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Sample records for dilated congestive cardiomyopathy

  1. Diagnosis and treatment of congestive heart failure secondary to dilated cardiomyopathy in a hedgehog.

    PubMed

    Delk, K W; Eshar, D; Garcia, E; Harkin, K

    2014-03-01

    A one-year-old African pygmy hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris) was evaluated for severe respiratory distress. Physical examination findings included marked dyspnoea, cyanosis and tachypnoea. Radiographic findings included an enlarged heart and pulmonary oedema, and dilated cardiomyopathy was confirmed via echocardiogram. The patient was treated for congestive heart failure because of dilated cardiomyopathy with furosemide, enalapril, pimobendan and l-carnitine. Within 24 hours of treatment, the pulmonary oedema and cyanosis had resolved. Following discharge, clinical improvement was noted by the owner and echocardiogram confirmed improved fractional shortening. Cardiomyopathy has been reported at post-mortem examination in hedgehogs, but there are no reports of ante-mortem diagnosis and treatment. Performing baseline cardiac assessment in hedgehogs is recommended, and treatment with l-carnitine and pimobendan may improve outcome, as carnitine deficiency is a possible cause of cardiomyopathy in hedgehogs. Successful emergency treatment of congestive heart failure in the hedgehog of this report may be effective for other hedgehogs presented with similar clinical signs.

  2. Dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Weintraub, Robert G; Semsarian, Christopher; Macdonald, Peter

    2017-02-09

    Dilated cardiomyopathy is defined by the presence of left ventricular dilatation and contractile dysfunction. Genetic mutations involving genes that encode cytoskeletal, sarcomere, and nuclear envelope proteins, among others, account for up to 35% of cases. Acquired causes include myocarditis and exposure to alcohol, drugs and toxins, and metabolic and endocrine disturbances. The most common presenting symptoms relate to congestive heart failure, but can also include circulatory collapse, arrhythmias, and thromboembolic events. Secondary neurohormonal changes contribute to reverse remodelling and ongoing myocyte damage. The prognosis is worst for individuals with the lowest ejection fractions or severe diastolic dysfunction. Treatment of chronic heart failure comprises medications that improve survival and reduce hospital admission-namely, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and β blockers. Other interventions include enrolment in a multidisciplinary heart failure service, and device therapy for arrhythmia management and sudden death prevention. Patients who are refractory to medical therapy might benefit from mechanical circulatory support and heart transplantation. Treatment of preclinical disease and the potential role of stem-cell therapy are being investigated.

  3. Dilated cardiomyopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Exposure to heavy metals such as lead, arsenic, cobalt, or mercury This condition can affect anyone at ... 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 60. Read More Anemia Arrhythmias Cardiomyopathy Fainting Headache Heart ...

  4. Neonatal dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Soares, Paulo; Rocha, Gustavo; Pissarra, Susana; Soares, Henrique; Flôr-de-Lima, Filipa; Costa, Sandra; Moura, Cláudia; Dória, Sofia; Guimarães, Hercília

    2017-03-01

    Cardiomyopathies are rare diseases of the heart muscle, of multiple causes, that manifest with various structural and functional phenotypes but are invariably associated with cardiac dysfunction. Dilated cardiomyopathy is the commonest cardiomyopathy in children, and the majority present before one year of age. Its etiology may be acquired or genetic. Myocarditis is an important cause and is responsible for the majority of acquired cases. Inherited (familial) forms of dilated cardiomyopathy may occur in 25-50% of patients. Echocardiographic and tissue Doppler studies are the basis for diagnosis of dilated cardiomyopathy in most patients. Marked dilatation of the left ventricle with global hypokinesis is the hallmark of the disease. This review will cover the classification, epidemiology and management of newborns with dilated cardiomyopathy. In particular, a comprehensive and up-to-date review of the genetic study of dilated cardiomyopathy and of detailed echocardiographic assessment of these patients will be presented.

  5. Inflammatory dilated cardiomyopathy (DCMI).

    PubMed

    Maisch, Bernhard; Richter, Anette; Sandmöller, Andrea; Portig, Irene; Pankuweit, Sabine

    2005-09-01

    Cardiomyopathies are heart muscle diseases, which have been defined by their central hemodynamics and macropathology and divided in five major forms: dilated (DCM), hypertrophic (HCM), restrictive (RCM), right ventricular (RVCM), and nonclassifiable cardiomyopathies (NCCM). Furthermore, the most recent WHO/WHF definition also comprises, among the specific cardiomyopathies, inflammatory cardiomyopathy as a distinct entity, defined as myocarditis in association with cardiac dysfunction. Idiopathic, autoimmune, and infectious forms of inflammatory cardiomyopathy were recognized. Viral cardiomyopathy has been defined as viral persistence in a dilated heart. It may be accompanied by myocardial inflammation and then termed inflammatory viral cardiomyopathy (or viral myocarditis with cardiomegaly). If no inflammation is observed in the biopsy of a dilated heart (< 14 lymphocytes and macrophages/mm(2)), the term viral cardiomyopathy or viral persistence in DCM should be applied according to the WHF Task Force recommendations. Within the German heart failure net it is the authors' working hypothesis, that DCM shares genetic risk factors with other diseases of presumed autoimmune etiology and, therefore, the same multiple genes in combination with environmental factors lead to numerous different autoimmune diseases including DCM. Therefore, the authors' primary goal is to acquire epidemiologic data of patients with DCM regarding an infectious and inflammatory etiology of the disease. Circumstantial evidence points to a major role of viral myocarditis in the etiology of DCM. The common presence of viral genetic material in the myocardium of patients with DCM provides the most compelling evidence, but proof of causality is still lacking. In addition, autoimmune reactions have been described in many studies, indicating them as an important etiologic factor. Nevertheless, data on the proportion of patients, in whom both mechanisms play a role are still missing.A pivotal role for

  6. [Cardiomyopathies. I: classification of cardiomyopathies--dilated cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Schultheiss, H P; Noutsias, M; Kühl, U; Lassner, D; Gross, U; Poller, W; Pauschinger, M

    2005-11-01

    Cardiomyopathies are common causes of heart failure and sudden cardiac death. According to the WHO classification, "specific" cardiomyopathies are differentiated from "idiopathic" cardiomyopathies. Thus, this classification is primarily based on pathophysiological characteristics. The diagnostic spectrum in cardiomyopathies comprises the entire spectrum of non-invasive and invasive cardiological examination techniques. The exact verification of certain cardiomyopathies necessitates additionally investigations. For example, immunohistological and molecular biological investigations of endomyocardial biopsies may confirm inflammatory cardiomyopathy, which is often induced by viruses. Several studies have shown that specific immunomodulatory treatment options can halt the progressive course of the disease. Several gene mutations have been identified in genetic/familial dilated cardiomyopathy. First-degree relatives should be screened for early stages. Primary prevention of sudden cardiac death shows increasing superiority of the implantable defibrillator compared with pharmacological approaches (i.e. amiodarone).

  7. Genetic basis of dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Serra, Alexandra; Toro, Rocio; Sarquella-Brugada, Georgia; de Gonzalo-Calvo, David; Cesar, Sergi; Carro, Esther; Llorente-Cortes, Vicenta; Iglesias, Anna; Brugada, Josep; Brugada, Ramon; Campuzano, Oscar

    2016-12-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy is a rare cardiac disease characterized by left ventricular dilatation and systolic dysfunction leading to heart failure and sudden cardiac death. Currently, despite several conditions have been reported as aetiologies of the disease, a large number of cases remain classified as idiopathic. Recent studies determine that nearly 60% of cases are inherited, therefore due to a genetic cause. Progressive technological advances in genetic analysis have identified over 60 genes associated with this entity, being TTN the main gene, so far. All these genes encode a wide variety of myocyte proteins, mainly sarcomeric and desmosomal, but physiopathologic pathways are not yet completely unraveled. We review the recent published data about genetics of familial dilated cardiomyopathy.

  8. Acute hemodynamic effects of right ventricular pacing site and pacing mode in patients with congestive heart failure secondary to either ischemic or idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Gold, M R; Brockman, R; Peters, R W; Olsovsky, M R; Shorofsky, S R

    2000-05-01

    The hemodynamic effects of pacing in patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) remain controversial. Early studies reported that pacing from the right ventricular (RV) apex improved acute hemodynamic parameters in patients with left ventricular systolic dysfunction, but these findings were not confirmed in subsequent controlled studies. More recently, it has been proposed that pacing from the RV side of the ventricular septum improves hemodynamic function compared with intrinsic conduction or apical pacing. Either dual-chamber or ventricular pacing have been evaluated, again with inconsistent findings. To assess the effects of pacing site and mode on acute hemodynamic function, we evaluated 21 subjects with CHF and intrinsic conduction disease. Hemodynamics were compared in AAI, VVI, and DDD modes with pacing from the RV apex or high septum. The pacing rate was constant in each patient and the order of testing was randomized. In the absence of ventricular pacing (AAI mode), the mean systemic arterial pressure was 85 +/- 11 mm Hg, the right atrial pressure was 11 +/- 4 mm Hg, the pulmonary capillary wedge pressure was 18 +/- 8 mm Hg and the cardiac index was 2.4 +/- 0.7 L/min/m(2). Compared with AAI pacing, there were no improvements in any hemodynamic parameter with DDD pacing from either RV site. Hemodynamic function worsened with VVI pacing from both RV sites. Subgroup analyses of patients with dilated cardiomyopathy, with prolonged PR interval, or with significant mitral regurgitation also failed to demonstrate an improvement with pacing. We conclude that pacing mode but not RV pacing site affects acute hemodynamic function. Pacing in the DDD mode prevents the deleterious effects of VVI pacing in this patient population.

  9. Genetics of hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Felix W; Carrier, Lucie

    2012-10-01

    Cardiomyopathies are categorized as extrinsic, being caused by external factors, such as hypertension, ischemia, inflammation, valvular dysfunction, or as intrinsic, which correspond to myocardial diseases without identifiable external causes. These so called primary cardiomyopathies can be categorized in four main forms: hypertrophic, dilated, restrictive, and arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy. Cardiomyopathies are diagnosed by clinical expression, echocardiography, electrocardiography, non-invasive imaging, and sometimes by cardiac catheterization to rule out external causes as ischemia. The two main forms of primary cardiomyopathies are the hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathies. Most of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and 20-50% of dilated cardiomyopathy are familial showing a wide genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity. This review presents the current knowledge on the causative genes, molecular mechanisms and the genotype � phenotype relations of hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathies.

  10. Dilated Cardiomyopathy Induced by Chronic Starvation and Selenium Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Protein energy malnutrition (PEM) has been rarely documented as a cause of cardiovascular abnormalities, including dilated cardiomyopathy. Selenium is responsible for antioxidant defense mechanisms in cardiomyocytes, and its deficiency in the setting of PEM and disease related malnutrition (DRM) may lead to exacerbation of the dilated cardiomyopathy. We report a rare case of a fourteen-year-old boy who presented with symptoms of congestive heart failure due to DRM and PEM (secondary to chronic starvation) along with severe selenium deficiency. An initial echocardiogram showed severely depressed systolic function consistent with dilated cardiomyopathy. Aggressive nutritional support and replacement of selenium and congestive heart failure medications that included diuretics and ACE inhibitors with the addition of carvedilol led to normalization of the cardiac function within four weeks. He continues to have significant weight gain and is currently completely asymptomatic from a cardiovascular standpoint. PMID:27994905

  11. Genetic mutations and mechanisms in dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    McNally, Elizabeth M; Golbus, Jessica R; Puckelwartz, Megan J

    2013-01-01

    Genetic mutations account for a significant percentage of cardiomyopathies, which are a leading cause of congestive heart failure. In hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), cardiac output is limited by the thickened myocardium through impaired filling and outflow. Mutations in the genes encoding the thick filament components myosin heavy chain and myosin binding protein C (MYH7 and MYBPC3) together explain 75% of inherited HCMs, leading to the observation that HCM is a disease of the sarcomere. Many mutations are "private" or rare variants, often unique to families. In contrast, dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is far more genetically heterogeneous, with mutations in genes encoding cytoskeletal, nucleoskeletal, mitochondrial, and calcium-handling proteins. DCM is characterized by enlarged ventricular dimensions and impaired systolic and diastolic function. Private mutations account for most DCMs, with few hotspots or recurring mutations. More than 50 single genes are linked to inherited DCM, including many genes that also link to HCM. Relatively few clinical clues guide the diagnosis of inherited DCM, but emerging evidence supports the use of genetic testing to identify those patients at risk for faster disease progression, congestive heart failure, and arrhythmia.

  12. The genetics of dilated cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Dellefave, Lisa; McNally, Elizabeth M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of review More than forty different individual genes have been implicated in the inheritance of dilated cardiomyopathy. For a subset of these genes, mutations can lead to a spectrum of cardiomyopathy that extends to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and left ventricular noncompaction. In nearly all cases, there is an increased risk of arrhythmias. With some genetic mutations, extracardiac manifestations are likely to be present. The precise genetic etiology can usually not be discerned from the cardiac and/or extracardiac manifestations and requires molecular genetic diagnosis for prognostic determination and cardiac care. Recent findings Newer technologies are influencing genetic testing, especially cardiomyopathy genetic testing, where an increased number of genes are now routinely being tested simultaneously. While this approach to testing multiple genes is increasing the diagnostic yield, the analysis of multiple genes in one test is also resulting in a large amount of genetic information of unclear significance. Summary Genetic testing is highly useful in the care of patients and families, since it guides diagnosis, influences care and aids in prognosis. However, the large amount of benign human genetic variation may complicate genetic results, and often requires a skilled team to accurately interpret the findings. PMID:20186049

  13. Mitogenic cardiomyopathy: a lethal neonatal familial dilated cardiomyopathy characterized by myocyte hyperplasia and proliferation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kenneth T E; Taylor, Glenn P; Meschino, Wendy S; Kantor, Paul F; Cutz, Ernest

    2010-07-01

    Pediatric cardiomyopathies are a heterogenous group of conditions of which dilated cardiomyopathies are the most common clinicomorphologic subtype. However, the etiology and pathogenesis of many cases of dilated cardiomyopathies remain unknown. We describe a series of 5 cases of a rare but clinically and histologically distinctive dilated cardiomyopathy that was uniformly lethal in early infancy. The 5 cases include 2 pairs of siblings. There was parental consanguinity in 1 of the 2 pairs of siblings. Death occurred in early infancy (range, 22-67 days; mean, 42 days) after a short history of general lethargy, decreased feeding, respiratory distress, or cyanosis. There was no specific birth or early neonatal problems. Autopsy revealed congestive cardiac failure and enlarged, dilated hearts with ventricular dilatation more pronounced than atrial dilatation, and endocardial fibroelastosis. Histology showed prominent hypertrophic nuclear changes of cardiac myofibers and markedly increased myocyte mitotic activity including occasional atypical mitoses. Immunohistochemical staining for Mib1 showed a markedly increased proliferative index of 10% to 20%. Ancillary investigations, including molecular studies, did not reveal a primary cause for the cardiomyopathies. This distinctive dilated cardiomyopathy characterized by unusual histologic features of myocyte nuclear hypertrophy and marked mitotic activity is lethal in early infancy. Its occurrence in 2 pairs of siblings suggests familial inheritance. Although the underlying molecular pathogenesis remains to be elucidated, it is important to recognize this distinctive entity for purposes of genetic counseling.

  14. Genetic Variations Leading to Familial Dilated Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kae Won; Lee, Jongsung; Kim, Youngjo

    2016-10-01

    Cardiomyopathy is a major cause of death worldwide. Based on pathohistological abnormalities and clinical manifestation, cardiomyopathies are categorized into several groups: hypertrophic, dilated, restricted, arrhythmogenic right ventricular, and unclassified. Dilated cardiomyopathy, which is characterized by dilation of the left ventricle and systolic dysfunction, is the most severe and prevalent form of cardiomyopathy and usually requires heart transplantation. Its etiology remains unclear. Recent genetic studies of single gene mutations have provided significant insights into the complex processes of cardiac dysfunction. To date, over 40 genes have been demonstrated to contribute to dilated cardiomyopathy. With advances in genetic screening techniques, novel genes associated with this disease are continuously being identified. The respective gene products can be classified into several functional groups such as sarcomere proteins, structural proteins, ion channels, and nuclear envelope proteins. Nuclear envelope proteins are emerging as potential molecular targets in dilated cardiomyopathy. Because they are not directly associated with contractile force generation and transmission, the molecular pathways through which these proteins cause cardiac muscle disorder remain unclear. However, nuclear envelope proteins are involved in many essential cellular processes. Therefore, integrating apparently distinct cellular processes is of great interest in elucidating the etiology of dilated cardiomyopathy. In this mini review, we summarize the genetic factors associated with dilated cardiomyopathy and discuss their cellular functions.

  15. Genetic Variations Leading to Familial Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Kae Won; Lee, Jongsung; Kim, Youngjo

    2016-01-01

    Cardiomyopathy is a major cause of death worldwide. Based on pathohistological abnormalities and clinical manifestation, cardiomyopathies are categorized into several groups: hypertrophic, dilated, restricted, arrhythmogenic right ventricular, and unclassified. Dilated cardiomyopathy, which is characterized by dilation of the left ventricle and systolic dysfunction, is the most severe and prevalent form of cardiomyopathy and usually requires heart transplantation. Its etiology remains unclear. Recent genetic studies of single gene mutations have provided significant insights into the complex processes of cardiac dysfunction. To date, over 40 genes have been demonstrated to contribute to dilated cardiomyopathy. With advances in genetic screening techniques, novel genes associated with this disease are continuously being identified. The respective gene products can be classified into several functional groups such as sarcomere proteins, structural proteins, ion channels, and nuclear envelope proteins. Nuclear envelope proteins are emerging as potential molecular targets in dilated cardiomyopathy. Because they are not directly associated with contractile force generation and transmission, the molecular pathways through which these proteins cause cardiac muscle disorder remain unclear. However, nuclear envelope proteins are involved in many essential cellular processes. Therefore, integrating apparently distinct cellular processes is of great interest in elucidating the etiology of dilated cardiomyopathy. In this mini review, we summarize the genetic factors associated with dilated cardiomyopathy and discuss their cellular functions. PMID:27802374

  16. Nemaline myopathy with dilated cardiomyopathy in childhood.

    PubMed

    Gatayama, Ryohei; Ueno, Kentaro; Nakamura, Hideaki; Yanagi, Sadamitsu; Ueda, Hideaki; Yamagishi, Hiroyuki; Yasui, Seiyo

    2013-06-01

    We present a case of a 9-year-old boy with nemaline myopathy and dilated cardiomyopathy. The combination of nemaline myopathy and cardiomyopathy is rare, and this is the first reported case of dilated cardiomyopathy associated with childhood-onset nemaline myopathy. A novel mutation, p.W358C, in ACTA1 was detected in this patient. An unusual feature of this case was that the patient's cardiac failure developed during early childhood with no delay of gross motor milestones. The use of a β-blocker did not improve his clinical course, and the patient died 6 months after diagnosis of dilated cardiomyopathy. Congenital nonprogressive nemaline myopathy is not necessarily a benign disorder: deterioration can occur early in the course of dilated cardiomyopathy with neuromuscular disease, and careful clinical evaluation is therefore necessary.

  17. RESTRICTIVE CARDIOMYOPATHY AND SECONDARY CONGESTIVE HEART FAILURE IN A MCDOWELL'S CARPET PYTHON (MORELIA SPILOTA MCDOWELLI).

    PubMed

    Schilliger, Lionel; Chetboul, Valérie; Damoiseaux, Cécile; Nicolier, Alexandra

    2016-12-01

    Echocardiography is an established and noninvasive diagnostic tool used in herpetologic cardiology. Various cardiac lesions have been previously described in reptiles with the exception of restrictive cardiomyopathy. In this case report, restrictive cardiomyopathy and congestive heart failure associated with left atrial and sinus venosus dilation were diagnosed in a 2-yr-old captive lethargic McDowell's carpet python ( Morelia spilota mcdowelli), based on echocardiographic, Doppler, and histopathologic examinations. This cardiomyopathy was also associated with thrombosis within the sinus venosus.

  18. Dilated Cardiomyopathy Revealing Cushing Disease

    PubMed Central

    Marchand, Lucien; Segrestin, Bérénice; Lapoirie, Marion; Favrel, Véronique; Dementhon, Julie; Jouanneau, Emmanuel; Raverot, Gérald

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Cardiovascular impairments are frequent in Cushing's syndrome and the hypercortisolism can result in cardiac structural and functional changes that lead in rare cases to dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Such cardiac impairment may be reversible in response to a eucortisolaemic state. A 43-year-old man with a medical past of hypertension and history of smoking presented to the emergency department with global heart failure. Coronary angiography showed a significant stenosis of a marginal branch and cardiac MRI revealed a nonischemic DCM. The left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was estimated as 28% to 30%. Clinicobiological features and pituitary imaging pointed toward Cushing's disease and administration of adrenolytic drugs (metyrapone and ketoconazole) was initiated. Despite the normalization of cortisol which had been achieved 2 months later, the patient presented an acute heart failure. A massive mitral regurgitation secondary to posterior papillary muscle rupture was diagnosed as a complication of the occlusion of the marginal branch. After 6 months of optimal pharmacological treatment for systolic heart failure, as well as treatment with inhibitors of steroidogenesis, there was no improvement of LVEF. The percutaneous mitral valve was therefore repaired and a defibrillator implanted. The severity of heart failure contraindicated pituitary surgery and the patient was instead treated by stereotaxic radiotherapy. This is the first case reporting a Cushing's syndrome DCM without improvement of LVEF despite normalization of serum cortisol levels. PMID:26579807

  19. Dilated cardiomyopathy and progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis

    PubMed Central

    James, Stephanie; Waterhouse, Deirdre; McDonald, Kenneth; O'Hanlon, Rory

    2014-01-01

    This case is of a 29-year-old man with progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis type 1 also known as Byler's disease. At the age of 21, our patient developed non-ischaemic dilated cardiomyopathy. Cardiac MRI demonstrated global wall thinning, with significant areas of myocardial fibrosis in the mid and epicardial walls from base to apex on postgadolinium late contrast enhanced images. No shared genetic loci between dilated cardiomyopathy and Byler's or cholestatic liver disease have yet been found. This presents the first documented case of non-ischaemic dilated cardiomyopathy, with evidence of mid wall fibrosis, in association with an established diagnosis of progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis type 1 since childhood. PMID:24654243

  20. Arterial microembolisation: an unusual presentation of dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Gillespie, R L; Mullen, G M; Costanzo-Nordin, M R

    1990-01-01

    Systemic embolisation is common in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy. Microembolisation as a presenting sign of dilated cardiomyopathy, however, has not been reported before. A 37 year old woman in whom dilated cardiomyopathy presented as arterial microembolisation to the toes is described. Images PMID:2310647

  1. Genetics Home Reference: familial dilated cardiomyopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... 10.1056/NEJMoa1110186. Citation on PubMed or Free article on PubMed Central Hershberger RE, Hedges DJ, Morales A. Dilated cardiomyopathy: the complexity of a diverse genetic architecture. Nat Rev Cardiol. 2013 Sep;10(9):531- ...

  2. Sheehan syndrome with reversible dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Laway, Bashir A; Alai, Mohammad S; Gojwari, Tariq; Ganie, Mohd A; Zargar, Abdul Hamid

    2010-01-01

    Cardiac abnormalities in patients with Sheehan syndrome are uncommon. A case of Sheehan syndrome with dilated cardiomyopathy is presented in whom hormone replacement with levothyroxine and prednisolone resulted in complete recovery of cardiomyopathy. A 25-year-old woman presented with lactation failure, secondary amenorrhea, features of hypothyroidism and a hypocortisol state following severe postpartum hemorrhage after her last child birth. She also had smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis. After starting antitubercular treatment, she developed shock, suggestive of hypocortisol crisis. Hormonal investigations revealed evidence of panhypopitutarism and magnetic resonance imaging revealed partial empty sella. Meanwhile echocardiography revealed evidence of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). The patient was given replacement therapy in the form of glucocorticoids and levothyroxine in addition to antitubercular treatment. She improved and on follow-up over a period of 7 months, the DCM completely reversed. To our knowledge this is the first report of reversible DCM in a patient with Sheehan syndrome.

  3. Peripartum cardiomyopathy and dilated cardiomyopathy: different at heart

    PubMed Central

    Bollen, Ilse A. E.; Van Deel, Elza D.; Kuster, Diederik W. D.; Van Der Velden, Jolanda

    2015-01-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) is a severe cardiac disease occurring in the last month of pregnancy or in the first 5 months after delivery and shows many similar clinical characteristics as dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) such as ventricle dilation and systolic dysfunction. While PPCM was believed to be DCM triggered by pregnancy, more and more studies show important differences between these diseases. While it is likely they share part of their pathogenesis such as increased oxidative stress and an impaired microvasculature, discrepancies seen in disease progression and outcome indicate there must be differences in pathogenesis as well. In this review, we compared studies in DCM and PPCM to search for overlapping and deviating disease etiology, pathogenesis and outcome in order to understand why these cardiomyopathies share similar clinical features but have different underlying pathologies. PMID:25642195

  4. Anaesthetic management of a case of dilated cardiomyopathy for emergency appendectomy.

    PubMed

    Raj, Ravi; Kumar, Mritunjay; Batra, Meenu

    2014-01-01

    The anesthetic management of a patient with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) undergoing non-cardiac surgery poses a challenge for anesthesiologist either due to pre-existing or a risk of precipitating congestive heart failure. We report a successful use of combined spinal epidural for emergency appendicectomy in a patient of DCM. Different anesthetic concerns and agents, some recent advances are also discussed.

  5. A splice site mutation in a gene encoding for PDK4, a mitochondrial protein, is associated with the development of dilated cardiomyopathy in the Doberman pinscher

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Familial dilated cardiomyopathy is a primary myocardial disease that can result in the development of congestive heart failure and sudden cardiac death. Spontaneous animal models of familial dilated cardiomyopathy exist and the Doberman pinscher dog is one of the most commonly reported canine breeds...

  6. Atrial natriuretic peptide affects cardiac remodeling, function, heart failure, and survival in a mouse model of dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong; Gladysheva, Inna P; Fan, Tai-Hwang M; Sullivan, Ryan; Houng, Aiilyan K; Reed, Guy L

    2014-03-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy is a frequent cause of heart failure and death. Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) is a biomarker of dilated cardiomyopathy, but there is controversy whether ANP modulates the development of heart failure. Therefore, we examined whether ANP affects heart failure, cardiac remodeling, function, and survival in a well-characterized, transgenic model of dilated cardiomyopathy. Mice with dilated cardiomyopathy with normal ANP levels survived longer than mice with partial ANP (P<0.01) or full ANP deficiency (P<0.001). In dilated cardiomyopathy mice, ANP protected against the development of heart failure as indicated by reduced lung water, alveolar congestion, pleural effusions, etc. ANP improved systolic function and reduced cardiomegaly. Pathological cardiac remodeling was diminished in mice with normal ANP as indicated by decreased ventricular interstitial and perivascular fibrosis. Mice with dilated cardiomyopathy and normal ANP levels had better systolic function (P<0.001) than mice with dilated cardiomyopathy and ANP deficiency. Dilated cardiomyopathy was associated with diminished cardiac transcripts for NP receptors A and B in mice with normal ANP and ANP deficiency, but transcripts for NP receptor C and C-type natriuretic peptide were selectively altered in mice with dilated cardiomyopathy and ANP deficiency. Taken together, these data indicate that ANP has potent effects in experimental dilated cardiomyopathy that reduce the development of heart failure, prevent pathological remodeling, preserve systolic function, and reduce mortality. Despite the apparent overlap in physiological function between the NPs, these data suggest that the role of ANP in dilated cardiomyopathy and heart failure is not compensated physiologically by other NPs.

  7. Dilated cardiomyopathy and inclusion body myositis.

    PubMed

    Ballo, Piercarlo; Chiodi, Leandro; Cameli, Matteo; Malandrini, Alessandro; Federico, Antonio; Mondillo, Sergio; Zuppiroli, Alfredo

    2012-04-01

    Inclusion body myositis (IBM) is the most common inflammatory myopathy after 50 years of age. In contrast to polymyositis and dermatomyositis, in which cardiac involvement is relatively common, current evidences indicate that IBM is not associated with cardiac disease. We report the case of a patient with biopsy-proven IBM who developed heart failure and major ventricular arrhythmias secondary to dilated cardiomyopathy few months after the clinical onset of IBM, and in whom no pathophysiologic causes explaining cardiac enlargement and dysfunction were found by laboratory and instrumental investigations. The hypothesis of a pathophysiologic association between the two conditions is discussed.

  8. Assessment of ventricular function in dilated cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Pak, P H; Kass, D A

    1995-05-01

    Regardless of its cause, systolic dysfunction in dilated cardiomyopathy triggers a wide variety of compensatory responses resulting in cardiac dilatation, fluid retention, and systemic vasoconstriction. Standard therapy with vasodilators, digoxin, and diuretics can provide symptomatic relief in many patients. However, many others do not respond adequately, and mortality from heart failure remains high. This has driven the search for novel therapies. To evaluate the efficacy and decipher mechanisms of action of these treatments, accurate assessments of left ventricular function are valuable. In particular, one seeks indexes that are cardiac-specific, in that they are minimally influenced by vascular loading conditions. An increasingly used "gold standard" that can achieve this goal is the invasively measured pressure-volume relation. Newer noninvasive methods have yielded several surrogates that have the key advantage of being applicable to chronic disease assessment. In this report, we review the current state-of-the-art in left ventricular function assessment, and describe recent advances in its noninvasive evaluation.

  9. Spontaneous Dilated Cardiomyopathy and Right-Sided Heart Failure as a Differential Diagnosis for Hepatosis Dietetica in a Production Pig.

    PubMed

    Collins, Dalis E; Eaton, Kathryn A; Hoenerhoff, Mark J

    2015-08-01

    An experimentally naïve 37.7-kg Yorkshire-crossbred gilt died unexpectedly 2 d after arrival. Necropsy revealed severe dilated cardiomyopathy characterized grossly by markedly dilated ventricles and thinned ventricular walls and interventricular septum. Histologically there was multifocal myofiber attenuation and patchy loss of myofiber cross striations. The liver contained submassive to massive, diffuse hepatic centrilobular hemorrhage and degeneration. These lesions supported a diagnosis of dilated cardiomyopathy with right heart failure and secondary hepatic degeneration due to marked acute passive congestion. To our knowledge, this case is the first report of spontaneous dilated cardiomyopathy in swine and represents a potential diagnostic challenge regarding the differentiation of the cardiac-associated liver lesion from hepatosis dietetica. The diagnosis of dilated cardiomyopathy and right-sided heart failure was supported by the character of the hepatic lesion, absence of typical gross or histologic lesions of mulberry heart disease, and normal selenium levels.

  10. Spontaneous Dilated Cardiomyopathy and Right-Sided Heart Failure as a Differential Diagnosis for Hepatosis Dietetica in a Production Pig

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Dalis E; Eaton, Kathryn A; Hoenerhoff, Mark J

    2015-01-01

    An experimentally naïve 37.7-kg Yorkshire-crossbred gilt died unexpectedly 2 d after arrival. Necropsy revealed severe dilated cardiomyopathy characterized grossly by markedly dilated ventricles and thinned ventricular walls and interventricular septum. Histologically there was multifocal myofiber attenuation and patchy loss of myofiber cross striations. The liver contained submassive to massive, diffuse hepatic centrilobular hemorrhage and degeneration. These lesions supported a diagnosis of dilated cardiomyopathy with right heart failure and secondary hepatic degeneration due to marked acute passive congestion. To our knowledge, this case is the first report of spontaneous dilated cardiomyopathy in swine and represents a potential diagnostic challenge regarding the differentiation of the cardiac-associated liver lesion from hepatosis dietetica. The diagnosis of dilated cardiomyopathy and right-sided heart failure was supported by the character of the hepatic lesion, absence of typical gross or histologic lesions of mulberry heart disease, and normal selenium levels. PMID:26310462

  11. Dietary taurine deficiency and dilated cardiomyopathy in the fox.

    PubMed

    Moise, N S; Pacioretty, L M; Kallfelz, F A; Stipanuk, M H; King, J M; Gilmour, R F

    1991-02-01

    Taurine deficiency has been implicated as a potential cause of dilated cardiomyopathy. However, the relationship between taurine and myocardial function is presently unclear. The purpose of this study was to determine whether dilated cardiomyopathy in the fox is associated with dietary taurine deficiency. A total of 68 foxes from farms with a history of death caused by dilated cardiomyopathy and 14 foxes from a farm with no history of dilated cardiomyopathy were studied. Dilated cardiomyopathy was diagnosed by echocardiography in 48% of the foxes from one farm with a positive history and in none of the foxes from the control farm. Foxes less than 9 months of age were more commonly affected than older foxes (p = 0.03). Plasma taurine concentrations were significantly less (p less than 0.01) in foxes that had dilated cardiomyopathy (26.8 +/- 16.4 nmol/ml) than in the control foxes (99.3 +/- 60.2 nmol/ml). A significantly higher (p less than 0.01) incidence of dilated cardiomyopathy was present in foxes with a history of a sibling or offspring that died of dilated cardiomyopathy than in foxes without a family history of cardiac death. In one fox with dilated cardiomyopathy that was tested, the myocardial taurine concentration was lower (1.7 mumol/gm wet weight) than that of control foxes (7.3 +/- 1.6 mumol/gm wet weight). Hepatic cysteinesulfinic acid decarboxylase activity was significantly less (p less than 0.001) in foxes with dilated cardiomyopathy (0.97 +/- 0.2 nmol/mm.mg protein) than in control foxes (2.11 +/- 0.07 nmol CO2/mm.mg protein).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. An Upgrade on the Rabbit Model of Anthracycline-Induced Cardiomyopathy: Shorter Protocol, Reduced Mortality, and Higher Incidence of Overt Dilated Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Talavera, Jesús; Giraldo, Alejandro; Fernández-Del-Palacio, María Josefa; García-Nicolás, Obdulio; Seva, Juan; Brooks, Gavin; Moraleda, Jose M

    2015-01-01

    Current protocols of anthracycline-induced cardiomyopathy in rabbits present with high premature mortality and nephrotoxicity, thus rendering them unsuitable for studies requiring long-term functional evaluation of myocardial function (e.g., stem cell therapy). We compared two previously described protocols to an in-house developed protocol in three groups: Group DOX2 received doxorubicin 2 mg/kg/week (8 weeks); Group DAU3 received daunorubicin 3 mg/kg/week (10 weeks); and Group DAU4 received daunorubicin 4 mg/kg/week (6 weeks). A cohort of rabbits received saline (control). Results of blood tests, cardiac troponin I, echocardiography, and histopathology were analysed. Whilst DOX2 and DAU3 rabbits showed high premature mortality (50% and 33%, resp.), DAU4 rabbits showed 7.6% premature mortality. None of DOX2 rabbits developed overt dilated cardiomyopathy; 66% of DAU3 rabbits developed overt dilated cardiomyopathy and quickly progressed to severe congestive heart failure. Interestingly, 92% of DAU4 rabbits showed overt dilated cardiomyopathy and 67% developed congestive heart failure exhibiting stable disease. DOX2 and DAU3 rabbits showed alterations of renal function, with DAU3 also exhibiting hepatic function compromise. Thus, a shortened protocol of anthracycline-induced cardiomyopathy as in DAU4 group results in high incidence of overt dilated cardiomyopathy, which insidiously progressed to congestive heart failure, associated to reduced systemic compromise and very low premature mortality.

  13. An Upgrade on the Rabbit Model of Anthracycline-Induced Cardiomyopathy: Shorter Protocol, Reduced Mortality, and Higher Incidence of Overt Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Talavera, Jesús; Fernández-Del-Palacio, María Josefa; García-Nicolás, Obdulio; Seva, Juan; Brooks, Gavin; Moraleda, Jose M.

    2015-01-01

    Current protocols of anthracycline-induced cardiomyopathy in rabbits present with high premature mortality and nephrotoxicity, thus rendering them unsuitable for studies requiring long-term functional evaluation of myocardial function (e.g., stem cell therapy). We compared two previously described protocols to an in-house developed protocol in three groups: Group DOX2 received doxorubicin 2 mg/kg/week (8 weeks); Group DAU3 received daunorubicin 3 mg/kg/week (10 weeks); and Group DAU4 received daunorubicin 4 mg/kg/week (6 weeks). A cohort of rabbits received saline (control). Results of blood tests, cardiac troponin I, echocardiography, and histopathology were analysed. Whilst DOX2 and DAU3 rabbits showed high premature mortality (50% and 33%, resp.), DAU4 rabbits showed 7.6% premature mortality. None of DOX2 rabbits developed overt dilated cardiomyopathy; 66% of DAU3 rabbits developed overt dilated cardiomyopathy and quickly progressed to severe congestive heart failure. Interestingly, 92% of DAU4 rabbits showed overt dilated cardiomyopathy and 67% developed congestive heart failure exhibiting stable disease. DOX2 and DAU3 rabbits showed alterations of renal function, with DAU3 also exhibiting hepatic function compromise. Thus, a shortened protocol of anthracycline-induced cardiomyopathy as in DAU4 group results in high incidence of overt dilated cardiomyopathy, which insidiously progressed to congestive heart failure, associated to reduced systemic compromise and very low premature mortality. PMID:26788502

  14. Shared Genetic Predisposition in Peripartum and Dilated Cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Ware, James S; Li, Jian; Mazaika, Erica; Yasso, Christopher M; DeSouza, Tiffany; Cappola, Thomas P; Tsai, Emily J; Hilfiker-Kleiner, Denise; Kamiya, Chizuko A; Mazzarotto, Francesco; Cook, Stuart A; Halder, Indrani; Prasad, Sanjay K; Pisarcik, Jessica; Hanley-Yanez, Karen; Alharethi, Rami; Damp, Julie; Hsich, Eileen; Elkayam, Uri; Sheppard, Richard; Kealey, Angela; Alexis, Jeffrey; Ramani, Gautam; Safirstein, Jordan; Boehmer, John; Pauly, Daniel F; Wittstein, Ilan S; Thohan, Vinay; Zucker, Mark J; Liu, Peter; Gorcsan, John; McNamara, Dennis M; Seidman, Christine E; Seidman, Jonathan G; Arany, Zoltan

    2016-01-21

    Background Peripartum cardiomyopathy shares some clinical features with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy, a disorder caused by mutations in more than 40 genes, including TTN, which encodes the sarcomere protein titin. Methods In 172 women with peripartum cardiomyopathy, we sequenced 43 genes with variants that have been associated with dilated cardiomyopathy. We compared the prevalence of different variant types (nonsense, frameshift, and splicing) in these women with the prevalence of such variants in persons with dilated cardiomyopathy and with population controls. Results We identified 26 distinct, rare truncating variants in eight genes among women with peripartum cardiomyopathy. The prevalence of truncating variants (26 in 172 [15%]) was significantly higher than that in a reference population of 60,706 persons (4.7%, P=1.3×10(-7)) but was similar to that in a cohort of patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (55 of 332 patients [17%], P=0.81). Two thirds of identified truncating variants were in TTN, as seen in 10% of the patients and in 1.4% of the reference population (P=2.7×10(-10)); almost all TTN variants were located in the titin A-band. Seven of the TTN truncating variants were previously reported in patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy. In a clinically well-characterized cohort of 83 women with peripartum cardiomyopathy, the presence of TTN truncating variants was significantly correlated with a lower ejection fraction at 1-year follow-up (P=0.005). Conclusions The distribution of truncating variants in a large series of women with peripartum cardiomyopathy was remarkably similar to that found in patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy. TTN truncating variants were the most prevalent genetic predisposition in each disorder.

  15. Shared Genetic Predisposition in Peripartum and Dilated Cardiomyopathies

    PubMed Central

    Ware, James S.; Li, Jian; Mazaika, Erica; Yasso, Christopher M.; DeSouza, Tiffany; Cappola, Thomas P.; Tsai, Emily J.; Hilfiker-Kleiner, Denise; Kamiya, Chizuko A.; Mazzarotto, Francesco; Cook, Stuart A.; Halder, Indrani; Prasad, Sanjay K.; Pisarcik, Jessica; Hanley-Yanez, Karen; Alharethi, Rami; Damp, Julie; Hsich, Eileen; Elkayam, Uri; Sheppard, Richard; Kealey, Angela; Alexis, Jeffrey; Ramani, Gautam; Safirstein, Jordan; Boehmer, John; Pauly, Daniel F.; Wittstein, Ilan S.; Thohan, Vinay; Zucker, Mark J.; Liu, Peter; Gorcsan, John; McNamara, Dennis M.; Seidman, Christine E.; Seidman, Jonathan G.; Arany, Zoltan

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Peripartum cardiomyopathy shares some clinical features with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy, a disorder caused by mutations in more than 40 genes, including TTN, which encodes the sarcomere protein titin. METHODS In 172 women with peripartum cardiomyopathy, we sequenced 43 genes with variants that have been associated with dilated cardiomyopathy. We compared the prevalence of different variant types (nonsense, frameshift, and splicing) in these women with the prevalence of such variants in persons with dilated cardiomyopathy and with population controls. RESULTS We identified 26 distinct, rare truncating variants in eight genes among women with peripartum cardiomyopathy. The prevalence of truncating variants (26 in 172 [15%]) was significantly higher than that in a reference population of 60,706 persons (4.7%, P = 1.3×10−7) but was similar to that in a cohort of patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (55 of 332 patients [17%], P = 0.81). Two thirds of identified truncating variants were in TTN, as seen in 10% of the patients and in 1.4% of the reference population (P = 2.7×10−10); almost all TTN variants were located in the titin A-band. Seven of the TTN truncating variants were previously reported in patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy. In a clinically well-characterized cohort of 83 women with peripartum cardiomyopathy, the presence of TTN truncating variants was significantly correlated with a lower ejection fraction at 1-year follow-up (P = 0.005). CONCLUSIONS The distribution of truncating variants in a large series of women with peripartum cardiomyopathy was remarkably similar to that found in patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy. TTN truncating variants were the most prevalent genetic predisposition in each disorder. PMID:26735901

  16. Patient with Eating Disorder, Carnitine Deficiency and Dilated Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Fotino, A Domnica; Sherma, A

    2015-01-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy is characterized by a dilated and poorly functioning left ventricle and can result from several different etiologies including ischemic, infectious, metabolic, toxins, autoimmune processes or nutritional deficiencies. Carnitine deficiency-induced cardiomyopathy (CDIM) is an uncommon cause of dilated cardiomyopathy that can go untreated if not considered. Here, we describe a 30-year-old woman with an eating disorder and recent percutaneous endoscopic gastrotomy (PEG) tube placement for weight loss admitted to the hospital for possible PEG tube infection. Carnitine level was found to be low. Transthoracic echocardiogram (TTE) revealed ejection fraction 15%. Her hospital course was complicated by sepsis from a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC). She was discharged on a beta-blocker and carnitine supplementation. One month later her cardiac function had normalized. Carnitine deficiency-induced myopathy is an unusual cause of cardiomyopathy and should be considered in adults with decreased oral intake or malabsorption who present with cardiomyopathy.

  17. Transformation of myocarditis and inflammatory cardiomyopathy to idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy: facts and fiction.

    PubMed

    Figulla, Hans R

    2004-05-01

    There is broad evidence that enteroviruses and adenoviruses can induce an acute inflammation of the myocardium without cardiac dysfunction (i.e. myocarditis) or with cardiac dysfunction (i.e. inflammatory cardiomyopathy) that can transform to a virus-negative dilated cardiomyopathy. In the adult patient neither other viruses (parvo-B 19 virus, hepatitis C virus, cytomegalovirus) nor post-infection autoimmunity are likely to induce idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy.

  18. Dilated cardiomyopathy: a preventable presentation of DiGeorge Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jamieson, A; Smith, C J

    2015-01-01

    Patients with cardiac failure require careful evaluation to determine the precise nature of the cause of their illness. Genetic causes of dilated cardiomyopathy are well known but inherited conditions may lead to unexpected consequences through intermediate mechanisms not readily recognised as a feature of the inherited disorder. We describe a case of dilated cardiomyopathy resulting from prolonged hypocalcaemia due to previously undiagnosed hypoparathyroidism resulting from DiGeorge Syndrome and describe the features of this case and the treatment of hypoparathyroidism.

  19. Dilated cardiomyopathy update: infectious-immune theory revisited.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Chuichi; Matsumori, Akira

    2013-11-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy is characterized by dilatation of the left or right ventricle, or both ventricles. The degree of myocardial dysfunction is not attributable to abnormal loading conditions. The infectious-immune theory has long been hypothesized to explain the pathogenesis of many etiologically unrecognized dilated cardiomyopathies. Inflammations followed by immune reactions, which may be excessive, in the myocardium, evoked by external triggers such as viral infections and/or autoimmune antibodies, continue insidiously, and lead to the process of cardiac remodeling with ventricular dilatation and systolic dysfunction. This ultimately results in dilated cardiomyopathy. Hepatitis C virus-associated heart diseases are good examples of cardiac lesions definitely induced by viral infections in humans that progress to a chronic stage through complicated immune mechanisms. Therapeutic strategies for myocarditis and dilated cardiomyopathy have been obtained through analyses of the acute, subacute, and chronic phases of experimental viral myocarditis in mice. The appropriate modulation of excessive immune reactions during myocarditis, rather than their complete elimination, appears to be a key option in the prevention and treatment of dilated cardiomyopathy. The clinical application of an NF-κB decoy and immune adsorption of IgG3 cardiac autoantibodies have been used as immunomodulating therapies and may provide novel approaches for the treatment of refractory patients with dilated cardiomyopathy. Conventional therapeutic agents for chronic heart failure such as β-blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers, and aldosterone antagonists in particular should be re-evaluated on the basis of their anti-inflammatory properties in the treatment of dilated cardiomyopathy.

  20. Characterization and Long-Term Prognosis of Postmyocarditic Dilated Cardiomyopathy Compared With Idiopathic Dilated Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Merlo, Marco; Anzini, Marco; Bussani, Rossana; Artico, Jessica; Barbati, Giulia; Stolfo, Davide; Gigli, Marta; Muça, Matilda; Naso, Paola; Ramani, Federica; Di Lenarda, Andrea; Pinamonti, Bruno; Sinagra, Gianfranco

    2016-09-15

    Dilated cardiomyopathy (DC) is the final common pathway of different pathogenetic processes and presents a significant prognostic heterogeneity, possibly related to its etiologic variety. The characterization and long-term prognosis of postmyocarditic dilated cardiomyopathy (PM-DC) remain unknown. This study assesses the clinical-instrumental evolution and long-term prognosis of a large cohort of patients with PM-DC. We analyzed 175 patients affected with DC consecutively enrolled from 1993 to 2008 with endomyocardial biopsy (EMB) data available. PM-DC was defined in the presence of borderline myocarditis at EMB or persistent left ventricular dysfunction 1 year after diagnosis of active myocarditis at EMB. Other patients were defined as affected by idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (IDC). Analysis of follow-up evaluations was performed at 24, 60, and 120 months. We found 72 PM-DC of 175 enrolled patients (41%). Compared with IDC, patients with PM-DC were more frequently females and less frequently presented a familial history of DC. No other baseline significant differences were found. During the long-term follow-up (median 154, first to third interquartile range 78 to 220 months), patients with PM-DC showed a trend toward slower disease progression. Globally, 18 patients with PM-DC (25%) versus 49 with IDC (48%) experienced death/heart transplantation (p = 0.045). The prognostic advantage for patients with PM-DC became significant beyond 40 months of follow-up. At multivariable time-dependent Cox analysis, PM-DC was confirmed to have a global independent protective role (hazard ratio 0.53, 95% confidence interval 0.28 to 0.97, p = 0.04). In conclusion, PM-DC is characterized by better long-term prognosis compared with IDC. An exhaustive etiologic characterization appears relevant in the prognostic assessment of DC.

  1. Intraventricular vortex properties in nonischemic dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Bermejo, Javier; Benito, Yolanda; Alhama, Marta; Yotti, Raquel; Martínez-Legazpi, Pablo; Del Villar, Candelas Pérez; Pérez-David, Esther; González-Mansilla, Ana; Santa-Marta, Cristina; Barrio, Alicia; Fernández-Avilés, Francisco; Del Álamo, Juan C

    2014-03-01

    Vortices may have a role in optimizing the mechanical efficiency and blood mixing of the left ventricle (LV). We aimed to characterize the size, position, circulation, and kinetic energy (KE) of LV main vortex cores in patients with nonischemic dilated cardiomyopathy (NIDCM) and analyze their physiological correlates. We used digital processing of color-Doppler images to study flow evolution in 61 patients with NIDCM and 61 age-matched control subjects. Vortex features showed a characteristic biphasic temporal course during diastole. Because late filling contributed significantly to flow entrainment, vortex KE reached its maximum at the time of the peak A wave, storing 26 ± 20% of total KE delivered by inflow (range: 1-74%). Patients with NIDCM showed larger and stronger vortices than control subjects (circulation: 0.008 ± 0.007 vs. 0.006 ± 0.005 m(2)/s, respectively, P = 0.02; KE: 7 ± 8 vs. 5 ± 5 mJ/m, P = 0.04), even when corrected for LV size. This helped confining the filling jet in the dilated ventricle. The vortex Reynolds number was also higher in the NIDCM group. By multivariate analysis, vortex KE was related to the KE generated by inflow and to chamber short-axis diameter. In 21 patients studied head to head, Doppler measurements of circulation and KE closely correlated with phase-contract magnetic resonance values (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.82 and 0.76, respectively). Thus, the biphasic nature of filling determines normal vortex physiology. Vortex formation is exaggerated in patients with NIDCM due to chamber remodeling, and enlarged vortices are helpful for ameliorating convective pressure losses and facilitating transport. These findings can be accurately studied using ultrasound.

  2. Intraventricular vortex properties in nonischemic dilated cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Benito, Yolanda; Alhama, Marta; Yotti, Raquel; Martínez-Legazpi, Pablo; del Villar, Candelas Pérez; Pérez-David, Esther; González-Mansilla, Ana; Santa-Marta, Cristina; Barrio, Alicia; Fernández-Avilés, Francisco; del Álamo, Juan C.

    2014-01-01

    Vortices may have a role in optimizing the mechanical efficiency and blood mixing of the left ventricle (LV). We aimed to characterize the size, position, circulation, and kinetic energy (KE) of LV main vortex cores in patients with nonischemic dilated cardiomyopathy (NIDCM) and analyze their physiological correlates. We used digital processing of color-Doppler images to study flow evolution in 61 patients with NIDCM and 61 age-matched control subjects. Vortex features showed a characteristic biphasic temporal course during diastole. Because late filling contributed significantly to flow entrainment, vortex KE reached its maximum at the time of the peak A wave, storing 26 ± 20% of total KE delivered by inflow (range: 1–74%). Patients with NIDCM showed larger and stronger vortices than control subjects (circulation: 0.008 ± 0.007 vs. 0.006 ± 0.005 m2/s, respectively, P = 0.02; KE: 7 ± 8 vs. 5 ± 5 mJ/m, P = 0.04), even when corrected for LV size. This helped confining the filling jet in the dilated ventricle. The vortex Reynolds number was also higher in the NIDCM group. By multivariate analysis, vortex KE was related to the KE generated by inflow and to chamber short-axis diameter. In 21 patients studied head to head, Doppler measurements of circulation and KE closely correlated with phase-contract magnetic resonance values (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.82 and 0.76, respectively). Thus, the biphasic nature of filling determines normal vortex physiology. Vortex formation is exaggerated in patients with NIDCM due to chamber remodeling, and enlarged vortices are helpful for ameliorating convective pressure losses and facilitating transport. These findings can be accurately studied using ultrasound. PMID:24414062

  3. C-Reactive protein in dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, K; Kanda, T; Yamauchi, Y; Hasegawa, A; Iwasaki, T; Arai, M; Suzuki, T; Kobayashi, I; Nagai, R

    1999-01-01

    The prognosis for patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is poor, although clinical features are variable. Prediction of outcome has been difficult in individual patients based on laboratory data. In some patients with DCM, myocardial damage secondary to viral or immune-mediated myocardial inflammation may persist. To objectively assess inflammation, we measured plasma concentrations of C-reactive protein (CRP) in 188 patients with idiopathic DCM over 5-8 years. All had dyspnea and fatigue at rest; all patients had a left ventricular ejection fraction less than 40% by echocardiography or by contrast or radionuclide ventriculography. We divided these patients into two groups: patients dying within 5 years following admission (n = 49) and the remainder surviving for at least 5 years (n = 139). CRP concentrations in the patients dying early were significantly higher than in the long-term survivors (1. 05 +/- 1.37 vs. 0.49 +/- 1.04 mg/dl, p < 0.05). Sixty-two percent of the patients with CRP>1.0 died within 5 years. In addition to other laboratory tests including electrocardiography and echocardiography, routine CRP measurements proved to be valuable for identifying high-risk patients who require special treatment strategies.

  4. Apoptosis in Endomyocardial Biopsies from Patients with Dilated Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Glumac, S; Pejić, S; Kostadinovic, S; Stojšić, Z; Vasiljevic, J

    2016-01-01

    Apoptosis is an active energy-consuming mechanism of cell death, which may contribute to heart failure in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy. Dilated cardiomyopathy is a common clinical outcome of many prolonged cardiac insults, and therefore is considered as the most prevalent form of cardiomyopathy. Loss of heart mass is highly correlated with the heart failure and mortality, thus the purpose of this study was to define the apoptotic index in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy. Apoptosis was detected by the TUNEL method in 30 patients. Biopsies were obtained from the left ventricle, and at least three specimens were taken. TUNEL-positive cardiomyocytes were found in 26 of 30 cases (86.7 %) and the mean apoptotic index for the entire specimen series was 5.41 ± 1.70 %. The analysis showed that patients with dilated cardiomyopathy had significantly higher apoptotic index (P < 0.001) than healthy subjects. One subject (man, 41 years old) had a markedly elevated apoptotic index of 52.2 %. In the remaining subjects, the percentage of cardiomyocyte death ranged from 0 % to 15.5 %. The high percentage of apoptosis found in our study may be in accordance with the clinically manifested cardiac failure in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy since in most patients we recorded the left ventricular ejection fraction values below 30 %.

  5. A Tension-Based Model Distinguishes Hypertrophic versus Dilated Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Davis, Jennifer; Davis, L Craig; Correll, Robert N; Makarewich, Catherine A; Schwanekamp, Jennifer A; Moussavi-Harami, Farid; Wang, Dan; York, Allen J; Wu, Haodi; Houser, Steven R; Seidman, Christine E; Seidman, Jonathan G; Regnier, Michael; Metzger, Joseph M; Wu, Joseph C; Molkentin, Jeffery D

    2016-05-19

    The heart either hypertrophies or dilates in response to familial mutations in genes encoding sarcomeric proteins, which are responsible for contraction and pumping. These mutations typically alter calcium-dependent tension generation within the sarcomeres, but how this translates into the spectrum of hypertrophic versus dilated cardiomyopathy is unknown. By generating a series of cardiac-specific mouse models that permit the systematic tuning of sarcomeric tension generation and calcium fluxing, we identify a significant relationship between the magnitude of tension developed over time and heart growth. When formulated into a computational model, the integral of myofilament tension development predicts hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathies in mice associated with essentially any sarcomeric gene mutations, but also accurately predicts human cardiac phenotypes from data generated in induced-pluripotent-stem-cell-derived myocytes from familial cardiomyopathy patients. This tension-based model also has the potential to inform pharmacologic treatment options in cardiomyopathy patients.

  6. Dilated cardiomyopathy after electrical injury: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Buono, Lee M; DePace, Nicholas L; Elbaum, David M

    2003-05-01

    The specific etiologic factor and pathogenesis of most dilated cardiomyopathies have yet to be described definitively. Hypotheses of the etiologic factor of idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) abound. This report describes two patients with electrical injury in whom DCM developed after the electrical insult in the absence of other precipitating causes. Further histologic examination of myocardial tissue after electrical injury may reveal clues regarding the pathophysiology behind electrically induced DCM. Because electrical injury may be associated with myocardial dysfunction, short- and long-term evaluation of left ventricular function may be warranted.

  7. Cardiac sarcoid: a chameleon masquerading as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and dilated cardiomyopathy in the same patient.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Anushree; Sulemanjee, Nasir Z; Cheema, Omar; Downey, Francis X; Tajik, A Jamil

    2014-05-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem, granulomatous disease of unknown etiology often seen in young adults, with cardiac involvement in more than one-quarter of sarcoid patients. The clinical presentation of cardiac sarcoid depends upon the location and extent of myocardium involved. Although cardiac sarcoid may produce asymmetrical septal hypertrophy, it is most commonly considered in the differential diagnosis of dilated cardiomyopathy. The hypertrophic stage of cardiac sarcoid is rarely seen. We describe a case of cardiac sarcoid in a young patient wherein a distinctive appearance of the cardiac sarcoid spectrum from "hypertrophic" stage to thinned/scarred stage, masquerading as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy followed by dilated cardiomyopathy, is demonstrated.

  8. Joint Symbolic Dynamics Analysis of Heart Rate and Systolic Blood Pressure Interactions in Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Abstract- The dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) induces important changes in the autonomic control. Measures of heart rate (HR) variability and systolic...rather simple physiological interpretations and seems to be particularly suitable for risk stratification in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy ...Keywords - Symbolic dynamics, heart rate variability, blood pressure variability I. INTRODUCTION Patients suffering from dilated cardiomyopathy

  9. [Optimal indication for surgical ventricular restoration for dilated cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Wakasa, Satoru; Shingu, Yasushige; Kubota, Suguru; Minamida, Taro; Iijima, Makoto; Naito, Yuji; Ooka, Tomonori; Tachibana, Tsuyoshi; Matsui, Yoshiro

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we assessed mid-term results of surgical ventricular restoration (SVR) for dilated cardiomyopathy. The study subjects were 107 patients who underwent SVR for both ischemic (ischemic cardiomyopathy:ICM, n=57) and non-ischemic (dilated cardiomyopathy:DCM, n=50) dilated cardiomyopathy. In 49(86%)patients ICM was associated with New York heart Association(NYHA) class III or more. Preoperative left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and left ventricular end-diastolic dimension(LVDd)were 22±6% and 67±9 mm, respectively. Hospital mortality was 14% and 5-year mortality was 40%. In contrast, 46( 92%) of the DCM patients presented with NYHA class III or more. Preoperative LVEF and LVDd were 20±6% and 74±9 mm, respectively. Hospital mortality was 28% and 5-year mortality was 63%. For NYHA class III or less, however, 5-year mortality rates were 23% and 39% in those with ICM and DCM, respectively. For those with NYHA functional class III or less, SVR was associated with a satisfactory survival rate and is recommended. For those with severe heart failure, however, ventricular assist devices or heart transplantation may have to be indicated.

  10. Linkage of familial dilated cardiomyopathy to chromosome 9

    SciTech Connect

    Krajinovic, M.; Vatta, M.; Milasin, J.

    1995-10-01

    Idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy is a heart muscle disease of unknown etiology, characterized by impaired myocardial contractility and ventricular dilatation. The disorder is an important cause of morbidity and mortality and represents the chief indication for heart transplantation. Familial transmission is often recognized (familial dilated cardiomyopathy, or FDC), mostly with autosomal dominant inheritance. In order to understand the molecular genetic basis of the disease, a large six-generation kindred with autosomal dominant FDC was studied for linkage analysis. A genome-wide search was undertaken after a large series of candidate genes were excluded and was then extended to two other families with autosomal dominant pattern of transmission and identical clinical features. Coinheritance of the disease gene was excluded for >95% of the genome, after 251 polymorphic markers were analyzed. Linkage was found for chromosome 9q13-q22, with a maximum multipoint lod score of 4.2. There was no evidence of heterogeneity. The FDC locus was placed in the interval between loci D9S153 and D9S152. Several candidate genes for causing dilated cardiomyopathy map in this region. 33 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Black-white differences in mortality in idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy: the Washington, DC, dilated cardiomyopathy study.

    PubMed Central

    Coughlin, S. S.; Gottdiener, J. S.; Baughman, K. L.; Wasserman, A.; Marx, E. S.; Tefft, M. C.; Gersh, B. J.

    1994-01-01

    Racial, socioeconomic, and clinical factors were examined as predictors of survival in idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy using cases from five Washington, DC-area hospitals. One hundred three (80.5%) of the patients were black and 25 (19.5%) were white. The black patients were less likely to have private health insurance, less educated on average, and more likely to have a household income of $15,000 or less (P < or = .05). No racial differences were found in cardiac medication usage, with the exception of beta blockers and antiarrhythmics. The cumulative survival among black patients at 12 and 24 months was 71.5% and 63.6%, respectively, as compared with 92.0% and 86.3% among whites. The 12-month survival of black patients with ventricular arrhythmias or an ejection fraction of less than 25% was particularly poor. Age, ventricular arrhythmias, ejection fraction, and cigarette usage were significant predictors of survival in univariate analysis using the proportional hazards model. The univariate association with black race was of borderline significance (P < or = .07). In multivariate analysis, age and race were statistically significant independent predictors of survival. A strong association with black race was observed with an estimated relative risk of mortality of 5.41 (P < or = .02) after adjustment for age, ejection fraction, ventricular arrhythmias, and educational attainment. Poorer survival among blacks may be caused by a greater severity of disease at the time of diagnosis or by racial differences in cardiac care, comorbid conditions, or biologic factors affecting survival. PMID:7932836

  12. Data of methylome and transcriptome derived from human dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Jo, Bong-Seok; Koh, In-Uk; Bae, Jae-Bum; Yu, Ho-Yeong; Jeon, Eun-Seok; Lee, Hae-Young; Kim, Jae-Joong; Choi, Murim; Choi, Sun Shim

    2016-12-01

    Alterations in DNA methylation and gene expression have been implicated in the development of human dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Differentially methylated probes (DMPs) and differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified between the left ventricle (LV, a pathological locus for DCM) and the right ventricle (RV, a proxy for normal hearts). The data in this DiB are for supporting our report entitled "Methylome analysis reveals alterations in DNA methylation in the regulatory regions of left ventricle development genes in human dilated cardiomyopathy" (Bong-Seok Jo, In-Uk Koh, Jae-Bum Bae, Ho-Yeong Yu, Eun-Seok Jeon, Hae-Young Lee, Jae-Joong Kim, Murim Choi, Sun Shim Choi, 2016) [1].

  13. Dilated cardiomyopathy in an American cocker spaniel with taurine deficiency.

    PubMed

    Gavaghan, B J; Kittleson, M D

    1997-12-01

    An American Cocker Spaniel with low plasma taurine concentration (< 2 nmol/mL) was presented with dyspnoea associated with pulmonary oedema and a left ventricular shortening fraction of 9%. Emergency therapy with furosemide, dobutamine, nitroglycerine and oxygen supplementation led to a good response. Chronic therapy was started with enalapril, furosemide, digoxin and taurine. Improvement in all echocardiographic indices were noted over a 22 week follow-up, most notably an increase in left ventricular shortening fraction to 20%, a decrease of E-point septal separation from 14 mm to 7 mm and marked left ventricular remodelling. This degree of improvement in myocardial function may represent a direct link between dilated cardiomyopathy in the American Cocker Spaniel and plasma taurine deficiency. Alternatively, this response may reflect a breed-related cardiomyopathy with a natural history and therapeutic response not commonly seen in the more common large breed cardiomyopathy presentations.

  14. Reversible transition from a hypertrophic to a dilated cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Spillmann, Frank; Kühl, Uwe; Van Linthout, Sophie; Dominguez, Fernando; Escher, Felicitas; Schultheiss, Heinz‐Peter; Pieske, Burkert

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We report the case of a 17‐year‐old female patient with known hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and a Wolff‐Parkinson‐White syndrome. She came to our department for further evaluation of a new diagnosed dilated cardiomyopathy characterized by an enlargement of the left ventricle and a fall in ejection fraction. Clinically, she complained about atypical chest pain, arrhythmic episodes with presyncopal events, and dyspnea (NYHA III) during the last 6 months. Non‐invasive and invasive examinations including magnetic resonance imaging, electrophysiological examinations, and angiography did not lead to a conclusive diagnosis. Therefore, endomyocardial biopsies (EMBs) were taken to investigate whether a specific myocardial disease caused the impairment of the left ventricular function. EMB analysis resulted in the diagnosis of a virus‐negative, active myocarditis. Based on this diagnosis, an immunosuppressive treatment with prednisolone and azathioprine was started, which led to an improvement of cardiac function and symptoms within 3 months after initiating therapy. In conclusion, we show that external stress triggered by myocarditis can induce a reversible transition from a hypertrophic cardiomyopathy to a dilated cardiomyopathy phenotype. This case strongly underlines the need for a thorough and invasive examination of heart failure of unknown causes, including EMB investigations as recommend by the actual ESC position statement. PMID:27774273

  15. Evolution of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) from idiopathic hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (IHCM) vs. inflammatory dilated cardiomyopathy (DCMi): a rare case of sudden death in an 8-year-old boy.

    PubMed

    Dettmeyer, Reinhard; Schmidt, Peter; Kandolf, Reinhard; Madea, Burkhard

    2004-01-01

    In rare cases, the diagnosis of hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) in children was established postmortem. Our case report deals with the sudden and unexpected death of an 8-year-old boy. The postmortem examination revealed non-obstructive hypertrophy with irregular arrangement of muscular fibers, dilatation of the ventricles, endocardial fibrosis, microfocal vacuolization with enlarged hyperchromatic nuclei, and signs of inflammation with interstitial fibrosis. We present an evolution from idiopathic cardiomyopathy to DCM. To some extent, there were morphologic signs of an inflammatory process that first led us to suspect a specific inflammatory DCM.

  16. Differentiating cardiomyopathy of coronary artery disease from nonischemic dilated cardiomyopathy utilizing positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Mody, F.V.; Brunken, R.C.; Stevenson, L.W.; Nienaber, C.A.; Phelps, M.E.; Schelbert, H.R. )

    1991-02-01

    To determine if imaging of blood flow (using N-13 ammonia) and glucose metabolism (using F-18 2-deoxyglucose) with positron emission tomography can distinguish cardiomyopathy of coronary artery disease from nonischemic dilated cardiomyopathy, 21 patients with severe left ventricular dysfunction who were evaluated for cardiac transplantation were studied. The origin of left ventricular dysfunction had been previously determined by coronary angiography to be ischemic (11 patients) or nonischemic (10 patients). Images were visually analyzed by three observers on a graded scale in seven left ventricular segments and revealed fewer defects in dilated cardiomyopathy compared with ischemic cardiomyopathy for N-13 ammonia (2.7 +/- 1.6 versus 5 +/- 0.6; p less than 0.03) and F-18 deoxyglucose (2.8 +/- 2.1 versus 4.6 +/- 1.1; p less than 0.03). An index incorporating extent and severity of defects revealed more homogeneity with fewer and less severe defects in subjects with nonischemic than in those with ischemic cardiomyopathy as assessed by imaging of flow (2.8 +/- 1.8 versus 9.2 +/- 3; p less than 0.001) and metabolism (3.8 +/- 3.3 versus 8.5 +/- 3.6; p less than 0.005). Diagnostic accuracy for distinguishing the two subgroups by visual image analysis was 85%. Using previously published circumferential count profile criteria, patients with dilated cardiomyopathy had fewer ischemic segments (0.4 +/- 0.8 versus 2.5 +/- 2 per patient; p less than 0.01) and infarcted segments (0.1 +/- 0.3 versus 2.4 +/- 1.4 per patient; p less than 0.001) than did patients with cardiomyopathy of coronary artery disease. The sensitivity for differentiating the two clinical subgroups using circumferential profile analysis was 100% and the specificity 80%.

  17. Hearing Profile in Patients with Dilated and Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathies

    PubMed Central

    El-Zarea, Gehan Abd El-Rahman; Hassan, Yasser Elsayed Mohamed; Mahmoud, Ahmed Mohamed Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cardiomyopathy may cause disruptions in the micro-vascular system of the stria vascularis in the cochlea, and, subsequently, may result in cochlear degeneration. Degeneration in the stria vascularis affects the physical and chemical processes in the organ of Corti, thereby causing a possible hearing impairment. The objective of this study was to assess the hearing profiles of patients with dilated and hypertrophic cardiomyopathies to determine the relationship between the degree of hearing loss and the degree and duration of the disease and to compare the dilated and hypertrophic cardiomyopathies as regards hearing profile. Methods In this case control study, we studied 21 patients (cases/study group/group 1) and 15 healthy individuals (controls/group 2). Six patients (group 1a) had hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), and 15 patients (group 1b) had dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). The data were analyzed using the t-test, chi-squared test, Kruskal-Wallis test, and the Multiple Mann-Whitney test. Results The results of this study showed that 80% of those patients with DCM (group 1b) had bilateral sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL), and 100% of the patients with HCM (group 1a) had mild to severe bilateral sloping SNHL. Distortion Product Otoacoustic Emissions (DPOAEs) were present in 14% of the study group and in 100 % of the control group. The results of the measurements of auditory brainstem response (ABR) showed that 50% of the study group had abnormal latencies compared to the control group, and there was no correlation between the duration of the disease and the degree of hearing loss or DPOAE. Fifty percent of the patients with HCM and 35% of the patients with DCM had positive family histories of similar conditions, and 35% of those with HCM had a positive family history of sudden death. Conclusion The results of this study suggested that the link between heart disease and hearing loss and early identification of hearing loss in patients with

  18. Four chamber pacing in dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Cazeau, S; Ritter, P; Bakdach, S; Lazarus, A; Limousin, M; Henao, L; Mundler, O; Daubert, J C; Mugica, J

    1994-11-01

    A 54-year-old man received a four chamber pacing system for severe congestive heart failure (NYHA functional Class IV). His ECG showed a left bundle branch block (200-msec QRS duration) with 200-msec PR interval, normal QRS axis, and 90-msec interatrial interval. An acute hemodynamic study with insertion of four temporary leads was performed prior to the implant, which demonstrated a significant increase in cardiac output and decrease of pulmonary capillary wedge pressure. A permanent pacemaker was implanted based on the encouraging results of the acute study. The right chamber leads were introduced by cephalic and subclavian approaches. The left atrium was paced with a coronary sinus lead, Medtronic SP 2188-58 model. An epicardial Medtronic 5071 lead was placed on the LV free wall. The four leads were connected to a standard bipolar DDD pacemaker, Chorus 6234. The two atrial leads were connected via a Y-connector to the atrial channel of the pacemaker with a bipolar pacing configuration. The two ventricular leads were connected in a similar fashion to the ventricular channel of the device. The right chamber leads were connected to the distal poles. The left chamber leads were connected to the proximal poles of the pacemaker. Six weeks later, the patient's clinical status improved markedly with a weight loss of 17 kg and disappearance of peripheral edema. His functional class was reduced to NYHA II. Four chamber pacing is technically feasible. In patients with evidence of interventricular dyssynchrony, this original pacing mode probably provides a mechanical activation sequence closer to the natural one.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Dilated cardiomyopathy: the complexity of a diverse genetic architecture.

    PubMed

    Hershberger, Ray E; Hedges, Dale J; Morales, Ana

    2013-09-01

    Remarkable progress has been made in understanding the genetic basis of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Rare variants in >30 genes, some also involved in other cardiomyopathies, muscular dystrophy, or syndromic disease, perturb a diverse set of important myocardial proteins to produce a final DCM phenotype. Large, publicly available datasets have provided the opportunity to evaluate previously identified DCM-causing mutations, and to examine the population frequency of sequence variants similar to those that have been observed to cause DCM. The frequency of these variants, whether associated with dilated or hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, is greater than estimates of disease prevalence. This mismatch might be explained by one or more of the following possibilities: that the penetrance of DCM-causing mutations is lower than previously thought, that some variants are noncausal, that DCM prevalence is higher than previously estimated, or that other more-complex genomics underlie DCM. Reassessment of our assumptions about the complexity of the genomic and phenomic architecture of DCM is warranted. Much about the genomic basis of DCM remains to be investigated, which will require comprehensive genomic studies in much larger cohorts of rigorously phenotyped probands and family members than previously examined.

  20. Development of dilated cardiomyopathy in Bmal1-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Lefta, Mellani; Campbell, Kenneth S.; Feng, Han-Zhong; Jin, Jian-Ping

    2012-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are approximate 24-h oscillations in physiology and behavior. Circadian rhythm disruption has been associated with increased incidence of hypertension, coronary artery disease, dyslipidemia, and other cardiovascular pathologies in both humans and animal models. Mice lacking the core circadian clock gene, brain and muscle aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT)-like protein (Bmal1), are behaviorally arrhythmic, die prematurely, and display a wide range of organ pathologies. However, data are lacking on the role of Bmal1 on the structural and functional integrity of cardiac muscle. In the present study, we demonstrate that Bmal1−/− mice develop dilated cardiomyopathy with age, characterized by thinning of the myocardial walls, dilation of the left ventricle, and decreased cardiac performance. Shortly after birth the Bmal1−/− mice exhibit a transient increase in myocardial weight, followed by regression and later onset of dilation and failure. Ex vivo working heart preparations revealed systolic ventricular dysfunction at the onset of dilation and failure, preceded by downregulation of both myosin heavy chain isoform mRNAs. We observed structural disorganization at the level of the sarcomere with a shift in titin isoform composition toward the stiffer N2B isoform. However, passive tension generation in single cardiomyocytes was not increased. Collectively, these findings suggest that the loss of the circadian clock gene, Bmal1, gives rise to the development of an age-associated dilated cardiomyopathy, which is associated with shifts in titin isoform composition, altered myosin heavy chain gene expression, and disruption of sarcomere structure. PMID:22707558

  1. Developing a rat model of dilated cardiomyopathy with improved survival* #

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Li-juan; Lu, Shu; Zhou, Yong-hua; Li, Lan; Xing, Qing-min; Xu, Yong-liang

    2016-01-01

    To compare the continuous infusion and intermittent bolus injection administration protocols of doxorubicin (Dox) under the same cumulative dose (12 mg/kg), and establish a rat dilated cardiomyopathy model with improved survival, a total of 150 Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were divided into three groups: a control group, administered with normal saline; a Dox 1 group, administration twice a week at 1 mg/kg; a Dox 2, administration once a week at 2 mg/kg. Mortality rates in the Dox 1 and Dox 2 groups were 22% and 48%, respectively (P<0.05). As shown by echocardiography, both Dox groups exhibited significant chamber dilatation and reduced cardiac function (all P<0.05 vs. control). Plasma brain natriuretic peptide and C-reactive protein concentrations were significantly increased (P<0.05) with both Dox regimens. The concentrations of Caspase-3 in myocardial tissues of rats significantly increased in both doxorubicin regimens. Myocardial metabolism imaging by histology and 18F-fluoro-deoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (18FDG-PET) both revealed decreased myocardial viability and necrosis, and even interstitial fibrosis, in left ventricles (LVs) in both Dox groups. Serum creatinine and aspartate aminotransferase concentrations were significantly higher in the Dox 2 model than in the Dox 1 model. Doxorubicin given at both regimens induced dilated cardiomyopathy, while its administration at lower doses with more frequent infusions reduced the mortality rate. PMID:27921402

  2. Long term survival effect of metoprolol in dilated cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Di, L; De Maria, R; Gavazzi, A; Gregori, D; Parolini, M; Sinagra, G; Salvatore, L; Longaro, F; Bernobich, E; Camerini, F

    1998-01-01

    Objective—To evaluate the additive effect of metoprolol treatment on long term incidence of fatal and non-fatal cardiac events in idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy.
Design—586 patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy were prospectively enrolled in a multicentre registry and followed up for a mean (SD) of 52 (32) months. Metoprolol, carefully titrated to the maximum tolerated dose, was added to conventional heart failure treatment in 175 patients.
Results—Survival and transplant-free survival at seven years were significantly higher in the 175 metoprolol treated patients than in the remaining 411 on standard treatment (81% v 60%, p < 0.001, and 69% v 49%, p < 0.001, respectively). By multivariate analysis, metoprolol independently predicted survival and transplant-free survival (relative risk reduction values for all cause mortality and combined mortality or transplantation 51% (95% confidence interval 21% to 69%), p = 0.002, and 34% (5% to 53%), p = 0.01, respectively). New York Heart Association class, left ventricular end diastolic diameter, and pulmonary wedge pressure were also predictive. Seven year survival (80% v 62%, p = 0.004) and transplant-free survival (68% v 51%, p = 0.005) were significantly higher in 127 metoprolol treated cases than in 127 controls selected from the entire control cohort and appropriately matched. Metoprolol was associated with a 30% reduction in all cause mortality (7% to 48%, p = 0.015) and a 26% reduction in mortality or transplantation (7% to 41%, p = 0.009). 
Conclusions—The addition of metoprolol to standard heart failure treatment, including angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, was effective in the long term, reducing both all cause mortality and transplantation in patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy.

 Keywords: β blockade;  dilated cardiomyopathy;  heart failure PMID:9616339

  3. Multiple Loci are associated with dilated cardiomyopathy in Irish wolfhounds.

    PubMed

    Philipp, Ute; Vollmar, Andrea; Häggström, Jens; Thomas, Anne; Distl, Ottmar

    2012-01-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is a highly prevalent and often lethal disease in Irish wolfhounds. Complex segregation analysis indicated different loci involved in pathogenesis. Linear fixed and mixed models were used for the genome-wide association study. Using 106 DCM cases and 84 controls we identified one SNP significantly associated with DCM on CFA37 and five SNPs suggestively associated with DCM on CFA1, 10, 15, 21 and 17. On CFA37 MOGAT1 and ACSL3 two enzymes of the lipid metabolism were located near the identified SNP.

  4. Dilated cardiomyopathy in acromegaly: Case report and anesthesia management

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Abhijit S.; Nirale, Anand M.; Sriprakash, K.; Gopal, T. V. S.

