three independent O-S-O angles [108.99(8) x 1, 110.38(3) x 4, 106.34(9){sup o} x 1; average [6] = 109.47(2){sup o}] and S-O distances indicate that the geometry of the SO{sub 4} group is quite distorted in anhydrite. The four anhydrite samples have structural trends where the a, b, and c unit-cell parameters increase linearly with increasing unit-cell volume, V, and their average and distances are nearly constant. The grand mean = 2.4660(2) {angstrom}, and grand mean = 1.4848(3) {angstrom}, the latter is longer than 1.480(1) {angstrom} in celestite, SrSO{sub 4}, as expected.

  15. Arterial microcalcification in atherosclerotic patients with and without chronic kidney disease: a comparative high-resolution scanning X-ray diffraction analysis.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Dagmar-Christiane; Behets, Geert J; Hakenberg, Oliver W; Voigt, Mathias; Vervaet, Benjamin A; Robijn, Stef; Kundt, Günther; Schareck, Wolfgang; D'Haese, Patrick C; Haffner, Dieter

    2012-06-01

    Vascular calcification, albeit heterogeneous in terms of biological and physicochemical properties, has been associated with ageing, lifestyle, diabetes, and chronic kidney disease (CKD). It is unknown whether or not moderately impaired renal function (CKD stages 2-4) affects the physiochemical composition and/or the formation of magnesium-containing tricalcium phosphate ([Ca,Mg](3)[PO(4)](2), whitlockite) in arterial microcalcification. Therefore, a high-resolution scanning X-ray diffraction analysis (European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble, France) utilizing histological sections of paraffin-embedded arterial specimens derived from atherosclerotic patients with normal renal function (n = 15) and CKD (stages 2-4, n = 13) was performed. This approach allowed us to spatially assess the contribution of calcium phosphate (apatite) and whitlockite to arterial microcalcification. Per group, the number of samples (13 vs. 12) with sufficient signal intensity and total lengths of regions (201 vs. 232 μm) giving rise to diffractograms ("informative regions") were comparable. Summarizing all informative regions per group into one composite sample revealed calcium phosphate/apatite as the leading mineral phase in CKD patients, whereas in patients with normal renal function the relative contribution of whitlockite and calcium phosphate/apatite was on the same order of magnitude (CKD, calcium phosphate/apatite 157 μm, whitlockite 38.7 μm; non-CKD, calcium phosphate/apatite 79.0 μm, whitlockite 94.1 μm; each p < 0.05). Our results, although based on a limited number of samples, indicate that chronic impairment of renal function affects local magnesium homeostasis and thus contributes to the physicochemical composition of microcalcification in atherosclerotic patients.

  16. Neutron diffraction, specific heat and magnetization studies on Nd2CuTiO6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rayaprol, S.; Kaushik, S. D.; Kumar, Naresh; Singh, K.; Guillou, F.; Simon, C.

    2016-05-01

    Structural and physical properties of a double-perovskite compound, Nd2CuTiO6 have been studied using neutron diffraction, magnetization and specific heat measurements. The compound crystallizes in an orthorhombic structure in space group Pnma. The interesting observation we make here is that, though no long range magnetic order is observed between 2 and 300K, the low temperature specific heat and magnetic susceptibility behavior exhibits non-Fermi liquid like behavior in this insulating compound. The magnetization and specific heat data are presented and discussed in light of these observations.

  17. High Pressure X-ray Diffraction Study on Icosahedral Boron Arsenide (B12As2)

    SciTech Connect

    J Wu; H Zhu; D Hou; C Ji; C Whiteley; J Edgar; Y Ma

    2011-12-31

    The high pressure properties of icosahedral boron arsenide (B12As2) were studied by in situ X-ray diffraction measurements at pressures up to 25.5 GPa at room temperature. B12As2 retains its rhombohedral structure; no phase transition was observed in the pressure range. The bulk modulus was determined to be 216 GPa with the pressure derivative 2.2. Anisotropy was observed in the compressibility of B12As2-c-axis was 16.2% more compressible than a-axis. The boron icosahedron plays a dominant role in the compressibility of boron-rich compounds.

  18. High pressure x-ray diffraction study of Mn-bearing dolomite, kutnohorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palaich, S.; Heffern, R.; Watenphul, A.; Beavers, C.; Kavner, A.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding the deep Earth's role in the global carbon cycle requires knowledge of the phase stability of carbon-bearing minerals at the high pressures and temperatures relevant to the mantle. Carbon is recycled into the deep Earth via subduction where carbonate phases dominate the carbon-rich mineralogy. Recent studies have demonstrated that iron-rich dolomite transforms to a new structure at 17 GPa (dolomite II) and then to new high pressure carbonate structure above 35 GPa (dolomite III) (Mao et al. 2011; Merlini et al. 2012). These phases may act as carbon carriers in whole mantle carbon cycling. The goal of this study is to extend the compositional range by examining phase stability of a Mn-rich dolomite Kutnohorite (Ca(Mn,Mg,Fe)(CO3)2 at lower mantle conditions. The phase stability of natural kutnohorite from Franklin, NJ was investigated at high pressures and temperatures. Powdered samples were compressed in a diamond anvil cell to pressures up to 50 GPa using neon gas as hydrostatic pressure medium. Monochromatic X-ray diffraction data were collected at beamline 12.2.2 at the Advanced Light Source. In a first experiment the sample was brought up in pressure steps of 2-3 GPa with diffraction patterns taken at every pressure step until 21 GPa, where the sample was laser heated to achieve a stable phase assemblage. In a second experiment, the sample was pressurized to 36 GPa and then brought up in 5 GPa steps to 50 GPa while being heated by infrared lasers at each pressure step. We observed a phase transformation to the dolomite II phase between 15 and 21 GPa , consistent with previous studies (Santillan et al. 2003; Mao et al. 2011; Merlini et al. 2012) As pressure was increased, the diffraction pattern changed, indicating a different high pressure phase stable in the range of 36 to 46 GPa after laser annealing. We will present our X-ray diffraction data, including compressibility of kutnohorite to 15 GPa, density of the dolomite II phase, and

  19. Structural Study of Liquid Se-Te Alloys by Neutron Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Shin'ichi; Tamaki, Shigeru; Waseda, Yoshio

    1986-12-01

    The neutron diffraction study of liquid Se-Te system has been carried out to reveal the origin of characteristic temperature dependence of various properties related to the structural order in atomic scale. The temperature dependence of measured structural functions of liquid SexTe1-x system could be explained by a gradual transition from two-fold coordinated component (non-metallic) to the three-fold coordinated one (metallic). The partial structure factors of these two-fold and three-fold coordinations are separated with the help of the thermodynamic data. A configurational model satisfying these situations is also presented.

  20. Studies of clays and clay minerals using x-ray powder diffraction and the Rietveld method

    SciTech Connect

    Bish, D.L.

    1993-09-01

    The Rietveld method was originally developed (Rietveld, 1967, 1969) to refine crystal structures using neutron powder diffraction data. Since then, the method has been increasingly used with X-ray powder diffraction data, and today it is safe to say that this is the most common application of the method. The method has been applied to numerous natural and synthetic materials, most of which do not usually form crystals large enough for study with single-crystal techniques. It is the ability to study the structures of materials for which sufficiently large single crystals do not exist that makes the method so powerful and popular. It would thus appear that the method is ideal for studying clays and clay minerals. In many cases this is true, but the assumptions implicit in the method and the disordered nature of many clay minerals can limit titsapplicability. This chapter will describe the Rietveld method, emphasizing the assumptions important for the study of disordered materials, and it will outline the potential applications of the method to these minerals. These applications include, in addition to the refinement of crystal structures, quantitative analysis of multicomponent mixtures, analysis of peak broadening, partial structure solution, and refinement of unit-cell parameters.

  1. Location of two antioxidants in oriented model membranes. Small-angle x-ray diffraction study.

    PubMed Central

    Katsaras, J; Stinson, R H; Davis, J H; Kendall, E J

    1991-01-01

    Small-angle x-ray diffraction has been applied in locating either butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) or delta-tocopherol and their brominated analogues at a concentration of 40 mol% in oriented bilayers of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) or DPPC + 15 mol% cholesterol at 20 degrees C. Phases were determined using swelling experiments with structure factors plotted in reciprocal space, creating a relatively smooth curve as the amount of water between the bilayers was changed. Continuous Fourier transforms were also calculated using sampling theory (Shannon, C. E. 1949. Proc. Inst. Radio Engrs. NY. 37:10-21) to further test the consistency of the phase assignments. Fourier synthesis of structure factors resulted in absolute electron density profiles for different bilayers to a resolution of 5-6 A. In addition, difference Patterson maps were constructed to confirm the positions of the bromine atoms in the unit cell. Analysis of the data indicates the following: (a) The BHT molecules are dispersed throughout the alkyl-chain region in DPPC samples with and without cholesterol. (b) The chromanol ring of delta-tocopherol is in the vicinity of the glycerol backbone-headgroup region in samples of DPPC or DPPC + 15 mol% cholesterol. (c) Difference Patterson maps confirm the localization of bromine atoms in the various delta-tocopherol samples and lack of bromine localization in the various BHT samples. PMID:2049525

  2. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of polyketide synthase-1 (PKS-1) from Cannabis sativa

    SciTech Connect

    Taguchi, Chiho; Taura, Futoshi; Tamada, Taro; Shoyama, Yoshinari; Shoyama, Yukihiro; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Kuroki, Ryota; Morimoto, Satoshi

    2008-03-01

    Polyketide synthase-1 from C. sativa has been crystallized. The crystal diffracted to 1.55 Å resolution with sufficient quality for further structure determination. Polyketide synthase-1 (PKS-1) is a novel type III polyketide synthase that catalyzes the biosynthesis of hexanoyl triacetic acid lactone in Cannabis sativa (Mexican strain). PKS-1 was overproduced in Escherichia coli, purified and finally crystallized in two different space groups. The crystal obtained in 0.1 M HEPES buffer pH 7.5 containing 0.2 M calcium acetate and 20%(w/v) polyethylene glycol 3350 diffracted to 1.65 Å resolution and belonged to space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a = 54.3, b = 59.3, c = 62.6 Å, α = 69, β = 81, γ = 80°. Another crystal obtained in 0.1 M HEPES buffer pH 7.5 containing 0.2 M sodium chloride and 20%(w/v) polyethylene glycol 3350 diffracted to 1.55 Å resolution and belonged to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 54.3, b = 110, c = 130 Å. These data will enable us to determine the crystal structure of PKS-1.

  3. The chemical reactivity and structure of collagen studied by neutron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Wess, T.J.; Wess, L.; Miller, A.

    1994-12-31

    The chemical reactivity of collagen can be studied using neutron diffraction (a non-destructive technique), for certain reaction types. Collagen contains a number of lysine and hydroxylysine side chains that can react with aldehydes and ketones, or these side chains can themselves be converted to aldehydes by lysyl oxidase. The reactivity of these groups not only has an important role in the maintenance of mechanical strength in collagen fibrils, but can also manifest pathologically in the cases of aging, diabetes (reactivity with a variety of sugars) and alcoholism (reactivity with acetaldehyde). The reactivity of reducing groups with collagen can be studied by neutron diffraction, since the crosslink formed in the adduction process is initially of a Schiff base or keto-imine nature. The nature of this crosslink allows it to be deuterated, and the position of this relatively heavy scattering atom can be used in a process of phase determination by multiple isomorphous replacement. This process was used to study the following: the position of natural crosslinks in collagen; the position of adducts in tendon from diabetic rats in vivo and the in vitro position of acetaidehyde adducts in tendon.

  4. An analytical study on the diffraction quality factor of open cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Y. J.; Chu, K. R.; Yeh, L. H.

    2014-10-15

    Open cavities are often employed as interaction structures in a new generation of coherent millimeter, sub-millimeter, and terahertz (THz) radiation sources called the gyrotron. One of the open ends of the cavity is intended for rapid extraction of the radiation generated by a powerful electron beam. Up to the sub-THz regime, the diffraction loss from this open end dominates over the Ohmic losses on the walls, which results in a much lower diffraction quality factor (Q{sub d}) than the Ohmic quality factor (Q{sub ohm}). Early analytical studies have led to various expressions for Q{sub d} and shed much light on its properties. In this study, we begin with a review of these studies, and then proceed with the derivation of an analytical expression for Q{sub d} accurate to high order. Its validity is verified with numerical solutions for a step-tunable cavity commonly employed for the development of sub-THz and THz gyrotrons. On the basis of the results, a simplified equation is obtained which explicitly expresses the scaling laws of Q{sub d} with respect to mode indices and cavity dimensions.

  5. Neutron diffraction study of water freezing on aircraft engine combustor soot.

    PubMed

    Tishkova, V; Demirdjian, B; Ferry, D; Johnson, M

    2011-12-14

    The study of the formation of condensation trails and cirrus clouds on aircraft emitted soot particles is important because of its possible effects on climate. In the present work we studied the freezing of water on aircraft engine combustor (AEC) soot particles under conditions of pressure and temperature similar to the upper troposphere. The microstructure of the AEC soot was found to be heterogeneous containing both primary particles of soot and metallic impurities (Fe, Cu, and Al). We also observed various surface functional groups such as oxygen-containing groups, including sulfate ions, that can act as active sites for water adsorption. Here we studied the formation of ice on the AEC soot particles by using neutron diffraction. We found that for low amount of adsorbed water, cooling even up to 215 K did not lead to the formation of hexagonal ice. Whereas, larger amount of adsorbed water led to the coexistence of liquid water (or amorphous ice) and hexagonal ice (I(h)); 60% of the adsorbed water was in the form of ice I(h) at 255 K. Annealing of the system led to the improvement of the crystal quality of hexagonal ice crystals as demonstrated from neutron diffraction.

  6. SINGLE CRYSTAL NEUTRON DIFFRACTION.

    SciTech Connect

    KOETZLE,T.F.

    2001-03-13

    Single-crystal neutron diffraction measures the elastic Bragg reflection intensities from crystals of a material, the structure of which is the subject of investigation. A single crystal is placed in a beam of neutrons produced at a nuclear reactor or at a proton accelerator-based spallation source. Single-crystal diffraction measurements are commonly made at thermal neutron beam energies, which correspond to neutron wavelengths in the neighborhood of 1 Angstrom. For high-resolution studies requiring shorter wavelengths (ca. 0.3-0.8 Angstroms), a pulsed spallation source or a high-temperature moderator (a ''hot source'') at a reactor may be used. When complex structures with large unit-cell repeats are under investigation, as is the case in structural biology, a cryogenic-temperature moderator (a ''cold source'') may be employed to obtain longer neutron wavelengths (ca. 4-10 Angstroms). A single-crystal neutron diffraction analysis will determine the crystal structure of the material, typically including its unit cell and space group, the positions of the atomic nuclei and their mean-square displacements, and relevant site occupancies. Because the neutron possesses a magnetic moment, the magnetic structure of the material can be determined as well, from the magnetic contribution to the Bragg intensities. This latter aspect falls beyond the scope of the present unit; for information on magnetic scattering of neutrons see Unit 14.3. Instruments for single-crystal diffraction (single-crystal diffractometers or SCDs) are generally available at the major neutron scattering center facilities. Beam time on many of these instruments is available through a proposal mechanism. A listing of neutron SCD instruments and their corresponding facility contacts is included in an appendix accompanying this unit.

  7. The beta-SiC(100) surface studied by low energy electron diffraction, Auger electron spectroscopy, and electron energy loss spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dayan, M.

    1986-01-01

    The beta-SiC(100) surface has been studied by low energy electron diffraction, Auger electron spectroscopy, high resolution electron energy loss spectra (HREELS), and core level excitation EELS. Two new Si-terminated phases have been discovered, one with (3 x 2) symmetry, and the other with (2 x 1) symmetry. Models are presented to describe these phases. New results, for the C-rich surface, are presented and discussed. In addition, core level excitation EELS results are given and compared with theory.

  8. Diffraction Studies from Minerals to Organics - Lessons Learned from Materials Analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Whitfield, Pamela S

    2014-01-01

    In many regards the study of materials and minerals by powder diffraction techniques are complimentary, with techniques honed in one field equally applicable to the other. As a long-time materials researcher many of the examples are of techniques developed for materials analysis applied to minerals. However in a couple of cases the study of new minerals was the initiation into techniques later used in materials-based studies. Hopefully they will show that the study of new minerals structures can provide opportunities to add new methodologies and approaches to future problems. In keeping with the AXAA many of the examples have an Australian connection, the materials ranging from organics to battery materials.

  9. High-pressure powder x-ray diffraction study of EuVO{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect

    Garg, Alka B.; Errandonea, D.

    2015-03-15

    The high-pressure structural behavior of europium orthovanadate has been studied using in-situ, synchrotron based, high-pressure x-ray powder diffraction technique. Angle-dispersive x-ray diffraction measurements were carried out at room temperature up to 34.7 GPa using a diamond-anvil cell, extending the pressure range reported in previous experiments. We confirmed the occurrence of zircon–scheelite phase transition at 6.8 GPa and the coexistence of low- and high-pressure phases up to 10.1 GPa. In addition, clear evidence of a scheelite–fregusonite transition is found at 23.4 GPa. The fergusonite structure remains stable up to 34.7 GPa, the highest pressure reached in the present measurements. A partial decomposition of EuVO{sub 4} was also observed from 8.1 to 12.8 GPa; however, this fact did not preclude the identification of the different crystal structures of EuVO{sub 4}. The crystal structures of the different phases have been Rietveld refined and their equations of state (EOS) have been determined. The results are compared with the previous experimental data and theoretical calculations. - Graphical abstract: The high-pressure structural sequence of EuVO{sub 4}. - Highlights: • EuVO{sub 4} is studied under pressure up to 35 GPa using synchrotron XRD. • The zircón–scheelite–fergusonite structural sequence is observed. • Crystal structures are refined and equations of state determined.

  10. Neutron diffraction study of a non-strichiometric Ni-Mn-Ga MSM alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Ari-Gur, Pnina; Garlea, Vasile O

    2013-01-01

    The structure and chemical order of a Heusler alloy of non-stoichiometric composition Ni-Mn-Ga were studied using constant-wavelength (1.538 ) neutron diffraction at 363K and the diffraction pattern was refined using the FullProf software. At this temperature the structure is austenite (cubic) with Fm-3m space group and lattice constant of a = 5.83913(4) [ ]. The chemical order is of critical importance in these alloys, as Mn becomes antiferromagnetic when the atoms are closer than the radius of the 3d shell. In the studied alloy the refinement of the site occupancy showed that the 4b (Ga site) contained as much as 22% Mn; that significantly alters the distances between the Mn atoms in the crystal and, as a result, also the exchange energy between some of the Mn atoms. Based on the refinement, the composition was determined to be Ni1.91Mn1.29Ga0.8

  11. X-ray diffraction study of defects in zinc-diffusion-doped silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Privezentsev, V. V.

    2013-12-15

    Samples of CZ n-Si〈Zn〉(111) are prepared by high-temperature zinc-diffusion annealing followed by quenching and are studied by X-ray diffraction. The silicon contains an initial phosphorus impurity and zinc-compensating admixture at concentrations N{sub P} = 1.5 × 10{sup 14} cm{sup −3} and N{sub Zn} = 1 × 10{sup 14} cm{sup −3}; i.e., the relation N{sub P}/2 < N{sub Zn} < N{sub P} is fulfilled. Microdefects are studied by double- and triple-crystal X-ray diffraction in the dispersion free modes (n, −n) and (n, −n, +n). The samples are found to contain microdefects with two characteristic sizes (average sizes of about 1 μm and 70 nm). The interplanar distance in the near-surface layer with a thickness of 0.1 μm is smaller than this parameter in the remaining matrix, the difference being equal to d{sub 0} Δd/d{sub 0} ≈ 2 × 10{sup −5}. This layer contains mainly vacancy-type microdefects. The angle between the reflecting planes and the local surface relief is Δψ = (7 ± 1) arcmin.

  12. Energy and dose considerations for diffraction enhanced CT in small animal studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connor, Dean; Dilmanian, F. Avraham; Parham, Christopher; Kao, Teresa; Zhong, Zhong

    2007-03-01

    Diffraction enhanced imaging (DEI) uses monochromatic x-rays coupled to an analyzer crystal to extract information about the refraction of x-rays within the object. Studies of excised biological tissues show that DEI has significant contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) advantages for soft tissue when compared to standard radiography. DEI differs from conventional CT in that its refraction contrast depends on x-ray energy as 1/E, thus the energy and dose considerations for conventional CT will be inappropriate. The goal of this study was to assess the optimal energy for in vivo CT imaging of a mouse head to obtain the largest soft tissue refraction CNR. Through a theoretical model, optimum refraction CNR for mouse brain imaging was found to be about 20 keV. The findings were tested experimentally using the DEI system at the X15A beamline of the National Synchrotron Light Source. Using the parameters for optimized refraction CNR (20 keV, silicon [333] reflection), large image artifacts were caused by DEI's scatter-rejection properties. By increasing the x-ray energy and using a lower order diffraction, silicon [111], soft tissue features within the brain, including the hippocampus, could be resolved.

  13. Uranium and thorium hydride complexes as multielectron reductants: a combined neutron diffraction and quantum chemical study.

    PubMed

    Grant, Daniel J; Stewart, Timothy J; Bau, Robert; Miller, Kevin A; Mason, Sax A; Gutmann, Matthias; McIntyre, Garry J; Gagliardi, Laura; Evans, William J

    2012-03-19

    The unusual uranium reaction system in which uranium(4+) and uranium(3+) hydrides interconvert by formal bimetallic reductive elimination and oxidative addition reactions, [(C(5)Me(5))(2)UH(2)](2) (1) ⇌ [(C(5)Me(5))(2)UH](2) (2) + H(2), was studied by employing multiconfigurational quantum chemical and density functional theory methods. 1 can act as a formal four-electron reductant, releasing H(2) gas as the byproduct of four H(2)/H(-) redox couples. The calculated structures for both reactants and products are in good agreement with the X-ray diffraction data on 2 and 1 and the neutron diffraction data on 1 obtained under H(2) pressure as part of this study. The interconversion of the uranium(4+) and uranium(3+) hydride species was calculated to be near thermoneutral (~-2 kcal/mol). Comparison with the unknown thorium analogue, [(C(5)Me(5))(2)ThH](2), shows that the thorium(4+) to thorium(3+) hydride interconversion reaction is endothermic by 26 kcal/mol.

  14. In-situ high-pressure x-ray diffraction study of zinc ferrite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, S.; Kumar, R. S.; Grinblat, F.; Aphesteguy, J. C.; Saccone, F. D.; Errandonea, D.

    2016-06-01

    We have studied the high-pressure structural behavior of zinc ferrite (ZnFe2O4) nanoparticles by powder X-ray diffraction measurements up to 47 GPa. We found that the cubic spinel structure of ZnFe2O4 remains up to 33 GPa and a phase transition is induced beyond this pressure. The high-pressure phase is indexed to an orthorhombic CaMn2O4-type structure. Upon decompression the low- and high-pressure phases coexist. The compressibility of both structures was also investigated. We have observed that the lattice parameters of the high-pressure phase behave anisotropically upon compression. Further, we predict possible phase transition around 55 GPa. For comparison, we also studied the compression behavior of magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles by X-ray diffraction up to 23 GPa. Spinel-type ZnFe2O4 and Fe3O4 nanoparticles have a bulk modulus of 172 (20) GPa and 152 (9) GPa, respectively. This indicates that in both cases the nanoparticles do not undergo a Hall-Petch strengthening.

  15. Structure of phospholipid-cholesterol membranes: An x-ray diffraction study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karmakar, Sanat; Raghunathan, V. A.

    2005-06-01

    We have studied the phase behavior of mixtures of cholesterol with dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC), dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine (DMPC), and dilauroyl phosphatidylethanolamine (DLPE), using x-ray diffraction techniques. Phosphatidylcholine (PC)-cholesterol mixtures are found to exhibit a modulated phase for cholesterol concentrations around 15mol% at temperatures below the chain melting transition. Lowering the relative humidity from 98% to 75% increases the temperature range over which it exists. An electron density map of this phase in DPPC-cholesterol mixtures, calculated from the x-ray diffraction data, shows bilayers with a periodic height modulation, as in the ripple phase observed in many PCs in between the main- and pretransitions. However, these two phases differ in many aspects, such as the dependence of the modulation wavelength on the cholesterol content and thermodynamic stability at reduced humidities. This modulated phase is found to be absent in DLPE-cholesterol mixtures. At higher cholesterol contents the gel phase does not occur in any of these three systems, and the fluid lamellar phase is observed down to the lowest temperature studied (5°C) .

  16. Neutron diffraction and quasielastic neutron scattering studies of films of intermediate-length alkanes adsorbed on a graphite surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diama, Armand

    Over the past several years, we have conducted a variety of elastic neutron diffraction and quasielastic neutron scattering experiments to study the structure and the dynamics of films of two intermediate-length alkane molecules (C nH2n+2), adsorbed on a graphite basal-plane surface. The two molecules are the normal alkane n-tetracosane [n-CH 3(CH2)22CH3] and the branched alkane squalane (C30H62 or 2, 6, 10, 15, 19, 23-hexamethyltetracosane) whose carbon backbone is the same length as teteracosane. The temperature dependence of the monolayer structure of tetracosane and squalane was investigated using elastic neutron diffraction and evidence of two phase transitions was observed. Both the low-coverage tetracosane (C 24H50) and squalane (C30H62) monolayers have crystalline-to-"smectic" and "smectic"-to-isotropic fluid phase transitions upon heating. The diffusive motion in the tetracosane and squalane monolayers has been investigated by quasielastic neutron scattering. Two different quasielastic neutron scattering spectrometers at the Center for Neutron Research, National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have been used. The spectrometers differ in both their dynamic range and energy resolution allowing molecular motions to be investigated on time scales in the range 10-13--10 -9 s. On these time scales, we observe evidence of translational, rotational, and intermolecular diffusive motions in the tetracosane and squalane monolayers. We conclude that the molecular diffusive motion in the two monolayers is qualitatively similar. Thus, despite the three methyl sidegroups at each end of the squalane molecule, its monolayer structure, phase transitions, and dynamics are qualitatively similar to that of a monolayer of the unbranched tetracosane molecules. With the higher resolution spectrometer at NIST, we have also investigated the molecular diffusive motion in multilayer tetracosane films. The analysis of our measurements indicates slower diffusive motion in

  17. Detecting liquid threats with x-ray diffraction imaging (XDi) using a hybrid approach to navigate trade-offs between photon count statistics and spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skatter, Sondre; Fritsch, Sebastian; Schlomka, Jens-Peter

    2016-05-01

    The performance limits were explored for an X-ray Diffraction based explosives detection system for baggage scanning. This XDi system offers 4D imaging that comprises three spatial dimensions with voxel sizes in the order of ~(0.5cm)3, and one spectral dimension for material discrimination. Because only a very small number of photons are observed for an individual voxel, material discrimination cannot work reliably at the voxel level. Therefore, an initial 3D reconstruction is performed, which allows the identification of objects of interest. Combining all the measured photons that scattered within an object, more reliable spectra are determined on the object-level. As a case study we looked at two liquid materials, one threat and one innocuous, with very similar spectral characteristics, but with 15% difference in electron density. Simulations showed that Poisson statistics alone reduce the material discrimination performance to undesirable levels when the photon counts drop to 250. When additional, uncontrolled variation sources are considered, the photon count plays a less dominant role in detection performance, but limits the performance also for photon counts of 500 and higher. Experimental data confirmed the presence of such non-Poisson variation sources also in the XDi prototype system, which suggests that the present system can still be improved without necessarily increasing the photon flux, but by better controlling and accounting for these variation sources. When the classification algorithm was allowed to use spectral differences in the experimental data, the discrimination between the two materials improved significantly, proving the potential of X-ray diffraction also for liquid materials.

  18. Neutron diffraction structure study of Er and Yb doped YAl3(BO3)4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sváb, E.; Beregi, E.; Fábián, M.; Mészáros, Gy.

    2012-06-01

    Neutron diffraction structure study has been performed on YAl3(BO3)4 (YAB), on doped Y0.88Er0.12Al3(BO3)4, Y0.5Er0.5Al3(BO3)4, Y0.5Yb0.5Al3(BO3)4 and on co-doped Y0.84Er0.01Yb0.15Al3(BO3)4 compositions. It was established that the doped compounds are isostructural to YAB. The neutron diffraction pattern have been be fitted in space group R32 using the triple hexagonal Wyckoff notation. Both Er3+ and Yb3+ ions occupy the Y3+ (3a) sites and not the Al3+ (9d) sites, as it was suggested previously. The lattice parameters are decreasing with increasing amount of the dopant elements. Slight changes are revealed in the positional parameters and interatomic distances with increasing concentration of the dopant ions. For the co-doped Y0.84Er0.01Yb0.15Al3(BO3)4 the changes are more significant than for the doped YAB compounds with only one type of dopant element, Er or Yb.

