Science.gov

Sample records for digital camera technology

  1. High Speed Digital Camera Technology Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clements, Sandra D.

    2009-01-01

    A High Speed Digital Camera Technology Review (HSD Review) is being conducted to evaluate the state-of-the-shelf in this rapidly progressing industry. Five HSD cameras supplied by four camera manufacturers participated in a Field Test during the Space Shuttle Discovery STS-128 launch. Each camera was also subjected to Bench Tests in the ASRC Imaging Development Laboratory. Evaluation of the data from the Field and Bench Tests is underway. Representatives from the imaging communities at NASA / KSC and the Optical Systems Group are participating as reviewers. A High Speed Digital Video Camera Draft Specification was updated to address Shuttle engineering imagery requirements based on findings from this HSD Review. This draft specification will serve as the template for a High Speed Digital Video Camera Specification to be developed for the wider OSG imaging community under OSG Task OS-33.

  2. Those Nifty Digital Cameras!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekhaml, Leticia

    1996-01-01

    Describes digital photography--an electronic imaging technology that merges computer capabilities with traditional photography--and its uses in education. Discusses how a filmless camera works, types of filmless cameras, advantages and disadvantages, and educational applications of the consumer digital cameras. (AEF)

  3. Digital Pinhole Camera

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lancor, Rachael; Lancor, Brian

    2014-01-01

    In this article we describe how the classic pinhole camera demonstration can be adapted for use with digital cameras. Students can easily explore the effects of the size of the pinhole and its distance from the sensor on exposure time, magnification, and image quality. Instructions for constructing a digital pinhole camera and our method for…

  4. 2010 A Digital Odyssey: Exploring Document Camera Technology and Computer Self-Efficacy in a Digital Era

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoge, Robert Joaquin

    2010-01-01

    Within the sphere of education, navigating throughout a digital world has become a matter of necessity for the developing professional, as with the advent of Document Camera Technology (DCT). This study explores the pedagogical implications of implementing DCT; to see if there is a relationship between teachers' comfort with DCT and to the…

  5. Digital Electronic Still Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, Samuel D.; Yeates, Herbert D.

    1993-01-01

    Digital electronic still camera part of electronic recording, processing, tansmitting, and displaying system. Removable hard-disk drive in camera serves as digital electronic equivalent of photographic film. Images viewed, analyzed, or transmitted quickly. Camera takes images of nearly photographic quality and stores them in digital form. Portable, hand-held, battery-powered unit designed for scientific use. Camera used in conjunction with playback unit also serving as transmitting unit if images sent to remote station. Remote station equipped to store, process, and display images. Digital image data encoded with error-correcting code at playback/transmitting unit for error-free transmission to remote station.

  6. Digital camera simulation.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Joyce E; Catrysse, Peter B; Wandell, Brian A

    2012-02-01

    We describe a simulation of the complete image processing pipeline of a digital camera, beginning with a radiometric description of the scene captured by the camera and ending with a radiometric description of the image rendered on a display. We show that there is a good correspondence between measured and simulated sensor performance. Through the use of simulation, we can quantify the effects of individual digital camera components on system performance and image quality. This computational approach can be helpful for both camera design and image quality assessment.

  7. Image Sensors Enhance Camera Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    In the 1990s, a Jet Propulsion Laboratory team led by Eric Fossum researched ways of improving complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) image sensors in order to miniaturize cameras on spacecraft while maintaining scientific image quality. Fossum s team founded a company to commercialize the resulting CMOS active pixel sensor. Now called the Aptina Imaging Corporation, based in San Jose, California, the company has shipped over 1 billion sensors for use in applications such as digital cameras, camera phones, Web cameras, and automotive cameras. Today, one of every three cell phone cameras on the planet feature Aptina s sensor technology.

  8. High-quality virus images obtained by transmission electron microscopy and charge coupled device digital camera technology.

    PubMed

    Tiekotter, Kenneth L; Ackermann, Hans-W

    2009-07-01

    The introduction of digital cameras has led to the publication of numerous virus electron micrographs of low magnification, poor contrast, and low resolution. Described herein is the methodology for obtaining highly contrasted virus images in the magnification range of approximately 250,000-300,000x. Based on recent advances in charged couple device (CCD) digital camera technology, methodology is described for optimal imaging parameters for using CCD cameras mounted in side- and bottom-mount position of electron microscopes and the recommendation of higher accelerating voltages, larger objective apertures, and small spot size. The authors are concerned with the principles of image formation and modulation, advocate a better use of imaging software to improve image quality, and recommend either pre- or post-acquisition adjustment for distributing pixel intensities of compressed histograms over the entire range of tonal values.

  9. A Novel Multi-Digital Camera System Based on Tilt-Shift Photography Technology

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Tao; Fang, Jun-yong; Zhao, Dong; Liu, Xue; Tong, Qing-xi

    2015-01-01

    Multi-digital camera systems (MDCS) are constantly being improved to meet the increasing requirement of high-resolution spatial data. This study identifies the insufficiencies of traditional MDCSs and proposes a new category MDCS based on tilt-shift photography to improve ability of the MDCS to acquire high-accuracy spatial data. A prototype system, including two or four tilt-shift cameras (TSC, camera model: Nikon D90), is developed to validate the feasibility and correctness of proposed MDCS. Similar to the cameras of traditional MDCSs, calibration is also essential for TSC of new MDCS. The study constructs indoor control fields and proposes appropriate calibration methods for TSC, including digital distortion model (DDM) approach and two-step calibrated strategy. The characteristics of TSC are analyzed in detail via a calibration experiment; for example, the edge distortion of TSC. Finally, the ability of the new MDCS to acquire high-accuracy spatial data is verified through flight experiments. The results of flight experiments illustrate that geo-position accuracy of prototype system achieves 0.3 m at a flight height of 800 m, and spatial resolution of 0.15 m. In addition, results of the comparison between the traditional (MADC II) and proposed MDCS demonstrate that the latter (0.3 m) provides spatial data with higher accuracy than the former (only 0.6 m) under the same conditions. We also take the attitude that using higher accuracy TSC in the new MDCS should further improve the accuracy of the photogrammetry senior product. PMID:25835187

  10. Measuring Distances Using Digital Cameras

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kendal, Dave

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a generic method of calculating accurate horizontal and vertical object distances from digital images taken with any digital camera and lens combination, where the object plane is parallel to the image plane or tilted in the vertical plane. This method was developed for a project investigating the size, density and spatial…

  11. Digital Camera Project Fosters Communication Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Ashley; Lazaros, Edward J.

    2009-01-01

    This article details the many benefits of educators' use of digital camera technology and provides an activity in which students practice taking portrait shots of classmates, manipulate the resulting images, and add language arts practice by interviewing their subjects to produce a photo-illustrated Word document. This activity gives…

  12. Teaching with Technology: Step Back and Hand over the Cameras! Using Digital Cameras to Facilitate Mathematics Learning with Young Children in K-2 Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northcote, Maria

    2011-01-01

    Digital cameras are now commonplace in many classrooms and in the lives of many children in early childhood centres and primary schools. They are regularly used by adults and teachers for "saving special moments and documenting experiences." The use of previously expensive photographic and recording equipment has often remained in the domain of…

  13. Digital laser scanning fundus camera.

    PubMed

    Plesch, A; Klingbeil, U; Bille, J

    1987-04-15

    Imaging and documentation of the human retina for clinical diagnostics are conventionally achieved by classical optical methods. We designed a digital laser scanning fundus camera. The optoelectronical instrument is based on scanning laser illumination of the retina and a modified video imaging procedure. It is coupled to a digital image buffer and a microcomputer for image storage and processing. Aside from its high sensitivity the LSF incorporates new ophthalmic imaging methods like polarization differential contrast. We give design considerations as well as a description of the instrument and its performance.

  14. Selecting a digital camera for telemedicine.

    PubMed

    Patricoski, Chris; Ferguson, A Stewart

    2009-06-01

    The digital camera is an essential component of store-and-forward telemedicine (electronic consultation). There are numerous makes and models of digital cameras on the market, and selecting a suitable consumer-grade camera can be complicated. Evaluation of digital cameras includes investigating the features and analyzing image quality. Important features include the camera settings, ease of use, macro capabilities, method of image transfer, and power recharging. Consideration needs to be given to image quality, especially as it relates to color (skin tones) and detail. It is important to know the level of the photographer and the intended application. The goal is to match the characteristics of the camera with the telemedicine program requirements. In the end, selecting a digital camera is a combination of qualitative (subjective) and quantitative (objective) analysis. For the telemedicine program in Alaska in 2008, the camera evaluation and decision process resulted in a specific selection based on the criteria developed for our environment.

  15. Flash photography by digital still camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Yoshitaka

    2001-04-01

    Recently, the number of commercially produced digital still cameras has increases rapidly. However, detailed performance of digital still camera had not been evaluated. One of the purposes of this paper is to devise the method of evaluating the performance of a new camera. Another purpose is to show possibility of taking a picture of a scientific high quality photograph with a camera on the market, and taking a picture of a high-speed phenomenon.

  16. Smart Camera Technology Increases Quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    When it comes to real-time image processing, everyone is an expert. People begin processing images at birth and rapidly learn to control their responses through the real-time processing of the human visual system. The human eye captures an enormous amount of information in the form of light images. In order to keep the brain from becoming overloaded with all the data, portions of an image are processed at a higher resolution than others, such as a traffic light changing colors. changing colors. In the same manner, image processing products strive to extract the information stored in light in the most efficient way possible. Digital cameras available today capture millions of pixels worth of information from incident light. However, at frame rates more than a few per second, existing digital interfaces are overwhelmed. All the user can do is store several frames to memory until that memory is full and then subsequent information is lost. New technology pairs existing digital interface technology with an off-the-shelf complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) imager to provide more than 500 frames per second of specialty image processing. The result is a cost-effective detection system unlike any other.

  17. High-performance digital color video camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parulski, Kenneth A.; D'Luna, Lionel J.; Benamati, Brian L.; Shelley, Paul R.

    1992-01-01

    Typical one-chip color cameras use analog video processing circuits. An improved digital camera architecture has been developed using a dual-slope A/D conversion technique and two full-custom CMOS digital video processing integrated circuits, the color filter array (CFA) processor and the RGB postprocessor. The system used a 768 X 484 active element interline transfer CCD with a new field-staggered 3G color filter pattern and a lenslet overlay, which doubles the sensitivity of the camera. The industrial-quality digital camera design offers improved image quality, reliability, manufacturability, while meeting aggressive size, power, and cost constraints. The CFA processor digital VLSI chip includes color filter interpolation processing, an optical black clamp, defect correction, white balance, and gain control. The RGB postprocessor digital integrated circuit includes a color correction matrix, gamma correction, 2D edge enhancement, and circuits to control the black balance, lens aperture, and focus.

  18. High-performance digital color video camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parulski, Kenneth A.; Benamati, Brian L.; D'Luna, Lionel J.; Shelley, Paul R.

    1991-06-01

    Typical one-chip color cameras use analog video processing circuits. An improved digital camera architecture has been developed using a dual-slope A/D conversion technique, and two full custom CMOS digital video processing ICs, the 'CFA processor' and the 'RGB post- processor.' The system uses a 768 X 484 active element interline transfer CCD with a new 'field-staggered 3G' color filter pattern and a 'lenslet' overlay, which doubles the sensitivity of the camera. The digital camera design offers improved image quality, reliability, and manufacturability, while meeting aggressive size, power, and cost constraints. The CFA processor digital VLSI chip includes color filter interpolation processing, an optical black clamp, defect correction, white balance, and gain control. The RGB post-processor digital IC includes a color correction matrix, gamma correction, two-dimensional edge-enhancement, and circuits to control the black balance, lens aperture, and focus.

  19. Tips and Tricks for Digital Camera Users.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekhaml, Leticia

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the use of digital cameras in school library media centers and offers suggestions for teachers and students in elementary schools. Describes appropriate image-editing software; explains how to create panoramas, screen savers, and coloring books; and includes useful tips for digital photographers. (LRW)

  20. Camera! Action! Collaborate with Digital Moviemaking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swan, Kathleen Owings; Hofer, Mark; Levstik, Linda S.

    2007-01-01

    Broadly defined, digital moviemaking integrates a variety of media (images, sound, text, video, narration) to communicate with an audience. There is near-ubiquitous access to the necessary software (MovieMaker and iMovie are bundled free with their respective operating systems) and hardware (computers with Internet access, digital cameras, etc.).…

  1. An Inexpensive Digital Infrared Camera

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Allan

    2012-01-01

    Details are given for the conversion of an inexpensive webcam to a camera specifically sensitive to the near infrared (700-1000 nm). Some experiments and practical applications are suggested and illustrated. (Contains 9 figures.)

  2. A stereoscopic lens for digital cinema cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipton, Lenny; Rupkalvis, John

    2015-03-01

    Live-action stereoscopic feature films are, for the most part, produced using a costly post-production process to convert planar cinematography into stereo-pair images and are only occasionally shot stereoscopically using bulky dual-cameras that are adaptations of the Ramsdell rig. The stereoscopic lens design described here might very well encourage more live-action image capture because it uses standard digital cinema cameras and workflow to save time and money.

  3. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Photometric Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunn, J. E.; Carr, M.; Rockosi, C.; Sekiguchi, M.; Berry, K.; Elms, B.; de Haas, E.; Ivezić, Ž .; Knapp, G.; Lupton, R.; Pauls, G.; Simcoe, R.; Hirsch, R.; Sanford, D.; Wang, S.; York, D.; Harris, F.; Annis, J.; Bartozek, L.; Boroski, W.; Bakken, J.; Haldeman, M.; Kent, S.; Holm, S.; Holmgren, D.; Petravick, D.; Prosapio, A.; Rechenmacher, R.; Doi, M.; Fukugita, M.; Shimasaku, K.; Okada, N.; Hull, C.; Siegmund, W.; Mannery, E.; Blouke, M.; Heidtman, D.; Schneider, D.; Lucinio, R.; Brinkman, J.

    1998-12-01

    We have constructed a large-format mosaic CCD camera for the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The camera consists of two arrays, a photometric array that uses 30 2048 x 2048 SITe/Tektronix CCDs (24 μm pixels) with an effective imaging area of 720 cm^2 and an astrometric array that uses 24 400 x 2048 CCDs with the same pixel size, which will allow us to tie bright astrometric standard stars to the objects imaged in the photometric camera. The instrument will be used to carry out photometry essentially simultaneously in five color bands spanning the range accessible to silicon detectors on the ground in the time-delay-and-integrate (TDI) scanning mode. The photometric detectors are arrayed in the focal plane in six columns of five chips each such that two scans cover a filled stripe 2.5d wide. This paper presents engineering and technical details of the camera.

  4. National Guidelines for Digital Camera Systems Certification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaron, Yaron; Keinan, Eran; Benhamu, Moshe; Regev, Ronen; Zalmanzon, Garry

    2016-06-01

    Digital camera systems are a key component in the production of reliable, geometrically accurate, high-resolution geospatial products. These systems have replaced film imaging in photogrammetric data capturing. Today, we see a proliferation of imaging sensors collecting photographs in different ground resolutions, spectral bands, swath sizes, radiometric characteristics, accuracies and carried on different mobile platforms. In addition, these imaging sensors are combined with navigational tools (such as GPS and IMU), active sensors such as laser scanning and powerful processing tools to obtain high quality geospatial products. The quality (accuracy, completeness, consistency, etc.) of these geospatial products is based on the use of calibrated, high-quality digital camera systems. The new survey regulations of the state of Israel specify the quality requirements for each geospatial product including: maps at different scales and for different purposes, elevation models, orthophotographs, three-dimensional models at different levels of details (LOD) and more. In addition, the regulations require that digital camera systems used for mapping purposes should be certified using a rigorous mapping systems certification and validation process which is specified in the Director General Instructions. The Director General Instructions for digital camera systems certification specify a two-step process as follows: 1. Theoretical analysis of system components that includes: study of the accuracy of each component and an integrative error propagation evaluation, examination of the radiometric and spectral response curves for the imaging sensors, the calibration requirements, and the working procedures. 2. Empirical study of the digital mapping system that examines a typical project (product scale, flight height, number and configuration of ground control points and process). The study examine all the aspects of the final product including; its accuracy, the product pixels size

  5. Toward a digital camera to rival the human eye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skorka, Orit; Joseph, Dileepan

    2011-07-01

    All things considered, electronic imaging systems do not rival the human visual system despite notable progress over 40 years since the invention of the CCD. This work presents a method that allows design engineers to evaluate the performance gap between a digital camera and the human eye. The method identifies limiting factors of the electronic systems by benchmarking against the human system. It considers power consumption, visual field, spatial resolution, temporal resolution, and properties related to signal and noise power. A figure of merit is defined as the performance gap of the weakest parameter. Experimental work done with observers and cadavers is reviewed to assess the parameters of the human eye, and assessment techniques are also covered for digital cameras. The method is applied to 24 modern image sensors of various types, where an ideal lens is assumed to complete a digital camera. Results indicate that dynamic range and dark limit are the most limiting factors. The substantial functional gap, from 1.6 to 4.5 orders of magnitude, between the human eye and digital cameras may arise from architectural differences between the human retina, arranged in a multiple-layer structure, and image sensors, mostly fabricated in planar technologies. Functionality of image sensors may be significantly improved by exploiting technologies that allow vertical stacking of active tiers.

  6. Practical aspects of adjusting digital cameras.

    PubMed

    Nordberg, Joshua J; Sluder, Greenfield

    2013-01-01

    This chapter introduces the adjustment of digital camera settings using the tools found within image acquisition software and discusses measuring gray-level information such as (1) the histogram, (2) line scan, and (3) other strategies. The pixel values in an image can be measured within many image capture software programs in two ways. The first is a histogram of pixel gray values and the second is a line-scan plot across a selectable axis of the image. Understanding how to evaluate the information presented by these tools is critical to properly adjusting the camera to maximize the image contrast without losing grayscale information. This chapter discusses the 0-255 grayscale resolution of an 8-bit camera; however, the concepts are the same for cameras of any bit depth. This chapter also describes camera settings, such as exposure time, offset, and gain, and the steps for contrast stretching such as setting the exposure time, adjusting offset and gain, and camera versus image display controls.

  7. Digital Earth Watch: Investigating the World with Digital Cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gould, A. D.; Schloss, A. L.; Beaudry, J.; Pickle, J.

    2015-12-01

    Every digital camera including the smart phone camera can be a scientific tool. Pictures contain millions of color intensity measurements organized spatially allowing us to measure properties of objects in the images. This presentation will demonstrate how digital pictures can be used for a variety of studies with a special emphasis on using repeat digital photographs to study change-over-time in outdoor settings with a Picture Post. Demonstrations will include using inexpensive color filters to take pictures that enhance features in images such as unhealthy leaves on plants, or clouds in the sky. Software available at no cost from the Digital Earth Watch (DEW) website that lets students explore light, color and pixels, manipulate color in images and make measurements, will be demonstrated. DEW and Picture Post were developed with support from NASA. Please visit our websites: DEW: http://dew.globalsystemsscience.orgPicture Post: http://picturepost.unh.edu

  8. X-ray imaging using digital cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winch, Nicola M.; Edgar, Andrew

    2012-03-01

    The possibility of using the combination of a computed radiography (storage phosphor) cassette and a semiprofessional grade digital camera for medical or dental radiography is investigated. We compare the performance of (i) a Canon 5D Mk II single lens reflex camera with f1.4 lens and full-frame CMOS array sensor and (ii) a cooled CCD-based camera with a 1/3 frame sensor and the same lens system. Both systems are tested with 240 x 180 mm cassettes which are based on either powdered europium-doped barium fluoride bromide or needle structure europium-doped cesium bromide. The modulation transfer function for both systems has been determined and falls to a value of 0.2 at around 2 lp/mm, and is limited by light scattering of the emitted light from the storage phosphor rather than the optics or sensor pixelation. The modulation transfer function for the CsBr:Eu2+ plate is bimodal, with a high frequency wing which is attributed to the light-guiding behaviour of the needle structure. The detective quantum efficiency has been determined using a radioisotope source and is comparatively low at 0.017 for the CMOS camera and 0.006 for the CCD camera, attributed to the poor light harvesting by the lens. The primary advantages of the method are portability, robustness, digital imaging and low cost; the limitations are the low detective quantum efficiency and hence signal-to-noise ratio for medical doses, and restricted range of plate sizes. Representative images taken with medical doses are shown and illustrate the potential use for portable basic radiography.

  9. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Photometric Camera

    SciTech Connect

    Gunn, J.E.; Carr, M.; Rockosi, C.; Sekiguchi, M.; Berry, K.; Elms, B.; de Haas, E.; Ivezic, Z.; Knapp, G.; Lupton, R.; Pauls, G.; Simcoe, R.; Hirsch, R.; Sanford, D.; Wang, S.; York, D.; Harris, F.; Annis, J.; Bartozek, L.; Boroski, W.; Bakken, J.; Haldeman, M.; Kent, S.; Holm, S.; Holmgren, D.; Petravick, D.; Prosapio, A.; Rechenmacher, R.; Doi, M.; Fukugita, M.; Shimasaku, K.; Okada, N.; Hull, C.; Siegmund, W.; Mannery, E.; Blouke, M.; Heidtman, D.; Schneider, D.; Lucinio, R.; and others

    1998-12-01

    We have constructed a large-format mosaic CCD camera for the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The camera consists of two arrays, a photometric array that uses 30 2048 {times} 2048 SITe/Tektronix CCDs (24 {mu}m pixels) with an effective imaging area of 720 cm{sup 2} and an astrometric array that uses 24 400 {times} 2048 CCDs with the same pixel size, which will allow us to tie bright astrometric standard stars to the objects imaged in the photometric camera. The instrument will be used to carry out photometry essentially simultaneously in five color bands spanning the range accessible to silicon detectors on the ground in the time-delay{endash}and{endash}integrate (TDI) scanning mode. The photometric detectors are arrayed in the focal plane in six columns of five chips each such that two scans cover a filled stripe 2&arcdeg;5 wide. This paper presents engineering and technical details of the camera. {copyright} {ital {copyright} 1998.} {ital The American Astronomical Society}

  10. Digital Camera Control for Faster Inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Katharine; Siekierski, James D.; Mangieri, Mark L.; Dekome, Kent; Cobarruvias, John; Piplani, Perry J.; Busa, Joel

    2009-01-01

    Digital Camera Control Software (DCCS) is a computer program for controlling a boom and a boom-mounted camera used to inspect the external surface of a space shuttle in orbit around the Earth. Running in a laptop computer in the space-shuttle crew cabin, DCCS commands integrated displays and controls. By means of a simple one-button command, a crewmember can view low- resolution images to quickly spot problem areas and can then cause a rapid transition to high- resolution images. The crewmember can command that camera settings apply to a specific small area of interest within the field of view of the camera so as to maximize image quality within that area. DCCS also provides critical high-resolution images to a ground screening team, which analyzes the images to assess damage (if any); in so doing, DCCS enables the team to clear initially suspect areas more quickly than would otherwise be possible and further saves time by minimizing the probability of re-imaging of areas already inspected. On the basis of experience with a previous version (2.0) of the software, the present version (3.0) incorporates a number of advanced imaging features that optimize crewmember capability and efficiency.

  11. Process simulation in digital camera system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toadere, Florin

    2012-06-01

    The goal of this paper is to simulate the functionality of a digital camera system. The simulations cover the conversion from light to numerical signal and the color processing and rendering. We consider the image acquisition system to be linear shift invariant and axial. The light propagation is orthogonal to the system. We use a spectral image processing algorithm in order to simulate the radiometric properties of a digital camera. In the algorithm we take into consideration the transmittances of the: light source, lenses, filters and the quantum efficiency of a CMOS (complementary metal oxide semiconductor) sensor. The optical part is characterized by a multiple convolution between the different points spread functions of the optical components. We use a Cooke triplet, the aperture, the light fall off and the optical part of the CMOS sensor. The electrical part consists of the: Bayer sampling, interpolation, signal to noise ratio, dynamic range, analog to digital conversion and JPG compression. We reconstruct the noisy blurred image by blending different light exposed images in order to reduce the photon shot noise, also we filter the fixed pattern noise and we sharpen the image. Then we have the color processing blocks: white balancing, color correction, gamma correction, and conversion from XYZ color space to RGB color space. For the reproduction of color we use an OLED (organic light emitting diode) monitor. The analysis can be useful to assist students and engineers in image quality evaluation and imaging system design. Many other configurations of blocks can be used in our analysis.

  12. Digital Sensor Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Ted Quinn; Jerry Mauck; Richard Bockhorst; Ken Thomas

    2013-07-01

    The nuclear industry has been slow to incorporate digital sensor technology into nuclear plant designs due to concerns with digital qualification issues. However, the benefits of digital sensor technology for nuclear plant instrumentation are substantial in terms of accuracy, reliability, availability, and maintainability. This report demonstrates these benefits in direct comparisons of digital and analog sensor applications. It also addresses the qualification issues that must be addressed in the application of digital sensor technology.

  13. Practical target location and accuracy indicator in digital close range photogrammetry using consumer grade cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriya, Gentaro; Chikatsu, Hirofumi

    2011-07-01

    Recently, pixel numbers and functions of consumer grade digital camera are amazingly increasing by modern semiconductor and digital technology, and there are many low-priced consumer grade digital cameras which have more than 10 mega pixels on the market in Japan. In these circumstances, digital photogrammetry using consumer grade cameras is enormously expected in various application fields. There is a large body of literature on calibration of consumer grade digital cameras and circular target location. Target location with subpixel accuracy had been investigated as a star tracker issue, and many target location algorithms have been carried out. It is widely accepted that the least squares models with ellipse fitting is the most accurate algorithm. However, there are still problems for efficient digital close range photogrammetry. These problems are reconfirmation of the target location algorithms with subpixel accuracy for consumer grade digital cameras, relationship between number of edge points along target boundary and accuracy, and an indicator for estimating the accuracy of normal digital close range photogrammetry using consumer grade cameras. With this motive, an empirical testing of several algorithms for target location with subpixel accuracy and an indicator for estimating the accuracy are investigated in this paper using real data which were acquired indoors using 7 consumer grade digital cameras which have 7.2 mega pixels to 14.7 mega pixels.

  14. Measurement of solar extinction in tower plants with digital cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballestrín, J.; Monterreal, R.; Carra, M. E.; Fernandez-Reche, J.; Barbero, J.; Marzo, A.

    2016-05-01

    Atmospheric extinction of solar radiation between the heliostat field and the receiver is accepted as a non-negligible source of energy loss in the increasingly large central receiver plants. However, the reality is that there is currently no reliable measurement method for this quantity and at present these plants are designed, built and operated without knowing this local parameter. Nowadays digital cameras are used in many scientific applications for their ability to convert available light into digital images. Its broad spectral range, high resolution and high signal to noise ratio, make them an interesting device in solar technology. In this work a method for atmospheric extinction measurement based on digital images is presented. The possibility of defining a measurement setup in circumstances similar to those of a tower plant increases the credibility of the method. This procedure is currently being implemented at Plataforma Solar de Almería.

  15. Quality criterion for digital still camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezryadin, Sergey

    2007-02-01

    The main quality requirements for a digital still camera are color capturing accuracy, low noise level, and quantum efficiency. Different consumers assign different priorities to the listed parameters, and camera designers need clearly formulated methods for their evaluation. While there are procedures providing noise level and quantum efficiency estimation, there are no effective means for color capturing accuracy estimation. Introduced in this paper criterion allows to fill this gap. Luther-Ives condition for correct color reproduction system became known in the beginning of the last century. However, since no detector system satisfies Luther-Ives condition, there are always stimuli that are distinctly different for an observer, but which detectors are unable to distinguish. To estimate conformity of a detector set with Luther-Ives condition and calculate a measure of discrepancy, an angle between detector sensor sensitivity and Cohen's Fundamental Color Space may be used. In this paper, the divergence angle is calculated for some typical CCD sensors and a demonstration provided on how this angle might be reduced with a corrective filter. In addition, it is shown that with a specific corrective filter Foveon sensors turn into a detector system with a good Luther-Ives condition compliance.

  16. Methods for identification of images acquired with digital cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geradts, Zeno J.; Bijhold, Jurrien; Kieft, Martijn; Kurosawa, Kenji; Kuroki, Kenro; Saitoh, Naoki

    2001-02-01

    From the court we were asked whether it is possible to determine if an image has been made with a specific digital camera. This question has to be answered in child pornography cases, where evidence is needed that a certain picture has been made with a specific camera. We have looked into different methods of examining the cameras to determine if a specific image has been made with a camera: defects in CCDs, file formats that are used, noise introduced by the pixel arrays and watermarking in images used by the camera manufacturer.

  17. Digital cameras with designs inspired by the arthropod eye.

    PubMed

    Song, Young Min; Xie, Yizhu; Malyarchuk, Viktor; Xiao, Jianliang; Jung, Inhwa; Choi, Ki-Joong; Liu, Zhuangjian; Park, Hyunsung; Lu, Chaofeng; Kim, Rak-Hwan; Li, Rui; Crozier, Kenneth B; Huang, Yonggang; Rogers, John A

    2013-05-02

    In arthropods, evolution has created a remarkably sophisticated class of imaging systems, with a wide-angle field of view, low aberrations, high acuity to motion and an infinite depth of field. A challenge in building digital cameras with the hemispherical, compound apposition layouts of arthropod eyes is that essential design requirements cannot be met with existing planar sensor technologies or conventional optics. Here we present materials, mechanics and integration schemes that afford scalable pathways to working, arthropod-inspired cameras with nearly full hemispherical shapes (about 160 degrees). Their surfaces are densely populated by imaging elements (artificial ommatidia), which are comparable in number (180) to those of the eyes of fire ants (Solenopsis fugax) and bark beetles (Hylastes nigrinus). The devices combine elastomeric compound optical elements with deformable arrays of thin silicon photodetectors into integrated sheets that can be elastically transformed from the planar geometries in which they are fabricated to hemispherical shapes for integration into apposition cameras. Our imaging results and quantitative ray-tracing-based simulations illustrate key features of operation. These general strategies seem to be applicable to other compound eye devices, such as those inspired by moths and lacewings (refracting superposition eyes), lobster and shrimp (reflecting superposition eyes), and houseflies (neural superposition eyes).

  18. A Simple Spectrophotometer Using Common Materials and a Digital Camera

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Widiatmoko, Eko; Widayani; Budiman, Maman; Abdullah, Mikrajuddin; Khairurrijal

    2011-01-01

    A simple spectrophotometer was designed using cardboard, a DVD, a pocket digital camera, a tripod and a computer. The DVD was used as a diffraction grating and the camera as a light sensor. The spectrophotometer was calibrated using a reference light prior to use. The spectrophotometer was capable of measuring optical wavelengths with a…

  19. CMOS Imaging Sensor Technology for Aerial Mapping Cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, Klaus; Welzenbach, Martin; Timm, Martin

    2016-06-01

    In June 2015 Leica Geosystems launched the first large format aerial mapping camera using CMOS sensor technology, the Leica DMC III. This paper describes the motivation to change from CCD sensor technology to CMOS for the development of this new aerial mapping camera. In 2002 the DMC first generation was developed by Z/I Imaging. It was the first large format digital frame sensor designed for mapping applications. In 2009 Z/I Imaging designed the DMC II which was the first digital aerial mapping camera using a single ultra large CCD sensor to avoid stitching of smaller CCDs. The DMC III is now the third generation of large format frame sensor developed by Z/I Imaging and Leica Geosystems for the DMC camera family. It is an evolution of the DMC II using the same system design with one large monolithic PAN sensor and four multi spectral camera heads for R,G, B and NIR. For the first time a 391 Megapixel large CMOS sensor had been used as PAN chromatic sensor, which is an industry record. Along with CMOS technology goes a range of technical benefits. The dynamic range of the CMOS sensor is approx. twice the range of a comparable CCD sensor and the signal to noise ratio is significantly better than with CCDs. Finally results from the first DMC III customer installations and test flights will be presented and compared with other CCD based aerial sensors.

  20. Characterizing Digital Camera Systems: A Prelude to Data Standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Robert

    2002-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation profiles: 1) Digital imaging systems; 2) Specifying a digital imagery product; and 3) Characterization of data acquisition systems. Advanced large array digital imaging systems are routinely being used. Digital imagery guidelines are being developed by ASPRS and ISPRS. Guidelines and standards are of little use without standardized characterization methods. Characterization of digital camera systems is important for supporting digital imagery guidelines. Specifications are characterized in the lab and/or the field. Laboratory characterization is critical for optimizing and defining performance. In-flight characterization is necessary for an end-to-end system test.

  1. Seeing elements by visible-light digital camera.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wenyang; Sakurai, Kenji

    2017-03-31

    A visible-light digital camera is used for taking ordinary photos, but with new operational procedures it can measure the photon energy in the X-ray wavelength region and therefore see chemical elements. This report describes how one can observe X-rays by means of such an ordinary camera - The front cover of the camera is replaced by an opaque X-ray window to block visible light and to allow X-rays to pass; the camera takes many snap shots (called single-photon-counting mode) to record every photon event individually; an integrated-filtering method is newly proposed to correctly retrieve the energy of photons from raw camera images. Finally, the retrieved X-ray energy-dispersive spectra show fine energy resolution and great accuracy in energy calibration, and therefore the visible-light digital camera can be applied to routine X-ray fluorescence measurement to analyze the element composition in unknown samples. In addition, the visible-light digital camera is promising in that it could serve as a position sensitive X-ray energy detector. It may become able to measure the element map or chemical diffusion in a multi-element system if it is fabricated with external X-ray optic devices. Owing to the camera's low expense and fine pixel size, the present method will be widely applied to the analysis of chemical elements as well as imaging.

  2. Digital Sensor Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Ken D.; Quinn, Edward L.; Mauck, Jerry L.; Bockhorst, Richard M.

    2015-02-01

    The nuclear industry has been slow to incorporate digital sensor technology into nuclear plant designs due to concerns with digital qualification issues. However, the benefits of digital sensor technology for nuclear plant instrumentation are substantial in terms of accuracy and reliability. This paper, which refers to a final report issued in 2013, demonstrates these benefits in direct comparisons of digital and analog sensor applications. Improved accuracy results from the superior operating characteristics of digital sensors. These include improvements in sensor accuracy and drift and other related parameters which reduce total loop uncertainty and thereby increase safety and operating margins. An example instrument loop uncertainty calculation for a pressure sensor application is presented to illustrate these improvements. This is a side-by-side comparison of the instrument loop uncertainty for both an analog and a digital sensor in the same pressure measurement application. Similarly, improved sensor reliability is illustrated with a sample calculation for determining the probability of failure on demand, an industry standard reliability measure. This looks at equivalent analog and digital temperature sensors to draw the comparison. The results confirm substantial reliability improvement with the digital sensor, due in large part to ability to continuously monitor the health of a digital sensor such that problems can be immediately identified and corrected. This greatly reduces the likelihood of a latent failure condition of the sensor at the time of a design basis event. Notwithstanding the benefits of digital sensors, there are certain qualification issues that are inherent with digital technology and these are described in the report. One major qualification impediment for digital sensor implementation is software common cause failure (SCCF).

  3. Digital Actuator Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Ken Thomas; Ted Quinn; Jerry Mauck; Richard Bockhorst

    2014-09-01

    There are significant developments underway in new types of actuators for power plant active components. Many of these make use of digital technology to provide a wide array of benefits in performance of the actuators and in reduced burden to maintain them. These new product offerings have gained considerable acceptance in use in process plants. In addition, they have been used in conventional power generation very successfully. This technology has been proven to deliver the benefits promised and substantiate the claims of improved performance. The nuclear industry has been reluctant to incorporate digital actuator technology into nuclear plant designs due to concerns due to a number of concerns. These could be summarized as cost, regulatory uncertainty, and a certain comfort factor with legacy analog technology. The replacement opportunity for these types of components represents a decision point for whether to invest in more modern technology that would provide superior operational and maintenance benefits. Yet, the application of digital technology has been problematic for the nuclear industry, due to qualification and regulatory issues. With some notable exceptions, the result has been a continuing reluctance to undertake the risks and uncertainties of implementing digital actuator technology when replacement opportunities present themselves. Rather, utilities would typically prefer to accept the performance limitations of the legacy analog actuator technologies to avoid impacts to project costs and schedules. The purpose of this report is to demonstrate that the benefits of digital actuator technology can be significant in terms of plant performance and that it is worthwhile to address the barriers currently holding back the widespread development and use of this technology. It addresses two important objectives in pursuit of the beneficial use of digital actuator technology for nuclear power plants: 1. To demonstrate the benefits of digital actuator

  4. Seeing elements by visible-light digital camera

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Wenyang; Sakurai, Kenji

    2017-01-01

    A visible-light digital camera is used for taking ordinary photos, but with new operational procedures it can measure the photon energy in the X-ray wavelength region and therefore see chemical elements. This report describes how one can observe X-rays by means of such an ordinary camera - The front cover of the camera is replaced by an opaque X-ray window to block visible light and to allow X-rays to pass; the camera takes many snap shots (called single-photon-counting mode) to record every photon event individually; an integrated-filtering method is newly proposed to correctly retrieve the energy of photons from raw camera images. Finally, the retrieved X-ray energy-dispersive spectra show fine energy resolution and great accuracy in energy calibration, and therefore the visible-light digital camera can be applied to routine X-ray fluorescence measurement to analyze the element composition in unknown samples. In addition, the visible-light digital camera is promising in that it could serve as a position sensitive X-ray energy detector. It may become able to measure the element map or chemical diffusion in a multi-element system if it is fabricated with external X-ray optic devices. Owing to the camera’s low expense and fine pixel size, the present method will be widely applied to the analysis of chemical elements as well as imaging. PMID:28361916

  5. A digital gigapixel large-format tile-scan camera.

    PubMed

    Ben-Ezra, M

    2011-01-01

    Although the resolution of single-lens reflex (SLR) and medium-format digital cameras has increased in recent years, applications for cultural-heritage preservation and computational photography require even higher resolutions. Addressing this issue, a large-format cameras' large image planes can achieve very high resolution without compromising pixel size and thus can provide high-quality, high-resolution images.This digital large-format tile scan camera can acquire high-quality, high-resolution images of static scenes. It employs unique calibration techniques and a simple algorithm for focal-stack processing of very large images with significant magnification variations. The camera automatically collects overlapping focal stacks and processes them into a high-resolution, extended-depth-of-field image.

  6. Design and implementation of digital airborne multispectral camera system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Zhaorong; Zhang, Xuguo; Wang, Li; Pan, Deai

    2012-10-01

    The multispectral imaging equipment is a kind of new generation remote sensor, which can obtain the target image and the spectra information simultaneously. A digital airborne multispectral camera system using discrete filter method had been designed and implemented for unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) and manned aircraft platforms. The digital airborne multispectral camera system has the advantages of larger frame, higher resolution, panchromatic and multispectral imaging. It also has great potential applications in the fields of environmental and agricultural monitoring and target detection and discrimination. In order to enhance the measurement precision and accuracy of position and orientation, Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) is integrated in the digital airborne multispectral camera. Meanwhile, the Temperature Control Unit (TCU) guarantees that the camera can operate in the normal state in different altitudes to avoid the window fogging and frosting which will degrade the imaging quality greatly. Finally, Flying experiments were conducted to demonstrate the functionality and performance of the digital airborne multispectral camera. The resolution capability, positioning accuracy and classification and recognition ability were validated.

  7. Reconstructing spectral reflectance from digital camera through samples selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Bin; Liao, Ningfang; Yang, Wenming; Chen, Haobo

    2016-10-01

    Spectral reflectance provides the most fundamental information of objects and is recognized as the "fingerprint" of them, since reflectance is independent of illumination and viewing conditions. However, reconstructing high-dimensional spectral reflectance from relatively low-dimensional camera outputs is an illposed problem and most of methods requaired camera's spectral responsivity. We propose a method to reconstruct spectral reflectance from digital camera outputs without prior knowledge of camera's spectral responsivity. This method respectively averages reflectances of selected subset from main training samples by prescribing a limit to tolerable color difference between the training samples and the camera outputs. Different tolerable color differences of training samples were investigated with Munsell chips under D65 light source. Experimental results show that the proposed method outperforms classic PI method in terms of multiple evaluation criteria between the actual and the reconstructed reflectances. Besides, the reconstructed spectral reflectances are between 0-1, which make them have actual physical meanings and better than traditional methods.

  8. Review of up-to date digital cameras interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linkemann, Joachim

    2013-04-01

    Over the past 15 years, various interfaces on digital industrial cameras have been available on the market. This tutorial will give an overview of interfaces such as LVDS (RS644), Channel Link and Camera Link. In addition, other interfaces such as FireWire, Gigabit Ethernet, and now USB 3.0 have become more popular. Owing to their ease of use, these interfaces cover most of the market. Nevertheless, for certain applications and especially for higher bandwidths, Camera Link and CoaXPress are very useful. This tutorial will give a description of the advantages and disadvantages, comment on bandwidths, and provide recommendations on when to use which interface.

  9. Small Orbital Stereo Tracking Camera Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryan, Tom; MacLeod, Todd; Gagliano, Larry

    2016-01-01

    On-Orbit Small Debris Tracking and Characterization is a technical gap in the current National Space Situational Awareness necessary to safeguard orbital assets and crew. This poses a major risk of MOD damage to ISS and Exploration vehicles. In 2015 this technology was added to NASA's Office of Chief Technologist roadmap. For missions flying in or assembled in or staging from LEO, the physical threat to vehicle and crew is needed in order to properly design the proper level of MOD impact shielding and proper mission design restrictions. Need to verify debris flux and size population versus ground RADAR tracking. Use of ISS for In-Situ Orbital Debris Tracking development provides attitude, power, data and orbital access without a dedicated spacecraft or restricted operations on-board a host vehicle as a secondary payload. Sensor Applicable to in-situ measuring orbital debris in flux and population in other orbits or on other vehicles. Could enhance safety on and around ISS. Some technologies extensible to monitoring of extraterrestrial debris as well To help accomplish this, new technologies must be developed quickly. The Small Orbital Stereo Tracking Camera is one such up and coming technology. It consists of flying a pair of intensified megapixel telephoto cameras to evaluate Orbital Debris (OD) monitoring in proximity of International Space Station. It will demonstrate on-orbit optical tracking (in situ) of various sized objects versus ground RADAR tracking and small OD models. The cameras are based on Flight Proven Advanced Video Guidance Sensor pixel to spot algorithms (Orbital Express) and military targeting cameras. And by using twin cameras we can provide Stereo images for ranging & mission redundancy. When pointed into the orbital velocity vector (RAM), objects approaching or near the stereo camera set can be differentiated from the stars moving upward in background.

  10. Small Orbital Stereo Tracking Camera Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryan, Tom; Macleod, Todd; Gagliano, Larry

    2015-01-01

    On-Orbit Small Debris Tracking and Characterization is a technical gap in the current National Space Situational Awareness necessary to safeguard orbital assets and crew. This poses a major risk of MOD damage to ISS and Exploration vehicles. In 2015 this technology was added to NASA's Office of Chief Technologist roadmap. For missions flying in or assembled in or staging from LEO, the physical threat to vehicle and crew is needed in order to properly design the proper level of MOD impact shielding and proper mission design restrictions. Need to verify debris flux and size population versus ground RADAR tracking. Use of ISS for In-Situ Orbital Debris Tracking development provides attitude, power, data and orbital access without a dedicated spacecraft or restricted operations on-board a host vehicle as a secondary payload. Sensor Applicable to in-situ measuring orbital debris in flux and population in other orbits or on other vehicles. Could enhance safety on and around ISS. Some technologies extensible to monitoring of extraterrestrial debris as well to help accomplish this, new technologies must be developed quickly. The Small Orbital Stereo Tracking Camera is one such up and coming technology. It consists of flying a pair of intensified megapixel telephoto cameras to evaluate Orbital Debris (OD) monitoring in proximity of International Space Station. It will demonstrate on-orbit optical tracking (in situ) of various sized objects versus ground RADAR tracking and small OD models. The cameras are based on Flight Proven Advanced Video Guidance Sensor pixel to spot algorithms (Orbital Express) and military targeting cameras. And by using twin cameras we can provide Stereo images for ranging & mission redundancy. When pointed into the orbital velocity vector (RAM), objects approaching or near the stereo camera set can be differentiated from the stars moving upward in background.

  11. Small Orbital Stereo Tracking Camera Technology Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagliano, L.; Bryan, T.; MacLeod, T.

    On-Orbit Small Debris Tracking and Characterization is a technical gap in the current National Space Situational Awareness necessary to safeguard orbital assets and crew. This poses a major risk of MOD damage to ISS and Exploration vehicles. In 2015 this technology was added to NASAs Office of Chief Technologist roadmap. For missions flying in or assembled in or staging from LEO, the physical threat to vehicle and crew is needed in order to properly design the proper level of MOD impact shielding and proper mission design restrictions. Need to verify debris flux and size population versus ground RADAR tracking. Use of ISS for In-Situ Orbital Debris Tracking development provides attitude, power, data and orbital access without a dedicated spacecraft or restricted operations on-board a host vehicle as a secondary payload. Sensor Applicable to in-situ measuring orbital debris in flux and population in other orbits or on other vehicles. Could enhance safety on and around ISS. Some technologies extensible to monitoring of extraterrestrial debris as well To help accomplish this, new technologies must be developed quickly. The Small Orbital Stereo Tracking Camera is one such up and coming technology. It consists of flying a pair of intensified megapixel telephoto cameras to evaluate Orbital Debris (OD) monitoring in proximity of International Space Station. It will demonstrate on-orbit optical tracking (in situ) of various sized objects versus ground RADAR tracking and small OD models. The cameras are based on Flight Proven Advanced Video Guidance Sensor pixel to spot algorithms (Orbital Express) and military targeting cameras. And by using twin cameras we can provide Stereo images for ranging & mission redundancy. When pointed into the orbital velocity vector (RAM), objects approaching or near the stereo camera set can be differentiated from the stars moving upward in background.

  12. Quantifying biodiversity using digital cameras and automated image analysis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roadknight, C. M.; Rose, R. J.; Barber, M. L.; Price, M. C.; Marshall, I. W.

    2009-04-01

    Monitoring the effects on biodiversity of extensive grazing in complex semi-natural habitats is labour intensive. There are also concerns about the standardization of semi-quantitative data collection. We have chosen to focus initially on automating the most time consuming aspect - the image analysis. The advent of cheaper and more sophisticated digital camera technology has lead to a sudden increase in the number of habitat monitoring images and information that is being collected. We report on the use of automated trail cameras (designed for the game hunting market) to continuously capture images of grazer activity in a variety of habitats at Moor House National Nature Reserve, which is situated in the North of England at an average altitude of over 600m. Rainfall is high, and in most areas the soil consists of deep peat (1m to 3m), populated by a mix of heather, mosses and sedges. The cameras have been continuously in operation over a 6 month period, daylight images are in full colour and night images (IR flash) are black and white. We have developed artificial intelligence based methods to assist in the analysis of the large number of images collected, generating alert states for new or unusual image conditions. This paper describes the data collection techniques, outlines the quantitative and qualitative data collected and proposes online and offline systems that can reduce the manpower overheads and increase focus on important subsets in the collected data. By converting digital image data into statistical composite data it can be handled in a similar way to other biodiversity statistics thus improving the scalability of monitoring experiments. Unsupervised feature detection methods and supervised neural methods were tested and offered solutions to simplifying the process. Accurate (85 to 95%) categorization of faunal content can be obtained, requiring human intervention for only those images containing rare animals or unusual (undecidable) conditions, and

  13. Bringing the Digital Camera to the Physics Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossi, M.; Gratton, L. M.; Oss, S.

    2013-01-01

    We discuss how compressed images created by modern digital cameras can lead to even severe problems in the quantitative analysis of experiments based on such images. Difficulties result from the nonlinear treatment of lighting intensity values stored in compressed files. To overcome such troubles, one has to adopt noncompressed, native formats, as…

  14. Using a Digital Video Camera to Study Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abisdris, Gil; Phaneuf, Alain

    2007-01-01

    To illustrate how a digital video camera can be used to analyze various types of motion, this simple activity analyzes the motion and measures the acceleration due to gravity of a basketball in free fall. Although many excellent commercially available data loggers and software can accomplish this task, this activity requires almost no financial…

  15. Comparison of 10 digital SLR cameras for orthodontic photography.

    PubMed

    Bister, D; Mordarai, F; Aveling, R M

    2006-09-01

    Digital photography is now widely used to document orthodontic patients. High quality intra-oral photography depends on a satisfactory 'depth of field' focus and good illumination. Automatic 'through the lens' (TTL) metering is ideal to achieve both the above aims. Ten current digital single lens reflex (SLR) cameras were tested for use in intra- and extra-oral photography as used in orthodontics. The manufacturers' recommended macro-lens and macro-flash were used with each camera. Handling characteristics, colour-reproducibility, quality of the viewfinder and flash recharge time were investigated. No camera took acceptable images in factory default setting or 'automatic' mode: this mode was not present for some cameras (Nikon, Fujifilm); led to overexposure (Olympus) or poor depth of field (Canon, Konica-Minolta, Pentax), particularly for intra-oral views. Once adjusted, only Olympus cameras were able to take intra- and extra-oral photographs without the need to change settings, and were therefore the easiest to use. All other cameras needed adjustments of aperture (Canon, Konica-Minolta, Pentax), or aperture and flash (Fujifilm, Nikon), making the latter the most complex to use. However, all cameras produced high quality intra- and extra-oral images, once appropriately adjusted. The resolution of the images is more than satisfactory for all cameras. There were significant differences relating to the quality of colour reproduction, size and brightness of the viewfinders. The Nikon D100 and Fujifilm S 3 Pro consistently scored best for colour fidelity. Pentax and Konica-Minolta had the largest and brightest viewfinders.

  16. Using digital technology to enhance restorative dentistry.

    PubMed

    Fasbinder, Dennis

    2012-10-01

    While there are many benefits for dental practices that incorporate digital systems into their workflow, the dental team must first master the learning curve involved in order to maximize their advantages for creating well-fitting restorations. This article describes the current systems-both digital impression systems and chairside CAD/CAM systems-including software and digital cameras and scanners. The author emphasizes that to consistently capture accurate impressions with this technology, the dental team must continue to rely on traditional skills such as achieving optimal soft-tissue retraction and maintaining moisture control and isolation.

  17. Aerotriangulation Supported by Camera Station Position Determined via Physical Integration of LIDAR and SLR Digital Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitishita, E.; Martins, M.; Centeno, J.; Hainosz, F.

    2011-09-01

    Nowadays lidar and photogrammetric surveys have been used together in many mapping procedures due to their complementary characteristics. Lidar survey is capable to promptly acquire reliable elevation information that is sometimes difficult via photogrammetric procedure. On the other hand, photogrammetric survey is easily able to get semantic information of the objects. Accessibility, availability, the increasing sensor size and quick image acquisition and processing are properties that have raised the use of SLR digital cameras in photogrammetry. Orthoimage generation is a powerful photogrammetric mapping procedure, where the advantages of the integration of lidar and image datasets are very well characterized. However, to perform this application both datasets must be within a common reference frame. In this paper, a procedure to have digital images positioned and oriented in the same lidar frame via a combination of direct and indirect georeferencing is studied. The SLR digital camera was physically connected with the lidar system to calculate the camera station's position in lidar frame. After that, the aerotriangulation supported by camera station's position is performed to get image's exterior orientation parameters (EOP).

  18. Use of the Digital Camera To Increase Student Interest and Learning in High School Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tatar, Denise; Robinson, Mike

    2003-01-01

    Attempts to answer two research questions: (1) Does the use of a digital camera in laboratory activities increase student learning?; and (2) Does the use of digital cameras motivate students to take a greater interest in laboratory work? Results indicate that the digital camera did increase student learning of process skills in two biology…

  19. Multispectral synthesis of daylight using a commercial digital CCD camera.

    PubMed

    Nieves, Juan L; Valero, Eva M; Nascimento, Sérgio M C; Hernández-Andrés, Javier; Romero, Javier

    2005-09-20

    Performance of multispectral devices in recovering spectral data has been intensively investigated in some applications, as in spectral characterization of art paintings, but has received little attention in the context of spectral characterization of natural illumination. This study investigated the quality of the spectral estimation of daylight-type illuminants using a commercial digital CCD camera and a set of broadband colored filters. Several recovery algorithms that did not need information about spectral sensitivities of the camera sensors nor eigenvectors to describe the spectra were tested. Tests were carried out both with virtual data, using simulated camera responses, and real data obtained from real measurements. It was found that it is possible to recover daylight spectra with high spectral and colorimetric accuracy with a reduced number of three to nine spectral bands.

  20. Observation of Planetary Motion Using a Digital Camera

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyn, Jan-Peter

    2008-01-01

    A digital SLR camera with a standard lens (50 mm focal length, f/1.4) on a fixed tripod is used to obtain photographs of the sky which contain stars up to 8[superscript m] apparent magnitude. The angle of view is large enough to ensure visual identification of the photograph with a large sky region in a stellar map. The resolution is sufficient to…

  1. X-ray imaging using a consumer-grade digital camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winch, N. M.; Edgar, A.

