Science.gov

Sample records for dimensional compressible hydrodynamic

  1. New numerical solutions of three-dimensional compressible hydrodynamic convection. [in stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hossain, Murshed; Mullan, D. J.

    1990-01-01

    Numerical solutions of three-dimensional compressible hydrodynamics (including sound waves) in a stratified medium with open boundaries are presented. Convergent/divergent points play a controlling role in the flows, which are dominated by a single frequency related to the mean sound crossing time. Superposed on these rapid compressive flows, slower eddy-like flows eventually create convective transport. The solutions contain small structures stacked on top of larger ones, with vertical scales equal to the local pressure scale heights, H sub p. Although convective transport starts later in the evolution, vertical scales of H sub p are apparently selected at much earlier times by nonlinear compressive effects.

  2. HYDRODYNAMIC COMPRESSIVE FORGING.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    HYDRODYNAMICS), (*FORGING, COMPRESSIVE PROPERTIES, LUBRICANTS, PERFORMANCE(ENGINEERING), DIES, TENSILE PROPERTIES, MOLYBDENUM ALLOYS , STRAIN...MECHANICS), BERYLLIUM ALLOYS , NICKEL ALLOYS , CASTING ALLOYS , PRESSURE, FAILURE(MECHANICS).

  3. VH-1: Multidimensional ideal compressible hydrodynamics code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawley, John; Blondin, John; Lindahl, Greg; Lufkin, Eric

    2012-04-01

    VH-1 is a multidimensional ideal compressible hydrodynamics code written in FORTRAN for use on any computing platform, from desktop workstations to supercomputers. It uses a Lagrangian remap version of the Piecewise Parabolic Method developed by Paul Woodward and Phil Colella in their 1984 paper. VH-1 comes in a variety of versions, from a simple one-dimensional serial variant to a multi-dimensional version scalable to thousands of processors.

  4. Hydrodynamic stability of compressible plane Couette flow

    SciTech Connect

    Chagelishvili, G.D. Department of Plasma Physics, Space Research Institute, str. Profsoyuznaya 84 Rogava, A.D. ); Segal, I.N. Department of Plasma Physics, Space Research Institute, str. Profsoyuznaya 84/32, 117810 Moscow )

    1994-12-01

    The evolution of two-dimensional spatial Fourier harmonics in a compressible plane Couette flow is considered. A new mechanism of energy exchange between the mean flow and sound-type perturbations is discovered.

  5. Compressible Lagrangian hydrodynamics without Lagrangian cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Robert A.

    The partial differential Eqs [2.1, 2.2, and 2.3], along with the equation of state 2.4, which describe the time evolution of compressible fluid flow can be solved without the use of a Lagrangian mesh. The method follows embedded fluid points and uses finite difference approximations to ěc nablaP and ěc nabla · ěc u to update p, ěc u and e. We have demonstrated that the method can accurately calculate highly distorted flows without difficulty. The finite difference approximations are not unique, improvements may be found in the near future. The neighbor selection is not unique, but the one being used at present appears to do an excellent job. The method could be directly extended to three dimensions. One drawback to the method is the failure toexplicitly conserve mass, momentum and energy. In fact, at any given time, the mass is not defined. We must perform an auxiliary calculation by integrating the density field over space to obtain mass, energy and momentum. However, in all cases where we have done this, we have found the drift in these quantities to be no more than a few percent.

  6. Phonon hydrodynamics in two-dimensional materials.

    PubMed

    Cepellotti, Andrea; Fugallo, Giorgia; Paulatto, Lorenzo; Lazzeri, Michele; Mauri, Francesco; Marzari, Nicola

    2015-03-06

    The conduction of heat in two dimensions displays a wealth of fascinating phenomena of key relevance to the scientific understanding and technological applications of graphene and related materials. Here, we use density-functional perturbation theory and an exact, variational solution of the Boltzmann transport equation to study fully from first-principles phonon transport and heat conductivity in graphene, boron nitride, molybdenum disulphide and the functionalized derivatives graphane and fluorographene. In all these materials, and at variance with typical three-dimensional solids, normal processes keep dominating over Umklapp scattering well-above cryogenic conditions, extending to room temperature and more. As a result, novel regimes emerge, with Poiseuille and Ziman hydrodynamics, hitherto typically confined to ultra-low temperatures, characterizing transport at ordinary conditions. Most remarkably, several of these two-dimensional materials admit wave-like heat diffusion, with second sound present at room temperature and above in graphene, boron nitride and graphane.

  7. Phonon hydrodynamics in two-dimensional materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cepellotti, Andrea; Fugallo, Giorgia; Paulatto, Lorenzo; Lazzeri, Michele; Mauri, Francesco; Marzari, Nicola

    2015-03-01

    The conduction of heat in two dimensions displays a wealth of fascinating phenomena of key relevance to the scientific understanding and technological applications of graphene and related materials. Here, we use density-functional perturbation theory and an exact, variational solution of the Boltzmann transport equation to study fully from first-principles phonon transport and heat conductivity in graphene, boron nitride, molybdenum disulphide and the functionalized derivatives graphane and fluorographene. In all these materials, and at variance with typical three-dimensional solids, normal processes keep dominating over Umklapp scattering well-above cryogenic conditions, extending to room temperature and more. As a result, novel regimes emerge, with Poiseuille and Ziman hydrodynamics, hitherto typically confined to ultra-low temperatures, characterizing transport at ordinary conditions. Most remarkably, several of these two-dimensional materials admit wave-like heat diffusion, with second sound present at room temperature and above in graphene, boron nitride and graphane.

  8. Three-Dimensional Hydrodynamics Experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Blue, B E; Weber, S V; Glendinning, S; Lanier, N; Woods, D; Bono, M; Dixit, S; Haynam, C; Holder, J; Kalantar, D; MacGowan, B; Moses, E; Nikitin, A; Rekow, V; Wallace, R; Van Wonterghem, B; Rosen, P; Foster, J; Stry, P; Wilde, B; Hsing, W; Robey, H

    2004-11-12

    The production of supersonic jets of material via the interaction of a strong shock wave with a spatially localized density perturbation is a common feature of inertial confinement fusion and astrophysics. The behavior of two-dimensional (2D) supersonic jets has previously been investigated in detail [J. M. Foster et. al, Phys. Plasmas 9, 2251 (2002)]. In three-dimensions (3D), however, there are new aspects to the behavior of supersonic jets in compressible media. In this paper, the commissioning activities on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [J. A. Paisner et al., Laser Focus World 30, 75 (1994)] to enable hydrodynamic experiments will be presented as well as the results from the first series of hydrodynamic experiments. In these experiments, two of the first four beams of NIF are used to drive a 40 Mbar shock wave into millimeter scale aluminum targets backed by 100 mg/cc carbon aerogel foam. The remaining beams are delayed in time and are used to provide a point-projection x-ray backlighter source for diagnosing the three-dimensional structure of the jet evolution resulting from a variety of 2D and 3D features. Comparisons between data and simulations using several codes will be presented.

  9. Three-Dimensional Hydrodynamic Experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Blue, B E; Robey, H F; Glendinning, S G; Bono, M J; Dixit, S N; Foster, J M; Haynam, C A; Holder, J P; Hsing, W W; Kalantar, D H; Lanier, N E; MacGowan, B J; Moses, E I; Nikitin, A J; Perry, T S; Rekow, V V; Rosen, P A; Stry, P E; Van Wonterghem, B M; Wallace, R; Weber, S V; Wilde, B H; Woods, D T

    2005-02-09

    The production of supersonic jets of material via the interaction of a strong shock wave with a spatially localized density perturbation is a common feature of inertial confinement fusion and astrophysics. The behavior of two-dimensional (2D) supersonic jets has previously been investigated in detail [J. M. Foster et. al, Phys. Plasmas 9, 2251 (2002)]. In three-dimensions (3D), however, there are new aspects to the behavior of supersonic jets in compressible media. In this paper, the commissioning activities on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [J. A. Paisner et al., Laser Focus World 30, 75 (1994)] to enable hydrodynamic experiments will be presented as well as the results from the first series of hydrodynamic experiments. In these experiments, two of the first four beams of NIF are used to drive a 40 Mbar shock wave into millimeter scale aluminum targets backed by 100 mg/cc carbon aerogel foam. The remaining beams are delayed in time and are used to provide a point-projection x-ray backlighter source for diagnosing the three-dimensional structure of the jet evolution resulting from a variety of 2D and 3D features. Comparisons between data and simulations using several codes will be presented.

  10. Three-dimensional hydrodynamic experiments on the National Ignition Facilitya)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blue, B. E.; Robey, H. F.; Glendinning, S. G.; Bono, M. J.; Burkhart, S. C.; Celeste, J. R.; Coker, R. F.; Costa, R. L.; Dixit, S. N.; Foster, J. M.; Hansen, J. F.; Haynam, C. A.; Hermann, M. R.; Holder, J. P.; Hsing, W. W.; Kalantar, D. H.; Lanier, N. E.; Latray, D. A.; Louis, H.; MacGowan, B. J.; Maggelssen, G. R.; Marshall, C. D.; Moses, E. I.; Nikitin, A. J.; O'Brien, D. W.; Perry, T. S.; Poole, M. W.; Rekow, V. V.; Rosen, P. A.; Schneider, M. B.; Stry, P. E.; Van Wonterghem, B. M.; Wallace, R.; Weber, S. V.; Wilde, B. H.; Woods, D. T.; Young, B. K.

    2005-05-01

    The production of supersonic jets of material via the interaction of a strong shock wave with a spatially localized density perturbation is a common feature of inertial confinement fusion and astrophysics. The behavior of two-dimensional (2D) supersonic jets has previously been investigated in detail [J. M. Foster, B. H. Wilde, P. A. Rosen, T. S. Perry, M. Fell, M. J. Edwards, B. F. Lasinski, R. E. Turner, and M. L. Gittings, Phys. Plasmas 9, 2251 (2002)]. In three dimensions (3D), however, there are new aspects to the behavior of supersonic jets in compressible media. In this paper, the commissioning activities on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [J. A. Paisner, J. D. Boyes, S. A. Kumpan, W. H. Lowdermilk, and M. Sorem, Laser Focus World 30, 75 (1994)] to enable hydrodynamic experiments will be presented as well as the results from the first series of hydrodynamic experiments. In these experiments, two of the first four beams of NIF are used to drive a 40Mbar shock wave into millimeter scale aluminum targets backed by 100mg/cc carbon aerogel foam. The remaining beams are delayed in time and are used to provide a point-projection x-ray backlighter source for diagnosing the three-dimensional structure of the jet evolution resulting from a variety of 2D and 3D features. Comparisons between data and simulations using several codes will be presented.