  19. Cage occupancies in the high pressure structure H methane hydrate: A neutron diffraction study

    SciTech Connect

    Tulk, Christopher A; Klug, Dennis D; Moreira Dos Santos, Antonio F; Karotsis, Georgios; Guthrie, Malcolm; Molaison, Jamie J; Pradhan, Neelam

    2012-01-01

    A neutron diffraction study was performed on the CD{sub 4}: D{sub 2}O structure H clathrate hydrate to refine its CD{sub 4} fractional cage occupancies. Samples of ice VII and hexagonal (sH) methane hydrate were produced in a Paris-Edinburgh press and in situ neutron diffraction data collected. The data were analyzed with the Rietveld method and yielded average cage occupancies of 3.1 CD{sub 4} molecules in the large 20-hedron (5{sup 12}6{sup 8}) cages of the hydrate unit cell. Each of the pentagonal dodecahedron (5{sup 12}) and 12-hedron (4{sup 3}5{sup 6}6{sup 3}) cages in the sH unit cell are occupied with on average 0.89 and 0.90 CD{sub 4} molecules, respectively. This experiment avoided the co-formation of Ice VI and sH hydrate, this mixture is more difficult to analyze due to the proclivity of ice VI to form highly textured crystals, and overlapping Bragg peaks of the two phases. These results provide essential information for the refinement of intermolecular potential parameters for the water methane hydrophobic interaction in clathrate hydrates and related dense structures.

  20. Thermodynamic and neutron diffraction studies on multiferroic NdMn2O5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chattopadhyay, S.; Balédent, V.; Auban-Senzier, P.; Pasquier, C.; Doubrovsky, C.; Greenblatt, M.; Foury-Leylekian, P.

    2015-03-01

    Magnetically frustrated RMn2O5 oxides have attracted considerable attention in recent years, because most of the members of this family show spin ordering induced dielectric polarization along with strong magneto-electric coupling. Although the true origin of the ferroelectricity is still a matter of debate, it has been observed that the magneto-electric phase diagram can be substantially tuned with the variation of rare earth elements. In this work, we have chosen NdMn2O5 as the compound of our interest since it lies exactly in between the ferroelectric and non-ferroelectric members of this family and also, because there are few investigations performed on RMn2O5 systems with large rare earth atoms . With the combination of heat capacity, magnetic susceptibility, dielectric permittivity, powder X-ray diffraction, and powder neutron diffraction measurements, it has been found that NdMn2O5 undergoes an incommensurate magnetic ordering around 30 K followed by a possible ferroelectric-like transition at ∼26 K. Another lock-in kind of magnetic transition appears when the temperature is decreased to ∼15 K. With further lowering of temperature, an antiferromagnetic ordering, which is presumably associated with the Nd3+, is achieved near 4 K. This study thus sheds light on a new compound of the RMn2O5 series presenting different multiferroic properties.

  1. Neutron diffraction and ferromagnetic resonance studies on plasma-sprayed MnZn ferrite films

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Q.Y.; Gambino, R.J.; Sampath, S.; Huang, Q.

    2005-02-01

    The magnetic properties of MnZn ferrites are affected by the plasma spray process. It is found that improvements can be made by annealing the ferrite films at 500 deg. C - 800 deg. C. The annealing induced magnetic property changes are studied by neutron diffraction and ferromagnetic resonance techniques. The increase of the saturation magnetization is attributed to the cation ordering within the spinel lattice, which increases the magnetic moment per ferrite formula. The refinements on the neutron diffraction data suggest that the redistribution of the cation during annealing neither starts from a fully disordered state nor ends to a fully ordered state. The decrease of the coercivity is analyzed with the domain wall pinning model. The measurements on the magnetostriction and residual stress indicate that coercive mechanisms arising from the magnetoelastic energy term are not dominant in these ferrite films. The decrease of the coercivity for annealed ferrite films is mainly attributed to the decrease of the effective anisotropic field, which may result from the homogenization of the film composition and the reduction of the microstructural discontinuity (e.g., cracks, voids, and splat boundaries)

  2. Structure and dynamics of aqueous 2-propanol: a THz-TDS, NMR and neutron diffraction study.

    PubMed

    McGregor, James; Li, Ruoyu; Zeitler, J Axel; D'Agostino, Carmine; Collins, James H P; Mantle, Mick D; Manyar, Haresh; Holbrey, John D; Falkowska, Marta; Youngs, Tristan G A; Hardacre, Christopher; Stitt, E Hugh; Gladden, Lynn F

    2015-11-11

    Aqueous liquid mixtures, in particular, those involving amphiphilic species, play an important role in many physical, chemical and biological processes. Of particular interest are alcohol/water mixtures; however, the structural dynamics of such systems are still not fully understood. Herein, a combination of terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) and NMR relaxation time analysis has been applied to investigate 2-propanol/water mixtures across the entire composition range; while neutron diffraction studies have been carried out at two specific concentrations. Excellent agreement is seen between the techniques with a maximum in both the relative absorption coefficient and the activation energy to molecular motion occurring at ∼90 mol% H2O. Furthermore, this is the same value at which well-established excess thermodynamic functions exhibit a maximum/minimum. Additionally, both neutron diffraction and THz-TDS have been used to provide estimates of the size of the hydration shell around 2-propanol in solution. Both methods determine that between 4 and 5 H2O molecules per 2-propanol are found in the 2-propanol/water clusters at 90 mol% H2O. Based on the acquired data, a description of the structure of 2-propanol/water across the composition range is presented.

  3. High-pressure neutron diffraction study on H D isotope effects in brucite

    SciTech Connect

    Horita, Juske; Moreira Dos Santos, Antonio F; Tulk, Christopher A; Chakoumakos, Bryan C; Polyakov, Dr. V. B.

    2010-01-01

    A neutron powder diffraction study of hydrogenated and deuterated brucite was conducted at ambient temperature and at pressures up to 9 GPa, using a Paris Edinburgh high-pressure cell at the WAND instrument of the ORNL High Flux Isotope Reactor. The two materials were synthesized by the same method and companion measurements of neutron diffraction were conducted under the same conditions. Our refinement results show that the lattice-parameters of the a axis, parallel to the sheets of Mg O octahedra, decrease only slightly with pressure with no effect of H D substitution. However, the c axis of Mg(OD)2 is shorter and may exhibit greater compressibility with pressure than that of Mg(OH)2. Consequently, the unit-cell volume of deuterated brucite is slightly, but systematically smaller than that of hydrogenated brucite. When fitted to a third-order Birch Murnaghan equation in terms of the normalized unit-cell volume, values of the bulk modulus for hydrogenated and deuterated brucite (K0 = 39.0 2.8 and 40.4 1.3 GPa, respectively) are, however, indistinguishable from each other within the experimental errors. The measured effect of H D substitution on the unit-cell volume also demonstrates that brucite (and other hydrous minerals) preferentially incorporate deuterium over hydrogen under pressure, suggesting that the distribution of hydrogen isotopes in deep-earth conditions may differ significantly from that in near-surface environments.

  4. Cage occupancies in the high pressure structure H methane hydrate: A neutron diffraction study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tulk, C. A.; Klug, D. D.; dos Santos, A. M.; Karotis, G.; Guthrie, M.; Molaison, J. J.; Pradhan, N.

    2012-02-01

    A neutron diffraction study was performed on the CD4 : D2O structure H clathrate hydrate to refine its CD4 fractional cage occupancies. Samples of ice VII and hexagonal (sH) methane hydrate were produced in a Paris-Edinburgh press and in situ neutron diffraction data collected. The data were analyzed with the Rietveld method and yielded average cage occupancies of 3.1 CD4 molecules in the large 20-hedron (51268) cages of the hydrate unit cell. Each of the pentagonal dodecahedron (512) and 12-hedron (435663) cages in the sH unit cell are occupied with on average 0.89 and 0.90 CD4 molecules, respectively. This experiment avoided the co-formation of Ice VI and sH hydrate, this mixture is more difficult to analyze due to the proclivity of ice VI to form highly textured crystals, and overlapping Bragg peaks of the two phases. These results provide essential information for the refinement of intermolecular potential parameters for the water-methane hydrophobic interaction in clathrate hydrates and related dense structures.

  5. High energy white beam x-ray diffraction studies of residual strains in engineering components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S. Y.; Vorster, W.; Jun, T. S.; Song, X.; Golshan, M.; Laundy, D.; Walsh, M. J.; Korsunsky, A. M.

    2008-09-01

    In order to predict the durability of engineering components and improve performance, it is mandatory to understand residual stresses. The last decade has witnessed a significant increase of residual stress evaluation using diffraction of penetrating radiation, such as neutrons or high energy X-rays. They provide a powerful non-destructive method for determining the level of residual stresses in engineering components through precise characterisation of interplanar crystal lattice spacing. The unique non-destructive nature of these measurement techniques is particularly beneficial in the context of engineering design, since it allows the evaluation of a variety of structural and deformational parameters inside real components without material removal, or at worst with minimal interference. However, while most real engineering components have complex shape and are often large in size, leading to measurement and interpretation difficulties, since experimental facilities usually have limited space for mounting the sample, limited sample travel range, limited loading capacity of the sample positioning system, etc. Consequently, samples often have to be sectioned, requiring appropriate corrections on measured data; or facilities must be improved. Our research group has contributed to the development of engineering applications of high-energy X-ray diffraction methods for residual stress evaluation, both at synchrotron sources and in the lab setting, including multiple detector setup, large engineering component manipulation and measurement at the UK Synchrotron Radiation Source (SRS Daresbury), and in our lab at Oxford. A nickel base superalloy combustion casing and a large MIG welded Al alloy plate were successfully studied.

  6. [Studies on all-spectrum analysis for X-ray diffraction of Chinese herbal medicine calculus bovis].

    PubMed

    Lu, Y; Zheng, Q; Wu, N; Zhou, J; Bao, T

    1997-10-01

    Investigation on famouse Chinese herbal medicine-Niu huang (calculus bovis) was carried out by all-spectrum X-ray diffraction analysis. Diffraction spectrums, as well as the specific symboling peaks of calculus bovis, artificial bezoar, bile ductstone, human gallstone and hog gallstone, were recognized. The error distribution curves of d-delta d for specific symboling peaks was also obtained by calculation under diffrent testing conditions, by which we identified successfully three samples provided by a pharmaceutical factory. This article shows that all-spectrum X-ray diffraction analysis can be used to identify Chinese traditional crude drug, and provides for morphological and microscopical study.

  7. Neutron diffraction study of U-5.4 wt% Mo alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jeong-Soo; Lee, Chang-Hee; Kim, Ki Hwan; Em, Vyacheslav

    2000-06-01

    The structure of U-5.4 wt% Mo alloy prepared by the centrifugal atomization method and the decomposition of the alloy at elevated temperature were studied. The single uniform γ-phase was obtained after annealing the synthesized alloy at 700°C for 48 h. The homogenized alloy was annealed at 400°C and 500°C to search for an ordered phase and study the decomposition process. No ordered phase in U-5.4 wt% Mo alloy after annealing was observed. With the result from the Rietveld refinement of the neutron diffraction patterns it was concluded that the b parameter of the α-phase is contracted like metastable α'-phase and phase boundary of the α-phase region at 500°C lies near 2.6 at.% Mo.

  8. Trapping the M{sub 1} and M{sub 2} substrates of bacteriorhodopsin for electron diffraction studies

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, G.A.

    1992-05-01

    Visible and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) absorption spectroscopies are used to observe protein conformational changes occuring during the bacteriorhodopsin photocycle. Spectroscopic measurements which define the conditions under which bacteriorhodopsin can be isolated and trapped in two distinct substates of the m intermediate of the photocycle, M{sub 1}, and M{sub 2}, are described. A protocol that can be used for high-resolution electron diffraction studies is presented that will trap glucose-embedded purple membrane in the M{sub 1}and M{sub 2} substates at greater than 90% concentration. It was discovered that glucose alone does not provide a fully hydrated environment for bacteriorhodopsin. Equilibration of glucose-embedded samples at high humidity can result in a physical state that is demonstrably closer to the native, fully hydrated state. An extension of the C-T Model of bacteriorhodopsin functionality (Fodor et al., 1988; Mathies et al., 1991) is proposed based on FTIR results and guided by published spectra from resonance Raman and FTIR work. 105 refs.

  9. Purification, crystallization, preliminary X-ray diffraction and molecular-replacement studies of great cormorant (Phalacrocorax carbo) haemoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Jagadeesan, G.; Malathy, P.; Gunasekaran, K.; Harikrishna Etti, S.; Aravindhan, S.

    2014-10-25

    The great cormorant hemoglobin has been isolated, purified and crystallized and the three dimensional structure is solved using molecular replacement technique. Haemoglobin is the iron-containing oxygen-transport metalloprotein that is present in the red blood cells of all vertebrates. In recent decades, there has been substantial interest in attempting to understand the structural basis and functional diversity of avian haemoglobins. Towards this end, purification, crystallization, preliminary X-ray diffraction and molecular-replacement studies have been carried out on cormorant (Phalacrocorax carbo) haemoglobin. Crystals were grown by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method using PEG 3350, NaCl and glycerol as precipitants. The crystals belonged to the trigonal system P3{sub 1}21, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 55.64, c = 153.38 Å, β = 120.00°; a complete data set was collected to a resolution of 3.5 Å. Matthews coefficient analysis indicated that the crystals contained a half-tetramer in the asymmetric unit.

  10. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of Tyr167His mutant α-cyclodextrin glucanotransferase from Bacillus macerans

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Yang; Liu, Shengquan; Li, Hongbin; Song, Binghong; Xie, Ting; Sun, Yan; Chao, Yapeng; Qian, Shijun

    2013-01-01

    Improving the specificity of α-cyclodextrin glucanotransferase is a significant issue in the field of α-cyclodextrin production. In this study, a constructed Y167H mutant α-cyclodextrin glucanotransferase with enhanced α-cyclodextrin specificity was successfully expressed and purified. Single crystals were grown using PEG 4000 as a precipitating agent by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method at 293 K. The crystals exhibited two kinds of morphology in different crystallization conditions. The crystals diffracted to at least 2.2 Å resolution (space group P212121), with unit-cell parameters a = 65.69, b = 78.70, c = 137.00 Å. Assuming the asymmetric cell to be occupied by a monomer of 75 kDa, the unit cell contains 43.77% solvent with a crystal volume per protein mass, V M, of 2.19 Å3 Da−1. PMID:24100578

  11. X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy studies of frozen erythrocyte membrane preparations.

    PubMed

    Rzepecki, L M; Berriman, J; Finean, J B

    1980-07-16

    Well-defined X-ray diffraction patterns have been recorded from erythrocyte membranes in the frozen state. At -40 degrees C, lamellar periodicities range from 19 to 95 nm depending on the glycerol content (0--40%, respectively). Freeze-fracture electon micrographs of samples frozen in two stages to approximate to the diffraction conditions show ice formation external to membrane stacks. The membrane stacks have periodicities of the same order of magnitude as those obtained by X-ray diffraction.

  12. A Study of Detonation Diffraction in the Ignition-and-Growth Model

    SciTech Connect

    Kapila, A K; Schwendeman, D W; Bdzil, J B; Henshaw, W D

    2006-04-14

    Heterogeneous high-energy explosives are morphologically, mechanically and chemically complex. As such, their ab-initio modeling, in which well-characterized phenomena at the scale of the microstructure lead to a rationally homogenized description at the scale of observation, is a subject of active research but not yet a reality. An alternative approach is to construct phenomenological models, in which forms of constitutive behavior are postulated with an eye on the perceived picture of the micro-scale phenomena, and which are strongly linked to experimental calibration. Most prominent among these is the ignition-and-growth model conceived by Lee and Tarver. The model treats the explosive as a homogeneous mixture of two distinct constituents, the unreacted explosive and the products of reaction. To each constituent is assigned an equation of state, and a single reaction-rate law is prescribed for the conversion of the explosive to products. It is assumed that the two constituents are always in pressure and temperature equilibrium. The purpose of this paper is to investigate in detail the behavior of the model in situations where a detonation turns a corner and undergoes diffraction. A set of parameters appropriate for the explosive LX-17 is selected. The model is first examined analytically for steady, planar, 1-D solutions and the reaction-zone structure of Chapman-Jouguet detonations is determined. A computational study of two classes of problems is then undertaken. The first class corresponds to planar, 1-D initiation by an impact, and the second to corner turning and diffraction in planar and axisymmetric geometries. The 1-D initiation, although interesting in its own right, is utilized here as a means for interpretation of the 2-D results. It is found that there are two generic ways in which 1-D detonations are initiated in the model, and that these scenarios play a part in the post-diffraction evolution as well. For the parameter set under study the model

  13. High-resolution seismic studies applied to injected geothermal fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, A.T.; Kasameyer, P.

    1985-01-01

    The application of high-resolution microseismicity studies to the problem of monitoring injected fluids is one component of the Geothermal Injection Monitoring Project at LLNL. The evaluation of microseismicity includes the development of field techniques, and the acquisition and processing of events during the initial development of a geothermal field. To achieve a specific detection threshold and location precision, design criteria are presented for seismic networks. An analysis of a small swarm near Mammoth Lakes, California, demonstrates these relationships and the usefulness of high-resolution seismic studies. A small network is currently monitoring the Mammoth-Pacific geothermal power plant at Casa Diablo as it begins production.

  14. Convergent Beam Electron Diffraction Study of Bi-BASED High Temperature Superconducting Layered Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X. F.; Yan, Y. F.; Fung, K. K.

    Cleaved specimens of layered compounds Bi2Sr2(CaCuO2)nCuO6, n = 0, 1 and 2 phases have been studied by convergent beam electron diffraction. The identity and the symmetry of the phases have been determined from the higher order Laue zone (HOLZ) rings and the symmetry of their [001] patterns. In the case of Bi2Sr2CuO6, the [001] axial periodicity corresponds to the component of the wave vector of the monoclinic modulation along the c axis. Widely different axial periodicities have been obtained. This is interpreted as the manifestation of the variation of the monoclinic modulation. The presence of basal stacking fault lowers the symmetry of the [001] pattern.

  15. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes grown in hydrogen atmosphere: An x-ray diffraction study

    SciTech Connect

    Maniwa, Yutaka; Fujiwara, Ryuji; Kira, Hiroshi; Tou, Hideki; Nishibori, Eiji; Takata, Masaki; Sakata, Makoto; Fujiwara, Akihiko; Zhao, Xinluo; Iijima, Sumio

    2001-08-15

    X-ray diffraction study of multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT) grown by arc discharge in hydrogen atmosphere is presented. It is found that the thermal-expansion coefficient along the radial direction of MWNT is widely distributed in a range from 1.6 x 10{sup -5} K{sup -1} to 2.6 x 10{sup -5} K{sup -1}, indicating the existence of both of Russian doll MWNT and highly defective MWNT. Russian doll MWNT is suggested to have the outer diameter less than {approx}100 Aa. Thicker MWNT's are typically highly defective, and may have the jelly roll (scroll) or defective polygonal structure consisting of flat graphite domains.

  16. Kinetics of Methane Hydrate Decomposition Studied via in Situ Low Temperature X-ray Powder Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Everett, Susan M; Rawn, Claudia J; Keffer, David J.; Mull, Derek L; Payzant, E Andrew; Phelps, Tommy Joe

    2013-01-01

    Gas hydrates are known to have a slowed decomposition rate at ambient pressure and temperatures below the melting point of ice termed self-preservation or anomalous preservation. As hydrate exothermically decomposes, gas is released and water of the clathrate cages transforms into ice. Two regions of slowed decomposition for methane hydrate, 180 200 K and 230 260 K, were observed, and the kinetics were studied by in situ low temperature x-ray powder diffraction. The kinetic constants for ice formation from methane hydrate were determined by the Avrami model within each region and activation energies, Ea, were determined by the Arrhenius plot. Ea determined from the data for 180 200 K was 42 kJ/mol and for 230 260 K was 22 kJ/mol. The higher Ea in the colder temperature range was attributed to a difference in the microstructure of ice between the two regions.

  17. A study of swing-curve physics in diffraction-based overlay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Kaustuve; den Boef, Arie; Storms, Greet; van Heijst, Joost; Noot, Marc; An, Kevin; Park, Noh-Kyoung; Jeon, Se-Ra; Oh, Nang-Lyeom; McNamara, Elliott; van de Mast, Frank; Oh, SeungHwa; Lee, Seung Yoon; Hwang, Chan; Lee, Kuntack

    2016-03-01

    With the increase of process complexity in advanced nodes, the requirements of process robustness in overlay metrology continues to tighten. Especially with the introduction of newer materials in the film-stack along with typical stack variations (thickness, optical properties, profile asymmetry etc.), the signal formation physics in diffraction-based overlay (DBO) becomes an important aspect to apply in overlay metrology target and recipe selection. In order to address the signal formation physics, an effort is made towards studying the swing-curve phenomena through wavelength and polarizations on production stacks using simulations as well as experimental technique using DBO. The results provide a wealth of information on target and recipe selection for robustness. Details from simulation and measurements will be reported in this technical publication.

  18. Bone mineral change during experimental calcination: an X-ray diffraction study.

    PubMed

    Galeano, Sergio; García-Lorenzo, Mari Luz

    2014-11-01

    The effects of calcination (400-1200°C) on pig bones have been studied using powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and secondary modifications, such as color change and weight loss. The characterisation by powder XRD confirmed the presence of the crystalline phase of hydroxyapatite, and comparison of the results obtained at different temperatures suggested that at 650°C, all the organic components and carbonate substitutions were completely removed. Accordingly, these samples were white. In addition, the crystallinity degree and the crystallite size progressively increased with the calcination temperature until 650°C, remaining stable until 1200°C. Below 650°C, bone samples presented organic compounds, resulting in background noise in the diffractogram and gray or black color. In addition, impurities in the lattice correspond to low crystallite sizes.

  19. Angle-Dispersive X-ray Diffraction Study of Energetic Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gump, Jared; Peiris, Suhithi

    2004-03-01

    Determining thermodynamic properties of energetic materials is important to the United States Navy for predicting the performance of new energetic formulations. This study uses angle dispersive x-ray diffraction performed at Cornell University's High Energy Synchrotron Source to obtain several isothermal equations of state of energetic materials, such as HMX and CL-20. Both non-hydrostatic and hydrostatic conditions were examined at room temperature. Pressures of up to 6GPa were achieved using diamond anvil cells. The bulk modulus and its first pressure derivative were determined by fitting the data to the Birch-Murnaghan equation of state formalism. Experimental data will be compared to ab-initio HF calculations and MD simulations.

  20. High Pressure Synchrotron X-ray diffraction and Raman Scattering Studies of Ammonium Azide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Hongyang; Wu, Xiaoxin; Cui, Hang; Zhang, Jian; Cong, Ridong; Cui, Qiliang

    2013-06-01

    High-pressure in situ X-ray powder diffraction and Raman scattering studies on NH4N3 have been conducted up to 50.5 GPa and 48 GPa, respectively. The compressibility of orthorhombic phase is isotropic due to the orientation of azide anions. The hydrogen bonding weaken with increasing pressure due to the bending of N -H . . . N bonding, leading to the increase of N -H stretch frequency and rotation of azide anions at 2b and 4h Wyckoff positions up to 2.9 GPa. The rotation of azide anions obviously influences the intermolecular interactions along c axis in orthorhombic phase. The pressure induced phase transition involves a proximity of a and c, temporally assigned as a reversible second-order orthorhombic-to-tetragonal transition. The bulk modulus of the orthorhombic phases are determined to be KOT = 24.5 +/-3.5 GPa with KOT' = 3.4 +/-3.2.

  1. High pressure synchrotron x-ray diffraction and Raman scattering studies of ammonium azide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaoxin; Cui, Hang; Zhang, Jian; Cong, Ridong; Zhu, Hongyang; Cui, Qiliang

    2013-03-01

    Ammonium azide (NH4N3) has been studied by in situ high-pressure X-ray diffraction and Raman scattering at room temperature. NH4N3 exhibits strong hydrogen bonding features with compression. The hydrogen bond weaken with increasing pressure due to the bending of N-H…N bond, leading to the increase of N-H stretch frequency and rotation of azide anions at 2b and 4h Wyckoff positions up to 2.9 GPa. The orientation of azide anions obviously influences the compressibility properties of NH4N3. The phase transition involves rotation of azide anions and a proximity of a and c, temporally assigned as a reversible second-order orthorhombic-to-tetragonal transition.

  2. Neutron diffraction and reflectivity studies of the Cr Neel transition in Fe/Cr(001) superlatices

    SciTech Connect

    Fullerton, E.E.; Adenwalla, S.; Felcher, G.P.

    1995-12-31

    The effects on the interlayer coupling of the Cr Neel transition is studied in Fe/Cr(001) superlattices. The Neel transition is suppressed for Cr layer thickness < 42 {angstrom}. For > 42{angstrom} of Cr, the Neel temperature TN initially increases rapidly and then asymptotically approaches its bulk value with a three-dimensional transition-temperature shift exponent value of {lambda}=1.4{+-}0.3. Neutron diffraction confirms both the Cr antiferromagnetic order and the existence of the incommensurate, transverse spin density wave whose nesting wavevector is the same as that of bulk Cr. The ordering of the Cr dramatically alters the coupling of the Fe layers. The biquadratic Fe interlayer coupling observed for T>T{sub N} vanishes below T{sub N} as confirmed by polarized neutron reflectivity. The behavior can be understood in terms of finite-size and spin frustration effects at rough Fe-Cr interfaces.

  3. Bone mineral change during experimental calcination: an X-ray diffraction study.

    PubMed

    Galeano, Sergio; García-Lorenzo, Mari Luz

    2014-11-01

    The effects of calcination (400-1200°C) on pig bones have been studied using powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and secondary modifications, such as color change and weight loss. The characterisation by powder XRD confirmed the presence of the crystalline phase of hydroxyapatite, and comparison of the results obtained at different temperatures suggested that at 650°C, all the organic components and carbonate substitutions were completely removed. Accordingly, these samples were white. In addition, the crystallinity degree and the crystallite size progressively increased with the calcination temperature until 650°C, remaining stable until 1200°C. Below 650°C, bone samples presented organic compounds, resulting in background noise in the diffractogram and gray or black color. In addition, impurities in the lattice correspond to low crystallite sizes. PMID:24962811

  4. Hydride precipitation kinetics in Zircaloy-4 studied using synchrotron X-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courty, Olivier F.; Motta, Arthur T.; Piotrowski, Christopher J.; Almer, Jonathan D.

    2015-06-01

    As a result of in-reactor corrosion during operation in nuclear reactors, hydrogen can enter the zirconium fuel cladding and precipitate as brittle hydride particles, which may reduce cladding ductility. Dissolved hydrogen responds to temperature gradients, resulting in transport and precipitation into cold spots so that the distribution of hydrides in the cladding is inhomogeneous. The hydrogen precipitation kinetics plays a strong role in the spatial distribution of the hydrides in the cladding. The precipitation rate is normally described as proportional to the supersaturation of hydrogen in solid solution. The proportionality constant, α2, for hydride precipitation in Zircaloy-4 is measured directly using in situ synchrotron X-Ray diffraction, at different temperatures and with three different initial hydrogen concentrations. The results validate the linear approximation of the phenomenological model and a near constant value of α2 = 4.5 × 10-4 s-1 was determined for the temperature range studied.

  5. Hydride precipitation kinetics in Zircaloy-4 studied using synchrotron X-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Courty, Olivier Fabrice; Motta, Arthur T.; Piotrowski, Christopher J.; Almer, Jonathan D.

    2015-01-01

    As a result of in-reactor corrosion during operation in nuclear reactors, hydrogen can enter the zirconium fuel cladding and precipitate as brittle hydride particles, which may reduce cladding ductility. Dissolved hydrogen responds to temperature gradients, resulting in transport and precipitation into cold spots so that the distribution of hydrides in the cladding is inhomogeneous. The hydrogen precipitation kinetics plays a strong role in the spatial distribution of the hydrides in the cladding. The precipitation rate is normally described as proportional to the supersaturation of hydrogen in solid solution. The proportionality constant, α2, for hydride precipitation in Zircaloy-4 is measured directly using in situ synchrotron X-Ray diffraction, at different temperatures and with three different initial hydrogen concentrations. The results validate the linear approximation of the phenomenological model and a near constant value of α2 = 4.5 × 10-4 s-1 was determined for the temperature range studied.

  6. An X-ray diffraction study of the NpNi system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akabori, M.; Haire, R. G.; Gibson, J. K.; Okamoto, Y.; Ogawa, T.

