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Sample records for digboiensis teri asn6

  1. Electronic Library: A TERI Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kar, Debal C.; Deb, Subrata; Kumar, Satish

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the development of Electronic Library at TERI (The Energy and Resources Institute, New Delhi). Highlights include: hardware and software used; the digital library/Virtual Electronic Library; directory of Internet journals; virtual reference resources; electronic collection/Physical Electronic Library; downloaded online full-length…

  2. Isolation and characterization of a potential paraffin-wax degrading thermophilic bacterial strain Geobacillus kaustophilus TERI NSM for application in oil wells with paraffin deposition problems.

    PubMed

    Sood, Nitu; Lal, Banwari

    2008-02-01

    Paraffin deposition problems, that have plagued the oil industry, are currently remediated by mechanical and chemical means. However, since these methods are problematic, a microbiological approach has been considered. The bacteria, required for the mitigation of paraffin deposition problems, should be able to survive the high temperatures of oil wells and degrade the paraffins under low oxygen and nutrient conditions while sparing the low carbon chain paraffins. In this study, a thermophilic paraffinic wax degrading bacterial strain was isolated from a soil sample contaminated with paraffinic crude oil. The selected strain, Geobacillus TERI NSM, could degrade 600mg of paraffinic wax as the sole carbon source in 1000ml minimal salts medium in 7d at 55 degrees C. This strain was identified as Geobacillus kaustophilus by fatty acid methyl esters analysis and 16S rRNA full gene sequencing. G. kaustophilus TERI NSM showed 97% degradation of eicosane, 85% degradation of pentacosane and 77% degradation of triacontane in 10d when used as the carbon source. The strain TERI NSM could also degrade the paraffins of crude oil collected from oil wells that had a history of paraffin deposition problems.

  3. Isolation and characterization of a potential paraffin-wax degrading thermophilic bacterial strain Geobacillus kaustophilus TERI NSM for application in oil wells with paraffin deposition problems.

    PubMed

    Sood, Nitu; Lal, Banwari

    2008-02-01

    Paraffin deposition problems, that have plagued the oil industry, are currently remediated by mechanical and chemical means. However, since these methods are problematic, a microbiological approach has been considered. The bacteria, required for the mitigation of paraffin deposition problems, should be able to survive the high temperatures of oil wells and degrade the paraffins under low oxygen and nutrient conditions while sparing the low carbon chain paraffins. In this study, a thermophilic paraffinic wax degrading bacterial strain was isolated from a soil sample contaminated with paraffinic crude oil. The selected strain, Geobacillus TERI NSM, could degrade 600mg of paraffinic wax as the sole carbon source in 1000ml minimal salts medium in 7d at 55 degrees C. This strain was identified as Geobacillus kaustophilus by fatty acid methyl esters analysis and 16S rRNA full gene sequencing. G. kaustophilus TERI NSM showed 97% degradation of eicosane, 85% degradation of pentacosane and 77% degradation of triacontane in 10d when used as the carbon source. The strain TERI NSM could also degrade the paraffins of crude oil collected from oil wells that had a history of paraffin deposition problems. PMID:17942139

  4. Bioflocculant production and biosorption of zinc and lead by a novel bacterial species, Achromobacter sp. TERI-IASST N, isolated from oil refinery waste.

    PubMed

    Subudhi, Sanjukta; Batta, Neha; Pathak, Mihirjyoti; Bisht, Varsha; Devi, Arundhuti; Lal, Banwari; Al khulifah, Bader

    2014-10-01

    A bioflocculant-producing bacterial isolate designated as 'TERI-IASST N' was isolated from activated sludge samples collected from an oil refinery. This isolate demonstrated maximum bioflocculation activity (74%) from glucose among 15 different bioflocculant-producing bacterial strains isolated from the sludge samples and identified as Achromobacter sp. based on 16S rRNA gene sequence. Optimization of pH and supplementation of urea as nitrogen source in the production medium enhanced the flocculation activity of strain TERI-IASST N to 84% (at pH 6). This strain revealed maximum flocculation activity (90%) from sucrose compared to the flocculation activity observed from other carbon sources as investigated (glucose, lactose, fructose, maltose and starch). Ca(2+) served as the suitable divalent cation for maximum bioflocculation activity of TERI-IASST strain N. Maximum flocculation activity was observed at optimum C/N ratio of 1. Flocculation activity of this strain decreased to 75% in the presence of heavy metals; Zn, Pb, Ni, Cu and Cd. In addition strain N revealed considerable biosorption of Zn (430mgL(-1)) and Pb (30mgL(-1)). Bioflocculant yield of strain N was 10.5gL(-1). Fourier transform infrared spectrum indicated the presence of carboxyl, hydroxyl, and amino groups, typical of glycoprotein. Spectroscopic analysis of bioflocculant by nuclear magnetic resonance revealed that it is a glycoprotein, consisting of 57% total sugar and 13% protein.

  5. Debunking the Myth-tery: How the New AASL Standards Unplugged Mythology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubbard, Erin E.

    2009-01-01

    Though few students realize it, many things in today's culture exist because of mythology. This article argues that library media specialists and teachers can teach mythology but it must be applied to the 21st century and shown its relevance in today's world. The article demonstrates that mythology studies are alive and well when the new AASL…

  6. Environmental Management Systems for Educational Institutions: A Case Study of Teri University, New Delhi

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jain, Suresh; Pant, Pallavi

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to put forth a model for implementation of an environmental management system (EMS) in institutes of higher education in India. Design/methodology/approach: The authors carried out initial environmental review (IER) and strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats (SWOT) analysis to identify the major…

  7. Use of an acidophilic yeast strain to enable the growth of leaching bacteria on solid media.

    PubMed

    Ngom, Baba; Liang, Yili; Liu, Yi; Yin, Huaqun; Liu, Xueduan

    2015-03-01

    In this study, a Candida digboiensis strain was isolated from a heap leaching plant in Zambia and used in double-layer agar plate to efficiently isolate and purify leaching bacteria. Unlike Acidiphilium sp., the yeast strain was tetrathionate tolerant and could metabolize a great range of organic compounds including organic acids. These properties allowed the yeast strain to enable and fasten the growth of iron and sulfur oxidizers on double-layer agar plate. The isolates were identified as Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans FOX1, Leptospirillun ferriphilum BN, and Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans ZMB. These three leaching bacteria were inhibited by organic acids such as acetic and propionic acids; however, their activities were enhanced by Candida digboiensis NB under dissolved organic matter stress.

  8. Luminescence dating of fluvial and coastal red sediments in the SE coast, India, and implications for paleoenvironmental changes and dune reddening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayangondaperumal, R.; Murari, M. K.; Sivasubramanian, P.; Chandrasekar, N.; Singhvi, A. K.

    2012-05-01

    The Holocene and late Pleistocene environmental history of the teri ('sandy waste' in local parlance) red sands in the southeast coastal Tamil Nadu was examined using remote sensing, stratigraphy, and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating. Geomorphological surveys enabled the classification of the teri red sands as, 1) inland fluvial teri, 2) coastal teri and, 3) near-coastal teri dunes. The inland teri sediments have higher clay and silty-sand component than the coastal and near-coastal teri, suggesting that these sediments were deposited by the fluvial process during a stronger winter monsoon around > 15 ka. The coastal teri dunes were deposited prior to 11.4 ± 0.9 ka, and the near-coastal dunes aggraded at around 5.6 ± 0.4 ka. We interpret that the coastal dunes were formed during a period of lower relative sea level and the near-coastal dunes formed during a period of higher sea level. Dune reddening is post deposition occurred after 11.4 ± 0.9 ka for the coastal teri dunes and after 5.6 ± 0.4 ka for the near-coastal teri dunes. Presence of microlithic sites associated with the coastal dunes suggest that the cultures existed in the region during 11.4 ± 0.9 ka and 5.6 ± 0.4 ka.

  9. Bold Books for Innovative Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallo, Don

    2004-01-01

    The ways in which Teri Lesesne, an author, selects the best book from the hundreds of books published each year are discussed. The importance of understanding the needs of the readers and the curriculum is explained.