  11. Two Dimensional Hydrodynamic Analysis of the Moose Creek Floodway

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    ER D C/ CH L TR -1 2 -2 0 Two Dimensional Hydrodynamic Analysis of the Moose Creek Floodway C oa st al a n d H yd ra u lic s La b or at...distribution is unlimited. ERDC/CHL TR-12-20 September 2012 Two Dimensional Hydrodynamic Analysis of the Moose Creek Floodway Stephen H. Scott, Jeremy A...A two-dimensional Adaptive Hydraulics (AdH) hydrodynamic model was developed to simulate the Moose Creek Floodway. The Floodway is located

  12. CASTRO: A NEW COMPRESSIBLE ASTROPHYSICAL SOLVER. II. GRAY RADIATION HYDRODYNAMICS

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, W.; Almgren, A.; Bell, J.; Howell, L.; Burrows, A.

    2011-10-01

    We describe the development of a flux-limited gray radiation solver for the compressible astrophysics code, CASTRO. CASTRO uses an Eulerian grid with block-structured adaptive mesh refinement based on a nested hierarchy of logically rectangular variable-sized grids with simultaneous refinement in both space and time. The gray radiation solver is based on a mixed-frame formulation of radiation hydrodynamics. In our approach, the system is split into two parts, one part that couples the radiation and fluid in a hyperbolic subsystem, and another parabolic part that evolves radiation diffusion and source-sink terms. The hyperbolic subsystem is solved explicitly with a high-order Godunov scheme, whereas the parabolic part is solved implicitly with a first-order backward Euler method.

  13. Pencil: Finite-difference Code for Compressible Hydrodynamic Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandenburg, Axel; Dobler, Wolfgang

    2010-10-01

    The Pencil code is a high-order finite-difference code for compressible hydrodynamic flows with magnetic fields. It is highly modular and can easily be adapted to different types of problems. The code runs efficiently under MPI on massively parallel shared- or distributed-memory computers, like e.g. large Beowulf clusters. The Pencil code is primarily designed to deal with weakly compressible turbulent flows. To achieve good parallelization, explicit (as opposed to compact) finite differences are used. Typical scientific targets include driven MHD turbulence in a periodic box, convection in a slab with non-periodic upper and lower boundaries, a convective star embedded in a fully nonperiodic box, accretion disc turbulence in the shearing sheet approximation, self-gravity, non-local radiation transfer, dust particle evolution with feedback on the gas, etc. A range of artificial viscosity and diffusion schemes can be invoked to deal with supersonic flows. For direct simulations regular viscosity and diffusion is being used. The code is written in well-commented Fortran90.

  14. CASTRO: A NEW COMPRESSIBLE ASTROPHYSICAL SOLVER. III. MULTIGROUP RADIATION HYDRODYNAMICS

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, W.; Almgren, A.; Bell, J.; Howell, L.; Burrows, A.; Dolence, J.

    2013-01-15

    We present a formulation for multigroup radiation hydrodynamics that is correct to order O(v/c) using the comoving-frame approach and the flux-limited diffusion approximation. We describe a numerical algorithm for solving the system, implemented in the compressible astrophysics code, CASTRO. CASTRO uses a Eulerian grid with block-structured adaptive mesh refinement based on a nested hierarchy of logically rectangular variable-sized grids with simultaneous refinement in both space and time. In our multigroup radiation solver, the system is split into three parts: one part that couples the radiation and fluid in a hyperbolic subsystem, another part that advects the radiation in frequency space, and a parabolic part that evolves radiation diffusion and source-sink terms. The hyperbolic subsystem and the frequency space advection are solved explicitly with high-order Godunov schemes, whereas the parabolic part is solved implicitly with a first-order backward Euler method. Our multigroup radiation solver works for both neutrino and photon radiation.

  15. Hydrodynamic stability of three-dimensional homogeneous flow topologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Aashwin A.; Girimaji, Sharath S.

    2015-11-01

    This article examines the hydrodynamic stability of various homogeneous three-dimensional flow topologies. The influence of inertial and pressure effects on the stability of flows undergoing strain, rotation, convergence, divergence, and swirl are isolated. In marked contrast to two-dimensional topologies, for three-dimensional flows the inertial effects are always destabilizing, whereas pressure effects are always stabilizing. In streamline topologies with a negative velocity-gradient third invariant, inertial effects prevail leading to instability. Vortex-stretching is identified as the underlying instability mechanism. In flows with positive velocity-gradient third derivative, pressure overcomes inertial effects to stabilize the flow.

  16. Analytical solutions of Landau (1+1)-dimensional hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Cheuk-Yin; Sen, Abhisek; Gerhard, Jochen; Torrieri, Giorgio; Read, Kenneth

    2014-12-17

    To help guide our intuition, summarize important features, and point out essential elements, we review the analytical solutions of Landau (1+1)-dimensional hydrodynamics and exhibit the full evolution of the dynamics from the very beginning to subsequent times. Special emphasis is placed on the matching and the interplay between the Khalatnikov solution and the Riemann simple wave solution at the earliest times and in the edge regions at later times.

  17. Analytical solutions of Landau (1+1)-dimensional hydrodynamics

    DOE PAGES

    Wong, Cheuk-Yin; Sen, Abhisek; Gerhard, Jochen; ...

    2014-12-17

    To help guide our intuition, summarize important features, and point out essential elements, we review the analytical solutions of Landau (1+1)-dimensional hydrodynamics and exhibit the full evolution of the dynamics from the very beginning to subsequent times. Special emphasis is placed on the matching and the interplay between the Khalatnikov solution and the Riemann simple wave solution at the earliest times and in the edge regions at later times.

  18. Two-Dimensional Simulation of Truckee River Hydrodynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-01

    ANALYSIS: The Truckee River originates from Lake Tahoe , flowing 140 miles (225 km) through Reno, NV, to Pyramid Lake . The downstream boundary of the...riverine restoration design. A two-dimensional (2-D) hydrodynamic model was applied to the McCarran Ranch reach of the Truckee River to evaluate...existing condition and future restoration plan condition hydraulics. The impact of the restoration design is presented in terms of the difference in the

  19. Hydrodynamic Liner Experiments Using the Ranchero Flux Compression Generator System

    SciTech Connect

    Goforth, J.H.; Atchison, W.L.; Fowler, C.M.; Lopez, E.A.; Oona, H.; Tasker, D.G.; King, J.C.; Herrera, D.H.; Torres, D.T.; Sena, F.C.; McGuire, J.A.; Reinovsky, R.E.; Stokes, J.L.; Tabaka, L.J.; Garcia, O.F.; Faehl, R.J.; Lindemuth, I.R.; Keinigs, R.K.; Broste, B.

    1998-10-18

    The authors have developed a system for driving hydrodynamic liners at currents approaching 30 MA. Their 43 cm module will deliver currents of interest, and when fully developed, the 1.4 m module will allow similar currents with more total system inductance. With these systems they can perform interesting physics experiments and support the Atlas development effort.

  20. Lossless compression for three-dimensional images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xiaoli; Pearlman, William A.

    2004-01-01

    We investigate and compare the performance of several three-dimensional (3D) embedded wavelet algorithms on lossless 3D image compression. The algorithms are Asymmetric Tree Three-Dimensional Set Partitioning In Hierarchical Trees (AT-3DSPIHT), Three-Dimensional Set Partitioned Embedded bloCK (3D-SPECK), Three-Dimensional Context-Based Embedded Zerotrees of Wavelet coefficients (3D-CB-EZW), and JPEG2000 Part II for multi-component images. Two kinds of images are investigated in our study -- 8-bit CT and MR medical images and 16-bit AVIRIS hyperspectral images. First, the performances by using different size of coding units are compared. It shows that increasing the size of coding unit improves the performance somewhat. Second, the performances by using different integer wavelet transforms are compared for AT-3DSPIHT, 3D-SPECK and 3D-CB-EZW. None of the considered filters always performs the best for all data sets and algorithms. At last, we compare the different lossless compression algorithms by applying integer wavelet transform on the entire image volumes. For 8-bit medical image volumes, AT-3DSPIHT performs the best almost all the time, achieving average of 12% decreases in file size compared with JPEG2000 multi-component, the second performer. For 16-bit hyperspectral images, AT-3DSPIHT always performs the best, yielding average 5.8% and 8.9% decreases in file size compared with 3D-SPECK and JPEG2000 multi-component, respectively. Two 2D compression algorithms, JPEG2000 and UNIX zip, are also included for reference, and all 3D algorithms perform much better than 2D algorithms.

  1. Multi-dimensional hydrodynamics of core-collapse supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Jeremiah W.

    Core-collapse supernovae are some of the most energetic events in the Universe, they herald the birth of neutron stars and black holes, are a major site for nucleosynthesis, influence galactic hydrodynamics, and trigger further star formation. As such, it is important to understand the mechanism of explosion. Moreover, observations imply that asymmetries are, in the least, a feature of the mechanism, and theory suggests that multi-dimensional hydrodynamics may be crucial for successful explosions. In this dissertation, we present theoretical investigations into the multi-dimensional nature of the supernova mechanism. It had been suggested that nuclear reactions might excite non-radial g-modes (the [straight epsilon]-mechanism) in the cores of progenitors, leading to asymmetric explosions. We calculate the eigenmodes for a large suite of progenitors including excitation by nuclear reactions and damping by neutrino and acoustic losses. Without exception, we find unstable g-modes for each progenitor. However, the timescales for growth are at least an order of magnitude longer than the time until collapse. Thus, the [straight epsilon]- mechanism does not provide appreciable amplification of non-radial modes before the core undergoes collapse. Regardless, neutrino-driven convection, the standing accretion shock instability, and other instabilities during the explosion provide ample asymmetry. To adequately simulate these, we have developed a new hydrodynamics code, BETHE-hydro that uses the Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) approach, includes rotational terms, solves Poisson's equation for gravity on arbitrary grids, and conserves energy and momentum in its basic implementation. By using time-dependent arbitrary grids that can adapt to the numerical challenges of the problem, this code offers unique flexibility in simulating astrophysical phenomena. Finally, we use BETHE-hydro to investigate the conditions and criteria for supernova explosions by the neutrino

  2. Correlating hydrodynamic radii with that of two-dimensional nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Yue, Yuan; Kan, Yuwei; Clearfield, Abraham; Choi, Hyunho; Liang, Hong

    2015-12-21

    Dynamic light scattering (DLS) is one of the most adapted methods to measure the size of nanoparticles, as referred to the hydrodynamic radii (R{sub h}). However, the R{sub h} represents only that of three-dimensional spherical nanoparticles. In the present research, the size of two-dimensional (2D) nanoparticles of yttrium oxide (Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and zirconium phosphate (ZrP) was evaluated through comparing their hydrodynamic diameters via DLS with lateral sizes obtained using scanning and transmission electron microscopy. We demonstrate that the hydrodynamic radii are correlated with the lateral sizes of both square and circle shaped 2D nanoparticles. Two proportional coefficients, i.e., correcting factors, are proposed for the Brownian motion status of 2D nanoparticles. The correction is possible by simplifying the calculation of integrals in the case of small thickness approximation. The correcting factor has great significance for investigating the translational diffusion behavior of 2D nanoparticles in a liquid and in effective and low-cost measurement in terms of size and morphology of shape-specific nanoparticles.

