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Sample records for digestibilidade intestinal verdadeira

  1. Intestine.

    PubMed

    Smith, J M; Skeans, M A; Horslen, S P; Edwards, E B; Harper, A M; Snyder, J J; Israni, A K; Kasiske, B L

    2016-01-01

    Intestine and intestine-liver transplant plays an important role in the treatment of intestinal failure, despite decreased morbidity associated with parenteral nutrition. In 2014, 210 new patients were added to the intestine transplant waiting list. Among prevalent patients on the list at the end of 2014, 65% were waiting for an intestine transplant and 35% were waiting for an intestine-liver transplant. The pretransplant mortality rate decreased dramatically over time for all age groups. Pretransplant mortality was highest for adult candidates, at 22.1 per 100 waitlist years compared with less than 3 per 100 waitlist years for pediatric candidates, and notably higher for candidates for intestine-liver transplant than for candidates for intestine transplant without a liver. Numbers of intestine transplants without a liver increased from a low of 51 in 2013 to 67 in 2014. Intestine-liver transplants increased from a low of 44 in 2012 to 72 in 2014. Short-gut syndrome (congenital and other) was the main cause of disease leading to both intestine and intestine-liver transplant. Graft survival improved over the past decade. Patient survival was lowest for adult intestine-liver recipients and highest for pediatric intestine recipients. © Copyright 2015 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  2. Intestine Transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... Heart/Lung Kidney Pancreas Kidney/Pancreas Liver Intestine Intestine Transplant Although it is possible for a living donor to donate an intestine segment, most intestine transplants involve a whole organ ...

  3. Intestinal Obstruction

    MedlinePlus

    An intestinal obstruction occurs when food or stool cannot move through the intestines. The obstruction can be complete or partial. ... abdomen Inability to pass gas Constipation A complete intestinal obstruction is a medical emergency. It often requires surgery. ...

  4. Intestinal obstruction

    MedlinePlus

    Paralytic ileus; Intestinal volvulus; Bowel obstruction; Ileus; Pseudo-obstruction - intestinal; Colonic ileus ... objects that are swallowed and block the intestines) Gallstones (rare) Hernias Impacted stool Intussusception (telescoping of 1 ...

  5. Intestinal leiomyoma

    MedlinePlus

    Leiomyoma - intestine ... McLaughlin P, Maher MM. The duodenum and small intestine. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH, Schaefer- ... Roline CE, Reardon RF. Disorders of the small intestine. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, et ...

  6. Intestinal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... connects your stomach to your large intestine. Intestinal cancer is rare, but eating a high-fat diet ... increase your risk. Possible signs of small intestine cancer include Abdominal pain Weight loss for no reason ...

  7. Small intestinal ischemia and infarction

    MedlinePlus

    Intestinal necrosis; Ischemic bowel - small intestine; Dead bowel - small intestine; Dead gut - small intestine; Infarcted bowel - small intestine; Atherosclerosis - small intestine; Hardening of the arteries - small intestine

  8. Intestinal Obstruction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Wall Hernias Inguinal Hernia Acute Mesenteric Ischemia Appendicitis Ileus Intestinal Obstruction Ischemic Colitis Perforation of the Digestive ... Wall Hernias Inguinal Hernia Acute Mesenteric Ischemia Appendicitis Ileus Intestinal Obstruction Ischemic Colitis Perforation of the Digestive ...

  9. Intestinal Surgery.

    PubMed

    Desrochers, André; Anderson, David E

    2016-11-01

    A wide variety of disorders affecting the intestinal tract in cattle may require surgery. Among those disorders the more common are: intestinal volvulus, jejunal hemorrhage syndrome and more recently the duodenal sigmoid flexure volvulus. Although general principles of intestinal surgery can be applied, cattle has anatomical and behavior particularities that must be known before invading the abdomen. This article focuses on surgical techniques used to optimize outcomes and discusses specific disorders of small intestine. Diagnoses and surgical techniques presented can be applied in field conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Intestinal Parasitoses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lagardere, Bernard; Dumburgier, Elisabeth

    1994-01-01

    Intestinal parasites have become a serious public health problem in tropical countries because of the climate and the difficulty of achieving efficient hygiene. The objectives of this journal issue are to increase awareness of the individual and collective repercussions of intestinal parasites, describe the current conditions of contamination and…

  11. Intestinal Ischemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... and hormone medications, such as estrogen Cocaine or methamphetamine use Vigorous exercise, such as long-distance running ... anti-phospholipid syndrome. Illegal drug use. Cocaine and methamphetamine use have been linked to intestinal ischemia. Complications ...

  12. Intestinal Capillariasis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-01

    bhIll inenais, the tiny nematode causing Intestinal capillariasis In humans, Is a Iunique parasite. It is one of the newest parasites that has been...Capillariaphilippinensis, the tiny nematode causing intestinal capillariasis in humans, is a unique parasite. It is one of the newest parasites that has been shown to...stichocytes surrounding the oesophagus. The posterior half of the nematode is wider than the anterior half and contains the digestive tract and the

  13. INTESTINAL CAPILLARIES

    PubMed Central

    Clementi, Francesco; Palade, George E.

    1969-01-01

    Perfusion of the fenestrated capillaries of the intestinal mucosa of the rat with 0.05–0.1 M EDTA removes the diaphragms of the endothelial cells and detaches these cells from one another and from the basement membrane. The latter, even when completely denuded, retains effectively particles of 340 A (average) diameter. Perfusion with histamine (1 µg/ml) results in partial removal of fenestral diaphragms, occasional detachment of the endothelium from the basement membrane, and focal separation of endothelial intercellular junctions. PMID:4979362

  14. Small Intestine Cancer Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Professional Small Intestine Cancer Treatment Research Small Intestine Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Small Intestine Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  15. Intestinal capillariasis.

    PubMed Central

    Cross, J H

    1992-01-01

    Intestinal capillariasis caused by Capillaria philippinensis appeared first in the Philippines and subsequently in Thailand, Japan, Iran, Egypt, and Taiwan, but most infections occur in the Philippines and Thailand. As established experimentally, the life cycle involves freshwater fish as intermediate hosts and fish-eating birds as definitive hosts. Embryonated eggs from feces fed to fish hatch and grow as larvae in the fish intestines. Infective larvae fed to monkeys, Mongolian gerbils, and fish-eating birds develop into adults. Larvae become adults in 10 to 11 days, and the first-generation females produce larvae. These larvae develop into males and egg-producing female worms. Eggs pass with the feces, reach water, embryonate, and infect fish. Autoinfection is part of the life cycle and leads to hyperinfection. Humans acquire the infection by eating small freshwater fish raw. The parasite multiplies, and symptoms of diarrhea, borborygmus, abdominal pain, and edema develop. Chronic infections lead to malabsorption and hence to protein and electrolyte loss, and death results from irreversible effects of the infection. Treatment consists of electrolyte replacement and administration of an antidiarrheal agent and mebendazole or albendazole. Capillariasis philippinensis is considered a zoonotic disease of migratory fish-eating birds. The eggs are disseminated along flyways and infect the fish, and when fish are eaten raw, the disease develops. Images PMID:1576584

  16. Intestinal capillariasis.

    PubMed

    Cross, J H

    1992-04-01

    Intestinal capillariasis caused by Capillaria philippinensis appeared first in the Philippines and subsequently in Thailand, Japan, Iran, Egypt, and Taiwan, but most infections occur in the Philippines and Thailand. As established experimentally, the life cycle involves freshwater fish as intermediate hosts and fish-eating birds as definitive hosts. Embryonated eggs from feces fed to fish hatch and grow as larvae in the fish intestines. Infective larvae fed to monkeys, Mongolian gerbils, and fish-eating birds develop into adults. Larvae become adults in 10 to 11 days, and the first-generation females produce larvae. These larvae develop into males and egg-producing female worms. Eggs pass with the feces, reach water, embryonate, and infect fish. Autoinfection is part of the life cycle and leads to hyperinfection. Humans acquire the infection by eating small freshwater fish raw. The parasite multiplies, and symptoms of diarrhea, borborygmus, abdominal pain, and edema develop. Chronic infections lead to malabsorption and hence to protein and electrolyte loss, and death results from irreversible effects of the infection. Treatment consists of electrolyte replacement and administration of an antidiarrheal agent and mebendazole or albendazole. Capillariasis philippinensis is considered a zoonotic disease of migratory fish-eating birds. The eggs are disseminated along flyways and infect the fish, and when fish are eaten raw, the disease develops.

  17. Intestinal protozoa.

    PubMed

    Juckett, G

    1996-06-01

    Giardia is the best known cause of protozoal gastrointestinal disease in North America, producing significant but not life-threatening gastrointestinal distress and diarrhea. Although diagnosis of giardiasis may be challenging, treatment is usually successful. Entamoeba histolytica poses a rarer but far more difficult clinical challenge. Dysentery caused by E. histolytica may be the most feared intestinal protozoal infection, although Cryptosporidium parvum, Balantidium coli, Isospora belli, Sarcocystis species and other newly described protozoa also may cause diarrhea in healthy individuals and may result in intractable, life-threatening illness in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome or other immunosuppressive diseases. Certain protozoa once considered relatively unimportant, such as Cryptosporidium, are now recognized as significant causes of morbidity even in the United States, since transmission readily occurs through contaminated water.

  18. [Intestinal microbiota].

    PubMed

    Perez, Horacio Joaquín; Menezes, Maria Elisabeth; d'Acâmpora, Armando José

    2014-01-01

    There is accumulative evidence on the multiple functions of the intestinal microflora in relation to the homeostasis of the host. At first considered as a simple mutualism, today this relationship proves to be essential to the health and to pathologic processes, particularly metabolic (eg, obesity) and gastrointestinal (eg, inflammatory bowel disease and functional disorders). The first studies were conducted on the microbiota from fecal material cultured anaerobically. With the advent of molecular biology, it has become possible to determine qualitative and quantitatively the dominant, subdominant and transients species. In recent years, there were advances in the understanding of the relationship betwen the microbiota and the host, as well as among the microorganisms in their respective niches. These advances result from translational integration of microbiology with specialities such as molecular biology, cell phisiology, immunology and ecology. There are few studies on the spatial distribution of the microflora in the gut. Unravelling the topography of the microflora in mammals is a way to validate new animal models for the study of microflora.

  19. [Adult intestinal malrotation associated with intestinal volvulus].

    PubMed

    Hernando-Almudí, Ernesto; Cerdán-Pascual, Rafael; Vallejo-Bernad, Cristina; Martín-Cuartero, Joaquín; Sánchez-Rubio, María; Casamayor-Franco, Carmen

    2016-06-23

    Intestinal malrotation is a congenital anomaly of the intestinal rotation and fixation, and usually occurs in the neonatal age. Description of a clinical case associated with acute occlusive symptoms. A case of intestinal malrotation is presented in a previously asymptomatic woman of 46 years old with an intestinal obstruction, with radiology and surgical findings showing an absence of intestinal rotation. Intestinal malrotation in adults is often asymptomatic, and is diagnosed as a casual finding during a radiological examination performed for other reasons. Infrequently, it can be diagnosed in adults, associated with an acute abdomen. Copyright © 2016 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  20. Disorders of the Small Intestine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disorders of the Stomach Disorders of the Small Intestine Disorders of the Large Intestine Disorders of the Pelvic Floor Motility Testing Personal ... Disorders of the Stomach Disorders of the Small Intestine Disorders of the Large Intestine Disorders of the ...

  1. Disorders of the Large Intestine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disorders of the Stomach Disorders of the Small Intestine Disorders of the Large Intestine Disorders of the Pelvic Floor Motility Testing Personal ... Disorders of the Stomach Disorders of the Small Intestine Disorders of the Large Intestine Disorders of the ...

  2. Small Intestine Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Your small intestine is the longest part of your digestive system - about twenty feet long! It connects your stomach to ... many times to fit inside your abdomen. Your small intestine does most of the digesting of the foods ...

  3. Small intestine (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The small intestine is the portion of the digestive system most responsible for absorption of nutrients from food into the ... the duodenum. This short first portion of the small intestine is followed by the jejunum and the ileum. ...

  4. Establishment of Intestinal Bacteriology

    PubMed Central

    MITSUOKA, Tomotari

    2014-01-01

    Research on intestinal bacteria began around the end of the 19th century. During the last 5 decades of the 20th century, research on the intestinal microbiota made rapid progress. At first, in my work, I first developed a method of comprehensive analysis of the intestinal microbiota, and then I established classification and identification methods for intestinal anaerobes. Using these methods I discovered a number of ecological rules governing the intestinal microbiota and the role of the intestinl microbiota in health and disease. Moreover, using germfree animals, it was proven that the intestinal microbiota has a role in carcinogenesis and aging in the host. Thus, a new interdisciplinary field, “intestinal bacteriology” was established. PMID:25032084

  5. Intestinal M cells

    PubMed Central

    Ohno, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    We have an enormous number of commensal bacteria in our intestine, moreover, the foods that we ingest and the water we drink is sometimes contaminated with pathogenic microorganisms. The intestinal epithelium is always exposed to such microbes, friend or foe, so to contain them our gut is equipped with specialized gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT), literally the largest peripheral lymphoid tissue in the body. GALT is the intestinal immune inductive site composed of lymphoid follicles such as Peyer’s patches. M cells are a subset of intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) residing in the region of the epithelium covering GALT lymphoid follicles. Although the vast majority of IEC function to absorb nutrients from the intestine, M cells are highly specialized to take up intestinal microbial antigens and deliver them to GALT for efficient mucosal as well as systemic immune responses. I will discuss recent advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of M-cell differentiation and functions. PMID:26634447

  6. Intestinal lymphangiectasia in children

    PubMed Central

    Isa, Hasan M.; Al-Arayedh, Ghadeer G.; Mohamed, Afaf M.

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal lymphangiectasia (IL) is a rare disease characterized by dilatation of intestinal lymphatics. It can be classified as primary or secondary according to the underlying etiology. The clinical presentations of IL are pitting edema, chylous ascites, pleural effusion, acute appendicitis, diarrhea, lymphocytopenia, malabsorption, and intestinal obstruction. The diagnosis is made by intestinal endoscopy and biopsies. Dietary modification is the mainstay in the management of IL with a variable response. Here we report 2 patients with IL in Bahrain who showed positive response to dietary modification. PMID:26837404

  7. Intestinal transplantation: a review.

    PubMed

    Desai, Chirag Sureshchandra; Khan, Khalid Mahmood; Girlanda, Raffaele; Fishbein, Thomas M

    2012-09-01

    Parenteral nutrition is a life-saving therapy for patients with intestinal failure. Intestinal transplantation is now recognized as a treatment for patients who develop complications of parenteral nutrition and in whom attempts at intestinal rehabilitation have failed. Patients with parenteral nutrition related liver disease will require a liver graft typically part of a multivisceral transplant. Isolated intestinal transplants are more commonly performed in adults while multivisceral transplants are most commonly performed in infants. Isolated intestinal transplants have the best short-term outcome, with over 80 % survival at 1 year. Patients requiring multivisceral transplants have a high rate of attrition with a 1 year survival less than 70 %. Prognostic factors for a poor outcome include patient hospitalization at the time of transplant and donor age greater than 40 years while systemic sepsis and acute rejection are the major determinant of early postoperative outcome. For patients surviving the first year the outcome of transplantation of the liver in addition to intestine affords some survival advantage though long-term outcome does not yet match other abdominal organs. Outcomes for intestinal retransplantation are poor as a result of immunology and patient debility. Overall intestinal transplantation continues to develop and is a clear indication with cost and quality of life advantages in patients with intestinal failure that do not remain stable on parenteral nutrition.

  8. Intestinal or bowel obstruction - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000150.htm Intestinal or bowel obstruction - discharge To use the sharing features on this ... your bowel (intestine). This condition is called an intestinal obstruction . The blockage may be partial or total (complete). ...

  9. Stages of Small Intestine Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Professional Small Intestine Cancer Treatment Research Small Intestine Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Small Intestine Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  10. Intestinal obstruction repair - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100116.htm Intestinal obstruction repair - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Adhesions Intestinal Obstruction A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by ...

  11. Intestinal obstruction (pediatric) - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100165.htm Intestinal obstruction (pediatric) - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Intestinal Obstruction A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by ...

  12. Intestinal Barrier and Behavior.

    PubMed

    Julio-Pieper, M; Bravo, J A

    2016-01-01

    The intestinal barrier function contributes to gut homeostasis by modulating absorption of water, electrolytes, and nutrients from the lumen into the circulation while restricting the passage of noxious luminal substances and microorganisms. Chronic conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, and celiac disease are associated to intestinal barrier dysfunction. Here, the hypothesis is that a leaky intestinal wall allowing for indiscriminate passage of intraluminal compounds to the vascular compartment could in turn lead to systemic inflammation. An increasing number of studies are now investigating the association between gut permeability and CNS disorders, under the premise that translocation of intestinal luminal contents could affect CNS function, either directly or indirectly. Still, it is unknown whether disruption of intestinal barrier is a causative agent or a consequence in these situations. Here, we discuss the latest evidence pointing to an association between increased gut permeability and disrupted behavioral responses.

  13. Intestinal permeability, leaky gut, and intestinal disorders.

    PubMed

    Hollander, D

    1999-10-01

    A major task of the intestine is to form a defensive barrier to prevent absorption of damaging substances from the external environment. This protective function of the intestinal mucosa is called permeability. Clinicians can use inert, nonmetabolized sugars such as mannitol, rhamnose, or lactulose to measure the permeability barrier or the degree of leakiness of the intestinal mucosa. Ample evidence indicates that permeability is increased in most patients with Crohn's disease and in 10% to 20% of their clinically healthy relatives. The abnormal leakiness of the mucosa in Crohn's patients and their relatives can be greatly amplified by aspirin preadministration. Permeability measurements in Crohn's patients reflect the activity, extent, and distribution of the disease and may allow us to predict the likelihood of recurrence after surgery or medically induced remission. Permeability is also increased in celiac disease and by trauma, burns, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. The major determinant of the rate of intestinal permeability is the opening or closure of the tight junctions between enterocytes in the paracellular space. As we broaden our understanding of the mechanisms and agents that control the degree of leakiness of the tight junctions, we will be increasingly able to use permeability measurements to study the etiology and pathogenesis of various disorders and to design or monitor therapies for their management.

  14. Biochemistry of intestinal development.

    PubMed Central

    Henning, S J

    1979-01-01

    In biochemical terms, the rat small intestine is relatively immature at birth and for the first two postnatal weeks. Then during the third week a dramatic array of enzymic changes begins, and by the end of the fourth week the intestine has the digestive and absorptive properties of the adult. Selective examples of these changes are discussed with emphasis on their implications for toxicological studies. The review also includes a detailed consideration of the roles of the dietary change of weaning and of glucocorticoid and thyroid hormones in the regulation of intestinal development. PMID:575507

  15. Intestinal Complications of IBD

    MedlinePlus

    ... that only affects the colon). LOCAL COMPLICATIONS OF CROHN’S DISEASE INTESTINAL OBSTRUCTION The most common complication of Crohn’s disease, obstruction may arise from swelling and the formation ...

  16. Intestinal pseudo-obstruction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Taking drugs that slow intestinal movements. These include narcotic (pain) medicines and drugs used when you are ... that may have caused the problem (such as narcotic drugs) may help. In severe cases, surgery may ...

  17. Intestinal parasitic infection.

    PubMed

    Park, Mi-Suk; Kim, Ki Whang; Ha, Hyun Kwon; Lee, Dong Ho

    2008-01-01

    In general, gastrointestinal tract is the primary involvement site of parasites during their life cycle. In this article, we will describe amebiasis, ascariasis, and anisakiasis among the many common intestinal parasitic diseases. We will review the epidemiology, life cycles, clinical manifestations and complications, and illustrate detailed imaging findings of intestinal parasites. Recognizing features of parasitic infection is important to establish an early diagnosis that leads to prompt treatment and helps avoid unnecessary surgery.

  18. Intestinal adaptation following resection.

    PubMed

    Tappenden, Kelly A

    2014-05-01

    Intestinal adaptation is a natural compensatory process that occurs following extensive intestinal resection, whereby structural and functional changes in the intestine improve nutrient and fluid absorption in the remnant bowel. In animal studies, postresection structural adaptations include bowel lengthening and thickening and increases in villus height and crypt depth. Functional changes include increased nutrient transporter expression, accelerated crypt cell differentiation, and slowed transit time. In adult humans, data regarding adaptive changes are sparse, and the mechanisms underlying intestinal adaptation remain to be fully elucidated. Several factors influence the degree of intestinal adaptation that occurs post resection, including site and extent of resection, luminal stimulation with enteral nutrients, and intestinotrophic factors. Two intestinotrophic growth factors, the glucagon-like peptide 2 analog teduglutide and recombinant growth hormone (somatropin), are now approved for clinical use in patients with short bowel syndrome (SBS). Both agents enhance fluid absorption and decrease requirements for parenteral nutrition (PN) and/or intravenous fluid. Intestinal adaptation has been thought to be limited to the first 1-2 years following resection in humans. However, recent data suggest that a significant proportion of adult patients with SBS can achieve enteral autonomy, even after many years of PN dependence, particularly with trophic stimulation.

  19. Claudins in intestines

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zhe; Ding, Lei; Lu, Qun; Chen, Yan-Hua

    2013-01-01

    Intestines are organs that not only digest food and absorb nutrients, but also provide a defense barrier against pathogens and noxious agents ingested. Tight junctions (TJs) are the most apical component of the junctional complex, providing one form of cell-cell adhesion in enterocytes and playing a critical role in regulating paracellular barrier permeability. Alteration of TJs leads to a number of pathophysiological diseases causing malabsorption of nutrition and intestinal structure disruption, which may even contribute to systemic organ failure. Claudins are the major structural and functional components of TJs with at least 24 members in mammals. Claudins have distinct charge-selectivity, either by tightening the paracellular pathway or functioning as paracellular channels, regulating ions and small molecules passing through the paracellular pathway. In this review, we have discussed the functions of claudin family members, their distribution and localization in the intestinal tract of mammals, their alterations in intestine-related diseases and chemicals/agents that regulate the expression and localization of claudins as well as the intestinal permeability, which provide a therapeutic view for treating intestinal diseases. PMID:24478939

  20. Intestinal lymphangiectasia in adults.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Hugh James; Nimmo, Michael

    2011-02-15

    Intestinal lymphangiectasia in the adult may be characterized as a disorder with dilated intestinal lacteals causing loss of lymph into the lumen of the small intestine and resultant hypoproteinemia, hypogammaglobulinemia, hypoalbuminemia and reduced number of circulating lymphocytes or lymphopenia. Most often, intestinal lymphangiectasia has been recorded in children, often in neonates, usually with other congenital abnormalities but initial definition in adults including the elderly has become increasingly more common. Shared clinical features with the pediatric population such as bilateral lower limb edema, sometimes with lymphedema, pleural effusion and chylous ascites may occur but these reflect the severe end of the clinical spectrum. In some, diarrhea occurs with steatorrhea along with increased fecal loss of protein, reflected in increased fecal alpha-1-antitrypsin levels, while others may present with iron deficiency anemia, sometimes associated with occult small intestinal bleeding. Most lymphangiectasia in adults detected in recent years, however, appears to have few or no clinical features of malabsorption. Diagnosis remains dependent on endoscopic changes confirmed by small bowel biopsy showing histological evidence of intestinal lymphangiectasia. In some, video capsule endoscopy and enteroscopy have revealed more extensive changes along the length of the small intestine. A critical diagnostic element in adults with lymphangiectasia is the exclusion of entities (e.g. malignancies including lymphoma) that might lead to obstruction of the lymphatic system and "secondary" changes in the small bowel biopsy. In addition, occult infectious (e.g. Whipple's disease from Tropheryma whipplei) or inflammatory disorders (e.g. Crohn's disease) may also present with profound changes in intestinal permeability and protein-losing enteropathy that also require exclusion. Conversely, rare B-cell type lymphomas have also been described even decades following initial

  1. The intestine is a blender

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Patricia; Lamarca, Morgan; Kravets, Victoria; Hu, David

    According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, digestive disease affects 60 to 70 million people and costs over 140 billion annually. Despite the significance of the gastrointestinal tract to human health, the physics of digestion remains poorly understood. In this study, we ask a simple question: what sets the frequency of intestinal contractions? We measure the frequency of intestinal contractions in rats, as a function of distance down the intestine. We find that intestines Contract radially ten times faster than longitudinally. This motion promotes mixing and, in turn, absorption of food products by the intestinal wall. We calculate viscous dissipation in the intestinal fluid to rationalize the relationship between frequency of intestinal contraction and the viscosity of the intestinal contents. Our findings may help to understand the evolution of the intestine as an ideal mixer.

  2. The intestine is a blender

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Patricia; Lamarca, Morgan; Hu, David

    2015-11-01

    According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, digestive disease affects 60 to 70 million people and costs over 140 billion annually. Despite the significance of the gastrointestinal tract to human health, the physics of digestion remains poorly understood. In this study, we ask a simple question: what sets the frequency of intestinal contractions? We measure the frequency of intestinal contractions in rats, as a function of distance down the intestine. We find that intestines contract radially ten times faster than longitudinally. This motion promotes mixing and, in turn, absorption of food products by the intestinal wall. We calculate viscous dissipation in the intestinal fluid to rationalize the relationship between frequency of intestinal contraction and the viscosity of the intestinal contents. Our findings may help to understand the evolution of the intestine as an ideal mixer.

  3. Intestinal and multivisceral transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Meira, Sérgio Paiva; Guardia, Bianca Della; Evangelista, Andréia Silva; Matielo, Celso Eduardo Lourenço; Neves, Douglas Bastos; Pandullo, Fernando Luis; Felga, Guilherme Eduardo Gonçalves; Alves, Jefferson André da Silva; Curvelo, Lilian Amorim; Diaz, Luiz Gustavo Guedes; Rusi, Marcela Balbo; Viveiros, Marcelo de Melo; de Almeida, Marcio Dias; Epstein, Marina Gabrielle; Pedroso, Pamella Tung; Salvalaggio, Paolo; Meirelles, Roberto Ferreira; Rocco, Rodrigo Andrey; de Almeida, Samira Scalso; de Rezende, Marcelo Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal transplantation has shown exceptional growth over the past 10 years. At the end of the 1990’s, intestinal transplantation moved out of the experimental realm to become a routine practice in treating patients with severe complications related to total parenteral nutrition and intestinal failure. In the last years, several centers reported an increasing improvement in survival outcomes (about 80%), during the first 12 months after surgery, but long-term survival is still a challenge. Several advances led to clinical application of transplants. Immunosuppression involved in intestinal and multivisceral transplantation was the biggest gain for this procedure in the past decade due to tacrolimus, and new inducing drugs, mono- and polyclonal anti-lymphocyte antibodies. Despite the advancement of rigid immunosuppression protocols, rejection is still very frequent in the first 12 months, and can result in long-term graft loss. The future of intestinal transplantation and multivisceral transplantation appears promising. The major challenge is early recognition of acute rejection in order to prevent graft loss, opportunistic infections associated to complications, post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease and graft versus host disease; and consequently, improve results in the long run. PMID:25993080

  4. Intestinal anisakidosis (anisakiosis).

    PubMed

    Takei, Hidehiro; Powell, Suzanne Z

    2007-10-01

    A case of intestinal anisakidosis in a 42-year-old man in Japan is presented. His chief complaint was an acute onset of severe abdominal pain. Approximately 12 hours before the onset of this symptom, he had eaten sliced raw mackerel ("sashimi"). Upper endoscopy was unremarkable. At exploratory laparotomy, an edematous, diffusely thickened segment of jejunum was observed, which was resected. The postoperative course was uneventful. The segment of small intestine showed a granular indurated area on the mucosal surface, and microscopically, a helminthic larva penetrating the intestinal wall, which was surrounded by a cuff of numerous neutrophils and eosinophils, as well as diffuse acute serositis. A cross section of the larva revealed the internal structures, pathognomonic of Anisakis simplex. Although anisakidosis is rare in the United States, with the increasing popularity of Japanese cuisine, the incidence is expected to increase, and pathologists should be familiar with this disease.

  5. Small Intestinal Infections.

    PubMed

    Munot, Khushboo; Kotler, Donald P

    2016-06-01

    Small intestinal infections are extremely common worldwide. They may be bacterial, viral, or parasitic in etiology. Most are foodborne or waterborne, with specific etiologies differing by region and with diverse pathophysiologies. Very young, very old, and immune-deficient individuals are the most vulnerable to morbidity or mortality from small intestinal infections. There have been significant advances in diagnostic sophistication with the development and early application of molecular diagnostic assays, though these tests have not become mainstream. The lack of rapid diagnoses combined with the self-limited nature of small intestinal infections has hampered the development of specific and effective treatments other than oral rehydration. Antibiotics are not indicated in the absence of an etiologic diagnosis, and not at all in the case of some infections.

  6. General Treatment Information for Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer A-Z Small Intestine Cancer Treating Small Intestine Cancer General treatment information Depending on the type ... questions about your treatment options. More In Small Intestine Cancer About Small Intestine Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, ...

  7. Assessment of intestinal malabsorption.

    PubMed

    Nikaki, K; Gupte, G L

    2016-04-01

    Significant efforts have been made in the last decade to either standardize the available tests for intestinal malabsorption or to develop new, more simple and reliable techniques. The quest is still on and, unfortunately, clinical practice has not dramatically changed. The investigation of intestinal malabsorption is directed by the patient's history and baseline tests. Endoscopy and small bowel biopsies play a major role although non-invasive tests are favored and often performed early on the diagnostic algorithm, especially in paediatric and fragile elderly patients. The current clinically available methods and research tools are summarized in this review article. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. [Intestinal microbiocenosis in children with intestinal enzymopathy].

    PubMed

    Kamilova, A T; Akhmedov, N N; Pulatova, D B; Nurmatov, B A

    2001-01-01

    141 children with different kinds of intestinal enzymopathy were examined; of these, 33 had celiac disease, 39--the syndrome of celiac disease, 12--congenital lactase deficiency and 57--the syndrome of disaccharidase insufficiency. In these patients a significant decrease in the average characteristics of the main protective flora and the growth of hemolytic and lactose-negative enterobacteria were established. In all groups of patients increased amounts of Proteus were detected, which was indicative of profound dysbiosis. The content of bifidobacteria was found to be decreased in 89.5-97% of the patients and the content of lactic acid bacteria, in 15.8-33.3%. The decreased content of Escherichia coli with normal enzymatic activity (less than 10(7) colony-forming units) was noted in one-third of the patients with the syndrome of celiac disease and congenital lactase deficiency, in about a half of the patients with the syndrome of disaccharidase insufficiency and least of all in patients with celiac disease (9.1%). The association of opportunistic microbes was detected in 15.6% of the patients, more often in those with celiac disease, the syndrome of celiac disease and congenital lactase deficiency. The severity of disturbances in intestinal eubiosis was found to depend on the gravity of the patients' state.

  9. Intestinal Failure (Short Bowel Syndrome)

    MedlinePlus

    ... N Vitamin deficiencies as a result of poor absorption in the intestine N Electrolyte and mineral deficiencies ... N Kidney stones or gallstones due to poor absorption of calcium or bile How is intestinal failure ...

  10. Small intestine contrast injection (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... and throat, through the stomach into the small intestine. When in place, contrast dye is introduced and ... means of demonstrating whether or not the small intestine is normal when abnormality is suspected.

  11. Intestinal Failure (Short Bowel Syndrome)

    MedlinePlus

    ... N Vitamin deficiencies as a result of poor absorption in the intestine N Electrolyte and mineral deficiencies ... N Kidney stones or gallstones due to poor absorption of calcium or bile How is intestinal failure ...

  12. Intestinal microbiota and ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Koido, Shigeo

    2015-11-01

    There is a close relationship between the human host and the intestinal microbiota, which is an assortment of microorganisms, protecting the intestine against colonization by exogenous pathogens. Moreover, the intestinal microbiota play a critical role in providing nutrition and the modulation of host immune homeostasis. Recent reports indicate that some strains of intestinal bacteria are responsible for intestinal ulceration and chronic inflammation in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) such as ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD). Understanding the interaction of the intestinal microbiota with pathogens and the human host might provide new strategies treating patients with IBD. This review focuses on the important role that the intestinal microbiota plays in maintaining innate immunity in the pathogenesis and etiology of UC and discusses new antibiotic therapies targeting the intestinal microbiota. Copyright © 2015 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Small intestine aspirate and culture

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003731.htm Small intestine aspirate and culture To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Small intestine aspirate and culture is a lab test to ...

  14. Intestinal ascariasis in children.

    PubMed

    Wani, Imtiaz; Rather, Muddasir; Naikoo, Ghulam; Amin, Abid; Mushtaq, Syed; Nazir, Mir

    2010-05-01

    Ascariasis is a staggering health problem commonly seen in children of endemic areas. In the abdomen, ascaris lumbricoides can cause a myriad of surgical complications. Intestinal obstruction by ascaris lumbricoides is commonly seen in children. Most cases are managed conservatively. The purpose was to study the clinical presentation and management of symptomatic intestinal ascariasis in children. A 3-year study was performed from April 2006 to April 2009 of pediatric-age patients who had symptomatic intestinal ascariasis. All patients had detailed clinical history, examination, plain X-ray of abdomen, and ultrasonography of abdomen. Peroperative findings were recorded in all patients who had surgical intervention. This prospective study had 360 patients. Male to female ratio was 1.37:1. 187 patients (52%) presented within 2-4 days of duration of illness. Mean +/- standard deviation (SD) age of patients was 6.35 +/- 2.25 years. Age group of 4-7 years (80%) was commonest group affected. Abdominal pain was a leading symptom in 357 patients (99%) with the pain in periumbilical area present in 215 patients (60%). In 227 patients (63%) abdominal distension was seen and was the commonest physical finding. Palpable worm masses were seen in 129 patients (36%); 81 patients (63%) had palpable worm masses in the umbilical quadrant. On X-ray of abdomen, visible worm masses were seen in 83 patients (23%). Abdominal sonography showed interloop fluid in 177 patients (49%) and free fluid in the pelvis of 97 patients (27%). The number of patients who were managed conservatively was 281 (78%), and 79 patients (22%) had surgical intervention. In patients who had surgical intervention, 39 patients (49%) had enterotomy and 7 patients (9%) had kneading of worms. Postoperative complications occurred in 33 patients, and an overall mortality of 1% (1 patient) was seen. Ascaridial intestinal obstruction is common in children in the Kashmir. Abdominal pain is the leading symptom in

  15. The Cystic Fibrosis Intestine

    PubMed Central

    De Lisle, Robert C.; Borowitz, Drucy

    2013-01-01

    The clinical manifestations of cystic fibrosis (CF) result from dysfunction of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator protein (CFTR). The majority of people with CF have a limited life span as a consequence of CFTR dysfunction in the respiratory tract. However, CFTR dysfunction in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract occurs earlier in ontogeny and is present in all patients, regardless of genotype. The same pathophysiologic triad of obstruction, infection, and inflammation that causes disease in the airways also causes disease in the intestines. This article describes the effects of CFTR dysfunction on the intestinal tissues and the intraluminal environment. Mouse models of CF have greatly advanced our understanding of the GI manifestations of CF, which can be directly applied to understanding CF disease in humans. PMID:23788646

  16. Unusual intestinal talcosis.

    PubMed

    Anani, P A; Ribaux, C; Gardiol, D

    1987-11-01

    A case of intestinal talcosis in a 46-year-old man is reported. At the age of 27, the patient was treated for pulmonary tuberculosis with tablets containing talc (183 g talc per 2,670 g total drug intake) over a period of 28 months. Eighteen years later, the patient was hospitalized for abdominal pain that remained refractory to antacids; he subsequently underwent a right hemicolectomy. Light-microscopic examination revealed a prominent fibrosis of the intestinal wall in which birefringent particles were demonstrated by polarized light. Using energy-dispersive spectroscopy, an analysis of these particles showed that they were predominantly composed of silicon and magnesium as well as small amounts of phosphorus, sulphur, calcium, and iron--the spectrum typically associated with talc. We believe that the source of this talc is the tablets ingested by the patient during prior antituberculosis therapy.

  17. Elenoside increases intestinal motility

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, E; Alonso, SJ; Navarro, R; Trujillo, J; Jorge, E

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To study the effects of elenoside, an arylnaph-thalene lignan from Justicia hyssopifolia, on gastro-intestinal motility in vivo and in vitro in rats. METHODS: Routine in vivo experimental assessments were catharsis index, water percentage of boluses, intestinal transit, and codeine antagonism. The groups included were vehicle control (propylene glycol-ethanol-plant oil-tween 80), elenoside (i.p. 25 and 50 mg/kg), cisapride (i.p. 10 mg/kg), and codeine phosphate (intragastric route, 50 mg/kg). In vitro approaches used isolated rat intestinal tissues (duodenum, jejunum, and ileum). The effects of elenoside at concentrations of 3.2 x 10-4, 6.4 x 10-4 and 1.2 x 10-3 mol/L, and cisapride at 10-6 mol/L were investigated. RESULTS: Elenoside in vivo produced an increase in the catharsis index and water percentage of boluses and in the percentage of distance traveled by a suspension of activated charcoal. Codeine phosphate antagonized the effect of 25 mg/kg of elenoside. In vitro, elenoside in duodenum, jejunum and ileum produced an initial decrease in the contraction force followed by an increase. Elenoside resulted in decreased intestinal frequency in duodenum, jejunum, and ileum. The in vitro and in vivo effects of elenoside were similar to those produced by cisapride. CONCLUSION: Elenoside is a lignan with an action similar to that of purgative and prokinetics drugs. Elenoside, could be an alternative to cisapride in treatment of gastrointestinal diseases as well as a preventive therapy for the undesirable gastrointestinal effects produced by opioids used for mild to moderate pain. PMID:17131476

  18. Alcohol and the Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Sheena; Behara, Rama; Swanson, Garth R.; Forsyth, Christopher B.; Voigt, Robin M.; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol abuse is a significant contributor to the global burden of disease and can lead to tissue damage and organ dysfunction in a subset of alcoholics. However, a subset of alcoholics without any of these predisposing factors can develop alcohol-mediated organ injury. The gastrointestinal tract (GI) could be an important source of inflammation in alcohol-mediated organ damage. The purpose of review was to evaluate mechanisms of alcohol-induced endotoxemia (including dysbiosis and gut leakiness), and highlight the predisposing factors for alcohol-induced dysbiosis and gut leakiness to endotoxins. Barriers, including immunologic, physical, and biochemical can regulate the passage of toxins into the portal and systemic circulation. In addition, a host of environmental interactions including those influenced by circadian rhythms can impact alcohol-induced organ pathology. There appears to be a role for therapeutic measures to mitigate alcohol-induced organ damage by normalizing intestinal dysbiosis and/or improving intestinal barrier integrity. Ultimately, the inflammatory process that drives progression into organ damage from alcohol appears to be multifactorial. Understanding the role of the intestine in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease can pose further avenues for pathogenic and treatment approaches. PMID:26501334

  19. The allometry of rodent intestines.

    PubMed

    Lovegrove, Barry G

    2010-06-01

    This study examined the allometry of the small intestine, caecum, colon and large intestine of rodents (n = 51) using a phylogenetically informed approach. Strong phylogenetic signal was detected in the data for the caecum, colon and large intestine, but not for the small intestine. Most of the phylogenetic signal could be attributed to clade effects associated with herbivorous versus omnivorous rodents. The herbivorous rodents have longer caecums, colons and large intestines, but their small intestines, with the exception of the desert otomyine rodents, are no different to those of omnivorous rodents. Desert otomyine rodents have significantly shorter small intestines than all other rodents, reflecting a possible habitat effect and providing a partial explanation for the low basal metabolic rates of small desert mammals. However, the desert otomyines do not have shorter colons or large intestines, challenging claims for adaptation to water retention in arid environments. Data for the Arvicolidae revealed significantly larger caecums and colons, and hence longer large intestines, with no compensatory reduction in the length of the small intestine, which may explain how the smallest mammalian herbivores manage to meet the demands of a very high mass-specific metabolic rate. This study provides phylogenetically corrected allometries suitable for future prediction testing.

  20. How to make an intestine

    PubMed Central

    Wells, James M.; Spence, Jason R.

    2014-01-01

    With the high prevalence of gastrointestinal disorders, there is great interest in establishing in vitro models of human intestinal disease and in developing drug-screening platforms that more accurately represent the complex physiology of the intestine. We will review how recent advances in developmental and stem cell biology have made it possible to generate complex, three-dimensional, human intestinal tissues in vitro through directed differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells. These are currently being used to study human development, genetic forms of disease, intestinal pathogens, metabolic disease and cancer. PMID:24496613

  1. Immunoglobulin in intestinal secretions.

    PubMed

    Cutropia de Guirao, C

    1977-12-01

    The objective of the present investigation is the study and interpretation of the role played by the immunoglobulins, especially IgA, during acute diarrhea in children. IgA, IGG and IgM values in serum and IgA in intestinal secretions were studied in a group of children (between 3 months and 5 years of age) during diarrhea, convalescence and in normals. The method of simple radial immunodiffusion according to Mancini was employed. IgA is the immunoglobulin which suffers the greastest alteration in acute diarrhea. The precipitation halos (the average values), were lower during the diarrhea than in convalescence and in normals.

  2. Teleost intestinal immunology.

    PubMed

    Rombout, Jan H W M; Abelli, Luigi; Picchietti, Simona; Scapigliati, Giuseppe; Kiron, Viswanath

    2011-11-01

    Teleosts clearly have a more diffuse gut associated lymphoid system, which is morphological and functional clearly different from the mammalian GALT. All immune cells necessary for a local immune response are abundantly present in the gut mucosa of the species studied and local immune responses can be monitored after intestinal immunization. Fish do not produce IgA, but a special mucosal IgM isotype seems to be secreted and may (partly) be the recently described IgZ/IgT. Fish produce a pIgR in their mucosal tissues but it is smaller (2 ILD) than the 4-5 ILD pIgR of higher vertebrates. Whether teleost pIgR is transcytosed and cleaved off in the same way needs further investigation, especially because a secretory component (SC) is only reported in one species. Teleosts also have high numbers of IEL, most of them are CD3-ɛ+/CD8-α+ and have cytotoxic and/or regulatory function. Possibly many of these cells are TCRγδ cells and they may be involved in the oral tolerance induction observed in fish. Innate immune cells can be observed in the teleost gut from first feeding onwards, but B cells appear much later in mucosal compartments compared to systemic sites. Conspicuous is the very early presence of putative T cells or their precursors in the fish gut, which together with the rag-1 expression of intestinal lymphoid cells may be an indication for an extra-thymic development of certain T cells. Teleosts can develop enteritis in their antigen transporting second gut segment and epithelial cells, IEL and eosinophils/basophils seem to play a crucial role in this intestinal inflammation model. Teleost intestine can be exploited for oral vaccination strategies and probiotic immune stimulation. A variety of encapsulation methods, to protect vaccines against degradation in the foregut, are reported with promising results but in most cases they appear not to be cost effective yet. Microbiota in fish are clearly different from terrestrial animals. In the past decade a fast

  3. Common flora and intestine

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kepeng; Karin, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Commensal microflora engages in a symbiotic relationship with their host, and plays an important role in the development of colorectal cancer (CRC). Pathogenic bacteria promote chronic intestinal inflammation and accelerate tumorigenesis. In sporadic CRC, loss of an effective epithelial barrier occurs at early stage of CRC development. As a result, non-pathogenic bacteria and/or their products infiltrate tumor stroma, drive “tumor-elicited inflammation” and promote CRC progression by activating tumor-associated myeloid and immune cells that produce IL-23 and IL-17. In this article we will summarize the recent advances in understanding the relationship between gut flora and CRC. PMID:24516778

  4. Synthetic Small Intestinal Scaffolds for Improved Studies of Intestinal Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Costello, Cait M.; Hongpeng, Jia; Shaffiey, Shahab; Yu, Jiajie; Jain, Nina K.; Hackam, David

    2014-01-01

    In vitro intestinal models can provide new insights into small intestinal function, including cellular growth and proliferation mechanisms, drug absorption capabilities, and host-microbial interactions. These models are typically formed with cells cultured on 2D scaffolds or transwell inserts, but it is widely understood that epithelial cells cultured in 3D environments exhibit different phenotypes that are more reflective of native tissue. Our focus was to develop a porous, synthetic 3D tissue scaffold with villous features that could support the culture of epithelial cell types to mimic the natural microenvironment of the small intestine. We demonstrated that our scaffold could support the co-culture of Caco-2 cells with a mucus-producing cell line, HT29-MTX, as well as small intestinal crypts from mice for extended periods. By recreating the surface topography with accurately sized intestinal villi, we enable cellular differentiation along the villous axis in a similar manner to native intestines. In addition, we show that the biochemical microenvironments of the intestine can be further simulated via a combination of apical and basolateral feeding of intestinal cell types cultured on the 3D models. PMID:24390638

  5. General Information about Small Intestine Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Professional Small Intestine Cancer Treatment Research Small Intestine Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Small Intestine Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  6. Treatment Option Overview (Small Intestine Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Professional Small Intestine Cancer Treatment Research Small Intestine Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Small Intestine Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  7. How Is Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma Staged?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging How Is Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma Staged? Staging is a process that tells ... distant m etastasis (M). T categories for small intestine adenocarcinoma T categories of small intestine cancer describe ...

  8. Intestinal microbiota and obesity.

    PubMed

    Blaut, Michael; Klaus, Susanne

    2012-01-01

    The human gut harbors a highly diverse microbial ecosystem of approximately 400 different species, which is characterized by a high interindividual variability. The intestinal microbiota has recently been suggested to contribute to the development of obesity and the metabolic syndrome. Transplantation of gut microbiota from obese mice to nonobese, germ-free mice resulted in transfer of metabolic syndrome-associated features from the donor to the recipient. Proposed mechanisms for the role of gut microbiota include the provision of additional energy by the conversion of dietary fiber to short-chain fatty acids, effects on gut-hormone production, and increased intestinal permeability causing elevated systemic levels of lipopolysaccharides (LPS). This metabolic endotoxemia is suggested to contribute to low-grade inflammation, a characteristic trait of obesity and the metabolic syndrome. Finally, activation of the endocannabinoid system by LPS and/or high-fat diets is discussed as another causal factor. In conclusion, there is ample evidence for a role of gut microbiota in the development of obesity in rodents. However, the magnitude of its contribution to human obesity is still unknown.

  9. What Happens After Treatment for Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma?

    MedlinePlus

    ... After Treatment What Happens After Treatment for Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma? For some people with small intestine cancer, ... Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma Stops Working More In Small Intestine Cancer About Small Intestine Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, ...

  10. The Intestinal Microbiome and Health

    PubMed Central

    Tuddenham, Susan; Sears, Cynthia L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of Review A diverse array of microbes colonizes the human intestine. In this review we seek to outline the current state of knowledge on what characterizes a “healthy” or “normal” intestinal microbiome, what factors modify the intestinal microbiome in the healthy state and how the intestinal microbiome affects normal host physiology Recent Findings What constitutes a “normal” or “healthy” intestinal microbiome is an area of active research, but key characteristics may include diversity, richness and a microbial community’s resilience and ability to resist change. A number of factors, including age, the host immune system, host genetics, diet and antibiotic use appear to modify the intestinal microbiome in the normal state. New research shows that the microbiome likely plays a critical role in the healthy human immune system and metabolism. Summary It is clear that there is a complicated bi-directional relationship between the intestinal microbiota and host which is vital to health. An enhanced understanding of this relationship will be critical not only to maximize and maintain human health but also to shape our understanding of disease and to foster new therapeutic approaches. PMID:26237547

  11. Intestinal flora, probiotics, and cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Guerrero Hernández, Ignacio; Torre Delgadillo, Aldo; Vargas Vorackova, Florencia; Uribe, Misael

    2008-01-01

    Intestinal microflora constitutes a symbiotic ecosystem in permanent equilibrium, composed mainly of anaerobic bacteria. However, such equilibrium may be altered by daily conditions as drug use or pathologies interfering with intestinal physiology, generating an unfavorable environment for the organism. Besides, there are factors which may cause alterations in the intestinal wall, creating the conditions for translocation or permeation of substances or bacteria. In cirrhotic patients, there are many conditions that combine to alter the amount and populations of intestinal bacteria, as well as the functional capacity of the intestinal wall to prevent the permeation of substances and bacteria. Nowadays, numerous complications associated with cirrhosis have been identified, where such mechanisms could play an important role. There is evidence that some probiotic microorganisms could restore the microbiologic and immunologic equilibrium in the intestinal wall in cirrhotic patients and help in the treatment of complications due to cirrhosis. This article has the objective to review the interactions between intestinal flora, gut permeability, and the actual role of probiotics in the field of cirrhotic patients.

  12. Intestinal nematodes: biology and control.

    PubMed

    Epe, Christian

    2009-11-01

    A variety of nematodes occur in dogs and cats. Several nematode species inhabit the small and large intestines. Important species that live in the small intestine are roundworms of the genus Toxocara (T canis, T cati) and Toxascaris (ie, T leonina), and hookworms of the genus Ancylostoma (A caninum, A braziliense, A tubaeforme) or Uncinaria (U stenocephala). Parasites of the large intestine are nematodes of the genus Trichuris (ie, whipworms, T vulpis). After a comprehensive description of their life cycle and biology, which are indispensable for understanding and justifying their control, current recommendations for nematode control are presented and discussed thereafter.

  13. Fetal intestinal graft is the best source for intestinal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lopes, M F; Cabrita, A M; Patrício, J A

    2000-01-01

    Adult intestinal allografts have demonstrated high immunogenicity in human transplantation, making the search for new and more favorable grafts an actual problem. Accepting that fetal and newborn immune systems are relatively immature, their intestines could be ideal sources for organ donation. The purpose of this study was to compare the immunogenicity of fetal, newborn, and adult intestine for selection of the least antigenic. Using a bidirectional rat model for immunologic responses, 116 small-bowel transplantations were done: 36 fetal, 40 newborn, and 40 adult grafts. Two histocompatibility barriers and different immunosuppression regimes were used. For fetal and newborn intestines, free grafts into the omentum of adult recipients were done; for adult intestines, accessory grafts in adult recipients of the same age, using vascular anastomoses. The diagnosis of graft rejection and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) was based on histology of hematoxylin and eosin-stained biopsies from target organs. Recipients of fetal and newborn grafts did not show signs of GVHD, while 12% of the adult group did (P < 0.05). Rejection was less severe in fetal and adult (P > 0.05) than in newborn (P < 0.05) intestinal transplantation. Treatment with 10 mg/kg per day cyclosporine prevented rejection in 70% of fetal and 75% of adult grafts, while all newborn grafts were rejected. Under no immunosuppression, or with low doses of cyclosporine (2 mg/kg per day), all groups showed histologic signs of rejection in almost all cases, the fetal intestine being the least affected. Concerning histocompatibility barriers, grafts were usually less damaged in the weaker transplantation subgroups. Our data indicate that fetal intestine is the least immunogenic of the three grafts studied, suggesting that it will be the most suitable tissue for organ donation.

  14. Intestinal Antigen-Presenting Cells

    PubMed Central

    Flannigan, Kyle L.; Geem, Duke; Harusato, Akihito; Denning, Timothy L.

    2016-01-01

    The microbiota that populate the mammalian intestine are critical for proper host physiology, yet simultaneously pose a potential danger. Intestinal antigen-presenting cells, namely macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs), are integral components of the mucosal innate immune system that maintain co-existence with the microbiota in face of this constant threat. Intestinal macrophages and DCs integrate signals from the microenvironment to orchestrate innate and adaptive immune responses that ultimately lead to durable tolerance of the microbiota. Tolerance is not a default response, however, because macrophages and DCs remain poised to vigorously respond to pathogens that breach the epithelial barrier. In this review, we summarize the salient features of macrophages and DCs in the healthy and inflamed intestine and discuss how signals from the microbiota can influence their function. PMID:25976247

  15. Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Antonucci, Alexandra; Fronzoni, Lucia; Cogliandro, Laura; Cogliandro, Rosanna F; Caputo, Carla; Giorgio, Roberto De; Pallotti, Francesca; Barbara, Giovanni; Corinaldesi, Roberto; Stanghellini, Vincenzo

    2008-01-01

    Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction (CIPO) is a severe digestive syndrome characterized by derangement of gut propulsive motility which resembles mechanical obstruction, in the absence of any obstructive process. Although uncommon in clinical practice, this syndrome represents one of the main causes of intestinal failure and is characterized by high morbidity and mortality. It may be idiopathic or secondary to a variety of diseases. Most cases are sporadic, even though familial forms with either dominant or recessive autosomal inheritance have been described. Based on histological features intestinal pseudo-obstruction can be classified into three main categories: neuropathies, mesenchymopathies, and myopathies, according on the predominant involvement of enteric neurones, interstitial cells of Cajal or smooth muscle cells, respectively. Treatment of intestinal pseudo-obstruction involves nutritional, pharmacological and surgical therapies, but it is often unsatisfactory and the long-term outcome is generally poor in the majority of cases. PMID:18494042

  16. Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction.

    PubMed

    Antonucci, Alexandra; Fronzoni, Lucia; Cogliandro, Laura; Cogliandro, Rosanna-F; Caputo, Carla; De Giorgio, Roberto; Pallotti, Francesca; Barbara, Giovanni; Corinaldesi, Roberto; Stanghellini, Vincenzo

    2008-05-21

    Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction (CIPO) is a severe digestive syndrome characterized by derangement of gut propulsive motility which resembles mechanical obstruction, in the absence of any obstructive process. Although uncommon in clinical practice, this syndrome represents one of the main causes of intestinal failure and is characterized by high morbidity and mortality. It may be idiopathic or secondary to a variety of diseases. Most cases are sporadic, even though familial forms with either dominant or recessive autosomal inheritance have been described. Based on histological features intestinal pseudo-obstruction can be classified into three main categories: neuropathies, mesenchymopathies, and myopathies, according on the predominant involvement of enteric neurones, interstitial cells of Cajal or smooth muscle cells, respectively. Treatment of intestinal pseudo-obstruction involves nutritional, pharmacological and surgical therapies, but it is often unsatisfactory and the long-term outcome is generally poor in the majority of cases.

  17. Fishborne Zoonotic Intestinal Trematodes, Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Dung, Do Trung; Van De, Nguyen; Waikagul, Jitra; Dalsgaard, Anders; Chai, Jong-Yil; Sohn, Woon-Mok

    2007-01-01

    Although fishborne zoonotic trematodes that infect the liver are well documented in Vietnam, intestinal fishborne zoonotic trematodes are unreported. Recent discoveries of the metacercarial stage of these flukes in wild and farmed fish prompted an assessment of their risk to a community that eats raw fish. A fecal survey of 615 persons showed a trematode egg prevalence of 64.9%. Infected persons were treated to expel liver and intestinal parasites for specific identification. The liver trematode Clonorchis sinensis was recovered from 51.5%, but >1 of 4 intestinal species of the family Heterophyidae was recovered from 100%. The most numerous were Haplorchis spp. (90.4% of all worms recovered). These results demonstrate that fishborne intestinal parasites are an unrecognized food safety risk in a country whose people have a strong tradition of eating raw fish. PMID:18258031

  18. Intestinal angioedema mimicking Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Malcolm, A; Prather, C M

    1999-10-18

    Angioedema usually presents as episodic attacks of swelling of the face, airway and extremities, but it may also involve visceral tissues. A 58-year-old woman with repeated episodes of abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting had two laparotomies and was treated for Crohn's disease for two years before a diagnosis of acquired intestinal angioedema was made. This case provides important insights into the presentation of intestinal angioedema.

  19. Sonographic detection of intestinal pneumatosis.

    PubMed

    Danse, E M; Van Beers BE; Gilles, A; Jacquet, L

    2000-06-01

    Intestinal pneumatosis is an uncommon affection characterized by the presence of gas in the wall of the gastro-intestinal tract. The prognosis of this condition, observed in benign or severe diseases, is based on the outcome of the underlying affection. The diagnosis of pneumatosis intestinalis is unusually made with sonography. We report a case of pneumatosis intestinalis due to small bowel necrosis, initially suggested with sonography and further confirmed with computed tomography (CT) and pathology.

  20. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bures, Jan; Cyrany, Jiri; Kohoutova, Darina; Förstl, Miroslav; Rejchrt, Stanislav; Kvetina, Jaroslav; Vorisek, Viktor; Kopacova, Marcela

    2010-01-01

    Human intestinal microbiota create a complex polymicrobial ecology. This is characterised by its high population density, wide diversity and complexity of interaction. Any dysbalance of this complex intestinal microbiome, both qualitative and quantitative, might have serious health consequence for a macro-organism, including small intestinal bacterial overgrowth syndrome (SIBO). SIBO is defined as an increase in the number and/or alteration in the type of bacteria in the upper gastrointestinal tract. There are several endogenous defence mechanisms for preventing bacterial overgrowth: gastric acid secretion, intestinal motility, intact ileo-caecal valve, immunoglobulins within intestinal secretion and bacteriostatic properties of pancreatic and biliary secretion. Aetiology of SIBO is usually complex, associated with disorders of protective antibacterial mechanisms (e.g. achlorhydria, pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, immunodeficiency syndromes), anatomical abnormalities (e.g. small intestinal obstruction, diverticula, fistulae, surgical blind loop, previous ileo-caecal resections) and/or motility disorders (e.g. scleroderma, autonomic neuropathy in diabetes mellitus, post-radiation enteropathy, small intestinal pseudo-obstruction). In some patients more than one factor may be involved. Symptoms related to SIBO are bloating, diarrhoea, malabsorption, weight loss and malnutrition. The gold standard for diagnosing SIBO is still microbial investigation of jejunal aspirates. Non-invasive hydrogen and methane breath tests are most commonly used for the diagnosis of SIBO using glucose or lactulose. Therapy for SIBO must be complex, addressing all causes, symptoms and complications, and fully individualised. It should include treatment of the underlying disease, nutritional support and cyclical gastro-intestinal selective antibiotics. Prognosis is usually serious, determined mostly by the underlying disease that led to SIBO. PMID:20572300

  1. Intestinal microflora and metabolic diseases.

    PubMed

    Serino, M; Luche, E; Chabo, C; Amar, J; Burcelin, R

    2009-09-01

    Recent advances in molecular sequencing technology have allowed researchers to answer major questions regarding the relationship between a vast genomic diversity-such as found in the intestinal microflora-and host physiology. Over the past few years, it has been established that, in obesity, type 1 diabetes and Crohn's disease-to cite but a few-the intestinal microflora play a pathophysiological role and can induce, transfer or prevent the outcome of such conditions. A few of the molecular vectors responsible for this regulatory role have been determined. Some are related to control of the immune, vascular, endocrine and nervous systems located in the intestines. However, more important is the fact that the intestinal microflora-to-host relationship is bidirectional, with evidence of an impact of the host genome on the intestinal microbiome. This means that the ecology shared by the host and gut microflora should now be considered a new player that can be manipulated, using pharmacological and nutritional approaches, to control physiological functions and pathological outcomes. What now remains is to demonstrate the molecular connection between the intestinal microflora and metabolic diseases. We propose here that the proinflammatory lipopolysaccharides play a causal role in the onset of metabolic disorders.

  2. [Malaria and intestinal protozoa].

    PubMed

    Rojo-Marcos, Gerardo; Cuadros-González, Juan

    2016-03-01

    Malaria is life threatening and requires urgent diagnosis and treatment. Incidence and mortality are being reduced in endemic areas. Clinical features are unspecific so in imported cases it is vital the history of staying in a malarious area. The first line treatments for Plasmodium falciparum are artemisinin combination therapies, chloroquine in most non-falciparum and intravenous artesunate if any severity criteria. Human infections with intestinal protozoa are distributed worldwide with a high global morbid-mortality. They cause diarrhea and sometimes invasive disease, although most are asymptomatic. In our environment populations at higher risk are children, including adopted abroad, immune-suppressed, travelers, immigrants, people in contact with animals or who engage in oral-anal sex. Diagnostic microscopic examination has low sensitivity improving with antigen detection or molecular methods. Antiparasitic resistances are emerging lately. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  3. Primary intestinal lymphangiectasia: Minireview

    PubMed Central

    Ingle, Sachin B; Hinge (Ingle), Chitra R

    2014-01-01

    Primary idiopathic intestinal lymphangiectasia is an unusual disease featured by the presence of dilated lymphatic channels which are located in the mucosa, submucosa or subserosa leading to protein loosing enteropathy.Most often affected were children and generally diagnosed before third year of life but may be rarely seen in adults too. Bilateral pitting oedema of lower limb is the main clinical manifestation mimicking the systemic disease and posing a real diagnostic dilemma to the clinicians to differentiate it from other common systemic diseases like Congestive cardiac failure, Nephrotic Syndrome, Protein Energy Malnutrition, etc. Diagnosis can be made on capsule endoscopy which can localise the lesion but unable to take biopsy samples. Thus, recently double-balloon enteroscopy and biopsy in combination can be used as an effective diagnostic tool to hit the correct diagnosis. Patients respond dramatically to diet constituting low long chain triglycerides and high protein content with supplements of medium chain triglyceride. So early diagnosis is important to prevent untoward complications related to disease or treatment for the sake of accurate pathological diagnosis. PMID:25325063

  4. Impact of Intestinal Microbiota on Intestinal Luminal Metabolome

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Mitsuharu; Kibe, Ryoko; Ooga, Takushi; Aiba, Yuji; Kurihara, Shin; Sawaki, Emiko; Koga, Yasuhiro; Benno, Yoshimi

    2012-01-01

    Low–molecular-weight metabolites produced by intestinal microbiota play a direct role in health and disease. In this study, we analyzed the colonic luminal metabolome using capillary electrophoresis mass spectrometry with time-of-flight (CE-TOFMS) —a novel technique for analyzing and differentially displaying metabolic profiles— in order to clarify the metabolite profiles in the intestinal lumen. CE-TOFMS identified 179 metabolites from the colonic luminal metabolome and 48 metabolites were present in significantly higher concentrations and/or incidence in the germ-free (GF) mice than in the Ex-GF mice (p < 0.05), 77 metabolites were present in significantly lower concentrations and/or incidence in the GF mice than in the Ex-GF mice (p < 0.05), and 56 metabolites showed no differences in the concentration or incidence between GF and Ex-GF mice. These indicate that intestinal microbiota highly influenced the colonic luminal metabolome and a comprehensive understanding of intestinal luminal metabolome is critical for clarifying host-intestinal bacterial interactions. PMID:22724057

  5. Intestinal microbiota and overweight.

    PubMed

    Lyra, A; Lahtinen, S; Tiihonen, K; Ouwehand, A C

    2010-11-01

    The microbes in our gut can influence our weight by providing us with energy through the degradation of nondigestable carbohydrates and by affecting the cellular energy status of liver and muscle cells and the accumulation of lipids in adipose tissue. Thus, it is not surprising that in several studies the gastrointestinal microbiota of overweight and obese subjects has been found to differ from that of lean subjects. The initial findings linked obesity with proportionally decreased levels of the phylum Bacteroidetes and increased levels of the phylum Firmicutes. Later, several studies have assessed the association between overweight or obesity and the gastrointestinal microbiota, applying an array of molecular methods targeting the microbiota as a whole or specific bacterial groups or species within. However, at present it is difficult to draw conclusions on which of the observed microbiota alterations are relevant; essentially all of the bacterial groups that have been studied in more than one trial have given contradictory results in regard to their association with weight. Some of these discrepancies can result from methodological issues and some from the nature of the gastrointestinal microbiota, which is an extremely complex and dynamic microbial ecosystem with high subject specificity. In addition, selecting subjects purely based on weight may result in a largely heterogeneous group with several potentially confounding factors. While it may be premature to conclude which specific groups of bacteria are prominent in the intestinal tract of overweight and obese subjects, it appears clear that microbes contribute to weight gain and related health issues, such as the metabolic syndrome and type II diabetes. Therefore, it is important to continue to search for common microbial markers and predictors of obesity, and to study how these may be modulated with probiotics and prebiotics to promote health.

  6. Small intestinal physiology and pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Sarna, S K; Otterson, M F

    1989-06-01

    The small intestine, like the rest of the gastrointestinal tract, is an intelligent organ. It generates a wide variety of motor patterns to meet motility requirements in different situations. Its basic motor function after a meal is to mix the chyme with exocrine and intestinal secretions, agitate its contents to uniformly and evenly expose them to the mucosal surface, and to propel them distally at a rate that allows optimal absorption of food components, and reabsorption of bile. Most of these functions are performed by individual phasic contractions. In humans, the phasic contractions are largely disorganized in time and space. These contractions may cause mixing and agitation of luminal contents with slow distal propulsion. Occasionally, an individual contraction of large amplitude and long duration migrates over several centimeters and may rapidly propel the contents over this distance. In general, the spatial and temporal relationships of individual phasic contractions become less organized distally, resulting in a slower propulsion rate in the distal small intestine than in the proximal small intestine. The migrating clustered contractions generated after a meal may also be propulsive, but because of their unpredictable and irregular occurrence, their precise role in postprandial propulsion is incompletely understood. Rapidly migrating contractions may occur when the electrical control activity is obliterated by pharmacologic agents or during parasitic infections. Their effects on motility are not known yet. Between meals, when digestion is complete, the small intestine generates migrating motor complexes that help keep the small intestine clean by dislodging debris from the villi and dumping them into the colon. This may prevent decay of these materials in the small intestine and limit their contribution to bacterial overgrowth. Giant migrating contractions may perform a similar function in the distal small intestine as well as return any refluxed fecal

  7. Intestinal dysfunction associated with acute thoracolumbar fractures.

    PubMed

    Peschiera, J L; Beerman, S P

    1990-03-01

    The frequency of intestinal dysfunction, particularly intestinal ileus, among patients with acute thoracolumbar fractures and no neurologic compromise was assessed. We reviewed the medical records of 70 patients who met specific criteria. Only four (6%) of these patients developed intestinal dysfunction, manifested by vomiting, abdominal distention, diminished bowel sounds, or an intestinal ileus documented by an abdominal roentgenogram. Conservative initial nutritional management of the patients did not reduce the incidence of intestinal dysfunction. This study suggests that patients with acute thoracolumbar fractures and no neurologic compromise are not at substantial risk of intestinal dysfunction and that nasogastric suction and restriction of oral intake are unnecessary in the initial management of these patients.

  8. Intestinal ischemia in neonates and children.

    PubMed

    Jeican, Ionuţ Isaia; Ichim, Gabriela; Gheban, Dan

    2016-01-01

    The article reviews the intestinal ischemia theme on newborn and children. The intestinal ischemia may be either acute - intestinal infarction (by vascular obstruction or by reduced mesenteric blood flow besides the occlusive mechanism), either chronic. In neonates, acute intestinal ischemia may be caused by aortic thrombosis, volvulus or hypoplastic left heart syndrome. In children, acute intestinal ischemia may be caused by fibromuscular dysplasia, volvulus, abdominal compartment syndrome, Burkitt lymphoma, dermatomyositis (by vascular obstruction) or familial dysautonomia, Addison's disease, situs inversus abdominus (intraoperative), burns, chemotherapy administration (by nonocclusive mesenteric ischemia). Chronic intestinal ischemia is a rare condition in pediatrics and can be seen in abdominal aortic coarctation or hypoplasia, idiopathic infantile arterial calcinosis.

  9. [Intestinal carcinoid tumour: Case report].

    PubMed

    Mussan-Chelminsky, Gil; Vidal-González, Pablo; Núñez-García, Edgar; Valencia-García, Luis César; Márquez-Ugalde, Miguel Ángel

    2015-01-01

    Carcinoid of the small intestine, is a well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumor that rarely presents with clinical signs. This tumour can be associated with other conditions, such as inflammatory bowel disease, presenting a wide range of symptoms. In some cases they have an aggressive and highly symptomatic behaviour; thus, clinical suspicion must be high to make an early diagnosis. A 60 year-old male patient with Crohn's disease and gastrointestinal symptoms attributed to this disease within the last year. He presented with intestinal obstruction initially treated with conservative management with no improvement. Exploratory laparotomy was performed finding a mesenteric tumour that caused the bowel obstruction. Bowel resection with primary anastomosis was performed. The pathology report showed an intestinal carcinoid tumour with lymph node metastases. The patient recovered well, and was discharged without complications to continue medical treatment and follow-up by the Oncology department. In almost 42% of the cases, the most common site of carcinoid tumours is the small intestine, and of these, 41% are presented as locoregional disease. Patients with Crohn's disease present a higher incidence. In these cases, the most common presentation is an acute intestinal obstruction (90%). Surgery is usually curative, and follow up is important as the symptoms of Crohn's disease can hide any recurrence. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  10. Claudin-related intestinal diseases.

