Science.gov

Sample records for dimensional compressible hydrodynamic

  1. VH-1: Multidimensional ideal compressible hydrodynamics code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawley, John; Blondin, John; Lindahl, Greg; Lufkin, Eric

    2012-04-01

    VH-1 is a multidimensional ideal compressible hydrodynamics code written in FORTRAN for use on any computing platform, from desktop workstations to supercomputers. It uses a Lagrangian remap version of the Piecewise Parabolic Method developed by Paul Woodward and Phil Colella in their 1984 paper. VH-1 comes in a variety of versions, from a simple one-dimensional serial variant to a multi-dimensional version scalable to thousands of processors.

  2. Superresonant instability of a compressible hydrodynamic vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Leandro A.; Cardoso, Vitor; Crispino, Luís C. B.

    2016-06-01

    We show that a purely circulating and compressible system, in an adiabatic regime of acoustic propagation, presents superresonant instabilities. To show the existence these instabilities, we compute the quasinormal mode frequencies of this system numerically using two different frequency domain methods.

  3. Reliable estimation of shock position in shock-capturing compressible hydrodynamics codes

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Eric M

    2008-01-01

    The displacement method for estimating shock position in a shock-capturing compressible hydrodynamics code is introduced. Common estimates use simulation data within the captured shock, but the displacement method uses data behind the shock, making the estimate consistent with and as reliable as estimates of material parameters obtained from averages or fits behind the shock. The displacement method is described in the context of a steady shock in a one-dimensional lagrangian hydrodynamics code, and demonstrated on a piston problem and a spherical blast wave.The displacement method's estimates of shock position are much better than common estimates in such applications.

  4. Compressible Lagrangian hydrodynamics without Lagrangian cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Robert A.

    The partial differential Eqs [2.1, 2.2, and 2.3], along with the equation of state 2.4, which describe the time evolution of compressible fluid flow can be solved without the use of a Lagrangian mesh. The method follows embedded fluid points and uses finite difference approximations to ěc nablaP and ěc nabla · ěc u to update p, ěc u and e. We have demonstrated that the method can accurately calculate highly distorted flows without difficulty. The finite difference approximations are not unique, improvements may be found in the near future. The neighbor selection is not unique, but the one being used at present appears to do an excellent job. The method could be directly extended to three dimensions. One drawback to the method is the failure toexplicitly conserve mass, momentum and energy. In fact, at any given time, the mass is not defined. We must perform an auxiliary calculation by integrating the density field over space to obtain mass, energy and momentum. However, in all cases where we have done this, we have found the drift in these quantities to be no more than a few percent.

  5. Phonon hydrodynamics in two-dimensional materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzari, Nicola

    2015-03-01

    The conduction of heat in two dimensions displays a wealth of fascinating phenomena of key relevance to the scientific and technological applications of novel layered materials. Here, we use third order density-functional perturbation theory and an exact, variational solution of the Boltzmann transport equation to study fully from first-principles phonon transport and heat conductivity in graphene and related materials (boron nitride, functionalized derivatives, transition-metal dichalcogenides...). Very good agreement is obtained with experimental data, where available, together with a microscopic understanding of the collective character of heat-carrying excitations, and the unusual length scales involved. Last, and at variance with typical three-dimensional solids, normal processes dominate over Umklapp scattering well above cryogenic conditions, extending to room temperature and more. As a result, novel hydrodynamics regimes, hitherto typically confined to ultra-low temperatures, become readily apparent. Work done in collaboration with Andrea Cepellotti, Giorgia Fugallo, Lorenzo Paulatto, Michele Lazzeri, and Francesco Mauri.

  6. CASTRO: A NEW COMPRESSIBLE ASTROPHYSICAL SOLVER. II. GRAY RADIATION HYDRODYNAMICS

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, W.; Almgren, A.; Bell, J.; Howell, L.; Burrows, A.

    2011-10-01

    We describe the development of a flux-limited gray radiation solver for the compressible astrophysics code, CASTRO. CASTRO uses an Eulerian grid with block-structured adaptive mesh refinement based on a nested hierarchy of logically rectangular variable-sized grids with simultaneous refinement in both space and time. The gray radiation solver is based on a mixed-frame formulation of radiation hydrodynamics. In our approach, the system is split into two parts, one part that couples the radiation and fluid in a hyperbolic subsystem, and another parabolic part that evolves radiation diffusion and source-sink terms. The hyperbolic subsystem is solved explicitly with a high-order Godunov scheme, whereas the parabolic part is solved implicitly with a first-order backward Euler method.

  7. Pencil: Finite-difference Code for Compressible Hydrodynamic Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandenburg, Axel; Dobler, Wolfgang

    2010-10-01

    The Pencil code is a high-order finite-difference code for compressible hydrodynamic flows with magnetic fields. It is highly modular and can easily be adapted to different types of problems. The code runs efficiently under MPI on massively parallel shared- or distributed-memory computers, like e.g. large Beowulf clusters. The Pencil code is primarily designed to deal with weakly compressible turbulent flows. To achieve good parallelization, explicit (as opposed to compact) finite differences are used. Typical scientific targets include driven MHD turbulence in a periodic box, convection in a slab with non-periodic upper and lower boundaries, a convective star embedded in a fully nonperiodic box, accretion disc turbulence in the shearing sheet approximation, self-gravity, non-local radiation transfer, dust particle evolution with feedback on the gas, etc. A range of artificial viscosity and diffusion schemes can be invoked to deal with supersonic flows. For direct simulations regular viscosity and diffusion is being used. The code is written in well-commented Fortran90.

  8. Hydrodynamic compression of young and adult rat osteoblast-like cells on titanium fiber mesh.

    PubMed

    Walboomers, X F; Elder, S E; Bumgardner, J D; Jansen, J A

    2006-01-01

    Living bone cells are responsive to mechanical loading. Consequently, numerous in vitro models have been developed to examine the application of loading to cells. However, not all systems are suitable for the fibrous and porous three-dimensional materials, which are preferable for tissue repair purposes, or for the production of tissue engineering scaffolds. For three-dimensional applications, mechanical loading of cells with either fluid flow systems or hydrodynamic pressure systems has to be considered. Here, we aimed to evaluate the response of osteoblast-like cells to hydrodynamic compression, while growing in a three-dimensional titanium fiber mesh scaffolding material. For this purpose, a custom hydrodynamic compression chamber was built. Bone marrow cells were obtained from the femora of young (12-day-old) or old (1-year-old) rats, and precultured in the presence of dexamethasone and beta-glycerophosphate to achieve an osteoblast-like phenotype. Subsequently, cells were seeded onto the titanium mesh scaffolds, and subjected to hydrodynamic pressure, alternating between 0.3 to 5.0 MPa at 1 Hz, at 15-min intervals for a total of 60 min per day for up to 3 days. After pressurization, cell viability was checked. Afterward, DNA levels, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, and extracellular calcium content were measured. Finally, all specimens were observed with scanning electron microscopy. Cell viability studies showed that the applied pressure was not harmful to the cells. Furthermore, we found that cells were able to detect the compression forces, because we did see evident effects on the cell numbers of the cells derived from old animals. However, there were no other changes in the cells under pressure. Finally, it was also noticeable that cells from old animals did not express ALP activity, but did show similar calcified extracellular matrix formation to the cells from young animals. In conclusion, the difference in DNA levels as reaction toward pressure

  9. A new three-dimensional general-relativistic hydrodynamics code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baiotti, L.; Hawke, I.; Montero, P. J.; Rezzolla, L.

    We present a new three-dimensional general relativistic hydrodynamics code, the Whisky code. This code incorporates the expertise developed over the past years in the numerical solution of Einstein equations and of the hydrodynamics equations in a curved spacetime, and is the result of a collaboration of several European Institutes. We here discuss the ability of the code to carry out long-term accurate evolutions of the linear and nonlinear dynamics of isolated relativistic stars.

  10. Three-dimensional hydrodynamic instabilities in stellar core collapses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Yu-Qing; Lian, Biao

    2012-03-01

    A spherically symmetric hydrodynamic stellar core collapse process under gravity is time-dependent and may become unstable once disturbed. Subsequent non-linear evolutions of such growth of hydrodynamic instabilities may lead to various physical consequences. Specifically for a homologous collapse of a stellar core characterized by a polytropic exponent Γ= 4/3, we examine oscillations and/or instabilities of three-dimensional (3D) general polytropic perturbations. Being incompressible, the radial component of vorticity perturbation always grows unstably during the same homologous core collapse. For compressible 3D perturbations, the polytropic index γ of perturbations can differ from Γ= 4/3 of the general polytropic hydrodynamic background flow, where the background specific entropy is conserved along streamlines and can vary in radius and time. Our model formulation here is more general than previous ones. The Brunt-Väisälä buoyancy frequency ? does not vanish, allowing for the existence of internal gravity g- modes and/or g+ modes, depending on the sign of ? respectively. Eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of various oscillatory and unstable perturbation modes are computed, given asymptotic boundary conditions. As studied in several specialized cases of Goldreich & Weber and of Lou & Cao and Cao & Lou, we further confirm that acoustic p modes and surface f modes remain stable in the current more general situations. In comparison, g- modes and sufficiently high radial order g+ modes are unstable, leading to inevitable convective motions within the collapsing stellar interior; meanwhile, sufficiently low radial order g+ modes remain stably trapped in the collapsing core. Unstable growths of 3D g-mode disturbances are governed dominantly by the angular momentum conservation and modified by the gas pressure restoring force. We note in particular that unstable temporal growths of 3D vortical perturbations exist even when the specific entropy distribution becomes

  11. CASTRO: A NEW COMPRESSIBLE ASTROPHYSICAL SOLVER. III. MULTIGROUP RADIATION HYDRODYNAMICS

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, W.; Almgren, A.; Bell, J.; Howell, L.; Burrows, A.; Dolence, J.

    2013-01-15

    We present a formulation for multigroup radiation hydrodynamics that is correct to order O(v/c) using the comoving-frame approach and the flux-limited diffusion approximation. We describe a numerical algorithm for solving the system, implemented in the compressible astrophysics code, CASTRO. CASTRO uses a Eulerian grid with block-structured adaptive mesh refinement based on a nested hierarchy of logically rectangular variable-sized grids with simultaneous refinement in both space and time. In our multigroup radiation solver, the system is split into three parts: one part that couples the radiation and fluid in a hyperbolic subsystem, another part that advects the radiation in frequency space, and a parabolic part that evolves radiation diffusion and source-sink terms. The hyperbolic subsystem and the frequency space advection are solved explicitly with high-order Godunov schemes, whereas the parabolic part is solved implicitly with a first-order backward Euler method. Our multigroup radiation solver works for both neutrino and photon radiation.

  12. CASTRO: A New Compressible Astrophysical Solver. III. Multigroup Radiation Hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, W.; Howell, L.; Almgren, A.; Burrows, A.; Dolence, J.; Bell, J.

    2013-01-01

    We present a formulation for multigroup radiation hydrodynamics that is correct to order O(v/c) using the comoving-frame approach and the flux-limited diffusion approximation. We describe a numerical algorithm for solving the system, implemented in the compressible astrophysics code, CASTRO. CASTRO uses a Eulerian grid with block-structured adaptive mesh refinement based on a nested hierarchy of logically rectangular variable-sized grids with simultaneous refinement in both space and time. In our multigroup radiation solver, the system is split into three parts: one part that couples the radiation and fluid in a hyperbolic subsystem, another part that advects the radiation in frequency space, and a parabolic part that evolves radiation diffusion and source-sink terms. The hyperbolic subsystem and the frequency space advection are solved explicitly with high-order Godunov schemes, whereas the parabolic part is solved implicitly with a first-order backward Euler method. Our multigroup radiation solver works for both neutrino and photon radiation.

  13. Hydrodynamic stability of three-dimensional homogeneous flow topologies.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Aashwin A; Girimaji, Sharath S

    2015-11-01

    This article examines the hydrodynamic stability of various homogeneous three-dimensional flow topologies. The influence of inertial and pressure effects on the stability of flows undergoing strain, rotation, convergence, divergence, and swirl are isolated. In marked contrast to two-dimensional topologies, for three-dimensional flows the inertial effects are always destabilizing, whereas pressure effects are always stabilizing. In streamline topologies with a negative velocity-gradient third invariant, inertial effects prevail leading to instability. Vortex-stretching is identified as the underlying instability mechanism. In flows with positive velocity-gradient third derivative, pressure overcomes inertial effects to stabilize the flow. PMID:26651773

  14. Multi-dimensional computer simulation of MHD combustor hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, G.F.; Chang, S.L.; Lottes, S.A.; Rimkus, W.A.

    1991-04-04

    Argonne National Laboratory is investigating the nonreacting jet-gas mixing patterns in an MHD second stage combustor by using a two-dimensional multi-phase hydrodynamics computer program and a three-dimensional single-phase hydrodynamics computer program. The computer simulations are intended to enhance the understanding of flow and mixing patterns in the combustor, which in turn may lead to improvement of the downstream MHD channel performance. A two-dimensional steady state computer model, based on mass and momentum conservation laws for multiple gas species, is used to simulate the hydrodynamics of the combustor in which a jet of oxidizer is injected into an unconfined cross-stream gas flow. A three-dimensional code is used to examine the effects of the side walls and the distributed jet flows on the non-reacting jet-gas mixing patterns. The code solves the conservation equations of mass, momentum, and energy, and a transport equation of a turbulence parameter and allows permeable surfaces to be specified for any computational cell. 17 refs., 25 figs.

  15. Analytical solutions of Landau (1+1)-dimensional hydrodynamics

    DOE PAGES

    Wong, Cheuk-Yin; Sen, Abhisek; Gerhard, Jochen; Torrieri, Giorgio; Read, Kenneth

    2014-12-17

    To help guide our intuition, summarize important features, and point out essential elements, we review the analytical solutions of Landau (1+1)-dimensional hydrodynamics and exhibit the full evolution of the dynamics from the very beginning to subsequent times. Special emphasis is placed on the matching and the interplay between the Khalatnikov solution and the Riemann simple wave solution at the earliest times and in the edge regions at later times.

  16. Second-order (2 +1 ) -dimensional anisotropic hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazow, Dennis; Heinz, Ulrich; Strickland, Michael

    2014-11-01

    We present a complete formulation of second-order (2 +1 ) -dimensional anisotropic hydrodynamics. The resulting framework generalizes leading-order anisotropic hydrodynamics by allowing for deviations of the one-particle distribution function from the spheroidal form assumed at leading order. We derive complete second-order equations of motion for the additional terms in the macroscopic currents generated by these deviations from their kinetic definition using a Grad-Israel-Stewart 14-moment ansatz. The result is a set of coupled partial differential equations for the momentum-space anisotropy parameter, effective temperature, the transverse components of the fluid four-velocity, and the viscous tensor components generated by deviations of the distribution from spheroidal form. We then perform a quantitative test of our approach by applying it to the case of one-dimensional boost-invariant expansion in the relaxation time approximation (RTA) in which case it is possible to numerically solve the Boltzmann equation exactly. We demonstrate that the second-order anisotropic hydrodynamics approach provides an excellent approximation to the exact (0+1)-dimensional RTA solution for both small and large values of the shear viscosity.

  17. Correlating hydrodynamic radii with that of two-dimensional nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Yue, Yuan; Kan, Yuwei; Clearfield, Abraham; Choi, Hyunho; Liang, Hong

    2015-12-21

    Dynamic light scattering (DLS) is one of the most adapted methods to measure the size of nanoparticles, as referred to the hydrodynamic radii (R{sub h}). However, the R{sub h} represents only that of three-dimensional spherical nanoparticles. In the present research, the size of two-dimensional (2D) nanoparticles of yttrium oxide (Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and zirconium phosphate (ZrP) was evaluated through comparing their hydrodynamic diameters via DLS with lateral sizes obtained using scanning and transmission electron microscopy. We demonstrate that the hydrodynamic radii are correlated with the lateral sizes of both square and circle shaped 2D nanoparticles. Two proportional coefficients, i.e., correcting factors, are proposed for the Brownian motion status of 2D nanoparticles. The correction is possible by simplifying the calculation of integrals in the case of small thickness approximation. The correcting factor has great significance for investigating the translational diffusion behavior of 2D nanoparticles in a liquid and in effective and low-cost measurement in terms of size and morphology of shape-specific nanoparticles.

  18. Correlating hydrodynamic radii with that of two-dimensional nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Yuan; Kan, Yuwei; Choi, Hyunho; Clearfield, Abraham; Liang, Hong

    2015-12-01

    Dynamic light scattering (DLS) is one of the most adapted methods to measure the size of nanoparticles, as referred to the hydrodynamic radii (Rh). However, the Rh represents only that of three-dimensional spherical nanoparticles. In the present research, the size of two-dimensional (2D) nanoparticles of yttrium oxide (Y2O3) and zirconium phosphate (ZrP) was evaluated through comparing their hydrodynamic diameters via DLS with lateral sizes obtained using scanning and transmission electron microscopy. We demonstrate that the hydrodynamic radii are correlated with the lateral sizes of both square and circle shaped 2D nanoparticles. Two proportional coefficients, i.e., correcting factors, are proposed for the Brownian motion status of 2D nanoparticles. The correction is possible by simplifying the calculation of integrals in the case of small thickness approximation. The correcting factor has great significance for investigating the translational diffusion behavior of 2D nanoparticles in a liquid and in effective and low-cost measurement in terms of size and morphology of shape-specific nanoparticles.

  19. Advanced three-dimensional Eulerian hydrodynamic algorithm development

    SciTech Connect

    Rider, W.J.; Kothe, D.B.; Mosso, S.

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The purpose of this project is to investigate, implement, and evaluate algorithms that have high potential for improving the robustness, fidelity and accuracy of three-dimensional Eulerian hydrodynamic simulations. Eulerian computations are necessary to simulate a number of important physical phenomena ranging from the molding process for metal parts to nuclear weapons safety issues to astrophysical phenomena such as that associated with a Type 2 supernovae. A number of algorithmic issues were explored in the course of this research including interface/volume tracking, surface physics integration, high resolution integration techniques, multilevel iterative methods, multimaterial hydrodynamics and coupling radiation with hydrodynamics. This project combines core strengths of several Laboratory divisions. The project has high institutional benefit given the renewed emphasis on numerical simulations in Science-Based Stockpile Stewardship and the Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative and LANL`s tactical goals related to high performance computing and simulation.

  20. Two dimensional hydrodynamic modeling of a high latitude braided river

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphries, E.; Pavelsky, T.; Bates, P. D.

    2014-12-01

    Rivers are a fundamental resource to physical, ecologic and human systems, yet quantification of river flow in high-latitude environments remains limited due to the prevalence of complex morphologies, remote locations and sparse in situ monitoring equipment. Advances in hydrodynamic modeling and remote sensing technology allow us to address questions such as: How well can two-dimensional models simulate a flood wave in a highly 3-dimensional braided river environment, and how does the structure of such a flood wave differ from flow down a similar-sized single-channel river? Here, we use the raster-based hydrodynamic model LISFLOOD-FP to simulate flood waves, discharge, water surface height, and velocity measurements over a ~70 km reach of the Tanana River in Alaska. In order to use LISFLOOD-FP a digital elevation model (DEM) fused with detailed bathymetric data is required. During summer 2013, we surveyed 220,000 bathymetric points along the study reach using an echo sounder system connected to a high-precision GPS unit. The measurements are interpolated to a smooth bathymetric surface, using Topo to Raster interpolation, and combined with an existing five meter DEM (Alaska IfSAR) to create a seamless river terrain model. Flood waves are simulated using varying complexities in model solvers, then compared to gauge records and water logger data to assess major sources of model uncertainty. Velocity and flow direction maps are also assessed and quantified for detailed analysis of braided channel flow. The most accurate model output occurs with using the full two-dimensional model structure, and major inaccuracies appear to be related to DEM quality and roughness values. Future work will intercompare model outputs with extensive ground measurements and new data from AirSWOT, an airborne analog for the Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) mission, which aims to provide high-resolution measurements of terrestrial and ocean water surface elevations globally.

  1. Low Mach number two-dimensional hydrodynamic turbulence - Energy budgets and density fluctuations in a polytropic fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosh, S.; Matthaeus, W. H.

    1992-01-01

    Theory suggests that three distinct types of turbulence can occur in the low Mach number limit of polytropic flow: nearly incompressible flows dominated by vorticity, nearly pure acoustic turbulence dominated by compression, and flows characterized by near statistical equipartition of vorticity and compressions. Distinctions between these kinds of turbulence are investigated here by direct numerical simulation of two-dimensional compressible hydrodynamic turbulence. Dynamical scalings of density fluctuations, examination of the ratio of transverse to longitudinal velocity fluctuations, and spectral decomposition of the fluctuations are employed to distinguish the nature of these low Mach number solutions. A strong dependence on the initial data is observed, as well as a tendency for enhanced effects of compressibility at later times and at higher wave numbers, as suggested by theories of nearly incompressible flows.

  2. CASTRO: Multi-dimensional Eulerian AMR Radiation-hydrodynamics Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    CenterComputational Sciences; Engineering (Berkeley); Howell, Louis; Singer, Mike

    2011-05-01

    CASTRO is a multi-dimensional Eulerian AMR radiation-hydrodynamics code that includes stellar equations of state, nuclear reaction networks, and self-gravity. Initial target applications for CASTRO include Type Ia and Type II supernovae. CASTRO supports calculations in 1-d, 2-d and 3-d Cartesian coordinates, as well as 1-d spherical and 2-d cylindrical (r-z) coordinate systems. Time integration of the hydrodynamics equations is based on an unsplit version of the the piecewise parabolic method (PPM) with new limiters that avoid reducing the accuracy of the scheme at smooth extrema. CASTRO can follow an arbitrary number of isotopes or elements. The atomic weights and amounts of these elements are used to calculate the mean molecular weight of the gas required by the equation of state. CASTRO supports several different approaches to solving for self-gravity. The most general is a full Poisson solve for the gravitational potential. CASTRO also supports a monopole approximation for gravity, and a constant gravity option is also available. The CASTRO software is written in C++ and Fortran, and is based on the BoxLib software framework developed by CCSE.

  3. Developing a Multi-Dimensional Hydrodynamics Code with Astrochemical Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Kyujin; Yang, Seungwon

    2015-08-01

    The Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) revealed high resolution molecular lines some of which are still unidentified yet. Because formation of these astrochemical molecules has been seldom studied in traditional chemistry, observations of new molecular lines drew a lot of attention from not only astronomers but also chemists both experimental and theoretical. Theoretical calculations for the formation of these astrochemical molecules have been carried out providing reaction rates for some important molecules, and some of theoretical predictions have been measured in laboratories. The reaction rates for the astronomically important molecules are now collected to form databases some of which are publically available. By utilizing these databases, we develop a multi-dimensional hydrodynamics code that includes the reaction rates of astrochemical molecules. Because this type of hydrodynamics code is able to trace the molecular formation in a non-equilibrium fashion, it is useful to study the formation history of these molecules that affects the spatial distribution of some specific molecules. We present the development procedure of this code and some test problems in order to verify and validate the developed code.

  4. Three-dimensional hydrodynamic and erosion modeling of fluidized beds using kinetic theory

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, J.; Lyczkowski, R.W. ); Burge, S.W. . Research Center)

    1992-05-01

    Three-dimensional hydrodynamic models for gas-solids flow are developed and used to compute bubble and solids motion in rectangular fluidized beds. Our computed results demonstrate the significance and necessity for three-dimensional models of hydrodynamics and erosion in fluidized-bed combustors. A kinetic theory model for erosion using Finnie's single-particle ductile erosion model was used to compute erosion in a rectangular fluidized bed containing a single tube. Comparison of two-dimensional and three-dimensional computed hydrodynamics, erosion rates, and patterns clearly show the superiority of three-dimensional modeling.

  5. Three-dimensional hydrodynamic and erosion modeling of fluidized beds using kinetic theory

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, J.; Lyczkowski, R.W.; Burge, S.W.

    1992-05-01

    Three-dimensional hydrodynamic models for gas-solids flow are developed and used to compute bubble and solids motion in rectangular fluidized beds. Our computed results demonstrate the significance and necessity for three-dimensional models of hydrodynamics and erosion in fluidized-bed combustors. A kinetic theory model for erosion using Finnie`s single-particle ductile erosion model was used to compute erosion in a rectangular fluidized bed containing a single tube. Comparison of two-dimensional and three-dimensional computed hydrodynamics, erosion rates, and patterns clearly show the superiority of three-dimensional modeling.

  6. CASTRO: A NEW COMPRESSIBLE ASTROPHYSICAL SOLVER. I. HYDRODYNAMICS AND SELF-GRAVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Almgren, A. S.; Beckner, V. E.; Bell, J. B.; Day, M. S.; Lijewski, M. J.; Nonaka, A.; Howell, L. H.; Singer, M.; Joggerst, C. C.; Zingale, M.

    2010-06-01

    We present a new code, CASTRO, that solves the multicomponent compressible hydrodynamic equations for astrophysical flows including self-gravity, nuclear reactions, and radiation. CASTRO uses an Eulerian grid and incorporates adaptive mesh refinement (AMR). Our approach to AMR uses a nested hierarchy of logically rectangular grids with simultaneous refinement in both space and time. The radiation component of CASTRO will be described in detail in the next paper, Part II, of this series.

  7. A two-dimensional hydrodynamic model of a tidal estuary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walters, Roy A.; Cheng, Ralph T.

    1979-01-01

    A finite element model is described which is used in the computation of tidal currents in an estuary. This numerical model is patterned after an existing algorithm and has been carefully tested in rectangular and curve-sided channels with constant and variable depth. One of the common uncertainties in this class of two-dimensional hydrodynamic models is the treatment of the lateral boundary conditions. Special attention is paid specifically to addressing this problem. To maintain continuity within the domain of interest, ‘smooth’ curve-sided elements must be used at all shoreline boundaries. The present model uses triangular, isoparametric elements with quadratic basis functions for the two velocity components and a linear basis function for water surface elevation. An implicit time integration is used and the model is unconditionally stable. The resultant governing equations are nonlinear owing to the advective and the bottom friction terms and are solved iteratively at each time step by the Newton-Raphson method. Model test runs have been made in the southern portion of San Francisco Bay, California (South Bay) as well as in the Bay west of Carquinez Strait. Owing to the complex bathymetry, the hydrodynamic characteristics of the Bay system are dictated by the generally shallow basins which contain deep, relict river channels. Great care must be exercised to ensure that the conservation equations remain locally as well as globally accurate. Simulations have been made over several representative tidal cycles using this finite element model, and the results compare favourably with existing data. In particular, the standing wave in South Bay and the progressive wave in the northern reach are well represented.

  8. Effect of three-dimensionality on compressible mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Papamoschou, D. )

    1992-02-01

    Existing experimental data and hypotheses on the growth rates of compressible and incompressible turbulent shear layers are used to estimate the effect of three-dimensionality in the turbulent mixing enhancement in compressible shear flows that is critically important to the efficiency of scramjet powerplants. The general trend is found to be a decrease in growth rate with increasing three-dimensionality, excepting only the restricted regime, where the growth-rate increase is modest. 9 refs.

  9. A Three-Dimensional Hydrodynamic Focusing Method for Polyplex Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Mengqian; Ho, Yi-Ping; Grigsby, Christopher L.; Nawaz, Ahmad Ahsan; Leong, Kam W.; Huang, Tony Jun

    2014-01-01

    Successful intracellular delivery of nucleic acid therapeutics relies on multi-aspect optimization, one of which is formulation. While there has been ample innovation on chemical design of polymeric gene carriers, the same cannot be said for physical processing of polymer-DNA nanocomplexes (polyplexes). Conventional synthesis of polyplexes by bulk mixing depends on the operators’ experience. The poorly controlled bulk-mixing process may also lead to batch-to-batch variation and consequent irreproducibility. Here, we synthesize polyplexes by using a three-dimensional hydrodynamic focusing (3D-HF) technique in a single-layered, planar microfluidic device. Without any additional chemical treatment or post processing, the polyplexes prepared by the 3D-HF method show smaller size, slower aggregation rate, and higher transfection efficiency, while exhibiting reduced cytotoxicity compared to the ones synthesized by conventional bulk mixing. In addition, by introducing external acoustic perturbation, mixing can be further enhanced, leading to even smaller nanocomplexes. The 3D-HF method provides a simple and reproducible process for synthesizing high-quality polyplexes, addressing a critical barrier in the eventual translation of nucleic acid therapeutics. PMID:24341632

  10. Three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of L2 Puppis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhuo; Nordhaus, Jason; Frank, Adam; Blackman, Eric G.; Balick, Bruce

    2016-08-01

    Recent observations of the L2 Puppis system suggest that this Mira-like variable may be in the early stages of forming a bipolar planetary nebula. As one of nearest and brightest asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, thought be a binary, L2 Puppis serves as a benchmark object for studying the late-stages of stellar evolution. We perform global, three-dimensional, adaptive-mesh-refinement hydrodynamic simulations of the L2 Puppis system with ASTROBEAR. We use the radiative transfer code RADMC-3D to construct the broad-band spectral energy distribution and synthetic observational images from our simulations. Given the reported binary parameters, we are able to reproduce the current observational data if a short pulse of dense material is released from the AGB star with a velocity sufficient to escape the primary but not the binary. Such a situation could result from a thermal pulse, be induced by a periastron passage of the secondary, or could be launched if the primary ingests a planet.

  11. Formation of globular clusters induced by external ultraviolet radiation II: Three-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Makito; Umemura, Masayuki; Hasegawa, Kenji

    2016-08-01

    We explore the possibility of the formation of globular clusters under ultraviolet (UV) background radiation. One-dimensional spherical symmetric radiation hydrodynamics (RHD) simulations by Hasegawa et al. have demonstrated that the collapse of low-mass (106-7 M⊙) gas clouds exposed to intense UV radiation can lead to the formation of compact star clusters like globular clusters (GCs) if gas clouds contract with supersonic infall velocities. However, three-dimensional effects, such as the anisotropy of background radiation and the inhomogeneity in gas clouds, have not been studied so far. In this paper, we perform three-dimensional RHD simulations in a semi-cosmological context, and reconsider the formation of compact star clusters in strong UV radiation fields. As a result, we find that although anisotropic radiation fields bring an elongated shadow of neutral gas, almost spherical compact star clusters can be procreated from a "supersonic infall" cloud, since photo-dissociating radiation suppresses the formation of hydrogen molecules in the shadowed regions and the regions are compressed by UV heated ambient gas. The properties of resultant star clusters match those of GCs. On the other hand, in weak UV radiation fields, dark matter-dominated star clusters with low stellar density form due to the self-shielding effect as well as the positive feedback by ionizing photons. Thus, we conclude that the "supersonic infall" under a strong UV background is a potential mechanism to form GCs.

  12. Incompressible-compressible flows with a transient discontinuous interface using smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lind, S. J.; Stansby, P. K.; Rogers, B. D.

    2016-03-01

    A new two-phase incompressible-compressible Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) method has been developed where the interface is discontinuous in density. This is applied to water-air problems with a large density difference. The incompressible phase requires surface pressure from the compressible phase and the compressible phase requires surface velocity from the incompressible phase. Compressible SPH is used for the air phase (with the isothermal stiffened ideal gas equation of state for low Mach numbers) and divergence-free (projection based) incompressible SPH is used for the water phase, with the addition of Fickian shifting to produce sufficiently homogeneous particle distributions to enable stable, accurate, converged solutions without noise in the pressure field. Shifting is a purely numerical particle regularisation device. The interface remains a true material discontinuity at a high density ratio with continuous pressure and velocity at the interface. This approach with the physics of compressibility and incompressibility represented is novel within SPH and is validated against semi-analytical results for a two-phase elongating and oscillating water drop, analytical results for low amplitude inviscid standing waves, the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, and a dam break problem with high interface distortion and impact on a vertical wall where experimental and other numerical results are available.

  13. Gaseous laser targets and optical diagnostics for studying compressible hydrodynamic instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, J M; Robey, H; Mackinnon, A

    2001-06-29

    Explore the combination of optical diagnostics and gaseous targets to obtain important information about compressible turbulent flows that cannot be derived from traditional laser experiments for the purposes of V and V of hydrodynamics models and understanding scaling. First year objectives: Develop and characterize blast wave-gas jet test bed; Perform single pulse shadowgraphy of blast wave interaction with turbulent gas jet as a function of blast wave Mach number; Explore double pulse shadowgraphy and image correlation for extracting velocity spectra in the shock-turbulent flow interaction; and Explore the use/adaptation of advanced diagnostics.

  14. Hydrodynamics of rotating stars and close binary interactions: Compressible ellipsoid models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lai, Dong; Rasio, Frederic A.; Shapiro, Stuart L.

    1994-01-01

    We develop a new formalism to study the dynamics of fluid polytropes in three dimensions. The stars are modeled as compressible ellipsoids, and the hydrodynamic equations are reduced to a set of ordinary differential equations for the evolution of the principal axes and other global quantities. Both viscous dissipation and the gravitational radiation reaction are incorporated. We establish the validity of our approximations and demonstrate the simplicity and power of the method by rederiving a number of known results concerning the stability and dynamical oscillations of rapidly rotating polytropes. In particular, we present a generalization to compressible fluids of Chandrasekhar's classical results for the secular and dynamical instabilities of incompressible Maclaurin spheroids. We also present several applications of our method to astrophysical problems of great current interest, such as the tidal disruption of a star by a massive black hole, the coalescence of compact binaries driven by the emission of gravitational waves, and the development of instabilities in close binary systems.

  15. High-fidelity numerical simulations of compressible turbulence and mixing generated by hydrodynamic instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Movahed, Pooya

    High-speed flows are prone to hydrodynamic interfacial instabilities that evolve to turbulence, thereby intensely mixing different fluids and dissipating energy. The lack of knowledge of these phenomena has impeded progress in a variety of disciplines. In science, a full understanding of mixing between heavy and light elements after the collapse of a supernova and between adjacent layers of different density in geophysical (atmospheric and oceanic) flows remains lacking. In engineering, the inability to achieve ignition in inertial fusion and efficient combustion constitute further examples of this lack of basic understanding of turbulent mixing. In this work, my goal is to develop accurate and efficient numerical schemes and employ them to study compressible turbulence and mixing generated by interactions between shocked (Richtmyer-Meshkov) and accelerated (Rayleigh-Taylor) interfaces, which play important roles in high-energy-density physics environments. To accomplish my goal, a hybrid high-order central/discontinuity-capturing finite difference scheme is first presented. The underlying principle is that, to accurately and efficiently represent both broadband motions and discontinuities, non-dissipative methods are used where the solution is smooth, while the more expensive and dissipative capturing schemes are applied near discontinuous regions. Thus, an accurate numerical sensor is developed to discriminate between smooth regions, shocks and material discontinuities, which all require a different treatment. The interface capturing approach is extended to central differences, such that smooth distributions of varying specific heats ratio can be simulated without generating spurious pressure oscillations. I verified and validated this approach against a stringent suite of problems including shocks, interfaces, turbulence and two-dimensional single-mode Richtmyer-Meshkov instability simulations. The three-dimensional code is shown to scale well up to 4000 cores

  16. A one-dimensional hydrodynamic model for pressures induced near the coating-water interface during laser shock peening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Benxin; Shin, Yung C.

    2007-01-01

    In laser shock peening (LSP) under a water-confinement regime, laser-matter interaction near the coating-water interface can induce very high pressures in the order of gigapascal, which can impart compressive residual stresses into metal workpieces to improve fatigue and corrosion properties. However, self-closed models with spatial distribution considerations for the induced pressures near the coating-water interface in LSP are rarely reported in literature. In this paper, a self-closed model is developed by numerically solving the one-dimensional hydrodynamic equations, supplemented with appropriate equations of state of water and the coating material. The model can produce the one-dimensional spatial distributions of the material responses near the water-coating interface in LSP. The model-predicted pressures have been compared with experimental measurements under a variety of conditions typical for LSP, and good agreements have been found for both the transient pressure history and the peak pressure magnitude.

  17. Magneto-hydrodynamic calculation of magnetic flux compression using imploding cylindrical liners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jibo; Sun, Chengwei; Gu, Zhuowei

    2015-06-01

    Based on the one-dimensional elastic-plastic reactive hydrodynamic code SSS, the one-dimensional magneto-hydrodynamics code SSS/MHD is developed successfully, and calculation is carried for cylindrical magneto cumulative generators (MC-1 device). The magnetic field diffusion into liner and sample tuber is analyzed, and the result shows that the maximum value of magnetic induction intensity to cavity 0.2 mm in liner is only sixteen Tesla, while the one in sample tuber is several hundred Tesla, which is caused by balancing of electromagnetism force and imploding one for the different velocity of liner and sample tuber. The curves of magnetic induction intensity on axes of cavity and the velocity history on the wall of sample tuber are calculated, which accord with the experiment results. The works in this paper account for that code SSS/MHD can be applied in experiment configures of detonation, shock and electromagnetism load and improve of parameter successfully. The experiment data can be estimated, analyzed and checked validly, and the physics course of correlative device can be understood deeply, according to SSS/MHD. This work was supported by the special funds of the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant 11176002.

  18. Medical image compression by using three-dimensional wavelet transformation.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Huang, K

    1996-01-01

    This paper proposes a three-dimensional (3-D) medical image compression method for computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) that uses a separable nonuniform 3-D wavelet transform. The separable wavelet transform employs one filter bank within two-dimensional (2-D) slices and then a second filter bank on the slice direction. CT and MR image sets normally have different resolutions within a slice and between slices. The pixel distances within a slice are normally less than 1 mm and the distance between slices can vary from 1 mm to 10 mm. To find the best filter bank in the slice direction, the authors use the various filter banks in the slice direction and compare the compression results. The results from the 12 selected MR and CT image sets at various slice thickness show that the Haar transform in the slice direction gives the optimum performance for most image sets, except for a CT image set which has 1 mm slice distance. Compared with 2-D wavelet compression, compression ratios of the 3-D method are about 70% higher for CT and 35% higher for MR image sets at a peak signal to noise ratio (PSNR) of 50 dB, In general, the smaller the slice distance, the better the 3-D compression performance. PMID:18215935

  19. Three-dimensional compressible and stretchable conductive composites.

    PubMed

    Yu, You; Zeng, Jifang; Chen, Chaojian; Xie, Zhuang; Guo, Ruisheng; Liu, Zhilu; Zhou, Xuechang; Yang, Yong; Zheng, Zijian

    2014-02-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) conductive composites with remarkable flexibility, compressibility, and stretchability are fabricated by solution deposition of thin metal coatings on chemically modified, macroscopically continuous, 3D polyurethane sponges, followed by infiltration of the metallic sponges with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). These low-cost conductive composites are used as high-performance interconnects for flexible and stretchable light-emitting diode (LED) arrays, even with severe surface abrasion or cutting. PMID:24307070

  20. USING TWO-DIMENSIONAL HYDRODYNAMIC MODELS AT SCALES OF ECOLOGICAL IMPORTANCE. (R825760)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Modeling of flow features that are important in assessing stream habitat conditions has been a long-standing interest of stream biologists. Recently, they have begun examining the usefulness of two-dimensional (2-D) hydrodynamic models in attaining this objective. Current modelin...

  1. ONE-DIMENSIONAL HYDRODYNAMIC/SEDIMENT TRANSPORT MODEL FOR STREAM NETWORKS: TECHNICAL REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This technical report describes a new sediment transport model and the supporting post-processor, and sampling procedures for sediments in streams. Specifically, the following items are described herein:

    EFDC1D - This is a new one-dimensional hydrodynamic and sediment tr...

  2. One-dimensional hydrodynamic model generating a turbulent cascade.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Takeshi; Sakajo, Takashi

    2016-05-01

    As a minimal mathematical model generating cascade analogous to that of the Navier-Stokes turbulence in the inertial range, we propose a one-dimensional partial-differential-equation model that conserves the integral of the squared vorticity analog (enstrophy) in the inviscid case. With a large-scale random forcing and small viscosity, we find numerically that the model exhibits the enstrophy cascade, the broad energy spectrum with a sizable correction to the dimensional-analysis prediction, peculiar intermittency, and self-similarity in the dynamical system structure. PMID:27300972

  3. Developing a weakly compressible smoothed particle hydrodynamics model for biological flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasyliv, Yaroslav; Alexeev, Alexander

    2014-11-01

    Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) is a meshless particle method originally developed for astrophysics applications in 1977. Over the years, limitations of the original formulations have been addressed by different groups to extend the domain of SPH application. In biologically relevant internal flows, two of the several challenges still facing SPH are 1) treatment of inlet, outlet, and no slip boundary conditions and 2) treatment of second derivatives present in the viscous terms. In this work, we develop a 2D weakly compressible SPH (WCSPH) for simulating viscous internal flows which incorporates some of the recent advancements made by groups in the above two areas. The method is validated against several analytical and experimental benchmark solutions for both steady and unsteady laminar flows. In particular, the 2013 U.S. Food and Drug Administration benchmark test case for medical devices - steady forward flow through a nozzle with a sudden contraction and conical diffuser - is simulated for different Reynolds numbers in the laminar region and results are validated against the published experimental and CFD datasets. Support from the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship Program (NSF GRFP) is gratefully acknowledged.

  4. Three Dimensional Simulations of Compressible Hall MHD Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Shaikh, Dastgeer; Shukla, P. K.

    2008-10-15

    We have developed three dimensional, time dependent, compressible, non-adiabatic, driven and massively parallelized Hall magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations to investigate turbulent spectral cascades in a regime where characteristic lengthscales associated with plasma fluctuations are smaller than ion gyro radii. Such regime is ubiquitously present in solar wind and many other collisionless space plasmas. Particularly in the solar wind, the high time resolution databases identify a spectral break at the end of MHD inertial range spectrum that corresponds to a high frequency regime. In the regime, turbulent cascades cannot be explained by the usual MHD models. With the help of our 3D Hall MHD code, we find that characteristic turbulent interactions in the high frequency regime evolve typically on kinetic Alfven time scales. The turbulent fluctuation associated with kinetic Alfven interactions are compressive and anisotropic and possess equipartition of kinetic and magnetic energies.

  5. Acceleration of multi-dimensional propagator measurements with compressed sensing.

    PubMed

    Paulsen, Jeffrey L; Cho, HyungJoon; Cho, Gyunggoo; Song, Yi-Qiao

    2011-12-01

    NMR can probe the microstructures of anisotropic materials such as liquid crystals, stretched polymers and biological tissues through measurement of the diffusion propagator, where internal structures are indicated by restricted diffusion. Multi-dimensional measurements can probe the microscopic anisotropy, but full sampling can then quickly become prohibitively time consuming. However, for incompletely sampled data, compressed sensing is an effective reconstruction technique to enable accelerated acquisition. We demonstrate that with a compressed sensing scheme, one can greatly reduce the sampling and the experimental time with minimal effect on the reconstruction of the diffusion propagator with an example of anisotropic diffusion. We compare full sampling down to 64× sub-sampling for the 2D propagator measurement and reduce the acquisition time for the 3D experiment by a factor of 32 from ∼80 days to ∼2.5 days. PMID:21924932

  6. Development of three-dimensional hydrodynamical and MHD codes using Adaptive Mesh Refinement scheme with TVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    den, M.; Yamashita, K.; Ogawa, T.

    A three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamical (HD) and magneto-hydrodynamical (MHD) simulation codes using an adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) scheme are developed. This method places fine grids over areas of interest such as shock waves in order to obtain high resolution and places uniform grids with lower resolution in other area. Thus AMR scheme can provide a combination of high solution accuracy and computational robustness. We demonstrate numerical results for a simplified model of a shock propagation, which strongly indicate that the AMR techniques have the ability to resolve disturbances in an interplanetary space. We also present simulation results for MHD code.

  7. Two-dimensional hydrodynamic flow focusing in a microfluidic platform featuring a monolithic integrated glass micronozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yifan; Shen, Yusheng; Duan, Lian; Yobas, Levent

    2016-10-01

    Two-dimensional hydrodynamic flow focusing is demonstrated through a microfluidic device featuring a monolithic integrated glass micronozzle inside a flow-focusing geometry. Such a coaxial configuration allows simple one-step focusing of a sample fluid stream, jetted from the micronozzle tip, in both in-plane and out-of-plane directions. The width of the focused filament can be precisely controlled and further scaled down to the submicrometer regime to facilitate rapid hydrodynamic mixing. Fluorescence quenching experiments reveal ultra-fast microsecond mixing of the denaturant into the focused filament. This device offers new possibilities to a set of applications such as the study of protein folding kinetics.

  8. Multi-dimensional high-order numerical schemes for Lagrangian hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, William W; Woodward, Paul R

    2009-01-01

    An approximate solver for multi-dimensional Riemann problems at grid points of unstructured meshes, and a numerical scheme for multi-dimensional hydrodynamics have been developed in this paper. The solver is simple, and is developed only for the use in numerical schemes for hydrodynamics. The scheme is truely multi-dimensional, is second order accurate in both space and time, and satisfies conservation laws exactly for mass, momentum, and total energy. The scheme has been tested through numerical examples involving strong shocks. It has been shown that the scheme offers the principle advantages of high-order Codunov schemes; robust operation in the presence of very strong shocks and thin shock fronts.

  9. A Two-Dimensional Compressible Gas Flow Code

    1995-03-17

    F2D is a general purpose, two dimensional, fully compressible thermal-fluids code that models most of the phenomena found in situations of coupled fluid flow and heat transfer. The code solves momentum, continuity, gas-energy, and structure-energy equations using a predictor-correction solution algorithm. The corrector step includes a Poisson pressure equation. The finite difference form of the equation is presented along with a description of input and output. Several example problems are included that demonstrate the applicabilitymore » of the code in problems ranging from free fluid flow, shock tubes and flow in heated porous media.« less

  10. Localized plumes in three-dimensional compressible magnetoconvection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houghton, S. M.; Bushby, P. J.

    2011-03-01

    Within the umbrae of sunspots, convection is generally inhibited by the presence of strong vertical magnetic fields. However, convection is not completely suppressed in these regions: bright features, known as umbral dots, are probably associated with weak, isolated convective plumes. Motivated by observations of umbral dots, we carry out numerical simulations of three-dimensional, compressible magnetoconvection. By following solution branches into the subcritical parameter regime (a region of parameter space in which the static solution is linearly stable to convective perturbations), we find that it is possible to generate a solution which is characterized by a single, isolated convective plume. This solution is analogous to the steady magnetohydrodynamic convectons that have previously been found in two-dimensional calculations. These results can be related, in a qualitative sense, to observations of umbral dots.

  11. On two-dimensional flows of compressible fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergman, Stefan

    1945-01-01

    This report is devoted to the study of two-dimensional steady motion of a compressible fluid. It is shown that the complete flow pattern around a closed obstacle cannot be obtained by the method of Chaplygin. In order to overcome this difficulty, a formula for the stream-function of a two-dimensional subsonic flow is derived. The formula involves an arbitrary function of a complex variable and yields all possible subsonic flow patterns of certain types. Conditions are given so that the flow pattern in the physical plane will represent a flow around a closed curve. The formula obtained can be employed for the approximate determination of a subsonic flow around an obstacle. The method can be extended to partially supersonic flows.

  12. (3 + 1)-dimensional framework for leading-order nonconformal anisotropic hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinti, Leonardo

    2015-07-01

    In this work I develop a new framework for anisotropic hydrodynamics that generalizes the leading order of the hydrodynamic expansion to the full (3 + 1)-dimensional anisotropic massive case. Following previous works, my considerations are based on the Boltzmann kinetic equation with the collisional term treated in the relaxation time approximation. The momentum anisotropy is included explicitly in the leading term, allowing for a large difference between the longitudinal and transverse pressures as well as for nontrivial transverse dynamics. Energy and momentum conservation is expressed by the first moment of the Boltzmann equation. The system of equations is closed by using the zeroth and second moments of the Boltzmann equation. The close-to-equilibrium matching with second-order viscous hydrodynamics is demonstrated. In particular, I show that the coupling between shear and bulk pressure corrections, recently proved to be important for an accurate description of momentum anisotropy and bulk viscous dynamics, does not vanish in the close-to-equilibrium limit.

  13. A Remark on the Two-Dimensional Magneto-Hydrodynamics-Alpha System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Kazuo

    2016-09-01

    We study the generalized magneto-hydrodynamics-{α} system in two dimensional space with fractional Laplacians in the dissipative and diffusive terms. We show that the solution pair of velocity and magnetic fields preserves their initial regularity in all cases when the powers add up to one. This settles the global regularity issue in the general case which was remarked by the authors in Zhao and Zhu (Appl Math Lett 29:26-29, 2014) to be a problem.

  14. Unsteady two-dimensional flow of a compressible non-newtonian fluid in a long annular channel caused by the motion of an inside pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Tseitlin, S.D.; Tarshish, M.S.

    1986-02-01

    One of the complex operations in drilling is the lowering and raising of the column of drill pipes, which must be done regularly to replace the drill bit when it becomes dull. This is particularly a problem in deep and superdeep drilling. The authors solve the unsteady, two-dimensional problem of the hydrodynamics of a compressible non-Newtonian fluid connected with the study of the flow in an annular channel caused by the motion of an inside pipe.

  15. Three-dimensional lattice Boltzmann model for compressible flows.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chenghai; Hsu, Andrew T

    2003-07-01

    A three-dimensional compressible lattice Boltzmann model is formulated on a cubic lattice. A very large particle-velocity set is incorporated in order to enable a greater variation in the mean velocity. Meanwhile, the support set of the equilibrium distribution has only six directions. Therefore, this model can efficiently handle flows over a wide range of Mach numbers and capture shock waves. Due to the simple form of the equilibrium distribution, the fourth-order velocity tensors are not involved in the formulation. Unlike the standard lattice Boltzmann model, no special treatment is required for the homogeneity of fourth-order velocity tensors on square lattices. The Navier-Stokes equations were recovered, using the Chapman-Enskog method from the Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook (BGK) lattice Boltzmann equation. The second-order discretization error of the fluctuation velocity in the macroscopic conservation equation was eliminated by means of a modified collision invariant. The model is suitable for both viscous and inviscid compressible flows with or without shocks. Since the present scheme deals only with the equilibrium distribution that depends only on fluid density, velocity, and internal energy, boundary conditions on curved wall are easily implemented by an extrapolation of macroscopic variables. To verify the scheme for inviscid flows, we have successfully simulated a three-dimensional shock-wave propagation in a box and a normal shock of Mach number 10 over a wedge. As an application to viscous flows, we have simulated a flat plate boundary layer flow, flow over a cylinder, and a transonic flow over a NACA0012 airfoil cascade.

  16. Two dimensional hydrodynamic simulation of high pressures induced by high power nanosecond laser-matter interactions under water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Benxin; Shin, Yung C.

    2007-05-01

    In laser shock peening (LSP) under a water-confinement regime, laser-matter interaction near the coating-water interface can induce very high pressures in the order of gigapascals, which can impart compressive residual stresses into metal workpieces to improve fatigue and corrosion properties. For axisymmetric laser spots with finite size, the pressure generation near the water-coating interface is a two dimensional process in nature. This is in particular the case for microscale LSP performed with very small laser spots, which is a very promising technique to improve the reliability performance of microdevices. However, models capable of predicting two dimensional (2D) spatial distributions of the induced pressures near the coating-water interface in LSP have rarely been reported in literature. In this paper, a predictive 2D axisymmetric model is developed by numerically solving the hydrodynamic equations, supplemented with appropriate equations of state of water and the coating material. The model can produce 2D spatial distributions of material responses near the water-coating interface in LSP, and is verified through comparisons with experimental measurements. The model calculation shows that the effect of radial release wave on pressure spatial distributions becomes more significant as the laser spot size decreases, indicating the importance of a 2D model, particularly for microscale LSP.

  17. Two dimensional hydrodynamic simulation of high pressures induced by high power nanosecond laser-matter interactions under water

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Benxin; Shin, Yung C.

    2007-05-15

    In laser shock peening (LSP) under a water-confinement regime, laser-matter interaction near the coating-water interface can induce very high pressures in the order of gigapascals, which can impart compressive residual stresses into metal workpieces to improve fatigue and corrosion properties. For axisymmetric laser spots with finite size, the pressure generation near the water-coating interface is a two dimensional process in nature. This is in particular the case for microscale LSP performed with very small laser spots, which is a very promising technique to improve the reliability performance of microdevices. However, models capable of predicting two dimensional (2D) spatial distributions of the induced pressures near the coating-water interface in LSP have rarely been reported in literature. In this paper, a predictive 2D axisymmetric model is developed by numerically solving the hydrodynamic equations, supplemented with appropriate equations of state of water and the coating material. The model can produce 2D spatial distributions of material responses near the water-coating interface in LSP, and is verified through comparisons with experimental measurements. The model calculation shows that the effect of radial release wave on pressure spatial distributions becomes more significant as the laser spot size decreases, indicating the importance of a 2D model, particularly for microscale LSP.

  18. Three-dimensional simulations of compressible tearing instability

    SciTech Connect

    Landi, Simone; Londrillo, Pasquale; Velli, Marco; Bettarini, Lapo

    2008-01-15

    Three-dimensional numerical simulations of the tearing instability in the framework of compressible and resistive magnetohydrodynamics are presented. Simulations have been performed with a novel Eulerian conservative high order code, including an explicit resistivity, which uses implicit high order numerical schemes having higher spectral resolution than classical schemes. The linear and non linear evolution of the tearing instability has been followed for force-free and pressure-balanced initial equilibrium configurations. Pressure equilibrium configurations are subject to a secondary instability which drives the system toward a quasi two dimensional structure oriented perpendicularly to the initial configuration. The development of secondary instabilities is suppressed by a guide field allowing the coalescence instability to fully develop in the system. Force-free initial configurations follow an intermediate path with respect the previous cases: Strong coalescence of magnetic islands, due to the non linear evolution of the tearing instability, is observed before the system enters in a phase dominated by 3D modes. The histories of the differing initial current-sheet equilibria have counterparts in the energy spectra that, for all three cases, are observed to be strongly anisotropic.

  19. Three dimensional inviscid compressible calculations around axial flow turbine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fourmaux, Antoine; Petot, Bertrand

    1991-12-01

    The application of a three dimensional (3D) method to the prediction of steady inviscid compressible flows in highly loaded stator bladings is presented. The complete set of Euler equations is solved by a finite difference method using a time marching two step Lax-Wendorff algorithm. The treatment of the boundary conditions is based on the use of the characteristic relations. This technique offers a great versatility and allows to prescribe conditions close to the physics of flows encountered in turbomachines. The code was adapted in order to build a 3D design tool able to run in different types of turbine blade geometries. Two types of multidomain structured meshes were tested (H+0+H and H+C). The H+C type of grid was finally choosen for industrial applications. Two applications to turbine nozzles are presented. The first is a low pressure turbine vane with evolutive flow path outer diameter. The results demonstrate the ability to predict flow features that cannot be computed via the classical two dimensional approach. The second is a high pressure inlet guide vane at transonic conditions. The strong radial evolution of pressure distribution and the trailing edge flow pattern are correctly predicted.

  20. Spherical-shell boundaries for two-dimensional compressible convection in a star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratt, J.; Baraffe, I.; Goffrey, T.; Geroux, C.; Viallet, M.; Folini, D.; Constantino, T.; Popov, M.; Walder, R.

    2016-10-01

    Context. Studies of stellar convection typically use a spherical-shell geometry. The radial extent of the shell and the boundary conditions applied are based on the model of the star investigated. We study the impact of different two-dimensional spherical shells on compressible convection. Realistic profiles for density and temperature from an established one-dimensional stellar evolution code are used to produce a model of a large stellar convection zone representative of a young low-mass star, like our sun at 106 years of age. Aims: We analyze how the radial extent of the spherical shell changes the convective dynamics that result in the deep interior of the young sun model, far from the surface. In the near-surface layers, simple small-scale convection develops from the profiles of temperature and density. A central radiative zone below the convection zone provides a lower boundary on the convection zone. The inclusion of either of these physically distinct layers in the spherical shell can potentially affect the characteristics of deep convection. Methods: We perform hydrodynamic implicit large eddy simulations of compressible convection using the MUltidimensional Stellar Implicit Code (MUSIC). Because MUSIC has been designed to use realistic stellar models produced from one-dimensional stellar evolution calculations, MUSIC simulations are capable of seamlessly modeling a whole star. Simulations in two-dimensional spherical shells that have different radial extents are performed over tens or even hundreds of convective turnover times, permitting the collection of well-converged statistics. Results: To measure the impact of the spherical-shell geometry and our treatment of boundaries, we evaluate basic statistics of the convective turnover time, the convective velocity, and the overshooting layer. These quantities are selected for their relevance to one-dimensional stellar evolution calculations, so that our results are focused toward studies exploiting the so

  1. Hydrodynamics for a model of a confined quasi-two-dimensional granular gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brey, J. Javier; Buzón, V.; Maynar, P.; García de Soria, M. I.

    2015-05-01

    The hydrodynamic equations for a model of a confined quasi-two-dimensional gas of smooth inelastic hard spheres are derived from the Boltzmann equation for the model, using a generalization of the Chapman-Enskog method. The heat and momentum fluxes are calculated to Navier-Stokes order, and the associated transport coefficients are explicitly determined as functions of the coefficient of normal restitution and the velocity parameter involved in the definition of the model. Also an Euler transport term contributing to the energy transport equation is considered. This term arises from the gradient expansion of the rate of change of the temperature due to the inelasticity of collisions, and it vanishes for elastic systems. The hydrodynamic equations are particularized for the relevant case of a system in the homogeneous steady state. The relationship with previous works is analyzed.

  2. A 3+1 dimensional viscous hydrodynamic code for relativistic heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpenko, Iu.; Huovinen, P.; Bleicher, M.

    2014-11-01

    We describe the details of 3+1 dimensional relativistic hydrodynamic code for the simulations of quark-gluon/hadron matter expansion in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions. The code solves the equations of relativistic viscous hydrodynamics in the Israel-Stewart framework. With the help of ideal-viscous splitting, we keep the ability to solve the equations of ideal hydrodynamics in the limit of zero viscosities using a Godunov-type algorithm. Milne coordinates are used to treat the predominant expansion in longitudinal (beam) direction effectively. The results are successfully tested against known analytical relativistic inviscid and viscous solutions, as well as against existing 2+1D relativistic viscous code. Catalogue identifier: AETZ_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AETZ_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 13 825 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 92 750 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++. Computer: any with a C++ compiler and the CERN ROOT libraries. Operating system: tested on GNU/Linux Ubuntu 12.04 x64 (gcc 4.6.3), GNU/Linux Ubuntu 13.10 (gcc 4.8.2), Red Hat Linux 6 (gcc 4.4.7). RAM: scales with the number of cells in hydrodynamic grid; 1900 Mbytes for 3D 160×160×100 grid. Classification: 1.5, 4.3, 12. External routines: CERN ROOT (http://root.cern.ch), Gnuplot (http://www.gnuplot.info/) for plotting the results. Nature of problem: relativistic hydrodynamical description of the 3-dimensional quark-gluon/hadron matter expansion in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions. Solution method: finite volume Godunov-type method. Running time: scales with the number of hydrodynamic cells; typical running times on Intel(R) Core(TM) i7-3770 CPU @ 3.40 GHz, single thread mode, 160

  3. Macroinvertebrate response to flow changes in a subalpine stream: predictions from two-dimensional hydrodynamic models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waddle, T.J.; Holmquist, J.G.

    2013-01-01

    Two-dimensional hydrodynamic models are being used increasingly as alternatives to traditional one-dimensional instream flow methodologies for assessing adequacy of flow and associated faunal habitat. Two-dimensional modelling of habitat has focused primarily on fishes, but fish-based assessments may not model benthic macroinvertebrate habitat effectively. We extend two-dimensional techniques to a macroinvertebrate assemblage in a high-elevation stream in the Sierra Nevada (Dana Fork of the Tuolumne River, Yosemite National Park, CA, USA). This stream frequently flows at less than 0.03?m3?s?1 in late summer and is representative of a common water abstraction scenario: maximum water abstraction coinciding with seasonally low flows. We used two-dimensional modelling to predict invertebrate responses to reduced flows that might result from increased abstraction. We collected site-specific field data on the macroinvertebrate assemblage, bed topography and flow conditions and then coupled a two-dimensional hydrodynamic model with macroinvertebrate indices to evaluate habitat across a range of low flows. Macroinvertebrate indices were calculated for the wetted area at each flow. A surrogate flow record based on an adjacent watershed was used to evaluate frequency and duration of low flow events. Using surrogate historical records, we estimated that flow should fall below 0.071?m3?s?1 at least 1?day in 82 of 95?years and below 0.028?m3?s?1 in 48 of 95?years. Invertebrate metric means indicated minor losses in response to modelled discharge reductions, but wetted area decreased substantially. Responses of invertebrates to water abstraction will likely be a function of changing habitat quantity rather than quality.

  4. Development of a Three-Dimensional PSE Code for Compressible Flows: Stability of Three-Dimensional Compressible Boundary Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakumar, P.; Jeyasingham, Samarasingham

    1999-01-01

    A program is developed to investigate the linear stability of three-dimensional compressible boundary layer flows over bodies of revolutions. The problem is formulated as a two dimensional (2D) eigenvalue problem incorporating the meanflow variations in the normal and azimuthal directions. Normal mode solutions are sought in the whole plane rather than in a line normal to the wall as is done in the classical one dimensional (1D) stability theory. The stability characteristics of a supersonic boundary layer over a sharp cone with 50 half-angle at 2 degrees angle of attack is investigated. The 1D eigenvalue computations showed that the most amplified disturbances occur around x(sub 2) = 90 degrees and the azimuthal mode number for the most amplified disturbances range between m = -30 to -40. The frequencies of the most amplified waves are smaller in the middle region where the crossflow dominates the instability than the most amplified frequencies near the windward and leeward planes. The 2D eigenvalue computations showed that due to the variations in the azimuthal direction, the eigenmodes are clustered into isolated confined regions. For some eigenvalues, the eigenfunctions are clustered in two regions. Due to the nonparallel effect in the azimuthal direction, the eigenmodes are clustered into isolated confined regions. For some eigenvalues, the eigenfunctions are clustered in two regions. Due to the nonparallel effect in the azimuthal direction, the most amplified disturbances are shifted to 120 degrees compared to 90 degrees for the parallel theory. It is also observed that the nonparallel amplification rates are smaller than that is obtained from the parallel theory.

  5. The Hydrodynamic Study of the Swimming Gliding: a Two-Dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Marinho, Daniel A.; Barbosa, Tiago M.; Rouboa, Abel I.; Silva, António J.

    2011-01-01

    Nowadays the underwater gliding after the starts and the turns plays a major role in the overall swimming performance. Hence, minimizing hydrodynamic drag during the underwater phases should be a main aim during swimming. Indeed, there are several postures that swimmers can assume during the underwater gliding, although experimental results were not conclusive concerning the best body position to accomplish this aim. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to analyse the effect in hydrodynamic drag forces of using different body positions during gliding through computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methodology. For this purpose, two-dimensional models of the human body in steady flow conditions were studied. Two-dimensional virtual models had been created: (i) a prone position with the arms extended at the front of the body; (ii) a prone position with the arms placed alongside the trunk; (iii) a lateral position with the arms extended at the front and; (iv) a dorsal position with the arms extended at the front. The drag forces were computed between speeds of 1.6 m/s and 2 m/s in a two-dimensional Fluent® analysis. The positions with the arms extended at the front presented lower drag values than the position with the arms aside the trunk. The lateral position was the one in which the drag was lower and seems to be the one that should be adopted during the gliding after starts and turns. PMID:23486656

  6. Interaction of three-dimensional hydrodynamic and thermocapillary instabilities in film flows.

    PubMed

    Scheid, Benoit; Kalliadasis, Serafim; Ruyer-Quil, Christian; Colinet, Pierre

    2008-12-01

    We study three-dimensional wave patterns on the surface of a film flowing down a uniformly heated wall. Our starting point is a model of four evolution equations for the film thickness h , the interfacial temperature theta , and the streamwise and spanwise flow rates, q and p , respectively, obtained by combining a gradient expansion with a weighted residual projection. This model is shown to be robust and accurate in describing the competition between hydrodynamic waves and thermocapillary Marangoni effects for a wide range of parameters. For small Reynolds numbers, i.e., in the "drag-gravity regime," we observe regularly spaced rivulets aligned with the flow and preventing the development of hydrodynamic waves. The wavelength of the developed rivulet structures is found to closely match the one of the most amplified mode predicted by linear theory. For larger Reynolds numbers, i.e., in the "drag-inertia regime," the situation is similar to the isothermal case and no rivulets are observed. Between these two regimes we observe a complex behavior for the hydrodynamic and thermocapillary modes with the presence of rivulets channeling quasi-two-dimensional waves of larger amplitude and phase speed than those observed in isothermal conditions, leading possibly to solitarylike waves. Two subregions are identified depending on the topology of the rivulet structures that can be either "ridgelike" or "groovelike." A regime map is further proposed that highlights the influence of the Reynolds and the Marangoni numbers on the rivulet structures. Interestingly, this map is found to be related to the variations of amplitude and speed of the two-dimensional solitary-wave solutions of the model. Finally, the heat transfer enhancement due to the increase of interfacial area in the presence of rivulet structures is shown to be significant. PMID:19256949

  7. A three-dimensional model of corotating streams in the solar wind. II - Hydrodynamic streams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pizzo, V. J.

    1980-01-01

    Theoretical aspects of corotating solar wind dynamics on a global scale are examined by means of numerical simulations executed with a nonlinear, inviscid, adiabatic, single fluid, three-dimensional hydrodynamic formulation. The factors most strongly affecting stream evolution, namely, the intrinsic correlations among density, temperature, and velocity existing near the source, the amplitude, longitudinal breadth and latitudinal breadth of the stream, and the heliographic latitude of the centroid of the stream, are considered. Calculations indicate that even in the presence of substantial meridional gradients, the latitudinal transport of mass, energy, and momentum by streams appears to have little impact on the overall evolution of the structure.

  8. High-energy particle transport in three-dimensional hydrodynamic models of colliding-wind binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Reitberger, K.; Kissmann, R.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Dubus, G.

    2014-02-20

    Massive stars in binary systems (such as WR 140, WR 147, or η Carinae) have long been regarded as potential sources of high-energy γ-rays. The emission is thought to arise in the region where the stellar winds collide and produce relativistic particles that subsequently might be able to emit γ-rays. Detailed numerical hydrodynamic simulations have already offered insight into the complex dynamics of the wind collision region (WCR), while independent analytical studies, albeit with simplified descriptions of the WCR, have shed light on the spectra of charged particles. In this paper, we describe a combination of these two approaches. We present a three-dimensional hydrodynamical model for colliding stellar winds and compute spectral energy distributions of relativistic particles for the resulting structure of the WCR. The hydrodynamic part of our model incorporates the line-driven acceleration of the winds, gravity, orbital motion, and the radiative cooling of the shocked plasma. In our treatment of charged particles, we consider diffusive shock acceleration in the WCR and the subsequent cooling via inverse Compton losses (including Klein-Nishina effects), bremsstrahlung, collisions, and other energy loss mechanisms.

