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Sample records for diffusive mass transfer

  1. Diffusive mass transfer by nonequilibrium fluctuations: Fick's law revisited.

    PubMed

    Brogioli, D; Vailati, A

    2001-01-01

    Recent experimental and theoretical works have shown that giant fluctuations are present during diffusion in liquid systems. We use linearized fluctuating hydrodynamics to calculate the net mass transfer due to these nonequilibrium fluctuations. Remarkably, the mass flow turns out to coincide with the usual Fick's one. The renormalization of the hydrodynamic equations allows us to quantify the gravitational modifications of the diffusion coefficient induced by the gravitational stabilization of long wavelength fluctuations.

  2. SVE design: Mass transfer limitation due to molecular diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Y.J.; Gates, T.M.; Edwards, S.

    1999-09-01

    Vaporization and soil adsorption are the two mass transfer mechanisms that control contaminant recovery rates for soil vapor extraction (SVE) systems. At most soil remediation sites, contaminants are distributed among three phases, namely, soil particles, pore water, and soil vapor. Contaminant mass transfer from adsorption sites into a convective vapor stream involves desorption, diffusion through pore water, and vaporization into soil vapor. An SVE design model is proposed to describe this three-phase mass transfer process and assist the design and evaluation of SVE systems. The model contains analytical solutions developed to estimate contaminant concentrations in the vapor phase and predict contaminant removal rates. Monitoring data from two full-scale SVE systems were used for model development and calibration. The results suggest that contaminant diffusion through the pore water is the rate-limiting step and leads to remediation inefficiency of an SVE system. Mass Transfer retardation from molecular diffusion in water is likely the major contributing component to the venting efficiency coefficient of Staudinger et al.

  3. Mass transfer of SCWO processes: Molecular diffusion and mass transfer coefficients of inorganic nitrate species in sub- and supercritical water

    SciTech Connect

    Goemans, M.G.E.; Gloyna, E.F.; Buelow, S.J.

    1996-04-01

    Molecular diffusion coefficients of lithium-, sodium-, potassium-, cesium-, calcium-, and strontium nitrate in subcritical water were determined by analysis of Taylor dispersion profiles. Pressures ranged from 300 to 500 bar at temperatures ranging from 25{degrees}C to 300{degrees}C. The reported diffusion values were determined at infinite dilution. Molecular diffusion coefficients were 10 to 20 times faster in near-critical subcritical water than in water at ambient temperature and pressure (ATP). These findings implied that the diffusion rates were more liquid like than they were gas like, hence experimental results were correlated with diffusion models for liquids. The subcritical diffusion data presented in this work, and supercritical diffusion results published elsewhere were correlated with hydrodynamic diffusion equations. Both the Wilke-Chang correlation and the Stokes-Einstein equation yielded predictions within 10% of the experimental results if the structure of the diffusing species could be estimated. The effect of the increased diffusion rates on mass transfer rates in supercritical water oxidation applications was quantified, with emphasis on heterogeneous oxidation processes. This study and results published elsewhere showed that diffusion limited conditions are much more likely to be encountered in SCWO processes than commonly acknowledged.

  4. Advective-diffusive mass transfer in fractured porous media with variable rock matrix block size.

    PubMed

    Sharifi Haddad, Amin; Hassanzadeh, Hassan; Abedi, Jalal

    2012-05-15

    Traditional dual porosity models do not take into account the effect of matrix block size distribution on the mass transfer between matrix and fracture. In this study, we introduce the matrix block size distributions into an advective-diffusive solute transport model of a divergent radial system to evaluate the mass transfer shape factor, which is considered as a first-order exchange coefficient between the fracture and matrix. The results obtained lead to a better understanding of the advective-diffusive mass transport in fractured porous media by identifying two early and late time periods of mass transfer. Results show that fractured rock matrix block size distribution has a great impact on mass transfer during early time period. In addition, two dimensionless shape factors are obtained for the late time, which depend on the injection flow rate and the distance of the rock matrix from the injection point.

  5. Mass transfer in SCW extraction molecular diffusion and mass transfer coefficients of ketones and alkenes in sub- and supercritical water

    SciTech Connect

    Goemans, M.G.E.; Gloyna, E.F.

    1996-10-01

    The potential of sub- and supercritical water as extraction solvents has been demonstrated for the (reactive) extraction of coals, used car tires, organic species from residual aqueous solutions, and class selective extraction of organic pollutants with different polarities from solids. In addition, the potential of extraction of coal with supercritical aqueous solutions has been studied. However, physical transport in water at elevated temperature and pressures- and their impact on heterogenous reactions and (reactive) extraction -are not adequately understood. This situation is largely due to the limited data that is available for diffusion in high temperature, high pressure water mixture. Only the molecular diffusion of Iodine ions and hydroquinone in near-critical subcritical water and the self diffusion of coefficient of compressed supercritical water have been reported. In this paper, we present molecular diffusion coefficients of benzophenone, acetone, naphthalene, and anthracene in water at infinite dilution. Pressures ranged from 250 to 500 bar at temperatures ranging from 50{degrees}C to 500{degrees}C resulting in water densities ranging from 1000 to 150 kg/m{sup 3}. Diffusion coefficients were determined by the Taylor-Aris dispersion technique. The effects of increased diffusion on the mass transfer coefficients for emulsions and packed beds were quantified. Molecular division coefficients were 10 to 20 times faster in supercritical water than in water at ambient conditions. Experimental results were correlated with hydrodynamic and kinetic theory. This study and results to be published elsewhere show that diffusion-limited conditions are much more likely to be encountered in supercritical water than is commonly acknowledged.

  6. Effect of bubble-induced surface turbulence on gas-liquid mass transfer in diffused aeration systems.

    PubMed

    Monteith, H D; Bell, J P; Parker, W J; Melcer, H; Harvey, R T

    2005-01-01

    Models that predict volatilization of organic compounds from wastewater treatment basins may underestimate emission rates if the surfaces are considered as quiescent. In reality, the water surface may be agitated by subsurface aeration, increasing mass transfer across the tank surface air-water interface. This study investigated the effect of turbulence, induced by diffused bubble aeration, on mass transfer at the water surface of a pilot aeration basin. The mass transfer of ammonia from an enclosed headspace over the basin to acidified water was measured when different diffuser types and airflow rates were applied. Oxygen-transfer tests were conducted immediately following each ammonia-transfer test. Increasing airflow rates through fine- and coarse-bubble diffusers had a significant effect on the ammonia mass-transfer rate. Experimental mass-transfer parameters (K(L)a's) for surface volatilization derived with aeration present were up to 48% higher than the K(L)a values for quiescent conditions over the range of conditions tested. No effect of diffuser type on ammonia transfer could be determined. The study results infer an effect on oxygen transfer into the water at the surface and potential transfer of volatile organic compounds, if present, from the water. The results of the ammonia mass-transfer experiments suggest that adjustments to the existing mass transfer correlations for surface volatilization from aeration basins may be in order. Such adjustments will have the greatest effect on predictions for the less volatile compounds, under conditions of low airflow rates.

  7. Mass transfer in mesoporous materials: the benefit of microscopic diffusion measurement.

    PubMed

    Kärger, Jörg; Valiullin, Rustem

    2013-05-01

    We introduce the various options of experimentally observing mass transfer in mesoporous materials. It shall be demonstrated that the exploration of the underlying mechanisms is excessively complicated by the complexity of the phenomena contributing to molecular transport in such systems and their mutual interdependence. Microscopic diffusion measurement by the pulsed field gradient (PFG) technique of NMR offers the unique option to measure both the relative amount of molecules adsorbed and the probability distribution of their displacements over space scales relevant to fundamental adsorption science just as for technological application. These advantages are shown to have cared for a recent breakthrough in our understanding. The examples presented include the measurement of diffusion in purely mesoporous materials and the rationalization of the complex concentration patterns revealed by such studies on the basis of suitably chosen micro-kinetic models. As an interesting feature, transition into the supercritical state is shown to become directly observable by monitoring a jump in the diffusivities during temperature enhancement, occurring at temperatures notably below the bulk critical temperature. PFG NMR studies with hierarchical materials are shown to permit selective diffusion measurement with each of the involved subspaces, in parallel with the measurement of the overall diffusivity as the key parameter for the technological exploitation of such materials. We refer to the occurrence of diffusion hysteresis as a novel phenomenon, found to accompany phase transitions quite in general. Though further complicating the measuring procedure and the correlation between experimental observation and the underlying mechanisms, diffusion hysteresis is doubtlessly among the new options provided by diffusion studies for gaining deeper insight into the structure and dynamics of complex porous systems.

  8. Single-drop reactive extraction/extractive reaction with forced convective diffusion and interphase mass transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinman, Leonid S.; Red, X. B., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    An algorithm has been developed for time-dependent forced convective diffusion-reaction having convection by a recirculating flow field within the drop that is hydrodynamically coupled at the interface with a convective external flow field that at infinity becomes a uniform free-streaming flow. The concentration field inside the droplet is likewise coupled with that outside by boundary conditions at the interface. A chemical reaction can take place either inside or outside the droplet, or reactions can take place in both phases. The algorithm has been implemented, and for comparison results are shown here for the case of no reaction in either phase and for the case of an external first order reaction, both for unsteady behavior. For pure interphase mass transfer, concentration isocontours, local and average Sherwood numbers, and average droplet concentrations have been obtained as a function of the physical properties and external flow field. For mass transfer enhanced by an external reaction, in addition to the above forms of results, we present the enhancement factor, with the results now also depending upon the (dimensionless) rate of reaction.

  9. Single-drop reactive extraction/extractive reaction with forced convective diffusion and interphase mass transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinman, Leonid S.; Reed, X. B., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    An algorithm has been developed for the forced convective diffusion-reaction problem for convection inside and outside a droplet by a recirculating flow field hydrodynamically coupled at the droplet interface with an external flow field that at infinity becomes a uniform streaming flow. The concentration field inside the droplet is likewise coupled with that outside by boundary conditions at the interface. A chemical reaction can take place either inside or outside the droplet or reactions can take place in both phases. The algorithm has been implemented and results are shown here for the case of no reaction and for the case of an external first order reaction, both for unsteady behavior. For pure interphase mass transfer, concentration isocontours, local and average Sherwood numbers, and average droplet concentrations have been obtained as a function of the physical properties and external flow field. For mass transfer enhanced by an external reaction, in addition to the above forms of results, we present the enhancement factor, with the results now also depending upon the (dimensionless) rate of reaction.

  10. Co-transport of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by motile microorganisms leads to enhanced mass transfer under diffusive conditions.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Dorothea; Jakobsen, Hans H; Winding, Anne; Mayer, Philipp

    2014-04-15

    The environmental chemodynamics of hydrophobic organic chemicals (HOCs) are often rate-limited by diffusion in stagnant boundary layers. This study investigated whether motile microorganisms can act as microbial carriers that enhance mass transfer of HOCs through diffusive boundary layers. A new experimental system was developed that allows (1) generation of concentration gradients of HOCs under the microscope, (2) exposure and direct observation of microorganisms in such gradients, and (3) quantification of HOC mass transfer. Silicone O-rings were integrated into a Dunn chemotaxis chamber to serve as sink and source for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). This resulted in stable concentration gradients in water (>24 h). Adding the model organism Tetrahymena pyriformis to the experimental system enhanced PAH mass transfer up to hundred-fold (benzo[a]pyrene). Increasing mass transfer enhancement with hydrophobicity indicated PAH co-transport with the motile organisms. Fluorescence microscopy confirmed such transport. The effective diffusivity of T. pyriformis, determined by video imaging microscopy, was found to exceed molecular diffusivities of the PAHs up to four-fold. Cell-bound PAH fractions were determined to range from 28% (naphthalene) to 92% (pyrene). Motile microorganisms can therefore function as effective carriers for HOCs under diffusive conditions and might significantly enhance mobility and availability of HOCs. PMID:24625194

  11. Co-transport of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by motile microorganisms leads to enhanced mass transfer under diffusive conditions.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Dorothea; Jakobsen, Hans H; Winding, Anne; Mayer, Philipp

    2014-04-15

    The environmental chemodynamics of hydrophobic organic chemicals (HOCs) are often rate-limited by diffusion in stagnant boundary layers. This study investigated whether motile microorganisms can act as microbial carriers that enhance mass transfer of HOCs through diffusive boundary layers. A new experimental system was developed that allows (1) generation of concentration gradients of HOCs under the microscope, (2) exposure and direct observation of microorganisms in such gradients, and (3) quantification of HOC mass transfer. Silicone O-rings were integrated into a Dunn chemotaxis chamber to serve as sink and source for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). This resulted in stable concentration gradients in water (>24 h). Adding the model organism Tetrahymena pyriformis to the experimental system enhanced PAH mass transfer up to hundred-fold (benzo[a]pyrene). Increasing mass transfer enhancement with hydrophobicity indicated PAH co-transport with the motile organisms. Fluorescence microscopy confirmed such transport. The effective diffusivity of T. pyriformis, determined by video imaging microscopy, was found to exceed molecular diffusivities of the PAHs up to four-fold. Cell-bound PAH fractions were determined to range from 28% (naphthalene) to 92% (pyrene). Motile microorganisms can therefore function as effective carriers for HOCs under diffusive conditions and might significantly enhance mobility and availability of HOCs.

  12. A diffusion-kinetic model for pulverized-coal combustion and heat-and-mass transfer in a gas stream

    SciTech Connect

    E.A. Boiko; S.V. Pachkovskii

    2008-12-15

    A diffusion-kinetic model for pulverized-coal combustion and heat-and-mass transfer in a gas stream is proposed, and the results of numerical simulation of the burnout dynamics of Kansk-Achinsk coals in the pulverized state at different treatment conditions and different model parameters are presented. The mathematical model describes the dynamics of thermochemical conversion of solid organic fuels with allowance for complex physicochemical phenomena of heat-and-mass exchange between coal particles and the gaseous environment.

  13. A new approach to the correlation of boundary layer mass transfer rates with thermal diffusion and/or variable properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, R.; Rosner, D. E.

    1979-01-01

    A rational approach to the correlation of boundary layer mass transport rates, applicable to many commonly encountered laminar flow conditions with thermal diffusion and/or variable properties, is outlined. The correlation scheme builds upon already available constant property blowing/suction solutions by introducing appropriate correction factors to account for the additional ('pseudo' blowing and source) effects identified with variable properties and thermal diffusion. Applications of the scheme to the particular laminar boundary layer mass transfer problems considered herein (alkali and transition metal compound vapor transport) indicates satisfactory accuracy up to effective blowing factors equivalent to about one third of the 'blow off' value. As a useful by-product of the variable property correlation, we extend the heat-mass transfer analogy, for a wide range of Lewis numbers, to include variable property effects.

  14. Computational characterization of diffusive mass transfer in porous solid oxide fuel cell components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, George J.

    Diffusive mass transport within porous SOFC components is explored using two modeling approaches that can better inform the SOFC electrode design process. These approaches include performance metrics for electrode cross-sectional design and a fractal approach for modeling mass transport within the pore structure of the electrode reaction zone. The performance metrics presented are based on existing analytical models for transport within SOFC electrodes. These metrics include a correction factor for button-cell partial pressure predictions and two forms of dimensionless reactant depletion current density. The performance impacts of multi-dimensional transport phenomena are addressed through the development of design maps that capture the trade-offs inherent in the reduction of mass transport losses within SOFC electrode cross-sections. As a complement to these bulk electrode models, a fractal model is presented for modeling diffusion within the electrochemically active region of an SOFC electrode. The porous electrode is separated into bulk and reaction zone regions, with the bulk electrode modeled in one-dimension based on the dusty-gas formalism. The reaction zone is modeled in detail with a two-dimensional finite element model using a regular Koch pore cross-section as a fractal template for the pore structure. Drawing on concepts from the analysis of porous catalysts, this model leads to a straightforward means of assessing the performance impacts of reaction zone microstructure. Together, the modeling approaches presented provide key insights into the impacts of bulk and microstructural geometry on the performance of porous SOFC components.

  15. Mathematical Model of the Processes of Heat and Mass Transfer and Diffusion of the Magnetic Field in an Induction Furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perminov, A. V.; Nikulin, I. L.

    2016-03-01

    We propose a mathematical model describing the motion of a metal melt in a variable inhomogeneous magnetic field of a short solenoid. In formulating the problem, we made estimates and showed the possibility of splitting the complete magnetohydrodynamical problem into two subproblems: a magnetic field diffusion problem where the distributions of the external and induced magnetic fields and currents are determined, and a heat and mass transfer problem with known distributions of volume sources of heat and forces. The dimensionless form of the heat and mass transfer equation was obtained with the use of averaging and multiscale methods, which permitted writing and solving separately the equations for averaged flows and temperature fields and their oscillations. For the heat and mass transfer problem, the boundary conditions for a real technological facility are discussed. The dimensionless form of the magnetic field diffusion equation is presented, and the experimental computational procedure and results of the numerical simulation of the magnetic field structure in the melt for various magnetic Reynolds numbers are described. The extreme dependence of heat release on the magnetic Reynolds number has been interpreted.

  16. Multi-Rate Mass Transfer (MRMT) models for general diffusive porosity structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babey, Tristan; de Dreuzy, Jean-Raynald; Casenave, Céline

    2015-02-01

    We determine the relevance of Multi-Rate Mass Tansfer (MRMT) models (Haggerty and Gorelick, 1995) to general diffusive porosity structures. To this end, we introduce Structured INteracting Continua (SINC) models as the combination of a finite number of diffusion-dominated interconnected immobile zones exchanging with an advection-dominated mobile domain. It directly extends Multiple INteracting Continua framework (Pruess and Narasimhan, 1985) by introducing a structure in the immobile domain, coming for example from the dead-ends of fracture clusters or poorly-connected dissolution patterns. We demonstrate that, whatever their structure, SINC models can be made equivalent in terms of concentration in the mobile zone to a unique MRMT model. We develop effective shape-free numerical methods to identify its few dominant rates, that comply with any distribution of rates and porosities. We show that differences in terms of macrodispersion are not larger than 50% for approximate MRMT models with only one rate (double porosity models), and drop down to less than 0.1% for five rates MRMT models. Low-dimensional MRMT models accurately approach transport in structured diffusive porosities at intermediate and long times and only miss early responses.

  17. Assessment of diffuse heavy metal pollution, mass transfer and flows at a gold mining site within the Lake Baikal Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorslund, Josefin; Jarsjö, Jerker; Chalov, Sergey; Belozerova, Ekaterina

    2013-04-01

    The flux, transfer and accumulation of heavy metals in aquatic systems pose a potential danger to the ecosystem at various scales, due to their toxicity and non-destroyable nature. Mining and ore excavation can cause heavy metal pollution of both local and downstream water systems, including groundwater sources. The Zaamar Goldfield, located in the upper Lake Baikal Basin (Mongolia), is an example of an extensive gold mining site, which significantly contributes to downstream increases in riverine concentrations of heavy metals, both in dissolved and suspended phases. However, the placer mining area is large and the pollution is diffuse by nature. Due to lack of detailed monitoring, it is unclear how the pollution is transported from the mine tailings to the river. There are several potentially important pathways, such as mobilization of bank sediments, in-stream dissolution from metal-rich suspended/bottom sediments, and through polluted groundwater. We here aim at estimating diffuse mass flows from the source zone to the river, in addition to riverine mass flows. Additionally, the behaviour of heavy metals under varying geochemical conditions (such as pH) is investigated, to be able to understand the solubility of various heavy metals and their partitioning between particulate and dissolved phase. We base our analysis on on-site hydrogeochemical field campaigns. These include concentration measurements in different media (groundwater, waste ponds, ditches, river water, suspended sediments, and bottom sediments). Runoff estimations from the site as well as solubility calculations are also main analytical methods. Results show a net increase in both dissolved and suspended riverine mass flows over the Zaamar site. Concentrations in the deep groundwater system are generally in the same order of magnitude as river concentrations, which suggest important inputs of dissolved heavy metals to the river through groundwater flows. The input of dissolved concentrations are

  18. Modeling mass transfer in solid oxide fuel cell anode: II. H2/CO co-oxidation and surface diffusion in synthesis-gas operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Cheng; Jiang, Zeyi; Zhang, Xinxin

    2016-08-01

    Following the previous work on comparing performance of Fickian, Stefan-Maxwell and dusty-gas model for mass transfer in single fuel system, this article is focused on the electrochemistry and transport in the anode of solid oxide fuel cell using H2sbnd H2Osbnd COsbnd CO2sbnd N2 hybrid fuel. Under the standard framework of the dusty-gas model combined with the Butler-Volmer equation, it carries out a macroscopic area-specific modeling work. More specifically, two variables of hydrogen current fraction and enhancement factor are well defined and solved for the electrochemical co-oxidation of H2 and CO, and the diffusion equivalent circuit model is introduced to describe more comprehensively the resistance of mass transfer including molecular/Knudsen diffusion and surface diffusion. The model has been validated well in full region of Vsbnd I performance of an experimental anode-supported button cell. An approximate analytical solution of the hydrogen current fraction is also presented for explicit computation. Comparison between the results by different approaches for the effective diffusivity shows the importance of right mass-transfer modeling.

  19. Heat transfer, diffusion, and evaporation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nusselt, Wilhelm

    1954-01-01

    Although it has long been known that the differential equations of the heat-transfer and diffusion processes are identical, application to technical problems has only recently been made. In 1916 it was shown that the speed of oxidation of the carbon in iron ore depends upon the speed with which the oxygen of the combustion air diffuses through the core of gas surrounding the carbon surface. The identity previously referred to was then used to calculate the amount of oxygen diffusing to the carbon surface on the basis of the heat transfer between the gas stream and the carbon surface. Then in 1921, H. Thoma reversed that procedure; he used diffusion experiments to determine heat-transfer coefficients. Recently Lohrisch has extended this work by experiment. A technically very important application of the identity of heat transfer and diffusion is that of the cooling tower, since in this case both processes occur simultaneously.

  20. Effect of pectins on the mass transfer kinetics of monosaccharides, amino acids, and a corn oil-in-water emulsion in a Franz diffusion cell.

    PubMed

    Espinal-Ruiz, Mauricio; Restrepo-Sánchez, Luz-Patricia; Narváez-Cuenca, Carlos-Eduardo

    2016-10-15

    The effect of high (HMP) and low (LMP) methoxylated pectins (2%w/w) on the rate and extent of the mass transfer of monosaccharides, amino acids, and a corn oil-in-water emulsion across a cellulose membrane was evaluated. A sigmoidal response kinetic analysis was used to calculate both the diffusion coefficients (rate) and the amount of nutrients transferred through the membrane (extent). In all cases, except for lysine, HMP was more effective than LMP in inhibiting both the rate and extent of the mass transfer of nutrients through the membrane. LMP and HMP, e.g., reduced 1.3 and 3.0times, respectively, the mass transfer rate of glucose, as compared to control (containing no pectin), and 1.3 and 1.5times, respectively, the amount of glucose transferred through the membrane. Viscosity, molecular interactions, and flocculation were the most important parameters controlling the mass transfer of electrically neutral nutrients, electrically charged nutrients, and emulsified lipids, respectively. PMID:27173546

  1. Effect of pectins on the mass transfer kinetics of monosaccharides, amino acids, and a corn oil-in-water emulsion in a Franz diffusion cell.

    PubMed

    Espinal-Ruiz, Mauricio; Restrepo-Sánchez, Luz-Patricia; Narváez-Cuenca, Carlos-Eduardo

    2016-10-15

    The effect of high (HMP) and low (LMP) methoxylated pectins (2%w/w) on the rate and extent of the mass transfer of monosaccharides, amino acids, and a corn oil-in-water emulsion across a cellulose membrane was evaluated. A sigmoidal response kinetic analysis was used to calculate both the diffusion coefficients (rate) and the amount of nutrients transferred through the membrane (extent). In all cases, except for lysine, HMP was more effective than LMP in inhibiting both the rate and extent of the mass transfer of nutrients through the membrane. LMP and HMP, e.g., reduced 1.3 and 3.0times, respectively, the mass transfer rate of glucose, as compared to control (containing no pectin), and 1.3 and 1.5times, respectively, the amount of glucose transferred through the membrane. Viscosity, molecular interactions, and flocculation were the most important parameters controlling the mass transfer of electrically neutral nutrients, electrically charged nutrients, and emulsified lipids, respectively.

  2. Heat and Mass Transfer of the Droplet Vacuum Freezing Process Based on the Diffusion-controlled Evaporation and Phase Transition Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhijun; Gao, Jingxin; Zhang, Shiwei

    2016-01-01

    A frozen phase transition model is developed to investigate the heat and mass transfer of a single water droplet during the vacuum freezing process. The model is based on the diffusion-controlled evaporation mechanism and phase transition characteristics. The droplet vacuum freezing process can be divided into three stages according to the droplet states and the time order. It includes the evaporation freezing stage, the isothermal freezing stage and the sublimation freezing stage. A numerical calculation is performed, and the result is analysed. The effects of the vacuum chamber pressure, initial droplet diameter and initial droplet temperature on the heat and mass transfer characteristics at each stage are studied. The droplet experiences supercooling breakdown at the end of the evaporation freezing stage before the isothermal freezing stage begins. The temperature is transiently raised as a result of the supercooling breakdown phenomenon, whose effects on the freezing process and freezing parameters are considered. PMID:27739466

  3. Heat and Mass Transfer of the Droplet Vacuum Freezing Process Based on the Diffusion-controlled Evaporation and Phase Transition Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhijun; Gao, Jingxin; Zhang, Shiwei

    2016-10-01

    A frozen phase transition model is developed to investigate the heat and mass transfer of a single water droplet during the vacuum freezing process. The model is based on the diffusion-controlled evaporation mechanism and phase transition characteristics. The droplet vacuum freezing process can be divided into three stages according to the droplet states and the time order. It includes the evaporation freezing stage, the isothermal freezing stage and the sublimation freezing stage. A numerical calculation is performed, and the result is analysed. The effects of the vacuum chamber pressure, initial droplet diameter and initial droplet temperature on the heat and mass transfer characteristics at each stage are studied. The droplet experiences supercooling breakdown at the end of the evaporation freezing stage before the isothermal freezing stage begins. The temperature is transiently raised as a result of the supercooling breakdown phenomenon, whose effects on the freezing process and freezing parameters are considered.

  4. Double-diffusive convection as a mechanism for transferring heat and mass within the Salton Sea geothermal brine

    SciTech Connect

    Fournier, Robert O.

    1988-01-01

    H. C. Helgeson noted in 1968 that the salinity of the brine in the geothermal reservoir within the Salton Sea geothermal system generally increases from the top to the bottom and from the center to the sides. He also noted that pressure measurements at perforations in cased wells seemed to indicate that the formation fluids at the depths of production have a specific density about equal to 1, and that hot concentrated brines apparently exist in pressure equilibrium with comparatively cold dilute pore waters in the surrounding rocks. Since 1968 there have been no published reports that dispute these observations. However, a very high heat flux through the top of the system seems to require a substantial component of convective transfer of heat beneath an impermeable cap, whereas the apparent salinity gradient with depth seems to require little or no free convection of brine. This paradox may be resolved if double-diffusive convection is the main process that controls the depth-temperature-salinity relations. Such convection provides a mechanism for transferring heat from the bottom to the top of the hydrothermal system while maintaining vertical and horizontal salinity gradients—densities remaining close to unity. In 1981, Griffiths showed experimentally that layered double-diffusive convection cells may develop in porous media when hot saline waters underlie more dilute cooler waters. However, nagging questions remain about whether fluid densities within the Salton Sea geothermal system really adjust to unity in response to changing temperature and salinity at depths greater than about 1 km. The State 2-14 well, the Salton Sea Scientific Drill Hole, has provided one high-quality data point for a depth interval of 1,865-1,877 m, where the temperature is about 305º C. The calculated density of the pre-flashed reservoir fluid sampled from that depth is 1.0008 ± 0.0023.

  5. Computational investigation of longitudinal diffusion, eddy dispersion, and trans-particle mass transfer in bulk, random packings of core-shell particles with varied shell thickness and shell diffusion coefficient.

    PubMed

    Daneyko, Anton; Hlushkou, Dzmitry; Baranau, Vasili; Khirevich, Siarhei; Seidel-Morgenstern, Andreas; Tallarek, Ulrich

    2015-08-14

    In recent years, chromatographic columns packed with core-shell particles have been widely used for efficient and fast separations at comparatively low operating pressure. However, the influence of the porous shell properties on the mass transfer kinetics in core-shell packings is still not fully understood. We report on results obtained with a modeling approach to simulate three-dimensional advective-diffusive transport in bulk random packings of monosized core-shell particles, covering a range of reduced mobile phase flow velocities from 0.5 up to 1000. The impact of the effective diffusivity of analyte molecules in the porous shell and the shell thickness on the resulting plate height was investigated. An extension of Giddings' theory of coupled eddy dispersion to account for retention of analyte molecules due to stagnant regions in porous shells with zero mobile phase flow velocity is presented. The plate height equation involving a modified eddy dispersion term excellently describes simulated data obtained for particle-packings with varied shell thickness and shell diffusion coefficient. It is confirmed that the model of trans-particle mass transfer resistance of core-shell particles by Kaczmarski and Guiochon [42] is applicable up to a constant factor. We analyze individual contributions to the plate height from different mass transfer mechanisms in dependence of the shell parameters. The simulations demonstrate that a reduction of plate height in packings of core-shell relative to fully porous particles arises mainly due to reduced trans-particle mass transfer resistance and transchannel eddy dispersion.

  6. Computational investigation of longitudinal diffusion, eddy dispersion, and trans-particle mass transfer in bulk, random packings of core-shell particles with varied shell thickness and shell diffusion coefficient.

    PubMed

    Daneyko, Anton; Hlushkou, Dzmitry; Baranau, Vasili; Khirevich, Siarhei; Seidel-Morgenstern, Andreas; Tallarek, Ulrich

    2015-08-14

    In recent years, chromatographic columns packed with core-shell particles have been widely used for efficient and fast separations at comparatively low operating pressure. However, the influence of the porous shell properties on the mass transfer kinetics in core-shell packings is still not fully understood. We report on results obtained with a modeling approach to simulate three-dimensional advective-diffusive transport in bulk random packings of monosized core-shell particles, covering a range of reduced mobile phase flow velocities from 0.5 up to 1000. The impact of the effective diffusivity of analyte molecules in the porous shell and the shell thickness on the resulting plate height was investigated. An extension of Giddings' theory of coupled eddy dispersion to account for retention of analyte molecules due to stagnant regions in porous shells with zero mobile phase flow velocity is presented. The plate height equation involving a modified eddy dispersion term excellently describes simulated data obtained for particle-packings with varied shell thickness and shell diffusion coefficient. It is confirmed that the model of trans-particle mass transfer resistance of core-shell particles by Kaczmarski and Guiochon [42] is applicable up to a constant factor. We analyze individual contributions to the plate height from different mass transfer mechanisms in dependence of the shell parameters. The simulations demonstrate that a reduction of plate height in packings of core-shell relative to fully porous particles arises mainly due to reduced trans-particle mass transfer resistance and transchannel eddy dispersion. PMID:26162667

  7. Sorption-induced effects of humic substances on mass transfer of organic pollutants through aqueous diffusion boundary layers: the example of water/air exchange.

    PubMed

    Ramus, Ksenia; Kopinke, Frank-Dieter; Georgi, Anett

    2012-02-21

    This study examines the effect of dissolved humic substances (DHS) on the rate of water-gas exchange of organic compounds under conditions where diffusion through the aqueous boundary layer is rate-determining. A synthetic surfactant was applied for comparison. Mass-transfer coefficients were determined from the rate of depletion of the model compounds by means of an apparatus containing a stirred aqueous solution with continuous purging of the headspace above the solution. In addition, experiments with continuous passive dosing of analytes into the water phase were conducted to simulate a system where thermodynamic activity of the chemical in the aqueous phase is identical in the presence and absence of DHS. The experimental results show that DHS and surfactants can affect water-gas exchange rates by the superposition of two mechanisms: (1) hydrodynamic effects due to surface film formation ("surface smoothing"), and (2) sorption-induced effects. Whether sorption accelerates or retards mass transfer depends on its effect on the thermodynamic activity of the pollutant in the aqueous phase. Mass transfer will be retarded if the activity (or freely dissolved concentration) of the pollutant is decreased due to sorption. If it remains unchanged (e.g., due to fast equilibration with a sediment acting as a large source phase), then DHS and surfactant micelles can act as an additional shuttle for the pollutants, enhancing the flux through the boundary layer.

  8. Mass transport by diffusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, James K.

    1987-01-01

    For the purpose of determining diffusion coefficients as required for electrodeposition studies and other applications, a diaphragm cell and an isothermal water bath were constructed. the calibration of the system is discussed. On the basis of three calibration runs on the diaphram cell, researchers concluded that the cell constant beta equals 0.12 cm -2 . Other calibration runs in progress should permit the cell constant to be determined with an accuracy of one percent.

  9. A mass transfer model for the fixed-bed adsorption of ferulic acid onto a polymeric resin: axial dispersion and intraparticle diffusion.

    PubMed

    Davila-Guzman, Nancy E; Cerino-Córdova, Felipe J; Soto-Regalado, Eduardo; Loredo-Cancino, Margarita; Loredo-Medrano, José A; García-Reyes, Refugio B

    2016-08-01

    In this study, amberlite XAD-16 (XAD-16) bed column system was used to remove ferulic acid (FA) from aqueous solutions. Laboratory-scale column experiments were conducted in downflow fixed bed at initial FA concentration of 1 g/L, initial pH 3, and 25°C. The performance of the adsorbent bed under different flow rates (1.3-7.7 mL/min) was studied. The bed utilization efficiency was in the range of 64.64-72.21% at the studied flow rates. A mass transfer model considering both axial dispersion and intraparticle diffusion was developed to predict the breakthrough curves of FA adsorption on XAD-16. This model predicted the experimental data better than Bohart-Adams model and Thomas model, based on the low deviation between predicted and experimental data. The axial dispersion coefficient value varied from 6.45 × 10(-6) to 1.10 × 10(-6) m(2)/s at flow rate from 1.3 to 7.7 mL/min, whereas the intraparticle diffusion coefficient was 1.04 × 10(-10) m(2)/s, being this last resistance the rate-limiting step. In conclusion, axial dispersion and intraparticle diffusion phenomena play the major role in predicting the adsorption of FA onto XAD-16 in fixed-bed columns.

  10. Heat and mass transfer in an explosion

    SciTech Connect

    Zakharova, I.G.

    1982-06-01

    The filtration of gaseous detonation products of high explosives from an underground chamber is investigated. The retention of gas in the pores by absorption is considered. The sorption process is determined to have three stages: outer diffusion (transfer of molecules of sorbed material to the outer surfaces of particles) an inner diffusion, and absorption per se. Equations are derived for diffusion flux, outer mass-transfer coefficient, mass balance in primary pores, motion of the gas, heat transfer, and so on. Within this framework, following assumptions of gas ideality, disregarding vaccum expansion, porosity variation, and heat transfer through wall, the filtration leakage of gaseous products of underground detonation of high explosives from an underground cavity is studied. Pressure in the cavity is measured as a function of filtration without heat and mass transfer; and with heat transfer; with heat and mass and limited sorption; and with heat and mass and infinite sorption capability. It is determined that heat-mass transfer significantly influences explosion efficiency. Thus, an increase in sorption capacities can increase the entrapment of gases.

  11. Determination of convective diffusion heat/mass transfer rates to burner rig test targets comparable in size to cross-stream jet diameter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, S. A.; Santoro, G. J.

    1985-01-01

    Two sets of experiments have been performed to be able to predict the convective diffusion heat/mass transfer rates to a cylindrical target whose height and diameter are comparable to, but less than, the diameter of the circular cross-stream jet, thereby simulating the same geometric configuration as a typical burner rig test specimen located in the cross-stream of the combustor exit nozzle. The first set exploits the naphthalene sublimation technique to determine the heat/mass transfer coefficient under isothermal conditions for various flow rates (Reynolds numbers). The second set, conducted at various combustion temperatures and Reynolds numbers, utilized the temperature variation along the surface of the above-mentioned target under steady-state conditions to estimate the effect of cooling (dilution) due to the entrainment of stagnant room temperature air. The experimental information obtained is used to predict high temperature, high velocity corrosive salt vapor deposition rates in burner rigs on collectors that are geometrically the same. The agreement with preliminary data obtained from Na2SO4 vapor deposition experiments is found to be excellent.

  12. Determination of convective diffusion heat/mass transfer rates to burner rig test targets comparable in size to cross-stream jet diameter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, S. A.; Santoro, G. J.

    1986-01-01

    Two sets of experiments have been performed to be able to predict the convective diffusion heat/mass transfer rates to a cylindrical target whose height and diameter are comparable to, but less than, the diameter of the circular cross-stream jet, thereby simulating the same geometric configuration as a typical burner rig test specimen located in the cross-stream of the combustor exit nozzlle. The first set exploits the naphthalene sublimation technique to detetermine the heat/mass transfer coefficient under isothermal conditions for various flow rates (Reynolds numbers). The second set, conducted at various combustion temperatures and Reynolds numbers, utilized the temperature variation along the surface of the above-mentioned target under steady-state conditions to estimate the effect of cooling (dilution) due to the entrainment of stagnant room temperature air. The experimental information obtained is used to predict high temperature, high velocity corrosive salt vapor deposition rates in burner rigs on collectors that are geometrically the same. The agreement with preliminary data obtained from Na2S04 vapor deposition experiments is found to be excellent.

  13. Geochemical Speciation Mass Transfer

    1985-12-01

    PHREEQC is designed to model geochemical reactions. Based on an ion association aqueous model, PHREEQC can calculate pH, redox potential, and mass transfer as a function of reaction progress. It can be used to describe geochemical processes for both far-field and near-field performance assessment and to evaluate data acquisition needs and test data. It can also calculate the composition of solutions in equilibrium with multiple phases. The data base, including elements, aqueous species, and mineralmore » phases, is independent of the program and is completely user-definable. PHREEQC requires thermodynamic data for each solid, gaseous, or dissolved chemical species being modeled. The two data bases, PREPHR and DEQPAK7, supplied with PHREEQC are for testing purposes only and should not be applied to real problems without first being carefully examined. The conceptual model embodied in PHREEQC is the ion-association model of Pearson and Noronha. In this model a set of mass action equations are established for each ion pair (and controlling solid phases when making mass transfer calculations) along with a set of mass balance equations for each element considered. These sets of equations are coupled using activity coefficient values for each aqueous species and solved using a continued fraction approach for the mass balances combined with a modified Newton-Raphson technique for all other equations. The activity coefficient expressions in PHREEQC include the extended Debye-Huckel, WATEQ Debye-Huckel, and Davies equations from the original United States Geological Survey version of the program. The auxiliary preprocessor program PHTL, which is derived from EQTL, converts EQ3/6 thermodynamic data to PHREEQC format so that the two programs can be compared. PHREEQC can be used to determine solubility limits on the radionuclides present in the waste form. These solubility constraints may be input to the WAPPA leach model.« less

  14. Mass Transfer with Chemical Reaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeCoursey, W. J.

    1987-01-01

    Describes the organization of a graduate course dealing with mass transfer, particularly as it relates to chemical reactions. Discusses the course outline, including mathematics models of mass transfer, enhancement of mass transfer rates by homogeneous chemical reaction, and gas-liquid systems with chemical reaction. (TW)

  15. Effect of internal pressure and gas/liquid interface area on the CO mass transfer coefficient using hollow fibre membranes as a high mass transfer gas diffusing system for microbial syngas fermentation.

    PubMed

    Yasin, Muhammad; Park, Shinyoung; Jeong, Yeseul; Lee, Eun Yeol; Lee, Jinwon; Chang, In Seop

    2014-10-01

    This study proposed a submerged hollow fibre membrane bioreactor (HFMBR) system capable of achieving high carbon monoxide (CO) mass transfer for applications in microbial synthesis gas conversion systems. Hydrophobic polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membrane fibres were used to fabricate a membrane module, which was used for pressurising CO in water phase. Pressure through the hollow fibre lumen (P) and membrane surface area per unit working volume of the liquid (A(S)/V(L)) were used as controllable parameters to determine gas-liquid volumetric mass transfer coefficient (k(L)a) values. We found a k(L)a of 135.72 h(-1) when P was 93.76 kPa and AS/VL was fixed at 27.5m(-1). A higher k(L)a of 155.16 h(-1) was achieved by increasing AS/VL to 62.5m(-1) at a lower P of 37.23 kPa. Practicality of HFMBR to support microbial growth and organic product formation was assessed by CO/CO2 fermentation using Eubacterium limosum KIST612.

  16. Thermal /Soret/ diffusion effects on interfacial mass transport rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosner, D. E.

    1980-01-01

    It is shown that thermal (Soret) diffusion significantly alters convective mass transport rates and important transition temperatures in highly nonisothermal flow systems involving the transport of 'heavy' species (vapors or particles). Introduction of the Soret transport term is shown to result in mass transfer effects similar to those of 'suction' and a homogeneous chemical 'sink'. It is pointed out that this analogy provides a simple method of correlating and predicting thermal diffusion effects in the abovementioned systems.

  17. Enhancement of heat and mass transfer by cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y. N.; Zhang, Y. N.; Du, X. Z.; Xian, H. Z.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a brief summary of effects of cavitation on the heat and mass transfer are given. The fundamental studies of cavitation bubbles, including its nonlinearity, rectified heat and mass diffusion, are initially introduced. Then selected topics of cavitation enhanced heat and mass transfer were discussed in details including whales stranding caused by active sonar activity, pool boiling heat transfer, oscillating heat pipe and high intensity focused ultrasound treatment.

  18. Mass Transfer by Stellar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boffin, Henri M. J.

    I review the process of mass transfer in a binary system through a stellar wind, with an emphasis on systems containing a red giant. I show how wind accretion in a binary system is different from the usually assumed Bondi-Hoyle approximation, first as far as the flow's structure is concerned, but most importantly, also for the mass accretion and specific angular momentum loss. This has important implications on the evolution of the orbital parameters. I also discuss the impact of wind accretion, on the chemical pollution and change in spin of the accreting star. The last section deals with observations and covers systems that most likely went through wind mass transfer: barium and related stars, symbiotic stars and central stars of planetary nebulae (CSPN). The most recent observations of cool CSPN progenitors of barium stars, as well as of carbon-rich post-common envelope systems, are providing unique constraints on the mass transfer processes.

  19. Mass partitioning effects in diffusion transport.

    PubMed

    Kojic, Milos; Milosevic, Miljan; Wu, Suhong; Blanco, Elvin; Ferrari, Mauro; Ziemys, Arturas

    2015-08-28

    Frequent mass exchange takes place in a heterogeneous environment among several phases, where mass partitioning may occur at the interface of phases. Analytical and computational methods for diffusion do not usually incorporate molecule partitioning masking the true picture of mass transport. Here we present a computational finite element methodology to calculate diffusion mass transport with a partitioning phenomenon included and the analysis of the effects of partitioning. Our numerical results showed that partitioning controls equilibrated mass distribution as expected from analytical solutions. The experimental validation of mass release from drug-loaded nanoparticles showed that partitioning might even dominate in some cases with respect to diffusion itself. The analysis of diffusion kinetics in the parameter space of partitioning and diffusivity showed that partitioning is an extremely important parameter in systems, where mass diffusivity is fast and that the concentration of nanoparticles can control payload retention inside nanoparticles. The computational and experimental results suggest that partitioning and physiochemical properties of phases play an important, if not crucial, role in diffusion transport and should be included in the studies of mass transport processes.

  20. Mass partitioning effects in diffusion transport.

    PubMed

    Kojic, Milos; Milosevic, Miljan; Wu, Suhong; Blanco, Elvin; Ferrari, Mauro; Ziemys, Arturas

    2015-08-28

    Frequent mass exchange takes place in a heterogeneous environment among several phases, where mass partitioning may occur at the interface of phases. Analytical and computational methods for diffusion do not usually incorporate molecule partitioning masking the true picture of mass transport. Here we present a computational finite element methodology to calculate diffusion mass transport with a partitioning phenomenon included and the analysis of the effects of partitioning. Our numerical results showed that partitioning controls equilibrated mass distribution as expected from analytical solutions. The experimental validation of mass release from drug-loaded nanoparticles showed that partitioning might even dominate in some cases with respect to diffusion itself. The analysis of diffusion kinetics in the parameter space of partitioning and diffusivity showed that partitioning is an extremely important parameter in systems, where mass diffusivity is fast and that the concentration of nanoparticles can control payload retention inside nanoparticles. The computational and experimental results suggest that partitioning and physiochemical properties of phases play an important, if not crucial, role in diffusion transport and should be included in the studies of mass transport processes. PMID:26204522

  1. Mass transfer and transport in salt repositories

    SciTech Connect

    Pigford, T.H.; Chambre, P.L.; Lee, W.W.L.

    1989-02-01

    Salt is a unique rock isolation of nuclear waste because it is dry'' and nearly impermeable. In this paper we summarize some mass-transfer and transport analyses of salt repositories. First we analyses brine migration. Heating by high-level waste can cause brine in grain boundaries to move due to pressure-gradients. We analyze brine migration treating salt as a thermoelastic solid and found that brine migration is transient and localized. We use previously developed techniques to estimate release rates from waste packages by diffusion. Interbeds exist in salt and may be conduits for radionuclide migration. We analyze steady-state migration due to brine flow in the interbed, as a function of the Peclet number. Then we analyze transient mass transfer, both into the interbed and directly to salt, due only to diffusion. Finally we compare mass transfer rates of a waste cylinder in granite facing a fracture and in salt facing an interbed. In all cases, numerical illustrations of the analytic solution are given. 10 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Diffusive and thermodiffusive transfer of magnetic nanoparticles in porous media.

    PubMed

    Sints, Viesturs; Blums, Elmars; Maiorov, Michail; Kronkalns, Gunars

    2015-05-01

    Experimental results on mass transfer within a thin porous layer saturated with ferrofluid are outlined in this paper. From the analysis of particle concentration distribution across the layer it is shown that both the mass diffusion and the Soret coefficients of nanoparticles are remarkably less than those measured in free fluid. The particle transport coefficient changes due to an external uniform magnetic field qualitatively well agree with the predictions of existing theoretical research. The magnetic field that is oriented transversely to the porous layer causes an increase in the diffusion coefficient and a decrease in the Soret coefficient whilst the longitudinal field causes a reduction of the mass diffusion and an intensification of the particle thermodiffusion. PMID:25957178

  3. In situ study of mass transfer in aqueous solutions under high pressures via Raman spectroscopy: A new method for the determination of diffusion coefficients of methane in water near hydrate formation conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, W.J.; Chou, I.-Ming; Burruss, R.C.; Yang, M.Z.

    2006-01-01

    A new method was developed for in situ study of the diffusive transfer of methane in aqueous solution under high pressures near hydrate formation conditions within an optical capillary cell. Time-dependent Raman spectra of the solution at several different spots along the one-dimensional diffusion path were collected and thus the varying composition profile of the solution was monitored. Diffusion coefficients were estimated by the least squares method based on the variations in methane concentration data in space and time in the cell. The measured diffusion coefficients of methane in water at the liquid (L)-vapor (V) stable region and L-V metastable region are close to previously reported values determined at lower pressure and similar temperature. This in situ monitoring method was demonstrated to be suitable for the study of mass transfer in aqueous solution under high pressure and at various temperature conditions and will be applied to the study of nucleation and dissolution kinetics of methane hydrate in a hydrate-water system where the interaction of methane and water would be more complicated than that presented here for the L-V metastable condition. ?? 2006 Society for Applied Spectroscopy.

  4. Mass transfer mechanism in hydrophilic interaction chromatography.

    PubMed

    Gritti, Fabrice; Guiochon, Georges

    2013-08-01

    The mass transfer mechanism in HILIC was investigated in depth. The reduced heights equivalent to a theoretical plate (HETP) of five low molecular weigh compounds with retention factors of -0.05 (slight exclusion from the surface due to the presence of a water-rich layer in which naphthalene is insoluble) to 3.64 were measured at room temperature for a 4.6mm×100mm column packed with 3.5μm 140Å XBridge HILIC particles in a wide range of flow velocities. The mobile phase was a buffered acetonitrile-water mixture (92.5/7.5, v/v). Using a physically reliable model of effective diffusion in binary composite media (Torquato's model), the longitudinal diffusion and solid-liquid mass transfer resistance reduced HETP terms were measured. The reduced short-range eddy dispersion HETP was taken from the literature data. The long-range reduced HETP was directly measured from the subtraction of these HETP terms to the overall HETP measured from moment analysis. In contrast to RPLC, the plots of the reduced HETP versus the reduced velocity depend weakly on the retention factor, due to the constant, low intra-particle diffusivity observed in HILIC. So, the reduced longitudinal diffusion HETP is smaller and the reduced solid-liquid mass transfer resistance HETP is larger in HILIC than in RPLC. Whereas border effects can be concealed in RPLC for retained analytes due to fast radial equilibration across the column diameter, a residual long-range eddy dispersion term persists in 4.6mm I.D. HILIC columns, even at very slow flow rates. Experiments show that the minor differences in the long-range eddy dispersion term between analytes having different retention factors is directly correlated to the reciprocal of their bulk diffusion coefficient. The performance of HILIC columns packed with fine particles is then more sensitive to the inlet sample distribution and to the outlet sample collection than RPLC columns due to the relatively poor radial mixing controlled by lateral diffusion.

  5. Experiments for the determination of convective diffusion heat/mass transfer to burner rig test targets comparable in size to jet stream diameter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santoro, G. J.; Gokoglu, S. A.

    1986-01-01

    The application of a recently formulated vapor transport theory to predict deposition rates of corrosive salts from alkali-seeded combustion gases of a small-capacity, high-velocity, atmospheric-pressure burner rig was hampered by the relatively large dimensions of the cylindrical deposit collector compared to the diameter of the combustion gas stream. The relative dimensions lead to a highly nonadiabatic combustion gas flow around the collector and necessitate two series of experiments. In the first series, mass transfer coefficients are determined by utilizing the naphthalene sublimation technique. The second series of experiments determines the dilution effect on the sodium species concentrations due to the entrainment of ambient air. This second series involves the measurement of the temperature variation along the surface of the collector under steady state conditions. Vapor deposition rates are determined exploiting this information and the results are found to compare favorably with experimentally obtained rates.

  6. Nanoparticle volume fraction with heat and mass transfer on MHD mixed convection flow in a nanofluid in the presence of thermo-diffusion under convective boundary condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandasamy, R.; Jeyabalan, C.; Sivagnana Prabhu, K. K.

    2016-02-01

    This article examines the influence of thermophoresis, Brownian motion of the nanoparticles with variable stream conditions in the presence of magnetic field on mixed convection heat and mass transfer in the boundary layer region of a semi-infinite porous vertical plate in a nanofluid under the convective boundary conditions. The transformed boundary layer ordinary differential equations are solved numerically using Maple 18 software with fourth-fifth order Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg method. Numerical results are presented both in tabular and graphical forms illustrating the effects of these parameters with magnetic field on momentum, thermal, nanoparticle volume fraction and solutal concentration boundary layers. The numerical results obtained for the velocity, temperature, volume fraction, and concentration profiles reveal interesting phenomenon, some of these qualitative results are presented through plots. It is interesting to note that the magnetic field plays a dominant role on nanofluid flow under the convective boundary conditions.

  7. Experiments for the determination of convective diffusion heat/mass transfer to burner rig test targets comparable in size to jet stream diameter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santoro, G. J.; Gokoglu, S. A.

    1988-01-01

    The application of a recently formulated vapor transport theory to predict deposition rates of corrosive salts from alkali-seeded combustion gases of a small-capacity, high-velocity, atmospheric-pressure burner rig was hampered by the relatively large dimensions of the cylindrical deposit collector compared to the diameter of the combustion gas stream. The relative dimensions lead to a highly nonadiabatic combustion gas flow around the collector and necessitate two series of experiments. In the first series, mass transfer coefficients are determined by utilizing the naphthalene sublimation technique. The second series of experiments determines the dilution effect on the sodium species concentrations due to the entrainment of ambient air. This second series involves the measurement of the temperature variation along the surface of the collector under steady state conditions. Vapor deposition rates are determined exploiting this information and the results are found to compare favorably with experimentally obtained rates.

  8. Mass transfer from bypassed zones during gas injection

    SciTech Connect

    Burger, J.E.; Mohanty, K.K.

    1995-12-31

    Gasflooding in oil reservoirs leads to bypassing of the oil due to gravitational, viscous and/or heterogeneity effects. The bypassed oil can be recovered by the flowing solvent by pressure-driven, gravity-driven, dispersion/diffusion-driven and capillarity-driven crossflow/mass transfer. It is difficult to represent all of these mechanisms explicitly in large-scale simulations. In this work, we have studied the effect of the orientation of the bypassed region and the enrichment of the solvent on the mass transfer. Laboratory-scale mass transfer and coreflood experiments were conducted. Numerical simulation was used to identify the role of the different mechanisms. Results indicate that the mass transfer is the least for the vertical orientation, intermediate for the inverted orientation and the highest for the horizontal orientation. The mass transfer increases with enrichment for all orientations. Liquid phase diffusion controls vertical orientation mass transfer for the fluids studied. Phase behavior determines the liquid phase saturation. Capillary pumping does not contribute to the mass transfer of oil because the interfacial tension decreases towards the flowing region. Gravity-driven flow contributes the most to the mass transfer in the horizontal and the inverted orientations. The gravity-driven flow, however, is impeded by the capillarity whose magnitude decreases with solvent enrichment. Oil recovery in the horizontal gasfloods is nonmonotonic with enrichment for this fluid system in an almost homogeneous Berea core. Multiphase flow in the near-miscible floods leads to less gravity override compared to the FCM floods. In the heterogeneous core studied, the heterogeneity is very strong and the capillary forces do not prevent bypassing. The capillary forces, in fact, reduce oil recovery by diminishing mass transfer from the bypassed regions.

  9. Transport phenomena of crystal growth—heat and mass transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolph, Peter

    2010-07-01

    Selected fundamentals of transport processes and their importance for crystal growth are given. First, principal parameters and equations of heat and mass transfer, like thermal flux, radiation and diffusion are introduced. The heat- and mass- balanced melt-solid and solution-solid interface velocities are derived, respectively. The today's significance of global numeric simulation for analysis of thermo-mechanical stress and related dislocation dynamics within the growing crystal is shown. The relation between diffusion and kinetic regime is discussed. Then, thermal and solutal buoyancy-driven and Marangoni convections are introduced. Their important interplay with the diffusion boundary layer, component and particle incorporation as well as morphological interface stability is demonstrated. Non-steady crystallization phenomena (striations) caused by convective fluctuations are considered. Selected results of global 3D numeric modeling are shown. Finally, advanced methods to control heat and mass transfer by external forces, such as accelerated container rotation, ultrasonic vibration and magnetic fields are discussed.

  10. Heat and mass transfer in flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faeth, G. M.

    1986-01-01

    Heat- and mass-transfer processes in turbulent diffusion flames are discussed, considering turbulent mixing and the structure of single-phase flames, drop processes in spray flames, and nonluminous and luminous flame radiation. Interactions between turbulence and other phenomena are emphasized, concentrating on past work of the author and his associates. The conserved-scalar formalism, along with the laminar-flamelet approximation, is shown to provide reasonable estimates of the structure of gas flames, with modest levels of empiricism. Extending this approach to spray flames has highlighted the importance of drop/turbulence interactions; e.g., turbulent dispersion of drops, modification of turbulence by drops, etc. Stochastic methods being developed to treat these phenomena are yielding encouraging results.

  11. A Simple Experiment for Mass Transfer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, Jesus M.; Henriquez, Vicente; Macias-Machin, Agustin

    1998-01-01

    Presents an experiment in which students use laboratory data to calculate the interphase mass transfer coefficient for a fluid passed over a sphere and obtain correlations for solid-gas mass transfer. Students develop a realistic mathematical model to describe the sublimation process. (DDR)

  12. How We Make Mass Transfer Seem Difficult.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cussler, E. L.

    1984-01-01

    Indicates that teaching of mass transfer can be improved by: (1) using a single, simple definition of mass transfer coefficients; (2) altering use of analogies; and (3) repeatedly stressing differences between mathematical models used for chemical reactions and the actual chemistry of these reactions. Examples for undergraduate/graduate courses…

  13. Modeling ozone mass transfer in reclaimed wastewater.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Pan; Chen, Hsiao-Ting; Babcock, Roger W; Stenstrom, Michael K

    2009-01-01

    Ozone mass transfer in reclaimed water was evaluated at pilot scale to determine mass-transfer characteristics and reaction kinetics and to assess the use of oxygen as a surrogate to measure this process. Tests were conducted in a 40-L/min pilot plant over a 3-year period. Nonsteady-state mass-transfer analyses for both oxygen and ozone were performed for superficial gas flow rates ranging from 0.13m/min to 0.40m/min. The psi factor, which is the ratio of volumetric mass-transfer coefficients of ozone to oxygen, was determined. The decrease in oxygen transfer rate caused by contaminants in reclaimed water was only 10 to 15% compared to tap water. A simple mathematical model was developed to describe transfer rate and steady state ozone concentration. Ozone decay was modeled accurately as a pseudo first-order reaction between ozone and ozone-demanding materials.

  14. Mass transfer parameters of celeriac during vacuum drying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beigi, Mohsen

    2016-09-01

    An accurate prediction of moisture transfer parameters is very important for efficient mass transfer analysis, accurate modelling of drying process, and better designing of new dryers and optimization of existing drying process. The present study aimed to investigate the influence of temperature (e.g., 55, 65 and 75 °C) and chamber pressure (e.g., 0.1, 3, 7, 10, 13 and 17 kPa) on effective diffusivity and convective mass transfer coefficient of celeriac slices during vacuum drying. The obtained Biot number indicated that the moisture transfer in the celeriac slices was controlled by both internal and external resistance. The effective diffusivity obtained to be in the ranges of 7.5231 × 10-10-3.8015 × 10-9 m2 s-1. The results showed that the diffusivity increased with increasing temperature and decreasing pressure. The mass transfer coefficient values varied from 4.6789 × 10-7 to 1.0059 × 10-6 m s-1, and any increment in drying temperature and pressure caused an increment in the coefficient.

  15. Mass transfer kinetics, band broadening and column efficiency.

    PubMed

    Gritti, Fabrice; Guiochon, Georges

    2012-01-20

    Important progress was recently made in our understanding of the physico-chemical aspects of mass transfer kinetics in chromatographic columns, in methods used for accurate determination of the different contributions to the height equivalent to a theoretical plate (HETP), and in the application of these advances to the elucidation of mass transfer mechanisms in columns packed with recent chromatographic supports (sub-2 μm fully porous particles, sub-3 μm core-shell particles, and monoliths). The independent contributions to the HETP are longitudinal diffusion, eddy dispersion, liquid-solid mass transfer (including trans-particle or trans-skeleton mass transfer and external film mass transfer), and the contributions caused by the thermal heterogeneity of the column. The origin and importance of these contributions are investigated in depth. This work underlines the areas in which improvements are needed, an understanding of the contribution of the external film mass transfer term, a better design of HPLC instruments providing a decrease of the extra-column band broadening contributions to the apparent HETP, the development of better packing procedures giving more radially homogeneous column beds, and new packing materials having a higher thermal conductivity to eliminate the nefarious impact of heat effects in very high pressure liquid chromatography (vHPLC) and supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC).

  16. Mass-Transfer-Controlled Dynamic Interfacial Tension in Microfluidic Emulsification Processes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kai; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Wanlu; Luo, Guangsheng

    2016-04-01

    Varied interfacial tension caused by the unsaturated adsorption of surfactants on dripping droplet surfaces is experimentally studied. The mass transfer and adsorption of surfactants, as well as the generation of fresh interfaces, are considered the main factors dominating the surfactant adsorption ratio on droplet surfaces. The diffusion and convective mass transfer of the surfactants are first distinguished by comparing the adsorption depth and the mass flux boundary layer thickness. A characterized mass transfer time is then calculated by introducing an effective diffusion coefficient. A time ratio is furthermore defined by dividing the droplet generation time by the characteristic mass transfer time, t/tm, in order to compare the rates of surfactant mass transfer and droplet generation. Different control mechanisms for different surfactants are analyzed based on the range of t/t(m), and a criterion time ratio using a simplified characteristic mass transfer time, t(m)*, is finally proposed for predicting the appearance of dynamic interfacial tension.

  17. Overall Heat and Mass Transfer Coefficient of Water Vapor Adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamamoto, Yoshinori; Mori, Hideo; Godo, Masazumi; Miura, Kunio; Watanabe, Yutaka; Ishizawa, Toshihiko; Takatsuka, Takeshi

    A fundamental investigation was performed to develop a compact and simple desiccant ventilation unit which is one of the main components of a novel energy saving air-conditioning system. Water vapor in the air is adsorbed and/or desorbed to be controlled the humidity of supply air through a unit of an adsorbent packed bed. A numerical simulation helps to understand the phenomena of heat and mass transfer in the bed. Overall transfer coefficients of them as properties for the simulation were estimated by performing both experiment and calculation. It was clarified that the transient overall equivalent heat and mass transfer does not strongly depend on the air flow rate through the packed bed, the averaged equivalent mass transfer is governed by surface and pore diffusion in a particle of adsorbent at low flow rate. Moreover, the coefficient during the adsorption process is slightly larger than desorption. An equation of the overall mass transfer coefficient is derived. It shows five times as large as the value estimated by experiment. Therefore, the correlation and fitting parameters are presented for prediction of the overall heat and mass transfer coefficients. The estimation accuracy was improved.

  18. The effects of dual-domain mass transfer on the tritium-helium-3 dating method.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Rebecca B; Labolle, Eric M; Harvey, Charles F

    2008-07-01

    Diffusion of tritiated water (referred to as tritium) and helium-3 between mobile and immobile regions in aquifers (mass transfer) can affect tritium and helium-3 concentrations and hence tritium-helium-3 (3H/3He) ages that are used to estimate aquifer recharge and groundwater residence times. Tritium and helium-3 chromatographically separate during transport because their molecular diffusion coefficients differ. Simulations of tritium and helium-3 transport and diffusive mass transfer along stream tubes show that mass transfer can shift the 3H/3He age of the tritium and helium-3 concentration ([3H + 3He]) peak to dates much younger than the 1963 peak in atmospheric tritium. Furthermore, diffusive mass-transfer can cause the 3H/3He age to become younger downstream along a stream tube, even as the mean water-age must increase. Simulated patterns of [3H + 3He] versus 3H/3He age using a mass transfer model appear consistent with a variety of field data. These results suggest that diffusive mass transfer should be considered, especially when the [3H + 3He] peak is not well defined or appears younger than the atmospheric peak. 3H/3He data provide information about upstream mass-transfer processes that could be used to constrain mass-transfer models; however, uncritical acceptance of 3H/3He dates from aquifers with immobile regions could be misleading.

  19. Heat and mass transfer analysis of a desiccant dehumidifier matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Pesaran, A.A.

    1986-07-01

    This report documents the SERI Single-Blow Test Facility's design, fabrication, and testing for characterizing desiccant dehumidifiers for solar cooling applications. The first test article, a silica-gel parallel-plate dehumidifier with highly uniform passages, was designed and fabricated. Transient heat and mass transfer data and pressure drop data across the dehumidifier were obtained. Available heat and mass transfer models were extended to the parallel-place geometry, and the experimental data were compared with model predictions. Pressure drop measurements were also compared with model predictions of the fully developed laminar flow theory. The comparisons between the lumped-capacitance model and the experimental data were satisfactory. The pressure drop data compared satisfactorily with the theory (within 15%). A solid-side resistance model that is more detailed and does not assume symmetrical diffusion in particles was recommended for performance. This study has increased our understanding of the heat and mass transfer in silica gel parallel-plate dehumidifiers.

  20. Ozone mass transfer and kinetics experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Bollyky, L.J.; Beary, M.M.

    1981-12-01

    Experiments were conducted at the Hanford Site to determine the most efficient pH and temperature levels for the destruction of complexants in Hanford high-level defense waste. These complexants enhance migration of radionuclides in the soil and inhibit the growth of crystals in the evaporator-crystallizer. Ozone mass transfer and kinetics tests have been outlined for the determination of critical mass transfer and kinetics parameters of the ozone-complexant reaction.

  1. Mass transfer and adsorption equilibrium for low volatility alkanes in BPL activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Mahle, John J; Furtado, Amanda M B; Glover, T Grant; Buchanan, James H; Peterson, Gregory W; LeVan, M Douglas

    2013-03-01

    The structure of a molecule and its concentration can strongly influence diffusional properties for transport in nanoporous materials. We study mass transfer of alkanes in BPL activated carbon using the concentration-swing frequency response method, which can easily discriminate among mass transfer mechanisms. We measure concentration-dependent diffusion rates for n-hexane, n-octane, n-decane, 2,7-dimethyloctane, and cyclodecane, which have different carbon numbers and geometries: straight chain, branched chain, and cyclic. Micropore diffusion is determined to be the controlling mass transfer resistance except at low relative saturation for n-decane, where an external mass transfer resistance also becomes important, showing that the controlling mass transfer mechanism can change with system concentration. Micropore diffusion coefficients are found to be strongly concentration dependent. Adsorption isotherm slopes obtained from measured isotherms, the concentration-swing frequency response method, and a predictive method show reasonably good agreement.

  2. Mass transfer cycles in cataclysmic variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, A. R.; Frank, J.; Kolb, U.; Ritter, H.

    1995-01-01

    It is well known that in cataclysmic variables the mass transfer rate must fluctuate about the evolutionary mean on timescales too long to be directly observable. We show that limit-cycle behavior can occur if the radius change of the secondary star is sensitive to the instantaneous mass transfer rate. The only reasonable way in which such a dependence can arise is through irradiation of this star by the accreting component. The system oscillates between high states, in which irradiation causes slow expansion of the secondary and drives an elevated transfer rate, and low states, in which this star contracts.

  3. Theory of exciton transfer and diffusion in conjugated polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Barford, William; Tozer, Oliver Robert

    2014-10-28

    We describe a theory of Förster-type exciton transfer between conjugated polymers. The theory is built on three assumptions. First, we assume that the low-lying excited states of conjugated polymers are Frenkel excitons coupled to local normal modes, and described by the Frenkel-Holstein model. Second, we assume that the relevant parameter regime is ℏω < J, i.e., the adiabatic regime, and thus the Born-Oppenheimer factorization of the electronic and nuclear degrees of freedom is generally applicable. Finally, we assume that the Condon approximation is valid, i.e., the exciton-polaron wavefunction is essentially independent of the normal modes. The resulting expression for the exciton transfer rate has a familiar form, being a function of the exciton transfer integral and the effective Franck-Condon factors. The effective Franck-Condon factors are functions of the effective Huang-Rhys parameters, which are inversely proportional to the chromophore size. The Born-Oppenheimer expressions were checked against DMRG calculations, and are found to be within 10% of the exact value for a tiny fraction of the computational cost. This theory of exciton transfer is then applied to model exciton migration in conformationally disordered poly(p-phenylene vinylene). Key to this modeling is the assumption that the donor and acceptor chromophores are defined by local exciton ground states (LEGSs). Since LEGSs are readily determined by the exciton center-of-mass wavefunction, this theory provides a quantitative link between polymer conformation and exciton migration. Our Monte Carlo simulations indicate that the exciton diffusion length depends weakly on the conformation of the polymer, with the diffusion length increasing slightly as the chromophores became straighter and longer. This is largely a geometrical effect: longer and straighter chromophores extend over larger distances. The calculated diffusion lengths of ∼10 nm are in good agreement with experiment. The spectral

  4. Multicomponent NAPL source dissolution: evaluation of mass-transfer coefficients.

    PubMed

    Mobile, Michael A; Widdowson, Mark A; Gallagher, Daniel L

    2012-09-18

    Mass transfer rate coefficients were quantified by employing an inverse modeling technique to high-resolution aqueous phase concentration data observed following an experimental release of a multicomponent nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL) at a field site. A solute transport model (SEAM3D) was employed to simulate advective-dispersive transport over time coupled to NAPL dissolution. Model calibration was demonstrated by accurately reproducing the observed breakthrough times and peak concentrations at multiple observation points, observed mass discharge at pumping wells, and the reported mass depletions for three soluble NAPL constituents. Vertically variable NAPL mass transfer coefficients were derived for each constituent using an optimized numerical solute transport model, ranging from 0.082 to 2.0 day(-1) across all constituents. Constituent-specific coefficients showed a positive correlation with liquid-phase diffusion coefficients. Application of a time-varying mass transfer coefficient as NAPL mass depleted showed limited sensitivity during which over 80% of the most soluble NAPL constituent dissolved from the source. Long-term simulation results, calibrated to the experimental data and rendered in terms of mass discharge versus source mass depletion, exhibited multistage behavior.

  5. Discrete diffusion Monte Carlo for frequency-dependent radiative transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Densmore, Jeffrey D; Kelly, Thompson G; Urbatish, Todd J

    2010-11-17

    Discrete Diffusion Monte Carlo (DDMC) is a technique for increasing the efficiency of Implicit Monte Carlo radiative-transfer simulations. In this paper, we develop an extension of DDMC for frequency-dependent radiative transfer. We base our new DDMC method on a frequency-integrated diffusion equation for frequencies below a specified threshold. Above this threshold we employ standard Monte Carlo. With a frequency-dependent test problem, we confirm the increased efficiency of our new DDMC technique.

  6. Educational Policy Diffusion and Transfer: The Case of Armenia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karakhanyan, Susanna; van Veen, Klaas; Bergen, Theo

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores the quality of the implementation of the West European Bologna reforms in higher education in a post-soviet country. This process of policy diffusion is analysed using concepts of policy diffusion/transfer and innovation literature, attempting to combine both streams of literature. Despite strong motivation to improve the…

  7. Rates of mass, momentum, and energy transfer at the magnetopause

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, T. W.