  10. A Young University in India Focuses on Real-World Industry and Sustainability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neelakantan, Shailaja

    2009-01-01

    A small, relatively new Indian university is making a name for itself--nationally and internationally--in the rapidly growing field of sustainable development. TERI University, the creation of one of India's leading environmentalists, has won praise from industry executives and academics alike. They say the institution is tackling some of the…

  11. CHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF WORLD TRADE CENTER FINE PARTICULATE MATTER FOR USE IN TOXICOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemical Analysis of World Trade Center Fine Particulate Matter for Use in Toxicological Assessment
    John K. McGee1, Lung Chi Chen2, Mitchell D. Cohen2, Glen R. Chee2, Colette M. Prophete2, Najwa Haykal-Coates1, Shirley J. Wasson3, Teri L. Conner4, Daniel L. Costa1, and Steph...

  12. Advances in Distance Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1999

    This document contains three symposium papers on advances in distance learning. "The Adoption of Computer Technology and Telecommunications: A Case Study" (Larry M. Dooley, Teri Metcalf, Ann Martinez) reports on a study of the possible applications of two theoretical models (Rogers' Diffusion of Innovations model and the Concerns-Based Adoption…

  13. From Numbers to Letters: Feedback Regularization in Visual Word Recognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molinaro, Nicola; Dunabeitia, Jon Andoni; Marin-Gutierrez, Alejandro; Carreiras, Manuel

    2010-01-01

    Word reading in alphabetic languages involves letter identification, independently of the format in which these letters are written. This process of letter "regularization" is sensitive to word context, leading to the recognition of a word even when numbers that resemble letters are inserted among other real letters (e.g., M4TERI4L). The present…

  14. DRINKING WATER ISSUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    According to recent reports by the California Department of Health Services, the State of Maine, and the United State Geological Survey (USGS); the fuel oxygenate methyl teri-butyl ether (MTBE) is present in 5 to 20 percent of the drinking water sources in California and the nort...

  15. Getting to the next level, together. Interview by Matthew Weinstock.

    PubMed

    Fontenot, Teri

    2010-11-01

    AHA Chair-elect Teri Fontenot says hospitals, physicians, other providers, insurers and patients must work together to improve care, reduce costs and create healthier communities. The CEO of Woman's Hospital in Baton Rouge, La., shares her thoughts on health reform, leadership and other staff came together to (see text) of Hurricane Katrina.

  16. Access to Justice: Middle School Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mertz, Gayle; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Gayle Mertz offers simulations covering balloting and the juvenile court system along with a legislation drafting activity. Mercedes J. Newsome provides guidance on the use of community resource persons. Teri Wilson's activity simulates a juvenile proceeding while Richard Marcroft and Elenor Taylor describe a simulation of small claims court. (KO)

  17. Trapping systems for Zaprionus indianus (Diptera: Drosophilidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    62nd Annual Meeting of the Entomological Society of America 16-19 November 2014; Portland, OR Title: Trapping systems for Zaprionus indianus (Diptera: Drosophilidae) Nancy D. Epsky, Micah A. Gill, C. Teri Allen, Dong H. Cha, and Peter J. Landolt Nancy D. Epsky USDA-ARS, Subtropical Horticulture...

  18. Internet-based information resource and discussion platform on GHG reduction strategies in Asia

    SciTech Connect

    2000-12-28

    The website (www.ccasia.teri.res.in) provides a consolidated Internet based information source and platform for discussions on climate change issues in Asia. The effort has been successful in reaching the target audience and in stimulating awareness about the crucial debate on GHG (greenhouse gas) reduction strategies in Asia.

  19. Algoritmi per il calcolo dell'epatta della Luna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigismondi, Costantino

    2016-05-01

    On the sides of the chair of St. Hyppolitus in the Vatican Libray there is a series of 112 epacts, used for calculating the date of Christian Easter valid for 112 years from 222 AD. The algorithm of octaëteris or 8 civil (julian) years=99 lunar months and a correction of three days each 16 years or one day each 5, 5, 6 years are discussed. Four complete solar cycles (28 years), after which the sequence of the day of the week are repeating, are included in 112 years as well as 7 groups of 16 years; 112 is the minimum common multiple between the double octaëteris (16 years) and the solar cycle (28).

  20. Emplacement Scenarios for Vallis Schroteri, Aristarchus Plateau, the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garry, W. Brent; Bleacher, Jacob E.

    2011-01-01

    The volcanic processes that formed Vallis Schr teri are not well understood. Vallis Schr teri, located on the Aristarchus Plateau, is the largest rille on the Moon, and it displays three key morphologic components: the Cobra Head, the 155-km-long primary rille, and the 240-km-long inner rille. Observations of terrestrial eruptions are applied here to help explain the morphologic relationships observed for Vallis Schr teri. The Cobra Head, a 10-km-wide source vent surrounded by a 35-kmdiameter and 900-m-high low shield, might have been constructed from fl ows, spatter, and pyroclastic deposits erupted during lava fountain events, similar to the early stages of the vent at Pu u O o in Hawaii and the fi nal morphology of Bandera crater, a cinder cone in New Mexico. The vent fed an initial sheet fl ow controlled by preeruption topography. A channel formed within this sheet fl ow was the foundation for the primary rille, which deepened through construction and thermomechanical erosion by lava. The inner rille is confi ned to the fl at fl oor of the primary rille and is characterized by tight gooseneck meanders. This rille crosscuts the distal scarp of the primary rille and extends toward Oceanus Procellarum. This enigmatic relationship can be explained through backup, overfl ow, and diversion of the lava into a new rille that eroded into the margin of the primary rille. Similar backup, overfl ow, and redirection of the lava fl ow were observed during the 1984 Mauna Loa eruption in Hawaii. Analysis of the fi nal morphology of lunar rilles provides key information about lunar volcanic processes and insight into the local stratigraphy.

  1. Investigation into pressurized fluidizing bed with fly ash recycling of fired coal

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Kunlei; Liu Qianxin; Zhang Mingyao

    1997-12-31

    Pressurized fluidized bed combustion with fly ash recycling (PCFBC) technology has been developed at TERI-SEU, Nanjing. 100 hours test was carried out on a 1 MWt heat-input PCFBC facility. A simple special siphon was used for fly ash recycling. The study on combustion performance, alkali vapor formation and NOx emission were conducted with two different kinds of coal and under various operating parameters. Compared to that of conventional PFBC, for PCFBC, combustion efficiency increases in 1--2%, the maximum can reach to 99.8%, NOx emission is reduced by 30%, alkali vapor concentration in flue gas is about 6 ppm.

  2. The relief formed by the descent phenomenon in the north-east part of Kosova.

    PubMed

    Bulliqi, Shpejtim; Isufi, Florim; Ramadani, Ibrahim; Gashi, Gani

    2012-04-01

    In the diverse relief of north-east part of Kosova a relatively wide range occupies the relief modelled by the descent phenomenon, which is conditioned by morph-structural and climatic factors quite suitable for their development. The morphogenesis activity of descent phenomenon is conditioned by the types of rocks, tectonic process of this region and climatic conditions. These factors condition horizontal and vertical relief fragmentation, slope, especially in Gollaku mountains and in SE part of Kopaonik mountain. Along the tectonic descents, the steepness is detaching and the detaching lines consisting of magmatic rocks show overthrows, demolitions and stony torrents, but the Teri gene composition formations are modelled by sliding and muddy torrents, depending upon the presence of clayey and alevrolite belts on these Teri gene ones. The impact of factors and conditions on the relief of this part, the phenomena like demolitions, overthrows, sliding, muddy torrents, stony torrents, etc, operate here, which play an important morphological role in the modelling of relief. PMID:23424844

  3. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the Bacillus subtilis replication termination protein in complex with the 37-base-pair TerI-binding site

    SciTech Connect

    Vivian, J. P.; Porter, C.; Wilce, J. A.; Wilce, M. C. J.

    2006-11-01

    A preparation of replication terminator protein (RTP) of B. subtilis and a 37-base-pair TerI sequence (comprising two binding sites for RTP) has been purified and crystallized. The replication terminator protein (RTP) of Bacillus subtilis binds to specific DNA sequences that halt the progression of the replisome in a polar manner. These terminator complexes flank a defined region of the chromosome into which they allow replication forks to enter but not exit. Forcing the fusion of replication forks in a specific zone is thought to allow the coordination of post-replicative processes. The functional terminator complex comprises two homodimers each of 29 kDa bound to overlapping binding sites. A preparation of RTP and a 37-base-pair TerI sequence (comprising two binding sites for RTP) has been purified and crystallized. A data set to 3.9 Å resolution with 97.0% completeness and an R{sub sym} of 12% was collected from a single flash-cooled crystal using synchrotron radiation. The diffraction data are consistent with space group P622, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 118.8, c = 142.6 Å.