    2011-10-01

    The recent advancements in consumer-grade digital camera technology and the introduction of high-resolution, high sensitivity CsBr:Eu 2+ storage phosphor imaging plates make possible a new cost-effective technique for X-ray imaging. The imaging plate is bathed with red stimulating light by high-intensity light-emitting diodes, and the photostimulated image is captured with a digital single-lens reflex (SLR) camera. A blue band-pass optical filter blocks the stimulating red light but transmits the blue photostimulated luminescence. Using a Canon D5 Mk II camera and an f1.4 wide-angle lens, the optical image of a 240×180 mm 2 Konica CsBr:Eu 2+ imaging plate from a position 230 mm in front of the camera lens can be focussed so as to laterally fill the 35×23.3 mm 2 camera sensor, and recorded in 2808×1872 pixel elements, corresponding to an equivalent pixel size on the plate of 88 μm. The analogue-to-digital conversion from the camera electronics is 13 bits, but the dynamic range of the imaging system as a whole is limited in practice by noise to about 2.5 orders of magnitude. The modulation transfer function falls to 0.2 at a spatial frequency of 2.2 line pairs/mm. The limiting factor of the spatial resolution is light scattering in the plate rather than the camera optics. The limiting factors for signal-to-noise ratio are shot noise in the light, and dark noise in the CMOS sensor. Good quality images of high-contrast objects can be recorded with doses of approximately 1 mGy. The CsBr:Eu 2+ plate has approximately three times the readout sensitivity of a similar BaFBr:Eu 2+ plate.

  2. Measuring magnification of virtual images using digital cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutzner, Mickey D.; Snelling, Samantha

    2016-11-01

    The concept of virtual images and why they lead to angular rather than linear magnification of optical images can be vague for students. A particularly straightforward method of obtaining quantitative magnification for simple magnifiers, microscopes, and telescopes uses the technology that students carry in their backpacks—their camera phones.

  3. The systematic error in digital image correlation induced by self-heating of a digital camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Shaopeng; Pang, Jiazhi; Ma, Qinwei

    2012-02-01

    The systematic strain measurement error in digital image correlation (DIC) induced by self-heating of digital CCD and CMOS cameras was extensively studied, and an experimental and data analysis procedure has been proposed and two parameters have been suggested to examine and evaluate this. Six digital cameras of four different types were tested to define the strain errors, and it was found that each camera needed between 1 and 2 h to reach a stable heat balance, with a measured temperature increase of around 10 °C. During the temperature increase, the virtual image expansion will cause a 70-230 µɛ strain error in the DIC measurement, which is large enough to be noticed in most DIC experiments and hence should be eliminated.

  4. Establishing imaging sensor specifications for digital still cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriss, Michael A.

    2007-02-01

    Digital Still Cameras, DSCs, have now displaced conventional still cameras in most markets. The heart of a DSC is thought to be the imaging sensor, be it Full Frame CCD, and Interline CCD, a CMOS sensor or the newer Foveon buried photodiode sensors. There is a strong tendency by consumers to consider only the number of mega-pixels in a camera and not to consider the overall performance of the imaging system, including sharpness, artifact control, noise, color reproduction, exposure latitude and dynamic range. This paper will provide a systematic method to characterize the physical requirements of an imaging sensor and supporting system components based on the desired usage. The analysis is based on two software programs that determine the "sharpness", potential for artifacts, sensor "photographic speed", dynamic range and exposure latitude based on the physical nature of the imaging optics, sensor characteristics (including size of pixels, sensor architecture, noise characteristics, surface states that cause dark current, quantum efficiency, effective MTF, and the intrinsic full well capacity in terms of electrons per square centimeter). Examples will be given for consumer, pro-consumer, and professional camera systems. Where possible, these results will be compared to imaging system currently on the market.

  5. Preparation of a Low-Cost Digital Camera System for Remote Sensing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Off-the-shelf consumer digital cameras are convenient and user-friendly. However, the use of these cameras in remote sensing is limited because convenient methods for concurrently determining visible and near-infrared (NIR) radiation have not been developed. Two Nikon COOLPIX 4300 digital cameras ...

  6. Simulating the functionality of a digital camera pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toadere, Florin

    2013-10-01

    The goal of this paper is to simulate the functionality of a digital camera system. The simulations cover the conversion from light to numerical signal, color processing, and rendering. A spectral image processing algorithm is used to simulate the radiometric properties of a digital camera. In the algorithm, we take into consideration the spectral image and the transmittances of the light source, lenses, filters, and the quantum efficiency of a complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) image sensor. The optical part is characterized by a multiple convolution between the different point spread functions optical components such as the Cooke triplet, the aperture, the light fall off, and the optical part of the CMOS sensor. The electrical part consists of the Bayer sampling, interpolation, dynamic range, and analog to digital conversion. The reconstruction of the noisy blurred image is performed by blending different light exposed images in order to reduce the noise. Then, the image is filtered, deconvoluted, and sharpened to eliminate the noise and blur. Next, we have the color processing and rendering blocks interpolation, white balancing, color correction, conversion from XYZ color space to LAB color space, and, then, into the RGB color space, the color saturation and contrast.

  7. A large distributed digital camera system for accelerator beam diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catani, L.; Cianchi, A.; Di Pirro, G.; Honkavaara, K.

    2005-07-01

    Optical diagnostics, providing images of accelerated particle beams using radiation emitted by particles impinging a radiator, typically a fluorescent screen, has been extensively used, especially on electron linacs, since the 1970's. Higher intensity beams available in the last decade allow extending the use of beam imaging techniques to perform precise measurements of important beam parameters such as emittance, energy, and energy spread using optical transition radiation (OTR). OTR-based diagnostics systems are extensively used on the superconducting TESLA Test Facility (TTF) linac driving the vacuum ultraviolet free electron laser (VUV-FEL) at the Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron facility. Up to 30 optical diagnostic stations have been installed at various positions along the 250-m-long linac, each equipped with a high-performance digital camera. This paper describes the new approach to the design of the hardware and software setups required by the complex topology of such a distributed camera system.

  8. Fast measurement of temporal noise of digital camera's photosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheremkhin, Pavel A.; Evtikhiev, Nikolay N.; Krasnov, Vitaly V.; Rodin, Vladislav G.; Starikov, Rostislav S.; Starikov, Sergey N.

    2015-10-01

    Currently photo- and videocameras are widespread parts of both scientific experimental setups and consumer applications. They are used in optics, radiophysics, astrophotography, chemistry, and other various fields of science and technology such as control systems and video-surveillance monitoring. One of the main information limitations of photoand videocameras are noises of photosensor pixels. Camera's photosensor noise can be divided into random and pattern components. Temporal noise includes random noise component while spatial noise includes pattern noise component. Spatial part usually several times lower in magnitude than temporal. At first approximation spatial noises might be neglected. Earlier we proposed modification of the automatic segmentation of non-uniform targets (ASNT) method for measurement of temporal noise of photo- and videocameras. Only two frames are sufficient for noise measurement with the modified method. In result, proposed ASNT modification should allow fast and accurate measurement of temporal noise. In this paper, we estimated light and dark temporal noises of four cameras of different types using the modified ASNT method with only several frames. These cameras are: consumer photocamera Canon EOS 400D (CMOS, 10.1 MP, 12 bit ADC), scientific camera MegaPlus II ES11000 (CCD, 10.7 MP, 12 bit ADC), industrial camera PixeLink PLB781F (CMOS, 6.6 MP, 10 bit ADC) and video-surveillance camera Watec LCL-902C (CCD, 0.47 MP, external 8 bit ADC). Experimental dependencies of temporal noise on signal value are in good agreement with fitted curves based on a Poisson distribution excluding areas near saturation. We measured elapsed time for processing of shots used for temporal noise estimation. The results demonstrate the possibility of fast obtaining of dependency of camera full temporal noise on signal value with the proposed ASNT modification.

  9. Social Justice through Literacy: Integrating Digital Video Cameras in Reading Summaries and Responses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Rong; Unger, John A.; Scullion, Vicki A.

    2014-01-01

    Drawing data from an action-oriented research project for integrating digital video cameras into the reading process in pre-college courses, this study proposes using digital video cameras in reading summaries and responses to promote critical thinking and to teach social justice concepts. The digital video research project is founded on…

  10. Practical use of digital cameras for microphotography through the operating microscope.

    PubMed

    Gurunluoglu, Raffi; Shafighi, Maziar; Ozer, Kagan; Piza-Katzer, Hildegunde

    2003-07-01

    A practical use of personal digital cameras for taking digital photographs in the microsurgical field through an operating microscope is described. This inexpensive and practical method for acquiring microscopic images at the desired magnification combines the advantages of the digital camera and the operating microscope.

  11. Influence of Digital Camera Errors on the Photogrammetric Image Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sužiedelytė-Visockienė, Jūratė; Bručas, Domantas

    2009-01-01

    The paper deals with the calibration of digital camera Canon EOS 350D, often used for the photogrammetric 3D digitalisation and measurements of industrial and construction site objects. During the calibration data on the optical and electronic parameters, influencing the distortion of images, such as correction of the principal point, focal length of the objective, radial symmetrical and non-symmetrical distortions were obtained. The calibration was performed by means of the Tcc software implementing the polynomial of Chebichev and using a special test-field with the marks, coordinates of which are precisely known. The main task of the research - to determine how parameters of the camera calibration influence the processing of images, i. e. the creation of geometric model, the results of triangulation calculations and stereo-digitalisation. Two photogrammetric projects were created for this task. In first project the non-corrected and in the second the corrected ones, considering the optical errors of the camera obtained during the calibration, images were used. The results of analysis of the images processing is shown in the images and tables. The conclusions are given.

  12. Temperature Mapping in Hydrogel Matrices Using Unmodified Digital Camera.

    PubMed

    Darwish, Ghinwa H; Fakih, Hassan H; Karam, Pierre

    2017-02-09

    We report a simple, generally applicable, and noninvasive fluorescent method for mapping thermal fluctuations in hydrogel matrices using an unmodified commercially available digital single-lens reflex camera (DSLR). The nanothermometer is based on the complexation of short conjugated polyelectrolytes, poly(phenylene ethynylene) carboxylate, with an amphiphilic polymer, polyvinylpyrrolidone, which is in turn trapped within the porous network of a gel matrix. Changes in the temperature lead to a fluorescent ratiometric response with a maximum relative sensitivity of 2.0% and 1.9% at 45.0 °C for 0.5% agarose and agar, respectively. The response was reversible with no observed hysteresis when samples were cycled between 20 and 40 °C. As a proof of concept, the change in fluorescent signal/color was captured using a digital camera. The images were then dissected into their red-green-blue (RGB) components using a Matlab routine. A linear correlation was observed between the hydrogel temperature and the green and blue intensity channels. The reported sensor has the potential to provide a wealth of information when thermal fluctuations mapped in soft gels matrices are correlated with chemical or physical processes.

  13. [An applied research on effective health care planning using cellular phone with the digital still camera function].

    PubMed

    Yoshiyama, Naoki; Hashimoto, Akihiro; Nakajima, Kieko; Hattori, Shin; Sugita, Fukashi

    2004-12-01

    In order to make effective health care plans for elder home care patients, we have tried an easy communication tool between medical doctors and their patients. This tool is the cellular phone with digital still camera function (CP-DSC). We have achieved successful results using this type of technology.

  14. Comparison of the effectiveness of three retinal camera technologies for malarial retinopathy detection in Malawi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soliz, Peter; Nemeth, Sheila C.; Barriga, E. Simon; Harding, Simon P.; Lewallen, Susan; Taylor, Terrie E.; MacCormick, Ian J.; Joshi, Vinayak S.

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the suitability of three available camera technologies (desktop, portable, and iphone based) for imaging comatose children who presented with clinical symptoms of malaria. Ultimately, the results of the project would form the basis for a design of a future camera to screen for malaria retinopathy (MR) in a resource challenged environment. The desktop, portable, and i-phone based cameras were represented by the Topcon, Pictor Plus, and Peek cameras, respectively. These cameras were tested on N=23 children presenting with symptoms of cerebral malaria (CM) at a malaria clinic, Queen Elizabeth Teaching Hospital in Malawi, Africa. Each patient was dilated for binocular indirect ophthalmoscopy (BIO) exam by an ophthalmologist followed by imaging with all three cameras. Each of the cases was graded according to an internationally established protocol and compared to the BIO as the clinical ground truth. The reader used three principal retinal lesions as markers for MR: hemorrhages, retinal whitening, and vessel discoloration. The study found that the mid-priced Pictor Plus hand-held camera performed considerably better than the lower price mobile phone-based camera, and slightly the higher priced table top camera. When comparing the readings of digital images against the clinical reference standard (BIO), the Pictor Plus camera had sensitivity and specificity for MR of 100% and 87%, respectively. This compares to a sensitivity and specificity of 87% and 75% for the i-phone based camera and 100% and 75% for the desktop camera. The drawback of all the cameras were their limited field of view which did not allow complete view of the periphery where vessel discoloration occurs most frequently. The consequence was that vessel discoloration was not addressed in this study. None of the cameras offered real-time image quality assessment to ensure high quality images to afford the best possible opportunity for reading by a remotely located

  15. Digital ureteroscopes: technology update

    PubMed Central

    Gridley, Chad M; Knudsen, Bodo E

    2017-01-01

    The field of ureteroscopy has undergone a continual evolution since the first ureteroscopes were introduced. Over the past 10 years, we have entered into the digital era of ureteroscopy with both semirigid and flexible options becoming available. The following review looks at the benefits and drawbacks of digital flexible ureteroscopes as well as the current commercially available options. PMID:28203551

  16. Encrypting Digital Camera with Automatic Encryption Key Deletion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oakley, Ernest C. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A digital video camera includes an image sensor capable of producing a frame of video data representing an image viewed by the sensor, an image memory for storing video data such as previously recorded frame data in a video frame location of the image memory, a read circuit for fetching the previously recorded frame data, an encryption circuit having an encryption key input connected to receive the previously recorded frame data from the read circuit as an encryption key, an un-encrypted data input connected to receive the frame of video data from the image sensor and an encrypted data output port, and a write circuit for writing a frame of encrypted video data received from the encrypted data output port of the encryption circuit to the memory and overwriting the video frame location storing the previously recorded frame data.

  17. Camera system resolution and its influence on digital image correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Reu, Phillip L.; Sweatt, William; Miller, Timothy; Fleming, Darryn

    2014-09-21

    Digital image correlation (DIC) uses images from a camera and lens system to make quantitative measurements of the shape, displacement, and strain of test objects. This increasingly popular method has had little research on the influence of the imaging system resolution on the DIC results. This paper investigates the entire imaging system and studies how both the camera and lens resolution influence the DIC results as a function of the system Modulation Transfer Function (MTF). It will show that when making spatial resolution decisions (including speckle size) the resolution limiting component should be considered. A consequence of the loss of spatial resolution is that the DIC uncertainties will be increased. This is demonstrated using both synthetic and experimental images with varying resolution. The loss of image resolution and DIC accuracy can be compensated for by increasing the subset size, or better, by increasing the speckle size. The speckle-size and spatial resolution are now a function of the lens resolution rather than the more typical assumption of the pixel size. The study will demonstrate the tradeoffs associated with limited lens resolution.

  18. Camera system resolution and its influence on digital image correlation

    DOE PAGES

    Reu, Phillip L.; Sweatt, William; Miller, Timothy; ...

    2014-09-21

    Digital image correlation (DIC) uses images from a camera and lens system to make quantitative measurements of the shape, displacement, and strain of test objects. This increasingly popular method has had little research on the influence of the imaging system resolution on the DIC results. This paper investigates the entire imaging system and studies how both the camera and lens resolution influence the DIC results as a function of the system Modulation Transfer Function (MTF). It will show that when making spatial resolution decisions (including speckle size) the resolution limiting component should be considered. A consequence of the loss ofmore » spatial resolution is that the DIC uncertainties will be increased. This is demonstrated using both synthetic and experimental images with varying resolution. The loss of image resolution and DIC accuracy can be compensated for by increasing the subset size, or better, by increasing the speckle size. The speckle-size and spatial resolution are now a function of the lens resolution rather than the more typical assumption of the pixel size. The study will demonstrate the tradeoffs associated with limited lens resolution.« less

  19. DR with a DSLR: Digital Radiography with a Digital Single-Lens Reflex camera.

    PubMed

    Fan, Helen; Durko, Heather L; Moore, Stephen K; Moore, Jared; Miller, Brian W; Furenlid, Lars R; Pradhan, Sunil; Barrett, Harrison H

    2010-02-15

    An inexpensive, portable digital radiography (DR) detector system for use in remote regions has been built and evaluated. The system utilizes a large-format digital single-lens reflex (DSLR) camera to capture the image from a standard fluorescent screen. The large sensor area allows relatively small demagnification factors and hence minimizes the light loss. The system has been used for initial phantom tests in urban hospitals and Himalayan clinics in Nepal, and it has been evaluated in the laboratory at the University of Arizona by additional phantom studies. Typical phantom images are presented in this paper, and a simplified discussion of the detective quantum efficiency of the detector is given.

  20. 77 FR 43858 - Certain Mobile Telephones and Wireless Communication Devices Featuring Digital Cameras, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-26

    ... COMMISSION Certain Mobile Telephones and Wireless Communication Devices Featuring Digital Cameras, and... States after importation of certain mobile telephones and wireless communication devices featuring digital cameras, and components thereof, that infringe certain claims of U.S. Patent No. 6,292,218...

  1. Use of a Digital Camera To Document Student Observations in a Microbiology Laboratory Class.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, David A.; Kelley, Kevin; Jones, Michael

    2001-01-01

    Points out the lack of microscopic images of wine-related microbes. Uses a digital camera during a wine microbiology laboratory to capture student-generated microscope images. Discusses the advantages of using a digital camera in a teaching lab. (YDS)

  2. The Challenge of Digital Imaging Technologies: A Practical View of the Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamber, Anthony

    1994-01-01

    Discusses digital imaging technologies. Topics include information technology; reprographics; scientific imaging processing; political considerations of telecommunications and the information superhighway; digital cameras; slide and transparency scanners; desktop prepress processing; digital proofing devices; direct-to-plate and direct-to-press…

  3. Development of High Speed Digital Camera: EXILIM EX-F1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nojima, Osamu

    The EX-F1 is a high speed digital camera featuring a revolutionary improvement in burst shooting speed that is expected to create entirely new markets. This model incorporates a high speed CMOS sensor and a high speed LSI processor. With this model, CASIO has achieved an ultra-high speed 60 frames per second (fps) burst rate for still images, together with 1,200 fps high speed movie that captures movements which cannot even be seen by human eyes. Moreover, this model can record movies at full High-Definition. After launching it into the market, it was able to get a lot of high appraisals as an innovation camera. We will introduce the concept, features and technologies about the EX-F1.

  4. Digital Camera with Apparatus for Authentication of Images Produced from an Image File

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, Gary L. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A digital camera equipped with a processor for authentication of images produced from an image file taken by the digital camera is provided. The digital camera processor has embedded therein a private key unique to it, and the camera housing has a public key that is so uniquely related to the private key that digital data encrypted with the private key may be decrypted using the public key. The digital camera processor comprises means for calculating a hash of the image file using a predetermined algorithm, and second means for encrypting the image hash with the private key, thereby producing a digital signature. The image file and the digital signature are stored in suitable recording means so they will be available together. Apparatus for authenticating the image file as being free of any alteration uses the public key for decrypting the digital signature, thereby deriving a secure image hash identical to the image hash produced by the digital camera and used to produce the digital signature. The authenticating apparatus calculates from the image file an image hash using the same algorithm as before. By comparing this last image hash with the secure image hash, authenticity of the image file is determined if they match. Other techniques to address time-honored methods of deception, such as attaching false captions or inducing forced perspectives, are included.

  5. Digital camera with apparatus for authentication of images produced from an image file

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, Gary L. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A digital camera equipped with a processor for authentication of images produced from an image file taken by the digital camera is provided. The digital camera processor has embedded therein a private key unique to it, and the camera housing has a public key that is so uniquely based upon the private key that digital data encrypted with the private key by the processor may be decrypted using the public key. The digital camera processor comprises means for calculating a hash of the image file using a predetermined algorithm, and second means for encrypting the image hash with the private key, thereby producing a digital signature. The image file and the digital signature are stored in suitable recording means so they will be available together. Apparatus for authenticating at any time the image file as being free of any alteration uses the public key for decrypting the digital signature, thereby deriving a secure image hash identical to the image hash produced by the digital camera and used to produce the digital signature. The apparatus calculates from the image file an image hash using the same algorithm as before. By comparing this last image hash with the secure image hash, authenticity of the image file is determined if they match, since even one bit change in the image hash will cause the image hash to be totally different from the secure hash.

  6. Passive auto-focus for digital still cameras and camera phones: Filter-switching and low-light techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamadia, Mark Noel

    In order to gain valuable market share in the growing consumer digital still camera and camera phone market, camera manufacturers have to continually add and improve existing features to their latest product offerings. Auto-focus (AF) is one such feature, whose aim is to enable consumers to quickly take sharply focused pictures with little or no manual intervention in adjusting the camera's focus lens. While AF has been a standard feature in digital still and cell-phone cameras, consumers often complain about their cameras' slow AF performance, which may lead to missed photographic opportunities, rendering valuable moments and events with undesired out-of-focus pictures. This dissertation addresses this critical issue to advance the state-of-the-art in the digital band-pass filter, passive AF method. This method is widely used to realize AF in the camera industry, where a focus actuator is adjusted via a search algorithm to locate the in-focus position by maximizing a sharpness measure extracted from a particular frequency band of the incoming image of the scene. There are no known systematic methods for automatically deriving the parameters such as the digital pass-bands or the search step-size increments used in existing passive AF schemes. Conventional methods require time consuming experimentation and tuning in order to arrive at a set of parameters which balance AF performance in terms of speed and accuracy ultimately causing a delay in product time-to-market. This dissertation presents a new framework for determining an optimal set of passive AF parameters, named Filter- Switching AF, providing an automatic approach to achieve superior AF performance, both in good and low lighting conditions based on the following performance measures (metrics): speed (total number of iterations), accuracy (offset from truth), power consumption (total distance moved), and user experience (in-focus position overrun). Performance results using three different prototype cameras

  7. High-end aerial digital cameras and their impact on the automation and quality of the production workflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paparoditis, Nicolas; Souchon, Jean-Philippe; Martinoty, Gilles; Pierrot-Deseilligny, Marc

    The IGN digital camera project was established in the early 1990s. The first research surveys were carried out in 1996 and the digital camera was first used in production in 2000. In 2004 approximately 10 French departments (accounting for 10% of the territory) were covered with a four-head camera system and since summer 2005 all IGN imagery has been acquired digitally. Nevertheless the camera system is still evolving, with tests on new geometric configurations being continuously undertaken. The progressive integration of the system in IGN production workflows has allowed IGN to keep the system evolving in accordance with production needs. Remaining problems are due to specific camera characteristics such as CCD format, the optical quality of off-the-shelf lenses, and because some production tools are ill-adapted to digital images with a large dynamic range. However, when considering the pros and cons of integrating these images into production lines, the disadvantages are largely balanced by the numerous benefits this technology offers.

  8. Advanced digital image archival system using MPEG technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Wo

    2009-08-01

    Digital information and records are vital to the human race regardless of the nationalities and eras in which they were produced. Digital image contents are produced at a rapid pace from cultural heritages via digitalization, scientific and experimental data via high speed imaging sensors, national defense satellite images from governments, medical and healthcare imaging records from hospitals, personal collection of photos from digital cameras. With these mass amounts of precious and irreplaceable data and knowledge, what standards technologies can be applied to preserve and yet provide an interoperable framework for accessing the data across varieties of systems and devices? This paper presents an advanced digital image archival system by applying the international standard of MPEG technologies to preserve digital image content.

  9. Aerosol retrieval from twilight photographs taken by a digital camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, M.; Iwabuchi, H.

    2014-12-01

    Twilight sky, one of the most beautiful sights seen in our daily life, varies day by day, because atmospheric components such as ozone and aerosols also varies day by day. Recent studies have revealed the effects of tropospheric aerosols on twilight sky. In this study, we develop a new algorithm for aerosol retrievals from twilight photographs taken by a digital single reflex-lens camera in solar zenith angle of 90-96˚ with interval of 1˚. A radiative transfer model taking spherical-shell atmosphere, multiple scattering and refraction into account is used as a forward model, and the optimal estimation is used as an inversion calculation to infer the aerosol optical and radiative properties. The sensitivity tests show that tropospheric (stratospheric) aerosol optical thickness is responsible to the distribution of twilight sky color and brightness near the horizon (in viewing angles of 10˚ to 20˚) and aerosol size distribution is responsible to the angular distribution of brightness near the solar direction. The AOTs are inferred with small uncertainties and agree very well with that from the Skyradiometer. In this conference, several case studies using the algorithm will be shown.

  10. The role of camera-bundled image management software in the consumer digital imaging value chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Milton; Mundkur, Anuradha; Balasubramanian, Ashok; Chirania, Virat

    2005-02-01

    This research was undertaken by the Convergence Center at the Syracuse University School of Information Studies (www.digital-convergence.info). Project ICONICA, the name for the research, focuses on the strategic implications of digital Images and the CONvergence of Image management and image CApture. Consumer imaging - the activity that we once called "photography" - is now recognized as in the throes of a digital transformation. At the end of 2003, market researchers estimated that about 30% of the households in the U.S. and 40% of the households in Japan owned digital cameras. In 2004, of the 86 million new cameras sold (excluding one-time use cameras), a majority (56%) were estimated to be digital cameras. Sales of photographic film, while still profitable, are declining precipitously.

  11. Digital Downsides: Exploring University Students' Negative Engagements with Digital Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selwyn, Neil

    2016-01-01

    Digital technologies are now an integral feature of university study. As such, academic research has tended to concentrate on the potential of digital technologies to support, extend and even "enhance" student learning. This paper, in contrast, explores the rather more messy realities of students' engagements with digital technology. In…

  12. Real-time object tracking for moving target auto-focus in digital camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Haike; Niinami, Norikatsu; Liu, Tong

    2015-02-01

    Focusing at a moving object accurately is difficult and important to take photo of the target successfully in a digital camera. Because the object often moves randomly and changes its shape frequently, position and distance of the target should be estimated at real-time so as to focus at the objet precisely. We propose a new method of real-time object tracking to do auto-focus for moving target in digital camera. Video stream in the camera is used for the moving target tracking. Particle filter is used to deal with problem of the target object's random movement and shape change. Color and edge features are used as measurement of the object's states. Parallel processing algorithm is developed to realize real-time particle filter object tracking easily in hardware environment of the digital camera. Movement prediction algorithm is also proposed to remove focus error caused by difference between tracking result and target object's real position when the photo is taken. Simulation and experiment results in digital camera demonstrate effectiveness of the proposed method. We embedded real-time object tracking algorithm in the digital camera. Position and distance of the moving target is obtained accurately by object tracking from the video stream. SIMD processor is applied to enforce parallel real-time processing. Processing time less than 60ms for each frame is obtained in the digital camera with its CPU of only 162MHz.

  13. DR with a DSLR: Digital Radiography with a Digital Single-Lens Reflex camera

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Helen; Durko, Heather L.; Moore, Stephen K.; Moore, Jared; Miller, Brian W.; Furenlid, Lars R.; Pradhan, Sunil; Barrett, Harrison H.

    2010-01-01

    An inexpensive, portable digital radiography (DR) detector system for use in remote regions has been built and evaluated. The system utilizes a large-format digital single-lens reflex (DSLR) camera to capture the image from a standard fluorescent screen. The large sensor area allows relatively small demagnification factors and hence minimizes the light loss. The system has been used for initial phantom tests in urban hospitals and Himalayan clinics in Nepal, and it has been evaluated in the laboratory at the University of Arizona by additional phantom studies. Typical phantom images are presented in this paper, and a simplified discussion of the detective quantum efficiency of the detector is given. PMID:21516238

  14. Applying and extending ISO/TC42 digital camera resolution standards to mobile imaging products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Don; Burns, Peter D.

    2007-01-01

    There are no fundamental differences between today's mobile telephone cameras and consumer digital still cameras that suggest many existing ISO imaging performance standards do not apply. To the extent that they have lenses, color filter arrays, detectors, apertures, image processing, and are hand held, there really are no operational or architectural differences. Despite this, there are currently differences in the levels of imaging performance. These are driven by physical and economic constraints, and image-capture conditions. Several ISO standards for resolution, well established for digital consumer digital cameras, require care when applied to the current generation of cell phone cameras. In particular, accommodation of optical flare, shading non-uniformity and distortion are recommended. We offer proposals for the application of existing ISO imaging resolution performance standards to mobile imaging products, and suggestions for extending performance standards to the characteristic behavior of camera phones.

  15. Impact of New Camera Technologies on Discoveries in Cell Biology.

    PubMed

    Stuurman, Nico; Vale, Ronald D

    2016-08-01

    New technologies can make previously invisible phenomena visible. Nowhere is this more obvious than in the field of light microscopy. Beginning with the observation of "animalcules" by Antonie van Leeuwenhoek, when he figured out how to achieve high magnification by shaping lenses, microscopy has advanced to this day by a continued march of discoveries driven by technical innovations. Recent advances in single-molecule-based technologies have achieved unprecedented resolution, and were the basis of the Nobel prize in Chemistry in 2014. In this article, we focus on developments in camera technologies and associated image processing that have been a major driver of technical innovations in light microscopy. We describe five types of developments in camera technology: video-based analog contrast enhancement, charge-coupled devices (CCDs), intensified sensors, electron multiplying gain, and scientific complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor cameras, which, together, have had major impacts in light microscopy.

  16. Arthropod eye-inspired digital camera with unique imaging characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Jianliang; Song, Young Min; Xie, Yizhu; Malyarchuk, Viktor; Jung, Inhwa; Choi, Ki-Joong; Liu, Zhuangjian; Park, Hyunsung; Lu, Chaofeng; Kim, Rak-Hwan; Li, Rui; Crozier, Kenneth B.; Huang, Yonggang; Rogers, John A.

    2014-06-01

    In nature, arthropods have a remarkably sophisticated class of imaging systems, with a hemispherical geometry, a wideangle field of view, low aberrations, high acuity to motion and an infinite depth of field. There are great interests in building systems with similar geometries and properties due to numerous potential applications. However, the established semiconductor sensor technologies and optics are essentially planar, which experience great challenges in building such systems with hemispherical, compound apposition layouts. With the recent advancement of stretchable optoelectronics, we have successfully developed strategies to build a fully functional artificial apposition compound eye camera by combining optics, materials and mechanics principles. The strategies start with fabricating stretchable arrays of thin silicon photodetectors and elastomeric optical elements in planar geometries, which are then precisely aligned and integrated, and elastically transformed to hemispherical shapes. This imaging device demonstrates nearly full hemispherical shape (about 160 degrees), with densely packed artificial ommatidia. The number of ommatidia (180) is comparable to those of the eyes of fire ants and bark beetles. We have illustrated key features of operation of compound eyes through experimental imaging results and quantitative ray-tracing-based simulations. The general strategies shown in this development could be applicable to other compound eye devices, such as those inspired by moths and lacewings (refracting superposition eyes), lobster and shrimp (reflecting superposition eyes), and houseflies (neural superposition eyes).

  17. Issues in implementing services for a wireless web-enabled digital camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkataraman, Shyam; Sampat, Nitin; Fisher, Yoram; Canosa, John; Noel, Nicholas

    2001-05-01

    The competition in the exploding digital photography market has caused vendors to explore new ways to increase their return on investment. A common view among industry analysts is that increasingly it will be services provided by these cameras, and not the cameras themselves, that will provide the revenue stream. These services will be coupled to e- Appliance based Communities. In addition, the rapidly increasing need to upload images to the Internet for photo- finishing services as well as the need to download software upgrades to the camera is driving many camera OEMs to evaluate the benefits of using the wireless web to extend their enterprise systems. Currently, creating a viable e- appliance such as a digital camera coupled with a wireless web service requires more than just a competency in product development. This paper will evaluate the system implications in the deployment of recurring revenue services and enterprise connectivity of a wireless, web-enabled digital camera. These include, among other things, an architectural design approach for services such as device management, synchronization, billing, connectivity, security, etc. Such an evaluation will assist, we hope, anyone designing or connecting a digital camera to the enterprise systems.

  18. Works starts on building world's largest digital camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruesi, Liz

    2015-10-01

    The $473m Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) has moved one step closer to completion after the US Department of Energy (DOE) approved the start of construction for the telescope's $168m 3.2-gigapixel camera.

  19. Digital-Centric RF CMOS Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuzawa, Akira

    Analog-centric RFCMOS technology has played an important role in motivating the change of technology from conventional discrete device technology or bipolar IC technology to CMOS technology. However it introduces many problems such as poor performance, susceptibility to PVT fluctuation, and cost increase with technology scaling. The most important advantage of CMOS technology compared with legacy RF technology is that CMOS can use more high performance digital circuits for very low cost. In fact, analog-centric RF-CMOS technology has failed the FM/AM tuner business and the digital-centric CMOS technology is becoming attractive for many users. It has many advantages; such as high performance, no external calibration points, high yield, and low cost. From the above facts, digital-centric CMOS technology which utilizes the advantages of digital technology must be the right path for future RF technology. Further investment in this technology is necessary for the advancement of RF technology.

  20. Technological Effects on Aesthetic Evaluation: Vermeer and the Camera Obscura

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hantula, Donald A.; Sudduth, Mary Margaret; Clabaugh, Alison

    2009-01-01

    The question of whether an artist's use of technology to create art results in a detectable aesthetic difference was investigated in the case of Dutch realist painter Johannes Vermeer and his use of the camera obscura. In Experiment 1, participants evaluated 20 Vermeer paintings on 6 aesthetic dimensions and preferred paintings created with the…

  1. Photogrammetry of a 5m Inflatable Space Antenna With Consumer Digital Cameras

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pappa, Richard S.; Giersch, Louis R.; Quagliaroli, Jessica M.

    2000-01-01

    This paper discusses photogrammetric measurements of a 5m-diameter inflatable space antenna using four Kodak DC290 (2.1 megapixel) digital cameras. The study had two objectives: 1) Determine the photogrammetric measurement precision obtained using multiple consumer-grade digital cameras and 2) Gain experience with new commercial photogrammetry software packages, specifically PhotoModeler Pro from Eos Systems, Inc. The paper covers the eight steps required using this hardware/software combination. The baseline data set contained four images of the structure taken from various viewing directions. Each image came from a separate camera. This approach simulated the situation of using multiple time-synchronized cameras, which will be required in future tests of vibrating or deploying ultra-lightweight space structures. With four images, the average measurement precision for more than 500 points on the antenna surface was less than 0.020 inches in-plane and approximately 0.050 inches out-of-plane.

  2. DigiCam: fully digital compact camera for SST-1M telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar, J. A.; Bilnik, W.; Bogacz, L.; Bulik, T.; Christov, A.; della Volpe, D.; Dyrda, M.; Frankowski, A.; Grudzinska, M.; Grygorczuk, J.; Heller, M.; Idźkowski, B.; Janiak, M.; Jamrozy, M.; Karczewski, M.; Kasperek, J.; Lyard, E.; Marszałek, A.; Michałowski, J.; Moderski, R.; Montaruli, T.; Neronov, A.; Nicolau-Kukliński, J.; Niemiec, J.; Ostrowski, M.; Paśko, P.; Płatos, Ł.; Prandini, E.; Pruchniewicz, R.; Rafalski, J.; Rajda, P. J.; Rameez, M.; Rataj, M.; Rupiński, M.; Rutkowski, K.; Seweryn, K.; Sidz, M.; Stawarz, Ł.; Stodulska, M.; Stodulski, M.; Tokarz, M.; Toscano, S.; Troyano Pujadas, I.; Walter, R.; Wawer, P.; Wawrzaszek, R.; Wiśniewski, L.; Zietara, K.; Ziółkowski, P.; Żychowski, P.

    2014-08-01

    The single mirror Small Size Telescopes (SST-1M), being built by a sub-consortium of Polish and Swiss Institutions of the CTA Consortium, will be equipped with a fully digital camera with a compact photodetector plane based on silicon photomultipliers. The internal trigger signal transmission overhead will be kept at low level by introducing a high level of integration. It will be achieved by massively deploying state-of-the-art multi-gigabit transceivers, beginning from the ADC flash converters, through the internal data and trigger signals transmission over backplanes and cables, to the camera's server 10Gb/s Ethernet links. Such approach will allow fitting the size and weight of the camera exactly to the SST-1M needs, still retaining the flexibility of a fully digital design. Such solution has low power consumption, high reliability and long lifetime. The concept of the camera will be described, along with some construction details and performance results.

  3. Field Portable Digital Ophthalmoscope/Fundus Camera. Phase I

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-05-01

    robbing injuries and pathologies. Included are retinal detachments, laser damage, CMV retinitis , retinitis pigmentosa , glaucoma, tumors, and the like...RMI-S, Fort Detrick, Frederick, Maryland 21702-5012. 13. ABSTRACT (Maximum 200 Retinal imaging is key for diagnoses and treatment of various eye-sight...personnel, and generally only used by ophthalmologists or in hospital settings. The retinal camera of this project will revolutionize retinal imaging

  4. Applications of the Lambert W function to analyze digital camera sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villegas, Daniel

    2014-05-01

    The Lambert W function is applied via Maple to analyze the operation of the modern digital camera sensors. The Lambert W function had been applied previously to understand the functioning of diodes and solar cells. The parallelism between the physics of solar cells and digital camera sensors will be exploited. Digital camera sensors use p-n photodiodes and such photodiodes can be studied using the Lambert W function. At general, the bulk transformation of light into photocurrent is described by an equivalent circuit which determines a dynamical equation to be solved using the Lambert W function. Specifically, in a camera senor, the precise measurement of light intensity by filtering through color filters is able to create a measurable photocurrent that is proportional to image point intensity; and such photocurrent is given in terms of the Lambert W function. It is claimed that the drift between neighboring photocells at long wavelengths affects the ability to resolve an image and such drift can be represented effectively using the Lambert W function. Also is conjectured that the recombination of charge carries in the digital sensors is connected to the notion of "noise" in photography and such "noise" could be described by certain combinations of Lambert W functions. Finally, it is suggested that the notion of bias, and varying the width of the depletion zone, has a relationship to the ISO "sped· of the camera sensor; and such relationship could be described using Lambert W functions.

  5. Accurate measurement of spatial noise portraits of photosensors of digital cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheremkhin, P. A.; Evtikhiev, N. N.; Krasnov, V. V.; Kulakov, M. N.; Starikov, R. S.

    2016-08-01

    Method of measurement of accurate portraits of light and dark spatial noise of photosensors is described. The method consists of four steps: creation of spatially homogeneous illumination; shooting light and dark frames; digital processing and filtering. Unlike standard technique, this method uses iterative creation of spatially homogeneous illumination by display, compensation of photosensor dark spatial noise portrait and improved procedure of elimination of dark temporal noise. Portraits of light and dark spatial noise of photosensors of a scientific digital camera were found. Characteristics of the measured portraits were compared with values of photo response and dark signal non-uniformities of camera's photosensor.

  6. Estimation of spectral distribution of sky radiance using a commercial digital camera.

    PubMed

    Saito, Masanori; Iwabuchi, Hironobu; Murata, Isao

    2016-01-10

    Methods for estimating spectral distribution of sky radiance from images captured by a digital camera and for accurately estimating spectral responses of the camera are proposed. Spectral distribution of sky radiance is represented as a polynomial of the wavelength, with coefficients obtained from digital RGB counts by linear transformation. The spectral distribution of radiance as measured is consistent with that obtained by spectrometer and radiative transfer simulation for wavelengths of 430-680 nm, with standard deviation below 1%. Preliminary applications suggest this method is useful for detecting clouds and studying the relation between irradiance at the ground and cloud distribution.

  7. Digital Technology and Student Cognitive Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavanaugh, J. Michael; Giapponi, Catherine C.; Golden, Timothy D.

    2016-01-01

    Digital technology has proven a beguiling, some even venture addictive, presence in the lives of our 21st century (millennial) students. And while screen technology may offer select cognitive benefits, there is mounting evidence in the cognitive neuroscience literature that digital technology is restructuring the way our students read and think,…

  8. Lights, Camera, Reflection! Digital Movies: A Tool for Reflective Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Genereux, Annie Prud'homme; Thompson, William A.

    2008-01-01

    At the end of a biology course entitled Ecology, Evolution, and Genetics, students were asked to consider how their learning experience had changed their perception of either ecology or genetics. Students were asked to express their thoughts in the form of a "digital story" using readily available software to create movies for the purpose of…

  9. The trustworthy digital camera: Restoring credibility to the photographic image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Gary L.

    1994-02-01

    The increasing sophistication of computers has made digital manipulation of photographic images, as well as other digitally-recorded artifacts such as audio and video, incredibly easy to perform and increasingly difficult to detect. Today, every picture appearing in newspapers and magazines has been digitally altered to some degree, with the severity varying from the trivial (cleaning up 'noise' and removing distracting backgrounds) to the point of deception (articles of clothing removed, heads attached to other people's bodies, and the complete rearrangement of city skylines). As the power, flexibility, and ubiquity of image-altering computers continues to increase, the well-known adage that 'the photography doesn't lie' will continue to become an anachronism. A solution to this problem comes from a concept called digital signatures, which incorporates modern cryptographic techniques to authenticate electronic mail messages. 'Authenticate' in this case means one can be sure that the message has not been altered, and that the sender's identity has not been forged. The technique can serve not only to authenticate images, but also to help the photographer retain and enforce copyright protection when the concept of 'electronic original' is no longer meaningful.

  10. The trustworthy digital camera: Restoring credibility to the photographic image

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, Gary L.

    1994-01-01

    The increasing sophistication of computers has made digital manipulation of photographic images, as well as other digitally-recorded artifacts such as audio and video, incredibly easy to perform and increasingly difficult to detect. Today, every picture appearing in newspapers and magazines has been digitally altered to some degree, with the severity varying from the trivial (cleaning up 'noise' and removing distracting backgrounds) to the point of deception (articles of clothing removed, heads attached to other people's bodies, and the complete rearrangement of city skylines). As the power, flexibility, and ubiquity of image-altering computers continues to increase, the well-known adage that 'the photography doesn't lie' will continue to become an anachronism. A solution to this problem comes from a concept called digital signatures, which incorporates modern cryptographic techniques to authenticate electronic mail messages. 'Authenticate' in this case means one can be sure that the message has not been altered, and that the sender's identity has not been forged. The technique can serve not only to authenticate images, but also to help the photographer retain and enforce copyright protection when the concept of 'electronic original' is no longer meaningful.

  11. Film cameras or digital sensors? The challenge ahead for aerial imaging

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Light, D.L.

    1996-01-01

    Cartographic aerial cameras continue to play the key role in producing quality products for the aerial photography business, and specifically for the National Aerial Photography Program (NAPP). One NAPP photograph taken with cameras capable of 39 lp/mm system resolution can contain the equivalent of 432 million pixels at 11 ??m spot size, and the cost is less than $75 per photograph to scan and output the pixels on a magnetic storage medium. On the digital side, solid state charge coupled device linear and area arrays can yield quality resolution (7 to 12 ??m detector size) and a broader dynamic range. If linear arrays are to compete with film cameras, they will require precise attitude and positioning of the aircraft so that the lines of pixels can be unscrambled and put into a suitable homogeneous scene that is acceptable to an interpreter. Area arrays need to be much larger than currently available to image scenes competitive in size with film cameras. Analysis of the relative advantages and disadvantages of the two systems show that the analog approach is more economical at present. However, as arrays become larger, attitude sensors become more refined, global positioning system coordinate readouts become commonplace, and storage capacity becomes more affordable, the digital camera may emerge as the imaging system for the future. Several technical challenges must be overcome if digital sensors are to advance to where they can support mapping, charting, and geographic information system applications.

  12. 75 FR 7519 - In the Matter of Certain Digital Cameras; Notice of Commission Determination Not To Review an...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-19

    ... COMMISSION In the Matter of Certain Digital Cameras; Notice of Commission Determination Not To Review an..., based on a complaint filed by Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. of Korea and Samsung Electronics America... importation, or the sale within the United States after importation of certain digital cameras by reason...

  13. Can Commercial Digital Cameras Be Used as Multispectral Sensors? A Crop Monitoring Test

    PubMed Central

    Lebourgeois, Valentine; Bégué, Agnès; Labbé, Sylvain; Mallavan, Benjamin; Prévot, Laurent; Roux, Bruno

    2008-01-01

    The use of consumer digital cameras or webcams to characterize and monitor different features has become prevalent in various domains, especially in environmental applications. Despite some promising results, such digital camera systems generally suffer from signal aberrations due to the on-board image processing systems and thus offer limited quantitative data acquisition capability. The objective of this study was to test a series of radiometric corrections having the potential to reduce radiometric distortions linked to camera optics and environmental conditions, and to quantify the effects of these corrections on our ability to monitor crop variables. In 2007, we conducted a five-month experiment on sugarcane trial plots using original RGB and modified RGB (Red-Edge and NIR) cameras fitted onto a light aircraft. The camera settings were kept unchanged throughout the acquisition period and the images were recorded in JPEG and RAW formats. These images were corrected to eliminate the vignetting effect, and normalized between acquisition dates. Our results suggest that 1) the use of unprocessed image data did not improve the results of image analyses; 2) vignetting had a significant effect, especially for the modified camera, and 3) normalized vegetation indices calculated with vignetting-corrected images were sufficient to correct for scene illumination conditions. These results are discussed in the light of the experimental protocol and recommendations are made for the use of these versatile systems for quantitative remote sensing of terrestrial surfaces. PMID:27873930

  14. Estimating the Infrared Radiation Wavelength Emitted by a Remote Control Device Using a Digital Camera

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Catelli, Francisco; Giovannini, Odilon; Bolzan, Vicente Dall Agnol

    2011-01-01

    The interference fringes produced by a diffraction grating illuminated with radiation from a TV remote control and a red laser beam are, simultaneously, captured by a digital camera. Based on an image with two interference patterns, an estimate of the infrared radiation wavelength emitted by a TV remote control is made. (Contains 4 figures.)

  15. On the Complexity of Digital Video Cameras in/as Research: Perspectives and Agencements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bangou, Francis

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this article is to consider the potential for digital video cameras to produce as part of a research agencement. Our reflection will be guided by the current literature on the use of video recordings in research, as well as by the rhizoanalysis of two vignettes. The first of these vignettes is associated with a short video clip shot by…

  16. Development of an XYZ Digital Camera with Embedded Color Calibration System for Accurate Color Acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kretkowski, Maciej; Jablonski, Ryszard; Shimodaira, Yoshifumi

    Acquisition of accurate colors is important in the modern era of widespread exchange of electronic multimedia. The variety of device-dependent color spaces causes troubles with accurate color reproduction. In this paper we present the outlines of accomplished digital camera system with device-independent output formed from tristimulus XYZ values. The outstanding accuracy and fidelity of acquired color is achieved in our system by employing an embedded color calibration system based on emissive device generating reference calibration colors with user-defined spectral distribution and chromaticity coordinates. The system was tested by calibrating the camera using 24 reference colors spectrally reproduced from 24 color patches of the Macbeth Chart. The average color difference (CIEDE2000) has been found to be ΔE =0.83, which is an outstanding result compared to commercially available digital cameras.

  17. Color calibration of a CMOS digital camera for mobile imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliasson, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    As white balance algorithms employed in mobile phone cameras become increasingly sophisticated by using, e.g., elaborate white-point estimation methods, a proper color calibration is necessary. Without such a calibration, the estimation of the light source for a given situation may go wrong, giving rise to large color errors. At the same time, the demands for efficiency in the production environment require the calibration to be as simple as possible. Thus it is important to find the correct balance between image quality and production efficiency requirements. The purpose of this work is to investigate camera color variations using a simple model where the sensor and IR filter are specified in detail. As input to the model, spectral data of the 24-color Macbeth Colorchecker was used. This data was combined with the spectral irradiance of mainly three different light sources: CIE A, D65 and F11. The sensor variations were determined from a very large population from which 6 corner samples were picked out for further analysis. Furthermore, a set of 100 IR filters were picked out and measured. The resulting images generated by the model were then analyzed in the CIELAB space and color errors were calculated using the ΔE94 metric. The results of the analysis show that the maximum deviations from the typical values are small enough to suggest that a white balance calibration is sufficient. Furthermore, it is also demonstrated that the color temperature dependence is small enough to justify the use of only one light source in a production environment.

  18. Chemistry on Camera: Integrating Technology into the Science Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hargis, Jace; Stehr, Jim

    2001-01-01

    Describes a relevant, innovative laboratory exercise that promotes the construction of ideas that can be used to further science processing. Integrates technology in the form of digital photography, a portable computer, and a projection device. This activity fits well in a high school chemistry class. (SAH)

  19. A versatile digital camera trigger for telescopes in the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwanke, U.; Shayduk, M.; Sulanke, K.-H.; Vorobiov, S.; Wischnewski, R.

    2015-05-01

    This paper describes the concept of an FPGA-based digital camera trigger for imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes, developed for the future Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA). The proposed camera trigger is designed to select images initiated by the Cherenkov emission of extended air showers from very-high energy (VHE, E > 20 GeV) photons and charged particles while suppressing signatures from background light. The trigger comprises three stages. A first stage employs programmable discriminators to digitize the signals arriving from the camera channels (pixels). At the second stage, a grid of low-cost FPGAs is used to process the digitized signals for camera regions with 37 pixels. At the third stage, trigger conditions found independently in any of the overlapping 37-pixel regions are combined into a global camera trigger by few central FPGAs. Trigger prototype boards based on Xilinx FPGAs have been designed, built and tested and were shown to function properly. Using these components a full camera trigger with a power consumption and price per channel of about 0.5 W and 19 €, respectively, can be built. With the described design the camera trigger algorithm can take advantage of pixel information in both the space and the time domain allowing, for example, the creation of triggers sensitive to the time-gradient of a shower image; the time information could also be exploited to online adjust the time window of the acquisition system for pixel data. Combining the results of the parallel execution of different trigger algorithms (optimized, for example, for the lowest and highest energies, respectively) on each FPGA can result in a better response over all photons energies (as demonstrated by Monte Carlo simulation in this work).

  20. Digital Photography and Journals in a Kindergarten-First-Grade Classroom: Toward Meaningful Technology Integration in Early Childhood Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ching, Cynthia Carter; Wang, X. Christine; Shih, Mei-Li; Kedem, Yore

    2006-01-01

    To explore meaningful and effective technology integration in early childhood education, we investigated how kindergarten-first-grade students created and employed digital photography journals to support social and cognitive reflection. These students used a digital camera to document their daily school activities and created digital photo…

  1. Digital Technologies: From Vision to Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armistead, Stuart

    2016-01-01

    The interest and uptake in utilising digital technologies in education appears to be exponential. With the rollout of ultrafast broadband and the development of the Network for Learning in New Zealand, school leaders face the challenges and opportunity of deciding when, what and how they go about implementing digital technologies in their schools.…

  2. Infrared detectors and test technology of cryogenic camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaole; Liu, Xingxin; Xing, Mailing; Ling, Long

    2016-10-01

    Cryogenic camera which is widely used in deep space detection cools down optical system and support structure by cryogenic refrigeration technology, thereby improving the sensitivity. Discussing the characteristics and design points of infrared detector combined with camera's characteristics. At the same time, cryogenic background test systems of chip and detector assembly are established. Chip test system is based on variable cryogenic and multilayer Dewar, and assembly test system is based on target and background simulator in the thermal vacuum environment. The core of test is to establish cryogenic background. Non-uniformity, ratio of dead pixels and noise of test result are given finally. The establishment of test system supports for the design and calculation of infrared systems.

  3. Evaluation of natural color and color infrared digital cameras as a remote sensing tool for natural resource management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobbe, Thomas J.; McKean, Jim; Zigadlo, Joseph P.

    1995-09-01

    Digital cameras are a recent development in electronic imaging that provide a unique capability to acquire high resolution digital imagery in near real-time. The USDA Forest Service Nationwide Forestry Applications Program has recently evaluated natural color and color infrared digital camera systems as a remote sensing tool to collect resource information. Digital cameras are well suited for small projects and complement the use of other remote sensing systems to perform environmental monitoring, sample surveys and accuracy assessments, and update geographic information systems (GIS) data bases.

  4. Fundamentals of in Situ Digital Camera Methodology for Water Quality Monitoring of Coast and Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Goddijn-Murphy, Lonneke; Dailloux, Damien; White, Martin; Bowers, Dave

    2009-01-01

    Conventional digital cameras, the Nikon Coolpix885® and the SeaLife ECOshot®, were used as in situ optical instruments for water quality monitoring. Measured response spectra showed that these digital cameras are basically three-band radiometers. The response values in the red, green and blue bands, quantified by RGB values of digital images of the water surface, were comparable to measurements of irradiance levels at red, green and cyan/blue wavelengths of water leaving light. Different systems were deployed to capture upwelling light from below the surface, while eliminating direct surface reflection. Relationships between RGB ratios of water surface images, and water quality parameters were found to be consistent with previous measurements using more traditional narrow-band radiometers. This current paper focuses on the method that was used to acquire digital images, derive RGB values and relate measurements to water quality parameters. Field measurements were obtained in Galway Bay, Ireland, and in the Southern Rockall Trough in the North Atlantic, where both yellow substance and chlorophyll concentrations were successfully assessed using the digital camera method. PMID:22346729

  5. Reading Out Single-Molecule Digital RNA and DNA Isothermal Amplification in Nanoliter Volumes with Unmodified Camera Phones.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Manzano, Jesus; Karymov, Mikhail A; Begolo, Stefano; Selck, David A; Zhukov, Dmitriy V; Jue, Erik; Ismagilov, Rustem F

    2016-03-22

    Digital single-molecule technologies are expanding diagnostic capabilities, enabling the ultrasensitive quantification of targets, such as viral load in HIV and hepatitis C infections, by directly counting single molecules. Replacing fluorescent readout with a robust visual readout that can be captured by any unmodified cell phone camera will facilitate the global distribution of diagnostic tests, including in limited-resource settings where the need is greatest. This paper describes a methodology for developing a visual readout system for digital single-molecule amplification of RNA and DNA by (i) selecting colorimetric amplification-indicator dyes that are compatible with the spectral sensitivity of standard mobile phones, and (ii) identifying an optimal ratiometric image-process for a selected dye to achieve a readout that is robust to lighting conditions and camera hardware and provides unambiguous quantitative results, even for colorblind users. We also include an analysis of the limitations of this methodology, and provide a microfluidic approach that can be applied to expand dynamic range and improve reaction performance, allowing ultrasensitive, quantitative measurements at volumes as low as 5 nL. We validate this methodology using SlipChip-based digital single-molecule isothermal amplification with λDNA as a model and hepatitis C viral RNA as a clinically relevant target. The innovative combination of isothermal amplification chemistry in the presence of a judiciously chosen indicator dye and ratiometric image processing with SlipChip technology allowed the sequence-specific visual readout of single nucleic acid molecules in nanoliter volumes with an unmodified cell phone camera. When paired with devices that integrate sample preparation and nucleic acid amplification, this hardware-agnostic approach will increase the affordability and the distribution of quantitative diagnostic and environmental tests.