    1979-01-01

    Empirical estimates of the global rates of transfer of solar wind mass, tangential momentum, and energy at the Earth's magnetopause are presented for comparison against model estimates based on the four principal mechanisms that have been proposed to explain such transfer. The comparisons, although not quite conclusive, strongly favor a model that incorporates some combination of direct magnetic connection and anomalous cross field diffusion. An additional global constraint, the rate at which magnetic flux is cycled through the magnetospheric convection system, strongly suggests that direct magnetic connection plays a significant if not dominant role in the solar wind/magnetosphere interaction.

  8. Mass transfer effects in a gasification riser

    SciTech Connect

    Breault, Ronald W; Li, Tingwen; Nicoletti, Phillip

    2013-01-01

    In the development of multiphase reacting computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes, a number of simplifications were incorporated into the codes and models. One of these simplifications was the use of a simplistic mass transfer correlation for the faster reactions and omission of mass transfer effects completely on the moderate speed and slow speed reactions such as those in a fluidized bed gasifier. Another problem that has propagated is that the mass transfer correlation used in the codes is not universal and is being used far from its developed bubbling fluidized bed regime when applied to circulating fluidized bed (CFB) riser reactors. These problems are true for the major CFD codes. To alleviate this problem, a mechanistic based mass transfer coefficient algorithm has been developed based upon an earlier work by Breault et al. This fundamental approach uses the local hydrodynamics to predict a local, time varying mass transfer coefficient. The predicted mass transfer coefficients and the corresponding Sherwood numbers agree well with literature data and are typically about an order of magnitude lower than the correlation noted above. The incorporation of the new mass transfer model gives the expected behavior for all the gasification reactions evaluated in the paper. At the expected and typical design values for the solid flow rate in a CFB riser gasifier an ANOVA analysis has shown the predictions from the new code to be significantly different from the original code predictions. The new algorithm should be used such that the conversions are not over predicted. Additionally, its behaviors with changes in solid flow rate are consistent with the changes in the hydrodynamics.

  9. 43 CFR 3106.4-3 - Mass transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... or Otherwise § 3106.4-3 Mass transfers. (a) A mass transfer may be utilized in lieu of the provisions... transfer shall be filed with each proper BLM office administering any lease affected by the mass transfer... in the mass transfer. A copy of the exhibit for each lease may be limited to line items pertaining...

  10. 43 CFR 3106.4-3 - Mass transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... or Otherwise § 3106.4-3 Mass transfers. (a) A mass transfer may be utilized in lieu of the provisions... transfer shall be filed with each proper BLM office administering any lease affected by the mass transfer... in the mass transfer. A copy of the exhibit for each lease may be limited to line items pertaining...

  11. 43 CFR 3106.4-3 - Mass transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... or Otherwise § 3106.4-3 Mass transfers. (a) A mass transfer may be utilized in lieu of the provisions... transfer shall be filed with each proper BLM office administering any lease affected by the mass transfer... in the mass transfer. A copy of the exhibit for each lease may be limited to line items pertaining...

  12. Calculating Mass Diffusion in High-Pressure Binary Fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellan, Josette; Harstad, Kenneth

    2004-01-01

    A comprehensive mathematical model of mass diffusion has been developed for binary fluids at high pressures, including critical and supercritical pressures. Heretofore, diverse expressions, valid for limited parameter ranges, have been used to correlate high-pressure binary mass-diffusion-coefficient data. This model will likely be especially useful in the computational simulation and analysis of combustion phenomena in diesel engines, gas turbines, and liquid rocket engines, wherein mass diffusion at high pressure plays a major role.

  13. Quantification of mass transfer during spheronisation.

    PubMed

    Koester, Martin; Thommes, Markus

    2012-06-01

    Spherical granules (pellets) are quite useful in many pharmaceutical applications. The extrusion spheronisation technique is well established as a method of producing pellets of a spherical shape and narrow size distribution. After the extrusion, the cylindrical extrudates are transformed to spherical pellets by spheronisation. The frequently used models consider deformation and breakage during this process. However, the adhesion of fine particles has been neglected as a mechanism in spheronisation for many years. This study quantifies the mass transfer between pellets during spheronisation. During the investigation, the pelletisation aids (microcrystalline cellulose and kappa-carrageenan), the drug (acetaminophen and ibuprofen) and water content were varied systematically. A novel parameter, namely, the "mass transfer fraction" (MTF), was defined to quantify the mass transfer between the pellets. All four investigated formulations had an MTF between 0.10 and 0.52 that implies that up to 50 % of the final pellet weight was involved in mass transfer. Both pelletisation aids showed similar MTF, independent of the drug used. Furthermore, an increase of the MTF, with respect to an increase of the water content, was found for microcrystalline cellulose formulations. In conclusion, the mass transfer between the pellets has to be considered as a mechanism for spheronisation.

  14. Mass Transfer Enhancement in Moving Biofilm Structures

    PubMed Central

    Taherzadeh, Danial; Picioreanu, Cristian; Horn, Harald

    2012-01-01

    Biofilms are layers of microbial cells growing on an interface and they can form highly complex structures adapted to a wide variety of environmental conditions. Biofilm streamers have a small immobile base attached to the support and a flexible tail elongated in the flow direction, which can vibrate in fast flows. Herein we report numerical results for the role of the periodical movement of biofilm streamers on the nutrient uptake and in general on the solute mass transfer enhancement due to flow-induced oscillations. We developed what to our knowledge is a novel two-dimensional fluid-structure interaction model coupled to unsteady solute mass transport and solved the model using the finite element method with a moving mesh. Results demonstrate that the oscillatory movement of the biofilm tail significantly increases the substrate uptake. The mass transfer coefficient is the highest in regions close to the streamer tip. The reason for substrate transfer enhancement is the increase in speed of tip movement relative to the surrounding liquid, thereby reducing the thickness of the mass transfer boundary layer. In addition, we show that the relative mass transfer enhancement in unsteady conditions compared with the rigid static structure is larger at higher flow velocities, and this relative increase favors a more flexible structure. PMID:22500748

  15. Flammable Gas Diffusion from Waste Transfer Associated Structures

    SciTech Connect

    MEACHAM, J.E.

    2003-06-24

    This report assesses potential accumulation of flammable gases in interim isolated concrete waste transfer structures. A hypothetical scenario was analyzed in which flammable gas was generated by spilled waste on the transfer structure floor. Results showed that the flammable gas would safely diffuse out of the concrete structures and equilibrium concentrations were well below the lower flammability limit.

  16. Flammable Gas Diffusion from Waste Transfer Associated Structures

    SciTech Connect

    MEACHAM, J.E.; ESTEY, S.D.

    2002-11-20

    This report assesses potential accumulation of flammable gases in interim isolated concrete waste transfer structures. A hypothetical scenario was analyzed in which flammable gas was generated by spilled waste on the transfer structure floor. Results showed that the flammable gas would safely diffuse out of the concrete structures and equilibrium concentrations were orders of magnitude below the lower flammability limit.

  17. Mass-transfer mechanisms for zeolite ion exchange in wastewater treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, S.M.; Arnold, W.D.; Byers, C.H. )

    1994-12-01

    In spite of the increasing commercial use of zeolites for binary and multicomponent ion exchange, understanding of the basic mass-transfer processes associated with multicomponent zeolite systems is quite limited. This study evaluates Na-Ca-Mg-Cs-Sr ion exchange from an aqueous solution using a chabazite zeolite. Mass-transfer coefficient are determined from experimental batch-reactor data for binary and multicomponent systems. The experimental data indicate that diffusion through the microporous zeolite crystals is the primary diffusional resistance. Macropore diffusion also significantly contributes to the mass-transfer resistance. Various mass-transfer models are compared with the experimental data to determine values for intraparticle diffusivities. Effective diffusivities obtained accurately predict experimental data sing a variety of models. Only the model accounting for micropore and macropore diffusion occurring in series accurately predict multicomponent data using diffusivities from the binary system. Liquid and surface diffusion both contribute to macropore diffusion. Surface and micropore diffusivities are concentration-dependent for the system of interest.

  18. Thermodynamic evaluation of mass diffusion in ionic mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Kagan, Grigory; Tang, Xian-Zhu

    2014-02-15

    The thermodynamic technique of Landau and Lifshitz originally developed for inter-species diffusion in a binary neutral gas mixture is extended to a quasi-neutral plasma with two ion species. It is shown that, while baro- and electro-diffusion coefficients depend on the choice of the thermodynamic system, prediction for the total diffusive mass flux is invariant.

  19. Mass transfer mechanisms in high-performance membrane dialyzers.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Akihiro C

    2011-01-01

    Four dialyzers with super-high-flux membrane or high-performance membrane (HPM) with varying packing density of the hollow fiber (PDF) from 29.6 to 53.1% were investigated in aqueous in vitro experiments for the purpose of identifying the mass transfer mechanism for three test solutes. Clearances for relatively small test solutes (creatinine and vitamin B(12)) slowly increased with PDF and reached plateau since mass transfer mechanism of these solutes was diffusion limited. However, since unlike classic high-flux dialyzers a considerable amount of internal filtration ( > 20 ml/min) should occur in super-high-flux dialyzers even under relatively reduced blood and dialysis fluid flow rates, Q(B) = 200 ml/min and Q(D) = 500 ml/min, it should contribute to enhance the rate of mass transfer especially for those solutes that cannot be easily removed by diffusion, such as β(2)-microglobulin or even larger toxic substances. For dialyzers with the HPM a module design becomes even more important for developing novel commercial products.

  20. Mass transfer for baromembrane separation of solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beloborodov, V. V.; Konstantinova, O. V.; Rusar, É. F.

    1991-12-01

    A mathematical model is obtained for transient mass transfer during the baromem-brane separation of liquids for a flat channel with a semipermeable wall. Hydrated sunflower oil is used as an example to show that the theoretical and experimental time-dependences for the content of the retained material in the concentrate differ insignificantly.

  1. An Entrance Region Mass Transfer Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Youngquist, G. R.

    1979-01-01

    This paper describes an experiment designed to reveal the consequences of the development of a concentration boundary layer. The rate of a mass transfer limited electrochemical reaction is measured and used to obtain the dependence of average Sherwood number on Reynolds number and entrance length. (Author/BB)

  2. Mass transfer mechanism in chiral reversed phase liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Gritti, Fabrice; Guiochon, Georges

    2014-03-01

    The mechanism of mass transfer in chiral chromatography was investigated using an experimental protocol already applied in RPLC and HILIC chromatography. The different contributions to the reduced height equivalent to a theoretical plate (HETP) include the longitudinal diffusion HETP term, the solid-liquid mass transfer resistance HETP term, the short-range eddy dispersion HETP term, and the long-range eddy dispersion HETP term. Their accurate measurement permits the determination of the adsorption rate constant kads of trans-stilbene enantiomers on a column packed with Lux 5 μm Cellulose-1 particles. The experimental results demonstrate that the number of adsorption-desorption steps per unit time of chiral compounds on polysaccharide-based chiral stationary phases is four orders of magnitude smaller than that of achiral compounds.

  3. Non-conservative mass transfers in Algols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdem, A.; Öztürk, O.

    2014-06-01

    We applied a revised model for non-conservative mass transfer in semi-detached binaries to 18 Algol-type binaries showing orbital period increase or decrease in their parabolic O-C diagrams. The combined effect of mass transfer and magnetic braking due to stellar wind was considered when interpreting the orbital period changes of these 18 Algols. Mass transfer was found to be the dominant mechanism for the increase in orbital period of 10 Algols (AM Aur, RX Cas, DK Peg, RV Per, WX Sgr, RZ Sct, BS Sct, W Ser, BD Vir, XZ Vul) while magnetic braking appears to be the responsible mechanism for the decrease in that of 8 Algols (FK Aql, S Cnc, RU Cnc, TU Cnc, SX Cas, TW Cas, V548 Cyg, RY Gem). The peculiar behaviour of orbital period changes in three W Ser-type binary systems (W Ser, itself a prototype, RX Cas and SX Cas) is discussed. The empirical linear relation between orbital period (P) and its rate of change (dP/dt) was also revised.

  4. Orbital Transfer Vehicle Engine Technology High Velocity Ratio Diffusing Crossover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lariviere, Brian W.

    1992-01-01

    High speed, high efficiency head rise multistage pumps require continuous passage diffusing crossovers to effectively convey the pumped fluid from the exit of one impeller to the inlet of the next impeller. On Rocketdyne's Orbital Transfer Vehicle (OTV), the MK49-F, a three stage high pressure liquid hydrogen turbopump, utilizes a 6.23 velocity ratio diffusing crossover. This velocity ratio approaches the diffusion limits for stable and efficient flow over the operating conditions required by the OTV system. The design of the high velocity ratio diffusing crossover was based on advanced analytical techniques anchored by previous tests of stationary two-dimensional diffusers with steady flow. To secure the design and the analytical techniques, tests were required with the unsteady whirling characteristics produced by an impeller. A tester was designed and fabricated using a 2.85 times scale model of the MK49-F turbopumps first stage, including the inducer, impeller, and the diffusing crossover. Water and air tests were completed to evaluate the large scale turbulence, non-uniform velocity, and non-steady velocity on the pump and crossover head and efficiency. Suction performance tests from 80 percent to 124 percent of design flow were completed in water to assess these pump characteristics. Pump and diffuser performance from the water and air tests were compared with the actual MK49-F test data in liquid hydrogen.

  5. Predicting oxygen transfer of fine bubble diffused aeration systems--model issued from dimensional analysis.

    PubMed

    Gillot, S; Capela-Marsal, S; Roustan, M; Héduit, A

    2005-04-01

    The standard oxygenation performances of fine bubble diffused aeration systems in clean water, measured in 12 cylindrical tanks (water depth from 2.4 to 6.1m), were analysed using dimensional analysis. A relationship was established to estimate the scale-up factor for oxygen transfer, the transfer number (N(T)) The transfer number, which is written as a function of the oxygen transfer coefficient (k(L)a(20)), the gas superficial velocity (U(G)), the kinematic viscosity of water (nu) and the acceleration due to gravity (g), has the same physical meaning as the specific oxygen transfer efficiency. N(T) only depends on the geometry of the tank/aeration system [the total surface of the perforated membrane (S(p)), the surface of the tank (S) or its diameter (D), the total surface of the zones covered by the diffusers ("aerated area", S(a)) and the submergence of the diffusers (h)]. This analysis allowed to better describe the mass transfer in cylindrical tanks. Within the range of the parameters considered, the oxygen transfer coefficient (k(L)a(20)) is an increasing linear function of the air flow rate. For a given air flow rate and a given tank surface area, k(L)a(20) decreases with the water depth (submergence of the diffusers). For a given water depth, k(L)a(20) increases with the number of diffusers, and, for an equal number of diffusers, with the total area of the zones covered by the diffusers. The latter result evidences the superiority of the total floor coverage over an arrangement whereby the diffusers are placed on separate grids. The specific standard oxygen transfer efficiency is independent of the air flow rate and the water depth, the drop in the k(L)a(20) being offset by the increase of the saturation concentration. For a given tank area, the impact of the total surface of the perforated membrane (S(p)) and of the aerated area (S(a)) is the same as on the oxygen transfer coefficient. PMID:15862338

  6. Geoelectrical Measurement of Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Day-Lewis, Frederick; Singha, Kamini; Haggerty, Roy; Johnson, Tim; Binley, Andrew; Lane, John

    2014-01-16

    measure mass transfer in-situ and estimate multi-scale and spatially variable mass-transfer parameters. The current lack of such techniques results in large parameter uncertainty, which in turn translates into enormous prediction uncertainty and cost to DOE. In this project, we considered three hydrogeophysical approaches for providing information about mass-transfer parameters: (1) the combination of electrical-resistivity tomography (ERT) and ionic tracer experiments to explore rates of exchange and relative mobile and immobile porosities; (2) complex resistivity (CR) measurements to infer the distribution of diffusive length scales active in a porous medium; and (3) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to estimate mobile and immobile porosity.

  7. Influence of diffusion on photoinduced electron transfer. [laser radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Song, L.; Dorfman, R.C.; Swallen, S.F.; Fayer, M.D. )

    1991-05-02

    Electron transfer from an optically excited donor (rubrene) to randomly distributed acceptors (duroquinone) has been investigated experimentally. The forward electron-transfer process under the influence of diffusion in liquid solution (diethyl sebacate) is compared with that in solid solution (sucrose octaacetate). Steady-state fluorescence yield and time-resolved fluorescence measurements were used to measure the excited-state population of the donor (rubrene). The parameters were used to analyze the electron-transfer dynamics under a variety of acceptor concentrations. The agreement between theoretical predictions and experiments is very good. The forward transfer parameters (a{sub f} and R{sub 0}) in liquid solution are almost identical with those obtained in solid solution.

  8. Macroscopic and microscopic analysis of mass transfer in reversed phase liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Bacskay, Ivett; Felinger, Attila

    2009-02-20

    For the correct description of a chromatographic process, the determination of mass-transfer kinetics in the column is required because the influence of the mass-transfer kinetics on the shape of chromatographic band profiles is crucial. Several sources of mass transfer in a chromatographic bed have been identified and studied: the axial dispersion in the stream of mobile phase, the external mass-transfer resistance, intraparticle diffusion, and the kinetics of adsorption-desorption In this study we compare mass-transfer coefficients obtained in a reversed phase chromatographic column using macroscopic and microscopic approaches. The general rate model, the plate height equation, moment analysis, and stochastic analysis were used to assess chromatographic process during the separation of alkylbenzenes.

  9. 43 CFR 3106.4-3 - Mass transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Mass transfers. 3106.4-3 Section 3106.4-3... or Otherwise § 3106.4-3 Mass transfers. (a) A mass transfer may be utilized in lieu of the provisions... large number of Federal leases to the same transferee. (b) Three originally executed copies of the...

  10. The electronic transfer of information and aerospace knowledge diffusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Bishop, Ann P.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

    1992-01-01

    Increasing reliance on and investment in information technology and electronic networking systems presupposes that computing and information technology will play a motor role in the diffusion of aerospace knowledge. Little is known, however, about actual information technology needs, uses, and problems within the aerospace knowledge diffusion process. The authors state that the potential contributions of information technology to increased productivity and competitiveness will be diminished unless empirically derived knowledge regarding the information-seeking behavior of the members of the social system - those who are producing, transferring, and using scientific and technical information - is incorporated into a new technology policy framework. Research into the use of information technology and electronic networks by U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists, collected as part of a research project designed to study aerospace knowledge diffusion, is presented in support of this assertion.

  11. Minimum Error Fickian Diffusion Coefficients for Mass Diffusion in Multicomponent Gas Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramaniam, S.

    1999-04-01

    Mass diffusion in multicomponent gas mixtures is governed by a coupled system of linear equations for the diffusive mass fluxes in terms of thermodynamic driving forces, known as the generalized Stefan-Maxwell equation. In computations of mass diffusion in multicomponent gas mixtures, this coupling between the different components results in considerable computational overhead. Consequently, simplified diffusion models for the diffusive mass fluxes as explicit functions of the driving forces are an attractive alternative. These models can be interpreted as an approximate solution to the Stefan-Maxwell equation. Simplified diffusion models require the specification of “effective” diffusion coefficients which are usually expressed as functions of the binary diffusion coefficients of each species pair in the mixture. Current models for the effective diffusion coefficients are incapable of providing a priori control over the error incurred in the approximate solution. In this paper a general form for diagonal approximations is derived, which accounts for the requirement imposed by the special structure of the Stefan-Maxwell equation that such approximations be constructed in a reduced-dimensional subspace. In addition, it is shown that current models can be expressed as particular cases of two general forms, but not all these models correspond to the general form for diagonal approximations. A new minimum error diagonal approximation (MEDA) model is proposed, based on the criterion that the diagonal approximation minimize the error in the species velocities. Analytic expressions are derived for the MEDA model's effective diffusion coefficients based on this criterion. These effective diffusion coefficients automatically give the correct solution in two important limiting cases: for that of a binary mixture, and for the case of arbitrary number of components with identical binary diffusivities. Although these minimum error effective diffusion

  12. A microscale turbine driven by diffusive mass flux.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mingcheng; Liu, Rui; Ripoll, Marisol; Chen, Ke

    2015-10-01

    An external diffusive mass flux is shown to be able to generate a mechanical torque on a microscale object based on anisotropic diffusiophoresis. In light of this finding, we propose a theoretical prototype micro-turbine driven purely by diffusive mass flux, which is in strong contrast to conventional turbines driven by convective mass flows. The rotational velocity of the proposed turbine is determined by the external concentration gradient, the geometry and the diffusiophoretic properties of the turbine. This scenario is validated by performing computer simulations. Our finding thus provides a new type of chemo-mechanical response which could be used to exploit existing chemical energies at small scales.

  13. A mass transfer model for VOC emission from silage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafner, Sasha D.; Montes, Felipe; Rotz, C. Alan

    2012-07-01

    Silage has been shown to be an important source of emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), which contribute to the formation of ground-level ozone. Measurements have shown that environmental conditions and silage properties strongly influence emission rates, making it difficult to assess the contribution of silage in VOC emission inventories. In this work, we present an analytical convection-diffusion-dispersion model for predicting emission of VOCs from silage. It was necessary to incorporate empirical relationships from wind tunnel trials for the response of mass transfer parameters to surface air velocity and silage porosity. The resulting model was able to accurately predict the effect of temperature on ethanol emission in wind tunnel trials, but it over-predicted alcohol and aldehyde emission measured using a mass balance approach from corn silage samples outdoors and within barns. Mass balance results confirmed that emission is related to gas-phase porosity, but the response to air speed was not clear, which was contrary to wind tunnel results. Mass balance results indicate that alcohol emission from loose silage on farms may approach 50% of the initial mass over six hours, while relative losses of acetaldehyde will be greater.

  14. Simultaneous Heat and Mass Transfer Model for Convective Drying of Building Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upadhyay, Ashwani; Chandramohan, V. P.

    2016-06-01

    A mathematical model of simultaneous heat and moisture transfer is developed for convective drying of building material. A rectangular brick is considered for sample object. Finite-difference method with semi-implicit scheme is used for solving the transient governing heat and mass transfer equation. Convective boundary condition is used, as the product is exposed in hot air. The heat and mass transfer equations are coupled through diffusion coefficient which is assumed as the function of temperature of the product. Set of algebraic equations are generated through space and time discretization. The discretized algebraic equations are solved by Gauss-Siedel method via iteration. Grid and time independent studies are performed for finding the optimum number of nodal points and time steps respectively. A MATLAB computer code is developed to solve the heat and mass transfer equations simultaneously. Transient heat and mass transfer simulations are performed to find the temperature and moisture distribution inside the brick.

  15. Effects of Rate-Limited Mass Transfer on Modeling Vapor Intrusion with Aerobic Biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yiming; Hou, Deyi; Lu, Chunhui; Spain, Jim C; Luo, Jian

    2016-09-01

    Most of the models for simulating vapor intrusion accept the local equilibrium assumption for multiphase concentration distributions, that is, concentrations in solid, liquid and vapor phases are in equilibrium. For simulating vapor transport with aerobic biodegradation controlled by counter-diffusion processes, the local equilibrium assumption combined with dual-Monod kinetics and biomass decay may yield near-instantaneous behavior at steady state. The present research investigates how predicted concentration profiles and fluxes change as interphase mass transfer resistances are increased for vapor intrusion with aerobic biodegradation. Our modeling results indicate that the attenuation coefficients for cases with and without mass transfer limitations can be significantly different by orders of magnitude. Rate-limited mass transfer may lead to larger overlaps of contaminant vapor and oxygen concentrations, which cannot be simulated by instantaneous reaction models with local equilibrium mass transfer. In addition, the contaminant flux with rate-limited mass transfer is much smaller than that with local equilibrium mass transfer, indicating that local equilibrium mass transfer assumption may significantly overestimate the biodegradation rate and capacity for mitigating vapor intrusion through the unsaturated zone. Our results indicate a strong research need for field tests to examine the validity of local equilibrium mass transfer, a widely accepted assumption in modeling vapor intrusion.

  16. Effects of Rate-Limited Mass Transfer on Modeling Vapor Intrusion with Aerobic Biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yiming; Hou, Deyi; Lu, Chunhui; Spain, Jim C; Luo, Jian

    2016-09-01

    Most of the models for simulating vapor intrusion accept the local equilibrium assumption for multiphase concentration distributions, that is, concentrations in solid, liquid and vapor phases are in equilibrium. For simulating vapor transport with aerobic biodegradation controlled by counter-diffusion processes, the local equilibrium assumption combined with dual-Monod kinetics and biomass decay may yield near-instantaneous behavior at steady state. The present research investigates how predicted concentration profiles and fluxes change as interphase mass transfer resistances are increased for vapor intrusion with aerobic biodegradation. Our modeling results indicate that the attenuation coefficients for cases with and without mass transfer limitations can be significantly different by orders of magnitude. Rate-limited mass transfer may lead to larger overlaps of contaminant vapor and oxygen concentrations, which cannot be simulated by instantaneous reaction models with local equilibrium mass transfer. In addition, the contaminant flux with rate-limited mass transfer is much smaller than that with local equilibrium mass transfer, indicating that local equilibrium mass transfer assumption may significantly overestimate the biodegradation rate and capacity for mitigating vapor intrusion through the unsaturated zone. Our results indicate a strong research need for field tests to examine the validity of local equilibrium mass transfer, a widely accepted assumption in modeling vapor intrusion. PMID:27486832

  17. Mass transfer kinetics during osmotic dehydration of pomegranate arils.

    PubMed

    Mundada, Manoj; Hathan, Bahadur Singh; Maske, Swati

    2011-01-01

    The mass transfer kinetics during osmotic dehydration of pomegranate arils in osmotic solution of sucrose was studied to increase palatability and shelf life of arils. The freezing of the whole pomegranate at -18 °C was carried out prior to osmotic dehydration to increase the permeability of the outer cellular layer of the arils. The osmotic solution concentrations used were 40, 50, 60°Bx, osmotic solution temperatures were 35, 45, 55 °C. The fruit to solution ratio was kept 1:4 (w/w) during all the experiments and the process duration varied from 0 to 240 min. Azuara model and Peleg model were the best fitted as compared to other models for water loss and solute gain of pomegranate arils, respectively. Generalized Exponential Model had an excellent fit for water loss ratio and solute gain ratio of pomegranate arils. Effective moisture diffusivity of water as well as solute was estimated using the analytical solution of Fick's law of diffusion. For above conditions of osmotic dehydration, average effective diffusivity of water loss and solute gain varied from 2.718 × 10(-10) to 5.124 × 10(-10) m(2)/s and 1.471 × 10(-10) to 5.147 × 10(-10) m(2)/s, respectively. The final product was successfully utilized in some nutritional formulations such as ice cream and bakery products. PMID:21535673

  18. Heat and mass transfer in deep-frying of pumpkin, sweet potato and taro.

    PubMed

    Ahromrit, Araya; Nema, Prabhat K

    2010-12-01

    Heat and mass transfer parameters, effective thermal diffusivity, heat transfer coefficient, effective moisture diffusivity and moisture transfer coefficient-for pumpkin (Cucurbita pepo), sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) and taro (Colocasia esculenta) under deep-frying conditions were determined by fitting experimental data on transient values of temperature and moisture content to the solution of the standard diffusion equation in cylindrical coordinates as modified by Dincer (Heat Mass Transfer 32:109-113, 1996). A case of Biot number in the range of 0< B i <100 was considered in this study. Remarkably good agreement was found between estimated and calculated values as the root mean square error between the measured and calculated temperature and moisture content values were only 5.0% and 1.3%, respectively. The model can be easily and effectively used to determine effective diffusion coefficients as well as transfer coefficients for heat and mass transfer. The oil uptake values for the above vegetables were lower than the values reported for other deep fried products. PMID:23572697

  19. USINT. Heat and Mass Transfer In Concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Eyberger, L.R.

    1989-12-01

    USINT was developed to model the thermal response of concrete to very high heating rates such as might occur from sodium spills on concrete surfaces in a breeder reactor. The major phenomena treated are conductive energy transport; chemical decomposition of concrete; and two-phase, three-component heat and mass transfer of the decomposition products: steam, liquid water, and carbon dioxide. The USINT model provides for porosity to increase as water and carbon-dioxide are formed from the concrete. The concrete is treated generally as divided into two basic regions, wet and dry. In the wet region, steam, carbon-dioxide, and liquid water may co-exist, but in the dry region, there is no liquid water. There is also the possibility of a third region in which there is only liquid water and no gases.

  20. USINT. Heat and Mass Transfer in Concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, J.V.; Knight, R.L.

    1989-12-01

    USINT was developed to model the thermal response of concrete to very high heating rates such as might occur from sodium spills on concrete surfaces in a breeder reactor. The major phenomena treated are conductive energy transport; chemical decomposition of concrete; and two-phase, three-component heat and mass transfer of the decomposition products: steam, liquid water, and carbon dioxide. The USINT model provides for porosity to increase as water and carbon-dioxide are formed from the concrete. The concrete is treated generally as divided into two basic regions, wet and dry. In the wet region, steam, carbon-dioxide, and liquid water may co-exist, but in the dry region, there is no liquid water. There is also the possibility of a third region in which there is only liquid water and no gases.

  1. Nanoparticle organization through photoinduced bulk mass transfer.

    PubMed

    Snell, Kristen E; Stéphant, Nicolas; Pansu, Robert B; Audibert, Jean-Frédéric; Lagugné-Labarthet, François; Ishow, Eléna

    2014-03-18

    A series of dipolar triphenylaminoazo derivatives, with largely distinct charge transfer and glass transition temperatures, has been synthesized. Their photomigration capability in the solid state to form surface relief gratings (SRGs) under interferential illumination has been investigated with respect to their photochromic properties and showed a prevailing influence of the bulkiness of the azo substituent. The azo mass transfer was utilized to efficiently photoalign 200 nm polystyrene nanoparticles along the SRG crests, which were initially deposited on nonirradiated azo surfaces. In contrast, nanoparticles spin cast on prestructured surface relief gratings were localized in the troughs of the periodic structures. These distinct locations point out the ability of isotropic and amorphous photochromic thin films to collectively move and organize nano-objects in an ordered fashion through the use of polarized illumination. This versatile approach opens the path to optically aligned ensembles of individual nano-objects over large areas, which can be further combined with metallic conductive or magnetic coating to create novel functional nanostructures.

  2. Early solar mass loss, element diffusion, and solar oscillation frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Guzik, J.A.; Cox, A.N.

    1994-07-01

    Swenson and Faulkner, and Boothroyd et al. investigated the possibility that early main-sequence mass loss via a stronger early solar wind could be responsible for the observed solar lithium and beryllium depiction. This depletion requires a total mass loss of {approximately}0.1 M{circle_dot}, nearly independent of the mass loss timescale. We have calculated the evolution and oscillation frequencies of solar models including helium and element diffusion, and such early solar mass loss. We show that extreme mass loss of 1 M{circle_dot} is easily ruled out by the low-degree p-modes that probe the solar center and sense the steeper molecular weight gradient produced by the early phase of more rapid hydrogen burning. The effects on central structure are much smaller for models with an initial mass of 1.1 M{circle_dot} and exponentially-decreasing mass loss irate with e-folding timescale 0.45 Gyr. While such mass loss slightly worsens the agreement between observed and calculated low-degree modes, the observational uncertainties of several tenths of a microhertz weaken this conclusion. Surprisingly, the intermediate-degree modes with much smaller observational uncertainties that probe the convection zone bottom prove to be the key to discriminating between models: The early mass loss phase decreases the total amount of helium and heavier elements diffused from the convection zone, and the extent of the diffusion produced composition gradient just below the convection zone, deteriorating the agreement with observed frequencies for these modes. Thus it appears that oscillations can also rule out this smaller amount of gradual early main-sequence mass loss in the young Sun. The mass loss phase must be confined to substantially under a billion years, probably 0.5 Gyr or less, to simultaneously solve the solar Li/Be problem and avoid discrepancies with solar oscillation frequencies.

  3. Topological spin-transfer drag driven by skyrmion diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochoa, Héctor; Kim, Se Kwon; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav

    2016-07-01

    We study the spin-transfer drag mediated by the Brownian motion of skyrmions. The essential idea is illustrated in a two-terminal geometry, in which a thin film of a magnetic insulator is placed in between two metallic reservoirs. An electric current in one of the terminals pumps topological charge into the magnet via a spin-transfer torque. The charge diffuses over the bulk of the system as stable skyrmion textures. By Onsager's reciprocity, the topological charge leaving the magnet produces an electromotive force in the second terminal. The voltage signal decays algebraically with the separation between contacts, in contrast to the exponential suppression of the spin drag driven by nonprotected excitations like magnons. We show how this topological effect can be used as a tool to characterize the phase diagram of chiral magnets and thin films with interfacial Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interactions.

  4. Thermophoretically augmented mass transfer rates to solid walls across laminar boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, S. A.; Rosner, D. E.

    1986-01-01

    Predictions of mass transfer (heavy vapor and small particle deposition) rates to solid walls, including the effects of thermal (Soret) diffusion ('thermophoresis' for small particles), are made by numerically solving the two-dimensional self-similar forced convection laminar boundary-layer equations with variable properties, covering the particle size range from vapor molecules up to the size threshold for inertial (dynamical nonequilibrium) effects. The effect of thermophoresis is predicted to be particularly important for submicron particle deposition on highly cooled solid surfaces, with corresponding enhancement factors at atmospheric conditions being over a thousand-fold at T(w)/T(e) equal to about 0.6. As a consequence of this mass transfer mechanism, the particle size dependence of the mass transfer coefficient to a cooled wall will be much weaker than for the corresponding case of isothermal capture by Brownian-convective diffusion.

  5. Reacting viscous-shock-layer solutions with multicomponent diffusion and mass injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moss, J. N.

    1974-01-01

    Numerical solutions of the viscous-shock-layer equation where the chemistry is treated as being either frozen, equilibrium, or nonequilibrium are presented. Also the effects of the diffusion model, surface catalysis, and mass injection on surface transport and flow parameters are considered. The flow is treated as a mixture of five inert and thermally perfect species. The viscous-shock-layer equations are solved by using an implicit-difference scheme. All calculations are for hyperboloids with included angles of 20 and 45. The flight conditions are those for various altitudes and velocities in the earth's atmosphere. Data are presented to show the effects of the chemical models; diffusion models; surface catalysis; and mass injection of air on heat transfer; skin friction; shock standoff distance; wall pressure distribution; and tangential velocity, temperature, and species profiles. The results show that an equilibrium analysis can substantially overpredict the heat-transfer rates for flow conditions experienced by earth-orbital entry vehicles. Moreover, at such conditions surface catalysis significantly influences heat-transfer and flow-field properties. If a binary rather than a multicomponent diffusion model is assumed, negligible errors in most flow properties result. Quantitative results are presented that show the effect of mass injection on flow properties within and downstream of the injection region.

  6. A simple modelling of mass diffusion effects on condensation with noncondensable gases for the CATHARE Code

    SciTech Connect

    Coste, P.; Bestion, D.

    1995-09-01

    This paper presents a simple modelling of mass diffusion effects on condensation. In presence of noncondensable gases, the mass diffusion near the interface is modelled using the heat and mass transfer analogy and requires normally an iterative procedure to calculate the interface temperature. Simplifications of the model and of the solution procedure are used without important degradation of the predictions. The model is assessed on experimental data for both film condensation in vertical tubes and direct contact condensation in horizontal tubes, including air-steam, Nitrogen-steam and Helium-steam data. It is implemented in the Cathare code, a french system code for nuclear reactor thermal hydraulics developed by CEA, EDF, and FRAMATOME.

  7. Diffusion and phase change characterization by mass spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koslin, M. E.; White, F. A.

    1979-01-01

    The high temperature diffusion of trace elements in metals and alloys was investigated. Measurements were made by high sensitivity mass spectrometry in which individual atoms were detected, and quantitative data was obtained for zircaloy-2, 304 stainless steel, and tantalum. Additionally, a mass spectrometer was also an analytical tool for determining an allotropic phase change for stainless steel at 955 C, and a phase transition region between 772 C and 1072 C existing for zircaloy-2. Diffusion rates were measured in thin (0.001" (0.0025 cm) and 0.0005" (0.0013 cm)) ribbons which were designed as high temperature thermal ion sources, with the alkali metals as naturally occurring impurities. In the temperature and pressure regime where diffusion measurements were made, the solute atoms evaporated from the ribbon filaments when the impurities diffused to the surface, with a fraction of these impurity atoms ionized according to the Langmuir-Saha relation. The techniques developed can be applied to many other alloys important to space vehicles and supersonic transports; and, with appropriate modifications, to the diffusion of impurities in composites.

  8. Mass transfer kinetics on heterogeneous binding sites of molecularly imprinted polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyunjung; Kaczmarski, Krzysztof; Guiochon, Georges A

    2005-07-01

    The mass transfer kinetics of the L- and D-Fmoc-Tryptophan (Fmoc-Trp) enantiomers on Fmoc-L-Trp imprinted polymer (MIP) and on its reference polymer (NIP), were measured using their elution peak profiles and the breakthrough curves recorded in frontal analysis for the determination of their equilibrium isotherms, at temperatures of 40, 50, 60, and 70 C. At all temperatures, the isotherm data of the Fmoc-Trp enantiomers on the MIP were best accounted for by the Tri-Langmuir isotherm model, while the isotherm data of Fmoc-Trp on the NIP were best accounted for by the Bi-Langmuir isotherm model. The profiles of the elution bands of various amounts of each enantiomer were acquired in the concentration range from 0.1 to 40 mM. These experimental profiles were compared with those calculated using the best values estimated for the isotherm parameters and the lumped pore diffusion model (POR), which made possible to calculate the intraparticle diffusion coefficients for each system. The results show that surface diffusion contributes predominantly to the overall mass transfer kinetics on both the MIP and the NIP, compared to external mass transfer and pore diffusion. The surface diffusion coefficients (D{sub s}) of Fmoc-L-Trp on the NIP does not depend on the amount bound (q) while the values of D{sub s} for the two Fmoc-Trp enantiomers on the MIP increase with increasing q at all temperatures. These positive dependencies of D{sub s} on q for Fmoc-Trp on the MIP were fairly well modeled by indirectly incorporating surface heterogeneity into the surface diffusion coefficient. The results obtained show that the mass transfer kinetics of the enantiomers on the imprinted polymers depend strongly on the surface heterogeneity.

  9. Calculation of the mass transfer coefficient for the combustion of a carbon particle

    SciTech Connect

    Scala, Fabrizio

    2010-01-15

    In this paper we address the calculation of the mass transfer coefficient around a burning carbon particle in an atmosphere of O{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, CO, and H{sub 2}O. The complete set of Stefan-Maxwell equations is analytically solved under the assumption of no homogeneous reaction in the boundary layer. An expression linking the oxygen concentration and the oxygen flux at the particle surface (as a function of the bulk gas composition) is derived which can be used to calculate the mass transfer coefficient. A very simple approximate explicit expression is also given for the mass transfer coefficient, that is shown to be valid in the low oxygen flux limit or when the primary combustion product is CO{sub 2}. The results are given in terms of a correction factor to the equimolar counter-diffusion mass transfer coefficient, which is typically available in the literature for specific geometries and/or fluid-dynamic conditions. The significance of the correction factor and the accuracy of the different available expressions is illustrated for several cases of practical interest. Results show that under typical combustion conditions the use of the equimolar counter-diffusion mass transfer coefficient can lead to errors up to 10%. Larger errors are possible in oxygen-enriched conditions, while the error is generally low in oxy-combustion. (author)

  10. Comparison of the mass transfer in totally porous and superficially porous stationary phases in liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Ibolya; Bacskay, Ivett; Kilár, Ferenc; Felinger, Attila

    2010-06-01

    The characterization of mass-transfer processes in a chromatographic column during a separation process is essential, since the influence of the mass-transfer kinetics on the shape of the chromatographic band profiles and on the efficiency of the separation is crucial. Several sources of mass transfer in a chromatographic bed have been identified and studied: the axial dispersion in the stream of mobile phase, the external mass-transfer resistance, intraparticle diffusion, and the kinetics of adsorption-desorption. We measured and compared the characteristics and performance of a new brand of shell particles and those of a conventional brand of totally porous silica particles. The shell stationary phase was made of 2.7-microm superficially porous particles (a 1.7-microm solid core is covered with a 0.5-microm-thick shell of porous silica). The other material consisted of totally porous particles of conventional 3.5-microm commercial silica. We measured the first and second central moments of the peaks of human insulin over a wide range of mobile phase velocities (from 0.02 to 1.3 mL/min) at 20 degrees C. The plate height equations were constructed and the axial dispersion, external mass transfer, as well as the intraparticle diffusion coefficients were calculated for the two stationary phases.

  11. Predicting diffusive alveolar oxygen transfer from carbon monoxide-diffusing capacity in exercising foxhounds

    PubMed Central

    Hsia, Connie C. W.; Wagner, Peter D.; Dane, D. Merrill; Wagner, Harrieth E.; Johnson, Robert L.

    2008-01-01

    Although lung diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide (DlCO) is a widely used test of diffusive O2 transfer, few studies have directly related DlCO to O2-diffusing capacity (DlO2); none has used the components of DlCO, i.e., conductance of alveolar membrane and capillary blood, to predict DlO2 from rest to exercise. To understand the relationship between DlCO and DlO2 at matched levels of cardiac output, we analyzed cumulative data from rest to heavy exercise in 43 adult dogs, with normal lungs or reduced lung capacity following lung resection, that were studied by two techniques. 1) A rebreathing (RB) technique was used to measure DlCO and pulmonary blood flow at two O2 tensions, independent of O2 exchange. DlCO was partitioned into CO-diffusing capacity of alveolar membrane and pulmonary capillary blood volume using the Roughton-Forster equation and converted into an equivalent DlO2, [DlO2(RB)]. 2) A multiple inert-gas elimination technique (MIGET) was used to measure ventilation-perfusion distributions, O2 and CO2 exchange under hypoxia, to derive DlO2 [DlO2(MIGET)] by the Lilienthal-Riley technique and Bohr integration. For direct comparisons, DlO2(RB) was interpolated to the cardiac output measured by the Fick principle corresponding to DlO2(MIGET). The DlO2-to-DlCO ratio averaged 1.61. Correlation between DlO2(RB) and DlO2(MIGET) was similar in normal and post-resection groups. Overall, DlO2(MIGET) = 0.975 DlO2(RB); mean difference between the two techniques was under 5% for both animal groups. We conclude that, despite various uncertainties inherent in these two disparate methods, the Roughton-Forster equation adequately predicts diffusive O2 transfer from rest to heavy exercise in canines with normal, as well as reduced, lung capacities. PMID:18719238

  12. Mass transfer across combustion gas thermal boundary layers - Power production and materials processing implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosner, D. E.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of Soret diffusion (for vapors) and thermophoresis (for particles) are illustrated using recent optical experiments and boundary layer computations. Mass transfer rate augmentations of up to a factor of 1000 were observed and predicted for submicron-particle capture by cooled solid surfaces, while mass transfer suppressions of more than 10 to the -10th-fold were predicted for 'overheated' surfaces. It is noted that the results obtained are of interest in connection with such technological applications as fly-ash capture in power generation equipment and glass droplet deposition in optical-waveguide manufacture.

  13. Numerical study on heat and mass transfer in hygroscopic rotor during sorption process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Hyun-Geun; Park, Il Seouk

    2016-06-01

    Recently, interest in hygroscopic dehumidifiers has rapidly increased in the indoor environment industry because of their potential contribution to the development of hybrid (refrigerating + hygroscopic) dehumidifiers. Heat and mass transport phenomena such as adsorption and desorption, and their complex interactions occur in a desiccant rotor, which comprises many small hygroscopic channels. This study numerically investigated the conjugated heat and mass transfers in a channel modeled with the flow and porous desiccant regions, where only ordinary and surface diffusions (excluding Knudsen diffusion) during the sorption processes were considered. The change in the dehumidification performance depending on operating conditions such as the rotor's rotating speed, air flow rate, and adsorption-desorption ratio, was examined under various working environments. The temporal and spatial variations in the temperature, vapor mass fraction, and liquid water mass fraction in the channel were considered in detail. The closely linked heat and mass transports were clarified for a better understanding of the sorption processes in the desiccant rotor.

  14. How changing the particle structure can speed up protein mass transfer kinetics in liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Gritti, Fabrice; Horvath, Krisztian; Guiochon, Georges

    2012-11-01

    The mass transfer kinetics of a few compounds (uracil, 112 Da), insulin (5.5 kDa), lysozyme (13.4 kDa), and bovine serum albumin (BSA, 67 kDa) in columns packed with several types of spherical particles was investigated under non-retained conditions, in order to eliminate the poorly known contribution of surface diffusion to overall sample diffusivity across the porous particles in RPLC. Diffusivity across particles is then minimum. Based on the porosity of the particles accessible to analytes, it was accurately estimated from the elution times, the internal obstruction factor (using Pismen correlation), and the hindrance diffusion factor (using Renkin correlation). The columns used were packed with fully porous particles 2.5 μm Luna-C(18) 100 Å, core-shell particles 2.6 μm Kinetex-C(18) 100 Å, 3.6 μm Aeris Widepore-C(18) 200 Å, and prototype 2.7 μm core-shell particles (made of two concentric porous shells with 100 and 300 Å average pore size, respectively), and with 3.3 μm non-porous silica particles. The results demonstrate that the porous particle structure and the solid-liquid mass transfer resistance have practically no effect on the column efficiency for small molecules. For them, the column performance depends principally on eddy dispersion (packing homogeneity), to a lesser degree on longitudinal diffusion (effective sample diffusivity along the packed bed), and only slightly on the solid-liquid mass transfer resistance (sample diffusivity across the particle). In contrast, for proteins, this third HETP contribution, hence the porous particle structure, together with eddy dispersion govern the kinetic performance of columns. Mass transfer kinetics of proteins was observed to be fastest for columns packed with core-shell particles having either a large core-to-particle ratio or having a second, external, shell made of a thin porous layer with large mesopores (200-300 Å) and a high porosity (~/=0.5-0.7). The structure of this external shell seems

  15. Electron Transfer Dissociation Mass Spectrometry of Hemoglobin on Clinical Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coelho Graça, Didia; Lescuyer, Pierre; Clerici, Lorella; Tsybin, Yury O.; Hartmer, Ralf; Meyer, Markus; Samii, Kaveh; Hochstrasser, Denis F.; Scherl, Alexander

    2012-10-01

    A mass spectrometry-based assay combining the specificity of selected reaction monitoring and the protein ion activation capabilities of electron transfer dissociation was developed and employed for the rapid identification of hemoglobin variants from whole blood without previous proteolytic cleavage. The analysis was performed in a robust ion trap mass spectrometer operating at nominal mass accuracy and resolution. Subtle differences in globin sequences, resulting with mass shifts of about one Da, can be unambiguously identified. These results suggest that mass spectrometry analysis of entire proteins using electron transfer dissociation can be employed on clinical samples in a workflow compatible with diagnostic applications.

  16. Influence of drying air parameters on mass transfer characteristics of apple slices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beigi, Mohsen

    2016-10-01

    To efficiently design both new drying process and equipment and/or to improve the existing systems, accurate values of mass transfer characteristics are necessary. The present study aimed to investigate the influence of drying air parameters (i.e. temperature, velocity and relative humidity) on effective diffusivity and convective mass transfer coefficient of apple slices. The Dincer and Dost model was used to determine the mass transfer characteristics. The obtained Biot number indicated that the moisture transfer in the apple slices was controlled by both internal and external resistance. The effective diffusivity and mass transfer coefficient values obtained to be in the ranges of 7.13 × 10-11-7.66 × 10-10 and 1.46 × 10-7-3.39 × 10-7 m s-1, respectively and the both of them increased with increasing drying air temperature and velocity, and decreasing relative humidity. The validation of the model showed that the model predicted the experimental drying curves of the samples with a good accuracy.

  17. Influence of drying air parameters on mass transfer characteristics of apple slices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beigi, Mohsen

    2015-12-01

    To efficiently design both new drying process and equipment and/or to improve the existing systems, accurate values of mass transfer characteristics are necessary. The present study aimed to investigate the influence of drying air parameters (i.e. temperature, velocity and relative humidity) on effective diffusivity and convective mass transfer coefficient of apple slices. The Dincer and Dost model was used to determine the mass transfer characteristics. The obtained Biot number indicated that the moisture transfer in the apple slices was controlled by both internal and external resistance. The effective diffusivity and mass transfer coefficient values obtained to be in the ranges of 7.13 × 10-11-7.66 × 10-10 and 1.46 × 10-7-3.39 × 10-7 m s-1, respectively and the both of them increased with increasing drying air temperature and velocity, and decreasing relative humidity. The validation of the model showed that the model predicted the experimental drying curves of the samples with a good accuracy.

  18. Application and limitations of a mass transfer VOC emission model for a dry building material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, S.; Lungu, C. T.

    2013-12-01

    Volatile organic compound (VOC) emission from building materials into air has been quantified, characterized and modeled. Internal diffusion of VOC through a material based on Fick's law of diffusion is the basis for mass transfer modeling of diffusive emission used to estimate VOC concentrations in air over time. Current mass transfer models have been shown to appropriately estimate air VOC concentrations at approximate room temperature, while other research has shown that temperature has a profound effect on the diffusion coefficient, D, of VOC in a material. Here, a mass transfer model is operated at 23 °C and 40 °C using input parameters applicable for each temperature. The model estimates are validated against environmental test chamber data for styrene emission from a vinyl ester resin thermoset composite material. The model correlates well with the 23 °C chamber data, but underestimates chamber data by as much as 10-4 at 264 h for the 40 °C modeling. This suggests that the model requires adjustment for predicting VOC air concentrations at temperatures other than 23 °C.

  19. Air sparging effectiveness: laboratory characterization of air-channel mass transfer zone for VOC volatilization.

    PubMed

    Braida, W J; Ong, S K

    2001-10-12

    Air sparging in conjunction with soil vapor extraction is one of many technologies currently being applied for the remediation of groundwater contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Mass transfer at the air-water interface during air sparging is affected by various soil and VOC properties. In this study with a single air-channel apparatus, mass transfer of VOCs was shown to occur within a thin layer of saturated porous media next to the air channel. In this zone, the VOCs were found to rapidly deplete during air sparging resulting in a steep concentration gradient while the VOC concentration outside the zone remained fairly constant. The sizes of the mass transfer zone were found to range from 17 to 41 mm or 70d(50) and 215d(50) (d(50)=mean particle size) for low organic carbon content media (<0.01% OC). The size of the mass transfer zone was found to be proportional to the square root of the aqueous diffusivity of the VOC, and was affected by the mean particle size, and the uniformity coefficient. Effects of the volatility of the VOCs as represented by the Henry's law constants and the airflow rates on the mass transfer zone were found to be negligible but VOC mass transfer from air-water interface to bulk air phase seems to play a role. A general correlation for predicting the size of the mass transfer zone was developed. The model was developed using data from nine different VOCs and verified by two other VOCs. The existence of the mass transfer zone provides an explanation for the tailing effect of the air phase concentration under prolonged air sparging and the rebound in the VOC air phase concentration after the sparging system is turned off.

  20. A new probe of pore geometry: diffusive MASS NMR.

    PubMed

    Sen, Pabitra N; Liu, Yun; Leu, Gabriela; Cory, David G

    2003-01-01

    NMR methods are widely used to probe the structure and fluid dynamics of porous materials, as they are uniquely suited to these studies since NMR records the correlation of changing local magnetic fields over a time scale of ns to seconds. The local magnetic fields are established by local variations in the bulk magnetic susceptibility of the sample (and so are directly tied to the sample's local structure). The fluctuation in field that a spin sees is due to molecular transport (including molecular diffusion) through these local fields, and so reports on the length scales of structures and impediments to transport. We have developed a new set of methods DIFFUSIVE-MASS to provide a means of systematically varying the effective time scale of the measurement and thus the effective length scale. This new handle permits a detailed, microscopic picture of the structure and dynamics. Diffusive MASS NMR methods will permit a systematic set of methods and analysis for characterizing the chemistry, structure and fluid dynamics of the mobile phase in porous materials. The approach will be applicable to any diamagnetic material. In particular, the industry of oil discovery depends on understanding heterogeneous porous media.

  1. Mass transfer characteristics of bisporus mushroom ( Agaricus bisporus) slices during convective hot air drying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanbarian, Davoud; Baraani Dastjerdi, Mojtaba; Torki-Harchegani, Mehdi

    2016-05-01

    An accurate understanding of moisture transfer parameters, including moisture diffusivity and moisture transfer coefficient, is essential for efficient mass transfer analysis and to design new dryers or improve existing drying equipments. The main objective of the present study was to carry out an experimental and theoretical investigation of mushroom slices drying and determine the mass transfer characteristics of the samples dried under different conditions. The mushroom slices with two thicknesses of 3 and 5 mm were dried at air temperatures of 40, 50 and 60 °C and air flow rates of 1 and 1.5 m s-1. The Dincer and Dost model was used to determine the moisture transfer parameters and predict the drying curves. It was observed that the entire drying process took place in the falling drying rate period. The obtained lag factor and Biot number indicated that the moisture transfer in the samples was controlled by both internal and external resistance. The effective moisture diffusivity and the moisture transfer coefficient increased with increasing air temperature, air flow rate and samples thickness and varied in the ranges of 6.5175 × 10-10 to 1.6726 × 10-9 m2 s-1 and 2.7715 × 10-7 to 3.5512 × 10-7 m s-1, respectively. The validation of the Dincer and Dost model indicated a good capability of the model to describe the drying curves of the mushroom slices.

  2. Variations in mass transfer to single endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Van Doormaal, Mark A; Zhang, Ji; Wada, Shigeo; Shaw, James E; Won, Doyon; Cybulsky, Myron I; Yip, Chris M; Ethier, C Ross

    2009-06-01

    Mass transfer between flowing blood and arterial mural cells (including vascular endothelial cells) may play an important role in atherogenesis. Endothelial cells are known to have an apical surface topography that is not flat, and hence mass transfer patterns to individual endothelial cells are likely affected by the local cellular topography. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between vascular endothelial cell surface topography and cellular level mass transfer. Confluent porcine endothelial monolayers were cultured under both shear and static conditions and atomic force microscopy was used to measure endothelial cell topography. Using finite element methods and the measured cell topography, flow and concentration fields were calculated for a typical, small, blood-borne solute. A relative Sherwood number was defined as the difference between the computed Sherwood number and that predicted by the Leveque solution for mass transfer over a flat surface: this eliminates the effects of axial location on mass transfer efficiency. The average intracellular relative Sherwood number range was found to be dependent on cell height and not dependent on cell elongation due to shear stress in culture. The mass flux to individual cells reached a maximum at the highest point on the endothelial cell surface, typically corresponding to the nucleus of the cell. Therefore, for small receptor-mediated solutes, increased solute uptake efficiency can be achieved by concentrating receptors near the nucleus. The main conclusion of the work is that although the rate of mass transfer varies greatly over an individual cell, the average mass transfer rate to a cell is close to that predicted for a flat cell. In comparison to other hemodynamic factors, the topography of endothelial cells therefore seems to have little effect on mass transfer rates and is likely physiologically insignificant.

  3. Mass transfer coefficients determination from linear gradient elution experiments.

    PubMed

    Pfister, David; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    A procedure to estimate mass transfer coefficients in linear gradient elution chromatography is presented and validated by comparison with experimental data. Mass transfer coefficients are traditionally estimated experimentally through the van Deemter plot, which represents the HETP as a function of the fluid velocity. Up to now, the HETP was obtained under isocratic elution conditions. Unfortunately, isocratic elution experiments are often not suitable for large biomolecules which suffer from severe mass transfer hindrances. Yamamoto et al. were the first to propose a semi-empirical equation to relate HETPs measured from linear gradient elution experiments to those obtained under isocratic conditions [7]. Based on his pioneering work, the approach presented in this work aims at providing an experimental procedure supported by simple equations to estimate reliable mass transfer parameters from linear gradient elution chromatographic experiments. From the resolution of the transport model, we derived a rigorous analytical expression for the HETP in linear gradient elution chromatography.

  4. New method to determine the mass transfer resistance of sterile closures for shaken bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Anderlei, Tibor; Mrotzek, Christian; Bartsch, Stefan; Amoabediny, Ghassem; Peter, Cyril P; Büchs, Jochen

    2007-12-01

    In this paper a novel and easily applied method to measure the mass transfer resistance of the sterile closures (e.g. cotton plug) of shaken bioreactors is introduced. This method requires no investment in special equipment (e.g. an oxygen sensor) and can be performed with the materials usually available in typical laboratories. The method is based on the model of Henzler et al. (1986), which mechanistically describes mass transfer through the sterile closure of a shaken bioreactor based on diffusion coupled with Stefan convection. The concentration dependency of the multi-component diffusion coefficients is taken into account. The water loss from two equivalent shaken bioreactors equipped with sterile closures during several days of shaking is measured. One flask contains distilled water, the other a saturated salt solution. From the water evaporation rate in each of the two flasks, the new model presented calculates the relative humidity in the environment, the average diffusion coefficient of oxygen in the sterile closure (D(O2)), and the diffusion coefficient of carbon dioxide (D(CO2)) . The diffusion coefficient of carbon dioxide (D(CO2)) only depends on the density and material properties of the sterile closure and not on the gas concentrations and is, therefore, an ideal parameter for the characterization of the mass transfer resistance. This new method is validated experimentally by comparing the diffusion coefficient of oxygen (D(O2)) to a measurement by the classic dynamic method; and by comparing the calculated relative humidity in the environment to a humidity sensor measurement. PMID:17497734

  5. Disentangling oil weathering using GC x GC. 2. Mass transfer calculations.

    PubMed

    Arey, J Samuel; Nelson, Robert K; Plata, Desiree L; Reddy, Christopher M

    2007-08-15

    Hydrocarbon mass transfers to the atmosphere and water column drive the early weathering of oil spills and also control the chemical exposures of many coastal wildlife species. However, in the field, mass transfer rates of individual hydrocarbons to air and water are often uncertain. In the Part 1 companion to this paper, we used comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC x GC) to identify distinct signatures of evaporation and dissolution encoded in the compositional evolution of weathered oils. In Part 2, we further investigate patterns of mass removal in GC x GC chromatograms using a mass transfer model. The model was tailored to conditions at a contaminated beach on Buzzards Bay, MA, after the 2003 Bouchard 120 oil spill. The model was applied to all resolved hydrocarbon compounds in the C11-C24 boiling range, based on their GC x GC-estimated vapor pressures and aqueous solubilities. With no fitted parameters, the model successfully predicted GC x GC chromatogram patterns of mass removal associated with evaporation, water-washing, and diffusion-limited transport. This enabled a critical field evaluation of the mass transfer model and also allowed mass apportionment estimates of hundreds of individual hydrocarbon compounds to air and water. Ultimately, this method should improve assessments of wildlife exposures to oil spill hydrocarbons.

  6. Local Mass and Heat Transfer on a Turbine Blade Tip

    DOE PAGES

    Jin, P.; Goldstein, R. J.

    2003-01-01

    Locmore » al mass and heat transfer measurements on a simulated high-pressure turbine blade-tip surface are conducted in a linear cascade with a nonmoving tip endwall, using a naphthalene sublimation technique. The effects of tip clearance (0.86–6.90% of chord) are investigated at various exit Reynolds numbers (4–7 × 10 5 ) and turbulence intensities (0.2 and 12.0%). The mass transfer on the tip surface is significant along its pressure edge at the smallest tip clearance. At the two largest tip clearances, the separation bubble on the tip surface can cover the whole width of the tip on the second half of the tip surface. The average mass-transfer rate is highest at a tip clearance of 1.72% of chord. The average mass-transfer rate on the tip surface is four and six times as high as on the suction and the pressure surface, respectively. A high mainstream turbulence level of 12.0% reduces average mass-transfer rates on the tip surface, while the higher mainstream Reynolds number generates higher local and average mass-transfer rates on the tip surface.« less

  7. Mass Transfers for Pressure and Boundary Driven Periodic Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Aaron M.; Narayanan, R.

    1997-11-01

    Enhancing the mass transfer of species from one reservoir to another can be achieved by imposing a periodic flow to the system. Periodic flow is obtained using two different mechanisms: an oscillating pressure drop or oscillating the boundary of the system to produce either a periodic Poiseuille or Couette flow, respectively. A simple calculation of an oscillating flat plate in a semi-infinite fluid reveals the process to be dependent on the viscous and mass transfer boundary layers. For gases, the mass transfer of the lighter species is greater than the heavier species, whereas for liquids, the mass transfer of the lighter species is less than the heavier species. In modeling a finite system of parallel plates with either an imposed periodic pressure drop from a piston or oscillating the plates at the same frequency, it is calculated that the mass transfer of the pressure driven system is higher than that for the boundary driven system for all scaled frequencies. However, more power is required to drive the pressure driven system than the boundary driven system, and we find that the mass transfer per power of the pressure driven and boundary driven system are equal to one another.

  8. Influence of pluronic F68 on oxygen mass transfer.

    PubMed

    Sieblist, Christian; Jenzsch, Marco; Pohlscheidt, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Pluronic F68 is one of the most used shear protecting additives in cell culture cultivations. It is well known from literature that such surface-active surfactants lower the surface tension at the gas-liquid interface, which influences the mass transfer. In this study, the effect of Pluronic F68 on oxygen mass transfer in aqueous solutions was examined. Therefore, the gassing in/gassing out method and bubble size measurements were used. At low concentrations of 0.02 g/L, a 50% reduction on mass transfer was observed for all tested spargers and working conditions. An explanation of the observed effects by means of Higbie's penetration or Dankwerts surface renewal theory was applied. It could be demonstrated that the suppressed movement of the bubble surface layer is the main cause for the significant drop down of the kL a-values. For Pluronic F68 concentrations above 0.1 g/L, it was observed that it comes to changes in bubble appearance and bubble size strongly dependent on the sparger type. By using the bubble size measurement data, it could be shown that only small changes in mass transfer coefficient (kL ) take place above the critical micelle concentration. Further changes on overall mass transfer at higher Pluronic F68 concentrations are mainly based on increasing of gas holdup and, more importantly, by increasing of the surface area available for mass transfer.

  9. Oscillatory flow through submerged canopies: 2. Canopy mass transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowe, Ryan J.; Koseff, Jeffrey R.; Monismith, Stephen G.; Falter, James L.

    2005-10-01

    Mass transfer rates from submerged canopies constructed from arrays of vertical cylinders were investigated for a range of different cylinder spacings under both unidirectional and oscillatory flow. Individual canopy elements made from gypsum were dissolved in fresh water to simulate the mass transfer of dissolved metabolites to and from canopies of living benthic organisms. Mass transfer rates under oscillatory flow were up to three times higher than values measured for a comparable unidirectional current. This enhancement was shown to be a strong function of the canopy element spacing. A model was developed to predict canopy mass transfer rates on the basis of the in-canopy flow speed and was generalized to incorporate either unidirectional or oscillatory flow. Agreement between the modeled and experimentally measured mass transfer rates indicate that enhanced mass transfer to/from living benthic canopies under oscillatory flow is driven primarily by the higher in-canopy water motion generated by the oscillatory flow, as detailed in the companion paper (Lowe et al., 2005).

  10. Micro-scale mass-transfer variations during electrodeposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutija, D. P.

    1991-08-01

    Results of two studies on micro-scale mass-transfer enhancement are reported. First, profiled cross-sections of striated zinc surfaces deposited in laminar channel flow were analyzed with fast-fourier transforms (FFT) to determine preferred striation wavelengths. Striation frequency increases with current density until a minimum separation between striae of 150 microns is reached. Beyond this point, independent of substrate used, striae meld together and form a relatively smooth, nodular deposit. Substrates equipped with artificial micron-sized protrusions result in significantly different macro-morphology in zinc deposits. Micro-patterned electrodes (MPE) with hemispherical protrusions 5 microns in diameter yield thin zinc striae at current densities that ordinarily produce random nodular deposits. MPEs with artificial hemi-cylinders, 2.5 microns in height and spaced 250 microns apart, form striae with a period which matches the spacing of micron-sized ridges. Second, a novel, corrosion-resistant micromosaic electrode was fabricated on a silicon wafer. Measurements of mass-transport enhancement to a vertical micromosaic electrode caused by parallel bubble streams rising inside of the diffusion boundary-layer demonstrated the presence of two co-temporal enhancement mechanisms: surface-renewal increases the limiting current within five bubble diameters of the rising column, while bubble-induced laminar flows cause weaker enhancement over a much broader swath. The enhancement caused by bubble curtains is predicted accurately by linear superposition of single-column enhancements. Two columns of smaller H2 bubbles generated at the same volumetric rate as a single column of larger bubbles cause higher peak and far-field enhancements.

  11. Micro-scale mass-transfer variations during electrodeposition

    SciTech Connect

    Sutija, D.P.

    1991-08-01

    Results of two studies on micro-scale mass-transfer enhancement are reported: (1) Profiled cross-sections of striated zinc surfaces deposited in laminar channel flow were analyzed with fast-fourier transforms (FFT) to determine preferred striation wavelengths. Striation frequency increases with current density until a minimum separation between striae of 150 {mu}m is reached. Beyond this point, independent of substrate used, striae meld together and form a relatively smooth, nodular deposit. Substrates equipped with artificial micron-sized protrusions result in significantly different macro-morphology in zinc deposits. Micro-patterned electrodes (MPE) with hemispherical protrusions 5 {mu}m in diameter yield thin zinc striae at current densities that ordinarily produce random nodular deposits. MPEs with artificial hemi-cylinders, 2.5 {mu}m in height and spaced 250 {mu}m apart, form striae with a period which matches the spacing of micron-sized ridges. (2) A novel, corrosion-resistant micromosaic electrode was fabricated on a silicon wafer. Measurements of mass-transport enhancement to a vertical micromosaic electrode caused by parallel bubble streams rising inside of the diffusion boundary-layer demonstrated the presence of two co-temporal enhancement mechanisms: surface-renewal increases the limiting current within five bubble diameters of the rising column, while bubble-induced laminar flows cause weaker enhancement over a much broader swath. The enhancement caused by bubble curtains is predicted accurately by linear superposition of single-column enhancements. Two columns of smaller H{sub 2} bubbles generated at the same volumetric rate as a single column of larger bubbles cause higher peak and far-field enhancements. 168 refs., 96 figs., 6 tabs.

  12. Intraparticle mass transfer kinetics on molecularly imprinted polymers of structural analogues of a template

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyunjung; Kaczmarski, Krzysztof; Guiochon, Georges A

    2005-09-01

    The intraparticle mass transfer kinetics of the structural analogues of a template on a Fmoc-L-Tryptophan (Fmoc-L-Trp) imprinted polymer (MIP) and on the corresponding non-imprinted polymer (NIP) were quantitatively studied using the lumped pore diffusion model (POR) of chromatography. The best equilibrium isotherm models of these compounds were used to calculate the high-concentration band profiles of different substrates on the MIP and the NIP with the POR model. These profiles were compared to experimental band profiles. The numerical values of the intraparticle pore and surface diffusion coefficients were adjusted to determine those that minimized the differences between calculated and experimental profiles. The results of this exercise show that surface diffusion is the dominant intraparticle mass transfer process for the substrates on the polymers and that the energetic heterogeneity of the surface should be considered in accounting for the surface diffusion of the L-enantiomers on the MIP. The surface diffusion coefficient increases with decreasing overall affinity of each substrate for the polymers.

  13. Mass transfer trends occurring in engineered ex vivo tissue scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Moore, Marc; Sarntinoranont, Malisa; McFetridge, Peter

    2012-08-01

    In vivo the vasculature provides an effective delivery system for cellular nutrients; however, artificial scaffolds have no such mechanism, and the ensuing limitations in mass transfer result in limited regeneration. In these investigations, the regional mass transfer properties that occur through a model scaffold derived from the human umbilical vein (HUV) were assessed. Our aim was to define the heterogeneous behavior associated with these regional variations, and to establish if different decellularization technologies can modulate transport conditions to improve microenvironmental conditions that enhance cell integration. The effect of three decellularization methods [Triton X-100 (TX100), sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), and acetone/ethanol (ACE/EtOH)] on mass transfer, cellular migration, proliferation, and metabolic activity were assessed. Results show that regional variation in tissue structure and composition significantly affects both mass transfer and cell function. ACE/EtOH decellularization was shown to increase albumin mass flux through the intima and proximate-medial region (0-250 μm) when compared with sections decellularized with TX100 or SDS; although, mass flux remained constant over all regions of the full tissue thickness when using TX100. Scaffolds decellularized with TX100 were shown to promote cell migration up to 146% further relative to SDS decellularized samples. These results show that depending on scaffold derivation and expectations for cellular integration, specificities of the decellularization chemistry affect the scaffold molecular architecture resulting in variable effects on mass transfer and cellular response.

  14. Mass transfer of VOCs in laboratory-scale air sparging tank.

    PubMed

    Chao, Keh-Ping; Ong, Say Kee; Huang, Mei-Chuan

    2008-04-15

    Volatilization of VOCs was investigated using a 55-gal laboratory-scale model in which air sparging experiments were conducted with a vertical air injection well. In addition, X-ray imaging of an air sparging sand box showed air flows were in the form of air bubbles or channels depending on the size of the porous media. Air-water mass transfer was quantified using the air-water mass transfer coefficient which was determined by fitting the experimental data to a two-zone model. The two-zone model is a one-dimensional lumped model that accounts for the effects of air flow type and diffusion of VOCs in the aqueous phase. The experimental air-water mass transfer coefficients, KGa, obtained from this study ranged from 10(-2) to 10(-3)1/min. From a correlation analysis, the air-water mass transfer coefficient was found to be directly proportional to the air flow rate and the mean particle size of soil but inversely proportional to Henry's constant. The correlation results implied that the air-water mass transfer coefficient was strongly affected by the size of porous media and the air flow rates. PMID:17804158

  15. Geoelectrical Measurement of Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Day-Lewis, Frederick David; Singha, Kamini; Johnson, Timothy C.; Haggerty, Roy; Binley, Andrew; Lane, John W.