  4. Order-fractal transitions in abstract paintings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Calleja, E. M.; Cervantes, F.; de la Calleja, J.

    2016-08-01

    In this study, we determined the degree of order for 22 Jackson Pollock paintings using the Hausdorff-Besicovitch fractal dimension. Based on the maximum value of each multi-fractal spectrum, the artworks were classified according to the year in which they were painted. It has been reported that Pollock's paintings are fractal and that this feature was more evident in his later works. However, our results show that the fractal dimension of these paintings ranges among values close to two. We characterize this behavior as a fractal-order transition. Based on the study of disorder-order transition in physical systems, we interpreted the fractal-order transition via the dark paint strokes in Pollock's paintings as structured lines that follow a power law measured by the fractal dimension. We determined self-similarity in specific paintings, thereby demonstrating an important dependence on the scale of observations. We also characterized the fractal spectrum for the painting entitled Teri's Find. We obtained similar spectra for Teri's Find and Number 5, thereby suggesting that the fractal dimension cannot be rejected completely as a quantitative parameter for authenticating these artworks.

  5. It's not about energy--it's about power!

    PubMed

    Blanton, Teri

    2014-01-01

    Teri Blanton is a former chairperson and current fellow at Kentuckians for the Commonwealth, a statewide organization that works "for a new balance of power and a just society aimed at changing unfair political, economic, and social systems." In March 2014 she was a keynote speaker addressing the annual conference of the Toxics Action Center in Boston, Massachusetts. We are publishing her speech, presented to the many environmental activists from community- and labor-based organizations that work on state and regional concerns. Ms. Blanton energized the conference with her message of persistent organizing to attain justice against the threats posed to our communities, health, and environment by powerful forces who exploit our lives and labor for their profit and power. She calls upon us to build the power to make the transition to more sustainable and democratic human development.

  6. A replica of the Olympic torch is recovered from STS-101 Atlantis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Teri McKinney, with Shuttle Crew Escape, Johnson Space Center, holds a replica of the Olympic torch carried aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis on mission STS-101. The addition of the torch to the payload was coordinated by astronaut Andy Thomas, who is from Australia. The torch will travel to Australia for the 2000 Olympic games being held there in September. . STS-101 was the third flight to the International Space Station and included repairs to the Station plus transfer of equipment and supplies to the Station for future missions. The landing of Atlantis completed a 9-day, 20-hour, 9-minute-long mission. It was the 98th flight in the Space Shuttle program and the 21st for Atlantis. The landing was the 51st at KSC, the 22nd consecutive landing at KSC, the 14th nighttime landing in Shuttle history and the 29th in the last 30 Shuttle flights.

  7. Influence of headspace composition on product diversity by sulphate reducing bacteria biocathode.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Mohita; Varanasi, Jhansi L; Jain, Pratiksha; Dureja, Prem; Lal, Banwari; Dominguez-Benetton, Xochitl; Pant, Deepak; Sarma, Priyangshu M

    2014-08-01

    Mixed culture of sulphate reducing bacteria named TERI-MS-003 was used for development of biocathode on activated carbon fabric fastened to stainless steel mesh for conversion of volatile fatty acids to reduced organic compounds under chronoamperometric conditions of -0.85V vs. Ag/AgCl (3.5M KCl). A range of chemicals were bioelectrosynthesized, however the gases present in headspace environment of the bioelectrochemical reactor governed the product profile. Succinate, ethanol, hydrogen, glycerol and propionate were observed to be the predominant products when the reactor was hermetically sealed. On the other hand, acetone, propionate, isopropanol, propanol, isobutyrate, isovalerate and heptanoate were the predominant products when the reactor was continuously sparged with nitrogen. This study highlights the importance of head space composition in order to manoeuvre the final product profile desired during a microbial electro-synthesis operation and the need for simultaneously developing effective separation and recovery strategies from an economical and practical standpoint. PMID:24726774

  8. It's not about energy--it's about power!

    PubMed

    Blanton, Teri

    2014-01-01

    Teri Blanton is a former chairperson and current fellow at Kentuckians for the Commonwealth, a statewide organization that works "for a new balance of power and a just society aimed at changing unfair political, economic, and social systems." In March 2014 she was a keynote speaker addressing the annual conference of the Toxics Action Center in Boston, Massachusetts. We are publishing her speech, presented to the many environmental activists from community- and labor-based organizations that work on state and regional concerns. Ms. Blanton energized the conference with her message of persistent organizing to attain justice against the threats posed to our communities, health, and environment by powerful forces who exploit our lives and labor for their profit and power. She calls upon us to build the power to make the transition to more sustainable and democratic human development. PMID:25085832

  9. Report on marine mammal stranding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Mohi

    2006-06-01

    The U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) released a report on 27 April indicating that U.S. Navy sonar transmissions may have played a role in the stranding of more than 150 melon-headed whales on 3 July 2004 off the coast of Kauai, Hawaii. At the time of the stranding, which resulted in one whale death, the Navy was preparing to conduct sonar activities as part of a military exercise. The report notes that six naval surface vessels transiting to the area on the previous night intermittenly transmitted mid-frequency active sonar. That activity is ``a plausible, if not likely, contributing factor'' to the stranding event. There was no significant weather, natural oceanographic event, or known biological factors that would explain the animals' movement into the bay nor the group's continued presence in the bay, according to report lead author Teri Rowles, NOAA marine mammal veterinarian.

  10. Evolutionary Selection on Barrier Activity: Bar1 Is an Aspartyl Protease with Novel Substrate Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Stephen K.; Clarke, Starlynn C.; Craik, Charles S.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Peptide-based pheromones are used throughout the fungal kingdom for coordinating sexual responses between mating partners. Here, we address the properties and function of Bar1, an aspartyl protease that acts as a “barrier” and antagonist to pheromone signaling in multiple species. Candida albicans Bar1 was purified and shown to exhibit preferential cleavage of native α pheromone over pheromones from related fungal species. This result establishes that protease substrate specificity coevolved along with changes in its pheromone target. Pheromone cleavage by Bar1 occurred between residues Thr-5 and Asn-6 in the middle of the tridecapeptide sequence. Surprisingly, proteolytic activity was independent of the amino acid residues present at the scissile bond and instead relied on residues at the C terminus of α pheromone. Unlike most aspartyl proteases, Bar1 also exhibited a near-neutral pH optimum and was resistant to the class-wide inhibitor pepstatin A. In addition, genetic analysis was performed on C. albicans BAR1 and demonstrated that the protease not only regulates endogenous pheromone signaling but also can limit interspecies pheromone signaling. We discuss these findings and propose that the unusual substrate specificity of Bar1 is a consequence of its coevolution with the α pheromone receptor Ste2 for their shared peptide target. PMID:26604258

  11. Coomassie Brilliant Blue removal/disposal from gel destain and used gel stain in an environment-friendly manner.

    PubMed

    Kurien, Biji T; Dorri, Yaser

    2012-01-01

    Toxic reagents are employed to destain Coomassie Brilliant Blue (CBB) stained gels. We tested the efficacy of various paper adsorbents in adsorbing CBB released from gels during destaining. Kimwipes were the most efficient, followed by Teri towels, multifold towels, and Whatman (numbers 1 and 3) filter papers. Three Kimwipes added during destaining of a CBB-stained mini-gel helped adsorb the released dye. Thus, stain removal with Kimwipes helps reduce destain use and organic waste accumulation, enables recycling of nonradioactive destaining solution, and is 7.5-fold cheaper than an available method for CBB disposal. Next, we used Kimwipes to deplete the dye from a used CBB staining solution awaiting proper disposal by our Institutional Safety Office. Seventy-five Kimwipes successfully helped remove the dye from a 0.05% CBB staining solution in 5 to 10 min. The blue-colored Kimwipes did not release the stain even when squeezed dry after incubation in various salts, water, or acid solutions for five weeks. The CBB removed thus can be simply disposed as solid waste and will not leach out from solid landfills. Kimwipes, thus, enables CBB disposal in an environmentally friendly manner and allows recycling of destaining solution.

