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Sample records for diffuse uv radiation

  1. Observations of the diffuse UV radiation field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, Jayant; Henry, R. C.; Feldman, P. D.; Tennyson, P. D.

    1989-01-01

    Spectra are presented for the diffuse UV radiation field between 1250 to 3100 A from eight different regions of the sky, which were obtained with the Johns Hopkins UVX experiment. UVX flew aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia (STS-61C) in January 1986 as part of the Get-Away Special project. The experiment consisted of two 1/4 m Ebert-Fastie spectrometers, covering the spectral range 1250 to 1700 A at 17 A resolution and 1600 to 3100 A at 27 A resolution, respectively, with a field of view of 4 x .25 deg, sufficiently small to pick out regions of the sky with no stars in the line of sight. Values were found for the diffuse cosmic background ranging in intensity from 300 to 900 photons/sq cm/sec/sr/A. The cosmic background is spectrally flat from 1250 to 3100 A, within the uncertainties of each spectrometer. The zodiacal light begins to play a significant role in the diffuse radiation field above 2000 A, and its brightness was determined relative to the solar emission. Observed brightnesses of the zodiacal light in the UV remain almost constant with ecliptic latitude, unlike the declining visible brightnesses, possibly indicating that those (smaller) grains responsible for the UV scattering have a much more uniform distribution with distance from the ecliptic plane than do those grains responsible for the visible scattering.

  2. Observations of the diffuse near-UV radiation field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, J.; Henry, R. C.; Feldman, P. D.; Tennyson, P. D.

    1990-01-01

    The diffuse radiation field from 1650-3100 A has been observed by spectrometer aboard the Space Shuttle, and the contributions of the zodiacal light an the diffuse cosmic background to the signal have been derived. Colors ranging from 0.65 to 1.2 are found for the zodiacal light with an almost linear increase in the color with ecliptic latitude. This rise in color is due to UV brightness remaining almost constant while the visible brightnesses drop by almost a factor of two. This is interpreted as evidence that the grains responsible for the UV scattering have much more uniform distribution with distance from the ecliptic plane than do those grains responsible for the visible scattering. Intensities for the cosmic diffuse background ranging from 300 units to 900 units are found which are not consistent with either a correlation with N(H I) or with spatial isotropy.

  3. Effects of Aerosol Optical Depth on diffuse UV and visible radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.; Kim, J.; Cho, H.; Kim, Y.

    2007-12-01

    Ultraviolet radiation (UV, 300-367nm) was measured with a UV-multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer (UV- MFRSR) at Yonsei University, Seoul (37.57°N, 126.97°) for 7 months from January to July 2006 and visible irradiance (400-700 nm) also measured with a MFRSR for 12 months of 2006 at the same station. Spectral UV_AOD and vis_AOD were retrieved using the Langley method and Beer-Bouguer-Lambert's law, and compared with AOD obtained from Skyradiometer to validate their values. The diffuse and direct irradiance were analyzed to investigate the dependence on total optical depth (TOD) and aerosol optical depth (AOD). The direct-horizontal solar irradiance decreases exponentially as the optical depth increases according to the Beer- Bouguer-Lambert's Law. As the TOD and AOD increase, the diffuse-horizontal UV radiation gradually increases and shows a maximum value at some critical optical depth for a given SZA. Similar analysis was performed on the relation between the diffuse irradiance and AOD. RAF(radiation amplification factor) was used to correct the ozone effects on UV. These results provide empirical equations for the amount of diffuse irradiance in UV and visible wavelengths.

  4. Solar UV-B in tropical forest gaps: Analysis using direct and diffuse radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Flint, S.D.; Caldwell, M.M.

    1995-06-01

    Experiments with natural levels of solar ultraviolet-B radiation (UV-B) have recently shown inhibition of the growth of some tropical forest tree seedlings. A knowledge of forest radiation environments is needed to help assess UV-B effects in natural situations. Although forest canopies strongly attenuate solar radiation, treefall gaps provide a very different radiation environment. We simultaneously measured both UV-B and photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) in forest gaps on Barro Colorado Island, Panama. Outside the forest, UV-B is predominately diffuse even under clear sky conditions. In sunflecks of small forest gaps, most of the UV-B was in the direct beam component. Compared to conditions outside the forest, the UV-B in these sunflecks was low relative to PAR. Shaded portions of the gap, in contrast, had proportionately high levels of UV-B relative to PAR. There are indications in the literature that relatively low UV-B levels may be effective under low PFD. Seasonal trends of PAR and UV-B in different locations in gaps can be inferred from hemispherical canopy photographs.

  5. Diffuse solar UV radiation and implications for preventing human eye damage.

    PubMed

    Parisi, A V; Green, A; Kimlin, M G

    2001-02-01

    Ocular UV exposure is a function of both the direct and diffuse components of solar radiation. Broadband global and diffuse UV measurements were made in the morning, noon and afternoon. Thirty sets of measurements were made in summer and 50 in each of the other seasons at each of the periods in full sun. Corresponding sets were made in the shade of Australian evergreen trees: 42 trees in summer and 50 in each of the other seasons. The percentage diffuse UV was higher for the shorter 320-400 nm range (UVB) than for 280-320 nm (UVA). The percentage diffuse UVB ranged from 23 to 59%, whereas the percentage diffuse UVA ranged from 17 to 31%. The percentage diffuse UV was lower at noon than in the morning and afternoon with the difference more pronounced for the UVB. The average percentage diffuse UVB over all the measurements in the tree shade for the morning, noon and afternoon was 62, 58 and 71%, respectively, and the average percentage diffuse UVA was 52, 51 and 59%, respectively.

  6. Diffuse radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    A diffuse celestial radiation which is isotropic at least on a course scale were measured from the soft X-ray region to about 150 MeV, at which energy the intensity falls below that of the galactic emission for most galactic latitudes. The spectral shape, the intensity, and the established degree of isotropy of this diffuse radiation already place severe constraints on the possible explanations for this radiation. Among the extragalactic theories, the more promising explanations of the isotropic diffuse emission appear to be radiation from exceptional galaxies from matter antimatter annihilation at the boundaries of superclusters of galaxies of matter and antimatter in baryon symmetric big bang models. Other possible sources for extragalactic diffuse gamma radiation are discussed and include normal galaxies, clusters of galaxies, primordial cosmic rays interacting with intergalactic matter, primordial black holes, and cosmic ray leakage from galaxies.

  7. Repetitively pulsed UV radiation source based on a run-away electron preionised diffuse discharge in nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baksht, E. Kh; Burachenko, A. G.; Lomaev, M. I.; Panchenko, A. N.; Tarasenko, V. F.

    2015-04-01

    An extended repetitively pulsed source of spontaneous UV radiation is fabricated, which may also be used for producing laser radiation. Voltage pulses with an incident wave amplitude of up to 30 kV, a half-amplitude duration of ~4 ns and a rise time of ~2.5 ns are applied to a gap with a nonuniform electric field. For an excitation region length of 35 cm and a nitrogen pressure of 30 - 760 Torr, a diffusive discharge up to a pulse repetition rate of 2 kHz is produced without using an additional system for gap preionisation. An investigation is made of the plasma of the run-away electron preionised diffuse discharge. Using a CCD camera it is found that the dense diffused plasma fills the gap in a time shorter than 1 ns. X-ray radiation is recorded from behind the foil anode throughout the pressure range under study; a supershort avalanche electron beam is recorded by the collector electrode at pressures below 100 Torr.

  8. Repetitively pulsed UV radiation source based on a run-away electron preionised diffuse discharge in nitrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Baksht, E Kh; Burachenko, A G; Lomaev, M I; Panchenko, A N; Tarasenko, V F

    2015-04-30

    An extended repetitively pulsed source of spontaneous UV radiation is fabricated, which may also be used for producing laser radiation. Voltage pulses with an incident wave amplitude of up to 30 kV, a half-amplitude duration of ∼4 ns and a rise time of ∼2.5 ns are applied to a gap with a nonuniform electric field. For an excitation region length of 35 cm and a nitrogen pressure of 30 – 760 Torr, a diffusive discharge up to a pulse repetition rate of 2 kHz is produced without using an additional system for gap preionisation. An investigation is made of the plasma of the run-away electron preionised diffuse discharge. Using a CCD camera it is found that the dense diffused plasma fills the gap in a time shorter than 1 ns. X-ray radiation is recorded from behind the foil anode throughout the pressure range under study; a supershort avalanche electron beam is recorded by the collector electrode at pressures below 100 Torr. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  9. UV Radiation and the Skin

    PubMed Central

    D’Orazio, John; Jarrett, Stuart; Amaro-Ortiz, Alexandra; Scott, Timothy

    2013-01-01

    UV radiation (UV) is classified as a “complete carcinogen” because it is both a mutagen and a non-specific damaging agent and has properties of both a tumor initiator and a tumor promoter. In environmental abundance, UV is the most important modifiable risk factor for skin cancer and many other environmentally-influenced skin disorders. However, UV also benefits human health by mediating natural synthesis of vitamin D and endorphins in the skin, therefore UV has complex and mixed effects on human health. Nonetheless, excessive exposure to UV carries profound health risks, including atrophy, pigmentary changes, wrinkling and malignancy. UV is epidemiologically and molecularly linked to the three most common types of skin cancer, basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and malignant melanoma, which together affect more than a million Americans annually. Genetic factors also influence risk of UV-mediated skin disease. Polymorphisms of the melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) gene, in particular, correlate with fairness of skin, UV sensitivity, and enhanced cancer risk. We are interested in developing UV-protective approaches based on a detailed understanding of molecular events that occur after UV exposure, focusing particularly on epidermal melanization and the role of the MC1R in genome maintenance. PMID:23749111

  10. UV-radiation in galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sil'Chenko, Olga K.

    2011-09-01

    I review the origin of UV-radiation in galaxies of different morphological types. UV-excess in spectra of massive elliptical galaxies which have predominantly old stellar populations is traditionally explained by the contribution of low-mass stars at very late, poorly known stages of evolution—by so called `AGB-manqué' stars or by the population of extended horizontal branch. However recent results from the GALEX survey of a large sample of nearby ellipticals have also demonstrated probable traces of recent star formation in a third of all ellipticals observed. In spiral galaxies extended UV-disks have been discovered by the GALEX; they are certainly illuminated by the current star formation, but what has provoked star formation in the areas of very low gas density, beyond the distribution of older stars, is a puzzle yet. The UV-spectra of starburst galaxies or starforming galactic nuclei are characterized by weak emission lines, if any, quite dissimilar to their optical spectra.

  11. Personal monitoring of UV radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, Joachim; Knuschke, Peter

    1994-06-01

    Personal monitoring of till-radiation (UVR) is important fo find out both overexposure and underexposure to UVR. At present polysulfone films seem to be most suitable for these purposes. They allow a reliable measurement of till-exposure to wavelengths between 250 and 330 nm if a number of influencing factors is respected. These are described in detail in a technical report of the Commission Internationale de L'Eclairage (CIE). Own investigations with polysulphone films have shown that these polymers can help as well to detect an overexposure to UVR at workplaces as an UVR-deficiency of people living in an old peoples home. It could be demonstrated that this till-deficiency well correlates to the deficiency of serum 25(OH)D3 levels of these people. Furthermore after optimization of a new phototherapeutic equipment in uniformity of UV-exposure round patients body by polysulphone film dosimeters it got useable in therapy.

  12. European Conference on Atmospheric UV Radiation: Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taalas, Petteri; Amanatidis, Georgios T.; Heikkilä, Anu

    2000-02-01

    Interest in atmospheric ultraviolet radiation (UV) research has increased considerably since the discovery of the Antarctic ozone "hole" and after indications of the existence of a similar kind of potential in northern high latitudes. UV measuring and research activities have grown accordingly, including development of new instruments, improvement in quality assurance/quality control methodologies, as well as development of models. Modeling methodologies have been applied for development of spaceborne techniques for estimating the global distribution of solar UV radiation. The European Conference on Atmospheric UV Radiation (ECUV), which was held on June 28 to July 2, 1998 in Helsinki, Finland, brought together 160 scientists from all parts of the world. The Journal of Geophysical Research (JGR) ECUV special issue summarizes 32 papers presented at the conference. New UV trend analyses based on spectral and broadband measurements and modeled UV data for the most recent decades indicate increases of UV-B radiation in various parts of Europe. Additional observational and modeled information on the impact of cloudiness, total ozone, ozone profiles, aerosols, and albedo on ground level UV irradiance has been gathered. The regional UV albedo has been studied over snow-covered surfaces, vegetation, and sea areas by aircraft-based, ground-based, and modeled methods. Further instrument development, improved QA/QC practices, and the application of data correction methods have already taken place but are also clearly needed in the future. Different methods for estimating UV irradiance using spaceborne information have been developed. Additional efforts to improve our understanding of the impact of cloudiness, albedo, and aerosol on UV are expected to improve spaceborne UV retrievals in the future. In Europe the European Commission and national funding agencies have been supporting research projects aimed at understanding the UV climatology in Europe through UV instrument

  13. Diffuse gamma radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, C. E.; Simpson, G. A.; Thompson, D. J.

    1977-01-01

    An examination of the intensity, energy spectrum, and spatial distribution of the diffuse gamma-radiation observed by SAS-2 satellite away from the galactic plane in the energy range above 35 MeV has shown that it consists of two components. One component is generally correlated with galactic latitudes, the atomic hydrogen column density was deduced from 21 cm measurements, and the continuum radio emission, believed to be synchrotron emission. It has an energy spectrum similar to that in the plane and joins smoothly to the intense radiation from the plane. It is therefore presumed to be of galactic origin. The other component is apparently isotropic, at least on a coarse scale, and has a steep energy spectrum. No evidence is found for a cosmic ray halo surrounding the galaxy in the shape of a sphere or oblate spheroid with galactic dimensions. Constraints for a halo model with significantly larger dimensions are set on the basis of an upper limit to the gamma-ray anisotropy.

  14. [Skin and occupational artificial UV-radiation].

    PubMed

    Fartasch, M; Wittlich, M; Broding, H C; Gellert, B; Blome, H; Brüning, T

    2012-10-01

    In various areas of professional activity, exposure of skin to ultraviolet radiation coming from artificial sources may occur. These UV rays differ from the solar UV radiation due to their intensity and spectrum. We review current developments with the introduction of statutory exposure limit values for jobs with UV radiation from artificial sources, a selection of relevant activities with artificial UV exposure and an overview of the occurrence of skin disorders and dermatologically relevant skin diseases caused by these specific occupational exposures. The latter is relevant for medical advice in occupational dermatology and occupational medicine. On the basis of existing studies on welders and studies regarding occupations with "open flames" (using the example of the glassblower) it is evident that so far no reliable data exist regarding the chronic photodamage or the occurrence of UV-typical skin cancers, but instead clear evidence exists regarding the regular occurrence of acute light damage in these occupations.

  15. UV image processing to detect diffuse clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armengot, M.; Gómez de Castro, A. I.; López-Santiago, J.; Sánchez-Doreste, N.

    2015-05-01

    The presence of diffuse clouds along the Galaxy is under consideration as far as they are related to stellar formation and their physical properties are not well understood. The signal received from most of these structures in the UV images is minimal compared to the point sources. The presence of noise in these images makes hard the analysis because the Signal-to-Noise ratio is proportionally much higher in these areas. However, the digital processing of the images shows that it is possible to enhance and target these clouds. Typically, this kind of treatment is done on purpose for specific research areas and the Astrophysicist's work depends on the computer tools and its possibilities for enhancing a particular area based on a prior knowledge. Automating this step is the goal of our work to make easier the study of these structures in UV images. In particular we have used the GALEX survey images in the aim of learning to automatically detect such clouds and be able of unsupervised detection and graphic enhancement to log them. Our experiments show the existence of some evidences in the UV images that allow the systematic computing and open the chance to generalize the algorithm to find these structures in universe areas where they have not been recorded yet.

  16. Electrodeless microwave source of UV radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkhudarov, E. M.; Kozlov, Yu. N.; Kossyi, I. A.; Malykh, N. I.; Misakyan, M. A.; Taktakishvili, I. M.; Khomichenko, A. A.

    2012-06-01

    The parameters of an electrodeless microwave low-pressure discharge in an Ar + Hg vapor mixture are studied, the design of a UV radiation source for water disinfection is suggested, and its main characteristics are presented. The domestic microwave oven ( f = 2.45 GHz; N = kW) is used as a microwave radiation source. The maximal UV power at wavelength λ = 254 nm amounts to 120-130 W.

  17. [UV-radiation--sources, wavelength, environment].

    PubMed

    Hölzle, Erhard; Hönigsmann, Herbert

    2005-09-01

    The UV-radiation in our environment is part of the electromagnetic radiation, which emanates from the sun. It is designated as optical radiation and reaches from 290-4,000 nm on the earth's surface. According to international definitions UV irradiation is divided into short-wave UVC (200-280 nm), medium-wave UVB (280-320 nm), and long-wave UVA (320-400 nm). Solar radiation which reaches the surface of the globe at a defined geographical site and a defined time point is called global radiation. It is modified quantitatively and qualitatively while penetrating the atmosphere. Besides atmospheric conditions, like ozone layer and air pollution, geographic latitude, elevation, time of the season, time of the day, cloudiness and the influence of indirect radiation resulting from stray effects in the atmosphere and reflection from the underground play a role in modifying global radiation, which finally represents the biologically effective radiation. The radiation's distribution on the body surface varies according to sun angle and body posture. The cumulative UV exposure is mainly influenced by outdoor profession and recreational activities. The use of sun beds and phototherapeutic measures additionally may contribute to the cumulative UV dose.

  18. Effects of UV radiation on phytoplankton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Raymond C.; Cullen, John J.

    1995-07-01

    It is now widely documented that reduced ozone will result in increased levels of ultraviolet (UV) radiation, especially UV-B (280-320nm), incident at the surface of the earth [Watson, 1988; Anderson et al., 1991; Schoeberl and Hartmann, 1991; Frederick and Alberts, 1991; WMO, 1991; Madronich, 1993; Kerr and McElroy, 1993], and there is considerable and increasing evidence that these higher levels of UV-B radiation may be detrimental to various forms of marine life in the upper layers of the ocean. With respect to aquatic ecosystems, we also know that this biologically- damaging mid-ultraviolet radiation can penetrate to ecologically- significant depths in marine and freshwater systems [Jerlov, 1950; Lenoble, 1956; Smith and Baker, 1979; Smith and Baker, 1980; Smith and Baker, 1981; Kirk et al., 1994]. This knowledge, plus the dramatic decline in stratospheric ozone over the Antarctic continent each spring, now known to be caused by anthropogenically released chemicals [Solomon, 1990; Booth et al., 1994], has resulted in increased UV-environmental research and a number of summary reports. The United Nations Environmental Program (UNEP) has provided recent updates with respect to the effects of ozone depletion on aquatic ecosystems (Hader, Worrest, Kumar in UNEP 1989, 1991, Hader, Worrest, Kumar and Smith UNEP 1994) and the Scientific Committee on Problems of the Environment (SCOPE) has provided [SCOPE, 1992] a summary of the effects of increased UV radiation on biological systems. SCOPE has also reported [SCOPE, 1993] on the effects of increased UV on the biosphere. In addition, several books have recently been published reviewing various aspects of environmental UV photobiology [Young et al., 1993], UV effects on humans, animals and plants [Tevini, 1993], the biological effects of UV radiation in Antarctica [Weiler and Penhale, 1994], and UV research in freshwater ecosystems [Williamson and Zagarese, 1994]. Several other reviews are relevant [NAS, 1984; Caldwell

  19. SOLAR UV RADIATION AND AQUATIC BIOGEOCHEMISTRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    During the past decade significant interest has developed in the influence of solar UV radiation on biogeochemical cycles in surface waters of lakes and the sea. A major portion of this research has focused on photoreactions of the colored component of dissolved organic matter, ...

  20. UV extinction and IR emission in diffuse H2 regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aannestad, Per A.

    1994-01-01

    HII regions occupy a unique position in our understanding of the physical relationships between stars, the interstellar medium, and galactic structure. Observations show a complex interaction between a newly formed hot star and its surroundings. In particular, the ultraviolet radiation from the stars modifies the pre-existing dust, which again affects both the amount of ionizing radiation absorbed by the gas, and the infrared spectrum emitted by the heated dust. The aim of this project was to use UV and far-UV observations to gain information on the nebular dust, and to use this dust to model the far-IR emission, for a consistent picture of a few selected diffuse HII regions. Using archival data from the IUE and Voyager data banks and computed model atmospheres, we have deduced extinction curves for early-types stars. The requisite spectral resolution turned out to be a major task. We have successfully modelled these curves in terms of a multi-component, multi-size distribution of dust grains, and interpret the differences in the curves as primarily due to the presence or non-presence of intermediate size grains (0.01 to 0.04 micron). Much smaller (0.005 micron) grains must also be present. Finally, we have made calculations of the temperature fluctuations and the corresponding infra-red emission in such small grains.

  1. The cloudiness effect on UV radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateos, D.; de Miguel, A.; Bilbao, J.

    2009-04-01

    Ultraviolet total solar irradiation, 290-385 nm, at ground level in Valladolid, Spain (lat. 41° 40'N, long. 4°50'W and 840 m a.m.s.l.), has been recorded from February 2001 to June 2008 with an Eppley TUVR radiometer. The aim of this study is to examine the effects of clouds on the ultraviolet total irradiation (UV). To this end, two parameters have been calculated to quantify the effect of clouds on this radiation: clearness index or hemispherical transmittance and cloud modification factor (CMF). The global hemispherical transmittance is defined as the ratio between the global measured irradiation and the global extraterrestrial irradiation. The global cloud modification factor is defined as the ratio between the global measured irradiation and the estimated in a clear sky model. By analogy, these parameters are defined for ultraviolet range. The dependence of UV and global hemispherical transmittances on cloudiness (in octas) have been analyzed. It can be seen that, for high solar elevation angles, the global hemispherical transmittance falls 60% from cloudless to overcast skies, whereas UV hemispherical transmittance decreases only 50%. Linear and potential fits have been found like the best relationships between these transmittances. Moreover, the dependence of UV/G ratio and the clearness index on the cloudiness (in octas) have been studied. Both variables show different behaviours, while the UV/G ratio increases with cloud cover, the clearness index decreases. For example, for high solar elevation, the clearness index falls 50% from cloudless to overcast skies, while the UV/G ratio rises almost 1%. The relationships between global and UV cloud modification factor have been found. The best ones obtained have been with the exponential or potential functions. It can be shown that these relationships move away from the linearity. Therefore, the clouds do not transmit the UV irradiation and the global solar irradiation in the same way. UV-CMF and global

  2. UV-Radiation: From Physics to Impacts

    PubMed Central

    Moshammer, Hanns; Simic, Stana; Haluza, Daniela

    2017-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation has affected life at least since the first life forms moved out of the seas and crawled onto the land. Therefore, one might assume that evolution has adapted to natural UV radiation. However, evolution is mostly concerned with the propagation of the genetic code, not with a long, happy, and fulfilling life. Because rickets is bad for a woman giving birth, the beneficial effects of UV-radiation outweigh the adverse effects like aged skin and skin tumors of various grades of malignancy that usually only afflict us at older age. Anthropogenic damage to the stratospheric ozone layer and frighteningly high rates of melanoma skin cancer in the light-skinned descendants of British settlers in Australia piqued interest in the health impacts of UV radiation. A changing cultural perception of the beauty of tanned versus light skin and commercial interests in selling UV-emitting devices such as tanning booths caught public health experts off-guard. Counseling and health communication are extremely difficult when dealing with a “natural” risk factor, especially when this risk factor cannot (and should not) be completely avoided. How much is too much for whom or for which skin type? How even measure “much”? Is it the (cumulative) dose or the dose rate that matters most? Or should we even construct a more complex metric such as the cumulative dose above a certain dose rate threshold? We find there are still many open questions, and we are glad that this special issue offered us the opportunity to present many interesting aspects of this important topic. PMID:28218687

  3. UV-Radiation: From Physics to Impacts.

    PubMed

    Moshammer, Hanns; Simic, Stana; Haluza, Daniela

    2017-02-17

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation has affected life at least since the first life forms moved out of the seas and crawled onto the land. Therefore, one might assume that evolution has adapted to natural UV radiation. However, evolution is mostly concerned with the propagation of the genetic code, not with a long, happy, and fulfilling life. Because rickets is bad for a woman giving birth, the beneficial effects of UV-radiation outweigh the adverse effects like aged skin and skin tumors of various grades of malignancy that usually only afflict us at older age. Anthropogenic damage to the stratospheric ozone layer and frighteningly high rates of melanoma skin cancer in the light-skinned descendants of British settlers in Australia piqued interest in the health impacts of UV radiation. A changing cultural perception of the beauty of tanned versus light skin and commercial interests in selling UV-emitting devices such as tanning booths caught public health experts off-guard. Counseling and health communication are extremely difficult when dealing with a "natural" risk factor, especially when this risk factor cannot (and should not) be completely avoided. How much is too much for whom or for which skin type? How even measure "much"? Is it the (cumulative) dose or the dose rate that matters most? Or should we even construct a more complex metric such as the cumulative dose above a certain dose rate threshold? We find there are still many open questions, and we are glad that this special issue offered us the opportunity to present many interesting aspects of this important topic.

  4. The diffuse component of erythemal ultraviolet radiation.

    PubMed

    Silva, Abel A

    2015-11-01

    The diffuse (Dif) component of ultraviolet radiation (UVR) plays an important role in the daily exposure of humans to solar radiation. This study proposes a semi-empirical method to obtain the Dif component of the erythemal dose rate, or the erythemally weighted irradiance, (EDRDif) calculated from synchronized measurements of the Dif component of UVR (UVDif) and the global (G) irradiances of both UVR (UVG) and the erythemal dose rate (EDRG). Since the study was conducted in the tropics, results involve a wide range of solar zenith angles to which EDRDif is seasonally dependent. Clouds are the main atmospheric agent affecting Dif radiation. The ratio between Dif and G (Dif/G) showed a quadratic dependence on cloud cover with a coefficient of determination r(2) = 0.79. The maxima of EDRDif were mainly above the moderate range (>137.5 mW m(-2)) of the UV-Index and reached the extreme range (>262.5 mW m(-2)) for the spring-summer period. The fraction of the global daily erythemal dose (daily EDG) corresponding to Dif radiation (daily EDDif) ranged from 936 J m(-2) to 5053 J m(-2) and averaged 2673 J m(-2). Daily EDDif corresponded to at least 48% of daily EDG for a practically cloudless sky. Therefore, Dif radiation is a real threat. Lighter skin people (types I and II) can get sunburnt in a couple of minutes under such an incidence of radiation. Moreover, accumulative harm can affect all skin types.

  5. Diffuse Cosmic Infrared Background Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwek, Eli

    2002-01-01

    The diffuse cosmic infrared background (CIB) consists of the cumulative radiant energy released in the processes of structure formation that have occurred since the decoupling of matter and radiation following the Big Bang. In this lecture I will review the observational data that provided the first detections and limits on the CIB, and the theoretical studies explaining the origin of this background. Finally, I will also discuss the relevance of this background to the universe as seen in high energy gamma-rays.

  6. Diffuse Cosmic Infrared Background Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwek, Eli

    2002-01-01

    The diffuse cosmic infrared background (CIB) consists of the cumulative radiant energy released in the processes of structure formation that have occurred since the decoupling of matter and radiation following the Big Bang. In this lecture I will review the observational data that provided the first detections and limits on the CIB, and the theoretical studies explaining the origin of this background. Finally, I will also discuss the relevance of this background to the universe as seen in high energy gamma-rays.

  7. A method for optimizing the cosine response of solar UV diffusers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulli, Tomi; Kärhä, Petri; Ikonen, Erkki

    2013-07-01

    Instruments measuring global solar ultraviolet (UV) irradiance at the surface of the Earth need to collect radiation from the entire hemisphere. Entrance optics with angular response as close as possible to the ideal cosine response are necessary to perform these measurements accurately. Typically, the cosine response is obtained using a transmitting diffuser. We have developed an efficient method based on a Monte Carlo algorithm to simulate radiation transport in the solar UV diffuser assembly. The algorithm takes into account propagation, absorption, and scattering of the radiation inside the diffuser material. The effects of the inner sidewalls of the diffuser housing, the shadow ring, and the protective weather dome are also accounted for. The software implementation of the algorithm is highly optimized: a simulation of 109 photons takes approximately 10 to 15 min to complete on a typical high-end PC. The results of the simulations agree well with the measured angular responses, indicating that the algorithm can be used to guide the diffuser design process. Cost savings can be obtained when simulations are carried out before diffuser fabrication as compared to a purely trial-and-error-based diffuser optimization. The algorithm was used to optimize two types of detectors, one with a planar diffuser and the other with a spherically shaped diffuser. The integrated cosine errors—which indicate the relative measurement error caused by the nonideal angular response under isotropic sky radiance—of these two detectors were calculated to be f2=1.4% and 0.66%, respectively.

  8. MEDICAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS OF UV RADIATION.

    SciTech Connect

    SUTHERLAND, B.M.

    2001-07-26

    Organisms living on the earth are exposed to solar radiation, including its ultraviolet (UV) components (for general reviews, the reader is referred to Smith [1] and Young et al. [2]). UV wavelength regions present in sunlight are frequently designated as UVB (290-320 nm) and UVA (320-400 nm). In today's solar spectrum, UVA is the principal UV component, with UVB present at much lower levels. Ozone depletion will increase the levels of UVB reaching the biosphere, but the levels of UVA will not be changed significantly [3]. Because of the high efficiency of UVB in producing damage in biological organisms in the laboratory experiments, it has sometimes been assumed that UVA has little or no adverse biological effects. However, accumulating data [4, 5], including action spectra (efficiency of biological damage as a function of wavelength of radiation; see Section 5) for DNA damage in alfalfa seedlings [6], in human skin [7], and for a variety of plant damages (Caldwell, this volume) indicate that UVA can induce damage in DNA in higher organisms. Thus, understanding the differential effects of UVA and UVB wavebands is essential for estimating the biological consequences of stratospheric ozone depletion.

  9. Modelling of ground-level UV radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koepke, P.; Schwander, H.; Thomalla, E.

    1996-06-01

    A number of modifications were made on the STAR radiation transmission model for greater ease of use while keeping its fault liability low. The improvements concern the entire aerosol description function of the model, the option of radiation calculation for different receiver geometries, the option of switching off temperature-dependent ozone absorption, and simplications of the STAR menu. The assets of using STAR are documented in the studies on the accuracy of the radiation transmission model. One of these studies gives a detailed comparison of the present model with a simple radiation model which reveals the limitations of approximation models. The other examines the error margin of radiation transmission models as a function of the input parameters available. It was found here that errors can be expected to range between 5 and 15% depending on the quality of the input data sets. A comparative study on the values obtained by measurement and through the model proved this judgement correct, the relative errors lying within the predicted range. Attached to this final report is a comprehensive sensitivity study which quantifies the action of various atmospheric parameters relevant to UV radiation, thus contributing to an elucidation of the process.

  10. Two years comparative studies on biological effects of environmental UV radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grof, P.; Ronto, Gyorgyi; Gaspar, S.; Berces, A.; Szabo, Laszlo D.

    1994-07-01

    A method has been developed for determination of the biologically effective UV dose based on T7 phage as biosensor. In field experiments clockwork driven telescope has been used for determining doses from direct and global (direct plus diffuse) solar radiation. On fine summer days at mid-latitude this arrangement allowed the following comparisons: measured doses from direct and global radiation obtained at the same time and measuring site reflecting the biological importance of diffuse radiation; direct and global radiation obtained at the same time and measuring site reflecting the biological importance of diffuse radiation; direct and global doses obtained at the same time on different measuring sites (downtown, suburb, outside the town) reflecting the differences caused by air quality; direct and global doses obtained on the same measuring place, in summertime of two different years reflecting the importance of the long-term measurements for estimating the biological risk caused by increased UV-B radiation; measured data and model calculations.

  11. Skyglow effects in UV and visible spectra: Radiative fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocifaj, Miroslav; Solano Lamphar, Hector Antonio

    2013-09-01

    Several studies have tried to understand the mechanisms and effects of radiative transfer under different night-sky conditions. However, most of these studies are limited to the various effects of visible spectra. Nevertheless, the invisible parts of the electromagnetic spectrum can pose a more profound threat to nature. One visible threat is from what is popularly termed skyglow. Such skyglow is caused by injudiciously situated or designed artificial night lighting systems which degrade desired sky viewing. Therefore, since lamp emissions are not limited to visible electromagnetic spectra, it is necessary to consider the complete spectrum of such lamps in order to understand the physical behaviour of diffuse radiation at terrain level. In this paper, the downward diffuse radiative flux is computed in a two-stream approximation and obtained ultraviolet spectral radiative fluxes are inter-related with luminous fluxes. Such a method then permits an estimate of ultraviolet radiation if the traditionally measured illuminance on a horizontal plane is available. The utility of such a comparison of two spectral bands is shown, using the different lamp types employed in street lighting. The data demonstrate that it is insufficient to specify lamp type and its visible flux production independently of each other. Also the UV emissions have to be treated by modellers and environmental scientists because some light sources can be fairly important pollutants in the near ultraviolet. Such light sources can affect both the living organisms and ambient environment.

  12. UV RADIATION EFFECTS ON MICROBES AND MICROBIAL PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ultraviolet (UV) region of solar radiation is defined as wavelengths in the range of 200 to 400 nm. In contrast to visible radiation (400 - 800 nm), which has a well-defined role as the energy source for most of the Earth's primary production, the effects of UV radiation on b...

  13. UV RADIATION EFFECTS ON MICROBES AND MICROBIAL PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ultraviolet (UV) region of solar radiation is defined as wavelengths in the range of 200 to 400 nm. In contrast to visible radiation (400 - 800 nm), which has a well-defined role as the energy source for most of the Earth's primary production, the effects of UV radiation on b...

  14. Temporal variation of optimal UV exposure time over Korea: risks and benefits of surface UV radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Y. G.; Koo, J. H.

    2015-12-01

    Solar UV radiation in a wavelength range between 280 to 400 nm has both positive and negative influences on human body. Surface UV radiation is the main natural source of vitamin D, providing the promotion of bone and musculoskeletal health and reducing the risk of a number of cancers and other medical conditions. However, overexposure to surface UV radiation is significantly related with the majority of skin cancer, in addition other negative health effects such as sunburn, skin aging, and some forms of eye cataracts. Therefore, it is important to estimate the optimal UV exposure time, representing a balance between reducing negative health effects and maximizing sufficient vitamin D production. Previous studies calculated erythemal UV and vitamin-D UV from the measured and modelled spectral irradiances, respectively, by weighting CIE Erythema and Vitamin D3 generation functions (Kazantzidis et al., 2009; Fioletov et al., 2010). In particular, McKenzie et al. (2009) suggested the algorithm to estimate vitamin-D production UV from erythemal UV (or UV index) and determined the optimum conditions of UV exposure based on skin type Ⅱ according to the Fitzpatrick (1988). Recently, there are various demands for risks and benefits of surface UV radiation on public health over Korea, thus it is necessary to estimate optimal UV exposure time suitable to skin type of East Asians. This study examined the relationship between erythemally weighted UV (UVEry) and vitamin D weighted UV (UVVitD) over Korea during 2004-2012. The temporal variations of the ratio (UVVitD/UVEry) were also analyzed and the ratio as a function of UV index was applied in estimating the optimal UV exposure time. In summer with high surface UV radiation, short exposure time leaded to sufficient vitamin D and erythema and vice versa in winter. Thus, the balancing time in winter was enough to maximize UV benefits and minimize UV risks.

  15. Life under solar UV radiation in aquatic organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, R. P.; Häder, D.-P.

    Aquatic photosynthetic organisms are exposed to solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation while they harvest longer wavelength radiation for energetic reasons. Solar UV-B radiation (280 - 315 nm) affects motility and orientation in motile organisms and impairs photosynthesis in cyanobacteria, phytoplankton and macroalgae as measured by monitoring oxygen production or pulse amplitude modulated fluorescence analysis. Upon moderate UV stress most organisms respond by photoinhibition which is an active downregulation of the photosynthetic electron transport in photosystem II by degradation of UV-damaged D1 protein. Photoinhibition is readily reversible during recovery in shaded conditions. Excessive UV stress causes photodamage which is not easily reversible. Another major target is the DNA where UV-B mainly induces thymine dimers. Cyanobacteria, phytoplankton and macroalgae produce scytonemin, mycosporine-like amino acids and other UV-absorbing substances to protect themselves from short wavelength solar radiation.

  16. [Measurement and evaluation of natural and artificial UV radiation].

    PubMed

    Krins, A; Burger, P M; Dörschel, B; Knuschke, P

    1999-10-01

    Natural and artificial UV radiation are environmental factors with both beneficial and harmful biological effects. This article will explain the physical measurement quantities and their relation to the biologically effective dose and will summarize the present technical state of the art of personal UV monitoring. In practical use are dosimeters based on polysulphone, a polymer which undergoes changes in its optical properties upon irradiation with UV. Other systems determine the UV dose by quantifying damage induced in Bacillus subtilis spores upon UV exposure. An electronic UV sensor represents a new and interesting development. Personal UV dosimeters will become an useful tool in both clinical and scientific areas within dermatology.

  17. Exposure to UV radiation and human health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimlin, Michael G.

    2005-08-01

    This paper will overview the significant issues facing researchers in relating the impact of exposure to sunlight and human health. Exposure to solar ultraviolet radiation is the major causative factor in most sun-related skin and eye disorders, however, very little is known quantitatively about human UV exposures. Interestingly, human exposure to sunlight also has a nutritional impact, namely the development of pre-Vitamin D, which is an important nutrient in bone health. New research suggest that low vitamin D status may be a causative factor in the development of selective types of cancer and autoimminue diseases, as well as a contributing factor in bone health. The 'health duality' aspect of sunlight exposure is an interesting and controversial topic that is a research focus of Kimlin's research group.

  18. Effects of Phobos and Deimos Eclipses on Mars UV surface radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin-Torres, Javier; Zorzano, María-Paz; Lemmon, Mark; Gómez-Elvira, Javier; REMS Team

    2013-04-01

    UV fluxes on the Martian surface are critical information to estimate the habitability of its surface and subsurface. The Rover Environmental Monitoring Station (REMS) at the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) is measuring for the first time ever the ultraviolet (UV) radiation in the range 200 nm to 400 nm on the surface of Mars. Here we report the first UV measurements ever recorded from another planet during a solar eclipse. Within 5 sols, the REMS UV sensor (UVS) monitored the eclipse of the Sun by the two Martian moons: a Phobos partial solar eclipse (September 17, 2012) and a total Deimos eclipse (September 22, 2012), as a drop in the UV signal during the time of their transits. The UVS observation of the Phobos eclipse took place under the shadow of the MSL mast. This configuration allowed the UVS to measure the impact of the transit on the UV diffuse sky irradiance alone. A few sols later, the UVS monitored the drop of the direct beam irradiance induced by the total Deimos eclipse. REMS UVS and concurrent images by Mastcam have been used to investigate the impact of the sun flux occultated by the satellites on the direct and direct sunlight relative contribution to the UV radiation reaching Mars surface. These observations took place under the maximal irradiance conditions (equatorial and summer equinox, prior to the dust season). Comparisons to detailed simulations indicate that diffuse UV radiation reaching the surface is best explained by an atmosphere covered by thin clouds or a particle-loaded atmosphere. On Mars the solar transits are quick and the moons very small, their transits left no distinguishable signal on the other environmental parameters measured by REMS such as surface pressure and temperature and near-surface air temperature.

  19. Recent studies on UV radiation in Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correa, M. P.; Ceballos, J. C.; Moregula, A.; Okuno, E.; Fausto, A.; Mol, A.; Santos, J. C.

    2009-04-01

    This presentation shows a summary of UV index measurements performed in the last years in Southeastern (SE) and Northeastern (NE) Brazilian regions. Brazil has an area of 8.5 million km2 distributed between latitudes 5˚ N and 35˚ S and longitudes 5˚ W and 75˚ W. SE is the most important economic pole of South America and the NE coast is an important tourist region. This large area has a great diversity of climatic, atmospheric and geographical conditions in addition to very diverse social and cultural habits. Non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is an epidemiological health problem with more than 120,000 new cases each year. The most of these cases are found in the South and Southeast regions, with about 70 new NMSC per 100,000 inhabitants. Solar Light UV501 biometers are installed in the SE cities of São Paulo (23.6˚ S, 46.7˚ W, 865 m ASL), Itajubá/Minas Gerais (22.4˚ S; 45.5˚ W, 846 m ASL) and the NE city of Ilhéus/Bahia (14.8˚ S; 39.3˚ W; 54 m ASL). First measurements began in 2005 in São Paulo city, while Itajubá and Ilhéus have regular measurements from the beginning of 2008. Other studies related to the UV radiation modeling and interactions with atmosphere components, as ozone, aerosols and clouds, have also been performed. For example: a) UVI modelling calculations performed by a multiple-scattering spectral models; b) studies on the aerosol radiative properties based on satellite (MODIS/Terra-Aqua) and ground-based (Aeronet) observation; c) ozone content variability from satellite (OMI/Aura) and ground-based (Microtops ozonometer) measurements; d) behavioral profile of the population, as regarding habits of solar exposure and sun protection measures. Results show that more than 75% of the measurements conducted in the summer (outside noon) can be classified as upper than high UVI according to World Health Organization (WHO) recommended categories: Low (UVI < 2), Medium (3 ? UVI < 6), High (6 ? UVI < 8), Very High (8 ? UVI

  20. Covalent dimerization of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase subunits by UV radiation.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, R M; Franco, E; Teixeira, A R

    1996-08-15

    The effect of UV radiation (UV-A, UV-B and UV-C) on ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase from a variety of plant species was examined. The exposition of plant leaves or the pure enzyme to UV radiation produced a UV-dependent accumulation of a +5 kDa polypeptide (P65). Different approaches were utilized to elucidate the origin and structure of P65: electrophoretic and fluorographic analyses of 35S-labelled ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase exposed to UV radiation and immunological experiments using antibodies specific for P65, for the large and small subunits of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase and for high-molecular-mass aggregates of the enzyme. These studies revealed that P65 is a dimer, formed by the covalent, non-disulphide linkage of one small subunit with one large subunit of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase. For short periods of time (< 1 h), the amount of P65 formed increased with the duration of the exposure to the UV radiation and with the energy of the radiation applied. Prolonged exposure to UV radiation (1-6 h) resulted in the formation of high-molecular-mass aggregates of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase. Formation of P65 was shown to depend on the native state of the protein, was stimulated by inhibitors of enzyme activity, and was inhibited by activators of enzyme activity. A UV-independent accumulation of P65 was also achieved by the in vitro incubation of plant crude extracts. However, the UV-dependent and the UV-independent formation of P65 seemed to occur by distinct molecular mechanisms. The UV-dependent accumulation of P65 was immunologically detected in all species examined, including Lemna minor, Arum italicum, Brassica oleracea, Triticum aestivum, Zea mays, Pisum sativum and Phaseolus vulgaris, suggesting that it may constitute a universal response to UV radiation, common to all photo-synthetic tissues.

  1. Unstructured Polyhedral Mesh Thermal Radiation Diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, T.S.; Zika, M.R.; Madsen, N.K.

    2000-07-27

    Unstructured mesh particle transport and diffusion methods are gaining wider acceptance as mesh generation, scientific visualization and linear solvers improve. This paper describes an algorithm that is currently being used in the KULL code at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to solve the radiative transfer equations. The algorithm employs a point-centered diffusion discretization on arbitrary polyhedral meshes in 3D. We present the results of a few test problems to illustrate the capabilities of the radiation diffusion module.

  2. UV-B Radiation Contributes to Amphibian Population Declines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaustein, Andrew

    2007-05-01

    UV-B (280-315 nm) radiation is the most significant biologically damaging radiation at the terrestrial surface. At the organismal level, UV-B radiation can slow growth rates, cause immune dysfunction and result in sublethal damage. UV-B radiation can lead to mutations and cell death. Over evolutionary time, UV radiation has been an important stressor on living organisms. Natural events, including impacts from comets and asteroids, volcanic activity, supernova explosions and solar flares, can cause large-scale ozone depletion with accompanying increases in UV radiation. However, these natural events are transient. Moreover, the amount of ozone damage due to natural events depends upon a number of variables, including the magnitude of the event. This is different from modern-day human-induced production of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and other chemicals that deplete stratospheric ozone continuously, resulting in long-term increases in UV-B radiation at the surface of the earth. We will briefly review the effects of UV-B exposure in one group of aquatic organisms_amphibians. UV-B has been implicated as a possible factor contributing to global declines and range reductions in amphibian populations.

  3. Evaluation of the impact of atmospheric ozone and aerosols on the horizontal global/diffuse UV Index at Livorno (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scaglione, Daniele; Giulietti, Danilo; Morelli, Marco

    2016-08-01

    A study was conducted at Livorno (Italy) to evaluate the impact of atmospheric aerosols and ozone on the solar UV radiation and its diffuse component at ground in clear sky conditions. Solar UV radiation has been quantified in terms of UV Index (UVI), following the ISO 17166:1999/CIE S007/E-1998 international standard. UVI has been calculated by exploiting the libRadtran radiative transfer modelling software as a function of both the Aerosols Optical Depth (AOD) and the Total Ozone Column (TOC). In particular AOD and TOC values have been remotely sensed by the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on board the NASA's EOS (Earth Observing System) satellites constellation. An experimental confirmation was also obtained by exploiting global UVI ground-based measurements from the 26/9/14 to 12/8/15 and diffuse UVI ground-based measurements from the 17/5/15 to 12/8/15. For every considered value of Solar Zenith Angle (SZA) and atmospheric condition, estimates and measurements confirm that the diffuse component contributes for more than 50% on the global UV radiation. Therefore an exposure of human skin also to diffuse solar UV radiation can be potentially harmful for health and need to be accurately monitored, e.g. by exploiting innovative applications such as a mobile app with a satellite-based UV dosimeter that has been developed. Global and diffuse UVI variations due to the atmosphere are primarily caused by the TOC variations (typically cyclic): the maximum TOC variation detected by OMI in the area under study leads to a corresponding variation in global and diffuse UVI of about 50%. Aerosols in the area concerned, mainly of maritime nature, have instead weaker effects causing a maximum variation of the global and diffuse UVI respectively of 9% and 35% with an SZA of 20° and respectively of 13% and 10% with an SZA of 60°.

  4. UV Tanning Equipment | Radiation Protection | US EPA

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    2016-05-18

    Sun lamps and tanning equipment emit ultraviolet (UV) rays. People who are exposed to UV rays over a long period of time are more likely to develop skin cancer. People with light skin are in more danger because their skin is more sensitive to UV rays.

  5. Measurements of the diffuse ultraviolet radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fix, John D.; Craven, John D.; Frank, Louis A.

    1989-01-01

    The imaging instrumentation on the Dynamics Explorer 1 satellite has been used to measure the intensity of the diffuse ultraviolet radiation on two great circles about the sky. It is found that the isotropic component of the diffuse ultraviolet radiation (possibly of extragalactic origin) has an intensity of 530 + or - 80 units (a unit is 1 photon per sq cm s A sr) at a wavelength of 150 nm. The Galactic component of the diffuse ultraviolet radiation has a dependence on Galactic latitude which requires strongly forward scattering particles if it is produced by dust above the Galactic plane.

  6. The impact of solar UV radiation on the early biosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horneck, G.

    2007-08-01

    Stratospheric ozone, photochemically produced from atmospheric oxygen, is a protective filter of the Earth's atmosphere by absorbing most of the biologically harmful UV radiation of our sun in the UV-C (190-280 nm) and short wavelength-region of the UV-B (280-315 nm). Numerous lines of isotopic and geologic evidence suggest that the Archean atmosphere was essentially anoxic. As a result the column abundance of ozone would have been insufficient to affect the surface UV radiation environment. Thus, as well as UV-B radiation, UV-C radiation would have penetrated to the Earth's surface with its associated biological consequences. The history of this ultraviolet stress for the early Earth has been determined from theoretical data and data obtained in Earth orbit on the inactivation of Bacillus subtilis spores under a simulated ozone layer of different thicknesses. Although the UV-C and UV-B regions contribute only 2 % of the entire solar extraterrestrial irradiance, photobiological experiments in space have demonstrated a high mutagenicity and lethality of this UV range to living organisms. The reason for these severe effects of extraterrestrial solar UV radiation - compared to conditions on present-day Earth - lies in the absorption characteristics of the DNA, which is the decisive target for inactivation and mutation induction at this UV range. Being a strong mutagen, UV-radiation is considered as a powerful promoter of biological evolution on the one hand, one the other hand, it may have deleterious consequences to individual cells and organisms, e.g. by causing inactivation, mutations or cancer induction. In response to potential harmful effects of environmental UV radiation, life on Earth has developed several strategies of survival, either avoiding exposure to UV radiation or restoring UV damage. Mechanisms of avoidance of exposure to UV radiation include (i) moving away from the UV radiation into shadowed areas, which requires the development of UV radiation

  7. Physics of Electrodeless UV Lamps and Applications of UV Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cekic, Miodrag; Ruckman, Mark

    2004-12-01

    Electrodeless discharge microwave powered ultraviolet limps are a special class of high power incoherent UV sources, conceptualized forty years ago for industrial processing applications. Because of the nonimaging character of the applications, the need for measuring averaged properties of the lamps' exceeds the motivation to obtain detailed space-resolved discharge parameters. This writing discusses measurements of the average plasma temperature of a 5.8kW high pressure mercury bulb and a XeCl* excimer bulb driven by the microwaves of the same power. First method is based on the black body radiance fit to the self-absorbed 185nm and 254nm mercury lines. The second method is essentially Boltzmann plot method applied to the roto-vibrational levels of B1/2 - X1/2 XeCl* molecular transition with a maximum at 308nm. We also present a procedure for evaluation of effectiveness of different bulb spectra to the given UV curing chemistry system independent from the Beer-Lambert law. Conversely, the procedure can be used for the optimization of the chemistry to the chosen UV lamp radiance spectrum.

  8. UV radiation transmittance: regular clothing versus sun-protective clothing.

    PubMed

    Bielinski, Kenneth; Bielinski, Nolan

    2014-09-01

    There are many clothing options available for patients who are interested in limiting their exposure to UV radiation; however, these options can be confusing for patients. For dermatologists, there is limited clinical data regarding the advantages, if any, of sun-protective clothing. In this study, we examined the UV radiation transmittance of regular clothing versus sun-protective clothing. We found that regular clothing may match or even exceed sun-protective clothing in blocking the transmittance of UV radiation. These data will help dermatologists better counsel their patients on clothing options for sun protection.

  9. UV Radiation Damage and Bacterial DNA Repair Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zion, Michal; Guy, Daniel; Yarom, Ruth; Slesak, Michaela

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports on a simple hands-on laboratory procedure for high school students in studying both radiation damage and DNA repair systems in bacteria. The sensitivity to ultra-violet (UV) radiation of both "Escherichia coli" and "Serratia marcescens" is tested by radiating them for varying time periods. Two growth temperatures are used in…

  10. UV Radiation Damage and Bacterial DNA Repair Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zion, Michal; Guy, Daniel; Yarom, Ruth; Slesak, Michaela

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports on a simple hands-on laboratory procedure for high school students in studying both radiation damage and DNA repair systems in bacteria. The sensitivity to ultra-violet (UV) radiation of both "Escherichia coli" and "Serratia marcescens" is tested by radiating them for varying time periods. Two growth temperatures are used in…

  11. UV-B radiation and acclimation in timberline plants.

    PubMed

    Turunen, Minna; Latola, Kirsi

    2005-10-01

    Research has shown that some plants respond to enhanced UV-B radiation by producing smaller and thicker leaves, by increasing the thickness of epidermis and concentration of UV-B absorbing compounds of their surface layers and activation of the antioxidant defence system. The response of high-altitude plants to UV-B radiation in controlled conditions is often less pronounced compared to low-altitude plants, which shows that the alpine timberline plants are adapted to UV-B. These plants may have a simultaneous co-tolerance for several stress factors: acclimation or adaptation to the harsh climate can also increase tolerance to UV-B radiation, and vice versa. On the other hand, alpine timberline plants of northern latitudes may be less protected against increasing UV-B radiation than plants from more southern latitudes and higher elevations due to harsh conditions and weaker preadaptation resulting from lower UV-B radiation exposure. It is evident that more long-term experimental field research is needed in order to study the interaction of climate, soil and UV-B irradiance on the timberline plants.

  12. Diffusion processes in general relativistic radiating spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Barreto, W.; Herrera, L.; Santos, N.O.; Universidad Central de Venezuela, Caracas; Observatorio Nacional do Brasil, Rio de Janeiro )

    1989-09-01

    The influence of diffusion processes on the dynamics of general relativistic radiating spheres is systematically studied by means of two examples. Differences between the streaming-out limit and the diffusion limit are exhibited, for both models, through the evolution curves of dynamical variables. In particular it is shown the Bondi mass decreases, for both models, in the diffusion limit as compared with its value at the streaming-out regime. 15 refs.

  13. Prevent Eye Damage: Protect Yourself from UV Radiation

    MedlinePlus

    ... With increased levels of UV radiation reaching the Earth’s surface, largely due to stratospheric ozone layer depletion, ... for more information, and remember, a combination approach works best! For more information, contact: American Academy of ...

  14. Study of UV radiation dose received by the Spanish population.

    PubMed

    Gurrea, Gonzalo; Cañada, Javier

    2007-01-01

    Excess exposure to UV radiation can affect our health by causing sunburn, skin cancer, etc. It is therefore useful to determine the UV dosage received by people as a way of protecting them from the possible negative effects that this kind of radiation can cause. In this work, the personal outdoor percentage, which shows the time spent in outdoor activities, as well as personal UV doses, has been calculated by means of global UV radiation on a horizontal plane. A database of average daily UVB radiation on the horizontal plane given by the National Institute of Meteorology has been used. In this work we evaluate the standard erythema dose of the Spanish population throughout the year.

  15. Sun, UV Radiation and Your Eyes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Protect their eyes with hats and sunglasses. UV Light: Good in Moderation for a Good Night's Sleep ... accumulated during the day. Some research suggests that light-sensitive cells in the eye are important to ...

  16. Impact of inner-wall reflection on UV reactor performance as evaluated by using computational fluid dynamics: The role of diffuse reflection.

    PubMed

    Li, Wentao; Li, Mengkai; Bolton, James R; Qu, Jiuhui; Qiang, Zhimin

    2017-02-01

    Making use of the reflected ultraviolet (UV) radiation with a reflective inner wall is a promising way to improve UV reactor performance. In this study, the impact of inner-wall reflection on UV reactor performance was evaluated in annular single-lamp UV reactors by using computational fluid dynamics, with an emphasis on the role of diffuse reflection. The UV radiation inside the reactor chamber was simulated using a calibrated discrete ordinates radiation model, which has been proven to be a reliable tool for modeling fluence rate (FR) distributions in UV reactors with a reflective inner wall. The results show that UV reactors with a highly reflective inner wall (Reflectivity = 0.80) had obviously higher FRs and reduction equivalent fluences (REFs) than those with an ordinary inner wall (Reflectivity = 0.26). The inner-wall diffuse reflection further increased the reactor REF, as a result of the elevated volume-averaged FR. The FR distribution uniformity had conditioned contributions to UV reactor performance. Specifically, in UV reactors with a plug-like flow the FR distribution uniformity contributed to the REF to some extent, while in UV reactors with a mixed flow it had little influence on the REF. This study has evaluated, for the first time, the impact of inner-wall diffuse reflection on UV reactor performance and has renewed the understanding about the contribution of FR distribution uniformity to UV reactor performance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. On the disproportionate role of tropospheric ozone as a filter against solar UV-B radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Bruehl, C.; Crutzen, P.J. )

    1989-07-01

    Increases in tropospheric ozone due to photochemical production, mostly due to growing industrial and technological NO{sub x}-emissions, in the industrialized northern hemisphere can overcompensate for increased UV-B radiation resulting from ozone depletions due to chlorine-catalyzed reactions in the stratosphere. This is especially the case in the summer months, because during this period a large fraction of the UV, which reaches the surface as diffuse radiation, is scattered by air molecules, droplets and aerosol particles in the troposphere. This causes a relatively longer path through tropospheric than through stratospheric ozone. Analyses using calculated, as well as observed ozone profiles at the station HohenpeiBenberg in Bavaria, FRG, show, that decreases of UV-B radiation at the earth's surface are possible even when total ozone declines.

  18. Effect of UV-radiation on the migration of vinyl chloride monomer from unplasticized PVC pipes.

    PubMed

    Al-Malack, Muhammad H

    2004-01-01

    The effect of direct exposure to UV-radiation on the migration of vinyl chloride monomer (VCM) from unplasticized polyvinyl chloride (uPVC) pipes was investigated using locally manufactured pipes. Specimens 33-cm long were used throughout the research. The investigation was carried out, at different times of exposure to a UV-radiation. The VCM concentration in the water was evaluated using the gas chromatography (GC)/head-space technique. A VCM concentration of 2.3 microg/L (ppb) was detected after 14 days of exposure to the UV-radiation. The initial VCM concentration in the uPVC pipe was calculated and the diffusion coefficient of VCM was expressed as a function of time.

  19. Interaction of UV-Laser Radiation with Molecular Surface Films.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    the adsorption of the UV light in the metal and adsorbed molecular layers. The details of this theory were described in part in an article published...A-RI5S 59 INTERACTION OF UV-LRSER RADIATION WITH MOLECULAR / SURFACE FILRS(U) COLUMBIA UNJY NEW YORK DEPT OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING R N OSGOOD 91...TITLE 1I"’c’" d stru.’ty clam"’fic98onII"Interaction of UV- Laser Radiation with Molecular Surface Films" __________________ * 12. PERSONAL AUTHORIS

  20. Sensing of UV-B radiation by plants

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Lei; Wang, Yan; Olof Björn, Lars; He, Jun-Xian; Li, Shaoshan

    2012-01-01

    Daylight UV-B (UV-B) radiation (280–315 nm) is, because of its photochemical effects and potential destructive impact, an important environmental factor for plants. After decades of fruitless attempts, a receptor molecule, UVR8, for sensing of ambient UV-B radiation by plants has been characterized, and the initial steps in signal transduction have been identified. There are, however, other signaling pathways, and there are apparent contradictions in the literature. There is still much to find out about the complex signaling network in plants for processing of information about the daylight surrounding them. PMID:22751358

  1. Tertiary treatment of slaughterhouse effluent: degradation kinetics applying UV radiation or H2O2/UV.

    PubMed

    Luiz, D B; Genena, A K; José, H J; Moreira, R F P M; Schröder, H Fr

    2009-01-01

    In some Brazilian regions, surface water has become scarce, e.g. semi arid climate areas and densely populated and industrial areas, where water over-exploitation and/or fluvial pollution has been more common. Advanced oxidative processes (AOP) provide treated water as a source of reuse water even with the characteristics of drinking water enabling water reuse practices also in food industries. The secondary wastewater of a slaughterhouse was the water source for a tertiary treatment study evaluating the kinetics of the photo-induced degradation of color and UV254 under UV radiation with and without the addition of H2O2. The proximity of the k' values of color and UV254 degradation by UV indicates that the compounds responsible for color may be the same content measured by UV254. The H2O2/UV treatment was 5.2 times faster than simple UV in removing aromatic compounds. The degradation kinetics of aromatic compounds in both treatments followed a pseudo-first order law. The pseudo-first order constant for H2O2/UV and UV treatments were kUV254'=0.0306 min(-1) and kUV254'=0.0056 min(-1), respectively.

  2. Protection from harmful UV radiation by contact lenses.

    PubMed

    Bergmanson, J P; Pitts, D G; Chu, L W

    1988-03-01

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) has been demonstrated to be harmful to the cornea, the lens and the retina. Recent research has indicated that, in addition to the epithelial trauma found in UVR-induced keratitis, the deeper corneal layers are also involved. Since trauma to keratocytes and endothelial cells can result in permanent damage or cell loss, it is imperative to protect eyes against excessive dosages of UVR. Standard hydrogel contact lenses (Vistamarc normal) and newly developed UV-filtering hydrogel lenses (Vistakon UV-BLOC) were fitted on five rabbits and compared in protection from harmful UVR (300 nm). The eyes that wore the UV-filtering lens maintained normal corneas; however, the eyes that wore the standard hydrogel lens showed pronounced epithelial, stromal and endothelial changes. We concluded that the UV-filtering lens effectively absorbed the hazardous UV radiation while the standard soft lens provided little protection.

  3. Ambient UV-B radiation causes deformities in amphibian embryos

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blaustein, A.R.; Kiesecker, J.M.; Chivers, D.P.; Anthony, R.G.

    1997-01-01

    There has been a great deal of recent attention on the suspected increase in amphibian deformities. However, most reports of amphibian deformities have been anecdotal, and no experiments in the field under natural conditions have been performed to investigate this phenomenon. Under laboratory conditions, a variety of agents can induce deformities in amphibians. We investigated one of these agents, UV-B radiation, in field experiments, as a cause for amphibian deformities. We monitored hatching success and development in long-toed salamanders under UV-B shields and in regimes that allowed UV-B radiation. Embryos under UV-B shields had a significantly higher hatching rate and fewer deformities, and developed more quickly than those exposed to UV-B. Deformities may contribute directly to embryo mortality, and they may affect an individual's subsequent survival after hatching.

  4. Reconstruction techniques of erythemal UV-radiation and future UV predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, J. E.; Rieder, H. E.; Simic, S.; Weihs, P.

    2009-04-01

    Since the discovery of anthropogenic ozone depletion more than 30 year ago, the scientific community has shown an increasing interest in UV-B radiation and started to monitor UV-radiation. However, difficulties involved in the routine operation and maintenance of the instruments have limited the length of reliable data records to about two decades. Further the number of places where they were measured, resulting in a set of observations too short and too sparse for a good understanding of past UV changes. Moreover state of the art climate models do not calculate future scenarios of UV-doses. Therefore detailed information about past and future UV-trends are lacking. Reconstruction techniques are indispensable to derive long-term time series of UV-radiation and fill this gap. Apart from the astronomical parameters, like solar zenith angle and sun-earth-distance, UV radiation is strongly influenced by clouds, ozone and surface albedo. We developed and evaluated a reconstruction technique for UV-doses that first calculates the UV-doses under clear-sky condition and afterwards applies corrections in order to take cloud effects into account. Since the input parameters cloud cover, total ozone column and surface albedo are available from the Regional Climate Model (REMO), we applied our reconstruction technique also for future scenarios using REMO data as input. Hence we are able to derive a seamless UV long-term time series from the past to the future. Our method was applied for the high alpine station Hoher Sonnblick (3108m) situated in Austrian Alps.

  5. Effects of ozone and aerosol on surface UV radiation variability.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jhoon; Cho, Hi-Ku; Mok, Jungbin; Yoo, Hee Dong; Cho, Nayeong

    2013-02-05

    Global (direct+diffuse) spectral ultraviolet (UV, 290-363nm) and total ozone measurements made on the roof of the Main Science Building, Yonsei University at Seoul (37.57°, 128.98°E) were analyzed to quantify the effects of ozone and aerosol on the variability of surface erythemal UV (EUV) irradiance. The measurements have been made with a Brewer Spectrophotometer MKIV (SCI-TEC#148) and a Dobson Ozone Spectrophotometer (Beck#123), respectively, during 2004-2008. The overall mean radiation amplification factor, RAF(AOD, SZA) [23,24] due to total ozone (O(3)) (hereafter O(3) RAF) shows that 1% decrease in total ozone results in an increase of 1.18±0.02% in the EUV irradiance with the range of 0.67-1.74% depending on solar zenith angles (SZAs) (40-70°) and on aerosol optical depths (AODs) (<4.0), under both clear (cloud cover<25%) and all sky conditions. For the mean AOD, the O(3) RAFs(SZA) for both sky conditions increased as SZA increased from 40° to 60°, and then decreased for higher SZA 70°, where the patterns are consistent with results of the previous studies [2,10]. A similar analysis of the RAF(O(3), SZA) due to AOD (hereafter AOD RAF) under clear and all-sky conditions shows that on average, a 1% increase in AOD forces a decrease of 0.29±0.06% in the EUV irradiance with the maximum range 0.18-0.63% depending on SZAs and O(3). Thus, overall sensitivity of UV to ozone (O(3), RAF) was estimated to be about four times higher than to the aerosol (AOD RAF). At the mean O(3), the AOD RAFs(SZA) for both skies appears to be almost independent of SZAs. It is shown that the O(3) RAFs are nearly independent of the sky conditions, whereas the AOD RAFs depend distinctly on the sky conditions with the larger values for all skies. Under cloud free conditions, the overall mean ratio for measured-to-modeled O(3), RAF(AOD, SZA) is 1.13, whereas the ratio for AOD RAF(O(3), SZA) shows 0.82 in the EUV irradiance. Overall, the RAF measurements are corroborated by radiative

  6. Response of biological uv dosimeters to the simulated extraterrestrial uv radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bérces, A.; Rontó, G.; Kerékgyártó, T.; Kovács, G.; Lammer, H.

    In the Laboratory polycrystalline uracil thin layer and bacteriophage T7 detectors have been developed for UV dosimetry on the EarthSs surface. Exponential response of the uracil polycrystal has been detected both by absorption spectroscopy and measurements of the refractive index under the influence of terrestrial solar radiation or using UV-C sources. In UV biological dosimetry the UV dose scale is additive starting at a value of zero according to the definition of CIE (Technical Report TC-6-18). The biological dose can be defined by a measured end-effect. In our dosimeters (phage T7 and uracil dosimeter) exposed to natural (terrestrial) UV radiation the proportion of pyrimidin photoproducts among the total photoproducts is smaller than 0.1 and the linear correlation between the biological and physical dose is higher than 0.9. According to the experimental data this linear relationship is often not valid. We observed that UV radiation did not only induce dimerisation but shorter wavelengths caused monomerisation of pyrimidin dimers. Performing the irradiation in oxygen free environment and using a Deuterium lamp as UV source, we could increase monomerisation against dimerisation thus the DNA-based dosimetrySs additivity rule is not fulfilled in these conditions. In this study we will demonstrate those non-linear experiments which constitute the basis of our biological experiments on the International Space Station.

  7. Solar UV radiation reduces the barrier function of human skin.

    PubMed

    Biniek, Krysta; Levi, Kemal; Dauskardt, Reinhold H

    2012-10-16

    The ubiquitous presence of solar UV radiation in human life is essential for vitamin D production but also leads to skin photoaging, damage, and malignancies. Photoaging and skin cancer have been extensively studied, but the effects of UV on the critical mechanical barrier function of the outermost layer of the epidermis, the stratum corneum (SC), are not understood. The SC is the first line of defense against environmental exposures like solar UV radiation, and its effects on UV targets within the SC and subsequent alterations in the mechanical properties and related barrier function are unclear. Alteration of the SC's mechanical properties can lead to severe macroscopic skin damage such as chapping and cracking and associated inflammation, infection, scarring, and abnormal desquamation. Here, we show that UV exposure has dramatic effects on cell cohesion and mechanical integrity that are related to its effects on the SC's intercellular components, including intercellular lipids and corneodesmosomes. We found that, although the keratin-controlled stiffness remained surprisingly constant with UV exposure, the intercellular strength, strain, and cohesion decreased markedly. We further show that solar UV radiation poses a double threat to skin by both increasing the biomechanical driving force for damage while simultaneously decreasing the skin's natural ability to resist, compromising the critical barrier function of the skin.