    2014-11-25

    Mass transfer affects contaminant transport and is thought to control the efficiency of aquifer remediation at a number of sites within the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. An improved understanding of mass transfer is critical to meeting the enormous scientific and engineering challenges currently facing DOE. Informed design of site remedies and long-term stewardship of radionuclide-contaminated sites will require new cost-effective laboratory and field techniques to measure the parameters controlling mass transfer spatially and across a range of scales. In this project, we sought to capitalize on the geophysical signatures of mass transfer. Previous numerical modeling and pilot-scale field experiments suggested that mass transfer produces a geoelectrical signature—a hysteretic relation between sampled (mobile-domain) fluid conductivity and bulk (mobile + immobile) conductivity—over a range of scales relevant to aquifer remediation. In this work, we investigated the geoelectrical signature of mass transfer during tracer transport in a series of controlled experiments to determine the operation of controlling parameters, and also investigated the use of complex-resistivity (CR) as a means of quantifying mass transfer parameters in situ without tracer experiments. In an add-on component to our grant, we additionally considered nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to help parse mobile from immobile porosities. Including the NMR component, our revised study objectives were to: 1. Develop and demonstrate geophysical approaches to measure mass-transfer parameters spatially and over a range of scales, including the combination of electrical resistivity monitoring, tracer tests, complex resistivity, nuclear magnetic resonance, and materials characterization; and 2. Provide mass-transfer estimates for improved understanding of contaminant fate and transport at DOE sites, such as uranium transport at the Hanford 300 Area. To achieve our objectives, we implemented a 3

  16. Secular dynamics in hierarchical three-body systems with mass loss and mass transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Michaely, Erez; Perets, Hagai B.

    2014-10-20

    Recent studies have shown that secular evolution of triple systems can play a major role in the evolution and interaction of their inner binaries. Very few studies explored the stellar evolution of triple systems, and in particular the mass-loss phase of the evolving stellar components. Here we study the dynamical secular evolution of hierarchical triple systems undergoing mass loss. We use the secular evolution equations and include the effects of mass loss and mass transfer, as well as general relativistic effects. We present various evolutionary channels taking place in such evolving triples, and discuss both the effects of mass loss and mass transfer in the inner binary system, as well as the effects of mass loss/transfer from an outer third companion. We discuss several distinct types/regimes of triple secular evolution, where the specific behavior of a triple system can sensitively depend on its hierarchy and the relative importance of classical and general relativistic effects. We show that the orbital changes due to mass-loss and/or mass-transfer processes can effectively transfer a triple system from one dynamical regime to another. In particular, mass loss/transfer can both induce and quench high-amplitude (Lidov-Kozai) variations in the eccentricity and inclination of the inner binaries of evolving triples. They can also change the system dynamics from an orderly periodic behavior to a chaotic one, and vice versa.

  17. Monolithic supports with unique geometries and enhanced mass transfer.

    SciTech Connect

    Stuecker, John Nicholas; Ferrizz, Robert Matthew; Cesarano, Joseph, III; Miller, James Edward

    2004-01-01

    The catalytic combustion of natural gas has been the topic of much research over the past decade. Interest in this technology results from a desire to decrease or eliminate the emissions of harmful nitrogen oxides (NOX) from gas turbine power plants. A low-pressure drop catalyst support, such as a ceramic monolith, is ideal for this high-temperature, high-flow application. A drawback to the traditional honeycomb monoliths under these operating conditions is poor mass transfer to the catalyst surface in the straight-through channels. 'Robocasting' is a unique process developed at Sandia National Laboratories that can be used to manufacture ceramic monoliths with alternative 3-dimensional geometries, providing tortuous pathways to increase mass transfer while maintaining low pressure drops. This report details the mass transfer effects for novel 3-dimensional robocast monoliths, traditional honeycomb-type monoliths, and ceramic foams. The mass transfer limit is experimentally determined using the probe reaction of CO oxidation over a Pt / {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst, and the pressure drop is measured for each monolith sample. Conversion versus temperature data is analyzed quantitatively using well-known dimensionless mass transfer parameters. The results show that, relative to the honeycomb monolith support, considerable improvement in mass transfer efficiency is observed for robocast samples synthesized using an FCC-like geometry of alternating rods. Also, there is clearly a trade-off between enhanced mass transfer and increased pressure drop, which can be optimized depending on the particular demands of a given application.

  18. Modeling NAPL dissolution fingering with upscaled mass transfer rate coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imhoff, Paul T.; Farthing, Matthew W.; Miller, Cass T.

    2003-10-01

    The dissolution of nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) at residual saturation in porous media has sometimes resulted in the development of preferential dissolution pathways or NAPL dissolution fingers. While NAPL dissolution fingering may be modeled using numerical simulators with fine discretization, this approach is computational intensive. We derived an expression for an upscaled mass transfer rate coefficient that accounts for the growth of dissolution fingers within porous media contaminated uniformly with residual NAPL. This expression was closely related to the lengthening of the dissolution front. Data from physical experiments and numerical simulations in two dimensions were used to examine the growth of the dissolution front and the corresponding upscaled mass transfer rate coefficient. Using this upscaled mass transfer rate coefficient, the time when dissolution fingering results in a reduction in the overall mass transfer rate and thus controls the rate of NAPL dissolution was determined. This crossover time is a convenient parameter for assessing the influence of dissolution fingering on NAPL removal. For the physical experiments and numerical simulations analyzed in this study, the crossover time to dissolution fingering control always occurred before the dissolution front had moved 14 cm within NAPL-contaminated porous media, which is small compared to the scale of typical systems of concern. To verify the utility of this approach, data from a three-dimensional physical experiment were predicted reasonably well using an upscaled mass transfer rate coefficient that was determined independently from this experiment.

  19. Subgrid models for mass and thermal diffusion in turbulent mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, H.; Yu, Y.; Glimm, J.; Li, X.-L.; Sharp, D. H.

    2010-12-01

    We propose a new method for the large eddy simulation (LES) of turbulent mixing flows. The method yields convergent probability distribution functions (PDFs) for temperature and concentration and a chemical reaction rate when applied to reshocked Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) unstable flows. Because such a mesh convergence is an unusual and perhaps original capability for LES of RM flows, we review previous validation studies of the principal components of the algorithm. The components are (i) a front tracking code, FronTier, to control numerical mass diffusion and (ii) dynamic subgrid scale (SGS) models to compensate for unresolved scales in the LES. We also review the relevant code comparison studies. We compare our results to a simple model based on 1D diffusion, taking place in the geometry defined statistically by the interface (the 50% isoconcentration surface between the two fluids). Several conclusions important to physics could be drawn from our study. We model chemical reactions with no closure approximations beyond those in the LES of the fluid variables itself, and as with dynamic SGS models, these closures contain no adjustable parameters. The chemical reaction rate is specified by the joint PDF for temperature and concentration. We observe a bimodal distribution for the PDF and we observe significant dependence on fluid transport parameters.

  20. Reciprocal theorem for convective heat and mass transfer from a particle in Stokes and potential flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandadi, Vahid; Jafari Kang, Saeed; Masoud, Hassan

    2016-06-01

    In the study of convective heat and mass transfer from a particle, key quantities of interest are usually the average rate of transfer and the mean distribution of the scalar (i.e., temperature or concentration) at the particle surface. Calculating these quantities using conventional equations requires detailed knowledge of the scalar field, which is available predominantly for problems involving uniform scalar and flux boundary conditions. Here we derive a reciprocal relation between two diffusing scalars that are advected by oppositely driven Stokes or potential flows whose streamline configurations are identical. This relation leads to alternative expressions for the aforementioned average quantities based on the solution of the scalar field for uniform surface conditions. We exemplify our results via two applications: (i) heat transfer from a sphere with nonuniform boundary conditions in Stokes flow at small Péclet numbers and (ii) extension of Brenner's theorem for the invariance of heat transfer rate to flow reversal.

  1. A simplified mass-transfer model for visual pigments in amphibian retinal-cone outer segments.

    PubMed

    Weber, Paul W; Howle, Laurens E; Murray, Mark M; Corless, Joseph M

    2011-02-01

    When radiolabeled precursors and autoradiography are used to investigate turnover of protein components in photoreceptive cone outer segments (COSs), the labeled components--primarily visual pigment molecules (opsins)--are diffusely distributed along the COS. To further assess this COS labeling pattern, we derive a simplified mass-transfer model for quantifying the contributions of advective and diffusive mechanisms to the distribution of opsins within COSs of the frog retina. Two opsin-containing regions of the COS are evaluated: the core axial array of disks and the plasmalemma. Numerical solutions of the mass-transfer model indicate three distinct stages of system evolution. In the first stage, plasmalemma diffusion is dominant. In the second stage, the plasmalemma density reaches a metastable state and transfer between the plasmalemma and disk region occurs, which is followed by an increase in density that is qualitatively similar for both regions. The final stage consists of both regions slowly evolving to the steady-state solution. Our results indicate that autoradiographic and cognate approaches for tracking labeled opsins in the COS cannot be effective methodologies for assessing new disk formation at the base of the COS.

  2. Agitating mass transfer with a warped disc's shadow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cambier, H.

    2015-10-01

    For compact objects fed by Roche lobe overflow, accretion-generated X-rays irradiating the donor star can alter gas flow towards the Lagrange point thus varying mass transfer. The latest work specific to this topic consists of simple yet insightful two-dimensional hydrodynamics simulations stressing the role of global flow. To explore how a time-varying disc shadow affects mass transfer, I generalize the geometry, employ a robust hydrodynamics solver, and use phase space analysis near the nozzle to include coriolis lift there. Without even exposing the nozzle, a warped disc's shadow can drive mass transfer cycles by shifting the equatorial edges of the irradiation patches in turns: drawing in denser ambient gas before sweeping it into the nozzle. Other important effects remain missing in two-dimensional models, which I discuss along with prospects for more detailed yet efficient models.

  3. A protocol for the measurement of all the parameters of the mass transfer kinetics in columns used in liquid chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Gritti, Fabrice; Guiochon, Georges A

    2010-01-01

    Band broadening in chromatography results from the combination of the dispersive effects that are associated with the different steps involved in the migration of compound bands along the column. These steps include longitudinal diffusion, trans-particle mass transfer, external film mass transfer, overall eddy diffusion, including trans-column, short-range inter-channel, trans-channel eddy diffusion, and the possible, additional mass transfer contributions arising from heat friction and the thermal heterogeneity of the column. We describe a series of experiments that provide the data needed to determine the coefficients of the contributions to band broadening of each one of these individual mass transfer steps. This specifically designed protocol can provide key information regarding the kinetic performance of columns used in liquid chromatography and explain why different columns behave so differently. The limitations, accuracy and precision of these methods are discussed. Further avenues of research that could improve the characterization of the mass transfer mechanisms in chromatographic columns, possibly contributing to the development of better columns, are suggested.

  4. Calculation of Mass Transfer Coefficients in a Crystal Growth Chamber through Heat Transfer Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, J H; Hand, L A

    2005-04-21

    The growth rate of a crystal in a supersaturated solution is limited by both reaction kinetics and the local concentration of solute. If the local mass transfer coefficient is too low, concentration of solute at the crystal-solution interface will drop below saturation, leading to a defect in the growing crystal. Here, mass transfer coefficients are calculated for a rotating crystal growing in a supersaturated solution of potassium diphosphate (KDP) in water. Since mass transfer is difficult to measure directly, the heat transfer coefficient of a scale model crystal in water is measured using temperature-sensitive paint (TSP). To the authors' knowledge this is the first use of TSP to measure temperatures in water. The corresponding mass transfer coefficient is then calculated using the Chilton- Colburn analogy. Measurements were made for three crystal sizes at two running conditions each. Running conditions include periodic reversals of rotation direction. Heat transfer coefficients were found to vary significantly both across the crystal faces and over the course of a rotation cycle, but not from one face to another. Mean heat transfer coefficients increased with both crystal size and rotation rate. Computed mass transfer coefficients were broadly in line with expectations from the full-scale crystal growth experiments. Additional experiments show that continuous rotation of the crystal results in about a 30% lower heat transfer compared to rotation with periodic reversals. The continuous rotation case also shows a periodic variation in heat transfer coefficient of about 15%, with a period about 1/20th of the rotation rate.

  5. Analysis of mass transfer performance in an air stripping tower

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, T.W.; Lai, C.H.; Wu, H.

    1999-10-01

    The carryover of working solution in a traditional stripping tower is of serious concern in real applications. A U-shaped spray tower to prevent carryover has been designed to study the stripping of water vapor from aqueous desiccant solutions of 91.8 to 95.8 wt% triethylene glycol. In this study, water vapor was removed from the diluted desiccant solution by heating the solution and stripping it with the ambient air. Therefore, the solution was concentrated to a desired concentration. This spray tower was capable of handling air flow rates from 3.2 to 5.13 kg/min and liquid flow rates from 1.6 to 2.76 kg/min. Since the literature data on air stripping towers are limited, studies on the mass transfer coefficient and other mass transfer parameters were carried out in this study. Under the operating conditions, the overall mass transfer coefficient calculated from the experimental data varied from 0.053 to 0.169 mol/m{sup 3}{center{underscore}dot}s. These corresponded to heights of a transfer unit of 2.3 to 0.71 m, respectively. The rates of stripping in this spray tower were typically varied from 2.28 to 12.15 kg H{sub 2}O/h. A correlation of the mass transfer coefficient for the air stripping process was also developed in this study.

  6. Heat and mass transfer considerations in advanced heat pump systems

    SciTech Connect

    Panchal, C.B.; Bell, K.J.

    1992-01-01

    Advanced heat-pump cycles are being investigated for various applications. However, the working media and associated thermal design aspects require new concepts for maintaining high thermal effectiveness and phase equilibrium for achieving maximum possible thermodynamic advantages. In the present study, the heat- and mass-transfer processes in two heat-pump systems -- those based on absorption processes, and those using refrigerant mixtures -- are analyzed. The major technical barriers for achieving the ideal performance predicted by thermodynamic analysis are identified. The analysis provides general guidelines for the development of heat- and mass-transfer equipment for advanced heat-pump systems.

  7. Heat and mass transfer considerations in advanced heat pump systems

    SciTech Connect

    Panchal, C.B.; Bell, K.J.

    1992-08-01

    Advanced heat-pump cycles are being investigated for various applications. However, the working media and associated thermal design aspects require new concepts for maintaining high thermal effectiveness and phase equilibrium for achieving maximum possible thermodynamic advantages. In the present study, the heat- and mass-transfer processes in two heat-pump systems -- those based on absorption processes, and those using refrigerant mixtures -- are analyzed. The major technical barriers for achieving the ideal performance predicted by thermodynamic analysis are identified. The analysis provides general guidelines for the development of heat- and mass-transfer equipment for advanced heat-pump systems.

  8. Mass transfer apparatus and method for separation of gases

    SciTech Connect

    Blount, Gerald C.

    2015-10-13

    A process and apparatus for separating components of a source gas is provided in which more soluble components of the source gas are dissolved in an aqueous solvent at high pressure. The system can utilize hydrostatic pressure to increase solubility of the components of the source gas. The apparatus includes gas recycle throughout multiple mass transfer stages to improve mass transfer of the targeted components from the liquid to gas phase. Separated components can be recovered for use in a value added application or can be processed for long-term storage, for instance in an underwater reservoir.

  9. Mass transfer from bubbles and drops in; mechanically agitated apparatuses

    SciTech Connect

    Barabash, V.A.; Belevitskaya, M.A.

    1995-07-01

    Mass transfer from bubbles and drops moving in a turbulent flow is analyzed on the basis of relationships for the flow of a liquid and turbulence damping in the vicinity of the interface being distorted and information on the behavior of the dispersed-phase elements in mechanically agitated apparatuses. Several relations for calculating linear and volumetric mass-transfer coefficients for agitated liquid-gas and liquid-liquid systems are obtained. The calculated results are compared with the experimental data available in the literature.

  10. Dual diffusion and finite mass exchange model for adsorption kinetics in activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Do, D.D.; Wang, K.

    1998-01-01

    A model allowing for the finite mass exchange between the two phases is proposed for the description of adsorption kinetics in activated carbon. This model based on Do`s earlier structural model for activated carbon involves three mass-transfer processes: pore diffusion, adsorbed phase diffusion, and finite mass interchange between the fluid and adsorbed phases. The solid phase is heterogeneous, which is characterized by the micropore size distribution. The interaction between the adsorbate molecule and the micropore is calculated from the Lennard-Jones potential theory. The model developed for nonpolar adsorbates is tested with the experimental data of seven adsorbates (paraffin gases, aromatics, carbon dioxide, and sulfur dioxide) on pellets of different shapes and sizes and at various operating conditions. The finite kinetics play an important role in the overall kinetics. Failure to account for this finite kinetics makes the model unable to describe correctly the desorption behavior, since under such conditions, the ability of the particle to release adsorbed molecules is dictated mostly by the resistance at the pore mouth of the micropore.

  11. Flow-dependent mass transfer may trigger endothelial signaling cascades.

    PubMed

    Vandrangi, Prashanthi; Sosa, Martha; Shyy, John Y-J; Rodgers, Victor G J

    2012-01-01

    It is well known that fluid mechanical forces directly impact endothelial signaling pathways. But while this general observation is clear, less apparent are the underlying mechanisms that initiate these critical signaling processes. This is because fluid mechanical forces can offer a direct mechanical input to possible mechanotransducers as well as alter critical mass transport characteristics (i.e., concentration gradients) of a host of chemical stimuli present in the blood stream. However, it has recently been accepted that mechanotransduction (direct mechanical force input), and not mass transfer, is the fundamental mechanism for many hemodynamic force-modulated endothelial signaling pathways and their downstream gene products. This conclusion has been largely based, indirectly, on accepted criteria that correlate signaling behavior and shear rate and shear stress, relative to changes in viscosity. However, in this work, we investigate the negative control for these criteria. Here we computationally and experimentally subject mass-transfer limited systems, independent of mechanotransduction, to the purported criteria. The results showed that the negative control (mass-transfer limited system) produced the same trends that have been used to identify mechanotransduction-dominant systems. Thus, the widely used viscosity-related shear stress and shear rate criteria are insufficient in determining mechanotransduction-dominant systems. Thus, research should continue to consider the importance of mass transfer in triggering signaling cascades.

  12. Fuel cell collector plates with improved mass transfer channels

    SciTech Connect

    Gurau, Vladimir; Barbir, Frano; Neutzler, Jay K.

    2003-04-22

    A fuel cell collector plate can be provided with one or more various channel constructions for the transport of reactants to the gas diffusion layer and the removal of water therefrom. The outlet channel can be arranged to have a reduced volume compared to the inlet channel, in both interdigitated and discontinuous spiral applications. The land width between an inlet channel and outlet channel can be reduced to improved mass flow rate in regions of deleted reactant concentrations. Additionally or alternatively, the depth of the inlet channel can be reduced in the direction of flow to reduce the diffusion path as the concentration of reactant is reduced.

  13. Prediction and rational correlation of thermophoretically reduced particle mass transfer to hot surfaces across laminar or turbulent forced-convection gas boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, Suleyman A.; Rosner, Daniel E.

    1986-01-01

    A formulation previously developed to predict and correlate the thermophoretically-augmented submicron particle mass transfer rate to cold surfaces is found to account for the thermophoretically reduced particle mass transfer rate to overheated surfaces such that thermophoresis brings about a 10-decade reduction below the convective mass transfer rate expected by pure Brownian diffusion and convection alone. Thermophoretic blowing is shown to produce effects on particle concentration boundary-layer (BL) structure and wall mass transfer rates similar to those produced by real blowing through a porous wall. The applicability of the correlations to developing BL-situations is demonstrated by a numerical example relevant to wet-steam technology.

  14. A METHOD FOR ESTIMATING DISTRIBUTIONS OF MASS TRANSFER RATE COEFFICIENTS WITH APPLICATION TO PURGING AND BATCH EXPERIMENTS. (R825825)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mass transfer between aquifer material and groundwater is often modeled as first-order rate-limited sorption or diffusive exchange between mobile zones and immobile zones with idealized geometries. Recent improvements in experimental techniques and advances in our understanding o...

  15. Drop mass transfer in a microfluidic chip compared to a centrifugal contactor

    DOE PAGES

    Nemer, Martin B.; Roberts, Christine C.; Hughes, Lindsey G.; Wyatt, Nicholas B.; Brooks, Carlton F.; Rao, Rekha

    2014-06-13

    A model system was developed for enabling a multiscale understanding of centrifugal-contactor liquid–liquid extraction.The system consisted of Nd(III) + xylenol orange in the aqueous phase buffered to pH =5.5 by KHP, and dodecane + thenoyltrifluroroacetone (HTTA) + tributyphosphate (TBP) in the organic phase. Diffusion constants were measured for neodymium in both the organic and aqueous phases, and the Nd(III) partition coefficients were measured at various HTTA and TBP concentrations. A microfluidic channel was used as a high-shear model environment to observe mass-transfer on a droplet scale with xylenol orange as the aqueous-phase metal indicator; mass-transfer rates were measured quantitatively inmore » both diffusion and reaction limited regimes on the droplet scale. Lastly, the microfluidic results were comparable to observations made for the same system in a laboratory scale liquid–liquid centrifugal contactor, indicating that single drop microfluidic experiments can provide information on mass transfer in complicated flows and geometries.« less

  16. Drop mass transfer in a microfluidic chip compared to a centrifugal contactor

    SciTech Connect

    Nemer, Martin B.; Roberts, Christine C.; Hughes, Lindsey G.; Wyatt, Nicholas B.; Brooks, Carlton F.; Rao, Rekha

    2014-06-13

    A model system was developed for enabling a multiscale understanding of centrifugal-contactor liquid–liquid extraction.The system consisted of Nd(III) + xylenol orange in the aqueous phase buffered to pH =5.5 by KHP, and dodecane + thenoyltrifluroroacetone (HTTA) + tributyphosphate (TBP) in the organic phase. Diffusion constants were measured for neodymium in both the organic and aqueous phases, and the Nd(III) partition coefficients were measured at various HTTA and TBP concentrations. A microfluidic channel was used as a high-shear model environment to observe mass-transfer on a droplet scale with xylenol orange as the aqueous-phase metal indicator; mass-transfer rates were measured quantitatively in both diffusion and reaction limited regimes on the droplet scale. Lastly, the microfluidic results were comparable to observations made for the same system in a laboratory scale liquid–liquid centrifugal contactor, indicating that single drop microfluidic experiments can provide information on mass transfer in complicated flows and geometries.

  17. Nonequilibrium sorption of phenols onto geosorbents: the impact of pH on intraparticle mass transfer.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Md Mokhlesur; Worch, Eckhard

    2005-12-01

    While the pH effect on sorption equilibrium of weak acids on natural sorbents was investigated in a number of studies, less is known about the pH dependence of sorption kinetics. This paper investigates the impact of pH on sorption kinetics during the transport of some selected phenols through a sandy aquifer material. Breakthrough curves measured in column experiments were analyzed using a mass transfer based nonequilibrium model designated as dispersed flow, film and particle diffusion model (DF-FPDM). In this model, the rate limiting intraparticle diffusion is characterized by the mass transfer coefficient, kSaV, which can be determined from breakthrough curves by curve fitting. The experimental results indicate that the kSaV is pH-dependent and inversely correlated with the pH-dependent distribution coefficient, K(d,app). Regression equations are presented that may be used to estimate approximate values of intraparticle mass transfer coefficients on the basis of experimentally determined or LFER predicted distribution coefficients.

  18. Mass-transfer properties of insulin on core-shell and fully porous stationary phases.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Nándor; Kiss, Ibolya; Felinger, Attila

    2014-10-31

    The mass-transfer properties of three superficially-porous packing materials, with 2.6 and 3.6μm particle and 1.9, 2.6, and 3.2μm inner core diameter, respectively, were investigated and compared with those of fully porous packings with similar particle properties. Several sources of band spreading in the chromatographic bed have been identified and studied according to the general rate model of chromatography. Besides the axial dispersion in the stream of the mobile phase, and the external mass transfer resistance, the intraparticle diffusion was studied in depth. The first absolute and the second central moments of the peaks of human insulin, over a wide range of mobile phase velocities were measured and used for the calculation of the mass-transfer coefficients. The experimental data were also analyzed using the stochastic or molecular dynamic model of Giddings and Eyring. The dissimilarities of the mass-transfer observed in the different columns were identified and evaluated.

  19. TWIN BINARIES: STUDIES OF STABILITY, MASS TRANSFER, AND COALESCENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Lombardi, J. C.; Holtzman, W.; Gearity, K.; Dooley, K. L.; Kalogera, V.; Rasio, F. A.

    2011-08-20

    Motivated by suggestions that binaries with almost equal-mass components ('twins') play an important role in the formation of double neutron stars and may be rather abundant among binaries, we study the stability of synchronized close and contact binaries with identical components in circular orbits. In particular, we investigate the dependency of the innermost stable circular orbit on the core mass, and we study the coalescence of the binary that occurs at smaller separations. For twin binaries composed of convective main-sequence stars, subgiants, or giants with low-mass cores (M{sub c} {approx}< 0.15M, where M is the mass of a component), a secular instability is reached during the contact phase, accompanied by a dynamical mass transfer instability at the same or at a slightly smaller orbital separation. Binaries that come inside this instability limit transfer mass gradually from one component to the other and then coalesce quickly as mass is lost through the outer Lagrangian points. For twin giant binaries with moderate to massive cores (M{sub c} {approx}> 0.15M), we find that stable contact configurations exist at all separations down to the Roche limit, when mass shedding through the outer Lagrangian points triggers a coalescence of the envelopes and leaves the cores orbiting in a central tight binary. In addition to the formation of binary neutron stars, we also discuss the implications of our results for the production of planetary nebulae with double degenerate central binaries.

  20. Saponification reaction system: a detailed mass transfer coefficient determination.

    PubMed

    Pečar, Darja; Goršek, Andreja

    2015-01-01

    The saponification of an aromatic ester with an aqueous sodium hydroxide was studied within a heterogeneous reaction medium in order to determine the overall kinetics of the selected system. The extended thermo-kinetic model was developed compared to the previously used simple one. The reaction rate within a heterogeneous liquid-liquid system incorporates a chemical kinetics term as well as mass transfer between both phases. Chemical rate constant was obtained from experiments within a homogeneous medium, whilst the mass-transfer coefficient was determined separately. The measured thermal profiles were then the bases for determining the overall reaction-rate. This study presents the development of an extended kinetic model for considering mass transfer regarding the saponification of ethyl benzoate with sodium hydroxide within a heterogeneous reaction medium. The time-dependences are presented for the mass transfer coefficient and the interfacial areas at different heterogeneous stages and temperatures. The results indicated an important role of reliable kinetic model, as significant difference in k(L)a product was obtained with extended and simple approach.

  1. Minimal mass transfer across dolomitic granular fault cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billi, Andrea; Primavera, Paolo; Soligo, Michele; Tuccimei, Paola

    2008-01-01

    The role of chemical changes and mass transfer in the formation of granular fault cores across carbonate strata is still unclear. Thirteen granular fault cores across strata of dolostone from Sperlonga, central Italy, are analyzed by chemical and physical methods. The analyzed faults are reverse or transpressional, up to about 1 m thick, and flanked by a host rock affected by a widely developed solution cleavage. Grain size distributions of fault core rocks are determined by a sieving procedure for grains larger than 63 μm. Mechanisms of grain comminution are inferred by microscopic analyses on a set of thin sections obtained from epoxy-impregnated fault rock samples. Concentrations of calcium and magnesium in the fault cores and in the adjacent host rock are determined by titrimetry. Results show that both the breccia and the gouge forming the fault cores show little evidence for mass transfer, regardless of the fault type and grain size distribution of fault rocks. We interpret these results as chiefly the effect, within the fault core, of a strongly reduced permeability, which impeded significant mass transfer processes through solute transport. It follows that grain comminution occurred mostly by brittle processes such as crushing and abrasive wear. Previous work suggests that these results are rather generalizable; some exceptions, however, compel further research on the role of circulating fluids and mass transfer in the formation of carbonate fault rocks.

  2. Dissociation and Mass Transfer Coefficients for Ammonia Volatilization Models

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Process-based models are being used to predict ammonia emissions from manure sources, but their accuracy has not been fully evaluated for cattle manure. Laboratory trials were conducted to measure the dissociation and mass transfer coefficients for ammonia volatilization from media of buffered ammon...

  3. A Course in Advanced Topics in Heat and Mass Transfer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaeiwitz, Joseph A.

    1983-01-01

    A three or four semester-hour graduate course was designed to provide basic instruction in heat/mass transfer topics relevant to chemical engineering problems and to train students to develop mathematical descriptions for new situations encountered in problem-solving. Course outline and list of references used in the course are provided. (JM)

  4. Evaporation from flowing channels ( mass-transfer formulas).

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fulford, J.M.; Sturm, T.W.

    1984-01-01

    Stability-dependent and Dalton-type mass transfer formulas are determined from experimental evaporation data in ambient and heated channels and are shown to have similar performance in prediction of evaporation. The formulas developed are compared with those proposed by other investigators for lakes and flowing channels. -from ASCE Publications Information

  5. LUT observations of the mass-transferring binary AI Dra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Wenping; Qian, Shengbang; Li, Linjia; Zhou, Xiao; Zhao, Ergang; Liu, Nianping

    2016-06-01

    Complete UV band light curve of the eclipsing binary AI Dra was observed with the Lunar-based Ultraviolet Telescope (LUT) in October 2014. It is very useful to adopt this continuous and uninterrupted light curve to determine physical and orbital parameters of the binary system. Photometric solutions of the spot model are obtained by using the W-D (Wilson and Devinney) method. It is confirmed that AI Dra is a semi-detached binary with secondary component filling its critical Roche lobe, which indicates that a mass transfer from the secondary component to the primary one should happen. Orbital period analysis based on all available eclipse times suggests a secular period increase and two cyclic variations. The secular period increase was interpreted by mass transfer from the secondary component to the primary one at a rate of 4.12 ×10^{-8}M_{⊙}/yr, which is in agreement with the photometric solutions. Two cyclic oscillations were due to light travel-time effect (LTTE) via the presence of two cool stellar companions in a near 2:1 mean-motion resonance. Both photometric solutions and orbital period analysis confirm that AI Dra is a mass-transferring binary, the massive primary is filling 69 % of its critical Roche lobe. After the primary evolves to fill the critical Roche lobe, the mass transfer will be reversed and the binary will evolve into a contact configuration.

  6. Vadose Zone VOC Mass Transfer Testing At The SRS Miscellaneous Chemical Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Riha, B

    2005-10-30

    Active remedial activities have been ongoing since 1996 to address low levels of solvent contamination at the Miscellaneous Chemical Basin at SRS. Contaminant levels in the subsurface may be approaching levels where mass transfer limitations are impacting the efficiency of the remedial action. Rate limited mass transfer effects have been observed at other sites in the vadose zone at the SRS, however, detailed measurements and evaluation has not been undertaken. Anecdotal evidence suggests that the mass transfer rates are very slow from the fine grain sediments. This conclusion is based on the observation that measured soil gas concentrations tend to be low in permeable zones relative to the higher concentrations found in fine grain zones. Decreasing soil gas concentration with depth below the ''upland unit'' at several areas at SRS is also evidence of slow diffusion rates. In addition, due to the length of time since disposal ceased at the MCB, we hypothesize that mobile solvents have migrated downward, and the solvent remaining in the upper fine grain zone (''upland unit'') are trapped in fine grain material and are primarily released by gas diffusion (Riha and Rossabi 2004). Natural weathering and other chemical solutions disposed with the solvents can further enhance this effect by increasing the micro-porosity in the clays (kaolinite). This microporosity can result in increased entrapment of water and solvents by capillary forces (Powers, et. al., 2003). Also supporting this conclusion is the observation that active SVE has proven ineffective on VOC removal from the fine grain zones at the SRS. Adsorption and the very slow release phenomenon have been documented similarly in the literature especially for old solvent spills such as at the SRS (Pavlostathis and Mathavan 1992; Oostrom and Lenhard 2003). Mass transfer relationships need to be developed in order to optimize remediation activities and to determine actual loading rates to groundwater. These metrics

  7. Heat and mass transfer at adiabatic evaporation of binary zeotropic solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarov, M. S.; Makarova, S. N.

    2016-01-01

    Results of numerical simulation of heat and mass transfer in a laminar flow of three-component gas at adiabatic evaporation of binary solutions from a flat plate are presented. The studies were carried out for the perfect solution of ethanol/methanol and zeotrope solutions of water/acetone, benzene/acetone, and ethanol/acetone. The liquid-vapor equilibrium is described by the Raoult law for the ideal solution and Carlson-Colburn model for real solutions. The effect of gas temperature and liquid composition on the heat and diffusion flows, and temperature of vapor-gas mixture at the interface is analyzed. The formula for calculating the temperature of the evaporation surface for the binary liquid mixtures using the similarity of heat and mass transfer was proposed. Data of numerical simulations are in a good agreement with the results of calculations based on the proposed dependence for all examined liquid mixtures in the considered range of temperatures and pressures.

  8. Analytical and numerical solutions for mass diffusion in a composite cylindrical body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, A.

    1980-12-01

    The analytical and numerical solution techniques were investigated to study moisture diffusion problems in cylindrical bodies that are assumed to be composed of a finite number of layers of different materials. A generalized diffusion model for an n-layer cylindrical body with discontinuous moisture content at the interfaces was developed and the formal solutions were obtained. The model is to be used for describing mass transfer rates of any composite body, such as an ear of corn which could be assumed of consisting two different layers: the inner core represents the woody cob and the outer cylinder represents the kernel layer. Data describing the fully exposed drying characteristics of ear corn at high air velocity were obtained under different drying conditions. Ear corns were modeled as homogeneous bodies since composite model did not improve the fit substantially. A computer program using multidimensional optimization technique showed that diffusivity was an exponential function of moisture content and an arrhenius function of temperature of drying air.

  9. Mass transfer experiments on single irregular-shaped particles

    SciTech Connect

    Ramezan, M. ); Kale, S.R. ); Anderson, R.J. )

    1991-01-01

    Mass transfer from irregular-shaped naphthalene particles (100-200 {mu}m in size) was studied in an electrodynamic balance. Charged particles were suspended in an electrostatic field directly in line with a calibrated air jet. Mass and size change histories were obtained under ambient conditions, and under steady- and pulsed-flow conditions. For natural convection, the time-averaged Sherwood number was similar to that for spheres. Forced-convection Sherwood number under steady-flow conditions was strongly dependent on particle shape and particle Reynolds number, and was consistently higher than values predicted for spheres at comparable Reynolds numbers. This paper validates the technique and indicates the shape effect on mass transfer from single particles.

  10. Estimation of whole lemon mass transfer parameters during hot air drying using different modelling methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torki-Harchegani, Mehdi; Ghanbarian, Davoud; Sadeghi, Morteza

    2015-08-01

    To design new dryers or improve existing drying equipments, accurate values of mass transfer parameters is of great importance. In this study, an experimental and theoretical investigation of drying whole lemons was carried out. The whole lemons were dried in a convective hot air dryer at different air temperatures (50, 60 and 75 °C) and a constant air velocity (1 m s-1). In theoretical consideration, three moisture transfer models including Dincer and Dost model, Bi- G correlation approach and conventional solution of Fick's second law of diffusion were used to determine moisture transfer parameters and predict dimensionless moisture content curves. The predicted results were then compared with the experimental data and the higher degree of prediction accuracy was achieved by the Dincer and Dost model.

  11. Simultaneous convective heat and mass transfer in impingement ink drying

    SciTech Connect

    Can, M.

    1998-08-01

    Effective and economical drying of thin ink films is essential in the printing, packaging and coating industries. In evaporative drying, high heat and mass transfer rates are commonly achieved by means of high velocity impinging air jets. To provide data for dryer design a program of research has been implemented to study the heat and mass transfer processes which underlie the drying of thin ink films. The heat transfer situation under impinging air jets is outlined and some experimental results are presented. Optimization of nozzle arrays for impinging air jets is analyzed for practical applications. A non-contact infra-red technique for continuously monitoring the ink drying process is described and drying curves for an ink based on a single solvent (4-Methyl-2-pentanol-MIBC) are presented. Heat and mass transfer theory has been used to predict drying times in the constant rate drying period. These predictions have been compared with experimentally determined drying times. This research has served to confirm the fundamental importance of the drying curve as a basis for dryer design.

  12. Mass transfer of large molecules through collagen and collagen-silica hybrid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jofre-Lora, Pedro

    Diabetes is a growing concern in the United States and around the world that must be addressed through new treatment options. Current standard treatment options of diabetes are limiting and have tremendous impacts on patient's lives. Emerging therapies, such as the implantation of encapsulated islets, are promising treatment options, but have not yet materialized due to unsolved problems with material properties. Hybrid silica-collagen membranes address some of these unsolved problems and are a promising material for cell encapsulation. However, the mass transfer properties of large molecules, such as insulin, TNF-alpha, IL1beta, and other important proteins in the etiology of diabetes, through these hybrid membranes are poorly characterized. In order to begin characterizing these properties, a device was constructed to accurately and efficiently measure the mass transfer of other similar large molecules, fluorescein isothiocyanate dextrans (FITC-dextran), through collagen-silica hybrid membranes. The device was used to measure diffusion coefficients of 4, 20, 40, and 150 kDa FITC-dextrans through non-silicified and silicified samples of 200 and 1000 Pa porcine skin collagen. Diffusion coefficients were found to be in the 10-7-10-6 cm2s -1 range, which is in agreement with previously published data for similar molecules through similar hydrogels. The effects of collagen stiffness, FITC-dextran molecular weight, and silicification treatment on diffusion were investigated. It was found that collagen stiffness and FITC-dextran molecular weight had a negative correlation with diffusion, whereas silicification treatment had no global impact on diffusion. The device created, and the results of this preliminary investigation, can be used to develop collagen-silica hybrid membranes as an alternative material for cell encapsulation in a forward-design manner.

  13. Fundamental mass transfer modeling of emission of volatile organic compounds from building materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodalal, Awad Saad

    In this study, a mass transfer theory based model is presented for characterizing the VOC emissions from building materials. A 3-D diffusion model is developed to describe the emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from individual sources. Then the formulation is extended to include the emissions from composite sources (system comprising an assemblage of individual sources). The key parameters for the model (The diffusion coefficient of the VOC in the source material D, and the equilibrium partition coefficient k e) were determined independently (model parameters are determined without the use of chamber emission data). This procedure eliminated to a large extent the need for emission testing using environmental chambers, which is costly, time consuming, and may be subject to confounding sink effects. An experimental method is developed and implemented to measure directly the internal diffusion (D) and partition coefficients ( ke). The use of the method is illustrated for three types of VOC's: (i) Aliphatic Hydrocarbons, (ii) Aromatic Hydrocarbons and ( iii) Aldehydes, through typical dry building materials (carpet, plywood, particleboard, vinyl floor tile, gypsum board, sub-floor tile and OSB). Then correlations for predicting D and ke based solely on commonly available properties such as molecular weight and vapour pressure were proposed for each product and type of VOC. These correlations can be used to estimate the D and ke when direct measurement data are not available, and thus facilitate the prediction of VOC emissions from the building materials using mass transfer theory. The VOC emissions from a sub-floor material (made of the recycled automobile tires), and a particleboard are measured and predicted. Finally, a mathematical model to predict the diffusion coefficient through complex sources (floor adhesive) as a function of time was developed. Then this model (for diffusion coefficient in complex sources) was used to predict the emission rate from

  14. Mass Transfer via Low Velocity Impacts into Regolith

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarmak, Stephanie; Colwell, Josh E.; Brisset, Julie; Dove, Adrienne

    2016-10-01

    The study of low velocity collisions (<1 m/s) is essential to understand the growth and formation of aggregates in a number of environments in planetary systems. The Collisions Into Dust Experiment (COLLIDE) and Physics of Regolith Impacts in Microgravity Experiment (PRIME) experiments produced observations of mass transfer from regolith onto an impactor at these velocities in microgravity. We have subsequently carried out ground-based experiments in which a cm-scale sphere impacts and rebounds from a bed of granular material in 1-g laboratory conditions at low impact speeds with the aid of a spring. This allows impacts at v<1 m/s and ensures rebound of the impactor, with the spring providing enough force to overcome gravity. Preliminary results from an impact of a brass impactor into sand (200-500 μm) produced a monolayer of granular material onto the impactor, but the grains are not cohesive enough to allow a significant mass transfer under these conditions. Further experiments with a range of regolith properties, impactor composition and surface properties, impact velocities, and atmospheric conditions will be performed in the laboratory to study the effects of each of these properties on the contact transfer of regolith onto the impactor. Further microgravity experiments with PRIME and in a small drop tower are planned to then study bulk mass transfer with conditions informed by the ground-based experiments. Impacts with the COLLIDE and PRIME microgravity experiments showed mass transfer at speeds < 40 cm/s into JSC-1 lunar regolith simulant and quartz sand targets. We will present the free-fall and laboratory results and implications for the collisional evolution of dust, pebbles and boulders in the protoplanetary disk as well as particles in planetary ring systems.

  15. Evaporative mass transfer behavior of a complex immiscible liquid.

    PubMed

    McColl, Colleen M; Johnson, Gwynn R; Brusseau, Mark L

    2008-09-01

    A series of laboratory experiments was conducted with a multiple-component immiscible liquid, collected from the Picillo Farm Superfund Site in Rhode Island, to examine liquid-vapor mass-transfer behavior. The immiscible liquid, which comprises solvents, oils, pesticides, PCBs, paint sludges, explosives, and other compounds, was characterized using gas chromatography and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry to determine mole fractions of selected constituents. Batch experiments were conducted to evaluate equilibrium phase-partitioning behavior. Two sets of air-stripping column studies were conducted to examine the mass-transfer dynamics of five selected target compounds present in the immiscible-liquid mixture. One set of column experiments was designed to represent a system with free-phase immiscible liquid present; the other was designed to represent a system with a residual phase of immiscible liquid. Initial elution behavior of all target components generally appeared to be ideal for both systems, as the initial vapor-phase concentrations were similar to vapor-phase concentrations measured for the batch experiment and those estimated using Raoult's law (incorporating the immiscible-liquid composition data). Later-stage removal of 1,2-dichlorobenzene appeared to be rate limited for the columns containing free-phase immiscible liquid and no porous medium. Conversely, evaporative mass transfer appeared to be ideal throughout the experiment conducted with immiscible liquid distributed relatively uniformly as a residual phase within a sandy porous medium.

  16. Simplified Simulation of Mass Transfer in Double White Dwarf Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vannah, Sara; Frank, Juhan

    2016-01-01

    The behavior both stable and unstable mass transfer in semi-detached double white dwarfs triggers a cornucopia of astrophysical phenomena including Type Ia supernovae and AM CVn stars. Current 3D hydrodynamic simulations of the evolution these systems following the mass transfer, binary orbital parameters, and the self-consistent gravitational field over several tens of orbital periods have produced a wealth of data. However, these simulations can take weeks to months in high-performance computing platforms to execute. To help with the interpretation of results of such large scale simulations, and to enable a quick exploration of binary parameter space, we have developed a Mathematica code that integrates forward in time a system of 5 ODEs describing the orbit-averaged evolution of the binary separation as well as the radius, mass, and spin angular momentum of both components of the binary. By adjusting a few parameters describing the mass transfer as a function of the Roche-lobe overflow and the strength of the tidal coupling between the orbit and component spins we are able to obtain approximate fits to previously run hydrodynamic simulations. This simplified simulation is able to run simulations similar to the hydrodynamic versions in a matter of seconds on a dual-core PC or Mac computer.

  17. Evaporative Mass Transfer Behavior of a Complex Immiscible Liquid

    PubMed Central

    McColl, Colleen M.; Johnson, Gwynn R.; Brusseau, Mark L.

    2010-01-01

    A series of laboratory experiments was conducted with a multiple-component immiscible liquid, collected from the Picillo Farm Superfund Site in Rhode Island, to examine liquid-vapor mass-transfer behavior. The immiscible liquid, which comprises solvents, oils, pesticides, PCBs, paint sludges, explosives, and other compounds, was characterized using gas chromatography and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry to determine mole fractions of selected constituents. Batch experiments were conducted to evaluate equilibrium phase-partitioning behavior. Two sets of air-stripping column studies were conducted to examine the mass-transfer dynamics of five selected target compounds present in the immiscible-liquid mixture. One set of column experiments was designed to represent a system with free-phase immiscible liquid present; the other was designed to represent a system with a residual phase of immiscible liquid. Initial elution behavior of all target components generally appeared to be ideal for both systems, as the initial vapor-phase concentrations were similar to vapor-phase concentrations measured for the batch experiment and those estimated using Raoult’s law (incorporating the immiscible-liquid composition data). Later-stage removal of 1,2-dichlorobenzene appeared to be rate limited for the columns containing free-phase immiscible liquid and no porous medium. Conversely, evaporative mass transfer appeared to be ideal throughout the experiment conducted with immiscible liquid distributed relatively uniformly as a residual phase within a sandy porous medium. PMID:18614196

  18. Evaporative mass transfer behavior of a complex immiscible liquid.

    PubMed

    McColl, Colleen M; Johnson, Gwynn R; Brusseau, Mark L

    2008-09-01

    A series of laboratory experiments was conducted with a multiple-component immiscible liquid, collected from the Picillo Farm Superfund Site in Rhode Island, to examine liquid-vapor mass-transfer behavior. The immiscible liquid, which comprises solvents, oils, pesticides, PCBs, paint sludges, explosives, and other compounds, was characterized using gas chromatography and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry to determine mole fractions of selected constituents. Batch experiments were conducted to evaluate equilibrium phase-partitioning behavior. Two sets of air-stripping column studies were conducted to examine the mass-transfer dynamics of five selected target compounds present in the immiscible-liquid mixture. One set of column experiments was designed to represent a system with free-phase immiscible liquid present; the other was designed to represent a system with a residual phase of immiscible liquid. Initial elution behavior of all target components generally appeared to be ideal for both systems, as the initial vapor-phase concentrations were similar to vapor-phase concentrations measured for the batch experiment and those estimated using Raoult's law (incorporating the immiscible-liquid composition data). Later-stage removal of 1,2-dichlorobenzene appeared to be rate limited for the columns containing free-phase immiscible liquid and no porous medium. Conversely, evaporative mass transfer appeared to be ideal throughout the experiment conducted with immiscible liquid distributed relatively uniformly as a residual phase within a sandy porous medium. PMID:18614196

  19. Origin of Self-preservation Effect for Hydrate Decomposition: Coupling of Mass and Heat Transfer Resistances.

    PubMed

    Bai, Dongsheng; Zhang, Diwei; Zhang, Xianren; Chen, Guangjin

    2015-10-01

    Gas hydrates could show an unexpected high stability at conditions out of thermodynamic equilibrium, which is called the self-preservation effect. The mechanism of the effect for methane hydrates is here investigated via molecular dynamics simulations, in which an NVT/E method is introduced to represent different levels of heat transfer resistance. Our simulations suggest a coupling between the mass transfer resistance and heat transfer resistance as the driving mechanism for self-preservation effect. We found that the hydrate is initially melted from the interface, and then a solid-like water layer with temperature-dependent structures is formed next to the hydrate interface that exhibits fractal feature, followed by an increase of mass transfer resistance for the diffusion of methane from hydrate region. Furthermore, our results indicate that heat transfer resistance is a more fundamental factor, since it facilitates the formation of the solid-like layer and hence inhibits the further dissociation of the hydrates. The self-preservation effect is found to be enhanced with the increase of pressure and particularly the decrease of temperature. Kinetic equations based on heat balance calculations is also developed to describe the self-preservation effect, which reproduces our simulation results well and provides an association between microscopic and macroscopic properties.

  20. Origin of Self-preservation Effect for Hydrate Decomposition: Coupling of Mass and Heat Transfer Resistances.

    PubMed

    Bai, Dongsheng; Zhang, Diwei; Zhang, Xianren; Chen, Guangjin

    2015-01-01

    Gas hydrates could show an unexpected high stability at conditions out of thermodynamic equilibrium, which is called the self-preservation effect. The mechanism of the effect for methane hydrates is here investigated via molecular dynamics simulations, in which an NVT/E method is introduced to represent different levels of heat transfer resistance. Our simulations suggest a coupling between the mass transfer resistance and heat transfer resistance as the driving mechanism for self-preservation effect. We found that the hydrate is initially melted from the interface, and then a solid-like water layer with temperature-dependent structures is formed next to the hydrate interface that exhibits fractal feature, followed by an increase of mass transfer resistance for the diffusion of methane from hydrate region. Furthermore, our results indicate that heat transfer resistance is a more fundamental factor, since it facilitates the formation of the solid-like layer and hence inhibits the further dissociation of the hydrates. The self-preservation effect is found to be enhanced with the increase of pressure and particularly the decrease of temperature. Kinetic equations based on heat balance calculations is also developed to describe the self-preservation effect, which reproduces our simulation results well and provides an association between microscopic and macroscopic properties. PMID:26423519

  1. Origin of Self-preservation Effect for Hydrate Decomposition: Coupling of Mass and Heat Transfer Resistances

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Dongsheng; Zhang, Diwei; Zhang, Xianren; Chen, Guangjin

    2015-01-01

    Gas hydrates could show an unexpected high stability at conditions out of thermodynamic equilibrium, which is called the self-preservation effect. The mechanism of the effect for methane hydrates is here investigated via molecular dynamics simulations, in which an NVT/E method is introduced to represent different levels of heat transfer resistance. Our simulations suggest a coupling between the mass transfer resistance and heat transfer resistance as the driving mechanism for self-preservation effect. We found that the hydrate is initially melted from the interface, and then a solid-like water layer with temperature-dependent structures is formed next to the hydrate interface that exhibits fractal feature, followed by an increase of mass transfer resistance for the diffusion of methane from hydrate region. Furthermore, our results indicate that heat transfer resistance is a more fundamental factor, since it facilitates the formation of the solid-like layer and hence inhibits the further dissociation of the hydrates. The self-preservation effect is found to be enhanced with the increase of pressure and particularly the decrease of temperature. Kinetic equations based on heat balance calculations is also developed to describe the self-preservation effect, which reproduces our simulation results well and provides an association between microscopic and macroscopic properties. PMID:26423519

  2. Origin of Self-preservation Effect for Hydrate Decomposition: Coupling of Mass and Heat Transfer Resistances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Dongsheng; Zhang, Diwei; Zhang, Xianren; Chen, Guangjin

    2015-10-01

    Gas hydrates could show an unexpected high stability at conditions out of thermodynamic equilibrium, which is called the self-preservation effect. The mechanism of the effect for methane hydrates is here investigated via molecular dynamics simulations, in which an NVT/E method is introduced to represent different levels of heat transfer resistance. Our simulations suggest a coupling between the mass transfer resistance and heat transfer resistance as the driving mechanism for self-preservation effect. We found that the hydrate is initially melted from the interface, and then a solid-like water layer with temperature-dependent structures is formed next to the hydrate interface that exhibits fractal feature, followed by an increase of mass transfer resistance for the diffusion of methane from hydrate region. Furthermore, our results indicate that heat transfer resistance is a more fundamental factor, since it facilitates the formation of the solid-like layer and hence inhibits the further dissociation of the hydrates. The self-preservation effect is found to be enhanced with the increase of pressure and particularly the decrease of temperature. Kinetic equations based on heat balance calculations is also developed to describe the self-preservation effect, which reproduces our simulation results well and provides an association between microscopic and macroscopic properties.

  3. Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry for Mg Tracer Diffusion: Issues and Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Tuggle, Jay; Giordani, Andrew; Kulkarni, Nagraj S; Warmack, Robert J Bruce; Coffey, Kevin; Sohn, Yong Ho; HunterJr., Jerry

    2014-01-01

    A Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) method has been developed to measure stable Mg isotope tracer diffusion. This SIMS method was then used to calculate Mg self- diffusivities and the data was verified against historical data measured using radio tracers. The SIMS method has been validated as a reliable alternative to the radio-tracer technique for the measurement of Mg self-diffusion coefficients and can be used as a routine method for determining diffusion coefficients.

  4. NASA/DoD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 30: The electronic transfer of information and aerospace knowledge diffusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Bishop, Ann P.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

    1992-01-01

    Increasing reliance on and investment in information technology and electronic networking systems presupposes that computing and information technology will play a major role in the diffusion of aerospace knowledge. Little is known, however, about actual information technology needs, uses, and problems within the aerospace knowledge diffusion process. The authors state that the potential contributions of information technology to increased productivity and competitiveness will be diminished unless empirically derived knowledge regarding the information-seeking behavior of the members of the social system - those who are producing, transferring, and using scientific and technical information - is incorporated into a new technology policy framework. Research into the use of information technology and electronic networks by U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists, collected as part of a research project designed to study aerospace knowledge diffusion, is presented in support of this assertion.

  5. Mass transfer and magnetic braking in Sco X-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlovskii, K.; Ivanova, N.

    2016-02-01

    Sco X-1 is a low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) that has one of the most precisely determined set of binary parameters such as the mass accretion rate, companions mass ratio and the orbital period. For this system, as well as for a large fraction of other well-studied LMXBs, the observationally-inferred mass accretion rate is known to strongly exceed the theoretically expected mass transfer (MT) rate. We suggest that this discrepancy can be solved by applying a modified magnetic braking prescription, which accounts for increased wind mass-loss in evolved stars compared to main sequence stars. Using our MT framework based on MESA, we explore a large range of binaries at the onset of the MT. We identify the subset of binaries for which the MT tracks cross the Sco X-1 values for the mass ratio and the orbital period. We confirm that no solution can be found for which the standard magnetic braking can provide the observed accretion rates, while wind-boosted magnetic braking can provide the observed accretion rates for many progenitor binaries that evolve to the observed orbital period and mass ratio.

  6. Body mass scaling of passive oxygen diffusion in endotherms and ectotherms.

    PubMed

    Gillooly, James F; Gomez, Juan Pablo; Mavrodiev, Evgeny V; Rong, Yue; McLamore, Eric S

    2016-05-10

    The area and thickness of respiratory surfaces, and the constraints they impose on passive oxygen diffusion, have been linked to differences in oxygen consumption rates and/or aerobic activity levels in vertebrates. However, it remains unclear how respiratory surfaces and associated diffusion rates vary with body mass across vertebrates, particularly in relation to the body mass scaling of oxygen consumption rates. Here we address these issues by first quantifying the body mass dependence of respiratory surface area and respiratory barrier thickness for a diversity of endotherms (birds and mammals) and ectotherms (fishes, amphibians, and reptiles). Based on these findings, we then use Fick's law to predict the body mass scaling of oxygen diffusion for each group. Finally, we compare the predicted body mass dependence of oxygen diffusion to that of oxygen consumption in endotherms and ectotherms. We find that the slopes and intercepts of the relationships describing the body mass dependence of passive oxygen diffusion in these two groups are statistically indistinguishable from those describing the body mass dependence of oxygen consumption. Thus, the area and thickness of respiratory surfaces combine to match oxygen diffusion capacity to oxygen consumption rates in both air- and water-breathing vertebrates. In particular, the substantially lower oxygen consumption rates of ectotherms of a given body mass relative to those of endotherms correspond to differences in oxygen diffusion capacity. These results provide insights into the long-standing effort to understand the structural attributes of organisms that underlie the body mass scaling of oxygen consumption.

  7. Body mass scaling of passive oxygen diffusion in endotherms and ectotherms.

    PubMed

    Gillooly, James F; Gomez, Juan Pablo; Mavrodiev, Evgeny V; Rong, Yue; McLamore, Eric S

    2016-05-10

    The area and thickness of respiratory surfaces, and the constraints they impose on passive oxygen diffusion, have been linked to differences in oxygen consumption rates and/or aerobic activity levels in vertebrates. However, it remains unclear how respiratory surfaces and associated diffusion rates vary with body mass across vertebrates, particularly in relation to the body mass scaling of oxygen consumption rates. Here we address these issues by first quantifying the body mass dependence of respiratory surface area and respiratory barrier thickness for a diversity of endotherms (birds and mammals) and ectotherms (fishes, amphibians, and reptiles). Based on these findings, we then use Fick's law to predict the body mass scaling of oxygen diffusion for each group. Finally, we compare the predicted body mass dependence of oxygen diffusion to that of oxygen consumption in endotherms and ectotherms. We find that the slopes and intercepts of the relationships describing the body mass dependence of passive oxygen diffusion in these two groups are statistically indistinguishable from those describing the body mass dependence of oxygen consumption. Thus, the area and thickness of respiratory surfaces combine to match oxygen diffusion capacity to oxygen consumption rates in both air- and water-breathing vertebrates. In particular, the substantially lower oxygen consumption rates of ectotherms of a given body mass relative to those of endotherms correspond to differences in oxygen diffusion capacity. These results provide insights into the long-standing effort to understand the structural attributes of organisms that underlie the body mass scaling of oxygen consumption. PMID:27118837

  8. First Order Chemical Reaction Effects on Exponentially Accelerated Vertical Plate with Variable Mass Diffusion in the Presence of Thermal Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthucumaraswamy, R.; Lakshmi, C. S.

    2015-05-01

    Effects of transfer of mass and free convection on the flow field of an incompressible viscous fluid past an exponentially accelerated vertical plate with variable surface temperature and mass diffusion are studied. Results for velocity, concentration, temperature are obtained by solving governing equations using the Laplace transform technique. It is observed that the velocity increases with decreasing values of the chemical reaction parameter or radiation parameter. But the trend is just reversed with respect to the time parameter. The skin friction is also studied.

  9. Subgrid models for mass and thermal diffusion in turbulent mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, David H; Lim, Hyunkyung; Li, Xiao - Lin; Gilmm, James G

    2008-01-01

    We are concerned with the chaotic flow fields of turbulent mixing. Chaotic flow is found in an extreme form in multiply shocked Richtmyer-Meshkov unstable flows. The goal of a converged simulation for this problem is twofold: to obtain converged solutions for macro solution features, such as the trajectories of the principal shock waves, mixing zone edges, and mean densities and velocities within each phase, and also for such micro solution features as the joint probability distributions of the temperature and species concentration. We introduce parameterized subgrid models of mass and thermal diffusion, to define large eddy simulations (LES) that replicate the micro features observed in the direct numerical simulation (DNS). The Schmidt numbers and Prandtl numbers are chosen to represent typical liquid, gas and plasma parameter values. Our main result is to explore the variation of the Schmidt, Prandtl and Reynolds numbers by three orders of magnitude, and the mesh by a factor of 8 per linear dimension (up to 3200 cells per dimension), to allow exploration of both DNS and LES regimes and verification of the simulations for both macro and micro observables. We find mesh convergence for key properties describing the molecular level of mixing, including chemical reaction rates between the distinct fluid species. We find results nearly independent of Reynolds number for Re 300, 6000, 600K . Methodologically, the results are also new. In common with the shock capturing community, we allow and maintain sharp solution gradients, and we enhance these gradients through use of front tracking. In common with the turbulence modeling community, we include subgrid scale models with no adjustable parameters for LES. To the authors' knowledge, these two methodologies have not been previously combined. In contrast to both of these methodologies, our use of Front Tracking, with DNS or LES resolution of the momentum equation at or near the Kolmogorov scale, but without resolving the

  10. MASS TRANSFER TO ROTATING DISKS AND ROTATING RINGS IN LAMINAR, TRANSITION, AND FULLY DEVELOPED TURBULENT FLOW

    SciTech Connect

    Law Jr., C.G.; Pierini, P.; Newman, J.

    1980-07-01

    Experimental data and theoretical calculations are presented for the mass-transfer rate to rotating disks and rotating rings when laminar, transition, and fully developed turbulent flow exist upon different portions of the surface. Good agreement of data and the model is obtained for rotating disks and relatively thick rotating rings. Results of the calculations for thin rings generally exceed the experimental data measured in transition and turbulent flow. A y{sup +{sup 3}} form for the eddy diffusivity is used to fit the data. No improvement is noticed with a form involving both y{sup +{sup 3}} and y{sup +{sup 3}}.

  11. Pulse Method of Mass Transfer Intensification in Elastic Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malyshev, V. L.

    2016-01-01

    The kinetics of internal mass transfer in the course of evaporation of liquids in elastic capillary systems in which the transverse dimensions of the pores can both decrease and increase on exposure to intense thermal effect is investigated. Structural transformations in a material arise as a result of its dehydration. It is assumed that the channel radius changes simultaneously over the entire length, synchronously with the interface motion. Three schemes are possible in principle: a uniform change during the process, a faster change in the initial stage, and, conversely, a faster change in the closing stage. The time-limited additional thermal effect during the period that makes the main contribution to the overall duration of the process is capable of substantially enhancing mass transfer with minimum energy consumption.

  12. Mass-transfer in close binary and their companions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Wenping; Qian, Shengbang; Zhu, Liying; Li, Linjia

    2016-07-01

    Secular and/or cyclical orbital period variations of close binaries can be derived by analyzing the (O-C) diagram. The secular variations are usually explained as mass transfer between components, while the most plausible explanation of the cyclic period changes is the light-travel time effect (LTTE) through the presence of a third body. Mass transfer and additional companions in close binary systems are important for understanding the formation and evolution of the systems. Here, UV light curves of several close binaries based on the Lunar-based Ultraviolet Telescope (LUT) observations are presented and analyzed with the Wilson-Devinney (W-D) method. Then, based on those light-curve solutions and new analysis of the orbital period variations, the multiplicity, geometrical structure and evolution state of targets are discussed.

  13. Chemical separations by bubble-assisted interphase mass-transfer.

    PubMed

    Boyd, David A; Adleman, James R; Goodwin, David G; Psaltis, Demetri

    2008-04-01

    We show that when a small amount of heat is added close to a liquid-vapor interface of a captive gas bubble in a microchannel, interphase mass-transfer through the bubble can occur in a controlled manner with only a slight change in the temperature of the fluid. We demonstrate that this method, which we refer to as bubble-assisted interphase mass-transfer (BAIM), can be applied to interphase chemical separations, e.g., simple distillation, without the need for high temperatures, vacuum, or active cooling. Although any source of localized heating could be used, we illustrate BAIM with an all-optical technique that makes use of the plasmon resonance in an array of nanoscale metal structures that are incorporated into the channel to produce localized heating of the fluid when illuminated by a stationary low-power laser.

  14. Geoelectrical inference of mass transfer parameters using temporal moments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Day-Lewis, F. D.; Singha, K.

    2008-01-01

    We present an approach to infer mass transfer parameters based on (1) an analytical model that relates the temporal moments of mobile and bulk concentration and (2) a bicontinuum modification to Archie's law. Whereas conventional geochemical measurements preferentially sample from the mobile domain, electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is sensitive to bulk electrical conductivity and, thus, electrolytic solute in both the mobile and immobile domains. We demonstrate the new approach, in which temporal moments of collocated mobile domain conductivity (i.e., conventional sampling) and ERT-estimated bulk conductivity are used to calculate heterogeneous mass transfer rate and immobile porosity fractions in a series of numerical column experiments. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  15. Combined heat and mass transfer device for improving separation process

    DOEpatents

    Tran, Thanh Nhon

    1999-01-01

    A two-phase small channel heat exchange matrix simultaneously provides for heat transfer and mass transfer between the liquid and vapor phases of a multi-component mixture at a single, predetermined location within a separation column, significantly improving the thermodynamic efficiency of the separation process. The small channel heat exchange matrix is composed of a series of channels having a hydraulic diameter no greater than 5.0 millimeters for conducting a two-phase coolant. In operation, the matrix provides the liquid-vapor contacting surfaces within the separation column, such that heat and mass are transferred simultaneously between the liquid and vapor phases. The two-phase coolant allows for a uniform heat transfer coefficient to be maintained along the length of the channels and across the surface of the matrix. Preferably, a perforated, concave sheet connects each channel to an adjacent channel to facilitate the flow of the liquid and vapor phases within the column and to increase the liquid-vapor contacting surface area.

  16. Combined heat and mass transfer device for improving separation process

    DOEpatents

    Tran, T.N.

    1999-08-24

    A two-phase small channel heat exchange matrix simultaneously provides for heat transfer and mass transfer between the liquid and vapor phases of a multi-component mixture at a single, predetermined location within a separation column, significantly improving the thermodynamic efficiency of the separation process. The small channel heat exchange matrix is composed of a series of channels having a hydraulic diameter no greater than 5.0 millimeters for conducting a two-phase coolant. In operation, the matrix provides the liquid-vapor contacting surfaces within the separation column, such that heat and mass are transferred simultaneously between the liquid and vapor phases. The two-phase coolant allows for a uniform heat transfer coefficient to be maintained along the length of the channels and across the surface of the matrix. Preferably, a perforated, concave sheet connects each channel to an adjacent channel to facilitate the flow of the liquid and vapor phases within the column and to increase the liquid-vapor contacting surface area. 12 figs.

  17. Influence of mass transfer on stable isotope fractionation.

    PubMed

    Thullner, Martin; Fischer, Anko; Richnow, Hans-Hermann; Wick, Lukas Y

    2013-01-01

    Biodegradation of contaminants is a common remediation strategy for subsurface environments. To monitor the success of such remediation means a quantitative assessment of biodegradation at the field scale is required. Nevertheless, the reliable quantification of the in situ biodegradation process it is still a major challenge. Compound-specific stable isotope analysis has become an established method for the qualitative analysis of biodegradation in the field and this method is also proposed for a quantitative analysis. However, to use stable isotope data to obtain quantitative information on in situ biodegradation requires among others knowledge on the influence of mass transfer processes on the observed stable isotope fractionation. This paper reviews recent findings on the influence of mass transfer processes on stable isotope fractionation and on the quantitative interpretation of isotope data. Focus will be given on small-scale mass transfer processes controlling the bioavailability of contaminants. Such bioavailability limitations are known to affect the biodegradation rate and have recently been shown to affect stable isotope fractionation, too. Theoretical as well as experimental studies addressing the link between bioavailability and stable isotope fractionation are reviewed and the implications for assessing biodegradation in the field are discussed.

  18. Effect of diffusion on Förster resonance energy transfer in low-viscosity solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muratsugu, Atsushi; Watanabe, Junji; Kinoshita, Shuichi

    2014-06-01

    The effect of translational diffusion on Förster resonance energy transfer between rhodamine 6G (the donor) and malachite green (the acceptor) was investigated by examining the donor's fluorescence decay profile. Eight straight-chain alkyl alcohols were used, and the temperature of ethanol was changed to vary the viscosity; the decay profiles were analyzed using the theory developed by Gösele. The critical transfer distance obtained from the decay profile is in good agreement with that evaluated using the spectroscopic quantities, and the diffusion coefficients are consistent with the Stokes-Einstein relation. The fluorescence decay profile was described well by Gösele's theory and the effect of diffusion is clearly verified by the temperature/viscosity dependence of the diffusion constant.

  19. A Comparison of Stellar Mass-Transfer & Merger Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tohline, Joel E.; Motl, P.; Diehl, S.; Even, W.; Clayton, G.; Fryer, C.

    2011-01-01

    We present detailed comparisons of 3D stellar mass-transfer and merger simulations that have been carried out using two very different numerical hydrodynamic algorithms -- a finite-volume "grid" code (typically using 4M cylindrical grid cells) and a smoothed-particle hydrodynamics (SPH) code (typically using 1M particles). In all cases the initial binary models contain synchronously rotating, n = 3/2 polytropic stars of a specified mass ratio (q = Mdonor/Maccretor) that are in circular orbit with one star (the donor) marginally filling its Roche lobe. In our "base" set of 8 comparison simulations, we have followed the evolution of binaries having four different initial mass ratios (q0 = 1.3, 0.7, 0.5, 0.4) and each is evolved using two different equations of state: polytropic (P) and ideal-gas (I). In addition, some evolutions are repeated using a different numerical resolution and/or a different initial episode of "driving" to initiate mass-transfer. In the case of the binary systems with q0 = 1.3 and q0 = 0.7, the codes show a remarkable level of quantitative agreement; in the former case, the two stars merge and, in the latter case, the donor gets tidally disrupted. Binary systems with q0 = 0.5 or 0.4 enter a long phase (> 10-20 orbits) of stable mass-transfer during which the binary separation steadily increases; tidal disruption of the donor may ultimately occur if sufficiently deep contact is made between the Roche lobe and the donor during an initial episode of "driving." This work has been supported by grants AST-0708551 and DGE-0504507 from the U.S. National Science Foundation; by grants NNX07AG84G and NNX10AC72G from NASA's ATP program; and by grants of high-performance computing time on the TeraGrid, at LSU and across LONI (Louisiana Optical Network Initiative).

  20. Diffusion-controlled electron transfer processes and power-law statistics of fluorescence intermittency of nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jau; Marcus, R A

    2005-09-01

    A mechanism involving diffusion-controlled electron transfer processes in Debye and non-Debye dielectric media is proposed to elucidate the power-law distribution for the lifetime of a blinking quantum dot. This model leads to two complementary regimes of power law with a sum of the exponents equal to 2, and to a specific value for the exponent in terms of a distribution of the diffusion correlation times. It also links the exponential bending tail with energetic and kinetic parameters.