  3. Scaling and self-similarity in two-dimensional hydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Ercan, Ali; Kavvas, M Levent

    2015-07-01

    The conditions under which depth-averaged two-dimensional (2D) hydrodynamic equations system as an initial-boundary value problem (IBVP) becomes self-similar are investigated by utilizing one-parameter Lie group of point scaling transformations. Self-similarity conditions due to the 2D k-ε turbulence model are also investigated. The self-similarity conditions for the depth-averaged 2D hydrodynamics are found for the flow variables including the time, the longitudinal length, the transverse length, the water depth, the flow velocities in x- and y-directions, the bed shear stresses in x- and y-directions, the bed shear velocity, the Manning's roughness coefficient, the kinematic viscosity of the fluid, the eddy viscosity, the turbulent kinetic energy, the turbulent dissipation, and the production and the source terms in the k-ε model. By the numerical simulations, it is shown that the IBVP of depth-averaged 2D hydrodynamic flow process in a prototype domain can be self-similar with that of a scaled domain. In fact, by changing the scaling parameter and the scaling exponents of the length dimensions, one can obtain several different scaled domains. The proposed scaling relations obtained by the Lie group scaling approach may provide additional spatial, temporal, and economical flexibility in setting up physical hydraulic models in which two-dimensional flow components are important.

  4. Correlating hydrodynamic radii with that of two-dimensional nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Yuan; Kan, Yuwei; Choi, Hyunho; Clearfield, Abraham; Liang, Hong

    2015-12-01

    Dynamic light scattering (DLS) is one of the most adapted methods to measure the size of nanoparticles, as referred to the hydrodynamic radii (Rh). However, the Rh represents only that of three-dimensional spherical nanoparticles. In the present research, the size of two-dimensional (2D) nanoparticles of yttrium oxide (Y2O3) and zirconium phosphate (ZrP) was evaluated through comparing their hydrodynamic diameters via DLS with lateral sizes obtained using scanning and transmission electron microscopy. We demonstrate that the hydrodynamic radii are correlated with the lateral sizes of both square and circle shaped 2D nanoparticles. Two proportional coefficients, i.e., correcting factors, are proposed for the Brownian motion status of 2D nanoparticles. The correction is possible by simplifying the calculation of integrals in the case of small thickness approximation. The correcting factor has great significance for investigating the translational diffusion behavior of 2D nanoparticles in a liquid and in effective and low-cost measurement in terms of size and morphology of shape-specific nanoparticles.

  5. Hydrodynamic versus collisionless dynamics of a one-dimensional harmonically trapped Bose gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Rosi, Giulia; Stringari, Sandro

    2016-12-01

    By using a sum-rule approach we investigate the transition between the hydrodynamic and the collisionless regime of the collective modes in a one-dimensional (1D) harmonically trapped Bose gas. Both the weakly interacting gas and the Tonks-Girardeau limits are considered. We predict that the excitation of the dipole compression mode is characterized in the high-temperature collisionless regime by a beating signal of two different frequencies (ωz and 3 ωz ), while in the high-temperature collisional regime, the excitation consists of a single frequency (√{7 }ωz ). This behavior differs from the case of the lowest breathing mode whose excitation consists of a single frequency (2 ωz ) in both regimes. Our predictions for the dipole compression mode open promising perspectives for the experimental investigation of collisional effects in 1D configurations.

  6. Polarization hydrodynamics in a one-dimensional polariton condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larré, P.-É.; Pavloff, N.; Kamchatnov, A. M.

    2013-12-01

    We study the hydrodynamics of a nonresonantly pumped polariton condensate in a quasi-one-dimensional quantum wire taking into account the spin degree of freedom. We clarify the relevance of the Landau criterion for superfluidity in this dissipative two-component system. Two Cherenkov-like critical velocities are identified corresponding to the opening of different channels of radiation: one of (damped) density fluctuations and another of (weakly damped) polarization fluctuations. We determine the drag force exerted onto an external obstacle and propose experimentally measurable consequences of the specific features of the fluctuations of polarization.

  7. Three-Dimensional Hydrodynamic Simulations of OMEGA Implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igumenshchev, I. V.

    2016-10-01

    The effects of large-scale (with Legendre modes less than 30) asymmetries in OMEGA direct-drive implosions caused by laser illumination nonuniformities (beam-power imbalance and beam mispointing and mistiming) and target offset, mount, and layers nonuniformities were investigated using three-dimensional (3-D) hydrodynamic simulations. Simulations indicate that the performance degradation in cryogenic implosions is caused mainly by the target offsets ( 10 to 20 μm), beampower imbalance (σrms 10 %), and initial target asymmetry ( 5% ρRvariation), which distort implosion cores, resulting in a reduced hot-spot confinement and an increased residual kinetic energy of the stagnated target. The ion temperature inferred from the width of simulated neutron spectra are influenced by bulk fuel motion in the distorted hot spot and can result in up to 2-keV apparent temperature increase. Similar temperature variations along different lines of sight are observed. Simulated x-ray images of implosion cores in the 4- to 8-keV energy range show good agreement with experiments. Demonstrating hydrodynamic equivalence to ignition designs on OMEGA requires reducing large-scale target and laser-imposed nonuniformities, minimizing target offset, and employing high-efficient mid-adiabat (α = 4) implosion designs that mitigate cross-beam energy transfer (CBET) and suppress short-wavelength Rayleigh-Taylor growth. These simulations use a new low-noise 3-D Eulerian hydrodynamic code ASTER. Existing 3-D hydrodynamic codes for direct-drive implosions currently miss CBET and noise-free ray-trace laser deposition algorithms. ASTER overcomes these limitations using a simplified 3-D laser-deposition model, which includes CBET and is capable of simulating the effects of beam-power imbalance, beam mispointing, mistiming, and target offset. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  8. Hydrodynamics and transport in low-dimensional interacting systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Manas

    Recent ground-breaking experiments have realized strongly interacting quantum degenerate Fermi gas in a cold atomic system with tunable interactions. This has provided a table-top system which is extremely hydrodynamic in nature. This experimental realization helps us to investigate several aspects such as the interplay between nonlinearity, dissipation and dispersion. We find, for instance, that the dynamics in such a system shows near perfect agreement with a hydrodynamic theory. In collaboration with the group of John Thomas at Duke we interpreted studies of collision of two strongly interacting Fermi gases that led to shock waves which are a hallmark of nonlinear physics. Due to reasons such as the nature of interactions, higher dimensionality, these cold atomic systems are non-integrable and moreover the underlying field theory construction is mostly phenomenological in nature. On the other hand there are certain one-dimensional systems which are not only integrable but also facilitate more formal and rigorous ways of deriving the corresponding integrable field theories. One such family of models is the family of Calogero models (and their generalizations). They provide an extraordinary insight into the field of strongly correlated systems and hydrodynamics. We study the collective field theory of such models and address aspects of nonlinear physics such as Spin-Charge Interaction, Emptiness Formation Probability, Solitons etc; We derive a two-component nonlinear, nonlocal, integrable field theory. We also show that the Calogero family which is integrable even in an external harmonic trap (usually unavoidable in cold atom setups) is relatively "short ranged" thereby qualifying as a toy model for cold atom experiments. Transport in certain strongly correlated systems (impurity models) was studied using few low-dimensional techniques such as a 1/N diagrammatic expansion, Slave Boson Mean Field Theory and the Bethe Ansatz. A mesoscopic setup such as parallel

  9. Three Dimensional Hybrid Continuum-Atomistic Simulations for Multiscale Hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijesinghe, Sanith; Hornung, Richard; Garcia, Alejandro; Hadjiconstantinou, Nicolas

    2002-11-01

    An adaptive mesh and algorithmic refinement (AMAR) scheme to model multi-scale, compressible continuum-atomistic hydrodynamics is presented. The AMAR technique applies the atomistic description as the finest level of refinement in regions where the continuum description is expected to fail, such as in regions of high flow gradients and discontinous material interfaces. In the current implementation the atomistic description is provided by the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC). The continuum flow is modeled using the compressible flow Euler equations and is solved using a second order Godunov scheme. Coupling is achieved by conservation of fluxes across the continuum-atomistic grid boundaries. The AMAR data structures are supported by a C++ object oriented framework (Structured Adaptive Mesh Refinement Application Infrastructure - SAMRAI) which allows for efficient parallel implementation. Current work is focused on extending AMAR to simulations of gas mixtures. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract number W-7405-Eng-48.

  10. Two dimensional hydrodynamic modeling of a high latitude braided river

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphries, E.; Pavelsky, T.; Bates, P. D.