  6. Reading Out Single-Molecule Digital RNA and DNA Isothermal Amplification in Nanoliter Volumes with Unmodified Camera Phones

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Digital single-molecule technologies are expanding diagnostic capabilities, enabling the ultrasensitive quantification of targets, such as viral load in HIV and hepatitis C infections, by directly counting single molecules. Replacing fluorescent readout with a robust visual readout that can be captured by any unmodified cell phone camera will facilitate the global distribution of diagnostic tests, including in limited-resource settings where the need is greatest. This paper describes a methodology for developing a visual readout system for digital single-molecule amplification of RNA and DNA by (i) selecting colorimetric amplification-indicator dyes that are compatible with the spectral sensitivity of standard mobile phones, and (ii) identifying an optimal ratiometric image-process for a selected dye to achieve a readout that is robust to lighting conditions and camera hardware and provides unambiguous quantitative results, even for colorblind users. We also include an analysis of the limitations of this methodology, and provide a microfluidic approach that can be applied to expand dynamic range and improve reaction performance, allowing ultrasensitive, quantitative measurements at volumes as low as 5 nL. We validate this methodology using SlipChip-based digital single-molecule isothermal amplification with λDNA as a model and hepatitis C viral RNA as a clinically relevant target. The innovative combination of isothermal amplification chemistry in the presence of a judiciously chosen indicator dye and ratiometric image processing with SlipChip technology allowed the sequence-specific visual readout of single nucleic acid molecules in nanoliter volumes with an unmodified cell phone camera. When paired with devices that integrate sample preparation and nucleic acid amplification, this hardware-agnostic approach will increase the affordability and the distribution of quantitative diagnostic and environmental tests. PMID:26900709

  7. A pilot study of digital camera resolution metrology protocols proposed under ISO 12233, edition 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Don; Wueller, Dietmar; Matherson, Kevin; Yoshida, Hideaka; Hubel, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Edition 2 of ISO 12233, Resolution and Spatial Frequency Response (SFR) for Electronic Still Picture Imaging, is likely to offer a choice of techniques for determining spatial resolution for digital cameras different from the initial standard. These choices include 1) the existing slanted-edge gradient SFR protocols but with low contrast features, 2) polar coordinate sine wave SFR technique using a Siemens star element, and 3) visual resolution threshold criteria using a continuous linear spatial frequency bar pattern features. A comparison of these methods will be provided. To establish the level of consistency between the results of these methods, theoretical and laboratory experiments were performed by members of ISO TC42/WG18 committee. Test captures were performed on several consumer and SLR digital cameras using the on-board image processing pipelines. All captures were done in a single session using the same lighting conditions and camera operator. Generally, there was good conformance between methods albeit with some notable differences. Speculation on the reason for these differences and how this can be diagnostic in digital camera evaluation will be offered.

  8. Comparison of fractional vegetation cover derived from digital camera and MODIS NDVI in Mongolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaebeom, K.; Jang, K.; Kang, S.

    2014-12-01

    Satellite remote sensing can continuously observe the land surface vegetation with repetitive error over large area, though it requires complex processes to correct errors occurred from atmosphere and topography. On the other hand, the imageries captured by digital camera provide several benefits such as high spatial resolution, simple shooting method, and relatively low-priced instrument. Furthermore, digital camera has less of atmospheric effect such as path radiance than satellite imagery, and have advantage of the shooting with actual land cover. The objective of this study is the comparison of fractional vegetation cover derived from digital camera and MODIS Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) in Mongolia. 670 imageries for the above ground including green leaves and soil surface captured by digital camera at the 134 sites in Mongolia from 2011 to 2014 were used to classify the vegetation cover fraction. Thirteen imageries captured by Mongolia and South Korea were selected to determine the best classification method. Various classification methods including the 4 supervised classifications, 2 unsupervised classifications, and histogram methods were used to separate the green vegetation in camera imageries that were converted to two color spaces such as Red-Green-Blue (RGB) and Hue-Intensity-Saturation (HIS). Those results were validated using the manually counted dataset from the local plant experts. The maximum likelihood classification (MLC) with HIS color space among classification methods showed a good agreement with manually counted dataset. The correlation coefficient and the root mean square error were 1.008 and 7.88%, respectively. Our preliminary result indicates that the MLC with HIS color space has a potential to classify the green vegetation in Mongolia.

  9. Digital scanner infrared focal plane technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, M. A.; Malone, N. R.; Harris, M.; Shin, J.; Byers, S.; Price, D.; Vampola, J.

    2011-09-01

    Advancements in finer geometry and technology advancements in circuit design now allow placement of digital architecture on cryogenic focal planes while using less power than heritage analog designs. These advances in technology reduce the size, weight, and power of modern focal planes. In addition, the interface to the focal plane is significantly simplified and is more immune to Electromagnetic Interference (EMI). The cost of the customer's instrument after integration with the digital scanning Focal Plane Array (FPA) has been significantly reduced by placing digital architecture such as Analog to digital convertors and Low Voltage Differential Signaling (LVDS) Inputs and Outputs (I/O) on the Read Out Integrated Circuit (ROIC).

  10. High Speed and Slow Motion: The Technology of Modern High Speed Cameras

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vollmer, Michael; Mollmann, Klaus-Peter

    2011-01-01

    The enormous progress in the fields of microsystem technology, microelectronics and computer science has led to the development of powerful high speed cameras. Recently a number of such cameras became available as low cost consumer products which can also be used for the teaching of physics. The technology of high speed cameras is discussed,…

  11. Combining laser scan and photogrammetry for 3D object modeling using a single digital camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Hanwei; Zhang, Hong; Zhang, Xiangwei

    2009-07-01

    In the fields of industrial design, artistic design and heritage conservation, physical objects are usually digitalized by reverse engineering through some 3D scanning methods. Laser scan and photogrammetry are two main methods to be used. For laser scan, a video camera and a laser source are necessary, and for photogrammetry, a digital still camera with high resolution pixels is indispensable. In some 3D modeling tasks, two methods are often integrated to get satisfactory results. Although many research works have been done on how to combine the results of the two methods, no work has been reported to design an integrated device at low cost. In this paper, a new 3D scan system combining laser scan and photogrammetry using a single consumer digital camera is proposed. Nowadays there are many consumer digital cameras, such as Canon EOS 5D Mark II, they usually have features of more than 10M pixels still photo recording and full 1080p HD movie recording, so a integrated scan system can be designed using such a camera. A square plate glued with coded marks is used to place the 3d objects, and two straight wood rulers also glued with coded marks can be laid on the plate freely. In the photogrammetry module, the coded marks on the plate make up a world coordinate and can be used as control network to calibrate the camera, and the planes of two rulers can also be determined. The feature points of the object and the rough volume representation from the silhouettes can be obtained in this module. In the laser scan module, a hand-held line laser is used to scan the object, and the two straight rulers are used as reference planes to determine the position of the laser. The laser scan results in dense points cloud which can be aligned together automatically through calibrated camera parameters. The final complete digital model is obtained through a new a patchwise energy functional method by fusion of the feature points, rough volume and the dense points cloud. The design

  12. Temporal monitoring of groundcover change using digital cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zerger, A.; Gobbett, D.; Crossman, C.; Valencia, P.; Wark, T.; Davies, M.; Handcock, R. N.; Stol, J.

    2012-10-01

    This paper describes the development and testing of an automated method for detecting change in groundcover vegetation in response to kangaroo grazing using visible wavelength digital photography. The research is seen as a precursor to the future deployment of autonomous vegetation monitoring systems (environmental sensor networks). The study was conducted over six months with imagery captured every 90 min and post-processed using supervised image processing techniques. Synchronous manual assessments of groundcover change were also conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of the automated procedures. Results show that for particular cover classes such as Live Vegetation and Bare Ground, there is excellent temporal concordance between automated and manual methods. However, litter classes were difficult to consistently differentiate. A limitation of the method is the inability to effectively deal with change in the vertical profile of groundcover. This indicates that the three dimensional structure related to species composition and plant traits play an important role in driving future experimental designs. The paper concludes by providing lessons for conducting future groundcover monitoring experiments.

  13. Recovering fluorescent spectra with an RGB digital camera and color filters using different matrix factorizations.

    PubMed

    Nieves, Juan L; Valero, Eva M; Hernández-Andrés, Javier; Romero, Javier

    2007-07-01

    The aim of a multispectral system is to recover a spectral function at each image pixel, but when a scene is digitally imaged under a light of unknown spectral power distribution (SPD), the image pixels give incomplete information about the spectral reflectances of objects in the scene. We have analyzed how accurately the spectra of artificial fluorescent light sources can be recovered with a digital CCD camera. The red-green-blue (RGB) sensor outputs are modified by the use of successive cutoff color filters. Four algorithms for simplifying the spectra datasets are used: nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF), independent component analysis (ICA), a direct pseudoinverse method, and principal component analysis (PCA). The algorithms are tested using both simulated data and data from a real RGB digital camera. The methods are compared in terms of the minimum rank of factorization and the number of sensors required to derive acceptable spectral and colorimetric SPD estimations; the PCA results are also given for the sake of comparison. The results show that all the algorithms surpass the PCA when a reduced number of sensors is used. The experimental results suggest a significant loss of quality when more than one color filter is used, which agrees with the previous results for reflectances. Nevertheless, an RGB digital camera with or without a prefilter is found to provide good spectral and colorimetric recovery of indoor fluorescent lighting and can be used for color correction without the need of a telespectroradiometer.

  14. CMOS image sensor noise reduction method for image signal processor in digital cameras and camera phones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Youngjin; Lee, SeongDeok; Choe, Wonhee; Kim, Chang-Yong

    2007-02-01

    Digital images captured from CMOS image sensors suffer Gaussian noise and impulsive noise. To efficiently reduce the noise in Image Signal Processor (ISP), we analyze noise feature for imaging pipeline of ISP where noise reduction algorithm is performed. The Gaussian noise reduction and impulsive noise reduction method are proposed for proper ISP implementation in Bayer domain. The proposed method takes advantage of the analyzed noise feature to calculate noise reduction filter coefficients. Thus, noise is adaptively reduced according to the scene environment. Since noise is amplified and characteristic of noise varies while the image sensor signal undergoes several image processing steps, it is better to remove noise in earlier stage on imaging pipeline of ISP. Thus, noise reduction is carried out in Bayer domain on imaging pipeline of ISP. The method is tested on imaging pipeline of ISP and images captured from Samsung 2M CMOS image sensor test module. The experimental results show that the proposed method removes noise while effectively preserves edges.

  15. Digital Radiography: A Technology Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, Ben A.

    1982-12-01

    Digital radiography, a term hardly recognized two years ago, has grown to become the talk of the radiology community and the excitement of many commercial companies. M2st of this attention has been directed toward digital subtraction intravenous angiography), although during this same time period, a variety of digital radiography apparatus and image processing techniques have been under development. In November of 1980 at the RSNA Conference in Chicago, three commercial digital angiography systems were announced by Philips, Technicare and ADAC Corporations. During this same time period, the University of Arizona was discussing the concept of a photo electronic radiology department2, the University of Pittsburg and Stanford University were investigating line scan radiography3,4 and approximately five laboratories were carrying out clinical IV angiography with digital video systems.5-9 These developments followed basic research programs in digital electronic and computerized imaging at various locations around the world. 10-18 In the spring of 1981 we attempted to review the state of digital radiography, focusing on the various detector systems and image acquisition approaches.19 Since that time, rapid advancements in digital radiography have occurred. A major conference was held on digital radiography at Stanford UniversityzO, a new area detector system for digital radiography was announced by Fuji Film Corporation, clinical testing began on the Picker line scan digital chest unit21, and improvements were made in selenium detectors for digital radiography. Several additional companies announced digital video angiography systems, bringing the total now to approximately 15 companies worldwide. Digital video subtraction angiography is now well established as an important clinical diagnostic procedure and a variety of improvements and extensions of digital angiography systems are now ongoing. Digital acquisition and storage systems are increasing in both speed and

  16. Quantitative Evaluation of Surface Color of Tomato Fruits Cultivated in Remote Farm Using Digital Camera Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Atsushi; Suehara, Ken-Ichiro; Kameoka, Takaharu

    To measure the quantitative surface color information of agricultural products with the ambient information during cultivation, a color calibration method for digital camera images and a remote monitoring system of color imaging using the Web were developed. Single-lens reflex and web digital cameras were used for the image acquisitions. The tomato images through the post-ripening process were taken by the digital camera in both the standard image acquisition system and in the field conditions from the morning to evening. Several kinds of images were acquired with the standard RGB color chart set up just behind the tomato fruit on a black matte, and a color calibration was carried out. The influence of the sunlight could be experimentally eliminated, and the calibrated color information consistently agreed with the standard ones acquired in the system through the post-ripening process. Furthermore, the surface color change of the tomato on the tree in a greenhouse was remotely monitored during maturation using the digital cameras equipped with the Field Server. The acquired digital color images were sent from the Farm Station to the BIFE Laboratory of Mie University via VPN. The time behavior of the tomato surface color change during the maturing process could be measured using the color parameter calculated based on the obtained and calibrated color images along with the ambient atmospheric record. This study is a very important step in developing the surface color analysis for both the simple and rapid evaluation of the crop vigor in the field and to construct an ambient and networked remote monitoring system for food security, precision agriculture, and agricultural research.

  17. Low-complexity camera digital signal imaging for video document projection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsia, Shih-Chang; Tsai, Po-Shien

    2011-04-01

    We present high-performance and low-complexity algorithms for real-time camera imaging applications. The main functions of the proposed camera digital signal processing (DSP) involve color interpolation, white balance, adaptive binary processing, auto gain control, and edge and color enhancement for video projection systems. A series of simulations demonstrate that the proposed method can achieve good image quality while keeping computation cost and memory requirements low. On the basis of the proposed algorithms, the cost-effective hardware core is developed using Verilog HDL. The prototype chip has been verified with one low-cost programmable device. The real-time camera system can achieve 1270 × 792 resolution with the combination of extra components and can demonstrate each DSP function.

  18. Project PANOPTES: a citizen-scientist exoplanet transit survey using commercial digital cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gee, Wilfred T.; Guyon, Olivier; Walawender, Josh; Jovanovic, Nemanja; Boucher, Luc

    2016-08-01

    Project PANOPTES (http://www.projectpanoptes.org) is aimed at establishing a collaboration between professional astronomers, citizen scientists and schools to discover a large number of exoplanets with the transit technique. We have developed digital camera based imaging units to cover large parts of the sky and look for exoplanet transits. Each unit costs approximately $5000 USD and runs automatically every night. By using low-cost, commercial digital single-lens reflex (DSLR) cameras, we have developed a uniquely cost-efficient system for wide field astronomical imaging, offering approximately two orders of magnitude better etendue per unit of cost than professional wide-field surveys. Both science and outreach, our vision is to have thousands of these units built by schools and citizen scientists gathering data, making this project the most productive exoplanet discovery machine in the world.

  19. A digital underwater video camera system for aquatic research in regulated rivers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martin, Benjamin M.; Irwin, Elise R.

    2010-01-01

    We designed a digital underwater video camera system to monitor nesting centrarchid behavior in the Tallapoosa River, Alabama, 20 km below a peaking hydropower dam with a highly variable flow regime. Major components of the system included a digital video recorder, multiple underwater cameras, and specially fabricated substrate stakes. The innovative design of the substrate stakes allowed us to effectively observe nesting redbreast sunfish Lepomis auritus in a highly regulated river. Substrate stakes, which were constructed for the specific substratum complex (i.e., sand, gravel, and cobble) identified at our study site, were able to withstand a discharge level of approximately 300 m3/s and allowed us to simultaneously record 10 active nests before and during water releases from the dam. We believe our technique will be valuable for other researchers that work in regulated rivers to quantify behavior of aquatic fauna in response to a discharge disturbance.

  20. Unsupervised illuminant estimation from natural scenes: an RGB digital camera suffices.

    PubMed

    Nieves, Juan L; Plata, Clara; Valero, Eva M; Romero, Javier

    2008-07-10

    A linear pseudo-inverse method for unsupervised illuminant recovery from natural scenes is presented. The algorithm, which uses a digital RGB camera, selects the naturally occurring bright areas (not necessarily the white ones) in natural images and converts the RGB digital counts directly into the spectral power distribution of the illuminants using a learning-based spectral procedure. Computations show a good spectral and colorimetric performance when only three sensors (a three-band RGB camera) are used. These results go against previous findings concerning the recovery of spectral reflectances and radiances, which claimed that the greater the number of sensors, the better the spectral performance. Combining the device with the appropriate computations can yield spectral information about objects and illuminants simultaneously, avoiding the need for spectroradiometric measurements. The method works well and needs neither a white reference located in the natural scene nor direct measurements of the spectral power distribution of the light.

  1. Digital camera workflow for high dynamic range images using a model of retinal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamburrino, Daniel; Alleysson, David; Meylan, Laurence; Süsstrunk, Sabine

    2008-02-01

    We propose a complete digital camera workflow to capture and render high dynamic range (HDR) static scenes, from RAW sensor data to an output-referred encoded image. In traditional digital camera processing, demosaicing is one of the first operations done after scene analysis. It is followed by rendering operations, such as color correction and tone mapping. In our workflow, which is based on a model of retinal processing, most of the rendering steps are performed before demosaicing. This reduces the complexity of the computation, as only one third of the pixels are processed. This is especially important as our tone mapping operator applies local and global tone corrections, which is usually needed to well render high dynamic scenes. Our algorithms efficiently process HDR images with different keys and different content.

  2. Digitizing Technologies for Preservation. SPEC Kit 214.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kellerman, L. Suzanne, Comp.; Wilson, Rebecca, Comp.

    The Association of Research Libraries distributed a survey to its 119 member libraries to assess the use of state-of-the-art digital technologies as a preservation method. Libraries were asked to report detailed data on all projects designed specifically to: (1) enhance images of faded or brittle originals, (2) provide access to digital images…

  3. Digital microscopy. Bringing new technology into focus.

    PubMed

    2010-06-01

    Digital microscopy enables the scanning of microscope slides so that they can be viewed, analyzed, and archived on a computer. While the technology is not yet widely accepted by pathologists, a switch to digital microscopy systems seems to be inevitable in the near future.

  4. Digital Literacy and New Technological Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feola, Elvia Ilaria

    2016-01-01

    This paper aims to reflect on the implications and challenges that experts in the field have to deal with when you want to evaluate the performance in the use of digital technologies in teaching. The argument stems from a contextual and social assessment, and then proceeds to an application and methodological connotation of digital literacy…

  5. Measuring the Orbital Period of the Moon Using a Digital Camera

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Stephen W.

    2006-01-01

    A method of measuring the orbital velocity of the Moon around the Earth using a digital camera is described. Separate images of the Moon and stars taken 24 hours apart were loaded into Microsoft PowerPoint and the centre of the Moon marked on each image. Four stars common to both images were connected together to form a "home-made" constellation.…

  6. Primary-consistent soft-decision color demosaicking for digital cameras (patent pending).

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaolin; Zhang, Ning

    2004-09-01

    Color mosaic sampling schemes are widely used in digital cameras. Given the resolution of CCD sensor arrays, the image quality of digital cameras using mosaic sampling largely depends on the performance of the color demosaicking process. A common problem with existing color demosaicking algorithms is an inconsistency of sample interpolations in different primary color channels, which is the cause of the most objectionable color artifacts. To cure the problem, we propose a new primary-consistent soft-decision framework (PCSD) of color demosaicking. In the PCSD framework, we make multiple estimates of a missing color sample under different hypotheses on edge or texture directions. The estimates are made via a primary consistent interpolation, meaning that all three primary components of a color are interpolated in the same direction. The final estimate of a color sample is obtained by testing different interpolation hypotheses in the reconstructed full-resolution color image and selecting the best via an optimal statistical decision or inference process. A concrete color demosaicking method of the PCSD framework is presented. This new method eliminates certain types of color artifacts of existing color demosaicking methods. Extensive experimental results demonstrate that the PCSD approach can significantly improve the image quality of digital cameras in both subjective and objective measures. In some instances, our gain over the competing methods can be as much as 7 dB.

  7. Two detector, active digital holographic camera for 3D imaging and digital holographic interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Żak, Jakub; Kujawińska, Małgorzata; Józwik, Michał

    2015-09-01

    In this paper we present the novel design and proof of concept of an active holographic camera consisting of two array detectors and Liquid Crystal on Silicon (LCOS) Spatial Light Modulator (SLM). The device allows sequential or simultaneous capture of two Fresnel holograms of 3D object/scene. The two detectors configuration provides an increased viewing angle of the camera, allows to capture two double exposure holograms with different sensitivity vectors and even facilitate capturing a synthetic aperture hologram for static objects. The LCOS SLM, located in a reference arm, serves as an active element, which enables phase shifting and proper pointing of reference beams towards both detectors in the configuration which allows miniaturization of the camera. The laboratory model of the camera has been tested for different modes of work namely for capture and reconstruction of 3D scene and for double exposure holographic interferometry applied for an engineering object under load. The future extension of the camera functionalities for Fourier holograms capture is discussed.

  8. Use of a Digital Camera to Monitor the Growth and Nitrogen Status of Cotton

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Biao; He, Haibing; Ma, Fuyu; Diao, Ming; Jiang, Guiying; Zheng, Zhong; Cui, Jin; Fan, Hua

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to develop a nondestructive method for monitoring cotton growth and N status using a digital camera. Digital images were taken of the cotton canopies between emergence and full bloom. The green and red values were extracted from the digital images and then used to calculate canopy cover. The values of canopy cover were closely correlated with the normalized difference vegetation index and the ratio vegetation index and were measured using a GreenSeeker handheld sensor. Models were calibrated to describe the relationship between canopy cover and three growth properties of the cotton crop (i.e., aboveground total N content, LAI, and aboveground biomass). There were close, exponential relationships between canopy cover and three growth properties. And the relationships for estimating cotton aboveground total N content were most precise, the coefficients of determination (R2) value was 0.978, and the root mean square error (RMSE) value was 1.479 g m−2. Moreover, the models were validated in three fields of high-yield cotton. The result indicated that the best relationship between canopy cover and aboveground total N content had an R2 value of 0.926 and an RMSE value of 1.631 g m−2. In conclusion, as a near-ground remote assessment tool, digital cameras have good potential for monitoring cotton growth and N status. PMID:24723817

  9. Greenness indices from digital cameras predict the timing and seasonal dynamics of canopy-scale photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Toomey, Michael; Friedl, Mark A; Frolking, Steve; Hufkens, Koen; Klosterman, Stephen; Sonnentag, Oliver; Baldocchi, Dennis D; Bernacchi, Carl J; Biraud, Sebastien C; Bohrer, Gil; Brzostek, Edward; Burns, Sean P; Coursolle, Carole; Hollinger, David Y; Margolis, Hank A; Mccaughey, Harry; Monson, Russell K; Munger, J William; Pallardy, Stephen; Phillips, Richard P; Torn, Margaret S; Wharton, Sonia; Zeri, Marcelo; And, Andrew D; Richardson, Andrew D

    2015-01-01

    The proliferation of digital cameras co-located with eddy covariance instrumentation provides new opportunities to better understand the relationship between canopy phenology and the seasonality of canopy photosynthesis. In this paper we analyze the abilities and limitations of canopy color metrics measured by digital repeat photography to track seasonal canopy development and photosynthesis, determine phenological transition dates, and estimate intra-annual and interannual variability in canopy photosynthesis. We used 59 site-years of camera imagery and net ecosystem exchange measurements from 17 towers spanning three plant functional types (deciduous broadleaf forest, evergreen needleleaf forest, and grassland/crops) to derive color indices and estimate gross primary productivity (GPP). GPP was strongly correlated with greenness derived from camera imagery in all three plant functional types. Specifically, the beginning of the photosynthetic period in deciduous broadleaf forest and grassland/crops and the end of the photosynthetic period in grassland/crops were both correlated with changes in greenness; changes in redness were correlated with the end of the photosynthetic period in deciduous broadleaf forest. However, it was not possible to accurately identify the beginning or ending of the photosynthetic period using camera greenness in evergreen needleleaf forest. At deciduous broadleaf sites, anomalies in integrated greenness and total GPP were significantly correlated up to 60 days after the mean onset date for the start of spring. More generally, results from this work demonstrate that digital repeat photography can be used to quantify both the duration of the photosynthetically active period as well as total GPP in deciduous broadleaf forest and grassland/crops, but that new and different approaches are required before comparable results can be achieved in evergreen needleleaf forest.

  10. A simple method for vignette correction of airborne digital camera data

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, A.T.; Stow, D.A.; Hope, A.S.

    1996-11-01

    Airborne digital camera systems have gained popularity in recent years due to their flexibility, high geometric fidelity and spatial resolution, and fast data turn-around time. However, a common problem that plagues these types of framing systems is vignetting which causes falloff in image brightness away from principle nadir point. This paper presents a simple method for vignetting correction by utilizing laboratory images of a uniform illumination source. Multiple lab images are averaged and inverted to create digital correction templates which then are applied to actual airborne data. The vignette correction was effective in removing the systematic falloff in spectral values. We have shown that the vignette correction is a necessary part of the preprocessing of raw digital airborne remote sensing data. The consequences of not correcting for these effects are demonstrated in the context of monitoring of salt marsh habitat. 4 refs.

  11. Tweens' Characterization of Digital Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brito, Pedro Quelhas

    2012-01-01

    The tweens are a transitional age group undergoing deep physical and psychological transformations. Based on a thirteen-focus group research design involving 103 students, and applying a tweens-centered approach, the characteristics of SMS, IM, Internet, digital photos, electronic games, and email were analyzed. Categories such as moral issues,…

  12. Technology Counts 2007: A Digital Decade

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Week, 2007

    2007-01-01

    "Technology Counts 2007" looks back, and ahead, after a decade of enormous upheaval in the educational technology landscape. This special issue of "Education Week" includes the following articles: (1) A Digital Decade; (2) Getting Up to Speed (Andrew Trotter); (3) E-Rate's Imprint Seen in Schools (Andrew Trotter); (4) Teaching…

  13. Whole-field thickness strain measurement using multiple camera digital image correlation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Junrui; Xie, Xin; Yang, Guobiao; Zhang, Boyang; Siebert, Thorsten; Yang, Lianxiang.

    2017-03-01

    Three Dimensional digital image correlation(3D-DIC) has been widely used by industry, especially for strain measurement. The traditional 3D-DIC system can accurately obtain the whole-field 3D deformation. However, the conventional 3D-DIC system can only acquire the displacement field on a single surface, thus lacking information in the depth direction. Therefore, the strain in the thickness direction cannot be measured. In recent years, multiple camera DIC (multi-camera DIC) systems have become a new research topic, which provides much more measurement possibility compared to the conventional 3D-DIC system. In this paper, a multi-camera DIC system used to measure the whole-field thickness strain is introduced in detail. Four cameras are used in the system. two of them are placed at the front side of the object, and the other two cameras are placed at the back side. Each pair of cameras constitutes a sub stereo-vision system and measures the whole-field 3D deformation on one side of the object. A special calibration plate is used to calibrate the system, and the information from these two subsystems is linked by the calibration result. Whole-field thickness strain can be measured using the information obtained from both sides of the object. Additionally, the major and minor strain on the object surface are obtained simultaneously, and a whole-field quasi 3D strain history is acquired. The theory derivation for the system, experimental process, and application of determining the thinning strain limit based on the obtained whole-field thickness strain history are introduced in detail.

  14. Determination of visual range during fog and mist using digital camera images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, John R.; Moogan, Jamie C.

    2010-08-01

    During the winter of 2008, daily time series of images of five "unit-cell chequerboard" targets were acquired using a digital camera. The camera and targets were located in the Majura Valley approximately 3 km from Canberra airport. We show how the contrast between the black and white sections of the targets is related to the meteorological range (or standard visual range), and compare estimates of this quantity derived from images acquired during fog and mist conditions with those from the Vaisala FD-12 visibility meter operated by the Bureau of Meteorology at Canberra Airport. The two sets of ranges are consistent but show the variability of visibility in the patchy fog conditions that often prevail in the Majura Valley. Significant spatial variations of the light extinction coefficient were found to occur over the longest 570 m optical path sampled by the imaging system. Visual ranges could be estimated out to ten times the distance to the furthest target, or approximately 6 km, in these experiments. Image saturation of the white sections of the targets was the major limitation on the quantitative interpretation of the images. In the future, the camera images will be processed in real time so that the camera exposure can be adjusted to avoid saturation.

  15. Improvements in remote cardiopulmonary measurement using a five band digital camera.

    PubMed

    McDuff, Daniel; Gontarek, Sarah; Picard, Rosalind W

    2014-10-01

    Remote measurement of the blood volume pulse via photoplethysmography (PPG) using digital cameras and ambient light has great potential for healthcare and affective computing. However, traditional RGB cameras have limited frequency resolution. We present results of PPG measurements from a novel five band camera and show that alternate frequency bands, in particular an orange band, allowed physiological measurements much more highly correlated with an FDA approved contact PPG sensor. In a study with participants (n = 10) at rest and under stress, correlations of over 0.92 (p 0.01) were obtained for heart rate, breathing rate, and heart rate variability measurements. In addition, the remotely measured heart rate variability spectrograms closely matched those from the contact approach. The best results were obtained using a combination of cyan, green, and orange (CGO) bands; incorporating red and blue channel observations did not improve performance. In short, RGB is not optimal for this problem: CGO is better. Incorporating alternative color channel sensors should not increase the cost of such cameras dramatically.

  16. An innovative silicon photomultiplier digitizing camera for gamma-ray astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heller, M.; Schioppa, E., Jr.; Porcelli, A.; Pujadas, I. Troyano; Ziȩtara, K.; Volpe, D. della; Montaruli, T.; Cadoux, F.; Favre, Y.; Aguilar, J. A.; Christov, A.; Prandini, E.; Rajda, P.; Rameez, M.; Bilnik, W.; Błocki, J.; Bogacz, L.; Borkowski, J.; Bulik, T.; Frankowski, A.; Grudzińska, M.; Idźkowski, B.; Jamrozy, M.; Janiak, M.; Kasperek, J.; Lalik, K.; Lyard, E.; Mach, E.; Mandat, D.; Marszałek, A.; Miranda, L. D. Medina; Michałowski, J.; Moderski, R.; Neronov, A.; Niemiec, J.; Ostrowski, M.; Paśko, P.; Pech, M.; Schovanek, P.; Seweryn, K.; Sliusar, V.; Skowron, K.; Stawarz, Ł.; Stodulska, M.; Stodulski, M.; Walter, R.; Wiȩcek, M.; Zagdański, A.

    2017-01-01

    The single-mirror small-size telescope (SST-1M) is one of the three proposed designs for the small-size telescopes (SSTs) of the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) project. The SST-1M will be equipped with a 4 m-diameter segmented reflector dish and an innovative fully digital camera based on silicon photo-multipliers. Since the SST sub-array will consist of up to 70 telescopes, the challenge is not only to build telescopes with excellent performance, but also to design them so that their components can be commissioned, assembled and tested by industry. In this paper we review the basic steps that led to the design concepts for the SST-1M camera and the ongoing realization of the first prototype, with focus on the innovative solutions adopted for the photodetector plane and the readout and trigger parts of the camera. In addition, we report on results of laboratory measurements on real scale elements that validate the camera design and show that it is capable of matching the CTA requirements of operating up to high moonlight background conditions.

  17. CMOS digital pixel sensors: technology and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skorka, Orit; Joseph, Dileepan

    2014-04-01

    CMOS active pixel sensor technology, which is widely used these days for digital imaging, is based on analog pixels. Transition to digital pixel sensors can boost signal-to-noise ratios and enhance image quality, but can increase pixel area to dimensions that are impractical for the high-volume market of consumer electronic devices. There are two main approaches to digital pixel design. The first uses digitization methods that largely rely on photodetector properties and so are unique to imaging. The second is based on adaptation of a classical analog-to-digital converter (ADC) for in-pixel data conversion. Imaging systems for medical, industrial, and security applications are emerging lower-volume markets that can benefit from these in-pixel ADCs. With these applications, larger pixels are typically acceptable, and imaging may be done in invisible spectral bands.

  18. Digital technology and the conservation of nature.

    PubMed

    Arts, Koen; van der Wal, René; Adams, William M

    2015-11-01

    Digital technology is changing nature conservation in increasingly profound ways. We describe this impact and its significance through the concept of 'digital conservation', which we found to comprise five pivotal dimensions: data on nature, data on people, data integration and analysis, communication and experience, and participatory governance. Examining digital innovation in nature conservation and addressing how its development, implementation and diffusion may be steered, we warn against hypes, techno-fix thinking, good news narratives and unverified assumptions. We identify a need for rigorous evaluation, more comprehensive consideration of social exclusion, frameworks for regulation and increased multi-sector as well as multi-discipline awareness and cooperation. Along the way, digital technology may best be reconceptualised by conservationists from something that is either good or bad, to a dual-faced force in need of guidance.

  19. "I Know How Much This Child Has Learned. I Have Proof!": Employing Digital Technologies for Documentation Processes in Kindergarten

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boardman, Margot

    2007-01-01

    This study set out to investigate the use of digital cameras and voice recorders to accurately capture essential components of early learners' achievements. The project was undertaken by 29 early childhood educators within kindergarten settings in Tasmania and the Australian Capital Territory. Data collected indicated that digital technologies,…

  20. Digital optical tape: Technology and standardization issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podio, Fernando L.

    1996-01-01

    During the coming years, digital data storage technologies will continue an aggressive growth to satisfy the user's need for higher storage capacities, higher data transfer rates and long-term archival media properties. Digital optical tape is a promising technology to satisfy these user's needs. As any emerging data storage technology, the industry faces many technological and standardization challenges. The technological challenges are great, but feasible to overcome. Although it is too early to consider formal industry standards, the optical tape industry has decided to work together by initiating prestandardization efforts that may lead in the future to formal voluntary industry standards. This paper will discuss current industry optical tape drive developments and the types of standards that will be required for the technology. The status of current industry prestandardization efforts will also be discussed.

  1. Technique for improving the quality of images from digital cameras using ink-jet printers and smoothed RGB transfer curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampat, Nitin; Grim, John F.; O'Hara, James E.

    1998-04-01

    The digital camera market is growing at an explosive rate. At the same time, the quality of photographs printed on ink- jet printers continues to improve. Most of the consumer cameras are designed with the monitor as the target output device and ont the printer. When a user is printing his images from a camera, he/she needs to optimize the camera and printer combination in order to maximize image quality. We describe the details of one such method for improving image quality using a AGFA digital camera and an ink jet printer combination. Using Adobe PhotoShop, we generated optimum red, green and blue transfer curves that match the scene content to the printers output capabilities. Application of these curves to the original digital image resulted in a print with more shadow detail, no loss of highlight detail, a smoother tone scale, and more saturated colors. The image also exhibited an improved tonal scale and visually more pleasing images than those captured and printed without any 'correction'. While we report the results for one camera-printer combination we tested this technique on numbers digital cameras and printer combinations and in each case produced a better looking image. We also discuss the problems we encountered in implementing this technique.

  2. Reflectance measurement using digital camera and a protecting dome with built in light source.

    PubMed

    Välisuo, Petri; Harju, Toni; Alander, Jarmo

    2011-08-01

    The reflectance of the skin reveals the chemical and physical changes of the skin as well as many metabolic changes. The reflectance measurement is an important method for medical diagnosis, follow-up and screening. This article concentrates on designing and validating an imaging system, based on a digital camera. The proposed system can measure the reflectance of the skin with high spatial and currently four channel spectral resolution, in the range of 450 nm to 980 nm. The accuracy of the system is determined by imaging a colour checker board and comparing the obtained values with both given values and spectrometer measurements. The diffuse interreflections of both, the integrating sphere and the lighting dome of the imaging system, is compensated with a correction factor. The accuracy of the proposed system is only slightly weaker than the spectrometer. The imaging system characteristics are independent of the camera characteristics.

  3. Cataract screening by minimally trained remote observer with non-mydriatic digital fundus camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Ann; Hjelmstad, David; Taibl, Jessica N.; Sayegh, Samir I.

    2013-03-01

    We propose a method that allows an inexperienced observer, through the examination of the digital fundus image of a retina on a computer screen, to simply determine the presence of a cataract and the necessity to refer the patient for further evaluation. To do so, fundus photos obtained with a non-mydriatic camera were presented to an inexperienced observer that was briefly instructed on fundus imaging, nature of cataracts and their probable effect on the image of the retina and the use of a computer program presenting fundus image pairs. Preliminary results of pair testing indicate the method is very effective.

  4. Acquisition of Diagnostic Screen and Synchrotron Radiation Images Using IEEE1394 Digital Cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehm, G.

    2004-11-01

    In the LINAC, booster synchrotron and transfer lines of DIAMOND a number of screens (YAG:Ce and OTR) as well as synchrotron radiation ports will be used to acquire information about the transverse beam distribution. Digital IEEE1394 cameras have been selected for their range of sensor sizes and resolutions available, their easy triggering to single events, and their noise-free transmission of the images into the control system. Their suitability for use under influence of high-energy radiation has been verified. Images from preliminary tests at the SRS Daresbury are presented.

  5. Determination of the diffusion coefficient between corn syrup and distilled water using a digital camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, E.; Bunton, P.; Pojman, J. A.

    2007-10-01

    A simple technique for determining the diffusion coefficient between two miscible liquids is presented based on observing concentration-dependent ultraviolet-excited fluorescence using a digital camera. The ultraviolet-excited visible fluorescence of corn syrup is proportional to the concentration of the syrup. The variation of fluorescence with distance from the transition zone between the fluids is fit by the Fick's law solution to the diffusion equation. By monitoring the concentration at successive times, the diffusion coefficient can be determined in otherwise transparent materials. The technique is quantitative and makes measurement of diffusion accessible in the advanced undergraduate physics laboratory.

  6. Conversion from light to numerical signal in a digital camera pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toadere, Florin

    2010-11-01

    The goal of this paper is to simulate the conversion from light to numerical signal which occurs during the image propagations through the digital camera pipeline. We focus on the spectral and resolution analysis of the optical system, the Bayer sampling, the photon shot and fixed pattern noise, the high dynamic range image, the amplitude and bilateral filters and the analog to digital conversion. The image capture system consists of a flash illumination source, a Cooke triplet photographic objective and a passive pixel CMOS sensor. We use a spectral image in order to simulate the illumination and the propagation of the light through the optical system components. The Fourier optics is used to compute the point spread function specific to each optical component. We consider the image acquisition system to be linear shift invariant and axial. The light propagation is orthogonal to the system.

  7. Digital imaging technology assessment: Digital document storage project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    An ongoing technical assessment and requirements definition project is examining the potential role of digital imaging technology at NASA's STI facility. The focus is on the basic components of imaging technology in today's marketplace as well as the components anticipated in the near future. Presented is a requirement specification for a prototype project, an initial examination of current image processing at the STI facility, and an initial summary of image processing projects at other sites. Operational imaging systems incorporate scanners, optical storage, high resolution monitors, processing nodes, magnetic storage, jukeboxes, specialized boards, optical character recognition gear, pixel addressable printers, communications, and complex software processes.

  8. Design of high speed camera based on CMOS technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sei-Hun; An, Jun-Sick; Oh, Tae-Seok; Kim, Il-Hwan

    2007-12-01

    The capacity of a high speed camera in taking high speed images has been evaluated using CMOS image sensors. There are 2 types of image sensors, namely, CCD and CMOS sensors. CMOS sensor consumes less power than CCD sensor and can take images more rapidly. High speed camera with built-in CMOS sensor is widely used in vehicle crash tests and airbag controls, golf training aids, and in bullet direction measurement in the military. The High Speed Camera System made in this study has the following components: CMOS image sensor that can take about 500 frames per second at a resolution of 1280*1024; FPGA and DDR2 memory that control the image sensor and save images; Camera Link Module that transmits saved data to PC; and RS-422 communication function that enables control of the camera from a PC.

  9. Adopting Digital Technologies in the Classroom: 10 Assessment Questions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staley, David J.

    2004-01-01

    Technology has long been a part of the classroom space. Sometime in the 1990s, the word technology was co-opted to refer only to digital tools. "Technology in the classroom" or "technology stocks" or "the dangers posed by technology" came to refer only to digital technology rather than to technology as a whole. As such, much of the discussion…

  10. The PANOPTES project: discovering exoplanets with low-cost digital cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guyon, Olivier; Walawender, Josh; Jovanovic, Nemanja; Butterfield, Mike; Gee, Wilfred T.; Mery, Rawad

    2014-07-01

    The Panoptic Astronomical Networked OPtical observatory for Transiting Exoplanets Survey (PANOPTES, www.projectpanoptes.org) project is aimed at identifying transiting exoplanets using a wide network of low-cost imaging units. Each unit consists of two commercial digital single lens reflex (DSLR) cameras equipped with 85mm F1.4 lenses, mounted on a small equatorial mount. At a few $1000s per unit, the system offers a uniquely advantageous survey eficiency for the cost, and can easily be assembled by amateur astronomers or students. Three generations of prototype units have so far been tested, and the baseline unit design, which optimizes robustness, simplicity and cost, is now ready to be duplicated. We describe the hardware and software for the PANOPTES project, focusing on key challenging aspects of the project. We show that obtaining high precision photometric measurements with commercial DSLR color cameras is possible, using a PSF-matching algorithm we developed for this project. On-sky tests show that percent-level photometric precision is achieved in 1 min with a single camera. We also discuss hardware choices aimed at optimizing system robustness while maintaining adequate cost. PANOPTES is both an outreach project and a scientifically compelling survey for transiting exoplanets. In its current phase, experienced PANOPTES members are deploying a limited number of units, acquiring the experience necessary to run the network. A much wider community will then be able to participate to the project, with schools and citizen scientists integrating their units in the network.

  11. High-resolution image digitizing through 12x3-bit RGB-filtered CCD camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Andrew Y. S.; Pau, Michael C. Y.

    1996-09-01

    A high resolution computer-controlled CCD image capturing system is developed by using a 12 bits 1024 by 1024 pixels CCD camera and motorized RGB filters to grasp an image with color depth up to 36 bits. The filters distinguish the major components of color and collect them separately while the CCD camera maintains the spatial resolution and detector filling factor. The color separation can be done optically rather than electronically. The operation is simply by placing the capturing objects like color photos, slides and even x-ray transparencies under the camera system, the necessary parameters such as integration time, mixing level and light intensity are automatically adjusted by an on-line expert system. This greatly reduces the restrictions of the capturing species. This unique approach can save considerable time for adjusting the quality of image, give much more flexibility of manipulating captured object even if it is a 3D object with minimal setup fixers. In addition, cross sectional dimension of a 3D capturing object can be analyzed by adapting a fiber optic ring light source. It is particularly useful in non-contact metrology of a 3D structure. The digitized information can be stored in an easily transferable format. Users can also perform a special LUT mapping automatically or manually. Applications of the system include medical images archiving, printing quality control, 3D machine vision, and etc.

  12. Cloud Height Estimation with a Single Digital Camera and Artificial Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carretas, Filipe; Janeiro, Fernando M.

    2014-05-01

    Clouds influence the local weather, the global climate and are an important parameter in the weather prediction models. Clouds are also an essential component of airplane safety when visual flight rules (VFR) are enforced, such as in most small aerodromes where it is not economically viable to install instruments for assisted flying. Therefore it is important to develop low cost and robust systems that can be easily deployed in the field, enabling large scale acquisition of cloud parameters. Recently, the authors developed a low-cost system for the measurement of cloud base height using stereo-vision and digital photography. However, due to the stereo nature of the system, some challenges were presented. In particular, the relative camera orientation requires calibration and the two cameras need to be synchronized so that the photos from both cameras are acquired simultaneously. In this work we present a new system that estimates the cloud height between 1000 and 5000 meters. This prototype is composed by one digital camera controlled by a Raspberry Pi and is installed at Centro de Geofísica de Évora (CGE) in Évora, Portugal. The camera is periodically triggered to acquire images of the overhead sky and the photos are downloaded to the Raspberry Pi which forwards them to a central computer that processes the images and estimates the cloud height in real time. To estimate the cloud height using just one image requires a computer model that is able to learn from previous experiences and execute pattern recognition. The model proposed in this work is an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) that was previously trained with cloud features at different heights. The chosen Artificial Neural Network is a three-layer network, with six parameters in the input layer, 12 neurons in the hidden intermediate layer, and an output layer with only one output. The six input parameters are the average intensity values and the intensity standard deviation of each RGB channel. The output

  13. Mobile technology and the digitization of healthcare.

    PubMed

    Bhavnani, Sanjeev P; Narula, Jagat; Sengupta, Partho P

    2016-05-07

    The convergence of science and technology in our dynamic digital era has resulted in the development of innovative digital health devices that allow easy and accurate characterization in health and disease. Technological advancements and the miniaturization of diagnostic instruments to modern smartphone-connected and mobile health (mHealth) devices such as the iECG, handheld ultrasound, and lab-on-a-chip technologies have led to increasing enthusiasm for patient care with promises to decrease healthcare costs and to improve outcomes. This 'hype' for mHealth has recently intersected with the 'real world' and is providing important insights into how patients and practitioners are utilizing digital health technologies. It is also raising important questions regarding the evidence supporting widespread device use. In this state-of-the-art review, we assess the current literature of mHealth and aim to provide a framework for the advances in mHealth by understanding the various device, patient, and clinical factors as they relate to digital health from device designs and patient engagement, to clinical workflow and device regulation. We also outline new strategies for generation and analysis of mHealth data at the individual and population-based levels.

  14. Portable retinal imaging for eye disease screening using a consumer-grade digital camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barriga, Simon; Larichev, Andrey; Zamora, Gilberto; Soliz, Peter

    2012-03-01

    The development of affordable means to image the retina is an important step toward the implementation of eye disease screening programs. In this paper we present the i-RxCam, a low-cost, hand-held, retinal camera for widespread applications such as tele-retinal screening for eye diseases like diabetic retinopathy (DR), glaucoma, and age-related ocular diseases. Existing portable retinal imagers do not meet the requirements of a low-cost camera with sufficient technical capabilities (field of view, image quality, portability, battery power, and ease-of-use) to be distributed widely to low volume clinics, such as the offices of single primary care physicians serving rural communities. The i-RxCam uses a Nikon D3100 digital camera body. The camera has a CMOS sensor with 14.8 million pixels. We use a 50mm focal lens that gives a retinal field of view of 45 degrees. The internal autofocus can compensate for about 2D (diopters) of focusing error. The light source is an LED produced by Philips with a linear emitting area that is transformed using a light pipe to the optimal shape at the eye pupil, an annulus. To eliminate corneal reflex we use a polarization technique in which the light passes through a nano-wire polarizer plate. This is a novel type of polarizer featuring high polarization separation (contrast ratio of more than 1000) and very large acceptance angle (>45 degrees). The i-RxCam approach will yield a significantly more economical retinal imaging device that would allow mass screening of the at-risk population.

  15. Estimating the spatial position of marine mammals based on digital camera recordings

    PubMed Central

    Hoekendijk, Jeroen P A; de Vries, Jurre; van der Bolt, Krissy; Greinert, Jens; Brasseur, Sophie; Camphuysen, Kees C J; Aarts, Geert

    2015-01-01

    Estimating the spatial position of organisms is essential to quantify interactions between the organism and the characteristics of its surroundings, for example, predator–prey interactions, habitat selection, and social associations. Because marine mammals spend most of their time under water and may appear at the surface only briefly, determining their exact geographic location can be challenging. Here, we developed a photogrammetric method to accurately estimate the spatial position of marine mammals or birds at the sea surface. Digital recordings containing landscape features with known geographic coordinates can be used to estimate the distance and bearing of each sighting relative to the observation point. The method can correct for frame rotation, estimates pixel size based on the reference points, and can be applied to scenarios with and without a visible horizon. A set of R functions was written to process the images and obtain accurate geographic coordinates for each sighting. The method is applied to estimate the spatiotemporal fine-scale distribution of harbour porpoises in a tidal inlet. Video recordings of harbour porpoises were made from land, using a standard digital single-lens reflex (DSLR) camera, positioned at a height of 9.59 m above mean sea level. Porpoises were detected up to a distance of ∽3136 m (mean 596 m), with a mean location error of 12 m. The method presented here allows for multiple detections of different individuals within a single video frame and for tracking movements of individuals based on repeated sightings. In comparison with traditional methods, this method only requires a digital camera to provide accurate location estimates. It especially has great potential in regions with ample data on local (a)biotic conditions, to help resolve functional mechanisms underlying habitat selection and other behaviors in marine mammals in coastal areas. PMID:25691982

  16. Payette National Forest aerial survey project using the Kodak digital color infrared camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greer, Jerry D.

    1997-11-01

    Staff of the Payette National Forest located in central Idaho used the Kodak Digital Infrared Camera to collect digital photographic images over a wide variety of selected areas. The objective of this aerial survey project is to collect airborne digital camera imagery and to evaluate it for potential use in forest assessment and management. The data collected from this remote sensing system is being compared with existing resource information and with personal knowledge of the areas surveyed. Resource specialists are evaluating the imagery to determine if it may be useful for; identifying cultural sites (pre-European settlement tribal villages and camps); recognizing ecosystem landscape pattern; mapping recreation areas; evaluating the South Fork Salmon River road reconstruction project; designing the Elk Summit Road; assessing the impact of sediment on anadramous fish in the South Fork Salmon River; assessing any contribution of sediment to the South Fork from the reconstructed road; determining post-wildfire stress development in conifer timber; in assessing the development of insect populations in areas initially determined to be within low intensity wildfire burn polygons; and to search for Idaho Ground Squirrel habitat. Project sites include approximately 60 linear miles of the South Fork of the Salmon River; a parallel road over about half that distance; 3 archaeological sites; two transects of about 6 miles each for landscape patterns; 3 recreation areas; 5 miles of the Payette River; 4 miles of the Elk Summit Road; a pair of transects 4.5 miles long for stress assessment in timber; a triplet of transects about 3 miles long for the assessment of the identification of species; and an area of about 640 acres to evaluate habitat for the endangered Idaho Ground Squirrel. Preliminary results indicate that the imagery is an economically viable way to collect site specific resource information that is of value in the management of a national forest.

  17. A historical perspective on digital hearing AIDS: how digital technology has changed modern hearing AIDS.

    PubMed

    Levitt, Harry

    2007-03-01

    This article provides the author's perspective on the development of digital hearing aids and how digital signal processing approaches have led to changes in hearing aid design. Major landmarks in the evolution of digital technology are identified, and their impact on the development of digital hearing aids is discussed. Differences between analog and digital approaches to signal processing in hearing aids are identified.

  18. A compact high-definition low-cost digital stereoscopic video camera for rapid robotic surgery development.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Jay; Kowalczuk, Jędrzej; Psota, Eric; Pérez, Lance C

    2012-01-01

    Robotic surgical platforms require vision feedback systems, which often consist of low-resolution, expensive, single-imager analog cameras. These systems are retooled for 3D display by simply doubling the cameras and outboard control units. Here, a fully-integrated digital stereoscopic video camera employing high-definition sensors and a class-compliant USB video interface is presented. This system can be used with low-cost PC hardware and consumer-level 3D displays for tele-medical surgical applications including military medical support, disaster relief, and space exploration.

  19. Combining multi-spectral proximal sensors and digital cameras for monitoring grazed tropical pastures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handcock, R. N.; Gobbett, D. L.; González, L. A.; Bishop-Hurley, G. J.; McGavin, S. L.

    2015-11-01

    Timely and accurate monitoring of pasture biomass and ground-cover is necessary in livestock production systems to ensure productive and sustainable management of forage for livestock. Interest in the use of proximal sensors for monitoring pasture status in grazing systems has increased, since such sensors can return data in near real-time, and have the potential to be deployed on large properties where remote sensing may not be suitable due to issues such as spatial scale or cloud cover. However, there are unresolved challenges in developing calibrations to convert raw sensor data to quantitative biophysical values, such as pasture biomass or vegetation ground-cover, to allow meaningful interpretation of sensor data by livestock producers. We assessed the use of multiple proximal sensors for monitoring tropical pastures with a pilot deployment of sensors at two sites on Lansdown Research Station near Townsville, Australia. Each site was monitored by a Skye SKR-four-band multi-spectral sensor (every 1 min), a digital camera (every 30 min), and a soil moisture sensor (every 1 min), each operated over 18 months. Raw data from each sensor were processed to calculate a number of multispectral vegetation indices. Visual observations of pasture characteristics, including above-ground standing biomass and ground cover, were made every 2 weeks. A methodology was developed to manage the sensor deployment and the quality control of the data collected. The data capture from the digital cameras was more reliable than the multi-spectral sensors, which had up to 63 % of data discarded after data cleaning and quality control. We found a strong relationship between sensor and pasture measurements during the wet season period of maximum pasture growth (January to April), especially when data from the multi-spectral sensors were combined with weather data. RatioNS34 (a simple band ratio between the near infrared (NIR) and lower shortwave infrared (SWIR) bands) and rainfall since 1

  20. Digital video technology and production 101: lights, camera, action.

    PubMed

    Elliot, Diane L; Goldberg, Linn; Goldberg, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    Videos are powerful tools for enhancing the reach and effectiveness of health promotion programs. They can be used for program promotion and recruitment, for training program implementation staff/volunteers, and as elements of an intervention. Although certain brief videos may be produced without technical assistance, others often require collaboration and contracting with professional videographers. To get practitioners started and to facilitate interactions with professional videographers, this Tool includes a guide to the jargon of video production and suggestions for how to integrate videos into health education and promotion work. For each type of video, production principles and issues to consider when working with a professional videographer are provided. The Tool also includes links to examples in each category of video applications to health promotion.