  9. Effect of Hydrodynamic Interactions on Self-Diffusion of Quasi-Two-Dimensional Colloidal Hard Spheres.

    PubMed

    Thorneywork, Alice L; Rozas, Roberto E; Dullens, Roel P A; Horbach, Jürgen

    2015-12-31

    We compare experimental results from a quasi-two-dimensional colloidal hard sphere fluid to a Monte Carlo simulation of hard disks with small particle displacements. The experimental short-time self-diffusion coefficient D(S) scaled by the diffusion coefficient at infinite dilution, D(0), strongly depends on the area fraction, pointing to significant hydrodynamic interactions at short times in the experiment, which are absent in the simulation. In contrast, the area fraction dependence of the experimental long-time self-diffusion coefficient D(L)/D(0) is in quantitative agreement with D(L)/D(0) obtained from the simulation. This indicates that the reduction in the particle mobility at short times due to hydrodynamic interactions does not lead to a proportional reduction in the long-time self-diffusion coefficient. Furthermore, the quantitative agreement between experiment and simulation at long times indicates that hydrodynamic interactions effectively do not affect the dependence of D(L)/D(0) on the area fraction. In light of this, we discuss the link between structure and long-time self-diffusion in terms of a configurational excess entropy and do not find a simple exponential relation between these quantities for all fluid area fractions. PMID:26765032

  10. High-energy Particle Transport in Three-dimensional Hydrodynamic Models of Colliding-wind Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reitberger, K.; Kissmann, R.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Dubus, G.

    2014-02-01

    Massive stars in binary systems (such as WR 140, WR 147, or η Carinae) have long been regarded as potential sources of high-energy γ-rays. The emission is thought to arise in the region where the stellar winds collide and produce relativistic particles that subsequently might be able to emit γ-rays. Detailed numerical hydrodynamic simulations have already offered insight into the complex dynamics of the wind collision region (WCR), while independent analytical studies, albeit with simplified descriptions of the WCR, have shed light on the spectra of charged particles. In this paper, we describe a combination of these two approaches. We present a three-dimensional hydrodynamical model for colliding stellar winds and compute spectral energy distributions of relativistic particles for the resulting structure of the WCR. The hydrodynamic part of our model incorporates the line-driven acceleration of the winds, gravity, orbital motion, and the radiative cooling of the shocked plasma. In our treatment of charged particles, we consider diffusive shock acceleration in the WCR and the subsequent cooling via inverse Compton losses (including Klein-Nishina effects), bremsstrahlung, collisions, and other energy loss mechanisms.

  11. Three-dimensional simulations of dilute and concentrated suspensions using smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez-Quesada, Adolfo; Bian, Xin; Ellero, Marco

    2016-04-01

    A three-dimensional model for a suspension of rigid spherical particles in a Newtonian fluid is presented. The solvent is modeled with smoothed particle hydrodynamics method, which takes into account exactly the long-range multi-body hydrodynamic interactions between suspended spheres. Short-range lubrication forces which are necessary to simulate concentrated suspensions, are introduced pair-wisely based on the analytical solution of Stokes equations for approaching/departing objects. Given that lubrication is singular at vanishing solid particle separations, an implicit splitting integration scheme is used to obtain accurate results and at the same time to avoid prohibitively small simulation time steps. Hydrodynamic interactions between solid particles, at both long-range and short-range limits, are verified against theory in the case of two approaching spheres in a quiescent medium and under bulk shear flow, where good agreements are obtained. Finally, numerical results for the suspension viscosity of a many-particle system are shown and compared with analytical solutions available in the dilute and semi-dilute case as well as with previous numerical results obtained in the concentrated limit.

  12. One-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamic simulations of imploding spherical plasma liners with detailed equation-of-state modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, J. S.; Hsu, S. C.; Golovkin, I. E.; MacFarlane, J. J.; Cassibry, J. T.

    2012-10-15

    This work extends the one-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamic imploding spherical argon plasma liner simulations of Awe et al.[Phys. Plasmas 18, 072705 (2011)] by using a detailed tabular equation-of-state (EOS) model, whereas Awe et al. used a polytropic EOS model. Results using the tabular EOS model give lower stagnation pressures by a factor of 3.9-8.6 and lower peak ion temperatures compared to the polytropic EOS results. Both local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) and non-LTE EOS models were used in this work, giving similar results on stagnation pressure. The lower stagnation pressures using a tabular EOS model are attributed to a reduction in the liner's ability to compress arising from the energy sink introduced by ionization and electron excitation, which are not accounted for in a polytropic EOS model. Variation of the plasma liner species for the same initial liner geometry, mass density, and velocity was also explored using the LTE tabular EOS model, showing that the highest stagnation pressure is achieved with the highest atomic mass species for the constraints imposed.

  13. Three-dimensional Hybrid Continuum-Atomistic Simulations for Multiscale Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Wijesinghe, S; Hornung, R; Garcia, A; Hadjiconstantinou, N

    2004-04-15

    We present an adaptive mesh and algorithmic refinement (AMAR) scheme for modeling multi-scale hydrodynamics. The AMAR approach extends standard conservative adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) algorithms by providing a robust flux-based method for coupling an atomistic fluid representation to a continuum model. The atomistic model is applied locally in regions where the continuum description is invalid or inaccurate, such as near strong flow gradients and at fluid interfaces, or when the continuum grid is refined to the molecular scale. The need for such ''hybrid'' methods arises from the fact that hydrodynamics modeled by continuum representations are often under-resolved or inaccurate while solutions generated using molecular resolution globally are not feasible. In the implementation described herein, Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) provides an atomistic description of the flow and the compressible two-fluid Euler equations serve as our continuum-scale model. The AMR methodology provides local grid refinement while the algorithm refinement feature allows the transition to DSMC where needed. The continuum and atomistic representations are coupled by matching fluxes at the continuum-atomistic interfaces and by proper averaging and interpolation of data between scales. Our AMAR application code is implemented in C++ and is built upon the SAMRAI (Structured Adaptive Mesh Refinement Application Infrastructure) framework developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. SAMRAI provides the parallel adaptive gridding algorithm and enables the coupling between the continuum and atomistic methods.

  14. Implications for the electron distribution from the stationary hydrodynamic model of a one-dimensional plasma expansion into vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiefer, Thomas; Schlegel, Theodor

    2012-10-01

    It is shown that the hydrodynamic model of a one-dimensional collisionless plasma expansion is contained in the kinetic description as a special case. This belongs to a specific choice for the electron distribution function. Moreover, the consequences of the use of the hydrodynamic approach regarding the temporal evolution of the electron phase space density are investigated. It turns out that only the case of a hydrodynamic description with the adiabatic constant κ =3 is physically self-consistent. Numerical simulations confirm this argumentation. The analysis for the case κ =3 is extended to the kinetics of a relativistic electron gas.

  15. Implications for the electron distribution from the stationary hydrodynamic model of a one-dimensional plasma expansion into vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Kiefer, Thomas; Schlegel, Theodor

    2012-10-15

    It is shown that the hydrodynamic model of a one-dimensional collisionless plasma expansion is contained in the kinetic description as a special case. This belongs to a specific choice for the electron distribution function. Moreover, the consequences of the use of the hydrodynamic approach regarding the temporal evolution of the electron phase space density are investigated. It turns out that only the case of a hydrodynamic description with the adiabatic constant {kappa}=3 is physically self-consistent. Numerical simulations confirm this argumentation. The analysis for the case {kappa}=3 is extended to the kinetics of a relativistic electron gas.

  16. Shape-Controlled Synthesis of Hybrid Nanomaterials via Three-Dimensional Hydrodynamic Focusing

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Shape-controlled synthesis of nanomaterials through a simple, continuous, and low-cost method is essential to nanomaterials research toward practical applications. Hydrodynamic focusing, with its advantages of simplicity, low-cost, and precise control over reaction conditions, has been used for nanomaterial synthesis. While most studies have focused on improving the uniformity and size control, few have addressed the potential of tuning the shape of the synthesized nanomaterials. Here we demonstrate a facile method to synthesize hybrid materials by three-dimensional hydrodynamic focusing (3D-HF). While keeping the flow rates of the reagents constant and changing only the flow rate of the buffer solution, the molar ratio of two reactants (i.e., tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) and HAuCl4) within the reaction zone varies. The synthesized TTF–Au hybrid materials possess very different and predictable morphologies. The reaction conditions at different buffer flow rates are studied through computational simulation, and the formation mechanisms of different structures are discussed. This simple one-step method to achieve continuous shape-tunable synthesis highlights the potential of 3D-HF in nanomaterials research. PMID:25268035

  17. Development and Calibration of Two-Dimensional Hydrodynamic Model of the Tanana River near Tok, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Conaway, Jeffrey S.; Moran, Edward H.

    2004-01-01

    Bathymetric and hydraulic data were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey on the Tanana River in proximity to Alaska Department of Transportation and Public Facilities' bridge number 505 at mile 80.5 of the Alaska Highway. Data were collected from August 7-9, 2002, over an approximate 5,000- foot reach of the river. These data were combined with topographic data provided by Alaska Department of Transportation and Public Facilities to generate a two-dimensional hydrodynamic model. The hydrodynamic model was calibrated with water-surface elevations, flow velocities, and flow directions collected at a discharge of 25,600 cubic feet per second. The calibrated model was then used for a simulation of the 100-year recurrence interval discharge of 51,900 cubic feet per second. The existing bridge piers were removed from the model geometry in a second simulation to model the hydraulic conditions in the channel without the piers' influence. The water-surface elevations, flow velocities, and flow directions from these simulations can be used to evaluate the influence of the piers on flow hydraulics and will assist the Alaska Department of Transportation and Public Facilities in the design of a replacement bridge.

  18. Time-dependent two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics of accreting matter onto highly magnetized neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, R.I. . Dept. of Astronomy Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA ); Arons, J. . Dept. of Astronomy California Univ., Berkeley, CA . Dept. of Physics)

    1990-11-20

    We present for the first time, the self-consistent solution of the two-dimensional, time-dependent equations of radiation-hydrodynamics governing the accretion of matter onto the highly magnetized polar caps of luminous x-ray pulsars. The calculations show a structure in the accretion column very different from previous one-zone uniform models. We have included all the relevant magnetic field corrections to both the hydrodynamics and the radiative transport. We include a new theory for the diffusion and advection of both radiation energy density and photon number density. For initially uniformly accreting models with super-Eddington flows, we have uncovered evidence of strong radiation-driven outflowing optically thin radiation filled regions of the accretion column embedded in optically-thick inflowing plasma. We follow the evolution of these photon bubbles for several dynamical timescales. The development of these photon bubbles'' indicates growth times on the order of a millisecond and show fluctuations on sub-millisecond timescales in agreement with a linear stability analysis. The photon bubbles are a consequence of the effect of radiative heat flux on the internal gravity waves in the strongly magnetized atmosphere and may result in observable fluctuations in the emitted luminosity leading to luminosity dependent changes in the pulse profile. This may provide important new diagnostics for conditions in accreting x-ray pulsars. 19 refs., 13 figs.

  19. Time-dependent two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics of accreting matter onto highly magnetized neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, R.I. . Dept. of Astronomy Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA California Univ., Los Angeles, CA . Inst. of Geophysics and Planetary Physics); Arons, J. . Dept. of Astronomy California Univ., Los Angeles, CA . Inst. of Geophysics and Planetary Physics CEA Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, 91 -

    1989-11-24

    We present for the first time, the self-consistent solution of the two-dimensional, time-dependent equations of radiation-hydrodynamics governing the accretion of matter onto the highly magnetized polar caps of luminous x-ray pulsars. The calculations show a structure in the accretion column very different from previous one-zone uniform models. We have included all the relevant magnetic field corrections to both the hydrodynamics and the radiative transport. We include a new theory for the diffusion and advection of both radiation energy density and photon number density. For initially uniformly accreting models with super-Eddington flows, we have uncovered evidence of strong radiation-driven outflowing optically thin radiation filled regions of the accretion column embedded in optically-thick inflowing plasma. The development of these photon bubbles'' have growth times on the order of a millisecond and show fluctuations on sub-millisecond timescales. The photon bubbles are likely to be a consequence of convective over-stability and may result in observable fluctuations in the emitted luminosity leading to luminosity dependent changes in the pulse profile. This may provide important new diagnostics for conditions in accreting x-ray pulsars. 13 refs., 18 figs.

  20. (1 + 1) dimensional hydrodynamics for high-energy heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satarov, L. M.; Mishustin, I. N.; Merdeev, A. V.; Stöcker, H.

    2007-10-01

    A (1 + 1)-dimensional hydrodynamical model in the light-cone coordinates is used to describe central heavy-ion collisions at ultrarelativistic bombarding energies. Deviations from Bjorken scaling are taken into account by choosing finite-size profiles for the initial energy density. The sensitivity of fluid-dynamical evolution to the equation of state and the parameters of initial state are investigated. Experimental constraints on the total energy of produced particles are used to reduce the number of model parameters. Spectra of secondary particles are calculated under the assumption that the transition from the hydrodynamical stage to the collisionless expansion of matter occurs at a certain freeze-out temperature. An important role of resonances in the formation of observed hadronic spectra is demonstrated. The calculated rapidity distributions of pions, kaons, and antiprotons in central Au + Au collisions at √s NN = 200 GeV are compared with experimental data of the BRAHMS Collaboration. Parameters of the initial state are reconstructed for different choices of the equation of state. The best fit of these data is obtained for a soft equation of state and Gaussian-like initial profiles of the energy density, intermediate between the Landau and Bjorken limits.

  1. Compression and Progressive Retrieval of Multi-Dimensional Sensor Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorkowski, P.; Brinkhoff, T.

    2016-06-01

    Since the emergence of sensor data streams, increasing amounts of observations have to be transmitted, stored and retrieved. Performing these tasks at the granularity of single points would mean an inappropriate waste of resources. Thus, we propose a concept that performs a partitioning of observations by spatial, temporal or other criteria (or a combination of them) into data segments. We exploit the resulting proximity (according to the partitioning dimension(s)) within each data segment for compression and efficient data retrieval. While in principle allowing lossless compression, it can also be used for progressive transmission with increasing accuracy wherever incremental data transfer is reasonable. In a first feasibility study, we apply the proposed method to a dataset of ARGO drifting buoys covering large spatio-temporal regions of the world's oceans and compare the achieved compression ratio to other formats.

  2. Cascade of kinetic energy in three-dimensional compressible turbulence.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianchun; Yang, Yantao; Shi, Yipeng; Xiao, Zuoli; He, X T; Chen, Shiyi

    2013-05-24

    The conservative cascade of kinetic energy is established using both Fourier analysis and a new exact physical-space flux relation in a simulated compressible turbulence. The subgrid scale (SGS) kinetic energy flux of the compressive mode is found to be significantly larger than that of the solenoidal mode in the inertial range, which is the main physical origin for the occurrence of Kolmogorov's -5/3 scaling of the energy spectrum in compressible turbulence. The perfect antiparallel alignment between the large-scale strain and the SGS stress leads to highly efficient kinetic energy transfer in shock regions, which is a distinctive feature of shock structures in comparison with vortex structures. The rescaled probability distribution functions of SGS kinetic energy flux collapse in the inertial range, indicating a statistical self-similarity of kinetic energy cascades.

  3. A variational principle for compressible fluid mechanics: Discussion of the multi-dimensional theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prozan, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    The variational principle for compressible fluid mechanics previously introduced is extended to two dimensional flow. The analysis is stable, exactly conservative, adaptable to coarse or fine grids, and very fast. Solutions for two dimensional problems are included. The excellent behavior and results lend further credence to the variational concept and its applicability to the numerical analysis of complex flow fields.

  4. A two-dimensional Segmented Boundary Algorithm for complex moving solid boundaries in Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khorasanizade, Sh.; Sousa, J. M. M.

    2016-03-01

    A Segmented Boundary Algorithm (SBA) is proposed to deal with complex boundaries and moving bodies in Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH). Boundaries are formed in this algorithm with chains of lines obtained from the decomposition of two-dimensional objects, based on simple line geometry. Various two-dimensional, viscous fluid flow cases have been studied here using a truly incompressible SPH method with the aim of assessing the capabilities of the SBA. Firstly, the flow over a stationary circular cylinder in a plane channel was analyzed at steady and unsteady regimes, for a single value of blockage ratio. Subsequently, the flow produced by a moving circular cylinder with a prescribed acceleration inside a plane channel was investigated as well. Next, the simulation of the flow generated by the impulsive start of a flat plate, again inside a plane channel, has been carried out. This was followed by the study of confined sedimentation of an elliptic body subjected to gravity, for various density ratios. The set of test cases was completed with the simulation of periodic flow around a sunflower-shaped object. Extensive comparisons of the results obtained here with published data have demonstrated the accuracy and effectiveness of the proposed algorithms, namely in cases involving complex geometries and moving bodies.

  5. Impacts of Rotation on Three-dimensional Hydrodynamics of Core-collapse Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Ko; Kuroda, Takami; Takiwaki, Tomoya; Kotake, Kei

    2014-09-01

    We perform a series of simplified numerical experiments to explore how rotation impacts the three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamics of core-collapse supernovae. For our systematic study, we employ a light-bulb scheme to trigger explosions and a three-flavor neutrino leakage scheme to treat deleptonization effects and neutrino losses from the proto-neutron-star interior. Using a 15 M ⊙ progenitor, we compute 30 models in 3D with a wide variety of initial angular momentum and light-bulb neutrino luminosity. We find that the rotation can help the onset of neutrino-driven explosions for the models in which the initial angular momentum is matched to that obtained in recent stellar evolutionary calculations (~0.3-3 rad s-1 at the center). For the models with larger initial angular momentum, the shock surface deforms to be more oblate due to larger centrifugal force. This not only makes the gain region more concentrated around the equatorial plane, but also makes the mass larger in the gain region. As a result, buoyant bubbles tend to be coherently formed and rise in the equatorial region, which pushes the revived shock toward ever larger radii until a global explosion is triggered. We find that these are the main reasons that the preferred direction of the explosion in 3D rotating models is often perpendicular to the spin axis, which is in sharp contrast to the polar explosions around the axis that were obtained in previous two-dimensional simulations.

  6. Efficient three-dimensional reconstruction of aquatic vegetation geometry: Estimating morphological parameters influencing hydrodynamic drag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liénard, Jean; Lynn, Kendra; Strigul, Nikolay; Norris, Benjamin K.; Gatziolis, Demetrios; Mullarney, Julia C.; Bryan, Karin, R.; Henderson, Stephen M.

    2016-09-01

    Aquatic vegetation can shelter coastlines from energetic waves and tidal currents, sometimes enabling accretion of fine sediments. Simulation of flow and sediment transport within submerged canopies requires quantification of vegetation geometry. However, field surveys used to determine vegetation geometry can be limited by the time required to obtain conventional caliper and ruler measurements. Building on recent progress in photogrammetry and computer vision, we present a method for reconstructing three-dimensional canopy geometry. The method was used to survey a dense canopy of aerial mangrove roots, called pneumatophores, in Vietnam's Mekong River Delta. Photogrammetric estimation of geometry required 1) taking numerous photographs at low tide from multiple viewpoints around 1 m2 quadrats, 2) computing relative camera locations and orientations by triangulation of key features present in multiple images and reconstructing a dense 3D point cloud, and 3) extracting pneumatophore locations and diameters from the point cloud data. Step 3) was accomplished by a new 'sector-slice' algorithm, yielding geometric parameters every 5 mm along a vertical profile. Photogrammetric analysis was compared with manual caliper measurements. In all 5 quadrats considered, agreement was found between manual and photogrammetric estimates of stem number, and of number × mean diameter, which is a key parameter appearing in hydrodynamic models. In two quadrats, pneumatophores were encrusted with numerous barnacles, generating a complex geometry not resolved by hand measurements. In remaining cases, moderate agreement between manual and photogrammetric estimates of stem diameter and solid volume fraction was found. By substantially reducing measurement time in the field while capturing in greater detail the 3D structure, photogrammetry has potential to improve input to hydrodynamic models, particularly for simulations of flow through large-scale, heterogenous canopies.

  7. Nonsteady, one-dimensional, internal, compressible flows - Theory and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kentfield, John A. C.

    The present treatment of nonsteady compressible internal flows gives attention to practical applications of this theory. A generalized method-of-characteristics as applied to 1D nonsteady internal flows is first given, followed by the various boundary conditions needed for handling practical problems. Families of devices treated encompass pressure-exchangers, pulse combustors, induction and exhaust-system tuning, and such interesting nonsteady flow devices as thrust augmentors and detonation-wave combustors.

  8. Gaseous Laser Targets and Optical Dignostics for Studying Compressible Turbulent Hydrodynamic Instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, M J; Hansen, J; Miles, A R; Froula, D; Gregori, G; Glenzer, S; Edens, A; Dittmire, T

    2005-02-08

    The possibility of studying compressible turbulent flows using gas targets driven by high power lasers and diagnosed with optical techniques is investigated. The potential advantage over typical laser experiments that use solid targets and x-ray diagnostics is more detailed information over a larger range of spatial scales. An experimental system is described to study shock - jet interactions at high Mach number. This consists of a mini-chamber full of nitrogen at a pressure {approx} 1 atms. The mini-chamber is situated inside a much larger vacuum chamber. An intense laser pulse ({approx}100J in {approx} 5ns) is focused on to a thin {approx} 0.3{micro}m thick silicon nitride window at one end of the mini-chamber. The window acts both as a vacuum barrier, and laser entrance hole. The ''explosion'' caused by the deposition of the laser energy just inside the window drives a strong blast wave out into the nitrogen atmosphere. The spherical shock expands and interacts with a jet of xenon introduced though the top of the mini-chamber. The Mach number of the interaction is controlled by the separation of the jet from the explosion. The resulting flow is visualized using an optical schlieren system using a pulsed laser source at a wavelength of 0.53 {micro}m. The technical path leading up to the design of this experiment is presented, and future prospects briefly considered. Lack of laser time in the final year of the project severely limited experimental results obtained using the new apparatus.

  9. MULTI2D - a computer code for two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramis, R.; Meyer-ter-Vehn, J.; Ramírez, J.

    2009-06-01

    required. Nature of problem: In inertial confinement fusion and related experiments with lasers and particle beams, energy transport by thermal radiation becomes important. Under these conditions, the radiation field strongly interacts with the hydrodynamic motion through emission and absorption processes. Solution method: The equations of radiation transfer coupled with Lagrangian hydrodynamics, heat diffusion and beam tracing (laser or ions) are solved, in two-dimensional axial-symmetric geometry ( R-Z coordinates) using a fractional step scheme. Radiation transfer is solved with angular resolution. Matter properties are either interpolated from tables (equations-of-state and opacities) or computed by user routines (conductivities and beam attenuation). Restrictions: The code has been designed for typical conditions prevailing in inertial confinement fusion (ns time scale, matter states close to local thermodynamical equilibrium, negligible radiation pressure, …). Although a wider range of situations can be treated, extrapolations to regions beyond this design range need special care. Unusual features: A special computer language, called r94, is used at top levels of the code. These parts have to be converted to standard C by a translation program (supplied as part of the package). Due to the complexity of code (hydro-code, grid generation, user interface, graphic post-processor, translator program, installation scripts) extensive manuals are supplied as part of the package. Running time: 567 seconds for the example supplied.

  10. Hydrodynamic and Nonhydrodynamic Behavior of Layer-Compression Modulus B at the Nematic-Smectic- A Phase Transition in 8 OCB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinoty, P.; Gallani, J. L.; Collin, D.

    1998-07-01

    We present dynamic compression experiments which show that layer-compression modulus B does not exhibit dispersion in the 100 Hz-1 kHz domain and varies with temperature according to a simple power law over four decades. These results indicate that the saturation effect predicted by Nelson and Toner does not exist for this compound, and that the thermal variation of B determined at higher frequencies by a second-sound technique is not hydrodynamic, contrary to what is claimed. We show that it is affected by two relaxation mechanisms.

  11. Volumetric imaging of shark tail hydrodynamics reveals a three-dimensional dual-ring vortex wake structure

    PubMed Central

    Flammang, Brooke E.; Lauder, George V.; Troolin, Daniel R.; Strand, Tyson

    2011-01-01

    Understanding how moving organisms generate locomotor forces is fundamental to the analysis of aerodynamic and hydrodynamic flow patterns that are generated during body and appendage oscillation. In the past, this has been accomplished using two-dimensional planar techniques that require reconstruction of three-dimensional flow patterns. We have applied a new, fully three-dimensional, volumetric imaging technique that allows instantaneous capture of wake flow patterns, to a classic problem in functional vertebrate biology: the function of the asymmetrical (heterocercal) tail of swimming sharks to capture the vorticity field within the volume swept by the tail. These data were used to test a previous three-dimensional reconstruction of the shark vortex wake estimated from two-dimensional flow analyses, and show that the volumetric approach reveals a different vortex wake not previously reconstructed from two-dimensional slices. The hydrodynamic wake consists of one set of dual-linked vortex rings produced per half tail beat. In addition, we use a simple passive shark-tail model under robotic control to show that the three-dimensional wake flows of the robotic tail differ from the active tail motion of a live shark, suggesting that active control of kinematics and tail stiffness plays a substantial role in the production of wake vortical patterns. PMID:21543357

  12. Volumetric imaging of shark tail hydrodynamics reveals a three-dimensional dual-ring vortex wake structure.

    PubMed

    Flammang, Brooke E; Lauder, George V; Troolin, Daniel R; Strand, Tyson

    2011-12-22

    Understanding how moving organisms generate locomotor forces is fundamental to the analysis of aerodynamic and hydrodynamic flow patterns that are generated during body and appendage oscillation. In the past, this has been accomplished using two-dimensional planar techniques that require reconstruction of three-dimensional flow patterns. We have applied a new, fully three-dimensional, volumetric imaging technique that allows instantaneous capture of wake flow patterns, to a classic problem in functional vertebrate biology: the function of the asymmetrical (heterocercal) tail of swimming sharks to capture the vorticity field within the volume swept by the tail. These data were used to test a previous three-dimensional reconstruction of the shark vortex wake estimated from two-dimensional flow analyses, and show that the volumetric approach reveals a different vortex wake not previously reconstructed from two-dimensional slices. The hydrodynamic wake consists of one set of dual-linked vortex rings produced per half tail beat. In addition, we use a simple passive shark-tail model under robotic control to show that the three-dimensional wake flows of the robotic tail differ from the active tail motion of a live shark, suggesting that active control of kinematics and tail stiffness plays a substantial role in the production of wake vortical patterns.

  13. Three dimensional hydrodynamic calculations with adaptive mesh refinement of the evolution of Rayleigh Taylor and Richtmyer Meshkov instabilities in converging geometry: Multi-mode perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, R.I. |; Bell, J.; Pember, R.; Kelleher, T.

    1993-04-01

    The authors present results for high resolution hydrodynamic calculations of the growth and development of instabilities in shock driven imploding spherical geometries in both 2D and 3D. They solve the Eulerian equations of hydrodynamics with a high order Godunov approach using local adaptive mesh refinement to study the temporal and spatial development of the turbulent mixing layer resulting from both Richtmyer Meshkov and Rayleigh Taylor instabilities. The use of a high resolution Eulerian discretization with adaptive mesh refinement permits them to study the detailed three-dimensional growth of multi-mode perturbations far into the non-linear regime for converging geometries. They discuss convergence properties of the simulations by calculating global properties of the flow. They discuss the time evolution of the turbulent mixing layer and compare its development to a simple theory for a turbulent mix model in spherical geometry based on Plesset`s equation. Their 3D calculations show that the constant found in the planar incompressible experiments of Read and Young`s may not be universal for converging compressible flow. They show the 3D time trace of transitional onset to a mixing state using the temporal evolution of volume rendered imaging. Their preliminary results suggest that the turbulent mixing layer loses memory of its initial perturbations for classical Richtmyer Meshkov and Rayleigh Taylor instabilities in spherically imploding shells. They discuss the time evolution of mixed volume fraction and the role of vorticity in converging 3D flows in enhancing the growth of a turbulent mixing layer.

  14. Galactic scale gas flows in colliding galaxies: 3-dimensional, N-body/hydrodynamics experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamb, Susan A.; Gerber, Richard A.; Balsara, Dinshaw S.

    1994-01-01

    We present some results from three dimensional computer simulations of collisions between models of equal mass galaxies, one of which is a rotating, disk galaxy containing both gas and stars and the other is an elliptical containing stars only. We use fully self consistent models in which the halo mass is 2.5 times that of the disk. In the experiments we have varied the impact parameter between zero (head on) and 0.9R (where R is the radius of the disk), for impacts perpendicular to the disk plane. The calculations were performed on a Cray 2 computer using a combined N-body/smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH) program. The results show the development of complicated flows and shock structures in the direction perpendicular to the plane of the disk and the propagation outwards of a density wave in both the stars and the gas. The collisional nature of the gas results in a sharper ring than obtained for the star particles, and the development of high volume densities and shocks.

  15. Field evaluation of a two-dimensional hydrodynamic model near boulders for habitat calculation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waddle, Terry

    2009-01-01

    Two-dimensional hydrodynamic models are now widely used in aquatic habitat studies. To test the sensitivity of calculated habitat outcomes to limitations of such a model and of typical field data, bathmetry, depth and velocity data were collected for three discharges in the vicinity of two large boulders in the South Platte River (Colorado) and used in the River2D model. Simulated depth and velocity were compared with observed values at 204 locations and the differences in habitat numbers produced by observed and simulated conditions were calculated. The bulk of the differences between simulated and observed depth and velocity values were found to lie within the likely error of measurement. However, the effect of flow simulation outliers on potential habitat outcomes must be considered when using 2D models for habitat simulation. Furthermore, the shape of the habitat suitability relation can influence the effects of simulation errors. Habitat relations with steep slopes in the velocity ranges found in similar study areas are expected to be sensitive to the magnitude of error found here. Comparison of habitat values derived from simulated and observed depth and velocity revealed a small tendency to under-predict habitat values.

  16. Three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of the combustion of a neutron star into a quark star

    SciTech Connect

    Herzog, Matthias; Roepke, Friedrich K.

    2011-10-15

    We present three-dimensional numerical simulations of turbulent combustion converting a neutron star into a quark star. Hadronic matter, described by a microphysical finite-temperature equation of state, is converted into strange quark matter. We assume this phase, represented by a bag-model equation of state, to be absolutely stable. Following the example of thermonuclear burning in white dwarfs leading to type Ia supernovae, we treat the conversion process as a potentially turbulent deflagration. Solving the nonrelativistic Euler equations using established numerical methods we conduct large eddy simulations including an elaborate subgrid scale model, while the propagation of the conversion front is modeled with a level-set method. Our results show that for large parts of the parameter space the conversion becomes turbulent and therefore significantly faster than in the laminar case. Despite assuming absolutely stable strange quark matter, in our hydrodynamic approximation an outer layer remains in the hadronic phase, because the conversion front stops when it reaches conditions under which the combustion is no longer exothermic.

  17. Hydrodynamic instability experiments with three-dimensional modulations at the National Ignition Facility

    DOE PAGES

    Smalyuk, V. A.; Weber, S. V.; Casey, D. T.; Clark, D. S.; Field, J. E.; Haan, S. W.; Hamza, A. V.; Hoover, D. E.; Landen, O. L.; Nikroo, A.; et al

    2015-06-18

    The first hydrodynamic instability growth measurements with three-dimensional (3D) surface-roughness modulations were performed on CH shell spherical implosions at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [G. H. Miller, E. I. Moses, and C. R. Wuest, Opt. Eng. 43, 2841 (2004)]. The initial capsule outer-surface amplitudes were increased approximately four times, compared with the standard specifications, to increase the signal-to-noise ratio, helping to qualify a technique for measuring small 3D modulations. The instability growth measurements were performed using x-ray through-foil radiography based on time-resolved pinhole imaging. Averaging over 15 similar images significantly increased the signal-to-noise ratio, making possible a comparison with 3Dmore » simulations. At a convergence ratio of ~2.4, the measured modulation levels were ~3 times larger than those simulated based on the growth of the known imposed initial surface modulations. Several hypotheses are discussed, including increased instability growth due to modulations of the oxygen content in the bulk of the capsule. In conclusion, future experiments will be focused on measurements with standard 3D ‘native-roughness’ capsules as well as with deliberately imposed oxygen modulations.« less

  18. Hydrodynamic instability experiments with three-dimensional modulations at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Smalyuk, V. A.; Weber, S. V.; Casey, D. T.; Clark, D. S.; Field, J. E.; Haan, S. W.; Hamza, A. V.; Hoover, D. E.; Landen, O. L.; Nikroo, A.; Robey, H. F.; Weber, C. R.

    2015-06-18

    The first hydrodynamic instability growth measurements with three-dimensional (3D) surface-roughness modulations were performed on CH shell spherical implosions at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [G. H. Miller, E. I. Moses, and C. R. Wuest, Opt. Eng. 43, 2841 (2004)]. The initial capsule outer-surface amplitudes were increased approximately four times, compared with the standard specifications, to increase the signal-to-noise ratio, helping to qualify a technique for measuring small 3D modulations. The instability growth measurements were performed using x-ray through-foil radiography based on time-resolved pinhole imaging. Averaging over 15 similar images significantly increased the signal-to-noise ratio, making possible a comparison with 3D simulations. At a convergence ratio of ~2.4, the measured modulation levels were ~3 times larger than those simulated based on the growth of the known imposed initial surface modulations. Several hypotheses are discussed, including increased instability growth due to modulations of the oxygen content in the bulk of the capsule. In conclusion, future experiments will be focused on measurements with standard 3D ‘native-roughness’ capsules as well as with deliberately imposed oxygen modulations.

  19. Anisotropic characteristics of the kraichnan direct cascade in two-dimensional hydrodynamic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, E. A.; Sereshchenko, E. V.

    2015-12-01

    The statistical characteristics of the Kraichnan direct cascade for two-dimensional hydrodynamic turbulence are numerically studied (with spatial resolution 8192 × 8192) in the presence of pumping and viscous-like damping. It is shown that quasi-shocks of vorticity and their Fourier partnerships in the form of jets introduce an essential influence in turbulence leading to strong angular dependencies for correlation functions. The energy distribution as a function of modulus k for each angle in the inertial interval has the Kraichnan behavior, ~ k -4, and simultaneously a strong dependence on angles. However, angle average provides with a high accuracy the Kraichnan turbulence spectrum E k = C Kη2/3k-3, where η is the enstrophy flux and the Kraichnan constant C K ≃ 1.3, in correspondence with the previous simulations. Familiar situation takes place for third-order velocity structure function S 3 L which, as for the isotropic turbulence, gives the same scaling with respect to the separation length R and η, S 3 L = C 3η R 3, but the average over the angles and time differs from its isotropic value.

  20. Effects of using two- versus three-dimensional computational modeling of fluidized beds Part I, hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Nan; Battaglia, Francine; Pannala, Sreekanth

    2008-01-01

    Simulations of fluidized beds are performed to study and determine the effect on the use of coordinate systems and geometrical configurations to model fluidized bed reactors. Computational fluid dynamics is employed for an Eulerian-Eulerian model, which represents each phase as an interspersed continuum. The transport equation for granular temperature is solved and a hyperbolic tangent function is used to provide a smooth transition between the plastic and viscous regimes for the solid phase. The aim of the present work is to show the range of validity for employing simulations based on a 2D Cartesian coordinate system to approximate both cylindrical and rectangular fluidized beds. Three different fluidization regimes, bubbling, slugging and turbulent regimes, are investigated and the results of 2D and 3D simulations are presented for both cylindrical and rectangular domains. The results demonstrate that a 2D Cartesian system can be used to successfully simulate and predict a bubbling regime. However, caution must be exercised when using 2D Cartesian coordinates for other fluidized regimes. A budget analysis that explains all the differences in detail is presented in Part II [N. Xie, F. Battaglia, S. Pannala, Effects of Using Two-Versus Three-Dimensional Computational Modeling of Fluidized Beds: Part II, budget analysis, 182 (1) (2007) 14] to complement the hydrodynamic theory of this paper.

  1. Verification of coronal loop diagnostics using realistic three-dimensional hydrodynamic models

    SciTech Connect

    Winebarger, Amy R.; Lionello, Roberto; Linker, Jon A.; Mikić, Zoran; Mok, Yung E-mail: lionel@predsci.com E-mail: mikicz@predsci.com

    2014-11-10

    Many different techniques have been used to characterize the plasma in the solar corona: density-sensitive spectral line ratios are used to infer the density, the evolution of coronal structures in different passbands is used to infer the temperature evolution, and the simultaneous intensities measured in multiple passbands are used to determine the emission measure distributions. All these analysis techniques assume that the intensity of the structures can be isolated through background subtraction. In this paper, we use simulated observations from a three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulation of a coronal active region to verify these diagnostics. The density and temperature from the simulation are used to generate images in several passbands and spectral lines. We identify loop structures in the simulated images and calculate the background. We then determine the density, temperature, and emission measure distribution as a function of time from the observations and compare these with the true temperature and density of the loop. We find that the overall characteristics of the temperature, density, and emission measure are recovered by the analysis methods, but the details are not. For instance, the emission measure curves calculated from the simulated observations are much broader than the true emission measure distribution, though the average temperature evolution is similar. These differences are due, in part, to a limitation of the analysis methods, but also to inadequate background subtraction.

  2. Impacts of rotation on three-dimensional hydrodynamics of core-collapse supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Ko; Kuroda, Takami; Kotake, Kei; Takiwaki, Tomoya

    2014-09-20

    We perform a series of simplified numerical experiments to explore how rotation impacts the three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamics of core-collapse supernovae. For our systematic study, we employ a light-bulb scheme to trigger explosions and a three-flavor neutrino leakage scheme to treat deleptonization effects and neutrino losses from the proto-neutron-star interior. Using a 15 M {sub ☉} progenitor, we compute 30 models in 3D with a wide variety of initial angular momentum and light-bulb neutrino luminosity. We find that the rotation can help the onset of neutrino-driven explosions for the models in which the initial angular momentum is matched to that obtained in recent stellar evolutionary calculations (∼0.3-3 rad s{sup –1} at the center). For the models with larger initial angular momentum, the shock surface deforms to be more oblate due to larger centrifugal force. This not only makes the gain region more concentrated around the equatorial plane, but also makes the mass larger in the gain region. As a result, buoyant bubbles tend to be coherently formed and rise in the equatorial region, which pushes the revived shock toward ever larger radii until a global explosion is triggered. We find that these are the main reasons that the preferred direction of the explosion in 3D rotating models is often perpendicular to the spin axis, which is in sharp contrast to the polar explosions around the axis that were obtained in previous two-dimensional simulations.

  3. Quasi-three-dimensional analysis for composite cylinder under lateral compressive loading

    SciTech Connect

    Nishiwaki, Tsuyoshi |; Yokoyama, Atsushi; Maekawa, Zenichiro; Hamada, Hiroyuki; Mori, Sadaki

    1995-11-01

    This paper presents a lateral compressive analytical method for CFRP cylinders using a quasi-three-dimensional model. This numerical model was constructed by shell and beam elements which represent fiber and resin respectively. The lateral compressive behaviors of CFRP cylinders with [{theta}/{minus}{theta}]sym ({theta} = 15{degree}, 30{degree}, 45{degree}, 60{degree}) were experimentally evaluated. The damage propagation was simulated using the quasi-three-dimensional model. The transverse cracking and interlaminar delamination were simulated independently. Furthermore comparing the analytical and experimental results, it is confirmed that the proposed analytical method is precise.

  4. Linear stability analysis of three-dimensional compressible boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malik, Mujeeb R.; Orszag, Steven A.

    1987-01-01

    A compressible stability analysis computer code is developed. The code uses a matrix finite-difference method for local eigenvale solution when a good guess for the eigenvalue is available and is significantly more computationally efficient than the commonly used inital-value approach. The local eigenvalue search procedure also results in eigenfunctions and, at little extra work, group velocities. A globally convergent eigenvalue procedure is also developed that may be used when no guess for the eigenvalue is available. The global problem is formulated in such a way that no unstable spurious modes appear so that the method is suitable for use in a black-box stability code. Sample stability calculations are presented for the boundary layer profiles of an LFC swept wing.

  5. Differences in aquatic habitat quality as an impact of one- and two-dimensional hydrodynamic model simulated flow variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benjankar, R. M.; Sohrabi, M.; Tonina, D.; McKean, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    Aquatic habitat models utilize flow variables which may be predicted with one-dimensional (1D) or two-dimensional (2D) hydrodynamic models to simulate aquatic habitat quality. Studies focusing on the effects of hydrodynamic model dimensionality on predicted aquatic habitat quality are limited. Here we present the analysis of the impact of flow variables predicted with 1D and 2D hydrodynamic models on simulated spatial distribution of habitat quality and Weighted Usable Area (WUA) for fall-spawning Chinook salmon. Our study focuses on three river systems located in central Idaho (USA), which are a straight and pool-riffle reach (South Fork Boise River), small pool-riffle sinuous streams in a large meadow (Bear Valley Creek) and a steep-confined plane-bed stream with occasional deep forced pools (Deadwood River). We consider low and high flows in simple and complex morphologic reaches. Results show that 1D and 2D modeling approaches have effects on both the spatial distribution of the habitat and WUA for both discharge scenarios, but we did not find noticeable differences between complex and simple reaches. In general, the differences in WUA were small, but depended on stream type. Nevertheless, spatially distributed habitat quality difference is considerable in all streams. The steep-confined plane bed stream had larger differences between aquatic habitat quality defined with 1D and 2D flow models compared to results for streams with well defined macro-topographies, such as pool-riffle bed forms. KEY WORDS: one- and two-dimensional hydrodynamic models, habitat modeling, weighted usable area (WUA), hydraulic habitat suitability, high and low discharges, simple and complex reaches

  6. Self-assembled three-dimensional and compressible interdigitated thin-film supercapacitors and batteries.

    PubMed

    Nyström, Gustav; Marais, Andrew; Karabulut, Erdem; Wågberg, Lars; Cui, Yi; Hamedi, Mahiar M

    2015-01-01

    Traditional thin-film energy-storage devices consist of stacked layers of active films on two-dimensional substrates and do not exploit the third dimension. Fully three-dimensional thin-film devices would allow energy storage in bulk materials with arbitrary form factors and with mechanical properties unique to bulk materials such as compressibility. Here we show three-dimensional energy-storage devices based on layer-by-layer self-assembly of interdigitated thin films on the surface of an open-cell aerogel substrate. We demonstrate a reversibly compressible three-dimensional supercapacitor with carbon nanotube electrodes and a three-dimensional hybrid battery with a copper hexacyanoferrate ion intercalating cathode and a carbon nanotube anode. The three-dimensional supercapacitor shows stable operation over 400 cycles with a capacitance of 25 F g(-1) and is fully functional even at compressions up to 75%. Our results demonstrate that layer-by-layer self-assembly inside aerogels is a rapid, precise and scalable route for building high-surface-area 3D thin-film devices. PMID:26021485

  7. Self-assembled three-dimensional and compressible interdigitated thin-film supercapacitors and batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyström, Gustav; Marais, Andrew; Karabulut, Erdem; Wågberg, Lars; Cui, Yi; Hamedi, Mahiar M.

    2015-05-01

    Traditional thin-film energy-storage devices consist of stacked layers of active films on two-dimensional substrates and do not exploit the third dimension. Fully three-dimensional thin-film devices would allow energy storage in bulk materials with arbitrary form factors and with mechanical properties unique to bulk materials such as compressibility. Here we show three-dimensional energy-storage devices based on layer-by-layer self-assembly of interdigitated thin films on the surface of an open-cell aerogel substrate. We demonstrate a reversibly compressible three-dimensional supercapacitor with carbon nanotube electrodes and a three-dimensional hybrid battery with a copper hexacyanoferrate ion intercalating cathode and a carbon nanotube anode. The three-dimensional supercapacitor shows stable operation over 400 cycles with a capacitance of 25 F g-1 and is fully functional even at compressions up to 75%. Our results demonstrate that layer-by-layer self-assembly inside aerogels is a rapid, precise and scalable route for building high-surface-area 3D thin-film devices.

  8. Self-assembled three-dimensional and compressible interdigitated thin-film supercapacitors and batteries

    PubMed Central

    Nyström, Gustav; Marais, Andrew; Karabulut, Erdem; Wågberg, Lars; Cui, Yi; Hamedi, Mahiar M.

    2015-01-01

    Traditional thin-film energy-storage devices consist of stacked layers of active films on two-dimensional substrates and do not exploit the third dimension. Fully three-dimensional thin-film devices would allow energy storage in bulk materials with arbitrary form factors and with mechanical properties unique to bulk materials such as compressibility. Here we show three-dimensional energy-storage devices based on layer-by-layer self-assembly of interdigitated thin films on the surface of an open-cell aerogel substrate. We demonstrate a reversibly compressible three-dimensional supercapacitor with carbon nanotube electrodes and a three-dimensional hybrid battery with a copper hexacyanoferrate ion intercalating cathode and a carbon nanotube anode. The three-dimensional supercapacitor shows stable operation over 400 cycles with a capacitance of 25 F g−1 and is fully functional even at compressions up to 75%. Our results demonstrate that layer-by-layer self-assembly inside aerogels is a rapid, precise and scalable route for building high-surface-area 3D thin-film devices. PMID:26021485

  9. The compressible Gortler problem in two-dimensional boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dando, Andrew H.; Seddougui, Sharon O.

    1993-01-01

    In this paper the authors investigate the growth rates of Gortler vortices in a compressible flow in the inviscid limit of large Gortler number. Numerical solutions are obtained for O(1) wavenumbers. The further limits of (i) large Mach number and (ii) large wavenumber with O(1) Mach number are considered. It is shown that two different types of disturbance mode can appear in this problem. The first is a wall layer mode, so named as it has its eigenfunctions trapped in a thin layer near the wall. The other mode investigated is confined to a thin layer away from the wall and termed a trapped-layer mode for large wavenumbers and an adjustment-layer mode for large Mach numbers, since then this mode has its eigenfunctions concentrated in the temperature adjustment layer. It is possible to investigate the near crossing of the modes which occurs in each of the limits mentioned. The inviscid limit does not predict a fastest growing mode, but does enable a most dangerous mode to be identified for O(1) Mach number. For hypersonic flow the most dangerous mode depends on the size of the Gortler number.

  10. Analysis and compression of six-dimensional gyrokinetic datasets using higher order singular value decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Hatch, David R.; Del-Castillo-Negrete, Diego B; Terry, P.W.

    2012-01-01

    Higher order singular value decomposition (HOSVD) is explored as a tool for analyzing and compressing gyrokinetic data. An efficient numerical implementation of an HOSVD algorithm is described. HOSVD is used to analyze the full six-dimensional (three spatial, two velocity space, and time dimensions) gyrocenter distribution function from gyrokinetic simulations of ion temperature gradient, electron temperature gradient, and trapped electron mode driven turbulence. The HOSVD eigenvalues for the velocity space coordinates decay very rapidly, indicating that only a few structures in velocity space can capture the most important dynamics. In almost all of the cases studied, HOSVD extracts parallel velocity space structures which are very similar to orthogonal polynomials. HOSVD is also used to compress gyrokinetic datasets, an application in which it is shown to significantly outperform the more commonly used singular value decomposition. It is shown that the effectiveness of the HOSVD compression improves as the dimensionality of the dataset increases. (C) 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Quasi One-Dimensional Unsteady Modeling of External Compression Supersonic Inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopasakis, George; Connolly, Joseph W.; Kratz, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    The AeroServoElasticity task under the NASA Supersonics Project is developing dynamic models of the propulsion system and the vehicle in order to conduct research for integrated vehicle dynamic performance. As part of this effort, a nonlinear quasi 1-dimensional model of an axisymmetric external compression supersonic inlet is being developed. The model utilizes compressible flow computational fluid dynamics to model the internal inlet segment as well as the external inlet portion between the cowl lip and normal shock, and compressible flow relations with flow propagation delay to model the oblique shocks upstream of the normal shock. The external compression portion between the cowl-lip and the normal shock is also modeled with leaking fluxes crossing the sonic boundary, with a moving CFD domain at the normal shock boundary. This model has been verified in steady state against tunnel inlet test data and it s a first attempt towards developing a more comprehensive model for inlet dynamics.

  12. A global three-dimensional radiation magneto-hydrodynamic simulation of super-eddington accretion disks

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Yan-Fei; Stone, James M.; Davis, Shane W.

    2014-12-01

    We study super-Eddington accretion flows onto black holes using a global three-dimensional radiation magneto-hydrodynamical simulation. We solve the time-dependent radiative transfer equation for the specific intensities to accurately calculate the angular distribution of the emitted radiation. Turbulence generated by the magneto-rotational instability provides self-consistent angular momentum transfer. The simulation reaches inflow equilibrium with an accretion rate ∼220 L {sub Edd}/c {sup 2} and forms a radiation-driven outflow along the rotation axis. The mechanical energy flux carried by the outflow is ∼20% of the radiative energy flux. The total mass flux lost in the outflow is about 29% of the net accretion rate. The radiative luminosity of this flow is ∼10 L {sub Edd}. This yields a radiative efficiency ∼4.5%, which is comparable to the value in a standard thin disk model. In our simulation, vertical advection of radiation caused by magnetic buoyancy transports energy faster than photon diffusion, allowing a significant fraction of the photons to escape from the surface of the disk before being advected into the black hole. We contrast our results with the lower radiative efficiencies inferred in most models, such as the slim disk model, which neglect vertical advection. Our inferred radiative efficiencies also exceed published results from previous global numerical simulations, which did not attribute a significant role to vertical advection. We briefly discuss the implications for the growth of supermassive black holes in the early universe and describe how these results provided a basis for explaining the spectrum and population statistics of ultraluminous X-ray sources.

  13. A Global Three-dimensional Radiation Magneto-hydrodynamic Simulation of Super-Eddington Accretion Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yan-Fei; Stone, James M.; Davis, Shane W.

    2014-12-01

    We study super-Eddington accretion flows onto black holes using a global three-dimensional radiation magneto-hydrodynamical simulation. We solve the time-dependent radiative transfer equation for the specific intensities to accurately calculate the angular distribution of the emitted radiation. Turbulence generated by the magneto-rotational instability provides self-consistent angular momentum transfer. The simulation reaches inflow equilibrium with an accretion rate ~220 L Edd/c 2 and forms a radiation-driven outflow along the rotation axis. The mechanical energy flux carried by the outflow is ~20% of the radiative energy flux. The total mass flux lost in the outflow is about 29% of the net accretion rate. The radiative luminosity of this flow is ~10 L Edd. This yields a radiative efficiency ~4.5%, which is comparable to the value in a standard thin disk model. In our simulation, vertical advection of radiation caused by magnetic buoyancy transports energy faster than photon diffusion, allowing a significant fraction of the photons to escape from the surface of the disk before being advected into the black hole. We contrast our results with the lower radiative efficiencies inferred in most models, such as the slim disk model, which neglect vertical advection. Our inferred radiative efficiencies also exceed published results from previous global numerical simulations, which did not attribute a significant role to vertical advection. We briefly discuss the implications for the growth of supermassive black holes in the early universe and describe how these results provided a basis for explaining the spectrum and population statistics of ultraluminous X-ray sources.

  14. Verification of the two-dimensional hydrodynamic model based on remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sazonov, Alexey; Mikhailukova, Polina; Krylenko, Inna; Frolova, Natalya; Kireeva, Mariya

    2016-04-01

    Mathematical modeling methods are used more and more actively to evaluate possible damage, identify potential flood zone and the influence of individual factors affecting the river during the passage of the flood. Calculations were performed by means of domestic software complex «STREAM-2D» which is based on the numerical solution of two-dimensional St. Venant equations. One of the major challenges in mathematical modeling is the verification of the model. This is usually made using data on water levels from hydrological stations: the smaller the difference of the actual level and the simulated one, the better the quality of the model used. Data from hydrological stations are not always available, so alternative sources of verification, such as remote sensing, are increasingly used. The aim of this work is to develop a method of verification of hydrodynamic model based on a comparison of actual flood zone area, which in turn is determined on the basis of the automated satellite image interpretation methods for different imaging systems and flooded area obtained in the course of the model. The study areas are Lena River, The North Dvina River, Amur River near Blagoveshchensk. We used satellite images made by optical and radar sensors: SPOT-5/HRG, Resurs-F, Radarsat-2. Flooded area were calculated using unsupervised classification (ISODATA and K-mean) for optical images and segmentation for Radarsat-2. Knowing the flow rate and the water level at a given date for the upper and lower limits of the model, respectively, it is possible to calculate flooded area by means of program STREAM-2D and GIS technology. All the existing vector layers with the boundaries of flooding are included in a GIS project for flood area calculation. This study was supported by the Russian Science Foundation, project no. 14-17-00155.

  15. Multi-Dimensional Full Boltzmann-Neutrino-Radiation Hydrodynamic Simulations and Their Detailed Comparisons with Monte-Carlo Methods in Core Collapse Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagakura, H.; Richers, S.; Ott, C. D.; Iwakami, W.; Furusawa, S.; Sumiyoshi, K.; Yamada, S.; Matsufuru, H.; Imakura, A.

    2016-10-01

    We have developed a 7-dimensional Full Boltzmann-neutrino-radiation-hydrodynamical code and carried out ab-initio axisymmetric CCSNe simulations. I will talk about main results of our simulations and also discuss current ongoing projects.

  16. One-dimensional compression of sands at high pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamuro, J.A.; Bopp, P.A.; Lade, P.V.

    1996-02-01

    A one-dimensional testing apparatus was developed to test soils to axial stresses up to 850 MPa. The apparatus was instrumented with strain gauges such that lateral soil stresses, and therefore K{sub 0}, could be inferred from measured circumferential strains. Three different initial densities of quartz, Cambria, and gypsum sands were tested and it was found that the effect of initial density was eliminated at high stress magnitudes. This stress magnitude was higher for mineralogically harder grains than for softer grains. The inferred values of K{sub 0} for the mineralogically harder Cambria sand was found to be constant at high pressures, but slightly below that indicates by Jaky`s equation. However, the softer gypsum sand indicated increasing values of K{sub 0} as the stress magnitude increased. This apparently was caused by inelastic, viscous flow during shearing.

  17. The inviscid compressible Görtler problem in three-dimensional boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dando, Andrew

    1992-09-01

    In this paper we investigate numerical solutions for the growth rates of Görtler vortices in a compressible three-dimensional flow in the inviscid limit of a large Görtler number. We look at a range of Mach numbers and find that there are three different types of behaviour for the mode growth-rate, corresponding to whether the flow is incompressible, has a Mach number small enough so that temperature-adjustment-layer modes do not appear in the two-dimensional case, or has a Mach number large enough so that they do. We find that it takes a considerably greater crossflow to destroy the Görtler vortices for moderate Mach numbers than it did in the incompressible case looked at by Bassom and Hall (1991). From this we believe that Görtler vortices may well still be a cause of transition for many practical compressible inviscid three-dimensional flows.

  18. THEHYCO-3DT: Thermal hydrodynamic code for the 3 dimensional transient calculation of advanced LMFBR core

    SciTech Connect

    Vitruk, S.G.; Korsun, A.S.; Ushakov, P.A.

    1995-09-01

    The multilevel mathematical model of neutron thermal hydrodynamic processes in a passive safety core without assemblies duct walls and appropriate computer code SKETCH, consisted of thermal hydrodynamic module THEHYCO-3DT and neutron one, are described. A new effective discretization technique for energy, momentum and mass conservation equations is applied in hexagonal - z geometry. The model adequacy and applicability are presented. The results of the calculations show that the model and the computer code could be used in conceptual design of advanced reactors.

  19. Time-of-flight compressed-sensing ultrafast photography for encrypted three-dimensional dynamic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Jinyang; Gao, Liang; Hai, Pengfei; Li, Chiye; Wang, Lihong V.

    2016-02-01

    We applied compressed ultrafast photography (CUP), a computational imaging technique, to acquire three-dimensional (3D) images. The approach unites image encryption, compression, and acquisition in a single measurement, thereby allowing efficient and secure data transmission. By leveraging the time-of-flight (ToF) information of pulsed light reflected by the object, we can reconstruct a volumetric image (150 mm×150 mm×1050 mm, x × y × z) from a single camera snapshot. Furthermore, we demonstrated high-speed 3D videography of a moving object at 75 frames per second using the ToF-CUP camera.

  20. One-Dimensional Lagrangian Code for Plasma Hydrodynamic Analysis of a Fusion Pellet Driven by Ion Beams.

    1986-12-01

    Version 00 The MEDUSA-IB code performs implosion and thermonuclear burn calculations of an ion beam driven ICF target, based on one-dimensional plasma hydrodynamics and transport theory. It can calculate the following values in spherical geometry through the progress of implosion and fuel burnup of a multi-layered target. (1) Hydrodynamic velocities, density, ion, electron and radiation temperature, radiation energy density, Rs and burn rate of target as a function of coordinates and time, (2) Fusion gainmore » as a function of time, (3) Ionization degree, (4) Temperature dependent ion beam energy deposition, (5) Radiation, -particle and neutron spectra as a function of time.« less

  1. Three-dimensional nonlinear ideal MHD equilibria with field-aligned incompressible and compressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moawad, S. M.; Ibrahim, D. A.

    2016-08-01

    The equilibrium properties of three-dimensional ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) are investigated. Incompressible and compressible flows are considered. The governing equations are taken in a steady state such that the magnetic field is parallel to the plasma flow. Equations of stationary equilibrium for both of incompressible and compressible MHD flows are derived and described in a mathematical mode. For incompressible MHD flows, Alfvénic and non-Alfvénic flows with constant and variable magnetofluid density are investigated. For Alfvénic incompressible flows, the general three-dimensional solutions are determined with the aid of two potential functions of the velocity field. For non-Alfvénic incompressible flows, the stationary equilibrium equations are reduced to two differential constraints on the potential functions, flow velocity, magnetofluid density, and the static pressure. Some examples which may be of some relevance to axisymmetric confinement systems are presented. For compressible MHD flows, equations of the stationary equilibrium are derived with the aid of a single potential function of the velocity field. The existence of three-dimensional solutions for these MHD flows is investigated. Several classes of three-dimensional exact solutions for several cases of nonlinear equilibrium equations are presented.

  2. Application of a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model to the Himmerfjärden, Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, Alexander

    2014-05-01

    Himmerfjärden is a coastal fjord-like bay situated in the north-western part of the Baltic Sea. The fjord has a mean depth of 17 m and a maximum depth of 52 m. The water is brackish (6 psu) with small salinity fluctuation (±2 psu). A sewage treatment plant, which serves about 300 000 people, discharges into the inner part of Himmerfjärden. This area is the subject of a long-term monitoring program. We are planning to develop a publicly available modelling system for this area, which will perform short-term forecast predictions of pertinent parameters (e.g., water-levels, currents, salinity, temperature) and disseminate them to users. A key component of the system is a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model. The open source Delft3D Flow system (http://www.deltaressystems.com/hydro) has been applied to model the Himmerfjärden area. Two different curvilinear grids were used to approximate the modelling domain (25 km × 50 km × 60 m). One grid has low horizontal resolution (cell size varies from 250 to 450 m) to perform long-term numerical experiments (modelling period of several months), while another grid has higher resolution (cell size varies from 120 to 250 m) to model short-term situations. In vertical direction both z-level (50 layers) and sigma coordinate (20 layers) were used. Modelling results obtained with different horizontal resolution and vertical discretisation will be presented. This model will be a part of the operational system which provides automated integration of data streams from several information sources: meteorological forecast based on the HIRLAM model from the Finnish Meteorological Institute (https://en.ilmatieteenlaitos.fi/open-data), oceanographic forecast based on the HIROMB-BOOS Model developed within the Baltic community and provided by the MyOcean Project (http://www.myocean.eu), riverine discharge from the HYPE model provided by the Swedish Meteorological Hydrological Institute (http://vattenwebb.smhi.se/modelarea/).

  3. Out-of-core Compression and Decompression of Large n-dimensional Scalar Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Ibarria, L; Lindstrom, P; Rossignac, J; Szymczak, A

    2003-02-03

    We present a simple method for compressing very large and regularly sampled scalar fields. Our method is particularly attractive when the entire data set does not fit in memory and when the sampling rate is high relative to the feature size of the scalar field in all dimensions. Although we report results for R{sup 3} and R{sup 4} data sets, the proposed approach may be applied to higher dimensions. The method is based on the new Lorenzo predictor, introduced here, which estimates the value of the scalar field at each sample from the values at processed neighbors. The predicted values are exact when the n-dimensional scalar field is an implicit polynomial of degree n-1. Surprisingly, when the residuals (differences between the actual and predicted values) are encoded using arithmetic coding, the proposed method often outperforms wavelet compression in an L{infinity} sense. The proposed approach may be used both for lossy and lossless compression and is well suited for out-of-core compression and decompression, because a trivial implementation, which sweeps through the data set reading it once, requires maintaining only a small buffer in core memory, whose size barely exceeds a single n-1 dimensional slice of the data.

  4. Out-of-Core Compression and Decompression of Large n-Dimensional Scalar Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Ibarria, L; Lindstrom, P; Rossignac, J; Szymczak, A

    2003-05-07

    We present a simple method for compressing very large and regularly sampled scalar fields. Our method is particularly attractive when the entire data set does not fit in memory and when the sampling rate is high relative to the feature size of the scalar field in all dimensions. Although we report results for R{sup 3} and R{sup 4} data sets, the proposed approach may be applied to higher dimensions. The method is based on the new Lorenzo predictor, introduced here, which estimates the value of the scalar field at each sample from the values at processed neighbors. The predicted values are exact when the n-dimensional scalar field is an implicit polynomial of degree n-1. Surprisingly, when the residuals (differences between the actual and predicted values) are encoded using arithmetic coding, the proposed method often outperforms wavelet compression in an L{infinity} sense. The proposed approach may be used both for lossy and lossless compression and is well suited for out-of-core compression and decompression, because a trivial implementation, which sweeps through the data set reading it once, requires maintaining only a small buffer in core memory, whose size barely exceeds a single n-1 dimensional slice of the data.

  5. Three-Dimensional Inverse Transport Solver Based on Compressive Sensing Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yuxiong; Wu, Hongchun; Cao, Liangzhi; Zheng, Youqi

    2013-09-01

    According to the direct exposure measurements from flash radiographic image, a compressive sensing-based method for three-dimensional inverse transport problem is presented. The linear absorption coefficients and interface locations of objects are reconstructed directly at the same time. It is always very expensive to obtain enough measurements. With limited measurements, compressive sensing sparse reconstruction technique orthogonal matching pursuit is applied to obtain the sparse coefficients by solving an optimization problem. A three-dimensional inverse transport solver is developed based on a compressive sensing-based technique. There are three features in this solver: (1) AutoCAD is employed as a geometry preprocessor due to its powerful capacity in graphic. (2) The forward projection matrix rather than Gauss matrix is constructed by the visualization tool generator. (3) Fourier transform and Daubechies wavelet transform are adopted to convert an underdetermined system to a well-posed system in the algorithm. Simulations are performed and numerical results in pseudo-sine absorption problem, two-cube problem and two-cylinder problem when using compressive sensing-based solver agree well with the reference value.

  6. Three-dimensional compressible boundary layer calculations to fourth order accuracy on wings and fuselages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iyer, Venkit; Harris, Julius E.

    1989-01-01

    Laminar flow control and drag reduction research requires accurate boundary layer solutions as input to the three-dimensional stability analysis procedures currently under development. In support of these major programs, a fourth-order accurate finite difference scheme for solving the three-dimensional, compressible boundary layer equations has been developed and is presented in this paper. The method employs a two-point scheme in the wall normal direction and second order zigzag scheme in the cross flow direction. Accurate procedures to interface with the inviscid results are also presented. The results of applying the procedure to laminar flow on wings and fuselages are presented.

  7. Three-dimensional plastic flow of anisotropic layer compressed by flat dies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksimova, Ljudmila A.

    2016-06-01

    Three-dimensional flow of anisotropic plastic layer compressed by parallel rough flat dies is considered. Ideal plastic material model with Hill anisotropic yield criterion modification of Mises isotropic model is used with associated plastic flow rule. General solution of a thin layer plastic flow problem with Prandtl linear velocity and shear stress variation in layer thickness direction is presented. Effects of contact friction force vector module and direction on the layer pressure on the dies and the layer plastic flow are considered.

  8. Simulating hydrodynamics in a spring-fed estuary using a three-dimensional unstructured Cartesian grid model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, XinJian

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents an application of a three-dimensional unstructured Cartesian grid model (Chen, 2011) to a real-world case, namely the Crystal River/Kings Bay system located on the Gulf coast of the Florida peninsula of the United States. Crystal River/Kings Bay is a spring-fed estuarine system which is believed to be the largest natural refuge in the United States for manatees during the coldest days in winter because of the existence of a large amount of discharge out of numerous spring vents at the bottom of Kings Bay. The unstructured Cartesian grid model was used to simulate hydrodynamics, including salinity transport processes and thermodynamics, in the estuary during a 34-month period from April 2007 to February 2010. Although there are some unidentified uncertainties in quantifying flow rates from the spring vents and salinity variations in spring flows, simulated water elevations, salinities, temperatures, and cross-sectional flux all match well or very well with measured real-time field data. This suggests that the unstructured Cartesian grid model can adequately simulate hydrodynamics in a complex shallow water system such as Crystal River/Kings Bay and the numerical theory for the unstructured Cartesian grid model works properly. The successful simulation of hydrodynamics in the estuarine system also suggests that an empirical formula that relates the spring discharge with the water level in Kings Bay and the groundwater level measured in a nearby well is reasonable.

  9. Experimental reconstruction of three-dimensional hydrodynamic loading in water entry problems through particle image velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalalisendi, Mohammad; Shams, Adel; Panciroli, Riccardo; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2015-02-01

    Predicting the hydrodynamic loading during water impact is of fundamental importance for the design of offshore and aerospace structures. Here, we experimentally characterize the 3D hydrodynamic loading on a rigid wedge vertically impacting a quiescent water surface. Planar particle image velocimetry is used to measure the velocity field on several planes, along the width and the length of the impacting wedge. Such data are ultimately utilized to estimate the 3D velocity field in the whole fluid domain, where the pressure field is reconstructed from the solution of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. Experimental results confirm that the velocity field is nearly 2D at the mid-span of the wedge, while the axial velocity along the length of the wedge becomes significant in the proximity of the edges. The variation of the fluid flow along the length of the wedge regulates the hydrodynamic loading experienced during the impact. Specifically, the hydrodynamic loading is maximized at the mid-span of the wedge and considerably decreases toward the edges. The method proposed in this study can find application in several areas of experimental fluid mechanics, where the analysis of unsteady 3D fluid-structure interactions is of interest.

  10. Fish Pectoral Fin Hydrodynamics; Part III: Low Dimensional Models via POD Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozkurttas, M.; Madden, P.