    1997-08-01

    The neptunium-nickel binary system has been studied by means of powder X-ray diffraction. The previously reported NpNi 2 Laves phase was confirmed and a previously unknown intermetallic compound, Np 2Ni 17, was identified. The crystal symmetry of Np 2Ni 17 was determined to be the Th 2Ni 17 type hexagonal structure which is the same as that of Pu 2Ni 17 The lattice parameters of Np 2Ni 17 were calculated to be: a0 = 0.8333 ± 0.0005 and c0 = 0.8010 ± 0.0009 nm. The solubility limit of nickel in NpNi solid solutions and the composition range of NpNi 2 compound were also discussed.

  7. X-ray diffraction, FTIR, UV-VIS and SEM studies on chromium (III) complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, Ashutosh; Dwivedi, Jagrati Shukla, Kritika

    2015-06-24

    Five Chromium (III) complexes have been prepared using Schiff base ligands which derived from benzoin and five different amino acids (H{sub 2}N-R). Samples were characterized by XRD, FTIR, UV-VIS and SEM method. X-Ray diffraction pattern analyzed that all chromium (III) complexes have hexagonal structure and crystalline, in nature, using Bruker D8 Advance instrument. Using VERTAX 70, FTIR spectroscopy reveals that Samples have (C=N), (C-O), (M-N) and (M-O) bonds in the range of 4000-400cm{sup −1}. UV-VIS spectroscopy give information that samples absorb the visible light which is in the range of 380-780nm. For this, Lambda 960 spectrometer used. SEM is designed for studying of the solid objects, using JEOL JSM 5600 instrument.

  8. X-ray diffraction study of the structure modification of aluminum samples by ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barragán-Vidal, A.; García-García, R.; Cruz-Manjarrez, H.; Aguilar-Franco, M.; Reyes-Gasga, J.

    This study shows the X-ray diffraction analysis of the structural changes registered in samples of highly pure aluminum (99.999%) of two different castings and of the aluminum alloy 7075 when they are irradiated at liquid nitrogen (LN2) temperature by protons of 300 keV first and of 700 keV thereafter, from a 0.7 MeV Van de Graff accelerator. The samples were also introduced in a magnetic field, and thereafter irradiated with a laser beam. The results indicated the loss of texture in the samples after proton irradiation and the magnetic field and laser beam treatments were found as contributors in the consolidation of the new structure. Without proton irradiation and without the LN2 temperature, no structural change was observed.

  9. A high temperature diffraction-resistance study of chalcopyrite, CuFeS{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Engin, T.E.; Powell, A.V.; Hull, S.

    2011-08-15

    The electrical, magnetic and structural properties of synthetic chalcopyrite, CuFeS{sub 2}, have been studied up to 873 K using DC resistance measurements performed in-situ during neutron powder diffraction experiments. Under ambient conditions the material adopts the accepted structural model for CuFeS{sub 2} in the space group I4-bar 2d, with the magnetic moment of the Fe{sup 3+} cations aligned along [001]. The electrical resistivity is around 0.3 {Omega} cm under ambient conditions, consistent with semiconductor character, and decreases slightly with increase in temperature until a more abrupt fall occurs in the region 750-800 K. This abrupt change in resistivity is accompanied by a structural transition to a cubic zinc blende structured phase (space group F4-bar 3m) in which Cu{sup +} and Fe{sup 3+} cations are disordered over the same tetrahedral crystallographic sites and by a simultaneous loss of long-range magnetic order. The implications of these results are discussed in the context of previous studies of the chalcopyrite system. - Graphical abstract: Structural, magnetic and electrical properties of CuFeS{sub 2} to 873 K have been investigated using DC resistance measurements, performed in-situ during the collection of powder neutron diffraction data. Highlights: > Structural, magnetic and electronic properties are probed simultaneously. > A fall in resistivity at high temperatures is associated with cation disorder. > The order-disorder transition is accompanied by the loss of magnetic order. > The structural and magnetic phase transition is preceded by a 2-phase region. > Sulphur loss at high temperatures causes the phase transitions to be irreversible.

  10. Realizing in-plane surface diffraction by x-ray multiple-beam diffraction with large incidence angle

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Xian-Rong Gog, Thomas; Assoufid, Lahsen; Peng, Ru-Wen; Siddons, D. P.

    2014-11-03

    Based on rigorous dynamical-theory calculations, we demonstrate the principle of an x-ray multiple-beam diffraction (MBD) scheme that overcomes the long-lasting difficulties of high-resolution in-plane diffraction from crystal surfaces. This scheme only utilizes symmetric reflection geometry with large incident angles but activates the out-of-plane and in-plane diffraction processes simultaneously and separately in the continuous MBD planes. The in-plane diffraction is realized by detoured MBD, where the intermediate diffracted waves propagate parallel to the surface, which corresponds to an absolute Bragg surface diffraction configuration that is extremely sensitive to surface structures. A series of MBD diffraction and imaging techniques may be developed from this principle to study surface/interface (misfit) strains, lateral nanostructures, and phase transitions of a wide range of (pseudo)cubic crystal structures, including ultrathin epitaxial films and multilayers, quantum dots, strain-engineered semiconductor or (multi)ferroic materials, etc.

  11. 18 CFR 5.14 - Formal study dispute resolution process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... resolution process. 5.14 Section 5.14 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER THE FEDERAL POWER ACT INTEGRATED LICENSE APPLICATION... under section 401 of the Clean Water Act, 42 U.S.C. 1341, may file a notice of study dispute...

  12. Energy-selective neutron imaging with high spatial resolution and its impact on the study of crystalline-structured materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, E. H.; Peetermans, S.; Josic, L.; Leber, H.; van Swygenhoven, H.

    2014-01-01

    Crystalline-structured materials with preferentially large grains were investigated by means of energy-selective neutron imaging methods (transmission radiography and tomography) under the conditions of the best possible spatial resolution at the ICON facility, SINQ, and PSI. Because of the cold spectrum at that beam line, access to the Bragg diffraction features was possible even when the energy resolution of the used selector device was only 15%. Grains with a size below the detector resolution (approximately 25 μm) are not visible, and a quasi-homogeneous contrast variation is found when the neutron energy is varied.In the cases of welded stainless steel samples and rolled Al plates, we obtained structural information from a very short exposure of approximately 60 s. Tomographic examinations of these samples at suitable neutron energies qualitatively verified the radiographic findings by showing the same features in the bulk. Comparison to common electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) investigations in selected regions of the samples provided a complete verification of the neutron-image data with respect to the grain size and the different grain orientations. The method of energy-selective neutron imaging provides an easy and straightforward approach for non-invasive material research that can be performed without any sample preparation if the most suitable neutron energy is chosen. Further studies will be necessary to extend the experimental data base to other materials with different crystal structures and grain sizes. A comparison to diffraction data will enhance the quantitative value of the investigations.

  13. High-Pressure Neutron Diffraction Study on H-D Isotope Effects in Brucite

    SciTech Connect

    Horita, Juske; Chakoumakos, Bryan C; dos Santos, Antonio M.; Tulk, Christopher A; Polyakov, Dr. Veniamin B

    2010-01-01

    A neutron powder diffraction study of hydrogenated and deuterated brucite was conducted at ambient temperature and at pressures to 9 GPa, using a Paris-Edinburgh high-pressure cell at the WAND instrument of ORNL High Flux Isotope Reactor. The two materials were synthesized by the same method and companion measurements of neutron diffraction were conducted under the same conditions. Our refinement results show that the lattice-parameters of the a axis, parallel to the sheets of Mg-O octahedra, decreases only slightly with pressure with no effect of H-D substitution. However, the c axis of Mg(OD)2 is shorter and decreases more rapidly than that of Mg(OH)2 with increasing pressure. Consequently, the unit-cell volume of deuterated brucite is slightly, but systematically smaller than that of normal brucite, which were fitted to third-order Birch-Murnaghan equation: K0=41.46 0.52 and 39.04 0.30 GPa for Mg(OH)2 and Mg(OD)2, respectively with a fixed K0 value of 10. Our results suggest that H-D substitution of brucite and other hydrous minerals with H-bonding likely influences their structural and dynamic properties under pressure, including the position of hydrogen atoms. The measured effect of H-D substitution on the unit-cell volume also demonstrates that brucite (and other hydrous minerals) preferentially incorporate deuterium over hydrogen under pressure, suggesting that the distribution of hydrogen isotopes in deep-earth conditions may differ significantly from that in near-surface environments.

  14. High-resolution x-ray absorption spectroscopy studies of metal compounds in neurodegenerative brain tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Collingwood, J.F.; Mikhaylova, A.; Davidson, M.R.; Batich, C.; Streit, W.J.; Eskin, T.; Terry, J.; Barrea, R.; Underhill, R.S.; Dobson, J.

    2008-06-16

    Fluorescence mapping and microfocus X-ray absorption spectroscopy are used to detect, locate and identify iron biominerals and other inorganic metal accumulations in neurodegenerative brain tissue at sub-cellular resolution (< 5 microns). Recent progress in developing the technique is reviewed. Synchrotron X-rays are used to map tissue sections for metals of interest, and XANES and XAFS are used to characterize anomalous concentrations of the metals in-situ so that they can be correlated with tissue structures and disease pathology. Iron anomalies associated with biogenic magnetite, ferritin and haemoglobin are located and identified in an avian tissue model with a pixel resolution {approx} 5 microns. Subsequent studies include brain tissue sections from transgenic Huntington's mice, and the first high-resolution mapping and identification of iron biominerals in human Alzheimer's and control autopsy brain tissue. Technical developments include use of microfocus diffraction to obtain structural information about biominerals in-situ, and depositing sample location grids by lithography for the location of anomalies by conventional microscopy. The combined techniques provide a breakthrough in the study of both intra- and extra-cellular iron compounds and related metals in tissue. The information to be gained from this approach has implications for future diagnosis and treatment of neurodegeneration, and for our understanding of the mechanisms involved.

  15. High-resolution x-ray absorption spectroscopy studies of metal compounds in neurodegenerative brain tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collingwood, J. F.; Mikhaylova, A.; Davidson, M. R.; Batich, C.; Streit, W. J.; Eskin, T.; Terry, J.; Barrea, R.; Underhill, R. S.; Dobson, J.

    2005-01-01

    Fluorescence mapping and microfocus X-ray absorption spectroscopy are used to detect, locate and identify iron biominerals and other inorganic metal accumulations in neurodegenerative brain tissue at sub-cellular resolution (<5 microns). Recent progress in developing the technique is reviewed. Synchrotron X-rays are used to map tissue sections for metals of interest, and XANES and XAFS are used to characterise anomalous concentrations of the metals in-situ so that they can be correlated with tissue structures and disease pathology. Iron anomalies associated with biogenic magnetite, ferritin and haemoglobin are located and identified in an avian tissue model with a pixel resolution ~5 microns. Subsequent studies include brain tissue sections from transgenic Huntington's mice, and the first high-resolution mapping and identification of iron biominerals in human Alzheimer's and control autopsy brain tissue. Technical developments include use of microfocus diffraction to obtain structural information about biominerals in-situ, and depositing sample location grids by lithography for the location of anomalies by conventional microscopy. The combined techniques provide a breakthrough in the study of both intra- and extra-cellular iron compounds and related metals in tissue. The information to be gained from this approach has implications for future diagnosis and treatment of neurodegeneration, and for our understanding of the mechanisms involved.

  16. Optical and resonant X-ray diffraction studies of molecular arrangements in several liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Suntao

    Using optical and x-ray techniques, we have studied several selected liquid crystal compounds formed by three types of molecules: rod-like; hockey-stick-shaped and bent-core-shaped molecules. This thesis describes four research projects. The first one is a study of the molecular arrangements in freestanding films of three chiral compounds showing no-layer-shrinkage behavior above their bulk SmA-SmC* transition temperatures. Upon cooling under a proper electric field, novel nonplanar-anticlinic-synclinic and nonplanar-synclinic transitions have been observed in two compounds. Increasing electric field can induce a rare transition from a synclinic to an anticlinic structure. Results from both x-ray diffraction and optical studies indicate that different molecular packing arrangements exist within the Sm A phase window. The second project is to investigate three achiral meta-substituted three-ring compounds. These compounds exhibit two different tilted smectic phases, Sm C1 and SmC2. A recent paper has reported that mirror symmetry is broken in one of these compounds. However, no mirror symmetry breaking has been observed in our studies of the same compound. Our studies of another two compounds confirmed previous results that the Sm C1 and SmC2 phases are Sm C and SmCA, respectively. Thirdly, we confirmed the SM C*FI2 -SmC* phase sequence reversal in one liquid crystal compound and specially prepared binary mixtures. This phase sequence reversal was predicted by a recent phenomenological model. Moreover, the temperature range for the SM C*FI2 phase increases significantly in the mixture suggesting that such a phase sequence may exist in other compounds. The last project is to study the B2 phase formed by bent-core molecules using polarization-analyzed resonant x-ray diffraction. The B2 phase has three possible arrangements which show a two-layer unit cell. We analyzed the polarization of the resonant peaks at different Bragg orders. By comparing a theoretical

  17. Picowatt Resolution Calorimetry for Micro and Nanoscale Energy Transport Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadat, Seid H.

    Precise quantification of energy transport is key to obtaining insights into a wide range of phenomena across various disciplines including physics, chemistry, biology and engineering. This thesis describes technical advancements into heat-flow calorimetry which enable measurement of energy transport at micro and nanoscales with picowatt resolution. I have developed two types of microfabricated calorimeter devices and demonstrated single digit picowatt resolution at room temperature. Both devices incorporate two distinct features; an active area isolated by a thermal conductance (GTh) of less than 1 microW/K and a high resolution thermometer with temperature resolution (DeltaTres) in the micro kelvin regime. These features enable measurements of heat currents (q) with picowatt resolution (q= Th xDeltaTres). In the first device the active area is suspended via silicon nitride beams with excellent thermal isolation (~600 nW/K) and a bimaterial cantilever (BMC) thermometer with temperature resolution of ~6 microK. Taken together this design enabled calorimetric measurements with 4 pW resolution. In the second device, the BMC thermometry technique is replaced by a high-resolution resistance thermometry scheme. A detailed noise analysis of resistance thermometers, confirmed by experimental data, enabled me to correctly predict the resolution of different measurement schemes and propose techniques to achieve an order of magnitude improvement in the resolution of resistive thermometers. By incorporating resistance thermometers with temperature resolution of ~30 microK, combined with a thermal isolation of ~150 nW/K, I demonstrated an all-electrical calorimeter device with a resolution of ~ 5 pW. Finally, I used these calorimeters to study Near-Field Radiative Heat Transfer (NF-RHT). Using these devices, we studied--for the first time--the effect of film thickness on the NF-RHT between two dielectric surfaces. We showed that even a very thin film (~50 nm) of silicon

  18. Theoretical study of the properties of X-ray diffraction moiré fringes. I

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshimura, Jun-ichi

    2015-05-14

    A detailed and comprehensive theoretical description of X-ray diffraction moiré fringes for a bicrystal specimen is given on the basis of a calculation by plane-wave dynamical diffraction theory, where the effect of the Pendellösung intensity oscillation on the moiré pattern is explained in detail. A detailed and comprehensive theoretical description of X-ray diffraction moiré fringes for a bicrystal specimen is given on the basis of a calculation by plane-wave dynamical diffraction theory. Firstly, prior to discussing the main subject of the paper, a previous article [Yoshimura (1997 ▸). Acta Cryst. A53, 810–812] on the two-dimensionality of diffraction moiré patterns is restated on a thorough calculation of the moiré interference phase. Then, the properties of moiré fringes derived from the above theory are explained for the case of a plane-wave diffraction image, where the significant effect of Pendellösung intensity oscillation on the moiré pattern when the crystal is strained is described in detail with theoretically simulated moiré images. Although such plane-wave moiré images are not widely observed in a nearly pure form, knowledge of their properties is essential for the understanding of diffraction moiré fringes in general.

  19. STEM Electron Diffraction and High Resolution Images Used in the Determination of the Crystal Structure of Au144(SR)60 Cluster

    PubMed Central

    Bahena, Daniel; Bhattarai, Nabraj; Santiago, Ulises; Tlahuice, Alfredo; Ponce, Arturo; Bach, Stephan B. H.; Yoon, Bokwon; Whetten, Robert L.; Landman, Uzi; Jose-Yacaman, Miguel

    2013-01-01

    Determination of the total structure of molecular nanocrystals is an outstanding experimental challenge that has been met, in only a few cases, by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Described here is an alternative approach that is of most general applicability and does not require the fabrication of a single crystal. The method is based on rapid, time-resolved nanobeam electron diffraction (NBD) combined with high-angle annular dark field scanning/transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM) images in a probe corrected STEM microscope, operated at reduced voltages. The results are compared with theoretical simulations of images and diffraction patterns obtained from atomistic structural models derived through first-principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The method is demonstrated by application to determination of the structure of the Au144(SCH2CH2Ph)60 cluster. PMID:23687562

  20. High-resolution thermal imaging with a combination of nano-focus X-ray diffraction and ultra-fast chip calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, Martin; Doblas, David; Hernandez, Jaime J; Odarchenko, Yaroslav I; Burghammer, Manfred; Di Cola, Emanuela; Spitzer, Denis; Antipov, A E; Aldoshin, L S; Ivanov, Dimitri A

    2014-01-01

    A microelectromechanical-systems-based calorimeter designed for use on a synchrotron nano-focused X-ray beamline is described. This instrument allows quantitative DC and AC calorimetric measurements over a broad range of heating/cooling rates (≤100000 K s(-1)) and temperature modulation frequencies (≤1 kHz). The calorimeter was used for high-resolution thermal imaging of nanogram-sized samples subjected to X-ray-induced heating. For a 46 ng indium particle, the measured temperature rise reaches ∼0.2 K, and is directly correlated to the X-ray absorption. Thermal imaging can be useful for studies of heterogeneous materials exhibiting physical and/or chemical transformations. Moreover, the technique can be extended to three-dimensional thermal nanotomography. PMID:24365940

  1. 75 FR 7469 - Panel Member List for Hydropower Licensing Study Dispute Resolution; Notice Extending Filing Date...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-19

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Panel Member List for Hydropower Licensing Study Dispute Resolution; Notice... Resolution February 4, 2010. On October 20, 2009, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (Commission... in the Commission's hydropower integrated licensing process (ILP) study dispute resolution...

  2. X-Ray Diffraction Study of the Internal Structure of Supercooled Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorsch, Robert G.; Boyd, Bemrose

    1951-01-01

    A Bragg X-ray spectrometer equipped with a volume-sensitive Geiger counter and Soller slits and employing filtered molybdenum Ka radiation was used to obtain a set of diffracted intensity curves as a Punction of angle for supercooled water. Diffracted intensity curves in the temperature region of 21 to -16 C were obtained. The minimum between the two main diffraction peaks deepened continuously with lowering temperature, indicating a gradual change in the internal structure of the water. No discontinuity in this trend was noted at the melting point. The internal structure of supercooled water was concluded to become progressively more ice-like as the temperature is lowered.

  3. An Atomistic study of Helium Resolution in bcc Iron

    SciTech Connect

    Stoller, Roger E; Stewart, David M

    2011-01-01

    The evolution of gas-stabilized bubbles in irradiated materials can be a significant factor in the microstructural processes that lead to mechanical property and dimensional changes in structural materials exposed to high-energy neutrons. Helium generation and accumulation is particularly important under DT fusion irradiation conditions. Although the process of ballistic resolutioning of gas from bubbles has been long-discussed in the literature, there have been few computational studies of this mechanism. Resolutioning could limit bubble growth by ejecting gas atoms back into the metal matrix. A detailed atomistic study of ballistic He resolutioning from bubbles in bcc iron has been carried out using molecular dynamics. A newly-developed Fe-He interatomic potential was employed, with the iron matrix described by the potential of Ackland and co-workers from 1997. The primary variables examined were: irradiation temperature (100 and 600K), iron knock-on atom energy (5 and 20 keV), bubble radius (~0.5 and 1.0 nm), and He-to-vacancy ratio in the bubble (0.25, 0.5 and 1.0) in order to obtain an assessment of this dynamic resolutioning mechanism. The results presented here focus on the 5 keV cascades which indicate a modest, but potentially significant level of He removal by this process.

  4. Radiation damage in a micron-sized protein crystal studied via reciprocal space mapping and Bragg coherent diffractive imaging

    PubMed Central

    Coughlan, H. D.; Darmanin, C.; Phillips, N. W.; Hofmann, F.; Clark, J. N.; Harder, R. J.; Vine, D. J.; Abbey, B.

    2015-01-01

    For laboratory and synchrotron based X-ray sources, radiation damage has posed a significant barrier to obtaining high-resolution structural data from biological macromolecules. The problem is particularly acute for micron-sized crystals where the weaker signal often necessitates the use of higher intensity beams to obtain the relevant data. Here, we employ a combination of techniques, including Bragg coherent diffractive imaging to characterise the radiation induced damage in a micron-sized protein crystal over time. The approach we adopt here could help screen for potential protein crystal candidates for measurement at X-ray free election laser sources. PMID:26798804

  5. Radiation damage in a micron-sized protein crystal studied via reciprocal space mapping and Bragg coherent diffractive imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Coughlan, H. D.; Darmanin, C.; Phillips, N. W.; Hofmann, F.; Clark, J. N.; Harder, R. J.; Vine, D. J.; Abbey, B.

    2015-04-29

    For laboratory and synchrotron based X-ray sources, radiation damage has posed a significant barrier to obtaining high-resolution structural data from biological macromolecules. The problem is particularly acute for micron-sized crystals where the weaker signal often necessitates the use of higher intensity beams to obtain the relevant data. Here, we employ a combination of techniques, including Bragg coherent diffractive imaging to characterise the radiation induced damage in a micron-sized protein crystal over time. The approach we adopt here could help screen for potential protein crystal candidates for measurement at X-ray free election laser sources.

  6. InSitu X-Ray Diffraction Studies on Lithium-Ion Battery Cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Doughty, Daniel H.; Ingersoll, David; Rodriguez, Mark A.

    1999-07-13

    In this paper numerical simulations of Mach 10 air flow over a hollow cylinder flare are presented in comparison with recent experimental results. The numerical study is performed using a Direct Simulation Monte Carlo code and the experimental results were obtained in the ONERA R5Ch wind tunnel. The flow phenomena involved include shock wave boundary layer interaction in hypersonic laminar flow. An analysis of the requirements on the grid resolution, number of particle simulators and run time is performed. Measured and calculated surface properties including pressure and heat transfer are compared.

  7. Single crystal x-ray diffraction: optical and micro hardness studies on chalcone derivative single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crasta, Vincent; Ravindrachary, V.; Bhajantri, R. F.; Naveen, S.; Shridar, M. A.; Shashidhara Prasad, J.

    2005-08-01

    1-(4-methylphenyl)-3-(4- N, N dimethyl amino phenyl)-2-propen-1-one, a chalcone derivative nonlinear optical material has been synthesized by standard method. FT-IR and NMR spectral studies have been performed to confirm the molecular structure of the synthesized compound. The single crystals up to a dimension of 13 x 9 x 3 mm3 were grown by slow evaporation method. The grown crystals were transparent in the entire visible region and absorbs in the UV-region. The refractive index has been measured using a He-Ne laser. The grown crystals have been subjected to single crystal X-ray diffraction studies to determine the crystal structure and hence the cell parameters of the crystal. From this study it is found that this compound crystallizes in orthorhombic system with a space group P212121 and corresponding lattice parameters are, a = 7.3610(13) Å, b = 11.651(2) Å, c = 17.6490(17) Å. The Kurtz powder second harmonic generation test shows that the compound is a potential candidate for Photonic application. The micro hardness test on these crystals were carried out and the load dependence hardness was observed

  8. The growth of epitaxial iron oxides on platinum (111) as studied by X-ray photoelectron diffraction, scanning tunneling microscopy, and low energy electron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Y.J.

    1995-05-01

    Three complementary surface structure probes, x-ray photoelectron diffraction (XPD), scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), and low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) have been combined in a single instrument. This experimental system has been utilized to study the structure and growth mechanisms of iron oxide films on Pt(111); these films were formed by first depositing a single overlayer of Fe with a certain coverage in monolayers (ML`s), and then thermally oxidizing it in an oxygen atmosphere. For films up to {approximately}1 ML in thickness, a bilayer of Fe and O similar to those in FeO(111) is found to form. In agreement with prior studies, STM and LEED show this to be an incommensurate oxide film forming a lateral superlattice with short- and long-range periodicities of {approximately}3.1 {Angstrom} and {approximately}26.0 {Angstrom}. XPD in addition shows a topmost oxygen layer to be relaxed inward by -0.6 {Angstrom} compared to bulk FeO(111), and these are new structural conclusions. The oxygen stacking in the FeO(111) bilayer is dominated by one of two possible binding sites. For thicker iron oxide films from 1.25 ML to 3.0 ML, the growth mode is essentially Stranski-Krastanov: iron oxide islands form on top of the FeO(111) bilayer mentioned above. For iron oxide films of 3.0 ML thickness, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) yields an Fe 2p{sub 3/2} binding energy and an Fe:O stoichiometry consistent with the presence of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}. Our XPD data further prove this overlayer to be Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}(111)-magnetite in two almost equally populated domains with a 180{degrees} rotation between them. The structural parameters for this Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} overlayer generally agree with those of a previous LEED study, except that we find a significant difference in the first Fe-O interplanar spacing. This work demonstrates the considerable benefits to be derived by using this set of complementary surface structure probes in such epitaxial growth studies.

  9. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction study of phosphopantetheine adenylyltransferase from M. tuberculosis crystallizing in space group P32

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timofeev, V. I.; Chupova, L. A.; Esipov, R. S.; Kuranova, I. P.

    2015-09-01

    Crystals of M. tuberculosis phosphopantetheine adenylyltransferase were grown in microgravity by the capillary counter-diffusion method through a gel layer. The X-ray diffraction data set suitable for the determination of the three-dimensional structure at atomic resolution was collected from one crystal at the Spring-8 synchrotron facility to 2.00-Å resolution. The crystals belong to sp. gr. P32 and have the following unit-cell parameters: a = b = 106.47 Å, c = 71.32 Å, α = γ = 90°, β = 120°. The structure was solved by the molecular-replacement method. There are six subunits of the enzyme comprising a hexamer per asymmetric unit. The hexamer is a biologically active form of phosphopantetheine adenylyltransferase from M. tuberculosis.

  10. Numerical studies and optimization of magnetron with diffraction output (MDO) using particle-in-cell simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majzoobi, Alireza

    The first magnetron as a vacuum-tube device, capable of generating microwaves, was invented in 1913. This thesis research focuses on numerical simulation-based analysis of magnetron performance. The particle-in-cell (PIC) based MAGIC software tool has been utilized to study the A6 and the Rising-Sun magnetron structures, and to obtain the optimized geometry for optimizing the device performance. The A6 magnetron is the more traditional structure and has been studied more often. The Rising-Sun geometry, consists of two alternating groups of short and long vanes in angular orientation, and was created to achieve mode stability. The effect of endcaps, changes in lengths of the cathode, the location of cathodes with respect to the anode block, and use of transparent cathodes have been probed to gauge the performance of the A6 magnetron with diffraction output. The simulations have been carried out with different types of endcaps. The results of this thesis research demonstrate peak output power in excess of 1GW, with efficiencies on the order of 66% for magnetic (B)-fields in the range of 0.4T - 0.42T. In addition, particle-in-cell simulations have been performed to provide a numerical evaluation of the efficiency, output power and leakage currents for a 12-cavitiy, Rising-Sun magnetron with diffraction output with transparent cathodes. The results demonstrate peak output power in excess of 2GW, with efficiencies on the order of 68% for B-fields in the 0.42T - 0.46T range. While slightly better performance for longer cathode length has been recorded. The results show the efficiency in excess of 70% and peak output power on the order of 2.1GW for an 18 cm cathode length at 0.45T magnetic field and 400 kV applied voltage. All results of this thesis conform to the definite advantage of having endcaps. Furthermore, the role of secondary electron emission (SEE) on the output performance of the12-cavity, 12-cathodes Rising-Sun magnetron has been probed. The results indicate

  11. Preliminayr Study on Diffraction Enhanced Radiographic Imaging for a Canine Model of Cartilage Damage

    SciTech Connect

    Muehleman,C.; Li, J.; Zhong, Z.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To demonstrate the ability of a novel radiographic technique, Diffraction Enhanced Radiographic Imaging (DEI), to render high contrast images of canine knee joints for identification of cartilage lesions in situ. Methods: DEI was carried out at the X-15A beamline at Brookhaven National Laboratory on intact canine knee joints with varying levels of cartilage damage. Two independent observers graded the DE images for lesions and these grades were correlated to the gross morphological grade. Results: The correlation of gross visual grades with DEI grades for the 18 canine knee joints as determined by observer 1 (r2=0.8856, P=0.001) and observer 2 (r2=0.8818, P=0.001) was high. The overall weighted ? value for inter-observer agreement was 0.93, thus considered high agreement. Conclusion: The present study is the first study for the efficacy of DEI for cartilage lesions in an animal joint, from very early signs through erosion down to subchondral bone, representing the spectrum of cartilage changes occurring in human osteoarthritis (OA). Here we show that DEI allows the visualization of cartilage lesions in intact canine knee joints with good accuracy. Hence, DEI may be applicable for following joint degeneration in animal models of OA.