    PubMed

    Barmeyer, Christian; Schulzke, Jörg D; Fromm, Michael

    2015-06-01

    With up to 200 m(2) the human intestine is the organ with the largest absorptive surface of the body. It is lined by a single layer of epithelial cells that separates the host from the environment. The intestinal epithelium provides both, selective absorption of nutrients, ions, and water but also a highly effective barrier function which includes the first line of defense against environmental antigens. The paracellular part of this barrier function is provided by tight junction (TJ) proteins, especially the large family of claudins. Changes in abundance or molecular structure of claudins can generally result in three typical effects, (i) decreased absorptive passage, (ii) increased secretory passage of small solutes and water causing leak flux diarrhea and (iii) increased absorptive passage of macromolecules which may induce inflammatory processes. Several intestinal diseases are associated with such changes that can result in intestinal inflammation and symptoms like weight loss, abdominal pain or diarrhea. This review summarizes our current knowledge on barrier dysfunction and claudin dysregulation in several intestinal diseases gastroenterologists are often faced with, like inflammatory bowel disease, microscopic colitis, celiac disease, irritable bowel syndrome, gallstones and infectious diseases like HIV enteropathy, Campylobacter jejuni and Clostridium perfringens infection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Therapeutic modulation of intestinal dysbiosis.

    PubMed

    Walker, Alan W; Lawley, Trevor D

    2013-03-01

    The human gastrointestinal tract is home to an extremely numerous and diverse collection of microbes, collectively termed the "intestinal microbiota". This microbiota is considered to play a number of key roles in the maintenance of host health, including aiding digestion of otherwise indigestible dietary compounds, synthesis of vitamins and other beneficial metabolites, immune system regulation and enhanced resistance against colonisation by pathogenic microorganisms. Conversely, the intestinal microbiota is also a potent source of antigens and potentially harmful compounds. In health, humans can therefore be considered to exist in a state of natural balance with their microbial inhabitants. A shift in the balance of microbiota composition such that it may become deleterious to host health is termed "dysbiosis". Dysbiosis of the gut microbiota has been implicated in numerous disorders, ranging from intestinal maladies such as inflammatory bowel diseases and colorectal cancer to disorders with more systemic effects such as diabetes, metabolic syndrome and atopy. Given the far reaching influence of the intestinal microbiota on human health a clear future goal must be to develop reliable means to alter the composition of the microbiota and restore a healthy balance of microbial species. While it is clear that much fundamental research remains to be done, potentially important therapeutic options include narrow spectrum antibiotics, novel probiotics, dietary interventions and more radical techniques such as faecal transplantation, all of which aim to suppress clinical dysbiosis, restore intestinal microbiota diversity and improve host health.

  12. Acquired causes of intestinal malabsorption.

    PubMed

    van der Heide, F

    2016-04-01

    This review focuses on the acquired causes, diagnosis, and treatment of intestinal malabsorption. Intestinal absorption is a complex process that depends on many variables, including the digestion of nutrients within the intestinal lumen, the absorptive surface of the small intestine, the membrane transport systems, and the epithelial absorptive enzymes. Acquired causes of malabsorption are classified by focussing on the three phases of digestion and absorption: 1) luminal/digestive phase, 2) mucosal/absorptive phase, and 3) transport phase. Most acquired diseases affect the luminal/digestive phase. These include short bowel syndrome, extensive small bowel inflammation, motility disorders, and deficiencies of digestive enzymes or bile salts. Diagnosis depends on symptoms, physical examination, and blood and stool tests. There is no gold standard for the diagnosis of malabsorption. Further testing should be based on the specific clinical context and the suspected underlying disease. Therapy is directed at nutritional support by enteral or parenteral feeding and screening for and supplementation of deficiencies in vitamins and minerals. Early enteral feeding is important for intestinal adaptation in short bowel syndrome. Medicinal treatment options for diarrhoea in malabsorption include loperamide, codeine, cholestyramine, or antibiotics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Intestinal Microbiota Metabolism and Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tian-Xing; Niu, Hai-Tao; Zhang, Shu-Yang

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This review aimed to summarize the relationship between intestinal microbiota metabolism and cardiovascular disease (CVD) and to propose a novel CVD therapeutic target. Data Sources: This study was based on data obtained from PubMed and EMBASE up to June 30, 2015. Articles were selected using the following search terms: “Intestinal microbiota”, “trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO)”, “trimethylamine (TMA)”, “cardiovascular”, and “atherosclerosis”. Study Selection: Studies were eligible if they present information on intestinal microbiota metabolism and atherosclerosis. Studies on TMA-containing nutrients were also included. Results: A new CVD risk factor, TMAO, was recently identified. It has been observed that several TMA-containing compounds may be catabolized by specific intestinal microbiota, resulting in TMA release. TMA is subsequently converted to TMAO in the liver. Several preliminary studies have linked TMAO to CVD, particularly atherosclerosis; however, the details of this relationship remain unclear. Conclusions: Intestinal microbiota metabolism is associated with atherosclerosis and may represent a promising therapeutic target with respect to CVD management. PMID:26481750

  14. Human intestinal capillariasis in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Saichua, Prasert; Nithikathkul, Choosak; Kaewpitoon, Natthawut

    2008-01-01

    Intestinal capillariasis caused by Capillaria philippinensis appeared first in the Philippines and subsequently in Thailand, Japan, Iran, Egypt and Taiwan; major outbreaks have occurred in the Philippines and Thailand. This article reviews the epidemiology, history and sources of C. philippinensis infection in Thailand. The annual epidemiological surveillance reports indicated that 82 accumulated cases of intestinal capillariasis were found in Thailand from 1994-2006. That made Thailand a Capillaria-prevalent area. Sisaket, in northeast Thailand, was the first province which has reported intestinal capillariasis. Moreover, Buri Ram presented a high prevalence of intestinal capillariasis, totaling 24 cases from 1994-2006. About half of all cases have consumed raw or undercooked fish. However, even if the numbers of the intestinal capillariasis cases in Thailand is reduced, C. philippinensis infection cases are still reported. The improvement of personal hygiene, specifically avoiding consumption of undercooked fish and promoting a health education campaign are required. These strategies may minimize or eliminate C. philippinensis infection in Thailand. PMID:18203280

  15. [Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction].

    PubMed

    Muñoz, M T; Solís Herruzo, J A

    2007-02-01

    Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction (CIPO) is a syndrome characterized by the presence of recurrent episodes of clinical intestinal obstruction in the absence of obstructive lesions. Although this syndrome is rare, it causes a high morbidity. It is caused by a disturbance of the intestinal motility, that results in a failure of the progression of the intestinal content. Basically, the failure of the intestinal motility is a consequence of muscular disorder, neurological disorder or both. Usually, CIPO is secondary to other systemic disease; however, in the last years, many cases of primary CIPO have been described. The use of new manometric tecniques and specific histological procedures have allowed to clarify the pathogenesis of some of these entities including mitochondrial diseases and paraneoplasic syndromes. Clinical manifestations of CIPO are diverse, depending on the location and extension of the motility disorder. As the diagnosis of this disease is usually not an easy task, patients frecuently undergo unnecesary surgical interventions, are diagnosed of psyquiatric disorders, or the correct diagnosis is delayed several years after the first symptoms arise. The aims of the treatment are to maintain the nutritional condition and to improve symptoms using nutritional measures, drugs or, eventually, endoscopical or surgical procedures.

  16. Intestinal circulation during inhalation anesthesia

    SciTech Connect

    Tverskoy, M.; Gelman, S.; Fowler, K.C.; Bradley, E.L.

    1985-04-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the influence of inhalational agents on the intestinal circulation in an isolated loop preparation. Sixty dogs were studied, using three intestinal segments from each dog. Selected intestinal segments were pumped with aortic blood at a constant pressure of 100 mmHg. A mixture of /sub 86/Rb and 9-microns spheres labeled with /sup 141/Ce was injected into the arterial cannula supplying the intestinal loop, while mesenteric venous blood was collected for activity counting. A very strong and significant correlation was found between rubidium clearance and microsphere entrapment (r = 0.97, P less than 0.0001). Nitrous oxide anesthesia was accompanied by a higher vascular resistance (VR), lower flow (F), rubidium clearance (Cl-Rb), and microspheres entrapment (Cl-Sph) than pentobarbital anesthesia, indicating that the vascular bed in the intestinal segment was constricted and flow (total and nutritive) decreased. Halothane, enflurane, and isoflurane anesthesia were accompanied by a much lower arteriovenous oxygen content difference (AVDO/sub 2/) and oxygen uptake than pentobarbital or nitrous oxide. Compared with pentobarbital, enflurane anesthesia was not accompanied by marked differences in VR, F, Cl-Rb, and Cl-Sph; halothane at 2 MAC decreased VR and increased F and Cl-Rb while isoflurane increased VR and decreased F. alpha-Adrenoceptor blockade with phentolamine (1 mg . kg-1) abolished isoflurane-induced vasoconstriction, suggesting that the increase in VR was mediated via circulating catecholamines.

  17. Prebiotics in Chronic Intestinal Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Looijer–van Langen, Mirjam A.C.; Dieleman, Levinus A.

    2016-01-01

    Prebiotics are nondigestible fermentable fibers that are reported to have health benefits for the host. Older as well as more recent studies show beneficial effects in experimental colitis and lately also in human inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), such as Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis, and chronic pouchitis. In this review we give an overview of the benefits of prebiotics in rodent IBD models and in IBD patients and discuss their possible protective mechanisms. Commensal intestinal bacteria induce and perpetuate chronic intestinal inflammation, whereas others are protective. However, most of the current medications are directed against the exaggerated proinflammatory immune response of the host, some of them toxic and costly. Feeding prebiotics changes the composition of the intestinal microflora toward more protective intestinal bacteria and alters systemic and mucosal immune responses of the host. Therapy for IBD targeting intestinal bacteria and their function is just emerging. Prebiotics have the promise to be relatively safe, inexpensive, and easy to administer. Unraveling their protective mechanisms will help to develop rational applications of prebiotics. However, the initial promising results with dietary prebiotics in preclinical trials as well as small studies in human IBD will need to be confirmed in large randomized controlled clinical trials. PMID:18831524

  18. Intestinal mycoplasma in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Roediger, W E W

    2004-01-01

    Intestinal diversion with reconnection in active Crohn's disease (CD) indicates that luminal contents or bacteria contribute to the formation of CD lesions. Fluorescent staining for mycoplasma in freshly resected Crohn's tissue and electron microscopy reveal intracellular organisms akin to mycoplasma. Historically, tissue culture of CD has shown mycoplasma described as contaminants. Mycoplasma are surface epithelial parasites requiring exogenous cholesterol for membrane stability and cell entry. PCR of intestinal tissue has shown Mycoplasma pneumoniae to be detectable more significantly in CD. Oral M. iowae in experimental poultry localizes to the distal small bowel and colon. Hypothetically, lipopeptides of mycoplasmal membranes are proposed to cause chronicity and stronger immune responses than by other bacteria. 'Intestinal' mycoplasmas, from a number of observations, deserve consideration as organisms mediating inflammation of acute and chronic CD.

  19. The Intestinal Absorption of Folates

    PubMed Central

    Visentin, Michele; Diop-Bove, Ndeye; Zhao, Rongbao; Goldman, I. David

    2014-01-01

    The properties of intestinal folate absorption were documented decades ago. However, it was only recently that the proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT) was identified and its critical role in folate transport across the apical brush-border membrane of the proximal small intestine established by the loss-of-function mutations identified in the PCFT gene in subjects with hereditary folate malabsorption and, more recently, by the Pcft-null mouse. This article reviews the current understanding of the properties of PCFT-mediated transport and how they differ from those of the reduced folate carrier. Other processes that contribute to the transport of folates across the enterocyte, along with the contribution of the enterohepatic circulation, are considered. Important unresolved issues are addressed, including the mechanism of intestinal folate absorption in the absence of PCFT and regulation of PCFT gene expression. The impact of a variety of ions, organic molecules, and drugs on PCFT-mediated folate transport is described. PMID:24512081

  20. [Intestinal cystic duplication. Case report].

    PubMed

    Herranz Barbero, Ana; Prat Ortells, Jordi; Muñoz Fernández, M Elena; Castañón García-Alix, Montserrat; Figueras Aloy, Josep

    2017-08-01

    Intestinal cystic duplications are rare congenital anomalies, with an estimated incidence of approximately 1:4500 autopsies. The etiopathogenesis is uncertain. These duplications are cystic, tubular or diverticular structures lined with gastrointestinal mucosa. They share a common smooth muscle wall with the gastrointestinal tract but usually their lumens do not communicate with each other. Gastric duplication cysts represent 7-9% of the gastrointestinal tract duplication. They can be diagnosed prenatally by fetal ultrasound; magnetic resonance imaging characterizes the cyst and excludes other malformations. Postnatal ultrasound shows a characteristic double walled cyst. Newborns are usually asymptomatic, although nonspecific gastrointestinal symptoms, intestinal obstruction due to mass effect, volvulus or infection are described. In asymptomatic patients, clinical follow-up and periodic image controls are recommended. Elective surgical resection is the treatment of choice, using minimally invasive technique whenever possible. A case of prenatally suspected intestinal cystic duplication is presented. Sociedad Argentina de Pediatría.

  1. Characterization of moose intestinal glycosphingolipids.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Miralda Madar; Dedic, Benjamin; Lundholm, Klara; Branzell, Filip Berner; Barone, Angela; Benktander, John; Teneberg, Susann

    2015-08-01

    As a part of a systematic investigation of the species-specific expression of glycosphingolipids, acid and non-acid glycosphingolipids were isolated from three small intestines and one large intestine of the moose (Alces alces). The glycosphingolipids were characterized by binding of monoclonal antibodies, lectins and bacteria in chromatogram binding assays, and by mass spectrometry. The non-acid fractions were complex mixtures, and all had glycosphingolipids belonging to the lacto- and neolactoseries (lactotriaosylceramide, lactotetraosylceramide, neolactotetraosylceramide, Galα3-Le(x) hexaosylceramide, and lacto-neolactohexaosylceramide), globo-series (globotriaosylceramide and globotetraosylceramide), and isogloboseries (isoglobotriaosylceramide). Penta- and heptaglycosylceramides with terminal Galili determinants were also characterized. Furthermore, glycosphingolipids with terminal blood group O determinants (H triaosylceramide, H type 2 pentaosylceramide, H type 1 penta- and heptaosylceramide) were characterized in two of the moose small intestines, and in the one large intestine, while the third small intestine had glycosphingolipids with terminal blood group A determinants (A tetraosylceramide, A type 1 hexa- and octaosylceramide, A dodecaosylceramide). The acid glycosphingolipid fractions of moose small and large intestine contained sulfatide, and the gangliosides GM3, GD3, GD1a, GD1b, and also NeuGc and NeuAc variants of the Sd(a) ganglioside and the sialyl-globopenta/SSEA-4 ganglioside. In humans, the NeuAc-globopenta/SSEA-4 ganglioside is a marker of embryonic and adult stem cells, and is also expressed in several human cancers. This is the first time sialyl-globopentaosylceramide/SSEA-4 has been characterized in a fully differentiated normal tissue, and also the first time NeuGc-globopentaosylceramide has been characterized.

  2. What Are the Risk Factors for Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prevention What Are the Risk Factors for Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma? A risk factor is anything that changes ... Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma Be Prevented? More In Small Intestine Cancer About Small Intestine Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, ...

  3. What Should You Ask Your Doctor About Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma?

    MedlinePlus

    ... What Should You Ask Your Doctor About Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma? It’s important to have honest, open discussions ... Doctor About Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma? More In Small Intestine Cancer About Small Intestine Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, ...

  4. Regulation of intestinal blood flow.

    PubMed

    Matheson, P J; Wilson, M A; Garrison, R N

    2000-09-01

    The gastrointestinal system anatomically is positioned to perform two distinct functions: to digest and absorb ingested nutrients and to sustain barrier function to prevent transepithelial migration of bacteria and antigens. Alterations in these basic functions contribute to a variety of clinical scenarios. These primary functions intrinsically require splanchnic blood flow at both the macrovascular and microvascular levels of perfusion. Therefore, a greater understanding of the mechanisms that regulate intestinal vascular perfusion in the normal state and during pathophysiological conditions would be beneficial. The purpose of this review is to summarize the current understanding regarding the regulatory mechanisms of intestinal blood flow in fasted and fed conditions and during pathological stress.

  5. Radiation-induced intestinal pseudoobstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Perino, L.E.; Schuffler, M.D.; Mehta, S.J.; Everson, G.T.

    1986-10-01

    A case of intestinal pseudoobstruction occurring 30 yr after radiation therapy is described. Mechanical causes of obstruction were excluded by laparotomy. Histology of full-thickness sections of the small bowel revealed vascular ectasia and sclerosis, serosal fibrosis, neuronal proliferation within the submucosa, and degeneration of the muscle fibers of the circular layer of the muscularis propria. On the basis of the clinical and histologic findings we conclude that, in this patient, intestinal pseudoobstruction was due to muscular and neuronal injury from abdominal irradiation.

  6. Human Enteroids/Colonoids and Intestinal Organoids Functionally Recapitulate Normal Intestinal Physiology and Pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Zachos, Nicholas C; Kovbasnjuk, Olga; Foulke-Abel, Jennifer; In, Julie; Blutt, Sarah E; de Jonge, Hugo R; Estes, Mary K; Donowitz, Mark

    2016-02-19

    Identification of Lgr5 as the intestinal stem cell marker as well as the growth factors necessary to replicate adult intestinal stem cell division has led to the establishment of the methods to generate "indefinite" ex vivo primary intestinal epithelial cultures, termed "mini-intestines." Primary cultures developed from isolated intestinal crypts or stem cells (termed enteroids/colonoids) and from inducible pluripotent stem cells (termed intestinal organoids) are being applied to study human intestinal physiology and pathophysiology with great expectations for translational applications, including regenerative medicine. Here we discuss the physiologic properties of these cultures, their current use in understanding diarrhea-causing host-pathogen interactions, and potential future applications.

  7. Intestinal disaccharidase activities in the chick

    PubMed Central

    Siddons, R. C.

    1969-01-01

    1. Disaccharidase activities of the small and large intestines of the chick were studied. 2. Homogenates of the small intestine readily hydrolysed maltose, sucrose and palatinose (6-O-α-d-glucopyranosyl-d-fructose), hydrolysed lactose slowly and did not hydrolyse trehalose and cellobiose. 3. Within the small intestine the disaccharidases were located mainly in the intestinal wall; the activity in the contents accounted for less than 5% of the total activity. 4. The disaccharidases were non-uniformly distributed along the small intestine, the activities being greatest in the middle section. 5. The disaccharidase activities increased with age between 1 and 43 days. 6. Homogenates of the large intestine and contents readily hydrolysed maltose, sucrose, palatinose and lactose and hydrolysed cellobiose and trehalose slowly. 7. The large-intestinal disaccharidases were located mainly in the contents. 8. Similar Km and pH optimum values were found for the maltase, sucrase and palatinase activities of the large and small intestines. 9. The lactase activity of the large intestine was markedly affected by diet and had different Km and pH values from the small intestinal lactase. 10. Low activities of intestinal disaccharidase were found in 12-day-old embryos and marked increases in the intestinal disaccharidases of the developing embryo occurred 2–3 days before hatching. PMID:5774506

  8. Circadian Disorganization Alters Intestinal Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Voigt, Robin M.; Forsyth, Christopher B.; Green, Stefan J.; Mutlu, Ece; Engen, Phillip; Vitaterna, Martha H.; Turek, Fred W.; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal dysbiosis and circadian rhythm disruption are associated with similar diseases including obesity, metabolic syndrome, and inflammatory bowel disease. Despite the overlap, the potential relationship between circadian disorganization and dysbiosis is unknown; thus, in the present study, a model of chronic circadian disruption was used to determine the impact on the intestinal microbiome. Male C57BL/6J mice underwent once weekly phase reversals of the light:dark cycle (i.e., circadian rhythm disrupted mice) to determine the impact of circadian rhythm disruption on the intestinal microbiome and were fed either standard chow or a high-fat, high-sugar diet to determine how diet influences circadian disruption-induced effects on the microbiome. Weekly phase reversals of the light:dark (LD) cycle did not alter the microbiome in mice fed standard chow; however, mice fed a high-fat, high-sugar diet in conjunction with phase shifts in the light:dark cycle had significantly altered microbiota. While it is yet to be established if some of the adverse effects associated with circadian disorganization in humans (e.g., shift workers, travelers moving across time zones, and in individuals with social jet lag) are mediated by dysbiosis, the current study demonstrates that circadian disorganization can impact the intestinal microbiota which may have implications for inflammatory diseases. PMID:24848969

  9. Intestinal fistula after magnets ingestion

    PubMed Central

    Macedo, Maurício; Velhote, Manoel Carlos Prieto; Maschietto, Rafael Forti; Waksman, Renata Dejtiar

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Accidental ingestion of magnetic foreign bodies has become more common due to increased availability of objects and toys with magnetic elements. The majority of them traverse the gastrointestinal system spontaneously without complication. However, ingestion of multiple magnets may require surgical resolution. The case of an 18-month girl who developed an intestinal fistula after ingestion of two magnets is reported. PMID:23843068

  10. Glutamine and intestinal barrier function.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Wu, Guoyao; Zhou, Zhigang; Dai, Zhaolai; Sun, Yuli; Ji, Yun; Li, Wei; Wang, Weiwei; Liu, Chuang; Han, Feng; Wu, Zhenlong

    2015-10-01

    The intestinal barrier integrity is essential for the absorption of nutrients and health in humans and animals. Dysfunction of the mucosal barrier is associated with increased gut permeability and development of multiple gastrointestinal diseases. Recent studies highlighted a critical role for glutamine, which had been traditionally considered as a nutritionally non-essential amino acid, in activating the mammalian target of rapamycin cell signaling in enterocytes. In addition, glutamine has been reported to enhance intestinal and whole-body growth, to promote enterocyte proliferation and survival, and to regulate intestinal barrier function in injury, infection, weaning stress, and other catabolic conditions. Mechanistically, these effects were mediated by maintaining the intracellular redox status and regulating expression of genes associated with various signaling pathways. Furthermore, glutamine stimulates growth of the small intestinal mucosa in young animals and also enhances ion transport by the gut in neonates and adults. Growing evidence supports the notion that glutamine is a nutritionally essential amino acid for neonates and a conditionally essential amino acid for adults. Thus, as a functional amino acid with multiple key physiological roles, glutamine holds great promise in protecting the gut from atrophy and injury under various stress conditions in mammals and other animals.

  11. Environmental contaminants and intestinal function

    PubMed Central

    Banwell, John G.

    1979-01-01

    The environmental contaminants which have their major effects on the small intestine may be classified into five major categories: (1) bacterial, viral, and parasitic agents, (2) food and plant substances, (3) environmental and industrial products, (4) pharmaceutical agents, and (5) toxic agents whose metabolic effects are dependent on interreaction with intestinal bacterial flora, other physical agents (detergents), human intestinal enzyme deficiency states, and the nutritional state of the host. Bacterial, viral, and parasitic agents are the most important of all such agents, being responsible for significant mortality and morbidity in association with diarrheal diseases of adults and children. Several plant substances ingested as foods have unique effects on the small bowel as well as from contaminants such as fungi on poorly preserved grains and cereals. Environmental and industrial products, in spite of their widespread prevalence in industrial societies as contaminants, are less important unless unexpectedly intense exposure occurs to the intestinal tract. Pharmaceutical agents of several types interreact with the small bowel mucosa causing impairment of transport processes for fluid and electrolytes, amino acid, lipid and sugars as well as vitamins. These interreactions may be dependent on bacterial metabolic activity, association with detergents, mucosal enzyme deficiency state (disaccharidases), and the state of nutrition of the subject. PMID:540611

  12. Intestinal perfusion monitoring using photoplethysmography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akl, Tony J.; Wilson, Mark A.; Ericson, M. Nance; Coté, Gerard L.

    2013-08-01

    In abdominal trauma patients, monitoring intestinal perfusion and oxygen consumption is essential during the resuscitation period. Photoplethysmography is an optical technique potentially capable of monitoring these changes in real time to provide the medical staff with a timely and quantitative measure of the adequacy of resuscitation. The challenges for using optical techniques in monitoring hemodynamics in intestinal tissue are discussed, and the solutions to these challenges are presented using a combination of Monte Carlo modeling and theoretical analysis of light propagation in tissue. In particular, it is shown that by using visible wavelengths (i.e., 470 and 525 nm), the perfusion signal is enhanced and the background contribution is decreased compared with using traditional near-infrared wavelengths leading to an order of magnitude enhancement in the signal-to-background ratio. It was further shown that, using the visible wavelengths, similar sensitivity to oxygenation changes could be obtained (over 50% compared with that of near-infrared wavelengths). This is mainly due to the increased contrast between tissue and blood in that spectral region and the confinement of the photons to the thickness of the small intestine. Moreover, the modeling results show that the source to detector separation should be limited to roughly 6 mm while using traditional near-infrared light, with a few centimeters source to detector separation leads to poor signal-to-background ratio. Finally, a visible wavelength system is tested in an in vivo porcine study, and the possibility of monitoring intestinal perfusion changes is showed.

  13. Intestinal surgery of adult cattle.

    PubMed

    Anderson, David E; Ewoldt, Jennifer M Ivany

    2005-03-01

    Surgical disorders of the gastrointestinal tract of cattle occur occasionally, and veterinarians are challenged to determine an accurate diagnosis and treatment for these conditions. Although surgical diseases most commonly occur in the forestomachs (dislocated abomasum, reticuloperitonitis) and the colons (cecal dilation), this article focuses n lesions in the small intestine (duodenum, jejunum, ileum).

  14. [Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction].

    PubMed

    Joly, Francisca; Amiot, Aurélien; Coffin, Benoît; Lavergne-Slove, Anne; Messing, Bernard; Bouhnik, Yoram

    2006-01-01

    Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction (CIPO) is a disease characterized by episodes resembling mechanical obstruction in the absence of organic, systemic, or metabolic disorders. Pseudo-obstruction is an uncommon condition and can result from primary (40%) or secondary (60%) causes. The most common symptoms are nausea, vomiting, abdominal distension, abdominal pain and constipation or diarrhea. These symptoms are usually present many years before CIPO diagnosis. They can lead to severe electrolyte disorders and malnutrition. Principles for management of patients with CIPO are: to establish a correct clinical diagnosis in excluding mechanical obstruction; to perform a symptomatic and physiologic assessment of the gastrointestinal tract involved; to look for extra-intestinal manifestations, especially for myopathy and neuropathy; to discuss in some cases a surgery for full-thickness intestinal biopsies, and/or a neuromuscular biopsy in case of mitochondrial cytopathy suspicion. The management is primarily focused on symptom control and nutritional support to prevent weight loss and malnutrition. Treatment of CIPO includes prokinetic agents which may help to reduce gastrointestinal symptoms Courses of antibiotics may be needed in patients with symptoms suggestive of bacterial overgrowth. When necessary, enteral nutrition is preferred. In carefully selected patients, feeding jejunostomy with or without decompression gastrostomy may be tried. Long term parenteral nutrition should be reserved for patients who can not tolerate enteral nutrition. Intestinal transplantation can be discussed in selected patients.

  15. [Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction].

    PubMed

    Ohkubo, Hidenori; Inoh, Yumi; Fuyuki, Akiko; Nakajima, Atsushi

    2015-05-01

    Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction(CIPO) is a rare severe digestive disease in which clinical symptoms of intestinal obstruction appear without any mechanical cause. Pathophysiologically, CIPO shows ineffective intestinal propulsion due to an impairment of intestinal smooth muscle, enteric nervous system, and interstitial cells of Cajal(ICC). Sustained increased intra-bowel pressure often causes small intestinal malabsorption and bacterial translocation, and leads to malnutrition and blood stream infection (sepsis). Key points of the medical approach for CIPO are to improve nutritional status and reduce abdominal symptoms. Dietary cure and defecation control are the main options in mild cases, whereas home-parenteral-nutrition(HPN) and decompression therapy are often needed in severe cases. Stimulant laxatives, prokinetics and herbal medicine are usually used but often in fail. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrojejunostomy(PEG-J) tube may be burdenless compared to conventional ileus tube. Most important points in the management of this disease are to make a correct diagnosis as early as possible and avoid unnecessary surgery. However, no clear diagnostic criteria have been established so far. Manometry, scintigraphy, and full-thickness biopsy are the major examination for the CIPO diagnosis in the Western countries; however these specialized examinations are not popular in Japan. Therefore the Research Group(chief investigator, Atsushi Nakajima) proposed Japanese diagnostic criteria in 2009 to facilitate the diagnosis of this rare disease by the general physician. In 2013, we have reported that cine-MRI is a non-invasive diagnostic method for CIPO. Although further data are eagerly awaited, it can become a promising diagnostic tool in CIPO patients. Furthermore the Japanese criteria have been revised, and in 2014, the comprehensive criteria from a child to an adult have been devised. In 2015, CIPO is newly certified as Specified Rare and Intractable Disease which is

  16. Intestinal Epithelial Sirtuin 1 Regulates Intestinal Inflammation During Aging in Mice by Altering the Intestinal Microbiota.

    PubMed

    Wellman, Alicia S; Metukuri, Mallikarjuna R; Kazgan, Nevzat; Xu, Xiaojiang; Xu, Qing; Ren, Natalie S X; Czopik, Agnieszka; Shanahan, Michael T; Kang, Ashley; Chen, Willa; Azcarate-Peril, M Andrea; Gulati, Ajay S; Fargo, David C; Guarente, Leonard; Li, Xiaoling

    2017-09-01

    Intestinal epithelial homeostasis is maintained by complex interactions among epithelial cells, commensal gut microorganisms, and immune cells. Disruption of this homeostasis is associated with disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), but the mechanisms of this process are not clear. We investigated how Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), a conserved mammalian NAD(+)-dependent protein deacetylase, senses environmental stress to alter intestinal integrity. We performed studies of mice with disruption of Sirt1 specifically in the intestinal epithelium (SIRT1 iKO, villin-Cre+, Sirt1(flox/flox) mice) and control mice (villin-Cre-, Sirt1(flox/flox)) on a C57BL/6 background. Acute colitis was induced in some mice by addition of 2.5% dextran sodium sulfate to drinking water for 5-9 consecutive days. Some mice were given antibiotics via their drinking water for 4 weeks to deplete their microbiota. Some mice were fed with a cholestyramine-containing diet for 7 days to sequester their bile acids. Feces were collected and proportions of microbiota were analyzed by 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing and quantitative PCR. Intestines were collected from mice and gene expression profiles were compared by microarray and quantitative PCR analyses. We compared levels of specific mRNAs between colon tissues from age-matched patients with ulcerative colitis (n=10) vs without IBD (n=8, controls). Mice with intestinal deletion of SIRT1 (SIRT1 iKO) had abnormal activation of Paneth cells starting at the age of 5-8 months, with increased activation of NF-κB, stress pathways, and spontaneous inflammation at 22-24 months of age, compared with control mice. SIRT1 iKO mice also had altered fecal microbiota starting at 4-6 months of age compared with control mice, in part because of altered bile acid metabolism. Moreover, SIRT1 iKO mice with defective gut microbiota developed more severe colitis than control mice. Intestinal tissues from patients with ulcerative colitis expressed significantly lower

  17. Regulation of intestinal IgA responses

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Na; Hu, Shaomin

    2015-01-01

    The intestine harbors enormous numbers of commensal bacteria and is under frequent attack from food-borne pathogens and toxins. A properly regulated immune response is critical for homeostatic maintenance of commensals and for protection against infection and toxins in the intestine. IgA isotype antibodies function specifically in mucosal sites such as the intestines to help maintain intestinal health by binding to and regulating commensal microbiota, pathogens and toxins. IgA antibodies are produced by intestinal IgA antibody-secreting plasma cells generated in gut-associated lymphoid tissues from naïve B cells in response to stimulations of the intestinal bacteria and components. Research on generation, migration, and maintenance of IgA-secreting cells is important in our effort to understand the biology of IgA responses and to help better design vaccines against intestinal infections. PMID:25837997

  18. [Intestinal-brain axis. Neuronal and immune-inflammatory mechanisms of brain and intestine pathology].

    PubMed

    Bondarenko, V M; Riabichenko, E V

    2013-01-01

    Mutually directed connections between intestine and brain are implemented by endocrine, neural and immune systems and nonspecific natural immunity. Intestine micro flora as an active participant of intestine-brain axis not only influences intestine functions but also stimulates the development of CNS in perinatal period and interacts with higher nervous centers causing depression and cognitive disorders in pathology. A special role belongs to intestine microglia. Apart from mechanic (protective) and trophic functions for intestine neurons, glia implements neurotransmitter, immunologic, barrier and motoric functions in the intestine. An interconnection between intestine barrier function and hematoencephalic barrier regulation exists. Chronic endotoxinemia as a result of intestine barrier dysfunction forms sustained inflammation state in periventricular zone of the brain with consequent destabilization of hematoencephalic barriers and spread oF inflammation to other parts of the brain resulting in neurodegradation development.

  19. The Contributions of Human Mini-Intestines to the Study of Intestinal Physiology and Pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Yu, Huimin; Hasan, Nesrin M; In, Julie G; Estes, Mary K; Kovbasnjuk, Olga; Zachos, Nicholas C; Donowitz, Mark

    2017-02-10

    The lack of accessibility to normal and diseased human intestine and the inability to separate the different functional compartments of the intestine even when tissue could be obtained have held back the understanding of human intestinal physiology. Clevers and his associates identified intestinal stem cells and established conditions to grow "mini-intestines" ex vivo in differentiated and undifferentiated conditions. This pioneering work has made a new model of the human intestine available and has begun making contributions to the understanding of human intestinal transport in normal physiologic conditions and the pathophysiology of intestinal diseases. However, this model is reductionist and lacks many of the complexities of normal intestine. Consequently, it is not yet possible to predict how great the advances using this model will be for understanding human physiology and pathophysiology, nor how the model will be modified to include multiple other intestinal cell types and physical forces necessary to more closely approximate normal intestine. This review describes recent studies using mini-intestines, which have readdressed previously established models of normal intestinal transport physiology and newly examined intestinal pathophysiology. The emphasis is on studies with human enteroids grown either as three-dimensional spheroids or two-dimensional monolayers. In addition, comments are provided on mouse studies in cases when human studies have not yet been described.

  20. Surgical Aspects of Intestinal Ascariasis

    PubMed Central

    Ajao, Oluwole G.; Solanke, Toriola F.

    1977-01-01

    At the University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria, a common differential diagnosis of acute abdomen is intestinal ascariasis. This condition mimics many causes of acute abdomen so that accurate pre-operative diagnosis depends mainly on a high index of suspicion. The purpose of this paper is to call attention to this condition which is prevalent in tropical countries, where preventive and social medicine have not reached their peak, and to review the pathological processes resulting from this disease. PMID:875064

  1. [Water and intestinal parasitic diseases].

    PubMed

    Romanenko, N A; Belova, E G; Baburina, L V; Novosil'tsev, G I; Chernyshenko, A I

    2004-01-01

    The paper presents data on the rates of Lamblia cyst dissemination of surface water sources in foreign countries, the Russian Federation, Moscow, and the Moscow Region. It shows a role of drinking water in the spread of intestinal parasitic diseases. In accordance with parasitological parameters, specific data on improvement of methodological control of water quality are presented. The dosages of ultraviolet radiation are given in relation to water decontamination of parasitic disease germs.

  2. Glycoprotein biosynthesis in small intestine

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young S.; Perdomo, Jose

    1972-01-01

    Rat small intestinal mucosa was examined for ability to produce mucins with human blood group A, B, and H activity. Blood group activity of the mucins was compared to antigenic activity of red blood cells in individual rats and the enzymatic basis for differences was investigated. Red cells in all the rats examined contained human blood group A and B antigens. All rats synthesized intestinal mucins having B and H antigenic activity but 57% failed to produce mucins with blood group A activity (A-); the remaining 43% (A+) produced A substance. The activities of five glycosyltransferases including α(1→2) fucosyltransferase, the determinant of human secretor status, were measured in the intestine of A+ and A- rats. Four enzymes were the same in both groups, while the fifth, N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase, was present only in A+ rats. The specificity of this latter enzyme, as found in the rat, appeared similar to that in humans, since it catalyzed addition of N-acetyl-D-galactosamine only to acceptors which had the H determinant structure. In the presence of the enzyme, A- mucin could be converted to A+ mucin; this was shown both by hemagglutination inhibition and immunoprecipitin studies of the products of incubation of A- mucin with UDP-N-acetyl-D-galactosamine and the enzyme. These studies indicate that the difference between A+ and A- rats is due to the apparent absence of N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase in the intestinal mucosa of A- rats. These rats may provide experimental models for studies on the effect of ABO and secretor status on susceptibility to ulceration and carcinogenesis. Images PMID:4112001

  3. [Chronic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia].

    PubMed

    Castillo, T; Navarrete, J; Celestina, A

    1989-01-01

    Much has been written about gastric mucosae behavior and the occurrence of intestinal metaplasia. The aim of this paper is to learn something more about these matters in peruvian population. We selected 100 patients with endoscopically no localized lesions between 30 to 70 years of age. We took 8 samples of gastric mucosae in each patient which were carefully examined for the presence of inflammatory changes, settle the line type between antral and fundic mucosae and the frequency of intestinal metaplasia finding. The results showed disagreement between endoscopic and histological findings, so we conclude it is better to diagnose chronic gastritis on the basis of histological parameters. The line between antral and fundic mucosae was of the close type one found in 87% of all cases and it advanced proximally with increasing age. Intestinal metaplasia was present in 46% of the whole number of patients and the rate of occurrence increased in 50% over 50 years age. These findings will let us compare future investigations of gastric mucosae behavior with localized benign or malign lesions.

  4. Management of acute intestinal failure.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, Keith R

    2011-08-01

    Intestinal failure (IF) occurs when intestinal absorptive function is inadequate to maintain hydration and nutrition without enteral or parenteral supplements. It has been classified into three types depending on duration of nutrition support and reversibility. Type 1 IF is commonly seen in the peri-operative period as ileus and usually spontaneously resolves within 14 d. Type 2 IF is uncommon and is often associated with an intra-abdominal catastrophe, intestinal resection, sepsis, metabolic disturbances and undernutrition. Type 3 IF is a chronic condition in a metabolically stable patient, which usually requires long-term parenteral nutrition. This paper focuses on Types 1 and 2 IF (or acute IF) that are usually found in surgical wards. The objectives of this paper are to review the incidence, aetiology, prevention, management principles and outcome of acute IF. The paper discusses the resources necessary to manage acute IF, the indications for inter-hospital transfer and the practicalities of how to transfer and receive a patient with acute IF.

  5. Redox biology of the intestine

    PubMed Central

    Circu, Magdalena L.; Aw, Tak Yee

    2011-01-01

    The intestinal tract, known for its capability for self-renew, represents the first barrier of defense between the organism and its luminal environment. The thiol/disulfide redox systems comprising the glutathione/glutathione disulfide (GSH/GSSG), cysteine/cystine (Cys/CySS) and reduced and oxidized thioredoxin (Trx/TrxSS) redox couples play important roles in preserving tissue redox homeostasis, metabolic functions, and cellular integrity. Control of the thiol-disulfide status at the luminal surface is essential for maintaining mucus fluidity and absorption of nutrients, and protection against chemical-induced oxidant injury. Within intestinal cells, these redox couples preserve an environment that supports physiological processes and orchestrates networks of enzymatic reactions against oxidative stress. In this review, we focus on the intestinal redox and antioxidant systems, their subcellular compartmentation, redox signaling and epithelial turnover, and contribution of luminal microbiota, key aspects that are relevant to understanding redox-dependent processes in gut biology with implications for degenerative digestive disorders, such as inflammation and cancer. PMID:21831010

  6. Protozoon infections and intestinal permeability.

    PubMed

    Dagci, Hande; Ustun, Sebnem; Taner, Memduh S; Ersoz, Galip; Karacasu, Ferit; Budak, Seza

    2002-01-01

    Intestinal permeability (IP) studies using some macromolecules have been assumed to demonstrate the intactness of intestinal mucosa. The aim of the present study is to determine the changes in IP among patients with protozoan infections. Thirty nine patients with protozoan infections and ten healthy controls were enrolled in the study. Protozoa were diagnosed by Native-lugol, Richie and Trichrome staining of faeces. IP was evaluated by diethyl triamine penta acetic acid labeled with 99m Technetium (99mTc labeled DTPA) assay. The IP was found to have increased in patients with protozoan infections compared with control patients (7.20+/-5.52 vs. 4.47+/-0.65%, P=0.0017). The IP values were 9.91+/-10.05% in Giardia intestinalis group, 6.81+/-2.25% in Blastocystis hominis group, 5.78+/-2.84% in Entamoeba coli group. In comparison with the control group, the IP was significantly higher in G. intestinalis and B. hominis patients (P=0.0025, P=0.00037, respectively), but not in E. coli patients. In conclusion, the IP increases in patients with G. intestinalis and B. hominis but not with E. coli infection. This finding supports the view that IP increases during the course of protozoan infections which cause damage to the intestinal wall while non-pathogenic protozoan infections have no effect on IP. The increase in IP in patients with B. hominis brings forth the idea that B. hominis can be a pathogenic protozoan.

  7. Hirschsprung's disease - Postsurgical intestinal dysmotility

    PubMed Central

    Romaneli, Mariana Tresoldi das Neves; Ribeiro, Antonio Fernando; Bustorff-Silva, Joaquim Murray; de Carvalho, Rita Barbosa; Lomazi, Elizete Aparecida

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To describe the case of an infant with Hirschsprung's disease presenting as total colonic aganglionosis, which, after surgical resection of the aganglionic segment persisted with irreversible functional intestinal obstruction; discuss the difficulties in managing this form of congenital aganglionosis and discuss a plausible pathogenetic mechanism for this case. Case description: The diagnosis of Hirschsprung's disease presenting as total colonic aganglionosis was established in a two-month-old infant, after an episode of enterocolitis, hypovolemic shock and severe malnutrition. After colonic resection, the patient did not recover intestinal motor function that would allow enteral feeding. Postoperative examination of remnant ileum showed the presence of ganglionic plexus and a reduced number of interstitial cells of Cajal in the proximal bowel segments. At 12 months, the patient remains dependent on total parenteral nutrition. Comments: Hirschsprung's disease presenting as total colonic aganglionosis has clinical and surgical characteristics that differentiate it from the classic forms, complicating the diagnosis and the clinical and surgical management. The postoperative course may be associated with permanent morbidity due to intestinal dysmotility. The numerical reduction or alteration of neural connections in the interstitial cells of Cajal may represent a possible physiopathological basis for the condition. PMID:26979103

  8. INTESTINAL MICROBIOTA IN DIGESTIVE DISEASES.

    PubMed

    Passos, Maria do Carmo Friche; Moraes-Filho, Joaquim Prado

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, especially after the development of sophisticated metagenomic studies, research on the intestinal microbiota has increased, radically transforming our knowledge about the microbiome and its association with health maintenance and disease development in humans. Increasing evidence has shown that a permanent alteration in microbiota composition or function (dysbiosis) can alter immune responses, metabolism, intestinal permeability, and digestive motility, thereby promoting a proinflammatory state. Such alterations can mainly impair the host's immune and metabolic functions, thus favoring the onset of diseases such as diabetes, obesity, digestive, neurological, autoimmune, and neoplastic diseases. This comprehensive review is a compilation of the available literature on the formation of the complex intestinal ecosystem and its impact on the incidence of diseases such as obesity, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, irritable bowel syndrome, inflammatory bowel disease, celiac disease, and digestive neoplasms. Alterations in the composition and function of the gastrointestinal microbiota (dysbiosis) have a direct impact on human health and seem to have an important role in the pathogenesis of several gastrointestinal diseases, whether inflammatory, metabolic, or neoplastic ones.

  9. Immunogenetic control of the intestinal microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Marietta, Eric; Rishi, Abdul; Taneja, Veena

    2015-01-01

    All vertebrates contain a diverse collection of commensal, symbiotic and pathogenic microorganisms, such as bacteria, viruses and fungi, on their various body surfaces, and the ecological community of these microorganisms is referred to as the microbiota. Mucosal sites, such as the intestine, harbour the majority of microorganisms, and the human intestine contains the largest community of commensal and symbiotic bacteria. This intestinal community of bacteria is diverse, and there is a significant variability among individuals with respect to the composition of the intestinal microbiome. Both genetic and environmental factors can influence the diversity and composition of the intestinal bacteria with the predominant environmental factor being diet. So far, studies have shown that diet-dependent differences in the composition of intestinal bacteria can be classified into three groups, called enterotypes. Other environmental factors that can influence the composition include antibiotics, probiotics, smoking and drugs. Studies of monozygotic and dizygotic twins have proven that genetics plays a role. Recently, MHC II genes have been associated with specific microbial compositions in human infants and transgenic mice that express different HLA alleles. There is a growing list of genes/molecules that are involved with the sensing and monitoring of the intestinal lumen by the intestinal immune system that, when genetically altered, will significantly alter the composition of the intestinal microflora. The focus of this review will be on the genetic factors that influence the composition of the intestinal microflora. PMID:25913295

  10. An intestinal Trojan horse for gene delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Haisheng; Wang, Chao; Xu, Xiaoyang; Yu, Chenxu; Wang, Qun

    2015-02-01

    The intestinal epithelium forms an essential element of the mucosal barrier and plays a critical role in the pathophysiological response to different enteric disorders and diseases. As a major enteric dysfunction of the intestinal tract, inflammatory bowel disease is a genetic disease which results from the inappropriate and exaggerated mucosal immune response to the normal constituents in the mucosal microbiota environment. An intestine targeted drug delivery system has unique advantages in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. As a new concept in drug delivery, the Trojan horse system with the synergy of nanotechnology and host cells can achieve better therapeutic efficacy in specific diseases. Here, we demonstrated the feasibility of encapsulating DNA-functionalized gold nanoparticles into primary isolated intestinal stem cells to form an intestinal Trojan horse for gene regulation therapy of inflammatory bowel disease. This proof-of-concept intestinal Trojan horse will have a wide variety of applications in the diagnosis and therapy of enteric disorders and diseases.

  11. Epidermal Growth Factor and Intestinal Barrier Function

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hu; Yang, Shufen; Li, Zuohua; Zhong, Jinfeng

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) is a 53-amino acid peptide that plays an important role in regulating cell growth, survival, migration, apoptosis, proliferation, and differentiation. In addition, EGF has been established to be an effective intestinal regulator helping to protect intestinal barrier integrity, which was essential for the absorption of nutrients and health in humans and animals. Several researches have demonstrated that EGF via binding to the EGF receptor and subsequent activation of Ras/MAPK, PI3K/AKT, PLC-γ/PKC, and STATS signal pathways regulates intestinal barrier function. In this review, the relationship between epidermal growth factor and intestinal development and intestinal barrier is described, to provide a better understanding of the effects of EGF on intestine development and health. PMID:27524860

  12. Epithelial stem cells and intestinal cancer.

    PubMed

    Tan, Shawna; Barker, Nick

    2015-06-01

    The mammalian intestine is comprised of an epithelial layer that serves multiple functions in order to maintain digestive activity as well as intestinal homeostasis. This epithelial layer contains highly proliferative stem cells which facilitate its characteristic rapid regeneration. How these stem cells contribute to tissue repair and normal homeostasis are actively studied, and while we have a greater understanding of the molecular mechanisms and cellular locations that underlie stem cell regulation in this tissue, much still remains undiscovered. This review describes epithelial stem cells in both intestinal and non-intestinal tissues, as well as the strategies that have been used to further characterize the cells. Through a discussion of the current understanding of intestinal self-renewal and tissue regeneration in response to injury, we focus on how dysregulation of critical signaling pathways results in potentially oncogenic aberrations, and highlight issues that should be addressed in order for effective intestinal cancer therapies to be devised.

  13. Crosstalk between intestinal epithelial cell and adaptive immune cell in intestinal mucosal immunity.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jun Tao; Xu, An Tao; Shen, Jun; Ran, Zhi Hua

    2017-05-01

    Constantly challenged by luminal bacteria, intestinal epithelium forms both a physical and biochemical defense against pathogens. Besides, intestinal epithelium senses dynamic and continuous changes in luminal environment and transmits signals to subjacent immune cells accordingly. It has been long accepted that adaptive immune cells fulfill their roles partly by modulating function of intestinal epithelial cells. Recent studies have brought up the proposal that intestinal epithelial cells also actively participate in the regulation of adaptive immunity, especially CD4+ adaptive T cells, which indicates that there is reciprocal crosstalk between intestinal epithelial cells and adaptive immune cells, and the crosstalk may play important role in intestinal mucosal immunity. This Review makes a comprehensive summary about crosstalk between intestinal epithelial cells and CD4+ adaptive T cells in intestinal immunity. Special attention would be given to their implications in inflammatory bowel disease pathogenesis and potential therapeutic targets. © 2017 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  14. Cinnamon polyphenols regulate multiple metabolic pathways involved in intestinal lipid metabolism of primary small intestinal enterocytes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Increasing evidence suggests that dietary factors may affect the expression of multiple genes and signaling pathways including those that regulate intestinal lipoprotein metabolism. The small intestine is actively involved in the regulation of dietary lipid absorption, intracellular transport and me...

  15. Appendicular Tourniquet: A Cause of Intestinal Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Shivashankar, Santhosh Chikkanayakanahalli; Gangappa, Rajashekara Babu; Varghese, Edison Vadakkenchery

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal obstruction is one of the common surgical emergencies seen in daily practice. Postoperative adhesions are notorious for being the most common cause for intestinal obstruction. Occasionally, laparotomy findings do come as a surprise to surgeons. Here one such case is discussed. A patient was operated on with suspicion of intestinal obstruction secondary to postoperative adhesions. However, laparotomy revealed the appendix to be inflamed, curled around the terminal ileum and acting as a tourniquet. PMID:27437300

  16. The effect of gastric inhibitory polypeptide on intestinal glucose absorption and intestinal motility in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Eiichi; Hosokawa, Masaya; Harada, Norio; Yamane, Shunsuke; Hamasaki, Akihiro; Toyoda, Kentaro; Fujimoto, Shimpei; Fujita, Yoshihito; Fukuda, Kazuhito; Tsukiyama, Katsushi; Yamada, Yuichiro; Seino, Yutaka; Inagaki, Nobuya

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} Exogenous GIP inhibits intestinal motility through a somatostatin-mediated pathway. {yields} Exogenous GIP inhibits intestinal glucose absorption by reducing intestinal motility. {yields} The GIP-receptor-mediated action in intestine does not involve in GLP-1-mediated pathway. -- Abstract: Gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP) is released from the small intestine upon meal ingestion and increases insulin secretion from pancreatic {beta} cells. Although the GIP receptor is known to be expressed in small intestine, the effects of GIP in small intestine are not fully understood. This study was designed to clarify the effect of GIP on intestinal glucose absorption and intestinal motility. Intestinal glucose absorption in vivo was measured by single-pass perfusion method. Incorporation of [{sup 14}C]-glucose into everted jejunal rings in vitro was used to evaluate the effect of GIP on sodium-glucose co-transporter (SGLT). Motility of small intestine was measured by intestinal transit after oral administration of a non-absorbed marker. Intraperitoneal administration of GIP inhibited glucose absorption in wild-type mice in a concentration-dependent manner, showing maximum decrease at the dosage of 50 nmol/kg body weight. In glucagon-like-peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor-deficient mice, GIP inhibited glucose absorption as in wild-type mice. In vitro examination of [{sup 14}C]-glucose uptake revealed that 100 nM GIP did not change SGLT-dependent glucose uptake in wild-type mice. After intraperitoneal administration of GIP (50 nmol/kg body weight), small intestinal transit was inhibited to 40% in both wild-type and GLP-1 receptor-deficient mice. Furthermore, a somatostatin receptor antagonist, cyclosomatostatin, reduced the inhibitory effect of GIP on both intestinal transit and glucose absorption in wild-type mice. These results demonstrate that exogenous GIP inhibits intestinal glucose absorption by reducing intestinal motility through a somatostatin

  17. Segmental Dilatation of Intestine Presenting as Partial Intestinal Obstruction in a Child

    PubMed Central

    Khemakhem, Rachid; Elhassan, Elbager Othman

    2014-01-01

    Segmental dilatation of the intestine in pediatric age group is a rare entity. Patients usually present with partial intestinal obstruction which may delay surgical decision. Our case was an 18-month-old girl, who presented with partial intestinal obstruction, provisionally diagnosed as a case of Hirschsprung’s disease. Diagnostic evaluation with contrast study gave a clue of small intestinal obstruction with a dilated segment. PMID:25057472

  18. Intestinal myiasis caused by Muscina stabulans.

    PubMed

    Shivekar, S; Senthil, K; Srinivasan, R; Sureshbabu, L; Chand, P; Shanmugam, J; Gopal, R

    2008-01-01

    Intestinal maggots were isolated from a patient, who had reported to the Department of General Medicine of Sri Manakula Vinayagar Medical College, Puducherry, in southern India with complaints of abdominal distress, bloating of abdomen and intestinal hurry following a meal. He was diagnosed as a case of intestinal myiasis. Maggots obtained from his stool were identified to be Muscina stabulans based on characteristic patterns of posterior spiracles. He was treated with purgatives and albendazole. This intestinal myiasis case caused by M. stabulans is reported here because of its rare occurrence and the need to establish a correct diagnosis.

  19. Intestinal barriers to bacteria and their toxins

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, R.I.; Owen, R.L. )

    1990-01-01

    Immunologic and nonimmunologic processes work together to protect the host from the multitude of microorganisms residing within the intestinal lumen. Mechanical integrity of the intestinal epithelium, mucus in combination with secretory antibody, antimicrobial metabolites of indigenous microorganisms, and peristalsis each limit proliferation and systemic dissemination of enteric pathogens. Uptake of microorganisms by Peyer's patches and other intestinal lymphoid structures and translocation circumvent the mucosal barrier, especially in immunosuppressed individuals. Improved understanding of the composition and limitation of the intestinal barrier, coupled with advances in genetic engineering of immunogenic bacteria, development of oral delivery systems, and immunomodulators, now make enhancement of mucosal barriers feasible. 32 references.

  20. A mathematical model of intestinal oedema formation.

    PubMed

    Young, Jennifer; Rivière, Béatrice; Cox, Charles S; Uray, Karen

    2014-03-01

    Intestinal oedema is a medical condition referring to the build-up of excess fluid in the interstitial spaces of the intestinal wall tissue. Intestinal oedema is known to produce a decrease in intestinal transit caused by a decrease in smooth muscle contractility, which can lead to numerous medical problems for the patient. Interstitial volume regulation has thus far been modelled with ordinary differential equations, or with a partial differential equation system where volume changes depend only on the current pressure and not on updated tissue stress. In this work, we present a computational, partial differential equation model of intestinal oedema formation that overcomes the limitations of past work to present a comprehensive model of the phenomenon. This model includes mass and momentum balance equations which give a time evolution of the interstitial pressure, intestinal volume changes and stress. The model also accounts for the spatially varying mechanical properties of the intestinal tissue and the inhomogeneous distribution of fluid-leaking capillaries that create oedema. The intestinal wall is modelled as a multi-layered, deforming, poroelastic medium, and the system of equations is solved using a discontinuous Galerkin method. To validate the model, simulation results are compared with results from four experimental scenarios. A sensitivity analysis is also provided. The model is able to capture the final submucosal interstitial pressure and total fluid volume change for all four experimental cases, and provide further insight into the distribution of these quantities across the intestinal wall.

  1. Development of intestinal transport function in mammals.

    PubMed

    Pácha, J

    2000-10-01

    Considerable progress has been made over the last decade in the understanding of mechanisms responsible for the ontogenetic changes of mammalian intestine. This review presents the current knowledge about the development of intestinal transport function in the context of intestinal mucosa ontogeny. The review predominantly focuses on signals that trigger and/or modulate the developmental changes of intestinal transport. After an overview of the proliferation and differentiation of intestinal mucosa, data about the bidirectional traffic (absorption and secretion) across the developing intestinal epithelium are presented. The largest part of the review is devoted to the description of developmental patterns concerning the absorption of nutrients, ions, water, vitamins, trace elements, and milk-borne biologically active substances. Furthermore, the review examines the development of intestinal secretion that has a variety of functions including maintenance of the fluidity of the intestinal content, lubrication of mucosal surface, and mucosal protection. The age-dependent shifts of absorption and secretion are the subject of integrated regulatory mechanisms, and hence, the input of hormonal, nervous, immune, and dietary signals is reviewed. Finally, the utilization of energy for transport processes in the developing intestine is highlighted, and the interactions between various sources of energy are discussed. The review ends with suggestions concerning possible directions of future research.

  2. Intraoperative scintigraphy for active small intestinal bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Biener, A.; Palestro, C.; Lewis, B.S.; Katz, L.B. )

    1990-11-01

    Localizing active sites of bleeding within the small intestine remains a difficult task. Endoscopic, angiographic or scintigraphic studies may point to the small intestine as the site of blood loss, but at operation, without a palpable lesion, the exact site of bleeding remains elusive. Patients are managed at laparotomy with intraoperative endoscopy, angiography, multiple enterotomies, blind resections, or placement of an enterostomy. We describe two patients in whom intraoperative scintigraphy accurately identified active sites of bleeding in the small intestine when other modalities failed. Intraoperative scintigraphy is rapid, easy to perform and is an effective means of identifying active sites of bleeding within the small intestine.

  3. A mathematical model of intestinal oedema formation

    PubMed Central

    Young, Jennifer; Rivière, Béatrice; Cox, Charles S.; Uray, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal oedema is a medical condition referring to the build-up of excess fluid in the interstitial spaces of the intestinal wall tissue. Intestinal oedema is known to produce a decrease in intestinal transit caused by a decrease in smooth muscle contractility, which can lead to numerous medical problems for the patient. Interstitial volume regulation has thus far been modelled with ordinary differential equations, or with a partial differential equation system where volume changes depend only on the current pressure and not on updated tissue stress. In this work, we present a computational, partial differential equation model of intestinal oedema formation that overcomes the limitations of past work to present a comprehensive model of the phenomenon. This model includes mass and momentum balance equations which give a time evolution of the interstitial pressure, intestinal volume changes and stress. The model also accounts for the spatially varying mechanical properties of the intestinal tissue and the inhomogeneous distribution of fluid-leaking capillaries that create oedema. The intestinal wall is modelled as a multi-layered, deforming, poroelastic medium, and the system of equations is solved using a discontinuous Galerkin method. To validate the model, simulation results are compared with results from four experimental scenarios. A sensitivity analysis is also provided. The model is able to capture the final submucosal interstitial pressure and total fluid volume change for all four experimental cases, and provide further insight into the distribution of these quantities across the intestinal wall. PMID:23036806

  4. Lymphangiectasia of small intestine presenting as intussusception.

    PubMed

    Katoch, Pervez; Bhardwaj, Subhash

    2008-01-01

    Intussusception is defined as telescoping of a segment of gastrointestinal tract into an adjacent one. In small children, it is the commonest cause of intestinal obstruction. More than 90% of childhood intussusceptions are idiopathic. We report a rare case of localized small intestinal lymphangiectasia, presenting as intussusception in a 6-month-old male child. The child presented with features of acute intestinal obstruction for which he was later operated. The gross examination of excised ileocecal mass revealed intussusception. Histopathologic examination revealed lymphangiectasia of small intestine, which acted as a lead point for ileocecal intussusception. Postoperative period was uneventful.

  5. Diffuse intestinal ganglioneuromatosis in a child

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Mika A.B.; Adler, Brent H.; Arnold, Michael A.; Kumar, Soma; Carvalho, Ryan; Besner, Gail E.

    2014-01-01

    A 7 year old male with a history of congenital neutropenia and growth hormone deficiency presented with abdominal pain, fevers, and diarrhea. Imaging and endoscopy revealed significant inflammation of the ascending colon with stenosis at the level of the hepatic flexure. A right hemicolectomy was performed, and pathologic findings were consistent with diffuse intestinal ganglioneuromatosis. Due to recurrent mass effect at the intestinal anastomotic site detected radiologically, a second intestinal resection was performed 7 months later. Genetic testing was negative for mutations in the RET protooncogene, NF1 and PTEN tumor suppressor genes. We report a case of diffuse intestinal ganglioneuromatosis in a child with congenital neutropenia. PMID:23701793

  6. Update on small intestinal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Tesori, Valentina; Puglisi, Maria Ausiliatrice; Lattanzi, Wanda; Gasbarrini, Giovanni Battista; Gasbarrini, Antonio

    2013-08-07

    Among somatic stem cells, those residing in the intestine represent a fascinating and poorly explored research field. Particularly, somatic stem cells reside in the small intestine at the level of the crypt base, in a constant balance between self-renewal and differentiation. Aim of the present review is to delve into the mechanisms that regulate the delicate equilibrium through which intestinal stem cells orchestrate intestinal architecture. To this aim, special focus will be addressed to identify the integrating signals from the surrounding niche, supporting a model whereby distinct cell populations facilitate homeostatic vs injury-induced regeneration.

  7. Application of three-dimensional imaging to the intestinal crypt organoids and biopsied intestinal tissues.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yun; Tsai, Ya-Hui; Liu, Yuan-An; Lee, Shih-Hua; Tseng, Sheng-Hong; Tang, Shiue-Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) histopathology is the standard analytical method for intestinal biopsied tissues; however, the role of 3-dimensional (3D) imaging system in the analysis of the intestinal tissues is unclear. The 3D structure of the crypt organoids from the intestinal stem cell culture and intestinal tissues from the donors and recipients after intestinal transplantation was observed using a 3D imaging system and compared with 2D histopathology and immunohistochemistry. The crypt organoids and intestinal tissues showed well-defined 3D structures. The 3D images of the intestinal tissues with acute rejection revealed absence of villi and few crypts, which were consistent with the histopathological features. In the intestinal transplant for megacystis microcolon intestinal hypoperistalsis syndrome, the donor's intestinal tissues had well-developed nerve networks and interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) in the muscle layer, while the recipient's intestinal tissues had distorted nerve network and the ICCs were few and sparsely distributed, relative to those of the donor. The 3D images showed a clear spatial relationship between the microstructures of the small bowel and the features of graft rejection. In conclusion, integration of the 3D imaging and 2D histopathology provided a global view of the intestinal tissues from the transplant patients.

  8. Inflammatory mediators and intestinal injury.

    PubMed

    Caplan, M S; MacKendrick, W

    1994-06-01

    Although the causes of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) are not well understood, there is compelling evidence to suggest that the inflammatory mediators play an important role in the pathophysiology of the disease. This article examines the role of platelet-activating factor (PAF) and other mediators on the development of NEC, and attempts to explain the association of the putative NEC risk factors with altered mediator production and subsequent intestinal injury. The authors hypothesize that PAF is a key mediator in the final common pathway leading to NEC.

  9. [Intestinal complications from vascular prostheses].

    PubMed

    Fernández, C; Calvete, J; García, J; Buch, E; Castells, P; Lledó, S

    1993-01-01

    Secondary FAE is a rare complication, usually located at the duodenum. The typical clinical presentation is like a digestive hemorrhage or a sepsis. We report two cases of FAE with atypical manifestations. The first case presented a lower digestive hemorrhage produced by the fistulization to the sigma. The second case appeared like an intestinal obliteration caused by the full emigration of a prosthesis to the jejunum. We wish to remark the importance of the clinical suspicion of a FAE (Key of diagnosis), and the sparing relevance of the complementary examinations and the urgency of a surgical treatment in order to avoid the high rate of morbi-mortality associated with this complication.

  10. [Intestinal giardiasis. Mini-review].

    PubMed

    Rivera, María; de la Parte, María A; Hurtado, Pilar; Magaldi, Luis; Collazo, María

    2002-06-01

    Giardia intestinalis is a common parasite in our country and the rest of the world and is responsible for several clinical disturbances that include dysentery type diarrheas, recurrent abdominal pain, duodenitis, jejunitis, cholecystitis and in some cases toxemias and convulsions. In this paper we review recent concepts of intestinal giardiasis, considering the basic aspects of the biology and physiology of Giardia intestinalis, its morphology and its relationship the parasite pathogenicity. We detail the physiopathological mechanisms responsible for the different clinic manifestations of giardiasis, the specific laboratory and endoscopic methods of diagnosis and the most recent advances in the treatment and prophylaxis of this disease.

  11. Alcohol, intestinal bacterial growth, intestinal permeability to endotoxin, and medical consequences: summary of a symposium.

    PubMed

    Purohit, Vishnudutt; Bode, J Christian; Bode, Christiane; Brenner, David A; Choudhry, Mashkoor A; Hamilton, Frank; Kang, Y James; Keshavarzian, Ali; Rao, Radhakrishna; Sartor, R Balfour; Swanson, Christine; Turner, Jerrold R

    2008-08-01

    This report is a summary of the symposium on Alcohol, Intestinal Bacterial Growth, Intestinal Permeability to Endotoxin, and Medical Consequences, organized by National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, Office of Dietary Supplements, and National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases of National Institutes of Health in Rockville, Maryland, October 11, 2006. Alcohol exposure can promote the growth of Gram-negative bacteria in the intestine, which may result in accumulation of endotoxin. In addition, alcohol metabolism by Gram-negative bacteria and intestinal epithelial cells can result in accumulation of acetaldehyde, which in turn can increase intestinal permeability to endotoxin by increasing tyrosine phosphorylation of tight junction and adherens junction proteins. Alcohol-induced generation of nitric oxide may also contribute to increased permeability to endotoxin by reacting with tubulin, which may cause damage to microtubule cytoskeleton and subsequent disruption of intestinal barrier function. Increased intestinal permeability can lead to increased transfer of endotoxin from the intestine to the liver and general circulation where endotoxin may trigger inflammatory changes in the liver and other organs. Alcohol may also increase intestinal permeability to peptidoglycan, which can initiate inflammatory response in liver and other organs. In addition, acute alcohol exposure may potentiate the effect of burn injury on intestinal bacterial growth and permeability. Decreasing the number of Gram-negative bacteria in the intestine can result in decreased production of endotoxin as well as acetaldehyde which is expected to decrease intestinal permeability to endotoxin. In addition, intestinal permeability may be preserved by administering epidermal growth factor, l-glutamine, oats supplementation, or zinc, thereby preventing the transfer of endotoxin to the general circulation. Thus reducing the number of intestinal Gram-negative bacteria

  12. Helminths and intestinal barrier function.

    PubMed

    McKay, Derek M; Shute, Adam; Lopes, Fernando

    2017-01-02

    Approximately one-sixth of the worlds' population is infected with helminths and this class of parasite takes a major toll on domestic livestock. The majority of species of parasitic helminth that infect mammals live in the gut (the only niche for tapeworms) where they contact the hosts' epithelial cells. Here, the helminth-intestinal epithelial interface is reviewed in terms of the impact on, and regulation of epithelial barrier function, both intrinsic (epithelial permeability) and extrinsic (mucin, bacterial peptides, commensal bacteria) elements of the barrier. The data available on direct effects of helminths on epithelial permeability are scant, fragmentary and pales in comparison with knowledge of mobilization of immune reactions and effector cells in response to helminth parasites and how these impact intestinal barrier function. The interaction of helminth-host and helminth-host-bacteria is an important determinant of gut form and function and precisely defining these interactions will radically alter our understanding of normal gut physiology and pathophysiological reactions, revealing new approaches to infection with parasitic helminths, bacterial pathogens and idiopathic auto-inflammatory disease.