  8. Protective effect of UV-A radiation during acclimation of the photosynthetic apparatus to UV-B treatment.

    PubMed

    Štroch, Michal; Materová, Zuzana; Vrábl, Daniel; Karlický, Václav; Šigut, Ladislav; Nezval, Jakub; Špunda, Vladimír

    2015-11-01

    We examined the acclimation response of the photosynthetic apparatus of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) to a combination of UV-A and UV-B radiation (UVAB) and to UV-B radiation alone. Our aim was to evaluate whether UV-A radiation prevents UV-B-induced damage to the photosynthetic apparatus and whether UV-A pre-acclimation is required to mitigate the negative influence of UV-B radiation. Barley plants were grown from seeds under low photosynthetically active radiation (50 μmol m(-2) s(-1)) either in the absence or presence of UV-A radiation (UVA- and UVA+ plants, respectively). After 8 days of development, plants were exposed simultaneously to UV-A and UV-B radiation for the next 6 days. Additionally, UVA- plants were exposed to UV-B radiation alone. The UVA+ plants had a higher CO2 assimilation rate near the light-saturation region (A(N)) and a higher content of both total chlorophylls (Chls) and total carotenoids than the UVA- plants. Chls content, A(N), the potential quantum yield of photosystem II (PSII) photochemistry (F(V)/F(M)), the capacity of light-induced thermal energy dissipation and the efficiency of excitation energy transfer within PSII remained the same or even increased in both UVA+ and UVA- plants after UVAB treatment. On the contrary, exposure of UVA- plants to UV-B radiation itself led to a reduction in all these characteristics. We revealed that the presence of UV-A radiation during UVAB treatment not only mitigated but completely eliminated the negative effect of UV-B radiation on the functioning of the photosynthetic apparatus and that UV-A pre-acclimation was not crucial for development of this UV-A-induced resistance against UV-B irradiation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Impact of UV Radiation on Bacterioplankton Community Composition†

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Christian; Moeseneder, Markus M.; Herndl, Gerhard J.

    2001-01-01

    The potential effect of UV radiation on the composition of coastal marine bacterioplankton communities was investigated. Dilution cultures with seawater collected from the surface mixed layer of the coastal North Sea were exposed to different ranges of natural or artificial solar radiation for up to two diurnal cycles. The composition of the bacterioplankton community prior to exposure was compared to that after exposure to the different radiation regimes using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of 16S rRNA and 16S ribosomal DNA. Only minor changes in the composition of the bacterial community in the different radiation regimes were detectable. Sequencing of selected bands obtained by DGGE revealed that some species of the Flexibacter-Cytophaga-Bacteroides (FCB) group were sensitive to UV radiation while other species of the FCB group were resistant. Overall, only up to ≈10% of the operational taxonomic units present in the dilution cultures appeared to be affected by UV radiation. Thus, we conclude that UV radiation has little effect on the composition of coastal marine bacterioplankton communities in the North Sea. PMID:11157229

  10. The enhancement of biological ocular UV radiation on beaches compared to the radiation on grass.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guang-Cong; Wang, Fang; Gao, Yan-Yan; Yang, Zheng; Hu, Li-Wen; Gao, Qian; Ri, Jun-Chol; Liu, Yang

    2014-12-01

    The influence of albedo on ocular UV exposure has seldom been reported. This paper aimed to explore the enhancement effect on measured ocular UV radiation due to a sand surface compared to measured ocular UV radiation due to a grass surface. We measured ambient and ocular UV radiation over the beach and grass surface in Sanya City of China (18.4°N, 109.7°E). The experimental apparatus was composed of a manikin and a dual-detector spectrometer. Integration of both UVA and UVB radiation was used to denote UV radiation. Then biologically effective ocular UVB radiation (UVBE) and the ratios of UVBE of two surfaces were calculated. Maximum of ocular UV radiation versus time over the two surfaces is bimodal. UVBE on the beach is significantly larger than UVBE on the sand, and UVBE peaked at different solar elevation angle (SEA) over the two surfaces (about 53° and 40° on the beach and grass, respectively, according to Bayesian regression). The maximum of ocular UVBE ratios is greater than two, which peaked SEA was about 50°. One hour's cumulative radiation under sunny weather exceeds thresholds for photokeratitis, conjunctivitis and lens damage. Higher albedo significantly increased biological ocular UV radiation. Tourists on tropical beaches should take protective measures and avoid facing the sun directly, especially when SEA is around 50°. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Solar UV-A and UV-B radiation fluxes at two Alpine stations at different altitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blumthaler, M.; Ambach, W.; Rehwald, W.

    1992-03-01

    Daily totals of UV-A and UV-B radiation fluxes and global radiation were measured since 1981 at Jungfraujoch (3576 m) a.s.l.) and in Innsbruck (577 m a.s.l.) in their seasonal course. The altitude effect of annual totals yields 19%/1000 m (UV-B), 11%/1000 m (UV-A) and 9%/1000 m (global radiation) with reference to Innsbruck station. The ratio of the daily totals of UV-B/global radiation shows a significant seasonal course with the maximum in summer, whereas the ratio of the daily totals of UV-A/global radiation shows no significant seasonal variation. The biological effective doses of erythema reaction, delayed tanning and immediate tanning by UV-A and UV-B radiant exposure are reported in the seasonal course at Jungfraujoch and in Innsbruck.

  12. Effective UV radiation from model calculations and measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feister, Uwe; Grewe, Rolf

    1994-01-01

    Model calculations have been made to simulate the effect of atmospheric ozone and geographical as well as meteorological parameters on solar UV radiation reaching the ground. Total ozone values as measured by Dobson spectrophotometer and Brewer spectrometer as well as turbidity were used as input to the model calculation. The performance of the model was tested by spectroradiometric measurements of solar global UV radiation at Potsdam. There are small differences that can be explained by the uncertainty of the measurements, by the uncertainty of input data to the model and by the uncertainty of the radiative transfer algorithms of the model itself. Some effects of solar radiation to the biosphere and to air chemistry are discussed. Model calculations and spectroradiometric measurements can be used to study variations of the effective radiation in space in space time. The comparability of action spectra and their uncertainties are also addressed.

  13. Diffuse ionizing radiation within HH jets

    SciTech Connect

    Esquivel, A.; Raga, A. C. E-mail: raga@nucleares.unam.mx

    2013-12-20

    We present numerical hydrodynamical simulations of a time-dependent ejection velocity precessing jet. The parameters used in our models correspond to a high excitation Herbig-Haro object, such as HH 80/81. We have included the transfer of ionizing radiation produced within the shocked regions of the jet. The radiative transfer is computed with a ray-tracing scheme from all the cells with an emissivity above a certain threshold. We show the development of a radiative precursor, and compare the morphology with a model without the diffuse radiation. Our simulations show that the morphology of the Hα emission is affected considerably if the diffuse ionizing radiation is accounted for. The predicted Hα position-velocity diagram (i.e., spatially resolved emission line profiles) from a model with the transfer of ionizing radiation has a relatively strong component at zero velocity, corresponding to the radiative precursor. Qualitatively similar 'zero velocity components' are observed in HH 80/81 and in the jet from Sanduleak's star in the Large Magellanic Cloud.

  14. Assessment of diffuse radiation models in Azores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magarreiro, Clarisse; Brito, Miguel; Soares, Pedro; Azevedo, Eduardo

    2014-05-01

    Measured irradiance databases usually consist of global solar radiation data with limited spatial coverage. Hence, solar radiation models have been developed to estimate the diffuse fraction from the measured global irradiation. This information is critical for the assessment of the potential of solar energy technologies; for example, the decision to use photovoltaic systems with tracking system. The different solar radiation models for this purpose differ on the parameters used as input. The simplest, and most common, are models which use global radiation information only. More sophisticated models require meteorological parameters such as information from clouds, atmospheric turbidity, temperature or precipitable water content. Most of these models comprise correlations with the clearness index, kt (portion of horizontal extra-terrestrial radiation reaching the Earth's surface) to obtain the diffuse fraction kd (portion of diffuse component from global radiation). The applicability of these different models is related to the local atmospheric conditions and its climatic characteristics. The models are not of general validity and can only be applicable to locations where the albedo of the surrounding terrain and the atmospheric contamination by dust are not significantly different from those where the corresponding methods were developed. Thus, models of diffuse fraction exhibit a relevant degree of location dependence: e.g. models developed considering data acquired in Europe are mainly linked to Northern, Central or, more recently, Mediterranean areas. The Azores Archipelago, with its particular climate and cloud cover characteristics, different from mainland Europe, has not yet been considered for the development of testing of such models. The Azorean climate reveals large amounts of cloud cover in its annual cycle, with spatial and temporal variabilities more complex than the common Summer/Winter pattern. This study explores the applicability of different

  15. Occupational exposure to natural UV radiation and premature skin ageing.

    PubMed

    Lastowiecka-Moras, Elżbieta; Bugajska, Joanna; Młynarczyk, Beata

    2014-01-01

    The skin is the part of the human body most vulnerable to ultraviolet (UV) radiation. The spectrum of the negative effects of UV radiation on the skin ranges from acute erythema to carcinogenesis. Between these extreme conditions, there are other common skin lesions, e.g., photoageing. The aim of this study was to assess the skin for signs of photoageing in a group of 52 men occupationally exposed to natural UV radiation. There were 2 types of examinations: an examination of skin condition (moisture, elasticity, sebum, porosity, smoothness, discolourations and wrinkles) with a device for diagnosing the skin, and a dermatological examination. The results of both examinations revealed a higher percentage of skin characteristics typical for photoageing in outdoor workers compared to the general population.

  16. UV radiation induces CXCL5 expression in human skin.

    PubMed

    Reichert, Olga; Kolbe, Ludger; Terstegen, Lara; Staeb, Franz; Wenck, Horst; Schmelz, Martin; Genth, Harald; Kaever, Volkhard; Roggenkamp, Dennis; Neufang, Gitta

    2015-04-01

    CXCL5 has recently been identified as a mediator of UVB-induced pain in rodents. To compare and to extend previous knowledge of cutaneous CXCL5 regulation, we performed a comprehensive study on the effects of UV radiation on CXCL5 regulation in human skin. Our results show a dose-dependent increase in CXCL5 protein in human skin after UV radiation. CXCL5 can be released by different cell types in the skin. We presumed that, in addition to immune cells, non-immune skin cells also contribute to UV-induced increase in CXCL5 protein. Analysis of monocultured dermal fibroblasts and keratinocytes revealed that only fibroblasts but not keratinocytes displayed up regulated CXCL5 levels after UV stimulation. Whereas UV treatment of human skin equivalents, induced epidermal CXCL5 mRNA and protein expression. Up regulation of epidermal CXCL5 was independent of keratinocyte differentiation and keratinocyte-keratinocyte interactions in epidermal layers. Our findings provide first evidence on the release of CXCL5 in UV-radiated human skin and the essential role of fibroblast-keratinocyte interaction in the regulation of epidermal CXCL5.

  17. Silver-Teflon contamination UV radiation study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muscari, J. A.

    1978-01-01

    Silver-Teflon (Ag/FEP) is planned to be used as the thermal control material covering the radiator surfaces on the shuttle orbiter payload bay doors. These radiators require the use of materials that have a very low solar absorptance and a high emittance for heat rejection. However, operationally, materials used on these critical radiator surfaces, such as silver-Teflon, will be exposed to a variety of conditions which include both the natural as well as the induced environments from the Shuttle Orbiter. A complete test facility was assembled, and detailed test procedures and a test matrix were developed. Measurements of low solar absorptance were taken before and after contamination, at intervals during irradiation, and after sample cleaning to fulfill all the requirements.

  18. Ozone depletion and climate change: impacts on UV radiation.

    PubMed

    Bais, A F; McKenzie, R L; Bernhard, G; Aucamp, P J; Ilyas, M; Madronich, S; Tourpali, K

    2015-01-01

    We assess the importance of factors that determine the intensity of UV radiation at the Earth's surface. Among these, atmospheric ozone, which absorbs UV radiation, is of considerable importance, but other constituents of the atmosphere, as well as certain consequences of climate change, can also be major influences. Further, we assess the variations of UV radiation observed in the past and present, and provide projections for the future. Of particular interest are methods to measure or estimate UV radiation at the Earth's surface. These are needed for scientific understanding and, when they are sufficiently sensitive, they can serve as monitors of the effectiveness of the Montreal Protocol and its amendments. Also assessed are several aspects of UV radiation related to biological effects and health. The implications for ozone and UV radiation from two types of geoengineering methods that have been proposed to combat climate change are also discussed. In addition to ozone effects, the UV changes in the last two decades, derived from measurements, have been influenced by changes in aerosols, clouds, surface reflectivity, and, possibly, by solar activity. The positive trends of UV radiation observed after the mid-1990s over northern mid-latitudes are mainly due to decreases in clouds and aerosols. Despite some indications from measurements at a few stations, no statistically significant decreases in UV-B radiation attributable to the beginning of the ozone recovery have yet been detected. Projections for erythemal irradiance (UVery) suggest the following changes by the end of the 21(st) century (2090-2100) relative to the present time (2010-2020): (1) Ozone recovery (due to decreasing ozone-depleting substances and increasing greenhouse gases) would cause decreases in UVery, which will be highest (up to 40%) over Antarctica. Decreases would be small (less than 10%) outside the southern Polar Regions. A possible decline of solar activity during the 21(st) century

  19. Prediction of UV spectra and UV-radiation damage in actual plasma etching processes using on-wafer monitoring technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jinnai, Butsurin; Fukuda, Seiichi; Ohtake, Hiroto; Samukawa, Seiji

    2010-02-01

    UV radiation during plasma processing affects the surface of materials. Nevertheless, the interaction of UV photons with surface is not clearly understood because of the difficulty in monitoring photons during plasma processing. For this purpose, we have previously proposed an on-wafer monitoring technique for UV photons. For this study, using the combination of this on-wafer monitoring technique and a neural network, we established a relationship between the data obtained from the on-wafer monitoring technique and UV spectra. Also, we obtained absolute intensities of UV radiation by calibrating arbitrary units of UV intensity with a 126 nm excimer lamp. As a result, UV spectra and their absolute intensities could be predicted with the on-wafer monitoring. Furthermore, we developed a prediction system with the on-wafer monitoring technique to simulate UV-radiation damage in dielectric films during plasma etching. UV-induced damage in SiOC films was predicted in this study. Our prediction results of damage in SiOC films shows that UV spectra and their absolute intensities are the key cause of damage in SiOC films. In addition, UV-radiation damage in SiOC films strongly depends on the geometry of the etching structure. The on-wafer monitoring technique should be useful in understanding the interaction of UV radiation with surface and in optimizing plasma processing by controlling UV radiation.

  20. Oxidation of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in water. 2: UV radiation and ozonation in the presence of UV radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Beltran, F.J.; Garcia-Araya, J.F.; Rivas, J.; Ovejero, G.

    1995-05-01

    Direct photolysis with UV radiation (254 nm) and oxidation with ozone combined with UV radiation of three polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, fluorene, phenanthrene, and acenaphthene, has been studied. Quantum yields of the direct photolysis of the PAHs determined were 7.5 {times} 10{sup {minus}3}, 6.9 {times} 10{sup {minus}3}, and 52 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} mol(photon){sup {minus}1} for fluorene, phenanthrene, and acenaphthene, respectively. Contributions of direct ozonation, direct photolysis, and radical oxidation have also been estimated for the oxidation with ozone combined with UV radiation. Fluorene is oxidized by direct photolysis and radical reactions, phenanthrene through direct mechanisms, ozonation, and photolysis, and acenaphthene mainly by direct ozonation.

  1. Reduction of patulin in apple cider by UV radiation.

    PubMed

    Dong, Qingfang; Manns, David C; Feng, Guoping; Yue, Tianli; Churey, John J; Worobo, Randy W

    2010-01-01

    The presence of the mycotoxin patulin in processed apple juice and cider presents a continual challenge to the food industry as both consumer health and product quality issues. Although several methods for control and/or elimination of patulin have been proposed, no unifying method has been commercially successful for reducing patulin burdens while maintaining product quality. In the present study, exposure to germicidal UV radiation was evaluated as a possible commercially viable alternative for the reduction and possible elimination of the patulin mycotoxin in fresh apple cider. UV exposure of 14.2 to 99.4 mJ/cm(2) resulted in a significant and nearly linear decrease in patulin levels while producing no quantifiable changes in the chemical composition (i.e., pH, Brix, and total acids) or organoleptic properties of the cider. For the range of UV doses tested, patulin levels decreased by 9.4 to 43.4%; the greatest reduction was achieved after less than 15 s of UV exposure. The method of UV radiation (the CiderSure 3500 system) is an easily implemented, high-throughput, and cost-effective method that offers simultaneous UV pasteurization of cider and juice products and reduction and/or elimination of patulin without unwanted alterations in the final product.

  2. Room-temperature effects of UV radiation in KBr:? crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Salas, R.; Meléndrez, R.; Aceves, R.; Rodriguez, R.; Barboza-Flores, M.

    1996-07-01

    Thermoluminescence and optical absorption measurements have been carried out in KBr:0953-8984/8/27/009/img9 crystals irradiated with monochromatic UV light (200 - 300 nm) and x-rays at room temperature. For UV- and x-irradiated crystals strong similarities between the thermoluminescence glow curves have been found, suggesting that the low-energy UV radiation produces the same defects as produced by x-irradiation in this material. The thermoluminescence glow curves are composed of six glow peaks located at 337, 383, 403, 435, 475 and 509 K. Thermal annealing experiments in previously irradiated crystals show clearly a correlation between the glow peak located at 383 K and the F-centre thermal bleaching process. Also, the excitation spectrum for each thermoluminescence glow peak has been investigated, showing that the low-energy radiation induces the formation of F centres.

  3. Mutagenic effects of solar UV-radiation on DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabbow, E.; Horneck, G.

    2001-08-01

    A decrease of the stratospheric ozone layer will result in an increase of shorter wavelengths of the solar radiation reaching in earth. To investigate the biological efficiency, especially the mutagenic specificity, of ranges of polychromatic UVA and UBV irradiations with wavelengths between 280 nm and 400 nm, the plasmid DNA pUC19 and its E. coli host strain JM83 were used as a model system. Different ranges of solar UV radiation were simulated with the SOL 2 sun simulator (Dr. Hönle) and a variety of cut-off filters (Schott). Three wavelength bands were investigated: 280 - 400 nm (simulating UV-range under a stratospheric ozone layer depletion), 300-400 nm (simulating the UV-range today) and 315-400 nm to examine the effects induced by UVA alone.

  4. ESTIMATION OF UV RADIATION DOSE IN NORTHERN MINNESOTA WETLANDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ultraviolet (UV) B wavelength range (280 nm to 320 nm) of solar radiation can be a significant biological stressor, and has been hypothesized to be partially responsible for amphibian declines and malformation. This hypothesis has been difficult to evaluate, in part, because ...

  5. ESTIMATION OF UV RADIATION DOSE IN NORTHERN MINNESOTA WETLANDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ultraviolet (UV) B wavelength range (280 nm to 320 nm) of solar radiation can be a significant biological stressor, and has been hypothesized to be partially responsible for amphibian declines and malformation. This hypothesis has been difficult to evaluate, in part, because ...

  6. Charge of particles in plasmas under external UV-radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puttscher, M.; Melzer, A.

    2011-11-01

    In this experiment we investigate the charge of dust particles when they are exposed to external UV-radiation. The determination of the changes in charge of the dust particles is given by a combination of two methods to evaluate electrical charge: the resonance method and the normal mode analysis. This contribution describes the experimental setup and the determination of the charge differences.

  7. MicroRNAs in skin response to UV radiation.

    PubMed

    Syed, Deeba N; Khan, Mohammad Imran; Shabbir, Maria; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2013-09-01

    Solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation, an ubiquitous environmental carcinogen, is classified depending on the wavelength, into three regions; short-wave UVC (200-280 nm), mid-wave UVB (280-320 nm), and long-wave UVA (320- 400 nm). The human skin, constantly exposed to UV radiation, particularly the UVB and UVA components, is vulnerable to its various deleterious effects such as erythema, photoaging, immunosuppression and cancer. To counteract these and for the maintenance of genomic integrity, cells have developed several protective mechanisms including DNA repair, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. The network of damage sensors, signal transducers, mediators, and various effector proteins is regulated through changes in gene expression. MicroRNAs (miRNAs), a group of small non-coding RNAs, act as posttranscriptional regulators through binding to complementary sequences in the 3´-untranslated region of their target genes, resulting in either translational repression or target degradation. Recent studies show that miRNAs add an additional layer of complexity to the intricately controlled cellular responses to UV radiation. This review summarizes our current knowledge of the role of miRNAs in the regulation of the human skin response upon exposure to UV radiation.

  8. Far-UV Radiation of the Early Sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heap, Sally

    2005-01-01

    Far-UV radiation is responsible for the photolysis of important greenhouse gases such as CO2, NH3 (ammonia), CH4 (methane) and more generally, the global UV photochemistry of the early atmosphere. In our project, we are concentrating on the young Sun's effect on methane, since UV sunlight (lambda less than 1450 Angstroms) was the main destruction mechanism for methane in the early Earth's atmosphere. Since the UV luminosity of the early Sun cannot be calculated a priori; it can only be estimated from observations of stars similar to the young Sun. We report our results based on Hubble + FUSE spectra of stars selected from Gaidos (1998) Catalog of Nearby Young Solar Analogs (YSA's).

  9. UV Radiation and Sun Exposure | RadTown USA | US EPA

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    2016-05-18

    Tanning is your body's attempt to protect itself from being damaged by ultraviolet radiation. Too much ultraviolet radiation (UV) from sunlight is dangerous. Nearly half of UV radiation is received between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m., when the sun's rays are the strongest. Even on a cloudy day, you can be sunburned by UV radiation.

  10. Development of UV-B screening compounds in response to variation in ambient levels of UV-B radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, Joe H.; Xu, Chenping; Gao, Wei; Slusser, James R.

    2005-08-01

    The induction of UV-B screening compounds in response to exposure to UV-B radiation is a commonly reported response and is generally considered to be an adaptive response of plants for protection from UVinduced damage. However, a number of questions remain to be answered including the importance of qualitative and localization differences among species in providing protection, indirect consequences of changes in leaf secondary chemistry on ecological processes and the dose response of metabolite accumulation. In this study we utilized UV monitoring data provided on site by the USDA UV-B Monitoring and Research Program to monitor the changes in UV-screening compounds in soybeans under a range of UV-B levels due to natural variation in ambient UV-B radiation. Soybean cultivars Essex, Clark and Clark-magenta, an isoline of Clark that produces minimal levels of flavonols, were grown beneath shelters covered either with polyester to block most UV-B radiation or teflon which is nearly transparent in the UV range and harvested at regular intervals for pigment and protein analysis. Daily levels of weighted UV-B varied from <1 to >7 kJ m-2. Increases in UV-screening compounds showed a positive dose response to UV-B radiation in all cultivars with Essex showing the steepest dose response. UV-A also induced screening compounds in all species The hydroxycinnimates of the magenta isoline showed a steep dose response to UV-A and a rather constant (non dose specific) but small additional increment in response to UV-B. The Clark isoline, which produced primarily the flavonol quercetin, showed a dose response to UV-B intermediate between that of Clark-magenta and Essex. All three cultivars show similar tolerance to UV-B in field conditions indicating that UV-induced pigment production is adequate to protect them from excessive UV-B damage.

  11. Characterization of supersonic radiation diffusion waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Alastair S.; Guymer, Thomas M.; Morton, John; Williams, Benjamin; Kline, John L.; Bazin, Nicholas; Bentley, Christopher; Allan, Shelly; Brent, Katie; Comley, Andrew J.; Flippo, Kirk; Cowan, Joseph; Taccetti, J. Martin; Mussack-Tamashiro, Katie; Schmidt, Derek W.; Hamilton, Christopher E.; Obrey, Kimberly; Lanier, Nicholas E.; Workman, Jonathan B.; Stevenson, R. Mark

    2015-07-01

    Supersonic and diffusive radiation flow is an important test problem for the radiative transfer models used in radiation-hydrodynamics computer codes owing to solutions being accessible via analytic and numeric methods. We present experimental results with which we compare these solutions by studying supersonic and diffusive flow in the laboratory. We present results of higher-accuracy experiments than previously possible studying radiation flow through up to 7 high-temperature mean free paths of low-density, chlorine-doped polystyrene foam and silicon dioxide aerogel contained by an Au tube. Measurements of the heat front position and absolute measurements of the x-ray emission arrival at the end of the tube are used to test numerical and analytical models. We find excellent absolute agreement with simulations provided that the opacity and the equation of state are adjusted within expected uncertainties; analytical models provide a good phenomenological match to measurements but are not in quantitative agreement due to their limited scope.

  12. Ozone and UV254 radiation for municipal wastewater disinfection.

    PubMed

    Blatchley, Ernest R; Weng, Shihchi; Afifi, Mehrnaz Zare; Chiu, Hsiao-Han; Reichlin, Douglas B; Jousset, Stéphane; Erhardt, Richard S

    2012-11-01

    Bench-scale experiments were conducted with municipal wastewater effluent samples to examine the feasibility of combined application of ozone and ultraviolet (UV) radiation for disinfection. Effluent samples displayed rapid initial ozone demand, which promotes ozone transfer but diminishes disinfection efficacy. Ozone doses up to 10 mg/L yielded only trace quantities of residual ozone; despite the fact that initial ozone demand was never exceeded, quantifiable (though variable) inactivation of E. coli was observed, along with modest improvements of UV transmittance. Results from collimated beam experiments demonstrated that compliance with effluent discharge permit limitations could be achieved consistently with a UV254 dose of 12.4 mJ/cm2 at a pre-ozonation dose of 2 to 3 mg/L. In the absence of pre-ozonation, consistent compliance was observed at a UV dose of 16.5 mJ/cm2. No evidence of synergism between ozone and UV254 radiation was found in the measured inactivation responses of E. coli.

  13. Photodegradation of etridiazole by UV radiation during drinking water treatment.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao; Qiang, Zhimin; Tian, Fang; Zhang, Tao

    2009-07-01

    The photodegradation of etridiazole (ETZ) in water by UV radiation at 254 nm was investigated. Results indicate that the simulated first-order rate constants decreased with the increase of initial ETZ concentration (i.e., 5, 20 and 30 microM), and did not show any pH dependence within the range from 6.0 to 8.0. The quantum yield was 0.46+/-0.02 molE(-1) at pH 7.0. H(2)O(2) was generated at trace levels in the range from 0 to 1.0 microM during photodegradation of ETZ. Direct photodegradation was responsible for the decomposition of ETZ in distilled water by UV radiation. Three organic byproducts were identified: 5-ethoxy-3-dichloromethyl-1,2,4-thiadiazole, 5-ethoxy-1,2,4-thiadiazole-3-carboxylic acid and 5-ethoxy-3-hydroxyl-1,2,4-thiadiazole. About 90% of chloro mass in the initial ETZ was released as Cl(-) at the end of photodegradation. In contrast, the formation of sulfate and nitrate was insignificant. In general, ETZ decayed more quickly in groundwater than in sand-filtered or surface water. It is reasonably deduced that ETZ may not get removed effectively under a typical UV dose of 40 mJcm(-2) at most water treatment plants that employ UV radiation for disinfection.

  14. The efficacy of a UV-blocking soft contact lens in protecting cornea against UV radiation.

    PubMed

    Bergmanson, J P; Pitts, D G; Chu, L W

    1987-06-01

    Recently, it has been shown that UV keratitis is more serious than previously thought because it is not limited to the corneal epithelium but also involves the stroma and the endothelium. It is, therefore, very important to avoid ultraviolet radiation (UVR) damage, and the purpose of the present study was to examine the ability of a UV absorbing hydrogel lens to filter such wavelengths. Ultrastructural observations of rabbit corneas showed that a regular soft (Vistamarc normal) contact lens offered no protection, and since wearing one adds stress to the cornea it seems possible that the cornea may be more vulnerable to UVR trauma. A UV absorbing soft contact lens (Vistakon UV-BLOC) provided complete protection to all corneal layers. Subepithelial nerve fibres in the traumatized corneas were mostly of normal morphology and may explain why UV keratitis is a very painful experience. It was concluded that a UV absorbing soft contact lenses with acceptable clinical performance may be prescribed on a routine basis.

  15. Penetration of UV Radiation in the Earth's Oceans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, B. Greg; Lubin, Dan

    2005-01-01

    This project was a collaboration between SIO/UCSD and NASA/GSFC to develop a global estimation of the penetration of UV light into open ocean waters, and into coastal waters. We determined the ocean UV reflectance spectra seen by satellites above the atmosphere by combining existing sophisticated radiative transfer models with in situ UV Visible data sets to improve coupled radiance estimates both underwater and within the atmosphere. Results included improved estimates of surface spectral irradiance, 0.3-1.0 micron, and estimates of photosynthetic inhibition, DNA mutation, and CO production. Data sets developed under this proposal have been made publicly available via submission to the SeaWiFS Bio-Optical Archive and Storage System. Numerous peer-reviewed publications and conference proceedings and abstracts resulted from the work supported by this research award.

  16. Human pigmentation genes and their response to solar UV radiation.

    PubMed

    Sturm, R A

    1998-11-09

    Identification and characterisation of the genes involved in melanin pigment formation, together with the study of how their action is influenced by exposure to UV radiation, is providing a molecular understanding of the process of skin photoprotection through tanning. The mechanisms underlying this change in epidermal melanin involve both a transcriptional response of the pigmentation genes and post-translational control of the melanin biosynthetic pathway. UV rays are known to interact with numerous molecules within cells, and among these the photochemical reactions involving lipids and DNA are implicated in modulating melanogenesis. The combination of DNA damage, the formation of diacylglycerol, and the action of the melanocyte stimulating hormone receptor are all likely to be involved in UV-induced tanning.

  17. Effects of solar UV-B radiation on aquatic ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Häder, D.-P.

    Solar UV degrades dissolved organic carbon photolytically so that they can readily be taken up by bacterioplankton. On the other hand solar UV radiation inhibits bacterioplankton activity. Bacterioplankton productivity is far greater than previously thought and is comparable to phytoplankton primary productivity. According to the "microbial loop hypothesis," bacterioplankton is seen in the center of a food web, having a similar function to phytoplankton and protists. The penetration of UV and PAR into the water column can be measured. Marine waters show large temporal and regional differences in their concentrations of dissolved and particulate absorbing substances. A network of dosimeters (ELDONET) has been installed in Europe ranging from Abisko in Northern Sweden to Gran Canaria. Cyanobacteria are capable of fixing atmospheric nitrogen which is then made available to higher plants. The agricultural potential of cyanobacteria has been recognized as a biological fertilizer for wet soils such as in rice paddies. UV-B is known to impair processes such as growth, survival, pigmentation, motility, as well as the enzymes of nitrogen metabolism and CO 2 fixation. The marine phytoplankton represents the single most important ecosystem on our planet and produces about the same biomass as all terrestrial ecosystems taken together. It is the base of the aquatic food chain and any changes in the size and composition of phytoplankton communities will directly affect food production for humans from marine sources. Another important role of marine phytoplankton is to serve as a sink for atmospheric carbon dioxide. Recent investigations have shown a large sensitivity of most phytoplankton organisms toward solar short-wavelength ultraviolet radiation (UV-B); even at ambient levels of UV-B radiation many organisms seem to be under UV stress. Because of their requirement for solar energy, the phytoplankton dwell in the top layers of the water column. In this near-surface position

  18. Effects of solar UV-B radiation on aquatic ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Hader, D P

    2000-01-01

    Solar UV degrades dissolved organic carbon photolytically so that they can readily be taken up by bacterioplankton. On the other hand solar UV radiation inhibits bacterioplankton activity. Bacterioplankton productivity is far greater than previously thought and is comparable to phytoplankton primary productivity. According to the "microbial loop hypothesis," bacterioplankton is seen in the center of a food web, having a similar function to phytoplankton and protists. The penetration of UV and PAR into the water column can be measured. Marine waters show large temporal and regional differences in their concentrations of dissolved and particulate absorbing substances. A network of dosimeters (ELDONET) has been installed in Europe ranging from Abisko in Northern Sweden to Gran Canaria. Cyanobacteria are capable of fixing atmospheric nitrogen which is then made available to higher plants. The agricultural potential of cyanobacteria has been recognized as a biological fertilizer for wet soils such as in rice paddies. UV-B is known to impair processes such as growth, survival, pigmentation, motility, as well as the enzymes of nitrogen metabolism and CO2 fixation. The marine phytoplankton represents the single most important ecosystem on our planet and produces about the same biomass as all terrestrial ecosystems taken together. It is the base of the aquatic food chain and any changes in the size and composition of phytoplankton communities will directly affect food production for humans from marine sources. Another important role of marine phytoplankton is to serve as a sink for atmospheric carbon dioxide. Recent investigations have shown a large sensitivity of most phytoplankton organisms toward solar short-wavelength ultraviolet radiation (UV-B); even at ambient levels of UV-B radiation many organisms seem to be under UV stress. Because of their requirement for solar energy, the phytoplankton dwell in the top layers of the water column. In this near-surface position

  19. UV Radiation in an Urban Canyon in Southeast Queensland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinley, A. R.; Moore, M. R.; Kimlin, M. G.

    2006-12-01

    Ultraviolet radiation (UV) has the possibility to both harm and to benefit human beings when unprotected exposure occurs. After receiving small amounts of UV our bodies begin to synthesise vitamin D, which is essential for maintaining healthy bones, however excessive UV exposure can result in a variety of damaging outcomes ranging from sunburn to skin cancer and cataracts. For this reason it is very important to understand the different environments in which people encounter UV so as to better prepare the public to make smart and healthy sun exposure decisions. Each day more and more people are moving into large cities around the world and spending their time inside the urban canyon, however UV measurements are generally taken at scientific stations in open areas or on top of tall buildings, meaning that at times the environmental characteristics measured may not accurately represent those found at street-level in these highly urbanized areas. Urban canyons are home to both very tall buildings and tropospheric air pollution, each of which reduces the amount of UV reaching street-level. This study measured the varying difference between UV measurements taken at street-level and at a standard UV monitoring site on top of a building outside of the urban canyon. Investigation was conducted in the central business district (CBD) of Brisbane, Australia, which models the CBDs of large cities around the world in that it boasts a great number of tall buildings, including many skyscrapers. Data was collected under clear sky conditions at five different street-level sites in the CBD (on either side of two streets running perpendicular to one another (four sites) and in a public square) and then compared to that obtained on the same day at the Queensland University of Technology's Australian Sun and Health Research Laboratory (ASHRL), which is located 2.5 kilometres outside Brisbane's CBD. Minimum erythemal dose (MED) data was collected at each location and it was found that

  20. Changes induced by UV radiation during virgin olive oil storage.

    PubMed

    Luna, G; Morales, M T; Aparicio, R

    2006-06-28

    The effects of UV radiation on the chemical and sensory characteristics of virgin olive oils (cv. Arbequina and Picual) were assessed. Even small doses of UV radiation induced oxidation of the virgin olive oil samples. Total phenols and fatty acids contents decreased during the process as well as the intensity of the bitter and fruity sensory attributes, while the intensity of the rancid sensory attribute notably increased. Acetaldehyde, 2-butenal, 2-pentenal, octane, octanal, hexanal, nonanal, and 2-decenal were the volatile compounds most affected, showing an important increase during the irradiation process. Nonanal, hexanal, and pentanal showed high correlation with the rancid sensory attribute (90%, 86%, and 86%, respectively). 2-Decenal and nonanal concentrations allowed us to predict the alteration level of the samples by mean of multiple Ridge regression.

  1. Multifaceted pathways protect human skin from UV radiation.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, Vivek T; Ganju, Parul; Ramkumar, Amrita; Grover, Ritika; Gokhale, Rajesh S

    2014-07-01

    The recurrent interaction of skin with sunlight is an intrinsic constituent of human life, and exhibits both beneficial and detrimental effects. The apparent robust architectural framework of skin conceals remarkable mechanisms that operate at the interface between the surface and environment. In this Review, we discuss three distinct protective mechanisms and response pathways that safeguard skin from deleterious effects of ultraviolet (UV) radiation. The unique stratified epithelial architecture of human skin along with the antioxidant-response pathways constitutes the important defense mechanisms against UV radiation. The intricate pigmentary system and its intersection with the immune-system cytokine axis delicately balance tissue homeostasis. We discuss the relationship among these networks in the context of an unusual depigmenting disorder, vitiligo. The elaborate tunable mechanisms, elegant multilayered architecture and evolutionary selection pressures involved in skin and sunlight interaction makes this a compelling model to understand biological complexity.

  2. uv radiation curable paints. Topical report on material identification

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-13

    The program for the development of ultraviolet radiation curing of paints for application on preformed structures is discussed. The starting point of this program was the matching of resins, photoinitiators, and pigments which will result in coatings that can be cured by ultraviolet radiation. The initial work was the identification of reactive diluents and base resins that are sensitive to the uv curing process. The reactive monomeric diluents tested included multifunctional acrylates, monofunctional acrylates, and non-acrylic unsaturated esters. The end point will be the application of these coatings to prefabricated metal structures to demonstrate the viability of this technique in producing commercially acceptable painted products. These uv curable paints should produce films that are hard, adherent, and opaque at a nominal thickness of one mil (0.001 inch).

  3. Adaptive Implicit Non-Equilibrium Radiation Diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Philip, Bobby; Wang, Zhen; Berrill, Mark A; Rodriguez Rodriguez, Manuel; Pernice, Michael

    2013-01-01

    We describe methods for accurate and efficient long term time integra- tion of non-equilibrium radiation diffusion systems: implicit time integration for effi- cient long term time integration of stiff multiphysics systems, local control theory based step size control to minimize the required global number of time steps while control- ling accuracy, dynamic 3D adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) to minimize memory and computational costs, Jacobian Free Newton-Krylov methods on AMR grids for efficient nonlinear solution, and optimal multilevel preconditioner components that provide level independent solver convergence.

  4. Monitoring of environmental UV radiation by biological dosimeters.

    PubMed

    Ronto, G; Berces, A; Grof, P; Fekete, A; Kerekgyarto, T; Gaspar, S; Stick, C

    2000-01-01

    As a consequence of the stratospheric ozone layer depletion biological systems can be damaged due to increased UV-B radiation. The aim of biological dosimetry is to establish a quantitative basis for the risk assessment of the biosphere. DNA is the most important target molecule of biological systems having special sensitivity against short wavelength components of the environmental radiation. Biological dosimeters are usually simple organisms, or components of them, modeling the cellular DNA. Phage T7 and polycrystalline uracil biological dosimeters have been developed and used in our laboratory for monitoring the environmental radiation in different radiation conditions (from the polar to equatorial regions). Comparisons with Robertson-Berger (RB) meter data, as well as with model calculation data weighted by the corresponding spectral sensitivities of the dosimeters are presented. Suggestion is given how to determine the trend of the increase in the biological risk due to ozone depletion. c2001 COSPAR Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. UV radiation sensors with unitary and binary superficial barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorogan, Valerian; Vieru, Tatiana; Kosyak, V.; Damaskin, I.; Chirita, F.

    1998-07-01

    UV radiation sensors with unitary and binary superficial barrier, made on the basis of GaP - SnO2 and GaAs - AlGaAs - SnO2 heterostructures, are presented in the paper. Technological and constructive factors, which permit to realize a high conversion efficiency and to exclude the influence of visible spectrum upon the photoanswer, are analyzed. It was established that the presence of an isotypical superficial potential barrier permits to suppress the photoanswer component formed by absorption of visible and infrared radiation in semiconductor structure bulk.

  6. Absorption of UV radiation by DNA: spatial and temporal features.

    PubMed

    Markovitsi, Dimitra; Gustavsson, Thomas; Banyasz, Akos

    2010-01-01

    The present review focuses on studies carried out by our group on the interaction of UV radiation with DNA. In particular, we examine the way that the energy acquired by DNA helices following direct absorption of UVC radiation is extended spatially and how its effects evolve during the time. These effects depend on the base sequence and can be revealed by the study of model helices. The experimental results were obtained by optical spectroscopy, used in a refined way which allows detection of very weak absorbance changes (10(-3)) as well as of intrinsic emission from DNA components whose fluorescence quantum yields are as low as 10(-4). Measurements were performed both under continuous irradiation and using pulsed excitation which permitted us to follow early events, occurring from 10(-14) to 10(-1)s. The experiments were guided by theoretical calculations. The spatial features concern the extent of the excited states formed immediately upon UV absorption; these were shown to be delocalized over several bases under the effect of electronic coupling. Moreover, thanks to the spectral fingerprints governed by the electronic coupling; we probed local denaturation induced on a double helix following formation of cyclobutane dimers. Regarding the temporal features, three different topics are presented: (i) ultrafast excitation energy transfer occurring among the bases in less than 100 fs, (ii) electron ejection from DNA upon absorption of one photon at 266 nm and (iii) formation of (6-4) photo-adducts involving a reaction intermediate. The most important message emerging from these studies is that DNA bases may adopt a collective behaviour versus UV radiation. Furthermore, time-resolved studies unravel processes which are undetectable by investigations using continuous irradiation. All these pieces of information change our understanding of how DNA damage occurs upon absorption of UV radiation.

  7. Worldwide forecast of the biologically effective UV radiation: UV index and daily dose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmalwieser, Alois W.; Schauberger, Guenther; Janouch, Michal; Nunez, Manuel; Koskela, Tapani; Berger, Daniel; Karamanian, Gabriel; Prosek, Pavel; Laska, Kamil

    2002-01-01

    Since October 1995 a global daily forecast of the UV index and the daily dose, as the irradiance of the biologically effective ultraviolet radiation, for clear sky is calculated. The Austrian model as well as the input parameters are described. By connecting the daily dose with the sensitivity of the photobiological skin types, a recommendation is given to select an appropriate sun protection factor of a sunscreen to avoid overexposure of the skin. The validation of the Austrian forecast model is done by long-term measurements of the biologically effective ultraviolet radiation. Measurements were taken from 6 different sites at 4 continents (Antarctica, Australia, America and Europe) covering the latitudinal range from 67 degree(s)N to 60 degree(s)S. By using the underestimation as criteria in the sense of radiation protection, the Austrian model shows less than 12% underestimation over the whole period for the UV index and less than 10% for the daily dose. The evaluation shows further that the forecast of the daily dose is much more influenced by the attenuation due to clouds than the UV index.

  8. Automatic actinometric system for diffuse radiation measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litwiniuk, Agnieszka; Zajkowski, Maciej

    2015-09-01

    Actinometric station is using for measuring solar of radiation. The results are helpful in determining the optimal position of solar panels relative to the Sun, especially in today's world, when the energy coming from the Sun and other alternative sources of energy become more and more popular. Polish climate does not provide as much energy as in countries in southern Europe, but it is possible to increase the amount of energy produced by appropriate arrangement of photovoltaic panels. There is the possibility of forecasting the amount of produced energy, the cost-effectiveness and profitability of photovoltaic installations. This implies considerable development opportunities for domestic photovoltaic power plants. This article presents description of actinometric system for diffuse radiation measurement, which is equipped with pyranometer - thermopile temperature sensor, amplifier AD620, AD Converter ADS1110, microcontroller Atmega 16, SD card, GPS module and LCD screen.

  9. Solar and supplemental UV-B radiation effects in lemon peel UV-B-absorbing compound content-seasonal variations.

    PubMed

    Hilal, Mirna; Rodríguez-Montelongo, Luisa; Rosa, Mariana; Gallardo, Miriam; González, Juan A; Interdonato, Roque; Rapisarda, Viviana A; Prado, Fernando E

    2008-01-01

    Effects of solar and supplemental UV-B radiation on UV-B-absorbing compounds and malondialdehyde (MDA) accumulations in the peel of lemons collected in summer and winter were analyzed. UV-B-absorbing compounds were higher in flavedo than in albedo tissue in both seasons; however, the highest values were observed in summer. These compounds were also higher in outer than in inner flavedo surface. Lemons were categorized as sun-, semisun- and shaded-lemon according to localization inside the tree canopy. Depending on-tree localization UV-B-absorbing compounds were higher in flavedo of sun-lemon than in semisun- and shaded-lemon. Supplementary UV-B radiation (22 kJ m(-2) day(-1) UV-BBE) induced UV-B-absorbing compound synthesis in on-tree and postharvest lemons. Two minutes of supplemental UV-B irradiation in summer lemons produced a strong increment (300%) of UV-B-absorbing compound content, whereas in winter lemons a slight increase (30%) was observed only after 3 min of irradiation. By contrast, UV-B-absorbing compound accumulation was not observed in albedo. MDA accumulation showed approximately a similar trend of UV-B-absorbing compounds. According to our results, solar UV-B was not required for UV-B-absorbing compound accumulation in lemon peel. Relationships between UV-B-absorbing compounds, MDA, reactive oxygen species and pathogen protection are also discussed.

  10. Photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) x ultraviolet radiation (UV) interact to initiate solar injury in apple

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sunburn or solar injury (SI) in apple is associated with high temperature, high visible light and ultraviolet radiation (UV). Fruit surface temperature (FST) thresholds for SI related disorders have been developed but there are no thresholds established for solar radiation. The objectives of the s...

  11. Self-assembly of organics promoted by UV radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heredia-Barbero, Alejandro; Colin-Garcia, Maria; Negron-Mendoza, Alicia; Ramos-Bernal, Sergio; Ortega-Gutierrez, Fernando

    Life on Earth originated prior to 3500 million years ago as an event that was preceded by ca. 1000 million years of chemical evolution. During this period, geochemical reactions probably took place between small organic molecules and solid surfaces in the presence of water. Chemical evolution involved the formation, but also the complexation of organic molecules in the prebiotic milieu. On primitive Earth, the physicochemical processes involving the participation of organic molecules and inorganic surfacesmight have been a factor to increase chemical complexity (Negrón et al. 2004, Hazen, 2006). Certain minerals, such as clays may have actively contributed to this phenomenon promoting the emergence of life. In this research, we investigated the assembly of organics anchored on different surfaces promoted by UV radiation. Our current studies deal with the crystal growth of urea, glycine and aspartic acid. The results point out that crystal formation is encouraged by the action of UV radiation. This result suggests that the strong UV radiation present on primitive Earth could have been a factor to promote the formation of more complex organic molecules and eventually life.

  12. Ecological responses to UV radiation: interactions between the biological effects of UV on plants and on associated organisms.

    PubMed

    Paul, Nigel D; Moore, Jason P; McPherson, Martin; Lambourne, Cathryn; Croft, Patricia; Heaton, Joanna C; Wargent, Jason J

    2012-08-01

    Solar ultraviolet (UV)-B radiation (280-315 nm) has a wide range of effects on terrestrial ecosystems, yet our understanding of how UV-B influences the complex interactions of plants with pest, pathogen and related microorganisms remains limited. Here, we report the results of a series of experiments in Lactuca sativa which aimed to characterize not only key plant responses to UV radiation in a field environment but also consequential effects for plant interactions with a sap-feeding insect, two model plant pathogens and phylloplane microorganism populations. Three spectrally modifying filters with contrasting UV transmissions were used to filter ambient sunlight, and when compared with our UV-inclusive filter, L. sativa plants grown in a zero UV-B environment showed significantly increased shoot fresh weight, reduced foliar pigment concentrations and suppressed population growth of green peach aphid (Myzus persicae). Plants grown under a filter which allowed partial transmission of UV-A radiation and negligible UV-B transmission showed increased density of leaf surface phylloplane microbes compared with the UV-inclusive treatment. Effects of UV treatment on the severity of two plant pathogens, Bremia lactucae and Botrytis cinerea, were complex as both the UV-inclusive and zero UV-B filters reduced the severity of pathogen persistence. These results are discussed with reference to known spectral responses of plants, insects and microorganisms, and contrasted with established fundamental responses of plants and other organisms to solar UV radiation, with particular emphasis on the need for future integration between different experimental approaches when investigating the effects of solar UV radiation.

  13. Ozone depletion and climate change: impacts on UV radiation.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, R L; Aucamp, P J; Bais, A F; Björn, L O; Ilyas, M; Madronich, S

    2011-02-01

    The Montreal Protocol is working, but it will take several decades for ozone to return to 1980 levels. The atmospheric concentrations of ozone depleting substances are decreasing, and ozone column amounts are no longer decreasing. Mid-latitude ozone is expected to return to 1980 levels before mid-century, slightly earlier than predicted previously. However, the recovery rate will be slower at high latitudes. Springtime ozone depletion is expected to continue to occur at polar latitudes, especially in Antarctica, in the next few decades. Because of the success of the Protocol, increases in UV-B radiation have been small outside regions affected by the Antarctic ozone hole, and have been difficult to detect. There is a large variability in UV-B radiation due to factors other than ozone, such as clouds and aerosols. There are few long-term measurements available to confirm the increases that would have occurred as a result of ozone depletion. At mid-latitudes UV-B irradiances are currently only slightly greater than in 1980 (increases less than ~5%), but increases have been substantial at high and polar latitudes where ozone depletion has been larger. Without the Montreal Protocol, peak values of sunburning UV radiation could have been tripled by 2065 at mid-northern latitudes. This would have had serious consequences for the environment and for human health. There are strong interactions between ozone depletion and changes in climate induced by increasing greenhouse gases (GHGs). Ozone depletion affects climate, and climate change affects ozone. The successful implementation of the Montreal Protocol has had a marked effect on climate change. The calculated reduction in radiative forcing due to the phase-out of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) far exceeds that from the measures taken under the Kyoto protocol for the reduction of GHGs. Thus the phase-out of CFCs is currently tending to counteract the increases in surface temperature due to increased GHGs. The amount of

  14. Distributions of Direct, Reflected, and Diffuse Irradiance for Ocular UV Exposure at Different Solar Elevation Angles

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jiaming; Hua, Hui; Liu, Yan; Liu, Yang

    2016-01-01

    To analyze intensities of ocular exposure to direct (Eo,dir), reflected (Eo,refl), and diffuse (Eo,diff) ultraviolet (UV) irradiance at different solar elevation angles (SEAs), a rotating manikin and dual-detector spectrometer were used to monitor the intensity of ocular exposure to UV irradiation (Eo) and ambient UV radiation (UVR) under clear skies in Sanya, China. Eo,dir was derived as the difference between maximum and minimum measured Eo values. Eo,refl was converted from the value measured at a height of 160 cm. Eo,diff was calculated as the minimum measured Eo value minus Eo,refl. Regression curves were fitted to determine distributions of intensities and growth rates at different wavelengths and SEAs. Eo,dir differed from ambient UVR exposure. Linear, quadratic, and linear Eo,dir distributions were obtained in SEA ranges of 14°–30°, 30°–50°, and 50°–90°, respectively, with maximum Eo,dir at 32°–38° SEA. Growth rates of Eo,dir with increasing wavelength were fitted with quadratic functions in all SEA ranges. Distributions and growth rate of Eo,refl values were fitted with quadratic functions. Maximum Eo,diff was achieved at the same SEA for all fitted quadratic functions. Growth rate of Eo,diff with increasing wavelength was fitted with a linear function. Eo,dir distributions were fitted with linear or quadratic functions in different SEA ranges. All Eo,refl and Eo,diff distributions were fitted with quadratic functions. As SEA increased, the Eo,dir portion of Eo increased and then decreased; the Eo,refl portion increased from an initial minimum; and the Eo,diff portion first decreased and then increased. The findings may provide data supporting on construction of a mathematical model of ocular UV exposure. PMID:27846278

  15. Distributions of Direct, Reflected, and Diffuse Irradiance for Ocular UV Exposure at Different Solar Elevation Angles.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jiaming; Hua, Hui; Liu, Yan; Liu, Yang

    2016-01-01

    To analyze intensities of ocular exposure to direct (Eo,dir), reflected (Eo,refl), and diffuse (Eo,diff) ultraviolet (UV) irradiance at different solar elevation angles (SEAs), a rotating manikin and dual-detector spectrometer were used to monitor the intensity of ocular exposure to UV irradiation (Eo) and ambient UV radiation (UVR) under clear skies in Sanya, China. Eo,dir was derived as the difference between maximum and minimum measured Eo values. Eo,refl was converted from the value measured at a height of 160 cm. Eo,diff was calculated as the minimum measured Eo value minus Eo,refl. Regression curves were fitted to determine distributions of intensities and growth rates at different wavelengths and SEAs. Eo,dir differed from ambient UVR exposure. Linear, quadratic, and linear Eo,dir distributions were obtained in SEA ranges of 14°-30°, 30°-50°, and 50°-90°, respectively, with maximum Eo,dir at 32°-38° SEA. Growth rates of Eo,dir with increasing wavelength were fitted with quadratic functions in all SEA ranges. Distributions and growth rate of Eo,refl values were fitted with quadratic functions. Maximum Eo,diff was achieved at the same SEA for all fitted quadratic functions. Growth rate of Eo,diff with increasing wavelength was fitted with a linear function. Eo,dir distributions were fitted with linear or quadratic functions in different SEA ranges. All Eo,refl and Eo,diff distributions were fitted with quadratic functions. As SEA increased, the Eo,dir portion of Eo increased and then decreased; the Eo,refl portion increased from an initial minimum; and the Eo,diff portion first decreased and then increased. The findings may provide data supporting on construction of a mathematical model of ocular UV exposure.

  16. Solar UV Radiation and the Origin of Life on Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heap, Sara R.; Hubeny, Ivan; Lanz, Thierry; Gaidos, Eric; Kasting, James; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We have started a comprehensive, interdisciplinary study of the influence of solar ultraviolet radiation on the atmosphere of of the early Earth. We plan to model the chemistry of the Earth atmosphere during its evolution, using observed UV flux distributions of early solar analogs as boundary conditions in photochemical models of the Earth's atmosphere. The study has four distinct but interlinked parts: (1) Establishing the radiation of the early Sun; (2) Determining the photochemistry of the early Earth's atmosphere; (3) Estimating the rates of H2 loss from the atmosphere; and (4) Ascertaining how sensitive is the photochemistry to the metallicity of the Sun. We are currently using STIS and EUVE to obtain high-quality far-UV and extreme-UV observations of three early-solar analogs. We will perform a detailed non-LTE study of each stars, and construct theoretical model photosphere, and an empirical model chromospheres, which can be used to extrapolate the continuum to the Lyman continuum region. Given a realistic flux distribution of the early Sun, we will perform photochemical modeling of weakly reducing primitive atmospheres to determine the lifetime and photochemistry of CH4. In particular, we will make estimates of the amount of CH4 present in the prebiotic atmosphere, and estimate the atmospheric CH4 concentration during the Late Archean (2.5-3.0 b.y. ago) and determine whether it would have been sufficiently abundant to help offset reduced solar luminosity at that time. Having obtained a photochemical model, we will solve for the concentrations of greenhouse gasses and important pre-biotic molecules, and perform a detailed radiative transfer calculations to compute the UV flux reaching the surface.

  17. Solar UV Radiation and the Origin of Life on Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heap, Sara R.; Hubeny, Ivan; Lanz, Thierry; Gaidos, Eric; Kasting, James; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We have started a comprehensive, interdisciplinary study of the influence of solar ultraviolet radiation on the atmosphere of of the early Earth. We plan to model the chemistry of the Earth atmosphere during its evolution, using observed UV flux distributions of early solar analogs as boundary conditions in photochemical models of the Earth's atmosphere. The study has four distinct but interlinked parts: (1) Establishing the radiation of the early Sun; (2) Determining the photochemistry of the early Earth's atmosphere; (3) Estimating the rates of H2 loss from the atmosphere; and (4) Ascertaining how sensitive is the photochemistry to the metallicity of the Sun. We are currently using STIS and EUVE to obtain high-quality far-UV and extreme-UV observations of three early-solar analogs. We will perform a detailed non-LTE study of each stars, and construct theoretical model photosphere, and an empirical model chromospheres, which can be used to extrapolate the continuum to the Lyman continuum region. Given a realistic flux distribution of the early Sun, we will perform photochemical modeling of weakly reducing primitive atmospheres to determine the lifetime and photochemistry of CH4. In particular, we will make estimates of the amount of CH4 present in the prebiotic atmosphere, and estimate the atmospheric CH4 concentration during the Late Archean (2.5-3.0 b.y. ago) and determine whether it would have been sufficiently abundant to help offset reduced solar luminosity at that time. Having obtained a photochemical model, we will solve for the concentrations of greenhouse gasses and important pre-biotic molecules, and perform a detailed radiative transfer calculations to compute the UV flux reaching the surface.

  18. Measuring solar UV radiation with EBT radiochromic film.

    PubMed

    Butson, Ethan T; Cheung, Tsang; Yu, Peter K N; Butson, Martin J

    2010-10-21

    Ultraviolet radiation dosimetry has been performed with the use of a radiochromic film dosimeter called Gafchromic EBT for solar radiation exposure. The film changes from a clear colour to blue colour when exposed to ultraviolet radiation and results have shown that the colour change is reproducible within ±10% at 5 kJ m(-2) UV exposure under various conditions of solar radiation. Parameters tested included changes in season (summer versus winter exposure), time of day, as well as sky conditions such as cloudy skies versus clear skies. As the radiochromic films' permanent colour change occurs in the visible wavelengths the film can be analysed with a desktop scanner with the most sensitive channel for analysis being the red component of the signal. Results showed that an exposure of 5 kJ m(-2) (approximately 1 h exposure in full sun during summer) produced an approximate 0.28 change in the net OD when analysed in reflection mode on the desktop scanner which is significant darkening. The main advantages of this film type, and thus the new EBT2 film which has replaced EBT for measurement of UV exposure, is the visible colour change and thus easy analysis using a desktop scanner, its uniformity in response and its robust physical strength for use in outside exposure situations.

  19. Anatomical exposure patterns of skin to sunlight: relative contributions of direct, diffuse and reflected ultraviolet radiation.

    PubMed

    Vernez, D; Milon, A; Vuilleumier, L; Bulliard, J-L

    2012-08-01

    The dose-response between ultraviolet (UV) exposure patterns and skin cancer occurrence is not fully understood. Sun-protection messages often focus on acute exposure, implicitly assuming that direct UV radiation is the key contributor to the overall UV exposure. However, little is known about the relative contribution of the direct, diffuse and reflected radiation components. To investigate solar UV exposure patterns at different body sites with respect to the relative contribution of the direct, diffuse and reflected radiation. A three-dimensional numerical model was used to assess exposure doses for various body parts and exposure scenarios of a standing individual (static and dynamic postures). The model was fed with erythemally weighted ground irradiance data for the year 2009 in Payerne, Switzerland. A year-round daily exposure (08:00-17:00 h) without protection was assumed. For most anatomical sites, mean daily doses were high (typically 6.2-14.6 standard erythemal doses) and exceeded the recommended exposure values. Direct exposure was important during specific periods (e.g. midday during summer), but contributed moderately to the annual dose, ranging from 15% to 24% for vertical and horizontal body parts, respectively. Diffuse irradiation explained about 80% of the cumulative annual exposure dose. Acute diffuse exposures were also observed during cloudy summer days. The importance of diffuse UV radiation should not be underestimated when advocating preventive measures. Messages focused on avoiding acute direct exposures may be of limited efficiency to prevent skin cancers associated with chronic exposure. © 2012 The Authors. BJD © 2012 British Association of Dermatologists.

  20. [Effect of UV-B radiation on cytophysiological responses in plants].

    PubMed

    Dmytriiev, O P; Hushcha, M I

    2003-01-01

    Solar UV-B radiation reaching the Earth's surface is continually increased due to the stratospheric ozone layer depletion. UV-B radiation has been shown to have mutagenic effects damaging DNA, proteins and membranes. During evolution plants developed systems for UV-B perception and effective defense mechanisms. In this review the main UV-B effects, cytophysiological responses of plants and their interactions with microorganisms are analyzed. UV-B-induced signal transduction pathways in plant cells are discussed.

  1. Fate of Earth Microbes on Mars -- UV Radiation Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cockell, Charles

    2000-01-01

    A radiative transfer model is used to quantitatively investigate aspects of the martian ultraviolet radiation environment. Biological action spectra for DNA inactivation are used to estimate biologically effective irradiances for the martian surface under cloudless skies. Although the present-day martian UV flux is similar to early earth and thus may not be a limitation to life in the evolutionary context, it is a constraint to an unadapted biota and will rapidly kill spacecraft-borne microbes not covered by a martian dust layer. Here calculations for loss of microbial viability on the Pathfinder and Polar lander spacecraft are presented and the effects of martian dust on loss of viability are discussed. Details of the radiative transfer model are presented.

  2. Fate of Earth Microbes on Mars: UV Radiation Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cockell, Charles

    2000-01-01

    A radiative transfer model is used to quantitatively investigate aspects of the martian ultraviolet radiation environment. Biological action spectra for DNA inactivation are used to estimate biologically effective irradiances for the martian surface under cloudless skies. Although the present-day martian UV flux is similar to early earth and thus may not be a limitation to life in the evolutionary context, it is a constraint to an unadapted biota and will rapidly kill spacecraft-borne microbes not covered by a martian dust layer. Here calculations for loss of microbial viability on the Pathfinder and Polar lander spacecraft are presented and the effects of martian dust on loss of viability are discussed. Details of the radiative transfer model are presented.

  3. Development of a method for mapping monthly average hourly diffuse erythemal ultraviolet radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choosri, P.; Janjai, S.; Nunez, M.; Buntoung, S.; Chanalert, W.

    2017-08-01

    In this study, a model for calculating monthly average hourly diffuse erythemal solar ultraviolet (EUV) radiation under all sky conditions in Thailand was developed. The model is a function of air mass, aerosol optical depth and satellite-derived cloud index, as these parameters are sensitive to diffuse EUV radiation. Diffuse EUV irradiance were measured using UV-biometers equipped with shade ball during April 2011-March 2014 at four stations in Thailand. Data from these stations were used to formulate the model. The model was validated using an independent dataset (April 2014-March 2016) at the same sites. The modeled diffuse EUV irradiance showed good agreement with that from the ground-based measurements, with root mean square difference (RMSD) of 12.7% and mean bias difference (MBD) of -2.8%. The use of satellite data provided a simple and practical method to calculate monthly average hourly diffuse EUV irradiance over Thailand. Spatial monthly distributions are shown as maps.

  4. Integration and scaling of UV-B radiation effects on plants: from DNA to leaf.

    PubMed

    Suchar, Vasile Alexandru; Robberecht, Ronald

    2015-07-01

    A process-based model integrating the effects of UV-B radiation through epidermis, cellular DNA, and its consequences to the leaf expansion was developed from key parameters in the published literature. Enhanced UV-B radiation-induced DNA damage significantly delayed cell division, resulting in significant reductions in leaf growth and development. Ambient UV-B radiation-induced DNA damage significantly reduced the leaf growth of species with high relative epidermal absorbance at longer wavelengths and average/low pyrimidine cyclobutane dimers (CPD) photorepair rates. Leaf expansion was highly dependent on the number of CPD present in the DNA, as a result of UV-B radiation dose, quantitative and qualitative absorptive properties of epidermal pigments, and repair mechanisms. Formation of pyrimidine-pyrimidone (6-4) photoproducts (6-4PP) has no effect on the leaf expansion. Repair mechanisms could not solely prevent the UV-B radiation interference with the cell division. Avoidance or effective shielding by increased or modified qualitative epidermal absorptance was required. Sustained increased UV-B radiation levels are more detrimental than short, high doses of UV-B radiation. The combination of low temperature and increased UV-B radiation was more significant in the level of UV-B radiation-induced damage than UV-B radiation alone. Slow-growing leaves were more affected by increased UV-B radiation than fast-growing leaves.

  5. Integration and scaling of UV-B radiation effects on plants: from DNA to leaf

    PubMed Central

    Suchar, Vasile Alexandru; Robberecht, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    A process-based model integrating the effects of UV-B radiation through epidermis, cellular DNA, and its consequences to the leaf expansion was developed from key parameters in the published literature. Enhanced UV-B radiation-induced DNA damage significantly delayed cell division, resulting in significant reductions in leaf growth and development. Ambient UV-B radiation-induced DNA damage significantly reduced the leaf growth of species with high relative epidermal absorbance at longer wavelengths and average/low pyrimidine cyclobutane dimers (CPD) photorepair rates. Leaf expansion was highly dependent on the number of CPD present in the DNA, as a result of UV-B radiation dose, quantitative and qualitative absorptive properties of epidermal pigments, and repair mechanisms. Formation of pyrimidine-pyrimidone (6-4) photoproducts (6-4PP) has no effect on the leaf expansion. Repair mechanisms could not solely prevent the UV-B radiation interference with the cell division. Avoidance or effective shielding by increased or modified qualitative epidermal absorptance was required. Sustained increased UV-B radiation levels are more detrimental than short, high doses of UV-B radiation. The combination of low temperature and increased UV-B radiation was more significant in the level of UV-B radiation-induced damage than UV-B radiation alone. Slow-growing leaves were more affected by increased UV-B radiation than fast-growing leaves. PMID:26257869

  6. Latitudinal variations over Australia of the solar UV-radiation exposures for vitamin D3 in shade compared to full sun.

    PubMed

    Turnbull, David J; Parisi, Alfio V

    2010-03-01

    Abstract This paper reports on the variation of UV radiation in full sun and in shade and how this relates to the physiological production of vitamin D(3) for various latitudes. Calibrated spectral measurements were used to measure the UV radiation in the shade of numerous shade environments for varying solar zenith angles and seasons. This was for exposures to the horizontal, 45 degrees and vertical planes for the solar zenith angle (SZA) range of approximately 5 degrees to 80 degrees. For an SZA of approximately 5 degrees, average UV irradiances required for vitamin D(3) production (UV(D3)) were 0.67 W/m(2) and 0.20 W/m(2) for global and for shade with a sky view of greater than 40%, respectively. The best time to expose the human body to UV radiation while using shaded environments with a sky view of greater than 40% for vitamin D(3) synthesis is for SZAs less than approximately 45 degrees. Shade can be used throughout Australia during summer and winter. However, winter exposure times will vary depending on the latitude. Using shade for UV(D3) exposures can reduce total UV-radiation exposure by 37% to 58% compared to full sun UV(D3) exposures. This research indicates that an improved approach to optimize UV-radiation exposures for the production of vitamin D(3) is to use diffuse UV radiation under shade in and around the middle of the day.

  7. A radiating shock evaluated using Implicit Monte Carlo Diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Cleveland, M.; Gentile, N.