  12. X-Ray diffraction study of KTiOPO{sub 4} single crystals doped with hafnium

    SciTech Connect

    Novikova, N. E. Verin, I. A.; Sorokina, N. I.; Alekseeva, O. A.; Orlova, E. I.; Voronkova, V. I.

    2011-05-15

    Single crystals of KTi{sub 1-x}Hf{sub x}OPO{sub 4} (x = 0.015(2), 0.035(1), and 0.128(1) are reinvestigated by precision X-ray diffraction at room temperature. It is found that the implantation of hafnium atoms in the crystal structure of KTiOPO{sub 4} does not lead to significant changes in the framework and affects only the positions of the potassium atoms in the channel. Our studies reveal the displacements of the potassium atoms from their main and additional positions in the structure of pure KTP in all three structures studied. The largest displacements from the K1 Prime and K1 Double-Prime additional positions are observed in the structure with x = 0.035. At this hafnium concentration, the occupancy of the main positions of potassium atoms decreases and the occupancy of the additional positions increases in relation to those in KTP. This redistribution of potassium atoms enhances the nonuniformity of distribution of the electron density in the vicinity of their positions, which is probably responsible for the increase in the nonlinear susceptibility of KTP crystals that contain 3.5% hafnium in relation to crystals of pure KTP.

  13. A theoretical study of hydrogen diffraction following photodissociation of adsorbed molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosloff, Ronnie; Zeiri, Yehuda

    1992-08-01

    A new probe of surface structure is presented which is based on the photodissociation of hydrogen from an adsorbate molecule. The event creates an atomic hydrogen fragment, positioned between the adsorbate layer and the solid surface. Due to its light mass, the hydrogen dynamics is quantum mechanical in nature. A useful image is of the hydrogenic wave function behaving like a liquid able to fill all cracks. The coherent character of the hydrogenic wave function is crucial in the ability of the photodissociation experiment to act as a probe. A series of case studies has been carried out whose aim is to reveal the relation between the structure of the surface and the asymptotic energy resolved angular distribution of the hydrogen fragment. The dynamics of the hydrogen atom motion was modeled by the time dependent Schrödinger equation. The cases studied include the dissociation of a single HBr adsorbate on flat and corrugated surfaces. A broad specular peak was observed, in addition to diffraction peaks which can be correlated with the corrugation. Moreover, selective adsorption peaks, which can be correlated with the attractive part of the surface potential, have been identified. Systems in which the hydrogenic wave function scatters from several adsorbates were also investigated. It was found that the scattering is dominated by the trapping of the wave function by unstable periodic orbits. The quantization rules of these periodic orbits have been identified, creating a link between the structure of the adsorbates and the asymptotic angular distributions.

  14. Packing of ganglioside-phospholipid monolayers: an x-ray diffraction and reflectivity study.

    PubMed

    Majewski, J; Kuhl, T L; Kjaer, K; Smith, G S

    2001-11-01

    Using synchrotron grazing-incidence x-ray diffraction (GIXD) and reflectivity, the in-plane and out-of-plane structure of mixed ganglioside-phospholipid monolayers was investigated at the air-water interface. Mixed monolayers of 0, 5, 10, 20, and 100 mol% ganglioside GM(1) and the phospholipid dipalmitoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DPPE) were studied in the solid phase at 23 degrees C and a surface pressure of 45 mN/m. At these concentrations and conditions the two components do not phase-separate and no evidence for domain formation was observed. X-ray scattering measurements reveal that GM(1) is accommodated within the host DPPE monolayer and does not distort the hexagonal in-plane unit cell or out-of-plane two-dimensional (2-D) packing compared with a pure DPPE monolayer. The oligosaccharide headgroups were found to extend normally from the monolayer surface, and the incorporation of these glycolipids into DPPE monolayers did not affect hydrocarbon tail packing (fluidization or condensation of the hydrocarbon region). This is in contrast to previous investigations of lipopolymer-lipid mixtures, where the packing structure of phospholipid monolayers was greatly altered by the inclusion of lipids bearing hydrophilic polymer groups. Indeed, the lack of packing disruptions by the oligosaccharide groups indicates that protein-GM(1) interactions, including binding, insertion, chain fluidization, and domain formation (lipid rafts), can be studied in 2-D monolayers using scattering techniques.

  15. In-situ early-age hydration study of sulfobelite cements by synchrotron powder diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Álvarez-Pinazo, G.; Cuesta, A.; García-Maté, M.; Santacruz, I.; Losilla, E.R.; Fauth, F.; Aranda, M.A.G.; De la Torre, A.G.

    2014-02-15

    Eco-friendly belite calcium sulfoaluminate (BCSA) cement hydration behavior is not yet well understood. Here, we report an in-situ synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction study for the first hours of hydration of BCSA cements. Rietveld quantitative phase analysis has been used to establish the degree of reaction (α). The hydration of a mixture of ye'elimite and gypsum revealed that ettringite formation (α ∼ 70% at 50 h) is limited by ye'elimite dissolution. Two laboratory-prepared BCSA cements were also studied: non-active-BCSA and active-BCSA cements, with β- and α′{sub H}-belite as main phases, respectively. Ye'elimite, in the non-active-BCSA system, dissolves at higher pace (α ∼ 25% at 1 h) than in the active-BCSA one (α ∼ 10% at 1 h), with differences in the crystallization of ettringite (α ∼ 30% and α ∼ 5%, respectively). This behavior has strongly affected subsequent belite and ferrite reactivities, yielding stratlingite and other layered phases in non-active-BCSA. The dissolution and crystallization processes are reported and discussed in detail. -- Highlights: •Belite calcium sulfoaluminate cements early hydration mechanism has been determined. •Belite hydration strongly depends on availability of aluminum hydroxide. •Orthorhombic ye’elimite dissolved at a higher pace than cubic one. •Ye’elimite larger reaction degree yields stratlingite formation by belite reaction. •Rietveld method quantified gypsum, anhydrite and bassanite dissolution rates.

  16. X-ray diffraction study of a recently identified phase transition in fatty acid Langmuir monolayers

    SciTech Connect

    Durbin, M.K.; Malik, A.; Ghaskadvi, R.; Dutta, P. ); Shih, M.C. ); Zschack, P. )

    1994-02-17

    Using Brewster angle microscopy to study fatty acid Langmuir monolayers, Overbeck and Mobius (J. Phys. Chem. 1993, 97, 7999) have observed changes of texture indicating a new phase boundary not visible in monolayer isotherms. We have studied Langmuir monolayers of CH[sub 3](CH[sub 2])[sub 17]COOH at 30[degrees]C using X-ray diffraction. We find that the monolayer undergoes a first-order phase transition from the known L[sub 2] phase in which molecules tilt toward a nearest neighbor to a phase with tilt toward a next-nearest neighbor. Both before and after the transition, the structures are hexagonal in the plane perpendicular to the molecules. Neither the intermolecular spacing in this plane ([approx] 4.85 [angstrom], close to that seen in the Rotator II phase) nor the tilt magnitude has an observable discontinuity at this transition; only the tilt direction changes. As a result, the isotherm area/molecule is also continuous across the transition. 10 refs., 5 figs.

  17. Alkyl-terminated Si(111) surfaces: A high-resolution, core level photoelectron spectroscopy study

    SciTech Connect

    Terry, J.; Linford, M.R.; Wigren, C.; Cao, R.; Pianetta, P.; Chidsey, C.E.

    1999-01-01

    The bonding of alkyl monolayers to Si(111) surfaces has been studied with high-resolution core level photoelectron spectroscopy (PES). Two very different wet-chemical methods have been used to prepare the alkyl monolayers: (i) Olefin insertion into the H{endash}Si bond of the H{endash}Si(111) surface, and (ii) replacement of Cl on the Cl{endash}Si(111) surface by an alkyl group from an alkyllithium reagent. In both cases, PES has revealed a C 1s component shifted to lower binding energy and a Si 2p component shifted to higher binding energy. Both components are attributed to the presence of a C{endash}Si bond at the interface. Along with photoelectron diffraction data [Appl. Phys. Lett. {bold 71}, 1056, (1997)], these data are used to show that these two synthetic methods can be used to functionalize the Si(111) surface. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  18. The application of x-ray diffraction and electron microscopy to the study of human peripheral nerve obtained by biopsy.

    PubMed

    FINEAN, J B; WOOLF, A L

    1961-03-01

    Human peripheral nerves obtained by biopsy from patients suffering from neuromuscular disorders have been studied by x-ray diffraction and electron microscopy. Few abnormal diffraction patterns have yet been recorded and their significance is not yet established. Electron micrographs have revealed wide variations in the numbers of myelinated fibres included in the nerve trunks and have facilitated a detailed study of the Schwann cell-axon relationships in the large numbers of unmyelinated fibres always present. Some indications of demyelination have been encountered.

  19. Time-resolved x-ray diffraction and calorimetric studies at low scan rates

    PubMed Central

    Tenchov, Boris G.; Yao, Haruhiko; Hatta, Ichiro

    1989-01-01

    The phase transitions in fully hydrated dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and DPPC/water/ethanol phases have been studied by lowangle time-resolved x-ray diffraction under conditions similar to those employed in calorimetry (scan rates 0.05-0.5°C/min and uniform temperature throughout the samples). This approach provides more adequate characterization of the equilibrium transition pathways and allows for close correlations between structural and thermodynamic data. No coexistence of the rippled gel (Pβ') and liquid-crystalline (Lα) phases was found in the main transition of DPPC; rather, a loss of correlation in the lamellar structure, observed as broadening of the lamellar reflections, takes place in a narrow temperature range of ∼100 mK at the transition midpoint. Formation of a long-living metastable phase, denoted by Pβ'(mst), differing from the initial Pβ' was observed in cooling direction by both x-ray diffraction and calorimetry. No direct conversion of Pβ'(mst) into Pβ' occurs for over 24 h but only by way of the phase sequence Pβ'(mst) → Lβ' → Pβ'. According to differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), the enthalpy of the Pβ'(mst)-Lα transition is by ∼5% lower than that of the Pβ'-Lα transition. The effects of ethanol (Rowe, E. S. 1983. Biochemistry. 22:3299-3305; Simon, S. A., and T. J. McIntosh. 1984. Biochim. Biophys. Acta 773:169-172) on the mechanism and reversibility of the DPPC main transition were clearly visualized. At ethanol concentrations inducing formation of interdigitated gel phase, the main transition proceeds through a coexistence of the initial and final phases over a finite temperature range. During the subtransition in DPPC recorded at scan rate 0.3°C/min, a smooth monotonic increase of the lamellar spacing from its subgel (Lc) to its gel (Lβ') phase value takes place. The width of the lamellar reflections remains unchanged during this transformation. This provides grounds to propose a

  20. X-Ray Diffraction and Imaging Study of Imperfections of Crystallized Lysozyme with Coherent X-Rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Zheng-Wei; Chu, Y. S.; Lai, B.; Cai, Z.; Thomas, B. R.; Chernov, A. A.

    2003-01-01

    Phase-sensitive x-ray diffraction imaging and high angular-resolution diffraction combined with phase contrast radiographic imaging are employed to characterize defects and perfection of a uniformly grown tetragonal lysozyme crystal in symmetric Laue case. The fill width at half-maximum (FWHM) of a 4 4 0 rocking curve measured from the original crystal is approximately 16.7 arcseconds, and defects, which include point defects, line defects, and microscopic domains, have been clearly observed in the diffraction images of the crystal. The observed line defects carry distinct dislocation features running approximately along the <110> growth front, and they have been found to originate mostly at a central growth area and occasionally at outer growth regions. Individual point defects trapped at a crystal nucleus are resolved in the images of high sensitivity to defects. Slow dehydration has led to the broadening of the 4 4 0 rocking curve by a factor of approximately 2.4. A significant change of the defect structure and configuration with drying has been revealed, which suggests the dehydration induced migration and evolution of dislocations and lattice rearrangements to reduce overall strain energy. The sufficient details of the observed defects shed light upon perfection, nucleation and growth, and properties of protein crystals.

  1. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary diffraction studies of the mammalian DAG kinase homologue YegS from Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Bakali H, M. Amin; Nordlund, Pär; Hallberg, B. Martin

    2006-03-01

    The overexpression, crystallization and preliminary diffraction analysis of E. coli YegS are reported. yegS is a gene encoding a 32 kDa cytosolic protein with unknown function but with strong sequence homology to a family of structurally uncharacterized eukaryotic non-protein kinases: diacylglycerol kinases, sphingosine kinases and ceramide kinases. Here, the overexpression, crystallization and preliminary diffraction analysis of Escherichia coli YegS are reported. The crystals belong to space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 42.4, b = 166.1, c = 48.5 Å, β = 96.97°. The presence of a dimer in the asymmetric unit was estimated to give a Matthews coefficient (V{sub M}) of 2.5 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1} and a solvent content of 50.8%(v/v). Single-wavelength diffraction data were collected to a resolution of 1.9 Å using synchrotron radiation.

  2. Temperature dependent x-ray diffraction and dielectric studies of multiferroic GaFeO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Rajeev; Mall, Ashish Kumar; Gupta, Rajeev

    2016-05-01

    Polycrystalline GaFeO3 (GFO) samples were synthesized by sol-gel method. The structural and dielectric properties of GaFeO3 ceramic have been investigated by a combination of XRD and permittivity measurement. The X-ray diffraction spectra shows single phase orthorhombically distorted perovskite structure with Pc21n symmetry over a wide range of temperature 300K to 600K, with no evidence of any phase transition. Refined lattice parameters (a, b, c and V) increases with increasing temperature. Temperature dependent dielectric properties were investigated in the frequency range from 100Hz-5MHz. Impedance spectroscopy study on the sample showed that the dielectric constant and ac conductivity with frequency increases on increasing the temperature. Cole-Cole plots suggest that the response from grain is dominant at low temperature whereas grain boundary response overcomes as temperature increases. The relaxation activation energy (calculated from Cole-Cole plots) value is found to be 0.32 eV for the grain boundary. We believe that the oxygen ion vacancies play an important role in conduction processes at higher temperatures.

  3. Boron phosphide under pressure: In situ study by Raman scattering and X-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solozhenko, Vladimir L.; Kurakevych, Oleksandr O.; Le Godec, Yann; Kurnosov, Aleksandr V.; Oganov, Artem R.

    2014-07-01

    Cubic boron phosphide, BP, has been studied in situ by X-ray diffraction and Raman scattering up to 55 GPa at 300 K in a diamond anvil cell. The bulk modulus of B0 = 174(2) GPa has been established, which is in excellent agreement with our ab initio calculations. The data on Raman shift as a function of pressure, combined with equation-of-state (EOS) data, allowed us to estimate the Grüneisen parameters of the TO and LO modes of zinc-blende structure, γGTO= 1.26 and γGLO= 1.13, just like in the case of other AIIIBV diamond-like phases, for which γGTO> γGLO≅ 1. We also established that the pressure dependence of the effective electro-optical constant α is responsible for a strong change in relative intensities of the TO and LO modes from ITO/ILO ˜ 0.25 at 0.1 MPa to ITO/ILO ˜ 2.5 at 45 GPa, for which we also find excellent agreement between experiment and theory.

  4. Boron phosphide under pressure: In situ study by Raman scattering and X-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Solozhenko, Vladimir L.; Kurakevych, Oleksandr O.; Le Godec, Yann; Kurnosov, Aleksandr V.; Oganov, Artem R.

    2014-07-21

    Cubic boron phosphide, BP, has been studied in situ by X-ray diffraction and Raman scattering up to 55 GPa at 300 K in a diamond anvil cell. The bulk modulus of B{sub 0} = 174(2) GPa has been established, which is in excellent agreement with our ab initio calculations. The data on Raman shift as a function of pressure, combined with equation-of-state (EOS) data, allowed us to estimate the Grüneisen parameters of the TO and LO modes of zinc-blende structure, γ{sub G}{sup TO }= 1.26 and γ{sub G}{sup LO }= 1.13, just like in the case of other A{sup III}B{sup V} diamond-like phases, for which γ{sub G}{sup TO }> γ{sub G}{sup LO }≅ 1. We also established that the pressure dependence of the effective electro-optical constant α is responsible for a strong change in relative intensities of the TO and LO modes from I{sub TO}/I{sub LO} ∼ 0.25 at 0.1 MPa to I{sub TO}/I{sub LO} ∼ 2.5 at 45 GPa, for which we also find excellent agreement between experiment and theory.

  5. Neon Hydrate at High Pressure: an in-situ Neutron Diffraction Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xiaohui

    2013-03-01

    Clathrate hydrates are a group of ice-like, crystalline inclusion compounds which form through the combination of water and suitably sized ``guest'' molecules. There are mainly three crystallographic structures of the hydrate clathrate: SI, SII and SH, which are determined by the shape and size of the included gas molecular. However, when the neon gas pressure got increased to 0.48 GPa, we found that the neon gas could be enclathrate in the ice II frameworks which is totally different structure from the traditional cubic clathrate. Through the in-situ neutron diffraction study, the detail structure of Ne hydrate, including the atom positions, can be derived using the Rietveld refinements. The Ne atoms are just in the middle of H2O channels and sandwiches by two H2O rings The thermal equation of state was calculated and compared with pure ice II. We found that inclusion of Ne atoms could enlarge the ice II H2O hexagonal rings, however, shortened the H2O channels. Although the Ne atoms crystallized in ice II frameworks, the thermal vibration is significant compared to the host atoms. The distribution of Ne atoms are presented by MD simulations.

  6. Diffraction studies of order-disorder at high pressures and temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Parise, John B; Antao, Sytle M; Martin, Charles D; Crichton, Wilson

    2008-06-18

    Recent developments at synchrotron X-ray beamlines now allow collection of data suitable for structure determination and Rietveld structure refinement at high pressures and temperatures on challenging materials. These include materials, such as dolomite (CaMg(CO{sub 3}){sub 2}) that tends to calcine at high temperatures, and Fe-containing materials, such as the spinel MgFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}, which tend to undergo changes in oxidation state. Careful consideration of encapsulation along with the use of radial collimation produced powder diffraction patterns virtually free of parasitic scattering from the cell in the case of large volume high-pressure experiments. These features have been used to study a number of phase transitions, especially those where superior signal-to-noise discrimination is required to distinguish weak ordering reflections. The structures adopted by dolomite, and CaSO4, anhydrite, were determined from 298 to 1466 K at high pressures. Using laser-heated diamond-anvil cells to achieve simultaneous high pressure and temperature conditions, we have observed CaSO{sub 4} undergo phase transitions to the monazite type and at highest pressure and temperature to crystallize in the barite-type structure. On cooling, the barite structure distorts, from an orthorhombic to a monoclinic lattice, to produce the AgMnO{sub 4}-type structure.

  7. Synthesis and X-ray diffraction study of new uranyl malonate and oxalate complexes with carbamide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedkov, Ya. A.; Serezhkina, L. B.; Grigor'ev, M. S.; Serezhkin, V. N.

    2016-05-01

    Two new malonate-containing uranyl complexes with carbamide of the formulas [UO2(C3H2O4)( Urea)2] ( I) and [UO2(C3H2O4)( Urea)3] ( II), where Urea is carbamide, and one uranyl oxalate complex of the formula [UO2(C2O4)( Urea)3] ( III) were synthesized, and their crystals were studied by X-ray diffraction. The main structural units in crystals I are the electroneutral chains [UO2(C3H2O4)( Urea)2]∞ belonging to the crystal-chemical group AT 11 M 2 1 ( A = UO 2 2+ , T 11 = C3H2O 4 2- , M 1 = Urea) of uranyl complexes. Crystals II and III are composed of the molecular complexes [UO2( L)( Urea)3], where L = C3H2O 4 2- or C2O 4 2- , belonging to the crystal-chemical group AB 01 M 3 1 ( A = UO 2 2+ , B 01 = C3H2O 4 2- or C2O 4 2- , M 1 = Urea). The characteristic features of the packing of the uranium-containing complexes are discussed in terms of molecular Voronoi-Dirichlet polyhedra. The effect of the Urea: U ratio on the structure of uranium-containing structural units is considered.

  8. X-ray diffraction study into the effects of liming on the structure of collagen.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Clark A; Wess, Tim J; Kennedy, Craig J

    2006-08-01

    The manufacture of parchment from animal skin involves processes that remove hair, fats, and other macromolecules. Although it is well understood that the collagen fibers "open up" during processing, this study uses small and wide-angle X-ray diffraction to measure quantitatively the changes induced at the nanoscopic and microscopic levels. The axial rise per residue distance within the collagen molecules is unaffected by salt and lime treatments. Salting of the hides appears to remove noncollagenous materials. The intermolecular lateral packing distance between the hydrated collagen molecules (1.4 nm) increases after salting ( approximately 1.5 nm) and liming ( approximately 1.55 nm); drying is responsible for a reduction to approximately 1.2 nm in all samples. The axial staggered array (d spacing) is reduced by 1 nm after liming and is unaffected by drying. The average fibril diameter increases from 103.2 to 114.5 nm following liming, and the fibril-to-fibril distance increases from 122.6 to 136.1 nm. PMID:16903677

  9. Spin and orbital ordering in TlMnO3: Neutron diffraction study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalyavin, Dmitry D.; Manuel, Pascal; Yi, Wei; Belik, Alexei A.

    2016-10-01

    Crystal and magnetic structures of the high-pressure stabilized perovskite phase of TlMnO3 have been studied by neutron powder diffraction. The crystal structure involves two types of primary structural distortions: a+b-b- octahedral tilting and antiferrodistortive type of orbital ordering, whose common action reduces the symmetry down to triclinic P 1 ¯ . The orbital pattern and the way it is combined with the octahedral tilting are different from the family of LnMnO3 (Ln = lanthanide or Y) manganites who share with TlMnO3 the same tilting scheme. The experimentally determined magnetic structure with the k =(1 /2 ,0 ,1 /2 ) propagation vector and PS1 ¯ symmetry implies anisotropic exchange interactions with a ferromagnetic coupling within the (1 ,0 ,1 ¯) planes and an antiferromagnetic one between them (A type). The spins in the primary magnetic mode were found to be confined close to the (1 ,0 ,1 ¯) plane, which underlines the predominant role of the single ion anisotropy with the local easy axes of Mn3 + following the Jahn-Teller distortions of the octahedra. In spite of the same octahedral tilting scheme in the perovskite structures of both LnMnO3 and TlMnO3 manganites, a coupling of the secondary ferromagnetic component to the primary A-type spin configuration through antisymmetric exchange interaction is allowed in the former and forbidden in the latter cases.

  10. High-temperature X-ray diffraction study of uranium-neptunium mixed oxides.

    PubMed

    Chollet, Mélanie; Belin, Renaud C; Richaud, Jean-Christophe; Reynaud, Muriel; Adenot, Frédéric

    2013-03-01

    Incorporating minor actinides (MAs = Am, Np, Cm) in UO2 fertile blankets is a viable option to recycle them. Despite this applied interest, phase equilibria between uranium and MAs still need to be thoroughly investigated, especially at elevated temperatures. In particular, few reports on the U-Np-O system are available. In the present work, we provide for the first time in situ high-temperature X-ray diffraction results obtained during the oxidation of (U1-yNpy)O2 uranium-neptunium mixed oxides up to 1373 K and discuss subsequent phase transformations. We show that (i) neptunium stabilizes the UO2-type fluorite structure at high temperature and that (ii) the U3O8-type orthorhombic structure is observed in a wide range of compositions. We clearly demonstrate the incorporation of neptunium in this phase, which was a controversial question in previous studies up to now. We believe it is the particular stability of the tetravalent state of neptunium that is responsible for the observed phase relationships.

  11. Deformation in metallic glasses studied by synchrotron x-ray diffraction

    DOE PAGES

    Dmowski, Wojciech; Egami, Takeshi; Tong, Yang

    2016-01-11

    In this study, high mechanical strength is one of the superior properties of metallic glasses which render them promising as a structural material. However, understanding the process of mechanical deformation in strongly disordered matter, such as metallic glass, is exceedingly difficult because even an effort to describe the structure qualitatively is hampered by the absence of crystalline periodicity. In spite of such challenges, we demonstrate that high-energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction measurement under stress, using a two-dimensional detector coupled with the anisotropic pair-density function (PDF) analysis, has greatly facilitated the effort of unraveling complex atomic rearrangements involved in the elastic, anelastic,more » and plastic deformation of metallic glasses. Even though PDF only provides information on the correlation between two atoms and not on many-body correlations, which are often necessary in elucidating various properties, by using stress as means of exciting the system we can garner rich information on the nature of the atomic structure and local atomic rearrangements during deformation in glasses.« less

  12. The structure of oxotitanium phthalocyanine: a gas-phase electron diffraction and computational study.

    PubMed

    Zakharov, Alexander V; Shlykov, Sergei A; Zhabanov, Yuriy A; Girichev, Georgy V

    2009-05-14

    The gas-phase molecular structure of oxotitanium phthalocyanine (TiOPc) has been studied by a synchronous gas electron diffraction and mass spectrometric experiment, and density functional theory calculations using the B3LYP hybrid method and cc-pVTZ basis sets. The molecule has an equilibrium structure of C4v symmetry with a convex macrocycle. The titanium atom is out-of-the-plane of the four central nitrogen atoms and forms a square pyramid with them, with the following parameters: r(Ti-N)=2.090(5) A, r(NN)=2.813(9) A (the side of the pyramid base), z(Ti)-z(N)=0.614 A (the height of the pyramid). Compared to solid-state crystal structures, the Ti-O distance in gas-phase TiOPc is shortened and the Ti-N distance is elongated, which can be attributed to significant intermolecular interaction in the crystals. PMID:19421550

  13. Rearrangement of twin variants in ferromagnetic shape memory alloy polyurethane composites studied by stroboscopic neutron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feuchtwanger, J.; Lázpita, P.; Vidal, N.; Barandiaran, J. M.; Gutiérrez, J.; Hansen, T.; Peel, M.; Mondelli, C.; O'Handley, R. C.; Allen, S. M.

    2008-03-01

    The use of ferromagnetic shape memory alloy (FSMA) particles as fillers in polymeric matrix composites has been proposed for vibration damping. The large pseudo-plastic recoverable deformation of the FSMA particles due to the rearrangement of twin variants can dissipate a large amount of energy, both under compression and tension. The composites studied are made by mixing particles of NiMnGa with a polyurethane matrix. A magnetic field is applied to the composite while the matrix sets, to achieve a strong [112] texture in the field direction. In situ strobed neutron diffraction measurements were carried out while the composites were subjected to a cyclic deformation. They show that the intensity of certain peaks varies during the deformation cycle. All the peaks that show this behavior can be grouped into pairs that stem from a single austenitic peak. The (020) and (112) martensite peaks correspond to the splitting of the (220) austenite peak, and the intensity of one increases as that of the other decreases. The neutron measurements show directly that there is a change in the texture of the composite during the stress cycle applied to the composite and confirm that the large mechanical loss observed in the stress-strain cycles is in good part due to the rearrangement of twin variants in the FSMA filler used in the composites.

  14. An experimental system for high temperature X-ray diffraction studies with in situ mechanical loading.

    PubMed

    Oswald, Benjamin B; Schuren, Jay C; Pagan, Darren C; Miller, Matthew P

    2013-03-01

    An experimental system with in situ thermomechanical loading has been developed to enable high energy synchrotron x-ray diffraction studies of crystalline materials. The system applies and maintains loads of up to 2250 N in uniaxial tension or compression at a frequency of up to 100 Hz. The furnace heats the specimen uniformly up to a maximum temperature of 1200 °C in a variety of atmospheres (oxidizing, inert, reducing) that, combined with in situ mechanical loading, can be used to mimic processing and operating conditions of engineering components. The loaded specimen is reoriented with respect to the incident beam of x-rays using two rotational axes to increase the number of crystal orientations interrogated. The system was used at the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source to conduct experiments on single crystal silicon and polycrystalline Low Solvus High Refractory nickel-based superalloy. The data from these experiments provide new insights into how stresses evolve at the crystal scale during thermomechanical loading and complement the development of high-fidelity material models. PMID:23556825

  15. Identifications studies of Lauha Bhasma by X-ray diffraction and X-ray fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Bhargava, S. C.; Reddy, K. R. C; Sastry, G. V. S

    2012-01-01

    Procedures for preparation of Lauha Bhasma are described in ancient texts of Ayurveda. These procedures also begin with different source material for iron such as Teekshna Lauha and Kanta Lauha etc. In the present study, we have selected different source materials viz. magnetite iron ore for Kanta Lauha and pure (Armco grade) iron turnings for Teekshna Lauha. The standard procedures of preparation of Lauha Bhasma are carried out in identical conditions for these two raw materials. The final product from the Puta are characterized by using X-ray diffraction and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy to understanding the crystallographic form or forms of iron oxides and their composition at the end of each Puta. The iron content at the end of repeated Putas (18 for Kanta Lauha and 20 for Teekshna Lauha) have shown a decrease in case of Teekshna Lauha since the starting material is pure iron while it showed only marginal decreases in the case of Kanta Lauha because the Fe3O4 of magnetite is undergoing oxidation to Fe2O3. The trace elements remain within the Bhasma in the form of various oxides of Si, Al, Ca, etc. PMID:23049200

  16. An experimental system for high temperature X-ray diffraction studies with in situ mechanical loading

    PubMed Central

    Oswald, Benjamin B.; Schuren, Jay C.; Pagan, Darren C.; Miller, Matthew P.