  12. Endoscopic therapy for weight loss: Gastroplasty, duodenal sleeves, intragastric balloons, and aspiration

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Nitin

    2015-01-01

    A new paradigm in the treatment of obesity and metabolic disease is developing. The global obesity epidemic continues to expand despite the availability of diet and lifestyle counseling, pharmacologic therapy, and weight loss surgery. Endoscopic procedures have the potential to bridge the gap between medical therapy and surgery. Current primary endoscopic bariatric therapies can be classified as restrictive, bypass, space-occupying, or aspiration therapy. Restrictive procedures include the USGI Primary Obesity Surgery Endolumenal procedure, endoscopic sleeve gastroplasty using Apollo OverStitch, TransOral GAstroplasty, gastric volume reduction using the ACE stapler, and insertion of the TERIS restrictive device. Intestinal bypass has been reported using the EndoBarrier duodenal-jejunal bypass liner. A number of space-occupying devices have been studied or are in use, including intragastric balloons (Orbera, Reshape Duo, Heliosphere BAG, Obalon), Transpyloric Shuttle, and SatiSphere. The AspireAssist aspiration system has demonstrated efficacy. Finally, endoscopic revision of gastric bypass to address weight regain has been studied using Apollo OverStitch, the USGI Incisionless Operating Platform Revision Obesity Surgery Endolumenal procedure, Stomaphyx, and endoscopic sclerotherapy. Endoscopic therapies for weight loss are potentially reversible, repeatable, less invasive, and lower cost than various medical and surgical alternatives. Given the variety of devices under development, in clinical trials, and currently in use, patients will have multiple endoscopic options with greater efficacy than medical therapy, and with lower invasiveness and greater accessibility than surgery. PMID:26240686

  13. Endoscopic therapy for weight loss: Gastroplasty, duodenal sleeves, intragastric balloons, and aspiration.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Nitin

    2015-07-25

    A new paradigm in the treatment of obesity and metabolic disease is developing. The global obesity epidemic continues to expand despite the availability of diet and lifestyle counseling, pharmacologic therapy, and weight loss surgery. Endoscopic procedures have the potential to bridge the gap between medical therapy and surgery. Current primary endoscopic bariatric therapies can be classified as restrictive, bypass, space-occupying, or aspiration therapy. Restrictive procedures include the USGI Primary Obesity Surgery Endolumenal procedure, endoscopic sleeve gastroplasty using Apollo OverStitch, TransOral GAstroplasty, gastric volume reduction using the ACE stapler, and insertion of the TERIS restrictive device. Intestinal bypass has been reported using the EndoBarrier duodenal-jejunal bypass liner. A number of space-occupying devices have been studied or are in use, including intragastric balloons (Orbera, Reshape Duo, Heliosphere BAG, Obalon), Transpyloric Shuttle, and SatiSphere. The AspireAssist aspiration system has demonstrated efficacy. Finally, endoscopic revision of gastric bypass to address weight regain has been studied using Apollo OverStitch, the USGI Incisionless Operating Platform Revision Obesity Surgery Endolumenal procedure, Stomaphyx, and endoscopic sclerotherapy. Endoscopic therapies for weight loss are potentially reversible, repeatable, less invasive, and lower cost than various medical and surgical alternatives. Given the variety of devices under development, in clinical trials, and currently in use, patients will have multiple endoscopic options with greater efficacy than medical therapy, and with lower invasiveness and greater accessibility than surgery. PMID:26240686

  14. GLC analysis of Indian rapeseed-mustard to study the variability of fatty acid composition.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, N; Agnihotri, A

    2000-12-01

    Rapeseed-mustard is one of the most economically important oilseed crops in India. Speciality oils having high amounts of a specific fatty acid are of immense importance for both nutritional and industrial purposes. Oil high in oleic acid has demand in commercial food-service applications due to a long shelf-life and cholesterol-reducing properties. Both linoleic and linolenic acids are essential fatty acids; however, less than 3% linolenic acid is preferred for oil stability. High erucic acid content is beneficial for the polymer industry, whereas low erucic acid is recommended for food purposes. Therefore, it is important to undertake systematic characterization of the available gene pool for its variable fatty acid profile to be utilized for specific purposes. In the present study the Indian rapeseed-mustard germplasm and some newly developed low-erucic-acid strains were analysed by GLC to study the fatty acid composition in these lines. The GLC analysis revealed that the rapeseed-mustard varieties being commonly grown in India are characterized by high erucic acid content (30-51%) in the oil with low levels of oleic acid (13-23%). However, from among the recently developed low-erucic-acid strains, several lines were identified with comparatively high oleic acid (60-70%), moderate to high linoleic acid (13-40%) and low linolenic acid (< 10%) contents. Work is in progress at TERI (New Delhi, India) to utilize these lines for development of strains with particular fatty acid compositions for specific purposes.

  15. Environmentally safe removal/disposal of Coomassie Brilliant Blue from gel destain and used gel stain.

    PubMed

    Dorri, Yaser; Kurien, Biji T

    2010-09-15

    Gel destaining following Coomassie Brilliant Blue (CBB) staining involves the use of toxic reagents. Here we demonstrate the efficacy of various paper adsorbents in adsorbing CBB. Kimwipes adsorbed the best, followed by Teri towels, multifold towels, and Whatman numbers 1 and 3 filter papers. Three Kimwipes completely adsorbed the dye released from a CBB-stained mini-gel. Nonradioactive destain solution can, therefore, be recycled for destaining CBB-stained gels. Stain removal with Kimwipes helps in reducing destain use and in reducing organic liquid waste, and it is 7.5-fold cheaper compared with an available method for CBB disposal. Following this, we determined the suitability of this procedure to remove the dye from a used CBB staining solution awaiting proper disposal by our Institutional Safety Office. The dye from a 0.05% CBB staining solution could be removed in 5 to 10 min using 75 Kimwipes. The CBB-adsorbed Kimwipes did not release the stain when squeezed dry even after incubation in various salts over 1week and in water for 5 weeks. The CBB removed allows its easy disposal as solid waste and will not leach out from solid landfills. Thus, stain removal with Kimwipes helps in disposing CBB in an environmentally friendly manner and allows recycling of destaining solution. PMID:20507825

  16. Coomassie Brilliant Blue removal/disposal from gel destain and used gel stain in an environment-friendly manner.

    PubMed

    Kurien, Biji T; Dorri, Yaser

    2012-01-01

    Toxic reagents are employed to destain Coomassie Brilliant Blue (CBB) stained gels. We tested the efficacy of various paper adsorbents in adsorbing CBB released from gels during destaining. Kimwipes were the most efficient, followed by Teri towels, multifold towels, and Whatman (numbers 1 and 3) filter papers. Three Kimwipes added during destaining of a CBB-stained mini-gel helped adsorb the released dye. Thus, stain removal with Kimwipes helps reduce destain use and organic waste accumulation, enables recycling of nonradioactive destaining solution, and is 7.5-fold cheaper than an available method for CBB disposal. Next, we used Kimwipes to deplete the dye from a used CBB staining solution awaiting proper disposal by our Institutional Safety Office. Seventy-five Kimwipes successfully helped remove the dye from a 0.05% CBB staining solution in 5 to 10 min. The blue-colored Kimwipes did not release the stain even when squeezed dry after incubation in various salts, water, or acid solutions for five weeks. The CBB removed thus can be simply disposed as solid waste and will not leach out from solid landfills. Kimwipes, thus, enables CBB disposal in an environmentally friendly manner and allows recycling of destaining solution. PMID:22585526

  17. [Measurement method of arterial shear stress of rats model based on ultrasonic particle imaging velocimetry].

    PubMed

    Xhu, Yiheng; Qian, Ming; Niu, Lili; Zheng, Hairong; Lu, Guangwen

    2014-12-01

    The development and progression of atherosclerosis and thrombosis are closely related to changes of hemodynamics parameters. Ultrasonic pulse wave Doppler technique is normally used for noninvasively blood flow imaging. However, this technique only provides one-dimensional velocity and depends on the angle between the ultrasound beam and the local velocity vector. In this study, ultrasonic particle image velocimetry method was used to assess whole field hemodynamic changes in normal blood vessels. By using the polynomial fitting method, we investigated the velocity gradient and assessed the shear in different blood flow velocity of 10 healthy rats. It was found that using four polynomial fitting could result in optimal measurement results. The results obtained by ultrasonic particle image velocimetry accorded with the results obtained using Doppler technique. The statistical average of cyclical vessel wall shear stress was positively related to the locational mean velocity. It is proven that ultrasonic particle image velocimetry method could be used to assess directly the real-time whole field hemodynamic changes in blood vessels and was non-invasively, and should be a good prosperous technique for monitoring complex blood flow in stenotic ar- teries.