  1. Mass transfer model for two-layer TBP oxidation reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Laurinat, J.E.

    1994-09-28

    To prove that two-layer, TBP-nitric acid mixtures can be safely stored in the canyon evaporators, it must be demonstrated that a runaway reaction between TBP and nitric acid will not occur. Previous bench-scale experiments showed that, at typical evaporator temperatures, this reaction is endothermic and therefore cannot run away, due to the loss of heat from evaporation of water in the organic layer. However, the reaction would be exothermic and could run away if the small amount of water in the organic layer evaporates before the nitric acid in this layer is consumed by the reaction. Provided that there is enough water in the aqueous layer, this would occur if the organic layer is sufficiently thick so that the rate of loss of water by evaporation exceeds the rate of replenishment due to mixing with the aqueous layer. This report presents measurements of mass transfer rates for the mixing of water and butanol in two-layer, TBP-aqueous mixtures, where the top layer is primarily TBP and the bottom layer is comprised of water or aqueous salt solution. Mass transfer coefficients are derived for use in the modeling of two-layer TBP-nitric acid oxidation experiments. Three cases were investigated: (1) transfer of water into the TBP layer with sparging of both the aqueous and TBP layers, (2) transfer of water into the TBP layer with sparging of just the TBP layer, and (3) transfer of butanol into the aqueous layer with sparging of both layers. The TBP layer was comprised of 99% pure TBP (spiked with butanol for the butanol transfer experiments), and the aqueous layer was comprised of either water or an aluminum nitrate solution. The liquid layers were air sparged to simulate the mixing due to the evolution of gases generated by oxidation reactions. A plastic tube and a glass frit sparger were used to provide different size bubbles. Rates of mass transfer were measured using infrared spectrophotometers provided by SRTC/Analytical Development.

  2. Thermodynamic functions and intraparticle mass transfer kinetics of structural analogues of a template on molecularly imprinted polymers in liquid chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyunjung; Guiochon, Georges A

    2005-08-01

    The parameters of the thermodynamics and mass transfer kinetics of the structural analogues (L-enantiomers) of the template were measured on an Fmoc-L-tryptophan (Fmoc-L-Trp) imprinted polymer, at different temperatures. The equilibrium isotherm data and the overloaded band profiles of these compounds were measured at temperatures of 298, 313, 323, and 333 K. The isotherm data were modeled. The thermodynamic functions of the different adsorption sites were derived from the isotherm parameters, using van't Hoff plots. The mass transfer parameters were derived by comparing the experimental peak profiles and profiles calculated using the lumped pore diffusion (POR) model for chromatography. These data show that (1) the strength between the substrate molecules and the MIP increases with increasing number of functional groups on the substrates; (2) enthalpy is the driving force for the affinity of the substrates for the MIP; (3) surface diffusion is the dominant mass transfer mechanism of the substrates through the porous MIP. For those substrate molecules that have the same stereochemistry as the template, the energetic surface heterogeneity needs to be incorporated into the surface diffusion coefficients. Heterogeneous surface diffusivities decrease with increasing affinity of the substrates for the MIP.

  3. The adsorption and mass-transfer process of cationic red X-GRL dye on natural zeolite.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jingjing; Guan, Junfang; Gao, Huimin; Wen, Yafei; Ren, Zijie

    2016-01-01

    The adsorption behavior of natural zeolite was studied in order to determine the adsorption capacity and mass-transfer process of cationic red X-GRL (C(18)H(21)BrN(6)) onto the adsorbent. The adsorption tests to determine both the uptake capacity and the mass-transfer process at equilibrium were performed under batch conditions, which showed rapid uptake in general for the initial 5 min, corresponding to 92% total removal. The equilibrium adsorption capacity value (q(e,cal)) in pseudo-second-order kinetics was 13.51 mg/g at 293 K and the whole adsorption process was governed by physical adsorption with an endothermic, endothermic spontaneous nature. Adsorption tests indicated that the zeolite has great potential as an alternative low-cost material in the treatment of X-GRL drainage. However, the mass-transfer process to determine the rate-controlling steps showed that both film diffusion and pore diffusion were important in controlling the adsorption rate. The adsorption process was governed by film diffusion while pore diffusion was poor because the X-GRL molecules could not penetrate into the zeolite easily. The X-GRL molecules were only adsorbed on the external surface of the zeolite. Hence, to improve the adsorption capacity of natural zeolite further, modification to expand its micropores is necessary.

  4. Rate-limited mass transfer of octane, decane, and dodecane into nonionic surfactants solutions under laminar flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Prak, Dianne J Luning

    2008-05-01

    A key component to predicting the success of utilizing surfactants to enhance the removal of organic liquids from soil system is quantifying micellar solubilization kinetics. In this study, a flow reactor was employed to investigate the influence of surfactant ethoxylate chain length on the rates of solubilization of octane, decane, and dodecane in micellar solutions of a homologous series of purified dodecyl alcohol ethoxylates. Effluent concentration data were fit using a finite element model utilizing a linear-driving-force model to represent mass transfer at the interface. For flow rates between 0.1 and 2 ml min(-1), mass transfer coefficients ranged from 5 x 10(-8) to 7 x 10(-7)m s(-1) and did not vary in a systematic way with either solute structure or surfactant ethoxylate chain length and were lower than those found in pure water. Correlations developed for the Sherwood number based on diffusion coefficients of surfactant micelles containing organic material (organic-laden micelle) exhibit a velocity dependence similar to that found for systems based on aqueous diffusion. These results suggest that under gentle flowing conditions, the mass transfer is limited by diffusion of the organic-laden micelle. Although these trends are specific for this experimental system, the results demonstrate the importance of selecting the proper diffusion coefficient when modeling surfactant solubilization processes.

  5. The adsorption and mass-transfer process of cationic red X-GRL dye on natural zeolite.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jingjing; Guan, Junfang; Gao, Huimin; Wen, Yafei; Ren, Zijie

    2016-01-01

    The adsorption behavior of natural zeolite was studied in order to determine the adsorption capacity and mass-transfer process of cationic red X-GRL (C(18)H(21)BrN(6)) onto the adsorbent. The adsorption tests to determine both the uptake capacity and the mass-transfer process at equilibrium were performed under batch conditions, which showed rapid uptake in general for the initial 5 min, corresponding to 92% total removal. The equilibrium adsorption capacity value (q(e,cal)) in pseudo-second-order kinetics was 13.51 mg/g at 293 K and the whole adsorption process was governed by physical adsorption with an endothermic, endothermic spontaneous nature. Adsorption tests indicated that the zeolite has great potential as an alternative low-cost material in the treatment of X-GRL drainage. However, the mass-transfer process to determine the rate-controlling steps showed that both film diffusion and pore diffusion were important in controlling the adsorption rate. The adsorption process was governed by film diffusion while pore diffusion was poor because the X-GRL molecules could not penetrate into the zeolite easily. The X-GRL molecules were only adsorbed on the external surface of the zeolite. Hence, to improve the adsorption capacity of natural zeolite further, modification to expand its micropores is necessary. PMID:27148713

  6. A generalized mass transfer law unifying various particle transport mechanisms in dilute dispersions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guha, Abhijit

    2008-09-01

    A generalized mass transfer law for dilute dispersion of particles (or droplets) of any sizes suspended in a fluid has been described, which can be applied to turbulent or laminar flow. The generalized law reduces to the Fick’s law of diffusion in the limit of very small particles. Thus the study shows how the well-known and much-used Fick’s law of diffusion fits into the broader context of particle transport. The general expression for particle flux comprises a diffusive flux due to Brownian motion and turbulent fluctuation, a diffusive flux due to temperature gradient (thermophoresis plus stressphoresis) and a convective flux that arises primarily due to the interaction of particle inertia and the inhomogeneity of the fluid turbulence field (turbophoresis). Shear-induced lift force, electrical force, gravity, etc. also contribute to the convective flux. The present study includes the effects of surface roughness, and the calculations show that the presence of small surface roughness even in the hydraulically smooth regime significantly enhances deposition especially of small particles. Thermophoresis can have equally strong effects, even with a modest temperature difference between the wall and the bulk fluid. For particles of the intermediate size range, turbophoresis, thermophoresis and roughness are all important contributors to the overall deposition rate. The paper includes a parametric study of the effects of electrostatic forces due to mirror charging. The present work provides a unified framework to determine the combined effect of various particle transport mechanisms on mass transfer rate and the inclusion of other mechanisms not considered in this paper is possible.

  7. Dissolution of residual non-aqueous phase liquids in porous media: pore-scale mechanisms and mass transfer rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahloul, N. A.; Ioannidis, M. A.; Chatzis, I.

    Experiments designed to elucidate the pore-scale mechanisms of the dissolution of a residual non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL), trapped in the form of ganglia within a porous medium, are discussed. These experiments were conducted using transparent glass micromodels with controlled pore geometry, so that the evolution of the size and shape of individual NAPL ganglia and, hence, the pore-scale mass transfer rates and mass transfer coefficients could be determined by image analysis. The micromodel design permitted reasonably accurate control of the pore water velocity, so that the mass transfer coefficients could be correlated in terms of a local (pore-scale) Peclet number. A simple mathematical model, incorporating convection and diffusion in a slit geometry was developed and used successfully to predict the observed mass transfer rates. For the case of non-wetting NAPL ganglia, water flow through the corners in the pore walls was seen to control the rate of NAPL dissolution, as recently postulated by Dillard and Blunt [Water Resour. Res. 36 (2000) 439-454]. Break-up of doublet non-wetting phase ganglia into singlet ganglia by snap-off in pore throats was also observed, confirming the interplay between capillarity and mass transfer. Additionally, the effect of wettability on dissolution mass transfer was demonstrated. Under conditions of preferential NAPL wettability, mass transfer from NAPL films covering the solid surfaces was seen to control the dissolution process. Supply of NAPL from the trapped ganglia to these films by capillary flow along pore corners was observed to result in a sequence of pore drainage events that increase the interfacial area for mass transfer. These observations provide new experimental evidence for the role of capillarity, wettability and corner flow on NAPL ganglia dissolution.

  8. Modelling mass and heat transfer in nano-based cancer hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Nabil, M; Decuzzi, P; Zunino, P

    2015-10-01

    We derive a sophisticated mathematical model for coupled heat and mass transport in the tumour microenvironment and we apply it to study nanoparticle delivery and hyperthermic treatment of cancer. The model has the unique ability of combining the following features: (i) realistic vasculature; (ii) coupled capillary and interstitial flow; (iii) coupled capillary and interstitial mass transfer applied to nanoparticles; and (iv) coupled capillary and interstitial heat transfer, which are the fundamental mechanisms governing nano-based hyperthermic treatment. This is an improvement with respect to previous modelling approaches, where the effect of blood perfusion on heat transfer is modelled in a spatially averaged form. We analyse the time evolution and the spatial distribution of particles and temperature in a tumour mass treated with superparamagnetic nanoparticles excited by an alternating magnetic field. By means of numerical experiments, we synthesize scaling laws that illustrate how nano-based hyperthermia depends on tumour size and vascularity. In particular, we identify two distinct mechanisms that regulate the distribution of particle and temperature, which are characterized by perfusion and diffusion, respectively.

  9. Modelling mass and heat transfer in nano-based cancer hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Nabil, M; Decuzzi, P; Zunino, P

    2015-10-01

    We derive a sophisticated mathematical model for coupled heat and mass transport in the tumour microenvironment and we apply it to study nanoparticle delivery and hyperthermic treatment of cancer. The model has the unique ability of combining the following features: (i) realistic vasculature; (ii) coupled capillary and interstitial flow; (iii) coupled capillary and interstitial mass transfer applied to nanoparticles; and (iv) coupled capillary and interstitial heat transfer, which are the fundamental mechanisms governing nano-based hyperthermic treatment. This is an improvement with respect to previous modelling approaches, where the effect of blood perfusion on heat transfer is modelled in a spatially averaged form. We analyse the time evolution and the spatial distribution of particles and temperature in a tumour mass treated with superparamagnetic nanoparticles excited by an alternating magnetic field. By means of numerical experiments, we synthesize scaling laws that illustrate how nano-based hyperthermia depends on tumour size and vascularity. In particular, we identify two distinct mechanisms that regulate the distribution of particle and temperature, which are characterized by perfusion and diffusion, respectively. PMID:26587251

  10. Modelling mass and heat transfer in nano-based cancer hyperthermia

    PubMed Central

    Nabil, M.; Decuzzi, P.; Zunino, P.

    2015-01-01

    We derive a sophisticated mathematical model for coupled heat and mass transport in the tumour microenvironment and we apply it to study nanoparticle delivery and hyperthermic treatment of cancer. The model has the unique ability of combining the following features: (i) realistic vasculature; (ii) coupled capillary and interstitial flow; (iii) coupled capillary and interstitial mass transfer applied to nanoparticles; and (iv) coupled capillary and interstitial heat transfer, which are the fundamental mechanisms governing nano-based hyperthermic treatment. This is an improvement with respect to previous modelling approaches, where the effect of blood perfusion on heat transfer is modelled in a spatially averaged form. We analyse the time evolution and the spatial distribution of particles and temperature in a tumour mass treated with superparamagnetic nanoparticles excited by an alternating magnetic field. By means of numerical experiments, we synthesize scaling laws that illustrate how nano-based hyperthermia depends on tumour size and vascularity. In particular, we identify two distinct mechanisms that regulate the distribution of particle and temperature, which are characterized by perfusion and diffusion, respectively. PMID:26587251

  11. Simultaneous heat and mass transfer in absorption of gases in laminar liquid films

    SciTech Connect

    Grossman, G

    1982-09-01

    A theoretical analysis of the combined heat and mass transfer process taking place in the absorption of a gas or vapor into a laminar liquid film is described. This type of process, which occurs in many gas-liquid systems, often releases only a small amount of heat, making the process almost isothermal. In some cases, however, the heat of absorption is significant and temperature variations cannot be ignored. One example, from which the present study originated, is in absorption heat pumps where mass transfer is produced specifically to generate a temperature change. The model analyzed describes a liquid film that flows over an inclined plane and has its free surface in contact with stagnant vapor. The absorption process at the surface creates nonuniform temperature and concentration profiles in the film, which develop until equilibrium between the liquid and vapor is achieved. The energy and diffusion equations are solved simultaneously to give the temperature and concentration variations at the interface and the wall. Two cases of interest are considered: constant-temperature and adiabatic walls. The Nusselt and Sherwood numbers are expressed in terms of the operating parameters, from which heat and mass transfer coefficients can be determined. The Nusselt and Sherwood numbers are found to depend on the Peclet and Lewis numbers as well as on the equilibrium characteristics of the working materials.

  12. Diffusion and transfer of antibody proteins from a sugar-based hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Markowitz, M A; Turner, D C; Martin, B D; Gaber, B P

    1997-01-01

    Diffusion of antibody protein from hydrogel films and hydrogel encapsulated in a microcapillary was studied. Thin hydrogel films were formed by crosslinking 6-acryloyl-B-O-methylgalactoside with N,N'-methylene-bis-acrylamide and the diffusive transport of monoclonal antimouse IgG-FITC into and out of the hydrate films was measured. Diffusion coefficients in 2 and 4% crosslinked hydrogel films were measured. The measured diffusion constants determined for IgG in both the 2 and 4% hydrogel films were comparable to the free diffusion of IgG in bulk water (Dmean approximately 10(-7) cm2/s). In addition, 2% crosslinked hydrogels were prepared in a capillary tube and the transport of antimouse IgG-FITC into and out of the hydrated hydrogel was measured. Kinetic analysis indicated that the protein transport through the capillary hydrogel was faster than would be expected for a simple diffusion process. Finally, by utilizing the diffusion of antibody from the capillary hydrogel, transfer of antibody to a silica surface was demonstrated. A capillary hydrogel loaded with antimouse IgG-FITC was used to transfer the protein to a silica surface forming a 30-micron spot of antibody, which was imaged using fluorescence microscopy. These results may lead to the development of a nonlithographic method of patterning antibodies on surfaces for use in integrated microimmunosensors.

  13. Rational design of mass diffusion metamaterial concentrators based on coordinate transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Restrepo-Flórez, Juan Manuel; Maldovan, Martin

    2016-08-01

    Recent advances in coordinate transformations of Fick's equation have paved the way for the design of metamaterial devices that can manipulate mass diffusion flux. The control of diffusion paths has a great potential for the design of novel catalytic and separation systems in chemical and biomolecular engineering. In order to explore these new applications, it is necessary to understand mass diffusion in coordinate transformation metamaterial devices. In this work, we present a comprehensive study on the impact of structure and material properties on the resultant physical properties of mass concentrator metamaterial shells. The concentration gradient at the core, the total mass flow rate towards the core, and the disturbance of the external concentration field are systematically examined in order to provide guidelines for the rational design and fabrication of metamaterial mass concentrators. A practical case is also presented where the concentration of oxygen diffusing in a polymeric system is studied.

  14. Effects of mass transfer between Martian satellites on surface geology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, Michael; Nimmo, Francis; Udrea, Bogdan

    2016-03-01

    Impacts on planetary bodies can lead to both prompt secondary craters and projectiles that reimpact the target body or nearby companions after an extended period, producing so-called "sesquinary" craters. Here we examine sesquinary cratering on the moons of Mars. We model the impact that formed Voltaire, the largest crater on the surface of Deimos, and explore the orbital evolution of resulting high-velocity ejecta across 500 years using four-body physics and particle tracking. The bulk of mass transfer to Phobos occurs in the first 102 years after impact, while reaccretion of ejecta to Deimos is predicted to continue out to a 104 year timescale (cf. Soter, S. [1971]. Studies of the Terrestrial Planets. Cornell University). Relative orbital geometry between Phobos and Deimos plays a significant role; depending on the relative true longitude, mass transfer between the moons can change by a factor of five. Of the ejecta with a velocity range capable of reaching Phobos, 25-42% by mass reaccretes to Deimos and 12-21% impacts Phobos. Ejecta mass transferred to Mars is <10%. We find that the characteristic impact velocity of sesquinaries on Deimos is an order of magnitude smaller than those of background (heliocentric) hypervelocity impactors and will likely result in different crater morphologies. The time-averaged flux of Deimos material to Phobos can be as high as 11% of the background (heliocentric) direct-to-Phobos impactor flux. This relatively minor contribution suggests that spectrally red terrain on Phobos (Murchie, S., Erard, S. [1996]. Icarus 123, 63-86) is not caused by Deimos material. However the high-velocity ejecta mass reaccreted to Deimos from a Voltaire-sized impact is comparable to the expected background mass accumulated on Deimos between Voltaire-size events. Considering that the high-velocity ejecta contains only 0.5% of the total mass sent into orbit, sesquinary ejecta from a Voltaire-sized impact could feasibly resurface large parts of the Moon

  15. Oxygen mass transfer and hydrodynamic behaviour in wastewater: determination of local impact of surfactants by visualization techniques.

    PubMed

    Jimenez, Mélanie; Dietrich, Nicolas; Grace, John R; Hébrard, Gilles

    2014-07-01

    Powerful techniques, based on the Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) technique, are deployed to locally visualize and quantify the impact of surfactants in wastewaters on hydrodynamics and oxygen mass transfer. Bubble diameter, aspect ratio, rise velocity, contamination angle, as well as flux, flux density, liquid side mass transfer and diffusion coefficients of transferred oxygen are determined based on these techniques applied in the wake of rising bubbles of diameter 1 mm and through planar gas/liquid interfaces. The initial experiments were performed in demineralized water containing small amounts of surfactant. Different concentrations of surfactant were added to finally reach the Critical Micelle Concentration (CMC). Bubbles have classically been found to be more spherical with a reduced rise velocity in the presence of surfactants up to the CMC. Above the CMC, these hydrodynamic characteristics were found to be almost constant, although the oxygen mass transfer decreased due to the presence of surfactants. Experimental results were markedly lower than predicted by the well-known Frössling equation with rigid surfaces. This is believed to be caused by a barrier of surfactants hindering the oxygen mass transfer at the interface. Similar hindrance of oxygen mass transfer applies to waters from sewage plants (filtered raw water and treated water), making accurate design of aeration tanks difficult.

  16. Combined heat and mass transfer device for improving separation process

    SciTech Connect

    Tran, Thanh Nhon

    1997-12-01

    A two-phase small channel heat exchange matrix for providing simultaneous heat transfer and mass transfer at a single, predetermined location within a separation column, whereby the thermodynamic efficiency of the separation process is significantly improved. The small channel heat exchange matrix is comprised of a series of channels having a hydraulic diameter no greater than 5.0 mm. The channels are connected to an inlet header for supplying a two-phase coolant to the channels and an outlet header for receiving the coolant horn the channels. In operation, the matrix provides the liquid-vapor contacting surfaces within a separation column, whereby liquid descends along the exterior surfaces of the cooling channels and vapor ascends between adjacent channels within the matrix. Preferably, a perforated and concave sheet connects each channel to an adjacent channel, such that liquid further descends along the concave surfaces of the sheets and the vapor further ascends through the perforations in the sheets. The size and configuration of the small channel heat exchange matrix allows the heat and mass transfer device to be positioned within the separation column, thereby allowing precise control of the local operating conditions within the column and increasing the energy efficiency of the process.

  17. Influence of mass transfer on bubble plume hydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Lima Neto, Iran E; Parente, Priscila A B

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents an integral model to evaluate the impact of gas transfer on the hydrodynamics of bubble plumes. The model is based on the Gaussian type self-similarity and functional relationships for the entrainment coefficient and factor of momentum amplification due to turbulence. The impact of mass transfer on bubble plume hydrodynamics is investigated considering different bubble sizes, gas flow rates and water depths. The results revealed a relevant impact when fine bubbles are considered, even for moderate water depths. Additionally, model simulations indicate that for weak bubble plumes (i.e., with relatively low flow rates and large depths and slip velocities), both dissolution and turbulence can affect plume hydrodynamics, which demonstrates the importance of taking the momentum amplification factor relationship into account. For deeper water conditions, simulations of bubble dissolution/decompression using the present model and classical models available in the literature resulted in a very good agreement for both aeration and oxygenation processes. Sensitivity analysis showed that the water depth, followed by the bubble size and the flow rate are the most important parameters that affect plume hydrodynamics. Lastly, dimensionless correlations are proposed to assess the impact of mass transfer on plume hydrodynamics, including both the aeration and oxygenation modes. PMID:26840001

  18. Conjugate heat and mass transfer in the lattice Boltzmann equation method.

    PubMed

    Li, Like; Chen, Chen; Mei, Renwei; Klausner, James F

    2014-04-01

    An interface treatment for conjugate heat and mass transfer in the lattice Boltzmann equation method is proposed based on our previously proposed second-order accurate Dirichlet and Neumann boundary schemes. The continuity of temperature (concentration) and its flux at the interface for heat (mass) transfer is intrinsically satisfied without iterative computations, and the interfacial temperature (concentration) and their fluxes are conveniently obtained from the microscopic distribution functions without finite-difference calculations. The present treatment takes into account the local geometry of the interface so that it can be directly applied to curved interface problems such as conjugate heat and mass transfer in porous media. For straight interfaces or curved interfaces with no tangential gradient, the coupling between the interfacial fluxes along the discrete lattice velocity directions is eliminated and thus the proposed interface schemes can be greatly simplified. Several numerical tests are conducted to verify the applicability and accuracy of the proposed conjugate interface treatment, including (i) steady convection-diffusion in a channel containing two different fluids, (ii) unsteady convection-diffusion in the channel, (iii) steady heat conduction inside a circular domain with two different solid materials, and (iv) unsteady mass transfer from a spherical droplet in an extensional creeping flow. The accuracy and order of convergence of the simulated interior temperature (concentration) field, the interfacial temperature (concentration), and heat (mass) flux are examined in detail and compared with those obtained from the "half-lattice division" treatment in the literature. The present analysis and numerical results show that the half-lattice division scheme is second-order accurate only when the interface is fixed at the center of the lattice links, while the present treatment preserves second-order accuracy for arbitrary link fractions. For curved

  19. Conjugate heat and mass transfer in the lattice Boltzmann equation method

    SciTech Connect

    Li, LK; Chen, C; Mei, RW; Klausner, JF

    2014-04-22

    An interface treatment for conjugate heat and mass transfer in the lattice Boltzmann equation method is proposed based on our previously proposed second-order accurate Dirichlet and Neumann boundary schemes. The continuity of temperature (concentration) and its flux at the interface for heat (mass) transfer is intrinsically satisfied without iterative computations, and the interfacial temperature (concentration) and their fluxes are conveniently obtained from the microscopic distribution functions without finite-difference calculations. The present treatment takes into account the local geometry of the interface so that it can be directly applied to curved interface problems such as conjugate heat and mass transfer in porous media. For straight interfaces or curved interfaces with no tangential gradient, the coupling between the interfacial fluxes along the discrete lattice velocity directions is eliminated and thus the proposed interface schemes can be greatly simplified. Several numerical tests are conducted to verify the applicability and accuracy of the proposed conjugate interface treatment, including (i) steady convection-diffusion in a channel containing two different fluids, (ii) unsteady convection-diffusion in the channel, (iii) steady heat conduction inside a circular domain with two different solid materials, and (iv) unsteady mass transfer from a spherical droplet in an extensional creeping flow. The accuracy and order of convergence of the simulated interior temperature (concentration) field, the interfacial temperature (concentration), and heat (mass) flux are examined in detail and compared with those obtained from the "half-lattice division" treatment in the literature. The present analysis and numerical results show that the half-lattice division scheme is second-order accurate only when the interface is fixed at the center of the lattice links, while the present treatment preserves second-order accuracy for arbitrary link fractions. For curved

  20. The balanced-force volume tracking algorithm and global embedded interface formulation for droplet dynamics with mass transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Francois, Marianne M; Carlson, Neil N

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the complex interaction of droplet dynamics with mass transfer and chemical reactions is of fundamental importance in liquid-liquid extraction. High-fidelity numerical simulation of droplet dynamics with interfacial mass transfer is particularly challenging because the position of the interface between the fluids and the interface physics need to be predicted as part of the solution of the flow equations. In addition, the discontinuity in fluid density, viscosity and species concentration at the interface present additional numerical challenges. In this work, we extend our balanced-force volume-tracking algorithm for modeling surface tension force (Francois et al., 2006) and we propose a global embedded interface formulation to model the interfacial conditions of an interface in thermodynamic equilibrium. To validate our formulation, we perform simulations of pure diffusion problems in one- and two-dimensions. Then we present two and three-dimensional simulations of a single droplet dynamics rising by buoyancy with mass transfer.

  1. Counter-extrapolation method for conjugate interfaces in computational heat and mass transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Guigao; Oulaid, Othmane; Zhang, Junfeng

    2015-03-01

    In this paper a conjugate interface method is developed by performing extrapolations along the normal direction. Compared to other existing conjugate models, our method has several technical advantages, including the simple and straightforward algorithm, accurate representation of the interface geometry, applicability to any interface-lattice relative orientation, and availability of the normal gradient. The model is validated by simulating the steady and unsteady convection-diffusion system with a flat interface and the steady diffusion system with a circular interface, and good agreement is observed when comparing the lattice Boltzmann results with respective analytical solutions. A more general system with unsteady convection-diffusion process and a curved interface, i.e., the cooling process of a hot cylinder in a cold flow, is also simulated as an example to illustrate the practical usefulness of our model, and the effects of the cylinder heat capacity and thermal diffusivity on the cooling process are examined. Results show that the cylinder with a larger heat capacity can release more heat energy into the fluid and the cylinder temperature cools down slower, while the enhanced heat conduction inside the cylinder can facilitate the cooling process of the system. Although these findings appear obvious from physical principles, the confirming results demonstrates the application potential of our method in more complex systems. In addition, the basic idea and algorithm of the counter-extrapolation procedure presented here can be readily extended to other lattice Boltzmann models and even other computational technologies for heat and mass transfer systems.

  2. Counter-extrapolation method for conjugate interfaces in computational heat and mass transfer.

    PubMed

    Le, Guigao; Oulaid, Othmane; Zhang, Junfeng

    2015-03-01

    In this paper a conjugate interface method is developed by performing extrapolations along the normal direction. Compared to other existing conjugate models, our method has several technical advantages, including the simple and straightforward algorithm, accurate representation of the interface geometry, applicability to any interface-lattice relative orientation, and availability of the normal gradient. The model is validated by simulating the steady and unsteady convection-diffusion system with a flat interface and the steady diffusion system with a circular interface, and good agreement is observed when comparing the lattice Boltzmann results with respective analytical solutions. A more general system with unsteady convection-diffusion process and a curved interface, i.e., the cooling process of a hot cylinder in a cold flow, is also simulated as an example to illustrate the practical usefulness of our model, and the effects of the cylinder heat capacity and thermal diffusivity on the cooling process are examined. Results show that the cylinder with a larger heat capacity can release more heat energy into the fluid and the cylinder temperature cools down slower, while the enhanced heat conduction inside the cylinder can facilitate the cooling process of the system. Although these findings appear obvious from physical principles, the confirming results demonstrates the application potential of our method in more complex systems. In addition, the basic idea and algorithm of the counter-extrapolation procedure presented here can be readily extended to other lattice Boltzmann models and even other computational technologies for heat and mass transfer systems.

  3. A numerical study on the effect of the bubble diameter on the mass transfer in bubbly plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Xiaobo; Huang, Huaxiong; Matsumoto, Yoichiro

    2005-11-01

    A numerical simulation has been conducted for studying the effect of bubble diameter on the mass transfer efficiency and the concentration distribution of the dissolved gas in a bubbly plume. The numerical method for describing the bubbly plume with mass transfer was developed in an Euler-Lagrange way. The Navier-Stokes equation was adopted for the movement of the liquid phase. The motion of bubbles was tracked individually. The interaction between the liquid and bubbles were considered with a two-way coupling method. The model for the correlation of the dissolution and diffusion of the gas and the translational motions of bubbles with mass loss was introduced. The oxygen bubble plume in a quasi two dimensional rectangular water tank was simulated and studied. The numerical results show that the mass transfer efficiency non-linearly deceases with the increase of bubble diameter. Optimal bubble diameter exists for the mass transfer with a given tank size. The bubble diameter distribution of a certain range does not clearly affect the mean mass transfer efficiency. However, the mixing of different sizes of bubbles improves the uniformity of the concentration distribution in the flow field.

  4. Fundamental Drop Dynamics and Mass Transfer Experiments to Support Solvent Extraction Modeling Efforts

    SciTech Connect

    Kristi Christensen; Veronica Rutledge; Troy Garn

    2011-09-01

    In support of the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling Simulation Safeguards and Separations (NEAMS SafeSep) program, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) worked in collaboration with Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to further a modeling effort designed to predict mass transfer behavior for selected metal species between individual dispersed drops and a continuous phase in a two phase liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) system. The purpose of the model is to understand the fundamental processes of mass transfer that occur at the drop interface. This fundamental understanding can be extended to support modeling of larger LLE equipment such as mixer settlers, pulse columns, and centrifugal contactors. The work performed at the INL involved gathering the necessary experimental data to support the modeling effort. A custom experimental apparatus was designed and built for performing drop contact experiments to measure mass transfer coefficients as a function of contact time. A high speed digital camera was used in conjunction with the apparatus to measure size, shape, and velocity of the drops. In addition to drop data, the physical properties of the experimental fluids were measured to be used as input data for the model. Physical properties measurements included density, viscosity, surface tension and interfacial tension. Additionally, self diffusion coefficients for the selected metal species in each experimental solution were measured, and the distribution coefficient for the metal partitioning between phases was determined. At the completion of this work, the INL has determined the mass transfer coefficient and a velocity profile for drops rising by buoyancy through a continuous medium under a specific set of experimental conditions. Additionally, a complete set of experimentally determined fluid properties has been obtained. All data will be provided to LANL to support the modeling effort.

  5. Communication: Modeling of concentration dependent water diffusivity in ionic solutions: Role of intermolecular charge transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Yi; Berkowitz, Max L. E-mail: ykanai@unc.edu; Kanai, Yosuke E-mail: ykanai@unc.edu

    2015-12-28

    The translational diffusivity of water in solutions of alkali halide salts depends on the identity of ions, exhibiting dramatically different behavior even in solutions of similar salts of NaCl and KCl. The water diffusion coefficient decreases as the salt concentration increases in NaCl. Yet, in KCl solution, it slightly increases and remains above bulk value as salt concentration increases. Previous classical molecular dynamics simulations have failed to describe this important behavior even when polarizable models were used. Here, we show that inclusion of dynamical charge transfer among water molecules produces results in a quantitative agreement with experiments. Our results indicate that the concentration-dependent diffusivity reflects the importance of many-body effects among the water molecules in aqueous ionic solutions. Comparison with quantum mechanical calculations shows that a heterogeneous and extended distribution of charges on water molecules around the ions due to ion-water and also water-water charge transfer plays a very important role in controlling water diffusivity. Explicit inclusion of the charge transfer allows us to model accurately the difference in the concentration-dependent water diffusivity between Na{sup +} and K{sup +} ions in simulations, and it is likely to impact modeling of a wide range of systems for medical and technological applications.

  6. Communication: Modeling of concentration dependent water diffusivity in ionic solutions: Role of intermolecular charge transfer.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yi; Berkowitz, Max L; Kanai, Yosuke

    2015-12-28

    The translational diffusivity of water in solutions of alkali halide salts depends on the identity of ions, exhibiting dramatically different behavior even in solutions of similar salts of NaCl and KCl. The water diffusion coefficient decreases as the salt concentration increases in NaCl. Yet, in KCl solution, it slightly increases and remains above bulk value as salt concentration increases. Previous classical molecular dynamics simulations have failed to describe this important behavior even when polarizable models were used. Here, we show that inclusion of dynamical charge transfer among water molecules produces results in a quantitative agreement with experiments. Our results indicate that the concentration-dependent diffusivity reflects the importance of many-body effects among the water molecules in aqueous ionic solutions. Comparison with quantum mechanical calculations shows that a heterogeneous and extended distribution of charges on water molecules around the ions due to ion-water and also water-water charge transfer plays a very important role in controlling water diffusivity. Explicit inclusion of the charge transfer allows us to model accurately the difference in the concentration-dependent water diffusivity between Na(+) and K(+) ions in simulations, and it is likely to impact modeling of a wide range of systems for medical and technological applications.

  7. Communication: Modeling of concentration dependent water diffusivity in ionic solutions: Role of intermolecular charge transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yi; Berkowitz, Max L.; Kanai, Yosuke

    2015-12-01

    The translational diffusivity of water in solutions of alkali halide salts depends on the identity of ions, exhibiting dramatically different behavior even in solutions of similar salts of NaCl and KCl. The water diffusion coefficient decreases as the salt concentration increases in NaCl. Yet, in KCl solution, it slightly increases and remains above bulk value as salt concentration increases. Previous classical molecular dynamics simulations have failed to describe this important behavior even when polarizable models were used. Here, we show that inclusion of dynamical charge transfer among water molecules produces results in a quantitative agreement with experiments. Our results indicate that the concentration-dependent diffusivity reflects the importance of many-body effects among the water molecules in aqueous ionic solutions. Comparison with quantum mechanical calculations shows that a heterogeneous and extended distribution of charges on water molecules around the ions due to ion-water and also water-water charge transfer plays a very important role in controlling water diffusivity. Explicit inclusion of the charge transfer allows us to model accurately the difference in the concentration-dependent water diffusivity between Na+ and K+ ions in simulations, and it is likely to impact modeling of a wide range of systems for medical and technological applications.

  8. Knowledge-for-Action Theories in Evaluation: Knowledge Utilization, Diffusion, Implementation, Transfer, and Translation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ottoson, Judith M.

    2009-01-01

    Five knowledge-for-action theories are summarized and compared in this chapter for their evaluation implications: knowledge utilization, diffusion, implementation, transfer, and translation. Usually dispersed across multiple fields and disciplines, these theories are gathered here for a common focus on knowledge and change. Knowledge in some form…

  9. Nonequilibrium ionization due to thermal diffusion and mass flows. [in solar atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roussel-Dupre, R.

    1980-01-01

    Recent calculations of diffusion coefficients are used in the continuity equation to compute ion populations of carbon in the solar transition region. Thermal diffusion causes strong departures from ionization equilibrium in the region where the temperature gradient is steepest. Mass-conserving flows are also included in our calculations. These dominate over thermal diffusion depending on the magnitude of the flows and also lead to departures from ionization equilibrium. These results have important implications for the interpretation of EUV line emission.

  10. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy determination of oxygen diffusion coefficient in heavily Sb doped Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagani, M.

    1990-10-01

    The diffusion coefficient of oxygen in heavily antimony doped Czochralski Si was measured in the temperature range 950-1100 °C by using secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS). The diffusion coefficient, obtained from SIMS oxygen concentration profiles in samples submitted to out diffusion, shows no dependence on antimony concentration. The combined data give an activation energy of 2.68 eV, which is in good agreement with published results.

  11. Direct geoelectrical evidence of mass transfer at the laboratory scale

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swanson, Ryan D.; Singha, Kamini; Day-Lewis, Frederick D.; Binley, Andrew; Keating, Kristina; Haggerty, Roy

    2012-01-01

    Previous field-scale experimental data and numerical modeling suggest that the dual-domain mass transfer (DDMT) of electrolytic tracers has an observable geoelectrical signature. Here we present controlled laboratory experiments confirming the electrical signature of DDMT and demonstrate the use of time-lapse electrical measurements in conjunction with concentration measurements to estimate the parameters controlling DDMT, i.e., the mobile and immobile porosity and rate at which solute exchanges between mobile and immobile domains. We conducted column tracer tests on unconsolidated quartz sand and a material with a high secondary porosity: the zeolite clinoptilolite. During NaCl tracer tests we collected nearly colocated bulk direct-current electrical conductivity (σb) and fluid conductivity (σf) measurements. Our results for the zeolite show (1) extensive tailing and (2) a hysteretic relation between σf and σb, thus providing evidence of mass transfer not observed within the quartz sand. To identify best-fit parameters and evaluate parameter sensitivity, we performed over 2700 simulations of σf, varying the immobile and mobile domain and mass transfer rate. We emphasized the fit to late-time tailing by minimizing the Box-Cox power transformed root-mean square error between the observed and simulated σf. Low-field proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements provide an independent quantification of the volumes of the mobile and immobile domains. The best-fit parameters based on σf match the NMR measurements of the immobile and mobile domain porosities and provide the first direct electrical evidence for DDMT. Our results underscore the potential of using electrical measurements for DDMT parameter inference.

  12. Analysis and application of Luikov`s heat, mass, and pressure transfer model to a capillary porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Irudayaraj, J.; Wu, Y.

    1996-05-01

    Luikov`s system of partial differential equations for heat, mass and pressure transfer was applied to describe the drying process in a capillary porous body. A two dimensional finite element model were formulated to solve the system of equations. The simulated results agreed very well with the exact solutions. The finite element model was then used to study the sensitivity of the parameters in Luikov`s heat, mass and pressure transfer system, and to estimate the key parameters identified (the coefficient of moisture conductivity, k{sub m}, and the ratio of vapor diffusion to total diffusion, {epsilon}) for Norway spruce. The finite element model was further used for the prediction of temperature, moisture and pressure variation during drying of Norway spruce. Laboratory experiments were conducted to measure the temperature and moisture content of a Norway spruce sample during drying. The predicted results showed good agreement with the experimental results.

  13. Collisional processes and transfer of mass among the planetary satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchi, S.; Dell'Oro, A.; Paolicchi, P.; Barbieri, C.

    2001-08-01

    Several pairs of planetary satellites may have been involved, during the history of the Solar System, in mutual mass transfer processes. Such processes can be triggered by catastrophic collisions of a satellite (parent body) with a third object. As a consequence, the collision fragments are injected into independent orbits that can cross the trajectory of the another satellite (target). These swarms of secondary impacts may be of some importance influencing the properties of the target body. Even the formation of the atmosphere around some giant satellites may have been triggered by the gas released after the impacts of fragments onto the target's surface. Moreover, the different albedos and the different surface density of impact craters within the same satellite system may be connected to peculiar collisional phenomena, such as those we are dealing with. A quantitative modelling of the role of mass transfer processes obviously requires an estimate of how much material the parent bodies are able to supply, and under what circumstances the process may take place. A general analysis of the various pairs throughout the major satellite systems present in the Solar System has been performed in the present paper. Our analysis uses a statistical algorithm, computing, as a function of the initial properties of the fragments (masses and ejection velocities from their parent body), the mean intrinsic probability of impact, and then the mean lifetime of a fragment before impacting the target, as well as the distribution of the relative velocity. For an order-of-magnitude estimate of the available amount of mass, some simple analytical equations have been derived to evaluate the fraction of fragments from the parent body that can reach the target. These formulae allow a preliminary discrimination of the interesting cases. The pair Hyperion-Titan and the Uranus system have been analyzed in detail.

  14. Macro- to Nanoscale Heat and Mass Transfer: The Lagging Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghazanfarian, Jafar; Shomali, Zahra; Abbassi, Abbas

    2015-07-01

    The classical model of the Fourier's law is known as the most common constitutive relation for thermal transport in various engineering materials. Although the Fourier's law has been widely used in a variety of engineering application areas, there are many exceptional applications in which the Fourier's law is questionable. This paper gathers together such applications. Accordingly, the paper is divided into two parts. The first part reviews the papers pertaining to the fundamental theory of the phase-lagging models and the analytical and numerical solution approaches. The second part wrap ups the various applications of the phase-lagging models including the biological materials, ultra-high-speed laser heating, the problems involving moving media, micro/nanoscale heat transfer, multi-layered materials, the theory of thermoelasticity, heat transfer in the material defects, the diffusion problems we call as the non-Fick models, and some other applications. It is predicted that the interest in the field of phase-lagging heat transport has grown incredibly in recent years because they show good agreement with the experiments across a wide range of length and time scales.

  15. Hornblendite delineates zones of mass transfer through the lower crust.

    PubMed

    Daczko, Nathan R; Piazolo, Sandra; Meek, Uvana; Stuart, Catherine A; Elliott, Victoria

    2016-01-01

    Geochemical signatures throughout the layered Earth require significant mass transfer through the lower crust, yet geological pathways are under-recognized. Elongate bodies of basic to ultrabasic rocks are ubiquitous in exposures of the lower crust. Ultrabasic hornblendite bodies hosted within granulite facies gabbroic gneiss of the Pembroke Valley, Fiordland, New Zealand, are typical occurrences usually reported as igneous cumulate hornblendite. Their igneous features contrast with the metamorphic character of their host gabbroic gneiss. Both rock types have a common parent; field relationships are consistent with modification of host gabbroic gneiss into hornblendite. This precludes any interpretation involving cumulate processes in forming the hornblendite; these bodies are imposter cumulates. Instead, replacement of the host gabbroic gneiss formed hornblendite as a result of channeled high melt flux through the lower crust. High melt/rock ratios and disequilibrium between the migrating magma (granodiorite) and its host gabbroic gneiss induced dissolution (grain-scale magmatic assimilation) of gneiss and crystallization of mainly hornblende from the migrating magma. The extent of this reaction-replacement mechanism indicates that such hornblendite bodies delineate significant melt conduits. Accordingly, many of the ubiquitous basic to ultrabasic elongate bodies of the lower crust likely map the 'missing' mass transfer zones. PMID:27546342

  16. Pattern formation and mass transfer under stationary solutal Marangoni instability.

    PubMed

    Schwarzenberger, Karin; Köllner, Thomas; Linde, Hartmut; Boeck, Thomas; Odenbach, Stefan; Eckert, Kerstin

    2014-04-01

    According to the seminal theory by Sternling and Scriven, solutal Marangoni convection during mass transfer of surface-active solutes may occur as either oscillatory or stationary instability. With strong support of Manuel G. Velarde, a combined initiative of experimental works, in particular to mention those of Linde, Wierschem and coworkers, and theory has enabled a classification of dominant wave types of the oscillatory mode and their interactions. In this way a rather comprehensive understanding of the nonlinear evolution of the oscillatory instability could be achieved. A comparably advanced state-of-the-art with respect to the stationary counterpart seemed to be out of reach a short time ago. Recent developments on both the numerical and experimental side, in combination with assessing an extensive number of older experiments, now allow one to draw a more unified picture. By reviewing these works, we show that three main building blocks exist during the nonlinear evolution: roll cells, relaxation oscillations and relaxation oscillations waves. What is frequently called interfacial turbulence results from the interaction between these partly coexisting basic patterns which may additionally occur in different hierarchy levels. The second focus of this review lies on the practical importance of such convection patterns concerning their influence on mass transfer characteristics. Particular attention is paid here to the interaction between Marangoni and buoyancy effects which frequently complicates the pattern formation even more. To shed more light on these dependencies, new simulations regarding the limiting case of stabilizing density stratification and vanishing buoyancy are incorporated.

  17. Hornblendite delineates zones of mass transfer through the lower crust.

    PubMed

    Daczko, Nathan R; Piazolo, Sandra; Meek, Uvana; Stuart, Catherine A; Elliott, Victoria

    2016-08-22

    Geochemical signatures throughout the layered Earth require significant mass transfer through the lower crust, yet geological pathways are under-recognized. Elongate bodies of basic to ultrabasic rocks are ubiquitous in exposures of the lower crust. Ultrabasic hornblendite bodies hosted within granulite facies gabbroic gneiss of the Pembroke Valley, Fiordland, New Zealand, are typical occurrences usually reported as igneous cumulate hornblendite. Their igneous features contrast with the metamorphic character of their host gabbroic gneiss. Both rock types have a common parent; field relationships are consistent with modification of host gabbroic gneiss into hornblendite. This precludes any interpretation involving cumulate processes in forming the hornblendite; these bodies are imposter cumulates. Instead, replacement of the host gabbroic gneiss formed hornblendite as a result of channeled high melt flux through the lower crust. High melt/rock ratios and disequilibrium between the migrating magma (granodiorite) and its host gabbroic gneiss induced dissolution (grain-scale magmatic assimilation) of gneiss and crystallization of mainly hornblende from the migrating magma. The extent of this reaction-replacement mechanism indicates that such hornblendite bodies delineate significant melt conduits. Accordingly, many of the ubiquitous basic to ultrabasic elongate bodies of the lower crust likely map the 'missing' mass transfer zones.

  18. Acoustic Streaming and Heat and Mass Transfer Enhancement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, E. H.; Gopinath, A.

    1996-01-01

    A second order effect associated with high intensity sound field, acoustic streaming has been historically investigated to gain a fundamental understanding of its controlling mechanisms and to apply it to practical aspects of heat and mass transfer enhancement. The objectives of this new research project are to utilize a unique experimental technique implementing ultrasonic standing waves in closed cavities to study the details of the generation of the steady-state convective streaming flows and of their interaction with the boundary of ultrasonically levitated near-spherical solid objects. The goals are to further extend the existing theoretical studies of streaming flows and sample interactions to higher streaming Reynolds number values, for larger sample size relative to the wavelength, and for a Prandtl and Nusselt numbers parameter range characteristic of both gaseous and liquid host media. Experimental studies will be conducted in support to the theoretical developments, and the crucial impact of microgravity will be to allow the neglect of natural thermal buoyancy. The direct application to heat and mass transfer in the absence of gravity will be emphasized in order to investigate a space-based experiment, but both existing and novel ground-based scientific and technological relevance will also be pursued.

  19. Pattern formation and mass transfer under stationary solutal Marangoni instability.

    PubMed

    Schwarzenberger, Karin; Köllner, Thomas; Linde, Hartmut; Boeck, Thomas; Odenbach, Stefan; Eckert, Kerstin

    2014-04-01

    According to the seminal theory by Sternling and Scriven, solutal Marangoni convection during mass transfer of surface-active solutes may occur as either oscillatory or stationary instability. With strong support of Manuel G. Velarde, a combined initiative of experimental works, in particular to mention those of Linde, Wierschem and coworkers, and theory has enabled a classification of dominant wave types of the oscillatory mode and their interactions. In this way a rather comprehensive understanding of the nonlinear evolution of the oscillatory instability could be achieved. A comparably advanced state-of-the-art with respect to the stationary counterpart seemed to be out of reach a short time ago. Recent developments on both the numerical and experimental side, in combination with assessing an extensive number of older experiments, now allow one to draw a more unified picture. By reviewing these works, we show that three main building blocks exist during the nonlinear evolution: roll cells, relaxation oscillations and relaxation oscillations waves. What is frequently called interfacial turbulence results from the interaction between these partly coexisting basic patterns which may additionally occur in different hierarchy levels. The second focus of this review lies on the practical importance of such convection patterns concerning their influence on mass transfer characteristics. Particular attention is paid here to the interaction between Marangoni and buoyancy effects which frequently complicates the pattern formation even more. To shed more light on these dependencies, new simulations regarding the limiting case of stabilizing density stratification and vanishing buoyancy are incorporated. PMID:24456800

  20. Hornblendite delineates zones of mass transfer through the lower crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daczko, Nathan R.; Piazolo, Sandra; Meek, Uvana; Stuart, Catherine A.; Elliott, Victoria

    2016-08-01

    Geochemical signatures throughout the layered Earth require significant mass transfer through the lower crust, yet geological pathways are under-recognized. Elongate bodies of basic to ultrabasic rocks are ubiquitous in exposures of the lower crust. Ultrabasic hornblendite bodies hosted within granulite facies gabbroic gneiss of the Pembroke Valley, Fiordland, New Zealand, are typical occurrences usually reported as igneous cumulate hornblendite. Their igneous features contrast with the metamorphic character of their host gabbroic gneiss. Both rock types have a common parent; field relationships are consistent with modification of host gabbroic gneiss into hornblendite. This precludes any interpretation involving cumulate processes in forming the hornblendite; these bodies are imposter cumulates. Instead, replacement of the host gabbroic gneiss formed hornblendite as a result of channeled high melt flux through the lower crust. High melt/rock ratios and disequilibrium between the migrating magma (granodiorite) and its host gabbroic gneiss induced dissolution (grain-scale magmatic assimilation) of gneiss and crystallization of mainly hornblende from the migrating magma. The extent of this reaction-replacement mechanism indicates that such hornblendite bodies delineate significant melt conduits. Accordingly, many of the ubiquitous basic to ultrabasic elongate bodies of the lower crust likely map the ‘missing’ mass transfer zones.

  1. Gas Blowing: Mass Transfer in Gas and Melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sortland, Øyvind Sunde; Tangstad, Merete

    2014-09-01

    Metallurgical routes for solar grade silicon production are being developed as alternatives to chemical processes for their potential to achieve cost reductions, increased production volume, and reduced environmental and safety concerns. An important challenge in the development of metallurgical routes relates to the higher impurity concentrations in the silicon product, particularly for boron and other elements that are not efficiently segregated in solidification techniques. The reactive gas refining process is studied for its potential to remove boron below the solar grade silicon target concentration in a single step by blowing steam and hydrogen gas jets onto the melt surface. Boron in a silicon melt is extracted to HBO gas in parallel to active oxidation of silicon. The literature is not unified regarding the rate determining step in this process. Relevant theories and equations for gas blowing in induction furnaces are combined and used to explain mass transfer in experiments. Mass transfer in the melt and gas is investigated by comparing resistance and induction heating of the melt, and varying gas flow rate, crucible diameter, diameter of the gas lance, and the position of the gas lance above the melt surface. The rate of boron removal is found to increase with increasing gas flow rate and crucible diameter. A relatively high fraction of the reactive gas is utilized in the process, and supply of steam in the bulk gas is the only identified rate determining step.

  2. Hornblendite delineates zones of mass transfer through the lower crust

    PubMed Central

    Daczko, Nathan R.; Piazolo, Sandra; Meek, Uvana; Stuart, Catherine A.; Elliott, Victoria

    2016-01-01

    Geochemical signatures throughout the layered Earth require significant mass transfer through the lower crust, yet geological pathways are under-recognized. Elongate bodies of basic to ultrabasic rocks are ubiquitous in exposures of the lower crust. Ultrabasic hornblendite bodies hosted within granulite facies gabbroic gneiss of the Pembroke Valley, Fiordland, New Zealand, are typical occurrences usually reported as igneous cumulate hornblendite. Their igneous features contrast with the metamorphic character of their host gabbroic gneiss. Both rock types have a common parent; field relationships are consistent with modification of host gabbroic gneiss into hornblendite. This precludes any interpretation involving cumulate processes in forming the hornblendite; these bodies are imposter cumulates. Instead, replacement of the host gabbroic gneiss formed hornblendite as a result of channeled high melt flux through the lower crust. High melt/rock ratios and disequilibrium between the migrating magma (granodiorite) and its host gabbroic gneiss induced dissolution (grain-scale magmatic assimilation) of gneiss and crystallization of mainly hornblende from the migrating magma. The extent of this reaction-replacement mechanism indicates that such hornblendite bodies delineate significant melt conduits. Accordingly, many of the ubiquitous basic to ultrabasic elongate bodies of the lower crust likely map the ‘missing’ mass transfer zones. PMID:27546342

  3. Evaluation of the Effect of Gravity Force on Transient Mass Diffusion Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komiya, Atsuki; Maruyama, Shigenao

    In this study, the relationship between gravitational force and diffusion phenomena in aque-ous solutions is discussed. The microgravity environment gives a high quality crystal growth condition which produces high quality medicines or foods. In this condition, a natural con-vection can be neglected and diffusion phenomenon without convection is observed. The mass diffusion coefficient is one of the most important thermophysical properties to investigate that mass transport system. However, the available experimental data of mass diffusion coefficients in microgravity conditions is not enough. Because it is quite a few opportunity that exper-iments can be conducted using facilities which produce microgravity environment for a long time. Then we have developed an observation system of small transient diffusion fields within 20 seconds. The experimental apparatus is composed of phase shifting interferometer, special designed signal processing unit and recorder. The mechanism of test cell used in this study has a unique performance that the transient diffusion fields can be produced continuously with no change of solutions and cell. Therefore this system can be applied to short-time microgravity experiment which is generated by the parabolic flight of an airplane. By using this system, the transient diffusion field of Sodium Chloride (NaCl) solution in microgravity conditions could be clearly observed and the mass diffusion coefficient was estimated from the obtained data. In microgravity condition, the transient diffusion fields have different appearances from the normal gravity condition. A slight acceleration governs the transient diffusion fields because of no density difference, so vibrations applied the apparatus disturb the transient diffusion fields. The measured mass diffusion coefficient has been estimated as a smaller value compared with ones under normal gravity condition. Using the airplane as a facility, not only microgravity condition but also 0.8G, 1

  4. Heat and mass transfer with condensation in capillary porous bodies.

    PubMed

    Larbi, Salah

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this present work is related to wetting process analysis caused by condensation phenomena in capillary porous material by using a numerical simulation. Special emphasis is given to the study of the mechanism involved and the evaluation of classical theoretical models used as a predictive tool. A further discussion will be given for the distribution of the liquid phase for both its pendular and its funicular state and its consequence on diffusion coefficients of the mathematical model used. Beyond the complexity of the interaction effects between vaporisation-condensation processes on the gas-liquid interfaces, the comparison between experimental and numerical simulations permits to identify the specific contribution and the relative part of mass and energy transport parameters. This analysis allows us to understand the contribution of each part of the mathematical model used and to simplify the study.

  5. Perturbations and dynamics of reaction-diffusion systems with mass conservation.

    PubMed

    Kuwamura, Masataka; Morita, Yoshihisa

    2015-07-01

    In some reaction-diffusion systems where the total mass of their components is conserved, solutions with initial values near a homogeneous equilibrium converge to a simple localized pattern (spike) after exhibiting Turing-like patterns near the equilibrium for appropriate diffusion coefficients. In this study, we investigate the perturbed reaction-diffusion systems of such conserved systems. We show that a reaction-diffusion model with a globally stable homogeneous equilibrium can exhibit large amplitude Turing-like patterns in the transient dynamics. Moreover, we propose a three-component model, which exhibits an alternating repetition of spatially (almost) homogeneous oscillations and large amplitude Turing-like patterns.

  6. Transformed Fourier and Fick equations for the control of heat and mass diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Guenneau, S.; Petiteau, D.; Zerrad, M.; Amra, C.; Puvirajesinghe, T.

    2015-05-15

    We review recent advances in the control of diffusion processes in thermodynamics and life sciences through geometric transforms in the Fourier and Fick equations, which govern heat and mass diffusion, respectively. We propose to further encompass transport properties in the transformed equations, whereby the temperature is governed by a three-dimensional, time-dependent, anisotropic heterogeneous convection-diffusion equation, which is a parabolic partial differential equation combining the diffusion equation and the advection equation. We perform two dimensional finite element computations for cloaks, concentrators and rotators of a complex shape in the transient regime. We precise that in contrast to invisibility cloaks for waves, the temperature (or mass concentration) inside a diffusion cloak crucially depends upon time, its distance from the source, and the diffusivity of the invisibility region. However, heat (or mass) diffusion outside cloaks, concentrators and rotators is unaffected by their presence, whatever their shape or position. Finally, we propose simplified designs of layered cylindrical and spherical diffusion cloaks that might foster experimental efforts in thermal and biochemical metamaterials.

  7. Transformed Fourier and Fick equations for the control of heat and mass diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guenneau, S.; Petiteau, D.; Zerrad, M.; Amra, C.; Puvirajesinghe, T.

    2015-05-01

    We review recent advances in the control of diffusion processes in thermodynamics and life sciences through geometric transforms in the Fourier and Fick equations, which govern heat and mass diffusion, respectively. We propose to further encompass transport properties in the transformed equations, whereby the temperature is governed by a three-dimensional, time-dependent, anisotropic heterogeneous convection-diffusion equation, which is a parabolic partial differential equation combining the diffusion equation and the advection equation. We perform two dimensional finite element computations for cloaks, concentrators and rotators of a complex shape in the transient regime. We precise that in contrast to invisibility cloaks for waves, the temperature (or mass concentration) inside a diffusion cloak crucially depends upon time, its distance from the source, and the diffusivity of the invisibility region. However, heat (or mass) diffusion outside cloaks, concentrators and rotators is unaffected by their presence, whatever their shape or position. Finally, we propose simplified designs of layered cylindrical and spherical diffusion cloaks that might foster experimental efforts in thermal and biochemical metamaterials.

  8. Magnetization transfer studies of the fast and slow tissue water diffusion components in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Mulkern, Robert V; Vajapeyam, Sridhar; Haker, Steven J; Maier, Stephan E

    2005-05-01

    Magnetization transfer (MT) properties of the fast and slow diffusion components recently observed in the human brain were assessed experimentally. One set of experiments, performed at 1.5 T in healthy volunteers, was designed to determine whether the amplitudes of fast and slow diffusion components, differentiated on the basis of biexponential fits to signal decays over a wide range of b-factors, demonstrated a different or similar magnetization transfer ratio (MTR). Another set of experiments, performed at 3 T in healthy volunteers, was designed to determine whether MTRs differed when measured from high signal-to-noise images acquired with b-factor weightings of 350 vs 3500 s/mm2. The 3 T studies included measurements of MTR as a function of off-resonance frequency for the MT pulse at both low and high b-factors. The primary conclusion drawn from all the studies is that there appears to be no significant difference between the magnetization transfer properties of the fast and slow tissue water diffusion components. The conclusions do not lend support to a direct interpretation of the 'components' of the biexponential diffusion decay in terms of the 'compartments' associated with intra- and extracellular water. PMID:15578729

  9. Optimal-mass-transfer-based estimation of glymphatic transport in living brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratner, Vadim; Zhu, Liangjia; Kolesov, Ivan; Nedergaard, Maiken; Benveniste, Helene; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2015-03-01

    It was recently shown that the brain-wide cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and interstitial fluid exchange system designated the `glymphatic pathway' plays a key role in removing waste products from the brain, similarly to the lymphatic system in other body organs . It is therefore important to study the flow patterns of glymphatic transport through the live brain in order to better understand its functionality in normal and pathological states. Unlike blood, the CSF does not flow rapidly through a network of dedicated vessels, but rather through para-vascular channels and brain parenchyma in a slower time-domain, and thus conventional fMRI or other blood-flow sensitive MRI sequences do not provide much useful information about the desired flow patterns. We have accordingly analyzed a series of MRI images, taken at different times, of the brain of a live rat, which was injected with a paramagnetic tracer into the CSF via the lumbar intrathecal space of the spine. Our goal is twofold: (a) find glymphatic (tracer) flow directions in the live rodent brain; and (b) provide a model of a (healthy) brain that will allow the prediction of tracer concentrations given initial conditions. We model the liquid flow through the brain by the diffusion equation. We then use the Optimal Mass Transfer (OMT) approach to derive the glymphatic flow vector field, and estimate the diffusion tensors by analyzing the (changes in the) flow. Simulations show that the resulting model successfully reproduces the dominant features of the experimental data. Keywords: inverse problem, optimal mass transport, diffusion equation, cerebrospinal fluid flow in brain, optical flow, liquid flow modeling, Monge Kantorovich problem, diffusion tensor estimation

  10. Effect of Diffusion on Resonance Energy Transfer Rate Distributions: Implications for Distance Measurements.

    PubMed

    Toptygin, Dmitri; Chin, Alexander F; Hilser, Vincent J

    2015-10-01

    Intrinsically disordered protein regions and many other biopolymers lack the three-dimensional structure that could be determined by X-ray crystallography or NMR, which encourages the application of alternative experimental methods. Time-resolved resonance energy transfer data are often used to measure distances between two fluorophores attached to a flexible biopolymer. This is complicated by the rotational and translational diffusion of the fluorophores and by nonmonoexponential donor decay in the absence of the acceptor. Equation I(DA)(t) = I(D)(t)·F(t) is derived here, which is applicable regardless of whether I(D)(t) is monoexponential. I(D)(t) and I(DA)(t) are the δ-excitation donor emission decays in the absence and in the presence of the acceptor; F(t) contains information about energy transfer, donor-acceptor distance distribution, and diffusion dynamics. It is shown that in the absence of rotational and translational diffusion, F(t) is a continuous distribution of exponentials, whereas in the presence of rotational and translational diffusion, F(t) is a sum of discrete exponentials. For each case it is shown how F(t) is related to the distance distribution. Experimental data obtained with a flexible tetradecapeptide in aqueous solution clearly demonstrate that F(t) is a sum of discrete exponential terms. A partial differential equation describing resonance energy transfer in the presence of both rotational and translational diffusion of the donor and acceptor tethered to the ends of a semiflexible chain is solved in this work using a combination of analytical and numerical methods; the solution is used to fit time-resolved emission of the donor, which makes it possible to determine the model parameters: contour length, persistence length, and the end-to-end translational diffusion coefficient.

  11. A new characterization of the turbulent diapycnal diffusivities of mass and momentum in the ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salehipour, H.; Peltier, W. R.; Whalen, C. B.; MacKinnon, J. A.

    2016-04-01

    The diapycnal diffusivity of mass supported by turbulent events in the ocean interior plays a fundamental role in controlling the global overturning circulation. The conventional representation of this diffusivity, due to Osborn (1980), assumes a constant mixing efficiency. We replace this methodology by a generalized-Osborn formula which involves a mixing efficiency that varies nonmonotonically with at least two nondimensional variables. Using these two variables, we propose dynamic parameterizations for mixing efficiency and turbulent Prandtl number (the latter quantifies the ratio of momentum to mass diapycnal diffusivities) based on the first synthesis of an extensive direct numerical simulation of inhomogeneously stratified shear-induced turbulence. Data from Argo floats are employed to demonstrate the extent of the spatial and statistical variability to be expected in both the diapycnal diffusivities of mass and momentum. We therefore suggest that previous estimates of these important characteristics of the global ocean require reconsideration.

  12. Effects of mass transfer on the hydrodynamic behavior of a Karr reciprocating plate column

    SciTech Connect

    Aravamudan, K.; Baird, M.H.I.

    1999-04-01

    A 5 cm internal diameter Karr reciprocating plate column has been operated in countercurrent liquid-liquid flow in the absence of mass transfer and with mass transfer of i-propanol from the dispersed phase (Isopar M) to the continuous phase (water). The effect of mass transfer is to increase the drop diameter, while the holdup is reduced and axial dispersion is increased. Although an unstable density gradient was created by the mass-transfer process, earlier models developed under non-mass-transfer conditions, based on Kolmogoroff`s isotropic turbulence theory, were not applicable in describing the enhancement in axial mixing. It was concluded that the density gradient effect was masked by the effect of the larger drops which were formed because of mass-transfer-induced coalescence. Mass-transfer coefficients for the dispersed phase were found to show the same trends as the Handlos and Baron oscillating drop model.

  13. Isotopic mass-dependence of noble gas diffusion coefficients inwater

    SciTech Connect

    Bourg, I.C.; Sposito, G.

    2007-06-25

    Noble gas isotopes are used extensively as tracers inhydrologic and paleoclimatic studies. These applications requireknowledge of the isotopic mass (m) dependence of noble gas diffusioncoefficients in water (D), which has not been measured but is estimatedusing experimental D-values for the major isotopes along with an untestedrelationship from kinetic theory, D prop m-0.5. We applied moleculardynamics methods to determine the mass dependence of D for four noblegases at 298 K, finding that D prop m-beta with beta<0.2, whichrefutes the kinetic theory model underlying all currentapplications.

  14. Mass transfer during osmotic dehydration of celery stalks in a batch osmo-reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sareban, M.; Abbasi Souraki, B.

    2016-07-01

    In this study, dehydration behavior of bulk of celery stalks, during osmotic drying in a limited volume of salt solution, was investigated. Experiments were carried out in the three initial solution concentrations of 10, 18 and 25 % (w/w) and at the three temperatures of 35, 45 and 55 °C. The volume ratio of the fruit to the solution was considered 1:3. A two-parameter model was used for prediction of kinetics of mass transfer and values of equilibrium moisture loss and solid gain. Moisture and salt effective diffusivities in celery stalks were estimated by fitting the experimental data of moisture loss and solute gain to the analytical solution of Fick's second law of diffusion. The analytical model was solved by defining a partition factor, K, assuming that the concentration of solute just within the surface of the material is K times that in the solution. Results showed that moisture and salt effective diffusivities and equilibrium values of moisture loss and solute gain increased with increasing the temperature and solution concentration. Results showed a good agreement between the two parameter model (with mean relative error of 4.016 % for moisture loss and 5.977 % for solid gain), analytical solution of Fick's second law (with mean relative error of 8.924 % for moisture loss and 9.164 % for solid gain) and experimental data.

  15. Mass Transfer and Light Time Effect Studies for AU Serpentis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amin, S. M.

    2015-02-01

    The orbital period changes of theWUMa eclipsing binary AU Ser are studied using the (O-C) method. We conclude that the period variation is due to mass transfer from the primary star to the secondary one at a very low and decreasing rate dP/dt = -8.872 × 10-8, superimposed on the sinusoidal variation due to a third body orbiting the binary with period 42.87 ± 3.16 years, orbital eccentricity e = 0.52±0.12 and a longitude of periastron passage ! = 133.7±15. On studying the magnetic activity, we have concluded that the Applegate mechanism failed to describe the cycling variation of the (O-C) diagram of AU Ser.

  16. On Two-Scale Modelling of Heat and Mass Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vala, J.; Št'astník, S.

    2008-09-01

    Modelling of macroscopic behaviour of materials, consisting of several layers or components, whose microscopic (at least stochastic) analysis is available, as well as (more general) simulation of non-local phenomena, complicated coupled processes, etc., requires both deeper understanding of physical principles and development of mathematical theories and software algorithms. Starting from the (relatively simple) example of phase transformation in substitutional alloys, this paper sketches the general formulation of a nonlinear system of partial differential equations of evolution for the heat and mass transfer (useful in mechanical and civil engineering, etc.), corresponding to conservation principles of thermodynamics, both at the micro- and at the macroscopic level, and suggests an algorithm for scale-bridging, based on the robust finite element techniques. Some existence and convergence questions, namely those based on the construction of sequences of Rothe and on the mathematical theory of two-scale convergence, are discussed together with references to useful generalizations, required by new technologies.

  17. Code System to Calculate Heat and Mass Transfer In Concrete

    1999-05-26

    Version 00 This version is designated USINTC and was developed to model the thermal response of concrete to very high heating rates such as might occur from sodium spills on concrete surfaces in a breeder reactor. The major phenomena treated are conductive energy transport; chemical decomposition of concrete; and two-phase, three-component heat and mass transfer of the decomposition products: steam, liquid water, and carbon dioxide. The USINT model provides for porosity to increase as watermore » and carbon-dioxide are formed from the concrete. The concrete is treated generally as divided into two basic regions, wet and dry. In the wet region, steam, carbon-dioxide, and liquid water may co-exist, but in the dry region, there is no liquid water. There is also the possibility of a third region in which there is only liquid water and no gases.« less

  18. Modeling of Heat and Mass Transfer in Fusion Welding

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wei

    2011-01-01

    In fusion welding, parts are joined together by melting and subsequent solidification. Although this principle is simple, complex transport phenomena take place during fusion welding, and they determine the final weld quality and performance. The heat and mass transfer in the weld pool directly affect the size and shape of the pool, the solidification microstructure, the formation of weld defects such as porosity and humping, and the temperature distribution in the fusion zone and heat-affected zone (HAZ). Furthermore, the temperature evolution affects the kinetics and extent of various solid-state phase transformations, which in turn determine the final weld microstructure and mechanical properties. The formation of residual stresses and distortion originates from the thermal expansion and contraction during welding heating and cooling, respectively.

  19. Mass transfer rate and outburst cycle of SS Cygni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hempelmann, Alexander; Kurths, Juergen

    1993-07-01

    From an analysis of the SS Cygni light curve, we have recently shown (Hempelmann & Kurths, 1990) that the rate of mass transfer, M-dot(T), from the secondary star to the white dwarf primary is inversely correlated with the outburst cycle, t(c). This has been criticized as being of a trivial nature by Cannizzo & Mattei (1992). We demonstrate the nontrivial character of our finding by means of a gedankenexperiment which is based on the static outburst parameters observed. We show in this experiment that a positive M-dot(T)-t(c) correlation is possible. The negative correlation found by Hempelmann & Kurths (1990) is a consequence of the dynamics of small and strong outbursts.

  20. Mass transfer in binary X-ray systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccray, R.; Hatchett, S.

    1975-01-01

    The influence of X-ray heating on gas flows in binary X-ray systems is examined. A simple estimate is obtained for the evaporative wind flux from a stellar atmosphere due to X-ray heating which agrees with numerical calculations by Alme and Wilson (1974) but disagrees with calculations by Arons (1973) and by Basko and Sunyaev (1974) for the Her X-1/HZ Her system. The wind flux is sensitive to the soft X-ray spectrum. The self-excited wind mechanism does not work. Mass transfer in the Hercules system probably occurs by flow of the atmosphere of HZ Her through the gravitational saddle point of the system. The accretion gas stream is probably opaque with atomic density of not less than 10 to the 15th power per cu cm and is confined to a small fraction of 4(pi) steradians. Other binary X-ray systems are briefly discussed.