    2013-01-01

    An experimental system with in situ thermomechanical loading has been developed to enable high energy synchrotron x-ray diffraction studies of crystalline materials. The system applies and maintains loads of up to 2250 N in uniaxial tension or compression at a frequency of up to 100 Hz. The furnace heats the specimen uniformly up to a maximum temperature of 1200 °C in a variety of atmospheres (oxidizing, inert, reducing) that, combined with in situ mechanical loading, can be used to mimic processing and operating conditions of engineering components. The loaded specimen is reoriented with respect to the incident beam of x-rays using two rotational axes to increase the number of crystal orientations interrogated. The system was used at the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source to conduct experiments on single crystal silicon and polycrystalline Low Solvus High Refractory nickel-based superalloy. The data from these experiments provide new insights into how stresses evolve at the crystal scale during thermomechanical loading and complement the development of high-fidelity material models. PMID:23556825

  17. An experimental system for high temperature X-ray diffraction studies with in situ mechanical loading

    SciTech Connect

    Oswald, Benjamin B.; Pagan, Darren C.; Miller, Matthew P.; Schuren, Jay C.

    2013-03-15

    An experimental system with in situ thermomechanical loading has been developed to enable high energy synchrotron x-ray diffraction studies of crystalline materials. The system applies and maintains loads of up to 2250 N in uniaxial tension or compression at a frequency of up to 100 Hz. The furnace heats the specimen uniformly up to a maximum temperature of 1200 Degree-Sign C in a variety of atmospheres (oxidizing, inert, reducing) that, combined with in situ mechanical loading, can be used to mimic processing and operating conditions of engineering components. The loaded specimen is reoriented with respect to the incident beam of x-rays using two rotational axes to increase the number of crystal orientations interrogated. The system was used at the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source to conduct experiments on single crystal silicon and polycrystalline Low Solvus High Refractory nickel-based superalloy. The data from these experiments provide new insights into how stresses evolve at the crystal scale during thermomechanical loading and complement the development of high-fidelity material models.

  18. An experimental system for high temperature X-ray diffraction studies with in situ mechanical loading.

    PubMed

    Oswald, Benjamin B; Schuren, Jay C; Pagan, Darren C; Miller, Matthew P

    2013-03-01

    An experimental system with in situ thermomechanical loading has been developed to enable high energy synchrotron x-ray diffraction studies of crystalline materials. The system applies and maintains loads of up to 2250 N in uniaxial tension or compression at a frequency of up to 100 Hz. The furnace heats the specimen uniformly up to a maximum temperature of 1200 °C in a variety of atmospheres (oxidizing, inert, reducing) that, combined with in situ mechanical loading, can be used to mimic processing and operating conditions of engineering components. The loaded specimen is reoriented with respect to the incident beam of x-rays using two rotational axes to increase the number of crystal orientations interrogated. The system was used at the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source to conduct experiments on single crystal silicon and polycrystalline Low Solvus High Refractory nickel-based superalloy. The data from these experiments provide new insights into how stresses evolve at the crystal scale during thermomechanical loading and complement the development of high-fidelity material models.

  19. Polymorphism in Photoluminescent KNdW2O8: Synthesis, Neutron Diffraction, and Raman Study

    SciTech Connect

    S. M. Bhat, Swetha; Swain, Diptikanta; Feygenson, Mikhail; Neuefeind, Joerg C; Sundaram, Nalini

    2014-01-01

    Polymorphs of KNdW2O8 ( -KNdW2O8 and -KNdW2O8) phosphors were synthesized by an efficient solution combustion technique for the first time. The crystal structure of the polymorphs analyzed from Rietveld refinement of neutron diffraction data confirms that -KNdW2O8 crystallizes in the tetragonal system (space group I4 ), and -KNdW2O8 crystallizes in the monoclinic system (space group C2/m). The local structure of both polymorphs was elucidated using combined neutron pair distribution function (PDF) and Raman scattering techniques. Photoluminescence measurements of the polymorphs showed broadened emission line width and increased intensity for -KNdW2O8 in the visible region compared to -KNdW2O8. This phenomenon is attributed to the increased distortion in the coordination environment of the luminescing Nd3+ ion. Combined PDF, Rietveld, and Raman measurements reveal distortions of the WO6 octahedra and NdO8 polyhedra in -KNdW2O8. This crystal structure photoluminescence study suggests that this class of tungstates can be exploited for visible light emitting devices by tuning the crystal symmetry.

  20. Neutron diffraction study of the magnetic structure of Na2 RuO 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mogare, K. M.; Sheptyakov, D. V.; Bircher, R.; Güdel, H.-U.; Jansen, M.

    2006-08-01

    Nuclear and magnetic structures of sodium ruthenate (VI) have been studied by neutron powder diffraction in the temperature range 1.5 200 K. Na2RuO4 crystallizes in the monoclinic structure, with space group P 21/c. The structure consists of apical corner sharing RuO5 trigonal bipyramids forming infinite chains running along the b axis. These infinite [ RuO3O2/2] chains form a pseudo hexagonal close packing of rods with Ru Ru distances of 3.51 Å within the chains and 5.30 5.47 Å between the chains. At TN=37.2 K a magnetic transition leads to an antiferromagnetic state. The Ru6+ magnetic moments are ordered antiferromagnetically along the chains (b-axis), while the inter-chain interaction is ferromagnetic. A classical infinite chain model was fitted to the magnetic susceptibility data in order to estimate the strength of the nearest-neighbor exchange interactions along and between the chains, resulting in an intrachain coupling parameter of 2J=-86 K, and an interchain parameter J⊥ with \\vert 2J⊥ \\vert = 3 K.

  1. Identifications studies of Lauha Bhasma by X-ray diffraction and X-ray fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Bhargava, S C; Reddy, K R C; Sastry, G V S

    2012-01-01

    Procedures for preparation of Lauha Bhasma are described in ancient texts of Ayurveda. These procedures also begin with different source material for iron such as Teekshna Lauha and Kanta Lauha etc. In the present study, we have selected different source materials viz. magnetite iron ore for Kanta Lauha and pure (Armco grade) iron turnings for Teekshna Lauha. The standard procedures of preparation of Lauha Bhasma are carried out in identical conditions for these two raw materials. The final product from the Puta are characterized by using X-ray diffraction and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy to understanding the crystallographic form or forms of iron oxides and their composition at the end of each Puta. The iron content at the end of repeated Putas (18 for Kanta Lauha and 20 for Teekshna Lauha) have shown a decrease in case of Teekshna Lauha since the starting material is pure iron while it showed only marginal decreases in the case of Kanta Lauha because the Fe(3)O(4) of magnetite is undergoing oxidation to Fe(2)O(3). The trace elements remain within the Bhasma in the form of various oxides of Si, Al, Ca, etc. PMID:23049200

  2. Structure resolution by electron diffraction tomography of the complex layered iron-rich Fe-2234-type Sr5Fe6O15.4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepoittevin, Christophe

    2016-10-01

    The crystal structure of the strontium ferrite Sr5Fe6O15.4, was solved by direct methods on electron diffraction tomography data acquired on a transmission electron microscope. The refined cell parameters are a=27.4047(3) Å, b=5.48590(7) Å and c=42.7442(4) Å in Fm2m symmetry. Its structure is built up from the intergrowth sequence between a quadruple perovskite-type layer with a complex rock-salt (RS)-type block. In the latter iron atoms are found in two different environments : tetragonal pyramid and tetrahedron. The structural model was refined by Rietveld method based on the powder X-ray diffraction pattern.

  3. A Weather climate change Impact Study at Extreme Resolution (WISER)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadian, A.; Burton, R.; Bruyere, C. L.; Done, J.; Tye, M. R.; Holland, G. J.; Thielen, J.; Blyth, A. M.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding and simulation of weather scale processes is required to understand extremes in the rapidly changing climate. The resolution required to include meso-scale features, is still out of the reach of climate model resolution, and this project attempts to include the important meso-scale features. WISER (Weather climate change Impact Study at Extreme Resolution) is a regional climate study to use a numerical weather model (WRF), in a channel formulation (+/- 68 degrees latitude) at a resolution of 20 km at the equator reducing to 9 km at the Northern and Southern boundaries. The inner domain nested regional model at a resolution of 3-4 km over Western Europe aims at resolving the larger convective scale precipitation events statistically. (see figure for geometrical domain set up). The outer domain is driven by ERA interim climate reanalysis global fields for recent decades 1989-2001; the nested inner domain d02 is driven by the outer domain. The inner model climatological statistics are compared with observations and with those from the outer domain, with particular reference for the statistical convective precipitation extremes. The extremes of the pdfs are shown to be better represented by the increase in resolution and suggest that this could be a tool useful in examining the likely extremes in future climates. The data also provides an assessment of the uncertainty in the precipitation extremes and an alternative approach to ownscaling. The overall aim is to examine statistical changes in(a) general precipitation over western Europe and the UK,(b) in quantity and frequency of severe and hazardous convective rainfall events. The future work-plan is(i) to complete simulations for the decade 1989-2000 driven by ERA-Interim reanalysis data(ii) to complete simulations for the same decade with boundary CESM/CAM climate model data to compute offset and bias corrections(iii) to complete climate scenarios for decadal periods, 2020-2030 initially and later 2050

  4. Structure of lamellar lipid domains and corneocyte envelopes of murine stratum corneum. An X-ray diffraction study.

    PubMed

    White, S H; Mirejovsky, D; King, G I

    1988-05-17

    The lipid of the outermost layer of the skin is confined largely to the extracellular spaces surrounding the corneocytes of the stratum corneum where it forms a multilamellar adhesive matrix to act as the major permeability barrier of the skin. Knowledge of the molecular architecture of these intercellular domains is important for understanding various skin pathologies and their treatment, percutaneous drug delivery, and the cosmetic maintenance of the skin. We have surveyed by X-ray diffraction the structure of the intercellular domains and the extracted lipids of murine stratum corneum (SC) at 25, 45, and 70 degrees C which are temperatures in the vicinity of known thermal phase transitions [Rehfeld, S. J., & Elias, P. M. (1982) J. Invest. Dermatol. 79, 1-3]. The intercellular domains produce lamellar diffraction patterns with a Bragg spacing of 131 +/- 2 A. Lipid extracted from the SC and dispersed in excess water does not produce a simple lamellar diffraction pattern at any temperature studied, however. This and other facts suggest that another component, probably a protein, must be present to control the architecture of the intercellular lipid domains. We have also obtained diffraction patterns attributable to the protein envelopes of the corneocytes. The patterns suggest a beta-pleated sheet organizational scheme. No diffraction patterns were observed that could be attributed to keratin.

  5. In-Situ Neutron Diffraction Studies of Complex Hydrogen Storage Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Yelon, William B.

    2013-05-13

    The thrust of this project was to investigate the structures of important materials with potential application to hydrogen storage, in an effort to meet the DOE goals for 2010 and 2015, namely 9% (wt) and 15% (wt) respectively. Unfortunately, no material has been found, despite the efforts of many laboratories, including our own, that achieves these goals in a reversible complex hydride such as ammonia borane (NH{sub 4}BH{sub 4}), and other ammonia based compounds, or with light hydrides such as LiBH{sub 4}, due either to their irreversibility or to the high decomposition temperatures and residual simple hydrides such as LiH from the decomposition of the last named compound. Nevertheless, several important technical goals have been accomplished that could be valuable to other DOE programs and would be available for collaborative research. These include the development of a high quality glove box with controlled (low) oxygen and water content, which we continue to employ for the synthesis of potential new materials (unfunded research) and the development of a high quality neutron diffraction furnace with controlled gas environment for studies of hydrogen uptake and loss as well as for studies with other gasses. This furnace was initially constructed with an alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) center tube to contain the sample and the flowing gas. The heaters are located in the vacuum space outside the tube and it was found that, for the low temperatures required for the study of hydrogen storage materials, the heat transfer was too poor to allow good control. At temperatures in excess of about 400C (and up to more than 1200C) the heat transfer and control are excellent. For the lower temperatures, however, the center tube was replaced by stainless steel and temperature control to 1C became possible. The paired heaters, above and below the neutron beam window allowed control of the temperature gradient to a similar precision. The high temperature capability of the furnace

  6. Theoretical study of the properties of X-ray diffraction moiré fringes. I.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Jun-ichi

    2015-07-01

    A detailed and comprehensive theoretical description of X-ray diffraction moiré fringes for a bicrystal specimen is given on the basis of a calculation by plane-wave dynamical diffraction theory. Firstly, prior to discussing the main subject of the paper, a previous article [Yoshimura (1997). Acta Cryst. A53, 810-812] on the two-dimensionality of diffraction moiré patterns is restated on a thorough calculation of the moiré interference phase. Then, the properties of moiré fringes derived from the above theory are explained for the case of a plane-wave diffraction image, where the significant effect of Pendellösung intensity oscillation on the moiré pattern when the crystal is strained is described in detail with theoretically simulated moiré images. Although such plane-wave moiré images are not widely observed in a nearly pure form, knowledge of their properties is essential for the understanding of diffraction moiré fringes in general. PMID:25970298

  7. In Situ High-Pressure X-ray Diffraction Study of H2O Ice VII

    SciTech Connect

    Somayazulu,M.; Shu, J.; Zha, C.; Goncharov, A.; Tschauner, O.; Mao, H.; Hemley, R.

    2008-01-01

    Ice VII was examined over the entire range of its pressure stability by a suite of x-ray diffraction techniques in order to understand a number of unexplained characteristics of its high-pressure behavior. Axial and radial polycrystalline (diamond anvil cell) x-ray diffraction measurements reveal a splitting of diffraction lines accompanied by changes in sample texture and elastic anisotropy. In situ laser heating of polycrystalline samples resulted in the sharpening of diffraction peaks due to release of nonhydrostatic stresses but did not remove the splitting. Radial diffraction measurements indicate changes in strength of the material at this pressure. Taken together, these observations provide evidence for a transition in ice VII near 14 GPa involving changes in the character of the proton order/disorder. The results are consistent with previous reports of changes in phase boundaries and equation of state at this pressure. The transition can be interpreted as ferroelastic with the appearance of spontaneous strain that vanishes at the hydrogen bond symmetrization transition near 60 GPa.

  8. Theoretical study of the properties of X-ray diffraction moiré fringes. I

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimura, Jun-ichi

    2015-01-01

    A detailed and comprehensive theoretical description of X-ray diffraction moiré fringes for a bicrystal specimen is given on the basis of a calculation by plane-wave dynamical diffraction theory. Firstly, prior to discussing the main subject of the paper, a previous article [Yoshimura (1997 ▸). Acta Cryst. A53, 810–812] on the two-dimensionality of diffraction moiré patterns is restated on a thorough calculation of the moiré interference phase. Then, the properties of moiré fringes derived from the above theory are explained for the case of a plane-wave diffraction image, where the significant effect of Pendellösung intensity oscillation on the moiré pattern when the crystal is strained is described in detail with theoretically simulated moiré images. Although such plane-wave moiré images are not widely observed in a nearly pure form, knowledge of their properties is essential for the understanding of diffraction moiré fringes in general. PMID:25970298

  9. Best Technology Practices of Conflict Resolution Specialists: A Case Study of Online Dispute Resolution at United States Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Law, Kimberli Marie

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to remedy the paucity of knowledge about higher education's conflict resolution practice of online dispute resolution by providing an in-depth description of mediator and instructor online practices. Telephone interviews were used as the primary data collection method. Eleven interview questions were relied upon to…

  10. Electromagnetic diffraction by plane reflection diffraction gratings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bocker, R. P.; Marathay, A. S.

    1972-01-01

    A plane wave theory was developed to study electromagnetic diffraction by plane reflection diffraction gratings of infinite extent. A computer program was written to calculate the energy distribution in the various orders of diffraction for the cases when the electric or magnetic field vectors are parallel to the grating grooves. Within the region of validity of this theory, results were in excellent agreement with those in the literature. Energy conservation checks were also made to determine the region of validity of the plane wave theory. The computer program was flexible enough to analyze any grating profile that could be described by a single value function f(x). Within the region of validity the program could be used with confidence. The computer program was used to investigate the polarization and blaze properties of the diffraction grating.

  11. High resolution spectroscopic study of Be10Lambda;

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogami, T.; Chen, C.; Kawama, D.; Achenbach, P.; Ahmidouch, A.; Albayrak, I.; Androic, D.; Asaturyan, A.; Asaturyan, R.; Ates, O.; Baturin, P.; Badui, R.; Boeglin, W.; Bono, J.; Brash, E.; Carter, P.; Chiba, A.; Christy, E.; Danagoulian, S.; de Leo, R.; Doi, D.; Elaasar, M.; Ent, R.; Fujii, Y.; Fujita, M.; Furic, M.; Gabrielyan, M.; Gan, L.; Garibaldi, F.; Gaskell, D.; Gasparian, A.; Han, Y.; Hashimoto, O.; Horn, T.; Hu, B.; Hungerford, Ed. V.; Jones, M.; Kanda, H.; Kaneta, M.; Kato, S.; Kawai, M.; Khanal, H.; Kohl, M.; Liyanage, A.; Luo, W.; Maeda, K.; Margaryan, A.; Markowitz, P.; Maruta, T.; Matsumura, A.; Maxwell, V.; Mkrtchyan, A.; Mkrtchyan, H.; Nagao, S.; Nakamura, S. N.; Narayan, A.; Neville, C.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, M. I.; Nunez, A.; Nuruzzaman, Okayasu, Y.; Petkovic, T.; Pochodzalla, J.; Qiu, X.; Reinhold, J.; Rodriguez, V. M.; Samanta, C.; Sawatzky, B.; Seva, T.; Shichijo, A.; Tadevosyan, V.; Tang, L.; Taniya, N.; Tsukada, K.; Veilleux, M.; Vulcan, W.; Wesselmann, F. R.; Wood, S. A.; Yamamoto, T.; Ya, L.; Ye, Z.; Yokota, K.; Yuan, L.; Zhamkochyan, S.; Zhu, L.; Hksjlab E05-115 Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    Spectroscopy of a Be10Lambda; hypernucleus was carried out at JLab Hall C using the (e ,e'K+) reaction. A new magnetic spectrometer system (SPL+HES+HKS), specifically designed for high resolution hypernuclear spectroscopy, was used to obtain an energy spectrum with a resolution of ˜0.78 MeV (FWHM). The well-calibrated spectrometer system of the present experiment using p (e ,e'K+)Λ ,Σ0 reactions allowed us to determine the energy levels; and the binding energy of the ground-state peak (mixture of 1- and 2- states) was found to be BΛ=8.55 ±0.07 (stat . ) ±0.11 (sys . ) MeV. The result indicates that the ground-state energy is shallower than that of an emulsion study by about 0.5 MeV which provides valuable experimental information on the charge symmetry breaking effect in the Λ N interaction.

  12. The structure of aqueous sodium hydroxide solutions: a combined solution x-ray diffraction and simulation study.

    PubMed

    Megyes, Tünde; Bálint, Szabolcs; Grósz, Tamás; Radnai, Tamás; Bakó, Imre; Sipos, Pál

    2008-01-28

    To determine the structure of aqueous sodium hydroxide solutions, results obtained from x-ray diffraction and computer simulation (molecular dynamics and Car-Parrinello) have been compared. The capabilities and limitations of the methods in describing the solution structure are discussed. For the solutions studied, diffraction methods were found to perform very well in describing the hydration spheres of the sodium ion and yield structural information on the anion's hydration structure. Classical molecular dynamics simulations were not able to correctly describe the bulk structure of these solutions. However, Car-Parrinello simulation proved to be a suitable tool in the detailed interpretation of the hydration sphere of ions and bulk structure of solutions. The results of Car-Parrinello simulations were compared with the findings of diffraction experiments.

  13. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction study of 112-type Ca1-xLaxFeAs2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katayama, N.; Sugawara, K.; Nakano, A.; Kitou, S.; Sugiyama, Y.; Kawaguchi, N.; Ito, H.; Higuchi, T.; Fujii, T.; Sawa, H.

    2015-11-01

    Synchrotron X-ray diffraction studies of Ca1-xLaxFeAs2 with monovalent arsenic zigzag chain layers are presented. While the crystal twins appear in all samples for the nominal composition of x = 0.25, we successfully obtained the samples without crystal twins for the nominal composition of x = 0.17. We present the structural parameters obtained using the synchrotron X-ray diffraction data and physical properties for the samples with x = 0.17. We further discuss the tactics for exploring novel 112-type iron arsenides without arsenic zigzag chains.

  14. Transformation from molecular to polymeric nitrogen at high pressures and temperatures: In situ x-ray diffraction study

    SciTech Connect

    Trojan, I.A.; Eremets, M.I.; Medvedev, S.A.; Gavriliuk, A.G.; Prakapenka, V.B.

    2010-09-17

    We studied the mechanism of the structural transformation of molecular nitrogen to atomic single-bonded nitrogen with a cubic gauche (cg-N) crystal structure using x-ray diffraction in situ at a pressure of - 140 GPa and temperatures up to 2000 K in a diamond anvil cell. The anvils, with a toroidal shape, allowed us to drastically increase the volume of the sample, reduce the acquisition time of the diffraction pattern, and improve the quality of the Raman spectra. Molecular nitrogen transforms to the cg-N phase through an intermediate disordered state. The Raman spectra are in good agreement with recent theoretical calculations.

  15. Synchrotron x-ray powder diffraction studies in pulsed magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Frings, P.; Vanacken, J.; Detlefs, C.; Duc, F.; Lorenzo, J. E.; Nardone, M.; Billette, J.; Zitouni, A.; Bras, W.; Rikken, G. L. J. A.

    2006-06-15

    X-ray powder diffraction experiments under pulsed magnetic fields were carried out at the DUBBLE beamline (BM26B) at the ESRF. A mobile generator delivered 110 kJ to the magnet coil, which was sufficient to generate peak fields of 30 T. A liquid He flow cryostat allowed us to vary the sample temperature accurately between 8 and 300 K. Powder diffraction patterns of several samples were recorded using 21 keV monochromatic x-rays and an on-line image plate detector. Here we present the first results on the suppression of the Jahn-Teller structural distortion in TbVO{sub 4} by magnetic field. These data clearly demonstrate the feasibility of x-ray powder diffraction experiments under pulsed magnetic fields with relatively inexpensive instrumentation.

  16. Advanced sample environments for in situ neutron diffraction studies of nuclear materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiche, Helmut Matthias

    Generation IV nuclear reactor concepts, such as the supercritical-water-cooled nuclear reactor (SCWR), are actively researched internationally. Operating conditions above the critical point of water (374°C, 22.1 MPa) and fuel core temperature that potentially exceed 1850°C put a high demand on the surrounding materials. For their safe application, it is essential to characterize and understand the material properties on an atomic scale such as crystal structure and grain orientation (texture) changes as a function of temperature and stress. This permits the refinement of models predicting the macroscopic behavior of the material. Neutron diffraction is a powerful tool in characterizing such crystallographic properties due to their deep penetration depth into condensed matter. This leads to the ability to study bulk material properties, as opposed to surface effects, and allows for complex sample environments to study e.g. the individual contributions of thermo-mechanical processing steps during manufacturing, operating or accident scenarios. I present three sample environments for in situ neutron diffraction studies that provide such crystallographic information and have been successfully commissioned and integrated into the user program of the High Pressure -- Preferred Orientation (HIPPO) diffractometer at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) user facility. I adapted a sample changer for reliable and fast automated texture measurements of multiple specimens. I built a creep furnace combining a 2700 N load frame with a resistive vanadium furnace, capable of temperatures up to 1000°C, and manipulated by a pair of synchronized rotation stages. This combination allows following deformation and temperature dependent texture and strain evolutions in situ. Utilizing the presented sample changer and creep furnace we studied pressure tubes made of Zr-2.5wt%Nb currently employed in CANDURTM nuclear reactors and proposed for future SCWRs, acting as the primary

  17. Calcination products of gibbsite studied by X-ray diffraction, XPS and solid-state NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Malki, A.; Mekhalif, Z.; Detriche, S.; Fonder, G.; Boumaza, A.; Djelloul, A.

    2014-07-01

    The changes caused by heat treatment of gibbsite powder at 300–1473 K were studied using the X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoemission (XPS) spectra and {sup 27}Al magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ({sup 27}Al MAS NMR). XRD analysis indicates that the transformation sequence involves the formation of κ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} as an intermediate phase between χ- and α-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The crystallite size of χ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} is as small as 10 nm. XPS analysis indicates that the ratio of aluminium atoms to oxygen atoms in χ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and κ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} increases, whereas the expected ratio is observed in α-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The percentage of AlO{sub 4} units in the transition aluminas follows the same behaviour as the ratio of Al/O. - Graphical abstract: The percentage of AlO{sub 4} units in transition aluminas follows the same behaviour as the ratio of Al/O. - Highlights: • Calcination products of gibbsite studied by XRD, XPS and solid-state NMR. • The crystallite size of χ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} is as small as 10 nm. • The Al/O atomic ratio determined by XPS is larger than 2/3 in χ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and κ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. • The percentage of AlO{sub 4} in the aluminas follows the same behaviour as the Al/O atomic ratio.

  18. Study of archaeological iron objects by PGAA, Mössbauer spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, F. E.; Gebhard, R.; Häusler, W.; Wagner, U.; Albert, P.; Hess, H.; Révay, Z.; Kudejová, P.; Kleszcz, K.

    2016-12-01

    Archaeological iron objects often corrode rapidly after their excavation, even though they have survived long times of burial in the ground. Chlorine that accumulates during burial is thought to play a major role in this destructive post-excavation corrosion. It is therefore important for the conservation of such objects to determine the chlorine content in a non-destructive manner and, if necessary, to remove the chlorine from the artefacts by appropriate methods. Such methods are leaching in alkaline solutions or heating in a reducing atmosphere at temperatures up to 800 ∘C. We have studied the efficiency of the heating method using prompt gamma activation analysis (PGAA) for monitoring the Cl content and Mössbauer spectroscopy at room temperature (RT) and 4.2 K as well as X-ray diffraction to study the mineralogical transformations of the rust layers. The heat treatments were performed a N2/H2 (90/10) mixture at temperatures up to 750 ∘C. As test specimens sections of iron rods from the Celtic oppidum of Manching (Bavaria) were used. The initial Cl contents of the pieces varied in the range of several hundred ppm, referring to the iron mass. Annealing for 24 h at 350, 550 and 750 ∘C was found to reduce the Cl contents of the specimens, to about 70, 30 and 15 % of the original values, respectively. The rust consists mainly of goethite with admixtures of magnetite, lepidocrocite and akaganeite, which is thought to be a major carrier of chlorine, probably together with iron chlorides. Much of the goethite is so fine-grained that it does not split magnetically at RT. Annealing converts the rust mainly to maghemite at 350 ∘C, to magnetite at 550 ∘C and to wüstite plus magnetite and metallic iron at 750 ∘C. Pure akaganeite behaves in nearly the same manner.

  19. A High Resolution Microprobe Study of EETA79001 Lithology C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrader, Christian M.; Cohen, B. A.; Donovan, J. J.; Vicenzi, E. P.

    2010-01-01

    Antarctic meteorite EETA79001 has received substantial attention for possibly containing a component of Martian soil in its impact glass (Lithology C) [1]. The composition of Martian soil can illuminate near-surface processes such as impact gardening [2] and hydrothermal and volcanic activity [3,4]. Impact melts in meteorites represent our most direct samples of Martian regolith. We present the initial findings from a high-resolution electron microprobe study of Lithology C from Martian meteorite EETA79001. As this study develops we aim to extract details of a potential soil composition and to examine Martian surface processes using elemental ratios and correlations.

  20. Spatial and spectral resolution necessary for remotely sensed vegetation studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rock, B. N.