  18. Pancreatic Polypeptide Is Recognized by Two Hydrophobic Domains of the Human Y4 Receptor Binding Pocket*

    PubMed Central

    Pedragosa-Badia, Xavier; Sliwoski, Gregory R.; Dong Nguyen, Elizabeth; Lindner, Diana; Stichel, Jan; Kaufmann, Kristian W.; Meiler, Jens; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G.

    2014-01-01

    Structural characterization of the human Y4 receptor (hY4R) interaction with human pancreatic polypeptide (hPP) is crucial, not only for understanding its biological function but also for testing treatment strategies for obesity that target this interaction. Here, the interaction of receptor mutants with pancreatic polypeptide analogs was studied through double-cycle mutagenesis. To guide mutagenesis and interpret results, a three-dimensional comparative model of the hY4R-hPP complex was constructed based on all available class A G protein-coupled receptor crystal structures and refined using experimental data. Our study reveals that residues of the hPP and the hY4R form a complex network consisting of ionic interactions, hydrophobic interactions, and hydrogen binding. Residues Tyr2.64, Asp2.68, Asn6.55, Asn7.32, and Phe7.35 of Y4R are found to be important in receptor activation by hPP. Specifically, Tyr2.64 interacts with Tyr27 of hPP through hydrophobic contacts. Asn7.32 is affected by modifications on position Arg33 of hPP, suggesting a hydrogen bond between these two residues. Likewise, we find that Phe7.35 is affected by modifications of hPP at positions 33 and 36, indicating interactions between these three amino acids. Taken together, we demonstrate that the top of transmembrane helix 2 (TM2) and the top of transmembrane helices 6 and 7 (TM6–TM7) form the core of the peptide binding pocket. These findings will contribute to the rational design of ligands that bind the receptor more effectively to produce an enhanced agonistic or antagonistic effect. PMID:24375409

  19. Nrf1 and Nrf2 positively and c-Fos and Fra1 negatively regulate the human antioxidant response element-mediated expression of NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase1 gene.

    PubMed

    Venugopal, R; Jaiswal, A K

    1996-12-10

    Twenty-four base pairs of the human antioxidant response element (hARE) are required for high basal transcription of the NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase1 (NQO1) gene and its induction in response to xenobiotics and antioxidants. hARE is a unique cis-element that contains one perfect and one imperfect AP1 element arranged as inverse repeats separated by 3 bp, followed by a "GC" box. We report here that Jun, Fos, Fra, and Nrf nuclear transcription factors bind to the hARE. Overexpression of cDNA derived combinations of the nuclear proteins Jun and Fos or Jun and Fra1 repressed hARE-mediated chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene expression in transfected human hepatoblastoma (Hep-G2) cells. Further experiments suggested that this repression was due to overexpression of c-Fos and Fra1, but not due to Jun proteins. The Jun (c-Jun, Jun-B, and Jun-D) proteins in all the possible combinations were more or less ineffective in repression or upregulation of hARE-mediated gene expression. Interestingly, overexpression of Nrf1 and Nrf2 individually in Hep-G2 and monkey kidney (COS1) cells significantly increased CAT gene expression from reporter plasmid hARE-thymidine kinase-CAT in transfected cells that were inducible by beta-naphthoflavone and teri-butyl hydroquinone. These results indicated that hARE-mediated expression of the NQO1 gene and its induction by xenobiotics and antioxidants are mediated by Nrf1 and Nrf2. The hARE-mediated basal expression, however, is repressed by overexpression of c-Fos and Fra1. PMID:8962164

  20. Immunosuppressive drugs and fertility.

    PubMed

    Leroy, Clara; Rigot, Jean-Marc; Leroy, Maryse; Decanter, Christine; Le Mapihan, Kristell; Parent, Anne-Sophie; Le Guillou, Anne-Claire; Yakoub-Agha, Ibrahim; Dharancy, Sébastien; Noel, Christian; Vantyghem, Marie-Christine

    2015-01-01

    Immunosuppressive drugs are used in the treatment of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, as well as in transplantation. Frequently prescribed in young people, these treatments may have deleterious effects on fertility, pregnancy outcomes and the unborn child. This review aims to summarize the main gonadal side effects of immunosuppressants, to detail the effects on fertility and pregnancy of each class of drug, and to provide recommendations on the management of patients who are seen prior to starting or who are already receiving immunosuppressive treatment, allowing them in due course to bear children. The recommendations for use are established with a rather low level of proof, which needs to be taken into account in the patient management. Methotrexate, mycophenolate, and le- and teri-flunomide, cyclophosphamide, mitoxanthrone are contraindicated if pregnancy is desired due to their teratogenic effects, as well as gonadotoxic effects in the case of cyclophosphamide. Anti-TNF-alpha and mTOR-inhibitors are to be used cautiously if pregnancy is desired, since experience using these drugs is still relatively scarce. Azathioprine, glucocorticoids, mesalazine, anticalcineurins such as cyclosporine and tacrolimus, ß-interferon, glatiramer-acetate and chloroquine can be used during pregnancy, bearing in mind however that side effects may still occur. Experience is limited concerning natalizumab, fingolimod, dimethyl-fumarate and induction treatments. Conclusion: At the time of prescription, patients must be informed of the possible consequences of immunosuppressants on fertility and of the need for contraception. Pregnancy must be planned and the treatment modified if necessary in a pre-conception time period adapted to the half-life of the drug, imperatively in relation with the prescriber of the immunosuppressive drugs. PMID:26490561

  1. Reorganization of terminator DNA upon binding replication terminator protein: implications for the functional replication fork arrest complex.

    PubMed

    Kralicek, A V; Wilson, P K; Ralston, G B; Wake, R G; King, G F

    1997-02-01

    Termination of DNA replication in Bacillus subtilis involves the polar arrest of replication forks by a specific complex formed between the replication terminator protein (RTP) and DNA terminator sites. While determination of the crystal structure of RTP has facilitated our understanding of how a single RTP dimer interacts with terminator DNA, additional information is required in order to understand the assembly of a functional fork arrest complex, which requires an interaction between two RTP dimers and the terminator site. In this study, we show that the conformation of the major B.subtilis DNA terminator,TerI, becomes considerably distorted upon binding RTP. Binding of the first dimer of RTP to the B site of TerI causes the DNA to become slightly unwound and bent by approximately 40 degrees. Binding of a second dimer of RTP to the A site causes the bend angle to increase to approximately 60 degrees . We have used this new data to construct two plausible models that might explain how the ternary terminator complex can block DNA replication in a polar manner. In the first model, polarity of action is a consequence of the two RTP-DNA half-sites having different conformations. These different conformations result from different RTP-DNA contacts at each half-site (due to the intrinsic asymmetry of the terminator DNA), as well as interactions (direct or indirect) between the RTP dimers on the DNA. In the second model, polar fork arrest activity is a consequence of the different affinities of RTP for the A and B sites of the terminator DNA, modulated significantly by direct or indirect interactions between the RTP dimers.

  2. LDEF (Postflight), S1001 : Low-Temperature Heat Pipe Experiment Package (HEPP) for LDEF, Tray H01

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The postflight photograph of the Low Tem perature Heat Pipe Package (HEPP) power tray was taken in the SAEF II at KSC after an all up system checkout with interfacing experiments and removal of the tray from the LDEF. An outline of the experiment tray clamp blocks is clearly visible in the light brown stain on the experiment tray flanges. The Low Temperature Heat Pipe Package (HEPP) experiment occupies two 12 inch deep LDEF experiment trays connected with an inter-tray wiring harness. The HEPP Power tray, an end cor ner tray, occupies a location on the space end of the LDEF in tray location H01 and the HEPP Experiment tray, a peripheral tray, is located in the LDEF tray location F12. The power tray (H01) consist of four solar array panels, one nickel-cadmium (NiCd) battery, a Power System Electronics (PSE) unit, protective thermal blankets that line the tray interior and a thirty seven pound baseplate mounted on thermal isolators to provide a thermally stable mounting for the bat tery and the PSE. Thirteen strips of thin film thermal control materials, part of an experiment by NASA GSFC that consist of sixty-five samples located at three different LDEF tray locations (H01, F09 and F12), were attached to the experiment tray flanges with Kapton tape. The experi ment was assembled and mounted in the experiment tray with non-magnetic stainless steel fasten ers. The experiment hardware appears to be intact with no apparent changes other than stains along outer edges of the solar arrays. The light brown stains observed along the upper edges of the solar array mounting plates and around the outer edge of the baseplate in the flight photograph are not apparent in the postflight photo. The atomic oxygen experiment thin film strips appear to be in place with no apparent damage. The Kapton tape appears to be firmly adhered to the tray flanges in all thirteen locations.