    2005-11-01

    The highly complex kinematics of the pectoral fin and the resulting hydrodynamics does not lend itself easily to analysis based on simple notions of pitching/heaving/paddling kinematics or lift/drag based propulsive mechanisms. A more inventive approach is needed to dissect the fin gait and gain insight into the hydrodynamic performance of the pectoral fin. The focus of the current work is on the hydrodynamics of the pectoral fin of a bluegill sunfish in steady forward motion. The 3D, time-dependent fin kinematics is obtained via a stereo-videographic technique. We employ proper orthogonal decomposition to extract the essential features of the fin gait and then use CFD to examine the hydrodynamics of simplified gaits synthesized from the POD modes. The POD spectrum shows that the first two, three and five POD modes capture 55%, 67%, and 80% of the motion respectively. The first three modes are in particular highly distinct: Mode-1 is a ``cupping'' motion where the fin cups forward as it is abducted; Mode-2 is an ``expansion'' motion where the fin expands to present a larger area during adduction and finally Mode-3 involves a ``spanwise flick'' of the dorsal edge of the fin. Numerical simulation of flow past fin gaits synthesized from these modes lead to insights into the mechanisms of thrust production; these are discussed in detail.

  11. Utilizing dimensional analysis with observed data to determine the significance of hydrodynamic solutions in coastal hydrology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swain, Eric D.; Decker, Jeremy D.; Hughes, Joseph D.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the authors present an analysis of the magnitude of the temporal and spatial acceleration (inertial) terms in the surface-water flow equations and determine the conditions under which these inertial terms have sufficient magnitude to be required in the computations. Data from two South Florida field sites are examined and the relative magnitudes of temporal acceleration, spatial acceleration, and the gravity and friction terms are compared. Parameters are derived by using dimensionless numbers and applied to quantify the significance of the hydrodynamic effects. The time series of the ratio of the inertial and gravity terms from field sites are presented and compared with both a simplified indicator parameter and a more complex parameter called the Hydrodynamic Significance Number (HSN). Two test-case models were developed by using the SWIFT2D hydrodynamic simulator to examine flow behavior with and without the inertial terms and compute the HSN. The first model represented one of the previously-mentioned field sites during gate operations of a structure-managed coastal canal. The second model was a synthetic test case illustrating the drainage of water down a sloped surface from an initial stage while under constant flow. The analyses indicate that the times of substantial hydrodynamic effects are sporadic but significant. The simplified indicator parameter correlates much better with the hydrodynamic effect magnitude for a constant width channel such as Miami Canal than at the non-uniform North River. Higher HSN values indicate flow situations where the inertial terms are large and need to be taken into account.

  12. Design of indirectly driven, high-compression Inertial Confinement Fusion implosions with improved hydrodynamic stability using a 4-shock adiabat-shaped drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milovich, J. L.; Robey, H. F.; Clark, D. S.; Baker, K. L.; Casey, D. T.; Cerjan, C.; Field, J.; MacPhee, A. G.; Pak, A.; Patel, P. K.; Peterson, J. L.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Weber, C. R.

    2015-12-01

    Experimental results from indirectly driven ignition implosions during the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) [M. J. Edwards et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 070501 (2013)] achieved a record compression of the central deuterium-tritium fuel layer with measured areal densities up to 1.2 g/cm2, but with significantly lower total neutron yields (between 1.5 × 1014 and 5.5 × 1014) than predicted, approximately 10% of the 2D simulated yield. An order of magnitude improvement in the neutron yield was subsequently obtained in the "high-foot" experiments [O. A. Hurricane et al., Nature 506, 343 (2014)]. However, this yield was obtained at the expense of fuel compression due to deliberately higher fuel adiabat. In this paper, the design of an adiabat-shaped implosion is presented, in which the laser pulse is tailored to achieve similar resistance to ablation-front instability growth, but with a low fuel adiabat to achieve high compression. Comparison with measured performance shows a factor of 3-10× improvement in the neutron yield (>40% of predicted simulated yield) over similar NIC implosions, while maintaining a reasonable fuel compression of >1 g/cm2. Extension of these designs to higher laser power and energy is discussed to further explore the trade-off between increased implosion velocity and the deleterious effects of hydrodynamic instabilities.

  13. Design of indirectly driven, high-compression Inertial Confinement Fusion implosions with improved hydrodynamic stability using a 4-shock adiabat-shaped drive

    SciTech Connect

    Milovich, J. L. Robey, H. F.; Clark, D. S.; Baker, K. L.; Casey, D. T.; Cerjan, C.; Field, J.; MacPhee, A. G.; Pak, A.; Patel, P. K.; Peterson, J. L.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Weber, C. R.

    2015-12-15

    Experimental results from indirectly driven ignition implosions during the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) [M. J. Edwards et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 070501 (2013)] achieved a record compression of the central deuterium-tritium fuel layer with measured areal densities up to 1.2 g/cm{sup 2}, but with significantly lower total neutron yields (between 1.5 × 10{sup 14} and 5.5 × 10{sup 14}) than predicted, approximately 10% of the 2D simulated yield. An order of magnitude improvement in the neutron yield was subsequently obtained in the “high-foot” experiments [O. A. Hurricane et al., Nature 506, 343 (2014)]. However, this yield was obtained at the expense of fuel compression due to deliberately higher fuel adiabat. In this paper, the design of an adiabat-shaped implosion is presented, in which the laser pulse is tailored to achieve similar resistance to ablation-front instability growth, but with a low fuel adiabat to achieve high compression. Comparison with measured performance shows a factor of 3–10× improvement in the neutron yield (>40% of predicted simulated yield) over similar NIC implosions, while maintaining a reasonable fuel compression of >1 g/cm{sup 2}. Extension of these designs to higher laser power and energy is discussed to further explore the trade-off between increased implosion velocity and the deleterious effects of hydrodynamic instabilities.

  14. Full-coverage film cooling: 3-dimensional measurements of turbulence structure and prediction of recovery region hydrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yavuzkurt, S.; Moffat, R. J.; Kays, W. M.

    1979-01-01

    Hydrodynamic measurements were made with a triaxial hot-wire in the full-coverage region and the recovery region following an array of injection holes inclined downstream, at 30 degrees to the surface. The data were taken under isothermal conditions at ambient temperature and pressure for two blowing ratios: M = 0.9 and M = 0.4. Profiles of the three main velocity components and the six Reynolds stresses were obtained at several spanwise positions at each of the five locations down the test plate. A one-equation model of turbulence (using turbulent kinetic energy with an algebraic mixing length) was used in a two-dimensional computer program to predict the mean velocity and turbulent kinetic energy profiles in the recovery region. A new real-time hotwire scheme was developed to make measurements in the three-dimensional turbulent boundary layer over the full-coverage surface.

  15. Predicted macroinvertebrate response to water diversion from a montane stream using two-dimensional hydrodynamic models and zero flow approximation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holmquist, Jeffrey G.; Waddle, Terry J.

    2013-01-01

    We used two-dimensional hydrodynamic models for the assessment of water diversion effects on benthic macroinvertebrates and associated habitat in a montane stream in Yosemite National Park, Sierra Nevada Mountains, CA, USA. We sampled the macroinvertebrate assemblage via Surber sampling, recorded detailed measurements of bed topography and flow, and coupled a two-dimensional hydrodynamic model with macroinvertebrate indicators to assess habitat across a range of low flows in 2010 and representative past years. We also made zero flow approximations to assess response of fauna to extreme conditions. The fauna of this montane reach had a higher percentage of Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, and Trichoptera (%EPT) than might be expected given the relatively low faunal diversity of the study reach. The modeled responses of wetted area and area-weighted macroinvertebrate metrics to decreasing discharge indicated precipitous declines in metrics as flows approached zero. Changes in area-weighted metrics closely approximated patterns observed for wetted area, i.e., area-weighted invertebrate metrics contributed relatively little additional information above that yielded by wetted area alone. Loss of habitat area in this montane stream appears to be a greater threat than reductions in velocity and depth or changes in substrate, and the modeled patterns observed across years support this conclusion. Our models suggest that step function losses of wetted area may begin when discharge in the Merced falls to 0.02 m3/s; proportionally reducing diversions when this threshold is reached will likely reduce impacts in low flow years.

  16. Three-dimensional evolution of magnetic and velocity shear driven instabilities in a compressible magnetized jet

    SciTech Connect

    Bettarini, Lapo; Landi, Simone; Velli, Marco; Londrillo, Pasquale

    2009-06-15

    The problem of three-dimensional combined magnetic and velocity shear driven instabilities of a compressible magnetized jet modeled as a plane neutral/current double vortex sheet in the framework of the resistive magnetohydrodynamics is addressed. The resulting dynamics given by the stream+current sheet interaction is analyzed and the effects of a variable geometry of the basic fields are considered. Depending on the basic asymptotic magnetic field configuration, a selection rule of the linear instability modes can be obtained. Hence, the system follows a two-stage path developing either through a fully three-dimensional dynamics with a rapid evolution of kink modes leading to a final turbulent state, or rather through a driving two-dimensional instability pattern that develops on parallel planes on which a reconnection+coalescence process takes place.

  17. Chirp-pulse-compression three-dimensional lidar imager with fiber optics.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Guy N; Ridley, Kevin D; Willetts, David V

    2005-01-10

    A coherent three-dimensional (angle-angle-range) lidar imager using a master-oscillator-power-amplifier concept and operating at a wavelength of 1.5 microm with chirp-pulse compression is described. A fiber-optic delay line in the local oscillator path enables a single continuous-wave semiconductor laser source with a modulated drive waveform to generate both the constant-frequency local oscillator and the frequency chirp. A portion of this chirp is gated out and amplified by a two-stage fiber amplifier. The digitized return signal was compressed by cross correlating it with a sample of the outgoing pulse. In this way a 350-ns, 10-microJ pulse with a 250-MHz frequency sweep is compressed to a width of approximately 8 ns. With a 25-mm output aperture, the lidar has been used to produce three-dimensional images of hard targets out to a range of approximately 2 km with near-diffraction-limited angular resolution and submeter range resolution. PMID:15678779

  18. Chirp-pulse-compression three-dimensional lidar imager with fiber optics.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Guy N; Ridley, Kevin D; Willetts, David V

    2005-01-10

    A coherent three-dimensional (angle-angle-range) lidar imager using a master-oscillator-power-amplifier concept and operating at a wavelength of 1.5 microm with chirp-pulse compression is described. A fiber-optic delay line in the local oscillator path enables a single continuous-wave semiconductor laser source with a modulated drive waveform to generate both the constant-frequency local oscillator and the frequency chirp. A portion of this chirp is gated out and amplified by a two-stage fiber amplifier. The digitized return signal was compressed by cross correlating it with a sample of the outgoing pulse. In this way a 350-ns, 10-microJ pulse with a 250-MHz frequency sweep is compressed to a width of approximately 8 ns. With a 25-mm output aperture, the lidar has been used to produce three-dimensional images of hard targets out to a range of approximately 2 km with near-diffraction-limited angular resolution and submeter range resolution.

  19. Revisiting pyramid compression to quantify flexoelectricity: A three-dimensional simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdollahi, Amir; Millán, Daniel; Peco, Christian; Arroyo, Marino; Arias, Irene

    2015-03-01

    Flexoelectricity is a universal property of all dielectrics by which they generate a voltage in response to an inhomogeneous deformation. One of the controversial issues in this field concerns the magnitude of flexoelectric coefficients measured experimentally, which greatly exceed theoretical estimates. Furthermore, there is a broad scatter amongst experimental measurements. The truncated pyramid compression method is one of the common setups to quantify flexoelectricity, the interpretation of which relies on simplified analytical equations to estimate strain gradients. However, the deformation fields in three-dimensional pyramid configurations are highly complex, particularly around its edges. In the present work, using three-dimensional self-consistent simulations of flexoelectricity, we show that the simplified analytical estimations of strain gradients in compressed pyramids significantly overestimate flexoelectric coefficients, thus providing a possible explanation to reconcile different estimates. In fact, the interpretation of pyramid compression experiments is highly nontrivial. We systematically characterize the magnitude of this overestimation, of over one order of magnitude, as a function of the truncated pyramid configuration. These results are important to properly characterize flexoelectricity, and provide design guidelines for effective electromechanical transducers exploiting flexoelectricity.

  20. Reconstructing high-dimensional two-photon entangled states via compressive sensing.

    PubMed

    Tonolini, Francesco; Chan, Susan; Agnew, Megan; Lindsay, Alan; Leach, Jonathan

    2014-10-13

    Accurately establishing the state of large-scale quantum systems is an important tool in quantum information science; however, the large number of unknown parameters hinders the rapid characterisation of such states, and reconstruction procedures can become prohibitively time-consuming. Compressive sensing, a procedure for solving inverse problems by incorporating prior knowledge about the form of the solution, provides an attractive alternative to the problem of high-dimensional quantum state characterisation. Using a modified version of compressive sensing that incorporates the principles of singular value thresholding, we reconstruct the density matrix of a high-dimensional two-photon entangled system. The dimension of each photon is equal to d = 17, corresponding to a system of 83521 unknown real parameters. Accurate reconstruction is achieved with approximately 2500 measurements, only 3% of the total number of unknown parameters in the state. The algorithm we develop is fast, computationally inexpensive, and applicable to a wide range of quantum states, thus demonstrating compressive sensing as an effective technique for measuring the state of large-scale quantum systems.

  1. Modeling and numerical analysis of compression molding of three-dimensional thin parts with curing process

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, T.H.; Kim, C.S.

    1995-07-01

    A numerical modeling is proposed for the simulation of flow, heat transfer, and reaction kinetics during the compression molding of three-dimensional thin parts. A nonisothermal, non-Newtonian model including the kinetic equation for a curing mechanism of thermosetting materials is implemented in a computer program, and a finite element method is used to simulate a preheating, a filling, and a post-heating stage during the entire compression molding process. As a more rigorous approach, a moving boundary condition due to the drag motion of an upper mold of a nonplanar shape or due to an apparent slip phenomena of particle filled materials is introduced into the present modeling, resulting in a new governing equation and the corresponding finite element formulation. Verifications of the analysis program were performed with a simple geometry for the Newtonian and non-Newtonian isothermal cases, in which the numerical results are found to be in good agreement with theoretical results. Effects of the moving boundary condition and processing conditions, such as thickness of compression molded parts, mold closing velocity and the preheating stage on overall compression molding processing, are numerically investigated.

  2. Quantum hydrodynamics approach to the formation of waves in polarized two-dimensional systems of charged and neutral particles

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, P. A.; Kuzmenkov, L. S.; Trukhanova, M. I.

    2011-12-15

    In this paper, we explicate a method of quantum hydrodynamics (QHD) for the study of the quantum evolution of a system of polarized particles. Although we focused primarily on the two-dimensional (2D) physical systems, the method is valid for three-dimensional (3D) and one-dimensional (1D) systems too. The presented method is based upon the Schroedinger equation. Fundamental QHD equations for charged and neutral particles were derived from the many-particle microscopic Schroedinger equation. The fact that particles possess the electric dipole moment (EDM) was taken into account. The explicated QHD approach was used to study dispersion characteristics of various physical systems. We analyzed dispersion of waves in a two-dimensional ion and hole gas placed into an external electric field, which is orthogonal to the gas plane. Elementary excitations in a system of neutral polarized particles were studied for 1D, 2D, and 3D cases. The polarization dynamics in systems of both neutral and charged particles is shown to cause formation of a new type of waves as well as changes in the dispersion characteristics of already known waves. We also analyzed wave dispersion in 2D exciton systems, in 2D electron-ion plasma, and in 2D electron-hole plasma. Generation of waves in 3D-system neutral particles with EDM by means of the beam of electrons and neutral polarized particles is investigated.

  3. Study of Two-Dimensional Compressible Non-Acoustic Modeling of Stirling Machine Type Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tew, Roy C., Jr.; Ibrahim, Mounir B.

    2001-01-01

    A two-dimensional (2-D) computer code was developed for modeling enclosed volumes of gas with oscillating boundaries, such as Stirling machine components. An existing 2-D incompressible flow computer code, CAST, was used as the starting point for the project. CAST was modified to use the compressible non-acoustic Navier-Stokes equations to model an enclosed volume including an oscillating piston. The devices modeled have low Mach numbers and are sufficiently small that the time required for acoustics to propagate across them is negligible. Therefore, acoustics were excluded to enable more time efficient computation. Background information about the project is presented. The compressible non-acoustic flow assumptions are discussed. The governing equations used in the model are presented in transport equation format. A brief description is given of the numerical methods used. Comparisons of code predictions with experimental data are then discussed.

  4. Encrypted Three-dimensional Dynamic Imaging using Snapshot Time-of-flight Compressed Ultrafast Photography.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jinyang; Gao, Liang; Hai, Pengfei; Li, Chiye; Wang, Lihong V

    2015-01-01

    Compressed ultrafast photography (CUP), a computational imaging technique, is synchronized with short-pulsed laser illumination to enable dynamic three-dimensional (3D) imaging. By leveraging the time-of-flight (ToF) information of pulsed light backscattered by the object, ToF-CUP can reconstruct a volumetric image from a single camera snapshot. In addition, the approach unites the encryption of depth data with the compressed acquisition of 3D data in a single snapshot measurement, thereby allowing efficient and secure data storage and transmission. We demonstrated high-speed 3D videography of moving objects at up to 75 volumes per second. The ToF-CUP camera was applied to track the 3D position of a live comet goldfish. We have also imaged a moving object obscured by a scattering medium. PMID:26503834

  5. Encrypted Three-dimensional Dynamic Imaging using Snapshot Time-of-flight Compressed Ultrafast Photography.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jinyang; Gao, Liang; Hai, Pengfei; Li, Chiye; Wang, Lihong V

    2015-10-27

    Compressed ultrafast photography (CUP), a computational imaging technique, is synchronized with short-pulsed laser illumination to enable dynamic three-dimensional (3D) imaging. By leveraging the time-of-flight (ToF) information of pulsed light backscattered by the object, ToF-CUP can reconstruct a volumetric image from a single camera snapshot. In addition, the approach unites the encryption of depth data with the compressed acquisition of 3D data in a single snapshot measurement, thereby allowing efficient and secure data storage and transmission. We demonstrated high-speed 3D videography of moving objects at up to 75 volumes per second. The ToF-CUP camera was applied to track the 3D position of a live comet goldfish. We have also imaged a moving object obscured by a scattering medium.

  6. Encrypted Three-dimensional Dynamic Imaging using Snapshot Time-of-flight Compressed Ultrafast Photography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Jinyang; Gao, Liang; Hai, Pengfei; Li, Chiye; Wang, Lihong V.

    2015-10-01

    Compressed ultrafast photography (CUP), a computational imaging technique, is synchronized with short-pulsed laser illumination to enable dynamic three-dimensional (3D) imaging. By leveraging the time-of-flight (ToF) information of pulsed light backscattered by the object, ToF-CUP can reconstruct a volumetric image from a single camera snapshot. In addition, the approach unites the encryption of depth data with the compressed acquisition of 3D data in a single snapshot measurement, thereby allowing efficient and secure data storage and transmission. We demonstrated high-speed 3D videography of moving objects at up to 75 volumes per second. The ToF-CUP camera was applied to track the 3D position of a live comet goldfish. We have also imaged a moving object obscured by a scattering medium.

  7. A variational principle for compressible fluid mechanics. Discussion of the one-dimensional theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prozan, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    The second law of thermodynamics is used as a variational statement to derive a numerical procedure to satisfy the governing equations of motion. The procedure, based on numerical experimentation, appears to be stable provided the CFL condition is satisfied. This stability is manifested no matter how severe the gradients (compression or expansion) are in the flow field. For reasons of simplicity only one dimensional inviscid compressible unsteady flow is discussed here; however, the concepts and techniques are not restricted to one dimension nor are they restricted to inviscid non-reacting flow. The solution here is explicit in time. Further study is required to determine the impact of the variational principle on implicit algorithms.

  8. Two-dimensional compressible flow in turbomachines with conic flow surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanitz, John D

    1949-01-01

    A general method of analysis is developed for two-dimensional, steady, compressible flow in stators or rotors of radial and mixed flow turbomachines with conic flow surfaces (surfaces of right circular cones generated by center line of flow passage in the axial-radial plane). The variables taken into account are: (1) tip speed of the rotor, (2) flow rate, (3) blade shape, (4) variation in passage height with radius, (5) number of blades, and (6) cone angle of the flow surface. Relaxation methods are used to solve the nonlinear differential equation for the stream function. Two numerical examples are presented; one for compressible and the other for incompressible flow in a centrifugal compressor with thin, straight blades. The results of these examples are given by plots of the streamlines, constant velocity-ratio lines, and constant pressure-ratio line.

  9. Efficient computation of the stability of three-dimensional compressible boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malik, M. R.; Orszag, S. A.

    1981-01-01

    Methods for the computer analysis of the stability of three-dimensional compressible boundary layers are discussed and the user-oriented Compressible Stability Analysis (COSAL) computer code is described. The COSAL code uses a matrix finite-difference method for local eigenvalue solution when a good guess for the eigenvalue is available and is significantly more computationally efficient than the commonly used initial-value approach. The local eigenvalue search procedure also results in eigenfunctions and, at little extra work, group velocities. A globally convergent eigenvalue procedure is also developed which may be used when no guess for the eigenvalue is available. The global problem is formulated in such a way that no unstable spurious modes appear so that the method is suitable for use in a black-box stability code. Sample stability calculations are presented for the boundary layer profiles of an LFC swept wing.

  10. Encrypted Three-dimensional Dynamic Imaging using Snapshot Time-of-flight Compressed Ultrafast Photography

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Jinyang; Gao, Liang; Hai, Pengfei; Li, Chiye; Wang, Lihong V.

    2015-01-01

    Compressed ultrafast photography (CUP), a computational imaging technique, is synchronized with short-pulsed laser illumination to enable dynamic three-dimensional (3D) imaging. By leveraging the time-of-flight (ToF) information of pulsed light backscattered by the object, ToF-CUP can reconstruct a volumetric image from a single camera snapshot. In addition, the approach unites the encryption of depth data with the compressed acquisition of 3D data in a single snapshot measurement, thereby allowing efficient and secure data storage and transmission. We demonstrated high-speed 3D videography of moving objects at up to 75 volumes per second. The ToF-CUP camera was applied to track the 3D position of a live comet goldfish. We have also imaged a moving object obscured by a scattering medium. PMID:26503834

  11. Multiscale molecular dynamics/hydrodynamics implementation of two dimensional "Mercedes Benz" water model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scukins, A.; Nerukh, D.; Pavlov, E.; Karabasov, S.; Markesteijn, A.

    2015-09-01

    A multiscale Molecular Dynamics/Hydrodynamics implementation of the 2D Mercedes Benz (MB or BN2D) [1] water model is developed and investigated. The concept and the governing equations of multiscale coupling together with the results of the two-way coupling implementation are reported. The sensitivity of the multiscale model for obtaining macroscopic and microscopic parameters of the system, such as macroscopic density and velocity fluctuations, radial distribution and velocity autocorrelation functions of MB particles, is evaluated. Critical issues for extending the current model to large systems are discussed.

  12. Hydrodynamic theory of surface excitations of three-dimensional topological insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vildanov, N. M.

    2011-03-01

    Edge excitations of a fractional quantum Hall system can be derived as surface excitations of an incompressible quantum droplet using one-dimensional chiral bosonization. Here we show that an analogous approach can be developed to characterize surface states of three-dimensional time-reversal invariant topological insulators. The key ingredient of our theory is the Luther’s multidimensional bosonization construction.

  13. Quasiconservation laws for compressible three-dimensional Navier-Stokes flow.

    PubMed

    Gibbon, J D; Holm, D D

    2012-10-01

    We formulate the quasi-Lagrangian fluid transport dynamics of mass density ρ and the projection q=ω·∇ρ of the vorticity ω onto the density gradient, as determined by the three-dimensional compressible Navier-Stokes equations for an ideal gas, although the results apply for an arbitrary equation of state. It turns out that the quasi-Lagrangian transport of q cannot cross a level set of ρ. That is, in this formulation, level sets of ρ (isopycnals) are impermeable to the transport of the projection q.

  14. Three dimensional compressible boundary-layer computations for a finite swept wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nash, J. F.; Scruggs, R. M.

    1972-01-01

    Three-dimensional, compressible turbulent boundary-layer calculations have been performed for the finite supercritical wing of the NASA modified F8 transonic research airplane. Data on the boundary-layer thickness, displacement thickness, skin friction components, and integrated streamwise skin friction are presented for points along the streamwise stations of which the pressure measurements were previously made. Representative velocity profiles are shown, and boundary-layer-thickness contour plots and skin-friction vector plots are presented. Results are given for a Reynolds number of 1.5 million per foot, and for Mach numbers of 0.50 and 0.99.

  15. Quasiconservation laws for compressible three-dimensional Navier-Stokes flow.

    PubMed

    Gibbon, J D; Holm, D D

    2012-10-01

    We formulate the quasi-Lagrangian fluid transport dynamics of mass density ρ and the projection q=ω·∇ρ of the vorticity ω onto the density gradient, as determined by the three-dimensional compressible Navier-Stokes equations for an ideal gas, although the results apply for an arbitrary equation of state. It turns out that the quasi-Lagrangian transport of q cannot cross a level set of ρ. That is, in this formulation, level sets of ρ (isopycnals) are impermeable to the transport of the projection q. PMID:23214709

  16. F2D users manual: A two-dimensional compressible gas flow code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suo-Anttila, A.

    1993-08-01

    The F2D computer code is a general purpose, two-dimensional, fully compressible thermal-fluids code that models most of the phenomena found in situations of coupled fluid flow and heat transfer. The code solves momentum, continuity, gas-energy, and structure-energy equations using a predictor-corrector solution algorithm. The corrector step includes a Poisson pressure equation. The finite difference form of the equation is presented along with a description of input and output. Several example problems are included that demonstrate the applicability of the code in problems ranging from free fluid flow, shock tubes, and flow in heated porous media.

  17. F2D. A Two-Dimensional Compressible Gas Flow Code

    SciTech Connect

    Suo-Anttila, A.

    1993-08-01

    F2D is a general purpose, two dimensional, fully compressible thermal-fluids code that models most of the phenomena found in situations of coupled fluid flow and heat transfer. The code solves momentum, continuity, gas-energy, and structure-energy equations using a predictor-correction solution algorithm. The corrector step includes a Poisson pressure equation. The finite difference form of the equation is presented along with a description of input and output. Several example problems are included that demonstrate the applicability of the code in problems ranging from free fluid flow, shock tubes and flow in heated porous media.

  18. F2D users manual: A two-dimensional compressible gas flow code

    SciTech Connect

    Suo-Anttila, A.

    1993-08-01

    The F2D computer code is a general purpose, two-dimensional, fully compressible thermal-fluids code that models most of the phenomena found in situations of coupled fluid flow and heat transfer. The code solves momentum, continuity, gas-energy, and structure-energy equations using a predictor-corrector solution algorithm. The corrector step includes a Poisson pressure equation. The finite difference form of the equation is presented along with a description of input and output. Several example problems are included that demonstrate the applicability of the code in problems ranging from free fluid flow, shock tubes and flow in heated porous media.

  19. Three-dimensional imaging reconstruction algorithm of gated-viewing laser imaging with compressive sensing.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Xiao, Wei; Jian, Weijian

    2014-11-20

    Three-dimensional (3D) laser imaging combining compressive sensing (CS) has an advantage in lower power consumption and less imaging sensors; however, it brings enormous stress to subsequent calculation devices. In this paper we proposed a fast 3D imaging reconstruction algorithm to deal with time-slice images sampled by single-pixel detectors. The algorithm implements 3D imaging reconstruction before CS recovery, thus it saves plenty of runtime of CS recovery. Several experiments are conducted to verify the performance of the algorithm. Simulation results demonstrated that the proposed algorithm has better performance in terms of efficiency compared to an existing algorithm.

  20. Microfluidic three-dimensional hydrodynamic flow focusing for the rapid protein concentration analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Sungmin; Tsou, Pei-Hsiang; Chou, Chao-Kai; Yamaguchi, Hirohito; Su, Chin B.; Hung, Mien-Chie; Kameoka, Jun

    2012-01-01

    A simple microfluidic 3D hydrodynamic flow focusing device has been developed and demonstrated quantitative determinations of quantum dot 525 with antibody (QD525-antibody) and hemagglutinin epitope tagged MAX (HA-MAX) protein concentrations. This device had a step depth cross junction structure at a hydrodynamic flow focusing point at which the analyte stream was flowed into a main detection channel and pinched not only horizontally but also vertically by two sheath streams. As a result, a triangular cross-sectional flow profile of the analyte stream was formed and the laser was focused on the top of the triangular shaped analyte stream. Since the detection volume was smaller than the radius of laser spot, a photon burst histogram showed Gaussian distribution, which was necessary for the quantitative analysis of protein concentration. By using this approach, a linear concentration curve of QD525-antibody down to 10 pM was demonstrated. In addition, the concentration of HA-MAX protein in HEK293 cell lysate was determined as 0.283 ± 0.015 nM. This approach requires for only 1 min determining protein concentration. As the best of our knowledge, this is the first time to determinate protein concentration by using single molecule detection techniques. PMID:23785388

  1. APSARA: A multi-dimensional unsplit fourth-order explicit Eulerian hydrodynamics code for arbitrary curvilinear grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wongwathanarat, A.; Grimm-Strele, H.; Müller, E.

    2016-10-01

    We present a new fourth-order, finite-volume hydrodynamics code named Apsara. The code employs a high-order, finite-volume method for mapped coordinates with extensions for nonlinear hyperbolic conservation laws. Apsara can handle arbitrary structured curvilinear meshes in three spatial dimensions. The code has successfully passed several hydrodynamic test problems, including the advection of a Gaussian density profile and a nonlinear vortex and the propagation of linear acoustic waves. For these test problems, Apsara produces fourth-order accurate results in case of smooth grid mappings. The order of accuracy is reduced to first-order when using the nonsmooth circular grid mapping. When applying the high-order method to simulations of low-Mach number flows, for example, the Gresho vortex and the Taylor-Green vortex, we discover that Apsara delivers superior results to codes based on the dimensionally split, piecewise parabolic method (PPM) widely used in astrophysics. Hence, Apsara is a suitable tool for simulating highly subsonic flows in astrophysics. In the first astrophysical application, we perform implicit large eddy simulations (ILES) of anisotropic turbulence in the context of core collapse supernova (CCSN) and obtain results similar to those previously reported.

  2. Three-dimensional numerical simulation of hydrodynamic interactions between pectoral-fin vortices and body undulation in a swimming fish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Cheng-Lun; Ting, Shang-Chieh; Yeh, Meng-Kao; Yang, Jing-Tang

    2011-09-01

    We investigated numerically the hydrodynamic interactions between pectoral-fin vortices and body undulation in a fish swimming with carangiform locomotion at a Reynolds number of 3.3 × 104; the three-dimensional, viscous, incompressible, Navier-Stokes equations were solved with a finite-volume method. For a fish swimming with the pectoral fins abducted, we characterized the wake flow structures, forces, and power consumption with respect to various Strouhal numbers. The numerical results reveal that a pair of vortices is formed immediately behind the abducted pectoral fins of a swimming fish. There exist hydrodynamic interactions between the pectoral-fin vortices and the undulating fish body. For Strouhal numbers in a range 0.2-0.8, the body undulation impedes the shedding of pectoral-fin vortices, resulting in vortices closely attached to the pectoral fins. In contrast, for Strouhal number = 0.1, the pectoral-fin vortices are shed from the pectoral fins and drift downstream. The low-pressure suction forces arising from the shed pectoral-fin vortices facilitate lateral movements of the fish body, decreasing the power consumption. This phenomenon indicates the possibility for an actual fish to harvest energy from the shed pectoral-fin vortices.

  3. Calibration and validation of a two-dimensional hydrodynamic model of the Ohio River, Jefferson County, Kentucky

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wagner, C.R.; Mueller, D.S.

    2001-01-01

    The quantification of current patterns is an essential component of a Water Quality Analysis Simulation Program (WASP) application in a riverine environment. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) provided a field validated two-dimensional Resource Management Associates-2 (RMA-2) hydrodynamic model capable of quantifying the steady-flowpatterns in the Ohio River extending from river mile 590 to 630 for the Ohio River Valley Water Sanitation Commission (ORSANCO) water-quality modeling efforts on that reach. Because of the hydrodynamic complexities induced by McAlpine Locks and Dam (Ohio River mile 607), the model was split into two segments: an upstream reach, which extended from the dam upstream to the upper terminus of the study reach at Ohio River mile 590; and a downstream reach, which extended from the dam downstream to a lower terminus at Ohio River mile 636. The model was calibrated to a low-flow hydraulic survey (approximately 35,000 cubic feet per second (ft3/s)) and verified with data collected during a high-flow survey (approximately 390,000 ft3/s). The model calibration and validation process included matching water-surface elevations at 10 locations and velocity profiles at 30 cross sections throughout the study reach. Based on the calibration and validation results, the model is a representative simulation of the Ohio River steady-flow patterns below discharges of approximately 400,000 ft3/s.

  4. Spatial heterogeneity in geothermally-influenced lakes derived from atmospherically corrected Landsat thermal imagery and three-dimensional hydrodynamic modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allan, Mathew G.; Hamilton, David P.; Trolle, Dennis; Muraoka, Kohji; McBride, Christopher

    2016-08-01

    Atmospheric correction of Landsat 7 thermal data was carried out for the purpose of retrieval of lake skin water temperature in Rotorua lakes, and Lake Taupo, North Island, New Zealand. The effect of the atmosphere was modelled using four sources of atmospheric profile data as input to the MODerate resolution atmospheric TRANsmission (MODTRAN) radiative transfer model. The retrieved skin water temperatures were validated using a high-frequency temperature sensor deployed from a monitoring buoy at the water surface of Lake Rotorua. The most accurate atmospheric correction method was with Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) atmospheric profile data (root-mean-square-error, RMSE, 0.48 K), followed by radiosonde (0.52 K), Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) Level 3 (0.54 K), and the NASA atmospheric correction parameter calculator (0.94 K). Retrieved water temperature was used for assessing spatial heterogeneity and accuracy of surface water temperature simulated with a three-dimensional (3-D) hydrodynamic model of Lake Rotoehu, located approximately 20 km east of Lake Rotorua. This comparison indicated that the model was suitable for reproducing the dominant horizontal variations in surface water temperature in the lake. This study demonstrated the potential of accurate satellite-based thermal monitoring to validate temperature outputs from 3-D hydrodynamic model simulations. It also provided atmospheric correction options for local and global applications of Landsat thermal data.

  5. Entropy Stable Wall Boundary Conditions for the Three-Dimensional Compressible Navier-Stokes Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsani, Matteo; Carpenter, Mark H.; Nielsen, Eric J.

    2015-01-01

    Non-linear entropy stability and a summation-by-parts framework are used to derive entropy stable wall boundary conditions for the three-dimensional compressible Navier-Stokes equations. A semi-discrete entropy estimate for the entire domain is achieved when the new boundary conditions are coupled with an entropy stable discrete interior operator. The data at the boundary are weakly imposed using a penalty flux approach and a simultaneous-approximation-term penalty technique. Although discontinuous spectral collocation operators on unstructured grids are used herein for the purpose of demonstrating their robustness and efficacy, the new boundary conditions are compatible with any diagonal norm summation-by-parts spatial operator, including finite element, finite difference, finite volume, discontinuous Galerkin, and flux reconstruction/correction procedure via reconstruction schemes. The proposed boundary treatment is tested for three-dimensional subsonic and supersonic flows. The numerical computations corroborate the non-linear stability (entropy stability) and accuracy of the boundary conditions.

  6. WIND: Computer program for calculation of three dimensional potential compressible flow about wind turbine rotor blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dulikravich, D. S.

    1980-01-01

    A computer program is presented which numerically solves an exact, full potential equation (FPE) for three dimensional, steady, inviscid flow through an isolated wind turbine rotor. The program automatically generates a three dimensional, boundary conforming grid and iteratively solves the FPE while fully accounting for both the rotating cascade and Coriolis effects. The numerical techniques incorporated involve rotated, type dependent finite differencing, a finite volume method, artificial viscosity in conservative form, and a successive line overrelaxation combined with the sequential grid refinement procedure to accelerate the iterative convergence rate. Consequently, the WIND program is capable of accurately analyzing incompressible and compressible flows, including those that are locally transonic and terminated by weak shocks. The program can also be used to analyze the flow around isolated aircraft propellers and helicopter rotors in hover as long as the total relative Mach number of the oncoming flow is subsonic.

  7. Entropy stable wall boundary conditions for the three-dimensional compressible Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsani, Matteo; Carpenter, Mark H.; Nielsen, Eric J.

    2015-07-01

    Non-linear entropy stability and a summation-by-parts framework are used to derive entropy stable wall boundary conditions for the three-dimensional compressible Navier-Stokes equations. A semi-discrete entropy estimate for the entire domain is achieved when the new boundary conditions are coupled with an entropy stable discrete interior operator. The data at the boundary are weakly imposed using a penalty flux approach and a simultaneous-approximation-term penalty technique. Although discontinuous spectral collocation operators on unstructured grids are used herein for the purpose of demonstrating their robustness and efficacy, the new boundary conditions are compatible with any diagonal norm summation-by-parts spatial operator, including finite element, finite difference, finite volume, discontinuous Galerkin, and flux reconstruction/correction procedure via reconstruction schemes. The proposed boundary treatment is tested for three-dimensional subsonic and supersonic flows. The numerical computations corroborate the non-linear stability (entropy stability) and accuracy of the boundary conditions.

  8. User's manual for DYNA2D: an explicit two-dimensional hydrodynamic finite-element code with interactive rezoning

    SciTech Connect

    Hallquist, J.O.

    1982-02-01

    This revised report provides an updated user's manual for DYNA2D, an explicit two-dimensional axisymmetric and plane strain finite element code for analyzing the large deformation dynamic and hydrodynamic response of inelastic solids. A contact-impact algorithm permits gaps and sliding along material interfaces. By a specialization of this algorithm, such interfaces can be rigidly tied to admit variable zoning without the need of transition regions. Spatial discretization is achieved by the use of 4-node solid elements, and the equations-of motion are integrated by the central difference method. An interactive rezoner eliminates the need to terminate the calculation when the mesh becomes too distorted. Rather, the mesh can be rezoned and the calculation continued. The command structure for the rezoner is described and illustrated by an example.

  9. A three-dimensional model of co-rotating streams in the solar wind. 2: Hydrodynamic streams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pizzo, V. J.

    1979-01-01

    Theoretical aspects of corotating solar wind dynamics on a global scale are explored by means of numerical simulations executed with a nonlinear, inviscid, adiabatic, single-fluid, three-dimensional (3-D) hydrodynamic formulation. A simple, hypothetical 3-D stream structure is defined on a source surface located at 35 solar radius and carefully documents its evolution to 1 AU under the influence of solar rotation. By manipulating the structure of this prototype configuration at the source surface, it is possible to elucidate the factors most strongly affecting stream evolution: (1) the intrinsic correlations among density, temperature, and velocity existing near the source; (2) the amplitude of the stream; (3) the longitudinal breadth of the stream; (4) the latitudinal breadth of the stream; and (5) the heliographic latitude of the centroid of the stream.

  10. Two-dimensional electromagnetic quantum-hydrodynamic simulations of isochoric heating of a solid target by proton beams

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Ya; Jiang, Wei; Song, Yuan-Hong; Wang, You-Nian

    2015-02-15

    Isochoric heating of an aluminum target by proton beams has been studied with a two-dimensional self-consistent electromagnetic quantum-hydrodynamic model, including the nonlinear quantum effects. It is shown that most protons deposit their energy within several micrometers near the surface, and the aluminum metal target is heated up to several electron volts in tens of Mbar pressure regime within one picosecond. Comparison between electrostatic and electromagnetic cases shows that the strength of electromagnetic field is much smaller than that of the electrostatic field at initial stage but increases more rapidly and becomes larger at later time. The results show that the time evolution of electric field has a significant influence on the interaction of intense beams with a solid target, while the effect of the self-magnetic field is small for non-relativistic beams considered here.

  11. Multi-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations aimed at characterizing heavily aluminized RDX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoh, Jack J.; Kim, Bohoon; Kim, Minsung

    2015-06-01

    An accurate and reliable prediction of reactive flow is a challenging task for an energetic material subjected to an external shock impact. The present study aims at simulating the shock induced detonation of heavily aluminized RDX which contains 35% of aluminum. A series of gap tests with the longitudinal simulations involving gap substances are conducted to understand the inherent initiation process that depends on the shock propagation through multi-material domain and the high strain dynamics of nearby confinement materials. A pressure chamber test is used to validate the blast wave calculation of the sample charge, and a full 3-D hydrodynamic simulation is performed to predict fragmentation of an explosively loaded steel casing. The paper provides an elaborate description of how a heavily aluminized RDX is characterized in terms of its thermo-chemical response and multi-material interaction with inert confinement materials.

  12. Geothermal well behaviour prediction after air compress stimulation using one-dimensional transient numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusman, W.; Viridi, S.; Rachmat, S.

    2016-01-01

    The non-discharges geothermal wells have been a main problem in geothermal development stages and well discharge stimulation is required to initiate a flow. Air compress stimulation is one of the methods to trigger a fluid flow from the geothermal reservoir. The result of this process can be predicted by using by the Af / Ac method, but sometimes this method shows uncertainty result in several geothermal wells and also this prediction method does not take into account the flowing time of geothermal fluid to discharge after opening the well head. This paper presents a simulation of non-discharges well under air compress stimulation to predict well behavior and time process required. The component of this model consists of geothermal well data during heating-up process such as pressure, temperature and mass flow in the water column and main feed zone level. The one-dimensional transient numerical model is run based on the Single Fluid Volume Element (SFVE) method. According to the simulation result, the geothermal well behavior prediction after air compress stimulation will be valid under two specific circumstances, such as single phase fluid density between 1 - 28 kg/m3 and above 28.5 kg/m3. The first condition shows that successful well discharge and the last condition represent failed well discharge after air compress stimulation (only for two wells data). The comparison of pf values between simulation and field observation shows the different result according to the success discharge well. Time required for flow to occur as observed in well head by using the SFVE method is different with the actual field condition. This model needs to improve by updating more geothermal well data and modified fluid phase condition inside the wellbore.

  13. EFDC1D - A ONE DIMENSIONAL HYDRODYNAMIC AND SEDIMENT TRANSPORT MODEL FOR RIVER AND STREAM NETWORKS: MODEL THEORY AND USERS GUIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This technical report describes the new one-dimensional (1D) hydrodynamic and sediment transport model EFDC1D. This model that can be applied to stream networks. The model code and two sample data sets are included on the distribution CD. EFDC1D can simulate bi-directional unstea...

  14. Horizontally propagating three-dimensional chemo-hydrodynamic patterns in the chlorite-tetrathionate reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pópity-Tóth, Éva; Horváth, Dezső; Tóth, Ágota

    2012-09-01

    Planar reaction fronts resulting from the coupling of exothermic autocatalytic reactions and transport processes can be deformed by convection in the presence of gravity field. We have experimentally investigated how buoyancy affects the spatiotemporal pattern formation at various solution thicknesses in three-dimensional medium. In the chlorite-tetrathionate reaction, a stable structure propagating horizontally with constant velocity and geometry develops when appropriately thick solutions are studied. Both the horizontal and the vertical projections of the resulting three-dimensional structures are quantitatively characterized: the smooth leading edge of the front is independent of the solution thickness and the structured trailing edge ends in a center cusp with a constant angle.

  15. Improved non-local electron thermal transport model for two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Duc; Moses, Gregory; Delettrez, Jacques

    2015-08-15

    An implicit, non-local thermal conduction algorithm based on the algorithm developed by Schurtz, Nicolai, and Busquet (SNB) [Schurtz et al., Phys. Plasmas 7, 4238 (2000)] for non-local electron transport is presented and has been implemented in the radiation-hydrodynamics code DRACO. To study the model's effect on DRACO's predictive capability, simulations of shot 60 303 from OMEGA are completed using the iSNB model, and the computed shock speed vs. time is compared to experiment. Temperature outputs from the iSNB model are compared with the non-local transport model of Goncharov et al. [Phys. Plasmas 13, 012702 (2006)]. Effects on adiabat are also examined in a polar drive surrogate simulation. Results show that the iSNB model is not only capable of flux-limitation but also preheat prediction while remaining numerically robust and sacrificing little computational speed. Additionally, the results provide strong incentive to further modify key parameters within the SNB theory, namely, the newly introduced non-local mean free path. This research was supported by the Laboratory for Laser Energetics of the University of Rochester.

  16. Improved non-local electron thermal transport model for two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Duc; Moses, Gregory; Delettrez, Jacques

    2015-08-01

    An implicit, non-local thermal conduction algorithm based on the algorithm developed by Schurtz, Nicolai, and Busquet (SNB) [Schurtz et al., Phys. Plasmas 7, 4238 (2000)] for non-local electron transport is presented and has been implemented in the radiation-hydrodynamics code DRACO. To study the model's effect on DRACO's predictive capability, simulations of shot 60 303 from OMEGA are completed using the iSNB model, and the computed shock speed vs. time is compared to experiment. Temperature outputs from the iSNB model are compared with the non-local transport model of Goncharov et al. [Phys. Plasmas 13, 012702 (2006)]. Effects on adiabat are also examined in a polar drive surrogate simulation. Results show that the iSNB model is not only capable of flux-limitation but also preheat prediction while remaining numerically robust and sacrificing little computational speed. Additionally, the results provide strong incentive to further modify key parameters within the SNB theory, namely, the newly introduced non-local mean free path. This research was supported by the Laboratory for Laser Energetics of the University of Rochester.

  17. A two-dimensional hydrodynamic model of the St. Clair-Detroit River waterway in the Great Lakes basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holtschlag, David J.; Koschik, John A.

    2002-01-01

    The St. Clair–Detroit River Waterway connects Lake Huron with Lake Erie in the Great Lakes basin to form part of the international boundary between the United States and Canada. A two-dimensional hydrodynamic model is developed to compute flow velocities and water levels as part of a source-water assessment of public water intakes. The model, which uses the generalized finite-element code RMA2, discretizes the waterway into a mesh formed by 13,783 quadratic elements defined by 42,936 nodes. Seven steadystate scenarios are used to calibrate the model by adjusting parameters associated with channel roughness in 25 material zones in sub-areas of the waterway. An inverse modeling code is used to systematically adjust model parameters and to determine their associated uncertainty by use of nonlinear regression. Calibration results show close agreement between simulated and expected flows in major channels and water levels at gaging stations. Sensitivity analyses describe the amount of information available to estimate individual model parameters, and quantify the utility of flow measurements at selected cross sections and water-level measurements at gaging stations. Further data collection, model calibration analysis, and grid refinements are planned to assess and enhance two-dimensional flow simulation capabilities describing the horizontal flow distributions in St. Clair and Detroit Rivers and circulation patterns in Lake St. Clair.

  18. An implicit method for two-dimensional hydrodynamics. [in stellar evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livne, Eli

    1993-01-01

    An implicit method for compressible multidimensional flows is presented. The method, which is strongly oriented toward astrophysical applications, enables one to simulate very subsonic flows by removing the Courant condition upon time steps. It consists of an implicit purely Lagrangian step, followed by an explicit and second-order accurate (at least in one dimension) remapping step, which is optional. When the remapping step is performed the time step is limited by the 'particle crossing time' and otherwise it is limited only by accuracy considerations. The suggested method, which results from a compromise between accuracy and efficiency, is very efficient relative to other methods. It enables the computation of many multidimensional problems in stellar evolution, such as those governed by very subsonic flows, which were not calculable with existing explicit methods.

  19. Three-Dimensional Numerical Simulation of Mold Filling Process in Compression Resin Transfer Molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bo; Jin, Tianguo; Li, Jianguang; Bi, Fengyang

    2015-04-01

    Compression resin transfer molding (CRTM) is an effective process for the manufacturing of composite parts with large size and high fiber content, while the existence of open gap, the dynamically changing dimensions of cavity geometry and the deformation of preform during filling process bring great difficulties to the three-dimensional simulation of resin flow in CRTM. In order to develop a convenient and efficient three-dimensional simulation approach for CRTM filling process, a unified mathematical model for resin flow in both open gap and preform is established instead of considering the gap as high permeability preform, then the analysis of the clamping force and stress distribution are presented. In order to avoid direct solving the coupled equations of resin flow and cavity deformation, volume of fluid (VOF) multiphase flow technology and dynamic mesh model are applied to track the resin flow front and update the cavity geometry during filling simulation, respectively. The master-slave element method is used to modify the amount of resin release and ensure the resin mass conservation. The validity of the numerical approach is verified by comparison with analytical and experimental results, three-dimensional simulation examples are also presented.

  20. Spectral maximum entropy hydrodynamics of fermionic radiation: a three-moment system for one-dimensional flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banach, Zbigniew; Larecki, Wieslaw

    2013-06-01

    The spectral formulation of the nine-moment radiation hydrodynamics resulting from using the Boltzmann entropy maximization procedure is considered. The analysis is restricted to the one-dimensional flows of a gas of massless fermions. The objective of the paper is to demonstrate that, for such flows, the spectral nine-moment maximum entropy hydrodynamics of fermionic radiation is not a purely formal theory. We first determine the domains of admissible values of the spectral moments and of the Lagrange multipliers corresponding to them. We then prove the existence of a solution to the constrained entropy optimization problem. Due to the strict concavity of the entropy functional defined on the space of distribution functions, there exists a one-to-one correspondence between the Lagrange multipliers and the moments. The maximum entropy closure of moment equations results in the symmetric conservative system of first-order partial differential equations for the Lagrange multipliers. However, this system can be transformed into the equivalent system of conservation equations for the moments. These two systems are consistent with the additional conservation equation interpreted as the balance of entropy. Exploiting the above facts, we arrive at the differential relations satisfied by the entropy function and the additional function required to close the system of moment equations. We refer to this additional function as the moment closure function. In general, the moment closure and entropy-entropy flux functions cannot be explicitly calculated in terms of the moments determining the state of a gas. Therefore, we develop a perturbation method of calculating these functions. Some additional analytical (and also numerical) results are obtained, assuming that the maximum entropy distribution function tends to the Maxwell-Boltzmann limit.

  1. CHEMISTRY IN THE FIRST HYDROSTATIC CORE STAGE BY ADOPTING THREE-DIMENSIONAL RADIATION HYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Furuya, Kenji; Aikawa, Yuri; Tomida, Kengo; Tomisaka, Kohji; Matsumoto, Tomoaki; Saigo, Kazuya; Hersant, Franck; Wakelam, Valentine

    2012-10-20

    We investigate molecular evolution from a molecular cloud core to a first hydrostatic core in three spatial dimensions. We perform a radiation hydrodynamic simulation in order to trace fluid parcels, in which molecular evolution is investigated, using a gas-phase and grain-surface chemical reaction network. We derive spatial distributions of molecular abundances and column densities in the molecular cloud core harboring the first core. We find that the total gas and ice abundances of many species in a cold era (10 K) remain unaltered until the temperature reaches {approx}500 K. The gas abundances in the warm envelope and the outer layer of the first core (T {approx}< 500 K) are mainly determined via the sublimation of ice-mantle species. Above 500 K, the abundant molecules, such as H{sub 2}CO, start to be destroyed, and simple molecules, such as CO, H{sub 2}O, and N{sub 2}, are reformed. On the other hand, some molecules are effectively formed at high temperature; carbon chains, such as C{sub 2}H{sub 2} and cyanopolyynes, are formed at temperatures >700 K. We also find that large organic molecules, such as CH{sub 3}OH and HCOOCH{sub 3}, are associated with the first core (r {approx}< 10 AU). Although the abundances of these molecules in the first core stage are comparable to or less than in the protostellar stage (hot corino), reflecting the lower luminosity of the central object, their column densities in our model are comparable to the observed values toward the prototypical hot corino, IRAS 16293-2422. We propose that these large organic molecules can be good tracers of the first cores.

  2. Three-dimensional simulations of ablative hydrodynamic instabilities in indirectly driven targets

    SciTech Connect

    Marinak, M.M.; Tipton, R.E.; Remington, B.A.

    1996-06-01

    To model ignition in a National Ignition Facility (NIF) capsule implosion, the authors must understand the behavior of instabilities that can cause breakup of the pellet shell. During a capsule implosion, shocks that transit the shell cause growth of perturbations at the surface or at an interface because of a Richtmyer-Meshkov type of instability. Following shock breakout, or earlier for a shaped pulse, the low-density ablated plasma accelerates the pusher, and the ablation front is Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) unstable. Ablation and finite density gradients have the effect of stabilizing the short wavelength modes. Unstable modes present on the outer surface grow and feed through to the inner surface. Once the shell encounters the rebounding shock from the capsule center, it decelerates and the inner surface becomes RT unstable. If perturbations grow large enough, pusher material mixes into the core, degrading implosion performance. Capsule designs for the NIF depend on ablative stabilization and saturation to prevent perturbations initially present on the capsule surface from growing large enough to quench ignition. Here, the authors examine the first simulations and experiments to study the effect of 3-D perturbation shape on instability growth and saturation in indirectly driven targets. The first section discusses HYDRA, the radiation hydrodynamics code developed for these simulations. The subsequent section examines 3-D shape effects in single-mode perturbations in planar foil simulations and experiments. A discussion of the evolution of multimode perturbations on planar foils is followed by a discussion of 3-D simulations of instability growth in Nova capsule implosions.

  3. Two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics simulations of superluminous interacting supernovae of Type IIn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlasis, Alkiviadis; Dessart, Luc; Audit, Edouard

    2016-05-01

    Some interacting supernovae (SNe) of Type IIn show a sizeable continuum polarization suggestive of a large-scale asymmetry in the circumstellar medium (CSM) and/or the SN ejecta. Here, we extend the recent work of Dessart et al. on superluminous SNe IIn and perform axially-symmetric (i.e. 2D) multigroup radiation hydrodynamics simulations to explore the impact of an imposed large-scale density asymmetry. When the CSM is asymmetric, the latitudinal variation of the radial optical depth τ introduces a strong flux redistribution from the higher density CSM regions, where the shock luminosity is larger, towards the lower density CSM regions where photons escape more freely - this redistribution ceases when τ ≲ 1. Along directions where the CSM density is larger, the shock deceleration is stronger and its progression slower, producing a non-spherical cold-dense shell (CDS). For an oblate CSM density distribution, the photosphere (CDS) has an oblate (prolate) morphology when τ ≳ 1. When the CSM is symmetric and the ejecta asymmetric, the flux redistribution within the CSM now tends to damp the latitudinal variation of the luminosity at the shock. It then requires a larger ejecta asymmetry to produce a sizeable latitudinal variation in the emergent flux. When the interaction is between a SN ejecta and a relic disc, the luminosity boost at early times scales with the disc opening angle - forming a superluminous SN IIn this way requires an unrealistically thick disc. In contrast, interaction with a disc of modest thickness/mass can yield a power that rivals radioactive decay of a standard SN II at nebular times.

  4. Two-dimensional simulations of thermonuclear burn in ignition-scale inertial confinement fusion targets under compressed axial magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, L. J.; Logan, B. G.; Zimmerman, G. B.; Werner, C. J.

    2013-07-15

    We report for the first time on full 2-D radiation-hydrodynamic implosion simulations that explore the impact of highly compressed imposed magnetic fields on the ignition and burn of perturbed spherical implosions of ignition-scale cryogenic capsules. Using perturbations that highly convolute the cold fuel boundary of the hotspot and prevent ignition without applied fields, we impose initial axial seed fields of 20–100 T (potentially attainable using present experimental methods) that compress to greater than 4 × 10{sup 4} T (400 MG) under implosion, thereby relaxing hotspot areal densities and pressures required for ignition and propagating burn by ∼50%. The compressed field is high enough to suppress transverse electron heat conduction, and to allow alphas to couple energy into the hotspot even when highly deformed by large low-mode amplitudes. This might permit the recovery of ignition, or at least significant alpha particle heating, in submarginal capsules that would otherwise fail because of adverse hydrodynamic instabilities.

  5. SASI ACTIVITY IN THREE-DIMENSIONAL NEUTRINO-HYDRODYNAMICS SIMULATIONS OF SUPERNOVA CORES

    SciTech Connect

    Hanke, Florian; Mueller, Bernhard; Wongwathanarat, Annop; Marek, Andreas; Janka, Hans-Thomas E-mail: bjmuellr@mpa-garching.mpg.de E-mail: amarek@mpa-garching.mpg.de

    2013-06-10

    The relevance of the standing accretion shock instability (SASI) compared to neutrino-driven convection in three-dimensional (3D) supernova-core environments is still highly controversial. Studying a 27 M{sub Sun} progenitor, we demonstrate, for the first time, that violent SASI activity can develop in 3D simulations with detailed neutrino transport despite the presence of convection. This result was obtained with the PROMETHEUS-VERTEX code with the same sophisticated neutrino treatment so far used only in one-dimensional and two-dimensional (2D) models. While buoyant plumes initially determine the nonradial mass motions in the postshock layer, bipolar shock sloshing with growing amplitude sets in during a phase of shock retraction and turns into a violent spiral mode whose growth is only quenched when the infall of the Si/SiO interface leads to strong shock expansion in response to a dramatic decrease of the mass accretion rate. In the phase of large-amplitude SASI sloshing and spiral motions, the postshock layer exhibits nonradial deformation dominated by the lowest-order spherical harmonics (l = 1, m = 0, {+-}1) in distinct contrast to the higher multipole structures associated with neutrino-driven convection. We find that the SASI amplitudes, shock asymmetry, and nonradial kinetic energy in three dimensions can exceed those of the corresponding 2D case during extended periods of the evolution. We also perform parameterized 3D simulations of a 25 M{sub Sun} progenitor, using a simplified, gray neutrino transport scheme, an axis-free Yin-Yang grid, and different amplitudes of random seed perturbations. They confirm the importance of the SASI for another progenitor, its independence of the choice of spherical grid, and its preferred growth for fast accretion flows connected to small shock radii and compact proto-neutron stars as previously found in 2D setups.

  6. SASI Activity in Three-dimensional Neutrino-hydrodynamics Simulations of Supernova Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanke, Florian; Müller, Bernhard; Wongwathanarat, Annop; Marek, Andreas; Janka, Hans-Thomas

    2013-06-01

    The relevance of the standing accretion shock instability (SASI) compared to neutrino-driven convection in three-dimensional (3D) supernova-core environments is still highly controversial. Studying a 27 M ⊙ progenitor, we demonstrate, for the first time, that violent SASI activity can develop in 3D simulations with detailed neutrino transport despite the presence of convection. This result was obtained with the PROMETHEUS-VERTEX code with the same sophisticated neutrino treatment so far used only in one-dimensional and two-dimensional (2D) models. While buoyant plumes initially determine the nonradial mass motions in the postshock layer, bipolar shock sloshing with growing amplitude sets in during a phase of shock retraction and turns into a violent spiral mode whose growth is only quenched when the infall of the Si/SiO interface leads to strong shock expansion in response to a dramatic decrease of the mass accretion rate. In the phase of large-amplitude SASI sloshing and spiral motions, the postshock layer exhibits nonradial deformation dominated by the lowest-order spherical harmonics (l = 1, m = 0, ±1) in distinct contrast to the higher multipole structures associated with neutrino-driven convection. We find that the SASI amplitudes, shock asymmetry, and nonradial kinetic energy in three dimensions can exceed those of the corresponding 2D case during extended periods of the evolution. We also perform parameterized 3D simulations of a 25 M ⊙ progenitor, using a simplified, gray neutrino transport scheme, an axis-free Yin-Yang grid, and different amplitudes of random seed perturbations. They confirm the importance of the SASI for another progenitor, its independence of the choice of spherical grid, and its preferred growth for fast accretion flows connected to small shock radii and compact proto-neutron stars as previously found in 2D setups.

  7. Pressure, compressibility, and contact of the two-dimensional attractive fermi gas.

    PubMed

    Anderson, E R; Drut, J E

    2015-09-11

    Using ab initio lattice methods, we calculate the finite temperature thermodynamics of homogeneous two-dimensional spin-1/2 fermions with attractive short-range interactions. We present results for the density, pressure, compressibility, and quantum anomaly (i.e., Tan's contact) for a wide range of temperatures (mostly above the superfluid phase, including the pseudogap regime) and coupling strengths, focusing on the unpolarized case. Within our statistical and systematic uncertainties, our prediction for the density equation of state differs quantitatively from the prediction by Luttinger-Ward theory in the strongly coupled region of parameter space, but otherwise agrees well with it. We also compare our calculations with the second- and third-order virial expansion, with which they are in excellent agreement in the low-fugacity regime. PMID:26406837

  8. Materials science. Assembly of micro/nanomaterials into complex, three-dimensional architectures by compressive buckling.

    PubMed

    Xu, Sheng; Yan, Zheng; Jang, Kyung-In; Huang, Wen; Fu, Haoran; Kim, Jeonghyun; Wei, Zijun; Flavin, Matthew; McCracken, Joselle; Wang, Renhan; Badea, Adina; Liu, Yuhao; Xiao, Dongqing; Zhou, Guoyan; Lee, Jungwoo; Chung, Ha Uk; Cheng, Huanyu; Ren, Wen; Banks, Anthony; Li, Xiuling; Paik, Ungyu; Nuzzo, Ralph G; Huang, Yonggang; Zhang, Yihui; Rogers, John A

    2015-01-01

    Complex three-dimensional (3D) structures in biology (e.g., cytoskeletal webs, neural circuits, and vasculature networks) form naturally to provide essential functions in even the most basic forms of life. Compelling opportunities exist for analogous 3D architectures in human-made devices, but design options are constrained by existing capabilities in materials growth and assembly. We report routes to previously inaccessible classes of 3D constructs in advanced materials, including device-grade silicon. The schemes involve geometric transformation of 2D micro/nanostructures into extended 3D layouts by compressive buckling. Demonstrations include experimental and theoretical studies of more than 40 representative geometries, from single and multiple helices, toroids, and conical spirals to structures that resemble spherical baskets, cuboid cages, starbursts, flowers, scaffolds, fences, and frameworks, each with single- and/or multiple-level configurations.

  9. Two-channel high-accuracy Holoimage technique for three-dimensional data compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yajun; Zhang, Lianxin; Yang, Sheng; Ji, Fang

    2016-10-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) shape data sizes can be substantially reduced using the Holoimage technique which converts the 3D shape data into regular 24-bit 2D images. However, the Holoimage technique generally takes up all the three standard image channels (RGB) and leave no room in an image to store other information, such as a texture or a normal map. Meanwhile, the recovered 3D accuracy is not very high due to the rounding process of image storage. To overcome these problems, this paper first proposes a two-channel Holoimage technique to compress 3D data and thus leave one more channel for storing other information. In addition, a novel phase-error compensation approach is also presented to enhance the recovered accuracy for Holoimage techniques. Without adding anymore bits, the error compensation approach can greatly improve the 3D recovered accuracy. Experimental results are presented to verify the performance of the proposed methods.

  10. Two-dimensional descent through a compressible atmosphere: Sequential deceleration of an unpowered load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silverman, M. P.

    2010-02-01

    Equations, based on Rayleigh's drag law valid for high Reynolds number, are derived for two-dimensional motion through a compressible atmosphere in isentropic equilibrium, such as characterizes the Earth's troposphere. Solutions yield horizontal and vertical displacement, velocity, and acceleration as a function of altitude and ground-level temperature. An exact analytical solution to the equations linearized in the aero-thermodynamic parameter is given; in general the equations must be solved numerically. The theory, applied to the unpowered fall of a large aircraft stabilized to flat descent by symmetrical, sequential deployment of horizontal and vertical decelerators, shows that such an aircraft can be brought down with mean peak deployment and impact decelerations below 10g.

  11. Flame four-dimensional deflection tomography with compressed-sensing-revision reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bin; Zhao, Minmin; Liu, Zhigang; Wu, Zhaohang

    2016-08-01

    Deflection tomography with limited angle projections was investigated to visualize a premixed flame. A projection sampling system for deflection tomography was used to obtain chronological deflectogram arrays at six view angles with only a pair of gratings. A new iterative reconstruction algorithm with deflection angle compressed-sensing revision was developed to improve reconstruction-distribution quality from incomplete projection data. Numerical simulation and error analysis provided a good indication of algorithm precision and convergence. In the experiment, 150 fringes were processed, and temperature distributions in 20 cross-sections were reconstructed from projection data in four instants. Four-dimensional flame structures and temperature distributions in the flame interior were visualized using the visualization toolkit. The experimental reconstruction was then compared with the result obtained from computational fluid dynamic analysis.

  12. Two-Dimensional Radiation Hydrodynamics with Detailed Equations of State and Opacities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santarius, J. F.; Macfarlane, J. J.; Moses, G. A.; Peterson, R. R.; Wang, P.; Cohen, D. H.

    1996-11-01

    The University of Wisconsin presently models ICF targets and target chambers with the 1-D BUCKY computer code.(J.J. MacFarlane, G.A. Moses, and R.R. Peterson, Univ. of Wis. Report UWFDM-984 (1995).) Progress on incorporating the BUCKY physics models in the ZEUS-2D two-dimensional radiation-magnetohydrodynamics computer code(J.M. Stone, D. Mihalas, and M.L. Norman, Ap. J. Suppl.) 80, 753--845 (1992). will be reported. ZEUS-2D has been modified to use detailed equations of state and opacities, multigroup flux-limited radiation diffusion, and multiple materials. Selected studies of radiation burn-through, heat-pulse propagation, and x-ray emission from hohlraums will be presented. Cylindrically symmetric hohlraums exhibit primarily two-dimensional emission of x rays, with axial jets and conical lobes out the laser entrance holes. This information will be particularly useful for evaluating the response of the chamber wall and diagnostics to high-yield NIF shots.

  13. Three-dimensional hydrodynamics of the deceleration stage in inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, C. R. Clark, D. S.; Cook, A. W.; Eder, D. C.; Haan, S. W.; Hammel, B. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Jones, O. S.; Marinak, M. M.; Milovich, J. L.; Patel, P. K.; Robey, H. F.; Salmonson, J. D.; Sepke, S. M.; Thomas, C. A.

    2015-03-15

    The deceleration stage of inertial confinement fusion implosions is modeled in detail using three-dimensional simulations designed to match experiments at the National Ignition Facility. In this final stage of the implosion, shocks rebound from the center of the capsule, forming the high-temperature, low-density hot spot and slowing the incoming fuel. The flow field that results from this process is highly three-dimensional and influences many aspects of the implosion. The interior of the capsule has high-velocity motion, but viscous effects limit the range of scales that develop. The bulk motion of the hot spot shows qualitative agreement with experimental velocity measurements, while the variance of the hot spot velocity would broaden the DT neutron spectrum, increasing the inferred temperature by 400–800 eV. Jets of ablator material are broken apart and redirected as they enter this dynamic hot spot. Deceleration stage simulations using two fundamentally different rad-hydro codes are compared and the flow field is found to be in good agreement.

  14. Magnetic dynamo action in two-dimensional turbulent magneto-hydrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fyfe, D.; Joyce, G.; Montgomery, D.