    2013-07-01

    Implicit Monte Carlo [1] (IMC) has been shown to be very expensive when used to evaluate a radiation field in opaque media. Implicit Monte Carlo Diffusion (IMD) [2], which evaluates a spatial discretized diffusion equation using a Monte Carlo algorithm, can be used to reduce the cost of evaluating the radiation field in opaque media [2]. This work couples IMD to the hydrodynamics equations to evaluate opaque diffusive radiating shocks. The Lowrie semi-analytic diffusive radiating shock benchmark[a] is used to verify our implementation of the coupled system of equations. (authors)

  8. Protosteller Disks Under the Influence of Winds and UV Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yorke, H. W.

    2003-01-01

    Star formation and the creation of protostellar disks generally occur in a crowded environment. Nearby young stars and protostars can influence the disks of their closets neighbors by a combination of outflows and hard radiation. The central stars themselves can have a stellar wind and may produce sufficient UV and X-ray to ultimately destroy their surrounding disks. Here we describe the results of numerical simulations of the influence that an external UV source and a central star's wind can have on its circumstellar disk. The numerical method (axial symmetry assumed) is described elsewhere. We find that protostellar disks will be destroyed on a relatively short time scale ( 10(sup 5)yr) unless they are well shielded from O-stars. Initially isotropic T-Tauri winds do not significantly influence their disks, but instead are focused toward the rotation axis by the disk wind from photoevaporation.

  9. Protosteller Disks Under the Influence of Winds and UV Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yorke, H. W.

    2003-01-01

    Star formation and the creation of protostellar disks generally occur in a crowded environment. Nearby young stars and protostars can influence the disks of their closets neighbors by a combination of outflows and hard radiation. The central stars themselves can have a stellar wind and may produce sufficient UV and X-ray to ultimately destroy their surrounding disks. Here we describe the results of numerical simulations of the influence that an external UV source and a central star's wind can have on its circumstellar disk. The numerical method (axial symmetry assumed) is described elsewhere. We find that protostellar disks will be destroyed on a relatively short time scale ( 10(sup 5)yr) unless they are well shielded from O-stars. Initially isotropic T-Tauri winds do not significantly influence their disks, but instead are focused toward the rotation axis by the disk wind from photoevaporation.

  10. Mutational Effects of Intermittent Jolts of Supernova UV Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalo, J.; Wheeler, J. C.; Williams, P.

    2001-11-01

    We estimate the frequency of intermittent hypermutation events and disruptions of planetary/satellite photochemistry due to ultraviolet radiation from core collapse supernova explosions. Calculations are presented for planetary systems in the local Milky Way, including the important moderating effects of vertical Galactic structure and UV absorption by interstellar dust. The events are particularly frequent for satellites of giant gas planets at distances more than 5-10 AU from solar-type parent stars, or in the conventional habitable zones for planets orbiting spectral type K and M parent stars, with rates of significant jolts about 103 - 104 per Gyr. The steep source spectra and existing data on UVA and longer-wavelength radiation damage in terrestrial organisms suggest that the mutational effects may operate even on planets with ozone shields. We argue that the mutation doubling dose for UV radiation should be much smaller than the mean lethal dose, using terrestrial prokaryotic organisms as our model, and that jolts may lead to real-time evolutionary effects (fixation of mutations) if the jolt durations are longer than about a week, corresponding to several hundred generation times, or much less if the equivalent of resting state adaptive mutations exist in extraterrestrial organisms. Longer-term phylogenetic effects are likely if atmospheric photochemical disturbances lead to niche creation or destruction in relevant habitats. This work was supported by NSF grant 9907582.

  11. UV and ionizing radiations induced DNA damage, differences and similarities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravanat, Jean-Luc; Douki, Thierry

    2016-11-01

    Both UV and ionizing radiations damage DNA. Two main mechanisms, so-called direct and indirect pathways, are involved in the degradation of DNA induced by ionizing radiations. The direct effect of radiation corresponds to direct ionization of DNA (one electron ejection) whereas indirect effects are produced by reactive oxygen species generated through water radiolysis, including the highly reactive hydroxyl radicals, which damage DNA. UV (and visible) light damages DNA by again two distinct mechanisms. UVC and to a lesser extend UVB photons are directly absorbed by DNA bases, generating their excited states that are at the origin of the formation of pyrimidine dimers. UVA (and visible) light by interaction with endogenous or exogenous photosensitizers induce the formation of DNA damage through photosensitization reactions. The excited photosensitizer is able to induce either a one-electron oxidation of DNA (type I) or to produce singlet oxygen (type II) that reacts with DNA. In addition, through an energy transfer from the excited photosensitizer to DNA bases (sometime called type III mechanism) formation of pyrimidine dimers could be produced. Interestingly it has been shown recently that pyrimidine dimers are also produced by direct absorption of UVA light by DNA, even if absorption of DNA bases at these wavelengths is very low. It should be stressed that some excited photosensitizers (such as psoralens) could add directly to DNA bases to generate adducts. The review will described the differences and similarities in terms of damage formation (structure and mechanisms) between these two physical genotoxic agents.

  12. Protection of Lexan from uv radiation by photodownconversion. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Yen, W.M.; Yu, H.

    1980-01-01

    Photodownconversion of uv radiation incident on a polymeric substrate, Lexan, into visible and IR region is effected by coating the substrate with cerous chloride (CeCl/sub 3/)/poly(vinyl alcohol) complex whereby photolytic degradation of the substrate is significantly inhibited. Thus it appears that cerous ion coating serves as an effective uv screener. The testing method consists of exposing the coated and naked substrate films to a medium intensity uv source with a cut-off filter below 280 nm for different intervals and determining their optical transmission characteristics. Some of the cerous ion coated films were further overcoated with poly(vinyl acetate) in order to prevent ion leaching by water. The final product retains the visible and IR transmittance of untreated Lexan film, and when the optimum composition of CeCl/sub 3/ in poly(vinyl alcohol) is coated, its transmission spectrum is barely changed even after 24 hours of uv irradiation which is estimated as equivalent to 2 years of solar radiation at Chicago, Illinois. The overcoating of poly(vinyl acetate) however, gradually allows permeation of humidity whereby phase separation of cerous chloride from the poly(vinyl alcohol) matrix takes place in about 6 to 8 months under ambient conditions. The attending deterioration of the optical transmission characteristics essentially prohibit long term storage of these films. In order to render the complexing matrix less hygroscopic and to bypass the need for overcoat, poly(vinyl butyral) was tried as the integral layer. Its efficacy for solarization inhibition of Lexan is reduced due to smaller amounts of cerous ion incorporated into the matrix but the phase separation problem is avoided. Fine tuning of these two conflicting factors is not yet achieved.

  13. Spectrometer system for diffuse extreme ultraviolet radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labov, Simon E.

    1989-01-01

    A unique grazing incidence spectrometer system has been designed to study diffuse line emission between 80 and 650 A with 10-30 A resolution. The minimum detectable emission line strength during a 5-min observation ranges from 100-2000 ph/sq cm sec str. The instrument uses mechanically ruled reflection gratings placed in front of a linear array of mirrors. These mirrors focus the spectral image on microchannel plate detectors located behind thin filters. The field of view is 40 min of arc by 15 deg, and there is no spatial imaging. This instrument has been fabricated, calibrated, and successfully flown on a sounding rocket to observe the astronomical background radiation.

  14. UV laser radiation-induced modifications and microstructuring of glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talkenberg, Marc; Kreutz, Ernst-Wolfgang; Horn, Alexander; Jacquorie, Michael; Poprawe, Reinhart

    2002-06-01

    Modifications and microstructures are generated on the surface and in the volume of silicate glasses using pulsed UV laser radiation of small pulse length. During the interaction of pulsed excimer laser radiation and frequency-trippled Nd:YAG laser radiation with intensities below the removal-threshold of the cerium- and silver-doped multi-component silicate glass absorption centers in the UV are induced. Subsequent thermal treatment and wet chemical etching results in crystallization of the laser-illuminated absorbing region and in the fabrication of microstructures on the surface. Processing of sodalime- and boro-silicate glass with pulsed ArF excimer laser radiation and frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser radiation with intensities above the removal-threshold leads to microstructures including the generation of microcracks on the surface and in the bulk. The dynamics and the transmission of the expanding plasma and changes in the refractive index of the glass are investigated with speckle photography using the pump and probe method. The determination of plasma emission and crack generation is carried out using high speed and Nomarski photography. Morphological and chemical properties of the debris generated under defined processing gas atmospheres are investigated with REM, white light interferometry, XPS and EPMA. Induced absorption and changes of the crystalline- phase are probed using optical-spectroscopy and XRD as well REM. On the basis of these investigations the processes of the generation of induced absorption centers and crystallization on the one hand and the generation of cracks and debris on the other hand as well as the quality of the produced microstructures is discussed.

  15. [Effect of enhanced UV-B radiation on photosynthetic structure and photosynthetic characteristics of Mentha piperita].

    PubMed

    Wu, Nengbiao; Ma, Hongqun; Hu, Litao; Hong, Hong; Sun, Jinchun; Zhang, Yanghuan; Dai, Dalin

    2009-12-01

    To reveal the effects of UV-B radiation on the growth of medical plant Mentha piperita, simulate an enhanced UV-B radiation and evaluate intensity of radiation on the photosynthesis of M. piperita. Three different levels of UV-B radiation were set in the experiment which included: natural light control (0 W x m(-2)), light UV-B radiation stress (0.15 W x m(-2)) and heavy UV-B radiation stress (0.35 W x m(-2)). The chloroplast ultrastructure, photosynthesis indexes and chlorophyll fluorescence parameters of the M. piperita were observed under the three treatments. Although the chloroplast ultrastructure was destroyed to some degree under the light UV-B radiation stress, F(v)/(F)m, F(v)/F(o), qP, phiPS II and ETR could resume to the comparative level of natural light control. At the same time, qN increased firstly and decreased thereafter. But under the high strength UV-B radiation stress, the photosynthetic structures were badly destroyed, which could not recover through protecting mechanism by itself. It was showed that M. piperita was able to protect photosynthetic structures by increasing respiration and dissipation when photosynthetic capacity reduced under light UV-B radiation stress. It is demonstrated that M. piperita has high adaptation to light UV-B radiation stress, which is kind of promising medical plant for area with higher UV-B radiation.

  16. Epidermal screening of UV-B radiation in loblolly pine and sweetgum

    SciTech Connect

    Howells, B.W.; Ruhland, C.T.; Day, T.A.

    1995-06-01

    Seedlings of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) and sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua) were grown in a greenhouse at the University of Maryland under either no UV-B radiation or daily supplemental UV-B radiation levels of 4, 8 or 11 kJ m{sup -2} of Biologically Effective. UV-B radiation. Measurements of leaf elongation, plant growth and UV-absorbing pigments were made and, at the conclusion of the growing season, measurements of UV-B screening effectiveness in different leaf age classes were made with a fiber-optic microprobe. In loblolly pine, less than 0.5 % of incident UV-B radiation was transmitted through the epidermis of fascicle needles and transmittance was less in needles that received UV-B radiation. Increases in epidermal thickness and the concentration of UV-absorbing corn may have accounted for this low transmittance. Transmission was slightly greater (about 1%) in primary needles, possibly due to a thinner epidermis. In contrast, in sweetgum, epidermal transmittance ranged from about 20% in leaves not preconditioned to UV-B exposure, to about 12% in leaves grown under UV-B radiation. These results suggest that any deleterious effects of UV-B radiation may be anticipated to be greatest in early stages of leaf development and in primary needles of conifers, before UV-B penetration is reduced by increases in epidermal thickness and UV-absorbing compounds.

  17. The influence of UV radiation on protistan evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothschild, L. J.

    1999-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation has provided an evolutionary challenge to life on Earth. Recent increases in surficial ultraviolet B fluxes have focused attention on the role of UV radiation in protistan ecology, cancer, and DNA damage. Exploiting this new wealth of data, I examine the possibility that ultraviolet radiation may have played a significant role in the evolution of the first eukaryotes, that is, protists. Protists probably arose well before the formation of a significant ozone shield, and thus were probably subjected to substantial ultraviolet A, ultraviolet B, and ultraviolet C fluxes early in their evolution. Evolution consists of the generation of heritable variations and the subsequent selection of these variants. Ultraviolet radiation has played a role both as a mutagen and as a selective agent. In its role as a mutagen, it may have been crucial in the origin of sex and as a driver of molecular evolution. As a selective agent, its influence has been broad. Discussed in this paper are the influence of ultraviolet radiation on biogeography, photosynthesis, and desiccation resistance.

  18. Solar UV Radiation and the Origin of Life on Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heap, S. R.; Gaidos, E.; Hubeny, I.; Lanz, T. M.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We have embarked on a program aimed at understanding the atmosphere of the early Earth, because of its importance as a greenhouse, radiation shield, and energy source for life. Here, we give a progress report on the first phase of this program: to establish the UV radiation from the early Sun. We are presently obtaining ultraviolet spectra (STIS, FUSE, EUVE) of carefully selected nearby, young solar-type stars, which act as surrogates for the early Sun. We are currently making detailed non-LTE analyses of the spectra and constructing models of their photospheres + chromospheres. once validated, these models will allow us to extrapolate our theoretical spectra to unobserved spectral regions, and to proceed to the next step: to develop photochemical models of the pre-biotic and Archean atmosphere of the Earth.

  19. Solar UV Radiation and the Origin of Life On Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heap, S. R.; Lanz, T.; Hubeny, I.; Gaidos, E.; Oegerle, William R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We have embarked on a program aimed at understanding the atmosphere of the early Earth, because of its importance as a greenhouse, radiation shield and energy source for life. Here, we give a progress report on the first phase of this program to establish the UV radiation from the early Sun. We have obtained ultraviolet spectra (STIS, FUSE, EUVE) of carefully selected nearby, young solar-type stars, which act as surrogates for the early Sun We are making detailed non-LTE analyses of the spectra and constructing models of their photospheres + chromospheres. Once validated, these models will allow us to extrapolate our theoretical spectra to other metallicities and to unobserved spectral regions.

  20. Solar UV Radiation and the Origin of Life On Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heap, S. R.; Lanz, T.; Hubeny, I.; Gaidos, E.; Oegerle, William R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We have embarked on a program aimed at understanding the atmosphere of the early Earth, because of its importance as a greenhouse, radiation shield and energy source for life. Here, we give a progress report on the first phase of this program to establish the UV radiation from the early Sun. We have obtained ultraviolet spectra (STIS, FUSE, EUVE) of carefully selected nearby, young solar-type stars, which act as surrogates for the early Sun We are making detailed non-LTE analyses of the spectra and constructing models of their photospheres + chromospheres. Once validated, these models will allow us to extrapolate our theoretical spectra to other metallicities and to unobserved spectral regions.

  1. Solar UV Radiation and the Origin of Life on Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heap, S. R.; Gaidos, E.; Hubeny, I.; Lanz, T. M.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We have embarked on a program aimed at understanding the atmosphere of the early Earth, because of its importance as a greenhouse, radiation shield, and energy source for life. Here, we give a progress report on the first phase of this program: to establish the UV radiation from the early Sun. We are presently obtaining ultraviolet spectra (STIS, FUSE, EUVE) of carefully selected nearby, young solar-type stars, which act as surrogates for the early Sun. We are currently making detailed non-LTE analyses of the spectra and constructing models of their photospheres + chromospheres. once validated, these models will allow us to extrapolate our theoretical spectra to unobserved spectral regions, and to proceed to the next step: to develop photochemical models of the pre-biotic and Archean atmosphere of the Earth.

  2. Improving radiation data quality of USDA UV-B monitoring and research program and evaluating UV decomposition in DayCent and its ecological impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Maosi

    from an improved cloud screening algorithm that utilizes an iterative rejection of cloudy points based on a decreasing tolerance of unstable optical depth behavior when calibration information is unknown. A MODTRAN radiative transfer model simulation showed the new cloud screening algorithm was capable of screening cloudy points while retaining clear-sky points. The comparison results showed that the cloud-free points determined by the new cloud screening algorithm generated significantly (56%) more and unbiased Langley offset voltages (VLOs) for both partly cloudy days and sunny days at two testing sites, Hawaii and Florida. The V¬LOs are proportional to the radiometric sensitivity. The stability of the calibration is also improved by the development of a two-stage reference channel calibration method for collocated UV-MFRSR and MFRSR instruments. Special channels where aerosol is the only contributor to total optical depth (TOD) variation (e.g. 368-nm channel) were selected and the radiative transfer model (MODTRAN) used to calculate direct normal and diffuse horizontal ratios which were used to evaluate the stability of TOD in cloud-free points. The spectral dependence of atmospheric constituents' optical properties and previously calibrated channels were used to find stable TOD points and perform Langley calibration at spectrally adjacent channels. The test of this method on the UV-B program site at Homestead, Florida (FL02) showed that the new method generated more clustered and abundant VLOs at all (UV-) MFRSR channels and potentially improved the accuracy by 2-4% at most channels and over 10% at 300-nm and 305-nm channels. In the second major part of this work, I calibrated the DayCent-UV model with ecosystem variables (e.g. soil water, live biomass), allowed maximum photodecay rate to vary with litter's initial lignin fraction in the model, and validated the optimized model with LIDET observation of remaining carbon and nitrogen at three semi-arid sites. I

  3. Radiation-stimulated diffusion in Al-Si alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiv, A.; Fuks, D.; Munitz, A.; Zenou, V.; Moiseenko, N.

    A di-vacancy low-temperature diffusion is proposed to explain diffusion-controlled processes in Al-Si alloys responsible for neutron-induced silicon precipitation. Ab initio calculations of potential barriers for Si atom hopping in aluminium lattice showed that in the case of di-vacancy diffusion, they are small compared with that of mono-vacancy diffusion. The low temperature diffusivity of mono-vacancies is too small to account for the measured Si diffusivities in aluminium. The dependencies of radiation-stimulated diffusion on the neutron flux and on the temperature are obtained and can be used for the experimental verification of the developed model.

  4. Hybrid radiative-transfer-diffusion model for optical tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarvainen, Tanja; Vauhkonen, Marko; Kolehmainen, Ville; Kaipio, Jari P.

    2005-02-01

    A hybrid radiative-transfer-diffusion model for optical tomography is proposed. The light propagation is modeled with the radiative-transfer equation in the vicinity of the laser sources, and the diffusion approximation is used elsewhere in the domain. The solution of the radiative-transfer equation is used to construct a Dirichlet boundary condition for the diffusion approximation on a fictitious interface within the object. This boundary condition constitutes an approximative distributed source model for the diffusion approximation in the remaining area. The results from the proposed approach are compared with finite-element solutions of the radiative-transfer equation and the diffusion approximation and Monte Carlo simulation. The results show that the method improves the accuracy of the forward model compared with the conventional diffusion model.

  5. Antioxidant responses of damiana (Turnera diffusa Willd) to exposure to artificial ultraviolet (UV) radiation in an in vitro model; part I; UV-C radiation.

    PubMed

    Soriano-Melgar, Lluvia de Abril Alexandra; Alcaraz-Meléndez, Lilia; Méndez-Rodríguez, Lía C; Puente, María Esther; Rivera-Cabrera, Fernando; Zenteno-Savín, Tania

    2014-05-01

    Ultraviolet type C (UV-C) radiation has higher energy than the UV-B radiation and has been less studied because it is completely absorbed by the ozone layer. However, artificial UV-C radiation can generate diverse modifications in the plants. Given that exposure to UV-C for short periods of time increases the antioxidant content, improving the appearance and shelf-life of products, its potential application in postharvest treatments to modify the antioxidant content of medicinal plants, such as damiana (Turnera diffusa), is novel and relevant. To determine the effects of UV-C radiation on enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidant defenses, as well as oxidative damage levels, in damiana (Turnera diffusa) plants in vitro. UV-C radiation decreased superoxide dismutase (SOD, EC 1.15.1.1) and total peroxidases (POX, EC 1.11.1) activities, the concentration of chlorophylls (a and b), carotenes, vitamin C, and total antioxidant capacity. UV-C radiation increased the phenolic compound levels in damiana. Loss of antioxidant defenses was higher in damiana plants exposed to higher UV-C doses and/or for longer periods. This study suggests that UV-C radiation induces oxidative stress, evidenced as increased protein carbonyls and phenolic compound content, in damiana (T. diffusa). Low dose, short exposure to UV-C stimulates phenolic compound content in damiana. Thus, controlled UV-C treatments could be used as postharvest treatment to increase phenolic compound content in damiana plants. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  6. Diffuse fraction of daily global radiation at Dhahran, Saudi Arabia

    SciTech Connect

    Elhadidy, M.A.; Abdel-Nabi, D.Y. )

    1991-01-01

    Relationship between the diffuse fraction of daily global solar radiation and clearness index (the ratio of global to extraterrestrial radiation) is obtained from the radiation data measured at Dhahran (26{degree}32{prime}N, 50{degree}13{prime}E), Saudia Arabia. Two years of daily radiation data calculated from measured one-minute values are used to develop the relationship. Another year of data is used to validate the relationship. Comparison between the present correlation and previous correlations is presented. The present data confirm the seasonal dependence and the location independence of the correlation reported in literature. The diffuse and global solar radiation are presented for dusty and clear days. The results show that the dust significantly increases the diffuse fraction of the global radiation. The diffuse fraction on a typical clear day in March is 0.11, while on a dusty day, in the same month, may be as high as 0.91.

  7. Antiradiation UV Vaccine: UV Radiation, Biological effects, lesions and medical management - immune-therapy and immune-protection.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Dmitri; Jones, Jeffrey; Maliev, Slava

    Key Words: Ultraviolet radiation,Standard Erythema Dose(SED), Minimal Erythema Dose(MED), Sun Burns, Solar Dermatitis, Sun Burned Disease, DNA Damage,Cell Damage, Antiradiation UV Vaccine, Immune-Prophylaxis of Sun Burned Diseases, Immune-Prophylaxis of Sun Burns, Immune-Therapy of Sun-Burned Disease and Sun Burns,Basal Cell Carcinoma (BCC), Squamous Cell Carcinoma (SCC), Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis(TEN). Introduction: High doses of UV generated by solar source and artificial sources create an exposure of mammals and other species which can lead to ultraviolet(UV)radiation- associated disease (including erythema, epilation, keratitis, etc.). UV radiation belongs to the non-ionizing part of the electromagnetic spectrum and ranges between 100 nm and 400 nm with 100 nm having been chosen arbitrarily as the boundary between non-ionizing and ionizing radiation, however EMR is a spectrum and UV can produce molecular ionization. UV radiation is conventionally categorized into 3 areas: UV-A (>315-400 nm),UV-B (>280-315 nm)and UV-C (>100-280 nm) [IARC,Working Group Reports,2005] An important consequence of stratospheric ozone depletion is the increased transmission of solar ultraviolet (UV)radiation to the Earth's lower atmosphere and surface. Stratospheric ozone levels have been falling, in certain areas, for the past several decades, so current surface ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation levels are thought to be close to their modern day maximum. [S.Madronich et al.1998] Overexposure of ultraviolet radiation a major cause of skin cancer including basal cell carcinoma (BCC), squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) { collectively referred to as “non-melanoma" skin cancer (NMSC) and melanoma as well, with skin cancers being the most common cancer in North America. [Armstrong et al. 1993, Gallagher et al. 2005] Methods and Experimental Design: Our experiments and testing of a novel UV “Antiradiation Vaccine” have employed a wide variety of laboratory animals which include : Chinchilla

  8. Diffuse galactic annihilation radiation from supernova nucleosynthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higdon, J. C.

    1985-01-01

    The propagation of MeV positrons in the outer ejecta of type I supernovae was investigated. It was found that the positrons created at times of approx 100 days propagated along magnetic field lines in the outer ejecta without any appreciable pitch-angle scattering or excitation of hydromagnetic waves. The lack of significant pitch-angle scattering is well consistent with models of wave excitation and scattering by resonant interactions. This occurs because time periods to scatter the particles or to excite waves are significantly longer than escape times. Thus it is expected that, when positrons are not coupled to the ejecta by Coulomb collisions, they escape from the relatively cold, dense ejecta and reside predominantly in the tenuous, hotter, shock-heated interstellar gas. In the tenuous shock-heated gas the positron lifetime against annihilation is much greater than lifetimes in the dense ejectra. Thus the production of steady-state diffuse annihilation radiation by some fraction of these escaped positrons seems probable.

  9. Photosensitizing potential of ciprofloxacin at ambient level of UV radiation.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Neeraj; Ray, Ratan Singh; Farooq, Mohammad; Pant, Aditya Bhushan; Hans, Rajendra Kumar

    2007-01-01

    Ciprofloxacin is a widely used fluoroquinolone drug with broad spectrum antibacterial activities. Clinical experience has shown incidences of adverse effects related to skin, hepatic, central nervous system, gastrointestinal and phototoxicity. India is a tropical country and sunlight is abundant throughout the day. In this scenario exposure to ambient levels of ultraviolet radiation (UV-R) in sunlight may lead to harmful effects in ciprofloxacin users. Phototoxicity assessment of ciprofloxacin was studied by two mouse fibroblast cell lines L-929 and NIH-3T3. Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) like singlet oxygen (1O2), superoxide anion radical (O2*-) and hydroxyl radical (*OH) was studied under the exposure of ambient intensities of UV-A (1.14, 1.6 and 2.2 mW cm(-2)), UV-B (0.6, 0.9 and 1.2 mW cm(-2)) and sunlight (60 min). The drug was generating 1O2, O2*- and *OH in a concentration and dose-dependent manner. Sodium azide (NaN3) and 1,4-diazabicyclo 2-2-2-octane (DABCO) inhibited the generation of 1O2. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) inhibited 90-95% O2*- generation. The drug (5-40 microg mL(-1)) was responsible for linoleic acid peroxidation. Quenching study of linoleic acid peroxidation with SOD (25 and 50 U mL(-1)) confirms the involvement of ROS in drug-induced lipid peroxidation. The generation of *OH radical was further confirmed by using specific quenchers of *OH such as mannitol (0.5 M) and sodium benzoate (0.5 M). 2'-deoxyguanosine (2'-dGuO) assay and linoleic acid peroxidation showed that ROS were mainly responsible for ciprofloxacin-sensitized photo-degradation of guanine base. L-929 cell line showed 29%, 34% and 54% reduced cell viability at higher drug concentration (300 microg mL(-1)) under UV-A, UV-B and sunlight, respectively. 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay in NIH-3T3 cell line at higher drug concentration (300 microg mL(-1)) showed a decrease in cell viability by 54%, 56% and 59% under UV-A, UV

  10. [High-spectral responses of Myrica rubra seedlings to UV-B radiation stress].

    PubMed

    Jin, Xin-Jie; Jiang, Hong; Chen, Jian; Shi, Qi-Long; Zhang, Qian-Qian

    2012-12-01

    A simulated field experiment with three treatments, i. e., ambient light (control), reduced UV-B radiation, and enhanced UV-B radiation, was conducted to evaluate the effects of solar ultraviolet (UV-B) radiation on the seedlings of Myrica rubra, a typical woody species in subtropical region. The leaf chlorophyll content, spectral reflectance and spectral characteristic parameters were measured and analyzed. As compared with the control, enhanced UV-B radiation decreased the seedling chlorophyll content while reduced UV-B radiation significantly increased the chlorophyll content, and these effects reflected in the spectral reflectance. Under the effects of the three gradients of UV-B radiation, the differences in the reflectance at visible region mainly occurred around the green peak and red edge on the reflectance curve, and the peak wavelength of the red edge shifted to longer wavelength. Enhanced UV-B radiation had an accumulated temporal effect on M. rubra. The inverted-Gaussian model parameters R0, lambda0, lambda(p), Rs, and 6 were the useful guides to reveal the spectral responses of M. rubra seedlings under UV-B radiation stress, among which, Rs performed the best. The differences in the spectral reflectance under different UV-B radiation levels could be effectively distinguished with the vegetation indices composed of the spectral reflectance of narrow wave bands or the reflectance at specific wavelengths.

  11. Improved Algorithms for Accurate Retrieval of UV - Visible Diffuse Attenuation Coefficients in Optically Complex, Inshore Waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cao, Fang; Fichot, Cedric G.; Hooker, Stanford B.; Miller, William L.

    2014-01-01

    Photochemical processes driven by high-energy ultraviolet radiation (UVR) in inshore, estuarine, and coastal waters play an important role in global bio geochemical cycles and biological systems. A key to modeling photochemical processes in these optically complex waters is an accurate description of the vertical distribution of UVR in the water column which can be obtained using the diffuse attenuation coefficients of down welling irradiance (Kd()). The Sea UV Sea UVc algorithms (Fichot et al., 2008) can accurately retrieve Kd ( 320, 340, 380,412, 443 and 490 nm) in oceanic and coastal waters using multispectral remote sensing reflectances (Rrs(), Sea WiFS bands). However, SeaUVSeaUVc algorithms are currently not optimized for use in optically complex, inshore waters, where they tend to severely underestimate Kd(). Here, a new training data set of optical properties collected in optically complex, inshore waters was used to re-parameterize the published SeaUVSeaUVc algorithms, resulting in improved Kd() retrievals for turbid, estuarine waters. Although the updated SeaUVSeaUVc algorithms perform best in optically complex waters, the published SeaUVSeaUVc models still perform well in most coastal and oceanic waters. Therefore, we propose a composite set of SeaUVSeaUVc algorithms, optimized for Kd() retrieval in almost all marine systems, ranging from oceanic to inshore waters. The composite algorithm set can retrieve Kd from ocean color with good accuracy across this wide range of water types (e.g., within 13 mean relative error for Kd(340)). A validation step using three independent, in situ data sets indicates that the composite SeaUVSeaUVc can generate accurate Kd values from 320 490 nm using satellite imagery on a global scale. Taking advantage of the inherent benefits of our statistical methods, we pooled the validation data with the training set, obtaining an optimized composite model for estimating Kd() in UV wavelengths for almost all marine waters. This

  12. High-resolution optical telescope for ultraviolet /UV/ radiation field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karayan, W. W.

    1979-01-01

    Design techniques are discussed for all-reflecting optics from first-order system considerations and applications currently utilized in the field of astronomical optics. The solution of the Dall-Karkham design problem is described, showing the advantage of inexpensive construction as compared with higher order surfaces. The design process reported here is a F/5 collecting system which quickly mates directly with the spectrometer; it is capable of achieving desired high resolution and sensitivity requirements. The theoretical limit of aberration tolerances is achieved with less than 1/8 of a wavelength at final focus (OPD). The design of spectrometer for ultra-violet (UV) radiation and its mechanism is included in this study.

  13. [Effects of UV-B radiation on the growth and reproduction of Vicia angustifolia].

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Wang, Xing-An; Wang, Ren-Jun; Qiu, Nian-Wei; Ma, Zong-Qi; Du, Guo-Zhen

    2012-05-01

    A simulation experiment with supplementation and exclusion of solar ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation was conducted to study the effects of enhanced and near ambient UV-B radiation on the growth and reproduction of alpine annual pasture Vicia angustifolia on Qinghai-Tibet Plateau. Enhanced UV-B decreased the plant height and biomass, biomass allocation to fruit, flower number, and 100-seed mass significantly, delayed flowering stage, increased the concentration degree of flowering and success rate of reproduction, but had little effect on seed yield. Near ambient UV-B radiation made the plant height increased after an initial decrease, decreased biomass allocation to fruit and 100-seed mass, but little affected flowering duration, flower number, and seed yield. Both enhanced and near ambient UV-B radiation could inhibit the growth and production of V. angustifolia, and the effect of enhanced UV-B radiation was even larger.

  14. Different growth sensitivity to enhanced UV-B radiation between male and female Populus cathayana.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiao; Zhao, Hongxia; Zhang, Xiaolu; Hänninen, Heikki; Korpelainen, Helena; Li, Chunyang

    2010-12-01

    We investigated sex-related morphological and physiological responses to enhanced UV-B radiation in the dioecious species Populus cathayana Rehd. Cuttings were subjected to two UV-B radiation regimes: ambient (4.5 kJ m⁻² day⁻¹) and enhanced (12.5 kJ m⁻² day⁻¹) biologically effective UV-B radiation for one growing season. Enhanced UV-B radiation was found to significantly decrease the shoot height and basal diameter and to reduce the leaf area, dry matter accumulation, net photosynthesis rate (P(n)), chlorophyll a/b ratio (Chl a/b) and anthocyanin content. Enhanced UV-B radiation also increased chlorophyll pigment, leaf nitrogen, malondialdehyde and abscisic acid (ABA) content, superoxide dismutase and peroxidase activities and UV-B-absorbing compounds. No significant effects of enhanced UV-B radiation were found on biomass allocation, gas exchange (except for P(n)), photochemical efficiency of photosystem II or water use efficiency. Moreover, different sensitivity to enhanced UV-B radiation between males and females was detected. Under enhanced UV-B radiation, males exhibited significantly higher basal diameter and leaf nitrogen, and lower Chl a/b, ABA content, UV-B-absorbing compounds, as well as less decrement of leaf area and dry matter accumulation than did females. However, no significant sexual differences in these traits were found under ambient UV-B radiation. Our results suggest that males may possess a greater UV-B resistance than do females, with males having a more efficient antioxidant system and higher anthocyanin content to alleviate UV-B penetration stress than females.

  15. The response of human skin commensal bacteria as a reflection of UV radiation: UV-B decreases porphyrin production.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanhan; Zhu, Wenhong; Shu, Muya; Jiang, Yong; Gallo, Richard L; Liu, Yu-Tsueng; Huang, Chun-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Recent global radiation fears reflect the urgent need for a new modality that can simply determine if people are in a radiation risk of developing cancer and other illnesses. Ultraviolet (UV) radiation has been thought to be the major risk factor for most skin cancers. Although various biomarkers derived from the responses of human cells have been revealed, detection of these biomarkers is cumbersome, probably requires taking live human tissues, and varies significantly depending on human immune status. Here we hypothesize that the reaction of Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes), a human resident skin commensal, to UV radiation can serve as early surrogate markers for radiation risk because the bacteria are immediately responsive to radiation. In addition, the bacteria can be readily accessible and exposed to the same field of radiation as human body. To test our hypothesis, P. acnes was exposed to UV-B radiation. The production of porphyrins in P. acnes was significantly reduced with increasing doses of UV-B. The porphyrin reduction can be detected in both P. acnes and human skin bacterial isolates. Exposure of UV-B to P. acnes- inoculated mice led to a significant decrease in porphyrin production in a single colony of P. acnes and simultaneously induced the formation of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD) in the epidermal layers of mouse skin. Mass spectrometric analysis via a linear trap quadrupole (LTQ)-Orbitrap XL showed that five peptides including an internal peptide (THLPTGIVVSCQNER) of a peptide chain release factor 2 (RF2) were oxidized by UV-B. Seven peptides including three internal peptides of 60 kDa chaperonin 1 were de-oxidized by UV-B. When compared to UV-B, gamma radiation also decreased the porphyrin production of P. acnes in a dose-dependent manner, but induced a different signature of protein oxidation/de-oxidation. We highlight that uncovering response of skin microbiome to radiation will facilitate the development of pre-symptomatic diagnosis

  16. The Response of Human Skin Commensal Bacteria as a Reflection of UV Radiation: UV-B Decreases Porphyrin Production

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanhan; Zhu, Wenhong; Shu, Muya; Jiang, Yong; Gallo, Richard L.; Liu, Yu-Tsueng; Huang, Chun-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Recent global radiation fears reflect the urgent need for a new modality that can simply determine if people are in a radiation risk of developing cancer and other illnesses. Ultraviolet (UV) radiation has been thought to be the major risk factor for most skin cancers. Although various biomarkers derived from the responses of human cells have been revealed, detection of these biomarkers is cumbersome, probably requires taking live human tissues, and varies significantly depending on human immune status. Here we hypothesize that the reaction of Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes), a human resident skin commensal, to UV radiation can serve as early surrogate markers for radiation risk because the bacteria are immediately responsive to radiation. In addition, the bacteria can be readily accessible and exposed to the same field of radiation as human body. To test our hypothesis, P. acnes was exposed to UV-B radiation. The production of porphyrins in P. acnes was significantly reduced with increasing doses of UV-B. The porphyrin reduction can be detected in both P. acnes and human skin bacterial isolates. Exposure of UV-B to P. acnes- inoculated mice led to a significant decrease in porphyrin production in a single colony of P. acnes and simultaneously induced the formation of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD) in the epidermal layers of mouse skin. Mass spectrometric analysis via a linear trap quadrupole (LTQ)-Orbitrap XL showed that five peptides including an internal peptide (THLPTGIVVSCQNER) of a peptide chain release factor 2 (RF2) were oxidized by UV-B. Seven peptides including three internal peptides of 60 kDa chaperonin 1 were de-oxidized by UV-B. When compared to UV-B, gamma radiation also decreased the porphyrin production of P. acnes in a dose-dependent manner, but induced a different signature of protein oxidation/de-oxidation. We highlight that uncovering response of skin microbiome to radiation will facilitate the development of pre-symptomatic diagnosis

  17. Divergences in the response to ultraviolet radiation between polar and non-polar ciliated protozoa: UV radiation effects in Euplotes.

    PubMed

    Di Giuseppe, Graziano; Cervia, Davide; Vallesi, Adriana

    2012-02-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation has detrimental effects on marine ecosystems, in particular in the polar regions where stratospheric ozone reduction causes higher levels of solar radiation. We analyzed two polar species of Euplotes, Euplotes focardii and Euplotes nobilii, for the sensitivity to UV radiation in comparison with two akin species from mid-latitude and tropical waters. Results showed that they face UV radiation much more efficiently than the non-polar species by adopting alternative strategies that most likely reflect different times of colonization of the polar waters. While E. focardii, which is endemic to the Antarctic, survives for longer exposed to UV radiation, E. nobilii, which inhabits both the Antarctic and Arctic, recovers faster from UV-induced damage.

  18. UV radiation and organic matter composition shape bacterial functional diversity in sediments

    PubMed Central

    Hunting, Ellard R.; White, Christopher M.; van Gemert, Maarten; Mes, Daan; Stam, Eva; van, Harm G.; der Geest; Kraak, Michiel H. S.; Admiraal, Wim

    2013-01-01

    UV radiation and organic matter (OM) composition are known to influence the species composition of bacterioplankton communities. Potential effects of UV radiation on bacterial communities residing in sediments remain completely unexplored to date. However, it has been demonstrated that UV radiation can reach the bottom of shallow waters and wetlands and alter the OM composition of the sediment, suggesting that UV radiation may be more important for sediment bacteria than previously anticipated. It is hypothesized here that exposure of shallow OM-containing sediments to UV radiation induces OM source-dependant shifts in the functional composition of sediment bacterial communities. This study therefore investigated the combined influence of both UV radiation and OM composition on bacterial functional diversity in laboratory sediments. Two different OM sources, labile and recalcitrant OM, were used and metabolic diversity was measured with Biolog GN. Radiation exerted strong negative effects on the metabolic diversity in the treatments containing recalcitrant OM, more than in treatments containing labile OM. The functional composition of the bacterial community also differed significantly between the treatments. Our findings demonstrate that a combined effect of UV radiation and OM composition shapes the functional composition of microbial communities developing in sediments, hinting that UV radiation may act as an important sorting mechanism for bacterial communities and driver for bacterial functioning in shallow waters and wetlands. PMID:24194736

  19. Human projected area factors for detailed direct and diffuse solar radiation analysis.

    PubMed

    Kubaha, K; Fiala, D; Toftum, J; Taki, A H

    2004-11-01

    Projected area factors for individual segments of the standing and sedentary human body were modelled for both direct and diffuse solar radiation using detailed 3D geometry and radiation models. The local projected area factors with respect to direct short-wave radiation are a function of the solar azimuth angle (alpha) between 0 degrees < alpha<360 degrees and the solar altitude (beta) angles between -90 degrees < beta<+90 degrees . In case of diffuse solar radiation from the isotropic sky the local human projected area factors were modelled as a function of the ground albedo (rho) ranging between 0< rho<1. The model was validated against available experimental data and showed good general agreement with projected area factors measured for both the human body as a whole and for local quantities. Scientists can use the equations to predict the inhomogeneous irradiation and absorption of direct and diffuse solar radiation and UV-radiation at surfaces of the human body. In conjunction with detailed multi-node models of human thermoregulation the equations can be used to predict the physiological implications of solar radiation and outdoor weather conditions on humans.

  20. Optical Protection Filters for Harmful Laser Beams and UV Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azim M., Osama A.

    2007-02-01

    Due to the rapid growth of radiation protection applications in various devices and instruments, it is essential to use suitable filters for eye protection of the personal working in the radiation field. Different protection filters were produced to protect from four laser beam wavelengths (at 532nm, 632.8nm, 694nm and 1064nm) and block three UV bands (UVA, UVB, and UVC). The design structure of the required dielectric multilayer filters used optical thin film technology. The computer analyses of the multilayer filter formulas were prepared using Macleod Software for the production filter processes. The deposition technique was achieved on optical substrates (Glass BK-7 and Infrasil 301) by dielectric material combinations including Dralo (mixture of oxides TiO2/Al2O3), and Lima (mixture of oxides SiO2/Al2O3); deposition by an electron beam gun. The output transmittance curves for both theoretical and experimental values of all filters are presented. To validate the suitability for use in a `real world', rather than laboratory test application, full environmental assessment was also carried out. These filters exhibited high endurance after exposing them to the durability tests (adhesion, abrasion resistance and humidity) according to military standards MIL-C-675C and MIL-C-48497A.

  1. Characterization of Actin Filament Dynamics during Mitosis in Wheat Protoplasts under UV-B Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Huize; Han, Rong

    2016-01-01

    Enhanced ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation is caused by the thinning ozone and affects photosynthesis and crop yield. Recently, UV-B radiation has been considered as an environmental signal that regulates plant growth. Elucidating the downstream effectors in UV-B-triggered pathways is of particular interest. Previous studies have shown that actin filaments (AFs) play many roles during cell physiological processes. However, the underlying response of AFs to UV-B radiation remains unclear. In this study, wheat protoplasts were isolated from 7-d-old leaves. The dynamics of AFs during mitosis were observed under different treatments. The protoplasts were treated with UV-B radiation, cytochalasin B (CB) and jasplakinolide (JAS). Ph-FITC labelling results revealed typical actin filament structures in the control group; AFs were rearranged under UV-B radiation. AFs polymerized into bundles during interphase, the preprophase band (PPB) structure was destroyed during prophase, and the AFs gathered into plaques during metaphase in response to UV-B radiation. During anaphase and telophase, the distribution of AFs was dispersed. Pharmacologic experiments revealed that CB induced apoptosis and JAS induced nuclear division without cytokinesis in wheat protoplasts. These results indicated that AFs respond to UV-B radiation during mitosis, supplying evidence of UV-B signal transduction in plants. PMID:26823006

  2. Bystander effect induced by UV radiation; why should we be interested?

    PubMed

    Widel, Maria

    2012-11-14

    The bystander effect, whose essence is an interaction of cells directly subjected to radiation with adjacent non-subjected cells, via molecular signals, is an important component of ionizing radiation action. However, knowledge of the bystander effect in the case of ultraviolet (UV) radiation is quite limited. Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species generated by UV in exposed cells induce bystander effects in non-exposed cells, such as reduction in clonogenic cell survival and delayed cell death, oxidative DNA damage and gene mutations, induction of micronuclei, lipid peroxidation and apoptosis. Although the bystander effect after UV radiation has been recognized in cell culture systems, its occurrence in vivo has not been studied. However, solar UV radiation, which is the main source of UV in the environment, may induce in human dermal tissue an inflammatory response and immune suppression, events which can be considered as bystander effects of UV radiation. The oxidative damage to DNA, genomic instability and the inflammatory response may lead to carcinogenesis. UV radiation is considered one of the important etiologic factors for skin cancers, basal- and squamous-cell carcinomas and malignant melanoma. Based on the mechanisms of actions it seems that the UV-induced bystander effect can have some impact on skin damage (carcinogenesis?), and probably on cells of other tissues. The paper reviews the existing data about the UV-induced bystander effect and discusses a possible implication of this phenomenon for health risk. 

  3. Synergism between UV-B radiation and pathogen magnifies amphibian embryo mortality in nature

    SciTech Connect

    Kiesecker, J.M.; Blaustein, R.

    1995-11-21

    Previous research has shown that amphibians have differential sensitivity to ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation. In some species, ambient levels of UV-B radiation cause embryonic mortality in nature. The detrimental effects of UV-B alone or with other agents may ultimately affect amphibians at the population level. Here, we experimentally demonstrate a synergistic effect between UV-B radiation and a pathogenic fungus in the field that increases the mortality of amphibian embryos compared with either factor alone. Studies investigating single factors for causes of amphibian egg mortality or population declines may not reveal the complex factors involved in declines.

  4. [Advances in influence of UV-B radiation on medicinal plant secondary metabolism].

    PubMed

    Wu, Yang; Fang, Minfeng; Yue, Ming; Chai, Yongfu; Wang, Hui; Li, Yifei

    2012-08-01

    Stratospheric ozone depletion results in an increased level of solar UV-B radiation (UV-B, 280-320 nm) reaching the earth surface. By the effect of UV-B radiation, various medicinal active ingredients changed because of the change of gene expression, enzyme activity and secondary metabolism, clinical effect is also changed. The research status of UV-B radiation and the accumulation of plant secondary metabolites in the past 10 years were summarized in this paper to supply reference for cultivation and exploitation of the medicinal plants.

  5. Differential effects of UV-B and UV-C components of solar radiation on MAP kinase signal transduction pathways in epidermal keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Dhanwada, K R; Dickens, M; Neades, R; Davis, R; Pelling, J C

    1995-11-16

    Exposure to solar ultraviolet (UV) light is a major cause of skin cancer, the most common human neoplasm. The earth's upper atmosphere absorbs the high energy UV-C wavelengths (100-280 nm), while allowing transmission of UV-B (280-320 nm) and UV-A (320-400 nm). It is therefore UV-B and to some extent UV-A, that contributes to most human skin malignancies. We report that the exposure of cultured keratinocytes or skin to UV-C radiation causes activation of MAP kinases (ERK and JNK). In contrast, the solar radiation associated with skin cancer (UV-B) was an ineffective activator of the ERK and JNK signal transduction pathways. Therefore, while exposure of epidermal cells to UV-C radiation under laboratory conditions causes marked activation of MAP kinase signal transduction pathways, only a low level of MAP kinase signaling is involved in the response of skin to biologically relevant solar radiation.

  6. Effects of Solar UV Radiation and Climate Change on Biogeochemical Cycling: Interactions and Feedbacks

    EPA Science Inventory

    Solar UV radiation, climate and other drivers of global change are undergoing significant changes and models forecast that these changes will continue for the remainder of this century. Here we assess the effects of solar UV radiation on biogeochemical cycles and the interactions...

  7. Effects of Solar UV Radiation and Climate Change on Biogeochemical Cycling: Interactions and Feedbacks

    EPA Science Inventory

    Solar UV radiation, climate and other drivers of global change are undergoing significant changes and models forecast that these changes will continue for the remainder of this century. Here we assess the effects of solar UV radiation on biogeochemical cycles and the interactions...

  8. Radiation Diffusion: An Overview of Physical and Numerical Concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Graziani, F R

    2005-01-14

    An overview of the physical and mathematical foundations of radiation transport is given. Emphasis is placed on how the diffusion approximation and its transport corrections arise. An overview of the numerical handling of radiation diffusion coupled to matter is also given. Discussions center on partial temperature and grey methods with comments concerning fully implicit methods. In addition finite difference, finite element and Pert representations of the div-grad operator is also discussed

  9. Discrete diffusion Monte Carlo for frequency-dependent radiative transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Densmore, Jeffrey D; Kelly, Thompson G; Urbatish, Todd J

    2010-11-17

    Discrete Diffusion Monte Carlo (DDMC) is a technique for increasing the efficiency of Implicit Monte Carlo radiative-transfer simulations. In this paper, we develop an extension of DDMC for frequency-dependent radiative transfer. We base our new DDMC method on a frequency-integrated diffusion equation for frequencies below a specified threshold. Above this threshold we employ standard Monte Carlo. With a frequency-dependent test problem, we confirm the increased efficiency of our new DDMC technique.

  10. Radiation Diffusion:. AN Overview of Physical and Numerical Concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graziani, Frank

    2005-12-01

    An overview of the physical and mathematical foundations of radiation transport is given. Emphasis is placed on how the diffusion approximation and its transport corrections arise. An overview of the numerical handling of radiation diffusion coupled to matter is also given. Discussions center on partial temperature and grey methods with comments concerning fully implicit methods. In addition finite difference, finite element and Pert representations of the div-grad operator is also discussed

  11. Validation of the Austrian forecast model for solar, biologically effective UV radiation-UV index for Vienna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmalwieser, Alois W.; Schauberger, Günther

    2000-11-01

    Since October 1995, a daily forecast of the UV index, as the irradiance of the biologically effective ultraviolet radiation, for the next day is published for Austria, Europe, and world wide. The Austrian forecast model as well as the input parameters are described. By connecting the UV index with the sensitivity of the photobiological skin types, a recommendation is given to select an appropriate sun protection factor of a sunscreen to avoid overexposure of the skin. The validation of the Austrian forecast model is done by measurements of the biologically effective ultraviolet radiation collected between July 1996 and July 1998 at Vienna (48°N, 16°E), Austria. The forecast quality is evaluated by comparing the Austrian model with two statistical models used in Canada and the Netherlands. By using the underestimation of the UV index as criteria in the sense of radiation protection, the Austrian model shows a 12% underestimation over the whole year.

  12. Marine Bacterial Isolates Display Diverse Responses to UV-B Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Joux, Fabien; Jeffrey, Wade H.; Lebaron, Philippe; Mitchell, David L.

    1999-01-01

    The molecular and biological consequences of UV-B radiation were investigated by studying five species of marine bacteria and one enteric bacterium. Laboratory cultures were exposed to an artificial UV-B source and subjected to various post-UV irradiation treatments. Significant differences in survival subsequent to UV-B radiation were observed among the isolates, as measured by culturable counts. UV-B-induced DNA photodamage was investigated by using a highly specific radioimmunoassay to measure cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs). The CPDs determined following UV-B exposure were comparable for all of the organisms except Sphingomonas sp. strain RB2256, a facultatively oligotrophic ultramicrobacterium. This organism exhibited little DNA damage and a high level of UV-B resistance. Physiological conditioning by growth phase and starvation did not change the UV-B sensitivity of marine bacteria. The rates of photoreactivation following exposure to UV-B were investigated by using different light sources (UV-A and cool white light). The rates of photoreactivation were greatest during UV-A exposure, although diverse responses were observed. The differences in sensitivity to UV-B radiation between strains were reduced after photoreactivation. The survival and CPD data obtained for Vibrio natriegens when we used two UV-B exposure periods interrupted by a repair period (photoreactivation plus dark repair) suggested that photoadaptation could occur. Our results revealed that there are wide variations in marine bacteria in their responses to UV radiation and subsequent repair strategies, suggesting that UV-B radiation may affect the microbial community structure in surface water. PMID:10473381

  13. Marine bacterial isolates display diverse responses to UV-B radiation.

    PubMed

    Joux, F; Jeffrey, W H; Lebaron, P; Mitchell, D L

    1999-09-01

    The molecular and biological consequences of UV-B radiation were investigated by studying five species of marine bacteria and one enteric bacterium. Laboratory cultures were exposed to an artificial UV-B source and subjected to various post-UV irradiation treatments. Significant differences in survival subsequent to UV-B radiation were observed among the isolates, as measured by culturable counts. UV-B-induced DNA photodamage was investigated by using a highly specific radioimmunoassay to measure cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs). The CPDs determined following UV-B exposure were comparable for all of the organisms except Sphingomonas sp. strain RB2256, a facultatively oligotrophic ultramicrobacterium. This organism exhibited little DNA damage and a high level of UV-B resistance. Physiological conditioning by growth phase and starvation did not change the UV-B sensitivity of marine bacteria. The rates of photoreactivation following exposure to UV-B were investigated by using different light sources (UV-A and cool white light). The rates of photoreactivation were greatest during UV-A exposure, although diverse responses were observed. The differences in sensitivity to UV-B radiation between strains were reduced after photoreactivation. The survival and CPD data obtained for Vibrio natriegens when we used two UV-B exposure periods interrupted by a repair period (photoreactivation plus dark repair) suggested that photoadaptation could occur. Our results revealed that there are wide variations in marine bacteria in their responses to UV radiation and subsequent repair strategies, suggesting that UV-B radiation may affect the microbial community structure in surface water.

  14. Interactive effects of solar UV radiation and climate change on biogeochemical cycling.

    PubMed

    Zepp, R G; Erickson, D J; Paul, N D; Sulzberger, B

    2007-03-01

    This report assesses research on the interactions of UV radiation (280-400 nm) and global climate change with global biogeochemical cycles at the Earth's surface. The effects of UV-B (280-315 nm), which are dependent on the stratospheric ozone layer, on biogeochemical cycles are often linked to concurrent exposure to UV-A radiation (315-400 nm), which is influenced by global climate change. These interactions involving UV radiation (the combination of UV-B and UV-A) are central to the prediction and evaluation of future Earth environmental conditions. There is increasing evidence that elevated UV-B radiation has significant effects on the terrestrial biosphere with implications for the cycling of carbon, nitrogen and other elements. The cycling of carbon and inorganic nutrients such as nitrogen can be affected by UV-B-mediated changes in communities of soil organisms, probably due to the effects of UV-B radiation on plant root exudation and/or the chemistry of dead plant material falling to the soil. In arid environments direct photodegradation can play a major role in the decay of plant litter, and UV-B radiation is responsible for a significant part of this photodegradation. UV-B radiation strongly influences aquatic carbon, nitrogen, sulfur and metals cycling that affect a wide range of life processes. UV-B radiation changes the biological availability of dissolved organic matter to microorganisms, and accelerates its transformation into dissolved inorganic carbon and nitrogen, including carbon dioxide and ammonium. The coloured part of dissolved organic matter (CDOM) controls the penetration of UV radiation into water bodies, but CDOM is also photodegraded by solar UV radiation. Changes in CDOM influence the penetration of UV radiation into water bodies with major consequences for aquatic biogeochemical processes. Changes in aquatic primary productivity and decomposition due to climate-related changes in circulation and nutrient supply occur concurrently with

  15. Species-specific effect of UV-B radiation on the temporal pattern of leaf growth.

    PubMed

    Robson, Thomas Matthew; Aphalo, Pedro José

    2012-02-01

    Recent molecular and physiological studies have demonstrated that ultraviolet-B radiation (UV-B) can affect some of the processes involved in leaf growth, but the phases of leaf growth affected have not been clearly delimited. We used functional growth analysis to assess the effects of UV-B radiation on the time course of leaf growth in seedlings of two birch species (Betula pendula and Betula pubescens). Our aim was to identify the phase(s) of leaf development affected by UV-B radiation. In a greenhouse study, 1-year-old birch seedlings were subjected to three daily doses of supplemental UV-B radiation treatments (UV-B⁺) and no UV-B radiation controls (UV-B⁻). Leaf growth measurements every 2 days were complemented by assessment of other functional traits over a 4-week period at the start of the growing season. Using fitted curves, we were able to determine that the rate of leaf expansion was slowed by the UV-B⁺ treatment in leaves of B. pendula because of a slower maximum leaf growth rate compared with plants under the UV-B⁻ controls, but that compensation toward the end of the period of expansion negated this difference when leaves reached their final size. UV-B⁺ had little effect on the rate of B. pubescens leaf growth despite a larger reduction in leaf final size due to UV-B⁺ than occurred in B. pendula leaves. In conclusion, effective regulation ameliorated the effects of UV-B radiation on leaf and seedling growth in B. pendula, whereas in B. pubescens, reductions in leaf final size under UV-B⁺ were consistent with a slightly reduced rate of height growth. Copyright © Physiologia Plantarum 2011.

  16. Diffuser for intravessels radiation based on plastic fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pich, Justyna; Grobelny, Andrzej; Beres-Pawlik, Elzbieta

    2006-03-01

    Laser radiation is used in such contemporary medicine as: sport medicine, gynecology etc. Because of many radiations inside the system, there is a need of an element, which allows to supply the place of illness with energy. The dimensions of this element are often small and the one that meets these conditions is diffuser.

  17. UV screening in higher plants induced by low temperature in the absence of UV-B radiation.

    PubMed

    Bilger, Wolfgang; Rolland, Mari; Nybakken, Line

    2007-02-01

    Epidermally located UV-B absorbing hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives and flavonoids serve as a screen against potentially damaging UV-B (280-315 nm) radiation in higher plants. We investigated the effect of low temperature on epidermal screening as assessed by a chlorophyll fluorescence technique. The epidermal UV-transmittance of greenhouse-grown Vicia faba plants was strongly dependent on growth temperatures between 21 and 9 degrees C, with significant differences already between 21 and 18 degrees C. There was a good correlation between epidermal UV-A and UV-B absorbance and the absorbance of whole leaf extracts at the respective wavelengths. Whereas in Oxyria digyna and Rumex longifolius no temperature dependence of epidermal transmittance could be detected, it was confirmed for seven other crop plant species, including summer and winter varieties, and for Arabidopsis thaliana. Dicotyledoneous plants showed a stronger response than monocotyledoneous ones. In all investigated species, the response in the UV-A spectral region was similar to that in the UV-B, suggesting that flavonoids were the responsible compounds. In V. faba, mature leaves did not respond with a change in epidermal transmittance upon transfer from warm to cool conditions or vice versa, whereas developing leaves did acclimate to the new conditions. We conclude that temperature is an important determinant of the acclimation of epidermal UV transmittance to environmental conditions in many plant species. The potential adaptive value of this response is discussed.

  18. Biologically weighted measurement of UV radiation in space and on earth with the biofilm technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rettberg, P.; Horneck, G.

    Biological dosimetry has provided experimental proof of the high sensitivity of the biologically effective UVB doses to changes in atmospheric ozone and has thereby confirmed the predictions from model calculations. The biological UV dosimeter 'biofilm' whose sensitivity is based on dried spores of B. subtilis as UV target weights the incident UV radiation according to its DNA damaging potential. Biofilm dosimetry was applicated in space experiments as well as in use in remote areas on Earth. Examples are long-term UV measurements in Antarctica, measurements of diurnal UV profiles parallel in time at different locations in Europe, continuous UV measurements in the frame of the German UV measurement network and personal UV dosimetry. In space biofilms were used to determine the biological efficiency of the extraterrestrial solar UV, to simulate the effects of decreasing ozone concentrations and to determine the interaction of UVB and vitamin D production of cosmonauts in the MIR station.

  19. The solar ultraviolet B radiation protection provided by shading devices with regard to its diffuse component.

    PubMed

    Kudish, Avraham I; Harari, Marco; Evseev, Efim G

    2011-10-01

    The composition of the incident solar global ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation with regard to its beam and diffuse radiation fractions is highly relevant with regard to outdoor sun protection. This is especially true with respect to sun protection during leisure-time outdoor sun exposure at the shore and pools, where people tend to escape the sun under shade trees or different types of shading devices, e.g., umbrellas, overhangs, etc., believing they offer protection from the erythemal solar radiation. The degree of sun protection offered by such devices is directly related to the composition of the solar global UVB radiation, i.e., its beam and diffuse fractions. The composition of the incident solar global UVB radiation can be determined by measuring the global UVB (using Solar Light Co. Inc., Model 501A UV-Biometer) and either of its components. The beam component of the UVB radiation was determined by measuring the normal incidence beam radiation using a prototype, tracking instrument consisting of a Solar Light Co. Inc. Model 501A UV-Biometer mounted on an Eppley Solar Tracker Model St-1. The horizontal beam component of the global UVB radiation was calculated from the measured normal incidence using a simple geometric correlation and the diffuse component is determined as the difference between global and horizontal beam radiations. Horizontal and vertical surfaces positioned under a horizontal overhang/sunshade or an umbrella are not fully protected from exposure to solar global UVB radiation. They can receive a significant fraction of the UVB radiation, depending on their location beneath the shading device, the umbrella radius and the albedo (reflectance) of the surrounding ground surface in the case of a vertical surface. Shading devices such as an umbrella or horizontal overhang/shade provide relief from the solar global radiation and do block the solar global UVB radiation to some extent; nevertheless, a significant fraction of the solar global UVB

  20. Solar UV radiation and cancer in young children

    PubMed Central

    Lombardi, Christina; Heck, Julia E.; Cockburn, Myles; Ritz, Beate

    2013-01-01

    Background Studies have shown that higher solar UV radiation exposure (UVR) may be related to lower risk of some cancers in adults. Recently an ecological study reported lower risks of some cancers among children living in higher UVR cities and countries. In a large population-based case-control study in California we tested the hypothesis that childhood cancers may be influenced by UVR. Methods Cancers in children ages 0 to 5 years were identified from California Cancer Registry records for 1986–2007 and linked to birth certificate data. Controls were sampled from the birth certificates at a ratio of 20:1. Based on birth address, we assigned UVR exposure in units of Watt-hours/m2 using a geostatistical exposure model developed with data from the National Solar Radiation Database. Results For cases with UVR exposure of 5111 Watt-hrs/m2 or above we estimated a reduction in odds of developing acute lymphoblastic leukemia (OR: 0.89, 95% CI: 0.81, 0.99), hepatoblastoma (OR: 0.69, 95% CI: 0.48, 1.00), and non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (OR: 0.71, 95% CI: 0.50, 1.02) adjusting for mother’s age, mother’s race and child’s year of birth. We also observed a small increase in odds for intracranial/intraspinal embryonal tumors (OR: 1.29, 95% CI: 1.01, 1.65). Conclusions Our findings suggest that UVR during pregnancy may decrease the odds of some childhood cancers. Future studies should explore additional factors that may be correlated with UVR exposure and possibly include biomarkers of immune function and vitamin D. Impact This study shows protective associations of UVR with some childhood cancers. PMID:23585515

  1. Internal pigment cells respond to external UV radiation in frogs.

    PubMed

    Franco-Belussi, Lilian; Nilsson Sköld, Helen; de Oliveira, Classius

    2016-05-01

    Fish and amphibians have pigment cells that generate colorful skins important for signaling, camouflage, thermoregulation and protection against ultraviolet radiation (UVR). However, many animals also have pigment cells inside their bodies, on their internal organs and membranes. In contrast to external pigmentation, internal pigmentation is remarkably little studied and its function is not well known. Here, we tested genotoxic effects of UVR and its effects on internal pigmentation in a neotropical frog, Physalaemus nattereri We found increases in body darkness and internal melanin pigmentation in testes and heart surfaces and in the mesenterium and lumbar region after just a few hours of UVR exposure. The melanin dispersion in melanomacrophages in the liver and melanocytes in testes increased after UV exposure. In addition, the amount of melanin inside melanomacrophages cells also increased. Although mast cells were quickly activated by UVR, only longer UVR exposure resulted in genotoxic effects inside frogs, by increasing the frequency of micronuclei in red blood cells. This is the first study to describe systemic responses of external UVR on internal melanin pigmentation, melanomacrophages and melanocytes in frogs and thus provides a functional explanation to the presence of internal pigmentation.

  2. Effects of UV radiation on marine ectotherms in polar regions.

    PubMed

    Dahms, Hans-U; Dobretsov, Sergey; Lee, Jae-Seong

    2011-05-01

    Ozone-related increase in solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) during the last decades provided an important ecological stressor, particularly for polar ecosystems since these are less adapted to such changes. All life forms appear to be susceptible to UVR to a highly variable extent that depends on individual species and their environment. Differences in sensitivity between organisms may relate to efficiency differences of their protection mechanisms and repair systems. UVR impacts are masked by large seasonal and geographic differences even in confined areas like the polar regions. UVR has effects and responses on various integration levels: from genetics, physiology, biology, populations, communities, to functional changes as in food webs with consequences on material and energy circulations through ecosystems. Even at current levels, solar UV-B affects consumer organisms, such as ectotherms (invertebrates and fish), particularly through impediments on critical phases of their development (early life history stages such as gametes, zygotes and larvae). Despite the overall negative implications of UVR, effect sizes vary widely in, e.g., molecular damage, cell and tissue damage, survival, growth, behavior, histology, and at the level of populations, communities and ecosystems. 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Leaf UV optical properties of rumex patientia l. and rumex obtusifolius l. in regard to a protective mechanism against solar UV-B radiation injury

    SciTech Connect

    Robberecht, R.; Caldwell, M.M.

    1987-01-01

    Effective UV attenuation in the outer leaf layers may represent an important protective mechanism against potentially damaging solar UV-B radiation. Epidermal optical properties for Rumex patientia and Rumex obtusifolius were examined on field-collected and greenhouse-grown plants. Rumex patientia, a relatively UV-B sensitive plant, has substantially higher epidermal UV transmittance than Rumex obtusifolius, which indicated that the UV-B flux at the mesophyll layer for Rumex obtusifolius by 27% after exposure to solar UV-B radiation. Flavonoid extract absorbance also increased in whole leaves of both species after solar UV-B radiation. The epidermis is not only an effective filter for UV-B radiation, but is wavelength selective, and shows a degree of plasticity in this attenuation.

  4. UV-B radiation and photosynthetic irradiance acclimate eggplant for outdoor exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Latimer, J. G.; Mitchell, C. A.; Mitchell, G. A.

    1987-01-01

    Treatment of greenhouse-grown eggplant (Solanum melongena L. var. esculentum Nees. 'Burpee's Black Beauty') seedlings with supplemental photosynthetically active radiation from cool-white fluorescent lamps increased growth of plants subsequently transferred outdoors relative to growth of plants that received no supplemental radiation or were shaded to 45% of solar irradiation in the greenhouse before transfer outdoors. Eggplant seedlings transferred outdoors were placed under plastic tarps either to provide relative protection from solar ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation (280-315 nm) using Mylar film or to allow exposure to UV-B using cellulose acetate. Protection of seedlings from UV-B radiation resulted in greater leaf expansion than for UV-B-exposed seedlings, but no change in leaf or shoot dry weight occurred after 9 days of treatment. Specific leaf weight increased in response to UV-B exposure outdoors. Exposure of eggplant to UV-B radiation from fluorescent sunlamps in the greenhouse also decreased leaf expansion and leaf and shoot dry weight gain after 5 days of treatment. However, there were no differences in leaf or shoot dry weight relative to control plants after 12 days of UV-B treatment, indicating that UV-B treated plants had acclimated to the treatment and actually had caught up with non-UV-B-irradiated plants in terms of growth.

  5. UV-B radiation and photosynthetic irradiance acclimate eggplant for outdoor exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Latimer, J. G.; Mitchell, C. A.; Mitchell, G. A.