  3. Immunosuppressive drugs and fertility.

    PubMed

    Leroy, Clara; Rigot, Jean-Marc; Leroy, Maryse; Decanter, Christine; Le Mapihan, Kristell; Parent, Anne-Sophie; Le Guillou, Anne-Claire; Yakoub-Agha, Ibrahim; Dharancy, Sébastien; Noel, Christian; Vantyghem, Marie-Christine

    2015-01-01

    Immunosuppressive drugs are used in the treatment of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, as well as in transplantation. Frequently prescribed in young people, these treatments may have deleterious effects on fertility, pregnancy outcomes and the unborn child. This review aims to summarize the main gonadal side effects of immunosuppressants, to detail the effects on fertility and pregnancy of each class of drug, and to provide recommendations on the management of patients who are seen prior to starting or who are already receiving immunosuppressive treatment, allowing them in due course to bear children. The recommendations for use are established with a rather low level of proof, which needs to be taken into account in the patient management. Methotrexate, mycophenolate, and le- and teri-flunomide, cyclophosphamide, mitoxanthrone are contraindicated if pregnancy is desired due to their teratogenic effects, as well as gonadotoxic effects in the case of cyclophosphamide. Anti-TNF-alpha and mTOR-inhibitors are to be used cautiously if pregnancy is desired, since experience using these drugs is still relatively scarce. Azathioprine, glucocorticoids, mesalazine, anticalcineurins such as cyclosporine and tacrolimus, ß-interferon, glatiramer-acetate and chloroquine can be used during pregnancy, bearing in mind however that side effects may still occur. Experience is limited concerning natalizumab, fingolimod, dimethyl-fumarate and induction treatments. Conclusion: At the time of prescription, patients must be informed of the possible consequences of immunosuppressants on fertility and of the need for contraception. Pregnancy must be planned and the treatment modified if necessary in a pre-conception time period adapted to the half-life of the drug, imperatively in relation with the prescriber of the immunosuppressive drugs.

  4. Prophylaxis and Treatment of Anthrax in Pregnant Women: A Systematic Review of Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Meaney-Delman, Dana; Rasmussen, Sonja A.; Beigi, Richard H.; Zotti, Marianne E.; Hutchings, Yalonda; Bower, William A.; Treadwell, Tracee A.; Jamieson, Denise J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To review the safety and pharmacokinetics of antibiotics recommended for anthrax post-exposure prophylaxis and treatment in pregnant women. Data Sources Articles were identified in the PUBMED database from inception through December 2012 by searching the keywords ([“pregnancy]” and [generic antibiotic name]). Additionally, hand searches of references from REPROTOX, TERIS, review articles and Briggs’ Drugs in Pregnancy and Lactation were performed. Methods of Study Selection Articles included in the review contain primary data related to the safety and pharmacokinetics among pregnant women of five antibiotics recommended for anthrax post-exposure prophylaxis and treatment (ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, moxifloxacin, doxycycline, amoxicillin), and of nine additional antibiotics recommended as part of the treatment regimen (penicillin, ampicillin, linezolid, clindamycin, meropenem, doripenem, rifampin, chloramphenicol, or vancomycin). Tabulation, Integration and Results The PUBMED search identified 3850 articles for review. Reference hand searching yielded nine additional articles. In total, 112 articles met the inclusion criteria. Conclusions Overall, safety and pharmacokinetic information is limited for these antibiotics. Although small increases in risks for certain anomalies have been observed with some antibiotics recommended for prophylaxis and treatment of anthrax, the absolute risk of these antibiotics appears low. Given the high morbidity and mortality associated with anthrax, antibiotics should be dosed appropriately to ensure that antibiotic levels can be achieved and sustained. Dosing adjustments may be necessary for the beta lactam antibiotics and the fluoroquinolones to achieve therapeutic levels in pregnant women. Data indicate that the beta lactam antibiotics, the fluoroquinolones, and, to a lesser extent, clindamycin enter the fetal compartment, an important consideration in the treatment of anthrax, as these antibiotics may provide

  5. Differential Management of the Replication Terminus Regions of the Two Vibrio cholerae Chromosomes during Cell Division

    PubMed Central

    Demarre, Gaëlle; Galli, Elisa; Muresan, Leila; Paly, Evelyne; David, Ariane; Possoz, Christophe; Barre, François-Xavier

    2014-01-01

    The replication terminus region (Ter) of the unique chromosome of most bacteria locates at mid-cell at the time of cell division. In several species, this localization participates in the necessary coordination between chromosome segregation and cell division, notably for the selection of the division site, the licensing of the division machinery assembly and the correct alignment of chromosome dimer resolution sites. The genome of Vibrio cholerae, the agent of the deadly human disease cholera, is divided into two chromosomes, chrI and chrII. Previous fluorescent microscopy observations suggested that although the Ter regions of chrI and chrII replicate at the same time, chrII sister termini separated before cell division whereas chrI sister termini were maintained together at mid-cell, which raised questions on the management of the two chromosomes during cell division. Here, we simultaneously visualized the location of the dimer resolution locus of each of the two chromosomes. Our results confirm the late and early separation of chrI and chrII Ter sisters, respectively. They further suggest that the MatP/matS macrodomain organization system specifically delays chrI Ter sister separation. However, TerI loci remain in the vicinity of the cell centre in the absence of MatP and a genetic assay specifically designed to monitor the relative frequency of sister chromatid contacts during constriction suggest that they keep colliding together until the very end of cell division. In contrast, we found that even though it is not able to impede the separation of chrII Ter sisters before septation, the MatP/matS macrodomain organization system restricts their movement within the cell and permits their frequent interaction during septum constriction. PMID:25255436

  6. Benzimidazole derivatives. 3. 3D-QSAR/CoMFA model and computational simulation for the recognition of 5-HT(4) receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    López-Rodríguez, María L; Murcia, Marta; Benhamú, Bellinda; Viso, Alma; Campillo, Mercedes; Pardo, Leonardo

    2002-10-24

    A three-dimensional quantitative structure-affinity relationship study (3D-QSAR), using the comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) method, and subsequent computational simulation of ligand recognition have been successfully applied to explain the binding affinities for the 5-HT(4) receptor (5-HT(4)R) of a series of benzimidazole-4-carboxamides and carboxylates derivatives 1-24. The K(i) values of these compounds are in the range from 0.11 to 10 000 nM. The derived 3D-QSAR model shows high predictive ability (q(2) = 0.789 and r(2) = 0.997). Steric (contribution of 43.5%) and electrostatic (50.3%) fields and solvation energy (6.1%) of this novel class of 5-HT(4)R antagonists are relevant descriptors for structure-activity relationships. Computational simulation of the complexes between the benzimidazole-4-carboxamide UCM-21195 (5) and the carboxylate UCM-26995 (21) and a 3D model of the transmembrane domain of the 5-HT(4)R, constructed using the reported crystal structure of rhodopsin, have allowed us to define the molecular details of the ligand-receptor interaction that includes (i) the ionic interaction between the NH group of the protonated piperidine of the ligand and the carboxylate group of Asp(3.32), (ii) the hydrogen bond between the carbonyl oxygen of the ligand and the hydroxyl group of Ser(5.43), (iii) the hydrogen bond between the NH group of Asn(6.55) and the aromatic ring of carboxamides or the ether oxygen of carboxylates, (iv) the interaction of the electron-rich clouds of the aromatic ring of Phe(6.51) and the electron-poor hydrogens of the carbon atoms adjacent to the protonated piperidine nitrogen of the ligand, and (v) the pi-sigma stacking interaction between the benzimidazole system of the ligand and the benzene ring of Tyr(5.38). Moreover, the noticeable increase in potency at the 5-HT(4)R sites, by the introduction of a chloro or bromo atom at the 6-position of the aromatic ring, is attributed to the additional electrostatic and van der

  7. GRAIL Gravity Observations of Lunar Volcanic Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiefer, W. S.; Zuber, M. T.; McGovern, P. J.; Head, J. W.