    2013-01-01

    Patients who are diagnosed having acromegaly develop a lot of cardiovascular Complications such as hypertension, arrhythmias, systolic and diastolic dysfunction, valvular dysfunction and heart failure. Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) with systolic and diastolic dysfunction is relatively rare but is associated with an increased mortality. We report a case of acromegaly diagnosed at 52 years of age in a known diabetic, non-hypertensive male who had DCM with severe left ventricular dysfunction, global hypokinesia, moderate mitral regurgitation, and grade II diastolic dysfunction who was treated with diuretics, digitalis, and vasodilators. He was diagnosed with a growth hormone secreting pituitary macroadenoma and underwent endoscopic excision of the pituitary tumor under general anesthesia. PMID:25885996

  5. Becker Muscular Dystrophy (BMD) caused by duplication of exons 3-6 of the dystrophin gene presenting as dilated cardiomyopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, A.C.; Allingham-Hawkins, D.J.; Becker, L.

    1994-09-01

    X-linked dilated cardiomyopathy (XLCM) is a progressive myocardial disease presenting with congestive heart failure in teenage males without clinical signs of skeletal myopathy. Tight linkage of XLCM to the DMD locus has been demonstrated; it has been suggested that, at least in some families, XLCM is a {open_quotes}dystrophinopathy.{close_quotes} We report a 14-year-old boy who presented with acute heart failure due to dilated cardiomyopathy. He had no history of muscle weakness, but physical examination revealed pseudohypertrophy of the calf muscles. He subsequently received a heart transplantation. Family history was negative. Serum CK level at the time of diagnosis was 10,416. Myocardial biopsy showed no evidence of carditis. Dystrophin staining of cardiac and skeletal muscle with anti-sera to COOH and NH{sub 2}termini showed a patchy distribution of positivity suggestive of Becker muscular dystrophy. Analysis of 18 of the 79 dystrophin exons detected a duplication that included exons 3-6. The proband`s mother has an elevated serum CK and was confirmed to be a carrier of the same duplication. A mutation in the muscle promotor region of the dystrophin gene has been implicated in the etiology of SLCM. However, Towbin et al. (1991) argued that other 5{prime} mutations in the dystrophin gene could cause selective cardiomyopathy. The findings in our patient support the latter hypothesis. This suggests that there are multiple regions in the dystrophin gene which, when disrupted, can cause isolated dilated cardiomyopathy.

  6. Clinical management of dilated cardiomyopathy: current knowledge and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Merlo, Marco; Cannatá, Antonio; Vitagliano, Alice; Zambon, Elena; Lardieri, Gerardina; Sinagra, Gianfranco

    2016-01-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is a primary heart muscle disease characterized by a progressive dilation and dysfunction of either the left or both ventricles. The management of DCM is currently challenging for clinicians. The persistent lack of knowledge about the etiology and pathophysiology of this disease continues to determine important fields of uncertainty in managing this condition. Molecular cardiology and genetics currently represent the most crucial horizon of increasing knowledge. Understanding the mechanisms underlying the disease allows clinicians to treat this disease more effectively and to further improve outcomes of DCM patients through advancements in etiologic characterization, prognostic stratification and individualized therapy. Left ventricular reverse remodeling predicts a lower rate of major cardiac adverse events independently from other factors. Optimized medical treatment and device implantation are pivotal in inducing left ventricular reverse remodeling. Newly identified targets, such as angiotensin-neprilysin inhibition, phosphodiesterase inhibition and calcium sensitizing are important in improving prognosis in patients affected by DCM.

  7. Abnormal myocardial fatty acid metabolism in dilated cardiomyopathy detected by iodine-123 phenylpentadecanoic acid and tomographic imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Ugolini, V.; Hansen, C.L.; Kulkarni, P.V.; Jansen, D.E.; Akers, M.S.; Corbett, J.R.

    1988-11-01

    The radioidinated synthetic fatty acid iodine-123 phenylpentadecanoic acid (IPPA) has proven useful in the identification of regional abnormalities of cardiac metabolism in patients with myocardial ischemia. The present study was performed to test the hypothesis that the myocardial distribution and turnover of fatty acids, assessed noninvasively with IPPA, are altered in patients with cardiomyopathy. Nine normal volunteers and 19 patients with dilated cardiomyopathy of various etiologies underwent cardiac imaging with single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) after intravenous injection of IPPA. Apical short-axis and basal short-axis sections were reconstructed and quantitatively analyzed for relative IPPA activity distribution and washout. Patients with congestive cardiomyopathy demonstrated significantly greater heterogeneity of IPPA uptake than normal subjects (maximal percent variation of activity 27 +/- 11 vs 18 +/- 4, p less than 0.01). They also demonstrated a more rapid percent washout rate than control subjects (24 +/- 8 vs 17 +/- 6 for the apical short-axis section, p less than 0.05; 26 +/- 7 vs 18 +/- 5 for the basal short-axis section, p less than 0.01). These abnormalities of fatty acid distribution and turnover were independent of the etiology of the cardiomyopathy. The degree of heterogeneity of IPPA uptake was significantly related to the patients' New York Heart Association functional class (r = 0.64, p less than 0.01). Thus, compared with normal myocardium, the myocardium of patients with congestive cardiomyopathy demonstrates a more heterogeneous distribution of fatty acid uptake, which parallels the clinical severity of the disease. Furthermore, patients with congestive cardiomyopathy demonstrate a more rapid myocardial clearance of the labeled fatty acid, as assessed with SPECT imaging.

  8. Viral Myocarditis and Dilated Cardiomyopathy: Etiology and Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Huber, Sally A

    2016-01-01

    Myocarditis is an inflammation of the myocardium which often follows microbial infections and is a significant cause of sudden unexpected death in the young (<40 years of age) and an underlying cause of dilated cardiomyopathy. Although histologically, the disease is usually associated with infiltration of the myocardium with either eosinophils or leukocytes, use of immunosuppression is controversial outside of giant cell myocarditis and has been found to be of limited value in lymphocytic myocarditis. The relatively limited response might reflect the need for host immunity to control persistent virus infection in the heart which may be the predominant cause of the chronic myocarditis and dilated cardiomyopathy. Treating the persistent virus infection with interferon-beta improved cardiac function in a clinical trial. However, classic immunosuppressive drugs, such as cyclosporine A and cyclophosphamide, are not effective against all types of immunity and experimental myocarditis models have shown that certain immunopathogenic forms of the disease are resistant to these immunosuppressive agents. Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of this disease and the various infectious agents which can cause it will be essential for developing effective therapeutic agents.

  9. The locus for bovine dilated cardiomyopathy maps to chromosome 18.

    PubMed

    Guziewicz, K E; Owczarek-Lipska, M; Küffer, J; Schelling, C; Tontis, A; Denis, C; Eggen, A; Leeb, T; Dolf, G; Braunschweig, M H

    2007-06-01

    Bovine dilated cardiomyopathy (BDCMP) is a severe and terminal disease of the heart muscle observed in Holstein-Friesian cattle over the last 30 years. There is strong evidence for an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance for BDCMP. The objective of this study was to genetically map BDCMP, with the ultimate goal of identifying the causative mutation. A whole-genome scan using 199 microsatellite markers and one SNP revealed an assignment of BDCMP to BTA18. Fine-mapping on BTA18 refined the candidate region to the MSBDCMP06-BMS2785 interval. The interval containing the BDCMP locus was confirmed by multipoint linkage analysis using the software loki. The interval is about 6.7 Mb on the bovine genome sequence (Btau 3.1). The corresponding region of HSA19 is very gene-rich and contains roughly 200 genes. Although telomeric of the marker interval, TNNI3 is a possible positional and a functional candidate for BDCMP given its involvement in a human form of dilated cardiomyopathy. Sequence analysis of TNNI3 in cattle revealed no mutation in the coding sequence, but there was a G-to-A transition in intron 6 (AJ842179:c.378+315G>A). The analysis of this SNP using the study's BDCMP pedigree did not conclusively exclude TNNI3 as a candidate gene for BDCMP. Considering the high density of genes on the homologous region of HSA19, further refinement of the interval on BTA18 containing the BDCMP locus is needed.

  10. Multiple Genetic Associations with Irish Wolfhound Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Dunning, Mark D.; Brownlie, Serena

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac disease is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in dogs and humans, with dilated cardiomyopathy being a large contributor to this. The Irish Wolfhound (IWH) is one of the most commonly affected breeds and one of the few breeds with genetic loci associated with the disease. Mutations in more than 50 genes are associated with human dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), yet very few are also associated with canine DCM. Furthermore, none of the identified canine loci explain many cases of the disease and previous work has indicated that genotypes at multiple loci may act together to influence disease development. In this study, loci previously associated with DCM in IWH were tested for associations in a new cohort both individually and in combination. We have identified loci significantly associated with the disease individually, but no genotypes individually or in pairs conferred a significantly greater risk of developing DCM than the population risk. However combining three loci together did result in the identification of a genotype which conferred a greater risk of disease than the overall population risk. This study suggests multiple rather than individual genetic factors, cooperating to influence DCM risk in IWH. PMID:28070514

  11. Molecular profiling of dilated cardiomyopathy that progresses to heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Michael A.; Chang, Stephen; Wakimoto, Hiroko; Gorham, Joshua M.; Conner, David A.; Christodoulou, Danos C.; Parfenov, Michael G.; DePalma, Steve R.; Eminaga, Seda; Konno, Tetsuo; Seidman, Jonathan G.; Seidman, Christine E.

    2016-01-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is defined by progressive functional and structural changes. We performed RNA-seq at different stages of disease to define molecular signaling in the progression from pre-DCM hearts to DCM and overt heart failure (HF) using a genetic model of DCM (phospholamban missense mutation, PLNR9C/+). Pre-DCM hearts were phenotypically normal yet displayed proliferation of nonmyocytes (59% relative increase vs. WT, P = 8 × 10–4) and activation of proinflammatory signaling with notable cardiomyocyte-specific induction of a subset of profibrotic cytokines including TGFβ2 and TGFβ3. These changes progressed through DCM and HF, resulting in substantial fibrosis (17.6% of left ventricle [LV] vs. WT, P = 6 × 10–33). Cardiomyocytes displayed a marked shift in metabolic gene transcription: downregulation of aerobic respiration and subsequent upregulation of glucose utilization, changes coincident with attenuated expression of PPARα and PPARγ coactivators -1α (PGC1α) and -1β, and increased expression of the metabolic regulator T-box transcription factor 15 (Tbx15). Comparing DCM transcriptional profiles with those in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) revealed similar and distinct molecular mechanisms. Our data suggest that cardiomyocyte-specific cytokine expression, early fibroblast activation, and the shift in metabolic gene expression are hallmarks of cardiomyopathy progression. Notably, key components of these profibrotic and metabolic networks were disease specific and distinguish DCM from HCM. PMID:27239561

  12. Congestive cardiomyopathy and endobronchial granulomas as manifestations of Churg-Strauss syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Sala, R.; Prados, C.; Armada, E.; Del Arco, A.; Villamor, J.

    1995-01-01

    Churg-Strauss syndrome is a systemic vasculitis. Its most frequent complications are heart diseases and asthma. Usually, cardiological manifestations are pericarditis, cardiac failure and myocardial infarction. Endobronchial granulomas identified by bronchoscopy are unusual. We present the case of a man with congestive cardiomyopathy and endobronchial granulomas macroscopically visible at bronchoscopy. After a review of medical literature, we found one case of congestive cardiomyopathy and no cases of endobronchial granulomas observed by bronchoscopy associated with Churg-Strauss syndrome. Images Figure PMID:7644400

  13. Unusual Case of Cardiac Amyloidosis Preceded by a Twenty-year History of Dilated Cardiomyopathy and Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Seijiro; Maekura, Shunji; Ino, Hikaru; Matsuura, Masayosi; Masunaga, Nobutaka; Matsumoto, Takahiro; Hama, Junkichi

    2016-01-01

    Amyloidosis is a well-known but uncommon disease, and the physician must maintain a high index of suspicion in order to make a timely diagnosis. The expected survival of patients with cardiac amyloidosis is generally poor. In particular, survival has been reported to be 4-12 months for patients with amyloid light-chain amyloidosis with congestive heart failure. We herein report a rare case of cardiac amyloidosis in which the patient presented with cardiac hypertrophy after a 20-year history of dilated cardiomyopathy and heart failure.

  14. Development of Dilated Cardiomyopathy and Impaired Calcium Homeostasis with Cardiac-Specific Deletion of ESRRβ.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Glenn C; Asimaki, Angeliki; Graham, Evan L; Martin, Kimberly D; Margulies, Kenneth B; Das, Saumya; Saffitz, Jeffrey E; Arany, Zoltan

    2017-01-27

    Mechanisms underlying the development of Idiopathic Dilated Cardiomyopathy (DCM) remain poorly understood. Using transcription factor expression profiling, we identified estrogen-related receptor beta (ESRRβ), a member of the nuclear receptor family of transcription factors, as highly expressed in murine hearts and other highly oxidative striated muscle beds. Mice bearing cardiac-specific deletion of ESRRβ (MHC-ERRB KO) develop dilated cardiomyopathy and sudden death at approximately 10 months of age. Isolated adult cardiomyocytes from the MHC-ERRB KO mice showed an increase in calcium sensitivity and impaired cardiomyocyte contractility, which preceded echocardiographic cardiac remodeling and dysfunction by several months. Histological analyses of myocardial biopsies from patients with various cardiomyopathies revealed that ESRRβ protein is absent from the nucleus of cardiomyocytes from patients with DCM, but not other forms of cardiomyopathy (ischemic, hypertrophic and arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy). Taken together these observations suggest that ESRRβ is a critical component in the onset of dilated cardiomyopathy by affecting contractility and calcium balance.

  15. Mutation in δ-Sg Gene in Familial Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Asadi, Marzieh; Foo, Roger; Salehi, Ahmad Reza; Salehi, Rasoul; Samienasab, Mohammad Reza

    2017-01-01

    Background: Mutations in different genes including dystrophin-associated glycoprotein complex caused familial dilated cardiomyopathy which is a genetically heterogeneous disease. The δ-SG gene contains nine exons spanning a 433-kb region of genomic DNA. It encodes a 35-kDa, singlepass, and type II transmembrane glycoprotein. Materials and Methods: In this study for the first time in Iran we screened 6 patients of a large family that they had positive family history of MI or sudden death by next generation sequencing method. Results: By employing NGS method we found missense mutation (p.R97Q) of δ-SG gene in 2 of 6 patients. Conclusions: The missense mutation (p.R97Q) in familial DCM patients is reported for the first time in Iranian patients with cardiac disease. Although this mutation is already known in other populations in Iran, it is not reported before.

  16. Evaluation of ventricular wall stress and cardiac function in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Scardulla, Francesco; Rinaudo, Antonino; Pasta, Salvatore; Scardulla, Cesare

    2016-01-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy is a heart disease characterized by both left ventricular dilatation and left ventricular systolic dysfunction, leading to cardiac remodeling and ultimately heart failure. We aimed to investigate the effect of dilated cardiomyopathy on the pump performance and myocardial wall mechanics using patient-specific finite element analysis. Results evinced pronounced end-systolic wall stress on left ventricular wall of patients with dilated cardiomyopathy as compared to that of normal hearts. In dilated cardiomyopathy, both end-diastolic and end-systolic pressure-volume relationships of left ventricle and right ventricle were shifted to the right compared to controls, suggesting reduced myocardial contractility. We hereby propose that finite element analysis represents a useful tool to assess the myocardial wall stress and cardiac work, which are responsible for progressive left ventricular deterioration and poor clinical course.

  17. Prognosis and possible presymptomatic manifestations of congestive cardiomyopathy (COCM).

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, H.; Breithardt, G.; Knieriem, H. J.; Köhler, E.; Lösse, B.; Seipel, L.; Loogen, F.

    1978-01-01

    In order to find evidence of prognosis and of presymptomatic manifestation of congestive cardiomyopathy (COCM) in fifty-eight patients, the extent of morphological changes of endomyocardial catheter biopsy (EMCB), clinical and haemodynamic data were correlated to the clinical course. In addition, clinical, haemodynamic, angiographic, morphological and His-bundle electrographic studies were performed in patients with left bundle branch block (LBBB), normal left ventricular end-diastolic volume, and normal coronary arteries (n = 43). Related to a 10-year mortality rate of 70% from the onset of symptoms, COCM is one of the most severe heart diseases. Endomyocardial catheter biopsy (EMCB) allowed clear prognostic separation in patients with COCM and seems to be of diagnostic value in patients with only slightly enlarged hearts and in patients with a short history of symptoms. The studies also revealed much evidence that at least some patients with LBBB, normal left ventricular end-diastolic volume (LVEDV) and normal coronary arteries exhibit an early stage of COCM. In these patients especially EMCB with severe changes of heart muscle cells and/or impaired left ventricular function may indicate subsequent COCM. So that there is now a new indication for performing EMCB. PMID:704515

  18. Diagnosis, prevalence, and screening of familial dilated cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Sweet, Mary; Taylor, Matthew R.G.; Mestroni, Luisa

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is the most common cardiomyopathy and occurs often in families. As an inherited disease, understanding the significance of diagnostic procedures and genetic screening within families is of utmost importance. Areas covered Genetic studies have shown that in 30–40% of familial DCM (FDC) cases a causative genetic mutation can be identified. Successful genetic analysis is highly dependent on close examination of patient and family history, and clinical guidelines exist recommending genetic testing to aid in the evaluation of family members at risk of developing FDC. Clinical genetic testing offers a resource for families to identify the etiology of their disease, and in some cases may provide clinical prognostic insight. Expert Opinion As an inherited disease, future FCD studies will focus on elucidating the remaining 60–70% of genetic causes in inherited cases and the pathogenic mechanisms leading to the phenotype. Specifically, a focus on regulatory regions, copy number variation, genetic and environmental modifiers and functional confirmatory investigations will be essential. PMID:27547593

  19. Progress with genetic cardiomyopathies: screening, counseling, and testing in dilated, hypertrophic, and arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia/cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Hershberger, Ray E; Cowan, Jason; Morales, Ana; Siegfried, Jill D

    2009-05-01

    This review focuses on the genetic cardiomyopathies: principally dilated cardiomyopathy, with salient features of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia/cardiomyopathy, regarding genetic etiology, genetic testing, and genetic counseling. Enormous progress has recently been made in identifying genetic causes for each cardiomyopathy, and key phenotype and genotype information is reviewed. Clinical genetic testing is rapidly emerging with a principal rationale of identifying at-risk asymptomatic or disease-free relatives. Knowledge of a disease-causing mutation can guide clinical surveillance for disease onset, thereby enhancing preventive and treatment interventions. Genetic counseling is also indicated for patients and their family members regarding the symptoms of their cardiomyopathy, its inheritance pattern, family screening recommendations, and genetic testing options and possible results.

  20. Jugular venous 'a' wave in dilated cardiomyopathy: sign of abbreviated right ventricular filling time.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, C H; Xiao, H B; Gibson, D G

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To study the mechanisms underlying the high venous pressure often seen in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy. DESIGN--Retrospective and prospective examination of the pattern of flow in the superior vena cava, cardiac echo-Doppler studies, and recordings of the jugular venous pulse. SETTING--A tertiary referral cardiac centre. PATIENTS PARTICIPANTS--23 patients with dilated cardiomyopathy, all with functional mitral and tricuspid regurgitation. RESULTS--Two patterns of venous pulse were seen: a dominant 'a' wave and 'x' descent, with systolic flow in the superior vena cava (group 1, n = 11), and a dominant 'v' wave with 'y' descent and diastolic flow in the superior vena cava (group 2, n = 12). A comparison of group 1 and group 2 showed: age (mean (SD] 58 (12) v 61 (6) years, left ventricular end diastolic dimension 7.0 (0.7) cm in both groups, right ventricular short axis 3.3 (0.6) v 3.6 (0.5) cm and long axis 7.3 (0.5) v 7.1 (0.7) cm, and duration of tricuspid regurgitation 350 (65) v 370 (50) ms. The RR interval (550 (100) v 680 (80) ms) and right ventricular filling time (150 (30) v 290 (50) ms) were significantly shorter in group 1. In all patients in group 2 right ventricular filling time was more than 200 ms with separate E and A waves on the tricuspid Doppler echocardiogram, while in all group 1 patients it was less than 200 ms with a single summation peak. In nine patients in group 1, the right ventricular filling time was limited by prolonged tricuspid regurgitation and in the remaining two by prolonged isovolumic relaxation time (215 (80) ms), so that it was consistently significantly less than that of the left ventricle. CONCLUSION--In patients with dilated cardiomyopathy, right ventricular filling time may be so short that it limits stroke volume. Such patients can be recognised by a dominant 'a' wave on the jugular venous pulse. Patients in whom the right ventricular filling time was longer showed a dominant 'v' wave. Both groups can

  1. LMNA mutations in Polish patients with dilated cardiomyopathy: prevalence, clinical characteristics, and in vitro studies

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background LMNA mutations are most frequently involved in the pathogenesis of dilated cardiomyopathy with conduction disease. The goal of this study was to identify LMNA mutations, estimate their frequency among Polish dilated cardiomyopathy patients and characterize their effect both in vivo and in vitro. Methods Between January, 2008 and June, 2012 two patient populations were screened for the presence of LMNA mutations by direct sequencing: 66 dilated cardiomyopathy patients including 27 heart transplant recipients and 39 dilated cardiomyopathy patients with heart failure referred for heart transplantation evaluation, and 44 consecutive dilated cardiomyopathy patients, referred for a family evaluation and mutation screening. Results We detected nine non-synonymous mutations including three novel mutations: p.Ser431*, p.Val256Gly and p.Gly400Argfs*11 deletion. There were 25 carriers altogether in nine families. The carriers were mostly characterized by dilated cardiomyopathy and heart failure with conduction system disease and/or complex ventricular arrhythmia, although five were asymptomatic. Among the LMNA mutation carriers, six underwent heart transplantation, fourteen ICD implantation and eight had pacemaker. In addition, we obtained ultrastructural images of cardiomyocytes from the patient carrying p.Thr510Tyrfs*42. Furthermore, because the novel p.Val256Gly mutation was found in a sporadic case, we verified its pathogenicity by expressing the mutation in a cellular model. Conclusions In conclusion, in the two referral centre populations, the screening revealed five mutations among 66 heart transplant recipients or patients referred for heart transplantation (7.6%) and four mutations among 44 consecutive dilated cardiomyopathy patients referred for familial evaluation (9.1%). Dilated cardiomyopathy patients with LMNA mutations have poor prognosis, however considerable clinical variability is present among family members. PMID:23702046

  2. High prevalence of myocardial monoclonal antimyosin antibody uptake in patients with chronic idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Obrador, D.; Ballester, M.; Carrio, I.; Berna, L.; Pons-Llado, G.

    1989-05-01

    Monoclonal antimyosin antibody studies were undertaken to assess the presence of myocardial uptake in patients with chronic idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy. Three groups were studied: 17 patients with chronic (greater than 12 months) idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy, 12 patients with a large, poorly contracting left ventricle not due to dilated cardiomyopathy (control patients) and 8 normal individuals. The patients in the cardiomyopathy and control groups showed a similar degree of clinical and functional impairment. Imaging was undertaken 48 h after antimyosin injection. The heart/lung ratio of antimyosin uptake was used to assess the results. The mean ratio in the cardiomyopathy group was 1.83 +/- 0.36 (range 1.40 to 2.80), a value significantly higher than that obtained in the control patients without cardiomyopathy (mean 1.46 +/- 0.04, range 1.38 to 1.50) or normal subjects (mean 1.46 +/- 0.13, range 1.31 to 1.6) (p less than 0.01). No difference in the ratio was noted between the normal subjects and control patients. Abnormal antimyosin uptake was seen in 12 (70%) of the 17 patients with cardiomyopathy and in only 1 (8%) of the 12 control patients. Positive monoclonal antimyosin antibody studies are highly prevalent in chronic idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy.

  3. [Cardiotropic DNA viruses and bacteria in the pathogenesis of dilated cardiomyopathy with or without inflammation].

    PubMed

    Pankuweit, S; Hufnagel, G; Eckhardt, H; Herrmann, H; Uttecht, S; Maisch, B

    1998-04-15

    In the report of the 1995 WHO/ISFC task force on the definition and classification of cardiomyopathies a new entity within the dilated cardiomyopathies was introduced as "inflammatory cardiomyopathy". It is defined as myocarditis associated with cardiac dysfunction. Idiopathic, autoimmune and infectious forms of inflammatory cardiomyopathy are now recognized through this definition. Dilated cardiomyopathy with inflammation (DCMi, chronic myocarditis) was also defined by a recent ISFC task force as > 14 lymphocytes/macrophages/mm3. Enteroviruses, adenoviruses and cytomegaloviruses are considered as main etiopathogenetic factors in the pathogenesis of inflammatory heart disease and have been demonstrated as important trigger for inflammatory cardiac disease. They may also cause dilated cardiomyopathy by viral persistence or secondary immunopathogenesis due to antigenic or molecular mimicry. For the detection of viral persistence the investigation of endomyocardial biopsies in patients with cardiomyopathy by the use of polymerase chain reaction and southern blot analysis is an important step for the standardization of diagnostic criteria on virally induced inflammatory cardiomyopathy. Present studies indicate an incidence of cytomegalovirus-DNA in patients with inflammatory cardiomyopathy in 10%, adenoviral-DNA in 17% and borreliosis only in rare cases (< 1%). In dilated cardiomyopathy without inflammation the respective incidences were for cytomegalovirus 12%, 15% for adenovirus and only 0.5% of cases for borreliosis. In addition the results of immunohistochemical analysis and molecular biological investigations of endomyocardial biopsies may have implications for future therapeutic studies. Depending on the etiology of the disease, immunosuppression may have benefit for patients with virus-negative cardiomyopathy with inflammation in contrast to patients with cytomegalo-, adenovirus-DNA or enteroviral persistence, in whom immunomodulation with hyperimmunoglobulins

  4. [The thickness/radius ratio (t/r) in patients with dilated and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Guadalajara, J F; Valenzuela, F; Martínez Sánchez, C; Huerta, D

    1990-01-01

    We studied 17 patients with cardiomyopathy (10 hypertrophic and 7 dilated). With two-dimensional echocardiography, we obtained a short axis view at the level of papillary muscle. We calculated the ratio between thickness (h), of ventricular wall and cavity's radius (r) in diastole and systole (h/r ratio). Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy has a high h/r ratio in diastole (inappropriate hypertrophy), hypercontractility and low and systolic wall stress. Dilated cardiomyopathy has a low diastolic h/r ratio (inadequate hypertrophy) with low contractility and elevated end-systolic, wall stress. We discuss the mechanisms and consequences of different patterns of hypertrophy on the ventricular performance.

  5. Stroke and dilated cardiomyopathy associated with celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Doğan, Murat; Peker, Erdal; Cagan, Eren; Akbayram, Sinan; Acikgoz, Mehmet; Caksen, Huseyin; Uner, Abdurrahman; Cesur, Yasar

    2010-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is manifested by a variety of clinical signs and symptoms that may begin either in childhood or adult life. Neurological symptoms without signs of malabsorption have been observed for a long time in CD. In this report, an 8-year-old girl with CD presented with rarely seen dilated cardiomyopathy and stroke. The girl was admitted with left side weakness. Her medical history indicated abdominal distention, chronic diarrhea, failure to thrive, and geophagia. On physical examination, short stature, pale skin and a grade 2 of 6 systolic murmur were detected. Muscle strength was 0/5 on the left side, and 5/5 on the right side. Coagulation examinations were normal. Tests for collagen tissue diseases were negative. Factor V Leiden and prothrombin GA20210 mutations were negative. Tandem mass spectrophotometry and blood carnitine profiles were normal. Brain magnetic resonance imaging and cerebral angiography showed an infarction area at the basal ganglia level. Examinations of serologic markers and intestinal biopsy revealed CD. We emphasize that in differential diagnosis of ischemic stroke, CD should be kept in mind. PMID:20458770

  6. Familial dilated cardiomyopathy: a worse prognosis compared with sporadic forms.

    PubMed Central

    Csanády, M.; Högye, M.; Kallai, A.; Forster, T.; Szárazajtai, T.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To establish the time of onset of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) by review of annual chest x rays, which are obligatory in Hungary. DESIGN--A retrospective survey of chest x rays of a cohort of confirmed cases of DCM, to assess time of onset of cardiomegaly. Clinical course was compared by follow up over a mean of six years from the time of diagnosis. SUBJECTS--240 patients with DCM (31 familial, 209 non-familial). Diagnosis was made by echocardiography in all cases and confirmed by coronary angiography and heart biopsy in some cases. MAIN RESULTS--At diagnosis, the mean age of the patients was 31.8 years in the familial group and 39.6 years in the non-familial group (P < 0.05). The time between the onset of cardiomegaly (cardiothoracic ratio > 0.45) and clinical diagnosis was 8.0 and 10.1 years respectively (P < 0.05). The six year survival was 6% in the familial group and 23% in the non-familial group (P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS--The familial form of DCM is the more malignant form: it occurs at an earlier age and progresses more rapidly than non-familial DCM. Images PMID:7546997

  7. Late Gadolinium Enhancement in Patients with Nonischemic Dilated Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Memon, Sarfaraz; Ganga, Harsha V; Kluger, Jeffrey

    2016-07-01

    One-third of all patients with heart failure have nonischemic dilated cardiomyopathy (NIDM). Five-year mortality from NIDM is as high as 20% with sudden cardiac death (SCD) as the cause in 30% of the deaths. Currently, the left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) is used as the main criteria to risk stratify patients requiring an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) to prevent SCD. However, LVEF does not necessarily reflect myocardial propensity for electrical instability leading to ventricular tachycardia (VT) or ventricular fibrillation (VF). Due to the differential risk in various subgroups of patients for arrhythmic death, it is important to identify appropriate patients for ICD implantation so that we can optimize healthcare resources and avoid the complications of ICDs in individuals who are unlikely to benefit. We performed a systematic search and review of clinical trials of NIDM and the use of ICDs and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging with late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) for risk stratification. LGE identifies patients with NIDM who are at high risk for SCD and enables optimized patient selection for ICD placement, while the absence of LGE may reduce the need for ICD implantation in patients with NIDM who are at low risk for future VF/VT or SCD.

  8. Clinical implications of anti-cardiac immunity in dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Caforio, A L P; Mahon, N G; McKenna, W J

    2006-01-01

    Criteria of organ-specific autoimmunity are fulfilled in a subset of patients with myocarditis/dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). In particular, circulating heart-reactive autoantibodies are found in such patients and symptom-free relatives. These autoantibodies are directed against multiple antigens, some of which are expressed in the heart (organ-specific), others in heart and some skeletal muscle fibres (partially heart-specific) or in heart and skeletal muscle (muscle-specific). Distinct autoantibodies have different frequency in disease and normal controls. Different techniques detect one or more antibodies, thus they cannot be used interchangeably for screening. It is unknown whether the same patients produce more antibodies or different patient groups develop autoimmunity to distinct antigens. IgG antibodies, shown to be cardiac- and disease-specific for myocarditis/DCM, can be used as autoimmune markers for relatives at risk as well as for identifying patients in whom immunosuppression may be beneficial. Some autoantibodies may also have a functional role, but further work is needed.

  9. Deception in simplicity: hereditary phospholamban mutations in dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Young, Howard S; Ceholski, Delaine K; Trieber, Catharine A

    2015-02-01

    The sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) calcium pump (SERCA) and its regulator phospholamban are required for cardiovascular function. Phospholamban alters the apparent calcium affinity of SERCA in a process that is modulated by phosphorylation via the β-adrenergic pathway. This regulatory axis allows for the dynamic control of SR calcium stores and cardiac contractility. Herein we focus on hereditary mutants of phospholamban that are associated with heart failure, such as Arg(9)-Cys, Arg(9)-Leu, Arg(9)-His, and Arg(14)-deletion. Each mutant has a distinct effect on PLN function and SR calcium homeostasis. Arg(9)-Cys and Arg(9)-Leu do not inhibit SERCA, Arg(14)-deletion is a partial inhibitor, and Arg(9)-His is comparable to wild-type. While the mutants have distinct functional effects on SERCA, they have in common that they cannot be phosphorylated by protein kinase A (PKA). Arg(9) and Arg(14) are required for PKA recognition and phosphorylation of PLN. Thus, mutations at these positions eliminate β-adrenergic control and dynamic cardiac contractility. Hydrophobic mutations of Arg(9) cause more complex changes in function, including loss of PLN function and dominant negative interaction with SERCA in heterozygous individuals. In addition, aberrant interaction with PKA may prevent phosphorylation of wild-type PLN and sequester PKA from other local subcellular targets. Herein we consider what is known about each mutant and how the synergistic changes in SR calcium homeostasis lead to impaired cardiac contractility and dilated cardiomyopathy.

  10. Genetics and genomics of dilated cardiomyopathy and systolic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Tayal, Upasana; Prasad, Sanjay; Cook, Stuart A

    2017-02-22

    Heart failure is a major health burden, affecting 40 million people globally. One of the main causes of systolic heart failure is dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), the leading global indication for heart transplantation. Our understanding of the genetic basis of both DCM and systolic heart failure has improved in recent years with the application of next-generation sequencing and genome-wide association studies (GWAS). This has enabled rapid sequencing at scale, leading to the discovery of many novel rare variants in DCM and of common variants in both systolic heart failure and DCM. Identifying rare and common genetic variants contributing to systolic heart failure has been challenging given its diverse and multiple etiologies. DCM, however, although rarer, is a reasonably specific and well-defined condition, leading to the identification of many rare genetic variants. Truncating variants in titin represent the single largest genetic cause of DCM. Here, we review the progress and challenges in the detection of rare and common variants in DCM and systolic heart failure, and the particular challenges in accurate and informed variant interpretation, and in understanding the effects of these variants. We also discuss how our increasing genetic knowledge is changing clinical management. Harnessing genetic data and translating it to improve risk stratification and the development of novel therapeutics represents a major challenge and unmet critical need for patients with heart failure and their families.

  11. Contemporary Outcome in Patients With Idiopathic Dilated Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Broch, Kaspar; Murbræch, Klaus; Andreassen, Arne Kristian; Hopp, Einar; Aakhus, Svend; Gullestad, Lars

    2015-09-15

    Outcome is better in patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (IDC) than in ischemic heart failure (HF), but morbidity and mortality are nevertheless presumed to be substantial. Most data on the prognosis in IDC stem from research performed before the widespread use of current evidence-based treatment, including implantable devices. We report outcome data from a cohort of patients with IDC treated according to current HF guidelines and compare our results with previous figures: 102 consecutive patients referred to our tertiary care hospital with idiopathic IDC and a left ventricular ejection fraction <40% were included in a prospective cohort study. After extensive baseline work-up, follow-up was performed after 6 and 13 months. Vital status and heart transplantation were recorded. Over the first year of follow-up, the patients were on optimal pharmacological treatment, and 24 patients received implantable devices. Left ventricular ejection fraction increased from 26 ± 10% to 41 ± 11%, peak oxygen consumption increased from 19.5 ± 7.1 to 23.4 ± 7.8 ml/kg/min, and functional class improved substantially (all p values <0.001). After a median follow-up of 3.6 years, 4 patients were dead, and heart transplantation had been performed in 9 patients. According to our literature search, survival in patients with IDC has improved substantially over the last decades. In conclusion, patients with IDC have a better outcome than previously reported when treated according to current guidelines.

  12. Paediatric dilated cardiomyopathy: clinical profile and outcome. The experience of a tertiary centre for paediatric cardiology.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Joana O; Costa, Liane; Rodrigues, Esmeralda; Teles, Elisa L; Baptista, Maria J; Areias, José C

    2015-02-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy is the most common form of cardiomyopathy in the paediatric population and an important cause of heart transplantation in children. The clinical profile and course of dilated cardiomyopathy in children have been poorly characterised. A retrospective review of 61 patients (37 female; 24 male) diagnosed with dilated cardiomyopathy from January, 2005 to June, 2012 at a single institution was performed. The median age at diagnosis was 15 months. Heart failure was present in 83.6% of patients and 44.3% required intensive care. The most prevalent causes were idiopathic (47.5%), viral myocarditis (18.0%) and inherited metabolic diseases (11.5%). In viral myocarditis, Parvovirus B19 was the most common identified agent, in concurrence with the increasing incidence documented recently. Inherited metabolic diseases were responsible for 11.5% of dilated cardiomyopathy cases compared with the 4-6% described in the literature, which reinforces the importance of considering this aetiology in differential diagnosis of paediatric dilated cardiomyopathy. The overall mortality rate was 16.1% and five patients underwent heart transplantation. In our series, age at diagnosis and aetiology were the most important prognosis factors. We report no mortality in the five patients who underwent heart transplantation, after 2 years of follow-up.

  13. Angiotensin II-induced dilated cardiomyopathy in Balb/c but not C57BL/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hongmei; Yang, Xiao-Ping; Carretero, Oscar A; Nakagawa, Pablo; D'Ambrosio, Martin; Leung, Pablo; Xu, Jiang; Peterson, Edward L; González, Germán E; Harding, Pamela; Rhaleb, Nour-Eddine

    2011-08-01

    Balb/c mice, which are T-helper lymphocyte 2 (Th2) responders, are highly susceptible to infectious and non-infectious heart diseases, whereas C57BL/6 mice (Th1 responders) are not. Angiotensin II (Ang II) is not only a vasopressor but also a pro-inflammatory factor that leads to cardiac hypertrophy, fibrosis and dysfunction. We hypothesized that Ang II exacerbates cardiac damage in Balb/c but not in C57BL/6 mice even though both strains have a similar level of hypertension. Twelve-week-old male C57BL/6J and Balb/c mice received either vehicle or Ang II (1.4 mg kg(-1) day(-1), s.c. via osmotic minipump) for 8 weeks. At baseline, Balb/c mice exhibited the following: (1) a lower heart rate; (2) an enlarged left ventricular chamber; (3) a lower ejection fraction and shortening fraction; and (4) twice the left ventricular collagen deposition of age-matched C57BL/6J mice. Angiotensin II raised systolic blood pressure (to ∼150 mmHg) and induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy in a similar manner in both strains. While C57BL/6J mice developed compensatory concentric hypertrophy and fibrosis in response to Ang II, Balb/c mice demonstrated severe left ventricular chamber dilatation, wall thinning and fibrosis, leading to congestive heart failure as evidenced by dramatically decreased ejection fraction and lung congestion (significant increase in lung weight), which are both characteristic of dilated cardiomyopathy. Our study suggests that the Th phenotype plays an active role in cardiac remodelling and function both in basal conditions and in hypertension. Angiotensin II-induced dilated cardiomyopathy in Balb/c mice is an ideal animal model for studying the impact of the adaptive immune system on cardiac remodelling and function and for testing strategies to prevent or treat hypertension-associated heart failure.

  14. Rare variant mutations identified in pediatric patients with dilated cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Rampersaud, Evadnie; Siegfried, Jill D; Norton, Nadine; Li, Duanxiang; Martin, Eden; Hershberger, Ray E

    2010-01-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) in infants and children can be partially explained by genetic cause but the catalogue of known genes is limited. We reviewed our database of 41 cases diagnosed with DCM before 18 years of age who underwent detailed clinical and genetic evaluation, and summarize here the evidence for mutations causing DCM in these cases from 15 genes (PSEN1, PSEN2, CSRP3, LBD3, MYH7, SCN5A, TCAP, TNNT2, LMNA, MYBPC3, MYH6, TNNC1, TNNI3, TPM1, and RBM20). Thirty-five of the 41 pediatric cases had relatives with adult-onset DCM. More males (66%) were found among children diagnosed after 1 year of age with DCM. Nineteen mutations in 9 genes were identified among 15 out of 41 patients; 3 patients (diagnosed at ages 2 weeks, 9 and 13 years) had multiple mutations. Of the 19 mutations identified in 12 families, mutations in TPM1 (32%) and TNNT2 (21%) were the most commonly found. Of the 6 patients diagnosed before 1 year of age, 3 had mutations in TPM1 (including a set of identical twins), 1 in TNNT2, 1 in MYH7, and 1 with multiple mutations (MYH7 and TNNC1). Most DCM was accompanied by advanced heart failure and need for cardiac transplantation. We conclude that in some cases pediatric DCM has a genetic basis, which is complicated by allelic and locus heterogeneity as seen in adult-onset DCM. We suggest that future prospective comprehensive family-based genetic studies of pediatric DCM are indicated to further define mutation frequencies in known genes and to discover novel genetic cause. PMID:21483645

  15. AV delay optimization and management of DDD paced patients with dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Guardigli, G; Ansani, L; Percoco, G F; Toselli, T; Spisani, P; Braggion, G; Antonioli, G E

    1994-11-01

    Ten DDD paced patients, suffering from dilated cardiomyopathy in the NYHA functional classes III or IV were studied by means of Doppler echocardiography at different programmed values of atrioventricular (AV) delay (200, 150, 120, 100, and 80 msec). The following variables were evaluated: LV diameter, ejection fraction, mitral and aortic flow velocity integrals, and stroke volume. During VDD pacing, a resting AV delay associated with the best diastolic filling and systolic function was identified and programmed individually. Shortening of the AV delay to about 100 msec was associated with a gradual and progressive improvement. Further decrease caused an impairment of systolic function. The patients were clinically and hemodynamically reevaluated after 2 months of follow-up. A reduction of NYHA class and an improvement of LV function were consistently found. The reported data suggest that programming of an optimal AV delay may improve myocardial function in DDD paced patients with congestive heart failure. This result may be the consequence of an optimization of left ventricular filling and a better use of the Frank-Starling law.

  16. Bmi1 limits dilated cardiomyopathy and heart failure by inhibiting cardiac senescence.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Valdes, I; Hidalgo, I; Bujarrabal, A; Lara-Pezzi, E; Padron-Barthe, L; Garcia-Pavia, P; Gómez-del Arco, P; Gomez, P; Redondo, J M; Ruiz-Cabello, J M; Jimenez-Borreguero, L J; Enriquez, J A; de la Pompa, J L; Hidalgo, A; Gonzalez, S

    2015-03-09

    Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is the most frequent cause of heart failure and the leading indication for heart transplantation. Here we show that epigenetic regulator and central transcriptional instructor in adult stem cells, Bmi1, protects against DCM by repressing cardiac senescence. Cardiac-specific Bmi1 deletion induces the development of DCM, which progresses to lung congestion and heart failure. In contrast, Bmi1 overexpression in the heart protects from hypertrophic stimuli. Transcriptome analysis of mouse and human DCM samples indicates that p16(INK4a) derepression, accompanied by a senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP), is linked to severely impaired ventricular dimensions and contractility. Genetic reduction of p16(INK4a) levels reverses the pathology of Bmi1-deficient hearts. In parabiosis assays, the paracrine senescence response underlying the DCM phenotype does not transmit to healthy mice. As senescence is implicated in tissue repair and the loss of regenerative potential in aging tissues, these findings suggest a source for cardiac rejuvenation.

  17. Ventricular hypertrophy in cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Oakley, C

    1971-01-01

    Semantic difficulties arise when hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy is seen without obstruction and with congestive failure, and also when congestive cardiomyopathy is seen with gross hypertrophy but without heart failure. Retention of a small left ventricular cavity and a normal ejection fraction characterizes hypertrophic cardiomyopathy at all stages of the disorder. Congestive cardiomyopathy is recognized by the presence of a dilated left ventricular cavity and reduced ejection fraction regardless of the amount of hypertrophy and the presence or not of heart failure. Longevity in congestive cardiomyopathy seems to be promoted when hypertrophy is great relative to the amount of pump failure as measured by increase in cavity size. Conversely, death in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is most likely when hypertrophy is greatest at a time when outflow tract obstruction has been replaced by inflow restriction caused by diminishing ventricular distensibility. Hypertrophy is thus beneficial and compensatory in congestive cardiomyopathy, whereas it may be the primary disorder and eventual cause of death in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Reasons are given for believing that hypertension may have been the original cause of left ventricular dilatation in some case of congestive cardiomyopathy in which loss of stroke output thenceforward is followed by normotension. Development of severe hypertension in these patients after recovery from a prolonged period of left ventricular failure with normotension lends weight to this hypothesis. No fault has been found in the large or small coronary arteries in either hypertrophic cardiomyopathy or congestive cardiomyopathy when they have been examined in life by selective coronary angiography, or by histological methods in biopsy or post-mortem material. Coronary blood supply may be a limiting factor in the compensatory hypertrophy of congestive cardiomyopathy, and the ability to hypertrophy may explain the better prognosis of some

  18. Acute dilated cardiomyopathy in a patient with beriberi and cryoglobulinaemic vasculitis: an unusual potential complication of two rare disorders.

    PubMed

    Tejedor, Ana; Solé, Manel; Prieto-González, Sergio; Alba, Marco Antonio; Grau, Josep Maria; Cid, Maria Cinta; Hernández-Rodríguez, José

    2014-01-01

    We report the case of a 45-year-old patient who presented with acute dilated cardiomyopathy. During admission the patient was consecutively diagnosed with cryoglobulinaemic vasculitis and beriberi. In both diseases, cardiac involvement may occur as dilated cardiomyopathy. Thiamin deficiency was the final cause for the severe cardiac manifestations (cardiac acute beriberi or Shoshin syndrome), which returned to normal after thiamin supplementation.

  19. Dilated Cardiomyopathy: Normalized Multiparametric Myocardial Strain Predicts Contractile Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Henn, Matthew C.; Lawrance, Christopher P.; Kar, Julia; Cupps, Brian P.; Kulshrestha, Kevin; Koerner, Danielle; Wallace, Kathleen; Joseph, Susan; Ewald, Greg; Pasque, Michael K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Left ventricular (LV) contractile injury in dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) may occur in a consistently heterogeneous distribution, suggesting that early injury “sentinel” regions may have prognostic significance. Heightened surveillance of these regions with high-resolution contractile metrics may predict recovery in DCM. Methods Multiple 3D strain parameters were calculated at each of 15,300 LV grid-points from systolic displacement data obtained from cardiac MRI in 124 test subjects. In 24 DCM patients, z-scores for two strain parameters at each grid-point were calculated by comparison of patient-specific strain values to respective point-specific mean and standard deviation values from a normal human strain database (n=100). Multiparametric strain z-scores were averaged over 6 LV regions at basilar, mid, and apical levels (18 sub-regions). DCM patients were stratified into 3 groups based on a blinded review of clinical contractile recovery (complete[n=7]; incomplete[n=7]; none[n=10]). Results Basilar-septal sub-regions were consistently heavily injured. Basilar-septal z-scores were significantly larger (worse) than those for the rest of the LV (2.73±1.27 vs 2.22±0.83; p=0.011) and lateral wall (2.73±1.27 vs 1.44±0.72; p<0.001). All patients with sentinel region average multiparametric strain z-scores <2 standard deviations (n=6) experienced complete recovery, while 17/18 DCM patients with z-scores >2 standard deviations experienced incomplete or no contractile recovery. Conclusions Contractile injury in DCM is heterogeneous with basilar-septal regions injured more than lateral regions. The targeting of early-injury sentinel regions for heightened surveillance with high-resolution metrics of micro-regional contractile function may accurately predict recovery on medical therapy. A 2 standard deviation z-score threshold may predict contractile recovery. PMID:26228597

  20. Familial dilated cardiomyopathy: A multidisciplinary entity, from basic screening to novel circulating biomarkers.

    PubMed

    de Gonzalo-Calvo, D; Quezada, M; Campuzano, O; Perez-Serra, A; Broncano, J; Ayala, R; Ramos, M; Llorente-Cortes, V; Blasco-Turrión, S; Morales, F J; Gonzalez, P; Brugada, R; Mangas, A; Toro, R

    2017-02-01

    Idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy has become one of the most prevalent inherited cardiomyopathies over the past decades. Genetic screening of first-degree relatives has revealed that 30-50% of the cases have a familial origin. Similar to other heart diseases, familial dilated cardiomyopathy is characterized by a high genetic heterogeneity that complicates family studies. Cli'nical screening, 12-lead electrocardiogram and transthoracic echocardiogram are recommended for patients and first-degree family members. Magnetic resonance also needs to be considered. Genetic technologies have become fundamental for the clinical management of this disease. New generation sequencing methods have made genetic testing feasible for extensive panels of genes related to the disease. Recently, new imaging modalities such as speckle-tracking, strain and strain rate or magnetic resonance, and circulating biomarkers such as non-coding RNAs, have emerged as potential strategies to help cardiologists in their clinical practice. Imaging, genetic and blood-based techniques should be considered together in the evaluation and testing of familial dilated cardiomyopathy. Here, we discuss the current procedures and novel approaches for the clinical management of familial dilated cardiomyopathy.

  1. Antibodies to beta-adrenergic receptors disclosing agonist-like properties in idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy and Chagas' heart disease.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, M B; Chiale, P A; Schejtman, D; Levin, M; Elizari, M V

    1994-04-01

    Recent studies confirm the existence of antibodies (Abs) to beta-adrenoceptors in patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy and Chagas' heart disease. These Abs can be shown to exert both stimulatory and inhibitory effects, which may play a role in the development of the cardiac abnormalities known to occur in these diseases, including advanced heart failure. The hypothesis is advanced that Chagas' heart disease and some forms of idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy may represent, at least partially, a form of "adrenergic cardiomyopathy."

  2. Human viral cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Maisch, Bernhard; Ristic, Arsen D; Portig, Irene; Pankuweit, Sabine

    2003-01-01

    Viral infection of the heart is relatively common, usually asymptomatic and has a spontaneous and complete resolution. It can, however, in rare cases, lead to substantial cardiac damage, development of viral cardiomyopathy and congestive heart failure. Viral cardiomyopathy is defined as viral persistence in a dilated heart. It may be accompanied by myocardial inflammation and then termed inflammatory viral cardiomyopathy (or viral myocarditis with cardiomegaly). If no inflammation is observed in the biopsy of a dilated heart (<14 lymphocytes and macrophages/mm ) the term viral cardiomyopathy or viral persistence in dilated cardiomyopathy should be applied. The diagnosis of myocarditis and viral cardiomyopathy can be made only by endomyocardial biopsy, implementing the WHO/WHF criteria, and PCR techniques for identification of viral genome. The most frequent cardiotropic viruses detected by endomyocardial biopsy are Parvo B19, enteroviruses, adenoviruses, cytomegalovirus, and less frequently Epstein-Barr virus, and influenza virus.

  3. Idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy: computerized anatomic study of relashionship between septal and free left ventricle wall

    PubMed Central

    Juliani, Paulo Sérgio; da Costa, Éder França; Correia, Aristides Tadeu; Monteiro, Rosangela; Jatene, Fabio Biscegli

    2014-01-01

    Introduction A feature of dilated cardiomyopathy is the deformation of ventricular cavity, which contributes to systolic dysfunction. Few studies have evaluated this deformation bearing in mind ventricular regions and segments of the ventricle, which could reveal important details of the remodeling process, supporting a better understanding of its role in functional impairment and the development of new therapeutic strategies. Objective To evaluate if, in basal, equatorial and apical regions, increased internal transverse perimeter of left ventricle in idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy occurs proportionally between the septal and non-septal segment. Methods We performed an anatomical study with 28 adult hearts from human cadavers. One group consisted of 18 hearts with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy and another group with 10 normal hearts. After lamination and left ventricle digital image capture, in three different regions (base, equator and apex), the transversal internal perimeter of left ventricle was divided into two segments: septal and not septal. These segments were measured by proper software. It was established an index of proportionality between these segments, called septal and non-septal segment index. Then we determined whether this index was the same in both groups. Results Among patients with normal hearts and idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy, the index of proportionality between the two segments (septal and non-septal) showed no significant difference in the three regions analyzed. The comparison results of the indices NSS/SS among normal and enlarged hearts were respectively: in base 1.99 versus 1.86 (P=0.46), in equator 2.22 versus 2.18 (P=0.79) and in apex 2.96 versus 3.56 (P=0.11). Conclusion In the idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy, the transversal dilatation of left ventricular internal perimeter occurs proportionally between the segments corresponding to the septum and free wall at the basal, equatorial and apical regions of this chamber

  4. Dynamic functional modules in co-expressed protein interaction networks of dilated cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Molecular networks represent the backbone of molecular activity within cells and provide opportunities for understanding the mechanism of diseases. While protein-protein interaction data constitute static network maps, integration of condition-specific co-expression information provides clues to the dynamic features of these networks. Dilated cardiomyopathy is a leading cause of heart failure. Although previous studies have identified putative biomarkers or therapeutic targets for heart failure, the underlying molecular mechanism of dilated cardiomyopathy remains unclear. Results We developed a network-based comparative analysis approach that integrates protein-protein interactions with gene expression profiles and biological function annotations to reveal dynamic functional modules under different biological states. We found that hub proteins in condition-specific co-expressed protein interaction networks tended to be differentially expressed between biological states. Applying this method to a cohort of heart failure patients, we identified two functional modules that significantly emerged from the interaction networks. The dynamics of these modules between normal and disease states further suggest a potential molecular model of dilated cardiomyopathy. Conclusions We propose a novel framework to analyze the interaction networks in different biological states. It successfully reveals network modules closely related to heart failure; more importantly, these network dynamics provide new insights into the cause of dilated cardiomyopathy. The revealed molecular modules might be used as potential drug targets and provide new directions for heart failure therapy. PMID:20950417

  5. Addison's Disease and Dilated Cardiomyopathy: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Mozolevska, Viktoriya; Schwartz, Anna; Cheung, David; Shaikh, Bilal; Bhagirath, Kapil M.

    2016-01-01

    Addison's disease is often accompanied by a number of cardiovascular manifestations. We report the case of a 30-year-old man who presented with a new onset dilated cardiomyopathy due to Addison's disease. The clinical presentation, treatment, and outcomes of this rare hormone mediated cardiac disorder are reviewed. PMID:28003914

  6. Dilated cardiomyopathy with cardiogenic shock in a child with Kearns-Sayre syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, Swati; Choudhry, Swati; Debelenko, Larisa; L'Ecuyer, Thomas

    2016-02-16

    Kearns-Sayre syndrome (KSS) is a mitochondrial myopathy resulting from mitochondrial DNA deletion. This syndrome primarily involves the central nervous system, eyes, skeletal muscles and the heart. The most well-known cardiac complications involve the conduction system; however, there have been case reports describing cardiomyopathy. We describe a case of a child with KSS who presented with decompensated cardiac failure from dilated cardiomyopathy representing cardiomyocyte involvement of KSS. Our patient had a rapidly progressing course, despite maximal medical management, requiring emergent institution of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and transition to a ventricular assist device. To the best of our knowledge, this is the youngest patient in the literature to have dilated cardiomyopathy in KSS.

  7. [Anesthetic management of a child with dilated cardiomyopathy associated with congenital fiber-type disproportion].

    PubMed

    Kawaraguchi, Yoshitaka; Taniguchi, Akihiro; Fukumitsu, Kazuo; Kinouchi, Keiko; Miyamoto, Yoshikazu; Hirao, Osamu; Kitamura, Seiji

    2002-04-01

    A 3-year-old girl, who presented with dilated cardiomyopathy in conjunction with congenital fiber-type disproportion, underwent open reduction for congenital dislocation of the hip. Preoperative echocardiography demonstrated left ventricular dilatation with an ejection fraction (EF) of 0.33. Anesthesia was induced with intravenous ketamine and fentanyl, and maintained with fentanyl administered incrementally to a total dose of 10 micrograms.kg-1 and 1-1.5% isoflurane. During operation, we continuously monitored left ventricular wall motion and measured left ventricular diastolic dimension (LVDd), systolic dimension (LVDs), cardiac output (CO), EF, and fractional shortening (FS) with transesophageal echocardiography (TEE). At the end of surgery, preload (LVDd) and LV contractility (CO, EF, FS) decreased, but LV wall motion remained almost stable throughout the procedure. In conclusion, TEE was useful for intraoperative management of a child with dilated cardiomyopathy.

  8. Renin-angiotensin system gene polymorphisms as potential modifiers of hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathy phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Rani, Bindu; Kumar, Amit; Bahl, Ajay; Sharma, Rajni; Prasad, Rishikesh; Khullar, Madhu

    2017-03-01

    The renin-angiotensin (RAS) pathway has an important role in the etiology of heart failure and given the importance of RAS as a therapeutic target in various cardiomyopathies, genetic polymorphisms in the RAS genes may modulate the risk and severity of disease in cardiomyopathy patients. In the present study, we examined the association of RAS pathway gene polymorphisms, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE), angiotensinogen (AGT), and angiotensin receptor type 1 (AGTR1) with risk and disease severity in Asian Indian idiopathic cardiomyopathy patients. The case-control study was conducted in 400 cardiomyopathy patients diagnosed with HCM, DCM, or restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM) and 235 healthy controls. Genotyping of patients and controls was done by PCR-RFLP assays. Left ventricular wall thickness and left ventricular ejection fraction were measured by means of M-mode echocardiography. We observed significantly higher prevalence of ACE DD and AGTR1 1166CC genotypes in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) patients. Also, 235TT genotype of AGT (M235T) was significantly associated with enhanced risk of the disease phenotype in HCM, DCM, and RCM.

  9. Familial Dilated Cardiomyopathy Caused by a Novel Frameshift in the BAG3 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Moncayo-Arlandi, Javier; Allegue, Catarina; Iglesias, Anna; Mangas, Alipio; Brugada, Ramon

    2016-01-01

    Background Dilated cardiomyopathy, a major cause of chronic heart failure and cardiac transplantation, is characterized by left ventricular or biventricular heart dilatation. In nearly 50% of cases the pathology is inherited, and more than 60 genes have been reported as disease-causing. However, in 30% of familial cases the mutation remains unidentified even after comprehensive genetic analysis. This study clinically and genetically assessed a large Spanish family affected by dilated cardiomyopathy to search for novel variations. Methods and Results Our study included a total of 100 family members. Clinical assessment was performed in alive, and genetic analysis was also performed in alive and 1 deceased relative. Genetic screening included resequencing of 55 genes associated with sudden cardiac death, and Sanger sequencing of main disease-associated genes. Genetic analysis identified a frame-shift variation in BAG3 (p.H243Tfr*64) in 32 patients. Genotype-phenotype correlation identified substantial heterogeneity in disease expression. Of 32 genetic carriers (one deceased), 21 relatives were clinically affected, and 10 were asymptomatic. Seventeen of the symptomatic genetic carriers exhibited proto-diastolic septal knock by echocardiographic assessment. Conclusions We report p.H243Tfr*64_BAG3 as a novel pathogenic variation responsible for familial dilated cardiomyopathy. This variation correlates with a more severe phenotype of the disease, mainly in younger individuals. Genetic analysis in families, even asymptomatic individuals, enables early identification of individuals at risk and allows implementation of preventive measures. PMID:27391596

  10. Studying Dynamic Myofiber Aggregate Reorientation in Dilated Cardiomyopathy Using In Vivo Magnetic Resonance Diffusion Tensor Imaging

    PubMed Central

    von Deuster, Constantin; Sammut, Eva; Asner, Liya; Nordsletten, David; Lamata, Pablo; Stoeck, Christian T.; Razavi, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Background— The objective of this study is to assess the dynamic alterations of myocardial microstructure and strain between diastole and systole in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy relative to healthy controls using the magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging, myocardial tagging, and biomechanical modeling. Methods and Results— Dual heart-phase diffusion tensor imaging was successfully performed in 9 patients and 9 controls. Tagging data were acquired for the diffusion tensor strain correction and cardiac motion analysis. Mean diffusivity, fractional anisotropy, and myocyte aggregate orientations were compared between both cohorts. Cardiac function was assessed by left ventricular ejection fraction, torsion, and strain. Computational modeling was used to study the impact of cardiac shape on fiber reorientation and how fiber orientations affect strain. In patients with dilated cardiomyopathy, a more longitudinal orientation of diastolic myofiber aggregates was measured compared with controls. Although a significant steepening of helix angles (HAs) during contraction was found in the controls, consistent change in HAs during contraction was absent in patients. Left ventricular ejection fraction, cardiac torsion, and strain were significantly lower in the patients compared with controls. Computational modeling revealed that the dilated heart results in reduced HA changes compared with a normal heart. Reduced torsion was found to be exacerbated by steeper HAs. Conclusions— Diffusion tensor imaging revealed reduced reorientation of myofiber aggregates during cardiac contraction in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy relative to controls. Left ventricular remodeling seems to be an important factor in the changes to myocyte orientation. Steeper HAs are coupled with a worsening in strain and torsion. Overall, the findings provide new insights into the structural alterations in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy. PMID:27729361

  11. Iodine-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine imaging of the heart in idiopathic congestive cardiomyopathy and cardiac transplants

    SciTech Connect

    Glowniak, J.V.; Turner, F.E.; Gray, L.L.; Palac, R.T.; Lagunas-Solar, M.C.; Woodward, W.R.

    1989-07-01

    Iodine-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine ((/sup 123/I)MIBG) is a norepinephrine analog which can be used to image the sympathetic innervation of the heart. In this study, cardiac imaging with (/sup 123/I)MIBG was performed in patients with idiopathic congestive cardiomyopathy and compared to normal controls. Initial uptake, half-time of tracer within the heart, and heart to lung ratios were all significantly reduced in patients compared to normals. Uptake in lungs, liver, salivary glands, and spleen was similar in controls and patients with cardiomyopathy indicating that decreased MIBG uptake was not a generalized abnormality in these patients. Iodine-123 MIBG imaging was also performed in cardiac transplant patients to determine cardiac nonneuronal uptake. Uptake in transplants was less than 10% of normals in the first 2 hr and nearly undetectable after 16 hr. The decreased uptake of MIBG suggests cardiac sympathetic nerve dysfunction while the rapid washout of MIBG from the heart suggests increased cardiac sympathetic nerve activity in idiopathic congestive cardiomyopathy.

  12. Comparison of thallium-201 scanning in idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy and severe coronary artery disease

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, R.F.; Uren, R.F.; Sadick, N.; Bautovich, G.; McLaughlin, A.; Hiroe, M.; Kelly, D.T.

    1982-10-01

    To determine whether cardiomyopathy could be distinguished from coronary artery disease, we used thallium scanning to study 25 patients with severe left ventricular dysfunction and chronic heart failure. Ten patients had normal coronary arteries and idiopathic cardiomyopathy (ejection fraction 20 +/- 5%), and 15 patients had multivessel coronary disease and left ventricular dysfunction (ejection fraction 25 +/- 6%). The exercise time and maximal heart rate were similar in the two groups. Two patients with cardiomyopathy and 11 with coronary artery disease had a positive exercise ECG (p less than 0.05). Thallium scans showed perfusion defects in all 25 patients. The perfusion defects were complete in nine coronary artery disease patients (60%) and in one patient (10%) with cardiomyopathy (p less than 0.05). Extensive defects involving more than 40% of the left ventricular circumference, the number of segments involved, redistribution on the 4-hour scan, lung uptake and ventricular size were similar in the two groups. Perfusion defects on thallium scanning can occur in patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy and chronic heart failure. Thallium scanning cannot be reliably used in patients with chronic heart failure to distinguish coronary artery disease from cardiomyopathy unless complete defects are present.

  13. Comparison of thallium-201 scanning in idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy and severe coronary artery disease

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, R.F.; Uren, R.F.; Sadick, N.; Bautovich, G.; McLaughlin, A.; Hiroe, M.; Kelly, D.T.

    1982-10-01

    To determine whether cardiomyopathy could be distinguished from coronary artery disease, we used thallium scanning to study 25 patients with severe left ventricular dysfunction and chronic heart failure. Ten patients had normal coronary arteries and idiopathic cardiomyopathy (ejection fraction 20 +/- 5%), and 15 patients had multivessel coronary disease and left ventricular dysfunction (ejection fraction 25 +/- 6%). The exercise time and maximal heart rate were similar in the two groups. Two patients with cardiomyopathy and 11 with coronary artery disease had a positive exercise ECG (p<0.05). Thallium scans showed perfusion defects in all 25 patients. The perfusion defects were complete in nine coronary artery disease patients (60%) and in one patient (10%) with cardiomyopathy (p<0.05). Extensive defects involving more than 40% of the left ventricular circumference, the number of segments involved, redistribution on the 4-hour scan, lung uptake and ventricular size were similar in the two groups. Perfusion defects on thallium scanning can occur in patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy and chronic heart failure. Thallium scanning cannot be reliably used in patients with chronic heart failure to distinguish coronary artery disease from cardiomyopathy unless complete defects are present.

  14. Dilated cardiomyopathy in two patients with xeroderma pigmentosum disease: a case report.

    PubMed

    Hajsadeghi, Shokoufeh; Hejrati, Maral; Moghadami, Samar; Rismantab, Sahar; Namiranian, Parva

    2012-01-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), is an autosomal recessive genetic disorder of DNA repair in which the ability to repair damage caused by ultraviolet (UV) light is deficient. The oxidative stress caused by decline catalase activity as an antioxidant enzyme, has been illustrated in these patients. This is the first case report of dilated cardiomyopathy in two patients with XP, A 26 year old girl and her younger brother. Laboratory studies demonstrated severe vitamin D deficiency in both of them. Cardiac dysfunction in the presented cases with XP might be caused by vitamin D deficiency. But this question still remains: whether chronic oxidative stress can involve the heart and can be a predisposing factor or even an underlying factor for dilated cardiomyopathy in XP, or not. More studies are needed for demonstrating this hypothesis.

  15. Successful treatment of cardiac electrical storm in dilated cardiomyopathy using esmolol: A case report.

    PubMed

    Li, L I; Zhou, Yuan-Li; Zhang, Xue-Jing; Wang, Hua-Ting

    2016-07-01

    The present study reports a case of electrical storm occurring in a 43-year-old woman with dilated cardiomyopathy. The patient suffered from a cardiac electrical storm, with 98 episodes of ventricular tachycardia rapidly degenerating to ventricular fibrillation in hospital. The patient was converted with a total of 120 defibrillations. Recurrent ventricular tachycardia/fibrillation was initiated by premature ventricular beats. The patient did not respond to the use of amiodaronum. However, the administration of esmolol stabilized the patient's heart rhythm. A moderate dose of the β-blocker esmolol, administered as an 0.5-mg intravenous bolus injection followed by an infusion at a rate of 0.15 mg/kg/min, inhibited the recurrence of ventricular fibrillation and normalized the electrocardiographic pattern. The results suggest that esmolol may be able to improve the survival rate of patients with electrical storm in dilated cardiomyopathy and should be considered as a primary therapy in the management of cardiac electrical storms.

  16. Risk Stratification for Sudden Cardiac Death In Patients With Non-ischemic Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Shekha, Karthik; Ghosh, Joydeep; Thekkoott, Deepak; Greenberg, Yisachar

    2005-01-01

    Non ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy (NIDCM) is a disorder of myocardium. It has varying etiologies. Albeit the varying etiologies of this heart muscle disorder, it presents with symptoms of heart failure, and rarely as sudden cardiac death (SCD). Manifestations of this disorder are in many ways similar to its counterpart, ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy (IDCM). A proportion of patients with NIDCM carries a grave prognosis and is prone to sudden cardiac death from sustained ventricular arrhythmias. Identification of this subgroup of patients who carry the risk of sudden cardiac death despite adequate medical management is a challenge .Yet another method is a blanket treatment of patients with this disorder with anti arrhythmic medications or anti tachyarrhythmia devices like implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICD). However this modality of treatment could be a costly exercise even for affluent economies. In this review we try to analyze the existing data of risk stratification of NIDCM and its clinical implications in practice. PMID:16943952

  17. Sheehan's syndrome with reversible dilated cardiomyopathy: A case report and brief overview.

    PubMed

    Islam, A K M Monwarul; Hasnat, Mohammad A; Doza, Fatema; Jesmin, Humayra

    2014-04-01

    Sheehan's syndrome is a rare condition characterized by post-partal panhypopituitarism due to necrosis of adenohypophysis resulting from severe post-partum hemorrhage. Lethargy, amenorrhea and failure of lactation are the usual presenting features. Cardiac involvement in Sheehan's syndrome is rare. The case presented here describes dilated cardiomyopathy in a 36-year-old lady who failed to respond adequately to the standard anti-failure treatment. Further investigation revealed the diagnosis of Sheehan's syndrome. Besides other manifestations, cardiac function reverted to normal after giving replacement therapy with glucocorticoid, levothyroxine and sex hormone. Physicians, specially those in developing countries, should have high index of suspicion for the diagnosis of Sheehan's syndrome while dealing with a case of 'peripartal dilated cardiomyopathy'. Persistent amenorrhea and failure of lactation may be important clues in this context. Timely diagnosis and appropriate treatment can lessen the sufferings of the patients.

  18. Myocardial calcium-independent nitric oxide synthase activity is present in dilated cardiomyopathy, myocarditis, and postpartum cardiomyopathy but not in ischaemic or valvar heart disease.

    PubMed Central

    de Belder, A. J.; Radomski, M. W.; Why, H. J.; Richardson, P. J.; Martin, J. F.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine the activity of the calcium-dependent constitutive (cNOS) and calcium-independent inducible nitric oxide (iNOS) synthases in heart tissue from patients with different cardiac diseases. PATIENTS AND DESIGN--Endomyocardial biopsy specimens were obtained from patients with dilated hearts (by echocardiography and ventriculography) and normal coronary arteries (by selective angiography). Recognised clinical, radiological, and histopathological criteria were used to diagnose non-inflammatory dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) (n = 6), inflammatory cardiomyopathy (ICM) (n = 5), and peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) (n = 3). Comparative groups were chosen with similarly dilated hearts caused by ischaemic (n = 5) or valvar disease (n = 4), and, in addition, non-dilated hearts with ischaemic (n = 5) and valvar (n = 3) disease. Venous blood was taken at the time of myocardial biopsy for assay of plasma tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha). RESULTS--Myocardial tissue from patients with DCM, ICM, and PPCM showed considerable iNOS activity (16.8 (2.7) pmol citrulline/mg protein/min) with little or no cNOS activity (1.3 (0.9) pmol citrulline/mg protein/min). In contrast, myocardial tissue from patients with both dilated and non-dilated hearts of ischaemic or valvar aetiology showed cNOS and little, if any, iNOS activity (dilated--cNOS 11.7 (2.4) and iNOS 0.8 (0.6) pmol citrulline/mg protein/min; non-dilated--cNOS 12.1 (1.8) and iNOS 1.4 (0.8) pmol citrulline/mg protein/min). Plasma TNF alpha was detectable only in patients with inflammatory DCM. CONCLUSIONS--These results support the hypothesis the generation of nitric oxide by iNOS accounts for some of the dilatation and impaired contractility associated with inflammatory and non-inflammatory dilated cardiomyopathy and peripartum cardiomyopathy. PMID:7488459

  19. Application of image analysis in the myocardial biopsies of patients with dilated cardiomyopathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agapitos, Emanuel; Kavantzas, Nikolaos; Bakouris, M. G.; Kassis, Kyriakos A.; Nanas, J.; Margari, Z.; Davaris, P.

    1996-04-01

    The aim of our study is to investigate if myocardial fibrosis measured by image analysis may be considered as an important and accurate index of dilated cardiomyopathy and its prognosis. The study group consisted of 24 patients with dilated cardiomyopathy which was diagnosed by echocardiography, radionuclide ventriculography, cardiac catheterization and left ventricular endomyocardial biopsy. The patients' overall disability was conventionally expressed with the criteria for functional capacity. Using image analysis the percentage of fibrosis in a total of 35 myocardial biopsies was measured accurately. A comparison study between the percentage of myocardial fibrosis and the clinical parameters (left ventricular ejection fraction and overall functional capacity) showing the degree of each patient's heart failure followed. A correlation was found among fibrosis, left ventricular ejection fraction and overall functional capacity. The cases with small values of fibrosis (less than 10%) have big values of ejection fraction and belong in Class I of overall functional capacity. The cases with big values of fibrosis (greater than 10%) belong in Classes III and IV of overall functional capacity and have small values of ejection fraction. The results of the comparison study were presented graphically and were considered significant. Myocardial fibrosis measured by image analysis might be considered an important prognostic index of dilated cardiomyopathy.

  20. 3-Methylglutaconyl-Coenzyme-A Hydratase Deficiency and the Development of Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Spergel, Craig D.; Milko, Mariya; Edwards, Christopher; Steinhoff, Jeff P.

    2014-01-01

    A 25-year-old Canadian male with a history of 3-methylglutaconyl-coenzyme-A hydratase deficiency, also known as 3-methylglutaconic aciduria type I, a very rare inborn error of metabolism, presented with respiratory distress, nausea, vomiting and signs of multisystem organ failure due to a suspected underlying infectious process. An electrocardiogram revealed bilateral atrial enlargement and an elevated brain natriuretic peptide on the initial laboratory studies, which prompted a more thorough cardiac workup. The transthoracic echocardiogram revealed a dilated cardiomyopathy with severe systolic dysfunction. The deficient enzyme present in this patient is involved in the pathway of leucine catabolism and is particularly important in various tissues for energy production and sterol synthesis. The dilated cardiomyopathy in this patient possibly had a variety of potential mechanisms including: a mitochondrial myopathy due to the deficiency of this enzyme leading to a defect in energy production inside cardiac myocytes; or a direct toxicity from 3-methylglutaconic acid (3-MGA) and its toxic metabolites; or a cardiac dysfunction due to a variety of other potential mechanisms. In conclusion, this patient’s clinical presentation suggested that 3-methylglutaconyl-CoA hydratase deficiency could cause a severe dilated cardiomyopathy and heart failure. PMID:28348715

  1. Cardiac beta-myosin heavy chain defects in two families with non-compaction cardiomyopathy: linking non-compaction to hypertrophic, restrictive, and dilated cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Hoedemaekers, Yvonne M; Caliskan, Kadir; Majoor-Krakauer, Danielle; van de Laar, Ingrid; Michels, Michelle; Witsenburg, Maarten; ten Cate, Folkert J; Simoons, Maarten L; Dooijes, Dennis

    2007-11-01

    Cardiomyopathies are classified according to distinct morphological characteristics. They occur relatively frequent and are an important cause of mortality and morbidity. Isolated ventricular non-compaction or non-compaction cardiomyopathy (NCCM) is characterized by an excessively thickened endocardial layer with deep intertrabecular recesses, reminiscent of the myocardium during early embryogenesis. Aims Autosomal-dominant as well as X-linked inheritance for NCCM has been described and several loci have been associated with the disease. Nevertheless, a major genetic cause for familial NCCM remains to be identified. Methods and Results We describe, in two separate autosomal-dominant NCCM families, the identification of mutations in the sarcomeric cardiac beta-myosin heavy chain gene (MYH7), known to be associated with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), restricted cardiomyopathy (RCM), and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Conclusion These results confirm the genetic heterogeneity of NCCM and suggest that the molecular classification of cardiomyopathies includes an MYH7-associated spectrum of NCCM with HCM, RCM, and DCM.

  2. Furthering the link between the sarcomere and primary cardiomyopathies: restrictive cardiomyopathy associated with multiple mutations in genes previously associated with hypertrophic or dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Caleshu, Colleen; Sakhuja, Rahul; Nussbaum, Robert L; Schiller, Nelson B; Ursell, Philip C; Eng, Celeste; De Marco, Teresa; McGlothlin, Dana; Burchard, Esteban González; Rame, J Eduardo

    2011-09-01

    Mutations in genes that encode components of the sarcomere are well established as the cause of hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathies. Sarcomere genes, however, are increasingly being associated with other cardiomyopathies. One phenotype more recently recognized as a disease of the sarcomere is restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM). We report on two patients with RCM associated with multiple mutations in sarcomere genes not previously associated with RCM. Patient 1 presented with NYHA Class III/IV heart failure at 22 years of age. She was diagnosed with RCM and advanced heart failure requiring heart transplantation. Sequencing of sarcomere genes revealed previously reported homozygous p.Glu143Lys mutations in MYL3, and a novel heterozygous p.Gly57Glu mutation in MYL2. The patient's mother is a double heterozygote for these mutations, with no evidence of cardiomyopathy. Patient 2 presented at 35 years of age with volume overload while hospitalized for oophorectomy. She was diagnosed with RCM and is being evaluated for heart transplantation. Sarcomere gene sequencing identified homozygous p.Asn279His mutations in TPM1. The patient's parents are consanguineous and confirmed heterozygotes. Her father was diagnosed with HCM at 42 years of age. This is the first report of mutations in TPM1, MYL3, and MYL2 associated with primary, non-hypertrophied RCM. The association of more sarcomere genes with RCM provides further evidence that mutations in the various sarcomere genes can cause different cardiomyopathy phenotypes. These cases also contribute to the growing body of evidence that multiple mutations have an additive effect on the severity of cardiomyopathies.