    1987-01-01

    Treatment of greenhouse-grown eggplant (Solanum melongena L. var. esculentum Nees. 'Burpee's Black Beauty') seedlings with supplemental photosynthetically active radiation from cool-white fluorescent lamps increased growth of plants subsequently transferred outdoors relative to growth of plants that received no supplemental radiation or were shaded to 45% of solar irradiation in the greenhouse before transfer outdoors. Eggplant seedlings transferred outdoors were placed under plastic tarps either to provide relative protection from solar ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation (280-315 nm) using Mylar film or to allow exposure to UV-B using cellulose acetate. Protection of seedlings from UV-B radiation resulted in greater leaf expansion than for UV-B-exposed seedlings, but no change in leaf or shoot dry weight occurred after 9 days of treatment. Specific leaf weight increased in response to UV-B exposure outdoors. Exposure of eggplant to UV-B radiation from fluorescent sunlamps in the greenhouse also decreased leaf expansion and leaf and shoot dry weight gain after 5 days of treatment. However, there were no differences in leaf or shoot dry weight relative to control plants after 12 days of UV-B treatment, indicating that UV-B treated plants had acclimated to the treatment and actually had caught up with non-UV-B-irradiated plants in terms of growth.

  6. Response of radiation belt simulations to different radial diffusion coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drozdov, A.; Shprits, Y.; Subbotin, D.; Kellerman, A. C.

    2013-12-01

    Resonant interactions between Ultra Low Frequency (ULF) waves and relativistic electrons may violate the third adiabatic invariant of motion, which produces radial diffusion in the electron radiation belts. This process plays an important role in the formation and structure of the outer electron radiation belt and is important for electron acceleration and losses in that region. Two parameterizations of the resonant wave-particle interaction of electrons with ULF waves in the magnetosphere by Brautigam and Albert [2000] and Ozeke et al. [2012] are evaluated using the Versatile Electron Radiation Belt (VERB) diffusion code to estimate their relative effect on the radiation belt simulation. The period of investigation includes quiet time and storm time geomagnetic activity and is compared to data based on satellite observations. Our calculations take into account wave-particle interactions represented by radial diffusion transport, local acceleration, losses due to pitch-angle diffusion, and mixed diffusion. We show that the results of the 3D diffusion simulations depend on the assumed parametrization of waves. The differences between the simulations and potential missing physical mechanisms are discussed. References Brautigam, D. H., and J. M. Albert (2000), Radial diffusion analysis of outer radiation belt electrons during the October 9, 1990, magnetic storm, J. Geophys. Res., 105(A1), 291-309, doi:10.1029/1999JA900344 Ozeke, L. G., I. R. Mann, K. R. Murphy, I. J. Rae, D. K. Milling, S. R. Elkington, A. A. Chan, and H. J. Singer (2012), ULF wave derived radiation belt radial diffusion coefficients, J. Geophys. Res., 117, A04222, doi:10.1029/2011JA017463.

  7. Effects of UV radiation on aquatic ecosystems and interactions with other environmental factors.

    PubMed

    Häder, Donat-P; Williamson, Craig E; Wängberg, Sten-Åke; Rautio, Milla; Rose, Kevin C; Gao, Kunshan; Helbling, E Walter; Sinha, Rajeshwar P; Worrest, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Interactions between climate change and UV radiation are having strong effects on aquatic ecosystems due to feedback between temperature, UV radiation, and greenhouse gas concentration. Higher air temperatures and incoming solar radiation are increasing the surface water temperatures of lakes and oceans, with many large lakes warming at twice the rate of regional air temperatures. Warmer oceans are changing habitats and the species composition of many marine ecosystems. For some, such as corals, the temperatures may become too high. Temperature differences between surface and deep waters are becoming greater. This increase in thermal stratification makes the surface layers shallower and leads to stronger barriers to upward mixing of nutrients necessary for photosynthesis. This also results in exposure to higher levels of UV radiation of surface-dwelling organisms. In polar and alpine regions decreases in the duration and amount of snow and ice cover on lakes and oceans are also increasing exposure to UV radiation. In contrast, in lakes and coastal oceans the concentration and colour of UV-absorbing dissolved organic matter (DOM) from terrestrial ecosystems is increasing with greater runoff from higher precipitation and more frequent extreme storms. DOM thus creates a refuge from UV radiation that can enable UV-sensitive species to become established. At the same time, decreased UV radiation in such surface waters reduces the capacity of solar UV radiation to inactivate viruses and other pathogens and parasites, and increases the difficulty and price of purifying drinking water for municipal supplies. Solar UV radiation breaks down the DOM, making it more available for microbial processing, resulting in the release of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere. In addition to screening solar irradiance, DOM, when sunlit in surface water, can lead to the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Increases in carbon dioxide are in turn acidifying the oceans and inhibiting

  8. Role of pigmentation in protecting Bacillus sp. endospores against environmental UV radiation.

    PubMed

    Moeller, Ralf; Horneck, Gerda; Facius, Rainer; Stackebrandt, Erko

    2005-01-01

    Bacillus endospores show different kinds of pigmentation. Red-pigmented spores of Bacillus atrophaeus DSM 675, dark-gray spores of B. atrophaeus(T) DSM 7264 and light-gray spores of B. subtilis DSM 5611 were used to study the protective role of the pigments in their resistance to defined ranges of environmental UV radiation. Spores of B. atrophaeus DSM 675 possessing a dark-red pigment were 10 times more resistant to UV-A radiation than those of the other two investigated strains, whereas the responses to the more energetic UV-B and UV-C radiation were identical in all three strains. The methanol fraction of the extracted pigment from the spores absorbs in the associated wavelength area. These results indicate that the carotene-like pigment of spores of B. atrophaeus DSM 675 affects the resistance of spores to environmental UV-A radiation.

  9. Are the surgeons safe during UV-A radiation exposure in collagen cross-linking procedure?

    PubMed

    Shetty, Rashmi; Shetty, Rohit; Mahendradas, Padmamalini; Shetty, Bhujang K

    2012-02-01

    To quantify the effect of scattered UV-A radiation used in the collagen cross-linking (CXL) procedure and the amount of radiation reaching the surgeon and the surrounding area and to estimate the dampening effect by various protective devices. In this case series, 3 patients [aged 25-30 (±2.5) years] with keratoconus underwent a CXL procedure with UV-A light and riboflavin. Irradiance was measured using a spectrometer (Model USB2000; Ocean Optics, Inc) for various distances from the source, at various angles, and for different durations of radiation. The spectrometer was also used to measure the dampening effect produced by gown, latex gloves, and UV-protective glasses. Maximum UV-A radiation (1.4 × 10(-9) mW/cm(2)) was measured at 2 cm from the limbus, when the probe was held at a 45-degree angle to the floor. UV-A radiation reaching the surgeon's eye and the abdomen was 3.403 × 10(-11) and 2.36 × 10(-11) mW/cm(2), respectively. Gown, latex gloves, and UV-protective glasses showed dampening effects of 99.58%, 95.01%, and 99.73%, respectively. CXL appears to be a safe procedure with respect to UV-A radiation exposure to the surgeon. Further safety can be ensured by UV-protective devices.

  10. Does cell cycle arrest occur in plant under solar UV-B radiation?

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lei; Wang, Yan; Björn, Lars Olof; Li, Shaoshan

    2011-06-01

    UV-B radiation (280-315 nm) is an integral part of solar radiation and has many harmful effects on plant growth and development. However, the molecular mechanism for the inhibition of plant growth by UV-B remains largely unknown. UV-B radiation induces various responses such as growth inhibition, DNA damage and changes of gene expression. Recently, by using synchronous root tip culture, we found that UV-B modulates the expression of cell cycle regulatory genes through DNA damage. Western blotting analysis revealed that UV-B induced G1-to-S arrest did not correlate with the protein abundance of CDKB1;1 and CYCD3;1 gene regulating proteins, but may with the posttranslational control. We extended the expression analysis of cell cycle related genes based on the published microarray data and the results strengthen our assumption that cell cycle arrest could occur in plant under solar UV-B radiation. Further study is needed to elucidate the relationship between cell cycle regulation and protective pathway induced by low dose of UV-B radiation fundamental molecular mechanism for how plants respond to solar UV-B radiation.

  11. Impact of increasing Ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation on photosynthetic processes.

    PubMed

    Kataria, Sunita; Jajoo, Anjana; Guruprasad, Kadur N

    2014-08-01

    Increased UV-B radiation on the earth's surface due to depletion of stratospheric ozone layer is one of the changes of current climate-change pattern. The deleterious effects of UV-B radiation on photosynthesis and photosynthetic productivity of plants are reviewed. Perusal of relevant literature reveals that UV-B radiation inflicts damage to the photosynthetic apparatus of green plants at multiple sites. The sites of damage include oxygen evolving complex, D1/D2 reaction center proteins and other components on the donor and acceptor sides of PS II. The radiation inactivates light harvesting complex II and alters gene expression for synthesis of PS II reaction center proteins. Mn cluster of water oxidation complex is the most important primary target of UV-B stress whereas D1 and D2 proteins, quinone molecules and cytochrome b are the subsequent targets of UV-B. In addition, photosynthetic carbon reduction is also sensitive to UV-B radiation which has a direct effect on the activity and content of Rubisco. Some indirect effects of UV-B radiation include changes in photosynthetic pigments, stomatal conductance and leaf and canopy morphology. The failure of protective mechanisms makes PS II further vulnerable to the UV-B radiation. Reactive oxygen species are involved in UV-B induced responses in plants, both as signaling and damaging agents. Exclusion of ambient UV components under field conditions results in the enhancement of the rate of photosynthesis, PS II efficiency and subsequently increases the biomass accumulation and crop yield. It is concluded that predicted future increase in UV-B irradiation will have significant impact on the photosynthetic efficiency and the productivity of higher plants. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Antioxidant responses of damiana (Turnera diffusa Willd) to exposure to artificial ultraviolet (UV) radiation in an in vitro model; part ii; UV-B radiation.

    PubMed

    Soriano-Melgar, Lluvia de Abril Alexandra; Alcaraz-Meléndez, Lilia; Méndez-Rodríguez, Lía C; Puente, María Esther; Rivera-Cabrera, Fernando; Zenteno-Savín, Tania

    2014-05-01

    Ultraviolet type B (UV-B) radiation effects on medicinal plants have been recently investigated in the context of climate change, but the modifications generated by UV-B radiation might be used to increase the content of antioxidants, including phenolic compounds. To generate information on the effect of exposure to artificial UV-B radiation at different highdoses in the antioxidant content of damiana plants in an in vitro model. Damiana plantlets (tissue cultures in Murashige- Skoog medium) were irradiated with artificial UV-B at 3 different doses (1) 0.5 ± 0.1 mW cm-2 (high) for 2 h daily, (2) 1 ± 0,1 mW cm-2 (severe) for 2 h daily, or (3) 1 ± 0.1 mW cm-2 for 4 h daily during 3 weeks. The concentration of photosynthetic pigments (chlorophylls a and b, carotenoids), vitamins (C and E) and total phenolic compounds, the enzymatic activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD, EC 1.15.1.1) and total peroxidases (POX, EC 1.11.1), as well as total antioxidant capacity and lipid peroxidation levels were quantified to assess the effect of high artificial UV-B radiation in the antioxidant content of in vitro damiana plants. Severe and high doses of artificial UV-B radiation modified the antioxidant content by increasing the content of vitamin C and decreased the phenolic compound content, as well as modified the oxidative damage of damiana plants in an in vitro model. UV-B radiation modified the antioxidant content in damiana plants in an in vitro model, depending on the intensity and duration of the exposure. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  13. Biological responses to solar UV radiation in space and on Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rettberg, P.; Scherer, K.; Horneck, G.

    2001-08-01

    Solar UV radiation is a dynamic driving force of organic chemical evolution. However, it has had also severe constraints in biological evolution. During the early history of life on Earth, before the formation of a protective ozone layer in the atmosphere, high intensities of solar UV radiation of short wavelengths could reach the surface of the Earth. Today the full spectrum of solar UV radiation is only experienced in space, where other important space parameters influence survival and genetic stability additionally, like vacuum, cosmic radiation, temperature, extremes, microgravity. To reach a better understanding of the processes leading to the origin, evolution and distribution of life on Earth we have performed several space experiments with microorganisms. The ability of resistant life forms like bacterial spores to survive high doses of extraterrestrial solar UV alone or in combination with other space parameters, e.g. vacuum, was investigated. Extraterrestrial solar UV was found to have a thousand times higher biological effectiveness than UV radiation filtered by stratospheric ozone concentrations found today on Earth. Radiative transfer models predicting a strong correlation between the decrease in biologically effective UV radiation with increasing ozone concentrations during the history of life on Earth could be validated experimentally in space.

  14. UV-A radiation effects on higher plants: Exploring the known unknown.

    PubMed

    Verdaguer, Dolors; Jansen, Marcel A K; Llorens, Laura; Morales, Luis O; Neugart, Susanne

    2017-02-01

    Ultraviolet-A radiation (UV-A: 315-400nm) is a component of solar radiation that exerts a wide range of physiological responses in plants. Currently, field attenuation experiments are the most reliable source of information on the effects of UV-A. Common plant responses to UV-A include both inhibitory and stimulatory effects on biomass accumulation and morphology. UV-A effects on biomass accumulation can differ from those on root: shoot ratio, and distinct responses are described for different leaf tissues. Inhibitory and enhancing effects of UV-A on photosynthesis are also analysed, as well as activation of photoprotective responses, including UV-absorbing pigments. UV-A-induced leaf flavonoids are highly compound-specific and species-dependent. Many of the effects on growth and development exerted by UV-A are distinct to those triggered by UV-B and vary considerably in terms of the direction the response takes. Such differences may reflect diverse UV-perception mechanisms with multiple photoreceptors operating in the UV-A range and/or variations in the experimental approaches used. This review highlights a role that various photoreceptors (UVR8, phototropins, phytochromes and cryptochromes) may play in plant responses to UV-A when dose, wavelength and other conditions are taken into account. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Effects of Litter Exposure to UV Radiation on Subsequent Microbial Decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Y.; Scarlett, R. D.; King, J. Y.

    2013-12-01

    In arid ecosystems, photodegradation has recently been identified as a key process in ecosystem carbon cycling. Photodegradation directly contributes to organic matter decomposition through photochemical mineralization. However, it remains unclear how photodegradation interacts with biotic decomposition processes. It is commonly thought that photodegradation can facilitate subsequent microbial decomposition, as it can preferentially decompose lignin, a recalcitrant substrate in microbial decomposition. We hypothesized that ultraviolet (UV) radiation exposure would increase the biodegradability of plant litter and that this effect would be greater with longer radiation exposure. In the field at the University of California's Sedgwick Reserve in Santa Ynez, CA, Bromus diandrus litter samples were exposed to two levels of UV radiation using screens: 'UV pass' (transmitting > 81% of UV radiation) and 'UV block' (transmitting < 8% of UV radiation). There were four lengths of UV exposure: 2.5 months (during summer), 4 months (during summer), 6 months, and 12 months. Litter samples were then analyzed for carbon and nitrogen content, fiber fractions, water extractable carbon and nitrogen, and biodegradability. We evaluated the biodegradability of litter using a 30-day laboratory incubation experiment. Litter samples were incubated in the dark in sealed glass microcosms with soil inoculum. The CO2 accumulation in each microcosm headspace was measured every 1-2 days to assess microbial respiration rate. In contrast to our hypothesis, litter exposed under UV block conditions had 28% higher cumulative CO2 production than litter from UV pass when the length of exposure was 2.5 months (P = 0.02, n = 4). Litter from the UV block treatment also tended to show higher cumulative CO2 production than litter from UV pass when the exposure lasted for 4 months (P = 0.10, n = 4). For samples with longer exposure times (6 and 12 months), there was no difference in CO2 production between UV

  16. The equilibrium-diffusion limit for radiation hydrodynamics

    DOE PAGES

    Ferguson, J. M.; Morel, J. E.; Lowrie, R.

    2017-07-27

    The equilibrium-diffusion approximation (EDA) is used to describe certain radiation-hydrodynamic (RH) environments. When this is done the RH equations reduce to a simplified set of equations. The EDA can be derived by asymptotically analyzing the full set of RH equations in the equilibrium-diffusion limit. Here, we derive the EDA this way and show that it and the associated set of simplified equations are both first-order accurate with transport corrections occurring at second order. Having established the EDA’s first-order accuracy we then analyze the grey nonequilibrium-diffusion approximation and the grey Eddington approximation and show that they both preserve this first-order accuracy.more » Further, these approximations preserve the EDA’s first-order accuracy when made in either the comoving-frame (CMF) or the lab-frame (LF). And while analyzing the Eddington approximation, we found that the CMF and LF radiation-source equations are equivalent when neglecting O(β2) terms and compared in the LF. Of course, the radiation pressures are not equivalent. It is expected that simplified physical models and numerical discretizations of the RH equations that do not preserve this first-order accuracy will not retain the correct equilibrium-diffusion solutions. As a practical example, we show that nonequilibrium-diffusion radiative-shock solutions devolve to equilibrium-diffusion solutions when the asymptotic parameter is small.« less

  17. Three-temperature plasma shock solutions with gray radiation diffusion

    DOE PAGES

    Johnson, Bryan M.; Klein, Richard I.

    2016-04-19

    Here we discuss the effects of radiation on the structure of shocks in a fully ionized plasma are investigated by solving the steady-state fluid equations for ions, electrons, and radiation. The electrons and ions are assumed to have the same bulk velocity but separate temperatures, and the radiation is modeled with the gray diffusion approximation. Both electron and ion conduction are included, as well as ion viscosity. When the material is optically thin, three-temperature behavior occurs. When the diffusive flux of radiation is important but radiation pressure is not, two-temperature behavior occurs, with the electrons strongly coupled to the radiation.more » Since the radiation heats the electrons on length scales that are much longer than the electron–ion Coulomb coupling length scale, these solutions resemble radiative shock solutions rather than plasma shock solutions that neglect radiation. When radiation pressure is important, all three components are strongly coupled. Results with constant values for the transport and coupling coefficients are compared to a full numerical simulation with a good match between the two, demonstrating that steady shock solutions constitute a straightforward and comprehensive verification test methodology for multi-physics numerical algorithms.« less

  18. Three-temperature plasma shock solutions with gray radiation diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Bryan M.; Klein, Richard I.

    2016-04-19

    Here we discuss the effects of radiation on the structure of shocks in a fully ionized plasma are investigated by solving the steady-state fluid equations for ions, electrons, and radiation. The electrons and ions are assumed to have the same bulk velocity but separate temperatures, and the radiation is modeled with the gray diffusion approximation. Both electron and ion conduction are included, as well as ion viscosity. When the material is optically thin, three-temperature behavior occurs. When the diffusive flux of radiation is important but radiation pressure is not, two-temperature behavior occurs, with the electrons strongly coupled to the radiation. Since the radiation heats the electrons on length scales that are much longer than the electron–ion Coulomb coupling length scale, these solutions resemble radiative shock solutions rather than plasma shock solutions that neglect radiation. When radiation pressure is important, all three components are strongly coupled. Results with constant values for the transport and coupling coefficients are compared to a full numerical simulation with a good match between the two, demonstrating that steady shock solutions constitute a straightforward and comprehensive verification test methodology for multi-physics numerical algorithms.

  19. Three-temperature plasma shock solutions with gray radiation diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Bryan M.; Klein, Richard I.

    2016-04-19

    Here we discuss the effects of radiation on the structure of shocks in a fully ionized plasma are investigated by solving the steady-state fluid equations for ions, electrons, and radiation. The electrons and ions are assumed to have the same bulk velocity but separate temperatures, and the radiation is modeled with the gray diffusion approximation. Both electron and ion conduction are included, as well as ion viscosity. When the material is optically thin, three-temperature behavior occurs. When the diffusive flux of radiation is important but radiation pressure is not, two-temperature behavior occurs, with the electrons strongly coupled to the radiation. Since the radiation heats the electrons on length scales that are much longer than the electron–ion Coulomb coupling length scale, these solutions resemble radiative shock solutions rather than plasma shock solutions that neglect radiation. When radiation pressure is important, all three components are strongly coupled. Results with constant values for the transport and coupling coefficients are compared to a full numerical simulation with a good match between the two, demonstrating that steady shock solutions constitute a straightforward and comprehensive verification test methodology for multi-physics numerical algorithms.

  20. Three-temperature plasma shock solutions with gray radiation diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, B. M.; Klein, R. I.

    2017-03-01

    The effects of radiation on the structure of shocks in a fully ionized plasma are investigated by solving the steady-state fluid equations for ions, electrons, and radiation. The electrons and ions are assumed to have the same bulk velocity but separate temperatures, and the radiation is modeled with the gray diffusion approximation. Both electron and ion conduction are included, as well as ion viscosity. When the material is optically thin, three-temperature behavior occurs. When the diffusive flux of radiation is important but radiation pressure is not, two-temperature behavior occurs, with the electrons strongly coupled to the radiation. Since the radiation heats the electrons on length scales that are much longer than the electron-ion Coulomb coupling length scale, these solutions resemble radiative shock solutions rather than plasma shock solutions that neglect radiation. When radiation pressure is important, all three components are strongly coupled. Results with constant values for the transport and coupling coefficients are compared to a full numerical simulation with a good match between the two, demonstrating that steady shock solutions constitute a straightforward and comprehensive verification test methodology for multi-physics numerical algorithms.

  1. Oceanic protection of prebiotic organic compounds from UV radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cleaves, H. J.; Miller, S. L.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    It is frequently stated that UV light would cause massive destruction of prebiotic organic compounds because of the absence of an ozone layer. The elevated UV flux of the early sun compounds this problem. This applies to organic compounds of both terrestrial and extraterrestrial origin. Attempts to deal with this problem generally involve atmospheric absorbers. We show here that prebiotic organic polymers as well as several inorganic compounds are sufficient to protect oceanic organic molecules from UV degradation. This aqueous protection is in addition to any atmospheric UV absorbers and should be a ubiquitous planetary phenomenon serving to increase the size of planetary habitable zones.

  2. Oceanic protection of prebiotic organic compounds from UV radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cleaves, H. J.; Miller, S. L.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    It is frequently stated that UV light would cause massive destruction of prebiotic organic compounds because of the absence of an ozone layer. The elevated UV flux of the early sun compounds this problem. This applies to organic compounds of both terrestrial and extraterrestrial origin. Attempts to deal with this problem generally involve atmospheric absorbers. We show here that prebiotic organic polymers as well as several inorganic compounds are sufficient to protect oceanic organic molecules from UV degradation. This aqueous protection is in addition to any atmospheric UV absorbers and should be a ubiquitous planetary phenomenon serving to increase the size of planetary habitable zones.

  3. Solar UV radiation enhances the toxicity of arsenic in Ceriodaphnia dubia.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Lara J; Whitehead, J Andrew; Anderson, Susan L

    2002-08-01

    Extensive research exists regarding the toxicity of metals (including arsenic) to aquatic invertebrates. However, there has been little consideration of potential synergies between metals and ultraviolet (UV) radiation--despite considerable debate on this topic in human health research. Ultraviolet radiation is nearly ubiquitous in the natural environment, but it is generally overlooked as a confounding variable in toxicological assessments. We evaluate synergies between arsenic and solar UV radiation using the crustacean, Ceriodaphnia dubia. Both laboratory (with simulated solar radiation) and outdoor (with natural solar radiation) factorial experiments were performed with two intensities of UV (low and high) and four arsenic concentrations (0, 1, 1.25 and 1.5 mg/l). The laboratory experiment was multigenerational, examining survival and fecundity effects. The combination of high UV + 1.5 mg/l As adversely impacted survival; whereas, High UV + 0 mg/l As and Low UV + 1.5 mg/l As treatments did not. These results suggest synergism. This pattern was consistent for all three generations. Fecundity effects were not consistent across generations, and arsenic was demonstrated to have a greater impact than UV. Outdoor experiments were limited to assessing survival. Exposures in September 1999 resulted in a pattern similar to that in the laboratory exposure. High UV + 1.5 mg/l As treatment elicited diminished survival as compared to high UV + 0 mg/l As and low UV + 1.5 mg/l As. These results indicate that a synergistic effect between arsenic and UV exposure is possible under ambient conditions and within a relatively narrow dose range. The mechanism of this effect is unknown but could include synergistic genotoxic or oxidative stress. These findings point to the importance of using realistic UV exposures when determining criteria for protection of aquatic life.

  4. UV-laser-based longitudinal illuminated diffuser (LID) incorporating diffractive and Lambertian reflectance for the disinfection of beverages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizotte, Todd

    2010-08-01

    A novel laser beam shaping system was designed to demonstrate the potential of using high power UV laser sources for large scale disinfection of liquids used in the production of food products, such as juices, beer, milk and other beverage types. The design incorporates a patented assembly of optical components including a diffractive beam splitting/shaping element and a faceted pyramidal or conically shaped Lambertian diffuser made from a compression molded PTFE compounds. When properly sintered to an appropriate density, as an example between 1.10 and 1.40 grams per cubic centimeter, the compressed PTFE compounds show a ~99% reflectance at wavelengths ranging from 300 nm to 1500 nm, and a ~98.5% refection of wavelengths from 250 nm to 2000 nm [1]. The unique diffuser configuration also benefits from the fact that the PTFE compounds do not degrade when exposed to ultraviolet radiation as do barium sulfate materials and silver or aluminized mirror coatings [2]. These components are contained within a hermetically sealed quartz tube. Once assembled a laser beam is directed through one end of the tube. This window takes the form of a computer generated diffractive splitter or other diffractive shaper element to split the laser beam into a series of spot beamlets, circular rings or other geometric shapes. As each of the split beamlets or rings cascade downward, they illuminate various points along the tapered PTFE cone or faceted pyramidal form. As they strike the surface they each diffuse in a Lambertian reflectance pattern creating a pseudo-uniform circumferential illuminator along the length of the quartz tube enclosing the assembly. The compact tubular structure termed Longitudinal Illuminated Diffuser (LID) provides a unique UV disinfection source that can be placed within a centrifugal reactor or a pipe based reactor chamber. This paper will review the overall design principle, key component design parameters, preliminary analytic and bench operational testing

  5. [Effects of enhanced UV-B radiation on the growth of five bryophytes in Changbai Mountains].

    PubMed

    Wu, Yu-Huan; Gu, Yan-Hong; Liu, Peng; Zoltán, Tuba

    2007-09-01

    Five bryophytes (Rhytidium rugosum, Rhytidiadelphus triquetrus, Hylocomium splendens, Hylocomium pyrenaicum, and Polytrichum alpinum) were exposed to 0.2 kJ x m(-2) x d(-1) (visible light under native condition, CK), 3.0 kJ x m(-2) x d(-1) (simulated dose of UV-B irradiance at the tundra in Changbai Mountains, medium dose of UV-B irradiance, T1), and 6.0 kJ x m(-2) x d(-1) (high dose of UV-B irradiance, T2) to investigate the effects of enhanced UV-B radiation on plant height, biomass, and chlorophyll content. The results indicated that medium and high UV-B radiations decreased the plant height, biomass, and chlorophyll content of R. triquetrus and H. splendens by 32.3%, 62.4%, and 81.3%, and 21.4%, 59.4%, and 62.8%, respectively, and the relative growth rates were negative. Enhanced UV-B radiations had less effect on P. alpinum chlorophyll content but doubled its below-ground biomass, and slightly increased the biomass of R. rugosum. P. alpinum and R. rugosum had higher tolerance against UV-B radiation, while R. triquetrus and H. splendens were more sensitive to UV-B radiation.

  6. Human skin pigmentation as an adaptation to UV radiation

    PubMed Central

    Jablonski, Nina G.; Chaplin, George

    2010-01-01

    Human skin pigmentation is the product of two clines produced by natural selection to adjust levels of constitutive pigmentation to levels of UV radiation (UVR). One cline was generated by high UVR near the equator and led to the evolution of dark, photoprotective, eumelanin-rich pigmentation. The other was produced by the requirement for UVB photons to sustain cutaneous photosynthesis of vitamin D3 in low-UVB environments, and resulted in the evolution of depigmented skin. As hominins dispersed outside of the tropics, they experienced different intensities and seasonal mixtures of UVA and UVB. Extreme UVA throughout the year and two equinoctial peaks of UVB prevail within the tropics. Under these conditions, the primary selective pressure was to protect folate by maintaining dark pigmentation. Photolysis of folate and its main serum form of 5-methylhydrofolate is caused by UVR and by reactive oxygen species generated by UVA. Competition for folate between the needs for cell division, DNA repair, and melanogenesis is severe under stressful, high-UVR conditions and is exacerbated by dietary insufficiency. Outside of tropical latitudes, UVB levels are generally low and peak only once during the year. The populations exhibiting maximally depigmented skin are those inhabiting environments with the lowest annual and summer peak levels of UVB. Development of facultative pigmentation (tanning) was important to populations settling between roughly 23° and 46° , where levels of UVB varied strongly according to season. Depigmented and tannable skin evolved numerous times in hominin evolution via independent genetic pathways under positive selection. PMID:20445093

  7. Oxidation of p-hydroxybenzoic acid by UV radiation and by TiO2/UV radiation: comparison and modelling of reaction kinetic.

    PubMed

    De Heredia, J B; Torregrosa, J; Dominguez, J R; Peres, J A

    2001-05-30

    The phenolic compound p-hydroxybenzoic acid is very common in a great variety of agroindustrial wastewaters (olive oil and table olive industries, distilleries). The objective of this work was to study the photocatalytic activity of TiO2 towards the decomposition of p-hydroxybenzoic acid. In order to demonstrate the greater oxidizing power of the photocatalytic system and to quantify the additional levels of degradation attained, we performed experiments on the oxidation of p-hydroxybenzoic acid by UV radiation alone and by the TiO2/UV radiation combination. A kinetic model is applied for the photooxidation by UV radiation and by the TiO(2)/UV system. Experimental results indicated that the kinetics for both oxidation processes can be fitted well by a pseudo-first-order kinetic model. The second oxidation process can be explained in terms of the Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetic model. The values of the adsorption equilibrium constant, K(pHB), and the second order kinetic rate constant, k(c), were 0.37 ppm(-1) and 6.99 ppm min(-1), respectively. Finally, a comparison between the kinetic rate constants for two oxidation systems reveals that the constants for the TiO2/UV system are clearly greater (between 220-435%) than those obtained in the direct UV photooxidation.

  8. [Effect of the combination of cadmium and UV-B radiation on soybean growth].

    PubMed

    Qiang, Weiya; Yang, Hui; Chen, Tuo; An, Lizhe; Wang, Xunling

    2004-04-01

    This paper studied the characteristics of soybean growth under the stress of Cd, UV-B radiation and their combination. The results showed that UV-B radiation gave a more pronounced inhibition on soybean growth than cadmium. Under UV-B radiation, the internode differentiation and elongation were inhibited, the internode and plant height were reduced, and the activities of SOD and POD had an apparent increase. Cd2+ could antagonize the effect of UV-B radiation on POD activity, and inhibit indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) oxidase activity. A significant decrease of POD and IAA oxidase activities in soybean was detected when exposed to combined UV-B and Cd2+, compared with UV-B radiation only. The decrease of POD and IAA oxidase activities was related to the increase of IAA contents and photosynthetic activity, which might account for the increases of biomass and plant height. Moreover, the combined stress enhanced the inhibition of root growth, and significantly decreased root length. The IAA oxidase and POD activities and photosynthesis rate might be the crucial factors determining the pattern of soybean growth under the stress of Cd2+ in combination with UV-B radiation.

  9. Re-interpreting plant morphological responses to UV-B radiation.

    PubMed

    Robson, T Matthew; Klem, Karel; Urban, Otmar; Jansen, Marcel A K

    2015-05-01

    There is a need to reappraise the effects of UV-B radiation on plant morphology in light of improved mechanistic understanding of UV-B effects, particularly elucidation of the UV RESISTANCE LOCUS 8 (UVR8) photoreceptor. We review responses at cell and organismal levels, and explore their underlying regulatory mechanisms, function in UV protection and consequences for plant fitness. UV-induced morphological changes include thicker leaves, shorter petioles, shorter stems, increased axillary branching and altered root:shoot ratios. At the cellular level, UV-B morphogenesis comprises changes in cell division, elongation and/or differentiation. However, notwithstanding substantial new knowledge of molecular, cellular and organismal UV-B responses, there remains a clear gap in our understanding of the interactions between these organizational levels, and how they control plant architecture. Furthermore, despite a broad consensus that UV-B induces relatively compact architecture, we note substantial diversity in reported phenotypes. This may relate to UV-induced morphological changes being underpinned by different mechanisms at high and low UV-B doses. It remains unproven whether UV-induced morphological changes have a protective function involving shading and decreased leaf penetration of UV-B, counterbalancing trade-offs such as decreased photosynthetic light capture and plant-competitive abilities. Future research will need to disentangle seemingly contradictory interactions occurring at the threshold UV dose where regulation and stress-induced morphogenesis overlap.

  10. Epidermal UV-A absorbance and whole-leaf flavonoid composition in pea respond more to solar blue light than to solar UV radiation.

    PubMed

    Siipola, Sari M; Kotilainen, Titta; Sipari, Nina; Morales, Luis O; Lindfors, Anders V; Robson, T Matthew; Aphalo, Pedro J

    2015-05-01

    Plants synthesize phenolic compounds in response to certain environmental signals or stresses. One large group of phenolics, flavonoids, is considered particularly responsive to ultraviolet (UV) radiation. However, here we demonstrate that solar blue light stimulates flavonoid biosynthesis in the absence of UV-A and UV-B radiation. We grew pea plants (Pisum sativum cv. Meteor) outdoors, in Finland during the summer, under five types of filters differing in their spectral transmittance. These filters were used to (1) attenuate UV-B; (2) attenuate UV-B and UV-A < 370 nm; (3) attenuate UV-B and UV-A; (4) attenuate UV-B, UV-A and blue light; and (5) as a control not attenuating these wavebands. Attenuation of blue light significantly reduced the flavonoid content in leaf adaxial epidermis and reduced the whole-leaf concentrations of quercetin derivatives relative to kaempferol derivatives. In contrast, UV-B responses were not significant. These results show that pea plants regulate epidermal UV-A absorbance and accumulation of individual flavonoids by perceiving complex radiation signals that extend into the visible region of the solar spectrum. Furthermore, solar blue light instead of solar UV-B radiation can be the main regulator of phenolic compound accumulation in plants that germinate and develop outdoors.

  11. Analysis of Fungal Pellets by UV-Visible Spectrum Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lestan, D; Podgornik, H; Perdih, A

    1993-12-01

    The application of the UV-visible spectrum diffuse reflectance spectroscopy for the determination of intracellular pH in vivo, for determination of cytochrome content, and for the noninvasive in vivo detection of the redox state of fungal mitochondrial cytochromes in filamentous fungi is introduced. The time course of the intracellular pH values, mitochondrial cytochromes, and CO-binding pigments content and the correlations between the actual redox state of cytochrome aa(3) and saturation of growth medium with oxygen in pellets of the basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium were determined. As the test microorganism, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was used. UV-visible spectrum diffuse reflectance spectroscopy proved to be a promising method for the quick and simple analysis of light-impermeable biological structures for which the classical transmittance spectrophotometric methods are difficult to implement.

  12. Solar UV radiation variations and their stratospheric and climatic effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donnelly, R. F.; Heath, D. F.

    1985-01-01

    Nimbus-7 SBUV measurements of the short-term solar UV variations caused by solar rotation and active-region evolution have determined the amplitude and wavelength dependence for the active-region component of solar UV variations. Intermediate-term variations lasting several months are associated with rounds of major new active regions. The UV flux stays near the peak value during the current solar cycle variation for more than two years and peaks about two years later than the sunspot number. Nimbus-7 measurements have observed the concurrent stratospheric ozone variations caused by solar UV variations. There is now no doubt that solar UV variations are an important cause of short- and long-term stratospheric variations, but the strength of the coupling to the troposphere and to climate has not yet been proven.

  13. MicroRNA-22 promotes cell survival upon UV radiation by repressing PTEN

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Guangyun; Shi, Yuling; Wu, Zhao-Hui

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-22 is induced in cells treated with UV radiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ATM is required for miR-22 induction in response to UV. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-22 targets 3 Prime -UTR of PTEN to repress its expression in UV-treated cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Upregulated miR-22 inhibits apoptosis in cells exposed to UV. -- Abstract: DNA damage response upon UV radiation involves a complex network of cellular events required for maintaining the homeostasis and restoring genomic stability of the cells. As a new class of players involved in DNA damage response, the regulation and function of microRNAs in response to UV remain poorly understood. Here we show that UV radiation induces a significant increase of miR-22 expression, which appears to be dependent on the activation of DNA damage responding kinase ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated). Increased miR-22 expression may result from enhanced miR-22 maturation in cells exposed to UV. We further found that tumor suppressor gene phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) expression was inversely correlated with miR-22 induction and UV-induced PTEN repression was attenuated by overexpression of a miR-22 inhibitor. Moreover, increased miR-22 expression significantly inhibited the activation of caspase signaling cascade, leading to enhanced cell survival upon UV radiation. Collectively, these results indicate that miR-22 is an important player in the cellular stress response upon UV radiation, which may promote cell survival via the repression of PTEN expression.

  14. Decomposition of two haloacetic acids in water using UV radiation, ozone and advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kunping; Guo, Jinsong; Yang, Min; Junji, Hirotsuji; Deng, Rongsen

    2009-03-15

    The decomposition of two haloacetic acids (HAAs), dichloroacetic acid (DCAA) and trichloroacetic acid (TCAA), from water was studied by means of single oxidants: ozone, UV radiation; and by the advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) constituted by combinations of O(3)/UV radiation, H(2)O(2)/UV radiation, O(3)/H(2)O(2), O(3)/H(2)O(2)/UV radiation. The concentrations of HAAs were analyzed at specified time intervals to elucidate the decomposition of HAAs. Single O(3) or UV did not result in perceptible decomposition of HAAs within the applied reaction time. O(3)/UV showed to be more suitable for the decomposition of DCAA and TCAA in water among the six methods of oxidation. Decomposition of DCAA was easier than TCAA by AOPs. For O(3)/UV in the semi-continuous mode, the effective utilization rate of ozone for HAA decomposition decreased with ozone addition. The kinetics of HAAs decomposition by O(3)/UV and the influence of coexistent humic acids and HCO(3)(-) on the decomposition process were investigated. The decomposition of the HAAs by the O(3)/UV accorded with the pseudo-first-order mode under the constant initial dissolved O(3) concentration and fixed UV radiation. The pseudo-first-order rate constant for the decomposition of DCAA was more than four times that for TCAA. Humic acids can cause the H(2)O(2) accumulation and the decrease in rate constants of HAAs decomposition in the O(3)/UV process. The rate constants for the decomposition of DCAA and TCAA decreased by 41.1% and 23.8%, respectively, when humic acids were added at a concentration of 1.2mgTOC/L. The rate constants decreased by 43.5% and 25.9%, respectively, at an HCO(3)(-) concentration of 1.0mmol/L.

  15. Modeling Suomi-NPP VIIRS Solar Diffuser Degradation due to Space Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, X.; Cao, C.

    2014-12-01

    The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) onboard Suomi-NPP uses a solar diffuser (SD) as on-board radiometric calibrator for the reflective solar band (RSB) calibration. Solar diffuser is made of Spectralon (one type of fluoropolymer) and was chosen because of its controlled reflectance in the VIS-NIR-SWIR region and its near-Lambertian reflectance profile. Spectralon is known to degrade in reflectance at the blue end of the spectrum due to exposure to space radiations such as solar UV radiation and energetic protons. These space radiations can modify the Spectralon surface through breaking C-C and C-F bonds and scissioning or cross linking the polymer, which causes the surface roughness and degrades its reflectance. VIIRS uses a SDSM (Solar Diffuser Stability Monitor) to monitor the change in the Solar Diffuser reflectance in the 0.4 - 0.94 um wavelength range and provide a correction to the calibration constants. The H factor derived from SDSM reveals that reflectance of 0.4 to 0.6um channels of VIIRS degrades faster than the reflectance of longer wavelength RSB channels. A model is developed to derive characteristic parameters such as mean SD surface roughness height and autocovariance length of SD surface roughness from the long term spectral degradation of SD reflectance as monitored by SDSM. These two parameters are trended to assess development of surface roughness of the SD over the operation period of VIIRS.

  16. UV radiation, vitamin D, and cancer: how to measure the vitamin D synthetic capacity of UV sources?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terenetskaya, Irina; Orlova, Tatiana

    2005-09-01

    UV irradiation is widely used in phototherapy. Regardless of the fact that UV overexposure is liable to cause adverse health effect, in appropriate doses UV radiation initiates synthesis of vitamin D in skin that is absolutely essential for human health. As it proved, most people in northern industrial countries have a level of vitamin D in their bodies that is insufficient for optimum health, especially in winter. These low levels of vitamin D are now known to be associated with a wide spectrum of serious disease much of which leads on to premature death. The diseases associated with D deficiency involve more than a dozen types of cancer including colon, breast and prostate, as well as the classic bone diseases: rickets, osteoporosis and osteomalacia. Irradiation with artificial UV sources can prevent the vitamin D deficiency. However, in view of different irradiation spectra of UV lamps, their ability to initiate vitamin D synthesis is different. The reliable method based on an in vitro model of vitamin D synthesis has been developed for direct measurement in situ of the vitamin D synthetic capacity of artificial UV sources during a phototherapeutic procedure

  17. Growth of a mat-forming photograph in the presence of UV radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, Beverly K.; Ruff, A. L.

    1989-01-01

    Knowledge of the survival and growth of microorganisms in the presence of ultraviolet radiation is important for understanding the potential for life to exist in environments exposed to high fluxes of UV radiation. The growth of a mat-forming phototrophic prokaryote, Chloroflexus aurantiacus, was examined in the presence of continuous high UV irradiation under otherwise optimal growth conditions. Evidence was sought for an intrinsic ability to grow in the presence of UV radiation in a carefully chosen organism known to be unusually resistant to UV radiation, of ancient lineage among the phototrophs, to resemble ancient microfossils from the Precambrian, and to be a mat-former. It was assumed that even a high intrinsic UV resistance would be inadequate for survival and growth in the presence of very high UV fluxes, and iron (Fe3+) was selected as a common, abundant UV-absorbing substance that might protest microorganisms growing in or under iron-bearing sediments. The effectiveness of Fe(3+) was tested as a UV protective agent at low concentrations in thin layers. It was concluded that intrinsic UV resistance in some organisms may account for growth, not just survival, of these organisms when exposed to high UV fluxes under otherwise optimal growth conditions in an anoxic environment. It was also concluded that Fe(3+) bearing sediments of 1 mm or less in thickness may provide an adequate shield against high UV fluxes permitting the growth of microorganisms just below their surface. As long as growth conditions were met, then the evolution and development of microorganisms would not be hampered by high UV fluxes impinging upon the surface of iron-bearing sediments.

  18. Evaluation of Structurally Different Carotenoids in Escherichia coli Transformants as Protectants against UV-B Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Sandmann, Gerhard; Kuhn, Silvia; Böger, Peter

    1998-01-01

    Escherichia coli cells transformed with several carotenogenic genes to mediate the formation of ζ-carotene, neurosporene, lycopene, β-carotene, and zeaxanthin were exposed to UV-B radiation. Short-term kinetics revealed that endogenous levels of neurosporene and β-carotene protected E. coli against irradiation with UV-B. Zeaxanthin protected against only the photosensitized UV-B treatment. All other carotenoids were ineffective. PMID:9572984

  19. UV-Radiation Induced Methane Emission from Murchison - Possible Implications for Methane in the Martian Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ott, U.; Keppler, F.; Vigano, I.; McLeod, A.; Früchtl, M.; Röckmann, T.

    2012-09-01

    Exposure of the Murchison meteorite to UV radiation releases large quantities of methane. Acting on meteoritic debris on the Martian surface, the process may be of importance for the Martian atmosphere.

  20. Modeling of urban trees' effects on reducing human exposure to UV radiation in Seoul, Korea

    Treesearch

    Hang Ryeol Na; Gordon M. Heisler; David J. Nowak; Richard H. Grant

    2014-01-01

    A mathematical model isconstructed for quantifying urban trees’ effects on mitigating the intensity of ultraviolet (UV) radiation on the ground within different landuse types across a city. The model is based upon local field data, meteorological data and equations designed to predict the reduced UV fraction due to trees at the ground level. Trees in Seoul, Korea (2010...

  1. INTERACTIVE EFFECTS OF SOLAR UV RADIATION AND CLIMATE CHANGE ON BIOGEOCHEMICAL CYCLING

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper assesses research on the interactions of UV radiation (280-400 nm) and global climate change with global biogeochemical cycles at the Earth's surface. The effects of UV-B (280-315 nm), which are dependent on the stratospheric ozone layer, on biogeochemical cycles are o...

  2. INTERACTIONS OF SOLAR UV RADIATION AND DISSOLVED ORGANIC MATTER IN AQUATIC ENVIRONMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Changes in the ozone layer over the past two decades have resulted in increases in solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation that reaches the surface of aquatic environments. Recent studies have demonstrated that these UV increases cause changes in photochemical reactions that affect the...

  3. Urban forest influences on exposure to UV radiation and potential consequences for human health

    Treesearch

    Gordon M. Heisler

    2010-01-01

    This chapter explores the literature on ultraviolet (UV) irradiance in urban ecosystems with respect to the likely effects on human health. The focus was the question of whether the health effects of UV radiation should be included in the planning of landscape elements such as trees and shading structures, especially for high use pedestrian areas and school play...

  4. INTERACTIONS OF SOLAR UV RADIATION AND DISSOLVED ORGANIC MATTER IN AQUATIC ENVIRONMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Changes in the ozone layer over the past two decades have resulted in increases in solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation that reaches the surface of aquatic environments. Recent studies have demonstrated that these UV increases cause changes in photochemical reactions that affect the...

  5. INTERACTIVE EFFECTS OF SOLAR UV RADIATION AND CLIMATE CHANGE ON BIOGEOCHEMICAL CYCLING

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper assesses research on the interactions of UV radiation (280-400 nm) and global climate change with global biogeochemical cycles at the Earth's surface. The effects of UV-B (280-315 nm), which are dependent on the stratospheric ozone layer, on biogeochemical cycles are o...

  6. Degassing a vacuum system with in-situ UV radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Koebley, Sean R.; Outlaw, Ronald A.; Dellwo, Randy R.

    2012-11-15

    Photon-stimulated desorption (PSD) from a high-powered ultraviolet source was investigated as a technique to degas a vacuum system. A stainless steel vacuum system was pumped down from atmosphere with different time doses of 185 nm light, and the resulting outgassing rates were compared to that of a control pumpdown without UV assistance. PSD was found to provide a factor of 2 advantage in pumpdown pressure after only 30 min of UV exposure, with no additional advantage observed for longer irradiation times. Specifically, an outgassing rate of 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -10} Torr L s{sup -1} cm{sup -2} was reached 3 h sooner in pumpdowns with UV assistance compared to those without UV, while a rate of 1.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -10} Torr L s{sup -1} cm{sup -2} was reached 16 h sooner in UV runs. The authors calculated that about 22 monolayers of water were desorbed after 30 min of UV exposure. The results indicate that PSD by a 40 W 185 nm UV source can serve as a nonthermal technique to significantly speed the pumpdown of a vacuum system from atmosphere after only 30 min.

  7. Stability of Stationary Solutions of the Multifrequency Radiation Diffusion Equations

    SciTech Connect

    Hald, O H; Shestakov, A I

    2004-01-20

    A nondimensional model of the multifrequency radiation diffusion equation is derived. A single material, ideal gas, equation of state is assumed. Opacities are proportional to the inverse of the cube of the frequency. Inclusion of stimulated emission implies a Wien spectrum for the radiation source function. It is shown that the solutions are uniformly bounded in time and that stationary solutions are stable. The spatially independent solutions are asymptotically stable, while the spatially dependent solutions of the linearized equations approach zero.

  8. Theoretical and Numerical Investigation of Radiative Extinction of Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Anjan

    1996-01-01

    The influence of soot radiation on diffusion flames was investigated using both analytical and numerical techniques. Soot generated in diffusion flames dominate the flame radiation over gaseous combustion products and can significantly lower the temperature of the flame. In low gravity situations there can be significant accumulation of soot and combustion products in the vicinity of the primary reaction zone owing to the absence of any convective buoyant flow. Such situations may result in substantial suppression of chemical activities in a flame, and the possibility of a radiative extinction may also be anticipated. The purpose of this work was to not only investigate the possibility of radiative extinction of a diffusion flame but also to qualitatively and quantitatively analyze the influence of soot radiation on a diffusion flame. In this study, first a hypothetical radiative loss profile of the form of a sech(sup 2) was assumed to influence a pure diffusion flame. It was observed that the reaction zone can, under certain circumstances, move through the radiative loss zone and locate itself on the fuel side of the loss zone contrary to our initial postulate. On increasing the intensity and/or width of the loss zone it was possible to extinguish the flame, and extinction plots were generated. In the presence of a convective flow, however, the movement of the temperature and reaction rate peaks indicated that the flame behavior is more complicated compared to a pure diffusional flame. A comprehensive model of soot formation, oxidation and radiation was used in a more involved analysis. The soot model of Syed, Stewart and Moss was used for soot nucleation and growth and the model of Nagle and Strickland-Constable was used for soot oxidation. The soot radiation was considered in the optically thin limit. An analysis of the flame structure revealed that the radiative loss term is countered both by the reaction term and the diffusion term. The essential balance for

  9. Molecular and physiological effects of environmental UV radiation on fungal conidia.

    PubMed

    Braga, Gilberto U L; Rangel, Drauzio E N; Fernandes, Éverton K K; Flint, Stephan D; Roberts, Donald W

    2015-08-01

    Conidia are specialized structures produced at the end of the asexual life cycle of most filamentous fungi. They are responsible for fungal dispersal and environmental persistence. In pathogenic species, they are also involved in host recognition and infection. Conidial production, survival, dispersal, germination, pathogenicity and virulence can be strongly influenced by exposure to solar radiation, although its effects are diverse and often species dependent. UV radiation is the most harmful and mutagenic waveband of the solar spectrum. Direct exposure to solar radiation for a few hours can kill conidia of most fungal species. Conidia are killed both by solar UV-A and UV-B radiation. In addition to killing conidia, which limits the size of the fungal population and its dispersion, exposures to sublethal doses of UV radiation can reduce conidial germination speed and virulence. The focus of this review is to provide an overview of the effects of solar radiation on conidia and on the major systems involved in protection from and repair of damage induced by solar UV radiation. The efforts that have been made to obtain strains of fungi of interest such as entomopathogens more tolerant to solar radiation will also be reviewed.

  10. Analysis of differentially expressed genes under UV-B radiation in the desert plant Reaumuria soongorica.

    PubMed

    Liu, Meiling; Li, Xinrong; Liu, Yubing; Shi, Yulan; Ma, Xiaofei

    2015-12-15

    Reaumuria soongorica is one of the typical desert plants that present excellent tolerance to adverse environments. However, its molecular response to UV-B radiation remains poorly understood. To test the response and tolerance mechanisms of R. soongorica to the increasing UV-B radiation, the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were investigated between the control and UV-B radiation groups. A total of 2150 DEGs were detected between the two groups, of which 561 were up-regulated and 1589 were down-regulated. For functional analysis, DEGs were divided into three groups: (i) Chloroplast-localized proteins, including photosynthesis-associated proteins, ribulose-phosphate-3-epimerase, and ATP-dependent Clp protease. Their transcripts were inhibited, implying that the normal function of chloroplast was affected by UV-B radiation. (ii) Proteins involved in signaling transduction, such as phototropins and GTP-binding proteins. The transcriptional alternation of phototropins may reduce the penetration of UV-B radiation by regulating phototropism, stomatal opening, and chloroplast relocation. The down regulation of GTP-binding proteins may inhibit replication of potentially damaged DNA through preventing cell division; and (iii) proteins for lipid transfer and flavonoids biosynthesis. The up-regulation of these genes suggested that lipid transfer and flavonoids may have a protective function in response to UV-B radiation. Thus, UV-B radiation may lead to the disruption of chloroplasts function. The induction of genes for signal transduction and protective proteins may be a strategy for responding to UV-B radiation in R. soongorica.

  11. Interactive effects of elevated ozone and UV-B radiation on soil nematode diversity.

    PubMed

    Bao, Xuelian; Li, Qi; Hua, Jianfeng; Zhao, Tianhong; Liang, Wenju

    2014-01-01

    Ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation and elevated tropospheric ozone may cause reductions in the productivity and quality of important agricultural crops. However, research regarding their interactive effect is still scarce, especially on the belowground processes. Using the open top chambers experimental setup, we monitored the response of soil nematodes to the elevated O3 and UV-B radiation individually as well as in combination. Our results indicated that elevated O3 and UV-B radiation have impact not only on the belowground biomass of plants, but also on the community structure and functional diversity of soil nematodes. The canonical correspondence analysis suggested that soil pH, shoot biomass and microbial biomass C and N were relevant parameters that influencing soil nematode distribution. The interactive effects of elevated O3 and UV-B radiation was only observed on the abundance of bacterivores. UV-B radiation significantly increased the abundance of total nematodes and bacterivores in comparison with the control at pod-filling stage of soybean. Following elevated O3, nematode diversity index decreased and dominance index increased relative to the control at pod-filling stage of soybean. Nematode functional diversity showed response to the effects of elevated O3 and UV-B radiation at pod-bearing stage. Higher enrichment index and lower structure index in the treatment with both elevated O3 and UV-B radiation indicated a stressed soil condition and degraded soil food web. However, the ratios of nematode trophic groups suggested that the negative effects of elevated O3 on soil food web may be weakened by the UV-B radiations.

  12. Intraspecific variation in sensitivity to UV-B radiation in rice

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, P.W.; Maggard, S.; Holman, S.R.; Vergara, B.S.

    1993-01-01

    Twenty-two cultivars of rice (Oryza sativa L.) from diverse origins were grown under greenhouse conditions and exposed to ultraviolet-B radiation (UV-B; 280-320 nm) simulating a 5% reduction in stratospheric ozone in spring for the Philippines (14 deg N lat.) to evaluate growth and morphological responses to UV-B. In comparison to controls that received no UV-B, plants exposed to UV-B exhibited significantly reduced dry matter production (total plant and shoot), shoot height, leaf blade length and total leaf area, increased number of tillers, and greater weight fractions in leaf blades and roots. For most cultivars, the relative effects of UV-B on shoot morphology were greater than the effects on biomass production. The direction of the UV-B effects were generally similar for all cultivars, however, there were significant differences among cultivars in the magnitude of the UV-B-induced changes.

  13. Study of the Response of a Biofilm Bacterial Community to UV Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Elasri, Mohamed O.; Miller, Robert V.

    1999-01-01

    We have developed a bioluminescent whole-cell biosensor that can be incorporated into biofilm ecosystems. RM4440 is a Pseudomonas aeruginosa FRD1 derivative that carries a plasmid-based recA-luxCDABE fusion. We immobilized RM4440 in an alginate matrix to simulate a biofilm, and we studied its response to UV radiation damage. The biofilm showed a protective property by physical shielding against UV C, UV B, and UV A. Absorption of UV light by the alginate matrix translated into a higher survival rate than observed with planktonic cells at similar input fluences. UV A was shown to be effectively blocked by the biofilm matrix and to have no detectable effects on cells contained in the biofilm. However, in the presence of photosensitizers (i.e., psoralen), UV A was effective in inducing light production and cell death. RM4440 has proved to be a useful tool to study microbial communities in a noninvasive manner. PMID:10223995

  14. Radiative Extinction of Gaseous Spherical Diffusion Flames in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santa, K. J.; Chao, B. H.; Sunderland, P. B.; Urban, D. L.; Stocker, D. P.; Axelbaum, R. L.

    2007-01-01

    Radiative extinction of spherical diffusion flames was investigated experimentally and numerically. The experiments involved microgravity spherical diffusion flames burning ethylene and propane at 0.98 bar. Both normal (fuel flowing into oxidizer) and inverse (oxidizer flowing into fuel) flames were studied, with nitrogen supplied to either the fuel or the oxygen. Flame conditions were chosen to ensure that the flames extinguished within the 2.2 s of available test time; thus extinction occurred during unsteady flame conditions. Diagnostics included color video and thin-filament pyrometry. The computations, which simulated flow from a porous sphere into a quiescent environment, included detailed chemistry, transport and radiation, and yielded transient results. Radiative extinction was observed experimentally and simulated numerically. Extinction time, peak temperature, and radiative loss fraction were found to be independent of flow rate except at very low flow rates. Radiative heat loss was dominated by the combustion products downstream of the flame and was found to scale with flame surface area, not volume. For large transient flames the heat release rate also scaled with surface area and thus the radiative loss fraction was largely independent of flow rate. Peak temperatures at extinction onset were about 1100 K, which is significantly lower than for kinetic extinction. One observation of this work is that while radiative heat losses can drive transient extinction, this is not because radiative losses are increasing with time (flame size) but rather because the heat release rate is falling off as the temperature drops.

  15. Analytic expressions for ULF wave radiation belt radial diffusion coefficients.

    PubMed

    Ozeke, Louis G; Mann, Ian R; Murphy, Kyle R; Jonathan Rae, I; Milling, David K

    2014-03-01

    We present analytic expressions for ULF wave-derived radiation belt radial diffusion coefficients, as a function of L and Kp, which can easily be incorporated into global radiation belt transport models. The diffusion coefficients are derived from statistical representations of ULF wave power, electric field power mapped from ground magnetometer data, and compressional magnetic field power from in situ measurements. We show that the overall electric and magnetic diffusion coefficients are to a good approximation both independent of energy. We present example 1-D radial diffusion results from simulations driven by CRRES-observed time-dependent energy spectra at the outer boundary, under the action of radial diffusion driven by the new ULF wave radial diffusion coefficients and with empirical chorus wave loss terms (as a function of energy, Kp and L). There is excellent agreement between the differential flux produced by the 1-D, Kp-driven, radial diffusion model and CRRES observations of differential electron flux at 0.976 MeV-even though the model does not include the effects of local internal acceleration sources. Our results highlight not only the importance of correct specification of radial diffusion coefficients for developing accurate models but also show significant promise for belt specification based on relatively simple models driven by solar wind parameters such as solar wind speed or geomagnetic indices such as Kp. Analytic expressions for the radial diffusion coefficients are presentedThe coefficients do not dependent on energy or wave m valueThe electric field diffusion coefficient dominates over the magnetic.

  16. Analytic expressions for ULF wave radiation belt radial diffusion coefficients

    PubMed Central

    Ozeke, Louis G; Mann, Ian R; Murphy, Kyle R; Jonathan Rae, I; Milling, David K

    2014-01-01

    We present analytic expressions for ULF wave-derived radiation belt radial diffusion coefficients, as a function of L and Kp, which can easily be incorporated into global radiation belt transport models. The diffusion coefficients are derived from statistical representations of ULF wave power, electric field power mapped from ground magnetometer data, and compressional magnetic field power from in situ measurements. We show that the overall electric and magnetic diffusion coefficients are to a good approximation both independent of energy. We present example 1-D radial diffusion results from simulations driven by CRRES-observed time-dependent energy spectra at the outer boundary, under the action of radial diffusion driven by the new ULF wave radial diffusion coefficients and with empirical chorus wave loss terms (as a function of energy, Kp and L). There is excellent agreement between the differential flux produced by the 1-D, Kp-driven, radial diffusion model and CRRES observations of differential electron flux at 0.976 MeV—even though the model does not include the effects of local internal acceleration sources. Our results highlight not only the importance of correct specification of radial diffusion coefficients for developing accurate models but also show significant promise for belt specification based on relatively simple models driven by solar wind parameters such as solar wind speed or geomagnetic indices such as Kp. Key Points Analytic expressions for the radial diffusion coefficients are presented The coefficients do not dependent on energy or wave m value The electric field diffusion coefficient dominates over the magnetic PMID:26167440

  17. Solar UV-B Radiation Inhibits the Growth of Antarctic Terrestrial Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Kevin A.; Lawley, Blair; Newsham, Kevin K.

    2003-01-01

    We tested the effects of solar radiation, and UV-B in particular, on the growth of Antarctic terrestrial fungi. The growth responses to solar radiation of five fungi, Geomyces pannorum, Phoma herbarum, Pythium sp., Verticillium sp., and Mortierella parvispora, each isolated from Antarctic terrestrial habitats, were examined on an agar medium in the natural Antarctic environment. A 3-h exposure to solar radiation of >287 nm reduced the hyphal extension rates of all species relative to controls kept in the dark. Pythium sp. cultures exposed to solar radiation for 1.5 h on five consecutive days were most sensitive to radiation of >287 nm, but radiation of >313 nm also inhibited growth to a lesser extent. Radiation of >400 nm had no effect on hyphal growth relative to controls kept in the dark. Short-wave solar UV-B radiation of between 287 and 305 nm inhibited the growth of Pythium sp. hyphae on and below the surface of the agar medium after 24 h, but radiation of ≥345 nm only reduced the growth of surface hyphae. Similar detrimental effects of UV-B on surface and, to a lesser extent, submerged hyphae of all five fungi were shown in the laboratory by using artificial UV-B from fluorescent lamps. A comparison of growth responses to solar radiation and temperature showed that the species that were most resistant to UV radiation grew fastest at higher temperatures. These data suggest that solar UV-B reduces the growth of fungi on the soil surface in the Antarctic terrestrial environment. PMID:12620833

  18. Different Proteome Profiles between Male and Female Populus cathayana Exposed to UV-B Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yunxiang; Feng, Lihua; Jiang, Hao; Zhang, Yuanbin; Zhang, Sheng

    2017-01-01

    With increasing altitude, solar UV-B radiation is enhanced. Based on the phenomenon of male-biased sex ratio of Populus cathayana Rehder in high altitude alpine area, we hypothesized that males have a faster and more sophisticated responsive mechanism to high UV-B radiation than that of females. Our previous studies have shown sexually different responses to high UV-B radiation were existed in P. cathayana at the morphological, physiological, and transcriptomic levels. However, the responses at the proteomic level remain unclear. In this study, an isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ)-based quantitative proteome analysis was performed in P. cathayana females and males. A total of 2,405 proteins were identified, with 331 proteins defined as differentially expressed proteins (DEPs). Among of these, 79 and 138 DEPs were decreased and 47 and 107 DEPs were increased under high solar UV-B radiation in females and males, respectively. A bioinformatics analysis categorized the common responsive proteins in the sexes as related to carbohydrate and energy metabolism, translation/transcription/post-transcriptional modification, photosynthesis, and redox reactions. The responsive proteins that showed differences in sex were mainly those involved in amino acid metabolism, stress response, and translation/transcription/post-transcriptional modification. This study provides proteomic profiles that poplars responding to solar UV-B radiation, and it also provides new insights into differentially sex-related responses to UV-B radiation. PMID:28326097

  19. Near-UV radiation acts as a beneficial factor for physiological responses in cucumber plants.

    PubMed

    Mitani-Sano, Makiko; Tezuka, Takafumi

    2013-11-05

    Effects of near-UV radiation on the growth and physiological activity of cucumber plants were investigated morphologically, physiologically and biochemically using 3-week-old seedlings grown under polyvinyl chloride films featuring transmission either above 290 nm or above 400 nm in growth chambers. The hypocotyl length and leaf area of cucumber seedlings were reduced but the thickness of leaves was enhanced by near-UV radiation, due to increased upper/lower epidermis thickness, palisade parenchyma thickness and volume of palisade parenchyma cells. Photosynthetic and respiratory activities were also promoted by near-UV radiation, associated with general enhancement of physiological/biochemical responses. Particularly, metabolic activities in the photosynthetic system of chloroplasts and the respiratory system of mitochondria were analyzed under the conditions of visible light with and without near-UV radiation. For example, the activities of NAD(P)-dependent enzymes such as glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (G3PDH) in chloroplasts and isocitrate dehydrogenase (ICDH) in mitochondria were elevated, along with levels of pyridine nucleotides (nicotinamide coenzymes) [NAD(H) and NADP(H)] and activity of NAD kinase (NADP forming enzyme). Taken together, these data suggest that promotion of cucumber plant growth by near-UV radiation involves activation of carbon and nitrogen metabolism in plants. The findings of this research showed that near-UV radiation reaching the Earth's surface is a beneficial factor for plant growth.

  20. Quantitative estimation of UV light dose concomitant to irradiation with ionizing radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petin, Vladislav G.; Morozov, Ivan I.; Kim, Jin Kyu; Semkina, Maria A.

    2011-01-01

    A simple mathematical model for biological estimation of UV light dose concomitant to ionizing radiation was suggested. This approach was applied to determine the dependency of equivalent UV light dose accompanied by 100 Gy of ionizing radiation on energy of sparsely ionizing radiation and on volume of the exposed cell suspension. It was revealed that the relative excitation contribution to the total lethal effect and the value of UV dose was greatly increased with an increase in energy of ionizing radiation and volume of irradiated suspensions. It is concluded that these observations are in agreement with the supposition that Čerenkov emission is responsible for the production of UV light damage and the phenomenon of photoreactivation observed after ionizing exposure of bacterial and yeast cells hypersensitive to UV light. A possible synergistic interaction of the damages produced by ionizations and excitations as well as a probable participation of UV component of ionizing radiation in the mechanism of hormesis and adaptive response observed after ionizing radiation exposure is discussed.

  1. Effects of solar UV radiation on aquatic ecosystems and interactions with climate change.

    PubMed

    Häder, D-P; Kumar, H D; Smith, R C; Worrest, R C

    2007-03-01

    Recent results continue to show the general consensus that ozone-related increases in UV-B radiation can negatively influence many aquatic species and aquatic ecosystems (e.g., lakes, rivers, marshes, oceans). Solar UV radiation penetrates to ecological significant depths in aquatic systems and can affect both marine and freshwater systems from major biomass producers (phytoplankton) to consumers (e.g., zooplankton, fish, etc.) higher in the food web. Many factors influence the depth of penetration of radiation into natural waters including dissolved organic compounds whose concentration and chemical composition are likely to be influenced by future climate and UV radiation variability. There is also considerable evidence that aquatic species utilize many mechanisms for photoprotection against excessive radiation. Often, these protective mechanisms pose conflicting selection pressures on species making UV radiation an additional stressor on the organism. It is at the ecosystem level where assessments of anthropogenic climate change and UV-related effects are interrelated and where much recent research has been directed. Several studies suggest that the influence of UV-B at the ecosystem level may be more pronounced on community and trophic level structure, and hence on subsequent biogeochemical cycles, than on biomass levels per se.

  2. Different Proteome Profiles between Male and Female Populus cathayana Exposed to UV-B Radiation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yunxiang; Feng, Lihua; Jiang, Hao; Zhang, Yuanbin; Zhang, Sheng

    2017-01-01

    With increasing altitude, solar UV-B radiation is enhanced. Based on the phenomenon of male-biased sex ratio of Populus cathayana Rehder in high altitude alpine area, we hypothesized that males have a faster and more sophisticated responsive mechanism to high UV-B radiation than that of females. Our previous studies have shown sexually different responses to high UV-B radiation were existed in P. cathayana at the morphological, physiological, and transcriptomic levels. However, the responses at the proteomic level remain unclear. In this study, an isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ)-based quantitative proteome analysis was performed in P. cathayana females and males. A total of 2,405 proteins were identified, with 331 proteins defined as differentially expressed proteins (DEPs). Among of these, 79 and 138 DEPs were decreased and 47 and 107 DEPs were increased under high solar UV-B radiation in females and males, respectively. A bioinformatics analysis categorized the common responsive proteins in the sexes as related to carbohydrate and energy metabolism, translation/transcription/post-transcriptional modification, photosynthesis, and redox reactions. The responsive proteins that showed differences in sex were mainly those involved in amino acid metabolism, stress response, and translation/transcription/post-transcriptional modification. This study provides proteomic profiles that poplars responding to solar UV-B radiation, and it also provides new insights into differentially sex-related responses to UV-B radiation.