    1982-01-01

    An outline is presented of the required spatial and spectral resolution needed for accurate vegetation discrimination and mapping studies as well as for determination of state of health (i.e., detection of stress symptoms) of actively growing vegetation. Good success was achieved in vegetation discrimination and mapping of a heterogeneous forest cover in the ridge and valley portion of the Appalachians using multispectral data acquired with a spatial resolution of 15 m (IFOV). A sensor system delivering 10 to 15 m spatial resolution is needed for both vegetation mapping and detection of stress symptoms. Based on the vegetation discrimination and mapping exercises conducted at the Lost River site, accurate products (vegetation maps) are produced using broad-band spectral data ranging from the .500 to 2.500 micron portion of the spectrum. In order of decreasing utility for vegetation discrimination, the four most valuable TM simulator VNIR bands are: 6 (1.55 to 1.75 microns), 3 (0.63 to 0.69 microns), 5 (1.00 to 1.30 microns) and 4 (0.76 to 0.90 microns).

  1. High-precision measurements of the groove spacing of diffraction gratings using the interference diffractometer and study of the quality of diffraction gratings

    SciTech Connect

    Vitushkin, L.F.; Zeilikovich, I.S.; Korotkov, V.I.

    1994-07-01

    An interference-diffractometric method for measuring the groove spacing of diffraction gratings (periodical standards of small length) and a method for examining the quality of diffraction gratings are developed and investigated. They are based on the holographic method of controlling the sensitivity of the interference measurements using the repeat recording of holograms with compensation for the aberrations of the optical system. Measurements of the groove spacing (398 nm) of the holographic grating were performed with an error of 5 nm. 4 refs., 4 figs.

  2. Thermal conductivity imaging at micrometre-scale resolution for combinatorial studies of materials.

    PubMed

    Huxtable, Scott; Cahill, David G; Fauconnier, Vincent; White, Jeffrey O; Zhao, Ji-Cheng

    2004-05-01

    Combinatorial methods offer an efficient approach for the development of new materials. Methods for generating combinatorial samples of materials, and methods for characterizing local composition and structure by electron microprobe analysis and electron-backscatter diffraction are relatively well developed. But a key component for combinatorial studies of materials is high-spatial-resolution measurements of the property of interest, for example, the magnetic, optical, electrical, mechanical or thermal properties of each phase, composition or processing condition. Advances in the experimental methods used for mapping these properties will have a significant impact on materials science and engineering. Here we show how time-domain thermoreflectance can be used to image the thermal conductivity of the cross-section of a Nb-Ti-Cr-Si diffusion multiple, and thereby demonstrate rapid and quantitative measurements of thermal transport properties for combinatorial studies of materials. The lateral spatial resolution of the technique is 3.4 microm, and the time required to measure a 100 x 100 pixel image is approximately 1 h. The thermal conductivity of TiCr(2) decreases by a factor of two in crossing from the near-stoichiometric side of the phase to the Ti-rich side; and the conductivity of (Ti,Nb)(3)Si shows a strong dependence on crystalline orientation.

  3. Structural study of methyl isonicotinate by gas phase electron diffraction combined with ab initio calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyono, Hajime; Kuze, Nobuhiko; Fujiwara, Hideo; Takeuchi, Hiroshi; Egawa, Toru; Konaka, Shigehiro

    1996-02-01

    The molecular structure of methyl isonicotinate was studied by gas phase electron diffraction combined with ab initio calculations. The molecular skeleton was assumed to be planar. The determined values of principal structure parameters ( rg and ∠ α) are as follows: r( NC) = 1.343(5) Å, r( C…C) ring = 1.401(3) Å, r( Cγ C) = 1.499(9) Å, r( C O) = 1.205(5) Å, r( C( O) O) = 1.331(8) Å, r( OC Me) = 1.430(8) Å, = 1.103(10) Å, ∠CNC = 117.6(9)°, ∠C βC γC β = 118.7(9)°, ∠C β,trans C γC(O) = 118.6(12), ∠C γCO = 121.4(12)°, ∠C γCO = 114.2(10)°, ∠COC = 115.4(15)°, where angled brackets denote average values and C γ,trans denotes the carbon atom which is trans to the carbonyl oxygen atom. Values in parentheses are the estimated limits of error (3σ) referring to the last significant digit. The structure of the ring in methyl isonicotinate agrees with that of pyridine within experimental error. In contrast, the structure parameters of the COOCH 3 group are significantly different from those of methyl acrylate and methyl acetate. These differences have been discussed in terms of hyperconjugation and steric effects.

  4. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction study of synthetic sodium-hydronium jarosite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najorka, Jens; Lewis, James M. T.; Spratt, John; Sephton, Mark A.

    2016-05-01

    Na-H3O jarosite was synthesized hydrothermally at 413 K for 8 days and investigated using single-crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD) and electron microprobe analysis (EMPA). The chemical composition of the studied crystal is [Na0.57(3) (H3O)0.36 (H2O)0.07]A Fe2.93(3) (SO4)2 (OH)5.70 (H2O)0.30, and Fe deficiency was confirmed by both EMPA and XRD analysis. The single-crystal XRD data were collected at 298 and 102 K, and crystal structures were refined in space group Roverline{3}m. The room-temperature data match structural trends of the jarosite group, which vary linearly with the c axis. The low-temperature structure at 102 K shows an anisotropic decrease in the unit cell parameters, with c and a decreasing by 0.45 and 0.03 %, respectively. Structural changes are mainly confined to the A site environment. Only minor changes occur in FeO6 and SO4 polyhedra. The structure responds upon cooling by increasing bond length distortion and by decreasing quadratic elongation of the large AO12 polyhedra. The structural parameters at low temperature follow very similar patterns to structural changes that correspond to compositional variation in the jarosite group, which is characterised by the flexibility of AO12 polyhedra and rigidity of Fe(OH)4O2-SO4 layers. The most flexible areas in the jarosite structure are localized at AO12 edges that are not shared with neighbouring FeO6 octahedra. Importantly, for the application of XRD in planetary settings, the temperature-related changes in jarosite can mimic compositional change.

  5. X-ray diffraction study on precipitate of Er:LiNbO3 induced by vapor transport equilibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, D.; Lan, G.; Chen, X.; Zhu, D.

    An X-ray powder diffraction study was performed on vapor transport equilibration (VTE) treated Er:LiNbO3 crystals with different doping levels (0.2, 0.4 and 2.0% Er per cation site), different cut orientations (X- and Z-cuts) and different VTE durations (120, 150 and 180 h). Their diffraction characteristics were compared with those of pure congruent LiNbO3 and as-grown Er:LiNbO3. The most significant characteristic is the appearance of additional weak and broad peaks around the 2θ angles 30° and 59° in the diffraction patterns of both X- and Z-cut 2.0 mol% doped VTE crystals, confirming that they precipitated. A further comparison of their diffraction data with the powder diffraction files indicated that the new phase in these precipitated crystals is ErNbO4, which has an approximate concentration of 1.0%, 1.065%, 1.485% for 120, 150 and 180 h crystals, respectively. The crystalline grain sizes of the new phase are 132.2 184.1Å. The unit cell parameters of the as-grown and VTE crystals were also determined from diffraction data; the variation from pure LiNbO3 to as-grown Er:LiNbO3 was qualitatively explained according to the crystal structure of LiNbO3 and using the concept of ionic radius. VTE brings the crystal closer to a stoichiometric composition, thus causing the contraction of the lattice constants. Finally, a tentatively qualitative explanation for precipitate formation is given on the basis of crystal structure.

  6. Synchrotron X-ray Powder Diffraction Studies in Pulsed Magnetic Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Detlefs, C.; Frings, P.; Duc, F.; Nardone, M.; Billette, J.; Zitouni, A.; Rikken, G. L. J. A.; Vanacken, J.; Lorenzo, J. E.; Bras, W.

    2007-01-19

    X-ray powder diffraction experiments under pulsed magnetic fields were carried out at the DUBBLE beamline (BM26B) at the ESRF. A mobile generator delivered 110kJ to the magnet coil, which was sufficient to generate peak fields of 30T. A liquid He flow cryostat allowed us to vary the sample temperature accurately between 8K and 300K.

  7. Neutron diffraction residual stress studies for aero-engine component applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clay, K.; Small, C.

    1991-12-01

    Computer graphics for a presentation describing how Rolls-Royce is refining the method of residual stress measurement by neutron diffraction to suit the characteristic stress fields of components are presented. Results to date are given. An outline of how this residual stress data is to be used in developing stress models for critical rotating components is given.

  8. X-ray diffraction study of the mineralogy of microinclusions in fibrous diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Evan; Kopylova, Maya; Dubrovinksy, Leonid

    2010-05-01

    Fibrous diamond, occurring both as cuboids and as coatings over non-fibrous diamond nuclei, is translucent due to the presence of millions of sub-micron-sized mineral and fluid inclusions. Diamond is strong and relatively inert, making it an excellent vessel to preserve trapped materials. These microinclusions represent direct samples of natural diamond-forming mantle fluids, and are critical for our understanding of diamond genesis. Traditionally, infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, secondary ion mass spectrometry, electron microprobe, and FIB-TEM techniques have proven to be effective for the study of microinclusions in diamond. The abundance and random orientation of included minerals in fibrous diamond make them amenable to a powder-type X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique. This technique provides an accurate way to identify included minerals. It also has the advantage of analyzing thousands of inclusions simultaneously, rather than analyzing one inclusion at a time, as with common FIB-TEM techniques. XRD provides a bulk analysis, giving a superior measure of relative abundances of included minerals, as well as potentially accounting for small quantities of minerals that might otherwise be overlooked. We studied fibrous cuboid diamonds with microinclusions from the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) (23 samples), Brazil (4 samples), Jericho (1 sample), and Wawa conglomerates (9 samples). XRD analysis was performed at the Bayerisches Geoinstitut (BGI), University of Bayreuth, Germany. The unique XRD setup consists of a RIGAKU FR-D high-brilliance source, OSMIC Inc. Confocal Max-Flux optics, and a SMART APEX 4K CCD area detector. Preliminary XRD studies of microinclusions 8 fibrous diamonds from the DRC showed a prevalence of silicates with structural and coordinated H2O. Sheet silicates constituted 9 out of 13 detected minerals, with phlogopite-biotite micas being present in 4 out of 8 samples. Other detected minerals were 2 chlorite minerals, 2 clay

  9. Neutron and X-ray diffraction study on the hydrous SiO2 glass under pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urakawa, S.; Inoue, T.; Hattori, T.; Sano, A.; Kikegawa, T.; Funakoshi, K. I.; Mibe, K.; Kohara, S.

    2015-12-01

    Water has significant effects on the physical properties and the structure of silicate melts. Studies on hydrous silicate melts are, therefore, important to understand the magma-related phenomena of the planetary interior. Neutron has an advantage over X-ray to study the structure of hydrous melts. We have developed the high-pressure neutron diffraction method on the amorphous silicates with water at the PLANTE beamline of MLF, J-PARC. Here we report the results of in-situ neutron diffraction experiments on the hydrous silica glass at room temperature up to 10 GPa as well as X-ray diffraction study. Hydrous silica glass was synthesized by quenching from liquid at 3 GPa, in which D2O content is 13 wt.%. Neutron diffraction experiments were carried out at BL11 of MLF, J-PARC and X-ray studies were done at BL04B2 of SPring-8 and AR-NE5 of Photon Factory. On the neutron and X-ray spectra, the FSDP of hydrous glass locates at the higher Q-side than dry one, indicating the breakdown of network structure of silica glass by an addition of water. The FSDP shifts toward higher-Q side with increasing pressure parallel to that of dry silica glass. The radial distribution functions shows that the SiO4 unit does not change up to 10 GPa but the Si-Si-distance decreases with pressure. These show that the intermediate range order, which consists of the network of SiO4 tetrahedra, shrinks with increasing pressure. The changes of silica framework with pressure in hydrous silica glass are similar to those in dry silica glass. On the other hand, neutron diffraction shows the D-O distance in hydrous silica glass is nearly constant up to 10 GPa.

  10. Study of radar pulse compression for high resolution satellite altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dooley, R. P.; Nathanson, F. E.; Brooks, L. W.

    1974-01-01

    Pulse compression techniques are studied which are applicable to a satellite altimeter having a topographic resolution of + 10 cm. A systematic design procedure is used to determine the system parameters. The performance of an optimum, maximum likelihood processor is analysed, which provides the basis for modifying the standard split-gate tracker to achieve improved performance. Bandwidth considerations lead to the recommendation of a full deramp STRETCH pulse compression technique followed by an analog filter bank to separate range returns. The implementation of the recommended technique is examined.

  11. Mn incorporation in as-grown and annealed (Ga,Mn)As layers studied by x-ray diffraction and standing-wave fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Holy, V.; Matej, Z.; Pacherova, O.; Novak, V.; Cukr, M.; Olejnik, K.; Jungwirth, T.

    2006-12-15

    A combination of high-resolution x-ray diffraction and a technique of x-ray standing-wave fluorescence at grazing incidence is employed to study the structure of a (Ga,Mn)As-diluted magnetic semiconductor and its changes during post-growth annealing steps. We find that the film is formed by a uniform, single-crystallographic phase epilayer covered by a thin surface layer with enhanced Mn concentration to Mn atoms at random noncrystallographic positions. In the epilayer, Mn incorporated at the interstitial position has a dominant effect on lattice expansion as compared to substitutional Mn. The expansion coefficient of interstitial Mn estimated from our data is consistent with theory predictions. The concentration of interstitial Mn and the corresponding lattice expansion of the epilayer are reduced by annealing, accompanied by an increase of the density of randomly distributed Mn atoms in the disordered surface layer. Substitutional Mn atoms remain stable during the low-temperature annealing.

  12. Multiple wavelength diffractive imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bo; Dilanian, Ruben A.; Teichmann, Sven; Abbey, Brian; Peele, Andrew G.; Williams, Garth J.; Hannaford, Peter; van Dao, Lap; Quiney, Harry M.; Nugent, Keith A.

    2009-02-01

    We demonstrate coherent diffraction imaging using multiple harmonics from a high-harmonic generation source. An algorithm is presented that builds the known incident spectrum into the reconstruction procedure with the result that the useable flux is increased by more than an order of magnitude. Excellent images are obtained with a resolution of (165±5)nm and compare very well with images from a scanning electron microscope.

  13. Phononic crystal diffraction gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moiseyenko, Rayisa P.; Herbison, Sarah; Declercq, Nico F.; Laude, Vincent

    2012-02-01

    When a phononic crystal is interrogated by an external source of acoustic waves, there is necessarily a phenomenon of diffraction occurring on the external enclosing surfaces. Indeed, these external surfaces are periodic and the resulting acoustic diffraction grating has a periodicity that depends on the orientation of the phononic crystal. This work presents a combined experimental and theoretical study on the diffraction of bulk ultrasonic waves on the external surfaces of a 2D phononic crystal that consists of a triangular lattice of steel rods in a water matrix. The results of transmission experiments are compared with theoretical band structures obtained with the finite-element method. Angular spectrograms (showing frequency as a function of angle) determined from diffraction experiments are then compared with finite-element simulations of diffraction occurring on the surfaces of the crystal. The experimental results show that the diffraction that occurs on its external surfaces is highly frequency-dependent and has a definite relation with the Bloch modes of the phononic crystal. In particular, a strong influence of the presence of bandgaps and deaf bands on the diffraction efficiency is found. This observation opens perspectives for the design of efficient phononic crystal diffraction gratings.

  14. High-pressure behavior and thermoelastic properties of niobium studied by in situ x-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, Yongtao E-mail: yongtaozou6@gmail.com; Li, Baosheng; Qi, Xintong; Wang, Xuebing; Chen, Ting; Li, Xuefei; Welch, David

    2014-07-07

    In situ synchrotron energy dispersive x-ray diffraction (XRD) experiments on Nb have been conducted at pressures up to 6.4 GPa and temperatures up to 1073 K. From the pressure-volume-temperature measurements, thermoelastic parameters were derived for the first time for Nb based on the thermal pressure (ΔP{sub th}) equation of state (EOS), modified high-T Birch-Murnaghan EOS, and Mie-Grüneisen-Debye EOS. With the pressure derivative of the bulk modulus K{sub T}{sup ´} fixed at 4.0, we obtained the ambient isothermal bulk modulus K{sub T0}=174(5) GPa, the temperature derivative of bulk modulus at constant pressure (∂K{sub T}/∂T){sub P}=-0.060(8) GPa K⁻¹ and at constant volume (∂K{sub T}/∂T){sub V}=-0.046(8) GPa K⁻¹, the volumetric thermal expansivity α{sub T}(T)=2.3(3)×10⁻⁵+0.3(2)×10⁻⁸T (K⁻¹), as well as the pressure dependence of thermal expansion (∂α/∂P){sub T}=(₋2.0±0.4)×10⁻⁶ K⁻¹ GPa⁻¹. Fitting the present data to the Mie-Grüneisen-Debye EOS with Debye temperature Θ₀=276.6 K gives γ₀=1.27(8) and K{sub T0}=171(3) GPa at a fixed value of q=3.0. The ambient isothermal bulk modulus and Grüneisen parameter derived from this work are comparable to previously reported values from both experimental and theoretical studies. An in situ high-resolution, angle dispersive XRD study on Nb did not indicate any anomalous behavior related to pressure-induced electronic topological transitions at ~5 GPa as has been reported previously.

  15. X-ray diffraction study of nanocrystalline and amorphous structure within major and minor ampullate dragline spider silks

    SciTech Connect

    Sampath, Sujatha; Isdebski, Thomas; Jenkins, Janelle E.; Ayon, Joel V.; Henning, Robert W.; Orgel, Joseph P.R.O.; Antipoa, Olga; Yarger, Jeffery L.

    2012-07-25

    Synchrotron X-ray micro-diffraction experiments were carried out on Nephila clavipes (NC) and Argiope aurantia (AA) major (MA) and minor ampullate (MiA) fibers that make up dragline spider silk. The diffraction patterns show a semi-crystalline structure with {beta}-poly(L-alanine) nanocrystallites embedded in a partially oriented amorphous matrix. A superlattice reflection 'S' diffraction ring is observed, which corresponds to a crystalline component larger in size and is poorly oriented, when compared to the {beta}-poly(L-alanine) nanocrystallites that are commonly observed in dragline spider silks. Crystallite size, crystallinity and orientation about the fiber axis have been determined from the wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) patterns. In both NC and AA, the MiA silks are found to be more highly crystalline, when compared with the corresponding MA silks. Detailed analysis on the amorphous matrix shows considerable differences in the degree of order of the oriented amorphous component between the different silks studied and may play a crucial role in determining the mechanical properties of the silks.

  16. An X-ray diffraction study on a single rod outer segment from frog retina

    PubMed Central

    Yagi, Naoto; Matsuo, Tatsuhito; Ohta, Noboru

    2012-01-01

    X-ray diffraction patterns were recorded from isolated single rod outer segments of frog. The outer segments in Ringer’s solution were exposed to a 6 µm microbeam (15 keV) at the BL40XU beamline, SPring-8. The diffraction pattern demonstrated a remarkable regularity in the stacking and flatness of the disk membranes. The electron density profile calculated from the intensity of up to tenth-order reflections showed a pair of bilayers that comprise a disk membrane. The structure of the disk membrane and the changes in the profile on swelling generally agreed with previous reports. Radiation damage was significant with an irradiation of 5 × 105 Gy which is much lower than the known damaging dose on proteins at the liquid-nitrogen temperature. PMID:22713892

  17. Structural study of new hydrocarbon nano-crystals by energy-filtered electron diffraction.

    PubMed

    Wu, J S; Melcer, N; Sharp, W P; O'Keeffe, M; Spence, J C H; Yaghi, O M

    2004-01-01

    A new brittle hydrocarbon has been successfully synthesized in polycrystalline form, and its crystal structure solved by quantitative electron diffraction. By 3D tilting of the nano-crystals, the lattice type and unit cell parameters were determined. (Triclinic, [Formula: see text] A, [Formula: see text] A, [Formula: see text] A, [Formula: see text] degrees, [Formula: see text] degrees, and [Formula: see text] degrees.) Spot diffraction patterns were obtained at -165 degrees C using the Koehler selected-area mode on a LEO 912 TEM fitted with an omega in-column elastic energy filter. The direct methods algorithm was then applied to merged intensities and a trial structure obtained assuming single scattering. This was further refined to obtain good agreement with a small residual of about 10% using multiple scattering calculations. A diagram of the proposed structure is given.

  18. Diffraction and coherence in breast ultrasound tomography: a study with a toroidal array

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Lianjie; Simonetti, Francesco; Duric, Neb; Littrup, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Ultrasound is commonly used as an adjunct to mammography for diagnostic evaluation of suspicions arising from breast cancer screening. As an alternative to conventional sonography that uses hand-held transducers, toroidal array probes that encircle the breast immersed in a water bath have been investigated for ultrasound tomography. In this paper, two sets of experiments performed with a prototype ultrasound scanner on a phantom and a human breast in vivo are used to investigate the effects of diffraction and coherence in ultrasound tomography. Reconstructions obtained with transmission diffraction tomography (TDT) are compared with conventional reflection imaging and computerized ultrasound tomography showing a substantial improvement. The in vivo tests demonstrate that TDT can image the complex boundary of a cancer mass and suggest that it can reveal the anatomy of milk ducts and Cooper's ligaments.

  19. High-pressure x-ray-diffraction study of α-AlPO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Surinder M.; Garg, Nandini; Sikka, S. K.

    2000-10-01

    Our high-pressure x-ray diffraction experiments on berlinite AlPO4 (α-AlPO4) show that it transforms to a crystalline Cmcm phase beyond 13 GPa. The persistence of diffraction pattern up to 40 GPa does not confirm the previous conclusions of high-pressure amorphization of AlPO4 around 12-18 GPa. Our experimental results, in agreement with earlier Raman scattering results, suggest that the so called memory glass effect observed earlier may in fact be due to the reversibility of α-phase<==>Cmcm phase transformation. These new experimental observations raise serious doubts about the theoretical understanding of the high-pressure behavior of α-AlPO4.

  20. A numerical study of shock wave diffraction by a circular cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, J.-Y.; Liu, Y.; Lomax, H.

    1986-01-01

    The nonstationary shock wave diffraction patterns generated by a blast wave impinging on a circular cylinder are numerically simulated using a second-order hybrid upwind method for solving the two-dimensional inviscid compressible Euler equations of gasdynamics. The complete diffraction patterns, including the transition from regular to Mach reflection, trajectory of the Mach triple point and the complex shock-on-shock interaction at the wake region resulting from the Mach shocks collision behind the cylinder are reported in detail. Pressure-time history and various contour plots are also included. Comparison between the work of Bryson and Gross (1961) which included both experimental schlieren pictures and theoretical calculations using Whitham's ray-shock theory and results of the present finite difference computation indicate good agreement in every aspect except for some nonideal gas and viscous effects which are not accounted for by the Euler equations.

  1. Spatially-resolved in-situ structural study of organic electronic devices with nanoscale resolution: the plasmonic photovoltaic case study.

    PubMed

    Paci, B; Bailo, D; Albertini, V Rossi; Wright, J; Ferrero, C; Spyropoulos, G D; Stratakis, E; Kymakis, E

    2013-09-14

    A novel high spatial resolution synchrotron X-ray diffraction stratigraphy technique has been applied in-situ to an integrated plasmonic nanoparticle-based organic photovoltaic device. This original approach allows for the disclosure of structure-property relations linking large scale organic devices to length scales of local nano/hetero structures and interfaces between the different components.

  2. High-Resolution NMR Studies of Human Tissue Factor

    PubMed Central

    Nuzzio, Kristin M.; Watt, Eric D.; Boettcher, John M.; Gajsiewicz, Joshua M.; Morrissey, James H.; Rienstra, Chad M.

    2016-01-01

    In normal hemostasis, the blood clotting cascade is initiated when factor VIIa (fVIIa, other clotting factors are named similarly) binds to the integral membrane protein, human tissue factor (TF). The TF/fVIIa complex in turn activates fX and fIX, eventually concluding with clot formation. Several X-ray crystal structures of the soluble extracellular domain of TF (sTF) exist; however, these structures are missing electron density in functionally relevant regions of the protein. In this context, NMR can provide complementary structural information as well as dynamic insights into enzyme activity. The resolution and sensitivity for NMR studies are greatly enhanced by the ability to prepare multiple milligrams of protein with various isotopic labeling patterns. Here, we demonstrate high-yield production of several isotopically labeled forms of recombinant sTF, allowing for high-resolution NMR studies both in the solid and solution state. We also report solution NMR spectra at sub-mM concentrations of sTF, ensuring the presence of dispersed monomer, as well as the first solid-state NMR spectra of sTF. Our improved sample preparation and precipitation conditions have enabled the acquisition of multidimensional NMR data sets for TF chemical shift assignment and provide a benchmark for TF structure elucidation. PMID:27657719

  3. New design studies for TRIUMF's ARIEL High Resolution Separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maloney, J. A.; Baartman, R.; Marchetto, M.

    2016-06-01

    As part of its new Advanced Rare IsotopE Laboratory (ARIEL), TRIUMF is designing a novel High Resolution Separator (HRS) (Maloney et al., 2015) to separate rare isotopes. The HRS has a 180° bend, separated into two 90° magnetic dipoles, bend radius 1.2 m, with an electrostatic multipole corrector between them. Second order correction comes mainly from the dipole edge curvatures, but is intended to be fine-tuned with a sextupole component and a small octupole component in the multipole. This combination is designed to achieve 1:20,000 resolution for a 3 μm (horizontal) and 6 μm (vertical) emittance. A design for the HRS dipole magnets achieves both radial and integral flatness goals of <10-5. A review of the optical design for the HRS is presented, including the study of limiting factors affecting separation, matching and aberration correction. Field simulations from the OPERA-3D (OPERA) [2] models of the dipole magnets are used in COSY Infinity (COSY) (Berz and Makino, 2005) [3] to find and optimize the transfer maps to 3rd order and study residual nonlinearities to 8th order.

  4. Monte-Carlo sorption and neutron diffraction study of the filling isotherm in clathrate hydrates

    SciTech Connect

    Klapproth, Alice; Kuhs, Werner F.; Chazallon, Bertrand

    1999-06-15

    We are interested in the thermodynamics of the gas filling of clathrate hydrates. In order to determine the pressure-dependent filling of the cages, neutron powder diffraction experiments on N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} clathrates were performed. Interaction potentials were refined by comparing the experimentally determined fillings with those generated by MC-sorption calculations. Unsatisfactory agreement between experiment and simulation is observed when using the widely employed SPC water-water interaction potential.

  5. Diffraction encoded position measuring apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Tansey, R.J.

    1991-09-24

    When a lightwave passes through a transmission grating, diffracted beams appear at the output or opposite side of the grating that are effectively Doppler shifted in frequency (phase) whereby a detector system can compare the phase of the zero order and higher order beams to obtain an indication of position. Multiple passes through the grating increase resolution for a given wavelength of a laser signal. The resolution can be improved further by using a smaller wavelength laser to generate the grating itself. Since the grating must only have a pitch sufficient to produce diffracted orders, inexpensive, ultraviolet wavelength lasers can be utilized and still obtain high resolution detection. 3 figures.

  6. Diffraction encoded position measuring apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Tansey, Richard J.

    1991-01-01

    When a lightwave passes through a transmission grating, diffracted beams appear at the output or opposite side of the grating that are effectively Doppler shifted in frequency (phase) whereby a detector system can compare the phase of the zero order and higher order beams to obtain an indication of position. Multiple passes through the grating increase resolution for a given wavelength of a laser signal. The resolution can be improved further by using a smaller wavelength laser to generate the grating itself. Since the grating must only have a pitch sufficient to produce diffracted orders, inexpensive, ultraviolet wavelength lasers can be utilized and still obtain high resolution detection.

  7. Comparison study of distinguishing cancerous and normal prostate epithelial cells by confocal and polarization diffraction imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Wenhuan; Lu, Jun Qing; Yang, Li V.; Sa, Yu; Feng, Yuanming; Ding, Junhua; Hu, Xin-Hua

    2016-07-01

    Accurate classification of malignant cells from benign ones can significantly enhance cancer diagnosis and prognosis by detection of circulating tumor cells (CTCs). We have investigated two approaches of quantitative morphology and polarization diffraction imaging on two prostate cell types to evaluate their feasibility as single-cell assay methods toward CTC detection after cell enrichment. The two cell types have been measured by a confocal imaging method to obtain their three-dimensional morphology parameters and by a polarization diffraction imaging flow cytometry (p-DIFC) method to obtain image texture parameters. The support vector machine algorithm was applied to examine the accuracy of cell classification with the morphology and diffraction image parameters. Despite larger mean values of cell and nuclear sizes of the cancerous prostate cells than the normal ones, it has been shown that the morphologic parameters cannot serve as effective classifiers. In contrast, accurate classification of the two prostate cell types can be achieved with high classification accuracies on measured data acquired separately in three measurements. These results provide strong evidence that the p-DIFC method has the potential to yield morphology-related "fingerprints" for accurate and label-free classification of the two prostate cell types.