    1976-01-01

    Two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic turbulence is explored by means of numerical simulation. Previous analytical theory, based on non-dissipative constants of the motion in a truncated Fourier representation, is verified by following the evolution of highly non-equilibrium initial conditions numerically. Dynamo action (conversion of a significant fraction of turbulent kinetic energy into long-wavelength magnetic field energy) is observed. It is conjectured that in the presence of dissipation and external forcing, a dual cascade will be observed for zero-helicity situations. Energy will cascade to higher wave numbers simultaneously with a cascade of mean square vector potential to lower wave numbers, leading to an omni-directional magnetic energy spectrum which varies as 1/k 3 at lower wave numbers, simultaneously with a buildup of magnetic excitation at the lowest wave number of the system. Equipartition of kinetic and magnetic energies is expected at the highest wave numbers in the system.

  15. General-Relativistic Three-Dimensional Multi-group Neutrino Radiation-Hydrodynamics Simulations of Core-Collapse Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Luke F.; Ott, Christian D.; Haas, Roland; O’Connor, Evan P.; Diener, Peter; Schnetter, Erik

    2016-11-01

    We report on a set of long-term general-relativistic three-dimensional (3D) multi-group (energy-dependent) neutrino radiation-hydrodynamics simulations of core-collapse supernovae. We employ a full 3D two-moment scheme with the local M1 closure, three neutrino species, and 12 energy groups per species. With this, we follow the post-core-bounce evolution of the core of a nonrotating 27 - {M}ȯ progenitor in full unconstrained 3D and in octant symmetry for ≳380 ms. We find the development of an asymmetric runaway explosion in our unconstrained simulation. We test the resolution dependence of our results and, in agreement with previous work, find that low resolution artificially aids explosion and leads to an earlier runaway expansion of the shock. At low resolution, the octant and full 3D dynamics are qualitatively very similar, but at high resolution, only the full 3D simulation exhibits the onset of explosion.

  16. Three-dimensional Hydrodynamical Simulations of the Supernovae-driven Gas Loss in the Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy Ursa Minor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caproni, A.; Lanfranchi, G. A.; da Silva, A. Luiz; Falceta-Gonçalves, D.

    2015-06-01

    As is usual in dwarf spheroidal galaxies, today the Local Group galaxy Ursa Minor is depleted of its gas content. How this galaxy lost its gas is still a matter of debate. To study the history of gas loss in Ursa Minor, we conducted the first three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations of this object, assuming that the gas loss was driven by galactic winds powered only by type II supernovae (SNe II). The initial gas setup and supernova (SN) rates used in our simulations are mainly constrained by the inferred star formation history and the observed velocity dispersion of Ursa Minor. After 3 Gyr of evolution, we found that the gas removal efficiency is higher when the SN rate is increased, and also when the initial mean gas density is lowered. The derived mass-loss rates are systematically higher in the central regions (\\lt 300 pc), even though such a relationship has not been strictly linear in time and in terms of the galactic radius. The filamentary structures induced by Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities and the concentric shells related to the acoustic waves driven by SNe can account for the inferred mass losses from the simulations. Our results suggest that SNe II are able to transfer most of the gas from the central region outward to the galactic halo. However, other physical mechanisms must be considered in order to completely remove the gas at larger radii.

  17. Assessing factors affecting the thermal properties of a passive thermal refuge using three-dimensional hydrodynamic flow and transport modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Decker, Jeremy D.; Swain, Eric D.; Stith, Bradley M.; Langtimm, Catherine A.

    2013-01-01

    Everglades restoration activities may cause changes to temperature and salinity stratification at the Port of the Islands (POI) marina, which could affect its suitability as a cold weather refuge for manatees. To better understand how the Picayune Strand Restoration Project (PSRP) may alter this important resource in Collier County in southwestern Florida, the USGS has developed a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model for the marina and canal system at POI. Empirical data suggest that manatees aggregate at the site during winter because of thermal inversions that provide warmer water near the bottom that appears to only occur in the presence of salinity stratification. To study these phenomena, the environmental fluid dynamics code simulator was used to represent temperature and salinity transport within POI. Boundary inputs were generated using a larger two-dimensional model constructed with the flow and transport in a linked overland-aquifer density-dependent system simulator. Model results for a representative winter period match observed trends in salinity and temperature fluctuations and produce temperature inversions similar to observed values. Modified boundary conditions, representing proposed PSRP alterations, were also tested to examine the possible effect on the salinity stratification and temperature inversion within POI. Results show that during some periods, salinity stratification is reduced resulting in a subsequent reduction in temperature inversion compared with the existing conditions simulation. This may have an effect on POI’s suitability as a passive thermal refuge for manatees and other temperature-sensitive species. Additional testing was completed to determine the important physical relationships affecting POI’s suitability as a refuge.

  18. Three-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamics calculations of the envelopes of young planets embedded in protoplanetary disks

    SciTech Connect

    D'Angelo, Gennaro; Bodenheimer, Peter E-mail: peter@ucolick.org

    2013-11-20

    We perform global three-dimensional (3D) radiation-hydrodynamics calculations of the envelopes surrounding young planetary cores of 5, 10, and 15 Earth masses, located in a protoplanetary disk at 5 and 10 AU from a solar-mass star. We apply a nested-grid technique to resolve the thermodynamics of the disk at the orbital-radius length scale and that of the envelope at the core-radius length scale. The gas is modeled as a solar mixture of molecular and atomic hydrogen, helium, and their ions. The equation of state accounts for both gas and radiation, and gas energy includes contributions from rotational and vibrational states of molecular hydrogen and from ionization of atomic species. Dust opacities are computed from first principles, applying the full Mie theory. One-dimensional (1D) calculations of planet formation are used to supplement the 3D calculations by providing energy deposition rates in the envelope due to solids accretion. We compare 1D and 3D envelopes and find that masses and gas accretion rates agree within factors of 2, and so do envelope temperatures. The trajectories of passive tracers are used to define the size of 3D envelopes, resulting in radii much smaller than the Hill radius and smaller than the Bondi radius. The moments of inertia and angular momentum of the envelopes are determined and the rotation rates are derived from the rigid-body approximation, resulting in slow bulk rotation. We find that the polar flattening is ≲ 0.05. The dynamics of the accretion flow are examined by tracking the motion of tracers that move into the envelope. The anisotropy of this flow is characterized in terms of both its origin and impact site at the envelope surface. Gas merges with the envelope preferentially at mid- to high latitudes.

  19. Radiation hydrodynamics modeling of the highest compression inertial confinement fusion ignition experiment from the National Ignition Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, D. S.; Marinak, M. M.; Weber, C. R.; Eder, D. C.; Haan, S. W.; Hammel, B. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Jones, O. S.; Milovich, J. L.; Patel, P. K.; Robey, H. F.; Salmonson, J. D.; Sepke, S. M.; Thomas, C. A.

    2015-02-01

    The recently completed National Ignition Campaign (NIC) on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) showed significant discrepancies between post-shot simulations of implosion performance and experimentally measured performance, particularly in thermonuclear yield. This discrepancy between simulation and observation persisted despite concerted efforts to include all of the known sources of performance degradation within a reasonable two-dimensional (2-D), and even three-dimensional (3-D), simulation model, e.g., using measured surface imperfections and radiation drives adjusted to reproduce observed implosion trajectories [Clark et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 056318 (2013)]. Since the completion of the NIC, several effects have been identified that could explain these discrepancies and that were omitted in previous simulations. In particular, there is now clear evidence for larger than anticipated long-wavelength radiation drive asymmetries and a larger than expected perturbation seeded by the capsule support tent. This paper describes an updated suite of one-dimensional (1-D), 2-D, and 3-D simulations that include the current best understanding of these effects identified since the NIC, as applied to a specific NIC shot. The relative importance of each effect on the experimental observables is compared. In combination, these effects reduce the simulated-to-measured yield ratio from 125:1 in 1-D to 1.5:1 in 3-D, as compared to 15:1 in the best 2-D simulations published previously. While the agreement with the experimental data remains imperfect, the comparison to the data is significantly improved and suggests that the largest sources for the previous discrepancies between simulation and experiment are now being included.

  20. Radiation hydrodynamics modeling of the highest compression inertial confinement fusion ignition experiment from the National Ignition Campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D. S.; Marinak, M. M.; Weber, C. R.; Eder, D. C.; Haan, S. W.; Hammel, B. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Jones, O. S.; Milovich, J. L.; Patel, P. K.; Robey, H. F.; Salmonson, J. D.; Sepke, S. M.; Thomas, C. A.

    2015-02-15

    The recently completed National Ignition Campaign (NIC) on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) showed significant discrepancies between post-shot simulations of implosion performance and experimentally measured performance, particularly in thermonuclear yield. This discrepancy between simulation and observation persisted despite concerted efforts to include all of the known sources of performance degradation within a reasonable two-dimensional (2-D), and even three-dimensional (3-D), simulation model, e.g., using measured surface imperfections and radiation drives adjusted to reproduce observed implosion trajectories [Clark et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 056318 (2013)]. Since the completion of the NIC, several effects have been identified that could explain these discrepancies and that were omitted in previous simulations. In particular, there is now clear evidence for larger than anticipated long-wavelength radiation drive asymmetries and a larger than expected perturbation seeded by the capsule support tent. This paper describes an updated suite of one-dimensional (1-D), 2-D, and 3-D simulations that include the current best understanding of these effects identified since the NIC, as applied to a specific NIC shot. The relative importance of each effect on the experimental observables is compared. In combination, these effects reduce the simulated-to-measured yield ratio from 125:1 in 1-D to 1.5:1 in 3-D, as compared to 15:1 in the best 2-D simulations published previously. While the agreement with the experimental data remains imperfect, the comparison to the data is significantly improved and suggests that the largest sources for the previous discrepancies between simulation and experiment are now being included.

  1. Uniform Regularity and Vanishing Dissipation Limit for the Full Compressible Navier-Stokes System in Three Dimensional Bounded Domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yong

    2016-09-01

    In the present paper, we study the uniform regularity and vanishing dissipation limit for the full compressible Navier-Stokes system whose viscosity and heat conductivity are allowed to vanish at different orders. The problem is studied in a three dimensional bounded domain with Navier-slip type boundary conditions. It is shown that there exists a unique strong solution to the full compressible Navier-Stokes system with the boundary conditions in a finite time interval which is independent of the viscosity and heat conductivity. The solution is uniformly bounded in {W^{1,infty}} and is a conormal Sobolev space. Based on such uniform estimates, we prove the convergence of the solutions of the full compressible Navier-Stokes to the corresponding solutions of the full compressible Euler system in {L^infty(0,T; L^2)}, {L^infty(0,T; H1)} and {L^infty([0,T]×Ω)} with a rate of convergence.

  2. Calibration of a two-dimensional hydrodynamic model for parts of the Allegheny, Monongahela, and Ohio Rivers, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fulton, John W.; Wagner, Chad R.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Allegheny County Sanitary Authority, developed a validated two-dimensional Resource Management Associates2 (RMA2) hydrodynamic model of parts of the Allegheny, Monongahela, and Ohio Rivers (Three Rivers) to help assess the effects of combined sewer overflows (CSOs) and sanitary sewer overflows (SSOs) on the rivers. The hydrodynamic model was used to drive a water-quality model of the study area that was capable of simulating the transport and fate of fecal-indicator bacteria and chemical constituents under open-water conditions. The study area includes 14 tributary streams and parts of the Three Rivers where they enter and exit Allegheny County, an area of approximately 730 square miles (mi2). The city of Pittsburgh is near the center of the county, where the Allegheny and Monongahela Rivers join to form the headwaters of the Ohio River. The Three Rivers are regulated by a series of fixed-crest dams, gated dams, and radial (tainter) gates and serve as the receiving waters for tributary streams, CSOs, and SSOs. The RMA2 model was separated into four individual segments on the basis of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers navigational pools in the study area (Dashields; Emsworth; Allegheny River, Pool 2; and Braddock), which were calibrated individually using measured water-surface slope, velocity, and discharge during high- and low-flow conditions. The model calibration process included the comparison of water-surface elevations at five locations and velocity profiles at more than 80 cross sections in the study area. On the basis of the calibration and validation results that included water-surface elevations and velocities, the model is a representative simulation of the Three Rivers flow patterns for discharges ranging from 4,050 to 47,400 cubic feet per second (ft3/s) on the Allegheny River, 2,550 to 40,000 ft3/s on the Monongahela River, and 10,900 to 99,000 ft3/s on the Ohio River. The Monongahela River was

  3. WIND- THREE DIMENSIONAL POTENTIAL COMPRESSIBLE FLOW ABOUT WIND TURBINE ROTOR BLADES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dulikravich, D. S.

    1994-01-01

    This computer program, WIND, was developed to numerically solve the exact, full-potential equation for three-dimensional, steady, inviscid flow through an isolated wind turbine rotor. The program automatically generates a three-dimensional, boundary-conforming grid and iteratively solves the full-potential equation while fully accounting for both the rotating and Coriolis effects. WIND is capable of numerically analyzing the flow field about a given blade shape of the horizontal-axis type wind turbine. The rotor hub is assumed representable by a doubly infinite circular cylinder. An arbitrary number of blades may be attached to the hub and these blades may have arbitrary spanwise distributions of taper and of the twist, sweep, and dihedral angles. An arbitrary number of different airfoil section shapes may be used along the span as long as the spanwise variation of all the geometeric parameters is reasonably smooth. The numerical techniques employed in WIND involve rotated, type-dependent finite differencing, a finite volume method, artificial viscosity in conservative form, and a successive overrelaxation combined with the sequential grid refinement procedure to accelerate the iterative convergence rate. Consequently, WIND is cabable of accurately analyzing incompressible and compressible flows, including those that are locally transonic and terminated by weak shocks. Along with the three-dimensional results, WIND provides the results of the two-dimensional calculations to aid the user in locating areas of possible improvement in the aerodynamic design of the blade. Output from WIND includes the chordwise distribution of the coefficient of pressure, the Mach number, the density, and the relative velocity components at spanwise stations along the blade. In addition, the results specify local values of the lift coefficient and the tangent and axial aerodynamic force components. These are also given in integrated form expressing the total torque and the total axial

  4. Global well-posedness of strong solutions to the two-dimensional barotropic compressible Navier-Stokes equations with vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Li; Guo, Zhenhua

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to establish the global well-posedness and large-time asymptotic behavior of the strong solution to the Cauchy problem of the two-dimensional compressible Navier-Stokes equations with vacuum. It is proved that if the shear viscosity {μ} is a positive constant and the bulk viscosity {λ} is the power function of the density, that is, {λ=ρ^{β}} with {β in [0,1],} then the Cauchy problem of the two-dimensional compressible Navier-Stokes equations admits a unique global strong solution provided that the initial data are of small total energy. This result can be regarded as the extension of the well-posedness theory of classical compressible Navier-Stokes equations [such as Huang et al. (Commun Pure Appl Math 65:549-585, 2012) and Li and Xin (http://arxiv.org/abs/1310.1673) respectively]. Furthermore, the large-time behavior of the strong solution to the Cauchy problem of the two-dimensional barotropic compressible Navier-Stokes equations had been also obtained.

  5. COSAL: A black-box compressible stability analysis code for transition prediction in three-dimensional boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malik, M. R.

    1982-01-01

    A fast computer code COSAL for transition prediction in three dimensional boundary layers using compressible stability analysis is described. The compressible stability eigenvalue problem is solved using a finite difference method, and the code is a black box in the sense that no guess of the eigenvalue is required from the user. Several optimization procedures were incorporated into COSAL to calculate integrated growth rates (N factor) for transition correlation for swept and tapered laminar flow control wings using the well known e to the Nth power method. A user's guide to the program is provided.

  6. Application of the Analogy Between Water Flow with a Free Surface and Two-dimensional Compressible Gas Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orlin, W James; Lindner, Norman J; Bitterly, Jack G

    1947-01-01

    The theory of hydraulic analogy, that is, the analogy between water flow with a free surface and two-dimensional compressible gas flow and the limitations and conditions of the analogy are discussed. A test run was made using the hydraulic analogy as applied to the flow about circular cylinders at various diameters at subsonic velocities extending to the super critical range. The apparatus and techniques used in this application are described and criticized. Reasonably satisfactory agreement of pressure distributions and flow fields existed between water and airflow about corresponding bodies. This agreement indicated the possibility of extending experimental compressibility research by new methods.

  7. Application of the Analogy Between Water Flow with a Free Surface and Two-Dimensional Compressible Gas Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orlin, W James; Lindner, Norman J; Butterly, Jack G

    1947-01-01

    The theory of the hydraulic analogy -- that is, the analogy between water flow with a free surface and two-dimensional compressible gas flow -- and the limitations and conditions of the analogy are discussed. A test was run using the hydraulic analogy as applied to the flow about circular cylinders of various diameters at subsonic velocities extending into the supercritical range. The apparatus and techniques used in this application are described and criticized. Reasonably satisfactory agreement of pressure distributions and flow fields existed between water and air flow about corresponding bodies. This agreement indicated the possibility of extending experimental compressibility research by new methods.

  8. Three-dimensional acoustic imaging with planar microphone arrays and compressive sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Fangli; Wei, Jingang; Qiu, Lianfang; Shi, Hongbing; Li, Xiaofan

    2016-10-01

    For obtaining super-resolution source maps, we extend compressive sensing (CS) to three-dimensional acoustic imaging. Source maps are simulated with a planar microphone array and a CS algorithm. Comparing the source maps of the CS algorithm with those of the conventional beamformer (CBF) and Tikhonov Regularization (TIKR), we find that the CS algorithm is computationally more effective and can obtain much higher resolution source maps than the CBF and TIKR. The effectiveness of the CS algorithm is analyzed. The CS algorithm can locate the sound sources exactly when the frequency is above 4000 Hz and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is above 12 dB. The location error of the CS algorithm increases as the frequency drops below the threshold, and the errors in location and power increase as SNR decreases. The further from the array the source is, the larger the location error is. The lateral resolution of the CS algorithm is much better than the range resolution. Finally, experimental measurements are conducted in a semi-anechoic room. Two mobile phones are served as sound sources. The results show that the CS algorithm can reconstruct two sound sources near the bottom of the two mobile phones where the speakers are located. The feasibility of the CS algorithm is also validated with the experiment.

  9. The Formation of Rotational Discontinuities in Compressive Three-dimensional MHD Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Liping; Zhang, Lei; He, Jiansen; Tu, Chuanyi; Wang, Linghua; Marsch, Eckart; Wang, Xin; Zhang, Shaohua; Feng, Xueshang

    2015-08-01

    Measurements of solar wind turbulence reveal the ubiquity of discontinuities. In this study we investigate how the discontinuities, especially rotational discontinuities (RDs), are formed in MHD turbulence. In a simulation of the decaying compressive three-dimensional (3D) MHD turbulence with an imposed uniform background magnetic field, we detect RDs with sharp field rotations and little variations of magnetic field intensity, as well as mass density. At the same time, in the de Hoffman-Teller frame, the plasma velocity is nearly in agreement with the Alfvén speed, and is field-aligned on both sides of the discontinuity. We take one of the identified RDs to analyze its 3D structure and temporal evolution in detail. By checking the magnetic field and plasma parameters, we find that the identified RD evolves from the steepening of the Alfvén wave with moderate amplitude, and that steepening is caused by the nonuniformity of the Alfvén speed in the ambient turbulence.

  10. THE FORMATION OF ROTATIONAL DISCONTINUITIES IN COMPRESSIVE THREE-DIMENSIONAL MHD TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Liping; Feng, Xueshang; Zhang, Lei; He, Jiansen; Tu, Chuanyi; Wang, Linghua; Wang, Xin; Marsch, Eckart; Zhang, Shaohua

    2015-08-20

    Measurements of solar wind turbulence reveal the ubiquity of discontinuities. In this study we investigate how the discontinuities, especially rotational discontinuities (RDs), are formed in MHD turbulence. In a simulation of the decaying compressive three-dimensional (3D) MHD turbulence with an imposed uniform background magnetic field, we detect RDs with sharp field rotations and little variations of magnetic field intensity, as well as mass density. At the same time, in the de Hoffman–Teller frame, the plasma velocity is nearly in agreement with the Alfvén speed, and is field-aligned on both sides of the discontinuity. We take one of the identified RDs to analyze its 3D structure and temporal evolution in detail. By checking the magnetic field and plasma parameters, we find that the identified RD evolves from the steepening of the Alfvén wave with moderate amplitude, and that steepening is caused by the nonuniformity of the Alfvén speed in the ambient turbulence.

  11. Nonstandard Analysis and Shock Wave Jump Conditions in a One-Dimensional Compressible Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baty, Roy S.; Farassat, Fereidoun; Hargreaves, John

    2007-01-01

    Nonstandard analysis is a relatively new area of mathematics in which infinitesimal numbers can be defined and manipulated rigorously like real numbers. This report presents a fairly comprehensive tutorial on nonstandard analysis for physicists and engineers with many examples applicable to generalized functions. To demonstrate the power of the subject, the problem of shock wave jump conditions is studied for a one-dimensional compressible gas. It is assumed that the shock thickness occurs on an infinitesimal interval and the jump functions in the thermodynamic and fluid dynamic parameters occur smoothly across this interval. To use conservations laws, smooth pre-distributions of the Dirac delta measure are applied whose supports are contained within the shock thickness. Furthermore, smooth pre-distributions of the Heaviside function are applied which vary from zero to one across the shock wave. It is shown that if the equations of motion are expressed in nonconservative form then the relationships between the jump functions for the flow parameters may be found unambiguously. The analysis yields the classical Rankine-Hugoniot jump conditions for an inviscid shock wave. Moreover, non-monotonic entropy jump conditions are obtained for both inviscid and viscous flows. The report shows that products of generalized functions may be defined consistently using nonstandard analysis; however, physically meaningful products of generalized functions must be determined from the physics of the problem and not the mathematical form of the governing equations.

  12. The role of molecular motors in the mechanics of active gels and the effects of inertia, hydrodynamic interaction and compressibility in passive microrheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uribe, Andres Cordoba

    The mechanical properties of soft biological materials are essential to their physiological function and cannot easily be duplicated by synthetic materials. The study of the mechanical properties of biological materials has lead to the development of new rheological characterization techniques. In the technique called passive microbead rheology, the positional autocorrelation function of a micron-sized bead embedded in a viscoelastic fluid is used to infer the dynamic modulus of the fluid. Single particle microrheology is limited to fluids were the microstructure is much smaller than the size of the probe bead. To overcome this limitation in two-bead microrheology the cross-correlated thermal motion of pairs of tracer particles is used to determine the dynamic modulus. Here we present a time-domain data analysis methodology and generalized Brownian dynamics simulations to examine the effects of inertia, hydrodynamic interaction, compressibility and non-conservative forces in passive microrheology. A type of biological material that has proven specially challenging to characterize are active gels. They are formed by semiflexible polymer filaments driven by motor proteins that convert chemical energy from the hydrolysis of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) to mechanical work and motion. Active gels perform essential functions in living tissue. Here we introduce a single-chain mean-field model to describe the mechanical properties of active gels. We model the semiflexible filaments as bead-spring chains and the molecular motors are accounted for by using a mean-field approach. The level of description of the model includes the end-to-end length and attachment state of the filaments, and the motor-generated forces, as stochastic state variables which evolve according to a proposed differential Chapman-Kolmogorov equation. The model allows accounting for physics that are not available in models that have been postulated on coarser levels of description. Moreover it allows

  13. Pore-water extraction from unsaturated tuff by triaxial and one-dimensional compression methods, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mower, Timothy E.; Higgins, Jerry D.; Yang, In C.; Peters, Charles A.

    1994-01-01

    Study of the hydrologic system at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, requires the extraction of pore-water samples from welded and nonwelded, unsaturated tuffs. Two compression methods (triaxial compression and one-dimensional compression) were examined to develop a repeatable extraction technique and to investigate the effects of the extraction method on the original pore-fluid composition. A commercially available triaxial cell was modified to collect pore water expelled from tuff cores. The triaxial cell applied a maximum axial stress of 193 MPa and a maximum confining stress of 68 MPa. Results obtained from triaxial compression testing indicated that pore-water samples could be obtained from nonwelded tuff cores that had initial moisture contents as small as 13 percent (by weight of dry soil). Injection of nitrogen gas while the test core was held at the maximum axial stress caused expulsion of additional pore water and reduced the required initial moisture content from 13 to 11 percent. Experimental calculations, together with experience gained from testing moderately welded tuff cores, indicated that the triaxial cell used in this study could not apply adequate axial or confining stress to expel pore water from cores of densely welded tuffs. This concern led to the design, fabrication, and testing of a one-dimensional compression cell. The one-dimensional compression cell used in this study was constructed from hardened 4340-alloy and nickel-alloy steels and could apply a maximum axial stress of 552 MPa. The major components of the device include a corpus ring and sample sleeve to confine the sample, a piston and base platen to apply axial load, and drainage plates to transmit expelled water from the test core out of the cell. One-dimensional compression extracted pore water from nonwelded tuff cores that had initial moisture contents as small as 7.6 percent; pore water was expelled from densely welded tuff cores that had initial moisture contents as small as 7

  14. Compression of ultra-short light pulses using the graded refractive index one-dimensional photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiri, R.; Bananej, A.; Safari, E.

    2016-09-01

    The one-dimensional photonic crystals (1D PCs) containing a graded refractive index layer have been theoretically utilized to compress the positively chirped ultra-short pulses of light. Two types of simple and graded index multi-layer structures consisting alternating layers of TiO2 and SiO2 with the same total thicknesses and periodicity have been investigated and compared. For the graded structure, three different refractive index distributions including linear, exponential and parabolic profiles have been considered. The results revealed that replacing one of the homogeneous layers of the unit cells in simple photonic crystal with a graded material having parabolic refractive index profile efficiently improves compression behavior of the structure. The compress factors of as much as 47% and 78% depending on the pulse's initial chirp rate obtained with parabolic profile of such the structures.

  15. CS²-Collector: A New Approach for Data Collection in Wireless Sensor Networks Based on Two-Dimensional Compressive Sensing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Yang, Zhuoshi; Zhang, Jianpei; Li, Feng; Wen, Hongkai; Shen, Yiran

    2016-08-19

    In this paper, we consider the problem of reconstructing the temporal and spatial profile of some physical phenomena monitored by large-scale Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) in an energy efficient manner. Compressive sensing is one of the popular choices to reduce the energy consumption of the data collection in WSNs. The existing solutions only consider sparsity of sensors' data from either temporal or spatial dimensions. In this paper, we propose a novel data collection strategy, CS²-collector, for WSNs based on the theory of Two Dimensional Compressive Sensing (2DCS). It exploits both temporal and spatial sparsity, i.e., 2D-sparsity of WSNs and achieves significant gain on the tradeoff between the compression ratio and reconstruction accuracy as the numerical simulations and evaluations on different types of sensors' data. More intuitively, with the same given energy budget, CS²-collector provides significantly more accurate reconstruction of the profile of the physical phenomena that are temporal-spatially sparse.

  16. Possible flow regimes of adiabatic one-dimensional compressible fluid flow with friction in convergent and divergent ducts.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shouman, A. R.; Garcia, C. E.

    1971-01-01

    An analytical solution for the compressible one-dimensional flow in convergent and divergent ducts with friction is obtained. It is found that a nondimensional parameter, N, can be formed using the friction factor, duct half-angle and the ratio of specific heats of the gas. Seven flow regimes are describable with the solution, based on certain bounds on the magnitude of N. The regimes are discussed and corollary data are presented graphically.

  17. One-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics of a cylindrical liner imploded by an azimuthal magnetic field and compressing an axial field

    SciTech Connect

    Hamann, F. Combis, P.; Videau, L.

    2015-08-15

    The one-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics of a plasma cylindrical liner is addressed in the case of a two components magnetic field. The azimuthal component is responsible for the implosion of the liner and the axial field is compressed inside the liner. A complete set of analytical profiles for the magnetic field components, the density, and the local velocity are proposed at the scale of the liner thickness. Numerical simulations are also presented to test the validity of the analytical formulas.

  18. Lattice Boltzmann study of hydrodynamic effects in lamellar ordering process of two-dimensional quenched block copolymers.

    PubMed

    Song, Kai-Xu; Jia, Yu-Xi; Sun, Zhao-Yan; An, Li-Jia

    2008-10-14

    By incorporating self-consistent field theory with lattice Boltzmann method, a model for polymer melts is proposed. Compared with models based on Ginzburg-Landau free energy, our model does not employ phenomenological free energies to describe systems and can consider the chain topological details of polymers. We use this model to study the effects of hydrodynamic interactions on the dynamics of microphase separation for block copolymers. In the early stage of phase separation, an exponential growth predicted by Cahn-Hilliard treatment is found. Simulation results also show that the effect of hydrodynamic interactions can be neglected in the early stage. For the late stage of phase separation, it is easy to see the effects of hydrodynamic interactions on the ordering process of lamellae phase. From the analysis of structure factor curves, we find that the growth of domains is faster if hydrodynamic interactions are introduced. Furthermore, the scaling of the pattern dynamics is investigated for the late stage at zero thermal noise. By studying the behavior of scaling exponents of the structure factor and the nematic order-parameter correlation function C(nn), we can see that the effects of hydrodynamic interactions lead to bigger growth exponent for both functions. PMID:19045162

  19. Three dimensional numerical modeling of Hydrodynamics and sediment transport in the Mississippi River Diversion at West Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadid, K. M.; Meselhe, E. A.; Roth, B.; Allison, M. A.

    2013-12-01

    The coastal wetlands of Louisiana have been experiencing high rates of land subsidence and erosion for decades. Anthropogenic alterations to the hydrology and geology, powerful hurricanes, and relative sea level rise have caused major coastal land loss in Louisiana. After years of research and discussions, the use of sediment diversions from the Mississippi River to adjacent embayment areas were proposed and further authorized as a solution for land building. To this end, the West Bay diversion (WBD) was constructed in 2003 to restore approximately 9,831 acres of wetlands in the West Bay area under the Coastal Wetlands Planning, Protection, and Restoration Act (CWPPRA). The WBD is located along the right-descending bank of the Mississippi River south of Venice, LA near River Mile (RM) 4.7. The initial size of the channel post-construction was designed to convey 20,000 cubic feet per second (cfs), and over time it was anticipated to support a maximum of 50,000 cfs. This sediment diversion provides an opportunity to examine and analyze the impact of such diversion on the morphology of the river channel, and the retention characteristics and rate of delta growth in the receiving basin. Additionally, the WBD serve as analogue to fully validate morphologic models that could consequently be used to model proposed land building sediment diversions in the Lower Mississippi River. In this study a three-dimensional numerical model is developed for the WBD which includes the main channel of the Mississippi River as well as the receiving basin. The model is being calibrated and validated for hydrodynamics and morphology using detailed field observations. Since 2003 regular monitoring has taken place as per the CWPPRA project guidelines. This includes bathymetric surveys of the receiving basin from 2002 (pre-construction), 2003, 2006, and 2009. A recent monitoring survey has been completed and will be available in the near future. In addition to this monitoring data, the U

  20. Weakly compressible turbulence in local interstellar medium. Three-dimensional modeling using Large Eddy Simulation method

    SciTech Connect

    Chernyshov, Alexander A.; Karelsky, Kirill V.; Petrosyan, Arakel S.

    2010-06-16

    Using advantages of large eddy simulation method, nontrivial regime of compressible magnetohydrodynamic turbulence of space plasma when initially supersonic fluctuations become weakly compressible is studied. Establishment of weakly compressible limit with Kolmogorov-like density fluctuations spectrum is shown in present work. We use our computations results to study dynamics of the turbulent plasma beta and anisotropic properties of the magnetoplasma fluctuations in the local interstellar medium. An outstanding, as yet unexplained, observation is that density fluctuations in the local interstellar medium exhibit a Kolmogorov-like spectrum over an extraordinary range of scales with a spectral index close to -5/3. In spite of the compressibility and the presence of magnetic field in the local interstellar medium, density fluctuations nevertheless admit a Kolmogorov-like power law. Supersonic flows with high value of large-scale Mach numbers are characterized in interstellar medium, nevertheless, there are subsonic fluctuations of weakly compressible components of interstellar medium. These weakly compressible subsonic fluctuations are responsible for emergence of a Kolmogorov-type spectrum in interstellar turbulence which is observed from experimental data. It is shown that density fluctuations are a passive scalar in a velocity field in weakly compressible magnetohydrodynamic turbulence and demonstrate Kolmogorov-like spectrum.

  1. General formulation of transverse hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Ryblewski, Radoslaw; Florkowski, Wojciech

    2008-06-15

    General formulation of hydrodynamics describing transversally thermalized matter created at the early stages of ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions is presented. Similarities and differences with the standard three-dimensionally thermalized relativistic hydrodynamics are discussed. The role of the conservation laws as well as the thermodynamic consistency of two-dimensional thermodynamic variables characterizing transversally thermalized matter is emphasized.

  2. A Navier-Stokes solution of the three-dimensional viscous compressible flow in a centrifugal compressor impeller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harp, J. L., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    A two-dimensional time-dependent computer code was utilized to calculate the three-dimensional steady flow within the impeller blading. The numerical method is an explicit time marching scheme in two spatial dimensions. Initially, an inviscid solution is generated on the hub blade-to-blade surface by the method of Katsanis and McNally (1973). Starting with the known inviscid solution, the viscous effects are calculated through iteration. The approach makes it possible to take into account principal impeller fluid-mechanical effects. It is pointed out that the second iterate provides a complete solution to the three-dimensional, compressible, Navier-Stokes equations for flow in a centrifugal impeller. The problems investigated are related to the study of a radial impeller and a backswept impeller.

  3. Geometric and Hydrodynamic Characteristics of Three-dimensional Saturated Prefractal Porous Media Determined with Lattice Boltzmann Modeling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fractal and prefractal geometric models have substantial potential of contributing to the analysis of flow and transport in porous media such as soils and reservoir rocks. In this study, geometric and hydrodynamic parameters of saturated 3D mass and pore-solid prefractal porous media were characteri...

  4. Turbulent Friction in the Boundary Layer of a Flat Plate in a Two-Dimensional Compressible Flow at High Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frankl, F.; Voishel, V.

    1943-01-01

    In the present report an investigation is made on a flat plate in a two-dimensional compressible flow of the effect of compressibility and heating on the turbulent frictional drag coefficient in the boundary layer of an airfoil or wing radiator. The analysis is based on the Prandtl-Karman theory of the turbulent boundary later and the Stodola-Crocco, theorem on the linear relation between the total energy of the flow and its velocity. Formulas are obtained for the velocity distribution and the frictional drag law in a turbulent boundary later with the compressibility effect and heat transfer taken into account. It is found that with increase of compressibility and temperature at full retardation of the flow (the temperature when the velocity of the flow at a given point is reduced to zero in case of an adiabatic process in the gas) at a constant R (sub x), the frictional drag coefficient C (sub f) decreased, both of these factors acting in the same sense.

  5. Compressive sensing based high-speed time-stretch optical microscopy for two-dimensional image acquisition.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qiang; Chen, Hongwei; Weng, Zhiliang; Chen, Minghua; Yang, Sigang; Xie, Shizhong

    2015-11-16

    In this paper, compressive sensing based high-speed time-stretch optical microscopy for two-dimensional (2D) image acquisition is proposed and experimentally demonstrated for the first time. A section of dispersion compensating fiber (DCF) is used to perform wavelength-to-time conversion and then ultrafast spectral shaping of broadband optical pulses can be achieved via high-speed intensity modulation. A 2D spatial disperser comprising a pair of orthogonally oriented dispersers is employed to produce spatially structured illumination for 2D image acquisition and a section of single mode fiber (SMF) is utilized for pulse compression in the optical domain. In our scheme, a 1.2-GHz photodetector and a 50-MHz analog-to-digital converter (ADC) are used to acquire the energy of the compressed pulses. Image reconstructions are demonstrated at a frame rate of 500 kHz and a sixteen-fold image compression is achieved in our proof-of-concept demonstration.

  6. Three-dimensionally bonded spongy graphene material with super compressive elasticity and near-zero Poisson’s ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yingpeng; Yi, Ningbo; Huang, Lu; Zhang, Tengfei; Fang, Shaoli; Chang, Huicong; Li, Na; Oh, Jiyoung; Lee, Jae Ah; Kozlov, Mikhail; Chipara, Alin C.; Terrones, Humberto; Xiao, Peishuang; Long, Guankui; Huang, Yi; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, Long; Lepró, Xavier; Haines, Carter; Lima, Márcio Dias; Lopez, Nestor Perea; Rajukumar, Lakshmy P.; Elias, Ana L.; Feng, Simin; Kim, Seon Jeong; Narayanan, N. T.; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Terrones, Mauricio; Aliev, Ali; Chu, Pengfei; Zhang, Zhong; Baughman, Ray H.; Chen, Yongsheng

    2015-01-01

    It is a challenge to fabricate graphene bulk materials with properties arising from the nature of individual graphene sheets, and which assemble into monolithic three-dimensional structures. Here we report the scalable self-assembly of randomly oriented graphene sheets into additive-free, essentially homogenous graphene sponge materials that provide a combination of both cork-like and rubber-like properties. These graphene sponges, with densities similar to air, display Poisson’s ratios in all directions that are near-zero and largely strain-independent during reversible compression to giant strains. And at the same time, they function as enthalpic rubbers, which can recover up to 98% compression in air and 90% in liquids, and operate between -196 and 900 °C. Furthermore, these sponges provide reversible liquid absorption for hundreds of cycles and then discharge it within seconds, while still providing an effective near-zero Poisson’s ratio.

  7. Analysis of fluid instabilities in core collapse supernova progenitors by a semi-analytical methodology and by two dimensional radiation-hydrodynamical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raley, Elizabeth

    2004-12-01

    We have performed an analysis of fluid instabilities below the neutrinospheres of the collapsed cores of supernova progenitors using a methodology introduced by Bruenn and Dineva [28, 29, 31]. In an extensive survey we found that the rate of lepton diffusion always exceeds the rate of thermal diffusion and as a result we do not anywhere see the neutron finger instability as described by the Livermore group [16, 17]. A new instability, lepto-entropy fingers, extending from a radius of 10 15 km out to the vicinity of the neutrinosphere, driven by the cross-response functions (i.e. the dependence of lepton transport on entropy perturbations and vice versa) was discovered. This instability has a maximum growth rate of the order of 100 s-1 with a scale of approximately 1/20 the distance of a perturbed fluid element from the core center [18]. This instability has probably already been seen in some multi-dimensional core collapse calculations. To test our results predicting the presence of doubly diffusive instabilities below the neutrinosphere of a proto-supernova, we have performed two dimensional hydrodynamic simulations with radial ray neutrino transport. This entailed rewriting RadHyd, which is the merger of EVH-1 hydrodynamics and MGFLD neutrino transport developed by Bruenn and DiNisco [43], for two dimensions. In particular, hydrodynamic evolution along angular arrays was included, as was MPI message passing capabilities, in order to utilize massively parallel computer platform such as FAU's BOCA4 Beowulf cluster. This work was partially funded by a grant from the DOE Office of Science, Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing Program.

  8. A splitting scheme based on the space-time CE/SE method for solving multi-dimensional hydrodynamical models of semiconductor devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nisar, Ubaid Ahmed; Ashraf, Waqas; Qamar, Shamsul

    2016-08-01

    Numerical solutions of the hydrodynamical model of semiconductor devices are presented in one and two-space dimension. The model describes the charge transport in semiconductor devices. Mathematically, the models can be written as a convection-diffusion type system with a right hand side describing the relaxation effects and interaction with a self consistent electric field. The proposed numerical scheme is a splitting scheme based on the conservation element and solution element (CE/SE) method for hyperbolic step, and a semi-implicit scheme for the relaxation step. The numerical results of the suggested scheme are compared with the splitting scheme based on Nessyahu-Tadmor (NT) central scheme for convection step and the same semi-implicit scheme for the relaxation step. The effects of various parameters such as low field mobility, device length, lattice temperature and voltages for one-space dimensional hydrodynamic model are explored to further validate the generic applicability of the CE/SE method for the current model equations. A two dimensional simulation is also performed by CE/SE method for a MESFET device, producing results in good agreement with those obtained by NT-central scheme.

  9. Second order symmetry-preserving conservative Lagrangian scheme for compressible Euler equations in two-dimensional cylindrical coordinates

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Juan; Shu, Chi-Wang

    2014-09-01

    In applications such as astrophysics and inertial confinement fusion, there are many three-dimensional cylindrical-symmetric multi-material problems which are usually simulated by Lagrangian schemes in the two-dimensional cylindrical coordinates. For this type of simulation, a critical issue for the schemes is to keep spherical symmetry in the cylindrical coordinate system if the original physical problem has this symmetry. In the past decades, several Lagrangian schemes with such symmetry property have been developed, but all of them are only first order accurate. In this paper, we develop a second order cell-centered Lagrangian scheme for solving compressible Euler equations in cylindrical coordinates, based on the control volume discretizations, which is designed to have uniformly second order accuracy and capability to preserve one-dimensional spherical symmetry in a two-dimensional cylindrical geometry when computed on an equal-angle-zoned initial grid. The scheme maintains several good properties such as conservation for mass, momentum and total energy, and the geometric conservation law. Several two-dimensional numerical examples in cylindrical coordinates are presented to demonstrate the good performance of the scheme in terms of accuracy, symmetry, non-oscillation and robustness. The advantage of higher order accuracy is demonstrated in these examples.

  10. Computer program for quasi-one-dimensional compressible flow with area change and friction - Application to gas film seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuk, J.; Smith, P. J.

    1974-01-01

    A computer program is presented for compressible fluid flow with friction and area change. The program carries out a quasi-one-dimensional flow analysis which is valid for laminar and turbulent flows under both subsonic and choked flow conditions. The program was written to be applied to gas film seals. The area-change analysis should prove useful for choked flow conditions with small mean thickness, as well as for face seals where radial area change is significant. The program is written in FORTRAN 4.

  11. Histogram approaches for lossy compression of digital holograms of three-dimensional objects.

    PubMed

    Shortt, Alison E; Naughton, Thomas J; Javidi, Bahram

    2007-06-01

    We present a novel nonuniform quantization compression technique-histogram quantization-for digital holograms of 3-D real-world objects. We exploit a priori knowledge of the distribution of the values in our data. We compare this technique to another histogram based approach: a modified version of Max's algorithm that has been adapted in a straight-forward manner to complex-valued 2-D signals. We conclude the compression procedure by applying lossless techniques to our quantized data. We demonstrate improvements over previous results obtained by applying uniform and nonuniform quantization techniques to the hologram data.

  12. Slip velocity method for three-dimensional compressible turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnwell, Richard W.; Wahls, Richard A.

    1988-01-01

    A slip velocity method for 2-D incompressible turbulent boundary layers was presented in AIAA Paper 88-0137. The inner part of the boundary layer was characterized by a law of the wall and a law of the wake, and the outer part was characterized by an arbitrary eddy viscosity model. In the present study for compressible flows, only a law of the wall is considered. The problem of 2-D compressible flow is treated first; then the extension to 3-D flow is addressed. A formulation for primitive variables is presented.

  13. Considerations on the effect of wind-tunnel walls on oscillating air forces for two-dimensional subsonic compressible flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Runyan, Harry L; Watkins, Charles E

    1953-01-01

    This report treats the effect of wind-tunnel walls on the oscillating two-dimensional air forces in a compressible medium. The walls are simulated by the usual method of placing images at appropriate distances above and below the wing. An important result shown is that, for certain conditions of wing frequency, tunnel height, and Mach number, the tunnel and wing may form a resonant system so that the forces on the wing are greatly changed from the condition of no tunnel walls. It is pointed out that similar conditions exist for three-dimensional flow in circular and rectangular tunnels and apparently, within certain Mach number ranges, in tunnels of nonuniform cross section or even in open tunnels or jets.

  14. Numerical solution of multi-dimensional compressible reactive flow using a parallel wavelet adaptive multi-resolution method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grenga, Temistocle

    The aim of this research is to further develop a dynamically adaptive algorithm based on wavelets that is able to solve efficiently multi-dimensional compressible reactive flow problems. This work demonstrates the great potential for the method to perform direct numerical simulation (DNS) of combustion with detailed chemistry and multi-component diffusion. In particular, it addresses the performance obtained using a massive parallel implementation and demonstrates important savings in memory storage and computational time over conventional methods. In addition, fully-resolved simulations of challenging three dimensional problems involving mixing and combustion processes are performed. These problems are particularly challenging due to their strong multiscale characteristics. For these solutions, it is necessary to combine the advanced numerical techniques applied to modern computational resources.

  15. Fast Hadamard transforms for compressive sensing of joint systems: measurement of a 3.2 million-dimensional bi-photon probability distribution.

    PubMed

    Lum, Daniel J; Knarr, Samuel H; Howell, John C

    2015-10-19

    We demonstrate how to efficiently implement extremely high-dimensional compressive imaging of a bi-photon probability distribution. Our method uses fast-Hadamard-transform Kronecker-based compressive sensing to acquire the joint space distribution. We list, in detail, the operations necessary to enable fast-transform-based matrix-vector operations in the joint space to reconstruct a 16.8 million-dimensional image in less than 10 minutes. Within a subspace of that image exists a 3.2 million-dimensional bi-photon probability distribution. In addition, we demonstrate how the marginal distributions can aid in the accuracy of joint space distribution reconstructions.

  16. Effect of Compressibility on the Flow past a Two-dimensional Bump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindsey, W F; Daley, Bernard N

    1952-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted to determine experimentally the effects of compressibility on the flow past a bump and to compare the experimentally determined results with theory. Pressure measurements and Schlieren photographs were made of the flow past two bumps having thickness-chord ratios of 0.10 and 0.30 at Mach numbers between 0.20 and 0.84

  17. Numerical solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations for the supersonic laminar flow over a two-dimensional compression corner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, J. E.

    1972-01-01

    Numerical solutions have been obtained for the supersonic, laminar flow over a two-dimensional compression corner. These solutions were obtained as steady-state solutions to the unsteady Navier-Stokes equations using the finite difference method of Brailovskaya, which has second-order accuracy in the spatial coordinates. Good agreement was obtained between the computed results and wall pressure distributions measured experimentally for Mach numbers of 4 and 6.06, and respective Reynolds numbers, based on free-stream conditions and the distance from the leading edge to the corner. In those calculations, as well as in others, sufficient resolution was obtained to show the streamline pattern in the separation bubble. Upstream boundary conditions to the compression corner flow were provided by numerically solving the unsteady Navier-Stokes equations for the flat plate flow field, beginning at the leading edge. The compression corner flow field was enclosed by a computational boundary with the unknown boundary conditions supplied by extrapolation from internally computed points.

  18. CS2-Collector: A New Approach for Data Collection in Wireless Sensor Networks Based on Two-Dimensional Compressive Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong; Yang, Zhuoshi; Zhang, Jianpei; Li, Feng; Wen, Hongkai; Shen, Yiran

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the problem of reconstructing the temporal and spatial profile of some physical phenomena monitored by large-scale Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) in an energy efficient manner. Compressive sensing is one of the popular choices to reduce the energy consumption of the data collection in WSNs. The existing solutions only consider sparsity of sensors’ data from either temporal or spatial dimensions. In this paper, we propose a novel data collection strategy, CS2-collector, for WSNs based on the theory of Two Dimensional Compressive Sensing (2DCS). It exploits both temporal and spatial sparsity, i.e., 2D-sparsity of WSNs and achieves significant gain on the tradeoff between the compression ratio and reconstruction accuracy as the numerical simulations and evaluations on different types of sensors’ data. More intuitively, with the same given energy budget, CS2-collector provides significantly more accurate reconstruction of the profile of the physical phenomena that are temporal-spatially sparse. PMID:27548180

  19. CS²-Collector: A New Approach for Data Collection in Wireless Sensor Networks Based on Two-Dimensional Compressive Sensing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Yang, Zhuoshi; Zhang, Jianpei; Li, Feng; Wen, Hongkai; Shen, Yiran

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the problem of reconstructing the temporal and spatial profile of some physical phenomena monitored by large-scale Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) in an energy efficient manner. Compressive sensing is one of the popular choices to reduce the energy consumption of the data collection in WSNs. The existing solutions only consider sparsity of sensors' data from either temporal or spatial dimensions. In this paper, we propose a novel data collection strategy, CS²-collector, for WSNs based on the theory of Two Dimensional Compressive Sensing (2DCS). It exploits both temporal and spatial sparsity, i.e., 2D-sparsity of WSNs and achieves significant gain on the tradeoff between the compression ratio and reconstruction accuracy as the numerical simulations and evaluations on different types of sensors' data. More intuitively, with the same given energy budget, CS²-collector provides significantly more accurate reconstruction of the profile of the physical phenomena that are temporal-spatially sparse. PMID:27548180

  20. Three-dimensional evaluation of the compression and recovery behavior in a flexible graphite sheet by synchrotron radiation microtomography

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, M.; Toda, H.; Takeuchi, A.; Uesugi, K.; Suzuki, Y.

    2012-07-15

    The compression and unloading behavior of flexible graphite sheets was investigated using synchrotron radiation microtomography with 1 {mu}m voxel size. The recovery ratio of the flexible graphite sheet was measured accurately by in-situ observation. The three-dimensional strain distribution in the interior of the specimen was obtained using the microstructural tracking method. The inner strain distribution with micrometer scale indicated inhomogeneous deformation. The microstructural tracking analysis revealed that deformation units exist in the flexible graphite sheet. The units seem to deform, affecting the neighboring units with each other. The units had a similar size and shape with compacted exfoliated graphite worms that constitute the flexible graphite sheet. Microscopic deformations during compression and unloading are surely affected by the microstructure of the sheet. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The compression and recovery behavior was investigated using microtomography. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The tracking analysis revealed that deformation units exist in the specimen. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Each unit deforms in relation to the neighboring unit.

  1. Density measurement of shock compressed foam using two-dimensional x-ray radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Le Pape, Sebastien; Macphee, Andrew; Hey, Daniel; Patel, Pravesh; Mackinnon, Andrew; Key, Mike; Pasley, John; Wei, Mingsheng; Chen, Sophia; Ma, Tammy; Beg, Farhat; Alexander, N.; Stephens, Rich; Offerman, Dustin; Link, A.; Van-Woerkom, Lynn; Freeman, R.

    2008-10-15

    We have used spherically bent quartz crystal to image a laser-generated shock in a foam medium. The foam targets had a density of 0.16 g/cm{sup 3} and thickness of 150 {mu}m, an aluminum/copper pusher drove the shock. The experiment was performed at the Titan facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory using a 2 ns, 250 J laser pulse to compress the foam target, and a short pulse (10 ps, 350 J) to generate a bright Ti K{alpha} x-ray source at 4.5 keV to radiograph the shocked target. The crystal used gives a high resolution ({approx}20 {mu}m) monochromatic image of the shock compressed foam.

  2. Compressibility of the Two-Dimensional Infinite-U Hubbard Model

    SciTech Connect

    Tandon, A.; Wang, Z.; Tandon, A.; Kotliar, G.

    1999-09-01

    We study the interactions between the coherent quasiparticles and the incoherent Mott-Hubbard excitations and their effects on the low-energy properties in the U={infinity} Hubbard model. Within the framework of a systematic large-N expansion, these effects first occur in the next-to-leading order in 1/N . We calculate the scattering phase shift and the free energy, and determine the quasiparticle weight Z , mass renormalization, and the compressibility. It is found that the compressibility is strongly renormalized and diverges at a critical doping {delta}{sub c}=0.07{plus_minus}0.01 . We discuss the nature of this zero-temperature phase transition and its connection to phase separation and superconductivity. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  3. Fluctuations in relativistic causal hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Avdhesh; Bhatt, Jitesh R.; Mishra, Ananta P.

    2014-05-01

    Formalism to calculate the hydrodynamic fluctuations by applying the Onsager theory to the relativistic Navier-Stokes equation is already known. In this work, we calculate hydrodynamic fluctuations within the framework of the second order hydrodynamics of Müller, Israel and Stewart and its generalization to the third order. We have also calculated the fluctuations for several other causal hydrodynamical equations. We show that the form for the Onsager-coefficients and form of the correlation functions remain the same as those obtained by the relativistic Navier-Stokes equation and do not depend on any specific model of hydrodynamics. Further we numerically investigate evolution of the correlation function using the one dimensional boost-invariant (Bjorken) flow. We compare the correlation functions obtained using the causal hydrodynamics with the correlation function for the relativistic Navier-Stokes equation. We find that the qualitative behavior of the correlation functions remains the same for all the models of the causal hydrodynamics.

  4. Compressible Astrophysics Simulation Code

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, L.; Singer, M.

    2007-07-18

    This is an astrophysics simulation code involving a radiation diffusion module developed at LLNL coupled to compressible hydrodynamics and adaptive mesh infrastructure developed at LBNL. One intended application is to neutrino diffusion in core collapse supernovae.

  5. Two-Dimensional Modeling of Time-Varying Hydrodynamics and Juvenile Chinook Salmon Habitat in the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, William A.; Richmond, Marshall C.; McMichael, Geoffrey A.

    2007-10-10

    The Hanford Reach is the only remaining unimpounded reach of the Columbia River in the United States above Bonneville Dam. Discharge in the Hanford Reach is regulated by several dams and is often subject to rapid changes. Sharp flow reductions have led to the stranding or entrapment, and subsequent mortality, of juvenile chinook salmon (Oncorynchus tshawytscha) and other important fish species within the Hanford Reach. A multi-block two-dimensional depth-averaged hydrodynamic model was used to simulate time-varying river velocity and stage in a 37~km portion of the Hanford Reach. Simulation results were used to estimate time-varying juvenile chinook salmon habitat area, and the part of that habitat affected by discharge fluctuations. Affected habitat area estimates were made for the chinook salmon rearing period of four years. These estimates were used, along with other important factors, to establish a statistical relationship between discharge fluctuation and juvenile chinook salmon mortality.

  6. A NEW MULTI-DIMENSIONAL GENERAL RELATIVISTIC NEUTRINO HYDRODYNAMICS CODE FOR CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE. II. RELATIVISTIC EXPLOSION MODELS OF CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Bernhard; Janka, Hans-Thomas; Marek, Andreas E-mail: thj@mpa-garching.mpg.de

    2012-09-01

    We present the first two-dimensional general relativistic (GR) simulations of stellar core collapse and explosion with the COCONUT hydrodynamics code in combination with the VERTEX solver for energy-dependent, three-flavor neutrino transport, using the extended conformal flatness condition for approximating the space-time metric and a ray-by-ray-plus ansatz to tackle the multi-dimensionality of the transport. For both of the investigated 11.2 and 15 M{sub Sun} progenitors we obtain successful, though seemingly marginal, neutrino-driven supernova explosions. This outcome and the time evolution of the models basically agree with results previously obtained with the PROMETHEUS hydro solver including an approximative treatment of relativistic effects by a modified Newtonian potential. However, GR models exhibit subtle differences in the neutrinospheric conditions compared with Newtonian and pseudo-Newtonian simulations. These differences lead to significantly higher luminosities and mean energies of the radiated electron neutrinos and antineutrinos and therefore to larger energy-deposition rates and heating efficiencies in the gain layer with favorable consequences for strong nonradial mass motions and ultimately for an explosion. Moreover, energy transfer to the stellar medium around the neutrinospheres through nucleon recoil in scattering reactions of heavy-lepton neutrinos also enhances the mentioned effects. Together with previous pseudo-Newtonian models, the presented relativistic calculations suggest that the treatment of gravity and energy-exchanging neutrino interactions can make differences of even 50%-100% in some quantities and is likely to contribute to a finally successful explosion mechanism on no minor level than hydrodynamical differences between different dimensions.

  7. A New Multi-dimensional General Relativistic Neutrino Hydrodynamics Code for Core-collapse Supernovae. II. Relativistic Explosion Models of Core-collapse Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Bernhard; Janka, Hans-Thomas; Marek, Andreas

    2012-09-01

    We present the first two-dimensional general relativistic (GR) simulations of stellar core collapse and explosion with the COCONUT hydrodynamics code in combination with the VERTEX solver for energy-dependent, three-flavor neutrino transport, using the extended conformal flatness condition for approximating the space-time metric and a ray-by-ray-plus ansatz to tackle the multi-dimensionality of the transport. For both of the investigated 11.2 and 15 M ⊙ progenitors we obtain successful, though seemingly marginal, neutrino-driven supernova explosions. This outcome and the time evolution of the models basically agree with results previously obtained with the PROMETHEUS hydro solver including an approximative treatment of relativistic effects by a modified Newtonian potential. However, GR models exhibit subtle differences in the neutrinospheric conditions compared with Newtonian and pseudo-Newtonian simulations. These differences lead to significantly higher luminosities and mean energies of the radiated electron neutrinos and antineutrinos and therefore to larger energy-deposition rates and heating efficiencies in the gain layer with favorable consequences for strong nonradial mass motions and ultimately for an explosion. Moreover, energy transfer to the stellar medium around the neutrinospheres through nucleon recoil in scattering reactions of heavy-lepton neutrinos also enhances the mentioned effects. Together with previous pseudo-Newtonian models, the presented relativistic calculations suggest that the treatment of gravity and energy-exchanging neutrino interactions can make differences of even 50%-100% in some quantities and is likely to contribute to a finally successful explosion mechanism on no minor level than hydrodynamical differences between different dimensions.

  8. High dimensional seismic data interpolation with weighted matching pursuit based on compressed sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiongwen, Wang; Huazhong, Wang; Xiaopeng, Zheng

    2014-12-01

    The spatial aliasing of seismic data is usually serious because of the sub-sampling rate of the acquisition system. It induces amplitude artifacts or blurs the migration result when the spatial aliasing is not removed before migration. The compressed sensing (CS) method has been proven to be an effective tool to restore a sub-sampled signal which is compressible in another domain. Since the wave-fronts of seismic data are sparse and linear in a local spatiotemporal window, they can be significantly compressed by linear Radon transform or Fourier transform. Therefore, seismic data interpolation can be considered as a CS problem. The approximate solution of a CS problem using L0-norm can be achieved by matching pursuit (MP) algorithm. MP becomes intractable due to the high computing cost induced by the increasing dimension of the problem. In order to tackle this issue, a variant of MP—weighted matching pursuit (WMP)—is presented in this paper. Since there is little spatial aliasing in the data of low frequency and the events are supposed to be linear, the linear Radon spectrogram of the interpolated data of low frequency can be used to predict the energy distribution of data of high frequency in a frequency-wavenumber (FK) domain. The predicted energy distribution is then utilized to form the weighted factor of WMP. With this factor, WMP possesses the ability to distinguish the linear events from the spatial aliasing in the FK domain. WMP is also proven to be an efficient algorithm. Since projection onto convex sets (POCS) is another common sparsity-based method, we use Fourier POCS and WMP to realize high-dimension interpolation in numerical examples. The numerical examples show that the interpolation result of WMP significantly improves the quality of seismic data, and the quality of the migration result is also improved by the interpolation.

  9. Experimental investigation of generic three-dimensional sidewall-compression scramjet inlets at Mach 6 in tetrafluoromethane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, Scott D.

    1993-01-01

    Three-dimensional sidewall-compression scramjet inlets with leading-edge sweeps of 30 deg and 70 deg were tested in the Langley Hypersonic CF4 Tunnel at Mach 6 and with a ratio of specific heats of 1.2. The parametric effects of leading-edge sweep, cowl position, contraction ratio, and Reynolds number were investigated. The models were instrumented with 42 static pressure orifices that were distributed on the sidewalls, base plate, and cowl. Schlieren movies were made of each test for flow visualization of the effects of the internal flow spillage on the external flow field. To obtain an approximate characterization of the flow field, a modification to two-dimensional, inviscid, oblique shock theory was derived to accommodate the three-dimensional effects of leading-edge sweep. This theory qualitatively predicted the reflected shock structure (i.e., sidewall impingement locations) and the observed increase in spillage with increasing leading-edge sweep. The primary effect of moving the cowl forward was capturing the flow that would have otherwise spilled out ahead of the cowl. Increasing the contraction ratio increases the number of internal shock reflections and hence incrementally increases the sidewall pressure distribution. Significant Reynolds number effects were noted over a small range of Reynolds number.

  10. Compressively Characterizing High-Dimensional Entangled States with Complementary, Random Filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howland, Gregory A.; Knarr, Samuel H.; Schneeloch, James; Lum, Daniel J.; Howell, John C.

    2016-04-01

    The resources needed to conventionally characterize a quantum system are overwhelmingly large for high-dimensional systems. This obstacle may be overcome by abandoning traditional cornerstones of quantum measurement, such as general quantum states, strong projective measurement, and assumption-free characterization. Following this reasoning, we demonstrate an efficient technique for characterizing high-dimensional, spatial entanglement with one set of measurements. We recover sharp distributions with local, random filtering of the same ensemble in momentum followed by position—something the uncertainty principle forbids for projective measurements. Exploiting the expectation that entangled signals are highly correlated, we use fewer than 5000 measurements to characterize a 65,536-dimensional state. Finally, we use entropic inequalities to witness entanglement without a density matrix. Our method represents the sea change unfolding in quantum measurement, where methods influenced by the information theory and signal-processing communities replace unscalable, brute-force techniques—a progression previously followed by classical sensing.

  11. Two-dimensional orthogonal DCT expansion in trapezoid and triangular blocks and modified JPEG image compression.

    PubMed

    Ding, Jian-Jiun; Huang, Ying-Wun; Lin, Pao-Yen; Pei, Soo-Chang; Chen, Hsin-Hui; Wang, Yu-Hsiang

    2013-09-01

    In the conventional JPEG algorithm, an image is divided into eight by eight blocks and then the 2-D DCT is applied to encode each block. In this paper, we find that, in addition to rectangular blocks, the 2-D DCT is also orthogonal in the trapezoid and triangular blocks. Therefore, instead of eight by eight blocks, we can generalize the JPEG algorithm and divide an image into trapezoid and triangular blocks according to the shapes of objects and achieve higher compression ratio. Compared with the existing shape adaptive compression algorithms, as we do not try to match the shape of each object exactly, the number of bytes used for encoding the edges can be less and the error caused from the high frequency component at the boundary can be avoided. The simulations show that, when the bit rate is fixed, our proposed algorithm can achieve higher PSNR than the JPEG algorithm and other shape adaptive algorithms. Furthermore, in addition to the 2-D DCT, we can also use our proposed method to generate the 2-D complete and orthogonal sine basis, Hartley basis, Walsh basis, and discrete polynomial basis in a trapezoid or a triangular block.

  12. Thermodynamic compressibility and spin-splitting in one-dimensional quantum wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Luke W.; Hamilton, A. R.; Thomas, K. J.; Pepper, M.; Farrer, I.; Anderson, D.; Jones, G. A. C.; Ritchie, D. A.

    2012-02-01

    We study spin-splitting and the much-debated 0.7 structure in GaAs quantum wires using compressibility measurements that directly probe the thermodynamic density of states. Two quantum wires are simultaneously defined in the upper and lower well of a GaAs/AlGaAs double quantum well heterostructure, using midline-gated split-gate devices [1]. The lower wire probes the ability of the upper wire to screen the electric field from a biased surface gate. The technique is sensitive enough to resolve spin splitting of the 1D subbands in the presence of an in-plane magnetic field. The compressibility response of the 0.7 structure is measured, and its evolution with increasing temperature and magnetic field is studied [2]. Despite the sensitivity of our measurements we see no evidence of the formation of the quasibound state predicted by the Kondo model of the 0.7 structure. Instead our data are more consistent with theories which predict that the 0.7 structure arises as a result of spontaneous spin polarization. [4pt] [1] I.M. Castleton et al, Physica B 249, 157 (1998).[0pt] [2] L.W. Smith et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 126801 (2011)

  13. Global classical solutions to the one-dimensional compressible fluid models of Korteweg type with large initial data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhengzheng; Chai, Xiaojuan; Dong, Boqing; Zhao, Huijiang

    2015-10-01

    This paper is concerned with the global existence of classical solutions with large initial data away from vacuum to the Cauchy problem of the one-dimensional isothermal compressible fluid models of Korteweg type with density-dependent viscosity coefficient and capillarity coefficient. The case when the viscosity coefficient μ (ρ) =ρα and the capillarity coefficient κ (ρ) =ρβ for some parameters α, β ∈ R is considered. Under some conditions on α, β, we first show the global existence of large solutions around constant states if the far-fields of the initial data are the same, while if the far-fields of the initial data are different, we prove the global stability of rarefaction waves with large strength. Here global stability means the initial perturbation can be arbitrarily large. Our analysis is based on the elementary energy method and the technique developed by Y. Kanel' [29].

  14. Wall interference in a two-dimensional-flow wind tunnel, with consideration of the effect of compressibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, H Julian; Vincenti, Walter G

    1944-01-01

    Theoretical tunnel-wall corrections are derived for an airfoil of finite thickness and camber in a two-dimensional-flow wind tunnel. The theory takes account of the effects of the wake of the airfoil and of the compressibility of the fluid, and is based upon the assumption that the chord of the airfoil is small in comparison with the height of the tunnel. Consideration is given to the phenomenon of choking at high speeds and its relation to the tunnel-wall corrections. The theoretical results are compared with the small amount of low-speed experimental data available and the agreement is seen to be satisfactory, even for relatively large values of the chord-height ratio.

  15. Development of a discrete gas-kinetic scheme for simulation of two-dimensional viscous incompressible and compressible flows.

    PubMed

    Yang, L M; Shu, C; Wang, Y

    2016-03-01

    In this work, a discrete gas-kinetic scheme (DGKS) is presented for simulation of two-dimensional viscous incompressible and compressible flows. This scheme is developed from the circular function-based GKS, which was recently proposed by Shu and his co-workers [L. M. Yang, C. Shu, and J. Wu, J. Comput. Phys. 274, 611 (2014)]. For the circular function-based GKS, the integrals for conservation forms of moments in the infinity domain for the Maxwellian function-based GKS are simplified to those integrals along the circle. As a result, the explicit formulations of conservative variables and fluxes are derived. However, these explicit formulations of circular function-based GKS for viscous flows are still complicated, which may not be easy for the application by new users. By using certain discrete points to represent the circle in the phase velocity space, the complicated formulations can be replaced by a simple solution process. The basic requirement is that the conservation forms of moments for the circular function-based GKS can be accurately satisfied by weighted summation of distribution functions at discrete points. In this work, it is shown that integral quadrature by four discrete points on the circle, which forms the D2Q4 discrete velocity model, can exactly match the integrals. Numerical results showed that the present scheme can provide accurate numerical results for incompressible and compressible viscous flows with roughly the same computational cost as that needed by the Roe scheme. PMID:27078488

  16. Development of a compression molding process for three-dimensional tailored free-form glass optics.

    PubMed

    Yi, Allen Y; Huang, Chunning; Klocke, Fritz; Brecher, Christian; Pongs, Guido; Winterschladen, Markus; Demmer, Axel; Lange, Sven; Bergs, Thomas; Merz, Michael; Niehaus, Frank

    2006-09-01

    Because of the limitation of manufacturing capability, free-form glass optics cannot be produced in a large volume using traditional processes such as grinding, lapping, and polishing. Very recently compression molding of glass optics became a viable manufacturing process for the high-volume production of precision glass optical components. An ultraprecision diamond-turning machine retrofitted with a fast tool servo was used to fabricate a free-form optical mold on a nickel-plated surface. A nonuniform rational B-spline trajectory generator was developed to calculate the computer numerical control machine tool path. A specially formulated glass with low transition temperature (Tg) was used, since the nickel alloy mold cannot withstand the high temperatures required for regular optical glasses. We describe the details of this process, from optical surface geometry, mold making, molding experiment, to lens measurement.