  1. Conception for enhanced mass transport in binary nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xuan, Yimin

    2009-12-01

    Besides their application in enhancing heat transfer, suspended nanoparticles have been found to improve mass transfer process inside binary nanofluids. The concepts of enhanced mass transfer in binary nanofluids are involved. By means of the heat and mass transfer analogy, the approaches for determining the mass diffusivity and mass transfer coefficient are proposed and discussed.

  2. Effect of molecular weight on ion diffusion and transference number in poly(ethylene oxide)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timachova, Ksenia; Balsara, Nitash

    2015-03-01

    Solid polymer electrolytes are of great interest for their potential use in high specific energy, solid-state batteries, however, salt transport properties in polymer electrolytes have not been comprehensively addressed over a wide range of molecular weights. Poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) has been the most widely studied polymer electrolyte due to its high solvation of lithium salts and low glass transition temperature. This study presents measurements of the transport properties of lithium bis(trifluoromethanesulfone)imide (LiTFSI) in PEO at both the high concentration present in functional electrolytes and in the dilute limit for a large range of PEO molecular weights. Individual diffusion coefficients of the Li + and TFSI- ions were measured using pulsed-field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance and the cation transference number was calculated. The diffusion coefficients, transference number, and conductivity as a function of molecular weight and salt concentration provide a complete set of transport properties for PEO.

  3. Devices with extended area structures for mass transfer processing of fluids

    DOEpatents

    TeGrotenhuis, Ward E.; Wegeng, Robert S.; Whyatt, Greg A.; King, David L.; Brooks, Kriston P.; Stenkamp, Victoria S.

    2009-04-21

    A microchannel device includes several mass transfer microchannels to receive a fluid media for processing at least one heat transfer microchannel in fluid communication with a heat transfer fluid defined by a thermally conductive wall, and at several thermally conductive fins each connected to the wall and extending therefrom to separate the mass transfer microchannels from one another. In one form, the device may optionally include another heat transfer microchannel and corresponding wall that is positioned opposite the first wall and has the fins and the mass transfer microchannels extending therebetween.

  4. Thermal and mass diffusion on MHD natural convective flow of a rarefied gas along vertical porous plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ram, P. C.; Nath, R.; Agrawal, A. K.

    1984-01-01

    The flow of an electrically conducting incompressible rarefied gas due to the combined buoyancy effects of thermal and mass diffusion past an infinite vertical porous plate with constant suction has been studied in the presence of uniform transverse magnetic field. The problem has been solved for velocity, temperature, and concentration fields. It has been observed that mean velocity and the mean temperature are affected by the Grashof numbers G1 and G2, the slip parameter h1, temperature jump coefficient h2, concentration jump coefficient h3 and magnetic field parameter M. The amplitude and the phase of skin-friction and the rate of heat transfer are affected by frequency in addition to the above parameters. They are shown graphically. The numerical values of the mean skin- friction and the mean rate of heat transfer are also tabulated

  5. Intracrystalline mass transfer in zeolites monitored by microscopic and macroscopic techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Foerste, C.; Kaerger, J.; Pfeifer, H. )

    1990-01-03

    Conventional {sup 1}H NMR signal intensity measurements have been used to monitor macroscopically the kinetics of molecular exchange of deuterium-labeled molecules between the intracrystalline space of zeolite crystallites and the surrounding atmosphere. After reaching equilibrium, a pulsed-field-gradient experiment was performed within the same sample tube so that it became possible for the first time to compare results for the intracrystalline migration of adsorbed molecules derived from macroscopic (intensity) and microscopic (pulsed-field-gradient) measurements on identical samples. For benzene adsorbed on zeolite Na-X the intracrystalline diffusivities resulting from these two measuring techniques are found to be in satisfactory agreement. This result proves that molecular exchange between benzene adsorbed in the intracrystalline space of Na-X and the surrounding atmosphere is essentially controlled by intracrystalline mass transfer.

  6. Mass transfer in AlN crystal growth at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noveski, V.; Schlesser, R.; Mahajan, S.; Beaudoin, S.; Sitar, Z.

    2004-03-01

    A one-dimensional mass transfer model based on equilibrium sublimation and gas phase diffusion was developed for high-temperature sublimation growth of AlN in an RF heated reactor and validated with growth results. The model predicted the apparent activation energy for growth to be close to the energy of sublimation. Using the model-predicted growth conditions, a 25 mm diameter polycrystalline boule was grown at a rate of 1 mm/h. Growth was performed at short source-to-seed distances (˜10 mm), nitrogen pressure of 600 Torr, nitrogen flow-rate of 100 sccm, and source temperatures ranging from 2000°C to 2400°C. Fast grain size development was achieved in the growth direction. The grown material was transparent and virtually colorless.

  7. A proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry based system for determining plant uptake of volatile organic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tani, Akira; Kato, Shungo; Kajii, Yoshizumi; Wilkinson, Michael; Owen, Sue; Hewitt, Nick

    In order to evaluate the contribution that higher plants make to the removal of volatile organic compounds from the atmosphere, a measurement system consisting of a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS), CO 2 analyzer, diffusion devise and leaf enclosure was established. The uptake of VOCs by Golden Pothos ( Epipremnum aureum) was investigated. The overall relative error associated with measurements made using this system was <2.2% when a Golden Pothos leaf was exposed to 75-750 ppbv of methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK). Even at the lowest MIBK concentration, more than 2.2% of the inflowing VOC was lost to the leaf, representing a detectable and positive MIBK uptake rate by the plant. The results of the investigation were compared with a measurement system based on gas chromatography analysis and it was shown that the use of a PTR-MS based system can significantly increase the certainties in determining the rate of VOC uptake by plants.

  8. Mass balance model parameter transferability on a tropical glacier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurgiser, Wolfgang; Mölg, Thomas; Nicholson, Lindsey; Kaser, Georg

    2013-04-01

    The mass balance and melt water production of glaciers is of particular interest in the Peruvian Andes where glacier melt water has markedly increased water supply during the pronounced dry seasons in recent decades. However, the melt water contribution from glaciers is projected to decrease with appreciable negative impacts on the local society within the coming decades. Understanding mass balance processes on tropical glaciers is a prerequisite for modeling present and future glacier runoff. As a first step towards this aim we applied a process-based surface mass balance model in order to calculate observed ablation at two stakes in the ablation zone of Shallap Glacier (4800 m a.s.l., 9°S) in the Cordillera Blanca, Peru. Under the tropical climate, the snow line migrates very frequently across most of the ablation zone all year round causing large temporal and spatial variations of glacier surface conditions and related ablation. Consequently, pronounced differences between the two chosen stakes and the two years were observed. Hourly records of temperature, humidity, wind speed, short wave incoming radiation, and precipitation are available from an automatic weather station (AWS) on the moraine near the glacier for the hydrological years 2006/07 and 2007/08 while stake readings are available at intervals of between 14 to 64 days. To optimize model parameters, we used 1000 model simulations in which the most sensitive model parameters were varied randomly within their physically meaningful ranges. The modeled surface height change was evaluated against the two stake locations in the lower ablation zone (SH11, 4760m) and in the upper ablation zone (SH22, 4816m), respectively. The optimal parameter set for each point achieved good model skill but if we transfer the best parameter combination from one stake site to the other stake site model errors increases significantly. The same happens if we optimize the model parameters for each year individually and transfer

  9. Limestone characterization to model damage from acidic precipitation: Effect of pore structure on mass transfer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leith, S.D.; Reddy, M.M.; Irez, W.F.; Heymans, M.J.

    1996-01-01

    The pore structure of Salem limestone is investigated, and conclusions regarding the effect of the pore geometry on modeling moisture and contaminant transport are discussed based on thin section petrography, scanning electron microscopy, mercury intrusion porosimetry, and nitrogen adsorption analyses. These investigations are compared to and shown to compliment permeability and capillary pressure measurements for this common building stone. Salem limestone exhibits a bimodal pore size distribution in which the larger pores provide routes for convective mass transfer of contaminants into the material and the smaller pores lead to high surface area adsorption and reaction sites. Relative permeability and capillary pressure measurements of the air/water system indicate that Salem limestone exhibits high capillarity end low effective permeability to water. Based on stone characterization, aqueous diffusion and convection are believed to be the primary transport mechanisms for pollutants in this stone. The extent of contaminant accumulation in the stone depends on the mechanism of partitioning between the aqueous and solid phases. The described characterization techniques and modeling approach can be applied to many systems of interest such as acidic damage to limestone, mass transfer of contaminants in concrete and other porous building materials, and modeling pollutant transport in subsurface moisture zones.

  10. Endocytic pathway rapidly delivers internalized molecules to lysosomes: an analysis of vesicle trafficking, clustering and mass transfer.

    PubMed

    Pangarkar, Chinmay; Dinh, Anh-Tuan; Mitragotri, Samir

    2012-08-20

    Lysosomes play a critical role in intracellular drug delivery. For enzyme-based therapies, they represent a potential target site whereas for nucleic acid or many protein drugs, they represent the potential degradation site. Either way, understanding the mechanisms and processes involved in routing of materials to lysosomes after cellular entry is of high interest to the field of drug delivery. Most therapeutic cargoes other than small hydrophobic molecules enter the cells through endocytosis. Endocytosed cargoes are routed to lysosomes via microtubule-based transport and are ultimately shared by various lysosomes via tethering and clustering of endocytic vesicles followed by exchange of their contents. Using a combined experimental and numerical approach, here we studied the rates of mass transfer into and among the endocytic vesicles in a model cell line, 3T3 fibroblasts. In order to understand the relationship of mass transfer with microtubular transport and vesicle clustering, we varied both properties through various pharmacological agents. At the same time, microtubular transport and vesicle clustering were modeled through diffusion-advection equations and the Smoluchowski equations, respectively. Our analysis revealed that the rate of mass transfer is optimally related to microtubular transport and clustering properties of vesicles. Further, the rate of mass transfer is highest in the innate state of the cell. Any perturbation to either microtubular transport or vesicle aggregation led to reduced mass transfer to lysosome. These results suggest that in the absence of an external intervention the endocytic pathway appears to maximize molecular delivery to lysosomes. Strategies are discussed to reduce mass transfer to lysosomes so as to extend the residence time of molecules in endosomes or late endosomes, thus potentially increasing the likelihood of their escape before disposition in the lysosomes.

  11. An experimental correction proposed for an accurate determination of mass diffusivity of wood in steady regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zohoun, Sylvain; Agoua, Eusèbe; Degan, Gérard; Perre, Patrick

    2002-08-01

    This paper presents an experimental study of the mass diffusion in the hygroscopic region of four temperate species and three tropical ones. In order to simplify the interpretation of the phenomena, a dimensionless parameter called reduced diffusivity is defined. This parameter varies from 0 to 1. The method used is firstly based on the determination of that parameter from results of the measurement of the mass flux which takes into account the conditions of operating standard device (tightness, dimensional variations and easy installation of samples of wood, good stability of temperature and humidity). Secondly the reasons why that parameter has to be corrected are presented. An abacus for this correction of mass diffusivity of wood in steady regime has been plotted. This work constitutes an advanced deal nowadays for characterising forest species.

  12. Sudden Morphometric Changes Induced by Diffuse Mass Wasting Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moretti, S.; Casagli, N.; Catani, F.; Battistini, A.; Raspini, F.

    2010-12-01

    On October 1st, 2009, an exceptionally intense and prolonged rainfall event, preceded by two similar storms on 16 and 23-24 September, triggered a large number of shallow landslides in the province of Messina (Sicily), causing human losses and extensive damages. In a follow-up study a detailed geomorphological survey was carried out as well as a LIDAR digital elevation model. In this paper we present an attempt at using such data to model and understand the mass wasting processes and their consequences in terms of slope morphometry changes in one of the affected watersheds, the Briga creek. Here, the event was characterized by a sudden triggering of many similar shallow soil failures, generating in turn a sediment flow that moved along the main directions of drainage with high velocities and modalities ranging from debris flow to mud flow. The main damages were registered at the channel junctions and at the watershed outlet, where the major mass concentration was reached. Starting from the landslide inventory mapping carried out a few days after the event, we performed an analisys of mobilized volumes, using a method that numerically compares the pre-event and the post-event DEMs. Afterwards, we generated a very accurate, morphology-based reconstruction of flow directions for the entire watershed, in order to understand which were the main avenues of mass flow over the area and where most of the mobilized sediment was deposited. Finally, combining the extensive data connected with landslide scars with a statistical model for the prediction of regolith thickness, we propose a distributed model of colluvium depth for the Briga watershed. The use of this dataset together with present-day topography as derived from LIDAR data allows for the definition of topographic and bedrock gradient maps which, in turn, constitute an important step towards the definition of the actual boundary conditions for slope stability analysis. We believe that this will be a fundamental

  13. Asymptotic profiles of steady states for a diffusive SIS epidemic model with mass action infection mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yixiang; Zou, Xingfu

    2016-10-01

    Mass action and standard incidence are two major infection mechanisms in modelling spread of infectious diseases. Spatial heterogeneity plays an important role in spread of infectious diseases, and hence, motivates and advocates diffusive models for disease dynamics. By analyzing a diffusive SIS model with the standard incidence infection mechanism, some recent works [2,12] have investigated the asymptotical profiles of the endemic steady state for large and small diffusion rates, and the results show that controlling the diffusion rate of the susceptible individuals can help eradicate the infection, while controlling the diffusion rate of the infectious individuals cannot. This paper aims to reveal the difference between the two infection mechanisms in a spatially heterogeneous environment. To this end, we consider a diffusive SIS model of the same structure but with the mass action infection adopted, and explore the asymptotic profiles of the endemic steady state for small and large diffusion rates. It turns out that the new model poses some new challenges due to the nonlocal term in the equilibrium problem and the unboundedness of the nonlinear term. Our results on this new model reveal some fundamental differences between the two transmission mechanisms in such spatial models, which may provide some implications on disease modelling and controls.

  14. Multi-rate mass transfer modeling of two-phase flow in highly heterogeneous fractured and porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tecklenburg, Jan; Neuweiler, Insa; Carrera, Jesus; Dentz, Marco

    2016-05-01

    We study modeling of two-phase flow in highly heterogeneous fractured and porous media. The flow behaviour is strongly influenced by mass transfer between a highly permeable (mobile) fracture domain and less permeable (immobile) matrix blocks. We quantify the effective two-phase flow behavior using a multirate rate mass transfer (MRMT) approach. We discuss the range of applicability of the MRMT approach in terms of the pertinent viscous and capillary diffusion time scales. We scrutinize the linearization of capillary diffusion in the immobile regions, which allows for the formulation of MRMT in the form of a non-local single equation model. The global memory function, which encodes mass transfer between the mobile and the immobile regions, is at the center of this method. We propose two methods to estimate the global memory function for a fracture network with given fracture and matrix geometry. Both employ a scaling approach based on the known local memory function for a given immobile region. With the first method, the local memory function is calculated numerically, while the second one employs a parametric memory function in form of truncated power-law. The developed concepts are applied and tested for fracture networks of different complexity. We find that both physically based parameter estimation methods for the global memory function provide predictive MRMT approaches for the description of multiphase flow in highly heterogeneous porous media.

  15. Liquid-to-Gas Mass Transfer in Anaerobic Processes: Inevitable Transfer Limitations of Methane and Hydrogen in the Biomethanation Process

    PubMed Central

    Pauss, André; Andre, Gérald; Perrier, Michel; Guiot, Serge R.

    1990-01-01

    Liquid-to-gas mass transfer in anaerobic processes was investigated theoretically and experimentally. By using the classical definition of kLa, the global volumetric mass transfer coefficient, theoretical development of mass balances in such processes demonstrates that the mass transfer of highly soluble gases is not limited in the usual conditions occurring in anaerobic fermentors (low-intensity mixing). Conversely, the limitation is important for poorly soluble gases, such as methane and hydrogen. The latter could be overconcentrated to as much as 80 times the value at thermodynamic equilibrium. Such overconcentrations bring into question the biological interpretations that have been deduced solely from gaseous measurements. Experimental results obtained in three different methanogenic reactors for a wide range of conditions of mixing and gas production confirmed the general existence of low mass transfer coefficients and consequently of large overconcentrations of dissolved methane and hydrogen (up to 12 and 70 times the equilibrium values, respectively). Hydrogen mass transfer coefficients were obtained from the direct measurements of dissolved and gaseous concentrations, while carbon dioxide coefficients were calculated from gas phase composition and calculation of related dissolved concentration. Methane transfer coefficients were based on calculations from the carbon dioxide coefficients. From mass balances performed on a gas bubble during its simulated growth and ascent to the surface of the liquid, the methane and carbon dioxide contents in the gas bubble appeared to be controlled by the bubble growth process, while the bubble ascent was largely responsible for a slight enrichment in hydrogen. PMID:16348206

  16. The impact of separated flow on heat and mass transfer. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, R.J.

    1998-08-01

    An investigation of the effect of flow separation on heat and mass transfer has been completed. This research provided enhanced understanding of fundamental mechanisms governing important heat and mass transfer flow processes. This report summarizes the work conducted under the project. This research has provided considerable new knowledge on flow and heat transfer situations of great interest in a number of energy conversion devices, including heat exchangers, gas turbines, solar energy systems and general heat transfer systems.

  17. Mass Transfer Effects on the Unsteady Flow of UCM Fluid Over a Stretching Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayat, T.; Awais, M.; Sajid, M.

    This paper looks at the mass transfer effects on the unsteady two-dimensional and magnetohydrodynamic flow of an upper-convected Maxwell fluid bounded by a stretching surface. Homotopy analysis method is used for the development of series solution of the arising nonlinear problem. Plots of velocity and concentration fields are displayed and discussed. The values of surface mass transfer and gradient of mass transfer are also tabulated.

  18. Diffusive transfer of water and glucose across the chorionic plate of the isolated human term placenta.

    PubMed

    Schröder, H J; Dehne, K; Andreas, T; Rägo, S; Rybakowski, C

    1999-01-01

    This study investigated systematically the diffusive transfer of water and glucose across the chorionic plate of the human placenta. Isolated sections of human term placentae were perfused at the fetal side (open loop) with modified Ringer's solution (n=31). An artificial amniotic compartment was created on top of the chorionic plate. 3H- and 14C-labelled tracer pairs were added (donor side) to the fetal perfusion fluid or to the 'amniotic' fluid. Transfer fractions (TF, ratio of acceptor side to donor side radioactivity) were calculated as percentages. TF of water and L-glucose from perfusion fluid into the 'amniotic' fluid were 3.9+/-0.5 per cent (mean+/-SEM) and 1.2+/-0.3 per cent after 60 min and significantly different (n=6). In each sample of the following experiments the transfer fraction of the D-hexose was larger than that of the L-isomer. At 60 min, the TF were 1.6+/-0.2 and 1.1+/-0.2 per cent (D-glucose/L-glucose; fetal to amniotic compartment, n=8), from amniotic compartment to fetal perfusate 0.6+/-0.1 and 0.4+/-0.1 per cent (D-glucose/L-glucose, n=11), and 0.8+/-0.1 and 0.6+/-0.1 per cent (3-O-methyl-D-glucose/L-glucose, n=6). The difference between the latter TF lost its significance after cytochalasin B (0.1-0.2 mmol/l) had been added to the amniotic compartment. It is concluded that a limited diffusive pathway across the chorionic plate of the human placenta exists and that the transfer of D-glucose depends in part on facilitated diffusion.

  19. Sorption and modeling of mass transfer of toxic chemical vapors in activated-carbon fiber-cloth adsorbers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lordgooei, M.; Sagen, J.; Rood, M.J.; Rostam-Abadi, M.

    1998-01-01

    A new activated-carbon fiber-cloth (ACFC) adsorber coupled with an electrothermal regenerator and a cryogenic condenser was designed and developed to efficiently capture and recover toxic chemical vapors (TCVs) from simulated industrial gas streams. The system was characterized for adsorption by ACFC, electrothermal desorption, and cryogenic condensation to separate acetone and methyl ethyl ketone from gas streams. Adsorption dynamics are numerically modeled to predict system characteristics during scale-up and optimization of the process in the future. The model requires diffusivities of TCVs into an activated-carbon fiber (ACF) as an input. Effective diffusivities of TCVs into ACFs were modeled as a function of temperature, concentration, and pore size distribution. Effective diffusivities for acetone at 65 ??C and 30-60 ppmv were measured using a chromatography method. The energy factor for surface diffusion was determined from comparison between the experimental and modeled effective diffusivities. The modeled effective diffusivities were used in a dispersive computational model to predict mass transfer zones of TCVs in fixed beds of ACFC under realistic conditions for industrial applications.

  20. Efficient Exciton Diffusion and Resonance-Energy Transfer in Multilayered Organic Epitaxial Nanofibers

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Multilayered epitaxial nanofibers are exemplary model systems for the study of exciton dynamics and lasing in organic materials because of their well-defined morphology, high luminescence efficiencies, and color tunability. We use temperature-dependent continuous wave and picosecond photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy to quantify exciton diffusion and resonance-energy transfer (RET) processes in multilayered nanofibers consisting of alternating layers of para-hexaphenyl (p6P) and α-sexithiophene (6T) serving as exciton donor and acceptor material, respectively. The high probability for RET processes is confirmed by quantum chemical calculations. The activation energy for exciton diffusion in p6P is determined to be as low as 19 meV, proving p6P epitaxial layers also as a very suitable donor material system. The small activation energy for exciton diffusion of the p6P donor material, the inferred high p6P-to-6T resonance-energy-transfer efficiency, and the observed weak PL temperature dependence of the 6T acceptor material together result in an exceptionally high optical emission performance of this all-organic material system, thus making it well suited, for example, for organic light-emitting devices. PMID:26191119

  1. Biological conversion of synthesis gas. Mass transfer/kinetic studies

    SciTech Connect

    Klasson, K.T.; Basu, R.; Johnson, E.R.; Clausen, E.C.; Gaddy, J.L.

    1992-03-01

    Mass transfer and kinetic studies were carried out for the Rhodospirillum rubrum and Chlorobium thiosulfatophilum bacterial systems. R. rubrum is a photosynthetic anaerobic bacterium which catalyzes the biological water gas shift reaction: CO + H{sub 2}0 {yields} CO{sub 2} + H{sub 2}. C. thiosulfatophilum is also a H{sub 2}S and COS to elemental sulfur. The growth of R. rubrum may be satisfactorily carried out at 25{degree} and 30{degree}C, while CO uptake and thus the conversion of CO best occurs at temperatures of either 30{degree}, 32{degree} or 34{degree}C. The rate of conversion of COs and H{sub 2}O to CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S may be modeled by a first order rate expression. The rate constant at 30{degree}C was found to be 0.243 h{sup {minus}1}. The growth of C. thiosulfatophilum may be modeled in terms of incoming light intensity using a Monod equation: {mu} = {sub 351} + I{sub o}/{sup 0.152}I{sub o}. Comparisons of the growth of R. rubrum and C. thiosulfatophilum shows that the specific growth rate of C. thiosulfatophilum is much higher at a given light intensity.

  2. Spicules, mass transfer, oscillations, and the heating of the corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasachoff, J. M.; Kozarev, K. A.; Butts, D. L.; Gangestad, J. W.; Seaton, D. B.; de Pontieu, B.; Golub, L.; Deluca, E.; Wilhelm, K.; Dammasch, I.

    2005-05-01

    The mass moving in chromospheric spicules is enough to replace the corona in a brief time, so understanding the dynamics of spicules is important for understanding the support and heating of the solar corona. We have undertaken a program involving simultaneous high-resolution observations in various chromospheric visible lines (H-alpha, Ca II H, and G-band, as well as Dopplergrams) using the Swedish Solar Telescope on La Palma, ultraviolet chromospheric, transition-region, and coronal lines (Fe IX/X 171 A, Lyman-alpha 1216 A, and continuum/C I/C IV 1600 A) using NASA's TRACE, and ultraviolet chromospheric and transition-region lines (Si II 1533, C IV 1548, and Ne VIII 770) using SUMER on SOHO. Our first coordinated observing run, in May 2004, yielded a variety of images that are under study, especially for the morphological statistics and dynamics of spicules. The energy transfer through the chromosphere is relevant to the overlapping investigation of coronal heating through rapid (1Hz range) oscillations of coronal loops as observed at total eclipses by Williams College expeditions. This research is supported by NASA grant number NNG04GK44G to Williams College. TRACE analysis at SAO is supported by a contract from Lockheed Martin. SOHO is a project of international cooperation between ESA and NASA.

  3. Heat and mass transfer in unsaturated porous media. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Childs, S.W.; Malstaff, G.

    1982-02-01

    A preliminary study of heat and water transport in unsaturated porous media is reported. The project provides background information regarding the feasibility of seasonal thermal energy storage in unconfined aquifers. A parametric analysis of the factors of importance, and an annotated bibliography of research findings pertinent to unconfined aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) are presented. This analysis shows that heat and mass transfer of water vapor assume dominant importance in unsaturated porous media at elevated temperature. Although water vapor fluxes are seldom as large as saturated medium liquid water fluxes, they are important under unsaturated conditions. The major heat transport mechanism for unsaturated porous media at temperatures from 50 to 90/sup 0/C is latent heat flux. The mechanism is nonexistent under saturated conditions but may well control design of unconfined aquifer storage systems. The parametric analysis treats detailed physical phenomena which occur in the flow systems study and demonstrates the temperature and moisture dependence of the transport coefficients of importance. The question of design of an unconfined ATES site is also addressed by considering the effects of aquifer temperature, depth to water table, porous medium flow properties, and surface boundary conditions. Recommendations are made for continuation of this project in its second phase. Both scientific and engineering goals are considered and alternatives are presented.

  4. Three-dimensional simulation of mass transfer in artificial kidneys.

    PubMed

    Ding, Weiping; Li, Weili; Sun, Sijie; Zhou, Xiaoming; Hardy, Peter A; Ahmad, Suhail; Gao, Dayong

    2015-06-01

    In this work, the three-dimensional velocity and concentration fields on both the blood and dialysate sides in an artificial kidney were simulated, taking into account the effects of the flow profiles induced by the inlet and outlet geometrical structures and the interaction between the flows of blood and dialysate. First, magnetic resonance imaging experiments were performed to validate the mathematical model. Second, the effects of the flow profiles induced by the blood and dialysate inlet and outlet geometrical structures on mass transfer were theoretically investigated. Third, the clearance of toxins was compared with the clearance value calculated by a simple model that is based on the ideal flow profiles on both the blood and dialysate sides. Our results show that as the blood flow rate increases, the flow field on the blood side becomes less uniform; however, as the dialysate flow rate increases, the flow field on the dialysate side becomes more uniform. The effect of the inlet and outlet geometrical structures of the dialysate side on the velocity and concentration fields is more significant than that of the blood side. Due to the effects of the flow profiles induced by the inlet and outlet geometrical structures, the true clearance of toxins is lower than the ideal clearance, especially when the dialysate flow rate is low or the blood flow rate is high. The results from this work are significant for the structural optimization of artificial kidneys and the accurate prediction of toxin clearance.

  5. INTERACTING BINARIES WITH ECCENTRIC ORBITS. II. SECULAR ORBITAL EVOLUTION DUE TO NON-CONSERVATIVE MASS TRANSFER

    SciTech Connect

    Sepinsky, J. F.; Willems, B.; Kalogera, V.; Rasio, F. A.

    2009-09-10

    We investigate the secular evolution of the orbital semimajor axis and eccentricity due to mass transfer in eccentric binaries, allowing for both mass and angular momentum loss from the system. Adopting a delta function mass transfer rate at the periastron of the binary orbit, we find that, depending on the initial binary properties at the onset of mass transfer, the orbital semimajor axis and eccentricity can either increase or decrease at a rate linearly proportional to the magnitude of the mass transfer rate at periastron. The range of initial binary mass ratios and eccentricities that lead to increasing orbital semimajor axes and eccentricities broadens with increasing degrees of mass loss from the system and narrows with increasing orbital angular momentum loss from the binary. Comparison with tidal evolution timescales shows that the usual assumption of rapid circularization at the onset of mass transfer in eccentric binaries is not justified, irrespective of the degree of systemic mass and angular momentum loss. This work extends our previous results for conservative mass transfer in eccentric binaries and can be incorporated into binary evolution and population synthesis codes to model non-conservative mass transfer in eccentric binaries.

  6. Sensitizing solid state nuclear magnetic resonance of dilute nuclei by spin-diffusion assisted polarization transfers.

    PubMed

    Lupulescu, Adonis; Frydman, Lucio

    2011-10-01

    Recent years have witnessed efforts geared at increasing the sensitivity of NMR experiments, by relying on the suitable tailoring and exploitation of relaxation phenomena. These efforts have included the use of paramagnetic agents, enhanced (1)H-(1)H incoherent and coherent transfers processes in 2D liquid state spectroscopy, and homonuclear (13)C-(13)C spin diffusion effects in labeled solids. The present study examines some of the opportunities that could open when exploiting spontaneous (1)H-(1)H spin-diffusion processes, to enhance relaxation and to improve the sensitivity of dilute nuclei in solid state NMR measurements. It is shown that polarization transfer experiments executed under sufficiently fast magic-angle-spinning conditions, enable a selective polarization of the dilute low-γ spins by their immediate neighboring protons. Repolarization of the latter can then occur during the time involved in monitoring the signal emitted by the low-γ nuclei. The basic features involved in the resulting approach, and its potential to improve the effective sensitivity of solid state NMR measurements on dilute nuclei, are analyzed. Experimental tests witness the advantages that could reside from utilizing this kind of approach over conventional cross-polarization processes. These measurements also highlight a number of limitations that will have to be overcome for transforming selective polarization transfers of this kind into analytical methods of choice.

  7. Solutions for Reacting and Nonreacting Viscous Shock Layers with Multicomponent Diffusion and Mass Injection. Ph.D. Thesis - Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moss, J. N.

    1971-01-01

    Numerical solutions are presented for the viscous shocklayer equations where the chemistry is treated as being either frozen, equilibrium, or nonequilibrium. Also the effects of the diffusion model, surface catalyticity, and mass injection on surface transport and flow parameters are considered. The equilibrium calculations for air species using multicomponent: diffusion provide solutions previously unavailable. The viscous shock-layer equations are solved by using an implicit finite-difference scheme. The flow is treated as a mixture of inert and thermally perfect species. Also the flow is assumed to be in vibrational equilibrium. All calculations are for a 45 deg hyperboloid. The flight conditions are those for various altitudes and velocities in the earth's atmosphere. Data are presented showing the effects of the chemical models; diffusion models; surface catalyticity; and mass injection of air, water, and ablation products on heat transfer; skin friction; shock stand-off distance; wall pressure distribution; and tangential velocity, temperature, and species profiles.

  8. Low energy emulsion-based fermentation enabling accelerated methane mass transfer and growth of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate)-accumulating methanotrophs.

    PubMed

    Myung, Jaewook; Kim, Minkyu; Pan, Ming; Criddle, Craig S; Tang, Sindy K Y

    2016-05-01

    Methane is a low-cost feedstock for the production of polyhydroxyalkanoate biopolymers, but methanotroph fermentations are limited by the low solubility of methane in water. To enhance mass transfer of methane to water, vigorous mixing or agitation is typically used, which inevitably increases power demand and operational costs. This work presents a method for accelerating methane mass transfer without agitation by growing methanotrophs in water-in-oil emulsions, where the oil has a higher solubility for methane than water does. In systems without agitation, the growth rate of methanotrophs in emulsions is five to six times that of methanotrophs in the medium-alone incubations. Within seven days, cells within the emulsions accumulate up to 67 times more P3HB than cells in the medium-alone incubations. This is achieved due to the increased interfacial area of the aqueous phase, and accelerated methane diffusion through the oil phase. PMID:26896714

  9. Theoretical gas phase mass transfer coefficients for endogenous gases in the lungs.

    PubMed

    Condorelli, P; George, S C

    1999-01-01

    Gas phase mass transfer coefficients for nitric oxide (NO), ethanol (EtOH), and water vapor (H2O) were determined for typical conducting airway geometry and tracheal flows (5 x 10(-5)and 5 x 10(-4) m3 s(-1)), by solving the steady-state two-dimensional diffusion equation. A constant absolute production rate with first order consumption reactions in pulmonary tissue was assumed for NO. For EtOH and H2O, constant concentrations were assumed in the blood and tissue, respectively. Results, expressed in terms of the average Sherwood number (Sh), were correlated with the Peclet (Pe(r)) number, and the length-to-diameter (L/D) ratio for each airway branch in terms of a lumped variable, Pe(r)(L/D)n. (Sh) increases as the solubility of the gas in tissue and blood increases. In addition, Sh passes through a minimum value at Pe(r)(D/L)n equal to approximately one when axial convection and diffusion have equal but opposite magnitudes. We conclude that Sh is not a monotonic function of Pe(r)(L/D)n within the entire airway tree and that it depends on the physical properties of the gas in the tissue. This conclusion contrasts with previous experimental and theoretical correlations.

  10. Reaction-diffusion systems in natural sciences and new technology transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, André A.

    2012-12-01

    Diffusion mechanisms in natural sciences and innovation management involve partial differential equations (PDEs). This is due to their spatio-temporal dimensions. Functional semi-discretized PDEs (with lattice spatial structures or time delays) may be even more adapted to real world problems. In the modeling process, PDEs can also formalize behaviors, such as the logistic growth of populations with migration, and the adopters’ dynamics of new products in innovation models. In biology, these events are related to variations in the environment, population densities and overcrowding, migration and spreading of humans, animals, plants and other cells and organisms. In chemical reactions, molecules of different species interact locally and diffuse. In the management of new technologies, the diffusion processes of innovations in the marketplace (e.g., the mobile phone) are a major subject. These innovation diffusion models refer mainly to epidemic models. This contribution introduces that modeling process by using PDEs and reviews the essential features of the dynamics and control in biological, chemical and new technology transfer. This paper is essentially user-oriented with basic nonlinear evolution equations, delay PDEs, several analytical and numerical methods for solving, different solutions, and with the use of mathematical packages, notebooks and codes. The computations are carried out by using the software Wolfram Mathematica®7, and C++ codes.

  11. Imaging of mass transfer process using artificial fringe deflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chhaniwal, Vani K.; Narayanamurthy, Chittur S.; Anand, Arun

    2014-07-01

    A noninterferometric technique used to measure the diffusion coefficients of transparent liquid solutions is reported. This technique uses a white light source and a diffusion cell, with an artificially developed fringe pattern of dark and white stripes at its entrance. As the diffusion process takes place in the cell, the light passing through this nonuniform refractive index medium will bend toward the higher refractive index region, which results in a fringe shift. This shift in the fringe pattern at different times is recorded in a personal computer (PC) using a CCD camera for the calculation of diffusion coefficients. The fringe shift is calculated after skeletonization and linear fit of the captured fringe system. The diffusion coefficient of different concentrations of ammonium dihydrogen phosphate was determined using the proposed technique and the measured values lay within 1% of the reported values. Detailed theoretical and experimental analyses with a comparison of other existing results are discussed.

  12. The influence of state-to-state kinetics on diffusion and heat transfer behind shock waves

    SciTech Connect

    Kunova, O.; Kustova, E.; Mekhonoshina, M.; Nagnibeda, E.

    2014-12-09

    In the paper, the influence of vibrational and chemical kinetics on heat transfer and diffusion in hypersonic flows of N{sub 2}/N mixture in the relaxation zone behind shock waves is studied on the basis of the state-to-state kinetic theory approach. The results of calculations of vibrational level populations ni, gas temperature T, total energy flux q, diffusion velocities of molecules at different vibrational states V{sub i} and atoms V{sub a} in the relaxation zone behind a shock front are presented for the free stream Mach number M = 10, 15. The contribution of different dissipative processes to the total energy flux is estimated for various flow conditions. The impact of non-equilibrium vibrational distributions in the free stream on molecular level populations and transport properties in the relaxation zone is shown.

  13. Bilayer mass transport model for determining swelling and diffusion in coated, ultrathin membranes.

    PubMed

    Nadermann, Nichole K; Chan, Edwin P; Stafford, Christopher M

    2015-02-18

    Water transport and swelling properties of an ultrathin, selective polyamide layer with a hydrophilic polymer coating, i.e., a polymer bilayer, are studied using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D). Specifically, QCM-D is used to measure the dynamic and equilibrium change in mass in a series of differential sorption experiments to determine the dependence of the apparent diffusion coefficient and equilibrium swelling of the bilayer as a function of the water vapor activity. To determine transport properties specific to the polyamide layer, sorption kinetics of the bilayer was modeled with a bilayer mass transport model. The swelling and water diffusion coefficients are interpreted according to the Painter-Shenoy polymer network swelling model and the solution-diffusion model, respectively.

  14. Fick's second law transformed: one path to cloaking in mass diffusion.

    PubMed

    Guenneau, S; Puvirajesinghe, T M

    2013-06-01

    Here, we adapt the concept of transformational thermodynamics, whereby the flux of temperature is controlled via anisotropic heterogeneous diffusivity, for the diffusion and transport of mass concentration. The n-dimensional, time-dependent, anisotropic heterogeneous Fick's equation is considered, which is a parabolic partial differential equation also applicable to heat diffusion, when convection occurs, for example, in fluids. This theory is illustrated with finite-element computations for a liposome particle surrounded by a cylindrical multi-layered cloak in a water-based environment, and for a spherical multi-layered cloak consisting of layers of fluid with an isotropic homogeneous diffusivity, deduced from an effective medium approach. Initial potential applications could be sought in bioengineering.

  15. Fick's second law transformed: one path to cloaking in mass diffusion

    PubMed Central

    Guenneau, S.; Puvirajesinghe, T. M.

    2013-01-01

    Here, we adapt the concept of transformational thermodynamics, whereby the flux of temperature is controlled via anisotropic heterogeneous diffusivity, for the diffusion and transport of mass concentration. The n-dimensional, time-dependent, anisotropic heterogeneous Fick's equation is considered, which is a parabolic partial differential equation also applicable to heat diffusion, when convection occurs, for example, in fluids. This theory is illustrated with finite-element computations for a liposome particle surrounded by a cylindrical multi-layered cloak in a water-based environment, and for a spherical multi-layered cloak consisting of layers of fluid with an isotropic homogeneous diffusivity, deduced from an effective medium approach. Initial potential applications could be sought in bioengineering. PMID:23536540

  16. Impact of NAPL architecture on interphase mass transfer: A pore network study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agaoglu, Berken; Scheytt, Traugott; Copty, Nadim K.

    2016-09-01

    Interphase mass transfer in porous media is commonly modeled using Sherwood number expressions that are developed in terms of fluid and porous medium properties averaged over some representative elementary volume (REV). In this work the influence of sub-grid scale properties on interphase mass transfer was investigated using a two-dimensional pore network model. The focus was on assessing the impact of (i) NAPL saturation, (ii) interfacial area (iii) NAPL spatial distribution at the pore scale, (iv) grain size heterogeneity, (v) REV or domain size and (vi) pore scale heterogeneity of the porous media on interphase mass transfer. Variability of both the mass transfer coefficient that explicitly accounts for the interfacial area and the mass transfer coefficient that lumps the interfacial area was examined. It was shown that pore scale NAPL distribution and its orientation relative to the flow direction have significant impact on flow bypassing and the interphase mass transfer coefficient. This results in a complex non-linear relationship between interfacial area and the REV-based interphase mass transfer rate. Hence, explicitly accounting for the interfacial area does not eliminate the uncertainty of the mass transfer coefficient. It was also shown that, even for explicitly defined flow patterns, changing the domain size over which the mass transfer process is defined influences the extent of NAPL bypassing and dilution and, consequently, the interphase mass transfer. It was also demonstrated that the spatial variability of pore scale parameters such as pore throat diameters may result in different rates of interphase mass transfer even for the same pore size distribution index.

  17. Charge Transfer Fluorescence and 34 nm Exciton Diffusion Length in Polymers with Electron Acceptor End Traps.

    PubMed

    Zaikowski, Lori; Mauro, Gina; Bird, Matthew; Karten, Brianne; Asaoka, Sadayuki; Wu, Qin; Cook, Andrew R; Miller, John R

    2015-06-18

    Photoexcitation of conjugated poly-2,7-(9,9-dihexylfluorene) polyfluorenes with naphthylimide (NI) and anthraquinone (AQ) electron-acceptor end traps produces excitons that form charge transfer states at the end traps. Intramolecular singlet exciton transport to end traps was examined by steady state fluorescence for polyfluorenes of 17-127 repeat units in chloroform, dimethylformamide (DMF), tetrahydrofuran (THF), and p-xylene. End traps capture excitons and form charge transfer (CT) states at all polymer lengths and in all solvents. The CT nature of the end-trapped states is confirmed by their fluorescence spectra, solvent and trap group dependence, and DFT descriptions. Quantum yields of CT fluorescence are as large as 46%. This strong CT emission is understood in terms of intensity borrowing. Energies of the CT states from onsets of the fluorescence spectra give the depths of the traps which vary with solvent polarity. For NI end traps, the trap depths are 0.06 (p-xylene), 0.13 (THF), and 0.19 eV (CHCl3). For AQ, CT fluorescence could be observed only in p-xylene where the trap depth is 0.27 eV. Quantum yields, emission energies, charge transfer energies, solvent reorganization, and vibrational energies were calculated. Fluorescence measurements on chains >100 repeat units indicate that end traps capture ∼50% of the excitons, and that the exciton diffusion length is LD = 34 nm, which is much larger than diffusion lengths reported in polymer films or than previously known for diffusion along isolated chains. The efficiency of exciton capture depends on chain length but not on trap depth, solvent polarity, or which trap group is present.

  18. Charge transfer fluorescence and 34 nm exciton diffusion length in polymers with electron acceptor end traps

    SciTech Connect

    Zaikowski, Lori; Mauro, Gina; Bird, Matthew; Karten, Brianne; Asaoka, Sadayuki; Wu, Qin; Cook, Andrew R.; Miller, John R.

    2014-12-22

    Photoexcitation of conjugated poly-2,7-(9,9-dihexylfluorene) polyfluorenes with naphthylimide (NI) and anthraquinone (AQ) electron-acceptor end traps produces excitons that form charge transfer states at the end traps. Intramolecular singlet exciton transport to end traps was examined by steady state fluorescence for polyfluorenes of 17 to 127 repeat units in chloroform, dimethylformamide (DMF), tetrahydrofuran (THF), and p-xylene. End traps capture excitons and form charge transfer (CT) states at all polymer lengths and in all solvents. The CT nature of the end-trapped states is confirmed by their fluorescence spectra, solvent and trap group dependence and DFT descriptions. Quantum yields of CT fluorescence are as large as 46%. This strong CT emission is understood in terms of intensity borrowing. Energies of the CT states from onsets of the fluorescence spectra give the depths of the traps which vary with solvent polarity. For NI end traps the trap depths are 0.06 (p-xylene), 0.13 (THF) and 0.19 eV (CHCl3). For AQ, CT fluorescence could be observed only in p-xylene where the trap depth is 0.27 eV. Quantum yields, emission energies, charge transfer energies, solvent reorganization and vibrational energies were calculated. Fluorescence measurements on chains >100 repeat units indicate that end traps capture ~50% of the excitons, and that the exciton diffusion length LD =34 nm, which is much larger than diffusion lengths reported in polymer films or than previously known for diffusion along isolated chains. As a result, the efficiency of exciton capture depends on chain length, but not on trap depth, solvent polarity or which trap group is present.

  19. Charge transfer fluorescence and 34 nm exciton diffusion length in polymers with electron acceptor end traps

    DOE PAGES

    Zaikowski, Lori; Mauro, Gina; Bird, Matthew; Karten, Brianne; Asaoka, Sadayuki; Wu, Qin; Cook, Andrew R.; Miller, John R.

    2014-12-22

    Photoexcitation of conjugated poly-2,7-(9,9-dihexylfluorene) polyfluorenes with naphthylimide (NI) and anthraquinone (AQ) electron-acceptor end traps produces excitons that form charge transfer states at the end traps. Intramolecular singlet exciton transport to end traps was examined by steady state fluorescence for polyfluorenes of 17 to 127 repeat units in chloroform, dimethylformamide (DMF), tetrahydrofuran (THF), and p-xylene. End traps capture excitons and form charge transfer (CT) states at all polymer lengths and in all solvents. The CT nature of the end-trapped states is confirmed by their fluorescence spectra, solvent and trap group dependence and DFT descriptions. Quantum yields of CT fluorescence are asmore » large as 46%. This strong CT emission is understood in terms of intensity borrowing. Energies of the CT states from onsets of the fluorescence spectra give the depths of the traps which vary with solvent polarity. For NI end traps the trap depths are 0.06 (p-xylene), 0.13 (THF) and 0.19 eV (CHCl3). For AQ, CT fluorescence could be observed only in p-xylene where the trap depth is 0.27 eV. Quantum yields, emission energies, charge transfer energies, solvent reorganization and vibrational energies were calculated. Fluorescence measurements on chains >100 repeat units indicate that end traps capture ~50% of the excitons, and that the exciton diffusion length LD =34 nm, which is much larger than diffusion lengths reported in polymer films or than previously known for diffusion along isolated chains. As a result, the efficiency of exciton capture depends on chain length, but not on trap depth, solvent polarity or which trap group is present.« less

  20. Impact of internal transport on the convective mass transfer from a droplet into a submerging falling film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landel, Julien R.; Thomas, Amalia; McEvoy, Harry; Dalziel, Stuart B.

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the convective mass transfer of dilute passive tracers contained in small viscous drops into a submerging falling film. This problem has applications in industrial cleaning, domestic dishwashers, and decontamination of hazardous material. The film Peclet number is very high, whereas the drop Peclet number varies from 0.1 to 1. The characteristic transport time in the drop is much larger than in the film. We model the mass transfer using an analogy with Newton's law of cooling. This empirical model is supported by an analytical model solving the quasi-steady two-dimensional advection-diffusion equation in the film that is coupled with a time-dependent one-dimensional diffusion equation in the drop. We find excellent agreement between our experimental data and the two models, which predict an exponential decrease in time of the drop concentration. The transport characteristic time is related to the drop diffusion time scale, as diffusion within the drop is the limiting process. Our theoretical model not only predicts the well-known relationship between the Sherwood number and the external Reynolds number in the case of a well-mixed drop Sh ~ Re1/3, it also predicts a correction in the case of a non-uniform drop concentration. The correction depends on Re, the film Schmidt number, the drop aspect ratio and the diffusivity ratio between the two phases. This prediction is in good agreement with experimental data. This material is based upon work supported by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency under Contract No. HDTRA1-12-D-0003-0001.

  1. Influence of operational parameters on the fluid-side mass transfer resistance observed in a packed bed bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Amir; Kangwa, Martin; Abo-Elwafa, Ahmed Gad; Fernandez-Lahore, Marcelo

    2015-01-01

    The influence of mass transfer on productivity as well as the performance of packed bed bioreactor was determined by varying a number of parameters; flow rate, glucose concentration and polymers (chitosan). Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells were immobilized in chitosan and non-chitosan coated alginate beads to demonstrate the effect on external mass transfer by substrate consumption time, lag phase and ethanol production. The results indicate that coating has a significant effect on the lag phase duration, being 30-40 min higher than non-coated beads. After lag phase, no significant change was observed in both types of beads on consumption of glucose with the same flow rate. It was observed that by increasing flow rates; lag phase and glucose consumption time decreased. The reason is due to the reduction of external mass transfer as a result of increase in flow rate as glucose is easily transported to and from the beads surface by diffusion. It is observed that chitosan acts as barrier for transfer of substrate and products, in and out of beads, at initial time of fermentation as it shows longer lag phase for chitosan coated beads than non-coated. Glucose consumption at low flow rate was lower as compared to higher flow rates. The optimum combination of parameters consisting of higher flow rates 30-90 ml/min and between 10 and 20 g/l of glucose was found for maximum production of ethanol.

  2. Nitrogen mass transfer models for plasma-based low-energy ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Bocong; Wang, Kesheng; Zhang, Zhipeng; Che, Honglong; Lei, Mingkai

    2015-03-15

    The nitrogen mass transfer process in plasma-based low-energy ion implantation (PBLEII) is theoretically and experimentally studied in order to explore the process mechanism of PBLEII and therefore to optimize the apparatus design and the process conditions. An electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) microwave discharge generates the nitrogen plasma with a high density of 10{sup 11}–10{sup 12} ions/cm{sup 3}, which diffuses downstream to the process chamber along the divergent magnetic field. The nitrogen ions in the plasma implant into the surface and transport to the matrix of an austenitic stainless steel under the low negative pulsed bias of −2 kV at a process temperature of 400 °C. A global plasma model is used to simulate the ECR microwave plasma discharge for a range of working pressures and microwave powers. The fluid models are adopted to calculate the plasma downstream diffusion, the sheath expansion and the low-energy ion implantation on the surface. A nonlinear kinetic discrete model is established to describe the nitrogen transport in the austenitic stainless steel and the results are compared with the experimental measurements. Under an average implantation current density of 0.3–0.6 mA/cm{sup 2}, the surface nitrogen concentration in the range from 18.5 to 29 at. % is a critical factor for the nitrogen transport in the AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel by PBLEII, which accelerates the implanted nitrogen diffusion inward up to 6–12 μm during a nitriding time of 4 h.

  3. Simulation results for a multirate mass transfer modell for immiscible displacement of two fluids in highly heterogeneous porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tecklenburg, Jan; Neuweiler, Insa; Dentz, Marco; Carrera, Jesus; Geiger, Sebastian

    2013-04-01

    Flow processes in geotechnical applications do often take place in highly heterogeneous porous media, such as fractured rock. Since, in this type of media, classical modelling approaches are problematic, flow and transport is often modelled using multi-continua approaches. From such approaches, multirate mass transfer models (mrmt) can be derived to describe the flow and transport in the "fast" or mobile zone of the medium. The porous media is then modeled with one mobile zone and multiple immobile zones, where the immobile zones are connected to the mobile zone by single rate mass transfer. We proceed from a mrmt model for immiscible displacement of two fluids, where the Buckley-Leverett equation is expanded by a sink-source-term which is nonlocal in time. This sink-source-term models exchange with an immobile zone with mass transfer driven by capillary diffusion. This nonlinear diffusive mass transfer can be approximated for particular imbibition or drainage cases by a linear process. We present a numerical scheme for this model together with simulation results for a single fracture test case. We solve the mrmt model with the finite volume method and explicit time integration. The sink-source-term is transformed to multiple single rate mass transfer processes, as shown by Carrera et. al. (1998), to make it local in time. With numerical simulations we studied immiscible displacement in a single fracture test case. To do this we calculated the flow parameters using information about the geometry and the integral solution for two phase flow by McWorther and Sunnada (1990). Comparision to the results of the full two dimensional two phase flow model by Flemisch et. al. (2011) show good similarities of the saturation breakthrough curves. Carrera, J., Sanchez-Vila, X., Benet, I., Medina, A., Galarza, G., and Guimera, J.: On matrix diffusion: formulations, solution methods and qualitative effects, Hydrogeology Journal, 6, 178-190, 1998. Flemisch, B., Darcis, M

  4. A diffusible compound can enhance conjugal transfer of the Ti plasmid in Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, L H; Kerr, A

    1991-01-01

    Several octopine strains of Agrobacterium tumefaciens were tested for Ti plasmid (pTi) transfer after induction by 400 micrograms of octopine per ml for 24 h. The strains could be divided into two groups, transfer efficient (Trae) and transfer inefficient (Traie); the respective rates of transfer were 0.77 x 10(-2) to 1.14 x 10(-2) and 0.33 x 10(-6) to 9.8 x 10(-6) plasmid transconjugant per donor cell. Transfer efficiencies of Traie strains were greatly increased when the time of induction was 72 h. A diffusible conjugation factor (CF) that can enhance conjugal transfer of pTi in A. tumefaciens was discovered when both Trae and Traie donor strains were induced in the same plate. The evidence indicates that CF is a key factor affecting transfer efficiency of pTi but is not sufficient by itself to induce transfer. Trac mutants can produce CF constitutively, and Trae strains can produce it after induction by low octopine concentrations. The transfer efficiency of Traie strains was greatly increased by adding CF to the induction medium. The thermosensitive strain B6S, which normally cannot conjugate at temperatures above 30 degrees C, could transfer pTi efficiently at 32 and 34 degrees C in the presence of CF. Production of CF is dependent on the presence of pTi but appears to be common for different opine strains; it was first detected in octopine strains, but nopaline strains also produced the same or a similar compound. CF is very biologically active, affecting donor but not recipient bacterial cells, but CF does not promote aggregation. Data suggest that CF might be an activator or derepressor in the conjugation system of A. tumefaciens. CF is a dialyzable small molecule and is resistant to DNase, RNase, protease, and heating to 100 degrees C for 10 min, but autoclaving (121 degrees C for 15 min) and alkaline treatment removed all activity. Images PMID:2001991

  5. Mass transfer in subduction zones: an elemental and isotopic perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, S.; George, R.

    2005-12-01

    Little doubt remains that subduction zone lavas contain elements recycled from the subducting slab. However, whether the key agents of this mass transfer are fluids, supercritical fluids or melts has major implications for the thermal structure of the mantle wedge. The evidence for contributions from both subducted sediment and altered oceanic crust are compelling and in most arcs their relative proportions vary inversely. Thus, so-called "fluid-rich" lavas with high Ba/Th and Sr.Th ratios have low Sr and Be isotopes etc and the converse is true for the so-called "sediment-rich"lavas with elevated La/Sm. A complicating factor is that many individual arcs tend to be dominated by one end-member. Nevertheless, experimental partition coefficient data are consistent with the differences between the fluid and sediment components being formed in the presence of different residual mineralogies. Sediment fluids appear to be poor in incompatible elements, relative to those derived from altered oceanic crust and cannot easily replicate the sediment end-member. We suggest that subducted sediments dehydrate at relatively shallow levels and that these fluids are not strongly sampled by arc lavas. Altered oceanic crust may dehydrate more extensively and to greater depths and may be buffered against melting. Model melts of dehydrated sediment residues provide a much better simulation of the inferred sediment end-member but may require ~800 C at ~ 2GPa, consistent with recent temperature-dependant viscosity models. These general inferences are strongly supported by Be and U-series isotope data which suggest that the sediment (melt) end-member is added 100's kyr to several Myr prior to eruption whereas addition of fluid components continues until a few 1000 yrs prior to eruption. Thus, the fluid and sediment end-member contributions are separate in composition, space and time. These data argue strongly against the involvement of any single supercritical fluid.

  6. A macroscale mixture theory analysis of deposition and sublimation rates during heat and mass transfer in dry snow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, A. C.; Foslien, W. E.

    2015-09-01

    The microstructure of a dry alpine snowpack is a dynamic environment where microstructural evolution is driven by seasonal density profiles and weather conditions. Notably, temperature gradients on the order of 10-20 K m-1, or larger, are known to produce a faceted snow microstructure exhibiting little strength. However, while strong temperature gradients are widely accepted as the primary driver for kinetic growth, they do not fully account for the range of experimental observations. An additional factor influencing snow metamorphism is believed to be the rate of mass transfer at the macroscale. We develop a mixture theory capable of predicting macroscale deposition and/or sublimation in a snow cover under temperature gradient conditions. Temperature gradients and mass exchange are tracked over periods ranging from 1 to 10 days. Interesting heat and mass transfer behavior is observed near the ground, near the surface, as well as immediately above and below dense ice crusts. Information about deposition (condensation) and sublimation rates may help explain snow metamorphism phenomena that cannot be accounted for by temperature gradients alone. The macroscale heat and mass transfer analysis requires accurate representations of the effective thermal conductivity and the effective mass diffusion coefficient for snow. We develop analytical models for these parameters based on first principles at the microscale. The expressions derived contain no empirical adjustments, and further, provide self consistent values for effective thermal conductivity and the effective diffusion coefficient for the limiting cases of air and solid ice. The predicted values for these macroscale material parameters are also in excellent agreement with numerical results based on microscale finite element analyses of representative volume elements generated from X-ray tomography.

  7. A macroscale mixture theory analysis of deposition and sublimation rates during heat and mass transfer in snow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, A. C.; Foslien, W. E.

    2015-03-01

    The microstructure of a dry alpine snowpack is a dynamic environment where microstructural evolution is driven by seasonal density profiles and weather conditions. Notably, temperature gradients on the order of 10-20 K m-1, or larger, are known to produce a faceted snow microstructure exhibiting little strength. However, while strong temperature gradients are widely accepted as the primary driver for kinetic growth, they do not fully account for the range of experimental observations. An additional factor influencing snow metamorphism is believed to be the rate of mass transfer at the macroscale. We develop a mixture theory capable of predicting macroscale deposition and/or sublimation in a snow cover under temperature gradient conditions. Temperature gradients and mass exchange are tracked over periods ranging from 1 to 10 days. Interesting heat and mass transfer behavior is observed near the ground, near the surface, as well as immediately above and below dense ice crusts. Information about deposition (condensation) and sublimation rates may help explain snow metamorphism phenomena that cannot be accounted for by temperature gradients alone. The macroscale heat and mass transfer analysis requires accurate representations of the thermal conductivity and the effective mass diffusion coefficient for snow. We develop analytical models for these parameters based on first principles at the microscale. The expressions derived contain no empirical adjustments, and further, provide self consistent values for thermal conductivity and the effective diffusion coefficient for the limiting cases of air and solid ice. The predicted values for these macroscale material parameters are also in excellent agreement with numerical results based on microscale finite element analyses of representative volume elements generated from X-ray tomography.

  8. Development of a correlation for aqueous-vapor phase mass transfer in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szatkowski, Andrew; Imhoff, Paul T.; Miller, Cass T.

    1995-03-01

    In many situations vapor-phase extraction procedures (e.g., soil venting, air sparging, and bioventing) may be suitable methods for remediating porous media contaminated by volatile organic compounds. This has led to increased study of operative processes in these systems, including aqueous-vapor phase mass transfer. Past work has shown the importance of the flow regime on this process, but a quantitative estimate of mass-transfer coefficients is lacking, especially for systems not confounded by uncertainties involving interfacial area between the phases. An experimental investigation was conducted to isolate the resistance to aqueous-vapor phase mass transfer at the phase boundary, using an ideal porous medium system. Mass-transfer coefficients were measured for toluene for a wide range of Reynolds numbers. An empirical model was fit to the data in dimensionless form. The mass-transfer model was coupled with an available interfacial area model, yielding a dimensionless expression for the mass-transfer rate coefficient. This expression was used to compare results from this work to three other experimental studies reported in the literature. These comparisons showed that for experiments where infiltrating water flowed uniformly within the porous medium, the predicted mass-transfer coefficients were within a factor of 5 of the measured coefficients. Mass transfer was significantly slower than the rate predicted, using the results from this work, in experiments where infiltrating water flowed nonuniformly.

  9. Estimating kinetic mass transfer by resting-period measurements in flow-interruption tracer tests

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, R; Lu, C; Wu, Wei-min; Cheng, H.; Gu, Baohua; Watson, David B; Criddle, Craig; Kitanidis, Peter K.; Brooks, Scott C; Jardine, Philip M; Luo, Jian

    2010-06-01

    Flow-interruption tracer test is an effective approach to identify kinetic mass transfer processes for solute transport in subsurface media. By switching well pumping and resting, one may alter the dominant transport mechanism and generate special concentration patterns for identifying kinetic mass transfer processes. In the present research, we conducted three-phase (i.e., pumping, resting, and pumping) field-scale flow-interruption tracer tests using a conservative tracer bromide in a multiple-well system installed at the US Department of Energy Site, Oak Ridge, TN. A novel modeling approach based on the resting-period measurements was developed to estimate the mass transfer parameters. This approach completely relied on the measured breakthrough curves without requiring detailed aquifer characterization and solving transport equations in nonuniform, transient flow fields. Additional measurements, including hydraulic heads and tracer concentrations in large pumping wells, were taken to justify the assumption that mass transfer processes dominated concentration change during resting periods. The developed approach can be conveniently applied to any linear mass transfer model. Both first-order and multirate mass transfer models were applied to analyze the breakthrough curves at various monitoring wells. The multirate mass transfer model was capable of jointly fitting breakthrough curve behavior, showing the effectiveness and flexibility for incorporating aquifer heterogeneity and scale effects in upscaling effective mass transfer models.

  10. Estimating kinetic mass transfer by resting-period measurements in flow-interruption tracer tests.

    PubMed

    Gong, R; Lu, C; Wu, W-M; Cheng, H; Gu, B; Watson, D B; Criddle, C S; Kitanidis, P K; Brooks, S C; Jardine, P M; Luo, J

    2010-09-20

    Flow-interruption tracer test is an effective approach to identify kinetic mass transfer processes for solute transport in subsurface media. By switching well pumping and resting, one may alter the dominant transport mechanism and generate special concentration patterns for identifying kinetic mass transfer processes. In the present research, we conducted three-phase (i.e., pumping, resting, and pumping) field-scale flow-interruption tracer tests using a conservative tracer bromide in a multiple-well system installed at the US Department of Energy Site, Oak Ridge, TN. A novel modeling approach based on the resting-period measurements was developed to estimate the mass transfer parameters. This approach completely relied on the measured breakthrough curves without requiring detailed aquifer characterization and solving transport equations in nonuniform, transient flow fields. Additional measurements, including hydraulic heads and tracer concentrations in large pumping wells, were taken to justify the assumption that mass transfer processes dominated concentration change during resting periods. The developed approach can be conveniently applied to any linear mass transfer model. Both first-order and multirate mass transfer models were applied to analyze the breakthrough curves at various monitoring wells. The multirate mass transfer model was capable of jointly fitting breakthrough curve behavior, showing the effectiveness and flexibility for incorporating aquifer heterogeneity and scale effects in upscaling effective mass transfer models.

  11. Direct estimation of mass flow and diffusion of nitrogen compounds in solution and soil.

    PubMed

    Oyewole, Olusegun Ayodeji; Inselsbacher, Erich; Näsholm, Torgny

    2014-02-01

    Plant nutrient uptake from soil is mainly governed by diffusion and transpirationally induced mass flow, but the current methods for assessing the relative importance of these processes are indirect. We developed a microdialysis method using solutions of different osmotic potentials as perfusates to simulate diffusion and mass flow processes, and assessed how induced mass flow affected fluxes of nitrogen (N) compounds in solution and in boreal forest soil. Varying the osmotic potential of perfusates induced vertical fluxes in the direction of the dialysis membranes at rates of between 1 × 10(-8) and 3 × 10(-7)  m s(-1) , thus covering the estimated range of water velocities perpendicular to root surfaces and induced by transpiration. Mass flow increased N fluxes in solution but even more so in soil. This effect was explained by an indirect effect of mass flow on rates of diffusive fluxes, possibly caused by the formation of steeper gradients in concentrations of N compounds from membrane surfaces out in the soil. Our results suggest that transpiration may be an essential driver of plant N acquisition.

  12. Direct estimation of mass flow and diffusion of nitrogen compounds in solution and soil.

    PubMed

    Oyewole, Olusegun Ayodeji; Inselsbacher, Erich; Näsholm, Torgny

    2014-02-01

    Plant nutrient uptake from soil is mainly governed by diffusion and transpirationally induced mass flow, but the current methods for assessing the relative importance of these processes are indirect. We developed a microdialysis method using solutions of different osmotic potentials as perfusates to simulate diffusion and mass flow processes, and assessed how induced mass flow affected fluxes of nitrogen (N) compounds in solution and in boreal forest soil. Varying the osmotic potential of perfusates induced vertical fluxes in the direction of the dialysis membranes at rates of between 1 × 10(-8) and 3 × 10(-7)  m s(-1) , thus covering the estimated range of water velocities perpendicular to root surfaces and induced by transpiration. Mass flow increased N fluxes in solution but even more so in soil. This effect was explained by an indirect effect of mass flow on rates of diffusive fluxes, possibly caused by the formation of steeper gradients in concentrations of N compounds from membrane surfaces out in the soil. Our results suggest that transpiration may be an essential driver of plant N acquisition. PMID:24134319

  13. Radiation Heat Transfer Between Diffuse-Gray Surfaces Using Higher Order Finite Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gould, Dana C.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents recent work on developing methods for analyzing radiation heat transfer between diffuse-gray surfaces using p-version finite elements. The work was motivated by a thermal analysis of a High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) wing structure which showed the importance of radiation heat transfer throughout the structure. The analysis also showed that refining the finite element mesh to accurately capture the temperature distribution on the internal structure led to very large meshes with unacceptably long execution times. Traditional methods for calculating surface-to-surface radiation are based on assumptions that are not appropriate for p-version finite elements. Two methods for determining internal radiation heat transfer are developed for one and two-dimensional p-version finite elements. In the first method, higher-order elements are divided into a number of sub-elements. Traditional methods are used to determine radiation heat flux along each sub-element and then mapped back to the parent element. In the second method, the radiation heat transfer equations are numerically integrated over the higher-order element. Comparisons with analytical solutions show that the integration scheme is generally more accurate than the sub-element method. Comparison to results from traditional finite elements shows that significant reduction in the number of elements in the mesh is possible using higher-order (p-version) finite elements.

  14. Characterizing Mass Transfer of a Complex Non-aqueous Phase Liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McColl, C. M.; Johnson, G. R.; Brusseau, M. L.

    2004-12-01

    A series of laboratory experiments were conducted with a multiple-component, non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) collected from the Picillo Farm Superfund Site. Physical property analysis and compositional analysis were performed to provide initial information about the NAPL. Batch experiments were conducted to evaluate equilibrium phase-partitioning behavior. Two sets of air-stripping column studies were conducted to examine the elution behavior, mass-transfer dynamics, and mass recovery of five selected target compounds present in the NAPL mixture. Initial elution behavior of all target components appeared to be ideal, as the initial vapor-phase concentrations were similar to vapor-phase concentrations measured for the batch equilibrium experiment and those estimated using Raoult's law based calculations incorporating NAPL composition data. Air-stripping of columns containing a pool of NAPL and no porous media revealed that removal of 1,2-DCB appeared to be limited by the molecular diffusion of the compound to the NAPL-air interface. Air-stripping of NAPL distributed relatively uniformly as a residual phase within a sandy porous medium exhibited ideal behavior.

  15. Investigation of Fundamental Physical Properties of a Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) Membrane using a Proton Transfer Reaction-Mass Spectrometry (PRTMS)

    SciTech Connect

    Boscaini, Elena; Alexander, M. Lizabeth; Prazeller, Peter; Mark, T. D.

    2004-12-15

    A membrane introduction proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (MI-PTRMS) has been employed for the characterisation of a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membrane. For this purpose the diffusion and partition coefficients (which serves as a measure for solubility) have been determined experimentally for different classes of chemical compounds both non-polar and polar species, i.e. aromatics, alcohols, ketones. It turned out that not only polar compounds exhibit strong interaction with a hydrophobic membrane such as the PDMS, but also non polar compounds as trimethylbenzene or propylbenzene which bear a relevant number of methyl groups or an alkyl chain show strong interaction with a PDMS membrane. Stronger interaction analyte-membrane leads to a slower diffusion coefficient and larger partition coefficient. The effect of the temperature on the diffusion coefficient and partition coefficient is also investigated. At higher temperature diffusion becomes faster and solubility lower. Permeability is calculated from diffusion and partition coefficients and activation energy are derived from corresponding Arrhenius plots. The MI-PTRMS system shows detection limits in the order of tens of pptv and it’s linear over five orders of magnitude.

  16. The effect of transpiration on coupled heat and mass transfer in mixed convection over a vertical plate embedded in a saturated porous medium

    SciTech Connect

    Yih, K.A.

    1997-03-01

    Effect of transpiration velocity on the heat and mass transfer characteristics of mixed convection about a permeable vertical plate embedded in a saturated porous medium under the coupled effects of thermal and mass diffusion is numerically analyzed. The plate is maintained at a uniform temperature and species concentration with constant transpiration velocity. The transformed governing equations are solved by Keller box method. Numerical results for the local Nusselt number and local Sherwood number are presented. In general, it has been found for thermally assisted flow that the local surface heat and mass transfer rates increase owing to suction of fluid. This trend reversed for blowing of fluid. It is apparent that the Lewis number has a pronounced effect on the local Sherwood number than it does on the local Nusselt number. Increasing the Lewis number decreases (increases) the local heat (mass) transfer rate.

  17. Ballistic vs. diffusive heat transfer across nanoscopic films of layered crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Meng; Keblinski, Pawel

    2014-04-14

    We use non-equilibrium molecular dynamics to study the heat transfer mechanism across sandwich interfacial structures of Si/n-atomic-layers/Si, with 1 ≤ n ≤ 20 and atomic layers composed of WSe{sub 2} and/or graphene. In the case of WSe{sub 2} sheets, we observe that the thermal resistance of the sandwich structure is increasing almost linearly with the number of WSe{sub 2} sheets, n, indicating a diffusive phonon transport mechanism. By contrast in the case of n graphene layers, the interfacial thermal resistance is more or less independent on the number of layers for 1 ≤ n ≤ 10, and is associated with ballistic phonon transport mechanism. We attribute the diffusive heat transfer mechanism across WSe{sub 2} sheets to abundant low frequency and low group velocity optical modes that carry most of the heat across the interface. By contrast, in graphene, acoustic modes dominate the thermal transport across the interface and render a ballistic heat flow mechanism.

  18. Ultra-shallow p{sup +}-junction formation in silicon by excimer laser doping -- A heat and mass transfer perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X.; Ho, J.R.; Grigoropoulos, C.P.