  13. Lymphoma Caused by Intestinal Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Mitsuko L.; Schiestl, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    The intestinal microbiota and gut immune system must constantly communicate to maintain a balance between tolerance and activation: on the one hand, our immune system should protect us from pathogenic microbes and on the other hand, most of the millions of microbes in and on our body are innocuous symbionts and some can even be beneficial. Since there is such a close interaction between the immune system and the intestinal microbiota, it is not surprising that some lymphomas such as mucosal-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma have been shown to be caused by the presence of certain bacteria. Animal models played an important role in establishing causation and mechanism of bacteria-induced MALT lymphoma. In this review we discuss different ways that animal models have been applied to establish a link between the gut microbiota and lymphoma and how animal models have helped to elucidate mechanisms of microbiota-induced lymphoma. While there are not a plethora of studies demonstrating a connection between microbiota and lymphoma development, we believe that animal models are a system which can be exploited in the future to enhance our understanding of causation and improve prognosis and treatment of lymphoma. PMID:25257357

  14. Intestinal Microbiome and Lymphoma Development

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Mitsuko L.; Schiestl, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    The intestinal microbiota and gut immune system must communicate to maintain a balance between tolerance and activation. Our immune system protects us from pathogenic microbes at the same time that our bodies are host to trillions of microbes, symbionts, mutualists, and some that are essential to human health. Since there is such a close interaction between the immune system and the intestinal microbiota, it is not surprising that some lymphomas such as mucosal-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma have been shown to be caused by the presence of certain bacteria. Animal models have played an important role in elucidating the causation and establishing the mechanism of bacteria-induced MALT lymphoma. In this review, we discuss different ways that animal models have been applied to investigate links between the gut microbiota and lymphoma and have helped to reveal the mechanisms of microbiota-induced lymphoma. While there is a paucity of published studies demonstrating the interplay between the microbiota and lymphoma development, we believe that the connection is real and that it can be exploited in the future to enhance our understanding of causation and to improve the prognosis and treatment of lymphoma. PMID:24855006

  15. Autophagy, viruses, and intestinal immunity

    PubMed Central

    Kernbauer, Elisabeth; Cadwell, Ken

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review To highlight recent findings that identify an essential role for the cellular degradative pathway of autophagy in governing a balanced response to intestinal pathogens and commensals. Recent findings Following the genetic association of autophagy with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) susceptibility, increasing evidence indicate that this pathway functions in various epithelial lineages to support the intestinal barrier. New studies are also revealing that autophagy proteins dictate the quality and magnitude of immune responses. Mouse models in particular suggest that autophagy and IBD susceptibility genes regulate inflammatory responses to viruses, a finding that coincides with an increasing appreciation that viruses have intricate interactions with the host and the microbiota beyond the obvious host-pathogen relationship. Summary Autophagy and other immunological or stress response pathways intersect in mucosal immunity to dictate the response to pathogenic and commensal agents. The development of novel treatment strategies as well as prognostic and diagnostic tools for gastrointestinal disorders will be greatly facilitated by a deeper understanding of these interactions at the cell type and microbe-specific manner, which includes less appreciated components of the microbiota such as eukaryotic and prokaryotic viruses. PMID:25291356

  16. Autophagy, viruses, and intestinal immunity.

    PubMed

    Kernbauer, Elisabeth; Cadwell, Ken

    2014-11-01

    To highlight recent findings that identify an essential role for the cellular degradative pathway of autophagy in governing a balanced response to intestinal pathogens and commensals. Following the genetic association of autophagy with inflammatory bowel disease susceptibility, increasing evidence indicates that this pathway functions in various epithelial lineages to support the intestinal barrier. New studies are also revealing that autophagy proteins dictate the quality and magnitude of immune responses. Mouse models, in particular, suggest that autophagy and inflammatory bowel disease susceptibility genes regulate inflammatory responses to viruses, a finding that coincides with an increasing appreciation that viruses have intricate interactions with the host and the microbiota beyond the obvious host-pathogen relationship. Autophagy and other immunological or stress response pathways intersect in mucosal immunity to dictate the response to pathogenic and commensal agents. The development of novel treatment strategies, as well as prognostic and diagnostic tools for gastrointestinal disorders, will be greatly facilitated by a deeper understanding of these interactions at the cell type and microbe-specific manner, which includes less appreciated components of the microbiota, such as eukaryotic and prokaryotic viruses.

  17. Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction.

    PubMed

    Gabbard, Scott L; Lacy, Brian E

    2013-06-01

    Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction (CIP) is a rare and serious disorder of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract characterized as a motility disorder with the primary defect of impaired peristalsis; symptoms are consistent with a bowel obstruction, although mechanical obstruction cannot be identified. CIP is classified as a neuropathy, myopathy, or mesenchymopathy; it is a neuropathic process in the majority of patients. The natural history of CIP is generally that of a progressive disorder, although occasional patients with secondary CIP note significant symptomatic improvement when the underlying disorder is identified and treated. Symptoms vary from patient to patient depending on the location of the luminal GI tract involved and the degree of involvement; however, the small intestine is nearly always involved. Common symptoms include dysphagia, gastroesophageal reflux, abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, bloating, abdominal distension, constipation or diarrhea, and involuntary weight loss. Unfortunately, these symptoms are nonspecific, which can contribute to misdiagnosis or a delay in diagnosis and treatment. Since many of the symptoms and signs suggest a mechanical bowel obstruction, diagnostic tests typically focus on uncovering a mechanical obstruction, although routine tests do not identify an obstructive process. Nutrition supplementation is required for many patients with CIP due to symptoms of dysphagia, nausea, vomiting, and weight loss. This review discusses the epidemiology, etiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of patients with CIP, with an emphasis on nutrition assessment and treatment options for patients with nutrition compromise.

  18. Intestinal histoplasmosis in immunocompetent adults

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lin-Lin; Wang, Jin; Wang, Zi-Jing; Wang, Yi-Ping; Yang, Jin-Lin

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To present a retrospective analysis of clinical and endoscopic features of 4 cases of immunocompetent hosts with intestinal histoplasmosis (IH). METHODS: Four immunocompetent adults were diagnosed with IH between October 2005 and March 2015 at West China Hospital of Sichuan University. Clinical and endoscopic characteristics were summarized and analyzed retrospectively. GMS (Gomori methenamine silver), PAS (periodic acid-Schiff) and Giemsa staining technique were used to confirm Histoplasma capsulatum(H. capsulatum). The symptoms, signs, endoscopic presentations, radiographic imaging, pathological stain results and follow-up are presented as tables and illustrations. RESULTS: The cases were male patients, ranging from 33 to 61 years old, and primarily presented with non-specific symptoms such as irregular fever, weight loss, abdominal pain and distention. Hepatosplenomegaly and lymphadenopathy were the most common signs. Endoscopic manifestations were localized or diffuse congestion, edema, ulcers, and polypoid nodules with central erosion involving the terminal ileum, ascending colon, transverse colon, descending colon, sigmoid colon and rectum, similar to intestinal tuberculosis, tumor, and inflammatory bowel disease. Numerous yeast-like pathogens testing positive for PAS and GMS stains but negative for Giemsa were detected in the cytoplasm of the histiocytes, which were highly suggestive of H. capsulatum. CONCLUSION: Immunocompetent individuals suffering from histoplasmosis are rarely reported. It is necessary that gastroenterologists and endoscopists consider histoplasmosis as a differential diagnosis, even in immunocompetent patients. PMID:27099446

  19. Intestinal histoplasmosis in immunocompetent adults.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lin-Lin; Wang, Jin; Wang, Zi-Jing; Wang, Yi-Ping; Yang, Jin-Lin

    2016-04-21

    To present a retrospective analysis of clinical and endoscopic features of 4 cases of immunocompetent hosts with intestinal histoplasmosis (IH). Four immunocompetent adults were diagnosed with IH between October 2005 and March 2015 at West China Hospital of Sichuan University. Clinical and endoscopic characteristics were summarized and analyzed retrospectively. GMS (Gomori methenamine silver), PAS (periodic acid-Schiff) and Giemsa staining technique were used to confirm Histoplasma capsulatum(H. capsulatum). The symptoms, signs, endoscopic presentations, radiographic imaging, pathological stain results and follow-up are presented as tables and illustrations. The cases were male patients, ranging from 33 to 61 years old, and primarily presented with non-specific symptoms such as irregular fever, weight loss, abdominal pain and distention. Hepatosplenomegaly and lymphadenopathy were the most common signs. Endoscopic manifestations were localized or diffuse congestion, edema, ulcers, and polypoid nodules with central erosion involving the terminal ileum, ascending colon, transverse colon, descending colon, sigmoid colon and rectum, similar to intestinal tuberculosis, tumor, and inflammatory bowel disease. Numerous yeast-like pathogens testing positive for PAS and GMS stains but negative for Giemsa were detected in the cytoplasm of the histiocytes, which were highly suggestive of H. capsulatum. Immunocompetent individuals suffering from histoplasmosis are rarely reported. It is necessary that gastroenterologists and endoscopists consider histoplasmosis as a differential diagnosis, even in immunocompetent patients.

  20. Schlafen 3 changes during rat intestinal maturation.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Mary F; Hermann, Rebecca; Sun, Kelian; Basson, Marc D

    2012-11-01

    Understanding gut development may illuminate the adaptive response to massive small-bowel resection and facilitate enteral nutrition. We reported that Schlafen-3 (Slfn3) mediates differentiation in vitro in rat intestinal epithelial. We hypothesized that Slfn3 is involved in intestinal development in vivo. We removed fetal intestines, liver, and lungs on day 20 of gestation, at birth, and on postnatal days 1 and 5. Expression of Slfn3, markers of intestinal differentiation, and Slfn5, to address specificity, were determined by quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. Villin expression increased on days 1 and 5 (8.7 ± .6 and 5.4 ± .4, respectively; P < .01). Intestinal Slfn3 expression was increased substantially after birth (2.1- ± .5-fold) and on days 1 and 5 (P < .02). Slfn3 was higher after birth in liver and lung but decreased sharply thereafter. Slfn5 expression was mostly unchanged. The data suggest that the developmental/maturation effects we observed correlate with Slfn3 but not Slfn5 and are more relevant to the intestines. A better understanding of how Slfn3 promotes intestinal differentiation could help promote intestinal maturation, improving outcomes in children or adults with short-gut syndrome. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Schlafen 3 changes during rat intestinal maturation

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Mary F.; Hermann, Rebecca; Sun, Kelian; Basson, Marc D.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Understanding gut development may illuminate the adaptive response to massive small-bowel resection and facilitate enteral nutrition. We reported that Schlafen-3 (Slfn3) mediates differentiation in vitro in rat intestinal epithelial. We hypothesized that Slfn3 is involved in intestinal development in vivo. METHODS We removed fetal intestines, liver, and lungs on day 20 of gestation, at birth, and on postnatal days 1 and 5. Expression of Slfn3, markers of intestinal differentiation, and Slfn5, to address specificity, were determined by quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. RESULTS Villin expression increased on days 1 and 5 (8.7 ± .6 and 5.4 ± .4, respectively; P < .01). Intestinal Slfn3 expression was increased substantially after birth (2.1- ± .5-fold) and on days 1 and 5 (P < .02). Slfn3 was higher after birth in liver and lung but decreased sharply thereafter. Slfn5 expression was mostly unchanged. CONCLUSIONS The data suggest that the developmental/maturation effects we observed correlate with Slfn3 but not Slfn5 and are more relevant to the intestines. A better understanding of how Slfn3 promotes intestinal differentiation could help promote intestinal maturation, improving outcomes in children or adults with short-gut syndrome. PMID:22906252

  2. Intestinal radiation syndrome: sepsis and endotoxin

    SciTech Connect

    Geraci, J.P.; Jackson, K.L.; Mariano, M.S.

    1985-03-01

    Rats were whole-body irradiated with 8-MeV cyclotron-produced neutrons and /sup 137/Cs ..gamma.. rays to study the role of enteric bacteria and endotoxin in the intestinal radiation syndrome. Decrease in intestinal weight was used as an index of radiation-induced breakdown of the mucosa. Neutron and ..gamma..-ray doses that were sublethal for intestinal death resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in intestinal weight, reaching minimal values 2 to 3 days after exposure, followed by recovery within 5 days after irradiation. Neutron and photon doses that caused intestinal death resulted in greater mucosal breakdown with little or no evidence of mucosal recovery. The presence of fluid in the intestine and diarrhea, but not bacteremia or endotoxemia, were related to mucosal breakdown and recovery. Neither sepsis nor endotoxin could be detected in liver samples taken at autopsy from animals which died a short time earlier from intestinal injury. These results suggest that overt sepsis and endotoxemia do not play a significant role in the intestinal radiation syndrome.

  3. Autonomic Modification of Intestinal Smooth Muscle Contractility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery, Laura E. A.; Tansey, Etain A.; Johnson, Chris D.; Roe, Sean M.; Quinn, Joe G.

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal smooth muscle contracts rhythmically in the absence of nerve and hormonal stimulation because of the activity of pacemaker cells between and within the muscle layers. This means that the autonomic nervous system modifies rather than initiates intestinal contractions. The practical described here gives students an opportunity to observe…

  4. Intestinal obstruction due to ingested Vaseline.

    PubMed Central

    Goh, D W; Buick, R G

    1987-01-01

    A case of intestinal obstruction due to ingested Vaseline (white soft paraffin) is described. While intestinal obstruction due to bezoars and impacted foodstuffs is uncommon, though well recognised, we know of no previous reports of obstruction caused by semisolid mineral matter. Images Figure PMID:3688922

  5. The genomics of probiotic intestinal microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Salminen, Seppo; Nurmi, Jussi; Gueimonde, Miguel

    2005-01-01

    An intestinal population of beneficial commensal microorganisms helps maintain human health, and some of these bacteria have been found to significantly reduce the risk of gut-associated disease and to alleviate disease symptoms. The genomic characterization of probiotic bacteria and other commensal intestinal bacteria that is now under way will help to deepen our understanding of their beneficial effects. PMID:15998456

  6. Autonomic Modification of Intestinal Smooth Muscle Contractility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery, Laura E. A.; Tansey, Etain A.; Johnson, Chris D.; Roe, Sean M.; Quinn, Joe G.

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal smooth muscle contracts rhythmically in the absence of nerve and hormonal stimulation because of the activity of pacemaker cells between and within the muscle layers. This means that the autonomic nervous system modifies rather than initiates intestinal contractions. The practical described here gives students an opportunity to observe…

  7. Regulation of intestinal calcium absorption by luminal calcium content: role of intestinal alkaline phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Brun, Lucas R; Brance, María L; Lombarte, Mercedes; Lupo, Maela; Di Loreto, Verónica E; Rigalli, Alfredo

    2014-07-01

    Intestinal alkaline phosphatase is a brush border enzyme that is stimulated by calcium. Inhibition of intestinal alkaline phosphatase increases intestinal calcium absorption. We hypothesized that intestinal alkaline phosphatase acts as a minute-to-minute regulatory mechanism of calcium entry. The aim of this study was to evaluate the mechanism by which intestinal luminal calcium controls intestinal calcium absorption. We performed kinetic studies with purified intestinal alkaline phosphatase and everted duodenal sacs and showed that intestinal alkaline phosphatase modifies the luminal pH as a function of enzyme concentration and calcium luminal content. A decrease in pH occurred simultaneously with a decrease in calcium absorption. The inhibition of intestinal alkaline phosphatase by l-phenylalanine caused an increase in calcium absorption. This effect was also confirmed in calcium uptake experiments with isolated duodenal cells. Changes in luminal pH arising from intestinal alkaline phosphatase activity induced by luminal calcium concentration modulate intestinal calcium absorption. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Intestinal Organoids: New Frontiers in the Study of Intestinal Disease and Physiology.

    PubMed

    Wallach, Thomas E; Bayrer, James R

    2017-02-01

    The development of sustainable intestinal organoid cell culture has emerged as a new modality for the study of intestinal function and cellular processes. Organoid culture is providing a new testbed for therapeutic research and development. Intestinal organoids, self-renewing 3-dimensional structures comprised intestinal stem cells and their differentiated epithelial progeny allow for more facile and robust exploration of cellular activity, cell organization and structure, genetic manipulation, and vastly more physiologic modeling of intestinal response to stimuli as compared to traditional 2-dimensional cell line cultures. Intestinal organoids are affecting a wide variety of research into gastrointestinal pathology. The purpose of this review is to discuss the current state-of-the-art and future effect of research using enteroids and colonoids (organoids grown from the small and large intestines, respectively).

  9. Multispectral tissue characterization for intestinal anastomosis optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, Jaepyeong; Shademan, Azad; Le, Hanh N. D.; Decker, Ryan; Kim, Peter C. W.; Kang, Jin U.; Krieger, Axel

    2015-10-01

    Intestinal anastomosis is a surgical procedure that restores bowel continuity after surgical resection to treat intestinal malignancy, inflammation, or obstruction. Despite the routine nature of intestinal anastomosis procedures, the rate of complications is high. Standard visual inspection cannot distinguish the tissue subsurface and small changes in spectral characteristics of the tissue, so existing tissue anastomosis techniques that rely on human vision to guide suturing could lead to problems such as bleeding and leakage from suturing sites. We present a proof-of-concept study using a portable multispectral imaging (MSI) platform for tissue characterization and preoperative surgical planning in intestinal anastomosis. The platform is composed of a fiber ring light-guided MSI system coupled with polarizers and image analysis software. The system is tested on ex vivo porcine intestine tissue, and we demonstrate the feasibility of identifying optimal regions for suture placement.

  10. The intestinal lesion of autistic spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Jass, Jeremy R

    2005-08-01

    This editorial briefly reviews the significance of lymphoid nodular hyperplasia in the intestinal tract of children with autistic spectrum disorder. The distinction between physiological and pathological lymphoid hyperplasia of the intestinal tract is of importance in the context of a possible causative link with autism. A primary intestinal lesion may occur as part of the broad spectrum of immunological disorders to which autistic children are prone. This could result in increased intestinal permeability to peptides of dietary origin which may then lead to disruption of neuroregulatory mechanisms required for normal brain development. Alternatively, there could be a primary defect in the translocation and processing of factors derived from the intestinal lumen. These possibilities deserve further investigation and should not be lost in the fog of the controversy regarding the role of measles/mumps/rubella vaccination in the aetiology of autistic spectrum disorder.

  11. Intestinal bile acid physiology and pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Augustin, Olga; de Medina, Fermín Sánchez

    2008-01-01

    Bile acids (BAs) have a long established role in fat digestion in the intestine by acting as tensioactives, due to their amphipathic characteristics. BAs are reabsorbed very efficiently by the intestinal epithelium and recycled back to the liver via transport mechanisms that have been largely elucidated. The transport and synthesis of BAs are tightly regulated in part by specific plasma membrane receptors and nuclear receptors. In addition to their primary effect, BAs have been claimed to play a role in gastrointestinal cancer, intestinal inflammation and intestinal ionic transport. BAs are not equivalent in any of these biological activities, and structural requirements have been generally identified. In particular, some BAs may be useful for cancer chemoprevention and perhaps in inflammatory bowel disease, although further research is necessary in this field. This review covers the most recent developments in these aspects of BA intestinal biology. PMID:18837078

  12. Mercury methylation by fish intestinal contents.

    PubMed Central

    Rudd, J W; Furutani, A; Turner, M A

    1980-01-01

    A new radiochemical method has been applied to the examination of mercury methylation in fish intestinal contents. Intestinal contents of six freshwater fish species were found capable of converting 203Hg2+ to CH3203Hg+. This activity was observed in fish from five of six lakes tested whether or not there was mercury pollution. Bacterial activity in the intestinal contents is most likely responsible for this methylation. Methylating activity of piscivors increased with decreasing quantity of intestinal contents. Generally, pike and walleye intestinal contents methylated a larger fraction of 203Hg2+ than those of whitefish and suckers. These data contradict the previous general conclusion that there is no mercury methylation in fish. PMID:7425625

  13. Mechanisms and consequences of intestinal dysbiosis.

    PubMed

    Weiss, G Adrienne; Hennet, Thierry

    2017-08-01

    The composition of the gut microbiota is in constant flow under the influence of factors such as the diet, ingested drugs, the intestinal mucosa, the immune system, and the microbiota itself. Natural variations in the gut microbiota can deteriorate to a state of dysbiosis when stress conditions rapidly decrease microbial diversity and promote the expansion of specific bacterial taxa. The mechanisms underlying intestinal dysbiosis often remain unclear given that combinations of natural variations and stress factors mediate cascades of destabilizing events. Oxidative stress, bacteriophages induction and the secretion of bacterial toxins can trigger rapid shifts among intestinal microbial groups thereby yielding dysbiosis. A multitude of diseases including inflammatory bowel diseases but also metabolic disorders such as obesity and diabetes type II are associated with intestinal dysbiosis. The characterization of the changes leading to intestinal dysbiosis and the identification of the microbial taxa contributing to pathological effects are essential prerequisites to better understand the impact of the microbiota on health and disease.

  14. Glycosphingolipids are essential for intestinal endocytic function.

    PubMed

    Jennemann, Richard; Kaden, Sylvia; Sandhoff, Roger; Nordström, Viola; Wang, Shijun; Volz, Martina; Robine, Sylvie; Amen, Nicole; Rothermel, Ulrike; Wiegandt, Herbert; Gröne, Hermann-Josef

    2012-09-21

    Glycosphingolipids (GSLs) constitute major components of enterocytes and were hypothesized to be potentially important for intestinal epithelial polarization. The enzyme UDP-glucose ceramide glucosyltransferase (Ugcg) catalyzes the initial step of GSL biosynthesis. Newborn and adult mice with enterocyte-specific genetic deletion of the gene Ugcg were generated. In newborn mutants lacking GSLs at day P0, intestinal epithelia were indistinguishable from those in control littermates displaying an intact polarization with regular brush border. However, those mice were not consistently able to absorb nutritional lipids from milk. Between postnatal days 5 and 7, severe defects in intestinal epithelial differentiation occurred accompanied by impaired intestinal uptake of nutrients. Villi of mutant mice became stunted, and enterocytes lacked brush border. The defects observed in mutant mice caused diarrhea, malabsorption, and early death. In this study, we show that GSLs are essential for enterocyte resorptive function but are primarily not for polarization; GSLs are required for intracellular vesicular transport in resorption-active intestine.

  15. Endoplasmic reticulum stress and intestinal inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kaser, A; Blumberg, R S

    2010-01-01

    The intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) is increasingly recognized to play a prominent role as an important intermediary between the commensal microbiota and the intestinal immune system. Moreover, it is now recognized that intestinal inflammation in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) may arise primarily from IEC dysfunction due to unresolved endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress as a consequence of genetic disruption of X box binding protein-1 function. In addition to primary (genetic) abnormalities of the unfolded protein response, a variety of secondary (inflammation and environmental) factors are also likely to be important regulators of ER stress. ER stress pathways are also well known to regulate (and be regulated by) autophagy pathways. Therefore, the host's ability to manage ER stress is likely to be a major pathway in the pathogenesis of intestinal inflammation that arises primarily from the IEC. Herein we discuss ER stress in the IEC as both an originator and perpetuator of intestinal inflammation in IBD.

  16. Gastric intestinal metaplasia: subtypes and natural history

    PubMed Central

    El-Zimaity, H; Ramchatesingh, J; Ali, S; Graham, D

    2001-01-01

    Background—It has been suggested that the subtyping of intestinal metaplasia in the stomach is useful in stratifying patients with regard to risk of developing gastric cancer. Aim—To determine whether subtyping intestinal metaplasia provided useful information regarding the natural history of intestinal metaplasia. Methods—The study used large cup gastric biopsy specimens from predetermined locations (gastric mapping). Follow up biopsies were obtained at one, two, and/or nine years. Biopsies with intestinal metaplasia were stained with high iron diamine/Alcian blue (HID/AB) to determine whether they expressed neutral mucins, sialomucins, or sulphomucins. Results—Seventy nine patients with intestinal metaplasia were studied and characterised with regard to the most advanced subtype of intestinal metaplasia. The most severe type of intestinal metaplasia was type II in 33 patients and type III in 34 patients. Helicobacter pylori was cured in 67 patients. Follow up showed that changes in type of metaplasia (apparent regression or progression) occurred in both directions and were independent of H pylori status. For example, biopsy sites with "loss" of metaplasia at a follow up visit might have it "reappear" at a subsequent visit. During follow up, no patient developed gastric dysplasia or died from gastric cancer. Conclusion—HID subtyping did not provide useful information to the clinician or the pathologist. The data are consistent with the notion that the pattern, extent, and severity of atrophy with/without intestinal metaplasia is a far more important predictor of increased cancer risk than intestinal metaplasia subtype. Key Words: Helicobacter pylori • intestinal metaplasia • high iron diamine • gastric cancer PMID:11533073

  17. Intestinal mucosal atrophy and adaptation.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Darcy; Gohil, Kartik; Basson, Marc D

    2012-11-28

    Mucosal adaptation is an essential process in gut homeostasis. The intestinal mucosa adapts to a range of pathological conditions including starvation, short-gut syndrome, obesity, and bariatric surgery. Broadly, these adaptive functions can be grouped into proliferation and differentiation. These are influenced by diverse interactions with hormonal, immune, dietary, nervous, and mechanical stimuli. It seems likely that clinical outcomes can be improved by manipulating the physiology of adaptation. This review will summarize current understanding of the basic science surrounding adaptation, delineate the wide range of potential targets for therapeutic intervention, and discuss how these might be incorporated into an overall treatment plan. Deeper insight into the physiologic basis of adaptation will identify further targets for intervention to improve clinical outcomes.

  18. [Intestinal endometriosis - a case report].

    PubMed

    Krzemiński, Sławomir

    2017-03-21

    Endometriosis intestines due to its non-specific symptoms can pose diagnostic problems, a lack of or incorrect treatment worsens the quality of life, sometimes leading to serious complications. The differential diagnosis of abdominal pain, especially in patients of reproductive age should be taken disease into account. Often abdominal pain in young women are classified as a functional gastrointestinal disorder, and only carefully collected intelligence allows you to focus on the diagnosis of endometriosis, especially if the symptoms significantly impair quality of life. A woman 32 year old who was admitted to the department of gastroenterology because of increasing pain in the abdomen. Due to the deteriorating condition of the patient, the characteristics of mechanical obstruction on imaging studies was transferred to the surgical ward with suspected Crohn's disease. She was treated surgically. Histopathological examination found endometriosis. Endometriosis outside the sex system can lead to serious complications.

  19. Intestinal mucosal atrophy and adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Darcy; Gohil, Kartik; Basson, Marc D

    2012-01-01

    Mucosal adaptation is an essential process in gut homeostasis. The intestinal mucosa adapts to a range of pathological conditions including starvation, short-gut syndrome, obesity, and bariatric surgery. Broadly, these adaptive functions can be grouped into proliferation and differentiation. These are influenced by diverse interactions with hormonal, immune, dietary, nervous, and mechanical stimuli. It seems likely that clinical outcomes can be improved by manipulating the physiology of adaptation. This review will summarize current understanding of the basic science surrounding adaptation, delineate the wide range of potential targets for therapeutic intervention, and discuss how these might be incorporated into an overall treatment plan. Deeper insight into the physiologic basis of adaptation will identify further targets for intervention to improve clinical outcomes. PMID:23197881

  20. Intestinal lymphangiectasia and thymic hypoplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Sorensen, R U; Halpin, T C; Abramowsky, C R; Hornick, D L; Miller, K M; Naylor, P; Incefy, G S

    1985-01-01

    We have evaluated the immunological abnormalities present in a 6 year old patient with primary intestinal and generalized lymphangiectasia confirmed by intestinal, lung and lymph node biopsies. Lymphocyte loss through the gut was confirmed by the detection of lymphocytes in her stool. An increased enteric protein loss was suggested by hypoproteinaemia, peripheral oedema, and a very short half-life for i.v. immune serum globulin (3 days). Lymphocyte subpopulation analysis revealed a selective loss of T lymphocytes, with a proportionally increased loss of the OKT4 positive helper/inducer subpopulation. Functionally, there was a decrease in proliferative responses to some mitogens and to allogeneic cells, and a lack of T cell help for in vitro B lymphocyte differentiation into immunoglobulin secreting cells. Natural killer function was normal. In this patient, a concomitant thymic deficiency was documented by failure to identify thymic tissue on a thymus biopsy and by an absence or decrease of the serum thymic factor (thymulin) and thymosin alpha 1. No compensatory lymphopoiesis was detected in the bone marrow. In an attempt to increase T lymphocyte development, the patient was treated with thymosin fraction 5. Daily treatment with this preparation resulted in a transient clinical improvement which could not be sustained on a weekly thymosin treatment schedule. However, lymphocyte numbers did not increase during this treatment. The findings in this patient support the notion that T lymphocytes are needed to stimulate thymic epithelium. In situations of excessive loss of long lived T lymphocytes a secondary thymic atrophy may occur and further contribute to the development of a deficiency in cell-mediated immunity. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:3971596

  1. Intestinal microbiota, diet and health.

    PubMed

    Power, Susan E; O'Toole, Paul W; Stanton, Catherine; Ross, R Paul; Fitzgerald, Gerald F

    2014-02-01

    The human intestine is colonised by 10¹³ to 10¹⁴ micro-organisms, the vast majority of which belong to the phyla Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes. Although highly stable over time, the composition and activities of the microbiota may be influenced by a number of factors including age, diet and antibiotic treatment. Although perturbations in the composition or functions of the microbiota are linked to inflammatory and metabolic disorders (e.g. inflammatory bowel diseases, irritable bowel syndrome and obesity), it is unclear at this point whether these changes are a symptom of the disease or a contributing factor. A better knowledge of the mechanisms through which changes in microbiota composition (dysbiosis) promote disease states is needed to improve our understanding of the causal relationship between the gut microbiota and disease. While evidence of the preventive and therapeutic effects of probiotic strains on diarrhoeal illness and other intestinal conditions is promising, the exact mechanisms of the beneficial effects are not fully understood. Recent studies have raised the question of whether non-viable probiotic strains can confer health benefits on the host by influencing the immune system. As the potential health effect of these non-viable bacteria depends on whether the mechanism of this effect is dependent on viability, future research needs to consider each probiotic strain on a case-by-case basis. The present review provides a comprehensive, updated overview of the human gut microbiota, the factors influencing its composition and the role of probiotics as a therapeutic modality in the treatment and prevention of diseases and/or restoration of human health.

  2. Adipose triglyceride lipase is a TG hydrolase of the small intestine and regulates intestinal PPARα signaling

    PubMed Central

    Obrowsky, Sascha; Chandak, Prakash G.; Patankar, Jay V.; Povoden, Silvia; Schlager, Stefanie; Kershaw, Erin E.; Bogner-Strauss, Juliane G.; Hoefler, Gerald; Levak-Frank, Sanja; Kratky, Dagmar

    2013-01-01

    Adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) is the rate-limiting enzyme mediating triglyceride (TG) hydrolysis. The lack of ATGL results in TG accumulation in multiple tissues, underscoring the critical role of ATGL in maintaining lipid homeostasis. Recent evidence suggests that ATGL affects TG metabolism via activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα). To investigate specific effects of intestinal ATGL on lipid metabolism we generated mice lacking ATGL exclusively in the intestine (ATGLiKO). We found decreased TG hydrolase activity and increased intracellular TG content in ATGLiKO small intestines. Intragastric administration of [3H]trioleate resulted in the accumulation of radioactive TG in the intestine, whereas absorption into the systemic circulation was unchanged. Intraperitoneally injected [3H]oleate also accumulated within TG in ATGLiKO intestines, indicating that ATGL mobilizes fatty acids from the systemic circulation absorbed by the basolateral side from the blood. Down-regulation of PPARα target genes suggested modulation of cholesterol absorption by intestinal ATGL. Accordingly, ATGL deficiency in the intestine resulted in delayed cholesterol absorption. Importantly, this study provides evidence that ATGL has no impact on intestinal TG absorption but hydrolyzes TGs taken up from the intestinal lumen and systemic circulation. Our data support the role of ATGL in modulating PPARα-dependent processes also in the small intestine. PMID:23220585

  3. Adipose triglyceride lipase is a TG hydrolase of the small intestine and regulates intestinal PPARα signaling.

    PubMed

    Obrowsky, Sascha; Chandak, Prakash G; Patankar, Jay V; Povoden, Silvia; Schlager, Stefanie; Kershaw, Erin E; Bogner-Strauss, Juliane G; Hoefler, Gerald; Levak-Frank, Sanja; Kratky, Dagmar

    2013-02-01

    Adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) is the rate-limiting enzyme mediating triglyceride (TG) hydrolysis. The lack of ATGL results in TG accumulation in multiple tissues, underscoring the critical role of ATGL in maintaining lipid homeostasis. Recent evidence suggests that ATGL affects TG metabolism via activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα). To investigate specific effects of intestinal ATGL on lipid metabolism we generated mice lacking ATGL exclusively in the intestine (ATGLiKO). We found decreased TG hydrolase activity and increased intracellular TG content in ATGLiKO small intestines. Intragastric administration of [(3)H]trioleate resulted in the accumulation of radioactive TG in the intestine, whereas absorption into the systemic circulation was unchanged. Intraperitoneally injected [(3)H]oleate also accumulated within TG in ATGLiKO intestines, indicating that ATGL mobilizes fatty acids from the systemic circulation absorbed by the basolateral side from the blood. Down-regulation of PPARα target genes suggested modulation of cholesterol absorption by intestinal ATGL. Accordingly, ATGL deficiency in the intestine resulted in delayed cholesterol absorption. Importantly, this study provides evidence that ATGL has no impact on intestinal TG absorption but hydrolyzes TGs taken up from the intestinal lumen and systemic circulation. Our data support the role of ATGL in modulating PPARα-dependent processes also in the small intestine.

  4. Alpha-ketoglutarate (AKG) lowers body weight and affects intestinal innate immunity through influencing intestinal microbiota.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuai; Bin, Peng; Ren, Wenkai; Gao, Wei; Liu, Gang; Yin, Jie; Duan, Jielin; Li, Yinghui; Yao, Kang; Huang, Ruilin; Tan, Bie; Yin, Yulong

    2017-06-13

    Alpha-ketoglutarate (AKG), a precursor of glutamate and a critical intermediate in the tricarboxylic acid cycle, shows beneficial effects on intestinal function. However, the influence of AKG on the intestinal innate immune system and intestinal microbiota is unknown. This study explores the effect of oral AKG administration in drinking water (10 g/L) on intestinal innate immunity and intestinal microbiota in a mouse model. Mouse water intake, feed intake and body weight were recorded throughout the entire experiment. The ileum was collected for detecting the expression of intestinal proinflammatory cytokines and innate immune factors by Real-time Polymerase Chain Reaction. Additionally, the ileal luminal contents and feces were collected for 16S rDNA sequencing to analyze the microbial composition. The intestinal microbiota in mice was disrupted with an antibiotic cocktail. The results revealed that AKG supplementation lowered body weight, promoted ileal expression of mammalian defensins of the alpha subfamily (such as cryptdins-1, cryptdins-4, and cryptdins-5) while influencing the intestinal microbial composition (i.e., lowering the Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes ratio). In the antibiotic-treated mouse model, AKG supplementation failed to affect mouse body weight and inhibited the expression of cryptdins-1 and cryptdins-5 in the ileum. We concluded that AKG might affect body weight and intestinal innate immunity through influencing intestinal microbiota.

  5. Current status of intestinal and multivisceral transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Bharadwaj, Shishira; Tandon, Parul; Gohel, Tushar D.; Brown, Jill; Steiger, Ezra; Kirby, Donald F.; Khanna, Ajai

    2017-01-01

    Clinical-nutritional autonomy is the ultimate goal of patients with intestinal failure (IF). Traditionally, patients with IF have been relegated to lifelong parenteral nutrition (PN) once surgical and medical rehabilitation attempts at intestinal adaptation have failed. Over the past two decades, however, outcome improvements in intestinal transplantation have added another dimension to the therapeutic armamentarium in the field of gut rehabilitation. This has become possible through relentless efforts in the standardization of surgical techniques, advancements in immunosuppressive therapies and induction protocols and improvement in postoperative patient care. Four types of intestinal transplants include isolated small bowel transplant, liver-small bowel transplant, multivisceral transplant and modified multivisceral transplant. Current guidelines restrict intestinal transplantation to patients who have had significant complications from PN including liver failure and repeated infections. From an experimental stage to the currently established therapeutic modality for patients with advanced IF, outcome improvements have also been possible due to the introduction of tacrolimus in the early 1990s. Studies have shown that intestinal transplant is cost-effective within 1–3 years of graft survival compared with PN. Improved survival and quality of life as well as resumption of an oral diet should enable intestinal transplantation to be an important option for patients with IF in addition to continued rehabilitation. Future research should focus on detecting biomarkers of early rejection, enhanced immunosuppression protocols, improved postoperative care and early referral to transplant centers. PMID:28130374

  6. Vitamin D and intestinal calcium absorption.

    PubMed

    Christakos, Sylvia; Dhawan, Puneet; Porta, Angela; Mady, Leila J; Seth, Tanya

    2011-12-05

    The principal function of vitamin D in calcium homeostasis is to increase calcium absorption from the intestine. Calcium is absorbed by both an active transcellular pathway, which is energy dependent, and by a passive paracellular pathway through tight junctions. 1,25Dihydroxyvitamin D(3) (1,25(OH)(2)D(3)) the hormonally active form of vitamin D, through its genomic actions, is the major stimulator of active intestinal calcium absorption which involves calcium influx, translocation of calcium through the interior of the enterocyte and basolateral extrusion of calcium by the intestinal plasma membrane pump. This article reviews recent studies that have challenged the traditional model of vitamin D mediated transcellular calcium absorption and the crucial role of specific calcium transport proteins in intestinal calcium absorption. There is also increasing evidence that 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) can enhance paracellular calcium diffusion. The influence of estrogen, prolactin, glucocorticoids and aging on intestinal calcium absorption and the role of the distal intestine in vitamin D mediated intestinal calcium absorption are also discussed.

  7. Intestinal absorption and metabolism of xenobiotics

    PubMed Central

    Chhabra, Rajendra S.

    1979-01-01

    There are five possible processes of intestinal absorption of xenobiotics. These are active transport, passive diffusions, pinocytosis, filtration through “pores,” and lymphatic absorption. The passive diffusion is major process for transport of foreign chemicals across the intestine. Though the lymphatic absorption of drugs is not of any major therapeutic significance, the uptake of toxic chemicals such as 3-MC, benzpyrene, and DDT through lymphatics may enhance their toxicity, since they are distributed to other organ systems in the body without being metabolized by liver. A number of factors such as diet, motility of intestine, interference with gastrointestinal flora, changes in the rate of gastric emptying, age of the animal, and dissolution rate of xenobiotic can alter the rate of absorption of chemicals. Liver is the major site of metabolism of xenobiotics, but the contribution of intestinal metabolism of xenobiotic can influence the overall bioavailability of chemicals. The xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes located in endoplasmic reticulum of intestine possess biochemical characteristics similar to that of liver. In general, the rate of metabolism of xenobiotics by intestinal microsomal preparation is lower than that observed with similar hepatic microsomal preparations. The in vitro intestinal metabolism of xenobiotics is affected by several factors including age, sex, diurnal variations, species, and nutritional status of the animal. The intestinal xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes are stimulated by the pretreatment of animals with foreign chemicals, but this depends on the route of administration of chemicals, drug substrate and the animal species used. Rabbit intestinal drug metabolizing enzymes seem to be resistant to induction by foreign chemicals. PMID:540626

  8. Intestinal lineage commitment of embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Cao, Li; Gibson, Jason D; Miyamoto, Shingo; Sail, Vibhavari; Verma, Rajeev; Rosenberg, Daniel W; Nelson, Craig E; Giardina, Charles

    2011-01-01

    Generating lineage-committed intestinal stem cells from embryonic stem cells (ESCs) could provide a tractable experimental system for understanding intestinal differentiation pathways and may ultimately provide cells for regenerating damaged intestinal tissue. We tested a two-step differentiation procedure in which ESCs were first cultured with activin A to favor formation of definitive endoderm, and then treated with fibroblast-conditioned medium with or without Wnt3A. The definitive endoderm expressed a number of genes associated with gut-tube development through mouse embryonic day 8.5 (Sox17, Foxa2, and Gata4 expressed and Id2 silent). The intestinal stem cell marker Lgr5 gene was also activated in the endodermal cells, whereas the Msi1, Ephb2, and Dcamkl1 intestinal stem cell markers were not. Exposure of the endoderm to fibroblast-conditioned medium with Wnt3A resulted in the activation of Id2, the remaining intestinal stem cell markers and the later gut markers Cdx2, Fabp2, and Muc2. Interestingly, genes associated with distal gut-associated mesoderm (Foxf2, Hlx, and Hoxd8) were also simulated by Wnt3A. The two-step differentiation protocol generated gut bodies with crypt-like structures that included regions of Lgr5-expressing proliferating cells and regions of cell differentiation. These gut bodies also had a smooth muscle component and some underwent peristaltic movement. The ability of the definitive endoderm to differentiate into intestinal epithelium was supported by the vivo engraftment of these cells into mouse colonic mucosa. These findings demonstrate that definitive endoderm derived from ESCs can carry out intestinal cell differentiation pathways and may provide cells to restore damaged intestinal tissue.

  9. The Circadian Clock Mutation Promotes Intestinal Dysbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Voigt, Robin M.; Summa, Keith C.; Forsyth, Christopher B.; Green, Stefan J.; Engen, Phillip; Naqib, Ankur; Vitaterna, Martha H.; Turek, Fred W; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background Circadian rhythm disruption is a prevalent feature of modern day society that is associated with an increase in pro-inflammatory diseases and there is a clear need for a better understanding of the mechanism(s) underlying this phenomenon. We have previously demonstrated that both environmental and genetic circadian rhythm disruption causes intestinal hyperpermeability and exacerbates alcohol-induced intestinal hyperpermeability and liver pathology. The intestinal microbiota can influence intestinal barrier integrity and impact immune system function; thus, in the current study, we sought to determine if genetic alteration of the core circadian clock gene, Clock, altered the intestinal microbiota community. Methods Male ClockΔ19 mutant mice (mice homozygous for a dominant-negative mutant allele) or littermate wild-type mice were fed one of three experimental diets: (1) a standard chow diet, (2) an alcohol-containing diet, or (3) an alcohol-control diet in which the alcohol calories were replaced with dextrose. Stool microbiota was assessed with 16S ribosomal RNA gene amplicon sequencing. Results The fecal microbial community of Clock mutant mice had lower taxonomic diversity, relative to wild type mice and the ClockΔ19 mutation was associated with intestinal dysbiosis when mice were fed either the alcohol-containing or the control diet. We found that alcohol consumption significantly altered the intestinal microbiota in both wild type and Clock mutant mice. Conclusion Our data support a model by which circadian rhythm disruption by the ClockΔ19 mutation perturbs normal intestinal microbial communities and this trend was exacerbated in the context of a secondary dietary intestinal stressor. PMID:26842252

  10. Uterine rotation: a cause of intestinal obstruction.

    PubMed

    González-Mesa, Ernesto; Narbona, Isidoro; Cohen, Isaac; Villegas, Emilia; Cuenca, Celia

    2013-01-01

    Intestinal obstruction is an uncommon surgical emergency during pregnancy that affects seriously the prognosis of gestation. The underlying cause can be identified in the majority of cases and usually consists of adhesions secondary to previous abdominal or pelvic surgery, followed in order of frequency by intestinal volvuli. In recent years there have been no reports in which the gravid uterus has been the cause of intestinal obstruction. We report the case of a woman in week 33 + 4 of pregnancy who developed extrinsic compression of the colon secondary to uterine rotation and pelvic impaction of the head of the fetus.

  11. Intestinal pseudo-obstruction associated with amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Liapis, Konstantinos; Michelis, Fotios V; Delimpasi, Sosanna; Karmiris, Themistoklis

    2011-06-01

    Intestinal pseudo-obstruction is a condition characterised by clinical manifestations of mechanical obstruction of the intestine in the absence of any organic occlusion of the lumen. This syndrome has rarely been reported to complicate the course of systemic amyloidosis. We describe the case of a 64-year-old man who presented with the syndrome of small bowel pseudo-obstruction secondary to AL amyloid infiltration of the gastrointestinal tract. We comment on the pathophysiology and on the clinical importance of amyloidosis-associated intestinal pseudo-obstruction.

  12. Immunological aspects of intestinal mucus and mucins.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Malin E V; Hansson, Gunnar C

    2016-10-01

    A number of mechanisms ensure that the intestine is protected from pathogens and also against our own intestinal microbiota. The outermost of these is the secreted mucus, which entraps bacteria and prevents their translocation into the tissue. Mucus contains many immunomodulatory molecules and is largely produced by the goblet cells. These cells are highly responsive to the signals they receive from the immune system and are also able to deliver antigens from the lumen to dendritic cells in the lamina propria. In this Review, we will give a basic overview of mucus, mucins and goblet cells, and explain how each of these contributes to immune regulation in the intestine.

  13. OPTN/SRTR 2015 Annual Data Report: Intestine.

    PubMed

    Smith, J M; Skeans, M A; Horslen, S P; Edwards, E B; Harper, A M; Snyder, J J; Israni, A K; Kasiske, B L

    2017-01-01

    Intestine and intestine-liver transplant remains important in the treatment of intestinal failure, despite decreased morbidity associated with parenteral nutrition. In 2015, 196 new patients were added to the intestine transplant waiting list, with equal numbers waiting for intestine and intestine-liver transplant. Among prevalent patients on the list at the end of 2015, 63.3% were waiting for an intestine transplant and 36.7% were waiting for an intestine-liver transplant. The pretransplant mortality rate decreased dramatically over time for all age groups. Pretransplant mortality was notably higher for intestine-liver than for intestine transplant candidates (respectively, 19.9 vs. 2.8 deaths per 100 waitlist years in 2014-2015). By age, pretransplant mortality was highest for adult candidates, at 19.6 per 100 waitlist years, and lowest for children aged younger than 6 years, at 3.6 per 100 waitlist years. Pretransplant mortality by etiology was highest for candidates with non-congenital types of short-gut syndrome. Numbers of intestine transplants without a liver increased from a low of 51 in 2013 to 70 in 2015. Intestine-liver transplants increased from a low of 44 in 2012 to 71 in 2015. Short-gut syndrome (congenital and non-congenital) was the main cause of disease leading to intestine and to intestine-liver transplant. Patient survival was lowest for adult intestine-liver recipients and highest for pediatric intestine recipients.

  14. Pathogen invasion changes the intestinal microbiota composition and induces innate immune responses in the zebrafish intestine.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hui-Ting; Zou, Song-Song; Zhai, Li-Juan; Wang, Yao; Zhang, Fu-Miao; An, Li-Guo; Yang, Gui-Wen

    2017-09-28

    Numerous bacteria are harbored in the animal digestive tract and are impacted by several factors. Intestinal microbiota homeostasis is critical for maintaining the health of an organism. However, how pathogen invasion affects the microbiota composition has not been fully clarified. The mechanisms for preventing invasion by pathogenic microorganisms are yet to be elucidated. Zebrafish is a useful model for developmental biology, and studies in this organism have gradually become focused on intestinal immunity. In this study, we analyzed the microbiota of normal cultivated and infected zebrafish intestines, the aquarium water and feed samples. We found that the predominant bacteria in the zebrafish intestine belonged to Gammaproteobacteria (67%) and that feed and environment merely influenced intestinal microbiota composition only partially. Intestinal microbiota changed after a pathogenic bacterial challenge. At the genus level, the abundance of some pathogenic intestinal bacteria increased, and these genera included Halomonas (50%), Pelagibacterium (3.6%), Aeromonas (2.6%), Nesterenkonia (1%), Chryseobacterium (3.4‰), Mesorhizobium (1.4‰), Vibrio (1‰), Mycoplasma (0.7‰) and Methylobacterium (0.6‰) in IAh group. However, the abundance of some beneficial intestinal bacteria decreased, and these genera included Nitratireductor (0.8‰), Enterococcus (0.8‰), Brevundimonas (0.7‰), Lactococcus (0.7‰) and Lactobacillus (0.4‰). Additionally, we investigated the innate immune responses after infection. ROS levels in intestine increased in the early stages after a challenge and recovered subsequently. The mRNA levels of antimicrobial peptide genes lectin, hepcidin and defensin1, were upregulated in the intestine after pathogen infection. These results suggested that the invasion of pathogen could change the intestinal microbiota composition and induce intestinal innate immune responses in zebrafish. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Peptidases Compartmentalized to the Ascaris suum Intestinal Lumen and Apical Intestinal Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Bruce A.

    2015-01-01

    The nematode intestine is a tissue of interest for developing new methods of therapy and control of parasitic nematodes. However, biological details of intestinal cell functions remain obscure, as do the proteins and molecular functions located on the apical intestinal membrane (AIM), and within the intestinal lumen (IL) of nematodes. Accordingly, methods were developed to gain a comprehensive identification of peptidases that function in the intestinal tract of adult female Ascaris suum. Peptidase activity was detected in multiple fractions of the A. suum intestine under pH conditions ranging from 5.0 to 8.0. Peptidase class inhibitors were used to characterize these activities. The fractions included whole lysates, membrane enriched fractions, and physiological- and 4 molar urea-perfusates of the intestinal lumen. Concanavalin A (ConA) was confirmed to bind to the AIM, and intestinal proteins affinity isolated on ConA-beads were compared to proteins from membrane and perfusate fractions by mass spectrometry. Twenty-nine predicted peptidases were identified including aspartic, cysteine, and serine peptidases, and an unexpectedly high number (16) of metallopeptidases. Many of these proteins co-localized to multiple fractions, providing independent support for localization to specific intestinal compartments, including the IL and AIM. This unique perfusion model produced the most comprehensive view of likely digestive peptidases that function in these intestinal compartments of A. suum, or any nematode. This model offers a means to directly determine functions of these proteins in the A. suum intestine and, more generally, deduce the wide array functions that exist in these cellular compartments of the nematode intestine. PMID:25569475

  16. Interactions between the intestinal microbiota and innate lymphoid cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Vincent L; Kasper, Dennis L

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian intestine must manage to contain 100 trillion intestinal bacteria without inducing inappropriate immune responses to these microorganisms. The effects of the immune system on intestinal microorganisms are numerous and well-characterized, and recent research has determined that the microbiota influences the intestinal immune system as well. In this review, we first discuss the intestinal immune system and its role in containing and maintaining tolerance to commensal organisms. We next introduce a category of immune cells, the innate lymphoid cells, and describe their classification and function in intestinal immunology. Finally, we discuss the effects of the intestinal microbiota on innate lymphoid cells. PMID:24418741

  17. Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction due to lymphocytic intestinal leiomyositis: Case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Keiichi; Otake, Kohei; Inoue, Mikihiro; Koike, Yuhki; Matsushita, Kohei; Araki, Toshimitsu; Okita, Yoshiki; Tanaka, Koji; Uchida, Katsunori; Yodoya, Noriko; Iwamoto, Shotaro; Arai, Katsuhiro; Kusunoki, Masato

    2012-02-01

    Lymphocytic intestinal leiomyositis is a rare entity, which causes chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction (CIPO) in children. We present the first case of a boy who had pure red cell anemia 1 year before onset. Prolonged ileus developed after gastroenteritis and the patient was diagnosed using a biopsy of the intestinal wall. Findings from the present case indicate that there are three important factors for accurate diagnosis: history of enteritis, positive serum smooth muscle antibody, and lymphocyte infiltration with muscle destruction in the muscularis propria in the intestinal wall. Earlier diagnosis and induction of immunosuppressive therapy may be essential for a better outcome.

  18. Small intestine biopotentials in rats after hypokinesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groza, P.; Stanciu, C.

    To study the effect of hypokinesia on rats small intestine (jejunum and ileum) biopotentials it was first necessary to characterize it. Biopotentials were recorded by intracellular placed microelectrodes from oral and caudal segments of the small intestine. The character of rats small intestine biopotentials differs from that of other species (man, cat, rabbit, dog, e.a.), the slow waves (SW) being smaller and the frequency of basal electrical rhythm higher (31.23 c/min orally and 24.50 caudally). Spike potentials are inscribed on the descending slope of SW but frequently delayed in each successive wave with a regular interval. Hypokinesia obtained by keeping rats in small cages for two weeks create only little changes in intestine biopotentials. The only clear difference was the increase of the slow waves amplitude. The other parameters were not specifically changed.

  19. [Recurrent intestinal ischemia due to factor VIII].

    PubMed

    Castellanos Monedero, Jesús Javier; Legaz Huidobro, María Luisa; Galindo Andugar, María Angeles; Rodríguez Pérez, Alvaro; Mantrana del Valle, José María

    2008-01-01

    Intestinal ischemia is difficult to diagnose and can be caused by several etiologic processes. We report the case of a female patient with recurrent bowel ischemia due to small vessel thrombosis, which is caused by factor VIII, a procoagulant factor.

  20. Intestinal Colonization Dynamics of Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Almagro-Moreno, Salvador; Pruss, Kali; Taylor, Ronald K.

    2015-01-01

    To cause the diarrheal disease cholera, Vibrio cholerae must effectively colonize the small intestine. In order to do so, the bacterium needs to successfully travel through the stomach and withstand the presence of agents such as bile and antimicrobial peptides in the intestinal lumen and mucus. The bacterial cells penetrate the viscous mucus layer covering the epithelium and attach and proliferate on its surface. In this review, we discuss recent developments and known aspects of the early stages of V. cholerae intestinal colonization and highlight areas that remain to be fully understood. We propose mechanisms and postulate a model that covers some of the steps that are required in order for the bacterium to efficiently colonize the human host. A deeper understanding of the colonization dynamics of V. cholerae and other intestinal pathogens will provide us with a variety of novel targets and strategies to avoid the diseases caused by these organisms. PMID:25996593

  1. Psychological Effects of Intestinal Bypass Surgery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wampler, Richard S.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Preoperative and postoperative intestinal bypass patients were evaluated. Results suggest that postoperative bypass patients have improved psychological health and an increased sense of freedom and well-being but may need assistance in improving self-concepts. (Author)

  2. Diffuse intestinal ganglioneuromatosis in a child.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Mika A B; Adler, Brent H; Arnold, Michael A; Kumar, Soma; Carvalho, Ryan; Besner, Gail E

    2013-05-01

    A 7 year old male with a history of congenital neutropenia and growth hormone deficiency presented with abdominal pain, fevers, and diarrhea. Imaging and endoscopy revealed significant inflammation of the ascending colon with stenosis at the level of the hepatic flexure. A right hemicolectomy was performed, and pathologic findings were consistent with diffuse intestinal ganglioneuromatosis. Due to recurrent mass effect at the intestinal anastomotic site detected radiologically, a second intestinal resection was performed 7 months later. Genetic testing was negative for mutations in the RET protooncogene, NF1 and PTEN tumor suppressor genes. We report a case of diffuse intestinal ganglioneuromatosis in a child with congenital neutropenia. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Intestinal microbiota and blue baby syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Collin L; Rutledge, John C

    2010-01-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is the most common intestinal emergency among premature infants. Risk factors in premature infants include immature intestinal immunity and an intestinal microbiota dominated by hospital-acquired bacteria. Some probiotics have been shown to decrease the incidence of NEC in premature infants. Among term infants, NEC is rare. However, among term infants with cyanotic congenital heart disease (CCHD), the incidence of NEC is similar to that of premature infants but with even greater mortality rates. Mechanisms by which NEC occurs in term infants with CCHD are unknown. Of central interest is the potential role of changes in the intestinal microbiota and whether these can be modified with probiotic bacteria; accordingly, we review the literature, propose hypotheses and present the rationale for future studies involving preliminary probiotic clinical trials. PMID:21468216

  4. Primary lymphoma of the upper small intestine

    PubMed Central

    Nasr, Khosrow; Haghighi, Parviz; Bakhshandeh, Kiumars; Haghshenas, Mansour

    1970-01-01

    Seven patients with primary lymphoma involving the upper small intestine and presenting with diarrhoea, non-specific abdominal pain, and clubbing are reported. The disease appears to be more prevalent in young women, and clinical and radiological findings can provide an excellent preliminary diagnosis which is usually confirmed by peroral biopsy of the small intestine. This type of lymphoma is found to be clinically distinguishable both from the primary intestinal lymphomas reported from western countries and also from gastrointestinal involvement as part of a more systemic disease. It appears to be prevalent in the Middle East, and because of clear clinical, radiological, and histological features, it can be singled out from other primary intestinal lymphomas and considered as a distinct clinical entity. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6 PMID:4919259

  5. [THE INTESTINAL BARRIER, THE MICROBIOTA, MICROBIOME].

    PubMed

    Mar'yanovich, A T

    2016-01-01

    The review examined modern condition of development directions physiology of digestion, like structure and function of the intestinal barrier, the microbiota of the digestive tract in its relations with the microorganism.

  6. [Antioxidant therapy in combined treatment of postoperative intestinal paresis].

    PubMed

    Magomedov, M A

    2004-01-01

    Method of treatment of postoperative intestinal paresis with antioxidant emoxipin in experiment demonstrated that stabilization of redox processes and antioxidant systems in intestinal tissues leads to compensation of energy deficiency and recovery of intestinal peristalsis. Clinical use of this method in combined treatment of patients with postoperative intestinal paresis in acute generalized peritonitis reduces time of postoperative intestinal paresis and intoxication, lethality reduced 1,7-fold.

  7. Urticarial Vasculitis-Associated Intestinal Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Uni; Yfantis, Harris; Xie, Guofeng

    2016-01-01

    Urticarial vasculitis (UV) is a rare small vessel vasculitis. UV is often idiopathic but can also present in the context of autoimmune disorders such as systemic lupus erythematosus, drug reactions, infections, or a paraneoplastic syndrome. Extracutaneous complications include intestinal ischemic injuries, in UV patients with nonspecific gastrointestinal symptoms such as abdominal pain and nausea. Prompt recognition and treatment can minimize morbidity and mortality. This paper describes a case of urticarial vasculitis-associated intestinal ischemia. PMID:27190661

  8. Small intestine dysfunction in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Dutkiewicz, Justyna; Szlufik, Stanisław; Nieciecki, Michał; Charzyńska, Ingeborga; Królicki, Leszek; Smektała, Piotr; Friedman, Andrzej

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the small bowel transit time in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Ten patients with PD with no gastrointestinal complaints and ten healthy control subjects were investigated using single photon emission computed tomography fused with computed tomography after swallowing of a specially prepared capsule containing technetium 99m, which allowed visualization of the passage in the intestines. Preliminary results show that the small intestine passage in PD patients was prolonged compared to controls.

  9. Intestinal perforation by an ingested foreign body*

    PubMed Central

    Nicolodi, Gabriel Cleve; Trippia, Cesar Rodrigo; Caboclo, Maria Fernanda F. S.; de Castro, Francisco Gomes; Miller, Wagner Peitl; de Lima, Raphael Rodrigues; Tazima, Leandro; Geraldo, Jamylle

    2016-01-01

    Objective To identify the computed tomography findings suggestive of intestinal perforation by an ingested foreign body. Materials and Methods This was a retrospective study of four cases of surgically proven intestinal perforation by a foreign body, comparing the computed tomography findings with those described in the literature. Results None of the patients reported having ingested a foreign body, all were over 60 years of age, three of the four patients used a dental prosthesis, and all of the foreign bodies were elongated and sharp. In all four patients, there were findings indicative of acute abdomen. None of the foreign bodies were identified on conventional X-rays. The computed tomography findings suggestive of perforation were thickening of the intestinal walls (in all four cases), increased density of mesenteric fat (in all four cases), identification of the foreign body passing through the intestinal wall (in three cases), and gas in the peritoneal cavity (in one case). Conclusion In cases of foreign body ingestion, intestinal perforation is more common when the foreign body is elongated and sharp. Although patients typically do not report having ingested such foreign bodies, the scenario should be suspected in elderly individuals who use dental prostheses. A computed tomography scan can detect foreign bodies, locate perforations, and guide treatment. The findings that suggest perforation are thickening of the intestinal walls, increased mesenteric fat density, and, less frequently, gas in the peritoneal cavity, often restricted to the point of perforation. PMID:27818542

  10. Perna canaliculus and the Intestinal Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Thomsen, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Natural medicines are often an attractive option for patients diagnosed with chronic conditions. Three main classes of bioactives that have been reported from marine mussel extracts include proteins, lipids and carbohydrates. Commercially, the most relevant species of marine mollusks belong to two genera, Perna and Mytilus. Specifically, the Perna canaliculus species has been repeatedly demonstrated to harbor anti-inflammatory compounds such as omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFAs) that can ameliorate pro-inflammatory conditions, or proteins that can promote thrombin inhibitory activity. Recent clinical studies have posited that extracts from green-lipped mussels may lead to prebiotic activity in the intestinal microbiome that in turn has been reported to improve symptoms of osteoarthritis of the knee. Prebiotics have been reported to favorably interact with the intestinal microbiome through the proliferation of beneficial bacteria in the gut, suppressing exogenous and endogenous intestinal infections and promoting homeostasis by balancing local pro- and anti-inflammatory actions. Bioactive compounds from Perna canaliculus are functional foods and, in this regard, may positively interact with the intestinal microbiome and provide novel therapeutic solutions for intra-intestinal and extra-intestinal inflammatory conditions. PMID:28665349

  11. The intestinal microbiome of fish under starvation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Starvation not only affects the nutritional and health status of the animals, but also the microbial composition in the host’s intestine. Next-generation sequencing provides a unique opportunity to explore gut microbial communities and their interactions with hosts. However, studies on gut microbiomes have been conducted predominantly in humans and land animals. Not much is known on gut microbiomes of aquatic animals and their changes under changing environmental conditions. To address this shortcoming, we determined the microbial gene catalogue, and investigated changes in the microbial composition and host-microbe interactions in the intestine of Asian seabass in response to starvation. Results We found 33 phyla, 66 classes, 130 orders and 278 families in the intestinal microbiome. Proteobacteria (48.8%), Firmicutes (15.3%) and Bacteroidetes (8.2%) were the three most abundant bacteria taxa. Comparative analyses of the microbiome revealed shifts in bacteria communities, with dramatic enrichment of Bacteroidetes, but significant depletion of Betaproteobacteria in starved intestines. In addition, significant differences in clusters of orthologous groups (COG) functional categories and orthologous groups were observed. Genes related to antibiotic activity in the microbiome were significantly enriched in response to starvation, and host genes related to the immune response were generally up-regulated. Conclusions This study provides the first insights into the fish intestinal microbiome and its changes under starvation. Further detailed study on interactions between intestinal microbiomes and hosts under dynamic conditions will shed new light on how the hosts and microbes respond to the changing environment. PMID:24708260

  12. Current understanding concerning intestinal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Shuang; Chang, Peng-Yu

    2016-01-01

    In mammals, the intestinal epithelium is a tissue that contains two distinct pools of stem cells: active intestinal stem cells and reserve intestinal stem cells. The former are located in the crypt basement membrane and are responsible for maintaining epithelial homeostasis under intact conditions, whereas the latter exhibit the capacity to facilitate epithelial regeneration after injury. These two pools of cells can convert into each other, maintaining their quantitative balance. In terms of the active intestinal stem cells, their development into functional epithelium is precisely controlled by the following signaling pathways: Wnt/β-catenin, Ras/Raf/Mek/Erk/MAPK, Notch and BMP/Smad. However, mutations in some of the key regulator genes associated with these signaling pathways, such as APC, Kras and Smad4, are also highly associated with gut malformations. At this point, clarifying the biological characteristics of intestinal stem cells will increase the feasibility of preventing or treating some intestinal diseases, such as colorectal cancer. Moreover, as preclinical data demonstrate the therapeutic effects of colon stem cells on murine models of experimental colitis, the prospects of stem cell-based regenerative treatments for ulcerous lesions in the gastrointestinal tract will be improved all the same. PMID:27610020

  13. Regulation of intestinal lactase in adult hypolactasia.

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, M; Mevissen, G; Fischer, M; Olsen, W; Goodspeed, D; Genini, M; Boll, W; Semenza, G; Mantei, N

    1992-01-01

    Relative deficiency of intestinal lactase activity during adulthood, adult hypolactasia, is a common condition worldwide. We studied the regulation of lactase-phlorizin hydrolase in normal and adult hypolactasic subjects by correlating transcript abundance in intestinal biopsies with relative synthetic rates for the protein in cultured intestinal explants. After metabolic labelling studies in six subjects, precursor lactase-phlorizin hydrolase was identified in amounts directly proportional to the enzyme-specific activity suggesting that levels of intestinal lactase are regulated by synthetic rate. Total intestinal RNA was extracted from biopsies of these subjects and three hypolactasic adults who had participated in previous biosynthesis studies. Transcript levels were markedly reduced in deficient subjects who demonstrated diminished lactase-phlorizin hydrolase synthesis. The sequence of 1 kb of 5'-flanking region of the lactase-phlorizin hydrolase gene was determined in two hypolactasic subjects and two controls. No sequence variability was identified to account for differences in mRNA levels or biosynthetic rates between the two groups. A single hypolactasic subject previously characterized as demonstrating delayed posttranslational processing, showed message levels intermediate between other deficients and controls. These results suggest that in the majority of our subjects, pretranslational mechanisms account for the predominate regulatory control of lactase-phlorizin hydrolase expression in the proximal intestine. Images PMID:1737843

  14. Epigenetic Regulation of the Intestinal Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Ellen N.; Kaestner, Klaus H.

    2015-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium is an ideal model system for the study of normal and pathological differentiation processes. The mammalian intestinal epithelium is a single cell layer comprised of proliferative crypts and differentiated villi. The crypts contain both proliferating and quiescent stem cell populations that self-renew and produce all the differentiated cell types, which are replaced every 3 to 5 days. The genetics of intestinal development, homeostasis, and disease are well defined, but less is known about the contribution of epigenetics in modulating these processes. Epigenetics refers to heritable phenotypic traits, including gene expression, which are independent of mutations in the DNA sequence. We have known for several decades that human colorectal cancers contain hypomethylated DNA, but the causes and consequences of this phenomenon are not fully understood. In contrast, tumor suppressor gene promoters are often hypermethylated in colorectal cancer, resulting in decreased expression of the associated gene. In this review, we describe the role that epigenetics plays in intestinal homeostasis and disease, with an emphasis on results from mouse models. We highlight the importance of producing and analyzing next-generation sequencing data detailing the epigenome from intestinal stem cell to differentiated intestinal villus cell. PMID:26220502

  15. Exercise, intestinal barrier dysfunction and probiotic supplementation.

    PubMed

    Lamprecht, Manfred; Frauwallner, Anita

    2012-01-01

    Athletes exposed to high-intensity exercise show an increased occurrence of gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms like cramps, diarrhea, bloating, nausea, and bleeding. These problems have been associated with alterations in intestinal permeability and decreased gut barrier function. The increased GI permeability, a so-called 'leaky gut', also leads to endotoxemia, and results in increased susceptibility to infectious and autoimmune diseases, due to absorption of pathogens/toxins into tissue and the bloodstream. Key components that determine intestinal barrier function and GI permeability are tight junctions, protein structures located in the paracellular channels between epithelial cells of the intestinal wall. The integrity of tight junctions depends on sophisticated interactions between the gut residents and their expressed substances, the intestinal epithelial cell metabolism and the activities of the gut-associated lymphoid tissue. Probiotic supplements are an upcoming group of nutraceuticals that could offer positive effects on athlete's gut and entire health. Some results demonstrate promising benefits for probiotic use on the athlete's immune system. There is also evidence that probiotic supplementation can beneficially influence intestinal barrier integrity in acute diseases. With regard to exercise-induced GI permeability problems, there is still a lack of studies with appropriate data and a gap to understand the underlying mechanisms to support such health beneficial statements implicitly. This article refers (i) to exercise-induced intestinal barrier dysfunction, (ii) provides suggestions to estimate increased gut barrier permeability in athletes, and (iii) discusses the potential of probiotic supplementation to counteract an exercise-induced leaky gut.

  16. Circadian regulators of intestinal lipid absorption

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, M. Mahmood; Pan, Xiaoyue

    2015-01-01

    Among all the metabolites present in the plasma, lipids, mainly triacylglycerol and diacylglycerol, show extensive circadian rhythms. These lipids are transported in the plasma as part of lipoproteins. Lipoproteins are synthesized primarily in the liver and intestine and their production exhibits circadian rhythmicity. Studies have shown that various proteins involved in lipid absorption and lipoprotein biosynthesis show circadian expression. Further, intestinal epithelial cells express circadian clock genes and these genes might control circadian expression of different proteins involved in intestinal lipid absorption. Intestinal circadian clock genes are synchronized by signals emanating from the suprachiasmatic nuclei that constitute a master clock and from signals coming from other environmental factors, such as food availability. Disruptions in central clock, as happens due to disruptions in the sleep/wake cycle, affect intestinal function. Similarly, irregularities in temporal food intake affect intestinal function. These changes predispose individuals to various metabolic disorders, such as metabolic syndrome, obesity, diabetes, and atherosclerosis. Here, we summarize how circadian rhythms regulate microsomal triglyceride transfer protein, apoAIV, and nocturnin to affect diurnal regulation of lipid absorption. PMID:25057097

  17. Autonomic modification of intestinal smooth muscle contractility.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Laura E A; Tansey, Etain A; Johnson, Chris D; Roe, Sean M; Quinn, Joe G

    2016-03-01

    Intestinal smooth muscle contracts rhythmically in the absence of nerve and hormonal stimulation because of the activity of pacemaker cells between and within the muscle layers. This means that the autonomic nervous system modifies rather than initiates intestinal contractions. The practical described here gives students an opportunity to observe this spontaneous activity and its modification by agents associated with parasympathetic and sympathetic nerve activity. A section of the rabbit small intestine is suspended in an organ bath, and the use of a pressure transducer and data-acquisition software allows the measurement of tension generated by the smooth muscle of intestinal walls. The application of the parasympathetic neurotransmitter ACh at varying concentrations allows students to observe an increase in intestinal smooth muscle tone with increasing concentrations of this muscarinic receptor agonist. Construction of a concentration-effect curve allows students to calculate an EC50 value for ACh and consider some basic concepts surrounding receptor occupancy and activation. Application of the hormone epinephrine to the precontracted intestine allows students to observe the inhibitory effects associated with sympathetic nerve activation. Introduction of the drug atropine to the preparation before a maximal concentration of ACh is applied allows students to observe the inhibitory effect of a competitive antagonist on the physiological response to a receptor agonist. The final experiment involves the observation of the depolarizing effect of K(+) on smooth muscle. Students are also invited to consider why the drugs atropine, codeine, loperamide, and botulinum toxin have medicinal uses in the management of gastrointestinal problems.