    2014-12-01

    Rivers are a fundamental resource to physical, ecologic and human systems, yet quantification of river flow in high-latitude environments remains limited due to the prevalence of complex morphologies, remote locations and sparse in situ monitoring equipment. Advances in hydrodynamic modeling and remote sensing technology allow us to address questions such as: How well can two-dimensional models simulate a flood wave in a highly 3-dimensional braided river environment, and how does the structure of such a flood wave differ from flow down a similar-sized single-channel river? Here, we use the raster-based hydrodynamic model LISFLOOD-FP to simulate flood waves, discharge, water surface height, and velocity measurements over a ~70 km reach of the Tanana River in Alaska. In order to use LISFLOOD-FP a digital elevation model (DEM) fused with detailed bathymetric data is required. During summer 2013, we surveyed 220,000 bathymetric points along the study reach using an echo sounder system connected to a high-precision GPS unit. The measurements are interpolated to a smooth bathymetric surface, using Topo to Raster interpolation, and combined with an existing five meter DEM (Alaska IfSAR) to create a seamless river terrain model. Flood waves are simulated using varying complexities in model solvers, then compared to gauge records and water logger data to assess major sources of model uncertainty. Velocity and flow direction maps are also assessed and quantified for detailed analysis of braided channel flow. The most accurate model output occurs with using the full two-dimensional model structure, and major inaccuracies appear to be related to DEM quality and roughness values. Future work will intercompare model outputs with extensive ground measurements and new data from AirSWOT, an airborne analog for the Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) mission, which aims to provide high-resolution measurements of terrestrial and ocean water surface elevations globally.

  11. Hydrodynamic simulations of gaseous Argon shock compression experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Daniel B.; Dattelbaum, Dana M.; Goodwin, Peter M.; Sheffield, Stephen A.; Morris, John S.; Gustavsen, Richard L.; Burkett, Michael W.

    2017-01-01

    The lack of published Ar gas shock data motivated an evaluation of the Ar Equation of State (EOS) in gas phase initial density regimes. In particular, these regimes include initial pressures in the range of 13.8 - 34.5 bar (0.025 - 0.056 g/ cm3) and initial shock velocities around 0.2 cm/μs. The objective of the numerical evaluation was to develop a physical understanding of the EOS behavior of shocked and subsequently multiply re-shocked Ar gas through Pagosa numerical simulations utilizing the SESAME equation of state. Pagosa is a Los Alamos National Laboratory 2-D and 3-D Eulerian continuum dynamics code capable of modeling high velocity compressible flow with multiple materials. The approach involved the use of gas gun experiments to evaluate the shock and multiple re-shock behavior of pressurized Ar gas to validate Pagosa simulations and the SESAME EOS. Additionally, the diagnostic capability within the experiments allowed for the EOS to be fully constrained with measured shock velocity, particle velocity and temperature. The simulations demonstrate excellent agreement with the experiments in the shock velocity/particle velocity space, and reasonable comparisons for the ionization temperatures.

  12. Low Mach number two-dimensional hydrodynamic turbulence - Energy budgets and density fluctuations in a polytropic fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosh, S.; Matthaeus, W. H.

    1992-01-01

    Theory suggests that three distinct types of turbulence can occur in the low Mach number limit of polytropic flow: nearly incompressible flows dominated by vorticity, nearly pure acoustic turbulence dominated by compression, and flows characterized by near statistical equipartition of vorticity and compressions. Distinctions between these kinds of turbulence are investigated here by direct numerical simulation of two-dimensional compressible hydrodynamic turbulence. Dynamical scalings of density fluctuations, examination of the ratio of transverse to longitudinal velocity fluctuations, and spectral decomposition of the fluctuations are employed to distinguish the nature of these low Mach number solutions. A strong dependence on the initial data is observed, as well as a tendency for enhanced effects of compressibility at later times and at higher wave numbers, as suggested by theories of nearly incompressible flows.

  13. Three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of OMEGA implosions

    DOE PAGES

    Igumenshchev, I. V.; Michel, D. T.; Shah, R. C.; ...

    2017-03-30

    Here, the effects of large-scale (with Legendre modes ≲10) asymmetries in OMEGA direct-drive implosions caused by laser illumination nonuniformities (beam-power imbalance and beam mispointing and mistiming), target offset, and variation in target-layer thickness were investigated using the low-noise, three-dimensional Eulerian hydrodynamic code ASTER. Simulations indicate that these asymmetries can significantly degrade the implosion performance. The most important sources of the asymmetries are the target offsets (~10 to 20 μm), beam-power imbalance (σrms ~ 10%), and variations (~5%) in target-layer thickness. Large-scale asymmetries distort implosion cores, resulting in a reduced hot-spot confinement and an increased residual kinetic energy of implosion targets.more » The ion temperature inferred from the width of simulated neutron spectra is influenced by bulk fuel motion in the distorted hot spot and can result in up to an ~1 -keV increase in apparent temperature. Similar temperature variations along different lines of sight are observed. Demonstrating hydrodynamic equivalence to ignition designs on OMEGA requires a reduction in large-scale target and laser-imposed nonuniformities, minimizing target offset, and employing highly efficient mid-adiabat (α = 4) implosion designs, which mitigate cross-beam energy transfer and suppress short-wavelength Rayleigh–Taylor growth.« less

  14. HERACLES: a three-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, M.; Audit, E.; Huynh, P.

    2007-03-01

    Aims:We present a new three-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics code called HERACLES that uses an original moment method to solve the radiative transfer. Methods: The radiation transfer is modelled using a two-moment model and a closure relation that allows large angular anisotropies in the radiation field to be preserved and reproduced. The radiative equations thus obtained are solved by a second-order Godunov-type method and integrated implicitly by using iterative solvers. HERACLES has been parallelized with the MPI library and implemented in Cartesian, cylindrical, and spherical coordinates. To characterize the accuracy of HERACLES and to compare it with other codes, we performed a series of tests including purely radiative tests and radiation-hydrodynamics ones. Results: The results show that the physical model used in HERACLES for the transfer is fairly accurate in both the diffusion and transport limit, but also for semi-transparent regions. Conclusions: . This makes HERACLES very well-suited to studying many astrophysical problems such as radiative shocks, molecular jets of young stars, fragmentation and formation of dense cores in the interstellar medium, and protoplanetary discs. Appendices are only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  15. CASTRO: A NEW COMPRESSIBLE ASTROPHYSICAL SOLVER. I. HYDRODYNAMICS AND SELF-GRAVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Almgren, A. S.; Beckner, V. E.; Bell, J. B.; Day, M. S.; Lijewski, M. J.; Nonaka, A.; Howell, L. H.; Singer, M.; Joggerst, C. C.; Zingale, M.

    2010-06-01

    We present a new code, CASTRO, that solves the multicomponent compressible hydrodynamic equations for astrophysical flows including self-gravity, nuclear reactions, and radiation. CASTRO uses an Eulerian grid and incorporates adaptive mesh refinement (AMR). Our approach to AMR uses a nested hierarchy of logically rectangular grids with simultaneous refinement in both space and time. The radiation component of CASTRO will be described in detail in the next paper, Part II, of this series.

  16. Hydrodynamic modes of a one-dimensional trapped Bose gas

    SciTech Connect

    Fuchs, J.N.; Leyronas, X.; Combescot, R.

    2003-10-01

    We consider two regimes where a trapped Bose gas behaves as a one-dimensional (1D) system. In the first one the Bose gas is microscopically described by 3D mean-field theory, but the trap is so elongated that it behaves as a 1D gas with respect to low-frequency collective modes. In the second regime we assume that the 1D gas is truly 1D and that it is properly described by the Lieb-Liniger model. In both regimes we find the frequency of the lowest compressional mode by solving the hydrodynamic equations. This is done by making use of a method which allows us to find analytical or quasianalytical solutions of these equations for a large class of models approaching very closely the actual equation of state of the Bose gas. We find an excellent agreement with the recent results of Menotti and Stringari obtained from a sum-rule approach.

  17. A two-dimensional hydrodynamic model of a tidal estuary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walters, Roy A.; Cheng, Ralph T.

    1979-01-01

    A finite element model is described which is used in the computation of tidal currents in an estuary. This numerical model is patterned after an existing algorithm and has been carefully tested in rectangular and curve-sided channels with constant and variable depth. One of the common uncertainties in this class of two-dimensional hydrodynamic models is the treatment of the lateral boundary conditions. Special attention is paid specifically to addressing this problem. To maintain continuity within the domain of interest, ‘smooth’ curve-sided elements must be used at all shoreline boundaries. The present model uses triangular, isoparametric elements with quadratic basis functions for the two velocity components and a linear basis function for water surface elevation. An implicit time integration is used and the model is unconditionally stable. The resultant governing equations are nonlinear owing to the advective and the bottom friction terms and are solved iteratively at each time step by the Newton-Raphson method. Model test runs have been made in the southern portion of San Francisco Bay, California (South Bay) as well as in the Bay west of Carquinez Strait. Owing to the complex bathymetry, the hydrodynamic characteristics of the Bay system are dictated by the generally shallow basins which contain deep, relict river channels. Great care must be exercised to ensure that the conservation equations remain locally as well as globally accurate. Simulations have been made over several representative tidal cycles using this finite element model, and the results compare favourably with existing data. In particular, the standing wave in South Bay and the progressive wave in the northern reach are well represented.

  18. Equilibration in one-dimensional quantum hydrodynamic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotiriadis, Spyros

    2017-10-01

    We study quench dynamics and equilibration in one-dimensional quantum hydrodynamics, which provides effective descriptions of the density and velocity fields in gapless quantum gases. We show that the information content of the large time steady state is inherently connected to the presence of ballistically moving localised excitations. When such excitations are present, the system retains memory of initial correlations up to infinite times, thus evading decoherence. We demonstrate this connection in the context of the Luttinger model, the simplest quantum hydrodynamic model, and in the quantum KdV equation. In the standard Luttinger model, memory of all initial correlations is preserved throughout the time evolution up to infinitely large times, as a result of the purely ballistic dynamics. However nonlinear dispersion or interactions, when separately present, lead to spreading and delocalisation that suppress the above effect by eliminating the memory of non-Gaussian correlations. We show that, for any initial state that satisfies sufficient clustering of correlations, the steady state is Gaussian in terms of the bosonised or fermionised fields in the dispersive or interacting case respectively. On the other hand, when dispersion and interaction are simultaneously present, a semiclassical approximation suggests that localisation is restored as the two effects compensate each other and solitary waves are formed. Solitary waves, or simply solitons, are experimentally observed in quantum gases and theoretically predicted based on semiclassical approaches, but the question of their stability at the quantum level remains to a large extent an open problem. We give a general overview on the subject and discuss the relevance of our findings to general out of equilibrium problems. Dedicated to John Cardy on the occasion of his 70th birthday.