  1. Preservice Teachers' Perceptions of Using Digital Technologies in Literacy Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierczynski, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    In order to best prepare our preservice teachers to incorporate digital technologies into future literacy instruction, we must first explore how they perceive implementation of digital technologies in literacy instruction. Limited research exists which examines the employment of digital technologies in literacy instruction, and even less considers…

  2. Nonlinear color-image decomposition for image processing of a digital color camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Takahiro; Aizawa, Haruya; Yamada, Daisuke; Komatsu, Takashi

    2009-01-01

    This paper extends the BV (Bounded Variation) - G and/or the BV-L1 variational nonlinear image-decomposition approaches, which are considered to be useful for image processing of a digital color camera, to genuine color-image decomposition approaches. For utilizing inter-channel color cross-correlations, this paper first introduces TV (Total Variation) norms of color differences and TV norms of color sums into the BV-G and/or BV-L1 energy functionals, and then derives denoising-type decomposition-algorithms with an over-complete wavelet transform, through applying the Besov-norm approximation to the variational problems. Our methods decompose a noisy color image without producing undesirable low-frequency colored artifacts in its separated BV-component, and they achieve desirable high-quality color-image decomposition, which is very robust against colored random noise.

  3. Optical wide field monitor AROMA-W using multiple digital single-lens reflex cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Ichiro; Tsunashima, Kosuke; Tatsuhito, Takeda; Saori, Ono; Kazutaka, Yamaoka; Yoshida, Atsumasa

    2010-12-01

    We have developed and operated the automatic optical observation device Aoyama Gakuin University Robotic Optical Monitor for Astrophysical objects - Wide field (AROMA-W). It covers a large field of view of about 45 degrees W 30 degrees at a time by the multiple digital single-lens reflex cameras, and provides photometric data in four bands with a limiting V magnitude of about 12-13 magnitude (20 seconds, 3 sigma level). The automatic analysis pipeline which can analyze in parallel with observation has been constructed so far. It can draw the light curves of all stars in the field of view of AROMA-W. We are aiming at the simultaneous observation of the transients (e.g., X-ray nova, Supernova, GRB) that MAXI discovered by using the AROMA-W. We report the developmental status, the observational results of AROMA-W and a possibility of the simultaneous observation to the X-ray transients discovered with MAXI.

  4. Noctilucent clouds: modern ground-based photographic observations by a digital camera network.

    PubMed

    Dubietis, Audrius; Dalin, Peter; Balčiūnas, Ričardas; Černis, Kazimieras; Pertsev, Nikolay; Sukhodoev, Vladimir; Perminov, Vladimir; Zalcik, Mark; Zadorozhny, Alexander; Connors, Martin; Schofield, Ian; McEwan, Tom; McEachran, Iain; Frandsen, Soeren; Hansen, Ole; Andersen, Holger; Grønne, Jesper; Melnikov, Dmitry; Manevich, Alexander; Romejko, Vitaly

    2011-10-01

    Noctilucent, or "night-shining," clouds (NLCs) are a spectacular optical nighttime phenomenon that is very often neglected in the context of atmospheric optics. This paper gives a brief overview of current understanding of NLCs by providing a simple physical picture of their formation, relevant observational characteristics, and scientific challenges of NLC research. Modern ground-based photographic NLC observations, carried out in the framework of automated digital camera networks around the globe, are outlined. In particular, the obtained results refer to studies of single quasi-stationary waves in the NLC field. These waves exhibit specific propagation properties--high localization, robustness, and long lifetime--that are the essential requisites of solitary waves.

  5. Digital technology in fixed implant prosthodontics.

    PubMed

    Joda, Tim; Ferrari, Marco; Gallucci, German O; Wittneben, Julia-Gabriela; Brägger, Urs

    2017-02-01

    Digital protocols are increasingly influencing prosthodontic treatment concepts. Implant-supported single-unit and short-span reconstructions will benefit mostly from the present digital trends. In these protocols, monolithic implant crowns connected to prefabricated titanium abutments, which are created based on data obtained from an intraoral scan followed by virtual design and production, without the need of a physical master cast, have to be considered in lieu of conventional manufacturing techniques for posterior implant restorations. No space for storage is needed in the complete digital workflow, and if a remake is required a replica of the original reconstruction can be produced quickly and inexpensively using rapid prototyping. The technological process is split into subtractive methods, such as milling or laser ablation, and additive processing, such as three-dimensional printing and selective laser melting. The dimensions of the supra-implant soft-tissue architecture can be calculated in advance of implant placement, according to the morphologic copy, and consequently are individualized for each patient. All these technologies have to be considered before implementing new digital dental workflows in daily routine. The correct indication and application are prerequisite and crucial for the success of the overall therapy, and, finally, for a satisfied patient. This includes a teamwork approach and equally affects the clinician, the dental assistant and the technician as well. The digitization process has the potential to change the entire dental profession. The major benefits will be reduced production costs, improvement in time efficiency and fulfilment of patients' perceptions of a modernized treatment concept.

  6. Calibration of Low Cost Digital Camera Using Data from Simultaneous LIDAR and Photogrammetric Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitishita, E.; Debiasi, P.; Hainosz, F.; Centeno, J.

    2012-07-01

    Digital photogrammetric products from the integration of imagery and lidar datasets are a reality nowadays. When the imagery and lidar surveys are performed together and the camera is connected to the lidar system, a direct georeferencing can be applied to compute the exterior orientation parameters of the images. Direct georeferencing of the images requires accurate interior orientation parameters to perform photogrammetric application. Camera calibration is a procedure applied to compute the interior orientation parameters (IOPs). Calibration researches have established that to obtain accurate IOPs, the calibration must be performed with same or equal condition that the photogrammetric survey is done. This paper shows the methodology and experiments results from in situ self-calibration using a simultaneous images block and lidar dataset. The calibration results are analyzed and discussed. To perform this research a test field was fixed in an urban area. A set of signalized points was implanted on the test field to use as the check points or control points. The photogrammetric images and lidar dataset of the test field were taken simultaneously. Four strips of flight were used to obtain a cross layout. The strips were taken with opposite directions of flight (W-E, E-W, N-S and S-N). The Kodak DSC Pro SLR/c digital camera was connected to the lidar system. The coordinates of the exposition station were computed from the lidar trajectory. Different layouts of vertical control points were used in the calibration experiments. The experiments use vertical coordinates from precise differential GPS survey or computed by an interpolation procedure using the lidar dataset. The positions of the exposition stations are used as control points in the calibration procedure to eliminate the linear dependency of the group of interior and exterior orientation parameters. This linear dependency happens, in the calibration procedure, when the vertical images and flat test field are

  7. Multi-ion detection by one-shot optical sensors using a colour digital photographic camera.

    PubMed

    Lapresta-Fernández, Alejandro; Capitán-Vallvey, Luis Fermín

    2011-10-07

    The feasibility and performance of a procedure to evaluate previously developed one-shot optical sensors as single and selective analyte sensors for potassium, magnesium and hardness are presented. The procedure uses a conventional colour digital photographic camera as the detection system for simultaneous multianalyte detection. A 6.0 megapixel camera was used, and the procedure describes how it is possible to quantify potassium, magnesium and hardness simultaneously from the images captured, using multianalyte one-shot sensors based on ionophore-chromoionophore chemistry, employing the colour information computed from a defined region of interest on the sensing membrane. One of the colour channels in the red, green, blue (RGB) colour space is used to build the analytical parameter, the effective degree of protonation (1-α(eff)), in good agreement with the theoretical model. The linearization of the sigmoidal response function increases the limit of detection (LOD) and analytical range in all cases studied. The increases were from 5.4 × 10(-6) to 2.7 × 10(-7) M for potassium, from 1.4 × 10(-4) to 2.0 × 10(-6) M for magnesium and from 1.7 to 2.0 × 10(-2) mg L(-1) of CaCO(3) for hardness. The method's precision was determined in terms of the relative standard deviation (RSD%) which was from 2.4 to 7.6 for potassium, from 6.8 to 7.8 for magnesium and from 4.3 to 7.8 for hardness. The procedure was applied to the simultaneous determination of potassium, magnesium and hardness using multianalyte one-shot sensors in different types of waters and beverages in order to cover the entire application range, statistically validating the results against atomic absorption spectrometry as the reference procedure. Accordingly, this paper is an attempt to demonstrate the possibility of using a conventional digital camera as an analytical device to measure this type of one-shot sensor based on ionophore-chromoionophore chemistry instead of using conventional lab

  8. UCXp camera imaging principle and key technologies of data post-processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Fangyan; Li, Guoqing; Zuo, Zhengli; Liu, Jianmin; Wu, Liang; Yu, Xiaoping; Zhao, Haitao

    2014-03-01

    The large format digital aerial camera product UCXp was introduced into the Chinese market in 2008, the image consists of 17310 columns and 11310 rows with a pixel size of 6 mm. The UCXp camera has many advantages compared with the same generation camera, with multiple lenses exposed almost at the same time and no oblique lens. The camera has a complex imaging process whose principle will be detailed in this paper. On the other hand, the UCXp image post-processing method, including data pre-processing and orthophoto production, will be emphasized in this article. Based on the data of new Beichuan County, this paper will describe the data processing and effects.

  9. Counterfeit deterrence and digital imaging technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Church, Sara E.; Fuller, Reese H.; Jaffe, Annette B.; Pagano, Lorelei W.

    2000-04-01

    The US government recognizes the growing problem of counterfeiting currency using digital imaging technology, as desktop systems become more sophisticated, less expensive and more prevalent. As the rate of counterfeiting with this type of equipment has grown, the need for specific prevention methods has become apparent to the banknote authorities. As a result, the Treasury Department and Federal Reserve have begun to address issues related specifically to this type of counterfeiting. The technical representatives of these agencies are taking a comprehensive approach to minimize counterfeiting using digital technology. This approach includes identification of current technology solutions for banknote recognition, data stream intervention and output marking, outreach to the hardware and software industries and enhancement of public education efforts. Other aspects include strong support and cooperation with existing international efforts to prevent counterfeiting, review and amendment of existing anti- counterfeiting legislation and investigation of currency design techniques to make faithful reproduction more difficult. Implementation of these steps and others are to lead to establishment of a formal, permanent policy to address and prevent the use of emerging technologies to counterfeit currency.

  10. Using digital time-lapse cameras to monitor species-specific understorey and overstorey phenology in support of wildlife habitat assessment.

    PubMed

    Bater, Christopher W; Coops, Nicholas C; Wulder, Michael A; Hilker, Thomas; Nielsen, Scott E; McDermid, Greg; Stenhouse, Gordon B

    2011-09-01

    Critical to habitat management is the understanding of not only the location of animal food resources, but also the timing of their availability. Grizzly bear (Ursus arctos) diets, for example, shift seasonally as different vegetation species enter key phenological phases. In this paper, we describe the use of a network of seven ground-based digital camera systems to monitor understorey and overstorey vegetation within species-specific regions of interest. Established across an elevation gradient in western Alberta, Canada, the cameras collected true-colour (RGB) images daily from 13 April 2009 to 27 October 2009. Fourth-order polynomials were fit to an RGB-derived index, which was then compared to field-based observations of phenological phases. Using linear regression to statistically relate the camera and field data, results indicated that 61% (r (2) = 0.61, df = 1, F = 14.3, p = 0.0043) of the variance observed in the field phenological phase data is captured by the cameras for the start of the growing season and 72% (r (2) = 0.72, df = 1, F = 23.09, p = 0.0009) of the variance in length of growing season. Based on the linear regression models, the mean absolute differences in residuals between predicted and observed start of growing season and length of growing season were 4 and 6 days, respectively. This work extends upon previous research by demonstrating that specific understorey and overstorey species can be targeted for phenological monitoring in a forested environment, using readily available digital camera technology and RGB-based vegetation indices.

  11. New Stereo Vision Digital Camera System for Simultaneous Measurement of Cloud Base Height and Atmospheric Visibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janeiro, F. M.; Carretas, F.; Palma, N.; Ramos, P. M.; Wagner, F.

    2013-12-01

    Clouds play an important role in many aspects of everyday life. They affect both the local weather as well as the global climate and are an important parameter on climate change studies. Cloud parameters are also important for weather prediction models which make use of actual measurements. It is thus important to have low-cost instrumentation that can be deployed in the field to measure those parameters. This kind of instruments should also be automated and robust since they may be deployed in remote places and be subject to adverse weather conditions. Although clouds are very important in environmental systems, they are also an essential component of airplane safety when visual flight rules (VFR) are enforced, such as in most small aerodromes where it is not economically viable to install instruments for assisted flying. Under VFR there are strict limits on the height of the cloud base, cloud cover and atmospheric visibility that ensure the safety of the pilots and planes. Although there are instruments, available in the market, to measure those parameters, their relatively high cost makes them unavailable in many local aerodromes. In this work we present a new prototype which has been recently developed and deployed in a local aerodrome as proof of concept. It is composed by two digital cameras that capture photographs of the sky and allow the measurement of the cloud height from the parallax effect. The new developments consist on having a new geometry which allows the simultaneous measurement of cloud base height, wind speed at cloud base height and atmospheric visibility, which was not previously possible with only two cameras. The new orientation of the cameras comes at the cost of a more complex geometry to measure the cloud base height. The atmospheric visibility is calculated from the Lambert-Beer law after the measurement of the contrast between a set of dark objects and the background sky. The prototype includes the latest hardware developments that

  12. Differentiating Digital Writing Instruction: The Intersection of Technology, Writing Instruction, and Digital Genre Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Nicole M.; Lambert, Claire

    2015-01-01

    U.S. adolescents' prior technology experiences and exposure to digital genres vary, but they will often write digital texts as they enter college and adulthood. We explored middle school students' digital writing instructional experience in the context of a university-based summer digital writing camp. The sixth- through eighth-grade adolescents…

  13. Deconstructing Digital Natives: Young People, Technology, and the New Literacies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Michael, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    There have been many attempts to define the generation of students who emerged with the Web and new digital technologies in the early 1990s. The term "digital native" refers to the generation born after 1980, which has grown up in a world where digital technologies and the internet are a normal part of everyday life. Young people…

  14. Digital mammography performed with computed radiography technology.

    PubMed

    Jouan, B

    1999-07-01

    Introduced by Fuji Photo Film Japan in the early 1980s, computed radiography (CR) technology has developed considerably since then to become the mature widely installed technology it is today (about 7500 systems worldwide). Various mammographic examinations require high performance results to which CR complies on demand or following some procedures such as geometrical magnification carried out during the examination. The basic CR principles and digital image processing as well as technical improvements are detailed in this study, which also includes a synthesis of the articles on CR mammographic applications referenced in the bibliography, focusing on strong points, limits and current methods of surpassing these limits. New CR technology development perspectives in mammography and computed assisted diagnosis (CAD) algorithms will allow wider use of this method in the near future.

  15. How to optimize radiological images captured from digital cameras, using the Adobe Photoshop 6.0 program.

    PubMed

    Chalazonitis, A N; Koumarianos, D; Tzovara, J; Chronopoulos, P

    2003-06-01

    Over the past decade, the technology that permits images to be digitized and the reduction in the cost of digital equipment allows quick digital transfer of any conventional radiological film. Images then can be transferred to a personal computer, and several software programs are available that can manipulate their digital appearance. In this article, the fundamentals of digital imaging are discussed, as well as the wide variety of optional adjustments that the Adobe Photoshop 6.0 (Adobe Systems, San Jose, CA) program can offer to present radiological images with satisfactory digital imaging quality.

  16. On digital image processing technology and application in geometric measure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Jiugen; Xing, Ruonan; Liao, Na

    2014-04-01

    Digital image processing technique is an emerging science that emerging with the development of semiconductor integrated circuit technology and computer science technology since the 1960s.The article introduces the digital image processing technique and principle during measuring compared with the traditional optical measurement method. It takes geometric measure as an example and introduced the development tendency of digital image processing technology from the perspective of technology application.

  17. Digital camera measurements of soot temperature and soot volume fraction in axisymmetric flames.

    PubMed

    Guo, Haiqing; Castillo, Jose A; Sunderland, Peter B

    2013-11-20

    New diagnostics are presented that use a digital camera to measure full-field soot temperatures and soot volume fractions in axisymmetric flames. The camera is a Nikon D700 with 12 megapixels and 14 bit depth in each color plane, which was modified by removing the infrared and anti-aliasing filters. The diagnostics were calibrated with a blackbody furnace. The flame considered here was an 88 mm long ethylene/air co-flowing laminar jet diffusion flame on a round 11.1 mm burner. The resolution in the flame plane is estimated at between 0.1 and 0.7 mm. Soot temperatures were measured from soot radiative emissions, using ratio pyrometry at 450, 650, and 900 nm following deconvolution. These had a range of 1600-1850 K, a temporal resolution of 125 ms, and an estimated uncertainty of ±50  K. Soot volume fractions were measured two ways: from soot radiative emissions and from soot laser extinction at 632.8 nm, both following deconvolution. Soot volume fractions determined from emissions had a range of 0.1-10 ppm, temporal resolutions of 125 ms, and an estimated uncertainty of ±30%. Soot volume fractions determined from laser extinction had a range of 0.2-10 ppm, similar temporal resolutions, and an estimated uncertainty of ±10%. The present measurements agree with past measurements in this flame using traversing optics and probes; however, they avoid the long test times and other complications of such traditional methods.

  18. Quantifying the yellow signal driver behavior based on naturalistic data from digital enforcement cameras.

    PubMed

    Bar-Gera, H; Musicant, O; Schechtman, E; Ze'evi, T

    2016-11-01

    The yellow signal driver behavior, reflecting the dilemma zone behavior, is analyzed using naturalistic data from digital enforcement cameras. The key variable in the analysis is the entrance time after the yellow onset, and its distribution. This distribution can assist in determining two critical outcomes: the safety outcome related to red-light-running angle accidents, and the efficiency outcome. The connection to other approaches for evaluating the yellow signal driver behavior is also discussed. The dataset was obtained from 37 digital enforcement cameras at non-urban signalized intersections in Israel, over a period of nearly two years. The data contain more than 200 million vehicle entrances, of which 2.3% (∼5million vehicles) entered the intersection during the yellow phase. In all non-urban signalized intersections in Israel the green phase ends with 3s of flashing green, followed by 3s of yellow. In most non-urban signalized roads in Israel the posted speed limit is 90km/h. Our analysis focuses on crossings during the yellow phase and the first 1.5s of the red phase. The analysis method consists of two stages. In the first stage we tested whether the frequency of crossings is constant at the beginning of the yellow phase. We found that the pattern was stable (i.e., the frequencies were constant) at 18 intersections, nearly stable at 13 intersections and unstable at 6 intersections. In addition to the 6 intersections with unstable patterns, two other outlying intersections were excluded from subsequent analysis. Logistic regression models were fitted for each of the remaining 29 intersection. We examined both standard (exponential) logistic regression and four parameters logistic regression. The results show a clear advantage for the former. The estimated parameters show that the time when the frequency of crossing reduces to half ranges from1.7 to 2.3s after yellow onset. The duration of the reduction of the relative frequency from 0.9 to 0.1 ranged

  19. Dry imaging cameras.

    PubMed

    Indrajit, Ik; Alam, Aftab; Sahni, Hirdesh; Bhatia, Mukul; Sahu, Samaresh

    2011-04-01

    Dry imaging cameras are important hard copy devices in radiology. Using dry imaging camera, multiformat images of digital modalities in radiology are created from a sealed unit of unexposed films. The functioning of a modern dry camera, involves a blend of concurrent processes, in areas of diverse sciences like computers, mechanics, thermal, optics, electricity and radiography. Broadly, hard copy devices are classified as laser and non laser based technology. When compared with the working knowledge and technical awareness of different modalities in radiology, the understanding of a dry imaging camera is often superficial and neglected. To fill this void, this article outlines the key features of a modern dry camera and its important issues that impact radiology workflow.

  20. Space-bandwidth extension in parallel phase-shifting digital holography using a four-channel polarization-imaging camera.

    PubMed

    Tahara, Tatsuki; Ito, Yasunori; Xia, Peng; Awatsuji, Yasuhiro; Nishio, Kenzo; Ura, Shogo; Kubota, Toshihiro; Matoba, Osamu

    2013-07-15

    We propose a method for extending the space bandwidth (SBW) available for recording an object wave in parallel phase-shifting digital holography using a four-channel polarization-imaging camera. A linear spatial carrier of the reference wave is introduced to an optical setup of parallel four-step phase-shifting interferometry using a commercially available polarization-imaging camera that has four polarization-detection channels. Then a hologram required for parallel two-step phase shifting, which is a technique capable of recording the widest SBW in parallel phase shifting, can be obtained. The effectiveness of the proposed method was numerically and experimentally verified.

  1. A Historical Perspective on Digital Hearing Aids: How Digital Technology Has Changed Modern Hearing Aids

    PubMed Central

    Levitt, Harry

    2007-01-01

    This article provides the author's perspective on the development of digital hearing aids and how digital signal processing approaches have led to changes in hearing aid design. Major landmarks in the evolution of digital technology are identified, and their impact on the development of digital hearing aids is discussed. Differences between analog and digital approaches to signal processing in hearing aids are identified. PMID:17301334

  2. Digital Technology for Geological Field Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rourke, Peter; Smith, Stuart; Vaughan, Alan; Ellis, Jenny

    2014-05-01

    The amount of time that students and professionals spend in the field has reduced over the past 25 years (Gibbs, 2012). Recent advances in technology are changing the way students and professionals are able to conduct geological field study. Applications such as Midland Valley Exploration's FieldMove Clino now allow the geologist to use their smartphone as a fast, georeferenced measuring device compared with a traditional compass-clinometer. Although we support the view that an understanding of field mapping and model building, taught at university level, is essential to give the geologist the ability to think in three and four dimensions, new technologies that automate the ability to digitise and visualise data in the field lead to a better appreciation of the geometry, scale, and evolution of geological structures and trapping mechanisms that will be encountered during a career in industry. The majority of future industry professionals own a smartphone or tablet device: A recent study found that four-fifths of new students own a smartphone and one-fifth own a tablet device (UCAS Media, 2013). This figure is increasing with each new intake of geoscience students. With the increased availability and affordability of smartphone and tablet devices, new techniques are being examined for digital data collection in the field. If the trend continues that geoscience students are likely to spend less time in the field than their predecessors, then the time available must be spent as effectively as possible. Digital devices allow students and professionals alike to optimise the time spent in the field, allowing more time to think about geological relationships, and highlighting areas of uncertainty that can be studied further. This poster will examine the use of new digital smartphone and tablet devices for the collection of geological field data.

  3. Applying Digital Sensor Technology: A Problem-Solving Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seedhouse, Paul; Knight, Dawn

    2016-01-01

    There is currently an explosion in the number and range of new devices coming onto the technology market that use digital sensor technology to track aspects of human behaviour. In this article, we present and exemplify a three-stage model for the application of digital sensor technology in applied linguistics that we have developed, namely,…

  4. A New Lunar Digital Elevation Model from the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter and SELENE Terrain Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barker, M. K.; Mazarico, E.; Neumann, G. A.; Zuber, M. T.; Haruyama, J.; Smith, D. E.

    2015-01-01

    We present an improved lunar digital elevation model (DEM) covering latitudes within +/-60 deg, at a horizontal resolution of 512 pixels per degree ( approx.60 m at the equator) and a typical vertical accuracy approx.3 to 4 m. This DEM is constructed from approx.4.5 ×10(exp 9) geodetically-accurate topographic heights from the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) onboard the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, to which we co-registered 43,200 stereo-derived DEMs (each 1 deg×1 deg) from the SELENE Terrain Camera (TC) ( approx.10(exp 10) pixels total). After co-registration, approximately 90% of the TC DEMs show root-mean-square vertical residuals with the LOLA data of < 5 m compared to approx.50% prior to co-registration. We use the co-registered TC data to estimate and correct orbital and pointing geolocation errors from the LOLA altimetric profiles (typically amounting to < 10 m horizontally and < 1 m vertically). By combining both co-registered datasets, we obtain a near-global DEM with high geodetic accuracy, and without the need for surface interpolation. We evaluate the resulting LOLA + TC merged DEM (designated as "SLDEM2015") with particular attention to quantifying seams and crossover errors.

  5. New long-zoom lens for 4K super 35mm digital cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorpe, Laurence J.; Usui, Fumiaki; Kamata, Ryuhei

    2015-05-01

    The world of television production is beginning to adopt 4K Super 35 mm (S35) image capture for a widening range of program genres that seek both the unique imaging properties of that large image format and the protection of their program assets in a world anticipating future 4K services. Documentary and natural history production in particular are transitioning to this form of production. The nature of their shooting demands long zoom lenses. In their traditional world of 2/3-inch digital HDTV cameras they have a broad choice in portable lenses - with zoom ranges as high as 40:1. In the world of Super 35mm the longest zoom lens is limited to 12:1 offering a telephoto of 400mm. Canon was requested to consider a significantly longer focal range lens while severely curtailing its size and weight. Extensive computer simulation explored countless combinations of optical and optomechanical systems in a quest to ensure that all operational requests and full 4K performance could be met. The final lens design is anticipated to have applications beyond entertainment production, including a variety of security systems.

  6. Side oblique real-time orthophotography with the 9Kx9K digital framing camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorin, Brian A.

    2003-08-01

    BAE SYSTEMS has reported on a new framing camera incorporating an ultra high resolution CCD detector array comprised of 9,216 x 9,216 pixels fabricated on one silicon wafer. The detector array features a 1:2 frame-per-second readout capable of stereo imagery with Nyquist resolution of 57 lp/mm from high velocity, low altitude (V/H) airborne platforms. Flight tests demonstrated the capability of the focal plane electronics for differential image motion compensation (IMC) with Nyquist performance utilizing a focal plane shutter (FPS) to enable both nadir and significant side and forward oblique imaging angles. The impact of FPS for differential image motion compensation is evaluated with the exterior orientation calibration parameters, which include the existing shutter velocity and flight dynamics from sample mapping applications. System requirements for GPS/INS are included with the effect of vertical error and side oblique angle impact of the digital elevation map (DEM) required to create the orthophoto. Results from the differentiated "collinearity equations" which relate the image coordinates to elements of interior and exterior orientation are combined with the DEM impact to provide useful guidelines for side oblique applications. The application of real-time orthophotography is described with the implications for system requirements for side oblique orthophoto capability.

  7. 3D Reconstruction of Static Human Body with a Digital Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remondino, Fabio

    2003-01-01

    Nowadays the interest in 3D reconstruction and modeling of real humans is one of the most challenging problems and a topic of great interest. The human models are used for movies, video games or ergonomics applications and they are usually created with 3D scanner devices. In this paper a new method to reconstruct the shape of a static human is presented. Our approach is based on photogrammetric techniques and uses a sequence of images acquired around a standing person with a digital still video camera or with a camcorder. First the images are calibrated and orientated using a bundle adjustment. After the establishment of a stable adjusted image block, an image matching process is performed between consecutive triplets of images. Finally the 3D coordinates of the matched points are computed with a mean accuracy of ca 2 mm by forward ray intersection. The obtained point cloud can then be triangulated to generate a surface model of the body or a virtual human model can be fitted to the recovered 3D data. Results of the 3D human point cloud with pixel color information are presented.

  8. Comparison of Floc Sizes From a LISST-100 and a Digital Floc Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikkelsen, O. A.; Chant, R.; Hill, P. S.; Milligan, T. G.

    2003-12-01

    A LISST-100 in situ laser particle sizer was deployed together with a digital floc camera (DFC) in estuarine and continental shelf settings on several occasions. The LISST-100 can measure particle sizes in the range 2.5-500μ m, whereas the DFC can detect particles larger than 125μ m; the two instruments thus overlap in the 125-500μ m size range. The particle sizes from the two instruments are compared. At a first glance, the LISST-100 underestimates the floc median diameter (D50) by a factor of 2-4 when compared to the DFC. However, when the data from the two instruments are "trimmed", so that only particles in the overlapping size ranges are considered, the two instruments yield nearly identical values for D50. Thus, the LISST-100 and the DFC both appear to detect particles in their overlapping size ranges correctly. Since the DFC only detects particles larger than 125μ m, it will usually overestimate D50, whereas the LISST-100 will usually underestimate D50. Using the two instruments in conjunction, floc size spectra from 2.5μ m and up can be measured, hence better estimates of the D50 can be obtained.

  9. Digital chemiluminescence imaging of DNA sequencing blots using a charge-coupled device camera.

    PubMed Central

    Karger, A E; Weiss, R; Gesteland, R F

    1992-01-01

    Digital chemiluminescence imaging with a cryogenically cooled charge-coupled device (CCD) camera is used to visualize DNA sequencing fragments covalently bound to a blotting membrane. The detection is based on DNA hybridization with an alkaline phosphatase(AP) labeled oligodeoxyribonucleotide probe and AP triggered chemiluminescence of the substrate 3-(2'-spiro-adamantane)-4-methoxy-4-(3"-phosphoryloxy)phenyl- 1,2-dioxetane (AMPPD). The detection using a direct AP-oligonucleotide conjugate is compared to the secondary detection of biotinylated oligonucleotides with respect to their sensitivity and nonspecific binding to the nylon membrane by quantitative imaging. Using the direct oligonucleotide-AP conjugate as a hybridization probe, sub-attomol (0.5 pg of 2.7 kb pUC plasmid DNA) quantities of membrane bound DNA are detectable with 30 min CCD exposures. Detection using the biotinylated probe in combination with streptavidin-AP was found to be background limited by nonspecific binding of streptavidin-AP and the oligo(biotin-11-dUTP) label in equal proportions. In contrast, the nonspecific background of AP-labeled oligonucleotide is indistinguishable from that seen with 5'-32P-label, in that respect making AP an ideal enzymatic label. The effect of hybridization time, probe concentration, and presence of luminescence enhancers on the detection of plasmid DNA were investigated. Images PMID:1480487

  10. A new lunar digital elevation model from the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter and SELENE Terrain Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, M. K.; Mazarico, E.; Neumann, G. A.; Zuber, M. T.; Haruyama, J.; Smith, D. E.

    2016-07-01

    We present an improved lunar digital elevation model (DEM) covering latitudes within ±60°, at a horizontal resolution of 512 pixels per degree (∼60 m at the equator) and a typical vertical accuracy ∼3 to 4 m. This DEM is constructed from ∼ 4.5 ×109 geodetically-accurate topographic heights from the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) onboard the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, to which we co-registered 43,200 stereo-derived DEMs (each 1° × 1°) from the SELENE Terrain Camera (TC) (∼1010 pixels total). After co-registration, approximately 90% of the TC DEMs show root-mean-square vertical residuals with the LOLA data of <5 m compared to ∼ 50% prior to co-registration. We use the co-registered TC data to estimate and correct orbital and pointing geolocation errors from the LOLA altimetric profiles (typically amounting to <10 m horizontally and <1 m vertically). By combining both co-registered datasets, we obtain a near-global DEM with high geodetic accuracy, and without the need for surface interpolation. We evaluate the resulting LOLA + TC merged DEM (designated as "SLDEM2015") with particular attention to quantifying seams and crossover errors.

  11. Examination of the semi-automatic calculation technique of vegetation cover rate by digital camera images.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takemine, S.; Rikimaru, A.; Takahashi, K.

    The rice is one of the staple foods in the world High quality rice production requires periodically collecting rice growth data to control the growth of rice The height of plant the number of stem the color of leaf is well known parameters to indicate rice growth Rice growth diagnosis method based on these parameters is used operationally in Japan although collecting these parameters by field survey needs a lot of labor and time Recently a laborsaving method for rice growth diagnosis is proposed which is based on vegetation cover rate of rice Vegetation cover rate of rice is calculated based on discriminating rice plant areas in a digital camera image which is photographed in nadir direction Discrimination of rice plant areas in the image was done by the automatic binarization processing However in the case of vegetation cover rate calculation method depending on the automatic binarization process there is a possibility to decrease vegetation cover rate against growth of rice In this paper a calculation method of vegetation cover rate was proposed which based on the automatic binarization process and referred to the growth hysteresis information For several images obtained by field survey during rice growing season vegetation cover rate was calculated by the conventional automatic binarization processing and the proposed method respectively And vegetation cover rate of both methods was compared with reference value obtained by visual interpretation As a result of comparison the accuracy of discriminating rice plant areas was increased by the proposed

  12. Zoom lens design for 10.2-megapixel APS-C digital SLR cameras.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wen-Shing; Chu, Pu-Yi; Tien, Chuen-Lin; Chung, Meng-Feng

    2017-01-20

    A zoom lens design for a 10.2-megapixel digital single-lens reflex (SLR) camera with an advanced photo system type-C (APS-C) CCD image sensor is presented. The proposed zoom lens design consists of four groups of 3× zoom lenses with a focal length range of 17-51 mm. In the optimization process, 107 kinds of Schott glass combined with 26 kinds of plastic materials, as listed in Code V, are used. The best combination of glass and plastic materials is found based on the nd-Vd diagram. The modulation transfer function (MTF) was greater than 0.509 at 42  lp/mm, the lateral chromatic aberration was less than 5 μm, the optical distortion was less than 1.97%, and the relative illumination was greater than 80.05%. We also performed the tolerance analysis with the 2σ (97.7%) position selected and given tolerance tables and results for three zooming positions, which made the design more practical for manufacturing.

  13. Performance analysis of digital cameras versus chromatic white light (CWL) sensors for the localization of latent fingerprints in crime scenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jankow, Mathias; Hildebrandt, Mario; Sturm, Jennifer; Kiltz, Stefan; Vielhauer, Claus

    2012-06-01

    In future applications of contactless acquisition techniques for latent fingerprints the automatic localization of potential fingerprint traces in crime scenes is required. Our goal is to study the application of a camera-based approach1 comparing with the performance of chromatic white light (CWL) techniques2 for the latent fingerprint localization in coarse and the resulting acquisition using detailed scans. Furthermore, we briefly evaluate the suitability of the camera-based acquisition for the detection of malicious fingerprint traces using an extended camera setup in comparison to Kiltz et al.3 Our experimental setup includes a Canon EOS 550D4 digital single-lens reflex (DSLR) camera and a FRT MicroProf2005 surface measurement device with CWL6002 sensor. We apply at least two fingerprints to each surface in our test set with 8 different either smooth, textured and structured surfaces to evaluate the detection performance of the two localization techniques using different pre-processing and feature extraction techniques. Printed fingerprint patterns as reproducible but potentially malicious traces3 are additionally acquired and analyzed on foil and compact discs. Our results indicate positive tendency towards a fast localization using the camera-based technique. All fingerprints that are located using the CWL sensor are found using the camera. However,the disadvantage of the camera-based technique is that the size of the region of interest for the detailed scan for each potential latent fingerprint is usually slightly larger compared to the CWL-based localization. Furthermore, this technique does not acquire 3D data and the resulting images are distorted due to the necessary angle between the camera and the surface. When applying the camera-based approach, it is required to optimize the feature extraction and classification. Furthermore, the required acquisition time for each potential fingerprint needs to be estimated to determine the time-savings of the

  14. Technological innovations in mental healthcare: harnessing the digital revolution.

    PubMed

    Hollis, Chris; Morriss, Richard; Martin, Jennifer; Amani, Sarah; Cotton, Rebecca; Denis, Mike; Lewis, Shôn

    2015-04-01

    Digital technology has the potential to transform mental healthcare by connecting patients, services and health data in new ways. Digital online and mobile applications can offer patients greater access to information and services and enhance clinical management and early intervention through access to real-time patient data. However, substantial gaps exist in the evidence base underlying these technologies. Greater patient and clinician involvement is needed to evaluate digital technologies and ensure they target unmet needs, maintain public trust and improve clinical outcomes.

  15. Snow melt and phenology of a subalpine grassland: analysis through the use of digital camera images.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julitta, Tommaso; Cremonese, Edoardo; Colombo, Roberto; Rossini, Micol; Fava, Franceso; Cogliati, Sergio; Galvagno, Marta; Panigada, Cinzia; Siniscalco, Consolata; Morra di Cella, Umberto; Migliavacca, Mirco

    2013-04-01

    Plant phenology is a good indicator of the impact of climate change on ecosystems. On mountain systems the main environmental constraints governing phenological timing are air and soil temperature, photoperiod and presence of snow. Recent studies showed the potentiality of using automated repeat digital photography for monitoring vegetative phenological events. In the present study, digital images collected with a CC640 Campbell Scientific Camera over 3 years (2009, 2010, 2011) in a subalpine grassland were used to analyse the spatial patterns of phenological events and their relationship with the timing of snowmelt. Yearly time series of green chromatic coordinates (gcc) were computed from hourly images. In order to analyse the spatial pattern of phenological metrics, gcc time series for each 10x10 pixel region of the target ecosystem were computed and the start of the season for the 10x10 regions was extracted. Based on the same grid dimension a snowmelt date map corresponding to the day of the year in which the snow disappears from the ground was obtained. Our main result showed that despite the snowmelt occurs rapidly, as maximum in seven days, several distinct spatial patterns were identified. The comparison of spatial patterns of snowmelt and phenological dynamics led to quite unexpected results. In fact, a negative correlation was found between the two variables, meaning that the growing season begins later in convex areas characterized by an early snowmelt, and vice versa in concave areas. A detailed field vegetational analysis revealed that these patterns were related to different plant communities. In particular differences in terms of species abundance seem to be related to convex and concave areas, mainly covered by grasses and by forbs respectively suggesting that different patterns of snow accumulation and of water availability during the growing season due to micromorphology affect the vegetation community and so indirectly phenology. These

  16. Transitioning towards the Digital Native: Examining Digital Technologies, Video Games, and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salomon, John

    2010-01-01

    Although digital technologies have become commonplace among people who grew up around them, little is known about the effect that such technology will have on learners or its impact on traditional methods of educational delivery. This dissertation examines how certain technologies affect digital natives and seeks to understand specific…

  17. Commercial communications technology on the digital battlefield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalomiris, Vasilios E.; Hafer, Tom

    1996-06-01

    To meet its objectives of winning the information ware and digitizing the battlefield, the U.S. Army must leverage advances in commercial technology. The Department of Defense has adopted a new approach to acquiring and fielding systems in response to economic realities and the need to incorporate rapidly advancing commercial technology into Army systems. This approach calls for the evaluation of commercial breakthroughs in a laboratory environment followed by evaluation by the user in a warfighting experiment. The most promising products are then transitioned to a program executive officer/project manager for accelerated acquisition and fielding. The U.S. Army Communications-Electronics Command (CECOM) Research, Development and Engineering Center Space & Terrestrial Communications Directorate is working with the Advanced Research Projects Agency (ARPA) to study the applicability of personal communications systems and related technologies for Army applications. The results of this cooperative effort were demonstrated in 1995 through the use of the trunked Land Mobile Radio (LMR) during field exercises. This paper will describe the joint CECOM/ARPA programs that sponsor the evaluation of commercial technologies, characteristics of the LMR and the details of its interface with the legacy systems, and current plans for further experimentation/evaluation.

  18. Study on key techniques for camera-based hydrological record image digitization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shijin; Zhan, Di; Hu, Jinlong; Gao, Xiangtao; Bo, Ping

    2015-10-01

    With the development of information technology, the digitization of scientific or engineering drawings has received more and more attention. In hydrology, meteorology, medicine and mining industry, the grid drawing sheet is commonly used to record the observations from sensors. However, these paper drawings may be destroyed and contaminated due to improper preservation or overuse. Further, it will be a heavy workload and prone to error if these data are manually transcripted into the computer. Hence, in order to digitize these drawings, establishing the corresponding data base will ensure the integrity of data and provide invaluable information for further research. This paper presents an automatic system for hydrological record image digitization, which consists of three key techniques, i.e., image segmentation, intersection point localization and distortion rectification. First, a novel approach to the binarization of the curves and grids in the water level sheet image has been proposed, which is based on the fusion of gradient and color information adaptively. Second, a fast search strategy for cross point location is invented and point-by-point processing is thus avoided, with the help of grid distribution information. And finally, we put forward a local rectification method through analyzing the central portions of the image and utilizing the domain knowledge of hydrology. The processing speed is accelerated, while the accuracy is still satisfying. Experiments on several real water level records show that our proposed techniques are effective and capable of recovering the hydrological observations accurately.

  19. A calibration technology for multi-camera system with various focal lengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ruihua; Zhang, Jin; Deng, Huaxia; Yu, Liandong

    2016-01-01

    Calibration is the basis of three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction for machine vision technology. Nowadays, the most widely used calibration method among computer vision is the technique for binocular stereo measurement. However, binocular stereo vision has limited view field which is difficult to measure large-scale mechanical components synchronously. Thus, enlarging the view field is urgent in need for the large scale measurement. With the application of multi-camera system, the calibration for cameras with different focal lengths is required. In this paper, a method aiming at calibration problems for multi-camera system of different focal lengths is proposed. An imaging model for multi-camera system with various focal lengths is analyzed. The Harris corner detector is applied to determine the relationship between signal camera and checkerboard. Finally, the external parameters of different cameras can be obtained by the link with the checkerboard. The calibration results indicate that the calculation method used in this work can calibrate multi-camera with various focal lengths.

  20. Three-dimensional displacement measurement for diffuse object using phase-shifting digital holography with polarization imaging camera.

    PubMed

    Kiire, Tomohiro; Nakadate, Suezou; Shibuya, Masato; Yatagai, Toyohiko

    2011-12-01

    The amount of displacement of a diffused object can be measured using phase-shifting digital holography with a polarization imaging camera. Four digital holograms in quadrature are extracted from the polarization imaging camera and used to calculate the phase hologram. Two Fourier transforms of the phase holograms are calculated before and after the displacement of the object. A phase slope is subsequently obtained from the phase distribution of division between the two Fourier transforms. The slope of the phase distribution is proportional to the lateral displacement of the object. The sensitivity is less than one pixel size in the lateral direction of the movement. The longitudinal component of the displacement can be also measured separately from the intercept on the phase axis along the phase distribution of the division between two Fourier transforms of the phase holograms.

  1. Digital technology and human development: a charter for nature conservation.

    PubMed

    Maffey, Georgina; Homans, Hilary; Banks, Ken; Arts, Koen

    2015-11-01

    The application of digital technology in conservation holds much potential for advancing the understanding of, and facilitating interaction with, the natural world. In other sectors, digital technology has long been used to engage communities and share information. Human development-which holds parallels with the nature conservation sector-has seen a proliferation of innovation in technological development. Throughout this Perspective, we consider what nature conservation can learn from the introduction of digital technology in human development. From this, we derive a charter to be used before and throughout project development, in order to help reduce replication and failure of digital innovation in nature conservation projects. We argue that the proposed charter will promote collaboration with the development of digital tools and ensure that nature conservation projects progress appropriately with the development of new digital technologies.

  2. Benchmarking of depth of field for large out-of-plane deformations with single camera digital image correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Mieghem, Bart; Ivens, Jan; Van Bael, Albert

    2017-04-01

    A problem that arises when performing stereo digital image correlation in applications with large out-of-plane displacements is that the images may become unfocused. This unfocusing could result in correlation instabilities or inaccuracies. When performing DIC measurements and expecting large out-of-plane displacements researchers either trust on their experience or use the equations from photography to estimate the parameters affecting the depth of field (DOF) of the camera. A limitation of the latter approach is that the definition of sharpness is a human defined parameter and that it does not reflect the performance of the digital image correlation system. To get a more representative DOF value for DIC applications, a standardised testing method is presented here, making use of real camera and lens combinations as well as actual image correlation results. The method is based on experimental single camera DIC measurements of a backwards moving target. Correlation results from focused and unfocused images are compared and a threshold value defines whether or not the correlation results are acceptable even if the images are (slightly) unfocused. By following the proposed approach, the complete DOF of a specific camera/lens combination as function of the aperture setting and distance from the camera to the target can be defined. The comparison between the theoretical and the experimental DOF results shows that the achievable DOF for DIC applications is larger than what theoretical calculations predict. Practically this means that the cameras can be positioned closer to the target than what is expected from the theoretical approach. This leads to a gain in resolution and measurement accuracy.

  3. Digital X-ray camera for quality evaluation three-dimensional topographic reconstruction of single crystals of biological macromolecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borgstahl, Gloria (Inventor); Lovelace, Jeff (Inventor); Snell, Edward Holmes (Inventor); Bellamy, Henry (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    The present invention provides a digital topography imaging system for determining the crystalline structure of a biological macromolecule, wherein the system employs a charge coupled device (CCD) camera with antiblooming circuitry to directly convert x-ray signals to electrical signals without the use of phosphor and measures reflection profiles from the x-ray emitting source after x-rays are passed through a sample. Methods for using said system are also provided.

  4. Two Years of Digital Terrain Model Production Using the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Narrow Angle Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, K.; Robinson, M. S.; Speyerer, E.; LROC Science Team

    2011-12-01

    One of the primary objectives of the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) is to gather stereo observations with the Narrow Angle Camera (NAC). These stereo observations are used to generate digital terrain models (DTMs). The NAC has a pixel scale of 0.5 to 2.0 meters but was not designed for stereo observations and thus requires the spacecraft to roll off-nadir to acquire these images. Slews interfere with the data collection of the other instruments, so opportunities are currently limited to four per day. Arizona State University has produced DTMs from 95 stereo pairs for 11 Constellation Project (CxP) sites (Aristarchus, Copernicus crater, Gruithuisen domes, Hortensius domes, Ina D-caldera, Lichtenberg crater, Mare Ingenii, Marius hills, Reiner Gamma, South Pole-Aitkin Rim, Sulpicius Gallus) as well as 30 other regions of scientific interest (including: Bhabha crater, highest and lowest elevation points, Highland Ponds, Kugler Anuchin, Linne Crater, Planck Crater, Slipher crater, Sears Crater, Mandel'shtam Crater, Virtanen Graben, Compton/Belkovich, Rumker Domes, King Crater, Luna 16/20/23/24 landing sites, Ranger 6 landing site, Wiener F Crater, Apollo 11/14/15/17, fresh craters, impact melt flows, Larmor Q crater, Mare Tranquillitatis pit, Hansteen Alpha, Moore F Crater, and Lassell Massif). To generate DTMs, the USGS ISIS software and SOCET SET° from BAE Systems are used. To increase the absolute accuracy of the DTMs, data obtained from the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) is used to coregister the NAC images and define the geodetic reference frame. NAC DTMs have been used in examination of several sites, e.g. Compton-Belkovich, Marius Hills and Ina D-caldera [1-3]. LROC will continue to acquire high-resolution stereo images throughout the science phase of the mission and any extended mission opportunities, thus providing a vital dataset for scientific research as well as future human and robotic exploration. [1] B.L. Jolliff (2011) Nature

  5. Per-Pixel Coded Exposure for High-Speed and High-Resolution Imaging Using a Digital Micromirror Device Camera.

    PubMed

    Feng, Wei; Zhang, Fumin; Qu, Xinghua; Zheng, Shiwei

    2016-03-04

    High-speed photography is an important tool for studying rapid physical phenomena. However, low-frame-rate CCD (charge coupled device) or CMOS (complementary metal oxide semiconductor) camera cannot effectively capture the rapid phenomena with high-speed and high-resolution. In this paper, we incorporate the hardware restrictions of existing image sensors, design the sampling functions, and implement a hardware prototype with a digital micromirror device (DMD) camera in which spatial and temporal information can be flexibly modulated. Combined with the optical model of DMD camera, we theoretically analyze the per-pixel coded exposure and propose a three-element median quicksort method to increase the temporal resolution of the imaging system. Theoretically, this approach can rapidly increase the temporal resolution several, or even hundreds, of times without increasing bandwidth requirements of the camera. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our method via extensive examples and achieve 100 fps (frames per second) gain in temporal resolution by using a 25 fps camera.

  6. Single-camera stereo-digital image correlation with a four-mirror adapter: optimized design and validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Liping; Pan, Bing

    2016-12-01

    A low-cost, easy-to-implement but practical single-camera stereo-digital image correlation (DIC) system using a four-mirror adapter is established for accurate shape and three-dimensional (3D) deformation measurements. The mirrors assisted pseudo-stereo imaging system can convert a single camera into two virtual cameras, which view a specimen from different angles and record the surface images of the test object onto two halves of the camera sensor. To enable deformation measurement in non-laboratory conditions or extreme high temperature environments, an active imaging optical design, combining an actively illuminated monochromatic source with a coupled band-pass optical filter, is compactly integrated to the pseudo-stereo DIC system. The optical design, basic principles and implementation procedures of the established system for 3D profile and deformation measurements are described in detail. The effectiveness and accuracy of the established system are verified by measuring the profile of a regular cylinder surface and displacements of a translated planar plate. As an application example, the established system is used to determine the tensile strains and Poisson's ratio of a composite solid propellant specimen during stress relaxation test. Since the established single-camera stereo-DIC system only needs a single camera and presents strong robustness against variations in ambient light or the thermal radiation of a hot object, it demonstrates great potential in determining transient deformation in non-laboratory or high-temperature environments with the aid of a single high-speed camera.

  7. [Impact of digital technology on clinical practices: perspectives from surgery].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y; Liu, X J

    2016-04-09

    Digital medical technologies or computer aided medical procedures, refer to imaging, 3D reconstruction, virtual design, 3D printing, navigation guided surgery and robotic assisted surgery techniques. These techniques are integrated into conventional surgical procedures to create new clinical protocols that are known as "digital surgical techniques". Conventional health care is characterized by subjective experiences, while digital medical technologies bring quantifiable information, transferable data, repeatable methods and predictable outcomes into clinical practices. Being integrated into clinical practice, digital techniques facilitate surgical care by improving outcomes and reducing risks. Digital techniques are becoming increasingly popular in trauma surgery, orthopedics, neurosurgery, plastic and reconstructive surgery, imaging and anatomic sciences. Robotic assisted surgery is also evolving and being applied in general surgery, cardiovascular surgery and orthopedic surgery. Rapid development of digital medical technologies is changing healthcare and clinical practices. It is therefore important for all clinicians to purposefully adapt to these technologies and improve their clinical outcomes.

  8. Deformation monitoring with off-the-shelf digital cameras for civil engineering fatigue testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detchev, I.; Habib, A.; He, F.; El-Badry, M.

    2014-06-01

    Deformation monitoring of civil infrastructure systems is important in terms of both their safety and serviceability. The former refers to estimating the maximum loading capacity during the design stages of a building project, and the latter means performing regularly scheduled maintenance of an already existing structure. Traditionally, large structures have been monitored using surveying techniques, while fine-scale monitoring of structural components such as beams and trusses has been done with strain gauge instrumentation. In the past decade, digital photogrammetric systems coupled with image processing techniques have also been used for deformation monitoring. The major advantage of this remote sensing method for performing deformation monitoring is that there is no need to access the object of interest while testing is in progress. The paper is a result of an experiment where concrete beams with polymer support sheets are subjected to dynamic loading conditions by a hydraulic actuator in a structures laboratory. This type of loading is also known as fatigue testing, and is used to simulate the typical use of concrete beams over a long period of time. From a photogrammetric point of view, the challenge for this type of experiment is to avoid motion artifacts by maximizing the sensor frame rate, and at the same time to have a good enough image quality in order to achieve satisfactory reconstruction precision. This research effort will investigate the optimal camera settings (e.g., aperture, shutter speed, sensor sensitivity, and file size resolution) in order to have a balance between high sensor frame rate and good image quality. The results will be first evaluated in terms of their repeatability, and then also in terms of their accuracy. The accuracy of the results will be checked against another set of results coming from high quality laser transducers.

  9. Imaging Emission Spectra with Handheld and Cellphone Cameras

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sitar, David

    2012-01-01

    As point-and-shoot digital camera technology advances it is becoming easier to image spectra in a laboratory setting on a shoestring budget and get immediate results. With this in mind, I wanted to test three cameras to see how their results would differ. Two undergraduate physics students and I used one handheld 7.1 megapixel (MP) digital Cannon…

  10. A pilot project combining multispectral proximal sensors and digital cameras for monitoring tropical pastures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handcock, Rebecca N.; Gobbett, D. L.; González, Luciano A.; Bishop-Hurley, Greg J.; McGavin, Sharon L.