  18. Neural regulation of intestinal nutrient absorption.

    PubMed

    Mourad, Fadi H; Saadé, Nayef E

    2011-10-01

    The nervous system and the gastrointestinal (GI) tract share several common features including reciprocal interconnections and several neurotransmitters and peptides known as gut peptides, neuropeptides or hormones. The processes of digestion, secretion of digestive enzymes and then absorption are regulated by the neuro-endocrine system. Luminal glucose enhances its own absorption through a neuronal reflex that involves capsaicin sensitive primary afferent (CSPA) fibres. Absorbed glucose stimulates insulin release that activates hepatoenteric neural pathways leading to an increase in the expression of glucose transporters. Adrenergic innervation increases glucose absorption through α1 and β receptors and decreases absorption through activation of α2 receptors. The vagus nerve plays an important role in the regulation of diurnal variation in transporter expression and in anticipation to food intake. Vagal CSPAs exert tonic inhibitory effects on amino acid absorption. It also plays an important role in the mediation of the inhibitory effect of intestinal amino acids on their own absorption at the level of proximal or distal segment. However, chronic extrinsic denervation leads to a decrease in intestinal amino acid absorption. Conversely, adrenergic agonists as well as activation of CSPA fibres enhance peptides uptake through the peptide transporter PEPT1. Finally, intestinal innervation plays a minimal role in the absorption of fat digestion products. Intestinal absorption of nutrients is a basic vital mechanism that depends essentially on the function of intestinal mucosa. However, intrinsic and extrinsic neural mechanisms that rely on several redundant loops are involved in immediate and long-term control of the outcome of intestinal function.

  19. Nutritional Keys for Intestinal Barrier Modulation

    PubMed Central

    De Santis, Stefania; Cavalcanti, Elisabetta; Mastronardi, Mauro; Jirillo, Emilio; Chieppa, Marcello

    2015-01-01

    The intestinal tract represents the largest interface between the external environment and the human body. Nutrient uptake mostly happens in the intestinal tract, where the epithelial surface is constantly exposed to dietary antigens. Since inflammatory response toward these antigens may be deleterious for the host, a plethora of protective mechanisms take place to avoid or attenuate local damage. For instance, the intestinal barrier is able to elicit a dynamic response that either promotes or impairs luminal antigens adhesion and crossing. Regulation of intestinal barrier is crucial to control intestinal permeability whose increase is associated with chronic inflammatory conditions. The cross talk among bacteria, immune, and dietary factors is able to modulate the mucosal barrier function, as well as the intestinal permeability. Several nutritional products have recently been proposed as regulators of the epithelial barrier, even if their effects are in part contradictory. At the same time, the metabolic function of the microbiota generates new products with different effects based on the dietary content. Besides conventional treatments, novel therapies based on complementary nutrients are now growing. Fecal therapy has been recently used for the clinical treatment of refractory Clostridium difficile infection instead of the classical antibiotic therapy. In the present review, we will outline the epithelial response to nutritional components derived from dietary intake and microbial fermentation focusing on the consequent effects on the integrity of the epithelial barrier. PMID:26697008

  20. Immunoproliferative small intestinal disease (IPSID).

    PubMed

    Pervez, Shahid; Mumtaz, Khalid; Ullah, Syed Siddiq; Akhtar, Nake; Ali, Naureen; Aaqil, Hina

    2011-01-01

    This study describes the frequency, demographics, clinical presentation, endoscopic findings, histopathological features, treatment and outcome of 'Immunoproliferative small intestinal disease' (IPSID). Archives contained a total of 27 cases of IPSID diagnosed and treated over an 18-year period. A M: F ratio of 2.4:1 was seen with a mean and median ages of 28.7 and 25 years. Most patients (68.8%) presented with abdominal pain and diarrhoea. In the majority (62.5%), duodenum was the primary site of involvement. Endoscopy showed polypoidal, raised or flat lesions. Biopsy findings included blunting or flattening of villi with dense plasma cell infiltrate and lymphoepithelial lesions. Twenty-four cases were categorized as stage A and B (benign and intermediate) and three were categorized as stage C (malignant, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma with plasmacytoid features). Stage A and B patients responded well to antibiotic treatment (tetracycline) with regression of the lesions while for stage C patients standard CHOP chemotherapy was administered.

  1. Intestinal protozoa important to poultry.

    PubMed

    McDougald, L R

    1998-08-01

    Parasites of two groups are important in poultry, the coccidia and the mastiogophora (flagellates) (Table 1). Most of the Coccidia in poultry are in the genus Eimeria, but a few species of Isospora, Cryptosporidium, and Sarcosporidia are represented. The Eimeria are best known, with seven important species recognized in chickens and several others in turkeys. Diagnosis of coccidiosis is by recognition of classic signs and lesions, by gross examination, and can be aided by microscopic examination of feces and intestinal contents. Control of coccidiosis is by preventive use of anticoccidials and by immunization. Cryptosporidium are common in poultry but little is known of their importance, except for the occasional outbreak of respiratory cryptosporidiosis in turkey poults. Of the flagellates, Histomonas meleagridis is the best known. Infections in turkeys may cause near 100% mortality, but outbreaks in chickens are more often marked by morbidity and subsequent recovery. Recent outbreaks in broiler breeder pullets caused excessive losses from mortality (5 to 20%) culling, and overall poor flock performance. Histomonas organisms are carried by eggs of the cecal worm Heterakis gallinarum enabling them to survive for long periods in soil as a source of infection. In the U.S. there are no products available for treatment of blackhead. Preventive use of anthelminthics to destroy the cecal worm carrier show some promise in reducing exposure.

  2. Hepatic and Intestinal Schistosomiasis: Review

    PubMed Central

    Elbaz, Tamer; Esmat, Gamal

    2013-01-01

    Schistosomiasis is an endemic disease in Egypt caused by the trematode Schistosoma which has different species. Hepatic schistosomiasis represents the best known form of chronic disease with a wide range of clinical manifestations. The pathogenesis of schistosomiasis is related to the host cellular immune response. This leads to granuloma formation and neo angiogenesis with subsequent periportal fibrosis manifested as portal hypertension, splenomegaly and esophageal varices. Intestinal schistosomiasis is another well identified form of chronic schistosomal affection. Egg deposition and granuloma formation eventually leads to acute then chronic schistosomal colitis and is commonly associated with polyp formation. It frequently presents as abdominal pain, diarrhea, tenesmus and anal pain. Definite diagnosis of schistosomiasis disease depends on microscopy and egg identification. Marked progress regarding serologic diagnosis occurred with development of recent PCR techniques that can confirm schistosomal affection at any stage. Many antischistosomal drugs have been described for treatment, praziquantel being the most safe and efficient drug. Still ongoing studies try to develop effective vaccines with identification of many target antigens. Preventive programs are highly needed to control the disease morbidity and to break the cycle of transmission. PMID:25685451

  3. Nutrition, microbiomes, and intestinal inflammation.

    PubMed

    Devkota, Suzanne; Chang, Eugene B

    2013-11-01

    To present and evaluate the recent findings that contribute to our understanding of the functional impact of diet on the enteric microbiome and outcomes of disease. Nutrients in excess and in deficiency have significant impact on gut microbial communities in both rodents and humans, acting directly on the microbiota or indirectly via altering host physiology. Furthermore, the effects of diet on the microbiome in determining health or disease can differ substantially depending on the age and environment of the individual. Dietary compounds can have profound short-term and long-term effects on the assemblage of the gut microbiome, which in turn affects the host-microbe interactions critically important for intestinal, metabolic, and immune homeostasis. Until recently, the mechanisms underlying these effects were poorly understood. However, new insights have now been gained, made possible through the application of advanced technologies and bioinformatics, novel experimental models, and human research. As a result, our conceptual framework for understanding the impact of diet on the gut microbiome, health, and disease has advanced considerably, bringing the promise of better tools of risk assessment, diagnostics, and therapeutic intervention in an age of personalized medicine.

  4. Incomplete intestinal absorption of fructose.

    PubMed Central

    Kneepkens, C M; Vonk, R J; Fernandes, J

    1984-01-01

    Intestinal D-fructose absorption in 31 children was investigated using measurements of breath hydrogen. Twenty five children had no abdominal symptoms and six had functional bowel disorders. After ingestion of fructose (2 g/kg bodyweight), 22 children (71%) showed a breath hydrogen increase of more than 10 ppm over basal values, indicating incomplete absorption: the increase averaged 53 ppm, range 12 to 250 ppm. Four of these children experienced abdominal symptoms. Three of the six children with bowel disorders showed incomplete absorption. Seven children were tested again with an equal amount of glucose, and in three of them also of galactose, added to the fructose. The mean maximum breath hydrogen increases were 5 and 10 ppm, respectively, compared with 103 ppm after fructose alone. In one boy several tests were performed with various sugars; fructose was the only sugar incompletely absorbed, and the effect of glucose on fructose absorption was shown to be dependent on the amount added. It is concluded that children have a limited absorptive capacity for fructose. We speculate that the enhancing effect of glucose and galactose on fructose absorption may be due to activation of the fructose carrier. Apple juice in particular contains fructose in excess of glucose and could lead to abdominal symptoms in susceptible children. PMID:6476870

  5. New approaches to increase intestinal length: Methods used for intestinal regeneration and bioengineering

    PubMed Central

    Shirafkan, Ali; Montalbano, Mauro; McGuire, Joshua; Rastellini, Cristiana; Cicalese, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Inadequate absorptive surface area poses a great challenge to the patients suffering a variety of intestinal diseases causing short bowel syndrome. To date, these patients are managed with total parenteral nutrition or intestinal transplantation. However, these carry significant morbidity and mortality. Currently, by emergence of tissue engineering, anticipations to utilize an alternative method to increase the intestinal absorptive surface area are increasing. In this paper, we will review the improvements made over time in attempting elongating the intestine with surgical techniques as well as using intestinal bioengineering. Performing sequential intestinal lengthening was the preliminary method applied in humans. However, these methods did not reach widespread use and has limited outcome. Subsequent experimental methods were developed utilizing scaffolds to regenerate intestinal tissue and organoids unit from the intestinal epithelium. Stem cells also have been studied and applied in all types of tissue engineering. Biomaterials were utilized as a structural support for naive cells to produce bio-engineered tissue that can achieve a near-normal anatomical structure. A promising novel approach is the elongation of the intestine with an acellular biologic scaffold to generate a neo-formed intestinal tissue that showed, for the first time, evidence of absorption in vivo. In the large intestine, studies are more focused on regeneration and engineering of sphincters and will be briefly reviewed. From the review of the existing literature, it can be concluded that significant progress has been achieved in these experimental methods but that these now need to be fully translated into a pre-clinical and clinical experimentation to become a future viable therapeutic option. PMID:27011901

  6. Molecular aspects of intestinal calcium absorption

    PubMed Central

    Diaz de Barboza, Gabriela; Guizzardi, Solange; Tolosa de Talamoni, Nori

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal Ca2+ absorption is a crucial physiological process for maintaining bone mineralization and Ca2+ homeostasis. It occurs through the transcellular and paracellular pathways. The first route comprises 3 steps: the entrance of Ca2+ across the brush border membranes (BBM) of enterocytes through epithelial Ca2+ channels TRPV6, TRPV5, and Cav1.3; Ca2+ movement from the BBM to the basolateral membranes by binding proteins with high Ca2+ affinity (such as CB9k); and Ca2+ extrusion into the blood. Plasma membrane Ca2+ ATPase (PMCA1b) and sodium calcium exchanger (NCX1) are mainly involved in the exit of Ca2+ from enterocytes. A novel molecule, the 4.1R protein, seems to be a partner of PMCA1b, since both molecules co-localize and interact. The paracellular pathway consists of Ca2+ transport through transmembrane proteins of tight junction structures, such as claudins 2, 12, and 15. There is evidence of crosstalk between the transcellular and paracellular pathways in intestinal Ca2+ transport. When intestinal oxidative stress is triggered, there is a decrease in the expression of several molecules of both pathways that inhibit intestinal Ca2+ absorption. Normalization of redox status in the intestine with drugs such as quercetin, ursodeoxycholic acid, or melatonin return intestinal Ca2+ transport to control values. Calcitriol [1,25(OH)2D3] is the major controlling hormone of intestinal Ca2+ transport. It increases the gene and protein expression of most of the molecules involved in both pathways. PTH, thyroid hormones, estrogens, prolactin, growth hormone, and glucocorticoids apparently also regulate Ca2+ transport by direct action, indirect mechanism mediated by the increase of renal 1,25(OH)2D3 production, or both. Different physiological conditions, such as growth, pregnancy, lactation, and aging, adjust intestinal Ca2+ absorption according to Ca2+ demands. Better knowledge of the molecular details of intestinal Ca2+ absorption could lead to the development of

  7. Current Status of Intestinal Transplantation in Children

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, Jorge; Bueno, Javier; Kocoshis, Samuel; Green, Mike; Abu-Elmagd, Kareem; Furukawa, Hiro; Barksdale, Edward M.; Strom, Sharon; Fung, John J.; Todo, Satoru; Irish, William; Starzl, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose A clinical trial of intestinal transplantation (Itx) under tacrolimus and prednisone immunosuppression was initiated in June 1990 in children with irreversible intestinal failure and who were dependent on total parenteral nutrition (TPN). Methods Fifty-five patients (28 girls, 27 boys) with a median age of 3.2 years (range, 0.5 to 18 years) received 58 intestinal transplants that included isolated small bowel (SB) (n = 17), liver SB (LSB) (n = 33), and multivisceral (MV) (n = 8) allografts. Nine patients also received bone marrow infusion, and there were 20 colonic allografts. Azathioprine, cyclophosphamide, or mycophenolate mofetil were used in different phases of the series. Indications for Itx included: gastroschisis(n = 14), volvulus (n = 13), necrotizing enterocolitis (n = 6), intestinal atresia (n = 8), chronic intestinal pseudoobstruction (n = 5), Hirschsprung’s disease (n = 4), microvillus inclusion disease (n = 3), multiple polyposis (n = 1), and trauma (n = 1). Results Currently, 30 patients are alive (patient survival, 55%; graft survival, 52%). Twenty-nine children with functioning grafts are living at home and off TPN, with a mean follow-up of 962 (range, 75 to 2,424) days. Immunologic complications have included liver allograft rejection (n = 18), intestinal allograft rejection (n = 52), posttransplant lymphoproliferative disease (n = 16), cytomegalovirus (n = 16) and graft-versus-host disease (n = 4). A combination of associated complications included intestinal perforation (n = 4), biliary leak (n = 3), bile duct stenosis (n = 1), intestinal leak (n = 6), dehiscence with evisceration (n = 4), hepatic artery thrombosis (n = 3), bleeding (n = 9), portal vein stenosis (n = 1), intraabdominal abscess (n = 11), and chylous ascites (n = 4). Graft loss occurred as a result of rejection (n = 8), infection (n = 12), technical complications (n = 8), and complications of TPN after graft removal (n = 3). There were four retransplants (SB, n = 1; LSB n

  8. Molecular aspects of intestinal calcium absorption.

    PubMed

    Diaz de Barboza, Gabriela; Guizzardi, Solange; Tolosa de Talamoni, Nori

    2015-06-21

    Intestinal Ca(2+) absorption is a crucial physiological process for maintaining bone mineralization and Ca(2+) homeostasis. It occurs through the transcellular and paracellular pathways. The first route comprises 3 steps: the entrance of Ca(2+) across the brush border membranes (BBM) of enterocytes through epithelial Ca(2+) channels TRPV6, TRPV5, and Cav1.3; Ca(2+) movement from the BBM to the basolateral membranes by binding proteins with high Ca(2+) affinity (such as CB9k); and Ca(2+) extrusion into the blood. Plasma membrane Ca(2+) ATPase (PMCA1b) and sodium calcium exchanger (NCX1) are mainly involved in the exit of Ca(2+) from enterocytes. A novel molecule, the 4.1R protein, seems to be a partner of PMCA1b, since both molecules co-localize and interact. The paracellular pathway consists of Ca(2+) transport through transmembrane proteins of tight junction structures, such as claudins 2, 12, and 15. There is evidence of crosstalk between the transcellular and paracellular pathways in intestinal Ca(2+) transport. When intestinal oxidative stress is triggered, there is a decrease in the expression of several molecules of both pathways that inhibit intestinal Ca(2+) absorption. Normalization of redox status in the intestine with drugs such as quercetin, ursodeoxycholic acid, or melatonin return intestinal Ca(2+) transport to control values. Calcitriol [1,25(OH)₂D₃] is the major controlling hormone of intestinal Ca(2+) transport. It increases the gene and protein expression of most of the molecules involved in both pathways. PTH, thyroid hormones, estrogens, prolactin, growth hormone, and glucocorticoids apparently also regulate Ca(2+) transport by direct action, indirect mechanism mediated by the increase of renal 1,25(OH)₂D₃ production, or both. Different physiological conditions, such as growth, pregnancy, lactation, and aging, adjust intestinal Ca(2+) absorption according to Ca(2+) demands. Better knowledge of the molecular details of intestinal Ca(2

  9. The virtual intestine: in silico modeling of small intestinal electrophysiology and motility and the applications.

    PubMed

    Du, Peng; Paskaranandavadivel, Niranchan; Angeli, Timothy R; Cheng, Leo K; O'Grady, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    The intestine comprises a long hollow muscular tube organized in anatomically and functionally discrete compartments, which digest and absorb nutrients and water from ingested food. The intestine also plays key roles in the elimination of waste and protection from infection. Critical to all of these functions is the intricate, highly coordinated motion of the intestinal tract, known as motility, which is coregulated by hormonal, neural, electrophysiological and other factors. The Virtual Intestine encapsulates a series of mathematical models of intestinal function in health and disease, with a current focus on motility, and particularly electrophysiology. The Virtual Intestine is being cohesively established across multiple physiological scales, from sub/cellular functions to whole organ levels, facilitating quantitative evaluations that present an integrative in silico framework. The models are also now finding broad physiological applications, including in evaluating hypotheses of slow wave pacemaker mechanisms, smooth muscle electrophysiology, structure-function relationships, and electromechanical coupling. Clinical applications are also beginning to follow, including in the pathophysiology of motility disorders, diagnosing intestinal ischemia, and visualizing colonic dysfunction. These advances illustrate the emerging potential of the Virtual Intestine to effectively address multiscale research challenges in interdisciplinary gastrointestinal sciences. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Fish oil enhances recovery of intestinal microbiota and epithelial integrity in chronic rejection of intestinal transplant.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiurong; Zhang, Qiang; Wang, Chenyang; Tang, Chun; Zhang, Yanmei; Li, Ning; Li, Jieshou

    2011-01-01

    The intestinal chronic rejection (CR) is the major limitation to long-term survival of transplanted organs. This study aimed to investigate the interaction between intestinal microbiota and epithelial integrity in chronic rejection of intestinal transplantation, and to find out whether fish oil enhances recovery of intestinal microbiota and epithelial integrity. The luminal and mucosal microbiota composition of CR rats were characterized by DGGE analysis at 190 days after intestinal transplant. The specific bacterial species were determined by sequence analysis. Furthermore, changes in the localization of intestinal TJ proteins were examined by immunofluorescent staining. PCR-DGGE analysis revealed that gut microbiota in CR rats had a shift towards Escherichia coli, Bacteroides spp and Clostridium spp and a decrease in the abundance of Lactobacillales bacteria in the intestines. Fish oil supplementation could enhance the recovery of gut microbiota, showing a significant decrease of gut bacterial proportions of E. coli and Bacteroides spp and an increase of Lactobacillales spp. In addition, CR rats showed pronounced alteration of tight junction, depicted by marked changes in epithelial cell ultrastructure and redistribution of occuldin and claudins as well as disruption in TJ barrier function. Fish oil administration ameliorated disruption of epithelial integrity in CR, which was associated with an improvement of the mucosal structure leading to improved tight junctions. Our study have presented novel evidence that fish oil is involved in the maintenance of epithelial TJ integrity and recovery of gut microbiota, which may have therapeutic potential against CR in intestinal transplantation.

  11. Small intestinal nematode infection of mice is associated with increased enterobacterial loads alongside the intestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Rausch, Sebastian; Held, Josephin; Fischer, André; Heimesaat, Markus M; Kühl, Anja A; Bereswill, Stefan; Hartmann, Susanne

    2013-01-01

    Parasitic nematodes are potent modulators of immune reactivity in mice and men. Intestinal nematodes live in close contact with commensal gut bacteria, provoke biased Th2 immune responses upon infection, and subsequently lead to changes in gut physiology. We hypothesized that murine nematode infection is associated with distinct changes of the intestinal bacterial microbiota composition. We here studied intestinal inflammatory and immune responses in mice following infection with the hookworm Heligmosomoides polygyrus bakeri and applied cultural and molecular techniques to quantitatively assess intestinal microbiota changes in the ileum, cecum and colon. At day 14 post nematode infection, mice harbored significantly higher numbers of γ-Proteobacteria/Enterobacteriaceae and members of the Bacteroides/Prevotella group in their cecum as compared to uninfected controls. Abundance of Gram-positive species such as Lactobacilli, Clostridia as well as the total bacterial load was not affected by worm infection. The altered microbiota composition was independent of the IL-4/-13 - STAT6 signaling axis, as infected IL-4Rα(-/-) mice showed a similar increase in enterobacterial loads. In conclusion, infection with an enteric nematode is accompanied by distinct intestinal microbiota changes towards higher abundance of gram-negative commensal species at the small intestinal site of infection (and inflammation), but also in the parasite-free large intestinal tract. Further studies should unravel the impact of nematode-induced microbiota changes in inflammatory bowel disease to allow for a better understanding of how theses parasites interfere with intestinal inflammation and bacterial communities in men.

  12. Exploring food effects on indinavir absorption with human intestinal fluids in the mouse intestine.

    PubMed

    Holmstock, Nico; De Bruyn, Tom; Bevernage, Jan; Annaert, Pieter; Mols, Raf; Tack, Jan; Augustijns, Patrick

    2013-04-11

    Food can have a significant impact on the pharmacokinetics of orally administered drugs, as it may affect drug solubility as well as permeability. Since fed state conditions cannot easily be implemented in the presently available permeability tools, including the frequently used Caco-2 system, exploring food effects during drug development can be quite challenging. In this study, we investigated the effect of fasted and fed state conditions on the intestinal absorption of the HIV protease inhibitor indinavir using simulated and human intestinal fluids in the in situ intestinal perfusion technique in mice. Although the solubility of indinavir was 6-fold higher in fed state human intestinal fluids (FeHIF) as compared to fasted state HIF (FaHIF), the intestinal permeation of indinavir was 22-fold lower in FeHIF as compared to FaHIF. Dialysis experiments showed that only a small fraction of indinavir is accessible for absorption in FeHIF due to micellar entrapment, possibly explaining its low intestinal permeation. The presence of ritonavir, a known P-gp inhibitor, increased the intestinal permeation of indinavir by 2-fold in FaHIF, while there was no increase when using FeHIF. These data confirm that drug-food interactions form a complex interplay between solubility and permeability effects. The use of HIF in in situ intestinal perfusions holds great promise for biorelevant absorption evaluation as it allows to directly explore this complex solubility/permeability interplay on drug absorption.

  13. The Virtual Intestine: in-silico modeling of small intestinal electrophysiology and motility and the applications

    PubMed Central

    Du, Peng; Paskaranandavadivel, Niranchan; Angeli, Timothy R.; Cheng, Leo K; O'Grady, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    The intestine comprises a long hollow muscular tube organized in anatomically and functionally discrete compartments, which digest and absorb nutrients and water from ingested food. The intestine also plays key roles in the elimination of waste and protection from infection. Critical to all of these functions is the intricate, highly-coordinated motion of the intestinal tract, known as motility, which is co-regulated by hormonal, neural, electrophysiological and other factors. The Virtual Intestine encapsulates a series of mathematical models of intestinal function in health and disease, with a current focus on motility, and particularly electrophysiology. The Virtual Intestine is being cohesively established across multiple physiological scales, from sub/cellular functions to whole organ levels, facilitating quantitative evaluations that present an integrative in-silico framework. The models are also now finding broad physiological applications, including in evaluating hypotheses of slow wave pacemaker mechanisms, smooth muscle electrophysiology, structure-function relationships, and electromechanical coupling. Clinical applications are also beginning to follow, including in the pathophysiology of motility disorders, diagnosing intestinal ischemia, and visualizing colonic dysfunction. These advances illustrate the emerging potential of the Virtual Intestine to effectively address multi-scale research challenges in interdisciplinary gastrointestinal sciences. PMID:26562482

  14. Analysis of Cell Death Induction in Intestinal Organoids In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Grabinger, Thomas; Delgado, Eugenia; Brunner, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium has an important function in the absorption of nutrients contained in the food. Furthermore, it also has an important barrier function, preventing luminal pathogens from entering the bloodstream. This single cell layer epithelium is quite sensitive to various cell death-promoting triggers, including drugs, irradiation, and TNF family members, leading to loss of barrier integrity, epithelial erosion, inflammation, malabsorption, and diarrhea. In order to assess the intestinal epithelium-damaging potential of treatments and substances specific test systems are required. As intestinal tumor cell lines are a poor substitute for primary intestinal epithelial cells, and in vivo experiments in mice are costly and often unethical, the use of intestinal organoids cultured from intestinal crypts provide an ideal tool to study cell death induction and mechanisms in primary intestinal epithelial cells. This protocol describes the isolation and culture of intestinal organoids from murine small intestinal crypts, and the quantitative assessment of cell death induction in these organoids.

  15. Early intestinal growth and development in poultry.

    PubMed

    Lilburn, M S; Loeffler, S

    2015-07-01

    While there are many accepted "facts" within the field of poultry science that are in truth still open for discussion, there is little debate with respect to the tremendous genetic progress that has been made with commercial broilers and turkeys (Havenstein et al., 2003, 2007). When one considers the changes in carcass development in poultry meat strains, these genetic "improvements" have not always been accompanied by correlated changes in other physiological systems and this can predispose some birds to developmental anomalies (i.e. ascites; Pavlidis et al., 2007; Wideman et al., 2013). Over the last decade, there has been increased interest in intestinal growth/health as poultry nutritionists have attempted to adopt new approaches to deal with the broader changes in the overall nutrition landscape. This landscape includes not only the aforementioned genetic changes but also a raft of governmental policies that have focused attention on the environment (phosphorus and nitrogen excretion), consumer pressure on the use of antibiotics, and renewable biofuels with its consequent effects on ingredient costs. Intestinal morphology has become a common research tool for assessing nutritional effects on the intestine but it is only one metric among many that can be used and histological results can often be interpreted in a variety of ways. This study will address the broader body of research on intestinal growth and development in commercial poultry and will attempt to integrate the topics of the intestinal: microbial interface and the role of the intestine as an immune tissue under the broad umbrella of intestinal physiology. © 2015 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  16. Mouse models of intestinal inflammation and cancer.

    PubMed

    Westbrook, Aya M; Szakmary, Akos; Schiestl, Robert H

    2016-09-01

    Chronic inflammation is strongly associated with approximately one-fifth of all human cancers. Arising from combinations of factors such as environmental exposures, diet, inherited gene polymorphisms, infections, or from dysfunctions of the immune response, chronic inflammation begins as an attempt of the body to remove injurious stimuli; however, over time, this results in continuous tissue destruction and promotion and maintenance of carcinogenesis. Here, we focus on intestinal inflammation and its associated cancers, a group of diseases on the rise and affecting millions of people worldwide. Intestinal inflammation can be widely grouped into inflammatory bowel diseases (ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease) and celiac disease. Long-standing intestinal inflammation is associated with colorectal cancer and small-bowel adenocarcinoma, as well as extraintestinal manifestations, including lymphomas and autoimmune diseases. This article highlights potential mechanisms of pathogenesis in inflammatory bowel diseases and celiac disease, as well as those involved in the progression to associated cancers, most of which have been identified from studies utilizing mouse models of intestinal inflammation. Mouse models of intestinal inflammation can be widely grouped into chemically induced models; genetic models, which make up the bulk of the studied models; adoptive transfer models; and spontaneous models. Studies in these models have lead to the understanding that persistent antigen exposure in the intestinal lumen, in combination with loss of epithelial barrier function, and dysfunction and dysregulation of the innate and adaptive immune responses lead to chronic intestinal inflammation. Transcriptional changes in this environment leading to cell survival, hyperplasia, promotion of angiogenesis, persistent DNA damage, or insufficient repair of DNA damage due to an excess of proinflammatory mediators are then thought to lead to sustained malignant transformation. With

  17. Autism and Schizophrenia: Intestinal Disorders.

    PubMed

    Cade, R; Privette, M; Fregly, M; Rowland, N; Sun, Z; Zele, V; Wagemaker, H; Edelstein, C

    2000-01-01

    We examined Dohan's hypothesis that schizophrenia is associated with the absorption of "exorphins" contained in gluten and casein. In addition, because of the work of Reichelt et al. (Reichelt, K.L., Saelid, G., Lindback, J. and Orbeck, H. (1986) Biological Psychiatry 21:1279-1290) and Rodriguez et al. (Rodriguez, Trav, A.L., Barreiro Marin, R, Galvez, Borrero, I.M., del Olmo Romero-Nieva, F. and Diaz Alvarez, A. (1994) Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease Aug; 182(8): 478-479), we carried out similar studies on a group of children with autism. In both syndromes we found similar patterns of peptide containing peaks (Ninhydrin positive) after molecular screening with Sephadex G-15. Immunoglobulin assay of IgA and IgG against gliadin and casein in serum was done. High titer IgG antibodies to gliadin were found in 87% of autistic and 86% of schizophrenic patients and high titer IgG antibodies to bovine casein were found in 90% of autistic and in 93% of schizophrenic patients. High titer IgA antibodies to gluten or casein were found in 30% of children with autism while in schizophrenic patients 86% had elevated IgA antibodies to gluten and 67% to casein; some normal children and adults have these antibodies but only in trace amounts. When schizophrenic patients were treated with dialysis or a gluten-casein free diet, or both (Cade, R., Wagemaker, H., Privette, R.M., Fregly, M., Rogers, J. and Orlando, J. (1990) Psychiatry: A World Prespective 1: 494-500) peptiduria and Brief Psychiatric Rating Scores fell while abnormal behavior diminished. A gluten-casein free diet was accompanied by improvement in 81% of autistic children within 3 months in most of the behavior categories. Our data provide support for the proposal that many patients with schizophrenia or autism suffer due to absorption of exorphins formed in the intestine from incomplete digestion of gluten and casein.

  18. Enterocyte Fatty Acid Binding Proteins (FABPs): Different Functions of Liver- and Intestinal- FABPs in the Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Gajda, Angela M.; Storch, Judith

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Fatty acid binding proteins (FABP) are highly abundant cytosolic proteins that are expressed in most mammalian tissues. In the intestinal enterocyte, both Liver- (LFABP; FABP1) and Intestinal-fatty acid binding proteins (IFABP; FABP2) are expressed. These proteins display high affinity binding for long chain fatty acids (FA) and other hydrophobic ligands, thus they are believed to be involved with uptake and trafficking of lipids in the intestine. In vitro studies have identified differences in ligand binding stoichiometry and specificity, and in mechanisms of FA transfer to membranes, and it has been hypothesized that LFABP and IFABP have difference functions in the enterocyte. Studies directly comparing LFABP- and IFABP-null mice have revealed markedly different phenotypes, indicating that these proteins indeed have different functions in intestinal lipid metabolism and whole body energy homeostasis. In this review, we discuss the evolving knowledge of the functions of LFABP and IFABP in the intestinal enterocyte. PMID:25458898

  19. Fat-soluble vitamin intestinal absorption: absorption sites in the intestine and interactions for absorption.

    PubMed

    Goncalves, Aurélie; Roi, Stéphanie; Nowicki, Marion; Dhaussy, Amélie; Huertas, Alain; Amiot, Marie-Josèphe; Reboul, Emmanuelle

    2015-04-01

    The interactions occurring at the intestinal level between the fat-soluble vitamins A, D, E and K (FSVs) are poorly documented. We first determined each FSV absorption profile along the duodenal-colonic axis of mouse intestine to clarify their respective absorption sites. We then investigated the interactions between FSVs during their uptake by Caco-2 cells. Our data show that vitamin A was mostly absorbed in the mouse proximal intestine, while vitamin D was absorbed in the median intestine, and vitamin E and K in the distal intestine. Significant competitive interactions for uptake were then elucidated among vitamin D, E and K, supporting the hypothesis of common absorption pathways. Vitamin A also significantly decreased the uptake of the other FSVs but, conversely, its uptake was not impaired by vitamins D and K and even promoted by vitamin E. These results should be taken into account, especially for supplement formulation, to optimise FSV absorption.

  20. Generation of tissue-engineered small intestine using embryonic stem cell-derived human intestinal organoids

    PubMed Central

    Finkbeiner, Stacy R.; Freeman, Jennifer J.; Wieck, Minna M.; El-Nachef, Wael; Altheim, Christopher H.; Tsai, Yu-Hwai; Huang, Sha; Dyal, Rachel; White, Eric S.; Grikscheit, Tracy C.; Teitelbaum, Daniel H.; Spence, Jason R.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Short bowel syndrome (SBS) is characterized by poor nutrient absorption due to a deficit of healthy intestine. Current treatment practices rely on providing supportive medical therapy with parenteral nutrition; while life saving, such interventions are not curative and are still associated with significant co-morbidities. As approaches to lengthen remaining intestinal tissue have been met with only limited success and intestinal transplants have poor survival outcomes, new approaches to treating SBS are necessary. Human intestine derived from embryonic stem cells (hESCs) or induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), called human intestinal organoids (HIOs), have the potential to offer a personalized and scalable source of intestine for regenerative therapies. However, given that HIOs are small three-dimensional structures grown in vitro, methods to generate usable HIO-derived constructs are needed. We investigated the ability of hESCs or HIOs to populate acellular porcine intestinal matrices and artificial polyglycolic/poly L lactic acid (PGA/PLLA) scaffolds, and examined the ability of matrix/scaffolds to thrive when transplanted in vivo. Our results demonstrate that the acellular matrix alone is not sufficient to instruct hESC differentiation towards an endodermal or intestinal fate. We observed that while HIOs reseed acellular porcine matrices in vitro, the HIO-reseeded matrices do not thrive when transplanted in vivo. In contrast, HIO-seeded PGA/PLLA scaffolds thrive in vivo and develop into tissue that looks nearly identical to adult human intestinal tissue. Our results suggest that HIO-seeded PGA/PLLA scaffolds are a promising avenue for developing the mucosal component of tissue engineered human small intestine, which need to be explored further to develop them into fully functional tissue. PMID:26459240

  1. Mesenchymal stem cells stimulate intestinal stem cells to repair radiation-induced intestinal injury

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Wei; Guo, Mengzheng; Han, Zhibo; Wang, Yan; Yang, Ping; Xu, Chang; Wang, Qin; Du, Liqing; Li, Qian; Zhao, Hui; Fan, Feiyue; Liu, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    The loss of stem cells residing in the base of the intestinal crypt has a key role in radiation-induced intestinal injury. In particular, Lgr5+ intestinal stem cells (ISCs) are indispensable for intestinal regeneration following exposure to radiation. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have previously been shown to improve intestinal epithelial repair in a mouse model of radiation injury, and, therefore, it was hypothesized that this protective effect is related to Lgr5+ ISCs. In this study, it was found that, following exposure to radiation, transplantation of MSCs improved the survival of the mice, ameliorated intestinal injury and increased the number of regenerating crypts. Furthermore, there was a significant increase in Lgr5+ ISCs and their daughter cells, including Ki67+ transient amplifying cells, Vil1+ enterocytes and lysozyme+ Paneth cells, in response to treatment with MSCs. Crypts isolated from mice treated with MSCs formed a higher number of and larger enteroids than those from the PBS group. MSC transplantation also reduced the number of apoptotic cells within the small intestine at 6 h post-radiation. Interestingly, Wnt3a and active β-catenin protein levels were increased in the small intestines of MSC-treated mice. In addition, intravenous delivery of recombinant mouse Wnt3a after radiation reduced damage in the small intestine and was radioprotective, although not to the same degree as MSC treatment. Our results show that MSCs support the growth of endogenous Lgr5+ ISCs, thus promoting repair of the small intestine following exposure to radiation. The molecular mechanism of action mediating this was found to be related to increased activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. PMID:27685631

  2. Generation of tissue-engineered small intestine using embryonic stem cell-derived human intestinal organoids.

    PubMed

    Finkbeiner, Stacy R; Freeman, Jennifer J; Wieck, Minna M; El-Nachef, Wael; Altheim, Christopher H; Tsai, Yu-Hwai; Huang, Sha; Dyal, Rachel; White, Eric S; Grikscheit, Tracy C; Teitelbaum, Daniel H; Spence, Jason R

    2015-10-12

    Short bowel syndrome (SBS) is characterized by poor nutrient absorption due to a deficit of healthy intestine. Current treatment practices rely on providing supportive medical therapy with parenteral nutrition; while life saving, such interventions are not curative and are still associated with significant co-morbidities. As approaches to lengthen remaining intestinal tissue have been met with only limited success and intestinal transplants have poor survival outcomes, new approaches to treating SBS are necessary. Human intestine derived from embryonic stem cells (hESCs) or induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), called human intestinal organoids (HIOs), have the potential to offer a personalized and scalable source of intestine for regenerative therapies. However, given that HIOs are small three-dimensional structures grown in vitro, methods to generate usable HIO-derived constructs are needed. We investigated the ability of hESCs or HIOs to populate acellular porcine intestinal matrices and artificial polyglycolic/poly L lactic acid (PGA/PLLA) scaffolds, and examined the ability of matrix/scaffolds to thrive when transplanted in vivo. Our results demonstrate that the acellular matrix alone is not sufficient to instruct hESC differentiation towards an endodermal or intestinal fate. We observed that while HIOs reseed acellular porcine matrices in vitro, the HIO-reseeded matrices do not thrive when transplanted in vivo. In contrast, HIO-seeded PGA/PLLA scaffolds thrive in vivo and develop into tissue that looks nearly identical to adult human intestinal tissue. Our results suggest that HIO-seeded PGA/PLLA scaffolds are a promising avenue for developing the mucosal component of tissue engineered human small intestine, which need to be explored further to develop them into fully functional tissue.

  3. Apoptosis, Necrosis, and Necroptosis in the Gut and Intestinal Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Negroni, Anna; Cucchiara, Salvatore; Stronati, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) form a physiochemical barrier that separates the intestinal lumen from the host's internal milieu and is critical for electrolyte passage, nutrient absorption, and interaction with commensal microbiota. Moreover, IECs are strongly involved in the intestinal mucosal inflammatory response as well as in mucosal innate and adaptive immune responses. Cell death in the intestinal barrier is finely controlled, since alterations may lead to severe disorders, including inflammatory diseases. The emerging picture indicates that intestinal epithelial cell death is strictly related to the maintenance of tissue homeostasis. This review is focused on previous reports on different forms of cell death in intestinal epithelium. PMID:26483605

  4. Apoptosis, Necrosis, and Necroptosis in the Gut and Intestinal Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Negroni, Anna; Cucchiara, Salvatore; Stronati, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) form a physiochemical barrier that separates the intestinal lumen from the host's internal milieu and is critical for electrolyte passage, nutrient absorption, and interaction with commensal microbiota. Moreover, IECs are strongly involved in the intestinal mucosal inflammatory response as well as in mucosal innate and adaptive immune responses. Cell death in the intestinal barrier is finely controlled, since alterations may lead to severe disorders, including inflammatory diseases. The emerging picture indicates that intestinal epithelial cell death is strictly related to the maintenance of tissue homeostasis. This review is focused on previous reports on different forms of cell death in intestinal epithelium.

  5. Small intestinal obstruction caused by anisakiasis.

    PubMed

    Takano, Yuichi; Gomi, Kuniyo; Endo, Toshiyuki; Suzuki, Reika; Hayashi, Masashi; Nakanishi, Toru; Tateno, Ayumi; Yamamura, Eiichi; Asonuma, Kunio; Ino, Satoshi; Kuroki, Yuichiro; Nagahama, Masatsugu; Inoue, Kazuaki; Takahashi, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Small intestinal anisakiasis is a rare disease that is very difficult to diagnose, and its initial diagnosis is often surgical. However, it is typically a benign disease that resolves with conservative treatment, and unnecessary surgery can be avoided if it is appropriately diagnosed. This case report is an example of small intestinal obstruction caused by anisakiasis that resolved with conservative treatment. A 63-year-old man admitted to our department with acute abdominal pain. A history of raw fish (sushi) ingestion was recorded. Abdominal CT demonstrated small intestinal dilatation with wall thickening and contrast enhancement. Ascitic fluid was found on the liver surface and in the Douglas pouch. His IgE (RIST) was elevated, and he tested positive for the anti-Anisakis antibodies IgG and IgA. Small intestinal obstruction by anisakiasis was highly suspected and conservative treatment was performed, ileus tube, fasting, and fluid replacement. Symptoms quickly resolved, and he was discharged on the seventh day of admission. Small intestinal anisakiasis is a relatively uncommon disease, the diagnosis of which may be difficult. Because it is a self-limiting disease that usually resolves in 1-2 weeks, a conservative approach is advisable to avoid unnecessary surgery.

  6. Small Intestinal Obstruction Caused by Anisakiasis

    PubMed Central

    Takano, Yuichi; Gomi, Kuniyo; Endo, Toshiyuki; Suzuki, Reika; Hayashi, Masashi; Nakanishi, Toru; Tateno, Ayumi; Asonuma, Kunio; Ino, Satoshi; Kuroki, Yuichiro; Nagahama, Masatsugu; Inoue, Kazuaki

    2013-01-01

    Small intestinal anisakiasis is a rare disease that is very difficult to diagnose, and its initial diagnosis is often surgical. However, it is typically a benign disease that resolves with conservative treatment, and unnecessary surgery can be avoided if it is appropriately diagnosed. This case report is an example of small intestinal obstruction caused by anisakiasis that resolved with conservative treatment. A 63-year-old man admitted to our department with acute abdominal pain. A history of raw fish (sushi) ingestion was recorded. Abdominal CT demonstrated small intestinal dilatation with wall thickening and contrast enhancement. Ascitic fluid was found on the liver surface and in the Douglas pouch. His IgE (RIST) was elevated, and he tested positive for the anti-Anisakis antibodies IgG and IgA. Small intestinal obstruction by anisakiasis was highly suspected and conservative treatment was performed, ileus tube, fasting, and fluid replacement. Symptoms quickly resolved, and he was discharged on the seventh day of admission. Small intestinal anisakiasis is a relatively uncommon disease, the diagnosis of which may be difficult. Because it is a self-limiting disease that usually resolves in 1-2 weeks, a conservative approach is advisable to avoid unnecessary surgery. PMID:24455340

  7. Intestinal microbiota: its role in digestive diseases.

    PubMed

    Bustos Fernandez, Luis M; Lasa, Juan S; Man, Fernando

    2014-09-01

    It is now well known that intestinal microbiota exerts not only several physiological functions, but has also been implied in the mechanisms of many conditions, both intestinal and extraintestinal. These advances, to the best of our knowledge, have been made possible by the development of new ways of studying gut flora. Metagenomics, the study of genetic material taken directly from environmental samples, avoiding individual culture, has become an excellent tool to study the human microbiota. Therefore, it has demonstrated an association between an altered intestinal microbiota and inflammatory bowel disease or irritable bowel syndrome, perhaps the most extensively studied conditions associated with this particular subject. However, microbiota has a potential role in the development of other diseases; their manifestations are not confined to the intestine only. In this article, an extensive updated review is conducted on the role intestinal microbiota has in health and in different diseases. Focus is made on the following conditions: inflammatory bowel disease, irritable bowel syndrome, celiac disease, hepatic encephalopathy, and obesity.

  8. Epigenetics in Intestinal Epithelial Cell Renewal

    PubMed Central

    Roostaee, Alireza; Benoit, Yannick D.; Boudjadi, Salah

    2016-01-01

    A controlled balance between cell proliferation and differentiation is essential to maintain normal intestinal tissue renewal and physiology. Such regulation is powered by several intracellular pathways that are translated into the establishment of specific transcription programs, which influence intestinal cell fate along the crypt‐villus axis. One important check‐point in this process occurs in the transit amplifying zone of the intestinal crypts where different signaling pathways and transcription factors cooperate to manage cellular proliferation and differentiation, before secretory or absorptive cell lineage terminal differentiation. However, the importance of epigenetic modifications such as histone methylation and acetylation in the regulation of these processes is still incompletely understood. There have been recent advances in identifying the impact of histone modifications and chromatin remodelers on the proliferation and differentiation of normal intestinal crypt cells. In this review we discuss recent discoveries on the role of the cellular epigenome in intestinal cell fate, development, and tissue renewal. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2361–2367, 2016. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Cellular Physiology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27061836

  9. Intestinal endocrine cells in radiation enteritis

    SciTech Connect

    Pietroletti, R.; Blaauwgeers, J.L.; Taat, C.W.; Simi, M.; Brummelkamp, W.H.; Becker, A.E. )

    1989-08-01

    In this study, the intestinal endocrine cells were investigated in 13 surgical specimens affected by radiation enteritis. Endocrine cells were studied by means of Grimelius' silver staining and immunostaining for chromogranin, a general marker of endocrine cells. Positively stained cells were quantified by counting their number per unit length of muscularis mucosa. Results in radiation enteritis were compared with matched control specimens by using Student's t test. Chromogranin immunostaining showed a statistically significant increase of endocrine cells in radiation enteritis specimens compared with controls both in small and large intestine (ileum, 67.5 +/- 23.5 cells per unit length of muscularis mucosa in radiation enteritis versus 17.0 +/- 6.1 in controls; colon, 40.9 +/- 13.7 cells per unit length of muscularis mucosa in radiation enteritis versus 9.5 +/- 4.1 in controls--p less than 0.005 in both instances). Increase of endocrine cells was demonstrated also by Grimelius' staining; however, without reaching statistical significance. It is not clear whether or not the increase of endocrine cells in radiation enteritis reported in this study is caused by a hyperplastic response or by a sparing phenomenon. We should consider that increased endocrine cells, when abnormally secreting their products, may be involved in some of the clinical features of radiation enteropathy. In addition, as intestinal endocrine cells produce trophic substances to the intestine, their increase could be responsible for the raised risk of developing carcinoma of the intestine in long standing radiation enteritis.

  10. [Nephrolithiasis in patients with intestinal diseases].

    PubMed

    Cirillo, M; Iudici, M; Marcarelli, F; Laudato, M; Zincone, F

    2008-01-01

    Intestinal diseases may cause the formation of urinary stones through changes in the metabolism of oxalate, calcium, and uric acid. The oxalate that is excreted into urine comes from the catabolism of ascorbic acid and some amino acids or from intestinal absorption of food oxalate. Calcium is absorbed by the gut after the stimulation of active vitamin D and is excreted by the kidney under the control of the bone/parathyroid hormone axis. Uric acid is generated by the oxidation of exogenous and endogenous purine bases, is excreted by the kidney through glomerular filtration/tubular secretion, and is soluble in alkaline urine. Several data indicate that patients with inflammatory bowel diseases are at high risk of urinary stones containing calcium-oxalate salt or uric acid. Calcium-oxalate stones are caused by colonic oxalate hyperabsorption (secondary to intestinal dysfunction) or by parenteral nutrition. Uric acid stones are typical of patients with severe diarrhea and/or intestinal neostomy, that is, in patients with hyperconcentrated acidic urine. Relationships between malabsorptive intestinal diseases and urinary stones are less well defined. Preventive countermeasures are not the same for all disorders. Hyperoxaluria should be controlled by diets with a low content of lipids and oxalate but supplemented with calcium and probiotics. The presence of hyperconcentrated acidic urine should be controlled by correct hydration and administration of citrate.

  11. Intestinal spirochetosis: an enigmatic disease.

    PubMed

    Anthony, Nicholas E; Blackwell, James; Ahrens, William; Lovell, Roger; Scobey, Martin W

    2013-01-01

    Intestinal spirochetosis (IS) is a condition in which colonic and appendiceal epithelial cells are colonized by one of two anaerobic spirochetes, either the Brachyspira aalborgi or Brachyspira pilosicoli. There is much debate in the literature as to whether IS is a pathogen or a commensal inhabitant. A recent case of IS at our institution prompted a retrospective database search and review of the literature. A pathology database search for IS was performed at Carolinas Medical Center from 2003 through 2007. After patient identification, a retrospective review of the endoscopic record and the pathology report was performed. Pathology slides were reviewed for accuracy and special silver stains and/or immunostains were performed if needed. The following data were collected for each patient when available: age, gender, nationality, HIV status, and other co-morbid conditions when noted. We attempted to determine whether patients were treated for spirochetosis and if so, the treatment regimen used as well as the results. The database search detected 29 patients with biopsies showing IS. Three patients were subsequently removed due to incorrect identification. A total of 26 patients with an average age of 45 years were reviewed. The most common symptoms were abdominal pain, diarrhea, and rectal bleeding. Most patients did not exhibit inflammatory changes despite the presence of spirochetosis. Pathologic examination revealed a relative increase in intra-epithelial lymphocytes in a subset of cases, a non-specific finding. Acute colitis or architectural distortion was not seen in any of the study cases. We were only able to obtain follow-up of two patients after treatment with metronidazole and both responded to therapy. To date, our study is the largest case series that includes both endoscopic and pathologic descriptions and confirms the "bland" nature of the condition. In <20 % of our patients inflammation was present microscopically and it did not correlate well with

  12. Small intestinal ganglioneuromatosis in a dog.

    PubMed

    Paris, J K; McCandlish, I A P; Schwarz, T; Simpson, J W; Smith, S H

    2013-05-01

    A 9-year-old female neutered collie-cross dog was presented with a 2-month history of persistent diarrhoea, weight loss and intermittent vomiting. Abdominal ultrasonography revealed one loop of jejunum with a markedly thickened and multifocally hyperechoic wall, without loss of wall layering. Laparotomies were performed for biopsy and resection of affected intestine. Histopathological examination revealed small intestinal ganglioneuromatosis (GN). The dog recovered well from surgery and the diarrhoea resolved. Eleven months later the dog has gained weight and remains asymptomatic. This is the first report of small intestinal GN affecting a mature dog, in which pathology was localized to the mucosal lamina propria and surgical treatment resulted in a successful outcome.

  13. [Intestinal stimulation in patients with colostomy].

    PubMed

    Quesada, Ramón Ruiz

    2011-12-01

    We presented/displayed our experience in the recovery of the evacuator function of the intestine in patients entered in our service with direction diagnoses of Ileo Paralitico or Adinámico (Functional), that by some cause has been taken part surgically and is carrying of a temporary or permanent colostomia. Our experience is based on more than 10 patients, but we have only gathered the data of ten clinical histories. This stimulation we have obtained it, introducing a sounding Foley type through estoma, trying not to produce to the patient the minimum annoyance to him. We have looked for justification, as much physiological as anatomical, that it entails this answer of recovery of the intestinal peristaltismo, using body solid and not liquid, with idea that thus we respected better the normal intestinal operation in these patients, that already has it altered, to the being carrying of a colostomia.

  14. Tipping elements in the human intestinal ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Lahti, Leo; Salojärvi, Jarkko; Salonen, Anne; Scheffer, Marten; de Vos, Willem M

    2014-07-08

    The microbial communities living in the human intestine can have profound impact on our well-being and health. However, we have limited understanding of the mechanisms that control this complex ecosystem. Here, based on a deep phylogenetic analysis of the intestinal microbiota in a thousand western adults, we identify groups of bacteria that exhibit robust bistable abundance distributions. These bacteria are either abundant or nearly absent in most individuals, and exhibit decreased temporal stability at the intermediate abundance range. The abundances of these bimodally distributed bacteria vary independently, and their abundance distributions are not affected by short-term dietary interventions. However, their contrasting alternative states are associated with host factors such as ageing and overweight. We propose that the bistable groups reflect tipping elements of the intestinal microbiota, whose critical transitions may have profound health implications and diagnostic potential.

  15. Kiwifruit (Actinidia deliciosa) changes intestinal microbial profile.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yuan Kun; Low, Kay Yi; Siah, Kewin; Drummond, Lynley M; Gwee, Kok-Ann

    2012-01-01

    Kiwifruit is high in pectic polysaccharides and dietary fiber. This study aimed to find out how the ingestion of kiwifruit will affect intestinal microbiota populations, namely Lactobacillus, Bacteroides, Clostridium, Bifidobacterium, and Enterococcus. Freeze dried kiwifruit (equivalent of two fresh kiwifruits) was given to each of the six subjects daily for four days. Faecal samples were collected before, during and after kiwifruit consumption. The faecal bacteria were enumerated by qPCR and RT qPCR methods. The effect of the kiwifruit on intestinal microbiota profile varied between individuals; in general, the kiwifruit demonstrated a prebiotic effect of promoting the content of faecal lactobacilli and bifidobacteria (as compared to the baselines of the same individual before consumption) for as long as the fruit was consumed. The effect was however transient, the levels of the two bacteria returned near to that of the baselines upon cessation of consumption. Kiwifruit is a prebiotic in selectively enhancing the growth of intestinal lactic acid bacteria.

  16. Pregnancy in an intestinal transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Lobo, Veronica; Landy, Helain J; Matsumoto, Cal; Fishbein, Thomas M

    2012-08-01

    Intestinal transplantation is a relatively new form of therapy for short gut syndrome. Pregnancy after intestinal transplantation is rare. A 26-year-old small bowel transplant recipient presented for prenatal care. She previously had undergone bariatric surgery and later experienced small bowel necrosis and resection. The resulting short gut syndrome was treated with an isolated small bowel transplant. Medications during this pregnancy included prednisone, esomeprazole, diphenoxylate-atropine, ascorbic acid, tacrolimus, and magnesium supplementation. Throughout her pregnancy, her creatinine level was elevated. Labor was induced at 39 3/7 weeks and resulted in a spontaneous vaginal delivery of a healthy female neonate. Twelve weeks after delivery, the mother was admitted for a rejection reaction that was treated successfully. A successful pregnancy in an intestinal transplant recipient resulted in delivery of a healthy term newborn.

  17. Childhood acute leukemia and intestinal parasitosis.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Luna, R; Cárdenas-Cardos, R; Martínez-Guerra, G; Ayón, A; Leal, C; Rivera-Ortegón, F

    1989-11-01

    Infectious complications are the leading cause of mortality in children with acute leukemia. Despite the fact that intestinal parasitosis is a rather frequent finding and a health problem in underdeveloped countries, in our experience the incidence of helminthic and protozoan infections among children with leukemia is uncommon. We analyzed 54 consecutive patients with leukemia in a period of 5 years, and only seven (12.9%) had intestinal parasites, four of whom died because of the infection or complication by the parasites. One hundred children without any malignancy were the control group, 26 (26%) of whom had intestinal parasitosis. When we compared the frequency of parasitosis in the control group with the children with leukemia and parasitosis, we found a statistical difference (p less than 0.05). We speculate that parasitic infections may reduce the risk of childhood leukemia.

  18. Primary intestinal lymphangiectasia with generalized warts

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Soon Jae; Song, Hyun Joo; Boo, Sun-Jin; Na, Soo-Young; Kim, Heung Up; Hyun, Chang Lim

    2015-01-01

    Primary intestinal lymphangiectasia (PIL) is a rare protein-losing enteropathy with lymphatic leakage into the small intestine. Dilated lymphatics in the small intestinal wall and mesentery are observed in this disease. Laboratory tests of PIL patients revealed hypoalbuminemia, lymphocytopenia, hypogammaglobulinemia and increased stool α-1 antitrypsin clearance. Cell-mediated immunodeficiency is also present in PIL patients because of loss of lymphocytes. As a result, the patients are vulnerable to chronic viral infection and lymphoma. However, cases of PIL with chronic viral infection, such as human papilloma virus-induced warts, are rarely reported. We report a rare case of PIL with generalized warts in a 36-year-old male patient. PIL was diagnosed by capsule endoscopy and colonoscopic biopsy with histological tissue confirmation. Generalized warts were observed on the head, chest, abdomen, back, anus, and upper and lower extremities, including the hands and feet of the patient. PMID:26217101

  19. [Intestinal helminthiasis in the Mexican Republic].

    PubMed

    Tay, J; Ruiz, A; Sánchez Vega, J T; Romero-Cabello, R; Robert, L; Becerril, M A

    1995-01-01

    Very few uncertain and not trustworthy reports about the frequency of intestinal helminthiases found in humans have been made in México. However, with the few trustful studies carried out from 1981 to 1992, it is possible in México to verify that ascariasis, trichuriasis, hookworm infection and hymenolepiasis are present with significant percentages of infected people 11.2%, 1.7%, 0.15% and 1.8%, respectively. With the information obtained from the researches analyzed in this article, one can conclude that human infections by intestinal helminths in México, at the present time are almost as frequent as in past decades. Without any doubt, this occurs because still remain the factors that contribute to the persistence and spreading of the intestinal helminths, such as fecalism, poor hygienic and alimentary habits within deficient environmental sanitary conditions.

  20. Primary intestinal lymphangiectasia with generalized warts.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soon Jae; Song, Hyun Joo; Boo, Sun-Jin; Na, Soo-Young; Kim, Heung Up; Hyun, Chang Lim

    2015-07-21

    Primary intestinal lymphangiectasia (PIL) is a rare protein-losing enteropathy with lymphatic leakage into the small intestine. Dilated lymphatics in the small intestinal wall and mesentery are observed in this disease. Laboratory tests of PIL patients revealed hypoalbuminemia, lymphocytopenia, hypogammaglobulinemia and increased stool α-1 antitrypsin clearance. Cell-mediated immunodeficiency is also present in PIL patients because of loss of lymphocytes. As a result, the patients are vulnerable to chronic viral infection and lymphoma. However, cases of PIL with chronic viral infection, such as human papilloma virus-induced warts, are rarely reported. We report a rare case of PIL with generalized warts in a 36-year-old male patient. PIL was diagnosed by capsule endoscopy and colonoscopic biopsy with histological tissue confirmation. Generalized warts were observed on the head, chest, abdomen, back, anus, and upper and lower extremities, including the hands and feet of the patient.

  1. [Metabolic complications of urinary intestinal diversion].

    PubMed

    Gelosa, Marco; Pisani, Enrico

    2003-03-01

    The use of bowel in urinary diversion has increased markedly over the last 15 years and this trend is expected to continue. Complications that have been noted in patients with urinary intestinal diversion occurring as a consequence of metabolic abnormalities include disordered electrolyte metabolism, osteomalacia, growth retardation, calculus formation, infection, abnormal drug metabolism. The factors that influence the intensity of absorption of urinary electrolites by intestinal mucosa include length of time of retention of the urine, concentration of solute in the urine, type of urinary diversion, quality of emptying, capacity of the reservoir, surface area of the bowel used, renal function, infection and chronic dilatation. Regular draining of the urinary intestinal diversion, vigilant metabolic follow-up, and careful patient selection are essential to prevent metabolic abnormalities.

  2. Physiology of Intestinal Absorption and Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Kiela, Pawel R.; Ghishan, Fayez K.

    2016-01-01

    Virtually all nutrients from the diet are absorbed into blood across the highly polarized epithelial cell layer forming the small and large intestinal mucosa. Anatomical, histological, and functional specializations along the gastrointestinal tract are responsible for the effective and regulated nutrient transport via both passive and active mechanisms. In this chapter, we summarize the current state of knowledge regarding the mechanism of intestinal absorption of key nutrients such as sodium, anions (chloride, sulfate, oxalate), carbohydrates, amino acids and peptides, lipids, lipidand water-soluble vitamins, as well as the major minerals and micronutrients. This outline, including the molecular identity, specificity, and coordinated activities of key transport proteins and genes involved, serves as the background for the following chapters focused on the pathophysiology of acquired and congenital intestinal malabsorption, as well as clinical tools to test and treat malabsorptive symptoms. PMID:27086882

  3. Seronegative Intestinal Villous Atrophy: A Diagnostic Challenge.

    PubMed

    Martins, Cláudio; Teixeira, Cristina; Ribeiro, Suzane; Trabulo, Daniel; Cardoso, Cláudia; Mangualde, João; Freire, Ricardo; Alves, Ana Luísa; Gamito, Élia; Cremers, Isabelle; Oliveira, Ana Paula

    2016-01-01

    Celiac disease is the most important cause of intestinal villous atrophy. Seronegative intestinal villous atrophy, including those that are nonresponsive to a gluten-free diet, is a diagnostic challenge. In these cases, before establishing the diagnosis of seronegative celiac disease, alternative etiologies of atrophic enteropathy should be considered. Recently, a new clinical entity responsible for seronegative villous atrophy was described-olmesartan-induced sprue-like enteropathy. Herein, we report two uncommon cases of atrophic enteropathy in patients with arterial hypertension under olmesartan, who presented with severe chronic diarrhea and significant involuntary weight loss. Further investigation revealed intestinal villous atrophy and intraepithelial lymphocytosis. Celiac disease and other causes of villous atrophy were ruled out. Drug-induced enteropathy was suspected and clinical improvement and histologic recovery were verified after olmesartan withdrawal. These cases highlight the importance for clinicians to maintain a high index of suspicion for olmesartan as a precipitant of sprue-like enteropathy.

  4. Seronegative Intestinal Villous Atrophy: A Diagnostic Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Cristina; Ribeiro, Suzane; Trabulo, Daniel; Cardoso, Cláudia; Mangualde, João; Freire, Ricardo; Alves, Ana Luísa; Gamito, Élia; Cremers, Isabelle; Oliveira, Ana Paula

    2016-01-01

    Celiac disease is the most important cause of intestinal villous atrophy. Seronegative intestinal villous atrophy, including those that are nonresponsive to a gluten-free diet, is a diagnostic challenge. In these cases, before establishing the diagnosis of seronegative celiac disease, alternative etiologies of atrophic enteropathy should be considered. Recently, a new clinical entity responsible for seronegative villous atrophy was described—olmesartan-induced sprue-like enteropathy. Herein, we report two uncommon cases of atrophic enteropathy in patients with arterial hypertension under olmesartan, who presented with severe chronic diarrhea and significant involuntary weight loss. Further investigation revealed intestinal villous atrophy and intraepithelial lymphocytosis. Celiac disease and other causes of villous atrophy were ruled out. Drug-induced enteropathy was suspected and clinical improvement and histologic recovery were verified after olmesartan withdrawal. These cases highlight the importance for clinicians to maintain a high index of suspicion for olmesartan as a precipitant of sprue-like enteropathy. PMID:27803820

  5. A geometric description of human intestine.

    PubMed

    Coşkun, Ihsaniye; Yildiz, Hüseyin; Arslan, Kadri; Yildiz, Bahri

    2007-01-01

    Mathematical models of natural phenomena play a central role in the physical sciences. Moreover, modeling of the organs draws from some beautiful areas of mathematics, such as nonlinear dynamics, multiscale transforms and stability analysis. In this study, a geometric recognition of the separate intestine sections (duodenum, jejunum, ileum, cecum and colon) of the human is presented. The human intestine was considered a tubular shape along a special curve and two male Turkish men were used for the modeling study. The length (cm) and diameter (mm) of the intestines were measured with a digital compass and formulated. These models were compared with their original photographs. It has been concluded that the geometric modeling and experimental work were consistent. These kinds of organ modeling techniques will also profit to medical lecturers to show 3-D figures to their students.

  6. Tipping elements in the human intestinal ecosystem

    PubMed Central

    Lahti, Leo; Salojärvi, Jarkko; Salonen, Anne; Scheffer, Marten; de Vos, Willem M.

    2014-01-01

    The microbial communities living in the human intestine can have profound impact on our well-being and health. However, we have limited understanding of the mechanisms that control this complex ecosystem. Here, based on a deep phylogenetic analysis of the intestinal microbiota in a thousand western adults, we identify groups of bacteria that exhibit robust bistable abundance distributions. These bacteria are either abundant or nearly absent in most individuals, and exhibit decreased temporal stability at the intermediate abundance range. The abundances of these bimodally distributed bacteria vary independently, and their abundance distributions are not affected by short-term dietary interventions. However, their contrasting alternative states are associated with host factors such as ageing and overweight. We propose that the bistable groups reflect tipping elements of the intestinal microbiota, whose critical transitions may have profound health implications and diagnostic potential. PMID:25003530

  7. Sensing via Intestinal Sweet Taste Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Young, Richard L.

    2010-01-01

    The detection of nutrients in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is of fundamental significance to the control of motility, glycemia and energy intake, and yet we barely know the most fundamental aspects of this process. This is in stark contrast to the mechanisms underlying the detection of lingual taste, which have been increasingly well characterized in recent years, and which provide an excellent starting point for characterizing nutrient detection in the intestine. This review focuses on the form and function of sweet taste transduction mechanisms identified in the intestinal tract; it does not focus on sensors for fatty acids or proteins. It examines the intestinal cell types equipped with sweet taste transduction molecules in animals and humans, their location, and potential signals that transduce the presence of nutrients to neural pathways involved in reflex control of GI motility. PMID:21519398

  8. Intestinal absorption of calcium and phosphorus

    SciTech Connect

    Wasserman, R.H.

    1981-01-01

    The intestinal absorption of calcium and phosphorus has received considerable attention in recent years. The evidence has clearly indicated that calcium is absorbed by two processes: active transport and diffusion. Vitamin D appears to affect both processes, and has a significant effect at the brush border of the intestinal cell. Several proposed models to account for the transmural movement of calcium are discussed. The active transport of phosphate is under the control of vitamin D and is located at the brush border region of the intestinal cell. This transport system, like several others, appears to be sodium-dependent and inhibited by ouabain. In-transit phosphate does not mix with the cellular phosphate pool. Emphasized in the presentation is current knowledge of the transport mechanisms and macromolecular changes that potentially account for the stimulatory effect of vitamin D on calcium and phosphate transport.

  9. PUMA Suppresses Intestinal Tumorigenesis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Wei; Carson-Walter, Eleanor B.; Kuan, Shih Fan; Zhang, Lin; Yu, Jian

    2010-01-01

    Defective apoptosis contributes to tumorigenesis, although the critical molecular targets remain to be fully characterized. PUMA, a BH3-only protein essential for p53-dependent apoptosis, has been shown to suppress lymphomagenesis. In this study, we investigated the role of PUMA in intestinal tumorigenesis using two animal models. In the azoxymethane (AOM)/dextran sulfate sodium salt model, PUMA deficiency increased the multiplicity and size of colon tumors but reduced the frequency of β-catenin hotspot mutations. The absence of PUMA led to a significantly elevated incidence of precursor lesions induced by AOM. AOM was found to induce p53-dependent PUMA expression and PUMA-dependent apoptosis in the colonic crypts and stem cell compartment. Furthermore, PUMA deficiency significantly enhanced the formation of spontaneous macroadenomas and microadenomas in the distal small intestine and colon of APCMin/+ mice. These results show an essential role of PUMA-mediated apoptosis in suppressing intestinal tumorigenesis in mice. PMID:19491259

  10. [L-lactate as a serum marker of intestinal ischemia in patients with complicated intestinal obstruction].

    PubMed

    Tun-Abraham, Mauro Enrique; Martínez-Ordaz, José Luis; Vargas-Rivas, Adriana; Sánchez-Fuentes, José Jesús; Pérez-Cerna, Edgar; Zaleta-González, Omar

    2015-01-01

    The intestinal obstruction secondary to internal hernia is a diagnostic challenge. The absence of specific symptoms and signs during clinical examination often lead to underestimation of the severity and early surgical treatment. The purpose of this article is to review the clinical presentation of two patients with internal hernia, describe the clinical, biochemical and radiological findings, with emphasis on the L-lactate as an early serum marker of intestinal ischemia. Case 1: female, 44 years history of urolithiasis and 2 cesarean sections. Case 2: female, 86 year old with a history of open cholecystectomy, incisional and bilateral inguinal hernia repair with mesh placement. Both admitted with abdominal pain and intestinal obstruction data. The only significant laboratory finding was elevation of L-lactate. The abdominal films showed air-fluid levels, dilated loops of small intestine and colon. Abdominal contrast tomography showed free abdominal fluid id, internal hernia and torque of mesentery. In both cases, exploratory laparotomy was performed with bowel resection of ischemic segments, with uneventful recovery. Intestinal ischemia secondary to internal hernia is difficult lt to diagnose. In patients with a high suspicion, signs of intestinal obstruction by plain radiography, the elevation of L-lactate, could help in the early diagnosis of intestinal ischemia and immediate surgical treatment. Copyright © 2015. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A.