  3. Raman spectroscopic analysis of the responds of desert cyanobacterium Nostoc sp under UV-B radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Gaohong; Hao, Zongjie; Hu, Chunxiang; Liu, Yongding

    Cyanobacteria are renowned for tolerating extremes of desiccation, UV radiation, freezethaw cycles, hypersalinity and oligotrophy, which make them as candidate par excellence for terraforming in extraterrestrial planet. Recently Raman spectrum was applied to study the biochemical information changes in different field of life science. In this study, we investigated the respond of desert cyanobactreium Nostoc sp under UV-B radiation via FT-Raman spectra. It was found that the spectral biomarkers of protectant molecular of UV radiation such as β-carotene and scytonemin were induced by UV-B radiation, but Chlorophyll a content was decreased, and also the photosynthesis activity was inhibited significantly. After light adaptation without UV-B radiation, the Chlorophyll a content and photosynthesis activity returned to high level, butβ-carotene and scytonemin content remained in the cells. Those results indicated that desert Cyanobacteria have good adaptation ability for UV-B radiation and synthesis of protectant molecular may be an effective strategy for its adaptation in evolution.

  4. UV radiation-induced accumulation of photoprotective compounds in the green alga Tetraspora sp. CU2551.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Rajesh P; Incharoensakdi, Aran

    2013-09-01

    The effect of UV radiation on the accumulation of novel mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) along with their photoprotective function was investigated in the green alga Tetraspora sp. CU2551. No UV-absorbing compound was detected in this organism growing under normal light condition while two MAAs with absorption maxima at 324 nm and 322 nm were found to be accumulated after UV irradiation. The effects of UV exposure time with different cut-off filter foils namely 295 (PAR + UV-A + UV-B), 320 (PAR + UV-A) and 395 nm (PAR only) were studied on induction of the synthesis of these MAAs. Concentration of MAAs was found to increase with increase in exposure time under UV radiation. Furthermore, the antioxidant and photoprotective action of these MAAs was also investigated. The role of MAAs in diminishing the UV-induced production of ROS in vivo was also demonstrated using the oxidant-sensing probe 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA) and results obtained supported the results of DPPH free radical scavenging assay. The MAAs also exhibited efficient photoprotective ability on Escherichia coli cells against UV-B stress. Thus, the MAAs in Tetraspora sp. CU2551 may act as efficient antioxidants as well as UV-sunscreen. This is the first report for the UV-induced synthesis and co-accumulation of these MAAs and their photoprotective actions in Tetraspora sp. which is a member of the class Chlorophyceae. Moreover, UV-induced accumulation as well as photoprotective function of these compounds may facilitate this chlorophyte to perform important ecological functions in harsh environmental conditions with high UV-B fluxes in their brightly lit habitats.

  5. Biological space experiments for the simulation of Martian conditions: UV radiation and Martian soil analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rettberg, P.; Rabbow, E.; Panitz, C.; Horneck, G.

    2004-01-01

    The survivability of resistant terrestrial microbes, bacterial spores of Bacillus subtilis, was investigated in the BIOPAN facility of the European Space Agency onboard of Russian Earth-orbiting FOTON satellites (BIOPAN I -III missions). The spores were exposed to different subsets of the extreme environmental parameters in space (vacuum, extraterrestrial solar UV, shielding by protecting materials like artificial meteorites). The results of the three space experiments confirmed the deleterious effects of extraterrestrial solar UV radiation which, in contrast to the UV radiation reaching the surface of the Earth, also contains the very energy-rich, short wavelength UVB and UVC radiation. Thin layers of clay, rock or meteorite material were shown to be only successful in UV-shielding, if they are in direct contact with the spores. On Mars the UV radiation climate is similar to that of the early Earth before the development of a protective ozone layer in the atmosphere by the appearance of the first aerobic photosynthetic bacteria. The interference of Martian soil components and the intense and nearly unfiltered Martian solar UV radiation with spores of B. subtilis will be tested with a new BIOPAN experiment, MARSTOX. Different types of Mars soil analogues will be used to determine on one hand their potential toxicity alone or in combination with solar UV (phototoxicity) and on the other hand their UV protection capability. Two sets of samples will be placed under different cut-off filters used to simulate the UV radiation climate of Mars and Earth. After exposure in space the survival of and mutation induction in the spores will be analyzed at the DLR, together with parallel samples from the corresponding ground control experiment performed in the laboratory. This experiment will provide new insights into the principal limits of life and its adaptation to environmental extremes on Earth or other planets which and will also have implications for the potential for the

  6. Biological space experiments for the simulation of Martian conditions: UV radiation and Martian soil analogues.

    PubMed

    Rettberg, P; Rabbow, E; Panitz, C; Horneck, G

    2004-01-01

    The survivability of resistant terrestrial microbes, bacterial spores of Bacillus subtilis, was investigated in the BIOPAN facility of the European Space Agency onboard of Russian Earth-orbiting FOTON satellites (BIOPAN I -III missions). The spores were exposed to different subsets of the extreme environmental parameters in space (vacuum, extraterrestrial solar UV, shielding by protecting materials like artificial meteorites). The results of the three space experiments confirmed the deleterious effects of extraterrestrial solar UV radiation which, in contrast to the UV radiation reaching the surface of the Earth, also contains the very energy-rich, short wavelength UVB and UVC radiation. Thin layers of clay, rock or meteorite material were shown to be only successful in UV-shielding, if they are in direct contact with the spores. On Mars the UV radiation climate is similar to that of the early Earth before the development of a protective ozone layer in the atmosphere by the appearance of the first aerobic photosynthetic bacteria. The interference of Martian soil components and the intense and nearly unfiltered Martian solar UV radiation with spores of B. subtilis will be tested with a new BIOPAN experiment, MARSTOX. Different types of Mars soil analogues will be used to determine on one hand their potential toxicity alone or in combination with solar UV (phototoxicity) and on the other hand their UV protection capability. Two sets of samples will be placed under different cut-off filters used to simulate the UV radiation climate of Mars and Earth. After exposure in space the survival of and mutation induction in the spores will be analyzed at the DLR, together with parallel samples from the corresponding ground control experiment performed in the laboratory. This experiment will provide new insights into the principal limits of life and its adaptation to environmental extremes on Earth or other planets which and will also have implications for the potential for the

  7. Diffuse gamma radiation. [intensity, energy spectrum and spatial distribution from SAS 2 observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, C. E.; Simpson, G. A.; Thompson, D. J.

    1978-01-01

    Results are reported for an investigation of the intensity, energy spectrum, and spatial distribution of the diffuse gamma radiation detected by SAS 2 away from the galactic plane in the energy range above 35 MeV. The gamma-ray data are compared with relevant data obtained at other wavelengths, including 21-cm emission, radio continuum radiation, and the limited UV and radio information on local molecular hydrogen. It is found that there are two quite distinct components to the diffuse radiation, one of which shows a good correlation with the galactic matter distribution and continuum radiation, while the other has a much steeper energy spectrum and appears to be isotropic at least on a coarse scale. The galactic component is interpreted in terms of its implications for both local and more distant regions of the Galaxy. The apparently isotropic radiation is discussed partly with regard to the constraints placed on possible models by the steep energy spectrum, the observed intensity, and an upper limit on the anisotropy.

  8. The role of coccoliths in protecting Emiliania huxleyi against stressful light and UV radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Juntian; Bach, Lennart T.; Schulz, Kai G.; Zhao, Wenyan; Gao, Kunshan; Riebesell, Ulf

    2016-08-01

    Coccolithophores are a group of phytoplankton species which cover themselves with small scales (coccoliths) made of calcium carbonate (CaCO3). The reason why coccolithophores form these calcite platelets has been a matter of debate for decades but has remained elusive so far. One hypothesis is that they play a role in light or UV protection, especially in surface dwelling species like Emiliania huxleyi, which can tolerate exceptionally high levels of solar radiation. In this study, we tested this hypothesis by culturing a calcified and a naked strain under different light conditions with and without UV radiation. The coccoliths of E. huxleyi reduced the transmission of visible radiation (400-700 nm) by 7.5 %, that of UV-A (315-400 nm) by 14.1 % and that of UV-B (280-315 nm) by 18.4 %. Growth rates of the calcified strain (PML B92/11) were about 2 times higher than those of the naked strain (CCMP 2090) under indoor constant light levels in the absence of UV radiation. When exposed to outdoor conditions (fluctuating sunlight with UV radiation), growth rates of calcified cells were almost 3.5 times higher compared to naked cells. Furthermore, the relative electron transport rate was 114 % higher and non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) was 281 % higher in the calcified compared to the naked strain, implying higher energy transfer associated with higher NPQ in the presence of calcification. When exposed to natural solar radiation including UV radiation, the maximal quantum yield of photosystem II was only slightly reduced in the calcified strain but strongly reduced in the naked strain. Our results reveal an important role of coccoliths in mitigating light and UV stress in E. huxleyi.

  9. Ubiquitination of p53 and p21 is differentially affected by ionizing and UV radiation.

    PubMed Central

    Maki, C G; Howley, P M

    1997-01-01

    Levels of the tumor suppressor protein p53 are normally quite low due in part to its short half-life. p53 levels increase in cells exposed to DNA-damaging agents, such as radiation, and this increase is thought to be responsible for the radiation-induced G1 cell cycle arrest or delay. The mechanisms by which radiation causes an increase in p53 are currently unknown. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of gamma and UV radiation on the stability and ubiquitination of p53 in vivo. Ubiquitin-p53 conjugates could be detected in nonirradiated and gamma-irradiated cells but not in cells which were UV treated, despite the fact that both treatments resulted in the stabilization of the p53 protein. These results demonstrate that UV and gamma radiation have different effects on ubiquitinated p53 and suggest that the UV-induced stabilization of p53 results from a loss of p53 ubiquitination. Ubiquitinated forms of p21, an inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinases, were detected in vivo, demonstrating that p21 is also a target for degradation by the ubiquitin-dependent proteolytic pathway. However, UV and gamma radiation had no effect on the stability or in vivo ubiquitination of p21, indicating that the radiation effects on p53 are specific. PMID:8972216

  10. Growth enhancement of soybean (Glycine max) upon exclusion of UV-B and UV-B/A components of solar radiation: characterization of photosynthetic parameters in leaves.

    PubMed

    Guruprasad, Kadur; Kadur, Guruprasad; Bhattacharjee, Swapan; Swapan, Bhattacharjee; Kataria, Sunita; Sunita, Kataria; Yadav, Sanjeev; Sanjeev, Yadav; Tiwari, Arjun; Arjun, Tiwari; Baroniya, Sanjay; Sanjay, Baroniya; Rajiv, Abhinav; Abhinav, Rajiv; Mohanty, Prasanna

    2007-01-01

    Exclusion of UV (280-380 nm) radiation from the solar spectrum can be an important tool to assess the impact of ambient UV radiation on plant growth and performance of crop plants. The effect of exclusion of UV-B and UV-A from solar radiation on the growth and photosynthetic components in soybean (Glycine max) leaves were investigated. Exclusion of solar UV-B and UV-B/A radiation, enhanced the fresh weight, dry weight, leaf area as well as induced a dramatic increase in plant height, which reflected a net increase in biomass. Dry weight increase per unit leaf area was quite significant upon both UV-B and UV-B/A exclusion from the solar spectrum. However, no changes in chlorophyll a and b contents were observed by exclusion of solar UV radiation but the content of carotenoids was significantly (34-46%) lowered. Analysis of chlorophyll (Chl) fluorescence transient parameters of leaf segments suggested no change in the F v/F m value due to UV-B or UV-B/A exclusion. Only a small reduction in photo-oxidized signal I (P700+)/unit Chl was noted. Interestingly the total soluble protein content per unit leaf area increased by 18% in UV-B/A and 40% in UV-B excluded samples, suggesting a unique upregulation of biosynthesis and accumulation of biomass. Solar UV radiation thus seems to primarily affect the photomorphogenic regulatory system that leads to an enhanced growth of leaves and an enhanced rate of net photosynthesis in soybean, a crop plant of economic importance. The presence of ultra-violet components in sunlight seems to arrest carbon sequestration in plants.

  11. Exclusion of solar UV radiation improves photosynthetic performance and yield of wheat varieties.

    PubMed

    Kataria, Sunita; Guruprasad, K N

    2015-12-01

    Field studies were conducted to determine the potential for alterations in photosynthetic performance and grain yield of four wheat (Triticum aestivum) varieties of India- Vidisha, Purna, Swarna and Naveen Chandausi by ambient ultraviolet radiation (UV). The plants were grown in specially designed UV exclusion chambers, wrapped with filters that excluded UV-B (<315 nm), UV-A/B (<400 nm) or transmitted ambient UV or lacked filters. The results indicated that solar UV exclusion increased the leaf mass per area ratio, leaf weight ratio and chlorophylls per unit area of flag leaves in all the four varieties of wheat. Polyphasic chlorophyll a fluorescence transients from the flag leaves of UV excluded wheat plants gave a higher fluorescence yield. Exclusion of solar UV significantly enhanced photosynthetic performance as a consequence of increased efficiency of PS II, performance index (PIABS) and rate of photosynthesis in the flag leaves of wheat varieties along with a remarkable increase in carbonic anhydrase, Rubisco and nitrate reductase activities. This additional fixation of carbon and nitrogen by exclusion of UV was channelized towards the improvement in grain yield of wheat varieties as there was a decrease in the UV-B absorbing substances and an increase in soluble protein content in flag leaves of all the four varieties of wheat. The magnitude of response for UV exclusion for all the measured parameters was higher in two varieties of wheat Vidisha and Purna as compared to Swarna and Naveen Chandausi. Cumulative stress response index (CSRI) for each variety was developed from the cumulative sum of physiological and yield parameters such as leaf mass area ratio of flag leaf, total chlorophyll content, performance index at absorption basis, rate of photosynthesis and grain yield. All the varieties had a negative CSRI, demonstrating a negative impact of ambient UV radiation. Naveen Chandausi and Swarna are less sensitive to ambient UV radiation; Vidisha is more

  12. MicroRNA-22 promotes cell survival upon UV radiation by repressing PTEN.

    PubMed

    Tan, Guangyun; Shi, Yuling; Wu, Zhao-Hui

    2012-01-06

    DNA damage response upon UV radiation involves a complex network of cellular events required for maintaining the homeostasis and restoring genomic stability of the cells. As a new class of players involved in DNA damage response, the regulation and function of microRNAs in response to UV remain poorly understood. Here we show that UV radiation induces a significant increase of miR-22 expression, which appears to be dependent on the activation of DNA damage responding kinase ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated). Increased miR-22 expression may result from enhanced miR-22 maturation in cells exposed to UV. We further found that tumor suppressor gene phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) expression was inversely correlated with miR-22 induction and UV-induced PTEN repression was attenuated by overexpression of a miR-22 inhibitor. Moreover, increased miR-22 expression significantly inhibited the activation of caspase signaling cascade, leading to enhanced cell survival upon UV radiation. Collectively, these results indicate that miR-22 is an important player in the cellular stress response upon UV radiation, which may promote cell survival via the repression of PTEN expression.

  13. Laser pretreatment protects cells of broad bean from UV-B radiation damage.

    PubMed

    Qi, Z; Yue, M; Wang, X L

    2000-12-01

    In order to determine the role of lasers in the stress resistance of broad bean (Vicia faba L.) to ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation, the embryos in seeds were exposed to He-Ne laser or CO2 laser radiation. Afterwards they were cultivated in Petri dishes in a constant temperature incubator until the lengths of epicotyls were nearly 3 cm. The epicotyls were then exposed to 1.02, 3.03 or 4.52 kJ m(-2) UV-B radiation, respectively, under 70 micromol m(-2) s(-1) photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) in a growth cabinet. Changes in the concentration of malondialdehyde (MDA), ascorbic acid (AsA) and UV-B absorbing compounds (absorbance at 300 nm) were measured to test the effects of laser pretreatment. The results showed that laser pretreatment of embryos enhanced UV-B stress resistance in the epicotyls of the broad bean by decreasing the MDA concentration and increasing the content of AsA and UV-B absorbing compounds. We suggest that those changes in MDA, AsA and UV-B absorbing compounds were responsible for the increase in stress resistance observed in the broad bean. This is the first investigation reporting the use of laser pretreatment to protect the cells of the broad bean from UV-B-induced damage.

  14. UV radiation impacts body weight, oxygen consumption, and shelter selection in the intertidal vertebrate Girella laevifrons.

    PubMed

    Pulgar, José; Waldisperg, Melany; Galbán-Malagón, Cristóbal; Maturana, Diego; Pulgar, Victor M; Aldana, Marcela

    2017-02-01

    The amount of ultraviolet (UV) radiation reaching the earth's surface has increased due to ozone layer depletion, and this fact represents an opportunity to evaluate the physiological and behavioral responses of animals to this global-scale stressor. The transitory fish Girella laevifrons inhabits pools in the upper intertidal zone, which is characterized by exposure to a wide range of stressors, including UV radiation. We documented the field magnitude and the impact of UV radiation on oxygen consumption, body mass variations, and shelter (rocky and algae) selection by G. laevifrons. UV-exposed animals showed increased oxygen consumption, slower body weight increase, and active rocky shelter selection. Control fish showed increased body weight and no evident shelter selection. The results indicated that UV exposure affects fish energetic balance and habitat selection to favor greater protection against radiation. Increased UV exposure in transitory intertidal animals at levels observed in upper intertidal pools may alter the residency time of fish before leaving for the subtidal zone. Therefore, UV-induced energetic changes may determine animal performance and ontogenetic physiological itineraries, whereas shelter quality might determine habitat use. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Direct effects of UV-B radiation on the freshwater heterotrophic nanoflagellate Paraphysomonas sp.

    PubMed

    Macaluso, Amy L; Mitchell, David L; Sanders, Robert W

    2009-07-01

    The formation of DNA photoproducts in organisms exposed to ambient levels of UV-B radiation can lead to death and/or reduced population growth in aquatic systems. Dependence on photoenzymatic repair to reverse DNA damage caused by UV-B radiation is demonstrated for Paraphysomonas sp., a member of a widely distributed genus of heterotrophic nanoflagellates. At 20 degrees C, Paraphysomonas sp. was exposed to a range of UV-B intensities encountered in natural systems. Populations of the flagellate survived and grew in a dose-dependent manner, but only when simultaneously exposed to photorepair radiation (PRR). In contrast, flagellates exposed to UV-B at 15 degrees C suffered 100% mortality except at the lowest UV-B level (with PRR) tested, which suggested a photorepair temperature optimum above 15 degrees C. After acute UV-B exposures, DNA damage (measured as the formation of pyrimidine dimers) was reduced only in organisms that underwent subsequent exposure to PRR. Populations kept in the dark after UV-B exposure maintained the initial levels of pyrimidine dimers. These results are the first to demonstrate the reliance of a heterotrophic flagellate on photoenzymatic DNA repair for survival from UV-B exposure.

  16. Directional Degradation of Spectralon Diffuser Under Ionizing Radiation for Calibration of Space-Based Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Georgiev, G. T.; Butler, J. J.; Kowalewski, M. G.; Ding, L.

    2012-01-01

    Assessment of the effect of Vacuum Ultra Violet (VUV) irradiation on the Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) of Spectralon is presented in this paper. The sample was a 99% white Spectralon calibration standard irradiated with VUV source positioned at 60o off the irradiation direction for a total of 20 hours. The BRDF before and after VUV irradiation was measured and compared at number of wavelengths in the UV, VIS and IR. Non-isotropic directional degradation of Spectralon diffuser under ionizing radiation was detected at different BRDF measurement geometries primarily at UV spectral range. The 8o directional/hemispherical reflectance of the same sample was also measured and compared from 200nm to 2500nm. Index Terms BRDF, Reflectance, Multiangular, Spectralon, Remote Sensing

  17. Model of radiation transmittance by inorganic fouling on UV reactor lamp sleeves.

    PubMed

    Wait, Isaac W; Blatchley, Ernest R

    2010-11-01

    The efficacy of UV disinfection of water depends on the ability of radiation to pass from UV lamps through the quartz sleeves that encase them; the accumulation of metal-containing foulants on sleeve surfaces inhibits disinfection by absorbing radiation that would otherwise be available for inactivation. In a series of experiments, the composition and quantity of sleeve foulants were studied relative to water chemistry and sleeve transmittance. Findings indicate that iron and calcium dominate fouling, with elevated fouling activity by iron, aluminum, manganese, and zinc. A regression-based modeling approach was used to characterize and quantify the effects of foulant metals on UV absorbance. The molar extinction coefficient for iron was found to be more than 3 times greater than that of calcium. Iron's relatively high activity in fouling reactions, elevated capacity to absorb UV, and reduced solubility under oxidizing conditions makes it a fouling precursor of particular concern, with respect to potential for sleeve fouling in UV reactors.

  18. Reproductive, morphological, and phytochemical responses of Arabidopsis thaliana ecotypes to enhanced UV-B radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Trumbull, V.L.; McCloud, E.S.; Paige, K.N. )

    1994-06-01

    Two ecotypes of Arabidopsis thaliana, collected from Libya and Norway, were grown in the greenhouse under. UV-B doses of 0 and 10.5 kJ m[sup [minus]2] UV-B[sub BE]. The high UV-B dose simulated midsummer ambient conditions over Libya and a 40% reduction in stratospheric ozone over Norway. The Libyan ectotype, which originated from latitudes where solar UV-B is high, showed no UV-B induced damage to plant growth. However the Norwegian ecotype, which originated from latitudes where solar UV-B is low, showed a significant reduction in plant height, inflorescence weight, and rosette weight in response to enhanced UV-B. Although fruit and seed number for both ecotypes were unaffected by enhanced UV-B radiation the germination success of the seeds harvested from the irradiated Norwegian plants were significantly reduced. The two ecotypes also differed with respect to their accumulation of kaempferol, a putative UV-B protective filter. The Libyan ecotype increased kaempferol concentration by 38% over the 0 kJ treatment whereas the Norwegian ecotype increased by only 15%. These data suggest that, for these ecotypes, variation in UV-B sensitivity may be explained by the differential induction of UV-absorbing leaf pigments.

  19. Simulating synchrotron radiation in accelerators including diffuse and specular reflections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dugan, G.; Sagan, D.

    2017-02-01

    An accurate calculation of the synchrotron radiation flux within the vacuum chamber of an accelerator is needed for a number of applications. These include simulations of electron cloud effects and the design of radiation masking systems. To properly simulate the synchrotron radiation, it is important to include the scattering of the radiation at the vacuum chamber walls. To this end, a program called synrad3d has been developed which simulates the production and propagation of synchrotron radiation using a collection of photons. Photons generated by a charged particle beam are tracked from birth until they strike the vacuum chamber wall where the photon is either absorbed or scattered. Both specular and diffuse scattering is simulated. If a photon is scattered, it is further tracked through multiple encounters with the wall until it is finally absorbed. This paper describes the synrad3d program, with a focus on the details of its scattering model, and presents some examples of the program's use.

  20. Comparison of the Radiative Two-Flux and Diffusion Approximations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spuckler, Charles M.

    2006-01-01

    Approximate solutions are sometimes used to determine the heat transfer and temperatures in a semitransparent material in which conduction and thermal radiation are acting. A comparison of the Milne-Eddington two-flux approximation and the diffusion approximation for combined conduction and radiation heat transfer in a ceramic material was preformed to determine the accuracy of the diffusion solution. A plane gray semitransparent layer without a substrate and a non-gray semitransparent plane layer on an opaque substrate were considered. For the plane gray layer the material is semitransparent for all wavelengths and the scattering and absorption coefficients do not vary with wavelength. For the non-gray plane layer the material is semitransparent with constant absorption and scattering coefficients up to a specified wavelength. At higher wavelengths the non-gray plane layer is assumed to be opaque. The layers are heated on one side and cooled on the other by diffuse radiation and convection. The scattering and absorption coefficients were varied. The error in the diffusion approximation compared to the Milne-Eddington two flux approximation was obtained as a function of scattering coefficient and absorption coefficient. The percent difference in interface temperatures and heat flux through the layer obtained using the Milne-Eddington two-flux and diffusion approximations are presented as a function of scattering coefficient and absorption coefficient. The largest errors occur for high scattering and low absorption except for the back surface temperature of the plane gray layer where the error is also larger at low scattering and low absorption. It is shown that the accuracy of the diffusion approximation can be improved for some scattering and absorption conditions if a reflectance obtained from a Kubelka-Munk type two flux theory is used instead of a reflection obtained from the Fresnel equation. The Kubelka-Munk reflectance accounts for surface reflection and

  1. DNA repair and resistance to UV-B radiation in western spotted frogs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blaustein, A.R.; Hays, J.B.; Hoffman, P.D.; Chivers, D.P.; Kiesecker, J.M.; Leonard, W.P.; Marco, A.; Olson, D.H.; Reaser, J.K.; Anthony, R.G.

    1999-01-01

    We assessed DNA repair and resistance to solar radiation in eggs of members of the western spotted frog complex (Rana pretiosa and R. luteiventris), species whose populations are suffering severe range reductions and declines. Specifically, we measured the activity of photoreactivating enzyme (photolyase) in oocytes of spotted frogs. In some species, photoreactivation is the most important mechanism for repair of UV-damaged DNA. Using field experiments, we also compared the hatching success of spotted frog embryos at natural oviposition sites at three elevations, where some embryos were subjected to ambient levels of UV-B radiation and others were shielded from UV-B radiation. Compared with other amphibians, photolyase activities in spotted frogs were relatively high. At all sites, hatching success was unaffected by UV-B. Our data support the interpretation that amphibian embryos with relatively high levels of photolyase are more resistant to UV-B radiation than those with lower levels of photolyase. At the embryonic stage, UV-B radiation does not presently seem to be contributing to the population declines of spotted frogs.

  2. Decreased frost hardiness of Vaccinium vitis-idaea in reponse to UV-A radiation.

    PubMed

    Taulavuori, Kari; Keränen, Johanna; Suokanerva, Hanne; Lakkala, Kaisa; Huttunen, Satu; Laine, Kari; Taulavuori, Erja

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate plant frost hardiness responses to ultraviolet (UV) radiation, since the few results reported are largely contradictory. It was hypothesized that functional adaptation of life forms could explain these contradictions. Dwarf shrubs and tree seedlings, representing both evergreen and deciduous forms, were tested (Vaccinium vitis-idaea, Vaccinium myrtillus, Pinus sylvestris, Betula pubescens and its red form f. rubra). The research was performed in Sodankylä, Northern Finland (67°N), with enhanced UV-B- and UV-A-radiation treatments between 2002 and 2009. Plant frost hardiness was determined using the freeze-induced electrolyte leakage method in early autumn, during the onset of the frost hardening process. Additional physiological variables (malondialdehyde, glutathione, total phenols, C and N contents) were analyzed in V. vitis-idaea to explain the possible responses. These variables did not respond significantly to UV-radiation treatments, but explained the frost hardiness well (r² = 0.678). The main finding was that frost hardiness decreased in the evergreen shrub V. vitis-idaea, particularly with enhanced UV-A radiation. No significant responses were observed with the other plants. Therefore, this study does not support the idea that enhanced UV radiation could increase plant frost hardiness.

  3. Adverse Effects of UV-B Radiation on Plants Growing at Schirmacher Oasis, East Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Singh, Jaswant; Singh, Rudra P

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the impacts of ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation over a 28-day period on the levels of pigments of Umbilicaria aprina and Bryum argenteum growing in field. The depletion of stratospheric ozone is most prominent over Antarctica, which receives more UV-B radiation than most other parts of the planet. Although UV-B radiation adversely affects all flora, Antarctic plants are better equipped to survive the damaging effects of UV-B owing to defenses provided by UV-B absorbing compounds and other screening pigments. The UV-B radiations and daily average ozone values were measured by sun photometer and the photosynthetic pigments were analyzed by the standard spectrophotometric methods of exposed and unexposed selected plants. The daily average atmospheric ozone values were recorded from 5 January to 2 February 2008. The maximum daily average for ozone (310.7 Dobson Units (DU)) was recorded on 10 January 2008. On that day, average UV-B spectral irradiances were 0.016, 0.071, and 0.186 W m(-2) at wavelengths of 305, 312, and 320 nm, respectively. The minimum daily average ozone value (278.6 DU) was recorded on 31 January 2008. On that day, average UV-B spectral irradiances were 0.018, 0.085, and 0.210 W m(-2) at wavelengths of 305, 312, and 320 nm, respectively. Our results concludes that following prolonged UV-B exposure, total chlorophyll levels decreased gradually in both species, whereas levels of UV-B absorbing compounds, phenolics, and carotenoids gradually increased.

  4. Adverse Effects of UV-B Radiation on Plants Growing at Schirmacher Oasis, East Antarctica

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Jaswant; Singh, Rudra P.

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the impacts of ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation over a 28-day period on the levels of pigments of Umbilicaria aprina and Bryum argenteum growing in field. The depletion of stratospheric ozone is most prominent over Antarctica, which receives more UV-B radiation than most other parts of the planet. Although UV-B radiation adversely affects all flora, Antarctic plants are better equipped to survive the damaging effects of UV-B owing to defenses provided by UV-B absorbing compounds and other screening pigments. The UV-B radiations and daily average ozone values were measured by sun photometer and the photosynthetic pigments were analyzed by the standard spectrophotometric methods of exposed and unexposed selected plants. The daily average atmospheric ozone values were recorded from 5 January to 2 February 2008. The maximum daily average for ozone (310.7 Dobson Units (DU)) was recorded on 10 January 2008. On that day, average UV-B spectral irradiances were 0.016, 0.071, and 0.186 W m-2 at wavelengths of 305, 312, and 320 nm, respectively. The minimum daily average ozone value (278.6 DU) was recorded on 31 January 2008. On that day, average UV-B spectral irradiances were 0.018, 0.085, and 0.210 W m-2 at wavelengths of 305, 312, and 320 nm, respectively. Our results concludes that following prolonged UV-B exposure, total chlorophyll levels decreased gradually in both species, whereas levels of UV-B absorbing compounds, phenolics, and carotenoids gradually increased. PMID:24748743

  5. Role of the Spore Coat Layers in Bacillus subtilis Spore Resistance to Hydrogen Peroxide, Artificial UV-C, UV-B, and Solar UV Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Riesenman, Paul J.; Nicholson, Wayne L.

    2000-01-01

    Spores of Bacillus subtilis possess a thick protein coat that consists of an electron-dense outer coat layer and a lamellalike inner coat layer. The spore coat has been shown to confer resistance to lysozyme and other sporicidal substances. In this study, spore coat-defective mutants of B. subtilis (containing the gerE36 and/or cotE::cat mutation) were used to study the relative contributions of spore coat layers to spore resistance to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and various artificial and solar UV treatments. Spores of strains carrying mutations in gerE and/or cotE were very sensitive to lysozyme and to 5% H2O2, as were chemically decoated spores of the wild-type parental strain. Spores of all coat-defective strains were as resistant to 254-nm UV-C radiation as wild-type spores were. Spores possessing the gerE36 mutation were significantly more sensitive to artificial UV-B and solar UV radiation than wild-type spores were. In contrast, spores of strains possessing the cotE::cat mutation were significantly more resistant to all of the UV treatments used than wild-type spores were. Spores of strains carrying both the gerE36 and cotE::cat mutations behaved like gerE36 mutant spores. Our results indicate that the spore coat, particularly the inner coat layer, plays a role in spore resistance to environmentally relevant UV wavelengths. PMID:10653726

  6. Daily variation of UV-A and UV-B solar radiation on the Adriatic Sea.

    PubMed

    Vojniković, Bozo; Toth, Ivan

    2011-09-01

    During the summer months, from June thru September, in Opatija and island of Rab area, we conducted UVA and UVB measurements using a professional detector: Solar Light Co., Inc. USA. Ordering: PMA2110 UV-A and PMA2101 UV-B detector. We conducted global UVA and UVB measurements in the 2006 to 2011 period. Results of the measurements show June to September daily, 10 am to 3 pm, UVA and UVB variations to be above allowed values especially in the maritime area. The measurements were performed in cooperation with "Dr. B. Vojniković" Daily eye clinic and the University of Applied Sciences Velika Gorica, Velika Gorica, Croatia.

  7. UV radiation reduces epidermal cell expansion in leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Hectors, Kathleen; Jacques, Eveline; Prinsen, Els; Guisez, Yves; Verbelen, Jean-Pierre; Jansen, Marcel A K; Vissenberg, Kris

    2010-10-01

    Plants have evolved a broad spectrum of mechanisms to ensure survival under changing and suboptimal environmental conditions. Alterations of plant architecture are commonly observed following exposure to abiotic stressors. The mechanisms behind these environmentally controlled morphogenic traits are, however, poorly understood. In this report, the effects of a low dose of chronic ultraviolet (UV) radiation on leaf development are detailed. Arabidopsis rosette leaves exposed for 7, 12, or 19 d to supplemental UV radiation expanded less compared with non-UV controls. The UV-mediated decrease in leaf expansion is associated with a decrease in adaxial pavement cell expansion. Elevated UV does not affect the number and shape of adaxial pavement cells, nor the stomatal index. Cell expansion in young Arabidopsis leaves is asynchronous along a top-to-base gradient whereas, later in development, cells localized at both the proximal and distal half expand synchronously. The prominent, UV-mediated inhibition of cell expansion in young leaves comprises effects on the early asynchronous growing stage. Subsequent cell expansion during the synchronous phase cannot nullify the UV impact established during the asynchronous phase. The developmental stage of the leaf at the onset of UV treatment determines whether UV alters cell expansion during the synchronous and/or asynchronous stage. The effect of UV radiation on adaxial epidermal cell size appears permanent, whereas leaf shape is transiently altered with a reduced length/width ratio in young leaves. The data show that UV-altered morphogenesis is a temporal- and spatial-dependent process, implying that common single time point or single leaf zone analyses are inadequate.

  8. The evolution of protostellar disks under the influence of external UV radiation and central stellar winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yorke, H. W.; Richling, S.

    2001-01-01

    The evolution and appearance of circumstellar disks in star forming regions can be influenced strongly by the radiation from nearby hot stars. Here we describe the results of numerical simulations of the evolution of protostellar disks and their immediate surroundings under the influence of external UV radiation.

  9. Spectral Observations of the Diffuse FUV Background with DUVE (the Diffuse UV Experiment)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korpela, E. J.; Bowyer, S.

    We present results from a search for FUV emission from the diffuse ISM conducted with an orbital FUV spectrometer, DUVE, which was launched in July, 1992. The DUVE spectrometer, which covers the band from 950 Angstroms to 1080 Angstroms with 3.2 Angstroms resolution, observed a region of low neutral hydrogen column density near the south galactic pole for a total effective integration time of 1583 seconds. The only emission line detected was a geocoronal hydrogen line at 1025 Angstroms. We were able to place upper limits to several emission features that provide constraints to interstellar plasma parameters. We were also able to place continuum limits in this band. We use these upper limits to place constraints upon the emission measure vs. temperature distribution of this gas using an isothermal Landini and Fossi model.

  10. The mechanisms of protection of antioxidants on Nostoc sphaeroides against UV-B radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, G. H.

    UV radiation is one of space harmful factor for earth organisms in space exploration In the present work we studied on the role of antioxidant system in Nostoc sphaeroides K u tz Cyanobacteria and the effects of exogenous antioxidant molecules on its photosynthetic rate under UV-B radiation It was found that UV-B radiation decreased the photosynthetic activity of cyanobacterium but promoted the activity of antioxidant system to protect photosystem II PSII and exogenous antioxidant sodium nitroprusside SNP N-acetylcysteine NAC had an obvious protection on PSII activity under UV-B radiation The activity of SOD Superoxide Dismutase EC 1 15 1 1 CAT Catalase EC 1 11 1 6 POD Peroxidase EC 1 11 1 7 and content of MDA and ASC were improved by 0 5mM and 1mM SNP but 0 1mM SNP decreased the activity of antioxide system Exogenous NAC addition decreased the activity of SOD POD CAT and the content MDA and ASC but exogenous NAC addition increased the content of GSH The results suggested that exogenous SNP and NAC may protect algae by different mechanisms in which SNP maybe play double roles as sources of reactive free radicals or ROS scavengers in formation of algae s protection of PSII under UV-B radiation while NAC does function as antioxidant reagent or precursor of glutathione which could protect PSII directly from UV-B radiation Keyword antioxidant system exogenous or endogenous antioxidant Nostoc sphaeroides photosynthesis UV-B radiation

  11. Effect of UV/EB radiation dosages on the properties of nanocomposite coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nik Salleh, Nik Ghazali; Firdaus Yhaya, Mohd; Hassan, Azman; Abu Bakar, Aznizam; Mokhtar, Munirah

    2011-02-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of ultraviolet (UV) and electron beam (EB) radiation on the properties of cured nanocomposite coatings. Surface hardness increased with increase in radiation dosages (number of passes) for all samples. This was due to the increase in crosslinking with increase in radiation dosage. Pendulum hardness, gel content, and thumb twist results were analyzed to choose appropriate curing dosage for both curing techniques. The selected dosages were then used to cure coatings for scratch and abrasion resistance tests. It was found that the UV curing produced coatings with better abrasion resistance, whereas EB curing was a more suitable approach for producing scratch resistance coatings.

  12. UV/PAR radiations and DOM properties in surface coastal waters of the Canadian shelf of the Beaufort Sea during summer 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Para, J.; Charrière, B.; Matsuoka, A.; Miller, W. L.; Rontani, J. F.; Sempéré, R.

    2012-11-01

    Water masses from the Beaufort Sea in the Arctic Ocean were evaluated for dissolved organic carbon (DOC), and optical characteristics including UV and PAR diffuse attenuation (Kd), and chromophoric and fluorescent dissolved organic matter (CDOM and FDOM) as part of the MALINA field campaign (30 July to 27 August). Even with relatively low mean daily solar radiation incident on the sea surface (0.12 ± 0.03, 8.46 ± 1.64 and 18.09 ± 4.20 kJ m-2 for UV-B (305 nm), UV-A (380 nm) and PAR, respectively), we report significant light penetration with 10% irradiance depths (Z10% (λ)) reaching 9.5 m for 340 nm (UV-A) radiation in the Eastern sector and 4.5 m in the Mackenzie River influenced area (Western sector). Spectral absorption coefficients (aCDOM (350 nm) (m-1)) were significantly correlated to both diffuse attenuation coefficients (Kd) in the UV-A and UV-B and to DOC concentrations. This indicates CDOM as the dominant attenuator of UV solar radiation and suggests its use as an optical proxy for DOC concentrations in this region. Extrapolating CDOM to DOC relationships, we estimate that ~ 16% of the DOC in the Mackenzie River does not absorb radiation at 350 nm. DOC and CDOM discharges by the Mackenzie River during the MALINA Cruise are estimated as ~ 0.22 TgC and 0.18 TgC, respectively. Three dissolved fluorescent components (C1-C3) were identified by fluorescence Excitation/Emission Matrix Spectroscopy (EEMS) and PARAFAC analysis. Our results showed an in-situ biological component (C1) that co-dominated with a terrestrial humic-like component (C2) in the Mackenzie Delta sector, whereas the protein-like (C3) component dominated in the saltiest waters of the North East sector.

  13. Radiation from Gas-Jet Diffusion Flames in Microgravity Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahadori, M. Yousef; Edelman, Raymond B.; Sotos, Raymond G.; Stocker, Dennis P.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents the first demonstration of quantitative flame-radiation measurement in microgravity environments, with the objective of studying the influences and characteristics of radiative transfer on the behavior of gas-jet diffusion flames with possible application to spacecraft fire detection. Laminar diffusion flames of propane, burning in quiescent air at atmospheric pressure, are studied in the 5.18-Second Zero-Gravity Facility of NASA Lewis Research Center. Radiation from these flames is measured using a wide-view angle, thermopile-detector radiometer, and comparisons are made with normal-gravity flames. The results show that the radiation level is significantly higher in microgravity compared to normal-gravity environments due to larger flame size, enhanced soot formation, and entrapment of combustion products in the vicinity of the flame. These effects are the consequences of the removal of buoyancy which makes diffusion the dominant mechanism of transport. The results show that longer test times may be needed to reach steady state in microgravity environments.

  14. Fires increase Amazon forest productivity through increases in diffuse radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rap, A.; Spracklen, D. V.; Mercado, L.; Reddington, C. L.; Haywood, J. M.; Ellis, R. J.; Phillips, O. L.; Artaxo, P.; Bonal, D.; Restrepo Coupe, N.; Butt, N.

    2015-06-01

    Atmospheric aerosol scatters solar radiation increasing the fraction of diffuse radiation and the efficiency of photosynthesis. We quantify the impacts of biomass burning aerosol (BBA) on diffuse radiation and plant photosynthesis across Amazonia during 1998-2007. Evaluation against observed aerosol optical depth allows us to provide lower and upper BBA emissions estimates. BBA increases Amazon basin annual mean diffuse radiation by 3.4-6.8% and net primary production (NPP) by 1.4-2.8%, with quoted ranges driven by uncertainty in BBA emissions. The enhancement of Amazon basin NPP by 78-156 Tg C a-1 is equivalent to 33-65% of the annual regional carbon emissions from biomass burning. This NPP increase occurs during the dry season and acts to counteract some of the observed effect of drought on tropical production. We estimate that 30-60 Tg C a-1 of this NPP enhancement is within woody tissue, accounting for 8-16% of the observed carbon sink across mature Amazonian forests.

  15. Event-Specific Quantification of Radiation Belt Radial Diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, W.; Sarris, T. E.; Ozeke, L.

    2016-12-01

    Recently, there has been a great emphasis on developing event-specific inputs for radiation belt models, since they are proven critical for reproducing the observed radiation belt dynamics during strong events. For example, our DREAM3D simulation of the 8-9 October 2012 storm demonstrates that event-specific chorus wave model and seed population are critical to reproduce the strong enhancement of MeV electrons in this event. However, the observed fast electron dropout preceding the enhancement was not captured by the simulation, which could be due to the combined effects of fast outward radial diffusion of radiation belt electrons with magnetopause shadowing and enhanced electron precipitation. Without an event-specific quantification of radial diffusion, we cannot resolve the relative contribution of outward radial diffusion and precipitation to the observed electron dropout or realistically reproduce the dynamics during the event. In this work, we provide physical quantification of radial diffusion specific to the October 2012 event by including both real-time and global distributions of ULF waves from a constellation of wave measurements and event-specific estimation of ULF wave mode structure. The global maps of ULF waves during the event are constructed by combining the real-time measurements from the Van Allen Probes, THEMIS, and GOES satellites in space and a large array of ground magnetometers. The real-time ULF wave mode structure is then estimated using the new Cross-Wavelet Transform technique, applied to various azimuthally aligned pairs of ULF wave measurements that are located at the same L shells. The cross power and phase differences between the time series are calculated using the technique, based on which the wave power per mode number is estimated. Finally, the physically estimated radial diffusion coefficients specific to the event are applied to the DREAM3D model to quantify the relative contribution of radial diffusion to the electron dynamics

  16. UV-C radiation as a factor reducing microbiological contamination of fish meal.

    PubMed

    Skowron, Krzysztof; Bauza-Kaszewska, Justyna; Dobrzański, Zbigniew; Paluszak, Zbigniew; Skowron, Karolina Jadwiga

    2014-01-01

    Fish meals, added to feeds as a source of protein, may contain pathogenic bacteria. Therefore, effective methods for their sanitizing, such as UV-C radiation, are needed to minimize the epidemiological risk. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of UV-C radiation on the sanitary state of fish meals. The research materials included salmon and cod meals. Samples of the fish meals were inoculated with suspensions of Salmonella, E. coli, enterococci, and C. sporogenes spores and exposed to the following surface UV-C fluencies: 0-400 J·m⁻² for bacteria and 0-5000 J·m⁻² for spores. For the vegetative forms, the highest theoretical lethal UV-C dose, ranging from 670.99 to 688.36 J·m⁻² depending on the meal type, was determined for Salmonella. The lowest UV-C fluency of 363.34-363.95 J·m⁻² was needed for the inactivation of Enterococcus spp. Spores were considerably more resistant, and the UV-C doses necessary for inactivation were 159571.1 J·m⁻² in salmon meal and 66836.9 J·m⁻² in cod meal. The application of UV-C radiation for the sanitization of fish meals proved to be a relatively effective method for vegetative forms of bacteria but was practically ineffective for spores.

  17. UV-C Radiation as a Factor Reducing Microbiological Contamination of Fish Meal

    PubMed Central

    Dobrzański, Zbigniew; Skowron, Karolina Jadwiga

    2014-01-01

    Fish meals, added to feeds as a source of protein, may contain pathogenic bacteria. Therefore, effective methods for their sanitizing, such as UV-C radiation, are needed to minimize the epidemiological risk. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of UV-C radiation on the sanitary state of fish meals. The research materials included salmon and cod meals. Samples of the fish meals were inoculated with suspensions of Salmonella, E. coli, enterococci, and C. sporogenes spores and exposed to the following surface UV-C fluencies: 0–400 J·m−2 for bacteria and 0–5000 J·m−2 for spores. For the vegetative forms, the highest theoretical lethal UV-C dose, ranging from 670.99 to 688.36 J·m−2 depending on the meal type, was determined for Salmonella. The lowest UV-C fluency of 363.34–363.95 J·m−2 was needed for the inactivation of Enterococcus spp. Spores were considerably more resistant, and the UV-C doses necessary for inactivation were 159571.1 J·m−2 in salmon meal and 66836.9 J·m−2 in cod meal. The application of UV-C radiation for the sanitization of fish meals proved to be a relatively effective method for vegetative forms of bacteria but was practically ineffective for spores. PMID:24578670

  18. Plant Responses to Increased UV-B Radiation: A Research Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DAntoni, H. L.; Skiles, J. W.; Armstrong, R.; Coughlan, J.; Daleo, G.; Mayoral, A.; Lawless, James G. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Ozone decrease implies more ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation reaching the surface of the Earth. Increased UV-B radiation triggers responses by living organisms. Despite the large potential impacts on vegetation, little is known about UV-B effects on terrestrial ecosystems. Long-term ecological studies are needed to quantify the effects of increased UV radiation on terrestrial ecosystems, asses the risks, and produce reliable data for prediction. Screening pigments are part of one of the protective mechanism in plants. Higher concentrations of screening pigments in leaves may be interpreted as a response to increased UV radiation. If the screening effect is not sufficient, important molecules will be disturbed by incoming radiation. Thus, genetics, photosynthesis, growth, plant and leaf shape and size, and pollen grains may be affected. This will have an impact on ecosystem dynamics, structure and productivity. It is necessary to monitor selected terrestrial ecosystems to permit detection and interpretation of changes attributable to global climate change and depleted ozone shield. The objectives of this project are: (1) To identify and measure indicators of the effects of increased solar UV-B radiation on terrestrial plants; (2) to select indicators with the greatest responses to UV-B exposure; (3) to test, adapt or create ecosystem models that use the information gathered by this project for prediction and to enhance our understanding of the effects of increased UV-B radiation on terrestrial ecosystems. As a first step to achieve these objectives we propose a three-year study of forest and steppe vegetation on the North slope of the Brooks Range (within the Arctic circle, in Alaska), in the Saguaro National Monument (near Tucson, Arizona) and in the forests and steppes of Patagonia (Argentina). We selected (1) vegetation north of the Polar Circle because at 70N there is 8% risk of plant damage due to increased UV-B radiation; (2) the foothills of Catalina Mountains

  19. Plant Responses to Increased UV-B Radiation: A Research Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DAntoni, H. L.; Skiles, J. W.; Armstrong, R.; Coughlan, J.; Daleo, G.; Mayoral, A.; Lawless, James G. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Ozone decrease implies more ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation reaching the surface of the Earth. Increased UV-B radiation triggers responses by living organisms. Despite the large potential impacts on vegetation, little is known about UV-B effects on terrestrial ecosystems. Long-term ecological studies are needed to quantify the effects of increased UV radiation on terrestrial ecosystems, asses the risks, and produce reliable data for prediction. Screening pigments are part of one of the protective mechanism in plants. Higher concentrations of screening pigments in leaves may be interpreted as a response to increased UV radiation. If the screening effect is not sufficient, important molecules will be disturbed by incoming radiation. Thus, genetics, photosynthesis, growth, plant and leaf shape and size, and pollen grains may be affected. This will have an impact on ecosystem dynamics, structure and productivity. It is necessary to monitor selected terrestrial ecosystems to permit detection and interpretation of changes attributable to global climate change and depleted ozone shield. The objectives of this project are: (1) To identify and measure indicators of the effects of increased solar UV-B radiation on terrestrial plants; (2) to select indicators with the greatest responses to UV-B exposure; (3) to test, adapt or create ecosystem models that use the information gathered by this project for prediction and to enhance our understanding of the effects of increased UV-B radiation on terrestrial ecosystems. As a first step to achieve these objectives we propose a three-year study of forest and steppe vegetation on the North slope of the Brooks Range (within the Arctic circle, in Alaska), in the Saguaro National Monument (near Tucson, Arizona) and in the forests and steppes of Patagonia (Argentina). We selected (1) vegetation north of the Polar Circle because at 70N there is 8% risk of plant damage due to increased UV-B radiation; (2) the foothills of Catalina Mountains

  20. Effects of Stratospheric Ozone Depletion, Solar UV Radiation, and Climate Change on Biogeochemical Cycling: Interactions and Feedbacks

    EPA Science Inventory

    Climate change modulates the effects of solar UV radiation on biogeochemical cycles in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, particularly for carbon cycling, resulting in UV-mediated positive or negative feedbacks on climate. Possible positive feedbacks discussed in this assessment...

  1. Effects of Stratospheric Ozone Depletion, Solar UV Radiation, and Climate Change on Biogeochemical Cycling: Interactions and Feedbacks

    EPA Science Inventory

    Climate change modulates the effects of solar UV radiation on biogeochemical cycles in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, particularly for carbon cycling, resulting in UV-mediated positive or negative feedbacks on climate. Possible positive feedbacks discussed in this assessment...

  2. The diffusion approximation. An application to radiative transfer in clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arduini, R. F.; Barkstrom, B. R.

    1976-01-01

    It is shown how the radiative transfer equation reduces to the diffusion equation. To keep the mathematics as simple as possible, the approximation is applied to a cylindrical cloud of radius R and height h. The diffusion equation separates in cylindrical coordinates and, in a sample calculation, the solution is evaluated for a range of cloud radii with cloud heights of 0.5 km and 1.0 km. The simplicity of the method and the speed with which solutions are obtained give it potential as a tool with which to study the effects of finite-sized clouds on the albedo of the earth-atmosphere system.

  3. Charged particle diffusion and acceleration in Saturn's radiation belts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckibben, R. B.; Simpson, J. A.

    1980-01-01

    In the present paper, an attempt is made to determine, from the observed intensity profiles for protons and electrons in the region of L smaller than 4, whether population of Saturn's innermost trapped radiation zones from an external source is possible. It is found that if diffusion proceeds in an episodic rather than a steady-state manner (long periods of quiescence interrupted by brief periods of rapid diffusion), the basic features of the observed phase space density profiles are qualitatively reproduced for both the trapped protons and electrons.

  4. Dynamic response of UV-absorbing compounds, quantum yield and the xanthophyll cycle to diel changes in UV-B and photosynthetic radiations in an aquatic liverwort.

    PubMed

    Fabón, Gabriel; Monforte, Laura; Tomás-Las-Heras, Rafael; Núñez-Olivera, Encarnación; Martínez-Abaigar, Javier

    2012-01-01

    We studied the diel responses of the liverwort Jungermannia exsertifolia subsp. cordifolia to radiation changes under laboratory conditions. The samples were exposed to three radiation regimes: P (only PAR), PA (PAR+UV-A), and PAB (PAR+UV-A+UV-B). The day was divided in four periods: darkness, a first low-PAR period, the high-PAR plus UV period, and a second low-PAR period. After 15 days of culture, we measured photosynthetic pigments, chlorophyll fluorescence and UV-absorbing compounds in the four periods of the day on two consecutive days. With respect to UV-absorbing compounds, we analyzed their global amount (as the bulk UV absorbance of methanolic extracts) and the concentration of seven hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives, both in the soluble (mainly vacuolar) and insoluble (cell wall-bound) fractions of the plant extracts. PAB samples increased the bulk UV absorbance of the soluble and insoluble fractions, and the concentrations of p-coumaroylmalic acid in the soluble fraction and p-coumaric acid in the cell wall. Most of these variables showed significant diel changes and responded within a few hours to radiation changes (more strongly to UV-B), increasing at the end of the period of high-PAR plus UV. F(v)/F(m), Φ(PSII), NPQ and the components of the xanthophyll cycle showed significant and quick diel changes in response to high PAR, UV-A and UV-B radiation, indicating dynamic photoinhibition and protection of PSII from excess radiation through the xanthophyll cycle. Thus, the liverwort showed a dynamic protection and acclimation capacity to the irradiance level and spectral characteristics of the radiation received.

  5. Structure and radiation properties of turbulent diffusion flames

    SciTech Connect

    Kounalakis, M. E.

    1990-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental study of the flame structure and gas band radiation of carbon monoxide/hydrogen/air diffusion flames is described. The results have applications to analysis of the rate of spread of natural fires, design and development of furnaces, determination of radiant heat loads to engine components, development of rocket plume visibility, safe operations of industrial flares, development of material test codes for fire properties and development of fire detectors. The structure of the turbulent flames was studied using the Mie scattering technique to measure single and two-point mixture fraction statistics, and laser Doppler anemometery to measure single-point velocity statistics along the centerline. A stochastic methodology for treating the nonlinear flame radiation fluctuations caused by turbulence/radiation interactions was developed. The methodology was evaluated by comparison with high resolution emission spectroscopy measurements of gas-band radiation.

  6. Ocean acidification mediates photosynthetic response to UV radiation and temperature increase in the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Gao, K.; Villafañe, V. E.; Helbling, E. W.

    2012-06-01

    Increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration is responsible for progressive ocean acidification, ocean warming as well as decreased thickness of upper mixing layer (UML), thus exposing phytoplankton cells not only to lower pH and higher temperatures but also to higher levels of solar UV radiation. In order to evaluate the combined effects of ocean acidification, UV radiation and temperature, we used the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum as a model organism and examined its physiological performance after grown under two CO2 concentrations (390 and 1000 µatm) for more than 20 generations. Compared to the ambient CO2 level (390 µatm), growth at the elevated CO2 concentration increased non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) of cells and partially counteracted the harm to PSII caused by UV-A and UV-B. Such an effect was less pronounced under increased temperature levels. As for photosynthetic carbon fixation, the rate increased with increasing temperature from 15 to 25 °C, regardless of their growth CO2 levels. In addition, UV-induced inhibition of photosynthesis was inversely correlated to temperature. The ratio of repair to UV-induced damage showed inverse relationship with increased NPQ, showing higher values under the ocean acidification condition against UV-B, reflecting that the increased pCO2 and lowered pH counteracted UV-B induced harm.

  7. Effects of solar UV radiation and climate change on biogeochemical cycling: Interactions and feedbacks

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson III, David J

    2011-01-01

    Solar UV radiation, climate and other drivers of global change are undergoing significant changes and models forecast that these changes will continue for the remainder of this century. Here we assess the effects of solar UV radiation on biogeochemical cycles and the interactions of these effects with climate change, including feedbacks on climate. Such interactions occur in both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. While there is significant uncertainty in the quantification of these effects, they could accelerate the rate of atmospheric CO{sub 2} increase and subsequent climate change beyond current predictions. The effects of predicted changes in climate and solar UV radiation on carbon cycling in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems are expected to vary significantly between regions. The balance of positive and negative effects on terrestrial carbon cycling remains uncertain, but the interactions between UV radiation and climate change are likely to contribute to decreasing sink strength in many oceanic regions. Interactions between climate and solar UV radiation will affect cycling of elements other than carbon, and so will influence the concentration of greenhouse and ozone-depleting gases. For example, increases in oxygen-deficient regions of the ocean caused by climate change are projected to enhance the emissions of nitrous oxide, an important greenhouse and ozone-depleting gas. Future changes in UV-induced transformations of aquatic and terrestrial contaminants could have both beneficial and adverse effects. Taken in total, it is clear that the future changes in UV radiation coupled with human-caused global change will have large impacts on biogeochemical cycles at local, regional and global scales.

  8. Effects of solar UV radiation and climate change on biogeochemical cycling: interactions and feedbacks.

    PubMed

    Zepp, R G; Erickson, D J; Paul, N D; Sulzberger, B

    2011-02-01

    Solar UV radiation, climate and other drivers of global change are undergoing significant changes and models forecast that these changes will continue for the remainder of this century. Here we assess the effects of solar UV radiation on biogeochemical cycles and the interactions of these effects with climate change, including feedbacks on climate. Such interactions occur in both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. While there is significant uncertainty in the quantification of these effects, they could accelerate the rate of atmospheric CO(2) increase and subsequent climate change beyond current predictions. The effects of predicted changes in climate and solar UV radiation on carbon cycling in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems are expected to vary significantly between regions. The balance of positive and negative effects on terrestrial carbon cycling remains uncertain, but the interactions between UV radiation and climate change are likely to contribute to decreasing sink strength in many oceanic regions. Interactions between climate and solar UV radiation will affect cycling of elements other than carbon, and so will influence the concentration of greenhouse and ozone-depleting gases. For example, increases in oxygen-deficient regions of the ocean caused by climate change are projected to enhance the emissions of nitrous oxide, an important greenhouse and ozone-depleting gas. Future changes in UV-induced transformations of aquatic and terrestrial contaminants could have both beneficial and adverse effects. Taken in total, it is clear that the future changes in UV radiation coupled with human-caused global change will have large impacts on biogeochemical cycles at local, regional and global scales.

  9. Biochemical traits and proteomic changes in postharvest flowers of medicinal chrysanthemum exposed to enhanced UV-B radiation.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xiaoqin; Chu, Jian-Zhou; Ma, Chun-Hui; Si, Chao; Li, Ji-Gang; Shi, Xiao-Fei; Liu, Chao-Nan

    2015-08-01

    The article studied UV-B effects on biochemical traits and proteomic changes in postharvest flowers of medicinal chrysanthemum. The experiment about UV-B effects on biochemical traits in flowers included six levels of UV-B treatments (0 (UV0), 50 (UV50), 200 (UV200), 400 (UV400), 600 (UV600) and 800 (UV800) μWcm(-2)). UV400, UV600 and UV800 treatments significantly increased the contents of hydrogen peroxide, malondialdehyde and UV-B absorbing compounds, and the activity of phenylalanine ammonia lyase enzyme over the control. The contents of chlorogenic acid and flavone in flowers were significantly increased by UV-B treatments (except for UV50 and UV800). Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis was utilized to analyze proteomic changes in flowers with or without UV-B radiation. Results indicated that 43 protein spots (>1.5-fold difference in volume) were detected, including 19 spots with a decreasing trend and 24 spots with an increasing trend, and 19 differentially expressed protein spots were successfully indentified by MALDI-TOF MS. The indentified proteins were classified based on functions, the most of which were involved in photosynthesis, respiration, protein biosynthesis and degradation and defence. An overall assessment using biochemical and differential proteomic data revealed that UV-B radiation could affect biochemical reaction and promote secondary metabolism processes in postharvest flowers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. UV-B radiation impacts shoot tissue pigment composition in Allium fistulosum L. cultigens.

    PubMed

    Abney, Kristin R; Kopsell, Dean A; Sams, Carl E; Zivanovic, Svetlana; Kopsell, David E

    2013-01-01

    Plants from the Allium genus are valued worldwide for culinary flavor and medicinal attributes. In this study, 16 cultigens of bunching onion (Allium fistulosum L.) were grown in a glasshouse under filtered UV radiation (control) or supplemental UV-B radiation [7.0  μ mol·m(-2) · s(-2) (2.68 W · m(-2))] to determine impacts on growth, physiological parameters, and nutritional quality. Supplemental UV-B radiation influenced shoot tissue carotenoid concentrations in some, but not all, of the bunching onions. Xanthophyll carotenoid pigments lutein and β -carotene and chlorophylls a and b in shoot tissues differed between UV-B radiation treatments and among cultigens. Cultigen "Pesoenyj" responded to supplemental UV-B radiation with increases in the ratio of zeaxanthin + antheraxanthin to zeaxanthin + antheraxanthin + violaxanthin, which may indicate a flux in the xanthophyll carotenoids towards deepoxydation, commonly found under high irradiance stress. Increases in carotenoid concentrations would be expected to increase crop nutritional values.

  11. UV-B Radiation Impacts Shoot Tissue Pigment Composition in Allium fistulosum L. Cultigens

    PubMed Central

    Abney, Kristin R.; Kopsell, Dean A.; Sams, Carl E.; Zivanovic, Svetlana; Kopsell, David E.

    2013-01-01

    Plants from the Allium genus are valued worldwide for culinary flavor and medicinal attributes. In this study, 16 cultigens of bunching onion (Allium fistulosum L.) were grown in a glasshouse under filtered UV radiation (control) or supplemental UV-B radiation [7.0 μmol·m−2 ·s−2 (2.68 W·m−2)] to determine impacts on growth, physiological parameters, and nutritional quality. Supplemental UV-B radiation influenced shoot tissue carotenoid concentrations in some, but not all, of the bunching onions. Xanthophyll carotenoid pigments lutein and β-carotene and chlorophylls a and b in shoot tissues differed between UV-B radiation treatments and among cultigens. Cultigen “Pesoenyj” responded to supplemental UV-B radiation with increases in the ratio of zeaxanthin + antheraxanthin to zeaxanthin + antheraxanthin + violaxanthin, which may indicate a flux in the xanthophyll carotenoids towards deepoxydation, commonly found under high irradiance stress. Increases in carotenoid concentrations would be expected to increase crop nutritional values. PMID:23606817

  12. Survival of thermophilic and hyperthermophilic microorganisms after exposure to UV-C, ionizing radiation and desiccation.

    PubMed

    Beblo, Kristina; Douki, Thierry; Schmalz, Gottfried; Rachel, Reinhard; Wirth, Reinhard; Huber, Harald; Reitz, Günther; Rettberg, Petra

    2011-11-01

    In this study, we investigated the ability of several (hyper-) thermophilic Archaea and phylogenetically deep-branching thermophilic Bacteria to survive high fluences of monochromatic UV-C (254 nm) and high doses of ionizing radiation, respectively. Nine out of fourteen tested microorganisms showed a surprisingly high tolerance against ionizing radiation, and two species (Aquifex pyrophilus and Ignicoccus hospitalis) were even able to survive 20 kGy. Therefore, these species had a comparable survivability after exposure to ionizing radiation such as Deinococcus radiodurans. In contrast, there was nearly no difference in survival of the tested strains after exposure to UV-C under anoxic conditions. If the cells had been dried in advance of UV-C irradiation, they were more sensitive to UV-C radiation compared with cells irradiated in liquid suspension; this effect could be reversed by the addition of protective material like sulfidic ores before irradiation. By exposure to UV-C, photoproducts were formed in the DNA of irradiated Archaea and Bacteria. The distribution of the main photoproducts was species specific, but the amount of the photoproducts was only partly dependent on the applied fluence. Overall, our results show that tolerance to radiation seems to be a common phenomenon among thermophilic and hyperthermophilic microorganisms.

  13. UV radiation induced surface modulation time evolution in polymeric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostol, I.; Apostol, D.; Damian, V.; Iordache, I.; Hurduc, N.; Sava, I.; Sacarescu, L.; Stoica, I.

    2010-11-01

    The reorganization processes at submicron level of the polymeric materials have been investigated because of their applications in optoelectronics and bio-science. We have obtained surface relief modulation in single step processing on the photo resist and polysiloxane films. But for technical applications the time evolution and stability of the induced surface structure is an important parameter and is a problem to be discussed. In case of single step surface relief formation on polymeric materials the process is connected with the photochromic behavior of the materials. As it is known the UV light induced effects on the material structure are reversible under the action of visible light, but with different speeds. In this report is analyzed the time evolution of the surface modulation obtained under the action of the UV light for azopolymers with different structures.

  14. Photocarcinogenesis by methoxypsoralen, neutral red, proflavine, and long UV radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Santamaria, L.; Bianchi, A.; Arnaboldi, A.; Daffara, P.; Andreoni, L.

    1985-01-01

    A study of the photosensitizing effects of 8-methoxypsoralen (MOP), neutral red (NR), and proflavine (PF) on the skin of female Swiss albino mice, strain 955, was carried out using fractionated exposure to long ultraviolet light (300-400 nm) and visible light (tungsten emission). The results (1) confirmed MOP photocarcinogenicity, (2) demonstrated that both NR and PF are photocarcinogens, and, further, (3) showed that the above UV light with 2.6% of fluence at 313 nm is a long-term carcinogenic agent even though the total dose of 313 nm was 100 times less than the minimal UV tumorigenic dose in mice. The tumors were mammary adenocarcinomas, carcinomas of skin appendages, carcino-mixo-sarcomas, lymphomas, and one case of thyroid adenocarcinoma. The implications of the above data regarding the controversy about oncogenic risks in photochemotherapy are discussed.

  15. Photoprotectant improves photostability and bioactivity of abscisic acid under UV radiation.

    PubMed

    Gao, Fei; Hu, Tanglu; Tan, Weiming; Yu, Chunxin; Li, Zhaohu; Zhang, Lizhen; Duan, Liusheng

    2016-05-01

    Photosensitivity causes serious drawback for abscisic acid (ABA) application, but preferable methods to stabilize the compound were not found yet. To select an efficient photoprotectant for the improvement of photostability and bioactivity of ABA when exposed to UV light, we tested the effects of a photostabilizer bis(2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-piperidinyl) sebacate (HS-770) and two UV absorbers 2-hydroxy-4-n-octoxy-benzophenone (UV-531) and 2-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzophenone-5-sulfonic acid (BP-4) with or without HS-770 on the photodegradation of ABA. Water soluble UV absorber BP-4 and oil soluble UV absorber UV-531 showed significant photo-stabilizing capability on ABA, possibly due to competitive energy absorption of UVB by the UV absorbers. The two absorbers showed no significant difference. Photostabilizer HS-770 accelerated the photodegradation of ABA and did not improve the photo-stabilizing capability of BP-4, likely due to no absorption in UVB region and salt formation with ABA and BP-4. Approximately 26% more ABA was kept when 280mg/l ABA aqueous solution was irradiated by UV light for 2h in the presence of 200mg/l BP-4. What's more, its left bioactivity on wheat seed (JIMAI 22) germination was greatly kept by BP-4, comparing to that of ABA alone. The 300 times diluent of 280mg/l ABA plus 200mg/l BP-4 after 2h irradiation showed more than 13% inhibition on shoot and root growth of wheat seed than that of ABA diluent alone. We concluded that water soluble UV absorber BP-4 was an efficient agent to keep ABA activity under UV radiation. The results could be used to produce photostable products of ABA compound or other water soluble agrichemicals which are sensitive to UV radiation. The frequencies and amounts of the agrichemicals application could be thereafter reduced.