  3. Depression of systolic and diastolic myocardial reserve during atrial pacing tachycardia in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, M D; Alderman, J D; Aroesty, J M; Royal, H D; Ferguson, J J; Owen, R M; Grossman, W; McKay, R G

    1988-01-01

    Previous reports have shown that increases in heart rate may result in enhanced left ventricular (LV) systolic and diastolic performance. To assess whether this phenomenon occurs in the presence of depressed LV function, the effects of pacing on LV pressure and volume were compared in seven patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (LV ejection fraction 0.19 +/- 0.11) and six patients with no or minimal coronary artery disease (LV ejection fraction 0.69 +/- 0.11). Patients with normal LV function demonstrated significant increases in LV peak-positive dP/dt, LV end-systolic pressure-volume ratio, LV peak filling rate, and a progressive leftward and downward shift of their pressure-volume diagrams, compatible with increased contractility and distensibility in response to pacing tachycardia. There was no change in LV peak-negative dP/dt or tau. Patients with dilated cardiomyopathy, in contrast, demonstrated no increase in either LV peak-positive dP/dt or the end-systolic pressure-volume ratio, and absence of a progressive leftward shift of their pressure-volume diagrams. Moreover, cardiomyopathy patients demonstrated no increase in LV peak-negative dP/dt or LV peak filling rate and a blunted downward shift of the diastolic limb of their pressure-volume diagrams. Tau, as determined from a derivative method, became abbreviated although never reaching control values. We conclude that patients with dilated cardiomyopathy may demonstrate little or no significant enhancement in systolic and diastolic function during atrial pacing tachycardia, suggesting a depression of both inotropic and lusitropic reserve. PMID:3183060

  4. Molecular Signature of Nitroso–Redox Balance in Idiopathic Dilated Cardiomyopathies

    PubMed Central

    Menazza, Sara; Aponte, Angel; Sun, Junhui; Gucek, Marjan; Steenbergen, Charles; Murphy, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Background Idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy is one of the most common types of cardiomyopathy. It has been proposed that an increase in oxidative stress in heart failure leads to a decrease in nitric oxide signaling, leading to impaired nitroso–redox signaling. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the occurrence of protein S-nitrosylation (SNO) and oxidation in biopsies from explanted dilated cardiomyopathy and nonfailing donor male and female human hearts. Methods and Results Redox-based resin-assisted capture for oxidation and SNO proteomic analysis was used to measure protein oxidation and SNO, respectively. In addition, 2-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis using maleimide sulfhydryl-reactive fluors was used to identify the SNO proteins. Protein oxidation increased in dilated cardiomyopathy biopsies in comparison with those from healthy donors. Interestingly, we did not find a consistent decrease in SNO in failing hearts; we found that some proteins showed an increase in SNO and others showed a decrease, and there were sex-specific differences in the response. We found 10 proteins with a significant decrease in SNO and 4 proteins with an increase in SNO in failing female hearts. Comparing nonfailing and failing male hearts, we found 9 proteins with a significant decrease and 12 proteins with a significant increase. We also found an increase in S-glutathionylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase in failing female versus male hearts, suggesting an increase in uncoupled nitric oxide synthase in female hearts. Conclusion These findings highlight the importance of nitroso–redox signaling in both physiological and pathological conditions, suggesting a potential target to treat heart failure. PMID:26396203

  5. Exome sequencing establishes diagnosis of Alström syndrome in an infant presenting with non-syndromic dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Long, Pamela A; Evans, Jared M; Olson, Timothy M

    2015-04-01

    Idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy is a heritable, genetically heterogeneous disorder characterized by progressive heart failure. Dilated cardiomyopathy typically exhibits autosomal dominant inheritance, yet frequently remains clinically silent until adulthood. We sought to discover the molecular basis of idiopathic, non-syndromic dilated cardiomyopathy in a one-month-old male presenting with severe heart failure. Previous comprehensive testing of blood, urine, and skin biopsy specimen was negative for metabolic, mitochondrial, storage, and infectious etiologies. Ophthalmologic examination was normal. Chromosomal microarray and commercial dilated cardiomyopathy gene panel testing failed to identify a causative mutation. Parental screening echocardiograms revealed no evidence of clinically silent dilated cardiomyopathy. Whole exome sequencing was carried out on the family trio on a research basis, filtering for rare, deleterious, recessive and de novo genetic variants. Pathogenic compound heterozygous truncating mutations were identified in ALMS1, diagnostic of Alström syndrome and prompting disclosure of genetic findings. Alström syndrome is a known cause for dilated cardiomyopathy in children yet delayed and mis-diagnosis are common owing to its rarity and age-dependent emergence of multisystem clinical manifestations. At six months of age the patient ultimately developed bilateral nystagmus and hyperopia, features characteristic of the syndrome. Early diagnosis is guiding clinical monitoring of other organ systems and allowing for presymptomatic intervention. Furthermore, recognition of recessive inheritance as the mechanism for sporadic disease has informed family planning. This case highlights a limitation of standard gene testing panels for pediatric dilated cardiomyopathy and exemplifies the potential for whole exome sequencing to solve a diagnostic dilemma and enable personalized care.

  6. Clinical diabetic cardiomyopathy: a two-faced disease with restrictive and dilated phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Seferović, Petar M; Paulus, Walter J

    2015-07-14

    Diabetes mellitus-related cardiomyopathy (DMCMP) was originally described as a dilated phenotype with eccentric left ventricular (LV) remodelling and systolic LV dysfunction. Recently however, clinical studies on DMCMP mainly describe a restrictive phenotype with concentric LV remodelling and diastolic LV dysfunction. Both phenotypes are not successive stages of DMCMP but evolve independently to respectively heart failure with preserved left ventricular ejection fraction (HFPEF) or reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (HFREF). Phenotype-specific pathophysiological mechanisms were recently proposed for LV remodelling and dysfunction in HFPEF and HFREF consisting of coronary microvascular endothelial dysfunction in HFPEF and cardiomyocyte cell death in HFREF. A similar preferential involvement of endothelial or cardiomyocyte cell compartments explains DMCMP development into distinct restrictive/HFPEF or dilated/HFREF phenotypes. Diabetes mellitus (DM)-related metabolic derangements such as hyperglycaemia, lipotoxicity, and hyperinsulinaemia favour development of DMCMP with restrictive/HFPEF phenotype, which is more prevalent in obese type 2 DM patients. In contrast, autoimmunity predisposes to a dilated/HFREF phenotype, which manifests itself more in autoimmune-prone type 1 DM patients. Finally, coronary microvascular rarefaction and advanced glycation end-products deposition are relevant to both phenotypes. Diagnosis of DMCMP requires impaired glucose metabolism and exclusion of coronary, valvular, hypertensive, or congenital heart disease and of viral, toxic, familial, or infiltrative cardiomyopathy. In addition, diagnosis of DMCMP with restrictive/HFPEF phenotype requires normal systolic LV function and diastolic LV dysfunction, whereas diagnosis of DMCMP with dilated/HFREF phenotype requires systolic LV dysfunction. Treatment of DMCMP with restrictive/HFPEF phenotype is limited to diuretics and lifestyle modification, whereas DMCMP with dilated

  7. Late gadolinium enhanced cardiovascular magnetic resonance of lamin A/C gene mutation related dilated cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to identify early features of lamin A/C gene mutation related dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) with cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR). We characterise myocardial and functional findings in carriers of lamin A/C mutation to facilitate the recognition of these patients using this method. We also investigated the connection between myocardial fibrosis and conduction abnormalities. Methods Seventeen lamin A/C mutation carriers underwent CMR. Late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) and cine images were performed to evaluate myocardial fibrosis, regional wall motion, longitudinal myocardial function, global function and volumetry of both ventricles. The location, pattern and extent of enhancement in the left ventricle (LV) myocardium were visually estimated. Results Patients had LV myocardial fibrosis in 88% of cases. Segmental wall motion abnormalities correlated strongly with the degree of enhancement. Myocardial enhancement was associated with conduction abnormalities. Sixty-nine percent of our asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic patients showed mild ventricular dilatation, systolic failure or both in global ventricular analysis. Decreased longitudinal systolic LV function was observed in 53% of patients. Conclusions Cardiac conduction abnormalities, mildly dilated LV and depressed systolic dysfunction are common in DCM caused by a lamin A/C gene mutation. However, other cardiac diseases may produce similar symptoms. CMR is an accurate tool to determine the typical cardiac involvement in lamin A/C cardiomyopathy and may help to initiate early treatment in this malignant familiar form of DCM. PMID:21689390

  8. Umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells: new therapeutic weapons for idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy?

    PubMed

    Roura, Santiago; Gálvez-Montón, Carolina; Bayes-Genis, Antoni

    2014-12-20

    Dilated cardiomyopathy is the most frequent etiology of non-ischemic heart failure. In a majority of cases the causal mechanism is unknown, giving rise to the term 'idiopathic' dilated cardiomyopathy (IDCM). Major pathological derangements include patchy interstitial fibrosis, degenerated cardiomyocytes, and dilatation of the cardiac chambers, but recent evidence suggests that disease progression may also have the signature of cardiac endothelial dysfunction. As we better understand the molecular basis of IDCM, novel therapeutic approaches, mainly gene transfer and cell-based therapies, are being explored. Cells with regenerative potential have been extensively tested in cardiac diseases of ischemic origin in both pre-clinical and clinical settings. However, whether cell therapy has any clinical value in IDCM patients is still being evaluated. This article is a concise summary of cell therapy studies for IDCM, with a focus on recent advances that highlight the vascular potential exhibited by umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (UCBMSCs). We also provide an overview of cardiac vasculature as a key regulator of subjacent myocardial integrity and function, and discuss the potential mechanisms of UCBMSC amelioration of IDCM myocardium. Consideration of these issues shows that these cells are conceivably new therapeutic agents for this complex and elusive human disorder.

  9. New contribution to the study of ventricular remodeling and valve rings in dilated cardiomyopathy: anatomical and histological evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Dalva, Moise; Correia, Aristides Tadeu; Jatene, Natalia de Freitas; Saldiva, Paulo Hilário Nascimento; Jatene, Fabio Biscegli

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy causes great impact but many aspects of its pathophysiology remain unknown. Objective To evaluate anatomical and histological aspects of hearts with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy and compare them to a control group, evaluating the behavior of the perimeters of the atrioventricular rings and ventricles and to compare the percentage of collagen and elastic fibers of the atrioventricular rings. Methods Thirteen hearts with cardiomyopathy and 13 normal hearts were analysed. They were dissected keeping the ventricular mass and atrioventricular rings, with lamination of segments 20%, 50% and 80% of the distance between the atrioventricular groove and the ventricular apex. The sections were subjected to photo scanning, with measurement of perimeters. The atrioventricular rings were dissected and measured digitally to evaluate their perimeters, later being sent to the pathology laboratory, and stained by hematoxylin-eosin, picrosirius and oxidized resorcin fuccin. Results Regarding to ventricles, dilation occurs in all segments in the pathological group, and the right atrioventricular ring measurement was higher in idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy group, with no difference in the left side. With respect to collagen, both sides had lower percentage of fibers in the pathological group. With respect to the elastic fibers, there was no difference between the groups. Conclusion There is a change in ventricular geometry in cardiomyopathy group. The left atrioventricular ring does not dilate, in spite of the fact that in both ventricles there is lowering of collagen. PMID:25714199

  10. Predictive value of mitral annular calcification for the diagnosis of coronary artery disease in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Dincer, I; Ozdol, C; Dandachi, R; Akyurek, O; Atmaca, Y; Kiliçkap, M; Erol, C; Oral, D

    2001-08-01

    Mitral annulus calcification (MAC) is an independent predictor of coronary artery disease (CAD). The present study was designed to determine whether an association exists between MAC and CAD in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy. Among the 286 patients with MAC on echocardiographic examination who underwent coronary angiography, 55 patients with echocardiographic findings of dilated cardiomyopathy (group I) were compared to 60 age-matched controls without MAC and an echocardiographic diagnosis of dilated cardiomyopathy (group II) who underwent coronary angiography during the same time. There were no differences in echocardiographic findings between two groups. The prevalence of CAD was higher in group I when compared to group II (74% vs 28%, p<0.001). With regard to severity of CAD, two-vessel, three-vessel, and left main coronary artery disease were found to be significantly frequent in group I (p<0.001). Multivariate analysis revealed that MAC (p=0.001), diabetes mellitus (p=0.048), and history of anginal chest pain (p=0.009) are the independent predictors for the presence of CAD in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy. In conclusion, MAC may be a marker for the presence of coronary artery disease in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy.

  11. Hypoxia Induces Dilated Cardiomyopathy in the Chick Embryo: Mechanism, Intervention, and Long-Term Consequences

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Shakil; Crispi, Fatima; van Bilsen, Marc; Carmeliet, Peter; Staff, Anne Cathrine; Tjwa, Marc; Cetin, Irene; Gratacos, Eduard; Hernandez-Andrade, Edgar; Hofstra, Leo; Jacobs, Michael; Lamers, Wouter H.; Morano, Ingo; Safak, Erdal; Ahmed, Asif; le Noble, Ferdinand

    2009-01-01

    Background Intrauterine growth restriction is associated with an increased future risk for developing cardiovascular diseases. Hypoxia in utero is a common clinical cause of fetal growth restriction. We have previously shown that chronic hypoxia alters cardiovascular development in chick embryos. The aim of this study was to further characterize cardiac disease in hypoxic chick embryos. Methods Chick embryos were exposed to hypoxia and cardiac structure was examined by histological methods one day prior to hatching (E20) and at adulthood. Cardiac function was assessed in vivo by echocardiography and ex vivo by contractility measurements in isolated heart muscle bundles and isolated cardiomyocytes. Chick embryos were exposed to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its scavenger soluble VEGF receptor-1 (sFlt-1) to investigate the potential role of this hypoxia-regulated cytokine. Principal Findings Growth restricted hypoxic chick embryos showed cardiomyopathy as evidenced by left ventricular (LV) dilatation, reduced ventricular wall mass and increased apoptosis. Hypoxic hearts displayed pump dysfunction with decreased LV ejection fractions, accompanied by signs of diastolic dysfunction. Cardiomyopathy caused by hypoxia persisted into adulthood. Hypoxic embryonic hearts showed increases in VEGF expression. Systemic administration of rhVEGF165 to normoxic chick embryos resulted in LV dilatation and a dose-dependent loss of LV wall mass. Lowering VEGF levels in hypoxic embryonic chick hearts by systemic administration of sFlt-1 yielded an almost complete normalization of the phenotype. Conclusions/Significance Our data show that hypoxia causes a decreased cardiac performance and cardiomyopathy in chick embryos, involving a significant VEGF-mediated component. This cardiomyopathy persists into adulthood. PMID:19357774

  12. Reversible cushing dilated cardiomyopathy mimicking peripartum cardiomyopathy with successful subsequent pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Al Banna, Rashed; Husain, Aysha; Al Aali, Jalila; Ebrahim, Khalid; Mohammed, AbdulAziz

    2011-01-01

    A 29-year-old lady G4P3A0 has been admitted in her last trimester with features of peripartum cardiomyopathy. She was treated accordingly with comprehensive antifailure therapy. She lost follow-up but reappeared 12 weeks later with further deterioration of her heart failure, severe depression and osteoporotic multiple lumbar fractures. She turned to be having Cushing syndrome secondary to adrenal adenoma. Post adrenalectomy all her symptoms subsided and her cardiac function fully recovered as shown by stress echocardiography. She reconceived with uneventful pregnancy and delivery. PMID:22674115

  13. Autologous Transplantation of Bone Marrow Adult Stem Cells for the Treatment of Idiopathic Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Westphal, Ricardo João; Bueno, Ronaldo Rocha Loures; Galvão, Paulo Bezerra de Araújo; Zanis Neto, José; Souza, Juliano Mendes; Guérios, Ênio Eduardo; Senegaglia, Alexandra Cristina; Brofman, Paulo Roberto; Pasquini, Ricardo; da Cunha, Claudio Leinig Pereira

    2014-01-01

    Background Morbimortality in patients with dilated idiopathic cardiomyopathy is high, even under optimal medical treatment. Autologous infusion of bone marrow adult stem cells has shown promising preliminary results in these patients. Objective Determine the effectiveness of autologous transplantation of bone marrow adult stem cells on systolic and diastolic left ventricular function, and on the degree of mitral regurgitation in patients with dilated idiopathic cardiomyopathy in functional classes NYHA II and III. Methods We administered 4,54 x 108 ± 0,89 x 108 bone marrow adult stem cells into the coronary arteries of 24 patients with dilated idiopathic cardiomyopathy in functional classes NYHA II and III. Changes in functional class, systolic and diastolic left ventricular function and degree of mitral regurgitation were assessed after 3 months, 6 months and 1 year. Results During follow-up, six patients (25%) improved functional class and eight (33.3%) kept stable. Left ventricular ejection fraction improved 8.9%, 9.7% e 13.6%, after 3, 6 and 12 months (p = 0.024; 0.017 and 0.018), respectively. There were no significant changes neither in diastolic left ventricular function nor in mitral regurgitation degree. A combined cardiac resynchronization and implantable cardioversion defibrillation was implanted in two patients (8.3%). Four patients (16.6%) had sudden death and four patients died due to terminal cardiac failure. Average survival of these eight patients was 2.6 years. Conclusion Intracoronary infusion of bone marrow adult stem cells was associated with an improvement or stabilization of functional class and an improvement in left ventricular ejection fraction, suggesting the efficacy of this intervention. There were no significant changes neither in left ventricular diastolic function nor in the degree of mitral regurgitation. PMID:25590932

  14. Knock-out of nexilin in mice leads to dilated cardiomyopathy and endomyocardial fibroelastosis.

    PubMed

    Aherrahrou, Zouhair; Schlossarek, Saskia; Stoelting, Stephanie; Klinger, Matthias; Geertz, Birgit; Weinberger, Florian; Kessler, Thorsten; Aherrahrou, Redouane; Moreth, Kristin; Bekeredjian, Raffi; Hrabě de Angelis, Martin; Just, Steffen; Rottbauer, Wolfgang; Eschenhagen, Thomas; Schunkert, Heribert; Carrier, Lucie; Erdmann, Jeanette

    2016-01-01

    Cardiomyopathy is one of the most common causes of chronic heart failure worldwide. Mutations in the gene encoding nexilin (NEXN) occur in patients with both hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM); however, little is known about the pathophysiological mechanisms and relevance of NEXN to these disorders. Here, we evaluated the functional role of NEXN using a constitutive Nexn knock-out (KO) mouse model. Heterozygous (Het) mice were inter-crossed to produce wild-type (WT), Het, and homozygous KO mice. At birth, 32, 46, and 22 % of the mice were WT, Het, and KO, respectively, which is close to the expected Mendelian ratio. After postnatal day 6, the survival of the Nexn KO mice decreased dramatically and all of the animals died by day 8. Phenotypic characterizations of the WT and KO mice were performed at postnatal days 1, 2, 4, and 6. At birth, the relative heart weights of the WT and KO mice were similar; however, at day 4, the relative heart weight of the KO group was 2.3-fold higher than of the WT group. In addition, the KO mice developed rapidly progressive cardiomyopathy with left ventricular dilation and wall thinning and decreased cardiac function. At day 6, the KO mice developed a fulminant DCM phenotype characterized by dilated ventricular chambers and systolic dysfunction. At this stage, collagen deposits and some elastin deposits were observed within the left ventricle cavity, which resembles the features of endomyocardial fibroelastosis (EFE). Overall, these results further emphasize the role of NEXN in DCM and suggest a novel role in EFE.

  15. Atorvastatin therapy associated with improvement in left ventricular remodeling in a case of idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Takahisa; Node, Koichi; Mine, Takanao; Morita, Takashi; Kioka, Hidetaka; Tamaki, Shunsuke; Tsukamoto, Yasumasa; Masuda, Masaharu; Okuda, Keiji; Fukunami, Masatake

    2006-12-01

    Statins have pleiotropic effects such as anti-inflammatory and vascular protective effects that would be beneficial for patients with chronic heart failure. This report describes a patient with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy and a long-standing history of heart failure that was treated with atorvastatin in addition to conventional therapy that included beta-blockers. Atorvastatin therapy for 12 months was associated with an improvement in cardiac function and improved left ventricular remodeling and peak oxygen consumption. This result suggests that statin therapy may be a potential novel treatment strategy for patients with chronic heart failure.

  16. Dilated cardiomyopathy being the presenting manifestation of Takayasu arteritis and treated with renal angioplasty.

    PubMed

    Patra, Soumya; Sastry, Usha Mandikal Kodanda Rama; Mahimaiha, Jayranganath; Subramanian, Anand P; Shankarappa, Ravindranath K; Nanjappa, Manjunath C

    2014-10-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is an uncommon complication of Takayasu arteritis (TA) with a prevalence of about 6%. We report a case of 14-year-old girl who presented with dyspnea, bipedal edema, loss of weight, and easy fatigability for three months. She was being treated for DCM for the same duration. Clinical examination revealed absence of both upper limb pulses. Echocardiography revealed features of DCM with severe biventricular dysfunction (ejection fraction 30%). Computed tomography angiogram confirmed the diagnosis of TA and revealed the presence of bilateral renal artery stenosis. Bilateral renal angioplasty was done, and immunosuppressant therapy with oral prednisolone and weekly oral methotrexate was started.

  17. Sheehan’s syndrome with reversible dilated cardiomyopathy: A case report and brief overview

    PubMed Central

    Islam, A.K.M. Monwarul; Hasnat, Mohammad A.; Doza, Fatema; Jesmin, Humayra

    2014-01-01

    Sheehan’s syndrome is a rare condition characterized by post-partal panhypopituitarism due to necrosis of adenohypophysis resulting from severe post-partum hemorrhage. Lethargy, amenorrhea and failure of lactation are the usual presenting features. Cardiac involvement in Sheehan’s syndrome is rare. The case presented here describes dilated cardiomyopathy in a 36-year-old lady who failed to respond adequately to the standard anti-failure treatment. Further investigation revealed the diagnosis of Sheehan’s syndrome. Besides other manifestations, cardiac function reverted to normal after giving replacement therapy with glucocorticoid, levothyroxine and sex hormone. Physicians, specially those in developing countries, should have high index of suspicion for the diagnosis of Sheehan’s syndrome while dealing with a case of ‘peripartal dilated cardiomyopathy’. Persistent amenorrhea and failure of lactation may be important clues in this context. Timely diagnosis and appropriate treatment can lessen the sufferings of the patients. PMID:24719543

  18. Cardiomyopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Valve Prolapse Myocardial Bridge Myocarditis Obstructive Sleep Apnea ... cardiomyopathy (HCM), ischemic cardiomyopathy, restrictive cardiomyopathy Cardiomyopathy means "disease of the heart muscle." ...

  19. Acute Stroke and Limb Ischemia Secondary to Catastrophic Massive Intracardiac Thrombus in a 40-Year-Old Patient With Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Gi Jung; Song, Bong Gun; Park, Yong Hwan; Kang, Gu Hyun; Chun, Woo Jung; Oh, Ju Hyeon

    2012-01-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy has been associated with left ventricular (LV) thrombosis which leads to substantial morbidity and mortality as a site for systemic emboli. We report an interesting case of a stroke and acute limb ischemia secondary to a large mobile pedunculated LV thrombus in 40-year-old patient with dilated cardiomyopathy.

  20. Partial left ventriculectomy improves left ventricular end systolic elastance in patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Gradinac, S

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To assess the effect of partial left ventriculectomy (PLV) on estimate of left ventricular end systolic elastance (Ees), arterial elastance, and ventriculoarterial coupling.
PATIENTS—11 patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy before and two weeks after PLV, and 11 controls.
INTERVENTIONS—Single plane left ventricular angiography with simultaneous measurements of femoral artery pressure was performed during right heart pacing before and after load reduction.
RESULTS—PLV increased mean (SD) Ees from 0.52 (0.27) to 1.47 (0.62) mm Hg/ml (p = 0.0004). The increase in Ees remained significant after correction for the change in left ventricular mass (p = 0.004) and end diastolic volume (p = 0.048). As PLV had no effect on arterial elastance, ventriculoarterial coupling improved from 3.25 (2.17) to 1.01 (0.93) (p = 0.017), thereby maximising left ventricular stroke work.
CONCLUSION—It appears that PLV improves both Ees and ventriculoarterial coupling, thus increasing left ventricular work efficiency.


Keywords: dilated cardiomyopathy; elastance; partial left ventriculectomy PMID:10677413

  1. Results of comprehensive diagnostic work-up in ‘idiopathic’ dilated cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Broch, Kaspar; Andreassen, Arne K; Hopp, Einar; Leren, Trond P; Scott, Helge; Müller, Fredrik; Aakhus, Svend; Gullestad, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Objective Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is characterised by left ventricular dilation and dysfunction not caused by coronary disease, valvular disease or hypertension. Owing to the considerable aetiological and prognostic heterogeneity in DCM, an extensive diagnostic work-up is recommended. We aimed to assess the value of diagnostic testing beyond careful physical examination, blood tests, echocardiography and coronary angiography. Methods From October 2008 to November 2012, we prospectively recruited 102 patients referred to our tertiary care hospital with a diagnosis of ‘idiopathic’ DCM based on patient history, physical examination, routine blood tests, echocardiography and coronary angiography. Extended work-up included cardiac MRI, exercise testing, right-sided catheterisation with biopsies, 24 h ECG and genetic testing. Results In 15 patients (15%), a diagnosis other than ‘idiopathic’ DCM was made based on additional tests. In 10 patients (10%), a possibly disease-causing mutation was detected. 2 patients were found to have non-compaction cardiomyopathy based on MRI findings; 2 patients had systemic inflammatory disease with cardiac involvement; and in 1 patient, cardiac amyloidosis was diagnosed by endomyocardial biopsy. Only in 5 cases did the results of the extended work-up have direct therapeutic consequences. Conclusions In patients with DCM, in whom patient history and routine work-up carry no clues to the aetiology, the diagnostic and therapeutic yield of extensive additional testing is modest. PMID:26468400

  2. Hydrophobic Imbalance in the Cytoplasmic Domain of Phospholamban Is a Determinant for Lethal Dilated Cardiomyopathy*

    PubMed Central

    Ceholski, Delaine K.; Trieber, Catharine A.; Young, Howard S.

    2012-01-01

    The sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA) and its regulatory partner phospholamban (PLN) are essential for myocardial contractility. Arg9 → Cys (R9C) and Arg14 deletion (R14del) mutations in PLN are associated with lethal dilated cardiomyopathy in humans. To better understand these mutations, we made a series of amino acid substitutions in the cytoplasmic domain of PLN and tested their ability to inhibit SERCA. R9C is a complete loss-of-function mutant of PLN, whereas R14del is a mild loss-of-function mutant. When combined with wild-type PLN to simulate heterozygous conditions, the mutants had a dominant negative effect on SERCA function. A series of targeted mutations in this region of the PLN cytoplasmic domain (8TRSAIRR14) demonstrated the importance of hydrophobic balance in proper PLN regulation of SERCA. We found that Arg9 → Leu and Thr8 → Cys substitutions mimicked the behavior of the R9C mutant, and an Arg14 → Ala substitution mimicked the behavior of the R14del mutant. The results reveal that the change in hydrophobicity resulting from the R9C and R14del mutations is sufficient to explain the loss of function and persistent interaction with SERCA. Hydrophobic imbalance in the cytoplasmic domain of PLN appears to be a predictor for the development and progression of dilated cardiomyopathy. PMID:22427649

  3. Autosomal Recessive Dilated Cardiomyopathy due to DOLK Mutations Results from Abnormal Dystroglycan O-Mannosylation

    PubMed Central

    Morava, Eva; Riemersma, Moniek; Schuurs-Hoeijmakers, Janneke H. M.; Absmanner, Birgit; Verrijp, Kiek; van den Akker, Willem M. R.; Huijben, Karin; Steenbergen, Gerry; van Reeuwijk, Jeroen; Jozwiak, Adam; Zucker, Nili; Lorber, Avraham; Lammens, Martin; Knopf, Carlos; van Bokhoven, Hans; Grünewald, Stephanie; Lehle, Ludwig; Kapusta, Livia; Mandel, Hanna; Wevers, Ron A.

    2011-01-01

    Genetic causes for autosomal recessive forms of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) are only rarely identified, although they are thought to contribute considerably to sudden cardiac death and heart failure, especially in young children. Here, we describe 11 young patients (5–13 years) with a predominant presentation of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Metabolic investigations showed deficient protein N-glycosylation, leading to a diagnosis of Congenital Disorders of Glycosylation (CDG). Homozygosity mapping in the consanguineous families showed a locus with two known genes in the N-glycosylation pathway. In all individuals, pathogenic mutations were identified in DOLK, encoding the dolichol kinase responsible for formation of dolichol-phosphate. Enzyme analysis in patients' fibroblasts confirmed a dolichol kinase deficiency in all families. In comparison with the generally multisystem presentation in CDG, the nonsyndromic DCM in several individuals was remarkable. Investigation of other dolichol-phosphate dependent glycosylation pathways in biopsied heart tissue indicated reduced O-mannosylation of alpha-dystroglycan with concomitant functional loss of its laminin-binding capacity, which has been linked to DCM. We thus identified a combined deficiency of protein N-glycosylation and alpha-dystroglycan O-mannosylation in patients with nonsyndromic DCM due to autosomal recessive DOLK mutations. PMID:22242004

  4. Cost-effectiveness of Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillators in Children with Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Feingold, Brian; Arora, Gaurav; Webber, Steven A.; Smith, Kenneth J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) improve survival and are cost-effective in adults with poor left ventricular function. Because of differences in heart failure etiology, sudden death rates, and ICD complication rates, these findings may not be applicable to children. Methods and Results We developed a Markov model to compare typical management of childhood dilated cardiomyopathy with symptomatic heart failure to prophylactic ICD implantation plus typical management. Model costs included costs of outpatient care, medications, complications, and transplantation. Time horizon was up to 20 years from model entry. Total costs were $433,000 (ICD strategy) and $355,000 (typical management). Although quality adjusted survival was greater in the ICD group (6.78 vs. 6.43 quality adjusted life-years, QALYs), the incremental cost-utility ratio was $281,622/QALY saved with the ICD strategy. In sensitivity analyses, the ICD strategy cost less than the $100,000/QALY benchmark for cost-effectiveness only when the annual probability of sudden death exceeded 13% or when strong, sustained benefits in QOL due to the ICD were assumed. Conclusions Prophylactic ICD use in children with dilated cardiomyopathy, poor ventricular function, and symptomatic heart failure does not appear to be cost-effective. This is likely due to lower sudden death rates in this population. PMID:20797597

  5. Left ventriculoplasty for dilated cardiomyopathy in Fukuyama-type muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Yoda, Masataka; Tanabe, Hiroaki; Nishino, Ichizo; Suma, Hisayoshi

    2011-08-01

    A 29-year-old man was hospitalized because of heart failure causing dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). On admission, he had elevated creatinine kinase levels (hyper CKemia) (4283IUl⁻) and false enlargement of bilateral calves. By a muscular biopsy, he was diagnosed as Fukuyama-type muscular dystrophy. Although neuromuscular diseases are often related to cardiomyopathy, reports showing a relation between cardiomyopathy and Fukuyama-type muscular dystrophy have been rare. Our group performed the partial left venticulectomy of the posterior wall and approximation of the papillary muscle, mitral valve annuloplasty, and tricuspid valve annuloplasty for DCM in the patient with Fukuyama-type muscular dystrophy, after obtaining informed consent from the patient and his family. At the 1-year follow-up examination, the neuromuscular symptoms had not progressed, and the left ventricular function was improved (left ventricular end-diastolic dimension (LVDd) 77-66 mm, left ventricular end-systolic dimension (LVDs) 73-59 mm, and ejection fraction (EF) 26-30%). This is the first case report of a left ventriculoplasty in a patient with Fukuyama-type muscular dystrophy.

  6. Comparison of Immune Profiles in Fetal Hearts with Idiopathic Dilated Cardiomyopathy, Maternal Autoimmune-Associated Dilated Cardiomyopathy and the Normal Fetus.

    PubMed

    Nield, Lynne E; von Both, Ingo; Popel, Najla; Strachan, Kate; Manlhiot, Cedric; Shannon, Patrick; McCrindle, Brian W; Atkinson, Adelle; Miner, Steven E S; Jaeggi, Edgar T; Taylor, Glenn P

    2016-02-01

    The etiology of idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (iDCM) remains unknown. Immune therapies have improved outcome in fetuses with DCM born to mothers with autoimmune disease (aDCM). The purpose of this retrospective study was to compare the myocardial B and T cell profiles in fetuses and neonates with idiopathic DCM (iDCM) versus autoimmune-mediated DCM (aDCM) and to describe the normal cell maturation within the human fetal myocardium. Of 60 fetal autopsy cases identified from institutional databases, 10 had aDCM (18-38 weeks), 12 iDCM (19-37 weeks) and 38 had normal hearts (11-40 weeks). Paraffin-embedded myocardium sections were stained for all lymphocyte (CD45), B cells (CD20, CD79a), T cells (CD3, CD4, CD7, CD8) and monocyte (CD68) surface markers. Two independent, blinded cell counts were performed. Normal hearts expressed all B and T cell markers in a bimodal fashion, with peaks at 22 and 37 weeks of gestation. The aDCM cohort was most distinct from normal hearts, with less overall T cell markers [EST -9.1 (2.6) cells/mm(2), p = 0.001], CD4 [EST -2.0 (0.6), p = 0.001], CD3 [EST -3.9 (1.0), p < 0.001], CD7 [EST -3.0 (1.1), p = 0.01] overall B cell markers [EST -4.9 (1.8), p = 0.01] and CD79a counts [EST -2.3 (0.9), p = 0.01]. The iDCM group had less overall B cell markers [EST -4.0 (1.8), p = 0.03] and CD79a [EST -1.7 (0.9), p = 0.05], but no difference in T cell markers. Autoimmune-mediated DCM fetuses have less B and T cell markers, whereas iDCM fetuses have less B cell markers compared with normal fetal hearts. The fetal immune system may play a role in the normal development of the heart and evolution of dilated cardiomyopathy.

  7. Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... or lying down Reduced ability to exercise Swelling (edema) in your legs, ankles and feet Swelling of ... making your heart pump less effectively. Fluid buildup (edema). Fluid can build up in the lungs, abdomen, ...

  8. Ectopic trypsin in the myocardium promotes dilated cardiomyopathy after influenza A virus infection.

    PubMed

    Pan, Hai-Yan; Sun, Hua-Mei; Xue, Lu-Jing; Pan, Min; Wang, Yi-Ping; Kido, Hiroshi; Zhu, Jian-Hua

    2014-09-15

    We have previously reported that ectopic trypsin in the myocardium triggers acute myocarditis after influenza A virus (IAV) infection. As myocarditis is a common precursor to dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), the aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of trypsin on the progression of DCM after IAV infection. IAV-infected mice treated with saline or trypsin inhibitor were euthanized on days 0, 9, 20, 40 and 60 postinfection. Trypsin expression colocalized with myocardial inflammatory loci and IAV-induced myocarditis peaked on day 9 postinfection and alleviated by day 20 but persisted until day 60 postinfection, even though replication of IAV was not detected from day 20 postinfection. Similar time courses were observed for the activation of pro-matrix metalloproteinase (pro-MMP)-9 and expression of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-6, IL-1β, and TNF-α. Degradation of collagen type I, proliferation of ventricular interstitial collagen, and expression of collagen type I and III mRNA increased significantly during acute and chronic phases; collagen type III mRNA increased more significantly than collagen type I mRNA. Cardiac function progressively deteriorated with progressive left ventricular dilation. The trypsin inhibitor aprotinin suppressed pro-MMP-9 activation and cytokine release, alleviated myocardial inflammation, and restored collagen metabolism during acute and chronic phases of myocarditis. This effectively prevented ventricular dilation and improved cardiac function. These results suggest that ectopic trypsin in the myocardium promoted DCM through chronic activation of pro-MMP-9, persistent induction of cytokines, and mediation of collagen remodeling. Pharmacological inhibition of trypsin activity might be a promising approach for the prevention of viral cardiomyopathy.

  9. New Altered Non-Fibrillar Collagens in Human Dilated Cardiomyopathy: Role in the Remodeling Process

    PubMed Central

    Ortega, Ana; Tarazón, Estefanía; Triviño, Juan Carlos; Martínez-Dolz, Luis; González-Juanatey, José Ramón; Lago, Francisca; Portolés, Manuel; Rivera, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Background In dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), cardiac failure is accompanied by profound alterations of extracellular matrix associated with the progression of cardiac dilation and left ventricular (LV) dysfunction. Recently, we reported alterations of non-fibrillar collagen expression in ischemic cardiomyopathy linked to fibrosis and cardiac remodeling. We suspect that expression changes in genes coding for non-fibrillar collagens may have a potential role in DCM development. Objectives This study sought to analyze changes in the expression profile of non-fibrillar collagen genes in patients with DCM and to examine relationships between cardiac remodeling parameters and the expression levels of these genes. Methods and Results Twenty-three human left ventricle tissue samples were obtained from DCM patients (n = 13) undergoing heart transplantation and control donors (n = 10) for RNA sequencing analysis. We found increased mRNA levels of six non-fibrillar collagen genes, such as COL4A5, COL9A1, COL21A1, and COL23A1 (P < 0.05 for all), not previously described in DCM. Protein levels of COL8A1 and COL16A1 (P < 0.05 for both), were correspondingly increased. We also identified TGF-β1 significantly upregulated and related to both COL8A1 and COL16A1. Interestingly, we found a significant relationship between LV mass index and the gene expression level of COL8A1 (r = 0.653, P < 0.05). Conclusions In our research, we identified new non-fibrillar collagens with altered expression in DCM, being COL8A1 overexpression directly related to LV mass index, suggesting that they may be involved in the progression of cardiac dilation and remodeling. PMID:27936202

  10. Prevalence, Predictors, and Outcomes of Cardiorenal Syndrome in Children with Dilated Cardiomyopathy: A Report from the Pediatric Cardiomyopathy Registry

    PubMed Central

    Kaddourah, Ahmad; Goldstein, Stuart L; Lipshultz, Steven E; Wilkinson, James D; Sleeper, Lynn A; Lu, Minmin; Colan, Steven D; Towbin, Jeffrey A; Aydin, Scott I; Rossano, Joseph; Everitt, Melanie D; Gossett, Jeffrey G; Rusconi, Paolo; Kantor, Paul F; Singh, Rakesh K; Jefferies, John L

    2015-01-01

    Background The association of cardiorenal syndrome (CRS) with mortality in children with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is unknown. Methods With a modified Schwartz formula, we estimated glomerular filtration rates (eGFR) for children ≥1 year old with DCM enrolled in the Pediatric Cardiomyopathy Registry at the time of DCM diagnosis and annually thereafter, and defined CRS as an eGFR <90 mL/min/1.73 m2. Children with and without CRS were compared on survival and serum creatinine concentrations (SCr). The association between eGFR and echocardiographic measures was assessed with linear mixed-effects regression models. Results Of 285 eligible children with DCM diagnosed at ≥1 year of age, 93 were evaluable. CRS was identified in 57 (61.3%). Mean (SD) eGFR was 62.0 (22.6) mL/min/1.73 m2 for children with CRS and 108.0 (14.0) for those without (P<0.001); median SCr concentrations were 0.9 and 0.5 mg/dL, respectively (P<0.001). The mortality hazard ratio of children with CRS vs. no CRS was 2.4 (95% CI: 0.8-7.4). eGFR was positively correlated with measures of left ventricular function and negatively correlated with age. Conclusions CRS in children newly diagnosed with DCM may be associated with higher 5-year mortality. Children with DCM, especially those with impaired left ventricular function, should be monitored for renal disease. PMID:26210985

  11. Mutation analysis of the phospholamban gene in 315 South Africans with dilated, hypertrophic, peripartum and arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathies

    PubMed Central

    Fish, Maryam; Shaboodien, Gasnat; Kraus, Sarah; Sliwa, Karen; Seidman, Christine E.; Burke, Michael A.; Crotti, Lia; Schwartz, Peter J.; Mayosi, Bongani M.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiomyopathy is an important cause of heart failure in Sub-Saharan Africa, accounting for up to 30% of adult heart failure hospitalisations. This high prevalence poses a challenge in societies without access to resources and interventions essential for disease management. Over 80 genes have been implicated as a cause of cardiomyopathy. Mutations in the phospholamban (PLN) gene are associated with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and severe heart failure. In Africa, the prevalence of PLN mutations in cardiomyopathy patients is unknown. Our aim was to screen 315 patients with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (n = 111), DCM (n = 95), hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (n = 40) and peripartum cardiomyopathy (n = 69) for disease-causing PLN mutations by high resolution melt analysis and DNA sequencing. We detected the previously reported PLN c.25C > T (p.R9C) mutation in a South African family with severe autosomal dominant DCM. Haplotype analysis revealed that this mutation occurred against a different haplotype background to that of the original North American family and was therefore unlikely to have been inherited from a common ancestor. No other mutations in PLN were detected (mutation prevalence = 0.2%). We conclude that PLN is a rare cause of cardiomyopathy in African patients. The PLN p.R9C mutation is not well-tolerated, emphasising the importance of this gene in cardiac function. PMID:26917049

  12. Mutation analysis of the phospholamban gene in 315 South Africans with dilated, hypertrophic, peripartum and arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Fish, Maryam; Shaboodien, Gasnat; Kraus, Sarah; Sliwa, Karen; Seidman, Christine E; Burke, Michael A; Crotti, Lia; Schwartz, Peter J; Mayosi, Bongani M

    2016-02-26

    Cardiomyopathy is an important cause of heart failure in Sub-Saharan Africa, accounting for up to 30% of adult heart failure hospitalisations. This high prevalence poses a challenge in societies without access to resources and interventions essential for disease management. Over 80 genes have been implicated as a cause of cardiomyopathy. Mutations in the phospholamban (PLN) gene are associated with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and severe heart failure. In Africa, the prevalence of PLN mutations in cardiomyopathy patients is unknown. Our aim was to screen 315 patients with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (n = 111), DCM (n = 95), hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (n = 40) and peripartum cardiomyopathy (n = 69) for disease-causing PLN mutations by high resolution melt analysis and DNA sequencing. We detected the previously reported PLN c.25C > T (p.R9C) mutation in a South African family with severe autosomal dominant DCM. Haplotype analysis revealed that this mutation occurred against a different haplotype background to that of the original North American family and was therefore unlikely to have been inherited from a common ancestor. No other mutations in PLN were detected (mutation prevalence = 0.2%). We conclude that PLN is a rare cause of cardiomyopathy in African patients. The PLN p.R9C mutation is not well-tolerated, emphasising the importance of this gene in cardiac function.

  13. Pathologic features of dilated cardiomyopathy with localized noncompaction in a child with deletion 1p36 syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pearce, F Bennett; Litovsky, Silvio H; Dabal, Robert J; Robin, Nathaniel; Dure, Leon J; George, James F; Kirklin, James K

    2012-01-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy and ventricular noncompaction have been reported in association with deletion 1p36 syndrome. Previous descriptions include echocardiographic and/or gross pathologic descriptions. There are no previous reports of microscopic findings. We report a case with descriptions of echocardiographic, gross pathologic, and microscopic findings.

  14. Assessment of myocardial damage in dilated-phase hypertrophic cardiomyopathy by using indium-111-antimyosin Fab myocardial scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, T.; Nagata, S.; Uehara, T.; Hayashida, K.; Mitani, I.; Kumita, S. )

    1991-07-01

    For the detection of myocardial cell damage, an 111In-antimyosin Fab study was carried out on seven patients (Group A) in the dilated phase of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, seven patients (Group B) with dilated cardiomyopathy, and eight control patients (Group C). Imaging was done 48 hr after intravenous injection of 74 MBq of 111In-antimyosin Fab. Myocardial antimyosin uptake was visually graded as 0, +1, +2 or +3. A score of +2 or +3 was considered positive. The heart/lung ratio of antimyosin uptake (antimyosin index) also was determined. Antimyosin uptake was positive in seven (100%), nine (90%) and no (0%) patients in Groups A, B, and C, respectively. The antimyosin index in Groups A and B was 2.46 {plus minus} 0.49 and 2.04 {plus minus} 0.24, respectively, findings were significantly higher than that in Group C (1.51 {plus minus} 0.13) (p less than 0.01). Positive biopsy findings were noted in only two patients in Group A. Thus, antimyosin uptake was increased in dilated phase hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and dilated cardiomyopathy, which suggests ongoing necrotic changes in these patients.

  15. Nav 1.5 mutations linked to dilated cardiomyopathy phenotypes: Is the gating pore current the missing link?

    PubMed

    Gosselin-Badaroudine, Pascal; Moreau, Adrien; Chahine, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    Nav 1.5 dysfunctions are commonly linked to rhythms disturbances that include type 3 long QT syndrome (LQT3), Brugada syndrome (BrS), sick sinus syndrome (SSS) and conduction defects. Recently, this channel protein has been also linked to structural heart diseases such as dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM).

  16. Severe reversible dilated cardiomyopathy associated with a large left ventricular thrombus in a young child with middle aortic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ponniah, U; Overholt, E

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of a seven-year girl who presented with severe dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) associated with a large thrombus in the left ventricle (LV). She had a long segment stenosis of the lower thoracic descending aorta, possibly due to non-specific aortitis and underwent successful stent angioplasty. The LV thrombus resolved after heparin without sequelae.

  17. Ablation of the Cardiac-Specific Gene Leucine-Rich Repeat Containing 10 (Lrrc10) Results in Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Brody, Matthew J.; Hacker, Timothy A.; Patel, Jitandrakumar R.; Feng, Li; Sadoshima, Junichi; Tevosian, Sergei G.; Balijepalli, Ravi C.; Moss, Richard L.; Lee, Youngsook

    2012-01-01

    Leucine-rich repeat containing 10 (LRRC10) is a cardiac-specific protein exclusively expressed in embryonic and adult cardiomyocytes. However, the role of LRRC10 in mammalian cardiac physiology remains unknown. To determine if LRRC10 is critical for cardiac function, Lrrc10-null (Lrrc10−/−) mice were analyzed. Lrrc10−/− mice exhibit prenatal systolic dysfunction and dilated cardiomyopathy in postnatal life. Importantly, Lrrc10−/− mice have diminished cardiac performance in utero, prior to ventricular dilation observed in young adults. We demonstrate that LRRC10 endogenously interacts with α-actinin and α-actin in the heart and all actin isoforms in vitro. Gene expression profiling of embryonic Lrrc10−/− hearts identified pathways and transcripts involved in regulation of the actin cytoskeleton to be significantly upregulated, implicating dysregulation of the actin cytoskeleton as an early defective molecular signal in the absence of LRRC10. In contrast, microarray analyses of adult Lrrc10−/− hearts identified upregulation of oxidative phosphorylation and cardiac muscle contraction pathways during the progression of dilated cardiomyopathy. Analyses of hypertrophic signal transduction pathways indicate increased active forms of Akt and PKCε in adult Lrrc10−/− hearts. Taken together, our data demonstrate that LRRC10 is essential for proper mammalian cardiac function. We identify Lrrc10 as a novel dilated cardiomyopathy candidate gene and the Lrrc10−/− mouse model as a unique system to investigate pediatric cardiomyopathy. PMID:23236519

  18. Left ventricular volumes during exercise in normal subjects and patients with dilated cardiomyopathy assessed by first-pass radionuclide angiography.

    PubMed

    Tomai, F; Ciavolella, M; Crea, F; Gaspardone, A; Versaci, F; Giannitti, C; Scali, D; Chiariello, L; Gioffrè, P A

    1993-11-15

    During isotonic exercise, left ventricular (LV) suction and the Frank-Starling law of the heart may have important roles in the enhancement of early LV diastolic filling and in the increase of myocardial contractility, respectively. It remains controversial whether these mechanisms operate in normal subjects or patients with dilated cardiomyopathy. Ten healthy subjects and 10 patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy who underwent maximal upright bicycle exercise testing were studied. First-pass radionuclide angiography was performed at both rest and peak exercise using a multicrystal gamma camera. In normal subjects, LV end-systolic volume at peak exercise was smaller than during baseline (17 +/- 7 vs 30 +/- 15 ml/m2; p < 0.05), whereas rapid filling volume was greater (52 +/- 16 vs 38 +/- 8 ml/m2; p < 0.01). In patients with dilated cardiomyopathy, both end-systolic (108 +/- 34 to 123 +/- 53 ml/m2; p = NS) and rapid filling (24 +/- 6 to 28 +/- 9 ml/m2; p = NS) volumes did not change from rest to peak exercise. A significant correlation was found between the changes in end-systolic volume at peak exercise and in peak rapid filling rate in normal subjects (r = 0.6; p < 0.05), but not in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (r = 0.3; p = NS). In normal subjects, end-diastolic volume at peak exercise was similar to that during baseline (78 +/- 14 and 85 +/- 15 ml/m2, respectively; p = NS), whereas in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy, it was greater (164 +/- 50 vs 146 +/- 33 ml/m2; p < 0.05).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Transgenic expression of replication-restricted enteroviral genomes in heart muscle induces defective excitation-contraction coupling and dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Wessely, R; Klingel, K; Santana, L F; Dalton, N; Hongo, M; Jonathan Lederer, W; Kandolf, R; Knowlton, K U

    1998-01-01

    Numerous studies have implicated Coxsackievirus in acute and chronic heart failure. Although enteroviral nucleic acids have been detected in selected patients with dilated cardiomyopathy, the significance of such persistent nucleic acids is unknown. To investigate the mechanisms by which restricted viral replication with low level expression of Coxsackieviral proteins may be able to induce cardiomyopathy, we generated transgenic mice which express a replication-restricted full-length Coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) cDNA mutant (CVB3DeltaVP0) in the heart driven by the cardiac myocyte-specific myosin light chain-2v (MLC-2v) promoter. CVB3DeltaVP0 was generated by mutating infectious CVB3 cDNA at the VP4/VP2 autocatalytic cleavage site from Asn-Ser to Lys-Ala. Cardiac-specific expression of this cDNA leads to synthesis of positive- and negative-strand viral RNA in the heart without formation of infectious viral progeny. Histopathologic analysis of transgenic hearts revealed typical morphologic features of myocardial interstitial fibrosis and in some cases degeneration of myocytes, thus resembling dilated cardiomyopathy in humans. There was also an increase in ventricular atrial natriuretic factor mRNA levels, demonstrating activation of the embryonic program of gene expression typical of ventricular hypertrophy and failure. Echocardiographic analysis demonstrated the presence of left ventricular dilation and decreased systolic function in the transgenic mice compared with wild-type littermates, evidenced by increased ventricular end-diastolic and end-systolic dimensions and decreased fractional shortening. Analysis of isolated myocytes from transgenic mice demonstrate that there is defective excitation-contraction coupling and a decrease in the magnitude of isolated cell shortening. These data demonstrate that restricted replication of enteroviral genomes in the heart can induce dilated cardiomyopathy with excitation-contraction coupling abnormalities similar to pressure

  20. [Severe obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome with dilated cardiomyopathy leading to pulmonary hypertension: case report and literature review].

    PubMed

    Chen, R K; Hong, C; Zhou, Y M; Kuang, A L; Zhang, Y T; Qing, S M; Liu, C L; Zhang, N F

    2017-01-12

    Objective: To study the relationship between dilated cardiomyopathy and obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) and to evaluate the curative effects of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) in OSAHS complicated with dilated cardiomyopathy. Methods: We reported one case with the symptom of exertional dyspnea for 1 year and aggravating for 1 month. The patient finally was diagnosed with severe OSAHS complicated with dilated cardiomyopathy leading to pulmonary hypertension. A systematic literature review was performed for similar published cases in Pubmed, Wanfang and CNKI database, using the keywords (obstructive sleep apnea) OR(OSA) OR(OSAHS) AND(dilated cardiomyopathy OR DCM)from January 1990 to May 2016. Results: Our patient had no significant improvement after receiving initial treatments, including reducing cardiac preload, improving myocardial metabolism, increasing myocardial contractility, and anticoagulants. After the patient was diagnosed as having severe OSAHS by polysomnography(PSG) and treated with CPAP, his symptoms improved remarkably. The enlarged heart became smaller and the patient had no repeated dyspnea at follow-up examination. By literature review, we found 4 English original articles and 6 Chinese articles (1 review article, 1 expert note, 1 original article and 3 case reports) on OSAHS complicated by DCM.Four Chinese and 1 English articles reported that the symptoms and parameters of OSAHS with DCM was improved remarkably after treatment with CPAP. Conclusion: For patients with dilated cardiomyopathy which fails to conventional therapy, especially those accompanied by obesity, snoring, daytime sleepiness, morning dry mouth and other related symptoms, PSG should be carried out. Early CPAP therapy could improve symptoms and prognosis of OSAHS associated with DCM.

  1. MLP and CARP are linked to chronic PKCα signalling in dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Lange, Stephan; Gehmlich, Katja; Lun, Alexander S; Blondelle, Jordan; Hooper, Charlotte; Dalton, Nancy D; Alvarez, Erika A; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Bang, Marie-Louise; Abassi, Yama A; Dos Remedios, Cristobal G; Peterson, Kirk L; Chen, Ju; Ehler, Elisabeth

    2016-06-29

    MLP (muscle LIM protein)-deficient mice count among the first mouse models for dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), yet the exact role of MLP in cardiac signalling processes is still enigmatic. Elevated PKCα signalling activity is known to be an important contributor to heart failure. Here we show that MLP directly inhibits the activity of PKCα. In end-stage DCM, PKCα is concentrated at the intercalated disc of cardiomyocytes, where it is sequestered by the adaptor protein CARP in a multiprotein complex together with PLCβ1. In mice deficient for both MLP and CARP the chronic PKCα signalling chain at the intercalated disc is broken and they remain healthy. Our results suggest that the main role of MLP in heart lies in the direct inhibition of PKCα and that chronic uninhibited PKCα activity at the intercalated disc in the absence of functional MLP leads to heart failure.

  2. MLP and CARP are linked to chronic PKCα signalling in dilated cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Stephan; Gehmlich, Katja; Lun, Alexander S.; Blondelle, Jordan; Hooper, Charlotte; Dalton, Nancy D.; Alvarez, Erika A.; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Bang, Marie-Louise; Abassi, Yama A.; dos Remedios, Cristobal G.; Peterson, Kirk L.; Chen, Ju; Ehler, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    MLP (muscle LIM protein)-deficient mice count among the first mouse models for dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), yet the exact role of MLP in cardiac signalling processes is still enigmatic. Elevated PKCα signalling activity is known to be an important contributor to heart failure. Here we show that MLP directly inhibits the activity of PKCα. In end-stage DCM, PKCα is concentrated at the intercalated disc of cardiomyocytes, where it is sequestered by the adaptor protein CARP in a multiprotein complex together with PLCβ1. In mice deficient for both MLP and CARP the chronic PKCα signalling chain at the intercalated disc is broken and they remain healthy. Our results suggest that the main role of MLP in heart lies in the direct inhibition of PKCα and that chronic uninhibited PKCα activity at the intercalated disc in the absence of functional MLP leads to heart failure. PMID:27353086

  3. Clinical and pathologic findings of myocarditis in two families with dilated cardiomyopathy

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connell, J.B.; Fowles, R.E.; Robinson, J.A.; Subramanian, R.; Henkin, R.E.; Gunnar, R.M.

    1984-01-01

    The use of endomyocardial biopsy and gallium-67 scans in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) has demonstrated the presence of myocardial inflammation in a subset of patients. A family with DCM was studied with endomyocardial biopsy and gallium-67 scanning; both identified the presence of myocarditis in the proband. Evaluation of histologic sections from deceased family members revealed myocarditis as the principal pathologic finding. This patient identified during life demonstrated a defect in suppressor lymphocytic function and improved with immunosuppressive therapy. A second family with DCM was discovered when postmortem examination of the proband and his father's heart showed myocarditis. A living sibling was identified with asymptomatic myocardial dysfunction. Longitudinal follow-up of surviving members of both families are in progress. This study indicates that thorough diagnostic evaluation of all patients with familial DCM should be pursued to identify subgroups with potentially treatable inflammation.

  4. Epidemiology and Natural History of Recovery of Left Ventricular Function in Recent Onset Dilated Cardiomyopathies

    PubMed Central

    Givertz, Michael M.; Mann, Douglas L.

    2013-01-01

    Although the long term prognosis of patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) remains poor, approximately 25% of DCM patients with recent onset of heart failure (< 6 months) have a relatively benign clinical course with a spontaneously improvement in symptoms and partial, or in some cases complete, recovery of left ventricular (LV) function. Despite the longstanding recognition of the clinical phenomenon of LV recovery, relatively little attention has been paid to the etiology and natural history of this important group of DCM patients. Accordingly, in the present review we will focus on the epidemiology and natural history of recent onset DCM in patients who undergo spontaneous resolution of symptoms that is accompanied by recovery of LV function. PMID:24014141

  5. Reversible Dilated Cardiomyopathy Caused by a High Burden of Ventricular Arrhythmias in Andersen-Tawil Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rezazadeh, Saman; Guo, Jiqing; Duff, Henry J; Ferrier, Raechel A; Gerull, Brenda

    2016-12-01

    Andersen-Tawil syndrome (ATS) is caused by mutations in KCNJ2 (Kir2.1). It remains unclear whether dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is a primary feature of ATS. We studied a proband with typical physical features of ATS plus DCM and moderate to severe left ventricular dysfunction (left ventricular ejection fraction = 30.5%). Genetic screening revealed a novel mutation in Kir2.1 (c.665T>C, p.L222S). Functional studies showed that this mutation reduced ionic currents in a dominant-negative manner. Suppression of ventricular arrhythmias with bisoprolol led to normalization of left ventricular size and function. We conclude that DCM is likely a secondary phenotype in ATS and is caused by high ventricular arrhythmia burden.

  6. Intracoronary allogeneic cardiosphere-derived stem cells are safe for use in dogs with dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Hensley, Michael Taylor; Tang, Junnan; Woodruff, Kathleen; Defrancesco, Teresa; Tou, Sandra; Williams, Christina M; Breen, Mathew; Meurs, Kathryn; Keene, Bruce; Cheng, Ke

    2017-03-15

    Cardiosphere-derived cells (CDCs) have been shown to reduce scar size and increase viable myocardium in human patients with mild/moderate myocardial infarction. Studies in rodent models suggest that CDC therapy may confer therapeutic benefits in patients with non-ischaemic dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). We sought to determine the safety and efficacy of allogeneic CDC in a large animal (canine) model of spontaneous DCM. Canine CDCs (cCDCs) were grown from a donor dog heart. Similar to human CDCs, cCDCs express CD105 and are slightly positive for c-kit and CD90. Thirty million of allogeneic cCDCs was infused into the coronary vessels of Doberman pinscher dogs with spontaneous DCM. Adverse events were closely monitored, and cardiac functions were measured by echocardiography. No adverse events occurred during and after cell infusion. Histology on dog hearts (after natural death) revealed no sign of immune rejection from the transplanted cells.

  7. Gallium-67 imaging in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy and biopsy-proven myocarditis

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connell, J.B.; Henkin, R.E.; Robinson, J.A.; Subramanian, R.; Scanlon, P.J.; Gunnar, R.M.

    1984-07-01

    Current standards for detection of myocarditis in a clinical setting rely on endomyocardial biopsy for accurate diagnosis. With this technique a subset of patients with dilated cardiomyopathy show unsuspected myocarditis histologically. Endomyocardial biopsy, despite its specificity, may lack sensitivity due to sampling error if the inflammation is patchy or focal. Therefore, inflammation-sensitive radioisotopic imaging may be a useful adjunct in the diagnosis of myocarditis. This study was designed to evaluate the applicability of gallium-67 (67Ga) myocardial imaging as an adjunct to endomyocardial biopsy in the diagnosis of myocarditis. Sixty-eight consecutive patients referred for evaluation of dilated cardiomyopathy underwent 71 parallel studies with 67Ga imaging and biopsies that served as the basis of comparison for this study. Histologic myocarditis was identified in 8% of biopsy specimens. Clinical and hemodynamic parameters could not be used to predict the presence of myocarditis. Five of six biopsy samples (87%) with myocarditis showed dense 67Ga uptake, whereas only nine of 65 negative biopsy samples (14%) were paired with equivocally positive 67Ga scans. The single patient with myocarditis and no myocardial 67Ga uptake had dense mediastinal lymph node uptake that may have obscured cardiac uptake. The incidence of myocarditis on biopsy with a positive 67Ga scan was 36% (5/14); however, the incidence of myocarditis with a negative 67Ga scan was only 1.8% (1/57). Follow-up scans for three patients showed close correlation of 67Ga uptake with myocarditis on biopsy. In conclusion 67Ga may be a useful screening test for identifying patients with a high yield of myocarditis on biopsy, and serial scans may eliminate the need for frequent biopsies in patients with proven myocarditis.

  8. Left ventricular filling in dilated cardiomyopathy: relation to functional class and hemodynamics.

    PubMed

    Vanoverschelde, J L; Raphael, D A; Robert, A R; Cosyns, J R

    1990-05-01

    Left ventricular systolic function does not correlate well with functional class in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy. To determine whether the correlation is better with Doppler indexes of left ventricular diastolic function, 34 patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (M-mode echocardiographic end-diastolic dimension greater than 60 mm, fractional shortening less than 25%, increased E point-septal separation) were studied. Patients were classified into two groups according to functional class. Group 1 consisted of 16 patients in New York Heart Association functional class I or II; group 2 included 18 patients in functional class III or IV. Left ventricular dimensions, fractional shortening, left ventricular mass, meridional end-systolic wall stress, peak early and late transmitral filling velocities and their ratio, isovolumetric relaxation period and time to peak filling rate were computed from pulsed wave Doppler and M-mode echocardiograms and calibrated carotid pulse tracings. Right heart catheterization was performed in 20 of 34 patients. No differences were observed between groups with regard to age, gender distribution, heart rate, blood pressure and M-mode echocardiographic-derived indexes of systolic function. Peak early filling velocity (72 +/- 13 versus 40 +/- 10 cm/s, p less than 0.001) was higher and atrial filling fraction (27 +/- 4% versus 46 +/- 8%, p less than 0.001) was lower in group 2 than in group 1. The ratio of early to late transmitral filling velocities was higher in group 2 patients (2.3 +/- 0.5 versus 0.7 +/- 0.2, p less than 0.001).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Exome-wide association study reveals novel susceptibility genes to sporadic dilated cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Esslinger, Ulrike; Garnier, Sophie; Korniat, Agathe; Proust, Carole; Kararigas, Georgios; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Empana, Jean-Philippe; Morley, Michael P.; Perret, Claire; Stark, Klaus; Bick, Alexander G.; Prasad, Sanjay K.; Kriebel, Jennifer; Li, Jin; Tiret, Laurence; Strauch, Konstantin; O'Regan, Declan P.; Marguiles, Kenneth B.; Seidman, Jonathan G.; Boutouyrie, Pierre; Lacolley, Patrick; Jouven, Xavier; Hengstenberg, Christian; Komajda, Michel; Hakonarson, Hakon; Isnard, Richard; Arbustini, Eloisa; Grallert, Harald; Cook, Stuart A.; Seidman, Christine E.; Regitz-Zagrosek, Vera; Cappola, Thomas P.; Charron, Philippe; Cambien, François; Villard, Eric

    2017-01-01

    Aims Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is an important cause of heart failure with a strong familial component. We performed an exome-wide array-based association study (EWAS) to assess the contribution of missense variants to sporadic DCM. Methods and results 116,855 single nucleotide variants (SNVs) were analyzed in 2796 DCM patients and 6877 control subjects from 6 populations of European ancestry. We confirmed two previously identified associations with SNVs in BAG3 and ZBTB17 and discovered six novel DCM-associated loci (Q-value<0.01). The lead-SNVs at novel loci are common and located in TTN, SLC39A8, MLIP, FLNC, ALPK3 and FHOD3. In silico fine mapping identified HSPB7 as the most likely candidate at the ZBTB17 locus. Rare variant analysis (MAF<0.01) demonstrated significant association for TTN variants only (P = 0.0085). All candidate genes but one (SLC39A8) exhibit preferential expression in striated muscle tissues and mutations in TTN, BAG3, FLNC and FHOD3 are known to cause familial cardiomyopathy. We also investigated a panel of 48 known cardiomyopathy genes. Collectively, rare (n = 228, P = 0.0033) or common (n = 36, P = 0.019) variants with elevated in silico severity scores were associated with DCM, indicating that the spectrum of genes contributing to sporadic DCM extends beyond those identified here. Conclusion We identified eight loci independently associated with sporadic DCM. The functions of the best candidate genes at these loci suggest that proteostasis regulation might play a role in DCM pathophysiology. PMID:28296976

  10. Eosinophil-derived IL-4 drives progression of myocarditis to inflammatory dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Diny, Nicola L; Baldeviano, G Christian; Talor, Monica V; Barin, Jobert G; Ong, SuFey; Bedja, Djahida; Hays, Allison G; Gilotra, Nisha A; Coppens, Isabelle; Rose, Noel R; Čiháková, Daniela

    2017-04-03

    Inflammatory dilated cardiomyopathy (DCMi) is a major cause of heart failure in children and young adults. DCMi develops in up to 30% of myocarditis patients, but the mechanisms involved in disease progression are poorly understood. Patients with eosinophilia frequently develop cardiomyopathies. In this study, we used the experimental autoimmune myocarditis (EAM) model to determine the role of eosinophils in myocarditis and DCMi. Eosinophils were dispensable for myocarditis induction but were required for progression to DCMi. Eosinophil-deficient ΔdblGATA1 mice, in contrast to WT mice, showed no signs of heart failure by echocardiography. Induction of EAM in hypereosinophilic IL-5Tg mice resulted in eosinophilic myocarditis with severe ventricular and atrial inflammation, which progressed to severe DCMi. This was not a direct effect of IL-5, as IL-5TgΔdblGATA1 mice were protected from DCMi, whereas IL-5(-/-) mice exhibited DCMi comparable with WT mice. Eosinophils drove progression to DCMi through their production of IL-4. Our experiments showed eosinophils were the major IL-4-expressing cell type in the heart during EAM, IL-4(-/-) mice were protected from DCMi like ΔdblGATA1 mice, and eosinophil-specific IL-4 deletion resulted in improved heart function. In conclusion, eosinophils drive progression of myocarditis to DCMi, cause severe DCMi when present in large numbers, and mediate this process through IL-4.

  11. Mutations in TAX1BP3 cause dilated cardiomyopathy with septo-optic dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Reinstein, Eyal; Orvin, Katia; Tayeb-Fligelman, Einav; Stiebel-Kalish, Hadas; Tzur, Shay; Pimienta, Allen L; Bazak, Lily; Bengal, Tuvia; Cohen, Lior; Gaton, Dan D; Bormans, Concetta; Landau, Meytal; Kornowski, Ran; Shohat, Mordechai; Behar, Doron M

    2015-04-01

    We describe a Bedouin family with a novel autosomal recessive syndrome characterized by dilated cardiomyopathy and septo-optic dysplasia. Genetic analysis revealed a homozygous missense mutation in TAX1BP3, which encodes a small PDZ domain containing protein implicated in regulation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, as the causative mutation. The mutation affects a conserved residue located at the core of TAX1BP3 binding pocket and is predicted to impair the nature of a crucial hydrophobic patch, thereby interrupting the structure and stability of the protein, and its ability to interact with other proteins. TAX1BP3 is highly expressed in heart and brain and consistent with the clinical findings observed in our patients; a knockdown of TAX1BP3 causes elongation defects, enlarged pericard, and enlarged head structures in zebrafish embryos. Thus, we describe a new genetic disorder that expands the monogenic cardiomyopathy disease spectrum and suggests that TAX1BP3 is essential for heart and brain development.

  12. A Heterozygous ZMPSTE24 Mutation Associated with Severe Metabolic Syndrome, Ectopic Fat Accumulation, and Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Galant, Damien; Gaborit, Bénédicte; Desgrouas, Camille; Abdesselam, Ines; Bernard, Monique; Levy, Nicolas; Merono, Françoise; Coirault, Catherine; Roll, Patrice; Lagarde, Arnaud; Bonello-Palot, Nathalie; Bourgeois, Patrice; Dutour, Anne; Badens, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    ZMPSTE24 encodes the only metalloprotease, which transforms prelamin into mature lamin A. Up to now, mutations in ZMPSTE24 have been linked to Restrictive Dermopathy (RD), Progeria or Mandibulo-Acral Dysplasia (MAD). We report here the phenotype of a patient referred for severe metabolic syndrome and cardiomyopathy, carrying a mutation in ZMPSTE24. The patient presented with a partial lipodystrophic syndrome associating hypertriglyceridemia, early onset type 2 diabetes, and android obesity with truncal and abdominal fat accumulation but without subcutaneous lipoatrophy. Other clinical features included acanthosis nigricans, liver steatosis, dilated cardiomyopathy, and high myocardial and hepatic triglycerides content. Mutated fibroblasts from the patient showed increased nuclear shape abnormalities and premature senescence as demonstrated by a decreased Population Doubling Level, an increased beta-galactosidase activity and a decreased BrdU incorporation rate. Reduced prelamin A expression by siRNA targeted toward LMNA transcripts resulted in decreased nuclear anomalies. We show here that a central obesity without subcutaneous lipoatrophy is associated with a laminopathy due to a heterozygous missense mutation in ZMPSTE24. Given the high prevalence of metabolic syndrome and android obesity in the general population, and in the absence of familial study, the causative link between mutation and phenotype cannot be formally established. Nevertheless, altered lamina architecture observed in mutated fibroblasts are responsible for premature cellular senescence and could contribute to the phenotype observed in this patient. PMID:27120622

  13. The Role of Leucine-Rich Repeat Containing Protein 10 (LRRC10) in Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Brody, Matthew J.; Lee, Youngsook

    2016-01-01

    Leucine-rich repeat containing protein 10 (LRRC10) is a cardiomyocyte-specific member of the Leucine-rich repeat containing (LRRC) protein superfamily with critical roles in cardiac function and disease pathogenesis. Recent studies have identified LRRC10 mutations in human idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and Lrrc10 homozygous knockout mice develop DCM, strongly linking LRRC10 to the molecular etiology of DCM. LRRC10 localizes to the dyad region in cardiomyocytes where it can interact with actin and α-actinin at the Z-disc and associate with T-tubule components. Indeed, this region is becoming increasingly recognized as a signaling center in cardiomyocytes, not only for calcium cycling, excitation-contraction coupling, and calcium-sensitive hypertrophic signaling, but also as a nodal signaling hub where the myocyte can sense and respond to mechanical stress. Disruption of a wide range of critical structural and signaling molecules in cardiomyocytes confers susceptibility to cardiomyopathies in addition to the more classically studied mutations in sarcomeric proteins. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying DCM remain unclear. Here, we review what is known about the cardiomyocyte functions of LRRC10, lessons learned about LRRC10 and DCM from the Lrrc10 knockout mouse model, and discuss ongoing efforts to elucidate molecular mechanisms whereby mutation or absence of LRRC10 mediates cardiac disease. PMID:27536250

  14. Effects of hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathy mutations on power output by human β-cardiac myosin.

    PubMed

    Spudich, James A; Aksel, Tural; Bartholomew, Sadie R; Nag, Suman; Kawana, Masataka; Yu, Elizabeth Choe; Sarkar, Saswata S; Sung, Jongmin; Sommese, Ruth F; Sutton, Shirley; Cho, Carol; Adhikari, Arjun S; Taylor, Rebecca; Liu, Chao; Trivedi, Darshan; Ruppel, Kathleen M

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is the most frequently occurring inherited cardiovascular disease, with a prevalence of more than one in 500 individuals worldwide. Genetically acquired dilated cardiomyopathy is a related disease that is less prevalent. Both are caused by mutations in the genes encoding the fundamental force-generating protein machinery of the cardiac muscle sarcomere, including human β-cardiac myosin, the motor protein that powers ventricular contraction. Despite numerous studies, most performed with non-human or non-cardiac myosin, there is no clear consensus about the mechanism of action of these mutations on the function of human β-cardiac myosin. We are using a recombinantly expressed human β-cardiac myosin motor domain along with conventional and new methodologies to characterize the forces and velocities of the mutant myosins compared with wild type. Our studies are extending beyond myosin interactions with pure actin filaments to include the interaction of myosin with regulated actin filaments containing tropomyosin and troponin, the roles of regulatory light chain phosphorylation on the functions of the system, and the possible roles of myosin binding protein-C and titin, important regulatory components of both cardiac and skeletal muscles.

  15. Immunosuppressive therapy in patients with congestive cardiomyopathy and myocardial uptake of Gallium-67

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connell, J.B.; Robinson, J.A.; Henkin, R.E.; Gunnar, R.M.

    1981-10-01

    Thirty-nine patients with idiopathic congestive cardiomyopathy underwent gallium-67 scintigraphy. Twenty had no evidence of myocardial uptake (group I) and 19 had demonstrable myocardial gallium-67 activity (group II). There was no significant difference in age, sex, duration of symptoms, antecedent viral illness, left ventricular end-diastolic pressure, pulmonary artery systolic pressure, or ejection fraction between the two groups. Fifteen patients in group II were treated with prednisone and azathioprine for a minimum of 8 months. Nine of 15 patients were clinically unchanged and gallium-67 scans remained positive (group IIa). Six patients had significant improvement and resolution of myocardial gallium-67 uptake (group IIb). The mean change in ejection fraction was +0.2% in group I, -4.8% in Group IIa, and +13.8% in group IIb. There were five deaths in group I (25% mortality), three in group IIa (33% mortality), and no deaths in group IIb. The only significant difference between patients in group IIa and those in group IIb was a greater left ventricular posterior wall thickness in group IIa patients. Twenty control patients without cardiac disease had negative gallium-67 scans. We conclude that gallium-67 myocardial scintigraphy may be a useful test for predicting the response to prednisone and azathioprine therapy.

  16. Immunosuppressive therapy in patients with congestive cardiomyopathy and myocardial uptake of gallium-67

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connell, J.B.; Robinson, J.A.; Henkin, R.E.; Gunnar, R.M.

    1981-10-01

    Thirty-nine patients with idiopathic congestive cardiomyopathy underwent gallium-67 scintigraphy. Twenty had no evidence of myocardial uptake (group I) and 19 had demonstrable myocardial gallium-67 activity (group II). There was no significant difference in age, sex, duration of symptoms, antecedent viral illness, left ventricular end-diastolic pressure, pulmonary artery systolic pressure, or ejection fraction between the two groups. Fifteen patients in group II were treated with prednisone and azathioprine for a minimum of 8 months. Nine of 15 patients were clinically unchanged and gallium-67 scans remained positive (group IIa). Six patients had significant improvement and resolution of myocardial gallium-67 uptake (group IIb). The mean change in ejection fraction was +0.2% in group I, -4.8% in Group IIa, and +13.8% in group IIb. There were five deaths in group I (25% mortality), three in group IIa (33% mortality), and no deaths in group IIb. The only significant difference between patients in group IIa and those in group IIb was a greater left ventricular posterior wall thickness in group IIa patients. Twenty control patients without cardiac disease had negative gallium-67 scans. We conclude that gallium-67 myocardial scintigraphy may be a useful test for predicting the response to prednisone and azathioprine therapy.

  17. Defects in nuclear structure and function promote dilated cardiomyopathy in lamin A/C–deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Nikolova, Vesna; Leimena, Christiana; McMahon, Aisling C.; Tan, Ju Chiat; Chandar, Suchitra; Jogia, Dilesh; Kesteven, Scott H.; Michalicek, Jan; Otway, Robyn; Verheyen, Fons; Rainer, Stephen; Stewart, Colin L.; Martin, David; Feneley, Michael P.; Fatkin, Diane

    2004-01-01

    Laminopathies are a group of disorders caused by mutations in the LMNA gene that encodes the nuclear lamina proteins, lamin A and lamin C; their pathophysiological basis is unknown. We report that lamin A/C–deficient (Lmna–/–) mice develop rapidly progressive dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) characterized by left ventricular (LV) dilation and reduced systolic contraction. Isolated Lmna–/– myocytes show reduced shortening with normal baseline and peak amplitude of Ca2+ transients. Lmna–/– LV myocyte nuclei have marked alterations of shape and size with central displacement and fragmentation of heterochromatin; these changes are present but less severe in left atrial nuclei. Electron microscopy of Lmna–/– cardiomyocytes shows disorganization and detachment of desmin filaments from the nuclear surface with progressive disruption of the cytoskeletal desmin network. Alterations in nuclear architecture are associated with defective nuclear function evidenced by decreased SREBP1 import, reduced PPARγ expression, and a lack of hypertrophic gene activation. These findings suggest a model in which the primary pathophysiological mechanism in Lmna–/– mice is defective force transmission resulting from disruption of lamin interactions with the muscle-specific desmin network and loss of cytoskeletal tension. Despite severe DCM, defects in nuclear function prevent Lmna–/– cardiomyocytes from developing compensatory hypertrophy and accelerate disease progression. PMID:14755333

  18. Antisense-mediated exon skipping: a therapeutic strategy for titin-based dilated cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Gramlich, Michael; Pane, Luna Simona; Zhou, Qifeng; Chen, Zhifen; Murgia, Marta; Schötterl, Sonja; Goedel, Alexander; Metzger, Katja; Brade, Thomas; Parrotta, Elvira; Schaller, Martin; Gerull, Brenda; Thierfelder, Ludwig; Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke; Labeit, Siegfried; Atherton, John J; McGaughran, Julie; Harvey, Richard P; Sinnecker, Daniel; Mann, Matthias; Laugwitz, Karl-Ludwig; Gawaz, Meinrad Paul; Moretti, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    Frameshift mutations in the TTN gene encoding titin are a major cause for inherited forms of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), a heart disease characterized by ventricular dilatation, systolic dysfunction, and progressive heart failure. To date, there are no specific treatment options for DCM patients but heart transplantation. Here, we show the beneficial potential of reframing titin transcripts by antisense oligonucleotide (AON)-mediated exon skipping in human and murine models of DCM carrying a previously identified autosomal-dominant frameshift mutation in titin exon 326. Correction of TTN reading frame in patient-specific cardiomyocytes derived from induced pluripotent stem cells rescued defective myofibril assembly and stability and normalized the sarcomeric protein expression. AON treatment in Ttn knock-in mice improved sarcomere formation and contractile performance in homozygous embryos and prevented the development of the DCM phenotype in heterozygous animals. These results demonstrate that disruption of the titin reading frame due to a truncating DCM mutation can be restored by exon skipping in both patient cardiomyocytes in vitro and mouse heart in vivo, indicating RNA-based strategies as a potential treatment option for DCM. PMID:25759365

  19. [Influence of pacing site on myocardial transmural dispersion of repolarization in intact normal and dilated cardiomyopathy dogs].