  11. Modulation of intestinal barrier by intestinal microbiota: pathological and therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Natividad, Jane M M; Verdu, Elena F

    2013-03-01

    Mammals and their intestinal microbiota peacefully coexist in a mutualistic relationship. Commensal bacteria play an active role in shaping and modulating physiological processes in the host, which include, but are not restricted to, the immune system and the intestinal barrier. Both play a crucial role in containing intestinal bacteria and other potentially noxious luminal antigens within the lumen and mucosal compartment. Although mutualism defines the relationship between the host and the intestinal microbiota, disruptions in this equilibrium may promote disease. Thus, alterations in gut microbiota (dysbiosis) have been linked to the recent increased expression of obesity, allergy, autoimmunity, functional and inflammatory disorders such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In this article, we review the evidence supporting a role of gut microbiota in regulating intestinal barrier function. We discuss the hypothesis that microbial factors can modulate the barrier in ways that can prevent or promote gastrointestinal disease. A better understanding of the role of the intestinal microbiota in maintaining a functional intestinal barrier may help develop targeted strategies to prevent and treat disease.

  12. Viability of the vascularly perfused, recirculating rat intestine and intestine-liver preparations

    SciTech Connect

    Hirayama, H.; Xu, X.; Pang, K.S. )

    1989-08-01

    Function and stability of vascularly perfused, recirculating in situ rat intestine (I) and intestine-liver (IL) preparations were evaluated in fasted and nonfasted rats because these techniques may be readily applied in drug metabolism studies. The rat intestine was perfused with blood medium (7.5 ml/min) via the superior mesenteric artery, with the venous outflow draining into the portal vein, which, together with hepatic arterial flow (2.5 ml/min), constituted the total blood flow (10 ml/min) to the liver. Maintenance of intestinal membrane integrity was observed. Rapid ({sup 14}C)glucose absorption against a concentration gradient and a lack of ({sup 3}H)-polyethylene glycol 4000 (PEG 4000, less than 4%) and Evans blue absorption by the recirculating I and IL preparations resulted after bolus injections of these markers into the pyloric end of the duodenum. Other indexes that revealed stable intestinal and liver functions were the following: preservation of reservoir perfusate volume, constancy in perfusion pressure, bile flow, and hemoglobin concentrations, evidence of intestinal glucose utilization and liver glucose production, and a lack of significant leakage of serum glutamic oxalic transaminase. The intestine and liver consumed oxygen at relatively constant rates, but the consumption rates for the fasted tissues (I or L) were significantly higher than those for nonfasted tissues. These results indicate that the vascularly perfused I and IL preparations were maintained in a viable and stable state for a 2-h perfusion period.

  13. Polyamine and intestinal properties in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Deloyer, P; Dandrifosse, G; Bartholomeus, C; Romain, N; Klimek, M; Salmon, J; Gérard, P; Goessens, G

    1996-10-01

    We questioned whether polyamines coming from the diet or produced by intestinal microflora or by intracellular metabolism influence intestinal functions. Therefore, we compared pathogen-free rats and germ-free rats receiving a diet with low polyamine content and either treated or not treated with difluoromethylornithine (DFMO) and/or methylglyoxal bis (guanylhydrazone) (MGBG). Wet weight, protein content, DNA content, sucrase (EC 3.2.1.48), maltase (EC 3.2.1.20) and lactase (EC 3.2.1.23) specific activities, amounts of putrescine, spermidine and spermine were measured in the mucosa of the proximal and distal intestine. Body weight was also determined. Rats without microflora had a higher specific activity of maltase and higher amounts of spermidine and spermine but lower lactase specific activity than pathogen-free animals; the low-polyamine diet given to germ-free rats had little effect on the functional variables measured (decrease of maltase and lactase specific activities) and did not modify the amounts of polyamines. DFMO and/or MGBG administered to germ-free rats receiving a low-polyamine diet induced modifications of most of the variables studied. Body weight and wet weight of proximal and distal intestine decreased, disaccharidase specific activities decreased, and amounts of polyamines changed according to the inhibitor used. Thus, our results showed that the deprivation of polyamine supply from microflora or from the diet failed, under our experimental conditions, to affect the intestinal properties analysed but exogenous and endogenous polyamine restriction altered general properties of the organism as well as intestinal functions.

  14. The intestinal ecosystem in chronic functional constipation.

    PubMed

    Zoppi, G; Cinquetti, M; Luciano, A; Benini, A; Muner, A; Bertazzoni Minelli, E

    1998-08-01

    Chronic functional constipation is common in infants, and the bacterial composition of stools in this condition is not known. The study aims were to: (i) investigate the composition of the intestinal ecosystem in chronic functional constipation; (ii) establish whether the addition of the water-holding agent calcium polycarbophil to the diet induces an improvement in constipation; and (iii) determine the composition of the intestinal ecosystem after the use of this agent. In total, 42 children (20F, 22M; mean age: 8.6 +/- 2.9 y) were studied. Twenty-eight children with functional chronic constipation without anatomical disorders were treated double-blind in random sequence for 1 month with an oral preparation of calcium polycarbophil (0.62 g/twice daily) or placebo. Intestinal flora composition was evaluated by standard microbiological methods and biochemical assays on faecal samples collected before and after treatment. Fourteen healthy children were studied as controls. The results show that (i) the constipated children presented a significant increase in clostridia and bifidobacteria in faeces compared to healthy subjects--different species of clostridia and enterobacteriaceae were frequently isolated; no generalized overgrowth was observed; Clostridia outnumbered bacteroides and E. coli mean counts by 2-3log, while bacteroides and E. coli counts were similar (5-6 log10/g fresh faeces); these intestinal disturbances could be defined as a dysbiosis, i.e. a quantitative alteration in the relative proportions of certain intestinal bacterial species. (ii) Clinical resolution of constipation was achieved only in 43% of treated children and an improvement in 21% (one bowel movement every 2 d). (iii) Calcium polycarbophil treatment induced no significant changes in the composition of the intestinal ecosystem, nor in blood chemistry parameters.

  15. Intestinal alkaline phosphatase to treat necrotizing enterocolitis.

    PubMed

    Biesterveld, Ben E; Koehler, Shannon M; Heinzerling, Nathan P; Rentea, Rebecca M; Fredrich, Katherine; Welak, Scott R; Gourlay, David M

    2015-06-15

    Intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP) activity is decreased in necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), and IAP supplementation prevents NEC development. It is not known if IAP given after NEC onset can reverse the course of the disease. We hypothesized that enteral IAP given after NEC induction would not reverse intestinal injury. NEC was induced in Sprague-Dawley pups by delivery preterm followed by formula feedings with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and hypoxia exposure and continued up to 4 d. IAP was added to feeds on day 2 until being sacrificed on day 4. NEC severity was scored based on hematoxylin and eosin-stained terminal ileum sections, and AP activity was measured using a colorimetric assay. IAP and interleukin-6 expression were measured using real time polymerase chain reaction. NEC pups' alkaline phosphatase (AP) activity was decreased to 0.18 U/mg compared with controls of 0.57 U/mg (P < 0.01). Discontinuation of LPS and hypoxia after 2 d increased AP activity to 0.36 U/mg (P < 0.01). IAP supplementation in matched groups did not impact total AP activity or expression. Discontinuing LPS and hypoxia after NEC onset improved intestinal injury scores to 1.14 compared with continued stressors, score 2.25 (P < 0.01). IAP supplementation decreased interleukin-6 expression two-fold (P < 0.05), though did not reverse NEC intestinal damage (P = 0.5). This is the first work to demonstrate that removing the source of NEC improves intestinal damage and increases AP activity. When used as a rescue treatment, IAP decreased intestinal inflammation though did not impact injury making it likely that IAP is best used preventatively to those neonates at risk. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. mTOR disruption causes intestinal epithelial cell defects and intestinal atrophy postinjury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Sampson, Leesa L.; Davis, Ashley K.; Grogg, Matthew W.; Zheng, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal stem cells (ISCs) drive small intestinal epithelial homeostasis and regeneration. Mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) regulates stem and progenitor cell metabolism and is frequently dysregulated in human disease, but its physiologic functions in the mammalian small intestinal epithelium remain poorly defined. We disrupted the genes mTOR, Rptor, Rictor, or both Rptor and Rictor in mouse ISCs, progenitors, and differentiated intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) using Villin-Cre. Mutant tissues and wild-type or heterozygous littermate controls were analyzed by histologic immunostaining, immunoblots, and proliferation assays. A total of 10 Gy irradiation was used to injure the intestinal epithelium and induce subsequent crypt regeneration. We report that mTOR supports absorptive enterocytes and secretory Paneth and goblet cell function while negatively regulating chromogranin A-positive enteroendocrine cell number. Through additional Rptor, Rictor, and Rptor/Rictor mutant mouse models, we identify mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 as the major IEC regulatory pathway, but mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 2 also contributes to ileal villus maintenance and goblet cell size. Homeostatic adult small intestinal crypt cell proliferation, survival, and canonical wingless-int (WNT) activity are not mTOR dependent, but Olfm4+ ISC/progenitor population maintenance and crypt regeneration postinjury require mTOR. Overall, we conclude that mTOR regulates multiple IEC lineages and promotes stem and progenitor cell activity during intestinal epithelium repair postinjury.—Sampson, L. L., Davis, A. K., Grogg, M. W., Zheng, Y. mTOR disruption causes intestinal epithelial cell defects and intestinal atrophy postinjury in mice. PMID:26631481

  17. Role of intestinal cytochrome p450 enzymes in diclofenac-induced toxicity in the small intestine.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yi; Zhang, Qing-Yu

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the role of small intestinal (SI) cytochrome P450 (P450) enzymes in the metabolic activation of diclofenac (DCF), a widely used nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, and DCF-induced intestinal toxicity. DCF induces intestinal ulcers in humans and mice, but the underlying mechanisms, including the necessity for drug bioactivation in the target tissues and the sources and identities of reactive intermediates, are not fully understood. We found that the number of DCF-induced (at 50 mg/kg p.o.) intestinal ulcers was significantly smaller in an intestinal epithelium (IE)-specific P450 reductase (CPR) knockout (IE-Cpr-null) mouse model, which has little P450 activity in the IE, than in wild-type (WT) mice, determined at 14 h after DCF administration. The involvement of intestinal P450 enzymes was confirmed by large reductions (>80-90%) in the rates of in vitro formation, in SI microsomal reactions, of hydroxylated DCF metabolites and reactive intermediates, trapped as DCF-glutathione (GSH) conjugates, in the IE-Cpr-null, compared with WT mice. The SI levels of DCF-GSH conjugates (at 4 h after dosing) and DCF-protein adducts (at 14 h after dosing) were significantly lower in IE-Cpr-null than in WT mice. In additional experiments, we found that pretreatment of mice with grapefruit juice, which is known to inhibit SI P450 activity, ameliorated DCF-induced intestinal toxicity in WT mice. Our results not only strongly support the notion that SI P450 enzymes play an important role in DCF-induced intestinal toxicity, but also illustrate the possibility of preventing DCF-induced intestinal toxicity through dietary intervention.

  18. Intestinal obstruction due to phytobezoars: An update

    PubMed Central

    Dikicier, Enis; Altintoprak, Fatih; Ozkan, Orhan Veli; Yagmurkaya, Orhan; Uzunoglu, Mustafa Yener

    2015-01-01

    The term bezoar refers to an intraluminal mass in the gastrointestinal system caused by the accumulation of indigestible ingested materials, such as vegetables, fruits, and hair. Bezoars are responsible for 0.4%-4% of cases of mechanical intestinal obstruction. The clinical findings of bezoar-induced ileus do not differ from those of mechanical intestinal obstruction due to other causes. The appearance and localization of bezoars can be established with various imaging methods. Treatment of choice depends on the localization of the bezoar which makes the clinical findings. PMID:26301232

  19. Relationships between intestinal parasitosis and handedness.

    PubMed

    Uslu, Hakan; Dane, Senol; Uyanik, M Hamidullah; Ayyildiz, Ahmet

    2010-07-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate if there is a possible relation between intestinal parasitosis and handedness in patients with suspected intestinal parasitosis. Hand preference was assessed on the Edinburgh Handedness Inventory. Stool samples were examined microscopically for the presence of parasite. In the present study right-handers had many more helminth infections and left-handers had many more protozoon infections. Lower rate of helminth infections in the present study, and higher asthma incidences in the left-handed population in literature, may be associated with different immune machinery in left-handed people than in right-handed ones.

  20. Intestinal lymphangiectasia secondary to radiotherapy and chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, S.S.; Dundas, S.; Holdsworth, C.D.

    1987-08-01

    We report a case of intestinal lymphangiectasia secondary to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. The patient also had small bowel bacterial overgrowth and pancreatic insufficiency. Lymphatic ectasia as a histological feature has been described previously in association with postradiotherapy malabsorption, but radiation-induced lymphangiectasia producing clinical manifestations has hitherto not been reported. Replacement of dietary long-chain fats with medium-chain triglycerides, pancreatic enzyme supplements, and a short course of oxytetracycline, resulted in dramatic clinical improvement. The possibility of intestinal lymphangiectasia should be borne in mind in patients with postradiotherapy malabsorption. A low serum albumin and lymphocyte count should draw attention to this possibility.

  1. Intestinal malrotation in Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Cathy A

    2015-10-01

    Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RSTS) is a multiple congenital anomaly syndrome which may include malformations of the central nervous system, heart, genitourinary tract, and other organs. However, intestinal malrotation has not been previously known to be associated with RSTS. This report documents six persons with RSTS who also had malrotation of the intestine requiring surgical repair. This suggests a possible increased frequency of malrotation in RSTS. Diagnostic studies for malrotation should be considered if recurrent vomiting, abdominal pain, and other symptoms of possible malrotation are present. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Ultrastructure of intestinal cells of Heterakis gallinarum.

    PubMed

    Zmoray, I; Gutteková, A

    1978-06-01

    Ultrastructure of intestinal cells of Heterakis gallinarum is described and compared with that of Ascaridia galli from ecomorphological point of view. The great analogy in bionomy and ecology of both worms is reflected in the great analogy of ultrastructural construction. A new organoid in the intestinal cells of H. gallinarum, hitherto unknown among nematodes, is also described. It is of a vacuole-like shape running in stripes close under the terminal bar. The paper is also meant to be a supplement to the authors' previous paper (1975) dealing with ultrastructure of muscle cells of Heterakis gallinarum.

  3. [Intestinal enzymopathies of children (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Schreier, K

    1976-12-24

    In recent years it has been successfully demonstrated that, in relation to congenital metabolic abnormalities, every enzyme of the gastro-intestinal tract may be absent or inactive.. In serious diseases of the intestinal tract, secondary inactivation of numerous enzymes may result. In this comprehensive presentation the pathology of the disaccharidases, the peptidases and lypolysis is described, the physiology being gone into briefly in each case. Furthermore, all known disturbances of absorption of sugar, aminoacids and fats are briefly dealt with. Finally, congenital chloridorrhea is described.

  4. Generation of intestinal surface: an absorbing tale

    PubMed Central

    Walton, Katherine D.; Freddo, Andrew M.; Wang, Sha

    2016-01-01

    The vertebrate small intestine requires an enormous surface area to effectively absorb nutrients from food. Morphological adaptations required to establish this extensive surface include generation of an extremely long tube and convolution of the absorptive surface of the tube into villi and microvilli. In this Review, we discuss recent findings regarding the morphogenetic and molecular processes required for intestinal tube elongation and surface convolution, examine shared and unique aspects of these processes in different species, relate these processes to known human maladies that compromise absorptive function and highlight important questions for future research. PMID:27381224

  5. [Dietary fatty acids, intestinal microbiota and cancer].

    PubMed

    Juste, Catherine

    2005-07-01

    The interactions between dietary fatty acids (FA) and the intestinal microbiota were reviewed, with their possible relationships to colon and breast cancers. Free and esterified FA in the colon are from dietary, endogenous and microbial origin. Their quantity and quality vary according to dietary FA. Some FA but not all are powerful antimicrobial agents, and different bacteria exhibit distinct sensitivity to FA. These data converge to suggest that dietary FA could influence the biodiversity of the intestinal microbiota and its functions. Conversely, bacteria can modify lipid substrates due to their enormous metabolic potential, and several studies demonstrated that dietary FA did influence the nature of the metabolites produced. Some of these, like hydroxylated FA or sn-1,2-diglycerides, have recognized biological activities on the intestinal mucosa, either as surfactants or intracellular messengers. The intestinal microbiota also represents a substantial source of usual and unusual FA whose biological activities remain to be explored. Dietary FA can influence the secretion of bile and bile acids into the duodenum, the bile acid flux and/or concentration into the feces and that of cholesterol and its bacterial products. This is expected to modify the cytotoxicity of the colonic contents which remains to be evaluated under different lipid diets. Lastly, the intestinal microbiota is very efficient in hydrolyzing conjugated endobiotics and xenobiotics, and this favours the reactivation and the enterohepatic circulation of compounds which have been eliminated through the bile. Hormones are especially concerned, and the intestinal microbiota could thus be implicated in breast cancer. Some dietary FA are known to increase bacterial beta-glucuronidases whereas their effect on other bacterial hydrolases or other enzymes capable of modifying the steroid nucleus remains unknown. In conclusion, numerous data suggest that a strong relationship could exist between dietary FA

  6. Public health significance of intestinal parasitic infections*

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    Intestinal parasitic infections are distributed virtually throughout the world, with high prevalence rates in many regions. Amoebiasis, ascariasis, hookworm infection and trichuriasis are among the ten most common infections in the world. Other parasitic infections such as abdominal angiostrongyliasis, intestinal capillariasis, and strongyloidiasis are of local or regional public health concern. The prevention and control of these infections are now more feasible than ever before owing to the discovery of safe and efficacious drugs, the improvement and simplification of some diagnostic procedures, and advances in parasite population biology. PMID:3501340

  7. Infections in intestinal and multivisceral transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Timpone, Joseph G; Girlanda, Raffaele; Rudolph, Lauren; Fishbein, Thomas M

    2013-06-01

    Intestinal and multivisceral transplantation has become an effective treatment option for patients with intestinal failure. More potent immunosuppressive therapy has resulted in a decreased incidence of acute rejection and has improved patient survival. However, infectious complications can cause significant morbidity both before and after transplantation. In comparison with other solid organ transplant recipients, these patients experience higher rates of acute allograft rejection, thus requiring higher levels of immunosuppression and escalating the risk of infection. This article reviews the most common infectious disease complications encountered, and proposes a potential temporal association for types of infections in this patient population.

  8. Plasmodium berghei ANKA causes intestinal malaria associated with dysbiosis.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Tomoyo; Miyauchi, Eiji; Nakamura, Shota; Hirai, Makoto; Suzue, Kazutomo; Imai, Takashi; Nomura, Takahiro; Handa, Tadashi; Okada, Hiroko; Shimokawa, Chikako; Onishi, Risa; Olia, Alex; Hirata, Jun; Tomita, Haruyoshi; Ohno, Hiroshi; Horii, Toshihiro; Hisaeda, Hajime

    2015-10-27

    Gastrointestinal symptoms, such as abdominal pain and diarrhea, are frequently observed in patients with Plasmodium falciparum malaria. However, the correlation between malaria intestinal pathology and intestinal microbiota has not been investigated. In the present study, infection of C57BL/6 mice with P. berghei ANKA (PbA) caused intestinal pathological changes, such as detachment of epithelia in the small intestines and increased intestinal permeability, which correlated with development with experimental cerebral malaria (ECM). Notably, an apparent dysbiosis occurred, characterized by a reduction of Firmicutes and an increase in Proteobacteria. Furthermore, some genera of microbiota correlated with parasite growth and/or ECM development. By contrast, BALB/c mice are resistant to ECM and exhibit milder intestinal pathology and dysbiosis. These results indicate that the severity of cerebral and intestinal pathology coincides with the degree of alteration in microbiota. This is the first report demonstrating that malaria affects intestinal microbiota and causes dysbiosis.

  9. Endothelin system in intestinal villi: A possible role of endothelin-2/vasoactive intestinal contractor in the maintenance of intestinal architecture.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Mariana; Adur, Javier; Takizawa, Satoshi; Saida, Kaname; Casco, Víctor H

    2012-01-27

    The endothelin system consists of three ligands (ET-1, ET-2 and ET-3) and at least two receptors (ETA and ETB). In mice ET-2 counterpart is a peptide originally called "vasoactive intestinal contractor" (VIC) for this reason, this peptide is frequently named ET-2/VIC. In intestinal villi, fibroblasts-like cells express endothelin's receptors and response to ET-1 and ET-3 peptides, changing their cellular shape. Several functions have been attributed to these peptides in the "architecture" maintenance of intestinal villi acting over sub-epithelial fibroblasts. Despite this, ET-2/VIC has not been analyzed in depth. In this work we show the intestine gene expression and immunolocalization of ET-1, ET-2 and the ETA and ETB receptors from duodenum to rectus and in the villus-crypt axis in mice, allowing a complete analysis of their functions. While ET-1 is expressed uniformly, ET-2 had a particular distribution, being higher at the bottom of the villi of duodenum, ileum and jejunum and reverting this pattern in the crypts of colon and rectus, where the higher expression was at the top. We postulated that ET-2 would act in a cooperative manner with ET-1, giving to the villus the straight enough to withstand mechanical stress.

  10. Fenofibrate reduces intestinal damage and improves intestinal recovery following intestinal ischemia-reperfusion injury in a rat.

    PubMed

    Sukhotnik, I; Nissimov, N; Ben Shahar, Y; Moati, D; Bitterman, N; Pollak, Y; Berkowitz, D; Coran, A G; Bitterman, A

    2016-12-01

    Fenofibrate (FEN) is known as a nuclear receptor activator which regulates many pathophysiological processes, such as oxidative stress, inflammation, and leukocyte endothelium interactions. Recent studies have demonstrated an anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-ischemic role of FEN in the attenuation of ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury in the kidney, liver, brain, and heart. The purpose of the present study was to examine the effect of FEN on intestinal recovery and enterocyte turnover after intestinal IR injury in rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four experimental groups: (1) sham rats underwent laparotomy, (2) sham-FEN rats underwent laparotomy and were treated with intraperitoneal (IP) FEN (20 mg/kg); (3) IR rats underwent occlusion of both the superior mesenteric artery and the portal vein for 30 min followed by 24 h of reperfusion, and (4) IR-FEN rats underwent IR and were treated with IP FEN immediately before abdominal closure. Intestinal structural changes, Park's injury score, enterocyte proliferation, and enterocyte apoptosis were determined 24 h following IR. The expression of Bax, Bcl-2, p-ERK, and caspase-3 in the intestinal mucosa was determined using real-time PCR, Western blot, and immunohistochemistry. Treatment with FEN resulted in a significant decrease in Park's injury score in jejunum (32 %) and ileum (33 %) compared to IR animals. IR-FEN rats also demonstrated a significant increase in mucosal weight in jejunum (23 %) and ileum (22 %), mucosal DNA (38 %) and protein (65 %) in jejunum, villus height in jejunum (17 %) and ileum (21 %), and crypt depth in ileum (14 %) compared to IR animals. IR-FEN rats also experienced significant proliferation rates as well as lower apoptotic indices in jejunum and ileum which was accompanied with higher Bcl-2 levels compared to IR animals. Treatment with fenofibrate prevents intestinal mucosal damage and stimulates intestinal epithelial cell turnover following intestinal IR

  11. INTESTINAL DIGESTION AND ABSORPTION OF SUGARS AND PEPTIDES.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Mammalian intestinal sucrase is activated by sodium in different ways in different species. The sodium-activation constants have been determined...Sodium-activation does not follow any compulsory reaction sequence. No diffusion barrier can be detected between lumen and intestinal sucrase ...Trehalase also shows a cooperative interaction between substrate sites. It is not activated by sodium. The intestinal sucrase -isomaltase complex can be

  12. The Intestinal Tract: Structure, Function, Disorders and Related Medication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, Dianne M.

    This instructional guide is intended for use within inservice or continuing education programs for people who work in long-term care facilities. This module includes an overview of the normal functions of the small and large intestines and discusses the structures of the intestines, absorption in the intestines, and commonly occurring conditions…

  13. OPTN/SRTR 2013 Annual Data Report: intestine.

    PubMed

    Smith, J M; Skeans, M A; Horslen, S P; Edwards, E B; Harper, A M; Snyder, J J; Israni, A K; Kasiske, B L

    2015-01-01

    Despite improvements in medical and surgical treatment of intestinal failure over the past decade, intestine transplant continues to play an important role. Of 171 new patients added to the intestine transplant waiting list in 2013, 49% were listed for intestine-liver transplant and 51% for intestine transplant alone or with an organ other than liver. The pretransplant mortality rate decreased dramatically over time for all age groups, from 30.3 per 100 waitlist years in 2002-2003 to 6.9 for patients listed in 2012-2013. The number of intestine transplants decreased from 91 in 2009 to 51 in 2013; intestine-liver transplants decreased from 135 in 2007 to a low of 44 in 2012, but increased slightly to 58 in 2013. Ages of intestine and intestineliver transplant recipients have changed substantially; the number of adult recipients was double the number of pediatric recipients in 2013. Graft survival improved over the past decade. Graft failure in the first 90 days posttransplant occurred in 14.1% of intestine recipients and in 11.2% of intestine-liver recipients in 2013. The number of recipients alive with a functioning intestine graft has steadily increased since 2002, to 1012 in 2013; almost half were pediatric intestine-liver transplant recipients. © Copyright 2015 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  14. Octreotide in the treatment of refractory diarrhoea and intestinal fistulae.

    PubMed Central

    Farthing, M J

    1994-01-01

    Persistent, refractory diarrhoea continues to be an important clinical problem. The mechanisms involved are associated with reduced intestinal absorption and increased intestinal secretion. Reduced intestinal absorption can result from small intestinal resection or from disorders in which there is damage to the small intestine. Motility disorders may also impair absorptive function. The rationale for using octreotide in refractory diarrhoea, intestinal motility disorders, and fistulae relates to its ability to promote intestinal absorption and inhibit gastric, pancreatic, and intestinal secretion. Several clinical studies in patients with short bowel syndrome have reported a reduction of intestinal output in patients taking octreotide compared with controls. Additionally, a number of studies have shown that octreotide improves secretory diarrhoea resulting from neuroendocrine tumours, intestinal infections in AIDS patients, and intestinal graft v host disease. Octreotide may be of use in patients suffering from intestinal motility disorders such as those associated with systemic sclerosis. Octreotide may also be of value in promoting closure of gastrointestinal and pancreatic fistulae. PMID:8206397

  15. The Intestinal Tract: Structure, Function, Disorders and Related Medication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, Dianne M.

    This instructional guide is intended for use within inservice or continuing education programs for people who work in long-term care facilities. This module includes an overview of the normal functions of the small and large intestines and discusses the structures of the intestines, absorption in the intestines, and commonly occurring conditions…

  16. Removal of the intestinal mucosa: photochemical approach in bladder augmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haselhuhn, Gregory D.; Kropp, Kenneth A.; Keck, Rick W.; Selman, Steven H.

    1995-03-01

    Experiments were undertaken to determine whether 5-aminoleuvinic acid in combination with light could be used as an adjunct to intestinal bladder augmentation with the aim of removing intestinal mucosa with subsequent re-epithelialization of the treated segment with urothelium. Histopathologic studies of so-treated intestinal segments used in bladder augmentation demonstrate the feasibility of this approach.

  17. Intestinal Hypoganglionosis Leading to Intestinal Failure and the Compassionate Use of Omegaven™

    PubMed Central

    Karjoo, Sara; Danielson, Paul; Wilsey, Michael; Shakeel, Fauzia

    2017-01-01

    Intestinal hypoganglionosis is a rare innervation disorder that provides numerous nutritional, medical and surgical challenges. In this case report, we present a case of a newborn with intestinal hypoganglionosis leading to intestinal failure and intestinal failure-associated liver disease who responded to Omegaven™, a fat emulsion comprised of omega-3 fatty acids. Omegaven™ has been shown to be beneficial in the management of cholestatic liver injury. Clinical success with Omegaven™ was seen in this patient with a clear decrease in aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase and complete resolution of cholestasis with a direct bilirubin of zero within two weeks of initiation of Omegaven™. No current guidelines for the diagnosis and management of hypoganglionosis are available. We recommend a multidisciplinary approach and the use of novel therapies such as fat emulsions composed of omega-3 fatty acids for improved patient outcomes. Appropriate compassionate use protocols should be obtained from the Food and Drug Administration prior to initiation of Omegaven™. PMID:28401057

  18. ACUTE INTESTINAL DISORDERS IN SHELTER GROUPS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The report evaluates the magnitude of acute intestinal disorders in human shelter occupancy studies and other closed ecosystems and estimates the...impact of such disorders on shelter occupants to permit better planning for the care of those afflicted and for minimizing the impact on unafflicted

  19. Intestinal amino acid metabolism in neonates

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The portal-drained viscera (stomach, intestine, pancreas, and spleen) have a much higher rate of both energy expenditure and protein synthesis than can be estimated on the basis of their weight. A high utilization rate of dietary nutrients by the portal-drained viscera might result in a low systemic...

  20. Intestinal angiodysplasia: retrospective study of 18 cases.

    PubMed

    De Diego, J A; Molina, L M; Diez, M; Delgado, I; Moreno, A; Solana, M; Picardo, A; Garrido, R; Balibrea, J L

    1988-10-01

    Eighteen patients operated on for intestinal angiodysplasia are reported. Visceral angiography was the diagnostic procedure of choice, providing evidence in most cases of lesions in the right colon. Right hemicolectomy was the surgical treatment normally provided. Mortality in our series was nil. This report looks at the main clinical features of these lesions, paying particular attention to their etiopathogenesis.

  1. Abdominal Plain Radiograph in Neonatal Intestinal Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, G Raghavendra; Aziz, Amtul

    2017-01-01

    A comprehensive all-inclusive resource on plain radiograph in neonatal intestinal obstruction is presented. This is an attempt to develop a protocol and to regain expertise in evaluating a plain radiograph that most often yields more than enough clues to diagnose and to decide a plan of action. PMID:28083492

  2. The Intestinal Microbiota and Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ringel, Yehuda; Ringel-Kulka, Tamar

    2015-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is the most prevalent and the best studied functional gastrointestinal disorder. The etiology and the pathogenesis of IBS are still not clear; however, recent studies have implicated a role for alterations in the intestinal microbiota (dysbiosis) in the pathophysiology of the disorder. Epidemiological observations have demonstrated that the development of IBS symptoms is often preceded by a disruption of the individual's normal intestinal microbiota, and microbiological studies have demonstrated compositional differences in the intestinal microbiota between patients with IBS patients and healthy controls. In addition, animal studies and a few recent human clinical studies have demonstrated that compositional changes in the intestinal microbiota in IBS are associated with relevant abnormal gastrointestinal and brain-gut axis functions that are often observed in patients with IBS. This article discusses points of interest from the current research on the microbiota-gut-brain interactions in IBS and highlights the relevance of the emerging data to our understanding of the disorder and the clinical implications for patients' care.

  3. [Medical treatment of inflammatory intestinal diseases].

    PubMed

    Järnerot, G

    1991-01-01

    What possible treatments are there for inflammatory intestinal diseases, and on what scientific grounds do we treat these patients? A survey shows that the considerable decline in mortality which has occurred as regards ulcerous colitis ensued rather via trial and error than as a result of regular clinical tests.

  4. CT of schistosomal calcification of the intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Fataar, S.; Bassiony, H.; Satyanath, S.; Rudwan, M.; Hebbar, G.; Khalifa, A.; Cherian, M.J.

    1985-01-01

    The spectrum of schistosomal colonic calcification on abdominal radiographs has been described. The appearance on computed tomography (CT) is equally distinctive and occurs with varying degrees of genitourinary calcification. The authors have experience in three cases with the appearance on CT of intestinal calcification due to schistosomiasis.

  5. Archaea in the intestinal tract of pigs

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Knowledge of Archaea in the intestinal tract of pigs is limited. In order to investigate archaeal community structure, samples were taken from the cecum and proximal colon of finishing pigs (24) fed diets with either corn or solvent extracted corn germ meal (CGM). Corn germ meal feeding began in w...

  6. Disorders of intestinal secretion and absorption.

    PubMed

    Schulzke, Jörg-Dieter; Tröger, Hanno; Amasheh, Maren

    2009-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract possesses a huge epithelial surface area and performs many different tasks. Amongst them are the digestive and absorptive functions. Disorders of intestinal absorption and secretion comprise a variety of different diseases, e.g. coeliac disease, lactase deficiency or Whipple's disease. In principle, impaired small intestinal function can occur with or without morphological alterations of the intestinal mucosa. Therefore, in the work up of a malabsorptive syndrome an early small intestinal biopsy is encouraged in conjunction with breath tests and stool analysis to guide further management. In addition, there is an array of functional tests, the clinical availability of which becomes more and more limited. In any case, early diagnosis of the underlying pathophysiology is most important, in order to initiate proper therapy. In this chapter, diagnostic procedure of malabsorption is discussed with special attention to specific disease like coeliac disease, Whipple's disease, giardiasis and short bowel syndrome. Furthermore, bacterial overgrowth, carbohydrate malabsorption and specific nutrient malabsorption (e.g. for iron or vitamins) and protein-losing enteropathy are presented with obligatory and optional tests as used in the clinical setting.

  7. Obesity, fatty liver disease and intestinal microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Arslan, Nur

    2014-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a chronic liver disorder that is increasing in prevalence with the worldwide epidemic of obesity. NAFLD is the hepatic manifestation of the metabolic syndrome. The term NAFLD describes a spectrum of liver pathology ranges from simple steatosis to steatosis with inflammation nonalcoholic steatohepatitis and even cirrhosis. Metabolic syndrome and NAFLD also predict hepatocellular carcinoma. Many genetic and environmental factors have been suggested to contribute to the development of obesity and NAFLD, but the exact mechanisms are not known. Intestinal ecosystem contains trillions of microorganisms including bacteria, Archaea, yeasts and viruses. Several studies support the relationship between the intestinal microbial changes and obesity and also its complications, including insulin resistance and NAFLD. Given that the gut and liver are connected by the portal venous system, it makes the liver more vulnerable to translocation of bacteria, bacterial products, endotoxins or secreted cytokines. Altered intestinal microbiota (dysbiosis) may stimulate hepatic fat deposition through several mechanisms: regulation of gut permeability, increasing low-grade inflammation, modulation of dietary choline metabolism, regulation of bile acid metabolism and producing endogenous ethanol. Regulation of intestinal microbial ecosystem by diet modifications or by using probiotics and prebiotics as a treatment for obesity and its complications might be the issue of further investigations. PMID:25469013

  8. Glucagon effects on the human small intestine.

    PubMed

    Patel, G K; Whalen, G E; Soergel, K H; Wu, W C; Meade, R C

    1979-07-01

    In healthy volunteers, the effects of intravenously administered glucagon on small intestinal function was investigated. Bolus doses resulting in plasma glucagon concentrations of greater than 800 pg/ml (5 min after injection) abolished jejunal contractions for 4.4 +/- 0.4 (SEM) min after a latency period of 49 +/- 4 sec. During continuous intravenous glucagon infusion, jejunal dilatation and increase in mean transit time (MTT) occurred at plasma levels greater than 720 pg/ml, while inhibition of water and electrolyte absorption was observed only with plasma glucagon concentrations of 1760 +/- 114 pg/ml. Under these conditions, the propulsion of fasting intestinal contents was slowed without change in flow rate. The observed effects cannot be attributed to the simultaneously occurring rise in plasma insulin and glucose concentrations. Short-term increases in circulating glucagon concentration inhibit intestinal tone, contractions, and propulsion with only a minor effect on water and electrolyte absorption limited to a narrow concentration range of plasma glucagon. Neither effect occurs at glucagon levels likely to occur under physiologic concentrations. The latency period preceding the abolition of jejunal contractions suggests that glucagon does not act directly on intestinal smooth muscle cells.

  9. Intestinal injury mechanisms after blunt abdominal impact.

    PubMed

    Cripps, N P; Cooper, G J

    1997-03-01

    Intestinal injury is frequent after non-penetrating abdominal trauma, particularly after modern, high-energy transfer impacts. Under these circumstances, delay in the diagnosis of perforation is a major contributor to morbidity and mortality. This study establishes patterns of intestinal injury after blunt trauma by non-penetrating projectiles and examines relationships between injury distribution and abdominal wall motion. Projectile impacts of variable momentum were produced in 31 anaesthetised pigs to cause abdominal wall motion of varying magnitude and velocity. No small bowel injury was observed at initial impact velocity of less than 40 m/s despite gross abdominal compression. At higher velocity, injury to the small bowel was frequent, irrespective of the degree of abdominal compression (P = 0.00044). Large bowel injury was observed at all impact velocities and at all degrees of abdominal compression. This study confirms the potential for intestinal injury in high velocity, low momentum impacts which do not greatly compress the abdominal cavity and demonstrates apparent differences in injury mechanisms for the small bowel and colon. Familiarity with injury mechanisms may reduce delays in the diagnosis of intestinal perforation in both military and civilian situations.

  10. Alterations in Intestinal Permeability After Thermal Injury,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-01

    disaccharide with a The cause of the altered intestinal permeability in our molecular weight of 342, and mannitol, a monosaccharide patients who...and linear regression analyses were used as indicated. Differences •P<.01 vs controls and uninfected patients by analysis of were considered

  11. [The complicated intestinal amebiasis in emergency surgery].

    PubMed

    Gostishev, V K; Khrupkin, V I; Afanas'ev, A N; Gorbacheva, I V; Bragin, M A

    2009-01-01

    18 patients with complicated forms of intestinal amebiasis were operated on acute appendicitis, liver abscess or total necrotic colitis. Appendectomy, abscess drainage and colon resection were performed respectively. There were no postoperative deaths. Features of amebic appendicitis and total necrotic amebic colitis are described using clinical cases demonstrations. Recommendations for the treatment of these forms of amebiasis are given.

  12. Methamphetamine-associated shock with intestinal infarction.

    PubMed

    Brannan, Temple A; Soundararajan, Suganthi; Houghton, Bruce L

    2004-12-29

    Methamphetamine abuse has increased rapidly in the United States over the last few years. Besides socioeconomic hardships acquired from using the drug, there are several adverse medical outcomes. Although there have been many reports of cardiovascular and central nervous system toxicities, there are few case reports of bowel ischemia induced by the drug. We report an unusual case of methamphetamine-associated intestinal infarction.

  13. Intestinal injury mechanisms after blunt abdominal impact.

    PubMed Central

    Cripps, N. P.; Cooper, G. J.

    1997-01-01

    Intestinal injury is frequent after non-penetrating abdominal trauma, particularly after modern, high-energy transfer impacts. Under these circumstances, delay in the diagnosis of perforation is a major contributor to morbidity and mortality. This study establishes patterns of intestinal injury after blunt trauma by non-penetrating projectiles and examines relationships between injury distribution and abdominal wall motion. Projectile impacts of variable momentum were produced in 31 anaesthetised pigs to cause abdominal wall motion of varying magnitude and velocity. No small bowel injury was observed at initial impact velocity of less than 40 m/s despite gross abdominal compression. At higher velocity, injury to the small bowel was frequent, irrespective of the degree of abdominal compression (P = 0.00044). Large bowel injury was observed at all impact velocities and at all degrees of abdominal compression. This study confirms the potential for intestinal injury in high velocity, low momentum impacts which do not greatly compress the abdominal cavity and demonstrates apparent differences in injury mechanisms for the small bowel and colon. Familiarity with injury mechanisms may reduce delays in the diagnosis of intestinal perforation in both military and civilian situations. PMID:9135238

  14. Breast milk, microbiota, and intestinal immune homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Walker, W Allan; Iyengar, Rajashri Shuba

    2015-01-01

    Newborns adjust to the extrauterine environment by developing intestinal immune homeostasis. Appropriate initial bacterial colonization is necessary for adequate intestinal immune development. An environmental determinant of adequate colonization is breast milk. Although the full-term infant is developmentally capable of mounting an immune response, the effector immune component requires bacterial stimulation. Breast milk stimulates the proliferation of a well-balanced and diverse microbiota, which initially influences a switch from an intrauterine TH2 predominant to a TH1/TH2 balanced response and with activation of T-regulatory cells by breast milk-stimulated specific organisms (Bifidobacteria, Lactobacillus, and Bacteroides). As an example of its effect, oligosaccharides in breast milk are fermented by colonic bacteria producing an acid milieu for bacterial proliferation. In addition, short-chain fatty acids in breast milk activate receptors on T-reg cells and bacterial genes, which preferentially mediate intestinal tight junction expression and anti-inflammation. Other components of breast milk (defensins, lactoferrin, etc.) inhibit pathogens and further contribute to microbiota composition. The breast milk influence on initial intestinal microbiota also prevents expression of immune-mediated diseases (asthma, inflammatory bowel disease, type 1 diabetes) later in life through a balanced initial immune response, underscoring the necessity of breastfeeding as the first source of nutrition.

  15. Anisotropic growth shapes intestinal tissues during embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ben Amar, Martine; Jia, Fei

    2013-06-25

    Embryogenesis offers a real laboratory for pattern formation, buckling, and postbuckling induced by growth of soft tissues. Each part of our body is structured in multiple adjacent layers: the skin, the brain, and the interior of organs. Each layer has a complex biological composition presenting different elasticity. Generated during fetal life, these layers will experience growth and remodeling in the early postfertilization stages. Here, we focus on a herringbone pattern occurring in fetal intestinal tissues. Common to many mammalians, this instability is a precursor of the villi, finger-like projections into the lumen. For avians (chicks' and turkeys' embryos), it has been shown that, a few days after fertilization, the mucosal epithelium of the duodenum is smooth, and then folds emerge, which present 2 d later a pronounced zigzag instability. Many debates and biological studies are devoted to this specific morphology, which regulates the cell renewal in the intestine. After reviewing experimental results about duodenum morphogenesis, we show that a model based on simplified hypothesis for the growth of the mesenchyme can explain buckling and postbuckling instabilities. Being completely analytical, it is based on biaxial compressive stresses due to differential growth between layers and it predicts quantitatively the morphological changes. The growth anisotropy increasing with time, the competition between folds and zigzags, is proved to occur as a secondary instability. The model is compared with available experimental data on chick's duodenum and can be applied to other intestinal tissues, the zigzag being a common and spectacular microstructural pattern of intestine embryogenesis.

  16. Intestinal Microbiota and Health in Childhood

    PubMed Central

    VANDENPLAS, Yvan; VEEREMAN-WAUTERS, Genevieve; DE GREEF, Elisabeth; MAHLER, Tania; DEVREKER, Thierry; HAUSER, Bruno

    2011-01-01

    Western medicine has only recently discovered that the intestinal microbiota is a major determinant of the well-being of the host. Although it would be oversimplifying to limit the benefits of breastfeeding compared to cow milk based infant formula to differences in gastrointestinal flora, the impact of the latter has been demonstrated beyond doubt. As a consequence, gastro intestinal flora manipulation with pre- and probiotics added to infant formula or food (mainly milk based products) and/or with food supplements have become a priority area of high quality research. The composition of intestinal microbiota can be manipulated with “biotics”: antibiotics, prebiotics and probiotics. Commercialised pre- and probiotic products differ in composition and dose. Major threats to the concept of developing a major role for intestinal microbiota manipulation on health are the commercialisation of products claiming health benefits that have not been validated. Legislation of food supplements and medication differs substantially and allows commercialisation of poor quality food supplements, what will result in negative experiences. Medicinal products can only be advertised for which there is scientific proof of benefit that has been demonstrated with “the same product with the same dose in the same indication”. Specificity of prebiotics and probiotics strains and product specificity are of importance, although high quality evidence for this assertion is missing. Dose-efficacy studies are urgently needed. Probiotics are “generally regarded as safe”, but side effects such as septicemia and fungemia have sometimes been reported in high-risk situations. PMID:25045316

  17. Obesity, fatty liver disease and intestinal microbiota.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Nur

    2014-11-28

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a chronic liver disorder that is increasing in prevalence with the worldwide epidemic of obesity. NAFLD is the hepatic manifestation of the metabolic syndrome. The term NAFLD describes a spectrum of liver pathology ranges from simple steatosis to steatosis with inflammation nonalcoholic steatohepatitis and even cirrhosis. Metabolic syndrome and NAFLD also predict hepatocellular carcinoma. Many genetic and environmental factors have been suggested to contribute to the development of obesity and NAFLD, but the exact mechanisms are not known. Intestinal ecosystem contains trillions of microorganisms including bacteria, Archaea, yeasts and viruses. Several studies support the relationship between the intestinal microbial changes and obesity and also its complications, including insulin resistance and NAFLD. Given that the gut and liver are connected by the portal venous system, it makes the liver more vulnerable to translocation of bacteria, bacterial products, endotoxins or secreted cytokines. Altered intestinal microbiota (dysbiosis) may stimulate hepatic fat deposition through several mechanisms: regulation of gut permeability, increasing low-grade inflammation, modulation of dietary choline metabolism, regulation of bile acid metabolism and producing endogenous ethanol. Regulation of intestinal microbial ecosystem by diet modifications or by using probiotics and prebiotics as a treatment for obesity and its complications might be the issue of further investigations.

  18. Intestinal parasitic infections in hosted Saharawi children.

    PubMed

    Soriano, J M; Domènech, G; Martínez, M C; Mañes, J; Soriano, F

    2011-12-01

    Literatures on intestinal parasitic infections in Saharawi children were scarce and distributed in non parasitological journals. This was the first article that specifically highlighted on the prevalence of these infections in 270 Saharawi children aged from 6 to 12 years hosted in Spain. Six different intestinal parasites were identified in this study and 78, 46, 40, 24, 13 and 5 were positive for Giardia lamblia (29%), Entamoeba coli (17%), Blastocystis hominis (15%), Endolimax nana (9%), Hymenolepis nana (5%) and Enterobius vermicularis (2%), respectively. Mixed intestinal parasitic infections were seen in 12 (4.4%) studied children. Six (2.2%) double infections for G. lamblia and B. hominis were seen in these children while in four (1.5%) had G. lamblia and H. nana. Triple intestinal parasitic infections of G. lamblia, B. hominis and H. nana were observed in two (0.7%) of the children studied. In the other hand, about 14.8% of the studied children had a mild anaemia and 15.5 and 16.6% had iron deficiency and eosinophilia, respectively.

  19. Adaptive regulation of intestinal nutrient transporters.

    PubMed Central

    Diamond, J M; Karasov, W H

    1987-01-01

    Because most eukaryotic somatic cells are bathed in a constant internal milieu, most of their proteins are constitutive, unlike the adaptive enzymes of bacteria. However, intestinal mucosal cells, like bacteria, face a varying milieu. Hence, we tested for adaptive regulation of intestinal nutrient transporters, sought its functional significance, and compared it with regulation of bacterial proteins. All 12 transporters studied proved to be regulated by dietary substrate levels. Regulation in the intestine is slower than in bacteria and shows lower peak-to-basal activity levels. Regulatory patterns vary greatly among transporters: two sugars and two nonessential amino acids monotonically up-regulate their transporters, two vitamins and three minerals monotonically down-regulate their transporters, and two transporters of essential amino acids respond nonmonotonically to levels of their substrates. These varied patterns arise from trade-offs among four factors: transporter costs, calories yielded by metabolizable substrates, fixed daily requirements of essential nutrients, and toxicity of certain nutrients in large amounts. Based on these trade-offs, we predict the form of regulatory pattern for intestinal transporters not yet studied. PMID:3470788

  20. Flow and mixing by small intestine villi.

    PubMed

    Lim, Y F; de Loubens, C; Love, R J; Lentle, R G; Janssen, P W M

    2015-06-01

    Flow and mixing in the small intestine are multi-scale processes. Flows at the scale of the villi (finger-like structures of ≈500 μm length) are poorly understood. We developed a three-dimensional lattice-Boltzmann model to gain insight into the effects of villous movements and the rheology of digesta on flow, mixing and absorption of nutrients at the periphery of the intestinal lumen. Our model simulated the hydrodynamic consequences of villi movements that resulted from folding of the mucosa during longitudinal contractions. We found that cyclic approximation and separation of groups of villi generated laminar eddies at the edges of the group and augmented mass transfers in the radial direction between the inter-villous space and the intestinal lumen which improved the absorption of nutrients and mixing at the periphery of the lumen. This augmentation was greater with highly diffusible nutrients and with high levels of shear-thinning (pseudoplasticity) of the fluid. We compared our results with bulk flows simulations done by previous workers and concluded that villous movements during longitudinal contractions is a major radial mixing mechanism in the small intestine and increases mixing and absorption around the mucosa despite adverse rheology.

  1. Structural and mechanical architecture of the intestinal villi and crypts in the rat intestine: integrative reevaluation from ultrastructural analysis.

    PubMed

    Hosoyamada, Yasue; Sakai, Tatsuo

    2005-08-01

    The ultrastructure of the rat intestinal interstitium was analyzed from the viewpoint of mechanical dynamics to stabilize the intestinal villi, crypts and mucosal folds. In the rat, the small intestine lacks circular folds, but the large intestine possesses spiral folds. The intestinal villi, the largest in the duodenum, decreased in size in the jejunum and ileum successively, and were absent in the large intestine. The intestinal interstitium consisted of lamina propria mucosae (LPM) and tela submucosa (TSM) separated by muscularis mucosae (MM), the LPM was subdivided into an upper part within the villi and a lower part among the crypts in the small intestine. The light microscopic density of interstitium in the intestinal wall was lowest in the upper LPM, moderately dense in the lower LPM and highest in the TSM, and that among the intestinal region was highest in the duodenum and decreased successively in the jejunum and ileum. In the large intestine, the TSM bulged to form spiral folds with very low density. The intestinal epithelium in the villi possessed wide intercellular spaces and that in the crypts had closed intercellular spaces. At electron microscopic level, the upper and lower LPM contained subepithelial supportive meshwork that consisted of collagen fibrils and myofibroblast processes. The lower LPM and TSM contained conspicuous bundles of collagen fibrils and, in addition, TSM contained minor populations of scattered collagen fibrils near the smooth muscle layer (SML). The diameter of collagen fibrils was the largest in the bundles of TSM, and decreased from the duodenum through the jejunum and ileum to the large intestine. On the basis of these observations, we hypothesize that the intestinal villi are mechanically stabilized by the balance between the expansive interstitial pressure and inward pull by the subepithelial supportive meshwork. This hypothesis explains the hitherto neglected fact that the intestinal epithelium possesses wide

  2. Stress modulates intestinal secretory immunoglobulin A

    PubMed Central

    Campos-Rodríguez, Rafael; Godínez-Victoria, Marycarmen; Abarca-Rojano, Edgar; Pacheco-Yépez, Judith; Reyna-Garfias, Humberto; Barbosa-Cabrera, Reyna Elizabeth; Drago-Serrano, Maria Elisa

    2013-01-01

    Stress is a response of the central nervous system to environmental stimuli perceived as a threat to homeostasis. The stress response triggers the generation of neurotransmitters and hormones from the hypothalamus pituitary adrenal axis, sympathetic axis and brain gut axis, and in this way modulates the intestinal immune system. The effects of psychological stress on intestinal immunity have been investigated mostly with the restraint/immobilization rodent model, resulting in an up or down modulation of SIgA levels depending on the intensity and time of exposure to stress. SIgA is a protein complex formed by dimeric (dIgA) or polymeric IgA (pIgA) and the secretory component (SC), a peptide derived from the polymeric immunoglobulin receptor (pIgR). The latter receptor is a transmembrane protein expressed on the basolateral side of gut epithelial cells, where it uptakes dIgA or pIgA released by plasma cells in the lamina propria. As a result, the IgA-pIgR complex is formed and transported by vesicles to the apical side of epithelial cells. pIgR is then cleaved to release SIgA into the luminal secretions of gut. Down modulation of SIgA associated with stress can have negative repercussions on intestinal function and integrity. This can take the form of increased adhesion of pathogenic agents to the intestinal epithelium and/or an altered balance of inflammation leading to greater intestinal permeability. Most studies on the molecular and biochemical mechanisms involved in the stress response have focused on systemic immunity. The present review analyzes the impact of stress (mostly by restraint/immobilization, but also with mention of other models) on the generation of SIgA, pIgR and other humoral and cellular components involved in the intestinal immune response. Insights into these mechanisms could lead to better therapies for protecting against pathogenic agents and avoiding epithelial tissue damage by modulating intestinal inflammation. PMID:24348350

  3. [Histophysiologic aspects of the remnant intestine of rats subjected to partial resection of the small intestine].

    PubMed

    Delgado, M J; Moreno, J; Murillo, M L; Bolufer, J; López-Campos, J L

    1986-06-01

    The effect of small bowel resection on the morphology, mucous secretion and alkaline phosphatase activity of the remnant intestine was studied five months after surgical operation. Distal small bowel resection produced hyperplasia and infiltration of lymphocytes. The intestinal neutral and acid mucosubstances, and the alkaline phosphatase activity were increased in resected animals, whilst the sulphomucins content of goblet cells was unaltered. The serum alkaline phosphatase activity two and five months after resection was also increased.

  4. Effects of Digested Onion Extracts on Intestinal Gene Expression: An Interspecies Comparison Using Different Intestine Models.

    PubMed

    de Wit, Nicole J W; Hulst, Marcel; Govers, Coen; van der Meulen, Jan; van Hoef, Angeline; Stoopen, Geert; Hamers, Astrid; Hoekman, Arjan; de Vos, Ric; Bovee, Toine F H; Smits, Mari; Mes, Jurriaan J; Hendriksen, Peter J M

    2016-01-01

    Human intestinal tissue samples are barely accessible to study potential health benefits of nutritional compounds. Numbers of animals used in animal trials, however, need to be minimalized. Therefore, we explored the applicability of in vitro (human Caco-2 cells) and ex vivo intestine models (rat precision cut intestine slices and the pig in-situ small intestinal segment perfusion (SISP) technique) to study the effect of food compounds. In vitro digested yellow (YOd) and white onion extracts (WOd) were used as model food compounds and transcriptomics was applied to obtain more insight into which extent mode of actions depend on the model. The three intestine models shared 9,140 genes which were used to compare the responses to digested onions between the models. Unsupervised clustering analysis showed that genes up- or down-regulated by WOd in human Caco-2 cells and rat intestine slices were similarly regulated by YOd, indicating comparable modes of action for the two onion species. Highly variable responses to onion were found in the pig SISP model. By focussing only on genes with significant differential expression, in combination with a fold change > 1.5, 15 genes showed similar onion-induced expression in human Caco-2 cells and rat intestine slices and 2 overlapping genes were found between the human Caco-2 and pig SISP model. Pathway analyses revealed that mainly processes related to oxidative stress, and especially the Keap1-Nrf2 pathway, were affected by onions in all three models. Our data fit with previous in vivo studies showing that the beneficial effects of onions are mostly linked to their antioxidant properties. Taken together, our data indicate that each of the in vitro and ex vivo intestine models used in this study, taking into account their limitations, can be used to determine modes of action of nutritional compounds and can thereby reduce the number of animals used in conventional nutritional intervention studies.

  5. Fish Oil Enhances Recovery of Intestinal Microbiota and Epithelial Integrity in Chronic Rejection of Intestinal Transplant

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiurong; Zhang, Qiang; Wang, Chenyang; Tang, Chun; Zhang, Yanmei; Li, Ning; Li, Jieshou

    2011-01-01

    Background The intestinal chronic rejection (CR) is the major limitation to long-term survival of transplanted organs. This study aimed to investigate the interaction between intestinal microbiota and epithelial integrity in chronic rejection of intestinal transplantation, and to find out whether fish oil enhances recovery of intestinal microbiota and epithelial integrity. Methods/Principal Findings The luminal and mucosal microbiota composition of CR rats were characterized by DGGE analysis at 190 days after intestinal transplant. The specific bacterial species were determined by sequence analysis. Furthermore, changes in the localization of intestinal TJ proteins were examined by immunofluorescent staining. PCR-DGGE analysis revealed that gut microbiota in CR rats had a shift towards Escherichia coli, Bacteroides spp and Clostridium spp and a decrease in the abundance of Lactobacillales bacteria in the intestines. Fish oil supplementation could enhance the recovery of gut microbiota, showing a significant decrease of gut bacterial proportions of E. coli and Bacteroides spp and an increase of Lactobacillales spp. In addition, CR rats showed pronounced alteration of tight junction, depicted by marked changes in epithelial cell ultrastructure and redistribution of occuldin and claudins as well as disruption in TJ barrier function. Fish oil administration ameliorated disruption of epithelial integrity in CR, which was associated with an improvement of the mucosal structure leading to improved tight junctions. Conclusions/Significance Our study have presented novel evidence that fish oil is involved in the maintenance of epithelial TJ integrity and recovery of gut microbiota, which may have therapeutic potential against CR in intestinal transplantation. PMID:21698145

  6. Effects of Digested Onion Extracts on Intestinal Gene Expression: An Interspecies Comparison Using Different Intestine Models

    PubMed Central

    Govers, Coen; van der Meulen, Jan; van Hoef, Angeline; Stoopen, Geert; Hamers, Astrid; Hoekman, Arjan; de Vos, Ric; Bovee, Toine F. H.; Smits, Mari; Mes, Jurriaan J.

    2016-01-01

    Human intestinal tissue samples are barely accessible to study potential health benefits of nutritional compounds. Numbers of animals used in animal trials, however, need to be minimalized. Therefore, we explored the applicability of in vitro (human Caco-2 cells) and ex vivo intestine models (rat precision cut intestine slices and the pig in-situ small intestinal segment perfusion (SISP) technique) to study the effect of food compounds. In vitro digested yellow (YOd) and white onion extracts (WOd) were used as model food compounds and transcriptomics was applied to obtain more insight into which extent mode of actions depend on the model. The three intestine models shared 9,140 genes which were used to compare the responses to digested onions between the models. Unsupervised clustering analysis showed that genes up- or down-regulated by WOd in human Caco-2 cells and rat intestine slices were similarly regulated by YOd, indicating comparable modes of action for the two onion species. Highly variable responses to onion were found in the pig SISP model. By focussing only on genes with significant differential expression, in combination with a fold change > 1.5, 15 genes showed similar onion-induced expression in human Caco-2 cells and rat intestine slices and 2 overlapping genes were found between the human Caco-2 and pig SISP model. Pathway analyses revealed that mainly processes related to oxidative stress, and especially the Keap1-Nrf2 pathway, were affected by onions in all three models. Our data fit with previous in vivo studies showing that the beneficial effects of onions are mostly linked to their antioxidant properties. Taken together, our data indicate that each of the in vitro and ex vivo intestine models used in this study, taking into account their limitations, can be used to determine modes of action of nutritional compounds and can thereby reduce the number of animals used in conventional nutritional intervention studies. PMID:27631494

  7. Cell dynamics in fetal intestinal epithelium: implications for intestinal growth and morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Grosse, Ann S.; Pressprich, Mark F.; Curley, Lauren B.; Hamilton, Kara L.; Margolis, Ben; Hildebrand, Jeffrey D.; Gumucio, Deborah L.

    2011-01-01

    The cellular mechanisms that drive growth and remodeling of the early intestinal epithelium are poorly understood. Current dogma suggests that the murine fetal intestinal epithelium is stratified, that villi are formed by an epithelial remodeling process involving the de novo formation of apical surface at secondary lumina, and that radial intercalation of the stratified cells constitutes a major intestinal lengthening mechanism. Here, we investigate cell polarity, cell cycle dynamics and cell shape in the fetal murine intestine between E12.5 and E14.5. We show that, contrary to previous assumptions, this epithelium is pseudostratified. Furthermore, epithelial nuclei exhibit interkinetic nuclear migration, a process wherein nuclei move in concert with the cell cycle, from the basal side (where DNA is synthesized) to the apical surface (where mitosis takes place); such nuclear movements were previously misinterpreted as the radial intercalation of cells. We further demonstrate that growth of epithelial girth between E12.5 and E14.5 is driven by microtubule- and actinomyosin-dependent apicobasal elongation, rather than by progressive epithelial stratification as was previously thought. Finally, we show that the actin-binding protein Shroom3 is crucial for the maintenance of the single-layered pseudostratified epithelium. In mice lacking Shroom3, the epithelium is disorganized and temporarily stratified during villus emergence. These results favor an alternative model of intestinal morphogenesis in which the epithelium remains single layered and apicobasally polarized throughout early intestinal development. PMID:21880782

  8. [Intestinal failure due to short bowel syndrome: impact of a multidisciplinary intestinal rehabilitation program].

    PubMed

    Molina, María Elena; Bellolio, Felipe; Klaassen, Julieta; Gómez, Javier; Villalón, Constanza; Guerra, Juan Francisco; Zúñiga, Álvaro

    2016-11-01

    In patients suffering intestinal failure due to short bowel, the goal of an Intestinal Rehabilitation Program is to optimize and tailor all aspects of clinical management, and eventually, wean patients off lifelong parenteral nutrition. To report the results of our program in patients suffering intestinal failure. A registry of all patients referred to the Intestinal Failure unit between January 2009 and December 2015 was constructed. Initial work up included prior intestinal surgery, blood tests, endoscopic and imaging studies. Also demographic data, medical and surgical management as well as clinical follow-up, were registered. Data from 14 consecutive patients aged 26 to 84 years (13 women) was reviewed. Mean length of remnant small bowel was 100 cm and they were on parenteral nutrition for a median of eight months. Seven of 14 patients had short bowel secondary to mesenteric vascular events (embolism/thrombosis). Medical management and autologous reconstruction of the bowel included jejuno-colic anastomosis in six, enterorraphies in three, entero-rectal anastomosis in two, lengthening procedures in two, ileo-colic anastomosis in one and reversal Roux-Y gastric bypass in one. Thirteen of 14 patients were weaned off parenteral nutrition. Our Multidisciplinary Intestinal Rehabilitation Program, allowed weaning most of the studied patients off parenteral nutrition.

  9. Matrix metalloproteinase-9 contributes to intestinal tumourigenesis in the adenomatous polyposis coli multiple intestinal neoplasia mouse.

    PubMed

    Sinnamon, Mark J; Carter, Kathy J; Fingleton, Barbara; Matrisian, Lynn M

    2008-12-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of 23 extracellular proteases that are best known for their collective ability to degrade all components of the extracellular matrix. We previously demonstrated that genetic ablation of MMP-7 reduced tumour multiplicity in multiple intestinal neoplasia (Min) mice possessing a genetic alteration in the adenomatous polyposis coli gene (APC). These mice, commonly referred to as APC-Min mice, are a frequently used model of early intestinal tumourigenesis. To examine further the role of MMPs in intestinal tumour development, we generated APC-Min mice genetically deficient in MMP-2, -9, -12 or -19. Genetic ablation of MMP-2, -12 or -19 did not affect multiplicity or size of intestinal tumours when crossed into the APC-Min system. However, MMP-9 deficient animals developed 40% fewer tumours than littermate controls, although tumour size distribution remained unaffected. Intestinal adenomas from MMP-9 deficient mice demonstrated a 50% decrease in proliferating cells compared with control tissues, with no difference in apoptosis. To determine the cellular origin of MMP-9 in these tumours, immunofluorescent co-staining with markers for different leucocyte lineages was used to demonstrate that intratumoural MMP-9 is largely a product of neutrophils. These studies extend the potential targets for chemoprevention of intestinal adenomas to MMP-9 in addition to MMP-7 and exclude MMP-2,-12,-19 as attractive targets for intervention.

  10. [Morphological changes of the intestine in experimental acute intestinal infection in the treatment of colloidal silver].

    PubMed

    Polov'ian, E S; Chemich, N D; Moskalenko, R A; Romaniuk, A N

    2012-06-01

    At the present stage of infectionist practice in the treatment of acute intestinal infections caused by opportunistic microorganisms, colloidal silver is used with a particle size of 25 nm as an alternative to conventional causal therapy. In 32 rats, distributed in 4 groups of 8 animals each (intact; healthy, got colloidal silver; with a modeled acute intestinal infection in the basic treatment and with the addition of colloidal silver), histological examination was performed of small and large intestine of rats. Oral administration of colloidal silver at a dose of 0.02 mg/day to intact rats did not lead to changes in morphometric parameters compared to the norm, and during early convalescence in rats with acute intestinal infections were observed destructive and compensatory changes in the intestine, which depended on the treatment regimen. With the introduction of colloidal silver decreased activity of the inflammatory process and the severity of morphological changes in tissues of small and large intestine, indicating that the positive effect of study drug compared with baseline therapy.

  11. Intestinal Alkaline Phosphatase Is Protective to the Preterm Rat Pup Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Heinzerling, Nathan P.; Liedel, Jennifer L.; Welak, Scott R.; Fredrich, Katherine; Biesterveld, Ben E.; Pritchard, Kirkwood A.; Gourlay, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is the most common surgical emergency in neonates, with a mortality rate between 10 and 50%. The onset of necrotizing enterocolitis is highly variable and associated with numerous risk factors. Prior research has shown enteral supplementation with intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP) decreases the severity of NEC. The aim of this study is to investigate whether IAP is protective to the preterm intestine in the presence of formula feeding and in the absence of NEC. Methods Preterm rat pups were fed formula with or without supplementation with IAP, and intestine was obtained on day of life 3 for analysis of IAP activity, mRNA expression of TNF-a, IL-6 and iNOS and permeability and cytokine expression after LPS. exposure. Results There was no difference in the absolute and intestine specific alkaline phosphatase activity in both groups. Rat pups fed IAP had decreased mRNA expression of the inflammatory cytokines TNFα, IL-6 and iNOS. Pups supplemented with IAP had decreased permeability and inflammatory cytokine expression after exposure to LPS ex vivo when compared to formula fed controls. Conclusions Our results support that IAP is beneficial to preterm intestine and decreases intestinal injury and inflammation caused by LPS. PMID:24888842

  12. The relationship between intestinal parasites and some immune-mediated intestinal conditions

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Rasoul; Hosseini-Safa, Ahmad; Ehsani Ardakani, Mohammad Javad; Rostami-Nejad, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decades, the incidence of infestation by minor parasites has decreased in developed countries. Infectious agents can also suppress autoimmune and allergic disorders. Some investigations show that various protozoa and helminthes are connected with the main immune-mediated intestinal conditions including celiac disease (CD), inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Celiac disease is a digestive and autoimmune disorder that can damage the small intestine and characterized by a multitude gastrointestinal (GI) and extra GI symptoms. IBD (including ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease) is a group of inflammatory conditions of the small intestine and colon. The etiology of IBD is unknown, but it may be related to instability in the intestinal microflora that leading to an immoderate inflammatory response to commensal microbiota. Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common, long-term condition of the digestive system. Bloating, diarrhoea and/or constipation are nonspecific symptoms of IBS. Various studies have shown that some intestinal parasites can effect on immune system of infected hosts and in some cases, they are able to modify and change the host’s immune responses, particularly in autoimmune disorders like celiac disease and IBD. The main objective of this review is to investigate the relationship between intestinal parasites and different inflammatory bowel disorders. PMID:25926937

  13. Intestinal motor activity, endoluminal motion and transit.

    PubMed

    de Iorio, F; Malagelada, C; Azpiroz, F; Maluenda, M; Violanti, C; Igual, L; Vitrià, J; Malagelada, J-R

    2009-12-01

    A programme for evaluation of intestinal motility has been recently developed based on endoluminal image analysis using computer vision methodology and machine learning techniques. Our aim was to determine the effect of intestinal muscle inhibition on wall motion, dynamics of luminal content and transit in the small bowel. Fourteen healthy subjects ingested the endoscopic capsule (Pillcam, Given Imaging) in fasting conditions. Seven of them received glucagon (4.8 microg kg(-1) bolus followed by a 9.6 microg kg(-1) h(-1) infusion during 1 h) and in the other seven, fasting activity was recorded, as controls. This dose of glucagon has previously shown to inhibit both tonic and phasic intestinal motor activity. Endoluminal image and displacement was analyzed by means of a computer vision programme specifically developed for the evaluation of muscular activity (contractile and non-contractile patterns), intestinal contents, endoluminal motion and transit. Thirty-minute periods before, during and after glucagon infusion were analyzed and compared with equivalent periods in controls. No differences were found in the parameters measured during the baseline (pretest) periods when comparing glucagon and control experiments. During glucagon infusion, there was a significant reduction in contractile activity (0.2 +/- 0.1 vs 4.2 +/- 0.9 luminal closures per min, P < 0.05; 0.4 +/- 0.1 vs 3.4 +/- 1.2% of images with radial wrinkles, P < 0.05) and a significant reduction of endoluminal motion (82 +/- 9 vs 21 +/- 10% of static images, P < 0.05). Endoluminal image analysis, by means of computer vision and machine learning techniques, can reliably detect reduced intestinal muscle activity and motion.