  17. Nanoscale chemical mapping using three-dimensional adiabatic compression of surface plasmon polaritons.

    PubMed

    De Angelis, Francesco; Das, Gobind; Candeloro, Patrizio; Patrini, Maddalena; Galli, Matteo; Bek, Alpan; Lazzarino, Marco; Maksymov, Ivan; Liberale, Carlo; Andreani, Lucio Claudio; Di Fabrizio, Enzo

    2010-01-01

    The fields of plasmonics, Raman spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy have recently undergone considerable development, but independently of one another. By combining these techniques, a range of complementary information could be simultaneously obtained at a single molecule level. Here, we report the design, fabrication and application of a photonic-plasmonic device that is fully compatible with atomic force microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Our approach relies on the generation and localization of surface plasmon polaritons by means of adiabatic compression through a metallic tapered waveguide to create strongly enhanced Raman excitation in a region just a few nanometres across. The tapered waveguide can also be used as an atomic force microscope tip. Using the device, topographic, chemical and structural information about silicon nanocrystals may be obtained with a spatial resolution of 7 nm.

  18. A pressure relaxation closure model for one-dimensional, two-material Lagrangian hydrodynamics based on the Riemann problem

    SciTech Connect

    Kamm, James R; Shashkov, Mikhail J

    2009-01-01

    Despite decades of development, Lagrangian hydrodynamics of strengthfree materials presents numerous open issues, even in one dimension. We focus on the problem of closing a system of equations for a two-material cell under the assumption of a single velocity model. There are several existing models and approaches, each possessing different levels of fidelity to the underlying physics and each exhibiting unique features in the computed solutions. We consider the case in which the change in heat in the constituent materials in the mixed cell is assumed equal. An instantaneous pressure equilibration model for a mixed cell can be cast as four equations in four unknowns, comprised of the updated values of the specific internal energy and the specific volume for each of the two materials in the mixed cell. The unique contribution of our approach is a physics-inspired, geometry-based model in which the updated values of the sub-cell, relaxing-toward-equilibrium constituent pressures are related to a local Riemann problem through an optimization principle. This approach couples the modeling problem of assigning sub-cell pressures to the physics associated with the local, dynamic evolution. We package our approach in the framework of a standard predictor-corrector time integration scheme. We evaluate our model using idealized, two material problems using either ideal-gas or stiffened-gas equations of state and compare these results to those computed with the method of Tipton and with corresponding pure-material calculations.

  19. Supernova Hydrodynamics on the Omega Laser

    SciTech Connect

    R. Paul Drake

    2004-01-16

    (B204)The fundamental motivation for our work is that supernovae are not well understood. Recent observations have clarified the depth of our ignorance, by producing observed phenomena that current theory and computer simulations cannot reproduce. Such theories and simulations involve, however, a number of physical mechanisms that have never been studied in isolation. We perform experiments, in compressible hydrodynamics and radiation hydrodynamics, relevant to supernovae and supernova remnants. These experiments produce phenomena in the laboratory that are believed, based on simulations, to be important to astrophysics but that have not been directly observed in either the laboratory or in an astrophysical system. During the period of this grant, we have focused on the scaling of an astrophysically relevant, radiative-precursor shock, on preliminary studies of collapsing radiative shocks, and on the multimode behavior and the three-dimensional, deeply nonlinear evolution of the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability at a decelerating, embedded interface. These experiments required strong compression and decompression, strong shocks (Mach {approx}10 or greater), flexible geometries, and very smooth laser beams, which means that the 60-beam Omega laser is the only facility capable of carrying out this program.

  20. Hydrodynamic instability growth of three-dimensional, “native-roughness” modulations in x-ray driven, spherical implosions at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Smalyuk, V. A.; Weber, S. V.; Casey, D. T.; Clark, D. S.; Field, J. E.; Haan, S. W.; Hammel, B. A.; Hamza, A. V.; Landen, O. L.; Robey, H. F.; Weber, C. R.; Hoover, D. E.; Nikroo, A.

    2015-07-15

    Hydrodynamic instability growth experiments with three-dimensional (3-D) surface-roughness modulations were performed on plastic (CH) shell spherical implosions at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [E. M. Campbell, R. Cauble, and B. A. Remington, AIP Conf. Proc. 429, 3 (1998)]. The initial capsule outer-surface roughness was similar to the standard specifications (“native roughness”) used in a majority of implosions on NIF. The experiments included instability growth measurements of the perturbations seeded by the thin membranes (or tents) used to hold the capsules inside the hohlraums. In addition, initial modulations included two divots used as spatial fiducials to determine the convergence in the experiments and to check the accuracy of 3D simulations in calculating growth of known initial perturbations. The instability growth measurements were performed using x-ray, through-foil radiography of one side of the imploding shell, based on time-resolved pinhole imaging. Averaging over 30 similar images significantly increases the signal-to-noise ratio, making possible a comparison with 3-D simulations. At a convergence ratio of ∼3, the measured tent and divot modulations were close to those predicted by 3-D simulations (within ∼15%–20%), while measured 3-D, broadband modulations were ∼3–4 times larger than those simulated based on the growth of the known imposed initial surface modulations. In addition, some of the measured 3-D features in x-ray radiographs did not resemble those characterized on the outer capsule surface before the experiments. One of the hypotheses to explain the results is based on the increased instability amplitudes due to modulations of the oxygen content in the bulk of the capsule. As the target assembly and handling procedures involve exposure to UV light, this can increase the uptake of the oxygen into the capsule, with irregularities in the oxygen seeding hydrodynamic instabilities. These new experimental results have

  1. Two-dimensional hydrodynamic modeling to quantify effects of peak-flow management on channel morphology and salmon-spawning habitat in the Cedar River, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Czuba, Christiana; Czuba, Jonathan A.; Gendaszek, Andrew S.; Magirl, Christopher S.

    2010-01-01

    The Cedar River in Washington State originates on the western slope of the Cascade Range and provides the City of Seattle with most of its drinking water, while also supporting a productive salmon habitat. Water-resource managers require detailed information on how best to manage high-flow releases from Chester Morse Lake, a large reservoir on the Cedar River, during periods of heavy precipitation to minimize flooding, while mitigating negative effects on fish populations. Instream flow-management practices include provisions for adaptive management to promote and maintain healthy aquatic habitat in the river system. The current study is designed to understand the linkages between peak flow characteristics, geomorphic processes, riverine habitat, and biological responses. Specifically, two-dimensional hydrodynamic modeling is used to simulate and quantify the effects of the peak-flow magnitude, duration, and frequency on the channel morphology and salmon-spawning habitat. Two study reaches, representative of the typical geomorphic and ecologic characteristics of the Cedar River, were selected for the modeling. Detailed bathymetric data, collected with a real-time kinematic global positioning system and an acoustic Doppler current profiler, were combined with a LiDAR-derived digital elevation model in the overbank area to develop a computational mesh. The model is used to simulate water velocity, benthic shear stress, flood inundation, and morphologic changes in the gravel-bedded river under the current and alternative flood-release strategies. Simulations of morphologic change and salmon-redd scour by floods of differing magnitude and duration enable water-resource managers to incorporate model simulation results into adaptive management of peak flows in the Cedar River. PDF version of a presentation on hydrodynamic modelling in the Cedar River in Washington state. Presented at the American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting 2010.

  2. Hydrodynamic Efficiency of Ablation Propulsion with Pulsed Ion Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Buttapeng, Chainarong; Yazawa, Masaru; Harada, Nobuhiro; Suematsu, Hisayuki; Jiang Weihua; Yatsui, Kiyoshi

    2006-05-02

    This paper presents the hydrodynamic efficiency of ablation plasma produced by pulsed ion beam on the basis of the ion beam-target interaction. We used a one-dimensional hydrodynamic fluid compressible to study the physics involved namely an ablation acceleration behavior and analyzed it as a rocketlike model in order to investigate its hydrodynamic variables for propulsion applications. These variables were estimated by the concept of ablation driven implosion in terms of ablated mass fraction, implosion efficiency, and hydrodynamic energy conversion. Herein, the energy conversion efficiency of 17.5% was achieved. In addition, the results show maximum energy efficiency of the ablation process (ablation efficiency) of 67% meaning the efficiency with which pulsed ion beam energy-ablation plasma conversion. The effects of ion beam energy deposition depth to hydrodynamic efficiency were briefly discussed. Further, an evaluation of propulsive force with high specific impulse of 4000s, total impulse of 34mN and momentum to energy ratio in the range of {mu}N/W was also analyzed.

  3. The one-dimensional compression method for extraction of pore water from unsaturated tuff and effects on pore-water chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, J.D.; Burger, P.A.; Yang, L.C.

    1997-12-31

    Study of the hydrologic system at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, requires extraction of pore-water samples from unsaturated tuff bedrock. Two generations of compression cells have been designed and tested for extracting representative, unaltered pore-water samples from unsaturated tuff cores. The one-dimensional compression cell has a maximum compressive stress rating of 552 MPa. Results from 86 tests show that the minimum degree of saturation for successful extraction of pore water was about 14% for non welded tuff and about 61% for densely welded tuff. The high-pressure, one-dimensional compression cell has a maximum compressive stress rating of 827 MPa. Results from 109 tests show that the minimum degree of saturation for successful extraction of pore water was about 7.5% for non welded tuff and about 34% for densely welded tuff. Geochemical analyses show that, in general, there is a decrease in ion concentration of pore waters as extraction pressures increase. Only small changes in pore-water composition occur during the one-dimensional extraction test.

  4. The solution of the three-dimensional viscous-compressible Navier-Stokes equations on a vector computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. E.; Pitts, J. I.

    1979-01-01

    The development of a vectorized computer code for the solution of the three-dimensional viscous-compressible Navier-Stokes equations is described. The code is applied on the CDC STAR-100 vector computer which is capable of achieving high result rates when a high degree of parallelism is present in the computations. The computational technique is an explicit time-split MacCormack predictor-corrector algorithm. Since a large volume of data is processed and virtual memory utilized, a data management scheme based on interleaving is used. The program has been applied to obtain the solution of the laminar supersonic flow about a family of three-dimensional corners. The equations of motion are expressed in a generalized form relative to a uniform rectangular computational domain. The metric coefficient and boundary conditions must be supplied for the corresponding physical domain. For calculations with 30,000 grid points, a computational rate of 0.00015 seconds per grid point per time step is observed.

  5. Constraining relativistic viscous hydrodynamical evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, Mauricio; Strickland, Michael

    2009-04-15

    We show that by requiring positivity of the longitudinal pressure it is possible to constrain the initial conditions one can use in second-order viscous hydrodynamical simulations of ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions. We demonstrate this explicitly for (0+1)-dimensional viscous hydrodynamics and discuss how the constraint extends to higher dimensions. Additionally, we present an analytic approximation to the solution of (0+1)-dimensional second-order viscous hydrodynamical evolution equations appropriate to describe the evolution of matter in an ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collision.

  6. DETECTION OF THE COMPRESSED PRIMARY STELLAR WIND IN {eta} CARINAE

    SciTech Connect

    Teodoro, M.; Madura, T. I.; Gull, T. R.; Corcoran, M. F.; Hamaguchi, K.

    2013-08-10

    A series of three Hubble Space Telescope/Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph spectroscopic mappings, spaced approximately one year apart, reveal three partial arcs in [Fe II] and [Ni II] emissions moving outward from {eta} Carinae. We identify these arcs with the shell-like structures, seen in the three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations, formed by compression of the primary wind by the secondary wind during periastron passages.

  7. Accelerated three-dimensional cine phase contrast imaging using randomly undersampled echo planar imaging with compressed sensing reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Basha, Tamer A; Akçakaya, Mehmet; Goddu, Beth; Berg, Sophie; Nezafat, Reza

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to implement and evaluate an accelerated three-dimensional (3D) cine phase contrast MRI sequence by combining a randomly sampled 3D k-space acquisition sequence with an echo planar imaging (EPI) readout. An accelerated 3D cine phase contrast MRI sequence was implemented by combining EPI readout with randomly undersampled 3D k-space data suitable for compressed sensing (CS) reconstruction. The undersampled data were then reconstructed using low-dimensional structural self-learning and thresholding (LOST). 3D phase contrast MRI was acquired in 11 healthy adults using an overall acceleration of 7 (EPI factor of 3 and CS rate of 3). For comparison, a single two-dimensional (2D) cine phase contrast scan was also performed with sensitivity encoding (SENSE) rate 2 and approximately at the level of the pulmonary artery bifurcation. The stroke volume and mean velocity in both the ascending and descending aorta were measured and compared between two sequences using Bland-Altman plots. An average scan time of 3 min and 30 s, corresponding to an acceleration rate of 7, was achieved for 3D cine phase contrast scan with one direction flow encoding, voxel size of 2 × 2 × 3 mm(3) , foot-head coverage of 6 cm and temporal resolution of 30 ms. The mean velocity and stroke volume in both the ascending and descending aorta were statistically equivalent between the proposed 3D sequence and the standard 2D cine phase contrast sequence. The combination of EPI with a randomly undersampled 3D k-space sampling sequence using LOST reconstruction allows a seven-fold reduction in scan time of 3D cine phase contrast MRI without compromising blood flow quantification.

  8. A New Multi-dimensional General Relativistic Neutrino Hydrodynamics Code for Core-collapse Supernovae. IV. The Neutrino Signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Bernhard; Janka, Hans-Thomas

    2014-06-01

    Considering six general relativistic, two-dimensional (2D) supernova (SN) explosion models of progenitor stars between 8.1 and 27 M ⊙, we systematically analyze the properties of the neutrino emission from core collapse and bounce to the post-explosion phase. The models were computed with the VERTEX-COCONUT code, using three-flavor, energy-dependent neutrino transport in the ray-by-ray-plus approximation. Our results confirm the close similarity of the mean energies, langErang, of \\bar{\

  9. Three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations of red giant stars: semi-global models for interpreting interferometric observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiavassa, A.; Collet, R.; Casagrande, L.; Asplund, M.

    2010-12-01

    Context. Theoretical predictions from models of red giant branch stars are a valuable tool for various applications in astrophysics ranging from galactic chemical evolution to studies of exoplanetary systems. Aims: We use the radiative transfer code Optim3D and realistic 3D radiative-hydrodynamical (RHD) surface convection simulations of red giants to explore the impact of granulation on interferometric observables. We assess how 3D simulations of surface convection can be validated against observations. Methods: We computed intensity maps for the 3D simulation snapshots in two filters, the optical at 5000 ± 300 Å and the K band 2.14 ± 0.26 μm FLUOR filter, corresponding to the wavelength-range of instruments mounted on the CHARA interferometer. From the intensity maps, we constructed images of the stellar disks and account for center-to-limb variations. We then derived interferometric visibility amplitudes and phases. We study their behavior with position angle and wavelength, and compare them with CHARA observations of the red giant star HD 214868. Results: We provide average limb darkening coefficients for different metallicities and wavelengths ranges. We explain prospects for detecting and characterizing granulation and center-to-limb variations of red giant stars with today's interferometers. Regarding interferometric observables, we find that the effect of convective-related surface structures depends on metallicity and surface gravity. We provide theoretical closure-phases that should be incorporated into the analysis of red giant planet companion closure phase signals. We estimate 3D-1D corrections to stellar radii determination: 3D models are ~3.5% smaller to ~1% larger in the optical than 1D, and roughly 0.5 to 1.5% smaller in the infrared. Even if these corrections are small, they are needed to properly set the zero point of effective temperature scale derived by interferometry and to strengthen the confidence of existing red giant catalogs of

  10. MESA meets MURaM. Surface effects in main-sequence solar-like oscillators computed using three-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, W. H.; Beeck, B.; Cameron, R. H.; Gizon, L.

    2016-08-01

    Context. Space-based observations of solar-like oscillators have identified large numbers of stars in which many individual mode frequencies can be precisely measured. However, current stellar models predict oscillation frequencies that are systematically affected by simplified modelling of the near-surface layers. Aims: We use three-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics simulations to better model the near-surface equilibrium structure of dwarfs with spectral types F3, G2, K0 and K5, and examine the differences between oscillation mode frequencies computed in stellar models with and without the improved near-surface equilibrium structure. Methods: We precisely match stellar models to the simulations' gravities and effective temperatures at the surface, and to the temporally- and horizontally-averaged densities and pressures at their deepest points. We then replace the near-surface structure with that of the averaged simulation and compute the change in the oscillation mode frequencies. We also fit the differences using several parametric models currently available in the literature. Results: The surface effect in the stars of solar-type and later is qualitatively similar and changes steadily with decreasing effective temperature. In particular, the point of greatest frequency difference decreases slightly as a fraction of the acoustic cut-off frequency and the overall scale of the surface effect decreases. The surface effect in the hot, F3-type star follows the same trend in scale (i.e. it is larger in magnitude) but shows a different overall variation with mode frequency. We find that a two-term fit using the cube and inverse of the frequency divided by the mode inertia is best able to reproduce the surface terms across all four spectral types, although the scaled solar term and a modified Lorentzian function also match the three cooler simulations reasonably well. Conclusions: Three-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics simulations of near-surface convection can be

  11. Three-dimensional compressible jet-in-crossflow calculations using improved viscosity models and adapted grid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lytle, John K.; Harloff, Gary J.; Hsu, Andrew T.

    1990-01-01

    Previous calculations of jet-in-crossflow problems have been sensitive to the turbulence and artificial viscosity models and to the grid. Consequently, the eddy viscosity model in the PARC3D code was modified to consider the turbulent jet by switching from the Baldwin-Lomax (1978) model to an axisymmetric jet model. A modified artificial viscosity model has been utilized and evaluated in this study as well. The new model includes cell size scaling and a directional dependence in the coefficients. Computational results from PARC3D demonstrate the effects of the viscosity models on the pressure distribution fore and aft of the jet and the ability of the adaptive grid scheme to adjust to the three-dimensional gradients around the jet.

  12. A three-dimensional turbulent compressible flow model for ejector and fluted mixers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rushmore, W. L.; Zelazny, S. W.

    1978-01-01

    A three dimensional finite element computer code was developed to analyze ejector and axisymmetric fluted mixer systems whose flow fields are not significantly influenced by streamwise diffusion effects. A two equation turbulence model was used to make comparisons between theory and data for various flow fields which are components of the ejector system, i.e., (1) turbulent boundary layer in a duct; (2) rectangular nozzle (free jet); (3) axisymmetric nozzle (free jet); (4) hypermixing nozzle (free jet); and (5) plane wall jet. Likewise, comparisons of the code with analytical results and/or other numerical solutions were made for components of the axisymmetric fluted mixer system. These included: (1) developing pipe flow; (2) developing flow in an annular pipe; (3) developing flow in an axisymmetric pipe with conical center body and no fluting and (4) developing fluted pipe flow. Finally, two demonstration cases are presented which show the code's ability to analyze both the ejector and axisymmetric fluted mixers.

  13. Development of a discrete gas-kinetic scheme for simulation of two-dimensional viscous incompressible and compressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, L. M.; Shu, C.; Wang, Y.

    2016-03-01

    In this work, a discrete gas-kinetic scheme (DGKS) is presented for simulation of two-dimensional viscous incompressible and compressible flows. This scheme is developed from the circular function-based GKS, which was recently proposed by Shu and his co-workers [L. M. Yang, C. Shu, and J. Wu, J. Comput. Phys. 274, 611 (2014), 10.1016/j.jcp.2014.06.033]. For the circular function-based GKS, the integrals for conservation forms of moments in the infinity domain for the Maxwellian function-based GKS are simplified to those integrals along the circle. As a result, the explicit formulations of conservative variables and fluxes are derived. However, these explicit formulations of circular function-based GKS for viscous flows are still complicated, which may not be easy for the application by new users. By using certain discrete points to represent the circle in the phase velocity space, the complicated formulations can be replaced by a simple solution process. The basic requirement is that the conservation forms of moments for the circular function-based GKS can be accurately satisfied by weighted summation of distribution functions at discrete points. In this work, it is shown that integral quadrature by four discrete points on the circle, which forms the D2Q4 discrete velocity model, can exactly match the integrals. Numerical results showed that the present scheme can provide accurate numerical results for incompressible and compressible viscous flows with roughly the same computational cost as that needed by the Roe scheme.

  14. A high-order vertex-based central ENO finite-volume scheme for three-dimensional compressible flows

    DOE PAGES

    Charest, Marc R.J.; Canfield, Thomas R.; Morgan, Nathaniel R.; Waltz, Jacob; Wohlbier, John G.

    2015-03-11

    High-order discretization methods offer the potential to reduce the computational cost associated with modeling compressible flows. However, it is difficult to obtain accurate high-order discretizations of conservation laws that do not produce spurious oscillations near discontinuities, especially on multi-dimensional unstructured meshes. A novel, high-order, central essentially non-oscillatory (CENO) finite-volume method that does not have these difficulties is proposed for tetrahedral meshes. The proposed unstructured method is vertex-based, which differs from existing cell-based CENO formulations, and uses a hybrid reconstruction procedure that switches between two different solution representations. It applies a high-order k-exact reconstruction in smooth regions and a limited linearmore » reconstruction when discontinuities are encountered. Both reconstructions use a single, central stencil for all variables, making the application of CENO to arbitrary unstructured meshes relatively straightforward. The new approach was applied to the conservation equations governing compressible flows and assessed in terms of accuracy and computational cost. For all problems considered, which included various function reconstructions and idealized flows, CENO demonstrated excellent reliability and robustness. Up to fifth-order accuracy was achieved in smooth regions and essentially non-oscillatory solutions were obtained near discontinuities. The high-order schemes were also more computationally efficient for high-accuracy solutions, i.e., they took less wall time than the lower-order schemes to achieve a desired level of error. In one particular case, it took a factor of 24 less wall-time to obtain a given level of error with the fourth-order CENO scheme than to obtain the same error with the second-order scheme.« less

  15. A high-order vertex-based central ENO finite-volume scheme for three-dimensional compressible flows

    SciTech Connect

    Charest, Marc R.J.; Canfield, Thomas R.; Morgan, Nathaniel R.; Waltz, Jacob; Wohlbier, John G.

    2015-03-11

    High-order discretization methods offer the potential to reduce the computational cost associated with modeling compressible flows. However, it is difficult to obtain accurate high-order discretizations of conservation laws that do not produce spurious oscillations near discontinuities, especially on multi-dimensional unstructured meshes. A novel, high-order, central essentially non-oscillatory (CENO) finite-volume method that does not have these difficulties is proposed for tetrahedral meshes. The proposed unstructured method is vertex-based, which differs from existing cell-based CENO formulations, and uses a hybrid reconstruction procedure that switches between two different solution representations. It applies a high-order k-exact reconstruction in smooth regions and a limited linear reconstruction when discontinuities are encountered. Both reconstructions use a single, central stencil for all variables, making the application of CENO to arbitrary unstructured meshes relatively straightforward. The new approach was applied to the conservation equations governing compressible flows and assessed in terms of accuracy and computational cost. For all problems considered, which included various function reconstructions and idealized flows, CENO demonstrated excellent reliability and robustness. Up to fifth-order accuracy was achieved in smooth regions and essentially non-oscillatory solutions were obtained near discontinuities. The high-order schemes were also more computationally efficient for high-accuracy solutions, i.e., they took less wall time than the lower-order schemes to achieve a desired level of error. In one particular case, it took a factor of 24 less wall-time to obtain a given level of error with the fourth-order CENO scheme than to obtain the same error with the second-order scheme.

  16. A theory for the compression of two dimensional strongly aggregated colloidal packings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tirumkudulu, Mahesh; Roy, Saikat

    2014-11-01

    The consolidation of suspended particulate matter under external forces such as pressure or gravity is of widespread interest. We derive a constitutive relation to describe the deformation of a two-dimensional strongly aggregated colloidal system by incorporating the inter-particle colloidal forces and contact dynamics. The theory accounts for the plastic events that occur in the form of rolling/sliding during the deformation along with elastic deformation. The theory predicts a yield stress that is a function of area fraction of the colloidal packing, the coordination number, the inter-particle potential, coefficient of friction and the normal and tangential stiffness coefficients. The predicted yield stress scales linearly with area fraction for low area fractions, and diverges at random close packing. Increasing the normal stiffness coefficient or the friction coefficient increases the yield stress. For stresses greater than the yield stress, both elastic and plastic deformations contribute to the overall stress. Authors acknowledge support from IIT Bombay and Dept of Science and Technology, India.

  17. Three-dimensional super Yang-Mills with compressible quark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faedo, Antón F.; Kundu, Arnab; Mateos, David; Pantelidou, Christiana; Tarrío, Javier

    2016-03-01

    We construct the gravity dual of three-dimensional, SU(N c) super Yang-Mills theory with N f flavors of dynamical quarks in the presence of a non-zero quark density N q. The supergravity solutions include the backreaction of N c color D2-branes and N f flavor D6-branes with N q units of electric flux on their worldvolume. For massless quarks, the solutions depend non-trivially only on the dimensionless combination ρ = N c 2 N q/ λ 2 N f 4 , with λ = g YM 2 N c the 't Hooft coupling, and describe renormalization group flows between the super Yang-Mills theory in the ultraviolet and a non-relativistic theory in the infrared. The latter is dual to a hyperscaling-violating, Lifshitz-like geometry with dynamical and hyperscaling-violating exponents z = 5 and θ = 1, respectively. If ρ ≪ 1 then at intermediate energies there is also an approximate AdS4 region, dual to a conformal Chern-Simons-Matter theory, in which the flow exhibits quasi-conformal dynamics. At zero temperature we compute the chemical potential and the equation of state and extract the speed of sound. At low temperature we compute the entropy density and extract the number of low-energy degrees of freedom. For quarks of non-zero mass M q the physics depends non-trivially on ρ and M q N c /λ N f.

  18. One-dimensional compressible gas dynamics calculations using the Boltzmann equation

    SciTech Connect

    Reitz, R.D.

    1981-07-01

    One-dimensional inviscid gas dynamics computations are made using a new method to solve the Boltzmann equation. The numerical method is explicit and is based on concepts from the kinetic theory of gases. The gas density, velocity and temperature are computed by integrating numerically the molecular velocity distribution function. This in turn is computed from the Boltzmann equation using an operator splitting approach. The basic algorithm is shown to be efficient and unconditionally stable. The method is tested for a single component diatomic ideal gas on initial-boundary value problems. These include the Riemann shock-tube problem and shock wave reflection from a stationary wall for a range of incident Mach numbers up to M = 10. The results show that the method can offer significant advantages over standard finite difference methods for certain problems. Shock waves are resolved well with minimal oscillations in the solution, and accurate results are obtained with Courant numbers an order of magnitude larger than the usual stability limit. The method performs best in regions of the flow which are close to thermodynamic equilibrium and is first order accurate in regions which are far from equilibrium, as would be predicted from kinetic theory arguments.

  19. [Motion-compensated compressed sensing four-dimensional cone-beam CT reconstruction].

    PubMed

    Yang, Xuan; Zhang, Hua; He, Ji; Zeng, Dong; Zhang, Xin-Yu; Bian, Zhao-Ying; Zhang, Jing; Ma, Jian-Hua

    2016-06-20

    Restriction by hardware caused the very low projection number at a single phase for 4-dimensional cone beam (4D-CBCT) CT imaging, and reconstruction using conventional reconstruction algorithms is thus constrained by serious streak artifacts and noises. To address this problem, we propose an approach to reconstructing 4D-CBCT images with multi-phase projections based on the assumption that the image at one phase can be viewed as the motion-compensated image at another phase. Specifically, we formulated a cost function using multi-phase projections to construct the fidelity term and the TV regularization method. For fidelity term construction, the projection data of the current phase and those at other phases were jointly used by reformulating the imaging model. The Gradient-Projection-Barzilai-Line search (GPBL) method was used to optimize the complex cost function. Physical phantom and patient data results showed that the proposed approach could effectively reduce the noise and artifacts, and the introduction of additional temporal correlation did not introduce new artifacts or motion blur. PMID:27435778

  20. Three-dimensional three-phase model for simulation of hydrodynamics, oxygen mass transfer, carbon oxidation, nitrification and denitrification in an oxidation ditch.

    PubMed

    Lei, Li; Ni, Jinren

    2014-04-15

    A three-dimensional three-phase fluid model, supplemented by laboratory data, was developed to simulate the hydrodynamics, oxygen mass transfer, carbon oxidation, nitrification and denitrification processes in an oxidation ditch. The model provided detailed phase information on the liquid flow field, gas hold-up distribution and sludge sedimentation. The three-phase model described water-gas, water-sludge and gas-sludge interactions. Activated sludge was taken to be in a pseudo-solid phase, comprising an initially separated solid phase that was transported and later underwent biological reactions with the surrounding liquidmedia. Floc parameters were modified to improve the sludge viscosity, sludge density, oxygen mass transfer rate, and carbon substrate uptake due to adsorption onto the activated sludge. The validation test results were in very satisfactory agreement with laboratory data on the behavior of activated sludge in an oxidation ditch. By coupling species transport and biological process models, reasonable predictions are made of: (1) the biochemical kinetics of dissolved oxygen, chemical oxygen demand (COD) and nitrogen variation, and (2) the physical kinematics of sludge sedimentation.

  1. Research on one-dimensional two-phase flow. Theory on hydrodynamic balance in two fluid model and its application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, H.

    1986-08-01

    In the Part I, the author describes the fundamental form of the hydraulic basic equations for a one-dimensional two-phase flow (two fluid model). Most of the discussions are concentrated on the treatment of phase change inertial force terms in the equations of motion, and the author's equations of motion have a strong uniqueness on the following three points in comparison with conventional equations of motion: (1) To express force balance of unit mass two-phase fluid instead of that of unit volume two-phase fluid; (2) To pick up the unit existing mass and the unit flowing mass as the unit mass of two-phase fluid; and (3) To apply the kinetic energy principle instead of the momentum low in the evaluation of stational inertia force term. In these three, the item: (1) is for excluding a part of momentum change or kinetic energy change due to mass change of the elementary part of fluid, which is independent of force; (2) is not to introduce a phenomenological physical model into the evaluation of phase change inertial force term; and (3) is for correctly applying the momentum law taking into account the difference of representative velocities between the main flow fluid (vapor phase or liquid phase) and the phase change part of fluid. In the Part II, characteristics of various kinds of high speed two-phase flow are clarified theoretically by using the basic equations derived in the Part I.

  2. Skew resisting hydrodynamic seal

    DOEpatents

    Conroy, William T.; Dietle, Lannie L.; Gobeli, Jeffrey D.; Kalsi, Manmohan S.

    2001-01-01

    A novel hydrodynamically lubricated compression type rotary seal that is suitable for lubricant retention and environmental exclusion. Particularly, the seal geometry ensures constraint of a hydrodynamic seal in a manner preventing skew-induced wear and provides adequate room within the seal gland to accommodate thermal expansion. The seal accommodates large as-manufactured variations in the coefficient of thermal expansion of the sealing material, provides a relatively stiff integral spring effect to minimize pressure-induced shuttling of the seal within the gland, and also maintains interfacial contact pressure within the dynamic sealing interface in an optimum range for efficient hydrodynamic lubrication and environment exclusion. The seal geometry also provides for complete support about the circumference of the seal to receive environmental pressure, as compared the interrupted character of seal support set forth in U.S. Pat. Nos. 5,873,576 and 6,036,192 and provides a hydrodynamic seal which is suitable for use with non-Newtonian lubricants.

  3. Three Dimensional Compressible Turbulent Flow Computations for a Diffusing S-Duct With/Without Vortex Generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cho, Soo-Yong; Greber, Isaac

    1994-01-01

    Numerical investigations on a diffusing S-duct with/without vortex generators and a straight duct with vortex generators are presented. The investigation consists of solving the full three-dimensional unsteady compressible mass averaged Navier-Stokes equations. An implicit finite volume lower-upper time marching code (RPLUS3D) has been employed and modified. A three-dimensional Baldwin-Lomax turbulence model has been modified in conjunction with the flow physics. A model for the analysis of vortex generators in a fully viscous subsonic internal flow is evaluated. A vortical structure for modeling the shed vortex is used as a source term in the computation domain. The injected vortex paths in the straight duct are compared with the analysis by two kinds of prediction models. The flow structure by the vortex generators are investigated along the duct. Computed results of the flow in a circular diffusing S-duct provide an understanding of the flow structure within a typical engine inlet system. These are compared with the experimental wall static-pressure, static- and total-pressure field, and secondary velocity profiles. Additionally, boundary layer thickness, skin friction values, and velocity profiles in wall coordinates are presented. In order to investigate the effect of vortex generators, various vortex strengths are examined in this study. The total-pressure recovery and distortion coefficients are obtained at the exit of the S-duct. The numerical results clearly depict the interaction between the low velocity flow by the flow separation and the injected vortices.

  4. Compressive Creep Performance and High Temperature Dimensional Stability of Conventional Silica Refractories

    SciTech Connect

    Karakus, M.; Kirkland, T.P.; Liu, K.C.; Moore, R.E.; Pint, B.A.; Wereszczak, A.A.

    1999-03-01

    Industrial Materials program is sponsoring work to conduct creep testing and analysis on refractories of interest to the glass industry. An earlier stage of the project involved identifying which refractories to test and this is described elsewhere. Conventional silica was one such identified refractory category, and the present report describes the creep behavior of this class of refractories. To portray a more complete understanding of how these refractories perform at service temperatures, their fundamental corrosion resistances, dimensional stabilities, and microstructure were characterized as well.

  5. A new multi-dimensional general relativistic neutrino hydrodynamics code for core-collapse supernovae. IV. The neutrino signal

    SciTech Connect

    Müller, Bernhard; Janka, Hans-Thomas E-mail: bjmuellr@mpa-garching.mpg.de

    2014-06-10

    Considering six general relativistic, two-dimensional (2D) supernova (SN) explosion models of progenitor stars between 8.1 and 27 M {sub ☉}, we systematically analyze the properties of the neutrino emission from core collapse and bounce to the post-explosion phase. The models were computed with the VERTEX-COCONUT code, using three-flavor, energy-dependent neutrino transport in the ray-by-ray-plus approximation. Our results confirm the close similarity of the mean energies, (E), of ν-bar {sub e} and heavy-lepton neutrinos and even their crossing during the accretion phase for stars with M ≳ 10 M {sub ☉} as observed in previous 1D and 2D simulations with state-of-the-art neutrino transport. We establish a roughly linear scaling of 〈E{sub ν-bar{sub e}}〉 with the proto-neutron star (PNS) mass, which holds in time as well as for different progenitors. Convection inside the PNS affects the neutrino emission on the 10%-20% level, and accretion continuing beyond the onset of the explosion prevents the abrupt drop of the neutrino luminosities seen in artificially exploded 1D models. We demonstrate that a wavelet-based time-frequency analysis of SN neutrino signals in IceCube will offer sensitive diagnostics for the SN core dynamics up to at least ∼10 kpc distance. Strong, narrow-band signal modulations indicate quasi-periodic shock sloshing motions due to the standing accretion shock instability (SASI), and the frequency evolution of such 'SASI neutrino chirps' reveals shock expansion or contraction. The onset of the explosion is accompanied by a shift of the modulation frequency below 40-50 Hz, and post-explosion, episodic accretion downflows will be signaled by activity intervals stretching over an extended frequency range in the wavelet spectrogram.

  6. Negative Compressibility and Charge Partitioning Between Graphene and MoS2 Two-Dimensional Electron Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolsma, John; Larentis, Stefano; Tutuc, Emanuel; MacDonald, Allan

    2014-03-01

    Electron-electron interactions often have opposite influences on thermodynamic properties of electrons in graphene compared to conventional two-dimensional electron gases (2DEGs), for example by lowering charge and spin-susceptibilities in the graphene case and enhancing them in the ordinary 2DEG case. In ordinary 2DEGs the charge susceptibility diverges at a finite carrier density, below which the compressibility becomes negative. We theoretically explore the influence of this qualitative difference on how charge is partitioned between a MoS2 and a graphene sheet 2DEG when they act as a compound capacitor electrode. Our theory is based on a random phase approximation for charge fluctuations in the 2DEGS and the coupling constant formulation for the ground state energy. We find that in the ideal case the MoS2 2DEG carrier density jumps immediately to a finite value when it is initially populated and discuss how this effect is moderated by disorder. Work supported by the Welch Foundation grant TBF1473 and the DOE Division of Materials Sciences Engineering grant DE-FG03-02ER45958.

  7. [Investigation on biomechanics behavior using three-dimensional finite element analysis for femur shaft fracture treated with locking compression plate].

    PubMed

    He, Qinli; Jiang, Wei; Luo, Jiaoming

    2014-08-01

    Based on the CT data and the structure characteristics of the femoral fractures during different healing stages, medical FE models of fractured femur treated with locking compression plate (LCP)were built. Under the physiological load of a standard body weight (70 kg) and the constraint condition, the stress distributions of LCP and fractured femur during healing were calculated by means of three-dimensional finite element analysis (3D-FEA). The results showed that the stress distribution in the LCP and the fractured femur was similar, during the initial stage which there was no newly formed bone or soft tissue in fracture site. The maximum von Mises stress (371.23,272.76 MPa) in the fractured femur was much higher than that in natural femur, and the intensive stress was concentrated mainly in the proximal area of the fractured femur. With the growth of bony callus bone in fracture site, the intensity of stress in proximal femur decreased. Contrasted to the two cases mentioned above, the value of the maximum von Mises stress (68. 17 MPa) in bony callus bone stage decreased significantly, and was lower than the safe strength of natural bone. Therefore, appropriate training which is benefitial for the growth to new bone could be arranged for the better rehabilitation.

  8. Three-dimensional compressible laminar boundary layers on sharp and blunt circular cones at angle of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popinski, Z.; Davis, R. T.

    1973-01-01

    A method for solving the three-dimensional compressible laminar boundary layer equations for the case of a circular cone and a sphere-cone body at an angle of attack is presented. The governing equations are modified by a similarity type transformation and then transformed into a Crocco-type form. The resulting set of equations is solved simultaneously by an iterative method using an implicit finite difference scheme by means of an efficient algorithm for equations of tridiagonal form. The effects of streamline swallowing on a sharp cone are included by introducing the true inviscid edge conditions at the distance from the wall equal to the boundary layer thickness. The validity of the approach was established by comparison of the computational results with similar results by other methods and with experimental data. It was concluded that at sufficiently high Mach number and moderate to large angles of attack, the streamline swallowing effects on a sharp cone result in higher values of skin friction and heat transfer as compared with the classical results for constant entropy.

  9. VNAP2: A Computer Program for Computation of Two-dimensional, Time-dependent, Compressible, Turbulent Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cline, M. C.

    1981-01-01

    A computer program, VNAP2, for calculating turbulent (as well as laminar and inviscid), steady, and unsteady flow is presented. It solves the two dimensional, time dependent, compressible Navier-Stokes equations. The turbulence is modeled with either an algebraic mixing length model, a one equation model, or the Jones-Launder two equation model. The geometry may be a single or a dual flowing stream. The interior grid points are computed using the unsplit MacCormack scheme. Two options to speed up the calculations for high Reynolds number flows are included. The boundary grid points are computed using a reference plane characteristic scheme with the viscous terms treated as source functions. An explicit artificial viscosity is included for shock computations. The fluid is assumed to be a perfect gas. The flow boundaries may be arbitrary curved solid walls, inflow/outflow boundaries, or free jet envelopes. Typical problems that can be solved concern nozzles, inlets, jet powered afterbodies, airfoils, and free jet expansions. The accuracy and efficiency of the program are shown by calculations of several inviscid and turbulent flows. The program and its use are described completely, and six sample cases and a code listing are included.

  10. Hydrodynamic test problems

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, B

    2005-06-02

    We present test problems that can be used to check the hydrodynamic implementation in computer codes designed to model the implosion of a National Ignition Facility (NIF) capsule. The problems are simplified, yet one of them is three-dimensional. It consists of a nearly-spherical incompressible imploding shell subjected to an exponentially decaying pressure on its outer surface. We present a semi-analytic solution for the time-evolution of that shell with arbitrary small three-dimensional perturbations on its inner and outer surfaces. The perturbations on the shell surfaces are intended to model the imperfections that are created during capsule manufacturing.

  11. Well-Posedness for the Motion of Physical Vacuum of the Three-dimensional Compressible Euler Equations with or without Self-Gravitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Tao; Xin, Zhouping; Zeng, Huihui

    2014-09-01

    This paper concerns the well-posedness theory of the motion of a physical vacuum for the compressible Euler equations with or without self-gravitation. First, a general uniqueness theorem of classical solutions is proved for the three dimensional general motion. Second, for the spherically symmetric motions, without imposing the compatibility condition of the first derivative being zero at the center of symmetry, a new local-in-time existence theory is established in a functional space involving less derivatives than those constructed for three-dimensional motions in (Coutand et al., Commun Math Phys 296:559-587, 2010; Coutand and Shkoller, Arch Ration Mech Anal 206:515-616, 2012; Jang and Masmoudi, Well-posedness of compressible Euler equations in a physical vacuum, 2008) by constructing suitable weights and cutoff functions featuring the behavior of solutions near both the center of the symmetry and the moving vacuum boundary.

  12. Calculation of the flow field in supersonic mixed-compression inlets at angle of attack using the three-dimensional method of characteristics with discrete shock wave fitting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vadyak, J.; Hoffman, J. D.

    1978-01-01

    The influence of molecular transport is included in the computation by treating viscous and thermal diffusion terms in the governing partial differential equations as correction terms in the method of characteristics scheme. The development of a production type computer program is reported which is capable of calculating the flow field in a variety of axisymmetric mixed-compression aircraft inlets. The results agreed well with those produced by the two-dimensional method characteristics when axisymmetric flow fields are computed. For three-dimensional flow fields, the results agree well with experimental data except in regions of high viscous interaction and boundary layer removal.

  13. Detection of Conveyance Changes in St. Clair River Using Historical Water-Level and Flow Data with Inverse One-Dimensional Hydrodynamic Modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holtschlag, David J.; Hoard, C.J.

    2009-01-01

    St. Clair River is a connecting channel that transports water from Lake Huron to the St. Clair River Delta and Lake St. Clair. A negative trend has been detected in differences between water levels on Lake Huron and Lake St. Clair. This trend may indicate a combination of flow and conveyance changes within St. Clair River. To identify where conveyance change may be taking place, eight water-level gaging stations along St. Clair River were selected to delimit seven reaches. Positive trends in water-level fall were detected in two reaches, and negative trends were detected in two other reaches. The presence of both positive and negative trends in water-level fall indicates that changes in conveyance are likely occurring among some reaches because all reaches transmit essentially the same flow. Annual water-level fall in reaches and reach lengths was used to compute conveyance ratios for all pairs of reaches by use of water-level data from 1962 to 2007. Positive and negative trends in conveyance ratios indicate that relative conveyance is changing among some reaches. Inverse one-dimensional (1-D) hydrodynamic modeling was used to estimate a partial annual series of effective channel-roughness parameters in reaches forming the St. Clair River for 21 years when flow measurements were sufficient to support parameter estimation. Monotonic, persistent but non-monotonic, and irregular changes in estimated effective channel roughness with time were interpreted as systematic changes in conveyances in five reaches. Time-varying parameter estimates were used to simulate flow throughout the St. Clair River and compute changes in conveyance with time. Based on the partial annual series of parameters, conveyance in the St. Clair River increased about 10 percent from 1962 to 2002. Conveyance decreased, however, about 4.1 percent from 2003 to 2007, so that conveyance was about 5.9 percent higher in 2007 than in 1962.

  14. Two-dimensional hydrodynamic modeling to quantify effects of peak-flow management on channel morphology and salmon-spawning habitat in the Cedar River, Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnas, C. R.; Czuba, J. A.; Gendaszek, A. S.; Magirl, C. S.

    2010-12-01

    The Cedar River in Washington State originates on the western slope of the Cascade Range and provides the City of Seattle with most of its drinking water, while also supporting a productive salmon habitat. Water-resource managers require detailed information on how best to manage high-flow releases from Chester Morse Lake, a large reservoir on the Cedar River, during periods of heavy precipitation to minimize flooding, while mitigating negative effects on fish populations. Instream flow-management practices include provisions for adaptive management to promote and maintain healthy aquatic habitat in the river system. The current study is designed to understand the linkages between peak flow characteristics, geomorphic processes, riverine habitat, and biological responses. Specifically, two-dimensional hydrodynamic modeling is used to simulate and quantify the effects of the peak-flow magnitude, duration, and frequency on the channel morphology and salmon-spawning habitat. Two study reaches, representative of the typical geomorphic and ecologic characteristics of the Cedar River, were selected for the modeling. Detailed bathymetric data, collected with a real-time kinematic global positioning system and an acoustic Doppler current profiler, were combined with a LiDAR-derived digital elevation model in the overbank area to develop a computational mesh. The model is used to simulate water velocity, benthic shear stress, flood inundation, and morphologic changes in the gravel-bedded river under the current and alternative flood-release strategies. Simulations of morphologic change and salmon-redd scour by floods of differing magnitude and duration enable water-resource managers to incorporate model simulation results into adaptive management of peak flows in the Cedar River.

  15. A NEW MULTI-DIMENSIONAL GENERAL RELATIVISTIC NEUTRINO HYDRODYNAMICS CODE OF CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE. III. GRAVITATIONAL WAVE SIGNALS FROM SUPERNOVA EXPLOSION MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Bernhard; Janka, Hans-Thomas; Marek, Andreas E-mail: thj@mpa-garching.mpg.de

    2013-03-20

    We present a detailed theoretical analysis of the gravitational wave (GW) signal of the post-bounce evolution of core-collapse supernovae (SNe), employing for the first time relativistic, two-dimensional explosion models with multi-group, three-flavor neutrino transport based on the ray-by-ray-plus approximation. The waveforms reflect the accelerated mass motions associated with the characteristic evolutionary stages that were also identified in previous works: a quasi-periodic modulation by prompt post-shock convection is followed by a phase of relative quiescence before growing amplitudes signal violent hydrodynamical activity due to convection and the standing accretion shock instability during the accretion period of the stalled shock. Finally, a high-frequency, low-amplitude variation from proto-neutron star (PNS) convection below the neutrinosphere appears superimposed on the low-frequency trend associated with the aspherical expansion of the SN shock after the onset of the explosion. Relativistic effects in combination with detailed neutrino transport are shown to be essential for quantitative predictions of the GW frequency evolution and energy spectrum, because they determine the structure of the PNS surface layer and its characteristic g-mode frequency. Burst-like high-frequency activity phases, correlated with sudden luminosity increase and spectral hardening of electron (anti-)neutrino emission for some 10 ms, are discovered as new features after the onset of the explosion. They correspond to intermittent episodes of anisotropic accretion by the PNS in the case of fallback SNe. We find stronger signals for more massive progenitors with large accretion rates. The typical frequencies are higher for massive PNSs, though the time-integrated spectrum also strongly depends on the model dynamics.

  16. A New Multi-dimensional General Relativistic Neutrino Hydrodynamic Code for Core-collapse Supernovae. I. Method and Code Tests in Spherical Symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Bernhard; Janka, Hans-Thomas; Dimmelmeier, Harald

    2010-07-01

    We present a new general relativistic code for hydrodynamical supernova simulations with neutrino transport in spherical and azimuthal symmetry (one dimension and two dimensions, respectively). The code is a combination of the COCONUT hydro module, which is a Riemann-solver-based, high-resolution shock-capturing method, and the three-flavor, fully energy-dependent VERTEX scheme for the transport of massless neutrinos. VERTEX integrates the coupled neutrino energy and momentum equations with a variable Eddington factor closure computed from a model Boltzmann equation and uses the "ray-by-ray plus" approximation in two dimensions, assuming the neutrino distribution to be axially symmetric around the radial direction at every point in space, and thus the neutrino flux to be radial. Our spacetime treatment employs the Arnowitt-Deser-Misner 3+1 formalism with the conformal flatness condition for the spatial three metric. This approach is exact for the one-dimensional case and has previously been shown to yield very accurate results for spherical and rotational stellar core collapse. We introduce new formulations of the energy equation to improve total energy conservation in relativistic and Newtonian hydro simulations with grid-based Eulerian finite-volume codes. Moreover, a modified version of the VERTEX scheme is developed that simultaneously conserves energy and lepton number in the neutrino transport with better accuracy and higher numerical stability in the high-energy tail of the spectrum. To verify our code, we conduct a series of tests in spherical symmetry, including a detailed comparison with published results of the collapse, shock formation, shock breakout, and accretion phases. Long-time simulations of proto-neutron star cooling until several seconds after core bounce both demonstrate the robustness of the new COCONUT-VERTEX code and show the approximate treatment of relativistic effects by means of an effective relativistic gravitational potential as in

  17. A NEW MULTI-DIMENSIONAL GENERAL RELATIVISTIC NEUTRINO HYDRODYNAMIC CODE FOR CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE. I. METHOD AND CODE TESTS IN SPHERICAL SYMMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Bernhard; Janka, Hans-Thomas; Dimmelmeier, Harald E-mail: thj@mpa-garching.mpg.d

    2010-07-15

    We present a new general relativistic code for hydrodynamical supernova simulations with neutrino transport in spherical and azimuthal symmetry (one dimension and two dimensions, respectively). The code is a combination of the COCONUT hydro module, which is a Riemann-solver-based, high-resolution shock-capturing method, and the three-flavor, fully energy-dependent VERTEX scheme for the transport of massless neutrinos. VERTEX integrates the coupled neutrino energy and momentum equations with a variable Eddington factor closure computed from a model Boltzmann equation and uses the 'ray-by-ray plus' approximation in two dimensions, assuming the neutrino distribution to be axially symmetric around the radial direction at every point in space, and thus the neutrino flux to be radial. Our spacetime treatment employs the Arnowitt-Deser-Misner 3+1 formalism with the conformal flatness condition for the spatial three metric. This approach is exact for the one-dimensional case and has previously been shown to yield very accurate results for spherical and rotational stellar core collapse. We introduce new formulations of the energy equation to improve total energy conservation in relativistic and Newtonian hydro simulations with grid-based Eulerian finite-volume codes. Moreover, a modified version of the VERTEX scheme is developed that simultaneously conserves energy and lepton number in the neutrino transport with better accuracy and higher numerical stability in the high-energy tail of the spectrum. To verify our code, we conduct a series of tests in spherical symmetry, including a detailed comparison with published results of the collapse, shock formation, shock breakout, and accretion phases. Long-time simulations of proto-neutron star cooling until several seconds after core bounce both demonstrate the robustness of the new COCONUT-VERTEX code and show the approximate treatment of relativistic effects by means of an effective relativistic gravitational potential as in

  18. Effect of processing variables (different compression packing processes and investment material types) and time on the dimensional accuracy of polymethyl methacrylate denture bases.

    PubMed

    Baydas, Seyfettin; Bayindir, Funda; Akyil, M Samil

    2003-06-01

    In this study we determined the effect of different compression packing processes, investment materials (a hemihydrate and dental stone) and time on the dimensional accuracy of polymethyl metacrylate denture bases. Square stainless steel plates (15 mm x 15 mm x 5 mm) were prepared to make an acrylic resin specimen. The linear dimensional changes of acrylic resin were determined by measuring the distances of fix points. Measurements were made at 24 hours, 48 hours, 12 days and 30 days after setting with a digital compass. Dimensional changes of test specimens that were obtained with three different flasks and two press techniques were compared by univariate analysis. Measurements of the linear dimensions of specimens cured by different compression packing techniques suggested that differences existed. The time interval differences were not significant. According to the results; flask and investment material types affect the dimensional accuracy of test specimens (p < 0.05). The least dimensional change observed in the specimens was obtained with Type 1 flask-dental stone-manual press combinations.

  19. Bridging fluctuating hydrodynamics and molecular dynamics simulations of fluids.

    PubMed

    Voulgarakis, Nikolaos K; Chu, Jhih-Wei

    2009-04-01

    A new multiscale coarse-graining (CG) methodology is developed to bridge molecular and hydrodynamic models of a fluid. The hydrodynamic representation considered in this work is based on the equations of fluctuating hydrodynamics (FH). The essence of this method is a mapping from the position and velocity vectors of a snapshot of a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation to the field variables on Eulerian cells of a hydrodynamic representation. By explicit consideration of the effective lengthscale d(mol) that characterizes the volume of a molecule, the computed density fluctuations from MD via our mapping procedure have volume dependence that corresponds to a grand canonical ensemble of a cold liquid even when a small cell length (5-10 A) is used in a hydrodynamic representation. For TIP3P water at 300 K and 1 atm, d(mol) is found to be 2.4 A, corresponding to the excluded radius of a water molecule as revealed by its center-of-mass radial distribution function. By matching the density fluctuations and autocorrelation functions of momentum fields computed from solving the FH equations with those computed from MD simulation, the sound velocity and shear and bulk viscosities of a CG hydrodynamic model can be determined directly from MD. Furthermore, a novel staggered discretization scheme is developed for solving the FH equations of an isothermal compressive fluid in a three dimensional space with a central difference method. This scheme demonstrates high accuracy in satisfying the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. Since the causative relationship between field variables and fluxes is captured, we demonstrate that the staggered discretization scheme also predicts correct physical behaviors in simulating transient fluid flows. The techniques presented in this work may also be employed to design multiscale strategies for modeling complex fluids and macromolecules in solution. PMID:19355721

  20. Computer program for solving laminar, transitional, or turbulent compressible boundary-layer equations for two-dimensional and axisymmetric flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, J. E.; Blanchard, D. K.

    1982-01-01

    A numerical algorithm and computer program are presented for solving the laminar, transitional, or turbulent two dimensional or axisymmetric compressible boundary-layer equations for perfect-gas flows. The governing equations are solved by an iterative three-point implicit finite-difference procedure. The software, program VGBLP, is a modification of the approach presented in NASA TR R-368 and NASA TM X-2458, respectively. The major modifications are: (1) replacement of the fourth-order Runge-Kutta integration technique with a finite-difference procedure for numerically solving the equations required to initiate the parabolic marching procedure; (2) introduction of the Blottner variable-grid scheme; (3) implementation of an iteration scheme allowing the coupled system of equations to be converged to a specified accuracy level; and (4) inclusion of an iteration scheme for variable-entropy calculations. These modifications to the approach presented in NASA TR R-368 and NASA TM X-2458 yield a software package with high computational efficiency and flexibility. Turbulence-closure options include either two-layer eddy-viscosity or mixing-length models. Eddy conductivity is modeled as a function of eddy viscosity through a static turbulent Prandtl number formulation. Several options are provided for specifying the static turbulent Prandtl number. The transitional boundary layer is treated through a streamwise intermittency function which modifies the turbulence-closure model. This model is based on the probability distribution of turbulent spots and ranges from zero to unity for laminar and turbulent flow, respectively. Several test cases are presented as guides for potential users of the software.

  1. On the one-dimensional theory of steady compressible fluid flow in ducts with friction and heat addition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hicks, Bruce L; Montgomery, Donald; Wasserman, Robert H

    1947-01-01

    Steady, diabatic (nonadiabatic), frictional, variable-area flow of a compressible fluid is treated in differential form on the basis of the one-dimensional approximation. The basic equations are first stated in terms of pressure, temperature, density, and velocity of the fluid. Considerable simplification and unification of the equations are then achieved by choosing the square of the local Mach number as one of the variables to describe the flow. The transformed system of equations thus obtained is first examined with regard to the existence of a solution. It is shown that, in general, a solution exists whose calculation requires knowledge only of the variation with position of any three of the dependent variables of the system. The direction of change of the flow variables can be obtained directly from the transformed equations without integration. As examples of this application of the equations, the direction of change of the flow variables is determined for two special flows. In the particular case when the local Mach number m = 1, a special condition must be satisfied by the flow if a solution is to exist. This condition restricts the joint rate of variation of heating, friction, and area at m = 1. Further analysis indicates that when a solution exists at this point it is not necessarily unique. Finally it is shown that the physical phenomenon of choking, which is known to occur in certain simple flow situations, is related to restrictions imposed on the variables by the form of the transformed equations. The phenomenon of choking is thus given a more general significance in that the transformed equations apply to a more general type of flow than has hitherto been treated. (author)

  2. Ship Hydrodynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lafrance, Pierre

    1978-01-01

    Explores in a non-mathematical treatment some of the hydrodynamical phenomena and forces that affect the operation of ships, especially at high speeds. Discusses the major components of ship resistance such as the different types of drags and ways to reduce them and how to apply those principles for the hovercraft. (GA)

  3. Radiation Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Castor, J I

    2003-10-16

    The discipline of radiation hydrodynamics is the branch of hydrodynamics in which the moving fluid absorbs and emits electromagnetic radiation, and in so doing modifies its dynamical behavior. That is, the net gain or loss of energy by parcels of the fluid material through absorption or emission of radiation are sufficient to change the pressure of the material, and therefore change its motion; alternatively, the net momentum exchange between radiation and matter may alter the motion of the matter directly. Ignoring the radiation contributions to energy and momentum will give a wrong prediction of the hydrodynamic motion when the correct description is radiation hydrodynamics. Of course, there are circumstances when a large quantity of radiation is present, yet can be ignored without causing the model to be in error. This happens when radiation from an exterior source streams through the problem, but the latter is so transparent that the energy and momentum coupling is negligible. Everything we say about radiation hydrodynamics applies equally well to neutrinos and photons (apart from the Einstein relations, specific to bosons), but in almost every area of astrophysics neutrino hydrodynamics is ignored, simply because the systems are exceedingly transparent to neutrinos, even though the energy flux in neutrinos may be substantial. Another place where we can do ''radiation hydrodynamics'' without using any sophisticated theory is deep within stars or other bodies, where the material is so opaque to the radiation that the mean free path of photons is entirely negligible compared with the size of the system, the distance over which any fluid quantity varies, and so on. In this case we can suppose that the radiation is in equilibrium with the matter locally, and its energy, pressure and momentum can be lumped in with those of the rest of the fluid. That is, it is no more necessary to distinguish photons from atoms, nuclei and electrons, than it is to distinguish

  4. Bacterial Hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauga, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria predate plants and animals by billions of years. Today, they are the world's smallest cells, yet they represent the bulk of the world's biomass and the main reservoir of nutrients for higher organisms. Most bacteria can move on their own, and the majority of motile bacteria are able to swim in viscous fluids using slender helical appendages called flagella. Low-Reynolds number hydrodynamics is at the heart of the ability of flagella to generate propulsion at the micrometer scale. In fact, fluid dynamic forces impact many aspects of bacteriology, ranging from the ability of cells to reorient and search their surroundings to their interactions within mechanically and chemically complex environments. Using hydrodynamics as an organizing framework, I review the biomechanics of bacterial motility and look ahead to future challenges.

  5. Compression-induced crystallization of amorphous indomethacin in tablets: characterization of spatial heterogeneity by two-dimensional X-ray diffractometry.

    PubMed

    Thakral, Naveen K; Mohapatra, Sarat; Stephenson, Gregory A; Suryanarayanan, Raj

    2015-01-01

    Tablets of amorphous indomethacin were compressed at 10, 25, 50, or 100 MPa using either an unlubricated or a lubricated die and stored individually at 35 °C in sealed Mylar pouches. At selected time points, tablets were analyzed by two-dimensional X-ray diffractometry (2D-XRD), which enabled us to profile the extent of drug crystallization in tablets, in both the radial and axial directions. To evaluate the role of lubricant, magnesium stearate was used as "internal" and/or "external" lubricant. Indomethacin crystallization propensity increased as a function of compression pressure, with 100 MPa pressure causing crystallization immediately after compression (detected using synchrotron radiation). However, the drug crystallization was not uniform throughout the tablets. In unlubricated systems, pronounced crystallization at the radial surface could be attributed to die wall friction. The tablet core remained substantially amorphous, irrespective of the compression pressure. Lubrication of the die wall with magnesium stearate, as external lubricant, dramatically decreased drug crystallization at the radial surface. The spatial heterogeneity in drug crystallization, as a function of formulation composition and compression pressure, was systematically investigated. When formulating amorphous systems as tablets, the potential for compression induced crystallization warrants careful consideration. Very low levels of crystallization on the tablet surface, while profoundly affecting product performance (decrease in dissolution rate), may not be readily detected by conventional analytical techniques. Early detection of crystallization could be pivotal in the successful design of a dosage form where, in order to obtain the desired bioavailability, the drug may be in a high energy state. Specialized X-ray diffractometric techniques (2D; use of high intensity synchrotron radiation) enabled detection of very low levels of drug crystallization and revealed the heterogeneity in

  6. Comparison between physical variables acquired by a new multiparametric platform, ELFO, and data calculated by a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model in different weather conditions at Tiber River mouth (Latium coast, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonamano, Simone; Piermattei, Viviana; Marcelli, Marco; Peviani, Maximo

    2010-05-01

    The coastal ecosystem is characterized by high variability physical processes, which are strongly influenced by sudden changes in weather conditions. For this reason instruments able to collect data in a short time or mathematical models able to simulate the same phenomena from experimental data are basic. In this study in situ data are compared with data calculated by three-dimensional hydrodynamic model. The multiparametric platform was developed ad hoc by Laboratory of Experimental Oceanology and Marine Ecology (DECOS, Tuscia University) for coastal monitoring by small vessels (ELFO), and integrates temperature, conductivity, dissolved oxygen and suspended solids measures with bio-optical measures like fluorescence, photosynthetic efficiency and PAR. The hydrodynamic model is the three-dimensional coastal hydrodynamic DELFT3D-FLOW simulating processes of temperature and salinity diffusion and the transport of suspended sediment (cohesive and non cohesive) in the water column. This study analyses the area at mouth of Tiber river investigated by two surveys wiht different weather conditions. Data collected during the first survey were used to calibrate the DELFT3D-FLOW model which computational domain extends from the Argentario headland to Capo Anzio. A microscale wind field (resolution of about 7 km), provided by the atmospheric model COSMO-ME (developed by CNMCA of Aeronautica Militare, Italy), was used to reproduce the hydrodynamic field and the distribution of the physical variables of the whole period. In this way the data calculated by the model can be compared with those collected in situ during the second survey. Moreover dynamic phenomena existed between the two monitoring periods can be investigated.

  7. Auto-calibration of a one-dimensional hydrodynamic-ecological model using a Monte Carlo approach: simulation of hypoxic events in a polymictic lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, L.

    2011-12-01

    Automated calibration of complex deterministic water quality models with a large number of biogeochemical parameters can reduce time-consuming iterative simulations involving empirical judgements of model fit. We undertook auto-calibration of the one-dimensional hydrodynamic-ecological lake model DYRESM-CAEDYM, using a Monte Carlo sampling (MCS) method, in order to test the applicability of this procedure for shallow, polymictic Lake Rotorua (New Zealand). The calibration procedure involved independently minimising the root-mean-square-error (RMSE), maximizing the Pearson correlation coefficient (r) and Nash-Sutcliffe efficient coefficient (Nr) for comparisons of model state variables against measured data. An assigned number of parameter permutations was used for 10,000 simulation iterations. The 'optimal' temperature calibration produced a RMSE of 0.54 °C, Nr-value of 0.99 and r-value of 0.98 through the whole water column based on comparisons with 540 observed water temperatures collected between 13 July 2007 - 13 January 2009. The modeled bottom dissolved oxygen concentration (20.5 m below surface) was compared with 467 available observations. The calculated RMSE of the simulations compared with the measurements was 1.78 mg L-1, the Nr-value was 0.75 and the r-value was 0.87. The autocalibrated model was further tested for an independent data set by simulating bottom-water hypoxia events for the period 15 January 2009 to 8 June 2011 (875 days). This verification produced an accurate simulation of five hypoxic events corresponding to DO < 2 mg L-1 during summer of 2009-2011. The RMSE was 2.07 mg L-1, Nr-value 0.62 and r-value of 0.81, based on the available data set of 738 days. The auto-calibration software of DYRESM-CAEDYM developed here is substantially less time-consuming and more efficient in parameter optimisation than traditional manual calibration which has been the standard tool practiced for similar complex water quality models.

  8. Efficient compression scheme by use of the region division of elemental images on MALT in three-dimensional integral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Ho-Hyun; Lee, Jung-Woo; Shin, Dong-Hak; Kim, Eun-Soo

    2010-02-01

    This paper addresses the efficient compression scheme of elemental image array (EIA) generated from the moving array lenslet technique (MALT) based on MPEG-4. The EIAs are picked-up by MALT controlling the spatial ray sampling of ray and which produces few EIAs that the positions of the lenslet arrays are rapidly vibrated in the lateral directions within the retention time of the afterimage of human eye. To enhance the similarity in each EIA picked-up by MALT, several EIAs obtained from MALT are regenerated by the collection of an elemental image occupied at the same position in each EIA. The newly generated each EIA has high similarity among adjacent elemental images. To illustrate the feasibility of the proposed scheme, some experiments are carried out to show the increased compression efficiency and we obtained the improved compression ratio of 12% compared to the unhandled compression scheme.

  9. Fabrication of three-dimensional porous scaffolds of complicated shape for tissue engineering. I. Compression molding based on flexible-rigid combined mold.

    PubMed

    Wu, Linbo; Zhang, Hong; Zhang, Junchuan; Ding, Jiandong

    2005-01-01

    A novel method for the fabrication of complexly shaped three-dimensional porous scaffolds has been developed by combining modified compression molding and conventional particulate leaching. The resultant scaffolds of various shapes, including some shaped like auricles, were made of hydrophobic biodegradable and bioresorbable poly(D,L-lactic acid) (PDLLA) and poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA). A polymer-particulate mixture was first prepared by the conventional solvent casting method and then compressively molded in a specially designed flexible-rigid combined mold which facilitates shaping and mold release during the fabrication process. The molding was carried out at a moderate temperature, above the glass transition temperature and below the flow temperature of these amorphous polymers. A porous scaffold was then obtained after particulate leaching. The pores are highly interconnected and uniformly distributed both in the bulk and on the external surface of the scaffolds, and the porosity can exceed 90%. The mechanical properties of the resultant porous scaffolds are satisfactory as determined by measurements of compressive modulus and compressive stress at 10% strain. Good viability of cells seeded in the porous scaffolds was confirmed. This novel fabrication method is promising in tissue engineering because of its ability to produce precise and complexly (anatomically) shaped porous scaffolds.

  10. Simulation of the effects of different inflows on hydrologic conditions in Lake Houston with a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model, Houston, Texas, 2009–10

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rendon, Samuel H.; Lee, Michael T.