    2016-08-01

    Timely and accurate monitoring of pasture biomass and ground cover is necessary in livestock production systems to ensure productive and sustainable management. Interest in the use of proximal sensors for monitoring pasture status in grazing systems has increased, since data can be returned in near real time. Proximal sensors have the potential for deployment on large properties where remote sensing may not be suitable due to issues such as spatial scale or cloud cover. There are unresolved challenges in gathering reliable sensor data and in calibrating raw sensor data to values such as pasture biomass or vegetation ground cover, which allow meaningful interpretation of sensor data by livestock producers. Our goal was to assess whether a combination of proximal sensors could be reliably deployed to monitor tropical pasture status in an operational beef production system, as a precursor to designing a full sensor deployment. We use this pilot project to (1) illustrate practical issues around sensor deployment, (2) develop the methods necessary for the quality control of the sensor data, and (3) assess the strength of the relationships between vegetation indices derived from the proximal sensors and field observations across the wet and dry seasons. Proximal sensors were deployed at two sites in a tropical pasture on a beef production property near Townsville, Australia. Each site was monitored by a Skye SKR-four-band multispectral sensor (every 1 min), a digital camera (every 30 min), and a soil moisture sensor (every 1 min), each of which were operated over 18 months. Raw data from each sensor was processed to calculate multispectral vegetation indices. The data capture from the digital cameras was more reliable than the multispectral sensors, which had up to 67 % of data discarded after data cleaning and quality control for technical issues related to the sensor design, as well as environmental issues such as water incursion and insect infestations. We recommend

  11. Digital Technology at the National Science Museum of Japan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lydens, Lois; Saito, Yasuji; Inoue, Tohru

    2007-01-01

    The National Science Museum (NSM) in Japan has recently completed a project using different types of visitor-oriented digital technologies. With sponsorship from the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS), the NSM team carried out a four-year study to examine how digital technologies can be used to enhance as well as educationally…

  12. Digital Media and Technology in Afterschool Programs, Libraries, and Museums

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herr-Stephenson, Becky; Rhoten, Diana; Perkel, Dan; Sims, Christo

    2011-01-01

    Digital media and technology have become culturally and economically powerful parts of contemporary middle-class American childhoods. Immersed in various forms of digital media as well as mobile and Web-based technologies, young people today appear to develop knowledge and skills through participation in media. This MacArthur Report examines the…

  13. Secondary School Teachers' Approaches to Teaching Composition Using Digital Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wise, Stuart

    2016-01-01

    The music industry in the 21 century uses digital technology in a wide range of applications including in performance, in composition and in recording and publishing. In this article, I consider how the impact of digital technologies may be affecting pedagogical processes adopted by secondary music teachers, particularly in the area of…

  14. Digital Guided Weapons Technology. Volume 1. Digital Processor System Studies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-11-01

    controlled during midcourse flight by navigation based on a combination of inertial sensor information (illustrated as an IMU module) and LORAN receiver... design weapon was described. In the latter situation, the integration subsystem is a combination of a digital processor and a harness with dedicated...subsystem for a fixed- design weapon, as noted previously, is the combination of the digital processor and a harness with dedicated links to the

  15. Cameras Monitor Spacecraft Integrity to Prevent Failures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2014-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory contracted Malin Space Science Systems Inc. to outfit Curiosity with four of its cameras using the latest commercial imaging technology. The company parlayed the knowledge gained under working with NASA to develop an off-the-shelf line of cameras, along with a digital video recorder, designed to help troubleshoot problems that may arise on satellites in space.

  16. Comparison of - and Mutual Informaton Based Calibration of Terrestrial Laser Scanner and Digital Camera for Deformation Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omidalizarandi, M.; Neumann, I.

    2015-12-01

    In the current state-of-the-art, geodetic deformation analysis of natural and artificial objects (e.g. dams, bridges,...) is an ongoing research in both static and kinematic mode and has received considerable interest by researchers and geodetic engineers. In this work, due to increasing the accuracy of geodetic deformation analysis, a terrestrial laser scanner (TLS; here the Zoller+Fröhlich IMAGER 5006) and a high resolution digital camera (Nikon D750) are integrated to complementarily benefit from each other. In order to optimally combine the acquired data of the hybrid sensor system, a highly accurate estimation of the extrinsic calibration parameters between TLS and digital camera is a vital preliminary step. Thus, the calibration of the aforementioned hybrid sensor system can be separated into three single calibrations: calibration of the camera, calibration of the TLS and extrinsic calibration between TLS and digital camera. In this research, we focus on highly accurate estimating extrinsic parameters between fused sensors and target- and targetless (mutual information) based methods are applied. In target-based calibration, different types of observations (image coordinates, TLS measurements and laser tracker measurements for validation) are utilized and variance component estimation is applied to optimally assign adequate weights to the observations. Space resection bundle adjustment based on the collinearity equations is solved using Gauss-Markov and Gauss-Helmert model. Statistical tests are performed to discard outliers and large residuals in the adjustment procedure. At the end, the two aforementioned approaches are compared and advantages and disadvantages of them are investigated and numerical results are presented and discussed.

  17. Use of Digital Image Technology to 'Clearly' Depict Global Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molnia, B. F.; Carbo, C. L.

    2014-12-01

    Earth is dynamic and beautiful. Understanding why, when, how, and how fast its surface changes yields information and serves as a source of inspiration. The artistic use of geoscience information can inform the public about what is happening to their planet in a non-confrontational and apolitical way. While individual images may clearly depict a landscape, photographic comparisons are necessary to clearly capture and display annual, decadal, or century-scale impacts of climate and environmental change on Earth's landscapes. After years of effort to artistically communicate geoscience concepts with unenhanced individual photographs or pairs of images, the authors have partnered to maximize this process by using digital image enhancement technology. This is done, not to manipulate the inherent artistic content or information content of the photographs, but to insure that the comparative photo pairs produced are geometrically correct and unambiguous. For comparative photography, information-rich historical photographs are selected from archives, websites, and other sources. After determining the geographic location from which the historical photograph was made, the original site is identified and eventually revisited. There, the historical photos field of view is again photographed, ideally from the original location. From nearly 250 locations revisited, about 175 pairs have been produced. Every effort is made to reoccupy the original historical site. However, vegetation growth, visibility reduction, and co-seismic level change may make this impossible. Also, inherent differences in lens optics, camera construction, and image format may result in differences in the geometry of the new photograph when compared to the old. Upon selection, historical photos are cleaned, contrast stretched, brightness adjusted, and sharpened to maximize site identification and information extraction. To facilitate matching historical and new images, digital files of each are overlain in

  18. IR camera system with an advanced image processing technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohkubo, Syuichi; Tamura, Tetsuo

    2016-05-01

    We have developed image processing technologies for resolving issues caused by the inherent UFPA (uncooled focal plane array) sensor characteristics to spread its applications. For example, large time constant of an uncooled IR (infra-red) sensor limits its application field, because motion blur is caused in monitoring the objective moving at high speed. The developed image processing technologies can eliminate the blur and retrieve almost the equivalent image observed in still motion. This image processing is based on the idea that output of the IR sensor is construed as the convolution of radiated IR energy from the objective and impulse response of the IR sensor. With knowledge of the impulse response and moving speed of the objective, the IR energy from the objective can be de-convolved from the observed images. We have successfully retrieved the image without blur using the IR sensor of 15 ms time constant under the conditions in which the objective is moving at the speed of about 10 pixels/60 Hz. The image processing for reducing FPN (fixed pattern noise) has also been developed. UFPA having the responsivity in the narrow wavelength region, e.g., around 8 μm is appropriate for measuring the surface of glass. However, it suffers from severe FPN due to lower sensitivity compared with 8-13 μm. The developed image processing exploits the images of the shutter itself, and can reduce FPN significantly.

  19. Differences in glance behavior between drivers using a rearview camera, parking sensor system, both technologies, or no technology during low-speed parking maneuvers.

    PubMed

    Kidd, David G; McCartt, Anne T

    2016-02-01

    This study characterized the use of various fields of view during low-speed parking maneuvers by drivers with a rearview camera, a sensor system, a camera and sensor system combined, or neither technology. Participants performed four different low-speed parking maneuvers five times. Glances to different fields of view the second time through the four maneuvers were coded along with the glance locations at the onset of the audible warning from the sensor system and immediately after the warning for participants in the sensor and camera-plus-sensor conditions. Overall, the results suggest that information from cameras and/or sensor systems is used in place of mirrors and shoulder glances. Participants with a camera, sensor system, or both technologies looked over their shoulders significantly less than participants without technology. Participants with cameras (camera and camera-plus-sensor conditions) used their mirrors significantly less compared with participants without cameras (no-technology and sensor conditions). Participants in the camera-plus-sensor condition looked at the center console/camera display for a smaller percentage of the time during the low-speed maneuvers than participants in the camera condition and glanced more frequently to the center console/camera display immediately after the warning from the sensor system compared with the frequency of glances to this location at warning onset. Although this increase was not statistically significant, the pattern suggests that participants in the camera-plus-sensor condition may have used the warning as a cue to look at the camera display. The observed differences in glance behavior between study groups were illustrated by relating it to the visibility of a 12-15-month-old child-size object. These findings provide evidence that drivers adapt their glance behavior during low-speed parking maneuvers following extended use of rearview cameras and parking sensors, and suggest that other technologies which

  20. Redefining Student Affairs through Digital Technology: A Ten-Year Historiography of Digital Technology Use by Student Affairs Administrators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cabellon, Edmund T.

    2016-01-01

    The student affairs profession is at a crossroads (Torres & Walbert, 2010) given digital technology's growth and the academy's administrative expansion (Bowen, 2013). Student affairs administrators must simultaneously respond to digital technology's implications in students' lives (Kirschner & Karpinski, 2010) and to new state and federal…

  1. Measurement of the spatial frequency response (SFR) of digital still-picture cameras using a modified slanted-edge method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Wei-Feng; Hsu, Yun C.; Chuang, Kai W.

    2000-06-01

    Spatial resolution is one of the main characteristics of electronic imaging devices such as the digital still-picture camera. It describes the capability of a device to resolve the spatial details of an image formed by the incoming optical information. The overall resolving capability is of great interest although there are various factors, contributed by camera components and signal processing algorithms, affecting the spatial resolution. The spatial frequency response (SFR), analogous to the MTF of an optical imaging system, is one of the four measurements for analysis of spatial resolution defined in ISO/FDIS 12233, and it provides a complete profile of the spatial response of digital still-picture cameras. In that document, a test chart is employed to estimate the spatial resolving capability. The calculations of SFR were conducted by using the slanted edge method in which a scene with a black-to- white or white-to-black edge tilted at a specified angle is captured. An algorithm is used to find the line spread function as well as the SFR. We will present a modified algorithm in which no prior information of the angle of the tilted black-to-white edge is needed. The tilted angle was estimated by assuming that a region around the center of the transition between black and white regions is linear. At a tilted angle of 8 degree the minimum estimation error is about 3%. The advantages of the modified slanted edge method are high accuracy, flexible use, and low cost.

  2. The future of consumer cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battiato, Sebastiano; Moltisanti, Marco

    2015-03-01

    In the last two decades multimedia, and in particular imaging devices (camcorders, tablets, mobile phones, etc.) have been dramatically diffused. Moreover the increasing of their computational performances, combined with an higher storage capability, allows them to process large amount of data. In this paper an overview of the current trends of consumer cameras market and technology will be given, providing also some details about the recent past (from Digital Still Camera up today) and forthcoming key issues.

  3. Can New Digital Technologies Support Parasitology Teaching and Learning?

    PubMed

    Jabbar, Abdul; Gasser, Robin B; Lodge, Jason

    2016-07-01

    Traditionally, parasitology courses have mostly been taught face-to-face on campus, but now digital technologies offer opportunities for teaching and learning. Here, we give a perspective on how new technologies might be used through student-centred teaching approaches. First, a snapshot of recent trends in the higher education is provided; then, a brief account is given of how digital technologies [e.g., massive open online courses (MOOCs), flipped classroom (FC), games, quizzes, dedicated Facebook, and digital badges] might promote parasitology teaching and learning in digital learning environments. In our opinion, some of these digital technologies might be useful for competency-based, self-regulated, learner-centred teaching and learning in an online or blended teaching environment.

  4. Small Field of View Scintimammography Gamma Camera Integrated to a Stereotactic Core Biopsy Digital X-ray System

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew Weisenberger; Fernando Barbosa; T. D. Green; R. Hoefer; Cynthia Keppel; Brian Kross; Stanislaw Majewski; Vladimir Popov; Randolph Wojcik

    2002-10-01

    A small field of view gamma camera has been developed for integration with a commercial stereotactic core biopsy system. The goal is to develop and implement a dual-modality imaging system utilizing scintimammography and digital radiography to evaluate the reliability of scintimammography in predicting the malignancy of suspected breast lesions from conventional X-ray mammography. The scintimammography gamma camera is a custom-built mini gamma camera with an active area of 5.3 cm /spl times/ 5.3 cm and is based on a 2 /spl times/ 2 array of Hamamatsu R7600-C8 position-sensitive photomultiplier tubes. The spatial resolution of the gamma camera at the collimator surface is < 4 mm full-width at half-maximum and a sensitivity of /spl sim/ 4000 Hz/mCi. The system is also capable of acquiring dynamic scintimammographic data to allow for dynamic uptake studies. Sample images of preliminary clinical results are presented to demonstrate the performance of the system.

  5. 47 CFR 73.9008 - Interim approval of authorized digital output protection technologies and authorized recording...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... information: (1) A general description of how the digital output protection technology or recording method... digital output protection technology or recording method affords content; (3) Information regarding... information to evaluate the appropriateness of the underlying digital output protection technology...

  6. Diabetic Retinopathy Screening Ratio Is Improved When Using a Digital, Nonmydriatic Fundus Camera Onsite in a Diabetes Outpatient Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Roser, Pia; Kalscheuer, Hannes; Groener, Jan B.; Lehnhoff, Daniel; Klein, Roman; Auffarth, Gerd U.; Nawroth, Peter P.; Schuett, Florian; Rudofsky, Gottfried

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the effect of onsite screening with a nonmydriatic, digital fundus camera for diabetic retinopathy (DR) at a diabetes outpatient clinic. Research Design and Methods. This cross-sectional study included 502 patients, 112 with type 1 and 390 with type 2 diabetes. Patients attended screenings for microvascular complications, including diabetic nephropathy (DN), diabetic polyneuropathy (DP), and DR. Single-field retinal imaging with a digital, nonmydriatic fundus camera was used to assess DR. Prevalence and incidence of microvascular complications were analyzed and the ratio of newly diagnosed to preexisting complications for all entities was calculated in order to differentiate natural progress from missed DRs. Results. For both types of diabetes, prevalence of DR was 25.0% (n = 126) and incidence 6.4% (n = 32) (T1DM versus T2DM: prevalence: 35.7% versus 22.1%, incidence 5.4% versus 6.7%). 25.4% of all DRs were newly diagnosed. Furthermore, the ratio of newly diagnosed to preexisting DR was higher than those for DN (p = 0.12) and DP (p = 0.03) representing at least 13 patients with missed DR. Conclusions. The results indicate that implementing nonmydriatic, digital fundus imaging in a diabetes outpatient clinic can contribute to improved early diagnosis of diabetic retinopathy. PMID:26904690

  7. Use of commercial off-the-shelf digital cameras for scientific data acquisition and scene-specific color calibration

    PubMed Central

    Akkaynak, Derya; Treibitz, Tali; Xiao, Bei; Gürkan, Umut A.; Allen, Justine J.; Demirci, Utkan; Hanlon, Roger T.

    2014-01-01

    Commercial off-the-shelf digital cameras are inexpensive and easy-to-use instruments that can be used for quantitative scientific data acquisition if images are captured in raw format and processed so that they maintain a linear relationship with scene radiance. Here we describe the image-processing steps required for consistent data acquisition with color cameras. In addition, we present a method for scene-specific color calibration that increases the accuracy of color capture when a scene contains colors that are not well represented in the gamut of a standard color-calibration target. We demonstrate applications of the proposed methodology in the fields of biomedical engineering, artwork photography, perception science, marine biology, and underwater imaging. PMID:24562030

  8. Photometric-based recovery of illuminant-free color images using a red-green-blue digital camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luis Nieves, Juan; Plata, Clara; Valero, Eva M.; Romero, Javier

    2012-01-01

    Albedo estimation has traditionally been used to make computational simulations of real objects under different conditions, but as yet no device is capable of measuring albedo directly. The aim of this work is to introduce a photometric-based color imaging framework that can estimate albedo and can reproduce the appearance both indoors and outdoors of images under different lights and illumination geometry. Using a calibration sample set composed of chips made of the same material but different colors and textures, we compare two photometric-stereo techniques, one of them avoiding the effect of shadows and highlights in the image and the other ignoring this constraint. We combined a photometric-stereo technique and a color-estimation algorithm that directly relates the camera sensor outputs with the albedo values. The proposed method can produce illuminant-free images with good color accuracy when a three-channel red-green-blue (RGB) digital camera is used, even outdoors under solar illumination.

  9. Use of commercial off-the-shelf digital cameras for scientific data acquisition and scene-specific color calibration.

    PubMed

    Akkaynak, Derya; Treibitz, Tali; Xiao, Bei; Gürkan, Umut A; Allen, Justine J; Demirci, Utkan; Hanlon, Roger T

    2014-02-01

    Commercial off-the-shelf digital cameras are inexpensive and easy-to-use instruments that can be used for quantitative scientific data acquisition if images are captured in raw format and processed so that they maintain a linear relationship with scene radiance. Here we describe the image-processing steps required for consistent data acquisition with color cameras. In addition, we present a method for scene-specific color calibration that increases the accuracy of color capture when a scene contains colors that are not well represented in the gamut of a standard color-calibration target. We demonstrate applications of the proposed methodology in the fields of biomedical engineering, artwork photography, perception science, marine biology, and underwater imaging.

  10. Digital imaging technology applied to crewstation display measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Leonard Y.; Green, John R.

    1993-12-01

    A `slow scan' CCD camera has been adapted for luminance and radiance measurement of displays used in night vision goggle (NVG) compatible aircraft. A video lightmeter offers several advantages compared to conventional test methods including high speed image capture and color coding of the digital image data. The color coding feature facilitates evaluation of the test display uniformity. Numerical values for luminance and infrared radiance are also extracted from the image data.

  11. Evaluation of a novel laparoscopic camera for characterization of renal ischemia in a porcine model using digital light processing (DLP) hyperspectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olweny, Ephrem O.; Tan, Yung K.; Faddegon, Stephen; Jackson, Neil; Wehner, Eleanor F.; Best, Sara L.; Park, Samuel K.; Thapa, Abhas; Cadeddu, Jeffrey A.; Zuzak, Karel J.

    2012-03-01

    Digital light processing hyperspectral imaging (DLP® HSI) was adapted for use during laparoscopic surgery by coupling a conventional laparoscopic light guide with a DLP-based Agile Light source (OL 490, Optronic Laboratories, Orlando, FL), incorporating a 0° laparoscope, and a customized digital CCD camera (DVC, Austin, TX). The system was used to characterize renal ischemia in a porcine model.

  12. Digital image measurement of specimen deformation based on CCD cameras and Image J software: an application to human pelvic biomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Yongwei; Cheng, Liming; Yu, Guangrong; Lou, Yongjian; Yu, Yan; Chen, Bo; Ding, Zuquan

    2008-03-01

    A method of digital image measurement of specimen deformation based on CCD cameras and Image J software was developed. This method was used to measure the biomechanics behavior of human pelvis. Six cadaveric specimens from the third lumbar vertebra to the proximal 1/3 part of femur were tested. The specimens without any structural abnormalities were dissected of all soft tissue, sparing the hip joint capsules and the ligaments of the pelvic ring and floor. Markers with black dot on white background were affixed to the key regions of the pelvis. Axial loading from the proximal lumbar was applied by MTS in the gradient of 0N to 500N, which simulated the double feet standing stance. The anterior and lateral images of the specimen were obtained through two CCD cameras. Based on Image J software, digital image processing software, which can be freely downloaded from the National Institutes of Health, digital 8-bit images were processed. The procedure includes the recognition of digital marker, image invert, sub-pixel reconstruction, image segmentation, center of mass algorithm based on weighted average of pixel gray values. Vertical displacements of S1 (the first sacral vertebrae) in front view and micro-angular rotation of sacroiliac joint in lateral view were calculated according to the marker movement. The results of digital image measurement showed as following: marker image correlation before and after deformation was excellent. The average correlation coefficient was about 0.983. According to the 768 × 576 pixels image (pixel size 0.68mm × 0.68mm), the precision of the displacement detected in our experiment was about 0.018 pixels and the comparatively error could achieve 1.11\\perthou. The average vertical displacement of S1 of the pelvis was 0.8356+/-0.2830mm under vertical load of 500 Newtons and the average micro-angular rotation of sacroiliac joint in lateral view was 0.584+/-0.221°. The load-displacement curves obtained from our optical measure system

  13. Digital video technology - today and tomorrow: 11th office information technology conference

    SciTech Connect

    Liberman, J.

    1994-10-01

    Digital video is probably computing`s fastest moving technology today. Just three years ago, the zenith of digital video technology on the PC was the successful marriage of digital text and graphics with analog audio and video by means of expensive analog laser disc players and video overlay boards. The state of the art involves two different approaches to fully digital video on computers: hardware-assisted and software-only solutions.

  14. Current State of Digital Reference in Primary and Secondary Education; The Technological Challenges of digital Reference; Question Negotiation and the Technological Environment; Evaluation of Chat Reference Service Quality; Visual Resource Reference: Collaboration between Digital Museums and Digital Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lankes, R. David; Penka, Jeffrey T.; Janes, Joseph; Silverstein, Joanne; White, Marilyn Domas; Abels, Eileen G.; Kaske, Neal; Goodrum, Abby A.

    2003-01-01

    Includes five articles that discuss digital reference in elementary and secondary education; the need to understand the technological environment of digital reference; question negotiation in digital reference; a pilot study that evaluated chat reference service quality; and collaborative digital museum and digital library reference services. (LRW)

  15. Combining digital image correlation and projected fringe techniques on a multi-camera multi-projector platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, T. N.; Huntley, J. M.; Burguete, R.; Coggrave, C. R.

    2009-08-01

    This paper presents how a shape measurement system (SMS) based on projected fringes can be combined with a 2-D digital image correlation (DIC) technique to accurately measure surface profile and 3-D displacement fields at the same time. Unlike traditional 3-D DIC techniques, the proposed method can measure discontinuous surfaces as easily as smooth ones. The method can also be extended to a multi-camera multi-projector system, and thus complete 360° 3-D displacement fields can be obtained within a single global coordinate system. Details of the algorithm are presented together with experimental results.

  16. Bridging storytelling traditions with digital technology

    PubMed Central

    Cueva, Melany; Kuhnley, Regina; Revels, Laura J.; Cueva, Katie; Dignan, Mark; Lanier, Anne P.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this project was to learn how Community Health Workers (CHWs) in Alaska perceived digital storytelling as a component of the “Path to Understanding Cancer” curriculum and as a culturally respectful tool for sharing cancer-related health messages. Design A pre-course written application, end-of-course written evaluation, and internet survey informed this project. Methods Digital storytelling was included in seven 5-day cancer education courses (May 2009–2012) in which 67 CHWs each created a personal 2–3 minute cancer-related digital story. Participant-chosen digital story topics included tobacco cessation, the importance of recommended cancer screening exams, cancer survivorship, loss, grief and end-of-life comfort care, and self-care as patient care providers. All participants completed an end-of-course written evaluation. In July 2012, contact information was available for 48 participants, of whom 24 completed an internet survey. Results All 67 participants successfully completed a digital story which they shared and discussed with course members. On the written post-course evaluation, all participants reported that combining digital storytelling with cancer education supported their learning and was a culturally respectful way to provide health messages. Additionally, 62 of 67 CHWs reported that the course increased their confidence to share cancer information with their communities. Up to 3 years post-course, all 24 CHW survey respondents reported they had shown their digital story. Of note, 23 of 24 CHWs also reported change in their own behavior as a result of the experience. Conclusions All CHWs, regardless of computer skills, successfully created a digital story as part of the cancer education course. CHWs reported that digital stories enhanced their learning and were a culturally respectful way to share cancer-related information. Digital storytelling gave the power of the media into the hands of CHWs to increase their

  17. Colloquium: Digital Technologies--Help or Hindrance for the Humanities?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Elton; Bissell, Chris; Hardwick, Lorna; Jones, Allan; Ridge, Mia; Wolffe, John

    2012-01-01

    This article offers reflections arising from a recent colloquium at the Open University on the implications of the development of digital humanities for research in arts disciplines, and also for their interactions with computing and technology. Particular issues explored include the ways in which the digital turn in humanities research is also a…

  18. Debating Digital Childhoods: Questions Concerning Technologies, Economies and Determinisms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbons, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The learning child, the child that is the object of interest through modernity and into mutated modernity, in the knowledge economy, is a digital age identity of great interest. Talk about childhood and the digital age invokes a range of questions about what is happening at this time and with these technologies and that creates more or less of a…

  19. New technology in dietary assessment: a review of digital methods in improving food record accuracy.

    PubMed

    Stumbo, Phyllis J

    2013-02-01

    Methods for conducting dietary assessment in the United States date back to the early twentieth century. Methods of assessment encompassed dietary records, written and spoken dietary recalls, FFQ using pencil and paper and more recently computer and internet applications. Emerging innovations involve camera and mobile telephone technology to capture food and meal images. This paper describes six projects sponsored by the United States National Institutes of Health that use digital methods to improve food records and two mobile phone applications using crowdsourcing. The techniques under development show promise for improving accuracy of food records.

  20. Effective Use of Digital Technologies of High School Teachers as Digital Immigrants in Six Rural Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pattee, Andy

    2012-01-01

    Problem: A widening experiential gap of effective use of technology in K-12 schools between "digital immigrants" and "digital natives" (Prensky, 2001) is becoming more evident as digital natives become classroom teachers and showcase pedagogical strategies with digital technologies. There is a dearth of research on digital…

  1. The Digital Literacy Debate: An Investigation of Digital Propensity and Information and Communication Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nasah, Angelique; DaCosta, Boaventura; Kinsell, Carolyn; Seok, Soonhwa

    2010-01-01

    Research suggests students' use of information and communication technology (ICT) may be more a matter of digital literacy and access rather than a generational trait. We sought to identify ICT preferences of post-secondary students (N = 580) through a Digital Propensity Index (DPI), investigating communication methods, Internet practices and the…

  2. The introduction of digital dental technology into BDS curricula.

    PubMed

    Chatham, C; Spencer, M H; Wood, D J; Johnson, A

    2014-12-05

    The aim of this study was to determine the degree to which digital dental technologies have been introduced into the curricula of UK dental schools. A survey was carried out of all the UK dental schools that teach undergraduate dental students. The survey contained six questions and was designed to determine if digital dental technology techniques or systems were being taught in the curricula, what these techniques were, and whether the school dental laboratories supported these techniques. Sixteen schools were surveyed and 11 replied: a response rate of 69%. Forty-five percent of the schools that replied did not teach digital dental technology in their curriculum. Of the 55% of schools who did teach digital dental technology, 50% gave lectures or demonstrations while the other 50% allowed practical involvement by the student. Two thirds of these stated that not all the students participated in practical usage. Seventy-three percent of the schools that replied had dental laboratories using some, but not all the digital dental technology techniques listed. Eighty percent of the schools that were not teaching digital dental technology said it was because it was not included in the curriculum, and 20% stated it was due to a lack of technical expertise or support.

  3. Dgnss/ins Van Project For Road Survey In The Cei Countries: The Problem of Digital Cameras Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deruda, G.; Falchi, E.; Sanna, G.; Vacca, G.

    In order to assess the influence of distortion of objective lens on digital photocameras and videocameras a series of experiments, using a digital photocamera by Nikon, a videocamera by Samsung and a webcam by Creative have been performed with the aim to test the possibility to enhance camera images by means of resampling tech- niques. For this purpose a network of fiducial points has been materialized on two walls of a building in the Faculty of Engineering of Cagliari. Points coordinate have been obtained by means of a topographic survey. Images and video sequences of the fronts have been taken at several distances and different focal lens, obtaining an esti- mate of the lens behaviour, on the basis of witch a regular grid of the displacement of points on the photo has been generated for each camera. The grid has been used in a resampling procedure to remove distortion influence by the images. The improvement of accuracy has been estimated between about 30 and 50%.

  4. Trend of digital camera and interchangeable zoom lenses with high ratio based on patent application over the past 10 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sensui, Takayuki

    2012-10-01

    Although digitalization has tripled consumer-class camera market scale, extreme reductions in prices of fixed-lens cameras has reduced profitability. As a result, a number of manufacturers have entered the market of the System DSC i.e. digital still camera with interchangeable lens, where large profit margins are possible, and many high ratio zoom lenses with image stabilization functions have been released. Quiet actuators are another indispensable component. Design with which there is little degradation in performance due to all types of errors is preferred for good balance in terms of size, lens performance, and the rate of quality to sub-standard products. Decentering, such as that caused by tilting, sensitivity of moving groups is especially important. In addition, image stabilization mechanisms actively shift lens groups. Development of high ratio zoom lenses with vibration reduction mechanism is confronted by the challenge of reduced performance due to decentering, making control over decentering sensitivity between lens groups everything. While there are a number of ways to align lenses (axial alignment), shock resistance and ability to stand up to environmental conditions must also be considered. Naturally, it is very difficult, if not impossible, to make lenses smaller and achieve a low decentering sensitivity at the same time. 4-group zoom construction is beneficial in making lenses smaller, but decentering sensitivity is greater. 5-group zoom configuration makes smaller lenses more difficult, but it enables lower decentering sensitivities. At Nikon, the most advantageous construction is selected for each lens based on specifications. The AF-S DX NIKKOR 18-200mm f/3.5-5.6G ED VR II and AF-S NIKKOR 28-300mm f/3.5-5.6G ED VR are excellent examples of this.

  5. Digital photogrammetric analysis of the IMP camera images: Mapping the Mars Pathfinder landing site in three dimensions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kirk, R.L.; Howington-Kraus, E.; Hare, T.; Dorrer, E.; Cook, D.; Becker, K.; Thompson, K.; Redding, B.; Blue, J.; Galuszka, D.; Lee, E.M.; Gaddis, L.R.; Johnson, J. R.; Soderblom, L.A.; Ward, A.W.; Smith, P.H.; Britt, D.T.

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes our photogrammetric analysis of the Imager for Mars Pathfinder data, part of a broader program of mapping the Mars Pathfinder landing site in support of geoscience investigations. This analysis, carried out primarily with a commercial digital photogrammetric system, supported by our in-house Integrated Software for Imagers and Spectrometers (ISIS), consists of three steps: (1) geometric control: simultaneous solution for refined estimates of camera positions and pointing plus three-dimensional (3-D) coordinates of ???103 features sitewide, based on the measured image coordinates of those features; (2) topographic modeling: identification of ???3 ?? 105 closely spaced points in the images and calculation (based on camera parameters from step 1) of their 3-D coordinates, yielding digital terrain models (DTMs); and (3) geometric manipulation of the data: combination of the DTMs from different stereo pairs into a sitewide model, and reprojection of image data to remove parallax between the different spectral filters in the two cameras and to provide an undistorted planimetric view of the site. These processes are described in detail and example products are shown. Plans for combining the photogrammetrically derived topographic data with spectrophotometry are also described. These include photometric modeling using surface orientations from the DTM to study surface microtextures and improve the accuracy of spectral measurements, and photoclinometry to refine the DTM to single-pixel resolution where photometric properties are sufficiently uniform. Finally, the inclusion of rover images in a joint photogrammetric analysis with IMP images is described. This challenging task will provide coverage of areas hidden to the IMP, but accurate ranging of distant features can be achieved only if the lander is also visible in the rover image used. Copyright 1999 by the American Geophysical Union.

  6. Low-cost camera modifications and methodologies for very-high-resolution digital images

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aerial color and color-infrared photography are usually acquired at high altitude so the ground resolution of the photographs is < 1 m. Moreover, current color-infrared cameras and manned aircraft flight time are expensive, so the objective is the development of alternative methods for obtaining ve...

  7. Greenness indices from digital cameras predict the timing and seasonal dynamics of canopy-scale photosynthesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The proliferation of tower-mounted cameras co-located with eddy covariance instrumentation provides a novel opportunity to better understand the relationship between canopy phenology and the seasonality of canopy photosynthesis. In this paper, we describe the abilities and limitations of webcams to ...

  8. 3D camera technology trade-off and breadboard demonstration for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christy, Julien; Bohn, Preben; Schumann-Olsen, Henrik; Biggio, Andrea; Kowaltschek, Steeve

    2015-06-01

    In previous decades, the vision-based navigation problem based on 2D imaging has been largely studied and applied in space, for rendezvous and docking, as well as rover navigation, or entry, descent and landing. By providing measurement of the third dimension (range), 3D camera technology looks a promising alternative for many applications. Stereoscopic camera is one option to measure the third coordinate, but relies on significant CPU capabilities, which are generally not available for space applications. Scanning LIDAR (LIght detection and ranging) is also an existing solution, but it is relatively large and heavy and the refresh rate, lifetime and reliability are mainly determined by moving parts. 3D time-of-flight (TOF) technology (including flash LIDARs) offers a reliable alternative. By illuminating a whole scene at a time and thus providing a whole array image, there is no need for complex processing nor moving mechanisms, which clearly appears as an advantage for space applications. This paper presents the ongoing study conducted under ESA contract in the field of 3D TOF technology. Its goal is to evaluate the suitability of a 3D TOF camera for space applications, to derive requirements and a preliminary design, and finally to create and test a breadboard model. Performance budget, cost, and a development plan of a versatile spatialized 3D TOF camera are also outputs of the study, in addition to a high-fidelity simulator, allowing further studies by generating representative images and depth maps. To fulfill this project, a European team has been created, gathering Thales Alenia Space, Terma and SINTEF.

  9. Digital Technology in Science by Doing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bothun, G.

    1998-05-01

    In partnernship with a pilot program of K12 teachers, we are significantly reshaping the traditional manner which astronomy is taught. Our focus is to incoporate the use of modern digital detectors and data analysis directly into the curriculum. The main goal of this project is to allow students to do real observations, either by remote observation with the Pine Mountain Observatory (PMO) 1-m telescope, or by accessing the HST digital archive. To assist students with data reduction we will provide them with JAVA reduction tools already under development. We will also train teachers on how to use this digital machinery in an effective manner so as to activate the innate curiosity of students and to instill in them an appreciation for the process of science. Our project will emphasize active student experimentation and collaboration (through coordinated observations). All results and observations will be maintained and archived on the Web server in residence at PMO.

  10. The application of camera calibration in range-gated 3D imaging technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiao-quan; Wang, Xian-wei; Zhou, Yan

    2013-09-01

    Range-gated laser imaging technology was proposed in 1966 by LF Gillespiethe in U.S. Army Night Vision Laboratory(NVL). Using pulse laser and intensified charge-coupled device(ICCD) as light source and detector respectively, range-gated laser imaging technology can realize space-slice imaging while restraining the atmospheric backs-catter, and in turn detect the target effectively, by controlling the delay between the laser pulse and strobe. Owing to the constraints of the development of key components such as narrow pulse laser and gated imaging devices, the research has been progressed slowly in the next few decades. Until the beginning of this century, as the hardware technology continues to mature, this technology has developed rapidly in fields such as night vision, underwater imaging, biomedical imaging, three-dimensional imaging, especially range-gated three-dimensional(3-D) laser imaging field purposing of access to target spatial information. 3-D reconstruction is the processing of restoration of 3-D objects visible surface geometric structure from three-dimensional(2-D) image. Range-gated laser imaging technology can achieve gated imaging of slice space to form a slice image, and in turn provide the distance information corresponding to the slice image. But to inverse the information of 3-D space, we need to obtain the imaging visual field of system, that is, the focal length of the system. Then based on the distance information of the space slice, the spatial information of each unit space corresponding to each pixel can be inversed. Camera calibration is an indispensable step in 3-D reconstruction, including analysis of the internal structure of camera parameters and the external parameters . In order to meet the technical requirements of the range-gated 3-D imaging, this paper intends to study the calibration of the zoom lens system. After summarizing the camera calibration technique comprehensively, a classic calibration method based on line is

  11. Airborne Digital Sensor System and GPS-aided inertial technology for direct geopositioning in rough terrain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanchez, Richard D.

    2004-01-01

    High-resolution airborne digital cameras with onboard data collection based on the Global Positioning System (GPS) and inertial navigation systems (INS) technology may offer a real-time means to gather accurate topographic map information by reducing ground control and eliminating aerial triangulation. Past evaluations of this integrated system over relatively flat terrain have proven successful. The author uses Emerge Digital Sensor System (DSS) combined with Applanix Corporation?s Position and Orientation Solutions for Direct Georeferencing to examine the positional mapping accuracy in rough terrain. The positional accuracy documented in this study did not meet large-scale mapping requirements owing to an apparent system mechanical failure. Nonetheless, the findings yield important information on a new approach for mapping in Antarctica and other remote or inaccessible areas of the world.

  12. Acquisition method improvement for Bossa Nova Technologies' full Stokes, passive polarization imaging camera SALSA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Ketara, M.; Vedel, M.; Breugnot, S.

    2016-05-01

    For some applications, the need for fast polarization acquisition is essential (if the scene observed is moving or changing quickly). In this paper, we present a new acquisition method for Bossa Nova Technologies' full Stokes passive polarization imaging camera, the SALSA. This polarization imaging camera is based on "Division of Time polarimetry" architecture. The use of this technique presents the advantage of preserving the full resolution of the image observed all the while reducing the speed acquisition time. The goal of this new acquisition method is to overcome the limitations associated with Division of Time acquisition technique as well as to obtain high-speed polarization imaging while maintaining the image resolution. The efficiency of this new method is demonstrated in this paper through different experiments.

  13. Digital Storytelling: Using Technology to Spark Creativity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tackvic, Charlene

    2012-01-01

    For any curriculum area that entails writing, digital storytelling could transform students' perceptions of and their actual abilities to express themselves through the written word. The use of two Web sites has helped the students of one school go from staring apprehensively at blank pages to eagerly publishing stories.

  14. Technological Implications for Assessment Ecosystems: Opportunities for Digital Technology to Advance Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behrens, John T.; DiCerbo, Kristen E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: It would be easy to think the technological shifts in the digital revolution are simple incremental progressions in societal advancement. However, the nature of digital technology is resulting in qualitative differences in nearly all parts of daily life. Purpose: This paper investigates how the new possibilities for understanding,…

  15. Technology Tools to Support Reading in the Digital Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biancarosa, Gina; Griffiths, Gina G.

    2012-01-01

    Advances in digital technologies are dramatically altering the texts and tools available to teachers and students. These technological advances have created excitement among many for their potential to be used as instructional tools for literacy education. Yet with the promise of these advances come issues that can exacerbate the literacy…

  16. New Digital Technologies: Educational Opportunities for Australian Indigenous Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Shalini

    2013-01-01

    This article presents a number of possibilities that digital technologies can offer to increase access for Indigenous people to higher education in Australia. Such technologies can assist Indigenous high school students acquire the knowledge and skills they require to be accepted into higher education courses. They can also assist Indigenous…

  17. Born Digital: Integrating Media Technology in the Political Science Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mancillas, Linda K.; Brusoe, Peter W.

    2016-01-01

    U.S. higher education institutions spend a large amount of time, money, and energy on technology. Educators face a student population that has never been without the Internet--they are "Born Digital." Students expect that faculty and universities utilize more technology. Higher education is faced with the question whether technology…

  18. Evaluation of Digital Technology and Software Use among Business Education Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Richard S.; Okpala, Comfort O.

    2004-01-01

    Digital video cameras are part of the evolution of multimedia digital products that have positive applications for educators, students, and industry. Multimedia digital video can be utilized by any personal computer and it allows the user to control, combine, and manipulate different types of media, such as text, sound, video, computer graphics,…

  19. Single-camera microscopic stereo digital image correlation using a diffraction grating.

    PubMed

    Pan, Bing; Wang, Qiong

    2013-10-21

    A simple, cost-effective but practical microscopic 3D-DIC method using a single camera and a transmission diffraction grating is proposed for surface profile and deformation measurement of small-scale objects. By illuminating a test sample with quasi-monochromatic source, the transmission diffraction grating placed in front of the camera can produce two laterally spaced first-order diffraction views of the sample surface into the two halves of the camera target. The single image comprising negative and positive first-order diffraction views can be used to reconstruct the profile of the test sample, while the two single images acquired before and after deformation can be employed to determine the 3D displacements and strains of the sample surface. The basic principles and implementation procedures of the proposed technique for microscopic 3D profile and deformation measurement are described in detail. The effectiveness and accuracy of the presented microscopic 3D-DIC method is verified by measuring the profile and 3D displacements of a regular cylinder surface.

  20. A Digital Readout System For The CSO Microwave Kinetic Inductance Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Max-Moerbeck, Walter; Mazin, B. A.; Zmuidzinas, J.

    2007-12-01

    Submillimeter galaxies are important to the understanding of galaxy formation and evolution. Determination of the spectral energy distribution in the millimeter and submillimeter regimes allows important and powerful diagnostics. Our group is developing a camera for the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO) using Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors (MKIDs). MKIDs are superconducting devices whose impedance changes with the absorption of photons. The camera will have 600 spatial pixels and 4 bands at 750 μm, 850 μm, 1.1 mm and 1.3 mm. For each spatial pixel of the camera the radiation is coupled to the MKIDs using phased-array antennas. This signal is split into 4 different bands using filters and detected using the superconductor as part of a MKID's resonant circuit. The detection process consists of measurement of the changes in the transmission through the resonator when it is illuminated. By designing resonant circuits to have different resonant frequencies and high transmission out resonance, MKIDs can be frequency-domain multiplexed. This allows the simultaneous readout of many detectors through a single coaxial cable. The readout system makes use of microwave IQ modulation and is based on commercial electronics components operating at room temperature. The basic readout has been demonstrated on the CSO. We are working on the implementation of an improved design to be tested on a prototype system with 6x6 pixels and 4 colors next April on the CSO.

  1. Detecting Chlorophyll and Phycocyanin in Lake Texoma Using in Situ Photo from GPS Digital Camera and Landsat 8 OLI Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Hambright, K.; Xiao, X.

    2013-12-01

    Characterizing the temporal and spatial change of algae blooms across lake systems is difficult through conventional sampling methodologies. The application of remote sensing to lake water quality has improved significantly over recent years. However there are seldom reports about in situ photos from GPS digital camera and the new satellite Landsat 8 OLI monitoring algae blooms in freshwater lakes. A pilot study was carried out in Lake Texoma in Oklahoma on April 25th 2013. At each site (12 sites in total), pigments (chlorophyll a and phycocyanin concentration), in situ spectral data and digital photos had been acquired using Hydrolab DS5X sonde (calibrated routinely against laboratory standards), ASD FieldSpec and GPS camera, respectively. The field spectral data sets were transformed to blue, green and red ranges which match the spectral resolution of Landsat 8 OLI images by average spectral reflectance signature to the first four Landsat 8 OLI bands. Comparing with other ratio indices, red/ blue was the best ratio index which can be employed in predicting phycocyanin and chlorophyll a concentration; and pigments (phycocyanin and chlorophyll a) concentration in whole depth should be selected to be detected using remote sensing method in Lake Texoam in the followed analysis. An image based darkest pixel subtraction method was used to process atmospheric correction of Landsat 8 OLI images. After atmospheric correction, the DN values were extracted and used to compute ratio of band4 (Red)/ band1(Blue). Higher correlation coefficients existed in both between resampled spectral reflectance and ratio of red/ blue of photo DN values (R2=0.9425 n=12) and between resampled spectral reflectance and ratio of red/ blue of Landsat 8 OLI images DN values (R2=0.8476 n=12). Finally, we analyzed the correlation between pigments concentrations in whole depth and DN values ratio red/ blue of both Landsat 8 OLI images and digital photos. There were higher correlation coefficients

  2. Two Persons with Multiple Disabilities Use Camera-Based Microswitch Technology to Control Stimulation with Small Mouth and Eyelid Responses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lancioni, Giulio E.; Bellini, Domenico; Oliva, Doretta; Singh, Nirbhay N.; O'Reilly, Mark F.; Sigafoos, Jeff; Lang, Russell

    2012-01-01

    Background: A camera-based microswitch technology was recently developed to monitor small facial responses of persons with multiple disabilities and allow those responses to control environmental stimulation. This study assessed such a technology with 2 new participants using slight variations of previous responses. Method: The technology involved…

  3. Technology research for digital flight control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carestia, R. A.

    1983-01-01

    The use of advanced digital systems for flight control and guidance for a specific mission is investigated. The research areas include advanced electronic system architectures, tests with the global positioning system (GPS) in a helicopter, and advanced integrated systems concept for rotorcraft. Emphasis is on a search and rescue mission, differential global positioning systems to provide a data base of performance information for navigation, and a study to determine the present usage and trends of microcomputers and microcomputer components in the avionics industries.

  4. Digital Tablet PCs as New Technologies of Writing and Learning: A Survey of Perceptions of Digital Ink Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reins, Kevin

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate effective uses of digital ink technology in an elementary mathematics methods course. A survey methodology was used in the study to examine the participants' perceptions toward this technology for teaching and learning. All of the items on the survey produced response means between 5.0 and 6.0, with a…

  5. New Trends of Emerging Technologies in Digital Pathology.

    PubMed

    Bueno, Gloria; Fernández-Carrobles, M Milagro; Deniz, Oscar; García-Rojo, Marcial

    2016-01-01

    The future paradigm of pathology will be digital. Instead of conventional microscopy, a pathologist will perform a diagnosis through interacting with images on computer screens and performing quantitative analysis. The fourth generation of virtual slide telepathology systems, so-called virtual microscopy and whole-slide imaging (WSI), has allowed for the storage and fast dissemination of image data in pathology and other biomedical areas. These novel digital imaging modalities encompass high-resolution scanning of tissue slides and derived technologies, including automatic digitization and computational processing of whole microscopic slides. Moreover, automated image analysis with WSI can extract specific diagnostic features of diseases and quantify individual components of these features to support diagnoses and provide informative clinical measures of disease. Therefore, the challenge is to apply information technology and image analysis methods to exploit the new and emerging digital pathology technologies effectively in order to process and model all the data and information contained in WSI. The final objective is to support the complex workflow from specimen receipt to anatomic pathology report transmission, that is, to improve diagnosis both in terms of pathologists' efficiency and with new information. This article reviews the main concerns about and novel methods of digital pathology discussed at the latest workshop in the field carried out within the European project AIDPATH (Academia and Industry Collaboration for Digital Pathology).

  6. Testing the accuracy of timing reports in visual timing tasks with a consumer-grade digital camera.

    PubMed

    Smyth, Rachael E; Oram Cardy, Janis; Purcell, David

    2016-06-20

    This study tested the accuracy of a visual timing task using a readily available and relatively inexpensive consumer grade digital camera. A visual inspection time task was recorded using short high-speed video clips and the timing as reported by the task's program was compared to the timing as recorded in the video clips. Discrepancies in these two timing reports were investigated further and based on display refresh rate, a decision was made whether the discrepancy was large enough to affect the results as reported by the task. In this particular study, the errors in timing were not large enough to impact the results of the study. The procedure presented in this article offers an alternative method for performing a timing test, which uses readily available hardware and can be used to test the timing in any software program on any operating system and display.

  7. Field test comparison of an autocorrelation technique for determining grain size using a digital 'beachball' camera versus traditional methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnard, P.L.; Rubin, D.M.; Harney, J.; Mustain, N.

    2007-01-01

    This extensive field test of an autocorrelation technique for determining grain size from digital images was conducted using a digital bed-sediment camera, or 'beachball' camera. Using 205 sediment samples and >1200 images from a variety of beaches on the west coast of the US, grain size ranging from sand to granules was measured from field samples using both the autocorrelation technique developed by Rubin [Rubin, D.M., 2004. A simple autocorrelation algorithm for determining grain size from digital images of sediment. Journal of Sedimentary Research, 74(1): 160-165.] and traditional methods (i.e. settling tube analysis, sieving, and point counts). To test the accuracy of the digital-image grain size algorithm, we compared results with manual point counts of an extensive image data set in the Santa Barbara littoral cell. Grain sizes calculated using the autocorrelation algorithm were highly correlated with the point counts of the same images (r2 = 0.93; n = 79) and had an error of only 1%. Comparisons of calculated grain sizes and grain sizes measured from grab samples demonstrated that the autocorrelation technique works well on high-energy dissipative beaches with well-sorted sediment such as in the Pacific Northwest (r2 ??? 0.92; n = 115). On less dissipative, more poorly sorted beaches such as Ocean Beach in San Francisco, results were not as good (r2 ??? 0.70; n = 67; within 3% accuracy). Because the algorithm works well compared with point counts of the same image, the poorer correlation with grab samples must be a result of actual spatial and vertical variability of sediment in the field; closer agreement between grain size in the images and grain size of grab samples can be achieved by increasing the sampling volume of the images (taking more images, distributed over a volume comparable to that of a grab sample). In all field tests the autocorrelation method was able to predict the mean and median grain size with ???96% accuracy, which is more than

  8. Digital multi-focusing from a single photograph taken with an uncalibrated conventional camera.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yang; Fang, Shuai; Wang, Zengfu

    2013-09-01

    The demand to restore all-in-focus images from defocused images and produce photographs focused at different depths is emerging in more and more cases, such as low-end hand-held cameras and surveillance cameras. In this paper, we manage to solve this challenging multi-focusing problem with a single image taken with an uncalibrated conventional camera. Different from all existing multi-focusing approaches, our method does not need to include a deconvolution process, which is quite time-consuming and will cause ringing artifacts in the focused region and low depth-of-field. This paper proposes a novel systematic approach to realize multi-focusing from a single photograph. First of all, with the optical explanation for the local smooth assumption, we present a new point-to-point defocus model. Next, the blur map of the input image, which reflects the amount of defocus blur at each pixel in the image, is estimated by two steps. 1) With the sharp edge prior, a rough blur map is obtained by estimating the blur amount at the edge regions. 2) The guided image filter is applied to propagate the blur value from the edge regions to the whole image by which a refined blur map is obtained. Thus far, we can restore the all-in-focus photograph from a defocused input. To further produce photographs focused at different depths, the depth map from the blur map must be derived. To eliminate the ambiguity over the focal plane, user interaction is introduced and a binary graph cut algorithm is used. So we introduce user interaction and use a binary graph cut algorithm to eliminate the ambiguity over the focal plane. Coupled with the camera parameters, this approach produces images focused at different depths. The performance of this new multi-focusing algorithm is evaluated both objectively and subjectively by various test images. Both results demonstrate that this algorithm produces high quality depth maps and multi-focusing results, outperforming the previous approaches.

  9. Quantitative single-particle digital autoradiography with α-particle emitters for targeted radionuclide therapy using the iQID camera

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Brian W.; Frost, Sofia H. L.; Frayo, Shani L.; Kenoyer, Aimee L.; Santos, Erlinda; Jones, Jon C.; Orozco, Johnnie J.; Green, Damian J.; Press, Oliver W.; Pagel, John M.; Sandmaier, Brenda M.; Hamlin, Donald K.; Wilbur, D. Scott; Fisher, Darrell R.

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: Alpha-emitting radionuclides exhibit a potential advantage for cancer treatments because they release large amounts of ionizing energy over a few cell diameters (50–80 μm), causing localized, irreparable double-strand DNA breaks that lead to cell death. Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) approaches using monoclonal antibodies labeled with α emitters may thus inactivate targeted cells with minimal radiation damage to surrounding tissues. Tools are needed to visualize and quantify the radioactivity distribution and absorbed doses to targeted and nontargeted cells for accurate dosimetry of all treatment regimens utilizing α particles, including RIT and others (e.g., Ra-223), especially for organs and tumors with heterogeneous radionuclide distributions. The aim of this study was to evaluate and characterize a novel single-particle digital autoradiography imager, the ionizing-radiation quantum imaging detector (iQID) camera, for use in α-RIT experiments. Methods: The iQID camera is a scintillator-based radiation detection system that images and identifies charged-particle and gamma-ray/x-ray emissions spatially and temporally on an event-by-event basis. It employs CCD-CMOS cameras and high-performance computing hardware for real-time imaging and activity quantification of tissue sections, approaching cellular resolutions. In this work, the authors evaluated its characteristics for α-particle imaging, including measurements of intrinsic detector spatial resolutions and background count rates at various detector configurations and quantification of activity distributions. The technique was assessed for quantitative imaging of astatine-211 ({sup 211}At) activity distributions in cryosections of murine and canine tissue samples. Results: The highest spatial resolution was measured at ∼20 μm full width at half maximum and the α-particle background was measured at a rate as low as (2.6 ± 0.5) × 10{sup −4} cpm/cm{sup 2} (40 mm diameter detector area

  10. Quantitative single-particle digital autoradiography with α-particle emitters for targeted radionuclide therapy using the iQID camera

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Brian W.; Frost, Sofia H. L.; Frayo, Shani L.; Kenoyer, Aimee L.; Santos, Erlinda; Jones, Jon C.; Green, Damian J.; Hamlin, Donald K.; Wilbur, D. Scott; Orozco, Johnnie J.; Press, Oliver W.; Pagel, John M.; Sandmaier, Brenda M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Alpha-emitting radionuclides exhibit a potential advantage for cancer treatments because they release large amounts of ionizing energy over a few cell diameters (50–80 μm), causing localized, irreparable double-strand DNA breaks that lead to cell death. Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) approaches using monoclonal antibodies labeled with α emitters may thus inactivate targeted cells with minimal radiation damage to surrounding tissues. Tools are needed to visualize and quantify the radioactivity distribution and absorbed doses to targeted and nontargeted cells for accurate dosimetry of all treatment regimens utilizing α particles, including RIT and others (e.g., Ra-223), especially for organs and tumors with heterogeneous radionuclide distributions. The aim of this study was to evaluate and characterize a novel single-particle digital autoradiography imager, the ionizing-radiation quantum imaging detector (iQID) camera, for use in α-RIT experiments. Methods: The iQID camera is a scintillator-based radiation detection system that images and identifies charged-particle and gamma-ray/x-ray emissions spatially and temporally on an event-by-event basis. It employs CCD-CMOS cameras and high-performance computing hardware for real-time imaging and activity quantification of tissue sections, approaching cellular resolutions. In this work, the authors evaluated its characteristics for α-particle imaging, including measurements of intrinsic detector spatial resolutions and background count rates at various detector configurations and quantification of activity distributions. The technique was assessed for quantitative imaging of astatine-211 (211At) activity distributions in cryosections of murine and canine tissue samples. Results: The highest spatial resolution was measured at ∼20 μm full width at half maximum and the α-particle background was measured at a rate as low as (2.6 ± 0.5) × 10−4 cpm/cm2 (40 mm diameter detector area). Simultaneous imaging of

  11. Airborne hyperspectral surface and cloud bi-directional reflectivity observations in the Arctic using a commercial, digital camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrlich, A.; Bierwirth, E.; Wendisch, M.; Herber, A.; Gayet, J.-F.