  19. Effect of three-dimensionality on compressible mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papamoschou, Dimitri

    1992-02-01

    Existing experimental data and hypotheses on the growth rates of compressible and incompressible turbulent shear layers are used to estimate the effect of three-dimensionality in the turbulent mixing enhancement in compressible shear flows that is critically important to the efficiency of scramjet powerplants. The general trend is found to be a decrease in growth rate with increasing three-dimensionality, excepting only the restricted regime, where the growth-rate increase is modest.

  20. Effect of three-dimensionality on compressible mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Papamoschou, D. )

    1992-02-01

    Existing experimental data and hypotheses on the growth rates of compressible and incompressible turbulent shear layers are used to estimate the effect of three-dimensionality in the turbulent mixing enhancement in compressible shear flows that is critically important to the efficiency of scramjet powerplants. The general trend is found to be a decrease in growth rate with increasing three-dimensionality, excepting only the restricted regime, where the growth-rate increase is modest. 9 refs.

  1. Anomalous Hydrodynamics of Two-Dimensional Vortex Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiegmann, Paul; Abanov, Alexander G.

    2014-07-01

    A dense system of vortices can be treated as a fluid and itself could be described in terms of hydrodynamics. We develop the hydrodynamics of the vortex fluid. This hydrodynamics captures characteristics of fluid flows averaged over fast circulations in the intervortex space. The hydrodynamics of the vortex fluid features the anomalous stress absent in Euler's hydrodynamics. The anomalous stress yields a number of interesting effects. Some of them are a deflection of streamlines, a correction to the Bernoulli law, and an accumulation of vortices in regions with high curvature in the curved space. The origin of the anomalous stresses is a divergence of intervortex interactions at the microscale which manifest at the macroscale. We obtain the hydrodynamics of the vortex fluid from the Kirchhoff equations for dynamics of pointlike vortices.

  2. Three-dimensional hydrodynamic focusing in a microfluidic Coulter counter.

    PubMed

    Scott, R; Sethu, P; Harnett, C K

    2008-04-01

    Electrical impedance-based particle detection or Coulter counting, offers a lab-on-chip compatible method for flow cytometry. Developments in this area will produce devices with greater portability, lower cost, and lower power requirements than fluorescence-based flow cytometry. Because conventional Coulter apertures are prone to clogging, hydrodynamic focusing improves the device by creating fluid-walled channels with variable width to increase sensitivity without the associated risk of blocking the channel. We describe a device that focuses the sample in three dimensions, creating a narrow sample stream on the floor of the channel for close interaction with sensing electrodes. The key to this design is a stepped outlet channel fabricated in a single layer with soft lithography. In contrast to previous impedance-based designs, the new design requires minimal alignment with the substrate. Three-dimensional focusing maximizes the sensitivity of the device to cell-size particles within much larger channels. Impedance-based particle sensing experiments within this device show an increase in percentage conductivity change by a factor of 2.5 over devices that only focus the sample in the horizontal direction.

  3. Three-dimensional hydrodynamic focusing method for polyplex synthesis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Mengqian; Ho, Yi-Ping; Grigsby, Christopher L; Nawaz, Ahmad Ahsan; Leong, Kam W; Huang, Tony Jun

    2014-01-28

    Successful intracellular delivery of nucleic acid therapeutics relies on multiaspect optimization, one of which is formulation. While there has been ample innovation on chemical design of polymeric gene carriers, the same cannot be said for physical processing of polymer-DNA nanocomplexes (polyplexes). Conventional synthesis of polyplexes by bulk mixing depends on the operators' experience. The poorly controlled bulk mixing process may also lead to batch-to-batch variation and consequent irreproducibility. Here, we synthesize polyplexes by using a three-dimensional hydrodynamic focusing (3D-HF) technique in a single-layered, planar microfluidic device. Without any additional chemical treatment or postprocessing, the polyplexes prepared by the 3D-HF method show smaller size, slower aggregation rate, and higher transfection efficiency, while exhibiting reduced cytotoxicity compared to the ones synthesized by conventional bulk mixing. In addition, by introducing external acoustic perturbation, mixing can be further enhanced, leading to even smaller nanocomplexes. The 3D-HF method provides a simple and reproducible process for synthesizing high-quality polyplexes, addressing a critical barrier in the eventual translation of nucleic acid therapeutics.

  4. A Three-Dimensional Hydrodynamic Focusing Method for Polyplex Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Mengqian; Ho, Yi-Ping; Grigsby, Christopher L.; Nawaz, Ahmad Ahsan; Leong, Kam W.; Huang, Tony Jun

    2014-01-01

    Successful intracellular delivery of nucleic acid therapeutics relies on multi-aspect optimization, one of which is formulation. While there has been ample innovation on chemical design of polymeric gene carriers, the same cannot be said for physical processing of polymer-DNA nanocomplexes (polyplexes). Conventional synthesis of polyplexes by bulk mixing depends on the operators’ experience. The poorly controlled bulk-mixing process may also lead to batch-to-batch variation and consequent irreproducibility. Here, we synthesize polyplexes by using a three-dimensional hydrodynamic focusing (3D-HF) technique in a single-layered, planar microfluidic device. Without any additional chemical treatment or post processing, the polyplexes prepared by the 3D-HF method show smaller size, slower aggregation rate, and higher transfection efficiency, while exhibiting reduced cytotoxicity compared to the ones synthesized by conventional bulk mixing. In addition, by introducing external acoustic perturbation, mixing can be further enhanced, leading to even smaller nanocomplexes. The 3D-HF method provides a simple and reproducible process for synthesizing high-quality polyplexes, addressing a critical barrier in the eventual translation of nucleic acid therapeutics. PMID:24341632

  5. Formation of globular clusters induced by external ultraviolet radiation - II. Three-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Makito; Umemura, Masayuki; Hasegawa, Kenji

    2016-12-01

    We explore the possibility of the formation of globular clusters (GCs) under ultraviolet (UV) background radiation. One-dimensional spherical symmetric radiation hydrodynamics (RHD) simulations by Hasegawa et al. have demonstrated that the collapse of low-mass (106-7 M⊙) gas clouds exposed to intense UV radiation can lead to the formation of compact star clusters like GCs if gas clouds contract with supersonic infall velocities. However, three-dimensional effects, such as the anisotropy of background radiation and the inhomogeneity in gas clouds, have not been studied so far. In this paper, we perform three-dimensional RHD simulations in a semicosmological context, and reconsider the formation of compact star clusters in strong UV radiation fields. As a result, we find that although anisotropic radiation fields bring an elongated shadow of neutral gas, almost spherical compact star clusters can be procreated from a `supersonic infall' cloud, since photodissociating radiation suppresses the formation of hydrogen molecules in the shadowed regions and the regions are compressed by UV heated ambient gas. The properties of resultant star clusters match those of GCs. On the other hand, in weak UV radiation fields, dark-matter-dominated star clusters with low stellar density form due to the self-shielding effect as well as the positive feedback by ionizing photons. Thus, we conclude that the `supersonic infall' under a strong UV background is a potential mechanism to form GCs.

  6. DIMENSIONAL DEPENDENCE OF THE HYDRODYNAMICS OF CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Dolence, Joshua C.; Burrows, Adam; Murphy, Jeremiah W.; Nordhaus, Jason E-mail: burrows@astro.princeton.edu E-mail: nordhaus@astro.rit.edu

    2013-03-10

    A major goal over the last decade has been understanding which multidimensional effects are crucial in facilitating core-collapse supernova (CCSN) explosions. Unfortunately, much of this work has necessarily assumed axisymmetry. In this work, we present analyses of simplified two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) CCSN models with the goal of comparing the hydrodynamics in setups that differ only in dimension. Not surprisingly, we find many differences between 2D and 3D models. While some differences are subtle and perhaps not crucial, others are dramatic and make interpreting 2D models problematic. In particular, axisymmetric models produce excess power at the largest spatial scales, power that has been deemed critical in previous explosion models. Nevertheless, our 3D models, which have an order of magnitude less power than 2D models on large scales, explode earlier. Since explosions occur earlier in 3D than in 2D, the vigorous large-scale sloshing is either not critical in any dimension or the explosion mechanism operates differently in 2D and 3D. On the other hand, we find that the average parcel of matter in the gain region has been exposed to net heating for up to 30% longer in 3D than in 2D, an effect we attribute to the differing characters of turbulence in 2D and 3D. We suggest that this effect plays a prominent role in producing earlier explosions in 3D. Finally, we discuss a simple model for the runaway growth of buoyant bubbles that is able to quantitatively account for the growth of the shock radius and predicts a critical luminosity relation.

  7. Gaseous laser targets and optical diagnostics for studying compressible hydrodynamic instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, J M; Robey, H; Mackinnon, A

    2001-06-29

    Explore the combination of optical diagnostics and gaseous targets to obtain important information about compressible turbulent flows that cannot be derived from traditional laser experiments for the purposes of V and V of hydrodynamics models and understanding scaling. First year objectives: Develop and characterize blast wave-gas jet test bed; Perform single pulse shadowgraphy of blast wave interaction with turbulent gas jet as a function of blast wave Mach number; Explore double pulse shadowgraphy and image correlation for extracting velocity spectra in the shock-turbulent flow interaction; and Explore the use/adaptation of advanced diagnostics.

  8. Two-dimensional symmetrical inlets with external compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruden, P

    1950-01-01

    The purpose of inlets like, for instance, those of air-cooled radiators and scoops is to take a certain air quantity out of the free stream and to partly convert the free-stream velocity into pressure. In the extreme case this pressure conversion may occur either entirely in the interior of the inlet (inlet with internal compression) or entirely in the free stream ahead of the inlet (inlet with external compression). In this report a theory for two-dimensional inlets with external compression is developed and illustrated by numerical examples. Intermediary forms between inlets with internal and external compression which can be derived from the latter are briefly discussed.