    1995-12-31

    A new technique is developed to fabricate the ultra-shallow p{sup +}-junctions with the depth from 30 nm to 400 nm. The ultra-shallow p{sup +}-junction is successfully made by the excimer laser doping of crystalline silicon with a solid spin-on-glass (SOG) dopant. High boron concentration of 10{sup 20} atoms/cc and the box-like junction profile are achieved through the nanosecond pulsed laser heating, melting, and boron mass diffusion in the 100 nm thin silicon layer close to the surface. The key mechanism determining the box-like junction shape is found to be the melt-solid interface limited diffusion. The optimal laser fluence condition for SOG doping is found about 0.6--0.8 J/cm{sup 2} by studying the ultra-shallow p{sup +}-junction boron profiles measured by the secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) versus the laser fluence and the pulse number. Heat and mass transfer are studied at the nanosecond time scale and the nanometer length scale. The ID numerical analysis agrees reasonably with the experiment, within the available physical picture. Possible mechanisms such as boron diffusivity dependence on the dopant concentration in the molten silicon are proposed.

  19. Impact of kinetic mass transfer on free convection in a porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Chunhui; Shi, Liangsheng; Chen, Yiming; Xie, Yueqing; Simmons, Craig T.

    2016-05-01

    We investigate kinetic mass transfer effects on unstable density-driven flow and transport processes by numerical simulations of a modified Elder problem. The first-order dual-domain mass transfer model coupled with a variable-density-flow model is employed to describe transport behavior in porous media. Results show that in comparison to the no-mass-transfer case, a higher degree of instability and more unstable system is developed in the mass transfer case due to the reduced effective porosity and correspondingly a larger Rayleigh number (assuming permeability is independent on the mobile porosity). Given a constant total porosity, the magnitude of capacity ratio (i.e., immobile porosity/mobile porosity) controls the macroscopic plume profile in the mobile domain, while the magnitude of mass transfer timescale (i.e., the reciprocal of the mass transfer rate coefficient) dominates its evolution rate. The magnitude of capacity ratio plays an important role on the mechanism driving the mass flux into the aquifer system. Specifically, for a small capacity ratio, solute loading is dominated by the density-driven transport, while with increasing capacity ratio local mass transfer dominated solute loading may occur at later times. At significantly large times, however, both mechanisms contribute comparably to solute loading. Sherwood Number could be a nonmonotonic function of mass transfer timescale due to complicated interactions of solute between source zone, mobile zone and immobile zone in the top boundary layer, resulting in accordingly a similar behavior of the total mass. The initial assessment provides important insights into unstable density-driven flow and transport in the presence of kinetic mass transfer.

  20. Effect of NAPL Source Morphology on Mass Transfer in the Vadose Zone.

    PubMed

    Petri, Benjamin G; Fučík, Radek; Illangasekare, Tissa H; Smits, Kathleen M; Christ, John A; Sakaki, Toshihiro; Sauck, Carolyn C

    2015-01-01

    The generation of vapor-phase contaminant plumes within the vadose zone is of interest for contaminated site management. Therefore, it is important to understand vapor sources such as non-aqueous-phase liquids (NAPLs) and processes that govern their volatilization. The distribution of NAPL, gas, and water phases within a source zone is expected to influence the rate of volatilization. However, the effect of this distribution morphology on volatilization has not been thoroughly quantified. Because field quantification of NAPL volatilization is often infeasible, a controlled laboratory experiment was conducted in a two-dimensional tank (28 cm × 15.5 cm × 2.5 cm) with water-wet sandy media and an emplaced trichloroethylene (TCE) source. The source was emplaced in two configurations to represent morphologies encountered in field settings: (1) NAPL pools directly exposed to the air phase and (2) NAPLs trapped in water-saturated zones that were occluded from the air phase. Airflow was passed through the tank and effluent concentrations of TCE were quantified. Models were used to analyze results, which indicated that mass transfer from directly exposed NAPL was fast and controlled by advective-dispersive-diffusive transport in the gas phase. However, sources occluded by pore water showed strong rate limitations and slower effective mass transfer. This difference is explained by diffusional resistance within the aqueous phase. Results demonstrate that vapor generation rates from a NAPL source will be influenced by the soil water content distribution within the source. The implications of the NAPL morphology on volatilization in the context of a dynamic water table or climate are discussed. PMID:25535651

  1. Effects of reservoir heterogeneity on scaling of effective mass transfer coefficient for solute transport.

    PubMed

    Leung, Juliana Y; Srinivasan, Sanjay

    2016-09-01

    Modeling transport process at large scale requires proper scale-up of subsurface heterogeneity and an understanding of its interaction with the underlying transport mechanisms. A technique based on volume averaging is applied to quantitatively assess the scaling characteristics of effective mass transfer coefficient in heterogeneous reservoir models. The effective mass transfer coefficient represents the combined contribution from diffusion and dispersion to the transport of non-reactive solute particles within a fluid phase. Although treatment of transport problems with the volume averaging technique has been published in the past, application to geological systems exhibiting realistic spatial variability remains a challenge. Previously, the authors developed a new procedure where results from a fine-scale numerical flow simulation reflecting the full physics of the transport process albeit over a sub-volume of the reservoir are integrated with the volume averaging technique to provide effective description of transport properties. The procedure is extended such that spatial averaging is performed at the local-heterogeneity scale. In this paper, the transport of a passive (non-reactive) solute is simulated on multiple reservoir models exhibiting different patterns of heterogeneities, and the scaling behavior of effective mass transfer coefficient (Keff) is examined and compared. One such set of models exhibit power-law (fractal) characteristics, and the variability of dispersion and Keff with scale is in good agreement with analytical expressions described in the literature. This work offers an insight into the impacts of heterogeneity on the scaling of effective transport parameters. A key finding is that spatial heterogeneity models with similar univariate and bivariate statistics may exhibit different scaling characteristics because of the influence of higher order statistics. More mixing is observed in the channelized models with higher-order continuity. It

  2. Effects of reservoir heterogeneity on scaling of effective mass transfer coefficient for solute transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Juliana Y.; Srinivasan, Sanjay

    2016-09-01

    Modeling transport process at large scale requires proper scale-up of subsurface heterogeneity and an understanding of its interaction with the underlying transport mechanisms. A technique based on volume averaging is applied to quantitatively assess the scaling characteristics of effective mass transfer coefficient in heterogeneous reservoir models. The effective mass transfer coefficient represents the combined contribution from diffusion and dispersion to the transport of non-reactive solute particles within a fluid phase. Although treatment of transport problems with the volume averaging technique has been published in the past, application to geological systems exhibiting realistic spatial variability remains a challenge. Previously, the authors developed a new procedure where results from a fine-scale numerical flow simulation reflecting the full physics of the transport process albeit over a sub-volume of the reservoir are integrated with the volume averaging technique to provide effective description of transport properties. The procedure is extended such that spatial averaging is performed at the local-heterogeneity scale. In this paper, the transport of a passive (non-reactive) solute is simulated on multiple reservoir models exhibiting different patterns of heterogeneities, and the scaling behavior of effective mass transfer coefficient (Keff) is examined and compared. One such set of models exhibit power-law (fractal) characteristics, and the variability of dispersion and Keff with scale is in good agreement with analytical expressions described in the literature. This work offers an insight into the impacts of heterogeneity on the scaling of effective transport parameters. A key finding is that spatial heterogeneity models with similar univariate and bivariate statistics may exhibit different scaling characteristics because of the influence of higher order statistics. More mixing is observed in the channelized models with higher-order continuity. It

  3. Effects of reservoir heterogeneity on scaling of effective mass transfer coefficient for solute transport.

    PubMed

    Leung, Juliana Y; Srinivasan, Sanjay

    2016-09-01

    Modeling transport process at large scale requires proper scale-up of subsurface heterogeneity and an understanding of its interaction with the underlying transport mechanisms. A technique based on volume averaging is applied to quantitatively assess the scaling characteristics of effective mass transfer coefficient in heterogeneous reservoir models. The effective mass transfer coefficient represents the combined contribution from diffusion and dispersion to the transport of non-reactive solute particles within a fluid phase. Although treatment of transport problems with the volume averaging technique has been published in the past, application to geological systems exhibiting realistic spatial variability remains a challenge. Previously, the authors developed a new procedure where results from a fine-scale numerical flow simulation reflecting the full physics of the transport process albeit over a sub-volume of the reservoir are integrated with the volume averaging technique to provide effective description of transport properties. The procedure is extended such that spatial averaging is performed at the local-heterogeneity scale. In this paper, the transport of a passive (non-reactive) solute is simulated on multiple reservoir models exhibiting different patterns of heterogeneities, and the scaling behavior of effective mass transfer coefficient (Keff) is examined and compared. One such set of models exhibit power-law (fractal) characteristics, and the variability of dispersion and Keff with scale is in good agreement with analytical expressions described in the literature. This work offers an insight into the impacts of heterogeneity on the scaling of effective transport parameters. A key finding is that spatial heterogeneity models with similar univariate and bivariate statistics may exhibit different scaling characteristics because of the influence of higher order statistics. More mixing is observed in the channelized models with higher-order continuity. It

  4. Study of dynamic structure and heat and mass transfer of a vertical ceramic tiles dryer using CFD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriaa, Wassim; Bejaoui, Salma; Mhiri, Hatem; Le Palec, Georges; Bournot, Philippe

    2014-02-01

    In this study, we developed a two-dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model to simulate dynamic structure and heat and mass transfer of a vertical ceramic tiles dryer (EVA 702). The carrier's motion imposed the choice of a dynamic mesh based on two methods: "spring based smoothing" and "local remeshing". The dryer airflow is considered as turbulent ( Re = 1.09 × 105 at the dryer inlet), therefore the Re-Normalization Group model with Enhanced Wall Treatment was used as a turbulence model. The resolution of the governing equation was performed with Fluent 6.3 whose capacities do not allow the direct resolution of drying problems. Thus, a user defined scalar equation was inserted in the CFD code to model moisture content diffusion into tiles. User-defined functions were implemented to define carriers' motion, thermo-physical properties… etc. We adopted also a "two-step" simulation method: in the first step, we follow the heat transfer coefficient evolution (Hc). In the second step, we determine the mass transfer coefficient (Hm) and the features fields of drying air and ceramic tiles. The found results in mixed convection mode (Fr = 5.39 at the dryer inlet) were used to describe dynamic and thermal fields of airflow and heat and mass transfer close to the ceramic tiles. The response of ceramic tiles to heat and mass transfer was studied based on Biot numbers. The evolutions of averages temperature and moisture content of ceramic tiles were analyzed. Lastly, comparison between experimental and numerical results showed a good agreement.

  5. Mass dependence of the Soret coefficient for atomic diffusion in condensed matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Wei-Feng; Lin, Zheng-Zhe; Ning, Xi-Jing

    2013-06-01

    Particle diffusion in condensed matters driven by thermal gradient, the so-called Ludwig-Soret effect, has been investigated for about 160 years, but up to the present, seldom do theories on atomic level understand a series of puzzles in relevant experiments. In this work, we derived an expression of Soret coefficient for atomic diffusion in condensed matter from a single atom statistic model with relevant parameters expressed in terms of atomic mass and the potential profile felt by the guest atom without empirical parameters. The reality of the model was strictly tested by molecular dynamics simulations, especially the result for He atom diffusing on graphene sheet, which suggests the Soret effect may be used to separate 3He from 4He.

  6. Noncontact diffuse optical assessment of blood flow changes in head and neck free tissue transfer flaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chong; Radabaugh, Jeffrey P.; Aouad, Rony K.; Lin, Yu; Gal, Thomas J.; Patel, Amit B.; Valentino, Joseph; Shang, Yu; Yu, Guoqiang

    2015-07-01

    Knowledge of tissue blood flow (BF) changes after free tissue transfer may enable surgeons to predict the failure of flap thrombosis at an early stage. This study used our recently developed noncontact diffuse correlation spectroscopy to monitor dynamic BF changes in free flaps without getting in contact with the targeted tissue. Eight free flaps were elevated in patients with head and neck cancer; one of the flaps failed. Multiple BF measurements probing the transferred tissue were performed during and post the surgical operation. Postoperative BF values were normalized to the intraoperative baselines (assigning "1") for the calculation of relative BF change (rBF). The rBF changes over the seven successful flaps were 1.89±0.15, 2.26±0.13, and 2.43±0.13 (mean±standard error), respectively, on postoperative days 2, 4, and 7. These postoperative values were significantly higher than the intraoperative baseline values (p<0.001), indicating a gradual recovery of flap vascularity after the tissue transfer. By contrast, rBF changes observed from the unsuccessful flaps were 1.14 and 1.34, respectively, on postoperative days 2 and 4, indicating less flow recovery. Measurement of BF recovery after flap anastomosis holds the potential to act early to salvage ischemic flaps.

  7. Distribution and Mass of Diffuse and Dense CO Gas in the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roman-Duval, Julia; Heyer, Mark; Brunt, Christopher M.; Clark, Paul; Klessen, Ralf; Shetty, Rahul

    2016-02-01

    Emission from carbon monoxide (CO) is ubiquitously used as a tracer of dense star-forming molecular clouds. There is, however, growing evidence that a significant fraction of CO emission originates from diffuse molecular gas. Quantifying the contribution of diffuse CO-emitting gas is vital for understanding the relation between molecular gas and star formation. We examine the Galactic distribution of two CO-emitting gas components, a high column density component detected in 13CO and 12CO, and a low column density component detected in 12CO, but not in 13CO. The “diffuse” and “dense” components are identified using a combination of smoothing, masking, and erosion/dilation procedures, making use of three large-scale 12CO and 13CO surveys of the inner and outer Milky Way. The diffuse component, which globally represents 25% (1.5 × 108M⊙) of the total molecular gas mass (6.5 × {10}8 M⊙), is more extended perpendicular to the Galactic plane. The fraction of diffuse gas increases from ˜10%-20% at a galactocentric radius of 3-4 kpc to 50% at 15 kpc, and increases with decreasing surface density. In the inner Galaxy, a yet denser component traced by CS emission represents 14% of the total molecular gas mass traced by 12CO emission. Only 14% of the molecular gas mass traced by 12CO emission is identified as part of molecular clouds in 13CO surveys by cloud identification algorithms. This study indicates that CO emission not only traces star-forming clouds, but also a significant diffuse molecular ISM component.

  8. Technical characterization of dialysis fluid flow of newly developed dialyzers using mass transfer correlation equations.

    PubMed

    Kunikata, Satoru; Fukuda, Makoto; Yamamoto, Ken-ichiro; Yagi, Yutaka; Matsuda, Masato; Sakai, Kiyotaka

    2009-01-01

    Dialysis fluid flow and mass transfer rate of newly developed dialyzers were evaluated using mass transfer correlation equations of dialysis fluid-side film coefficient. Aqueous creatinine clearance and overall mass transfer coefficient for APS-15S (Asahi Kasei Kuraray) as a conventional dialyzer, and APS-15SA (Asahi Kasei Kuraray), PES-150Salpha (Nipro), FPX140 (Fresenius), and CS-1.6U (Toray) as newly developed dialyzers were obtained at a blood-side flow rate (QB) of 200 ml/min, dialysis fluid-side flow rates (QD) of 200-800 ml/min and a net filtration rate (QF) of 0 ml/min. Mass transfer correlation equations between Sherwood number (Sh) containing dialysis fluid-side mass transfer film coefficient and Reynolds number (Re) were formed for each dialyzer. The exponents of Re were 0.62 for APS-15S whereas approximately 0.5 for the newly developed dialyzers. The dialysis fluid-side mass transfer film coefficients of the newly developed dialyzers were higher than those of the conventional dialyzer. Based on the mass transfer correlation equations, introduction of short taper, full baffle of dialyzer jacket and further wave-shaped hollow fiber improves the dialysis fluid flow of the newly developed dialyzers.

  9. Effect of water content on transient nonequilibrium NAPL-gas mass transfer during soil vapor extraction.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hongkyu; Kim, Joong Hoon; Liljestrand, Howard M; Khim, Jeehyeong

    2002-01-01

    The effect of water content on the volatilization of nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL) in unsaturated soils was characterized by one-dimensional venting experiments conducted to evaluate the lumped mass transfer coefficient. An empirical correlation based upon the modified Sherwood number, Peclet number, and normalized mean grain size was used to estimate initial lumped mass transfer coefficients over a range of water content. The effects of water content on the soil vapor extraction SVE process have been investigated through experimentation and mathematical modeling. The experimental results indicated that a rate-limited NAPL-gas mass transfer occurred in water-wet soils. A severe mass transfer limitation was observed at 61.0% water saturation where the normalized effluent gas concentrations fell below 1.0 almost immediately, declined exponentially from the initiation of venting, and showed long tailing. This result was attributed to the reduction of interfacial area between the NAPL and mobile gas phases due to the increased water content. A transient mathematical model describing the change of the lumped mass transfer coefficient was used. Simulations showed that the nonequilibrium mass transfer process could be characterized by the exponent beta, a parameter which described the reduction of the specific area available for NAPL volatilization. The nonequilibrium mass transfer limitations were controlled by the soil mean grain size and pore gas velocity, were well described by beta values below 1.0 at low water saturation, and were well predicted with beta values greater than 1.0 at high water saturation. PMID:11848263

  10. Fluidic oscillator-mediated microbubble generation to provide cost effective mass transfer and mixing efficiency to the wastewater treatment plants.

    PubMed

    Rehman, Fahad; Medley, Gareth J D; Bandulasena, Hemaka; Zimmerman, William B J

    2015-02-01

    Aeration is one of the most energy intensive processes in the waste water treatment plants and any improvement in it is likely to enhance the overall efficiency of the overall process. In the current study, a fluidic oscillator has been used to produce microbubbles in the order of 100 μm in diameter by oscillating the inlet gas stream to a pair of membrane diffusers. Volumetric mass transfer coefficient was measured for steady state flow and oscillatory flow in the range of 40-100l/min. The highest improvement of 55% was observed at the flow rates of 60, 90 and 100l/min respectively. Standard oxygen transfer rate and efficiency were also calculated. Both standard oxygen transfer rate and efficiency were found to be considerably higher under oscillatory air flow conditions compared to steady state airflow. The bubble size distributions and bubble densities were measured using an acoustic bubble spectrometer and confirmed production of monodisperse bubbles with approximately 100 μm diameters with fluidic oscillation. The higher number density of microbubbles under oscillatory flow indicated the effect of the fluidic oscillation in microbubble production. Visual observations and dissolved oxygen measurements suggested that the bubble cloud generated by the fluidic oscillator was sufficient enough to provide good mixing and to maintain uniform aerobic conditions. Overall, improved mass transfer coefficients, mixing efficiency and energy efficiency of the novel microbubble generation method could offer significant savings to the water treatment plants as well as reduction in the carbon footprint.

  11. Proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry applications in medical research.

    PubMed

    Herbig, Jens; Amann, Anton

    2009-06-01

    Gathering information about a subject's physiological and pathophysiological condition from the `smell' of breath is an idea that dates back to antiquity. This intriguing concept of non-invasive diagnosis has been revitalized by `exhaled breath analysis' in recent decades. A main driving force was the development of sensitive and versatile gas-chromatographic and mass-spectrometric instruments for trace gas analysis. Ironically, only non-smelling constituents of breath, such as O(2), CO(2), H(2), and NO have so far been included in routine clinical breath analysis. The `smell' of human breath, on the other hand, arises through a combination of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) of which several hundred have been identified to date. Most of these volatiles are systemic and are released in the gas-exchange between blood and air in the alveoli. The concentration of these compounds in the alveolar breath is related to the respective concentrations in blood. Measuring VOCs in exhaled breath allows for screening of disease markers, studying the uptake and effect of medication (pharmacokinetics), or monitoring physiological processes. There is a range of requirements for instruments for the analysis of a complex matrix, such as human breath. Mass-spectrometric techniques are particularly well suited for this task since they offer the possibility of detecting a large variety of interesting compounds. A further requirement is the ability to measure accurately in the concentration range of breath VOCs, i.e. between parts-per-trillion (pptv) and parts-per-million (ppmv) range. In the mid 1990's proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) was developed as a powerful and promising tool for the analysis of VOCs in gaseous media. Soon thereafter these instruments became commercially available to a still growing user community and have now become standard equipment in many fields including environmental research, food and flavour science, as well as life sciences. Their

  12. Assessing the influence of biofilm surface roughness on mass transfer by combining optical coherence tomography and two-dimensional modeling.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunyan; Wagner, Michael; Lackner, Susanne; Horn, Harald

    2016-05-01

    Imaging and modeling are two major approaches in biofilm research to understand the physical and biochemical processes involved in biofilm development. However, they are often used separately. In this study we combined these two approaches to investigate substrate mass transfer and mass flux. Cross-sectional biofilm images were acquired by means of optical coherence tomography (OCT) for biofilms grown on carriers. A 2D biofilm model was developed incorporating OCT images as well as a simplified biofilm geometry serving as structural templates. The model incorporated fluid flow, substrate transfer and biochemical conversion of substrates and simulated the hydrodynamics surrounding the biofilm structure as well as the substrate distribution. The method allowed detailed analysis of the hydrodynamics and mass transfer characteristics at the micro-scale. Biofilm activity with respect to substrate fluxes was compared among different combinations of flow, substrate availability and biomass density. The combined approach revealed that higher substrate fluxes at heterogeneous biofilm surface under two conditions: pure diffusion and when high flow velocity along the biofilms surface renders the whole liquid-biofilm interface to be highly active. In-between the two conditions the substrate fluxes across the surface of smooth biofilm geometry were higher than that of the heterogeneous biofilms.

  13. Primary diffuse large B-cell lymphoma of the corpora cavernosa presented as a perineal mass

    PubMed Central

    Carlos, González-Satué; Ivanna, Valverde Vilamala; Gustavo, Tapia Melendo; Joan, Areal Calama; Javier, Sanchez Macias; Luis, Ibarz Servio

    2012-01-01

    Primary male genital lymphomas may appear rarely in testis, and exceptionally in the penis and prostate, but there is not previous evidence of a lymphoma arising from the corpora cavernosa. We report the first case in the literature of a primary diffuse cell B lymphoma of the corpora cavernosa presented with low urinary tract symptoms, perineal pain and palpable mass. Diagnosis was based on trucut biopsy, histopathological studies and computed tomographic images. PMID:22919138

  14. Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma Presenting with Bilateral Renal Masses and Hematuria: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Erdoğmuş, Şiyar; Aktürk, Serkan; Kendi Çelebi, Zeynep; Kiremitçi, Saba; Kaygusuz, Gülşah; Altınbaş, Namık Kemal; Üstüner, Evren; Keven, Kenan

    2016-06-01

    Renal involvement is most often seen in conjunction with multisystemic, disseminated lymphoma either by direct extension from a retroperitoneal mass or via hematogenous spread. Primary lymphoma of the kidney is not a common entity and it is a controversial issue on account of the absence of lymphatic tissues in the normal kidney. In this case report, we describe a 19-year-old male with hematuria, acute kidney injury, and bilateral renal masses due to massive lymphomatous infiltration of the kidneys, which was diagnosed as diffuse large B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma by Tru-Cut biopsy. PMID:27095511

  15. On copper diffusion in silicon measured by glow discharge mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Modanese, Chiara; Gaspar, Guilherme; Arnberg, Lars; Di Sabatino, Marisa

    2014-11-01

    Copper contamination occurs frequently in silicon for photovoltaic applications due to its very fast diffusion coupled with a low solid solubility, especially at room temperature. The combination of these properties exerts a challenge on the direct analysis of Cu bulk concentration in Si by sputtering techniques like glow discharge mass spectrometry (GDMS). This work aims at addressing the challenges in quantitative analysis of fast diffusing elements in Si matrix by GDMS. N-type, monocrystalline (Czochralski) silicon samples were intentionally contaminated with Cu after solidification and consequently annealed at 900 °C to ensure a homogeneous distribution of Cu in the bulk. The samples were quenched after annealing to control the extent of the diffusion to the surface prior to the GDMS analyses, which were carried out at different time intervals from within few minutes after cooling onward. The Cu profiles were measured by high-resolution GDMS operating in a continuous direct current mode, where the integration step length was set to ∼0.5 μm over a total sputtered depth of 8-30 μm. The temperature of the samples during the GDMS analyses was also measured in order to evaluate the diffusion. The Cu contamination of n-type Si samples was observed to be highly material dependent. The practical impact of Cu out-diffusion on the calculation of the relative sensitivity factor (RSF) of Cu in Si is discussed.

  16. Study of Cu diffusion in porous dielectrics using secondary-ion-mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Oscar R.; Gill, William N.; Plawsky, Joel L.; Tsui Ting, Y.; Grunow, Stephan

    2005-12-15

    Secondary-ion-mass spectrometry measurements were used to study Cu diffusion in porous silica. The total concentration of Cu{sup +} decreases with increasing porosity of the dielectric. This behavior is the combined result of both the chemistry and the morphology of the dielectric. The injection of Cu is triggered by outgassing of hydroxyl and water-related species from the dielectric; furthermore, the reduced available cross-sectional area of solid for diffusion, due to porosity, leads to reduced diffusion through the porous film. This suggests that surface diffusion does not play an important role in this process. The Cu{sup +} concentration at the Cu/dielectric interface is on the order of 10{sup 23} at./m{sup 3}, but decreases with time and exponentially with porosity, which suggests the occurrence of a chemical reaction at the interface. A model of molecular diffusion and ion drift that considers the porosity of the film is developed and the results are consistent with the experimental data.

  17. Mass transfer in a 1370 C (2500 F) lithium thermal convection loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheuermann, C. M.

    1974-01-01

    Experimental results from a test to evaluate interstitial element mass transfer effects on T-111, ASTAR 811C, and ASTAR 1211C after 5000 hours in flowing lithium at 1370 C (2500 F) are presented. No gross corrosion effects were observed. However, hafnium and nitrogen transfer to cooler regions within the loop were noted. Oxygen was in general removed from test specimens, but there was no evidence to indicate that it was a major factor in the mass transfer process. Carbon and hydrogen transfer were not detected.

  18. Experimental validation of convection-diffusion discretisation scheme employed for computational modelling of biological mass transport

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The finite volume solver Fluent (Lebanon, NH, USA) is a computational fluid dynamics software employed to analyse biological mass-transport in the vasculature. A principal consideration for computational modelling of blood-side mass-transport is convection-diffusion discretisation scheme selection. Due to numerous discretisation schemes available when developing a mass-transport numerical model, the results obtained should either be validated against benchmark theoretical solutions or experimentally obtained results. Methods An idealised aneurysm model was selected for the experimental and computational mass-transport analysis of species concentration due to its well-defined recirculation region within the aneurysmal sac, allowing species concentration to vary slowly with time. The experimental results were obtained from fluid samples extracted from a glass aneurysm model, using the direct spectrophometric concentration measurement technique. The computational analysis was conducted using the four convection-diffusion discretisation schemes available to the Fluent user, including the First-Order Upwind, the Power Law, the Second-Order Upwind and the Quadratic Upstream Interpolation for Convective Kinetics (QUICK) schemes. The fluid has a diffusivity of 3.125 × 10-10 m2/s in water, resulting in a Peclet number of 2,560,000, indicating strongly convection-dominated flow. Results The discretisation scheme applied to the solution of the convection-diffusion equation, for blood-side mass-transport within the vasculature, has a significant influence on the resultant species concentration field. The First-Order Upwind and the Power Law schemes produce similar results. The Second-Order Upwind and QUICK schemes also correlate well but differ considerably from the concentration contour plots of the First-Order Upwind and Power Law schemes. The computational results were then compared to the experimental findings. An average error of 140% and 116% was demonstrated

  19. Mass transfer within electrostatic precipitators: in-flight adsorption of mercury by charged suspended particulates

    SciTech Connect

    Herek L. Clack

    2006-06-01

    Electrostatic precipitation is the dominant method of particulate control used for coal combustion, and varying degrees of mercury capture and transformation have been reported across ESPs. Nevertheless, the fate of gas-phase mercury within an ESP remains poorly understood. The present analysis focuses on the gas-particle mass transfer that occurs within a charged aerosol in an ESP. As a necessary step in gas-phase mercury adsorption or transformation, gas-particle mass transfer - particularly in configurations other than fixed beds - has received far less attention than studies of adsorption kinetics. Our previous analysis showed that only a small fraction of gas-phase mercury entering an ESP is likely to be adsorbed by collected particulate matter on the plate electrodes. The present simplified analysis provides insight into gas-particle mass transfer within an ESP under two limiting conditions: laminar and turbulent fluid flows. The analysis reveals that during the process of particulate collection, gas-particle mass transfer can be quite high, easily exceeding the mass transfer to ESP plate electrodes in most cases. Decreasing particle size, increasing particle mass loading, and increasing temperature all result in increased gas-particle mass transfer. The analysis predicts significantly greater gas-particle mass transfer in the laminar limit than in the turbulent limit; however, the differences become negligible under conditions where other factors, such as total mass of suspended particulates, are the controlling mass transfer parameters. Results are compared to selected pilot- and full-scale sorbent injection data. 41 refs., 5 figs.

  20. MASS TRANSFER VARIATIONS IN UX MONOCEROTIS: EIGHT YEARS OF AUTOMATED PHOTOMETRIC MONITORING

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, Edward C.; Henry, Gregory W.; ETZEL, PAUL B. E-mail: henry@schwab.tsuniv.edu

    2009-11-15

    We analyze eight years (1999-2007) of automated photometric observations of the active Algol binary UX Monocerotis to search for mass transfer bursts similar to those seen in U Cephei. The largest photometric anomaly is the mean gainer luminosity difference between the stream-impact hemisphere and the opposite hemisphere. We find an updated Wilson-Devinney solution for earlier six-color observations. The UX Mon donor star fills its Roche lobe and the gainer nearly fills its rotational lobe. Instead of isolated bursts of the U Cep type, we found nearly continuous brightness fluctuations likely produced by variable mass transfer. We discuss implications for mass transfer.

  1. Late Diagenesis and Mass Transfer in Sandstone Shale Sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milliken, K. L.

    2003-12-01

    , involving only compaction and dewatering of sedimentary materials. Detrital phases that survived weathering were seen as essentially inert to subsequent reaction during burial and prior to the onset of metamorphism. Metamorphism itself was viewed as isochemical and accomplished principally through solid-state reactions (see a brief summary in Ague, 1991). Notable exceptions to these views constitute the foundations of existing theory regarding the nature of late diagenesis. "Intrastratal solution" of chemically unstable detrital minerals (e.g., Pettijohn, 1941), apparent potassium metasomatism of shales (e.g., Weaver and Beck, 1971), and massive mineralogical changes during progressive burial (e.g., Coombs et al., 1959) are observations that established the directions of modern research in late diagenesis. Advances in petrographic imaging techniques (e.g., backscattered electron- and cathodoluminescence-imaging) and integration of petrographic observations with both bulk and spatially resolved chemical analyses have greatly accelerated the evolution of concepts about late diagenesis and early metamorphism.Today, basin-scale mass transfer of some materials (e.g., helium, water, and petroleum) is unquestioned (e.g., Hunt, 1996). Other materials (e.g., titanium and the REEs) are sufficiently mobile to appear within authigenic precipitates, but are likely to be "immobile" on the scale of a hand specimen. Mobilities of the major elements that make up sandstones and shales (silicon, aluminum, calcium, sodium, potassium) remain controversial. Conflicting notions about processes in rock suites across the wide range of burial conditions and alteration show that fundamental questions remain unanswered about the nature of the volumetrically significant processes within a major segment of the rock cycle. It is very likely that something is wrong, or at least inadequate, with the present concepts and/or data pertaining to the evolution of permeability, transport mechanisms, and timing

  2. Bimolecular photoinduced electron transfer beyond the diffusion limit: the Rehm-Weller experiment revisited with femtosecond time resolution.

    PubMed

    Rosspeintner, Arnulf; Angulo, Gonzalo; Vauthey, Eric

    2014-02-01

    To access the intrinsic, diffusion free, rate constant of bimolecular photoinduced electron transfer reactions, fluorescence quenching experiments have been performed with 14 donor/acceptor pairs, covering a driving-force range going from 0.6 to 2.4 eV, using steady-state and femtosecond time-resolved emission, and applying a diffusion-reaction model that accounts for the static and transient stages of the quenching for the analysis. The intrinsic electron transfer rate constants are up to 2 orders of magnitude larger than the diffusion rate constant in acetonitrile. Above ∼1.5 eV, a slight decrease of the rate constant is observed, pointing to a much weaker Marcus inverted region than those reported for other types of electron transfer reactions, such as charge recombination. Despite this, the driving force dependence can be rationalized in terms of Marcus theory. PMID:24400958

  3. Large-scale mass transfers related to pressure solution creep-faulting interactions in mudstones: Driving processes and impact of lithification degree

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, J.

    2014-02-01

    Where normal faulting is associated with PSC (Pressure Solution Creep), it generates evolutions in petrophysical properties of mudstones like chalk: decrease in reservoir qualities and transport properties in the deformed zones adjacent to the fault plane and increase (or no change) in reservoir qualities and transport properties in the outermost deformed zones. These modifications result from large-scale mass transfers linked to a transport of solutes through the pore space over distances of several grains within decimeter or larger zones (open systems at the grain scale). In the lithified mudstones, these large-scale mass transfers consist in a mass redistribution from the outermost deformed zones (mass and volume loss) to the deformed zones adjacent to the fault planes (mass gain). In the weakly lithified mudstones, the mass redistribution occurs in an opposite direction. A deeper understanding of these large-scale mass redistributions is essential because the PSC-faulting interactions and the associated petrophysical modifications can be a key topic in several geological applications (oil and gas migration and entrapment in mudstone reservoirs, anthropogenic waste storage, carbon dioxyde geosequestration). The results of two studies about mass transfers and volume changes induced by natural fault systems in “white chalk” allowed to point out that two driving processes control the large-scale mass transfers during PSC-faulting interactions: the advective mass transport related to pore fluid flows and the large-scale diffusive mass transport linked to chemical potential gradients. The present contribution also highlights that the lithification degree of the host material plays a key role in the large-scale mass transfers related to PSC-faulting interactions by controlling (1) the spatial distribution of voids induced by the deformation, (2) the particle displacement on the fault plane and in the adjacent zones and (3) the petrophysical properties of the host

  4. Effects of microscale inertia on heat or mass transfer from a drop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnamurthy, Deepak; Subramanian, Ganesh

    2012-11-01

    Heat or mass transport from suspensions of solid particles or drops is ubiquitous in many industrial processes. In the zero inertia limit the transport is diffusion limited owing to the presence of closed streamlines around each particle. A small but finite amount of inertia though, results in a vastly different picture, greatly enhancing transport by destroying the closed streamline configuration. We develop a theoretical formulation to study the effects of weak inertia on transport from a density-matched drop in a 2D linear flow. It is shown that, unlike a solid particle, the near-surface streamlines are closed only when the viscosity ratio (λ) exceeds a critical value λc = 2 α / (1- α) , where α is the linear flow parameter measuring relative magnitudes of extension and vorticity. The velocity field on the drop surface can be characterized using a complex-valued analogue of the (C, τ) coordinate system used to describe Jeffrey orbits of an axisymmetric particle. In the open-streamline case (λ < λ c) , convective transport occurs even with zero inertia, and for large Peclet number (Pe) (the relative magnitude of convective to diffusive transport), the Nusselt number (dimensionless rate of heat transfer) is expected to scale as F(α, λ) Pe1/2 and is determined via a boundary layer analysis in the (C, τ) coordinate system. In the closed streamline case (λ > λ c) , similar to the solid particle, inertia plays a crucial role, and the Nusselt number must scale as G(α, λ)Re1/2Pe1/2. A methodology is developed to analyze the convection along spiraling streamlines using a physically motivated choice of coordinate system on the drop surface.

  5. Tracking polymer diffusion in a wet latex film with fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Haley, Jeffrey C; Liu, Yuanqin; Winnik, Mitchell A; Demmer, David; Haslett, Tom; Lau, Willie

    2007-08-01

    We describe an instrument to measure the polymer interdiffusion between donor-labeled and acceptor-labeled latex polymers in a partially wet latex film with fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). It is possible to temporarily arrest the drying process of a wet latex film by sealing the film in an airtight chamber. In our approach, we measure donor fluorescence decays from 0.5 mm diameter spots at various positions across an arrested latex film with time-correlated single photon counting. We interpret the resulting decays with a Monte Carlo simulation of the FRET process and extract information about the extent of polymer diffusion as a function of position on the film. These results enable us to determine the extent of polymer interdiffusion as a function of distance from the wet-dry edge in the latex film. To highlight this device's ability to capture the rapid early stages of latex interdiffusion, we report results from an acrylate copolymer latex.

  6. Method and apparatus for transferring energy and mass

    SciTech Connect

    Rockenfeller, U.

    1989-10-24

    This patent describes method of transferring and recovering energy. It comprises forming a slurry of a liquid selected from the group consisting of long chain alcohols, ethers, glycols, glycol ethers, sebecates, phthalates, aldehydes and ketones and a solid sorbate which does not dissolve in the liquid and is capable of forming a solid/gas compound with a gaseous refrigerant, mixing the gaseous refrigerant with the slurry whereby the gas forms a solid/gas compound with the solid sorbate, and exposing the slurry mixture to a heat exchange surface whereby the energy from the formation of the solid/gas compound is transferred to the heat exchange surface.

  7. Oxygen profiles in egg masses predicted from a diffusion-reaction model.

    PubMed

    Woods, H Arthur; Moran, Amy L

    2008-03-01

    We developed a novel diffusion-reaction model to describe spatial and temporal changes in oxygen concentrations in gelatinous egg masses containing live, respiring embryos. We used the model in two ways. First, we constructed artificial egg masses of known metabolic density using embryos of the Antarctic sea urchin Sterechnius neumayeri, measured radial oxygen profiles at two temperatures, and compared our measurements to simulated radial oxygen profiles generated by the model. We parameterized the model by measuring the radius of the artificial masses, metabolic densities (=embryo metabolic rate x embryo density) and oxygen diffusion coefficients at both ambient (-1.5 degrees C) or slightly warmer (+1.5-2 degrees C) temperatures. Simulated and measured radial oxygen profiles were similar, indicating that the model captured the major biological features determining oxygen distributions. Second, we used the model to analyze sources of error in step-change experiments for determining oxygen diffusion coefficients (D), and to determine the suitability of simpler, analytical equations for estimating D. Our analysis indicated that embryo metabolism can lead to large (several-fold) overestimates of D if the analytical equation is fitted to step-down-traces of central oxygen concentration (i.e. external oxygen concentration stepped from some high value to zero). However, good estimates of D were obtained from step-up-traces. We used these findings to estimate D in egg masses of three species of nudibranch molluscs: two Antarctic species (Tritonia challengeriana and Tritoniella belli; -1.5 and +2 degrees C) and one temperate Pacific species (Tritonia diomedea; 12 and 22 degrees C). D for all three species was approximately 8 x 10(-6) cm(2) s(-1), and there was no detectable effect of temperature on estimated D. For the Antarctic species, D in egg masses was 70-90% of its value in seawater of similar temperature. PMID:18281342

  8. Measurement of atmospheric sesquiterpenes by proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S.; Karl, T.; Helmig, D.; Daly, R.; Rasmussen, R.; Guenther, A.

    2008-12-01

    The ability to measure sesquiterpenes (SQT; C15H24) by a Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS) was investigated with SQT standards, prepared by a capillary diffusion method, and the estimated mixing ratios, derived from the counts of product ions and proton transfer reaction constants were intercompared with measured mixing ratios, measured by a complementary Gas Chromatograph (GC) coupled to a Flame Ionization Detector (GC-FID). Product ion distributions due to soft-ionization occurring in a selected ion drift tube via proton transfer were measured as a function of collision energies. Results after the consideration of the mass discrimination of the PTR-MS system suggest that quantitative SQT measurements within 20% accuracy can be achieved with PTR-MS if two major product ions (m/z 149+ and 205+) out of seven major product ions (m/z 81+, 95+, 109+, 123+, 135+, 149+ and 205+) are accounted for. Bicyclic sesquiterpenes, i.e. β-caryophyllene and α-humulene, showed considerable fragmentation causing the accuracy of their analysis to be reduced to 50% if only the parent ion (m/z 205) is considered. These findings were applied to a field dataset collected above a deciduous forest at the PROPHET (Program for Research on Oxidants: Photochemistry, Emissions, and Transport) research station in 2005. Inferred Average daytime ecosystem scale mixing ratios (fluxes) of isoprene, sum of monoterpenes (MT), and sum of SQT exhibited values of 15 μg m-3 (4.5 mg m-2 h-1), 1.2 μg m-3 (0.21 mg m-2 h-1) and 0.0016 μg m-3 (0.10 mgm-2 h-1) respectively. A range of MT and SQT reactivities with respect to the OH radical was calculated and compared to an earlier study inferring significantly underestimated OH reactivities due to unknown terpenes above this deciduous forest. The results indicate that MT and SQT can resolve ~30% of missing OH reactivity, reported from this site.

  9. Mass transfer in supercritical fluids instancing selected fluids in supercritical carbon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Miao; Benning, Rainer; Delgado, Antonio; Ertunc, Oezguer

    The research interests lie in a deeper understanding of the mechanisms of diffusion and nucle-ation of organic solutes in near-and supercritical state of a solvent, which count as important means of mass transfer in the process engineering industry. The use of supercritical fluids in industrial processes, such as extraction and particle handling, has become a more and more popular method. Take a closer look at the two processes one would find that there are obviously two sub-processes involved in each of the process, namely the diffusion/nucleation as well as a phase transition procedure. Because of the operational limitations in the practice, this phase transition can-not be neglected. So it is also included in the theoretical approach. Classically to deduce conclusions from experiment results, mathematical/physical models outlining property changes and summarizing characteristics of the two processes are expected. In order to become an insight of these phenomena from the origin, and also to serve as a fundamental attribute for the numerical simulation later, the theories of statistical thermodynamics are adopted here as a proper means to describe the behaviors of the two processes. As the diffusion coefficients of the samples in our case are only of an order of approx. 10-8m2s-1, it can be assumed that the processes are in equilibrium (local changes are neglectably small), a model can be built on a general macroscopic approach for equilibrium systems, namely the Boltzmann-Gibbs distri-bution. And some rather general methods e.g. linear response theory can be applied. But as the transfer phenomena are genuinely not equilibrium systems, from this aspect a model can also be built based on the microscopic description -the kinetic theory of the behaviors of the particles of this non-equilibrium system. The characteristics under compensated gravity are also to be considered in the models. The differences and constraints between the models are to be compared and

  10. Single-molecule-sensitive fluorescence resonance energy transfer in freely-diffusing attoliter droplets

    SciTech Connect

    Rahmanseresht, Sheema; Ramos, Kieran P.; Gamari, Ben D.; Goldner, Lori S.; Milas, Peker

    2015-05-11

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from individual, dye-labeled RNA molecules confined in freely-diffusing attoliter-volume aqueous droplets is carefully compared to FRET from unconfined RNA in solution. The use of freely-diffusing droplets is a remarkably simple and high-throughput technique that facilitates a substantial increase in signal-to-noise for single-molecular-pair FRET measurements. We show that there can be dramatic differences between FRET in solution and in droplets, which we attribute primarily to an altered pH in the confining environment. We also demonstrate that a sufficient concentration of a non-ionic surfactant mitigates this effect and restores FRET to its neutral-pH solution value. At low surfactant levels, even accounting for pH, we observe differences between the distribution of FRET values in solution and in droplets which remain unexplained. Our results will facilitate the use of nanoemulsion droplets as attoliter volume reactors for use in biophysical and biochemical assays, and also in applications such as protein crystallization or nanoparticle synthesis, where careful attention to the pH of the confined phase is required.

  11. Design and characterisation of a novel in vitro skin diffusion cell system for assessing mass casualty decontamination systems.

    PubMed

    Matar, H; Larner, J; Kansagra, S; Atkinson, K L; Skamarauskas, J T; Amlot, R; Chilcott, R P

    2014-06-01

    The efficient removal of contaminants from the outer surfaces of the body can provide an effective means of reducing adverse health effects associated with incidents involving the accidental or deliberate release of hazardous materials. Showering with water is frequently used by first responders as a rapid method of mass casualty decontamination (MCD). However, there is a paucity of data on the generic effectiveness and safety of aqueous decontamination systems. To address these issues, we have developed a new in vitro skin diffusion cell system to model the conditions of a common MCD procedure ("ladder pipe system"). The new diffusion cell design incorporates a showering nozzle, an air sampling port for measurement of vapour loss and/aerosolisation, adjustable (horizontal to vertical) skin orientation and a circulating manifold system (to maintain a specified flow rate, temperature and pressure of shower water). The dermal absorption characteristics of several simulants (Invisible Red S, curcumin and methyl salicylate) measured with the new in vitro model were in good agreement with previous in vitro and in vivo studies. Moreover, these initial studies have indicated that whilst flow rate and water temperature are important factors for MCD, the presence of clothing during showering may (under certain circumstances) cause transfer and spreading of contaminants to the skin surface.

  12. Design and characterisation of a novel in vitro skin diffusion cell system for assessing mass casualty decontamination systems.

    PubMed

    Matar, H; Larner, J; Kansagra, S; Atkinson, K L; Skamarauskas, J T; Amlot, R; Chilcott, R P

    2014-06-01

    The efficient removal of contaminants from the outer surfaces of the body can provide an effective means of reducing adverse health effects associated with incidents involving the accidental or deliberate release of hazardous materials. Showering with water is frequently used by first responders as a rapid method of mass casualty decontamination (MCD). However, there is a paucity of data on the generic effectiveness and safety of aqueous decontamination systems. To address these issues, we have developed a new in vitro skin diffusion cell system to model the conditions of a common MCD procedure ("ladder pipe system"). The new diffusion cell design incorporates a showering nozzle, an air sampling port for measurement of vapour loss and/aerosolisation, adjustable (horizontal to vertical) skin orientation and a circulating manifold system (to maintain a specified flow rate, temperature and pressure of shower water). The dermal absorption characteristics of several simulants (Invisible Red S, curcumin and methyl salicylate) measured with the new in vitro model were in good agreement with previous in vitro and in vivo studies. Moreover, these initial studies have indicated that whilst flow rate and water temperature are important factors for MCD, the presence of clothing during showering may (under certain circumstances) cause transfer and spreading of contaminants to the skin surface. PMID:24412538

  13. Multi-layer onion drying: Study of mass and heat transfer mechanism and quality evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asiah, N.; Djaeni, M.

    2015-12-01

    Drying is one of methods to prolong storage life of onion. The outer layer of onion has kept dry around 12% of moisture content or below to retain the freshness of its inside part. The model of multi layers onion drying is very important to predict the water and temperature transport during dying process. In this case, one dimensional partial equation was used for predicting moisture distribution in the onion layer. To support the study, the onion drying was performed at various temperatures ranging of 40-50 °C. Then the attribute quality (quercetin content) of dried onion was analysed. The experimental data was to validate the value of water diffusivity and mass transfer coefficient used in the model. Results showed that the model can predict moisture distribution in each layer of onion. Moreover, based on the average moisture content during the drying, the model result closed to experiment data with accuracy of R2 0.970-0.999. The model was useful to estimate the drying time of outer layer to the desired level. Besides that, the quality evaluation showed that after 2 hours drying process, quercetin content can be retained.

  14. Impact of plant shoot architecture on leaf cooling: a coupled heat and mass transfer model.

    PubMed

    Bridge, L J; Franklin, K A; Homer, M E

    2013-08-01

    Plants display a range of striking architectural adaptations when grown at elevated temperatures. In the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, these include elongation of petioles, and increased petiole and leaf angles from the soil surface. The potential physiological significance of these architectural changes remains speculative. We address this issue computationally by formulating a mathematical model and performing numerical simulations, testing the hypothesis that elongated and elevated plant configurations may reflect a leaf-cooling strategy. This sets in place a new basic model of plant water use and interaction with the surrounding air, which couples heat and mass transfer within a plant to water vapour diffusion in the air, using a transpiration term that depends on saturation, temperature and vapour concentration. A two-dimensional, multi-petiole shoot geometry is considered, with added leaf-blade shape detail. Our simulations show that increased petiole length and angle generally result in enhanced transpiration rates and reduced leaf temperatures in well-watered conditions. Furthermore, our computations also reveal plant configurations for which elongation may result in decreased transpiration rate owing to decreased leaf liquid saturation. We offer further qualitative and quantitative insights into the role of architectural parameters as key determinants of leaf-cooling capacity.

  15. Impact of plant shoot architecture on leaf cooling: a coupled heat and mass transfer model

    PubMed Central

    Bridge, L. J.; Franklin, K. A.; Homer, M. E.

    2013-01-01

    Plants display a range of striking architectural adaptations when grown at elevated temperatures. In the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, these include elongation of petioles, and increased petiole and leaf angles from the soil surface. The potential physiological significance of these architectural changes remains speculative. We address this issue computationally by formulating a mathematical model and performing numerical simulations, testing the hypothesis that elongated and elevated plant configurations may reflect a leaf-cooling strategy. This sets in place a new basic model of plant water use and interaction with the surrounding air, which couples heat and mass transfer within a plant to water vapour diffusion in the air, using a transpiration term that depends on saturation, temperature and vapour concentration. A two-dimensional, multi-petiole shoot geometry is considered, with added leaf-blade shape detail. Our simulations show that increased petiole length and angle generally result in enhanced transpiration rates and reduced leaf temperatures in well-watered conditions. Furthermore, our computations also reveal plant configurations for which elongation may result in decreased transpiration rate owing to decreased leaf liquid saturation. We offer further qualitative and quantitative insights into the role of architectural parameters as key determinants of leaf-cooling capacity. PMID:23720538

  16. Exploring bubble oscillation and mass transfer enhancement in acoustic-assisted liquid-liquid extraction with a microfluidic device

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yuliang; Chindam, Chandraprakash; Nama, Nitesh; Yang, Shikuan; Lu, Mengqian; Zhao, Yanhui; Mai, John D.; Costanzo, Francesco; Huang, Tony Jun

    2015-01-01

    We investigated bubble oscillation and its induced enhancement of mass transfer in a liquid-liquid extraction process with an acoustically-driven, bubble-based microfluidic device. The oscillation of individually trapped bubbles, of known sizes, in microchannels was studied at both a fixed frequency, and over a range of frequencies. Resonant frequencies were analytically identified and were found to be in agreement with the experimental observations. The acoustic streaming induced by the bubble oscillation was identified as the cause of this enhanced extraction. Experiments extracting Rhodanmine B from an aqueous phase (DI water) to an organic phase (1-octanol) were performed to determine the relationship between extraction efficiency and applied acoustic power. The enhanced efficiency in mass transport via these acoustic-energy-assisted processes was confirmed by comparisons against a pure diffusion-based process. PMID:26223474

  17. A multiscale modeling study for the convective mass transfer in a subsurface aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Jahrul M.

    2015-09-01

    Quantitative and realistic computer simulations of mass transfer associated with disposal in subsurface aquifers is a challenging endeavor. This article has proposed a novel and efficient multiscale modeling framework, and has examined its potential to study the penetrative mass transfer in a plume that migrates in an aquifer. Numerical simulations indicate that the migration of the injected enhances the vorticity generation, and the dissolution of has a strong effect on the natural convection mass transfer. The vorticity decays with the increase of the porosity. The time scale of the vertical migration of a plume is strongly dependent on the rate of dissolution. Comparisons confirm the near optimal performance of the proposed multiscale model. These primary results with an idealized computational model of the migration in an aquifer brings the potential of the proposed multiscale model to the field of heat and mass transfer in the geoscience.

  18. The mechanism of thermal-gradient mass transfer in the sodium hydroxide-nickel system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, Charles E

    1958-01-01

    "Thermal-gradient mass transfer" was investigated in the molten sodium hydroxide-nickel system. Possible mechanisms (physical, electrochemical, and chemical) are discussed in terms of experimental and theoretical evidence. Experimental details are included in appendixes.

  19. OVERALL MASS TRANSFER COEFFICIENT FOR POLLUTANT EMISSIONS FROM SMALL WATER POOLS UNDER SIMULATED INDOOR ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Small chamber tests were conducted to experimentally determine the overall mass transfer coefficient for pollutant emissions from still water under simulated indoor-residential or occupational-environmental conditions. Fourteen tests were conducted in small environmental chambers...

  20. Estimating Heat and Mass Transfer Processes in Green Roof Systems: Current Modeling Capabilities and Limitations (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Tabares Velasco, P. C.

    2011-04-01

    This presentation discusses estimating heat and mass transfer processes in green roof systems: current modeling capabilities and limitations. Green roofs are 'specialized roofing systems that support vegetation growth on rooftops.'

  1. Improving mass transfer to soften tissues by pulsed electric fields: fundamentals and applications.

    PubMed

    Puértolas, E; Luengo, E; Álvarez, I; Raso, J

    2012-01-01

    The mass transfer phenomenon occurs in many operations of the food industry with the purpose of obtaining a given substance of interest, removing water from foods, or introducing a given substance into the food matrix. Pretreatments that modify the permeability of the cell membranes, such as grinding, heating, or enzymatic treatment, enhance the mass transfer. However, these techniques may require a significant amount of energy and can cause losses of valuable food compounds. Pulsed electric field (PEF) technology is a nonthermal processing method that causes permeabilization of cell membranes using low energy requirements and minimizing quality deterioration of the food compounds. Many practical applications of PEF for enhancing mass transfer in the food industry have been investigated. The purpose of this chapter is to give an overview of the state of the art of application of PEF for improving mass transfer in the food industry.

  2. Particle-liquid mass transfer in three-phase mechanically agitated contactors

    SciTech Connect

    Kushalkar, K.B.; Pangarkar, V.G. . Dept. of Chemical Technology)

    1994-07-01

    Mass transfer to or from solid particles suspended in an agitated liquid is relevant to many chemical processes such as adsorption, crystallization, fermentation, slurry reactors, extraction of metals, polymer processing, waste water treatment, etc. Particle-liquid mass transfer in a three-phase mechanically agitated contactor has been studied. The experiments covered a broad range of particle sizes, liquid viscosities, and gas velocities besides variations in system geometry. The impellers used were upflow pitched blade turbine (PTU), downflow pitched blade turbine (PTD), the disk turbine (DT). The results indicated a unique relationship of the particle-liquid mass-transfer coefficient with respect to the critical suspension speed under gassed conditions, N[sub sg]. This observation has resulted in a simplified correlation for the particle-liquid mass-transfer coefficient.

  3. Mass transfer in countercurrent packed columns: Application to supercritical CO[sub 2] extraction of terpenes

    SciTech Connect

    Simoes, P.C.; Matos, H.A.; Carmelo, P.J.; Gomes de Azevedo, E.; Nunes da Ponte, M. . Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia)

    1995-02-01

    Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) is an alternative separation method to more conventional processes such as liquid extraction and distillation. However, up to now, few works have been devoted to the investigation of the efficiency of countercurrent packed columns under supercritical conditions from a mass transfer point of view. Mass transfer in a countercurrent column, filled with structured gauze packing, was measured for the separation of a mixture of terpenes (d-limonene/1,8-cineole) by supercritical carbon dioxide, at 313 and 318 K and pressures up to 9 MPa. The extraction efficiency was determined in terms of the overall mass transfer coefficient. Operating lines for this process had an appreciable curvature due to a high miscibility of the two contacting phases. The real slope of these lines had to be estimated. Available mass transfer models for packed columns predicted efficiencies diverging to a great extent from the experimental results.

  4. Fluid-dynamic and mass-transfer behavior of static mixers and regular packings

    SciTech Connect

    Cavatorta, O.N.; Boehm, U.; Chiappori de del Giorgio, A.M.

    1999-05-01

    The fluid dynamics and liquid-to-wall mass transfer for spaced and stacked regular packings were studied for forced convection and fluidized beds. The behavior of these configurations in bubble columns and under natural convection conditions is also presented. Flow parameters characterizing structured packings, presented in the literature, were used in the evaluation of results. General equations to predict pressure drop and mass transfer are discussed, as well as the relationship between energy dissipation and mass transfer. In the presence of fluidized particles, single-phase flow or natural convection conditions, the mass-transfer behavior of a packing element stacked between other packs or separated from the neighboring elements by liquid layers is almost the same, but differs in bubble columns.

  5. A mass transfer origin for blue stragglers in NGC 188 as revealed by half-solar-mass companions.

    PubMed

    Geller, Aaron M; Mathieu, Robert D

    2011-10-20

    In open star clusters, where all members formed at about the same time, blue straggler stars are typically observed to be brighter and bluer than hydrogen-burning main-sequence stars, and therefore should already have evolved into giant stars and stellar remnants. Correlations between blue straggler frequency and cluster binary star fraction, core mass and radial position suggest that mass transfer or mergers in binary stars dominates the production of blue stragglers in open clusters. Analytic models, detailed observations and sophisticated N-body simulations, however, argue in favour of stellar collisions. Here we report that the blue stragglers in long-period binaries in the old (7 × 10(9)-year) open cluster NGC 188 have companions with masses of about half a solar mass, with a surprisingly narrow mass distribution. This conclusively rules out a collisional origin, as the collision hypothesis predicts a companion mass distribution with significantly higher masses. Mergers in hierarchical triple stars are marginally permitted by the data, but the observations do not favour this hypothesis. The data are highly consistent with a mass transfer origin for the long-period blue straggler binaries in NGC 188, in which the companions would be white dwarfs of about half a solar mass. PMID:22012393

  6. Influence of microwave irradiation on the mass-transfer kinetics of propylbenzene in reversed-phase liquid chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Galinada, Wilmer; Kaczmarski, Krzysztof; Guiochon, Georges A

    2005-09-01

    The effect of microwave irradiation on the kinetics of mass transfer in reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RPLC) was studied by measuring its influence on the band profile of propylbenzene in a C{sub 18}-silica column eluted with an aqueous solution of methanol and placed inside a microwave oven. The elution peaks were measured by the pulse-response method, under linear conditions. The amount of microwave energy induced into the column was varied based on the microwave input power. The experimental data were analyzed using the conventional method of moment analysis and the lumped pore diffusion model. With input powers of 15 and 30 W, the effluent temperatures were 25 {+-} 1 and 30 {+-} 1 C, respectively. The effect of microwave irradiation on the mass transfer of the studied solute was determined by comparing the band profiles obtained under the same experimental conditions, at the same temperature, with and without irradiation. The values of the intraparticle diffusion coefficient, D{sub e}, measured with microwave irradiation were ca. 20% higher than those obtained without irradiation. Derived from the method of moments, the values of D{sub e} at 15 W (25 {+-} 1 C) and 0 W (25 {+-} 1 C) were 8.408 x 10{sup -6} cm{sup 2} s{sup -1} and 6.947 x 10{sup -6} cm{sup 2} s{sup -1}, respectively, while these values at 30 W (30 {+-} 1 C) and 0 W (30 {+-} 1 C) were 9.389 x 10{sup -6} cm{sup 2} s{sup -1} and 7.848 x 10{sup -6} cm{sup 2} s{sup -1}, respectively. The values of the surface diffusivity, D{sub S}, also increased with increasing power of the microwave irradiation. It is assumed that the increase in intraparticle diffusion for propylbenzene was caused by the molecular excitation of the organic modifier that has a higher dielectric loss than the solute. The values of D{sub e} were also analyzed and determined using the POR model. There was an excellent agreement between the results of the two independent methods. These preliminary results suggest that microwave

  7. Mass transfer kinetic mechanism in monolithic columns and application to the characterization of new research monolithic samples with different average pore sizes.

    PubMed

    Gritti, Fabrice; Guiochon, Georges

    2009-06-01

    A general reduced HETP (height equivalent to a theoretical plate) equation is proposed that accounts for the mass transfer of a wide range of molecular weight compounds in monolithic columns. The detailed derivatization of each one of the individual and independent mass transfer contributions (longitudinal diffusion, eddy dispersion, film mass transfer resistance, and trans-skeleton mass transfer resistance) is discussed. The reduced HETPs of a series of small molecules (phenol, toluene, acenaphthene, and amylbenzene) and of a larger molecule, insulin, were measured on three research grade monolithic columns (M150, M225, M350) having different average pore size (approximately 150, 225, and 350 A, respectively) but the same dimension (100 mm x 4.6 mm). The first and second central moments of 2 muL samples were measured and corrected for the extra-column contributions. The h data were fitted to the new HETP equation in order to identify which contribution controls the band broadening in monolithic columns. The contribution of the B-term was found to be negligible compared to that of the A-term, even at very low reduced velocities (nu<1). At moderate velocities (1diffusivity of the compound studied due to faster mass transfer across the column. Experimental chromatograms exhibited variable degrees of systematic peak fronting, depending on the column studied. The heterogeneity of the distribution of eluent velocities from the column center to its wall (average 5%) is the source of this peak fronting. At high reduced velocities (nu>5), the C-term of the monolithic columns is controlled by film mass transfer resistance between the eluent circulating in the large throughpores and the eluent stagnant inside the thin porous skeleton. The experimental Sherwood number measured on the monolith columns increases from 0.05 to 0.22 while the adsorption energy increases by nearly 6 k

  8. Evaluation of vapor mass transfer in various membrane distillation configurations: an experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannella, G. A.; La Carrubba, V.; Brucato, V.

    2012-06-01

    Vapor mass transfer phenomena in four different membrane distillation (MD) configurations were examined through a self-built laboratory scale experimental apparatus: Air Gap MD, Sweeping Gas MD, Vacuum Sweeping Gas MD and Vacuum MD. Vapor fluxes were measured and compared with those predicted by various models, showing that MD performance under usual processing conditions is severely controlled by the permeate side resistance to mass transfer.

  9. Intensification of heat and mass transfer by ultrasound: application to heat exchangers and membrane separation processes.

    PubMed

    Gondrexon, N; Cheze, L; Jin, Y; Legay, M; Tissot, Q; Hengl, N; Baup, S; Boldo, P; Pignon, F; Talansier, E

    2015-07-01

    This paper aims to illustrate the interest of ultrasound technology as an efficient technique for both heat and mass transfer intensification. It is demonstrated that the use of ultrasound results in an increase of heat exchanger performances and in a possible fouling monitoring in heat exchangers. Mass transfer intensification was observed in the case of cross-flow ultrafiltration. It is shown that the enhancement of the membrane separation process strongly depends on the physico-chemical properties of the filtered suspensions.

  10. Models of low-mass helium white dwarfs including gravitational settling, thermal and chemical diffusion, and rotational mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Istrate, A. G.; Marchant, P.; Tauris, T. M.; Langer, N.; Stancliffe, R. J.; Grassitelli, L.

    2016-10-01

    A large number of extremely low-mass helium white dwarfs (ELM WDs) have been discovered in recent years. The majority of them are found in close binary systems suggesting they are formed either through a common-envelope phase or via stable mass transfer in a low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) or a cataclysmic variable (CV) system. Here, we investigate the formation of these objects through the LMXB channel with emphasis on the proto-WD evolution in environments with different metallicities. We study for the first time the combined effects of rotational mixing and element diffusion (e.g. gravitational settling, thermal and chemical diffusion) on the evolution of proto-WDs and on the cooling properties of the resulting WDs. We present state-of-the-art binary stellar evolution models computed with MESA for metallicities of Z = 0.02, 0.01, 0.001 and 0.0002, producing WDs with masses between 0.16-0.45 M⊙. Our results confirm that element diffusion plays a significant role in the evolution of proto-WDs that experience hydrogen shell flashes. The occurrence of these flashes produces a clear dichotomy in the cooling timescales of ELM WDs, which has important consequences e.g. for the age determination of binary millisecond pulsars. In addition, we confirm that the threshold mass at which this dichotomy occurs depends on metallicity. Rotational mixing is found to counteract the effect of gravitational settling in the surface layers of young, bloated ELM proto-WDs and therefore plays a key role in determining their surface chemical abundances, i.e. the observed presence of metals in their atmospheres. We predict that these proto-WDs have helium-rich envelopes through a significant part of their lifetime. This is of great importance as helium is a crucial ingredient in the driving of the κ-mechanism suggested for the newly observed ELM proto-WD pulsators. However, we find that the number of hydrogen shell flashes and, as a result, the hydrogen envelope mass at the beginning of

  11. Direct measurement of small diffusion coefficients with secondary ion mass spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macht, M.-P.; Naundorf, V.

    1982-11-01

    Sputter sectioning in combination with secondary ion mass spectroscopy enables the determination of very small diffusion coefficients which are not attainable with classical sectioning techniques. The exceedingly good depth resolution of the sputter sectioning and the high sensitivity of the mass spectroscopy allow to resolve penetration profiles of solutes in the 10-nm range at the ppm level. Two perturbing effects, inherent to the method and limiting its sensitivity are discussed: degradation of depth resolution by surface roughening and atomic mixing, and near surface distortion of profiles by transient erosion effects. Degradation of depth resolution was minimized by use of single crystalline specimens and low energy sputtering with reactive ions. To overcome the near surface distortions a special sample preparation technique has been developed, resulting in single crystalline specimens with one or more inserted layers of the solutes to be diffused. The application of the method is demonstrated by examples of thermal- and irradiation-induced diffusion of nickel in copper, and the main errors are discussed.

  12. Monte-Carlo Radiative Transfer Model of the Diffuse Galactic Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seon, Kwang-Il

    2015-02-01

    Monte-Carlo radiative models of the diffuse Galactic light (DGL) in our Galaxy are calcu-lated using the dust radiative transfer code MoCafe, which is three-dimensional and takes full account of multiple scattering. The code is recently updated to use a fast voxel traversal algorithm, which has dramatically increased the computing speed. The radiative transfer models are calculated with the gen-erally accepted dust scale-height of 0.1 kpc. The stellar scale-heights are assumed to be 0.1 or 0.35 kpc, appropriate for far-ultraviolet (FUV) and optical wavelengths, respectively. The face-on optical depth, measured perpendicular to the Galactic plane, is also varied from 0.2 to 0.6, suitable to the optical to FUV wavelengths, respectively. We find that the DGL at high Galactic latitudes is mostly due to backward or large-angle scattering of starlight originating from the local stars within a radial distance of r < 0.5 kpc from the Earth. On the other hand, the DGL measured in the Galactic plane is mostly due to stars at a distance range that corresponds to an optical depth of -1 measured from the Earth. Therefore, the low-latitude DGL at the FUV wavelength band would be mostly caused by the stars located at a distance of r . 0.5 kpc and the optical DGL near the Galactic plane mainly originates from stars within a distance range of 1 . r . 2 kpc. We also calculate the radiative transfer models in a clumpy two-phase medium. The clumpy two-phase models provide lower intensities at high Galactic latitudes compared to the uniform density models, because of the lower effective optical depth in clumpy media. However, no significant difference in the intensity at the Galactic plane is found.

  13. An active wound dressing for controlled convective mass transfer with the wound bed.

    PubMed

    Cabodi, Mario; Cross, Valerie L; Qu, Zheng; Havenstrite, Karen L; Schwartz, Suzanne; Stroock, Abraham D

    2007-07-01

    Conventional wound dressings-gauze, plastic films, foams, and gels-do not allow for spatial and temporal control of the soluble chemistry within the wound bed, and are thus limited to a passive role in wound healing. Here, we present an active wound dressing (AWD) designed to control convective mass transfer with the wound bed; this mass transfer provides a means to tailor and monitor the chemical state of a wound and, potentially, to aid the healing process. We form this AWD as a bilayer of porous poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (pHEMA) and silicone; the pHEMA acts as the interface with the wound bed, and a layer of silicone provides a vapor barrier and a support for connecting to external reservoirs and pumps. We measure the convective permeability of the pHEMA sponge, and use this value to design a device with a spatially uniform flow profile. We quantify the global coefficient of mass transfer of the AWD on a dissolvable synthetic surface, and compare it to existing theories of mass transfer in porous media. We also operate the AWD on model wound beds made of calcium alginate gel to demonstrate extraction and delivery of low molecular weight solutes and a model protein. Using this system, we demonstrate both uniform mass transfer over the entire wound bed and patterned mass transfer in three spatially distinct regions. Finally, we discuss opportunities and challenges for the clinical application of this design of an AWD.

  14. Coupled effect of flow variability and mass transfer on contaminant transport and attenuation in groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cvetkovic, Vladimir; Fiori, Aldo; Dagan, Gedeon

    2016-04-01

    The driving mechanism of contaminant transport in aquifers is groundwater flow, which is controlled by boundary conditions and heterogeneity of hydraulic properties. In this work we show how hydrodynamics and mass transfer can be combined in a general analytical manner to derive a physically-based (or process-based) residence time distribution for a given integral scale of the hydraulic conductivity; the result can be applied for a broad class of linear mass transfer processes. The derived tracer residence time distribution is a transfer function with parameters to be inferred from combined field and laboratory measurements. It is scalable relative to the correlation length and applicable for an arbitrary statistical distribution of the hydraulic conductivity. Based on the derived residence time distribution, the coefficient of variation and skewness of contaminant residence time are illustrated assuming a log-normal hydraulic conductivity distribution and first-order mass transfer. We show that for a low Damkohler number the coefficient of variation is more strongly influenced by mass transfer than by heterogeneity, whereas skewness is more strongly influenced by heterogeneity. The derived physically-based residence time distribution for solute transport in heterogeneous aquifers is particularly useful for studying natural attenuation of contaminants. We illustrate the relative impacts of high heterogeneity and a generalised (non-Fickian) multi-rate mass transfer on natural attenuation defined as contaminant mass loss from injection to a downstream compliance boundary.