    PubMed

    Bai, Rong; Pu, Jun; Liu, Nian; Lu, Jia-Gao; Zhou, Qiang; Ruan, Yan-Fei; Niu, Hui-Yan; Wang, Lin

    2003-12-25

    In order to verify the hypothesis that left ventricular epicardial (LV-Epi) pacing and biventricular (BiV) pacing unavoidably influence the myocardial electrophysiological characters and may result in high risk of malignant ventricular arrhythmia, we calculated, in both normal mongrel dogs and dog models with rapid-right-ventricular-pacing induced dilated cardiomyopathy congestive heart failure (DCM-CHF), the monophasic action potential duration (MAPD) and the transmural dispersion of repolarization (TDR) in intracardiac electrogram together with the QT interval and T(peak)-T(end) (T(p(-T(e)) interval in surface electrocardiogram (ECG) during LV-Epi and BiV pacing, compared with those during right ventricular endocardial (RV-Endo) pacing. To prepare the DCM-CHF dog model, rapid right ventricular pacing (250 bpm) was performed for 23.6+/-2.57 days to the dog. All the normal and DCM-CHF dogs were given radio frequency catheter ablation (RFCA) to His bundle with the guide of X-ray fluoroscopy. After the RFCA procedures, the animals were under the situation of complete atrioventricular block so that the canine heart rates could be voluntarily controlled in the following experiments. After a thoracotomy, ECG and monophasic action potentials (MAP) of subendocardial, subepicardial and mid-layer myocardium were recorded synchronously in 8 normal and 5 DCM-CHF dogs during pacing from endocardium of RV apex (RV-Endo), epicardium of LV anterior wall (LV-Epi) and simultaneously both of the above (biventricular, BiV), the later was similar to the ventricular resynchronization therapy to congestive heart failure patients in clinic. The Tp-Te) meant the interval from the peak to the end of T wave, which was a representative index of TDR in surface ECG. The TDR was defined as the difference between the longest and the shortest MAPD of subendocardial, subepicardial and mid-layer myocardium. Our results showed that in normal dogs, pacing participating of LV (LV-Epi, BiV) prolonged

  20. Left ventricular chamber dilatation in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: related variables and prognosis in patients with medical and surgical therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Seiler, C.; Jenni, R.; Vassalli, G.; Turina, M.; Hess, O. M.

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND--To determine the incidence and prognosis of left ventricular dilatation and systolic dysfunction in 139 patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy during long term follow up. METHODS--Left ventricular chamber dilatation and systolic dysfunction (both together referred to as left ventricular chamber dilatation) were determined echocardiographically. Chamber dilatation was defined as an increase in the left ventricular end diastolic diameter of > 2% per year combined with a decrease in midventricular systolic fractional shortening of > 2% per year of follow up [10.3 (SD 6) years]. The predictive value for left ventricular chamber dilatation of clinical, invasive, and echocardiographic variables and its prognosis were assessed. RESULTS--In 119 of 139 individuals (86%), left ventricular chamber size and systolic function remained stable (group 1), and in 20/139 patients (14%) left ventricular chamber dilatation occurred during follow up (group 2). At baseline examination, symptoms such as dyspnoea and syncope occurred less often in group 1 than in group 2; New York Heart Association classification was lower in group 1 than in group 2 (P = 0.001). Left ventricular mass index relative to sex specific normal values was increased by 18% in group 1 and by 41% in group 2 (P = 0.04). Cumulative survival rates were slightly although not significantly higher in group 1 than in group 2. Event-free survival was significantly higher in group 1 than in group 2 (P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS--(1) The development of left ventricular chamber dilatation and systolic dysfunction in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy occurs in approximately 1.5% of the patients per year. (2) Factors associated with left ventricular dilatation are dyspnoea, syncope, a higher functional classification, and a higher degree of left ventricular hypertrophy. (3) Patients with chamber dilatation have a worse prognosis than those without, particularly regarding quality of life. PMID:8562235

  1. Hemodynamic and histomorphometric characteristics of dilated cardiomyopathy of Syrian hamsters (Bio TO-2 strain).

    PubMed

    Goineau, S; Pape, D; Guillo, P; Ramée, M P; Bellissant, E

    2001-04-01

    The natural history of the disease of the dilated strain Bio TO-2 of cardiomyopathic hamsters (CMH) is not totally characterized. We investigated its hemodynamic and histomorphometric characteristics at 140, 180, 220, 260, and 300 days of age. Forty CMH and 40 controls were investigated (8 at each stage). Mean arterial pressure (MAP, carotid artery catheter) and cardiac output and femoral blood flow (CO, FBF, transit time method) were measured in anesthetized animals. Systemic (SVR) and femoral (FVR) vascular resistances were calculated. Atria, left and right ventricles (LV, RV), lungs, and liver were weighed. LV cavity area, LV and RV wall thicknesses and collagen densities were determined (computer-assisted image analyzer). Pulmonary and hepatic congestion were assessed (arbitrary scales). Compared with controls, MAP, CO and FBF were significantly lower in CMH throughout the study (on average: -22%, -34%, -33%, respectively), FVR was significantly increased (+15%), but SVR was not significantly modified. Concerning histomorphometric characteristics, differences between groups significantly increased with age for most variables: at 300 days, atria (+292%), RV (+13%), lungs (+44%), and liver (+23%) weights, LV cavity area (+130%), LV (+364%) and RV (+181%) collagen densities were significantly increased in CMH vs controls, whereas LV (-40%) and RV (-23%) wall thicknesses were significantly decreased. At 260 and 300 days, CMH showed significant pulmonary congestion without hepatic alteration. Bio TO-2 CMH progressively develop an alteration of cardiac function leading to decreased MAP and musculo-cutaneous blood flow associated with cardiac remodeling including atria hypertrophy and LV dilation, wall thinning and a rise in collagen density.

  2. The Effect of Rosuvastatin on Inflammation, Matrix Turnover and Left Ventricular Remodeling in Dilated Cardiomyopathy: A Randomized, Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Gjertsen, Erik; Ueland, Thor; Yndestad, Arne; Godang, Kristin; Stueflotten, Wenche; Andreassen, Johanna; Svendsmark, Rolf; Smith, Hans-Jørgen; Aakhus, Svend; Aukrust, Pål; Gullestad, Lars

    2014-01-01

    Background Dilated cardiomyopathy is characterized by left ventricular dilatation and dysfunction. Inflammation and adverse remodeling of the extracellular matrix may be involved in the pathogenesis. Statins reduce levels of low density lipoprotein cholesterol, but may also attenuate inflammation and affect matrix remodeling. We hypothesized that treatment with rosuvastatin would reduce or even reverse left ventricular remodeling in dilated cardiomyopathy. Materials and Methods In this multicenter, randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled study, 71 patients were randomized to 10 mg of rosuvastatin or matching placebo. Physical examination, blood sampling, echocardiography and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging were performed at baseline and at six months’ follow-up. The pre-specified primary end point was the change in left ventricular ejection fraction from baseline to six months. Results Over all, left ventricular ejection fraction improved 5 percentage points over the duration of the study, but there was no difference in the change in left ventricular ejection fraction between patients allocated to rosuvastatin and those allocated to placebo. Whereas serum low density lipoprotein cholesterol concentration fell significantly in the treatment arm, rosuvastatin did not affect plasma or serum levels of a wide range of inflammatory variables, including C-reactive protein. The effect on markers of extracellular matrix remodeling was modest. Conclusion Treatment with rosuvastatin does not improve left ventricular ejection fraction in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00505154 PMID:24586994

  3. Reversible catecholamine-induced cardiomyopathy due to pheochromocytoma: case report.

    PubMed

    Satendra, Milan; de Jesus, Cláudia; Bordalo e Sá, Armando L; Rosário, Luís; Rocha, José; Bicha Castelo, Henrique; Correia, Maria José; Nunes Diogo, António

    2014-03-01

    Pheochromocytoma is a tumor originating from chromaffin tissue. It commonly presents with symptoms and signs of catecholamine excess, such as hypertension, tachycardia, headache and sweating. Cardiovascular manifestations include catecholamine-induced cardiomyopathy, which may present as severe left ventricular dysfunction and congestive heart failure. We report a case of pheochromocytoma which was diagnosed following investigation of dilated cardiomyopathy. We highlight the dramatic symptomatic improvement and reversal of cardiomyopathy, with recovery of left ventricular function after treatment.

  4. Neural cell adhesion molecule expression in dilated cardiomyopathy is associated with intramyocardial inflammation and hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Ostermann, Karsten; Schultheiss, Heinz-Peter; Noutsias, Michel

    2017-03-18

    Chronic intramyocardial inflammation (inflammatory cardiomyopathy/DCMi) is linked to the pathogenesis of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) is involved in orchestrating cardiac muscle morphogenesis, but is down-regulated after embryogenesis. We investigated NCAM expression in adult DCM hearts, its possible association with DCMi-parameters, and with cardiomyocyte hypertrophy (CMH). Endomyocardial biopsies (EMBs) from DCM patients (n=85; n=37 females; age: 48±19years; LVEF <40%) and controls from non-cardiac deaths were immunostained for DCMi markers and for NCAM expression, and quantified by digital image analysis (DIA). NCAM expression on the intercalated discs and the sarcolemma was confirmed in n=46 (54%) of the DCM-EMBs. In the 17 controls, NCAM expression was confined to scattered intramyocardial nerves, but was absent on cardiomyocytes. DIA-quantified area fraction (AF) of NCAM was significantly (p=0.0001) higher in the DCM hearts (0.0044±0.017) compared with the controls (0.0006±0.0004). Multivariate analysis of DIA-quantified NCAM-AF revealed significant associations with infiltrates (CD18(+), CD11a/LFA-1(+), CD11b/Mac-1(+), TNFα(+), CD3(+)) and with endothelial cell adhesion molecules (CAM; CD54/ICAM-1 and CD29; p<0.05). The mean cardiomyocyte diameter (MCD) correlated highly significantly (p<0.01) with NCAM-AF, ICAM-1-AF, CD29-AF, CD18(+) and TNFa(+) infiltrates, and was associated less significantly (p<0.05) with CD3(+), CD11a/LFA-1(+), and CD11b/Mac-1(+) infiltrates. In conclusion, NCAM-expression in ca. 50% of adult DCM hearts is associated with CMH, and may be induced by inflammatory pathways.

  5. Autoantibodies in dilated cardiomyopathy induce vascular endothelial growth factor expression in cardiomyocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Saygili, Erol; Noor-Ebad, Fawad; Schröder, Jörg W.; Mischke, Karl; Saygili, Esra; Rackauskas, Gediminas; Marx, Nikolaus; Kelm, Malte; Rana, Obaida R.

    2015-09-11

    Background: Autoantibodies have been identified as major predisposing factors for dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Patients with DCM show elevated serum levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) whose source is unknown. Besides its well-investigated effects on angiogenesis, evidence is present that VEGF signaling is additionally involved in fibroblast proliferation and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, hence in cardiac remodeling. Whether autoimmune effects in DCM impact cardiac VEGF signaling needs to be elucidated. Methods: Five DCM patients were treated by the immunoadsorption (IA) therapy on five consecutive days. The eluents from the IA columns were collected and prepared for cell culture. Cardiomyocytes from neonatal rats (NRCM) were incubated with increasing DCM-immunoglobulin-G (IgG) concentrations for 48 h. Polyclonal IgG (Venimmun N), which was used to restore IgG plasma levels in DCM patients after the IA therapy was additionally used for control cell culture purposes. Results: Elevated serum levels of VEGF decreased significantly after IA (Serum VEGF (ng/ml); DCM pre-IA: 45 ± 9.1 vs. DCM post–IA: 29 ± 6.7; P < 0.05). In cell culture, pretreatment of NRCM by DCM-IgG induced VEGF expression in a time and dose dependent manner. Biologically active VEGF that was secreted by NRCM significantly increased BNP mRNA levels in control cardiomyocytes and induced cell-proliferation of cultured cardiac fibroblast (Fibroblast proliferation; NRCM medium/HC-IgG: 1 ± 0.0 vs. NRCM medium/DCM-IgG 100 ng/ml: 5.6 ± 0.9; P < 0.05). Conclusion: The present study extends the knowledge about the possible link between autoimmune signaling in DCM and VEGF induction. Whether this observation plays a considerable role in cardiac remodeling during DCM development needs to be further elucidated. - Highlights: • Mechanisms of remodeling in dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) are not fully understood. • Autoantibodies have been identified as major predisposing factors

  6. Functional Characterization of TNNC1 Rare Variants Identified in Dilated Cardiomyopathy*

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Jose Renato; Siegfried, Jill D.; Parvatiyar, Michelle S.; Li, Duanxiang; Norton, Nadine; Jones, Michelle A.; Liang, Jingsheng; Potter, James D.; Hershberger, Ray E.

    2011-01-01

    TNNC1, which encodes cardiac troponin C (cTnC), remains elusive as a dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) gene. Here, we report the clinical, genetic, and functional characterization of four TNNC1 rare variants (Y5H, M103I, D145E, and I148V), all previously reported by us in association with DCM (Hershberger, R. E., Norton, N., Morales, A., Li, D., Siegfried, J. D., and Gonzalez-Quintana, J. (2010) Circ. Cardiovasc. Genet. 3, 155–161); in the previous study, two variants (Y5H and D145E) were identified in subjects who also carried MYH7 and MYBPC3 rare variants, respectively. Functional studies using the recombinant human mutant cTnC proteins reconstituted into porcine papillary skinned fibers showed decreased Ca2+ sensitivity of force development (Y5H and M103I). Furthermore, the cTnC mutants diminished (Y5H and I148V) or abolished (M103I) the effects of PKA phosphorylation on Ca2+ sensitivity. Only M103I decreased the troponin activation properties of the actomyosin ATPase when Ca2+ was present. CD spectroscopic studies of apo (absence of divalent cations)-, Mg2+-, and Ca2+/Mg2+-bound states indicated that all of the cTnC mutants (except I148V in the Ca2+/Mg2+ condition) decreased the α-helical content. These results suggest that each mutation alters the function/ability of the myofilament to bind Ca2+ as a result of modifications in cTnC structure. One variant (D145E) that was previously reported in association with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and that produced results in vivo in this study consistent with prior hypertrophic cardiomyopathy functional studies was found associated with the MYBPC3 P910T rare variant, likely contributing to the observed DCM phenotype. We conclude that these rare variants alter the regulation of contraction in some way, and the combined clinical, molecular, genetic, and functional data reinforce the importance of TNNC1 rare variants in the pathogenesis of DCM. PMID:21832052

  7. Preoperative preparation of patients with cardiomyopathies in non-cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Bradić, Zeljko; Ivanović, Branislava; Marković, Dejan; Simić, Dusica; Janković, Radmilo; Kalezić, Nevena

    2011-01-01

    Cardiomyopathies are myocardial diseases in which there is structural and functional disorder of the heart muscle, in the absence of coronary artery disease, hypertension, valvular disease and congenital heart disease. Cardiomyopathies are grouped into specific morphological and functional phenotypes: dilated cardiomyopathy, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, restrictive cardiomyopathy, arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy and unclassified cardiomyopathies. Patients with dilated and hypertrophic cardiomypathy are prone to the development of congestive heart failure in the perioperative period. Also, patients with hypertrophic and arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy are prone to arrhythmias in the perioperative period. Preoperative evaluation includes history, physical examination, ECG, chest radiography, complete blood count, electrolytes, creatinine, glomerular filtration rate, glucose, liver enzymes, urin analysis, BNP and echocardiographic evaluation of left ventricular function. Drug therapy should be optimized and continued preoperatively. Surgery should be delayed (unless urgent) in patients with decompensated or untreated cardiomyopathy. Preoperative evaluation requires integrated multidisciplinary approach of anesthesiologists, cardiologist and surgeons.

  8. Whole exome sequencing identifies a troponin T mutation hot spot in familial dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Nzali; Sinagra, Gianfranco; Jones, Kenneth L; Slavov, Dobromir; Gowan, Katherine; Merlo, Marco; Carniel, Elisa; Fain, Pamela R; Aragona, Pierluigi; Di Lenarda, Andrea; Mestroni, Luisa; Taylor, Matthew R G

    2013-01-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) commonly causes heart failure and shows extensive genetic heterogeneity that may be amenable to newly developed next-generation DNA sequencing of the exome. In this study we report the successful use of exome sequencing to identify a pathogenic variant in the TNNT2 gene using segregation analysis in a large DCM family. Exome sequencing was performed on three distant relatives from a large family with a clear DCM phenotype. Missense, nonsense, and splice variants were analyzed for segregation among the three affected family members and confirmed in other relatives by direct sequencing. A c.517T C>T, Arg173Trp TNNT2 variant segregated with all affected family members and was also detected in one additional DCM family in our registry. The inclusion of segregation analysis using distant family members markedly improved the bioinformatics filtering process by removing from consideration variants that were not shared by all affected subjects. Haplotype analysis confirmed that the variant found in both DCM families was located on two distinct haplotypes, supporting the notion of independent mutational events in each family. In conclusion, an exome sequencing strategy that includes segregation analysis using distant affected relatives within a family represents a viable diagnostic strategy in a genetically heterogeneous disease like DCM.

  9. Functional Class in Children with Idiopathic Dilated Cardiomyopathy. A pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Tavares, Aline Cristina; Bocchi, Edimar Alcides; Guimarães, Guilherme Veiga

    2016-01-01

    Background Idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (IDCM), most common cardiac cause of pediatric deaths, mortality descriptor: a low left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and low functional capacity (FC). FC is never self reported by children. Objective The aims of this study were (i) To evaluate whether functional classifications according to the children, parents and medical staff were associated. (iv) To evaluate whether there was correlation between VO2 max and Weber's classification. Method Prepubertal children with IDCM and HF (by previous IDCM and preserved LVEF) were selected, evaluated and compared. All children were assessed by testing, CPET and functional class classification. Results Chi-square test showed association between a CFm and CFp (1, n = 31) = 20.6; p = 0.002. There was no significant association between CFp and CFc (1, n = 31) = 6.7; p = 0.4. CFm and CFc were not associated as well (1, n = 31) = 1.7; p = 0.8. Weber's classification was associated to CFm (1, n = 19) = 11.8; p = 0.003, to CFp (1, n = 19) = 20.4; p = 0.0001and CFc (1, n = 19) = 6.4; p = 0.04). Conclusion Drawing were helpful for children's self NYHA classification, which were associated to Weber's stratification. PMID:27168472

  10. Metabolomic Distinction and Insights Into the Pathogenesis of Human Primary Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Danny; Lombardi, Raffaella; Rodriguez, Gabriela; Mitchell, Matthew M.; Marian, A. J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Metabolomics, the comprehensive profile of small molecule metabolites found in biological specimens, has the potential to provide insights into the pathogenesis of disease states and lead to identification of new biomarkers. Methods and Results We analyzed 451 plasma metabolites by liquid chromatography/mass spectroscopy and gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy in 39 patients with primary dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and 31 age-, sex- and body mass index-matched controls. Sixty-one metabolites were significantly different between primary DCM and control individuals (FDR < 0.05). Plasma levels of steroid metabolites, glutamine, threonine and histidine were reduced while levels of citric acid cycle intermediates and lipid β-oxidation products were increased in patients with primary DCM as compared to controls. Medications, particularly furosemide and angiotensin-1 converting enzyme-1 inhibitors, had significant effects on the plasma metabolites. Reduced levels of glutamine in conjunction with increased 3-methyhistidine and prolylhydroxyproline levels suggested enhanced myofibrillar and collagen degradation in DCM patients. Likewise, increased stachydrine and reduced indole-3-propionate implicated a role for intestinal derived anti-oxidant molecules. Changes in steroid metabolites were notable for the loss of metabolic distinction between males and females in patients with primary DCM. Cortisol and cortisone levels were increased while androgen metabolites were decreased significantly, implying metabolic “feminization” of primary DCM males. Conclusions Metabolomic profiling identifies biologically active metabolites that could serve as markers of primary DCM and impart protective or harmful effects on cardiac structure and function. PMID:21155767

  11. Global phosphoproteomic profiling reveals perturbed signaling in a mouse model of dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Kuzmanov, Uros; Guo, Hongbo; Buchsbaum, Diana; Cosme, Jake; Abbasi, Cynthia; Isserlin, Ruth; Sharma, Parveen; Gramolini, Anthony O; Emili, Andrew

    2016-11-01

    Phospholamban (PLN) plays a central role in Ca(2+) homeostasis in cardiac myocytes through regulation of the sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase 2A (SERCA2A) Ca(2+) pump. An inherited mutation converting arginine residue 9 in PLN to cysteine (R9C) results in dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) in humans and transgenic mice, but the downstream signaling defects leading to decompensation and heart failure are poorly understood. Here we used precision mass spectrometry to study the global phosphorylation dynamics of 1,887 cardiac phosphoproteins in early affected heart tissue in a transgenic R9C mouse model of DCM compared with wild-type littermates. Dysregulated phosphorylation sites were quantified after affinity capture and identification of 3,908 phosphopeptides from fractionated whole-heart homogenates. Global statistical enrichment analysis of the differential phosphoprotein patterns revealed selective perturbation of signaling pathways regulating cardiovascular activity in early stages of DCM. Strikingly, dysregulated signaling through the Notch-1 receptor, recently linked to cardiomyogenesis and embryonic cardiac stem cell development and differentiation but never directly implicated in DCM before, was a prominently perturbed pathway. We verified alterations in Notch-1 downstream components in early symptomatic R9C transgenic mouse cardiomyocytes compared with wild type by immunoblot analysis and confocal immunofluorescence microscopy. These data reveal unexpected connections between stress-regulated cell signaling networks, specific protein kinases, and downstream effectors essential for proper cardiac function.

  12. Cardiac fibroblasts mediate IL-17A–driven inflammatory dilated cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Lei; Ong, SuFey; Talor, Monica V.; Barin, Jobert G.; Baldeviano, G. Christian; Kass, David A.; Bedja, Djahida; Zhang, Hao; Sheikh, Asfandyar; Margolick, Joseph B.; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Rose, Noel R.; Čiháková, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory dilated cardiomyopathy (DCMi) is a major cause of heart failure in individuals below the age of 40. We recently reported that IL-17A is required for the development of DCMi. We show a novel pathway connecting IL-17A, cardiac fibroblasts (CFs), GM-CSF, and heart-infiltrating myeloid cells with the pathogenesis of DCMi. Il17ra−/− mice were protected from DCMi, and this was associated with significantly diminished neutrophil and Ly6Chi monocyte/macrophage (MO/MΦ) cardiac infiltrates. Depletion of Ly6Chi MO/MΦ also protected mice from DCMi. Mechanistically, IL-17A stimulated CFs to produce key chemokines and cytokines that are critical downstream effectors in the recruitment and differentiation of myeloid cells. Moreover, IL-17A directs Ly6Chi MO/MΦ in trans toward a more proinflammatory phenotype via CF-derived GM-CSF. Collectively, this IL-17A–fibroblast–GM-CSF–MO/MΦ axis could provide a novel target for the treatment of DCMi and related inflammatory cardiac diseases. PMID:24935258

  13. Expression of coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor and its cellular localization in myocardial tissues of dilated cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Tripta; Mishra, Baijayantimala; Saikia, Uma Nahar; Sharma, Mirnalini; Bahl, Ajay; Ratho, Radha Kanta

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Myocarditis and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) are common causes of morbidity and mortality in children and adults. Recently, the human coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR), a common receptor for coxsackieviruses and adenoviruses, was discovered and its increased expression has been reported in patients with DCM and myocarditis. OBJECTIVE: To measure the expression of CAR in myocardial tissues of patients with DCM and its cellular localization in DCM cases. METHODS: Formalin-fixed myocardial tissues collected during autopsy from 26 cases of DCM, and 20 cases each of noncardiac disease and cardiac disease other than DCM were included as the test group, and control groups A and B, respectively. Expression of CAR was studied using immunohistochemical staining of myocardial tissue with a CAR-specific rabbit polyclonal antibody. CAR messenger RNA was semiquantified by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction followed by agarose gel analysis and measurement of band intensity. RESULTS: CAR positivity in DCM cases was found to be 96% (25 of 26) compared with 30% in control group A and 40% in control group B. CAR was found to be expressed in myocytes, endothelial and interstitial cells; however, positivity in myocytes was significantly higher than in other cells in all groups. The site of CAR expression was predominantly the sarcolemma along with cytoplasm in cardiomyocytes. CONCLUSIONS: The present study highlighted the increased expression of CAR in DCM cases, with localization in myocytes and endothelial cells. PMID:23592932

  14. Cardiac fibroblasts mediate IL-17A-driven inflammatory dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lei; Ong, SuFey; Talor, Monica V; Barin, Jobert G; Baldeviano, G Christian; Kass, David A; Bedja, Djahida; Zhang, Hao; Sheikh, Asfandyar; Margolick, Joseph B; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Rose, Noel R; Ciháková, Daniela

    2014-06-30

    Inflammatory dilated cardiomyopathy (DCMi) is a major cause of heart failure in individuals below the age of 40. We recently reported that IL-17A is required for the development of DCMi. We show a novel pathway connecting IL-17A, cardiac fibroblasts (CFs), GM-CSF, and heart-infiltrating myeloid cells with the pathogenesis of DCMi. Il17ra(-/-) mice were protected from DCMi, and this was associated with significantly diminished neutrophil and Ly6Chi monocyte/macrophage (MO/MΦ) cardiac infiltrates. Depletion of Ly6Chi MO/MΦ also protected mice from DCMi. Mechanistically, IL-17A stimulated CFs to produce key chemokines and cytokines that are critical downstream effectors in the recruitment and differentiation of myeloid cells. Moreover, IL-17A directs Ly6Chi MO/MΦ in trans toward a more proinflammatory phenotype via CF-derived GM-CSF. Collectively, this IL-17A-fibroblast-GM-CSF-MO/MΦ axis could provide a novel target for the treatment of DCMi and related inflammatory cardiac diseases.

  15. Altered protein levels in the isolated extracellular matrix of failing human hearts with dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    DeAguero, Joshua L; McKown, Elizabeth N; Zhang, Liwen; Keirsey, Jeremy; Fischer, Edgar G; Samedi, Von G; Canan, Benjamin D; Kilic, Ahmet; Janssen, Paul M L; Delfín, Dawn A

    Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is associated with extensive pathological cardiac remodeling and involves numerous changes in the protein expression profile of the extracellular matrix of the heart. We obtained seven human, end-stage, failing hearts with DCM (DCM-failing) and nine human, nonfailing donor hearts and compared their extracellular matrix protein profiles. We first showed that the DCM-failing hearts had indeed undergone extensive remodeling of the left ventricle myocardium relative to nonfailing hearts. We then isolated the extracellular matrix from a subset of these hearts and performed a proteomic analysis on the isolated matrices. We found that the levels of 26 structural proteins were altered in the DCM-failing isolated cardiac extracellular matrix compared to nonfailing isolated cardiac extracellular matrix. Overall, most of the extracellular matrix proteins showed reduced levels in the DCM-failing hearts, while all of the contractile proteins showed increased levels. There was a mixture of increased and decreased levels of cytoskeletal and nuclear transport proteins. Using immunoprobing, we verified that collagen IV (α2 and α6 isoforms), zyxin, and myomesin protein levels were reduced in the DCM-failing hearts. We expect that these data will add to the understanding of the pathology associated with heart failure with DCM.

  16. [Anesthetic management of patients with dilated cardiomyopathy undergoing non-cardiac surgery].

    PubMed

    Maekawa, Takuji

    2014-01-01

    There is little information on the perioperative management of patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) undergoing non-cardiac surgery. The presence of a history or signs of heart failure and un-diagnosed DCM preoperatively, may be associated with an increased risk during non-cardiac surgery. In these patients, preoperative assessment of LV function, including echocardiography, and assessment of an individual's capacity to perform a spectrum of common daily tasks may be recommended to quantify the severity of systolic function. It is important to prevent low cardiac output and arrhythmia for the perioperative management of patients with DCM. Sympathetic hyperactivity often causes atrial or ventricular tachyarrhythmia, which could worsen systemic hemodynamics in these patients. In particular, the prevention of life-threatening arrhythmia, such as, ventricular tachycardia or ventricular fibrillation is important. To prevent perioperative low output syndrome, inotropic support, using catecholamines or phosphodiesterase inhibitors with or without vasodilators should be performed under careful monitoring. It is desirable to use a pulmonary-artery catheter during moderate to high risk surgery, because the optimum level of left ventricular pre-load is very narrow in these patients. Every effort must be made to detect postoperative heart failure by careful monitoring, including PAC, and physical examination.

  17. Prognostic value of thallium-201 perfusion defects in idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Doi, Y.L.; Chikamori, T.; Tukata, J.; Yonezawa, Y.; Poloniecki, J.D.; Ozawa, T.; McKenna, W.J. )

    1991-01-15

    To assess the prognostic significance of thallium-201 perfusion defects in patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (IDC), 43 patients underwent thallium scintigraphy in addition to clinical, echocardiographic, angiographic and hemodynamic evaluation. Eleven patients had no significant thallium perfusion abnormality, 19 had multiple small defects and 13 had a large defect. During 3.2 +/- 2.2 years, 14 patients had disease-related mortality. The patients who died had a higher incidence of ventricular tachycardia (71 vs 31%; p less than 0.02), increased cardiothoracic ratio (60 +/- 6 vs 54 +/- 6; p = 0.005), decreased fractional shortening (11 +/- 6 vs 15 +/- 5; p less than 0.05), increased pulmonary wedge pressure (15 +/- 7 vs 10 +/- 6 mm Hg; p = 0.05), increased left ventricular end-diastolic pressure (21 +/- 8 vs 14 +/- 6 mm Hg; p = 0.02) and abnormal thallium perfusion defects (13 of 14 vs 16 of 26; p less than 0.05) compared with survivors. Age, gender, left ventricular end-systolic and end-diastolic dimensions, cardiac index and ejection fraction were not statistically different in the survivors versus the patients who died. Kaplan-Meier survival estimates at 1, 3 and 5 years were 100% in patients without significant perfusion abnormality; 89, 77 and 64%, respectively, in patients with multiple small defects; and 84, 76 and 30%, respectively, in patients with a large defect (p less than 0.025 by log rank test).

  18. [Dilated cardiomyopathy: a dynamic disease - clinical course, reverse remodeling and prognostic stratification].

    PubMed

    Merlo, Marco; Gigli, Marta; Poli, Stefano; Stolfo, Davide; Brun, Francesca; Lardieri, Gerardina; Pinamonti, Bruno; Zecchin, Massimo; Pivetta, Alberto; Vitrella, Giancarlo; Di Lenarda, Andrea; Sinagra, Gianfranco

    2016-01-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is a relatively rare primary heart muscle disease with genetic or post-inflammatory etiology. In the last decade, the incidence and prevalence of the disease have significantly increased as a consequence of an earlier diagnosis supported by extensive familial screening programs and by the improvement in diagnostic techniques. Moreover, current therapeutic strategies have deeply modified the prognosis of DCM with a dramatic reduction in mortality. A significant number of patients with DCM present an impressive response to pharmacological and non-pharmacological therapy in terms of left ventricular reverse remodeling (reduction in ventricular size with improvement of systolic function), which confers a more favorable prognosis in the long term. However, the identification of patients with an increased likelihood of improvement after therapeutic optimization remains a challenging issue; in particular the assessment of arrhythmic risk carries important implications. Finally, the long-term follow-up of patients showing a significant left ventricular functional recovery under optimal treatment is still poorly known. Hence, the aim of the present review is to provide an insight into the clinical evolution/long-term follow-up of DCM, which should be actually considered a dynamic process rather than a static and chronic disease. Left ventricular reverse remodeling should be considered a key therapeutic goal, mostly associated with a long-standing recovery, but cannot be considered the expression of permanent "healing", confirming the need for a systematic and careful follow-up over time in this setting.

  19. Heart rate variability in idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy: relation to disease severity and prognosis.

    PubMed Central

    Yi, G.; Goldman, J. H.; Keeling, P. J.; Reardon, M.; McKenna, W. J.; Malik, M.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the clinical importance of heart rate variability (HRV) in patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). PATIENTS AND METHODS: Time domain analysis of 24 hour HRV was performed in 64 patients with DCM, 19 of their relatives with left ventricular enlargement (possible early DCM), and 33 healthy control subjects. RESULTS: Measures of HRV were reduced in patients with DCM compared with controls (P < 0.05). HRV parameters were similar in relatives and controls. Measures of HRV were lower in DCM patients in whom progressive heart failure developed (n = 28) than in those who remained clinically stable (n = 36) during a follow up of 24 (20) months (P = 0.0001). Reduced HRV was associated with NYHA functional class, left ventricular end diastolic dimension, reduced left ventricular ejection fraction, and peak exercise oxygen consumption (P < 0.05) in all patients. DCM patients with standard deviation of normal to normal RR intervals calculated over the 24 hour period (SDNN) < 50 ms had a significantly lower survival rate free of progressive heart failure than those with SDNN > 50 ms (P = 0.0002, at 12 months; P = 0.0001, during overall follow up). Stepwise multiple regression analysis showed that SDNN < 50 ms identified, independently of other clinical variables, patients who were at increased risk of developing progressive heart failure (P = 0.0004). CONCLUSIONS: HRV is reduced in patients with DCM and related to disease severity. HRV is clinically useful as an early non-invasive marker of DCM deterioration. PMID:9068391

  20. Young MLP deficient mice show diastolic dysfunction before the onset of dilated cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzen-Schmidt, Ilka; Stuyvers, Bruno D.; ter Keurs, Henk E.D.J.; Date, Moto-o; Hoshijima, Masahiko; Chien, Kenneth R.; McCulloch, Andrew D.; Omens, Jeffrey H.

    2015-01-01

    Targeted deletion of cytoskeletal muscle LIM protein (MLP) in mice consistently leads to dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) after one or more months. However, next to nothing is known at present about the mechanisms of this process. We investigated whether diastolic performance including passive mechanics and systolic behavior are altered in 2-week-old MLP knockout (MLPKO) mice, in which heart size, fractional shortening and ejection fraction are still normal. Right ventricular trabeculae were isolated from 2-week-old MLPKO and wildtype mice and placed in an apparatus that allowed force measurements and sarcomere length measurements using laser diffraction. During a twitch from the unloaded state at 1 Hz, MLPKO muscles relengthened to slack length more slowly than controls, although the corresponding force relaxation time was unchanged. Active developed stress at a diastolic sarcomere length of 2.00 μm was preserved in MLPKO trabeculae over a wide range of pacing frequencies. Force relaxation under the same conditions was consistently prolonged compared with wildtype controls, whereas time to peak and maximum rate of force generation were not significantly altered. Ca2+ content of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) and the quantities of Ca2+ handling proteins were similar in both genotypes. In summary, young MLPKO mice revealed substantial alterations in passive myocardial properties and relaxation time, but not in most systolic characteristics. These results indicate that the progression to heart failure in the MLPKO model may be driven by diastolic myocardial dysfunction and abnormal passive properties rather than systolic dysfunction. PMID:15978612

  1. Global phosphoproteomic profiling reveals perturbed signaling in a mouse model of dilated cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kuzmanov, Uros; Guo, Hongbo; Buchsbaum, Diana; Cosme, Jake; Abbasi, Cynthia; Isserlin, Ruth; Sharma, Parveen; Gramolini, Anthony O.; Emili, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Phospholamban (PLN) plays a central role in Ca2+ homeostasis in cardiac myocytes through regulation of the sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase 2A (SERCA2A) Ca2+ pump. An inherited mutation converting arginine residue 9 in PLN to cysteine (R9C) results in dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) in humans and transgenic mice, but the downstream signaling defects leading to decompensation and heart failure are poorly understood. Here we used precision mass spectrometry to study the global phosphorylation dynamics of 1,887 cardiac phosphoproteins in early affected heart tissue in a transgenic R9C mouse model of DCM compared with wild-type littermates. Dysregulated phosphorylation sites were quantified after affinity capture and identification of 3,908 phosphopeptides from fractionated whole-heart homogenates. Global statistical enrichment analysis of the differential phosphoprotein patterns revealed selective perturbation of signaling pathways regulating cardiovascular activity in early stages of DCM. Strikingly, dysregulated signaling through the Notch-1 receptor, recently linked to cardiomyogenesis and embryonic cardiac stem cell development and differentiation but never directly implicated in DCM before, was a prominently perturbed pathway. We verified alterations in Notch-1 downstream components in early symptomatic R9C transgenic mouse cardiomyocytes compared with wild type by immunoblot analysis and confocal immunofluorescence microscopy. These data reveal unexpected connections between stress-regulated cell signaling networks, specific protein kinases, and downstream effectors essential for proper cardiac function. PMID:27742792

  2. Diagnosis of Dilated Cardiomyopathy: Patient Reaction and Adaptation—Case Study and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Stavrou, Maria; Marley, Justin

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Heart failure remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Given that heart failure generally has a chronic course, it is important to appreciate the impact it can have on the quality of life of patients and also their partners or family carers. Method. Questionnaires were given to a patient newly diagnosed with dilated cardiomyopathy, during his hospital admission, as well as after discharge. The responses are summarised and explored in the discussion section, where we used review of the literature to discuss the implications of a new diagnosis of heart failure. Results. The patient's responses to the questionnaires suggest certain anxieties that are part of his adaptation to the diagnosis of heart failure. Conclusion. Depression is a common comorbid condition in patients with heart failure. Various tools can be used to screen for depression in patients with heart failure. Both pharmacological and nonpharmacological options are available. Rapid evaluation of ongoing problems and active participation by a psychiatrist can ensure that the patient receives the best possible clinical care. PMID:27822399

  3. Whole Exome Sequencing Identifies a Troponin T Mutation Hot Spot in Familial Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Nzali; Sinagra, Gianfranco; Jones, Kenneth L.; Slavov, Dobromir; Gowan, Katherine; Merlo, Marco; Carniel, Elisa; Fain, Pamela R.; Aragona, Pierluigi; Di Lenarda, Andrea; Mestroni, Luisa; Taylor, Matthew R. G.

    2013-01-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) commonly causes heart failure and shows extensive genetic heterogeneity that may be amenable to newly developed next-generation DNA sequencing of the exome. In this study we report the successful use of exome sequencing to identify a pathogenic variant in the TNNT2 gene using segregation analysis in a large DCM family. Exome sequencing was performed on three distant relatives from a large family with a clear DCM phenotype. Missense, nonsense, and splice variants were analyzed for segregation among the three affected family members and confirmed in other relatives by direct sequencing. A c.517T C>T, Arg173Trp TNNT2 variant segregated with all affected family members and was also detected in one additional DCM family in our registry. The inclusion of segregation analysis using distant family members markedly improved the bioinformatics filtering process by removing from consideration variants that were not shared by all affected subjects. Haplotype analysis confirmed that the variant found in both DCM families was located on two distinct haplotypes, supporting the notion of independent mutational events in each family. In conclusion, an exome sequencing strategy that includes segregation analysis using distant affected relatives within a family represents a viable diagnostic strategy in a genetically heterogeneous disease like DCM. PMID:24205113

  4. Initial clinical experience of real-time three-dimensional echocardiography in patients with ischemic and idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiota, T.; McCarthy, P. M.; White, R. D.; Qin, J. X.; Greenberg, N. L.; Flamm, S. D.; Wong, J.; Thomas, J. D.

    1999-01-01

    The geometry of the left ventricle in patients with cardiomyopathy is often sub-optimal for 2-dimensional ultrasound when assessing left ventricular (LV) function and localized abnormalities such as a ventricular aneurysm. The aim of this study was to report the initial experience of real-time 3-D echocardiography for evaluating patients with cardiomyopathy. A total of 34 patients were evaluated with the real-time 3D method in the operating room (n = 15) and in the echocardiographic laboratory (n = 19). Thirteen of 28 patients with cardiomyopathy and 6 other subjects with normal LV function were evaluated by both real-time 3-D echocardiography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for obtaining LV volumes and ejection fractions for comparison. There were close relations and agreements for LV volumes (r = 0.98, p <0.0001, mean difference = -15 +/- 81 ml) and ejection fractions (r = 0.97, p <0.0001, mean difference = 0.001 +/- 0.04) between the real-time 3D method and MRI when 3 cardiomyopathy cases with marked LV dilatation (LV end-diastolic volume >450 ml by MRI) were excluded. In these 3 patients, 3D echocardiography significantly underestimated the LV volumes due to difficulties with imaging the entire LV in a 60 degrees x 60 degrees pyramidal volume. The new real-time 3D echocardiography is feasible in patients with cardiomyopathy and may provide a faster and lower cost alternative to MRI for evaluating cardiac function in patients.

  5. LMNA gene single nucleotide polymorphisms in dilated cardiomyopathy of Han children

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Li-Jian; Xiao, Ting-Ting; Huang, Min; Shen, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether LMNA gene mutation is associated with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) in Chinese Han Race children. Methods: DNA was isolated from 78 patients with DCM and 100 healthy Chinese children who served as controls. 12 exons in the functional regions and the adjacent part of introns of the LMNA gene were amplified with polymerase chain reactions (PCR) and the PCR products were sequenced with DNA sequencer. We compared the DNA sequence with Blast software online PubMed website. The differences of allele and genotype between the groups were detected by χ2 test. Results: No disease-causing mutation in LMNA gene was found in all DCM patients. Three nonsense single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified. ① The first is c.1908C>T (H566H, rs4641) which was located at exon 10 of LMNA gene. It was found in 29 DCM cases and 15 control subjects. Compared to healthy controls, the frequency of TT and TC genotypes, and the C allele were significantly increased in DCM patients (P<0.05). ② The second was c.861C>T (A287A, rs5380) which was located at exon 5 of LMNA gene. It was found in 9 DCM cases and 2 control subjects. The frequency of TC genotype was significantly increased in DCM patients (P<0.05). ③ The third was c.1338C>T (D446D, rs5058) which located at exon 7 of LMNA gene. It was found in 8 DCM cases and 3 control subjects. The frequency of TC genotype was significantly increased in DCM patients (P<0.05). Conclusion: The SNP of LMNA gene may be associated with the susceptivity of DCM in Chinese Han children. PMID:26379929

  6. Hyper-Prolactinemia in Men With Idiopathic Dilated Cardiomyopathy: Does It Have any Prognostic Implications?

    PubMed Central

    Naderi, Nasim; Bakhshandeh, Hooman; Ardeshiri, Maryam; Barzegari, Fatemeh; Amin, Ahmad; Taghavi, Sepideh; Maleki, Majid

    2014-01-01

    Background: Prolactin (PRL) has increasingly been recognized to play a stimulatory role in inflammatory response. Recently, studies have reported an increase in prolactin level among patients with chronic heart failure, however, there is conflicting data about its role as a prognostic factor in these patients. Objectives: We aimed to measure PRL level in male patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (IDC) and its relationship with some prognostic factors. Patients and Methods: Serum prolactin level was assessed in 33 men with a diagnosis of IDC, left ventricle ejection fraction (LVEF) less than 35% on standard medical therapy for heart failure and New York Heart Association class II-III. Serum NT-Pro BNP (N terminal pro brain natriuretic peptide), hs-CRP (High sensitive C reactive protein) and six-minute walk test (6MWT) were also measured. Our secondary endpoints were mortality, transplantation and hospitalization due to acute heart failure and all patients were followed for one year. Results: The mean age was 33 ± 7 years (24-45 years) and the mean LVEF was 23% ± 6.5. The mean PRL level was 16 ± 7.7 ng/mL (95% confidence interval: 13.3-18.7 ng/mL), which was significantly higher than normal reference values (4.04-15 ng/mL) (P < 0.0001). There was no correlation between PRL levels and pro BNP, hs-CRP or 6MWT test, however, the serum PRL level was slightly higher among patients who died or were hospitalized or transplanted. Conclusions: Considering our study results, prognostic implication of PRL should be questioned. However, it seems that the significant increase in serum PRL in the study population needs more consideration and may have its own pathophysiologic importance. Further studies are recommended for better addressing the role of PRL in chronic heart failure patients. PMID:25478544

  7. Circulating Omentin-1 Levels Are Decreased in Dilated Cardiomyopathy Patients with Overt Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ying; Lin, Yingzhong; Zhang, Shumin; Wang, Zhijian; Zhang, Jianwei; Chang, Chao; Liu, Ling; Ji, Qingwei; Liu, Xiaofei

    2016-01-01

    Background. Recent evidence demonstrated that the circulating levels of omentin-1 are related to the presence of ischemic heart disease and heart failure. However, omentin-1 plasma levels in patients with nonischemic dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), which is the most common etiology of heart failure, have yet to be investigated. Methods. Plasma levels of omentin-1 and adiponectin were measured in 100 patients with DCM and 45 healthy controls. Results. Plasma omentin-1 levels significantly decreased in DCM patients compared with the control group, whereas adiponectin levels significantly increased in DCM patients compared with the control group. Plasma omentin-1 levels were negatively correlated with adiponectin (R = −0.376, P = 0.005), C-reactive protein (CRP) (R = −0.320, P = 0.001), and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) (R = −0.365, P = 0.000) levels as well as left ventricular end-diastolic diameter (LVEDD) (R = −0.200, P = 0.046) but were positively correlated with left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) (R = 0.496, P = 0.000). Plasma adiponectin levels were positively correlated with CRP (R = 0.273, P = 0.006) and NT-proBNP (R = 0.329, P = 0.001) levels but were negatively correlated with fasting glucose (R = −0.218, P = 0.029) and LVEF (R = −0.615, P = 0.000) levels. Furthermore, omentin-1 (OR 0.983, 95% CI 0.970 to 0.996; P = 0.008) levels were independently associated with the presence of DCM before NT-proBNP was added. Conclusions. Omentin-1 is a novel biomarker of DCM. PMID:27313334

  8. Timing of left heart base descent in dogs with dilated cardiomyopathy and normal dogs.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Kerry E; Devine, Bryan C; Woolley, Richard; Corcoran, Brendan M; French, Anne T

    2008-01-01

    The identification and assessment of myocardial failure in canine idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is achieved using a variety of two-dimensional and Doppler echocardiographic techniques. More recently, the availability of tissue Doppler imaging (TDI) has raised the potential for development of new ways of more accurately identifying a disease phenotype. Nevertheless, TDI has not been universally adapted to veterinary clinical cardiology primarily because of the lack of information on its utility in diagnosis. We assessed the application of timing of left heart base descent using TDI in the identification of differences between DCM and normal dogs. The times from the onset of the QRS complex on a simultaneously recorded electrocardiograph to the onset (Q--S'), peak (Q--peak S'), and end (Q--end S') of the systolic velocity peak were measured in the interventricular septum (IVS) and the left ventricular free wall. The duration of S' was also calculated. The Q--S' (FW), Q--end S' (FW), and duration S' (FW) were correlated with ejection fraction in the diseased group (P < 0.05). In addition, Q--S', Q--peak S', Q--end S', and the peak S' velocity were prolonged in the diseased dogs at both the free wall and in the IVS (P < 0.01). The duration of S' was unaffected by disease status. These findings provide insight into the electromechanical uncoupling that occurs in canine DCM and identifies new TDI parameters that can be added to the range of Doppler and echocardiographic parameters used for detecting myocardial failure in the dog.

  9. Increased circulating T‑helper 22 cells in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Kong, Qing; Li, Xiaomo; Wu, Weifeng; Yang, Fan; Liu, Yanli; Lai, Wenyin; Pan, Xiaofen; Gao, Mengsha; Xue, Yimin

    2014-07-01

    Recently, the newly determined interleukin (IL)‑22‑producing T-helper (Th) 22 cell has been implicated to be involved in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. However, its role in the pathogenesis of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) has yet to be elucidated. A total of 30 patients with DCM and 30 healthy controls were enrolled in the present study. The levels of Th22, Th17 and Th1 cells in the peripheral blood were analyzed by flow cytometry. Levels of plasma IL‑22 and autoantibody adenine nucleotide translocator (ANT) were assessed using the ELISA. The key transcription factor of Th22, aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), was assessed using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Additionally, clinical data on the brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), C‑reactive protein (CRP) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) were collected. In comparison with those in the control group, significantly elevated levels of Th22, Th17 and Th1 cells were detected in patients with DCM (all P<0.01). Similarly, elevated mRNA levels of peripheral AHR were detected in patients with DCM. The percentage of Th22 cells was higher in ANT‑positive compared with ANT‑negative patients with DCM. The levels of BNP and CRP, but not ESR, showed a significant positive correlation with those of Th22 cells. With regard to the concentrations of plasma IL‑22, no statistical difference was found between patients with DCM and the healthy controls, nor did it demonstrate a statistical correlation with the percentage of Th22 cells. In conclusion, the present study showed that patients with DCM, particularly those of the ANT autoantibody positive subjects, exhibit elevated levels of peripheral Th22 cells, indicating that a Th22 immune response may be implicated in the pathogenesis of DCM.

  10. Evaluation of mechanical dyssynchrony in children with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy and associated clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Friedberg, Mark Kevin; Roche, Susan Lucy; Balasingam, Mervin; Stephenson, Elizabeth; Slorach, Cameron; Fackoury, Cheryl; Kantor, Paul Fraser

    2008-04-15

    We studied mechanical dyssynchrony and its association with clinical status in children with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (IDC). The SD of QRS to peak systolic velocity interval by tissue Doppler was measured in 12 left ventricular segments, as a dyssynchrony index (DI), in each child with IDC during a 12-month period. Results were compared with a control cohort. We used the adult-defined DI cutpoint of 32.6 ms to define patients with IDC as "dyssynchronous" or "synchronous" and compared clinical status and outcomes (transplantation listing/death) between these groups. Patients with IDC (n = 23) and controls (n = 14) had similar age, gender, and QRS duration. Patients with IDC had a higher DI than controls (44.8 +/- 23.7 vs 19.9 +/- 8 ms, p <0.0001). A DI >32.6 ms defined mechanical dyssynchrony in 65% of patients with IDC. Dyssynchronous and synchronous patients had similar QRS durations. Age at diagnosis, at dyssynchrony evaluation, and duration of clinical illness were similar in the 2 groups. New York Heart Association score was better in dyssynchronous than in synchronous patients (2 vs 3.1, p <0.05). Number of synchronous and dyssynchronous patients reaching the end point of death or transplantation was similar, although synchronous patients had poorer actuarial survival from the time of diagnosis (hazard ratio 3.25, p = .04). In conclusion, left ventricular mechanical dyssynchrony is prevalent in pediatric IDC. QRS duration alone is inadequate to define dyssynchrony in pediatric IDC, whereas the adult-derived DI of >32.6 ms seems applicable to the pediatric population. In this cohort, the presence of mechanical dyssynchrony was not associated with more severe clinical status or adverse outcomes.

  11. Computer-based assessment of left ventricular wall stiffness in patients with ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Y.; Teo, S. K.; Tan, R. S.; Lim, C. W.; Zhong, L.

    2013-02-01

    Ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy (IDCM) is a degenerative disease of the myocardial tissue accompanied by left ventricular (LV) structural changes such as interstitial fibrosis. This can induce increased passive stiffness of the LV wall. However, quantification of LV passive wall stiffness in vivo is extremely difficult, particularly in ventricles with complex geometry. Therefore, we sought to (i) develop a computer-based assessment of LV passive wall stiffness from cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging in terms of a nominal stiffness index (E*); and (ii) investigate whether E* can offer an insight into cardiac mechanics in IDCM. CMR scans were performed in 5 normal subjects and 5 patients with IDCM. For each data sample, an in-house software was used to generate a 1-to-1 corresponding mesh pair of the LV from the ED and ES phases. The E* values are then computed as a function of local ventricular wall strain. We found that E* in the IDCM group (40.66 - 215.12) was at least one order of magnitude larger than the normal control group (1.00 - 6.14). In addition, the IDCM group revealed much higher inhomogeneity of E* values manifested by a greater spread of E* values throughout the LV. In conclusion, there is a substantial elevated ventricular stiffness index in IDCM. This would suggest that E* could be used as discriminator for early detection of disease state. The computational performance per data sample took approximately 25 seconds, which demonstrates its clinical potential as a real-time cardiac assessment tool.

  12. Segmental wall motion abnormalities in dilated cardiomyopathy: hemodynamic characteristics and comparison with thallium-201 myocardial scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, S.; Tsuiki, K.; Hayasaka, M.; Yasui, S.

    1987-05-01

    This study assessed the hemodynamic characteristics of segmental wall motion abnormality of the left ventricle in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and its relation to the thallium-201 (TI-201) myocardial scintigraphy (MPI). Left ventriculograms and MPI in 23 patients were analyzed by the use of quantitative indexes of regional wall motion and TI-201 uptake based on a mean and a standard deviation of 13 normal subjects. Relative normokinesis in our definition was more frequently seen in the inferior wall than in the anterior wall (p less than 0.01). In contrast, severe asynergy was more often seen in the anterior wall than in the inferior wall (p less than 0.01). There were 11 patients who had relative normokinesis and asynergy together. By means of the index of wall motion, the DCM patients were divided into two groups, one with segmental wall motion abnormality (SWMA) and another with diffuse wall motion abnormality (DWMA). The DWMA group had higher left ventricular end-diastolic pressures (p less than 0.05) and the tendency of large left ventricular end-diastolic volumes than the SWMA group. There was a rough correlation (r = 0.58) between the quantitative indexes of TI-201 uptake and wall motion at the same region of the left ventricle. Thus, the nonuniformity of the left ventricular wall motion was recognized in the patients with DCM and more increased preload was shown in the patients with DWMA than in the group with SWMA. Further, the regional asynergy may be related to the localized fibrosis within the left ventricle in DCM, considering the result that the worse TI-201 uptake was roughly accompanied by the more severe asynergy.

  13. A dilated cardiomyopathy mutation blunts adrenergic response and induces contractile dysfunction under chronic angiotensin II stress.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Ross; Song, Weihua; Smoktunowicz, Natalia; Marston, Steven

    2015-12-01

    We investigated cardiac contractility in the ACTC E361G transgenic mouse model of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). No differences in cardiac dimensions or systolic function were observed in young mice, whereas young adult mice exhibited only mild diastolic abnormalities. Dobutamine had an inotropic and lusitropic effect on the mouse heart. In papillary muscle at 37°C, dobutamine increased relaxation rates [∼50% increase of peak rate of force decline normalized to force (dF/dtmin/F), 25% reduction of time to 90% relaxation (t90) in nontransgenic (NTG) mice], but in the ACTC E361G mouse, dF/dtmin/F was increased 20-30%, and t90 was only reduced 10% at 10 Hz. Pressure-volume measurements showed increases in maximum rate of pressure decline and decreases in time constant of left ventricular pressure decay in the ACTC E361G mouse that were 25-30% of the changes in the NTG mouse, consistent with blunting of the lusitropic response. The inotropic effect of dobutamine was also blunted in ACTC E361G mice, and the dobutamine-stimulated increase in cardiac output (CO) was reduced from 2,100 to 900 μl/min. Mice were treated with high doses of ANG II for 4 wk. The chronic stress treatment evoked systolic dysfunction in ACTC E361G mice but not in NTG. There was a significant reduction in rates of pressure increase and decrease, as well as reduced end-systolic pressure and increased volume. Ejection fraction and CO were reduced in the ACTC E361G mouse, indicating DCM. In vitro DCM-causing mutations uncouple the relationship between Ca(2+) sensitivity and troponin I phosphorylation. We conclude that this leads to the observed, reduced response to β1 agonists and reduced cardiac reserve that predisposes the heart to DCM under conditions of chronic stress.

  14. ANGIOTENSIN-DEPENDENT AUTONOMIC DYSREGULATION PRECEDES DILATED CARDIOMYOPATHY IN A MOUSE MODEL OF MUSCULAR DYSTROPHY

    PubMed Central

    Sabharwal, Rasna; Weiss, Robert M.; Zimmerman, Kathy; Domenig, Oliver; Cicha, Michael Z.; Chapleau, Mark W.

    2015-01-01

    Sarcoglycan mutations cause muscular dystrophy. Patients with muscular dystrophy develop autonomic dysregulation and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), but the temporal relationship and mechanism of autonomic dysregulation are not well understood. We hypothesized that activation of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) causes autonomic dysregulation prior to development of DCM in sarcoglycan-delta (Sgcd) deficient mice, and that the severity of autonomic dysfunction at a young age predicts the severity of DCM at older ages. At 10-12 weeks of age, when left ventricular function assessed by echocardiography remained normal, Sgcd−/− mice exhibited decreases in arterial pressure, locomotor activity, baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) and cardiovagal tone, and increased sympathetic tone compared with age-matched C57BL/6 control mice (P<0.05). Systemic and skeletal muscle RAS were activated, and angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) expression, superoxide and fibrosis were increased in dystrophic skeletal muscle (P<0.05). Treatment with the AT1R blocker losartan for 7-9 weeks beginning at 3 weeks of age prevented or strongly attenuated the abnormalities in Sgcd−/− mice (P<0.05). Repeated assessment of phenotypes between 10 and 75 weeks of age demonstrated worsening of autonomic function, progressive cardiac dysfunction and DCM, and increased mortality in Sgcd−/− mice. High sympathetic tone predicted subsequent left ventricular dysfunction. We conclude that RAS activation causes severe autonomic dysregulation in young Sgcd−/− mice, which portends a worse long-term prognosis. Therapeutic targeting of RAS at a young age may improve autonomic function and slow disease progression in muscular dystrophy. PMID:25921929

  15. Integrated Left Ventricular Global Transcriptome and Proteome Profiling in Human End-Stage Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kaya, Namik; Muiya, Nzioka P.; AlHarazi, Olfat; Shinwari, Zakia; Andres, Editha

    2016-01-01

    Aims The disease pathways leading to idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) are still elusive. The present study investigated integrated global transcriptional and translational changes in human DCM for disease biomarker discovery. Methods We used identical myocardial tissues from five DCM hearts compared to five non-failing (NF) donor hearts for both transcriptome profiling using the ABI high-density oligonucleotide microarrays and proteome expression with One-Dimensional Nano Acquity liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry on the Synapt G2 system. Results We identified 1262 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) and 269 proteins (DEPs) between DCM cases and healthy controls. Among the most significantly upregulated (>5-fold) proteins were GRK5, APOA2, IGHG3, ANXA6, HSP90AA1, and ATP5C1 (p< 0.01). On the other hand, the most significantly downregulated proteins were GSTM5, COX17, CAV1 and ANXA3. At least ten entities were concomitantly upregulated on the two analysis platforms: GOT1, ALDH4A1, PDHB, BDH1, SLC2A11, HSP90AA1, HSP90AB1, H2AFV, HSPA5 and NDUFV1. Gene ontology analyses of DEGs and DEPs revealed significant overlap with enrichment of genes/proteins related to metabolic process, biosynthetic process, cellular component organization, oxidative phosphorylation, alterations in glycolysis and ATP synthesis, Alzheimer’s disease, chemokine-mediated inflammation and cytokine signalling pathways. Conclusion The concomitant use of transcriptome and proteome expression to evaluate global changes in DCM has led to the identification of sixteen commonly altered entities as well as novel genes, proteins and pathways whose cardiac functions have yet to be deciphered. This data should contribute towards better management of the disease. PMID:27711126

  16. Titin Truncating Variants in Dilated Cardiomyopathy – Prevalence and Genotype-Phenotype Correlations

    PubMed Central

    Franaszczyk, Maria; Chmielewski, Przemyslaw; Truszkowska, Grazyna; Stawinski, Piotr; Michalak, Ewa; Rydzanicz, Malgorzata; Sobieszczanska-Malek, Malgorzata; Pollak, Agnieszka; Szczygieł, Justyna; Kosinska, Joanna; Parulski, Adam; Stoklosa, Tomasz; Tarnowska, Agnieszka; Machnicki, Marcin M.; Foss-Nieradko, Bogna; Szperl, Malgorzata; Sioma, Agnieszka; Kusmierczyk, Mariusz; Grzybowski, Jacek; Zielinski, Tomasz; Ploski, Rafal

    2017-01-01

    TTN gene truncating variants are common in dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), although data on their clinical significance is still limited. We sought to examine the frequency of truncating variants in TTN in patients with DCM, including familial DCM (FDCM), and to look for genotype-phenotype correlations. Clinical cardiovascular data, family histories and blood samples were collected from 72 DCM probands, mean age of 34 years, 45.8% FDCM. DNA samples were examined by next generation sequencing (NGS) with a focus on the TTN gene. Truncating mutations were followed up by segregation study among family members. We identified 16 TTN truncating variants (TTN trunc) in 17 probands (23.6% of all cases, 30.3% of FDCM, 17.9% of sporadic DCM). During mean 63 months from diagnosis, there was no difference in adverse cardiac events between probands with and without TTN truncating mutations. Among relatives 29 mutation carriers were identified, nine were definitely affected (31%), eight probably affected (27.6%) one possibly affected (3.4%) and eleven were not affected (37.9%). When relatives with all affected statuses were combined, disease penetrance was still incomplete (62.1%) even after exclusion of unaffected relatives under 40 (82%) and was higher in males versus females. In all mutation carriers, during follow-up, 17.4% had major adverse cardiac events, and prognosis was significantly worse in men than in women. In conclusion, TTN truncating variants were observed in nearly one fourth of young DCM patient population, in vast majority without conduction system disease. Incomplete penetrance suggests possible influence of other genetic and/or environmental factors on the course of cardiotitinopathy. Counseling should take into account sex and incomplete penetrance. PMID:28045975

  17. Targeted next-generation sequencing of candidate genes reveals novel mutations in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    ZHAO, YUE; FENG, YUE; ZHANG, YUN-MEI; DING, XIAO-XUE; SONG, YU-ZHU; ZHANG, A-MEI; LIU, LI; ZHANG, HONG; DING, JIA-HUAN; XIA, XUE-SHAN

    2015-01-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is a major cause of sudden cardiac death and heart failure, and it is characterized by genetic and clinical heterogeneity, even for some patients with a very poor clinical prognosis; in the majority of cases, DCM necessitates a heart transplant. Genetic mutations have long been considered to be associated with this disease. At present, mutations in over 50 genes related to DCM have been documented. This study was carried out to elucidate the characteristics of gene mutations in patients with DCM. The candidate genes that may cause DCM include MYBPC3, MYH6, MYH7, LMNA, TNNT2, TNNI3, MYPN, MYL3, TPM1, SCN5A, DES, ACTC1 and RBM20. Using next-generation sequencing (NGS) and subsequent mutation confirmation with traditional capillary Sanger sequencing analysis, possible causative non-synonymous mutations were identified in ~57% (12/21) of patients with DCM. As a result, 7 novel mutations (MYPN, p.E630K; TNNT2, p.G180A; MYH6, p.R1047C; TNNC1, p.D3V; DES, p.R386H; MYBPC3, p.C1124F; and MYL3, p.D126G), 3 variants of uncertain significance (RBM20, p.R1182H; MYH6, p.T1253M; and VCL, p.M209L), and 2 known mutations (MYH7, p.A26V and MYBPC3, p.R160W) were revealed to be associated with DCM. The mutations were most frequently found in the sarcomere (MYH6, MYBPC3, MYH7, TNNC1, TNNT2 and MYL3) and cytoskeletal (MYPN, DES and VCL) genes. As genetic testing is a useful tool in the clinical management of disease, testing for pathogenic mutations is beneficial to the treatment of patients with DCM and may assist in predicting disease risk for their family members before the onset of symptoms. PMID:26458567

  18. TNNI3K mutation in familial syndrome of conduction system disease, atrial tachyarrhythmia and dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Theis, Jeanne L; Zimmermann, Michael T; Larsen, Brandon T; Rybakova, Inna N; Long, Pamela A; Evans, Jared M; Middha, Sumit; de Andrade, Mariza; Moss, Richard L; Wieben, Eric D; Michels, Virginia V; Olson, Timothy M

    2014-11-01

    Locus mapping has uncovered diverse etiologies for familial atrial fibrillation (AF), dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), and mixed cardiac phenotype syndromes, yet the molecular basis for these disorders remains idiopathic in most cases. Whole-exome sequencing (WES) provides a powerful new tool for familial disease gene discovery. Here, synergistic application of these genomic strategies identified the pathogenic mutation in a familial syndrome of atrial tachyarrhythmia, conduction system disease (CSD), and DCM vulnerability. Seven members of a three-generation family exhibited the variably expressed phenotype, three of whom manifested CSD and clinically significant arrhythmia in childhood. Genome-wide linkage analysis mapped two equally plausible loci to chromosomes 1p3 and 13q12. Variants from WES of two affected cousins were filtered for rare, predicted-deleterious, positional variants, revealing an unreported heterozygous missense mutation disrupting the highly conserved kinase domain in TNNI3K. The G526D substitution in troponin I interacting kinase, with the most deleterious SIFT and Polyphen2 scores possible, resulted in abnormal peptide aggregation in vitro and in silico docking models predicted altered yet energetically favorable wild-type mutant dimerization. Ventricular tissue from a mutation carrier displayed histopathological hallmarks of DCM and reduced TNNI3K protein staining with unique amorphous nuclear and sarcoplasmic inclusions. In conclusion, mutation of TNNI3K, encoding a heart-specific kinase previously shown to modulate cardiac conduction and myocardial function in mice, underlies a familial syndrome of electrical and myopathic heart disease. The identified substitution causes a TNNI3K aggregation defect and protein deficiency, implicating a dominant-negative loss of function disease mechanism.

  19. Systolic-diastolic functional coupling in healthy children and in those with dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Friedberg, Mark K; Margossian, Renee; Lu, Minmin; Mercer-Rosa, Laura; Henderson, Heather T; Nutting, Arni; Friedman, Kevin; Molina, Kimberly M; Altmann, Karen; Canter, Charles; Sleeper, Lynn A; Colan, Steven D

    2016-06-01

    Systolic and diastolic function affect dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) outcomes. However, systolic-diastolic coupling, as a distinct characteristic, may itself affect function but is poorly characterized. We hypothesized that echocardiographic left ventricular (LV) longitudinal systolic tissue velocities (S') correlate with diastolic longitudinal velocities (E') and that their relationship is associated with ventricular function and that this relationship is impaired in pediatric DCM. We analyzed data from the Pediatric Heart Network Ventricular Volume Variability study, using linear regression and generalized additive modeling to assess relationships between S' and E' at the lateral and septal mitral annulus. We explored relationships between the systolic:diastolic (S:D) coupling ratio (S':E' relative to age) and ventricular function. Up to 4 echocardiograms from 130 DCM patients (mean age: 9.3 ± 6.1 yr) and 1 echocardiogram from each of 591 healthy controls were analyzed. S' and E' were linearly related in controls (r = 0.64, P < 0.001) and DCM (r = 0.83, P < 0.001). In DCM, the magnitude of association between S' and E' was reduced with progressive ventricular remodeling. The S:D ratio was more strongly associated with LV function in controls vs. DCM. The septal S:D ratio was higher (presumed worse) in DCM vs. controls (0.69 ± 0.13 vs. 0.62 ± 0.12, P = 0.001). A higher septal S:D ratio was associated with worse LV dimensions (parameter estimate: 0.0061, P = 0.004), mass (parameter estimate: 0.0074, P = 0.002), ejection fraction (parameter estimate: -0.0303, P = 0.024), and inflow propagation (parameter estimate: -0.3538, P < .001). S:D coupling becomes weaker in DCM with LV remodeling and dysfunction. The S:D coupling ratio may be useful to assess coupling, warranting study in relation to patient outcomes.

  20. The Protective Effects of Ivabradine in Preventing Progression from Viral Myocarditis to Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Yue-Chun, Li; Guang-Yi, Chen; Li-Sha, Ge; Chao, Xing; Xinqiao, Tian; Cong, Lin; Xiao-Ya, Dai; Xiangjun, Yang

    2016-01-01

    To study the beneficial effects of ivabradine in dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) mice, which evolved from coxsackievirus B3-induced chronic viral myocarditis. Four-to-five-week-old male balb/c mice were inoculated intraperitoneally with coxsackievirus B3 (Strain Nancy) on days 1, 14, and 28. The day of the first virus inoculation was defined as day 1. Thirty-five days later, the surviving chronic viral myocarditis mice were divided randomly into two groups, a treatment group and an untreated group. Ivabradine was administered by gavage for 30 consecutive days in the treatment group, and the untreated group was administered normal saline. Masson’s trichrome stain was used to evaluate the fibrosis degree in myocardial tissue. The expression levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), interleukin-6 (IL-6), collagen I, collagen III and p38-MAPK signaling pathway proteins were detected by Western blot. Electrocardiogram was used to investigate the heart rate and rhythm. The thickness of the ventricular septum and left ventricular posterior wall, left ventricular end diastolic dimension, left ventricular end systolic dimension, left ventricular ejection fractions and fractional shortening were studied by echocardiography. Compared with the untreated chronic viral myocarditis mice, ivabradine significantly increased the survival rate, attenuated the myocardial lesions and fibrosis, improved the impairment of the left ventricular function, diminished the heart dimension, decreased the production of collagen I and collagen III, reduced the expression of the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6, and lowered the production of phospho-p38 MAPK. The findings indicate the therapeutic effect of ivabradine in preventing the progression from viral myocarditis to DCM in mice with chronic viral myocarditis induced by coxsackievirus B3, is associated with inhibition of the p38 MAPK pathway, downregulated inflammatory responses and decreased

  1. Peripartum cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Grixti, Sarah; Magri, Caroline J; Xuereb, Robert; Fava, Stephen

    2015-02-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy is a form of dilated cardiomyopathy of indeterminate aetiology occurring in late pregnancy or the months following delivery. This article reviews current knowledge of its pathophysiology, therapeutic strategies and prognosis, as well as new treatments and future directions.

  2. Positive action of propionyl-L-carnitine on mechanical performance of papillary muscle from Syrian hamsters with hereditary dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Maresca, P; Mancinelli, R; Corsico, N; Arrigoni-Martelli, E; Manni, E

    1995-12-20

    Propionyl-L-carnitine has been shown to exert a beneficial effect on cardiac function in different experimental models of cardiomyopathy in the rat, most likely by improving cardiac metabolism and energy production. We have previously shown that, in a strain of hamsters with hereditary dilated cardiomyopathy (BIO TO.2), the mechanical activity of papillary muscle (length-tension, velocity of shortening, shortening, work and power relationship) is significantly depressed when compared to the same parameter in normal hamsters (BIO F1.B). The repeated oral treatment with propionyl-L-carnitine (60 mg/kg per os for 7 weeks) to BIO TO.2 hamsters had a significant positive inotropic effect, as indicated by an increase in developed tension up to the levels observed in papillary muscles from normal hamsters. This action is most likely associated with metabolic effects similar to those observed in rats.

  3. Lack of correlation between intracavitary thrombosis detected by cross sectional echocardiography and systemic emboli in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Ciaccheri, M; Castelli, G; Cecchi, F; Nannini, M; Santoro, G; Troiani, V; Zuppiroli, A; Dolara, A

    1989-01-01

    The correlation between intracavitary thrombosis detected by cross sectional echocardiography and systemic embolism was studied in 126 consecutive patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy who were examined from January 1980 to September 1987. A total of 1041 serial echocardiograms were obtained with 3.5 and 5 MHz transducers. The mean follow up period was 41.2 months. The survival rate was 88% at two years and 56% at five years. Echocardiography showed intracavitary thrombi in 14 (11.1%) patients; 13 were mural and 11 were localised at the apex of the left ventricle. Twelve patients (8.4%) had systemic emboli; this corresponded to an incidence of new embolic events of 1.4 for 100 patient-years. Patients with intracavitary thrombi or systemic emboli were treated with oral anticoagulants, as were nine in functional class IV of the New York Heart Association, for 61 patient-years. The cumulative observation period for the whole population study was 418 patient-years. None of the patients with intracavitary thrombosis had embolic complications and none of those with embolism had intracavitary thrombi. Rates of intracavitary thrombosis and systemic embolism in this series were low and there was no overlap between the two events. This may have been because the patients did not have severe dilated cardiomyopathy, because echocardiography did not detect all the thrombi, or because patients were treated with oral anticoagulants. The presence of intracardiac thrombosis detected by cross sectional echocardiography is not predictive of systemic embolism in patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy. Criteria for the use of the anticoagulant treatment remain largely empirical in these cases. Images Fig 1 Fig 2 PMID:2757871

  4. Six-Minute Walk Test as a Predictor for Outcome in Children with Dilated Cardiomyopathy and Chronic Stable Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    den Boer, Susanna L; Flipse, Daniël H K; van der Meulen, Marijke H; Backx, Ad P C M; du Marchie Sarvaas, Gideon J; Ten Harkel, Arend D J; van Iperen, Gabriëlle G; Rammeloo, Lukas A J; Tanke, Ronald B; Helbing, Willem A; Takken, Tim; Dalinghaus, Michiel

    2017-03-01

    Cardiopulmonary exercise testing is an important tool to predict prognosis in children and adults with heart failure. A much less sophisticated exercise test is the 6 min walk test, which has been shown an independent predictor for morbidity and mortality in adults with heart failure. Therefore, we hypothesized that the 6 min walk test could be predictive for outcome in children with dilated cardiomyopathy. We prospectively included 49 children with dilated cardiomyopathy ≥6 years who performed a 6 min walk test. Median age was 11.9 years (interquartile range [IQR] 7.4-15.1), median time after diagnosis was 3.6 years (IQR 0.6-7.4). The 6 min walk distance was transformed to a percentage of predicted, using age- and gender-specific norm values (6MWD%). For all patients, mean 6MWD% was 70 ± 21%. Median follow-up was 33 months (IQR 14-50). Ten patients reached the combined endpoint of death or heart transplantation. Using univariable Cox regression, a higher 6MWD% resulted in a lower risk of death or transplantation (hazard ratio 0.95 per percentage increase, p = 0.006). A receiver operating characteristic curve was generated to define the optimal threshold to identify patients at highest risk for an endpoint. Patients with a 6MWD% < 63% had a 2 year transplant-free survival of 73%, in contrast to a transplant-free survival of 92% in patients with a 6MWD% ≥ 63% (p = 0.003). In children with dilated cardiomyopathy, the 6 min walk test is a simple and feasible tool to identify children with a higher risk of death or heart transplantation.

  5. Anesthetic management of an elderly patient with kyphoscoliosis and dilated cardiomyopathy posted for abdominal hysterectomy and salpingo-oophorectomy

    PubMed Central

    Sood, Suvidha; Kamath, Manjunath R.; Shetty, Anil S.

    2015-01-01

    A 76-year-old kyphoscoliotic female patient presented with severe pain and sudden acute abdominal distension for 1-week and was diagnosed to have right-sided massive twisted ovarian cyst. The patient was a known case of hypertension, dilated cardiomyopathy with low 20% cardiac ejection fraction. Though very few incidences of multiple co-morbid conditions existing together in a single elderly patient have been reported in the past, it is important to titrate the dosage, type of anesthetic agents and their routes of administration in high risk patients. PMID:26543469

  6. Comparison of mortality rates and progression of left ventricular dysfunction in patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy and dilated versus nondilated right ventricular cavities.

    PubMed

    Sun, J P; James, K B; Yang, X S; Solankhi, N; Shah, M S; Arheart, K L; Thomas, J D; Stewart, W J

    1997-12-15

    This study assesses the influence of right ventricular (RV) dilation on the progression of left ventricular (LV) dysfunction and survival in patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (IDC). Using transthoracic echocardiography, we studied 100 patients with IDC aged 20 to 80 years (mean 55 +/- 14); 67% were men. In the apical 4-chamber view, diastolic LV and RV chamber area measurements classified patients into 2 groups: group RV enlargement+ (RV area/LV area > 0.5) included 54 patients; group RV enlargement- (no RV enlargement) had RV area/LV area < or = 0.5. Echocardiographic studies were repeated in all patients after a mean of 33 +/- 16 months. At the time of the initial study, the 2 groups did not differ in age, gender, incidence of atrial fibrillation and diabetes, left ventricular mass, and LV ejection fraction, but the RV enlargement+ group had more severe tricuspid regurgitation and less LV enlargement. After 47 +/- 22 months (range 12 to 96), patients in group RV enlargement+ had lower LV ejection fraction (29% vs 34%, p = 0.006) than patients with initial RV enlargement-. At clinical follow-up, mortality was higher (43%) in patients with initial RV enlargement+ than the RV enlargement- patients (15%), p = 0.002. For survivors, the mitral deceleration time averaged 157 +/- 36 ms; for nonsurvivors or patients who required transplant, the mitral deceleration time averaged 97 +/- 12 ms (p < 0.0001). With use of a multivariate Cox model adjusting for LV ejection fraction, LV size, and age, the relative risk ratio of mortality from initial RV enlargement+ was 4.4 (95% confidence limits 1.7 to 11.1) (p = 0.002). Thus, patients with significant RV dilation had nearly triple the mortality over 4 years and more rapidly deteriorating LV function than patients with less initial RV dilation. In IDC, RV enlargement is a strong marker for adverse prognosis that may represent a different morphologic subset.

  7. Cardiomyopathy

    MedlinePlus

    Cardiomyopathy is the name for diseases of the heart muscle. These diseases enlarge your heart muscle or ... tissue. Some people live long, healthy lives with cardiomyopathy. Some people don't even realize they have ...

  8. Myocardial imaging and metabolic studies with (/sup 17 -123/I)iodoheptadecanoic acid in patients with idiopathic congestive cardiomyopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Hoeck, A.; Freundlieb, C.; Vyska, K.; Loesse, B.; Erbel, R.; Feinendegen, L.E.