  9. High-fidelity numerical simulations of compressible turbulence and mixing generated by hydrodynamic instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Movahed, Pooya

    High-speed flows are prone to hydrodynamic interfacial instabilities that evolve to turbulence, thereby intensely mixing different fluids and dissipating energy. The lack of knowledge of these phenomena has impeded progress in a variety of disciplines. In science, a full understanding of mixing between heavy and light elements after the collapse of a supernova and between adjacent layers of different density in geophysical (atmospheric and oceanic) flows remains lacking. In engineering, the inability to achieve ignition in inertial fusion and efficient combustion constitute further examples of this lack of basic understanding of turbulent mixing. In this work, my goal is to develop accurate and efficient numerical schemes and employ them to study compressible turbulence and mixing generated by interactions between shocked (Richtmyer-Meshkov) and accelerated (Rayleigh-Taylor) interfaces, which play important roles in high-energy-density physics environments. To accomplish my goal, a hybrid high-order central/discontinuity-capturing finite difference scheme is first presented. The underlying principle is that, to accurately and efficiently represent both broadband motions and discontinuities, non-dissipative methods are used where the solution is smooth, while the more expensive and dissipative capturing schemes are applied near discontinuous regions. Thus, an accurate numerical sensor is developed to discriminate between smooth regions, shocks and material discontinuities, which all require a different treatment. The interface capturing approach is extended to central differences, such that smooth distributions of varying specific heats ratio can be simulated without generating spurious pressure oscillations. I verified and validated this approach against a stringent suite of problems including shocks, interfaces, turbulence and two-dimensional single-mode Richtmyer-Meshkov instability simulations. The three-dimensional code is shown to scale well up to 4000 cores

  10. Smart compression using high-dimensional imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosario, Dalton

    2011-06-01

    This paper offers an innovative image processing technique (smart data compression) for some Department of Defense and Government users, who may be disadvantaged in terms of network and resource availability as they operate at the tactical edge. Specifically, we propose using the concept of autonomous anomaly detection to significantly reduce the amount of data transmitted to the disadvantaged user. The primary sensing modality is hyperspectral, where a national asset is expected to fly over the region of interest acquiring and processing data in real time, but transmitting only the corresponding data of scene anomalies, their spatial relationships in the imagery, range and navigational direction. Results from a proof of principle experiment using real hyperspectral imagery are encouraging.

  11. Structural transitions in laterally compressed two-dimensional Coulomb clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Rancova, O.; Anisimovas, E.; Varanavicius, T.

    2011-03-15

    We model structural transitions of small-size Wigner crystals in laterally compressed two-dimensional traps. Ground and metastable configurations are calculated and their transformations are linked to conspicuous changes in the heat capacity of the system. We show that various types of structural transitions are reflected by characteristic features in the behavior of the heat capacity. For deeper understanding, results produced by the Monte Carlo numerical calculations are compared to predictions of simple one-dimensional models.

  12. Magneto-hydrodynamic calculation of magnetic flux compression using imploding cylindrical liners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jibo; Sun, Chengwei; Gu, Zhuowei

    2015-06-01

    Based on the one-dimensional elastic-plastic reactive hydrodynamic code SSS, the one-dimensional magneto-hydrodynamics code SSS/MHD is developed successfully, and calculation is carried for cylindrical magneto cumulative generators (MC-1 device). The magnetic field diffusion into liner and sample tuber is analyzed, and the result shows that the maximum value of magnetic induction intensity to cavity 0.2 mm in liner is only sixteen Tesla, while the one in sample tuber is several hundred Tesla, which is caused by balancing of electromagnetism force and imploding one for the different velocity of liner and sample tuber. The curves of magnetic induction intensity on axes of cavity and the velocity history on the wall of sample tuber are calculated, which accord with the experiment results. The works in this paper account for that code SSS/MHD can be applied in experiment configures of detonation, shock and electromagnetism load and improve of parameter successfully. The experiment data can be estimated, analyzed and checked validly, and the physics course of correlative device can be understood deeply, according to SSS/MHD. This work was supported by the special funds of the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant 11176002.

  13. Three-dimensional image compression with integer wavelet transforms.

    PubMed

    Bilgin, A; Zweig, G; Marcellin, M W

    2000-04-10

    A three-dimensional (3-D) image-compression algorithm based on integer wavelet transforms and zerotree coding is presented. The embedded coding of zerotrees of wavelet coefficients (EZW) algorithm is extended to three dimensions, and context-based adaptive arithmetic coding is used to improve its performance. The resultant algorithm, 3-D CB-EZW, efficiently encodes 3-D image data by the exploitation of the dependencies in all dimensions, while enabling lossy and lossless decompression from the same bit stream. Compared with the best available two-dimensional lossless compression techniques, the 3-D CB-EZW algorithm produced averages of 22%, 25%, and 20% decreases in compressed file sizes for computed tomography, magnetic resonance, and Airborne Visible Infrared Imaging Spectrometer images, respectively. The progressive performance of the algorithm is also compared with other lossy progressive-coding algorithms.

  14. Three-Dimensional Image Compression With Integer Wavelet Transforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilgin, Ali; Zweig, George; Marcellin, Michael W.

    2000-04-01

    A three-dimensional (3-D) image-compression algorithm based on integer wavelet transforms and zerotree coding is presented. The embedded coding of zerotrees of wavelet coefficients (EZW) algorithm is extended to three dimensions, and context-based adaptive arithmetic coding is used to improve its performance. The resultant algorithm, 3-D CB-EZW, efficiently encodes 3-D image data by the exploitation of the dependencies in all dimensions, while enabling lossy and lossless decompression from the same bit stream. Compared with the best available two-dimensional lossless compression techniques, the 3-D CB-EZW algorithm produced averages of 22%, 25%, and 20% decreases in compressed file sizes for computed tomography, magnetic resonance, and Airborne Visible Infrared Imaging Spectrometer images, respectively. The progressive performance of the algorithm is also compared with other lossy progressive-coding algorithms.

  15. A 3-dimensional mass conserving element for compressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fix, G.; Suri, M.

    1985-01-01

    A variety of finite element schemes has been used in the numerical approximation of compressible flows particularly in underwater acoustics. In many instances instabilities have been generated due to the lack of mass conservation. Two- and three-dimensional elements are developed which avoid these problems.

  16. A 2-dimensional MHD code & survey of the ``buckling'' phenomenon in cylindrical magnetic flux compression experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Bo; Wang, Ganghua; Gu, Zhuowei; Computational Physics Team

    2015-11-01

    We made a 2-dimensional magneto-hydrodynamics Lagrangian code. The code handles two kinds of magnetic configuration, a (x-y) plane with z-direction magnetic field Bz and a (r-z) plane with θ-direction magnetic field Bθ. The solving of the MHD equations is split into a pure dynamical step (i.e., ideal MHD) and a diffusion step. In the diffusion step, the Joule heat is calculated with a numerical scheme based on an specific form of the Joule heat production equation, ∂eJ/∂t = ∇ . (η/μ0 º × (∇ × º)) -∂/∂t (1/2μ0 B2) , where the term ∂/∂t (1/2μ0 B2) is the magnetic field energy variation caused solely by diffusion. This scheme insures the equality of the total Joule heat produced and the total electromagnetic energy lost in the system. Material elastoplasticity is considered in the code. An external circuit is coupled to the magneto-hydrodynamics and a detonation module is also added to enhance the code's ability for simulating magnetically-driven compression experiments. As a first application, the code was utilized to simulate a cylindrical magnetic flux compression experiment. The origin of the ``buckling'' phenomenon observed in the experiment is explored.

  17. A Mesh Adaptive and Mass Conservative Three Dimensional Numerical Model For Ocean Hydrodynamics and Transport Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savant, G.; Trahan, C. J.

    2016-02-01

    Next generation finite element method (FEM)hydrodynamic and transport code are expected to be at the fore front of Ocean modeling, of particular importance are the FEM codes that conserve hydrodynamic and transport mass (locally and globally). This talk will introduce the new U.S. Army Corps of Engineers enterprise implicit time stepping and multi-dimensional FEM model, this model is characterized by adaptive meshing to resolve the fine detail required to capture baroclinic effects on hydrodynamics as well as on transported quantities such as salt/heat/tracers etc. The FEM developmental theory that guarantees local and global mass conservation, and results from simulations will be presented, also presented will be the aspects of the Eulerian-Lagrangian meshing that removes certain limitations of sigma and z-gridding in hydrodynamic models.

  18. One-dimensional and two-dimensional hydrodynamic modelling derived flow properties: Impacts on aquatic habitat quality predictions

    Treesearch

    Rohan Benjankar; Daniele Tonina; James McKean

    2014-01-01

    Studies of the effects of hydrodynamic model dimensionality on simulated flow properties and derived quantities such as aquatic habitat quality are limited. It is important to close this knowledge gap especially now that entire river networks can be mapped at the microhabitat scale due to the advent of point-cloud techniques. This study compares flow properties, such...

  19. All-optical three-dimensional electron pulse compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jie Wong, Liang; Freelon, Byron; Rohwer, Timm; Gedik, Nuh; Johnson, Steven G.

    2015-01-01

    We propose an all-optical, three-dimensional electron pulse compression scheme in which Hermite-Gaussian optical modes are used to fashion a three-dimensional optical trap in the electron pulse’s rest frame. We show that the correct choices of optical incidence angles are necessary for optimal compression. We obtain analytical expressions for the net impulse imparted by Hermite-Gaussian free-space modes of arbitrary order. Although we focus on electrons, our theory applies to any charged particle and any particle with non-zero polarizability in the Rayleigh regime. We verify our theory numerically using exact solutions to Maxwell’s equations for first-order Hermite-Gaussian beams, demonstrating single-electron pulse compression factors of \\gt {{10}2} in both longitudinal and transverse dimensions with experimentally realizable optical pulses. The proposed scheme is useful in ultrafast electron imaging for both single- and multi-electron pulse compression, and as a means of circumventing temporal distortions in magnetic lenses when focusing ultrashort electron pulses. Other applications include the creation of flat electron beams and ultrashort electron bunches for coherent terahertz emission.

  20. Two Dimensional Compressibility of Electrochemically Adsorbed Lead on Silver (111).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-28

    electrode surface, occur at electrode potentials positive of the reversible thermodynamic potential for bulk deposition and hence are termed underpotential ...monolayer formation and bulk deposition , the 1J near neighbor distance of the lead monolayer decreases linearly with applied potential, (proportional to the...report the two dimensional compressibility of electrochemically deposited lead on silver (111). Measurements were made in-situ (in contact with solution

  1. Three-dimensional compressible and stretchable conductive composites.

    PubMed

    Yu, You; Zeng, Jifang; Chen, Chaojian; Xie, Zhuang; Guo, Ruisheng; Liu, Zhilu; Zhou, Xuechang; Yang, Yong; Zheng, Zijian

    2014-02-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) conductive composites with remarkable flexibility, compressibility, and stretchability are fabricated by solution deposition of thin metal coatings on chemically modified, macroscopically continuous, 3D polyurethane sponges, followed by infiltration of the metallic sponges with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). These low-cost conductive composites are used as high-performance interconnects for flexible and stretchable light-emitting diode (LED) arrays, even with severe surface abrasion or cutting.