    2015-12-08

    Lake Houston, an important water resource for the Houston, Texas, area, receives inflows from seven major tributaries that compose the San Jacinto River Basin upstream from the reservoir. The effects of different inflows from the watersheds drained by these tributaries on the residence time of water in Lake Houston and closely associated physical and chemical properties including lake elevation, salinity, and water temperature are not well known. Accordingly, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the City of Houston, developed a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model of Lake Houston as a tool for evaluating the effects of different inflows on residence time of water in the lake and associated physical and chemical properties. The Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (EFDC), a grid-based, surface-water modeling package for simulating three-dimensional circulation, mass transport, sediments, and biogeochemical processes, was used to develop the model of Lake Houston. The Lake Houston EFDC model was developed and calibrated by using 2009 data and verified by using 2010 data. Three statistics (mean error, root mean square error, and the Nash-Sutcliffe model efficiency coefficient) were used to evaluate how well the Lake Houston EFDC model simulated lake elevation, salinity, and water temperature. The residence time of water in reservoirs is associated with various physical and chemical properties (including lake elevation, salinity, and water temperature). Simulated and measured lake-elevation values were compared at USGS reservoir station 08072000 Lake Houston near Sheldon, Tex. The accuracy of simulated salinity and water temperature values was assessed by using the salinity (computed from measured specific conductance) and water temperature at two USGS monitoring stations: 295826095082200 Lake Houston south Union Pacific Railroad Bridge near Houston, Tex., and 295554095093401 Lake Houston at mouth of Jack’s Ditch near Houston, Tex. Specific conductance

  11. Long-range dynamic correlations in a compressible viscous fluid confined in a circular tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felderhof, B. U.

    2011-01-01

    A set of simplified one-dimensional hydrodynamic equations proposed for the description of transient small amplitude flow of a compressible viscous fluid in a linear channel is tested by comparison with exact results for a circular tube obtained from the linearized Navier-Stokes equations. There is a qualitative agreement between the approximate and exact results, but for the simplified calculation the amplitude of the algebraic long-time tail is a factor of 2 too small.

  12. Some Uniform Estimates and Large-Time Behavior of Solutions to One-Dimensional Compressible Navier-Stokes System in Unbounded Domains with Large Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing; Liang, Zhilei

    2016-06-01

    We study the large-time behavior of solutions to the initial and initial boundary value problems with large initial data for the compressible Navier-Stokes system describing the one-dimensional motion of a viscous heat-conducting perfect polytropic gas in unbounded domains. The temperature is proved to be bounded from below and above, independent of both time and space. Moreover, it is shown that the global solution is asymptotically stable as time tends to infinity. Note that the initial data can be arbitrarily large. This result is proved by using elementary energy methods.

  13. Investigation of test methods for measuring compressive strength and modulus of two-dimensional carbon-carbon composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohlhorst, Craig W.; Sawyer, James Wayne; Yamaki, Y. Robert

    1989-01-01

    An experimental evaluation has been conducted to ascertain the the usefulness of two techniques for measuring in-plane compressive failure strength and modulus in coated and uncoated carbon-carbon composites. The techniques involved testing specimens with potted ends as well as testing them in a novel clamping fixture; specimen shape, length, gage width, and thickness were the test parameters investigated for both coated and uncoated 0/90 deg and +/-45 deg laminates. It is found that specimen shape does not have a significant effect on the measured compressive properties. The potting of specimen ends results in slightly higher measured compressive strengths than those obtained with the new clamping fixture. Comparable modulus values are obtained by both techniques.

  14. Efficient compression of rearranged time-multiplexed elemental image arrays in MALT-based three-dimensional integral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Ho-Hyun; Lee, Byung-Gook; Kim, Eun-Soo

    2011-06-01

    In this paper, an approach to efficiently compress the time-multiplexed EIAs picked up from the MALT-based integral imaging system is proposed. In this method, the time-multiplexed EIAs are rearranged by collecting the elemental images occupied at the same position in each EIA to enhance the similarity among the elemental images. Then, MPEG-4 is applied to these rearranged elemental images for compression. From the experimental results, it is shown that the average correlation quality ( ACQ) value representing a degree of similarity between the elemental images, and the resultant compression efficiency have been enhanced by 11.50% and 9.97%, respectively on the average for three kinds of test scenarios in the proposed method, compared to those of the conventional method. Good experimental results finally confirmed the feasibility of the proposed scheme.

  15. Littrow angle based autocollimation method for precision online monitoring three-dimensional angular drifts of chirped-pulse compression-gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhaoyang; Wang, Tao; Xu, Guang; Li, Dawei; Chen, Lei; Dai, Yaping

    2013-06-01

    A simple optical method for online precisely monitoring three-dimensional (3D) angular drifts of chirped-pulse compression-gratings in chirped-pulse amplification (CPA) lasers is proposed. Monitoring objects include all dimensional angular drifts of a grating, especially the grating groove in-plane-rotation. Monitoring contents contain direction and amount. And monitoring results are obtained by detecting the direction and the amount of 2D relative offsets of three focal spots formed by a ternary monitoring beam line. The theoretical model of the proposed method is set up using a matrix ray-tracing method, and a simplified monitoring equation is concluded based on numerical simulations. And the validity of this method is verified by a simple demonstration experiment. Besides, monitoring error and reliability discussion of the method are presented, as well.

  16. Hydrodynamic effects on coalescence.

    SciTech Connect

    Dimiduk, Thomas G.; Bourdon, Christopher Jay; Grillet, Anne Mary; Baer, Thomas A.; de Boer, Maarten Pieter; Loewenberg, Michael; Gorby, Allen D.; Brooks, Carlton, F.

    2006-10-01

    The goal of this project was to design, build and test novel diagnostics to probe the effect of hydrodynamic forces on coalescence dynamics. Our investigation focused on how a drop coalesces onto a flat surface which is analogous to two drops coalescing, but more amenable to precise experimental measurements. We designed and built a flow cell to create an axisymmetric compression flow which brings a drop onto a flat surface. A computer-controlled system manipulates the flow to steer the drop and maintain a symmetric flow. Particle image velocimetry was performed to confirm that the control system was delivering a well conditioned flow. To examine the dynamics of the coalescence, we implemented an interferometry capability to measure the drainage of the thin film between the drop and the surface during the coalescence process. A semi-automated analysis routine was developed which converts the dynamic interferogram series into drop shape evolution data.

  17. Supernova hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colgate, S. A.

    1981-11-01

    The physics as well as astrophysics of the supernova (SN) phenomenon are illustrated with the appropriate numbers. The explosion of a star, a supernova, occurs at the end of its evolution when the nuclear fuel in its core is almost, or completely, consumed. The star may explode due to a small residual thermonuclear detonation, type I SN, or it may collapse, type I and type II SN, leaving a neutron star remnant. The type I progenitor is thought to be an old accreting white dwarf, 1.4 interior mass, with a close companion star. A type II SN is thought to be a massive young star, 6 to 10 interior mass. The mechanism of explosion is still a challenge to model, being the most extreme conditions of matter and hydrodynamics that occur presently and excessively in the universe.

  18. Characterization of a two-dimensional temperature field within a rapid compression machine using a toluene planar laser-induced fluorescence imaging technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strozzi, Camille; Sotton, Julien; Mura, Arnaud; Bellenoue, Marc

    2009-12-01

    The homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) combustion process is an advanced operating mode for automotive engines. The self-ignition mechanisms that occur within the combustion chamber exhibit extreme temperature dependence. Therefore, the thorough understanding of corresponding phenomena requires the use of diagnostic methods featuring a sufficient thermal sensitivity, applicable in severe conditions similar to those encountered within engines. In this respect, toluene planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) is applied to the inert compression flow generated within an optical rapid compression machine (RCM). A relatively simple diagnostic system is retained: a single wavelength excitation device (266 nm) and a single (filtered) collection system. This diagnostic system is associated with an image processing strategy specifically adapted to RCM devices. Despite the severe conditions under consideration (40 bar, 700-950 K), the method allows us to obtain relatively large two-dimensional temperature fields that display a level of description seldom achieved in such devices. In particular the temperature gradients, which play a crucial role in HCCI combustion processes, can be estimated. The present experimental results confirm the good reliability and accuracy of the method. The information gathered with this toluene PLIF method puts in evidence its high potentialities for the study of aero-thermal-reactive processes as they take place in real engine conditions. The retained strategy also brings new possibilities of non-intrusive analysis for flows practically encountered within industrial devices.

  19. Black brane entropy and hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Booth, Ivan; Heller, Michal P.; Spalinski, Michal

    2011-03-15

    Recent advances in holography have led to the formulation of fluid-gravity duality, a remarkable connection between the hydrodynamics of certain strongly coupled media and dynamics of higher dimensional black holes. This paper introduces a correspondence between phenomenologically defined entropy currents in relativistic hydrodynamics and 'generalized horizons' of near-equilibrium black objects in a dual gravitational description. A general formula is given, expressing the divergence of the entropy current in terms of geometric objects which appear naturally in the gravity dual geometry. The proposed definition is explicitly covariant with respect to boundary diffeomorphisms and reproduces known results when evaluated for the event horizon.

  20. Prolonged matrix metalloproteinase-3 high expression after cyclic compressive load on human synovial cells in three-dimensional cultured tissue.

    PubMed

    Akamine, Y; Kakudo, K; Kondo, M; Ota, K; Muroi, Y; Yoshikawa, H; Nakata, K

    2012-07-01

    Excessive mechanical stress is thought to be a factor in the development of joint disorders through the expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and related cytokines. Although studies revealed that mechanical stress on the synovium induces MMP expression, it is still not known which MMPs prolonged high level expression. The authors focused on MMP-3, which is one of the major factors in joint disorders such as rheumatism and temporomandibular joint disorders. They examined mRNA and protein levels of MMP-3, other MMPs and related cytokines after loading stress. Human synovial cells were seeded onto a collagen scaffold and different magnitudes of cyclic compressive load were applied for 1h. Time-dependent mRNA and protein levels for catabolic genes were examined after loading. mRNA expressions of MMP-1, MMP-3, MMP-9, IL-6, IL-8 and IL-1β increased after excessive compression. In particular, only mRNA of MMP-3 was up-regulated and maintained at a high level for 24h after excessive loading. The concentrations of MMP-3, IL-6 and IL-8 in culture media after loading increased with excessive compression. These results may account for the pathomechanism of MMP-3 induced by cyclic load on synovial cells in joint disorders.

  1. Augmenting two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations with measured velocity data to identify flow paths as a function of depth on Upper St. Clair River in the Great Lakes basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holtschlag, D.J.; Koschik, J.A.

    2005-01-01

    Upper St. Clair River, which receives outflow from Lake Huron, is characterized by flow velocities that exceed 7 feet per second and significant channel curvature that creates complex flow patterns downstream from the Blue Water Bridge in the Port Huron, Michigan, and Sarnia, Ontario, area. Discrepancies were detected between depth-averaged velocities previously simulated by a two-dimensional (2D) hydrodynamic model and surface velocities determined from drifting buoy deployments. A detailed ADCP (acoustic Doppler current profiler) survey was done on Upper St. Clair River during July 1–3, 2003, to help resolve these discrepancies. As part of this study, a refined finite-element mesh of the hydrodynamic model used to identify source areas to public water intakes was developed for Upper St. Clair River. In addition, a numerical procedure was used to account for radial accelerations, which cause secondary flow patterns near channel bends. The refined model was recalibrated to better reproduce local velocities measured in the ADCP survey. ADCP data also were used to help resolve the remaining discrepancies between simulated and measured velocities and to describe variations in velocity with depth. Velocity data from ADCP surveys have significant local variability, and statistical processing is needed to compute reliable point estimates. In this study, velocity innovations were computed for seven depth layers posited within the river as the differences between measured and simulated velocities. For each layer, the spatial correlation of velocity innovations was characterized by use of variogram analysis. Results were used with kriging to compute expected innovations within each layer at applicable model nodes. Expected innovations were added to simulated velocities to form integrated velocities, which were used with reverse particle tracking to identify the expected flow path near a sewage outfall as a function of flow depth. Expected particle paths generated by use

  2. Augmenting two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations with measured velocity data to identify flow paths as a function of depth on Upper St. Clair River in the Great Lakes basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holtschlag, D.J.; Koschik, J.A.

    2005-01-01

    Upper St. Clair River, which receives outflow from Lake Huron, is characterized by flow velocities that exceed 7 feet per second and significant channel curvature that creates complex flow patterns downstream from the Blue Water Bridge in the Port Huron, Michigan, and Sarnia, Ontario, area. Discrepancies were detected between depth-averaged velocities previously simulated by a two-dimensional (2D) hydrodynamic model and surface velocities determined from drifting buoy deployments. A detailed ADCP (acoustic Doppler current profiler) survey was done on Upper St. Clair River during July 1-3, 2003, to help resolve these discrepancies. As part of this study, a refined finite-element mesh of the hydrodynamic model used to identify source areas to public water intakes was developed for Upper St. Clair River. In addition, a numerical procedure was used to account for radial accelerations, which cause secondary flow patterns near channel bends. The refined model was recalibrated to better reproduce local velocities measured in the ADCP survey. ADCP data also were used to help resolve the remaining discrepancies between simulated and measured velocities and to describe variations in velocity with depth. Velocity data from ADCP surveys have significant local variability, and statistical processing is needed to compute reliable point estimates. In this study, velocity innovations were computed for seven depth layers posited within the river as the differences between measured and simulated velocities. For each layer, the spatial correlation of velocity innovations was characterized by use of variogram analysis. Results were used with kriging to compute expected innovations within each layer at applicable model nodes. Expected innovations were added to simulated velocities to form integrated velocities, which were used with reverse particle tracking to identify the expected flow path near a sewage outfall as a function of flow depth. Expected particle paths generated by use of

  3. Use of a two-dimensional hydrodynamic model to evaluate extreme flooding and transport of dissolved solids through Devils Lake and Stump Lake, North Dakota, 2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nustad, Rochelle A.; Wood, Tamara M.; Bales, Jerad D.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the North Dakota Department of Transportation, North Dakota State Water Commission, and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, developed a two-dimensional hydrodynamic model of Devils Lake and Stump Lake, North Dakota to be used as a hydrologic tool for evaluating the effects of different inflow scenarios on water levels, circulation, and the transport of dissolved solids through the lake. The numerical model, UnTRIM, and data primarily collected during 2006 were used to develop and calibrate the Devils Lake model. Performance of the Devils Lake model was tested using 2009 data. The Devils Lake model was applied to evaluate the effects of an extreme flooding event on water levels and hydrological modifications within the lake on the transport of dissolved solids through Devils Lake and Stump Lake. For the 2006 calibration, simulated water levels in Devils Lake compared well with measured water levels. The maximum simulated water level at site 1 was within 0.13 feet of the maximum measured water level in the calibration, which gives reasonable confidence that the Devils Lake model is able to accurately simulate the maximum water level at site 1 for the extreme flooding scenario. The timing and direction of winddriven fluctuations in water levels on a short time scale (a few hours to a day) were reproduced well by the Devils Lake model. For this application, the Devils Lake model was not optimized for simulation of the current speed through bridge openings. In future applications, simulation of current speed through bridge openings could be improved by more accurate definition of the bathymetry and geometry of select areas in the model grid. As a test of the performance of the Devils Lake model, a simulation of 2009 conditions from April 1 through September 30, 2009 was performed. Overall, errors in inflow estimates affected the results for the 2009 simulation; however, for the rising phase of the lakes, the Devils Lake model

  4. pyro: Python-based tutorial for computational methods for hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zingale, Michael

    2015-07-01

    pyro is a simple python-based tutorial on computational methods for hydrodynamics. It includes 2-d solvers for advection, compressible, incompressible, and low Mach number hydrodynamics, diffusion, and multigrid. It is written with ease of understanding in mind. An extensive set of notes that is part of the Open Astrophysics Bookshelf project provides details of the algorithms.

  5. Effect of wall suction on the stability of compressible subsonic flows over smooth two-dimensional backward-facing steps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Al-Maaitah, Ayman A.; Nayfeh, Ali H.; Ragab, Saad A.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of suction on the stability of compressible flows over backward-facing steps is investigated. Mach numbers up to 0.8 are considered. The results show that continuous suction stabilizes the flow outside the separation bubble, but it destabilizes the flow inside it. Nevertheless, the overall N factor decreases as the suction level increases due to the considerable reduction of the separation bubble. For the same suction flow rate, properly distributed suction strips stabilize the flow more than continuous suction. The size of the separation bubble, and hence its effect on the instability can be considerably reduced by placing strips with high suction velocities in the separation region.

  6. A three-dimensional, compressible, laminar boundary-layer method for general fuselages. Volume 1: Numerical method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wie, Yong-Sun

    1990-01-01

    A procedure for calculating 3-D, compressible laminar boundary layer flow on general fuselage shapes is described. The boundary layer solutions can be obtained in either nonorthogonal 'body oriented' coordinates or orthogonal streamline coordinates. The numerical procedure is 'second order' accurate, efficient and independent of the cross flow velocity direction. Numerical results are presented for several test cases, including a sharp cone, an ellipsoid of revolution, and a general aircraft fuselage at angle of attack. Comparisons are made between numerical results obtained using nonorthogonal curvilinear 'body oriented' coordinates and streamline coordinates.

  7. Flash Kα radiography of laser-driven solid sphere compression for fast ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawada, H.; Lee, S.; Shiroto, T.; Nagatomo, H.; Arikawa, Y.; Nishimura, H.; Ueda, T.; Shigemori, K.; Sunahara, A.; Ohnishi, N.; Beg, F. N.; Theobald, W.; Pérez, F.; Patel, P. K.; Fujioka, S.

    2016-06-01

    Time-resolved compression of a laser-driven solid deuterated plastic sphere with a cone was measured with flash Kα x-ray radiography. A spherically converging shockwave launched by nanosecond GEKKO XII beams was used for compression while a flash of 4.51 keV Ti Kα x-ray backlighter was produced by a high-intensity, picosecond laser LFEX (Laser for Fast ignition EXperiment) near peak compression for radiography. Areal densities of the compressed core were inferred from two-dimensional backlit x-ray images recorded with a narrow-band spherical crystal imager. The maximum areal density in the experiment was estimated to be 87 ± 26 mg/cm2. The temporal evolution of the experimental and simulated areal densities with a 2-D radiation-hydrodynamics code is in good agreement.

  8. A strategy for reducing stagnation phase hydrodynamic instability growth in inertial confinement fusion implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D. S.; Robey, H. F.; Smalyuk, V. A.

    2015-05-15

    Encouraging progress is being made in demonstrating control of ablation front hydrodynamic instability growth in inertial confinement fusion implosion experiments on the National Ignition Facility [E. I. Moses, R. N. Boyd, B. A. Remington, C. J. Keane, and R. Al-Ayat, Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)]. Even once ablation front stabilities are controlled, however, instability during the stagnation phase of the implosion can still quench ignition. A scheme is proposed to reduce the growth of stagnation phase instabilities through the reverse of the “adiabat shaping” mechanism proposed to control ablation front growth. Two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics simulations confirm that improved stagnation phase stability should be possible without compromising fuel compression.

  9. Algorithm refinement for fluctuating hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Sarah A.; Bell, John B.; Garcia, Alejandro L.

    2007-07-03

    This paper introduces an adaptive mesh and algorithmrefinement method for fluctuating hydrodynamics. This particle-continuumhybrid simulates the dynamics of a compressible fluid with thermalfluctuations. The particle algorithm is direct simulation Monte Carlo(DSMC), a molecular-level scheme based on the Boltzmann equation. Thecontinuum algorithm is based on the Landau-Lifshitz Navier-Stokes (LLNS)equations, which incorporate thermal fluctuations into macroscopichydrodynamics by using stochastic fluxes. It uses a recently-developedsolver for LLNS, based on third-order Runge-Kutta. We present numericaltests of systems in and out of equilibrium, including time-dependentsystems, and demonstrate dynamic adaptive refinement by the computationof a moving shock wave. Mean system behavior and second moment statisticsof our simulations match theoretical values and benchmarks well. We findthat particular attention should be paid to the spectrum of the flux atthe interface between the particle and continuum methods, specificallyfor the non-hydrodynamic (kinetic) time scales.

  10. Computation of three-dimensional compressible boundary layers to fourth-order accuracy on wings and fuselages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iyer, Venkit

    1990-01-01

    A solution method, fourth-order accurate in the body-normal direction and second-order accurate in the stream surface directions, to solve the compressible 3-D boundary layer equations is presented. The transformation used, the discretization details, and the solution procedure are described. Ten validation cases of varying complexity are presented and results of calculation given. The results range from subsonic flow to supersonic flow and involve 2-D or 3-D geometries. Applications to laminar flow past wing and fuselage-type bodies are discussed. An interface procedure is used to solve the surface Euler equations with the inviscid flow pressure field as the input to assure accurate boundary conditions at the boundary layer edge. Complete details of the computer program used and information necessary to run each of the test cases are given in the Appendix.

  11. A general method for calculating three-dimensional compressible laminar and turbulent boundary layers on arbitrary wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cebeci, T.; Kaups, K.; Ramsey, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    The method described utilizes a nonorthogonal coordinate system for boundary-layer calculations. It includes a geometry program that represents the wing analytically, and a velocity program that computes the external velocity components from a given experimental pressure distribution when the external velocity distribution is not computed theoretically. The boundary layer method is general, however, and can also be used for an external velocity distribution computed theoretically. Several test cases were computed by this method and the results were checked with other numerical calculations and with experiments when available. A typical computation time (CPU) on an IBM 370/165 computer for one surface of a wing which roughly consist of 30 spanwise stations and 25 streamwise stations, with 30 points across the boundary layer is less than 30 seconds for an incompressible flow and a little more for a compressible flow.

  12. Three-dimensional hydrodynamical CO5BOLD model atmospheres of red giant stars. IV. Oxygen diagnostics in extremely metal-poor red giants with infrared OH lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrovolskas, V.; Kučinskas, A.; Bonifacio, P.; Caffau, E.; Ludwig, H.-G.; Steffen, M.; Spite, M.

    2015-04-01

    Context. Although oxygen is an important tracer of Galactic chemical evolution, measurements of its abundance in the atmospheres of the oldest Galactic stars are still scarce and rather imprecise. This is mainly because only a few spectral lines are available for the abundance diagnostics. At the lowest end of the metallicity scale, oxygen can only be measured in giant stars and in most of cases such measurements rely on a single forbidden [O i] 630 nm line that is very weak and frequently blended with telluric lines. Although molecular OH lines located in the ultraviolet and infrared could also be used for the diagnostics, oxygen abundances obtained from the OH lines and the [O i] 630 nm line are usually discrepant to a level of ~ 0.3-0.4 dex. Aims: We study the influence of convection on the formation of the infrared (IR) OH lines and the forbidden [O i] 630 nm line in the atmospheres of extremely metal-poor (EMP) red giant stars. Our ultimate goal is to clarify whether a realistic treatment of convection with state-of-the-art 3D hydrodynamical model atmospheres may help to bring the oxygen abundances obtained using the two indicators into closer agreement. Methods: We used high-resolution (R = 50 000) and high signal-to-noise ratio (S/N ≈ 200-600) spectra of four EMP red giant stars obtained with the VLT CRIRES spectrograph. For each EMP star, 4-14 IR OH vibrational-rotational lines located in the spectral range of 1514-1548 and 1595-1632 nm were used to determine oxygen abundances by employing standard 1D local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) abundance analysis methodology. We then corrected the 1D LTE abundances obtained from each individual OH line for the 3D hydrodynamical effects, which was done by applying 3D-1D LTE abundance corrections that were determined using 3D hydrodynamical CO5BOLD and 1D hydrostatic LHD model atmospheres. Results: We find that the influence of convection on the formation of [O i] 630 nm line in the atmospheres of EMP giants

  13. Transition to turbulence and effect of initial conditions on three-dimensional compressible mixing in planar blast-wave-driven systems

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, A.R.; Blue, B.; Edwards, M.J.; Greenough, J.A.; Hansen, J.F.; Robey, H.F.; Drake, R.P.; Kuranz, C.; Leibrandt, D.R.

    2005-05-15

    Perturbations on an interface driven by a strong blast wave grow in time due to a combination of Rayleigh-Taylor, Richtmyer-Meshkov, and decompression effects. In this paper, results from three-dimensional (3D) numerical simulations of such a system under drive conditions to be attainable on the National Ignition Facility [E. M. Campbell, Laser Part. Beams 9, 209 (1991)] are presented. Using the multiphysics, adaptive mesh refinement, higher order Godunov Eulerian hydrocode, Raptor [L. H. Howell and J. A. Greenough, J. Comput. Phys. 184, 53 (2003)], the late nonlinear instability evolution, including transition to turbulence, is considered for various multimode perturbation spectra. The 3D post-transition state differs from the 2D result, but the process of transition proceeds similarly in both 2D and 3D. The turbulent mixing transition results in a reduction in the growth rate of the mixing layer relative to its pretransition value and, in the case of the bubble front, relative to the 2D result. The post-transition spike front velocity is approximately the same in 2D and 3D. Implications for hydrodynamic mixing in core-collapse supernovae are discussed.

  14. Transition to turbulence and effect of initial conditions on three-dimensional compressible mixing in planar blast-wave-driven systemsa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miles, A. R.; Blue, B.; Edwards, M. J.; Greenough, J. A.; Hansen, J. F.; Robey, H. F.; Drake, R. P.; Kuranz, C.; Leibrandt, D. R.

    2005-05-01

    Perturbations on an interface driven by a strong blast wave grow in time due to a combination of Rayleigh-Taylor, Richtmyer-Meshkov, and decompression effects. In this paper, results from three-dimensional (3D) numerical simulations of such a system under drive conditions to be attainable on the National Ignition Facility [E. M. Campbell, Laser Part. Beams 9, 209 (1991)] are presented. Using the multiphysics, adaptive mesh refinement, higher order Godunov Eulerian hydrocode, Raptor [L. H. Howell and J. A. Greenough, J. Comput. Phys. 184, 53 (2003)], the late nonlinear instability evolution, including transition to turbulence, is considered for various multimode perturbation spectra. The 3D post-transition state differs from the 2D result, but the process of transition proceeds similarly in both 2D and 3D. The turbulent mixing transition results in a reduction in the growth rate of the mixing layer relative to its pretransition value and, in the case of the bubble front, relative to the 2D result. The post-transition spike front velocity is approximately the same in 2D and 3D. Implications for hydrodynamic mixing in core-collapse supernovae are discussed.

  15. Low Mach number fluctuating hydrodynamics of multispecies liquid mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Donev, Aleksandar Bhattacharjee, Amit Kumar; Nonaka, Andy; Bell, John B.; Garcia, Alejandro L.

    2015-03-15

    We develop a low Mach number formulation of the hydrodynamic equations describing transport of mass and momentum in a multispecies mixture of incompressible miscible liquids at specified temperature and pressure, which generalizes our prior work on ideal mixtures of ideal gases [Balakrishnan et al., “Fluctuating hydrodynamics of multispecies nonreactive mixtures,” Phys. Rev. E 89 013017 (2014)] and binary liquid mixtures [Donev et al., “Low mach number fluctuating hydrodynamics of diffusively mixing fluids,” Commun. Appl. Math. Comput. Sci. 9(1), 47-105 (2014)]. In this formulation, we combine and extend a number of existing descriptions of multispecies transport available in the literature. The formulation applies to non-ideal mixtures of arbitrary number of species, without the need to single out a “solvent” species, and includes contributions to the diffusive mass flux due to gradients of composition, temperature, and pressure. Momentum transport and advective mass transport are handled using a low Mach number approach that eliminates fast sound waves (pressure fluctuations) from the full compressible system of equations and leads to a quasi-incompressible formulation. Thermal fluctuations are included in our fluctuating hydrodynamics description following the principles of nonequilibrium thermodynamics. We extend the semi-implicit staggered-grid finite-volume numerical method developed in our prior work on binary liquid mixtures [Nonaka et al., “Low mach number fluctuating hydrodynamics of binary liquid mixtures,” http://arxiv.org/abs/1410.2300 (2015)] and use it to study the development of giant nonequilibrium concentration fluctuations in a ternary mixture subjected to a steady concentration gradient. We also numerically study the development of diffusion-driven gravitational instabilities in a ternary mixture and compare our numerical results to recent experimental measurements [Carballido-Landeira et al., “Mixed-mode instability of a

  16. Hydrodynamics of diatom chains and semiflexible fibres.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hoa; Fauci, Lisa

    2014-07-01

    Diatoms are non-motile, unicellular phytoplankton that have the ability to form colonies in the form of chains. Depending upon the species of diatoms and the linking structures that hold the cells together, these chains can be quite stiff or very flexible. Recently, the bending rigidities of some species of diatom chains have been quantified. In an effort to understand the role of flexibility in nutrient uptake and aggregate formation, we begin by developing a three-dimensional model of the coupled elastic-hydrodynamic system of a diatom chain moving in an incompressible fluid. We find that simple beam theory does a good job of describing diatom chain deformation in a parabolic flow when its ends are tethered, but does not tell the whole story of chain deformations when they are subjected to compressive stresses in shear. While motivated by the fluid dynamics of diatom chains, our computational model of semiflexible fibres illustrates features that apply widely to other systems. The use of an adaptive immersed boundary framework allows us to capture complicated buckling and recovery dynamics of long, semiflexible fibres in shear. PMID:24789565

  17. A dynamic range compression and three-dimensional peptide fractionation analysis platform expands proteome coverage and the diagnostic potential of whole saliva.

    PubMed

    Bandhakavi, Sricharan; Stone, Matthew D; Onsongo, Getiria; Van Riper, Susan K; Griffin, Timothy J

    2009-12-01

    Comprehensive identification of proteins in whole human saliva is critical for appreciating its full diagnostic potential. However, this is challenged by the large dynamic range of protein abundance within the fluid. To address this problem, we used an analysis platform that coupled hexapeptide libraries for dynamic range compression (DRC) with three-dimensional (3D) peptide fractionation. Our approach identified 2340 proteins in whole saliva and represents the largest saliva proteomic dataset generated using a single analysis platform. Three-dimensional peptide fractionation involving sequential steps of preparative isoelectric focusing (IEF), strong cation exchange, and capillary reversed-phase liquid chromatography was essential for maximizing gains from DRC. Compared to saliva not treated with hexapeptide libraries, DRC substantially increased identified proteins across physicochemical and functional categories. Approximately 20% of total salivary proteins are also seen in plasma, and proteins in both fluids show comparable functional diversity and disease-linkage. However, for a subset of diseases, saliva has higher apparent diagnostic potential. These results expand the potential for whole saliva in health monitoring/diagnostics and provide a general platform for improving proteomic coverage of complex biological samples.

  18. Three dimensional compressible turbulent flow computations for a diffusing S-duct with/without vortex generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Soo Yong

    1993-01-01

    Numerical investigations on a diffusing S-duct with/without vortex generators and a straight duct with vortex generators are presented. The investigation consists of solving the full 3-D unsteady compressible mass averaged Navier-Stokes equations. An implicit finite volume lower-upper time marching code (RPLUS3D) has been employed and modified. A 3-D Baldwin-Lomax turbulence model has been modified in conjunction with the flow physics. A model for the analysis of vortex generators in a fully viscous subsonic internal flow is evaluated. A vortical structure for modeling the shed vortex is used as a source term in the computation domain. The injected vortex paths in the straight duct are compared with the analysis by two kinds of prediction models. The flow structures by the vortex generators are investigated along the duct. Computed results of the flow in a circular diffusing S-duct provide an understanding of the flow structure within a typical engine inlet system. These are compared with the experimental wall static-pressure, static-, and total-pressure field, and secondary velocity profiles. Additionally, boundary layer thickness, skin friction values, and velocity profiles in wall coordinates are presented. In order to investigate The effect of vortex generators, various vortex strengths are examined. The total-pressure recovery and distortion coefficients are obtained at the exit of the S-duct. The numerical results clearly depict the interaction between the low velocity flow by the flow separation and the injected vortices.

  19. Rapid Fabrication of Living Tissue Models by Collagen Plastic Compression: Understanding Three-Dimensional Cell Matrix Repair In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Cheema, Umber; Brown, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To produce biomimetic collagen scaffolds for tissue modeling and as tissue-engineered implants. Approach Control of collagen fibril material parameters in collagen hydrogel scaffolds by using plastic compression (PC), resulting in direct control of cell proliferation, cell migration, and cell–cell interaction. Results We were able to control the density of collagen in such scaffolds from between 0.2% and 30%, and controllably layer the fibrils in the Z-plane. Cell migration was observed in gels where a gradient of collagen density was present. In these gels, cells preferentially migrated toward the collagen-dense areas. Cell proliferation rates were measurably higher in dense collagen gels. Innovation The use of PC to control material properties of collagen hydrogels results in collagen scaffolds that are biomimetic. These collagen gels reproduce the relevant matrix-mechanical environment in which behavior is more representative of that found in vivo. Conclusion The material properties of native collagen type I gels can be engineered to match those found in tissues in vivo to elicit more biomimetic cell behavior. PMID:24527341

  20. Macrostatistical hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Brenner, H.

    1989-01-01

    Work performed during this contract period involved performing trajectory measurements of the three-dimensional position of the falling ball as a function of time. This has allowed us to calculate the dispersivity of the falling ball around its mean settling velocity. Whereas the mean settling velocity predicts the continuum behavior of the suspension, the dispersivity allows insight into the non-continuum behavior of the suspension caused by the presence of the macroscopic suspended spheres. Experiments were performed for several sphere sizes (0.635 and 0.3125 cm diameter) as a function of volume fraction ({phi} = 0.30 and 0.50) and relative size ratio of the settling to suspended sphere diameter (0.5 to 4.0). In addition, the bulk behavior of monodisperse and bidisperse sphere suspensions were examined for both Poiseuille and Couette flows. This allowed qualitative analysis of shear-induced particle migration phenomena observed during the processing of highly-concentrated suspensions. Finally, numerical methods are being developed to allow a more complete understanding of the micromechanical effects which cause the dispersivity phenomenon in both falling-ball and shear-induced particle migration experiments.

  1. Equalizing resolution in smoothed-particle hydrodynamics calculations using self-adaptive sinc kernels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Senz, Domingo; Cabezón, Rubén M.; Escartín, José A.; Ebinger, Kevin

    2014-10-01

    Context. The smoothed-particle hydrodynamics (SPH) technique is a numerical method for solving gas-dynamical problems. It has been applied to simulate the evolution of a wide variety of astrophysical systems. The method has a second-order accuracy, with a resolution that is usually much higher in the compressed regions than in the diluted zones of the fluid. Aims: We propose and check a method to balance and equalize the resolution of SPH between high- and low-density regions. This method relies on the versatility of a family of interpolators called sinc kernels, which allows increasing the interpolation quality by varying only a single parameter (the exponent of the sinc function). Methods: The proposed method was checked and validated through a number of numerical tests, from standard one-dimensional Riemann problems in shock tubes, to multidimensional simulations of explosions, hydrodynamic instabilities, and the collapse of a Sun-like polytrope. Results: The analysis of the hydrodynamical simulations suggests that the scheme devised to equalize the accuracy improves the treatment of the post-shock regions and, in general, of the rarefacted zones of fluids while causing no harm to the growth of hydrodynamic instabilities. The method is robust and easy to implement with a low computational overload. It conserves mass, energy, and momentum and reduces to the standard SPH scheme in regions of the fluid that have smooth density gradients.

  2. A Numerical Gamma-Ray Burst Simulation Using Three-Dimensional Relativistic Hydrodynamics: The Transition from Spherical to Jet-like Expansion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cannizzo, John K.; Gehrels, Neil; Vishniac, Ethan T.

    2003-01-01

    Utilizing 3D relativistic hydrodynamical calculations, we have examined the evolution of an expanding relativistic blob of gas intended to be representative of a jet associated with ejecta from an extremely energetic event such as a hypernova, that produces a gamma-ray burst (Aloy et al. 2000; Tan, Matzner, & McKee 2001; MacFadyen, Woosley, & Heger 2001, Zhang, Woosley, & Heger 2003, Zhang, Woosley, & MacFadyen 2003). Since these are the first such calculations applied to the blob during the time in which the afterglow radiation is produced, we have purposely kept them simple in an effort to concentrate on the most fundamental aspects of the physics. We restrict our attention to the transition from spherical to jetlike expansion that occurs during the time that the Lorentz factor becomes less than the reciprocal of the jet spreading angle. We have not yet attached specific numbers to our results. From the SRHD equations, one sees that the relevant quantities are the ratios of pressure to density, and of distance to time. If we specify either one of these two sets of numbers, the other one is also determined.

  3. FLOW FIELD IN SUPERSONIC MIXED-COMPRESSION INLETS AT ANGLE OF ATTACK USING THE THREE DIMENSIONAL METHOD OF CHARACTERISTICS WITH DISCRETE SHOCK WAVE FITTING

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, A. R.

    1994-01-01

    This computer program calculates the flow field in the supersonic portion of a mixed-compression aircraft inlet at non-zero angle of attack. This approach is based on the method of characteristics for steady three-dimensional flow. The results of this program agree with those produced by the two-dimensional method of characteristics when axisymmetric flow fields are calculated. Except in regions of high viscous interaction and boundary layer removal, the results agree well with experimental data obtained for threedimensional flow fields. The flow field in a variety of axisymmetric mixed compression inlets can be calculated using this program. The bow shock wave and the internal shock wave system are calculated using a discrete shock wave fitting procedure. The internal flow field can be calculated either with or without the discrete fitting of the internal shock wave system. The influence of molecular transport can be included in the calculation of the external flow about the forebody and in the calculation of the internal flow when internal shock waves are not discretely fitted. The viscous and thermal diffussion effects are included by treating them as correction terms in the method of characteristics procedure. Dynamic viscosity is represented by Sutherland's law and thermal conductivity is represented as a quadratic function of temperature. The thermodynamic model used is that of a thermally and calorically perfect gas. The program assumes that the cowl lip is contained in a constant plane and that the centerbody contour and cowl contour are smooth and have continuous first partial derivatives. This program cannot calculate subsonic flow, the external flow field if the bow shock wave does not exist entirely around the forebody, or the internal flow field if the bow flow field is injected into the annulus. Input to the program consists of parameters to control execution, to define the geometry, and the vehicle orientation. Output consists of a list of parameters

  4. Supernova hydrodynamics experiments using the Nova laser

    SciTech Connect

    Remington, B.A.; Glendinning, S.G.; Estabrook, K.; Wallace, R.J.; Rubenchik, A.; Kane, J.; Arnett, D.; Drake, R.P.; McCray, R.

    1997-04-01

    We are developing experiments using the Nova laser to investigate two areas of physics relevant to core-collapse supernovae (SN): (1) compressible nonlinear hydrodynamic mixing and (2) radiative shock hydrodynamics. In the former, we are examining the differences between the 2D and 3D evolution of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, an issue critical to the observables emerging from SN in the first year after exploding. In the latter, we are investigating the evolution of a colliding plasma system relevant to the ejecta-stellar wind interactions of the early stages of SN remnant formation. The experiments and astrophysical implications are discussed.

  5. Development and application of a two-dimensional hydrodynamic model for assessment of modern and historical flow conditions of Upper Mississippi River Pool 8 near La Crosse, Wisconsin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stafne, Brice E.

    The Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS) is a diverse and dynamic ecosystem that includes the main stem river channel, side channels, backwater floodplains and lakes, islands, wetlands, grasslands, and floodplain forests. The hydrology of this rich ecosystem is one of the key drivers for physical, chemical and biological processes. However, the hydrology and hydraulics of the UMRS has been drastically altered from its natural state as a result of the construction of the locks and dams in the 1930s. Beginning with the Water Resources Development Act of 1986, biologists, ecologists, and engineers have been working to restore the river to a more natural state within the current constraints imposed by the lock and dam system. In an effort to restore rivers to a more natural state, the determination of a hydraulic reference condition is essential to understanding the "why and how" of historical river system function. Understanding the fundamental processes of historical conditions will help prioritize resources and better quantify possible outcomes for riverine restoration. The main goal of this study was to construct a hydrodynamic reference condition for Pool 8 of the Upper Mississippi River System using hydrodynamic computational fluid dynamic (CFD) modeling. The CFD model will provide a better understanding of pre-impoundment flow conditions as compared to post-impoundment conditions today. The numerical model was constructed and developed primarily from a pre-impoundment 1890s topographic map with bathymetric cross-sections in the channels. The 1890s map and other sources from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers provided historic elevation and hydraulic reference data for model calibration. The calibrated historic model was then compared with a current model of similar scale representing post-impoundment conditions, allowing for quantitative analysis of the differences between the two conditions. Model results indicated large changes in average depth and average

  6. Hydrodynamics from Landau initial conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, Abhisek; Gerhard, Jochen; Torrieri, Giorgio; Read jr, Kenneth F.; Wong, Cheuk-Yin

    2015-01-01

    We investigate ideal hydrodynamic evolution, with Landau initial conditions, both in a semi-analytical 1+1D approach and in a numerical code incorporating event-by-event variation with many events and transverse density inhomogeneities. The object of the calculation is to test how fast would a Landau initial condition transition to a commonly used boost-invariant expansion. We show that the transition to boost-invariant flow occurs too late for realistic setups, with corrections of O (20 - 30%) expected at freezeout for most scenarios. Moreover, the deviation from boost-invariance is correlated with both transverse flow and elliptic flow, with the more highly transversely flowing regions also showing the most violation of boost invariance. Therefore, if longitudinal flow is not fully developed at the early stages of heavy ion collisions, 2+1 dimensional hydrodynamics is inadequate to extract transport coefficients of the quark-gluon plasma. Based on [1, 2

  7. Pressure-induced recovery of Fourier's law in one-dimensional momentum-conserving systems.

    PubMed

    Sato, Dye Sk

    2016-07-01

    We report the two typical models of normal heat conduction in one-dimensional momentum-conserving systems. They show the Arrhenius and the non-Arrhenius temperature dependence. We construct the two corresponding phenomenologies, transition-state theory of thermally activated dissociation and the pressure-induced crossover between two fixed points in fluctuating hydrodynamics. Compressibility yields the ballistic fixed point, whose scaling is observed in Fermi-Pasta-Ulam (FPU) β lattices. PMID:27575085

  8. Pressure-induced recovery of Fourier's law in one-dimensional momentum-conserving systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Dye SK

    2016-07-01

    We report the two typical models of normal heat conduction in one-dimensional momentum-conserving systems. They show the Arrhenius and the non-Arrhenius temperature dependence. We construct the two corresponding phenomenologies, transition-state theory of thermally activated dissociation and the pressure-induced crossover between two fixed points in fluctuating hydrodynamics. Compressibility yields the ballistic fixed point, whose scaling is observed in Fermi-Pasta-Ulam (FPU) β lattices.

  9. An Experimental Parametric Study of Geometric, Reynolds Number, and Ratio of Specific Heats Effects in Three-Dimensional Sidewall Compression Scramjet Inlets at Mach 6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, Scott D.; Murphy, Kelly J.

    1993-01-01

    Since mission profiles for airbreathing hypersonic vehicles such as the National Aero-Space Plane include single-stage-to-orbit requirements, real gas effects may become important with respect to engine performance. The effects of the decrease in the ratio of specific heats have been investigated in generic three-dimensional sidewall compression scramjet inlets with leading-edge sweep angles of 30 and 70 degrees. The effects of a decrease in ratio of specific heats were seen by comparing data from two facilities in two test gases: in the Langley Mach 6 CF4 Tunnel in tetrafluoromethane (where gamma=1.22) and in the Langley 15-Inch Mach 6 Air Tunnel in perfect gas air (where gamma=1.4). In addition to the simulated real gas effects, the parametric effects of cowl position, contraction ratio, leading-edge sweep, and Reynolds number were investigated in the 15-Inch Mach 6 Air Tunnel. The models were instrumented with a total of 45 static pressure orifices distributed on the sidewalls and baseplate. Surface streamline patterns were examined via oil flow, and schlieren videos were made of the external flow field. The results of these tests have significant implications to ground based testing of inlets in facilities which do not operate at flight enthalpies.

  10. Schlieren photographs and internal pressure distributions for three-dimensional sidewall-compression scramjet inlets at a Mach number of 6 in CF4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, Scott D.

    1993-01-01

    Three-dimensional sidewall-compression scramjet inlets with leading-edge sweeps of 30 deg and 70 deg were tested in the Langley Hypersonic CF4 Tunnel at a Mach number of 6 and a free-stream ratio of specific heats of 1.2. The parametric effects of leading-edge sweep, cowl position, contraction ratio, and Reynolds number were investigated. The models were instrumented with static pressure orifices distributed on the sidewalls, baseplate, and cowl. Schlieren movies were made of selected tunnel runs for flow visualization of the entrance plane and cowl region. Although these movies could not show the internal flow, the effect of the internal flow on the external flow was evident by way of spillage. The purpose is to provide a preliminary data release for the investigation. The models, facility, and testing methods are described, and the test matrix and a tabulation of tunnel runs are provided. Line plots highlighting the stated parametric effects and a representative set of schlieren photographs are presented without analysis.

  11. Combined influences of micro-pillar geometry and substrate constraint on microplastic behavior of compressed single-crystal micro-pillar: Two-dimensional discrete dislocation dynamics modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyanga, Chaojun; Lia, Zhenhuan; Huanga, Minsheng; Hua, Lili; Houa, Chuantao

    2009-11-01

    2D discrete dislocation dynamic modeling of compressed micro-pillars attached on a huge base is executed to study the size-dependent microplastic behavior of micro-pillars and the corresponding size effect. In addition to the conventional dimensional parameters of the micro-pillar such as the micro-pillar size and the height-to-width ratio, the micro-pillar taper angle and the dislocation slip plane orientation angle in the micro-pillar are also considered to address the size effect and its rich underlying mechanism. Computational results show that there are at least two operating mechanisms responsible for the plastic behavior of micro-pillars. One is associated with the dislocation free slip-out from the micro-pillar sidewall; the other is related to the dislocation pile-up at the base and the top end of the pillar. The overall mechanism governing the size effect of the micro-pillar rests with multi-factors, including the micro-pillar size, the height-to-width ratio, the micro-pillar taper and the slip plane orientation angle; however, whether the "free slip band" exists or not is the most important denotation. The well-known Schmid law still validates in the slender micro-pillars due to existence of the free slip band, whereas it may fail in the podgier micro-pillars due to absence of the free slip band; as a result, a complicated even "reverse" size effect appears.

  12. Two-Dimensional Hydrodynamic Simulation of Surface-Water Flow and Transport to Florida Bay through the Southern Inland and Coastal Systems (SICS)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swain, Eric D.; Wolfert, Melinda A.; Bales, Jerad D.; Goodwin, Carl R.

    2004-01-01

    Successful restoration of the southern Florida ecosystem requires extensive knowledge of the physical characteristics and hydrologic processes controlling water flow and transport of constituents through extremely low-gradient freshwater marshes, shallow mangrove-fringed coastal creeks and tidal embayments, and near-shore marine waters. A sound, physically based numerical model can provide simulations of the differing hydrologic conditions that might result from various ecosystem restoration scenarios. Because hydrology and ecology are closely linked in southern Florida, hydrologic model results also can be used by ecologists to evaluate the degree of ecosystem restoration that could be achieved for various hydrologic conditions. A robust proven model, SWIFT2D, (Surface-Water Integrated Flow and Transport in Two Dimensions), was modified to simulate Southern Inland and Coastal Systems (SICS) hydrodynamics and transport conditions. Modifications include improvements to evapotranspiration and rainfall calculation and to the algorithms that describe flow through coastal creeks. Techniques used in this model should be applicable to other similar low-gradient marsh settings in southern Florida and elsewhere. Numerous investigations were conducted within the SICS area of southeastern Everglades National Park and northeastern Florida Bay to provide data and parameter values for model development and testing. The U.S. Geological Survey and the National Park Service supported investigations for quantification of evapotranspiration, vegetative resistance to flow, wind-induced flow, land elevations, vegetation classifications, salinity conditions, exchange of ground and surface waters, and flow and transport in coastal creeks and embayments. The good agreement that was achieved between measured and simulated water levels, flows, and salinities through minimal adjustment of empirical coefficients indicates that hydrologic processes within the SICS area are represented properly

  13. The hydrodynamics of lamprey locomotion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leftwich, Megan C.

    The lamprey, an anguilliform swimmer, propels itself by undulating most of its body. This type of swimming produces flow patterns that are highly three-dimensional in nature and not very well understood. However, substantial previous work has been done to understand two-dimensional unsteady propulsion, the possible wake structures and thrust performance. Limited studies of three-dimensional propulsors with simple geometries have displayed the importance of the third dimension in designing unsteady swimmers. Some of the results of those studies, primarily the ways in which vorticity is organized in the wake region, are seen in lamprey swimming as well. In the current work, the third dimension is not the only important factor, but complex geometry and body undulations also contribute to the hydrodynamics. Through dye flow visualization, particle induced velocimetry and pressure measurements, the hydrodynamics of anguilliform swimming are studied using a custom built robotic lamprey. These studies all indicate that the undulations of the body are not producing thrust. Instead, it is the tail which acts to propel the animal. This conclusion led to further investigation of the tail, specifically the role of varying tail flexibility on hydrodymnamics. It is found that by making the tail more flexible, one decreases the coherence of the vorticity in the lamprey's wake. Additional flexibility also yields less thrust.

  14. TH-E-17A-06: Anatomical-Adaptive Compressed Sensing (AACS) Reconstruction for Thoracic 4-Dimensional Cone-Beam CT

    SciTech Connect

    Shieh, C; Kipritidis, J; OBrien, R; Cooper, B; Kuncic, Z; Keall, P

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The Feldkamp-Davis-Kress (FDK) algorithm currently used for clinical thoracic 4-dimensional (4D) cone-beam CT (CBCT) reconstruction suffers from noise and streaking artifacts due to projection under-sampling. Compressed sensing theory enables reconstruction of under-sampled datasets via total-variation (TV) minimization, but TV-minimization algorithms such as adaptive-steepest-descent-projection-onto-convex-sets (ASD-POCS) often converge slowly and are prone to over-smoothing anatomical details. These disadvantages can be overcome by incorporating general anatomical knowledge via anatomy segmentation. Based on this concept, we have developed an anatomical-adaptive compressed sensing (AACS) algorithm for thoracic 4D-CBCT reconstruction. Methods: AACS is based on the ASD-POCS framework, where each iteration consists of a TV-minimization step and a data fidelity constraint step. Prior to every AACS iteration, four major thoracic anatomical structures - soft tissue, lungs, bony anatomy, and pulmonary details - were segmented from the updated solution image. Based on the segmentation, an anatomical-adaptive weighting was applied to the TV-minimization step, so that TV-minimization was enhanced at noisy/streaky regions and suppressed at anatomical structures of interest. The image quality and convergence speed of AACS was compared to conventional ASD-POCS using an XCAT digital phantom and a patient scan. Results: For the XCAT phantom, the AACS image represented the ground truth better than the ASD-POCS image, giving a higher structural similarity index (0.93 vs. 0.84) and lower absolute difference (1.1*10{sup 4} vs. 1.4*10{sup 4}). For the patient case, while both algorithms resulted in much less noise and streaking than FDK, the AACS image showed considerably better contrast and sharpness of the vessels, tumor, and fiducial marker than the ASD-POCS image. In addition, AACS converged over 50% faster than ASD-POCS in both cases. Conclusions: The proposed AACS

  15. Ergoregion instability: The hydrodynamic vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Leandro A.; Cardoso, Vitor; Crispino, Luís C. B.

    2014-06-01

    Four-dimensional, asymptotically flat spacetimes with an ergoregion but no horizon have been shown to be linearly unstable against a superradiant-triggered mechanism. This result has wide implications in the search for astrophysically viable alternatives to black holes, but also in the understanding of black holes and Hawking evaporation. Here we investigate this instability in detail for a particular setup that can be realized in the laboratory: the hydrodynamic vortex, an effective geometry for sound waves, with ergoregion and without an event horizon.

  16. An Assessment of Pulsed Flows on Foothill Yellow-legged Frog Habitat Hydraulics in a Regulated River using Two-Dimensional Hydrodynamic Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarnell, S.; Lind, A.; Kupferberg, S.

    2007-12-01

    We used a freely available two-dimensional model, River2D, to evaluate changes in habitat suitability and availability for Foothill yellow-legged frog egg masses and tadpoles during pulsed flow events. Two study sites in Northern California, one on the unregulated South Fork Eel River and the other on the regulated North Fork Feather River, were selected for modeling. Simulated depths and velocities agreed well with measured field values. When coupled with a definition of breeding habitat suitability that encompassed the variability of field- measured values and the range of error within the model output, the model accurately predicted suitable breeding locations throughout the survey reach. Using data on percentages of egg mass and tadpole loss associated with increased velocities, we assessed several scenarios of how pulsed flows affected habitat availability and suitability. In a seasonal (spring) pulse scenario, lower discharges provided the greatest weighted usable area for breeding, but higher initial discharges provided the greatest buffering capacity against lethal increases in velocity. In an aseasonal (summer) pulse scenario, only 20-30% of the suitable tadpole habitat in the unregulated site and <5% of the suitable habitat in the regulated site remained suitable during the pulse regardless of initial flow level. In both scenarios, the unregulated study site provided 2-3 times the buffering capacity of the regulated site. This was likely due to differences in channel morphology; the regulated site had an entrenched channel with steep banks, while the unregulated site had an asymmetric cross-sectional shape where shallow overbank areas provided refuge from high velocities as flows fluctuated. This type of model-based methodology that can evaluate effects from flow fluctuation on individuals and local habitat conditions for multiple life stages would be useful for managing Foothill yellow-legged frog or similar aquatic species in regulated river systems.

  17. Nonlocal transport and the hydrodynamic shear viscosity in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torre, Iacopo; Tomadin, Andrea; Geim, Andre K.; Polini, Marco

    2015-10-01

    Motivated by recent experimental progress in preparing encapsulated graphene sheets with ultrahigh mobilities up to room temperature, we present a theoretical study of dc transport in doped graphene in the hydrodynamic regime. By using the continuity and Navier-Stokes equations, we demonstrate analytically that measurements of nonlocal resistances in multiterminal Hall bar devices can be used to extract the hydrodynamic shear viscosity of the two-dimensional (2D) electron liquid in graphene. We also discuss how to probe the viscosity-dominated hydrodynamic transport regime by scanning probe potentiometry and magnetometry. Our approach enables measurements of the viscosity of any 2D electron liquid in the hydrodynamic transport regime.

  18. Evaluation of Floodplain Modifications to Reduce the Effect of Floods Using a Two-Dimensional Hydrodynamic Model of the Flint River at Albany, Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Musser, Jonathan W.

    2008-01-01

    Potential flow characteristics of future flooding along a 4.8-mile reach of the Flint River in Albany, Georgia, were simulated using recent digital-elevation-model data and the U.S. Geological Survey finite-element surface-water modeling system for two-dimensional flow in the horizontal plane (FESWMS-2DH). The model was run at four water-surface altitudes at the Flint River at Albany streamgage (02352500): 181.5-foot (ft) altitude with a flow of 61,100 cubic feet per second (ft3/s), 184.5-ft altitude with a flow of 75,400 ft3/s, 187.5-ft altitude with a flow of 91,700 ft3/s, and 192.5-ft altitude with a flow of 123,000 ft3/s. The model was run to measure changes in inundated areas and water-surface altitudes for eight scenarios of possible modifications to the 4.8-mile reach on the Flint River. The eight scenarios include removing a human-made peninsula located downstream from Oglethorpe Boulevard, increasing the opening under the Oakridge Drive bridge, adding culverts to the east Oakridge Drive bridge approach, adding culverts to the east and west Oakridge Drive bridge approaches, adding an overflow across the oxbow north of Oakridge Drive, making the overflow into a channel, removing the Oakridge Drive bridge, and adding a combination of an oxbow overflow and culverts on both Oakridge Drive bridge approaches. The modeled inundation and water-surface altitude changes were mapped for use in evaluating the river modifications. The most effective scenario at reducing inundated area was the combination scenario. At the 187.5-ft altitude, the inundated area decreased from 4.24 square miles to 4.00 square miles. The remove-peninsula scenario was the least effective with a reduction in inundated area of less than 0.01 square miles. In all scenarios, the inundated area reduction increased with water-surface altitude, peaking at the 187.5-ft altitude. The inundated area reduction then decreased at the gage altitude of 192.5 ft.

  19. Hydrodynamical Simulations of Unevenly Irradiated Jovian Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langton, Jonathan

    2007-05-01

    We discuss a series of two-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations which model the global time-dependent radiative responses and surface flow patterns of Jovian planets subject to strongly variable atmospheric irradiation. We treat the planetary atmosphere as a thin compressible fluid-layer subject to time-dependent radiative heating and cooling.We consider planets in several environments, including hot Jupiters on circular orbits, short-period planets on eccentric orbits such as HD 118203 b (in which libration effects are important), and planets on highly eccentric orbits. Particular attention is given to HD 80606 b, which has the highest known eccentricity (e=0.932) of any planet. Its orbital period is P=111.4d, and at periastron, it passes within 7 RSun of its parent star. As a result of spin pseudo-synchronization, the rotation period of the planet is expected to be 36.8 hours, allowing the initial conditions for the simulation to determined with confidence. We show that the atmospheric response during the periastron passage of HD 80606 b will likely be observable by the Spitzer Space telescope at all infrared bands. We show that photometric observations taken during periastron passage can determine the effective radiative time constant in the planet's atmosphere. We show that a direct measurement of the radiative time constant can be used to clarify interpretation of infrared observations of other short-period planets. This research has been supported by the NSF through CAREER Grant AST-0449986, and by the NASA Planetary Geology and Geophysics Program through Grant NNG04GK19G.

  20. Early hydrodynamic evolution of a stellar collision

    SciTech Connect

    Kushnir, Doron; Katz, Boaz

    2014-04-20

    The early phase of the hydrodynamic evolution following the collision of two stars is analyzed. Two strong shocks propagate from the contact surface and move toward the center of each star at a velocity that is a small fraction of the velocity of the approaching stars. The shocked region near the contact surface has a planar symmetry and a uniform pressure. The density vanishes at the (Lagrangian) surface of contact, and the speed of sound diverges there. The temperature, however, reaches a finite value, since as the density vanishes, the finite pressure is radiation dominated. For carbon-oxygen white dwarf (CO WD) collisions, this temperature is too low for any appreciable nuclear burning shortly after the collision, which allows for a significant fraction of the mass to be highly compressed to the density required for efficient {sup 56}Ni production in the detonation wave that follows. This property is crucial for the viability of collisions of typical CO WD as progenitors of type Ia supernovae, since otherwise only massive (>0.9 M {sub ☉}) CO WDs would have led to such explosions (as required by all other progenitor models). The divergence of the speed of sound limits numerical studies of stellar collisions, as it makes convergence tests exceedingly expensive unless dedicated schemes are used. We provide a new one-dimensional Lagrangian numerical scheme to achieve this. A self-similar planar solution is derived for zero-impact parameter collisions between two identical stars, under some simplifying assumptions (including a power-law density profile), which is the planar version of previous piston problems that were studied in cylindrical and spherical symmetries.

  1. New formulation of leading order anisotropic hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinti, Leonardo

    2015-05-01

    Anisotropic hydrodynamics is a reorganization of the relativistic hydrodynamics expansion, with the leading order already containing substantial momentum-space anisotropies. The latter are a cause of concern in the traditional viscous hydrodynamics, since large momentum anisotropies generated in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions are not consistent with the hypothesis of small deviations from an isotropic background, i.e., from the local equilibrium distribution. We discuss the leading order of the expansion, presenting a new formulation for the (1+1)- dimensional case, namely, for the longitudinally boost invariant and cylindrically symmetric flow. This new approach is consistent with the well established framework of Israel and Stewart in the close to equilibrium limit (where we expect viscous hydrodynamics to work well). If we consider the (0+1)-dimensional case, that is, transversally homogeneous and longitudinally boost invariant flow, the new form of anisotropic hydrodynamics leads to better agreement with known solutions of the Boltzmann equation than the previous formulations, especially when we consider massive particles.

  2. The hydrodynamic focusing effect inside rectangular microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Gwo-Bin; Chang, Chih-Chang; Huang, Sung-Bin; Yang, Ruey-Jen

    2006-05-01

    This paper presents a theoretical and experimental investigation into the hydrodynamic focusing effect in rectangular microchannels. Two theoretical models for two-dimensional hydrodynamic focusing are proposed. The first model predicts the width of the focused stream in symmetric hydrodynamic focusing in microchannels of various aspect ratios. The second model predicts the location and the width of the focused stream in asymmetric hydrodynamic focusing in microchannels with a low or high aspect ratio. In both models, the theoretical results are shown to be in good agreement with the experimental data. Hence, the models provide a useful means of performing a theoretical analysis of flow control in microfluidic devices using hydrodynamic focusing effects. The ability of the proposed models to control the focused stream within a micro flow cytometer is verified in a series of experimental trials performed using polystyrene microparticles with a diameter of 20 µm. The experimental data show that the width of the focused stream can be reduced to the same order of magnitude as that of the particle size. Furthermore, it is shown that the microparticles can be successfully hydrodynamically focused and switched to the desired outlet port of the cytometer. Hence, the models presented in this study provide sufficient control to support cell/particle counting and sorting applications.

  3. IKT for quantum hydrodynamic equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tessarotto, Massimo; Ellero, Marco; Nicolini, Piero

    2007-11-01

    A striking feature of standard quantum mechanics (SQM) is its analogy with classical fluid dynamics. In fact, it is well-known that the Schr"odinger equation is equivalent to a closed set of partial differential equations for suitable real-valued functions of position and time (denoted as quantum fluid fields) [Madelung, 1928]. In particular, the corresponding quantum hydrodynamic equations (QHE) can be viewed as the equations of a classical compressible and non-viscous fluid, endowed with potential velocity and quantized velocity circulation. In this reference, an interesting theoretical problem, in its own right, is the construction of an inverse kinetic theory (IKT) for such a type of fluids. In this note we intend to investigate consequences of the IKT recently formulated for QHE [M.Tessarotto et al., Phys. Rev. A 75, 012105 (2007)]. In particular a basic issue is related to the definition of the quantum fluid fields.

  4. Three-dimensional hydrodynamical CO5BOLD model atmospheres of red giant stars. III. Line formation in the atmospheres of giants located close to the base of the red giant branch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrovolskas, V.; Kučinskas, A.; Steffen, M.; Ludwig, H.-G.; Prakapavičius, D.; Klevas, J.; Caffau, E.; Bonifacio, P.

    2013-11-01

    Aims: We utilize state-of-the-art three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamical and classical 1D stellar model atmospheres to study the influence of convection on the formation properties of various atomic and molecular spectral lines in the atmospheres of four red giant stars, located close to the base of the red giant branch, RGB (Teff ≈ 5000 K, log g = 2.5), and characterized by four different metallicities, [M/H] = 0.0, -1.0, -2.0, -3.0. Methods: The role of convection in the spectral line formation is assessed with the aid of abundance corrections, i.e., the differences in abundances predicted for a given equivalent width of a particular spectral line with the 3D and 1D model atmospheres. The 3D hydrodynamical and classical 1D model atmospheres used in this study were calculated with the CO5BOLD and 1D LHD codes, respectively. Identical atmospheric parameters, chemical composition, equation of state, and opacities were used with both codes, therefore allowing a strictly differential analysis of the line formation properties in the 3D and 1D models. Results: We find that for lines of certain neutral atoms, such as Mg i, Ti i, Fe i, and Ni i, the abundance corrections strongly depend both on the metallicity of a given model atmosphere and the line excitation potential, χ. While abundance corrections for all lines of both neutral and ionized elements tend to be small at solar metallicity (≤±0.1 dex), for lines of neutral elements with low ionization potential and low-to-intermediate χ they quickly increase with decreasing metallicity, reaching in their extremes -0.6 to -0.8 dex. In all such cases the large abundance corrections are due to horizontal temperature fluctuations in the 3D hydrodynamical models. Lines of neutral elements with higher ionization potentials (Eion ≳ 10 eV) generally behave very similarly to lines of ionized elements characterized by low ionization potentials (Eion ≲ 6 eV). In the latter case, the abundance corrections are small

  5. A point-centered arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian hydrodynamic approach for tetrahedral meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, Nathaniel R.; Waltz, Jacob I.; Burton, Donald E.; Charest, Marc R.; Canfield, Thomas R.; Wohlbier, John G.

    2015-02-24

    We present a three dimensional (3D) arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) hydrodynamic scheme suitable for modeling complex compressible flows on tetrahedral meshes. The new approach stores the conserved variables (mass, momentum, and total energy) at the nodes of the mesh and solves the conservation equations on a control volume surrounding the point. This type of an approach is termed a point-centered hydrodynamic (PCH) method. The conservation equations are discretized using an edge-based finite element (FE) approach with linear basis functions. All fluxes in the new approach are calculated at the center of each tetrahedron. A multidirectional Riemann-like problem is solved at the center of the tetrahedron. The advective fluxes are calculated by solving a 1D Riemann problem on each face of the nodal control volume. A 2-stage Runge–Kutta method is used to evolve the solution forward in time, where the advective fluxes are part of the temporal integration. The mesh velocity is smoothed by solving a Laplacian equation. The details of the new ALE hydrodynamic scheme are discussed. Results from a range of numerical test problems are presented.

  6. A point-centered arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian hydrodynamic approach for tetrahedral meshes

    DOE PAGES

    Morgan, Nathaniel R.; Waltz, Jacob I.; Burton, Donald E.; Charest, Marc R.; Canfield, Thomas R.; Wohlbier, John G.

    2015-02-24

    We present a three dimensional (3D) arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) hydrodynamic scheme suitable for modeling complex compressible flows on tetrahedral meshes. The new approach stores the conserved variables (mass, momentum, and total energy) at the nodes of the mesh and solves the conservation equations on a control volume surrounding the point. This type of an approach is termed a point-centered hydrodynamic (PCH) method. The conservation equations are discretized using an edge-based finite element (FE) approach with linear basis functions. All fluxes in the new approach are calculated at the center of each tetrahedron. A multidirectional Riemann-like problem is solved atmore » the center of the tetrahedron. The advective fluxes are calculated by solving a 1D Riemann problem on each face of the nodal control volume. A 2-stage Runge–Kutta method is used to evolve the solution forward in time, where the advective fluxes are part of the temporal integration. The mesh velocity is smoothed by solving a Laplacian equation. The details of the new ALE hydrodynamic scheme are discussed. Results from a range of numerical test problems are presented.« less

  7. DNABIT Compress - Genome compression algorithm.

    PubMed

    Rajarajeswari, Pothuraju; Apparao, Allam

    2011-01-01

    Data compression is concerned with how information is organized in data. Efficient storage means removal of redundancy from the data being stored in the DNA molecule. Data compression algorithms remove redundancy and are used to understand biologically important molecules. We present a compression algorithm, "DNABIT Compress" for DNA sequences based on a novel algorithm of assigning binary bits for smaller segments of DNA bases to compress both repetitive and non repetitive DNA sequence. Our proposed algorithm achieves the best compression ratio for DNA sequences for larger genome. Significantly better compression results show that "DNABIT Compress" algorithm is the best among the remaining compression algorithms. While achieving the best compression ratios for DNA sequences (Genomes),our new DNABIT Compress algorithm significantly improves the running time of all previous DNA compression programs. Assigning binary bits (Unique BIT CODE) for (Exact Repeats, Reverse Repeats) fragments of DNA sequence is also a unique concept introduced in this algorithm for the first time in DNA compression. This proposed new algorithm could achieve the best compression ratio as much as 1.58 bits/bases where the existing best methods could not achieve a ratio less than 1.72 bits/bases.