  15. An active wound dressing for controlled convective mass transfer with the wound bed.

    PubMed

    Cabodi, Mario; Cross, Valerie L; Qu, Zheng; Havenstrite, Karen L; Schwartz, Suzanne; Stroock, Abraham D

    2007-07-01

    Conventional wound dressings-gauze, plastic films, foams, and gels-do not allow for spatial and temporal control of the soluble chemistry within the wound bed, and are thus limited to a passive role in wound healing. Here, we present an active wound dressing (AWD) designed to control convective mass transfer with the wound bed; this mass transfer provides a means to tailor and monitor the chemical state of a wound and, potentially, to aid the healing process. We form this AWD as a bilayer of porous poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (pHEMA) and silicone; the pHEMA acts as the interface with the wound bed, and a layer of silicone provides a vapor barrier and a support for connecting to external reservoirs and pumps. We measure the convective permeability of the pHEMA sponge, and use this value to design a device with a spatially uniform flow profile. We quantify the global coefficient of mass transfer of the AWD on a dissolvable synthetic surface, and compare it to existing theories of mass transfer in porous media. We also operate the AWD on model wound beds made of calcium alginate gel to demonstrate extraction and delivery of low molecular weight solutes and a model protein. Using this system, we demonstrate both uniform mass transfer over the entire wound bed and patterned mass transfer in three spatially distinct regions. Finally, we discuss opportunities and challenges for the clinical application of this design of an AWD. PMID:17106898

  16. Estimation of cauliflower mass transfer parameters during convective drying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahin, Medine; Doymaz, İbrahim

    2016-05-01

    The study was conducted to evaluate the effect of pre-treatments such as citric acid and hot water blanching and air temperature on drying and rehydration characteristics of cauliflower slices. Experiments were carried out at four different drying air temperatures of 50, 60, 70 and 80 °C with the air velocity of 2.0 m/s. It was observed that drying and rehydration characteristics of cauliflower slices were greatly influenced by air temperature and pre-treatment. Six commonly used mathematical models were evaluated to predict the drying kinetics of cauliflower slices. The Midilli et al. model described the drying behaviour of cauliflower slices at all temperatures better than other models. The values of effective moisture diffusivities (D eff ) were determined using Fick's law of diffusion and were between 4.09 × 10-9 and 1.88 × 10-8 m2/s. Activation energy was estimated by an Arrhenius type equation and was 23.40, 29.09 and 26.39 kJ/mol for citric acid, blanch and control samples, respectively.

  17. Mass and Energy Transfer Between the Solar Photosphere and Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peter, H.

    2015-12-01

    The problem of chromospheric and coronal heating is also a problem of mass supply to the corona. On average we see redshifts at transition region temperatures of the order of 10 km/s. If interpreted as downflows, this would quickly empty the corona, and fresh material has to be transported into the corona. Several models have been proposed to understand this mass cycle between the different atmospheric layers. However, as of yet all these proposals have serious shortcomings. On the observational side open questions remain, too. With the new IRIS mission we can observe the transition region at unprecedented spatial and spectral resolution, but the observational results are still puzzling. In particular the finding that the spatial distribution of line widths and Doppler shifts do not change with increasing resolution is against physical intuition. This shows that even with IRIS we still have significant velocity gradients along the line-of-sight, indicating that shocks might play a significant role. Likewise the temporal evolution might be a key for our understanding of the mass cycle. It might well be that the filling and draining of hot plasma occurs on significantly different time scales, which might be part of the difficulty to arrive at a conclusive observational picture. Considering the progress made for the quiet Sun, it seems clear that the processes responsible for the mass exchange are not resolved (yet). Therefore one might wonder to what extent one could use larger and resolved individual events in more active parts of the Sun to understand the details of the mass transport. In particular a common understanding of reconnection events such as Ellerman bombs in the photosphere, explosive events in the transition region and the recently discovered IRIS bombs in-between might provide the key to better understand the mass cycle throughout the atmospheric layers from the photosphere to the corona.

  18. Turbulent heat and mass transfers across a thermally stratified air-water interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papadimitrakis, Y. A.; Hsu, Y.-H. L.; Wu, J.

    1986-01-01

    Rates of heat and mass transfer across an air-water interface were measured in a wind-wave research facility, under various wind and thermal stability conditions (unless otherwise noted, mass refers to water vapor). Heat fluxes were obtained from both the eddy correlation and the profile method, under unstable, neutral, and stable conditions. Mass fluxes were obtained only under unstable stratification from the profile and global method. Under unstable conditions the turbulent Prandtl and Schmidt numbers remain fairly constant and equal to 0.74, whereas the rate of mass transfer varies linearly with bulk Richardson number. Under stable conditions the turbulent Prandtl number rises steadily to a value of 1.4 for a bulk Richardson number of about 0.016. Results of heat and mass transfer, expressed in the form of bulk aerodynamic coefficients with friction velocity as a parameter, are also compared with field data.

  19. Orbital Evolution of Mass-transferring Eccentric Binary Systems. II. Secular Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dosopoulou, Fani; Kalogera, Vicky

    2016-07-01

    Finite eccentricities in mass-transferring eccentric binary systems can be explained by taking into account the mass loss and mass transfer processes that often occur in these systems. These processes can be treated as perturbations of the general two-body problem. The time-evolution equations for the semimajor axis and the eccentricity derived from perturbative methods are generally phase-dependent. The osculating semimajor axis and eccentricity change over the orbital timescale and are not easy to implement in binary evolution codes like MESA. However, the secular orbital element evolution equations can be simplified by averaging over the rapidly varying true anomalies. In this paper, we derive the secular time-evolution equations for the semimajor axis and the eccentricity for various mass loss/transfer processes using either the adiabatic approximation or the assumption of delta-function mass loss/transfer at periastron. We begin with the cases of isotropic and anisotropic wind mass loss. We continue with conservative and non-conservative non-isotropic mass ejection/accretion (including Roche-Lobe-Overflow) for both point-masses and extended bodies. We conclude with the case of phase-dependent mass accretion. Comparison of the derived equations with similar work in the literature is included and an explanation of the existing discrepancies is provided.

  20. Effect of ohmic, mass-transfer, and kinetic resistances on linear-sweep voltammetry in a cylindrical-pore electrode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weidner, John W.; Fedkiw, Peter S.

    1991-01-01

    A means is presented to account for the effect of ohmic, mass-transfer, and kinetic resistances on linear-sweep voltammograms by modeling a pore in a porous matrix as a cylindrical-pore electrode, and solving the mass and charge conservation equations in the context of this geometry for the simply redox reaction O + ne(-) yield R where both O and R are soluble species. Both analytical and numerical techniques are used to solve the governing equations. The calculated peak currents and potentials are correlated by empirical formulas to the measurable parameters: sweep rate, concentration of the redox species, diffusion coefficient, conductivity of the electrolyte, and pore dimensions. Using the correlations, a methodology is established for determining if the redox reaction kinetics are irreversible or reversible (Nernstian). If the reaction is irreversible, it is shown how the standard rate constant and the transfer coefficient may be extracted from linear-sweep voltammetry data, or, if the reaction is reversible, how the number of electrons transferred may be deduced.

  1. On the Effective Thermal Conductivity of Frost Considering Mass Diffusion and Eddy Convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandula, Max

    2010-01-01

    A physical model for the effective thermal conductivity of water frost is proposed for application to the full range of frost density. The proposed model builds on the Zehner-Schlunder one-dimensional formulation for porous media appropriate for solid-to-fluid thermal conductivity ratios less than about 1000. By superposing the effects of mass diffusion and eddy convection on stagnant conduction in the fluid, the total effective thermal conductivity of frost is shown to be satisfactorily described. It is shown that the effects of vapor diffusion and eddy convection on the frost conductivity are of the same order. The results also point out that idealization of the frost structure by cylindrical inclusions offers a better representation of the effective conductivity of frost as compared to spherical inclusions. Satisfactory agreement between the theory and the measurements for the effective thermal conductivity of frost is demonstrated for a wide range of frost density and frost temperature.

  2. Benign neck masses showing restricted diffusion: Is there a histological basis for discordant behavior?

    PubMed Central

    Das, Abanti; Bhalla, Ashu S; Sharma, Raju; Kumar, Atin; Sharma, Meher; Gamanagatti, Shivanand; Thakar, Alok; Sharma, Suresh

    2016-01-01

    Diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) evolved as a complementary tool to morphologic imaging by offering additional functional information about lesions. Although the technique utilizes movement of water molecules to characterize biological tissues in terms of their cellularity, there are other factors related to the histological constitution of lesions which can have a significant bearing on DWI. Benign lesions with atypical histology including presence of lymphoid stroma, inherently increased cellularity or abundant extracellular collagen can impede movement of water molecules similar to malignant tissues and thereby, show restricted diffusion. Knowledge of these atypical entities while interpreting DWI in clinical practice can avoid potential misdiagnosis. This review aims to present an imaging spectrum of such benign neck masses which, owing to their distinct histology, can show discordant behavior on DWI. PMID:26981226

  3. Integral solutions to transient nonlinear heat (mass) diffusion with a power-law diffusivity: a semi-infinite medium with fixed boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hristov, Jordan

    2016-03-01

    Closed form approximate solutions to nonlinear heat (mass) diffusion equation with power-law nonlinearity of the thermal (mass) diffusivity have been developed by the integral-balance method avoiding the commonly used linearization by the Kirchhoff transformation. The main improvement of the solution is based on the double-integration technique and a new approach to the space derivative. Solutions to Dirichlet and Neumann boundary condition problems have been developed and benchmarked against exact numerical and approximate analytical solutions available in the literature.

  4. Final Report: Geoelectrical Measurement of Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Haggerty, Roy; Day-Lewis, Fred; Singha, Kamini; Johnson, Timothy; Binley, Andrew; Lane, John

    2014-03-20

    Mass transfer affects contaminant transport and is thought to control the efficiency of aquifer remediation at a number of sites within the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. An improved understanding of mass transfer is critical to meeting the enormous scientific and engineering challenges currently facing DOE. Informed design of site remedies and long-term stewardship of radionuclide-contaminated sites will require new cost-effective laboratory and field techniques to measure the parameters controlling mass transfer spatially and across a range of scales. In this project, we sought to capitalize on the geophysical signatures of mass transfer. Previous numerical modeling and pilot-scale field experiments suggested that mass transfer produces a geoelectrical signature—a hysteretic relation between sampled (mobile-domain) fluid conductivity and bulk (mobile + immobile) conductivity—over a range of scales relevant to aquifer remediation. In this work, we investigated the geoelectrical signature of mass transfer during tracer transport in a series of controlled experiments to determine the operation of controlling parameters, and also investigated the use of complex-resistivity (CR) as a means of quantifying mass transfer parameters in situ without tracer experiments. In an add-on component to our grant, we additionally considered nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to help parse mobile from immobile porosities. Including the NMR component, our revised study objectives were to: 1. Develop and demonstrate geophysical approaches to measure mass-transfer parameters spatially and over a range of scales, including the combination of electrical resistivity monitoring, tracer tests, complex resistivity, nuclear magnetic resonance, and materials characterization; and 2. Provide mass-transfer estimates for improved understanding of contaminant fate and transport at DOE sites, such as uranium transport at the Hanford 300 Area. To achieve our objectives, we implemented a 3

  5. Mathematical equivalence between time-dependent single-rate and multirate mass transfer models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Garcia, D.; Sanchez-Vila, X.

    2015-05-01

    The often observed tailing of tracer breakthrough curves is caused by a multitude of mass transfer processes taking place over multiple scales. Yet, in some cases, it is convenient to fit a transport model with a single-rate mass transfer coefficient that lumps all the non-Fickian observed behavior. Since mass transfer processes take place at all characteristic times, the single-rate mass transfer coefficient derived from measurements in the laboratory or in the field vary with time ω>(t>). The literature review and tracer experiments compiled by Haggerty et al. (2004) from a number of sites worldwide suggest that the characteristic mass transfer time, which is proportional to ω>(t>)-1, scales as a power law of the advective and experiment duration. This paper studies the mathematical equivalence between the multirate mass transfer model (MRMT) and a time-dependent single-rate mass transfer model (t-SRMT). In doing this, we provide new insights into the previously observed scale-dependence of mass transfer coefficients. The memory function, g(t), which is the most salient feature of the MRMT model, determines the influence of the past values of concentrations on its present state. We found that the t-SRMT model can also be expressed by means of a memory function φ>(t,τ>). In this case, though the memory function is nonstationary, meaning that in general it cannot be written as φ>(t-τ>). Nevertheless, the full behavior of the concentrations using a single time-dependent rate ω>(t>) is approximately analogous to that of the MRMT model provided that the equality ω>(t>)=-dln⁡g>(t>)/dt holds and the field capacity is properly chosen. This relationship suggests that when the memory function is a power law, g>(t>)˜t1-k, the equivalent mass transfer coefficient scales as ω>(t>)˜t-1, nicely fitting without calibration the estimated mass transfer coefficients compiled by Haggerty et al. (2004).

  6. Thermal diffusivity of spinels at elevated temperature: implications for heat transfer in the transition zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmeister, A. M.

    2006-12-01

    The dependence of the vibrational component of thermal diffusivity (D) of spinel-family minerals on chemical composition, disorder, and temperature (T) is discerned using laser-flash measurements of single-crystals up to 1850 K, and used along with data on garnets and radiative transfer calculations to constrain heat transport in Earth's transition zone (TZ). Laser-flash analysis lacks the systematic errors associated with conventional methods, namely, corruption with radiative transfer, and thermal contact losses. Chemical compositions are synthetic disordered spinel, 4 natural samples near MgAl2O4; 4 natural hercynites (Mg,Fe,Al)3O4], nearly ZnAl2O4, and 2 magnetites [Fe3O4]. The magnetic transition is manifest as a lambda curve in 1/D, but otherwise, 1/D is described by low-order polynomial fits with temperature. Ordered, MgAl2O4 has D(298K) = 7.78 mm2/s, which should approximate that of γ-Mg2SiO4. At 298 K, D decreases strongly as cation substitution or Mg-Al disorder increases: D(298K) for ringwoodite is estimated as 5.8 mm2/s. However, above 1400 K, D becomes constant: this limit (Dsat=0.70-1.07 mm2/s) weakly depends on composition and disorder and is analogous to the Dulong-Petit limit in heat capacity (Cp). Mantle garnets have Dsat=0.65 mm2/s (Hofmeister 2006 Phys Chem Min.). To obtain TZ values, we use d(lnD)/dP= (4γth 2/3)KT, literature data on bulk modulus and thermal Gruneisen parameter, density from PREM, and Cp=1.3 J/g-K, which depends weakly on composition, T, and P. Average thermal conductivity (k)in the TZ is 5-6 W/m-K, depending on garnet proportion, and increase with P. Radiative transfer provides ca 1 W/m-K, depending on Fe content and grain-size (Hofmeister 2005 J. Geodyn.). Our estimate of large k = 6-7 W/m-K is twice recent estimates, and is a consequence of phonon saturation revealed by laser-flash measurements. Efficient vibrational transport of heat in the TZ and deeper stabilizes against convection, as does the positive temperature

  7. Numerical Simulation of Heat and Mass Transfer in an Ejection Apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kologrivov, M. M.; Buzovskii, V. P.

    2016-01-01

    The results of numerical simulation of heat and mass transfer in an ejection apparatus during condensation of vapor-gas mixture components on cold brine droplets are presented. The local parameters of working flows were determined by solving a system of differential heat transfer equations with account for the hydrodynamic pattern. Calculations were carried out on the assumption that the liquid spray is directed horizontally. The Stefan formula has been derived with reference to a spherical coordinate system. The results of calculation of heat and mass transfer rates with and without regard for steam condensation jointly with hydrocarbon vapors are compared and analyzed. Estimation of the effect exerted by the apparatus and drip pan walls on the general process of heat and mass transfer was carried out. The results of simulation made it possible to quantitatively estimate the influence of the adopted thickness of the diffusional boundary layer on the vapor-air mixture cooling effect.

  8. Mass Conservation in Modeling Moisture Diffusion in Multi-Layer Carbon Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nurge, Mark A.; Youngquist, Robert C.; Starr, Stanley O.

    2009-01-01

    Moisture diffusion in multi-layer carbon composite structures is difficult to model using finite difference methods due to the discontinuity in concentrations between adjacent layers of differing materials. Applying a mass conserving approach at these boundaries proved to be effective at accurately predicting moisture uptake for a sample exposed to a fixed temperature and relative humidity. Details of the model developed are presented and compared with actual moisture uptake data gathered over 130 days from a graphite epoxy composite sandwich coupon with a Rohacell foam core.

  9. Isotopic mass-dependence of metal cation diffusion coefficients in liquid water

    SciTech Connect

    Bourg, I.C.; Richter, F.M.; Christensen, J.N.; Sposito, G.

    2009-01-11

    Isotope distributions in natural systems can be highly sensitive to the mass (m) dependence of solute diffusion coefficients (D) in liquid water. Isotope geochemistry studies routinely have assumed that this mass dependence either is negligible (as predicted by hydrodynamic theories) or follows a kinetic-theory-like inverse square root relationship (D {proportional_to} m{sup -0.5}). However, our recent experimental results and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations showed that the mass dependence of D is intermediate between hydrodynamic and kinetic theory predictions (D {proportional_to} m{sup -{beta}} with 0 {<=} {beta} < 0.2 for Li{sup +}, Cl{sup -}, Mg{sup 2+}, and the noble gases). In this paper, we present new MD simulations and experimental results for Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, Cs{sup +}, and Ca{sup 2+} that confirm the generality of the inverse power-law relation D {proportional_to} m{sup -{beta}}. Our new findings allow us to develop a general description of the influence of solute valence and radius on the mass dependence of D for monatomic solutes in liquid water. This mass dependence decreases with solute radius and with the magnitude of solute valence. Molecular-scale analysis of our MD simulation results reveals that these trends derive from the exponent {beta} being smallest for those solutes whose motions are most strongly coupled to solvent hydrodynamic modes.

  10. Influence of liquid redistributors on the mass-transfer efficiency of packed columns

    SciTech Connect

    Schultes, M.

    2000-05-01

    In industrial mass-transfer columns liquid distributors and redistributors are used to mix the liquid after a certain random packing or structured packing height before it is applied to the next bed. The purpose of this is to counter a possible deterioration of the mass-transfer efficiency along the height of the column as a result of wall flow tendency of the liquid or to minimize the deterioration of the mass-transfer efficiency as a consequence of maldistribution of the liquid by the liquid distributor located above. However, when planning industrial columns, this influence on the mass-transfer efficiency can only be quantified with some difficulty which is why empirical standard values are mostly used for maximum bed and packing heights. This analysis shows that the height, after which liquid redistribution should take place, depends on numerous further influencing factors. It becomes evident that uneven irrigation of a packing with liquid over the cross section of the column is also a cause for the decline in the mass-transfer efficiency along the packed bed. The resultant decline in the mass-transfer efficiency is influenced, for instance, by the gas/liquid equilibrium behavior of the mixture that is to be separated, by the L/V flow ratio in the rectification, absorption, and desorption columns, by the type of packing used, and by the number of theoretical stages to be executed. A simulation procedure is shown, with whose assistance these factors influencing the mass-transfer efficiency can be recorded quantitatively.

  11. Modeling of solid/liquid/gas mass transfer for environmental evaluation of cement-based solidified waste.

    PubMed

    Tiruta-Barna, L R; Barna, R; Moszkowicz, P

    2001-01-01

    A physicochemical and transport model has been developed for the long term prediction of environmental leaching behavior of porous materials containing inorganic waste solidified with hydraulic binders and placed in a reuse scenario. The reuse scenario considered in the paper is a storage tank open to the atmosphere including material leaching with water and carbonation through the leachate contact with air. The model includes three levels: (i) the physicochemical pollution source term (chemical equilibria in the pore water and diffusion in the porous system); (ii) chemical equilibria and mass transfer in the tank; and (iii) gas/liquid transfer of carbon dioxide. The model was applied to the case of a material obtained through solidification of Air Pollution Control (APC) residues from Municipal Solid Waste Incinerator (MSWI). The simulation results are in good agreement with two scale experimental data: laboratory and field tests. Experimental data and simulations show the main trends for release of elements contained in the material: (i) the release of alkaline metals and chloride is not significantly influenced by carbonation and (ii) the release of Ca and Pb is governed by chemical equilibria in pore water and diffusion, while their speciation in the leachate is determined by pH and the presence of carbonate ions.

  12. Comparative study of spectral diffuse-only and diffuse-specular radiative transfer models and field-collected data in the LWIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoyanov, Dimitar M.; Marciniak, Michael A.; Meola, Joseph

    2015-09-01

    The sensitivity of hyper-spectral remote sensing to the directional reflectance of surfaces was studied using both laboratory and field measurements. Namely, the effects of the specular- and diffuse-reflectance properties of a set of eight samples, ranging from high to low in both total reflectance and specularity, on diffuse-only and diffusespecular radiative transfer models in the long-wave infrared (LWIR, 7-14-μm wavelength) were studied. The samples were measured in the field as a set of eight panels, each in two orientations, with surface normal pointing toward zenith and tipped at 45° from zenith. The field-collected data also included down-welling spectral sky radiance at several angles from zenith to the horizon, ground spectral radiance, panel spectral radiances in both orientations, Infragold® spectral radiances in both orientations near each panel location, and panel temperatures. Laboratory measurements included spectral hemispherical, specular and diffuse directional reflectance (HDR, SDR and DDR) for each sample for several reflectance angles with respect to the surface normal. The diffuse-only radiative transfer model used the HDR data, while the diffuse-specular model used the SDR and DDR data. Both calculated spectral reflected and self-emitted radiances for each panel, using the field-collected sky radiance data to avoid uncertainties associated with atmospheric models. The modeled spectral radiances were then compared to the field-collected values to quantify differences in moving from an HDR-based model to an SDR/DDR model in the LWIR for a variety of surface-reflectance types.

  13. Modelling transport in media with heterogeneous advection properties and mass transfer with a Continuous Time Random Walk approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comolli, Alessandro; Moussey, Charlie; Dentz, Marco

    2016-04-01

    Transport processes in groundwater systems are strongly affected by the presence of heterogeneity. The heterogeneity leads to non-Fickian features, that manifest themselves in the heavy-tailed breakthrough curves, as well as in the non-linear growth of the mean squared displacement and in the non-Gaussian plumes of solute particles. The causes of non-Fickian transport can be the heterogeneity in the flow fields and the processes of mass exchange between mobile and immobile phases, such as sorption/desorption reactions and diffusive mass transfer. Here, we present a Continuous Time Random Walk (CTRW) model that describes the transport of solutes in d-dimensional systems by taking into account both heterogeneous advection and mobile-immobile mass transfer. In order to account for these processes in the CTRW, the heterogeneities are mapped onto a distribution of transition times, which can be decomposed into advective transition times and trapping times, the latter being treated as a compound Poisson process. While advective transition times are related to the Eulerian flow velocities and, thus, to the conductivity distribution, trapping times depend on the sorption/desorption time scale, in case of reactive problems, or on the distribution of diffusion times in the immobile zones. Since the trapping time scale is typically much larger than the advective time scale, we observe the existence of two temporal regimes. The pre-asymptotic regime is defined by a characteristic time scale at which the properties of transport are fully determined by the heterogeneity of the advective field. On the other hand, in the asymptotic regime both the heterogeneity and the mass exchange processes play a role in conditioning the behaviour of transport. We consider different scenarios to discuss the relative importance of the advective heterogeneity and the mass transfer for the occurrence of non-Fickian transport. For each case we calculate analytically the scalings of the breakthrough

  14. Influence of mass diffusion on the stability of thermophoretic growth of a solid from the vapor phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castillo, J. L.; Garcia-Ybarra, P. L.; Rosner, D. E.

    1991-01-01

    The stability of solid planar growth from a binary vapor phase with a condensing species dilute in a carrier gas is examined when the ratio of depositing to carrier species molecular mass is large and the main diffusive transport mechanism is thermal diffusion. It is shown that a deformation of the solid-gas interface induces a deformation of the gas phase isotherms that increases the thermal gradients and thereby the local mass deposition rate at the crests and reduces them at the valleys. The initial surface deformation is enhanced by the modified deposition rates in the absence of appreciable Fick/Brownian diffusion and interfacial energy effects.

  15. Orbital Evolution of Mass-transferring Eccentric Binary Systems. I. Phase-dependent Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dosopoulou, Fani; Kalogera, Vicky

    2016-07-01

    Observations reveal that mass-transferring binary systems may have non-zero orbital eccentricities. The time evolution of the orbital semimajor axis and eccentricity of mass-transferring eccentric binary systems is an important part of binary evolution theory and has been widely studied. However, various different approaches to and assumptions on the subject have made the literature difficult to comprehend and comparisons between different orbital element time evolution equations not easy to make. Consequently, no self-consistent treatment of this phase has ever been included in binary population synthesis codes. In this paper, we present a general formalism to derive the time evolution equations of the binary orbital elements, treating mass loss and mass transfer as perturbations of the general two-body problem. We present the self-consistent form of the perturbing acceleration and phase-dependent time evolution equations for the orbital elements under different mass loss/transfer processes. First, we study the cases of isotropic and anisotropic wind mass loss. Then, we proceed with non-isotropic ejection and accretion in a conservative as well as a non-conservative manner for both point masses and extended bodies. We compare the derived equations with similar work in the literature and explain the existing discrepancies.

  16. Effects of mass transfer and light intensity on substrate biological degradation by immobilized photosynthetic bacteria within an annular fiber-illuminating biofilm reactor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chuan; Zhang, Huan; Zhang, Zhiping; Jiao, Youzhou; Zhang, Quanguo

    2014-02-01

    In this work, effects of mass transfer and light intensity on performance of substrate biodegradation by cell-immobilized photosynthetic bacteria were investigated within an annular fiber-illuminating bioreactor (AFIBR). In AFIBR, stable biofilm of photosynthetic bacteria was generated on the surface of side-glowing optical fiber to provide sufficient light supply and uniform light distribution in cell-immobilized zone for continuous substrate biodegradation during hydrogen production process. To optimize operation parameters for substrate degradation, a two-dimensional mass transfer model based on experimental data to describe coupled processes of substrate transfer and biodegradation in biofilm with substrate diffusion and convection in bulk flow region was proposed. Investigations on influences of substrate concentration, flow rate and light intensity were carried out. It was showed that the optimum operational parameters for the substrate degradation in the AFIBR are: 10g/l substrate concentration, 100ml/h flow rate and 3.1W/m(2) light intensity.

  17. Analysis of the moisture diffusion transfer through fibrous porous membrane used for waterproof breathable fabrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Fanglong; Zhou, Yu; Liu, Suyan

    2013-10-01

    In this paper, we propose a new fractal model to determine the moisture effective diffusivity of porous membrane such as expanded polytetrafluorethylene membrane, by taking account of both parallel and perpendicular channels to diffusion flow direction. With the consideration of both the Knudsen and bulk diffusion effect, a relationship between micro-structural parameters and effective moisture diffusivity is deduced. The effective moisture diffusivities predicted by the present fractal model are compared with moisture diffusion experiment data and calculated values obtained from other theoretical models.

  18. Seasonal changes of thermal diffusivity and their effect on heat transfer in soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dedecek, Petr; Correia, Antonio; Safanda, Jan; Cermak, Vladimir; Rajver, Dusan; Pechacova, Blanka

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the work is to describe the effects of seasonal changes of thermal diffusivity (TD) on the thermal regime in shallow subsurface soils. The long term temperature series from observatories at Prague (Czechia), Evora (Portugal) and Malence (Slovenia) were processed by newly improved code which enables a detailed calculation of time changes of TD of the soils. To determine the effect of climate warming of the recent years and to describe the possible effect of TD changes on the temperature-depth profiles, time dependent numerical models were computed. In the case of Evora, the effect of the TD changes on mean annual temperatures was confirmed. This observatory is located on bare sandy surface and TD in the upper soil layer significantly decreases (up to 50%) in summer months. It is due to local climate, which is typical by alternating winter/wet and summer/dry periods. The negative temperature gradient in the depth of 2-5 cm increases with TD decreasing, the coefficient of determination is 0.6 (2012). The TD decreasing during the summer months substitutes the effect of vegetation and controls the heat transfer to the subsurface. The climate in Prague and Malence is typical by rainy/snowy periods during the whole year and effect of TD changes in bare sandy soils is only short-term, or even insignificant under grassy surfaces.

  19. A new, coupled transport-diffusion method for radiative transfer calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Wollaber, A. B.; Warsa, J. S.

    2013-07-01

    We derive and present a new frequency- and angle-integrated low-order system of equations designed to enhance the accuracy of a coupled, high-order (transport) solution of the thermal radiative transfer equations. In particular, our new low-order system is designed to use intensity-weighted opacities and anisotropic diffusion coefficients generated by a solution of the Implicit Monte Carlo (IMC) equations in order to predict the spatial dependence of the material temperature and radiation energies in the ensuing time cycle. The predicted temperature solution can then be exploited to generate appropriately time-centered opacities, specific heats, and Planck emission spectra for the upcoming IMC solution. Additionally, the relatively inexpensive solution of the low-order system can be iteratively solved to recommend an adaptive time step size before the IMC solution is computed. A test implementation has been implemented using existing software available from the Jayenne and Capsaicin projects at Los Alamos National Laboratory. We present initial results from a new driver code that has integrated these stochastic and deterministic software packages. (authors)

  20. Microfluidic bubbler facilitates near complete mass transfer for sustainable multiphase and microbial processing.

    PubMed

    Baker, Jordan J; Crivellari, Francesca; Gagnon, Zachary; Betenbaugh, Michael J

    2016-09-01

    A microfluidic device (channels <70 μm) was utilized to create micro-scale bubbles to significantly increase mass transfer efficiency at low flow rates. The convergence of one gas and two liquid channels at a Y-junction generates bubbles via cyclic changes in pressure. At low flow rates, the bubbles had an average diameter of 110 μm, corresponding to a volumetric mass transfer KL a of 1.43 h(-1) . Values of KL a normalized per flow rate showed that the microbubbler had a 100-fold increased transfer efficiency compared to four other commonly used bubblers. The calculated percentage of oxygen transferred was approximately 90%, which was consistent with a separate off-gas analysis. The improved mass transfer was also tested in an algae bioreactor in which the microbubbler absorbed approximately 90% of the CO2 feed compared to 2% in the culture with an alternative needle bubbling method. The microbubbler yielded a cell density 82% of the cell density for the alternative needle tip with an 800-fold lower flow rate (0.5 mL/min versus 400 mL/min) and a 700-fold higher ratio of biomass to fed carbon dioxide. The application of microfluidics may transform interfacial processing in order to increase mass transfer efficiencies, minimize gas feeding, and provide for more sustainable multiphase processes. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1924-1933. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Influence of mass-transfer limitations on carbon isotope fractionation during microbial dechlorination of trichloroethene.

    PubMed

    Aeppli, Christoph; Berg, Michael; Cirpka, Olaf A; Holliger, Christof; Schwarzenbach, René P; Hofstetter, Thomas B

    2009-12-01

    Mass transfer of organic contaminants from nonaqueous phase liquids to the aqueous phase can significantly modulate the observable carbon isotope fractionation behavior associated with contaminant transformation. We evaluated the effects of kinetic interphase mass transfer between tetradecane and water on the observable (13)C enrichment factor, epsilon(obs), pertinent to the reductive dechlorination of trichloroethene (TCE) by Sulfurospirillum sp. in laboratory batch model systems containing organic, aqueous and gaseous phases. We propose a conceptual model, which includes the kinetics of tetradecane-water and gas-water mass transfer, microbial growth, and isotope-sensitive parameters describing dehalorespiration, for quantifying variable (13)C enrichment factors. While the C isotope fractionation of TCE reduction to cis-dichloroethene (cDCE) in the absence of phase-transfer effects can be characterized by a constant epsilon-value of -18.8 +/- 0.6 per thousand, mass-transfer limitations impede describing this process with a constant enrichment factor typically used in Rayleigh equations. Owing to the masking of kinetic isotope effects by the transfer of TCE from tetradecane to the aqueous phase, (obs)-values gradually changed from -18.4 per thousand to -5.9 per thousand. Such variations may complicate the interpretation of compound-specific isotope analysis in the assessment of chloroethene biodegradation in field applications.

  2. Bridge Frost Prediction by Heat and Mass Transfer Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenfield, Tina M.; Takle, Eugene S.

    2006-03-01

    Frost on roadways and bridges can present hazardous conditions to motorists, particularly when it occurs in patches or on bridges when adjacent roadways are clear of frost. To minimize materials costs, vehicle corrosion, and negative environmental impacts, frost-suppression chemicals should be applied only when, where, and in the appropriate amounts needed to maintain roadways in a safe condition for motorists. Accurate forecasts of frost onset times, frost intensity, and frost disappearance (e.g., melting or sublimation) are needed to help roadway maintenance personnel decide when, where, and how much frost-suppression chemical to use. A finite-difference algorithm (BridgeT) has been developed that simulates vertical heat transfer in a bridge based on evolving meteorological conditions at its top and bottom as supplied by a weather forecast model. BridgeT simulates bridge temperatures at numerous points within the bridge (including its upper and lower surface) at each time step of the weather forecast model and calculates volume per unit area (i.e., depth) of deposited, melted, or sublimed frost. This model produces forecasts of bridge surface temperature, frost depth, and bridge condition (i.e., dry, wet, icy/snowy). Bridge frost predictions and bridge surface temperature are compared with observed and measured values to assess BridgeT's skill in forecasting bridge frost and associated conditions.

  3. Ambipolar diffusion in low-mass star formation. I. General comparison with the ideal magnetohydrodynamic case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masson, J.; Chabrier, G.; Hennebelle, P.; Vaytet, N.; Commerçon, B.

    2016-03-01

    Angular momentum transport and the formation of rotationally supported structures are major issues in our understanding of protostellar core formation. Whereas purely hydrodynamical simulations lead to large Keplerian disks, ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) models yield the opposite result, with essentially no disk formation. This stems from the flux-freezing condition in ideal MHD, which leads to strong magnetic braking. In this paper, we provide a more accurate description of the evolution of the magnetic flux redistribution by including resistive terms in the MHD equations. We focus more particularly on the effect of ambipolar diffusion on the properties of the first Larson core and its surrounding structure, exploring various initial magnetisations and magnetic field versus rotation axis orientations of a 1 M⊙ collapsing prestellar dense core. We used the non-ideal magnetohydrodynamics version of the adaptive mesh refinement code RAMSES to carry out these calculations. The resistivities required to calculate the ambipolar diffusion terms were computed using a reduced chemical network of charged, neutral, and grain species. Including ambipolar diffusion leads to the formation of a magnetic diffusion barrier (also known as the decoupling stage) in the vicinity of the core, which prevents accumulation of magnetic flux in and around the core and amplification of the field above 0.1 G. The mass and radius of the first Larson core, however, remain similar between ideal and non-ideal MHD models. This diffusion plateau, preventing further amplification of the field and reorganising the field topology, has crucial consequences for magnetic braking processes, allowing the formation of disk structures. Magnetically supported outflows launched in ideal MHD models are weakened or even disappear when using non-ideal MHD. In contrast to ideal MHD calculations, misalignment between the initial rotation axis and the magnetic field direction does not significantly affect the

  4. Theoretical approach for enhanced mass transfer effects in-duct flue gas desulfurization processes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-08-22

    While developing dry sorbent duct injection flue gas desulfurization processes may offer significant improvement in capital cost and process simplicity compared to wet scrubbing systems, the economics of this technology can be improved significantly by an improvement in sorbent utilization. While a general understanding of the mechanism by which the sorbents operate is known, a much more detailed knowledge of reaction rate-controlling phenomena, the role of inherent reactivity, and mass transfer effects and their interaction in needed. Objectives of this project are threefold: 1. Mass transfer investigation--determine the controlling physical and chemical processes that limit sorbent utilization. In particular, determine whether mass transfer is a controlling factor in in-duct flue gas desulfurization and establish the relative contributions of gas- and liquid-phase mass transfer and inherent sorbent reactivity. 2. Field test support--evaluate various sorbents, operating conditions and process schemes to support large-scale field testings at Meredosia and Beverly. 3. Mass transfer enhancement--examine various techniques that will enable sorbent utilization rates of at least 75 percent to be achieved. Sorbents investigated were Ca(OH){sub 2}, Mississippi hydrate and Mississippi slaked lime. Epsom Salt was investigated as an additive. Agglomeration of Ca(OH){sub 2} solids was also investigated. 3 refs., 92 figs., 23 tabs.

  5. Numerical analysis of heat and mass transfer during freeze-drying.

    PubMed

    Ku, A C; Furry, R B; Jordan, W K; Dropkin, D

    1976-10-01

    The transient-state external heat and mass-transfer during freeze-drying was investigated. The spaces between the heaters and porous product-surfaces were simulated as semi porous channels, with mass-injection into the channels from the sublimation of ice. The energy, vorticity, concentration, and stream function/vorticity equations were the governing equations used as the mathematical model. These partial differential-equations were solved by finite-difference, numberical methods. The Fromm, Alternating Direction Implicity, and Upwind Difference methods were used in solving the parabolic equations; and the Successive Over Relaxation method was adopted to solve the elliptic equation. Numerical solutions obtained from the digital computer for the external heat and mass-transfer during freeze-drying were computed for Reynolds numbers equal t0 0.1, 1.0, and 4.0 and Grashof numbers equal to 0, +/- 100, and +/- 1000. The Prandtl number selected for water vapor was 1.0. One set of these solutions were compared to a known, analytical solution, and good agreement was obtained. The external heat and mass-transfer mechanism was then combined with the internal-heat-transfer mechanism developed by Dyer and Sunderland (1968), and the equations describing the relation of heater temperatures and product surface-temperatures developed by Massey and Sunderland (1972). A thorough computer-simulation was carried out for the combined heat and mass-transfer mechanism during freeze-drying of food products.

  6. Uptake, efflux, and mass transfer coefficient of fluorescent PAMAM dendrimers into pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Opitz, Armin W; Czymmek, Kirk J; Wickstrom, Eric; Wagner, Norman J

    2013-02-01

    Targeted delivery of imaging agents to cells can be optimized with the understanding of uptake and efflux rates. Cellular uptake of macromolecules is studied frequently with fluorescent probes. We hypothesized that the internalization and efflux of fluorescently labeled macromolecules into and out of mammalian cells could be quantified by confocal microscopy to determine the rate of uptake and efflux, from which the mass transfer coefficient is calculated. The cellular influx and efflux of a third generation poly(amido amine) (PAMAM) dendrimer labeled with an Alexa Fluor 555 dye was measured in Capan-1 pancreatic cancer cells using confocal fluorescence microscopy. The Capan-1 cells were also labeled with 5-chloromethylfluorescein diacetate (CMFDA) green cell tracker dye to delineate cellular boundaries. A dilution curve of the fluorescently labeled PAMAM dendrimer enabled quantification of the concentration of dendrimer in the cell. A simple mass transfer model described the uptake and efflux behavior of the PAMAM dendrimer. The effective mass transfer coefficient was found to be 0.054±0.043μm/min, which corresponds to a rate constant of 0.035±0.023min(-1) for uptake of the PAMAM dendrimer into the Capan-1 cells. The effective mass transfer coefficient was shown to predict the efflux behavior of the PAMAM dendrimer from the cell if the fraction of labeled dendrimer undergoing non-specific binding is accounted for. This work introduces a novel method to quantify the mass transfer behavior of fluorescently labeled macromolecules into mammalian cells.

  7. MASS TRANSFER IN BINARY STARS USING SMOOTHED PARTICLE HYDRODYNAMICS. I. NUMERICAL METHOD

    SciTech Connect

    Lajoie, Charles-Philippe; Sills, Alison E-mail: asills@mcmaster.ca

    2011-01-10

    Close interactions and mass transfer in binary stars can lead to the formation of many different exotic stellar populations, but detailed modeling of mass transfer is a computationally challenging problem. Here, we present an alternate smoothed particle hydrodynamics approach to the modeling of mass transfer in binary systems that allows a better resolution of the flow of matter between main-sequence stars. Our approach consists of modeling only the outermost layers of the stars using appropriate boundary conditions and ghost particles. We arbitrarily set the radius of the boundary and find that our boundary treatment behaves physically and conserves energy well. In particular, when used with our binary relaxation procedure, our treatment of boundary conditions is also shown to evolve circular binaries properly for many orbits. The results of our first simulation of mass transfer are also discussed and used to assess the strengths and limitations of our method. We conclude that it is well suited for the modeling of interacting binary stars. The method presented here represents a convenient alternative to previous hydrodynamical techniques aimed at modeling mass transfer in binary systems since it can be used to model both the donor and the accretor while maintaining the density profiles taken from realistic stellar models.

  8. Understanding and controlling airborne organic compounds in the indoor environment: mass transfer analysis and applications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y; Xiong, J; Mo, J; Gong, M; Cao, J

    2016-02-01

    Mass transfer is key to understanding and controlling indoor airborne organic chemical contaminants (e.g., VVOCs, VOCs, and SVOCs). In this study, we first introduce the fundamentals of mass transfer and then present a series of representative works from the past two decades, focusing on the most recent years. These works cover: (i) predicting and controlling emissions from indoor sources, (ii) determining concentrations of indoor air pollutants, (iii) estimating dermal exposure for some indoor gas-phase SVOCs, and (iv) optimizing air-purifying approaches. The mass transfer analysis spans the micro-, meso-, and macroscales and includes normal mass transfer modeling, inverse problem solving, and dimensionless analysis. These representative works have reported some novel approaches to mass transfer. Additionally, new dimensionless parameters such as the Little number and the normalized volume of clean air being completely cleaned in a given time period were proposed to better describe the general process characteristics in emissions and control of airborne organic compounds in the indoor environment. Finally, important problems that need further study are presented, reflecting the authors' perspective on the research opportunities in this area.

  9. Effect of electric fields on mass transfer to droplets. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Carleson, T.E.; Budwig, R.

    1994-02-01

    During the six year funding period, the effects of a direct and alternating field upon single drop hydrodynamics and mass transfer were evaluated both experimentally and theoretically. Direct current field effects upon drop size, velocity and mass transfer rates were also observed for multiple drops formed in a three stage sieve tray column. Drop size, velocity, and mass transfer rates were measured experimentally and compared to simple models for direct current electric fields. Agreement between theory and experiment was found for drop charge, size, and velocity. Drop mass transfer coefficients were substantially larger than theoretical predictions while extraction efficiencies were moderately higher. Drop distortion and oscillation were observed and are thought to result in the experimentally observed higher values. For alternating current fields, drop flow streamlines and oscillations were measured and found to compare well with predictions from a solved mathematical model. In addition, equipment was constructed to determine mass transfer rates to oscillating drops. Concentration profiles in still and oscillating drops were measured and qualitatively compared to theoretical predictions.

  10. Determining Solubility and Diffusivity by Using a Flow Cell Coupled to a Mass Spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Khodayari, Mehdi; Reinsberg, Philip; Abd-El-Latif, Abd-El-Aziz A; Merdon, Christian; Fuhrmann, Juergen; Baltruschat, Helmut

    2016-06-01

    One of the main challenges in metal-air batteries is the selection of a suitable electrolyte that is characterized by high oxygen solubility, low viscosity, a liquid state and low vapor pressure across a wide temperature range, and stability across a wide potential window. Herein, a new method based on a thin layer flow through cell coupled to a mass spectrometer through a porous Teflon membrane is described that allows the determination of the solubility of volatile species and their diffusion coefficients in aqueous and nonaqueous solutions. The method makes use of the fact that at low flow rates the rate of species entering the vacuum system, and thus the ion current, is proportional to the concentration times the flow rate (c⋅u) and independent of the diffusion coefficient. The limit at high flow rates is proportional to D2/3·c·u1/3 . Oxygen concentrations and diffusion coefficients in aqueous electrolytes that contain Li(+) and K(+) and organic solvents that contain Li(+) , K(+) , and Mg(2+) , such as propylene carbonate, dimethyl sulfoxide tetraglyme, and N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone, have been determined by using different flow rates in the range of 0.1 to 80 μL s(-1) . This method appears to be quite reliable, as can be seen by a comparison of the results obtained herein with available literature data. The solubility and diffusion coefficient values of O2 decrease as the concentration of salt in the electrolyte was increased due to a "salting out" effect. PMID:27017297

  11. Simulation of Mass Transfer of Calcium in Concrete by the Lattice Kinetic Scheme for a Binary Miscible Fluid Mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshino, Masato; Murayama, Toshiro; Matsuzaki, Akihiro; Hitomi, Takashi

    The lattice kinetic scheme (LKS) for a binary miscible fluid mixture was applied to the simulation of the mass transfer of calcium in concrete. Cement paste, a major component of concrete, is a porous medium with a complicated three-dimensional geometry. The structure of the model concrete was selected on the basis of experimental data obtained by high-intensity X-ray computed tomography. The LKS, an improved version of the original lattice Boltzmann method, was used to save computational memory and to maintain numerical stability. First, an unsteady convection-diffusion problem was examined, and the accuracy of the method and the error norms with various lattice resolutions were investigated. Next, the problem of the calcium current in concrete was simulated. Pressure drops in the concrete were calculated for various Reynolds numbers, and the results were compared with those of an empirical equation based on experimental data. Also, velocity fields and concentration profiles were obtained at a pore scale for a structure with inhomogeneous mass diffusivities. These simulations showed that the present method might be useful for predicting calcium leaching in concrete from the microscopic point of view.

  12. A 17-billion-solar-mass black hole in a group galaxy with a diffuse core.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Jens; Ma, Chung-Pei; McConnell, Nicholas J; Greene, Jenny E; Blakeslee, John P; Janish, Ryan

    2016-04-21

    Quasars are associated with and powered by the accretion of material onto massive black holes; the detection of highly luminous quasars with redshifts greater than z = 6 suggests that black holes of up to ten billion solar masses already existed 13 billion years ago. Two possible present-day 'dormant' descendants of this population of 'active' black holes have been found in the galaxies NGC 3842 and NGC 4889 at the centres of the Leo and Coma galaxy clusters, which together form the central region of the Great Wall--the largest local structure of galaxies. The most luminous quasars, however, are not confined to such high-density regions of the early Universe; yet dormant black holes of this high mass have not yet been found outside of modern-day rich clusters. Here we report observations of the stellar velocity distribution in the galaxy NGC 1600--a relatively isolated elliptical galaxy near the centre of a galaxy group at a distance of 64 megaparsecs from Earth. We use orbit superposition models to determine that the black hole at the centre of NGC 1600 has a mass of 17 billion solar masses. The spatial distribution of stars near the centre of NGC 1600 is rather diffuse. We find that the region of depleted stellar density in the cores of massive elliptical galaxies extends over the same radius as the gravitational sphere of influence of the central black holes, and interpret this as the dynamical imprint of the black holes. PMID:27049949

  13. A 17-billion-solar-mass black hole in a group galaxy with a diffuse core.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Jens; Ma, Chung-Pei; McConnell, Nicholas J; Greene, Jenny E; Blakeslee, John P; Janish, Ryan

    2016-04-21

    Quasars are associated with and powered by the accretion of material onto massive black holes; the detection of highly luminous quasars with redshifts greater than z = 6 suggests that black holes of up to ten billion solar masses already existed 13 billion years ago. Two possible present-day 'dormant' descendants of this population of 'active' black holes have been found in the galaxies NGC 3842 and NGC 4889 at the centres of the Leo and Coma galaxy clusters, which together form the central region of the Great Wall--the largest local structure of galaxies. The most luminous quasars, however, are not confined to such high-density regions of the early Universe; yet dormant black holes of this high mass have not yet been found outside of modern-day rich clusters. Here we report observations of the stellar velocity distribution in the galaxy NGC 1600--a relatively isolated elliptical galaxy near the centre of a galaxy group at a distance of 64 megaparsecs from Earth. We use orbit superposition models to determine that the black hole at the centre of NGC 1600 has a mass of 17 billion solar masses. The spatial distribution of stars near the centre of NGC 1600 is rather diffuse. We find that the region of depleted stellar density in the cores of massive elliptical galaxies extends over the same radius as the gravitational sphere of influence of the central black holes, and interpret this as the dynamical imprint of the black holes.

  14. Angularly Adaptive P1 - Double P0 Flux-Limited Diffusion Solutions of Non-Equilibrium Grey Radiative Transfer Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Brantley, P S

    2006-08-08

    The double spherical harmonics angular approximation in the lowest order, i.e. double P{sub 0} (DP{sub 0}), is developed for the solution of time-dependent non-equilibrium grey radiative transfer problems in planar geometry. Although the DP{sub 0} diffusion approximation is expected to be less accurate than the P{sub 1} diffusion approximation at and near thermodynamic equilibrium, the DP{sub 0} angular approximation can more accurately capture the complicated angular dependence near a non-equilibrium radiation wave front. In addition, the DP{sub 0} approximation should be more accurate in non-equilibrium optically thin regions where the positive and negative angular domains are largely decoupled. We develop an adaptive angular technique that locally uses either the DP{sub 0} or P{sub 1} flux-limited diffusion approximation depending on the degree to which the radiation and material fields are in thermodynamic equilibrium. Numerical results are presented for two test problems due to Su and Olson and to Ganapol and Pomraning for which semi-analytic transport solutions exist. These numerical results demonstrate that the adaptive P{sub 1}-DP{sub 0} diffusion approximation can yield improvements in accuracy over the standard P{sub 1} diffusion approximation, both without and with flux-limiting, for non-equilibrium grey radiative transfer.

  15. Angularly Adaptive P1-Double P0 Flux-Limited Diffusion Solutions of Non-Equilibrium Grey Radiative Transfer Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Brantley, P S

    2005-12-13

    The double spherical harmonics angular approximation in the lowest order, i.e. double P{sub 0} (DP{sub 0}), is developed for the solution of time-dependent non-equilibrium grey radiative transfer problems in planar geometry. Although the DP{sub 0} diffusion approximation is expected to be less accurate than the P{sub 1} diffusion approximation at and near thermodynamic equilibrium, the DP{sub 0} angular approximation can more accurately capture the complicated angular dependence near a non-equilibrium radiation wave front. In addition, the DP{sub 0} approximation should be more accurate in non-equilibrium optically thin regions where the positive and negative angular domains are largely decoupled. We develop an adaptive angular technique that locally uses either the DP{sub 0} or P{sub 1} flux-limited diffusion approximation depending on the degree to which the radiation and material fields are in thermodynamic equilibrium. Numerical results are presented for two test problems due to Su and Olson and to Ganapol and Pomraning for which semi-analytic transport solutions exist. These numerical results demonstrate that the adaptive P{sub 1}-DP{sub 0} diffusion approximation can yield improvements in accuracy over the standard P{sub 1} diffusion approximation, both without and with flux-limiting, for non-equilibrium grey radiative transfer.

  16. Modeling of turbulence effects on the heat and mass transfer of evaporating sprays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madhanabharatam, Balasubramanyam

    A large diversity of two-phase gas-liquid flows of both scientific and practical interest involves the evaporation of near spherical liquid droplets in high temperature turbulent environments. Current numerical modeling approaches are predominantly focused towards the effects of continuous phase (gas phase) turbulence on the evaporation rates of liquid fuel sprays during the evaporation process, failing to account for the inherent turbulence present in the dispersed phase (liquid phase), due to the injection of sprays at high velocities. Existing models accounting for internal turbulence effects use Direct Numerical Simulations and Large Eddy Simulations that are computationally intensive. This research provides an alternative phenomenological approach of modeling droplet internal turbulence effects through the mass and heat transfer between the droplet surface and the external gas phase within a thin film inside the droplet. This finite conductivity (F-C) model was based on the two-temperature film theory, where the turbulence characteristics of the droplet are used to estimate the effective thermal diffusivity (alphaeff) within the droplet phase. The alphaeff is estimated from the physical properties of the flow within the droplet rather than from a 'curve-fit' as done conventionally. The results of the one-way coupled study indicated that the equilibrium drop temperature predictions were higher than calculations by the infinite conductivity (I-C) model. The liquid internal turbulence has a considerable effect on the diffusivity in the primary atomization regime. The thermal boundary layer was found to be substantially thick initially, decreasing quickly to a small value, exhibiting a reasonable physical trend. The two-way coupled studies (CFD) indicated that the F-C model, slowed down the evaporation process, produced larger droplets and longer tip penetration lengths during the initial stages of injection. For a jet in a supersonic cross-flow, results indicated

  17. A NUMERICAL METHOD FOR STUDYING SUPER-EDDINGTON MASS TRANSFER IN DOUBLE WHITE DWARF BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Marcello, Dominic C.; Tohline, Joel E. E-mail: tohline@phys.lsu.edu

    2012-04-01

    We present a numerical method for the study of double white dwarf (DWD) binary systems at the onset of super-Eddington mass transfer. We incorporate the physics of ideal inviscid hydrodynamical flow, Newtonian self-gravity, and radiation transport on a three-dimensional uniformly rotating cylindrical Eulerian grid. Care has been taken to conserve the key physical quantities such as angular momentum and energy. Our new method conserves total energy to a higher degree of accuracy than other codes that are presently being used to model mass transfer in DWD systems. We present the results of verification tests and simulate the first 20 + orbits of a binary system of mass ratio q 0.7 at the onset of dynamically unstable direct impact mass transfer. The mass transfer rate quickly exceeds the critical Eddington limit by many orders of magnitude, and thus we are unable to model a trans-Eddington phase. It appears that radiation pressure does not significantly affect the accretion flow in the highly super-Eddington regime. An optically thick common envelope forms around the binary within a few orbits. Although this envelope quickly exceeds the spatial domain of the computational grid, the fraction of the common envelope that exceeds zero gravitational binding energy is extremely small, suggesting that radiation-driven mass loss is insignificant in this regime. It remains to be seen whether simulations that capture the trans-Eddington phase of such flows will lead to the same conclusion or show that substantial material gets expelled.

  18. Effect of impeller geometry on gas-liquid mass transfer coefficients in filamentous suspensions.

    PubMed

    Dronawat, S N; Svihla, C K; Hanley, T R

    1997-01-01

    Volumetric gas-liquid mass transfer coefficients were measured in suspensions of cellulose fibers with concentrations ranging from 0 to 20 g/L. The mass transfer coefficients were measured using the dynamic method. Results are presented for three different combinations of impellers at a variety of gassing rates and agitation speeds. Rheological properties of the cellulose fibers were also measured using the impeller viscometer method. Tests were conducted in a 20 L stirred-tank fermentor and in 65 L tank with a height to diameter ratio of 3:1. Power consumption was measured in both vessels. At low agitation rates, two Rushton turbines gave 20% better performance than the Rushton and hydrofoil combination and 40% better performance than the Rushton and propeller combination for oxygen transfer. At higher agitation rates, the Rushton and hydrofoil combination gave 14 and 25% better performance for oxygen transfer than two Rushton turbines and the Rushton and hydrofoil combination, respectively.

  19. Permanently reconfigured metamaterials due to terahertz induced mass transfer of gold.

    PubMed

    Strikwerda, Andrew C; Zalkovskij, Maksim; Iwaszczuk, Krzysztof; Lorenzen, Dennis Lund; Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    2015-05-01

    We present a new technique for permanent metamaterial reconfiguration via optically induced mass transfer of gold. This mass transfer, which can be explained by field-emission induced electromigration, causes a geometric change in the metamaterial sample. Since a metamaterial's electromagnetic response is dictated by its geometry, this structural change massively alters the metamaterial's behavior. We show this by optically forming a conducting pathway between two closely spaced dipole antennas, thereby changing the resonance frequency by a factor of two. After discussing the physics of the process, we conclude by presenting an optical fuse that can be used as a sacrificial element to protect sensitive components, demonstrating the applicability of optically induced mass transfer for device design.

  20. Influence of fluid dynamic conditions on enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass: Effect of mass transfer rate.

    PubMed

    Wojtusik, Mateusz; Zurita, Mauricio; Villar, Juan C; Ladero, Miguel; Garcia-Ochoa, Felix

    2016-09-01

    The effect of fluid dynamic conditions on enzymatic hydrolysis of acid pretreated corn stover (PCS) has been assessed. Runs were performed in stirred tanks at several stirrer speed values, under typical conditions of temperature (50°C), pH (4.8) and solid charge (20% w/w). A complex mixture of cellulases, xylanases and mannanases was employed for PCS saccharification. At low stirring speeds (<150rpm), estimated mass transfer coefficients and rates, when compared to chemical hydrolysis rates, lead to results that clearly show low mass transfer rates, being this phenomenon the controlling step of the overall process rate. However, for stirrer speed from 300rpm upwards, the overall process rate is controlled by hydrolysis reactions. The ratio between mass transfer and overall chemical reaction rates changes with time depending on the conditions of each run.

  1. Distribution and mass transfer of dissolved oxygen in a multi-habitat membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Tang, Bing; Qiu, Bing; Huang, Shaosong; Yang, Kanghua; Bin, Liying; Fu, Fenglian; Yang, Huiwen

    2015-04-01

    This work investigated the DO distribution and the factors influencing the mass transfer of DO in a multi-habitat membrane bioreactor. Through the continuous measurements of an on-line automatic system, the timely DO values at different zones in the bioreactor were obtained, which gave a detailed description to the distribution of oxygen within the bioreactor. The results indicated that the growth of biomass had an important influence on the distribution of oxygen. As the extension of operational time, the volumetric oxygen mass transfer coefficient (kLa) was generally decreased. With the difference in DO values, a complex environment combining anoxic and oxic state was produced within a single bioreactor, which provided a fundamental guarantee for the total removal of TN. Aeration rate, the concentration and apparent viscosity of MLSS have different influences on kLa, but adjusting the viscosity is a feasible method to improve the mass transfer of oxygen in the bioreactor.

  2. Influence of fluid dynamic conditions on enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass: Effect of mass transfer rate.

    PubMed

    Wojtusik, Mateusz; Zurita, Mauricio; Villar, Juan C; Ladero, Miguel; Garcia-Ochoa, Felix

    2016-09-01

    The effect of fluid dynamic conditions on enzymatic hydrolysis of acid pretreated corn stover (PCS) has been assessed. Runs were performed in stirred tanks at several stirrer speed values, under typical conditions of temperature (50°C), pH (4.8) and solid charge (20% w/w). A complex mixture of cellulases, xylanases and mannanases was employed for PCS saccharification. At low stirring speeds (<150rpm), estimated mass transfer coefficients and rates, when compared to chemical hydrolysis rates, lead to results that clearly show low mass transfer rates, being this phenomenon the controlling step of the overall process rate. However, for stirrer speed from 300rpm upwards, the overall process rate is controlled by hydrolysis reactions. The ratio between mass transfer and overall chemical reaction rates changes with time depending on the conditions of each run. PMID:27233094

  3. A chemical method for flow visualization and determination of local mass transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kottke, V.

    A method for measuring local mass transfer is presented, and the physical and chemical concept behind the measuring technique for reaction gases, such as ammonia or methylamine, are discussed, based on absorption, chemical reactions, and coupled-color reactions. Flow visualization at surfaces of arbitrary shape is evident by the color intensity distribution, which corresponds to the locally transferred mass rate. The technique is characterized by its simple handling, good local accuracy, and high local resolution. As an example, the effects of turbulence intensity on the formation of longitudinal vortices in stagnation flows and on the length of separation bubbles for a flat plate with a semi-circular nose section are discussed. Finally the influence of concentration and the temperature boundary layer at separation on the maximum of mass or heat transfer is described.

  4. Permanently reconfigured metamaterials due to terahertz induced mass transfer of gold.

    PubMed

    Strikwerda, Andrew C; Zalkovskij, Maksim; Iwaszczuk, Krzysztof; Lorenzen, Dennis Lund; Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    2015-05-01

    We present a new technique for permanent metamaterial reconfiguration via optically induced mass transfer of gold. This mass transfer, which can be explained by field-emission induced electromigration, causes a geometric change in the metamaterial sample. Since a metamaterial's electromagnetic response is dictated by its geometry, this structural change massively alters the metamaterial's behavior. We show this by optically forming a conducting pathway between two closely spaced dipole antennas, thereby changing the resonance frequency by a factor of two. After discussing the physics of the process, we conclude by presenting an optical fuse that can be used as a sacrificial element to protect sensitive components, demonstrating the applicability of optically induced mass transfer for device design. PMID:25969252

  5. Generalized Couette Poiseuille flow with boundary mass transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, F.; Sanchez, J.; Weidman, P. D.

    1998-11-01

    A generalized similarity formulation extending the work of Terrill (1967) for Couette Poiseuille flow in the annulus between concentric cylinders of infinite extent is given. Boundary conditions compatible with the formulation allow a study of the effects of inner and outer cylinder transpiration, rotation, translation, stretching and twisting, in addition to that of an externally imposed constant axial pressure gradient. The problem is governed by [eta], the ratio of inner to outer radii, a Poiseuille number, and nine Reynolds numbers. Single-cylinder and planar problems can be recovered in the limits [eta][rightward arrow]0 and [eta][rightward arrow]1, respectively. Two coupled primary nonlinear equations govern the meridional motion generated by uniform mass flux through the porous walls and the azimuthal motion generated by torsional movement of the cylinders; subsidiary equations linearly slaved to the primary flow govern the effects of cylinder translation, cylinder rotation, and an external pressure gradient. Steady solutions of the primary equations for uniform source/sink flow of strength F through the inner cylinder are reported for 0[less-than-or-eq, slant][eta][less-than-or-eq, slant]1. Asymptotic results corroborating the numerical solutions are found in different limiting cases. For F<0 fluid emitted through the inner cylinder fills the gap and flows uniaxially down the annulus; an asymptotic analysis leads to a scaling that removes the effect of [eta] in the pressure parameter [beta], namely [beta]=[pi]2R*2, where R*=F(1[minus sign][eta])/(1+[eta]). The case of sink flow for F>0 is more complex in that unique solutions are found at low Reynolds numbers, a region of triple solutions exists at moderate Reynolds numbers, and a two-cell solution prevails at large Reynolds numbers. The subsidiary linear equations are solved at [eta]=0.5 to exhibit the effects of cylinder translation, rotation, and an axial pressure gradient on the source/sink flows.

  6. Characterization of the intragranular water regime within subsurface sediments: Pore volume, surface area, and mass transfer limitations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hay, M.B.; Stoliker, D.L.; Davis, J.A.; Zachara, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Although "intragranular" pore space within grain aggregates, grain fractures, and mineral surface coatings may contain a relatively small fraction of the total porosity within a porous medium, it often contains a significant fraction of the reactive surface area, and can thus strongly affect the transport of sorbing solutes. In this work, we demonstrate a batch experiment procedure using tritiated water as a high-resolution diffusive tracer to characterize the intragranular pore space. The method was tested using uranium-contaminated sediments from the vadose and capillary fringe zones beneath the former 300A process ponds at the Hanford site (Washington). Sediments were contacted with tracers in artificial groundwater, followed by a replacement of bulk solution with tracer-free groundwater and the monitoring of tracer release. From these data, intragranular pore volumes were calculated and mass transfer rates were quantified using a multirate first-order mass transfer model. Tritium-hydrogen exchange on surface hydroxyls was accounted for by conducting additional tracer experiments on sediment that was vacuum dried after reaction. The complementary ("wet" and "dry") techniques allowed for the simultaneous determination of intragranular porosity and surface area using tritium. The Hanford 300A samples exhibited intragranular pore volumes of ???1% of the solid volume and intragranular surface areas of ???20%-35% of the total surface area. Analogous experiments using bromide ion as a tracer yielded very different results, suggesting very little penetration of bromide into the intragranular porosity. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  7. Characterization of the intragranular water regime within subsurface sediments: pore volume, surface area, and mass transfer limitations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hay, Michael B.; Stoliker, Deborah L.; Davis, James A.; Zachara, John M.

    2011-01-01

    Although "intragranular" pore space within grain aggregates, grain fractures, and mineral surface coatings may contain a relatively small fraction of the total porosity within a porous medium, it often contains a significant fraction of the reactive surface area, and can thus strongly affect the transport of sorbing solutes. In this work, we demonstrate a batch experiment procedure using tritiated water as a high-resolution diffusive tracer to characterize the intragranular pore space. The method was tested using uranium-contaminated sediments from the vadose and capillary fringe zones beneath the former 300A process ponds at the Hanford site (Washington). Sediments were contacted with tracers in artificial groundwater, followed by a replacement of bulk solution with tracer-free groundwater and the monitoring of tracer release. From these data, intragranular pore volumes were calculated and mass transfer rates were quantified using a multirate first-order mass transfer model. Tritium-hydrogen exchange on surface hydroxyls was accounted for by conducting additional tracer experiments on sediment that was vacuum dried after reaction. The complementary ("wet" and "dry") techniques allowed for the simultaneous determination of intragranular porosity and surface area using tritium. The Hanford 300A samples exhibited intragranular pore volumes of ~1% of the solid volume and intragranular surface areas of ~20%–35% of the total surface area. Analogous experiments using bromide ion as a tracer yielded very different results, suggesting very little penetration of bromide into the intragranular porosity.

  8. Monitoring the variations of the oxygen transfer rate in a full scale membrane bioreactor using daily mass balances.

    PubMed

    Racault, Y; Stricker, A-E; Husson, A; Gillot, S

    2011-01-01

    Oxygen transfer in biological wastewater treatment processes with high sludge concentration, such as membrane bioreactor (MBR), is an important issue. The variation of alpha-factor versus mixed liquor suspended solids (MLSS) concentration was investigated in a full scale MBR plant under process conditions, using mass balances. Exhaustive data from the Supervisory Control And Data Acquisition (SCADA) and from additional online sensors (COD, DO, MLSS) were used to calculate the daily oxygen consumption (OC) using a non-steady state mass balance for COD and total N on a 24-h basis. To close the oxygen balance, OC has to match the total oxygen transfer rate (OTRtot) of the system, which is provided by fine bubble (FB) diffusers in the aeration tank and coarse bubbles (CB) in separate membrane tanks. First assessing OTR(CB) then closing the balance OC = OTRtot allowed to calculate OTR(FB) and to fit an exponential relationship between OTR(FB) and MLSS. A comparison of the alpha-factor obtained by this balance method and by direct measurements with the off-gas method on the same plant is presented and discussed. PMID:22049761

  9. Characterization of the intragranular water regime within subsurface sediments: Pore volume, surface area, and mass transfer limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hay, Michael B.; Stoliker, Deborah L.; Davis, James A.; Zachara, John M.

    2011-10-01

    Although "intragranular" pore space within grain aggregates, grain fractures, and mineral surface coatings may contain a relatively small fraction of the total porosity within a porous medium, it often contains a significant fraction of the reactive surface area, and can thus strongly affect the transport of sorbing solutes. In this work, we demonstrate a batch experiment procedure using tritiated water as a high-resolution diffusive tracer to characterize the intragranular pore space. The method was tested using uranium-contaminated sediments from the vadose and capillary fringe zones beneath the former 300A process ponds at the Hanford site (Washington). Sediments were contacted with tracers in artificial groundwater, followed by a replacement of bulk solution with tracer-free groundwater and the monitoring of tracer release. From these data, intragranular pore volumes were calculated and mass transfer rates were quantified using a multirate first-order mass transfer model. Tritium-hydrogen exchange on surface hydroxyls was accounted for by conducting additional tracer experiments on sediment that was vacuum dried after reaction. The complementary ("wet" and "dry") techniques allowed for the simultaneous determination of intragranular porosity and surface area using tritium. The Hanford 300A samples exhibited intragranular pore volumes of ˜1% of the solid volume and intragranular surface areas of ˜20%-35% of the total surface area. Analogous experiments using bromide ion as a tracer yielded very different results, suggesting very little penetration of bromide into the intragranular porosity.

  10. Optical cell with periodic resistive heating for the measurement of heat, mass, and thermal diffusions in liquid mixtures.

    PubMed

    Hartung, M; Köhler, W

    2007-08-01

    A new technique for the measurement of heat, mass, and thermal diffusions in liquids has been developed. Similar to laser induced dynamic gratings, a temperature grating is created in the sample. Thermal expansion transforms the temperature into a refractive-index grating, which is read by diffraction of a readout laser beam. In a multicomponent mixture an additional concentration grating is formed by thermal diffusion driven by the temperature gradients of the temperature grating. Differently to laser induced dynamic grating experiments we use Joule heating instead of optical heating. For that purpose we have built cuvettes which have a grating of transparent conducting strips on the inner side of one of their windows. If heated by an electric current a temperature grating will build up in the sample. Both the heat equation and the extended diffusion equation have been solved in two dimensions to allow for quantitative data analysis. Our apparatus and method of analysis have been validated by measurements of heat, mass, and thermal diffusions in pure and binary liquids. Heat diffusion can be correctly determined as was shown for pure toluene, pure dodecane, and the symmetric mixture of isobutylbenzene dodecane. Mass and thermal diffusions were studied in the three symmetric mixtures of dodecane, isobutylbenzene, and tetralin. The obtained diffusion and Soret coefficients agree with the literature values within the experimental errors. Uncompensated transient heating effects limit the resolution of the experimental technique.

  11. Mass and momentum transfer across solid-fluid boundaries in the lattice-Boltzmann method.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xuewen; Le, Guigao; Zhang, Junfeng

    2012-08-01

    Mass conservation and momentum transfer across solid-fluid boundaries have been active topics through the development of the lattice-Boltzmann method. In this paper, we review typical treatments to prevent net mass transfer across solid-fluid boundaries in the lattice-Boltzmann method, and argue that such efforts are in general not necessary and could lead to incorrect results. Carefully designed simulations are conducted to examine the effects of normal boundary movement, tangential density gradient, and lattice grid resolution. Our simulation results show that the global mass conservation can be well satisfied even with local unbalanced mass transfer at boundary nodes, while a local mass conservation constraint can produce incorrect flow and pressure fields. These simulations suggest that local mass conservation, at either a fluid or solid boundary node, is not only an unnecessary consequence to maintain the global mass conservation, but also harmful for meaningful simulation results. In addition, the concern on the momentum addition and reduction associated with status-changing nodes is also not technically necessary. Although including this momentum addition or reduction has no direct influence on flow and pressure fields, the incorrect fluid-particle interaction may affect simulation results of particulate suspensions.