  2. Low-dimensional chaos in a hydrodynamic system

    SciTech Connect

    Brandstater, A.; Swift, J.; Swinney, H.L.; Wolf, A.; Farmer, J.D.; Jen, E.; Crutchfield, J.P.

    1983-10-17

    Evidence is presented for low-dimensional strange attractors in Couette-Taylor flow data. Computations of the largest Lyapunov exponent and metric entropy show that the system displays sensitive dependence on initial conditions. Although the phase space is very high dimensional, analysis of experimental data shows that motion is restricted to an attractor of dimension less than 5 for Reynolds numbers up to 30% above the onset of chaos. The Lyapunov exponent, entropy, and dimension all generally increase with Reynolds number.

  3. Three-Dimensional Shallow Water Adaptive Hydraulics (ADH-SW3) Validation: Galveston Bay Hydrodynamics and Salinity Transport

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-01

    ER D C/ CH L TR -1 5- 3 Three-Dimensional Shallow Water Adaptive Hydraulics (ADH-SW3) Validation: Galveston Bay Hydrodynamics and...challenges. ERDC develops innovative solutions in civil and military engineering, geospatial sciences, water resources, and environmental sciences...Three-Dimensional Shallow Water Adaptive Hydraulics (ADH-SW3) Validation Report 1: Galveston Bay Hydrodynamics and Salinity Transport Gaurav

  4. USING TWO-DIMENSIONAL HYDRODYNAMIC MODELS AT SCALES OF ECOLOGICAL IMPORTANCE. (R825760)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Modeling of flow features that are important in assessing stream habitat conditions has been a long-standing interest of stream biologists. Recently, they have begun examining the usefulness of two-dimensional (2-D) hydrodynamic models in attaining this objective. Current modelin...

  5. ONE-DIMENSIONAL HYDRODYNAMIC/SEDIMENT TRANSPORT MODEL FOR STREAM NETWORKS: TECHNICAL REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This technical report describes a new sediment transport model and the supporting post-processor, and sampling procedures for sediments in streams. Specifically, the following items are described herein:

    EFDC1D - This is a new one-dimensional hydrodynamic and sediment tr...

  6. ONE-DIMENSIONAL HYDRODYNAMIC/SEDIMENT TRANSPORT MODEL FOR STREAM NETWORKS: TECHNICAL REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This technical report describes a new sediment transport model and the supporting post-processor, and sampling procedures for sediments in streams. Specifically, the following items are described herein:

    EFDC1D - This is a new one-dimensional hydrodynamic and sediment tr...

  7. USING TWO-DIMENSIONAL HYDRODYNAMIC MODELS AT SCALES OF ECOLOGICAL IMPORTANCE. (R825760)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Modeling of flow features that are important in assessing stream habitat conditions has been a long-standing interest of stream biologists. Recently, they have begun examining the usefulness of two-dimensional (2-D) hydrodynamic models in attaining this objective. Current modelin...

  8. One-dimensional hydrodynamic model generating a turbulent cascade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Takeshi; Sakajo, Takashi

    2016-05-01

    As a minimal mathematical model generating cascade analogous to that of the Navier-Stokes turbulence in the inertial range, we propose a one-dimensional partial-differential-equation model that conserves the integral of the squared vorticity analog (enstrophy) in the inviscid case. With a large-scale random forcing and small viscosity, we find numerically that the model exhibits the enstrophy cascade, the broad energy spectrum with a sizable correction to the dimensional-analysis prediction, peculiar intermittency, and self-similarity in the dynamical system structure.

  9. Dimensional similitude and the hydrodynamics of three- phase fluidized beds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safoniuk, Michael

    It is proposed that scaling of three-phase fluidized bed hydrodynamics can be carried out based on geometric similarity and matching of a set of five dimensionless groups: (i)the M-group, M = g.Δρ.μ L4/(ρL2.σ 3); (ii)an Eötvös number, Eo = g.Δρ.d p2/σ (iii)the liquid Reynolds number, Re L = ρL.dp.UL/μ L; (iv)a density ratio, βd = ρp/ρ L; and (v)a superficial velocity ratio, βu = U g/UL. These were varied in an experimental study where four dimensionless hydrodynamic parameters were measured: (i)gas hold-up, ɛ g; (ii)bed expansion ratio, βbe (iii)the ratio of mean bubble diameter to particle diameter, db/dp ; and (iv)the ratio of mean bubble rise velocity to gas superficial velocity, Ub/Ug. This approach was validated experimentally by matching the dimensionless operating conditions from a kerosene-nitrogen-ceramic three-phase system with those in an aqueous magnesium sulphate solution-air-aluminum particle fluidized bed. There was good agreement between the gas hold-ups and bed expansion ratios in the two systems. A pilot-plant scale cold-flow co-current upwards-flowing three-phase fluidized bed column of inside diameter 292 mm was built and operated using three different liquids (tap water, an aqueous 44 mass % glycerol solution, and an aqueous 60 mass % glycerol solution), air, and cylindrical aluminum particles of diameter 4 mm and length 10 mm. The fluids and solids were carefully selected to result in dimensionless group values in the range of those of an industrial hydroprocessor. Specially built conductivity probes and pressure transducers were used to measure the hydrodynamic properties for different gas and liquid superficial velocities. Special attention was required to provide for drift and calibration when recording and analyzing data from the conductivity probes. Gas hold-ups were in the range of 5 to 20% by volume and were correlated as a function of liquid-phase Reynolds number and superficial velocity ratio. The gas hold-ups were a

  10. Highly stable and routinely convergent 2-dimensional hydrodynamic device simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Qi; Goldsman, Neil; Tai, Gwo-Chung

    1994-02-01

    This paper presents a new method for solving the hydrodynamic (HD) model in submicron semiconductor device simulation. The main feature of this method is that the Poisson, current-continuity and energy-balance equations in the HD model are all expressed in self-adjoint forms through a set of new Slotboom-like variables. As a consequence, the discretization results in a system of finite-difference equations with a diagonally dominant coefficient matrix for each HD equation. The simultaneous HD equations are decoupled by using the Gummel block iteration method. To solve each equation, a fixed-point iteration technique is employed which explicitly updates the state variables at each spatial mesh-point. In addition to avoiding direct solution of large matrix equations, the diagonal dominance guarantees that each HD equation will converge for any initial value. We demonstrate the method by simulating a 2-D submicron MOSFET, and by comparison with Monte Carlo calculations. Excellent numerical convergence, stability, and efficiency are observed.

  11. Hydrodynamic-type systems describing 2-dimensional polynomially integrable geodesic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manno, Gianni; Pavlov, Maxim V.

    2017-03-01

    Starting from a homogeneous polynomial in momenta of arbitrary order we extract multi-component hydrodynamic-type systems which describe 2-dimensional geodesic flows admitting the initial polynomial as integral. All these hydrodynamic-type systems are semi-Hamiltonian, thus implying that they are integrable according to the generalized hodograph method. Moreover, they are integrable in a constructive sense as polynomial first integrals allow to construct generating equations of conservation laws. According to the multiplicity of the roots of the polynomial integral, we separate integrable particular cases.

  12. High strain Lagrangian hydrodynamics: A three dimensional SPH code for dynamic material response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allahdadi, Firooz A.; Carney, Theodore C.; Hipp, Jim R.; Libersky, Larry D.; Petschek, Albert G.

    1993-03-01

    MAGI, a three-dimensional shock and material response code which is based on Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics is described. Calculations are presented and compared with experimental results. The SPH method is unique in that it employs no spatial mesh. The absence of a grid leads to some nice features such as the ability to handle large distortions in a pure Lagrangian frame and a natural treatment of voids. Both of these features are important in the tracking of debris clouds produced by hypervelocity impact, a difficult problem for which Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics seems ideally suited. It is believed this is the first application of SPH to the dynamics of elastic-plastic solid.

  13. Three-Dimensional Hydrodynamic Simulations of Collapsing Prolate Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, R. P.; Papaloizou, J. C. B.

    1993-12-01

    We present the results of collapse calculations for elongated clouds performed using the numerical method of smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH). The clouds considered are isothermal, prolate spheroids with different axial ratios (a/b). Results are obtained for different values of a/b and mbarL, the mean mass per unit length. It is found that initially uniform clouds undergo fragmentation when the collapse is preferentially down on to the major axis, due to the intrinsic instability of a linear configuration. This occurs when the value of mbarL is sufficiently large. A criterion for elongated clouds to undergo linear collapse is derived using the tensor virial theorem, and it is found that the numerically obtained value of mbarL for which fragmentation occurs corresponds closely to that expected from analytical considerations. The addition of small density perturbations simply results in clouds that fragment more easily, particularly for cases in which a/b is close to unity. Previous calculations, presented by other authors for the case of finite cylinders, show that clouds with cylindrical geometries are highly unstable to the formation of two fragments that occur at the ends of the cylinder. We find that collapsing, prolate spheroids show qualitatively different behaviour, with no preferred tendency to form fragments at the ends of the cloud. Instead fragmentation appears to occur more readily towards the centre of the cloud where the local mass per unit length is greatest. Our implementation of SPH employs spatially variable smoothing lengths, h. In order to obtain a Hamiltonian system, we incorporate terms involving the spatial variability of h in the particle equations of motion, not included in previous implementations. We find that inclusion of these ∇h terms results in much improved energy conservation, but has little effect on the qualitative outcome of the calculations presented here. (fset 'queer "∇")

  14. Multi-dimensional high-order numerical schemes for Lagrangian hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, William W; Woodward, Paul R

    2009-01-01

    An approximate solver for multi-dimensional Riemann problems at grid points of unstructured meshes, and a numerical scheme for multi-dimensional hydrodynamics have been developed in this paper. The solver is simple, and is developed only for the use in numerical schemes for hydrodynamics. The scheme is truely multi-dimensional, is second order accurate in both space and time, and satisfies conservation laws exactly for mass, momentum, and total energy. The scheme has been tested through numerical examples involving strong shocks. It has been shown that the scheme offers the principle advantages of high-order Codunov schemes; robust operation in the presence of very strong shocks and thin shock fronts.