    2011-09-01

    Spectral radiance measurements by a digital single-lens reflex camera were used to derive the bi-directional reflectivity of clouds and different surfaces in the Arctic. The camera has been calibrated radiometrically and spectrally to provide accurate radiance measurements with high angular resolution. A comparison with spectral radiance measurements with the SMART-Albedometer showed an agreement within the uncertainties of both instruments. The bi-directional reflectivity in terms of the hemispherical directional reflectance factor HDRF was obtained for sea ice, ice free ocean and clouds. The sea ice, with an albedo of ρ = 0.96, showed an almost isotropic HDRF, while sun glint was observed for the ocean HDRF (ρ = 0.12). For the cloud observations with ρ = 0.62, the fog bow - a backscatter feature typically for scattering by liquid water droplets - was covered by the camera. For measurements above a heterogeneous stratocumulus clouds, the required number of images to obtain a mean HDRF which clearly exhibits the fog bow has been estimated with about 50 images (10 min flight time). A representation of the HDRF as function of the scattering angle only reduces the image number to about 10 (2 min flight time). The measured cloud and ocean HDRF have been compared to radiative transfer simulations. The ocean HDRF simulated with the observed surface wind speed of 9 m s-1 agreed best with the measurements. For the cloud HDRF, the best agreement was obtained by a broad and weak fog bow simulated with a cloud droplet effective radius of Reff = 4 μm. This value agrees with the particle sizes from in situ measurements and retrieved from the spectral radiance of the SMART-Albedometer.

  12. Digital high-speed camera system for combustion research using UV-laser diagnostic under microgravity at Bremen drop tower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renken, Hartmut; Bolik, T.; Eigenbrod, Ch.; Koenig, Jens; Rath, Hans J.

    1997-04-01

    A digital high-speed camera- and recording system for 2D UV- laser spectroscopy was recently completed at Bremen drip tower. At the moment the primary users are the microgravity combustion researchers. The current project studies the reaction zones during the process of combustion. Particularly OH-radicals are detected 2D by using the method of laser induced predissociation fluorescence (LIPF). A pulsed high-energy excimer lasersystem combined with a two- staged intensified CCD-camera allows a repetition rate of 250 images per second, according to the maximum laser pulse repetition. The laser system is integrated at the top of the 110 m high evacuatable drop tube. Motorized mirrors are necessary to achieve a stable beam position within the area of interest during the drop of the experiment-capsule. The duration of 1 drop will be 4.7 seconds. About 1500 images are captured and stored onboard the drop capsule 96 Mbyte RAM image storagesystem. After saving capsule and data, a special PC-based image processing software visualizes the movies and extracts physical information out of the images. Now, after two and a half years of development the system is working operational and capable of high temporal 2D LIPF- measuring of OH, H2O, O2 and CO concentrations and 2D temperature distribution of these species.

  13. Educational Perspectives on Digital Communications Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brett, Clare

    2009-01-01

    This article examines key issues in how new technologies are impacting upon how we teach, learn and collaborate, and uses an educational research project called GRAIL (Graduate Researcher's Academic Identity Online) under development to illustrate some fundamental issues in adopting new technologies. A significant challenge to the effective use of…

  14. Integrating Digital Technologies in Teaching Learning Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagarajan, R.; Velmanirajan, K.; Kanna, K. Sankesh

    2013-01-01

    India has made impressive strides in the application of information and communication technology in recent years and this has reflected in a vibrant and fast growing economy. It is now an acknowledged world leader in the knowledge industry. In this paper an attempt is made to highlight the role of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) in…

  15. A digital architecture for striping noise compensation in push-broom hyperspectral cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valenzuela, Wladimir E.; Figueroa, Miguel; Pezoa, Jorge E.; Meza, Pablo

    2015-09-01

    We present a striping noise compensation architecture for hyperspectral push-broom cameras, implemented on a Field-Programmable Gate Array (FPGA). The circuit is fast, compact, low power, and is capable of eliminating the striping noise in-line during the image acquisition process. The architecture implements a multi dimensional neural network (MDNN) algorithm for striping noise compensation previously reported by our group. The algorithm relies on the assumption that the amount of light impinging at the neighboring photo-detectors is approximately the same in the spatial and spectral dimensions. Under this assumption, two striping noise parameters are estimated using spatial and spectral information from the raw data. We implemented the circuit on a Xilinx ZYNQ XC7Z2010 FPGA and tested it with images obtained from a NIR N17E push-broom camera, with a frame rate of 25fps and a band-pixel rate of 1.888 MHz. The setup consists of a loop of 320 samples of 320 spatial lines and 236 spectral bands between 900 and 1700 nanometers, in laboratory condition, captured with a rigid push-broom controller. The noise compensation core can run at more than 100 MHZ and consumes less than 30mW of dynamic power, using less than 10% of the logic resources available on the chip. It also uses one of two ARM processors available on the FPGA for data acquisition and communication purposes.

  16. Point Cloud Derived Fromvideo Frames: Accuracy Assessment in Relation to Terrestrial Laser Scanningand Digital Camera Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delis, P.; Zacharek, M.; Wierzbicki, D.; Grochala, A.

    2017-02-01

    The use of image sequences in the form of video frames recorded on data storage is very useful in especially when working with large and complex structures. Two cameras were used in this study: Sony NEX-5N (for the test object) and Sony NEX-VG10 E (for the historic building). In both cases, a Sony α f = 16 mm fixed focus wide-angle lens was used. Single frames with sufficient overlap were selected from the video sequence using an equation for automatic frame selection. In order to improve the quality of the generated point clouds, each video frame underwent histogram equalization and image sharpening. Point clouds were generated from the video frames using the SGM-like image matching algorithm. The accuracy assessment was based on two reference point clouds: the first from terrestrial laser scanning and the second generated based on images acquired using a high resolution camera, the NIKON D800. The performed research has shown, that highest accuracies are obtained for point clouds generated from video frames, for which a high pass filtration and histogram equalization had been performed. Studies have shown that to obtain a point cloud density comparable to TLS, an overlap between subsequent video frames must be 85 % or more. Based on the point cloud generated from video data, a parametric 3D model can be generated. This type of the 3D model can be used in HBIM construction.

  17. Imaging Emission Spectra with Handheld and Cellphone Cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitar, David

    2012-12-01

    As point-and-shoot digital camera technology advances it is becoming easier to image spectra in a laboralory setting on a shoestring budget and get immediale results. With this in mind, I wanted to test three cameras to see how their results would differ. Two undergraduate physics students and I used one handheld 7.1 megapixel (MP) digital Cannon point-and-shoot auto focusing camera and two different cellphone cameras: one at 6.1 MP and the other at 5.1 MP.

  18. Using immersive media and digital technology to communicate Earth Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapur, Ravi

    2016-04-01

    A number of technologies in digital media and interactivity have rapidly advanced and are now converging to enable rich, multi-sensoral experiences which create opportunities for both digital art and science communication. Techniques used in full-dome film-making can now be deployed in virtual reality experiences; gaming technologies can be utilised to explore real data sets; and collaborative interactivity enable new forms of public artwork. This session will explore these converging trends through a number of emerging and forthcoming projects dealing with Earth science, climate change and planetary science.

  19. Study on camera calibration technique of 3D color digitization system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yuchen; Ge, Baozhen

    2006-11-01

    3D (three-dimensional) color digitization of an object is fulfilled by light-stripe method based on laser triangle principle and direct capturing method based on the color photo of the object. With this system, information matching between 3D and color sensor and data registration of different sensors are fulfilled by a sensor calibration process. The process uses the same round filament target to calibrate all of the sensors together. The principle and procedure of the process are presented in detail. Finally, a costume model is 3D color digitized and the obtaining data sets are processed by the method discussed, the results verify the correctness and feasibility of the algorithm.

  20. Technology tools to support reading in the digital age.

    PubMed

    Biancarosa, Gina; Griffiths, Gina G

    2012-01-01

    Advances in digital technologies are dramatically altering the texts and tools available to teachers and students. These technological advances have created excitement among many for their potential to be used as instructional tools for literacy education. Yet with the promise of these advances come issues that can exacerbate the literacy challenges identified in the other articles in this issue. In this article Gina Biancarosa and Gina Griffiths characterize how literacy demands have changed in the digital age and how challenges identified in other articles in the issue intersect with these new demands. Rather than seeing technology as something to be fit into an already crowded education agenda, Biancarosa and Griffiths argue that technology can be conceptualized as affording tools that teachers can deploy in their quest to create young readers who possess the higher levels of literacy skills and background knowledge demanded by today's information-based society. Biancarosa and Griffiths draw on research to highlight some of the ways technology has been used to build the skills and knowledge needed both by children who are learning to read and by those who have progressed to reading to learn. In their review of the research, Biancarosa and Griffiths focus on the hardware and software used to display and interface with digital text, or what they term e-reading technology. Drawing on studies of e-reading technology and computer technology more broadly, they also reflect on the very real, practical challenges to optimal use of e-reading technology. The authors conclude by presenting four recommendations to help schools and school systems meet some of the challenges that come with investing in e-reading technology: use only technologies that support Universal Design for Learning; choose evidence-based tools; provide technology users with systemic supports; and capitalize on the data capacities and volume of information that technology provides.

  1. Noncontact imaging of plethysmographic pulsation and spontaneous low-frequency oscillation in skin perfusion with a digital red-green-blue camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishidate, Izumi; Hoshi, Akira; Aoki, Yuta; Nakano, Kazuya; Niizeki, Kyuichi; Aizu, Yoshihisa

    2016-03-01

    A non-contact imaging method with a digital RGB camera is proposed to evaluate plethysmogram and spontaneous lowfrequency oscillation. In vivo experiments with human skin during mental stress induced by the Stroop color-word test demonstrated the feasibility of the method to evaluate the activities of autonomic nervous systems.

  2. Bringing Superconductor Digital Technology to the Market Place

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nisenoff, Martin

    The unique properties of superconductivity can be exploited to provide the ultimate in electronic technology for systems such as ultra-precise analogue-to-digital and digital-to-analogue converters, precise DC and AC voltage standards, ultra high speed logic circuits and systems (both digital and hybrid analogue-digital systems), and very high throughput network routers and supercomputers which would have superior electrical performance at lower overall electrical power consumption compared to systems with comparable performance which are fabricated using conventional room temperature technologies. This potential for high performance electronics with reduced power consumption would have a positive impact on slowing the increase in the demand for electrical utility power by the information technology community on the overall electrical power grid. However, before this technology can be successfully brought to the commercial market place, there must be an aggressive investment of resources and funding to develop the required infrastructure needed to yield these high performance superconductor systems, which will be reliable and available at low cost. The author proposes that it will require a concerted effort by the superconductor and cryogenic communities to bring this technology to the commercial market place or make it available for widespread use in scientific instrumentation.

  3. Digital video technologies and their network requirements

    SciTech Connect

    R. P. Tsang; H. Y. Chen; J. M. Brandt; J. A. Hutchins

    1999-11-01

    Coded digital video signals are considered to be one of the most difficult data types to transport due to their real-time requirements and high bit rate variability. In this study, the authors discuss the coding mechanisms incorporated by the major compression standards bodies, i.e., JPEG and MPEG, as well as more advanced coding mechanisms such as wavelet and fractal techniques. The relationship between the applications which use these coding schemes and their network requirements are the major focus of this study. Specifically, the authors relate network latency, channel transmission reliability, random access speed, buffering and network bandwidth with the various coding techniques as a function of the applications which use them. Such applications include High-Definition Television, Video Conferencing, Computer-Supported Collaborative Work (CSCW), and Medical Imaging.

  4. HST Solar Arrays photographed by Electronic Still Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    This close-up view of one of two Solar Arrays (SA) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) was photographed with an Electronic Still Camera (ESC), and downlinked to ground controllers soon afterward. Electronic still photography is a technology which provides the means for a handheld camera to electronically capture and digitize an image with resolution approaching film quality.

  5. Camera-on-a-Chip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Jet Propulsion Laboratory's research on a second generation, solid-state image sensor technology has resulted in the Complementary Metal- Oxide Semiconductor Active Pixel Sensor (CMOS), establishing an alternative to the Charged Coupled Device (CCD). Photobit Corporation, the leading supplier of CMOS image sensors, has commercialized two products of their own based on this technology: the PB-100 and PB-300. These devices are cameras on a chip, combining all camera functions. CMOS "active-pixel" digital image sensors offer several advantages over CCDs, a technology used in video and still-camera applications for 30 years. The CMOS sensors draw less energy, they use the same manufacturing platform as most microprocessors and memory chips, and they allow on-chip programming of frame size, exposure, and other parameters.

  6. Quantitative Single-Particle Digital Autoradiography with α-Particle Emitters for Targeted Radionuclide Therapy using the iQID Camera

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Brian W.; Frost, Sophia; Frayo, Shani; Kenoyer, Aimee L.; Santos, E. B.; Jones, Jon C.; Green, Damian J.; Hamlin, Donald K.; Wilbur, D. Scott; Fisher, Darrell R.; Orozco, Johnnie J.; Press, Oliver W.; Pagel, John M.; Sandmaier, B. M.

    2015-07-01

    Abstract Alpha emitting radionuclides exhibit a potential advantage for cancer treatments because they release large amounts of ionizing energy over a few cell diameters (50–80 μm) causing localized, irreparable double-strand DNA breaks that lead to cell death. Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) approaches using monoclonal antibodies labeled with alpha emitters may inactivate targeted cells with minimal radiation damage to surrounding tissues. For accurate dosimetry in alpha-RIT, tools are needed to visualize and quantify the radioactivity distribution and absorbed dose to targeted and non-targeted cells, especially for organs and tumors with heterogeneous radionuclide distributions. The aim of this study was to evaluate and characterize a novel single-particle digital autoradiography imager, iQID (ionizing-radiation Quantum Imaging Detector), for use in alpha-RIT experiments. Methods: The iQID camera is a scintillator-based radiation detection technology that images and identifies charged-particle and gamma-ray/X-ray emissions spatially and temporally on an event-by-event basis. It employs recent advances in CCD/CMOS cameras and computing hardware for real-time imaging and activity quantification of tissue sections, approaching cellular resolutions. In this work, we evaluated this system’s characteristics for alpha particle imaging including measurements of spatial resolution and background count rates at various detector configurations and quantification of activity distributions. The technique was assessed for quantitative imaging of astatine-211 (211At) activity distributions in cryosections of murine and canine tissue samples. Results: The highest spatial resolution was measured at ~20 μm full width at half maximum (FWHM) and the alpha particle background was measured at a rate of (2.6 ± 0.5) × 10–4 cpm/cm2 (40 mm diameter detector area). Simultaneous imaging of multiple tissue sections was performed using a large-area iQID configuration (ø 11.5 cm

  7. Digital Citizenship: Addressing Appropriate Technology Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ribble, Mike S.; Bailey, Gerald D.; Ross, Tweed W.

    2004-01-01

    Recently, the popular press has pointed to increasing evidence of misuse and abuse of emerging technologies in U.S. schools. Some examples include using Web sites to intimidate or threaten students, downloading music illegally from the Internet, plagiarizing information using the Internet, using cellular phones during class time, and playing games…

  8. Cultivating Wisdom through Digital Learning Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kok, Ayse

    2009-01-01

    The word "wisdom" is rarely seen in contemporary technology and learning discourse. This conceptual paper aims to provide some clear principles that answer the question: How can we establish wisdom in complex learning networks? By considering the nature of contemporary calls for wisdom the paper provides a metatheoretical framework to…

  9. Range-Gated LADAR Coherent Imaging Using Parametric Up-Conversion of IR and NIR Light for Imaging with a Visible-Range Fast-Shuttered Intensified Digital CCD Camera

    SciTech Connect

    YATES,GEORGE J.; MCDONALD,THOMAS E. JR.; BLISS,DAVID E.; CAMERON,STEWART M.; ZUTAVERN,FRED J.

    2000-12-20

    Research is presented on infrared (IR) and near infrared (NIR) sensitive sensor technologies for use in a high speed shuttered/intensified digital video camera system for range-gated imaging at ''eye-safe'' wavelengths in the region of 1.5 microns. The study is based upon nonlinear crystals used for second harmonic generation (SHG) in optical parametric oscillators (OPOS) for conversion of NIR and IR laser light to visible range light for detection with generic S-20 photocathodes. The intensifiers are ''stripline'' geometry 18-mm diameter microchannel plate intensifiers (MCPIIS), designed by Los Alamos National Laboratory and manufactured by Philips Photonics. The MCPIIS are designed for fast optical shattering with exposures in the 100-200 ps range, and are coupled to a fast readout CCD camera. Conversion efficiency and resolution for the wavelength conversion process are reported. Experimental set-ups for the wavelength shifting and the optical configurations for producing and transporting laser reflectance images are discussed.

  10. Plasma technology and its use in flat panel digital radiography.

    PubMed

    Zur, Albert

    2010-01-01

    Plasma DR technology is used to produce a cost effective flat panel x-ray detector that acquires digital x-ray images with excellent diagnostic quality. The detector is radiation hard and permanently zero defect, with a full virtual pixel matrix that has no dead lines, pixels, or dead pixel clusters. The technology also allows the full potential of large area amorphous Selenium imaging to finally be realized (see Figure 4).

  11. Camera-Based Microswitch Technology to Monitor Mouth, Eyebrow, and Eyelid Responses of Children with Profound Multiple Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lancioni, Giulio E.; Bellini, Domenico; Oliva, Doretta; Singh, Nirbhay N.; O'Reilly, Mark F.; Lang, Russell; Didden, Robert

    2011-01-01

    A camera-based microswitch technology was recently used to successfully monitor small eyelid and mouth responses of two adults with profound multiple disabilities (Lancioni et al., Res Dev Disab 31:1509-1514, 2010a). This technology, in contrast with the traditional optic microswitches used for those responses, did not require support frames on…

  12. Camera-Based Microswitch Technology for Eyelid and Mouth Responses of Persons with Profound Multiple Disabilities: Two Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lancioni, Giulio E.; Bellini, Domenico; Oliva, Doretta; Singh, Nirbhay N.; O'Reilly, Mark F.; Sigafoos, Jeff

    2010-01-01

    These two studies assessed camera-based microswitch technology for eyelid and mouth responses of two persons with profound multiple disabilities and minimal motor behavior. This technology, in contrast with the traditional optic microswitches used for those responses, did not require support frames on the participants' face but only small color…

  13. Screen Capture Technology: A Digital Window into Students' Writing Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seror, Jeremie

    2013-01-01

    Technological innovations and the prevalence of the computer as a means of producing and engaging with texts have dramatically transformed how literacy is defined and developed in modern society. This rise in digital writing practices has led to a growing number of tools and methods that can be used to explore second language (L2) writing…

  14. Bridging Divides through Technology Use: Transnationalism and Digital Literacy Socialization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nogueron, Silvia Cecilia

    2011-01-01

    In this study, I investigate the digital literacy practices of adult immigrants, and their relationship with transnational processes and practices. Specifically, I focus on their conditions of access to information and communication technologies (ICTs) in their life trajectories, their conditions of learning in a community center, and their…

  15. Buckets: A New Digital Library Technology for Preserving NASA Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Michael L.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the need for preserving and disseminating scientific and technical information through digital libraries and describes buckets, an intelligent construct for publishing that contains data and metadata and methods for accessing them. Explains SODA (Smart Object, Dumb Archive) and discusses experiences using these technologies in NASA and…

  16. Educational Digital Technologies in Developing Countries Challenge Third Party Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Passey, Don; Laferrière, Thérèse; Ahmad, Manal Yazbak-Abu; Bhowmik, Miron; Gross, Diana; Price, Janet; Resta, Paul; Shonfeld, Miri

    2016-01-01

    In this conceptual paper, we consider issues and challenges of third party and governmental organisations in planning and implementing access to and uses of digital technologies for learning and teaching in developing countries. We consider failures and weaknesses in the planning and implementation processes highlighted by research in developed…

  17. Pre-Service Teachers' Motivation in Using Digital Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeung, Alexander S.; Tay, Eng Guan; Hui, Chenri; Lin, Jane Huiling; Low, Ee-Ling

    2014-01-01

    Digital technology (DT) has a significant role to play in modern education. This study examined motivational goals of student teachers in initial teacher education in Singapore and the influences of goals on their use of DT personally and in the classroom. The participants (N = 312) responded to a survey about their motivational goals (learning…

  18. The Role of Digital Technologies in Numeracy Teaching and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geiger, Vince; Goos, Merrilyn; Dole, Shelley

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a model of numeracy that integrates the use of digital technologies among other elements of teaching and learning mathematics. Drawing on data from a school-based project, which includes records of classroom observations, semi-structured teacher interviews and artefacts such as student work samples, a classroom-based vignette…

  19. Limited Digital Response. Satellite Technology Demonstration, Technical Report No. 0426.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laurence, Dennis; Woughter, William

    The VHF system used by the Satellite Technology Demonstration had a built-in digital response system to collect data about student programing. This paper describes the hardware and software required to implement and operate the system. In addition, information on the applications of this device is provided along with the results of a field…

  20. Digital Images: Capturing America's Past with the Technology of Today

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berson, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    The use of digital photography in the social studies classroom offers students an application of technology that can help them develop the skills necessary to access, analyze, and evaluate all forms of information and communication. Students learn to recognize how images represent diverse perspectives, connect disparate pieces of information, and…

  1. Supporting Teachers Developing Mathematical Tasks with Digital Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratnayake, Iresha; Oates, Greg; Thomas, Mike

    2016-01-01

    A crucial step towards improving the conceptual use of digital technology (DT) in the mathematics classroom is to increase teacher involvement in the development of tasks. Hence, this research considers some teacher factors that might influence DT algebra task development and implementation in secondary schools. We observed and assisted one group…

  2. "Digital Natives": An Asian Perspective for Using Learning Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, David M.; Fox, Bob

    2013-01-01

    Students entering universities in the 21st century have been described variously as digital natives, the millennial generation or the net generation. Considerable study has occurred around the world to determine the knowledge, skills, understanding and the purposes to which this group of individuals makes technology work for them. A number of…

  3. Technology and Music Education in a Digitized, Disembodied, Posthuman World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thwaites, Trevor

    2014-01-01

    Digital forms of sound manipulation are eroding traditional methods of sound development and transmission, causing a disjuncture in the ontology of music. Sound, the ambient phenomenon, is becoming disrupted and decentred by the struggles between long established controls, beliefs and desires as well as controls from within technologized contexts.…

  4. Supporting Student Research with Semantic Technologies and Digital Archives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez-Garcia, Agustina; Corti, Louise

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses how the idea of higher education students as producers of knowledge rather than consumers can be operationalised by means of student research projects, in which processes of research archiving and analysis are enabled through the use of semantic technologies. It discusses how existing digital repository frameworks can be…

  5. Pre-Service Teacher Self-Efficacy in Digital Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lemon, Narelle; Garvis, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    Self-efficacy is an important motivational construct for primary school teachers (teachers of children aged 5-12 years) within Australia. Teacher self-efficacy beliefs will determine the level of teacher confidence and competence to engage with a task. In this study, we explore engagement with digital technology and the associated learning and…

  6. Point light source detection characteristics of a SEC vidicon digital TV camera.

    PubMed

    Dargis, A B

    1978-03-01

    Optimization of the point source detection properties of a Secondary Electron Conduction (SEC) vidicon TV camera tube as a detector of point light sources such as star fields or certain optical spectra requires the accurate determination of peak height, half-peak width, background, and location of the point image. Two perpendicular Gaussian curves have been used to define a point image, allowing changes in the parameters of these Gaussian curves to be used in the study of SEC vidicon point source properties as a function of electrical and optical parameters. Peak height was shown to depend on priming time and a method was developed to reduce the priming time by almost an order of magnitude by momentarily raising the target voltage during priming. Power supply specifications needed for 0.1 pixel (picture element) addressing accuracy were found to be +/-0.03 V. Focus current was optimized to obtain the best sensitivity and resolution over the entire target. Peak height, background, and half-peak width were found to be strongly dependent on readout beam current. Target voltage, over the limited range examined, was found to affect only the gain without compromising other image parameters, so that any value could be used, consistent with gain and sensitivity required.

  7. Digital Participatory Pedagogy: Digital Participation as a Method for Technology Integration in Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dooley, Caitlin McMunn; Lewis Ellison, Tisha; Welch, Meghan M.; Allen, Mindy; Bauer, Dennis

    2016-01-01

    This qualitative participatory action research study provides two case studies to demonstrate how teachers in Grades 4 and 6 integrated digital tools into everyday, content-focused classroom instruction. The study demonstrates how teachers' technological pedagogical knowledge might combine with a participatory stance to encourage students to…

  8. Final Report for the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) from Ball Aerospace and Technologies Corporation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volmer, Paul; Sullivan, Pam (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    The Advanced Camera for Surveys ACS was launched aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia just before dawn on March 1, 2002. After successfully docking with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), several components were replaced. One of the components was the Advanced Camera for Surveys built by Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp. (BATC) in Boulder, Colorado. Over the life of the HST contract at BATC hundreds of employees had the pleasure of working on the concept, design, fabrication, assembly and test of ACS. Those employees thank NASA - Goddard Space Flight Center and the science team at Johns Hopkins University (JHU) for the opportunity to participate in building a great science instrument for HST. After installation in HST a mini-functional test was performed and later a complete functional test. ACS performed well and has continued performing well since then. One of the greatest rewards for the BATC employees is a satisfied science team. Following is an excerpt from the JHU final report, "The foremost promise of ACS was to increase Hubble's capability for surveys in the near infrared by a factor of 10. That promise was kept. "

  9. Mistaking Computers for Technology: Technology Literacy and the Digital Divide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amiel, Tel

    2006-01-01

    No other information and communication technology has swept the globe with greater speed than the Internet, having the potential to promote vast social, economic, and political transformations. As new technologies become available the pattern of adoption and diffusion creates disparities in access and ownership. At the most basic this gap is…

  10. In situ particle size distributions and volume concentrations from a LISST-100 laser particle sizer and a digital floc camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikkelsen, Ole A.; Hill, Paul S.; Milligan, Timothy G.; Chant, Robert J.

    2005-10-01

    A LISST-100 in situ laser particle sizer was deployed together with a digital floc camera during field work in the Newark Bay area (USA) and along the Apennine margin (the Adriatic Sea, Italy). The purpose of these simultaneous deployments was to investigate how well in situ particle (floc) sizes and volume concentrations from the two different instruments compared. In the Adriatic Sea the two instruments displayed the same temporal variation, but the LISST provided lower estimates of floc size by a factor of 2-3, compared to the DFC. In the Newark Bay area, the LISST provided higher values of floc size by up to a factor of 2. When floc size was computed using only the overlapping size bins from the two instruments the discrepancy disappeared. The reason for the discrepancy in size was found to be related to several issues: First, the LISST measured particles in the 2.5-500 μm range, whereas the camera measured particles in the 135-9900 μm range, so generally the LISST should provide lower estimates of floc size, as it measures the smaller particles. Second, in the Newark Bay area scattering from particles >500 μm generally caused the LISST to overestimate the volume of particles in its largest size bin, thereby increasing apparent floc size. Relative to the camera, the LISST generally provided estimates of total floc volume that were lower by a factor of 3. Factors that could explain this discrepancy are errors arising from the accuracy of the LISST volume conversion coefficient and image processing. Regardless of these discrepancies, the shapes of the size spectra from the instruments were similar in the regions of overlap and could be matched by multiplying with an appropriate correction coefficient. This facilitated merging of the size spectra from the LISST and the DFC, yielding size spectra in the 2.5-9900 μm range. The merged size spectra generally had one or more peaks in the coarse end of the spectrum, presumably due to the presence of flocs. The fine

  11. Research status and application prospects of digital technology in orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan-xi; Zhang, Kun; Hao, Yi-ni; Hu, Yong-cheng

    2012-08-01

    In the last 10 years, basic and clinical research in orthopaedics has developed rapidly. Understanding of orthopaedic disorders involves not only routine diagnosis, but also the pursuit of highly efficient and accurate three-dimensional imaging of the intra- and extra-medullary distribution, form and structure of orthopaedic disorders, thus allowing scientific evaluation of the indications for surgery, drawing up of the best surgical plan, minimization of operative trauma and the earliest possible restoration of limb function. Meanwhile, the most important type of basic research, which was previously biomechanical research, has gradually become computational biomechanics based on in vitro cadaver experiments. This review aims to summarize the research status and application prospects of digital technology in orthopaedics, including virtual reality technology, reverse engineering and rapid prototyping techniques, computational biomechanics, computer navigation technology and management of digitization of medical records.

  12. Complementary HFET technology for wireless digital and microwave applications

    SciTech Connect

    Baca, A.G.; Zolper, J.C.; Dubbert, D.F.

    1996-09-01

    Development of a complementary heterostructure field effect transistor (CHFET) technology for low-power, mixed-mode digital-microwave applications is presented. Digital CHFET technology with independently optimizable transistors has been shown to operate with 319 ps loaded gate delays at 8.9 fJ. Power consumption is dominated by leakage currents of the p-channel FET, while performance is determined by the characteristics of 0.7 {mu}m gate length devices. As a microwave technology, the nJFET forms the basis of low-power cirucitry without any modification to the digital process. Narrow band amplification with a 0.7x100 {mu}m nJFET has been demonstrated at 2.1-2.4 GHz with gains of 8-10 dB at 1 mW power. These amplifiers showed a minimum noise figure of 2.5 dB. Next generation CHFET transistors with sub 0.5 {mu}m gate lengths have also been developed. Cutoff frequencies of 49 and 11.5 GHz were achieved for n- and p-channel FETs with 0.3 and 0.4 {mu}m gates, respectively. These FETs will enable enhancements in both digital and microwave circuits.

  13. 76 FR 10403 - Western Digital Technologies, Inc., Coporate Headquaters/Hard Drive Development Division, Lake...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-24

    ... Employment and Training Administration Western Digital Technologies, Inc., Coporate Headquaters/Hard Drive... Drive Development Division, Lake Forest, California (Western Digital Technologies). The Department's... supply engineering (development) services in support of hard drive (also known as disk...

  14. 76 FR 61746 - Western Digital Technologies, Inc.: Hard Drive Development Engineering Group Irvine (Formerly at...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-05

    ... Employment and Training Administration Western Digital Technologies, Inc.: Hard Drive Development Engineering... Western Digital Technologies, Inc., Hard Drive Development Engineering Group, Lake Forest, California... firm. AR 1. Workers at the subject firm (subject worker group) are engaged in engineering functions...

  15. A Bevel Gear Quality Inspection System Based on Multi-Camera Vision Technology

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ruiling; Zhong, Dexing; Lyu, Hongqiang; Han, Jiuqiang

    2016-01-01

    Surface defect detection and dimension measurement of automotive bevel gears by manual inspection are costly, inefficient, low speed and low accuracy. In order to solve these problems, a synthetic bevel gear quality inspection system based on multi-camera vision technology is developed. The system can detect surface defects and measure gear dimensions simultaneously. Three efficient algorithms named Neighborhood Average Difference (NAD), Circle Approximation Method (CAM) and Fast Rotation-Position (FRP) are proposed. The system can detect knock damage, cracks, scratches, dents, gibbosity or repeated cutting of the spline, etc. The smallest detectable defect is 0.4 mm × 0.4 mm and the precision of dimension measurement is about 40–50 μm. One inspection process takes no more than 1.3 s. Both precision and speed meet the requirements of real-time online inspection in bevel gear production. PMID:27571078

  16. A Bevel Gear Quality Inspection System Based on Multi-Camera Vision Technology.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ruiling; Zhong, Dexing; Lyu, Hongqiang; Han, Jiuqiang

    2016-08-25

    Surface defect detection and dimension measurement of automotive bevel gears by manual inspection are costly, inefficient, low speed and low accuracy. In order to solve these problems, a synthetic bevel gear quality inspection system based on multi-camera vision technology is developed. The system can detect surface defects and measure gear dimensions simultaneously. Three efficient algorithms named Neighborhood Average Difference (NAD), Circle Approximation Method (CAM) and Fast Rotation-Position (FRP) are proposed. The system can detect knock damage, cracks, scratches, dents, gibbosity or repeated cutting of the spline, etc. The smallest detectable defect is 0.4 mm × 0.4 mm and the precision of dimension measurement is about 40-50 μm. One inspection process takes no more than 1.3 s. Both precision and speed meet the requirements of real-time online inspection in bevel gear production.

  17. Miniaturized fundus camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gliss, Christine; Parel, Jean-Marie A.; Flynn, John T.; Pratisto, Hans S.; Niederer, Peter F.

    2003-07-01

    We present a miniaturized version of a fundus camera. The camera is designed for the use in screening for retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). There, but also in other applications a small, light weight, digital camera system can be extremely useful. We present a small wide angle digital camera system. The handpiece is significantly smaller and lighter then in all other systems. The electronics is truly portable fitting in a standard boardcase. The camera is designed to be offered at a compatible price. Data from tests on young rabbits' eyes is presented. The development of the camera system is part of a telemedicine project screening for ROP. Telemedical applications are a perfect application for this camera system using both advantages: the portability as well as the digital image.

  18. Noninvasive imaging of human skin hemodynamics using a digital red-green-blue camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishidate, Izumi; Tanaka, Noriyuki; Kawase, Tatsuya; Maeda, Takaaki; Yuasa, Tomonori; Aizu, Yoshihisa; Yuasa, Tetsuya; Niizeki, Kyuichi

    2011-08-01

    In order to visualize human skin hemodynamics, we investigated a method that is specifically developed for the visualization of concentrations of oxygenated blood, deoxygenated blood, and melanin in skin tissue from digital RGB color images. Images of total blood concentration and oxygen saturation can also be reconstructed from the results of oxygenated and deoxygenated blood. Experiments using tissue-like agar gel phantoms demonstrated the ability of the developed method to quantitatively visualize the transition from an oxygenated blood to a deoxygenated blood in dermis. In vivo imaging of the chromophore concentrations and tissue oxygen saturation in the skin of the human hand are performed for 14 subjects during upper limb occlusion at 50 and 250 mm Hg. The response of the total blood concentration in the skin acquired by this method and forearm volume changes obtained from the conventional strain-gauge plethysmograph were comparable during the upper arm occlusion at pressures of both 50 and 250 mm Hg. The results presented in the present paper indicate the possibility of visualizing the hemodynamics of subsurface skin tissue.

  19. Conventional digital cameras as a tool for assessing leaf area index and biomass for cereal breeding.

    PubMed

    Casadesús, Jaume; Villegas, Dolors

    2014-01-01

    Affordable and easy-to-use methods for assessing biomass and leaf area index (LAI) would be of interest in most breeding programs. Here, we describe the evaluation of a protocol for photographic sampling and image analysis aimed at providing low-labor yet robust indicators of biomass and LAI. In this trial, two genotypes of triticale, two of bread wheat, and four of tritordeum were studied. At six dates during the growing cycle, biomass and LAI were measured destructively, and digital photography was taken on the same dates. Several vegetation indices were calculated from each image. The results showed that repeatable and consistent values of the indices were obtained in consecutive photographic samplings on the same plots. The photographic indices were highly correlated with the destructive measurements, though the magnitude of the correlation was lower after anthesis. This work shows that photographic assessment of biomass and LAI can be fast, affordable, have good repeatability, and can be used under bright and overcast skies. A practical vegetation index derived from pictures is the fraction of green pixels over the total pixels of the image, and as it shows good correlations with all biomass variables, is the most robust to lighting conditions and has easy interpretation.

  20. Digital Microdroplet Ejection Technology-Based Heterogeneous Objects Prototyping

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jiquan; Feng, Chunmei; Yang, Jianfei; Zhu, Liya; Guo, Aiqing

    2016-01-01

    An integrate fabrication framework is presented to build heterogeneous objects (HEO) using digital microdroplets injecting technology and rapid prototyping. The heterogeneous materials part design and manufacturing method in structure and material was used to change the traditional process. The net node method was used for digital modeling that can configure multimaterials in time. The relationship of material, color, and jetting nozzle was built. The main important contributions are to combine the structure, material, and visualization in one process and give the digital model for manufacture. From the given model, it is concluded that the method is effective for HEO. Using microdroplet rapid prototyping and the model given in the paper HEO could be gotten basically. The model could be used in 3D biomanufacturing. PMID:26981110

  1. Digital technologies as truth-bearers in health care.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, Ruth; Balmer, Andrew; Brannelly, Petula

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we explore the idea of digital technologies as truth-bearers in health care and argue that devices like SenseCam, which facilitate reflection and memory recall, have a potentially vital role in healthcare situations when questions of veracity are at stake (e.g., when best interest decisions are being made). We discuss the role of digital technologies as truth-bearers in the context of nursing people with dementia, as this is one area of health care in which the topic of truth-telling has been hotly debated. People with dementia have been excluded from research studies and decisions that affect their lives because they are not regarded as truth-bearers-that is, as being capable of giving truthful accounts of their experiences. Also, considerable research has focused on the ethics of lying to and deceiving people with dementia. Given their increasing prominence in healthcare settings, there has been surprisingly little discussion of what role digital technologies might play in relation to these questions of truth and deception. Drawing on theories from science and technology studies (STS), we explore their possible future role in some of the truth-making processes of health care. In particular, we discuss the potential value of constraints on use of SenseCam to support the accounts of people with dementia as part of their care.

  2. Real-world evaluation of the effectiveness of reversing camera and parking sensor technologies in preventing backover pedestrian injuries.

    PubMed

    Keall, M D; Fildes, B; Newstead, S

    2017-02-01

    Backover injuries to pedestrians are a significant road safety issue, but their prevalence is underestimated as the majority of such injuries are often outside the scope of official road injury recording systems, which just focus on public roads. Based on experimental evidence, reversing cameras have been found to be effective in reducing the rate of collisions when reversing; the evidence for the effectiveness of reverse parking sensors has been mixed. The wide availability of these technologies in recent model vehicles provides impetus for real-world evaluations using crash data. A logistic model was fitted to data from crashes that occurred on public roads constituting 3172 pedestrian injuries in New Zealand and four Australian States to estimate the odds of backover injury (compared to other sorts of pedestrian injury crashes) for the different technology combinations fitted as standard equipment (both reversing cameras and sensors; just reversing cameras; just sensors; neither cameras nor sensors) controlling for vehicle type, jurisdiction, speed limit area and year of manufacture restricted to the range 2007-2013. Compared to vehicles without any of these technologies, reduced odds of backover injury were estimated for all three of these technology configurations: 0.59 (95% CI 0.39-0.88) for reversing cameras by themselves; 0.70 (95% CI 0.49-1.01) for both reversing cameras and sensors; 0.69 (95% CI 0.47-1.03) for reverse parking sensors by themselves. These findings are important as they are the first to our knowledge to present an assessment of real-world safety effectiveness of these technologies.

  3. [Application of three-dimensional digital technology in the diagnosis and treatment planning in orthodontics].

    PubMed

    Bai, Y X

    2016-06-01

    Three-dimensional(3D)digital technology has been widely used in the field of orthodontics in clinical examination, diagnosis, treatment and curative effect evaluation. 3D digital technology greatly improves the accuracy of diagnosis and treatment, and provides effective means for personalized orthodontic treatment. This review focuses on the application of 3D digital technology in the field of orthodontics.

  4. Using and choosing digital health technologies: a communications science perspective.

    PubMed

    Ovretveit, John; Wu, Albert; Street, Richard; Thimbleby, Harold; Thilo, Friederike; Hannawa, Annegret

    2017-03-20

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to explore a non-technical overview for leaders and researchers about how to use a communications perspective to better assess, design and use digital health technologies (DHTs) to improve healthcare performance and to encourage more research into implementation and use of these technologies. Design/methodology/approach Narrative overview, showing through examples the issues and benefits of introducing DHTs for healthcare performance and the insights that communications science brings to their design and use. Findings Communications research has revealed the many ways in which people communicate in non-verbal ways, and how this can be lost or degraded in digitally mediated forms. These losses are often not recognized, can increase risks to patients and reduce staff satisfaction. Yet digital technologies also contribute to improving healthcare performance and staff morale if skillfully designed and implemented. Research limitations/implications Researchers are provided with an introduction to the limitations of the research and to how communications science can contribute to a multidisciplinary research approach to evaluating and assisting the implementation of these technologies to improve healthcare performance. Practical implications Using this overview, managers are more able to ask questions about how the new DHTs will affect healthcare and take a stronger role in implementing these technologies to improve performance. Originality/value New insights into the use and understanding of DHTs from applying the new multidiscipline of communications science. A situated communications perspective helps to assess how a new technology can complement rather than degrade professional relationships and how safer implementation and use of these technologies can be devised.

  5. Canadian community pharmacists’ use of digital health technologies in practice

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Valerie; Tharmalingam, Sukirtha; Cooper, Janet; Charlebois, Maureen

    2016-01-01

    Background: In 2010, a pan-Canadian study on the current state and benefits of provincial drug information systems (DIS) found that substantial benefits were being realized and that pharmacists perceived DIS to be a valuable tool in the evolving models of pharmacy practice. To understand changes in digital health and the impact on practice since that time, a survey of community pharmacists in Canada was conducted. Methods: In 2014, Canada Health Infoway (Infoway) and the Canadian Pharmacists Association (CPhA) invited community pharmacists to participate in a Web-based survey to understand their use and perceived benefits of digital health in practice. The survey was open from April 15 to May 12, 2014. Results: Of the 447 survey responses, almost all used some form of digital health in practice. Those with access to DIS and provincial laboratory information systems (LIS) reported increased productivity and better quality of care. Those without access to these systems would overwhelmingly like access. Discussion: There have been significant advances in digital health and community pharmacy practice over the past several years. In addition to digital health benefits in the areas of productivity and quality of care, pharmacists are also experiencing substantial benefits in areas related to recently expanded scope of practice activities such as ordering lab tests. Conclusion: Community pharmacists frequently use digital health in practice and recognize the benefits of these technologies. Digital health is, and will continue to be, a key enabler for practice transformation and improved quality of care. Can Pharm J (Ott) 2016;149:xx-xx. PMID:26798376

  6. Digital Technology in the protection of cultural heritage Bao Fan Temple mural digital mapping survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Y.

    2015-08-01

    Peng Xi county, Sichuan province, the Bao Fan temple mural digitization survey mapping project: we use three-dimensional laserscanning, multi-baseline definition digital photography, multi-spectral digital image acquisition and other technologies for digital survey mapping. The purpose of this project is to use modern mathematical reconnaissance mapping means to obtain accurate mural shape, color, quality and other data. Combined with field investigation and laboratory analysis results, and based on a comprehensive survey and study, a comprehensive analysis of the historical Bao Fan Temple mural artistic and scientific value was conducted. A study of the mural's many qualities (structural, material, technique, preservation environment, degradation, etc.) reveal all aspects of the information carried by the Bao Fan Temple mural. From multiple angles (archeology, architecture, surveying, conservation science and other disciplines) an assessment for the Bao Fan Temple mural provides basic data and recommendations for conservation of the mural. In order to achieve the conservation of cultural relics in the Bao Fan Temple mural digitization survey mapping process, we try to apply the advantages of three-dimensional laser scanning equipment. For wall murals this means obtaining three-dimensional scale data from the scan of the building and through the analysis of these data to help determine the overall condition of the settlement as well as the deformation of the wall structure. Survey analysis provides an effective set of conclusions and suggestions for appropriate mural conservation. But before data collection, analysis and research need to first to select the appropriate scanning equipment, set the appropriate scanning accuracy and layout position of stations necessary to determine the scope of required data. We use the fine features of the three-dimensional laser scanning measuring arm to scan the mural surface deformation degradation to reflect the actual state of

  7. High density monolithic packaging technology for digital/microwave avionics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fertig, Timothy; Walter, Theresa; Gaver, Eric; Leahy, Kevin

    1994-10-01

    There has been a need for generic technologies and common approaches in design, development, and manufacturing of military and commercial products. This need is more pronounced and pressing today than ever before. With the objective to dramatically enhance avionics reliability, maintainability and availability (RM&A), an integrated, generic technology for packaging, cooling, and interconnection of high density and high performance circuits was developed. It is named High Density Monolithic Packaging (HDMP). Under the sponsorship of Wright Laboratory, a two-part complementary program (1990-1994), named Advanced Radio-Frequency Packaging/ARFP was contracted to Westinghouse. Under the ARFP program, the HDMP technology is being applied and its promising capability is being assessed for its ability to reduce the low power RF avionics life-cycle cost. Being better than half way through the program, the results and projections have been extremely promising. The technology assessment is approximately 50 percent complete and initial results have been extremely successful. Although the focus of the development effort has been on RF subsystems, the basic elements of HDMP technology have applications beyond RF/microwave subsystems. As digital processing speeds increase, RF/microwave design techniques must be applied to maintain high speed digital signal integrity. The basic elements of the HDMP technology are: low temperature co-fired ceramic (LTCC), solderless interconnects, multichip modules (MCM's), and composite heatsink materials. The key technology element, in this avionics availability enabling technology, is LTCC. LTCC material technology is a monolithic multilayered ceramic and conductor/metallization structure used as a substrate to support dense co-habitation of high density electronic circuits, their interconnections, and the electromechanical integrity of the integrated constituents.

  8. Waste reduction efforts through evaluation and procurement of a digital camera system for the Alpha-Gamma Hot Cell Facility at Argonne National Laboratory-East.

    SciTech Connect

    Bray, T. S.; Cohen, A. B.; Tsai, H.; Kettman, W. C.; Trychta, K.

    1999-11-08

    The Alpha-Gamma Hot Cell Facility (AGHCF) at Argonne National Laboratory-East is a research facility where sample examinations involve traditional photography. The AGHCF documents samples with photographs (both Polaroid self-developing and negative film). Wastes generated include developing chemicals. The AGHCF evaluated, procured, and installed a digital camera system for the Leitz metallograph to significantly reduce labor, supplies, and wastes associated with traditional photography with a return on investment of less than two years.

  9. Advanced framework for digital forensic technologies and procedures.

    PubMed

    Trček, Denis; Abie, Habtamu; Skomedal, Asmund; Starc, Iztok

    2010-11-01

    Recent trends in global networks are leading toward service-oriented architectures and sensor networks. On one hand of the spectrum, this means deployment of services from numerous providers to form new service composites, and on the other hand this means emergence of Internet of things. Both these kinds belong to a plethora of realms and can be deployed in many ways, which will pose serious problems in cases of abuse. Consequently, both trends increase the need for new approaches to digital forensics that would furnish admissible evidence for litigation. Because technology alone is clearly not sufficient, it has to be adequately supported by appropriate investigative procedures, which have yet become a subject of an international consensus. This paper therefore provides appropriate a holistic framework to foster an internationally agreed upon approach in digital forensics along with necessary improvements. It is based on a top-down approach, starting with legal, continuing with organizational, and ending with technical issues. More precisely, the paper presents a new architectural technological solution that addresses the core forensic principles at its roots. It deploys so-called leveled message authentication codes and digital signatures to provide data integrity in a way that significantly eases forensic investigations into attacked systems in their operational state. Further, using a top-down approach a conceptual framework for forensics readiness is given, which provides levels of abstraction and procedural guides embellished with a process model that allow investigators perform routine investigations, without becoming overwhelmed by low-level details. As low-level details should not be left out, the framework is further evaluated to include these details to allow organizations to configure their systems for proactive collection and preservation of potential digital evidence in a structured manner. The main reason behind this approach is to stimulate efforts

  10. Beyond Moore's Law: Harnessing spatial-digital disruptive technologies for Digital Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foresman, Timothy W.

    2016-11-01

    Moore's law will reach its plateau by 2020. Big data, however, will continue to increase as the Internet of Things and social media converge into the new era of ‘huge data’. Disruptive technologies, including big data and cloud computing are forces impacting business and government communities. The truth of our collective future is suggested to align with the Digital Earth (DE) vision. Benefits of technological advances will be manifested from business performance improvements based on capitalizing the locational attributes of corporate and government assets - the foundation of big data. Better governance and better business represents a key foundation for sustainability and therefore should be explicit DE guiding principles.

  11. A Survey of Complex Object Technologies for Digital Libraries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Michael L.; Argue, Brad; Efron, Miles; Denn, Sheila; Pattuelli, Maria Cristina

    2001-01-01

    Many early web-based digital libraries (DLs) had implicit assumptions reflected in their architecture that the unit of focus in the DL (frequently "reports" or "e-prints") would only be manifested in a single, or at most a few, common file formats such as PDF or PostScript. DLs have now matured to the point where their contents are commonly no longer simple files. Complex objects in DLs have emerged from in response to various requirements, including: simple aggregation of formats and supporting files, bundling additional information to aid digital preservation, creating opaque digital objects for e-commerce applications, and the incorporation of dynamic services with the traditional data files. We examine a representative (but not necessarily exhaustive) number of current and recent historical web-based complex object technologies and projects that are applicable to DLs: Aurora, Buckets, ComMentor, Cryptolopes, Digibox, Document Management Alliance, FEDORA, Kahn-Wilensky Framework Digital Objects, Metadata Encoding & Transmission Standard, Multivalent Documents, Open eBooks, VERS Encapsulated Objects, and the Warwick Framework.

  12. Exposing digital image forgeries by 3D reconstruction technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yongqiang; Xu, Xiaojing; Li, Zhihui; Liu, Haizhen; Li, Zhigang; Huang, Wei

    2009-11-01

    Digital images are easy to tamper and edit due to availability of powerful image processing and editing software. Especially, forged images by taking from a picture of scene, because of no manipulation was made after taking, usual methods, such as digital watermarks, statistical correlation technology, can hardly detect the traces of image tampering. According to image forgery characteristics, a method, based on 3D reconstruction technology, which detect the forgeries by discriminating the dimensional relationship of each object appeared on image, is presented in this paper. This detection method includes three steps. In the first step, all the parameters of images were calibrated and each crucial object on image was chosen and matched. In the second step, the 3D coordinates of each object were calculated by bundle adjustment. In final step, the dimensional relationship of each object was analyzed. Experiments were designed to test this detection method; the 3D reconstruction and the forged image 3D reconstruction were computed independently. Test results show that the fabricating character in digital forgeries can be identified intuitively by this method.

  13. A method for evaluating image quality of monochrome and color displays based on luminance by use of a commercially available color digital camera

    SciTech Connect

    Tokurei, Shogo E-mail: junjim@med.kyushu-u.ac.jp; Morishita, Junji E-mail: junjim@med.kyushu-u.ac.jp

    2015-08-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to propose a method for the quantitative evaluation of image quality of both monochrome and color liquid-crystal displays (LCDs) using a commercially available color digital camera. Methods: The intensities of the unprocessed red (R), green (G), and blue (B) signals of a camera vary depending on the spectral sensitivity of the image sensor used in the camera. For consistent evaluation of image quality for both monochrome and color LCDs, the unprocessed RGB signals of the camera were converted into gray scale signals that corresponded to the luminance of the LCD. Gray scale signals for the monochrome LCD were evaluated by using only the green channel signals of the camera. For the color LCD, the RGB signals of the camera were converted into gray scale signals by employing weighting factors (WFs) for each RGB channel. A line image displayed on the color LCD was simulated on the monochrome LCD by using a software application for subpixel driving in order to verify the WF-based conversion method. Furthermore, the results obtained by different types of commercially available color cameras and a photometric camera were compared to examine the consistency of the authors’ method. Finally, image quality for both the monochrome and color LCDs was assessed by measuring modulation transfer functions (MTFs) and Wiener spectra (WS). Results: The authors’ results demonstrated that the proposed method for calibrating the spectral sensitivity of the camera resulted in a consistent and reliable evaluation of the luminance of monochrome and color LCDs. The MTFs and WS showed different characteristics for the two LCD types owing to difference in the subpixel structure. The MTF in the vertical direction of the color LCD was superior to that of the monochrome LCD, although the WS in the vertical direction of the color LCD was inferior to that of the monochrome LCD as a result of luminance fluctuations in RGB subpixels. Conclusions: The authors

  14. Improved Construction of Auricular Prosthesis by Digital Technologies.

    PubMed

    Nuseir, Amjad; Hatamleh, Muhanad; Watson, Jason; Al-Wahadni, Ahed M; Alzoubi, Firas; Murad, Mohammed

    2015-09-01

    Implant-retained auricular prostheses are a successful prosthetic treatment option for patients who are missing their ear(s) due to trauma, oncology, or birth defects. The prosthetic ear is aesthetically pleasing, composed of natural looking anatomical contours, shape, and texture along with good color that blends with surrounding existing skin. These outcomes can be optimized by the integration of digital technologies in the construction process. This report describes a sequential process of reconstructing a missing left ear by digital technologies. Two implants were planned for placement in the left mastoid region utilizing specialist biomedical software (Materialise, Belgium). The implant positions were determined underneath the thickest portion (of anti-helix area) left ear that is virtually simulated by means of mirror imaging of the right ear. A surgical stent recording the implant positions was constructed and used in implant fixtures placement. Implants were left for eight weeks, after which they were loaded with abutments and an irreversible silicone impression was taken to record their positions. The right existing ear was virtually segmented using the patient CT scan and then mirror imaged to produce a left ear, which was then printed using 3D printer (Z Corp, USA). The left ear was then duplicated in wax which was fitted over the defect side. Then, it was conventionally flasked. Skin color was digitalized using spectromatch skin color system (London, UK). The resultant silicone color was mixed as prescribed and then packed into the mold. The silicone was cured conventionally. Ear was trimmed and fitted and there was no need for any extrinsic coloring. The prosthetic ear was an exact match to the existing right ear in shape, skin color, and orientation due to the great advantages of technologies employed. Additionally, these technologies saved time and provided a base for reproducible results regardless of operator.