  12. A random walk solution for modeling solute transport with network reactions and multi-rate mass transfer in heterogeneous systems: Impact of biofilms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henri, Christopher V.; Fernàndez-Garcia, Daniel

    2015-12-01

    The interplay between the spatial variability of the aquifer hydraulic properties, mass transfer due to sub-grid heterogeneity and chemical reactions often complicates reactive transport simulations. It is well documented that hydro-biochemical properties are ubiquitously heterogeneous and that diffusion and slow advection at the sub-grid scale typically leads to the conceptualization of an aquifer as a multi-porosity system. Within this context, chemical reactions taking place in mobile/immobile water regions can be substantially different between each other. This paper presents a particle-based method that can efficiently simulate heterogeneity, network reactions and multi-rate mass transfer. The approach is based on the development of transition probabilities that describe the likelihood that particles belonging to a given species and mobile/immobile domain at a given time will be transformed into another species and mobile/immobile domain afterwards. The joint effect of mass transfer and sequential degradation is shown to be non-trivial. A characteristic rebound of degradation products can be observed. This late rebound of concentrations is not driven by any change in the flow regime (e.g., pumping ceases in the pump-and-treat remediation strategy) but due to the natural interplay between mass transfer and chemical reactions. To illustrate that the method can simultaneously represent mass transfer, spatially varying properties and network reactions without numerical problems, we have simulated the degradation of tetrachloroethylene (PCE) in a three-dimensional fully heterogeneous aquifer subjected to rate-limited mass transfer. Two types of degradation modes were considered to compare the effect of an active biofilm with that of clay pods present in the aquifer. Results of the two scenarios display significantly differences. Biofilms that promote the degradation of compounds in an immobile region are shown to significantly enhance degradation, rapidly producing

  13. ON THE FORMATION OF DOUBLE WHITE DWARFS THROUGH STABLE MASS TRANSFER AND A COMMON ENVELOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, T. E.; Ivanova, N.; Van der Sluys, M. V.; Chaichenets, S.

    2012-01-01

    Although several dozen double white dwarfs (DWDs) have been observed, for many the exact nature of the evolutionary channel(s) by which they form remains uncertain. The canonical explanation calls for the progenitor binary system to undergo two subsequent mass-transfer events, both of which are unstable and lead to a common envelope (CE). However, it has been shown that if both CE events obey the standard {alpha}{sub CE}-prescription (parameterizing energy loss), it is not possible to reproduce all of the observed systems. The {gamma}-prescription was proposed as an alternative to this description, instead parameterizing the fraction of angular momentum carried away in dynamical-timescale mass loss. However, this too has proven problematic, and does not provide a clear physical mechanism. In this paper, we consider in detail the first episode of mass transfer in binary systems with initially low companion masses, with a primary mass in the range 1.0-1.3 M{sub Sun} and an initial mass ratio between the secondary and primary stars of 0.83-0.92. In these systems, the first episode of dramatic mass loss may be stable, non-conservative mass transfer. This strips the donor's envelope and dramatically raises the mass ratio; the considered progenitor binary systems can then evolve into DWDs after passing through a single CE during the second episode of mass loss. We find that such a mechanism reproduces the properties of the observed DWD systems which have an older component with M {approx}< 0.46 M{sub Sun} and mass ratios between the younger and older WDs of q {>=} 1.

  14. Tribological behavior of a friction couple functioning with selective mass transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilie, Filip

    2016-06-01

    Experimental researches on different lubricated friction couples, have confirmed that it is useful to investigate thermodynamic processes which are unstable in lubricant and on the friction couples surfaces in the first stage of the friction process. This presupposes that, in operating conditions, physical-chemical processes which are favourable to friction, such as: polymerization, formation of colloids, formation of other active substances at the contact surfaces and of other compounds with low resistance to shear take place. Friction in such conditions takes place with selective mass transfer, and it is used there where the friction of the mixed and adherence layers is not safe enough, or the durability of the friction couples is not assured. The selective mass transfer allows the transfer of some elements of the materials in contact from one surface to the other, covering them with a thin, superficial layer, with superior properties at minimal friction and wear. The aim of this paper is to analyse the physical-chemical factors and the proper processes for achieving the selective mass transfer for the couple steel/bronze, which in optimal conditions, forms a thin layer of copper on the contact surfaces areas. Also, it presents some studies and researches concerning the tribological behaviour of the surfaces of a friction couple with linear contact (roll/roll) which operates with selective mass transfer, tested on Amsler tribometer.

  15. Mass Transfer Studies of Geobacter sulfurreducens Biofilms on Rotating Disk Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Babuta, Jerome T.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2014-01-01

    Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy has received significant attention recently as a method to measure electrochemical parameters of Geobacter sulfurreducens bio-films. Here, we use electrochemical impedance spectroscopy to demonstrate the effect of mass transfer processes on electron transfer by G.sulfurreducens biofilms grown in situ on an electrode that was subsequently rotated. By rotating the biofilms up to 530 rpm, we could control the microscale gradients formed inside G.sulfurreducens biofilms. A 24% increase above a baseline of 82 μA could be achieved with a rotation rate of 530 rpm. By comparison, we observed a 340% increase using a soluble redox mediator (ferrocyanide) limited by mass transfer. Control of mass transfer processes was also used to quantify the change in biofilm impedance during the transition from turnover to non-turnover. We found that only one element of the biofilm impedance, the interfacial resistance, changed significantly from 900 to 4,200 Ω under turnover and non-turnover conditions, respectively. We ascribed this change to the electron transfer resistance overcome by the biofilm metabolism and estimate this value as 3,300 Ω. Additionally, under non-turnover, the biofilm impedance developed pseudocapacitive behavior indicative of bound redox mediators. Pseudocapacitance of the biofilm was estimated at 740 μF and was unresponsive to rotation of the electrode. The increase in electron transfer resistance and pseudocapacitive behavior under non-turnover could be used as indicators of acetate limitations inside G.sulfurreducens biofilms. PMID:23996084

  16. Measuring carbon monoxide gas-liquid mass transfer in a stirred tank reactor for syngas fermentation.

    PubMed

    Riggs, Seth S; Heindel, Theodore J

    2006-01-01

    Carbon monoxide-liquid mass transfer rates in a water-filled stirred tank reactor are determined using a myoglobin protein method to measure dissolved carbon monoxide concentrations as a function of time. Data are acquired over a range of stirrer speeds (200 < or = N < or = 600 rpm) and gas flow rates (1 < or = Q < or = 6 L/min), corresponding to a gas retention time range of 1.2-7 min. Volumetric CO-water mass transfer coefficients range from 0.003 to 0.043 s(-1) and are well-correlated using the power density and the superficial gas velocity.

  17. Mathematical modeling of non-stationary heat and mass transfer in disperse systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermakova, L. A.; Krasnoperov, S. Y.; Kalashnikov, S. N.

    2016-09-01

    The work describes mathematical model of non-stationary heat and mass transfer processes in dispersed environment, taking into account the phase transition; presents the results of numeric modelling for conditions of direct reduction in high-temperature reducing atmosphere, corresponding to the direct reduction in the jet-emulsion unit according to the principles of self-organization. The method was developed for calculation of heat and mass transfer of the aggregate of iron material particles in accordance with the given distribution law.

  18. Heat/mass transfer and flow characteristics of pin fin cooling channels in turbine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, S. C.; Saxena, A.

    Experiments studied the local heat/mass transfer distributions and pressure drops in pin fin channels that modeled internal cooling passages in gas turbine blades. Heat/mass transfer distributions were determined for a straight flow through a pin fin channel (H/D = 1.0, X/D = S/D = 2.5) and a flow through the pin fin channel with trailing edge flow ejection. The overall friction factor and local pressure drop results were obtained for various configurations and lengths of the trailing edge ejection holes. The results show that, when there is trailing edge flow ejection, the main flow stream turns toward the trailing edge ejection holes. The wake regions downstream of the pins and the regions affected by secondary flow shift toward the ejection holes. The local channel wall heat/mass transfer is generally high immediately upstream of a pin, in the wake region downstream of a pin, and in the regions affected by secondary flow. In the case with trailing edge flow ejection, the heat/mass transfer generally decreases in the radial direction as a result of the reducing radial mass flow rate. The overall friction is higher when the trailing edge ejection holes are longer and when they are configured such that more flow is forced further downstream in the pin fin channel before exiting through the ejection holes.

  19. LUT Reveals a New Mass-transferring Semi-detached Binary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, S.-B.; Zhou, X.; Zhu, L.-Y.; Zejda, M.; Soonthornthum, B.; Zhao, E.-G.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, B.; Liao, W.-P.

    2015-12-01

    GQ Dra is a short-period eclipsing binary in a double stellar system that was discovered by Hipparcos. Complete light curves in the UV band were obtained with the Lunar-based Ultraviolet Telescope in 2014 November and December. Photometric solutions are determined using the W-D (Wilson and Devinney) method. It is discovered that GQ Dra is a classical Algol-type semi-detached binary where the secondary component is filling the critical Roche lobe. An analysis of all available times of minimum light suggests that the orbital period is increasing continuously at a rate of \\dot{P}=+3.48(+/- 0.23)× {10}-7 days yr-1. This could be explained by mass transfer from the secondary to the primary, which is in agreement with the semi-detached configuration with a lobe-filling secondary. By assuming a conservation of mass and angular momentum, the mass transfer rate is estimated as \\dot{m}=9.57(+/- 0.63)× {10}-8 {M}⊙ {{yr}}-1. All of these results reveal that GQ Dra is a mass-transferring semi-detached binary in a double system that was formed from an initially detached binary star. After the massive primary evolves to fill the critical Roche lobe, the mass transfer will be reversed and the binary will evolve into a contact configuration with two sub-giant or giant component stars.

  20. In-situ determination of field-scale NAPL mass transfer coefficients: Performance, simulation and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mobile, Michael; Widdowson, Mark; Stewart, Lloyd; Nyman, Jennifer; Deeb, Rula; Kavanaugh, Michael; Mercer, James; Gallagher, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    Better estimates of non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) mass, its persistence into the future, and the potential impact of source reduction are critical needs for determining the optimal path to clean up sites impacted by NAPLs. One impediment to constraining time estimates of source depletion is the uncertainty in the rate of mass transfer between NAPLs and groundwater. In this study, an innovative field test is demonstrated for the purpose of quantifying field-scale NAPL mass transfer coefficients (klN) within a source zone of a fuel-contaminated site. Initial evaluation of the test concept using a numerical model revealed that the aqueous phase concentration response to the injection of clean groundwater within a source zone was a function of NAPL mass transfer. Under rate limited conditions, NAPL dissolution together with the injection flow rate and the radial distance to monitoring points directly controlled time of travel. Concentration responses observed in the field test were consistent with the hypothetical model results allowing field-scale NAPL mass transfer coefficients to be quantified. Site models for groundwater flow and solute transport were systematically calibrated and utilized for data analysis. Results show klN for benzene varied from 0.022 to 0.60 d- 1. Variability in results was attributed to a highly heterogeneous horizon consisting of layered media of varying physical properties.

  1. In-situ determination of field-scale NAPL mass transfer coefficients: Performance, simulation and analysis.

    PubMed

    Mobile, Michael; Widdowson, Mark; Stewart, Lloyd; Nyman, Jennifer; Deeb, Rula; Kavanaugh, Michael; Mercer, James; Gallagher, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    Better estimates of non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) mass, its persistence into the future, and the potential impact of source reduction are critical needs for determining the optimal path to clean up sites impacted by NAPLs. One impediment to constraining time estimates of source depletion is the uncertainty in the rate of mass transfer between NAPLs and groundwater. In this study, an innovative field test is demonstrated for the purpose of quantifying field-scale NAPL mass transfer coefficients (kl(N)) within a source zone of a fuel-contaminated site. Initial evaluation of the test concept using a numerical model revealed that the aqueous phase concentration response to the injection of clean groundwater within a source zone was a function of NAPL mass transfer. Under rate limited conditions, NAPL dissolution together with the injection flow rate and the radial distance to monitoring points directly controlled time of travel. Concentration responses observed in the field test were consistent with the hypothetical model results allowing field-scale NAPL mass transfer coefficients to be quantified. Site models for groundwater flow and solute transport were systematically calibrated and utilized for data analysis. Results show kl(N) for benzene varied from 0.022 to 0.60d(-1). Variability in results was attributed to a highly heterogeneous horizon consisting of layered media of varying physical properties.

  2. The heating of diffuse dust at large scale in AGNs: a radiative transfer model study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritz, Jacopo; De Looze, Ilse; Baes, Maarten; Camps, Peter; Saftly, Waad; Pérez Villegas, Angeles; Rivaz-Sánchez, Mariana; Stalevski, Marko; Hatziminaoglou, Evanthia

    2016-08-01

    The panchromatic, broad-band, spectral energy distribution (SED) of galaxies is usually modelled by combining together the theoretical spectra of its emission components: stars in the optical/near-infrared, and thermal emission by dust -heated by the stellar radiation field- in the infrared. SED fitting codes such as MAGPHYS and CIGALE are capable to automatically fit observed multiwavelength data of galaxies, providing a set of galactic properties as a result. The situation gets somehow complicated when Active Galaxies (both local, low-luminosity Seyferts, and the bright QSOs) are considered. Very often, in fact, their observed near- and mid-infrared (NIR and MIR, respectively) SED is dominated by the emission of hot dust located close to the supermassive, active black hole which powers the bulk of their luminosity. Hence, a third component must be added to the set of theoretical SEDs: that of the molecular torus which surrounds the disk of gas accreting onto the supermassive black hole. The standard way to do it, is to simply add such models to the observed SED, until the MIR gap is filled. This implicitly assumes that the AGN has no influence whatsoever on the dust properties on scales larger than that of the torus (~few pc). I am investigating whether this assumption is valid, in which cases, and under which circumstances the AGN provides a non negligible contribution to the interstellar radiation field heating the diffuse dust in galaxies. This is accomplished by means of radiative transfer models which take into account the most relevant characteristics of the problem: the relative dust-stars distribution and the very wide range of spatial scales involved.

  3. Combined mass and heat transfer during nonisothermal absorption in gas-liquid slug flow

    SciTech Connect

    Elperin, T.; Fominykh, A.

    1995-03-01

    A model of combined mass and heat transfer during nonisothermal gas absorption from a slug rising, in a channel filled with liquid is suggested. The expressions for coefficients of heat and mass transfer from a single slug are derived in the approximation of the thin concentration and heat boundary layers in a liquid phase. Under the assumptions of a perfect mixing of the dissolved -as in liquid plugs and uniform temperature distribution in liquid plugs, recurrent relations for the dissolved gas concentration and temperature in the n-th liquid plug and mass and heat fluxes from the n-th gas slug are derived. The total mass and heat fluxes in a gas-liquid slug flow are determined. In the limiting case of absorption without heat release the derived formulas recover the expressions for isothermal absorption in a gas-liquid slug flow.

  4. Simultaneous determination of position and mass in the cantilever sensor using transfer function method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Deokman; Hong, Seongkyeol; Jang, Jaesung; Park, Junhong

    2013-07-01

    We present the simultaneous measurement of mass and position of micro-beads attached to the cantilever-based mass sensors using the transfer function method. 10 μm diameter micro-beads were placed on micro-cantilevers and the cantilevers were excited by lead-zirconate-titanate through low-pass filtered random voltages. The cantilever vibration was measured via a laser Doppler vibrometer before and after applying the beads. From the measured transfer function, the bead position was identified using its influence on the cantilever kinetic energy. The bead mass was then obtained by analyzing the wave propagation near the beads. The predicted position and mass agreed well with actual values.

  5. Transient, compressible heat and mass transfer in porous media using the strongly implicit iteration procedure.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curry, D. M.; Cox, J. E.

    1972-01-01

    Coupled nonlinear partial differential equations describing heat and mass transfer in a porous matrix are solved in finite difference form with the aid of a new iterative technique (the strongly implicit procedure). Example numerical results demonstrate the characteristics of heat and mass transport in a porous matrix such as a charring ablator. It is emphasized that multidimensional flow must be considered when predicting the thermal response of a porous material subjected to nonuniform boundary conditions.

  6. Elastic stress transfer as a diffusive process due to aseismic fault slip in response to fluid injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viesca, R. C.

    2015-12-01

    Subsurface fluid injection is often followed by observations of an enlarging cloud of microseismicity. The cloud's diffusive growth is thought to be a direct response to the diffusion of elevated pore fluid pressure reaching pre-stressed faults, triggering small instabilities; the observed high rates of this growth are interpreted to reflect a relatively high permeability of a fractured subsurface [e.g., Shapiro, GJI 1997]. We investigate an alternative mechanism for growing a microseismic cloud: the elastic transfer of stress due to slow, aseismic slip on a subset of the pre-existing faults in this damaged subsurface. We show that the growth of the slipping region of the fault may be self-similar in a diffusive manner. While this slip is driven by fluid injection, we show that, for critically stressed faults, the apparent diffusion of this slow slip may quickly exceed the poroelastically driven diffusion of the elevated pore fluid pressure. Under these conditions, microseismicity can be first triggered by the off-fault stress perturbation due to the expanding region of slip on principal faults. This provides an alternative interpretation of diffusive growth rates in terms of the subsurface stress state rather than an enhanced hydraulic diffusivity. That such aseismic slip may occur, outpace fluid diffusion, and in turn trigger microseismic events, is also suggested by on- and near-fault observations in past and recently reported fluid injection experiments [e.g., Cornet et al., PAGEOPH 1997; Guglielmi et al., Science 2015]. The model of injection-induced slip assumes elastic off-fault behavior and a fault strength determined by the product of a constant friction coefficient and the local effective normal stress. The sliding region is enlarged by the pore pressure increase resolved on the fault plane. Remarkably, the rate of self-similar expansion may be determined by a single parameter reflecting both the initial stress state and the magnitude of the pore pressure

  7. Hybrid model of light propagation in random media based on the time-dependent radiative transfer and diffusion equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Hiroyuki; Okawa, Shinpei; Yamada, Yukio; Hoshi, Yoko

    2014-11-01

    Numerical modeling of light propagation in random media has been an important issue for biomedical imaging, including diffuse optical tomography (DOT). For high resolution DOT, accurate and fast computation of light propagation in biological tissue is desirable. This paper proposes a space-time hybrid model for numerical modeling based on the radiative transfer and diffusion equations (RTE and DE, respectively) in random media under refractive-index mismatching. In the proposed model, the RTE and DE regions are separated into space and time by using a crossover length and the time from the ballistic regime to the diffusive regime, ρDA~10/μt‧ and tDA~20/vμt‧ where μt‧ and v represent a reduced transport coefficient and light velocity, respectively. The present model succeeds in describing light propagation accurately and reduces computational load by a quarter compared with full computation of the RTE.

  8. Differentiation of the functional in an optimization problem for diffusion and convective transfer coefficients of elliptic imperfect contact interface problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manapova, Aigul

    2016-08-01

    We consider optimal control problems for second order elliptic equations with non-self-adjoint operators-convection-diffusion problems. Control processes are described by semi-linear convection-diffusion equation with discontinuous data and solutions (states) subject to the boundary interface conditions of imperfect type (i.e., problems with a jump of the coefficients and the solution on the interface; the jump of the solution is proportional to the normal component of the flux). Controls are involved in the coefficients of diffusion and convective transfer. We prove differentiability and Lipshitz continuity of the cost functional, depending on a state of the system and a control. The calculation of the gradients uses the numerical solutions of direct problems for the state and adjoint problems.

  9. Simultaneous heat and mass transfer in polymer solutions exposed to intermittent infrared radiation heating

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.J.; Lin, J.D.

    1998-06-01

    Drying is one of the essential steps in a number of industrial applications, such as the preserving of food and the drying of paint, pulp, and paper. The quality of paper tubes is significantly affected by the heat and mass transfer process. The drying of polymer solution plays a crucial role in the manufacturer of photographic film, synthetic fibers, adhesives, and a variety of other polymeric products. During drying of wet materials, simultaneous heat and mass transfer occurs both inside the medium and in the boundary layer of the drying agent. Drying is one of the most energy-consuming processes in the industrial sector and can also be very time consuming as, for example, in conventional convective drying by hot air, while minimum cost and energy consumption and maximum product quality are among the main concerns in industry today. Here, a theoretical study is performed that describes heat transfer and moisture variation while a polymer solution is exposed to high-intensity infrared radiation flux and/or an airflow. While the intermittent heating is considered, the authors investigate the influences of various radiation and convection parameters on the transfer of heat and moisture variation of coated layers on an optically thick substrate. During the tempering stage in the intermittent heating process, the convective mass transfer is included to simulate the ambient air in reality. The effects of radiation and convection parameters on the transfer processes are presented in terms of the rate of water content removal, heat transfer, and moisture distributions. Numerical results show that the rate of water removal from the polymer solution is dominated by both the adsorbed radiative heat energy and the distributions of water mass fraction in the polymer solution.

  10. Mass transfer characterization of gamma-aminobutyric acid production by Enterococcus faecium CFR 3003: encapsulation improves its survival under simulated gastro-intestinal conditions.

    PubMed

    Divyashri, Gangaraju; Prapulla, Siddalingaiya Gurudatt

    2015-03-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) production by free and Ca-alginate encapsulated cells of Enterococcus faecium CFR 3003 was investigated. Mass transfer rates characterizing the GABA production process using encapsulated cells were investigated. Experiments were performed to investigate external film and internal pore diffusion mass transfer rates. The Damkohler and Thiele analysis provides a good description of external film and internal pore diffusion resistances, respectively. The experiments revealed that the external film effects could be neglected but the process is affected to the greater extent by internal mass transfer effects and was found to be the principal rate-controlling step. Protective effect of encapsulation on cell survivability was tested under digestive environment, when challenged to salivary α-amylase, simulated gastric fluid and intestinal fluid. Viability of encapsulated cells was significantly higher under simulated gastro-intestinal conditions and could produce higher GABA than those observed with free cells. The results indicate that the Ca-alginate encapsulated probiotics could effectively be delivered to the colonic site for effective inhibitory action.

  11. Effect of acoustic streaming on the mass transfer from a sublimating sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawahara, N.; Yarin, A. L.; Brenn, G.; Kastner, O.; Durst, F.

    2000-04-01

    The effect of the acoustic streaming on the mass transfer from the surface of a sphere positioned in an ultrasonic acoustic levitator is studied both experimentally and theoretically. Acoustic levitation using standing ultrasonic waves is an experimental tool for studying the heat and mass transfer from small solid or liquid samples, because it allows an almost steady positioning of a sample at a fixed location in space. However, the levitator introduces some difficulties. One of the main problems with acoustic levitation is that an acoustic streaming is induced near the sample surface, which affects the heat and mass transfer rates, as characterized by increased Nusselt and Sherwood numbers. The transfer rates are not uniform along the sample surface, and the aim of the present study is to quantify the spatial Sherwood number distribution over the surface of a sphere. The experiments are based on the measurement of the surface shape of a sphere layered with a solid substance as a function of time using a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera with backlighting. The sphere used in this research is a glass sphere layered with a volatile solid substance (naphthalene or camphor). The local mass transfer from the surface both with and without an ultrasonic acoustic field is investigated in order to evaluate the effect of the acoustic streaming. The experimental results are compared with predictions following from the theory outlined [A. L. Yarin, M. Pfaffenlehner, and C. Tropea, J. Fluid Mech. 356, 65 (1998); A. L. Yarin, G. Brenn, O. Kastner, D. Rensink, and C. Tropea, ibid. 399, 151 (1999)] which describes the acoustic field and the resulting acoustic streaming, and the mass transfer at the surface of particles and droplets located in an acoustic levitator. The results are also compared with the experimental data and with the theoretical predictions of Burdukov and Nakoryakov [J. Appl. Mech. Tech. Phys. 6, 51 (1965)], which are valid only in the case of spherical

  12. Mass fractionation of noble gases in diffusion-limited hydrodynamic hydrogen escape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahnle, Kevin; Pollack, James B.; Kasting, James F.

    1990-01-01

    The theory of mass fractionation by hydrogen is presently extended to atmospheres in which hydrogen is not the major constituent. This theoretical framework is applied to three different cases. In the first, it is shown that the fractionation of terrestrial atmospheric neon with respect to mantle neon is explainable as a consequence of diffusion-limited hydrogen escape from a steam atmosphere toward the end of the accretion process. In the second, the anomalously high Ar-38/Ar-36 ratio of Mars is shown to be due to hydrodynamic fractionation by a vigorously escaping and very pure hydrogen wind. In the last case, it is speculated that the currently high Martian D/H ratio emerged during the hydrodynamic escape phase which fractionated Ar.

  13. On the treatment of material interfaces in the presence of finite mass physical diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Movahed, Pooya; Johnsen, Eric

    2014-11-01

    In incompressible miscible variable-density flows, density is a function of composition and temperature (but not pressure), and velocity does not remain divergence-free in mixing regions. In numerical simulations of diffuse interfaces, it was previously shown that a specific form of the velocity, based on the density profile, should be prescribed initially, for consistency. In this work, we are interested in extending these ideas to compressible miscible flows, where the density and pressure are coupled through an equation of state. We study the temporal evolution of an isolated material interface in the presence of diffusion processes (mass, momentum and energy). We show that a velocity profile similar to that introduced in the incompressible case should be prescribed initially to avoid generating spurious waves at the interface. A new form of the initial velocity profile is suggested for an isothermal problem in the presence of gravity. The single-mode Richtmyer-Meshkov instability is used to illustrate the importance of this prescribed velocity on large-scale flow dynamics after re-shock. This work used the Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE), which is supported by National Science Foundation Grant Number ACI-1053575.

  14. On the role of mass diffusion and fluid dynamics in the dissipation of chunk mix

    SciTech Connect

    Cloutman, L D

    1999-03-01

    When numerically simulating multicomponent turbulent flows, subgrid-scale diffusion of chemical species requires closure. This mixing of chemical species at the molecular level dissipates concentration uctuations, which limits possible demixing and affects other pro- cesses such as energy transport and reaction rates at the subgrid level. We discuss some of the physical processes that reduce small chunks of a heavy material in a light gas or plasma to a mixture at the atomic level. Preliminary direct numerical simulations of these processes are presented using the dissipation of small spheres of heavy gas in a light gas as an archetypal process in turbulent micromixing in multicomponent ows, including classical uid instabilities and shock ejecta. We use a detailed approach for the diffusion process, directly solving the Stefan-Maxwell equations for the mass fluxes. We discuss the dissipa- tion of a 24µm sphere of xenon in helium in three different flow regimes, and we present suggestions for future work intended as input to improved subgrid-scale turbulence models.

  15. A large-scale experiment on mass transfer of trichloroethylene from the unsaturated zone of a sandy aquifer to its interfaces.

    PubMed

    Jellali, Salah; Benremita, Hocine; Muntzer, Paul; Razakarisoa, Olivier; Schäfer, Gerhard

    2003-01-01

    A large-scale experiment was conducted to investigate the transport of trichloroethylene (TCE) vapors in the unsaturated zone and to determine the mass transfer to the groundwater and the atmosphere. The experiment involved injection of 5 1 of TCE in the unsaturated zone under controlled conditions, with multidepth sampling of gas and water through the unsaturated zone and across the capillary zone into underlying groundwater. The mass transfer of TCE vapors from the vadose zone to the atmosphere was quantified using a vertical flux chamber. A special soil water sampler was used to monitor transport across the capillary fringe. Experimental data indicated that TCE in the unsaturated zone was mainly transported to the atmosphere and this exchange reduced significantly the potential for groundwater pollution. The maximum measured TCE flux to the atmosphere was about 3 g/m(2)/day. Observed and calculated fluxes based on vertical TCE vapor concentration gradients and Fick's law were in good agreement. This confirms that TCE vapor transport under the experimental conditions was governed essentially by molecular diffusion. TCE vapors also caused a lower, but significant contamination of the underlying groundwater by dispersion across the capillary fringe with a corresponding maximum flux of about 0.1 g/m(2)/day. This mass transfer to groundwater is partly uncertain due to an inadvertent entry of some nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL) from the source area into the saturated zone. Application of an analytical solution to estimate the TCE flux from the unsaturated zone to the groundwater indicated that this phenomenon is not only influenced by molecular diffusion but also by vertical dispersion. The mass balance indicates that, under the given experimental conditions (e.g. proximity of the source emplacement relative to the soil surface, relatively high permeable porous medium), nearly 95% of the initial TCE mass was transferred to the atmosphere.

  16. Heat and mass transfer models to understand the drying mechanisms of a porous substrate.

    PubMed

    Songok, Joel; Bousfield, Douglas W; Gane, Patrick A C; Toivakka, Martti

    2016-02-01

    While drying of paper and paper coatings is expensive, with significant energy requirements, the rate controlling mechanisms are not currently fully understood. Two two-dimensional models are used as a first approximation to predict the heat transfer during hot air drying and to evaluate the role of various parameters on the drying rates of porous coatings. The models help determine the structural limiting factors during the drying process, while applying for the first time the recently known values of coating thermal diffusivity. The results indicate that the thermal conductivity of the coating structure is not the controlling factor, but the drying rate is rather determined by the thermal transfer process at the structure surface. This underlines the need for ensuring an efficient thermal transfer from hot air to coating surface during drying, before considering further measures to increase the thermal conductivity of porous coatings. PMID:26920528

  17. GRAVITATIONAL INSTABILITY OF SOLIDS ASSISTED BY GAS DRAG: SLOWING BY TURBULENT MASS DIFFUSIVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Shariff, Karim; Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.

    2011-09-01

    The Goldreich and Ward (axisymmetric) gravitational instability of a razor thin particle layer occurs when the Toomre parameter Q{sub T} {identical_to} c{sub p}{Omega}{sub 0}/{pi}G{Sigma}{sub p} < 1 (c{sub p} being the particle dispersion velocity). Ward extended this analysis by adding the effect of gas drag upon particles and found that even when Q{sub T} > 1, sufficiently long waves were always unstable. Youdin carried out a detailed analysis and showed that the instability allows chondrule-sized ({approx}1 mm) particles to undergo radial clumping with reasonable growth times even in the presence of a moderate amount of turbulent stirring. The analysis of Youdin includes the role of turbulence in setting the thickness of the dust layer and in creating a turbulent particle pressure in the momentum equation. However, he ignores the effect of turbulent mass diffusivity on the disturbance wave. Here, we show that including this effect reduces the growth rate significantly, by an amount that depends on the level of turbulence, and reduces the maximum intensity of turbulence the instability can withstand by 1-3 orders of magnitude. The instability is viable only when turbulence is extremely weak and the solid to gas surface density of the particle layer is considerably enhanced over minimum-mass-nebula values. A simple mechanistic explanation of the instability shows how the azimuthal component of drag promotes instability while the radial component hinders it. A gravito-diffusive overstability is also possible but never realized in the nebula models.

  18. THE HALO MASS FUNCTION FROM EXCURSION SET THEORY. II. THE DIFFUSING BARRIER

    SciTech Connect

    Maggiore, Michele; Riotto, Antonio

    2010-07-01

    In excursion set theory, the computation of the halo mass function is mapped into a first-passage time process in the presence of a barrier, which in the spherical collapse model is a constant and in the ellipsoidal collapse model is a fixed function of the variance of the smoothed density field. However, N-body simulations show that dark matter halos grow through a mixture of smooth accretion, violent encounters, and fragmentations, and modeling halo collapse as spherical, or even as ellipsoidal, is a significant oversimplification. In addition, the very definition of what is a dark matter halo, both in N-body simulations and observationally, is a difficult problem. We propose that some of the physical complications inherent to a realistic description of halo formation can be included in the excursion set theory framework, at least at an effective level, by taking into account that the critical value for collapse is not a fixed constant {delta}{sub c}, as in the spherical collapse model, nor a fixed function of the variance {sigma} of the smoothed density field, as in the ellipsoidal collapse model, but rather is itself a stochastic variable, whose scatter reflects a number of complicated aspects of the underlying dynamics. Solving the first-passage time problem in the presence of a diffusing barrier we find that the exponential factor in the Press-Schechter mass function changes from exp{l_brace}-{delta}{sup 2}{sub c}/2{sigma}{sup 2{r_brace}} to exp{l_brace}-a{delta}{sup 2}{sub c}/2{sigma}{sup 2{r_brace}}, where a = 1/(1 + D{sub B}) and D{sub B} is the diffusion coefficient of the barrier. The numerical value of D{sub B} , and therefore the corresponding value of a, depends among other things on the algorithm used for identifying halos. We discuss the physical origin of the stochasticity of the barrier and, from recent N-body simulations that studied the properties of the collapse barrier, we deduce a value D{sub B} {approx_equal} 0.25. Our model then predicts a

  19. Impact of saturation on mass transfer rate between mobile and immobile waters in solute transport within aggregated soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Wulong; Huang, Ning; Zhang, Xiaoxian

    2014-11-01

    Solute transport in aggregated soils is controlled by pores both inside and between the aggregates. Because the intra-aggregate pores are much smaller than the inter-aggregate pores, in chemical transport modelling the water in the former was often assumed to be immobile in comparison with water in the latter. How to describe mass transfer between the two waters has been studied intensively for saturated soils but poorly for unsaturated soils. In this paper, we investigated this using pore-scale modelling and tomography. The binary structures of porous materials acquired using tomography in our previous work served as the aggregated soils. Since the sizes of the intra-aggregate pores were smaller than the resolution of the tomography, they cannot be explicitly resolved in the tomography. As a result, the solids in the binary structures were porous aggregates and their impact on solute movement was described by an effective diffusion coefficient. In all simulations, the aggregates were assumed to be fully saturated and water distribution between the aggregates was determined by inter-aggregate pore sizes and pore connectedness. Solute movement from water within the inter-aggregates into the aggregates under different saturations was simulated using a pore-scale model. The simulated concentration and flux at pore scale were spatially averaged, and they were then used to calculate the volumetric average mass transfer rate between the two waters. The calculated average mass transfer rates were linked to the memory function widely used in the literature to model solute transport in structured soils. The results indicate that the commonly-used linear mobile-immobile transfer model with its transfer rate coefficient proportional to water content cannot fit the memory function calculated at any saturation. We fitted the simulated results to an empirical formula. The comparisons reveal that in the earlier stage, the memory function decreases with time in a power-law, and in

  20. A 17-billion-solar-mass black hole in a group galaxy with a diffuse core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Jens; Ma, Chung-Pei; McConnell, Nicholas J.; Greene, Jenny E.; Blakeslee, John P.; Janish, Ryan

    2016-04-01

    Quasars are associated with and powered by the accretion of material onto massive black holes; the detection of highly luminous quasars with redshifts greater than z = 6 suggests that black holes of up to ten billion solar masses already existed 13 billion years ago. Two possible present-day ‘dormant’ descendants of this population of ‘active’ black holes have been found in the galaxies NGC 3842 and NGC 4889 at the centres of the Leo and Coma galaxy clusters, which together form the central region of the Great Wall—the largest local structure of galaxies. The most luminous quasars, however, are not confined to such high-density regions of the early Universe; yet dormant black holes of this high mass have not yet been found outside of modern-day rich clusters. Here we report observations of the stellar velocity distribution in the galaxy NGC 1600—a relatively isolated elliptical galaxy near the centre of a galaxy group at a distance of 64 megaparsecs from Earth. We use orbit superposition models to determine that the black hole at the centre of NGC 1600 has a mass of 17 billion solar masses. The spatial distribution of stars near the centre of NGC 1600 is rather diffuse. We find that the region of depleted stellar density in the cores of massive elliptical galaxies extends over the same radius as the gravitational sphere of influence of the central black holes, and interpret this as the dynamical imprint of the black holes.

  1. Supercritical CO2 Dissolution and Mass Transfer in a Heterogeneous Pore Network under Drainage and Imbibition Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kneafsey, T. J.; Chang, C.; Zhou, Q.; Oostrom, M.; Wietsma, T. W.; Yu, Q.

    2015-12-01

    Dissolution trapping of supercritical CO2 (scCO2) is usually modeled by assuming instantaneous scCO2 dissolution and equilibrium phase partitioning. Our recent core-scale imbibition experiments show a prolonged depletion of residual scCO2 by dissolution, implying a non-equilibrium mechanism. In our 2D sandstone-analogue micromodel experimental study, pore-scale scCO2 dissolution was inferred from imaging (1) drainage using a pH-sensitive water dye and (2) imbibition using a scCO2 dye. The drainage experiment was conducted by injecting scCO2 into the dissolved-CO2 (dsCO2)-free water-filled pore network. The time-lapse images of non-uniform dye intensities indicating varying pH show that dsCO2 concentration varies from zero to solubility in individual pores and pore clusters and the average concentration gradually increases with time. The different rates of dissolution in different pores/clusters can be attributed to (1) fast scCO2 dissolution at scCO2-water interfaces, (2) rate-limited mass transfer due to limited interface areas, and (3) a transition from rate-limited to diffusion-limited mass transfer, revealed by detailed analysis on selected pores and pore clusters. The imbibition experiments conducted by injecting deionized water at different rates show (1) water flow in channels bypassing scCO2 at high residual saturations, (2) subsequent, slow scCO2 depletion by dissolution and mass transfer as effluent dsCO2 concentration varies from 0.06% to 4.44% of solubility, and (3) creation of new water flow paths by dissolution, enhancing scCO2 depletion by coupled displacement and dissolution. Both the drainage and imbibitions experiments indicate non-equilibrium scCO2 dissolution in the centimeter-scale pore network over 4.5 hours and up to 14 hours, respectively. The pore-scale imaging can help better understand the effects of pore-throat characteristics on scCO2 dissolution and mass transfer during drainage and imbibition and the interplay between displacement and

  2. A mass-conserved diffuse interface method and its application for incompressible multiphase flows with large density ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Shu, C.; Shao, J. Y.; Wu, J.; Niu, X. D.

    2015-06-01

    In this work a mass-conserved diffuse interface method is proposed for simulating incompressible flows of binary fluids with large density ratio. In the method, a mass correction term is introduced into the Cahn-Hilliard equation to compensate the mass losses or offset the mass increases caused by the numerical and modeling diffusion. Since the mass losses or increases are through the phase interfaces and at each time step, their values are very small, to keep mass conservation, mass sources or sinks are introduced and uniformly distributed in the volume of diffuse layer. With the uniform distribution, the mass correction term representing mass sources or sinks is derived analytically by applying mass conservation principle. By including the mass correction, the modified Cahn-Hilliard equation is solved by the fifth-order upwind scheme to capture the phase field of the bindery fluids. The flow field is simulated by the newly-developed multiphase lattice Boltzmann flux solver [20]. The proposed approach is validated by simulating the Laplace law, the merging of two bubbles, Rayleigh-Taylor instability and bubble rising under gravity with density ratio of 1000 and viscosity ratio of 100. Numerical results of interface shapes and flow properties agree well with both analytical solutions and benchmark data in the literature. Numerical results also show that the mass is well-conserved in all cases considered. In addition, it is demonstrated that the mass correction term at each time step is in the order of 10-4 ∼10-5, which is a small number compared with the magnitude of order parameter.

  3. Effect of liquid distribution on gas-water phase mass transfer in an unsaturated sand during infiltration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imhoff, Paul T.; Jaffé, Peter R.

    1994-09-01

    Gas-water phase mass transfer was examined in a homogeneous sand with both the gas and water phase mobile: water was infiltrated from the top of the sand column while benzene-laden air flowed upward from the bottom. Mass-transfer limitations for this situation may be important for applications of bioventing, where water and nutrients are added at the ground surface simultaneously with induced air movement to carry oxygen and volatile organics to microbial populations. Gas- and water-phase samples indicate that gas-water phase mass transfer was sufficiently fast that equilibrium between gas and water phases was achieved at all sampling locations within the porous medium. Lower-bound estimates for the gas-water mass-transfer rate coefficient show that mass transfer was at least 10-40 times larger than predictions made from an empirical model developed for gas-water phase mass transfer in an identical porous medium. A water-phase tracer test demonstrates that water flow was much more uniform in this study than in those earlier experiments, which is a likely explanation for the differing rates of gas-water phase mass transfer. It is hypothesized that the liquid distribution in previous laboratory experiments was less uniform because of preferential flow paths due to wetting front instabilities. Gas-water phase mass-transfer rate coefficients reported in this investigation are for an ideal situation of uniform water infiltration: mass-transfer rates in field soils are expected to be significantly smaller.

  4. Natural convection mass transfer at a vertical array of closely-spaced horizontal cylinders with special reference to electrochemical reactor design

    SciTech Connect

    Sedahmed, G.H.; Nirdosh, I.

    1995-06-01

    Many industrial electrochemical processes such as electrowinning of metals, electrochemical pollution control, and electroorganic and electroinorganic syntheses are diffusion-controlled processes whose rates depend on the geometry of the working electrode as well as the prevailing hydrodynamic conditions. Recently much work has been done to develop new electrochemical reactors which are more efficient than the traditional parallel plate electrochemical reactor used in conducting such processes. In line with this, the object of the present work was to study the natural convection mass transfer behavior of a new electrode geometry, namely an array of closely-spaced horizontal tubes. Natural convection mass transfer at a vertical array of closely-spaced horizontal cylinders was studied by an electrochemical technique involving the measurement of the limiting current of the cathodic deposition of copper from acidified copper sulfate solution. Various combinations of solution concentration, cylinder diameter, and number of cylinders per array were used including experiments on single cylinders. The mass transfer coefficient at the array was found to decrease with increasing number of cylinders, pass through a minimum, and then increase with further increase in the number of cylinders per array; the mass transfer coefficient increased with increasing cylinder diameter in the array. Mass transfer data for different arrays were correlated for the range 6.3 {times} 10{sup 9} < ScGr < 3.63 {times} 10{sup 10} by the equation Sh = 0.455(ScGr){sup 0.25} and for the range 6.3 {times} 10{sup 10} < ScGr < 3.63 {times} 10{sup 12} by the equation Sh = 0.0064(ScGr){sup 0.42}. The characteristic length used in the above correlations was obtained by dividing the array area by the perimeter projected onto a horizontal plane. Practical implications of the present results in designing electrochemical reactors with heat transfer facilities are highlighted.

  5. Magnetic braking, ambipolar diffusion, cloud cores, and star formation - Natural length scales and protostellar masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouschovias, Telemachos Ch.

    1991-05-01

    Magnetic braking is essential for cloud contraction and star formation. Ambipolar diffusion is unavoidable in self-gravitating, magnetic clouds and leads to single-stage (as opposed to hierarchical) fragmentation (or core formation) and protostar formation. Magnetic forces dominate thermal-pressure and centrifugal forces over scales comparable to molecular cloud radii. Magnetic support of molecular clouds and the imperfect collisional coupling between charged and neutral particles introduce a critical magnetic length scale (λM,cr = 0.62υAτff) and an Alfvén length scale ((λA = πυAτni), respectively, in the problem which together with a critical thermal length scale (λT,cr = 1.09Caτff) explain naturally the formation of fragments (or cores) in otherwise quiescent clouds and determine the sizes and masses of these fragments during the subsequent stages of contraction. (The quantity υA is the Alfvén speed, τni the mean neutral-ion collision time, Ca the adiabatic speed of sound, and τff the free4all time scale.) Numerical calculations based on new adaptive-grid techniques follow the formation of fragments by ambipolar diffusion and their subsequent collapse up to an enhancement in central density above its initial equilibrium value by a factor ≃106 with excellent spatial resolution. The results confirm the existence and relevance of the three length scales and extend the analytical understanding of fragmentation and star formation derived from them. The ultimately bimodal opposition to gravity (by magnetic forces in the envelope and by thermal-pressure forces in the core) introduces a break in the slope of the log pn -log r profile. The relation Bc ∞ pkc between the magnetic field strength and the gas density in cloud cores holds with K = 0.4 - 0.5 even in the presence of ambipolar diffusion up to densities ˜109 cm-3 for a wide variety of clouds. The value K ≃ ½ is fairly typical. At the late stages of evolution, for example, at a central density

  6. Numerical Problems and Agent-Based Models for a Mass Transfer Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murthi, Manohar; Shea, Lonnie D.; Snurr, Randall Q.

    2009-01-01

    Problems requiring numerical solutions of differential equations or the use of agent-based modeling are presented for use in a course on mass transfer. These problems were solved using the popular technical computing language MATLABTM. Students were introduced to MATLAB via a problem with an analytical solution. A more complex problem to which no…

  7. Demonstrating the Effect of Interphase Mass Transfer in a Transparent Fluidized Bed Reactor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saayman, Jean; Nicol, Willie

    2011-01-01

    A demonstration experiment is described that employs the ozone decomposition reaction at ambient conditions on Fe2O3 impregnated Fluidized Catalytic Cracking (FCC) catalyst. Using a two-dimensional see-through column the importance of interphase mass transfer is clearly illustrated by the significant difference in ozone conversion between the…

  8. The ultrasonic-enhanced factor of mass-transfer coefficient in the supercritical carbon dioxide extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Benyi; Lu, Yigang

    2008-10-01

    Based on several hypotheses about the process of supercritical carbon dioxide extraction, the onflow around the solute granule is figured out by the Navier-Stocks equation. In combination with the Higbie’s solute infiltration model, the link between the mass-transfer coefficient and the velocity of flow is found. The mass-transfer coefficient with the ultrasonical effect is compared with that without the ultrasonical effect, and then a new parameter named the ultrasonic-enhanced factor of mass-transfer coefficient is brought forward, which describes the mathematical model of the supercritical carbon dioxide extraction process enhanced by ultrasonic. The model gives out the relationships among the ultrasonical power, the ultrasonical frequency, the radius of solute granule and the ultrasonic-enhanced factor of mass-transfer coefficient. The results calculated by this model fit well with the experimental data, including the extraction of Coix Lacryma-jobi Seed Oil (CLSO) and Coix Lacryma-jobi Seed Ester (CLSE) from coix seeds and the extraction of Eicosapentaenoic Acid (EPA) and Docosahexaenoic Acid (DHA) from the alga by means of the ultrasonic-enhanced supercritical carbon dioxide extraction (USFE) and the supercritical carbon dioxide extraction (SFE) respectively. This proves the rationality of the ultrasonic-enhanced factor model. The model provides a theoretical basis for the application of ultrasonic-enhanced supercritical fluid extraction technique.

  9. MASS TRANSFER IN BINARY STARS USING SMOOTHED PARTICLE HYDRODYNAMICS. II. ECCENTRIC BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Lajoie, Charles-Philippe; Sills, Alison E-mail: asills@mcmaster.ca

    2011-01-10

    Despite numerous efforts to better understand binary star evolution, some aspects of it remain poorly constrained. In particular, the evolution of eccentric binaries has remained elusive mainly because the Roche lobe formalism derived for circular binaries does not apply. Here we report the results of our smoothed particle hydrodynamic simulations of mass transfer in eccentric binaries using an alternate method in which we model only the outermost layers of the stars with appropriate boundary conditions. Using this technique, along with properly relaxed model stars, we characterize the mass transfer episodes of binaries with various orbital parameters. In particular, we show that these episodes can be described by Gaussians with an FWHM of {approx}0.12P{sub orb} and that the peak rates occur after periastron, at an orbital phase of {approx}0.58, independently of the eccentricity and mass of the stars. The accreted material is observed to form a rather sparse envelope around either or both stars. Although the fate of this envelope is not modeled in our simulations, we show that a constant fraction ({approx}5%) of the material transferred is ejected from the systems. We discuss this result in terms of the non-conservative mass transfer scenario. We suggest that our results could be incorporated in analytical and binary population synthesis studies to help better understand the evolution of eccentric binaries and the formation of exotic stellar populations.

  10. The effects of recirculation flows on mass transfer from the arterial wall to flowing blood.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhiguo; Deng, Xiaoyan; Fan, Yubo; Guidoin, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Using a sudden tubular expansion as a model of an arterial stenosis, the effect of disturbed flow on mass transfer from the arterial wall to flowing blood was studied theoretically and tested experimentally by measuring the dissolution rate of benzoic acid disks forming the outer tube of a sudden tubular expansion. The study revealed that mass transfer from vessel wall to flowing fluid in regions of disturbed flow is independent of wall shear rates. The rate of mass transfer is significantly higher in regions of disturbed flow with a local maximum around the reattachment point where the wall shear rate is zero. The experimental study also revealed that the rate of mass transfer from the vessel wall to a flowing fluid is much higher in the presence of microspheres (as models of blood cells) in the flowing fluid and under the condition of pulsatile flow than in steady flow. These results imply that flow disturbance may enhance the transport of biochemicals and macromolecules, such as plasma proteins and lipoproteins synthesized within the blood vessel wall, from the blood vessel wall to flowing blood. PMID:18204314

  11. Mass Transfer Study of Chlorine Dioxide Gas Through Polymeric Packaging Materials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A continuous system for measuring the mass transfer of gaseous chlorine dioxide (ClO2), a strong oxidizing agent and used in food and pharmaceutical packaging, through 10 different types of polymeric packaging material was developed utilizing electrochemical sensor as a detector. Permeability, diff...

  12. Dissociation and ammonia mass transfer from ammonium solution and dairy cattle manure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Process-based models are being used to predict ammonia (NH**3) emissions from manure sources, but their accuracy has not been fully evaluated for cattle manure. Laboratory trials were conducted to measure the dissociation and mass transfer coefficient for NH**3 volatilization from media of buffered ...

  13. Empirical correlation of volumetric mass transfer coefficient for a rectangular internal-loop airlift bioreactor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An empirical correlation of volumetric mass transfer coefficient was developed for a pilot scale internal-loop rectangular airlift bioreactor that was designed for biotechnology. The empirical correlation combines classic turbulence theory, Kolmogorov’s isotropic turbulence theory with Higbie’s pen...

  14. A Laboratory Experiment for Measuring Solid-Liquid Mass Transfer Parameters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dapia, Sonia; Vila, Carlos; Dominguez, Herminia; Parajo, Juan Carlos

    2004-01-01

    The lab experiment described starts from the principles developed by Sensel and Myers, but the experimental procedure are modified to provide a more reliable experiment assessment. The mass transfer equation is solved and all the involved parameters are calculated by a simple, numerical method.

  15. Oxygen mass transfer and scale-up studies in baffled roller bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Nikakhtari, H; Song, W; Nemati, M; Hill, G A

    2014-02-01

    Oxygen mass transfer was studied in conventional, bead mill and baffled roller bioreactors. Using central composite rotational design, impacts of size, rotation speed and working volume on the oxygen mass transfer were evaluated. Baffled roller bioreactor outperformed its conventional and bead mill counterparts, with the highest k(L)a obtained in these configurations being 0.58, 0.19, 0.41 min(-1), respectively. Performances of the bead mill and baffled roller bioreactor were only comparable when a high bead loading (40%) was applied. Regardless of configuration increase in rotation speed and decrease in working volume improved the oxygen mass transfer rate. Increase in size led to enhanced mass transfer and higher k(L)a in baffled roller bioreactor (0.49 min(-1) for 2.2 L and 1.31 min(-1) for 55 L bioreactors). Finally, the experimentally determined k(L)a in the baffled roller bioreactors of different sizes fit reasonably well to an empirical correlation describing the k(L)a in terms of dimensionless numbers.

  16. Mass transfer in a bubble-agitated liquid-liquid system

    SciTech Connect

    Clinton, S.D.; Perona, J.J.

    1980-01-01

    A polarographic method was used to measure the mass transfer coefficients between a mercury layer and an aqueous layer agitated by gas bubbles. The effects of gas rate, vessel size, and sparge-tube diameter were studied. The Schmidt number of the aqueous phase was varied by the use of sucrose solutions.

  17. Mass transfer within electrostatic precipitators: trace gas adsorption by sorbent-covered plate electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Herek L. Clack

    2006-06-15

    Varying degrees of mercury (Hg) capture have been reported within the electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) of coal-fired electric utility boilers. There has been some speculation that the adsorption takes place on the particulate-covered plate electrodes. This convective mass transfer analysis of laminar and turbulent channel flows provides the maximum potential for Hg adsorption by the plate electrodes within an ESP under those conditions. Mass transfer calculations, neglecting electro hydrodynamic (EHD) effects, reveal 65% removal of elemental Hg for a laminar flow within a 15-m-long channel of 0.2-m spacing and 42% removal for turbulent flow within a similar configuration. Both configurations represent specific collection areas (SCAs) that are significantly larger than conventional ESPs in use. Results reflecting more representative SCA values generally returned removal efficiencies of {lt}20%. EHD effects, although potentially substantial at low Reynolds numbers, diminish rapidly with increasing Reynolds number and become negligible at typical ESP operating conditions. The present results indicate maximum Hg removal efficiencies for ESPs that are much less than those observed in practice for comparable ESP operating conditions. Considering Hg adsorption kinetics and finite sorbent capacity in addition to the present mass transfer analyses would yield even lower adsorption efficiencies than the present results. In a subsequent paper, the author addresses the mass transfer potential presented by the charged, suspended particulates during their collection within an ESP and the role they potentially play in Hg capture within ESPs. 28 refs., 4 figs.

  18. Mass transfer coefficient in ginger oil extraction by microwave hydrotropic solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handayani, Dwi; Ikhsan, Diyono; Yulianto, Mohamad Endy; Dwisukma, Mandy Ayulia

    2015-12-01

    This research aims to obtain mass transfer coefficient data on the extraction of ginger oil using microwave hydrotropic solvent as an alternative to increase zingiberene. The innovation of this study is extraction with microwave heater and hydrotropic solvent,which able to shift the phase equilibrium, and the increasing rate of the extraction process and to improve the content of ginger oil zingiberene. The experiment was conducted at the Laboratory of Separation Techniques at Chemical Engineering Department of Diponegoro University. The research activities carried out in two stages, namely experimental and modeling work. Preparation of the model postulated, then lowered to obtain equations that were tested and validated using data obtained from experimental. Measurement of experimental data was performed using microwave power (300 W), extraction temperature of 90 ° C and the independent variable, i.e.: type of hydrotropic, the volume of solvent and concentration in order, to obtain zingiberen levels as a function of time. Measured data was used as a tool to validate the postulation, in order to obtain validation of models and empirical equations. The results showed that the mass transfer coefficient (Kla) on zingiberene mass transfer models ginger oil extraction at various hydrotropic solution attained more 14 ± 2 Kla value than its reported on the extraction with electric heating. The larger value of Kla, the faster rate of mass transfer on the extraction process. To obtain the same yields, the microwave-assisted extraction required one twelfth time shorter.

  19. A mass transfer model of ethanol emission from thin layers of corn silage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A mass transfer model of ethanol emission from thin layers of corn silage was developed and validated. The model was developed based on data from wind tunnel experiments conducted at different temperatures and air velocities. Multiple regression analysis was used to derive an equation that related t...

  20. Diffusion-regulated phase-transfer catalysis for atom transfer radical polymerization of methyl methacrylate in an aqueous/organic biphasic system.

    PubMed

    Ding, Mingqiang; Jiang, Xiaowu; Peng, Jinying; Zhang, Lifen; Cheng, Zhenping; Zhu, Xiulin

    2015-03-01

    A concept based on diffusion-regulated phase-transfer catalysis (DRPTC) in an aqueous-organic biphasic system with copper-mediated initiators for continuous activator regeneration is successfully developed for atom transfer radical polymerization (ICAR ATRP) (termed DRPTC-based ICAR ATRP here), using methyl methacrylate (MMA) as a model monomer, ethyl α-bromophenylacetate (EBrPA) as an initiator, and tris(2-pyridylmethyl)amine (TPMA) as a ligand. In this system, the monomer and initiating species in toluene (organic phase) and the catalyst complexes in water (aqueous phase) are simply mixed under stirring at room temperature. The trace catalyst complexes transfer into the organic phase via diffusion to trigger ICAR ATRP of MMA with ppm level catalyst content once the system is heated to the polymerization temperature (75 °C). It is found that well-defined PMMA with controlled molecular weights and narrow molecular weight distributions can be obtained easily. Furthermore, the polymerization can be conducted in the presence of limited amounts of air without using tedious degassed procedures. After cooling to room temperature, the upper organic phase is decanted and the lower aqueous phase is reused for another 10 recycling turnovers with ultra low loss of catalyst and ligand loading. At the same time, all the recycled catalyst complexes retain nearly perfect catalytic activity and controllability, indicating a facile and economical strategy for catalyst removal and recycling.

  1. Numerical Analysis of Simultaneous Heat and Mass Transfer in Cork Lightweight Concretes Used in Building Envelopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotehi, Nassima; Chaker, Abla

    A numerical study was carried out in order to investigate the behaviour of building envelopes made of lightweight concretes. In this work, we are particularly interested to the building envelopes which are consist of cement paste with incorporation of cork aggregates in order to obtain small thermal conductivity and low-density materials. The mathematical formulation of coupled heat and mass transfer in wet porous materials has been made using Luikov's model, the system describing temperature and moisture transfer processes within building walls is solved numerically with the finite elements method. The obtained results illustrate the temporal evolutions of the temperature and the moisture content, and the distributions of the temperature and moisture content inside the wall for several periods of time. They allow us to specify the effect of the nature and dosage of fibre on the heat and mass transfer.

  2. Diffuse supernova neutrinos: oscillation effects, stellar cooling and progenitor mass dependence

    SciTech Connect

    Lunardini, Cecilia; Tamborra, Irene E-mail: tamborra@mpp.mpg.de

    2012-07-01

    We estimate the diffuse supernova neutrino background (DSNB) using the recent progenitor-dependent, long-term supernova simulations from the Basel group and including neutrino oscillations at several post-bounce times. Assuming multi-angle matter suppression of collective effects during the accretion phase, we find that oscillation effects are dominated by the matter-driven MSW resonances, while neutrino-neutrino collective effects contribute at the 5–10% level. The impact of the neutrino mass hierarchy, of the time-dependent neutrino spectra and of the diverse progenitor star population is 10% or less, small compared to the uncertainty of at least 25% of the normalization of the supernova rate. Therefore, assuming that the sign of the neutrino mass hierarchy will be determined within the next decade, the future detection of the DSNB will deliver approximate information on the MSW-oscillated neutrino spectra. With a reliable model for neutrino emission, its detection will be a powerful instrument to provide complementary information on the star formation rate and for learning about stellar physics.

  3. Ultra-diffuse Galaxies in Clusters and the Field: Masses and Stellar Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanowsky, Aaron; Laine, Seppo; Krick, Jessica; van Dokkum, Pieter; Villaume, Alexa; Brodie, Jean

    2016-08-01

    Ultra-diffuse galaxies (UDGs) were recognized only last year as a novel class of galaxies, with luminosities like dwarfs but sizes like giants. Although some UDGs appear to be just unusually extended dwarfs, others show evidence of being very different and unexpected: their dark matter halos are overmassive by factors of ~10, with one UDG even being arguably a 'failed Milky Way.' These exotic galaxies might be a byproduct of environmental processes within galaxy clusters, but UDGs have also now been found in the field. It is crucial for understanding their origins to test if UDGs have the same properties in cluster and field environments. Here we propose studying the stellar populations (ages and metallicities) of seven UDGs using Spitzer/IRAC 3.6- and 4.5-micron imaging combined with optical photometry, along with mass estimation of three of the UDGs using HST/ACS imaging to provide globular cluster number counts and colors (proxies for halo mass). This ultra low surface brightness photometry in the near infrared, on an important new class of galaxies, could become a legacy result from the Spitzer mission.

  4. Analysis of mass transfer characteristics in a tubular membrane using CFD modeling.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jixiang; Vedantam, Sreepriya; Spanjers, Henri; Nopens, Ingmar; van Lier, Jules B

    2012-10-01

    In contrast to the large amount of research into aerobic membrane bioreactors, little work has been reported on anaerobic membrane bioreactors (AMBRs). As to the application of membrane bioreactors, membrane fouling is a key issue. Membrane fouling generally occurs more seriously in AMBRs than in aerobic membrane bioreactors. However, membrane fouling could be managed through the application of suitable shear stress that can be introduced by the application of a two-phase flow. When the two-phase flow is applied in AMBRs, little is known about the mass transfer characteristics, which is of particular importance, in tubular membranes of AMBRs. In our present work, we have employed fluid dynamic modeling to analyze the mass transfer characteristics in the tubular membrane of a side stream AMBR in which, gas-lift two-phase flow was applied. The modeling indicated that the mass transfer capacity at the membrane surface at the noses of gas bubbles was higher than the mass transfer capacity at the tails of the bubbles, which is in contrast to the results when water instead of sludge is applied. At the given mass transfer rate, the filterability of the sludge was found to have a strong influence on the transmembrane pressure at a steady flux. In addition, the model also showed that the shear stress in the internal space of the tubular membrane was mainly around 20 Pa but could be as high as about 40 Pa due to gas bubble movements. Nonetheless, at these shear stresses a stable particle size distribution was found for sludge particles.

  5. Prediction of gas-liquid mass transfer coefficient in sparged stirred tank bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Ochoa, Felix; Gomez, Emilio

    2005-12-20

    Oxygen mass transfer in sparged stirred tank bioreactors has been studied. The rate of oxygen mass transfer into a culture in a bioreactor is affected by operational conditions and geometrical parameters as well as the physicochemical properties of the medium (nutrients, substances excreted by the micro-organism, and surface active agents that are often added to the medium) and the presence of the micro-organism. Thus, oxygen mass transfer coefficient values in fermentation broths often differ substantially from values estimated for simple aqueous solutions. The influence of liquid phase physicochemical properties on kLa must be divided into the influence on k(L) and a, because they are affected in different ways. The presence of micro-organisms (cells, bacteria, or yeasts) can affect the mass transfer rate, and thus kLa values, due to the consumption of oxygen for both cell growth and metabolite production. In this work, theoretical equations for kLa prediction, developed for sparged and stirred tanks, taking into account the possible oxygen mass transfer enhancement due to the consumption by biochemical reactions, are proposed. The estimation of kLa is carried out taking into account a strong increase of viscosity broth, changes in surface tension and different oxygen uptake rates (OURs), and the biological enhancement factor, E, is also estimated. These different operational conditions and changes in several variables are performed using different systems and cultures (xanthan aqueous solutions, xanthan production cultures by Xanthomonas campestris, sophorolipids production by Candida bombicola, etc.). Experimental and theoretical results are presented and compared, with very good results.

  6. Distinction between tectonic mixing and mass transfer processes in a ductile shear zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, X.-Y.; O'Hara, K. D.; Moecher, D. P.

    1998-08-01

    A petrological, geochemical and microtextural study of an upper amphibolite facies shear zone, developed in interlayered mafic and felsic layers, permits the relative roles of tectonic mixing and fluid-assisted mass transfer processes to be determined. Geochemical evidence indicates that the chemical changes in the deformed rocks result from mixing of mafic and felsic layers together with fluid-assisted mass transfer within the shear zone. During mylonitization, most major elements and some trace elements (LREE, Rb, Sr, Ba, Cu, Ni) exhibited mobile behavior. The HREEs, Ti, V, Sc, Co and Fe, on the other hand, were immobile. Based on mass conservation of these elements, a two-component mixing model using mafic and felsic rocks from outside the shear zone as end-members explains the major and trace element data. The chemical composition of the felsic mylonite is modeled by mixing 12±5% mafic rock and 88±5% felsic rock, whereas, the mafic mylonite is modeled by mixing 55±4% mafic rock and 45±4% felsic rock. A closed system mixing model yields a good fit for immobile elements, such as HREEs, Ti, V, and Sc, but significant chemical differences between the calculated data and observed data are explained by fluid-assisted mass transfer of mobile elements under open system conditions. A 24% volume loss in the felsic mylonite and 13% volume loss in mafic mylonite are derived from the mass balance, assuming the HREE, Ti, V and Sc were immobile.

  7. Combined numerical and experimental investigations of local hydrodynamics and coolant flow mass transfer in Kvadrat-type fuel assemblies of PWR reactors with mixing grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriev, S. M.; Samoilov, O. B.; Khrobostov, A. E.; Varentsov, A. V.; Dobrov, A. A.; Doronkov, D. V.; Sorokin, V. D.

    2014-08-01

    Results of research works on studying local hydrodynamics and mass transfer for coolant flow in the characteristic zones of PWR reactor fuel assemblies in case of using belts of mixing spacer grids are presented. The investigations were carried out on an aerodynamic rig using the admixture diffusion method (the tracer-gas method). Certain specific features pertinent to coolant flow in the fuel rod bundles of Kvadrat-type fuel assemblies were revealed during the experiments. The obtained study results were included in the database for verifying computation fluid dynamics computer codes and detailed cell-wise calculations of reactor cores with Kvadrat-type fuel assemblies. The obtained results can also be used for more exact determination of local coolant flow hydrodynamic and mass transfer characteristics in assessing thermal reliability of PWR reactor cores.

  8. THE PROCESS OF MASS TRANSFER ON THE SOLID-LIQUID BOUNDARY LAYER DURING THE RELEASE OF DICLOFENAC SODIUM AND PAPAVERINE HYDROCHLORIDE FROM TABLETS IN A PADDLE APPARATUS.

    PubMed

    Kasperek, Regina; Zimmer, Lukasz; Poleszak, Ewa

    2016-01-01

    The release study of diclofenac sodium (DIC) and papaverine hydrochloride (PAP) from two formulations of the tablets in the paddle apparatus using different rotation speeds to characterize the process of mass transfer on the solid-liquid boundary layer was carried out. The dissolution process of active substances was described by values of mass transfer coefficients, the diffusion boundary layer thickness and dimensionless numbers (Sh and Re). The values of calculated parameters showed that the release of DIC and PAP from tablets comprising potato starch proceeded faster than from tablets containing HPMC and microcrystalline cellulose. They were obtained by direct dependencies between Sh and Re in the range from 75 rpm to 125 rpm for both substances from all tablets. The description of the dissolution process with the dimensionless numbers make it possible to plan the drug with the required release profile under given in vitro conditions. PMID:27008811

  9. A risk-based probabilistic framework to estimate the endpoint of remediation: Concentration rebound by rate-limited mass transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barros, F. P. J.; Fernã Ndez-Garcia, D.; Bolster, D.; Sanchez-Vila, X.

    2013-04-01

    Aquifer remediation is a challenging problem with environmental, social, and economic implications. As a general rule, pumping proceeds until the concentration of the target substance within the pumped water lies below a prespecified value. In this paper we estimate the a priori potential failure of the endpoint of remediation due to a rebound of concentrations driven by back diffusion. In many cases, it has been observed that once pumping ceases, a rebound in the concentration at the well takes place. For this reason, administrative approaches are rather conservative, and pumping is forced to last much longer than initially expected. While a number of physical and chemical processes might account for the presence of rebounding, we focus here on diffusion from low water mobility into high mobility zones. In this work we look specifically at the concentration rebound when pumping is discontinued while accounting for multiple mass transfer processes occurring at different time scales and parametric uncertainty. We aim to develop a risk-based optimal operation methodology that is capable of estimating the endpoint of remediation based on aquifer parameters characterizing the heterogeneous medium as well as pumping rate and initial size of the polluted area.

  10. Characteristic time scales of mixing, mass transfer and biomass growth in a Taylor vortex algal photobioreactor.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xi; Kong, Bo; Vigil, R Dennis

    2015-12-01

    Recently it has been demonstrated that algal biomass yield can be enhanced using fluid flow patterns known as Taylor vortices. It has been suggested that these growth rate improvements can be attributed to improved light delivery as a result of rapid transport of microorganisms between light and dark regions of the reactor. However, Taylor vortices also strongly impact fluid mixing and interphase (gas-liquid) mass transport, and these in turn may also explain improvements in biomass productivity. To identify the growth-limiting factor in a Taylor vortex algal photobioreactor, experiments were performed to determine characteristic time scales for mixing and mass transfer. By comparing these results with the characteristic time scale for biomass growth, it is shown that algal growth rate in Taylor vortex reactors is not limited by fluid mixing or interphase mass transfer, and therefore the observed biomass productivity improvements are likely attributable to improved light utilization efficiency.

  11. Modeling the improvement of ultrafiltration membrane mass transfer when using biofiltration pretreatment in surface water applications.

    PubMed

    Netcher, Andrea C; Duranceau, Steven J

    2016-03-01

    In surface water treatment, ultrafiltration (UF) membranes are widely used because of their ability to supply safe drinking water. Although UF membranes produce high-quality water, their efficiency is limited by fouling. Improving UF filtrate productivity is economically desirable and has been attempted by incorporating sustainable biofiltration processes as pretreatment to UF with varying success. The availability of models that can be applied to describe the effectiveness of biofiltration on membrane mass transfer are lacking. In this work, UF water productivity was empirically modeled as a function of biofilter feed water quality using either a quadratic or Gaussian relationship. UF membrane mass transfer variability was found to be governed by the dimensionless mass ratio between the alkalinity (ALK) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC). UF membrane productivity was optimized when the biofilter feed water ALK to DOC ratio fell between 10 and 14.

  12. 3D modelling of coupled mass and heat transfer of a convection-oven roasting process.

    PubMed

    Feyissa, Aberham Hailu; Gernaey, Krist V; Adler-Nissen, Jens

    2013-04-01

    A 3D mathematical model of coupled heat and mass transfer describing oven roasting of meat has been developed from first principles. The proposed mechanism for the mass transfer of water is modified and based on a critical literature review of the effect of heat on meat. The model equations are based on a conservation of mass and energy, coupled through Darcy's equations of porous media - the water flow is mainly pressure-driven. The developed model together with theoretical and experimental assessments were used to explain the heat and water transport and the effect of the change in microstructure (permeability, water binding capacity and elastic modulus) that occur during the meat roasting process. The developed coupled partial differential equations were solved by using COMSOL Multiphysics®3.5 and state variables are predicted as functions of both position and time. The proposed mechanism was partially validated by experiments in a convection oven where temperatures were measured online.

  13. Bibliography on augmentation of convective heat and mass transfer-II

    SciTech Connect

    Bergles, A.E.; Nirmalan, V.; Junkhan, G.H.; Webb, R.L.

    1983-12-01

    Heat transfer augmentation has developed into a major specialty area in heat transfer research and development. This report presents and updated bibliography of world literature on augmentation. The literature is classified into passive augmentation techniques, which require no external power, and active techniques, which do require external power. The fifteen techniques are grouped in terms of their applications to the various modes of heat transfer. Mass transfer is included for completeness. Key words are included with each citation for technique/mode identification. The total number of publications cited is 3045, including 135 surveys of various techniques and 86 papers on performance evaluation of passive techniques. Patents are not included, as they are the subject of a separate bibliographic report.