  14. [Sonographic examinations of the intestines in calves].

    PubMed

    Padel-Gschwind, D; Stocker, H

    2004-04-01

    The aim of this investigation was to describe the normal ultrasonic appearance of the intestinal loops of calves at different stages of their adolescence and at various intervals after suckling and to determine reliable reference values. Therefore the abdomen of 20 clinically healthy calves have been examined with a 5 MHz sector probe on the right and left flank of each animal and the exact position, the largest diameter, the thickness of the walls, the peristaltic activity and the appearance of the contents of each part of the intestines described. Most often, the pars cranialis duodeni could be seen ventral of the right costal arch as well as in the right flank, with younger calves it also showed in the left flank sometimes. The position could be changed considerably depending on the period elapsed since the last suckling time. The duodenum descendens and the duodenum ascendens could be traced in the right flank. The thickness of the wall was found to measure between 2 and 3 mm throughout the whole duodenum. The examination of the jejunum and the ileum was basically done in the right flank. In cases where the rumen was not yet fully developed visualization was also possible in the left flank. Most often these parts were seen in cross-section displaying permanent peristaltic activity. With the younger calves the large intestine could equally be traced in both flanks. In older animals it could be recognized as voluminous hollow organ filled with gas, or in case of the colon ascendens as garlandshape. In the jejunum and ileum as well as in the large intestine the thickness of the wall measured between 1 and 2 mm. Each part of the intestine showed an increase in diameter as the calves grew older. The peristaltic activity increased during two hours after suckling and during this time the echoing level of the contents was lower.

  15. Overview of intestinal adaptation and its stimulation.

    PubMed

    Robinson, M K; Ziegler, T R; Wilmore, D W

    1999-08-01

    Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) can be life-saving for many patients with short-bowel syndrome (SBS). However, chronic TPN administration is associated with nutritional deficiencies, septic complications, high health care costs, and life-threatening organ failure. In an effort to rehabilitate SBS patients so they may achieve enteral autonomy, investigators have attempted to stimulate the adaptive response following extensive small-bowel resection. Intestinal adaptation may include: 1) morphological changes of the residual bowel which increase the absorptive surface area; 2) functional changes that increase the absorptive capacity of individual enterocytes and colonocytes; and 3) changes in colonic production and absorption of short-chain fatty acids which improve intestinal vitality and maximize efficiency of energy and fluid absorption. Several peptides, nutrients, cytokines, and other factors promote intestinal adaptation in animals. These "growth" factors may predominantly affect one aspect of the adaptive response while having little or no effect on other physiologic or morphologic parameters. In addition, combined administration of stimulatory agents may be necessary to enhance adaptation. Dietary constituents may have profound positive and negative effects on adaptation and must be considered in developing an overall plan for treatment of the SBS patients. Only a few clinical studies have been performed to evaluate therapeutic regimens for SBS beyond standard supportive care and TPN administration. The combined administration of growth hormone, glutamine and a modified diet to over 225 adults has been shown to eliminate or decrease TPN dependence in 80% of patients receiving this therapy. Further study is required to optimize the treatment of humans with intestinal failure and to determine which patients are most likely to benefit from medical therapy. The authors conclude that the intestinal length to body weight index may be one predictive factor useful

  16. Short segment Barrett's esophagus and distal gastric intestinal metaplasia.

    PubMed

    Dietz, Judite; Chaves-E-Silva, Sílvia; Meurer, Luíse; Sekine, Setsuo; de Souza, Andréa Ribeiro; Meine, Gilmara Coelho

    2006-01-01

    Short segment Barrett's esophagus is defined by the presence of <3 cm of columnar-appearing mucosa in the distal esophagus with intestinal metaplasia on histophatological examination. Barrett's esophagus is a risk factor to develop adenocarcinoma of the esophagus. While Barrett's esophagus develops as a result of chronic gastroesophageal reflux disease, intestinal metaplasia in the gastric cardia is a consequence of chronic Helicobacter pylori infection and is associated with distal gastric intestinal metaplasia. It can be difficult to determine whether short-segment columnar epithelium with intestinal metaplasia are lining the esophagus (a condition called short segment Barrett's esophagus) or the proximal stomach (a condition called intestinal metaplasia of the gastric cardia). To study the association of short segment Barrett's esophagus (length <3 cm) with gastric intestinal metaplasia (antrum or body) and infection by H. pylori. Eight-nine patients with short segment columnar-appearing mucosa in the esophagus, length <3 cm, were studied. Symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease were recorded. Biopsies were obtained immediately below the squamous-columnar lining, from gastric antrum and gastric corpus for investigation of intestinal metaplasia and H. pylori. Forty-two from 89 (47.2%) patients were diagnosed with esophageal intestinal metaplasia by histopathology. The mean-age was significantly higher in the group with esophageal intestinal metaplasia. The two groups were similar in terms of gender (male: female), gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms and H. pylori infection. Gastric intestinal metaplasia (antrum or body) was diagnosed in 21 from 42 (50.0%) patients in the group with esophageal intestinal metaplasia and 7 from 47 (14.9%) patients in the group with esophageal columnar appearing mucosa but without intestinal metaplasia. Intestinal metaplasia is a frequent finding in patients with <3 cm of columnar-appearing mucosa in the distal esophagus. In

  17. Gastrin attenuates ischemia-reperfusion-induced intestinal injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhihao; Luo, Yongli; Cheng, Yunjiu; Zou, Dezhi; Zeng, Aihong; Yang, Chunhua

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury is a devastating complication when the blood supply is reflowed in ischemic organs. Gastrin has critical function in regulating acid secretion, proliferation, and differentiation in the gastric mucosa. We aimed to determine whether gastrin has an effect on intestinal I/R damage. Intestinal I/R injury was induced by 60-min occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery followed by 60-min reperfusion, and the rats were induced to be hypergastrinemic by pretreated with omeprazole or directly injected with gastrin. Some hypergastrinemic rats were injected with cholecystokinin-2 (CCK-2) receptor antagonist prior to I/R operation. After the animal surgery, the intestine was collected for histological analysis. Isolated intestinal epithelial cells or crypts were harvested for RNA and protein analysis. CCK-2 receptor expression, intestinal mucosal damage, cell apoptosis, and apoptotic protein caspase-3 activity were measured. We found that high gastrin in serum significantly reduced intestinal hemorrhage, alleviated extensive epithelial disruption, decreased disintegration of lamina propria, downregulated myeloperoxidase activity, tumor necrosis factor-α, and caspase-3 activity, and lead to low mortality in response to I/R injury. On the contrary, CCK-2 receptor antagonist L365260 could markedly impair intestinal protection by gastrin on intestinal I/R. Severe edema of mucosal villi with severe intestinal crypt injury and numerous intestinal villi disintegrated were observed again in the hypergastrinemic rats with L365260. The survival in the hypergastrinemic rats after intestinal I/R injury was shortened by L365260. Finally, gastrin could remarkably upregulated intestinal CCK-2 receptor expression. Our data suggest that gastrin by omeprazole remarkably attenuated I/R induced intestinal injury by enhancing CCK-2 receptor expression and gastrin could be a potential mitigator for intestinal I/R damage in the clinical setting. PMID

  18. Intestinal Transplant Inflammation: the Third Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Kroemer, Alexander; Cosentino, Christopher; Kaiser, Jason; Matsumoto, Cal S; Fishbein, Thomas M

    2016-11-01

    Intestinal transplantation is the most immunologically complex of all abdominal organ transplants. Understanding the role both humoral and innate and adaptive cellular immunity play in intestinal transplantation is critical to improving outcomes and increasing indications for patients suffering from intestinal failure. Recent findings highlighting the impact of donor-specific antibodies on intestinal allografts, the role of NOD2 as a key regulator of intestinal immunity, the protective effects of innate lymphoid cells, and the role of Th17 in acute cellular rejection are reviewed here.

  19. Berberine Reduces Uremia-Associated Intestinal Mucosal Barrier Damage.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chao; Tan, Shanjun; Zhou, Chunyu; Zhu, Cuilin; Kang, Xin; Liu, Shuai; Zhao, Shuang; Fan, Shulin; Yu, Zhen; Peng, Ai; Wang, Zhen

    2016-11-01

    Berberine is one of the main active constituents of Rhizoma coptidis, a traditional Chinese medicine, and has long been used for the treatment of gastrointestinal disorders. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of berberine on the intestinal mucosal barrier damage in a rat uremia model induced by the 5/6 kidney resection. Beginning at postoperative week 4, the uremia rats were treated with daily 150 mg/kg berberine by oral gavage for 6 weeks. To assess the intestinal mucosal barrier changes, blood samples were collected for measuring the serum D-lactate level, and terminal ileum tissue samples were used for analyses of intestinal permeability, myeloperoxidase activity, histopathology, malondialdehyde (MDA) level, and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity. Berberine treatment resulted in significant decreases in the serum D-lactate level, intestinal permeability, intestinal myeloperoxidase activity, and intestinal mucosal and submucosal edema and inflammation, and the Chiu's scores assessed for intestinal mucosal injury. The intestinal MDA level was reduced and the intestinal SOD activity was increased following berberine treatment. In conclusion, berberine reduces intestinal mucosal barrier damage induced by uremia, which is most likely due to its anti-oxidative activity. It may be developed as a potential treatment for preserving intestinal mucosal barrier function in patients with uremia.

  20. Intestinal Cgi-58 deficiency reduces postprandial lipid absorption.

    PubMed

    Xie, Ping; Guo, Feng; Ma, Yinyan; Zhu, Hongling; Wang, Freddy; Xue, Bingzhong; Shi, Hang; Yang, Jian; Yu, Liqing

    2014-01-01

    Comparative Gene Identification-58 (CGI-58), a lipid droplet (LD)-associated protein, promotes intracellular triglyceride (TG) hydrolysis in vitro. Mutations in human CGI-58 cause TG accumulation in numerous tissues including intestine. Enterocytes are thought not to store TG-rich LDs, but a fatty meal does induce temporary cytosolic accumulation of LDs. Accumulated LDs are eventually cleared out, implying existence of TG hydrolytic machinery in enterocytes. However, identities of proteins responsible for LD-TG hydrolysis remain unknown. Here we report that intestine-specific inactivation of CGI-58 in mice significantly reduces postprandial plasma TG concentrations and intestinal TG hydrolase activity, which is associated with a 4-fold increase in intestinal TG content and large cytosolic LD accumulation in absorptive enterocytes during the fasting state. Intestine-specific CGI-58 knockout mice also display mild yet significant decreases in intestinal fatty acid absorption and oxidation. Surprisingly, inactivation of CGI-58 in intestine significantly raises plasma and intestinal cholesterol, and reduces hepatic cholesterol, without altering intestinal cholesterol absorption and fecal neutral sterol excretion. In conclusion, intestinal CGI-58 is required for efficient postprandial lipoprotein-TG secretion and for maintaining hepatic and plasma lipid homeostasis. Our animal model will serve as a valuable tool to further define how intestinal fat metabolism influences the pathogenesis of metabolic disorders, such as obesity and type 2 diabetes.

  1. Robust bioengineered 3D functional human intestinal epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying; Lin, Yinan; Davis, Kimberly M.; Wang, Qianrui; Rnjak-Kovacina, Jelena; Li, Chunmei; Isberg, Ralph R.; Kumamoto, Carol A.; Mecsas, Joan; Kaplan, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal functions are central to human physiology, health and disease. Options to study these functions with direct relevance to the human condition remain severely limited when using conventional cell cultures, microfluidic systems, organoids, animal surrogates or human studies. To replicate in vitro the tissue architecture and microenvironments of native intestine, we developed a 3D porous protein scaffolding system, containing a geometrically-engineered hollow lumen, with adaptability to both large and small intestines. These intestinal tissues demonstrated representative human responses by permitting continuous accumulation of mucous secretions on the epithelial surface, establishing low oxygen tension in the lumen, and interacting with gut-colonizing bacteria. The newly developed 3D intestine model enabled months-long sustained access to these intestinal functions in vitro, readily integrable with a multitude of different organ mimics and will therefore ensure a reliable ex vivo tissue system for studies in a broad context of human intestinal diseases and treatments. PMID:26374193

  2. The Role of the Intestinal Microcirculation in Necrotizing Enterocolitis

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, Daniel J.; Besner, Gail E.

    2013-01-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) continues to be a devastating inflammatory disease of the newborn intestine. Despite advances in management, morbidity and mortality remain high. While it is clear that intestinal ischemia plays a large role in disease pathogenesis, attempts to link NEC to intestinal macrovascular derangement have been largely unsuccessful. More recently, there has been a concerted effort to characterize the pathologic changes of the intestinal microcirculation in response to intestinal injury, including NEC. This microcirculatory regulation is controlled by a balance of vasoconstrictor and vasodilator forces. Vasoconstriction is mediated primarily by endothelin-1 (ET-1) while vasodilation is mediated primarily by nitric oxide (NO). These chemical mediators have been implicated in many aspects of intestinal ischemic injury and NEC, with the balance shifting towards increased vasoconstriction associated with intestinal injury. With a proper understanding of these antagonistic forces, potential therapeutic avenues may result from improving this pathologic microcirculatory dysregulation. PMID:23611611

  3. Robust bioengineered 3D functional human intestinal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying; Lin, Yinan; Davis, Kimberly M; Wang, Qianrui; Rnjak-Kovacina, Jelena; Li, Chunmei; Isberg, Ralph R; Kumamoto, Carol A; Mecsas, Joan; Kaplan, David L

    2015-09-16

    Intestinal functions are central to human physiology, health and disease. Options to study these functions with direct relevance to the human condition remain severely limited when using conventional cell cultures, microfluidic systems, organoids, animal surrogates or human studies. To replicate in vitro the tissue architecture and microenvironments of native intestine, we developed a 3D porous protein scaffolding system, containing a geometrically-engineered hollow lumen, with adaptability to both large and small intestines. These intestinal tissues demonstrated representative human responses by permitting continuous accumulation of mucous secretions on the epithelial surface, establishing low oxygen tension in the lumen, and interacting with gut-colonizing bacteria. The newly developed 3D intestine model enabled months-long sustained access to these intestinal functions in vitro, readily integrable with a multitude of different organ mimics and will therefore ensure a reliable ex vivo tissue system for studies in a broad context of human intestinal diseases and treatments.

  4. [Intestinal transplant: in what phase are we?].

    PubMed

    Andrés Moreno, A M; Ramos, E; Hernández, F; Encinas, J L; Leal, N; Gámez, M L; Martínez, L; Sarriá, J; Molina, M; Martínez-Ojinaga, E; Murcia, J; Frauca, E; Delgado, M; Prieto, G; López Santamaría, M; Tovar, J A

    2010-07-01

    To analyze the evolution of Small Bowel Transplantation program since the beginning of the program. [corrected] All children who underwent intestinal transplantation between 1997 and 2009 were retrospectively reviewed: epidemiological data, status before transplant, surgical technique, immunosupression, results, survival and long.term quality of life were analysed. Fifty-two intestinal transplants were performed in 46 children (20 isolated bowel, 20 combined liver and intestine, and 12 multivisceral); median age was 32m (range 7m-19a); weight 12,3 kg (range 3,9-60); 31 had short gut syndrome, 8 dismotility, 5 intractable diarrhea, and two were miscellaneous. Intestinal adaptation was initially attempted in 26 patients, without success, 20 were directly listed for transplant. The modality of transplant was modified in 17 while listed. Baseline immunosupression consisted of tacrolimus and steroids, although 5 required conversion to Sirolimus later. Six died during the first month, due to sepsis/multiorganic failure (poor status at transplant); 13 died during the long-term follow-up. Acute rejection was seen in 20, chronic rejection in 3, PTLD in 8 (6 died) and GVHD in 5 patients (3 died). Overall survival after 5 years of follow-up is 65,2 % (51,7% for the graft). From 2006 to 2008, overall patient/graft survival at 6 m, 1 and 3 years after transplant is 88,7/84,1, 81,2/81,2 and 81,2/71,1%, respectively. After a median follw-up of 39 +/- 29 months, 27 patients are alive (59%), off TPN, (70% had their ostomy taken down), go to school, are scarcely hospitalized and enjoy a good quality of life. Intestinal transplantation has consolided itself as a good choice for irreversible intestinal failure, being feasible to achieve a normal life. Although overall survival diminishes over time, the center experience has improved the results. These patients need a very close follow-up, once transplant is over, in order to get an early diagnose of immunological complications.

  5. High-fat Diet Accelerates Intestinal Tumorigenesis Through Disrupting Intestinal Cell Membrane Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Park, Mi-Young; Kim, Min Young; Seo, Young Rok; Kim, Jong-Sang; Sung, Mi-Kyung

    2016-01-01

    Background: Excess energy supply induces chronic low-grade inflammation in association with oxidative stress in various tissues including intestinal epithelium. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of high-fat diet (HFD) on intestinal cell membrane integrity and intestinal tumorigenesis in ApcMin/+ mice. Methods: Mice were fed with either normal diet (ND) or HFD for 12 weeks. The number of intestinal tumors were counted and biomarkers of endotoxemia, oxidative stress, and inflammation were determined. Changes in intestinal integrity was measured by fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-dextran penetration and membrane gap junction protein expression. Results: HFD group had significantly higher number of tumors compared to ND group (P < 0.05). Blood total antioxidant capacity was lower in HFD group, while colonic 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine level, a marker of oxidative damage, was higher in HFD group compared to that of ND group (P < 0.05). The penetration of FITC-dextran was substantially increased in HFD group (P < 0.05) while the expressions of membrane gap junction proteins including zonula occludens-1, claudin-1, and occludin were lower in HFD group (P < 0.05) compared to those in ND group. Serum concentration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) receptor (CD14) and colonic toll-like receptor 4 (a LPS receptor) mRNA expression were significantly higher in HFD group than in ND group (P < 0.05), suggesting that significant endotoxemia may occur in HFD group due to the increased membrane permeability. Serum interleukin-6 concentration and myeloperoxidase activity were also higher in HFD group compared to those of ND group (P < 0.05). Conclusions: HFD increases oxidative stress disrupting intestinal gap junction proteins, thereby accelerating membrane permeability endotoxemia, inflammation, and intestinal tumorigenesis. PMID:27390738

  6. Heat Stress Reduces Intestinal Barrier Integrity and Favors Intestinal Glucose Transport in Growing Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, Sarah C.; Mani, Venkatesh; Boddicker, Rebecca L.; Johnson, Jay S.; Weber, Thomas E.; Ross, Jason W.; Rhoads, Robert P.; Baumgard, Lance H.; Gabler, Nicholas K.

    2013-01-01

    Excessive heat exposure reduces intestinal integrity and post-absorptive energetics that can inhibit wellbeing and be fatal. Therefore, our objectives were to examine how acute heat stress (HS) alters intestinal integrity and metabolism in growing pigs. Animals were exposed to either thermal neutral (TN, 21°C; 35–50% humidity; n = 8) or HS conditions (35°C; 24–43% humidity; n = 8) for 24 h. Compared to TN, rectal temperatures in HS pigs increased by 1.6°C and respiration rates by 2-fold (P<0.05). As expected, HS decreased feed intake by 53% (P<0.05) and body weight (P<0.05) compared to TN pigs. Ileum heat shock protein 70 expression increased (P<0.05), while intestinal integrity was compromised in the HS pigs (ileum and colon TER decreased; P<0.05). Furthermore, HS increased serum endotoxin concentrations (P = 0.05). Intestinal permeability was accompanied by an increase in protein expression of myosin light chain kinase (P<0.05) and casein kinase II-α (P = 0.06). Protein expression of tight junction (TJ) proteins in the ileum revealed claudin 3 and occludin expression to be increased overall due to HS (P<0.05), while there were no differences in claudin 1 expression. Intestinal glucose transport and blood glucose were elevated due to HS (P<0.05). This was supported by increased ileum Na+/K+ ATPase activity in HS pigs. SGLT-1 protein expression was unaltered; however, HS increased ileal GLUT-2 protein expression (P = 0.06). Altogether, these data indicate that HS reduce intestinal integrity and increase intestinal stress and glucose transport. PMID:23936392

  7. Developmental changes in distribution of the mucous gel layer and intestinal permeability in rat small intestine.

    PubMed

    Iiboshi, Y; Nezu, R; Khan, J; Chen, K; Cui, L; Yoshida, H; Wasa, M; Fukuzawa, M; Kamata, S; Takagi, Y; Okada, A

    1996-01-01

    From the developmental aspects, the distribution of fluorescein isothiocyanate dextran 70,000 (FTTC-dextran) and mucous gel across the lumen of small intestine was observed as an investigation into the role of mucous gel on intestinal permeability. Furthermore, the effect of N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), a mucolytic agent, on intestinal permeability was examined. In suckling and weaned rats, FTTC-dextran (750 mg/kg body wt) was gavage-fed. After 3 hours, blood samples were taken by cardiac puncture to analyze plasma FTTC-dextran by fluorescence spectrometry. Samples of small intestine with luminal contents were frozen and sectioned in a cryostat for fluorescence microscopy; the same sections were placed in a 0.2% celloidin solution to preserve mucous gel and were stained by periodic acid-Schiff reaction for light microscopy. In weaned rats, intestinal permeability was examined with different concentrations of intraluminally instilled NAC. The plasma level of FTTC-dextran showed a significant increase (p < .01) in suckling rats compared with the weaned rats. Morphologic findings were similar in both the jejunum and ileum: The spaces between villi were not entirely filled with mucus but filled with FTTC-dextran in suckling rats, whereas the spaces were filled with mucus and not filled with FTTC-dextran in weaned rats. Intestinal permeability in groups with NAC were significantly higher (p < .01) than that in group without NAC. These results suggest that an increase in the mucous gel layer that coats the epithelial lining according to the maturation of the gastrointestinal tract is one of the most important factors for a restriction in intestinal permeability.

  8. Presentation of a nationwide multicenter registry of intestinal failure and intestinal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Neelis, E G; Roskott, A M; Dijkstra, G; Wanten, G J; Serlie, M J; Tabbers, M M; Damen, G; Olthof, E D; Jonkers, C F; Kloeze, J H; Ploeg, R J; Imhann, F; Nieuwenhuijs, V B; Rings, E H H M

    2016-02-01

    Exact data on Dutch patients with chronic intestinal failure (CIF) and after intestinal transplantation (ITx) have been lacking. To improve standard care of these patients, a nationwide collaboration has been established. Objectives of this study were obtaining an up-to-date prevalence of CIF and characterizing these patients using the specially developed multicenter web-based Dutch Registry of Intestinal Failure and Intestinal Transplantation (DRIFT). Cross-sectional study. CIF was defined as type 3 intestinal failure in which >75% of nutritional requirements were given as home parenteral nutrition (HPN) for ≥ 4 weeks in children and >50% for ≥3 months in adults. All patients with CIF receiving HPN care by the three Dutch specialized centers on January 1, 2013 and all ITx patients were registered in DRIFT (https://drift.darmfalen.nl). In total, 195 patients with CIF (158 adults, 37 children) were identified, of whom 184 were registered in DRIFT. The Dutch point prevalence of CIF was 11.62 per million (12.24 for adults, 9.56 for children) on January 1, 2013. Fifty-seven patients (31%) had one or more indications for ITx, while 12 patients actually underwent ITx since its Dutch introduction. Four patients required transplantectomy of their intestinal graft and 3 intestinal transplant patients died. The multicenter registry DRIFT revealed an up-to-date prevalence of CIF and provided nationwide insight into the patients with CIF during HPN and after ITx in the Netherlands. DRIFT will facilitate the multicenter monitoring of individual patients, thereby supporting multidisciplinary care and decision-making. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  9. Intestinal Stem Cell Markers in the Intestinal Metaplasia of Stomach and Barrett's Esophagus.

    PubMed

    Jang, Bo Gun; Lee, Byung Lan; Kim, Woo Ho

    2015-01-01

    Gastric intestinal metaplasia (IM) is a highly prevalent preneoplastic lesion; however, the molecular mechanisms regulating its development remain unclear. We have previously shown that a population of cells expressing the intestinal stem cell (ISC) marker LGR5 increases remarkably in IM. In this study, we further investigated the molecular characteristics of these LGR5+ cells in IM by examining the expression profile of several ISC markers. Notably, we found that ISC markers-including OLFM4 and EPHB2-are positively associated with the CDX2 expression in non-tumorous gastric tissues. This finding was confirmed in stomach lesions with or without metaplasia, which demonstrated that OLFM4 and EPHB2 expression gradually increased with metaplastic progression. Moreover, RNA in situ hybridization revealed that LGR5+ cells coexpress several ISC markers and remained confined to the base of metaplastic glands, reminiscent to that of normal intestinal crypts, whereas those in normal antral glands expressed none of these markers. Furthermore, a large number of ISC marker-expressing cells were diffusely distributed in gastric adenomas, suggesting that these markers may facilitate gastric tumorigenesis. In addition, Barrett's esophagus (BE)-which is histologically similar to intestinal metaplasia-exhibited a similar distribution of ISC markers, indicating the presence of a stem cell population with intestinal differentiation potential. In conclusion, we identified that LGR5+ cells in gastric IM and BE coexpress ISC markers, and exhibit the same expression profile as those found in normal intestinal crypts. Taken together, these results implicate an intestinal-like stem cell population in the pathogenesis of IM, and provide an important basis for understanding the development and maintenance of this disease.

  10. [Effect of Safflor injection on the intestine ultrastructure characteristics following intestine ischemia/reperfusion injury in rabbits].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hua; Chen, Cong-De; Li, Zhong-Rong; Chen, Xiao-Ming; Wang, Wan-Tie; Wang, Wei; Wang, Fang-Yan; Fang, Zhou-Xi

    2009-11-01

    To explore effects of Safflor (Chinese Tradional Medicine) on the intestine ultrastructure characteristics during intestine ischemia/ reperfusion injury (I/RI) in rabbits. Thirty rabbits were randomly divided into three groups: control group (group S), ischemia/reperfusion group (group I/R) and Safflor injection group (group SI). Morphological changes of intestine ischemia/reperfusion in rabbits and the protective effects of Safflor were observed under electric telescope. The intestine ultrastructure was badly injured in group I/R. Mitochondria and intestinal mucosal cells were swellen and endoplasmic reticulum expanded, however, in the SI group the ultrastructural injury of the ischemia greatly ameliorated. The ultrastructure injury occurrted after intestine I/RI and Safflor has protective effects on the intestine ultrastructure.

  11. Antigen sampling in the fish intestine.

    PubMed

    Løkka, Guro; Koppang, Erling Olaf

    2016-11-01

    Antigen uptake in the gastrointestinal tract may induce tolerance, lead to an immune response and also to infection. In mammals, most pathogens gain access to the host though the gastrointestinal tract, and in fish as well, this route seems to be of significant importance. The epithelial surface faces a considerable challenge, functioning both as a barrier towards the external milieu but simultaneously being the site of absorption of nutrients and fluids. The mechanisms allowing antigen uptake over the epithelial barrier play a central role for maintaining the intestinal homeostasis and regulate appropriate immune responses. Such uptake has been widely studied in mammals, but also in fish, a number of experiments have been reported, seeking to reveal cells and mechanisms involved in antigen sampling. In this paper, we review these studies in addition to addressing our current knowledge of the intestinal barrier in fish and its anatomical construction. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Transcriptional Networks in Liver and Intestinal Development

    PubMed Central

    Sheaffer, Karyn L.; Kaestner, Klaus H.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY The development of the gastrointestinal tract is a complex process that integrates signaling processes with downstream transcriptional responses. Here, we discuss the regionalization of the primitive gut and formation of the intestine and liver. Anterior–posterior position in the primitive gut is important for establishing regions that will become functional organs. Coordination of signaling between the epithelium and mesenchyme and downstream transcriptional responses is required for intestinal development and homeostasis. Liver development uses a complex transcriptional network that controls the establishment of organ domains, cell differentiation, and adult function. Discussion of these transcriptional mechanisms gives us insight into how the primitive gut, composed of simple endodermal cells, develops into multiple diverse cell types that are organized into complex mature organs. PMID:22952394

  13. The Intestinal Microbiota and Viral Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Pfeiffer, Julie K.; Sonnenburg, Justin L.

    2011-01-01

    Many infections start with microbial invasion of mucosal surfaces, which are typically colonized by a community of resident microbes. A growing body of literature demonstrates that the resident microbiota plays a significant role in host susceptibility to pathogens. Recent work has largely focused on the considerable effect that the intestinal microbiota can have upon bacterial pathogenesis. These studies reveal many significant gaps in our knowledge about the mechanisms by which the resident community impacts pathogen invasion and the nature of the ensuing host immune response. It is likely that as viral pathogens become the focus of studies that examine microbiota–host interaction, substantial effects of resident communities exerted via diverse mechanisms will be elucidated. Here we provide a perspective of the exciting emerging field that examines how the intestinal microbiota influences host susceptibility to viruses. PMID:21833331

  14. Intestinal transport and metabolism of bile acids

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Paul A.; Karpen, Saul J.

    2015-01-01

    In addition to their classical roles as detergents to aid in the process of digestion, bile acids have been identified as important signaling molecules that function through various nuclear and G protein-coupled receptors to regulate a myriad of cellular and molecular functions across both metabolic and nonmetabolic pathways. Signaling via these pathways will vary depending on the tissue and the concentration and chemical structure of the bile acid species. Important determinants of the size and composition of the bile acid pool are their efficient enterohepatic recirculation, their host and microbial metabolism, and the homeostatic feedback mechanisms connecting hepatocytes, enterocytes, and the luminal microbiota. This review focuses on the mammalian intestine, discussing the physiology of bile acid transport, the metabolism of bile acids in the gut, and new developments in our understanding of how intestinal metabolism, particularly by the gut microbiota, affects bile acid signaling. PMID:25210150

  15. Genetic and epigenetic regulation of intestinal fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Crohn’s disease affects those individuals with polygenic risk factors. The identified risk loci indicate that the genetic architecture of Crohn’s disease involves both innate and adaptive immunity and the response to the intestinal environment including the microbiome. Genetic risk alone, however, predicts only 25% of disease, indicating that other factors, including the intestinal environment, can shape the epigenome and also confer heritable risk to patients. Patients with Crohn’s disease can have purely inflammatory disease, penetrating disease or fibrostenosis. Analysis of the genetic risk combined with epigenetic marks of Crohn’s disease and other disease associated with organ fibrosis reveals common events are affecting the genes and pathways key to development of fibrosis. This review will focus on what is known about the mechanisms by which genetic and epigenetic risk factors determine development of fibrosis in Crohn’s disease and contrast that with other fibrotic conditions. PMID:27536359

  16. Intestinal micropatches for oral insulin delivery.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Amrita; Wong, Jessica; Gogoi, Rohan; Brown, Tyler; Mitragotri, Samir

    2017-03-19

    Diabetes mellitus has become a major public health issue that has almost reached epidemic proportions worldwide. Injectable insulin has been typically utilized for the management of this chronic disease. However, lack of patient compliance with injectable formulations has spurred the development of oral insulin formulations, which although appealing, face several delivery challenges. We have developed novel mucoadhesive intestinal patches, several hundred micrometers in dimension (micropatches) that address the challenges of oral insulin delivery. The micropatches adhere to the intestinal mucosa, release their drug load rapidly within 30 min and are effective in lowering blood glucose levels in vivo. When insulin-loaded micropatches were administered with a permeation enhancer and protease inhibitor, a peak efficacy of 34% drop in blood glucose levels was observed within 3 h. Efficacy further improved to 41% when micropatches were administered in multiple doses. Here, we describe the design of micropatches as an oral insulin formulation and report their in vivo efficacy.

  17. The pathophysiology of intestinal lipoprotein production

    PubMed Central

    Giammanco, Antonina; Cefalù, Angelo B.; Noto, Davide; Averna, Maurizio R.

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal lipoprotein production is a multistep process, essential for the absorption of dietary fats and fat-soluble vitamins. Chylomicron assembly begins in the endoplasmic reticulum with the formation of primordial, phospholipids-rich particles that are then transported to the Golgi for secretion. Several classes of transporters play a role in the selective uptake and/or export of lipids through the villus enterocytes. Once secreted in the lymph stream, triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRLs) are metabolized by Lipoprotein lipase (LPL), which catalyzes the hydrolysis of triacylglycerols of very low density lipoproteins (VLDLs) and chylomicrons, thereby delivering free fatty acids to various tissues. Genetic mutations in the genes codifying for these proteins are responsible of different inherited disorders affecting chylomicron metabolism. This review focuses on the molecular pathways that modulate the uptake and the transport of lipoproteins of intestinal origin and it will highlight recent findings on TRLs assembly. PMID:25852563

  18. Intestinal parasitism in Malayan aborigines (Orang Asli)*

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, F. L.

    1972-01-01

    Surveys were conducted in the southern Malay peninsula to assess intestinal parasitism in the aboriginal ethnic minority groups. Faecal specimens from 1 273 persons were examined by the thiomersal—iodine—formol direct-smear technique. Prevalences are reported and, for helminth infections, data on worm burdens. The state of sanitation in each of 9 cultural-ecological groups was assessed by means of a simplified system of scoring for variables. Particular attention was paid to relationships between cultural and ecological factors, sanitation, and observed patterns of intestinal parasitism. The author also discusses the fact that the number of parasitic species diminishes in habitats simplified by man, whereas an increase occurs in the prevalence and intensity of the more adaptable species that persist in ecosystems of low complexity. PMID:4537337

  19. Understanding drug resistance in human intestinal protozoa.

    PubMed

    El-Taweel, Hend Aly

    2015-05-01

    Infections with intestinal protozoa continue to be a major health problem in many areas of the world. The widespread use of a limited number of therapeutic agents for their management and control raises concerns about development of drug resistance. Generally, the use of any antimicrobial agent should be accompanied by meticulous monitoring of its efficacy and measures to minimize resistance formation. Evidence for the occurrence of drug resistance in different intestinal protozoa comes from case studies and clinical trials, sometimes with a limited number of patients. Large-scale field-based assessment of drug resistance and drug sensitivity testing of clinical isolates are needed. Furthermore, the association of drug resistance with certain geographic isolates or genotypes deserves consideration. Drug resistance has been triggered in vitro and has been linked to modification of pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase, nitroreductases, antioxidant defense, or cytoskeletal system. Further mechanistic studies will have important implications in the development of second generation therapeutic agents.

  20. Management of intestinal failure in children.

    PubMed

    Dalzell, A Mark

    2015-10-01

    The management of children with intestinal failure is a rewarding but resource intensive process. There is however variability in practice and outcome for patients, despite the basic principles of care and measures of success being well defined. The importance of multidisciplinary working is paramount and there is an urgent need to obtain collaboration between paediatric surgical and medical gastroenterological colleagues and an obligation of commissioners to see that there is recognition and implementation of ideal practice as an essential element in improving the outlook for children with intestinal failure in the United Kingdom. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  1. Iron absorption by small intestine of chickens.

    PubMed

    Sáiz, M P; Martí, M T; Mitjavila, M T; Planas, J

    1993-01-01

    Iron (Fe) absorption by three segments (duodenum, jejunum, and ileum) of the small intestine of chickens was studied by a perfusion technique in vivo in closed circuit using 59Fe Cl3 and was related to the histological characteristics of each segment. The serosal transfers of Fe for the duodenum and jejunum were the same (14%/cm), but significantly different (p < 0.05) from those of the ileum (9%/cm), which may be explained by the morphological and histological properties of the gut of chickens. However, the presence of Fe in blood and in liver was significantly lower after perfusion of the jejunum and ileum than after perfusion of the duodenum. It is concluded that chickens show an early adaptation of small intestine to Fe absorption in response to the considerable loss of Fe suffered during the laying process.

  2. Temporal profile of intestinal tissue expression of intestinal fatty acid-binding protein in a rat model of necrotizing enterocolitis

    PubMed Central

    Simões, Ana Leda Bertoncini; Figueira, Rebeca Lopes; Gonçalves, Frances Lilian Lanhellas; Mitidiero, Luís Felipe Tsuyoshi; Silva, Orlando Castro e; Peiró, José Luis; Sbragia, Lourenço

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Necrotizing enterocolitis is a severe multifactorial intestinal disorder that primarily affects preterm newborns, causing 20-40% mortality and morbidity. Intestinal fatty acid-binding protein has been reported to be a biomarker for the detection of intestinal injuries. Our aim was to assess intestinal tissue injury and the molecular expression of intestinal fatty acid-binding protein over time in a necrotizing enterocolitis model. METHODS: A total of 144 Newborn rats were divided into two groups: 1) Control, which received breastfeeding (n=72) and 2) Necrotizing Enterocolitis, which received formula feeding and underwent hypoxia and hypothermia (n=72). A total of six time points of ischemia (2 times a day for 3 days; 12 pups for each time point) were examined. Samples were collected for analysis of body weight, morphological and histological characteristics, intestinal weight, intestinal weight/body weight ratio, injury grade, and intestinal fatty acid-binding protein levels. RESULTS: Body and intestinal weights were lower in the Necrotizing Enterocolitis group than in the Control group (p<0.005 and p<0.0005, respectively). The intestinal weight/body weight ratio was higher in the Necrotizing Enterocolitis group than in the Control group (p<0.005) only at the sixth ischemia time point. The Necrotizing Enterocolitis group displayed higher expression of intestinal fatty acid-binding protein (p<0.0005) and showed greater tissue damage than the Control group. CONCLUSION: Intestinal fatty acid-binding protein was an efficient marker of ischemic injury to the intestine and a good correlation was demonstrated between the time of ischemic injury and the grade of intestinal injury. PMID:27464299

  3. Prophylactic Ozone Administration Reduces Intestinal Mucosa Injury Induced by Intestinal Ischemia-Reperfusion in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Onal, Ozkan; Yetisir, Fahri; Sarer, A. Ebru Salman; Zeybek, N. Dilara; Onal, C. Oztug; Yurekli, Banu; Celik, H. Tugrul; Sirma, Ayse; Kılıc, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Intestinal ischemia-reperfusion injury is associated with mucosal damage and has a high rate of mortality. Various beneficial effects of ozone have been shown. The aim of the present study was to show the effects of ozone in ischemia reperfusion model in intestine. Material and Method. Twenty eight Wistar rats were randomized into four groups with seven rats in each group. Control group was administered serum physiologic (SF) intraperitoneally (ip) for five days. Ozone group was administered 1 mg/kg ozone ip for five days. Ischemia Reperfusion (IR) group underwent superior mesenteric artery occlusion for one hour and then reperfusion for two hours. Ozone + IR group was administered 1 mg/kg ozone ip for five days and at sixth day IR model was applied. Rats were anesthetized with ketamine∖xyzlazine and their intracardiac blood was drawn completely and they were sacrificed. Intestinal tissue samples were examined under light microscope. Levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathioneperoxidase (GSH-Px), malondyaldehide (MDA), and protein carbonyl (PCO) were analyzed in tissue samples. Total oxidant status (TOS), and total antioxidant capacity (TAC) were analyzed in blood samples. Data were evaluated statistically by Kruskal Wallis test. Results. In the ozone administered group, degree of intestinal injury was not different from the control group. IR caused an increase in intestinal injury score. The intestinal epithelium maintained its integrity and decrease in intestinal injury score was detected in Ozone + IR group. SOD, GSH-Px, and CAT values were high in ozone group and low in IR. TOS parameter was highest in the IR group and the TAC parameter was highest in the ozone group and lowest in the IR group. Conclusion. In the present study, IR model caused an increase in intestinal injury.In the present study, ozone administration had an effect improving IR associated tissue injury. In the present study, ozone therapy prevented

  4. Liver Disease Secondary to Intestinal Failure

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Wasel, Bassam

    2014-01-01

    IFALD is a common and potentially life-threatening condition for patients with SBS requiring long-term PN. There exists the potential for decreasing its incidence by optimizing the composition and the rate of infusion of parenteral solutions, by advocating a multidisciplinary approach, and by early referral for intestinal-liver transplantation to ensure long-term survival of patients with SBS. PMID:24551858

  5. Antiphospholipid syndrome associated with intestinal amoebiasis.

    PubMed

    Korkmaz, C; Harmanci, E; Metintaş, I; Gülbaş, Z

    2001-01-01

    We present a case of intestinal amoebiasis with subsequent development of antiphospholipid syndrome, manifested by deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary emboli. Anticardiolipin antibodies (aCL) of IgM type at medium titer and aCL IgG antibody at low titer were determined during the days after the onset of infection. To our knowledge this is the first case of antiphospholipid syndrome associated with amoebiasis to be presented in the literature.

  6. Biaxial mechanical modeling of the small intestine.

    PubMed

    Bellini, Chiara; Glass, Paul; Sitti, Metin; Di Martino, Elena S

    2011-11-01

    Capsule endoscopes are pill-size devices provided with a camera that capture images of the small intestine from inside the body after being ingested by a patient. The interaction between intestinal tissue and capsule endoscopes needs to be investigated to optimize capsule design while preventing tissue damage. To that purpose, a constitutive model that can reliably predict the mechanical response of the intestinal tissue under complex mechanical loading is required. This paper describes the development and numerical validation of a phenomenological constitutive model for the porcine duodenum, jejunum and ileum. Parameters characterizing the mechanical behavior of the material were estimated from planar biaxial test data, where intestinal tissue specimens were simultaneously loaded along the circumferential and longitudinal directions. Specimen-specific Fung constitutive models were able to accurately predict the planar stress-strain behavior of the tested samples under a wide range of loading conditions. To increase model generality, average anisotropic constitutive relationships were also generated for each tissue region by fitting average stress-strain curves to the Fung potential. Due to the observed variability in the direction of maximum stiffness, the average Fung models were less anisotropic than the specimen-specific models. Hence, average isotropic models in the Neo-Hookean and Mooney-Rivlin forms were attempted, but they could not adequately describe the degree of nonlinearity in the tissue. Values of the R2 for the nonlinear regressions were 0.17, 0.44 and 0.93 for the average Neo-Hookean, Mooney-Rivlin and Fung models, respectively. Average models were successfully implemented into FORTRAN routines and used to simulate capsule deployment with a finite element method analysis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. [Diagnosis and treatment of an intestinal obstruction].

    PubMed

    Hor, Thévy; Paye, François

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal obstruction, revealed by obstruction syndrome, is defined by the cessation of the bowel function whatever the cause. Bowel obstructions are one of the most frequent reasons for hospitalisation in digestive system surgery. They represent a surgical emergency. Diagnosis must enable the obstruction to be confirmed and its mechanisms and location to be specified. The treatment must always include restoring water-electrolyte balance, particularly in elderly people.

  8. INTESTINAL MALROTATION IN PATIENTS UNDERGOING BARIATRIC SURGERY

    PubMed Central

    VIDAL, Eduardo Arevalo; RENDON, Francisco Abarca; ZAMBRANO, Trino Andrade; GARCÍA, Yudoco Andrade; VITERI, Mario Ferrin; CAMPOS, Josemberg Marins; RAMOS, Manoela Galvão; RAMOS, Almino Cardoso

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Intestinal malrotation is a rare congenital anomaly. In adults is very difficult to recognize due to the lack of symptoms. Diagnosis is usually incidental during surgical procedures or at autopsy. Aim: To review the occurrence and recognition of uneventful intestinal malrotation discovered during regular cases of bariatric surgeries. Methods: Were retrospectively reviewed the medical registry of 20,000 cases undergoing bariatric surgery, from January 2002 to January 2016, looking for the occurrence of intestinal malrotation and consequences in the intraoperative technique and immediate evolution of the patients. Results: Five cases (0,025%) of intestinal malrotation were found. All of them were males, aging 45, 49, 37,52 and 39 years; BMI 35, 42, 49, 47 and 52 kg/m2, all of them with a past medical history of morbid obesity. The patient with BMI 35 kg/m2 suffered from type 2 diabetes also. All procedures were completed by laparoscopic approach, with no conversions. In one patient was not possible to move the jejunum to the upper abdomen in order to establish the gastrojejunostomy and a sleeve gastrectomy was performed. In another patient was not possible to fully recognize the anatomy due to bowel adhesions and a single anastomosis gastric bypass was preferred. No leaks or bleeding were identified. There were no perioperative complications. All patients were discharged 72 h after the procedure and no immediate 30-day complications were reported. Conclusion: Patients with malrotation can successfully undergo laparoscopic bariatric surgery. May be necessary changes in the surgical original strategy regarding the malrotation. Surgeons must check full abdominal anatomical condition prior to start the division of the stomach. PMID:27683770

  9. Improved purification of rat intestinal lactase.

    PubMed

    Nsi-Emvo, E; Launay, J F; Raul, F

    1986-02-01

    A rapid and improved method to obtain purified lactase from rat intestine is described. The purification procedure involved only two chromatographic steps. The degree of purification was far above (500 fold) the values reached with classical methods. Rabbit antisera raised to the purified lactase were characterized using conventional immunological techniques. The specificity of the lactase antibodies was confirmed by the lack of interference on maltase, aminopeptidase and alkaline phosphatase activities measured after papain extraction of the membrane proteins.

  10. Laparoscopic surgery for intestinal and urinary endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Redwine, D B; Sharpe, D R

    1995-12-01

    Intestinal and urinary tract involvement by endometriosis may be symptomatic, particularly when invasive disease is present. Even in expert hands, complete excision of all invasive disease cannot be accomplished laparoscopically in every case. The practitioner must balance enthusiasm for the advantages of a laparoscopic approach with limitations of time and skill. Laparoscopy should be abandoned in a particular case if a better job can be performed by laparotomy. Hysterectomy with castration may not relieve symptoms due to invasive disease.

  11. Effects of psychological stress on small intestinal motility and expression of cholecystokinin and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide in plasma and small intestine in mice

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Shu-Guang; Wu, Wan-Chun; Han, Zhen; Wang, Meng-Ya

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of psychological stress on small intestinal motility and expression of cholecystokinin (CCK) and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) in plasma and small intestine, and to explore the relationship between small intestinal motor disorders and gastrointestinal hormones under psychological stress. METHODS: Thirty-six mice were randomly divided into psychological stress group and control group. A mouse model with psychological stress was established by housing the mice with a hungry cat in separate layers of a two-layer cage. A semi-solid colored marker (carbon-ink) was used for monitoring small intestinal transit. CCK and VIP levels in plasma and small intestine in mice were measured by radioimmunoassay (RIA). RESULTS: Small intestinal transit was inhibited (52.18±19.15% vs 70.19±17.79%, P<0.01) in mice after psychological stress, compared to the controls. Small intestinal CCK levels in psychological stress mice were significantly lower than those in the control group (0.75±0.53 μg/g vs 1.98±1.17 μg/g, P<0.01), whereas plasma CCK concentrations were not different between the groups. VIP levels in small intestine were significantly higher in psychological stress mice than those in the control group (8.45±1.09 μg/g vs 7.03±2.36 μg/g, P<0.01), while there was no significant difference in plasma VIP levels between the two groups. CONCLUSION: Psychological stress inhibits the small intestinal transit, probably by down-regulating CCK and up-regulating VIP expression in small intestine. PMID:15655834

  12. A method for assaying intestinal brush-border sucrase in an intact intestinal preparation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eric A.; Weiss, Stacey L.; Lam, Mandy; Torres, Rosa; Diamond, Jared

    1998-01-01

    Small intestinal brush-border hydrolases usually are assayed in intestinal mucosal homogenates resuspended in solutions of unphysiological ionic composition. Thus, extrapolation of measured Vmax values (maximal reaction rates at high substrate concentrations) to in vivo conditions, hence comparison with physiological substrate loads, is uncertain. We therefore have developed a sucrase assay in an intact preparation of mouse small intestine, an everted intestinal sleeve incubated in a physiological Ringer’s solution. As in homogenate studies, sucrase is assayed by glucose production measured colorimetrically, but uptake of liberated glucose into the intestinal sleeve is prevented by the transport inhibitor phlorizin. The coefficient of variation of Vmax is 16% for sleeves from the same mouse and 8% for mean values from different mice. Sleeve sucrase activity is abolished by the inhibitor castanospermine. Activity in sleeves and homogenates proves to be the same when measured under identical solution conditions, but variations in assay conditions cause large activity changes from values measured in physiological solutions. PMID:9482847

  13. Intestinal absorptive capacity, intestinal permeability and jejunal histology in HIV and their relation to diarrhoea.

    PubMed Central

    Keating, J; Bjarnason, I; Somasundaram, S; Macpherson, A; Francis, N; Price, A B; Sharpstone, D; Smithson, J; Menzies, I S; Gazzard, B G

    1995-01-01

    Intestinal function is poorly defined in patients with HIV infection. Absorptive capacity and intestinal permeability were assessed using 3-O-methyl-D-glucose, D-xylose, L-rhamnose, and lactulose in 88 HIV infected patients and the findings were correlated with the degree of immunosuppression (CD4 counts), diarrhoea, wasting, intestinal pathogen status, and histomorphometric analysis of jejunal biopsy samples. Malabsorption of 3-O-methyl-D-glucose and D-xylose was prevalent in all groups of patients with AIDS but not in asymptomatic, well patients with HIV. Malabsorption correlated significantly (r = 0.34-0.56, p < 0.005) with the degree of immune suppression and with body mass index. Increased intestinal permeability was found in all subgroups of patients. The changes in absorption-permeability were of comparable severity to those found in patients with untreated coeliac disease. Jejunal histology, however, showed only mild changes in the villus height/crypt depth ratio as compared with subtotal villus atrophy in coeliac disease. Malabsorption and increased intestinal permeability are common in AIDS patients. Malabsorption, which has nutritional implications, relates more to immune suppression than jejunal morphological changes. PMID:8549936

  14. Distribution of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide and substance P receptors in human colon and small intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Korman, L.Y.; Sayadi, H.; Bass, B.; Moody, T.W.; Harmon, J.W.

    1989-07-01

    Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) and substance P are found in neurons in the lamina propria and submucosa and muscularis propria of human small intestine and colon. VIP receptors coupled to adenylate cyclase are present on epithelial, smooth muscle, and mononuclear cells. This study analyzes the distribution of (/sup 125/I)VIP binding and (/sup 125/I)substance P in human colon and small intestine using autoradiographic techniques. (/sup 125/I)VIP binding was present in high density in the mucosal layer of colon and small intestine. (/sup 125/I)VIP binding was not significantly greater than nonspecific binding in smooth muscle layers or the lymphoid follicles. In contrast, (/sup 125/I)substance P binding was present in high density over the colonic muscle but was not present over the mucosal layer. In human colon cancer, (/sup 125/I)VIP grain density over the malignant tissue was only slightly higher than background. These autoradiographic studies of (/sup 125/I)VIP binding indicate that the highest density of VIP receptors was found in the small intestine and superficial colonic mucosa, whereas the density of substance P receptors was highest over the smooth muscle layers. These findings suggest a mismatch between immunochemical content of the peptide and autoradiographic density of the receptor.

  15. ER stress transcription factor Xbp1 suppresses intestinal tumorigenesis and directs intestinal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Niederreiter, Lukas; Fritz, Teresa M.J.; Adolph, Timon E.; Krismer, Anna-Maria; Offner, Felix A.; Tschurtschenthaler, Markus; Flak, Magdalena B.; Hosomi, Shuhei; Tomczak, Michal F.; Kaneider, Nicole C.; Sarcevic, Edina; Kempster, Sarah L.; Raine, Tim; Esser, Daniela; Rosenstiel, Philip; Kohno, Kenji; Iwawaki, Takao; Tilg, Herbert

    2013-01-01

    Unresolved endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in the epithelium can provoke intestinal inflammation. Hypomorphic variants of ER stress response mediators, such as X-box–binding protein 1 (XBP1), confer genetic risk for inflammatory bowel disease. We report here that hypomorphic Xbp1 function instructs a multilayered regenerative response in the intestinal epithelium. This is characterized by intestinal stem cell (ISC) expansion as shown by an inositol-requiring enzyme 1α (Ire1α)–mediated increase in Lgr5+ and Olfm4+ ISCs and a Stat3-dependent increase in the proliferative output of transit-amplifying cells. These consequences of hypomorphic Xbp1 function are associated with an increased propensity to develop colitis-associated and spontaneous adenomatous polyposis coli (APC)–related tumors of the intestinal epithelium, which in the latter case is shown to be dependent on Ire1α. This study reveals an unexpected role for Xbp1 in suppressing tumor formation through restraint of a pathway that involves an Ire1α- and Stat3-mediated regenerative response of the epithelium as a consequence of ER stress. As such, Xbp1 in the intestinal epithelium not only regulates local inflammation but at the same time also determines the propensity of the epithelium to develop tumors. PMID:24043762

  16. Intestinal protozoan parasitic infection among school children.

    PubMed

    Mukhiya, R K; Rai, S K; Karki, A B; Prajapati, A

    2012-09-01

    Intestinal protozoan parasitosis is highly prevalent among general population, majority of them are children. The objective of the study is to find out the prevalence of intestinal protozoan infection in school children of Sindhuli. Stool samples were collected from school children of Sindhuli in June 2011 and investigated in National Institute of Tropical Medicine and Public Health Research, Laboratory by using formal-ether concentration method. Statistical significance was analyzed by using Chi-Square test. A total of 342 stool samples were collected and 68 (19.8%) protozoan parasites were identified. The prevalence rate of protozoa in boys and girls were 16.9% and 22.0% respectively. Altogether 5 species of protozoan parasites were detected. Of them Entamoeba coli was most common followed by Giardia lamblia, Entamoeba histolytica, Blastocystis hominis and Endolimax nana. Positive rate was highest in Dalit (20.3%), and least in Indo-Aryan (19.6%). There is a low prevalence of intestinal protozoan parasitosis among children even though this study emphasizes the need for improved environmental hygiene i.e. clean water supplies and enhanced sanitation.

  17. Clinical studies of intestinal folate conjugases.

    PubMed

    Halsted, C H; Beer, W H; Chandler, C J; Ross, K; Wolfe, B M; Bailey, L; Cerda, J J

    1986-03-01

    Clinical differences between the two human intestinal mucosal folate conjugases were assessed by measurement of their activities in normal individuals and in patients with chronic diarrhea of differing causes. Intracellular folate conjugase (ICFC) was 15-fold more active than brush border folate conjugase (BBFC) in jejunal mucosa from seven obese patients undergoing elective gastric bypass surgery. The activity of ICFC was similar among normal volunteers and patients with diarrhea of unknown origin (DUO), gluten-sensitive enteropathy (GSE), inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and the short bowel syndrome (IBD-SBS). By contrast, BBFC, sucrase, and lactase were decreased significantly in GSE, and BBFC was increased in IBD-SBS. The activity of BBFC correlated with lactase and with sucrase in the normal subjects and in patients with DUO, whereas no correlations were found with the activity of ICFC in any group. Our clinical studies confirm that ICFC and BBFC are different enzymes. ICFC is not affected by intestinal disease, whereas the activity of jejunal BBFC, like that of other brush border enzymes, is decreased by mucosal injury and is also capable of adapting to distal small intestinal disease or surgical resection.

  18. Prostaglandin synthesis inhibition and postprandial intestinal hyperemia.

    PubMed

    Gallavan, R H; Chou, C C

    1982-02-01

    The effect of prostaglandin synthesis inhibition on the postprandial intestinal hyperemia was examined in the jejunum of anesthetized dogs. Both intravenous and intra-arterial infusion of the cyclooxygenase inhibitors indomethacin and mefenamic acid reduced resting jejunal blood flow and markedly enhanced the food-induced jejunal hyperemia. The jejunal vascular response to food did not change after either intravenous or intra-arterial infusion of the carrier solutions or intra-arterial infusion of angiotensin II. The enhancement of the jejunal hyperemia was associated with an increase in the food-induced increase in jejunal oxygen consumption. Infusion of the cyclooxygenase inhibitors increased the mean amplitude of the monophasic intestinal contractions; however, this did not appear to play a role in the enhancement of the food-induced hyperemia. The study indicates that inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis has a marked effect on the postprandial intestinal hyperemia and that this may be due to its enhancement of the jejunal metabolic response to food. The prostaglandins involved and their mechanism of action are unknown.

  19. Streaming potentials in the rat small intestine

    PubMed Central

    Smyth, D. H.; Wright, E. M.

    1966-01-01

    1. The effect of adverse osmotic pressure gradients on fluid transfer and electrical potential across the wall of sacs of rat everted small intestine was investigated. 2. Addition of mannitol to the mucosal fluid produced a potential change of 0·062 mV/m-osM and a decrease in fluid transfer of 0·015 ml./m-osM/hr. This is consistent with the production of streaming potentials due to fluid movement through negatively charged pores in the intestine. 3. The solute-linked fluid movement does not pass through these negatively charged pores which are responsible for the streaming potentials. 4. From the magnitude and polarity of the streaming potential a value of —50 mV has been calculated for the zeta potential at the phase boundary in the pores. 5. Streaming potentials have been used to measure the equivalent pore radius, and a value of 4Å has been obtained. 6. It is concluded that electro-osmosis is not responsible for fluid transfer by the intestine, and the potential difference associated with hexose transfer is not electrokinetic in origin. PMID:5943002

  20. Morpho-elasticity of intestinal villi

    PubMed Central

    Balbi, V.; Ciarletta, P.

    2013-01-01

    Villi are ubiquitous structures in the intestine of all vertebrates, originating from the embryonic development of the epithelial mucosa. Their morphogenesis has similar stages in living organisms but different forming mechanisms. In this work, we model the emergence of the bi-dimensional undulated patterns in the intestinal mucosa from which villi start to elongate. The embryonic mucosa is modelled as a growing thick-walled cylinder, and its mechanical behaviour is described using an hyperelastic constitutive model, which also accounts for the anisotropic characteristics of the reinforcing fibres at the microstructural level. The occurrence of surface undulations is investigated using a linear stability analysis based on the theory of incremental deformations superimposed on a finite deformation. The Stroh formulation of the incremental boundary value problem is derived, and a numerical solution procedure is implemented for calculating the growth thresholds of instability. The numerical results are finally discussed with respect to different growth and materials properties. In conclusion, we demonstrate that the emergence of intestinal villi in embryos is triggered by a differential growth between the mucosa and the mesenchymal tissues. The proposed model quantifies how both the geometrical and the mechanical properties of the mucosa drive the formation of previllous structures in embryos. PMID:23486174

  1. Unbalance of intestinal microbiota in atopic children.

    PubMed

    Candela, Marco; Rampelli, Simone; Turroni, Silvia; Severgnini, Marco; Consolandi, Clarissa; De Bellis, Gianluca; Masetti, Riccardo; Ricci, Giampaolo; Pession, Andrea; Brigidi, Patrizia

    2012-06-06

    Playing a strategic role in the host immune function, the intestinal microbiota has been recently hypothesized to be involved in the etiology of atopy. In order to investigate the gastrointestinal microbial ecology of atopic disease, here we performed a pilot comparative molecular analysis of the faecal microbiota in atopic children and healthy controls. Nineteen atopic children and 12 healthy controls aged 4-14 years were enrolled. Stools were collected and the faecal microbiota was characterized by means of the already developed phylogenetic microarray platform, HTF-Microbi.Array, and quantitative PCR. The intestinal microbiota of atopic children showed a significant depletion in members of the Clostridium cluster IV, Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, Akkermansia muciniphila and a corresponding increase of the relative abundance of Enterobacteriaceae. Depleted in key immunomodulatory symbionts, the atopy-associated microbiota can represent an inflammogenic microbial consortium which can contribute to the severity of the disease. Our data open the way to the therapeutic manipulation of the intestinal microbiota in the treatment of atopy by means of pharmaceutical probiotics.

  2. Unbalance of intestinal microbiota in atopic children

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Playing a strategic role in the host immune function, the intestinal microbiota has been recently hypothesized to be involved in the etiology of atopy. In order to investigate the gastrointestinal microbial ecology of atopic disease, here we performed a pilot comparative molecular analysis of the faecal microbiota in atopic children and healthy controls. Results Nineteen atopic children and 12 healthy controls aged 4–14 years were enrolled. Stools were collected and the faecal microbiota was characterized by means of the already developed phylogenetic microarray platform, HTF-Microbi.Array, and quantitative PCR. The intestinal microbiota of atopic children showed a significant depletion in members of the Clostridium cluster IV, Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, Akkermansia muciniphila and a corresponding increase of the relative abundance of Enterobacteriaceae. Conclusion Depleted in key immunomodulatory symbionts, the atopy-associated microbiota can represent an inflammogenic microbial consortium which can contribute to the severity of the disease. Our data open the way to the therapeutic manipulation of the intestinal microbiota in the treatment of atopy by means of pharmaceutical probiotics. PMID:22672413

  3. Microvascular architecture of anthropoid primate intestine.

    PubMed

    Swan, K G; Spees, E K; Reynolds, D G; Kerr, J C; Zinner, M J

    1978-01-01

    Microvascular architecture of the small intestine of New World monkey, ape, and man was examined with the silicone rubber injection technique and the results compared to previous observations in dogs and Old World monkeys. In man, chimpanzee, and New World monkey the small intestine villus contains a single centrally located vein draining a subepithelial capillary plexus converging at the apex of the villus. These villi also contain a single eccentrically located artery rising to the midlevel of the villus, where it branches into subepithelial capillaries over the rest of its length. This vascular architecture most closely resembles that observed in the gut of Old World monkeys in which the villus artery is absent altogether. This observation contrasts the microvascular architecture of canine intestinal villi in which marginal arteries surround a centrally located vein. These patterns of microvascular anatomy are analyzed in terms of the role of the gut in the pathogenesis of experimental shock. The differences observed may account for the known species variations in canine and primate experimental shock.

  4. Bioactivation of Phytoestrogens: Intestinal Bacteria and Health.

    PubMed

    Landete, J M; Arqués, J; Medina, M; Gaya, P; de Las Rivas, B; Muñoz, R

    2016-08-17

    Phytoestrogens are polyphenols similar to human estrogens found in plants or derived from plant precursors. Phytoestrogens are found in high concentration in soya, flaxseed and other seeds, fruits, vegetables, cereals, tea, chocolate, etc. They comprise several classes of chemical compounds (stilbenes, coumestans, isoflavones, ellagitannins, and lignans) which are structurally similar to endogenous estrogens but which can have both estrogenic and antiestrogenic effects. Although epidemiological and experimental evidence indicates that intake of phytoestrogens in foods may be protective against certain chronic diseases, discrepancies have been observed between in vivo and in vitro experiments. The microbial transformations have not been reported so far in stilbenes and coumestans. However, isoflavones, ellagitanins, and lignans are metabolized by intestinal bacteria to produce equol, urolithins, and enterolignans, respectively. Equol, urolithin, and enterolignans are more bioavailable, and have more estrogenic/antiestrogenic and antioxidant activity than their precursors. Moreover, equol, urolithins and enterolignans have anti-inflammatory effects and induce antiproliferative and apoptosis-inducing activities. The transformation of isoflavones, ellagitanins, and lignans by intestinal microbiota is essential to be protective against certain chronic diseases, as cancer, cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, and menopausal symptoms. Bioavailability, bioactivity, and health effects of dietary phytoestrogens are strongly determined by the intestinal bacteria of each individual.

  5. Cellular and molecular mechanisms of intestinal fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Speca, Silvia; Giusti, Ilaria; Rieder, Florian; Latella, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    Fibrosis is a chronic and progressive process characterized by an excessive accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) leading to stiffening and/or scarring of the involved tissue. Intestinal fibrosis may develop in several different enteropathies, including inflammatory bowel disease. It develops through complex cell, extracellular matrix, cytokine and growth factor interactions. Distinct cell types are involved in intestinal fibrosis, such as resident mesenchymal cells (fibroblasts, myofibroblasts and smooth muscle cells) but also ECM-producing cells derived from epithelial and endothelial cells (through a process termed epithelial- and endothelial-mesenchymal transition), stellate cells, pericytes, local or bone marrow-derived stem cells. The most important soluble factors that regulate the activation of these cells include cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, components of the renin-angiotensin system, angiogenic factors, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors, mammalian target of rapamycin, and products of oxidative stress. It soon becomes clear that although inflammation is responsible for triggering the onset of the fibrotic process, it only plays a minor role in the progression of this condition, as fibrosis may advance in a self-perpetuating fashion. Definition of the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in intestinal fibrosis may provide the key to developing new therapeutic approaches. PMID:22851857

  6. Symptomatic intestinal amoebiasis and climatic parameters.

    PubMed

    Erdem, Hakan; Kiliç, Selim; Cinar, Esref; Pahsa, Alaaddin

    2003-01-01

    Symptomatic intestinal amoebiasis is an important problem, especially in the developing world. The relationships between climatic parameters and amoebic dysentery cases were evaluated in this study. Climatic data were obtained from the local meteorological department and the diagnosis of amoebic dysentery was established by clinical and laboratory investigation. Monthly mean temperature (r = 0.755, p = 0.005), monthly mean maximum temperature (r = 0.711, p = 0.01), monthly mean temperature at 100 cm underground (r = 0.818, p = 0.001) and monthly mean humidity values (r = -0.656, p = 0.02) correlated significantly with symptomatic disease. Although inverse relationships were found for humidity and atmospheric pressure, the monthly mean atmospheric pressure (r = -0.084) did not seem to have a significant effect on intestinal amoebiasis (p = 0.80). Thus, when the weather warmed up, the frequency of symptomatic intestinal amoebiasis increased significantly. To improve the ability to predict disease trends, it seems logical to assess the independent and interactive effects of climatic parameters on disease impact.

  7. Cellular and Molecular Mediators of Intestinal Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Lawrance, Ian C; Rogler, Gerhard; Bamias, Giorgos; Breynaert, Christine; Florholmen, Jon; Pellino, Gianluca; Reif, Shimon; Speca, Silvia; Latella, Giovanni

    2015-11-02

    Intestinal fibrosis is a major complication of the inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) and although inflammation is necessary for its development, it would appear that it plays a minor role in its progression as anti-inflammatory treatments in IBD do not prevent fibrosis once it has started. The processes that regulate fibrosis would thus appear to be distinct from those regulating inflammation and, therefore, a detailed understanding of these pathways is vital to the development of anti-fibrogenic strategies. There have been several recent reviews exploring what is known, and what remains unknown, about the development of intestinal fibrosis. This review is designed to add to this literature but with a focus on the cellular components that are involved in the development of fibrogenesis and the major molecular mediators that impact on these cells. The aim is to heighten the understanding of the factors involved in intestinal fibrogenesis so that detailed research can be encouraged in order to advance the processes that could lead to effective treatments.

  8. The Intestinal Microbiota in Metabolic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Woting, Anni; Blaut, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Gut bacteria exert beneficial and harmful effects in metabolic diseases as deduced from the comparison of germfree and conventional mice and from fecal transplantation studies. Compositional microbial changes in diseased subjects have been linked to adiposity, type 2 diabetes and dyslipidemia. Promotion of an increased expression of intestinal nutrient transporters or a modified lipid and bile acid metabolism by the intestinal microbiota could result in an increased nutrient absorption by the host. The degradation of dietary fiber and the subsequent fermentation of monosaccharides to short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) is one of the most controversially discussed mechanisms of how gut bacteria impact host physiology. Fibers reduce the energy density of the diet, and the resulting SCFA promote intestinal gluconeogenesis, incretin formation and subsequently satiety. However, SCFA also deliver energy to the host and support liponeogenesis. Thus far, there is little knowledge on bacterial species that promote or prevent metabolic disease. Clostridium ramosum and Enterococcus cloacae were demonstrated to promote obesity in gnotobiotic mouse models, whereas bifidobacteria and Akkermansia muciniphila were associated with favorable phenotypes in conventional mice, especially when oligofructose was fed. How diet modulates the gut microbiota towards a beneficial or harmful composition needs further research. Gnotobiotic animals are a valuable tool to elucidate mechanisms underlying diet–host–microbe interactions. PMID:27058556

  9. Mucosal macrophages in intestinal homeostasis and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Mowat, Allan McI; Bain, Calum C

    2011-01-01

    Intestinal macrophages are essential for local homeostasis and in keeping a balance between commensal microbiota and the host. However, they also play essential roles in inflammation and protective immunity, when they change from peaceful regulators to powerful aggressors. As a result, activated macrophages are important targets for treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases such as Crohn's disease. Until recently, the complexity and heterogeneity of intestinal macrophages have been underestimated and here we review current evidence that there are distinct populations of resident and inflammatory macrophages in the intestine. We describe the mechanisms that ensure macrophages remain partially inert in the healthy gut and cannot promote inflammation despite constant exposure to bacteria and other stimuli. This may be because the local environment 'conditions' macrophage precursors to become unresponsive after they arrive in the gut. Nevertheless, this permits some active, physiological functions to persist. A new population of pro-inflammatory macrophages appears in inflammation and we review the evidence that this involves recruitment of a distinct population of fully responsive monocytes, rather than alterations in the existing cells. A constant balance between these resident and inflammatory macrophages is critical for maintaining the status quo in healthy gut and ensuring protective immunity when required. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Intestinal digestive resistance of immunodominant gliadin peptides.