  15. Advanced Technologies Demonstrated by the Miniature Integrated Camera and Spectrometer (MICAS) Aboard Deep Space 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodgers, David H.; Beauchamp, Patricia M.; Soderblom, Laurence A.; Brown, Robert H.; Chen, Gun-Shing; Lee, Meemong; Sandel, Bill R.; Thomas, David A.; Benoit, Robert T.; Yelle, Roger V.

    2007-04-01

    MICAS is an integrated multi-channel instrument that includes an ultraviolet imaging spectrometer (80 185 nm), two high-resolution visible imagers (10 20 μrad/pixel, 400 900 nm), and a short-wavelength infrared imaging spectrometer (1250 2600 nm). The wavelength ranges were chosen to maximize the science data that could be collected using existing semiconductor technologies and avoiding the need for multi-octave spectrometers. It was flown on DS1 to validate technologies derived from the development of PICS (Planetary Imaging Camera Spectrometer). These technologies provided a novel systems approach enabling the miniaturization and integration of four instruments into one entity, spanning a wavelength range from the UV to IR, and from ambient to cryogenic temperatures with optical performance at a fraction of a wavelength. The specific technologies incorporated were: a built-in fly-by sequence; lightweight and ultra-stable, monolithic silicon-carbide construction, which enabled room-temperature alignment for cryogenic (85 140 K) performance, and provided superb optical performance and immunity to thermal distortion; diffraction-limited, shared optics operating from 80 to 2600 nm; advanced detector technologies for the UV, visible and short-wavelength IR; high-performance thermal radiators coupled directly to the short-wave infrared (SWIR) detector optical bench, providing an instrument with a mass less than 10 kg, instrument power less than 10 W, and total instrument cost of less than ten million dollars. The design allows the wavelength range to be extended by at least an octave at the short wavelength end and to ˜50 microns at the long wavelength end. Testing of the completed instrument demonstrated excellent optical performance down to 77 K, which would enable a greatly reduced background for longer wavelength detectors. During the Deep Space 1 Mission, MICAS successfully collected images and spectra for asteroid 9969 Braille, Mars, and comet 19/P Borrelly

  16. Advanced technologies demonstrated by the miniature integrated camera and spectrometer (MICAS) aboard deep space 1

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rodgers, D.H.; Beauchamp, P.M.; Soderblom, L.A.; Brown, R.H.; Chen, G.-S.; Lee, M.; Sandel, B.R.; Thomas, D.A.; Benoit, R.T.; Yelle, R.V.

    2007-01-01

    MICAS is an integrated multi-channel instrument that includes an ultraviolet imaging spectrometer (80-185 nm), two high-resolution visible imagers (10-20 ??rad/pixel, 400-900 nm), and a short-wavelength infrared imaging spectrometer (1250-2600 nm). The wavelength ranges were chosen to maximize the science data that could be collected using existing semiconductor technologies and avoiding the need for multi-octave spectrometers. It was flown on DS1 to validate technologies derived from the development of PICS (Planetary Imaging Camera Spectrometer). These technologies provided a novel systems approach enabling the miniaturization and integration of four instruments into one entity, spanning a wavelength range from the UV to IR, and from ambient to cryogenic temperatures with optical performance at a fraction of a wavelength. The specific technologies incorporated were: a built-in fly-by sequence; lightweight and ultra-stable, monolithic silicon-carbide construction, which enabled room-temperature alignment for cryogenic (85-140 K) performance, and provided superb optical performance and immunity to thermal distortion; diffraction-limited, shared optics operating from 80 to 2600 nm; advanced detector technologies for the UV, visible and short-wavelength IR; high-performance thermal radiators coupled directly to the short-wave infrared (SWIR) detector optical bench, providing an instrument with a mass less than 10 kg, instrument power less than 10 W, and total instrument cost of less than ten million dollars. The design allows the wavelength range to be extended by at least an octave at the short wavelength end and to 50 microns at the long wavelength end. Testing of the completed instrument demonstrated excellent optical performance down to 77 K, which would enable a greatly reduced background for longer wavelength detectors. During the Deep Space 1 Mission, MICAS successfully collected images and spectra for asteroid 9969 Braille, Mars, and comet 19/P Borrelly. The

  17. Hybrid Placemaking in the Library: Designing Digital Technology to Enhance Users' On-Site Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bilandzic, Mark; Johnson, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents research findings and design strategies that illustrate how digital technology can be applied as a tool for "hybrid" placemaking in ways that would not be possible in purely digital or physical spaces. Digital technology has revolutionised the way people learn and gather new information. This trend has challenged the…

  18. Inspection focus technology of space tridimensional mapping camera based on astigmatic method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhi; Zhang, Liping

    2010-10-01

    The CCD plane of the space tridimensional mapping camera will be deviated from the focal plane(including the CCD plane deviated due to camera focal length changed), under the condition of space environment and vibration, impact when satellite is launching, image resolution ratio will be descended because defocusing. For tridimensional mapping camera, principal point position and focal length variation of the camera affect positioning accuracy of ground target, conventional solution is under the condition of vacuum and focusing range, calibrate the position of CCD plane with code of photoelectric encoder, when the camera defocusing in orbit, the magnitude and direction of defocusing amount are obtained by photoelectric encoder, then the focusing mechanism driven by step motor to compensate defocusing amount of the CCD plane. For tridimensional mapping camera, under the condition of space environment and vibration, impact when satellite is launching, if the camera focal length changes, above focusing method has been meaningless. Thus, the measuring and focusing method was put forward based on astigmation, a quadrant detector was adopted to measure the astigmation caused by the deviation of the CCD plane, refer to calibrated relation between the CCD plane poison and the asrigmation, the deviation vector of the CCD plane can be obtained. This method includes all factors caused deviation of the CCD plane, experimental results show that the focusing resolution of mapping camera focusing mechanism based on astigmatic method can reach 0.25 μm.

  19. HD Photo: a new image coding technology for digital photography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Sridhar; Tu, Chengjie; Regunathan, Shankar L.; Sullivan, Gary J.

    2007-09-01

    This paper introduces the HD Photo coding technology developed by Microsoft Corporation. The storage format for this technology is now under consideration in the ITU-T/ISO/IEC JPEG committee as a candidate for standardization under the name JPEG XR. The technology was developed to address end-to-end digital imaging application requirements, particularly including the needs of digital photography. HD Photo includes features such as good compression capability, high dynamic range support, high image quality capability, lossless coding support, full-format 4:4:4 color sampling, simple thumbnail extraction, embedded bitstream scalability of resolution and fidelity, and degradation-free compressed domain support of key manipulations such as cropping, flipping and rotation. HD Photo has been designed to optimize image quality and compression efficiency while also enabling low-complexity encoding and decoding implementations. To ensure low complexity for implementations, the design features have been incorporated in a way that not only minimizes the computational requirements of the individual components (including consideration of such aspects as memory footprint, cache effects, and parallelization opportunities) but results in a self-consistent design that maximizes the commonality of functional processing components.

  20. A Study on the Timing Technology of Digital Satellite TV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, K. X.

    2013-03-01

    Based on analyzing and summarizing the modern timing technologies, through intensive analyzing the characteristics of the current digital satellite TV signals, and without changing equipment configuration of the digital satellite TV transmitter and signal system, this thesis puts forward the method of using the digital TV signal to transmit the standard time and frequency, and carries out the relevant researches on the key technologies. Meanwhile, we make experiments on the digital satellite TV timing system, which are based on the proposed timing method. Through analyzing the test data, the timing method is proved practicable and with a high precision. The main research work is as follows: (1) Firstly, we summarize the necessary conditions and key elements required for timing by analyzing the characteristics of modern timing methods, and analyze China’s digital satellite TV signal system; Secondly, we propose the idea that the inherent flag bit of source coding signals of TV is used to trigger event of timing and then complete this task; Thirdly, we propose the principle of transmitting the standard time and frequency through digital satellite TV signal, analyze the error sources which affect the accuracy of timing, and find the ways to reduce the error effect. (2) Synchronization clock signal is recovered from asynchronous serial interface (ASI) data to achieve bit synchronization, so that the transmitter can accurately access to the high-precision standard time code. At the same time, the TV signal transmission delay on the transmission channel is accurately measured in order to supply the necessary information for timing. Based on the analysis of the ASI data transmission characteristics and transmission standards, a method using over-sampling to recover the ASI clock signal and synchronize the digital TV signal source coding is proposed in this paper. This method is proved effective by the implementation on the FPGA (Field Programmable Gate Array). (3) Using

  1. Guidance, Navigation and Control Digital Emulation Technology Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alford, Cecil O.; Chamdani, J. I.; Huang, T. C.; Kubota, T.; Ghannadian, F.

    1994-09-01

    The contract began with seven tasks: (1) Digital Emulation Facility; (2) FPA Seeker Emulator Development; (3) Special Studies; (4) Software Development; (5) Automated Input; (6) PFP Technology; and (7) GN and C Processor Development. These tasks were developed through the first two years of the contract when virtually all funding was removed. Two additional tasks have been developed since the funding cut. The first was a speed test on the rad-hard FPU chip developed by Harris. A summary of this testing and the associated report is given in Section 2. The second task is the development of an FPA Test System.

  2. Technology and cognitive ability: the use of new technologies and the design of digital interfaces.

    PubMed

    Bessa, Olavo

    2012-01-01

    This study is guided by the principle that there is no technology detached from an ideology. This ideology appears in the interfaces conditioning the relationship between people and digital artifacts. This article adopts as theoretical reference the User-Centered Design (UCD). Under the UCD principles it is presented a key to understand how technology is a vehicle of ideological content that affects the design practices.

  3. Technology evaluation center assessment synopsis: full-field digital mammography.

    PubMed

    Rothenberg, Barbara M; Ziegler, Kathleen M; Aronson, Naomi

    2006-08-01

    Full-field digital mammography (FFDM) is proposed as an alternative to screen-film mammography (SFM). The ability to separate and optimize the acquisition, storage, and display of images may allow greater visualization of breast cancers at equal or lower radiation doses, especially in younger women and those with denser breasts. This is a synopsis of a systematic review by the Blue Cross Blue Shield Association Technology Evaluation Center. This updated systematic review primarily incorporated the results of the ACR Imaging Network(R) Digital Mammographic Imaging Screening Trial (DMIST), which provided results on 42,760 asymptomatic women who underwent both FFDM and SFM and showed with reasonable certainty that there was no difference in the accuracy of the 2 modalities for asymptomatic women in general, with some advantages of FFDM in certain subgroups. There were no strong, new studies on the use of digital mammography compared with film mammography in a diagnostic population. However, the DMIST results indicated that tumors detected by FFDM, but not by SFM, were likely to be invasive carcinomas or medium-grade to high-grade ductal carcinoma in situ. On the basis of the suppositions that these are the cancers of greatest interest and the ones more likely to be found in a diagnostic population and that the diagnostic population may be younger on average than the screening population, it was concluded that there is sufficient evidence to support the use of FFDM for diagnostic purposes.

  4. Digital modeling technology for full dental crown tooth preparation.

    PubMed

    Dai, Ning; Zhong, Yicheng; Liu, Hao; Yuan, Fusong; Sun, Yuchun

    2016-04-01

    A dental defect is one of the most common oral diseases, and it often requires a full crown restoration. In this clinical operation, the dentist must manually prepare the affected tooth for the full crown so that it has a convergence angle between 4° and 10°, no undercuts, and uniform and even shoulder widths and depths using a high speed diamond bur in the patient׳s mouth within one hour, which is a difficult task that requires visual-manual operation. The quality of the tooth preparation has an important effect on the success rate of the subsequent prosthodontic treatment. This study involved research into digital modeling technology for full dental crown tooth preparation. First, the margin line of the tooth preparation was designed using a semi-automatic interactive process. Second, the inserting direction was automatically computed. Then, the characteristic parameters and the constraints on the tooth preparation were defined for the model. Next, the shoulder and axial surface of the tooth preparation were formed using parametric modeling. Finally, the implicit surface of a radial basis function was used to construct the tooth preparation׳s occlusal surface. The experimental results verified that the method of digital modeling for full crown preparation proposed in this study can quickly and accurately implement personalized designs of various parameters, such as the shoulder width and the convergence angle; it provides a digital design tool for full crown preparation.

  5. Stream vision: a digital imaging and display technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandl, William J.; Shen, Chyau N.; Yang, John W.

    1999-12-01

    On focal plane analog to digital conversion, A/D has matured to such an extent that large low power arrays are now being built. Recently Amain developed a cooled MWIR 640 X 480 staring focal plane array with an A/D at each pixel. The technology, MOSADCPY, Multiplexed OverSample A/D, allowed the placement of over 300,000 converters on the focal plane on 27 micron centers with 12 bits dynamic range. A unique one bit digital data format, Stream VisionCPY, was generated on focal plane and transmitted directly to a Ferroelectric LCD for real time viewing of the IR scene. This data stream produces apparent gray to the eye by rapidly modulating the on/off density of the display pixel in concert with the corresponding pixel on the focal plane array. To correct for detector nonuniformity (NUC), a systolic array of parallel processing elements was developed that provided offset and gain correction while preserving the dynamic range of the Stream Vision data. The benefits of this new digital format is that no transformation is required for processing and displaying the image data and there is no analog electronics in the system. Compared to present displays using either PCM to analog or PCM to pulse width modulation. Stream Vision uses less electronics and substantially lower switching bandwidth for the equivalent dynamic range. This development was sponsored by Naval Air Warfare Center under a Phase II SBIR program.

  6. Using Disruptive Technologies to Make Digital Connections: Stories of Media Use and Digital Literacy in Secondary Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nowell, Shanedra D.

    2014-01-01

    This study focused on ways teachers and students in an urban high school used technologies often labeled as disruptive (i.e. social media and mobile phones) as learning and relationship building tools, inside and outside the classroom. In this teacher research study, secondary teachers discussed digital literacies, the digital divide, and digital…

  7. Erosion research with a digital camera: the structure from motion method used in gully monitoring - field experiments from southern Morocco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, Andreas; Rock, Gilles; Neugirg, Fabian; Müller, Christoph; Ries, Johannes

    2014-05-01

    From a geoscientific view arid or semiarid landscapes are often associated with soil degrading erosion processes and thus active geomorphology. In this regard gully incision represents one of the most important influences on surface dynamics. Established approaches to monitor and quantify soil loss require costly and labor-intensive measuring methods: terrestrial or airborne LiDAR scans to create digital elevation models and unmanned airborne vehicles for image acquisition provide adequate tools for geomorphological surveying. Despite their ever advancing abilities, they are finite with their applicability in detailed recordings of complex surfaces. Especially undercuttings and plunge pools in the headcut area of gully systems are invisible or cause shadowing effects. The presented work aims to apply and advance an adequate tool to avoid the above mentioned obstacles and weaknesses of the established methods. The emerging structure from motion-based high resolution 3D-visualisation not only proved to be useful in gully erosion. Moreover, it provides a solid ground for additional applications in geosciences such as surface roughness measurements, quantification of gravitational mass movements or capturing stream connectivity. During field campaigns in semiarid southern Morocco a commercial DSLR camera was used, to produce images that served as input data for software based point cloud and mesh generation. Thus, complex land surfaces could be reconstructed entirely in high resolution by photographing the object from different perspectives. In different scales the resulting 3D-mesh represents a holistic reconstruction of the actual shape complexity with its limits set only by computing capacity. Analysis and visualization of time series of different erosion-related events illustrate the additional benefit of the method. It opens new perspectives on process understanding that can be exploited by open source and commercial software. Results depicted a soil loss of 5

  8. [Application of digital earth technology in research of traditional Chinese medicine resources].

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinxin; Liu, Xinxin; Gao, Lu; Wei, Yingqin; Meng, Fanyun; Wang, Yongyan

    2011-02-01

    This paper describes the digital earth technology and its core technology-"3S" integration technology. The advance and promotion of the "3S" technology provide more favorable means and technical support for Chinese medicine resources survey, evaluation and appropriate zoning. Grid is a mature and popular technology that can connect all kinds of information resources. The author sums up the application of digital earth technology in the research of traditional Chinese medicine resources in recent years, and proposes the new method and technical route of investigation in traditional Chinese medicine resources, traditional Chinese medicine zoning and suitability assessment by combining the digital earth technology and grid.

  9. Digital Control Technologies for Modular DC-DC Converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Button, Robert M.; Kascak, Peter E.; Lebron-Velilla, Ramon

    2002-01-01

    Recent trends in aerospace Power Management and Distribution (PMAD) systems focus on using commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) components as standard building blocks. This move to more modular designs has been driven by a desire to reduce costs and development times, but is also due to the impressive power density and efficiency numbers achieved by today's commercial DC-DC converters. However, the PMAD designer quickly learns of the hidden "costs" of using COTS converters. The most significant cost is the required addition of external input filters to meet strict electromagnetic interference (MIAMI) requirements for space systems. In fact, the high power density numbers achieved by the commercial manufacturers are greatly due to the lack of necessary input filters included in the COTS module. The NASA Glenn Research Center is currently pursuing a digital control technology that addresses this problem with modular DC-DC converters. This paper presents the digital control technologies that have been developed to greatly reduce the input filter requirements for paralleled, modular DC-DC converters. Initial test result show that the input filter's inductor size was reduced by 75 percent, and the capacitor size was reduced by 94 percent while maintaining the same power quality specifications.

  10. Presence capture cameras - a new challenge to the image quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peltoketo, Veli-Tapani

    2016-04-01

    Commercial presence capture cameras are coming to the markets and a new era of visual entertainment starts to get its shape. Since the true presence capturing is still a very new technology, the real technical solutions are just passed a prototyping phase and they vary a lot. Presence capture cameras have still the same quality issues to tackle as previous phases of digital imaging but also numerous new ones. This work concentrates to the quality challenges of presence capture cameras. A camera system which can record 3D audio-visual reality as it is has to have several camera modules, several microphones and especially technology which can synchronize output of several sources to a seamless and smooth virtual reality experience. Several traditional quality features are still valid in presence capture cameras. Features like color fidelity, noise removal, resolution and dynamic range create the base of virtual reality stream quality. However, co-operation of several cameras brings a new dimension for these quality factors. Also new quality features can be validated. For example, how the camera streams should be stitched together with 3D experience without noticeable errors and how to validate the stitching? The work describes quality factors which are still valid in the presence capture cameras and defines the importance of those. Moreover, new challenges of presence capture cameras are investigated in image and video quality point of view. The work contains considerations how well current measurement methods can be used in presence capture cameras.

  11. Ground-based detection of nighttime clouds above Manila Observatory (14.64°N, 121.07°E) using a digital camera.

    PubMed

    Gacal, Glenn Franco B; Antioquia, Carlo; Lagrosas, Nofel

    2016-08-01

    Ground-based cloud detection at nighttime is achieved by using cameras, lidars, and ceilometers. Despite these numerous instruments gathering cloud data, there is still an acknowledged scarcity of information on quantified local cloud cover, especially at nighttime. In this study, a digital camera is used to continuously collect images near the sky zenith at nighttime in an urban environment. An algorithm is developed to analyze pixel values of images of nighttime clouds. A minimum threshold pixel value of 17 is assigned to determine cloud occurrence. The algorithm uses temporal averaging to estimate the cloud fraction based on the results within the limited field of view. The analysis of the data from the months of January, February, and March 2015 shows that cloud occurrence is low during the months with relatively lower minimum temperature (January and February), while cloud occurrence during the warmer month (March) increases.

  12. Medium Format Camera Evaluation Based on the Latest Phase One Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tölg, T.; Kemper, G.; Kalinski, D.

    2016-06-01

    In early 2016, Phase One Industrial launched a new high resolution camera with a 100 MP CMOS sensor. CCD sensors excel at ISOs up to 200, but in lower light conditions, exposure time must be increased and Forward Motion Compensation (FMC) has to be employed to avoid smearing the images. The CMOS sensor has an ISO range of up to 6400, which enables short exposures instead of using FMC. This paper aims to evaluate the strengths of each of the sensor types based on real missions over a test field in Speyer, Germany, used for airborne camera calibration. The test field area has about 30 Ground Control Points (GCPs), which enable a perfect scenario for a proper geometric evaluation of the cameras. The test field includes both a Siemen star and scale bars to show any blurring caused by forward motion. The result of the comparison showed that both cameras offer high accuracy photogrammetric results with post processing, including triangulation, calibration, orthophoto and DEM generation. The forward motion effect can be compensated by a fast shutter speed and a higher ISO range of the CMOS-based camera. The results showed no significant differences between cameras.

  13. A Historical Perspective on Student Affairs Professionals' Use of Digital Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cabellon, Edmund T.; Payne-Kirchmeier, Julie

    2016-01-01

    This chapter provides a historical perspective of student affairs professionals' use of digital and social technologies in their work on college campuses. The purpose of the chapter is to describe how digital technology tools have evolved since 2005, demonstrate how student affairs technology shifted and changed during this time, and shape student…

  14. Malaysian Teachers' Conceptions and Uses of Digital Technology in English Writing Instruction: A Multiple Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohamed Razali, Abu Bakar

    2013-01-01

    Very little is known about how teachers' "conceptualizations" of digital technology and their "uses" of the technology evolve and relate. Yet knowing about and understanding teachers' conceptions and uses of digital technology are essential for learning how teachers integrate it effectively for student learning. By applying…

  15. Integration of the digital technologies in the teaching of astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Macedo, J. A.; Voelzke, M. R.

    2014-08-01

    This study presents results of a survey conducted at the Federal Institution of Education, Science and Technology in the North of Minas Gerais (IFNMG), and aimed to investigate the potential uses of interactive materials in the teaching of astronomy. Despite being part of official documents, proposals included in the curriculum of several states, and having contributed to human and technological development, astronomy is rarely taught adequately in the Brazilian basic education. When it is taught, it is with unsatisfactory results as presented by students and teachers as shown by several studies, such as those carried out by (Voelzke and Gonzaga, 2013). Digital technologies are commonly used by youth, but neglected by the majority of teachers. In this sense, a survey with the aim of pointing out the potential use of digital technologies in teaching astronomy was developed. An advanced course in astronomy was offered for participants with the goal to help them understand astronomical phenomena. The following steps were to be taken: i) analysis of the pedagogical projects (PPC) of the licenciates at the IFNMG, with its Campus Januária as research locus; ii) analysis of students' preconceptions about astronomy and digital technologies, identified by the application of an initial questionnaire; iii) preparation of the course taking into account the students' previous knowledge; iv) application of the education proposal developed under part-time presence modality, using various interactive tools; v) application and analysis of the final questionnaire. The test consisted of thirty-two students of physics, mathematics and biology and was conducted with the qualitative and quantitative methodology, combined with a content analysis. Among other results, it was verified that: (i) In the IFNMG only the licenciate-course in physics includes astronomy content diluted in various subjects of the curriculum; (ii) the analysis of the initial questionnaire showed even that group

  16. Digital Linear Tape (DLT) technology and product family overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lignos, Demetrios

    1994-01-01

    The demand that began a couple of years ago for increased data storage capacity continues. Peripheral Strategies (a Santa Barbara, California, Storage Market Research Firm) projects the amount of data stored on the average enterprise network will grow by 50 percent to 100 percent per year. Furthermore, Peripheral Strategies says that a typical mid-range workstation system containing 30GB to 50GB of storage today will grow at the rate of 50 percent per year. Dan Friedlander, a Boulder, Colorado-based consultant specializing in PC-LAN backup, says, 'The average NetWare LAN is about 8GB, but there are many that have 30GB to 300GB.....' The substantial growth of storage requirements has created various tape technologies that seek to satisfy the needs of today's and, especially, the next generations's systems and applications. There are five leading tape technologies in the market today: QIC (Quarter Inch Cartridge), IBM 3480/90, 8mm, DAT (Digital Audio Tape) and DLT (Digital Linear Tape). Product performance specifications and user needs have combined to classify these technologies into low-end, mid-range, and high-end systems applications. Although the manufacturers may try to position their products differently, product specifications and market requirements have determined that QIC and DAT are primarily low-end systems products while 8mm and DLT are competing for mid-range systems applications and the high-end systems space, where IBM compatibility is not required. The 3480/90 products seem to be used primarily in the IBM market, for interchangeability purposes. There are advantages and disadvantages for each of the tape technologies in the market today. We believe that DLT technology offers a significant number of very important features and specifications that make it extremely attractive for most current as well as emerging new applications, such as Hierarchical Storage Management (HSM). This paper will demonstrate why we think that the DLT technology and family

  17. Using a slit lamp-mounted digital high-speed camera for dynamic observation of phakic lenses during eye movements: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Leitritz, Martin Alexander; Ziemssen, Focke; Bartz-Schmidt, Karl Ulrich; Voykov, Bogomil

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate a digital high-speed camera combined with digital morphometry software for dynamic measurements of phakic intraocular lens movements to observe kinetic influences, particularly in fast direction changes and at lateral end points. Materials and methods A high-speed camera taking 300 frames per second observed movements of eight iris-claw intraocular lenses and two angle-supported intraocular lenses. Standardized saccades were performed by the patients to trigger mass inertia with lens position changes. Freeze images with maximum deviation were used for digital software-based morphometry analysis with ImageJ. Results Two eyes from each of five patients (median age 32 years, range 28–45 years) without findings other than refractive errors were included. The high-speed images showed sufficient usability for further morphometric processing. In the primary eye position, the median decentrations downward and in a lateral direction were −0.32 mm (range −0.69 to 0.024) and 0.175 mm (range −0.37 to 0.45), respectively. Despite the small sample size of asymptomatic patients, we found a considerable amount of lens dislocation. The median distance amplitude during eye movements was 0.158 mm (range 0.02–0.84). There was a slight positive correlation (r=0.39, P<0.001) between the grade of deviation in the primary position and the distance increase triggered by movements. Conclusion With the use of a slit lamp-mounted high-speed camera system and morphometry software, observation and objective measurements of iris-claw intraocular lenses and angle-supported intraocular lenses movements seem to be possible. Slight decentration in the primary position might be an indicator of increased lens mobility during kinetic stress during eye movements. Long-term assessment by high-speed analysis with higher case numbers has to clarify the relationship between progressing motility and endothelial cell damage. PMID:25071365

  18. Technology: Digital Photography in an Inner-City Fifth Grade, Part 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riner, Phil

    2005-01-01

    Last month, Phil Riner began discussing his project of teaching digital photography and prosocial behavior skills to inner-city fifth-graders. This work led him to generate some very specific procedures for camera care and use. Phil also taught the students some simple rules for taking better photos. These rules fell into four broad categories:…

  19. Using Information and Communication Technology (ICT) to the Maximum: Learning and Teaching Biology with Limited Digital Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Rooy, Wilhelmina S.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The ubiquity, availability and exponential growth of digital information and communication technology (ICT) creates unique opportunities for learning and teaching in the senior secondary school biology curriculum. Digital technologies make it possible for emerging disciplinary knowledge and understanding of biological processes…

  20. Optical engineering application of modeled photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) for high-speed digital camera dynamic range optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, James; Gueymard, Christian A.

    2009-08-01

    As efforts to create accurate yet computationally efficient estimation models for clear-sky photosynthetically active solar radiation (PAR) have succeeded, the range of practical engineering applications where these models can be successfully applied has increased. This paper describes a novel application of the REST2 radiative model (developed by the second author) in optical engineering. The PAR predictions in this application are used to predict the possible range of instantaneous irradiances that could impinge on the image plane of a stationary video camera designed to image license plates on moving vehicles. The overall spectral response of the camera (including lens and optical filters) is similar to the 400-700 nm PAR range, thereby making PAR irradiance (rather than luminance) predictions most suitable for this application. The accuracy of the REST2 irradiance predictions for horizontal surfaces, coupled with another radiative model to obtain irradiances on vertical surfaces, and to standard optical image formation models, enable setting the dynamic range controls of the camera to ensure that the license plate images are legible (unsaturated with adequate contrast) regardless of the time of day, sky condition, or vehicle speed. A brief description of how these radiative models are utilized as part of the camera control algorithm is provided. Several comparisons of the irradiance predictions derived from the radiative model versus actual PAR measurements under varying sky conditions with three Licor sensors (one horizontal and two vertical) have been made and showed good agreement. Various camera-to-plate geometries and compass headings have been considered in these comparisons. Time-lapse sequences of license plate images taken with the camera under various sky conditions over a 30-day period are also analyzed. They demonstrate the success of the approach at creating legible plate images under highly variable lighting, which is the main goal of this

  1. Measurement of Young’s modulus and Poisson’s ratio of metals by means of ESPI using a digital camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francisco, J. B. Pascual; Michtchenko, A.; Barragán Pérez, O.; Susarrey Huerta, O.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, mechanical experiments with a low-cost interferometry set-up are presented. The set-up is suitable for an undergraduate laboratory where optical equipment is absent. The arrangement consists of two planes of illumination, allowing the measurement of the two perpendicular in-plane displacement directions. An axial load was applied on three different metals, and the longitudinal and transversal displacements were measured sequentially. A digital camera was used to acquire the images of the different states of load of the illuminated area. A personal computer was used to perform the digital subtraction of the images to obtain the fringe correlations, which are needed to calculate the displacements. Finally, Young’s modulus and Poisson’s ratio of the metals were calculated using the displacement data.

  2. Digital Media, Technologies and Scholarship: Some Shapes of eResearch in Educational Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markauskaite, Lina

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses some recent developments in digital media, research technologies and scholarly practices that are known under the umbrella term of "eResearch". Drawing on conceptual ideas of digital materialism, epistemic artefacts and epistemic tools, this paper discusses how the digital inscription of knowledge and knowing could…

  3. Digital time stamping system based on open source technologies.

    PubMed

    Miskinis, Rimantas; Smirnov, Dmitrij; Urba, Emilis; Burokas, Andrius; Malysko, Bogdan; Laud, Peeter; Zuliani, Francesco

    2010-03-01

    A digital time stamping system based on open source technologies (LINUX-UBUNTU, OpenTSA, OpenSSL, MySQL) is described in detail, including all important testing results. The system, called BALTICTIME, was developed under a project sponsored by the European Commission under the Program FP 6. It was designed to meet the requirements posed to the systems of legal and accountable time stamping and to be applicable to the hardware commonly used by the national time metrology laboratories. The BALTICTIME system is intended for the use of governmental and other institutions as well as personal bodies. Testing results demonstrate that the time stamps issued to the user by BALTICTIME and saved in BALTICTIME's archives (which implies that the time stamps are accountable) meet all the regulatory requirements. Moreover, the BALTICTIME in its present implementation is able to issue more than 10 digital time stamps per second. The system can be enhanced if needed. The test version of the BALTICTIME service is free and available at http://baltictime. pfi.lt:8080/btws/ and http://baltictime.lnmc.lv:8080/btws/.

  4. Progress in Low-Power Digital Microwave Radiometer Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piepmeier, Jeffrey R.; Kim, Edward J.

    2004-01-01

    Three component technologies were combined into a digital correlation microwave radiometer. The radiometer comprises a dual-channel X-band superheterodyne receiver, low-power high-speed cross-correlator (HSCC), three-level ADCs, and a correlated noise source (CNS). The HSCC dissipates 10 mW and operates at 500 MHz clock speed. The ADCs are implemented using ECL components and dissipate more power than desired. Thus, a low-power ADC development is underway. The new ADCs arc predicted to dissipated less than 200 mW and operate at 1 GSps with 1.5 GHz of input bandwidth. The CNS provides different input correlation values for calibration of the radiometer. The correlation channel had a null offset of 0.0008. Test results indicate that the correlation channel can be calibrated with 0.09% error in gain.

  5. [Development and prospect of digital technology in the field of prosthodontics].

    PubMed

    Zhang, F Q

    2016-04-09

    The development of digital technology is gradually changing clinical practice and laboratory procedure of prosthodontics. After decades of exploration and development, the modern digital technology has been perfectly merged with prosthodontics and created a brand new treatment mode. The application of digital impression, digital design and digital processing has changed the way we treat patients and the way we communicate with patients. The data storage also provides a basis for long-term follow-up. The establishment of digital remote system, transferring data through internet, has improved communication in dental technique, tracing analysis of patient's condition, sharing and management of medical data, and popularization and promotion of knowledge. Digital technology promoted the development of prosthodontics in the direction of more precision, more convenience, more efficiency and more simulation in functional recovery, which will be one of the development directions of dentistry and even the medical science in the future.

  6. Situational Awareness from a Low-Cost Camera System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freudinger, Lawrence C.; Ward, David; Lesage, John

    2010-01-01

    A method gathers scene information from a low-cost camera system. Existing surveillance systems using sufficient cameras for continuous coverage of a large field necessarily generate enormous amounts of raw data. Digitizing and channeling that data to a central computer and processing it in real time is difficult when using low-cost, commercially available components. A newly developed system is located on a combined power and data wire to form a string-of-lights camera system. Each camera is accessible through this network interface using standard TCP/IP networking protocols. The cameras more closely resemble cell-phone cameras than traditional security camera systems. Processing capabilities are built directly onto the camera backplane, which helps maintain a low cost. The low power requirements of each camera allow the creation of a single imaging system comprising over 100 cameras. Each camera has built-in processing capabilities to detect events and cooperatively share this information with neighboring cameras. The location of the event is reported to the host computer in Cartesian coordinates computed from data correlation across multiple cameras. In this way, events in the field of view can present low-bandwidth information to the host rather than high-bandwidth bitmap data constantly being generated by the cameras. This approach offers greater flexibility than conventional systems, without compromising performance through using many small, low-cost cameras with overlapping fields of view. This means significant increased viewing without ignoring surveillance areas, which can occur when pan, tilt, and zoom cameras look away. Additionally, due to the sharing of a single cable for power and data, the installation costs are lower. The technology is targeted toward 3D scene extraction and automatic target tracking for military and commercial applications. Security systems and environmental/ vehicular monitoring systems are also potential applications.

  7. HST Solar Arrays photographed by Electronic Still Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    This medium close-up view of one of two original Solar Arrays (SA) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) was photographed with an Electronic Still Camera (ESC), and downlinked to ground controllers soon afterward. This view shows the cell side of the minus V-2 panel. Electronic still photography is a technology which provides the means for a handheld camera to electronically capture and digitize an image with resolution approaching film quality.

  8. HST Solar Arrays photographed by Electronic Still Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    This view, backdropped against the blackness of space shows one of two original Solar Arrays (SA) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The scene was photographed with an Electronic Still Camera (ESC), and downlinked to ground controllers soon afterward. Electronic still photography is a technology which provides the means for a handheld camera to electronically capture and digitize an image with resolution approaching film quality.

  9. Experimental Demonstration of Extended Depth-of-Field F/1.2 Visible High Definition Camera with Jointly Optimized Phase Mask and Real-Time Digital Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burcklen, M.-A.; Diaz, F.; Lepretre, F.; Rollin, J.; Delboulbé, A.; Lee, M.-S. L.; Loiseaux, B.; Koudoli, A.; Denel, S.; Millet, P.; Duhem, F.; Lemonnier, F.; Sauer, H.; Goudail, F.

    2015-10-01

    Increasing the depth of field (DOF) of compact visible high resolution cameras while maintaining high imaging performance in the DOF range is crucial for such applications as night vision goggles or industrial inspection. In this paper, we present the end-to-end design and experimental validation of an extended depth-of-field visible High Definition camera with a very small f-number, combining a six-ring pyramidal phase mask in the aperture stop of the lens with a digital deconvolution. The phase mask and the deconvolution algorithm are jointly optimized during the design step so as to maximize the quality of the deconvolved image over the DOF range. The deconvolution processing is implemented in real-time on a Field-Programmable Gate Array and we show that it requires very low power consumption. By mean of MTF measurements and imaging experiments we experimentally characterize the performance of both cameras with and without phase mask and thereby demonstrate a significant increase in depth of field of a factor 2.5, as it was expected in the design step.

  10. Real-time photothermoplastic 8-inch camera with an emphasis on the visualization of 3D digital data by holographic means

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherkasov, Yuri A.; Alexandrova, Elena L.; Rumjantsev, Alexander G.; Smirnov, Mikhail V.

    1995-04-01

    The development and investigations of large-formate (8-inch) real-time photothermoplastic (PTP) camera are carried out. The PTP camera is applied for operative recording of 3D- images by means of compound and digital holography and visualization of these holograms as 3D-static images. The optimization of the recording regimes is fulfilled with use the model of the relief-phase PTP images thermodevelopment, proposed by authors. According with that model, the achievement of maximal value of deformation (diffraction efficiency) is based on the opportunity in increasing of charge contrast of electrostatic latent image formed early by the moment of the viscosity decreasing during the thermodevelopment process. It is achieved by means of the control of the thermodevelopment regime. Also, the opportunities of the increase of the camera size (to 14 inch), of the rising of photosensitivity value and the enlarging of its spectral range, of the creation of Benton holograms and of the increasing of the speed of response to 25 Hz are discussed.

  11. The impact of digital technology on psychological treatments and their dissemination.

    PubMed

    Fairburn, Christopher G; Patel, Vikram

    2017-01-01

    The psychological treatment of mental health problems is beginning to undergo a sea-change driven by the widespread availability of digital technology. In this paper we provide an overview of the developments to date and those in the pipeline. We describe the various uses of digital interventions and consider their likely impact on clinical practice, clinical services and the global dissemination of psychological treatments. We note the importance of online clinics, blended treatment, digital assessment and digital training.

  12. Teaching with Technology. Hands-on. On Camera--And in the Computer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oehring, Sandra

    1993-01-01

    Describes how a still video camera can enhance elementary students' classroom presentations by transferring video images to a computer, a television monitor, or a standard videotape. The article presents suggestions for conducting still video projects involving historical research and local geography. (SM)

  13. Maximizing the Performance of Automated Low Cost All-sky Cameras

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bettonvil, F.

    2011-01-01

    Thanks to the wide spread of digital camera technology in the consumer market, a steady increase in the number of active All-sky camera has be noticed European wide. In this paper I look into the details of such All-sky systems and try to optimize the performance in terms of accuracy of the astrometry, the velocity determination and photometry. Having autonomous operation in mind, suggestions are done for the optimal low cost All-sky camera.

  14. The Digital Divide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson, Hannah Trierweiler

    2011-01-01

    Megan is a 14-year-old from Nebraska who just started ninth grade. She has her own digital camera, cell phone, Nintendo DS, and laptop, and one or more of these devices is usually by her side. Compared to the interactions and exploration she's engaged in at home, Megan finds the technology in her classroom falls a little flat. Most of the…

  15. Getting the Picture: Using the Digital Camera as a Tool to Support Reflective Practice and Responsive Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luckenbill, Julia

    2012-01-01

    Many early childhood educators use cameras to share the charming things that children do and the artwork they make. Programs often bind these photographs into portfolios and give them to children and their families as mementos at the end of the year. In the author's classrooms, they use photography on a daily basis to document children's…

  16. Exploring How Digital Media Technology Can Foster Saudi EFL Students' English Language Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altawil, Abdulmohsin

    2016-01-01

    Digital media technology has become an integral part of daily life for almost all young students, and for the majority of Saudi EFL (English as a Foreign Language) students. Digital media technology may not be limited to one or two kinds; it has various types such as software and programs, devices, application, websites, social media tools, etc.…

  17. Organizational Influences in Technology Adoption Decisions: A Case Study of Digital Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oguz, Fatih

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand the organizational level decision factors in technology adoption in the context of digital libraries. A qualitative case study approach was used to investigate the adoption of a specific technology, XML-based Web services, in digital libraries. Rogers' diffusion of innovations and Wenger's communities of…

  18. iGeneration: The Social Cognitive Effects of Digital Technology on Teenagers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ives, Eugenia A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine and better understand the social cognitive effects of digital technology on teenagers' brains and their socialization processes, as well as to learn best practices with regard to digital technology consumption. An extensive literature review was conducted on the social cognitive effects of digital…

  19. The Use of Digital Technologies across the Adult Life Span in Distance Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jelfs, Anne; Richardson, John T. E.

    2013-01-01

    In June 2010, a survey was carried out to explore access to digital technology, attitudes to digital technology and approaches to studying across the adult life span in students taking courses with the UK Open University. In total, 7000 people were surveyed, of whom more than 4000 responded. Nearly all these students had access to a computer and…

  20. Using Digital Technology to See Angles from Different Angles. Part 1: Corners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Host, Erin; Baynham, Emily; McMaster, Heather

    2014-01-01

    In Part 1 of their article, Erin Host, Emily Baynham and Heather McMaster use a combination of digital technology and concrete materials to explore the concept of "corners". They provide a practical, easy to follow sequence of activities that builds on students' understandings. [For "Using Digital Technology to See Angles from…

  1. Embracing Digital Technologies in Classroom Practice: The Impact of Teacher Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abbott, Rosemary

    2016-01-01

    It is often perceived that learning in 21st century classrooms will involve extensive use of digital technologies. This paper, based on a qualitative research investigation at a private girls' college in Melbourne, explores the impact of teacher subjectivities on the need to change through the integration of digital technologies into classroom…

  2. Teaching in a Digital Age: How Educators Use Technology to Improve Student Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKnight, Katherine; O'Malley, Kimberly; Ruzic, Roxanne; Horsley, Maria Kelly; Franey, John J.; Bassett, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    A successful digital conversion for classrooms, districts, and states is not determined by the technology, but by how technology enables teaching and learning. The purpose of our multisite case study was to document digital instructional strategies teachers use to enhance and transform student learning, and align that use with learning research.…

  3. 77 FR 8284 - Western Digital Technologies, Inc., Hard Drive Development Engineering Group Irvine (Formerly at...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-14

    ..., 212-218, 228-231, 244, 245- 246, 271-279. According to the subject firm, the engineering work... Employment and Training Administration Western Digital Technologies, Inc., Hard Drive Development Engineering... workers of Western Digital Technologies, Inc., Hard Drive Development Engineering Group, Lake...

  4. How Digital Technologies, Blended Learning and MOOCs Will Impact the Future of Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Neil P.

    2014-01-01

    Digital technologies are revolutionizing all parts of society, including higher education. Universities are rapidly adapting to the prevalence of staff and student mobile devices, digital tools and services on campus, and are developing strategies to harness these technologies to enhance student learning. In this paper, I explore the use of…

  5. Adult Learning in the Digital Age: Perspectives on Online Technologies and Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kidd, Terry T., Ed.; Keengwe, Jared, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    As instructors move further into the incorporation of 21st century technologies in adult education, a new paradigm of digitally-enriched mediated learning has emerged. This book provides a comprehensive framework of trends and issues related to adult learning for the facilitation of authentic learning in the age of digital technology. This…

  6. Digital Technology and the Culture of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lai, Kwok-Wing

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses how the use of digital technologies may support a shift of cultural practices in teaching and learning, to better meet the needs of 21st century higher education learners. A brief discussion of the changing needs of the learners is provided, followed by a review of the overall impact of digital technologies on teaching and…

  7. Comic Relief: Graduate Students Address Multiple Meanings for Technology Integration with Digital Comic Creation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sockman, Beth Rajan; Sutton, Rhonda; Herrmann, Michele

    2016-01-01

    This study determined the usefulness of digital comic creation with 77 graduate students in a teacher technology course. Students completed an assigned reading and created digital comics that addressed technology integration concerns in the schools and society. Using practical action research, 77 student-created comics were analyzed. The findings…

  8. Teachers' Use of Digital Technology in Secondary Music Education: Illustrations of Changing Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wise, Stuart; Greenwood, Janinka; Davis, Niki

    2011-01-01

    The music industry in the 21st century uses digital technology in a wide range of applications including performance, composition and in recording and publishing. Much of this digital technology is freely available via downloads from the internet, as part of software included with computers when they are purchased and via applications that are…

  9. The Impact of Digital Video Technology on Production: The Case of "American Gothic."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fink, Edward J.

    1997-01-01

    Opines that the study of video production is important in better understanding the aural/visual aspects of television, especially since television production is undergoing a digital revolution. Assesses the impact of new technologies by examining a "cutting-edge" program, "American Gothic." Finds that digital technology offers…

  10. Anger Camera Firmware

    SciTech Connect

    2010-11-19

    The firmware is responsible for the operation of Anger Camera Electronics, calculation of position, time of flight and digital communications. It provides a first stage analysis of 48 signals from 48 analog signals that have been converted to digital values using A/D convertors.

  11. A Digital Ecosystem of Diabetes Data and Technology

    PubMed Central

    Heintzman, Nathaniel D.

    2015-01-01

    The management of type 1 diabetes (T1D) ideally involves regimented measurement of various health signals; constant interpretation of diverse kinds of data; and consistent cohesion between patients, caregivers, and health care professionals (HCPs). In the context of myriad factors that influence blood glucose dynamics for each individual patient (eg, medication, activity, diet, stress, sleep quality, hormones, environment), such coordination of self-management and clinical care is a great challenge, amplified by the routine unavailability of many types of data thought to be useful in diabetes decision-making. While much remains to be understood about the physiology of diabetes and blood glucose dynamics at the level of the individual, recent and emerging medical and consumer technologies are helping the diabetes community to take great strides toward truly personalized, real-time, data-driven management of this chronic disease. This review describes “connected” technologies—such as smartphone apps, and wearable devices and sensors—which comprise part of a new digital ecosystem of data-driven tools that can link patients and their care teams for precision management of diabetes. These connected technologies are rich sources of physiologic, behavioral, and contextual data that can be integrated and analyzed in “the cloud” for research into personal models of glycemic dynamics, and employed in a multitude of applications for mobile health (mHealth) and telemedicine in diabetes care. PMID:26685994

  12. Geospatial technologies and digital geomorphological mapping: Concepts, issues and research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, Michael P.; James, L. Allan; Shroder, John F.; Walsh, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    Geomorphological mapping plays an essential role in understanding Earth surface processes, geochronology, natural resources, natural hazards and landscape evolution. It involves the partitioning of the terrain into conceptual spatial entities based upon criteria that include morphology (form), genetics (process), composition and structure, chronology, environmental system associations (land cover, soils, ecology), as well as spatial topological relationships of surface features (landforms). Historically, the power of human visualization was primarily relied upon for analysis, introducing subjectivity and biases with respect to selection of criteria for terrain segmentation and placement of boundaries. This paper reviews new spatio-temporal data and geocomputational approaches that now permit Earth scientists to go far beyond traditional mapping, permitting quantitative characterization of landscape morphology and the integration of varied landscape thematic information. Numerous conceptual, theoretical, and information-technology issues are at the heart of digital geomorphological mapping (DGM), and scientific progress has not kept pace with new and rapidly evolving geospatial technologies. Consequently, new capabilities exist but numerous issues have not been adequately addressed. Therefore, this paper discusses conceptual foundations and illustrates how geomorphometry and mapping approaches can be used to produce geomorphological information related to the land surface and landforms, process rates, process-form relationships, and geomorphic systems.

  13. Image quality of digital radiography using flat detector technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ducourant, Thierry; Couder, David; Wirth, Thibaut; Trochet, J. C.; Bastiaens, Raoul J. M.; Bruijns, Tom J. C.; Luijendijk, Hans A.; Sandkamp, Bernhard; Davies, Andrew G.; Didier, Dominique; Gonzalez, Agustin; Terraz, Sylvain; Ruefenacht, Daniel

    2003-06-01

    One of the most demanding applications in dynamic X-Ray imaging is Digital Subtraction Angiography (DSA). As opposed to other applications such as Radiography or Fluoroscopy, there has been so far limited attempts to introduce DSA with flat detector (FD) technology: Up to now, only part of the very demanding requirements could be taken into account. In order to enable an introduction of FD technology also in this area, a complete understanding of all physical phenomena related to the use of this technology in DSA is necessary. This knowledge can be used for detector design and performance optimization. Areas of research include fast switching between several detector operating modes (e.g. switching between fluoroscopy and high dose exposure modes and vice versa) and non stability during the DSA run e.g. due to differences in gain between subsequent images. Furthermore, effects of local and global X-Ray overexposure (due to direct radiation), which can cause temporal artifacts such as ghosting, may have a negative impact on the image quality. Pixel shift operations and image subtraction enhance the visibility of any artifact. The use of a refresh light plays an important role in the optimization process. Both an 18x18 cm2 as well as a large area 30x40 cm2 flat panel detector are used for studying the various phenomena. Technical measurements were obtained using complex imaging sequences representing the most demanding application conditions. Studies on subtraction test objects were performed and vascular applications have been carried out in order to confirm earlier findings. The basis for comparison of DSA is, still, the existing and mature IITV technology. The results of this investigation show that the latest generation of dynamic flat detectors is capable of handling this kind of demanding application. Not only the risk areas and their solutions and points of attention will be addressed, but also the benefits of present FD technology with respect to state

  14. Application of Digital Industrial Photogrammetric Technology to Measure the Surface Accuracy of 13.7 m Millimeter-wave Radio Telescope Antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Q. H.; Fang, S. H.; Zuo, Y. X.; Li, Y.; Sun, J. X.; Yang, J.; Li, J. J.; Xu, Y.; He, D. Y.

    2010-04-01

    In this paper, the surface accuracy of 13.7 m millimeter-wave radio telescope antenna is measured by digital industrial photogrammetric technology. In order to overcome the inconvenience introduced by local conditions, the circular orbits are used to transport the camera and wireless transmission is used to take on-line photos. Measuring targets are made of retro-reflective material. All camera stations are orientated and the homologous image points are matched automatically by the coded targets. The 3D point coordinates are calculated by the bundle adjustment method. Using the methods of CAD surface conversion algorithm and best fitting to calculate the deviation value of the surface, the RMS of the 480 points gotten from CAD best fitting algorithm is adjusted to 0.083 mm. The feasibility and superiority of photogrammetric technology, which is used to measure the radio astronomy antenna's surface, is demonstrated.

  15. A Strategic Necessity: Building Senior Leadership's Fluency in Digital Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolomitz, Kara; Cabellon, Edmund T.

    2016-01-01

    This chapter describes the opportunity for senior student affairs officers (SSAOs) to develop an increased digital fluency to meet the needs of various constituencies in the digital age. The authors explore what a digital fluency is, how it might impact SSAOs' leadership potential, and the benefits for their respective divisions.

  16. Research on auto-calibration technology of the image plane's center of 360-degree and all round looking camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shaojun; Xu, Xiping

    2015-10-01

    The 360-degree and all round looking camera, as its characteristics of suitable for automatic analysis and judgment on the ambient environment of the carrier by image recognition algorithm, is usually applied to opto-electronic radar of robots and smart cars. In order to ensure the stability and consistency of image processing results of mass production, it is necessary to make sure the centers of image planes of different cameras are coincident, which requires to calibrate the position of the image plane's center. The traditional mechanical calibration method and electronic adjusting mode of inputting the offsets manually, both exist the problem of relying on human eyes, inefficiency and large range of error distribution. In this paper, an approach of auto- calibration of the image plane of this camera is presented. The imaging of the 360-degree and all round looking camera is a ring-shaped image consisting of two concentric circles, the center of the image is a smaller circle and the outside is a bigger circle. The realization of the technology is just to exploit the above characteristics. Recognizing the two circles through HOUGH TRANSFORM algorithm and calculating the center position, we can get the accurate center of image, that the deviation of the central location of the optic axis and image sensor. The program will set up the image sensor chip through I2C bus automatically, we can adjusting the center of the image plane automatically and accurately. The technique has been applied to practice, promotes productivity and guarantees the consistent quality of products.

  17. Estimation of the Spectral Sensitivity Functions of Un-Modified and Modified Commercial Off-The Digital Cameras to Enable Their Use as a Multispectral Imaging System for Uavs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berra, E.; Gibson-Poole, S.; MacArthur, A.; Gaulton, R.; Hamilton, A.

    2015-08-01

    Commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) digital cameras on-board unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) have the potential to be used as multispectral imaging systems; however, their spectral sensitivity is usually unknown and needs to be either measured or estimated. This paper details a step by step methodology for identifying the spectral sensitivity of modified (to be response to near infra-red wavelengths) and un-modified COTS digital cameras, showing the results of its application for three different models of camera. Six digital still cameras, which are being used as imaging systems on-board different UAVs, were selected to have their spectral sensitivities measured by a monochromator. Each camera was exposed to monochromatic light ranging from 370 nm to 1100 nm in 10 nm steps, with images of each step recorded in RAW format. The RAW images were converted linearly into TIFF images using DCRaw, an open-source program, before being batch processed through ImageJ (also open-source), which calculated the mean and standard deviation values from each of the red-green-blue (RGB) channels over a fixed central region within each image. These mean values were then related to the relative spectral radiance from the monochromator and its integrating sphere, in order to obtain the relative spectral response (RSR) for each of the cameras colour channels. It was found that different un-modified camera models present very different RSR in some channels, and one of the modified cameras showed a response that was unexpected. This highlights the need to determine the RSR of a camera before using it for any quantitative studies.