    2012-12-01

    Gravity observations by NASA's GRAIL mission are providing important new insights into the volcanic plumbing associated with major volcanic complexes on the Moon. The Marius Hills are the Moon's largest volcanic dome field, consisting of more than 250 basaltic domes and cones and 20 sinuous rilles. There are two distinct free-air gravity anomalies, with the larger anomaly (260 mGal) occurring close to the maximum concentration of volcanic domes in the northern part of the field. Much of the gravity anomaly in this area is due to buried, high density material, mapping out a sill complex with a spatial scale of 200 by 250 kilometers. For plausible choices of density contrast, the sill is more than 2 km thick in the north and 4 km thick in the south. The Aristarchus Plateau is the source for the Moon's largest pyroclastic eruption and numerous sinuous rilles. Most of the gravity anomaly on the plateau itself has relatively low amplitude (< 60 mGal) and is likely due to isostatic or flexurally supported topography. There is a significant gravity high (160 mGal) associated with the Cobra Head, which is the source region for Vallis Schröteri, the largest rille in the Aristarchus Plateau. Regions of high free-air gravity also occur in the plains wrapping around the south and east sides of the plateau and in the adjacent Harbinger Mountains/Prinz Crater volcanic field (150 mGal). These gravity highs are all likely due to buried, high density material, plausibly in the form of volcanic intrusions. The Cauchy volcanic dome complex in eastern Mare Tranquillitatis is a regional topographic high about 400 km across but a free-air gravity low (-90 mGal). Similarly, the Hortensius/Tobias Mayer volcanic field in Mare Insularum is also a free-air gravity low (-80 mGal) in its center. In both cases, this implies the presence of low density material at depth, possibly due to thicker than normal crust. The Rümker Hills in northern Oceanus Procellarum is a small basaltic dome complex

  8. Realities of weather extremes on daily life in urban India - How quantified impacts infer sensible adaptation options

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reckien, D.

    2012-12-01

    when resources are scarce. 1 Parry ML, Canziani OF, Palutikof JP, van der Linden PJ, Hanson CE (eds) (2007) Contribution of Working Group II to the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge New York. 2 TERI (2007) Adaptation to Climate Change in the context of Sustainable Development. Background Paper to the conference ''Climate Change and Sustainable Development: An international workshop to strengthen research and understanding'', 7-8 April 2006, The Energy and Resources Institute, New Delhi.

  9. LDEF (Postflight), S1001 : Low-Temperature Heat Pipe Experiment Package (HEPP) for LDEF, Tray H01

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Postflight), S1001 : Low-Temperature Heat Pipe Experiment Package (HEPP) for LDEF, Tray H01 The post landing photograph of the Low Tempera ture Heat Pipe Package (HEPP) experiment was taken from the Orbiter's cargo bay access hatch during post landing operations to prepare the Orbiter for the ferry flight from the Dryden Flight Research Center to the Kennedy Space Center. The white paint dots on the center clamp blocks of the experiment trays right flange and upperer flange appear to be discolored. The discoloration diminishes as as the distance from the vent area of the thermal shields increases. The right and upper tray flanges also appear to be discolored. Finger prints are visible on the thermal panels in the vicinity of the panel mounting fasteners. The Low Temperature Heat Pipe Package (HEPP) experiment occupies two 12 inch deep LDEF experiment trays connected with an inter-tray wiring harness. The HEPP Power tray, an end cor ner tray, occupies a location on the space end of the LDEF in tray location H01 and the HEPP Experiment tray, a peripheral tray, is located in the LDEF tray location F12. The power tray (H01) consist of four solar array panels, one nickel-cadmium (NiCd) battery, a Power System Electronics (PSE) unit, protective thermal blankets that line the tray interior and a thirty seven pound baseplate mounted on thermal isolators to provide a thermally stable mounting for the bat tery and the PSE.. Thirteen strips of thin film thermal control materials, part of an experiment by NASA GSFC that consist of sixty-five samples located at three different LDEF tray locations (H01, F09 and F12), were attached to the experiment tray flanges with Kapton tape. The experi ment was assembled and mounted in the experiment tray with non-magnetic stainless steel fasten ers. The experiment hardware appears to be intact with no apparent changes other than stains along outer edges of the solar arrays. Light brown stains are visible along the upper edges of the

  10. LDEF (Flight), S1001 : Low-Temperature Heat Pipe Experiment Package (HEPP) for LDEF, Tray H01

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The flight photograph of the Low Temperature Heat Pipe Package (HEPP) experiment was taken while the LDEF was attached to the Orbiter's RMS arm prior to berthing in the Orbiter's cargo bay. The white paint dots on the center clamp blocks of the experiment trays right flange and lower flange appear to be discolored. The discolor ation diminishes as as the distance from the vent area of the thermal shields increases. The right and lower tray flanges also appear to be discolored. Finger prints are visible on the thermal panels in the vicinity of the panel mounting fasteners. The Low Temperature Heat Pipe Package (HEPP) experiment occupies two 12 inch deep LDEF experiment trays connected with an inter-tray wiring harness. The HEPP Power tray, an end cor ner tray, occupies a location on the space end of the LDEF in tray location H01 and the HEPP Experiment tray, a peripheral tray, is located in the LDEF tray location F12. The power tray (H01) consist of four solar array panels, one nickel-cadmium (NiCd) battery, a Power System Electronics (PSE) unit, protective thermal blankets that line the tray interior and a thirty seven pound baseplate mounted on thermal isolators to provide a thermally stable mounting for the bat tery and the PSE. Thirteen strips of thin film thermal control materials, part of an experiment by NASA GSFC that consist of sixty-five samples located at three different LDEF tray locations (H01, F09 and F12), were attached to the experiment tray flanges with Kapton tape. The experi ment was assembled and mounted in the experiment tray with non-magnetic stainless steel fasten ers. The experiment hardware appears to be intact with no apparent changes other than stains along outer edges of the solar arrays. Light brown stains are visible along the upper edges of the solar array mounting plates with faint traces of a lighter colored stain around the outer edge of the base plate. The atomic oxygen experiment thin film strips appear to be in place with no

  11. Source quantification of size and season resolved aerosols in a semi-urban area of Indo-Gangetic plain, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooda, R. K.; Hyvärinen, A.; Gilardoni, S.; Sharma, V.; Vestenius, M.; Kerminen, V.; Vignati, E.; Kulmala, M. T.; Lihavainen, H.

    2012-12-01

    This study describes a one year measurements of size-segregated aerosols at a semi-urban site in Indo-Gangetic plain (IGP), India, South Asia with focus on source quantification applied to organic and inorganic chemical species data using Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF), trajectory analysis and conditional probability function (CPF) methods. The campaign was planned in the framework of the European Integrated project on Aerosol Cloud Climate and Air Quality interactions (EUCAARI) project. In light of the above, Finnish Meteorological Institute (FMI), The Energy and Resources Institute (TERI) and Joint Research Centre (JRC) conducted aerosol mass measurements in Gual Pahari, India from April 2008 to March 2009. The average mass concentrations of fine (PM2.5) and coarse (PM2.5-10) aerosols are higher during the postmonsoon (October-November) and winter (December- February) compared to that during the summer season (March-May). Fine and coarse fraction concentrations observed are higher during the post-monsoon & winter months due to low and stable boundary layer. Concentrations decrease in March-June due to increasing temperatures and a higher boundary layer. The lowest concentrations are during the rainy months (June to August/Sept) due to wet removal. OC and EC fraction is higher in PM2.5. EC in in PM2.5 is 9%, and in PM2.5-10 size EC is 2%. OC contribution is about 36% of fine aerosol mass. High OC could be attributed to enhanced combustion sources and the meteorological conditions during winter period. High OC to EC ratio during postmonsoon and winter also supports higher secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation in these seasons. Secondary organic carbon (SOC) calculated is 42% of the annual average of total OC in coarse fraction. SOC to total OC is highest in postmonsoon (53%), winter (34%) and followed by 29% in summer and monsoon seasons. 24-hr speciated fine and coarse aerosols annual data was used for source identification and quantification studies with

  12. Stress field modelling from digital geological map data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, Gáspár; Barancsuk, Ádám; Szentpéteri, Krisztián