  8. Synchrotron Diffraction Studies of Spontaneous Magnetostriction in Rare Earth Transition Metal Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Ning Yang

    2004-12-19

    Thermal expansion anomalies of R{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B and R{sub 2}Fe{sub 17}C{sub x} (x = 0,2) (R = Y, Nd, Gd, Tb, Er) stoichiometric compounds are studied with high-energy synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction using Debye-Schemer geometry in temperature range 10K to 1000K. Large spontaneous magnetostriction up to their Curie temperatures (T{sub c}) is observed. The a-axes show relatively larger invar effects than c-axes in the R{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B compounds whereas the R{sub 2}Fe{sub 17}C{sub x} show the contrary anisotropies. The iron sub-lattice is shown to dominate the spontaneous magnetostriction of the compounds. The contribution of the rare earth sublattice is roughly proportional to the spin magnetic moment of the rare earth in the R{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B compounds but in R{sub 2}Fe{sub 17}C{sub x}, the rare earth sub-lattice contribution appears more likely to be dominated by the local bonding. The calculation of spontaneous magnetostrain of bonds shows that the bonds associated with Fe(j2) sites in R{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B and the dumbbell sites in R{sub 2}Fe{sub 17}C{sub x} have larger values, which is strongly related to their largest magnetic moment and Wigner-Seitz atomic cell volume. The roles of the carbon atoms in increasing the Curie temperatures of the R{sub 2}Fe{sub 17} compounds are attributed to the increased separation of Fe hexagons. The R{sub 2}Fe{sub 17} and R{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B phases with magnetic rare earth ions also show anisotropies of thermal expansion above T{sub c}. For R{sub 2}Fe{sub 17} and R{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B the a{sub a}/a{sub c} > 1 whereas the anisotropy is reversed with the interstitial carbon in R{sub 2}Fe{sub 17}. The average bond magnetostrain is shown to be a possible predictor of the magnetic moment of Fe sites in the compounds. Both of the theoretical and phenomenological models on spontaneous magnetostriction are discussed and a Landau model on the spontaneous magnetostriction is proposed.

  9. Lattice-level observation of the elastic-to-plastic relaxation process with subnanosecond resolution in shock-compressed Ta using time-resolved in situ Laue diffraction

    DOE PAGES

    Wehrenberg, C. E.; Comley, A. J.; Barton, N. R.; Coppari, F.; Fratanduono, D.; Huntington, C. M.; Maddox, B. R.; Park, H. -S.; Plechaty, C.; Prisbrey, S. T.; et al

    2015-09-29

    We report direct lattice level measurements of plastic relaxation kinetics through time-resolved, in-situ Laue diffraction of shock-compressed single-crystal [001] Ta at pressures of 27-210 GPa. For a 50 GPa shock, a range of shear strains is observed extending up to the uniaxial limit for early data points (<0.6 ns) and the average shear strain relaxes to a near steady state over ~1 ns. For 80 and 125 GPa shocks, the measured shear strains are fully relaxed already at 200 ps, consistent with rapid relaxation associated with the predicted threshold for homogeneous nucleation of dislocations occurring at shock pressure ~65 GPa.more » The relaxation rate and shear stresses are used to estimate the dislocation density and these quantities are compared to the Livermore Multiscale Strength model as well as various molecular dynamics simulations.« less

  10. In situ and real-time characterization of metal-organic chemical vapor deposition growth by high resolution x-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Kharchenko, A.; Lischka, K.; Schmidegg, K.; Sitter, H.; Bethke, J.; Woitok, J.

    2005-03-01

    We present an x-ray diffractometer for the analysis of epitaxial layers during (in situ) metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). Our diffractometer has a conventional x-ray source, does not need a goniometer stage, and is not sensitive to precise adjustment of the samples before measurement. It allows us to perform measurements within a few seconds even from rotating and wobbling samples. The first results of laboratory tests performed with our x-ray diffraction system show that it is well suited for in situ and real-time monitoring of the MOCVD growth process. We were able to measure the growth rate of a cubic GaN layer and the intensity and peak position of Bragg reflections of the growing layer in less than 20 s only.

  11. Isolation, purification, crystallization, and preliminary X-ray diffraction study of the crystals of HU protein from M. gallisepticum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolaeva, A. Yu.; Timofeev, V. I.; Boiko, K. M.; Korzhenevskii, D. A.; Rakitina, T. V.; Dorovatovskii, P. V.; Lipkin, A. V.

    2015-11-01

    HU proteins are involved in bacterial DNA and RNA repair. Since these proteins are absent in cells of higher organisms, inhibitors of HU proteins can be used as effective and safe antibiotics. The crystallization conditions for the M. gallisepticum HU protein were found and optimized by the vapor-diffusion method. The X-ray diffraction data set was collected to 2.91 Å resolution from the crystals grown by the vapor-diffusion method on a synchrotron source. The crystals of the HU protein belong to sp. gr. P41212 and have the following unit-cell parameters: a = b = 97.94 Å, c = 77.92 Å, α = β = γ = 90°.

  12. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of disintegrin (schistatin) from saw-scaled viper (Echis carinatus).

    PubMed

    Tomar, S; Yadav, S; Chandra, V; Kumar, P; Singh, T P

    2001-11-01

    This is the first report of crystallographic data on a disintegrin molecule from any source. The heterodimeric disintegrin with a molecular weight of 14 kDa from Echis carinatus venom is a potent antagonist of alpha4 integrins. The intact disintegrin, containing two subunits A and B, was isolated and purified using affinity and ion-exchange columns. It has been crystallized using 1.6 M ammonium sulfate as a precipitating agent. The crystals grew to dimensions of 0.25 x 0.20 x 0.20 mm and diffracted to 2.5 A resolution. The crystals belong to space group I4(1)22, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 91.7, c = 55.1 A. Assuming a molecular weight of 14 kDa, a V(M) of 2.1 A(3) Da(-1) is obtained for one molecule of disintegrin in the asymmetric unit. PMID:11679739

  13. Powder neutron diffraction study of quasi-one-dimensional Li0.9Mo6O17

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Luz, Mario S.; Dos Santos, C. A. M.; White, B. D.; Neumeier, J. J.; Huang, Q.; Leao, J. B.; Lynn, J. W.

    2008-03-01

    The crystallographic structure of quasi-one-dimensional Li0.9Mo6O17 was investigated by Rietveld refinement of powder neutron diffraction data at temperatures in the range 5 K < T < 295 K. Structural parameters, atomic positions, occupation numbers, and isotropic thermal parameter Biso will be reported. The occupancy was refined revealing a Li occupancy greater than 0.9. Bond valences sums will also be reported for various Li and Mo sites. At room temperature, the crystal was found to exhibit monoclinic symmetry with space group P21/m and lattice parameters a =12.7506(1) ,b = 5.5242(1) ,c = 9.4913(2) å,nd β = 90.593(1)^o. Good agreement between the temperature dependence of lattice parameters and high resolution thermal expansion results^* was obtained. ^*C. A. M. dos Santos, B. D. White, Yi-Kuo Yu, J. J. Neumeier, and J.A. Souza, Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 266405 (2007).

  14. Recombinant formate dehydrogenase from Arabidopsis thaliana: Preparation, crystal growth in microgravity, and preliminary X-ray diffraction study

    SciTech Connect

    Shabalin, I. G.; Serov, A. E.; Skirgello, O. E.; Timofeev, V. I.; Samygina, V. R.; Popov, V. O.; Tishkov, V. I.; Kuranova, I. P.

    2010-09-15

    Crystals of high-purity recombinant NAD{sup +}-dependent formate dehydrogenase from the higher plant Arabidopsis thaliana (AraFDH) were grown in microgravity in the Modul'-1 protein crystallization apparatus on the International Space Station. The space-grown crystals have larger sizes than those grown on Earth. X-ray diffraction data suitable for determining the three-dimensional structure were collected from the space-grown crystals to a resolution of 1.22 A using an X-ray synchrotron source. The crystals belong to sp. gr. P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2; the unit-cell parameters are a = b = 107.865 A, c = 71.180 A, {alpha} = {beta} = {gamma} = 90 deg.

  15. An X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy study of the extraction of erythrocyte membranes with the bile salt, cholate.

    PubMed

    Finean, J B; Gunn, T K; Hutchinson, A; Mills, D

    1984-10-17

    Studies by X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy of slowly frozen samples of control and cholate-extracted preparations of erythrocyte membranes have demonstrated changes in structural parameters which can readily be related to the extraction of cytoskeletal proteins. In the frozen state, these components appear to be condensed to about 10% of the total membrane thickness. The observations illustrate some of the advantages and limitations in the use of slowly frozen membrane preparations in studies of membrane structure.

  16. X-ray diffraction study of LC films: generalization of Moncton-Pindac method for studies of internal diffraction maximum using reflected beam on thin film with only one free surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zmija, Jozef; Michalski, E.; Piecek, Wiktor

    1993-10-01

    The chosen results of investigations of internal and external diffraction maximum, using a transmission beam to freely suspended `thick' and `thin' films of smectic LC, are presented. On the basis of these results the way to the generalization of the Moncton-Pindac method was illustrated. Our generalization of the Moncton-Pindac method can be distinguished from the other methods by study of internal diffraction maximum using reflected (instead of transmission) beam. It is important that the film placed on a heated plate has only one free surface. In commonly used methods, the investigated film has two free surfaces. Some results of diffractometer measurements are presented as examples of studies using the generalized Moncton-Pindac method. Possible experiments using this method, advantages, and inconveniences are discussed.

  17. Hippo/crates-in-situ deformation strain and testure studies using neutron time-of-flight diffraction.

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, S. C.; Hartig, C.; Brissier, T. D.; Mecking, H.

    2005-01-01

    In situ deformation studies by diffraction allow studying of deformation mechanisms and provide valuable data to validate and improve deformation models. In particular, deformation studies using time-of-flight neutrons provide averages over large numbers of grains and allow to probing the response of lattice planes parallel and perpendicular to the applied load simultaneously. In this paper we describe the load-frame CRATES, designed for the HIPPO neutron time-of-flight diffractometer at LANSCE. The HIPPO/CRATES combination allows probing up to 20 diffraction vectors simultaneously and provides rotation of the sample in the beam while under load. With this, deformation texture, i.e. the change of grain orientation due to plastic deformation, or strain pole figures may be measured. We report initial results of a validation experiment, comparing deformation of a Zircaloy specimen measured using the NPD neutron diffractometer with results obtained for the same material using HIPPO/CRATES.

  18. Asymmetric structure of germanene on an Al(111) surface studied by total-reflection high-energy positron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukaya, Yuki; Matsuda, Iwao; Feng, Baojie; Mochizuki, Izumi; Hyodo, Toshio; Shamoto, Shin-ichi

    2016-09-01

    The structure of germanene on an Al(111) surface has been experimentally investigated using the total-reflection high-energy positron diffraction (TRHEPD) method. The observed spot intensities are asymmetric, revealing no mirror symmetry in the atomic coordinates of germenene with respect to the <110> direction. Quantitative TRHEPD rocking curve analysis, based on dynamical diffraction theory, has revealed that the germanene layer has a 3 × 3 structure with asymmetrical buckling due to the protrusion of one of the Ge atoms in the unit cell, which is unlike the structural model proposed in previous studies. The magnitude of the buckling was found to be 0.94 Å, and the spacing between the germanene and the Al(111) substrate to be 2.51 Å. The new structure proposed in the present investigations, though different from that reported in studies before, does not contradict the other characteristics which were found experimentally in the previous studies.

  19. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of the WW4 domain of the Nedd4-2 ubiquitin–protein ligase

    SciTech Connect

    Umadevi, N.; Kumar, S.; Narayana, N.

    2005-12-01

    The first crystallographic study of an isolated WW domain is reported. Single crystals of the WW4 domain of the Nedd4-2 ubiquitin–protein ligase contain a high solvent content of 74% and diffract X-rays to 2.5 Å resolution. Ubiquitin-mediated protein modification via covalent attachment of ubiquitin has emerged as one of the most common regulatory processes in all eukaryotes. Nedd4-2, closely related to neuronal precursor cell-expressed developmentally down-regulated 4 (Nedd4), is a multimodular ubiquitin–protein ligase comprised of four WW domains and a Hect domain. The WW domains recognize the proline-rich motifs on the multi-subunit amiloride-sensitive epithelial sodium channel (ENaC). To gain insights into the binding of the WW domain to proline-rich peptides, a protein fragment (78 amino acids) containing the fourth WW domain (WW4) of the Nedd4-2 protein was purified and crystallized and X-ray diffraction data were collected. A data set was obtained to 2.5 Å resolution from a cryocooled single crystal at a synchrotron source. The crystals belong to the tetragonal space group P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2 (or P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2), with unit-cell parameters a = b = 113.43, c = 103.21 Å. Analysis of the self-rotation function suggests the presence of four WW4 molecules in the asymmetric unit, with a high unit-cell solvent content of 74%.

  20. High resolution spectroscopic study of BeΛ10

    DOE PAGES

    Gogami, T.; Chen, C.; Kawama, D.; Achenbach, P.; Ahmidouch, A.; Albayrak, I.; Androic, D.; Asaturyan, A.; Asaturyan, R.; Ates, O.; et al

    2016-03-10

    Spectroscopy of amore » $$^{10}_{\\Lambda}$$Be hypernucleus was carried out at JLab Hall C using the $$(e,e^{\\prime}K^{+})$$ reaction. A new magnetic spectrometer system (SPL+HES+HKS), specifically designed for high resolution hypernuclear spectroscopy, was used to obtain an energy spectrum with a resolution of 0.78 MeV (FWHM). The well-calibrated spectrometer system of the present experiment using the $$p(e,e^{\\prime}K^{+})\\Lambda,\\Sigma^{0}$$ reactions allowed us to determine the energy levels, and the binding energy of the ground state peak (mixture of 1$$^{-}$$ and 2$$^{-}$$ states) was obtained to be B$$_{\\Lambda}$$=8.55$$\\pm$$0.07(stat.)$$\\pm$$0.11(sys.) MeV. Furthermore, the result indicates that the ground state energy is shallower than that of an emulsion study by about 0.5 MeV which provides valuable experimental information on charge symmetry breaking effect in the $$\\Lambda N$$ interaction.« less

  1. Peace studies and conflict resolution: the need for transdisciplinarity.

    PubMed

    Galtung, Johan

    2010-02-01

    Peace studies seeks to understand the negation of violence through conflict transformation, cooperation and harmony by drawing from many disciplines, including psychology, sociology and anthropology, political science, economics, international relations, international law and history. This raises the problem of the complementarity, coexistence and integration of different systems of knowledge. In fact, all of the human and social sciences are products of the post-Westphalian state system and so reify the state and its internal and international system and focus on this as the main source of political conflict. Conflicts, however, can arise from other distinctions involving gender, generation, race, class and so on. To contribute to peace building and conflict resolution, the social sciences must be globalized, developing theories that address conflicts at the levels of interpersonal interaction (micro), within countries (meso), between nations (macro ), and between whole regions or civilizations (mega). Psychiatry and the "psy" disciplines can contribute to peace building and conflict resolution through understanding the interactions between processes at each of these levels and the mental health or illness of individuals.

  2. Peace studies and conflict resolution: the need for transdisciplinarity.

    PubMed

    Galtung, Johan

    2010-02-01

    Peace studies seeks to understand the negation of violence through conflict transformation, cooperation and harmony by drawing from many disciplines, including psychology, sociology and anthropology, political science, economics, international relations, international law and history. This raises the problem of the complementarity, coexistence and integration of different systems of knowledge. In fact, all of the human and social sciences are products of the post-Westphalian state system and so reify the state and its internal and international system and focus on this as the main source of political conflict. Conflicts, however, can arise from other distinctions involving gender, generation, race, class and so on. To contribute to peace building and conflict resolution, the social sciences must be globalized, developing theories that address conflicts at the levels of interpersonal interaction (micro), within countries (meso), between nations (macro ), and between whole regions or civilizations (mega). Psychiatry and the "psy" disciplines can contribute to peace building and conflict resolution through understanding the interactions between processes at each of these levels and the mental health or illness of individuals. PMID:20511249

  3. Recent diffractive results from HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valkárová, Alice

    2016-07-01

    The diffractive dijet cross sections for photoproduction and deep inelastic scattering were studied and compared with theoretical NLO QCD predictions. The results of exclusive dijet production were compared to predictions from models which are based on different assumptions about the nature of diffractive exchange. Isolated prompt photons in diffractive photoproduction produced inclusively or together with a jet were studied for the first time.

  4. Monitoring aggregate disintegration with laser diffraction: A tool for studying soils as sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Joseph; Kasmerchak, Chase; Liang, Mengyu

    2016-04-01

    One of the more important characteristics of soil that becomes hillslope, fluvial, or aeolian sediment is the presences of aggregates, which disintegrate at varying rates and to varying degrees during transport. Laser diffraction particle size analyzers allow monitoring of aggregate disintegration as a sample of soil or sediment suspended in water is circulated continuously through the measurement cell (Bieganowski et al., 2010, Clay Minerals 45-23-34; Mason et al., Catena 87:107-118). Mason et al. (2011) applied this approach to aeolian sedimentary aggregates (e.g. clay pellets eroded from dry lakebeds), immersing dry samples in DI water and circulating them through a Malvern Mastersizer 2000 particle size analyzer for three hours while repeated size distribution (SD) measurements were made. A final measurement was made after sonication and treatment with Na-metaphosphate. In that study, most samples approached a steady SD within three hours, which included both primary mineral grains and persistent aggregates. The disintegration process could be modeled with a first-order rate law representing the disintegration of a single population of aggregates. A wide range of model parameters were observed among the samples studied, and it was suggested that they could be useful in predicting the behavior of these aggregates, under rainfall impact and during slopewash or fluvial transport. Addition of Ca++ to the suspension altered aggregate behavior in some but not all cases. We applied the same method to dry, unground material from upper horizons of soils sampled along a bioclimatic gradient in northern Minnesota, USA, all formed in lithologically similar glacigenic sediment. These ranged from Alfisols (Luvisols) formed under forest since the last deglaciation, to Alfisols under forest that more recently replaced grassland, and Mollisols (Chernozems) that formed entirely under grassland vegetation. Few of these soil samples approached a steady SD within three hours, and

  5. In situ X-ray powder diffraction studies of the synthesis of graphene oxide and formation of reduced graphene oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storm, Mie Møller; Johnsen, Rune E.; Norby, Poul

    2016-08-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) are important materials in a wide range of fields. The modified Hummers methods, for synthesizing GO, and subsequent thermal reduction to rGO, are often employed for production of rGO. However, the mechanism behinds these syntheses methods are still unclear. We present an in situ X-ray diffraction study of the synthesis of GO and thermal reduction of GO. The X-ray diffraction revealed that the Hummers method includes an intercalation state and finally formation of additional crystalline material. The formation of GO is observed during both the intercalation and the crystallization stage. During thermal reduction of GO three stages were observed: GO, a disordered stage, and the rGO stage. The appearance of these stages depends on the heating ramp. The aim of this study is to provide deeper insight into the chemical and physical processes during the syntheses.

  6. Investigation of the reduction of NiAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}. 1: Neutron diffraction studies

    SciTech Connect

    Uestuendag, E.; Hanan, J.C.; Clausen, B.; Bourke, M.A.M.; Sass, S.L.; Barbieri, T.J.

    1998-09-01

    In-situ metal-ceramic composites consisting of Ni particles embedded in alumina matrices were obtained by the partial reduction of NiAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}. The volume shrinkage that accompanies the reduction reaction generates residual stresses. Neutron diffraction studies were performed for the first time at various temperatures to study the evolution of phases in situ during reduction and to determine their stress state. It was determined that compressive stresses of several hundred MPa in magnitude can be generated inside the unreduced part of spinel. It was also found that the stress generation is strongly influenced by material and processing variables such as reduction temperature and the initial density of spinel. The diffraction results were then compared to finite element calculations and a reasonable agreement was obtained.

  7. [Use of X-ray diffraction for studying the temperature dependence of the Young modulus of protein crystals].

    PubMed

    Pozharskiĭ, E V

    1998-01-01

    The possibility of using X-ray diffraction for studying the elastic properties of protein crystals is considered. It is shown for hen egg--white lysozyme tetragonal crystals that the temperature dependences of the Young modulus obtained from X-ray scattering data and in direct mechanical measurements are the same. It is discussed how the changes in general mobility of protein atoms can be estimated using elasticity measurements.

  8. High-temperature x-ray diffraction study of coating-substrate compatibility in yttria-coated graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, D.A.

    1985-01-18

    A high-temperature x-ray diffraction (XRD) study of the compatibility of yttria (Y/sub 2/O/sub 3/) coatings on graphite substrates showed a near-surface reaction rate consistent with an autocatalytic model. The model was more appropriate for thicker coatings than for thin ones. The reaction product, yttrium carbide (YC/sub 2/), transformed from face-centered cubic to tetragonal during the reaction. The phase stability was dependent upon carbon stoichiometry.

  9. Molecular-dynamics modelling and neutron diffraction study of the site disorder in air clathrate hydrates

    SciTech Connect

    Chazallon, Bertrand; Klapproth, Alice; Kuhs, Werner F.

    1999-06-15

    We present the results of MD-simulation runs with subsequent quenches for clathrate hydrates using SPC water in order to model properly the crystallographic site disorder of the guest molecules in the water cages. A procedure is described to transform the results of the quench (symmetry P1) into the proper space-time averaged space group (Fd3-bar m) of the clathrate hydrate. The resulting disorder models are compared with the outcome of crystallographic structure refinements (R-factors, Fourier maps) from our neutron powder diffraction data. A correct description of the disorder is important for a reliable determination of the pressure-dependent cage filling.

  10. Neutron powder diffraction studies as a function of temperature of structure II hydrate formed from propane

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rawn, C.J.; Rondinone, A.J.; Chakoumakos, B.C.; Circone, S.; Stern, L.A.; Kirby, S.H.; Ishii, Y.

    2003-01-01

    Neutron powder diffraction data confirm that hydrate samples synthesized with propane crystallize as structure type II hydrate. The structure has been modeled using rigid-body constraints to describe C3H8 molecules located in the eight larger polyhedral cavities of a deuterated host lattice. Data were collected at 12, 40, 100, 130, 160, 190, 220, and 250 K and used to calculate the thermal expansivity from the temperature dependence of the lattice parameters. The data collected allowed for full structural refinement of atomic coordinates and the atomic-displacement parameters.

  11. Neutron diffraction studies of structural phase transformations for water-ice in confined geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dore, John; Webber, Beau; Hartl, Monika; Behrens, Peter; Hansen, Thomas

    2002-11-01

    Neutron diffraction measurements have been made for D 2O water in the confined geometry of various mesoporous silicas over a wide temperature range. The data have been taken for cooling and heating runs incorporating the nucleation and melting of the crystalline phases and the super-cooled liquid phase. The crystalline forms and the temperatures at which they change are shown to be strongly dependent on the pore size and type of silica used as the confining medium and relate to the phase relationship between hexagonal ice [ Ih] and cubic ice [ Ic].

  12. X-ray diffraction study of elemental thulium at pressures up to 86 GPa

    SciTech Connect

    Pravica, Michael; Quine, Zachary; Romano, Edward

    2006-09-01

    We have performed a high-pressure synchrotron x-ray diffraction experiment on elemental thulium in a diamond anvil cell to 86 GPa. A series of phase transitions was observed as a function of pressure that follow the expected hexagonal-close-packed{yields}Samarium-type{yields}double hexagonal-close-packed{yields}distorted distorted face-centered cubic sequence. In particular, we present evidence for the predicted double hexagonal close packed{yields}distorted face-centered cubic phase transition near 68 GPa. Equation of state data for thulium are also reported up to 86 GPa.

  13. The evolution with strain of the stored energy in different texture components of cold-rolled IF steel revealed by high resolution X-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Wauthier-Monnin, A.; Chauveau, T.; Castelnau, O.; Réglé, H.; Bacroix, B.

    2015-06-15

    During the deformation of low carbon steel by cold-rolling, dislocations are created and stored in grains depending on local crystallographic orientation, deformation, and deformation gradient. Orientation dependent dislocation densities have been estimated from the broadening of X-ray diffraction lines measured on a synchrotron beamline. Different cold-rolling levels (from 30% to 95% thickness reduction) have been considered. It is shown that the present measurements are consistent with the hypothesis of the sole consideration of screw dislocations for the analysis of the data. The presented evolutions show that the dislocation density first increases within the α fiber (=(hkl)<110>) and then within the γ fiber (=(111)). A comparison with EBSD measurements is done and confirms that the storage of dislocations during the deformation process is orientation dependent and that this dependence is correlated to the cold-rolling level. If we assume that this dislocation density acts as a driving force during recrystallization, these observations can explain the fact that the recrystallization mechanisms are generally different after moderate or large strains. - Highlights: • Dislocation densities are assessed by XRD in main texture components of a steel sheet. • Dislocation densities vary with both strain and texture components. • The analysis relies on the sole presence of screw dislocations. • The measured dislocation densities include the contribution of both SSD and GND.

  14. High resolution surface wave dispersion studies in China

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, L.E.; Patton, H.J.

    1997-11-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory regional calibration project is actively assembling a database of surface-wave dispersion information for China and surrounding areas. As part of the effort to characterize surface wave dispersion in China, we integrate prior long period results from the University of Colorado with our shorter period dispersion measurements in a high resolution survey of key monitoring areas. Focusing on western China initially, we employ broadband data recorded on CDSN stations, and regional events (m{sub b} 4 and above). Our approach is twofold, employing path specific calibration of key stations and well-recorded reference events, and tomographic inference to provide group velocity curves for regions with sparse station distribution and little seismic activity. Initial dispersion studies at Chinese stations WMQ and LZH show substantial azimuthal variation in dispersion, reinforcing the need for careful determination of source regions for path-specific calibration.

  15. In Situ X-ray Diffraction Studies of Cathode Materials in Lithium Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, X. Q.; Sun, X.; McBreen, J.; Mukerjee, S.; Gao, Yuan; Yakovleva, M. V.; Xing, X. K.; Daroux, M. L.

    1998-11-01

    There is an increasing interest in lithiated transition metal oxides because of their use as cathodes in lithium batteries. LiCoO{sub 2}, LiNiO{sub 2} and LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} are the three most widely used and studied materials, At present, although it is relative expensive and toxic, LiCoO{sub 2} is the material of choice in commercial lithium ion batteries because of its ease of manufacture, better thermal stability and cycle life. However, the potential use of lithium ion batteries with larger capacity for power tools and electric vehicles in the future will demand new cathode materials with higher energy density, lower cost and better thermal stability. LiNiO{sub 2} is isostructural with LiCoO{sub 2}. It offers lower cost and high energy density than LiCoO{sub 2}. However, it has much poorer thermal stability than LiCoO{sub 2}, in the charged (delithiated) state. Co, Al, and other elements have been used to partially replace Ni in LiNiO{sub 2} system in order to increase the thermal stability. LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} has the highest thermal stability and lowest cost and toxicity. However, the low energy density and poor cycle life at elevated temperature are the major obstacles for this material. In order to develop safer, cheaper, and better performance cathode materials, the in-depth understanding of the relationships between the thermal stability and structure, performance and structure are very important. The performance here includes energy density and cycle life of the cathode materials. X-ray diffraction (XRD) is one of the most powerful tools to study these relationships. The pioneer ex situ XRD work on cathode materials for lithium batteries was done by Ohzuku. His XRD studies on LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4}, LiCoO{sub 2}, LiNiO{sub 2}, LiNi{sub 0.5}Co{sub 0.5}O{sub 2}, and LiAl{sub x}Ni{sub 1-x}O{sub 2} cathodes at different states of charge have provided important guidelines for the development of these new materials. However, the kinetic nature of the battery

  16. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of choline-binding protein F from Streptococcus pneumoniae

    SciTech Connect

    Molina, Rafael; González, Ana; Moscoso, Miriam; García, Pedro; Stelter, Meike; Kahn, Richard; Hermoso, Juan A.

    2007-09-01

    The modular choline-binding protein F (CbpF) from S. pneumoniae has been crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. A SAD data set from a gadolinium-complex derivative has been collected to 2.1 Å resolution. Choline-binding protein F (CbpF) is a modular protein that is bound to the pneumococcal cell wall through noncovalent interactions with choline moieties of the bacterial teichoic and lipoteichoic acids. Despite being one of the more abundant proteins on the surface, along with the murein hydrolases LytA, LytB, LytC and Pce, its function is still unknown. CbpF has been crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method at 291 K. Diffraction-quality orthorhombic crystals belong to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = 49.13, b = 114.94, c = 75.69 Å. A SAD data set from a Gd-HPDO3A-derivatized CbpF crystal was collected to 2.1 Å resolution at the gadolinium L{sub III} absorption edge using synchrotron radiation.