  16. Application of Principal Component Analysis to Classify Textile Fibers Based on UV-Vis Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C.; Chen, Q.; Hussain, M.; Wu, S.; Chen, J.; Tang, Z.

    2017-07-01

    This study provides a new approach to the classification of textile fibers by using principal component analysis (PCA), based on UV-Vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (UV-Vis DRS). Different natural and synthetic fibers such as cotton, wool, silk, linen, viscose, and polyester were used. The spectrum of each kind of fiber was scanned by a spectrometer equipped with an integrating sphere. The characteristics of their UV-Vis diffuse reflectance spectra were analyzed. PCA revealed that the first three components represented 99.17% of the total variability in the ultraviolet region. Principal component score scatter plot (PC1 × PC2) of each fiber indicated the accuracy of this classification for these six varieties of fibers. Therefore, it was demonstrated that UV diffuse reflectance spectroscopy can be used as a novel approach to rapid, real-time, fiber identification.

  17. European standards for protective apparel against UV radiation.

    PubMed

    Laperre, Jan; Foubert, Fred

    2002-01-01

    The first European standard which describes the test procedure to determine the UV-protection factor of clothing is about to be completed. A second part of the same standard, dealing with labelling and marking aspects, is ready to be submitted to public enquiry. In this effort a group of experts from most EU member states have cooperated with a high degree of consensus. In this chapter we explain this European standard together with the standard developed in the UK.

  18. Influence of radiation damage on krypton diffusion in silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedland, E.; Hlatshwayo, T. T.; van der Berg, N. G.; Mabena, M. C.

    2015-07-01

    Diffusion of krypton in poly and single crystalline silicon carbide is investigated and compared with the previously obtained results for xenon, which pointed to a different diffusion mechanism than observed for chemically active elements. For this purpose 360 keV krypton ions were implanted in commercial 6H-SiC and CVD-SiC wafers at room temperature, 350 °C and 600 °C. Width broadening of the implantation profiles and krypton retention during isochronal and isothermal annealing up to temperatures of 1400 °C was determined by RBS-analysis, whilst in the case of 6H-SiC damage profiles were simultaneously obtained by α-particle channeling. Little diffusion and no krypton loss was detected in the initially amorphized and eventually recrystallized surface layer of cold implanted 6H-SiC during annealing up to 1200 °C. Above that temperature thermal etching of the implanted surface became increasingly important. No diffusion or krypton loss is detected in the hot implanted 6H-SiC samples during annealing up to 1400 °C. Radiation damage dependent grain boundary diffusion is observed at 1300 °C in CVD-SiC. The results seem to indicate, that the chemically inert noble gas atoms do not form defect-impurity complexes, which strongly influence the diffusion behavior of other diffusors in silicon carbide.

  19. VOYAGER OBSERVATIONS OF THE DIFFUSE FAR-ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Murthy, Jayant; Henry, Richard Conn; Holberg, Jay B.

    2012-03-01

    The two Voyager spacecraft have completed their planetary exploration mission and are now probing the outer realms of the heliosphere. The Voyager ultraviolet spectrometers continued to operate well after the Voyager 2 Neptune encounter in 1989. We present a complete database of diffuse radiation observations made by both Voyagers: a total of 1943 spectra (500-1600 A) scattered throughout the sky. These include observations of dust-scattered starlight, emission lines from the hot interstellar medium, and a number of locations where no diffuse radiation was detected, with the very low upper limit of about 25 photons cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} sr{sup -1} A{sup -1}. Many of these observations were from late in the mission when there was significantly less contribution from interplanetary emission lines and thus less contamination of the interstellar signal.

  20. Responses of a rice-field cyanobacterium Anabaena siamensis TISTR-8012 upon exposure to PAR and UV radiation.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Rajesh P; Incharoensakdi, Aran; Madamwar, Datta

    2014-10-15

    The effects of PAR and UV radiation and subsequent responses of certain antioxidant enzymatic and non-enzymatic defense systems were studied in a rice field cyanobacterium Anabaena siamensis TISTR 8012. UV radiation resulted in a decline in growth accompanied by a decrease in chlorophyll a and photosynthetic efficiency. Exposure of cells to UV radiation significantly affected the differentiation of vegetative cells into heterocysts or akinetes. UV-B radiation caused the fragmentation of the cyanobacterial filaments conceivably due to the observed oxidative stress. A significant increase of reactive oxygen species in vivo and DNA strand breaks were observed in UV-B exposed cells followed by those under UV-A and PAR radiation, respectively. The UV-induced oxidative damage was alleviated due to an induction of antioxidant enzymatic/non-enzymatic defense systems. In response to UV irradiation, the studied cyanobacterium exhibited a significant increase in antioxidative enzyme activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase and peroxidase. Moreover, the cyanobacterium also synthesized some UV-absorbing/screening substances. HPLC coupled with a PDA detector revealed the presence of three compounds with UV-absorption maxima at 326, 331 and 345 nm. The induction of the biosynthesis of these UV-absorbing compounds was found under both PAR and UV radiation, thus suggesting their possible function as an active photoprotectant.

  1. Rediscovering leaf optical properties: New insights into plant acclimation to solar UV radiation.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Paul W; Flint, Stephan D; Ryel, Ronald J; Tobler, Mark A; Barkley, Anne E; Wargent, Jason J

    2015-08-01

    The accumulation of UV-absorbing compounds (flavonoids and other phenylpropanoid derivatives) and resultant decrease in the UV transmittance of the epidermis in leaves (TUV), is a primary protective mechanism against the potentially deleterious effects of UV radiation and is a critical component of the overall acclimation response of plants to changing UV environments. Traditional measurements of TUV were laborious, time-consuming and destructive or invasive, thus limiting their ability to efficiently make multiple measurements of the optical properties of plants in the field. The development of rapid, nondestructive optical methods of determining TUV has permitted the examination of UV optical properties of leaves with increased replication, on a finer time scale, and enabled repeated sampling of the same leaf over time. This technology has therefore allowed for studies examining acclimation responses to UV in plants in ways not previously possible. Here we provide a brief review of these earlier studies examining leaf UV optical properties and some of their important contributions, describe the principles by which the newer non-invasive measurements of epidermal UV transmittance are made, and highlight several case studies that reveal how this technique is providing new insights into this UV acclimation response in plants, which is far more plastic and dynamic than previously thought.

  2. Biologically weighted measurement of UV radiation in space and on Earth with the biofilm technique.

    PubMed

    Rettberg, P; Horneck, G

    2000-01-01

    Biological dosimetry has provided experimental proof of the high sensitivity of the biologically effective UVB doses to changes in atmospheric ozone and has thereby confirmed the predictions from model calculations. The biological UV dosimeter 'biofilm' whose sensitivity is based on dried spores of B. subtilis as UV target weights the incident UV radiation according to its DNA damaging potential. Biofilm dosimetry was applicated in space experiments as well as in use in remote areas on Earth. Examples are long-term UV measurements in Antarctica, measurements of diurnal UV profiles parallel in time at different locations in Europe, continuous UV measurements in the frame of the German UV measurement network and personal UV dosimetry. In space biofilms were used to determine the biological efficiency of the extraterrestrial solar UV, to simulate the effects of decreasing ozone concentrations and to determine the interaction of UVB and vitamin D production of cosmonauts in the MIR station. c2001 COSPAR Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. RecBC enzyme overproduction affects UV and gamma radiation survival of Deinococcus radiodurans.

    PubMed

    Khairnar, Nivedita P; Kamble, Vidya A; Misra, Hari S

    2008-01-01

    Deinococcus radiodurans recovering from the effect of acute dose of gamma (gamma) radiation shows a biphasic mechanism of DNA double strands breaks repair that involves an efficient homologous recombination. However, it shows higher sensitivity to near-UV (NUV) than Escherichia coli and lacks RecBC, a DNA strand break (DSB) repair enzyme in some bacteria. Recombinant Deinococcus expressing the recBC genes of E. coli showed nearly three-fold improvements in near-UV tolerance and nearly 2 log cycle reductions in wild type gamma radiation resistance. RecBC over expression effect on radiation response of D. radiodurans was independent of indigenous RecD. Loss of gamma radiation tolerance was attributed to the enhanced rate of in vivo degradation of radiation damaged DNA and delayed kinetics of DSB repair during post-irradiation recovery. RecBC expressing cells of Deinococcus showed wild type response to Far-UV. These results suggest that the overproduction of RecBC competes with the indigenous mechanism of gamma radiation damaged DNA repair while it supports near-UV tolerance in D. radiodurans.

  4. Commercial devices measuring UV radiation: a good choice for the public?

    PubMed

    Pettazzi, Alberto

    2010-10-01

    Commercial devices measuring UV radiation are available on the market at affordable prices. This work presents the response of six commercial devices in comparison to UV index measurements and in relation to the guidelines provided by the INTERSUN programme. Taking everything into account, overestimated or non-standard data, and ambiguous or incomplete information was found. Instead of using these gadgets, people should refer to official information and advice provided by health and weather services. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  5. An assessment of ozone levels, UV radiation and their occupational health hazard estimation during photocopying operation.

    PubMed

    Singh, Bhupendra Pratap; Kumar, Amit; Singh, Deepak; Punia, Monika; Kumar, Krishan; Jain, Vinod Kumar

    2014-06-30

    This study investigates the levels of ozone concentration along with an ultraviolet (UV) and visible spectral radiation at eight photocopy centers in an academic institute, Delhi. Sampling was done in two types of locations, i.e., basement photocopy centers (BPC) and ground floor photocopy centers (GPC) for 8h. Measurements of levels of ozone, UV and visible radiation were done by ozone analyzer, UV radiometer and Field spectra instrument, respectively. Results show that the hourly mean concentration of ozone was observed to be in the range of 1.8-10.0 ppb and 5.3-45.8 ppb for BPC and GPC, respectively. In terms UV radiations, energy lies between 5.0×10(-3) and 7.0×10(-3) mW/cm(2) for ultraviolet A (UVA), 1.0×10(-3) and 2.0×10(-3) mW/cm(2) for ultraviolet B (UVB) and 6.0×10(-3) and 8.0×10(-3) mW/cm(2) for ultraviolet C (UVC). Correlation between the UV radiations and ozone production observed was statistically insignificant. To know the health hazard occurred to the workers, the standard erythema dose (SED) value was calculated for emitting UV radiation. The SED was estimated to be in the range of 0.02-0.04 and 0.02-0.32 for direct and indirect methods which is less than the guideline prescribed by Commission Internationale del' Eclairage (CIE). In nutshell, person involved in photocopy operation for their livelihood must be trained and should have knowledge for the long term gradual build up health problems due to ozone and UV production from photocopier. The manufactures should be ultimated with the significant ozone production, so that photocopier machine can be redesigned.

  6. Responses of Crepis japonica induced by supplemental blue light and UV-A radiation.

    PubMed

    Constantino, L F da S; Nascimento, L B Dos S; Casanova, L M; Moreira, N Dos S; Menezes, E A; Esteves, R L; Costa, S S; Tavares, E S

    2017-02-15

    Crepis japonica (L.) D.C. (Asteraceae), a weed with antioxidant, antiallergenic, antiviral and antitumor properties displays both medicinal properties and nutritional value. This study aims to assess the effects of a supplementation of blue light and UV-A radiation on the growth, leaf anatomical structure and phenolic profile of the aerial parts of Crepis japonica. Plants were grown under two light treatments: W (control - white light), W + B (white light supplemented with blue light) and W + UV-A (white light supplemented with UV-A radiation). We recorded the length, width, and weight of fresh and dry leaves, the thickness of the epidermis and mesophyll, and stomata density. The phenolic profiles of the aqueous extracts of the aerial parts were analyzed by HPLC-DAD. There was an increase in the leaf size, stomatal density, and phenolic production, and a thickening of the mesophyll and epidermis. UV-A radiation increased the phenolic production more than blue light. Blue light and UV-A radiation both improved the production of caffeic acid by about 6 and 3 times, respectively, in comparison to control. This compound was first reported as a constituent of the extract from the aerial parts together with caftaric acid. UV-A also promoted the production of chlorogenic acid (about 1.5 times in comparison to the control). We observed that the morphological and chemical parameters of C. japonica are modified in response to blue light and UV-A radiation, which can be used as tools in the cultivation of this species in order to improve its medicinal properties and nutritional value.

  7. Effects of solar UV-A and UV-B radiation on gene expression and phenolic accumulation in Betula pendula leaves.

    PubMed

    Morales, Luis O; Tegelberg, Riitta; Brosché, Mikael; Keinänen, Markku; Lindfors, Anders; Aphalo, Pedro J

    2010-07-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation is an important environmental factor for plant communities; however, plant responses to solar UV are not fully understood. Here, we report differential effects of solar UV-A and UV-B radiation on the expression of flavonoid pathway genes and phenolic accumulation in leaves of Betula pendula Roth (silver birch) seedlings grown outdoors. Plants were exposed for 30 days to six UV treatments created using three types of plastic film. Epidermal flavonoids measured in vivo decreased when UV-B was excluded. In addition, the concentrations of six flavonoids determined by high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry declined linearly with UV-B exclusion, and transcripts of PAL and HYH measured by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction were expressed at lower levels. UV-A linearly regulated the accumulation of quercetin-3-galactoside and quercetin-3-arabinopyranoside and had a quadratic effect on HYH expression. Furthermore, there were strong positive correlations between PAL expression and accumulation of four flavonols under the UV treatments. Our findings in silver birch contribute to a more detailed understanding of plant responses to solar UV radiation at both molecular and metabolite levels.

  8. Effect of UV radiation on habitat selection by Girella laevifrons and Graus nigra (Kyphosidae).

    PubMed

    Pulgar, J; Lagos, P; Maturana, D; Valdés, M; Aldana, M; Pulgar, V M

    2015-01-04

    The effect of UV radiation on habitat use of two species of intertidal fishes that inhabit the same pools but exhibit different activity levels and diets was measured: the highly active omnivorous Girella laevifrons and the cryptic carnivorous Graus nigra. Individuals of each species were acclimated to a tank divided in three sections with different illumination; no light (NL), ultraviolet light (UV) and white light (WL), and the time spent and number of visits to each section were recorded. Although both species preferred the NL section, G. laevifrons spent more time in UV and less time in WL compared with G. nigra; G. laevifrons also displayed higher number of visits to UV, suggesting a different tendency in space use in response to UV exposure in intertidal fishes. © 2014 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  9. UV radiation effect towards mechanical properties of Natural Fibre Reinforced Composite material: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahzan, Shahruddin; Fitri, Muhamad; Zaleha, M.

    2017-01-01

    The use of natural fibres as reinforcement material have become common in human applications. Many of them are used in composite materials especially in the polymer matrix composites. The use of natural fibres as reinforcement also provide alternative solution of usage instead of being a waste materials. In some applications, these natural reinforced polymer composites were used as the outer layer, making them exposed to ultra violet exposure, hence prone to UV radiation. This paper reviews the effect of UV radiation towards the mechanical properties of natural fibre reinforced polymer matrix composite material. The effect of chemical treatment towards the natural fibre is also investigated. One of the important features that was critically explored was the degradation of the composite materials. The influence of UV radiation on the degradation rate involve several parameters such as wavelength, intensity and exposure time. This review highlights the influence of these parameters in order to provide better solution for polymer matrix composite’s development.

  10. THE MYSTERY OF THE COSMIC DIFFUSE ULTRAVIOLET BACKGROUND RADIATION

    SciTech Connect

    Henry, Richard Conn; Murthy, Jayant; Overduin, James; Tyler, Joshua E-mail: jmurthy@yahoo.com E-mail: 97tyler@cardinalmail.cua.edu

    2015-01-01

    The diffuse cosmic background radiation in the Galaxy Evolution Explorer far-ultraviolet (FUV, 1300-1700 Å) is deduced to originate only partially in the dust-scattered radiation of FUV-emitting stars: the source of a substantial fraction of the FUV background radiation remains a mystery. The radiation is remarkably uniform at both far northern and far southern Galactic latitudes and increases toward lower Galactic latitudes at all Galactic longitudes. We examine speculation that this might be due to interaction of the dark matter with the nuclei of the interstellar medium, but we are unable to point to a plausible mechanism for an effective interaction. We also explore the possibility that we are seeing radiation from bright FUV-emitting stars scattering from a ''second population'' of interstellar grains—grains that are small compared with FUV wavelengths. Such grains are known to exist, and they scatter with very high albedo, with an isotropic scattering pattern. However, comparison with the observed distribution (deduced from their 100 μm emission) of grains at high Galactic latitudes shows no correlation between the grains' location and the observed FUV emission. Our modeling of the FUV scattering by small grains also shows that there must be remarkably few such ''smaller'' grains at high Galactic latitudes, both north and south; this likely means simply that there is very little interstellar dust of any kind at the Galactic poles, in agreement with Perry and Johnston. We also review our limited knowledge of the cosmic diffuse background at ultraviolet wavelengths shortward of Lyα—it could be that our ''second component'' of the diffuse FUV background persists shortward of the Lyman limit and is the cause of the reionization of the universe.

  11. The Mystery of the Cosmic Diffuse Ultraviolet Background Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, Richard Conn; Murthy, Jayant; Overduin, James; Tyler, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    The diffuse cosmic background radiation in the Galaxy Evolution Explorer far-ultraviolet (FUV, 1300-1700 Å) is deduced to originate only partially in the dust-scattered radiation of FUV-emitting stars: the source of a substantial fraction of the FUV background radiation remains a mystery. The radiation is remarkably uniform at both far northern and far southern Galactic latitudes and increases toward lower Galactic latitudes at all Galactic longitudes. We examine speculation that this might be due to interaction of the dark matter with the nuclei of the interstellar medium, but we are unable to point to a plausible mechanism for an effective interaction. We also explore the possibility that we are seeing radiation from bright FUV-emitting stars scattering from a "second population" of interstellar grains—grains that are small compared with FUV wavelengths. Such grains are known to exist, and they scatter with very high albedo, with an isotropic scattering pattern. However, comparison with the observed distribution (deduced from their 100 μm emission) of grains at high Galactic latitudes shows no correlation between the grains' location and the observed FUV emission. Our modeling of the FUV scattering by small grains also shows that there must be remarkably few such "smaller" grains at high Galactic latitudes, both north and south; this likely means simply that there is very little interstellar dust of any kind at the Galactic poles, in agreement with Perry and Johnston. We also review our limited knowledge of the cosmic diffuse background at ultraviolet wavelengths shortward of Lyα—it could be that our "second component" of the diffuse FUV background persists shortward of the Lyman limit and is the cause of the reionization of the universe.

  12. Effect of elevated CO2, O3, and UV radiation on soils.

    PubMed

    Formánek, Pavel; Rejšek, Klement; Vranová, Valerie

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we have attempted to review the current knowledge on the impact of elevated CO2, O3, and UV on soils. Elevated CO2 increases labile and stabile soil C pool as well as efficiency of organic pollutants rhizoremediation and phytoextraction of heavy metals. Conversely, both elevated O3 and UV radiation decrease inputs of assimilates to the rhizosphere being accompanied by inhibitory effects on decomposition processes, rhizoremediation, and heavy metals phytoextraction efficiency. Contrary to elevated CO2, O3, or UV-B decreases soil microbial biomass, metabolisable C, and soil N t content leading to higher C/N of soil organic matter. Elevated UV-B radiation shifts soil microbial community and decreases populations of soil meso- and macrofauna via direct effect rather than by induced changes of litter quality and root exudation as in case of elevated CO2 or O3. CO2 enrichment or increased UV-B is hypothesised to stimulate or inhibit both plant and microbial competitiveness for soluble soil N, respectively, whereas O3 favours only microbial competitive efficiency. Understanding the consequences of elevated CO2, O3, and UV radiation for soils, especially those related to fertility, phytotoxins inputs, elements cycling, plant-microbe interactions, and decontamination of polluted sites, presents a knowledge gap for future research.

  13. Effect of Elevated CO2, O3, and UV Radiation on Soils

    PubMed Central

    Rejšek, Klement; Vranová, Valerie

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we have attempted to review the current knowledge on the impact of elevated CO2, O3, and UV on soils. Elevated CO2 increases labile and stabile soil C pool as well as efficiency of organic pollutants rhizoremediation and phytoextraction of heavy metals. Conversely, both elevated O3 and UV radiation decrease inputs of assimilates to the rhizosphere being accompanied by inhibitory effects on decomposition processes, rhizoremediation, and heavy metals phytoextraction efficiency. Contrary to elevated CO2, O3, or UV-B decreases soil microbial biomass, metabolisable C, and soil Nt content leading to higher C/N of soil organic matter. Elevated UV-B radiation shifts soil microbial community and decreases populations of soil meso- and macrofauna via direct effect rather than by induced changes of litter quality and root exudation as in case of elevated CO2 or O3. CO2 enrichment or increased UV-B is hypothesised to stimulate or inhibit both plant and microbial competitiveness for soluble soil N, respectively, whereas O3 favours only microbial competitive efficiency. Understanding the consequences of elevated CO2, O3, and UV radiation for soils, especially those related to fertility, phytotoxins inputs, elements cycling, plant-microbe interactions, and decontamination of polluted sites, presents a knowledge gap for future research. PMID:24688424

  14. Responses in the morphology, physiology and biochemistry of Taxus chinensis var. mairei grown under supplementary UV-B radiation.

    PubMed

    Zu, Yuan-gang; Pang, Hai-He; Yu, Jing-Hua; Li, De-Wen; Wei, Xiao-Xue; Gao, Yin-Xiang; Tong, Lu

    2010-02-12

    The effects of supplemental UV-B radiation on Taxus chinensis var. mairei were studied. Leaf traits, gas exchange parameters and the concentrations of photosynthetic pigments, cellular defense system products, secondary metabolites and ultrastructure were determined. UV-B radiation significantly decreased leaf area (p<0.05). Leaf number, secondary branch number, leaf weight per plant and leaf moisture all increased dramatically (p<0.05). Neither the leaf weight nor the specific leaf weight (SLW) exhibited significant differences between ambient and enhanced UV-B radiation. Gas exchange parameters were all dramatically reduced by enhanced UV-B radiation (p<0.05). The contents of chlorophyll and the chlorophyll a/b ratio were not distinctly affected by UV-B radiation, while carotenoids content significantly decreased (p<0.05). Supplemental UV-B treatment induced significant flavonoid accumulation (p<0.05), which was able to protect plant from radiation damage. Meanwhile, the appendage content, abaxial stomatal density, papilla density and particulate matter content in substomatic chambers increased noticeably by supplemental UV-B radiation, whereas the aperture size of single stomata was diminished. The number and area of plastoglobuli were apparently reduced by UV-B radiation, but stroma and grana lamellae were not destroyed. Our results demonstrated that T. chinensis var. mairei can activate several defense mechanisms against oxidative stress injury caused by supplemental UV-B radiation.

  15. Short- and long-term physiological responses of grapevine leaves to UV-B radiation.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Lüscher, J; Morales, F; Delrot, S; Sánchez-Díaz, M; Gomés, E; Aguirreolea, J; Pascual, I

    2013-12-01

    The present study aimed at evaluating the short- and long-term effects of UV-B radiation on leaves of grapevine Vitis vinifera (cv. Tempranillo). Grapevine fruit-bearing cuttings were exposed to two doses of supplemental biologically effective UV-B radiation (UV-BBE) under glasshouse-controlled conditions: 5.98 and 9.66kJm(-2)d(-1). The treatments were applied either for 20d (from mid-veraison to ripeness) or 75d (from fruit set to ripeness). A 0kJm(-2)d(-1) UV-B treatment was included as control. The main effects of UV-B were observed after the short-term exposure (20d) to 9.66kJm(-2)d(-1). Significant decreases in net photosynthesis, stomatal conductance, sub-stomatal CO2 concentration, the actual photosystem II (PSII) efficiency, total soluble proteins and de-epoxidation state of the VAZ cycle were observed, whereas the activities of several antioxidant enzymes increased significantly. UV-B did not markedly affect dark respiration, photorespiration, the maximum potential PSII efficiency (Fv/Fm), non-photochemical quenching (NPQ), as well as the intrinsic PSII efficiency. However, after 75d of exposure to 5.98and 9.66kJm(-2)d(-1) UV-B most photosynthetic and biochemical variables were unaffected and there were no sign of oxidative damage in leaves. The results suggest a high long-term acclimation capacity of grapevine to high UV-B levels, associated with a high accumulation of UV-B absorbing compounds in leaves, whereas plants seemed to be tolerant to moderate doses of UV-B.

  16. Action spectrum and mechanisms of UV radiation-induced injury in lupus erythematosus

    SciTech Connect

    Kochevar, I.E.

    1985-07-01

    Photosensitivity associated with lupus erythematosus (LE) is well established. The photobiologic basis for this abnormal response to ultraviolet radiation, however, has not been determined. This paper summarizes the criteria for elucidating possible photobiologic mechanisms and reviews the literature relevant to the mechanism of photosensitivity in LE. In patients with LE, photosensitivity to wavelengths shorter than 320 nm has been demonstrated; wavelengths longer than 320 nm have not been adequately evaluated. DNA is a possible chromophore for photosensitivity below 320 nm. UV irradiation of skin produces thymine photodimers in DNA. UV-irradiated DNA is more antigenic than native DNA and the antigenicity of UV-irradiated DNA has been proposed, but not proven, to be involved in the development of clinical lesions. UV irradiation of mice previously injected with anti-UV-DNA antibodies produces Ig deposition and complement fixation that appears to be similar to the changes seen in lupus lesions. Antibodies to UV-irradiated DNA occur in the serum of LE patients although a correlation between antibody titers and photosensitivity was not observed. Defective repair of UV-induced DNA damage does not appear to be a mechanism for the photosensitivity in LE. Other mechanisms must also be considered. The chromophore for photosensitivity induced by wavelengths longer than 320 nm has not been investigated in vivo. In vitro studies indicate that 360-400 nm radiation activates a photosensitizing compound in the lymphocytes and serum of LE patients and causes chromosomal aberrations and cell death. The mechanism appears to involve superoxide anion.

  17. Satellite and ground measurements of solar erythemal UV radiation and ozone in Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piacentini, R. D.; Luccini, E.; Micheletti, M. I.; Quel, E.; Wolfram, E. A.; Pazmiño, A. F.; Fochesatto, J.; Crino, E.; Cede, A.; Blumthaler, M.; Herman, J.; Godin-Beekmann, S.; Mégie, G.

    2004-01-01

    Solar erythemal UV radiation incident on Argentina from tropical to high latitude regions has been measured with ground-based instruments as well as with the TOMS instrument on board of the NASA Earth-Probe satellite. These data permit validation of the UV index, a measure of solar risk to UV exposure, forecasted daily by CONAE (Argentina National Commission on Space Activities) and the Argentine National Weather Service. Model calculations of this index are also presented. In addition, we analyzed the UV effects from the Antarctic ozone hole passing over the continental part of the country using TOMS data corrected by a factor derived from the intercomparison of TOMS satellite data with those determined with Southern Hemisphere ground-based spectroradiometers. In this way, we obtained a rather comprehensive description of the amount of erythemal UV radiation and consequently of the UV index for the entire country, as well as the ozone total column and profile (the latter one at Buenos Aires). The results presented in this work were determined through collaboration between the following institutions: GSFC/NASA in USA, Institute Pierre Simon Laplace in France, University of Innsbruck in Austria and CEILAP, IFIR, CONAE, SMN, Universities of Rosario and San Luis in Argentina. The need to use erythemal irradiance and ozone results in Argentina, one of the most exposed regions of the Southern Hemisphere to study the effects of ozone depletion and consequently UV detrimental effects, has been partially covered in the framework of this North-South collaboration.

  18. Effect of gamma and UV-B/C radiation on plant cells.

    PubMed

    Kovács, E; Keresztes, A

    2002-01-01

    The biological effect of gamma-rays is based on the interaction with atoms or molecules in the cell, particularly water, to produce free radicals, which can damage different important compounds of plant cell. The UV-B/C photons have enough energy to destroy chemical bounds, causing a photochemical reaction. The biological effect is due to these processes. This paper is focused on the structural and biochemical changes of the cell wall and plastids after gamma and/or UV-B irradiation. Gamma-rays accelerate the softening of fruits, causing the breakdown of middle lamella in cell wall. They also influence the plastid development and function, such as starch-sugar interconversion. The penetration of UV-B light into the cell is limited, while gamma-rays penetrate through the cells. For this reason, UV-B light has a strong effect on surface or near-to-surface area in plant cells. UV-B radiation influences plastid structure (mostly thylakoid membranes) and photosynthesis. Some kinds of pigments, such as carotenoids, flavonoids save plant cells against UV-B and gamma irradiation. Plant cells are generally ozone sensitive. The detoxifying systems operate at the cellular level. Methods for studying structural changes in plant cells develop in direction to molecular biology, combined with immunoassays and new microscopical techniques. Nowadays, UV-B radiation is undergoing much research, being an environmental factor which causes damage to both humans and plant cells.

  19. The effect of UV-B radiation on chloroplast translation in Pisum sativum

    SciTech Connect

    Raab, M.M.; Jagendorf, A.T. )

    1990-05-01

    UV-B radiation has previously been reported to reduce growth, flowering, and net photosynthesis. The present study examines the effect of UV-B radiation on isolated chloroplast of 7-10 day old pea seedlings. Amount of ({sup 3}H)-Leu incorporated into isolated chloroplasts was measured in the presence or absence of UV-B exposure. Preliminary experiments show a 30% inhibition of protein synthesis in isolated chloroplasts after only 20 mins of UV-B exposure (6.9 J/m{sup 2}/30 min). Percent inhibition of chloroplast translation is directly correlated with UV-B exposure over a 60 min time span. Preliminary studies also show no change in both cold and radiolabeled protein profiles as expressed on 1-D PAGE and autofluorography. Comparative studies on the sensitivity of e{sup {minus}} flow vs protein synthesis following UV-B exposure are underway. Further work on the role of oxygen free radicals and the specific site of action of UV-B damage to the translation machinery of chloroplasts will be discussed.

  20. Kinetics of avoidance of simulated solar uv radiation by two arthropods

    SciTech Connect

    Barcelo, J.A.; Calkins, J.

    1980-12-01

    There is an increasing likelihood that the solar uv-B radiation (lambda = 280-320 nm) reaching the earth's surface will increase due to depletion of the stratospheric ozone layer. It is recognized that many organisms are insufficiently resistant to solar uv-B to withstand full summer sunlight and thus mechanisms which facilitate avoidance of solar uv-B exposure may have significance for the survival of sensitive species. There are many alternative pathways which would lead to avoidance of solar uv-B. We have investigated the dynamics of biological reactions to simulated solar uv-B radiation in two small arthropods, the two-spotted spider mite Tetranychus urticae Koch and the aquatic copepod Cyclops serrulatus. Observations of positioning and rate of movement were made; a mathematical formalism was developed which assisted in interpretation of the observations. Our observations suggest that, although avoidance would mitigate increased solar uv-B effects, even organisms which specifically reduce their uv-B exposure would encounter additional stress if ozone depletion does occur.

  1. The Martian and extraterrestrial UV radiation environment--1. Biological and closed-loop ecosystem considerations.

    PubMed

    Cockell, C S; Andrady, A L

    1999-01-01

    The Martian surface is exposed to both UVC radiation (<280 nm) and higher doses of UVB (280-315 nm) compared to the surface of the Earth. Terrestrial organisms have not evolved to cope with such high levels of UVC and UVB and thus any attempts to introduce organisms to Mars, particularly in closed-loop life support systems that use ambient sunlight, must address this problem. Here we examine the UV radiation environment of Mars with respect to biological systems. Action spectra and UV surface fluxes are used to estimate the UV stress that both DNA and chloroplasts would experience. From this vantage point it is possible to consider appropriate measures to address the problem of the Martian UV environment for future long term human exploration and settlement strategies. Some prospects for improving the UV tolerance of organisms are also discussed. Existing artificial ecosystems such as Biosphere 2 can provide some insights into design strategies pertinent to high UV environments. Some prospects for improving the UV tolerance of organisms are also discussed. The data also have implications for the establishment of closed-loop ecosystems using natural sunlight on the lunar surface and elsewhere in the Solar System.

  2. Long-Term Dosimetry of Solar UV Radiation in Antarctica with Spores of Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Puskeppeleit, Monika; Quintern, Lothar E.; el Naggar, Saad; Schott, Jobst-Ulrich; Eschweiler, Ute; Horneck, Gerda; Bücker, Horst

    1992-01-01

    The main objective was to assess the influence of the seasonal stratospheric ozone depletion on the UV climate in Antarctica by using a biological test system. This method is based on the UV sensitivity of a DNA repair-deficient strain of Bacillus subtilis (TKJ 6321). In our field experiment, dried layers of B. subtilis spores on quartz discs were exposed in different seasons in an exposure box open to solar radiation at the German Antarctic Georg von Neumayer Station (70°37′S, 8°22′W). The UV-induced loss of the colony-forming ability was chosen as the biological end point and taken as a measure for the absorbed biologically harmful UV radiation. Inactivation constants were calculated from the resulting dose-response curves. The results of field experiments performed in different seasons indicate a strongly season-dependent trend of the daily UV-B level. Exposures performed at extremely depleted ozone concentrations (October 1990) gave higher biologically harmful UV-B levels than expected from the calculated season-dependent trend, which was determined at normal ozone values. These values were similar to values which were measured during the Antarctic summer, indicating that the depleted ozone column thickness has an extreme influence on the biologically harmful UV climate on ground. PMID:16348742

  3. Ocean acidification mediates photosynthetic response to UV radiation and temperature increase in the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Gao, K.; Villafañe, V. E.; Helbling, E. W.

    2012-10-01

    Increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration is responsible for progressive ocean acidification, ocean warming as well as decreased thickness of upper mixing layer (UML), thus exposing phytoplankton cells not only to lower pH and higher temperatures but also to higher levels of solar UV radiation. In order to evaluate the combined effects of ocean acidification, UV radiation and temperature, we used the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum as a model organism and examined its physiological performance after grown under two CO2 concentrations (390 and 1000 μatm) for more than 20 generations. Compared to the ambient CO2 level (390 μatm), growth at the elevated CO2 concentration increased non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) of cells and partially counteracted the harm to PS II (photosystem II) caused by UV-A and UV-B. Such an effect was less pronounced under increased temperature levels. The ratio of repair to UV-B induced damage decreased with increased NPQ, reflecting induction of NPQ when repair dropped behind the damage, and it was higher under the ocean acidification condition, showing that the increased pCO2 and lowered pH counteracted UV-B induced harm. As for photosynthetic carbon fixation rate which increased with increasing temperature from 15 to 25 °C, the elevated CO2 and temperature levels synergistically interacted to reduce the inhibition caused by UV-B and thus increase the carbon fixation.

  4. Investigation of the solar UV/EUV heating effect on the Jovian radiation belt by GMRT-IRTF observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kita, H.; Misawa, H.; Bhardwaj, A.; Tsuchiya, F.; Tao, C.; Uno, T.; Kondo, T.; Morioka, A.

    2012-12-01

    Jupiter's synchrotron radiation (JSR) is the emission from relativistic electrons, and it is the most effective probe for remote sensing of Jupiter's radiation belt from the Earth. Recent intensive observations of JSR revealed short term variations of JSR with the time scale of days to weeks. Brice and McDonough (1973) proposed a scenario for the short term variations; i.e, the solar UV/EUV heating for Jupiter's upper atmosphere causes enhancement of total flux density. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether sufficient solar UV/EUV heating in Jupiter's upper atmosphere can actually causes variation in the JSR total flux and brightness distribution. Previous JSR observations using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) suggested important characteristics of short term variations; relatively low energy particles are accelerated by some acceleration processes which might be driven by solar UV/EUV heating and/or Jupiter's own magnetic activities. In order to evaluate the effect of solar UV/EUV heating on JSR variations, we made coordinated observations using the GMRT and NASA Infra-Red Telescope Facility (IRTF). By using IRTF, we can estimate the temperature of Jupiter's upper atmosphere from spectroscopic observation of H_3^+ infrared emission. Hence, we can evaluate the relationship between variations in Jupiter's upper atmosphere initiated by the solar UV/EUV heating and its linkage with the JSR. The GMRT observations were made during Nov. 6-17, 2011 at the frequency of 235/610MHz. The H_3^+ 3.953 micron line was observed using the IRTF during Nov. 7-12, 2011. During the observation period, the solar UV/EUV flux variations expected on Jupiter showed monotonic increase. A preliminary analysis of GMRT 610MHz band showed a radio flux variation similar to that in the solar UV/EUV. Radio images showed that the emission intensity increased at the outer region and the position of equatorial peak emission moved in the outward direction. If radial diffusion

  5. Isoprene emission from a subarctic peatland under enhanced UV-B radiation.

    PubMed

    Tiiva, Päivi; Rinnan, Riikka; Faubert, Patrick; Räsänen, Janne; Holopainen, Toini; Kyrö, Esko; Holopainen, Jarmo K

    2007-01-01

    Isoprene is a reactive hydrocarbon with an important role in atmospheric chemistry, and emissions from vegetation contribute to atmospheric carbon fluxes. The magnitude of isoprene emissions from arctic peatlands is not known, and it may be altered by increasing UV-B radiation. Isoprene emission was measured with the dynamic chamber method from a subarctic peatland under long-term enhancement of UV-B radiation targeted to correspond to a 20% loss in the stratospheric ozone layer. The site type of the peatland was a flark fen dominated by the moss Warnstorfia exannulata and sedges Eriophorum russeolum and Carex limosa. The relationship between species densities and the emission was also assessed. Isoprene emissions were significantly increased by enhanced UV-B radiation during the second (2004) and the fourth (2006) growing seasons under the UV-B exposure. Emissions were related to the density of E. russeolum. The dominant moss, W. exannulata, proved to emit small amounts of isoprene in a laboratory trial. Subarctic fens, even without Sphagnum moss, are a significant source of isoprene to the atmosphere, especially under periods of warm weather. Warming of the Arctic together with enhanced UV-B radiation may substantially increase the emissions.

  6. [Effects of UV radiation on the aggregation performance of small molecular organic acids].

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen-Dong; Wang, Ya-Bo; Fan, Qing-Hai; Ding, Zhen-Zhen; Wang, Wen; Song, Shan; Zhang, Yin-Ting

    2014-10-01

    This study systematically investigated the effects of UV radiation on the aggregation of small molecular aliphatic carboxylic acids and phenolic acids by jar test. Experimental results show that solution pH has little effect on the coagulation of small molecular aliphatic carboxylic acids including citric acid, oxalic acid, tartaric acid, and succinic acid. For the solutions pretreated with UV light, the removal rates of the selected aliphatic carboxylic acids in coagulation are higher than that without UV radiation. Further study shows that photochemical reactions occur during UV radiation which decreases the negative charge in aliphatic carboxylic acids, and thereby increases their aggregation properties. Different from aliphatic carboxylic acids, phenol, salicylic acid, and benzoic acid have poor coagulation properties, and UV radiation does not have notable effects on their aggregation in the coagulation process. The coagulation performance of tannic acid is better than the other phenolic acids. At pH = 6, its removal rate is above 90%, which may be contributed to the aliphatic carboxylic acid structure in its molecular. Meanwhile, the large molecular of tannic acid is also easier to be adsorbed by the hydrolysis products of PAC1.

  7. Design of autotrack detecting instrument for solar UV radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Jiangtao; Mao, Xiaoli; Zhao, Jing

    2009-11-01

    In order to autotrack the object and detect the solar UV index, a reliable real-time high-precise instrument is proposed in this paper. This instrument involves two subsystems: the autotrack and detecting modules. The autotrack module consists of four-quadrant photo detector, multi-channel signal processing circuit and precise stepping system. The detecting module designed for dada measurement and acquisition is made up of the ultraviolet sensor UV460 and high precision A/D converter MAX1162. The key component of the entire instrument is ultralow-power microprocessor MSP430 which is used for entire system controlling and data processing. The lower system of autotracking and measurement is communicated with upper PC computer by RS232 module. In the experiment, the tracking precision of two-dimensional motion revolving stage is calibrated to be less than 0.05°. Experimental results indicate that the system designed could realize the precise autotracking and detecting function well, and the measure precision of system has reached the desirable target.

  8. The origin of the diffuse background gamma radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.; Puget, J. L.

    1974-01-01

    Recent observations provided evidence for diffuse background gamma radiation extending to energies beyond 100 MeV, and evidence of isotropy and implied cosmological origin. Significant features in the spectrum of this background radiation were observed which provide evidence for its origin in nuclear processes in the early stages of big-bang cosmology, and connect these processes with the galaxy formation theory. A test of the theory is in future observations of the background radiation in the 100 MeK to 100 GeV energy range which are made with large orbiting spark-chamber satellite detectors. The theoretical interpretations of present data, their connection with baryon-symmetric cosmology and galaxy formation theory, and the need for future observations are discussed.

  9. The origin of the diffuse background gamma-radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.; Puget, J. L.

    1974-01-01

    Recent observations have now provided evidence for diffuse background gamma radiation extending to energies beyond 100 MeV. There is some evidence of isotropy and implied cosmological origin. Significant features in the spectrum of this background radiation have been observed which provide evidence for its origin in nuclear processes in the early stages of the big-band cosmology and tie in these processes with galaxy fromation theory. A crucial test of the theory may lie in future observations of the background radiation in the 100 MeV to 100 GeV energy range which may be made with large orbiting spark-chamber satellite detectors. A discussion of the theoretical interpretations of present data, their connection with baryon symmetric cosmology and galaxy formation theory, and the need for future observations are given.

  10. The origin of the diffuse background gamma radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.; Puget, J. L.

    1974-01-01

    Recent observations provided evidence for diffuse background gamma radiation extending to energies beyond 100 MeV, and evidence of isotropy and implied cosmological origin. Significant features in the spectrum of this background radiation were observed which provide evidence for its origin in nuclear processes in the early stages of big-bang cosmology, and connect these processes with the galaxy formation theory. A test of the theory is in future observations of the background radiation in the 100 MeK to 100 GeV energy range which are made with large orbiting spark-chamber satellite detectors. The theoretical interpretations of present data, their connection with baryon-symmetric cosmology and galaxy formation theory, and the need for future observations are discussed.

  11. Dependence of erythemally weighted UV radiation on geographical parameters in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xinli; Gao, Wei; Davis, John; Olson, Becky; Janson, George; Slusser, James

    2007-09-01

    The relationship between solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation reaching the Earth's surface and geographical parameters is helpful in estimating the spatial distribution of UV radiation, which provides useful information to evaluate the potential impacts of enhanced UV levels on human health, agriculture, environment, and ecosystems for sustainable development. Measurements of erythemally weighted UV radiation at the sites of the United States Department of Agriculture UV-B Monitoring and Research Program (UVBMRP) monitoring network were analyzed to investigate the geographical distribution and seasonal variations. Twenty nine observation sites, which had continuous measurements during the recent six years, are selected for this study; twenty seven of them are distributed in the United States, including one in Hawaii and one in Alaska, and two of them are located in Canada along the United States border. The measurements were taken using the Yankee Environmental Systems Inc. (YES) UVB-1 ultraviolet pyranometer. This work focuses the data from the recent six years of 2001-2006 and the measurements during summer months (June-August) are emphasized. For each day, the measurements are integrated from sunrise to sunset to produce the daily UV dosage, which is then averaged for different seasons or for the whole year over the six years to generate the average daily UV dosage. A multivariable regression technique is exploited to characterize the dependence of UV dosages on geographical parameters, including latitude and altitude. The results show that, although there are many factors, such as clouds, ozone, aerosols, air pollutants, and haze, that affect the UV radiation intensity at a location, the latitude and altitude of the site are the primary factors that regulate the average daily UV dosage. On average over the last six years in the United States, more than 95% of the variability in averaged daily UV dosages can be explained by the latitude and altitude. Longitude is

  12. Reconstruction of solar spectral surface UV irradiances using radiative transfer simulations.

    PubMed

    Lindfors, Anders; Heikkilä, Anu; Kaurola, Jussi; Koskela, Tapani; Lakkala, Kaisa

    2009-01-01

    UV radiation exerts several effects concerning life on Earth, and spectral information on the prevailing UV radiation conditions is needed in order to study each of these effects. In this paper, we present a method for reconstruction of solar spectral UV irradiances at the Earth's surface. The method, which is a further development of an earlier published method for reconstruction of erythemally weighted UV, relies on radiative transfer simulations, and takes as input (1) the effective cloud optical depth as inferred from pyranometer measurements of global radiation (300-3000 nm); (2) the total ozone column; (3) the surface albedo as estimated from measurements of snow depth; (4) the total water vapor column; and (5) the altitude of the location. Reconstructed daily cumulative spectral irradiances at Jokioinen and Sodankylä in Finland are, in general, in good agreement with measurements. The mean percentage difference, for instance, is mostly within +/-8%, and the root mean square of the percentage difference is around 10% or below for wavelengths over 310 nm and daily minimum solar zenith angles (SZA) less than 70 degrees . In this study, we used pseudospherical radiative transfer simulations, which were shown to improve the performance of our method under large SZA (low Sun).

  13. Functional activation of p53 via phosphorylation following DNA damage by UV but not gamma radiation.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, M; Lozano, G

    1998-03-17

    The tumor suppressor p53 is a nuclear phosphoprotein in which DNA-binding activity is increased on exposure to DNA-damaging agents such as UV or gamma radiation by unknown mechanisms. Because phosphorylation of p53 at the casein kinase (CK) II site activates p53 for DNA-binding function in vitro, we sought to determine the in vivo relevance of phosphorylation at this site after UV and gamma radiation. A polyclonal antibody was generated that binds to bacterially expressed p53 only when phosphorylated in vitro by CK II. Using this antibody, we showed that p53 is phosphorylated at the CK II site upon UV treatment of early passage rat embryo fibroblasts and RKO cells. In addition, DNA-binding assays indicated that phosphorylated p53 bound to a p53-responsive element, suggesting functional activation. However, gamma radiation, which also stabilizes p53, did not result in phosphorylation at the CK II site. These results indicate that phosphorylation at the CK II site is one of the post-translational mechanisms through which p53 is activated in response to UV radiation and that different mechanisms activate p53 after DNA damage by gamma radiation.

  14. Reconstruction of past and prediction of future erythemal UV-radiation at two sites in Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weihs, Philipp; Rieder, Harald; Wagner, Jochen; Simic, Stana; Dameris, Martin

    2010-05-01

    Since the discovery of anthropogenic ozone depletion more than 30 year ago, the scientific community has shown an increasing interest in UV-B radiation and started to monitor UV-radiation. However, difficulties involved in the routine operation and maintenance of the instruments have limited the length of reliable data records to about two decades. Further the number of places where they were measured, result in a set of observations too short and too sparse for a good understanding of past UV changes. Moreover state of the art climate models do not calculate future scenarios of UV-doses. Therefore detailed information about past and future UV-trends are lacking. Reconstruction techniques are indispensable to derive long-term time series of UV-radiation and fill this gap. Apart from the astronomical parameters, like solar zenith angle and sun-earth-distance, UV radiation is strongly influenced by clouds, ozone and surface albedo. We developed and evaluated a reconstruction technique for UV-doses (from regional climate model output) that first calculates the UV-doses under clear-sky condition and afterwards applies corrections in order to take cloud effects into account. Since the input parameters cloud cover, total ozone column and surface albedo are available from the Regional Climate Models REMO and E39/C (DLR-model), we applied our reconstruction technique for the past and for future scenarios using REMO and E39/C data as input. Hence we simulated a seamless UV long-term time series from the past to the future. Our method was applied for the high alpine station Hoher Sonnblick (3106m) situated in the Austrian Alps and for Vienna (170m) in the Eastern part of the Austrian territory. We first analyse the accuracy of the obtained backward reconstruction and intercompare the modelled and measured input parameters ozone, cloud modification factor, and ground albedo. Several approaches to improve the accuracy of the reconstruction are presented. Then we present the

  15. Inactivation of single-celled Ascaris suum eggs by low-pressure UV radiation.

    PubMed

    Brownell, Sarah A; Nelson, Kara L

    2006-03-01

    Intact and decorticated single-celled Ascaris suum eggs were exposed to UV radiation from low-pressure, germicidal lamps at fluences (doses) ranging from 0 to 8,000 J/m2 for intact eggs and from 0 to 500 J/m2 for decorticated eggs. With a UV fluence of 500 J/m2, 0.44-+/-0.20-log inactivation (mean+/-95% confidence interval) (63.7%) of intact eggs was observed, while a fluence of 4,000 J/m2 resulted in 2.23-+/-0.49-log inactivation (99.4%). (The maximum quantifiable inactivation was 2.5 log units.) Thus, according to the methods used here, Ascaris eggs are the most UV-resistant water-related pathogen identified to date. For the range of fluences recommended for disinfecting drinking water and wastewater (200 to 2,000 J/m2), from 0- to 1.5-log inactivation can be expected, although at typical fluences (less than 1,000 J/m2), the inactivation may be less than 1 log. When the eggs were decorticated (the outer egg shell layers were removed with sodium hypochlorite, leaving only the lipoprotein ascaroside layer) before exposure to UV, 1.80-+/-0.32-log reduction (98.4%) was achieved with a fluence of 500 J/m2, suggesting that the outer eggshell layers protected A. suum eggs from inactivation by UV radiation. This protection may have been due to UV absorption by proteins in the outer layers of the 3- to 4-microm-thick eggshell. Stirring alone (without UV exposure) also inactivated some of the Ascaris eggs (approximately 20% after 75 min), which complicated determination of the inactivation caused by UV radiation alone.

  16. Inactivation of Single-Celled Ascaris suum Eggs by Low-Pressure UV Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Brownell, Sarah A.; Nelson, Kara L.

    2006-01-01

    Intact and decorticated single-celled Ascaris suum eggs were exposed to UV radiation from low-pressure, germicidal lamps at fluences (doses) ranging from 0 to 8,000 J/m2 for intact eggs and from 0 to 500 J/m2 for decorticated eggs. With a UV fluence of 500 J/m2, 0.44- ± 0.20-log inactivation (mean ± 95% confidence interval) (63.7%) of intact eggs was observed, while a fluence of 4,000 J/m2 resulted in 2.23- ± 0.49-log inactivation (99.4%). (The maximum quantifiable inactivation was 2.5 log units.) Thus, according to the methods used here, Ascaris eggs are the most UV-resistant water-related pathogen identified to date. For the range of fluences recommended for disinfecting drinking water and wastewater (200 to 2,000 J/m2), from 0- to 1.5-log inactivation can be expected, although at typical fluences (less than 1,000 J/m2), the inactivation may be less than 1 log. When the eggs were decorticated (the outer egg shell layers were removed with sodium hypochlorite, leaving only the lipoprotein ascaroside layer) before exposure to UV, 1.80- ± 0.32-log reduction (98.4%) was achieved with a fluence of 500 J/m2, suggesting that the outer eggshell layers protected A. suum eggs from inactivation by UV radiation. This protection may have been due to UV absorption by proteins in the outer layers of the 3- to 4-μm-thick eggshell. Stirring alone (without UV exposure) also inactivated some of the Ascaris eggs (∼20% after 75 min), which complicated determination of the inactivation caused by UV radiation alone. PMID:16517669

  17. UV Radiation: a new first year physics/life sciences laboratory experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petelina, S. V.; Siddaway, J. M.

    2010-12-01

    Unfortunately, Australia leads the world in the number of skin cancer cases per capita. Three major factors that contribute to this are: 1) the level of damaging ultraviolet (UV) radiation in Australia is higher than in many other countries. This is caused, among other factors, by the stratospheric ozone depletion and Antarctic ozone hole; 2) many people in Australia are of Irish-Scottish origin and their skin can not repair the damage caused by the UV radiation as effectively as the skin of people of other origins; 3) Australia is one of the world’s leaders in the outdoor activities where people tend to spend more time outside. As our experience has shown, most Australian University students, high school students, and even high school teachers were largely unaware of the UV damage details and effective safety measures. Therefore, a need for new ways to educate people became apparent. The general aim of this new 1st year laboratory experiment, developed and first offered at La Trobe University (Melbourne, Australia) in 2009, is to investigate how UV-B radiation levels change under various solar illumination conditions and how effective different types of protection are. After pre-lab readings on physical concepts and biological effects of UV radiation, and after solving all pre-lab problems, the students go outside and measure the actual change in UV-B and UV-A radiation levels under various conditions. Some of these conditions are: direct sun, shade from a building, shade under the roof, reflection from various surfaces, direct sun through cheap and expensive sunglasses and eyeglasses, direct sun through various types of cloth and hair. The equipment used is the UV-Probe manufactured by sglux SolGel Technologies GmbH. The students’ feedback on this new laboratory experiment was very positive. It was ranked top among all physics experiments offered as part of that subject (Physics for Life Sciences) in 2009 and top among all physics experiments presented for

  18. Interaction of metagalactic X-UV radiation with galactic hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, J. K.

    1974-01-01

    Calculations show that the existence of a metagalactic X-UV flux of the intensity required to explain the high-latitude soft X-ray observations, plus a reasonable extrapolation toward lower energies, is consistent with the existence of neutral hydrogen in galaxies. Shielding by H II slabs can be effective both in the solar neighborhood and in the peripheries of galaxies out to a radius of 30 to 40 kpc. At earlier cosmological epochs shielding is less efficient. The soft X-ray spectrum as observed by Yentis et al. (1972) is difficult to reconcile with a purely extragalactic origin for the flux. A local source of ionization also may be necessary to explain the pulsar dispersion data.

  19. Antibacterial properties of Au doped polycarbonate synthesized by gamma radiation assisted diffusion method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hareesh, K.; Deore, Avinash V.; Dahiwale, S. S.; Sanjeev, Ganesh; Kanjilal, D.; Ojha, Sunil; Dhole, N. A.; Kodam, K. M.; Bhoraskar, V. N.; Dhole, S. D.

    2015-07-01

    Gold (Au)-Polycarbonate (PC) matrix was prepared by gamma radiation assisted diffusion of Au nanoparticles in PC matrix. UV-Visible spectroscopy showed the surface plasmon resonance around 550 nm which corresponds to Au and this peak shift towards lower wavelength i.e. blue shift indicating the decrease in particle size of Au. Rutherford Backscattering (RBS) experiment confirmed the diffusion of Au in PC and depth of diffusion is found to be around 0.85 μm. X-ray Diffractogram (XRD) results also revealed the diffusion of Au in PC where the peak observed at 2θ∼38.29° which correspond to the FCC structure. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) images showed the hexagonal shaped Au nanoparticles and average particle size is found to be around 110 nm. These samples also showed anti-bacterial properties with both gram positive and gram negative bacteria's and revealed the inhibition of the overall growth of the bacteria with gamma dose.

  20. DSMC simulation of two-phase plume flow with UV radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jie; Liu, Ying; Wang, Ning; Jin, Ling

    2014-12-09

    Rarefied gas-particle two-phase plume in which the phase of particles is liquid or solid flows from a solid propellant rocket of hypersonic vehicle flying at high altitudes, the aluminum oxide particulates not only impact the rarefied gas flow properties, but also make a great difference to plume radiation signature, so the radiation prediction of the rarefied gas-particle two-phase plume flow is very important for space target detection of hypersonic vehicles. Accordingly, this project aims to study the rarefied gas-particle two-phase flow and ultraviolet radiation (UV) characteristics. Considering a two-way interphase coupling of momentum and energy, the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method is developed for particle phase change and the particle flow, including particulate collision, coalescence as well as separation, and a Monte Carlo ray trace model is implemented for the particulate UV radiation. A program for the numerical simulation of the gas-particle two-phase flow and radiation in which the gas flow nonequilibrium is strong is implemented as well. Ultraviolet radiation characteristics of the particle phase is studied based on the calculation of the flow field coupled with the radiation calculation, the radiation model for different size particles is analyzed, focusing on the effects of particle emission, absorption, scattering as well as the searchlight emission of the nozzle. A new approach may be proposed to describe the rarefied gas-particle two-phase plume flow and radiation transfer characteristics in this project.

  1. Effects of UV-A Radiation on Desmodesmus armatus: Changes in Growth Rate, Pigment Content and Morphological Appearance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pálffy, Károly; Vörös, Lajos

    2006-10-01

    Laboratory cultures of Desmodesmus armatus (R. Chod.) Hegew. were grown under different levels of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) supplemented with 3.75 mW . cm-2 UV-A radiation. Growth rate was monitored daily, chlorophyl-a concentration, total carotenoid content, cell number and the relative abundance of different coenobial forms was determined at the end of each experiment. Exposure to UV-A radiation resulted in an increasing inhibition of growth towards higher PAR levels, reaching 100% at 400 μmol . m-2 . s-1. Cellular carotenoid content was higher in the presence of UV-A radiation, on the other hand no differences were observed in cellular chlorophyll-a concentration. UV-A radiation also induced changes in coenobium formation with a decreasing proportion of 4-celled coenobia and an increase in the abundance of 2-celled and teratologic coenobia, suggesting that high intensity UV-A radiation may influence cell cycle events or morphology development.

  2. A study of the diffuse galactic gamma radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, C. E.; Kniffen, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    The observed diffuse galactic gamma radiation is compared to that predicted from galactic cosmic ray interactions with galactic matter and photons, assuming that on a broad scale the galactic cosmic rays in the plane are correlated with matter density. Recent considerations of the galactic diffuse matter distribution, particularly the molecular hydrogen, the galactic photon density, and a revised cosmic ray galactic scale height, are included. The predictions are compared to the observational gamma ray longitude distributions, the latitude distribution, and energy spectrum, including the COS-B satellite results, and the COS-B background estimate. Considering the uncertainties, the agreement between the theoretical predictions and the gamma ray data seems generally reasonable, suggesting that the general concepts are likely to be correct. Both the results determined here alone and in conjunction with other work calculating source functions assuming only cosmic ray matter contributions indicate no necessity for a significant point source contribution to the diffuse gamma radiation in the energy range being considered (E(gamma)10 MeV). Previously announced in STAR as N84-18151

  3. A study of the diffuse galactic gamma radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, C. E.; Kniffen, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    The observed diffuse galactic gamma radiation is compared to that predicted from galactic cosmic ray interactions with galactic matter and photons, assuming that on a broad scale the galactic cosmic rays in the plane are correlated with matter density. Recent considerations of the galactic diffuse matter distribution, particularly the molecular hydrogen, the galactic photon density, and a revised cosmic ray galactic scale height, are included. The predictions are compared to the observational gamma ray longitude distributions, the latitude distribution, and energy spectrum, including the COS-B satellite results, and the COS-B background estimate. Considering the uncertainties, the agreement between the theoretical predictions and the gamma ray data seems generally reasonable, suggesting that the general concepts are likely to be correct. Both the results determined here alone and in conjunction with other work calculating source functions assuming only cosmic ray matter contributions indicate no necessity for a significant point source contribution to the diffuse gamma radiation in the energy range being considered (E(gamma)10 MeV).

  4. The Gamma-ray galactic diffuse radiation and Cerenkov telescopes

    SciTech Connect

    Chardonnet, P. |; Salati, P. ||; Silk, J.; Grenier, I.; Smoot, G.

    1995-12-01

    By using the PYTHIA version of the Lund Monte Carlo program, we study the photon yield of proton-proton collisions in the energy range between 10 GeV and 1 TeV. The resulting photon spectrum turns out to scale roughly with incident energy. Then, by folding the energy spectrum of cosmic-ray protons with the distribution of HI and CO, the Galactic diffuse emission of {gamma}-rays above 100 GeV is mapped. Prospects for observing that diffuse radiation with atmospheric Cerenkov telescopes are discussed. Present instruments are able to detect the {gamma}-ray glow of the Galactic center. The latter will be mapped by the next generation of telescopes if their energy threshold is decreased. However, a detailed survey of the Galactic ridge will be a real challenge, even in the long term. The MILAGRO project seems more appropriate. Finally, we investigate the {gamma}-ray emission from weakly interacting massive particles clustering at the Galactic center. It has been speculated that those species are a major component of the halo dark matter. We show that their {gamma}-ray signal is swamped in the Galactic diffuse radiation and cannot be observed at TeV energies. {copyright} {ital 1995 The American Astronomical Society.}

  5. The PUR Experiment on the EXPOSE-R facility: biological dosimetry of solar extraterrestrial UV radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bérces, A.; Egyeki, M.; Fekete, A.; Horneck, G.; Kovács, G.; Panitz, C.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of our experiment Phage and Uracil Response was to extend the use of bacteriophage T7 and uracil biological dosimeters for measuring the biologically effective ultraviolet (UV) dose in the harsh extraterrestrial radiation conditions. The biological detectors were exposed in vacuum-tightly cases in the European Space Agency (ESA) astrobiological exposure facility attached to the external platform of Zvezda (EXPOSE-R). EXPOSE-R took off to the International Space Station (ISS) in November 2008 and was installed on the External platform of the Russian module Zvezda of the ISS in March 2009. Our goal was to determine the dose-effect relation for the formation of photoproducts (i.e. damage to phage DNA and uracil, respectively). The extraterrestrial solar UV radiation ranges over the whole spectrum from vacuum-UV (λ<200 nm) to UVA (315 nm<λ<400 nm), which causes photolesions (photoproducts) in the nucleic acids/their components either by photoionization or excitation. However, these wavelengths cause not only photolesions but in a wavelength-dependent efficiency the reversion of some photolesions, too. Our biological detectors measured in situ conditions the resultant of both reactions induced by the extraterrestrial UV radiation. From this aspect the role of the photoreversion in the extension of the biological UV dosimetry are discussed.

  6. Involvement of pnp in survival of UV radiation in Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Rath, Devashish; Mangoli, Suhas H; Pagedar, Amruta R; Jawali, Narendra

    2012-05-01

    Polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase), a multifunctional protein, is a 3'→5' exoribonuclease or exoDNase in the presence of inorganic phosphate (P(i)), and extends a 3'-OH of RNA or ssDNA in the presence of ADP or dADP. In Escherichia coli, PNPase is known to protect against H(2)O(2)- and mitomycin C-induced damage. Recent reports show that Bacillus subtilis PNPase is required for repair of H(2)O(2)-induced double-strand breaks. Here we show that absence of PNPase makes E. coli cells sensitive to UV, indicating that PNPase has a role in survival of UV radiation damage. Analyses of various DNA repair pathways show that in the absence of nucleotide excision repair, survival of UV radiation depends critically on PNPase function. Consequently, uvrA pnp, uvrB pnp and uvrC pnp strains show hypersensitivity to UV radiation. Whereas the pnp mutation is non-epistatic to recJ, recQ and recG mutations with respect to the UV-sensitivity phenotype, it is epistatic to uvrD, recB and ruvA mutations, implicating it in the recombinational repair process.

  7. Accidental exposure to UV radiation produced by germicidal lamp: case report and risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Zaffina, Salvatore; Camisa, Vincenzo; Lembo, Marco; Vinci, Maria Rosaria; Tucci, Mario Graziano; Borra, Massimo; Napolitano, Antonio; Cannatà, Vittorio

    2012-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation is known to cause both benefits and harmful effects on humans. The adverse effects mainly involve two target organs, skin and eye, and can be further divided into short- and long-term effects. The present case report describes an accidental exposure of two health-care workers to ultraviolet radiation produced by a germicidal lamp in a hospital pharmacy. The germicidal lamp presented a spectrum with an intense UV-C component as well as a modest UV-B contribution. Overexposure to UV-C radiation was over 100 times as large as the ICNIRP exposure limits. A few hours after the exposure, the two subjects reported symptoms of acute UV injury and both of them continued having significant clinical signs for over 2 years. In this study, we describe acute and potentially irreversible effects caused by high UV exposure. In addition, we present the results of risk assessment by occupational exposure to germicidal lamps. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Photochemistry and Photobiology © 2012 The American Society of Photobiology.

  8. Identification of Genes Responsive to Solar Simulated UV Radiation in Human Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    de la Fuente, Hortensia; Lamana, Amalia; Mittelbrunn, María; Perez-Gala, Silvia; Gonzalez, Salvador; García-Diez, Amaro; Vega, Miguel; Sanchez-Madrid, Francisco

    2009-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation has profound effects on the skin and the systemic immune system. Several effects of UV radiation on Dendritic cells (DCs) functions have been described. However, gene expression changes induced by UV radiation in DCs have not been addressed before. In this report, we irradiated human monocyte-derived DCs with solar-simulated UVA/UVB and analyzed regulated genes on human whole genome arrays. Results were validated by RT-PCR and further analyzed by Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA). Solar-simulated UV radiation up-regulated expression of genes involved in cellular stress and inflammation, and down-regulated genes involved in chemotaxis, vesicular transport and RNA processing. Twenty four genes were selected for comparison by RT-PCR with similarly treated human primary keratinocytes and human melanocytes. Several genes involved in the regulation of the immune response were differentially regulated in UVA/UVB irradiated human monocyte-derived DCs, such as protein tyrosine phosphatase, receptor type E (PTPRE), thrombospondin-1 (THBS1), inducible costimulator ligand (ICOSL), galectins, Src-like adapter protein (SLA), IL-10 and CCR7. These results indicate that UV-exposure triggers the regulation of a complex gene repertoire involved in human-DC–mediated immune responses. PMID:19707549

  9. Simulating synchrotron radiation in accelerators including diffuse and specular reflections

    DOE PAGES

    Dugan, G.; Sagan, D.