    1983-01-01

    In twenty patients with primary congestive cardiomyopathy (COCM) the patterns of accumulation and washout of the fatty acid analogue (/sup 17 -123/I)iodoheptadecanoic acid (I-123 HA) were studied. In contrast to patients with ischemic heart disease, where reduced I-123 HA accumulation was correlated with stenosis of the main coronary arteries, thus usually involving larger wall segments, the patients with COCM concentrated I-123 HA heterogeneously in small spotty segments throughout the entire left-ventricular myocardium. The regional washout half-times varied between 15.1 and 116.2 min. It seems that in patients with severe COCM the elimination half-times are more prolonged than in early stages of the disease. There was no correlation between the regional uptake and the elimination half-times. Sequential myocardial imaging with I-123 HA appears useful for noninvasively diagnosis of COCM.

  9. Identification of the molecular mechanisms underlying dilated cardiomyopathy via bioinformatic analysis of gene expression profiles

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hu; Yu, Zhuo; He, Jianchao; Hua, Baotong; Zhang, Guiming

    2017-01-01

    In the present study, gene expression profiles of patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) were re-analyzed with bioinformatics tools to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying DCM. Gene expression dataset GSE3585 was downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus, which included seven heart biopsy samples obtained from patients with DCM and five healthy controls. Differential analysis was performed using a Limma package in R to screen for differentially expressed genes (DEGs). Functional enrichment analysis was subsequently conducted for DEGs using the Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integration Discovery. A protein-protein interaction (PPI) network was constructed using information from Search Tool for the Retrieval of Interacting Genes software. A total of 89 DEGs were identified in the patients with DCM, including 67 upregulated and 22 downregulated genes. Functional enrichment analysis demonstrated that the downregulated genes predominantly encoded chromosomal proteins and transport-related proteins, which were significantly associated with the biological processes of ‘nucleosome assembly’, ‘chromatin assembly’, ‘protein-DNA complex assembly’, ‘nucleosome organization’ and ‘DNA packaging’ (H1 histone family member 0, histone cluster 1 H1c, histone cluster 1 H2bd and H2A histone family member Z). The upregulated genes detected in the present study encoded secreted proteins or phosphotransferase, which were associated with biological processes including ‘cell adhesion’ [connective tissue growth factor (CTGF)], ‘skeletal system development’ [CTGF and insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 (IGFBP3)], ‘muscle organ development’ (SMAD7) and ‘regulation of cell migration’ [SMAD7, IGFBP3 and insulin receptor (INSR)]. Notably, signal transducer and activator of transcription 3, SMAD7, INSR, CTGF, exportin 1, IGFBP3 and phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase, catalytic subunit alpha were hub nodes with the

  10. CD4+/CD25+ T-Lymphocytes and Th1/Th2 regulation in dilated cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Efthimiadis, I; Skendros, P; Sarantopoulos, A; Boura, P

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Autoimmune mechanisms are often involved in the pathogenesis of Dilated Cardiomyopathy (DCM) and Th1 immune response against cardiac antigens plays a pivotal role in disease development. Methods: IL-2 receptor (CD4+/CD25+) and cytokines IL-2, IFN-γ, IL-10 were studied in 42 patients (17 with DCM - DCM group, 10 patients with hypertrophic cardiac disease - HCD group, and 15 healthy volunteers - Control group). DCM group was subdivided in: DCM-1 (9 patients with recent disease onset) and DCM-2 (8 patients with chronic DCM). The % CD4+/CD25+ T-lymphocytes were analyzed by double fluorescence flow cytometry both ex vivo and after phytohaemagglutinin (PHA)-cultures with/without 5 and 10 microgr of human cardiac myosin. The cytokines were measured using Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbant Assay (ELISA) method. Results: Ex vivo analysis: In DCM group, CD4+/CD25+ T-cells significantly increased compared to other groups (p<0.05), due exclusively to DCM-2 subgroup (p=0.019). In PHA cultures in DCM-2 subgroup CD4+/CD25+ T-lymphocytes were significantly increased compared to all other groups (p<0.001). The addition of myosin in the cultures of DCM-2 subgroup maintained the same result. In cultures supernatants in DCM-2 subgroup, IL-2 levels were impressively increased compared to DCM-1 subgroup (p=5.91x10-6), HCD and Control groups (p<0.001). Addition of antigen decreased significantly IL-2 levels in DCM-2 subgroup (p=0.01). IFN-γ levels followed the same pattern of alterations. IL-10 levels were significantly increased in both DCM subgroups compared to HCD and Control groups (p<0.05). Conclusions: Increased peripheral CD4+/CD25+ T-cells found in chronic DCM could be a useful prognostic marker in DCM progress. Increased synthesis of IL-2 and IFN-γ and varying IL-10 levels reflects a Th1 pattern of immune response during chronic disease and implies active cellular immunity process, related to poor prognosis. Thus, analysis of the Th1/Th2 phenotype may be useful in disease

  11. E2F6 Impairs Glycolysis and Activates BDH1 Expression Prior to Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Major, Jennifer L.; Dewan, Aaraf; Salih, Maysoon; Leddy, John J.; Tuana, Balwant S.

    2017-01-01

    Rationale The E2F pathway plays a critical role in cardiac growth and development, yet its role in cardiac metabolism remains to be defined. Metabolic changes play important roles in human heart failure and studies imply the ketogenic enzyme β-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase I (BDH1) is a potential biomarker. Objective To define the role of the E2F pathway in cardiac metabolism and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) with a focus on BDH1. Methods and Results We previously developed transgenic (Tg) mice expressing the transcriptional repressor, E2F6, to interfere with the E2F/Rb pathway in post-natal myocardium. These Tg mice present with an E2F6 dose dependent DCM and deregulated connexin-43 (CX-43) levels in myocardium. Using the Seahorse platform, a 22% decrease in glycolysis was noted in neonatal cardiomyocytes isolated from E2F6-Tg hearts. This was associated with a 39% reduction in the glucose transporter GLUT4 and 50% less activation of the regulator of glucose metabolism AKT2. The specific reduction of cyclin B1 (70%) in Tg myocardium implicates its importance in supporting glycolysis in the postnatal heart. No changes in cyclin D expression (known to regulate mitochondrial activity) were noted and lipid metabolism remained unchanged in neonatal cardiomyocytes from Tg hearts. However, E2F6 induced a 40-fold increase of the Bdh1 transcript and 890% increase in its protein levels in hearts from Tg pups implying a potential impact on ketolysis. By contrast, BDH1 expression is not activated until adulthood in normal myocardium. Neonatal cardiomyocytes from Wt hearts incubated with the ketone β-hydroxybutyrate (β-OHB) showed a 100% increase in CX-43 protein levels, implying a role for ketone signaling in gap junction biology. Neonatal cardiomyocyte cultures from Tg hearts exhibited enhanced levels of BDH1 and CX-43 and were not responsive to β-OHB. Conclusions The data reveal a novel role for the E2F pathway in regulating glycolysis in the developing myocardium

  12. Association of tumor necrosis factor-α gene G-308A polymorphism with dilated cardiomyopathy: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Luo, Rong; Li, Xiaoping; Fan, Xiongwei; Yuan, Wuzhou; Wu, Xiushan

    2013-03-01

    Published data on the association between tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) G-308A gene polymorphism and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) risk are inconclusive. To clarify the association of TNF-α G-308A gene polymorphism and DCM, a meta-analysis of case-control studies was performed. Some databases, such as PubMed and Embase, were searched to indentify related studies. Search terms included dilated cardiomyopathy, tumor necrosis factor-alpha or TNF-α or TNF alpha or tumor necrosis factor alpha, and polymorphism or mutation. Eight case-control studies involving 1487 DCM cases and 1734 normal controls were included in the meta-analysis to assess the purported association between the TNF-α G-308A gene polymorphism and the risk of DCM. A dominant genetic model was used and the comparison of GA/AA genotype versus GG genotype was performed in the present meta-analysis. The odds ratio was 1.42 (95% confidence interval: 1.05, 1.93, P=0.02), manifesting frequency of the TNF-α-308 GA/AA genotype was higher in DCM patients than the control group. TNF-α G-308A nucleotide transition might be associated with the risk of DCM.

  13. A novel locus for autosomal-dominant dilated cardiomyopathy maps to chromosome 7q22.3-31.1.

    PubMed

    Schönberger, Jost; Kühler, Leif; Martins, Elisabete; Lindner, Tom H; Silva-Cardoso, Jose; Zimmer, Michael

    2005-12-01

    Inherited dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is a genetically and phenotypically very heterogeneous disease. DCM is caused by mutations in multiple genes encoding proteins that are involved in force generation, force transmission, energy production and several signalling pathways. Thus, the pathophysiology of heart failure is complex and not yet fully understood. Familial forms of DCM let the way to identify new key proteins by positional cloning and to study respective pathomechanisms that are critical for normal cardiac function, but may not have been correlated with heart disease before. Here we report a three-generation pedigree including 16 individuals affected by dilated cardiomyopathy without additional phenotypes. The pedigree is consistent with autosomal-dominant inheritance and age-related penetrance. A genome-wide linkage analysis excluded linkage to all known DCM genes and loci, whereas several close markers on chromosome 7q22.3-31.1 segregated with the disease (maximum logarithm of odds score, 4.20 at D7S471 and D7S501). The disease causing mutation lies in a 9.73 Mb interval between markers D7S2545 and D7S2554 that contains no known cytoskeletal genes. Coding exons of the candidate genes LAMB1, LAMB4 and PIK3CG were screened but no mutations were identified.

  14. Dilated cardiomyopathy due to type II X-linked 3-methylglutaconic aciduria: successful treatment with pantothenic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Ostman-Smith, I; Brown, G; Johnson, A; Land, J M

    1994-01-01

    A case of dilated cardiomyopathy in a young boy secondary to type II 3-methylglutaconic aciduria is described. A metabolic cause for his dilated cardiomyopathy was suspected because of the development on the electrocardiogram of an unusual "camel's hump" shape of the T waves, and of progressive thickening with increasing echogenicity of the left ventricular wall. He initially improved on digoxin treatment, but did not maintain the response with conventional dietary treatment for this condition. Supplementation with L-carnitine was associated with rapid deterioration in cardiac state, and may be contraindicated in this condition. At a point when the patient was moribund, large doses of pantothenic acid, a precursor of coenzyme A, produced a dramatic and sustained improvement in myocardial function and in growth, neutrophil cell count, hypocholesterolaemia, and hyperuricaemia, which suggests that limitation of availability of coenzyme A is a fundamental pathological process in this condition. The clinical improvement has been maintained for 13 months, and myocardial function is now nearly normal. Oral pantothenol, unlike pantothenic acid, is not efficacious. PMID:7833193

  15. Regional evidence of modulation of cardiac adiponectin level in dilated cardiomyopathy: pilot study in a porcine animal model

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The role of systemic and myocardial adiponectin (ADN) in dilated cardiomyopathy is still debated. We tested the regulation of both systemic and myocardial ADN and the relationship with AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity in a swine model of non-ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy. Methods and results Cardiac tissue was collected from seven instrumented adult male minipigs by pacing the left ventricular (LV) free wall (180 beats/min, 3 weeks), both from pacing (PS) and opposite sites (OS), and from five controls. Circulating ADN levels were inversely related to global and regional cardiac function. Myocardial ADN in PS was down-regulated compared to control (p < 0.05), yet ADN receptor 1 was significantly up-regulated (p < 0.05). No modifications of AMPK were observed in either region of the failing heart. Similarly, myocardial mRNA levels of PPARγ, PPARα, TNFα, iNOS were unchanged compared to controls. Conclusions Paradoxically, circulating ADN did not show any cardioprotective effect, confirming its role as negative prognostic biomarker of heart failure. Myocardial ADN was reduced in PS compared to control in an AMPK-independent fashion, suggesting the occurrence of novel mechanisms by which reduced cardiac ADN levels may regionally mediate the decline of cardiac function. PMID:23164042

  16. Chronic alcohol consumption from adolescence-to-adulthood in mice - hypothalamic gene expression changes in the dilated cardiomyopathy signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Adolescence is a developmental stage vulnerable to alcohol drinking-related problems and the onset of alcoholism. Hypothalamus is a key brain region for food and water intake regulation, and is one of the alcohol-sensitive brain regions. However, it is not known what would be the alcohol effect on hypothalamus following adolescent alcohol intake, chronically over the adolescent development, at moderate levels. Results We employed a paradigm of chronic moderate alcohol intake from adolescence-to-adulthood in mice, and analyzed the alcohol effect on both behavioral and hypothalamic gene expression changes. A total of 751 genes were found and subjected to pathway analysis. The dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) pathway was identified. The changes of ten genes under this pathway were further verified using RT-PCR. Chronic alcohol consumption during adolescence, even at moderate levels, led to a decrease of motor activity in mice, and also a concerted down regulation of signaling pathway initiating factor (SPIF) genes in the DCM signaling pathway, including β1-adrenergic receptor (Adrb1), Gs protein (Gnas), adenylyl cyclase 1 (Adcy1), and dihydropyridine receptor/L-type calcium channel (Cacna1d). Conclusions These findings suggest that adolescent alcohol intake may trigger gene expression changes in the CNS that parallel those found in the dilated cardiomyopathy signaling pathway. If such effects also take place in humans, our findings would serve as a warning against alcohol intake in youth, such as by teens and/or college students. PMID:24884436

  17. Left ventricular assist for pediatric patients with dilated cardiomyopathy using the Medos VAD cannula and a centrifugal pump.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shu-Chien; Chi, Nai-Hsin; Chen, Chun-An; Chen, Yih-Sharng; Chou, Nai-Kuan; Ko, Wen-Je; Wang, Shoei-Shen

    2009-11-01

    Ventricular assist devices for small pediatric patients are expensive and commercially unavailable in Taiwan. We used the Medos ventricular assist device cannula (Medos, Aachen, Germany) and a centrifugal pump to support pediatric patients with dilated cardiomyopathy and decompensated heart failure. From January 2007 to December 2008, three pediatric patients with dilated cardiomyopathy were supported using a centrifugal pump as the left ventricular assist device. The Medos arterial cannula was sutured to the ascending aorta, and the Apex cannula was fixed into the left ventricular apex. When the patient was weaned off of cardiopulmonary bypass, the left ventricular assist device pump was started. The pump flow was gradually titrated according to the filling status of the left ventricle. All the left ventricular assist devices were successfully implanted and functioned well. Two patients on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation had severe lung edema before left ventricular assist device implantation. Both patients required extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for the postoperative period until the pulmonary edema was resolved. Among the three patients, two successfully bridged to heart transplantation after support for 6 and 11 days, respectively. The first patient (10 kg) expired due to systemic emboli 30 days after left ventricular assist device support. In summary, these results suggest that the Medos ventricular assist device cannula and a centrifugal pump is an option for temporary left ventricular assist device support in patients with intractable heart failure and as a bridge to heart transplantation.

  18. Cardiomyocyte-Specific Ablation of Med1 Subunit of the Mediator Complex Causes Lethal Dilated Cardiomyopathy in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Yuzhi; Chang, Hsiang-Chun; Schipma, Matthew J.; Liu, Jing; Shete, Varsha; Liu, Ning; Sato, Tatsuya; Thorp, Edward B.; Barger, Philip M.; Zhu, Yi-Jun; Viswakarma, Navin; Kanwar, Yashpal S.; Ardehali, Hossein; Thimmapaya, Bayar; Reddy, Janardan K.

    2016-01-01

    Mediator, an evolutionarily conserved multi-protein complex consisting of about 30 subunits, is a key component of the polymerase II mediated gene transcription. Germline deletion of the Mediator subunit 1 (Med1) of the Mediator in mice results in mid-gestational embryonic lethality with developmental impairment of multiple organs including heart. Here we show that cardiomyocyte-specific deletion of Med1 in mice (csMed1-/-) during late gestational and early postnatal development by intercrossing Med1fl/fl mice to α-MyHC-Cre transgenic mice results in lethality within 10 days after weaning due to dilated cardiomyopathy-related ventricular dilation and heart failure. The csMed1-/- mouse heart manifests mitochondrial damage, increased apoptosis and interstitial fibrosis. Global gene expression analysis revealed that loss of Med1 in heart down-regulates more than 200 genes including Acadm, Cacna1s, Atp2a2, Ryr2, Pde1c, Pln, PGC1α, and PGC1β that are critical for calcium signaling, cardiac muscle contraction, arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, dilated cardiomyopathy and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor regulated energy metabolism. Many genes essential for oxidative phosphorylation and proper mitochondrial function such as genes coding for the succinate dehydrogenase subunits of the mitochondrial complex II are also down-regulated in csMed1-/- heart contributing to myocardial injury. Data also showed up-regulation of about 180 genes including Tgfb2, Ace, Atf3, Ctgf, Angpt14, Col9a2, Wisp2, Nppa, Nppb, and Actn1 that are linked to cardiac muscle contraction, cardiac hypertrophy, cardiac fibrosis and myocardial injury. Furthermore, we demonstrate that cardiac specific deletion of Med1 in adult mice using tamoxifen-inducible Cre approach (TmcsMed1-/-), results in rapid development of cardiomyopathy and death within 4 weeks. We found that the key findings of the csMed1-/- studies described above are highly reproducible in TmcsMed1-/- mouse heart

  19. NT-proBNP in Children With Left to Right Shunt and Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Koura, Hala Mahmoud; Abdalla, Neamat M.; Hamed Ibrahim, Mona; Abo Hashish, Maha M. A.; Zaki, Sherif Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Background B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels are elevated in children with congenital heart disease involving a left-to-right shunt (LRS) and are also raised in dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). As far as we know, there are few reports in the literature comparing the change of the NT-proBNP in LRS and DCM especially in the pediatric age group. Objectives The aim of the study was to compare the changes of the NT-proBNP in pediatric patients with LRS and DCM. Correlation between the levels of NT-proBNP and the echocardiographic parameters in both groups was determined. Patients and Methods A total of 30 children (13 males and 17 females) participated in the study. There were 11/30 (36.7%) DCM and 19/30 (63.3%) LRS. The control group consisted of 44 healthy infants and children. Manifestations of heart failure (decompensation) were recorded. The NT-pro BNP levels were measured. The following Echo parameters were assessed: systolic function (ejection fraction and fraction shortening), pulmonary to systemic flow (Qp/Qs) in LRS, pulmonary flow and pulmonary artery pressure (SPAP) and LV diastolic function (E-wave, A-wave, E/A ratio and deceleration time). Results Clinically 17/30 (56.7%) (11 of the LRS and 5 of the DCM) were decompensated. Significant shunt was present in 15/19 (78.9%) in LRS. Systolic dysfunction was presented in 5/30 (16.7%) cases (4 patients were DCM and one case was LRS). Two types of diastolic dysfunction, impaired relaxation in 5/22 (22.7%) patients and restrictive-like filling pattern in 5/16 (31.2 %) were observed. The NT-Pro BNP level was significantly elevated 11 and 16 times in the LRS and DCM groups respectively. Negative significant correlations were observed between the levels of NT-ProBNP and the following echo variables; EDD, LAD, E wave and E/A ratio in the LRS patients. Positive significant correlations were observed between the levels of NT-ProBNP and the following echo variables; PAP and QP/QS in the LRS. Both the PAP and QP/QS were

  20. Modeling and study of the mechanism of dilated cardiomyopathy using induced pluripotent stem cells derived from individuals with Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Bo; Li, Yang; Han, Lu; Kaplan, Aaron D.; Ao, Ying; Kalra, Spandan; Bett, Glenna C. L.; Rasmusson, Randall L.; Denning, Chris; Yang, Lei

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene (DMD), and is characterized by progressive weakness in skeletal and cardiac muscles. Currently, dilated cardiomyopathy due to cardiac muscle loss is one of the major causes of lethality in late-stage DMD patients. To study the molecular mechanisms underlying dilated cardiomyopathy in DMD heart, we generated cardiomyocytes (CMs) from DMD and healthy control induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). DMD iPSC-derived CMs (iPSC-CMs) displayed dystrophin deficiency, as well as the elevated levels of resting Ca2+, mitochondrial damage and cell apoptosis. Additionally, we found an activated mitochondria-mediated signaling network underlying the enhanced apoptosis in DMD iPSC-CMs. Furthermore, when we treated DMD iPSC-CMs with the membrane sealant Poloxamer 188, it significantly decreased the resting cytosolic Ca2+ level, repressed caspase-3 (CASP3) activation and consequently suppressed apoptosis in DMD iPSC-CMs. Taken together, using DMD patient-derived iPSC-CMs, we established an in vitro model that manifests the major phenotypes of dilated cardiomyopathy in DMD patients, and uncovered a potential new disease mechanism. Our model could be used for the mechanistic study of human muscular dystrophy, as well as future preclinical testing of novel therapeutic compounds for dilated cardiomyopathy in DMD patients. PMID:25791035

  1. Modeling and study of the mechanism of dilated cardiomyopathy using induced pluripotent stem cells derived from individuals with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Lin, Bo; Li, Yang; Han, Lu; Kaplan, Aaron D; Ao, Ying; Kalra, Spandan; Bett, Glenna C L; Rasmusson, Randall L; Denning, Chris; Yang, Lei

    2015-05-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene (DMD), and is characterized by progressive weakness in skeletal and cardiac muscles. Currently, dilated cardiomyopathy due to cardiac muscle loss is one of the major causes of lethality in late-stage DMD patients. To study the molecular mechanisms underlying dilated cardiomyopathy in DMD heart, we generated cardiomyocytes (CMs) from DMD and healthy control induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). DMD iPSC-derived CMs (iPSC-CMs) displayed dystrophin deficiency, as well as the elevated levels of resting Ca(2+), mitochondrial damage and cell apoptosis. Additionally, we found an activated mitochondria-mediated signaling network underlying the enhanced apoptosis in DMD iPSC-CMs. Furthermore, when we treated DMD iPSC-CMs with the membrane sealant Poloxamer 188, it significantly decreased the resting cytosolic Ca(2+) level, repressed caspase-3 (CASP3) activation and consequently suppressed apoptosis in DMD iPSC-CMs. Taken together, using DMD patient-derived iPSC-CMs, we established an in vitro model that manifests the major phenotypes of dilated cardiomyopathy in DMD patients, and uncovered a potential new disease mechanism. Our model could be used for the mechanistic study of human muscular dystrophy, as well as future preclinical testing of novel therapeutic compounds for dilated cardiomyopathy in DMD patients.

  2. Retrospective evaluation of antibody index of human parvovirus B19 as a prognostic factor in patients with dilated and ischemic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Zedtwitz-Liebenstein, Konstantin; Robak, Oliver; Burgmann, Heinz; Frass, Michael

    2013-06-01

    Cardiotropic viral infections are important causative factors in dilated cardiomyopathy. This retrospective study examined the antibody index for human parvovirus B19 in patients suffering from dilated or ischemic cardiomyopathy as a prognostic factor for stable left ventricular function. Blood specimens from 43 patients with the diagnosis of dilated or ischemic cardiomyopathy were analyzed for human parvovirus B19 by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and enzyme immunoassay kit for qualitative determination of IgG and IgM antibodies. To exclude patients with acute myocarditis, only patients with onset of symptoms more than 4 months previously were included. Patients with dilated cardiomyopathy and a high antibody index showed a significantly better clinical outcome when compared to patients with a low IgG antibody index (8.5 ± 2.4 vs. 3.1 ± 2.6; P = 0.006). There was no significant difference in left ventricular ejection fraction between patients with a high antibody index and patients with a lower antibody index (P = 0.59). The presence of human parvovirus B19 antibodies is associated with protective immunity. A high antibody index seems to be a good prognostic factor for the disease correlating to a relatively stable left ventricular ejection fraction.

  3. Symptomatic cardiomyopathy as a presentation in Whipple's disease.

    PubMed Central

    de Takats, P. G.; de Takats, D. L.; Iqbal, T. H.; Watson, R. D.; Sheppard, M. N.; Cooper, B. T.

    1995-01-01

    A patient presenting with congestive cardiac failure and anaemia underwent investigation which led to the diagnosis of Whipple's disease, associated with dilated cardiomyopathy. Conventional antibiotic therapy for Whipple's disease resulted in resolution of the traditional features of Whipple's disease and a marked improvement in the patient's heart failure. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:7540301

  4. Comparison of Ventricular Inducibility with Late Gadolinium Enhancement and Myocardial Inflammation in Endomyocardial Biopsy in Patients with Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Karin A. L.; Heck, Christian; Heinzmann, David; Schwille, Johannes; Klingel, Karin; Kandolf, Reinhard; Kramer, Ulrich; Gramlich, Michael; Geisler, Tobias; Gawaz, Meinrad P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Risk stratification of patients with non-ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy remains a matter of debate in the era of device implantation. Objective We investigated associations between histopathological findings, contrast-enhanced cardiac MRI and the inducibility of ventricular tachycardia (VT) or fibrillation (VF) in programmed ventricular stimulation. Methods 56 patients with impaired left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF≤50%, mean 36.6±10.5%) due to non-ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy underwent cardiac MRI, programmed ventricular stimulation, and endomyocardial biopsy and were retrospectively investigated. Inducibility was defined as sustained mono- or polymorphic VT or unstable VT/VF requiring cardioversion/defibrillation. Primary study endpoint was defined as the occurrence of hemodynamically relevant VT/VF and/or adequate ICD-therapy during follow-up. Results Endomyocardial biopsy detected cardiac fibrosis in 18 (32.1%) patients. Cardiac MRI revealed 35 (62.5%) patients with positive late gadolinium enhancement. VT/VF was induced in ten (17.9%) patients during programmed ventricular stimulation. Monomorphic VT was inducible in 70%, while 20% of patients showed polymorphic VT. One patient (10%) presented with VF. Inducibility correlated significantly with the presence of positive late gadolinium enhancement in cardiac MRI (p<0.01). We could not find a significant association between inducibility and the degree of cardiac inflammation and fibrosis in non-site directed routine right ventricular endomyocardial biopsy. During a mean follow-up of 2.6 years, nine (16.1%) patients reached the primary endpoint. Monomorphic VTs were found in 66.7% patients and were terminated by antitachycardia pacing therapy. One patient with polymorphic VT and two patients with VF received adequate therapy by an ICD-shock. However, inducibility did not correlate with the occurrence of endpoints. Conclusion Inducibilty during programmed ventricular stimulation is

  5. Doxorubicin-induced dilated cardiomyopathy for modified radical mastectomy: A case managed under cervical epidural anaesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Anuj; Kishore, Kamal

    2013-01-01

    Doxorubicin (Dox) is an antineoplastic agent used in a wide variety of malignancies. Its use is limited because of a cumulative, dose-dependent irreversible cardiomyopathy. We report a case of Dox induced cardiomyopathy, posted for modified radical mastectomy. The patient had poor LV function along with moderate pulmonary hypertension. Regional anaesthesia was planned as the risk associated with general anaesthesia was more. A cervical epidural was placed and a block adequate for surgery could be achived. The haemodynamic parameters as measured by esophageal doppler showed a stable trend. The surgery could be managed well under cervical epidural and also provided a good postoperative pain relief. PMID:23825820

  6. Five-week use of a monopivot centrifugal blood pump as a right ventricular assist device in severe dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Takamichi; Kitamura, Tadashi; Torii, Shinzo; Hanayama, Naoji; Oka, Norihiko; Itatani, Keiichi; Tomoyasu, Takahiro; Irisawa, Yusuke; Shibata, Miyuki; Hayashi, Hidenori; Ono, Minoru; Miyaji, Kagami

    2014-03-01

    Right heart failure is a critical complication in patients requiring mechanical ventricular support. However, it is often difficult to provide adequate right ventricular support in the acute phase. A 41-year-old woman diagnosed with dilated cardiomyopathy with severe right heart failure underwent implantation of a paracorporeal pulsatile left ventricular assist device (LVAD, Nipro Corporation, Tokyo, Japan) and a MERA monopivot centrifugal pump (Senko Medical Instrument Manufacturing Co., Ltd., Tokyo, Japan) as a right ventricular assist device (RVAD). The patient developed ischemic enteritis 3 weeks after surgery, necessitating fasting and reversal of anticoagulation therapy. A target international normalized ratio of 1.5 was selected, and aspirin administration was discontinued. Following recovery without thromboembolic events, the patient failed the RVAD discontinuation test. Five weeks after surgery, the monopivot centrifugal pump was exchanged for a pulsatile pump. No thrombus was evident on the centrifugal pump. The patient was undergoing cardiac rehabilitation at the time of this writing and awaiting heart transplantation.

  7. HEART DISEASE. Titin mutations in iPS cells define sarcomere insufficiency as a cause of dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Hinson, John T; Chopra, Anant; Nafissi, Navid; Polacheck, William J; Benson, Craig C; Swist, Sandra; Gorham, Joshua; Yang, Luhan; Schafer, Sebastian; Sheng, Calvin C; Haghighi, Alireza; Homsy, Jason; Hubner, Norbert; Church, George; Cook, Stuart A; Linke, Wolfgang A; Chen, Christopher S; Seidman, J G; Seidman, Christine E

    2015-08-28

    Human mutations that truncate the massive sarcomere protein titin [TTN-truncating variants (TTNtvs)] are the most common genetic cause for dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), a major cause of heart failure and premature death. Here we show that cardiac microtissues engineered from human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are a powerful system for evaluating the pathogenicity of titin gene variants. We found that certain missense mutations, like TTNtvs, diminish contractile performance and are pathogenic. By combining functional analyses with RNA sequencing, we explain why truncations in the A-band domain of TTN cause DCM, whereas truncations in the I band are better tolerated. Finally, we demonstrate that mutant titin protein in iPS cell-derived cardiomyocytes results in sarcomere insufficiency, impaired responses to mechanical and β-adrenergic stress, and attenuated growth factor and cell signaling activation. Our findings indicate that titin mutations cause DCM by disrupting critical linkages between sarcomerogenesis and adaptive remodeling.

  8. Influence of Mechanical Circulatory Support on Endothelin Receptor Expression in Human Left Ventricular Myocardium from Patients with Dilated Cardiomyopathy (DCM)

    PubMed Central

    Gärtner, Florian; Abraham, Getu; Kassner, Astrid; Baurichter, Daniela; Milting, Hendrik

    2017-01-01

    Background In terminal failing hearts ventricular assist devices (VAD) are implanted as a bridge to transplantation. Endothelin receptor (ETR) antagonists are used for treatment of secondary pulmonary hypertension in VAD patients. However, the cardiac ETR regulation in human heart failure and during VAD support is incompletely understood. Methods In paired left ventricular samples of 12 dilated cardiomyopathy patients we investigated the density of endothelin A (ETA) and B (ETB) receptors before VAD implantation and after device removal. Left ventricular samples of 12 non-failing donor hearts served as control. Receptor quantification was performed by binding of [125I]-ET-1 in the presence of nonselective and ETA selective ETR ligands as competitors. Additionally, the ETR mRNA expression was analyzed using quantitative real-time-PCR. Results The mRNA of ETA but not ETB receptors was significantly elevated in heart failure, whereas total ETR density analyzed by radioligand binding was significantly reduced due to ETB receptor down regulation. ETA and ETB receptor density showed poor correlation to mRNA data (spearman correlation factor: 0.43 and 0.31, respectively). VAD support had no significant impact on the density of both receptors and on mRNA expression of ETA whereas ETB mRNA increased during VAD. A meta-analysis reveals that the ETA receptor regulation in human heart failure appears to depend on non-failing hearts. Conclusions In deteriorating hearts of patients suffering from dilated cardiomyopathy the ETA receptor density is not changed whereas the ETB receptor is down regulated. The mRNA and the proteins of ETA and ETB show a weak correlation. Non-failing hearts might influence the interpretation of ETA receptor regulation. Mechanical unloading of the failing hearts has no impact on the myocardial ETR density. PMID:28095452

  9. Severity of mitral regurgitation predicts risk of death or cardiac transplantation in children with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Patange, Amit; Thomas, Ronald; Ross, Robert D

    2014-02-01

    Clinical outcomes among children with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (IDC) are diverse, which makes the decision as to when a patient should be listed for a cardiac transplantation challenging. This study aimed to determine echocardiographic and clinical variables that can help clinicians identify those at highest risk for death or cardiac transplantation. The study was a single-center, retrospective chart review of children with IDC. Patients younger than 18 years with a diagnosis of IDC, as defined by a left ventricular end-diastolic dimension (LVEDD) z-score higher than 2, and fractional shortening of less than 28 % on the initial echocardiogram, were included in the study. Echocardiographic parameters including mitral regurgitation (MR) grade and certain clinical parameters at the time of presentation were assessed. A follow-up echocardiogram was similarly studied. The study included 49 children with IDC. Those who died or underwent cardiac transplantation were grouped as "nonsurvivors" (n = 26). The remaining children who either completely recovered or experienced chronic dilated cardiomyopathy were grouped as "survivors" (n = 23). The median age overall was 1.25 years (range 0.1-17 years). The follow-up echocardiograms of the survivors showed significant improvement in left ventricle size, systolic function, left atrial volume, and MR grade, whereas these parameters did not change in the nonsurvivor group. The use of inotropic medications at initial presentation was an independent predictor of death or cardiac transplantation (p < 0.05). The presence of moderate to severe MR at diagnosis also was predictive of a worse outcome.

  10. A Role for Toll-like Receptor 3 Variants in Host Susceptibility to Enteroviral Myocarditis and Dilated Cardiomyopathy*

    PubMed Central

    Gorbea, Carlos; Makar, Kimberly A.; Pauschinger, Matthias; Pratt, Gregory; Bersola, Jeathrina L. F.; Varela, Jacquelin; David, Ryan M.; Banks, Lori; Huang, Chien-Hua; Li, Hua; Schultheiss, Heinz-Peter; Towbin, Jeffrey A.; Vallejo, Jesús G.; Bowles, Neil E.

    2010-01-01

    The innate antiviral response is mediated, at least in part, by Toll-like receptors (TLRs). TLR3 signaling is activated in response to viral infection, and the absence of TLR3 in mice significantly increases mortality after infection with enteroviruses that cause myocarditis and/or dilated cardiomyopathy. We screened TLR3 in patients diagnosed with enteroviral myocarditis/cardiomyopathy and identified a rare variant in one patient as well as a significantly increased occurrence of a common polymorphism compared with controls. Expression of either variant resulted in significantly reduced TLR3-mediated signaling after stimulation with synthetic double-stranded RNA. Furthermore, Coxsackievirus B3 infection of cell lines expressing mutated TLR3 abrogated activation of the type I interferon pathway, leading to increased viral replication. TLR3-mediated type I interferon signaling required cellular autophagy and was suppressed by 3-methyladenine and bafilomycin A1, by inhibitors of lysosomal proteolysis, and by reduced expression of Beclin 1, Atg5, or microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3β (MAP1LC3β). However, TLR3-mediated signaling was restored upon exogenous expression of Beclin 1 or a variant MAP1LC3β fusion protein refractory to RNA interference. These data suggest that individuals harboring these variants may have a blunted innate immune response to enteroviral infection, leading to reduced viral clearance and an increased risk of cardiac pathology. PMID:20472559

  11. Connective Tissue Growth Factor Regulates Cardiac Function and Tissue Remodeling in a Mouse Model of Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Koshman, Yevgeniya E.; Sternlicht, Mark D.; Kim, Taehoon; O'Hara, Christopher P.; Koczor, Christopher A.; Lewis, William; Seeley, Todd W.; Lipson, Kenneth E.; Samarel, Allen M.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac structural changes associated with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) include cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and myocardial fibrosis. Connective Tissue Growth Factor (CTGF) has been associated with tissue remodeling and is highly expressed in failing hearts. Our aim was to test if inhibition of CTGF would alter the course of cardiac remodeling and preserve cardiac function in the protein kinase Cε (PKCε) mouse model of DCM. Transgenic mice expressing constitutively active PKCε in cardiomyocytes develop cardiac dysfunction that was evident by 3 months of age, and that progressed to cardiac fibrosis, heart failure, and increased mortality. Beginning at 3 months of age, PKCε mice were treated with a neutralizing monoclonal antibody to CTGF (FG-3149) for an additional 3 months. CTGF inhibition significantly improved left ventricular (LV) systolic and diastolic function in PKCε mice, and slowed the progression of LV dilatation. Using gene arrays and quantitative PCR, the expression of many genes associated with tissue remodeling were elevated in PKCε mice, but significantly decreased by CTGF inhibition. However total collagen deposition was not attenuated. The observation of significantly improved LV function by CTGF inhibition in PKCε mice suggests that CTGF inhibition may benefit patients with DCM. Additional studies to explore this potential are warranted. PMID:26549358

  12. Functional networks of nucleocytoplasmic transport-related genes differentiate ischemic and dilated cardiomyopathies. A new therapeutic opportunity.

    PubMed

    Molina-Navarro, María Micaela; Triviño, Juan Carlos; Martínez-Dolz, Luis; Lago, Francisca; González-Juanatey, Jose Ramón; Portolés, Manuel; Rivera, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Heart failure provokes alterations in the expression of nucleocytoplasmic transport-related genes. To elucidate the nucleocytoplasmic transport-linked functional network underlying the two major causes of heart failure, ischemic cardiomyopathy (ICM) and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), we examined global transcriptome profiles of left ventricular myocardium tissue samples from 31 patients (ICM, n = 10; DCM, n = 13) undergoing heart transplantation and control donors (CNT, n = 8) using RNA-Sequencing and GeneMANIA. Comparative profiling of ICM versus control and DCM versus control showed 1081 and 2440 differentially expressed genes, respectively (>1.29-fold; P<0.05). GeneMANIA revealed differentially regulated functional networks specific to ICM and DCM. In comparison with CNT, differential expression was seen in 9 and 12 nucleocytoplasmic transport-related genes in ICM and DCM groups, respectively. DDX3X, KPNA2, and PTK2B were related to ICM, while SMURF2, NUP153, IPO5, RANBP3, NOXA1, and RHOJ were involved in DCM pathogenesis. Furthermore, the two pathologies shared 6 altered genes: XPO1, ARL4, NFKB2, FHL3, RANBP2, and RHOU showing an identical trend in expression in both ICM and DCM. Notably, the core of the derived functional networks composed of nucleocytoplasmic transport-related genes (XPO1, RANBP2, NUP153, IPO5, KPNA2, and RANBP3) branched into several pathways with downregulated genes. Moreover, we identified genes whose expression levels correlated with left ventricular mass index and left ventricular function parameters in HF patients. Collectively, our study provides a clear distinction between the two pathologies at the transcriptome level and opens up new possibilities to search for appropriate therapeutic targets for ICM and DCM.

  13. Beneficial effect of muscarinic-2 antagonist on dilated cardiomyopathy induced by autoimmune mechanism against muscarinic-2 receptor.

    PubMed

    Matsui, S; Fu, M L; Hayase, M; Katsuda, S; Yamaguchi, N; Teraoka, K; Kurihara, T; Takekoshi, N

    2001-10-01

    We have previously shown that a peptide corresponding to the sequence of the second extracellular loop of the human muscarinic-2 (M2) receptor (M2-peptide) was able to induce an autoimmune cardiomyopathy in rabbits. In this study, we investigated the effect of M2-antagonist (otenzepad) on M2-peptide-induced cardiomyopathy in rabbits. New Zealand White rabbits were divided into four groups: 1) control group, saline injection; 2) M2-peptide group, M2-peptide injection; 3) M2-antagonist group, otenzepad (30 mg/day) orally and saline injection; and (4) M2-antagonist + M2-peptide group, otenzepad (30 mg/day) orally and M2-peptide injection. The study duration was 1 year. Saline or peptide was injected once a month. All rabbits in both the M2-peptide group and the M2-antagonist + M2-peptide group had high titers of anti-M2-autoantibodies in their sera. Rabbits in the M2-peptide group showed an increase in heart weight, wall thinning and dilatation of the right ventricle. On the contrary, rabbits in the M2-antagonist + M2-peptide group had normal heart weight and shape. All rabbits in the M2-peptide group showed multifocal degeneration and necrosis of myocardial cells with moderate infiltration of inflammatory cells, while four rabbits in the M2-antagonist + M2-peptide group showed slight infiltration of inflammatory cells with normal myocardial cells and interstitium, and another three showed no histological changes in the hearts. In conclusion, M2-antagonist protects the myocardium from injury induced by autoimmune mechanism against M2-muscarinic receptor.

  14. [Ultrastructural changes of neutrophilic granulocytes in dilated cardiomyopathy and their dynamics after blood irradiation with Helium-Neon laser in vitro].

    PubMed

    Khomeriki, S G; Morozov, I A

    1998-01-01

    Venous blood from 10 patients with dilated cardiomyopathy was irradiated with a laser in vitro. The control group consisted of 20 healthy donors. The neutrophil granulocytes were separated at gradient centrifugation. Alterations of neutrophils manifested with an increase of specific cytoplasmic granules number, thickening of submembrane actin, cell configuration changes with a relative increase of their surface. Laser irradiation of the blood resulted in destruction of the altered (less resistant) cells while morphometric parameters of the remaining cells approaches those of donor cells. Thus, low-intensity laser irradiation results in the renewal of the neutrophil population in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy and normalization of structural-functional changes in the circulating neutrophil population.

  15. Successful Delivery by a Cesarean Section in a Parturient with Severe Dilated Cardiomyopathy, an Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator, and a Repaired Tetralogy of Fallot

    PubMed Central

    Al-Aqeedi, Rafid Fayadh; Alnabti, Abdulrahman; Al-Ani, Fuad; Dabdoob, Wafer; Abdullatef, Waleed Khalid

    2011-01-01

    Repaired congenital heart disease has become more prevalent in women of childbearing age. We report an unusual case of a 24-year-old multigravida with a repaired tetralogy of Fallot, severe dilated cardiomyopathy, and implantable cardioverter defibrillator placement who was managed successfully by a cesarean section three times. This case underscores the impact of such events on maternal and fetal safety and the importance of a multidisciplinary approach in the management of pregnant patients with complex congenital and medical problems. PMID:21731806

  16. Novel Familial Dilated Cardiomyopathy Mutation in MYL2 Affects the Structure and Function of Myosin Regulatory Light Chain

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wenrui; Liang, Jingsheng; Yuan, Chen-Ching; Kazmierczak, Katarzyna; Zhou, Zhiqun; Morales, Ana; McBride, Kim L.; Fitzgerald-Butt, Sara M.; Hershberger, Ray E.; Szczesna-Cordary, Danuta

    2015-01-01

    Dilated Cardiomyopathy (DCM) is a disease of the myocardium characterized by left ventricular dilatation and diminished contractile function. In this report we describe a novel DCM mutation identified for the first time in the myosin regulatory light chain (RLC), replacing Aspartic Acid at position 94 with Alanine (D94A). The mutation was identified by exome sequencing of three adult first-degree relatives who met formal criteria for idiopathic DCM. To gain insight into the functional significance of this pathogenic MYL2 variant, we have cloned and purified the human ventricular RLC wild-type (WT) and D94A-mutant proteins and performed in vitro experiments using RLC-exchanged porcine cardiac preparations. The mutation was observed to induce a reduction in the α-helical content of the RLC and imposed intra-molecular rearrangements. The Ca2+-calmodulin-activated myosin light chain kinase phosphorylation of RLC was not affected by D94A. The mutation was seen to impair the binding of RLC to the MHC (myosin heavy chain), and its incorporation into the RLC-depleted porcine myosin. The actin-activated ATPase activity of mutant-reconstituted porcine cardiac myosin was significantly higher compared to ATPase of WT. No changes in myofibrillar ATPase-pCa relationship were observed in WT- or D94A-reconstituted preparations. Measurements of contractile force showed a slightly reduced maximal tension per cross-section of muscle with no change in calcium sensitivity of force in D94A-reconstituted skinned porcine papillary muscle strips compared with WT. Our data indicate that subtle structural rearrangements in the RLC molecule followed by its impaired interaction with the MHC may trigger functional abnormalities contributing to the DCM phenotype. PMID:25825243

  17. Direct evidence for a β1-adrenergic receptor–directed autoimmune attack as a cause of idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Jahns, Roland; Boivin, Valérie; Hein, Lutz; Triebel, Sven; Angermann, Christiane E.; Ertl, Georg; Lohse, Martin J.

    2004-01-01

    Today, dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) represents the main cause of severe heart failure and disability in younger adults and thus is a challenge for public health. About 30% of DCM cases are genetic in origin; however, the large majority of cases are sporadic, and a viral or immune pathogenesis is suspected. Following the established postulates for pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases, here we provide direct evidence that an autoimmune attack directed against the cardiac β1-adrenergic receptor may play a causal role in DCM. First, we immunized inbred rats against the second extracellular β1-receptor loop (β1-ECII; 100% sequence identity between human and rat) every month. All these rats developed first, receptor-stimulating anti–β1-ECII Ab’s and then, after 9 months, progressive severe left ventricular dilatation and dysfunction. Second, we transferred sera from anti–β1-ECII–positive and Ab-negative animals every month to healthy rats of the same strain. Strikingly, all anti–β1-ECII–transferred rats also developed a similar cardiomyopathic phenotype within a similar time frame, underlining the pathogenic potential of these receptor Ab’s. As a consequence, β1-adrenergic receptor–targeted autoimmune DCM should now be categorized with other known receptor Ab-mediated autoimmune diseases, such as Graves disease or myasthenia gravis. Although carried out in an experimental animal model, our findings should further encourage the development of therapeutic strategies that combat harmful anti–β1-ECII in receptor Ab–positive DCM patients. PMID:15146239

  18. Gene-Targeted Mice with the Human Troponin T R141W Mutation Develop Dilated Cardiomyopathy with Calcium Desensitization

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Ravi K.; Wang, David Wen Rui; Smith, Stephen H.; Banerjee, Sanjay K.; Huang, Xueyin N.; Gifford, Lindsey M.; Pruce, Michele L.; Gabris, Bethann E.; Saba, Samir; Shroff, Sanjeev G.; Ahmad, Ferhaan

    2016-01-01

    Most studies of the mechanisms leading to hereditary dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) have been performed in reconstituted in vitro systems. Genetically engineered murine models offer the opportunity to dissect these mechanisms in vivo. We generated a gene-targeted knock-in murine model of the autosomal dominant Arg141Trp (R141W) mutation in Tnnt2, which was first described in a human family with DCM. Mice heterozygous for the mutation (Tnnt2R141W/+) recapitulated the human phenotype, developing left ventricular dilation and reduced contractility. There was a gene dosage effect, so that the phenotype in Tnnt2R141W/+mice was attenuated by transgenic overexpression of wildtype Tnnt2 mRNA transcript. Male mice exhibited poorer survival than females. Biomechanical studies on skinned fibers from Tnnt2R141W/+ hearts showed a significant decrease in pCa50 (-log[Ca2+] required for generation of 50% of maximal force) relative to wildtype hearts, indicating Ca2+ desensitization. Optical mapping studies of Langendorff-perfused Tnnt2R141W/+ hearts showed marked increases in diastolic and peak systolic intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i), and prolonged systolic rise and diastolic fall of [Ca2+]i. Perfused Tnnt2R141W/+ hearts had slower intrinsic rates in sinus rhythm and reduced peak heart rates in response to isoproterenol. Tnnt2R141W/+ hearts exhibited a reduction in phosphorylated phospholamban relative to wildtype mice. However, crossing Tnnt2R141W/+ mice with phospholamban knockout (Pln-/-) mice, which exhibit increased Ca2+ transients and contractility, had no effect on the DCM phenotype. We conclude that the Tnnt2 R141W mutation causes a Ca2+ desensitization and mice adapt by increasing Ca2+-transient amplitudes, which impairs Ca2+ handling dynamics, metabolism and responses to β-adrenergic activation. PMID:27936050

  19. Doxorubicin Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Kanu; Zhang, Jianqing; Honbo, Norman; Karliner, Joel S.

    2010-01-01

    Established doxorubicin cardiomyopathy is a lethal disease. When congestive heart failure develops, mortality is approximately 50%. Extensive research has been done to understand the mechanism and pathophysiology of doxorubicin cardiomyopathy, and considerable knowledge and experience has been gained. Unfortunately, no effective treatment for established doxorubicin cardiomyopathy is presently available. Extensive research has been done and is being done to discover preventive treatments. However an effective and clinically applicable preventive treatment is yet to be discovered. PMID:20016174

  20. Persistent left bundle branch block in a patient with dilated cardiomyopathy that improved with low dose carvedilol therapy.

    PubMed

    Kaku, Bunji; Sato, Takao; Nakatani, Yosuke; Katsuda, Shoji; Taguchi, Tomio; Nitta, Yutaka; Hiraiwa, Yoshio

    2008-03-01

    A 43-year-old Japanese woman with dilated cardiomyopathy had complete left ventricular bundle branch block (CLBBB), which had persisted for at least two years. At the time of admission, the serum brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) concentration was 502 pg/mL (normal range, 0-18 pg/mL), the left ventricular diastolic dimension (LVDd) was 59 mm, the left ventricular systolic dimension (LVDs) was 54 mm, the %fractional shortening (FS) was 8%, and the left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was 19.7% by echocardiography. Low dose carvedilol was initiated for the treatment of heart failure. Adverse effects, such as progression of cardiac conduction disturbances, did not occur after initiation of carvedilol therapy. About one year after initiation of carvedilol therapy, the CLBBB disappeared and a significant improvement in left ventricular function was noted. The LVDd was 44 mm, the LVDs was 30 mm, the %FS was 33%, and the LVEF was 61%, and the serum BNP concentration was decreased to 18.5 pg/mL. We describe a case in which low dose carvedilol was effective for treating both CLBBB and left ventricular function.

  1. Effect of protection and repair of injury of mitochondrial membrane-phospholipid on prognosis in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Ma, A; Zhang, W; Liu, Z

    1996-01-01

    We have already proved that the mitochondrial membrane-phospholipid (MMP) injury changes of peripheral lymphocytes in patients with heart failure can be used as an injury indicator of myocardia, and are related to the long-term prognosis. In the present study, MMP localization of the peripheral lymphocytes was performed by modified Demer's tricomplex flocculation method, and we compared the changes, after classification, between the pre-treatment and the 12-week post-treatment, of coenzyme Q10 (Co.Q10) and captopril in 61 hospitalized patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). They were followed up for 16.1 +/- 7.8 months (mean). The results showed that compared with the placebo, Co.Q10 and captopril could significantly protect against and repair MMP injury and improve the heart function of patients with DCM after 12 weeks, and the 2-year survival rate rose significantly by 72.7% for Co.Q10, and 64.0% for captopril, vs 24.7% for placebo. As for Longrank test, X2 equals 4.660 and 6.318, respectively, with both p < 0.05. The aforementioned results indicate that MMP injury of peripheral lymphocytes can predict the prognosis of the patients with DCM, thus the protection and repairment of MMP injury can improve the life-quality and prolong the life-span of the patients.

  2. Inhibition of osteopontin reduce the cardiac myofibrosis in dilated cardiomyopathy via focal adhesion kinase mediated signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hui; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Jie; Liang, Tuo; Fan, Guang-Pu; Wang, Zhi-Wei; Zhang, Pei-De; Wang, Xu; Zhang, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Background: Osteopontin (OPN) is a pleiotropic cytokine, which has been shown to a close relationship with cardiac fibrosis. Overexpression of OPN in cardiomyocytes induces dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). This research is to study whether inhibition of OPN could reduce myocardial remodelling in DCM, and if this process is focal adhesion kinase (FAK) dependent, which is recently found an important signal molecule in fibrosis. Method: Eight-week-old cTnTR141W transgenic mouse of DCM were injected with OPN-shRNA in left ventricular free wall, which could inhibit the OPN expression. Six weeks later, echocardiographic examinations were performed to test left ventricle function and heart tissues were harvested to test the quality of FAK by western blot and severity of fibrosis by masson staining. Human cardiac fibroblast was administrated with OPN, and FAK inhibition by PP2 was treated 2 h before OPN was given. Expression of α-SMA and collagen-I were tested by western blot and real-time PCR assay. Results: OPN-shRNA group has a relatively high ejection fraction (EF), fractional shortening (FS), LV free wall thickness and a less sever cardiac fibrosis. In vitro, OPN could increase collagen-I and α-SMA expression, and this process can be inhibited by FAK inhibitor. Conclusion: Inhibition of OPN could reduce the LV remodeling and dysfunction in DCM mice, which may attribute to the suppression of collagen-I secretion in fibroblast through a FAK/Akt dependent pathway. PMID:27725847

  3. Neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio predicts appropriate therapy in idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy patients with primary prevention implantable cardioverter defibrillator

    PubMed Central

    Uçar, Fatih M.; Açar, Burak

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate whether an inflammatory marker of neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (NLR) predicts appropriate implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) therapy (shock or anti tachycardia pacing) in idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (IDC) patients. Methods: We retrospectively examined IDC patients (mean age: 58.3 ± 11.8 years, 81.5% male) with ICD who admitted to outpatient clinic for pacemaker control at 2 tertiary care hospitals in Ankara and Edirne, Turkey from January 2013-2015. All ICDs were implanted for primary prevention. Hematological and biochemical parameters were measured prior procedure. Results: Over a median follow-up period of 43 months (Range 7-125), 68 (33.1%) patients experienced appropriate ICD therapy. The NLR was increased in patients that received appropriate therapy (4.39 ± 2.94 versus 2.96 ± 1.97, p<0.001). To identify independent risk factors for appropriate therapy, a multivariate linear regression model was conducted and age (β=0.163, p=0.013), fasting glucose (β=0.158, p=0.017), C-reactive protein (CRP) (β=0.289, p<0.001) and NLR (β=0.212, p<0.008) were found to be independent risk factors for appropriate ICD therapy. Conclusions: Before ICD implantation by using NLR and CRP, arrhythmic episodes may be predictable and better antiarrhythmic medical therapy optimization may protect these IDC patients from unwanted events. PMID:28133686

  4. A novel mitochondrial DNA tRNAIle (m.4322dupC) mutation associated with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Mahjoub, Sinda; Sternberg, Damien; Boussaada, Rafik; Filaut, Sandrine; Gmira, Fathi; Mechmech, Rachid; Jardel, Claude; Arab, Saïda Ben

    2007-12-01

    We identified a novel heteroplasmic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) (m.4322dupC) mutation in tRNA gene associated with isolated dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) as maternal trait. Mutation screening techniques and automated DNA sequencing were performed to identify mtDNA mutations and to assess heteroplasmy in family's proband and healthy control subjects. All family members tested had heteroplasmic mtDNA m.4322dupC mutation. We also screened 350 normal controls for this mutation and found no evidence of heteroplasmy. The m.4322dupC mutation was found in the skeletal tissue from the proband that exhibited slightly reduced deficiency of mitochondrial respiratory chain enzymes (complex III). The present study reports the novel m.4322dupC mutation in tRNA gene, which is possibly associated to the disease, to isolated DCM. It was localized in a hot-spot region for mutations and is possibly pathogenic because of a cosegregation with the matrilineal transmission of DCM.

  5. Determinants of Right Ventricular Muscle Mass in Idiopathic Dilated Cardiomyopathy: Impact of Left Ventricular Muscle Mass and Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Vormbrock, Julia; Liebeton, Jeanette; Wirdeier, Sophia; Meissner, Axel; Butz, Thomas; Trappe, Hans-Joachim; Plehn, Gunnar

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Although chronic pulmonary hypertension and right ventricular (RV) function carry important functional and prognostic implications in idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (IDC), little information on RV muscle mass (RVMM) and its determinants has been published. Methods: Our study comprised thirty-five consecutive patients with IDC, left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction <40% and NYHA class ≥2. Hemodynamic data and parameters on LV and RV geometry were derived from right heart catheterisation and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. Results: RVMM was normalized to body size using a common linear, body surface area based approach (RVMMI) and by an allometric index (RVMM-AI) incorporating adjustment for age, height and weight. Stepwise multiple regression analysis revealed that pulmonary artery pressure and left ventricular muscle mass were independent predictors of RVMM-AI. The interventricular mass ratio of RV and LV mass (IVRM) was closely related to RVMM (r = 0.79, p < 0.001) and total muscle mass (r = 0.39, p < 0.02). However, there was no significant relationship between LVMM and IVMR (r = 0.17, p = 0.32). Conclusion: Our data suggest that an increase in RV mass in IDC may be explained by two mechanisms: First, as a consequence of the myopathic process itself resulting in a balanced hypertrophy of both ventricles. Second, due to the chamber specific burden of pulmonary artery pressure rise, resulting in unbalanced RV hypertrophy. PMID:24936147

  6. [Heart rate and arrhythmias in long-term ECG in patients with coronary disease and dilated cardiomyopathy with reference to left ventricular function].

    PubMed

    Weber, H

    1986-01-01

    Heart-rate (HR) and arrhythmias (AR) are influenced by the vegetative balance. This cannot be measured during daily life at present. Otherwise HR and AR can be detected with a high accuracy using the Holter-Method (HM). Therefore we investigated the relationship of HR, AR and left-ventricular function (LVF) in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD: 342 HM; normal LVF 33%, moderate reduced 33%, reduced 35%) and dilative cardiomyopathy (DCM: 225 HM, LVF normal 13%, moderate reduced 39%, reduced 48%), with special emphasis on the problem, whether tachycardia during chronic congestion will stimulate AR (AR due to an increased sympathic tone) or will suppress AR (overdrive suppression). Furthermore we evaluated, whether patients with a loss of the circadian pattern (CP) of HR or AR, who demonstrated an uniform high HR (due to the enhanced sympathic tone), were on higher risk of dying than other collectives. HM were analysed using the computer-supported "Multipass-Scanning" system. The decreasing LVF coincides with an increase in HR and a loss of HR-CP (i.e. dHR-day-night greater than or equal to 10 b.p.m.). The amount of the HR-CP depends on the mean HR during day in the manner of a direct relationship. The prevalence of premature ventricular ectopics (PVC) increases with decreasing LVF from 39 to 53% (CHD) and from 47 to 63%. A positive circadian pattern of the PVC exists in 60% of CHD and in 84% of DCM, which also decreases with the LVF to 54 vs. 52%. Independent from a CP in two thirds of the patients VA were stimulated and in one third suppressed with a worsening of the LVF. The phenomenon of an overdrive suppression of VA starts with a HR of 90 b.p.m. and higher. The 40% mortality in patients with an uniform (day and night) high HR (greater than 90 b.p.m.) was significantly higher than in other collectives (10%).

  7. FasL expression in cardiomyocytes activates the ERK1/2 pathway, leading to dilated cardiomyopathy and advanced heart failure.

    PubMed

    Huby, Anne-Cecile; Turdi, Subat; James, Jeanne; Towbin, Jeffrey A; Purevjav, Enkhsaikhan

    2016-02-01

    Increase in the apoptotic molecule Fas ligand (FasL) in serum and cardiomyocytes has been shown to be associated with progressive dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and congestive heart failure (CHF) in humans. However, the underlying mechanism(s) of FasL-related deterioration of heart function remain obscure. The aim of the present study is to determine roles of myocardial FasL in the activation of alternative pathways such as extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), inflammation or fibrosis and to identify effective treatments of progressive DCM and advanced CHF. Transgenic mice with cardiomyocyte-specific overexpression of FasL were investigated and treated with an ERK1/2 inhibitor (U-0126), losartan (los), prednisolone (pred) or placebo. Morpho-histological and molecular studies were subsequently performed. FasL mice showed significantly higher mortality compared with wild-type (WT) littermates due to DCM and advanced CHF. Prominent perivascular and interstitial fibrosis, increased interleukin secretion and diffuse CD3-positive cell infiltration were evident in FasL hearts. Up-regulation of the short form of Fas-associated death domain (FADD)-like interleukin 1β-converting enzyme (FLICE) inhibitory protein (s-FLIP), RIP (receptor-interacting protein) and ERK1/2 and down-regulation of transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGFβ1) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) was determined in the myocardium, whereas expression of ERK1/2, periostin (Postn) and osteopontin increased in cardiac fibroblasts. U-0126 and los increased CHF survival by 75% compared with pred and placebo groups. U-0126 had both anti-fibrotic and anti-apoptotic effects, whereas los reduced fibrosis only. Myocardial FasL expression in mice activates differential robust fibrotic, apoptotic and inflammatory responses via ERK1/2 in cardiomyocytes and cardiac fibroblasts inducing DCM and CHF. Blocking the ERK1/2 pathway prevented progression of FasL-induced DCM and CHF by reducing fibrosis, inflammation

  8. Clinical profile of patients with advanced age and inflammatoric dilated cardiomyopathy on endomyocardial biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Ohlow, Marc-Alexander; Chen, Ting-Hui; Schmidt, Andreas; Saenger, Joerg; Lauer, Bernward

    2015-01-01

    Background Endomyocardial biopsy (EMB) is an important tool when patients with inflammatoric cardiomyopathy (DCMi) are evaluated. We aimed to assess the clinical profile of elderly patients with DCMi on EMB. Methods Retrospective study of all consecutive patients hospitalized from January 2007 to December 2011 with clinical suspicion of DCMi undergoing EMB. Patients with evidence of DCMi on EMB (Group 1 ≥ 70 years, n = 85; Group 3 < 70 years; n = 418) were compared to patients of the same age group without evidence of DCMi on EMB (Group 2 ≥ 70 years, n = 45; Group 4 < 70 years; n = 147). Results Among 24,275 patients treated at our institution during the study period, 695 had clinical suspicion of DCMi and underwent EMB; 503 (2.1%) patients had DCMi on EMB. There were more male patients in Group 1, mean age was 74 ± 2.8 years, mean ejection fraction was 38% ± 14%. On presentation, signs of hemodynamic compromise (NYHA functional class III/IV, low cardiac output/index, and low cardiac power index) were more frequent in Group 1. EMB revealed viral genome in 78% of the patients, parvovirus B19 (PVB) was frequently encountered in both age groups (Group 1: 69.4% vs. Group 2: 59.6%); detection of more than one viral genome was more frequent in Group 1 (21.2% vs. 11.2%; P = 0.02) whereas the extent of immune response was significantly lower in individuals with advanced age. Conclusions In patients ≥ 70 years with DCMi on EMB signs of hemodynamic compromise, detection of multiple viral genomes together with an overall lower extent of immune response were more frequently observed. PMID:26788036

  9. Use of serum creatine kinase MM isoforms for predicting the progression of left ventricular dilation in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Hina, K; Kusachi, S; Iwasaki, K; Takaishi, A; Yamamoto, K; Tominaga, Y; Kita, T; Tsuji, T

    1997-04-01

    Serum creatine kinase (CK) isoforms were examined to detect the progression of left ventricular (LV) enlargement with reduced motion, resembling dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Changes in LV indices were determined annually by echocardiography in 51 patients until serum measurements (first follow-up period, 6.5 +/- 2.2 years). Serum creatine isoforms (CKMM1, CKMM2 and CKMM3) were measured with high-voltage electrophoresis in 35 of these patients from 1991 to 1992, and the data for these latter patients are reported here. Serum total CK, CKMB, lactate dehydrogenase and its isoenzyme LDH1 were also measured. The changes in LV indices were further monitored until January, 1995 (second follow-up). During the 2 follow-up periods, the patients in the on-going group showed a reduction in the LV ejection fraction (LVEF) to < 55% with LV end-diastolic dimension (LVDd) < 55 mm, and those in the DCM-like group showed a reduction in LVEF to < 55% and an increase in LVDd to > 55 mm. During the first follow-up period, LVEF and LVDd remained at > or = 55% and < 55 mm, respectively, in 26 patients (nonprogressive-disease group), while 3 patients entered the on-going group and 6 entered the DCM-like group. The CKMM3/CKMM1 ratios in the on-going and DCM-like groups were significantly higher than those in the control and nonprogressive-disease groups. The CKMM3/CKMM1 ratio was significantly correlated with the annual rate of change for the LV end-systolic dimension (LVDs), LVDd, and LVEF, with the closest correlation observed for the annual change in LVDs. Moreover, 5 patients in the nonprogressive-disease group with elevation of the CKMM3/CKMM1 ratio to > + 2SD above the mean for the controls had an elevated annual change in LVDs within +/- 1SD of the mean in the DCM-like group. These results indicate that the ratio of CKMM3 to CKMM1 can be used to predict the progression of LV enlargement in HCM.

  10. Randomized Comparison of Allogeneic Vs. Autologous Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Non-lschemic Dilated Cardiomyopathy: POSEIDON-DCM Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hare, Joshua M.; DiFede, Darcy L; Castellanos, Angela M; Florea, Victoria; Landin, Ana M; El-Khorazaty, Jill; Khan, Aisha; Mushtaq, Muzammil; Lowery, Maureen H; Byrnes, John J; Hendel, Robert C; Cohen, Mauricio G; Alfonso, Carlos E; Valasaki, Krystalenia; Pujol, Marietsy V; Golpanian, Samuel; Ghersin, Eduard; Fishman, Joel E; Pattany, Pradip; Gomes, Samirah A; Delgado, Cindy; Miki, Roberto; Abuzeid, Fouad; Vidro-Casiano, Mayra; Premer, Courtney; Medina, Audrey; Porras, Valeria; Hatzistergos, Konstantinos E.; Anderson, Erica; Mendizabal, Adam; Mitrani, Raul; Heldman, Alan W.

    2016-01-01

    Background While human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) have been tested in ischemic cardiomyopathy, few studies exist in chronic non-ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy (NIDCM). Objectives The POSEIDON-DCM trial is a randomized comparison of safety and efficacy of autologous (auto) vs. allogeneic (allo) bone marrow-derived hMSCs in NIDCM. Methods Thirty-seven patients were randomized to either allo- or auto-hMSCs in a 1:1 ratio. Patients were recruited between December 2011 and July 2015 at the University of Miami Hospital. Patients (age: 55.8 ± 11.2; 32% female) received hMSCs (100 million) by transendocardial stem cell injection (TESI) in ten left ventricular sites by NOGA Catheter. Treated patients were evaluated at baseline, 30 days, 3-, 6-, and 12-months for safety: serious adverse events (SAE), and efficacy endpoints: Ejection Fraction (EF), Minnesota Living with Heart Failure Questionnaire (MLHFQ), Six Minute Walk Test (6MWT), MACE, and immune-biomarkers. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, #NCT01392625. Results There were no 30-day treatment-emergent (TE)-SAEs. 12-month SAE incidence was 28.2% (95% CI: 12.8, 55.1) in allo, and 63.5% (95% CI: 40.8, 85.7; p=0.1004) in auto. One allo-group patient developed an elevated donor specific cPRA. EF increased in allo by 8.0 units (95% Cl: 2.8, 13.2; p=0.004), and in auto: 5.4 units (95% Cl: −1.4, 12.1; p=0.116, allo vs. auto p=0.4887). 6MWT increased for allo: 37.0 meters (95% Cl: 2.0 to 72.0; p=0.04), but not auto: 7.3 meters (95% Cl: −47.8, 33.3; p=0.71, auto vs. allo p=0.0168). MLHFQ score decreased in allo (p=0.0022), and auto (p=0.463; p=0.172). The MACE rate was lower in allo vs. auto (p=0.0186). Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) decreased (p=0.0001 for each), to a greater extent in allo vs. auto at six-months (p=0.05). Conclusion These findings demonstrate safety and support greater, clinically meaningful efficacy of allo-hMSC vs. auto-hMSC in NIDCM patients. Pivotal trials of allo-hMSCs are

  11. Hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathy: four decades of basic research on muscle lead to potential therapeutic approaches to these devastating genetic diseases.

    PubMed

    Spudich, James A

    2014-03-18

    With the advent of technologies to obtain the complete sequence of the human genome in a cost-effective manner, this decade and those to come will see an exponential increase in our understanding of the underlying genetics that lead to human disease. And where we have a deep understanding of the biochemical and biophysical basis of the machineries and pathways involved in those genetic changes, there are great hopes for the development of modern therapeutics that specifically target the actual machinery and pathways altered by individual mutations. Prime examples of such a genetic disease are those classes of hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathy that result from single amino-acid substitutions in one of several of the proteins that make up the cardiac sarcomere or from the truncation of myosin binding protein C. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy alone affects ∼1 in 500 individuals, and it is the leading cause of sudden cardiac death in young adults. Here I describe approaches to understand the molecular basis of the alterations in power output that result from these mutations. Small molecules binding to the mutant sarcomeric protein complex should be able to mitigate the effects of hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathy mutations at their sources, leading to possible new therapeutic approaches for these genetic diseases.

  12. Hypertrophic and Dilated Cardiomyopathy: Four Decades of Basic Research on Muscle Lead to Potential Therapeutic Approaches to These Devastating Genetic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Spudich, James A.

    2014-01-01

    With the advent of technologies to obtain the complete sequence of the human genome in a cost-effective manner, this decade and those to come will see an exponential increase in our understanding of the underlying genetics that lead to human disease. And where we have a deep understanding of the biochemical and biophysical basis of the machineries and pathways involved in those genetic changes, there are great hopes for the development of modern therapeutics that specifically target the actual machinery and pathways altered by individual mutations. Prime examples of such a genetic disease are those classes of hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathy that result from single amino-acid substitutions in one of several of the proteins that make up the cardiac sarcomere or from the truncation of myosin binding protein C. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy alone affects ∼1 in 500 individuals, and it is the leading cause of sudden cardiac death in young adults. Here I describe approaches to understand the molecular basis of the alterations in power output that result from these mutations. Small molecules binding to the mutant sarcomeric protein complex should be able to mitigate the effects of hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathy mutations at their sources, leading to possible new therapeutic approaches for these genetic diseases. PMID:24655499

  13. [Diffuse left ventricular hypokinesis mimicking dilated cardiomyopathy with multi-vessel coronary vasospasm].

    PubMed

    Shimizu, M; Kawata, M; Okada, T; Mizutani, T

    2000-06-01

    We investigated 7 patients with multi-vessel coronary vasospasm (> or = 75%) and diffuse left ventricular hypokinesis by coronary angiography and echocardiography. Four patients were male and 3 were female and mean +/- SD age was 63.0 +/- 11.2 years. Chief complaints were dyspnea in 3 patients, and chest pain, appetite loss, palpitation and general fatigue in one each. New York Heart Association functional classification was I in one patient, II in 5 and III in one. Mean heart rate was 73.9 +/- 11.6 beats/min. Initial echocardiography showed left ventricular end-diastolic diameter (LVDd) 54.4 +/- 5.5 mm, left ventricular end-systolic diameter (LVDs) 43.7 +/- 4.8 mm and percentage fractional shortening (%FS) 19.7 +/- 2.6%. The left ventricle was not remarkably enlarged despite poor contraction. Coronary vasospasm was induced after acetylcholine injection into the right coronary artery in 6 patients, left anterior descending artery in 7 and circumflex artery in 5. Four patients developed three-vessel coronary vasospasm. Three patients underwent endomyocardial biopsy which showed non-specific mild fibrosis. They were treated with nitrates and/or Ca-antagonists to prevent coronary vasospasm. Follow-up echocardiography was performed in 6 patients after 8.5 +/- 6.6 months. Echocardiography revealed marked improvement in left ventricular contraction (LVDd 49.7 +/- 4.6 mm, LVDs 35.8 +/- 4.4 mm, p < 0.05; %FS 27.9 +/- 4.5%, p < 0.05). These data suggested that left ventricular dilation was not prominent despite the poor contractility in patients with multi-vessel coronary vasospasm and diffuse left ventricular hypokinesis. The left ventricular dysfunction might be hibernating myocardium produced by multiple episodes of coronary vasospasm. Anti-vasospastic agents were effective in these patients.

  14. Dilated cardiomyopathy mutations in δ-sarcoglycan exert a dominant-negative effect on cardiac myocyte mechanical stability.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Matthew D; Witcher, Marc; Gopal, Anoop; Michele, Daniel E

    2016-05-01

    Delta-sarcoglycan is a component of the sarcoglycan subcomplex within the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex located at the plasma membrane of muscle cells. While recessive mutations in δ-sarcoglycan cause limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2F, dominant mutations in δ-sarcoglycan have been linked to inherited dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). The purpose of this study was to investigate functional cellular defects present in adult cardiac myocytes expressing mutant δ-sarcoglycans harboring the dominant inherited DCM mutations R71T or R97Q. This study demonstrates that DCM mutant δ-sarcoglycans can be stably expressed in adult rat cardiac myocytes and traffic similarly to wild-type δ-sarcoglycan to the plasma membrane, without perturbing assembly of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex. However, expression of DCM mutant δ-sarcoglycan in adult rat cardiac myocytes is sufficient to alter cardiac myocyte plasma membrane stability in the presence of mechanical strain. Upon cyclical cell stretching, cardiac myocytes expressing mutant δ-sarcoglycan R97Q or R71T have increased cell-impermeant dye uptake and undergo contractures at greater frequencies than myocytes expressing normal δ-sarcoglycan. Additionally, the R71T mutation creates an ectopic N-linked glycosylation site that results in aberrant glycosylation of the extracellular domain of δ-sarcoglycan. Therefore, appropriate glycosylation of δ-sarcoglycan may also be necessary for proper δ-sarcoglycan function and overall dystrophin-glycoprotein complex function. These studies demonstrate that DCM mutations in δ-sarcoglycan can exert a dominant negative effect on dystrophin-glycoprotein complex function leading to myocardial mechanical instability that may underlie the pathogenesis of δ-sarcoglycan-associated DCM.

  15. Typical coronary appearance of dilated cardiomyopathy versus left ventricular concentric hypertrophy: coronary volumes measured by multislice computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Ehara, Shoichi; Matsumoto, Kenji; Shirai, Nobuyuki; Nakanishi, Koki; Otsuka, Kenichiro; Iguchi, Tomokazu; Hasegawa, Takao; Nakata, Shinji; Yoshikawa, Junichi; Yoshiyama, Minoru

    2013-03-01

    Several coronary angiographic studies have reported that enlarged and tortuous epicardial coronary arteries are characteristic of patients with left ventricular concentric hypertrophy (LVCH). Recently, we showed that small volumes opacified by contrast medium can be accurately measured by 64-multislice computed tomography (MSCT) and that there is a direct relationship between the coronary artery volume and left ventricular (LV) mass. However, the relationship of coronary artery volume with LV mass in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is unknown. The present study was designed to investigate this issue. Thirteen patients with DCM and 18 patients with LVCH who underwent MSCT angiography were included in this analysis. The coronary arteries were segmented on a workstation, and the appropriate window settings obtained from the results of the phantom experiments were applied to the volume-rendered images to calculate the total coronary artery volume (right and left coronary arteries). The absolute coronary lengths and volumes in patients with LVCH and DCM were greater than those in controls. The coronary artery volumes adjusted for LV mass in patients with DCM were found to be smaller than those in patients with LVCH or in controls, and these values did not differ between patients with LVCH and controls (DCM 4.1 ± 0.9, LVCH 5.4 ± 1.4, controls 5.5 ± 2.3 ml/100 g of LV mass, P < 0.005; DCM vs LVCH, P < 0.01; and DCM vs control, P < 0.0005). This study showed that the increase in the coronary artery volume in patients with LVCH matched the increase in LV mass, but a decreased coronary volume with regard to LV mass was characteristic of patients with DCM.

  16. Beneficial effects of intramyocardial mesenchymal stem cells and VEGF165 plasmid injection in rats with furazolidone induced dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qin; Fang, Weiyi; Zhu, Ning; Zheng, Xiaoqun; Na, Rongmei; Liu, Baiting; Meng, Lili; Li, Zhu; Li, Qianxiao; Li, Xiaofei

    2015-08-01

    To explore the impact of myocardial injection of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and specific recombinant human VEGF165 (hVEGF165 ) plasmid on collagen remodelling in rats with furazolidone induced dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). DCM was induced by furazolidone (0.3 mg/bodyweight (g)/day per gavage for 8 weeks). Rats were then divided into four groups: (i) PBS group (n = 18): rats received equal volume myocardial PBS injection; (ii) MSCs group (n = 17): 100 μl culture medium containing 10(5) MSCs were injected into four sites of left ventricular free wall (25 μl per site); (iii) GENE group (n = 18): pCMVen-MLC2v-EGFP-VEGF165 plasmid [5 × 10(9) pfu (0.2 ml)] were injected into four sites of left ventricular free wall (0.05 ml per site)] and (iv) MSCs+GENE group (n = 17): rats received both myocardial MSCs and pCMVen-MLC2v-EGFP-VEGF165 plasmid injections. After 4 weeks, cardiac function was evaluated by echocardiography. Myocardial mRNA expressions of type I, type III collagen and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 were detected by RT-PCR. The protein expression of hVEGF165 was determined by Western blot. Myocardial protein expression of hVEGF165 was demonstrated in GENE and MSCs+GENE groups. Cardiac function was improved in MSCs, GENE and MSCs+GENE groups. Collagen volume fraction was significantly reduced and myocardial TGF-β1 mRNA expression significantly down-regulated in both GENE and MSCs+GENE groups, collagen type I/III ratio reduction was more significant in MSCs+GENE group than in MSCs or GENE group. Myocardial MSCs and hVEGF165 plasmid injection improves cardiac function possibly through down-regulating myocardial TGF-β1 expression and reducing the type I/III collagen ratio in this DCM rat model.