  8. Two-Dimensional Hydrodynamic Modeling and Analysis of the Proposed Channel Modifications and Grade Control Structure on the Blue River near Byram's Ford Industrial Park, Kansas City, Missouri

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huizinga, Richard J.

    2007-01-01

    The Blue River Channel Modification project being implemented by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) is intended to provide flood protection within the Blue River valley in the Kansas City, Mo., metropolitan area. In the latest phase of the project, concerns have arisen about preserving the Civil War historic area of Byram's Ford and the associated Big Blue Battlefield while providing flood protection for the Byram's Ford Industrial Park. In 1996, the USACE used a physical model built at the Waterways Experiment Station (WES) in Vicksburg, Miss., to examine the feasibility of a proposed grade control structure (GCS) that would be placed downstream from the historic river crossing of Byram's Ford to provide a subtle transition of flow from the natural channel to the modified channel. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the USACE, modified an existing two-dimensional finite element surface-water model of the river between 63d Street and Blue Parkway (the 'original model'), used the modified model to simulate the existing (as of 2006) unimproved channel and the proposed channel modifications and GCS, and analyzed the results from the simulations and those from the WES physical model. Modifications were made to the original model to create a model that represents existing (2006) conditions between the north end of Swope Park immediately upstream from 63d Street and the upstream limit of channel improvement on the Blue River (the 'model of existing conditions'). The model of existing conditions was calibrated to two measured floods. The model of existing conditions also was modified to create a model that represents conditions along the same reach of the Blue River with proposed channel modifications and the proposed GCS (the 'model of proposed conditions'). The models of existing conditions and proposed conditions were used to simulate the 30-, 50-, and 100-year recurrence floods. The discharge from the calibration flood of May 15, 1990, also

  9. Comparison of Artificial Compressibility Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiris, Cetin; Housman, Jeffrey; Kwak, Dochan

    2004-01-01

    Various artificial compressibility methods for calculating the three-dimensional incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are compared. Each method is described and numerical solutions to test problems are conducted. A comparison based on convergence behavior, accuracy, and robustness is given.

  10. Results of a Two-Dimensional Hydrodynamic and Sediment-Transport Model to Predict the Effects of the Phased Construction and Operation of the Olmsted Locks and Dam on the Ohio River near Olmsted, Illinois

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wagner, Chad R.

    2004-01-01

    The Olmsted two-dimensional hydrodynamic and sediment-transport model was developed in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Louisville District. The model was used to estimate the effects that the phased-construction sequence and operation of the Olmsted Locks and Dam had on sediment-transport patterns in the 11.9-mile study reach (Ohio River miles 962.6 to 974.5), particularly over an area of endangered orange-footed pearly mussel (Plethobasus cooperianus) beds beginning approximately 2 miles downstream of the dam construction. A Resource Management Associates?2 (RMA-2) two-dimensional hydrodynamic model for the reach was calibrated to a middle-flow hydraulic survey (350,000 cubic feet per second) and verified with data collected during low- and high-flow hydraulic surveys (72,500 and 770,000 cubic feet per second, respectively). The calibration and validation process included matching water-surface elevations at the construction site and velocity profiles at 15 cross sections throughout the study reach. The sediment-transport aspect of the project was simulated with the Waterways Experiment Station's Sed2D model for a 6-year planned-construction period (construction-phase modeling) and a subsequent 3-year operational period (operational-phase modeling). The sediment-transport results from the construction and operational models both were compared to results of concurrent baseline simulations to determine the changes in erosional and depositional patterns induced by the dam construction and operation throughout the study reach and more importantly over the area of the endangered mussel beds. Simulation of the phased-in-the-wet Olmsted Locks and Dam construction and subsequent operation period resulted in a maximum additional deposition of approximately 2 feet over a localized region of the mussel beds when compared to the bed change simulated with baseline conditions (river conditions that included only the completed locks section). Most areas on the

  11. Hydrodynamic simulations with the Godunov smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murante, G.; Borgani, S.; Brunino, R.; Cha, S.-H.

    2011-10-01

    We present results based on an implementation of the Godunov smoothed particle hydrodynamics (GSPH), originally developed by Inutsuka, in the GADGET-3 hydrodynamic code. We first review the derivation of the GSPH discretization of the equations of moment and energy conservation, starting from the convolution of these equations with the interpolating kernel. The two most important aspects of the numerical implementation of these equations are (a) the appearance of fluid velocity and pressure obtained from the solution of the Riemann problem between each pair of particles, and (b) the absence of an artificial viscosity term. We carry out three different controlled hydrodynamical three-dimensional tests, namely the Sod shock tube, the development of Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities in a shear-flow test and the 'blob' test describing the evolution of a cold cloud moving against a hot wind. The results of our tests confirm and extend in a number of aspects those recently obtained by Cha, Inutsuka & Nayakshin: (i) GSPH provides a much improved description of contact discontinuities, with respect to smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), thus avoiding the appearance of spurious pressure forces; (ii) GSPH is able to follow the development of gas-dynamical instabilities, such as the Kevin-Helmholtz and the Rayleigh-Taylor ones; (iii) as a result, GSPH describes the development of curl structures in the shear-flow test and the dissolution of the cold cloud in the 'blob' test. Besides comparing the results of GSPH with those from standard SPH implementations, we also discuss in detail the effect on the performances of GSPH of changing different aspects of its implementation: choice of the number of neighbours, accuracy of the interpolation procedure to locate the interface between two fluid elements (particles) for the solution of the Riemann problem, order of the reconstruction for the assignment of variables at the interface, choice of the limiter to prevent oscillations of

  12. Space-time compressive imaging.

    PubMed

    Treeaporn, Vicha; Ashok, Amit; Neifeld, Mark A

    2012-02-01

    Compressive imaging systems typically exploit the spatial correlation of the scene to facilitate a lower dimensional measurement relative to a conventional imaging system. In natural time-varying scenes there is a high degree of temporal correlation that may also be exploited to further reduce the number of measurements. In this work we analyze space-time compressive imaging using Karhunen-Loève (KL) projections for the read-noise-limited measurement case. Based on a comprehensive simulation study, we show that a KL-based space-time compressive imager offers higher compression relative to space-only compressive imaging. For a relative noise strength of 10% and reconstruction error of 10%, we find that space-time compressive imaging with 8×8×16 spatiotemporal blocks yields about 292× compression compared to a conventional imager, while space-only compressive imaging provides only 32× compression. Additionally, under high read-noise conditions, a space-time compressive imaging system yields lower reconstruction error than a conventional imaging system due to the multiplexing advantage. We also discuss three electro-optic space-time compressive imaging architecture classes, including charge-domain processing by a smart focal plane array (FPA). Space-time compressive imaging using a smart FPA provides an alternative method to capture the nonredundant portions of time-varying scenes.

  13. Progress in smooth particle hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Wingate, C.A.; Dilts, G.A.; Mandell, D.A.; Crotzer, L.A.; Knapp, C.E.

    1998-07-01

    Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) is a meshless, Lagrangian numerical method for hydrodynamics calculations where calculational elements are fuzzy particles which move according to the hydrodynamic equations of motion. Each particle carries local values of density, temperature, pressure and other hydrodynamic parameters. A major advantage of SPH is that it is meshless, thus large deformation calculations can be easily done with no connectivity complications. Interface positions are known and there are no problems with advecting quantities through a mesh that typical Eulerian codes have. These underlying SPH features make fracture physics easy and natural and in fact, much of the applications work revolves around simulating fracture. Debris particles from impacts can be easily transported across large voids with SPH. While SPH has considerable promise, there are some problems inherent in the technique that have so far limited its usefulness. The most serious problem is the well known instability in tension leading to particle clumping and numerical fracture. Another problem is that the SPH interpolation is only correct when particles are uniformly spaced a half particle apart leading to incorrect strain rates, accelerations and other quantities for general particle distributions. SPH calculations are also sensitive to particle locations. The standard artificial viscosity treatment in SPH leads to spurious viscosity in shear flows. This paper will demonstrate solutions for these problems that they and others have been developing. The most promising is to replace the SPH interpolant with the moving least squares (MLS) interpolant invented by Lancaster and Salkauskas in 1981. SPH and MLS are closely related with MLS being essentially SPH with corrected particle volumes. When formulated correctly, JLS is conservative, stable in both compression and tension, does not have the SPH boundary problems and is not sensitive to particle placement. The other approach to

  14. Hydrodynamic stellar interactions in dense star clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasio, Frederic A.

    1993-01-01

    Highly detailed HST observations of globular-cluster cores and galactic nuclei motivate new theoretical studies of the violent dynamical processes which govern the evolution of these very dense stellar systems. These processes include close stellar encounters and direct physical collisions between stars. Such hydrodynamic stellar interactions are thought to explain the large populations of blue stragglers, millisecond pulsars, X-ray binaries, and other peculiar sources observed in globular clusters. Three-dimensional hydrodynamics techniques now make it possible to perform realistic numerical simulations of these interactions. The results, when combined with those of N-body simulations of stellar dynamics, should provide for the first time a realistic description of dense star clusters. Here I review briefly current theoretical work on hydrodynamic stellar interactions, emphasizing its relevance to recent observations.

  15. High-Order Curvilinear Finite Element Methods for Lagrangian Hydrodynamics [High Order Curvilinear Finite Elements for Lagrangian Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Dobrev, Veselin A.; Kolev, Tzanio V.; Rieben, Robert N.

    2012-09-20

    The numerical approximation of the Euler equations of gas dynamics in a movingLagrangian frame is at the heart of many multiphysics simulation algorithms. Here, we present a general framework for high-order Lagrangian discretization of these compressible shock hydrodynamics equations using curvilinear finite elements. This method is an extension of the approach outlined in [Dobrev et al., Internat. J. Numer. Methods Fluids, 65 (2010), pp. 1295--1310] and can be formulated for any finite dimensional approximation of the kinematic and thermodynamic fields, including generic finite elements on two- and three-dimensional meshes with triangular, quadrilateral, tetrahedral, or hexahedral zones. We discretize the kinematic variables of position and velocity using a continuous high-order basis function expansion of arbitrary polynomial degree which is obtained via a corresponding high-order parametric mapping from a standard reference element. This enables the use of curvilinear zone geometry, higher-order approximations for fields within a zone, and a pointwise definition of mass conservation which we refer to as strong mass conservation. Moreover, we discretize the internal energy using a piecewise discontinuous high-order basis function expansion which is also of arbitrary polynomial degree. This facilitates multimaterial hydrodynamics by treating material properties, such as equations of state and constitutive models, as piecewise discontinuous functions which vary within a zone. To satisfy the Rankine--Hugoniot jump conditions at a shock boundary and generate the appropriate entropy, we introduce a general tensor artificial viscosity which takes advantage of the high-order kinematic and thermodynamic information available in each zone. Finally, we apply a generic high-order time discretization process to the semidiscrete equations to develop the fully discrete numerical algorithm. Our method can be viewed as the high-order generalization of the so-called staggered

  16. Compression embedding

    DOEpatents

    Sandford, II, Maxwell T.; Handel, Theodore G.; Bradley, Jonathan N.

    1998-01-01

    A method and apparatus for embedding auxiliary information into the digital representation of host data created by a lossy compression technique and a method and apparatus for constructing auxiliary data from the correspondence between values in a digital key-pair table with integer index values existing in a representation of host data created by a lossy compression technique. The methods apply to data compressed with algorithms based on series expansion, quantization to a finite number of symbols, and entropy coding. Lossy compression methods represent the original data as ordered sequences of blocks containing integer indices having redundancy and uncertainty of value by one unit, allowing indices which are adjacent in value to be manipulated to encode auxiliary data. Also included is a method to improve the efficiency of lossy compression algorithms by embedding white noise into the integer indices. Lossy compression methods use loss-less compression to reduce to the final size the intermediate representation as indices. The efficiency of the loss-less compression, known also as entropy coding compression, is increased by manipulating the indices at the intermediate stage. Manipulation of the intermediate representation improves lossy compression performance by 1 to 10%.

  17. Compression embedding

    DOEpatents

    Sandford, M.T. II; Handel, T.G.; Bradley, J.N.

    1998-07-07

    A method and apparatus for embedding auxiliary information into the digital representation of host data created by a lossy compression technique and a method and apparatus for constructing auxiliary data from the correspondence between values in a digital key-pair table with integer index values existing in a representation of host data created by a lossy compression technique are disclosed. The methods apply to data compressed with algorithms based on series expansion, quantization to a finite number of symbols, and entropy coding. Lossy compression methods represent the original data as ordered sequences of blocks containing integer indices having redundancy and uncertainty of value by one unit, allowing indices which are adjacent in value to be manipulated to encode auxiliary data. Also included is a method to improve the efficiency of lossy compression algorithms by embedding white noise into the integer indices. Lossy compression methods use loss-less compression to reduce to the final size the intermediate representation as indices. The efficiency of the loss-less compression, known also as entropy coding compression, is increased by manipulating the indices at the intermediate stage. Manipulation of the intermediate representation improves lossy compression performance by 1 to 10%. 21 figs.

  18. Hydrodynamics in Holocene Lake Mega-Chad

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchette, Frédéric; Schuster, Mathieu; Ghienne, Jean-François; Denamiel, Cléa; Roquin, Claude; Moussa, Abderamane; Marsaleix, Patrick; Duringer, Philippe

    2010-03-01

    Holocene Lake Mega-Chad (LMC) was the largest late Quaternary water-body in Africa. The development of this giant paleo-lake is related to a northward shift of the isohyetes interpreted as evidence for an enhanced Monsoon (African Humid Period). Numerous preserved coastal features have been described all around the LMC shore. Such features reveal the main paleo-hydrodynamical tendencies. In the context of a closed water-body like LMC, hydrodynamics are forced mainly by winds. We use a three-dimensional numerical model (SYMPHONIE) to simulate the mean hydrodynamics in LMC under both Harmattan-like (northeasterly trade winds) and Monsoon-like (southwesterly winds) forcings. The northern part of LMC displays coastal features, such as sand spits, that are consistent with the simulations forced by Harmattan-like winds. Geomorphic features related to Monsoon-driven hydrodynamics are not clearly expressed. They could have developed during the early stage of LMC but subsequently reworked. At the time of sand-spit building, Harmattan-like driven hydrodynamics prevailed and related coastal features were preferentially preserved in the sedimentary record.

  19. Compression embedding

    DOEpatents

    Sandford, M.T. II; Handel, T.G.; Bradley, J.N.

    1998-03-10

    A method of embedding auxiliary information into the digital representation of host data created by a lossy compression technique is disclosed. The method applies to data compressed with lossy algorithms based on series expansion, quantization to a finite number of symbols, and entropy coding. Lossy compression methods represent the original data as integer indices having redundancy and uncertainty in value by one unit. Indices which are adjacent in value are manipulated to encode auxiliary data. By a substantially reverse process, the embedded auxiliary data can be retrieved easily by an authorized user. Lossy compression methods use loss-less compressions known also as entropy coding, to reduce to the final size the intermediate representation as indices. The efficiency of the compression entropy coding, known also as entropy coding is increased by manipulating the indices at the intermediate stage in the manner taught by the method. 11 figs.

  20. Compression embedding

    DOEpatents

    Sandford, II, Maxwell T.; Handel, Theodore G.; Bradley, Jonathan N.

    1998-01-01

    A method of embedding auxiliary information into the digital representation of host data created by a lossy compression technique. The method applies to data compressed with lossy algorithms based on series expansion, quantization to a finite number of symbols, and entropy coding. Lossy compression methods represent the original data as integer indices having redundancy and uncertainty in value by one unit. Indices which are adjacent in value are manipulated to encode auxiliary data. By a substantially reverse process, the embedded auxiliary data can be retrieved easily by an authorized user. Lossy compression methods use loss-less compressions known also as entropy coding, to reduce to the final size the intermediate representation as indices. The efficiency of the compression entropy coding, known also as entropy coding is increased by manipulating the indices at the intermediate stage in the manner taught by the method.

  1. Quasinormal modes of the polytropic hydrodynamic vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Leandro A.; Cardoso, Vitor; Crispino, Luís C. B.

    2015-07-01

    Analogue systems are a powerful instrument to investigate and understand in a controlled setting many general-relativistic effects. Here, we focus on superradiant-triggered instabilities and quasinormal modes. We consider a compressible hydrodynamic vortex characterized by a polytropic equation of state, the polytropic hydrodynamic vortex, a purely circulating system with an ergoregion but no event horizon. We compute the quasinormal modes of this system numerically with different methods, finding excellent agreement between them. When the fluid velocity is larger than the speed of sound, an ergoregion appears in the effective spacetime, triggering an "ergoregion instability." We study the details of the instability for the polytropic vortex, and in particular find analytic expressions for the marginally stable configuration.

  2. Compressible turbulent boundary layer interaction experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Settles, G. S.; Bogdonoff, S. M.

    1981-01-01

    Four phases of research results are reported: (1) experiments on the compressible turbulent boundary layer flow in a streamwise corner; (2) the two dimensional (2D) interaction of incident shock waves with a compressible turbulent boundary layer; (3) three dimensional (3D) shock/boundary layer interactions; and (4) cooperative experiments at Princeton and numerical computations at NASA-Ames.

  3. libpolycomp: Compression/decompression library

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomasi, Maurizio

    2016-04-01

    Libpolycomp compresses and decompresses one-dimensional streams of numbers by means of several algorithms. It is well-suited for time-ordered data acquired by astronomical instruments or simulations. One of the algorithms, called "polynomial compression", combines two widely-used ideas (namely, polynomial approximation and filtering of Fourier series) to achieve substantial compression ratios for datasets characterized by smoothness and lack of noise. Notable examples are the ephemerides of astronomical objects and the pointing information of astronomical telescopes. Other algorithms implemented in this C library are well known and already widely used, e.g., RLE, quantization, deflate (via libz) and Burrows-Wheeler transform (via libbzip2). Libpolycomp can compress the timelines acquired by the Planck/LFI instrument with an overall compression ratio of ~9, while other widely known programs (gzip, bzip2) reach compression ratios less than 1.5.

  4. TOWARD END-TO-END MODELING FOR NUCLEAR EXPLOSION MONITORING: SIMULATION OF UNDERGROUND NUCLEAR EXPLOSIONS AND EARTHQUAKES USING HYDRODYNAMIC AND ANELASTIC SIMULATIONS, HIGH-PERFORMANCE COMPUTING AND THREE-DIMENSIONAL EARTH MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Rodgers, A; Vorobiev, O; Petersson, A; Sjogreen, B

    2009-07-06

    This paper describes new research being performed to improve understanding of seismic waves generated by underground nuclear explosions (UNE) by using full waveform simulation, high-performance computing and three-dimensional (3D) earth models. The goal of this effort is to develop an end-to-end modeling capability to cover the range of wave propagation required for nuclear explosion monitoring (NEM) from the buried nuclear device to the seismic sensor. The goal of this work is to improve understanding of the physical basis and prediction capabilities of seismic observables for NEM including source and path-propagation effects. We are pursuing research along three main thrusts. Firstly, we are modeling the non-linear hydrodynamic response of geologic materials to underground explosions in order to better understand how source emplacement conditions impact the seismic waves that emerge from the source region and are ultimately observed hundreds or thousands of kilometers away. Empirical evidence shows that the amplitudes and frequency content of seismic waves at all distances are strongly impacted by the physical properties of the source region (e.g. density, strength, porosity). To model the near-source shock-wave motions of an UNE, we use GEODYN, an Eulerian Godunov (finite volume) code incorporating thermodynamically consistent non-linear constitutive relations, including cavity formation, yielding, porous compaction, tensile failure, bulking and damage. In order to propagate motions to seismic distances we are developing a one-way coupling method to pass motions to WPP (a Cartesian anelastic finite difference code). Preliminary investigations of UNE's in canonical materials (granite, tuff and alluvium) confirm that emplacement conditions have a strong effect on seismic amplitudes and the generation of shear waves. Specifically, we find that motions from an explosion in high-strength, low-porosity granite have high compressional wave amplitudes and weak shear

  5. Hybrid magneto-hydrodynamic simulation of a driven FRC

    SciTech Connect

    Rahman, H. U. Wessel, F. J.; Binderbauer, M. W.; Qerushi, A.; Rostoker, N.; Conti, F.; Ney, P.

    2014-03-15

    We simulate a field-reversed configuration (FRC), produced by an “inductively driven” FRC experiment; comprised of a central-flux coil and exterior-limiter coil. To account for the plasma kinetic behavior, a standard 2-dimensional magneto-hydrodynamic code is modified to preserve the azimuthal, two-fluid behavior. Simulations are run for the FRC's full-time history, sufficient to include: acceleration, formation, current neutralization, compression, and decay. At start-up, a net ion current develops that modifies the applied-magnetic field forming closed-field lines and a region of null-magnetic field (i.e., a FRC). After closed-field lines form, ion-electron drag increases the electron current, canceling a portion of the ion current. The equilibrium is lost as the total current eventually dissipates. The time evolution and magnitudes of the computed current, ion-rotation velocity, and plasma temperature agree with the experiments, as do the rigid-rotor-like, radial-profiles for the density and axial-magnetic field [cf. Conti et al. Phys. Plasmas 21, 022511 (2014)].

  6. The quantum hydrodynamic model for semiconductor devices

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, C.L. )

    1994-04-01

    The classical hydrodynamic equations can be extended to include quantum effects by incorporating the first quantum corrections. The full three-dimensional quantum hydrodynamic (QHD) model is derived for the first time by a moment expansion of the Wigner-Boltzmann equations. The QHD conservation laws have the same form as the classical hydrodynamic equations, but the energy density and stress tensor have additional quantum terms. These quantum terms allow particles to tunnel through potential barriers and to build up in potential wells. The three-dimensional QHD transport equations are mathematically classified as having two Schroedinger modes, two hyperbolic modes, and one parabolic mode. The one-dimensional steady-state QHD equations are discretized in conservation form using the second upwind method. Simulations of a resonant tunneling diode are presented that show charge buildup in the quantum well and negative differential resistance (NDR) in the current-voltage curve. These are the first simulations of the full QHD equations to show NDR in the resonant tunneling diode. The computed current-voltage curve agrees quantitatively with experimental measurements. NDR interpreted in terms of the time spent by electrons in the quantum well.

  7. Resurgence in extended hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aniceto, Inês; Spaliński, Michał

    2016-04-01

    It has recently been understood that the hydrodynamic series generated by the Müller-Israel-Stewart theory is divergent and that this large-order behavior is consistent with the theory of resurgence. Furthermore, it was observed that the physical origin of this is the presence of a purely damped nonhydrodynamic mode. It is very interesting to ask whether this picture persists in cases where the spectrum of nonhydrodynamic modes is richer. We take the first step in this direction by considering the simplest hydrodynamic theory which, instead of the purely damped mode, contains a pair of nonhydrodynamic modes of complex conjugate frequencies. This mimics the pattern of black brane quasinormal modes which appear on the gravity side of the AdS/CFT description of N =4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills plasma. We find that the resulting hydrodynamic series is divergent in a way consistent with resurgence and precisely encodes information about the nonhydrodynamic modes of the theory.

  8. Consistent Hydrodynamics for Phase Field Crystals.

    PubMed

    Heinonen, V; Achim, C V; Kosterlitz, J M; Ying, See-Chen; Lowengrub, J; Ala-Nissila, T

    2016-01-15

    We use the amplitude expansion in the phase field crystal framework to formulate an approach where the fields describing the microscopic structure of the material are coupled to a hydrodynamic velocity field. The model is shown to reduce to the well-known macroscopic theories in appropriate limits, including compressible Navier-Stokes and wave equations. Moreover, we show that the dynamics proposed allows for long wavelength phonon modes and demonstrate the theory numerically showing that the elastic excitations in the system are relaxed through phonon emission. PMID:26824543

  9. Hydrodynamic effects in the atmosphere of variable stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, C. G., Jr.; Bunker, S. S.

    1975-01-01

    Numerical models of variable stars are established, using a nonlinear radiative transfer coupled hydrodynamics code. The variable Eddington method of radiative transfer is used. Comparisons are for models of W Virginis, beta Doradus, and eta Aquilae. From these models it appears that shocks are formed in the atmospheres of classical Cepheids as well as W Virginis stars. In classical Cepheids, with periods from 7 to 10 days, the bumps occurring in the light and velocity curves appear as the result of a compression wave that reflects from the star's center. At the head of the outward going compression wave, shocks form in the atmosphere. Comparisons between the hydrodynamic motions in W Virginis and classical Cepheids are made. The strong shocks in W Virginis do not penetrate into the interior as do the compression waves formed in classical Cepheids. The shocks formed in W Virginis stars cause emission lines, while in classical Cepheids the shocks are weaker.

  10. Dispersive hydrodynamics: Preface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biondini, G.; El, G. A.; Hoefer, M. A.; Miller, P. D.

    2016-10-01

    This Special Issue on Dispersive Hydrodynamics is dedicated to the memory and work of G.B. Whitham who was one of the pioneers in this field of physical applied mathematics. Some of the papers appearing here are related to work reported on at the workshop "Dispersive Hydrodynamics: The Mathematics of Dispersive Shock Waves and Applications" held in May 2015 at the Banff International Research Station. This Preface provides a broad overview of the field and summaries of the various contributions to the Special Issue, placing them in a unified context.

  11. Synchronization via Hydrodynamic Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendelbacher, Franziska; Stark, Holger

    2013-12-01

    An object moving in a viscous fluid creates a flow field that influences the motion of neighboring objects. We review examples from nature in the microscopic world where such hydrodynamic interactions synchronize beating or rotating filaments. Bacteria propel themselves using a bundle of rotating helical filaments called flagella which have to be synchronized in phase. Other micro-organisms are covered with a carpet of smaller filaments called cilia on their surfaces. They beat highly synchronized so that metachronal waves propagate along the cell surfaces. We explore both examples with the help of simple model systems and identify generic properties for observing synchronization by hydrodynamic interactions.

  12. Hydrodynamic Instability of Ionization Fronts in HII Regions

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuta, A; Kane, J; Ryutov, D; Remington, B; Takabe, H; Pound, M

    2003-08-21

    The authors investigate hydrodynamic instability of accelerating ionization fronts with two dimensional hydrodynamic simulations. When recombination in the ionized region is turned off, Rayleigh-Taylor instability is effective. Perturbation grows up with classical Rayleigh-Taylor growth rate. In the case with recombination, the local difference of absorption profile works to smooth the surface. The perturbation does not grow and the amplitude follows a damped oscillations with time.

  13. Ion holes in the hydrodynamic regime in ultracold neutral plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    McQuillen, P.; Castro, J.; Strickler, T.; Bradshaw, S. J.; Killian, T. C.

    2013-04-15

    We describe the creation of localized density perturbations, or ion holes, in an ultracold neutral plasma in the hydrodynamic regime, and show that the holes propagate at the local ion acoustic wave speed. We also observe the process of hole splitting, which results from the formation of a density depletion initially at rest in the plasma. One-dimensional, two-fluid hydrodynamic simulations describe the results well. Measurements of the ion velocity distribution also show the effects of the ion hole and confirm the hydrodynamic conditions in the plasma.

  14. Hydrodynamic wave contributions to combustion instability in rockets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu-Irshaid, Esam M. T.

    Experimental measurements suggest that a new source of instability in rocket motors is due to hydrodynamic disturbances. These disturbances, if ignored, could impact our assessment of rocket motor performance. In this work, the corresponding problem of hydrodynamic instability is considered. A mathematical model for these disturbances is carried out by perturbing the continuity and momentum equations. A one dimensional model which represents the wave disturbances in time and space is implemented to quantify the amplification rate, in time or space, and the wave amplitude. The only available measurements of these disturbances arise in cold flow experiments that simulate the gas dynamics in a solid rocket motor and where no real combustion takes place. The reason for cold flow experiments is the difficulty in measuring the hydrodynamic disturbances in real rockets. To gain better understanding of the interaction between hydrodynamic and combustion driven disturbances, a new approach is implemented that accounts for hydrodynamic effects on the combustion instability net system amplitude. In this model the impact of spatial hydrodynamic vortices in solid rocket motors is projected on the net system amplitude calculations. Results show that some factors play a significant role in controlling the hydrodynamic disturbances. These factors include the injection Mach number, chamber aspect ratio, admittance function and the tangential wave number. Here, the influence of each of these factors is examined. Finally, the hydrodynamic energy density is calculated and found to be small in comparison to the vortical-acoustic one.

  15. Calculation methods for compressible turbulent boundary layers, 1976

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bushnell, D. M.; Cary, A. M., Jr.; Harris, J. E.

    1977-01-01

    Equations and closure methods for compressible turbulent boundary layers are discussed. Flow phenomena peculiar to calculation of these boundary layers were considered, along with calculations of three dimensional compressible turbulent boundary layers. Procedures for ascertaining nonsimilar two and three dimensional compressible turbulent boundary layers were appended, including finite difference, finite element, and mass-weighted residual methods.

  16. The Quantum Hydrodynamic Description of Tunneling

    SciTech Connect

    Kendrick, Brian K.

    2012-06-15

    The quantum hydrodynamic approach is based on the de Broglie-Bohm formulation of quantum mechanics. The resulting fluid-like equations of motion describe the flow of probability and an accurate solution to these equations is equivalent to solving the time-dependent Schroedinger equation. Furthermore, the hydrodynamic approach provides new insight into the mechanisms as well as an alternative computational approach for treating tunneling phenomena. New concepts include well-defined 'quantum trajectories', 'quantum potential', and 'quantum force' all of which have classical analogues. The quantum potential and its associated force give rise to all quantum mechanical effects such as zero point energy, tunneling, and interference. A new numerical approach called the Iterative Finite Difference Method (IFDM) will be discussed. The IFDM is used to solve the set of non-linear coupled hydrodynamic equations. It is 2nd-order accurate in both space and time and exhibits exponential convergence with respect to the iteration count. The stability and computational efficiency of the IFDM is significantly improved by using a 'smart' Eulerian grid which has the same computational advantages as a Lagrangian or Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) grid. The IFDM is also capable of treating anharmonic potentials. Example calculations using the IFDM will be presented which include: a one-dimensional Gaussian wave packet tunneling through an Eckart barrier, a one-dimensional bound-state Morse oscillator, and a two-dimensional (2D) model collinear reaction using an anharmonic potential energy surface. Approximate treatments of the quantum hydrodynamic equations will also be discussed which could allow scaling of the calculations to hundreds of degrees of freedom which is important for treating tunneling phenomena in condensed phase systems.

  17. Circumstellar Hydrodynamics and Spectral Radiation in ALGOLS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrell, Dirk Curtis

    1994-01-01

    Algols are the remnants of binary systems that have undergone large scale mass transfer. This dissertation presents the results of the coupling of a hydrodynamical model and a radiative model of the flow of gas from the inner Lagrangian point. The hydrodynamical model is a fully Lagrangian, three-dimensional scheme with a novel treatment of viscosity and an implementation of the smoothed particle hydrodynamics method to compute pressure gradients. Viscosity is implemented by allowing particles within a specified interaction length to share momentum. The hydrodynamical model includes a provision for computing the self-gravity of the disk material, although it is not used in the present application to Algols. Hydrogen line profiles and equivalent widths computed with a code by Drake and Ulrich are compared with observations of both short and long period Algols. More sophisticated radiative transfer computations are done with the escape probability code of Ko and Kallman which includes the spectral lines of thirteen elements. The locations and velocities of the gas particles, and the viscous heating from the hydro program are supplied to the radiative transfer program, which computes the equilibrium temperature of the gas and generates its emission spectrum. Intrinsic line profiles are assumed to be delta functions and are properly Doppler shifted and summed for gas particles that are not eclipsed by either star. Polarization curves are computed by combining the hydro program with the Wilson-Liou polarization program. Although the results are preliminary, they show that polarization observations show great promise for studying circumstellar matter.

  18. Simple Waves in Ideal Radiation Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, B M

    2008-09-03

    In the dynamic diffusion limit of radiation hydrodynamics, advection dominates diffusion; the latter primarily affects small scales and has negligible impact on the large scale flow. The radiation can thus be accurately regarded as an ideal fluid, i.e., radiative diffusion can be neglected along with other forms of dissipation. This viewpoint is applied here to an analysis of simple waves in an ideal radiating fluid. It is shown that much of the hydrodynamic analysis carries over by simply replacing the material sound speed, pressure and index with the values appropriate for a radiating fluid. A complete analysis is performed for a centered rarefaction wave, and expressions are provided for the Riemann invariants and characteristic curves of the one-dimensional system of equations. The analytical solution is checked for consistency against a finite difference numerical integration, and the validity of neglecting the diffusion operator is demonstrated. An interesting physical result is that for a material component with a large number of internal degrees of freedom and an internal energy greater than that of the radiation, the sound speed increases as the fluid is rarefied. These solutions are an excellent test for radiation hydrodynamic codes operating in the dynamic diffusion regime. The general approach may be useful in the development of Godunov numerical schemes for radiation hydrodynamics.

  19. Hydrodynamically driven colloidal assembly in dip coating.

    PubMed

    Colosqui, Carlos E; Morris, Jeffrey F; Stone, Howard A

    2013-05-01

    We study the hydrodynamics of dip coating from a suspension and report a mechanism for colloidal assembly and pattern formation on smooth substrates. Below a critical withdrawal speed where the coating film is thinner than the particle diameter, capillary forces induced by deformation of the free surface prevent the convective transport of single particles through the meniscus beneath the film. Capillary-induced forces are balanced by hydrodynamic drag only after a minimum number of particles assemble within the meniscus. The particle assembly can thus enter the thin film where it moves at nearly the withdrawal speed and rapidly separates from the next assembly. The interplay between hydrodynamic and capillary forces produces periodic and regular structures below a critical ratio Ca(2/3)/sqrt[Bo] < 0.7, where Ca and Bo are the capillary and Bond numbers, respectively. An analytical model and numerical simulations are presented for the case of two-dimensional flow with circular particles in suspension. The hydrodynamically driven assembly documented here is consistent with stripe pattern formations observed experimentally in dip coating.

  20. Hydrodynamically Driven Colloidal Assembly in Dip Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colosqui, Carlos E.; Morris, Jeffrey F.; Stone, Howard A.

    2013-05-01

    We study the hydrodynamics of dip coating from a suspension and report a mechanism for colloidal assembly and pattern formation on smooth substrates. Below a critical withdrawal speed where the coating film is thinner than the particle diameter, capillary forces induced by deformation of the free surface prevent the convective transport of single particles through the meniscus beneath the film. Capillary-induced forces are balanced by hydrodynamic drag only after a minimum number of particles assemble within the meniscus. The particle assembly can thus enter the thin film where it moves at nearly the withdrawal speed and rapidly separates from the next assembly. The interplay between hydrodynamic and capillary forces produces periodic and regular structures below a critical ratio Ca2/3/Bo<0.7, where Ca and Bo are the capillary and Bond numbers, respectively. An analytical model and numerical simulations are presented for the case of two-dimensional flow with circular particles in suspension. The hydrodynamically driven assembly documented here is consistent with stripe pattern formations observed experimentally in dip coating.

  1. Chiral Magnetic Effect in Hydrodynamic Approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, Valentin I.

    We review derivations of the chiral magnetic effect (ChME) in hydrodynamic approximation. The reader is assumed to be familiar with the basics of the effect. The main challenge now is to account for the strong interactions between the constituents of the fluid. The main result is that the ChME is not renormalized: in the hydrodynamic approximation it remains the same as for non-interacting chiral fermions moving in an external magnetic field. The key ingredients in the proof are general laws of thermodynamics and the Adler-Bardeen theorem for the chiral anomaly in external electromagnetic fields. The chiral magnetic effect in hydrodynamics represents a macroscopic manifestation of a quantum phenomenon (chiral anomaly). Moreover, one can argue that the current induced by the magnetic field is dissipation free and talk about a kind of "chiral superconductivity". More precise description is a quantum ballistic transport along magnetic field taking place in equilibrium and in absence of a driving force. The basic limitation is the exact chiral limit while temperature—excitingly enough—does not seemingly matter. What is still lacking, is a detailed quantum microscopic picture for the ChME in hydrodynamics. Probably, the chiral currents propagate through lower-dimensional defects, like vortices in superfluid. In case of superfluid, the prediction for the chiral magnetic effect remains unmodified although the emerging dynamical picture differs from the standard one.

  2. A one-dimensional numerical model for predicting pressure and velocity oscillations of a compressed air-pocket in a vertical shaft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Y.; Leon, A.; Apte, S.

    2015-12-01

    The presence of pressurized air pockets in combined sewer systems is argued to produce geyser flows, which is an oscillating jetting of a mixture of gas-liquid flows through vertical shafts. A 1D numerical model is developed for predicting pressure and velocity oscillations of a compressed air-pocket in a vertical shaft which in turn attempts to simulate geyser like flows. The vertical shaft is closed at the bottom and open to ambient pressure at the top. Initially, the lower section of the vertical shaft is filled with compressed air and the upper section with water. The interaction between the pressurized air pocket and the water column in the vertical shaft exhibits an oscillatory motion of the water column that decays over time. The model accounts for steady and unsteady friction to estimate the energy dissipation. The model also includes the falling flow of water around the external perimeter of the pressurized air pocket by assuming that any expansion in the pressurized air pocket would result in the falling volume of water. The acceleration of air-water interface is predicted through a force balance between the pressurized air pocket and the water column combined with the Method of Characteristics that resolves pressure and velocity within the water column. The expansion and compression of the pressurized air pocket is assumed to follow either isothermal process or adiabatic process. Results for both assumptions; isothermal and adiabatic processes, are presented. The performance of the developed 1D numerical model is compared with that of a commercial 3D CFD model. Overall, a good agreement between both models is obtained for pressure and velocity oscillations. The paper will also present a sensitivity analysis of the 3D CFD model.

  3. Existence and uniqueness of small energy weak solution to multi-dimensional compressible Navier-Stokes equations with large external potential force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Ka Luen; Suen, Anthony

    2016-08-01

    We study the 3-D compressible Navier-Stokes equations with an external potential force and a general non-decreasing pressure. We prove the global-in-time existence of weak solutions with small-energy initial data and with densities being non-negative and essentially bounded. A solution may have large oscillations and contain vacuum states. No smallness assumption is made on the external force nor the initial perturbation in L∞ for density. Initial velocity u0 is taken to be bounded in Lq for some q > 6 and no further regularity assumption is imposed on u0. Finally, we discuss the uniqueness of weak solutions.

  4. Hydrodynamically Lubricated Rotary Shaft Having Twist Resistant Geometry

    DOEpatents

    Dietle, Lannie; Gobeli, Jeffrey D.

    1993-07-27

    A hydrodynamically lubricated squeeze packing type rotary shaft with a cross-sectional geometry suitable for pressurized lubricant retention is provided which, in the preferred embodiment, incorporates a protuberant static sealing interface that, compared to prior art, dramatically improves the exclusionary action of the dynamic sealing interface in low pressure and unpressurized applications by achieving symmetrical deformation of the seal at the static and dynamic sealing interfaces. In abrasive environments, the improved exclusionary action results in a dramatic reduction of seal and shaft wear, compared to prior art, and provides a significant increase in seal life. The invention also increases seal life by making higher levels of initial compression possible, compared to prior art, without compromising hydrodynamic lubrication; this added compression makes the seal more tolerant of compression set, abrasive wear, mechanical misalignment, dynamic runout, and manufacturing tolerances, and also makes hydrodynamic seals with smaller cross-sections more practical. In alternate embodiments, the benefits enumerated above are achieved by cooperative configurations of the seal and the gland which achieve symmetrical deformation of the seal at the static and dynamic sealing interfaces. The seal may also be configured such that predetermined radial compression deforms it to a desired operative configuration, even through symmetrical deformation is lacking.

  5. Global Existence of Weak Solution to the Compressible Prandtl Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Min; Gong, Shengbo

    2016-07-01

    We study the two dimensional boundary layer problem for compressible Navier-Stokes equations, provided that the density is favourable. We employ the viscous splitting method to establish global existence of weak solutions to the compressible Prandtl equations.

  6. Hydrodynamics of Turning Flocks.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xingbo; Marchetti, M Cristina

    2015-12-18

    We present a hydrodynamic model of flocking that generalizes the familiar Toner-Tu equations to incorporate turning inertia of well-polarized flocks. The continuum equations controlled by only two dimensionless parameters, orientational inertia and alignment strength, are derived by coarse-graining the inertial spin model recently proposed by Cavagna et al. The interplay between orientational inertia and bend elasticity of the flock yields anisotropic spin waves that mediate the propagation of turning information throughout the flock. The coupling between spin-current density to the local vorticity field through a nonlinear friction gives rise to a hydrodynamic mode with angular-dependent propagation speed at long wavelengths. This mode becomes unstable as a result of the growth of bend and splay deformations augmented by the spin wave, signaling the transition to complex spatiotemporal patterns of continuously turning and swirling flocks.

  7. Hydrodynamics of Turning Flocks.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xingbo; Marchetti, M Cristina

    2015-12-18

    We present a hydrodynamic model of flocking that generalizes the familiar Toner-Tu equations to incorporate turning inertia of well-polarized flocks. The continuum equations controlled by only two dimensionless parameters, orientational inertia and alignment strength, are derived by coarse-graining the inertial spin model recently proposed by Cavagna et al. The interplay between orientational inertia and bend elasticity of the flock yields anisotropic spin waves that mediate the propagation of turning information throughout the flock. The coupling between spin-current density to the local vorticity field through a nonlinear friction gives rise to a hydrodynamic mode with angular-dependent propagation speed at long wavelengths. This mode becomes unstable as a result of the growth of bend and splay deformations augmented by the spin wave, signaling the transition to complex spatiotemporal patterns of continuously turning and swirling flocks. PMID:26722945

  8. HYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATION OF THE UPPER POTOMAC ESTUARY.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schaffranck, Raymond W.

    1986-01-01

    Hydrodynamics of the upper extent of the Potomac Estuary between Indian Head and Morgantown, Md. , are simulated using a two-dimensional model. The model computes water-surface elevations and depth-averaged velocities by numerically integrating finite-difference forms of the equations of mass and momentum conservation using the alternating direction implicit method. The fundamental, non-linear, unsteady-flow equations, upon which the model is formulated, include additional terms to account for Coriolis acceleration and meteorological influences. Preliminary model/prototype data comparisons show agreement to within 9% for tidal flow volumes and phase differences within the measured-data-recording interval. Use of the model to investigate the hydrodynamics and certain aspects of transport within this Potomac Estuary reach is demonstrated. Refs.

  9. Hydrodynamic blade guide

    DOEpatents

    Blaedel, Kenneth L.; Davis, Pete J.; Landram, Charles S.

    2000-01-01

    A saw having a self-pumped hydrodynamic blade guide or bearing for retaining the saw blade in a centered position in the saw kerf (width of cut made by the saw). The hydrodynamic blade guide or bearing utilizes pockets or grooves incorporated into the sides of the blade. The saw kerf in the workpiece provides the guide or bearing stator surface. Both sides of the blade entrain cutting fluid as the blade enters the kerf in the workpiece, and the trapped fluid provides pressure between the blade and the workpiece as an inverse function of the gap between the blade surface and the workpiece surface. If the blade wanders from the center of the kerf, then one gap will increase and one gap will decrease and the consequent pressure difference between the two sides of the blade will cause the blade to re-center itself in the kerf. Saws using the hydrodynamic blade guide or bearing have particular application in slicing slabs from boules of single crystal materials, for example, as well as for cutting other difficult to saw materials such as ceramics, glass, and brittle composite materials.

  10. Hydrodynamics of fossil fishes

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Thomas; Altringham, John; Peakall, Jeffrey; Wignall, Paul; Dorrell, Robert

    2014-01-01

    From their earliest origins, fishes have developed a suite of adaptations for locomotion in water, which determine performance and ultimately fitness. Even without data from behaviour, soft tissue and extant relatives, it is possible to infer a wealth of palaeobiological and palaeoecological information. As in extant species, aspects of gross morphology such as streamlining, fin position and tail type are optimized even in the earliest fishes, indicating similar life strategies have been present throughout their evolutionary history. As hydrodynamical studies become more sophisticated, increasingly complex fluid movement can be modelled, including vortex formation and boundary layer control. Drag-reducing riblets ornamenting the scales of fast-moving sharks have been subjected to particularly intense research, but this has not been extended to extinct forms. Riblets are a convergent adaptation seen in many Palaeozoic fishes, and probably served a similar hydrodynamic purpose. Conversely, structures which appear to increase skin friction may act as turbulisors, reducing overall drag while serving a protective function. Here, we examine the diverse adaptions that contribute to drag reduction in modern fishes and review the few attempts to elucidate the hydrodynamics of extinct forms. PMID:24943377

  11. Hydrodynamics of insect spermatozoa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pak, On Shun; Lauga, Eric

    2010-11-01

    Microorganism motility plays important roles in many biological processes including reproduction. Many microorganisms propel themselves by propagating traveling waves along their flagella. Depending on the species, propagation of planar waves (e.g. Ceratium) and helical waves (e.g. Trichomonas) were observed in eukaryotic flagellar motion, and hydrodynamic models for both were proposed in the past. However, the motility of insect spermatozoa remains largely unexplored. An interesting morphological feature of such cells, first observed in Tenebrio molitor and Bacillus rossius, is the double helical deformation pattern along the flagella, which is characterized by the presence of two superimposed helical flagellar waves (one with a large amplitude and low frequency, and the other with a small amplitude and high frequency). Here we present the first hydrodynamic investigation of the locomotion of insect spermatozoa. The swimming kinematics, trajectories and hydrodynamic efficiency of the swimmer are computed based on the prescribed double helical deformation pattern. We then compare our theoretical predictions with experimental measurements, and explore the dependence of the swimming performance on the geometric and dynamical parameters.

  12. Hydrodynamics of fossil fishes.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Thomas; Altringham, John; Peakall, Jeffrey; Wignall, Paul; Dorrell, Robert

    2014-08-01

    From their earliest origins, fishes have developed a suite of adaptations for locomotion in water, which determine performance and ultimately fitness. Even without data from behaviour, soft tissue and extant relatives, it is possible to infer a wealth of palaeobiological and palaeoecological information. As in extant species, aspects of gross morphology such as streamlining, fin position and tail type are optimized even in the earliest fishes, indicating similar life strategies have been present throughout their evolutionary history. As hydrodynamical studies become more sophisticated, increasingly complex fluid movement can be modelled, including vortex formation and boundary layer control. Drag-reducing riblets ornamenting the scales of fast-moving sharks have been subjected to particularly intense research, but this has not been extended to extinct forms. Riblets are a convergent adaptation seen in many Palaeozoic fishes, and probably served a similar hydrodynamic purpose. Conversely, structures which appear to increase skin friction may act as turbulisors, reducing overall drag while serving a protective function. Here, we examine the diverse adaptions that contribute to drag reduction in modern fishes and review the few attempts to elucidate the hydrodynamics of extinct forms. PMID:24943377

  13. Video Compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Optivision developed two PC-compatible boards and associated software under a Goddard Space Flight Center Small Business Innovation Research grant for NASA applications in areas such as telerobotics, telesciences and spaceborne experimentation. From this technology, the company used its own funds to develop commercial products, the OPTIVideo MPEG Encoder and Decoder, which are used for realtime video compression and decompression. They are used in commercial applications including interactive video databases and video transmission. The encoder converts video source material to a compressed digital form that can be stored or transmitted, and the decoder decompresses bit streams to provide high quality playback.

  14. Combining Hydrodynamic and Evolution Calculations of Rotating Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deupree, R. G.

    1996-12-01

    Rotation has two primary effects on stellar evolutionary models: the direct influence on the model structure produced by the rotational terms, and the indirect influence produced by rotational instabilities which redistribute angular momentum and composition inside the model. Using a two dimensional, fully implicit finite difference code, I can follow events on both evolutionary and hydrodynamic timescales, thus allowing the simulation of both effects. However, there are several issues concerning how to integrate the results from hydrodynamic runs into evolutionary runs that must be examined. The schemes I have devised for the integration of the hydrodynamic simulations into evolutionary calculations are outlined, and the positive and negative features summarized. The practical differences among the various schemes are small, and a successful marriage between hydrodynamic and evolution calculations is possible.

  15. Hydrodynamic and Salinity Intrusion Model in Selangor River Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haron, N. F.; Tahir, W.

    2016-07-01

    A multi-dimensional hydrodynamic and transport model has been used to develop the hydrodynamic and salinity intrusion model for Selangor River Estuary. Delft3D-FLOW was applied to the study area using a curvilinear, boundary fitted grid. External boundary forces included ocean water level, salinity, and stream flow. The hydrodynamic and salinity transport used for the simulation was calibrated and confirmed using data on November 2005 and from May to June 2014. A 13-day period for November 2005 data and a 6-day period of May to June 2014 data were chosen as the calibration and confirmation period because of the availability of data from the field-monitoring program conducted. From the calibration results, it shows that the model was well suited to predict the hydrodynamic and salinity intrusion characteristics of the study area.

  16. Relativistic viscous hydrodynamics for high energy heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vredevoogd, Joshua Aaron

    It has been over a decade since the first experimental data from gold nuclei collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider suggested hydrodynamic behavior. Early ideal hydrodynamical models ignored the large longitudinal gradients that imply viscosity playing an important role in the dynamics. In addition, at that time, much less was known about the equation of state predicted by lattice calculations of quantum chromodynamics and the effects of late (dilute) stage rescattering were handled within the hydrodynamic framework. This dissertation presents a three-dimensional viscous hydrodynamics code with a realistic equation of state coupled consistently to a hadron resonance gas calculation. This code is capable of making significant comparisons to experimental data as part of an effort to learn about the structure of experimental constraints on the microscopic interactions of dense, hot quark matter.

  17. HADY-I, a FORTRAN program for the compressible stability analysis of three-dimensional boundary layers. [on swept and tapered wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Hady, N. M.

    1981-01-01

    A computer program HADY-I for calculating the linear incompressible or compressible stability characteristics of the laminar boundary layer on swept and tapered wings is described. The eigenvalue problem and its adjoint arising from the linearized disturbance equations with the appropriate boundary conditions are solved numerically using a combination of Newton-Raphson interative scheme and a variable step size integrator based on the Runge-Kutta-Fehlburh fifth-order formulas. The integrator is used in conjunction with a modified Gram-Schmidt orthonormalization procedure. The computer program HADY-I calculates the growth rates of crossflow or streamwise Tollmien-Schlichting instabilities. It also calculates the group velocities of these disturbances. It is restricted to parallel stability calculations, where the boundary layer (meanflow) is assumed to be parallel. The meanflow solution is an input to the program.

  18. Two-boundary grid generation for the solution of the three dimensional compressible Navier-Stokes equations. Ph.D. Thesis - Old Dominion Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    A grid generation technique called the two boundary technique is developed and applied for the solution of the three dimensional Navier-Stokes equations. The Navier-Stokes equations are transformed from a cartesian coordinate system to a computational coordinate system, and the grid generation technique provides the Jacobian matrix describing the transformation. The two boundary technique is based on algebraically defining two distinct boundaries of a flow domain and the distribution of the grid is achieved by applying functions to the uniform computational grid which redistribute the computational independent variables and consequently concentrate or disperse the grid points in the physical domain. The Navier-Stokes equations are solved using a MacCormack time-split technique. Grids and supersonic laminar flow solutions are obtained for a family of three dimensional corners and two spike-nosed bodies.

  19. Density measurement of low- Z shocked material from monochromatic x-ray two-dimensional images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benuzzi-Mounaix, A.; Loupias, B.; Koenig, M.; Ravasio, A.; Ozaki, N.; Rabec Le Gloahec, M.; Vinci, T.; Aglitskiy, Y.; Faenov, A.; Pikuz, T.; Boehly, T.

    2008-04-01

    An experiment on LULI 2000 laser devoted to density determination of shocked plastic from a two-dimensional monochromatic x-ray radiography is presented. A spherical quartz crystal was set to select the He-α line of vanadium at 2.382Å and perform the image of the main target. Rear side diagnostics were implemented to validate the new diagnostic. The density experimental results given by radiography are in good agreement with rear side diagnostics data and hydrodynamical simulations. The pressure regime into the plastic is 2 3Mbar , corresponding to a compression between 2.7 2.9.

  20. Density measurement of low- Z shocked material from monochromatic x-ray two-dimensional images.

    PubMed

    Benuzzi-Mounaix, A; Loupias, B; Koenig, M; Ravasio, A; Ozaki, N; Rabec le Gloahec, M; Vinci, T; Aglitskiy, Y; Faenov, A; Pikuz, T; Boehly, T

    2008-04-01

    An experiment on LULI 2000 laser devoted to density determination of shocked plastic from a two-dimensional monochromatic x-ray radiography is presented. A spherical quartz crystal was set to select the He-alpha line of vanadium at 2.382 A and perform the image of the main target. Rear side diagnostics were implemented to validate the new diagnostic. The density experimental results given by radiography are in good agreement with rear side diagnostics data and hydrodynamical simulations. The pressure regime into the plastic is 2-3 Mbar, corresponding to a compression between 2.7-2.9. PMID:18517682

  1. Low torque hydrodynamic lip geometry for rotary seals

    DOEpatents

    Dietle, Lannie L.; Schroeder, John E.

    2015-07-21

    A hydrodynamically lubricating geometry for the generally circular dynamic sealing lip of rotary seals that are employed to partition a lubricant from an environment. The dynamic sealing lip is provided for establishing compressed sealing engagement with a relatively rotatable surface, and for wedging a film of lubricating fluid into the interface between the dynamic sealing lip and the relatively rotatable surface in response to relative rotation that may occur in the clockwise or the counter-clockwise direction. A wave form incorporating an elongated dimple provides the gradual convergence, efficient impingement angle, and gradual interfacial contact pressure rise that are conducive to efficient hydrodynamic wedging. Skewed elevated contact pressure zones produced by compression edge effects provide for controlled lubricant movement within the dynamic sealing interface between the seal and the relatively rotatable surface, producing enhanced lubrication and low running torque.

  2. Compressive Sensing for Quantum Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howland, Gregory A.

    This thesis describes the application of compressive sensing to several challenging problems in quantum imaging with practical and fundamental implications. Compressive sensing is a measurement technique that compresses a signal during measurement such that it can be dramatically undersampled. Compressive sensing has been shown to be an extremely efficient measurement technique for imaging, particularly when detector arrays are not available. The thesis first reviews compressive sensing through the lens of quantum imaging and quantum measurement. Four important applications and their corresponding experiments are then described in detail. The first application is a compressive sensing, photon-counting lidar system. A novel depth mapping technique that uses standard, linear compressive sensing is described. Depth maps up to 256 x 256 pixel transverse resolution are recovered with depth resolution less than 2.54 cm. The first three-dimensional, photon counting video is recorded at 32 x 32 pixel resolution and 14 frames-per-second. The second application is the use of compressive sensing for complementary imaging---simultaneously imaging the transverse-position and transverse-momentum distributions of optical photons. This is accomplished by taking random, partial projections of position followed by imaging the momentum distribution on a cooled CCD camera. The projections are shown to not significantly perturb the photons' momenta while allowing high resolution position images to be reconstructed using compressive sensing. A variety of objects and their diffraction patterns are imaged including the double slit, triple slit, alphanumeric characters, and the University of Rochester logo. The third application is the use of compressive sensing to characterize spatial entanglement of photon pairs produced by spontaneous parametric downconversion. The technique gives a theoretical speedup N2/log N for N-dimensional entanglement over the standard raster scanning technique

  3. Nonlinear Generalized Hydrodynamic Wave Equations in Strongly Coupled Dusty Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Veeresha, B. M.; Sen, A.; Kaw, P. K.

    2008-09-07

    A set of nonlinear equations for the study of low frequency waves in a strongly coupled dusty plasma medium is derived using the phenomenological generalized hydrodynamic (GH) model and is used to study the modulational stability of dust acoustic waves to parallel perturbations. Dust compressibility contributions arising from strong Coulomb coupling effects are found to introduce significant modifications in the threshold and range of the instability domain.

  4. Hydrodynamic and Spectral Simulations of HMXB Winds

    SciTech Connect

    Mauche, C W; Liedahl, D A; Akiyama, S; Plewa, T

    2007-03-30

    We describe preliminary results of a global model of the radiatively-driven photoionized wind and accretion flow of the high-mass X-ray binary Vela X-1. The full model combines FLASH hydrodynamic calculations, XSTAR photoionization calculations, HULLAC atomic data, and Monte Carlo radiation transport. We present maps of the density, temperature, velocity, and ionization parameter from a FLASH two-dimensional time-dependent simulation of Vela X-1, as well as maps of the emissivity distributions of the X-ray emission lines.

  5. Fast lattice Boltzmann solver for relativistic hydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, M; Boghosian, B M; Herrmann, H J; Succi, S

    2010-07-01

    A lattice Boltzmann formulation for relativistic fluids is presented and numerically validated through quantitative comparison with recent hydrodynamic simulations of relativistic fluids. In order to illustrate its capability to handle complex geometries, the scheme is also applied to the case of a three-dimensional relativistic shock wave, generated by a supernova explosion, impacting on a massive interstellar cloud. This formulation opens up the possibility of exporting the proven advantages of lattice Boltzmann methods, namely, computational efficiency and easy handling of complex geometries, to the context of (mildly) relativistic fluid dynamics at large, from quark-gluon plasmas up to supernovae with relativistic outflows.

  6. Hydrodynamics of anisotropic quark and gluon fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florkowski, Wojciech; Maj, Radoslaw; Ryblewski, Radoslaw; Strickland, Michael

    2013-03-01

    The recently developed framework of anisotropic hydrodynamics is generalized to describe the dynamics of coupled quark and gluon fluids. The quark and gluon components of the fluids are characterized by different dynamical anisotropy parameters. The dynamical equations describing such mixtures are derived from kinetic theory, with the collisional kernel treated in the relaxation-time approximation, allowing for different relaxation times for quarks and gluons. Baryon number conservation is enforced in the quark and antiquark components of the fluid, but overall parton number nonconservation is allowed in the system. The resulting equations are solved numerically in the (0+1)-dimensional boost-invariant case at zero and finite baryon density.

  7. Impact modeling with Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Stellingwerf, R.F.; Wingate, C.A.

    1993-07-01

    Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) can be used to model hypervelocity impact phenomena via the addition of a strength of materials treatment. SPH is the only technique that can model such problems efficiently due to the combination of 3-dimensional geometry, large translations of material, large deformations, and large void fractions for most problems of interest. This makes SPH an ideal candidate for modeling of asteroid impact, spacecraft shield modeling, and planetary accretion. In this paper we describe the derivation of the strength equations in SPH, show several basic code tests, and present several impact test cases with experimental comparisons.

  8. Fast lattice Boltzmann solver for relativistic hydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, M; Boghosian, B M; Herrmann, H J; Succi, S

    2010-07-01

    A lattice Boltzmann formulation for relativistic fluids is presented and numerically validated through quantitative comparison with recent hydrodynamic simulations of relativistic fluids. In order to illustrate its capability to handle complex geometries, the scheme is also applied to the case of a three-dimensional relativistic shock wave, generated by a supernova explosion, impacting on a massive interstellar cloud. This formulation opens up the possibility of exporting the proven advantages of lattice Boltzmann methods, namely, computational efficiency and easy handling of complex geometries, to the context of (mildly) relativistic fluid dynamics at large, from quark-gluon plasmas up to supernovae with relativistic outflows. PMID:20867451

  9. An experimental parametric study of geometric, Reynolds number, and ratio of specific heats effects in three-dimensional sidewall compression scramjet inlets at Mach 6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, Scott D.; Murphy, Kelly J.

    1993-01-01

    The effects of the decrease in the ratio of specific heats have been investigated in generic 3D sidewall compression scramjet inlets with leading-edge sweep angles of 30 and 70 degrees. The effects of a decrease in ratio of specific heats were seen by comparing data from two facilities in two test gases: in the Langley Mach 6 CF4 Tunnel in tetrafluoromethane and in the Langley 15-Inch Mach 6 Air Tunnel in perfect gas air. In addition to the simulated real gas effects, the parametric effects of cowl position, contraction ratio, leading-edge sweep, and Reynolds number were investigated in the 15-Inch Mach 6 Air Tunnel. The models were instrumented with a total of 45 static pressure orifices distributed on the sidewalls and baseplate. Surface streamline patterns were examined via oil flow, and schlieren videos were made of the external flow field. The results of these tests have significant implications to ground based testing of inlets in facilities which do not operate at flight enthalpies.

  10. Molecular Hydrodynamics from Memory Kernels.

    PubMed

    Lesnicki, Dominika; Vuilleumier, Rodolphe; Carof, Antoine; Rotenberg, Benjamin

    2016-04-01

    The memory kernel for a tagged particle in a fluid, computed from molecular dynamics simulations, decays algebraically as t^{-3/2}. We show how the hydrodynamic Basset-Boussinesq force naturally emerges from this long-time tail and generalize the concept of hydrodynamic added mass. This mass term is negative in the present case of a molecular solute, which is at odds with incompressible hydrodynamics predictions. Lastly, we discuss the various contributions to the friction, the associated time scales, and the crossover between the molecular and hydrodynamic regimes upon increasing the solute radius. PMID:27104730

  11. Hydrodynamics of Inclusions in Freely Suspended Liquid Crystal Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Zhiyuan

    Hydrodynamic interaction of pairs of circular inclusions in two-dimensional (2D), fluid smectic membranes suspended in air has been studied systematically. By analyzing their Brownian motion, it is found that the radial mutual mobilities of identical inclusions are independent of their size but that the angular coupling becomes strongly size-dependent when their radius exceeds a characteristic hydrodynamic length. These observations are described well for arbitrary inclusion separations by a model that generalizes the Levine/MacKintosh theory of point-force response functions and uses a boundary-element approach to calculate the mobility matrix for inclusions of finite extent. Beyond that, 2D flow fields generated by a rigid, oscillating post inserted in the film have been measured by analyzing the motion of tracer particles and provide a detailed understanding of the hydrodynamic behavior in the film/gas system. The Brownian diffusion of micron-scale inclusions in freely suspended smectic A liquid crystal films a few nanometers thick and several millimeters in diameter depends strongly on the air surrounding the film. Near atmospheric pressure, the three-dimensionally coupled film/gas system is well described by Hughes/Pailthorpe/White hydrodynamic theory but at lower pressure, the diffusion coefficient increases substantially, tending in high vacuum toward the two-dimensional limit where it is determined by film size. In the absence of air, the films are found to be a nearly ideal physical realization of a two-dimensional, incompressible Newtonian fluid.

  12. Compressed Genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Erlich, Yaniv; Gordon, Assaf; Brand, Michael; Hannon, Gregory J.; Mitra, Partha P.

    2011-01-01

    Over the past three decades we have steadily increased our knowledge on the genetic basis of many severe disorders. Nevertheless, there are still great challenges in applying this knowledge routinely in the clinic, mainly due to the relatively tedious and expensive process of genotyping. Since the genetic variations that underlie the disorders are relatively rare in the population, they can be thought of as a sparse signal. Using methods and ideas from compressed sensing and group testing, we have developed a cost-effective genotyping protocol to detect carriers for severe genetic disorders. In particular, we have adapted our scheme to a recently developed class of high throughput DNA sequencing technologies. The mathematical framework presented here has some important distinctions from the ’traditional’ compressed sensing and group testing frameworks in order to address biological and technical constraints of our setting. PMID:21451737

  13. Load responsive hydrodynamic bearing

    DOEpatents

    Kalsi, Manmohan S.; Somogyi, Dezso; Dietle, Lannie L.

    2002-01-01

    A load responsive hydrodynamic bearing is provided in the form of a thrust bearing or journal bearing for supporting, guiding and lubricating a relatively rotatable member to minimize wear thereof responsive to relative rotation under severe load. In the space between spaced relatively rotatable members and in the presence of a liquid or grease lubricant, one or more continuous ring shaped integral generally circular bearing bodies each define at least one dynamic surface and a plurality of support regions. Each of the support regions defines a static surface which is oriented in generally opposed relation with the dynamic surface for contact with one of the relatively rotatable members. A plurality of flexing regions are defined by the generally circular body of the bearing and are integral with and located between adjacent support regions. Each of the flexing regions has a first beam-like element being connected by an integral flexible hinge with one of the support regions and a second beam-like element having an integral flexible hinge connection with an adjacent support region. A least one local weakening geometry of the flexing region is located intermediate the first and second beam-like elements. In response to application of load from one of the relatively rotatable elements to the bearing, the beam-like elements and the local weakening geometry become flexed, causing the dynamic surface to deform and establish a hydrodynamic geometry for wedging lubricant into the dynamic interface.

  14. Hydrodynamics of pronuclear migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazockdast, Ehssan; Needleman, Daniel; Shelley, Michael

    2014-11-01

    Microtubule (MT) filaments play a key role in many processes involved in cell devision including spindle formation, chromosome segregation, and pronuclear positioning. We present a direct numerical technique to simulate MT dynamics in such processes. Our method includes hydrodynamically mediated interactions between MTs and other cytoskeletal objects, using singularity methods for Stokes flow. Long-ranged many-body hydrodynamic interactions are computed using a highly efficient and scalable fast multipole method, enabling the simulation of thousands of MTs. Our simulation method also takes into account the flexibility of MTs using Euler-Bernoulli beam theory as well as their dynamic instability. Using this technique, we simulate pronuclear migration in single-celled Caenorhabditis elegans embryos. Two different positioning mechanisms, based on the interactions of MTs with the motor proteins and the cell cortex, are explored: cytoplasmic pulling and cortical pushing. We find that although the pronuclear complex migrates towards the center of the cell in both models, the generated cytoplasmic flows are fundamentally different. This suggest that cytoplasmic flow visualization during pronuclear migration can be utilized to differentiate between the two mechanisms.

  15. Hydrodynamics of Bacterial Cooperation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petroff, A.; Libchaber, A.

    2012-12-01

    Over the course of the last several decades, the study of microbial communities has identified countless examples of cooperation between microorganisms. Generally—as in the case of quorum sensing—cooperation is coordinated by a chemical signal that diffuses through the community. Less well understood is a second class of cooperation that is mediated through physical interactions between individuals. To better understand how the bacteria use hydrodynamics to manipulate their environment and coordinate their actions, we study the sulfur-oxidizing bacterium Thiovulum majus. These bacteria live in the diffusive boundary layer just above the muddy bottoms of ponds. As buried organic material decays, sulfide diffuses out of the mud. Oxygen from the pond diffuses into the boundary layer from above. These bacteria form communities—called veils— which are able to transport nutrients through the boundary layer faster than diffusion, thereby increasing their metabolic rate. In these communities, bacteria attach to surfaces and swim in place. As millions of bacteria beat their flagella, the community induces a macroscopic fluid flow, which mix the boundary layer. Here we present experimental observations and mathematical models that elucidate the hydrodynamics linking the behavior of an individual bacterium to the collective dynamics of the community. We begin by characterizing the flow of water around an individual bacterium swimming in place. We then discuss the flow of water and nutrients around a small number of individuals. Finally, we present observations and models detailing the macroscopic dynamics of a Thiovulum veil.