    2017-02-24

    An accurate calculation of the synchrotron radiation flux within the vacuum chamber of an accelerator is needed for a number of applications. These include simulations of electron cloud effects and the design of radiation masking systems. To properly simulate the synchrotron radiation, it is important to include the scattering of the radiation at the vacuum chamber walls. To this end, a program called synrad3d has been developed which simulates the production and propagation of synchrotron radiation using a collection of photons. Photons generated by a charged particle beam are tracked from birth until they strike the vacuum chamber wall wheremore » the photon is either absorbed or scattered. Both specular and diffuse scattering is simulated. If a photon is scattered, it is further tracked through multiple encounters with the wall until it is finally absorbed. This paper describes the synrad3d program, with a focus on the details of its scattering model, and presents some examples of the program’s use.« less

  10. Decontamination of poultry feed from ochratoxin A by UV and sunlight radiations.

    PubMed

    Ameer Sumbal, Gul; Hussain Shar, Zahid; Hussain Sherazi, Syed Tufail; Sirajuddin; Nizamani, Shafi Muhammad; Mahesar, Safaraz Ahmed

    2016-06-01

    Mycotoxin-contaminated feed is very dangerous for the growth and even life of poultry. The objective of the current study was to investigate the efficacy of ultra-violet irradiation for decontamination of ochratoxin A (OTA) in spiked and naturally contaminated poultry feed samples. Spiked and naturally contaminated feed samples were irradiated with ultra-violet light (UV) at distance of 25 cm over the feed samples. In vitro, the effect of UV intensity (0.1 mW cm(-2) at 254 nm UV-C) on different types of poultry feeds contaminated with OTA was evaluated. The same samples were also irradiated with sunlight and analysed for OTA by an indirect enzyme linked immunosorbent assay method. Poultry feed samples containing 500 µg kg(-1) were 100% decontaminated in 180 min with UV radiation while OTA was decreased to 70-95 µg kg(-1) using the same poultry feed samples after 8 h sunlight irradiation. Therefore, UV light was found to be more effective. Only 1 h of UV irradiation was found to be sufficient to bring the OTA level to the maximum regulatory limit suggested for poultry feeds (100 µg kg(-1) ), while 8 h were needed to obtain this level using sunlight radiations. The proposed approach is a viable option to reduce the level of OTA in contaminated poultry feeds. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  11. Diffusive and dynamical radiating stars with realistic equations of state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brassel, Byron P.; Maharaj, Sunil D.; Goswami, Rituparno

    2017-03-01

    We model the dynamics of a spherically symmetric radiating dynamical star with three spacetime regions. The local internal atmosphere is a two-component system consisting of standard pressure-free, null radiation and an additional string fluid with energy density and nonzero pressure obeying all physically realistic energy conditions. The middle region is purely radiative which matches to a third region which is the Schwarzschild exterior. A large family of solutions to the field equations are presented for various realistic equations of state. We demonstrate that it is possible to obtain solutions via a direct integration of the second order equations resulting from the assumption of an equation of state. A comparison of our solutions with earlier well known results is undertaken and we show that all these solutions, including those of Husain, are contained in our family. We then generalise our class of solutions to higher dimensions. Finally we consider the effects of diffusive transport and transparently derive the specific equations of state for which this diffusive behaviour is possible.

  12. Flux limited Diffusion Theory of Microwave Background Radiation Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonanno, A.; Antonuccio-Delogu, V.

    1995-08-01

    A physically satisfactory treatment of the radiative transfer during the recombination epoch is complicated by the fact that the Universe has a quite rapid (Dz~400 at z_dec~1200) transition into the optically thin regime. We show here that all previous approaches (e.g. Peebles and Yu,1968 [1],Bond and Efstathiou,1987 [2],up to the most recent by Holtzmann,1992 [3] and Stompor,1994 [4]) are based on analytic expansions in powers of the mean free path which run into physical inconsistencies (the predicted radiation flux is larger than the product of speed of light and radiation density). To remedy to this situation, we apply to this problem the Covariant Flux-Limited Diffusion (CFLD) theory recently formulated by Bonanno and Romano (1993)[4]. Flux-limited diffusion theories are currently adopted in plasma physics, and offer a physical description free of the above mentioned inconsistency. We calculate the spectrum of the resulting perturbations for a few CDM models. Our physical treatment improves consistently on small (<=50') scales over previous treatments: the resulting spectra for the corresponding high wavenumbers are then substantially different from those found by the previous authors.

  13. Seasonality of UV-radiation and vitamin D status at 69 degrees north.

    PubMed

    Brustad, Magritt; Edvardsen, Kåre; Wilsgaard, Tom; Engelsen, Ola; Aksnes, Lage; Lund, Eiliv

    2007-08-01

    The main purpose with this study was to assess the seasonal variation in measured UV-radiation and its impact on vitamin D status throughout one year in subjects living at high latitude. Blood samples drawn from 60 volunteers (44 women, 16 men) living at Andenes (69 degrees N), Norway, were collected throughout one year, at two-month intervals. The blood samples were analysed for 25-hydroxy vitamin D [25(OH)D]. Data on dietary intakes of vitamin D, time spent in daylight, use of sun beds and sun seeking holidays were collected by using questionnaires. The ambient vitamin D effective UV-radiation was measured at a site near by Andenes, and the number of hours spent outdoors with sufficient radiation for cutaneous vitamin D production (UV-hours) was estimated for each day. The mean 25(OH)D values were significantly higher at the end of the summer and in December, 2004 and varied from 42.0 nmol L(-1) in October, 2004 and April, 2005 to around 47 nmol L(-1) in December, 2004 and September, 2005. For the whole group, a positive relationship between UV-hours and 25(OH)D was found at UV-hours>or=3.5. However, for subjects with lower 25(OH)D levels i.e. at least one blood measurement with 25(OH)D<37.5 nmol L(-1), the positive relationship were found at around 1.5 UV-hours and more, whereas for the group of subjects that had all their vitamin D values above 37.5 nmol L(-1), positive relationship was found at UV-hours>or=4.0, when adjusting for vitamin D intake, sun bed use and sun seeking holidays. The generally high dietary intakes of vitamin D, especially in winter, mask largely the effect of seasonal variation in UV-exposure, causing an atypical seasonal variation in vitamin D status. The UV-hour variable significantly predicted 25(OH)D levels in blood when adjusted for intakes and artificial UV-radiation exposure and sun holidays abroad.

  14. Space experiments for the simulation of Martian conditions: UV radiation and Martian soil analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rettberg, P.; Rabbow, E.; Panitz, C.; Horneck, G.

    For the study of the responses of organisms to space environment and for the future exploration of Mars as another planet which has had the potential for the evolution of life the survivability of terrestrial resistant microbial forms, bacterial spores of Bacillus subtilis, exposed to different subsets of the extreme environmental parameters in space (vacuum, extraterrestrial solar UV, shielding by protecting materials like artificial meteorites) was investigated in the BIOPAN facility of the European Space Agency onboard of Russian Earth-orbiting Foton satellites (BIOPAN I - III missions). The results of these three space experiments confirmed the deleterious effects of extraterrestrial solar UV radiation which, in contrast to the UV radiation reaching the surface of the Earth, also contains very energy-rich short wavelengths of the UVB and UVC. Thin layers of clay, rock or meteorite material were shown to be only successful in UV-shielding, if they are in direct contact with the spores. On Mars the UV radiation climate is similar to that of the early Earth before the development of a protective ozone layer in the atmosphere by the appearance of the first anaerobic photosynthetic bacteria. The interference of Martian soil components and the intense and nearly unfiltered Martian solar UV radiation with spores of Bacillus subtilis will be tested with a new BIOPAN experiment - MARSTOX -during the FOTON M-1 mission scheduled for the end of 2002. Different types of Mars soil analogues will be used to determine on one hand their potential toxicity alone or in combination with solar UV (phototoxicity) and on the other hand their UV protection capability. Two sets of samples will be used under different cut-off filters used to simulate the UV radiation climate of Mars and Earth. After exposure in space the survival of and mutation induction in the spores will be analyzed at DLR together with parallel samples from the corresponding ground control experiment performed at

  15. Radiation hydrodynamics of triggered star formation: the effect of the diffuse radiation field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haworth, Thomas J.; Harries, Tim J.

    2012-02-01

    We investigate the effect of including diffuse field radiation when modelling the radiatively driven implosion of a Bonnor-Ebert sphere (BES). Radiation-hydrodynamical calculations are performed by using operator splitting to combine Monte Carlo photoionization with grid-based Eulerian hydrodynamics that includes self-gravity. It is found that the diffuse field has a significant effect on the nature of radiatively driven collapse which is strongly coupled to the strength of the driving shock that is established before impacting the BES. This can result in either slower or more rapid star formation than expected using the on-the-spot approximation depending on the distance of the BES from the source object. As well as directly compressing the BES, stronger shocks increase the thickness and density in the shell of accumulated material, which leads to short, strong, photoevaporative ejections that reinforce the compression whenever it slows. This happens particularly effectively when the diffuse field is included as rocket motion is induced over a larger area of the shell surface. The formation and evolution of 'elephant trunks' via instability is also found to vary significantly when the diffuse field is included. Since the perturbations that seed instabilities are smeared out elephant trunks form less readily and, once formed, are exposed to enhanced thermal compression.

  16. Pr,Ce:YAlO3 crystal properties under UV-radiation exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fibrich, Martin; Jelínková, Helena; Sulc, Jan; Nejezchleb, Karel; Skoda, Václav

    2012-06-01

    As came out in one of our past experiments concerning the Pr:YAlO3 (Pr:YAP) active material, UV-radiation had an adverse effect for lasing action due to the crystal solarization. So, co-doping of this material by Ce3+-ions having broad absorption-bands in the UV-region has been proposed for crystal property improvement in terms of color-center formation. The Pr,Ce:YAP absorption-spectrum investigation under UV-radiation exposure, in comparison to the Pr:YAP one, is reported in this contribution. Moreover, lasing properties of these two materials under the GaN-diode pumping are summarized.

  17. Radiation-damage-induced phasing: a case study using UV irradiation with light-emitting diodes

    PubMed Central

    de Sanctis, Daniele; Zubieta, Chloe; Felisaz, Franck; Caserotto, Hugo; Nanao, Max H.

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to X-rays, high-intensity visible light or ultraviolet radiation results in alterations to protein structure such as the breakage of disulfide bonds, the loss of electron density at electron-rich centres and the movement of side chains. These specific changes can be exploited in order to obtain phase information. Here, a case study using insulin to illustrate each step of the radiation-damage-induced phasing (RIP) method is presented. Unlike a traditional X-ray-induced damage step, specific damage is introduced via ultraviolet light-emitting diodes (UV-LEDs). In contrast to UV lasers, UV-LEDs have the advantages of small size, low cost and relative ease of use. PMID:26960126

  18. Radiation-damage-induced phasing: a case study using UV irradiation with light-emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    de Sanctis, Daniele; Zubieta, Chloe; Felisaz, Franck; Caserotto, Hugo; Nanao, Max H

    2016-03-01

    Exposure to X-rays, high-intensity visible light or ultraviolet radiation results in alterations to protein structure such as the breakage of disulfide bonds, the loss of electron density at electron-rich centres and the movement of side chains. These specific changes can be exploited in order to obtain phase information. Here, a case study using insulin to illustrate each step of the radiation-damage-induced phasing (RIP) method is presented. Unlike a traditional X-ray-induced damage step, specific damage is introduced via ultraviolet light-emitting diodes (UV-LEDs). In contrast to UV lasers, UV-LEDs have the advantages of small size, low cost and relative ease of use.

  19. Colour change evaluation on UV radiation exposure for Păun-Repedea calcareous geomaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelin, V.; Sandu, I.; Munteanu, M.; Iurcovschi, C. T.; Gurlui, S.; Sandu, AV; Vasilache, V.; Brȃnzilă, M.; Sandu, I. G.

    2016-06-01

    When talking about the preservation treatments that can be applied to natural stones used in different constructions, the surface hydrophobization plays an important part, especially when referring to porous surfaces like the calcareous oolithic stones specific to Repedea area, Iasi County, Romania. The present paper presents a method that evaluates the hydrophobization efficiency of two types of pellicles, involving UV artificial ageing and colorimetric analysis of the treated surfaces. The evaluation was done through continuous colorimetric monitoring and by comparing the evolution of the chromatic modifications of the two treated surfaces with the original colorimetric values and with the witness area, which was exposed to UV radiations under the same conditions, but left chemical untreated. The techniques used during this experiment were: CIE L*a*b* colorimetry, OM, SEM-EDX, UV radiation exposure and Spectrum Irradiance Measurement.

  20. Genomic bipyrimidine nucleotide frequency and microbial reactions to germicidal UV radiation.

    PubMed

    Moeller, Ralf; Douki, Thierry; Rettberg, Petra; Reitz, Günther; Cadet, Jean; Nicholson, Wayne L; Horneck, Gerda

    2010-07-01

    The role of the genomic bipyrimidine nucleotide frequency in pyrimidine dimer formation caused by germicidal UV radiation was studied in three microbial reference organisms (Escherichia coli K12, Deinococcus radiodurans R1, spores and cells of Bacillus subtilis 168). The sensitive HPLC tandem mass spectrometry assay was used to identify and quantify the different bipyrimidine photoproducts induced in the DNA of microorganisms by germicidal UV radiation. The yields of photoproducts per applied fluence were very similar among vegetative cells but twofold reduced in spores. This similarity in DNA photoreactivity greatly contrasted with the 11-fold range determined in the fluence causing a decimal reduction of survival. It was also found that the spectrum of UV-induced bipyrimidine lesions was species-specific and the formation rates of bi-thymine and bi-cytosine photoproducts correlated with the genomic frequencies of thymine and cytosine dinucleotides in the bacterial model systems.

  1. ATTENUATION OF SOLAR UV RADIATION BY AEROSOLS DURING AIR POLLUTION EPISODES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Increase in the amount of solar UV radiation reaching the surface due to decrease in stratospheric ozone continues to be a major concern (WMO, 1998). However, recent studies show that absorption and smattering by aerosols during air pollution episode decreases the amount of radi...

  2. GROWTH RESPONSE OF SYMBODINIUM SPP. TO COMBINED TEMPERATURE AND UV RADIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rogers, J.E. and D. Marcovich. In press. Growth Response of a Coral Symbiont, Symbiodinium sp., to Combined Temperature and UV Radiation Exposure (Abstract). To be presented at the ASLO 2004 Summer Meeting: The Changing Landscapes of Oceans and Freshwater, 13-18 June 2004, Savann...

  3. Photocatalytic ROS production and phototoxicity of titanium dioxide nanoparticles is dependent on solar UV radiation spectrum

    EPA Science Inventory

    Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nano-TiO2) and its consequent phototoxicity to Daphnia magna were measured under different solar UV radiation spectrum by applying a series of optical filters in a solar simulator. Removing UVB (280-32...

  4. Photocatalytic ROS production and phototoxicity of titanium dioxide nanoparticles is dependent on solar UV radiation spectrum

    EPA Science Inventory

    Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nano-TiO2) and its consequent phototoxicity to Daphnia magna were measured under different solar UV radiation spectrum by applying a series of optical filters in a solar simulator. Removing UVB (280-32...

  5. AMBIENT SOLAR UV RADIATION CAUSES MORTALITY IN LARVAE OF THREE SPECIES OF RANA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent reports concerning the lethal effects of solar ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation on amphibians suggest that this stressor has the potential to impact some amphibian populations. In this study embryos and larvae of three anuran species, Rana pipiens, R. clamitans, and R. septe...

  6. [Degradation of endocrine disruptor atrazine in drinking water by UV radiation].

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Gao, Nai-yun; Wei, Hong-bin; Xia, Li-hua; Cui, Jing

    2006-06-01

    The degradation of atrazine with low concentration in drinking water by UV radiation was studied. The main influencing factors and degradation mechanism of this technology were discussed. Experimental results show that the photolytic degradation of atrazine by UV radiation alone is very efficient. Under 205 microW/cm2 irradiation intensity, atrazine removal ratio is 92.38% after 120 minutes. The rate of photodecomposition in aqueous solution follows first-order kinetics. The removal ratio of atrazine can be greatly enhanced by increasing the intensity of UV radiation. The initial concentration of atrazine has no effect on the oxidation reaction. The organic matter and various ion in tap water will decrease the degradation rate. The primary degradation pathway is dechlorination. The reaction rate is high. The hydroxylated compound is the major intermediate product. Hydroyatrazine can be further decomposed by UV radiation and form dealkylated derivatives. But the rate of dealkylated reaction is very low. There is intimate relationship between the change of pH in the solution and the formation of intermediate products.

  7. The effect of UV radiation on the properties of diffraction gratings based on dichromated gelatin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganzherli, N. M.; Gulyaev, S. N.; Maurer, I. A.

    2016-10-01

    Results of experiments on the influence exerted by UV radiation on the height of the surface relief and on the diffraction efficiency of holographic diffraction gratings recorded on dichromated gelatin layers are reported. It is shown that the height of the surface relief substantially increases, which leads to a rise in the diffraction efficiency of the gratings to a value exceeding 25%.

  8. ATTENUATION OF SOLAR UV RADIATION BY AEROSOLS DURING AIR POLLUTION EPISODES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Increase in the amount of solar UV radiation reaching the surface due to decrease in stratospheric ozone continues to be a major concern (WMO, 1998). However, recent studies show that absorption and smattering by aerosols during air pollution episode decreases the amount of radi...

  9. Decomposition of 2-naphthalenesulfonate in electroplating solution by ozonation with UV radiation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Hung; Chang, Ching-Yuan; Huang, Shih-Fong; Shang, Neng-Chou; Chiu, Chun-Yu; Yu, Yue-Hwa; Chiang, Pen-Chi; Shie, Je-Lueng; Chiou, Chyow-San

    2005-02-14

    This study investigates the ozonation of 2-naphthalenesulfonate (2-NS) combined with UV radiation in the electroplating solution. 2-NS is commonly used as a brightening and stabilization agent in the electroplating solution. Semibatch ozonation experiments were conducted under various reaction conditions to study the effects of ozone dosage and UV radiation on the oxidation of 2-NS. The concentrations of 2-NS were analyzed at specified time intervals to elucidate the decomposition of 2-NS. Total organic carbon (TOC) is chosen as a mineralization index of the ozonation of 2-NS. In addition, values of pH and oxidation reduction potential were continuously measured in the course of experiments. As a result, the nearly complete mineralization of 2-NS via the ozonation treatment can be achieved. The mineralization of 2-NS is found accelerated by the introduction of UV radiation and has a distinct relationship with the consumption of applied ozone. These results can provide useful information for the proper removal of 2-NS in the electroplating solution by the ozonation with UV radiation.

  10. Effects of UV-B Radiation on the Structural and Physiological Diversity of Bacterioneuston and Bacterioplankton

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Ana L.; Oliveira, Vanessa; Baptista, Inês; Henriques, Isabel; Gomes, Newton C. M.; Almeida, Adelaide; Correia, António

    2012-01-01

    The effects of UV radiation (UVR) on estuarine bacterioneuston and bacterioplankton were assessed in microcosm experiments. Bacterial abundance and DNA synthesis were more affected in bacterioplankton. Protein synthesis was more inhibited in bacterioneuston. Community analysis indicated that UVR has the potential to select resistant bacteria (e.g., Gammaproteobacteria), particularly abundant in bacterioneuston. PMID:22247171

  11. Effects of solar UV radiation on alkaloid production in Erythroxylum novogranatense var. novogranatense

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cocaine-producing species of Erythroxylum have been cultivated in South America for centuries, yet little is know of environmental effects on alkaloid production in these species. Given the high incidence of UV radiation in the equatorial and high altitude environments in which cocaine-producing sp...

  12. GROWTH RESPONSE OF SYMBODINIUM SPP. TO COMBINED TEMPERATURE AND UV RADIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rogers, J.E. and D. Marcovich. In press. Growth Response of a Coral Symbiont, Symbiodinium sp., to Combined Temperature and UV Radiation Exposure (Abstract). To be presented at the ASLO 2004 Summer Meeting: The Changing Landscapes of Oceans and Freshwater, 13-18 June 2004, Savann...

  13. A simple convenient biological dosimeter for monitoring solar UV-B radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, T.C. )

    1991-05-31

    The use of dry Bacillus subtilis spores as a biological dosimeter for the monitoring of solar UV-B (290-330 nm) radiation was described. Our field tests had supported the utility of this dosimeter as a reproducible and reliable sunlight dosimeter.

  14. AMBIENT SOLAR UV RADIATION CAUSES MORTALITY IN LARVAE OF THREE SPECIES OF RANA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent reports concerning the lethal effects of solar ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation on amphibians suggest that this stressor has the potential to impact some amphibian populations. In this study embryos and larvae of three anuran species, Rana pipiens, R. clamitans, and R. septe...

  15. Adsorbable organic halogens generation and reduction during degradation of phenol by UV radiation/sodium hypochlorite.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Qing-Fu; Fu, Jie; Shi, Yin-Tao; Xia, Dong-Sheng; Zhu, Hai-Liang

    2009-02-01

    The degradation of phenol by UV radiation/sodium hypochlorite (UV/NaClO) was investigated. The degradation processes were analyzed by a UV-visible spectrometer, total organic carbon analyzer, and gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy. The experimental results indicate that phenol can be photodegraded by UV/NaClO effectively. However, adsorbable organic halogens (AOX) were produced during the degradation process. Analysis of the mechanism of degradation indicates that the decrease in pH value would increase the formation of AOX. Also, dissolved oxygen greatly increased the rate of phenol degradation and reduced the formation of AOX. Therefore, appropriate conditions could increase degradation and inhibit chlorination. Adjusting the pH value and increasing the amount of oxygen were effective methods.

  16. Impulse powerful UV-radiation source pumped by the sublight ionization waves for the bacteriological disinfection of water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filiouguine, Igor V.; Kostiouchenko, S. V.; Koudryavtsev, N. N.; Vasilyak, Leonid M.; Yakimenko, A. V.

    1993-11-01

    The bacteriological disinfective action of UV-radiation is well known. The pioneer work on UV-radiation used for bacteriological disinfection of waste water was made in 1910. Because of the high cost and low living time of the UV-radiation sources, the alternative technique for waste water purification by chlorine introducing was spread out. During the second stage of the UV purification development, beginning in approximately 1970, the interest for bacteriological cleaning of water, increased again. Two reasons were responsible for this event: first, the significant improvement of technology and design of UV-bacteriological purificators, and second, recognition of the serious danger of chlorine compounds introduced into water under purification because of the toxicity of these compounds. Further investigations gave excellent results in the creation and industrial applications of UV- bacteriological purificators. Now we can see a rapid development of industrial technology in UV-purification of drinking and waste waters.

  17. Influence of low ozone episodes on erythemal UV-B radiation in Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Matthias; Baumgartner, Dietmar J.; Pietsch, Helga; Blumthaler, Mario; Weihs, Philipp; Rieder, Harald E.

    2017-06-01

    This study investigates the influence of low ozone episodes on UV-B radiation in Austria during the period 1999 to 2015. To this aim observations of total column ozone (TCO) in the Greater Alpine Region (Arosa, Switzerland; Hohenpeissenberg, Germany; Hradec Kralove, Czech Republic; Sonnblick, Austria), and erythemal UV-B radiation, available from 12 sites of the Austrian UV-B monitoring network, are analyzed. As previous definitions for low ozone episodes are not particularly suited to investigate effects on UV radiation, a novel threshold approach—considering anomalies—is developed to provide a joint framework for the analysis of extremes. TCO and UV extremes are negatively correlated, although modulating effects of sunshine duration impact the robustness of the statistical relationship. Therefore, information on relative sunshine duration (SDrel), available at (or nearby) UV-B monitoring sites, is included as explanatory variable in the analysis. The joint analysis of anomalies of both UV index (UVI) and total ozone (∆UVI, ∆TCO) and SDrel across sites shows that more than 65% of observations with strongly negative ozone anomalies (∆TCO < -1) led to positive UVI anomalies. Considering only days with strongly positive UVI anomaly (∆UVI > 1), we find (across all sites) that about 90% correspond to negative ∆TCO. The remaining 10% of days occurred during fair weather conditions (SDrel ≥ 80%) explaining the appearance of ∆UVI > 1 despite positive TCO anomalies. Further, we introduce an anomaly amplification factor (AAF), which quantifies the expected change of the ∆UVI for a given change in ∆TCO.

  18. NONO regulates the intra-S-phase checkpoint in response to UV radiation.

    PubMed

    Alfano, L; Costa, C; Caporaso, A; Altieri, A; Indovina, P; Macaluso, M; Giordano, A; Pentimalli, F

    2016-02-04

    The main risk factor for skin cancer is ultraviolet (UV) exposure, which causes DNA damage. Cells respond to UV-induced DNA damage by activating the intra-S-phase checkpoint, which prevents replication fork collapse, late origin firing and stabilizes fragile sites. Recently, the 54-kDa multifunctional protein NONO was found to be involved in the non-homologous end-joining DNA repair process and in poly ADP-ribose polymerase 1 activation. Interestingly, NONO is mutated in several tumour types and emerged as a crucial factor underlying both melanoma development and progression. Therefore, we set out to evaluate whether NONO could be involved in the DNA-damage response to UV radiations. We generated NONO-silenced HeLa cell clones and found that lack of NONO decreased cell growth rate. Then, we challenged NONO-silenced cells with exposure to UV radiations and found that NONO-silenced cells, compared with control cells, continued to synthesize DNA, failed to block new origin firing and impaired CHK1S345 phosphorylation showing a defective checkpoint activation. Consistently, NONO is present at the sites of UV-induced DNA damage where it localizes to RAD9 foci. To position NONO in the DNA-damage response cascade, we analysed the loading onto chromatin of various intra-S-phase checkpoint mediators and found that NONO favours the loading of topoisomerase II-binding protein 1 acting upstream of the ATM and Rad3-related kinase activity. Strikingly, re-expression of NONO, through an sh-resistant mRNA, rescued CHK1S345 phosphorylation in NONO-silenced cells. Interestingly, NONO silencing affected cell response to UV radiations also in a melanoma cell line. Overall, our data uncover a new role for NONO in mediating the cellular response to UV-induced DNA damage.

  19. Inward diffusion and loss of radiation belt protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selesnick, R. S.; Baker, D. N.; Jaynes, A. N.; Li, X.; Kanekal, S. G.; Hudson, M. K.; Kress, B. T.

    2016-03-01

    Radiation belt protons in the kinetic energy range 24 to 76 MeV are being measured by the Relativistic Electron Proton Telescope on each of the two Van Allen Probes. Data have been processed for the purpose of studying variability in the trapped proton intensity during October 2013 to August 2015. For the lower energies (≲32 MeV), equatorial proton intensity near L = 2 showed a steady increase that is consistent with inward diffusion of trapped solar protons, as shown by positive radial gradients in phase space density at fixed values of the first two adiabatic invariants. It is postulated that these protons were trapped with enhanced efficiency during the 7 March 2012 solar proton event. A model that includes radial diffusion, along with known trapped proton source and loss processes, shows that the observed average rate of increase near L = 2 is predicted by the same model diffusion coefficient that is required to form the entire proton radiation belt, down to low L, over an extended (˜103 year) interval. A slower intensity decrease for lower energies near L = 1.5 may also be caused by inward diffusion, though it is faster than predicted by the model. Higher-energy (≳40 MeV) protons near the L = 1.5 intensity maximum are from cosmic ray albedo neutron decay. Their observed intensity is lower than expected by a factor ˜2, but the discrepancy is resolved by adding an unspecified loss process to the model with a mean lifetime ˜120 years.

  20. The genotoxic effects of DNA lesions induced by artificial UV-radiation and sunlight.

    PubMed

    Schuch, André Passaglia; Menck, Carlos Frederico Martins

    2010-06-01

    Solar radiation sustains and affects all life forms on Earth. The increase in solar UV-radiation at environmental levels, due to depletion of the stratospheric ozone layer, highlights serious issues of social concern. This becomes still more dramatic in tropical and subtropical regions where radiation-intensity is still higher. Thus, there is the need to evaluate the harmful effects of solar UV-radiation on the DNA molecule as a basis for assessing the risks involved for human health, biological productivity and ecosystems. In order to evaluate the profile of DNA damage induced by this form of radiation and its genotoxic effects, plasmid DNA samples were exposed to artificial-UV lamps and directly to sunlight. The induction of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer photoproducts (CPDs) and oxidative DNA damage in these molecules were evaluated by means of specific DNA repair enzymes. On the other hand, the biological effects of such lesions were determined through the analysis of the DNA inactivation rate and mutation frequency, after replication of the damaged pCMUT vector in an Escherichia coliMBL50 strain. The results indicated the induction of a significant number of CPDs after exposure to increasing doses of UVC, UVB, UVA radiation and sunlight. Interestingly, these photoproducts are those lesions that better correlate with plasmid inactivation as well as mutagenesis, and the oxidative DNA damages induced present very low correlation with these effects. The results indicated that DNA photoproducts play the main role in the induction of genotoxic effects by artificial UV-radiation sources and sunlight. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Extremely high UV-C radiation resistant microorganisms from desert environments with different manganese concentrations.

    PubMed

    Paulino-Lima, Ivan Glaucio; Fujishima, Kosuke; Navarrete, Jesica Urbina; Galante, Douglas; Rodrigues, Fabio; Azua-Bustos, Armando; Rothschild, Lynn Justine

    2016-10-01

    Desiccation resistance and a high intracellular Mn/Fe ratio contribute to ionizing radiation resistance of Deinococcus radiodurans. We hypothesized that this was a general phenomenon and thus developed a strategy to search for highly radiation-resistant organisms based on their natural environment. While desiccation is a typical feature of deserts, the correlation between radiation resistance and the intracellular Mn/Fe ratio of indigenous microorganisms or the Mn/Fe ratio of the environment, has not yet been described. UV-C radiation is highly damaging to biomolecules including DNA. It was used in this study as a selective tool because of its relevance to early life on earth, high altitude aerobiology and the search for life beyond Earth. Surface soil samples were collected from the Sonoran Desert, Arizona (USA), from the Atacama Desert in Chile and from a manganese mine in northern Argentina. Microbial isolates were selected after exposure to UV-C irradiation and growth. The isolates comprised 28 genera grouped within six phyla, which we ranked according to their resistance to UV-C irradiation. Survival curves were performed for the most resistant isolates and correlated with their intracellular Mn/Fe ratio, which was determined by ICP-MS. Five percent of the isolates were highly resistant, including one more resistant than D. radiodurans, a bacterium generally considered the most radiation-resistant organism, thus used as a model for radiation resistance studies. No correlation was observed between the occurrence of resistant microorganisms and the Mn/Fe ratio in the soil samples. However, all resistant isolates showed an intracellular Mn/Fe ratio much higher than the sensitive isolates. Our findings could represent a new front in efforts to harness mechanisms of UV-C radiation resistance from extreme environments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. UV radiation-induced immunosuppression is greater in men and prevented by topical nicotinamide.

    PubMed

    Damian, Diona L; Patterson, Clare R S; Stapelberg, Michael; Park, Joohong; Barnetson, Ross St C; Halliday, Gary M

    2008-02-01

    UV radiation-induced immunosuppression augments cutaneous carcinogenesis. The incidence of skin cancer continues to increase despite increased use of sunscreens, which are less effective at preventing immunosuppression than sunburn. Using the Mantoux reaction as a model of skin immunity, we investigated the effects of solar-simulated (ss) UV and its component UVA and UVB wavebands and tested the ability of topical nicotinamide to protect from UV-induced immunosuppression. Healthy, Mantoux-positive volunteers were UV-irradiated on their backs, with 5% nicotinamide or vehicle applied to different sites in a randomized, double-blinded manner. Subsequent Mantoux testing at irradiated and adjacent unirradiated sites enabled measurement of UV-induced immunosuppression with and without nicotinamide. Suberythemal ssUV caused significant immunosuppression, although component UVB and UVA doses delivered independently did not. Men were immunosuppressed by ssUV doses three times lower than those required to immunosuppress women. This may be an important cause of the higher skin cancer incidence and mortality observed in men. Topical nicotinamide prevented immunosuppression, with gene chip microarrays suggesting that the mechanisms of protection may include alterations in complement, energy metabolism and apoptosis pathways. Nicotinamide is a safe and inexpensive compound that could be added to sunscreens or after-sun lotions to improve protection from immunosuppression. immunosuppression.JID JOURNAL CLUB ARTICLE: For questions, answers, and open discussion about this article, please go to http://network.nature.com/group/jidclub

  3. Response of different crop growth and yield to enhanced UV-B radiation under field conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Youfei; Gao, Wei; Slusser, James R.; Grant, Richard H.; Wang, Chuanhai

    2004-10-01

    Enhanced UV-B radiation due to stratospheric ozone depletion may have impacts on the productivity of agricultural crops. Which crop will be more sensitive to increased UV-B has received little attention. This paper presents a comparative study of the effects of supplemental UV-B on plant height, leaf area, biomass and yield among soybean, cotton, corn and wheat which were cultivated in fields in Nanjing, China. The experimental results showed that the four crops response to enhanced UV-B irradiation was shortened plant height, decreased leaf area and reduced biomass and yield of crops. Using the same criteria, the response of soybean and cotton to elevated UV-B is bigger than that of wheat and corn. RI (response index) is an integrated index which is the accumulation of relative change in plant height, leaf area, biomass and yield, reflecting general impact of increased UV-B on crops. The results suggested that the RI for the four crops was minus, demonstrating a negative impact of enhanced UV-B on the crops. According to the RI, the soybean and cotton belong to the sensitive plants category, wheat is a moderately sensitive plant and corn is a tolerant plant.

  4. [Comparative study of aging, UV treatment, and radiation on cataract formation].

    PubMed

    Muranov, K O; Polianskiî, N B; Kurova, V S; Riabokon', A M; Sheremet, N L; Fedorov, A A; Bannik, K I; Abrosimova, A N; Ostrovskiî, M A

    2010-01-01

    Four randomized groups of male mice F1 (C57Black/CBA) were investigated: a) UV-irraidated (UV-A, 15 min daily during 9 months, dose 5.6 + 1.2 W/m2), b) gamma-rays irradiated (2 Gy), single, c) influence for combination of UV- and gamma-rays treatment, d) aging. The lens opacities were measured on 7th and 10th month. The expert method based on six grade scale was used for cataract measure. On 7th month the median of lens opacities were Aging group = 0; UV-irradiated group = 2.5; gamma-irradiated group = 4.75; gamma- and UV-irradiated group = 6.0. The difference between all groups was significant (p < 0.004, Kruskall-Wallis ANOVA test). The Conover post hock test has shown the significant difference for all comparison pairs (p < 0.002) with the exception of UV-irradiated group, gamma-irradiated group, gamma- and UV-irradiated group. On 10th month the lens opacities were strongly increased: Aging group = 2.5; UV-irradiated group = 5.0; gamma-irradiated group = 6.5; gamma- and UV-irradiated group = 7.5 (median). The difference between groups was significant (p < 0.0001, Kruskall-Wallis ANOVA test). The Conover post hock test has shown the significant difference for all comparison pairs (p <0.003) with the exception ofthe UV-irradiated group and gamma-irradiated group. The formation of the specific lens opacities for any group was not found. Morphology and protein composition have been investigated on 10th month. The results of morphological changes study show destructive and degenerative impairments of capsule, epithelium cells and lens fibers. However, no specific changes related to some particular actions have been found. In addition, there were no specific changes of protein composition of both water-soluble and water-insoluble fractions estimated with Differential Gel Electrophoresis technique. Obtained data mean that aging, UV-treatment, and gamma-radiation causes the similar changes of lens. It was supposed that UV-treatment or/and gamma-radiation act as an aging

  5. Photoacoustic imaging of prostate cancer using cylinder diffuse radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Wenming; Li, Li; Li, Zhifang; Li, Hui

    2012-12-01

    Prostate cancer is one of diseases with high mortality in man. Many clinical imaging modalities are utilized for the detection, grading and staging of prostate cancer, such as ultrasound, CT, MRI, etc. But they lacked adequate sensitivity and specificity for finding cancer in transition or central zone of prostate. To overcome these problems, we propose a photoacoustic imaging modality based on cylinder diffuse radiation through urethra for prostate cancer detection. We measure the related parameters about this system like lateral resolution (~2mm) and axial resolution(~333μm). Finally, simulated sample was imaged by our system. The results demonstrate the feasibility for detecting prostate cancer by our system.

  6. Survival of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 after UV radiation exposure.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Xiaoyun; Sundin, George W; Chai, Benli; Tiedje, James M

    2004-11-01

    We systematically investigated the physiological response as well as DNA damage repair and damage tolerance in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 following UVC, UVB, UVA, and solar light exposure. MR-1 showed the highest UVC sensitivity among Shewanella strains examined, with D37 and D10 values of 5.6 and 16.5% of Escherichia coli K-12 values. Stationary cells did not show an increased UVA resistance compared to exponential-phase cells; instead, they were more sensitive at high UVA dose. UVA-irradiated MR-1 survived better on tryptic soy agar than Luria-Bertani plates regardless of the growth stage. A 20% survival rate of MR-1 was observed following doses of 3.3 J of UVC m(-2), 568 J of UVB m(-2), 25 kJ of UVA m(-2), and 558 J of solar UVB m(-2), respectively. Photoreactivation conferred an increased survival rate to MR-1 of as much as 177- to 365-fold, 11- to 23-fold, and 3- to 10-fold following UVC, UVB, and solar light irradiation, respectively. A significant UV mutability to rifampin resistance was detected in both UVC- and UVB-treated samples, with the mutation frequency in the range of 10(-5) to 10(-6). Unlike in E. coli, the expression levels of the nucleotide excision repair (NER) component genes uvrA, uvrB, and uvrD were not damage inducible in MR-1. Complementation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa UA11079 (uvrA deficient) with uvrA of MR-1 increased the UVC survival of this strain by more than 3 orders of magnitude. Loss of damage inducibility of the NER system appears to contribute to the high sensitivity of this bacterium to UVR as well as to other DNA-damaging agents.

  7. Rapid Enzymatic Response to Compensate UV Radiation in Copepods

    PubMed Central

    Souza, María Sol; Hansson, Lars-Anders; Hylander, Samuel; Modenutti, Beatriz; Balseiro, Esteban

    2012-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) causes physical damage to DNA, carboxylation of proteins and peroxidation of lipids in copepod crustaceans, ubiquitous and abundant secondary producers in most aquatic ecosystems. Copepod adaptations for long duration exposures include changes in behaviour, changes in pigmentation and ultimately changes in morphology. Adaptations to short-term exposures are little studied. Here we show that short-duration exposure to UVR causes the freshwater calanoid copepod, Eudiaptomus gracilis, to rapidly activate production of enzymes that prevent widespread collateral peroxidation (glutathione S-transferase, GST), that regulate apoptosis cell death (Caspase-3, Casp-3), and that facilitate neurotransmissions (cholinesterase-ChE). None of these enzyme systems is alone sufficient, but they act in concert to reduce the stress level of the organism. The interplay among enzymatic responses provides useful information on how organisms respond to environmental stressors acting on short time scales. PMID:22384136

  8. Dichloroacetic acid degradation employing hydrogen peroxide and UV radiation.

    PubMed

    Zalazar, Cristina S; Labas, Marisol D; Brandi, Rodolfo J; Cassano, Alberto E

    2007-01-01

    The degradation reaction of dichloroacetic acid employing H(2)O(2) and UVC radiation (253.7nm) has been studied in a well mixed reactor operating inside a recycling system. It has been shown that in an aqueous solution no stable reaction intermediates are formed and, at every time during the reaction, two mols of hydrochloric acid are formed for every mol of dichloroacetic acid that is decomposed and, in the same way, there is a paired agreement between the calculated TOC concentration corresponding to the unaltered dichloroacetic acid and the experimental values measured in the solution. On this basis and classical references from the scientific literature for the H(2)O(2) photolysis, a complete reaction scheme, apt for reaction kinetics mathematical modeling and ulterior scale-up is proposed.

  9. UV radiation in marine ectotherms: molecular effects and responses.

    PubMed

    Dahms, Hans-U; Lee, Jae-Seong

    2010-04-01

    This review summarizes current knowledge on ultraviolet radiation (UVR)-induced cellular and molecular damage in marine ectotherms (invertebrates and fish). UVR impairs sperm motility, reduces fertilization, and causes embryo malformation that in turn affects recruitment and therefore the sustainability of natural populations. The direct molecular effects of UVR are mediated by absorption of certain wavelengths by specific macromolecules and the dissipation of the absorbed energy via photochemical reactions. Most organisms have defense mechanisms that either prevent UVR-induced damage, or mechanisms that repair the damage. Photoprotective pigments, antioxidant defense compounds, and cell cycle development genes are some of the molecules involved in UVR defense. Photoenzymatic repair and nucleotide excision repair are the two primary DNA repair systems in marine ectotherms. We anticipate that toxicogenomic studies will gain importance in UVR research because they can elucidate the primary processes involved in UVR damage and the cellular response to this damage.

  10. Effect of solar UV radiation on earthworm (Metaphire posthuma).

    PubMed

    Misra, R B; Lal, K; Farooq, M; Hans, R K

    2005-11-01

    Human health risks like damage to the eyes, immune system, and skin are known to be associated with increasing ultraviolet radiation (UVR) in the environment. In this study, we evaluated the phototoxic effects of UVR in sunlight and its possible mechanism of action by using earthworm as an alternative model because earthworm skin contains several biomolecules (tetraene and triene sterol) similar to human beings. We studied the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), photooxidation of lipids, and histopathological changes in earthworm integument. It was observed that UVR-exposed earthworm skin homogenate produced a significant amount of singlet oxygen ((1)O(2)), superoxide anion (O(2)(*)(-)), hydroxyl radicals ((*)OH), and photooxidation of lipids. The production of ROS and lipid peroxidation product was found dependent on the dose of solar UVR in earthworm integument. Histological anomalies such as thickening, vacuolation, and hypertrophy of epidermal cells were observed when the animals were exposed for 1 to 2h, while a higher exposure period (3h) caused degeneration of circular and longitudinal muscles. Continuous sunlight exposure for more than 3h was found lethal to worms. These observations suggested that the current level of UVR in sunlight may produce significant phototoxic effects in the earthworms probably via the generation of ROS (photodynamic action). Possible increases in UVR in view of ozone depletion may be more detrimental to the biomolecules in the worm's skin. The earthworm thus turned out as a simple, sensitive, and cost-effective test organism for the assessment of the hazardous potential of solar radiation and also for planning safety measures for human beings.

  11. The effect of ozone and aerosols on the surface erythemal UV radiation estimated from OMI measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Joonsuk; Choi, Won Jun; Kim, Deok Rae; Kim, Seung-Yeon; Song, Chang-Keun; Hong, Jun Suk; Hong, Youdeog; Lee, Sukjo

    2013-05-01

    Surface erythemal UV radiation is mainly affected by total column ozone, aerosols, clouds, and solar zenith angle. The effect of ozone on the surface UV radiation has been explored many times in the previous studies due to the decrease of ozone layer. In this study, we calculated the effect of aerosols on the surface UV radiation as well as that of ozone using data acquired from Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI). First, ozone, aerosol optical depth (AOD), and surface erythemal UVB radiation measured from satellite are compared with those from ground measurements. The results showed that the comparison for ozone was good with r 2 of 0.92. For aerosol, there was difference between satellite measurements and surface measurements due to the insufficient information on aerosol in the retrieval algorithm. The r 2 for surface erythemal UV radiation was high (˜0.94) but satellite measurements showed about 30% larger values than surface measurements on average by not considering the effect of absorbing aerosols in the retrieval process from satellite measurements. Radiative amplification factor (RAF) is used to access the effect of ozone and aerosol quantitatively. RAF for ozone was 0.97˜1.49 with solar zenith angle. To evaluate the effect of aerosol on the surface UV radiation, only clear-sky pixel data were used and solar zenith angle and total column amount of ozone were fixed. Also, RAF for aerosol was assessed according to the single scattering albedo (SSA) of aerosols. The results showed that RAF for aerosol with smaller SSA (< 0.90) was larger than that for with larger SSA (> 0.90). The RAF for aerosol was 0.09˜0.22 for the given conditions which was relatively small compared to that for ozone. However, considering the fact that aerosol optical depth can change largely in time and space while the total column amount of ozone does not change very much, it needs to include the effect of aerosol to predict the variations of surface UV radiation more correctly.

  12. Effects of UV-B radiation on tetraspores of Chondrus ocellatus Holm (Rhodophyta), and effects of red and blue light on repair of UV-B-induced damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Qing; Xiao, Hui; Wang, You; Tang, Xuexi

    2015-05-01

    We evaluated the effects of red and blue light on the repair of UV-B radiation-induced damage in tetraspores of Chondrus ocellatus Holm. Tetraspores of C. ocellatus were treated with different UV-B radiation levels (0, 36, 72, 108, 144 and 180 J/m2), and thereafter subjected to PAR, darkness, or red or blue light during a 2-h repair stage, each day for 48 days. The diameters and cellular contents of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimmers (CPDs), chlorophyll a (Chl a), phycoerythrin, and UV-B-absorbing mycosporinelike amino acids (MAAs) contents of the tetraspores were determined. Our results show that low doses of UV-B radiation (36 and 72 J/m2) promoted the growth of C. ocellatus; however, increased UV-B radiation gradually reduced the C. ocellatus growth (greater than 72 J/m2). The MAAs (palythine and asterina-330) in C. ocellatus were detected and analyzed by LC/MS. Our results suggest that moderate red light could induce the growth of this alga in aquaculture. In addition, photorepair was inhibited by red light, so there may be some other DNA repair mechanism activated by red light. Blue light promoted the activity of DNA photolyase, greatly improving remediation efficiency. Red and blue lights were found to reduce the capacity of C. ocellatus to form MAAs. Therefore, PAR, red light, and blue light play different roles during the repair processes for damage induced by UV-B radiation.

  13. The effects of UV radiation, litter chemistry, and drought on desert litter decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, H.; Nieto, B.; Hewins, D. B.; Barnes, P. W.; McDowell, N. G.; Pockman, W.; Rahn, T.; Throop, H. L.

    2011-12-01

    Recent studies suggest that photodegradation by solar UV radiation can be a major driver of litter decomposition in dryland ecosystems. The importance of photodegradation in litter decomposition appears to decline with precipitation, suggesting that the relative importance of photodegradation may increase given current projections of future increases in drought severity in the southwestern USA. Several previous studies indicate that UV-B radiation (280-320 nm) is the most effective waveband in breaking chemical bonds forming organic material, but whether UV-B exposure may facilitate subsequent decomposition by microbes (i.e., photo-priming) has received little attention. In this study, we tested the effects of pre-exposure UV radiation (photo-priming), litter chemistry (lignin and cellulose content and nitrogen content), and drought on the rate of litter decomposition in a semi-arid ecosystem. To understand the effects of UV radiation on litter decomposition, we pre-exposed litter to three radiation treatments: control (no radiation), UV-A+visible, UV-A+UV-B+visible. Litter was exposed to the equivalent of three months' solar radiation of southern New Mexico prior to microbial decomposition. There were three litter types: basswood sheets (high lignin content), pure cellulose filter paper, and mesquite (Prosopis glandulosa) leaflets. Following radiation treatment, litter was placed in mesh litterbags that were buried within a large-scale precipitation manipulation experiment at the Sevilleta Long-Term Ecological Research site: control (ambient precipitation), elevated precipitation (x2 ambient precipitation), and drought (x0.5 ambient precipitation). We collected a subset of bags at 0, 1, 3, and 6 months and measured mass remaining and carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) content. After 6 months, mass remaining of filter paper and basswood sheets did not differ from the initial mass, but mesquite mass remaining declined over 30%. The pre-exposure UV effects had minimal

  14. Compression zone of a magnetoplasma compressor as a source of extreme UV radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Garkusha, I. E.; Chebotarev, V. V.; Solyakov, D. G.; Petrov, Yu. V.; Ladygina, M. S.; Marchenko, A. K.; Staltsov, V. V.; Yelisyeyev, D. V.

    2012-02-15

    Results from experimental studies of extreme UV (EUV) radiation from the compression zone of a magnetoplasma compressor (MPC) operating with xenon are presented. Two MPC operating modes that differ in the method of xenon injection into the discharge were studied. It is shown that EUV radiation in the wavelength range of 5-80 nm is emitted from the compression zone. In the MPC operating mode with local xenon injection directly into the compression zone surrounded by helium plasma, the radiation power reaches it peak value of 16-18 kW in the wavelength range of 12.2-15.8 nm.

  15. The Martian and extraterrestrial UV radiation environment. Part II: further considerations on materials and design criteria for artificial ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Cockell, C S

    2001-12-01

    Ultraviolet radiation is an important natural physical influence on organism function and ecosystem interactions. The UV radiation fluxes in extraterrestrial environments are substantially different from those experienced on Earth. On Mars, the moon and in Earth orbit they are more biologically detrimental than on Earth. Based on previously presented fluxes and biologically weighted irradiances, this paper considers in more detail measures to mitigate UV radiation damage and methods to modify extraterrestrial UV radiation environments in artificial ecosystems that use natural sunlight. The transmission characteristics of a Martian material that will mimic the terrestrial UV radiation environment are presented. Transmissivity characteristics of other Martian and lunar materials are described. Manufacturing processes for the production of plastics and glass on the lunar and Martian surface are presented with special emphasis on photobiological requirements. Novel UV absorbing configurations are suggested.

  16. UV radiation may explain intercity difference for cataract in A-bomb survivors.

    PubMed

    Minamoto, Atsushi; Neriishi, Kazuo; Nakashima, Eiji

    2011-05-03

    Accurate assessment of risk factors is important for the evaluation of radiation-induced ocular lens damage. Our previous study identified a significant city difference between Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic-bomb survivors in terms of cataract prevalence, prompting further analysis. This study analyzed the sites of lens opacities and used model fitting that incorporated the variable impact of UV on the eye, based on the hypothesis that the city difference in the prevalence of cataract was due to differences in UV radiation between the two cities. The results suggested that cataracts among Nagasaki residents were more frequently located at the inferior nasal portion of the lens compared to cataracts in Hiroshima residents, with no ionizing radiation-specific localization observed. Based on the angles of incidence, UV was suggested as a possible cause of the city difference. We therefore analyzed models of city differences in terms of UVA and UVB levels. The UVB model provided a better fit than the UVA model, suggesting that UVB might account for the city difference. The current study implicated the geographic location of the subject, the investigation period, and outdoor activities as potentially important surrogate factors for UVB influence in radiation-induced cataract. In addition, the superior temporal portion of the lens seemed the most suitable for evaluating the effects of ionizing radiation because of the lesser amount of UVB interference at that site. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Experimental study of the degradation of 2,4-D induced by vacuum-UV radiation.

    PubMed

    Imoberdorf, G E; Mohseni, M

    2011-01-01

    Vacuum-UV (VUV) photoinduced degradation of the herbicide 2,4-D was studied. A flow-through VUV photoreactor was used (i) in batch mode to study the kinetics of degradation and (ii) in continuous mode under steady state to analyze the potential utilization of this process in commercial applications. In both cases, the reactants were recycled to minimize diffusive resistances. Experimental results from the batch studies showed that the initial degradation rate of 2,4-D in ultrapure water was independent of the initial concentration of the herbicide. However, a reduction in the reaction rate was obtained over the course of the treatment, largely due to the formation of 2,4-D partial oxidation by-products which compete with 2,4-D molecules for HO (scavenging effect). Increases in water alkalinity reduced 2,4-D degradation rate as a consequence of the scavenging of HO by carbonates and bicarbonates. The degradation of 2,4-D in raw surface waters was also investigated. A noticeable reduction in the degradation rate was observed because of the presence of NOM and alkalinity, both being known HO scavengers. Additionally, the presence of inorganic species/ions that absorb VUV may also have contributed to the reduction of the overall degradation rate. High conversions were obtained in the continuous system. At a residence time of 25 seconds, conversions of 97% and 65% were achieved for inlet herbicide concentrations of 1 and 10 mg L(-1), respectively. Under these conditions, the received dose of 185 nm radiation was 44.8 mJ cm(-2).

  18. Distinct physiological and metabolic reprogramming by highbush blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum) cultivars revealed during long-term UV-B radiation.

    PubMed

    Luengo Escobar, Ana; Alberdi, Miren; Acevedo, Patricio; Machado, Mariana; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano; Inostroza-Blancheteau, Claudio; Reyes-Díaz, Marjorie

    2017-05-01

    Despite the Montreal protocol and the eventual recovery of the ozone layer over Antarctica, there are still concerns about increased levels of ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation in the Southern Hemisphere. UV-B induces physiological, biochemical and morphological stress responses in plants, which are species-specific and different even for closely related cultivars. In woody plant species, understanding of long-term mechanisms to cope with UV-B-induced stress is limited. Therefore, a greenhouse UV-B daily course simulation was performed for 21 days with two blueberry cultivars (Legacy and Bluegold) under UV-BBE irradiance doses of 0, 0.07 and 0.19 W m(-2) . Morphological changes, photosynthetic performance, antioxidants, lipid peroxidation and metabolic features were evaluated. We found that both cultivars behaved differently under UV-B exposure, with Legacy being a UV-B-resistant cultivar. Interestingly, Legacy used a combined strategy: initially, in the first week of exposure its photoprotective compounds increased, coping with the intake of UV-B radiation (avoidance strategy), and then, increasing its antioxidant capacity. These strategies proved to be UV-B radiation dose dependent. The avoidance strategy is triggered early under high UV-B radiation in Legacy. Moreover, the rapid metabolic reprogramming capacity of this cultivar, in contrast to Bluegold, seems to be the most relevant contribution to its UV-B stress-coping strategy. © 2016 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  19. Comparison of the effect of UV laser radiation and of a radiomimetic substance on chromatin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radulescu, Irina; Radu, Liliana; Serbanescu, Ruxandra; Nelea, V. D.; Martin, C.; Mihailescu, Ion N.

    1998-07-01

    The damages of the complex of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and proteins from chromatin, produced by the UV laser radiation and/or by treatment with a radiomimetic substance, bleomycin, were compared. The laser radiation and bleomycin effects on chromatin structure were determined by the static and dynamic fluorimetry of chromatin complexes with the DNA specific ligand-- proflavine and by the analysis of tryptophan chromatin intrinsic fluorescence. Time resolved spectroscopy is a sensitive technique which allows to determine the excited state lifetimes of chromatin--proflavine complexes. Also, the percentage contributions to the fluorescence of proflavine, bound and unbound to chromatin DNA, were evaluated. The damages produced by the UV laser radiation on chromatin are similar with those of radiomimetic substance action and consists in DNA and proteins destruction. The DNA damage degree has been determined. The obtained results may constitute some indications in the laser utilization in radiochimiotherapy.

  20. Past changes in Arctic terrestrial ecosystems, climate and UV radiation.

    PubMed

    Callaghan, Terry V; Björn, Lars Olof; Chernov, Yuri; Chapin, Terry; Christensen, Torben R; Huntley, Brian; Ims, Rolf A; Johansson, Margareta; Jolly, Dyanna; Jonasson, Sven; Matveyeva, Nadya; Panikov, Nicolai; Oechel, Walter; Shaver, Gus

    2004-11-01

    that are apparently without precedent during the Pleistocene is likely to be considerable, particularly as their exposure to co-occurring environmental changes (such as enhanced levels of UV-B, deposition of nitrogen compounds from the atmosphere, heavy metal and acidic pollution, radioactive contamination, increased habitat fragmentation) is also without precedent.

  1. Influence of ground reflectivity and topography on erythemal UV radiation on inclined planes.

    PubMed

    Weihs, P

    2002-05-01

    Erythemal UV irradiance incident on a horizontal surface is not always the best way of estimating the real dose received by humans or animals. For this purpose knowledge of the irradiance incident on inclined planes is required. This study presents a physically accurate model for the calculation of erythemal UV on inclined planes. The influence of ground reflectivity and topography on erythemal UV on inclined planes is investigated as a function of solar zenith and azimuth angle. It is shown that including directional reflectivity does not substantially change the incident dose on inclined planes, the maximum deviation being 10%. The incident erythemal UV may, however, be much more influenced by the surrounding topography and by the direct/diffuse partitioning of the irradiance (which is a function of altitude). Maximum increases in erythemal UV of +57%, compared with the incident erythemal UV on a horizontal plane, were found when the sensor faced the sun with a mountain slope to the left and right of it and for very high altitudes.

  2. Separate and combined responses to water deficit and UV-B radiation.

    PubMed

    Bandurska, Hanna; Niedziela, Justyna; Chadzinikolau, Tamara

    2013-12-01

    Crops and other plants in natural conditions are routinely affected by several stresses acting simultaneously or in sequence. In areas affected by drought, plants may also be exposed to enhanced UV-B radiation (280-315nm). Each of these stress factors differently affects cellular metabolism. A common consequence of plant exposure to the separate action of water deficit and UV-B radiation is the enhanced generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) causing damage to proteins, lipids, carbohydrates and DNA. Despite this destructive activity, ROS also act as signalling molecules in cellular processes responsible for defence responses. Plants have evolved many physiological and biochemical mechanisms that avoid or tolerate the effects of stress factors. Water deficit avoidance leads to stomatal closure, stimulation of root growth, and accumulation of free proline and other osmolytes. Secondary metabolites (flavonols, flavones and anthocyanins) that accumulate in epidermal cells effectively screen UV-B irradiation and reduce its penetration to mesophyll tissue. The coordinated increased activity of the enzymatic antioxidant defence system such as up-regulation of superoxide dismutase, catalase, guaiacol peroxidase, ascorbate peroxidase and glutathione reductase is an important mechanism of tolerance to water deficit and UV-B radiation. The accumulation of low molecular antioxidants (proline, glycine betaine, ascorbate and glutathione) can also contribute to tolerance to water deficit. Polyamines, tocopherol, carotenoids, alkaloids, flavonoids and other secondary metabolites participate in the removal of ROS under conditions of increased UV-B radiation. The combination of water deficit and UV-B radiation induces responses that can be antagonistic, additive or synergistic in comparison with the action of single stresses. UV-B radiation may enhance resistance to water deficit and vice versa. Hydrogen peroxide, nitric oxide (NO), abscisic acid (ABA), jasmonic acid, ethylene

  3. The changes in quality ingredients of Qi chrysanthemum flowers treated with elevated UV-B radiation at different growth stages.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xiaoqin; Chu, Jianzhou; He, Xueli; Ma, Chunhui; Han, Chao; Shen, Haiyu

    2015-05-01

    The paper mainly reported the changes in quality ingredients of Qi chrysanthemum flowers treated with elevated UV-B radiation at different growth stages. The experiment included two levels of UV-B radiation (ambient UV-B, a 10% increase in ambient UV-B). Elevated UV-B radiation was carried out for 10-days during seedling, vigorous growth, bud and flower stages of Qi chrysanthemum, respectively. Elevated UV-B treatments applied during four development stages did not significantly affect flower yield, the rate of superoxide radical production and malondialdehyde concentration in flowers, while increased free amino acid concentration. The amino acid concentration induced by elevated UV-B radiation applied during bud stage was higher than that during the other stages. Elevated UV-B radiation applied during vigorous growth (except for flavone), bud and flower stages of chrysanthemum significantly increased hydrogen peroxide concentration, phenylalanine ammonia lyase enzyme activity, vitamin C, chlorogenic acid and flavone concentrations in flowers. These results suggested that active and nutritional ingredients in flowers of chrysanthemum could be increased by elevated UV-B radiation applied during the later growth stages of chrysanthemum. The paper supplied a simple and environmental-friendly method to improve quality of medicinal plants. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Biodegradable herbicide delivery systems with slow diffusion in soil and UV protection properties.

    PubMed

    Chevillard, Anne; Angellier-Coussy, Hélène; Guillard, Valérie; Bertrand, Cédric; Gontard, Nathalie; Gastaldi, Emmanuelle

    2014-11-01

    New herbicidal formulations were designed by combining wheat gluten (WG), two montmorillonites (MMTs) (unmodified and organically modified) and a model pesticide (ethofumesate), and their performances were assessed through an integrative study conducted in soil using an experimental methodology with data modelling. All the WG formulations tested were effective in decreasing the apparent diffusivity of ethofumesate in soil in comparison with the non-formulated active substance. The slow-release effect was significantly more pronounced in the presence of the organically modified MMT, confirming the importance of sorption mechanisms to reduce ethofumesate diffusion. The bioassays undertaken on watercress to evaluate herbicidal antigerminating performances showed that all the WG formulations (with or without MMT) were more effective than both the commercial formulation and the non-formulated ethofumesate, whatever the concentration tested. To explain such results, it was proposed that WG formulations would enable ethofumesate to be more available and thus more effective in inhibiting seed germination, as they would be less prone to be leached by water transport due to watering and also less subject to photodegradation. The use of pesticide formulations based on wheat gluten and nanoclays appeared to be a promising strategy both to reduce the mobility of pesticides in soil and to protect UV-photosensitive pesticides from photodegradation. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  5. UV radiation and freshwater zooplankton: damage, protection and recovery.

    PubMed

    Rautio, Milla; Tartarotti, Barbara

    2010-12-01

    While many laboratory and field studies show that zooplankton are negatively affected when exposed to high intensities of ultraviolet radiation (UVR), most studies also indicate that zooplankton are well adapted to cope with large variations in their UVR exposure in the pelagic zone of lakes. The response mechanisms of zooplankton are diverse and efficient and may explain the success and richness of freshwater zooplankton in optically variable waters. While no single behavioural or physiological protection mechanism seems to be superior, and while several unexplained and contradictory patterns exist in zooplankton UVR ecology, recent increases in our understanding are consistent with UVR playing an important role for zooplankton. This review examines the variability in freshwater zooplankton responses to UVR, with a focus on crustacean zooplankton (Cladocera and Copepoda). We present an overview of UVR-induced damages, and the protection and recovery mechanisms freshwater zooplankton use when exposed to UVR. We review the current knowledge of UVR impact on freshwater zooplankton at species and community levels, and discuss briefly how global change over the last three decades has influenced the UVR milieu in lakes.

  6. UV radiation and freshwater zooplankton: damage, protection and recovery

    PubMed Central

    Rautio, Milla; Tartarotti, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    While many laboratory and field studies show that zooplankton are negatively affected when exposed to high intensities of ultraviolet radiation (UVR), most studies also indicate that zooplankton are well adapted to cope with large variations in their UVR exposure in the pelagic zone of lakes. The response mechanisms of zooplankton are diverse and efficient and may explain the success and richness of freshwater zooplankton in optically variable waters. While no single behavioural or physiological protection mechanism seems to be superior, and while several unexplained and contradictory patterns exist in zooplankton UVR ecology, recent increases in our understanding are consistent with UVR playing an important role for zooplankton. This review examines the variability in freshwater zooplankton responses to UVR, with a focus on crustacean zooplankton (Cladocera and Copepoda). We present an overview of UVR-induced damages, and the protection and recovery mechanisms freshwater zooplankton use when exposed to UVR. We review the current knowledge of UVR impact on freshwater zooplankton at species and community levels, and discuss briefly how global change over the last three decades has influenced the UVR milieu in lakes. PMID:21516254

  7. Modeling the photodegradation of emerging contaminants in waters by UV radiation and UV/H2O2 system.

    PubMed

    Benitez, F Javier; Acero, Juan L; Real, Francisco J; Roldan, Gloria; Rodriguez, Elena

    2013-01-01

    Five emerging contaminants (1-H-Benzotriazole, N,N-diethyl-m-toluamide or DEET, Chlorophene, 3-Methylindole, and Nortriptyline HCl), frequently found in surface waters and wastewaters, were selected to be photooxidized in several water matrices. Previous degradation experiments of these compounds individually dissolved in ultra pure water were performed by using UV radiation at 254 nm and the Fenton's reagent. These oxidation systems allowed the determination of the quantum yields and the rate constants for the radical reaction between each compound and hydroxyl radicals. Later, the simultaneous photodegradation of mixtures of the selected ECs in several types of water (ultrapure water, reservoir water, and two effluents from WWTPs) was carried out and a kinetic study was conducted. A model is proposed for the ECs elimination, and the theoretically calculated concentrations with this model agreed well with the experimental results obtained, which confirmed that it constitutes an excellent tool to predict the elimination of these compounds in waters.

  8. Synergistic effects of ethanol and UV radiation to reduce levels of selected foodborne pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Ha, Ji-Hyoung; Ha, Sang-Do

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether combined treatments would produce synergistic disinfection effects on food products during food processing compared with single treatments. We investigated the bactericidal effects of a commercial chemical disinfectant (ethanol) and of UV radiation on Bacillus cereus F4810/72, Cronobacter sakazakii KCTC 2949, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 35556, Escherichia coli ATCC 10536, and Salmonella enterica Typhimurium NO/NA in vitro. Various concentrations of ethanol (10, 30, 40, and 50%) were tested with various exposure doses of UV radiation (6, 96, 216, 360, and 504 mWs/cm(2)) with a UV lamp. The combined ethanol-UV treatments resulted in greater reductions in bacterial counts than did either treatment alone. The synergistic effect values for B. cereus, C. sakazakii, S. aureus, S. enterica Typhimurium NO/NA, and E. coli were 0.40 to 1.52, 0.52 to 1.74, 0.20 to 2.32, 0.07 to 1.14, and 0.02 to 1.75 log CFU/ml, respectively. The results of this study suggest that a significant synergistic benefit results from combining ethanol and UV treatments against foodborne pathogens in vitro.

  9. System for monitoring UV radiation level in phototherapy cabins in Poland

    PubMed Central

    Narbutt, Joanna; Pawlaczyk, Mariola; Sysa-Jędrzejowska, Anna; Sobolewski, Piotr; Rajewska-Więch, Bonawentura; Lesiak, Aleksandra

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Ultraviolet phototherapy (UVP) is widely used in dermatological practice for the treatment of various skin diseases. Numerous studies support its beneficial curing effectiveness; however, overexposure to ultraviolet radiation can cause adverse health effects, such as sunburn reaction, erythema response, cataract, skin aging, etc. For these reasons, it is of special importance to monitor performance of UVP cabins using a calibration system to evaluate the UV doses incident upon the patient. Material and methods A mechanized cabin control system (CCS) is proposed. It consists of radiometers with a wide and narrow field of view to estimate the body irradiation and to identify malfunctioning cabin tubes. Quality control and quality assurance procedures are developed to keep high accuracy of the calibration procedure. The CCS has been used in the examination of two different types of UVP cabins routinely working in Poland. Results It allows precise calculation of UV doses and spatial variability of UV radiance inside the cabin, thus providing uncertainties of the doses assigned by medical staff. The CCS could potentially serve as a primary standard for monitoring various UVP cabins working in Poland. Conclusions The methodology developed to quantify UV doses in UVP cabins may be easily extended to any UV radiation source. PMID:25624865

  10. System for monitoring UV radiation level in phototherapy cabins in Poland.

    PubMed

    Narbutt, Joanna; Pawlaczyk, Mariola; Sysa-Jędrzejowska, Anna; Krzyścin, Janusz W; Sobolewski, Piotr; Rajewska-Więch, Bonawentura; Lesiak, Aleksandra

    2014-12-22

    Ultraviolet phototherapy (UVP) is widely used in dermatological practice for the treatment of various skin diseases. Numerous studies support its beneficial curing effectiveness; however, overexposure to ultraviolet radiation can cause adverse health effects, such as sunburn reaction, erythema response, cataract, skin aging, etc. For these reasons, it is of special importance to monitor performance of UVP cabins using a calibration system to evaluate the UV doses incident upon the patient. A mechanized cabin control system (CCS) is proposed. It consists of radiometers with a wide and narrow field of view to estimate the body irradiation and to identify malfunctioning cabin tubes. Quality control and quality assurance procedures are developed to keep high accuracy of the calibration procedure. The CCS has been used in the examination of two different types of UVP cabins routinely working in Poland. It allows precise calculation of UV doses and spatial variability of UV radiance inside the cabin, thus providing uncertainties of the doses assigned by medical staff. The CCS could potentially serve as a primary standard for monitoring various UVP cabins working in Poland. The methodology developed to quantify UV doses in UVP cabins may be easily extended to any UV radiation source.