  18. Rethinking Education in the Age of Technology: The Digital Revolution and Schooling in America. Technology, Education--Connections (TEC) Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Allan; Halverson, Richard

    2009-01-01

    The digital revolution has hit education, with more and more classrooms plugged into the whole wired world. But are schools making the most of new technologies? Are they tapping into the learning potential of today's Firefox/Facebook/cell phone generation? Have schools fallen through the crack of the digital divide? In "Rethinking Education in the…

  19. Use of iris recognition camera technology for the quantification of corneal opacification in mucopolysaccharidoses.

    PubMed

    Aslam, Tariq Mehmood; Shakir, Savana; Wong, James; Au, Leon; Ashworth, Jane

    2012-12-01

    Mucopolysaccharidoses (MPS) can cause corneal opacification that is currently difficult to objectively quantify. With newer treatments for MPS comes an increased need for a more objective, valid and reliable index of disease severity for clinical and research use. Clinical evaluation by slit lamp is very subjective and techniques based on colour photography are difficult to standardise. In this article the authors present evidence for the utility of dedicated image analysis algorithms applied to images obtained by a highly sophisticated iris recognition camera that is small, manoeuvrable and adapted to achieve rapid, reliable and standardised objective imaging in a wide variety of patients while minimising artefactual interference in image quality.

  20. The DSLR Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkó, Ernő; Argyle, R. W.

    Cameras have developed significantly in the past decade; in particular, digital Single-Lens Reflex Cameras (DSLR) have appeared. As a consequence we can buy cameras of higher and higher pixel number, and mass production has resulted in the great reduction of prices. CMOS sensors used for imaging are increasingly sensitive, and the electronics in the cameras allows images to be taken with much less noise. The software background is developing in a similar way—intelligent programs are created for after-processing and other supplementary works. Nowadays we can find a digital camera in almost every household, most of these cameras are DSLR ones. These can be used very well for astronomical imaging, which is nicely demonstrated by the amount and quality of the spectacular astrophotos appearing in different publications. These examples also show how much post-processing software contributes to the rise in the standard of the pictures. To sum up, the DSLR camera serves as a cheap alternative for the CCD camera, with somewhat weaker technical characteristics. In the following, I will introduce how we can measure the main parameters (position angle and separation) of double stars, based on the methods, software and equipment I use. Others can easily apply these for their own circumstances.

  1. In vivo multispectral imaging of the absorption and scattering properties of exposed brain using a digital red-green-blue camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Keiichiro; Ishizuka, Tomohiro; Mizushima, Chiharu; Nishidate, Izumi; Kawauchi, Satoko; Sato, Shunichi; Sato, Manabu

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate multi-spectral images of the absorption and scattering properties in the cerebral cortex of rat brain, we investigated spectral reflectance images estimated by the Wiener estimation method using a digital red-green-blue camera. A Monte Carlo simulation-based multiple regression analysis for the corresponding spectral absorbance images at nine wavelengths (500, 520, 540, 560, 570, 580, 600, 730, and 760 nm) was then used to specify the absorption and scattering parameters. The spectral images of absorption and reduced scattering coefficients were reconstructed from the absorption and scattering parameters. We performed in vivo experiments on exposed rat brain to confirm the feasibility of this method. The estimated images of the absorption coefficients were dominated by hemoglobin spectra. The estimated images of the reduced scattering coefficients had a broad scattering spectrum, exhibiting a larger magnitude at shorter wavelengths, corresponding to the typical spectrum of brain tissue published in the literature.

  2. Hierarchical object-based classification of ultra-high-resolution digital mapping camera (DMC) imagery for rangeland mapping and assessment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ultra high resolution digital aerial photography has great potential to complement or replace ground measurements of vegetation cover for rangeland monitoring and assessment. We investigated object-based image analysis (OBIA) techniques for classifying vegetation in southwestern U.S. arid rangelands...

  3. ProgRes 3000: a digital color camera with a 2-D array CCD sensor and programmable resolution up to 2994 x 2320 picture elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenz, Reimar K.; Lenz, Udo

    1990-11-01

    A newly developed imaging principle two dimensional microscanning with Piezo-controlled Aperture Displacement (PAD) allows for high image resolutions. The advantages of line scanners (high resolution) are combined with those of CCD area sensors (high light sensitivity geometrical accuracy and stability easy focussing illumination control and selection of field of view by means of TV real-time imaging). A custom designed sensor optimized for small sensor element apertures and color fidelity eliminates the need for color filter revolvers or mechanical shutters and guarantees good color convergence. By altering the computer controlled microscan patterns spatial and temporal resolution become interchangeable their product being a constant. The highest temporal resolution is TV real-time (50 fields/sec) the highest spatial resolution is 2994 x 2320 picture elements (Pels) for each of the three color channels (28 MBytes of raw image data in 8 see). Thus for the first time it becomes possible to take 35mm slide quality still color images of natural 3D scenes by purely electronic means. Nearly " square" Pels as well as hexagonal sampling schemes are possible. Excellent geometrical accuracy and low noise is guaranteed by sensor element (Sel) synchronous analog to digital conversion within the camera head. The cameras principle of operation and the procedure to calibrate the two-dimensional piezo-mechanical motion with an accuracy of better than O. 2. tm RMSE in image space is explained. The remaining positioning inaccuracy may be further

  4. Application of a digital high-speed camera system for combustion research by using UV laser diagnostics under microgravity at Bremen drop tower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renken, Hartmut; Bolik, T.; Eigenbrod, Ch.; Koenig, Jens; Rath, Hans J.

    1997-05-01

    This paper describes a digital high-speed camera- and recording system that will be used primary for combustion research under microgravity ((mu) g) at Bremen drop tower. To study the reactionzones during the process of combustion particularly OH-radicals are detected 2D by using the method of laser induced predissociation fluorescence (LIPF). A pulsed high-energy excimer lasersystem combined with a two- staged intensified CCD-camera allows a repetition rate of 250 images (256 X 256 pixel) per second, according to the maximum laser pulse repetition. The laser system is integrated at the top of the 110 m high evacutable drop tube. Motorized mirrors are necessary to achieve a stable beam position within the area of interest during the drop of the experiment-capsule. The duration of 1 drop will be 4.7 seconds (microgravity conditions). About 1500 images are captured and stored onboard the drop capsule 96 Mbyte RAM image storagesystem. After saving capsule and datas, a special PC-based image processing software visualizes the movies and extracts physical information out of the images. Now, after two and a half years of developments the system is working operational and capable of high temporal 2D LIPF- measuring of OH, H2O, O2, and CO concentrations and 2D temperature distribution of these species.

  5. Camera-based measurement for transverse vibrations of moving catenaries in mine hoists using digital image processing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Jiannan; Xiao, Xingming; Liu, Yao

    2016-03-01

    This paper proposes a novel, non-contact, sensing method to measure the transverse vibrations of hoisting catenaries in mine hoists. Hoisting catenaries are typically moving cables and it is not feasible to use traditional methods to measure their transverse vibrations. In order to obtain the transverse displacements of an arbitrary point in a moving catenary, by superposing a mask image having the predefined reference line perpendicular to the hoisting catenaries on each frame of the processed image sequence, the dynamic intersecting points with a grey value of 0 in the image sequence could be identified. Subsequently, by traversing the coordinates of the pixel with a grey value of 0 and calculating the distance between the identified dynamic points from the reference, the transverse displacements of the selected arbitrary point in the hoisting catenary can be obtained. Furthermore, based on a theoretical model, the reasonability and applicability of the proposed camera-based method were confirmed. Additionally, a laboratory experiment was also carried out, which then validated the accuracy of the proposed method. The research results indicate that the proposed camera-based method is suitable for the measurement of the transverse vibrations of moving cables.

  6. A low jitter all - digital phase - locked loop in 180 nm CMOS technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shumkin, O. V.; Butuzov, V. A.; Normanov, D. D.; Ivanov, P. Yu

    2016-02-01

    An all-digital phase locked loop (ADPLL) was implemented in 180 nm CMOS technology. The proposed ADPLL uses a digitally controlled oscillator to achieve 3 ps resolution. The pure digital phase locked loop is attractive because it is less sensitive to noise and operating conditions than its analog counterpart. The proposed ADPLL can be easily applied to different process as a soft IP block, making it very suitable for system-on-chip applications.

  7. Building a Digital Library: A Technology Manager's Point of View.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Elizabeth J.

    2000-01-01

    Describes the Historic Pittsburgh project at the University of Pittsburgh, a joint project with the Historical Society of Western Pennsylvania to produce a digital collection of historical materials available on the Internet. Discusses costs; metadata; digitization and preservation of originals; full-text capabilities; scanning; quality review;…

  8. Reference Implications of Digital Technology in a Library Photograph Collection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benemann, William E.

    1994-01-01

    Describes a feasibility study which focused on converting Japanese-American evacuation and relocation photographs to digital format for improved access and preservation. Problems and issues surrounding indexing the collection, the use of Library of Congress Subject Headings and authority files, and public service issues raised by a digital image…

  9. A Planning Cycle for Integrating Digital Technology into Literacy Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchison, Amy; Woodward, Lindsay

    2014-01-01

    With the adoption of the Common Core State Standards by most states, the use of digital tools in literacy and language arts instruction has become of critical importance to educators. These changes produce a need for a better understanding of how literacy and language arts teachers can successfully integrate digital tools into their instruction…

  10. Literary Education and Digital Learning: Methods and Technologies for Humanities Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Peer, Willie, Ed.; Zyngier, Sonia, Ed.; Viana, Vander, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    Today's popularization of modern technologies has allowed literature specialists to access an array of new opportunities in the digital medium, which have brought about an equal number of challenges and questions. This book provides insight into the most relevant issues in literary education and digital learning. This unique reference fills a gap…

  11. Using TPCK with Digital Storytelling to Investigate Contemporary Issues in Educational Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maddin, Ellen

    2012-01-01

    Digital storytelling is recognized as a motivating instructional approach that engages students in critical thinking and reflective learning. Technology tools that support digital storytelling are readily available and much easier to use today than they were in years past. The convergence of these factors has facilitated the inclusion of digital…

  12. Digital Storytelling in Writing: A Case Study of Student Teacher Attitudes toward Teaching with Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bumgarner, Barri L.

    2012-01-01

    This case study investigated how preservice teachers taught digital storytelling to students who often possessed more technology skills than the teachers. During the spring semester of 2011, two secondary-level language arts teaching interns and their cooperating teachers taught a digital storytelling project. The participants and their students…

  13. Creativity in the Age of Technology: Measuring the Digital Creativity of Millennials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffmann, Jessica; Ivcevic, Zorana; Brackett, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Digital technology and its many uses form an emerging domain of creative expression for adolescents and young adults. To date, measures of self-reported creative behavior cover more traditional forms of creativity, including visual art, music, or writing, but do not include creativity in the digital domain. This article introduces a new measure,…

  14. The Contributions of Digital Communications Technology to Human Rights Education: A Case Study of Amnesty International

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norlander, Rebecca Joy

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation addresses the need for critical assessment and evaluation of human rights education (HRE) programs and activities, especially newer initiatives that incorporate the use of digital information and communications technology (ICT). It provides an in-depth case study of the use of digital ICT in Amnesty International's HRE efforts,…

  15. Access to Technology in Transnational Social Fields: Simultaneity and Digital Literacy Socialization of Adult Immigrants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nogueron-Liu, Silvia

    2013-01-01

    Some studies of technology use by immigrants have explored the role of digital media in their maintenance of affiliations with their nations of origin. However, the potential for transnational social networks to serve as "resources" that facilitate digital literacy socialization for adult immigrant learners remains unexplored. In this…

  16. Beyond Digital Natives: European Research on Media Education; Challenges of Technology and Pedagogical Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivoltella, Pier Cesare

    2012-01-01

    This article aims to map issues of Media Education currently under debate in Europe. It points out three main research trends. The first one concerns digital natives and their skills in media and technologies. Here we have quite a dialectic situation: on the one hand, a lot of scholars and policymakers are sure that digital natives exist, that…

  17. 78 FR 59903 - Emission Mask Requirements for Digital Technologies on 800 MHz NPSPAC Channels; Analog FM...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-30

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 90 Emission Mask Requirements for Digital Technologies on 800 MHz NPSPAC Channels... Petition for Rulemaking filed by Harris Corporation (Harris). The NPRM proposes to require digital... affect reporting, recordkeeping and other compliance requirements. The NPRM proposes requiring...

  18. Digital Technology Snapshot of the Literacy and Essential Skills Field 2013. Summary Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trottier, Vicki

    2013-01-01

    From January to March 2013, "Canadian Literacy and Learning Network" (CLLN) conducted a snapshot to provide information about how digital technology tools are being used in the Literacy and Essential Skills (L/ES) field. The snapshot focused primarily on digital tools and activities that meet the organizational needs of provincial and…

  19. Using Digital Technologies to Improve the Authenticity of Performance Assessment for High-Stakes Purposes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newhouse, C. Paul

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on the outcomes of a three-year study investigating the use of digital technologies to increase the authenticity of high-stakes summative assessment in four Western Australian senior secondary courses. The study involved 82 teachers and 1015 students and a range of digital forms of assessment using computer-based exams, digital…

  20. Digital Technology and Creative Arts Career Patterns in the UK Creative Economy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comunian, Roberta; Faggian, Alessandra; Jewell, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we ask what role both digital and artistic human capital play in the creative economy by examining employment patterns of digital technology (DT) and creative arts and design (CAD) graduates. Using student micro-data collected by the Higher Education Statistical Agency (HESA) in the United Kingdom, we investigate the…

  1. The Digital Classroom: How Technology Is Changing the Way We Teach and Learn

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, David T. Ed.

    2000-01-01

    This book features more than 25 articles and essays that discuss the rewards and challenges of integrating technology into schools, as well as short editorials from technology experts, educators, and cultural critics. Digital technologies are reshaping the way education is practiced, raising many questions: How can we better prepare teachers for…

  2. Examining Student Digital Artifacts during a Year-Long Technology Integration Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, Prisca M.; Frey, Chris; Dawson, Kara; Liu, Feng; Ritzhaupt, Albert D.

    2012-01-01

    This study was situated within a year-long, statewide technology integration initiative designed to support technology integration within science, technology, engineering, and math classrooms. It examined the elements used in student artifacts in an attempt to investigate trends in digital artifact creation. Among several conclusions, this…

  3. Pre-School Children Creating and Communicating with Digital Technologies in the Home

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McPake, Joanna; Plowman, Lydia; Stephen, Christine

    2013-01-01

    There is a limited literature on pre-school children's experiences with "digital technologies" at home and little discussion of the ways in which children harness these technologies for their own purposes. This paper discusses findings drawn from three studies that investigated the role of "domestic technologies" and…

  4. Making Sense of Young People, Education and Digital Technology: The Role of Sociological Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selwyn, Neil

    2012-01-01

    This paper considers the contribution of sociological theory to the academic study of young people, education and digital technology. First it discusses the shortcomings of the technological and socially determinist views of technology and education that prevail in current academic and policy discussions. Against this background the paper outlines…

  5. Streak camera meeting summary

    SciTech Connect

    Dolan, Daniel H.; Bliss, David E.

    2014-09-01

    Streak cameras are important for high-speed data acquisition in single event experiments, where the total recorded information (I) is shared between the number of measurements (M) and the number of samples (S). Topics of this meeting included: streak camera use at the national laboratories; current streak camera production; new tube developments and alternative technologies; and future planning. Each topic is summarized in the following sections.

  6. Digital field ion microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Sijbrandij, S.J.; Russell, K.F.; Miller, M.K.; Thomson, R.C.

    1998-01-01

    Due to environmental concerns, there is a trend to avoid the use of chemicals needed to develop negatives and to process photographic paper, and to use digital technologies instead. Digital technology also offers the advantages that it is convenient, as it enables quick access to the end result, allows image storage and processing on computer, allows rapid hard copy output, and simplifies electronic publishing. Recently significant improvements have been made to the performance and cost of camera-sensors and printers. In this paper, field ion images recorded with two digital cameras of different resolution are compared to images recorded on standard 35 mm negative film. It should be noted that field ion images exhibit low light intensity and high contrast. Field ion images were recorded from a standard microchannel plate and a phosphor screen and had acceptance angles of {approximately} 60{degree}. Digital recordings were made with a Digital Vision Technologies (DVT) MICAM VHR1000 camera with a resolution of 752 x 582 pixels, and a Kodak DCS 460 digital camera with a resolution of 3,060 x 2,036 pixels. Film based recordings were made with Kodak T-MAX film rated at 400 ASA. The resolving power of T-MAX film, as specified by Kodak, is between 50 and 125 lines per mm, which corresponds to between 1,778 x 1,181 and 4,445 x 2,953 pixels, i.e. similar to that from the DCS 460 camera. The intensities of the images were sufficient to be recorded with standard fl:1.2 lenses with exposure times of less than 2 s. Many digital cameras were excluded from these experiments due to their lack of sensitivity or the inability to record a full frame image due to the fixed working distance defined by the vacuum system. The digital images were output on a Kodak Digital Science 8650 PS dye sublimation color printer (300 dpi). All field ion micrographs presented were obtained from a Ni-Al-Be specimen.

  7. Camera-based microswitch technology for eyelid and mouth responses of persons with profound multiple disabilities: two case studies.

    PubMed

    Lancioni, Giulio E; Bellini, Domenico; Oliva, Doretta; Singh, Nirbhay N; O'Reilly, Mark F; Sigafoos, Jeff

    2010-01-01

    These two studies assessed camera-based microswitch technology for eyelid and mouth responses of two persons with profound multiple disabilities and minimal motor behavior. This technology, in contrast with the traditional optic microswitches used for those responses, did not require support frames on the participants' face but only small color marks. The person involved in Study I had previously used optic sensors fixed on an eyeglasses' frame for detecting his eyelid- and mouth-opening responses. However, a deterioration of his head posture was making the correct location/use of this frame progressively more difficult. The person involved in Study II had previously been selected for a program relying on eyelid-closure responses and an optic sensor. Such a program however appeared difficult to implement given his sideward lying position and dystonic head movements. The new technology could be satisfactorily applied with both participants using mouth and eyelid opening with the first participant and eyelid closures with the second participant. Both participants had large increases in responding during the intervention periods (i.e., when their responses were followed by preferred stimulation). The findings are discussed in relation to the role of the new technology in helping persons with multiple disabilities and minimal motor behavior.

  8. Navigation and Elctro-Optic Sensor Integration Technology for Fusion of Imagery and Digital Mapping Products

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-08-01

    Electro - Optic Sensor Integration Technology (NEOSIT) software application. The design is highly modular and based on COTS tools to facilitate integration with sensors, navigation and digital data sources already installed on different host

  9. 75 FR 65517 - Western Digital Technologies, Inc., Corporate Headquarters/Hard Drive Development Division, Lake...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration Western Digital Technologies, Inc., Corporate Headquarters/Hard Drive... TAA. The request for reconsideration alleges that increased imports of articles (disk drives)...

  10. [Information digital technologies and medical psychologic prevention of stress state in railway transport workers].

    PubMed

    Kostin, A V; Kostina, S A

    2015-01-01

    The authors determined criteria of medical and psychologic training of railway transport workers, with applied information digital technologies. The results obtained prove that application of software "Railway worker" ("Zheleznodorozhnik") reduces frequency and duration of "emotional stress states".

  11. A BUNCH TO BUCKET PHASE DETECTOR USING DIGITAL RECEIVER TECHNOLOGY.

    SciTech Connect

    DELONG,J.; BRENNAN, J. M.; HAYES,T.; TUONG, N. LE,; SMITH, K.

    2003-05-12

    Transferring high-speed digital signals to a Digital Signal Processor is limited by the IO bandwidth of the DSP. A digital receiver circuit is used to translate high frequency W signals to base-band. The translated output frequency is close to DC and the data rate can be reduced, by decimation, before transfer to the DSP. By translating both the longitudinal beam (bunch) and RF cavity pick-ups (bucket) to DC, a DSP can be used to measure their relative phase angle. The result can be used as an error signal in a beam control servo loop and any phase differences can be compensated.

  12. Single chip camera active pixel sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, Timothy (Inventor); Pain, Bedabrata (Inventor); Olson, Brita (Inventor); Nixon, Robert H. (Inventor); Fossum, Eric R. (Inventor); Panicacci, Roger A. (Inventor); Mansoorian, Barmak (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A totally digital single chip camera includes communications to operate most of its structure in serial communication mode. The digital single chip camera include a D/A converter for converting an input digital word into an analog reference signal. The chip includes all of the necessary circuitry for operating the chip using a single pin.

  13. Video-Based Point Cloud Generation Using Multiple Action Cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teo, T.

    2015-05-01

    Due to the development of action cameras, the use of video technology for collecting geo-spatial data becomes an important trend. The objective of this study is to compare the image-mode and video-mode of multiple action cameras for 3D point clouds generation. Frame images are acquired from discrete camera stations while videos are taken from continuous trajectories. The proposed method includes five major parts: (1) camera calibration, (2) video conversion and alignment, (3) orientation modelling, (4) dense matching, and (5) evaluation. As the action cameras usually have large FOV in wide viewing mode, camera calibration plays an important role to calibrate the effect of lens distortion before image matching. Once the camera has been calibrated, the author use these action cameras to take video in an indoor environment. The videos are further converted into multiple frame images based on the frame rates. In order to overcome the time synchronous issues in between videos from different viewpoints, an additional timer APP is used to determine the time shift factor between cameras in time alignment. A structure form motion (SfM) technique is utilized to obtain the image orientations. Then, semi-global matching (SGM) algorithm is adopted to obtain dense 3D point clouds. The preliminary results indicated that the 3D points from 4K video are similar to 12MP images, but the data acquisition performance of 4K video is more efficient than 12MP digital images.

  14. Miniaturized Autonomous Extravehicular Robotic Camera (Mini AERCam)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fredrickson, Steven E.

    2001-01-01

    The NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) Engineering Directorate is developing the Autonomous Extravehicular Robotic Camera (AERCam), a low-volume, low-mass free-flying camera system . AERCam project team personnel recently initiated development of a miniaturized version of AERCam known as Mini AERCam. The Mini AERCam target design is a spherical "nanosatellite" free-flyer 7.5 inches in diameter and weighing 1 0 pounds. Mini AERCam is building on the success of the AERCam Sprint STS-87 flight experiment by adding new on-board sensing and processing capabilities while simultaneously reducing volume by 80%. Achieving enhanced capability in a smaller package depends on applying miniaturization technology across virtually all subsystems. Technology innovations being incorporated include micro electromechanical system (MEMS) gyros, "camera-on-a-chip" CMOS imagers, rechargeable xenon gas propulsion system , rechargeable lithium ion battery, custom avionics based on the PowerPC 740 microprocessor, GPS relative navigation, digital radio frequency communications and tracking, micropatch antennas, digital instrumentation, and dense mechanical packaging. The Mini AERCam free-flyer will initially be integrated into an approximate flight-like configuration for demonstration on an airbearing table. A pilot-in-the-loop and hardware-in-the-loop simulation to simulate on-orbit navigation and dynamics will complement the airbearing table demonstration. The Mini AERCam lab demonstration is intended to form the basis for future development of an AERCam flight system that provides beneficial on-orbit views unobtainable from fixed cameras, cameras on robotic manipulators, or cameras carried by EVA crewmembers.

  15. Manufacturing Methods and Technology for Digital Fault Isolation for Printed Circuit Boards.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-08-25

    PrAO-AO8O 9 iHUGHES AIRCRAFT CO FULLERTON CA GROUNO SYSTLIrNS Op I Jgi A4ANUFACTURING METHODS AND TECHNOLOGY FOR DIGITAL FAULT ISOLATbO-ETC(U) AUO... METHODS AND -TE CH- gk 79i ’ NOLOGY FOR DIGITAL gAULT ISOLATION FOR PRINTED OJCUIT BOARDS- Huhe Aircraft1( S,-ONTRACT ON GRANT NUMMSER(.) Support Systems...MANUFACTURING METHODS AND TECHNOLOGY -I FOR ’DIGITAL FAULT ISOLATION FOR PRINTED CIRCUIT BOARDS’ - PROJECT NO. R783242I CONTRACT DAAK40-78-C-0290 25 AUGUST

  16. [Application and prospect of digital technology in the field of orthodontics].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Y H

    2016-06-01

    The three-dimensional(3D)digital technology has brought a revolutionary change in diagnostic planning and treatment strategy of orthodontics. Acquisition of 3D image data of the hard and soft tissues of the patients, diagnostic analysis and treatment prediction, and ultimately the individualized orthodontic appliance, will become the development trend and workflow of the 3D orthodontics. With the development of 3D digital technology, the traditional plaster model has been gradually replacing by 3D digital models. Meanwhile, 3D facial soft tissue scan and cone-beam CT scan have been gradually applied to clinical orthodontics, making it possible to get 3D virtual anatomical structure for patients. With the help of digital technology, the diagnostic process is much easier for orthodontist. However how to command the whole digital workflow and put it into practice in the daily work is still a long way to go. The purpose of this article is to enlighten the orthodontists interested in digital technology and discuss the future of digital orthodontics in China.

  17. Integrating different tracking systems in football: multiple camera semi-automatic system, local position measurement and GPS technologies.

    PubMed

    Buchheit, Martin; Allen, Adam; Poon, Tsz Kit; Modonutti, Mattia; Gregson, Warren; Di Salvo, Valter

    2014-12-01

    Abstract During the past decade substantial development of computer-aided tracking technology has occurred. Therefore, we aimed to provide calibration equations to allow the interchangeability of different tracking technologies used in soccer. Eighty-two highly trained soccer players (U14-U17) were monitored during training and one match. Player activity was collected simultaneously with a semi-automatic multiple-camera (Prozone), local position measurement (LPM) technology (Inmotio) and two global positioning systems (GPSports and VX). Data were analysed with respect to three different field dimensions (small, <30 m(2) to full-pitch, match). Variables provided by the systems were compared, and calibration equations (linear regression models) between each system were calculated for each field dimension. Most metrics differed between the 4 systems with the magnitude of the differences dependant on both pitch size and the variable of interest. Trivial-to-small between-system differences in total distance were noted. However, high-intensity running distance (>14.4 km · h(-1)) was slightly-to-moderately greater when tracked with Prozone, and accelerations, small-to-very largely greater with LPM. For most of the equations, the typical error of the estimate was of a moderate magnitude. Interchangeability of the different tracking systems is possible with the provided equations, but care is required given their moderate typical error of the estimate.

  18. Integration of Digital Technologies into Play-Based Pedagogy in Kuwaiti Early Childhood Education: Teachers' Views, Attitudes and Aptitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aldhafeeri, Fayiz; Palaiologou, Ioanna; Folorunsho, Aderonke

    2016-01-01

    Scholars in the field of early childhood education are still debating the inclusion of digital technologies in play-based pedagogy and our understanding of digital play in early childhood education is still developing. This research paper examines early childhood education teachers' views, aptitudes and attitudes towards digital technologies in…

  19. 77 FR 42764 - Distribution of the 2005, 2006, 2007 and 2008 Digital Audio Recording Technology Royalty Funds...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-20

    ... Copyright Royalty Board Distribution of the 2005, 2006, 2007 and 2008 Digital Audio Recording Technology... the digital audio recording technology royalty fees in the 2005, 2006, 2007 and 2008 Musical Works... royalties on digital audio recording devices and media that are distributed in the United States. 17...

  20. Applying the Technology Acceptance Model in a Study of the Factors Affecting Usage of the Taiwan Digital Archives System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hong, Jon-Chao; Hwang, Ming-Yueh; Hsu, Hsuan-Fang; Wong, Wan-Tzu; Chen, Mei-Yung

    2011-01-01

    The rapid development of information and communication technology and the popularization of the Internet have given a boost to digitization technologies. Since 2001, The National Science Council (NSC) of Taiwan has invested a large amount of funding in the National Digital Archives Program (NDAP) to develop digital content. Some studies have…

  1. Effects of image compression and illumination on digital terrain models for the stereo camera of the BepiColombo mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Re, C.; Simioni, E.; Cremonese, G.; Roncella, R.; Forlani, G.; Langevin, Y.; Da Deppo, V.; Naletto, G.; Salemi, G.

    2017-02-01

    The great amount of data that will be produced during the imaging of Mercury by the stereo camera (STC) of the BepiColombo mission needs a compromise with the restrictions imposed by the band downlink that could drastically reduce the duration and frequency of the observations. The implementation of an on-board real time data compression strategy preserving as much information as possible is therefore mandatory. The degradation that image compression might cause to the DTM accuracy is worth to be investigated. During the stereo-validation procedure of the innovative STC imaging system, several image pairs of an anorthosite sample and a modelled piece of concrete have been acquired under different illumination angles. This set of images has been used to test the effects of the compression algorithm (Langevin and Forni, 2000) on the accuracy of the DTM produced by dense image matching. Different configurations taking in account at the same time both the illumination of the surface and the compression ratio, have been considered. The accuracy of the DTMs is evaluated by comparison with a high resolution laser-scan acquisition of the same targets. The error assessment includes also an analysis on the image plane indicating the influence of the compression procedure on the image measurements.

  2. Using information and communication technology (ICT) to the maximum: learning and teaching biology with limited digital technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Rooy, Wilhelmina S.

    2012-04-01

    Background: The ubiquity, availability and exponential growth of digital information and communication technology (ICT) creates unique opportunities for learning and teaching in the senior secondary school biology curriculum. Digital technologies make it possible for emerging disciplinary knowledge and understanding of biological processes previously too small, large, slow or fast to be taught. Indeed, much of bioscience can now be effectively taught via digital technology, since its representational and symbolic forms are in digital formats. Purpose: This paper is part of a larger Australian study dealing with the technologies and modalities of learning biology in secondary schools. Sample: The classroom practices of three experienced biology teachers, working in a range of NSW secondary schools, are compared and contrasted to illustrate how the challenges of limited technologies are confronted to seamlessly integrate what is available into a number of molecular genetics lessons to enhance student learning. Design and method: The data are qualitative and the analysis is based on video classroom observations and semi-structured teacher interviews. Results: Findings indicate that if professional development opportunities are provided where the pedagogy of learning and teaching of both the relevant biology and its digital representations are available, then teachers see the immediate pedagogic benefit to student learning. In particular, teachers use ICT for challenging genetic concepts despite limited computer hardware and software availability. Conclusion: Experienced teachers incorporate ICT, however limited, in order to improve the quality of student learning.

  3. Fermilab Recycler Ring BPM Upgrade Based on Digital Receiver Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webber, R.; Crisp, J.; Prieto, P.; Voy, D.; Briegel, C.; McClure, C.; West, R.; Pordes, S.; Mengel, M.

    2004-11-01

    Electronics for the 237 BPMs in the Fermilab Recycler Ring have been upgraded from a log-amplifier based system to a commercially produced digitizer-digital down converter based system. The hardware consists of a pre-amplifier connected to a split-plate BPM, an analog differential receiver-filter module and an 8-channel 80-MHz digital down converter VME board. The system produces position and intensity with a dynamic range of 30 dB and a resolution of ±10 microns. The position measurements are made on 2.5-MHz bunched beam and barrier buckets of the un-bunched beam. The digital receiver system operates in one of six different signal processing modes that include 2.5-MHz average, 2.5-MHz bunch-by-bunch, 2.5-MHz narrow band, unbunched average, un-bunched head/tail and 89-kHz narrow band. Receiver data is acquired on any of up to sixteen clock events related to Recycler beam transfers and other machine activities. Data from the digital receiver board are transferred to the front-end CPU for position and intensity computation on an on-demand basis through the VME bus. Data buffers are maintained for each of the acquisition events and support flash, closed orbit and turn-by-turn measurements. A calibration system provides evaluation of the BPM signal path and application programs.

  4. The Digital Divide in Classrooms: Teacher Technology Comfort and Evaluations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dornisch, Michele

    2013-01-01

    A disconnect exists between students' comfort with using technology for learning and teachers' comfort in using technology for teaching. Students report the desire for more engaging technology-based assignments. Teachers cite multiple reasons for their hesitancy to use technology in their teaching. The current study investigates whether…

  5. New approach to color calibration of high fidelity color digital camera by using unique wide gamut color generator based on LED diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kretkowski, M.; Shimodaira, Y.; Jabłoński, R.

    2008-11-01

    Development of a high accuracy color reproduction system requires certain instrumentation and reference for color calibration. Our research led to development of a high fidelity color digital camera with implemented filters that realize the color matching functions. The output signal returns XYZ values which provide absolute description of color. In order to produce XYZ output a mathematical conversion must be applied to CCD output values introducing a conversion matrix. The conversion matrix coefficients are calculated by using a color reference with known XYZ values and corresponding output signals from the CCD sensor under each filter acquisition from a certain amount of color samples. The most important feature of the camera is its ability to acquire colors from the complete theoretically visible color gamut due to implemented filters. However market available color references such as various color checkers are enclosed within HDTV gamut, which is insufficient for calibration in the whole operating color range. This led to development of a unique color reference based on LED diodes called the LED Color Generator (LED CG). It is capable of displaying colors in a wide color gamut estimated by chromaticity coordinates of 12 primary colors. The total amount of colors possible to produce is 25512. The biggest advantage is a possibility of displaying colors with desired spectral distribution (with certain approximations) due to multiple primary colors it consists. The average color difference obtained for test colors was found to be ▵E~0.78 for calibration with LED CG. The result is much better and repetitive in comparison with the Macbeth ColorCheckerTM which typically gives ▵E~1.2 and in the best case ▵E~0.83 with specially developed techniques.

  6. Comparative evaluation of consumer grade cameras and mobile phone cameras for close range photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chikatsu, Hirofumi; Takahashi, Yoji

    2009-08-01

    The authors have been concentrating on developing convenient 3D measurement methods using consumer grade digital cameras, and it was concluded that consumer grade digital cameras are expected to become a useful photogrammetric device for the various close range application fields. On the other hand, mobile phone cameras which have 10 mega pixels were appeared on the market in Japan. In these circumstances, we are faced with alternative epoch-making problem whether mobile phone cameras are able to take the place of consumer grade digital cameras in close range photogrammetric applications. In order to evaluate potentials of mobile phone cameras in close range photogrammetry, comparative evaluation between mobile phone cameras and consumer grade digital cameras are investigated in this paper with respect to lens distortion, reliability, stability and robustness. The calibration tests for 16 mobile phone cameras and 50 consumer grade digital cameras were conducted indoors using test target. Furthermore, practability of mobile phone camera for close range photogrammetry was evaluated outdoors. This paper presents that mobile phone cameras have ability to take the place of consumer grade digital cameras, and develop the market in digital photogrammetric fields.

  7. Spherical Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Developed largely through a Small Business Innovation Research contract through Langley Research Center, Interactive Picture Corporation's IPIX technology provides spherical photography, a panoramic 360-degrees. NASA found the technology appropriate for use in guiding space robots, in the space shuttle and space station programs, as well as research in cryogenic wind tunnels and for remote docking of spacecraft. Images of any location are captured in their entirety in a 360-degree immersive digital representation. The viewer can navigate to any desired direction within the image. Several car manufacturers already use IPIX to give viewers a look at their latest line-up of automobiles. Another application is for non-invasive surgeries. By using OmniScope, surgeons can look more closely at various parts of an organ with medical viewing instruments now in use. Potential applications of IPIX technology include viewing of homes for sale, hotel accommodations, museum sites, news events, and sports stadiums.

  8. Digital Suicide Prevention: Can Technology Become a Game-changer?

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Ned; Kalali, Amir

    2016-01-01

    Suicide continues to be a leading cause of death and has been recognized as a significant public health issue. Rapid advances in data science can provide us with useful tools for suicide prevention, and help to dynamically assess suicide risk in quantitative data-driven ways. In this article, the authors highlight the most current international research in digital suicide prevention, including the use of machine learning, smartphone applications, and wearable sensor driven systems. The authors also discuss future opportunities for digital suicide prevention, and propose a novel Sensor-driven Mental State Assessment System. PMID:27800282

  9. Development of Critical Technologies for the COSMO/SkyMed Hyperspectral Camera

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-10-01

    Carbide (SiC) material (SiC or lightweighted Zerodur mirrors , carbon fiber technology. structures). - development of electronics blocks at high - High...investigation was Kcarried out to get the highest lightening factors on the Zerodur mirror substrates. Several samples of the TMA Fig. 5 - Prototypes of...implementation of state-of-the-art - manufacturing of very light mirrors with special manufacturing techniques for light components emphasis on Silicon

  10. The PS1 Gigapixel Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonry, John L.; Isani, S.; Onaka, P.

    2007-12-01

    The world's largest and most advanced digital camera has been installed on the Pan-STARRS-1 (PS1) telescope on Haleakala, Maui. Built at the University of Hawaii at Manoa's Institute for Astronomy (IfA) in Honolulu, the gigapixel camera will capture images that will be used to scan the skies for killer asteroids, and to create the most comprehensive catalog of stars and galaxies ever produced. The CCD sensors at the heart of the camera were developed in collaboration with Lincoln Laboratory of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The image area, which is about 40 cm across, contains 60 identical silicon chips, each of which contains 64 independent imaging circuits. Each of these imaging circuits contains approximately 600 x 600 pixels, for a total of about 1.4 gigapixels in the focal plane. The CCDs themselves employ the innovative technology called "orthogonal transfer." Splitting the image area into about 4,000 separate regions in this way has three advantages: data can be recorded more quickly, saturation of the image by a very bright star is confined to a small region, and any defects in the chips only affect only a small part of the image area. The CCD camera is controlled by an ultrafast 480-channel control system developed at the IfA. The individual CCD cells are grouped in 8 x 8 arrays on a single silicon chip called an orthogonal transfer array (OTA), which measures about 5 cm square. There are a total of 60 OTAs in the focal plane of each telescope.

  11. Where's the revolution? Digital technology and health care in the internet age.

    PubMed

    Miller, Edward Alan; West, Darrell M

    2009-04-01

    Despite the growing use of online resources, it is unclear how many Americans are using the World Wide Web for different health-related purposes and whether factors promoting use of the Internet in health care correspond with those affecting more traditional in-person and telemedicine encounters. This research uses a national public opinion survey to examine the degree to which health care consumers communicate through conventional, face-to-face consultation, telemedicine, or digital technology, and the relationship between these means of communication and respondent characteristics. Results indicate that few people are using digital technology to get information, communicate with health personnel, or make online medical purchases. Furthermore, less well educated, lower-income individuals living in rural areas tend to use the health care Internet less than others. Several policy measures need to be undertaken in order to accelerate the appropriate use of digital technology by health care consumers of all kinds. These include improving education and technological literacy and providing access to low-cost digital technology. Without a consumer complement to prevailing efforts to spur health information technology development and implementation on the part of providers, the promise of the digital revolution will continue to be limited to certain better-connected segments of the population.

  12. The digital compensation technology system for automotive pressure sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Bin; Li, Quanling; Lu, Yi; Luo, Zai

    2010-12-01

    Piezoresistive pressure sensor be made of semiconductor silicon based on Piezoresistive phenomenon, has many characteristics. But since the temperature effect of semiconductor, the performance of silicon sensor is also changed by temperature, and the pressure sensor without temperature drift can not be produced at present. This paper briefly describe the principles of sensors, the function of pressure sensor and the various types of compensation method, design the detailed digital compensation program for automotive pressure sensor. Simulation-Digital mixed signal conditioning is used in this dissertation, adopt signal conditioning chip MAX1452. AVR singlechip ATMEGA128 and other apparatus; fulfill the design of digital pressure sensor hardware circuit and singlechip hardware circuit; simultaneously design the singlechip software; Digital pressure sensor hardware circuit is used to implementing the correction and compensation of sensor; singlechip hardware circuit is used to implementing to controll the correction and compensation of pressure sensor; singlechip software is used to implementing to fulfill compensation arithmetic. In the end, it implement to measure the output of sensor, and contrast to the data of non-compensation, the outcome indicates that the compensation precision of compensated sensor output is obviously better than non-compensation sensor, not only improving the compensation precision but also increasing the stabilization of pressure sensor.

  13. The digital compensation technology system for automotive pressure sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Bin; Li, Quanling; Lu, Yi; Luo, Zai

    2011-05-01

    Piezoresistive pressure sensor be made of semiconductor silicon based on Piezoresistive phenomenon, has many characteristics. But since the temperature effect of semiconductor, the performance of silicon sensor is also changed by temperature, and the pressure sensor without temperature drift can not be produced at present. This paper briefly describe the principles of sensors, the function of pressure sensor and the various types of compensation method, design the detailed digital compensation program for automotive pressure sensor. Simulation-Digital mixed signal conditioning is used in this dissertation, adopt signal conditioning chip MAX1452. AVR singlechip ATMEGA128 and other apparatus; fulfill the design of digital pressure sensor hardware circuit and singlechip hardware circuit; simultaneously design the singlechip software; Digital pressure sensor hardware circuit is used to implementing the correction and compensation of sensor; singlechip hardware circuit is used to implementing to controll the correction and compensation of pressure sensor; singlechip software is used to implementing to fulfill compensation arithmetic. In the end, it implement to measure the output of sensor, and contrast to the data of non-compensation, the outcome indicates that the compensation precision of compensated sensor output is obviously better than non-compensation sensor, not only improving the compensation precision but also increasing the stabilization of pressure sensor.

  14. The Effect of the Digital Classroom on Academic Success and Online Technologies Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozerbas, Mehmet Arif; Erdogan, Bilge Has

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to observe whether the learning environment created by digital classroom technologies has any effect on the academic success and online technologies self-efficacy of 7th grade students. In this study, an experimental design with a pre-test/post-test control group was used. The research was conducted with 58 students in a secondary…

  15. Digital Technology in the 21st Century: Considerations for Clinical Supervision in Rehabilitation Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrne, Andrew M.; Hartley, Michael T.

    2010-01-01

    Technological innovations are increasingly affecting the delivery of clinical supervision. Yet there is limited information on how supervisors can use digital technology to broaden settings in which students record client interviews, enhance evaluation of students' clinical performance, and increase accessibility for students with disabilities.…

  16. What's Used and What's Useful? Exploring Digital Technology Use(s) among Taught Postgraduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Michael; Finger, Glenn; Selwyn, Neil

    2016-01-01

    This article explores the digital technologies that taught postgraduate students engage with during their studies, what these technologies are used for and how useful they are perceived to be. The article draws upon data gathered from a survey of 253 masters and postgraduate diploma/certificate students across two universities in Australia.…

  17. Passport to Digital Citizenship: Journey toward Appropriate Technology Use at School and at Home

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ribble, Mike

    2009-01-01

    Technology has changed people's lives. In fewer than 30 years, people have gone from barely hearing about cell phones, laptops, and MP3 players to almost not being able to live without them. Digital citizenship describes the norms of appropriate, responsible behavior with regard to technology use. In this article, the author presents nine elements…

  18. Relating Use of Digital Technology by Pre-Service Teachers to Confidence: A Singapore Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeung, Alexander Seeshing; Lim, Kam Ming; Tay, Eng Guan; Lam-Chiang, Audrey Cheausim; Hui, Chenri

    2012-01-01

    Teachers today are expected to be able to apply a wide range of digital technologies in the classroom. Initial teacher education programs should prepare teachers to apply them with confidence. Pre-service teachers in Singapore responded to a survey on use of technologies in their personal lives and in their teaching, and how confident they were in…

  19. Punctuated Equilibrium--Digital Technology in Schools' Teaching of the Mother Tongue (Swedish)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erixon, Per-Olof

    2016-01-01

    This article deals with how teachers and pupils in seventh to ninth grade in Sweden look upon and relate to the incorporation of new digital technology in mother tongue education (Swedish). The result shows that both the classification and framing of the subject is being challenged by new technology, but that the awareness of the impact seems to…

  20. Heidegger, Digital Technology, and Postmodern Education: From Being in Cyberspace to Meeting on MySpace

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walters, Patrick; Kop, Rita

    2009-01-01

    Digital technology is transforming life and is beginning to have a profound effect on individual psychic life and the wider social milieu. This article seeks to understand the nature of the new technology and its implications for personal life, culture, and education. The scene is set by comparing the introduction of printing to the revolution…

  1. Transforming Schools with Technology: How Smart Use of Digital Tools Helps Achieve Six Key Education Goals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zucker, Andrew A.

    2008-01-01

    In this timely and thoughtful book, Andrew Zucker argues that technology can and will play a central role in efforts to achieve crucial education goals, and that it will be an essential component of further improvement and transformation of schools. The book is marked not only by Zucker's cutting-edge sophistication about digital technologies, but…

  2. Children Learning to Use Technologies through Play: A Digital Play Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bird, Jo; Edwards, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Digital technologies are increasingly acknowledged as an important aspect of early childhood education. A significant problem for early childhood education has been how to understand the pedagogical use of technologies in a sector that values play-based learning. This paper presents a new framework to understand how children learn to use…

  3. The Sociology of Education and Digital Technology: Past, Present and Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selwyn, Neil; Facer, Keri

    2014-01-01

    During the past 15 years of his career, John Furlong's research and writing has focused--in part--on digital technologies and people's everyday experiences of education. While hardly a technology expert, his work has shown an acute awareness of the significance of computers, the internet and mobile telephony in making sociological sense…

  4. The Use of Digital Technologies in the Classroom: A Teaching and Learning Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buzzard, Christopher; Crittenden, Victoria L.; Crittenden, William F.; McCarty, Paulette

    2011-01-01

    Today's college students, often referred to as the "digital generation," use an impressive assortment of technological tools in a wide variety of ways. However, the findings reported here suggest that students prefer more traditional instructional technology for effective engagement and learning. Faculty members, however, prefer the use of…

  5. 5 Myths about Classroom Technology: How Do We Integrate Digital Tools to Truly Enhance Learning?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renwick, Matt

    2015-01-01

    What's keeping your school behind the technology curve? Is it a fear of the unfamiliar? Expenses? Or some other myth? Have you considered how students with special needs or students learning a second language may benefit from using digital tools? If you've fallen for the perception that technology is too expensive, unnecessary for real learning,…

  6. Innovating Education and Educating for Innovation: The Power of Digital Technologies and Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    OECD Publishing, 2016

    2016-01-01

    OECD's Innovation Strategy calls upon all sectors in the economy and society to innovate in order to foster productivity, growth and well-being. Education systems are critically important for innovation through the development of skills that nurture new ideas and technologies. However, whereas digital technologies are profoundly changing the way…

  7. Digitally Distanced Learning: A Study of International Distance Learners' (Non)Use of Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selwyn, Neil

    2011-01-01

    This article considers the uses and non-uses of digital technology by international distance learners. It draws upon data from in-depth interviews with 60 learners from around the world following distance education degree courses provided by a large UK federal university. The article focuses firstly on learners' descriptions of technology's role…

  8. Bridging the Digital Divide: Changing the Technological Landscape of Inner-City Catholic Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbs, Michael G.; Dosen, Anthony J.; Guerrero, Rosalie B.

    2009-01-01

    This article presents an evaluation of the Bridging the Digital Divide Program, an intervention in five inner-city Chicago Catholic schools during one school year conducted by a local university. The interventions included (a) instillation of technology and (b) professional technology skill development for in-service teachers. The analysis…

  9. Digital Disturbances, Disorders, and Pathologies: A Discussion of Some Unintended Consequences of Technology in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haughton, Noela A.; Yeh, Kuo-Chuan; Nworie, John; Romero, Liz

    2013-01-01

    As with any innovation, the adoption and diffusion of digital technologies in higher education have also brought unintended consequences. This article discusses the unintended misuse of these technologies in the higher education setting. Depending upon severity, these consequences discussed--distraction, addiction, academic dishonesty, and…

  10. Digital Advances Reshaping K-12 Testing. Technology Counts, 2014. Education Week. Volume 33 Number 25

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Virginia B., Ed.

    2014-01-01

    Figuring out how to use digital tools to transform testing requires a willingness to invest in new technologies and the patience to experiment with novel approaches, a commitment to ongoing professional development and reliable technical support, and an openness to learn from mistakes. Whatever bumpy ride this technological journey takes, experts…

  11. Information Technology Management: Transition From the Automatic Digital Network to the Defense Message System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Information Technology Management Department of Defense Office of the Inspector General April 8, 2003 AccountabilityIntegrityQuality Transition From...Dates Covered (from... to) - Title and Subtitle Information Technology Management : Transition From the Automatic Digital Network to the Defense Message

  12. Mitigation and Adaptation: Critical Perspectives toward Digital Technologies in Place-Conscious Environmental Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenwood, David A.; Hougham, R. Justin

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores the tension for educators between the proliferation of mobile, digital technologies, and the widely held belief that environmental learning is best nurtured through place-based approaches that emphasize direct experience. We begin by offering a general critique of technology in culture and education, emphasizing what is at…

  13. Robots, GPS/GIS, and Programming Technologies: The Power of "Digital Manipulatives" in Youth Extension Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Bradley S.; Grandgenett, Neal; Nugent, Gwen; Adamchuk, Viacheslav I.

    2010-01-01

    The study reported here examined the effectiveness of educational robotics combined with GPS/GIS technologies used as "digital manipulatives" in the teaching of concepts in science, engineering, and technology. Based on the success of previous summer camps, the study also examined a scaling-up of the intervention from 38 participants to…

  14. Young Children's Learning of Novel Digital Interfaces: How Technology Experience, Age, and Design Come into Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilutz, Shuli

    2009-01-01

    This study looks at the relationship between age, technology experience, and design factors in determining young children's comprehension of novel digital interfaces. In Experiment 1, 35 preschoolers played three games that varied in complexity and familiarity. Parental questionnaires were used to assess children's previous technology experience.…

  15. Writing Assessment and the Revolution in Digital Texts and Technologies. Language & Literacy Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neal, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Writing and the teaching of writing is changing at a rapid pace. How can educators understand writing assessment "as" and "with" technology in the 21st-century classroom? Michael Neal contends that new technologies are neither the problem nor the solution. Instead, educators need to tap into digital resources only inasmuch as they promote writing…

  16. Digital Libraries with Embedded Values: Combining Insights from LIS and Science and Technology Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleischmann, Kenneth R.

    2007-01-01

    In the digital age, libraries are increasingly being augmented or even replaced by information technology (IT), which is often accompanied by implicit assumptions of objectivity and neutrality, yet the field of science and technology studies (STS) has a long history of studying what values are embedded in IT and how they are embedded. This article…

  17. Improving Technology Competency and Disposition of Beginning Pre-Service Teachers with Digital Storytelling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heo, Misook

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the effects of the digital storytelling experience of beginning pre-service teachers on their self-efficacy in educational technology and disposition toward change with regard to new technological approaches to teaching. A total of 76 freshmen participated in the study. After participating in a brief tutorial session, the…

  18. Digital Teaching Platforms: Customizing Classroom Learning for Each Student. Technology & Education, Connections (TEC)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dede, Chris, Ed.; Richards, John, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    The Digital Teaching Platform (DTP) brings the power of interactive technology to teaching and learning in classrooms. In this authoritative book, top researchers in the field of learning science and educational technology examine the current state of design and research on DTPs, the principles for evaluating them, and their likely evolution as a…

  19. Use of a digital camera onboard an unmanned aerial vehicle to monitor spring phenology at individual tree level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berra, Elias; Gaulton, Rachel; Barr, Stuart

    2016-04-01

    The monitoring of forest phenology, in a cost-effective manner, at a fine spatial scale and over relatively large areas remains a significant challenge. To address this issue, unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) appear as a potential new option for forest phenology monitoring. The aim of this study is to assess the potential of imagery acquired from a UAV to track seasonal changes in leaf canopy at individual tree level. UAV flights, deploying consumer-grade standard and near-infrared modified cameras, were carried out over a deciduous woodland during the spring season of 2015, from which a temporal series of calibrated and georeferenced 5 cm spatial resolution orthophotos was generated. Initial results from a subset of trees are presented in this paper. Four trees with different observed Start of Season (SOS) dates were selected to monitor UAV-derived Green Chromatic Coordinate (GCC), as a measure of canopy greenness. Mean GCC values were extracted from within the four individual tree crowns and were plotted against the day of year (DOY) when the data were acquired. The temporal GCC trajectory of each tree was associated with the visual observations of leaf canopy phenology (SOS) and also with the development of understory vegetation. The chronological order when sudden increases of GCC values occurred matched with the chronological order of observed SOS: the first sudden increase in GCC was detected in the tree which first reached SOS; 18.5 days later (on average) the last sudden increase of GCC was detected in the tree which last reached SOS (18 days later than the first one). Trees with later observed SOS presented GCC values increasing slowly over time, which were associated with development of understory vegetation. Ongoing work is dealing with: 1) testing different indices; 2) radiometric calibration (retrieving of spectral reflectance); 3) expanding the analysis to more tree individuals, more tree species and over larger forest areas, and; 4) deriving

  20. Applicability of digital analysis and imaging technology in neuropathology assessment.

    PubMed

    Dunn, William D; Gearing, Marla; Park, Yuna; Zhang, Lifan; Hanfelt, John; Glass, Jonathan D; Gutman, David A

    2016-06-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurological disorder that affects more than 30 million people worldwide. While various dementia-related losses in cognitive functioning are its hallmark clinical symptoms, ultimate diagnosis is based on manual neuropathological assessments using various schemas, including Braak staging, CERAD (Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer's Disease) and Thal phase scoring. Since these scoring systems are based on subjective assessment, there is inevitably some degree of variation between readers, which could affect ultimate neuropathology diagnosis. Here, we report a pilot study investigating the applicability of computer-driven image analysis for characterizing neuropathological features, as well as its potential to supplement or even replace manually derived ratings commonly performed in medical settings. In this work, we quantitatively measured amyloid beta (Aβ) plaque in various brain regions from 34 patients using a robust digital quantification algorithm. We next verified these digitally derived measures to the manually derived pathology ratings using correlation and ordinal logistic regression methods, while also investigating the association with other AD-related neuropathology scoring schema commonly used at autopsy, such as Braak and CERAD. In addition to successfully verifying our digital measurements of Aβ plaques with respective categorical measurements, we found significant correlations with most AD-related scoring schemas. Our results demonstrate the potential for digital analysis to be adapted to more complex staining procedures commonly used in neuropathological diagnosis. As the efficiency of scanning and digital analysis of histology images increases, we believe that the basis of our semi-automatic approach may better standardize quantification of neuropathological changes and AD diagnosis, ultimately leading to a more comprehensive understanding of neurological disorders and more efficient patient