  16. Modelling compressible mantle convection with large viscosity contrasts in a three-dimensional spherical shell using the yin-yang grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tackley, Paul J.

    2008-12-01

    Here it is documented how an existing code for modelling mantle convection in a cartesian domain, Stag3D, has been converted to model a 3D spherical shell by using the recently introduced yin-yang grid. StagYY is thus the latest evolution of a code that has been in continuous use and development for about 15 years so incorporates much physics and several features including compressibility, phase transitions, compositional variations, non-linear rheology, parallelisation, tracers to track composition, partial melting and melt migration, and the ability to also model spherical patches, cartesian boxes, and various 2D geometries by changing one input switch. StagYY uses a multigrid solver to obtain a velocity-pressure solution at each timestep on a staggered grid, a finite-volume scheme for advection of temperature and tracers to track composition. Convergence of multigrid solvers in the presence of realistically large viscosity variations has always been a problem; here a new pressure interpolation scheme is presented that can dramatically improve the robustness of the iterations to large viscosity variations, with up to 19 orders of magnitude variation in presented tests. Benchmark tests show that StagYY produces results that are consistent with those produced by other codes. Performance tests show reasonable scaling on a parallel Beowulf cluster up to 64 CPUs, with up to 1.2 billion unknowns solved for in a few minutes. StagYY is designed to be a stand-alone application with no libraries required and if MPI is installed it can be run in parallel. Technical issues and goals for the future are discussed.

  17. Simulating hydrodynamics on tidal mudflats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, S.; Lippmann, T. C.

    2014-12-01

    Biogeochemical cycling in estuaries is governed by fluxes from both riverine sources and through estuarine sediment deposits. Although estimates from river sources are relatively common and easily sampled, estimates of nutrient fluxes through the fluid-sediment interface are less common and limited to deeper portions of the bays away from intertidal areas. Lack of quantifiable shear stress estimates over intertidal areas limits our overall understanding of nutrient budgets in estuaries. Unfortunately, observation of intertidal hydrodynamics and nutrient fluxes over tidal flats and near the water's edge is difficult owing to the temporally varying and spatially extensive region where the tides inundate, and thus numerical modeling is often employed. In this work, the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS), a three dimensional numerical hydrodynamic model was used to investigate the shear stresses over intertidal mudflats in the Great Bay, a tidally-dominated New England estuary cut by several tidal channels and with over 50% of the estuary exposed at low tide. The ROMS wetting and drying scheme was used to simulate the rising and falling tide on the flats, a successful approach adapted in other regions of the world but not always inclusive of tidal channels. Bathymetric data obtained in 2009 and 2013 was used to define the model grid. Predicted tides are forced at Adam's Pt., a natural constriction in the estuary about 20 km upstream of the mouth and at the entrance to the Great Bay. Of particular interest are fluxes of material on-to and off-of the tidal flats which contribute to water quality conditions in the estuary, and are largely governed by shear stresses that drive nutrient fluxes at the fluid-sediment interface. Basin wide estimates of near-bottom shear stresses can be used to estimate first order nutrient fluxes over a tidal cycle and hence describe general biogeochemical dynamics of the estuary. Future work will include enhanced forcing of currents by

  18. High-order compact MacCormack scheme for two-dimensional compressible and non-hydrostatic equations of the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    JavanNezhad, R.; Meshkatee, A. H.; Ghader, S.; Ahmadi-Givi, F.

    2016-09-01

    This study is devoted to application of the fourth-order compact MacCormack scheme to spatial differencing of the conservative form of two-dimensional and non-hydrostatic equation of a dry atmosphere. To advance the solution in time a four-stage Runge-Kutta method is used. To perform the simulations, two test cases including evolution of a warm bubble and a cold bubble in a neutral atmosphere with open and rigid boundaries are employed. In addition, the second-order MacCormack and the standard fourth-order compact MacCormack schemes are used to perform the simulations. Qualitative and quantitative assessment of the numerical results for different test cases exhibit the superiority of the fourth-order compact MacCormack scheme on the second-order method.

  19. Influence of the equation of state on the compression and heating of hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahir, N. A.; Juranek, H.; Shutov, A.; Redmer, R.; Piriz, A. R.; Temporal, M.; Varentsov, D.; Udrea, S.; Hoffmann, D. H.; Deutsch, C.; Lomonosov, I.; Fortov, V. E.

    2003-05-01

    This paper presents two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of implosion of a multilayered cylindrical target that is driven by an intense heavy ion beam which has an annular focal spot. The target consists of a hollow lead cylinder which is filled with hydrogen at one tenth of the solid density at room temperature. The beam is assumed to be made of 2.7-GeV/u uranium ions and six different cases for the beam intensity (total number of particles in the beam, N) are considered. In each of these six cases the particles are delivered in single bunches, 20 ns long. The simulations have been carried out using a two-dimensional hydrodynamic computer code BIG-2. A multiple shock reflection scheme is employed in these calculations that leads to very high densities of the compressed hydrogen while the temperature remains relatively low. In this study we have used two different equation-of-state models for hydrogen, namely, the SESAME data and a model that includes molecular dissociation that is based on a fluid variational theory in the neutral fluid region which is replaced by Padé approximation in the fully ionized plasma region. Our calculations show that the latter model predicts higher densities, higher pressures but lower temperatures compared to the SESAME model. The differences in the results are more pronounced for lower driving energies (lower beam intensities).

  20. Analysis of the phase transition in the two-dimensional Ising ferromagnet using a Lempel-Ziv string-parsing scheme and black-box data-compression utilities.

    PubMed

    Melchert, O; Hartmann, A K

    2015-02-01

    In this work we consider information-theoretic observables to analyze short symbolic sequences, comprising time series that represent the orientation of a single spin in a two-dimensional (2D) Ising ferromagnet on a square lattice of size L(2)=128(2) for different system temperatures T. The latter were chosen from an interval enclosing the critical point T(c) of the model. At small temperatures the sequences are thus very regular; at high temperatures they are maximally random. In the vicinity of the critical point, nontrivial, long-range correlations appear. Here we implement estimators for the entropy rate, excess entropy (i.e., "complexity"), and multi-information. First, we implement a Lempel-Ziv string-parsing scheme, providing seemingly elaborate entropy rate and multi-information estimates and an approximate estimator for the excess entropy. Furthermore, we apply easy-to-use black-box data-compression utilities, providing approximate estimators only. For comparison and to yield results for benchmarking purposes, we implement the information-theoretic observables also based on the well-established M-block Shannon entropy, which is more tedious to apply compared to the first two "algorithmic" entropy estimation procedures. To test how well one can exploit the potential of such data-compression techniques, we aim at detecting the critical point of the 2D Ising ferromagnet. Among the above observables, the multi-information, which is known to exhibit an isolated peak at the critical point, is very easy to replicate by means of both efficient algorithmic entropy estimation procedures. Finally, we assess how good the various algorithmic entropy estimates compare to the more conventional block entropy estimates and illustrate a simple modification that yields enhanced results.

  1. MAESTRO: An Adaptive Low Mach Number Hydrodynamics Algorithm for Stellar Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nonaka, Andrew; Almgren, A. S.; Bell, J. B.; Malone, C. M.; Zingale, M.

    2010-01-01

    Many astrophysical phenomena are highly subsonic, requiring specialized numerical methods suitable for long-time integration. We present MAESTRO, a low Mach number stellar hydrodynamics code that can be used to simulate long-time, low-speed flows that would be prohibitively expensive to model using traditional compressible codes. MAESTRO is based on an equation set that we have derived using low Mach number asymptotics; this equation set does not explicitly track acoustic waves and thus allows a significant increase in the time step. MAESTRO is suitable for two- and three-dimensional local atmospheric flows as well as three-dimensional full-star flows, and uses adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) to locally refine grids in regions of interest. Our initial scientific applications include the convective phase of Type Ia supernovae and Type I X-ray Bursts on neutron stars. The work at LBNL was supported by the SciDAC Program of the DOE Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research under the DOE under contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. The work at Stony Brook was supported by the DOE/Office of Nuclear Physics, grant No. DE-FG02-06ER41448. We made use of the Jaguar via a DOE INCITE allocation at the OLCF at ORNL and Franklin at NERSC at LBNL.

  2. Existence of global weak solutions to compressible isentropic finitely extensible nonlinear bead-spring chain models for dilute polymers: The two-dimensional case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, John W.; Süli, Endre

    2016-07-01

    We prove the existence of global-in-time weak solutions to a general class of models that arise from the kinetic theory of dilute solutions of nonhomogeneous polymeric liquids, where the polymer molecules are idealized as bead-spring chains with finitely extensible nonlinear elastic (FENE) type spring potentials. The class of models under consideration involves the unsteady, compressible, isentropic, isothermal Navier-Stokes system in a bounded domain Ω in Rd, d = 2, for the density ρ, the velocity u ˜ and the pressure p of the fluid, with an equation of state of the form p (ρ) =cpργ, where cp is a positive constant and γ > 1. The right-hand side of the Navier-Stokes momentum equation includes an elastic extra-stress tensor, which is the classical Kramers expression. The elastic extra-stress tensor stems from the random movement of the polymer chains and is defined through the associated probability density function that satisfies a Fokker-Planck-type parabolic equation, a crucial feature of which is the presence of a centre-of-mass diffusion term. This extends the result in our paper J.W. Barrett and E. Süli (2016) [9], which established the existence of global-in-time weak solutions to the system for d ∈ { 2 , 3 } and γ >3/2, but the elastic extra-stress tensor required there the addition of a quadratic interaction term to the classical Kramers expression to complete the compactness argument on which the proof was based. We show here that in the case of d = 2 and γ > 1 the existence of global-in-time weak solutions can be proved in the absence of the quadratic interaction term. Our results require no structural assumptions on the drag term in the Fokker-Planck equation; in particular, the drag term need not be corotational. With a nonnegative initial density ρ0 ∈L∞ (Ω) for the continuity equation; a square-integrable initial velocity datum u˜0 for the Navier-Stokes momentum equation; and a nonnegative initial probability density function ψ0

  3. Hydrodynamics of Peristaltic Propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athanassiadis, Athanasios; Hart, Douglas

    2014-11-01

    A curious class of animals called salps live in marine environments and self-propel by ejecting vortex rings much like jellyfish and squid. However, unlike other jetting creatures that siphon and eject water from one side of their body, salps produce vortex rings by pumping water through siphons on opposite ends of their hollow cylindrical bodies. In the simplest cases, it seems like some species of salp can successfully move by contracting just two siphons connected by an elastic body. When thought of as a chain of timed contractions, salp propulsion is reminiscent of peristaltic pumping applied to marine locomotion. Inspired by salps, we investigate the hydrodynamics of peristaltic propulsion, focusing on the scaling relationships that determine flow rate, thrust production, and energy usage in a model system. We discuss possible actuation methods for a model peristaltic vehicle, considering both the material and geometrical requirements for such a system.

  4. Synchronization and hydrodynamic interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powers, Thomas; Qian, Bian; Breuer, Kenneth

    2008-03-01

    Cilia and flagella commonly beat in a coordinated manner. Examples include the flagella that Volvox colonies use to move, the cilia that sweep foreign particles up out of the human airway, and the nodal cilia that set up the flow that determines the left-right axis in developing vertebrate embryos. In this talk we present an experimental study of how hydrodynamic interactions can lead to coordination in a simple idealized system: two nearby paddles driven with fixed torques in a highly viscous fluid. The paddles attain a synchronized state in which they rotate together with a phase difference of 90 degrees. We discuss how synchronization depends on system parameters and present numerical calculations using the method of regularized stokeslets.

  5. Hydrodynamics, resurgence, and transasymptotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Başar, Gökçe; Dunne, Gerald V.

    2015-12-01

    The second order hydrodynamical description of a homogeneous conformal plasma that undergoes a boost-invariant expansion is given by a single nonlinear ordinary differential equation, whose resurgent asymptotic properties we study, developing further the recent work of Heller and Spalinski [Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 072501 (2015)]. Resurgence clearly identifies the nonhydrodynamic modes that are exponentially suppressed at late times, analogous to the quasinormal modes in gravitational language, organizing these modes in terms of a trans-series expansion. These modes are analogs of instantons in semiclassical expansions, where the damping rate plays the role of the instanton action. We show that this system displays the generic features of resurgence, with explicit quantitative relations between the fluctuations about different orders of these nonhydrodynamic modes. The imaginary part of the trans-series parameter is identified with the Stokes constant, and the real part with the freedom associated with initial conditions.

  6. Reaching the hydrodynamic regime in a Bose-Einstein condensate by suppression of avalanches

    SciTech Connect

    Stam, K. M. R. van der; Meppelink, R.; Vogels, J. M.; Straten, P. van der

    2007-03-15

    We report the realization of a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) in the hydrodynamic regime. The hydrodynamic regime is reached by evaporative cooling at a relatively low density suppressing the effect of avalanches. With the suppression of avalanches a BEC containing more than 10{sup 8} atoms is produced. The collisional opacity can be tuned from the collisionless regime to a collisional opacity of more than 2 by compressing the trap after condensation. In the collisional opaque regime a significant heating of the cloud at time scales shorter than half of the radial trap period is measured, which is a direct proof that the BEC is hydrodynamic.

  7. Code Differentiation for Hydrodynamic Model Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Henninger, R.J.; Maudlin, P.J.

    1999-06-27

    Use of a hydrodynamics code for experimental data fitting purposes (an optimization problem) requires information about how a computed result changes when the model parameters change. These so-called sensitivities provide the gradient that determines the search direction for modifying the parameters to find an optimal result. Here, the authors apply code-based automatic differentiation (AD) techniques applied in the forward and adjoint modes to two problems with 12 parameters to obtain these gradients and compare the computational efficiency and accuracy of the various methods. They fit the pressure trace from a one-dimensional flyer-plate experiment and examine the accuracy for a two-dimensional jet-formation problem. For the flyer-plate experiment, the adjoint mode requires similar or less computer time than the forward methods. Additional parameters will not change the adjoint mode run time appreciably, which is a distinct advantage for this method. Obtaining ''accurate'' sensitivities for the j et problem parameters remains problematic.

  8. Hydrodynamics of sediment threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Sk Zeeshan; Dey, Subhasish

    2016-07-01

    A novel hydrodynamic model for the threshold of cohesionless sediment particle motion under a steady unidirectional streamflow is presented. The hydrodynamic forces (drag and lift) acting on a solitary sediment particle resting over a closely packed bed formed by the identical sediment particles are the primary motivating forces. The drag force comprises of the form drag and form induced drag. The lift force includes the Saffman lift, Magnus lift, centrifugal lift, and turbulent lift. The points of action of the force system are appropriately obtained, for the first time, from the basics of micro-mechanics. The sediment threshold is envisioned as the rolling mode, which is the plausible mode to initiate a particle motion on the bed. The moment balance of the force system on the solitary particle about the pivoting point of rolling yields the governing equation. The conditions of sediment threshold under the hydraulically smooth, transitional, and rough flow regimes are examined. The effects of velocity fluctuations are addressed by applying the statistical theory of turbulence. This study shows that for a hindrance coefficient of 0.3, the threshold curve (threshold Shields parameter versus shear Reynolds number) has an excellent agreement with the experimental data of uniform sediments. However, most of the experimental data are bounded by the upper and lower limiting threshold curves, corresponding to the hindrance coefficients of 0.2 and 0.4, respectively. The threshold curve of this study is compared with those of previous researchers. The present model also agrees satisfactorily with the experimental data of nonuniform sediments.

  9. MONTE CARLO RADIATION-HYDRODYNAMICS WITH IMPLICIT METHODS

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, Nathaniel; Kasen, Daniel

    2015-03-15

    We explore the application of Monte Carlo transport methods to solving coupled radiation-hydrodynamics (RHD) problems. We use a time-dependent, frequency-dependent, three-dimensional radiation transport code that is special relativistic and includes some detailed microphysical interactions such as resonant line scattering. We couple the transport code to two different one-dimensional (non-relativistic) hydrodynamics solvers: a spherical Lagrangian scheme and a Eulerian Godunov solver. The gas–radiation energy coupling is treated implicitly, allowing us to take hydrodynamical time-steps that are much longer than the radiative cooling time. We validate the code and assess its performance using a suite of radiation hydrodynamical test problems, including ones in the radiation energy dominated regime. We also develop techniques that reduce the noise of the Monte Carlo estimated radiation force by using the spatial divergence of the radiation pressure tensor. The results suggest that Monte Carlo techniques hold promise for simulating the multi-dimensional RHD of astrophysical systems.

  10. Hydrodynamic evolution and jet energy loss in Cu + Cu collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Schenke, Bjoern; Jeon, Sangyong; Gale, Charles

    2011-04-15

    We present results from a hybrid description of Cu + Cu collisions using (3 + 1)-dimensional hydrodynamics (music) for the bulk evolution and a Monte Carlo simulation (martini) for the evolution of high-momentum partons in the hydrodynamical background. We explore the limits of this description by going to small system sizes and determine the dependence on different fractions of wounded nucleon and binary collisions scaling of the initial energy density. We find that Cu + Cu collisions are well described by the hybrid description at least up to 20% central collisions.

  11. Purely hydrodynamic origin for swarming of swimming particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyama, Norihiro; Molina, John Jairo; Yamamoto, Ryoichi

    2016-04-01

    Three-dimensional simulations with fully resolved hydrodynamics are performed to study the collective motion of model swimmers in bulk and confinement. Calculating the dynamic structure factor, we clarified that the swarming in bulk systems can be understood as a pseudoacoustic mode. Under confinement between flat parallel walls, this pseudoacoustic mode leads to a traveling wavelike motion. This swarming behavior is due purely to the hydrodynamic interactions between the swimmers and depends strongly on the type and strength of swimming (i.e., pusher or puller).

  12. Laser-Accelerated Ions from a Shock-Compressed Gas Foil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helle, M. H.; Gordon, D. F.; Kaganovich, D.; Chen, Y.; Palastro, J. P.; Ting, A.

    2016-10-01

    We present results of energetic laser-ion acceleration from a tailored, near solid density gas target. Colliding hydrodynamic shocks compress a pure hydrogen gas jet into a 70 μ m thick target prior to the arrival of the ultraintense laser pulse. A density scan reveals the transition from a regime characterized by a wide angle, low-energy beam (target normal sheath acceleration) to one of a more focused beam with a high-energy halo (magnetic vortex acceleration). In the latter case, three-dimensional simulations show the formation of a Z pinch driven by the axial current resulting from laser wakefield accelerated electrons. Ions at the rear of the target are then accelerated by a combination of space charge fields from accelerated electrons and Coulombic repulsion as the pinch dissipates.

  13. Warm dense mater: another application for pulsed power hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Reinovsky, Robert Emil

    2009-01-01

    Pulsed Power Hydrodynamics (PPH) is an application of low-impedance pulsed power, and high magnetic field technology to the study of advanced hydrodynamic problems, instabilities, turbulence, and material properties. PPH can potentially be applied to the study of the properties of warm dense matter (WDM) as well. Exploration of the properties of warm dense matter such as equation of state, viscosity, conductivity is an emerging area of study focused on the behavior of matter at density near solid density (from 10% of solid density to slightly above solid density) and modest temperatures ({approx}1-10 eV). Conditions characteristic of WDM are difficult to obtain, and even more difficult to diagnose. One approach to producing WDM uses laser or particle beam heating of very small quantities of matter on timescales short compared to the subsequent hydrodynamic expansion timescales (isochoric heating) and a vigorous community of researchers are applying these techniques. Pulsed power hydrodynamic techniques, such as large convergence liner compression of a large volume, modest density, low temperature plasma to densities approaching solid density or through multiple shock compression and heating of normal density material between a massive, high density, energetic liner and a high density central 'anvil' are possible ways to reach relevant conditions. Another avenue to WDM conditions is through the explosion and subsequent expansion of a conductor (wire) against a high pressure (density) gas background (isobaric expansion) techniques. However, both techniques demand substantial energy, proper power conditioning and delivery, and an understanding of the hydrodynamic and instability processes that limit each technique. In this paper we will examine the challenges to pulsed power technology and to pulsed power systems presented by the opportunity to explore this interesting region of parameter space.

  14. Recent development of hydrodynamic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirano, Tetsufumi

    2014-09-01

    In this talk, I give an overview of recent development in hydrodynamic modeling of high-energy nuclear collisions. First, I briefly discuss about current situation of hydrodynamic modeling by showing results from the integrated dynamical approach in which Monte-Carlo calculation of initial conditions, quark-gluon fluid dynamics and hadronic cascading are combined. In particular, I focus on rescattering effects of strange hadrons on final observables. Next I highlight three topics in recent development in hydrodynamic modeling. These include (1) medium response to jet propagation in di-jet asymmetric events, (2) causal hydrodynamic fluctuation and its application to Bjorken expansion and (3) chiral magnetic wave from anomalous hydrodynamic simulations. (1) Recent CMS data suggest the existence of QGP response to propagation of jets. To investigate this phenomenon, we solve hydrodynamic equations with source term which exhibits deposition of energy and momentum from jets. We find a large number of low momentum particles are emitted at large angle from jet axis. This gives a novel interpretation of the CMS data. (2) It has been claimed that a matter created even in p-p/p-A collisions may behave like a fluid. However, fluctuation effects would be important in such a small system. We formulate relativistic fluctuating hydrodynamics and apply it to Bjorken expansion. We found the final multiplicity fluctuates around the mean value even if initial condition is fixed. This effect is relatively important in peripheral A-A collisions and p-p/p-A collisions. (3) Anomalous transport of the quark-gluon fluid is predicted when extremely high magnetic field is applied. We investigate this possibility by solving anomalous hydrodynamic equations. We found the difference of the elliptic flow parameter between positive and negative particles appears due to the chiral magnetic wave. Finally, I provide some personal perspective of hydrodynamic modeling of high energy nuclear collisions

  15. Simulation and experimental studies of three-dimensional (3D) image reconstruction from insufficient sampling data based on compressed-sensing theory for potential applications to dental cone-beam CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Je, U. K.; Lee, M. S.; Cho, H. S.; Hong, D. K.; Park, Y. O.; Park, C. K.; Cho, H. M.; Choi, S. I.; Woo, T. H.

    2015-06-01

    In practical applications of three-dimensional (3D) tomographic imaging, there are often challenges for image reconstruction from insufficient sampling data. In computed tomography (CT), for example, image reconstruction from sparse views and/or limited-angle (<360°) views would enable fast scanning with reduced imaging doses to the patient. In this study, we investigated and implemented a reconstruction algorithm based on the compressed-sensing (CS) theory, which exploits the sparseness of the gradient image with substantially high accuracy, for potential applications to low-dose, high-accurate dental cone-beam CT (CBCT). We performed systematic simulation works to investigate the image characteristics and also performed experimental works by applying the algorithm to a commercially-available dental CBCT system to demonstrate its effectiveness for image reconstruction in insufficient sampling problems. We successfully reconstructed CBCT images of superior accuracy from insufficient sampling data and evaluated the reconstruction quality quantitatively. Both simulation and experimental demonstrations of the CS-based reconstruction from insufficient data indicate that the CS-based algorithm can be applied directly to current dental CBCT systems for reducing the imaging doses and further improving the image quality.

  16. Hydrodynamic Elastic Magneto Plastic

    1985-02-01

    The HEMP code solves the conservation equations of two-dimensional elastic-plastic flow, in plane x-y coordinates or in cylindrical symmetry around the x-axis. Provisions for calculation of fixed boundaries, free surfaces, pistons, and boundary slide planes have been included, along with other special conditions.

  17. Convective overstability in accretion disks: Three-dimensional linear analysis and nonlinear saturation

    SciTech Connect

    Lyra, Wladimir

    2014-07-01

    Recently, Klahr and Hubbard claimed that a hydrodynamical linear overstability exists in protoplanetary disks, powered by buoyancy in the presence of thermal relaxation. We analyze this claim, confirming it through rigorous compressible linear analysis. We model the system numerically, reproducing the linear growth rate for all cases studied. We also study the saturated properties of the overstability in the shearing box, finding that the saturated state produces finite amplitude fluctuations strong enough to trigger the subcritical baroclinic instability (SBI). Saturation leads to a fast burst of enstrophy in the box, and a large-scale vortex develops in the course of the next ≈100 orbits. The amount of angular momentum transport achieved is of the order of α ≈ 10{sup –3}, as in compressible SBI models. For the first time, a self-sustained three-dimensional vortex is produced from linear amplitude perturbation of a quiescent base state.

  18. Weakly Compressible Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence in the Solar Wind and the Interstellar Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharjee, A.; Ng, C. S.; Spangler, S. R.

    1998-02-01

    A new four-field system of equations is derived from the compressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations for low Mach number turbulence in the solar wind and the interstellar medium, permeated by a spatially varying magnetic field. The plasma beta is assumed to be of order unity or less. It is shown that the full MHD equations can be reduced rigorously to a closed system for four fluctuating field variables: magnetic flux, vorticity, pressure, and parallel flow. Although the velocity perpendicular to the magnetic field is shown to obey a two-dimensional incompressibility condition (analogous to the Proudman-Taylor theorem in hydrodynamics), the three-dimensional dynamics exhibit the effects of compressibility. In the presence of spatial inhomogeneities, the four dynamical equations are coupled to each other, and pressure fluctuations enter the weakly compressible dynamics at leading order. If there are no spatial inhomogeneities and or if the plasma beta is low, the four-field equations reduce to the well-known equations of reduced magnetohydrodynamics (RMHD). For pressure-balanced structures, the four-field equations undergo a remarkable simplification which provides insight on the special nature of the fluctuations driven by these structures. The important role of spatial inhomogeneities is elucidated by 2.5-dimensional numerical simulations. In the presence of inhomogeneities, the saturated pressure and density fluctuations scale with the Mach number of the turbulence, and the system attains equipartition with respect to the kinetic, magnetic, and thermal energy of the fluctuations. The present work suggests that if heliospheric and interstellar turbulence exists in a plasma with large-scale, nonturbulent spatial gradients, one expects the pressure and density fluctuations to be of significantly larger magnitude than suggested in nearly incompressible models such as pseudosound.

  19. Experimental hydrodynamics of swimming in fishes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tytell, Eric Daniel

    2005-11-01

    The great diversity of fish body shapes suggests that they have adapted to different selective pressures. For many fishes, the pressures include hydrodynamic demands: swimming efficiently or accelerating rapidly, for instance. However, the hydrodynamic advantages or disadvantages to specific morphologies are poorly understood. In particular, eels have been considered inefficient swimmers, but they migrate long distances without feeding, a task that requires efficient swimming. This dissertation, therefore, begins with an examination of the swimming hydrodynamics of American eels, Anguilla rostrata, at steady swimming speeds from 0.5 to 2 body lengths (L) per second and during accelerations from -1.4 to 1.3 L s -2. The final chapter examines the hydrodynamic effects of body shape directly by describing three-dimensional flow around swimming bluegill sunfish, Lepomis macrochirus. In all chapters, flow is quantified using digital particle image velocimetry, and simultaneous kinematics are measured from high-resolution digital video. The wake behind a swimming eel in the horizontal midline plane is described first. Rather than producing a wake with fluid jets angled backwards, like in fishes such as sunfish, eels have a wake with exclusively lateral jets. The lack of downstream momentum indicates that eels balance the axial forces of thrust and drag evenly over time and over their bodies, and therefore do not change axial fluid momentum. This even balance, present at all steady swimming speeds, is probably due to the relatively uniform body shape of eels. As eels accelerate, thrust exceeds drag, axial momentum increases, and the wake approaches that of other fishes. During steady swimming, though, the lack of axial momentum prevents direct efficiency estimation. The effect of body shape was examined directly by measuring flow in multiple transverse planes along the body of bluegill sunfish swimming at 1.2 L s-1. The dorsal and anal fin, neglected in many previous

  20. Spin hydrodynamic generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, R.; Matsuo, M.; Ono, M.; Harii, K.; Chudo, H.; Okayasu, S.; Ieda, J.; Takahashi, S.; Maekawa, S.; Saitoh, E.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic generation is the conversion of fluid kinetic energy into electricity. Such conversion, which has been applied to various types of electric power generation, is driven by the Lorentz force acting on charged particles and thus a magnetic field is necessary. On the other hand, recent studies of spintronics have revealed the similarity between the function of a magnetic field and that of spin-orbit interactions in condensed matter. This suggests the existence of an undiscovered route to realize the conversion of fluid dynamics into electricity without using magnetic fields. Here we show electric voltage generation from fluid dynamics free from magnetic fields; we excited liquid-metal flows in a narrow channel and observed longitudinal voltage generation in the liquid. This voltage has nothing to do with electrification or thermoelectric effects, but turned out to follow a universal scaling rule based on a spin-mediated scenario. The result shows that the observed voltage is caused by spin-current generation from a fluid motion: spin hydrodynamic generation. The observed phenomenon allows us to make mechanical spin-current and electric generators, opening a door to fluid spintronics.

  1. Hydrodynamics of micropipette aspiration.

    PubMed Central

    Drury, J L; Dembo, M

    1999-01-01

    The dynamics of human neutrophils during micropipette aspiration are frequently analyzed by approximating these cells as simple slippery droplets of viscous fluid. Here, we present computations that reveal the detailed predictions of the simplest and most idealized case of such a scheme; namely, the case where the fluid of the droplet is homogeneous and Newtonian, and the surface tension of the droplet is constant. We have investigated the behavior of this model as a function of surface tension, droplet radius, viscosity, aspiration pressure, and pipette radius. In addition, we have tabulated a dimensionless factor, M, which can be utilized to calculate the apparent viscosity of the slippery droplet. Computations were carried out using a low Reynolds number hydrodynamics transport code based on the finite-element method. Although idealized and simplistic, we find that the slippery droplet model predicts many observed features of neutrophil aspiration. However, there are certain features that are not observed in neutrophils. In particular, the model predicts dilation of the membrane past the point of being continuous, as well as a reentrant jet at high aspiration pressures. PMID:9876128

  2. Hydrodynamic synchronization of colloidal oscillators

    PubMed Central

    Kotar, Jurij; Leoni, Marco; Bassetti, Bruno; Lagomarsino, Marco Cosentino; Cicuta, Pietro

    2010-01-01

    Two colloidal spheres are maintained in oscillation by switching the position of an optical trap when a sphere reaches a limit position, leading to oscillations that are bounded in amplitude but free in phase and period. The interaction between the oscillators is only through the hydrodynamic flow induced by their motion. We prove that in the absence of stochastic noise the antiphase dynamical state is stable, and we show how the period depends on coupling strength. Both features are observed experimentally. As the natural frequencies of the oscillators are made progressively different, the coordination is quickly lost. These results help one to understand the origin of hydrodynamic synchronization and how the dynamics can be tuned. Cilia and flagella are biological systems coupled hydrodynamically, exhibiting dramatic collective motions. We propose that weakly correlated phase fluctuations, with one of the oscillators typically precessing the other, are characteristic of hydrodynamically coupled systems in the presence of thermal noise. PMID:20385848

  3. Reciprocal relations in dissipationless hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Melnikovsky, L. A.

    2014-12-15

    Hidden symmetry in dissipationless terms of arbitrary hydrodynamics equations is recognized. We demonstrate that all fluxes are generated by a single function and derive conventional Euler equations using the proposed formalism.

  4. Relativistic hydrodynamics on graphic cards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerhard, Jochen; Lindenstruth, Volker; Bleicher, Marcus

    2013-02-01

    We show how to accelerate relativistic hydrodynamics simulations using graphic cards (graphic processing units, GPUs). These improvements are of highest relevance e.g. to the field of high-energetic nucleus-nucleus collisions at RHIC and LHC where (ideal and dissipative) relativistic hydrodynamics is used to calculate the evolution of hot and dense QCD matter. The results reported here are based on the Sharp And Smooth Transport Algorithm (SHASTA), which is employed in many hydrodynamical models and hybrid simulation packages, e.g. the Ultrarelativistic Quantum Molecular Dynamics model (UrQMD). We have redesigned the SHASTA using the OpenCL computing framework to work on accelerators like graphic processing units (GPUs) as well as on multi-core processors. With the redesign of the algorithm the hydrodynamic calculations have been accelerated by a factor 160 allowing for event-by-event calculations and better statistics in hybrid calculations.

  5. Quasispherical fuel compression and fast ignition in a heavy-ion-driven X-target with one-sided illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henestroza, Enrique; Logan, B. Grant; Perkins, L. John

    2011-03-01

    The HYDRA radiation-hydrodynamics code [M. M. Marinak et al., Phys. Plasmas 8, 2275 (2001)] is used to explore one-sided axial target illumination with annular and solid-profile uranium ion beams at 60 GeV to compress and ignite deuterium-tritium fuel filling the volume of metal cases with cross sections in the shape of an "X" (X-target). Quasi-three-dimensional, spherical fuel compression of the fuel toward the X-vertex on axis is obtained by controlling the geometry of the case, the timing, power, and radii of three annuli of ion beams for compression, and the hydroeffects of those beams heating the case as well as the fuel. Scaling projections suggest that this target may be capable of assembling large fuel masses resulting in high fusion yields at modest drive energies. Initial two-dimensional calculations have achieved fuel compression ratios of up to 150X solid density, with an areal density ρR of about 1 g/cm2. At these currently modest fuel densities, fast ignition pulses of 3 MJ, 60 GeV, 50 ps, and radius of 300 μm are injected through a hole in the X-case on axis to further heat the fuel to propagating burn conditions. The resulting burn waves are observed to propagate throughout the tamped fuel mass, with fusion yields of about 300 MJ. Tamping is found to be important, but radiation drive to be unimportant, to the fuel compression. Rayleigh-Taylor instability mix is found to have a minor impact on ignition and subsequent fuel burn-up.

  6. Quasispherical fuel compression and fast ignition in a heavy-ion-driven X-target with one-sided illumination

    SciTech Connect

    Henestroza, Enrique; Logan, B. Grant; Perkins, L. John

    2011-03-15

    The HYDRA radiation-hydrodynamics code [M. M. Marinak et al., Phys. Plasmas 8, 2275 (2001)] is used to explore one-sided axial target illumination with annular and solid-profile uranium ion beams at 60 GeV to compress and ignite deuterium-tritium fuel filling the volume of metal cases with cross sections in the shape of an ''X'' (X-target). Quasi-three-dimensional, spherical fuel compression of the fuel toward the X-vertex on axis is obtained by controlling the geometry of the case, the timing, power, and radii of three annuli of ion beams for compression, and the hydroeffects of those beams heating the case as well as the fuel. Scaling projections suggest that this target may be capable of assembling large fuel masses resulting in high fusion yields at modest drive energies. Initial two-dimensional calculations have achieved fuel compression ratios of up to 150X solid density, with an areal density {rho}R of about 1 g/cm{sup 2}. At these currently modest fuel densities, fast ignition pulses of 3 MJ, 60 GeV, 50 ps, and radius of 300 {mu}m are injected through a hole in the X-case on axis to further heat the fuel to propagating burn conditions. The resulting burn waves are observed to propagate throughout the tamped fuel mass, with fusion yields of about 300 MJ. Tamping is found to be important, but radiation drive to be unimportant, to the fuel compression. Rayleigh-Taylor instability mix is found to have a minor impact on ignition and subsequent fuel burn-up.

  7. Fast Lossless Compression of Multispectral-Image Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klimesh, Matthew

    2006-01-01

    An algorithm that effects fast lossless compression of multispectral-image data is based on low-complexity, proven adaptive-filtering algorithms. This algorithm is intended for use in compressing multispectral-image data aboard spacecraft for transmission to Earth stations. Variants of this algorithm could be useful for lossless compression of three-dimensional medical imagery and, perhaps, for compressing image data in general.

  8. An iterative finite difference method for solving the quantum hydrodynamic equations of motion

    SciTech Connect

    Kendrick, Brian K

    2010-01-01

    The quantum hydrodynamic equations of motion associated with the de Broglie-Bohm description of quantum mechanics describe a time evolving probability density whose 'fluid' elements evolve as a correlated ensemble of particle trajectories. These equations are intuitively appealing due to their similarities with classical fluid dynamics and the appearance of a generalized Newton's equation of motion in which the total force contains both a classical and quantum contribution. However, the direct numerical solution of the quantum hydrodynamic equations (QHE) is fraught with challenges: the probability 'fluid' is highly-compressible, it has zero viscosity, the quantum potential ('pressure') is non-linear, and if that weren't enough the quantum potential can also become singular during the course of the calculations. Collectively these properties are responsible for the notorious numerical instabilities associated with a direct numerical solution of the QHE. The most successful and stable numerical approach that has been used to date is based on the Moving Least Squares (MLS) algorithm. The improved stability of this approach is due to the repeated local least squares fitting which effectively filters or reduces the numerical noise which tends to accumulate with time. However, this method is also subject to instabilities if it is pushed too hard. In addition, the stability of the MLS approach often comes at the expense of reduced resolution or fidelity of the calculation (i.e., the MLS filtering eliminates the higher-frequency components of the solution which may be of interest). Recently, a promising new solution method has been developed which is based on an iterative solution of the QHE using finite differences. This method (referred to as the Iterative Finite Difference Method or IFDM) is straightforward to implement, computationally efficient, stable, and its accuracy and convergence properties are well understood. A brief overview of the IFDM will be presented

  9. Detection of the Compressed Primary Stellar Wind in eta Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teodoro, Mairan Macedo; Madura, Thomas I.; Gull, Theodore R.; Corcoran, Michael F.; Hamaguchi, K.

    2014-01-01

    A series of three HST/STIS spectroscopic mappings, spaced approximately one year apart, reveal three partial arcs in [Fe II] and [Ni II] emissions moving outward from eta Carinae. We identify these arcs with the shell-like structures, seen in the 3D hydrodynamical simulations, formed by compression of the primary wind by the secondary wind during periastron passages.

  10. A hybrid Godunov method for radiation hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Sekora, Michael D.; Stone, James M.

    2010-09-20

    From a mathematical perspective, radiation hydrodynamics can be thought of as a system of hyperbolic balance laws with dual multiscale behavior (multiscale behavior associated with the hyperbolic wave speeds as well as multiscale behavior associated with source term relaxation). With this outlook in mind, this paper presents a hybrid Godunov method for one-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics that is uniformly well behaved from the photon free streaming (hyperbolic) limit through the weak equilibrium diffusion (parabolic) limit and to the strong equilibrium diffusion (hyperbolic) limit. Moreover, one finds that the technique preserves certain asymptotic limits. The method incorporates a backward Euler upwinding scheme for the radiation energy density E{sub r} and flux F{sub r} as well as a modified Godunov scheme for the material density {rho}, momentum density m, and energy density E. The backward Euler upwinding scheme is first-order accurate and uses an implicit HLLE flux function to temporally advance the radiation components according to the material flow scale. The modified Godunov scheme is second-order accurate and directly couples stiff source term effects to the hyperbolic structure of the system of balance laws. This Godunov technique is composed of a predictor step that is based on Duhamel's principle and a corrector step that is based on Picard iteration. The Godunov scheme is explicit on the material flow scale but is unsplit and fully couples matter and radiation without invoking a diffusion-type approximation for radiation hydrodynamics. This technique derives from earlier work by Miniati and Colella (2007) . Numerical tests demonstrate that the method is stable, robust, and accurate across various parameter regimes.

  11. Advection by polytropic compressible turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladeinde, F.; O'Brien, E. E.; Cai, X.; Liu, W.

    1995-11-01

    Direct numerical simulation (DNS) is used to examine scalar correlation in low Mach number, polytropic, homogeneous, two-dimensional turbulence (Ms≤0.7) for which the initial conditions, Reynolds, and Mach numbers have been chosen to produce three types of flow suggested by theory: (a) nearly incompressible flow dominated by vorticity, (b) nearly pure acoustic turbulence dominated by compression, and (c) nearly statistical equipartition of vorticity and compressions. Turbulent flows typical of each of these cases have been generated and a passive scalar field imbedded in them. The results show that a finite-difference based computer program is capable of producing results that are in reasonable agreement with pseudospectral calculations. Scalar correlations have been calculated from the DNS results and the relative magnitudes of terms in low-order scalar moment equations determined. It is shown that the scalar equation terms with explicit compressibility are negligible on a long time-averaged basis. A physical-space EDQNM model has been adapted to provide another estimate of scalar correlation evolution in these same two-dimensional, compressible cases. The use of the solenoidal component of turbulence energy, rather than total turbulence energy, in the EDQNM model gives results closer to those from DNS in all cases.

  12. Hydrodynamic escape from planetary atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Feng

    Hydrodynamic escape is an important process in the formation and evolution of planetary atmospheres. Due to the existence of a singularity point near the transonic point, it is difficult to find transonic steady state solutions by solving the time-independent hydrodynamic equations. In addition to that, most previous works assume that all energy driving the escape flow is deposited in one narrow layer. This assumption not only results in less accurate solutions to the hydrodynamic escape problem, but also makes it difficult to include other chemical and physical processes in the hydrodynamic escape models. In this work, a numerical model describing the transonic hydrodynamic escape from planetary atmospheres is developed. A robust solution technique is used to solve the time dependent hydrodynamic equations. The method has been validated in an isothermal atmosphere where an analytical solution is available. The hydrodynamic model is applied to 3 cases: hydrogen escape from small orbit extrasolar planets, hydrogen escape from a hydrogen rich early Earth's atmosphere, and nitrogen/methane escape from Pluto's atmosphere. Results of simulations on extrasolar planets are in good agreement with the observations of the transiting extrasolar planet HD209458b. Hydrodynamic escape of hydrogen from other hypothetical close-in extrasolar planets are simulated and the influence of hydrogen escape on the long-term evolution of these extrasolar planets are discussed. Simulations on early Earth suggest that hydrodynamic escape of hydrogen from a hydrogen rich early Earth's atmosphere is about two orders magnitude slower than the diffusion limited escape rate. A hydrogen rich early Earth's atmosphere could have been maintained by the balance between the hydrogen escape and the supply of hydrogen into the atmosphere by volcanic outgassing. Origin of life may have occurred in the organic soup ocean created by the efficient formation of prebiotic molecules in the hydrogen rich early

  13. Comparison of Artificial Compressibility Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiris, Cetin; Housman, Jeffrey; Kwak, Dochan

    2003-01-01

    Various artificial compressibility methods for calculating three-dimensional, steady and unsteady, laminar and turbulent, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are compared in this work. Each method is described in detail along with appropriate physical and numerical boundary conditions. Analysis of well-posedness and numerical solutions to test problems for each method are provided. A comparison based on convergence behavior, accuracy, stability and robustness is used to establish the relative positive and negative characteristics of each method.

  14. SPH simulation of high density hydrogen compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrel, R.; Romero, V.

    1998-07-01

    The density dependence of the electronic energy band gap of the hydrogen has been studied with respect to the insulator-metal (IM) transition. The valence conduction band gap of solid hydrogen is about 15eV at zero pressure, therefore very high pressures are required to close the gap and achieve metallization. We propose to investigate what will be the degree to which one can expect to maintain a shockless compression of hydrogen with a low temperature (close to that of a cold isentrope) and verify if it is possible to achieve metallization. Multistage compression will be driven by energetic materials in a cylindrical implosion system, in which we expect a slow compression rate that will maintain the low temperature in the isentropic compression. It is hoped that pressures on the order of 100Mbars can be achieved while maintaining low temperatures. In order to better understand this multistage compression a smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH) analysis has been performed. Since the SPH technique does not use a grid structure it is well suited to analyzing spatial deformation processes. This analysis will be used to improve the design of possible multistage compression devices.

  15. SPH Simulation of High Density Hydrogen Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrel, R.; Romero, Van D.

    1997-07-01

    The density dependence of the electronic energy band gap of hydrogen has been studied with respect to the insulator-metal (IM) transition. The valence conduction band gap of solid hydrogen is about 15eV at zero pressure, therefore very high pressures are required to close the gap and achieve metallization. We are planning to investigate the degree to which shock less compression of hydrogen can be maintained at low temperature isentrope) and explore the possibililty of achieving metallization. Multistage compression will be driven by energetic materials in a cylindrical implosion system, in which we expect a slow compression rate that will maintain the low temperature in the isentropic compression. It is hoped that pressures of the order of 100 Mbars can be achieved while maintaining low temperatures. In order to understand this multistage compression better a smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH) analysis has been performed. Since the SPH technique uses a gridless structure it is well suited to analyzing spatial deformation processes. This paper presents the analysis which will be used to improve the design of possible multistage compression devices.

  16. Load-Induced Hydrodynamic Lubrication of Porous Films.

    PubMed

    Khosla, Tushar; Cremaldi, Joseph; Erickson, Jeffrey S; Pesika, Noshir S

    2015-08-19

    We present an exploratory study of the tribological properties and mechanisms of porous polymer surfaces under applied loads in aqueous media. We show how it is possible to change the lubrication regime from boundary lubrication to hydrodynamic lubrication even at relatively low shearing velocities by the addition of vertical pores to a compliant polymer. It is hypothesized that the compressed, pressurized liquid in the pores produces a repulsive hydrodynamic force as it extrudes from the pores. The presence of the fluid between two shearing surfaces results in low coefficients of friction (μ ≈ 0.31). The coefficient of friction is reduced further by using a boundary lubricant. The tribological properties are studied for a range of applied loads and shear velocities to demonstrate the potential applications of such materials in total joint replacement devices.

  17. Hydrodynamic growth and mix experiments at National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smalyuk, V. A.; Caggiano, J.; Casey, D.; Cerjan, C.; Clark, D. S.; Edwards, J.; Grim, G.; Haan, S. W.; Hammel, B. A.; Hamza, A.; Hsing, W.; Hurricane, O.; Kilkenny, J.; Kline, J.; Knauer, J.; Landen, O.; McNaney, J.; Mintz, M.; Nikroo, A.; Parham, T.; Park, H.-S.; Pino, J.; Raman, K.; Remington, B. A.; Robey, H. F.; Rowley, D.; Tipton, R.; Weber, S.; Yeamans, C.

    2016-03-01

    Hydrodynamic growth and its effects on implosion performance and mix were studied at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Spherical shells with pre-imposed 2D modulations were used to measure Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability growth in the acceleration phase of implosions using in-flight x-ray radiography. In addition, implosion performance and mix have been studied at peak compression using plastic shells filled with tritium gas and imbedding localized CD diagnostic layer in various locations in the ablator. Neutron yield and ion temperature of the DT fusion reactions were used as a measure of shell-gas mix, while neutron yield of the TT fusion reaction was used as a measure of implosion performance. The results have indicated that the low-mode hydrodynamic instabilities due to surface roughness were the primary culprits to yield degradation, with atomic ablator-gas mix playing a secondary role.

  18. Load-Induced Hydrodynamic Lubrication of Porous Films.

    PubMed

    Khosla, Tushar; Cremaldi, Joseph; Erickson, Jeffrey S; Pesika, Noshir S

    2015-08-19

    We present an exploratory study of the tribological properties and mechanisms of porous polymer surfaces under applied loads in aqueous media. We show how it is possible to change the lubrication regime from boundary lubrication to hydrodynamic lubrication even at relatively low shearing velocities by the addition of vertical pores to a compliant polymer. It is hypothesized that the compressed, pressurized liquid in the pores produces a repulsive hydrodynamic force as it extrudes from the pores. The presence of the fluid between two shearing surfaces results in low coefficients of friction (μ ≈ 0.31). The coefficient of friction is reduced further by using a boundary lubricant. The tribological properties are studied for a range of applied loads and shear velocities to demonstrate the potential applications of such materials in total joint replacement devices. PMID:26223011

  19. The Hydrodynamics of Plesiosaurs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muscutt, Luke; Ganapathisubramani, Bharathram; Dyke, Gareth; Weymouth, Gabriel

    2015-11-01

    Plesiosaurs are extinct marine reptiles that existed at the same time as the dinosaurs, and are the only known animals to swim by actively flapping their four wing-like flippers. This can be viewed as a tandem flapping wing problem, where the hind wing is operating in the wake of the fore wing. Experiments using full-scale robotic plesiosaur flippers in a large flume tank have been used to investigate the kinematics and interaction of the flippers. The flippers are actuated in heave and pitch, and a combination of force measurements and flow visualization are used to analyze the characteristics of the vortex interaction between the flippers. Previous two-dimensional numerical simulations have shown that certain kinematics give an increase in thrust of the hind flipper of up to 50%. The current experiments determine if such thrust augmentation is present for a three-dimensional flowfield and determine the kinematics that give the highest possible thrust. This will help to answer paleo-biological questions about the function and evolution of the plesiosaur flippers, along with helping to determine if tandem flapping wings could be a viable propulsion system for autonomous underwater vehicles. Support from EPSRC and Ginko Investments Ltd.

  20. Hydrodynamic Burnett equations for inelastic Maxwell models of granular gases.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Nagi; Garzó, Vicente; Santos, Andrés

    2014-05-01

    The hydrodynamic Burnett equations and the associated transport coefficients are exactly evaluated for generalized inelastic Maxwell models. In those models, the one-particle distribution function obeys the inelastic Boltzmann equation, with a velocity-independent collision rate proportional to the γ power of the temperature. The pressure tensor and the heat flux are obtained to second order in the spatial gradients of the hydrodynamic fields with explicit expressions for all the Burnett transport coefficients as functions of γ, the coefficient of normal restitution, and the dimensionality of the system. Some transport coefficients that are related in a simple way in the elastic limit become decoupled in the inelastic case. As a byproduct, existing results in the literature for three-dimensional elastic systems are recovered, and a generalization to any dimension of the system is given. The structure of the present results is used to estimate the Burnett coefficients for inelastic hard spheres. PMID:25353781

  1. 3D hydrodynamic focusing microfluidics for emerging sensing technologies.

    PubMed

    Daniele, Michael A; Boyd, Darryl A; Mott, David R; Ligler, Frances S

    2015-05-15

    While the physics behind laminar flows has been studied for 200 years, understanding of how to use parallel flows to augment the capabilities of microfluidic systems has been a subject of study primarily over the last decade. The use of one flow to focus another within a microfluidic channel has graduated from a two-dimensional to a three-dimensional process and the design principles are only now becoming established. This review explores the underlying principles for hydrodynamic focusing in three dimensions (3D) using miscible fluids and the application of these principles for creation of biosensors, separation of cells and particles for sample manipulation, and fabrication of materials that could be used for biosensors. Where sufficient information is available, the practicality of devices implementing fluid flows directed in 3D is evaluated and the advantages and limitations of 3D hydrodynamic focusing for the particular application are highlighted.

  2. Rheological and fractal hydrodynamics of aerobic granules.

    PubMed

    Tijani, H I; Abdullah, N; Yuzir, A; Ujang, Zaini

    2015-06-01

    The structural and hydrodynamic features for granules were characterized using settling experiments, predefined mathematical simulations and ImageJ-particle analyses. This study describes the rheological characterization of these biologically immobilized aggregates under non-Newtonian flows. The second order dimensional analysis defined as D2=1.795 for native clusters and D2=1.099 for dewatered clusters and a characteristic three-dimensional fractal dimension of 2.46 depicts that these relatively porous and differentially permeable fractals had a structural configuration in close proximity with that described for a compact sphere formed via cluster-cluster aggregation. The three-dimensional fractal dimension calculated via settling-fractal correlation, U∝l(D) to characterize immobilized granules validates the quantitative measurements used for describing its structural integrity and aggregate complexity. These results suggest that scaling relationships based on fractal geometry are vital for quantifying the effects of different laminar conditions on the aggregates' morphology and characteristics such as density, porosity, and projected surface area.

  3. Explicit 2-D Hydrodynamic FEM Program

    1996-08-07

    DYNA2D* is a vectorized, explicit, two-dimensional, axisymmetric and plane strain finite element program for analyzing the large deformation dynamic and hydrodynamic response of inelastic solids. DYNA2D* contains 13 material models and 9 equations of state (EOS) to cover a wide range of material behavior. The material models implemented in all machine versions are: elastic, orthotropic elastic, kinematic/isotropic elastic plasticity, thermoelastoplastic, soil and crushable foam, linear viscoelastic, rubber, high explosive burn, isotropic elastic-plastic, temperature-dependent elastic-plastic. Themore » isotropic and temperature-dependent elastic-plastic models determine only the deviatoric stresses. Pressure is determined by one of 9 equations of state including linear polynomial, JWL high explosive, Sack Tuesday high explosive, Gruneisen, ratio of polynomials, linear polynomial with energy deposition, ignition and growth of reaction in HE, tabulated compaction, and tabulated.« less

  4. Hydrodynamic instability of solar thermosyphon water heaters

    SciTech Connect

    Du, S.C.; Huang, B.J.; Yen, R.H. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1994-02-01

    The flow instability of a solar thermosyphon water heater is studied analytically. A system dynamics model is derived by means of a one-dimensional approach and a linear perturbation method. The characteristic equation is obtained and the Nyquist criterion is used to examine the flow stability. The parameter M is a dimensionless parameter of system stability. The stability maps are plotted in terms of 14 parameters. The occurrence of hydrodynamic instability is determined by comparing the stability curves and the designed values of M. Flow instability is shown not to occur in most of solar water heaters commercially available, because the loop friction is relatively high in the design and because solar irradiation in field operation is still not high enough to cause flow instability.

  5. Explicit 2-D Hydrodynamic FEM Program

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jerry

    1996-08-07

    DYNA2D* is a vectorized, explicit, two-dimensional, axisymmetric and plane strain finite element program for analyzing the large deformation dynamic and hydrodynamic response of inelastic solids. DYNA2D* contains 13 material models and 9 equations of state (EOS) to cover a wide range of material behavior. The material models implemented in all machine versions are: elastic, orthotropic elastic, kinematic/isotropic elastic plasticity, thermoelastoplastic, soil and crushable foam, linear viscoelastic, rubber, high explosive burn, isotropic elastic-plastic, temperature-dependent elastic-plastic. The isotropic and temperature-dependent elastic-plastic models determine only the deviatoric stresses. Pressure is determined by one of 9 equations of state including linear polynomial, JWL high explosive, Sack Tuesday high explosive, Gruneisen, ratio of polynomials, linear polynomial with energy deposition, ignition and growth of reaction in HE, tabulated compaction, and tabulated.

  6. Smoothed-particle hydrodynamics and nonequilibrium molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Hoover, W. G.; Hoover, C. G.

    1993-08-01

    Gingold, Lucy, and Monaghan invented a grid-free version of continuum mechanics ``smoothed-particle hydrodynamics,`` in 1977. It is a likely contributor to ``hybrid`` simulations combining atomistic and continuum simulations. We describe applications of this particle-based continuum technique from the closely-related standpoint of nonequilibrium molecular dynamics. We compare chaotic Lyapunov spectra for atomistic solids and fluids with those which characterize a two-dimensional smoothed-particle fluid system.

  7. Leading-order anisotropic hydrodynamics for systems with massive particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florkowski, Wojciech; Ryblewski, Radoslaw; Strickland, Michael; Tinti, Leonardo

    2014-05-01

    The framework of anisotropic hydrodynamics is generalized to include finite particle masses. Two schemes are introduced and their predictions compared with exact solutions of the kinetic equation in the relaxation time approximation. The first formulation uses the zeroth and first moments of the kinetic equation, whereas the second formulation uses the first and second moments. For the case of one-dimensional boost-invariant expansion, our numerical results indicate that the second formulation yields much better agreement with the exact solutions.

  8. Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics Model for Reactive Transport and Mineral Precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Scheibe, Timothy D.; Redden, George; Meakin, Paul; Fang, Yilin

    2006-06-30

    A new Lagrangian particle model based on smoothed particle hydrodynamics was used to simulate pore scale precipitation reactions. The side-by-side injection of reacting solutions into two halves of a two-dimensional granular porous medium was simulated. Precipitation on grain surfaces occurred along a narrow zone in the middle of the domain, where the reacting solutes mixed to generate a supersaturated reaction product. The numerical simulations qualitatively reproduced the behavior observed in related laboratory experiments.

  9. THE KOZAI-LIDOV MECHANISM IN HYDRODYNAMICAL DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Rebecca G.; Nixon, Chris; Armitage, Philip J.; Lubow, Stephen H.; Price, Daniel J.; Doğan, Suzan; King, Andrew

    2014-09-10

    We use three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations to show that a highly misaligned accretion disk around one component of a binary system can exhibit global Kozai-Lidov cycles, where the inclination and eccentricity of the disk are interchanged periodically. This has important implications for accreting systems on all scales, for example, the formation of planets and satellites in circumstellar and circumplanetary disks, outbursts in X-ray binary systems, and accretion onto supermassive black holes.

  10. Modelling the hydrodynamics of offshore sandbanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, S.; MacDonald, N.; Williams, J.; O'Connor, B. A.; Nicholson, J.; Davies, A. M.

    2007-05-01

    This paper describes the details of a quasi-three-dimensional model (3DBANK), which has been developed to investigate medium and long-term morphological evolution and development of offshore sandbanks. The model is based on a three-dimensional tidal module using the Galerkin-eigenfunction method, but also includes four sub-modules to compute: the instantaneous bedform characteristics from which the temporal and spatial variations of the shear stresses at the sea bed can be derived; the suspended sediment concentration through the water column; the bed-load and suspended sediment fluxes at a point-in-plan; and the resulting morphological changes, respectively. The model also includes the effects of the wind and waves at the sea surface, as well as the wave-current interaction (WCI), and operates with full hydrodynamic and morphodynamic interaction. The components of the model were tested against laboratory and field data, and the complete model was then applied to Middlekerke Bank off the Flemish coast where extensive field measurements were taken during the European Community (EC) funded Circulation and Sediment Transport Around Banks (CSTAB) Project using various advanced instrumentation including STABLE and HF OSCR. Comparisons of the model results with the field measurements and observations show that the model is capable of reproducing the current and wave-induced bedforms, bed roughness, tidal currents and tidal residuals around the sandbank satisfactorily, and can be used to study the long-term sandbank evolution under various offshore conditions. This paper, however, focuses on the hydrodynamic aspects of the model, while the details of the morphological components will be given in a companion paper.

  11. Wavelet compression techniques for hyperspectral data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Bruce; Ringer, Brian; Yeates, Mathew

    1994-01-01

    Hyperspectral sensors are electro-optic sensors which typically operate in visible and near infrared bands. Their characteristic property is the ability to resolve a relatively large number (i.e., tens to hundreds) of contiguous spectral bands to produce a detailed profile of the electromagnetic spectrum. In contrast, multispectral sensors measure relatively few non-contiguous spectral bands. Like multispectral sensors, hyperspectral sensors are often also imaging sensors, measuring spectra over an array of spatial resolution cells. The data produced may thus be viewed as a three dimensional array of samples in which two dimensions correspond to spatial position and the third to wavelength. Because they multiply the already large storage/transmission bandwidth requirements of conventional digital images, hyperspectral sensors generate formidable torrents of data. Their fine spectral resolution typically results in high redundancy in the spectral dimension, so that hyperspectral data sets are excellent candidates for compression. Although there have been a number of studies of compression algorithms for multispectral data, we are not aware of any published results for hyperspectral data. Three algorithms for hyperspectral data compression are compared. They were selected as representatives of three major approaches for extending conventional lossy image compression techniques to hyperspectral data. The simplest approach treats the data as an ensemble of images and compresses each image independently, ignoring the correlation between spectral bands. The second approach transforms the data to decorrelate the spectral bands, and then compresses the transformed data as a set of independent images. The third approach directly generalizes two-dimensional transform coding by applying a three-dimensional transform as part of the usual transform-quantize-entropy code procedure. The algorithms studied all use the discrete wavelet transform. In the first two cases, a wavelet

  12. Deformable cells in confined geometries: From hemolysis to hydrodynamic interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abkarian, Manouk; Faivre, Magalie; Stone, Howard A.

    2004-11-01

    Recent developments in microfluidics allow a wide range of possibilities for studying cellular-scale hydrodynamics. Here we use microfluidic technology to address several open questions in the blood flow literature where cell deformation and hydrodynamic interactions are significant. In particular, we investigate the pressure-driven flow of a dilute suspension in a channel and characterize the transition from steady axisymmetric cell shapes (for which numerical calculations exist) to asymmetric, highly extended shapes, which are precursors to hemolysis (i.e. destruction of the cell). In addition, we examine the influence of geometry on hydrodynamic interactions of deformable cells by contrasting one-dimensional motion of a train of particles in a channel with two-dimensional motions in a Hele-Shaw cell. This study can help to understand flow of cells in microcirculation from the unidirectional flow in capillaries to the two-dimensional flow in the lung alveoli and provides the basic steps to understand certain aspects of microcirculatory deseases like sickle cell anemia for example.

  13. Interactive computer graphics applications for compressible aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, Thomas J.

    1994-01-01

    Three computer applications have been developed to solve inviscid compressible fluids problems using interactive computer graphics. The first application is a compressible flow calculator which solves for isentropic flow, normal shocks, and oblique shocks or centered expansions produced by two dimensional ramps. The second application couples the solutions generated by the first application to a more graphical presentation of the results to produce a desk top simulator of three compressible flow problems: 1) flow past a single compression ramp; 2) flow past two ramps in series; and 3) flow past two opposed ramps. The third application extends the results of the second to produce a design tool which solves for the flow through supersonic external or mixed compression inlets. The applications were originally developed to run on SGI or IBM workstations running GL graphics. They are currently being extended to solve additional types of flow problems and modified to operate on any X-based workstation.

  14. Turbulence in Compressible Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Lecture notes for the AGARD Fluid Dynamics Panel (FDP) Special Course on 'Turbulence in Compressible Flows' have been assembled in this report. The following topics were covered: Compressible Turbulent Boundary Layers, Compressible Turbulent Free Shear Layers, Turbulent Combustion, DNS/LES and RANS Simulations of Compressible Turbulent Flows, and Case Studies of Applications of Turbulence Models in Aerospace.

  15. New equation of state model for hydrodynamic applications

    SciTech Connect

    Young, D.A.; Barbee, T.W. III; Rogers, F.J.

    1997-07-01

    Two new theoretical methods for computing the equation of state of hot, dense matter are discussed.The ab initio phonon theory gives a first-principles calculation of lattice frequencies, which can be used to compare theory and experiment for isothermal and shock compression of solids. The ACTEX dense plasma theory has been improved to allow it to be compared directly with ultrahigh pressure shock data on low-Z materials. The comparisons with experiment are good, suggesting that these models will be useful in generating global EOS tables for hydrodynamic simulations.

  16. Calculation methods for compressible turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bushnell, D. M.; Cary, A. M., Jr.; Harris, J. E.

    1976-01-01

    Calculation procedures for non-reacting compressible two- and three-dimensional turbulent boundary layers were reviewed. Integral, transformation and correlation methods, as well as finite difference solutions of the complete boundary layer equations summarized. Alternative numerical solution procedures were examined, and both mean field and mean turbulence field closure models were considered. Physics and related calculation problems peculiar to compressible turbulent boundary layers are described. A catalog of available solution procedures of the finite difference, finite element, and method of weighted residuals genre is included. Influence of compressibility, low Reynolds number, wall blowing, and pressure gradient upon mean field closure constants are reported.

  17. Evolution Of Nonlinear Waves in Compressing Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    P.F. Schmit, I.Y. Dodin, and N.J. Fisch

    2011-05-27

    Through particle-in-cell simulations, the evolution of nonlinear plasma waves is examined in one-dimensional collisionless plasma undergoing mechanical compression. Unlike linear waves, whose wavelength decreases proportionally to the system length L(t), nonlinear waves, such as solitary electron holes, conserve their characteristic size {Delta} during slow compression. This leads to a substantially stronger adiabatic amplification as well as rapid collisionless damping when L approaches {Delta}. On the other hand, cessation of compression halts the wave evolution, yielding a stable mode.

  18. Abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neuzil, C.E.

    1995-01-01

    So-called abnormal pressures, subsurface fluid pressures significantly higher or lower than hydrostatic, have excited speculation about their origin since subsurface exploration first encountered them. Two distinct conceptual models for abnormal pressures have gained currency among earth scientists. The static model sees abnormal pressures generally as relict features preserved by a virtual absence of fluid flow over geologic time. The hydrodynamic model instead envisions abnormal pressures as phenomena in which flow usually plays an important role. This paper develops the theoretical framework for abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena, shows that it explains the manifold occurrences of abnormal pressures, and examines the implications of this approach. -from Author

  19. The behavior of compression and degradation for municipal solid waste and combined settlement calculation method.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jianyong; Qian, Xuede; Liu, Xiaodong; Sun, Long; Liao, Zhiqiang

    2016-09-01

    The total compression of municipal solid waste (MSW) consists of primary, secondary, and decomposition compressions. It is usually difficult to distinguish between the three parts of compressions. In this study, the odeometer test was used to distinguish between the primary and secondary compressions to determine the primary and secondary compression coefficient. In addition, the ending time of the primary compressions were proposed based on municipal solid waste compression tests in a degradation-inhibited condition by adding vinegar. The amount of the secondary compression occurring in the primary compression stage has a relatively high percentage to either the total compression or the total secondary compression. The relationship between the degradation ratio and time was obtained from the tests independently. Furthermore, a combined compression calculation method of municipal solid waste for all three parts of compressions including considering organics degradation is proposed based on a one-dimensional compression method. The relationship between the methane generation potential L0 of LandGEM model and degradation compression index was also discussed in the paper. A special column compression apparatus system, which can be used to simulate the whole compression process of municipal solid waste in China, was designed. According to the results obtained from 197-day column compression test, the new combined calculation method for municipal solid waste compression was analyzed. The degradation compression is the main part of the compression of MSW in the medium test period.

  20. The behavior of compression and degradation for municipal solid waste and combined settlement calculation method.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jianyong; Qian, Xuede; Liu, Xiaodong; Sun, Long; Liao, Zhiqiang

    2016-09-01

    The total compression of municipal solid waste (MSW) consists of primary, secondary, and decomposition compressions. It is usually difficult to distinguish between the three parts of compressions. In this study, the odeometer test was used to distinguish between the primary and secondary compressions to determine the primary and secondary compression coefficient. In addition, the ending time of the primary compressions were proposed based on municipal solid waste compression tests in a degradation-inhibited condition by adding vinegar. The amount of the secondary compression occurring in the primary compression stage has a relatively high percentage to either the total compression or the total secondary compression. The relationship between the degradation ratio and time was obtained from the tests independently. Furthermore, a combined compression calculation method of municipal solid waste for all three parts of compressions including considering organics degradation is proposed based on a one-dimensional compression method. The relationship between the methane generation potential L0 of LandGEM model and degradation compression index was also discussed in the paper. A special column compression apparatus system, which can be used to simulate the whole compression process of municipal solid waste in China, was designed. According to the results obtained from 197-day column compression test, the new combined calculation method for municipal solid waste compression was analyzed. The degradation compression is the main part of the compression of MSW in the medium test period. PMID:26548978