    PubMed

    Hausch, Felix; Shan, Lu; Santiago, Nilda A; Gray, Gary M; Khosla, Chaitan

    2002-10-01

    Two recently identified immunodominant epitopes from alpha-gliadin account for most of the stimulatory activity of dietary gluten on intestinal and peripheral T lymphocytes in patients with celiac sprue. The proteolytic kinetics of peptides containing these epitopes were analyzed in vitro using soluble proteases from bovine and porcine pancreas and brush-border membrane vesicles from adult rat intestine. We showed that these proline-glutamine-rich epitopes are exceptionally resistant to enzymatic processing. Moreover, as estimated from the residual peptide structure and confirmed by exogenous peptidase supplementation, dipeptidyl peptidase IV and dipeptidyl carboxypeptidase I were identified as the rate-limiting enzymes in the digestive breakdown of these peptides. A similar conclusion also emerged from analogous studies with brush-border membrane from a human intestinal biopsy. Supplementation of rat brush-border membrane with trace quantities of a bacterial prolyl endopeptidase led to the rapid destruction of the immunodominant epitopes in these peptides. These results suggest a possible enzyme therapy strategy for celiac sprue, for which the only current therapeutic option is strict exclusion of gluten-containing food.

  11. Food-borne intestinal trematodiases in humans.

    PubMed

    Fried, Bernard; Graczyk, Thaddeus K; Tamang, Leena

    2004-06-01

    Food-borne trematodiases still remain a public health problem world-wide, despite changes in eating habits, alterations in social and agricultural practices, health education, industrialization, environmental alteration, and broad-spectrum anthelmintics. Food-borne trematodiases usually occur focally, are still persistently endemic in some parts of the world, and are most prevalent in remote rural places among school-age children, low-wage earners, and women of child-bearing age. Intestinal fluke diseases are aggravated by socio-economic factors such as poverty, malnutrition, an explosively growing free-food market, a lack of sufficient food inspection and sanitation, other helminthiases, and declining economic conditions. Control programs implemented for food-borne zoonoses and sustained in endemic areas are not fully successful for intestinal food-borne trematodiases because of centuries-old traditions of eating raw or insufficiently cooked food, widespread zoonotic reservoirs, promiscuous defecation, and the use of "night soil" (human excrement collected from latrines) as fertilizer. This review examines food-borne intestinal trematodiases associated with species in families of the Digenea: Brachylaimidae, Diplostomidae, Echinostomatidae, Fasciolidae, Gastrodiscidae, Gymnophallidae, Heterophyidae, Lecithodendriidae, Microphallidae, Nanophyetidae, Paramphistomatidae, Plagiorchiidae, and Strigeidae. Because most of the implicated species are in the Echinostomatidae and Heterophyidae, emphasis in the review is placed on species in these families.

  12. Foodborne Intestinal Flukes in Southeast Asia

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Eun-Hee; Lee, Soon-Hyung; Rim, Han-Jong

    2009-01-01

    In Southeast Asia, a total of 59 species of foodborne intestinal flukes have been known to occur in humans. The largest group is the family Heterophyidae, which constitutes 22 species belonging to 9 genera (Centrocestus, Haplorchis, Heterophyes, Heterophyopsis, Metagonimus, Procerovum, Pygidiopsis, Stellantchasmus, and Stictodora). The next is the family Echinostomatidae, which includes 20 species in 8 genera (Artyfechinostomum, Acanthoparyphium, Echinochasmus, Echinoparyphium, Echinostoma, Episthmium, Euparyphium, and Hypoderaeum). The family Plagiorchiidae follows the next containing 5 species in 1 genus (Plagiorchis). The family Lecithodendriidae includes 3 species in 2 genera (Phaneropsolus and Prosthodendrium). In 9 other families, 1 species in 1 genus each is involved; Cathaemaciidae (Cathaemacia), Fasciolidae (Fasciolopsis), Gastrodiscidae (Gastrodiscoides), Gymnophallidae (Gymnophalloides), Microphallidae (Spelotrema), Neodiplostomidae (Neodiplostomum), Paramphistomatidae (Fischoederius), Psilostomidae (Psilorchis), and Strigeidae (Cotylurus). Various types of foods are sources of human infections. They include freshwater fish, brackish water fish, fresh water snails, brackish water snails (including the oyster), amphibians, terrestrial snakes, aquatic insects, and aquatic plants. The reservoir hosts include various species of mammals or birds.The host-parasite relationships have been studied in Metagonimus yokogawai, Echinostoma hortense, Fasciolopsis buski, Neodiplostomum seoulense, and Gymnophalloides seoi; however, the pathogenicity of each parasite species and host mucosal defense mechanisms are yet poorly understood. Clinical aspects of each parasite infection need more clarification. Differential diagnosis by fecal examination is difficult because of morphological similarity of eggs. Praziquantel is effective for most intestinal fluke infections. Continued efforts to understand epidemiological significance of intestinal fluke infections, with

  13. Three-dimensional Printing in the Intestine.

    PubMed

    Wengerter, Brian C; Emre, Gulus; Park, Jea Young; Geibel, John

    2016-08-01

    Intestinal transplantation remains a life-saving option for patients with severe intestinal failure. With the advent of advanced tissue engineering techniques, great strides have been made toward manufacturing replacement tissues and organs, including the intestine, which aim to avoid transplant-related complications. The current paradigm is to seed a biocompatible support material (scaffold) with a desired cell population to generate viable replacement tissue. Although this technique has now been extended by the three-dimensional (3D) printing of geometrically complex scaffolds, the overall approach is hindered by relatively slow turnover and negative effects of residual scaffold material, which affects final clinical outcome. Methods recently developed for scaffold-free 3D bioprinting may overcome such obstacles and should allow for rapid manufacture and deployment of "bioprinted organs." Much work remains before 3D bioprinted tissues can enter clinical use. In this brief review we examine the present state and future perspectives of this nascent technology before full clinical implementation. Copyright © 2016 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Intestinal metaplasia in gallbladders: prevalence study.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, José Eduardo Vasconcelos; Franco, Maria Isete Fares; Suzuki, Reinaldo Kenji; Tavares, Nelson Mattos; Bromberg, Sansom Henrique

    2008-07-01

    Gallbladder cancer is usually diagnosed at a late stage and generally results in death. Discovery of predisposing factors for this neoplasia could prevent this outcome. In this study, we assess the presence of one of these factors: intestinal metaplasia in gallbladders with stones and inflammatory processes. Cross-sectional study in Hospital do Servidor Público Estadual de São Paulo. The first 80 gallbladders from patients who underwent elective cholecystectomy between April and August 2002, presenting stones and chronic inflammation, were studied. The patients were divided into groups according to their age: CC1, from 15 to 40 years; CC2, from 41 to 60 years; and CC3, from 61 to 85 years. Twenty-one patients (26%) were male, while 59 (74%) were female. In the group CC1, intestinal metaplasia was present in 85.71% of the 21 patients studied; in CC2, in 79.41% of 34 patients; and in CC3, in 56.00% of 25 patients. These differences presented statistical significance (p = 0.04542). Intestinal metaplasia is extremely frequent in gallbladders with inflammation and lithiasis, especially in younger patients.

  15. Interleukin-25 Induces Resistance Against Intestinal Trematodes

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Antoli, Carla; Cortés, Alba; Santano, Rebeca; Sotillo, Javier; Esteban, J. Guillermo; Toledo, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Echinostoma caproni is an intestinal trematode that has been extensively used as an experimental model to investigate the factors determining the resistance to intestinal helminths or the development of chronic infections. ICR mice are permissive hosts for E. caproni in which chronic infections are developed, concomitantly with local Th1 responses, elevated levels of local IFN-γ, inflammation and antibody responses. However, mice develop partial resistance to homologous challenge infections after cure of a primary infection, which converts this subject into an adequate model for the study of the mechanisms generating resistance against intestinal helminths. The purpose of the present study was to compare the immune response induced in primary and secondary infections to elucidate the factors determining the different outcome of the infection in each type of infection. The results obtained indicate that susceptibility is determined by the lack of IL-25 expression in response to primary infection. In contrast, infection in an environment with elevated levels of IL-25, as occurs in challenge infection, results in a Th2 phenotype impairing parasite survival. This was confirmed by treatment of naïve mice with exogenous IL-25 and subsequent infection. Changes induced in goblet cell populations and mucin glycosylation could be implicated in resistance to infection. PMID:27658962

  16. Biotin absorption by distal rat intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, B.B.; Rosenberg, I.H.

    1987-12-01

    We used the in vivo intestinal loop approach, with short (10-min) and long (3-h) incubations, to examine biotin absorption in proximal jejunum, distal ileum, cecum and proximal colon. In short-term studies, luminal biotin disappearance from rat ileum was about half that observed in the jejunum, whereas absorption by proximal colon was about 12% of that in the jejunum. In 3-h closed-loop studies, the absorption of 1.0 microM biotin varied regionally. Biotin absorption was nearly complete in the small intestine after 3 h; however, only about 15% of the dose had been absorbed in the cecum and 27% in the proximal colon after 3 h. Independent of site of administration, the major fraction of absorbed biotin was recovered in the liver; measurable amounts of radioactive biotin were also present in kidney and plasma. The results support the potential nutritional significance for the rat of biotin synthesized by bacteria in the distal intestine, by demonstrating directly an absorptive capability of mammalian large bowel for this vitamin.

  17. Genetic analysis of Vibrio parahaemolyticus intestinal colonization

    PubMed Central

    Hubbard, Troy P.; Chao, Michael C.; Abel, Sören; Blondel, Carlos J.; Abel zur Wiesch, Pia; Zhou, Xiaohui; Davis, Brigid M.; Waldor, Matthew K.

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is the most common cause of seafood-borne gastroenteritis worldwide and a blight on global aquaculture. This organism requires a horizontally acquired type III secretion system (T3SS2) to infect the small intestine, but knowledge of additional factors that underlie V. parahaemolyticus pathogenicity is limited. We used transposon-insertion sequencing to screen for genes that contribute to viability of V. parahaemolyticus in vitro and in the mammalian intestine. Our analysis enumerated and controlled for the host infection bottleneck, enabling robust assessment of genetic contributions to in vivo fitness. We identified genes that contribute to V. parahaemolyticus colonization of the intestine independent of known virulence mechanisms in addition to uncharacterized components of T3SS2. Our study revealed that toxR, an ancestral locus in Vibrio species, is required for V. parahaemolyticus fitness in vivo and for induction of T3SS2 gene expression. The regulatory mechanism by which V. parahaemolyticus ToxR activates expression of T3SS2 resembles Vibrio cholerae ToxR regulation of distinct virulence elements acquired via lateral gene transfer. Thus, disparate horizontally acquired virulence systems have been placed under the control of this ancestral transcription factor across independently evolved human pathogens. PMID:27185914

  18. Sulfur Cycling and the Intestinal Microbiome.

    PubMed

    Barton, Larry L; Ritz, Nathaniel L; Fauque, Guy D; Lin, Henry C

    2017-08-01

    In this review, we focus on the activities transpiring in the anaerobic segment of the sulfur cycle occurring in the gut environment where hydrogen sulfide is produced. While sulfate-reducing bacteria are considered as the principal agents for hydrogen sulfide production, the enzymatic desulfhydration of cysteine by heterotrophic bacteria also contributes to production of hydrogen sulfide. For sulfate-reducing bacteria respiration, molecular hydrogen and lactate are suitable as electron donors while sulfate functions as the terminal electron acceptor. Dietary components provide fiber and macromolecules that are degraded by bacterial enzymes to monomers, and these are fermented by intestinal bacteria with the production to molecular hydrogen which promotes the metabolic dominance by sulfate-reducing bacteria. Sulfate is also required by the sulfate-reducing bacteria, and this can be supplied by sulfate- and sulfonate-containing compounds that are hydrolyzed by intestinal bacterial with the release of sulfate. While hydrogen sulfide in the intestinal biosystem may be beneficial to bacteria by increasing resistance to antibiotics, and protecting them from reactive oxygen species, hydrogen sulfide at elevated concentrations may become toxic to the host.

  19. Irreversible electroporation on the small intestine

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, M A; Narayan, R; Padath, T; Rubinsky, B

    2012-01-01

    Background: Non-thermal irreversible electroporation (NTIRE) has recently been conceived as a new minimally invasive ablation method, using microsecond electric fields to produce nanoscale defects in the cell membrane bilayer and induce cell death while keeping all other molecules, including the extracellular matrix, intact. Here, we present the first in vivo study that examines the effects of NTIRE on the small intestine, an organ whose collateral damage is of particular concern in the anticipated use of NTIRE for treatment of abdominal cancers. Methods: A typical NTIRE electrical protocol was applied directly to the rat small intestine and histological analysis was used to examine the effect of NTIRE over time. Results: The application of NTIRE led to complete cell ablation in the targeted tissue, but the animal did not show any physiological effects of the procedure and the intestine showed signs of recovery, developing an epithelial layer 3 days post treatment and regenerating its distinct layers within a week. Conclusion: Our results indicate that this novel procedure can be used for abdominal cancer treatment while minimising collateral damage to adjacent tissues because of the unique ability of the NTIRE ablation method to target the cell membrane. PMID:22223084

  20. Increased prevalence of intestinal inflammation in patients with liver cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Saitoh, Osamu; Sugi, Kazunori; Kojima, Keishi; Matsumoto, Hisashi; Nakagawa, Ken; Kayazawa, Masanobu; Tanaka, Seigou; Teranishi, Tsutomu; Hirata, Ichiro; Katsu, Ken-ichi

    1999-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the pathophysiology of the digestive tract in patients with liver cirrhosis. METHODS: In 42 cirrhotic patients and 20 control subjects, the following fecal proteins were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay: albumin (Alb), transferrin (Tf), and α1-antitrypsin (α1-AT) as a marker for intestinal protein loss, hemoglobin (Hb) for bleeding, PMN-elastase for intestinal inflammation, and secretory IgA for intestinal immunity. RESULTS: The fecal concentrations of Hb, Alb, Tf, α1-AT, an d PMN-elastase were increased in 13 (31%), 8 (19%), 10 (24%), 6 (14%), and 11 (26%) cases among 42 patients, respectively. Fecal concentration of secretory IgA was decreased in 7 (17%) of 42 patients. However, these fecal concentrations were not related to the severity or etiology of liver cirrhosis. The serum Alb level was significantly decreased in patients with intestinal protein loss compared to that in patients without intestinal protein loss. CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that: ① besides the well-known pathological conditions, such as bleeding and protein loss, intestinal inflammation and decreased intestinal immunity are found in cirrhotic patients; ② intestinal protein loss contributes to hypoalbuminemia in cirrhotic patients, and ③ intestinal inflammation should not be over looked in cirrhotic patients, since it may contribute to or cause intestinal protein loss and other various path ological conditions. PMID:11819475

  1. OPTN/SRTR 2012 Annual Data Report: intestine.

    PubMed

    Smith, J M; Skeans, M A; Horslen, S P; Edwards, E B; Harper, A M; Snyderf, J J; Israni, A K; Kasiske, B L

    2014-01-01

    Advances in the medical and surgical treatments of intestinal failure have led to a decrease in the number of transplants over the past decade. In 2012, 152 candidates were added to the intestinal transplant waiting list, a new low. Of these, 64 were listed for intestine-liver transplant and 88 for intestinal transplant alone or with an organ other than liver. Historically, the most common organ transplanted with the intestine was the liver; this practice decreased substantially from a peak of 52.9% in 2007 to 30.0% in 2012. Short-gut syndrome, which encompasses a large group of diagnoses, is the most common etiology of intestinal failure. The pretransplant mortality rate decreased dramatically over time for all age groups, from 51.0 per 100 wait-list years in 1998-1999 to 6.7 for patients listed in 2010-2012. Numbers of intestinal and intestine-liver transplants steadily decreased from 198 in 2007 to 106 in 2012. By age, intestinal transplant recipients have changed substantially; the number of adult recipients now approximately equals the number of pediatric recipients. Graft survival has improved over the past decade. Graft failure in the first 90 days after transplant occurred in 15.7% of 2011-2012 intestinal transplant recipients, compared with 21% in 2001-2002.

  2. Ghrelin Attenuates Intestinal Barrier Dysfunction Following Intracerebral Hemorrhage in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yijun; Wei, Yongxu; Yang, Wenlei; Cai, Yu; Chen, Bin; Yang, Guoyuan; Shang, Hanbing; Zhao, Weiguo

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal barrier dysfunction remains a critical problem in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) and is associated with poor prognosis. Ghrelin, a brain-gut peptide, has been shown to exert protection in animal models of gastrointestinal injury. However, the effect of ghrelin on intestinal barrier dysfunction post-ICH and its possible underlying mechanisms are still unknown. This study was designed to investigate whether ghrelin administration attenuates intestinal barrier dysfunction in experimental ICH using an intrastriatal autologous blood infusion mouse model. Our data showed that treatment with ghrelin markedly attenuated intestinal mucosal injury at both histomorphometric and ultrastructural levels post-ICH. Ghrelin reduced ICH-induced intestinal permeability according to fluorescein isothiocyanate conjugated-dextran (FITC-D) and Evans blue extravasation assays. Concomitantly, the intestinal tight junction-related protein markers, Zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) and claudin-5 were upregulated by ghrelin post-ICH. Additionally, ghrelin reduced intestinal intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) expression at the mRNA and protein levels following ICH. Furthermore, ghrelin suppressed the translocation of intestinal endotoxin post-ICH. These changes were accompanied by improved survival rates and an attenuation of body weight loss post-ICH. In conclusion, our results suggest that ghrelin reduced intestinal barrier dysfunction, thereby reducing mortality and weight loss, indicating that ghrelin is a potential therapeutic agent in ICH-induced intestinal barrier dysfunction therapy. PMID:27929421

  3. Intestinal absorption of aluminium in renal failure.

    PubMed

    Drüeke, Tilman B

    2002-01-01

    The proportion of the daily ingested aluminium that is absorbed in the intestinal tract has remained a matter of debate for many years because no reliable method of measurement was available. Studies with earlier analytic techniques reported fractional absorption of aluminium from as little as 0.001% to as much as 27% of an oral dose. Measurement of (26)Al by high-energy accelerator mass spectrometry has permitted more accurate analyses. In normal young rats, 0.05-0.1% of ingested aluminium is absorbed in the intestine, of which roughly half goes to the skeleton within 2 h, whereas the remaining half is excreted in the urine, most of it within 48 h. Deposition in organs other than the skeleton appears to be negligible. In healthy human volunteers, the most recent estimates of fractional intestinal (26)Al absorption were also in the range of 0.06-0.1%. In both rats and humans, intestinal absorption of aluminium is subject to many systemic and local factors. The latter include various compounds with which aluminium is complexed in the gut lumen, and gastric acidity. The influence of food is controversial; however, absorption appears higher in the fasted than the post-prandial state. Luminal phosphate concentration decreases aluminium absorption, whereas citrate increases it. For theoretical reasons, silicates should prevent aluminium absorption, but experimental evidence has not supported this theory. Whether water hardness affects aluminium bioavailability remains a matter of debate. General conditions may also modify aluminium absorption and deposition in bone. Examples of these general factors include the uraemic syndrome, diabetes mellitus, secondary hyperparathyroidism, vitamin D status, Alzheimer's disease and Down's syndrome. Awareness of intestinal absorption of aluminium is particularly important, given that aluminium-based binders continue to be used in uraemic patients, despite the hazards of aluminium accumulation. The lessons we have learned about

  4. Development and physiological regulation of intestinal lipid absorption. III. Intestinal transporters and cholesterol absorption.

    PubMed

    Hui, David Y; Labonté, Eric D; Howles, Philip N

    2008-04-01

    Intestinal cholesterol absorption is modulated by transport proteins in enterocytes. Cholesterol uptake from intestinal lumen requires several proteins on apical brush-border membranes, including Niemann-Pick C1-like 1 (NPC1L1), scavenger receptor B-I, and CD36, whereas two ATP-binding cassette half transporters, ABCG5 and ABCG8, on apical membranes work together for cholesterol efflux back to the intestinal lumen to limit cholesterol absorption. NPC1L1 is essential for cholesterol absorption, but its function as a cell surface transporter or an intracellular cholesterol transport protein needs clarification. Another ATP transporter, ABCA1, is present in the basolateral membrane to mediate HDL secretion from enterocytes.

  5. Adult zebrafish intestine resection: a novel model of short bowel syndrome, adaptation, and intestinal stem cell regeneration.

    PubMed

    Schall, K A; Holoyda, K A; Grant, C N; Levin, D E; Torres, E R; Maxwell, A; Pollack, H A; Moats, R A; Frey, M R; Darehzereshki, A; Al Alam, D; Lien, C; Grikscheit, T C

    2015-08-01

    Loss of significant intestinal length from congenital anomaly or disease may lead to short bowel syndrome (SBS); intestinal failure may be partially offset by a gain in epithelial surface area, termed adaptation. Current in vivo models of SBS are costly and technically challenging. Operative times and survival rates have slowed extension to transgenic models. We created a new reproducible in vivo model of SBS in zebrafish, a tractable vertebrate model, to facilitate investigation of the mechanisms of intestinal adaptation. Proximal intestinal diversion at segment 1 (S1, equivalent to jejunum) was performed in adult male zebrafish. SBS fish emptied distal intestinal contents via stoma as in the human disease. After 2 wk, S1 was dilated compared with controls and villus ridges had increased complexity, contributing to greater villus epithelial perimeter. The number of intervillus pockets, the intestinal stem cell zone of the zebrafish increased and contained a higher number of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)-labeled cells after 2 wk of SBS. Egf receptor and a subset of its ligands, also drivers of adaptation, were upregulated in SBS fish. Igf has been reported as a driver of intestinal adaptation in other animal models, and SBS fish exposed to a pharmacological inhibitor of the Igf receptor failed to demonstrate signs of intestinal adaptation, such as increased inner epithelial perimeter and BrdU incorporation. We describe a technically feasible model of human SBS in the zebrafish, a faster and less expensive tool to investigate intestinal stem cell plasticity as well as the mechanisms that drive intestinal adaptation.

  6. Extra-intestinal calcium handling contributes to normal serum calcium levels when intestinal calcium absorption is suboptimal.

    PubMed

    Lieben, Liesbet; Verlinden, Lieve; Masuyama, Ritsuko; Torrekens, Sophie; Moermans, Karen; Schoonjans, Luc; Carmeliet, Peter; Carmeliet, Geert

    2015-12-01

    The active form of vitamin D, 1,25(OH)2D, is a crucial regulator of calcium homeostasis, especially through stimulation of intestinal calcium transport. Lack of intestinal vitamin D receptor (VDR) signaling does however not result in hypocalcemia, because the increased 1,25(OH)2D levels stimulate calcium handling in extra-intestinal tissues. Systemic VDR deficiency, on the other hand, results in hypocalcemia because calcium handling is impaired not only in the intestine, but also in kidney and bone. It remains however unclear whether low intestinal VDR activity, as observed during aging, is sufficient for intestinal calcium transport and for mineral and bone homeostasis. To this end, we generated mice that expressed the Vdr exclusively in the gut, but at reduced levels. We found that ~15% of intestinal VDR expression greatly prevented the Vdr null phenotype in young-adult mice, including the severe hypocalcemia. Serum calcium levels were, however, in the low-normal range, which may be due to the suboptimal intestinal calcium absorption, renal calcium loss, insufficient increase in bone resorption and normal calcium incorporation in the bone matrix. In conclusion, our results indicate that low intestinal VDR levels improve intestinal calcium absorption compared to Vdr null mice, but also show that 1,25(OH)2D-mediated fine-tuning of renal calcium reabsorption and bone mineralization and resorption is required to maintain fully normal serum calcium levels.

  7. The Effect of DA-6034 on Intestinal Permeability in an Indomethacin-Induced Small Intestinal Injury Model

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Dong Shin; Lee, Oh Young; Lee, Kang Nyeong; Jun, Dae Won; Lee, Hang Lak; Yoon, Byung Chul; Choi, Ho Soon

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims DA-6034 has anti-inflammatory activities and exhibits cytoprotective effects in acute gastric injury models. However, explanations for the protective effects of DA-6034 on intestinal permeability are limited. This study sought to investigate the effect of DA-6034 on intestinal permeability in an indomethacin-induced small intestinal injury model and its protective effect against small intestinal injury. Methods Rats in the treatment group received DA-6034 from days 0 to 2 and indomethacin from days 1 to 2. Rats in the control group received indomethacin from days 1 to 2. On the fourth day, the small intestines were examined to compare the severity of inflammation. Intestinal permeability was evaluated by using fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled dextran. Western blotting was performed to confirm the association between DA-6034 and the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway. Results The inflammation scores in the treatment group were lower than those in the control group, but the difference was statistically insignificant. Hemorrhagic lesions in the treatment group were broader than those in the control group, but the difference was statistically insignificant. Intestinal permeability was lower in the treatment group than in the control group. DA-6034 enhanced extracellular signal-regulated kinase expression, and intestinal permeability was negatively correlated with ERK expression. Conclusions DA-6034 may decrease intestinal permeability in an indomethacin-induced intestinal injury model via the ERK pathway. PMID:27114435

  8. Effect of alemtuzumab on intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes and intestinal barrier function in cynomolgus model.

    PubMed

    Qu, Lin-Lin; Lyu, Ya-Qing; Jiang, Hai-Tao; Shan, Ting; Zhang, Jing-Bin; Li, Qiu-Rong; Li, Jie-Shou

    2015-03-05

    Alemtuzumab has been used in organ transplantation and a variety of hematologic malignancies (especially for the treatment of B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia). However, serious infectious complications frequently occur after treatment. The reason for increased infections postalemtuzumab treatment is unknown at this stage. We explore the effect of alemtuzumab on intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs) and intestinal barrier function in cynomolgus model to explain the reason of infection following alemtuzumab treatment. Twelve male cynomolguses were randomly assigned to either a treatment or control group. The treatment group received alemtuzumab (3 mg/kg, intravenous injection) while the control group received the same volume of physiological saline. Intestinal IELs were isolated from the control group and the treatment group (on day 9, 35, and 70 after treatment) for counting and flow cytometric analysis. Moreover, intestinal permeability was monitored by enzymatic spectrophotometric technique and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The numbers of IELs were decreased significantly on day 9 after treatment compared with the control group (0.35 ± 0.07 × 10 8 and 1.35 ± 0.09 × 10 8 , respectively; P < 0.05) and were not fully restored until day 70 after treatment. There were significant differences among four groups considering IELs subtypes. In addition, the proportion of apoptotic IELs after alemtuzumab treatment was significantly higher than in the control group (22.01 ± 3.67 and 6.01 ± 1.42, respectively; P < 0.05). Moreover, the concentration of D-lactate and endotoxin was also increased significantly on day 9 after treatment. Alemtuzumab treatment depletes lymphocytes in the peripheral blood and intestine of cynomolgus model. The induction of apoptosis is an important mechanism of lymphocyte depletion after alemtuzumab treatment. Notably, intestinal barrier function may be disrupted after alemtuzumab treatment.

  9. Effect of Alemtuzumab on Intestinal Intraepithelial Lymphocytes and Intestinal Barrier Function in Cynomolgus Model

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Lin-Lin; Lyu, Ya-Qing; Jiang, Hai-Tao; Shan, Ting; Zhang, Jing-Bin; Li, Qiu-Rong; Li, Jie-Shou

    2015-01-01

    Background: Alemtuzumab has been used in organ transplantation and a variety of hematologic malignancies (especially for the treatment of B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia). However, serious infectious complications frequently occur after treatment. The reason for increased infections postalemtuzumab treatment is unknown at this stage. We explore the effect of alemtuzumab on intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs) and intestinal barrier function in cynomolgus model to explain the reason of infection following alemtuzumab treatment. Methods: Twelve male cynomolguses were randomly assigned to either a treatment or control group. The treatment group received alemtuzumab (3 mg/kg, intravenous injection) while the control group received the same volume of physiological saline. Intestinal IELs were isolated from the control group and the treatment group (on day 9, 35, and 70 after treatment) for counting and flow cytometric analysis. Moreover, intestinal permeability was monitored by enzymatic spectrophotometric technique and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results: The numbers of IELs were decreased significantly on day 9 after treatment compared with the control group (0.35 ± 0.07 × 108 and 1.35 ± 0.09 × 108, respectively; P < 0.05) and were not fully restored until day 70 after treatment. There were significant differences among four groups considering IELs subtypes. In addition, the proportion of apoptotic IELs after alemtuzumab treatment was significantly higher than in the control group (22.01 ± 3.67 and 6.01 ± 1.42, respectively; P < 0.05). Moreover, the concentration of D-lactate and endotoxin was also increased significantly on day 9 after treatment. Conclusions: Alemtuzumab treatment depletes lymphocytes in the peripheral blood and intestine of cynomolgus model. The induction of apoptosis is an important mechanism of lymphocyte depletion after alemtuzumab treatment. Notably, intestinal barrier function may be disrupted after alemtuzumab

  10. Kaiso overexpression promotes intestinal inflammation and potentiates intestinal tumorigenesis in Apc(Min/+) mice.

    PubMed

    Pierre, Christina C; Longo, Joseph; Mavor, Meaghan; Milosavljevic, Snezana B; Chaudhary, Roopali; Gilbreath, Ebony; Yates, Clayton; Daniel, Juliet M

    2015-09-01

    Constitutive Wnt/β-catenin signaling is a key contributor to colorectal cancer (CRC). Although inactivation of the tumor suppressor adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) is recognized as an early event in CRC development, it is the accumulation of multiple subsequent oncogenic insults facilitates malignant transformation. One potential contributor to colorectal carcinogenesis is the POZ-ZF transcription factor Kaiso, whose depletion extends lifespan and delays polyp onset in the widely used Apc(Min/+) mouse model of intestinal cancer. These findings suggested that Kaiso potentiates intestinal tumorigenesis, but this was paradoxical as Kaiso was previously implicated as a negative regulator of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. To resolve Kaiso's role in intestinal tumorigenesis and canonical Wnt signaling, we generated a transgenic mouse model (Kaiso(Tg/+)) expressing an intestinal-specific myc-tagged Kaiso transgene. We then mated Kaiso(Tg/+) and Apc(Min/+) mice to generate Kaiso(Tg/+):Apc(Min/+) mice for further characterization. Kaiso(Tg/+):Apc(Min/+) mice exhibited reduced lifespan and increased polyp multiplicity compared to Apc(Min/+) mice. Consistent with this murine phenotype, we found increased Kaiso expression in human CRC tissue, supporting a role for Kaiso in human CRC. Interestingly, Wnt target gene expression was increased in Kaiso(Tg/+):Apc(Min/+) mice, suggesting that Kaiso's function as a negative regulator of canonical Wnt signaling, as seen in Xenopus, is not maintained in this context. Notably, Kaiso(Tg/+):Apc(Min/+) mice exhibited increased inflammation and activation of NFκB signaling compared to their Apc(Min/+) counterparts. This phenotype was consistent with our previous report that Kaiso(Tg/+) mice exhibit chronic intestinal inflammation. Together our findings highlight a role for Kaiso in promoting Wnt signaling, inflammation and tumorigenesis in the mammalian intestine. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Improving access to intestinal stem cells as a step toward intestinal gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Sandberg, J W; Lau, C; Jacomino, M; Finegold, M; Henning, S J

    1994-03-01

    In previous studies exploring the intestinal epithelium as a potential site for somatic gene therapy, we concluded that the mucus lining the intestine constitutes a significant barrier to any attempts at gene transfer via the lumenal route. The mucus problem is aggravated by the fact that the epithelial stem cells, which are the logical target for gene transfer, are located deep in the intestinal crypts. The goals of the current study were to develop procedures that would improve accessibility to the intestinal stem cells and which would effect in vivo mucus removal without damaging the underlying epithelium. Initial experiments involved evaluation of the use of distension to improve accessibility to the intestinal crypts and the use of the mucolytic agents dithiothreitol (DTT) and N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) versus a control solution of phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) for mucus removal. Catheters were inserted in each end of 3-cm terminal ileal segments in anesthetized rats. Two milliliters of agent was instilled into the clamped segment for 2 min, removed, and repeated. Lumenal distension resulted in shortened villi with wider intervillus spacing, thereby improving crypt access. Both NAC and DTT washes removed significant mucus between the villi but failed to reach the crypt lumen. To enhance mucus release from the crypt lumen, pilocarpine was selected due to its cholinergic properties and preferential binding to muscarinic receptors on crypt goblet cells. Pilocarpine given intraperitoneally 30 min prior to the mucolytic or PBS wash resulted in significant eradication of mucus down into the crypt lumen. This effect was still evident 3-4 hr later provided the intestine remained undisturbed.

  12. Intestinal Subepithelial Myofibroblasts Support the Growth of Intestinal Epithelial Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Nan Ye; Jabaji, Ziyad; Wang, Jiafang; Joshi, Vaidehi S.; Brinkley, Garrett J.; Khalil, Hassan; Wang, Fengchao; Jaroszewicz, Artur; Pellegrini, Matteo; Li, Linheng; Lewis, Michael; Stelzner, Matthias; Dunn, James C. Y.; Martín, Martín G.

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal epithelial stem cells (ISCs) are the focus of recent intense study. Current in vitro models rely on supplementation with the Wnt agonist R-spondin1 to support robust growth, ISC self-renewal, and differentiation. Intestinal subepithelial myofibroblasts (ISEMFs) are important supportive cells within the ISC niche. We hypothesized that co-culture with ISEMF enhances the growth of ISCs in vitro and allows for their successful in vivo implantation and engraftment. ISC-containing small intestinal crypts, FACS-sorted single ISCs, and ISEMFs were procured from C57BL/6 mice. Crypts and single ISCs were grown in vitro into enteroids, in the presence or absence of ISEMFs. ISEMFs enhanced the growth of intestinal epithelium in vitro in a proximity-dependent fashion, with co-cultures giving rise to larger enteroids than monocultures. Co-culture of ISCs with supportive ISEMFs relinquished the requirement of exogenous R-spondin1 to sustain long-term growth and differentiation of ISCs. Mono- and co-cultures were implanted subcutaneously in syngeneic mice. Co-culture with ISEMFs proved necessary for successful in vivo engraftment and proliferation of enteroids; implants without ISEMFs did not survive. ISEMF whole transcriptome sequencing and qPCR demonstrated high expression of specific R-spondins, well-described Wnt agonists that supports ISC growth. Specific non-supportive ISEMF populations had reduced expression of R-spondins. The addition of ISEMFs in intestinal epithelial culture therefore recapitulates a critical element of the intestinal stem cell niche and allows for its experimental interrogation and biodesign-driven manipulation. PMID:24400106

  13. Dietary synbiotic application modulates Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) intestinal microbial communities and intestinal immunity.

    PubMed

    Abid, A; Davies, S J; Waines, P; Emery, M; Castex, M; Gioacchini, G; Carnevali, O; Bickerdike, R; Romero, J; Merrifield, D L

    2013-12-01

    A feeding trial was conducted to determine the effect of dietary administration of Pediococcus acidilactici MA18/5M and short chain fructooligosaccharides (scFOS) on Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) intestinal health. Salmon (initial average weight 250 g) were allocated into triplicate sea pens and were fed either a control diet (commercial diet: 45% protein, 20% lipid) or a synbiotic treatment diet (control diet + P. acidilactici at 3.5 g kg(-1) and 7 g kg(-1) scFOS) for 63 days. At the end of this period, fish were sampled for intestinal microbiology, intestinal histology and the expression of selected immune-related genes (IL1β, TNFα, IL8, TLR3 and MX-1) in the intestine. Compared to the control fish, the total bacterial levels were significantly lower in the anterior mucosa, posterior mucosa and posterior digesta of the synbiotic fed fish. qPCR revealed good recovery (log 6 bacteria g(-1)) of the probiotic in the intestinal digesta of the synbiotic fed fish and PCR-DGGE revealed that the number of OTUs, as well as the microbial community diversity and richness were significantly higher in the anterior digesta of the synbiotic fed fish than the control. Compared to the control fed fish, the mucosal fold (villi) length and the infiltration of epithelial leucocytes were significantly higher in the anterior and posterior intestine, respectively, in the synbiotic group. Real-time PCR demonstrated that all of the genes investigated were significantly up-regulated in the anterior and posterior intestine of the synbiotic fed salmon, compared to the control group. At the systemic level, serum lysozyme activity was significantly higher in the synbiotic fed fish and growth performance, feed utilisation and biometric measurements (condition factor, gutted weight and gut loss) were not affected. Together these results suggest that the synbiotic modulation of the gut microbiota has a protective action on the intestinal mucosal cells, improving morphology and stimulating

  14. Osteoporosis in patients with intestinal insufficiency and intestinal failure: Prevalence and clinical risk factors.

    PubMed

    Nygaard, Louis; Skallerup, Anders; Olesen, Søren Schou; Køhler, Marianne; Vinter-Jensen, Lars; Kruse, Christian; Vestergaard, Peter; Rasmussen, Henrik Højgaard

    2017-08-05

    Intestinal insufficiency and intestinal failure are associated with malabsorption of micro- and macronutrients that may negatively influence bone metabolism and increase the risk for developing osteoporosis. However, information regarding prevalence and contribution of individual risk factors is scarce. We investigated the prevalence of osteoporosis in patients with intestinal insufficiency and intestinal failure and identified associated risk factors. This was a retrospective cross-sectional study including 167 clinically stable outpatients with intestinal insufficiency or intestinal failure. Bone mineral density (BMD) was measured by dual X-ray absorptiometry and the prevalence of osteoporosis was compared to a gender and age matched population. Several clinical and demographic parameters, including body mass index (BMI), vitamin-D, smoking habits and medications, were analyzed for association with BMD. The prevalence of osteoporosis was 56.9% in the combined patient group compared to 24.1% in the control group (OR 4.2 [95% CI, 2.3 to 7.7]; p < 0.001). BMD in the hip was independently associated with BMI (0.13 [95% CI, 0.09 to 0.18]; p < 0.001) and vitamin-D levels (-0.41 [95% CI, -0.76 to -0.06]; p = 0.03). Similar associations were seen for BMD in the spine (0.15 [95% CI, 0.08 - 0.22]; p < 0.001) and (-0.60 [95% CI, -0.76 to -0.06]; p = 0.02), respectively. Trends for low BMD were observed in smokers, and in patients using glucocorticoids, opioids, and proton pump inhibitors. Patients with intestinal insufficiency and intestinal failure are at immense risk of developing osteoporosis. Low BMI and vitamin-D deficiency were identified as independent risk factors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  15. The outer mucus layer hosts a distinct intestinal microbial niche

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hai; Limenitakis, Julien P.; Fuhrer, Tobias; Geuking, Markus B.; Lawson, Melissa A.; Wyss, Madeleine; Brugiroux, Sandrine; Keller, Irene; Macpherson, Jamie A.; Rupp, Sandra; Stolp, Bettina; Stein, Jens V.; Stecher, Bärbel; Sauer, Uwe; McCoy, Kathy D.; Macpherson, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    The overall composition of the mammalian intestinal microbiota varies between individuals: within each individual there are differences along the length of the intestinal tract related to host nutrition, intestinal motility and secretions. Mucus is a highly regenerative protective lubricant glycoprotein sheet secreted by host intestinal goblet cells; the inner mucus layer is nearly sterile. Here we show that the outer mucus of the large intestine forms a unique microbial niche with distinct communities, including bacteria without specialized mucolytic capability. Bacterial species present in the mucus show differential proliferation and resource utilization compared with the same species in the intestinal lumen, with high recovery of bioavailable iron and consumption of epithelial-derived carbon sources according to their genome-encoded metabolic repertoire. Functional competition for existence in this intimate layer is likely to be a major determinant of microbiota composition and microbial molecular exchange with the host. PMID:26392213

  16. A20 controls intestinal homeostasis through cell-specific activities.

    PubMed

    Vereecke, Lars; Vieira-Silva, Sara; Billiet, Thomas; van Es, Johan H; Mc Guire, Conor; Slowicka, Karolina; Sze, Mozes; van den Born, Maaike; De Hertogh, Gert; Clevers, Hans; Raes, Jeroen; Rutgeerts, Paul; Vermeire, Severine; Beyaert, Rudi; van Loo, Geert

    2014-09-30

    The transcription factor NF-κB is indispensable for intestinal immune homeostasis, but contributes to chronic inflammation and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). A20, an inhibitor of both NF-κB and apoptotic signalling, was identified as a susceptibility gene for multiple inflammatory diseases, including IBD. Despite absence of spontaneous intestinal inflammation in intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) specific A20 knockout mice, we found additional myeloid-specific A20 deletion to synergistically drive intestinal pathology through cell-specific mechanisms. A20 ensures intestinal barrier stability by preventing cytokine-induced IEC apoptosis, while A20 prevents excessive cytokine production in myeloid cells. Combining IEC and myeloid A20 deletion induces ileitis and severe colitis, characterized by IEC apoptosis, Paneth and goblet cell loss, epithelial hyperproliferation and intestinal microbiota dysbiosis. Continuous epithelial cell death and regeneration in an inflammatory environment sensitizes cells for neoplastic transformation and the development of colorectal tumours in aged mice.

  17. Intestinal organoids as tissue surrogates for toxicological and pharmacological studies.

    PubMed

    Kuratnik, Anton; Giardina, Charles

    2013-06-15

    Recently developed cell culture protocols have allowed for the derivation of multi-cellular structures dubbed intestinal "organoids" from embryonic stem cells (ESCs), induced pluripotent stem cells (IPSCs), and adult intestinal stem cells (ISCs). These structures resemble in vivo intestinal crypts, both in structure and developmental processes, and can be grown quickly and in relatively large quantities. Although much research has focused on developing intestinal organoids for tissue repair, more immediate applications include high-throughput screening for agents that target intestinal epithelium. Here we describe current methods for deriving mouse and human intestinal organoids and discuss some applications aimed at developing novel therapies or preventive agents for diseases of the lower GI tract such as inflammatory bowel diseases and colorectal cancer.

  18. Study Bacteria-Host Interactions Using Intestinal Organoids.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong-Guo; Sun, Jun

    2016-08-19

    The intestinal epithelial cells function to gain nutrients, retain water and electrolytes, and form an efficient barrier against foreign microbes and antigens. Researchers employed cell culture lines derived from human or animal cancer cells as experimental models in vitro for understanding of intestinal infections. However, most in vitro models used to investigate interactions between bacteria and intestinal epithelial cells fail to recreate the differentiated tissue components and structure observed in the normal intestine. The in vitro analysis of host-bacteria interactions in the intestine has been hampered by a lack of suitable intestinal epithelium culture systems. Here, we present a new experimental model using an organoid culture system to study bacterial infection.

  19. [Enteropathic arthritis: water in the intestines, fire in the joints].

    PubMed

    Ronneberger, M

    2009-06-01

    Patients with various kinds of intestinal illnesses sometimes suffer not only abdominal symptoms, but also joint involvement, leading to a reduction in quality of life. Diseases leading to inflammatory joint involvement such as inflammatory bowel disease, Whipple's disease or surgical intestinal bypass, are classified as enteropathic arthritis. In all cases, disrupted barrier function of the intestine causes activation of the immune system and inflammation of joints.

  20. Macrophage Isolation from the Mouse Small and Large Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Harusato, Akihito; Geem, Duke; Denning, Timothy L.

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages play important roles in maintaining intestinal homeostasis via their ability to orchestrate responses to the normal microbiota as well as pathogens. One of the most important steps in beginning to understand the functions of these cells is the ability to effectively isolate them from the complex intestinal environment. Here, we detail methodology for the isolation and phenotypic characterization of macrophages from the mouse small and large intestine. PMID:27246032

  1. Intestinal adaptation in short bowel syndrome: A case report.

    PubMed

    Palla, Viktoria-Varvara; Karaolanis, Georgios; Pentazos, Panagiotis; Ladopoulos, Alexios; Papageorgiou, Evaggelos

    2015-06-01

    Short bowel syndrome is a clinical entity that includes loss of energy, fluid, electrolytes or micronutrient balance because of inadequate functional intestinal length. This case report demonstrates the case of a woman who compensated for short bowel syndrome through intestinal adaptation, which is a complex process worthy of further investigation for the avoidance of dependence on total parenteral nutrition and of intestinal transplantation in such patients.

  2. A Revised Model for Dosimetry in the Human Small Intestine

    SciTech Connect

    John Poston; Nasir U. Bhuiyan; R. Alex Redd; Neil Parham; Jennifer Watson

    2005-02-28

    A new model for an adult human gastrointestinal tract (GIT) has been developed for use in internal dose estimations to the wall of the GIT and to the other organs and tissues of the body from radionuclides deposited in the lumenal contents of the five sections of the GIT. These sections were the esophasgus, stomach, small intestine, upper large intestine, and the lower large intestine. The wall of each section was separated from its lumenal contents.

  3. [Short bowel syndrome and intestinal failure - new developments].

    PubMed

    Lamprecht, Georg

    2015-12-01

    Intestinal failure is characterized by intestinal water and electrolyte losses as well as malabsorption of macronutrients. It often requires individually composed parenteral support (so call compounding). Teduglutide, a DPP-IV resistant GLP2 analogue, is available a pharmacologic treatment, which stimulates intestinal absorption and can facilitate infusion free days. Catheter infections are the most common complication of home parenteral support. The incidence can be minimized using Taurolidin as a catheter block solution.

  4. CLMP-Mediated Regulation of Intestinal Homeostasis in IBD

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0333 TITLE: CLMP-mediated regulation of intestinal homeostasis in...Sep 2013 – 29 Sep 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-13-1-0333 CLMP-mediated regulation of intestinal ... intestinal mucosa is composed by a single layer of epithelial cells that forms a selective physical barrier allowing the passage of nutrients and solutes

  5. Sub-acute intestinal obstruction by Strongyloides stercolaris.

    PubMed

    al-Bahrani, Z R; al-Saleem, T; al-Gailani, M A

    1995-01-01

    Strongyloides stercolaris infestation is rather rare in Iraq. Individuals with infection confined to the intestinal tract are often asymptomatic. Symptoms include abdominal pain, diarrhea, weight loss and other non-specific complaints. The diagnosis depends upon repeated examination of stool and duodenal aspirate. Two cases presenting as sub-acute intestinal obstruction and mimicking primary intestinal lymphoma (PIL) on presentation are presented. Differentiation between the two conditions regarding presenting features, barium studies and pathology are discussed.

  6. Hepatic Injury in Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis Contributes to Altered Intestinal Permeability.

    PubMed

    Luther, Jay; Garber, John J; Khalili, Hamed; Dave, Maneesh; Bale, Shyam Sundhar; Jindal, Rohit; Motola, Daniel L; Luther, Sanjana; Bohr, Stefan; Jeoung, Soung Won; Deshpande, Vikram; Singh, Gurminder; Turner, Jerrold R; Yarmush, Martin L; Chung, Raymond T; Patel, Suraj J

    2015-03-01

    Emerging data suggest that changes in intestinal permeability and increased gut microbial translocation contribute to the inflammatory pathway involved in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) development. Numerous studies have investigated the association between increased intestinal permeability and NASH. Our meta-analysis of this association investigates the underlying mechanism. A meta-analysis was performed to compare the rates of increased intestinal permeability in patients with NASH and healthy controls. To further address the underlying mechanism of action, we studied changes in intestinal permeability in a diet-induced (methionine-and-choline-deficient; MCD) murine model of NASH. In vitro studies were also performed to investigate the effect of MCD culture medium at the cellular level on hepatocytes, Kupffer cells, and intestinal epithelial cells. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) patients, and in particular those with NASH, are more likely to have increased intestinal permeability compared with healthy controls. We correlate this clinical observation with in vivo data showing mice fed an MCD diet develop intestinal permeability changes after an initial phase of liver injury and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) induction. In vitro studies reveal that MCD medium induces hepatic injury and TNFα production yet has no direct effect on intestinal epithelial cells. Although these data suggest a role for hepatic TNFα in altering intestinal permeability, we found that mice genetically resistant to TNFα-myosin light chain kinase (MLCK)-induced intestinal permeability changes fed an MCD diet still develop increased permeability and liver injury. Our clinical and experimental results strengthen the association between intestinal permeability increases and NASH and also suggest that an early phase of hepatic injury and inflammation contributes to altered intestinal permeability in a fashion independent of TNFα and MLCK.

  7. Inhibition of porcine small intestinal sucrase by valienamine.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yu-Guo; Shentu, Xu-Ping; Shen, Yin-Chu

    2005-02-01

    Valienamine, an aminocyclitol, has been isolated from the enzymolysis broth of validamycins. The absolute configuration of valienamine is similar to that of alpha-D-glucose. The inhibitory effect of this amino-sugar analog of alpha-D-glucose, valienamine, on porcine small intestinal sucrase was examined. Valienamine was found to be potent, competitive reversible inhibitor of porcine small intestinal sucrase in vitro with an IC50 value of 1.17 x 10(-3)M. Valienamine also exhibited dose-dependent, instantaneous inhibition of porcine small intestinal sucrase. The inhibition of porcine small intestinal sucrase by valienamine was pH-independent.

  8. Encountering Meckel's diverticulum in emergency surgery for ascaridial intestinal obstruction

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Meckel's diverticulum is the most common congenital anomaly of the gastrointestinal tract. In children with intestinal ascariasis, the diverticulum remains asymptomatic or rarely the Ascaris lumbricoides may lead to its complications in the presence of massive intestinal roundworm load. Given that preoperative diagnosis is seldom carried out, when Meckel's diverticulum is found at laparotomy for obstructive intestinal complications of roundworm, the diverticulum should be removed as complications may occur at any time. The aim of this study was to describe the findings of concomitant presence of Meckel's diverticulum who had surgical intervention in symptomatic intestinal ascariasis in children. Methods A retrospective case review study of 14 children who had surgical intervention for symptomatic intestinal ascariasis having the presence of concomitant Meckel's diverticulum was done. The study was done at SMHS Hospital Srinagar, Kashmir. Results A total of the 14 children who had ascaridial intestinal obstruction with concomitant presence of Meckel's diverticulum were studied. Age of children ranged from 4-12 years, male:female ratio was 1.8:1. Nine patients had asymptomatic Meckel's diverticulum, whereas 5 patients with symptomatic signs were found in the course of emergency surgery for ascaridial intestinal obstruction. Conclusion Meckel's diverticulum in intestinal ascariasis may pursue silent course or may be accompanied with complications of the diverticulitis, perforation or the gangrene. Incidental finding of the Meckel's diverticulum in the intestinal ascariasis should have removal. PMID:20529382

  9. Controlling the frontier: regulatory T-cells and intestinal homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Bollrath, Julia; Powrie, Fiona M

    2013-11-30

    The intestine represents one of the most challenging sites for the immune system as immune cells must be able to mount an efficient response to invading pathogens while tolerating the large number and diverse array of resident commensal bacteria. Foxp3(+) regulatory T-cells (Tregs) play a non-redundant role at maintaining this balance. At the same time Treg cell differentiation and function can be modulated by the intestinal microbiota. In this review, we will discuss effector mechanisms of Treg cells in the intestine and how these cells can be influenced by the intestinal microbiota. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Intestinal mast cells and eosinophils in relation to Strongyloides ratti adult expulsion from the small and large intestines of rats.

    PubMed

    Shintoku, Y; Kadosaka, T; Kimura, E; Takagi, H; Kondo, S; Itoh, M

    2013-04-01

    Mucosal mast cells (MMC) play a crucial role in the expulsion of Strongyloides ratti adults from the small intestine of mice. We reported the large intestinal parasitism of S. ratti in rats, and there has been no report on MMC in the large intestine of the natural host. We studied kinetics of MMC, together with eosinophils, in the upper and lower small intestines, caecum and colon of infected rats. Two distinct phases of mastocytosis were revealed: one in the upper small intestine triggered by stimulation of 'ordinary' adults, and the other in the colon stimulated by 'immune-resistant' adults that started parasitizing the colon around 19 days post-infection. In all 4 intestinal sites, the MMC peaks were observed 5-7 days after the number of adult worms became the maximum and the height of MMC peaks appeared to be dependent on the number of parasitic adults, suggesting an important role played by worms themselves in the MMC buildup.

  11. Intestinal-renal syndrome: mirage or reality?

    PubMed

    Ritz, Eberhard

    2011-01-01

    The recent interest in the role of the intestine in the cardiovascular stability of uremic patients, specifically on dialysis, but potentially also in chronic kidney disease, must be seen against the background of the recent great interest in the role of the gut in chronic heart failure [Curr Opin Clin Nutr Metab Care 2008;11:632-639]. There has been a long-standing interest in the role of the intestine in renal failure, mainly concerning the role of metabolites of bacterial metabolism in the gut as potential uremic toxins. This area has recently been given a new twist by the finding that increased endotoxin concentrations in the blood of dialyzed patients are associated with hypotensive episodes and myocardial 'stunning'. Recent studies suggest that intradialytic underperfusion of myocardial areas, the so-called stunning, may be related to the entry of bacterial endotoxin and/or cytokines across the mucosal barrier into the circulation, where they have a negative impact on myocardial function (and presumably beyond the negative cardiac side effect also contribute to catabolism and malnutrition). Entry of bacterial endotoxin during dialysis sessions is presumably the result of intermittent underperfusion of the intestine if the effective blood volume is rapidly reduced causing breakdown of the mucosal barrier. Apart from the impact on myocardial perfusion, the entry of bacterial endotoxin and/or cytokines across the mucosal barrier may also contribute to malnutrition, wasting and reduced life expectancy in hemodialyzed patients. Such a causal relationship is absolutely plausible in view of an extensive literature on congestive heart failure where clinical and experimental evidence indicates that bacterial endotoxin and/or cytokines may escape from a hypoperfused edematous gut, entering the circulation, triggering an inflammatory response, upregulating circulating cytokines and interfering with the function of the heart through several pathogenic mechanisms

  12. Immunohistochemical detection of human intestinal spirochetosis.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Sho; Shimizu, Ken; Oda, Tomohiro; Tominaga, Susumu; Nakanishi, Kuniaki

    2016-12-01

    Human intestinal spirochetosis (HIS) is a colorectal infection by Brachyspira species of spiral bacteria. Immunohistochemical cross-reaction to an antibody for Treponema pallidum aids its histologic diagnosis. This study's aim was to analyze the immunohistochemical characteristics of HIS. In this analysis, on 223 specimens from 83 HIS cases, we focused on so-called fringe formation (a histologic hallmark of HIS), spiral organisms within mucus or within crypts, and strong immunopositive materials in the mucosa, together with their location and the types of lesions. Fringe formation was found in 81.6% of all specimens and spiral organisms within mucus or within crypts in 97.3% and 57.0%, respectively. Strong immunopositive materials were observed in the surface epithelial layer in 87.9%, in the subepithelial layer in 94.6%, and in deeper mucosa in 2.2% of all specimens. The positive rates in conventional adenomas (24.0%, n = 146) and hyperplastic nodules (100%, n = 17) were each different from that found in inflammation (70.8%, n = 24), and spiral organisms were seen more frequently in the right-side large intestine than in the left (within mucus, 100%, n = 104 versus 95.0%, n = 119; within crypts, 65.4%, n = 104 versus 49.6%, n = 119). Thus, immunohistochemistry was effective not only in supporting the diagnosis of HIS but also in highlighting spiral organisms within mucus or crypts that were invisible in routine histology. Possibly, these spiral organisms may spread throughout the entire large intestine, although there is a potential problem with antibody specificity.

  13. Intestinal alkaline phosphatase: multiple biological roles in maintenance of intestinal homeostasis and modulation by diet.

    PubMed

    Lallès, Jean-Paul

    2010-06-01

    The diverse nature of intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP) functions has remained elusive, and it is only recently that four additional major functions of IAP have been revealed. The present review analyzes the earlier literature on the dietary factors modulating IAP activity in light of these new findings. IAP regulates lipid absorption across the apical membrane of enterocytes, participates in the regulation of bicarbonate secretion and of duodenal surface pH, limits bacterial transepithelial passage, and finally controls bacterial endotoxin-induced inflammation by dephosphorylation, thus detoxifying intestinal lipopolysaccharide. Many dietary components, including fat, protein, and carbohydrate, modulate IAP expression or activity and may be combined to sustain a high level of IAP activity. In conclusion, IAP has a pivotal role in intestinal homeostasis and its activity could be increased through the diet. This is especially true in pathological situations (e.g., inflammatory bowel diseases) in which the involvement of commensal bacteria is suspected and when intestinal AP is too low to detoxify a sufficient amount of bacterial lipopolysaccharide.

  14. Intestinal Disaccharidase Activity in Patients with Autism: Effect of Age, Gender, and Intestinal Inflammation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kushak, Rafail I.; Lauwers, Gregory Y.; Winter, Harland S.; Buie, Timothy M.

    2011-01-01

    Intestinal disaccharidase activities were measured in 199 individuals with autism to determine the frequency of enzyme deficiency. All patients had duodenal biopsies that were evaluated morphologically and assayed for lactase, sucrase, and maltase activity. Frequency of lactase deficiency was 58% in autistic children less than or equal to 5 years…

  15. Intestinal Disaccharidase Activity in Patients with Autism: Effect of Age, Gender, and Intestinal Inflammation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kushak, Rafail I.; Lauwers, Gregory Y.; Winter, Harland S.; Buie, Timothy M.

    2011-01-01

    Intestinal disaccharidase activities were measured in 199 individuals with autism to determine the frequency of enzyme deficiency. All patients had duodenal biopsies that were evaluated morphologically and assayed for lactase, sucrase, and maltase activity. Frequency of lactase deficiency was 58% in autistic children less than or equal to 5 years…

  16. EpCAM-dependent extracellular vesicles from intestinal epithelial cells maintain intestinal tract immune balance

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Lingling; Shen, Yingying; Guo, Danfeng; Yang, Diya; Liu, Jiajun; Fei, Xuefeng; Yang, Yunshan; Zhang, Buyi; Lin, Zhendong; Yang, Fei; Wang, Xiaojian; Wang, Keyi; Wang, Jianli; Cai, Zhijian

    2016-01-01

    How the intestinal tract develops a tolerance to foreign antigens is still largely unknown. Here we report that extracellular vesicles (EVs) with TGF-β1-dependent immunosuppressive activity are produced by intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) under physiological conditions. Transfer of these EVs into inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) mice induced by dextran sulfate sodium salt decreases IBD severity by inducing regulatory T cells and immunosuppressive dendritic cells. In contrast, decreased endogenous EV production promotes IBD development. IECs produce EVs with increased levels of TGF-β1 upon IBD development in an ERK-dependent manner. Furthermore, these EVs tend to localize in the intestinal tract associated with epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM). Knockdown of EpCAM in vivo increases the severity of murine IBD, and the protective effect of EVs from IECs with decreased EpCAM on murine IBD is blunted. Therefore, our study indicates that EVs from IECs participate in maintaining the intestinal tract immune balance. PMID:27721471

  17. Campylobacter-induced interleukin-8 responses in human intestinal epithelial cells and primary intestinal chick cells.

    PubMed

    Borrmann, Erika; Berndt, Angela; Hänel, Ingrid; Köhler, Heike

    2007-09-20

    Campylobacter (C.) jejuni and C. coli can cause gastrointestinal disorders in humans characterized by acute inflammation. Inflammatory signals are initiated during interaction between these pathogens and human intestinal cells, but nothing is known about the stimulation of avian intestinal cells by Campylobacter. Interleukin-8 (IL-8) as a proinflammatory chemokine plays an important role in mobilizing cellular defence mechanism. IL-8 mRNA expression in both human intestinal cells (INT 407) and primary intestinal chick cells (PIC) was determined by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. The secretion of IL-8 protein by INT407 was measured using ELISA. Although C. jejuni and C. coli are considered to be harmless commensals in the gut of birds, the avian Campylobacter isolates investigated were able to induce the proinflammatory IL-8 in PIC as well as in INT407. In an in vitro system, C. jejuni as well as C. coli were able to induce IL-8 mRNA in PIC. Relation between the virulence properties like toxin production, the ability to invade and to survive in Caco-2 cells and the level of IL-8 mRNA produced by INT 407 and PIC after infection with Campylobacter strains was also investigated.

  18. Intestinal-fatty acid binding protein and lipid transport in human intestinal epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Montoudis, Alain; Delvin, Edgard; Menard, Daniel

    2006-01-06

    Intestinal-fatty acid binding protein (I-FABP) is a 14-15 kDa cytoplasmic molecule highly expressed in the enterocyte. Although different functions have been proposed for various FABP family members, the specific function of I-FABP in human intestine remains unclear. Here, we studied the role of I-FABP in molecularly modified normal human intestinal epithelial cells (HIEC-6). cDNA transfection resulted in 90-fold I-FABP overexpression compared to cells treated with empty pQCXIP vector. The high-resolution immunogold technique revealed labeling mainly in the cytosol and confirmed the marked phenotype abundance of I-FABP in cDNA transfected cells. I-FABP overexpression was not associated with alterations in cell proliferation and viability. Studies using these transfected cells cultured with [{sup 14}C]oleic acid did not reveal higher efficiency in de novo synthesis or secretion of triglycerides, phospholipids, and cholesteryl esters compared to cells treated with empty pQCXIP vector only. Similarly, the incubation with [{sup 35}S]methionine did not disclose a superiority in the biogenesis of apolipoproteins (apo) A-I, A-IV, B-48, and B-100. Finally, cells transfected with I-FABP did not exhibit an increased production of chylomicrons, VLDL, LDL, and HDL. Our observations establish that I-FABP overexpression in normal HIEC-6 is not related to cell proliferation, lipid esterification, apo synthesis, and lipoprotein assembly, and, therefore, exclude its role in intestinal fat transport.

  19. Dietary Phospholipids and Intestinal Cholesterol Absorption

    PubMed Central

    Cohn, Jeffrey S.; Kamili, Alvin; Wat, Elaine; Chung, Rosanna W. S.; Tandy, Sally

    2010-01-01

    Experiments carried out with cultured cells and in experimental animals have consistently shown that phospholipids (PLs) can inhibit intestinal cholesterol absorption. Limited evidence from clinical studies suggests that dietary PL supplementation has a similar effect in man. A number of biological mechanisms have been proposed in order to explain how PL in the gut lumen is able to affect cholesterol uptake by the gut mucosa. Further research is however required to establish whether the ability of PLs to inhibit cholesterol absorption is of therapeutic benefit. PMID:22254012

  20. Biomagnetic Signals of the Large Intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Cordova, T.; Sosa, M.; Bradshaw, L. A.; Adilton, A.

    2008-08-11

    Large intestine is part of the gastrointestinal tract with an average length, in adults, of 1.5 m. The gold standard technique in clinical medicine is the colonoscopy. Nevertheless, other techniques are capable of presenting information on physiological processes which take place in this part of the gastrointestinal system. Three recent studies are discussed in this paper in order to make this information more widely available. The authors consider that the biomagnetic technique could be easily implemented in hospitals around the world. Options will be available for research and clinical medicine.

  1. Subclinical intestinal malabsorption in developing countries

    PubMed Central

    Baker, S. J.

    1976-01-01

    Asymptomatic small intestinal disease characterized by abnormalities of structure and function has been reported from many developing countries. Abnormalities of structure include changes in villus architecture and in appearance under both the light and the electron microscope. Changes in function include abnormalities in the absorption of xylose, fat, vitamin B12, amino acids, and dipeptides and excessive faecal losses of nitrogen and energy. The etiology of the condition is unknown but appears to be closely related to exposure to the environment. The nutritional consequences of this condition have not been fully explored but for people living on marginally sufficient dietary intakes they may be extremely important. PMID:800354

  2. Biomagnetic Signals of the Large Intestine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordova, T.; Bradshaw, L. A.; Adilton, A.; Sosa, M.

    2008-08-01

    Large intestine is part of the gastrointestinal tract with an average length, in adults, of 1.5 m. The gold standard technique in clinical medicine is the colonoscopy. Nevertheless, other techniques are capable of presenting information on physiological processes which take place in this part of the gastrointestinal system. Three recent studies are discussed in this paper in order to make this information more widely available. The authors consider that the biomagnetic technique could be easily implemented in hospitals around the world. Options will be available for research and clinical medicine.

  3. Severe emphysematous pyelonephritis mimicking intestinal obstruction.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ji Ning; Zhang, Bao Long; Yu, Hai Yan; Wang, Bin

    2015-12-01

    Emphysematous pyelonephritis is a severe necrotizing infection characterized by the presence of gas and/or fluid in the renal parenchyma, collecting system, or perirenal tissues. Emphysematous pyelonephritis with approximately 15 cm air-fluid level, diffused ureteral involvement, and the accumulation of gas in liver and peritoneal cavity is very rare. Here, we reported a severe emphysematous pyelonephritis with multiple huge air-fluid level mimicking intestinal obstruction and with the accumulation of gas in liver and ureter in computed tomography imaging. The patient was successfully managed by percutaneous nephrostomy combined with medical treatment.

  4. [A technic to avoid postoperative intestinal hypodynamia].

    PubMed

    Pérez Rodríguez, J; Gaztambide Casellas, J; Argos Rodríguez, M D; Vargas Vallejo, J; García Mérida, M; Galiano Duro, E; López Pérez, G A

    1984-04-15

    The hypodynamic postoperative ileus in children, has as main cause the circle gastric distension-reflex intestinal ileus, produced by the swallowed air. The gastric emptying system-through a Levin tube from the stomach is not usually sufficient to get off all the swallowed air. Nevertheless, a continuous suction from the lower third of oesophagus, through a double lumen sump tube is twelve times more effective in the getting off de air before it comes into the stomach, without need of a nasogastric tube.

  5. Intestinal obstruction in an autistic adolescent.

    PubMed

    Serour, Francis; Witzling, Michaela; Frenkel-Laufer, Daniela; Gorenstein, Arkadi

    2008-10-01

    Bezoars and foreign bodies are frequently encountered in children with psychiatric disorders. Eating disorder (called pica) occurs predominantly in some high-risk patients such as psychiatric and mentally disabled children. Small-bowel obstruction is an uncommon complication of ingested foreign body because the foreign body is able to cross the whole small intestine and be excreted in the feces.We present the case history of an autistic adolescent who was operated on because of bowel obstruction due to an unusual foreign body.

  6. Rebamipide protects small intestinal mucosal injuries caused by indomethacin by modulating intestinal microbiota and the gene expression in intestinal mucosa in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Kurata, Satoshi; Nakashima, Takako; Osaki, Takako; Uematsu, Naoya; Shibamori, Masafumi; Sakurai, Kazushi; Kamiya, Shigeru

    2015-01-01

    The effect of rebamipide, a mucosal protective drug, on small intestinal mucosal injury caused by indomethacin was examined using a rat model. Indomethacin administration (10 mg/kg, p.o.) induced intestinal mucosal injury was accompanied by an increase in the numbers of intestinal bacteria particularly Enterobacteriaceae in the jejunum and ileum. Rebamipide (30 and 100 mg/kg, p.o., given 5 times) was shown to inhibit the indomethacin-induced small intestinal mucosal injury and decreased the number of Enterococcaceae and Enterobacteriaceae in the jejunal mucosa to normal levels. It was also shown that the detection rate of segmented filamentous bacteria was increased by rebamipide. PCR array analysis of genes related to inflammation, oxidative stress and wound healing showed that indomethacin induced upregulation and downregulation of 14 and 3 genes, respectively in the rat jejunal mucosa by more than 5-fold compared to that of normal rats. Rebamipide suppressed the upregulated gene expression of TNFα and Duox2 in a dose-dependent manner. In conclusion, our study confirmed that disturbance of intestinal microbiota plays a crucial role in indomethacin-induced small intestinal mucosal injury, and suggests that rebamipide could be used as prophylaxis against non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs -induced gastrointestinal mucosal injury, by modulating microbiota and suppressing mucosal inflammation in the small intestine.