  11. Water diffusion into radiation crosslinked PVA-PVP network hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, David J. T.; Whittaker, Andrew K.; Zainuddin

    2011-02-01

    A series of hydrogels comprised of crosslinked networks of poly(vinyl alcohol), PVA and poly(vinyl pyrrolidone), PVP, have been prepared using gamma radiolysis of aqueous solutions of the polymers to effect crosslinking of the polymer chains. The molecular weight of the PVA was in the range 75-105 kDa and of PVP was 360 kDa. Gel doses were measured for the polymers and found to be 11 kGy for PVA, 3.7 kGy for PVP and 4.6 kGy for a mixture of PVA and PVP with a mole fraction of PVP of 0.19. The initial water content of the gels was 87.2 wt%. Further water uptake studies were undertaken using both gravimetric and NMR imaging analyses. These studies showed that the uptake processes followed Fickian kinetics with diffusion coefficients ranging from 1.8×10 -11 for the PVA hydrogel to 4.4×10 -11 m 2 s -1 for the PVP hydrogel for radiation doses of 25 kGy and a temperature of 310 K. At 298 K the gravimetric study yielded a diffusion coefficient of 1.5×10 -11 m 2 s -1 whereas the NMR analysis yielded a slightly higher value of 2.0×10 -11 m 2 s -1 for the hydrogel with a mole fraction of PVP of 0.19 and a radiation dose of 25 kGy.

  12. [Effects of UV Radiation on the Physicochemical Properties and Coagulation Properties of Humic Acid Solution].

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen-dong; Zhang, Ke; Fan, Qing-hai; Zheng, Dan

    2016-03-15

    To investigate the mechanism of UV light in promoting the removal of humic acid ( HA) by coagulation, the variations of the physical and chemical properties of the HA solution before and after UV light radiation were investigated. The effects of the changes in water quality conditions on the removal performance of HA in coagulation were also observed. Experimental results showed that except zeta potential, pH, chromaticity and viscosity of the HA solution exhibited varying degrees of decline after UV radiation. Further study showed that the impact of changes in viscosity of the solution on humic acid coagulation performance was relatively small. Under acidic conditions, the coagulation performance of HA significantly increased. The increase of zeta potential led to easy gathering of colloidal particles and improved the coagulation performance. Furthermore, except for HA with relative molecular mass of between (10-30) x 10³ and less than 10³, there was little variation in the proportion of low molecular weight HA, which may be an important reason that the coagulation performance of the humic acid solution increased after UV radiation.

  13. Variations of metabolites and proteome in Lonicera japonica Thunb. buds and flowers under UV radiation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wei; Zheng, Wen; Hu, Xingjiang; Xu, Xiaobao; Zhang, Lin; Tian, Jingkui

    2017-04-01

    Lonicera japonica Thunb., also known as Jin Yin Hua and Japanese honeysuckle, is used as a herbal medicine in Asian countries. Its flowers have been used in folk medicine in the clinic and in making food or healthy beverages for over 1500years in China. To investigate the molecular processes involved in L. japonica development from buds to flowers exposed to UV radiation, a comparative proteomics analysis was performed. Fifty-four proteins were identified as differentially expressed, including 42 that had increased expression and 12 that had decreased expression. The levels of the proteins related to glycolysis, TCA/organic acid transformation, major carbohydrate metabolism, oxidative pentose phosphate, stress, secondary metabolism, hormone, and mitochondrial electron transport were increased during flower opening process after exposure to UV radiation. Six metabolites in L. japonica buds and flowers were identified and relatively quantified using LC-MS/MS. The antioxidant activity was performed using a 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl assay, which revealed that L. japonica buds had more activity than the UV irradiated flowers. This suggests that UV-B radiation induces production of endogenous ethylene in L. japonica buds, thus facilitating blossoming of the buds and activating the antioxidant system. Additionally, the higher metabolite contents and antioxidant properties of L. japonica buds indicate that the L. japonica bud stage may be a more optimal time to harvest than the flower stage when using for medicinal properties. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. From ozone depletion to agriculture: understanding the role of UV radiation in sustainable crop production.

    PubMed

    Wargent, Jason J; Jordan, Brian R

    2013-03-01

    Largely because of concerns regarding global climate change, there is a burgeoning interest in the application of fundamental scientific knowledge in order to better exploit environmental cues in the achievement of desirable endpoints in crop production. Ultraviolet (UV) radiation is an energetic driver of a diverse range of plant responses and, despite historical concerns regarding the damaging consequences of UV-B radiation for global plant productivity as related to stratospheric ozone depletion, current developments representative of a range of organizational scales suggest that key plant responses to UV-B radiation may be exploitable in the context of a sustainable contribution towards the strengthening of global crop production, including alterations in secondary metabolism, enhanced photoprotection, up-regulation of the antioxidative response and modified resistance to pest and disease attack. Here, we discuss the prospect of this paradigm shift in photobiology, and consider the linkages between fundamental plant biology and crop-level outcomes that can be applied to the plant UV-B response, in addition to the consequences for related biota and many other facets of agro-ecosystem processes. © 2013 The Author. New Phytologist © 2012 New Phytologist Trust.

  15. Oxidation of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in water. 3: UV radiation combined with hydrogen peroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Beltran, F.J.; Rivas, J.; Ovejero, G.

    1996-03-01

    Oxidation in water of three polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), fluorene, phenanthrene, and acenaphthene, with UV radiation combined with hydrogen peroxide has been studied. The effect of hydrogen peroxide concentration, pH, and bicarbonate ion has been investigated. Disappearance rates of PAHs are substantially increased with respect to those from UV radiation alone if proper conditions of hydrogen peroxide concentration and pH are established. Direct photolysis contribution decreases with the increasing hydrogen peroxide concentration and is the main way of degradation at acid pH (76% at pH 2 with 10{sup {minus}3} M hydrogen peroxide concentration, for fluorene oxidation). Rate constants of reactions between the hydroxyl radical and PAHs were found to be 9.9 {times} 10{sup 9}, 8.8 {times} 10{sup 9}, and 13.4 {times} 10{sup 9} M{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}, for fluorene, acenaphthene, and phenanthrene, respectively. Both UV radiation and UV/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} oxidation of PAHs yield numerous intermediate compounds. Most of these compounds disappear as oxidation time is increased.

  16. Diffusion of radiation belt protons by whistler waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villalon, Elena; Burke, William J.

    1994-11-01

    Whistler waves propagating near the quasi-electrostatic limit can interact with energetic protons (approximately 80 - 500 keV) that are transported into the radiation belts. The waves may be launched from either the ground or generated in the magnetosphere as a result of the resonant interactions with trapped electrons. The wave frequencies are significant fractions of the equatorial electron gyrofrequency, and they propagate obliquely to the geomagnetic field. A finite spectrum of waves compensates for the inhomogeneity of the geomagnetic field allowing the protons to stay in gyroresonance with the waves over long distances along magnetic field lines. The Fokker-Planck equation is intergrated along the flux tube considering the contributions of multiple-resonance crossings. The quasi-linear diffusion coefficients in energy, cross energy/ pitch angle, and pitch angle are obtained for second-order resonant interactions. They are sown to be proportional to the electric fields amplitudes. Numerical calculations for the second-order interactions show that diffusion dominates near the edge of the loss cone. For small pitch angles the largest diffusion coefficient is in energy, although the cross energy/ pitch angle term is also important. This may explain the induced proton precipitation observed in active space experiments.

  17. Understanding Coupling of Global and Diffuse Solar Radiation with Climatic Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamdan, Lubna

    Global solar radiation data is very important for wide variety of applications and scientific studies. However, this data is not readily available because of the cost of measuring equipment and the tedious maintenance and calibration requirements. Wide variety of models have been introduced by researchers to estimate and/or predict the global solar radiations and its components (direct and diffuse radiation) using other readily obtainable atmospheric parameters. The goal of this research is to understand the coupling of global and diffuse solar radiation with climatic variability, by investigating the relationships between these radiations and atmospheric parameters. For this purpose, we applied multilinear regression analysis on the data of National Solar Radiation Database 1991--2010 Update. The analysis showed that the main atmospheric parameters that affect the amount of global radiation received on earth's surface are cloud cover and relative humidity. Global radiation correlates negatively with both variables. Linear models are excellent approximations for the relationship between atmospheric parameters and global radiation. A linear model with the predictors total cloud cover, relative humidity, and extraterrestrial radiation is able to explain around 98% of the variability in global radiation. For diffuse radiation, the analysis showed that the main atmospheric parameters that affect the amount received on earth's surface are cloud cover and aerosol optical depth. Diffuse radiation correlates positively with both variables. Linear models are very good approximations for the relationship between atmospheric parameters and diffuse radiation. A linear model with the predictors total cloud cover, aerosol optical depth, and extraterrestrial radiation is able to explain around 91% of the variability in diffuse radiation. Prediction analysis showed that the linear models we fitted were able to predict diffuse radiation with efficiency of test adjusted R2 values

  18. A Consistent Approach to Solving the Radiation Diffusion Equation

    SciTech Connect

    Hammer, J H; Rosen, M D

    2002-11-06

    Diffusive x-ray-driven heat waves are found in a variety of astrophysical and laboratory settings, e.g. in the heating of a hohlraum used for ICF, and hence are of intrinsic interest. However, accurate analytic diffusion wave (also called Marshak wave) solutions are difficult to obtain due to the strong non-linearity of the radiation diffusion equation. The typical approach is to solve near the heat front, and by ansatz apply the solution globally. This works fairly well due to ''steepness'' of the heat front, but energy is not conserved and it does not lead to a consistent way of correcting the solution or estimating accuracy. We employ the steepness of the front through a perturbation expansion in {var_epsilon} = {beta}/(4+{alpha}), where the internal energy varies as T{sup {beta}} and the opacity varies as T{sup -{alpha}}. We solve using an iterative approach, equivalent to asymptotic methods that match outer (away from the front) and inner (near the front) solutions. Typically {var_epsilon} < 0.3. Calculations are through first order in {var_epsilon} and are accurate to {approx} 10%, which is comparable to the inaccuracy from assuming power laws for material properties. We solve for supersonic waves with arbitrary drive time history, including the case of a rapidly cooling surface, and generalize the method to arbitrary temperature dependence of opacity and internal energy. We also solve for subsonic waves with drive temperature varying as a power of time. In the subsonic case, the specific heat, (pressure/density) and opacity are each assumed to vary as density to a small power, of order {var_epsilon}. We find the theory compares well with radiation hydrodynamics code calculations of the heat front position, absorbed flux and ablation pressure.

  19. Duality of solar UV-B radiation and relevant dosimetry: vitamin D synthesis versus skin erythema

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terenetskaya, Irina P.

    2003-06-01

    Solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) gives rise to beneficial or adverse health effects depending on the dose. Excessive UV exposures are associated with acute and chronic health effect but in appropriate doses UV sunlight is advisable. Important biological function of UVR is initiation of endogenous synthesis of vitamin D in human skin. A useful method based on an in vitro model of vitamin D synthesis ('D-dosimeter') has been specially developed to measure the vitamin D synthetic capacity of sunlight in situ. For the first time laboratory and field tests have been performed to link commonly used erythemal units (MEDs) and previtamin D accumulation.

  20. Shading areas, sky-view factor and UV radiation in urban canopy of Moscow city

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konstantinov, P. I.; Samsonov, T. E.; Zhdanova, E. Yu.; Chubarova, N. Ye.

    2017-02-01

    The main goal of this investigation is to develop a kind of "urban reanalysis" - the database of meteorological and radiation fields under Moscow megalopolis with high spatial resolution. Sky View Factor (SVF) is widely used for evaluating the solar irradiance attenuation in urban canopy. In this study we suggested raster-based calculation of SVF. We applied this technique for evaluating specific features in UV irradiance at Moscow megalopolis conditions. We showed that relative frequency of SVF over the territory of Moscow higher than 80% is observed in more than 86% of cases. The maps of UV losses due to sky obscuring over the territory of Moscow have been obtained for different seasons.

  1. Transition from star-like to crew-cut micelles induced by UV radiation.

    PubMed

    Fayad, Samira Jamil; Minatti, Edson; Soldi, Valdir; Borsali, Redouane

    2014-02-15

    In the present article, the effect of UV on PS-b-PMMA micelles in solution is discussed. Micellar solutions of the amphiphilic poly(styrene-b-methylmethacrylate) block copolymer in selective solvent (methanol for the PMMA block) were exposed to UV radiation, which has simultaneously led to cross linking of the micellar core (PS) and degradation of the micellar corona (PMMA). The kinetics of such process were investigated in situ by means of dynamic light scattering, allowing the measurement of hydrodynamic radius as a function of UV exposure time. Results indicate that the size of micelles has decreased with UV exposure time down to a minimum value. Such reduced size resulted from PMMA degradation, which later promoted aggregation and coagulation because the micellar core was no longer well protected by PMMA. Addition of good solvent for both blocks (toluene) to non-UV exposed micelles has led to core swelling (PS) and, ultimately, system disassembly (free copolymer chain). The effect of adding toluene on the UV-exposed micelles has only caused core swelling as a consequence of the PS cross-linking.

  2. Sensitivity of pathogenic and free-living Leptospira spp. to UV radiation and mitomycin C

    SciTech Connect

    Stamm, L.V.; Charon, N.W.

    1988-03-01

    The habitats for the two major Leptospira spp. differ. The main habitat of L. biflexa is soil and water, whereas L. interrogans primarily resides in the renal tubules of animals. We investigated whether these two species, along with L. illini (species incertae sedis), differ with respect to their sensitivity to UV radiation. The doses of UV resulting in 37, 10 and 1% survival were determined for representive serovars from each species. L. interrogans serovar pomona was 3.0 to 4.8 times more sensitive to UV than the other Leptospira species under the 37, 10, and 1% survival parameters. In comparison to other bacteria, L. interrogans serovar pomona is among the most sensitive to UV. In a qualitative UV sensitivity assay., L. interrogans serovars were found to be in general more sensitive than L. biflexa serovars. All three species were found to have a photoreactivation DNA repair mechanism. Since organisms that are resistant to UV are often resistant to the DNA cross-linking agent mitomycin C, we tested the relative sensitivity of several Leptospira serovars to this compound. With few exceptions, L. biflexa and L. illini serovars were considerably more resistant to mitomycin C than the L. interrogans serovars. The mitomycin C sensitivity assay could be a useful addition to current characterization tests used to differentiate the Leptospira species.

  3. Sensitivity of pathogenic and free-living Leptospira spp. to UV radiation and mitomycin C.

    PubMed Central

    Stamm, L V; Charon, N W

    1988-01-01

    The habitats for the two major Leptospira spp. differ. The main habitat of L. biflexa is soil and water, whereas L. interrogans primarily resides in the renal tubules of animals. We investigated whether these two species, along with L. illini (species incertae sedis), differ with respect to their sensitivity to UV radiation. The doses of UV resulting in 37, 10, and 1% survival were determined for representative serovars from each species. L. interrogans serovar pomona was 3.0 to 4.8 times more sensitive to UV than the other Leptospira species under the 37, 10, and 1% survival parameters. In comparison to other bacteria, L. interrogans serovar pomona is among the most sensitive to UV. In a qualitative UV sensitivity assay, L. interrogans serovars were found to be in general more sensitive than L. biflexa serovars. All three species were found to have a photoreactivation DNA repair mechanism. Since organisms that are resistant to UV are often resistant to the DNA cross-linking agent mitomycin C, we tested the relative sensitivity of several Leptospira serovars to this compound. With few exceptions, L. biflexa and L. illini serovars were considerably more resistant to mitomycin C than the L. interrogans serovars. The mitomycin C sensitivity assay could be a useful addition to current characterization tests used to differentiate the Leptospira species. PMID:3132098

  4. Multiple roles for UV RESISTANCE LOCUS8 in regulating gene expression and metabolite accumulation in Arabidopsis under solar ultraviolet radiation.

    PubMed

    Morales, Luis O; Brosché, Mikael; Vainonen, Julia; Jenkins, Gareth I; Wargent, Jason J; Sipari, Nina; Strid, Åke; Lindfors, Anders V; Tegelberg, Riitta; Aphalo, Pedro J

    2013-02-01

    Photomorphogenic responses triggered by low fluence rates of ultraviolet B radiation (UV-B; 280-315 nm) are mediated by the UV-B photoreceptor UV RESISTANCE LOCUS8 (UVR8). Beyond our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of UV-B perception by UVR8, there is still limited information on how the UVR8 pathway functions under natural sunlight. Here, wild-type Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and the uvr8-2 mutant were used in an experiment outdoors where UV-A (315-400 nm) and UV-B irradiances were attenuated using plastic films. Gene expression, PYRIDOXINE BIOSYNTHESIS1 (PDX1) accumulation, and leaf metabolite signatures were analyzed. The results show that UVR8 is required for transcript accumulation of genes involved in UV protection, oxidative stress, hormone signal transduction, and defense against herbivores under solar UV. Under natural UV-A irradiance, UVR8 is likely to interact with UV-A/blue light signaling pathways to moderate UV-B-driven transcript and PDX1 accumulation. UVR8 both positively and negatively affects UV-A-regulated gene expression and metabolite accumulation but is required for the UV-B induction of phenolics. Moreover, UVR8-dependent UV-B acclimation during the early stages of plant development may enhance normal growth under long-term exposure to solar UV.

  5. UV-B absorbing compounds in present-day and fossil pollen, spores, cuticles, seed coats and wood: evaluation of a proxy for solar UV radiation.

    PubMed

    Rozema, J; Blokker, P; Mayoral Fuertes, M A; Broekman, R

    2009-09-01

    UV-B absorbing compounds (UACs) in present-day and fossil pollen, spores, cuticles, seed coats and wood have been evaluated as a proxy for past UV. This proxy may not only provide information on variation of stratospheric ozone and solar UV in the period preceding and during the Antarctic ozone hole (1974-present day), but also on the development and variation of the stratospheric ozone layer and solar surface UV during the evolution of life on Earth. Sporopollenin and cutin are highly resistant biopolymers, preserving well in the geological record and contain the phenolic acids p-coumaric (pCA) and ferulic acid (FA). pCA and FA represent a good perspective for a plant-based proxy for past surface UV radiation since they are induced by solar UV-B via the phenylpropanoid pathway (PPP). UV-B absorption by these monomers in the wall of pollen and spores and in cuticles may prevent damage to the cellular metabolism. Increased pCA and FA in pollen of Vicia faba exposed to enhanced UV-B was found in greenhouse experiments. Further correlative evidence comes from UV-absorbing compounds in spores from 1960-2000 comparing exposure of land plants (Lycopodium species) to solar UV before and during ozone depletion and comparing plants from Antarctica (severe ozone depletion), Arctic, and other latitudes with less or negligible ozone depletion. Wood-derived compounds guaiacyl (G), syringyl (S), and p-hydroxyphenyl (P) are produced via the PPP. The proportions of P, G, and S in the lignin differ between various plant groups (e.g. dicotyledons/monocotyledons, gymnosperms/angiosperms). It is hypothesized that this lignin composition and derived physiological and physical properties of lignin (such as tree-ring wood density) has potential as a proxy for palaeo-UV climate. However validation by exposure of trees to enhanced UV is lacking. pCA and FA also form part of cutin polymers and are found in extant and fossil Ginkgo leaf cuticles as shown by thermally-assisted hydrolysis and

  6. UV-B radiation arising from stratospheric ozone depletion influences the pigmentation of the Antarctic moss Andreaea regularis.

    PubMed

    Newsham, K K

    2003-05-01

    Changes to the radiative environment arising from stratospheric ozone (O(3)) depletion and subsequent associations between these changes and the pigmentation of the moss Andreaea regularis were measured in late austral spring and early summer 1998 at Rothera Point on the western Antarctic Peninsula (67 degrees S, 68 degrees W). A strong relationship between O(3) column depth and the ratio of UV-B to PAR irradiance ( F(uv-b)/ F(par)) was recorded at ground level ( r(2)=92%, P<0.001). Weaker, but significant, associations between O(3) column depth and ground level unweighted and biologically effective UV-B radiation (UV-B(be)) were also found. Regression analyses indicated that F(uv-b)/ F(par) was the best predictor for concentrations of UV-B screening pigments and total carotenoids extracted from plant tissues. Concentrations of these pigments were loosely ( r(2)= ca. 30%) but significantly ( P<0.01) positively associated with F(uv-b)/ F(par). Concentrations of UV-B screening pigments were also positively associated with irradiances and daily doses of unweighted UV-B and UV-B(be) radiation. The concentrations of chlorophylls a and b were apparently unaffected by O(3) depletion. The data derived from this study suggest that changes to the radiative environment associated with stratospheric O(3) depletion influence the pigmentation of A. regularis. As a corollary, flavonoids are shown to be present in tissues of A. regularis.

  7. Biological dosimetry to determine the UV radiation climate inside the MIR station and its role in vitamin D biosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rettberg, P.; Horneck, G.; Zittermann, A.; Heer, M.

    1998-11-01

    The vitamin D synthesis in the human skin, is absolutely dependent on UVB radiation. Natural UVB from sunlight is normally absent in the closed environment of a space station like MIR. Therefore it was necessary to investigate the UV radiation climate inside the station resulting from different lamps as well as from occasional solar irradiation behind a UV-transparent quartz window. Biofilms, biologically weighting and integrating UV dosimeters successfully applied on Earth (e.g. in Antarctica) and in space (D-2, Biopan I) were used to determine the biological effectiveness of the UV radiation climate at different locations in the space station. Biofilms were also used to determine the personal UV dose of an individual cosmonaut. These UV data were correlated with the concentration of vitamin D in the cosmonaut's blood and the dietary vitamin D intake. The results showed that the UV radiation climate inside the Mir station is not sufficient for an adequate supply of vitamin D, which should therefore be secured either by vitamin D supplementat and/or by the regular exposure to special UV lamps like those in sun-beds. The use of natural solar UV radiation through the quartz window for `sunbathing' is dangerous and should be avoided even for short exposure periods.

  8. Interactive effects of UV radiation and water availability on seedlings of six woody Mediterranean species.

    PubMed

    Bernal, Meritxell; Llorens, Laura; Badosa, Jordi; Verdaguer, Dolors

    2013-02-01

    To assess the effects of UV radiation and its interaction with water availability on Mediterranean plants, we performed an experiment with seedlings of six Mediterranean species (three mesophytes vs three xerophytes) grown in a glasshouse from May to October under three UV conditions (without UV, with UVA and with UVA+UVB) and two irrigation levels (watered to saturation and low watered). Morphological, physiological and biochemical measures were taken. Exposure to UVA+UVB increased the overall leaf mass per area (LMA) and the leaf carotenoids/chlorophyll a + b ratio of plants in relation to plants grown without UV or with UVA, respectively. In contrast, we did not find a general effect of UV on the leaf content of phenols or UVB-absorbing compounds of the studied species. Regarding plant growth, UV inhibited the above-ground biomass production of well-watered plants of Pistacia lentiscus. Conversely, under low irrigation, UVA tended to abolish the reduction in growth experienced by P. lentiscus plants growing in a UV-free environment, in accordance with UVA-enhanced apparent electron transport rate (ETR) values under drought in this species. UVA also induced an overall increase in root biomass when plants of the studied species were grown under a low water supply. In conclusion, while plant exposition to UVA favored root growth under water shortage, UVB addition only gave rise to photoprotective responses, such as the increase in LMA or in the leaf carotenoids/chlorophyll a + b ratio of plants. Species-specific responses to UV were not related with the xerophytic or mesophytic character of the studied species. Copyright © Physiologia Plantarum 2012.

  9. The effect of selenium and UV radiation on leaf traits and biomass production in Triticum aestivum L.

    PubMed

    Golob, Aleksandra; Kavčič, Jan; Stibilj, Vekoslava; Gaberščik, Alenka; Vogel-Mikuš, Katarina; Germ, Mateja

    2017-02-01

    UV radiation as an evolutionarily important environmental factor, significantly affects plants traits and alters the effects of other environmental factors. Single and combined effects of ambient UV radiation, its exclusion, and Se foliar treatments on Si concentrations and production of Si phytoliths in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cv. 'Reska' were studied. The effects of these treatments on growth parameters of the plants, structural and biochemical traits of the leaves, and interactions of the leaves with light, as Si incrustation is the first barrier to light at the leaf surface were also examined. Under ambient UV radiation and foliar treatment with 10mgL(-1) sodium selenate solution, there was a trade-off between the plant investment in primary and secondary metabolism, as the production of UV-absorbing compounds was enhanced while photosynthetic pigment levels were reduced. Independent of Se treatment, ambient UV radiation lowered respiratory potential, Ca concentration, and leaf thickness, and increased Si concentration, Si phytoliths formation, and cuticle thickness. The Se treatment has little effect on plant traits and biomass production but it increased Se concentrations in the plants by >100-fold, independent of UV radiation. In combination with UV radiation Se strengthen the protection of plants against stress by increasing the amount of UV absorbing compounds, light reflectance and transmittance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. UV-B radiation-induced oxidative stress and p38 signaling pathway involvement in the benthic copepod Tigriopus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bo-Mi; Rhee, Jae-Sung; Lee, Kyun-Woo; Kim, Min-Jung; Shin, Kyung-Hoon; Lee, Su-Jae; Lee, Young-Mi; Lee, Jae-Seong

    2015-01-01

    Ultraviolet B (UV-B) radiation presents an environmental hazard to aquatic organisms. To understand the molecular responses of the intertidal copepod Tigriopus japonicus to UV-B radiation, we measured the acute toxicity response to 96 h of UV-B radiation, and we also assessed the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, glutathione (GSH) content, and antioxidant enzyme (GST, GR, GPx, and SOD) activities after 24 h of exposure to UV-B with LD50 and half LD50 values. Also, expression patterns of p53 and hsp gene families with phosphorylation of p38 MAPK were investigated in UV-B-exposed copepods. We found that the ROS level, GSH content, and antioxidant enzyme activity levels were increased with the transcriptional upregulation of antioxidant-related genes, indicating that UV-B induces oxidative stress by generating ROS and stimulating antioxidant enzymatic activity as a defense mechanism. Additionally, we found that p53 expression was significantly increased after UV-B irradiation due to increases in the phosphorylation of the stress-responsive p38 MAPK, indicating that UV-B may be responsible for inducing DNA damage in T. japonicus. Of the hsp family genes, transcriptional levels of hsp20, hsp20.7, hsp70, and hsp90 were elevated in response to a low dose of UV-B radiation (9 kJ m(-2)), suggesting that these hsp genes may be involved in cellular protection against UV-B radiation. In this paper, we performed a pathway-oriented mechanistic analysis in response to UV-B radiation, and this analysis provides a better understanding of the effects of UV-B in the intertidal benthic copepod T. japonicus.

  11. RADIATIVE TRANSFER IN A CLUMPY UNIVERSE. IV. NEW SYNTHESIS MODELS OF THE COSMIC UV/X-RAY BACKGROUND

    SciTech Connect

    Haardt, Francesco; Madau, Piero E-mail: pmadau@ucolick.org

    2012-02-20

    We present improved synthesis models of the evolving spectrum of the UV/X-ray diffuse background, updating and extending our previous results. Five new main components are added to our radiative transfer code CUBA: (1) the sawtooth modulation of the background intensity from resonant line absorption in the Lyman series of cosmic hydrogen and helium; (2) the X-ray emission from the obscured and unobscured quasars that gives origin to the X-ray background; (3) a piecewise parameterization of the distribution in redshift and column density of intergalactic absorbers that fits recent measurements of the mean free path of 1 ryd photons; (4) an accurate treatment of the photoionization structure of absorbers, which enters in the calculation of the helium continuum opacity and recombination emissivity; and (5) the UV emission from star-forming galaxies at all redshifts. We provide tables of the predicted H I and He II photoionization and photoheating rates for use, e.g., in cosmological hydrodynamics simulations of the Ly{alpha} forest and a new metallicity-dependent calibration to the UV luminosity density-star formation rate density relation. A 'minimal cosmic reionization model' is also presented in which the galaxy UV emissivity traces recent determinations of the cosmic history of star formation, the luminosity-weighted escape fraction of hydrogen-ionizing radiation increases rapidly with look-back time, the clumping factor of the high-redshift intergalactic medium evolves following the results of hydrodynamic simulations, and Population III stars and miniquasars make a negligible contribution to the metagalactic flux. The model provides a good fit to the hydrogen-ionization rates inferred from flux decrement and proximity effect measurements, predicts that cosmological H II (He III) regions overlap at redshift 6.7 (2.8), and yields an optical depth to Thomson scattering, {tau}{sub es} = 0.084 that is in agreement with Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe results

  12. Radiative Transfer in a Clumpy Universe. IV. New Synthesis Models of the Cosmic UV/X-Ray Background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haardt, Francesco; Madau, Piero

    2012-02-01

    We present improved synthesis models of the evolving spectrum of the UV/X-ray diffuse background, updating and extending our previous results. Five new main components are added to our radiative transfer code CUBA: (1) the sawtooth modulation of the background intensity from resonant line absorption in the Lyman series of cosmic hydrogen and helium; (2) the X-ray emission from the obscured and unobscured quasars that gives origin to the X-ray background; (3) a piecewise parameterization of the distribution in redshift and column density of intergalactic absorbers that fits recent measurements of the mean free path of 1 ryd photons; (4) an accurate treatment of the photoionization structure of absorbers, which enters in the calculation of the helium continuum opacity and recombination emissivity; and (5) the UV emission from star-forming galaxies at all redshifts. We provide tables of the predicted H I and He II photoionization and photoheating rates for use, e.g., in cosmological hydrodynamics simulations of the Lyα forest and a new metallicity-dependent calibration to the UV luminosity density-star formation rate density relation. A "minimal cosmic reionization model" is also presented in which the galaxy UV emissivity traces recent determinations of the cosmic history of star formation, the luminosity-weighted escape fraction of hydrogen-ionizing radiation increases rapidly with look-back time, the clumping factor of the high-redshift intergalactic medium evolves following the results of hydrodynamic simulations, and Population III stars and miniquasars make a negligible contribution to the metagalactic flux. The model provides a good fit to the hydrogen-ionization rates inferred from flux decrement and proximity effect measurements, predicts that cosmological H II (He III) regions overlap at redshift 6.7 (2.8), and yields an optical depth to Thomson scattering, τes = 0.084 that is in agreement with Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe results. Our new

  13. Artificial and Solar UV Radiation Induces Strand Breaks and Cyclobutane Pyrimidine Dimers in Bacillus subtilis Spore DNA

    PubMed Central

    Slieman, Tony A.; Nicholson, Wayne L.

    2000-01-01

    The loss of stratospheric ozone and the accompanying increase in solar UV flux have led to concerns regarding decreases in global microbial productivity. Central to understanding this process is determining the types and amounts of DNA damage in microbes caused by solar UV irradiation. While UV irradiation of dormant Bacillus subtilis endospores results mainly in formation of the “spore photoproduct” 5-thyminyl-5,6-dihydrothymine, genetic evidence indicates that an additional DNA photoproduct(s) may be formed in spores exposed to solar UV-B and UV-A radiation (Y. Xue and W. L. Nicholson, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 62:2221–2227, 1996). We examined the occurrence of double-strand breaks, single-strand breaks, cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers, and apurinic-apyrimidinic sites in spore DNA under several UV irradiation conditions by using enzymatic probes and neutral or alkaline agarose gel electrophoresis. DNA from spores irradiated with artificial 254-nm UV-C radiation accumulated single-strand breaks, double-strand breaks, and cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers, while DNA from spores exposed to artificial UV-B radiation (wavelengths, 290 to 310 nm) accumulated only cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers. DNA from spores exposed to full-spectrum sunlight (UV-B and UV-A radiation) accumulated single-strand breaks, double-strand breaks, and cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers, whereas DNA from spores exposed to sunlight from which the UV-B component had been removed with a filter (“UV-A sunlight”) accumulated only single-strand breaks and double-strand breaks. Apurinic-apyrimidinic sites were not detected in spore DNA under any of the irradiation conditions used. Our data indicate that there is a complex spectrum of UV photoproducts in DNA of bacterial spores exposed to solar UV irradiation in the environment. PMID:10618224

  14. Long-term variability and impact on human health of biologically active UV radiation in Moscow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanova, Ekaterina; Chubarova, Natalia

    2014-05-01

    Measurements of erythemally weighted UV irradiance (Qer) have been performed at the Meteorological Observatory of Moscow State University since 1999 with the UVB-1 YES pyranometers. These types of devices are broadband with a spectral sensitivity curve close to the action spectrum of erythema. Main uncertainties of UVB-1 YES measurements include the difference in spectral curves of the instrument and the action spectrum of erythema, as well as the deviation from the cosine law. These uncertainties were taken into account in the database of Qer measurements (Chubarova, 2008. Additional corrections of UVB-1 measurements at low ambient temperatures have been made. We analyze interannual, seasonal and diurnal Qer changes over the time period 1999-2012. In addition, the comparisons with the results of UV reconstruction model (Chubarova, 2008) are made. This model allows us to evaluate relative changes in Qer due to variations in total ozone, effective cloud amount transmission, aerosol and cloud optical thickness since 1968. It is important to note that the main reason for UV irradiance monitoring development is the strong influence of UV irradiance on the biosphere and especially on human health mainly on human skin (CIE, 1993, CIE, 2006) and eyes (Oriowo, M. et al., 2001). Based on the detailed studies we have shown the possibility of utilizing UVB-1 pyranometers for measuring the eye-damage UV radiation. Parallel measurements by the Bentham DTM-300 spectrometer and the UVB-1 YES pyranometer at the Innsbruck Medical University (Austria) have provided us the calibration factor in eye-damage units for this broadband instrument. Influence of main geophysical factors on different types of UV irradiance is estimated by means the RAF ideology (Booth, Madronich, 1994). We discuss the responses of different types of biologically active UV radiation to the impact of various atmospheric factors. The UV conditions (deficiency, optimum, excess for human) are analyzed according to

  15. Gaseous mercury emissions from unsterilized and sterilized soils: the effect of temperature and UV radiation.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyun-Deok; Holsen, Thomas M

    2009-05-01

    Mercury (Hg) emissions from the soils taken from two different sites (deciduous and coniferous forests) in the Adirondacks were measured in outdoor and laboratory experiments. Some of the soil samples were irradiated to eliminate biological activity. The result from the outdoor measurements with different soils suggests the Hg emission from the soils is partly limited by fallen leaves covering the soils which helps maintain relatively high soil moisture and limits the amount of heat and solar radiation reaching the soil surface. In laboratory experiments exposure to UV-A (365 nm) had no significant effect on the Hg emissions while the Hg emissions increased dramatically during exposure to UV-B (302 nm) light suggesting UV-B directly reduced soil-associated Hg. Overall these results indicate that for these soils biotic processes have a relatively constant and smaller influence on the Hg emission from the soil than the more variable abiotic processes.

  16. 'Averaged' Diffusion of Radiation in Spectral Lines intra Interjacent Plasma-Gas Layer

    SciTech Connect

    Demura, A. V.; Demchenko, G. V.

    2008-10-22

    The approximate model of 'averaged diffusion' for resonance radiation transfer is introduced. It allows to reduce computational efforts preserving satisfactory accuracy while modeling divertor plasmas.

  17. Nitroaromatic hydrocarbon ozonation in water. 2: Combined ozonation with hydrogen peroxide or UV radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Beltran, F.J.; Encinar, J.M.; Alonso, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    The combined ozonation of nitrobenzene and 2,6-dinitrotoluene with hydrogen peroxide and UV radiation has been studied. Effects of variables such as pH, hydroxyl radical scavengers, ozone feed rate, or hydrogen peroxide to ozone feed molar ratios have been investigated. Results are also compared to those obtained from UV radiation and single ozonation (Beltran et al., 1998). Quantum yields of nitrobenzene and 2,6-dinitrotoluene at 254 nm were found to be 7.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} and 2.2 {times} 10{sup {minus}2} mol/einstein, respectively. Removal rates of nitrobenzene through single or combined ozonation with hydrogen peroxide at concentration lower than 10{sup {minus}2} M are similar, while under the same conditions combined ozonation of 2,6-dinitrotoluene leads to higher removal rates than single ozonation. Also, the latter compound is removed faster by UV radiation alone and UV/O{sub 3} oxidation than by single ozonation. Rate constants of the reaction between the hydroxyl radical and nitrobenzene and 2,6-dinitrotoluene were found to be 2.9 {times} 10{sup 9} and 7.5 {times} 10{sup 8} M{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}, respectively. Nitrophenols and 2,6-dinitrobenzaldehyde appear to be some of the principal intermediates formed in the treatment of nitrobenzene and 2,6-dinitrotoluene, respectively, regardless of oxidation techniques applied. Apart from economic considerations UV/O{sub 3} oxidation is the technique among those studied leading to the highest removal rates.

  18. Satellite and ground measurements of solar erythemal UV radiation and ozone in Argentina.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piacentini, R.; Luccini, E.; Micheletti, M.; Quel, E.; Wolfram, E.; Pazmiño, A.; Fochesatto, J.; Crino, E.; Cede, A.; Blumthaler, M.; Herman, J.; Godin, S.; Megie, P.

    Solar erythemal UV radiation incident on Argentina f om tropical to high latituder regions has been measured with instruments placed at ground as well as with the TOMS instrument on board the NASA Earth Probe satellite. These data permit the validation of the UV index, a measure of the solar risk to UV exposure, daily forecasted by CONAE (Argentina National Commission on Space Activities) and the Argentine National Weather Service. Model calculations of this index are also presented. In addition, we show the influence of the Antarctic ozone hole passing over the continental part of the country and over the Argentinean sea and Atlantic Ocean causing the large increase of the erythemal irradiance. The ozone hole is analyzed from TOMS data corrected by the factor derived from the intercomparison of this satellite data with those obtained with southern hemisphere ground spectroradiometers. We obtained, at present, a rather comprehensive description of the amount of erythemal UV radiation and consequently of the UV index all over the country, as well as the ozone total column and profile (the latter one at Buenos Aires). It was determined through collaboration between the following institutions: GSFC/NASA in USA, Institute Pierre Simon Laplace in France, University of Innsbruck in Austria and CEILAP, IFIR, CONAE, SMN, Universities of Rosario and San Luis in Argentina. The need for detailed results in Argentina, one of the most exposed regions of the Southern Hemisphere to ozone depletion and consequently to UV detrimental effects, has been partially covered in the framework of this North - South collaboration.

  19. Influence of UV-B radiation on photosynthesis near the sea-surface

    SciTech Connect

    Cullen, J.J.; MacIntyre, H.L. )

    1990-01-09

    Middle ultraviolet radiation (UV-B) is harmful to marine phytoplankton. This has been demonstrated repeatedly in the laboratory and in the field. In a typical field experiment, photosynthesis (uptake of [sup 14]C-biocarbonate) is reduced in samples exposed to the full range of environmental radiation as compared to samples from which UV-B has been screened. The nature of this inhibition of photosynthesis is not well documented. Specifically, it is not known how much of the effect is due to reduction of photosynthetic capacity and how much is due to destruction of photosynthetic pigment or disruption of sensitive cells. Experiments were performed to help resolve unanswered questions about the effects of UV-B on photosynthesis of phytoplankton near the sea-surface. Samples from the sea-surface microlayer (SSM), upper 10cm, and greater depths were exposed to different irradiance regimes for several hours and analyzed for changes in in vivo fluorescence, chlorophyll a concentration, and photosynthesis vs irradiance. Consistent with previous studies, exposure to environmental UV-B resulted in reduced rates of photosynthesis in confined samples. Samples from the SSM were less susceptible to solar irradiance that were those from the upper 10cm. Deeper samples were the most sensitive. The principal reason for reduced photosynthesis was destruction of chlorophyll, not inhibition of photosynthesis per unit chlorophyll. These results suggest that the increased resistance of near-surface populations to UV-B might be in part due to the fact that at the time of sampling, sensitive cells have already been damaged and their photosynthetic pigment destroyed. If this is true, simple measurements of chlorophyll concentration might be useful in assessing the effects of UV-B on phytoplankton.

  20. Transcriptome responses involved in artemisinin production in Artemisia annua L. under UV-B radiation.

    PubMed

    Pan, Wei Song; Zheng, Li Ping; Tian, Hao; Li, Wan Yi; Wang, Jian Wen

    2014-11-01

    Artemisinin, an endoperoxide sesquiterpene lactone, is an effective antimalarial drug isolated from Artemisia annua L. In this study, a low dose (1.44 kJm(-2)d(-1)) of UV-B radiation (280-320 nm) for short-term (1h per day for 10 days) was applied to A. annua seedlings to stimulate artemisinin production. UV-B treatment not only induced the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), enhanced peroxidase activity and endogenous content of abscisic acid (ABA), but stimulated the biosynthesis of artemisinin in the seedlings. Here, transcriptomic changes during UV-B radiation in A. annua were detected using an Agilent GeneChip with 43,692 probe sets. In total, 358 transcripts were identified as differentially expressed under UV-B stress, of which 172 transcripts increased and 186 transcripts decreased in abundance. In terms of biological processes, gene ontology (GO) terms including primary carbohydrate and nitrogen compound metabolic processes were enriched in UV-B-repressed genes. The up-regulated genes were enriched in response to stress, ROS generation, hormone (ethylene, ABA) stimulus and cell cycle control. The expression of key enzymes such as amorpha-4,11-diene synthase (ADS) and cytochrome P450 dependent monooxygenase/hydroxylase (CYP71AV1), and related WRKY transcription factors was up-regulated significantly for artemisinin biosynthesis. This profile of global gene expression patterns during UV-B stress will be valuable for further identification of the enzymes involved in artemisinin biosynthesis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Influence of UV radiation on chlorophyll, and antioxidant enzymes of wetland plants in different types of constructed wetland.

    PubMed

    Xu, Defu; Wu, Yinjuan; Li, Yingxue; Howard, Alan; Jiang, Xiaodong; Guan, Yidong; Gao, Yongxia

    2014-09-01

    A surface- and vertical subsurface-flow-constructed wetland were designed to study the response of chlorophyll and antioxidant enzymes to elevated UV radiation in three types of wetland plants (Canna indica, Phragmites austrail, and Typha augustifolia). Results showed that (1) chlorophyll content of C. indica, P. austrail, and T. augustifolia in the constructed wetland was significantly lower where UV radiation was increased by 10 and 20 % above ambient solar level than in treatment with ambient solar UV radiation (p < 0.05). (2) The malondialdehyde (MDA) content, guaiacol peroxidase (POD), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and catalase (CAT) activities of wetland plants increased with elevated UV radiation intensity. (3) The increased rate of MDA, SOD, POD, and CAT activities of C. indica, P. australis, and T. angustifolia by elevated UV radiation of 10 % was higher in vertical subsurface-flow-constructed wetland than in surface-flow-constructed wetland. The sensitivity of MDA, SOD, POD, and CAT activities of C. indica, P. austrail, and T. augustifolia to the elevated UV radiation was lower in surface-flow-constructed wetland than in the vertical subsurface-flow-constructed wetland, which was related to a reduction in UV radiation intensity through the dissolved organic carbon and suspended matter in the water. C. indica had the highest SOD and POD activities, which implied it is more sensitive to enhanced UV radiation. Therefore, different wetland plants had different antioxidant enzymes by elevated UV radiation, which were more sensitive in vertical subsurface-flow-constructed wetland than in surface-flow-constructed wetland.

  2. Temporal variation in epidermal flavonoids due to altered solar UV radiation is moderated by the leaf position in Betula pendula.

    PubMed

    Morales, Luis O; Tegelberg, Riitta; Brosché, Mikael; Lindfors, Anders; Siipola, Sari; Aphalo, Pedro J

    2011-11-01

    The physiological mechanisms controlling plant responses to dynamic changes in ambient solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation are not fully understood: this information is important to further comprehend plant adaptation to their natural habitats. We used the fluorimeter Dualex to estimate in vivo the epidermal flavonoid contents by measuring epidermal UV absorbance (A(375) ) in Betula pendula Roth (silver birch) leaves of different ages under altered UV. Seedlings were grown in a greenhouse for 15 days without UV and transferred outdoors under three UV treatments (UV-0, UV-A and UV-A+B) created by three types of plastic film. After 7 and 13 days, Dualex measurements were taken at adaxial and abaxial epidermis of the first three leaves (L1, L2 and L3) of the seedlings. After 14 days, some of the seedlings were reciprocally swapped amongst the treatments to study the accumulation of epidermal flavonoids in the youngest unfolded leaves (L3) during leaf expansion under changing solar UV environments. A(375) of the leaves responded differently to the UV treatment depending on their position. UV-B increased the A(375) in the leaves independently of leaf position. L3 quickly adjusted A(375) in their epidermis according to the UV they received and these adjustments were affected by previous UV exposure. The initial absence of UV-A+B or UV-A, followed by exposure to UV-A+B, particularly enhanced leaf A(375) . Silver birch leaves modulate their protective pigments in response to changes in the UV environment during their expansion, and their previous UV exposure history affects the epidermal-absorbance achieved during later UV exposure. Copyright © Physiologia Plantarum 2011.

  3. [Apoptosis and necrosis of lymphocytes induced by UV-radiation in the presence of autological plasma].

    PubMed

    Artiukhov, V G; Zemchenkova, O V; Basharina, O V; Riazantsev, S V; Pashkov, M V

    2014-01-01

    The influence of UV-light (240-390 nm) in doses 151-3020 J/m2 on the nature of the death of lymphocytes cells of donor's blood (using markers of apoptotic and necrotic death of cells) and on the level of expression of the marker of apoptotic pre-preparation--CD95-receptor has been investigated. We have shown that UV-radiation increases expression of CD95-receptors which is caused mainly by de novo synthesis of the receptors. It has been revealed that during daily incubation of photo-modified lymphocytes (151 and 755 J/m2) without autological blood cell death occurs by receptor-involved apoptosis. Exposure to high doses of radiation (1510 and 3020 J/m2) causes massive necrotic death of immunocytes. The use of autologous blood plasma during incubation of photo-modified lymphocytes allows decreasing the number of both apoptotic and necrotic cells.

  4. Visible emission in Sm3+ and Tb3+ doped phosphate glass excited by UV radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zmojda, Jacek; Dorosz, Dominik; Kochanowicz, Marcin; Miluski, Piotr; Czajkowski, Karol; Ragin, Tomasz

    2013-10-01

    In the article analysis of UV absorption and visible fluorescence of Sm3+ and Tb3+ ions doped phosphate glass with molar composition: 65P2O5 + 8Al2O3 + 10BaO + 17(Na2O + MgO + ZnO) have been investigated. As a result of optical pumping fabricated glass with radiation from a deuterium lamp four luminescence bands were observed near to the wavelength of 600 nm for Sm3+ ions and 550 nm for Tb3+ ions. It was found that larger energy gap between laser and ground levels leads to the strongest emission in the visible range in terbium doped glasses than in glasses doped with samarium ions. Both fabricated glasses are characterized by the ability to selectively detect the radiation in the UV range.

  5. Skin irritation and histopathologic alterations in rats exposed to lightstick contents, UV radiation and seawater.

    PubMed

    Ivar do Sul, Juliana A; Rodrigues, Obirajara; Santos, Isaac R; Fillmann, Gilberto; Matthiensen, Alexandre

    2009-10-01

    Lightsticks are fishing gadgets that provide fluorescent lighting when two organic solutions are mixed. In NE Brazil, low-income coastal residents ignore their conventional use and collect lightsticks stranded on beaches. The lightstick solution is then used for various purposes, including direct human skin exposure. We assessed the reactions and possible cell damages on the skin of Wistar rats. Animals were exposed to lightstick contents, UV radiation and/or seawater. Lightstick exposure led to erythemas, oedemas and vesicles. Histopathologic alterations included proliferation of the epidermis and inflammatory infiltrates. In spite of the short time of experimentation (4 days), the rats exposed to the lightstick content alone and together with UV radiation and/or seawater provided evidence of irritation/alteration reactions that may evolve into skin cancer. Our results demonstrated a few of the potential problems associated with lightstick dumping into the ocean and highlight the need for further investigations about this new type of marine pollutant.

  6. UV radiation and CH4 gas detection with a single ZnO:Pd nanowire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupan, O.; Adelung, R.; Postica, V.; Ababii, N.; Chow, L.; Viana, B.; Pauporté, T.

    2017-02-01

    There is an increasing demand for sensors to monitor environmental levels of ultraviolet (UV) radiation and pollutant gases. In this work, an individual nanowire of Pd modified ZnO nanowire (ZnO:Pd NW) was integrated in a nanosensor device for efficient and fast detection of UV light and CH4 gas at room temperature. Crystalline ZnO:Pd nanowire/nanorod arrays were synthesized onto fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO) substrates by electrochemical deposition (ECD) at relative low-temperatures (90 °C) with different concentrations of PdCl2 in electrolyte solution and investigated by SEM and EDX. Nanodevices were fabricated using dual beam focused electron/ion beam (FIB/SEM) system and showed improved UV radiation response compared to pristine ZnO NW, reported previously by our group. The UV response was increased by one order in magnitude (≈ 11) for ZnO:Pd NW. Gas sensing measurements demonstrated a higher gas response and rapidity to methane (CH4 gas, 100 ppm) at room temperature, showing promising results for multifunctional applications. Also, due to miniature size and ultra-low power consumption of these sensors, it is possible to integrate them into portable devices easily, such as smartphones, digital clock, flame detection, missile lunching and other smart devices.

  7. Toxic effects of combined effects of anthracene and UV radiation on Brachionus plicatilis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Ceng; Zhang, Xinxin; Xu, Ningning; Tang, Xuexi

    2017-05-01

    Anthracene is a typical polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, with photo activity, can absorb ultraviolet light a series of chemical reactions, aquatic organisms in the ecosystem has a potential light induced toxicity. In this paper, the effects of anthracene and UV radiation on the light-induced toxicity of Brachionus plicatilis were studied. The main methods and experimental results were as follows: (1) The semi-lethal concentration of anthracene in UV light was much lower than that in normal light, The rotifers have significant light-induced acute toxicity. (2) Under UV irradiation, anthracene could induce the increase of ROS and MDA content in B. plicatilis, and the activity of antioxidant enzymes in B. plicatilis significantly changed, Where SOD, GPx activity was induced within 24 hours of the beginning of the experiment. And the content of GPX and CAT was inhibited after 48 hours. Therefore, the anthracite stress induced by UV radiation could more strongly interfere with the ant oxidative metabolism of B. plicatilis, and more seriously cause oxidative damage, significant light-induced toxicity.

  8. A Radiative Transfer Case Study for 3-d cloud effects in the UV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meerkötter, Ralf; Degünther, Markus

    Satellite UV mapping is usually based on the independent pixel approximation (IPA) which neglects horizontal photon transport between adjacent columns. Horizontal inhomogeneity of cloud fields therefore causes uncertainties in the derived UV radiation fields. While these effects are small for large pixel satellites, the broken-cloud errors increase as the pixel size decreases. By comparing results of 1-d and 3-d UV radiative transfer calculations for three selected cloud scenes that cover a rather broad range of cloud inhomogeneity the main 3-d cloud effects on the atmospheric UV transmission are identified and quantified in their order of magnitude. With respect to the different spatial resolutions of satellite instruments it is further shown how 3-d cloud effects average out with increasing spatial scale. It turns out that locally the IPA cause maximum uncertainties up to ±100% for a spatial resolution of about 1 × 1 km² (e.g., AVHRR), they are reduced to ±10% for a resolution of about 15 × 15 km² and below 5% for a resolution greater than 30 km (e.g., TOMS).

  9. Effect of UV radiation on the expulsion of Symbiodinium from the coral Pocillopora damicornis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jie; Huang, Hui; Beardall, John; Gao, Kunshan

    2017-01-01

    The variation in density of the symbiotic dinoflagellate Symbiodinum in coral is a basic indicator of coral bleaching, i.e. loss of the symbiotic algae or their photosynthetic pigments. However, in the field corals constantly release their symbiotic algae to surrounding water. To explore the underlying mechanism, the rate of expulsion of zooxanthellae from the coral Pocillopora damicornis was studied over a three-day period under ultraviolet radiation (UVR, 280-400nm) stress. The results showed that the algal expulsion rate appeared 10-20% higher under exposure to UV-A (320-395nm) or UV-B (295-320nm), though the differences were not statistically significant. When corals were exposed to UV-A and UV-B radiation, the maximum expulsion of zooxanthellae occurred at noon (10:00-13:00), and this timing was 1h earlier than in the control without UVR. UVR stress led to obvious decreases in the concentrations of chl a and carotenoids in the coral nubbins after a three-day exposure. Therefore, our results suggested that although the UVR effect on algal expulsion rate was a chronic stress and was not significant within a time frame of only three days, the reduction in chl a and carotenoids may potentially enhance the possibility of coral bleaching over a longer period. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Soot and Radiation Measurements in Microgravity Jet Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jerry C.

    1996-01-01

    The subject of soot formation and radiation heat transfer in microgravity jet diffusion flames is important not only for the understanding of fundamental transport processes involved but also for providing findings relevant to spacecraft fire safety and soot emissions and radiant heat loads of combustors used in air-breathing propulsion systems. Our objectives are to measure and model soot volume fraction, temperature, and radiative heat fluxes in microgravity jet diffusion flames. For this four-year project, we have successfully completed three tasks, which have resulted in new research methodologies and original results. First is the implementation of a thermophoretic soot sampling technique for measuring particle size and aggregate morphology in drop-tower and other reduced gravity experiments. In those laminar flames studied, we found that microgravity soot aggregates typically consist of more primary particles and primary particles are larger in size than those under normal gravity. Comparisons based on data obtained from limited samples show that the soot aggregate's fractal dimension varies within +/- 20% of its typical value of 1.75, with no clear trends between normal and reduced gravity conditions. Second is the development and implementation of a new imaging absorption technique. By properly expanding and spatially-filtering the laser beam to image the flame absorption on a CCD camera and applying numerical smoothing procedures, this technique is capable of measuring instantaneous full-field soot volume fractions. Results from this technique have shown the significant differences in local soot volume fraction, smoking point, and flame shape between normal and reduced gravity flames. We observed that some laminar flames become open-tipped and smoking under microgravity. The third task we completed is the development of a computer program which integrates and couples flame structure, soot formation, and flame radiation analyses together. We found good

  11. Vacuum-UV radiation at 185 nm in water treatment--a review.

    PubMed

    Zoschke, Kristin; Börnick, Hilmar; Worch, Eckhard

    2014-04-01

    The vacuum-UV radiation of water results in the in situ generation of hydroxyl radicals. Low-pressure mercury vapor lamps which emit at 185 nm are potential sources of VUV radiation. The scope of this article is to give an overview of the application of VUV radiation at 185 nm for water treatment including the transformation of inorganic and organic water constituents, and the disinfection efficiency. Another focus is on the generation of ozone by VUV radiation from oxygen or air and the application of the produced ozone in combination with VUV irradiation of water in the VUV/O3 process. The advantages and limitation of the VUV process at 185 nm as well as possible applications in water treatment are outlined. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Backscattered UV radiation - Effects of multiple scattering and the lower boundary of the atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aruga, T.; Heath, D. F.

    1982-01-01

    A method is proposed for the calculation of a multiple-scattering correction to the single-scattering calculation of the radiance of the terrestrial atmosphere resulting from backscattered ultraviolet solar radiation in the spectral region used in the ozone profile inversion. This method uses jointly the usual analytical and Monte Carlo methods. Effects of the lower boundary of the atmosphere, cloud tops, and ground surface are investigated both qualitatively and quantitatively. The ratio of multiple to single scattering is determined, and its importance in ozone profile inversion of backscattered UV solar radiation from the terrestrial atmosphere is evaluated. The polarization of the atmospheric radiance is treated briefly.

  13. The reduction of Chlorella vulgaris concentrations through UV-C radiation treatments: A nature-based solution (NBS).

    PubMed

    Chen, Erika S; Bridgeman, Thomas B

    2017-03-25

    Algal blooms have become a pressing issue in inland freshwater systems on local and global scales. A plausible approach to reducing algae without the use of chemical/biological agents is through the use of UV-C radiation from lamps potentially powered by in situ solar panels to eliminate algae. Yet, the quantitative scientific base has not been established. Our objective is to conduct a controlled experiment to quantify the effectiveness of UV-C radiation on the reduction of Chlorella vulgaris, a common algal species in the Great Lakes region. A full factorial design of three intensities of UV-C radiation (0, 15, and 30W) and three sources of C. vulgaris was constructed to test the corresponding hypotheses. Empirical models were constructed to predict the reductions. UV-C radiation effectively reduced the algal concentration with clear differences by radiation level and source of algal water. Algal concentration decreased exponentially over time, with distinct decreasing trends among the radiation intensities and the samples. With 15W UV-C radiation, algal concentration of three samples were reduced to 75.3%, 51.5%, and 70.0% of the initial level within an hour, respectively. We also found a clear density-dependent reduction rate by UV radiation. Using this information, more efficient treatment systems could be constructed and implemented for cleaning algae-contaminated water.

  14. UV-VUV synchrotron radiation spectroscopy of NiWO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzmin, A.; Pankratov, V.; Kalinko, A.; Kotlov, A.; Shirmane, L.; Popov, A. I.

    2016-07-01

    Photoluminescence and excitation spectra of microcrystalline and nanocrystalline nickel tungstate (NiWO4) were measured using UV-VUV synchrotron radiation source. The origin of the bands is interpreted using comparative analysis with isostructural ZnWO4 tungstate and based on the results of recent first-principles band structure calculations. The influence of the local atomic structure relaxation and of Ni2+ intra-ion d-d transitions on the photoluminescence band intensity are discussed.

  15. Calicivirus Inactivation by Nonionizing (253.7-Nanometer-Wavelength [UV]) and Ionizing (Gamma) Radiation

    PubMed Central

    de Roda Husman, Ana Maria; Bijkerk, Paul; Lodder, Willemijn; van den Berg, Harold; Pribil, Walter; Cabaj, Alexander; Gehringer, Peter; Sommer, Regina; Duizer, Erwin

    2004-01-01

    Noroviruses (previously Norwalk-like viruses) are the most common viral agents associated with food- and waterborne outbreaks of gastroenteritis. In the absence of culture methods for noroviruses, animal caliciviruses were used as model viruses to study inactivation by nonionizing (253.7-nm-wavelength [UV]) and ionizing (gamma) radiation. Here, we studied the respiratory feline calicivirus (FeCV) and the presumed enteric canine calicivirus (CaCV) and compared them with the well-studied bacteriophage MS2. When UV irradiation was used, a 3-log10 reduction was observed at a fluence of 120 J/m2 in the FeCV suspension and at a fluence of 200 J/m2 for CaCV; for the more resistant phage MS2 there was a 3-log10 reduction at a fluence of 650 J/m2. Few or no differences were observed between levels of UV inactivation in high- and low-protein-content virus stocks. In contrast, ionizing radiation could readily inactivate MS2 in water, and there was a 3-log10 reduction at a dose of 100 Gy, although this did not occur when the phage was diluted in high-protein-content stocks of CaCV or FeCV. The low-protein-content stocks showed 3-log10 reductions at a dose of 500 Gy for FeCV and at a dose of 300 for CaCV. The inactivation rates for both caliciviruses with ionizing and nonionizing radiation were comparable but different from the inactivation rates for MS2. Although most FeCV and CaCV characteristics, such as overall particle and genome size and structure, are similar, the capsid sequences differ significantly, making it difficult to predict human norovirus inactivation. Adequate management of UV and gamma radiation processes for virus inactivation should limit public health risks. PMID:15345386

  16. Newton-Krylov methods applied to nonequilibrium radiation diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Knoll, D.A.; Rider, W.J.; Olsen, G.L.

    1998-03-10

    The authors present results of applying a matrix-free Newton-Krylov method to a nonequilibrium radiation diffusion problem. Here, there is no use of operator splitting, and Newton`s method is used to convert the nonlinearities within a time step. Since the nonlinear residual is formed, it is used to monitor convergence. It is demonstrated that a simple Picard-based linearization produces a sufficient preconditioning matrix for the Krylov method, thus elevating the need to form or store a Jacobian matrix for Newton`s method. They discuss the possibility that the Newton-Krylov approach may allow larger time steps, without loss of accuracy, as compared to an operator split approach where nonlinearities are not converged within a time step.

  17. Beneficial effects of solar UV-B radiation on soybean yield mediated by reduced insect herbivory under field conditions.

    PubMed

    Mazza, Carlos A; Giménez, Patricia I; Kantolic, Adriana G; Ballaré, Carlos L

    2013-03-01

    Ultraviolet-B radiation (UV-B: 280-315 nm) has damaging effects on cellular components and macromolecules. In plants, natural levels of UV-B can reduce leaf area expansion and growth, which can lead to reduced productivity and yield. UV-B can also have important effects on herbivorous insects. Owing to the successful implementation of the Montreal Protocol, current models predict that clear-sky levels of UV-B radiation will decline during this century in response to ozone recovery. However, because of climate change and changes in land use practices, future trends in UV doses are difficult to predict. In the experiments reported here, we used an exclusion approach to study the effects of solar UV-B radiation on soybean crops, which are extensively grown in many areas of the world that may be affected by future variations in UV-B radiation. In a first experiment, performed under normal management practices (which included chemical pest control), we found that natural levels of UV-B radiation reduced soybean yield. In a second experiment, where no pesticides were applied, we found that solar UV-B significantly reduced insect herbivory and, surprisingly, caused a concomitant increase in crop yield. Our data support the idea that UV-B effects on agroecosystems are the result of complex interactions involving multiple trophic levels. A better understanding of the mechanisms that mediate the anti-herbivore effect of UV-B radiation may be used to design crop varieties with improved adaptation to the cropping systems that are likely to prevail in the coming decades in response to agricultural intensification.

  18. In vitro model of vitamin D synthesis by UV radiation in an Australian urban environment.

    PubMed

    McKinley, Alex; Janda, Monika; Auster, Josephine; Kimlin, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Vitamin D, an important constituent of human health, is produced through the exposure of human skin to short wave (280-315 nm) ultraviolet radiation (UV). We aimed to establish whether an urbanized environment with tall buildings in close proximity (an "urban canyon") significantly reduced the capacity of sunlight to synthesize vitamin D, when compared with a typical suburban area (∼2.5 km away); and to investigate the association of UV and vitamin D production with pollution, temperature, and humidity. Measurements of ambient UV (295-400 nm) (using a portable photometer/radiometer and detector) and synthesized vitamin D (from an in vitro model) were taken regularly at urban and control sites over 3 months in Brisbane, Australia. During a typical 20 min measurement, urban and control sites received 0.26 and 1.03 W m(-2) mean total UV respectively (P < 0.001), and produced 0.12 and 0.53 μg mL(-1) mean vitamin D (P < 0.001). Pollution, temperature and humidity were not associated with UV or vitamin D production. This demonstrates a large difference in vitamin D synthesis between an urban canyon and a nearby control site. Although the results cannot be directly applied to humans, they emphasize the need for further study of human vitamin D production in urban environments.

  19. Potential Repair of Escherichia coli DNA following Exposure to UV Radiation from Both Medium- and Low-Pressure UV Sources Used in Drinking Water Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Zimmer, J. L.; Slawson, R. M.

    2002-01-01

    The increased use of UV radiation as a drinking water treatment technology has instigated studies of the repair potential of microorganisms following treatment. This study challenged the repair potential of an optimally grown nonpathogenic laboratory strain of Escherichia coli after UV radiation from low- and medium-pressure lamps. Samples were irradiated with doses of 5, 8, and 10 mJ/cm2 from a low-pressure lamp and 3, 5, 8, and 10 mJ/cm2 from a medium-pressure UV lamp housed in a bench-scale collimated beam apparatus. Following irradiation, samples were incubated at 37°C under photoreactivating light or in the dark. Sample aliquots were analyzed for up to 4 h following incubation using a standard plate count. Results of this study showed that E. coli underwent photorepair following exposure to the low-pressure UV source, but no repair was detectable following exposure to the medium-pressure UV source at the initial doses examined. Minimal repair was eventually observed upon medium-pressure UV lamp exposure when doses were lowered to 3 mJ/cm2. This study clearly indicates differences in repair potential under laboratory conditions between irradiation from low-pressure and medium-pressure UV sources of the type used in water treatment. PMID:12089006

  20. Arctic microorganisms respond more to elevated UV-B radiation than CO2.

    PubMed

    Johnson, David; Campbell, Colin D; Lee, John A; Callaghan, Terry V; Gwynn-Jones, Dylan

    2002-03-07

    Surface ultraviolet-B radiation and atmospheric CO2 concentrations have increased as a result of ozone depletion and burning of fossil fuels. The effects are likely to be most apparent in polar regions where ozone holes have developed and ecosystems are particularly sensitive to disturbance. Polar plant communities are dependent on nutrient cycling by soil microorganisms, which represent a significant and highly labile portion of soil carbon (C) and nitrogen (N). It was thought that the soil microbial biomass was unlikely to be affected by exposure of their associated plant communities to increased UV-B. In contrast, increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations were thought to have a strong effect as a result of greater below-ground C allocation. In addition, there is a growing belief that ozone depletion is of only minor environmental concern because the impacts of UV-B radiation on plant communities are often very subtle. Here we show that 5 years of exposure of a subarctic heath to enhanced UV-B radiation both alone and in combination with elevated CO2 resulted in significant changes in the C:N ratio and in the bacterial community structure of the soil microbial biomass.

  1. [Dependence of vitamin C content in animal tissues on the dose of UV radiation].

    PubMed

    Dev'iatka, D G; Iatsina, O V

    1977-01-01

    The content of vitamin C in tissues was determined for animals synthetizing (rabbits) and nonsynthetizing (guinea pigs) it with UV radiation. Significant doses of radiation cause a considerable decrease in the content of vitamin C in blood of both animal species. In the adrenal, liver, spleen, lung, small intestine, kidney, brain tissues and vitamin C content decreases in animals nonsynthetizing the vitamin and, vice versa, it rises in the vitamin-synthetizing animals. After irradiation with small doses the vitamin C content in blood and tissues of animals nonsynthetizing it lowers but not below the normal level. Additional administration of 100 mg of ascorbic acid (under conditions of sufficient supply of vitamin C with food) does not prevent a decrease in the content of vitamin C in blood of the animals irradiated with significant UV doses. An opinion is advanced as to necessity of vitamin C rationing taking into account "the UV climate" of the area and dose of radiation from the artifical sources.

  2. Kolmogorov Complexity Spectrum for Use in Analysis of Uv-B Radiation Time Series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihailović, Dragutin T.; Malinović-Milićević, Slavica; Arsenić, Ilija; Drešković, Nusret; Bukosa, Beata

    2013-10-01

    In this paper, we have used the Kolmogorov complexity and sample entropy measures to estimate the complexity of the UV-B radiation time series in the Vojvodina region (Serbia) for the period 1990-2007. We have defined the Kolmogorov complexity spectrum and have introduced the Kolmogorov complexity spectrum highest value (KCH). We have established the UV-B radiation time series on the basis of their daily sum (dose) for seven representative places in this region using: (i) measured data, (ii) data calculated via a derived empirical formula and (iii) data obtained by a parametric UV radiation model. We have calculated the Kolmogorov complexity (KC) based on the Lempel-Ziv algorithm (LZA), KCH and sample entropy (SE) values for each time series. We have divided the period 1990-2007 into two