  17. Heart Mitochondrial Proteome Study Elucidates Changes in Cardiac Energy Metabolism and Antioxidant PRDX3 in Human Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Roselló-Lletí, Esther; Tarazón, Estefanía; Barderas, María G.; Ortega, Ana; Otero, Manuel; Molina-Navarro, Maria Micaela; Lago, Francisca; González-Juanatey, Jose Ramón; Salvador, Antonio; Portolés, Manuel; Rivera, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Background Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is a public health problem with no available curative treatment, and mitochondrial dysfunction plays a critical role in its development. The present study is the first to analyze the mitochondrial proteome in cardiac tissue of patients with DCM to identify potential molecular targets for its therapeutic intervention. Methods and Results 16 left ventricular (LV) samples obtained from explanted human hearts with DCM (n = 8) and control donors (n = 8) were extracted to perform a proteomic approach to investigate the variations in mitochondrial protein expression. The proteome of the samples was analyzed by quantitative differential electrophoresis and Mass Spectrometry. These changes were validated by classical techniques and by novel and precise selected reaction monitoring analysis and RNA sequencing approach increasing the total heart samples up to 25. We found significant alterations in energy metabolism, especially in molecules involved in substrate utilization (ODPA, ETFD, DLDH), energy production (ATPA), other metabolic pathways (AL4A1) and protein synthesis (EFTU), obtaining considerable and specific relationships between the alterations detected in these processes. Importantly, we observed that the antioxidant PRDX3 overexpression is associated with impaired ventricular function. PRDX3 is significantly related to LV end systolic and diastolic diameter (r = 0.73, p value<0.01; r = 0.71, p value<0.01), fractional shortening, and ejection fraction (r = −0.61, p value<0.05; and r = −0.62, p value<0.05, respectively). Conclusion This work could be a pivotal study to gain more knowledge on the cellular mechanisms related to the pathophysiology of this disease and may lead to the development of etiology-specific heart failure therapies. We suggest new molecular targets for therapeutic interventions, something that up to now has been lacking. PMID:25397948

  18. Value of the signal-averaged electrocardiogram as a predictor of sudden death in myocardial infarction and dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Ohnishi, Y; Inoue, T; Fukuzaki, H

    1990-02-01

    To clarify the prognostic significance of signal averaged electrocardiogram (SAE), 100 patients with old myocardial infarction (OMI) and 54 patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) were studied. Late potentials (LPs) were detected in 31 patients with OMI and in 21 patients with DCM. During a mean follow up of 18 months (3 to 60) in OMI and 28 months (3 to 71) in DCM, 29 patients died. Fifteen patients died suddenly (8 in OMI, 7 in DCM). In OMI, the sensitivity (Se), specificity (Sp), predictive accuracy (PA) of LPs for sudden death were 75%, 72%, and 73%, respectively. The presence of either LPs or prolonged filtered QRS (f-QRS) predicted sudden death with a high Se, and the presence of both LPs and prolonged f-QRS predicted with high Sp and PA. In DCM, Se, Sp, and PA of LPs were lower than those in OMI (Se; 71%, Sp; 66%, PA; 67%). A life table analysis showed that the probability of remaining free from sudden death was significantly lower in patients with LPs than those without them in OMI, but no significant difference was observed between those with and without LPs in DCM. Patients with either LPs or prolonged f-QRS, however, had a significantly higher probability of sudden death in both diseases and no patient with normal SAE died suddenly. SAE was also useful in separating high risk patients in either normal or low cardiac index group in both diseases. Ventricular tachycardia (VT) and % fractional shortening in OMI and only VT in DCM were also useful predictors among other parameters. In conclusion, SAE provides useful information in a noninvasive method to identify patients at risk of sudden death, and patients with normal SAE have a low risk of sudden death in OMI and DCM.

  19. Circulating miR-185 might be a novel biomarker for clinical outcome in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Miao; Liang, Wei; Xie, Yu; Long, Qi; Cheng, Xiang; Liao, Yu-Hua; Yuan, Jing

    2016-01-01

    B cells contribute to the development of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) by inducing myocyte injuries and myocardial fibrosis. Our recent research indicated that microRNA (miR) -185 participated in human B-cell activation. Thus, this study was aimed to explore the relationship between miR-185 and DCM progression. Forty-one healthy volunteers and fifty newly diagnosed DCM patients were enrolled. The levels of plasma miR-185, TNF-α secreting B cells, and anti-heart autoantibody were detected. We found that the mean levels of plasma miR-185 in DCM patients were significantly higher than those in healthy controls. Furthermore, these DCM patients could be divided into miR-185high and miR-185low groups according to the cluster distribution. During one-year follow-up period, the miR-185high group showed apparent improvements in left ventricular ejection fraction, left ventricular end diastolic diameter, and NT-proBNP, accompanied by significant declines in both cardiovascular mortality and total admissions for heart failure re-hospitalizations. In addition, the levels of anti-β1-AR antibody and TNF-α secreting B cells were also reduced in miR-185high group. These findings suggested that high miR-185 levels might be associated with a favorable prognosis by repressing B cell function in DCM. The findings of this study need to be confirmed with larger sample size and longer duration of observation. PMID:27645404

  20. AMPK deficiency in cardiac muscle results in dilated cardiomyopathy in the absence of changes in energy metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Miranda M.; Zordoky, Beshay N.; Bujak, Adam L.; Lally, James S.V.; Fung, David; Young, Martin E.; Horman, Sandrine; Miller, Edward J.; Light, Peter E.; Kemp, Bruce E.; Steinberg, Gregory R.; Dyck, Jason R.B.

    2015-01-01

    Aims AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is thought to be a central player in regulating myocardial metabolism and its activation has been shown to inhibit cardiac hypertrophy. Recently, mice with muscle-specific deletion of AMPK β1/β2 subunits (AMPKβ1β2-deficient mice, β1β2M-KO) have been generated and possess <10% of normal AMPK activity in muscle. However, how/if dramatic AMPK deficiency alters cardiac metabolism, function, or morphology has not been investigated. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine whether a significant loss of AMPK activity alters cardiac function, metabolism, and hypertrophy, and whether this may play a role in the pathogenesis of heart failure. Methods and results β1β2M-KO mice exhibit an approximate 25% reduction in systolic and diastolic function compared with wild-type (WT) littermates. Despite the well-documented role of AMPK in controlling myocardial energy metabolism, there was no difference in basal glucose and fatty acid oxidation rates between β1β2M-KO and WT mice. However, there was reduced AMPK-mediated phosphorylation of troponin I in β1β2M-KO and reduced ventricular cell shortening in the presence of low Ca2+, which may explain the impaired cardiac function in these mice. Interestingly, β1β2M-KO mice did not display any signs of compensatory cardiac hypertrophy, which could be attributed to impaired activation of p38 MAPK. Conclusions β1β2M-KO mice display evidence of dilated cardiomyopathy. This is the first mouse model of AMPK deficiency that demonstrates cardiac dysfunction in the absence of pathological stress and provides insights into the role of AMPK in regulating myocardial function, metabolism, hypertrophy, and the progression to heart failure. PMID:26023060

  1. A Novel Murine Model of Parvovirus Associated Dilated Cardiomyopathy Induced by Immunization with VP1-Unique Region of Parvovirus B19

    PubMed Central

    Šimoliūnas, Egidijus; Rinkūnaitė, Ieva; Smalinskaitė, Luka; Podkopajev, Andrej; Bironaitė, Daiva; Weis, Cleo-Aron; Marx, Alexander; Bukelskienė, Virginija; Gretz, Norbert; Grabauskienė, Virginija; Labeit, Dittmar; Labeit, Siegfried

    2016-01-01

    Background. Parvovirus B19 (B19V) is a common finding in endomyocardial biopsy specimens from myocarditis and dilated cardiomyopathy patients. However, current understanding of how B19V is contributing to cardiac damage is rather limited due to the lack of appropriate mice models. In this work we demonstrate that immunization of BALB/c mice with the major immunogenic determinant of B19V located in the unique sequence of capsid protein VP1 (VP1u) is an adequate model to study B19V associated heart damage. Methods and Results. We immunized mice in the experimental group with recombinant VP1u; immunization with cardiac myosin derived peptide served as a positive reference and phosphate buffered saline served as negative control. Cardiac function and dimensions were followed echocardiographically 69 days after immunization. Progressive dilatation of left ventricle and decline of ejection fraction were observed in VP1u- and myosin-immunized mice. Histologically, severe cardiac fibrosis and accumulation of heart failure cells in lungs were observed 69 days after immunization. Transcriptomic profiling revealed ongoing cardiac remodeling and immune process in VP1u- and myosin-immunized mice. Conclusions. Immunization of BALB/c mice with VP1u induces dilated cardiomyopathy in BALB/c mice and it could be used as a model to study clinically relevant B19V associated cardiac damage. PMID:27812527

  2. Dilated cardiomyopathy and left bundle branch block associated with ingestion of colloidal gold and silver is reversed by British antiLewisite and vitamin E: the potential toxicity of metals used as health supplements.

    PubMed

    Archer, Stephen Lawrence

    2008-05-01

    A case of left bundle branch block and a dilated, nonhypertrophic cardiomyopathy associated with ingestion of colloidal gold and silver as an 'energy tonic' is described. The cardiac disease was reversed within two months by a course of dimercaprol (Akorn Inc, USA) (British antiLewisite) and vitamin E. This is the first case of gold and silver cardiomyopathy in humans, and highlights the risks of these colloidal metal 'health supplements'.

  3. Effect of hypertension at presentation on prognosis in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy presenting with normal renal angiogram

    PubMed Central

    Balije, Swetha; Kumar, Ashutosh; Bhawani, Goru; Murthy, Kasturi S. N.; Kumari, Neera

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is a progressive disease of heart with systolic and diastolic dysfunction carrying a poor long-term prognosis. The prognostic index and predictors of mortality are considered to be useful in guiding the treatment. This study was undertaken to evaluate the effects of hypertension at presentation on prognosis in patients with DCM presenting with normal renal and coronary angiogram. Methods: An observational, analytical, non-interventional and a combination of retrospective and prospective study was conducted in patients between 15 and 75 yr of age with DCM having on and off symptoms while receiving treatment in a cardiology outpatient department for more than a year. Sixty patients who fulfilled the inclusion criteria were enrolled in the study. Left ventricular systolic and diastolic functions were assessed by echocardiography along with New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class prospectively and at baseline retrospectively. Patients were grouped into two categories: DCM with hypertension at presentation (HTNAP, Category 1) and DCM without hypertension at presentation (NHTNAP, Category 2). The primary end-points were the number and dose of parenteral drugs at hospitalization, duration of hospital stay and change in the left ventricular (LV) systolic function expressed as LV ejection fraction, and the secondary end-points included overall mortality, change in LV and right ventricular systolic and diastolic functions and change in the NYHA functional class between baseline and three month follow up in patients. Results: Thirty five and 25 patients presented with HTNAP and NHTNAP, respectively (total 60). The overall mortality was 10 per cent (6/60). The number of hospitalizations was less in HTNAP category and of days of hospital stay was 6.3 in HTNAP and 9.8 in NHTNAP, the difference being significant (P < 0.001). The HTNAP category required less parenteral diuretics and inotropes compared with the NHTNAP

  4. Multistep Ion Channel Remodeling and Lethal Arrhythmia Precede Heart Failure in a Mouse Model of Inherited Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Takeshi; Shioya, Takao; Murayama, Takashi; Sugihara, Masami; Odagiri, Fuminori; Nakazato, Yuji; Nishizawa, Hiroto; Chugun, Akihito; Sakurai, Takashi; Daida, Hiroyuki; Morimoto, Sachio; Kurebayashi, Nagomi

    2012-01-01

    Background Patients with inherited dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) frequently die with severe heart failure (HF) or die suddenly with arrhythmias, although these symptoms are not always observed at birth. It remains unclear how and when HF and arrhythmogenic changes develop in these DCM mutation carriers. In order to address this issue, properties of the myocardium and underlying gene expressions were studied using a knock-in mouse model of human inherited DCM caused by a deletion mutation ΔK210 in cardiac troponinT. Methodology/Principal Findings By 1 month, DCM mice had already enlarged hearts, but showed no symptoms of HF and a much lower mortality than at 2 months or later. At around 2 months, some would die suddenly with no clear symptoms of HF, whereas at 3 months, many of the survivors showed evident symptoms of HF. In isolated left ventricular myocardium (LV) from 2 month-mice, spontaneous activity frequently occurred and action potential duration (APD) was prolonged. Transient outward (Ito) and ultrarapid delayed rectifier K+ (IKur) currents were significantly reduced in DCM myocytes. Correspondingly, down-regulation of Kv4.2, Kv1.5 and KChIP2 was evident in mRNA and protein levels. In LVs at 3-months, more frequent spontaneous activity, greater prolongation of APD and further down-regulation in above K+ channels were observed. At 1 month, in contrast, infrequent spontaneous activity and down-regulation of Kv4.2, but not Kv1.5 or KChIP2, were observed. Conclusions/Significance Our results suggest that at least three steps of electrical remodeling occur in the hearts of DCM model mice, and that the combined down-regulation of Kv4.2, Kv1.5 and KChIP2 prior to the onset of HF may play an important role in the premature sudden death in this DCM model. DCM mice at 1 month or before, on the contrary, are associated with low risk of death in spite of inborn disorder and enlarged heart. PMID:22514734

  5. A Haplotype of Two Novel Polymorphisms in δ-Sarcoglycan Gene Increases Risk of Dilated Cardiomyopathy in Mongoloid Population

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong; Wei, Sisi; Chen, Dan; Ying, Li; Zhou, Qing; Li, Gang; Li, Joyce; Gao, Jimin; Kato, Naoya; Hu, Wei; Li, Yigang; Wang, Yuepeng

    2015-01-01

    The role of genetic abnormality of δ-sarcoglycan (δ-SG) gene in dilated (DCM) and hypertrophied (HCM) cardiomyopathy patients is still unfolding. In this study we first defined the promoter region and then searched for polymorphisms/mutations among the promoter, 5'-untranslated region, and the encoding exons in δ-SG gene in 104 Chinese patients with DCM, 145 with HCM, and 790 normal controls. Two novel polymorphisms were found, an 11 base-pair (bp) deletion (c.-100~-110; -) in the promoter region and a missense polymorphism of A848G resulting in p.Q283R in the highly conserved C-terminus. The prevalence of homozygous genotype -/- of c.-100~-110 was slightly higher in DCM (14.42%) and HCM patients (14.48%), as compared with normal controls (11.01%). The prevalence of genotype of 848A/G was significantly higher in DCM (6.73%; OR = 9.43; p = 0.0002), but not in HCM patients (1.38%; OR = 1.37; p = 0.62), as compared with controls (0.76%). Haplotype -_G consisting c.-100~-110 and A848G was associated with increased risk of DCM (OR = 17.27; 95%CI = 3.19–93.56; p = 0.001) but not associated with HCM (OR = 1.90; 95%CI = 0.38–9.55; p = 0.44). Co-occurrence of the genotypes -/- of c.-100~-110 and 848A/G was found in 5 patients with DCM (4.81%; OR = 39.85; p = 0.0001), none of HCM patients, and only 1 of the controls (0.13%). Both polymorphisms were also found in the Japanese population, but not in the Africans and Caucasians. C.-100~-110 resulted in a decrease of δ-SG promoter activity to 64±3% of the control level (p<0.01). Both co-immunoprecipitation and in vitro protein pull-down assays demonstrated that δ-SG-283R interacts normally to β- and γ-SG, but significantly decreased localization of β/δ/γ-SG on the plasma membrane. In conclusion, haplotype -_G composed of c.-100~-110 and A848G confers higher susceptibility to DCM in the Mongoloid population. PMID:26720722

  6. Myofibrillar calcium sensitivity of isometric tension is increased in human dilated cardiomyopathies: role of altered beta-adrenergically mediated protein phosphorylation.

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, M R; Buck, S H; Stoker, S W; Greaser, M L; Mentzer, R M

    1996-01-01

    To examine the role of alterations in myofibrillar function in human dilated cardiomyopathies, we determined isometric tension-calcium relations in permeabilized myocytesized myofibrillar preparations (n = 16) obtained from left ventricular biopsies from nine patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) during cardiac transplantation or left ventricular assist device implantation. Similar preparations (n = 10) were obtained from six normal hearts used for cardiac transplantation. Passive and maximal Ca2+-activated tensions were similar for the two groups. However, the calcium sensitivity of isometric tension was increased in DCM compared to nonfailing preparations ([Ca2+]50=2.46+/-0.49 microM vs 3.24+/-0.51 microM, P < 0.001). In vitro treatment with the catalytic subunit of protein kinase A (PKA) decreased calcium sensitivity of tension to a greater degree in failing than in normal preparations. Further, isometric tension-calcium relations in failing and normal myofibrillar preparations were similar after PKA treatment. These findings suggest that the increased calcium sensitivity of isometric tension in DCM may be due at least in part to a reduction of the beta-adrenergically mediated (PKA-dependent) phosphorylation of myofibrillar regulatory proteins such as troponin I and/or C-protein. PMID:8690789

  7. Prognostic utility of right ventricular systolic functions assessed by tissue doppler imaging in dilated cardiomyopathy and its correlation with plasma NT-pro-BNP levels.

    PubMed

    Tigen, Kursat; Karaahmet, Tansu; Cevik, Cihan; Gurel, Emre; Pala, Selcuk; Mutlu, Bulent; Basaran, Yelda

    2009-01-01

    The authors invesitgated the impact of right ventricular systolic function measured by tissue Doppler imaging on clinical end points and its correlation with plasma NT-pro-BNP levels in 75 patients with nonischemic dilated cardiomyopathy. Echocardiographic peak systolic velocities of tricuspid lateral annulus by tissue Doppler imaging and plasma pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-pro-BNP) levels were measured. Forty patients had clinical end points in 29+/-16 months. They were found to have higher plasma NT-pro-BNP levels and lower tricuspid lateral annulus and interventricular septum tissue Doppler peak systolic velocities than patients without clinical end points. Cut-off level of plasma NT-pro-BNP levels for predicting clinical end points was 1700 pg/mL (sensitivity and specificity, 82% and 75%, respectively). Cut-off level of tricuspid lateral annulus tissue Doppler peak systolic velocities for predicting clinical end points was 6.25 cm/sec (sensitivity and specificity, 80% and 57%, respectively). In conclusion, plasma NT-pro-BNP levels and tissue Doppler-derived right ventricular systolic functional parameters are helpful in determining prognosis in dilated cardiomyopathy.

  8. Comparison of nonlinear methods symbolic dynamics, detrended fluctuation, and Poincaré plot analysis in risk stratification in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voss, Andreas; Schroeder, Rico; Truebner, Sandra; Goernig, Matthias; Figulla, Hans Reiner; Schirdewan, Alexander

    2007-03-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) has an incidence of about 20/100 000 new cases per annum and accounts for nearly 10 000 deaths per year in the United States. Approximately 36% of patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) suffer from cardiac death within five years after diagnosis. Currently applied methods for an early risk prediction in DCM patients are rather insufficient. The objective of this study was to investigate the suitability of short-term nonlinear methods symbolic dynamics (STSD), detrended fluctuation (DFA), and Poincaré plot analysis (PPA) for risk stratification in these patients. From 91 DCM patients and 30 healthy subjects (REF), heart rate and blood pressure variability (HRV, BPV), STSD, DFA, and PPA were analyzed. Measures from BPV analysis, DFA, and PPA revealed highly significant differences (p<0.0011) discriminating REF and DCM. For risk stratification in DCM patients, four parameters from BPV analysis, STSD, and PPA revealed significant differences between low and high risk (maximum sensitivity: 90%, specificity: 90%). These results suggest that STSD and PPA are useful nonlinear methods for enhanced risk stratification in DCM patients.

  9. FTY720 (Gilenya) treatment prevents spontaneous autoimmune myocarditis and dilated cardiomyopathy in transgenic HLA-DQ8-BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Boldizsar, Ferenc; Tarjanyi, Oktavia; Olasz, Katalin; Hegyi, Akos; Mikecz, Katalin; Glant, Tibor T; Rauch, Tibor A

    2016-01-01

    Although dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is often caused by viral infections, it frequently involves autoimmune mechanisms associated with particular HLA-DR and DQ alleles. Our homozygous HLA-DQ8Ab(0) transgenic mice in the BALB/c background (HLA-DQ8(BALB/c)-Tg) developed early and progressive fatal heart failure from 4 to 5 weeks of age. Clinical signs of the disease included cyanotic eyes, tachycardia with dyspnea (from pale to cyanotic limbs), and terminal whole body edema. Sick mice had extremely dilated hearts, enlarged liver and spleen, and pleural/peritoneal effusion. Histology of the heart showed extensive heart muscle destruction with signs of fibrosis. The autoimmune nature of the disease was shown by high titers of antimyosin antibodies in the sera and IgG deposits in sick heart muscles, as well as focal neutrophil, T cell, and macrophage infiltration of the heart muscle. The sera of the sick mice showed a granular staining pattern on sections of healthy heart muscle. Quantitative analyses of DCM-specific gene expression studies revealed that sets of genes are involved in inflammation, hypoxia, and fibrosis. Treatment with FTY720 (Fingolimod/Gilenya) protected animals from the development of cardiomyopathy. HLA-DQ8(BALB/c)-Tg mice represent a spontaneous autoimmune myocarditis model that may provide a useful tool for studying the autoimmune mechanism of DCM and testing immunosuppressive drugs.

  10. Cardiomyopathy in neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Finsterer, Josef; Stöllberger, Claudia; Wahbi, Karim

    2013-01-01

    According to the American Heart Association, cardiomyopathies are classified as primary (solely or predominantly confined to heart muscle), secondary (those showing pathological myocardial involvement as part of a neuromuscular disorder) and those in which cardiomyopathy is the first/predominant manifestation of a neuromuscular disorder. Cardiomyopathies may be further classified as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, dilated cardiomyopathy, restrictive cardiomyopathy, arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, or unclassified cardiomyopathy (noncompaction, Takotsubo-cardiomyopathy). This review focuses on secondary cardiomyopathies and those in which cardiomyopathy is the predominant manifestation of a myopathy. Any of them may cause neurological disease, and any of them may be a manifestation of a neurological disorder. Neurological disease most frequently caused by cardiomyopathies is ischemic stroke, followed by transitory ischemic attack, syncope, or vertigo. Neurological disease, which most frequently manifests with cardiomyopathies are the neuromuscular disorders. Most commonly associated with cardiomyopathies are muscular dystrophies, myofibrillar myopathies, congenital myopathies and metabolic myopathies. Management of neurological disease caused by cardiomyopathies is not at variance from the same neurological disorders due to other causes. Management of secondary cardiomyopathies is not different from that of cardiomyopathies due to other causes either. Patients with neuromuscular disorders require early cardiologic investigations and close follow-ups, patients with cardiomyopathies require neurological investigation and avoidance of muscle toxic medication if a neuromuscular disorder is diagnosed. Which patients with cardiomyopathy profit most from primary stroke prevention is unsolved and requires further investigations.

  11. Distinguishing between anomalous origin of the left coronary artery from the pulmonary trunk and dilated cardiomyopathy: role of echocardiographic measurement of the right coronary artery diameter.

    PubMed Central

    Koike, K; Musewe, N N; Smallhorn, J F; Freedom, R M

    1989-01-01

    Patients with anomalous origin of the left coronary artery from the pulmonary trunk usually have a large right coronary artery. This study examines the diagnostic value of measuring the diameter of the right coronary artery by echocardiography in distinguishing between this lesion and other causes of dilated cardiomyopathy. The diameter of the right coronary artery and the right coronary artery/aorta ratio were measured in the parasternal short axis view in 40 controls, 11 patients with dilated cardiomyopathy, and 10 with anomalous origin of the left coronary artery from the pulmonary trunk. In the controls, the diameter of the right coronary artery increased with age, but the right coronary artery/aorta ratio remained constant. In the control group the 95% upper limits of prediction for right coronary artery diameter were 1.6 mm for one month of age, 1.8 mm for three months, 2.0 mm for one year, 2.2 mm for two years, 2.4 mm for three years, 2.6 mm for four years, 2.7 mm for six years, 3.0 mm for eight years, and 3.2 mm for 10 years; and for right coronary/aorta ratios the limits were 0.17 for one month to one year, 0.18 for one to six years, 0.19 for six to 10 years, and 0.20 for more than 10 years. All patients with dilated cardiomyopathy had normal right coronary artery diameters and right coronary artery/aorta ratios (0.10-0.13). Those patients with anomalous origin of the left coronary artery from the pulmonary trunk had larger than normal right coronary artery diameter and a significant increase in the right coronary artery/aorta ratio (0.21-0.29). The presence of an anomalous left coronary artery was likely if the diameter of the right coronary artery or the right coronary artery/aorta ratio was larger than the normal 95% limits of prediction. Images Fig 1 PMID:2923759

  12. Herpes simplex virus-induced cardiomyopathy successfully treated with acyclovir.

    PubMed

    Kuchynka, Petr; Palecek, Tomas; Hrbackova, Hana; Vitkova, Ivana; Simek, Stanislav; Nemecek, Eduard; Aster, Viktor; Louch, William E; Aschermann, Michael; Linhart, Ales

    2010-10-01

    Inflammatory dilated cardiomyopathy (DCMi) represents an acquired form of dilated cardiomyopathy. Viral infection is the most common cause of DCMi. In contrast with other cardiotropic viruses, herpes simplex virus (HSV) is a very rare finding in endomyocardial biopsies of patients with dilated cardiomyopathy. We report a case of HSV-induced cardiomyopathy successfully treated with acyclovir.

  13. Dasatinib and Prednisolone Induction Therapy for a Case of Philadelphia Chromosome-Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia with Dilated Cardiomyopathy Accompanied by Life-Threatening Ventricular Tachycardia

    PubMed Central

    Nakamae, Hirohisa; Matsumoto, Kana; Morita, Kunihiko; Koga, Yuki; Momose, Dai; Hino, Masayuki

    2017-01-01

    A 56-year-old man being treated for dilated cardiomyopathy presented with epigastralgia. He was diagnosed with ventricular tachycardia and Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia. After treating incessant ventricular tachycardia, we commenced induction therapy for leukemia with dasatinib and prednisolone to minimize toxicity towards cardiomyocytes and the cardiac conduction system. Although dasatinib was temporarily withheld because of a recurrence of ventricular tachycardia, we rechallenged dasatinib while using bisoprolol and amiodarone and achieved a complete hematological response three weeks later. Although drug interactions between dasatinib and amiodarone were of concern, the blood concentration of each drug remained within the safe range after concomitant use, and there were no adverse cardiac effects such as QT prolongation after rechallenging dasatinib. Induction therapy with dasatinib and prednisolone may be an acceptable therapeutic option for Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia with severe cardiac complications. PMID:28326207

  14. Intraventricular vorticity favors conservation of kinetic energy along the cardiac cycle: analysis in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy by post-processing color-doppler images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alhama, Marta; Benito, Yolanda; Bermejo, Javier; Yotti, Raquel; Perez-David, Esther; Barrio, Alicia; Perez Del Villar, Candelas; Gonzalez Mansilla, Ana; Fernandez Aviles, Francisco; Del Alamo, Juan Carlos

    2011-11-01

    Background: This study assesses if the left ventricle (LV) filling vortex developed during diastole may be a mechanism that improves systolic efficiency. 19 patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and 37 healthy volunteers were studied. Recently, we have developed and validated a method that derives two-dimensional maps of the LV flow from standard color-Doppler sequences. Two-dimensional maps of instantaneous LV flow were obtained, and circulation, energy and position of the main and secondary vortices were calculated along the cardiac cycle. At aortic valve opening (AVO) the vortex circulation is higher in DCM subjects than healthy volunteers. However, the position of the vortex is farthest form LV outflow tract (LVOT), and this results in lower flow velocity in LVOT at AVO. This phenomenon is altered in patients with DCM. Supported by ISCIII (Spain) and NIH 1 R21 HL108268-01 (US).

  15. Systemic autoimmunity induced by the TLR7/8 agonist Resiquimod causes myocarditis and dilated cardiomyopathy in a new mouse model of autoimmune heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Hasham, Muneer G.; Baxan, Nicoleta; Stuckey, Daniel J.; Branca, Jane; Perkins, Bryant; Dent, Oliver; Duffy, Ted; Hameed, Tolani S.; Stella, Sarah E.; Bellahcene, Mohammed; Schneider, Michael D.; Harding, Sian E.; Rosenthal, Nadia

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Systemic autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) show significant heart involvement and cardiovascular morbidity, which can be due to systemically increased levels of inflammation or direct autoreactivity targeting cardiac tissue. Despite high clinical relevance, cardiac damage secondary to systemic autoimmunity lacks inducible rodent models. Here, we characterise immune-mediated cardiac tissue damage in a new model of SLE induced by topical application of the Toll-like receptor 7/8 (TLR7/8) agonist Resiquimod. We observe a cardiac phenotype reminiscent of autoimmune-mediated dilated cardiomyopathy, and identify auto-antibodies as major contributors to cardiac tissue damage. Resiquimod-induced heart disease is a highly relevant mouse model for mechanistic and therapeutic studies aiming to protect the heart during autoimmunity. PMID:28250051

  16. Iodine-123 meta-iodobenzylguanidine scintigraphy: a noninvasive method to demonstrate myocardial adrenergic nervous system disintegrity in patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Schofer, J.; Spielmann, R.; Schuchert, A.; Weber, K.; Schlueter, M.

    1988-11-01

    Iodine-123 (I-123) meta-iodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) imaging was performed in 31 patients. Three patients were without cardiac disease and 28 had idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy with various degrees of left ventricular dysfunction. The qualitatively assessed myocardial I-123 MIBG scintigrams and the myocardial versus mediastinal I-123 MIBG uptake ratio were related to I-123 MIBG activity and norepinephrine concentration determined from endomyocardial biopsy samples taken from the right side of the interventricular septum. Scintigrams and the MIBG uptake ratio were also related to plasma catecholamine concentrations, left ventricular ejection fraction and New York Heart Association functional class. Patients with distinct myocardial I-123 MIBG uptake (score 1) had a normal ejection fraction (58 +/- 16%). Patients with diffusely reduced uptake or scintigraphic defects (score 2) had a significantly lower ejection fraction (38 +/- 9%, p less than 0.05), whereas patients with shadowy or no visible myocardial uptake (score 3) had the lowest ejection fraction (23 +/- 6%, p less than 0.002 versus patients with score 2). The scintigraphically determined I-123 MIBG activity in the septal region correlated significantly with I-123 MIBG activity from the endomyocardial biopsy samples (r = 0.78, p less than 0.001, n = 9). The myocardial versus mediastinal I-123 MIBG activity ratio was significantly related to myocardial norepinephrine concentration (r = 0.63, n = 28) and to left ventricular ejection fraction (r = 0.74, n = 31). These data suggest that myocardial I-123 MIBG scintigraphy is a useful noninvasive method for the assessment of myocardial adrenergic nervous system disintegrity in patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy.

  17. Mutations in the Voltage Sensors of Domains I and II of Nav1.5 that are Associated with Arrhythmias and Dilated Cardiomyopathy Generate Gating Pore Currents.

    PubMed

    Moreau, Adrien; Gosselin-Badaroudine, Pascal; Boutjdir, Mohamed; Chahine, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Voltage gated sodium channels (Nav) are transmembrane proteins responsible for action potential initiation. Mutations mainly located in the voltage sensor domain (VSD) of Nav1.5, the cardiac sodium channel, have been associated with the development of arrhythmias combined with dilated cardiomyopathy. Gating pore currents have been observed with three unrelated mutations associated with similar clinical phenotypes. However, gating pores have never been associated with mutations outside the first domain of Nav1.5. The aim of this study was to explore the possibility that gating pore currents might be caused by the Nav1.5 R225P and R814W mutations (R3, S4 in DI and DII, respectively), which are associated with rhythm disturbances and dilated cardiomyopathy. Nav1.5 WT and mutant channels were transiently expressed in tsA201 cells. The biophysical properties of the alpha pore currents and the presence of gating pore currents were investigated using the patch-clamp technique. We confirmed the previously reported gain of function of the alpha pores of the mutant channels, which mainly consisted of increased window currents mostly caused by shifts in the voltage dependence of activation. We also observed gating pore currents associated with the R225P and R814W mutations. This novel permeation pathway was open under depolarized conditions and remained temporarily open at hyperpolarized potentials after depolarization periods. Gating pore currents could represent a molecular basis for the development of uncommon electrical abnormalities and changes in cardiac morphology. We propose that this biophysical defect be routinely evaluated in the case of Nav1.5 mutations on the VSD.

  18. Pharmacological Modulation of Calcium Homeostasis in Familial Dilated Cardiomyopathy: An In Vitro Analysis From an RBM20 Patient‐Derived iPSC Model

    PubMed Central

    Wyles, SP; Hrstka, SC; Reyes, S; Terzic, A; Olson, TM

    2016-01-01

    For inherited cardiomyopathies, abnormal sensitivity to intracellular calcium (Ca2+), incurred from genetic mutations, initiates subsequent molecular events leading to pathological remodeling. Here, we characterized the effect of β‐adrenergic stress in familial dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) using human‐induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC)‐derived cardiomyocytes (CMs) from a patient with RBM20 DCM. Our findings suggest that β‐adrenergic stimulation accelerated defective Ca2+ homeostasis, apoptotic changes, and sarcomeric disarray in familial DCM hiPSC‐CMs. Furthermore, pharmacological modulation of abnormal Ca2+ handling by pretreatment with β‐blocker, carvedilol, or Ca2+‐channel blocker, verapamil, significantly decreased the area under curve, reduced percentage of disorganized cells, and decreased terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase‐mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate nick‐end labeling (TUNEL)‐positive apoptotic loci in familial DCM hiPSC‐CMs after β‐adrenergic stimulation. These translational data provide patient‐based in vitro analysis of β‐adrenergic stress in RBM20‐deficient familial DCM hiPSC‐CMs and evaluation of therapeutic interventions to modify heart disease progression, which may be personalized, but more importantly generalized in the clinic. PMID:27105042

  19. Congestive hepatic fibrosis score: a novel histologic assessment of clinical severity.

    PubMed

    Dai, Dao-Fu; Swanson, Paul E; Krieger, Eric V; Liou, Iris W; Carithers, Robert L; Yeh, Matthew M

    2014-12-01

    Chronic right heart failure predisposes to hepatic passive congestion and centrizonal necrosis that may lead to hepatic fibrosis (cardiac sclerosis). Although there have been several studies on the histologic features of congestive hepatopathy, there is no available grading system. In this study we developed a novel grading system for congestive hepatic fibrosis. Liver biopsies were examined in patients with chronic heart failure of various etiologies including congenital heart disease, idiopathic cardiomyopathy, ischemic heart disease, and valvular heart disease. The cases with available echocardiography and/or right heart catheterization were included. Cases with other types of underlying chronic liver diseases, alcoholic liver disease, significant steatosis (>20%), malignant neoplasm, and acute heart failure or shock were excluded. After exclusion, 42 cases were included in the study. We herein proposed a novel congestive hepatic fibrosis score and correlated it with the right heart structure and function obtained by echocardiography and/or right heart catheterization. Our results showed that congestive hepatic fibrosis score is well correlated with the right atrial pressure (P for trend <0.001). The presence of portal fibrosis (congestive hepatic fibrosis scores 2 and 3) is associated with significantly higher right atrial pressure than those with no fibrosis (P<0.001) or with centrizonal fibrosis only (P=0.02). Congestive hepatic fibrosis score is also significantly associated with increasing severity of right atrial dilatation (P=0.03) and right ventricular dilatation (P=0.02), indicators for chronic volume and/or pressure overload. Other histopathologic features include sinusoidal dilatation and centrizonal hepatocyte atrophy. In summary, although sinusoidal dilatation and centrizonal fibrosis are the hallmarks of hepatic passive congestion, the presence of portal fibrosis is suggestive of more advanced disease, as it correlates with more severe impairment

  20. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy simulating an infiltrative myocardial disease.

    PubMed Central

    Frustaci, A; Loperfido, F; Pennestrì, F

    1985-01-01

    Congestive heart failure developed in a patient with low electrocardiographic QRS voltages, diffuse thickening of the septum and free cardiac wall, and a reduction in left ventricular internal diameter, which suggested an infiltrative heart muscle disease. Histological examination at necropsy showed hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with symmetrical left ventricular hypertrophy. Myocardial disarray of type 1A disorganisation was extensive and equally distributed in the ventricular septum and the left anterior and left posterior ventricular free walls. Severe fibrosis (40%) was also present and may have been a possible cause of the electrocardiographic abnormalities as well as of the lack of ventricular dilatation. Images PMID:4041302

  1. Bortezomib-induced Severe Congestive Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Jerkins, James H.; Suciu, Anca; Mazimba, Sula; Calvo, Alejandro

    2010-01-01

    The clinical manifestations of anti-cancer drug associated cardiac side effects are diverse and can range from acutely induced cardiac arrhythmias to severe contractile dysfunction, and potentially fatal heart failure. Anthracyclines and trastuzumab cardiac toxicity have been well described and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) evaluation is commonly performed before their use. Bortezomib (Velcade), a potent, specific and reversible proteasome inhibitor is approved for treatment of multiple myeloma (MM). The incidence of cardiac failure associated with bortezomib therapy in clinical trials remains incidental. Acute exacerbation of pre-existing congestive cardiac failure has been associated with this therapy but de novo cardiomyopathy has been reported in only one patient receiving bortezomib for small cell lung cancer. As a result, cardiac evaluation is not normally ordered before its use. We describe a 50-year-old female with newly diagnosed MM and no risk factors for cardiac disease that unexpectedly developed florid heart failure after 2 cycles of bortezomib and low-dose dexamethasone. 2-D echocardiogram showed dilated cardiomyopathy with severely decreased LVEF; no changes consistent with amyloid deposits or myocardial scarring were described. Coronary angiogram ruled out coronary artery disease. The mechanism of bortezomib-induced cardiomyopathy has been postulated to be through fluid retention. Based on literature review we hypothesize that the disruption of the ubiquitin-proteasome system by bortezomib may cause cardiomyopathy and severe cardiac failure. As Bortezomib is a new and promising therapy for MM patients, we recommend routinely monitoring cardiac parameters in patients undergoing this treatment.

  2. Mitochondrial Cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    El-Hattab, Ayman W; Scaglia, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are found in all nucleated human cells and perform various essential functions, including the generation of cellular energy. Mitochondria are under dual genome control. Only a small fraction of their proteins are encoded by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), whereas more than 99% of them are encoded by nuclear DNA (nDNA). Mutations in mtDNA or mitochondria-related nDNA genes result in mitochondrial dysfunction leading to insufficient energy production required to meet the needs for various organs, particularly those with high energy requirements, including the central nervous system, skeletal and cardiac muscles, kidneys, liver, and endocrine system. Because cardiac muscles are one of the high energy demanding tissues, cardiac involvement occurs in mitochondrial diseases with cardiomyopathies being one of the most frequent cardiac manifestations found in these disorders. Cardiomyopathy is estimated to occur in 20-40% of children with mitochondrial diseases. Mitochondrial cardiomyopathies can vary in severity from asymptomatic status to severe manifestations including heart failure, arrhythmias, and sudden cardiac death. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is the most common type; however, mitochondrial cardiomyopathies might also present as dilated, restrictive, left ventricular non-compaction, and histiocytoid cardiomyopathies. Cardiomyopathies are frequent manifestations of mitochondrial diseases associated with defects in electron transport chain complexes subunits and their assembly factors, mitochondrial transfer RNAs, ribosomal RNAs, ribosomal proteins, translation factors, mtDNA maintenance, and coenzyme Q10 synthesis. Other mitochondrial diseases with cardiomyopathies include Barth syndrome, Sengers syndrome, TMEM70-related mitochondrial complex V deficiency, and Friedreich ataxia.

  3. Mitochondrial Cardiomyopathies

    PubMed Central

    El-Hattab, Ayman W.; Scaglia, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are found in all nucleated human cells and perform various essential functions, including the generation of cellular energy. Mitochondria are under dual genome control. Only a small fraction of their proteins are encoded by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), whereas more than 99% of them are encoded by nuclear DNA (nDNA). Mutations in mtDNA or mitochondria-related nDNA genes result in mitochondrial dysfunction leading to insufficient energy production required to meet the needs for various organs, particularly those with high energy requirements, including the central nervous system, skeletal and cardiac muscles, kidneys, liver, and endocrine system. Because cardiac muscles are one of the high energy demanding tissues, cardiac involvement occurs in mitochondrial diseases with cardiomyopathies being one of the most frequent cardiac manifestations found in these disorders. Cardiomyopathy is estimated to occur in 20–40% of children with mitochondrial diseases. Mitochondrial cardiomyopathies can vary in severity from asymptomatic status to severe manifestations including heart failure, arrhythmias, and sudden cardiac death. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is the most common type; however, mitochondrial cardiomyopathies might also present as dilated, restrictive, left ventricular non-compaction, and histiocytoid cardiomyopathies. Cardiomyopathies are frequent manifestations of mitochondrial diseases associated with defects in electron transport chain complexes subunits and their assembly factors, mitochondrial transfer RNAs, ribosomal RNAs, ribosomal proteins, translation factors, mtDNA maintenance, and coenzyme Q10 synthesis. Other mitochondrial diseases with cardiomyopathies include Barth syndrome, Sengers syndrome, TMEM70-related mitochondrial complex V deficiency, and Friedreich ataxia. PMID:27504452

  4. Gating pore currents are defects in common with two Nav1.5 mutations in patients with mixed arrhythmias and dilated cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Moreau, Adrien; Gosselin-Badaroudine, Pascal; Delemotte, Lucie; Klein, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    The gating pore current, also called omega current, consists of a cation leak through the typically nonconductive voltage-sensor domain (VSD) of voltage-gated ion channels. Although the study of gating pore currents has refined our knowledge of the structure and the function of voltage-gated ion channels, their implication in cardiac disorders has not been established. Two Nav1.5 mutations (R222Q and R225W) located in the VSD are associated with atypical clinical phenotypes involving complex arrhythmias and dilated cardiomyopathy. Using the patch-clamp technique, in silico mutagenesis, and molecular dynamic simulations, we tested the hypothesis that these two mutations may generate gating pore currents, potentially accounting for their clinical phenotypes. Our findings suggest that the gating pore current generated by the R222Q and R225W mutations could constitute the underlying pathological mechanism that links Nav1.5 VSD mutations with human cardiac arrhythmias and dilatation of cardiac chambers. PMID:25624448

  5. Gating pore currents are defects in common with two Nav1.5 mutations in patients with mixed arrhythmias and dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Moreau, Adrien; Gosselin-Badaroudine, Pascal; Delemotte, Lucie; Klein, Michael L; Chahine, Mohamed

    2015-02-01

    The gating pore current, also called omega current, consists of a cation leak through the typically nonconductive voltage-sensor domain (VSD) of voltage-gated ion channels. Although the study of gating pore currents has refined our knowledge of the structure and the function of voltage-gated ion channels, their implication in cardiac disorders has not been established. Two Na(v)1.5 mutations (R222Q and R225W) located in the VSD are associated with atypical clinical phenotypes involving complex arrhythmias and dilated cardiomyopathy. Using the patch-clamp technique, in silico mutagenesis, and molecular dynamic simulations, we tested the hypothesis that these two mutations may generate gating pore currents, potentially accounting for their clinical phenotypes. Our findings suggest that the gating pore current generated by the R222Q and R225W mutations could constitute the underlying pathological mechanism that links Na(v)1.5 VSD mutations with human cardiac arrhythmias and dilatation of cardiac chambers.

  6. Direct intramyocardial transthoracic transplantation of bone marrow mononuclear cells for non-ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy: INTRACELL, a prospective randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Sant'Anna, Roberto T.; Fracasso, James; Valle, Felipe H.; Castro, Iran; Nardi, Nance B.; Sant'Anna, João Ricardo M.; Nesralla, Ivo Abrahão; Kalil, Renato A. K.

    2014-01-01

    Objective We tested the hypothesis that direct intramyocardial injection of bone marrow mononuclear cells in patients with non-ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy can improve left ventricular function and physical capacity. Methods Thirty non-ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy patients with left ventricular ejection fraction <35% were randomized at a 1:2 ratio into two groups, control and treated. The bone marrow mononuclear cells group received 1.06±108 bone marrow mononuclear cells through mini-thoracotomy. There was no intervention in the control group. Assessment was carried out through clinical evaluations as well as a 6-min walk test, nuclear magnectic resonance imaging and echocardiogram. Results The bone marrow mononuclear cells group showed a trend toward left ventricular ejection fraction improvement, with magnectic resonance imaging - at 3 months, showing an increase from 27.80±6.86% to 30.13±9.06% (P=0.08) and returning to baseline at 9 months (28.78%, P=0.77). Magnectic resonance imaging showed no changes in left ventricular ejection fraction during follow-up of the control group (28.00±4.32%, 27.42±7.41%, and 29.57±4.50%). Echocardiogram showed left ventricular ejection fraction improved in the bone marrow mononuclear cells group at 3 months, 25.09±3.98 to 30.94±9.16 (P=0.01), and one year, 30.07±7.25% (P=0.001). The control group showed no change (26.1±4.4 vs 26.5±4.7 and 30.2±7.39%, P=0.25 and 0.10, respectively). Bone marrow mononuclear cells group showed improvement in New York Heart Association functional class, from 3.40±0.50 to 2.41±0.79 (P=0.002); patients in the control group showed no change (3.37±0.51 to 2.71±0.95; P=0.17). Six-minute walk test improved in the bone marrow mononuclear cells group (348.00±93.51m at baseline to 370.41±91.56m at 12 months, P=0.66) and there was a non-significant decline in the control group (361.25±90.78m to 330.00±123.42m after 12 months, P=0.66). Group comparisons were non-significant. Conclusion

  7. Genetic linkage analysis excludes HLA and several other potential candidates as being responsible for familial dilated cardiomyopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Durand, J.B.; Bachinski, L.L.; Beiling, L.

    1994-09-01

    Familial dilated cardiomyopthy (FDCM), manifested by ventricular dilation and decreased systolic function, is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. We identified a family segregating DCM with 11 affected living individuals in whom the diagnosis was confirmed by echocardiography (EF <50%, left ventricular volume >80 ml/m{sup 2}). DNA was extracted and analyzed with highly polymorphmic microsatellite markers (STRs). In view of the high frequency of antibodies to specific HLA proteins in FDCM, this region was selected as a possible candidate locus. Genes whose products are sarcomeric proteins were also selected as candidates. Genetic linkage of FDCM to these candidate genes was excluded on the basis of a LOD score of <= -2. Subsequent to the candidate gene approach we pursued random mapping and completed analysis of a total of 93 chromosomal markers excluding 1000 cM.

  8. Geometric differences of the mitral apparatus between ischemic and dilated cardiomyopathy with significant mitral regurgitation: real-time three-dimensional echocardiography study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwan, Jun; Shiota, Takahiro; Agler, Deborah A.; Popovic, Zoran B.; Qin, Jian Xin; Gillinov, Marc A.; Stewart, William J.; Cosgrove, Delos M.; McCarthy, Patrick M.; Thomas, James D.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study was conducted to elucidate the geometric differences of the mitral apparatus in patients with significant mitral regurgitation caused by ischemic cardiomyopathy (ICM-MR) and by idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM-MR) by use of real-time 3D echocardiography (RT3DE). METHODS AND RESULTS: Twenty-six patients with ICM-MR caused by posterior infarction, 18 patients with DCM-MR, and 8 control subjects were studied. With the 3D software, commissure-commissure plane and 3 perpendicular anteroposterior (AP) planes were generated for imaging the medial, central, and lateral sides of the mitral valve (MV) during mid systole. In 3 AP planes, the angles between the annular plane and each leaflet (anterior, Aalpha; posterior, Palpha) were measured. In ICM-MR, Aalpha measured in the medial and central planes was significantly larger than that in the lateral plane (39+/-5 degrees, 34+/-6 degrees, and 27+/-5 degrees, respectively; P<0.01), whereas Palpha showed no significant difference in any of the 3 AP planes (61+/-7 degrees, 57+/-7 degrees, and 56+/-7 degrees, P>0.05). In DCM-MR, both Aalpha (38+/-8 degrees, 37+/-9 degrees, and 36+/-7 degrees, P>0.05) and Palpha (59+/-6 degrees, 58+/-5 degrees, and 57+/-6 degrees, P>0.05) revealed no significant differences in the 3 planes. CONCLUSIONS: The pattern of MV deformation from the medial to the lateral side was asymmetrical in ICM-MR, whereas it was symmetrical in DCM-MR. RT3DE is a helpful tool for differentiating the geometry of the mitral apparatus between these 2 different types of functional mitral regurgitation.

  9. Activated nuclear transcription factor {kappa}B in patients with myocarditis and dilated cardiomyopathy-relation to inflammation and cardiac function

    SciTech Connect

    Alter, Peter . E-mail: palter@med.uni-marburg.de; Rupp, Heinz; Maisch, Bernhard

    2006-01-06

    Objectives and background: Myocarditis is caused by various agents and autoimmune processes. It is unknown whether viral genome persistence represents inactive remnants of previous infections or whether it is attributed to ongoing adverse processes. The latter also applies to the course of autoimmune myocarditis. One principal candidate for an adverse remodeling is nuclear factor-{kappa}B (NF{kappa}B). Methods: A total of 93 patients with suspected myocarditis/cardiomyopathy was examined. Hemodynamics were assessed by echocardiography as well as right and left heart catheterization. Endomyocardial biopsies were taken from the left ventricle. Biopsies were examined by immunohistochemistry and PCR for viral genomes. Selective immunostaining of activated NF{kappa}B was performed. Results: NF{kappa}B was increased in patients with myocarditis when compared with controls (11.1 {+-} 7.1% vs. 5.0 {+-} 5.3%, P < 0.005) whereas dilated cardiomyopathy showed no significant increase. Patients with myocarditis and preserved left ventricular function exhibited increased activated NF{kappa}B when compared with reduced function (r {sup 2} = 0.72, P < 0.001). In parallel, inverse correlation of NF{kappa}B and left ventricular enddiasstolic volume was found (r {sup 2} = 0.43, P < 0.02). Increased activated NF{kappa}B was found in adenovirus persistence when compared with controls (P = 0.001). Only a trend of increased NF{kappa}B activation was seen in cytomegalovirus persistence. Parvovirus B19 persistence did not affect NF{kappa}B activation. Conclusions: Increased activation of NF{kappa}B is related to inflammatory processes in myocarditis. Since activated NF{kappa}B correlates with left ventricular function, it could be assumed that NF{kappa}B activation occurs at early stages of inflammation. Potentially, NF{kappa}B could inhibit loss of cardiomyocytes by apoptosis and protect from cardiac dilation. Since NF{kappa}B is a crucial key transcription factor of inflammation, its

  10. PSORIASIS AND CARDIOMYOPATHY: AN INTRIGUING ASSOCIATION

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Anupam; Deepshikha

    2010-01-01

    A 25-year-old male symptomatic of heart disease for four months presented with biventricular failure. Echocardiography revealed dilated cardiomyopathy. He had skin lesions for 10 years which were clinically and histopathologically identified as psoriasis. Association of cardiomyopathy with psoriasis is uncommon and intriguing. The link between dilated cardiomyopathy and psoriasis on a common inflammatory background is discussed. PMID:21063523

  11. Types of Cardiomyopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Links Related Topics Arrhythmia Heart Failure Heart Murmur Heart Valve Disease Sudden Cardiac Arrest Send a link to NHLBI ... effectively. Dilated cardiomyopathy can lead to heart failure , heart valve disease , irregular heart rate , and blood clots in the ...

  12. Early-progressive dilated cardiomyopathy in a family with Becker muscular dystrophy related to a novel frameshift mutation in the dystrophin gene exon 27.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, Takeshi; Fitzgerald, Kristi; Scavena, Mena; Gidding, Samuel; Cox, Mary O; Marks, Harold; Flanigan, Kevin M; Moore, Steven A

    2015-03-01

    We report a family in which two male siblings with Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) developed severe dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and progressive heart failure (HF) at age 11 years; one died at age 14 years while awaiting heart transplant and the other underwent left ventricular assist device implantation at the same age. Genetic analysis of one sibling showed a novel frameshift mutation in exon 27 of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) gene (c.3779_3785delCTTTGGAinsGG), in which seven base pairs are deleted and two are inserted. Although this predicts an amino-acid substitution and premature termination (p.Thr1260Argfs*8), muscle biopsy dystrophin immunostaining instead indicates that the mutation is more likely to alter splicing. Despite relatively preserved skeletal muscular performance, both the siblings developed progressive HF secondary to early-onset DCM. In addition, their 7-year-old nephew with delayed gross motor development, mild proximal muscle weakness and markedly elevated serum creatine kinase level (>13 000 IU l(-1)) at 16 months was recently demonstrated to have the familial DMD mutation. Here, we report a novel genotype of BMD with early-onset DCM and progressive lethal HF during early adolescence.

  13. Early Progressive Dilated Cardiomyopathy in a Family with Becker Muscular Dystrophy Related to a Novel Frameshift Mutation in the Dystrophin Gene Exon 27

    PubMed Central

    Tsuda, Takeshi; Fitzgerald, Kristi; Scavena, Mena; Gidding, Samuel; Cox, Mary O.; Marks, Harold; Flanigan, Kevin M.; Moore, Steven A.

    2014-01-01

    We report a family in which two male siblings with Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) developed severe dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and progressive heart failure (HF) at age 11; one died at age 14 years while awaiting heart transplant and the other underwent left ventricular assist device (LVAD) implantation at the same age. Genetic analysis of one sibling showed a novel frameshift mutation in exon 27 of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) gene (c.3779_3785delCTTTGGAins GG), in which 7 base pairs are deleted and two are inserted. While this predicts an amino acid substitution and premature termination (p.Thr1260Argfs*8), muscle biopsy dystrophin immunostaining instead indicates that the mutation is more likely to alter splicing. Despite relatively preserved skeletal muscular performance, both siblings developed progressive heart failure secondary to early onset DCM. In addition, their 7 year old nephew with delayed gross motor development, mild proximal muscle weakness, and markedly elevated serum creatine kinase (CK) level (> 13,000 IU/L) at 16 months was recently demonstrated to have the familial DMD mutation. Here we report a novel genotype of BMD with early onset DCM and progressive lethal heart failure during early adolescence. PMID:25537791

  14. Usefulness of microvolt T-wave alternans for prediction of ventricular tachyarrhythmic events in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy: results from a prospective observational study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hohnloser, Stefan H.; Klingenheben, Thomas; Bloomfield, Daniel; Dabbous, Omar; Cohen, Richard J.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study was designed to evaluate the ability of microvolt-level T-wave alternans (MTWA) to identify prospectively patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) at risk of ventricular tachyarrhythmic events and to compare its predictive accuracy with that of conventional risk stratifiers. BACKGROUND: Patients with DCM are at increased risk of sudden death from ventricular tachyarrhythmias. At present, there are no established methods of assessing this risk. METHODS: A total of 137 patients with DCM underwent risk stratification through assessment of MTWA, left ventricular ejection fraction, baroreflex sensitivity (BRS), heart rate variability, presence of nonsustained ventricular tachycardia (VT), signal-averaged electrocardiogram, and presence of intraventricular conduction defect. The study end point was either sudden death, resuscitated ventricular fibrillation, or documented hemodynamically unstable VT. RESULTS: During an average follow-up of 14 +/- 6 months, MTWA and BRS were significant univariate predictors of ventricular tachyarrhythmic events (p < 0.035 and p < 0.015, respectively). Multivariate Cox regression analysis revealed that only MTWA was a significant predictor. CONCLUSIONS: Microvolt-level T-wave alternans is a powerful independent predictor of ventricular tachyarrhythmic events in patients with DCM.

  15. [The origin of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Moiseev, V S

    1985-01-01

    The author describes the clinical cases of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (CMP). The development of obstructive CMP in a patient with hyperparathyroidism indicates a possible pathogenetic role of endocrine factors and calcium metabolism abnormalities. The familial character of the disease and its combination with hereditary diseases (familial microspherocytosis) point to the significance of genetic factors. In addition, marked hypertrophy of the myocardium (without dilatation) including hypertrophy with obstruction of the outflow tract of the left ventricle was observed in nonspecific protracted myocarditis, alcoholic injury to the heart, in athletes, in coronary heart disease (after survival of myocardial infarction). It is suggested that hypertrophic CMP (similarly to restrictive and congestive CMP) is most likely a syndrome of varying origin.

  16. [Peripartum cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Mouquet, Frédéric; Bouabdallaoui, Nadia

    2015-01-01

    The peripartum cardiomyopathy is a rare form of dilated cardiomyopathy resulting from alteration of angiogenesis toward the end of pregnancy. The diagnosis is based on the association of clinical heart failure and systolic dysfunction assessed by echocardiography or magnetic resonance imaging. Diagnoses to rule out are myocardial infarction, amniotic liquid embolism, myocarditis, inherited cardiomyopathy, and history of treatment by anthracycline. Risk factors are advance maternal age (>30), multiparity, twin pregnancy, African origin, obesity, preeclampsia, gestational hypertension, and prolonged tocolytic therapy. Treatment of acute phase is identical to usual treatment of acute systolic heart failure. After delivery, VKA treatment should be discussed in case of systolic function <25% because of higher risk of thrombus. A specific treatment by bromocriptine can be initiated on a case-by-case basis. Complete recovery of systolic function is observed in 50% of cases. The mortality risk is low. Subsequent pregnancy should be discouraged, especially if systolic function did not recover.

  17. The LMNA mutation p.Arg321Ter associated with dilated cardiomyopathy leads to reduced expression and a skewed ratio of lamin A and lamin C proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Saaidi, Rasha; Rasmussen, Torsten B.; Palmfeldt, Johan; Nissen, Peter H.; Beqqali, Abdelaziz; Hansen, Jakob; Pinto, Yigal M.; Boesen, Thomas; Mogensen, Jens; Bross, Peter

    2013-11-15

    Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is a disease of the heart muscle characterized by cardiac chamber enlargement and reduced systolic function of the left ventricle. Mutations in the LMNA gene represent the most frequent known genetic cause of DCM associated with disease of the conduction systems. The LMNA gene generates two major transcripts encoding the nuclear lamina major components lamin A and lamin C by alternative splicing. Both haploinsuffiency and dominant negative effects have been proposed as disease mechanism for premature termination codon (PTC) mutations in LMNA. These mechanisms however are still not clearly established. In this study, we used a representative LMNA nonsense mutation, p.Arg321Ter, to shed light on the molecular disease mechanisms. Cultured fibroblasts from three DCM patients carrying this mutation were analyzed. Quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR and sequencing of these PCR products indicated that transcripts from the mutant allele were degraded by the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) mechanism. The fact that no truncated mutant protein was detectable in western blot (WB) analysis strengthens the notion that the mutant transcript is efficiently degraded. Furthermore, WB analysis showed that the expression of lamin C protein was reduced by the expected approximately 50%. Clearly decreased lamin A and lamin C levels were also observed by immunofluorescence microscopy analysis. However, results from both WB and nano-liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry demonstrated that the levels of lamin A protein were more reduced suggesting an effect on expression of lamin A from the wild type allele. PCR analysis of the ratio of lamin A to lamin C transcripts showed unchanged relative amounts of lamin A transcript suggesting that the effect on the wild type allele was operative at the protein level. Immunofluorescence microscopy analysis showed no abnormal nuclear morphology of patient fibroblast cells. Based on these data, we propose that

  18. Impact of repeated intravenous bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells infusion on myocardial collagen network remodeling in a rat model of doxorubicin-induced dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qin; Li, Qianxiao; Na, Rongmei; Li, Xiaofei; Liu, Baiting; Meng, Lili; Liutong, Hanyu; Fang, Weiyi; Zhu, Ning; Zheng, Xiaoqun

    2014-02-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) transplantation improved cardiac function and reduced myocardial fibrosis in both ischemic and non-ischemic cardiomyopathies. We evaluated the effects of repeated peripheral vein injection of MSCs on collagen network remodeling and myocardial TGF-β1, AT1, CYP11B2 (aldosterone synthase) gene expressions in a rat model of doxorubicin (DOX)-induced dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Thirty-eight out of 53 SD rats survived at 10 weeks post-DOX injection (2.5 mg/kg/week for 6 weeks, i.p.) were divided into DCM blank (without treatment, n = 12), DCM placebo (intravenous tail injection of 0.5 mL serum-free culture medium every other day for ten times, n = 13), and DCM plus MSCs group (intravenous tail injection of 5 × 10(6) MSCs dissolved in 0.5 mL serum-free culture medium every other day for 10 times, n = 13). Ten untreated rats served as normal controls. At 20 weeks after DOX injection, echocardiography, myocardial collagen content, myocardial expressions of types I and III collagen, TGF-β1, AT1, and CYP11B2 were compared among groups. At 20 weeks post-DOX injection, 8 rats (67%) survived in DCM blank group, 9 rats (69%) survived in DCM placebo group while 13 rats (100 %) survived in DCM plus MSCs group. Left ventricular end-diastolic diameter was significantly higher and ejection fraction was significantly lower in DCM blank and DCM placebo groups compared to normal control rats, which were significantly improved in DCM plus MSCs group (all p < 0.05 vs. DCM blank and DCM placebo groups). Moreover, myocardial collagen volume fraction, types I and III collagen, myocardial mRNA expressions of TGF-β1, AT1, CYP11B2, and collagen I/III ratio were all significantly lower in DCM plus MSCs group compared to DCM blank and DCM placebo groups (all p < 0.05). Repeated intravenous MSCs transplantation could improve cardiac function by attenuating myocardial collagen network remodeling possibly through downregulating renin

  19. [Classification of cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Asakura, Masanori; Kitakaze, Masafumi

    2014-01-01

    Cardiomyopathy is a group of cardiovascular diseases with poor prognosis. Some patients with dilated cardiomyopathy need heart transplantations due to severe heart failure. Some patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy die unexpectedly due to malignant ventricular arrhythmias. Various phenotypes of cardiomyopathies are due to the heterogeneous group of diseases. The classification of cardiomyopathies is important and indispensable in the clinical situation. However, their classification has not been established, because the causes of cardiomyopathies have not been fully elucidated. We usually use definition and classification offered by WHO/ISFC task force in 1995. Recently, several new definitions and classifications of the cardiomyopathies have been published by American Heart Association, European Society of Cardiology and Japanese Circulation Society.

  20. Lack of Gαi2 leads to dilative cardiomyopathy and increased mortality in β1-adrenoceptor overexpressing mice

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Kirsten; Maass, Martina; Dizayee, Sara; Leiss, Veronika; Annala, Suvi; Köth, Jessica; Seemann, Wiebke K.; Müller-Ehmsen, Jochen; Mohr, Klaus; Nürnberg, Bernd; Engelhardt, Stefan; Herzig, Stefan; Birnbaumer, Lutz; Matthes, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Aims Inhibitory G (Gi) proteins have been proposed to be cardioprotective. We investigated effects of Gαi2 knockout on cardiac function and survival in a murine heart failure model of cardiac β1-adrenoceptor overexpression. Methods and results β1-transgenic mice lacking Gαi2 (β1-tg/Gαi2−/−) were compared with wild-type mice and littermates either overexpressing cardiac β1-adrenoceptors (β1-tg) or lacking Gαi2 (Gαi2−/−). At 300 days, mortality of mice only lacking Gαi2 was already higher compared with wild-type or β1-tg, but similar to β1-tg/Gαi2−/−, mice. Beyond 300 days, mortality of β1-tg/Gαi2−/− mice was enhanced compared with all other genotypes (mean survival time: 363 ± 21 days). At 300 days of age, echocardiography revealed similar cardiac function of wild-type, β1-tg, and Gαi2−/− mice, but significant impairment for β1-tg/Gαi2−/− mice (e.g. ejection fraction 14 ± 2 vs. 40 ± 4% in wild-type mice). Significantly increased ventricle-to-body weight ratio (0.71 ± 0.06 vs. 0.48 ± 0.02% in wild-type mice), left ventricular size (length 0.82 ± 0.04 vs. 0.66 ± 0.03 cm in wild types), and atrial natriuretic peptide and brain natriuretic peptide expression (mRNA: 2819 and 495% of wild-type mice, respectively) indicated hypertrophy. Gαi3 was significantly up-regulated in Gαi2 knockout mice (protein compared with wild type: 340 ± 90% in Gαi2−/− and 394 ± 80% in β1-tg/Gαi2−/−, respectively). Conclusions Gαi2 deficiency combined with cardiac β1-adrenoceptor overexpression strongly impaired survival and cardiac function. At 300 days of age, β1-adrenoceptor overexpression alone had not induced cardiac hypertrophy or dysfunction while there was overt cardiomyopathy in mice additionally lacking Gαi2. We propose an enhanced effect of increased β1-adrenergic drive by the lack of protection via Gαi2. Gαi3 up-regulation was not sufficient to compensate for Gαi2 deficiency, suggesting an isoform-specific or

  1. Dilated Cardiomyopathy Mutation (R134W) in Mouse Cardiac Troponin T Induces Greater Contractile Deficits against α-Myosin Heavy Chain than against β-Myosin Heavy Chain.

    PubMed

    Gollapudi, Sampath K; Chandra, Murali

    2016-01-01

    Many studies have demonstrated that depressed myofilament Ca(2+) sensitivity is common to dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) in humans. However, it remains unclear whether a single determinant-such as myofilament Ca(2+) sensitivity-is sufficient to characterize all cases of DCM because the severity of disease varies widely with a given mutation. Because dynamic features dominate in the heart muscle, alterations in dynamic contractile parameters may offer better insight on the molecular mechanisms that underlie disparate effects of DCM mutations on cardiac phenotypes. Dynamic features are dominated by myofilament cooperativity that stem from different sources. One such source is the strong tropomyosin binding region in troponin T (TnT), which is known to modulate crossbridge (XB) recruitment dynamics in a myosin heavy chain (MHC)-dependent manner. Therefore, we hypothesized that the effects of DCM-linked mutations in TnT on contractile dynamics would be differently modulated by α- and β-MHC. After reconstitution with the mouse TnT equivalent (TnTR134W) of the human DCM mutation (R131W), we measured dynamic contractile parameters in detergent-skinned cardiac muscle fiber bundles from normal (α-MHC) and transgenic mice (β-MHC). TnTR134W significantly attenuated the rate constants of tension redevelopment, XB recruitment dynamics, XB distortion dynamics, and the magnitude of length-mediated XB recruitment only in α-MHC fiber bundles. TnTR134W decreased myofilament Ca(2+) sensitivity to a greater extent in α-MHC (0.14 pCa units) than in β-MHC fiber bundles (0.08 pCa units). Thus, our data demonstrate that TnTR134W induces a more severe DCM-like contractile phenotype against α-MHC than against β-MHC background.

  2. Dilated Cardiomyopathy Mutation (R134W) in Mouse Cardiac Troponin T Induces Greater Contractile Deficits against α-Myosin Heavy Chain than against β-Myosin Heavy Chain

    PubMed Central

    Gollapudi, Sampath K.; Chandra, Murali

    2016-01-01

    Many studies have demonstrated that depressed myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity is common to dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) in humans. However, it remains unclear whether a single determinant—such as myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity—is sufficient to characterize all cases of DCM because the severity of disease varies widely with a given mutation. Because dynamic features dominate in the heart muscle, alterations in dynamic contractile parameters may offer better insight on the molecular mechanisms that underlie disparate effects of DCM mutations on cardiac phenotypes. Dynamic features are dominated by myofilament cooperativity that stem from different sources. One such source is the strong tropomyosin binding region in troponin T (TnT), which is known to modulate crossbridge (XB) recruitment dynamics in a myosin heavy chain (MHC)-dependent manner. Therefore, we hypothesized that the effects of DCM-linked mutations in TnT on contractile dynamics would be differently modulated by α- and β-MHC. After reconstitution with the mouse TnT equivalent (TnTR134W) of the human DCM mutation (R131W), we measured dynamic contractile parameters in detergent-skinned cardiac muscle fiber bundles from normal (α-MHC) and transgenic mice (β-MHC). TnTR134W significantly attenuated the rate constants of tension redevelopment, XB recruitment dynamics, XB distortion dynamics, and the magnitude of length-mediated XB recruitment only in α-MHC fiber bundles. TnTR134W decreased myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity to a greater extent in α-MHC (0.14 pCa units) than in β-MHC fiber bundles (0.08 pCa units). Thus, our data demonstrate that TnTR134W induces a more severe DCM-like contractile phenotype against α-MHC than against β-MHC background. PMID:27757084

  3. Free Triiodothyronine Level Correlates with Myocardial Injury and Prognosis in Idiopathic Dilated Cardiomyopathy: Evidence from Cardiac MRI and SPECT/PET Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenyao; Guan, Haixia; Fang, Wei; Zhang, Kuo; Gerdes, A. Martin; Iervasi, Giorgio; Tang, Yi-Da

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid dysfunction is associated with poor prognosis in heart failure, but theories of mechanisms are mainly based on animal experiments, not on human level. We aimed to explore the relation between thyroid function and myocardial injuries in idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (IDCM) using cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET). Myocardial fibrosis was detected by late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) MRI, and myocardial perfusion/metabolism was evaluated by 99mTc-MIBI SPECT /18F-FDG PET imaging. Across the quartiles of FT3, decreased percentage of segments with LGE and perfusion/metabolism abnormalities were found. As for FT4 and TSH levels, no significant distribution trend of myocardial injuries could be detected. In logistic analysis, FT3 was independently associated with the presence of LGE (OR: 0.140, 95% CI: 0.035–0.567), perfusion abnormalities (OR: 0.172, 95% CI: 0.040–0.738) and metabolism abnormalities (OR: 0.281, 95% CI: 0.081–0.971). After a median follow-up of 46 months, LGE-positive and FT3 < 2.77 pg/mL was identified as the strongest predictor of cardiac events (HR: 8.623, 95% CI: 3.626–16.438). Low FT3 level is associated with myocardial fibrosis and perfusion/metabolism abnormalities in patients with IDCM. The combination of FT3 level and LGE provides useful information for assessing the prognosis of IDCM. PMID:28004791

  4. Relationship between evaluation by quantitative fatty acid myocardial scintigraphy and response to beta-blockade therapy in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Ito, T; Hoshida, S; Nishino, M; Aoi, T; Egami, Y; Takeda, T; Kawabata, M; Tanouchi, J; Yamada, Y; Kamada, T

    2001-12-01

    Predicting the effect of beta-blockade therapy on the clinical outcome of patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is difficult prior to the initiation of therapy. Myocardial fatty acid metabolism has been shown to be impaired in patients with DCM. We examined whether the extent of myocardial injury, as assessed by iodine-123 15-( p-iodophenyl)-3- R, S-methylpentadecanoic acid (BMIPP) myocardial scintigraphy, is related to the response of patients with DCM to beta-blockade therapy. Thirty-seven patients with DCM were examined using BMIPP myocardial scintigraphy before and after 6 months of treatment with metoprolol. Myocardial BMIPP uptake (%BM uptake) was estimated quantitatively as a percentage of the total injected count ratio. The left ventricular end-diastolic and end-systolic dimensions (LVDd, LVDs) and ejection fraction (LVEF) were also evaluated. The patients were divided into two groups according to their functional improvement (>10% elevation of LVEF) after 6 months of metoprolol therapy. Twenty-eight patients responded to the therapy, while nine did not. Prior to the therapy, no significant differences in LVDd, LVDs or LVEF were observed between the responders and non-responders. However, the %BM uptake was significantly lower in the non-responders than in the responders (1.0%+/-0.2% vs 2.1%+/-0.5%, P<0.001). The %BM uptake could be used to distinguish the responders from the non-responders with a sensitivity of 0.93 and a specificity of 1.00 at a threshold value of 1.4. After the metoprolol therapy, the %BM uptake improved significantly in the responders (2.5%+/-0.5%, P<0.01) but did not change in the non-responders. These results indicate that myocardial BMIPP uptake could predict the response of DCM patients to beta-blockade therapy.

  5. [Evaluation of therapy for dilated cardiomyopathy with heart failure by iodine-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine imaging: comparison with heart rate variability power spectral analysis].

    PubMed

    Li, S; Ikeda, J; Takita, T; Sekiguchi, Y; Demachi, J; Chikama, H; Goto, A; Shirato, K

    1998-11-01

    The relationship between the myocardial uptake of iodine-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine (123I-MIBG) and heart rate variability parameters has not been determined. This study determined the relationship between the change in myocardial uptake of 123I-MIBG and improvement in left ventricular function after treatment, to determine the usefulness of 123I-MIBG imaging to assess the effect of therapy on heart failure due to dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). 123I-MIBG imaging and power spectral analysis of heart rate variability were performed before and after treatment in 17 patients with heart failure due to DCM. The following parameters were compared before and after treatment: New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class, radiographic cardiothoracic ratio (CTR), blood pressure, echocardiographic data [left ventricular end-systolic (LVDs) and end-diastolic (LVDd) diameters, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF)], plasma concentrations of norepinephrine and epinephrine, heart rate variability power spectral analysis data [mean low frequency (MLF) and high frequency power (MHF)] and the myocardium to mediastinum activity ratio (MYO/M) obtained in early and late images, and washout rate calculated by anterior planar imaging of 123I-MIBG. The NYHA functional class, LVEF, LVDs, CTR, MLF and MHF improved after treatment. Early MYO/M and late MYO/M improved after treatment. The rate of increase in late MYO/M was positively correlated with the rate of improvement of LVEF after treatment. Furthermore, the late MYO/M was negatively correlated with MLF. Washout rate revealed no correlation with hemodynamic parameters. These findings suggest that late MYO/M is more useful than washout rate to assess the effect of treatment on heart failure due to DCM. Furthermore, the 123I-MIBG imaging and heart rate variability parameters are useful to assess the autonomic tone in DCM with heart failure.

  6. Does pretreatment of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells with 5-azacytidine or double intravenous infusion improve their therapeutic potential for dilated cardiomyopathy?

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Sirui; Piao, Jinhua; Jin, Lianhua; Zhou, Yan

    2013-01-01

    Background This study was designed to investigate whether pretreatment of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) with 5-azacytidine (5-aza) or double intravenous infusion could enhance their therapeutic potential for dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Material/Methods BMSCs were cultured for 2 weeks in the presence or absence of 5-aza and DCM serum. The cultured BMSCs (Groups 1 and 2), 5-aza-induced BMSCs (Groups 3 and 4), and medium alone (model control) were transplanted into 80 female Wistar rats by intravenous tail vein injection. Double infusion of BMSCs with 1-day time-interval was carried out in Groups 2 and 4. Postmortem histological analysis and evaluation of heart function were performed at 4 weeks post-transplantation. Results Some transplanted BMSCs engrafted into myocardial tissue and were positive for cardiac marker troponin T. The hearts containing transplanted BMSCs secreted a larger amount of vascular endothelial growth factor. Cardiac function parameters and serum level of brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) did not differ among Groups 1, 3, and the model control. As compared with model control, BMSC transplantation in Groups 2 and 4 significantly decreased the serum level of BNP and improved cardiac contractile function, as evidenced by reduced left ventricular end-diastolic and end-systolic diameter, elevated ejection fraction, and fractional shortening. Conclusions BMSC transplantation is a promising strategy for the treatment of DCM. Pretreatment of BMSCs with 5-aza and DCM serum does not enhance their therapeutic efficacy, and the double intravenous BMSC infusion method is superior to single infusion for preserving cardiac contractile function in a rat model of DCM. PMID:23314418

  7. PLEKHM2 mutation leads to abnormal localization of lysosomes, impaired autophagy flux and associates with recessive dilated cardiomyopathy and left ventricular noncompaction

    PubMed Central

    Muhammad, Emad; Levitas, Aviva; Singh, Sonia R.; Braiman, Alex; Ofir, Rivka; Etzion, Sharon; Sheffield, Val C.; Etzion, Yoram; Carrier, Lucie; Parvari, Ruti

    2015-01-01

    Gene mutations, mostly segregating with a dominant mode of inheritance, are important causes of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), a disease characterized by enlarged ventricular dimensions, impaired cardiac function, heart failure and high risk of death. Another myocardial abnormality often linked to gene mutations is left ventricular noncompaction (LVNC) characterized by a typical diffuse spongy appearance of the left ventricle. Here, we describe a large Bedouin family presenting with a severe recessive DCM and LVNC. Homozygosity mapping and exome sequencing identified a single gene variant that segregated as expected and was neither reported in databases nor in Bedouin population controls. The PLEKHM2 cDNA2156_2157delAG variant causes the frameshift p.Lys645AlafsTer12 and/or the skipping of exon 11 that results in deletion of 30 highly conserved amino acids. PLEKHM2 is known to interact with several Rabs and with kinesin-1, affecting endosomal trafficking. Accordingly, patients' primary fibroblasts exhibited abnormal subcellular distribution of endosomes marked by Rab5, Rab7 and Rab9, as well as the Golgi apparatus. In addition, lysosomes appeared to be concentrated in the perinuclear region, and autophagy flux was impaired. Transfection of wild-type PLEKHM2 cDNA into patient's fibroblasts corrected the subcellular distribution of the lysosomes, supporting the causal effect of PLEKHM2 mutation. PLEKHM2 joins LAMP-2 and BAG3 as a disease gene altering autophagy resulting in an isolated cardiac phenotype. The association of PLEKHM2 mutation with DCM and LVNC supports the importance of autophagy for normal cardiac function. PMID:26464484

  8. Time course of left ventricular reverse remodeling in response to pharmacotherapy: clinical implication for heart failure prognosis in patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Yuki; Inomata, Takayuki; Iida, Yuichiro; Iwamoto-Ishida, Miwa; Nabeta, Takeru; Ishii, Shunsuke; Sato, Takanori; Yanagisawa, Tomoyoshi; Mizutani, Tomohiro; Naruke, Takashi; Koitabashi, Toshimi; Takeuchi, Ichiro; Nishii, Mototsugu; Ako, Junya

    2016-04-01

    The present study aimed to identify the clinical significance of differences in detection timings of left ventricular reverse remodeling (LVRR) on heart failure (HF) prognosis in patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (IDCM). We investigated 207 patients with IDCM who underwent pharmacotherapeutic treatment. LVRR was defined as improvements in both LV ejection fraction ≥10 % and indexed LV end-diastolic dimension (LVEDDi) ≥10 %. Patients were stratified into 3 groups by LVRR timing: patients with LVRR <24 months (Early LVRR), those with LVRR ≥24 months (Delayed LVRR), and those without LVRR during the entire follow-up period (No LVRR). The major endpoint was first detection of composite event including readmission for decompensated HF, major ventricular arrhythmias, or all-cause mortality. LVRR was recognized in 108 patients (52 %): Early LVRR in 83 (40 %), Delayed LVRR in 25 (12 %), and No LVRR in 99 (48 %). The survival rate for the major endpoint was significantly higher for Delayed LVRR than for No LVRR (P = 0.001); there was no significant difference between Early and Delayed LVRR. Among patients without LVRR <24 months (Delayed + No LVRR), receiver operating characteristic curve analysis showed that the area under the curve for improvement in LVEDDi during the first 6 months for predicting subsequent LVRR (Delayed LVRR) [0.822 (95 % confidence interval, 0.740-0.916; P = 0.038)] was greater than that for improvement in LVEF. In conclusion, LVRR was a favorable prognostic indicator in patients with IDCM irrespective of its detection timing. Reduced LVEDDi during the first 6 months was predictive for subsequent LVRR in the later phase.