  17. Coherent femtosecond low-energy single-electron pulses for time-resolved diffraction and imaging: A numerical study

    SciTech Connect

    Paarmann, A.; Mueller, M.; Ernstorfer, R.; Gulde, M.; Schaefer, S.; Schweda, S.; Maiti, M.; Ropers, C.; Xu, C.; Hohage, T.; Schenk, F.

    2012-12-01

    We numerically investigate the properties of coherent femtosecond single electron wave packets photoemitted from nanotips in view of their application in ultrafast electron diffraction and non-destructive imaging with low-energy electrons. For two different geometries, we analyze the temporal and spatial broadening during propagation from the needle emitter to an anode, identifying the experimental parameters and challenges for realizing femtosecond time resolution. The simple tip-anode geometry is most versatile and allows for electron pulses of several ten of femtosecond duration using a very compact experimental design, however, providing very limited control over the electron beam collimation. A more sophisticated geometry comprising a suppressor-extractor electrostatic unit and a lens, similar to typical field emission electron microscope optics, is also investigated, allowing full control over the beam parameters. Using such a design, we find {approx}230 fs pulses feasible in a focused electron beam. The main limitation to achieve sub-hundred femtosecond time resolution is the typical size of such a device, and we suggest the implementation of more compact electron optics for optimal performance.

  18. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of Seneca Valley virus-001, a new member of the Picornaviridae family.

    PubMed

    Venkataraman, Sangita; Reddy, Seshidhar P; Loo, Jackie; Idamakanti, Neeraja; Hallenbeck, Paul L; Reddy, Vijay S

    2008-04-01

    Seneca Valley Virus-001 (SVV-001) is a newly found species in the Picornaviridae family. SVV-001 is the first naturally occurring nonpathogenic picornavirus observed to mediate selective cytotoxicity towards tumor cells with neuroendocrine cancer features. The nonsegmented (+)ssRNA genome of SVV-001 shares closest sequence similarity to the genomes of the members of the Cardiovirus genus. However, based on the distinct characteristics of the genome organization and other biochemical properties, it has been suggested that SVV-001 represents a new genus, namely 'Senecavirus', in the Picornaviridae family. In order to understand the oncolytic properties of SVV-001, the native virus was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals belonged to space group R3, with unit-cell parameters (in the hexagonal setting) a = b = 311.5, c = 1526.4 A. Although the SVV crystals diffracted to better than 2.3 A resolution, the data quality is acceptable [I/sigma(I) > 2.0] to 2.6 A resolution. The unit-cell volume and the locked rotation-function analysis suggest that six particles could be accommodated in the unit cell, with two distinct sets of one third of a particle, each containing 20 protomers, occupying the crystallographic asymmetric unit. (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT00314925)

  19. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of Seneca Valley Virus-001, a new member of the Picornaviridae family

    SciTech Connect

    Venkataraman, Sangita; Reddy, Seshidhar P.; Loo, Jackie; Idamakanti, Neeraja; Hallenbeck, Paul L.; Reddy, Vijay S.

    2008-04-01

    Seneca Valley Virus-001 (SVV-001) is a newly found species in the Picornaviridae family. SVV-001 is the first naturally occurring nonpathogenic picornavirus observed to mediate selective cytotoxicity towards tumor cells with neuroendocrine cancer features. The nonsegmented (+)ssRNA genome of SVV-001 shares closest sequence similarity to the genomes of the members of the Cardiovirus genus. However, based on the distinct characteristics of the genome organization and other biochemical properties, it has been suggested that SVV-001 represents a new genus, namely 'Senecavirus', in the Picornaviridae family. In order to understand the oncolytic properties of SVV-001, the native virus was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals belonged to space group R3, with unit-cell parameters (in the hexagonal setting) a = b = 311.5, c = 1526.4 {angstrom}. Although the SVV crystals diffracted to better than 2.3 {angstrom} resolution, the data quality is acceptable [I/{sigma}(I) > 2.0] to 2.6 {angstrom} resolution. The unit-cell volume and the locked rotation-function analysis suggest that six particles could be accommodated in the unit cell, with two distinct sets of one third of a particle, each containing 20 protomers, occupying the crystallographic asymmetric unit.

  20. Capture and X-ray diffraction studies of protein microcrystals in a microfluidic trap array

    PubMed Central

    Lyubimov, Artem Y.; Murray, Thomas D.; Koehl, Antoine; Araci, Ismail Emre; Uervirojnangkoorn, Monarin; Zeldin, Oliver B.; Cohen, Aina E.; Soltis, S. Michael; Baxter, Elizabeth L.; Brewster, Aaron S.; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Brunger, Axel T.; Berger, James M.

    2015-01-01

    X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) promise to enable the collection of interpretable diffraction data from samples that are refractory to data collection at synchrotron sources. At present, however, more efficient sample-delivery methods that minimize the consumption of microcrystalline material are needed to allow the application of XFEL sources to a wide range of challenging structural targets of biological importance. Here, a microfluidic chip is presented in which microcrystals can be captured at fixed, addressable points in a trap array from a small volume (<10 µl) of a pre-existing slurry grown off-chip. The device can be mounted on a standard goniostat for conducting diffraction experiments at room temperature without the need for flash-cooling. Proof-of-principle tests with a model system (hen egg-white lysozyme) demonstrated the high efficiency of the microfluidic approach for crystal harvesting, permitting the collection of sufficient data from only 265 single-crystal still images to permit determination and refinement of the structure of the protein. This work shows that microfluidic capture devices can be readily used to facilitate data collection from protein microcrystals grown in traditional laboratory formats, enabling analysis when cryopreservation is problematic or when only small numbers of crystals are available. Such microfluidic capture devices may also be useful for data collection at synchrotron sources. PMID:25849403

  1. A study of three techniques used in the diffraction analysis of shaped dual-reflector antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cwik, Tom A.; Kildal, Per-Simon

    1989-01-01

    An examination is presented of three techniques used for the efficient computation of fields diffracted by a subreflector that has been shaped by geometrical optics synthesis. It is found that these techniques, which are based on the geometrical theory of diffraction (GTD), produce errors in the computed fields that are specific to shaped reflectors. These errors are examined for a reflector system shaped to produce maximum gain from a tapered feed illumination. The discrepancies are directly related to the caustic being located near an observation point of the GTD calculations. The errors found are localized, and they increase in magnitude as the caustic approaches the main reflector. In a general offset geometry, the location of the caustic may be located arbitrarily close to the main reflector given a prescribed output aperture distribution. For the specific case considered here-the common situation of shaping to produce maximum gain-the caustic is located near the edge of the main reflector and on the reflection shadow boundary. A local correction is derived which creates a uniform solution through the caustic and across the reflection shadow boundary. Away from this point the calculation receeds to the standard GTD solution.

  2. Study of gold nanoparticle synthesis by synchrotron x-ray diffraction and fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zhongying; Wang, Xiao; Yu, Le; Moeendarbari, Sina; Hao, Yaowu; Cai, Zhonghou; Cheng, Xuemei

    Gold nanoparticles have a wide range of potential applications, including therapeutic agent delivery, catalysis, and electronics. Recently a new process of hollow nanoparticle synthesis was reported, the mechanism of which was hypothesized to involve electroless deposition around electrochemically evolved hydrogen bubbles. However, the growth mechanism still needs experimental evidence. We report investigation of this synthesis process using synchrotron x-ray diffraction and fluorescence measurements performed at beamline 2-ID-D of the Advanced Photon Source (APS). A series of gold nanoparticle samples with different synthesis time (50-1200 seconds) were deposited using a mixture electrolyte solution of Na3Au(SO3)2 and H4N2NiO6S2 on anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes. The 2D mapping of fluorescence intensity and comparison of x-ray diffraction peaks of the samples have provided valuable information on the growth mechanism. Work at Bryn Mawr College and University of Texas at Arlington is supported by NSF Grants (1207085 and 1207377) and use of the APS at Argonne National Laboratory is supported by the U. S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  3. Ferroelectric glycine silver nitrate: a single-crystal neutron diffraction study.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, R R; Chitra, R; Aliouane, N; Schefer, J

    2013-12-01

    Protonated crystals of glycine silver nitrate (C4H10Ag2N4O10) undergo a displacive kind of structural phase transition to a ferroelectric phase at 218 K. Glycine silver nitrate (GSN) is a light-sensitive crystal. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction investigations are difficult to perform on these crystals due to the problem of crystal deterioration on prolonged exposure to X-rays. To circumvent this problem, single-crystal neutron diffraction investigations were performed. We report here the crystal structure of GSN in a ferroelectric phase. The final R value for the refined structure at 150 K is 0.059. A comparison of the low-temperature structure with the room-temperature structure throws some light on the mechanism of the structural phase change in this crystal. We have attempted to explain the structural transition in GSN within the framework of the vibronic theory of ferroelectricity, suggesting that the second-order Jahn-Teller (pseudo-Jahn-Teller) behavior of the Ag(+) ion in GSN leads to structural distortion at low temperature (218 K). PMID:24253085

  4. Magnetic neutron diffraction and pressure studies on CeRuSn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartwig, Steffen; Prokeš, Karel; Huang, Yingkai; Pöttgen, Rainer

    2015-03-01

    We have determined the influence of magnetic fields on the crystal and magnetic structures of CeRuSn using single crystal neutron diffraction and susceptibility measurements at various pressures up to 7.4 kbar and temperatures down to 1.6 K. CeRuSn adopts below 160 K an incommensurately modulated crystal structure. It orders antiferromagnetically below TN=2.8 K in an incommensurate manner as well. This Néel-temperature is pressure independent up to 7.4 kbar. The neutron diffraction experiments detected a magnetic modulation vector qmag = (0, 0, 0.175), however, it is commensurate with the incommensurate crystal structure with qnuc = (0, 0, 0.35). At 0.6 T as well as at 0.9 T metamagnetic transitions have been observed via magnetic property measurements. The magnetic field of 0.9 T applied along the c-axis suppresses the magnetic reflections. The moments align ferromagnetically along the modulated crystal structure. Up to 3 T no change of the wavelength of the crystal structure modulations could be detected.

  5. Capture and X-ray diffraction studies of protein microcrystals in a microfluidic trap array.

    PubMed

    Lyubimov, Artem Y; Murray, Thomas D; Koehl, Antoine; Araci, Ismail Emre; Uervirojnangkoorn, Monarin; Zeldin, Oliver B; Cohen, Aina E; Soltis, S Michael; Baxter, Elizabeth L; Brewster, Aaron S; Sauter, Nicholas K; Brunger, Axel T; Berger, James M

    2015-04-01

    X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) promise to enable the collection of interpretable diffraction data from samples that are refractory to data collection at synchrotron sources. At present, however, more efficient sample-delivery methods that minimize the consumption of microcrystalline material are needed to allow the application of XFEL sources to a wide range of challenging structural targets of biological importance. Here, a microfluidic chip is presented in which microcrystals can be captured at fixed, addressable points in a trap array from a small volume (<10 µl) of a pre-existing slurry grown off-chip. The device can be mounted on a standard goniostat for conducting diffraction experiments at room temperature without the need for flash-cooling. Proof-of-principle tests with a model system (hen egg-white lysozyme) demonstrated the high efficiency of the microfluidic approach for crystal harvesting, permitting the collection of sufficient data from only 265 single-crystal still images to permit determination and refinement of the structure of the protein. This work shows that microfluidic capture devices can be readily used to facilitate data collection from protein microcrystals grown in traditional laboratory formats, enabling analysis when cryopreservation is problematic or when only small numbers of crystals are available. Such microfluidic capture devices may also be useful for data collection at synchrotron sources.

  6. Structure, magnetic properties, polarized neutron diffraction, and theoretical study of a copper(II) cubane.

    PubMed

    Aronica, Christophe; Chumakov, Yurii; Jeanneau, Erwann; Luneau, Dominique; Neugebauer, Petr; Barra, Anne-Laure; Gillon, Béatrice; Goujon, Antoine; Cousson, Alain; Tercero, Javier; Ruiz, Eliseo

    2008-01-01

    The paper reports the synthesis, X-ray and neutron diffraction crystal structures, magnetic properties, high field-high frequency EPR (HF-EPR), spin density and theoretical description of the tetranuclear CuII complex [Cu4L4] with cubane-like structure (LH2=1,1,1-trifluoro-7-hydroxy-4-methyl-5-aza-hept-3-en-2-one). The simulation of the magnetic behavior gives a predominant ferromagnetic interaction J1 (+30.5 cm(-1)) and a weak antiferromagnetic interaction J2 (-5.5 cm(-1)), which correspond to short and long Cu-Cu distances, respectively, as evidence from the crystal structure [see formulate in text]. It is in agreement with DFT calculations and with the saturation magnetization value of an S=2 ground spin state. HF-EPR measurements at low temperatures (5 to 30 K) provide evidence for a negative axial zero-field splitting parameter D (-0.25+/-0.01 cm(-1)) plus a small rhombic term E (0.025+/-0.001 cm(-1), E/D = 0.1). The experimental spin distribution from polarized neutron diffraction is mainly located in the basal plane of the CuII ion with a distortion of yz-type for one CuII ion. Delocalization on the ligand (L) is observed but to a smaller extent than expected from DFT calculations. PMID:18792037

  7. Ferroelectric glycine silver nitrate: a single-crystal neutron diffraction study.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, R R; Chitra, R; Aliouane, N; Schefer, J

    2013-12-01

    Protonated crystals of glycine silver nitrate (C4H10Ag2N4O10) undergo a displacive kind of structural phase transition to a ferroelectric phase at 218 K. Glycine silver nitrate (GSN) is a light-sensitive crystal. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction investigations are difficult to perform on these crystals due to the problem of crystal deterioration on prolonged exposure to X-rays. To circumvent this problem, single-crystal neutron diffraction investigations were performed. We report here the crystal structure of GSN in a ferroelectric phase. The final R value for the refined structure at 150 K is 0.059. A comparison of the low-temperature structure with the room-temperature structure throws some light on the mechanism of the structural phase change in this crystal. We have attempted to explain the structural transition in GSN within the framework of the vibronic theory of ferroelectricity, suggesting that the second-order Jahn-Teller (pseudo-Jahn-Teller) behavior of the Ag(+) ion in GSN leads to structural distortion at low temperature (218 K).

  8. Diffractive deep inelastic scattering in an AdS/CFT inspired model: A phenomenological study

    SciTech Connect

    Betemps, M. A.; Goncalves, V. P.; Santana Amaral, J. T. de

    2010-05-01

    The analytical treatment of the nonperturbative QCD dynamics is one of the main open questions of the strong interactions. Currently, it is only possible to get some qualitative information about this regime considering other QCD-like theories, as, for example, the N=4 super Yang-Mills theory, where one can perform calculations in the nonperturbative limit of large 't Hooft coupling using the anti-de Sitter space/conformal field theory (AdS/CFT). Recently, the high energy scattering amplitude was calculated in the AdS/CFT approach, applied to deep-inelastic scattering and confronted with the F{sub 2} HERA data. In this work we extend the nonperturbative AdS/CFT inspired model for diffractive processes and compare its predictions with a perturbative approach based on the Balitsky-Kovchegov equation. We demonstrate that the AdS/CFT inspired model is not able to describe the current F{sub 2}{sup D(3)} HERA data and predicts a similar behavior to that from the Balitsky-Kovchegov equation in the range 10{sup -7} < or approx. x{sub P} < or approx. 10{sup -4}. At smaller values of x{sub P} the diffractive structure function is predicted to be energy independent.

  9. Capture and X-ray diffraction studies of protein microcrystals in a microfluidic trap array

    SciTech Connect

    Lyubimov, Artem Y.; Murray, Thomas D.; Koehl, Antoine; Araci, Ismail Emre; Uervirojnangkoorn, Monarin; Zeldin, Oliver B.; Cohen, Aina E.; Soltis, S. Michael; Baxter, Elizabeth L.; Brewster, Aaron S.; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Brunger, Axel T.; Berger, James M.

    2015-03-27

    X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) promise to enable the collection of interpretable diffraction data from samples that are refractory to data collection at synchrotron sources. At present, however, more efficient sample-delivery methods that minimize the consumption of microcrystalline material are needed to allow the application of XFEL sources to a wide range of challenging structural targets of biological importance. Here, a microfluidic chip is presented in which microcrystals can be captured at fixed, addressable points in a trap array from a small volume (<10 µl) of a pre-existing slurry grown off-chip. The device can be mounted on a standard goniostat for conducting diffraction experiments at room temperature without the need for flash-cooling. Proof-of-principle tests with a model system (hen egg-white lysozyme) demonstrated the high efficiency of the microfluidic approach for crystal harvesting, permitting the collection of sufficient data from only 265 single-crystal still images to permit determination and refinement of the structure of the protein. This work shows that microfluidic capture devices can be readily used to facilitate data collection from protein microcrystals grown in traditional laboratory formats, enabling analysis when cryopreservation is problematic or when only small numbers of crystals are available. Such microfluidic capture devices may also be useful for data collection at synchrotron sources.

  10. Capture and X-ray diffraction studies of protein microcrystals in a microfluidic trap array

    DOE PAGES

    Lyubimov, Artem Y.; Murray, Thomas D.; Koehl, Antoine; Araci, Ismail Emre; Uervirojnangkoorn, Monarin; Zeldin, Oliver B.; Cohen, Aina E.; Soltis, S. Michael; Baxter, Elizabeth L.; Brewster, Aaron S.; et al

    2015-03-27

    X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) promise to enable the collection of interpretable diffraction data from samples that are refractory to data collection at synchrotron sources. At present, however, more efficient sample-delivery methods that minimize the consumption of microcrystalline material are needed to allow the application of XFEL sources to a wide range of challenging structural targets of biological importance. Here, a microfluidic chip is presented in which microcrystals can be captured at fixed, addressable points in a trap array from a small volume (<10 µl) of a pre-existing slurry grown off-chip. The device can be mounted on a standard goniostat formore » conducting diffraction experiments at room temperature without the need for flash-cooling. Proof-of-principle tests with a model system (hen egg-white lysozyme) demonstrated the high efficiency of the microfluidic approach for crystal harvesting, permitting the collection of sufficient data from only 265 single-crystal still images to permit determination and refinement of the structure of the protein. This work shows that microfluidic capture devices can be readily used to facilitate data collection from protein microcrystals grown in traditional laboratory formats, enabling analysis when cryopreservation is problematic or when only small numbers of crystals are available. Such microfluidic capture devices may also be useful for data collection at synchrotron sources.« less

  11. Capture and X-ray diffraction studies of protein microcrystals in a microfluidic trap array

    SciTech Connect

    Lyubimov, Artem Y.; Murray, Thomas D.; Koehl, Antoine; Araci, Ismail Emre; Uervirojnangkoorn, Monarin; Zeldin, Oliver B.; Cohen, Aina E.; Soltis, S. Michael; Baxter, Elizabeth L.; Brewster, Aaron S.; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Brunger, Axel T.; Berger, James M.

    2015-04-01

    A microfluidic platform has been developed for the capture and X-ray analysis of protein microcrystals, affording a means to improve the efficiency of XFEL and synchrotron experiments. X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) promise to enable the collection of interpretable diffraction data from samples that are refractory to data collection at synchrotron sources. At present, however, more efficient sample-delivery methods that minimize the consumption of microcrystalline material are needed to allow the application of XFEL sources to a wide range of challenging structural targets of biological importance. Here, a microfluidic chip is presented in which microcrystals can be captured at fixed, addressable points in a trap array from a small volume (<10 µl) of a pre-existing slurry grown off-chip. The device can be mounted on a standard goniostat for conducting diffraction experiments at room temperature without the need for flash-cooling. Proof-of-principle tests with a model system (hen egg-white lysozyme) demonstrated the high efficiency of the microfluidic approach for crystal harvesting, permitting the collection of sufficient data from only 265 single-crystal still images to permit determination and refinement of the structure of the protein. This work shows that microfluidic capture devices can be readily used to facilitate data collection from protein microcrystals grown in traditional laboratory formats, enabling analysis when cryopreservation is problematic or when only small numbers of crystals are available. Such microfluidic capture devices may also be useful for data collection at synchrotron sources.

  12. Lamellar spacing of photosystem II membrane fragments upon dehydration studied by neutron membrane diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pieper, Jörg; Rusevich, Leonid; Hauß, Thomas; Renger, Gernot

    2015-12-01

    The effect of dehydration on the lamellar spacing of photosystem II (PS II) membrane fragments from spinach has been investigated using neutron membrane diffraction at room temperature. The diffraction data reveal a major peak at a scattering vector Q of 0.049 Å-1 at a relative humidity (r.h.) of 90% corresponding to a repeat distance D of about 129 Å. Upon dehydration to 44% r.h., this peak shifts to about 0.060 Å-1 corresponding to a distance of 104.7±2.5 Å. Within experimental error, the latter repeat distance remains almost the same at hydration levels below 44% r.h. indicating that most of the hydration water is removed. This result is consistent with the earlier finding that hydration-induced conformational protein motions in PS II membrane fragments are observed above 44% r.h. and correlated with the onset electron transfer in PS II (Pieper et al. 2008, Eur. Biophys. J. 37: 657-663).

  13. Lamellar spacing of photosystem II membrane fragments upon dehydration studied by neutron membrane diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pieper, Jörg; Rusevich, Leonid; Hauß, Thomas; Renger, Gernot

    2016-02-01

    The effect of dehydration on the lamellar spacing of photosystem II (PS II) membrane fragments from spinach has been investigated using neutron membrane diffraction at room temperature. The diffraction data reveal a major peak at a scattering vector Q of 0.049 Å-1 at a relative humidity (r.h.) of 90% corresponding to a repeat distance D of about 129 Å. Upon dehydration to 44% r.h., this peak shifts to about 0.060 Å-1 corresponding to a distance of 104.7±2.5 Å. Within experimental error, the latter repeat distance remains almost the same at hydration levels below 44% r.h. indicating that most of the hydration water is removed. This result is consistent with the earlier finding that hydration-induced conformational protein motions in PS II membrane fragments are observed above 44% r.h. and correlated with the onset electron transfer in PS II (Pieper et al. 2008, Eur. Biophys. J. 37: 657-663).

  14. Neutron diffraction study of Bi doped cubic spinel Co{sub 2}MnO{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect

    Rajeevan, N. E.; Kaushik, S. D.; Kumar, Ravi

    2015-06-24

    Polycrystalline Bi doped spinel Bi{sub x}Co{sub 2-x}MnO{sub 4} compounds were prepared by solid state reaction route. Room temperature neutron diffraction study reveals that all the compounds are formed in cubic phase and there is no change in the crystal structure due to Bi doping and the compound has cubic structure with Fd-3m space group. Cell parameter found to increase with respect to Bi doping and ferrimagnetic nature is established through magnetization. Low temperature neutron diffraction is carried out and emphasis the ferrimagnetic ordering in the samples of Bi{sub x}Co{sub 2-x}MnO{sub 4} series.

  15. High pressure Laue diffraction and its application to study microstructural changes during the α → β phase transition in Si

    SciTech Connect

    Popov, D. Park, C.; Kenney-Benson, C.; Shen, G.

    2015-07-15

    An approach using polychromatic x-ray Laue diffraction is described for studying pressure induced microstructural changes of materials under pressure. The advantages of this approach with respect to application of monochromatic x-ray diffraction and other techniques are discussed. Experiments to demonstrate the applications of the method have been performed on the α → β phase transition in Si at high pressures using a diamond anvil cell. We present the characterization of microstructures across the α–β phase transition, such as morphology of both the parent and product phases, relative orientation of single-crystals, and deviatoric strains. Subtle inhomogeneous strain of the single-crystal sample caused by lattice rotations becomes detectable with the approach.

  16. High spatial and temporal resolution studies of ferroelectric thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubert, Charles Rankin, Jr.

    The subject of this thesis is the investigation of the polar structure and dynamics of ferroelectric thin films using newly developed high resolution optical, scanning- force microscopy and time-resolved methods. A technique based on confocal scanning optical microscopy (CSOM) is used to image the ferroelectric polarization of BaxSr1-xTiO 3 (BST) thin films at room temperature with sub-micron spatial resolution. Films of both paraelectric (x = 0.5) and ferroelectric ( x = 0.8) compositions show a coexistence of both paraelectric and ferroelectric phases on the smallest scale resolvable with this technique. These results suggest that non-uniform stress is responsible for the strong inhomogeneous thermal broadening of the ferroelectric phase transition, and that dielectric loss in thin films may be dominated by a relatively small fraction of nanometer-sized regions. Apertureless near-field scanning optical microscopy (ANSOM) is used to map the inhomogeneous ferroelectric polarization in BaxSr 1-xTiO3 thin films. Images of nanometer-scale ferroelectric domains in BaxSr1-xTiO3 thin films are obtained with 30 Å spatial resolution using ANSOM. The images exhibit inhomogeneities in the ferroelectric polarization over the smallest scales that can be observed, and are largely uncorrelated with topographic features. The application of an in-plane static electric field causes domain reorientation and domain-wall motion over distances as small as 40 Å. These results demonstrate the promise of ANSOM for imaging near-atomic-scale polarization fluctuations in ferroelectric materials. Interferometric ANSOM is described in detail, including a practical description of how ANSOM images are acquired. A discussion of the various contrast mechanisms in ANSOM is followed by a prescription for eliminating a certain class of topographic artifacts. For the imaging of polarization in ferroelectric thin films, the linear electro-optic effect provides the central contrast mechanism. High-resolution

  17. Solid state parameters, structure elucidation, High Resolution X-Ray Diffraction (HRXRD), phase matching, thermal and impedance analysis on L-Proline trichloroacetate (L-PTCA) NLO single crystals.

    PubMed

    Kalaiselvi, P; Raj, S Alfred Cecil; Jagannathan, K; Vijayan, N; Bhagavannarayana, G; Kalainathan, S

    2014-11-11

    Nonlinear optical single crystal of L-Proline trichloroacetate (L-PTCA) was successfully grown by Slow Evaporation Solution Technique (SEST). The grown crystals were subjected to single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis to confirm the structure. From the single crystal XRD data, solid state parameters were determined for the grown crystal. The crystalline perfection has been evaluated using high resolution X-ray diffractometer. The frequencies of various functional groups were identified from FTIR spectral analysis. The percentage of transmittance was obtained from UV Visible spectral analysis. TGA-DSC measurements indicate the thermal stability of the crystal. The dielectric constant, dielectric loss and ac conductivity were measured by the impedance analyzer. The DC conductivity was calculated by the cole-cole plot method.

  18. Study of tempering behavior of lath martensite using in situ neutron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Z.M.; Gong, W.; Tomota, Y.; Harjo, S.; Li, J.; Chi, B.; Pu, J.

    2015-09-15

    To elucidate changes in the density and substructure of dislocations during tempering of lath martensite steel, a convolutional multiple whole-profile fitting method was applied to in situ neutron diffraction profiles. With increasing tempering temperature, the dislocation density scarcely changed in the beginning and then decreased at temperatures above 473 K, whereas the dislocation arrangement drastically changed at temperatures above 673 K. The strength of the steel is speculated to depend on the density and arrangement of dislocations. - Highlights: • A convolutional multiple whole-profile fitting method was applied. • Dislocation density and dislocation arrangement changing with tempering were discussed. • Dislocation density scarcely changed in the beginning. • And then dislocation density decreased at temperatures above 473 K. • The dislocation arrangement drastically changed at temperatures above 673 K.

  19. Crystallization and preliminary diffraction studies of porcine pancreatic elastase in complex with a novel inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Tânia F; Mulchande, Jalmira; Moreira, Rui; Iley, Jim; Archer, Margarida

    2007-01-01

    Porcine pancreatic elastase (PPE) was crystallized in complex with a novel inhibitor at pH 5 and X-ray diffraction data were collected at a synchrotron source to 1.66 A. Crystals belong to the orthorhombic space group P2(1)2(1)2(1), with unit cell parameters a = 50.25 A, b = 57.94 A and c = 74.69 A. PPE is often used as model for drug target, due to its structural homology with the important therapeutic target human leukocyte elastase (HLE). Elastase is a serine protease that belongs to the chymotrypsin family, which has the ability to degrade elastin, an important component in connective tissues. Excessive elastin proteolysis leads to a number of pathological diseases. PMID:17266656

  20. Electron Diffraction Study of α- and α T -AlFeSi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, C. L.; Wyss, R. K.

    1988-04-01

    Electron diffraction patterns from a-AIFeSi and α T -AlFeSi are compared. Unusual Kikuchi band patterns are found in both a and α T . Structure factor calculations can be used to explain these patterns. Additional higher order Laue zone (HOLZ) rings are seen in α T . Reflections located at n/9[521] are seen in some zero order Laue zones (ZOLZ) in α T . These additional reflections are responsible for the additional HOLZ rings found in α T . Most atomic positions in a and α T are similar. The specific structural feature which causes the additional reflections in α T is not known. Lattice imaging and image calculation will be necessary to determine the exact structure of α T .