  7. Rebamipide protects small intestinal mucosal injuries caused by indomethacin by modulating intestinal microbiota and the gene expression in intestinal mucosa in a rat model

    PubMed Central

    Kurata, Satoshi; Nakashima, Takako; Osaki, Takako; Uematsu, Naoya; Shibamori, Masafumi; Sakurai, Kazushi; Kamiya, Shigeru

    2015-01-01

    The effect of rebamipide, a mucosal protective drug, on small intestinal mucosal injury caused by indomethacin was examined using a rat model. Indomethacin administration (10 mg/kg, p.o.) induced intestinal mucosal injury was accompanied by an increase in the numbers of intestinal bacteria particularly Enterobacteriaceae in the jejunum and ileum. Rebamipide (30 and 100 mg/kg, p.o., given 5 times) was shown to inhibit the indomethacin-induced small intestinal mucosal injury and decreased the number of Enterococcaceae and Enterobacteriaceae in the jejunal mucosa to normal levels. It was also shown that the detection rate of segmented filamentous bacteria was increased by rebamipide. PCR array analysis of genes related to inflammation, oxidative stress and wound healing showed that indomethacin induced upregulation and downregulation of 14 and 3 genes, respectively in the rat jejunal mucosa by more than 5-fold compared to that of normal rats. Rebamipide suppressed the upregulated gene expression of TNFα and Duox2 in a dose-dependent manner. In conclusion, our study confirmed that disturbance of intestinal microbiota plays a crucial role in indomethacin-induced small intestinal mucosal injury, and suggests that rebamipide could be used as prophylaxis against non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs -induced gastrointestinal mucosal injury, by modulating microbiota and suppressing mucosal inflammation in the small intestine. PMID:25834302

  8. Goblet cells and intestinal Alkaline phosphatase expression (IAP) during the development of the rat small intestine.

    PubMed

    Gomes, José Rosa; Ayub, Laís Costa; Dos Reis, Camila Audrey; Machado, Miriam Joice; da Silva, Jéssica; Omar, Nádia Fayez; de Miranda Soares, Maria Albertina

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the temporal and spacial distribution of the mucins produced by goblet cells and intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP) expression during the development of the small intestine of the rat. Intestines were removed from rats on the 15th, 17th and 18th days of intratuterine life (i.u.) and on the 3rd, 10th, 17th and 25th days after birth (a.b.). Intestines were processed for routine histological procedures and sections were submitted to histochemistry using PAS to stain neutral glycoproteins and Alcian blue for acidic glycoproteins, as well as immunohistochemistry to detect IAP. In rats, glycoprotein production was seen to begin in the intestinal epithelium cell at around the 17th day of i.u. life; however, this production was not accompanied by morphological indications of the presence of goblet cells. By the 18th i.u. day, the villus epithelium was undergoing differentiation and the first goblet cells could be identified from this time. At around the 10th day a.b., both compartments of the small intestine were detected; i.e. the villi and the crypts. At this timepoint, goblet cells were present in the villi, and also in the upper regions of the crypts. On the 3rd, 10th 17th and 25th days a.b., the presence of the goblet cells increased and presented regional differences in the sections evaluated. IAP was not detected during i.u. life, but was weakly detected in the cells of the villi from the 3rd day a.b., along the entire extension of the villi. On the 10th day, IAP was detected at the tip of the villi, while on the 25th day, it was detected along the extension of the villi, but with a weaker intensity. In conclusion, a temporal and spacial distribution of goblet cells and IAP activity occurs during the development of the small intestine, suggesting a possible regulatory control in accordance with the suckling and weaning phases of food intake in the rat's life. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  9. Effect of gluconic acid on piglet growth performance, intestinal microflora, and intestinal wall morphology.

    PubMed

    Biagi, G; Piva, A; Moschini, M; Vezzali, E; Roth, F X

    2006-02-01

    Gluconic acid (GA) derives from the incomplete oxidation of glucose by some Gluconobacter strains. When fed to nonruminant animals, GA is only poorly absorbed in the small intestine and is primarly fermented to butyric acid in the lower gut. This study investigated the effect of GA on in vitro growth response and metabolism of swine cecal microflora and on animal growth performance, intestinal wall morphology, and intestinal microflora. During a 24-h in vitro cecal fermentation, total gas production and maximum rate of gas production were increased by GA (linear, P < 0.001). Ammonia in cecal liquor was reduced by GA after 4, 8, and 24 h of fermentation (quadratic, P < 0.01). After 24 h of fermentation, total short-chain fatty acids, acetic acid, propionic acid, n-butyric acid, acetic to propionic acid ratio, and acetic + butyric to propionic acid ratio were linearly increased by GA (P < 0.001). In the in vivo study, 48 piglets were divided into 4 groups and housed in individual cages for 6 wk. Piglets received a basal diet with a) no addition (control) or with GA addition at b) 3,000 ppm, c) 6,000 ppm, or d) 12,000 ppm. After 6 wk, 4 animals per treatment were killed, and samples of intestinal content and mucosa were collected. Compared with control, GA tended to increase average daily gain (+13 and +14% for GA at 3,000 and 6,000 ppm, respectively; P of the model = 0.11; quadratic, P < 0.05). Daily feed consumption and gain to feed ratio were not influenced by GA. Intestinal counts of clostridia, enterobacteriaceae, and lactic acid bacteria were not affected by GA. Gluconic acid tended to increase total short-chain fatty acids in the jejunum (+174, +87, and +74% for GA at 3,000, 6,000, and 12,000 ppm, respectively; P of the model = 0.07; quadratic, P = 0.07). Morphological evaluation of intestinal mucosa from jejunum, ileum, and cecum did not show any significant differences among treatments. This study showed that feeding GA influences the composition and activity

  10. Intestinal Microbiota-Derived GABA Mediates Interleukin-17 Expression during Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Wenkai; Yin, Jie; Xiao, Hao; Chen, Shuai; Liu, Gang; Tan, Bie; Li, Nengzhang; Peng, Yuanyi; Li, Tiejun; Zeng, Benhua; Li, Wenxia; Wei, Hong; Yin, Zhinan; Wu, Guoyao; Hardwidge, Philip R.; Yin, Yulong

    2017-01-01

    Intestinal microbiota has critical importance in pathogenesis of intestinal infection; however, the role of intestinal microbiota in intestinal immunity during enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) infection is poorly understood. The present study tested the hypothesis that the intestinal microbiota is associated with intestinal interleukin-17 (IL-17) expression in response to ETEC infection. Here, we found ETEC infection induced expression of intestinal IL-17 and dysbiosis of intestinal microbiota, increasing abundance of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-producing Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis. Antibiotics treatment in mice lowered the expression of intestinal IL-17 during ETEC infection, while GABA or L. lactis subsp. lactis administration restored the expression of intestinal IL-17. L. lactis subsp. lactis administration also promoted expression of intestinal IL-17 in germ-free mice during ETEC infection. GABA enhanced intestinal IL-17 expression in the context of ETEC infection through activating mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1)-ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) signaling. GABA–mTORC1 signaling also affected intestinal IL-17 expression in response to Citrobacter rodentium infection and in drug-induced model of intestinal inflammation. These findings highlight the importance of intestinal GABA signaling in intestinal IL-17 expression during intestinal infection and indicate the potential of intestinal microbiota-GABA signaling in IL-17-associated intestinal diseases. PMID:28138329

  11. Intestinal Microbiota-Derived GABA Mediates Interleukin-17 Expression during Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Infection.

    PubMed

    Ren, Wenkai; Yin, Jie; Xiao, Hao; Chen, Shuai; Liu, Gang; Tan, Bie; Li, Nengzhang; Peng, Yuanyi; Li, Tiejun; Zeng, Benhua; Li, Wenxia; Wei, Hong; Yin, Zhinan; Wu, Guoyao; Hardwidge, Philip R; Yin, Yulong

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal microbiota has critical importance in pathogenesis of intestinal infection; however, the role of intestinal microbiota in intestinal immunity during enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) infection is poorly understood. The present study tested the hypothesis that the intestinal microbiota is associated with intestinal interleukin-17 (IL-17) expression in response to ETEC infection. Here, we found ETEC infection induced expression of intestinal IL-17 and dysbiosis of intestinal microbiota, increasing abundance of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-producing Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis. Antibiotics treatment in mice lowered the expression of intestinal IL-17 during ETEC infection, while GABA or L. lactis subsp. lactis administration restored the expression of intestinal IL-17. L. lactis subsp. lactis administration also promoted expression of intestinal IL-17 in germ-free mice during ETEC infection. GABA enhanced intestinal IL-17 expression in the context of ETEC infection through activating mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1)-ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) signaling. GABA-mTORC1 signaling also affected intestinal IL-17 expression in response to Citrobacter rodentium infection and in drug-induced model of intestinal inflammation. These findings highlight the importance of intestinal GABA signaling in intestinal IL-17 expression during intestinal infection and indicate the potential of intestinal microbiota-GABA signaling in IL-17-associated intestinal diseases.

  12. Intestinal permeability measurements: general aspects and possible pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Salles Teixeira, Tatiana Fiche; Boroni Moreira, Ana Paula; Silva Souza, Nilian Carla; Frias, Rafael; Gouveia Peluzio, Maria do Carmo

    2014-02-01

    Introducción: Alteraciones funcionales de la barrera intestinal se han relacionado con una variedad de enfermedades intestinales y también con enfermedades no intestinales. Las pruebas de permeabilidad intestinal son consideradas herramientas útiles para evaluar la gravedad de la enfermedad para el posterior seguimiento de los pacientes después de una intervención terapéutica. Objetivo: El objeto de esta revisión ha sido destacar los posibles factores que pueden estar asociados a una mayor permeabilidad intestinal y revisar condiciones clínicas que han sido asociadas en individuos de diferentes edades. También revisar ciertos aspectos metodológicos de las pruebas de permeabilidad intestinal. Resultados y discusión: Las uniones estrechas entre los enterocitos son las principales estructuras encargadas de la regulación de la barrera intestinal. Una alteración de éstas, resulta en una deficiencia en la permeabilidad intestinal y una mayor penetración de las sustancias marcadoras de permeabilidad intestinal. La lactulosa y el manitol son las sustancias marcadoras más utilizadas. La inocuidad y facilidad de los test de permeabilidad han sido de ayuda para explorar y ampliar el conocimiento de muchas condiciones clínicas en las que la disfunción de la barrera intestinal ha sido un sello distintivo. Muchos factores pueden influir en los resultados de los test de permeabilidad. Sin embargo, los investigadores y los clínicos han de tratar de eludir los posibles inconvenientes de las pruebas de permeabilidad intestinal para poder producir evidencias más consistentes. El uso de otras sustancias marcadoras de la fisiología intestinal también puede contribuir a comprender mejor el papel de la barrera intestinal en diferentes enfermedades.

  13. Dosimetry Model for Radioactivity Localized to Intestinal Mucosa

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, Darrell R.; Rajon, Didier; Breitz, Hazel B.; Goris, Michael L.; Bolch, Wesley E.; Knox, Susan J.

    2004-06-30

    This paper provides a new model for calculating radiation absorbed dose to the full thickness of the small and large intestinal walls, and to the mucosal layers. The model was used to estimate the intestinal radiation doses from yttrium-90-labeled-DOTA-biotin binding to NR-LU-10-streptavidin in patients. We selected model parameters from published data and observations and used the model to calculate energy absorbed fractions using the EGS4 radiation transport code. We determined the cumulated 90Y activity in the small and large intestines of patients from gamma camera images and calculated absorbed doses to the mucosal layer and to the whole intestinal wall. The mean absorbed dose to the wall of the small intestine was 16.2 mGy/MBq (60 cGy/mCi) administered from 90Y localized in the mucosa and 70 mGy/MBq (260 cGy/mCi) to the mucosal layer within the wall. Doses to the large intestinal wall and to the mucosa of the large intestine were lower than those for small intestine by a factor of about 2.5. These doses are greater by factors of about 5 to 6 than those that would have been calculated using the standard MIRD models that assume the intestinal activity is in the bowel contents. The specific uptake of radiopharmaceuticals in mucosal tissues may lead to dose-related intestinal toxicities. Tissue dosimetry at the sub-organ level is useful for better understanding intestinal tract radiotoxicity and associated dose-response relationships.

  14. Arginine consumption by the intestinal parasite Giardia intestinalis reduces proliferation of intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Stadelmann, Britta; Merino, María C; Persson, Lo; Svärd, Staffan G

    2012-01-01

    In the field of infectious diseases the multifaceted amino acid arginine has reached special attention as substrate for the hosts production of the antimicrobial agent nitric oxide (NO). A variety of infectious organisms interfere with this part of the host immune response by reducing the availability of arginine. This prompted us to further investigate additional roles of arginine during pathogen infections. As a model we used the intestinal parasite Giardia intestinalis that actively consumes arginine as main energy source and secretes an arginine-consuming enzyme, arginine deiminase (ADI). Reduced intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) proliferation is a common theme during bacterial and viral intestinal infections, but it has never been connected to arginine-consumption. Our specific question was thereby, whether the arginine-consumption by Giardia leads to reduced IEC proliferation, in addition to NO reduction. In vitro cultivation of human IEC lines in arginine-free or arginine/citrulline-complemented medium, as well as in interaction with different G. intestinalis isolates, were used to study effects on host cell replication by MTT assay. IEC proliferation was further analyzed by DNA content analysis, polyamine measurements and expressional analysis of cell cycle regulatory genes. IEC proliferation was reduced upon arginine-withdrawal and also in an arginine-dependent manner upon interaction with G. intestinalis or addition of Giardia ADI. We show that arginine-withdrawal by intestinal pathogens leads to a halt in the cell cycle in IECs through reduced polyamine levels and upregulated cell cycle inhibitory genes. This is of importance with regards to intestinal tissue homeostasis that is affected through reduced cell proliferation. Thus, the slower epithelial cell turnover helps the pathogen to maintain a more stable niche for colonization. This study also shows why supplementation therapy of diarrhea patients with arginine/citrulline is helpful and that

  15. Ultrasonographic examination of the small intestine, large intestine and greater omentum in 30 Saanen goats.

    PubMed

    Braun, U; Steininger, K; Tschuor, A; Hässig, M

    2011-09-01

    The small and large intestine of 30 healthy Saanen goats were examined ultrasonographically using a 5.0 MHz-linear transducer. The goats were examined on the right side, from the eighth rib to the caudal aspect of the flank. The small and large intestine could be easily differentiated. The descending duodenum could be imaged in 19 goats, and the jejunum and ileum seen in all goats. The jejunum and ileum were most often seen in cross-section and rarely in longitudinal section in the ventral region of the right flank. The intestinal contents were usually homogenously echoic, and active motility was observed in all the goats. The diameter of the small intestine was 0.8-2.7 cm (1.6 [0.33] cm). The spiral ansa of the colon was imaged in all the goats, and in 21 the caecum was also seen. Both these sections of large intestine were most commonly seen in the dorsal region of the right flank. The spiral ansa of the colon was easily identified by its spiral arrangement of centripetal and centrifugal gyri, which had a garland-like appearance. Because of intraluminal gas, only the wall of the colon closest to the transducer could be imaged. The diameter of the spiral colon ranged from 0.8 to 2.0 cm (1.1 [0.24] cm). Usually only the wall of the caecum closest to the transducer could be imaged and it appeared as a thick, echoic, slightly undulating line. The greater omentum could be seen in all the goats.

  16. [Experimental substantiation of use of sodium hypochlorite and ozone at a formation of intestinal anastomosis in conditions of acute intestinal obstruction and peritonitis].

    PubMed

    Lelianov, A D; Ivliev, N V; Bazhenov, S M; Nesterov, A A

    2009-01-01

    Presented are the results of experimental research on 144 animals (the rats Wistar), on whom was carried out resection of a part of large intestine and a intestinal anastamosis was formed in the presents of acute intestinal obstruction and peritonitis. The sanitation of abdominal cavity in the basic group of animals (74) was performed using sodium hypochlorite solution and dissolved ozone. The intestinal lavage was carried out by dissolved ozone with the subsequent introduction of ozonized oil Ozonide in the area of intestinal anastamosis. The combined application of ozone and sodium produces an expressed samative effect which leads to healing of intestinal anastamosis and decreases unstability of intestinal sutures and mortality.

  17. Wine consumption and intestinal redox homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Biasi, Fiorella; Deiana, Monica; Guina, Tina; Gamba, Paola; Leonarduzzi, Gabriella; Poli, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Regular consumption of moderate doses of wine is an integral part of the Mediterranean diet, which has long been considered to provide remarkable health benefits. Wine׳s beneficial effect has been attributed principally to its non-alcoholic portion, which has antioxidant properties, and contains a wide variety of phenolics, generally called polyphenols. Wine phenolics may prevent or delay the progression of intestinal diseases characterized by oxidative stress and inflammation, especially because they reach higher concentrations in the gut than in other tissues. They act as both free radical scavengers and modulators of specific inflammation-related genes involved in cellular redox signaling. In addition, the importance of wine polyphenols has recently been stressed for their ability to act as prebiotics and antimicrobial agents. Wine components have been proposed as an alternative natural approach to prevent or treat inflammatory bowel diseases. The difficulty remains to distinguish whether these positive properties are due only to polyphenols in wine or also to the alcohol intake, since many studies have reported ethanol to possess various beneficial effects. Our knowledge of the use of wine components in managing human intestinal inflammatory diseases is still quite limited, and further clinical studies may afford more solid evidence of their beneficial effects. PMID:25009781

  18. The developing intestinal microbiome: probiotics and prebiotics.

    PubMed

    Neu, Josef

    2014-01-01

    The microbes in the human intestinal tract interact with the host to form a 'superorganism'. The functional aspects of the host microbe interactions are being increasingly scrutinized and it is becoming evident that this interaction in early life is critical for development of the immune system and metabolic function and aberrations may result in life-long health consequences. Evidence is suggesting that such interactions occur even before birth, where the microbes may be either beneficial or harmful, and possibly even triggering preterm birth. Mode of delivery, use of antibiotics, and other perturbations may have life-long consequences in terms of health and disease. Manipulating the microbiota by use of pro- and prebiotics may offer a means for maintenance of 'healthy' host microbe interactions, but over-exuberance in their use also has the potential to cause harm. Considerable controversy exists concerning the routine use of probiotics in the prevention of necrotizing enterocolitis. This chapter will provide a brief overview of the developing intestinal microbiome and discuss the use of pro- and prebiotics in preterm infants.

  19. Intestinal Absorption of Immunoglobulins by Newborn Infants

    PubMed Central

    Iyengar, Leela; Selvaraj, R. J.

    1972-01-01

    Intestinal absorption in newborn infants of immunoglobulins present in colostrum was studied by measuring the concentrations of immunoglobulins IgA, IgG, and IgM in cord blood and following the changes in the serum of the infant on the 5th day after birth. In infants who did not receive colostrum, a marked fall in IgG levels was observed on the 5th day after birth as compared to levels at birth. The concentrations of IgA and IgM showed marginal changes. In contrast, colostrumfed infants showed significant increases in the concentration of IgG. Levels of all 3 immunoglobulins on the 5th day were significantly higher in the serum of colostrumfed infants as compared to those who did not receive colostrum. It is suggested that immunoglobulins present in colostrum are to some extent absorbed from the intestinal tract of newborn infants, and this may have some physiological significance in the resistance to infection during the early neonatal period. PMID:4624594

  20. Intestinal gastrointestinal stromal tumor in a cat

    PubMed Central

    SUWA, Akihisa; SHIMODA, Tetsuya

    2017-01-01

    A 12-year-old, 3.6-kg, spayed female domestic shorthaired cat had a 2-month history of anorexia and weight loss. Abdominal ultrasonography and computed tomography revealed an exophytic mass originating from the jejunum with very poor central and poor peripheral contrast enhancement. On day 14, surgical resection of the jejunum and mass with 5-cm margins and an end-to-end anastomosis were performed. Histopathological examination revealed the mass was a transmural, invasive cancer showing exophytic growth and originating from the small intestinal muscle layer. Immunohistochemical analysis of tumor cells revealed diffuse positivity for KIT protein and negativity for desmin and S-100. The mass was diagnosed as a gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST). Ultrasonographic findings indicated the tumor probably metastasized to the liver and omentum, as seen in humans and dogs. The owner rejected further treatment at the last visit on day 192. To our knowledge, this is the first report of intestinal tumor and metastasis in feline GIST and its imaging features. PMID:28163271

  1. Intestinal Immunity and Gut Microbiota in Atherogenesis.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Tomoya

    2017-02-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease. Interventions targeting the inflammatory process could provide new strategies for preventing atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Previously, we have reported that oral administration of anti-CD3 antibodies, or active vitamin D3, reduced atherosclerosis in mice via recruiting regulatory T cells and tolerogenic dendritic cells to the gut-associated lymphoid tissues. From this, it is reasonable to propose that the intestine could be a novel therapeutic target for prevention of atherosclerotic CVD. Recently, the association between cardio-metabolic diseases and gut microbiota has attracted increased attention. Gut microbiota, reported to be highly associated with intestinal immunity and metabolism, were shown to aggravate CVD by contributing to the production of trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO), a pro-atherogenic compound. We have also previously investigated the relationship between patient susceptibility to coronary artery disease (CAD) and gut microbiota. We found that the order Lactobacillales was significantly increased and the phylum Bacteroidetes was decreased in CAD patients compared with control patients. In this review article, we discuss the evidence for the relationship between the gut microbiota and cardio-metabolic diseases, and consider the gut microbiota as new potential diagnostic and therapeutic tool for treating CVD.

  2. The intestinal microbiota and microenvironment in liver.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hong-Di; Wang, Yin-Hu; Chang, Christopher; Gershwin, M Eric; Lian, Zhe-Xiong

    2015-03-01

    The intestinal microbiome plays a significant role in the development of autoimmune diseases, in particular, inflammatory bowel diseases. But the interplay between the intestinal tract and the liver may explain the increased association with autoimmune liver diseases and inflammatory bowel diseases. The gut-liver axis involves multiple inflammatory cell types and cytokines, chemokines and other molecules which lead to the destruction of normal liver architecture. Triggers for the initiation of these events are unclear, but appear to include multiple environmental factors, including pathogenic or even commensal microbial agents. The variation in the gut microbiome has been cited as a major factor in the pathogenesis of autoimmune liver disease and even other autoimmune diseases. The unique positioning of the liver at the juncture of the peripheral circulation and the portal circulation augments the interaction between naïve T cells and other hepatic cells and leads to the disruption in the development of tolerance to commensal bacteria and other environmental agents. Finally, the innate immune system and in particular toll-like receptors play a significant role in the pathogenesis of autoimmune liver disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Pseudomyxoma peritonei originating from an intestinal duplication.

    PubMed

    Lemahieu, Julie; D'Hoore, André; Deloose, Stijn; Sciot, Raf; Moerman, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Alimentary tract duplications are rare congenital anomalies. They most often become symptomatic in childhood and rarely undergo malignant transformation. Pseudomyxoma peritonei (PMP) is an equally uncommon condition, most frequently originating from a primary appendiceal mucinous neoplasm. We report an extremely unusual case of PMP arising from an intestinal duplication. A 67-year-old woman presented with vague upper abdominal pain, and, unexpectedly, explorative laparoscopy revealed diffuse jelly-like peritoneal implants. The histopathological diagnosis of a low-grade PMP or "disseminated peritoneal adenomucinosis" was made. At that moment, no primary tumor was found. During later surgery, a cystic lesion located in the mesentery of the small bowel could be resected. Histologically, the cyst wall clearly showed the concentric layering of a normal bowel wall. The mucosa, however, displayed a diffuse low-grade villous adenoma. We concluded that this histological picture was most consistent with a small intestinal duplication, containing a low-grade villous adenoma. The adenoma caused a mucocele, which subsequently leaked or ruptured, giving rise to noninvasive mucinous peritoneal implants or low-grade PMP, also known as "disseminated peritoneal adenomucinosis" (DPAM).

  4. Pseudomyxoma Peritonei Originating from an Intestinal Duplication

    PubMed Central

    Lemahieu, Julie; D'Hoore, André; Deloose, Stijn; Sciot, Raf; Moerman, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Alimentary tract duplications are rare congenital anomalies. They most often become symptomatic in childhood and rarely undergo malignant transformation. Pseudomyxoma peritonei (PMP) is an equally uncommon condition, most frequently originating from a primary appendiceal mucinous neoplasm. We report an extremely unusual case of PMP arising from an intestinal duplication. A 67-year-old woman presented with vague upper abdominal pain, and, unexpectedly, explorative laparoscopy revealed diffuse jelly-like peritoneal implants. The histopathological diagnosis of a low-grade PMP or “disseminated peritoneal adenomucinosis” was made. At that moment, no primary tumor was found. During later surgery, a cystic lesion located in the mesentery of the small bowel could be resected. Histologically, the cyst wall clearly showed the concentric layering of a normal bowel wall. The mucosa, however, displayed a diffuse low-grade villous adenoma. We concluded that this histological picture was most consistent with a small intestinal duplication, containing a low-grade villous adenoma. The adenoma caused a mucocele, which subsequently leaked or ruptured, giving rise to noninvasive mucinous peritoneal implants or low-grade PMP, also known as “disseminated peritoneal adenomucinosis” (DPAM). PMID:24024058

  5. Cytomegalovirus Infection After Intestinal Transplantation in Children

    PubMed Central

    Bueno, Javier; Green, Michael; Kocoshis, Samuel; Furukawa, Hiroyuki; Ahu-Elmagd, Kareem; Yunis, Eduardo; Irish, William; Todo, Satoru; Reyes, Jorge; Starzl, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    Sixteen episodes of cytomegalovirus (CMV) disease occurred in 10 of 41 children undergoing intestinal transplantation from 1990 to 1995. Stratification of CMV disease by donor (D)/recipient (R) serological status was as follows: 3 of 8, D+/R−; 3 of 9, D+/R+; 4 of 9, D−/R+; and 0 of 15, D−/R−. Treatment resulted in resolution of CMV disease in 93.3% of episodes. No deaths attributable to CMV disease occurred in this series. CMV in D+/R− children resulted in more extensive and persistent disease. However, patient and graft survival rates were similar in the different D/R subgroups and between children with and without CMV disease. Cumulative dose of steroid boluses (relative risk [RR]. 1.59; 95% confidence interval [CI]. 1.14–2.21) and history of steroid recycles (RR, 2.72; 95% CI, 1.21–6.13) were associated with CMV disease. These results suggest that although CMV-associated morbidity in pediatric intestinal transplant recipients was substantial, it was not associated with an increased rate of mortality or graft loss, even among high-risk D+/R− patients. PMID:9402361

  6. Linking intestinal homeostasis and liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Schnabl, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Interactions of the gut microbiome with the host are important in health and disease. Microbial translocation releases bacterial products that play a key role in progression of chronic liver disease by promoting hepatic injury and inflammation. Although this has long been recognized, we are just beginning to understand the circumstances under which the gut becomes leaky and to discover bacterial metabolites that promote liver disease. In this review we will summarize recent findings from the last two years. Recent findings Chronic liver disease is associated with an altered microbiome with both qualitative (dysbiosis) and quantitative (overgrowth) differences. This can be viewed as a loss of the symbiotic relationship between the microflora and the host. An imbalanced intestinal homeostasis results in a breach of the gut barrier and subsequent microbial translocation. However, the contribution of the intestinal microflora is beyond simple microbial translocation as pathogenic factor. Bacterial metabolites resulting from an imbalanced homeostasis and dysbiosis play also a crucial role in liver disease. Summary A combination between an initiating liver insult and a disturbance of the gut – host symbiosis synergize in progression of liver disease. PMID:23493073

  7. Intestinal Immunity and Gut Microbiota in Atherogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease. Interventions targeting the inflammatory process could provide new strategies for preventing atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Previously, we have reported that oral administration of anti-CD3 antibodies, or active vitamin D3, reduced atherosclerosis in mice via recruiting regulatory T cells and tolerogenic dendritic cells to the gut-associated lymphoid tissues. From this, it is reasonable to propose that the intestine could be a novel therapeutic target for prevention of atherosclerotic CVD. Recently, the association between cardio-metabolic diseases and gut microbiota has attracted increased attention. Gut microbiota, reported to be highly associated with intestinal immunity and metabolism, were shown to aggravate CVD by contributing to the production of trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO), a pro-atherogenic compound. We have also previously investigated the relationship between patient susceptibility to coronary artery disease (CAD) and gut microbiota. We found that the order Lactobacillales was significantly increased and the phylum Bacteroidetes was decreased in CAD patients compared with control patients. In this review article, we discuss the evidence for the relationship between the gut microbiota and cardio-metabolic diseases, and consider the gut microbiota as new potential diagnostic and therapeutic tool for treating CVD. PMID:27928097

  8. Fucose Sensing Regulates Bacterial Intestinal Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Pacheco, Alline R.; Curtis, Meredith M.; Ritchie, Jennifer M.; Munera, Diana; Waldor, Matthew K.; Moreira, Cristiano G.; Sperandio, Vanessa

    2012-01-01

    The mammalian gastrointestinal (GI) tract provides a complex and competitive environment for the microbiota1. Successful colonization by pathogens depends on scavenging nutrients, sensing chemical signals, competing with the resident bacteria, and precisely regulating expression of virulence genes2. The GI pathogen enterohemorrhagic E.coli (EHEC) relies on inter-kingdom chemical sensing systems to regulate virulence gene expression3–4. Here we show that these systems control the expression of a novel two-component signal transduction system, named FusKR, where FusK is the histidine sensor kinase (HK), and FusR the response regulator (RR). FusK senses fucose and controls expression of virulence and metabolic genes. This fucose-sensing system is required for robust EHEC colonization of the mammalian intestine. Fucose is highly abundant in the intestine5. Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron (B.theta) produces multiple fucosidases that cleave fucose from host glycans, resulting in high fucose availability in the gut lumen6. During growth in mucin, B.theta contributes to EHEC virulence by cleaving fucose from mucin, thereby activating the FusKR signaling cascade, modulating EHEC’s virulence gene expression. Our findings suggest that EHEC uses fucose, a host-derived signal made available by the microbiota, to modulate EHEC pathogenicity and metabolism. PMID:23160491

  9. Intestinal immunoglobulins in children with coeliac disease

    PubMed Central

    Savilahti, E.

    1972-01-01

    The numbers of immunoglobulin-containing cells in jejunal biopsy specimens of 19 children with active coeliac disease aged 0·5 to 16·5 years were studied by direct immunofluorescence. Intestinal juice immunoglobulins were measured in 14 of these patients. The number of IgA-containing cells was twice and the number of IgM-containing cells 2·5 times that of age-matched controls. There were also more IgG-, IgE-, and IgD-containing cells in the jejunal mucosa of the coeliac patients, but the absolute numbers of these cells were low. The immunoglobulin content of the intestinal juice was not altered in coeliacs. A follow-up biopsy specimen was available from seven patients kept on a strict gluten-free diet for one to four months. A significant fall in the numbers of immunoglobulin-containing cells was seen, and they did not differ at that time from the controls. Two patients were followed until full normalization of the jejunal structure and they had normal numbers of immunoglobulin-containing cells. In children with coeliac disease in contrast to adult coeliacs, the study shows that the IgA-producing system is quantitatively stimulated during gluten challenge. The rapid drop in the numbers of immunoglobulin-containing cells after gluten withdrawal suggests that there is no quantitative abnormality in the local immunoglobulin-producing system of the gut in coeliac disease. ImagesFig. 3 PMID:4568803

  10. Can lipid nanoparticles improve intestinal absorption?

    PubMed

    Mendes, M; Soares, H T; Arnaut, L G; Sousa, J J; Pais, A A C C; Vitorino, C

    2016-12-30

    Lipid nanoparticles and their multiple designs have been considered appealing nanocarrier systems. Bringing the benefits of these nanosystems together with conventional coating technology clearly results in product differentiation. This work aimed at developing an innovative solid dosage form for oral administration based on tableting nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC), coated with conventional polymer agents. NLC dispersions co-encapsulating olanzapine and simvastatin (Combo-NLC) were produced by high pressure homogenization, and evaluated in terms of scalability, drying procedure, tableting and performance from in vitro release, cytotoxicity and intestinal permeability stand points. Factorial design indicated that the scaling-up of the NLC production is clearly feasible. Spray-drying was the method selected to obtain dry particles, not only because it consists of a single step procedure, but also because it facilitates the coating process of NLC with different polymers. Modified NLC formulations with the polymers allowed obtaining distinct release mechanisms, comprising immediate, delayed and prolonged release. Sureteric:Combo-NLC provided a low cytotoxicity profile, along with a ca. 12-fold OL/3-fold SV higher intestinal permeability, compared to those obtained with commercial tablets. Such findings can be ascribed to drug protection and control over release promoted by NLC, supporting them as a versatile platform able to be modified according to the intended needs.

  11. Autism spectrum disorders and intestinal microbiota.

    PubMed

    De Angelis, Maria; Francavilla, Ruggiero; Piccolo, Maria; De Giacomo, Andrea; Gobbetti, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Through extensive microbial-mammalian co-metabolism, the intestinal microbiota have evolved to exert a marked influence on health and disease via gut-brain-microbiota interactions. In this addendum, we summarize the findings of our recent study on the fecal microbiota and metabolomes of children with pervasive developmental disorder-not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS) or autism (AD) compared with healthy children (HC). Children with PDD-NOS or AD have altered fecal microbiota and metabolomes (including neurotransmitter molecules). We hypothesize that the degree of microbial alteration correlates with the severity of the disease since fecal microbiota and metabolomes alterations were higher in children with PDD-NOS and, especially, AD compared to HC. Our study indicates that the levels of free amino acids (FAA) and volatile organic compounds (VOC) differ in AD subjects compared to children with PDD-NOS, who are more similar to HC. Finally, we propose a new perspective on the implications for the interaction between intestinal microbiota and AD.

  12. Optimality in the Development of Intestinal Crypts

    PubMed Central

    Itzkovitz, Shalev; Blat, Irene C.; Jacks, Tyler; Clevers, Hans; van Oudenaarden, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Intestinal crypts in mammals are comprised of long-lived stem cells and shorter-lived progenies. These two populations are maintained in specific proportions during adult life. Here, we investigate the design principles governing the dynamics of these proportions during crypt morphogenesis. Using optimal control theory, we show that a proliferation strategy known as a “bang-bang” control minimizes the time to obtain a mature crypt. This strategy consists of a surge of symmetric stem cell divisions, establishing the entire stem cell pool first, followed by a sharp transition to strictly asymmetric stem cell divisions, producing nonstem cells with a delay. We validate these predictions using lineage tracing and single-molecule fluorescence in situ hybridization of intestinal crypts in infant mice, uncovering small crypts that are entirely composed of Lgr5-labeled stem cells, which become a minority as crypts continue to grow. Our approach can be used to uncover similar design principles in other developmental systems. PMID:22304925

  13. INTESTINAL MALROTATION IN PATIENTS UNDERGOING BARIATRIC SURGERY.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Eduardo Arevalo; Rendon, Francisco Abarca; Zambrano, Trino Andrade; García, Yudoco Andrade; Viteri, Mario Ferrin; Campos, Josemberg Marins; Ramos, Manoela Galvão; Ramos, Almino Cardoso

    Intestinal malrotation is a rare congenital anomaly. In adults is very difficult to recognize due to the lack of symptoms. Diagnosis is usually incidental during surgical procedures or at autopsy. To review the occurrence and recognition of uneventful intestinal malrotation discovered during regular cases of bariatric surgeries. Were retrospectively reviewed the medical registry of 20,000 cases undergoing bariatric surgery, from January 2002 to January 2016, looking for the occurrence of intestinal malrotation and consequences in the intraoperative technique and immediate evolution of the patients. Five cases (0,025%) of intestinal malrotation were found. All of them were males, aging 45, 49, 37,52 and 39 years; BMI 35, 42, 49, 47 and 52 kg/m2, all of them with a past medical history of morbid obesity. The patient with BMI 35 kg/m2 suffered from type 2 diabetes also. All procedures were completed by laparoscopic approach, with no conversions. In one patient was not possible to move the jejunum to the upper abdomen in order to establish the gastrojejunostomy and a sleeve gastrectomy was performed. In another patient was not possible to fully recognize the anatomy due to bowel adhesions and a single anastomosis gastric bypass was preferred. No leaks or bleeding were identified. There were no perioperative complications. All patients were discharged 72 h after the procedure and no immediate 30-day complications were reported. Patients with malrotation can successfully undergo laparoscopic bariatric surgery. May be necessary changes in the surgical original strategy regarding the malrotation. Surgeons must check full abdominal anatomical condition prior to start the division of the stomach. Má-rotação intestinal é rara anomalia congênita em adultos de difícil reconhecimento devido à falta de sintomas. O diagnóstico é feito geralmente incidentalmente durante procedimentos cirúrgicos ou durante autópsia. Verificar a ocorrência e reconhecimento não eventual

  14. Alimentary prion infections: Touchdown in the intestine.

    PubMed

    Da Costa Dias, Bianca; Jovanovic, Katarina; Weiss, Stefan F T

    2011-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are caused by proteinaceous aggregates, usually consisting of misfolded proteins which are often typified by a high proportion of β-sheets, which accumulate in the Central Nervous System. These diseases, including Morbus Alzheimer, Parkinson disease and Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies (TSEs)--also termed prion disorders--afflict a substantial proportion of the human population and as such the etiology and pathogenesis of these diseases has been the focus of mounting research. Although many of these diseases arise from genetic mutations or are sporadic in nature, the possible horizontal transmissibility of neurodegenerative diseases poses a great threat to population health. In this article we discuss recent studies which suggest that the "non-transmissible" status bestowed upon Alzheimer and Parkinson diseases may need to be revised as these diseases have been successfully induced through tissue transplants. Furthermore, we highlight the importance of investigating the "natural" mechanism of prion transmission including peroral and perenteral transmission, proposed routes of gastrointestinal uptake and neuroinvasion of ingested infectious prion proteins. We examine the multitude of factors which may influence oral transmissibility and discuss the zoonotic threats which Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD), Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) and Scrapie may pose resulting in vCJD or related disorders. In addition, we suggest that the 37 kDa/67 kDa laminin receptor on the cell surface of enterocytes, a major cell population in the intestine, may play an important role in the intestinal pathophysiology of alimentary prion infections.

  15. [The association of intestinal microbiota with obesity].

    PubMed

    Morales, Pamela; Brignardello, Jerusa; Gotteland, Martín

    2010-08-01

    Intestinal microbiota (IM) plays a role in the development of obesity and its associated low grade inflammation. Bacterial colonization of the gastrointestinal tract of germ free mice (without microbiota) increases by 60% their fat mass, alters their fasting glucose and insulin levels, triples their hepatic triglycerides and induces adipocyte hypertrophy. IM favors fat storage in adipocytes through the inhibition of Fiaf (Fasting Induced Adipocyte Factor), an inhibitor of lipoprotein lipase. Compared with normal weight subjects, the IM from obese exhibits a higher proportion of Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes and is more efficient in extracting energy from foodstuffs. The loss of bodyweight by a hypocaloric diet reverts the proportion of bacteria to that of lean subjects. The intake of a high fat diet also alters the IM, affecting intestinal barrier function and favoring endotoxinemia. These events increase oxidative and pro-inflammatory processes in plasma and peripheral tissues and increment the risk of insulin resistance. Such events are reverted by the administration of prebiotics which stimulate the growth of Bifdobacterium and Lactobacillus species in the colon, reestablishing the gut homeostasis. Interestingly, products resulting from the fermentation of prebiotics stimulate the differentiation of enteroendocrine cells and the release of glucagon like peptide 1 and peptide YY, that have insulin like and anorexigenic activities, thus contributing to body weight equilibrium.

  16. Fucose sensing regulates bacterial intestinal colonization.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Alline R; Curtis, Meredith M; Ritchie, Jennifer M; Munera, Diana; Waldor, Matthew K; Moreira, Cristiano G; Sperandio, Vanessa

    2012-12-06

    The mammalian gastrointestinal tract provides a complex and competitive environment for the microbiota. Successful colonization by pathogens requires scavenging nutrients, sensing chemical signals, competing with the resident bacteria and precisely regulating the expression of virulence genes. The gastrointestinal pathogen enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) relies on inter-kingdom chemical sensing systems to regulate virulence gene expression. Here we show that these systems control the expression of a novel two-component signal transduction system, named FusKR, where FusK is the histidine sensor kinase and FusR the response regulator. FusK senses fucose and controls expression of virulence and metabolic genes. This fucose-sensing system is required for robust EHEC colonization of the mammalian intestine. Fucose is highly abundant in the intestine. Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron produces multiple fucosidases that cleave fucose from host glycans, resulting in high fucose availability in the gut lumen. During growth in mucin, B. thetaiotaomicron contributes to EHEC virulence by cleaving fucose from mucin, thereby activating the FusKR signalling cascade, modulating the virulence gene expression of EHEC. Our findings suggest that EHEC uses fucose, a host-derived signal made available by the microbiota, to modulate EHEC pathogenicity and metabolism.

  17. Home parenteral nutrition in chronic intestinal failure.

    PubMed Central

    Bisset, W M; Stapleford, P; Long, S; Chamberlain, A; Sokel, B; Milla, P J

    1992-01-01

    In children with severe failure of intestinal function, intravenous nutrition is at present the only treatment able to maintain adequate nutrition for prolonged periods of time. Over the last five years we have discharged 10 patients home on parenteral nutrition for a total of 25 patient years and here the outcome of these children is presented. Of the 10 patients, one has discontinued home parenteral nutrition (HPN), seven patients remain well, one patient has recently moved to the USA, and one patient has died after major abdominal surgery. All children had either normal or an accelerated rate of growth on HPN and developmentally all have progressed well. All the children over 5 years attend normal schools. The major complication of treatment was line sepsis with an overall rate of one episode in 476 days and a total of nine central lines (five patients) have required replacement giving an average line life of 680 days. For those children unfortunate enough to suffer from severe intestinal failure, HPN is preferable to prolonged hospital treatment and offers the chance of a good quality of life with prolonged survival. PMID:1739322

  18. Dysbiosis in intestinal inflammation: Cause or consequence.

    PubMed

    Buttó, Ludovica F; Haller, Dirk

    2016-08-01

    The intestinal microbiota encompasses hundreds of bacterial species that constitute a relatively stable ecosystem. Alteration in the microbiota composition may arise from infections, immune defects, metabolic alterations, diet or antibiotic treatment. Dysbiosis is considered as an alteration in microbiota community structure and/or function, capable of causing/driving a detrimental distortion of microbe-host homeostasis. A variety of pathologies are associated with changes in the community structure and function of the gut microbiota, suggesting a link between dysbiosis and disease etiology. With an emphasis in this review on inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), the non-trivial question is whether dysbiosis is the cause or consequence of inflammation. It is important to understand whether changes in microbial ecosystems are causally linked to the pathology and to what extend disease risk is predicable based on characteristic changes in community structure and/or function. Local changes in tissue integrity associated with focal areas of inflammation may result in the selection of a dysbiotic bacterial community associated with the propagation of a disease phenotype. This review outlines the role of dysbiosis in intestinal inflammation with particular focus on IBD-relevant gnotobiotic mouse models, the factors implicated in the development of dysbiosis and the means available to investigate dysbiosis in the context of human diseases.

  19. Intestinal nutrient transport during ontogeny of vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Buddington, R K

    1992-09-01

    Patterns of transporter development are known for 12 species of vertebrates (2 fish, 1 amphibian, 1 bird, and 8 mammals), ranging from early gestation to adulthood. Although transporters for some nutrients (amino acids and some sugars) appear before the onset of external feeding, species differ in when and which transporters appear. Postnatal changes in the activities of different transporters are twofold: corresponding with shifts in the composition of a species' evolutionary diet, and the need to absorb ever-increasing quantities of food for growth and metabolism. The mechanisms responsible for the age-related shifts in rates of transport include changes in the densities, distribution, and types of transporters for specific nutrients and changes in the physiochemical characteristics of the intestinal brush-border membrane. The signals that trigger the age-related changes originate from internal preprogrammed sources and external sources, with both acting in concert to mediate intestinal development. Although much more is known for the brush-border hydrolases, recent studies with the pig suggest the ontogenetic development of hydrolases and transporters are regulated independently during early development.

  20. Mucosal immune responses following intestinal nematode infection

    PubMed Central

    Zaph, C; Cooper, P J; Harris, N L

    2014-01-01

    In most natural environments, the large majority of mammals harbour parasitic helminths that often live as adults within the intestine for prolonged periods (1–2 years) 1. Although these organisms have been eradicated to a large extent within westernized human populations, those living within rural areas of developing countries continue to suffer from high infection rates. Indeed, recent estimates indicate that approximately 2·5 billion people worldwide, mainly children, currently suffer from infection with intestinal helminths (also known as geohelminths and soil-transmitted helminths) 2. Paradoxically, the eradication of helminths is thought to contribute to the increased incidence of autoimmune diseases and allergy observed in developed countries. In this review, we will summarize our current understanding of host–helminth interactions at the mucosal surface that result in parasite expulsion or permit the establishment of chronic infections with luminal dwelling adult worms. We will also provide insight into the adaptive immune mechanisms that provide immune protection against re-infection with helminth larvae, a process that is likely to be key to the future development of successful vaccination strategies. Lastly, the contribution of helminths to immune modulation and particularly to the treatment of allergy and inflammatory bowel disease will be discussed. PMID:25201407

  1. Autism spectrum disorders and intestinal microbiota

    PubMed Central

    De Angelis, Maria; Francavilla, Ruggiero; Piccolo, Maria; De Giacomo, Andrea; Gobbetti, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Through extensive microbial-mammalian co-metabolism, the intestinal microbiota have evolved to exert a marked influence on health and disease via gut-brain-microbiota interactions. In this addendum, we summarize the findings of our recent study on the fecal microbiota and metabolomes of children with pervasive developmental disorder–not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS) or autism (AD) compared with healthy children (HC). Children with PDD-NOS or AD have altered fecal microbiota and metabolomes (including neurotransmitter molecules). We hypothesize that the degree of microbial alteration correlates with the severity of the disease since fecal microbiota and metabolomes alterations were higher in children with PDD-NOS and, especially, AD compared to HC. Our study indicates that the levels of free amino acids (FAA) and volatile organic compounds (VOC) differ in AD subjects compared to children with PDD-NOS, who are more similar to HC. Finally, we propose a new perspective on the implications for the interaction between intestinal microbiota and AD. PMID:25835343

  2. Chemically induced mouse models of intestinal inflammation.

    PubMed

    Wirtz, Stefan; Neufert, Clemens; Weigmann, Benno; Neurath, Markus F

    2007-01-01

    Animal models of intestinal inflammation are indispensable for our understanding of the pathogenesis of Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis, the two major forms of inflammatory bowel disease in humans. Here, we provide protocols for establishing murine 2,4,6-trinitro benzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-, oxazolone- and both acute and chronic dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) colitis, the most widely used chemically induced models of intestinal inflammation. In the former two models, colitis is induced by intrarectal administration of the covalently reactive reagents TNBS/oxazolone, which are believed to induce a T-cell-mediated response against hapten-modified autologous proteins/luminal antigens. In the DSS model, mice are subjected several days to drinking water supplemented with DSS, which seems to be directly toxic to colonic epithelial cells of the basal crypts. The procedures for the hapten models of colitis and acute DSS colitis can be accomplished in about 2 weeks but the protocol for chronic DSS colitis takes about 2 months.

  3. Newer diagnostic approaches to intestinal protozoa.

    PubMed

    van Lieshout, Lisette; Verweij, Jaco J

    2010-10-01

    To update the reader on the latest developments in the laboratory diagnosis of intestinal protozoa. Correct identification of a diarrhoea causing pathogens is essential for the choice of treatment in an individual patient as well as to map the aetiology of diarrhoea in a variety of patient populations. Classical diagnosis of diarrhoea causing protozoa by microscopic examination of a stool sample lacks both sensitivity and specificity. Alternative diagnostic platforms are discussed. Recent literature on the diagnosis of intestinal protozoa has focused mainly on nucleic acid-based assays, in particular the specific detection of parasite DNA in stool samples using real-time PCR. In addition, the trend has been moving from single pathogen detection to a multiplex approach, allowing simultaneous identification of multiple parasites. Different combinations of targets can be used within a routine diagnostic setting, depending on the patient population, such as children, immunocompromised individuals and those who have been travelling to tropical regions. Large-scale monitoring and evaluation of control strategies become feasible due to automation and high-throughput facilities. Improved technology also has become available for differentiating protozoa subspecies, which facilitates outbreak investigations and extensive research in molecular epidemiology.

  4. Early cytokine responses during intestinal parasitic infections.

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, N; Goyal, P K; Mahida, Y R; Li, K F; Wakelin, D

    1998-01-01

    Infections with gastro-intestinal nematodes elicit immune and inflammatory responses mediated by cytokines released from T-helper type-2 (Th2) cells. In vitro assays of cells from the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) of experimentally infected rodents confirm that, after about 1 week, the dominant cytokine responses to mitogens and antigens are those associated with this Th-cell subset. Polarization of the Th response in this way implies an initial local cytokine environment that favours Th2 development. However, experimental infections with Trichinella spiralis and Nippostrongylus brasiliensis show that, within 2 days of worms reaching the intestine, MLN cells (MLNC) respond with a Th1 rather than a Th2 response [i.e. there is an increase in mRNA for the type 1 cytokine interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), and mitogen-stimulated MLNC release IFN-gamma rather than interleukin-5 (IL-5)]. Antigen stimulation at this time does not elicit IFN-gamma release and the MLNC cannot adoptively transfer immunity. Within a few days the MLNC phenotype changes. There is a Th2 response (IL-5 release) to both mitogen and antigen stimulation and MLNC can adoptively transfer immunity. Early release of IFN-gamma is T-cell dependent, with CD4+ T cells playing the major role. The data are discussed in relation to factors regulating the mucosal response to invasion by parasites. PMID:9616376

  5. Expression and localization of VPAC1, the major receptor of vasoactive intestinal peptide along the length of the intestine.

    PubMed

    Jayawardena, Dulari; Guzman, Grace; Gill, Ravinder K; Alrefai, Waddah A; Onyuksel, Hayat; Dudeja, Pradeep K

    2017-07-01

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) is an endogenous neuropeptide with a broad array of physiological functions in many organs including the intestine. Its actions are mediated via G protein-coupled receptors, and vasoactive intestinal peptide receptor 1 (VPAC1) is the key receptor responsible for majority of VIP's biological activity. The distribution of VPAC1 along the length of the gastrointestinal tract and its subcellular localization in intestinal epithelial cells have not been fully characterized. The current studies were undertaken to determine VPAC1 distribution and localization so that VIP-based therapies can be targeted to specific regions of the intestine. The results indicated that the mRNA levels of VPAC1 showed an abundance pattern of colon > ileum > jejunum in the mouse intestine. In parallel, the VPAC1 protein levels were higher in the mouse colon, followed by the ileum and jejunum. Immunofluorescence studies in mouse colon demonstrated that the receptor was specifically localized to the luminal surface, as was evident by colocalization with the apical marker villin but not with the basolateral marker Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase. In the human intestine, VPAC1 mRNA expression exhibited a distribution similar to that in mouse intestine and was highest in the sigmoid colon. Furthermore, in the human colon, VPAC1 also showed predominantly apical localization. The physiological relevance of the expression and apical localization of VPAC1 remains elusive. We speculate that apical VPAC1 in intestinal epithelial cells may have relevance in recognizing secreted peptides in the intestinal lumen and therefore supports the feasibility of potential therapeutic and targeting use of VIP formulations via oral route to treat gastrointestinal diseases.NEW & NOTEWORTHY These studies for the first time present comprehensive data on the relative characterization of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) receptors in the intestinal mucosa. Vasoactive intestinal peptide receptor 1

  6. Human intestinal lipoproteins. Studies in chyluric subjects.

    PubMed

    Green, P H; Glickman, R M; Saudek, C D; Blum, C B; Tall, A R

    1979-07-01

    To explore the role of the human intestine as a source of apolipoproteins, we have studied intestinal lipoproteins and apoprotein secretion in two subjects with chyluria (mesenteric lymphatic-urinary fistulae). After oral corn oil, apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) and apolipoprotein A-II (apoA-II) output in urine increased in parallel to urinary triglyceride. One subject, on two occasions, after 40 g of corn oil, excreted 8.4 and 8.6 g of triglyceride together with 196 and 199 mg apoA-I and on one occasion, 56 mg apoA-II. The other subject, after 40 g corn oil, excreted 0.3 g triglyceride and 17.5 mg apoA-I, and, after 100 g of corn oil, excreted 44.8 mg apoA-I and 5.8 mg apoA-II. 14.5+/-2.1% of apoA-I and 17.7+/-4.3% of apoA-II in chylous urine was in the d < 1.006 fraction (chylomicrons and very low density lipoprotein). Calculations based on the amount of apoA-I and apoA-II excreted on triglyceride-rich lipoproteins revealed that for these lipid loads, intestinal secretion could account for 50 and 33% of the calculated daily synthetic rate of apoA-I and apoA-II, respectively. Similarly, subject 2 excreted 48-70% and 14% of the calculated daily synthetic rate of apoA-I and apoA-II, respectively. Chylous urine contained chylomicrons, very low density lipoproteins and high density lipoproteins, all of which contained apoA-I. Chylomicrons and very low density lipoproteins contained a previously unreported human apoprotein of 46,000 mol wt. We have called this apoprotein apoA-IV because of the similarity of its molecular weight and amino acid composition to rat apoA-IV. In sodium dodecyl sulfate gels, chylomicron apoproteins consisted of apoB 3.4+/-0.7%, apoA-IV 10.0+/-3.3%, apoE 4.4+/-0.3%, apoA-I 15.0+/-1.8%, and apoC and apoA-II 43.3+/-11.3%. Very low density lipoprotein contained more apoB and apoA-IV and less apoC than chylomicrons. Ouchterlony immunodiffusion of chylomicron apoproteins revealed the presence of apoC-I, apoC-II, and apoC-III. In contrast, plasma

  7. Intestinal microbiota in healthy adults: temporal analysis reveals individual and common core and relation to intestinal symptoms.

    PubMed

    Jalanka-Tuovinen, Jonna; Salonen, Anne; Nikkilä, Janne; Immonen, Outi; Kekkonen, Riina; Lahti, Leo; Palva, Airi; de Vos, Willem M

    2011-01-01

    While our knowledge of the intestinal microbiota during disease is accumulating, basic information of the microbiota in healthy subjects is still scarce. The aim of this study was to characterize the intestinal microbiota of healthy adults and specifically address its temporal stability, core microbiota and relation with intestinal symptoms. We carried out a longitudinal study by following a set of 15 healthy Finnish subjects for seven weeks and regularly assessed their intestinal bacteria and archaea with the Human Intestinal Tract (HIT) Chip, a phylogenetic microarray, in conjunction with qPCR analyses. The health perception and occurrence of intestinal symptoms was recorded by questionnaire at each sampling point. A high overall temporal stability of the microbiota was observed. Five subjects showed transient microbiota destabilization, which correlated not only with the intake of antibiotics but also with overseas travelling and temporary illness, expanding the hitherto known factors affecting the intestinal microbiota. We identified significant correlations between the microbiota and common intestinal symptoms, including abdominal pain and bloating. The most striking finding was the inverse correlation between Bifidobacteria and abdominal pain: subjects who experienced pain had over five-fold less Bifidobacteria compared to those without pain. Finally, a novel computational approach was used to define the common core microbiota, highlighting the role of the analysis depth in finding the phylogenetic core and estimating its size. The in-depth analysis suggested that we share a substantial number of our intestinal phylotypes but as they represent highly variable proportions of the total community, many of them often remain undetected. A global and high-resolution microbiota analysis was carried out to determine the temporal stability, the associations with intestinal symptoms, and the individual and common core microbiota in healthy adults. The findings provide

  8. Role of Intestinal HIF-2α in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishnan, Sadeesh K.; Shah, Yatrik M.

    2016-01-01

    The intestine is supported by a complex vascular system that undergoes dynamic and transient daily shifts in blood perfusion, depending on the metabolic state. Moreover, the intestinal villi have a steep oxygen gradient from the hypoxic epithelium adjacent to the anoxic lumen to the relative higher tissue oxygenation at the base of villi. Due to the daily changes in tissue oxygen levels in the intestine, the hypoxic transcription factors hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α and HIF-2α are essential in maintaining intestinal homeostasis. HIF-2α is essential in maintaining proper micronutrient balance, the inflammatory response, and the regenerative and proliferative capacity of the intestine following an acute injury. However, chronic activation of HIF-2α leads to enhanced proinflammatory response, intestinal injury, and colorectal cancer. In this review, we detail the major mechanisms by which HIF-2α contributes to health and disease of the intestine and the therapeutic implications of targeting HIF-2α in intestinal diseases. PMID:26667076

  9. Helminths and Intestinal Flora Team Up to Improve Gut Health.

    PubMed

    Giacomin, Paul; Agha, Zainab; Loukas, Alex

    2016-09-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are associated with impaired intestinal barrier function, chronic inflammation, and microbial dysbiosis. In a recent publication in Science, Ramanan et al. used murine and human studies to demonstrate that infections with gastrointestinal helminths can protect against IBD by provoking immune responses that alter the balance of commensal and pathogenic bacteria in the intestine.

  10. [CT - diagnosis and differential diagnosis of inflammatory acute intestinal conditions].

    PubMed

    Wiesner, W

    2011-08-24

    Multidetector-row CT has shown over the past years that it is able to provide reliable diagnoses in various acute intestinal conditions. The presented article provides an overview of primary and secondary inflammatory acute intestinal pathologies and their differential diagnoses.

  11. Enantioselective oxidation of enterodiol to enterolactone by human intestinal bacteria.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jong-Sik; Kakiuchi, Nobuko; Hattori, Masao

    2007-11-01

    In the course of our experiments on the metabolic conversion of lignans to the estrogenic substances enterodiol (END) and enterolactone (ENL) by human intestinal flora, we isolated two anaerobes, Ruminococcus sp. END-1 and strain END-2, capable of oxidizing END. The former selectively converted (-)-END to (-)-ENL, while the latter selectively converted (+)-END to (+)-ENL, indicating enantioselective oxidation by intestinal bacteria.

  12. Interactions Between the Intestinal Microbiome and Liver Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Schnabl, Bernd; Brenner, David A.

    2014-01-01

    The human intestine harbors a diverse community of microbes that promote metabolism and digestion in their symbiotic relationship with the host. Disturbance of its homeostasis can result in disease. We review factors that disrupt intestinal homeostasis and contribute to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), steatohepatitis (NASH), alcoholic liver disease, and cirrhosis. Liver disease has long been associated with qualitative and quantitative (overgrowth) dysbiotic changes in the intestinal microbiota. Extrinsic factors, such as the Western diet and alcohol, contribute to these changes. Dysbiosis results in intestinal inflammation, a breakdown of the intestinal barrier, and translocation of microbial products in animal models. However, the contribution of the intestinal microbiome to liver disease goes beyond simple translocation of bacterial products that promote hepatic injury and inflammation. Microbial metabolites produced in a dysbiotic intestinal environment and host factors are equally important in the pathogenesis of liver disease. We review how the combination of liver insult and disruptions in intestinal homeostasis contribute to liver disease. PMID:24440671

  13. Factoring the intestinal microbiome into the pathogenesis of autoimmune hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Czaja, Albert J

    2016-01-01

    The intestinal microbiome is a reservoir of microbial antigens and activated immune cells. The aims of this review were to describe the role of the intestinal microbiome in generating innate and adaptive immune responses, indicate how these responses contribute to the development of systemic immune-mediated diseases, and encourage investigations that improve the understanding and management of autoimmune hepatitis. Alterations in the composition of the intestinal microflora (dysbiosis) can disrupt intestinal and systemic immune tolerances for commensal bacteria. Toll-like receptors within the intestine can recognize microbe-associated molecular patterns and shape subsets of T helper lymphocytes that may cross-react with host antigens (molecular mimicry). Activated gut-derived lymphocytes can migrate to lymph nodes, and gut-derived microbial antigens can translocate to extra-intestinal sites. Inflammasomes can form within hepatocytes and hepatic stellate cells, and they can drive the pro-inflammatory, immune-mediated, and fibrotic responses. Diet, designer probiotics, vitamin supplements, re-colonization methods, antibiotics, drugs that decrease intestinal permeability, and molecular interventions that block signaling pathways may emerge as adjunctive regimens that complement conventional immunosuppressive management. In conclusion, investigations of the intestinal microbiome are warranted in autoimmune hepatitis and promise to clarify pathogenic mechanisms and suggest alternative management strategies. PMID:27895415

  14. Montmorillonite adsorbs creatinine and accelerates creatinine excretion from the intestine.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan-Ting; Wang, Xiu-Fang; Long, Li-Hui; Liu, Tong; Cao, Yong-Xiao

    2009-04-01

    This study aims to evaluate the sorption by montmorillonite of creatinine and the accelerating effect of montmorillonite on creatinine excretion from the intestine. The sorption of montmorillonite was observed in vitro. Also, rat intestinal tract and blood vessels were perfused circularly with perfusate with or without creatinine, respectively, to study the promotion of creatinine diffusion from the blood vessel to the intestine and the inhibition of creatinine absorption in the intestinal tract. The effect of decreasing the serum concentration of creatinine was studied in an acute hypercreatininaemia mouse model. The concentration of creatinine was determined by the basic picric acid method. Montmorillonite adsorbed creatinine markedly in the simulated intestinal solution in a concentration-dependent manner. The sorption-time curve of montmorillonite with creatinine showed that the sorption was fast. The adsorption rate reached a maximum in 10 min. The pH of the solution influenced the sorption, the rate of which was higher at a low pH than at a high pH. Creatinine could diffuse from the blood vessel to the intestine and was reabsorbed in the intestine. Montmorillonite promoted the diffusion and inhibited the absorption. Montmorillonite decreased the serum creatinine level of hypercreatininaemia mice prepared by injecting creatinine intraperitoneally. Montmorillonite adsorbs creatinine and accelerates its excretion from the intestine.

  15. Modified Spiral Intestinal Lengthening and Tailoring for Short Bowel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mehrabi, Valiollah; Mehrabi, Arianeb; Jamshidi, S H; Pedram, M S; Sabagh, M S; Jaberansari, N; Fonouni, H R; Sharifi, A H; Malekzadeh, R; Frongia, G

    2016-02-01

    The spiral intestinal lengthening and tailoring (SILT) procedure is a new surgical technique for autologous intestinal reconstruction in patients with short bowel syndrome. The aim of this work is to present a first description of a modified SILT technique by which the mucosal layer is left intact to possibly reduce the severe postoperative complications of intestinal leakage and abdominal abscess formation. The modified SILT technique was performed on a 10-cm-long intestinal segment in 2 pigs to determine the technical feasibility. Thereafter, the short-term clinical feasibility was monitored clinically in 2 dogs by gastrointestinal X-ray series at postoperative day 4 and by relaparotomy postoperative day 10. It was technically feasible to lengthen the intestinal segment from 10 cm to 20 cm and tailoring it from 3 cm to 1.7 cm in diameter, while leaving the intestinal mucosal layer intact. The postoperative course was uneventful for both dogs. The gastrointestinal X-ray series showed an inconspicuous intestinal transit time without any signs of stricture, perforation, or leakage. In the relaparotomy, the initially achieved lengthening and tailoring extents were preserved and the operated intestinal segment was well perfused with no early signs of necrosis, stenosis, or leakage. Leaving the mucosal layer intact during SILT is technically and clinically feasible in the short term in a large animal model. Further studies are needed to fully assess the impact of this technical modification on the long-term outcome of larger series. © The Author(s) 2015.

  16. New etiology for intestinal uptake of thallium-201

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, M.; Fairholm, S.; Freeman, M.R. )

    1989-10-01

    A patient with both rest and exercise thallium images for unstable angina demonstrated marked large intestinal uptake of thallium. However, the thallium uptake in the large intestine was noted only after exercise. The only change in the patient status between the two studies was the administration of verapamil. Thus, verapamil administration has been demonstrated to be a new cause for gut uptake of thallium.

  17. Distinct human stem cell populations in small and large intestine.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Julie M; Thompson, Timothy; Geskin, Albert; LaFramboise, William; Lagasse, Eric

    2015-01-01

    The intestine is composed of an epithelial layer containing rapidly proliferating cells that mature into two regions, the small and the large intestine. Although previous studies have identified stem cells as the cell-of-origin for intestinal epithelial cells, no studies have directly compared stem cells derived from these anatomically distinct regions. Here, we examine intrinsic differences between primary epithelial cells isolated from human fetal small and large intestine, after in vitro expansion, using the Wnt agonist R-spondin 2. We utilized flow cytometry, fluorescence-activated cell sorting, gene expression analysis and a three-dimensional in vitro differentiation assay to characterize their stem cell properties. We identified stem cell markers that separate subpopulations of colony-forming cells in the small and large intestine and revealed important differences in differentiation, proliferation and disease pathways using gene expression analysis. Single cells from small and large intestine cultures formed organoids that reflect the distinct cellular hierarchy found in vivo and respond differently to identical exogenous cues. Our characterization identified numerous differences between small and large intestine epithelial stem cells suggesting possible connections to intestinal disease.

  18. Factoring the intestinal microbiome into the pathogenesis of autoimmune hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Czaja, Albert J

    2016-11-14

    The intestinal microbiome is a reservoir of microbial antigens and activated immune cells. The aims of this review were to describe the role of the intestinal microbiome in generating innate and adaptive immune responses, indicate how these responses contribute to the development of systemic immune-mediated diseases, and encourage investigations that improve the understanding and management of autoimmune hepatitis. Alterations in the composition of the intestinal microflora (dysbiosis) can disrupt intestinal and systemic immune tolerances for commensal bacteria. Toll-like receptors within the intestine can recognize microbe-associated molecular patterns and shape subsets of T helper lymphocytes that may cross-react with host antigens (molecular mimicry). Activated gut-derived lymphocytes can migrate to lymph nodes, and gut-derived microbial antigens can translocate to extra-intestinal sites. Inflammasomes can form within hepatocytes and hepatic stellate cells, and they can drive the pro-inflammatory, immune-mediated, and fibrotic responses. Diet, designer probiotics, vitamin supplements, re-colonization methods, antibiotics, drugs that decrease intestinal permeability, and molecular interventions that block signaling pathways may emerge as adjunctive regimens that complement conventional immunosuppressive management. In conclusion, investigations of the intestinal microbiome are warranted in autoimmune hepatitis and promise to clarify pathogenic mechanisms and suggest alternative management strategies.

  19. Intestinal Anisakiasis Treated Successfully with Prednisolone and Olopatadine Hydrochloride

    PubMed Central

    Toyoda, Hideki; Tanaka, Kyosuke

    2016-01-01

    The clinical characteristic of gastrointestinal anisakiasis is severe abdominal pain after eating raw fish. Intestinal anisakiasis is more uncommon than gastric anisakiasis. Most patients with intestinal anisakiasis need hospitalization because anisakiasis can cause intestinal obstruction, ileus, peritonitis or intestinal perforation. We report a case of intestinal anisakiasis. A 43-year-old woman presented with symptoms of intermittent abdominal pain 2 days after eating raw fish. Her brother had eaten the same food and had been suffering from gastric anisakiasis. Abdominal ultrasonography in this patient showed localized jejunal wall thickening with dilated lumen of proximal jejunum and ascites. According to the clinical course and examinations, she was diagnosed with intestinal anisakiasis. Administration of prednisolone 5 mg/day and olopatadine hydrochloride 10 mg/day improved her symptoms quickly without hospitalization. Prednisolone was administered for 10 days, and olopatadine hydrochloride was administered for a total of 6 weeks according to ultrasonographic findings. Six months after the treatment, the abdominal ultrasonography demonstrated normal findings. This case demonstrates that ultrasonography was quite useful for the diagnosis and surveillance of intestinal anisakiasis. Furthermore, treatment with corticosteroid and an antiallergic agent could be an option for patients with intestinal anisakiasis. PMID:27403099

  20. Intestinal Anisakiasis Treated Successfully with Prednisolone and Olopatadine Hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Toyoda, Hideki; Tanaka, Kyosuke

    2016-01-01

    The clinical characteristic of gastrointestinal anisakiasis is severe abdominal pain after eating raw fish. Intestinal anisakiasis is more uncommon than gastric anisakiasis. Most patients with intestinal anisakiasis need hospitalization because anisakiasis can cause intestinal obstruction, ileus, peritonitis or intestinal perforation. We report a case of intestinal anisakiasis. A 43-year-old woman presented with symptoms of intermittent abdominal pain 2 days after eating raw fish. Her brother had eaten the same food and had been suffering from gastric anisakiasis. Abdominal ultrasonography in this patient showed localized jejunal wall thickening with dilated lumen of proximal jejunum and ascites. According to the clinical course and examinations, she was diagnosed with intestinal anisakiasis. Administration of prednisolone 5 mg/day and olopatadine hydrochloride 10 mg/day improved her symptoms quickly without hospitalization. Prednisolone was administered for 10 days, and olopatadine hydrochloride was administered for a total of 6 weeks according to ultrasonographic findings. Six months after the treatment, the abdominal ultrasonography demonstrated normal findings. This case demonstrates that ultrasonography was quite useful for the diagnosis and surveillance of intestinal anisakiasis. Furthermore, treatment with corticosteroid and an antiallergic agent could be an option for patients with intestinal anisakiasis.