  9. Mitochondrial-related gene expression profiles suggest an important role of PGC-1alpha in the compensatory mechanism of endemic dilated cardiomyopathy

    SciTech Connect

    He, Shu-Lan; Tan, Wu-Hong; Zhang, Zeng-Tie; Zhang, Feng; Qu, Cheng-Juan; Lei, Yan-Xia; Zhu, Yan-He; Yu, Han-Jie; Xiang, You-Zhang; and others

    2013-10-15

    Keshan disease (KD) is an endemic dilated cardiomyopathy with unclear etiology. In this study, we compared mitochondrial-related gene expression profiles of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) derived from 16 KD patients and 16 normal controls in KD areas. Total RNA was isolated, amplified, labeled and hybridized to Agilent human 4×44k whole genome microarrays. Mitochondrial-related genes were screened out by the Third-Generation Human Mitochondria-Focused cDNA Microarray (hMitChip3). Quantitative real-time PCR, immunohistochemical and biochemical parameters related mitochondrial metabolism were conducted to validate our microarray results. In KD samples, 34 up-regulated genes (ratios≥2.0) were detected by significance analysis of microarrays and ingenuity systems pathway analysis (IPA). The highest ranked molecular and cellular functions of the differentially regulated genes were closely related to amino acid metabolism, free radical scavenging, carbohydrate metabolism, and energy production. Using IPA, 40 significant pathways and four significant networks, involved mainly in apoptosis, mitochondrion dysfunction, and nuclear receptor signaling were identified. Based on our results, we suggest that PGC-1alpha regulated energy metabolism and anti-apoptosis might play an important role in the compensatory mechanism of KD. Our results may lead to the identification of potential diagnostic biomarkers for KD in PBMCs, and may help to understand the pathogenesis of KD. Highlights: • Thirty-four up-regulated genes were detected in KD versus health controls. • Forty pathways and four networks were detected in KD. • PGC-1alpha regulated energy metabolism and anti-apoptosis in KD.

  10. [The significance of 201Tl/123I MIBG (metaiodobenzylguanidine) mismatched myocardial regions for predicting ventricular tachycardia in patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Maeno, M; Ishida, Y; Shimonagata, T; Hayashida, K; Toyama, T; Hirose, Y; Nagata, M; Miyatake, K; Uehara, T; Nishimura, T

    1993-10-01

    123I-MIBG (MIBG) regional defects in myocardial regions with preserved 201Tl (Tl) uptake have been observed in patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). To evaluate whether the presence of Tl/MIBG mismatched regions is related to the occurrence of ventricular tachycardia (VT), we performed myocardial dual SPECT imaging with Tl (111 MBq) and MIBG (111 MBq) in 17 patients with DCM, 11 (Gp A) with and 6 (Gp B) without VT. Myocardial dual SPECT imaging was performed at 15 minutes after and 4 hours after the tracer injection. The regional tracer uptake was scored visually in 6 segments of the basal, middle, and apical short-axial images and in 2 apical segments of the midventricular vertical long-axial image by a four-point scoring system (0 = normal, 1 = moderate, 2 = severe and 3 = complete defect). Then, the severity of tracer maldistributions was assessed by the difference between total defect scores (TDSs) of Tl and MIBG (delta TDS). TDS was not different between Gps A and B in both Tl and MIBG images. However, delta TDS was larger in Gp A than in Gp B (13.5 +/- 6.5 vs. 5.8 +/- 3.0, p < 0.05). Also, the number of segments with the mismatched tracer uptake was larger in Gp A than in Gp B (12.5 +/- 3.0 vs. 8.3 +/- 1.5, p < 0.01). In the electrophysiologic study, we found that the fractionated area corresponded to the mismatched region in 3 of 5 patients in Gp A. These results suggest that regional sympathetic denervation is a possible factor which provocates VT, and myocardial dual SPECT imaging with Tl and MIBG is a useful method for predicting VT in patients with DCM.

  11. Exome sequencing and genome-wide linkage analysis in 17 families illustrate the complex contribution of TTN truncating variants to dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Norton, Nadine; Li, Duanxiang; Rampersaud, Evadnie; Morales, Ana; Martin, Eden R; Zuchner, Stephan; Guo, Shengru; Gonzalez, Michael; Hedges, Dale J; Robertson, Peggy D; Krumm, Niklas; Nickerson, Deborah A; Hershberger, Ray E

    2013-04-01

    BACKGROUND- Familial dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is a genetically heterogeneous disease with >30 known genes. TTN truncating variants were recently implicated in a candidate gene study to cause 25% of familial and 18% of sporadic DCM cases. METHODS AND RESULTS- We used an unbiased genome-wide approach using both linkage analysis and variant filtering across the exome sequences of 48 individuals affected with DCM from 17 families to identify genetic cause. Linkage analysis ranked the TTN region as falling under the second highest genome-wide multipoint linkage peak, multipoint logarithm of odds, 1.59. We identified 6 TTN truncating variants carried by individuals affected with DCM in 7 of 17 DCM families (logarithm of odds, 2.99); 2 of these 7 families also had novel missense variants that segregated with disease. Two additional novel truncating TTN variants did not segregate with DCM. Nucleotide diversity at the TTN locus, including missense variants, was comparable with 5 other known DCM genes. The average number of missense variants in the exome sequences from the DCM cases or the ≈5400 cases from the Exome Sequencing Project was ≈23 per individual. The average number of TTN truncating variants in the Exome Sequencing Project was 0.014 per individual. We also identified a region (chr9q21.11-q22.31) with no known DCM genes with a maximum heterogeneity logarithm of odds score of 1.74. CONCLUSIONS- These data suggest that TTN truncating variants contribute to DCM cause. However, the lack of segregation of all identified TTN truncating variants illustrates the challenge of determining variant pathogenicity even with full exome sequencing.

  12. P2×7 purinergic signaling in dilated cardiomyopathy induced by auto-immunity against muscarinic M2 receptors: autoantibody levels, heart functionality and cytokine expression

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Camila Guerra; Zamith-Miranda, Daniel; da Silva, Marcia Gracindo; Ribeiro, Karla Consort; Brandão, Izaíra Trincani; Silva, Celio Lopes; Diaz, Bruno Lourenço; Bellio, Maria; Persechini, Pedro Muanis; Kurtenbach, Eleonora

    2015-01-01

    Autoantibodies against the M2 receptors (M2AChR) have been associated with Dilated Cardiomyopathy (DCM). In the heart, P2×7 receptors influence electrical conduction, coronary circulation and response to ischemia. They can also trigger pro-inflammatory responses and the development of neurological, cardiac and renal disorders. Here, P2×7−/− mice displayed an increased heart rate and ST segment depression, but similar exercise performance when compared to wild type (WT) animals. After immunization with plasmid containing M2AChR cDNA sequence, WT mice produced anti-M2AChR antibodies, while P2×7−/− mice showed an attenuated production. Despite this, WT and P2×7−/− showed left ventricle cavity enlargement and decreased exercise tolerance. Transfer of serum from M2AChR WT immunized mice to näive recipients led to an alteration in heart shape. P2×7−/− mice displayed a significant increase in the frequency of spleen regulatory T cells population, which is mainly composed by the FoxP3+CD25− subset. M2AChR WT immunized mice showed an increase in IL-1β, IFNγ and IL-17 levels in the heart, while P2×7−/− group produced lower amounts of IL-1β and IL-17 and higher amounts of IFNγ. These results pointed to previously unnoticed roles of P2×7 in cardiovascular and immune systems, and underscored the participation of IL-17 and IFNγ in the progress of autoimmune DCM. PMID:26592184

  13. A Randomized Comparative Study on the Efficacy of Intracoronary Infusion of Autologous Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cells and Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Patients With Dilated Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Wentao; Guo, Suping; Gao, Chuanyu; Dai, Guoyou; Gao, Yongjv; Li, Muwei; Wang, Xianpei; Hu, Dayi

    2017-02-13

    Stem cell therapy has shown therapeutic benefit in dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), but doubt remains about the most appropriate stem cell subpopulation. The current study compared the efficacy of intracoronary administration of bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMC) or mesenchymal stem cells (BMSC) in patients with DCM.Fifty-three patients with DCM and reduced (< 40%) left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), were randomized to intracoronary infusion of BMMC (BMMC group, n = 16) or BMSC (BMSC group, n = 17) or equal volume normal saline (CTRL group, n = 20). LVEF, New York Heart Association (NYHA) class, left ventricular end-diastolic diameter (LVEDd), and myocardial perfusion were assessed at baseline and at 3-month and 12-month follow-ups. Major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) were also recorded.At the 3-month follow-up, LVEF, NYHA class, and myocardial perfusion had improved significantly in the BMSC group (P = 0.004, 0.020 and 0.019, respectively) along with significant changes in LVEF and NYHA class in the BMMC group compared with CTRL (P = 0.042 and 0.047, respectively), however, LVEDd remained unchanged. In comparison with CTRL, LVEF, NYHA class, and myocardial perfusion improved significantly in the BMSC group at the 12-month follow-up (P = 0.005, 0.050 and 0.038 respectively), but not in the BMMC group (P > 0.05). There were no significant differences between the transplantation groups during follow-up (P > 0.05). There were no differences in MACE among the 3 groups (P = 0.817).Intracoronary bone marrow stem cell transplantation in DCM is safe and effective, while BMSC and BMMC infusion possess comparable effectiveness.

  14. Anabolic steroids abuse-induced cardiomyopathy and ischaemic stroke in a young male patient.

    PubMed

    Shamloul, Reham Mohammed; Aborayah, Ahmed Fathy; Hashad, Assem; Abd-Allah, Foad

    2014-02-26

    We report a case of a 37-year-old man presented with acute stroke and hepatorenal impairment which were associated with anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) abuse over 2 years. Despite the absence of apparent symptoms and signs of congestive heart failure at presentation, an AAS-induced dilated cardiomyopathy with multiple thrombi in the left ventricle was attributed to be the underlying cause of his condition. Awareness of the complications of AAS led to the prompt treatment of the initially unrecognised dilated cardiomyopathy, and improved the liver and kidney functions. However, the patient was exposed to a second severe ischaemic event, which led to his death. This unique and complex presentation of AAS complications opens for better recognition and treatment of their potentially fatal effects.

  15. Myocardial Expression Analysis of Osteopontin and Its Splice Variants in Patients Affected by End-Stage Idiopathic or Ischemic Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Cabiati, Manuela; Svezia, Benedetta; Matteucci, Marco; Botta, Luca; Pucci, Angela; Rinaldi, Mauro; Caselli, Chiara; Lionetti, Vincenzo; Del Ry, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Osteopontin (OPN) is a phosphoglycoprotein of cardiac extracellular matrix and it is still poorly defined whether its expression changes in failing heart of different origin. The full-length OPN-a and its isoforms (OPN-b, OPN-c) transcriptomic profile were evaluated in myocardium of patients with dilated or ischemic cardiomyopathy (DCM n = 8; LVEF% = 17.5±3; ICM n = 8; LVEF% = 19.5±5.2) and in auricle of valvular patients (VLP n = 5; LVEF%≥50), by Real-time PCR analysis. OPN-a and thrombin mRNA levels resulted significantly higher in DCM compared to ICM patients (DCM:31.3±7.4, ICM:2.7±1.1, p = 0.0002; DCM:19.1±4.9, ICM:5.4±2.2, p = 0.007, respectively). Although both genes’ mRNA levels increased in patients with LVEF<50% (DCM+ICM) with respect to VLP with LVEF>50%, a significant increase in OPN (p = 0.0004) and thrombin (p = 0.001) expression was observed only in DCM. In addition, a correlation between OPN-a and thrombin was found in patients with LVEF<50% (r = 0.6; p = 0.003). The mRNA pattern was confirmed by OPN-a cardiac protein concentration (VLP:1.127±0.26; DCM:1.29±0.22; ICM:1.00±0.077 ng/ml). The OPN splice variants expression were detectable only in ICM (OPN-b: 0.357±0.273; OPN-c: 0.091±0.033) and not in DCM patients. A significant correlation was observed between collagen type I, evaluated by immunohistochemistry analysis, and both OPN-a mRNA expression (r = 0.87, p = 0.002) and OPN protein concentrations (r = 0.77, p = 0.016). Concluding, OPN-a and thrombin mRNA resulted dependent on the origin of heart failure while OPN-b and OPN-c highlighted a different expression for DCM and ICM patients, suggesting their correlation with different clinical-pathophysiological setting. PMID:27479215

  16. Co segregation of the m.1555A>G mutation in the MT-RNR1 gene and mutations in MT-ATP6 gene in a family with dilated mitochondrial cardiomyopathy and hearing loss: A whole mitochondrial genome screening.

    PubMed

    Alila-Fersi, Olfa; Chamkha, Imen; Majdoub, Imen; Gargouri, Lamia; Mkaouar-Rebai, Emna; Tabebi, Mouna; Tlili, Abdelaziz; Keskes, Leila; Mahfoudh, Abdelmajid; Fakhfakh, Faiza

    2017-02-26

    Mitochondrial disease refers to a heterogeneous group of disorders resulting in defective cellular energy production due to dysfunction of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, which is responsible for the generation of most cellular energy. Because cardiac muscles are one of the high energy demanding tissues, mitochondrial cardiomyopathies is one of the most frequent mitochondria disorders. Mitochondrial cardiomyopathy has been associated with several point mutations of mtDNA in both genes encoded mitochondrial proteins and mitochondrial tRNA and rRNA. We reported here the first description of mutations in MT-ATP6 gene in two patients with clinical features of dilated mitochondrial cardiomyopathy. The mutational analysis of the whole mitochondrial DNA revealed the presence of m.1555A>G mutation in MT-RNR1 gene associated to the m.8527A>G (p.M>V) and the m.8392C>T (p.136P>S) variations in the mitochondrial MT-ATP6 gene in patient1 and his family members with variable phenotype including hearing impairment. The second patient with isolated mitochondrial cardiomyopathy presented the m.8605C>T (p.27P>S) mutation in the MT-ATP6 gene. The three mutations p.M1V, p.P27S and p.P136S detected in MT-ATP6 affected well conserved residues of the mitochondrial protein ATPase 6. In addition, the substitution of proline residue at position 27 and 136 effect hydrophobicity and structure flexibility conformation of the protein.

  17. Pregnancy, cardiomyopathies, and genetics.

    PubMed

    Van Tintelen, J Peter; Pieper, Petronella G; Van Spaendonck-Zwarts, Karin Y; Van Den Berg, Maarten P

    2014-03-15

    Although familial forms of cardiomyopathy such as hypertrophic or dilated cardiomyopathy have been recognized for decades, it is only recently that much of the genetic basis of these inherited cardiomyopathies has been elucidated. This has provided important insights into the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the disease phenotype. This increased knowledge and the availability of genetic testing has resulted in increasing numbers of mutation carriers who are being monitored, including many who are now of child-bearing age. Pregnancy is generally well tolerated in asymptomatic patients or mutation carriers with inherited cardiomyopathies. However, since pregnancy leads to major physiological changes in the cardiovascular system, in women with genetic cardiomyopathies or who carry a mutation pre-disposing to a genetic cardiomyopathy, pregnancy entails a risk of developing heart failure and/or arrhythmias. This deterioration of cardiac function may occur despite optimal medical treatment. Advanced left ventricular dysfunction, poor functional class (NYHA class III or IV), or prior cardiac events appear to increase the risk of maternal cardiac complications. However, there are no large series of cardiomyopathy patients who are regularly evaluated for cardiac complications during pregnancy and for certain types of inherited cardiomyopathy, only case reports on individual pregnancies are available. Pre-conception cardiologic evaluation and genetic counselling are important for every woman with a cardiomyopathy or a cardiomyopathy-related mutation who is considering having a family. In this article, we give an overview of the basic clinical aspects, genetics, and pregnancy outcome in women with different types of inherited cardiomyopathies. We also discuss the genetic aspects of pregnancy-associated cardiomyopathy, including peripartum cardiomyopathy.

  18. Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy in two cats.

    PubMed

    Harvey, A M; Battersby, I A; Faena, M; Fews, D; Darke, P G G; Ferasin, L

    2005-03-01

    Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) is a disease characterised by infiltration of the myocardium by adipose and fibrous tissue. The disease is an important cause of sudden death in humans, but has rarely been described in animals. This report describes ARVC in two cats with right-sided congestive heart failure. One cat had also experienced previous episodes of syncope. Standard six-lead and 24-hour (Holter) electrocardiogram recording revealed complete atrioventricular block and multiform ventricular ectopics in both cats, with the addition of ventricular tachycardia, ventricular bigeminy and R-on-T phenomenon in one of them. On echocardiography, the right ventricle and atrium were massively dilated and hypokinetic. The survival times of the cats were three days and 16 days following diagnosis. Histopathology in one case revealed fibro-fatty infiltration of the myocardium, predominantly affecting the right ventricular free wall.

  19. The influence of atorvastatin on parameters of inflammation left ventricular function, hospitalizations and mortality in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy – 5-year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background We assessed the influence of atorvastatin on selected indicators of an inflammatory condition, left ventricular function, hospitalizations and mortality in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Methods We included 68 DCM patients with left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) ≤40% treated optimally in a prospective, randomized study. They were observed for 5 years. Patients were divided into two groups: patients who were commenced on atorvastatin 40 mg daily for two months followed by an individually matched dose of 10 or 20 mg/day (group A), and patients who were treated according to current recommendations without statin therapy (group B). Results After 5-year follow-up we assessed 45 patients of mean age 59 ± 11 years - 22 patients in group A (77% male) and 23 patients in group B (82% male). Interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and uric acid concentrations were significantly lower in the statin group than in group B (14.96 ± 4.76 vs. 19.02 ± 3.94 pg/ml, p = 0.012; 19.10 ± 6.39 vs. 27.53 ± 7.39 pg/ml, p = 0.001, and 5.28 ± 0.48 vs. 6.53 ± 0.46 mg/dl, p = 0.001, respectively). In patients on statin therapy a reduction of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide concentration (from 1425.28 ± 1264.48 to 1098.01 ± 1483.86 pg/ml, p = 0.045), decrease in left ventricular diastolic (from 7.15 ± 0.90 to 6.67 ± 0.88 cm, p = 0.001) and systolic diameters (from 5.87 ± 0.92 to 5.17 ± 0.97, p = 0.001) in comparison to initial values were observed. We also showed the significant increase of LVEF in patients after statin therapy (from 32.0 ± 6.4 to 38.8 ± 8.8%, p = 0.016). Based on a comparison of curves using the log-rank test, the probability of survival to 5 years was significantly higher in patients receiving statins (p = 0.005). Conclusions Atorvastatin in a small dose significantly reduce levels of inflammatory cytokines and uric

  20. Prognostic value of tissue Doppler right ventricular systolic and diastolic function indexes combined with plasma B-type natriuretic Peptide in patients with advanced heart failure secondary to ischemic or idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Bistola, Vasiliki; Parissis, John T; Paraskevaidis, Ioannis; Panou, Fotios; Nikolaou, Maria; Ikonomidis, Ignatios; Flessas, Nikolaos; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Iliodromitis, Efstathios; Kremastinos, Dimitrios T

    2010-01-15

    Right ventricular (RV) dysfunction adversely affects prognosis in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) due to left ventricular (LV) dysfunction. However, little evidence exists regarding the prognostic role of RV systolic and diastolic function indexes in combination with plasma B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) in advanced CHF. Thus, 102 consecutive hospitalized patients with advanced CHF (New York Heart Association classes III to IV) due to LV systolic dysfunction (LV ejection fraction <35%) were studied by 2-dimensional conventional and tissue Doppler imaging (TDI) echocardiography of the left and right ventricles. Plasma BNP was also measured. Patients were followed for 6 months for major cardiovascular events (cardiovascular death and/or CHF-related hospitalization). During follow-up, 13 patients died and 63 patients reached the combined end point of cardiovascular death or CHF-related hospitalization. By univariate analysis, RV TDI systolic velocity, dilated cardiomyopathy, digoxin treatment (all p values <0.01), and female gender (p <0.05) were associated with increased cardiovascular death. Transmitral Doppler to mitral annular TDI early diastolic velocity ratio, RV TDI early diastolic velocity (p <0.05), and ratio of early to late RV diastolic TDI velocities (p <0.01) predicted the combined end point. In multivariate analysis, decreased RV systolic velocity, dilated cardiomyopathy, and female gender (all p values <0.05) were independent predictors of cardiovascular death, whereas increased ratio of early to late RV diastolic TDI velocities (p <0.01) and increased BNP (p <0.05) predicted the combined end point. In conclusion, RV TDI indexes combined with increased plasma BNP additively predict adverse cardiac outcomes in advanced CHF.

  1. [Gender effect on cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Biagini, Elena; Berardini, Alessandra; Graziosi, Maddalena; Rosmini, Stefania; Pazzi, Chiara; Rapezzi, Claudio

    2012-06-01

    . Pregnancy in women with dilated cardiomyopathy and significant left ventricular systolic dysfunction represents a high-risk condition. In addition, information on the clinical course and potential complications in pregnant women with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy or restrictive cardiomyopathy is limited to individual reports.

  2. Atrophic nerve fibers in regions of reduced MIBG uptake in doxorubicin cardiomyopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Takano, Hajime; Ozawa Hideyuki; Kobayashi, Isao

    1995-11-01

    A myocardial MIBG-SPECT examination was conducted 2 wk after doxorubicin chemotherapy on a 52-yr-old woman without cardiac symptoms. Despite normal {sup 201}Tl scintigraphy, reduced MIBG uptake was detected in the apical anterior, inferior and lateral segments of the left ventricle. The patient died of congestive heart failure due to doxorubicin-induced cardiomyopathy 10 mo later. At necropsy, the left ventricle was markedly dilated and the apical anterior, inferior and lateral walls were thin, stiff and whitish. Nerve fibers in the apical inferior wall were atrophic and markedly fibrotic where MIBG uptake was most reduced. Nerve fibers in the septum were normal where MIBG uptake had remained normal. The histologic findings correspond with the findings on the MIBG image. MIBG imaging may detect cardiac sympathetic denervation in doxorubicin-induced cardiomyopathy before cardiac symptoms are manifest and cardiac function deteriorates. 5 refs., 2 figs.

  3. Anabolic steroid-induced cardiomyopathy underlying acute liver failure in a young bodybuilder

    PubMed Central

    Bispo, Miguel; Valente, Ana; Maldonado, Rosário; Palma, Rui; Glória, Helena; Nóbrega, João; Alexandrino, Paula

    2009-01-01

    Heart failure may lead to subclinical circulatory disturbances and remain an unrecognized cause of ischemic liver injury. We present the case of a previously healthy 40-year-old bodybuilder, referred to our Intensive-Care Unit of Hepatology for treatment of severe acute liver failure, with the suspicion of toxic hepatitis associated with anabolic steroid abuse. Despite the absence of symptoms and signs of congestive heart failure at admission, an anabolic steroid-induced dilated cardiomyopathy with a large thrombus in both ventricles was found to be the underlying cause of the liver injury. Treatment for the initially unrecognized heart failure rapidly restored liver function to normal. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of severe acute liver failure due to an unrecognized anabolic steroid-induced cardiomyopathy. Awareness of this unique presentation will allow for prompt treatment of this potentially fatal cause of liver failure. PMID:19533818

  4. Injection of vessel-derived stem cells prevents dilated cardiomyopathy and promotes angiogenesis and endogenous cardiac stem cell proliferation in mdx/utrn-/- but not aged mdx mouse models for duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Chun, Ju Lan; O'Brien, Robert; Song, Min Ho; Wondrasch, Blake F; Berry, Suzanne E

    2013-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common form of muscular dystrophy. DMD patients lack dystrophin protein and develop skeletal muscle pathology and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Approximately 20% succumb to cardiac involvement. We hypothesized that mesoangioblast stem cells (aorta-derived mesoangioblasts [ADMs]) would restore dystrophin and alleviate or prevent DCM in animal models of DMD. ADMs can be induced to express cardiac markers, including Nkx2.5, cardiac tropomyosin, cardiac troponin I, and α-actinin, and adopt cardiomyocyte morphology. Transplantation of ADMs into the heart of mdx/utrn(-/-) mice prior to development of DCM prevented onset of cardiomyopathy, as measured by echocardiography, and resulted in significantly higher CD31 expression, consistent with new vessel formation. Dystrophin-positive cardiomyocytes and increased proliferation of endogenous Nestin(+) cardiac stem cells were detected in ADM-injected heart. Nestin(+) striated cells were also detected in four of five mdx/utrn(-/-) hearts injected with ADMs. In contrast, when ADMs were injected into the heart of aged mdx mice with advanced fibrosis, no functional improvement was detected by echocardiography. Instead, ADMs exacerbated some features of DCM. No dystrophin protein, increase in CD31 expression, or increase in Nestin(+) cell proliferation was detected following ADM injection in aged mdx heart. Dystrophin was observed following transplantation of ADMs into the hearts of young mdx mice, however, suggesting that pathology in aged mdx heart may alter the fate of donor stem cells. In summary, ADMs delay or prevent development of DCM in dystrophin-deficient heart, but timing of stem cell transplantation may be critical for achieving benefit with cell therapy in DMD cardiac muscle.

  5. Restrictive cardiomyopathy

    MedlinePlus

    Cardiomyopathy - restrictive; Infiltrative cardiomyopathy; Idiopathic myocardial fibrosis ... In a case of restrictive cardiomyopathy, the heart muscle is of normal size or slightly enlarged. Most of the time, it also pumps normally. However, it does ...

  6. Cardiac CT Angiography in Congestive Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Levine, Avi; Hecht, Harvey S

    2015-06-01

    Cardiac CT angiography has become an important tool for the diagnosis and treatment of congestive heart failure. Differentiation of ischemic from nonischemic cardiomyopathy; evaluation of myocardial perfusion; characterization of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, left ventricular noncompaction, and arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia; and delineation of congenital heart defects and valvular abnormalities are the primary diagnostic applications. Therapeutic use includes visualization of the coronary venous anatomy for optimal implementation of cardiac resynchronization therapy and evaluation of left ventricular assist devices and transplant vasculopathy.

  7. Arrhythmias in peripartum cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Honigberg, Michael C; Givertz, Michael M

    2015-06-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) is a complication of late pregnancy and the early postpartum period characterized by dilated cardiomyopathy and heart failure with reduced ejection fraction. Approximately half of women fail to recover left ventricular function. Standard management of heart failure is indicated, with some exceptions for women who are predelivery or breastfeeding. Atrial and ventricular arrhythmias are reported in PPCM, but the frequency of arrhythmias in this condition is not well characterized. Management of PPCM-associated arrhythmias may include antiarrhythmic drugs, catheter ablation, and wearable or implantable cardioverter-defibrillators. Further research is needed on the prevalence, natural history, and optimal management of arrhythmias in PPCM.

  8. Congestive heart failure in 6 African grey parrots (Psittacus e erithacus).

    PubMed

    Juan-Sallés, C; Soto, S; Garner, M M; Montesinos, A; Ardiaca, M

    2011-05-01

    Six African grey parrots (Psittacus e erithacus) were diagnosed with cardiomyopathy and congestive heart failure based on gross and microscopic findings. Ages ranged from 15 days to 8 years, and 5 of 6 parrots were either neonates or juveniles at the time of diagnosis. Two neonates and 2 juveniles came from the same breeding aviary; the 2 juveniles were born to the same breeding pair. The 2 other parrots were kept as pets. Clinical signs included distention of the coelomic cavity (4 of 6), rales (3 of 6), weakness (4 of 6), bradyarrhythmia (1 of 6), growth retardation (1 of 6), crop stasis (1 of 6), and regurgitation (1 of 6). Three parrots were euthanized and 3 died. Gross findings included cardiomegaly due to biventricular, right-, or left-sided cardiomyopathy (6 of 6); coelomic effusion (6 of 6); whitish or yellow foci in the liver (6 of 6); atrophy of the liver (particularly, the left lobe; 5 of 6); reddened or grey lungs (5 of 6); subcutaneous edema (2 of 6); hydropericardium (1 of 6); and bilateral thyroid gland enlargement (1 of 6). Relevant microscopic findings included passive hepatic congestion (6 of 6) and pulmonary congestion (2 of 6), lymphocytic thyroiditis (2 of 6), and diffuse thyroid follicular hyperplasia (2 of 6). Microscopically, the heart was unremarkable (2 of 6) or had mild lymphocytic myocarditis (2 of 6), mild multifocal cytoplasmic vacuolation of cardiomyocytes (2 of 6), mild lymphocytic myocardial (Purkinje cell) ganglioneuritis (1 of 6), and mild multifocal interstitial fibrosis and nuclear hypertrophy of cardiomyocytes (1 of 6). One parrot had concurrent proventricular dilatation disease (systemic ganglioneuritis). The cause of cardiomyopathy in these parrots was not determined.

  9. Peripartum cardiomyopathy: a review.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Anirban; Basra, Sukhdeep Singh; Sen, Priyanka; Kar, Biswajit

    2012-01-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy is idiopathic heart failure occurring in the absence of any determinable heart disease during the last month of pregnancy or the first 5 months postpartum. The incidence varies worldwide but is high in developing nations; the cause of the disease might be a combination of environmental and genetic factors. Diagnostic echocardiographic criteria include left ventricular ejection fraction <0.45 or M-mode fractional shortening <30% (or both) and end-diastolic dimension >2.7 cm/m(2). Electrocardiography, magnetic resonance imaging, endomyocardial biopsy, and cardiac catheterization aid in the diagnosis and management of peripartum cardiomyopathy. Cardiac protein assays can also be useful, as suggested by reports of high levels of NT-proBNP, cardiac troponin, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, interferon-γ, and C-reactive protein in peripartum cardiomyopathy. The prevalence of mutations associated with familial dilated-cardiomyopathy genes in patients with peripartum cardiomyopathy suggests an overlap in the clinical spectrum of these 2 diseases.Treatment for peripartum cardiomyopathy includes conventional pharmacologic heart-failure therapies-principally diuretics, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, vasodilators, digoxin, β-blockers, anticoagulants, and peripartum cardiomyopathy-targeted therapies. Therapeutic decisions are influenced by drug-safety profiles during pregnancy and lactation. Mechanical support and transplantation might be necessary in severe cases. Targeted therapies (such as intravenous immunoglobulin, pentoxifylline, and bromocriptine) have shown promise in small trials but require further evaluation. Fortunately, despite a mortality rate of up to 10% and a high risk of relapse in subsequent pregnancies, many patients with peripartum cardiomyopathy recover within 3 to 6 months of disease onset.

  10. Metabolic cardiology: an integrative strategy in the treatment of congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Sinatra, Stephen T

    2009-01-01

    Congestive heart failure (CHF) and dilated cardiomyopathy are life-threatening conditions in which the heart muscle is so weak that effective pulsatile action is compromised. Pulmonary vascular congestion and swelling in the lower extremities as well as in the liver and lining of the gastrointestinal tract frequently cause overwhelming symptoms and disability. Millions of Americans suffer from CHF, and more than 500,000 cases are diagnosed annually. Cardiovascular diseases such as hypertension with left ventricular hypertrophy, valvular heart disease, coronary artery disease, myocarditis, and various cardiomyopathies can lead to the progressive onset of CHF. The purpose of this communication article is to introduce metabolic cardiology as a vital therapeutic strategy utilizing nutritional biochemical interventions that preserve and promote adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production. Treatment options that incorporate metabolic interventions targeted to preserve energy substrates (D-ribose) or accelerate ATP turnover (L-carnitine and coenzyme Q10) are indicated for at-risk populations or patients at any stage of CHF. The integration of these metabolic supports provides the missing link in CHF treatment that has been eluding physicians for decades.

  11. Arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Pilichou, Kalliopi; Thiene, Gaetano; Bauce, Barbara; Rigato, Ilaria; Lazzarini, Elisabetta; Migliore, Federico; Perazzolo Marra, Martina; Rizzo, Stefania; Zorzi, Alessandro; Daliento, Luciano; Corrado, Domenico; Basso, Cristina

    2016-04-02

    -functional abnormalities. The main differential diagnoses are idiopathic right ventricular outflow tract tachycardia, myocarditis, sarcoidosis, dilated cardiomyopathy, right ventricular infarction, congenital heart diseases with right ventricular overload and athlete heart. A positive genetic test in the affected AC proband allows early identification of asymptomatic carriers by cascade genetic screening of family members. Risk stratification remains a major clinical challenge and antiarrhythmic drugs, catheter ablation and implantable cardioverter defibrillator are the currently available therapeutic tools. Sport disqualification is life-saving, since effort is a major trigger not only of electrical instability but also of disease onset and progression. We review the current knowledge of this rare cardiomyopathy, suggesting a flowchart for primary care clinicians and geneticists.

  12. Utilization of "Stand-By" Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation in a High-Risk Parturient With Methamphetamine-Associated Cardiomyopathy Undergoing Dilation and Evacuation: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Padilla, Cesar; Hernandez Conte, Antonio; Ramzy, Danny; Lubin, Lorraine; LaBounty, Troy; Chung, Judith H; Zeng, Ying

    2017-03-01

    Parturients may present with evidence of acute heart failure or respiratory distress during the peripartum period. This case report documents utilization of "stand-by" extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) for a 40-year-old woman with a history of severe left ventricular dysfunction who presented for elective dilation and evacuation of triplets at 20 weeks' gestation. The patient's medical history was significant for hypertension, diabetes mellitus, methamphetamine use (acute/chronic), and cardiac-respiratory arrest before her previous emergent cesarean delivery. The patient underwent general anesthesia with the placement of peripheral venous and arterial cannulas for "stand-by" ECMO. The patient remained stable throughout the procedure, and "stand-by" ECMO was not initiated; the patient was discharged 5 days' postprocedure. The use of "stand-by" ECMO in the parturient with severe cardiopulmonary dysfunction is still in its infancy. Centers managing populations of both high-risk parturients and nonparturients may consider development of algorithms for implementation and utilization of ECMO.

  13. Cardiomyopathy in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Lewey, Jennifer; Haythe, Jennifer

    2014-08-01

    Cardiomyopathy during pregnancy is uncommon but potentially catastrophic to maternal health, accounting for up to 11% of maternal deaths. Peripartum cardiomyopathy is diagnosed in women without a history of heart disease 1 month before delivery or within 5 months postpartum. About half of all women will have full myocardial recovery within 6 months of diagnosis, but complications such as severe heart failure or death are not rare. African-American women have higher rates of diagnosis and adverse events. Women with preexisting cardiomyopathy, such as dilated or hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, followed closely during pregnancy often tolerate pregnancy and delivery. Risk factors for adverse outcomes include functional status at baseline, severity of systolic dysfunction or outflow tract gradient, or history of prior cardiac event, such as arrhythmia or stroke. The level of brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) can be used to risk stratify women for adverse events. Pregnant women with cardiomyopathy should be followed closely by a multidisciplinary team comprised of nurses, obstetricians, neonatologists, cardiologists, anesthesiologists, and cardiac surgeons.

  14. A Three-Dimensional Regional Strain Computation Method with Displacement ENcoding with Stimulated Echoes (DENSE) in Non-Ischemic, Non-Valvular Dilated Cardiomyopathy Patients and Healthy Subjects Validated by Tagged MRI

    PubMed Central

    Kar, Julia; Knutsen, Andrew K.; Cupps, Brian P.; Zhong, Xiaodong; Pasque, Michael K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Fast cine displacement encoding with stimulated echoes (DENSE) MR has higher spatial resolution and enables rapid post-processing. Thus we compared the accuracy of regional strains computation by DENSE with tagged MR in healthy and non-ischemic, non-valvular dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) subjects. Materials and Methods Validation of 3D regional strains computed with DENSE was conducted in reference to standard tagged MRI (TMRI) in healthy subjects and patients with DCM. Additional repeatability studies in healthy subjects were conducted to increase confidence in DENSE. A meshfree multiquadrics radial point interpolation method (RPIM) was used for computing Lagrange strains in sixteen left ventricular segments. Bland-Altman analysis and Student's t-tests were conducted to observe similarities in regional strains between sequences and in DENSE repeatability studies. Results Regional circumferential strains ranged from -0.21 ± 0.07 (Lateral-Apex) to -0.11 ± 0.05 (Posterorseptal-Base) in healthy subjects and -0.15 ± 0.04 (Anterior-Apex) to -0.02 ± 0.08 (Posterorseptal-Base) in DCM patients. Computed mean differences in regional circumferential strain from the DENSE-TMRI comparison study was 0.01 ± 0.03 (95% limits of agreement) in normal subjects, -0.01 ± 0.06 in DCM patients and 0.0 ± 0.02 in repeatability studies, with similar agreements in longitudinal and radial strains. Conclusion We found agreement between DENSE and tagged MR in patients and volunteers in terms of evaluation of regional strains. PMID:24753028

  15. Fragmented QRS as a Marker of Electrical Dyssynchrony to Predict Inter-Ventricular Conduction Defect by Subsequent Echocardiographic Assessment in Symptomatic Patients of Non-Ischemic Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Santosh Kumar; Bhagat, Kush; Asif, Mohammad; Singh, Karandeep; Sachan, Mohit; Mishra, Vikas; Afdaali, Nasar; Jha, Mukesh Jitendra; Kumar, Ashutosh; Singh, Shravan; Sinha, Rupesh; Khanra, Dibbendhu; Thakur, Ramesh; Varma, Chandra Mohan; Krishna, Vinay; Pandey, Umeshwar

    2016-01-01

    Background Left ventricular (LV) dyssynchrony frequently occurs in patients with heart failure (HF). QRS ≥ 120 ms is a surrogate marker of electrical dyssynchrony, which occurs in only 30% of HF patients. In contrary, in those with normal QRS (nQRS) duration, LV dyssynchrony has been reported in 20-50%. This study was carried out to investigate the role of fragmented QRS (fQRS) on the surface electrocardiography (ECG) as a marker of electrical dyssynchrony to predict the presence of significant intraventricular dyssynchrony (IVD) by subsequent echocardiographic assessment. Methods A total of 226 consecutive patients with non-ischemic cardiomyopathy were assessed for fQRS on surface ECG as defined by presence of an additional R wave (R prime), notching in nadir of the S wave, notching of R wave, or the presence of more than one R prime (fragmentation) in two contiguous leads corresponding to a major myocardial segment. Tissue Doppler imaging (TDI) was performed in the apical views (four-chamber, two-chamber and long-axis) to analyze all 12 segments at both basal and middle levels. Time-to-peak myocardial sustained systolic (Ts) velocities were calculated. Significant systolic IVD was defined as Ts-SD > 32.6 ms as known as “Yu index”. Result Of the total patients, 112 had fQRS (49.5%), while 114 had nQRS (50.5%) with male dominance (M/F = 71:29). Majority of patients were in NYHA class II (n = 122, 54%) followed by class III (n = 83; 37%), and class IV (n = 21; 9%). There were no significant differences among both groups for baseline parameters except higher QRS duration (102.42 ± 14.05 vs. 91.10 ± 13.75 ms; P = 0.001), higher Yu index (35.64 ± 12.79 vs. 20.45 ± 11.17; P = 0.01) and number of patients with positive Yu index (78.6% vs. 21.1%; P = 0.04) in group with fQRS compared with group with nQRS. fQRS complexes had 84.61% sensitivity and 80.32% specificity with positive predictive value of 78.6% and negative predictive value of 85.9% to detect IVD. On

  16. Heart failure and tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Ethan R; Josephson, Mark E

    2013-12-01

    Congestive heart failure is a major health care concern affecting almost six million Americans and an estimated 23 million people worldwide, and its prevalence is increasing with time. Long-standing tachycardia is a well-recognized cause of heart failure and left ventricular dysfunction and has led to the nomenclature, tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy. Tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy is generally a reversible cardiomyopathy with effective treatment of the causative arrhythmia, either with medications, surgery, or catheter ablation. Tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy remains poorly understood and is likely under-diagnosed. A better understanding of tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy and improved recognition of its presence in clinical practice is vital to the health of patients with this disorder. The goal of this review is to discuss the pathogenesis and clinical manifestations of tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy, as well as approaches to its diagnosis and treatment.

  17. Rationale and design of the Percutaneous Stem Cell Injection Delivery Effects on Neomyogenesis in Dilated Cardiomyopathy (the POSEIDON-DCM study): a phase I/II, randomized pilot study of the comparative safety and efficacy of transendocardial injection of autologous mesenchymal stem cell vs. allogeneic mesenchymal stem cells in patients with non-ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Mushtaq, Muzammil; DiFede, Darcy L; Golpanian, Samuel; Khan, Aisha; Gomes, Samirah A; Mendizabal, Adam; Heldman, Alan W; Hare, Joshua M

    2014-12-01

    While accumulating clinical trials have focused on the impact of cell therapy in patients with acute myocardial infarction (MI) and ischemic cardiomyopathy, there are fewer efforts to examine cell-based therapy in patients with non-ischemic cardiomyopathy (NICM). We hypothesized that cell therapy could have a similar impact in NICM. The POSEIDON-DCM trial is a phase I/II trial designed to address autologous vs. allogeneic bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in patients with NICM. In this study, cells will be administered transendocardially with the NOGA injection-catheter system to patients (n = 36) randomly allocated to two treatment groups: group 1 (n = 18 auto-human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC)) and group 2 (n = 18 allo-hMSCs). The primary and secondary objectives are, respectively, to demonstrate the safety and efficacy of allo-hMSCS vs. auto-hMSCs in patients with NICM. This study will establish safety of transendocardial injection of stem cells (TESI), compare phenotypic outcomes, and offer promising advances in the field of cell-based therapy in patients with NICM.

  18. Evolving Approaches to Genetic Evaluation of Specific Cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Teo, Loon Yee Louis; Moran, Rocio T; Tang, W H Wilson

    2015-12-01

    The understanding of the genetic basis of cardiomyopathy has expanded significantly over the past 2 decades. The increasing availability, shortening diagnostic time, and lowering costs of genetic testing have provided researchers and physicians with the opportunity to identify the underlying genetic determinants for thousands of genetic disorders, including inherited cardiomyopathies, in effort to improve patient morbidities and mortality. As such, genetic testing has advanced from basic scientific research to clinical application and has been incorporated as part of patient evaluations for suspected inherited cardiomyopathies. Genetic evaluation framework of inherited cardiomyopathies typically encompasses careful evaluation of family history, genetic counseling, clinical screening of family members, and if appropriate, molecular genetic testing. This review summarizes the genetics, current guideline recommendations, and evidence supporting the genetic evaluation framework of five hereditary forms of cardiomyopathy: dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC), restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM), and left ventricular noncompaction (LVNC).

  19. Importance of genetic evaluation and testing in pediatric cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Tariq, Muhammad; Ware, Stephanie M

    2014-11-26

    Pediatric cardiomyopathies are clinically heterogeneous heart muscle disorders that are responsible for significant morbidity and mortality. Phenotypes include hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, dilated cardiomyopathy, restrictive cardiomyopathy, left ventricular noncompaction and arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy. There is substantial evidence for a genetic contribution to pediatric cardiomyopathy. To date, more than 100 genes have been implicated in cardiomyopathy, but comprehensive genetic diagnosis has been problematic because of the large number of genes, the private nature of mutations, and difficulties in interpreting novel rare variants. This review will focus on current knowledge on the genetic etiologies of pediatric cardiomyopathy and their diagnostic relevance in clinical settings. Recent developments in sequencing technologies are greatly impacting the pace of gene discovery and clinical diagnosis. Understanding the genetic basis for pediatric cardiomyopathy and establishing genotype-phenotype correlations may help delineate the molecular and cellular events necessary to identify potential novel therapeutic targets for heart muscle dysfunction in children.

  20. Dietary Salt Exacerbates Isoproterenol-induced Cardiomyopathy in Rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Spontaneously Hypertensive Heart Failure rats (SHHFs) take far longer to develop compensated heart failure and congestive decompensation than common surgical models of heart failure. Isoproterenol (ISO) infusion can accelerate cardiomyopathy in young SHHFs, while dietary salt loa...

  1. Morphometric Documentation of a High Prevalence of Left Ventricular Dilated Cardiomyopathy in Both Clinically Normal and Cyanotic Mature Commercial Broiler Breeder Roosters with Comparisons to Market-Age Broilers.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Floyd D; Magee, Danny L; Jones, Kelli H; Baravik-Munsell, Erica; Cummings, Timothy S; Wills, Robert W; Pace, Lanny W

    2016-09-01

    Previous studies documented the common occurrence of transitory cyanosis and echocardiographic aortic insufficiency in mature commercial broiler breeder roosters. During further investigations, we observed a high prevalence of hearts exhibiting extensive dilation of the left ventricle chamber compatible with dilated left ventricular cardiomyopathy present in both cyanotic and normal subpopulations. We conducted quantitative studies focused on documentation of cardiac ventricle parameters by using simple gross morphometric methods performed on formalin-fixed hearts obtained from both clinically normal roosters and those exhibiting variable transitory cyanosis, echocardiographic aortic insufficiency, or both. A high prevalence of often dramatic left ventricular dilation reflected in enlarged left ventricular chamber areas and elevated left ventricle-to-total ventricle area ratios was morphometrically documented. However, no statistically significant differences in the occurrence of ventricular abnormalities were observed between normal and cyanotic roosters. Age-associated changes were also demonstrated by comparative morphometric studies on hearts from normal market-age broilers (average age of 7 wk) and those of mature roosters (average age of 42 wk). Elevation in both left and right ventricular weight-to-total heart weight ratios dramatically increased with aging. In addition, values (average ± SD) for the left ventricle chamber area-to-total ventricle area ratios increased from 3.2 ± 2.0% in broilers up to 10.0 ± 8.8% in roosters. None of the normal broilers studied demonstrated left ventricular volume ratios above 10%, whereas 33% of the roosters had left ventricular volume ratios above 10%, including 13% with ratios of 20% or higher. However, the left ventricle wall area-to-body weight ratios were much closer for the two age groups (0.85 ± 0.18 cm(2)/kg in broilers and 0.79 ± 0.13 cm(2)/kg in roosters). Also, the standard right ventricle-to-total ventricle

  2. Calcium Ions in Inherited Cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Deftereos, Spyridon; Papoutsidakis, Nikolaos; Giannopoulos, Georgios; Angelidis, Christos; Raisakis, Konstantinos; Bouras, Georgios; Davlouros, Periklis; Panagopoulou, Vasiliki; Goudevenos, John; Cleman, Michael W; Lekakis, John

    2016-01-01

    Inherited cardiomyopathies are a known cause of heart failure, although the pathways and mechanisms leading from mutation to the heart failure phenotype have not been elucidated. There is strong evidence that this transition is mediated, at least in part, by abnormal intracellular Ca(2+) handling, a key ion in ventricular excitation, contraction and relaxation. Studies in human myocytes, animal models and in vitro reconstituted contractile protein complexes have shown consistent correlations between Ca(2+) sensitivity and cardiomyopathy phenotype, irrespective of the causal mutation. In this review we present the available data about the connection between mutations linked to familial hypertrophic (HCM), dilated (DCM) and restrictive (RCM) cardiomyopathy, right ventricular arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy/dysplasia (ARVC/D) as well as left ventricular non-compaction and the increase or decrease in Ca(2+) sensitivity, together with the results of attempts to reverse the manifestation of heart failure by manipulating Ca(2+) homeostasis.

  3. Molecular etiology of idiopathic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Arimura, T; Hayashi, T; Kimura, A

    2007-01-01

    Summary Idiopathic cardiomyopathy (ICM) is a primary cardiac disorder associated with abnormalities of ventricular wall thickness, size of ventricular cavity, contraction, relaxation, conduction and rhythm. Over the past two decades, molecular genetic analyses have revealed that mutations in the various genes cause ICM and such information concerning the genetic basis of ICM enables us to speculate the pathogenesis of this heterogeous cardiac disease. This review focuses on the molecular pathogenesis, i.e., genetic abnormalities and functional alterations due to the mutations especially in sarcomere/cytoskeletal components, in three characteristic features of ICM, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM). Understanding the functional abnormalities of the sarcomere/cytoskeletal components, in ICM, has unraveled the function of these components not only as a contractile unit but also as a pivot for transduction of biochemical signals. PMID:18646564

  4. [Hereditary cardiomyopathies: a review. Mutation of structural proteins a common cause of hereditary cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Sjöberg, Gunnar; Kostareva, Anna; Sejersen, Thomas

    Cardiomyopathy is a disorder of the cardiac muscle and can be either primary or secondary. The primary disorders have been classified by WHO into 4 groups based on structure and function; hypertrophic, dilated and restricted cardiomyopathies and arrythmogenic right ventricle dysplasia. During the last decade the familial nature of many of these cardiomyopathies has been elucidated and different genes have been found to be mutated and causative of disease. Certain patterns can be distinguished in the mutated genes, e.g. in general the genes causing hypertrophic cardiomyopathies code for proteins involved in the contractile apparatus, the sarcomere, and the genes causing dilated cardiomyopathy code for proteins that anchor the sarcomere to the cell membrane and extracellular matrix. This article reviews these recent genetic findings and discusses their potential clinical applicability.

  5. Myocardial mechanics in cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Modesto, Karen; Sengupta, Partho P

    2014-01-01

    Cardiomyopathies are a heterogeneous group of diseases that can be phenotypically recognized by specific patterns of ventricular morphology and function. The authors summarize recent clinical observations that mechanistically link the multidirectional components of left ventricular (LV) deformation with morphological phenotypes of cardiomyopathies for offering key insights into the transmural heterogeneity of myocardial function. Subendocardial dysfunction predominantly alters LV longitudinal shortening, lengthening and suction performance and contributes to the phenotypic patterns of heart failure (HF) with preserved ejection fraction (EF) seen with hypertrophic and restrictive patterns of cardiomyopathy. On the other hand, a more progressive transmural disease results in reduction of LV circumferential and twist mechanics leading to the phenotypic pattern of dilated cardiomyopathy and the clinical syndrome of HF with reduced (EF). A proper characterization of LV transmural mechanics, energetics, and space-time distributions of pressure and shear stress may allow recognition of early functional changes that can forecast progression or reversal of LV remodeling. Furthermore, the interactions between LV muscle and fluid mechanics hold the promise for offering newer mechanistic insights and tracking impact of novel therapies.

  6. Peripartum cardiomyopathy: a review

    PubMed Central

    Capriola, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) is a form of dilated cardiomyopathy of unclear etiology affecting women without preexisting heart disease during the last month of pregnancy or during the first 5 months postpartum. Its incidence shows marked geographic and ethnic variation, being most common in Africa and among women of African descent. Most women present in the first month postpartum with typical heart failure symptoms such as dyspnea, lower extremity edema, and fatigue. These symptoms are often initially erroneously diagnosed as part of the normal puerperal process. Diagnosis can be aided by the finding of a significantly elevated serum brain natriuretic peptide. The etiology of PPCM is unclear; however, recent research suggests abnormal prolactin metabolism is seminal in its development, and prolactin antagonism with bromocriptine shows promise as a novel treatment for PPCM. PMID:23300351

  7. [Tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Povolný, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Cardiomyopathy is a heterogeneous group of diseases of heart muscle accompanied with impaired cardiac function. Tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy (TIC) is caused by prolonged tachycardia leading to dilatation and systolic dysfunction with clinical manifestation of heart failure. This state is reversible after normalization of heart rate. The diagnosis is usually made retrospectively after normalization of heart rate and recovery of left ventricular function (LVF). More than 100 years after the first documented case (described in 1913 in a young patient with atrial fibrillation and symptoms of heart failure [25]) is still limited knowledge of pathophysiological mechanisms. The most common arrhythmias responsible for the TIC include atrial fibrillation [1,2], atrial flutter [3], incessant supraventricular tachycardia [4], ventricular tachycardia (VT) [5] and frequent ventricular extrasystoles (VES) [6]. TIC detection and therapeutic intervention is crucial considering potential reversibility of tachycardia. Current options of treatment involve drug therapy and surgical or catheter ablation.

  8. Evolving molecular diagnostics for familial cardiomyopathies: at the heart of it all.

    PubMed

    Callis, Thomas E; Jensen, Brian C; Weck, Karen E; Willis, Monte S

    2010-04-01

    Cardiomyopathies are an important and heterogeneous group of common cardiac diseases. An increasing number of cardiomyopathies are now recognized to have familial forms, which result from single-gene mutations that render a Mendelian inheritance pattern, including hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, dilated cardiomyopathy, restrictive cardiomyopathy, arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy and left ventricular noncompaction cardiomyopathy. Recently, clinical genetic tests for familial cardiomyopathies have become available for clinicians evaluating and treating patients with these diseases, making it necessary to understand the current progress and challenges in cardiomyopathy genetics and diagnostics. In this review, we summarize the genetic basis of selected cardiomyopathies, describe the clinical utility of genetic testing for cardiomyopathies and outline the current challenges and emerging developments.

  9. Peripartum Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Arany, Zolt; Elkayam, Uri

    2016-04-05

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy is a potentially life-threatening pregnancy-associated disease that typically arises in the peripartum period and is marked by left ventricular dysfunction and heart failure. The disease is relatively uncommon, but its incidence is rising. Women often recover cardiac function, but long-lasting morbidity and mortality are not infrequent. Management of peripartum cardiomyopathy is largely limited to the same neurohormonal antagonists used in other forms of cardiomyopathy, and no proven disease-specific therapies exist yet. Research in the past decade has suggested that peripartum cardiomyopathy is caused by vascular dysfunction, triggered by late-gestational maternal hormones. Most recently, information has also indicated that many cases of peripartum cardiomyopathy have genetic underpinnings. We review here the known epidemiology, clinical presentation, and management of peripartum cardiomyopathy, as well as the current knowledge of the pathophysiology of the disease.

  10. Importance of transesophageal echocardiography in peripartum cardiomyopathy undergoing lower section cesarean section under regional anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Poonam Malhotra; Goyal, Sameer; Irpachi, Kalpana; Smita, Barya

    2014-07-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy is a relatively rare but life threatening disease. The etiology and pathogenesis of peripartum cardiomyopathy is generally centered upon viral and autoimmune mechanism. This case report describes the anesthetic management of a patient with term pregnancy suffering from dilated peripartum cardiomyopathy planned for cesarean section, successfully managed with epidural anesthesia after precipitate labour.

  11. Role of brain serotonin dysfunction in the pathophysiology of congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Li, Lei; Morimoto, Sachio; Take, Sachiko; Zhan, Dong-Yun; Du, Cheng-Kun; Wang, Yuan-Yuan; Fan, Xue-Li; Yoshihara, Tatsuya; Takahashi-Yanaga, Fumi; Katafuchi, Toshihiko; Sasaguri, Toshiyuki

    2012-12-01

    Inherited or non-inherited dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) patients develop varied disease phenotypes leading to death after developing congestive heart failure (HF) or sudden death with mild or no overt HF symptoms, suggesting that environmental and/or genetic factors may modify the disease phenotype of DCM. In this study, we sought to explore unknown genetic factors affecting the disease phenotype of monogenic inherited human DCM. Knock-in mice bearing a sarcomeric protein mutation that causes DCM were created on different genetic backgrounds; BALB/c and C57Bl/6. DCM mice on the BALB/c background showed cardiac enlargement and systolic dysfunction and developed congestive HF before died. In contrast, DCM mice on the C57Bl/6 background developed no overt HF symptoms and died suddenly, although they showed considerable cardiac enlargement and systolic dysfunction. BALB/c mice have brain serotonin dysfunction due to a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in tryptophan hydroxylase 2 (TPH2). Brain serotonin dysfunction plays a critical role in depression and anxiety and BALB/c mice exhibit depression- and anxiety-related behaviors. Since depression is common and associated with poor prognosis in HF patients, we examined therapeutic effects of anti-depression drug paroxetine and anti-anxiety drug buspirone that could improve the brain serotonin function in mice. Both drugs reduced cardiac enlargement and improved systolic dysfunction and symptoms of severe congestive HF in DCM mice on the BALB/c background. These results strongly suggest that genetic backgrounds involving brain serotonin dysfunction, such as TPH2 gene SNP, may play an important role in the development of congestive HF in DCM.

  12. Peripartum cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Sundin, Courtney Stanley

    2014-01-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy is a very rare, but serious life-threatening emergency. Early recognition of signs and symptoms, along with radiologic imaging and blood work, can facilitate timely diagnosis. Once peripartum cardiomyopathy is diagnosed, a multidisciplinary team can facilitate the delivery of quality care to promote optimal outcomes.

  13. Cardiomyopathy in captive African hedgehogs (Atelerix albiventris).

    PubMed

    Raymond, J T; Garner, M M

    2000-09-01

    From 1994 to 1999, 16 captive African hedgehogs (Atelerix albiventris), from among 42 necropsy cases, were diagnosed with cardiomyopathy. The incidence of cardiomyopathy in this study population was 38%. Fourteen of 16 hedgehogs with cardiomyopathy were males and all hedgehogs were adult (>1 year old). Nine hedgehogs exhibited 1 or more of the following clinical signs before death: heart murmur, lethargy, icterus, moist rales, anorexia, dyspnea, dehydration, and weight loss. The remaining 7 hedgehogs died without premonitory clinical signs. Gross findings were cardiomegaly (6 cases), hepatomegaly (5 cases), pulmonary edema (5 cases), pulmonary congestion (4 cases), hydrothorax (3 cases), pulmonary infarct (1 case), renal infarcts (1 case), ascites (1 case), and 5 cases showed no changes. Histologic lesions were found mainly within the left ventricular myocardium and consisted primarily of myodegeneration, myonecrosis, atrophy, hypertrophy, and disarray of myofibers. All hedgehogs with cardiomyopathy had myocardial fibrosis, myocardial edema, or both. Other common histopathologic findings were acute and chronic passive congestion of the lungs, acute passive congestion of the liver, renal tubular necrosis, vascular thrombosis, splenic extramedullary hematopoiesis, and hepatic lipidosis. This is the first report of cardiomyopathy in African hedgehogs.

  14. Determinants of Thyrotoxic Cardiomyopathy Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Oliveros-Ruiz, Lucia; Vallejo, Maite; Diez Canseco, L. Fernando; Cárdenas, Manuel; Hermosillo, J. Antonio G.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose was to evaluate the effect of the disease duration prior to treatment, thyroid hormones level, or both on the reversibility of dilated cardiomyopathy. Between January 2006 and December 2010, a longitudinal study with a 6 months follow-up was carried on. One hundred and seventy patients with hyperthyroidism were referred to the cardiologist, and 127 had a 6 months followup after antithyroid treatment and were evaluated by echocardiography. Dilated cardiomyopathy reversibility criteria were established according to echocardiographic parameters. Complete reversibility existed when all parameters were met, partial reversibility when LVEF was ≥55% plus two or three other parameters, and no reversibility when LVEF was ≤55% regardless of other parameters. The results showed that echocardiography parameters related to the regression of myocardial mass were associated with a disease duration shorter than 10.38 months. This was the main predictive variable for reversal of dilated cardiomyopathy, followed by β-blocker treatment, and the last predictive variable was the serum level of free triiodothyronine. This study showed that the effect on the myocardium related to thyrotoxicosis was associated with the disease duration before treatment. PMID:24106705

  15. Stem Cell-Based Therapies in Chagasic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Campos de Carvalho, Antonio Carlos; Bastos Carvalho, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    Chagas disease is caused by Trypanosoma cruzi and can lead to a dilated cardiomyopathy decades after the prime infection by the parasite. As with other dilated cardiomyopathies, conventional pharmacologic therapies are not always effective and as heart failure progresses patients need heart transplantation. Therefore alternative therapies are highly desirable and cell-based therapies have been investigated in preclinical and clinical studies. In this paper we review the main findings of such studies and discuss future directions for stem cell-based therapies in chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy. PMID:26161401

  16. What's Cardiomyopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood effectively and heart failure or irregular heartbeats (arrhythmias or dysrhythmia) may occur. Cardiomyopathy is classified as ... HCM are also at an increased risk of arrhythmias and sudden cardiac arrest. In advanced HCM (seen ...

  17. Cardiomyopathy in a dish: using human inducible pluripotent stem cells to model inherited cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Kamdar, Forum; Klaassen Kamdar, Andre; Koyano-Nakagawa, Naoko; Garry, Mary G; Garry, Daniel J

    2015-09-01

    Inherited cardiomyopathies, including hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, dilated cardiomyopathies, arrythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, and other inherited forms of heart failure, represent a unique set of genetically defined cardiovascular disease processes. Unraveling the molecular mechanisms of these deadly forms of human heart disease has been challenging, but recent groundbreaking scientific advances in stem cell technology have allowed for the generation of patient-specific human inducible stem cell (hiPSC)-derived cardiomyocytes (CMs). hiPSC-derived CMs retain the genetic blueprint of the patient, they can be maintained in culture, and they recapitulate the phenotypic characteristics of the disease in vitro, thus serving as a disease in a dish. This review provides an overview of in vitro modeling of inherited cardiomyopathies with the use of patient-specific hiPSC-derived CMs.

  18. Psychological disorders in adults with inherited cardiomyopathies and Takotsubo syndrome.

    PubMed

    Suárez Bagnasco, Mariana; Núñez-Gil, Iván J

    2016-06-03

    We performed a narrative review about psychological disorders in adults with Takotsubo syndrome and inherited cardiomyopathies. Through the electronic database PubMed and PsycINFO we searched all relevant related manuscripts published between 2000 and 2015. We found twelve studies that explore psychological disorders in Takotsubo syndrome and eight about inherited cardiomyopathies: five enrolled patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, two dilated cardiomyopathy, and one arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy. All papers reported the presence of psychological disorders. In Takotsubo syndrome, depression fluctuates between 20.5 and 48% and anxiety was present among 26 and 56%. A study reported that anxiety increases the probability of developing Takotsubo syndrome. In dilated cardiomyopathy, anxiety was present in 50% and depression in 22%. In arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, younger age, poorer functional capacity and having experienced at least one implantable cardioverter defibrillator shock, were significant independent predictors of both device-specific and generalized anxiety. In hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, anxiety and depression were present in 45.2% and 17.9%, respectively. Thirty seven percent met diagnostic criteria for anxiety disorders and 21% for mood disorders. Nearby half hypertrophic cardiomyopathy patients report triggering of chest pain, dyspnea, and dizziness by emotional stress. Due to the small number of studies, conclusions are limited. However, we discuss some results.

  19. Systematic review of pregnancy in women with inherited cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Krul, Sébastien P J; van der Smagt, Jasper J; van den Berg, Maarten P; Sollie, Krystyna M; Pieper, Petronella G; van Spaendonck-Zwarts, Karin Y

    2011-06-01

    Pregnancy exposes women with inherited cardiomyopathies to increased risk for heart failure and arrhythmias. In this paper, we review the clinical course and management of pregnant women with the following inherited cardiomyopathies: hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, dilated cardiomyopathy, arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, left ventricular non-compaction cardiomyopathy, and restrictive cardiomyopathy. We also discuss peripartum cardiomyopathy. Pregnancy is generally well tolerated in asymptomatic patients with inherited cardiomyopathies. However, worsening of the clinical condition can occur during pregnancy, despite intensive medical treatment. If prior cardiac events, poor functional class (New York Heart Association class III or IV), or advanced left ventricular systolic dysfunction are present, the risk of maternal cardiac complications during pregnancy are markedly increased. The postpartum condition is generally no worse than the antepartum condition, but no long-term follow-up studies have been reported. Preconception evaluation and counselling are important aspects of managing women with inherited cardiomyopathies. Genetic counselling and DNA testing should be offered to all women following the diagnosis of an inherited cardiomyopathy.

  20. Role of diastolic properties in the transition to failure in a mouse model of the cardiac dilatation.

    PubMed

    Costandi, Peter N; Frank, Lawrence R; McCulloch, Andrew D; Omens, Jeffrey H

    2006-12-01

    Although the physiological states of hypertrophic remodeling and congestive heart failure have been intensively studied, less is known about the transition from one to the other. The use of genetically engineered murine models of heart failure has proven valuable in characterizing the progression of remodeling and its ultimate decompensation to failure. Mice deficient in the cytoskeletal muscle LIM-only protein (MLP) are known to present with a clinical picture of dilated cardiomyopathy and transition to failure as adults. Longitudinal high-field magnetic resonance (MR) cardiac imaging provided a time course of remodeling where an improvement in ejection fraction and stroke volume (15- vs. 31-wk MLP(-/-) mice; P < 0.0001) was temporally concurrent with an abrupt phase of end-diastolic chamber dilatation. Hemodynamic analysis conducted throughout that dilatation phase showed improved ratio of maximum first derivative of pressure to end-diastolic pressure (dP/dt(max)/EDP; 15- vs. 31-wk MLP(-/-) mice; P < 0.0005), ratio of minimum first derivative of pressure to EDP (dP/dt(min)/EDP; 15- vs. 31-wk MLP(-/-) mice; P < 0.003), and developed pressure (15- vs. 31-wk MLP(-/-) mice; P < 0.0001) levels in the MLP(-/-) mice. Computational modeling techniques were used to estimate the EDP volume relationship, revealing that although MLP hearts possess a stiffer stress-strain relation, chamber compliance increased as a function of dilatation. This detailed physiological characterization during a phase of rapid anatomical remodeling suggests that systolic function in the MLP(-/-) mice may temporarily improve as a result of alterations in chamber compliance, which are mediated by dilatation. In turn, a balance may exist between exploiting the Frank-Starling mechanism and altering chamber compliance that maintains function in the absence of hypertrophic growth. Though initially compensatory, this process may exhaust itself and consequently transition to a maladaptive course.

  1. [Peripartum cardiomyopathy--a case report].

    PubMed

    Banaczek, Zbigniew; Rak, Grzegorz; Gołyska-Rączkiewicz, Danuta

    2015-01-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy, a type of dilated cardiomyopathy of unknown origin, occurs in previously healthy women in the final month of pregnancy and up to 5 months after delivery. Although the incidence is low--less than 0.1% of pregnancies--morbidity and mortality rates are high at 5% to 32%. The etiology of left ventricular dysfunction is unknown. Diagnosis of peripartum cardiomyopathy requires heightened awareness among multidisciplinary patient care teams and a high degree of suspicion. Confirmation involves the echocardiography reveals severe left ventricular failure. The outcome of peripartum cardiomyopathy is also highly variable. For some women, the clinical and echocardiographic status improves and sometimes returns to normal, whereas for others, the disease progresses to severe cardiac failure and even sudden cardiac death. Management of peripartum cardiomyopathy should aim first at improving heart-failure symptoms through conventional therapies, and then at administering targeted therapies.The prognosis is best when peripartum cardiomyopathy is diagnosed and treated early. Fortunately, despite a high risk of recurrence in subsequent pregnancies, many patients with peripartum cardiomyopathy recover within 3 to 6 months of disease onset. Future pregnancy is not recommended especially in patients with persistent left ventricular dysfunction because of the risk of dangerous complications.

  2. Pathophysiological targets for beta-blocker therapy in congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Just, H

    1996-04-01

    The treatment of congestive heart failure has seen considerable changes: while treatment with diuretics, digitalis glycosides and vasodilators has remained the mainstay of therapy, recently neurohumeral inhibition has been developed as an important principle: ACE-inhibitors have been shown to significantly improve quality of life and exercise performance and to substantially reduce mortality. Beta-blockers have been employed with increasing success mainly in congestive heart failure due to dilated idiopathic cardiomyopathy, in which a significant improvement in symptoms and life expectancy has been demonstrated. However, the precise mechanisms by which beta-blockade improves congestive heart failure remain to be elucidated. In addition to direct sympathoadrenal inhibition, reduction of heart rate may also play a major role in the therapeutic efficacy of beta-blockade in congestive heart failure. In the normal human heart increase in heart rate is accompanied by an increase in myocardial contractile performance (Bowditch-Treppe phenomenon). In chronic heart failure the myocardium undergoes a phenotype change which includes alterations of the activity of enzymes regulating calcium homoeostasis. The sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA) is depressed both in function, as well as in expression. At the same time the sarcolemmal sodium-calcium exchanger is increased both in function and in expression. The result is a characteristic change in calcium homoeostasis with decreased diastolic uptake of calcium into the sarcoplasmic reticulum with subsequently reduced calcium release during the next systole, resulting in reduced contractile performance. At the same time increased capacity of the sodium-calcium exchanger extrudes intracellular calcium ions to the extra-cellular space, thereby rendering these ions unavailable for the contractile cycle. A result of these, seemingly specific, phenotype changes is an alteration of the force/frequency relationship. Instead of

  3. Exome Sequencing Identifies a Novel LMNA Splice-Site Mutation and Multigenic Heterozygosity of Potential Modifiers in a Family with Sick Sinus Syndrome, Dilated Cardiomyopathy, and Sudden Cardiac Death.

    PubMed

    Zaragoza, Michael V; Fung, Lianna; Jensen, Ember; Oh, Frances; Cung, Katherine; McCarthy, Linda A; Tran, Christine K; Hoang, Van; Hakim, Simin A; Grosberg, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The goals are to understand the primary genetic mechanisms that cause Sick Sinus Syndrome and to identify potential modifiers that may result in intrafamilial variability within a multigenerational family. The proband is a 63-year-old male with a family history of individuals (>10) with sinus node dysfunction, ventricular arrhythmia, cardiomyopathy, heart failure, and sudden death. We used exome sequencing of a single individual to identify a novel LMNA mutation and demonstrated the importance of Sanger validation and family studies when evaluating candidates. After initial single-gene studies were negative, we conducted exome sequencing for the proband which produced 9 gigabases of sequencing data. Bioinformatics analysis showed 94% of the reads mapped to the reference and identified 128,563 unique variants with 108,795 (85%) located in 16,319 genes of 19,056 target genes. We discovered multiple variants in known arrhythmia, cardiomyopathy, or ion channel associated genes that may serve as potential modifiers in disease expression. To identify candidate mutations, we focused on ~2,000 variants located in 237 genes of 283 known arrhythmia, cardiomyopathy, or ion channel associated genes. We filtered the candidates to 41 variants in 33 genes using zygosity, protein impact, database searches, and clinical association. Only 21 of 41 (51%) variants were validated by Sanger sequencing. We selected nine confirmed variants with minor allele frequencies <1% for family studies. The results identified LMNA c.357-2A>G, a novel heterozygous splice-site mutation as the primary mutation with rare or novel variants in HCN4, MYBPC3, PKP4, TMPO, TTN, DMPK and KCNJ10 as potential modifiers and a mechanism consistent with haploinsufficiency.

  4. Exome Sequencing Identifies a Novel LMNA Splice-Site Mutation and Multigenic Heterozygosity of Potential Modifiers in a Family with Sick Sinus Syndrome, Dilated Cardiomyopathy, and Sudden Cardiac Death

    PubMed Central

    Zaragoza, Michael V.; Fung, Lianna; Jensen, Ember; Oh, Frances; Cung, Katherine; McCarthy, Linda A.; Tran, Christine K.; Hoang, Van; Hakim, Simin A.; Grosberg, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The goals are to understand the primary genetic mechanisms that cause Sick Sinus Syndrome and to identify potential modifiers that may result in intrafamilial variability within a multigenerational family. The proband is a 63-year-old male with a family history of individuals (>10) with sinus node dysfunction, ventricular arrhythmia, cardiomyopathy, heart failure, and sudden death. We used exome sequencing of a single individual to identify a novel LMNA mutation and demonstrated the importance of Sanger validation and family studies when evaluating candidates. After initial single-gene studies were negative, we conducted exome sequencing for the proband which produced 9 gigabases of sequencing data. Bioinformatics analysis showed 94% of the reads mapped to the reference and identified 128,563 unique variants with 108,795 (85%) located in 16,319 genes of 19,056 target genes. We discovered multiple variants in known arrhythmia, cardiomyopathy, or ion channel associated genes that may serve as potential modifiers in disease expression. To identify candidate mutations, we focused on ~2,000 variants located in 237 genes of 283 known arrhythmia, cardiomyopathy, or ion channel associated genes. We filtered the candidates to 41 variants in 33 genes using zygosity, protein impact, database searches, and clinical association. Only 21 of 41 (51%) variants were validated by Sanger sequencing. We selected nine confirmed variants with minor allele frequencies <1% for family studies. The results identified LMNA c.357-2A>G, a novel heterozygous splice-site mutation as the primary mutation with rare or novel variants in HCN4, MYBPC3, PKP4, TMPO, TTN, DMPK and KCNJ10 as potential modifiers and a mechanism consistent with haploinsufficiency. PMID:27182706

  5. Cirrhotic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-del-Árbol, Luis; Serradilla, Regina

    2015-11-07

    During the course of cirrhosis, there is a progressive deterioration of cardiac function manifested by the disappearance of the hyperdynamic circulation due to a failure in heart function with decreased cardiac output. This is due to a deterioration in inotropic and chronotropic function which takes place in parallel with a diastolic dysfunction and cardiac hypertrophy in the absence of other known cardiac disease. Other findings of this specific cardiomyopathy include impaired contractile responsiveness to stress stimuli and electrophysiological abnormalities with prolonged QT interval. The pathogenic mechanisms of cirrhotic cardiomyopathy include impairment of the b-adrenergic receptor signalling, abnormal cardiomyocyte membrane lipid composition and biophysical properties, ion channel defects and overactivity of humoral cardiodepressant factors. Cirrhotic cardiomyopathy may be difficult to determine due to the lack of a specific diagnosis test. However, an echocardiogram allows the detection of the diastolic dysfunction and the E/e' ratio may be used in the follow-up progression of the illness. Cirrhotic cardiomyopathy plays an important role in the pathogenesis of the impairment of effective arterial blood volume and correlates with the degree of liver failure. A clinical consequence of cardiac dysfunction is an inadequate cardiac response in the setting of vascular stress that may result in renal hypoperfusion leading to renal failure. The prognosis is difficult to establish but the severity of diastolic dysfunction may be a marker of mortality risk. Treatment is non-specific and liver transplantation may normalize the cardiac function.

  6. Restrictive cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Nihoyannopoulos, Petros; Dawson, David

    2009-12-01

    Restrictive cardiomyopathies constitute a heterogenous group of heart muscle conditions that all have, in common, the symptoms of heart failure. Diastolic dysfunction with preserved systolic function is often the only echocardiographic abnormality that may be noted, although systolic dysfunction may also be an integral part of some specific pathologies, particularly in the most advanced cases such as amyloid infiltration of the heart. By far, the majority of restrictive cardiomyopathies are secondary to a systemic disorder such as amyloidosis, sarcoidosis, scleroderma, haemochromatosis, eosinophilic heart disease, or as a result of radiation treatment. The much more rare diagnosis of idiopathic restrictive cardiomyopathy is supported only by the absence of specific pathology on either endomyocardial biopsies or at post-mortem. Restrictive cardiomyopathy is diagnosed based on medical history, physical examination, and tests: such as blood tests, electrocardiogram, chest X-ray, echocardiography, and magnetic resonance imaging. With its wide availability, echocardiography is probably the most important investigation to identify the left ventricular dysfunction and should be performed early and by groups that are familiar with the wide variety of aetiologies. Finally, on rare occasions, the differential diagnosis from constrictive pericarditis may be necessary.

  7. What Is Cardiomyopathy?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Cardiomyopathy? Cardiomyopathy refers to diseases of the heart muscle. These ... many causes, signs and symptoms, and treatments. In cardiomyopathy, the heart muscle becomes enlarged, thick, or rigid. ...

  8. [Prevalence of positive serology to Trypanosoma cruzi in patients with clinical diagnosis of dilated myocardiopathy in the state of Campeche].

    PubMed

    Alducin-Téllez, César; Rueda-Villegas, Enrique; Medina-Yerbes, Isaí; Hernández, Oscar; López, Ruth; Peña-Hernández, Virginia; Monteón, Víctor

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence of chronic Chagas' heart disease as a cause of dilated cardiomyopathy is unknown in the State of Campeche, Mexico. A study was conducted to determine the prevalence of positive serology for Trypanosoma cruzi in patients with clinical diagnosis of dilated cardiomyopathy. Of a total of 127 patients diagnosed with dilated cardiomyopathy, we studied 91 with two positive serological tests for T. cruzi. We identified 14 positive cases for a prevalence of 15 % of chronic Chagas' heart disease. This prevalence is similar to that reported for the rest of the Yucatan Peninsula.

  9. Dilating Eye Drops

    MedlinePlus

    ... Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Dilating Eye Drops En Español Read in Chinese What are dilating eye drops? Dilating eye drops contain medication to enlarge ( ...

  10. Arrhythmogenic Noncompaction Cardiomyopathy: Is There an Echocardiographic Phenotypic Overlap of Two Distinct Cardiomyopathies?

    PubMed

    Aras, Dursun; Ozeke, Ozcan; Cay, Serkan; Ozcan, Firat; Baser, Kazım; Dogan, Umuttan; Unlu, Murat; Demirkan, Burcu; Tufekcioglu, Omac; Topaloglu, Serkan

    2015-09-01

    The clinical diagnosis of right ventricular (RV) cardiomyopathies is often challenging. It is difficult to differentiate the isolated left ventricular (LV) noncompaction cardiomyopathy (NC) from biventricular NC or from coexisting arrhythmogenic ventricular cardiomyopathy (AC). There are currently few established morphologic criteria for the diagnosis other than RV dilation and presence of excessive regional trabeculation. The gross and microscopic changes suggest pathological similarities between, or coexistence of, RV-NC and AC. Therefore, the term arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy is somewhat misleading as isolated LV or biventricular involvement may be present and thus a broader term such as AC should be preferred. We describe an unusual case of AC associated with a NC in a 27-year-old man who had a history of permanent pacemaker 7 years ago due to second-degree atrioventricular block.