    2016-04-01

    calculated from the fracture criterion. The calculation includes the gravitational acceleration, the average density of rocks and the experimental 60 degree of the fracture angle from the normal of the fault plane. This way, the stress tensors are calculated as absolute pressure values per square meters on both sides of the faults. If the stress from the overburden is greater than 1 bar (i.e. the faults are buried), a confined compression would be present. Modelling this state of stress may result a confusing pattern of vectors, because in a confined position the horizontal stress vectors may point towards structures primarily associated with extension. To step over this, and to highlight the variability in the stress-field, the model calculates the vectors directly from the differential stress (practically subtracting the minimum principal stress from the critical stress). The result of the modelling is a vector map, which theoretically represents the minimum tectonic pressure in the moment, when the rock body breaks from an initial state. This map - together with the original fault-map - is suitable for determining those areas where unrevealed tectonic, sedimentary and lithological structures are possibly present (e.g. faults, sub-basins and intrusions). With modelling different deformational phases on the same area, change of the stress vectors can be detected which reveals not only the varying directions of the principal stresses, but the tectonic-driven sedimentation patterns too. The decrease of necessary critical stress in the case of a possible reactivation of a fault in subsequent deformation phase can be managed with the down-ranking of the concerning structural elements. Reference: Albert G., Ungvári ZS., Szentpéteri K. 2014: Modeling the present day stress field of the Pannonian Basin from neotectonic maps - In: Beqiraj A, Ionescu C, Christofides G, Uta A, Beqiraj Goga E, Marku S (eds.) Proceedings XX Congress of the Carpathian-Balkan Geological Association

  13. Journal abstracts from current research in the field of child and adolescent mental health.

    PubMed

    2009-12-01

    Debate RD, Kelley PG, Zwald M, Huberty J & Zhang Y (2009) Changes in psychosocial factors and physical activity frequency among third- to eighth-grade girls who participated in a developmentally focused youth sport program: A preliminary study. Journal of School Health 79(10): 474-484 Boyce JC, Mueller NB, Hogan-Watts M & Luke Douglas A (2009) Evaluating the strength of school tobacco policies: The development of a practical rating system. Journal of School Health 79(10): 495-504 Craine JL, Tanaka Teri A, Nishina A & Conger KJ (2009) Understanding adolescent delinquency: The role of older siblings' delinquency and popularity with peers. Merrill-Palmer Quarterly 55(4): 436-453 Rosales FJ, Reznick JS & Zeisel SH (2009) Understanding the role of nutrition in the rain and behavioural development of toddlers and pre-school children: Identifying methodological barriers. Nutritional Neuroscience 12(5): 190-202 Clemmens DA (2009) The Significance of motherhood for adolescents whose mothers have breast cancer. Oncology Nursing Forum 36(5): 571-577 Archambault I, Janosz M, Morizot J & Pagani L (2009) Adolescent behavioural, affective, and cognitive engagement in school: Relationship to dropout. Journal of School Health 79(9): 408-415 Denison JA, McCauley AP, Dunnett-Dagg WA, Lungu N & Sweat MD (2009) HIV testing among adolescents in Ndola, Zambia: How individual, relational, and environmental factors relate to demand. AIDS Education & Prevention 21(4): 314-324 Pollock JA & Halkitis PN (2009) Environmental factors in relation to unprotected sexual behaviour among gay, bisexual and other MSM. AIDS Education & Prevention 21(4): 340-355 Nippold MA, Mansfield TC, Billow JL & Tomblin JB (2009) Syntactic development in adolescents with a history of language impairments: A follow-up investigation. American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology 18(3): 241-251 Sharaf AY, Thompson EA & Walsh E (2009) Protective effects of self-esteem and family support on suicide risk behaviours among

  14. Genetic toxicities of human teratogens.

    PubMed

    Bishop, J B; Witt, K L; Sloane, R A

    1997-12-12

    Birth defects cause a myriad of societal problems and place tremendous anguish on the affected individual and his or her family. Current estimates categorize about 3% of all newborn infants as having some form of birth defect or congenital anomaly. As more precise means of detecting subtle anomalies become available this estimate, no doubt, will increase. Even though birth defects have been observed in newborns throughout history, our knowledge about the causes and mechanisms through which these defects are manifested is limited. For example, it has been estimated that around 20% of all birth defects are due to gene mutations, 5-10% to chromosomal abnormalities, and another 5-10% to exposure to a known teratogenic agent or maternal factor [D.A. Beckman, R.L. Brent, Mechanisms of teratogenesis. Ann. Rev. Pharmacol. Toxicol. 24 (1984) 483-500; K. Nelson, L.B. Holmes Malformations due to presumed spontaneous mutations in newborn infants, N. Engl. J. Med. 320 (1989) 19-23.]. Together, these percentages account for only 30-40%, leaving the etiology of more than half of all human birth defects unexplained. It has been speculated that environmental factors account for no more than one-tenth of all congenital anomalies [D.A. Beckman, R.L. Brent, Mechanisms of teratogenesis, Ann. Rev. Pharmacol. Toxicol. 24 (1984) 483-500]. Furthermore, since there is no evidence in humans that the exposure of an individual to any mutagen measurably increases the risk of congenital anomalies in his or her offspring' [J.F. Crow, C. Denniston, Mutation in human populations, Adv. Human Genet. 14 (1985) 59-121; J.M. Friedman, J.E. Polifka, Teratogenic Effects of Drugs: A Resource for Clinicians (TERIS). The John Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, 1994], the mutagenic activity of environmental agents and drugs as a factor in teratogenesis has been given very little attention. Epigenetic activity has also been given only limited consideration as a mechanism for teratogenesis. As new molecular

  15. New developments at Hunveyor and Husar space probe model constructions in Hungarian Universities and Colleges: status report of 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegzi, S.; Bérczi, Sz.; Hudoba, Gy.; Magyar, I.; Lang, A.; Istenes, Z.; Weidinger, T.; Tepliczky, I.; Varga, T.; Hargitai, H.

    2008-09-01

    Society developed the last Hunveyor system. It was a meteorological station with 14 measurements. It represents a halfway Hunveyor, because of the building together of the instruments can be studied in this system. It was transported by the Crew 71 to the MDRS and two weeks of measurements were carried out in Utah, during 2008 April (with Husar-2d field work, too). Summary Several new developments of the Hunveyor-Husar university robot system were shown to mark the intensity of interest of students to the preparations to the field work research in planetary geology by building robotics and use them in field works. References: [1] Hargitai, H. (2004): 35th LPSC, #1078. LPI, Houston; [2] Bérczi, Sz.; Fabriczy, A.; Hargitai, H.; Hegyi, S.; Illés, E.; Kabai, S.; Kovács, Zs.; Kereszturi, A.; Opitz, A.; Sik, A.; 34th LPSC, #1305. LPI, Houston; [3] Bérczi Sz. Hargitai H., Kereszturi Á., Sik A. (2001, 2005): [4] Roskó, F.; Diósy, T.; Bérczi, Sz.; Fabriczy, A.; Cech, V.; Hegyi, S. (2000): 31st LPSC, #1572. LPI, Houston; [5] Bérczi Sz., Hegyi S., Kovács Zs., Fabriczy A., Földi T., Keresztesi M., Cech V., Drommer B., Gránicz K., Hevesi L., Borbola T., Tóth Sz., Németh I., Horváth Cs., Diósy T., Kovács B., Bordás F., Köllõ Z., Roskó F., Balogh Zs., Koris A., Imrek Gy. (2001, 2002): [6] Bérczi, Sz.; Diósy, T.; Tóth, Sz.; Hegyi, S.; Imrek, Gy.; Kovács, Zs.; Cech, V.; Müller-Bodó, E.; Roskó, F.; Szentpétery, L.; Hudoba, Gy. (2002): 33rd LPSC, #1496. LPI, Houston; [7] Hudoba, Gy.; Kovács, Zs. I.; Pintér, A.; Földi, T.; Hegyi, S.; Tóth, Sz.; Roskó, F.; Bérczi, Sz. (2004): 35th LPSC, #1572. LPI, Houston; [8] Gimesi, L.; Béres, Cs. Z.; Bérczi, Sz.; Hegyi, S.; Cech, V. (2004): 35th LPSC, #1140; [9] Hegyi, S.; Drommer, B.; Hegyi, A.; Biró, T.; Kókány, A.; Hudoba, Gy.; Bérczi, Sz. (2006): 37th LPSC, #1136. LPI, Houston; [10] Bérczi, Sz.; Gál-Sólymos, K.; Gucsik, A.; Hargitai, H.; Józsa, S.; Szakmány, Gy.; Kubovics, I.; Puskás, Z. (2006): 37th LPSC