  11. Reversible Cardiomyopathies

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Harsh; Madanieh, Raef; Kosmas, Constantine E; Vatti, Satya K; Vittorio, Timothy J

    2015-01-01

    Cardiomyopathies (CMs) have many etiological factors that can result in severe structural and functional dysregulation. Fortunately, there are several potentially reversible CMs that are known to improve when the root etiological factor is addressed. In this article, we discuss several of these reversible CMs, including tachycardia-induced, peripartum, inflammatory, hyperthyroidism, Takotsubo, and chronic illness–induced CMs. Our discussion also includes a review on their respective pathophysiology, as well as possible management solutions. PMID:26052233

  12. Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy Occurring in the Postoperative Period.

    PubMed

    Deniz, Süleyman; Bakal, Ömer; İnangil, Gökhan; Şen, Hüseyin; Özkan, Sezai

    2015-02-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy simulates acute myocardial infarction, and it is characterised by reversible left ventricular failure. A case of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy diagnosed after emergency angiography performed in a patient with evidence of acute myocardial infarction in the postoperative period will be described in this report. Transurethral resection of a bladder tumour (TUR-BT) was performed in a 92-year-old male patient by the urology clinic. The patient was transferred to the post-anaesthesia care unit after the operation. An echocardiography was performed because of the sudden onset of dyspnoea, tachycardia (140-150 beats per minute, rhythm-atrial fibrillation) and ST-segment elevation on electrocardiography (ECG) at the first postoperative hour, and midapical dyskinesia was detected at the patient. An immediate angiography was performed due to suspicion of acute coronary syndrome. Patent coronary arteries and temporary aneurysmatic dilatation of the apex of the heart were revealed by angiography. As a result of these findings, the patient was diagnosed with Takotsubo cardiomyopathy by the cardiology service. The patient was discharged uneventfully following 10 days in the intensive care unit. Aneurysm of the apex of the left ventricle and normal anatomy of the coronary arteries in the angiography have diagnostic value for Takotsubo cardiomyopathy. Diuretics (furosemide) and beta-blockers (metoprolol) are commonly used for the treatment of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy. Even though Takotsubo cardiomyopathy is a rare and benign disease, it should be kept in mind in patients suspected for acute myocardial infarction in the postoperative period.

  13. Childhood Cardiomyopathies: A Study in Tertiary Care Hospital in Upper Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Bakeet, Mohamed Abd Elaal; Mohamed, Montaser Mohamed; Allam, Ahmed Ahmed; Gamal, Rania

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cardiomyopathy (CMP) is defined by the World Health Organization (WHO) as a disease of the myocardium associated with cardiac dysfunction. An understanding of CMP is very important, as it is a common cause of heart failure in children, and the most common indication for heart transplantation in children older than one year, but data on CMP in Egypt are scarce. The aim of this study was to determine the number, risk factors, clinical presentation, complications and outcome of different types of childhood cardiomyopathies in Sohag University Hospital. Methods This cross-sectional hospital based study enrolled fifty children with Cardiomyopathy in Pediatric Departments, Neonatal Care Units, and Cardiac Outpatient Clinics in Sohag University Hospital from March 01, 2014 to February 28, 2015. Results Cases with Dilated Cardiomyopathy (DCMP) were 38 (76%), and those who had Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCMP) were 12 (24%). Dyspnea was the most common presenting complaint in 71% of cases. In cases with DCMP, the mean EF was 33.8, and FS was 17.11, while in cases with HCMP, the mean EF was 70.75, FS was 37. Fifty percent of cases were found to have moderate to severe PHT. Serum CK-MB was elevated in 3 (6%) cases, while serum Troponin I was elevated in 2 (4.2%) cases who diagnosed as having myocarditis. Viral myocarditis was the most common identified etiological agent responsible for 14 (37%) cases with DCMP. Conclusions CMP represents a considerable percentage of children with cardiac disorders. DCMP is the most common type, usually presented with congestive heart failure, and the most common cause is myocarditis. L-Carnitine profile was normal in all cases, despite its routine use. Pediatricians need to raise their clinical suspicion to CMPs, as atypical presentations are not uncommon. To do screening for other family members, cardiac enzymes (CK-MB, Troponin I) have to be done in all newly diagnosed CMP cases, along with a revision of the routine

  14. Two Cases of Apical Ballooning Syndrome Masking Apical Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Ranjini Raina; Hakim, Fayaz A.; Hurst, R. Todd; Simper, David; Appleton, Christopher P.

    2014-01-01

    Apical akinesis and dilation in the absence of obstructive coronary artery disease is a typical feature of stress-induced (takotsubo) cardiomyopathy, whereas apical hypertrophy is seen in apical-variant hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. We report the cases of 2 patients who presented with takotsubo cardiomyopathy and were subsequently found to have apical-variant hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, after the apical ballooning from the takotsubo cardiomyopathy had resolved. The first patient, a 43-year-old woman with a history of alcohol abuse, presented with shortness of breath, electrocardiographic and echocardiographic features consistent with takotsubo cardiomyopathy, and no significant coronary artery disease. An echocardiogram 2 weeks later revealed a normal left ventricular ejection fraction and newly apparent apical hypertrophy. The 2nd patient, a 70-year-old woman with pancreatitis, presented with chest pain, apical akinesis, and a left ventricular ejection fraction of 0.39, consistent with takotsubo cardiomyopathy. One month later, her left ventricular ejection fraction was normal; however, hypertrophy of the left ventricular apex was newly noted. To our knowledge, these are the first reported cases in which apical-variant hypertrophic cardiomyopathy was masked by apical ballooning from stress-induced cardiomyopathy. PMID:24808780

  15. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in infants: clinical features and natural history

    SciTech Connect

    Maron, B.J.; Tajik, A.J.; Ruttenberg, H.D.; Graham, T.P.; Atwood, G.F.; Victorica, B.E.; Lie, J.T.; Roberts, W.C.

    1982-01-01

    The clinical and morphologic features of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in 20 patients recognized as having cardiac disease in the first year of life are described. Fourteen of these 20 infants were initially suspected of having heart disease solely because a heart murmur was identified. However, the infants showed a variety of clinical findings, including signs of marked congestive heart failure (in the presence of nondilated ventricular cavities and normal or increased left ventricular contractility) and substantial cardiac enlargement on chest radiograph. Other findings were markedly different from those usually present in older children and adults with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (e.g., right ventricular hypertrophy on the ECG and cyanosis). Consequently, in 14 infants, the initial clinical diagnosis was congenital cardiac malformation other than hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. The clinical course was variable in these patients, but the onset of marked congestive heart failure in the first year of life appeared to be an unfavorable prognostic sign; nine of the 11 infants with congestive heart failure died within the first year of life. In infants with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, unlike older children and adults with this condition, sudden death was less common (two patients) than death due to progressive congestive heart failure.

  16. Diagnosis and management of inherited cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Millar, Lynne; Sharma, Sanjay

    2014-10-01

    Inherited heart conditions are the most common cause of sudden cardiac death in those under the age of 35 and the leading cause of non-traumatic death in young athletes. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most common inherited heart disease affecting 1 in 500 of the population. Some patients may exhibit severe left ventricular hypertrophy, others may show nothing more than an abnormal ECG. Left ventricular hypertrophy most commonly manifests in the second decade of life. Sudden death is rare and usually affects patients in the first three decades whereas older patients present with heart failure, atrial fibrillation and stroke. Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy is a rare, autosomal dominant heart muscle disorder which affects between 1 in 1,000 and 1 in 5,000 of the population. Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is characterised by a dilated left ventricle with impaired function that cannot be explained by ischaemic heart disease, hypertension or valvular heart disease. At least 25% of cases of DCM are familial. DCM may be associated with multisystem conditions such as muscular dystrophy. Chemotherapy and certain other drugs, alcohol abuse and myocarditis may also lead to a dilated and poorly contracting left ventricle. In many cases the first manifestation of an inherited cardiomyopathy can be a sudden cardiac arrest. Other presentations include chest pain or breathlessness during exertion, palpitations and syncope. In many of the cardiomyopathies, the diagnosis can be made with a standard ECG and echocardiogram. However if the diagnosis is not certain or the cardiologist wishes to look at the heart structure in greater detail, a cardiac MRI may be performed.

  17. A fatal case of peripartum cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Ronny; Mallet, Thierry; Mirrer, Brooks; Loarte, Pablo; Gale, Michael; Kastell, Paul

    2014-06-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy is a life-threatening cardiac condition affecting pregnant women either late in pregnancy or early in the post-partum period. The latest studies show a dramatic improvement in the mortality rates of women affected with this disorder, which has been correlated with advances in medical therapy for heart failure. However, patients continue to die of this condition. The following case report describes a typical patient with peripartum cardiomyopathy diagnosed on clinical grounds, along with echocardiogram findings of severe systolic dysfunction and global hypokinesis consistent with dilated cardiomyopathy. Emergency cesarean delivery had to be performed for fetal distress. There was significant improvement of the patient's condition with standard pharmacological management for heart failure at the time of discharge. However, five weeks after discharge, fatal cardiac arrest occurred. It is hoped that this article will raise awareness about this rare but potentially fatal condition and promote understanding of its main clinical features, diagnostic criteria, and conventional pharmacological management.

  18. Primary prophylaxis of sudden death in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, and dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Klein, George J; Krahn, Andrew D; Skanes, Allan C; Yee, Raymond; Gula, Lorne J

    2005-09-01

    We present an evidence-based overview of primary prevention of sudden cardiac death. Several recent studies have provided important data regarding pharmacologic and device-based therapy for patients with conditions that confer high risk for sudden death. A rational approach to these therapies, with emphasis on implanted cardiovertor defibrillators, is discussed.

  19. Research priorities in sarcomeric cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    van der Velden, Jolanda; Ho, Carolyn Y; Tardiff, Jil C; Olivotto, Iacopo; Knollmann, Bjorn C; Carrier, Lucie

    2015-04-01

    The clinical variability in patients with sarcomeric cardiomyopathies is striking: a mutation causes cardiomyopathy in one individual, while the identical mutation is harmless in a family member. Moreover, the clinical phenotype varies ranging from asymmetric hypertrophy to severe dilatation of the heart. Identification of a single phenotype-associated disease mechanism would facilitate the design of targeted treatments for patient groups with different clinical phenotypes. However, evidence from both the clinic and basic knowledge of functional and structural properties of the sarcomere argues against a 'one size fits all' therapy for treatment of one clinical phenotype. Meticulous clinical and basic studies are needed to unravel the initial and progressive changes initiated by sarcomere mutations to better understand why mutations in the same gene can lead to such opposing phenotypes. Ultimately, we need to design an 'integrative physiology' approach to fully realize patient/gene-tailored therapy. Expertise within different research fields (cardiology, genetics, cellular biology, physiology, and pharmacology) must be joined to link longitudinal clinical studies with mechanistic insights obtained from molecular and functional studies in novel cardiac muscle systems. New animal models, which reflect both initial and more advanced stages of sarcomeric cardiomyopathy, will also aid in achieving these goals. Here, we discuss current priorities in clinical and preclinical investigation aimed at increasing our understanding of pathophysiological mechanisms leading from mutation to disease. Such information will provide the basis to improve risk stratification and to develop therapies to prevent/rescue cardiac dysfunction and remodelling caused by sarcomere mutations.

  20. Two different cardiomyopathies in a single patient : hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and left ventricular noncompaction.

    PubMed

    Sunbul, M; Ozben, B; Mutlu, B

    2013-05-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a complex and relatively common genetic disorder characterized by left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy, usually associated with a nondilated and hyperdynamic chamber with heterogeneous phenotypic expression and clinical course. On the other hand, LV noncompaction is an uncommon cardiomyopathy characterized by the persistence of fetal myocardium with a pattern of prominent trabecular meshwork and deep intertrabecular recesses, systolic dysfunction, and LV dilatation. We report a 29-year-old man with these two different inherent conditions. Our case raises the possibility of a genetic mutation common to these two clinical entities or different gene mutations existing in the same individual.

  1. Metabolic imaging of patients with cardiomyopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Geltman, E.M. )

    1991-09-01

    The cardiomyopathies comprise a diverse group of illnesses that can be characterized functionally by several techniques. However, the delineation of derangements of regional perfusion and metabolism have been accomplished only relatively recently with positron emission tomography (PET). Regional myocardial accumulation and clearance of 11C-palmitate, the primary myocardial substrate under most conditions, demonstrate marked spatial heterogeneity when studied under fasting conditions or with glucose loading. PET with 11C-palmitate permits the noninvasive differentiation of patients with nonischemic from ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy, since patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy demonstrate large zones of intensely depressed accumulation of 11C-palmitate, probably reflecting prior infarction. Patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and Duchenne's muscular dystrophy demonstrate relatively unique patterns of myocardial abnormalities of perfusion and metabolism. The availability of new tracers and techniques for the evaluation of myocardial metabolism (11C-acetate), perfusion (H2(15)O), and autonomic tone (11-C-hydroxyephedrine) should facilitate further understanding of the pathogenesis of the cardiomyopathies.

  2. Hybrid cutting balloon dilatation for treatment of cor triatriatum sinister in a cat.

    PubMed

    Stern, Joshua A; Tou, Sandra P; Barker, Piers C A; Hill, Kevin D; Lodge, Andrew J; Mathews, Kyle G; Keene, Bruce W

    2013-09-01

    A hybrid surgical approach and balloon dilatation were performed successfully in a cat with cor triatriatum sinister and clinical signs of congestive heart failure. Left lateral thoracotomy was used to access the heart and cutting balloon followed by standard balloon dilatation were utilized to dilate the perforation in the anomalous left atrial membrane. Clinical signs resolved completely after dilation of the anomalous left atrial membrane. Based upon the outcome of this case, balloon dilatation appears to be a viable treatment option for cats affected with cor triatriatum sinister.

  3. Significantly Elevated Liver Alkaline Phosphatase in Congestive Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Shamban, Leonid; Patel, Brijesh; Williams, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Congestive hepatopathy can have a mildly elevated liver profile, which should normalize with appropriate therapy. Liver specific alkaline phosphatase (ALP) in decompensated heart failure (HF) can be mildly elevated. The levels exceeding beyond the expected rise should be a concern and lead to further investigation. The literature reports insubstantial number of cases regarding significantly elevated levels of ALP and congestive hepatopathy. We report a case of a 45-year-old female with known history of severe cardiomyopathy that had persistently elevated levels of ALP. The extensive workup was negative for any specific pathology. The liver biopsy was consistent with congestive hepatopathy. The patient’s ALP levels decreased with aggressive diuretic therapy but still remained elevated. PMID:27785272

  4. Discoveries in peripartum cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Fett, James D; Markham, David W

    2015-07-01

    The past decade has seen remarkable gains for outcomes in peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM), one of the leading causes of maternal mortality and morbidity in the USA and many other countries, including the high-incidence areas of Haiti and South Africa. This review article emphasizes the importance of continuing the process of increasing awareness of PPCM and presents details of this evolving picture, including important discoveries that point the way to full recovery for almost all PPCM subjects. In addition, new interventions will be highlighted, which may facilitate recovery. Numerous studies have demonstrated that when the diagnosis of PPCM is made with LVEF > 0.30, the probability is that recovery to LVEF ≥ 0.50 will occur in the overwhelming majority of subjects. PPCM patients diagnosed with severely depressed systolic function (LVEF < 0.30) and a remodeled left ventricle with greater dilatation (LVEDd ≥ 60mm) are least likely to reach the outcome recovery goals. These are the patients with the greatest need for newer interventional strategies.

  5. Pathophysiology of nasal congestion

    PubMed Central

    Naclerio, Robert M; Bachert, Claus; Baraniuk, James N

    2010-01-01

    Nasal congestion is a common symptom in rhinitis (both allergic and nonallergic), rhinosinusitis and nasal polyposis. Congestion can also be caused by physical obstruction of nasal passages and/or modulation of sensory perception. Mucosal inflammation underlies many of the specific and interrelated factors that contribute to nasal congestion, as well as other symptoms of both allergic rhinitis and rhinosinusitis. A wide range of biologically active agents (eg, histamine, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukins, cell adhesion molecules) and cell types contribute to inflammation, which can manifest as venous engorgement, increased nasal secretions and tissue swelling/edema, ultimately leading to impaired airflow and the sensation of nasal congestion. Inflammation-induced changes in the properties of sensory afferents (eg, expression of peptides and receptors) that innervate the nose can also contribute to altered sensory perception, which may result in a subjective feeling of congestion. Increased understanding of the mechanisms underlying inflammation can facilitate improved treatment selection and the development of new therapies for congestion. PMID:20463823

  6. Cardiomyopathies in Noonan syndrome and the other RASopathies

    PubMed Central

    Gelb, Bruce D.; Roberts, Amy E.; Tartaglia, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Noonan syndrome and related disorders (Noonan syndrome with multiple lentigines, Costello syndrome, cardiofaciocutaneous syndrome, Noonan syndrome with loose anagen hair, and other related traits) are autosomal dominant traits. Mutations causing these disorders alter proteins relevant for signaling through RAS. Thus, these traits are now collectively called the RASopathies. While the RASopathies have pleiomorphic features, this review will focus on the hypertrophic cardiomyopathy observed in varying percentages of all of these traits. In addition, inherited abnormalities in one pathway gene, RAF1, cause pediatric-onset dilated cardiomyopathy. The pathogeneses for the RASopathy-associated cardiomyopathies are being elucidated, principally using animal models, leading to genotype-specific insights into how signal transduction is perturbed. Based on those findings, small molecule therapies seem possible for RASopathy-associated cardiomyopathies. PMID:26380542

  7. Anthracycline cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Kobrinsky, N L; Ramsay, N K; Krivit, W

    1982-01-01

    Life-threatening irreversible cardiomyopathy is a major complication of anthracycline therapy, particularly in the pediatric population. The pediatric cardiologist, in concert with the primary oncologist, should therefore play a major role in the care of patients receiving these agents and in clinical trials involving their use. Many risk factors and their relationships to drug pharmacokinetics, mechanisms of action, and toxicity have been identified. These data provide a rational basis for present-day recommendations regarding anthracycline administration and dosage scheduling. They furthermore provide potential avenues for clinical investigation aimed at improving the therapeutic index of these agents: alpha-tocopherol, cytochrome Q10, and other free radical scavengers may decrease the deleterious effects of free radical generation on the myocardium without apparent interference with tumoricidal effect. The cardiac glycosides may decrease cardiac toxicity by specific myocardial exclusion. Anthracycline analogs have been designed to specifically inhibit myocardial binding and/or free radical generation. Clinical trials involving these agents are difficult to interpret because of variability in front end risk factors and dosage schedules in the study population. Furthermore, the relatively low (5 to 10%) incidence of affected patients implies the need for large numbers to demonstrate a statistically significant benefit. Pediatric protocols addressing these issues are urgently needed. Guidelines for present-day management and future studies are outlined.

  8. Inherited cardiomyopathies mimicking arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Jason D; Veinot, John P; Rutberg, Julie; Gollob, Michael H

    2010-01-01

    Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) represents an inherited cardiomyopathy that manifests clinically with malignant ventricular arrhythmias, sudden cardiac death, and less commonly heart failure. The condition is characterized by replacement of the myocardium, primarily of the right ventricle, with fibrofatty tissue. Extensive fibrofatty replacement of the myocardium has been previously thought to be pathognomonic of ARVC; however, this report details two other forms of inherited cardiomyopathy, namely hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and the PRKAG2 cardiac syndrome, that were found to have significant fibrofatty myocardial replacement at pathologic examination. This report represents the first documentation of inherited cardiomyopathies mimicking ARVC and highlights the concept that other cardiac conditions can be associated with fibrofatty replacement of the myocardium.

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Non-ischemic Cardiomyopathies: A Pictorial Essay.

    PubMed

    Olivas-Chacon, Cristina I; Mullins, Carola; Stewart, Kevan; Akle, Nassim; Calleros, Jesus E; Ramos-Duran, Luis R

    2015-01-01

    Non-ischemic cardiomyopathies are defined as either primary or secondary diseases of the myocardium resulting in cardiac dysfunction. While primary cardiomyopathies are confined to the heart and can be genetic or acquired, secondary cardiomyopathies show involvement of the heart as a manifestation of an underlying systemic disease including metabolic, inflammatory, granulomatous, infectious, or autoimmune entities. Non-ischemic cardiomyopathies are currently classified as hypertrophic, dilated, restrictive, or unclassifiable, including left ventricular non-compaction. Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging (CMRI) not only has the capability to assess cardiac morphology and function, but also the ability to detect edema, hemorrhage, fibrosis, and intramyocardial deposits, providing a valuable imaging tool in the characterization of non-ischemic cardiomyopathies. This pictorial essay shows some of the most important non-ischemic cardiomyopathies with an emphasis on magnetic resonance imaging features.

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Non-ischemic Cardiomyopathies: A Pictorial Essay

    PubMed Central

    Olivas-Chacon, Cristina I; Mullins, Carola; Stewart, Kevan; Akle, Nassim; Calleros, Jesus E; Ramos-Duran, Luis R

    2015-01-01

    Non-ischemic cardiomyopathies are defined as either primary or secondary diseases of the myocardium resulting in cardiac dysfunction. While primary cardiomyopathies are confined to the heart and can be genetic or acquired, secondary cardiomyopathies show involvement of the heart as a manifestation of an underlying systemic disease including metabolic, inflammatory, granulomatous, infectious, or autoimmune entities. Non-ischemic cardiomyopathies are currently classified as hypertrophic, dilated, restrictive, or unclassifiable, including left ventricular non-compaction. Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging (CMRI) not only has the capability to assess cardiac morphology and function, but also the ability to detect edema, hemorrhage, fibrosis, and intramyocardial deposits, providing a valuable imaging tool in the characterization of non-ischemic cardiomyopathies. This pictorial essay shows some of the most important non-ischemic cardiomyopathies with an emphasis on magnetic resonance imaging features. PMID:26199786

  11. Molecular Characterization of Pediatric Restrictive Cardiomyopathy from Integrative Genomics.

    PubMed

    Rindler, Tara N; Hinton, Robert B; Salomonis, Nathan; Ware, Stephanie M

    2017-01-18

    Pediatric restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM) is a genetically heterogeneous heart disease with limited therapeutic options. RCM cases are largely idiopathic; however, even within families with a known genetic cause for cardiomyopathy, there is striking variability in disease severity. Although accumulating evidence implicates both gene expression and alternative splicing in development of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), there have been no detailed molecular characterizations of underlying pathways dysregulated in RCM. RNA-Seq on a cohort of pediatric RCM patients compared to other forms of adult cardiomyopathy and controls identified transcriptional differences highly common to the cardiomyopathies, as well as those unique to RCM. Transcripts selectively induced in RCM include many known and novel G-protein coupled receptors linked to calcium handling and contractile regulation. In-depth comparisons of alternative splicing revealed splicing events shared among cardiomyopathy subtypes, as well as those linked solely to RCM. Genes identified with altered alternative splicing implicate RBM20, a DCM splicing factor, as a potential mediator of alternative splicing in RCM. We present the first comprehensive report on molecular pathways dysregulated in pediatric RCM including unique/shared pathways identified compared to other cardiomyopathy subtypes and demonstrate that disruption of alternative splicing patterns in pediatric RCM occurs in the inverse direction as DCM.

  12. Molecular Characterization of Pediatric Restrictive Cardiomyopathy from Integrative Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Rindler, Tara N.; Hinton, Robert B.; Salomonis, Nathan; Ware, Stephanie M.

    2017-01-01

    Pediatric restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM) is a genetically heterogeneous heart disease with limited therapeutic options. RCM cases are largely idiopathic; however, even within families with a known genetic cause for cardiomyopathy, there is striking variability in disease severity. Although accumulating evidence implicates both gene expression and alternative splicing in development of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), there have been no detailed molecular characterizations of underlying pathways dysregulated in RCM. RNA-Seq on a cohort of pediatric RCM patients compared to other forms of adult cardiomyopathy and controls identified transcriptional differences highly common to the cardiomyopathies, as well as those unique to RCM. Transcripts selectively induced in RCM include many known and novel G-protein coupled receptors linked to calcium handling and contractile regulation. In-depth comparisons of alternative splicing revealed splicing events shared among cardiomyopathy subtypes, as well as those linked solely to RCM. Genes identified with altered alternative splicing implicate RBM20, a DCM splicing factor, as a potential mediator of alternative splicing in RCM. We present the first comprehensive report on molecular pathways dysregulated in pediatric RCM including unique/shared pathways identified compared to other cardiomyopathy subtypes and demonstrate that disruption of alternative splicing patterns in pediatric RCM occurs in the inverse direction as DCM. PMID:28098235

  13. X-linked cardiomyopathy is heterogeneous

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, M.J.; Sillence, D.O.; Mulley, J.C.

    1994-09-01

    Two major loci of X-linked cardiomyopathy have been mapped by linkage analysis. The gene for X-linked dilated cardiomyopathy (XLCM) is mapped to the dystrophin locus at Xp21, while Barth syndrome has been localised to distal Xq28. XLCM usually presents in juvenile males with no skeletal disease but decreased dystrophin in cardiac muscle. Barth syndrome most often presents in infants and is characterized by skeletal myopathy, short stature and neutropenia in association with cardiomyopathy of variable severity. Prior to carrier or prenatal diagnosis in a family, delineation of the cardiomyopathy locus involved is essential. We report the linkage mapping of a large kindred in which several male infants have died with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. There is a family history of unexplained death of infant males less than 6 months old over 4 generations. Features of Barth syndrome such as short stature, skeletal myopathy and neutropenia have not been observed. Genotyping at 10 marker loci in Xq28 has revealed significant pairwise lod scores with the cardiomyopathy phenotype at DXS52 (Z=2.21 at {theta}=0.0), at markers p26 and p39 near DXS15 (Z=2.30 at {theta}=0.0) and at F8C (Z=2.24 at {theta}=0.0). A recombinant detected with DXS296 defines the proximal limit to the localization. No recombinants were detected at any of the loci distal to DXS296. The most distal marker in Xq28, DXS1108, is within 500 kb of the telomere. As the gene in this family is localized to Xq28, it is possible that this disorder is an allelic variant at the Barth syndrome locus.

  14. Molecular biology of doxorubicin-induced cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Umlauf, J; Horký, M

    2002-01-01

    The anthracycline doxorubicin is an antineoplastic agent, eliciting chronic cardiac toxicity. It occurs in patients after prolonged administration of doxorubicin, leading to congestive heart failure. The pathogenesis of the doxorubicin-induced car-diomyopathy is not well understood. The present article summarizes the unique effect of doxorubicin on cardiac-specific gene expression. In addition to binding to DNA, doxorubicin directly affects the function of a variety of proteins. Free radical generation, damage to mitochondria and active cell death are also critical in the development of doxorubicin-induced cardiac toxicity. Agents providing effective cardioprotection are also reviewed. PMID:19644577

  15. Intravenous immunoglobulin treatment for acute fulminant inflammatory cardiomyopathy: Series of six patients and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Goland, Sorel; Czer, Lawrence SC; Siegel, Robert J; Tabak, Steven; Jordan, Stanley; Luthringer, Daniel; Mirocha, James; Coleman, Bernice; Kass, Robert M; Trento, Alfredo

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although an autoimmune mechanism has been postulated for myocarditis and acute-onset inflammatory dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), immunomodulatory treatment strategies are still under investigation. METHODS AND RESULTS: The clinical data of six patients with acute inflammatory DCM referred for evaluation for possible heart transplantation were reviewed. All patients were admitted with acute congestive heart failure and severely impaired left ventricular (LV) function and were treated with high-dose (2 g/kg) intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG). The diagnosis of acute inflammatory DCM was based on recent onset of congestive heart failure (New York Heart Association functional class III or IV) with severely depressed LV ejection fraction ([LVEF] 30% or lower) occurring shortly after viral-like illness. All patients had inflammation on endomyocardial biopsy or elevated cardiac enzymes, as well as a normal coronary angiogram. All patients were in New York Heart Association class I or II at the time of hospital discharge. The mean LVEF improved from 21.7±7.5% at baseline to 50.3±8.6% at discharge (P=0.005). Four patients had complete recovery (LVEF 50% or higher) and two patients had partial LV recovery. Patients were followed for a median 13.2 months (range two to 24 months) and had a mean LVEF of 53±6% (P not significant versus LVEF at discharge). CONCLUSIONS: Therapy with intravenous high-dose IVIG may be a potentially useful treatment in selected patients if given early in the course of acute fulminant inflammatory DCM. A randomized, prospective trial is warranted to prove the real benefit of IVIG in this patient population. PMID:18612500

  16. Ubiquitin-proteasome system and hereditary cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Schlossarek, Saskia; Frey, Norbert; Carrier, Lucie

    2014-06-01

    Adequate protein turnover is essential for cardiac homeostasis. Different protein quality controls are involved in the maintenance of protein homeostasis, including molecular chaperones and co-chaperones, the autophagy-lysosomal pathway, and the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). In the last decade, a series of evidence has underlined a major function of the UPS in cardiac physiology and disease. Particularly, recent studies have shown that dysfunctional proteasomal function leads to cardiac disorders. Hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathies are the two most prevalent inherited cardiomyopathies. Both are primarily transmitted as an autosomal-dominant trait and mainly caused by mutations in genes encoding components of the cardiac sarcomere, including a relevant striated muscle-specific E3 ubiquitin ligase. A growing body of evidence indicates impairment of the UPS in inherited cardiomyopathies as determined by measurement of the level of ubiquitinated proteins, the activities of the proteasome and/or the use of fluorescent UPS reporter substrates. The present review will propose mechanisms of UPS impairment in inherited cardiomyopathies, summarize the potential consequences of UPS impairment, including activation of the unfolded protein response, and underline some therapeutic options available to restore proteasome function and therefore cardiac homeostasis and function. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Protein Quality Control, the Ubiquitin Proteasome System, and Autophagy".

  17. Biomarkers in inflammatory and noninflammatory cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Noutsias, Michel; Pankuweit, Sabine; Maisch, Bernhard

    2009-12-01

    Acute myocarditis (AMC) and its sequela, dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), are most often caused by cardiotropic viral infections in the Western world. Inflammatory cardiomyopathy (DCMi) is a specific cardiomyopathy entity of DCM, being defined by the proof of intramyocardial inflammation and/or viral infection in endomyocardial biopsies (EMBs). Diagnostic procedures of EMBs are indispensable for the etiopathogenic differentiation of the disease. Experienced cardiology centers have reported low complication rates of EMB obtainment. The histological Dallas criteria are prone to substantial sampling error and interobserver variability, have no prognostic impact and, moreover, are not suitable to select AMC/DCMi patients who favorably respond to immunosuppression. Immunohistological detection of myocarditis and viral persistence have proven adverse prognostic impact in AMC and DCM patients, respectively. This contemporary diagnostic repertoire on EMBs is essential for the selection of DCMi patients who will likely benefit from immunomodulatory treatment, which has been addressed in randomized trials. During the past decade, cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) has developed as a valuable noninvasive diagnostic approach for the detection and localization of intramyocardial inflammation, and CMR guidelines for AMC have been elaborated. Late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) has been associated with adverse prognostic outcome in DCM patients. CMR techniques, however, are not suitable to specifically detect myocardial viral infections. To date, no classic biomarker has been shown to differentiate between DCMi and noninflammatory cardiomyopathies.

  18. Genetic advances in sarcomeric cardiomyopathies: state of the art.

    PubMed

    Ho, Carolyn Y; Charron, Philippe; Richard, Pascale; Girolami, Francesca; Van Spaendonck-Zwarts, Karin Y; Pinto, Yigal

    2015-04-01

    Genetic studies in the 1980s and 1990s led to landmark discoveries that sarcomere mutations cause both hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathies. Sarcomere mutations also likely play a role in more complex phenotypes and overlap cardiomyopathies with features of hypertrophy, dilation, diastolic abnormalities, and non-compaction. Identification of the genetic cause of these important conditions provides unique opportunities to interrogate and characterize disease pathogenesis and pathophysiology, starting from the molecular level and expanding from there. With such insights, there is potential for clinical translation that may transform management of patients and families with inherited cardiomyopathies. If key pathways for disease development can be identified, they could potentially serve as targets for novel disease-modifying or disease-preventing therapies. By utilizing gene-based diagnostic testing, we can identify at-risk individuals prior to the onset of clinical disease, allowing for disease-modifying therapy to be initiated early in life, at a time that such treatment may be most successful. In this section, we review the current application of genetics in clinical management, focusing on hypertrophic cardiomyopathy as a paradigm; discuss state-of-the-art genetic testing technology; review emerging knowledge of gene expression in sarcomeric cardiomyopathies; and discuss both the prospects, as well as the challenges, of bringing genetics to medicine.

  19. [Classification of cardiomyopathies according to the WHO/ISFC Task Force--more questions than answers?].

    PubMed

    Maisch, B

    1998-04-15

    The most recent WHO/ISFC classification of cardiomyopathies (1995) describes as cardiomyopathies all heart muscle diseases, which demonstrate a disturbance of cardiac function. It distinguishes primarily according to hemodynamic criteria the following 5 forms: 1. dilated (DCM), 2. hypertrophic (HCM), 3. restrictive (RCM) from 4. arrhythmogenic right ventricular (ARVCM) and assembles in 5. non-classified cardiomyopathies (NKCM) the non-classifiable forms. When compared to the 18-year-old former classification several points have been altered: 1. ARVCM has been introduced as a new entity. 2. The new term ischemic cardiomyopathy has been reserved for the remodeling process of the non-infarcted myocardium and does not mean hemodynamic alterations of an infarcted area (aneurysm), of stunned or hibernating myocardium. Hypertensive cardiomyopathy corresponds to left ventricular hypertrophy in hypertensive patients, valvular cardiomyopathy identifies cardiomegaly, which cannot sufficiently be explained by the valvular dysfunction (stenoses or insufficiency) alone. For the first time the term inflammatory cardiomyopathy has been used and defined as acute or chronic myocarditis associated with cardiac dysfunction, for which etiological and pathogenetic factors, e.g. viral or microbial infection or autoimmune processes have been made responsible. Two ISFC task forces have just recently clarified in consensus conferences the immunohistopathological criteria for chronic myocarditis or dilated cardiomyopathy with inflammation (DCMi: > 14 lymphocytes or macrophages/mm3) and set standards for molecular and virological diagnoses in endomyocardial biopsies.

  20. Cardiac tamponade, constrictive pericarditis, and restrictive cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, James A

    2004-09-01

    The pericardium envelopes the cardiac chambers and under physiological conditions exerts subtle functions, including mechanical effects that enhance normal ventricular interactions that contribute to balancing left and right cardiac outputs. Because the pericardium is non-compliant, conditions that cause intrapericardial crowding elevate intrapericardial pressure, which may be the mediator of adverse cardiac compressive effects. Elevated intrapericardial pressure may result from primary disease of the pericardium itself (tamponade or constriction) or from abrupt chamber dilatation (eg, right ventricular infarction). Regardless of the mechanism leading to increased intrapericardial pressure, the resultant pericardial constraint exerts adverse effects on cardiac filling and output. Constriction and restrictive cardiomyopathy share common pathophysiological and clinical features; their differentiation can be quite challenging. This review will consider the physiology of the normal pericardium and its dynamic interactions with the heart and review in detail the pathophysiology and clinical manifestations of cardiac tamponade, constrictive pericarditis, and restrictive cardiomyopathy.

  1. Systemic lupus erythematosus presented as non-inflammatory necrotizing vasculopathy-induced ischemic glomerulopathy and small vessels-related ischemic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Sung, J M; Hsu, S C; Chen, F F; Huang, J J

    2002-01-01

    The clinical significance of lupus non-inflammatory necrotizing vasculopathy (NINV) is not well established. For example, since lupus renal NINV is usually reported to coexist with proliferative and active glomerulonephritis, it is difficult to demonstrate the role of NINV on renal pathophysiology. Here we report a 16-year-old SLE boy with renal NINV presenting as ischemic glomerulopathy and small vessels-related ischemic heart failure. The renal biopsy demonstrated mild proliferative glomerulonephritis and NINV initially, and one month later repeated renal biopsy showed NINV with ischemic glomerulopathy. These findings established that NINV, but not proliferative glomerulonephritis, was responsive for his acute renal failure (ARF). Another interesting question is about the pathophysiology of his myocardial dysfunction. This patient presented typical angina and congestive heart failure (CHF). Echocardiograms and ventriculography revealed dilatation of four chambers and low ejection fraction. Serial electrocardiograms demonstrated evolutionary ischemic changes. Coronary angiography revealed no abnormality of large vessels. These findings suggested small vascular lesions-induced myocardial ischemia was the underlying mechanism of dilated cardiomyopathy. As myocardial biopsy was not done in our case, we could only speculate, but not prove, that the NINV observed in renal biopsy may also involve in cardiac microvascular beds. Nevertheless, this interesting case emphasized the role of obliterative small vascular lesions in the pathophysiology of ARF and myocardial dysfunction. The patient was treated with high-dose corticosteroid, plasma infusion and hemodialysis. His cardiac function improved gradually, however the renal function did not recover.

  2. Clinical Characteristics and Treatment of Cardiomyopathies in Children.

    PubMed

    Price, Jack F; Jeewa, Aamir; Denfield, Susan W

    2016-01-01

    Cardiomyopathies are diseases of the heart muscle, a term introduced in 1957 to identify a group of myocardial diseases not attributable to coronary artery disease. The definition has since been modified to refer to structural and or functional abnormalities of the myocardium where other known causes of myocardial dysfunction, such as systemic hypertension, valvular disease and ischemic heart disease, have been excluded. In this review, we discuss the pathophysiology, clinical assessment and therapeutic strategies for hypertrophic, dilated and hypertrophic cardiomyopathies, with a particular focus on aspects unique to children.

  3. Cardiomyopathy Induced by Pulmonary Sequestration in a 50-Year-Old Man

    PubMed Central

    Chatelain, Shaun; Comp, Robert A.; Grace, R. Randal

    2015-01-01

    A 50-year-old black man presented at the emergency department with midsternal, nonradiating chest pressure and chronic dyspnea on exertion. Four years before the current admission, he had been diagnosed with nonischemic cardiomyopathy at another facility. After our complete evaluation, we suspected that his symptoms arose from left-to-left shunting in association with pulmonary sequestration, a congenital malformation. Our preliminary diagnosis of secondary dilated cardiomyopathy was confirmed by normalization of the patient's ventricular size and function after lobectomy. To our knowledge, this patient is the oldest on record to present with cardiomyopathy consequent to pulmonary sequestration. His case is highly unusual because of his age and the rapid resolution of his symptoms after lobectomy. We believe that pulmonary sequestration should be included in the differential diagnosis of dilated cardiomyopathy. PMID:25873803

  4. [Desmin-related cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Rybakova, M G; Kuznetsova, I A; Gudkova, A Ia; Kostareva, A A; Semernin, E N

    2011-01-01

    The observation of 26 years old patient with desminopathy declared itself by hypertrophied cardiomyopathy with its transformation into restrictive phenotype is presented. The features of pathologic course at the patient were a dominance and diversity of cardiac manifestations. Endomyocardiac biopsy allowed suspecting the desminopathy confirmed by genetic analysis. Morphological features of desmin-related cardiomyopathy were irregular desmin conglomerates mainly located under sarcolemma and an indirect histological signs of idiopathic cardiomyopathy as well nuclear polymorphism, perinuclear "nimbus", chaotic located myofibrils.

  5. Cardiomyopathy induced by incessant fascicular ventricular tachycardia.

    PubMed

    Velázquez-Rodríguez, Enrique; Rodríguez-Piña, Horacio; Pacheco-Bouthillier, Alex; Deras-Mejía, Luz María

    2013-01-01

    A 12-year-old girl with symptoms of fatigue, decreased exercise tolerance and progressive dyspnea (New York Heart Association functional class III) with a possible diagnosis of dilated cardiomyopathy secondary to viral myocarditis. Because of incessant wide QRS tachycardia refractory to antiarrhythmic drugs, she was referred for electrophysiological study. The diagnosis was idiopathic left ventricular tachycardia involving the posterior fascicle of the left bundle branch. After successful treatment with radiofrequency catheter ablation guided by a Purkinje potential radiological and echocardiographic evaluation showed complete reversal of left ventricular function in the first 3 months and no recurrence of arrhythmia during 2 years of follow up.

  6. Genetics Home Reference: dilated cardiomyopathy with ataxia syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... for making a protein found in structures called mitochondria , which are the energy-producing centers of cells. ... transport of other proteins into and out of mitochondria. The DNAJC19 gene mutations that cause DCMA syndrome ...

  7. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked dilated cardiomyopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... sex chromosomes. In females (who have two X chromosomes), a mutation in one of the two copies of the ... life. In males (who have only one X chromosome ), a mutation in the only copy of the gene in ...

  8. Long-Term Survival Following Cardiac Arrest Without Implantable Defibrillator Protection in a Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Patient

    PubMed Central

    Cetin, Mustafa; Ucar, Ozgul; Canbay, Alper; Cetin, Zehra Guven; Cicekcioglu, Hulya; Diker, Erdem

    2011-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most common cause of sudden cardiac death in young people. Implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) is the optimal therapy in patients with HCM, both for primary or secondary prevention of sudden death. Left ventricular systolic function in HCM is usually normal. However, in few patients, HCM has been reported to progress to a state that is characterized by left ventricular dilation and systolic dysfunction, resembling dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Although arrhythmias are common in HCM, advanced or complete atrioventricular block (AV) is very rare. This case report describes a HCM patient who progressed to DCM with advanced AV block and survived 31 years following cardiac arrest without ICD protection.

  9. Sinuplasty (Balloon Catheter Dilation)

    MedlinePlus

    ... development of the balloon dilating catheter and its adaptation to sinus surgery. In the 1980s, the field ... used in endoscopic sinus surgery. It is the adaptation or application of minimally-invasive balloon technology to ...

  10. Information technology solutions to support translational research on inherited cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Bellazzi, Riccardo; Larizza, Cristiana; Gabetta, Matteo; Milani, Giuseppe; Bucalo, Mauro; Mulas, Francesca; Nuzzo, Angelo; Favalli, Valentina; Arbustini, Eloisa

    2011-01-01

    The INHERITANCE project, funded by the European Commission, is aimed at studying genetic or inherited Dilated cardiomyopathies (DCM) and at understanding the impact and management of the condition within families that suffer from heart conditions that are caused by DCMs. The project is supported by a number of advanced biomedical informatics tools, including data warehousing, automated literature search and decision support. The paper describes the design of these tools and the current status of implementation.

  11. Analysis of shape and motion of the mitral annulus in subjects with and without cardiomyopathy by echocardiographic 3-dimensional reconstruction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flachskampf, F. A.; Chandra, S.; Gaddipatti, A.; Levine, R. A.; Weyman, A. E.; Ameling, W.; Hanrath, P.; Thomas, J. D.

    2000-01-01

    The shape and dynamics of the mitral annulus of 10 patients without heart disease (controls), 3 patients with dilated cardiomyopathy, and 5 patients with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy and normal systolic function were analyzed by transesophageal echocardiography and 3-dimensional reconstruction. Mitral annular orifice area, apico-basal motion of the annulus, and nonplanarity were calculated over time. Annular area was largest in end diastole and smallest in end systole. Mean areas were 11.8 +/- 2.5 cm(2) (controls), 15.2 +/- 4.2 cm(2) (dilated cardiomyopathy), and 10.2 +/- 2.4 cm(2) (hypertrophic cardiomyopathy) (P = not significant). After correction for body surface, annuli from patients with normal left ventricular function were smaller than annuli from patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (5.9 +/- 1.2 cm(2)/m(2) vs 7.7 +/- 1.0 cm(2)/m(2); P <.02). The change in area during the cardiac cycle showed significant differences: 23.8% +/- 5.1% (controls), 13.2% +/- 2.3% (dilated cardiomyopathy), and 32.4% +/- 7.6% (hypertrophic cardiomyopathy) (P <.001). Apico-basal motion was highest in controls, followed by those with hypertrophic obstructive and dilated cardiomyopathy (1.0 +/- 0.3 cm, 0.8 +/- 0.2 cm, 0.3 +/- 0.2 cm, respectively; P <.01). Visual inspection and Fourier analysis showed a consistent pattern of anteroseptal and posterolateral elevations of the annulus toward the left atrium. In conclusion, although area changes and apico-basal motion of the mitral annulus strongly depend on left ventricular systolic function, nonplanarity is a structural feature preserved throughout the cardiac cycle in all three groups.

  12. [Peripartum cardiomyopathy: A multiple entity].

    PubMed

    Vanzetto, Gérald; Martin, Alix; Bouvaist, Hélène; Marlière, Stéphanie; Durand, Michel; Chavanon, Olivier

    2012-06-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCMP) is a dilated and hypokinetic cardiomyopathy occurring during pregnancy or after delivery, with an estimated incidence between 1/1000 and 1/4000 births. It has been defined as a new onset of heart failure in the month preceding or following delivery, without demonstrated aetiology nor previously known heart disease, and with echocardiographic evidences of left ventricular (LV) dysfunction (LV ejection fraction<0.45). It's a multifactorial disease, immunologic, hormonal, and possibly viral mechanisms playing a determinant pathophysiological role. The classical clinical presentation is a rapid and unexpected onset of heart failure in a previously healthy woman, echocardiography being the key examination for positive and differential diagnosis, prognostication, therapeutic decision-making, and follow-up. The potential severity of PPCMP, and its unpredictable evolution in the first days following diagnosis, require that patients be referred to a tertiary care centre with a high skill in intensive cardiology care. Therapeutic management of PPCMP does not offer any specificity when compared to other causes of acute or chronic heart failure (from diuretics to extracorporeal life support), except for ACE-inhibitors, that are contraindicated before delivery. The high incidence of thrombo-embolic complications observed in the disease requires however rapid and curative anticoagulation, and immuno-suppressive treatment has been proposed in fulminant and highly inflammatory presentation, but its efficacy remains controversial. Very recently, promising results have been reported with bromocriptin-a prolactin secretion inhibitor-for reducing 6-month morbidity and mortality, but these findings have to be confirmed in larger scale randomised trials. As for the long-term evolution, approximately half of the patients will heal, while half of the women will keep some degree of LV dysfunction, 25% of them developing moderate to severe chronic heart

  13. Peripartum Cardiomyopathy From a Genetic Perspective.

    PubMed

    Kamiya, Chizuko A; Yoshimatsu, Jun; Ikeda, Tomoaki

    2016-07-25

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) is a rare, but life-threatening condition that occurs during the peripartum period in previously healthy women. Although its etiology remains unknown, potential risk factors include hypertensive disorders during pregnancy, such as preeclampsia, advanced maternal age, multiparity, multiple gestation, and African descent. Several cohort studies of PPCM revealed that the prevalence of these risk factors was quite similar. Clinically, approximately 40% of PPCM patients are complicated with hypertensive disorders during pregnancy. Because PPCM is a diagnosis of exclusion, heterogeneity is a common element in its pathogenesis. Recent genetic research has given us new aspects of the disease. PPCM and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) share genetic predisposition: 15% of PPCM patients were found to have genetic mutations that have been associated with DCM, and they showed a lower recovery rate. Other basic research using PPCM model mice suggests that predisposition genes related to both hypertensive and cardiac disorders via angiogenic imbalance may explain common elements of hypertensive disorders and PPCM. Furthermore, hypertensive disorders during pregnancy are now found to be a risk factor of not only PPCM, but also cardiomyopathy in the future. Understanding genetic variations allows us to stratify PPCM patients and to guide therapy. (Circ J 2016; 80: 1684-1688).

  14. Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy in Owl Monkeys (Aotus spp.)

    PubMed Central

    Knowlen, Grant G; Weller, Richard E; Perry, Ruby L; Baer, Janet F; Gozalo, Alfonso S

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is a common postmortem finding in owl monkeys. In most cases the animals do not exhibit clinical signs until the disease is advanced, making antemortem diagnosis of subclinical disease difficult and treatment unrewarding. We obtained echocardiograms, electrocardiograms, and thoracic radiographs from members of a colony of owl monkeys that previously was identified as showing a 40% incidence of gross myocardial hypertrophy at necropsy, to assess the usefulness of these modalities for antemortem diagnosis. No single modality was sufficiently sensitive and specific to detect all monkeys with cardiac hypertrophy. Electrocardiography was the least sensitive method for detecting owl monkeys with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Thoracic radiographs were more sensitive than was electrocardiography in this context but cannot detect animals with concentric hypertrophy without an enlarged cardiac silhouette. Echocardiography was the most sensitive method for identifying cardiac hypertrophy in owl monkeys. The most useful parameters suggestive of left ventricular hypertrophy in our owl monkeys were an increased average left ventricular wall thickness to chamber radius ratio and an increased calculated left ventricular myocardial mass. Parameters suggestive of dilative cardiomyopathy were an increased average left ventricular myocardial mass and a decreased average ratio of left ventricular free wall thickness to left ventricular chamber radius. When all 4 noninvasive diagnostic modalities (physical examination, echocardiography, electrocardiography, and thoracic radiography) were used concurrently, the probability of detecting hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in owl monkeys was increased greatly. PMID:23759531

  15. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in owl monkeys (Aotus spp.).

    PubMed

    Knowlen, Grant G; Weller, Richard E; Perry, Ruby L; Baer, Janet F; Gozalo, Alfonso S

    2013-06-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is a common postmortem finding in owl monkeys. In most cases the animals do not exhibit clinical signs until the disease is advanced, making antemortem diagnosis of subclinical disease difficult and treatment unrewarding. We obtained echocardiograms, electrocardiograms, and thoracic radiographs from members of a colony of owl monkeys that previously was identified as showing a 40% incidence of gross myocardial hypertrophy at necropsy, to assess the usefulness of these modalities for antemortem diagnosis. No single modality was sufficiently sensitive and specific to detect all monkeys with cardiac hypertrophy. Electrocardiography was the least sensitive method for detecting owl monkeys with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Thoracic radiographs were more sensitive than was electrocardiography in this context but cannot detect animals with concentric hypertrophy without an enlarged cardiac silhouette. Echocardiography was the most sensitive method for identifying cardiac hypertrophy in owl monkeys. The most useful parameters suggestive of left ventricular hypertrophy in our owl monkeys were an increased average left ventricular wall thickness to chamber radius ratio and an increased calculated left ventricular myocardial mass. Parameters suggestive of dilative cardiomyopathy were an increased average left ventricular myocardial mass and a decreased average ratio of left ventricular free wall thickness to left ventricular chamber radius. When all 4 noninvasive diagnostic modalities (physical examination, echocardiography, electrocardiography, and thoracic radiography) were used concurrently, the probability of detecting hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in owl monkeys was increased greatly.

  16. Nutrition in Pediatric Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Tracie L.; Neri, Daniela; Extein, Jason; Somarriba, Gabriel; Strickman-Stein, Nancy

    2007-01-01

    Pediatric cardiomyopathies are heterogeneous groups of serious disorders of the heart muscle and are responsible for significant morbidity and mortality among children who have the disease. While enormous improvements have been made in the treatment and survival of children with congenital heart disease, parallel strides have not been made in the outcomes for cardiomyopathies. Thus, ancillary therapies, such as nutrition and nutritional interventions, that may not cure but may potentially improve cardiac function and quality of life, are imperative to consider in children with all types of cardiomyopathy. Growth failure is one of the most significant clinical problems of children with cardiomyopathy with nearly one-third of children with this disorder manifesting some degree of growth failure during the course of their illness. Optimal intake of macronutrients can help improve cardiac function. In addition, several specific nutrients have been shown to correct myocardial abnormalities that often occur with cardiomyopathy and heart failure. In particular, antioxidants that can protect against free radical damage that often occurs in heart failure and nutrients that augment myocardial energy production are important therapies that have been explored more in adults with cardiomyopathy than in the pediatric population. Future research directions should pay particular attention to the effect of overall nutrition and specific nutritional therapies on clinical outcomes and quality of life in children with pediatric cardiomyopathy. PMID:18159216

  17. Prevention of experimental autoimmune cardiomyopathy in rabbits by receptor blockers.

    PubMed

    Matsui, S; Fu, M L

    2001-01-01

    We investigated the effects of beta1-adrenoceptor blockade and M2-muscarinic receptor antagonist in rabbits which have developed dilated cardiomyopathy-like changes after immunization with the peptides from the second extracellular loop of human beta1-adrenoceptor (beta1-peptide) and M2-muscarinic receptor (M2-peptide). Ten rabbits, which were immunized with beta1-peptide once a month for one year, were treated with bisoprolol and 10 rabbits, which were immunized with M2-peptide, were treated with otenzepad. Although both groups treated with receptor blockade or antagonist showed an increased titer of anti-beta1-adrenoceptor or anti-M2-muscarinic receptor antibodies, myocardial damages were markedly less than those in beta1-peptide- or M2-peptide-immunized rabbits. This study indicates that anti-beta1-adrenoceptor and anti-M2-muscarinic receptor antibodies are of pathogenic importance in the development of human dilated cardiomyopathy, and that beta-adrenoceptor blockade, bisoprolol, and M2-muscarinic receptor antagonist, otenzepad, might be clinically useful for treatment of dilated cardiomyopathy.

  18. Genetics of restrictive cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Sen-Chowdhry, Srijita; Syrris, Petros; McKenna, William J

    2010-04-01

    Restrictive physiology, a severe form of diastolic dysfunction, is characteristically observed in the setting of constrictive pericarditis and myocardial restriction. The latter is commonly due to systemic diseases, some of which are inherited as mendelian traits (eg, hereditary amyloidosis), while others are multifactorial (eg, sarcoidosis). When restrictive physiology occurs as an early and dominant feature of a primary myocardial disorder, it may be termed restrictive cardiomyopathy. In the past decade, clinical and genetic studies have demonstrated that restrictive cardiomyopathy as such is part of the spectrum of sarcomeric disease and frequently coexists with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in affected families.

  19. Mutation Glu82Lys in lamin A/C gene is associated with cardiomyopathy and conduction defect

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Hu; Wang Jizheng; Zheng Weiyue; Wang Xiaojian; Wang Shuxia; Song Lei; Zou Yubao; Yao Yan; Hui Rutai . E-mail: huirutai@sglab.org

    2006-05-26

    Dilated cardiomyopathy is a form of heart muscle disease characterized by impaired systolic function and ventricular dilation. The mutations in lamin A/C gene have been linked to dilated cardiomyopathy. We screened genetic mutations in a large Chinese family of 50 members including members with dilated cardiomyopathy and found a Glu82Lys substitution mutation in the rod domain of the lamin A/C protein in eight family members, three of them have been diagnosed as dilated cardiomyopathy, one presented with heart dilation. The pathogenic mechanism of lamin A/C gene defect is poorly understood. Glu82Lys mutated lamin A/C and wild type protein was transfected into HEK293 cells. The mutated protein was not properly localized at the inner nuclear membrane and the emerin protein, which interacts with lamin A/C, was also aberrantly distributed. The nuclear membrane structure was disrupted and heterochromatin was aggregated aberrantly in the nucleus of the HEK293 cells stably transfected with mutated lamin A/C gene as determined by transmission electron microscopy.

  20. Mitochondrial Diseases and Cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Brunel-Guitton, Catherine; Levtova, Alina; Sasarman, Florin

    2015-11-01

    Mitochondrial cardiomyopathies are clinically and genetically heterogeneous. An integrative approach encompassing clinical, biochemical, and molecular investigations is required to reach a specific diagnosis. In this review we summarize the clinical and genetic aspects of mitochondrial disorders associated with cardiomyopathy, including disorders of oxidative phosphorylation. It also describes groups of disorders that, although not usually classified as mitochondrial disorders, stem from defects in mitochondrial function (eg, disorders of β-oxidation and the carnitine cycle), are associated with secondary mitochondrial impairment (eg, organic acidurias), and are important diagnostically because they are treatable. Current biochemical and molecular techniques for the diagnosis of mitochondrial cardiomyopathies are described, and a diagnostic algorithm is proposed, to help clinicians in their approach to cardiomyopathies in the context of mitochondrial diseases.

  1. Children's Cardiomyopathy Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... A Cause for Today… A Cure for Tomorrow” Join Us for 2 Online Events Join CCF for ... benefit programs for children with cardiomyopathy. LEARN MORE Join CCF's Family Network! Become a CCF member and ...

  2. [Cardiomyopathies and pregnancy--how often, when to decide to terminate?].

    PubMed

    Nowalany-Kozielska, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    Cardiomyopathies are a small percentage of heart disease in pregnant women, but usually cause severe complications. It is not know the exact incidence of cardiomyopathy associated with pregnancy in Europe. In these patients, there is a higher probability of death due to changes in hemodynamic, metabolic and hemostatic that occur in pregnancy. Pregnant mortality is 2.4% vs. 0.007%--in the normal population. The most common cause of severe maternal complications is peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM). In dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and restrictive (RCM) is usually observed significant clinical deterioration during pregnancy. On the other hand, in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), pregnancy and childbirth are often associated with a low risk of complications. There is a greater risk in women presenting symptoms before and on pregnancy and in women with large inrtaventricular and subaortic pressure gradient. There are only a few case reports of pregnancy in patients with rare storage diseases and infiltrative phenotype of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. For these patients the pregnancy is contraindicated. In patients with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) is sometimes the severity of arrhythmia in the third trimester of pregnancy, and childbirth (natural or cesarean section) is usually safe. Remember to informing women with various cardiomyopathies both the risks of pregnancy and about the possibility of transferring the disease to offspring. Contraception should be advised in many cases.

  3. Inherited cardiomyopathies: molecular genetics and clinical genetic testing in the postgenomic era.

    PubMed

    Teekakirikul, Polakit; Kelly, Melissa A; Rehm, Heidi L; Lakdawala, Neal K; Funke, Birgit H

    2013-03-01

    Inherited cardiomyopathies include hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, dilated cardiomyopathy, arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, left ventricular noncompaction, and restrictive cardiomyopathy. These diseases have a substantial genetic component and predispose to sudden cardiac death, which provides a high incentive to identify and sequence disease genes in affected individuals to identify pathogenic variants. Clinical genetic testing, which is now widely available, can be a powerful tool for identifying presymptomatic individuals. However, locus and allelic heterogeneity are the rule, as are clinical variability and reduced penetrance of disease in carriers of pathogenic variants. These factors, combined with genetic and phenotypic overlap between different cardiomyopathies, have made clinical genetic testing a lengthy and costly process. Next-generation sequencing technologies have removed many limitations such that comprehensive testing is now feasible, shortening diagnostic odysseys for clinically complex cases. Remaining challenges include the incomplete understanding of the spectrum of benign and pathogenic variants in the cardiomyopathy genes, which is a source of inconclusive results. This review provides an overview of inherited cardiomyopathies with a focus on their genetic etiology and diagnostic testing in the postgenomic era.

  4. Continuous controllable balloon dilation: a novel approach for cervix dilation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Cervical dilation using mechanical dilators is associated with various complications, such as uterine perforation, cervical laceration, infections and intraperitoneal hemorrhage. To achieve safe and painless cervical dilation, we constructed a new medical device to achieve confident mechanical cervical dilation: a continuous controllable balloon dilator (CCBD). Methods Controlled pumping of incompressible fluid into the CCBD increases the pressure and outer diameter of the CCBD, continuously dilating the cervical canal. The reliability of the CCBD was confirmed in vitro (testing for consistency and endurance, with no detected risk for breakage) and in vivo. A multi-center clinical study was conducted,with 120 pregnant women randomly assigned to one of three groups: Group I,control group, no dilation;Group II,mechanical dilation, Hegar dilator (HeD); and Group III,CCBD. The tissue material for histological evaluation was obtained from the endocervical mucosa before and after dilation using the HeD or CCBD. Results The CCBD dilations were successful and had no complications in all 40 patients of Group III. The cervical tissue was markedly less damaged after CCBD dilation compared with HeD dilation (epithelium damage: 95% (HeD) vs. 45% (CCBD), P <0.001; basal membrane damage: 82.5% (HeD) vs. 27.5% (CCBD), P <0.001; stromal damage: 62.5% (HeD) vs. 37.5% (CCBD), P <0.01). Cervical hemorrhagia was observed in 90% of the patients after HeD dilation versus in 32.5% of the patients after CCBD dilation. Conclusions The CCBD should be used as a replacement for mechanical dilators to prevent uterine and cervical injury during cervical dilation. Trial registration ISRCTN54007498 PMID:23088906

  5. [Cardiac arrest during anaesthesia in a young adult with occult cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Fjølner, Jesper; Franzen, Niels; Sloth, Erik; Grøfte, Thorbjørn

    2012-05-07

    Severe heart failure is a significant risk factor in anaesthesia. We present a case of circulatory collapse and cardiac arrest during routine anaesthesia of a younger man, caused by occult dilated cardiomyopathy. We propose preoperative focus assessed transthoracic echocardiography as useful in detecting cardiopulmonary pathology.

  6. [Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Arrhythmia in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Colín Lizalde, Luis de Jesús

    2003-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a relatively common genetic disorder with heterogeneity in mutations, forms of presentation, prognosis and treatment strategies. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is recognized as the most common cause of sudden cardiac death that occurs in young people, including athletes. The clinical diagnosis is complemented with the ecocardiographic study, in which an abnormal myocardial hypertrophy of the septum can be observed in the absence of a cardiac or systemic disease (arterial systemic hypertension, aortic stenosis). The annual sudden mortality rate is 1% and, in selected populations, it ranges between 3 and 6%. The therapeutic strategies depend on the different subsets of patients according to the morbidity and mortality, sudden cardiac death, obstructive symptoms, heart failure or atrial fibrillation and stroke. High risk patients for sudden death may effectively be treated with the automatic implantable cardioverter-defibrillator.

  7. Constrictive Pericarditis Versus Restrictive Cardiomyopathy?

    PubMed

    Garcia, Mario J

    2016-05-03

    About one-half of the patients with congestive heart failure have preserved left ventricular ejection fraction (HFpEF). Although the etiology of HFpEF is most commonly related to long-standing hypertension and atherosclerosis, a significant number of suspected HFpEF patients have a restrictive cardiomyopathy or chronic pericardial disease. Recognizing these syndromes is important because early diagnosis may lead to instituting specific therapy that may prolong survival, improve quality of life, and/or recognize and treat an underlying systemic disorder. Advances in diagnostic imaging, biomarkers, and genetic testing today allow identification of the specific etiology in most cases. Novel pharmacological, immunologic, and surgical therapies are leading to improved quality of life and survival.

  8. Stress-related cardiomyopathies

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Stress-related cardiomyopathies can be observed in the four following situations: Takotsubo cardiomyopathy or apical ballooning syndrome; acute left ventricular dysfunction associated with subarachnoid hemorrhage; acute left ventricular dysfunction associated with pheochromocytoma and exogenous catecholamine administration; acute left ventricular dysfunction in the critically ill. Cardiac toxicity was mediated more by catecholamines released directly into the heart via neural connection than by those reaching the heart via the bloodstream. The mechanisms underlying the association between this generalized autonomic storm secondary to a life-threatening stress and myocardial toxicity are widely discussed. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy has been reported all over the world and has been acknowledged by the American Heart Association as a form of reversible cardiomyopathy. Four "Mayo Clinic" diagnostic criteria are required for the diagnosis of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy: 1) transient left ventricular wall motion abnormalities involving the apical and/or midventricular myocardial segments with wall motion abnormalities extending beyond a single epicardial coronary artery distribution; 2) absence of obstructive epicardial coronary artery disease that could be responsible for the observed wall motion abnormality; 3) ECG abnormalities, such as transient ST-segment elevation and/or diffuse T wave inversion associated with a slight troponin elevation; and 4) the lack of proven pheochromocytoma and myocarditis. ECG changes and LV dysfunction occur frequently following subarachnoid hemorrhage and ischemic stroke. This entity, referred as neurocardiogenic stunning, was called neurogenic stress-related cardiomyopathy. Stress-related cardiomyopathy has been reported in patients with pheochromocytoma and in patients receiving intravenous exogenous catecholamine administration. The role of a huge increase in endogenous and/or exogenous catecholamine level in critically ill patients

  9. [Effects of hot water bath or sauna on patients with congestive heart failure: acute hemodynamic improvement by thermal vasodilation].

    PubMed

    Tei, C; Horikiri, Y; Park, J C; Jeong, J W; Chang, K S; Tanaka, N; Toyama, Y

    1994-01-01

    The acute hemodynamic effects of thermal vasodilation caused by exposure to hot water bath or sauna in chronic congestive heart failure were investigated in 32 patients (mean age 57 +/- 15 years old) with dilated cardiomyopathy (25 idiopathic and 7 ischemic). The clinical symptoms were New York Heart Association Class II in 2 patients, III in 17 and IV in 13, and the mean ejection fraction was 25 +/- 9% (9-44%). Exposure to hot water bath was for 10 minutes at 41 degrees C in a semi-sitting position, and to sauna for 15 minutes at 60 degrees C in a supine position using a special far infrared ray sauna chamber. Blood pressure, electrocardiogram, two-dimensional and Doppler echocardiograms, expiration gas, and intracardiac pressure tracings were recorded before (control), during, and 30 minutes after hot water bath or sauna. 1. The increase in oxygen consumption was only 0.3 Mets during hot water bath or sauna, and returned to the control level 30 minutes later. 2. The deep temperature in the main pulmonary artery increased by 1.0-1.2 degrees C on average at the end of hot water bath or sauna. 3. Heart rate increased significantly (p < 0.01) by 20-25/min during bathing and still increased 30 min later. 4. Systolic blood pressure did not change significantly during and after hot water bath or sauna, while, diastolic blood pressure decreased significantly during (p < 0.05) and after sauna (p < 0.01), and after hot water bath (p < 0.01).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Privacy-Sensitive Congestion Charging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beresford, Alastair R.; Davies, Jonathan J.; Harle, Robert K.

    National-scale congestion charging schemes are increasingly viewed as the most viable long-term strategy for controlling congestion and maintaining the viability of the road network. In this paper we challenge the widely held belief that enforceable and economically viable congestion charging schemes require drivers to give up their location privacy to the government. Instead we explore an alternative scheme where privately-owned cars enforce congestion charge payments by using an on-board vehicle unit containing a camera and wireless communications. Our solution prevents centralised tracking of vehicle movements but raises an important issue: should we trust our neighbours with a little personal information in preference to entrusting it all to the government?

  11. Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy in a Patient with Undiscovered Sigmoid Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TTC) is a stress-related cardiomyopathy that is characterized by reversible left systolic dysfunction, which appears to be precipitated by sudden emotional or physical stress in the absence of myocardial infarction. Here we present a rare case that clinically presented with intermittent abdominal pain, initially impressed as non-ST elevation myocardial infarction and congestive heart failure but with a normal coronary angiogram. Her symptoms relieved spontaneously without returning. Sigmoid colon cancer was diagnosed via colonoscopy later due to persistent abdominal discomfort. In the absence of detectable emotional or physical stress factors, the newly diagnosed sigmoid colon cancer was the only possible trigger factor of TTC. We offer this case as a reminder that cancer should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with the etiology of TTC. PMID:28377824

  12. Treatment of Chagas Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Botoni, Fernando A.; Ribeiro, Antonio Luiz P.; Marinho, Carolina Coimbra; Lima, Marcia Maria Oliveira; Nunes, Maria do Carmo Pereira; Rocha, Manoel Otávio C.

    2013-01-01

    Chagas' disease (ChD), caused by the protozoa Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi), was discovered and described by the Brazilian physician Carlos Chagas in 1909. After a century of original description, trypanosomiasis still brings much misery to humanity and is classified as a neglected tropical disease prevalent in underdeveloped countries, particularly in South America. It is an increasing worldwide problem due to the number of cases in endemic areas and the migration of infected subjects to more developed regions, mainly North America and Europe. Despite its importance, chronic chagas cardiomyopathy (CCC) pathophysiology is yet poorly understood, and independently of its social, clinical, and epidemiological importance, the therapeutic approach of CCC is still transposed from the knowledge acquired from other cardiomyopathies. Therefore, the objective of this review is to describe the treatment of Chagas cardiomyopathy with emphasis on its peculiarities. PMID:24350293

  13. Alcoholic cardiomyopathy: Pathophysiologic insights

    PubMed Central

    Piano, Mariann R.; Phillips, Shane A.

    2014-01-01

    Alcoholic cardiomyopathy is a specific heart muscle disease found in individuals with a history of long-term heavy alcohol consumption. Alcoholic cardiomyopathy is associated with a number of adverse histological, cellular, and structural changes within the myocardium. Several mechanisms are implicated in mediating the adverse effects of ethanol, including the generation of oxidative stress, apoptotic cell death, impaired mitochondrial bioenergetics/stress, derangements in fatty acid metabolism and transport, and accelerated protein catabolism. In this review, we discuss the evidence for such mechanisms and present the potential importance of drinking patterns, genetic susceptibility, nutritional factors, race, and sex. The purpose of this review is to provide a mechanistic paradigm for future research in the area of alcoholic cardiomyopathy. PMID:24671642

  14. Acute and Chronic Pheochromocytoma-Induced Cardiomyopathies: Different Prognoses?: A Systematic Analytical Review.

    PubMed

    Batisse-Lignier, Marie; Pereira, Bruno; Motreff, Pascal; Pierrard, Romain; Burnot, Christelle; Vorilhon, Charles; Maqdasy, Salwan; Roche, Béatrice; Desbiez, Francoise; Clerfond, Guillaume; Citron, Bernard; Lusson, Jean-René; Tauveron, Igor; Eschalier, Romain

    2015-12-01

    Pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma (PPG) are rare and late-diagnosed catecholamine secreting tumors, which may be associated with unrecognized and/or severe cardiomyopathies. We performed a computer-assisted systematic search of the electronic Medline databases using the MESH terms "myocarditis," "myocardial infarction," "Takotsubo," "stress cardiomyopathy," "cardiogenic shock", or "dilated cardiomyopathy," and "pheochromocytoma" or "paraganglioma" from 1961 to August 2012. All detailed case reports of cardiomyopathy due to a PPG, without coronary stenosis, and revealed by acute symptoms were included and analyzed. A total of 145 cases reports were collected (49 Takotsubo Cardiomyopathies [TTC] and 96 other Catecholamine Cardiomyopathies [CC]). At initial presentation, prevalence of high blood pressure (87.7%), chest pain (49.0%), headaches (47.6%), palpitations (46.9%), sweating (39.3%), and shock (51.0%) were comparable between CC and TTC. Acute pulmonary edema (58.3% vs 38.8%, P = 0.03) was more frequent in CC. There was no difference in proportion of patients with severe left ventricular systolic dysfunction (LV Ejection Fraction [LVEF] < 30%) at initial presentation between both groups (P = 0.15). LVEF recovery before (64.9% vs 40.8%, P = 0.005) and after surgical resection (97.7% vs 73.3%, P = 0.001) was higher in the TTC group. Death occurred in 11 cases (7.6%). In multivariate analysis, only TTC was associated with a better LV recovery (0.15 [0.03-0.67], P = 0.03). Pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma can lead to different cardiomyopathies with the same brutal and life-threatening initial clinical presentation but with a different recovery rate. Diagnosis of unexplained dilated cardiomyopathy or TTC should lead clinicians to a specific search for PPG.

  15. Pathophysiology and epidemiology of peripartum cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Hilfiker-Kleiner, Denise; Sliwa, Karen

    2014-06-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are a major cause of complications in pregnancy worldwide, and the number of patients who develop cardiac problems during pregnancy is increasing. Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) is a potentially life-threatening heart disease that emerges towards the end of pregnancy or in the first months postpartum, in previously healthy women. Symptoms and signs of PPCM are similar to those in patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy. The incidence varies geographically, most likely because of socioeconomic and genetic factors. The syndrome is associated with a high morbidity and mortality, and diagnosis is often delayed. Various mechanisms have been investigated, including the hypothesis that unbalanced peripartum or postpartum oxidative stress triggers the proteolytic cleavage of the nursing hormone prolactin into a potent antiangiogenic, proapoptotic, and proinflammatory 16 kDa fragment. This theory provides the basis for the discovery of disease-specific biomarkers and promising novel therapeutic targets. In this Review, we describe the latest understanding of the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and novel treatment strategies for patients with PPCM.

  16. Arrhythmogenic Cardiomyopathy: Electrical and Structural Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Akdis, Deniz; Brunckhorst, Corinna; Duru, Firat

    2016-01-01

    This overview gives an update on the molecular mechanisms, clinical manifestations, diagnosis and therapy of arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy (ACM). ACM is mostly hereditary and associated with mutations in genes encoding proteins of the intercalated disc. Three subtypes have been proposed: the classical right-dominant subtype generally referred to as ARVC/D, biventricular forms with early biventricular involvement and left-dominant subtypes with predominant LV involvement. Typical symptoms include palpitations, arrhythmic (pre)syncope and sudden cardiac arrest due to ventricular arrhythmias, which typically occur in athletes. At later stages, heart failure may occur. Diagnosis is established with the 2010 Task Force Criteria (TFC). Modern imaging tools are crucial for ACM diagnosis, including both echocardiography and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging for detecting functional and structural alternations. Of note, structural findings often become visible after electrical alterations, such as premature ventricular beats, ventricular fibrillation (VF) and ventricular tachycardia (VT). 12-lead ECG is important to assess for depolarisation and repolarisation abnormalities, including T-wave inversions as the most common ECG abnormality. Family history and the detection of causative mutations, mostly affecting the desmosome, have been incorporated in the TFC, and stress the importance of cascade family screening. Differential diagnoses include idiopathic right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) VT, sarcoidosis, congenital heart disease, myocarditis, dilated cardiomyopathy, athlete’s heart, Brugada syndrome and RV infarction. Therapeutic strategies include restriction from endurance and competitive sports, β-blockers, antiarrhythmic drugs, heart failure medication, implantable cardioverter-defibrillators and endocardial/epicardial catheter ablation. PMID:27617087

  17. Barth Syndrome: Connecting Cardiolipin to Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Ikon, Nikita; Ryan, Robert O

    2017-02-01

    The Barth syndrome (BTHS) is caused by an inborn error of metabolism that manifests characteristic phenotypic features including altered mitochondrial membrane phospholipids, lactic acidosis, organic acid-uria, skeletal muscle weakness and cardiomyopathy. The underlying cause of BTHS has been definitively traced to mutations in the tafazzin (TAZ) gene locus on chromosome X. TAZ encodes a phospholipid transacylase that promotes cardiolipin acyl chain remodeling. Absence of tafazzin activity results in cardiolipin molecular species heterogeneity, increased levels of monolysocardiolipin and lower cardiolipin abundance. In skeletal muscle and cardiac tissue mitochondria these alterations in cardiolipin perturb the inner membrane, compromising electron transport chain function and aerobic respiration. Decreased electron flow from fuel metabolism via NADH ubiquinone oxidoreductase activity leads to a buildup of NADH in the matrix space and product inhibition of key TCA cycle enzymes. As TCA cycle activity slows pyruvate generated by glycolysis is diverted to lactic acid. In turn, Cori cycle activity increases to supply muscle with glucose for continued ATP production. Acetyl CoA that is unable to enter the TCA cycle is diverted to organic acid waste products that are excreted in urine. Overall, reduced ATP production efficiency in BTHS is exacerbated under conditions of increased energy demand. Prolonged deficiency in ATP production capacity underlies cell and tissue pathology that ultimately is manifest as dilated cardiomyopathy.

  18. Genetic Variation in Cardiomyopathy and Cardiovascular Disorders.

    PubMed

    McNally, Elizabeth M; Puckelwartz, Megan J

    2015-01-01

    With the wider deployment of massively-parallel, next-generation sequencing, it is now possible to survey human genome data for research and clinical purposes. The reduced cost of producing short-read sequencing has now shifted the burden to data analysis. Analysis of genome sequencing remains challenged by the complexity of the human genome, including redundancy and the repetitive nature of genome elements and the large amount of variation in individual genomes. Public databases of human genome sequences greatly facilitate interpretation of common and rare genetic variation, although linking database sequence information to detailed clinical information is limited by privacy and practical issues. Genetic variation is a rich source of knowledge for cardiovascular disease because many, if not all, cardiovascular disorders are highly heritable. The role of rare genetic variation in predicting risk and complications of cardiovascular diseases has been well established for hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathy, where the number of genes that are linked to these disorders is growing. Bolstered by family data, where genetic variants segregate with disease, rare variation can be linked to specific genetic variation that offers profound diagnostic information. Understanding genetic variation in cardiomyopathy is likely to help stratify forms of heart failure and guide therapy. Ultimately, genetic variation may be amenable to gene correction and gene editing strategies.

  19. Experimental models of inherited cardiomyopathy and its therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Nonaka, Miki; Morimoto, Sachio

    2014-01-01

    Cardiomyopathy is a disease of myocardium categorized into three major forms, hypertrophic (HCM), dilated (DCM) and restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM), which has recently been demonstrated to be a monogenic disease due to mutations in various proteins expressed in cardiomyocytes. Mutations in HCM and RCM typically increase the myofilament sensitivity to cytoplasmic Ca2+, leading to systolic hyperfunction and diastolic dysfunction. In contrast, mutations in DCM typically decrease the myofilament sensitivity to cytoplasmic Ca2+ and/or force generation/transmission, leading to systolic dysfunction. Creation of genetically-manipulated transgenic and knock-in animals expressing mutant proteins exogenously and endogenously, respectively, in their hearts provides valuable animal models to discover the molecular and cellular mechanisms for pathogenesis and promising therapeutic strategy in vivo. Recently, cardiomyocytes have been differentiated from patient’s induced pluripotent stem cells as a model of inherited