  15. Acceleration of multi-dimensional propagator measurements with compressed sensing.

    PubMed

    Paulsen, Jeffrey L; Cho, HyungJoon; Cho, Gyunggoo; Song, Yi-Qiao

    2011-12-01

    NMR can probe the microstructures of anisotropic materials such as liquid crystals, stretched polymers and biological tissues through measurement of the diffusion propagator, where internal structures are indicated by restricted diffusion. Multi-dimensional measurements can probe the microscopic anisotropy, but full sampling can then quickly become prohibitively time consuming. However, for incompletely sampled data, compressed sensing is an effective reconstruction technique to enable accelerated acquisition. We demonstrate that with a compressed sensing scheme, one can greatly reduce the sampling and the experimental time with minimal effect on the reconstruction of the diffusion propagator with an example of anisotropic diffusion. We compare full sampling down to 64× sub-sampling for the 2D propagator measurement and reduce the acquisition time for the 3D experiment by a factor of 32 from ∼80 days to ∼2.5 days. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. On two-dimensional flows of compressible fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergman, Stefan

    1945-01-01

    This report is devoted to the study of two-dimensional steady motion of a compressible fluid. It is shown that the complete flow pattern around a closed obstacle cannot be obtained by the method of Chaplygin. In order to overcome this difficulty, a formula for the stream-function of a two-dimensional subsonic flow is derived. The formula involves an arbitrary function of a complex variable and yields all possible subsonic flow patterns of certain types. Conditions are given so that the flow pattern in the physical plane will represent a flow around a closed curve. The formula obtained can be employed for the approximate determination of a subsonic flow around an obstacle. The method can be extended to partially supersonic flows.

  17. Universally applicable three-dimensional hydrodynamic microfluidic flow focusing.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Yu-Jui; Cho, Sung Hwan; Mei, Zhe; Lien, Victor; Wu, Tsung-Feng; Lo, Yu-Hwa

    2013-05-07

    We have demonstrated a microfluidic device that can not only achieve three-dimensional flow focusing but also confine particles to the center stream along the channel. The device has a sample channel of smaller height and two sheath flow channels of greater height, merged into the downstream main channel where 3D focusing effects occur. We have demonstrated that both beads and cells in our device display significantly lower CVs in velocity and position distributions as well as reduced probability of coincidental events than they do in conventional 2D-confined microfluidic channels. The improved particle confinement in the microfluidic channel is highly desirable for microfluidic flow cytometers and in fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). We have also reported a novel method to measure the velocity of each individual particle in the microfluidic channel. The method is compatible with the flow cytometer setup and requires no sophisticated visualization equipment. The principles and methods of device design and characterization can be applicable to many types of microfluidic systems.

  18. Compressible, Dense, Three-Dimensional Holey Graphene Monolithic Architecture.

    PubMed

    Han, Xiaogang; Yang, Zhi; Zhao, Bin; Zhu, Shuze; Zhou, Lihui; Dai, Jiaqi; Kim, Jae-Woo; Liu, Boyang; Connell, John W; Li, Teng; Yang, Bao; Lin, Yi; Hu, Liangbing

    2017-03-10

    By creating holes in 2D nanosheets, tortuosity and porosity can be greatly tunable, which enables a fast manufacturing process (i.e., fast removal of gas and solvent) toward various nanostructures. We demonstrated outstanding compressibility of holey graphene nanosheets, which is impossible for pristine graphene. Holey graphene powder can be easily compressed into dense and strong monoliths with different shapes at room temperature without using any solvents or binders. The remarkable compressibility of holey graphene, which is in sharp contrast with pristine graphene, not only enables the fabrication of robust, dense graphene products that exhibit high density (1.4 g/cm(3)), excellent specific mechanical strength [18 MPa/(g/cm(3))], and good electrical (130 S/cm) and thermal (20 W/mK) conductivities, but also provides a binder-free dry process that overcomes the disadvantages of wet processes required for fabrication of three-dimensional graphene products. Fundamentally different from graphite, the holey graphene products are both dense and porous, which can enable possible broader applications such as energy storage and gas separation membranes.

  19. High-resolution three-dimensional imaging with compress sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jingyi; Ke, Jun

    2016-10-01

    LIDAR three-dimensional imaging technology have been used in many fields, such as military detection. However, LIDAR require extremely fast data acquisition speed. This makes the manufacture of detector array for LIDAR system is very difficult. To solve this problem, we consider using compress sensing which can greatly decrease the data acquisition and relax the requirement of a detection device. To use the compressive sensing idea, a spatial light modulator will be used to modulate the pulsed light source. Then a photodetector is used to receive the reflected light. A convex optimization problem is solved to reconstruct the 2D depth map of the object. To improve the resolution in transversal direction, we use multiframe image restoration technology. For each 2D piecewise-planar scene, we move the SLM half-pixel each time. Then the position where the modulated light illuminates will changed accordingly. We repeat moving the SLM to four different directions. Then we can get four low-resolution depth maps with different details of the same plane scene. If we use all of the measurements obtained by the subpixel movements, we can reconstruct a high-resolution depth map of the sense. A linear minimum-mean-square error algorithm is used for the reconstruction. By combining compress sensing and multiframe image restoration technology, we reduce the burden on data analyze and improve the efficiency of detection. More importantly, we obtain high-resolution depth maps of a 3D scene.

  20. Two-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamic calculations for a nominal 1-Mt nuclear explosion near the ground

    SciTech Connect

    Horak, H.G.; Jones, E.M.; Sandford, M.T. II; Whitaker, R.W.; Anderson, R.C.; Kodis, J.W.

    1982-03-01

    The two-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamic code SN-YAQUI was used to calculate the evolution of a hypothetical nuclear fireball of 1-Mt yield at a burst altitude of 500 m. The ground-reflected shock wave interacts strongly with the fireball and induces the early formation of a rapidly rotating ring-shaped vortex. The hydrodynamic and radiation phenomena are discussed.

  1. Hydrodynamic study of terahertz three-dimensional plasma resonances in InGaAs diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziadé, Pierre; Kallassy, Ziad; Marinchio, Hugues; Sabatini, Giulio; Palermo, Christophe; Varani, Luca

    2009-11-01

    We investigate the presence of plasma resonances in InGaAs diodes under different optical excitation conditions. In particular, we study the case of diodes submitted to an optical photoexcitation presenting a beating in the terahertz frequency domain. The responses of the diodes are calculated using a hydrodynamic approach coupled to a one-dimensional Poisson solver. The results show clearly the presence of three-dimensional plasma resonances in the terahertz frequency domain. We also show that the resonances frequency and amplitude can be tuned by modifying the diode geometry and doping profile.

  2. Computational hydrodynamics of animal swimming: boundary element method and three-dimensional vortex wake structure.

    PubMed

    Cheng, J Y; Chahine, G L

    2001-12-01

    The slender body theory, lifting surface theories, and more recently panel methods and Navier-Stokes solvers have been used to study the hydrodynamics of fish swimming. This paper presents progress on swimming hydrodynamics using a boundary integral equation method (or boundary element method) based on potential flow model. The unsteady three-dimensional BEM code 3DynaFS that we developed and used is able to model realistic body geometries, arbitrary movements, and resulting wake evolution. Pressure distribution over the body surface, vorticity in the wake, and the velocity field around the body can be computed. The structure and dynamic behavior of the vortex wakes generated by the swimming body are responsible for the underlying fluid dynamic mechanisms to realize the high-efficiency propulsion and high-agility maneuvering. Three-dimensional vortex wake structures are not well known, although two-dimensional structures termed 'reverse Karman Vortex Street' have been observed and studied. In this paper, simulations about a swimming saithe (Pollachius virens) using our BEM code have demonstrated that undulatory swimming reduces three-dimensional effects due to substantially weakened tail tip vortex, resulting in a reverse Karman Vortex Street as the major flow pattern in the three-dimensional wake of an undulating swimming fish.

  3. Ballistic transport in the one-dimensional Hubbard model: The hydrodynamic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilievski, Enej; De Nardis, Jacopo

    2017-08-01

    We outline a general formalism of hydrodynamics for quantum systems with multiple particle species which undergo completely elastic scattering. In the thermodynamic limit, the complete kinematic data of the problem consist of the particle content, the dispersion relations, and a universal dressing transformation which accounts for interparticle interactions. We consider quantum integrable models and we focus on the one-dimensional fermionic Hubbard model. By linearizing hydrodynamic equations, we provide exact closed-form expressions for Drude weights, generalized static charge susceptibilities, and charge-current correlators valid on the hydrodynamic scale, represented as integral kernels operating diagonally in the space of mode numbers of thermodynamic excitations. We find that, on hydrodynamic scales, Drude weights manifestly display Onsager reciprocal relations even for generic (i.e., noncanonical) equilibrium states, and establish a generalized detailed balance condition for a general quantum integrable model. We present exact analytic expressions for the general Drude weights in the Hubbard model, and explain how to reconcile different approaches for computing Drude weights from the previous literature.

  4. Application of kinetic flux vector splitting scheme for solving multi-dimensional hydrodynamical models of semiconductor devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nisar, Ubaid Ahmed; Ashraf, Waqas; Qamar, Shamsul

    In this article, one and two-dimensional hydrodynamical models of semiconductor devices are numerically investigated. The models treat the propagation of electrons in a semiconductor device as the flow of a charged compressible fluid. It plays an important role in predicting the behavior of electron flow in semiconductor devices. Mathematically, the governing equations form a convection-diffusion type system with a right hand side describing the relaxation effects and interaction with a self consistent electric field. The proposed numerical scheme is a splitting scheme based on the kinetic flux-vector splitting (KFVS) method for the hyperbolic step, and a semi-implicit Runge-Kutta method for the relaxation step. The KFVS method is based on the direct splitting of macroscopic flux functions of the system on the cell interfaces. The second order accuracy of the scheme is achieved by using MUSCL-type initial reconstruction and Runge-Kutta time stepping method. Several case studies are considered. For validation, the results of current scheme are compared with those obtained from the splitting scheme based on the NT central scheme. The effects of various parameters such as low field mobility, device length, lattice temperature and voltage are analyzed. The accuracy, efficiency and simplicity of the proposed KFVS scheme validates its generic applicability to the given model equations. A two dimensional simulation is also performed by KFVS method for a MESFET device, producing results in good agreement with those obtained by NT-central scheme.

  5. Modeling the three-dimensional river antidunes using a depth-integrated hydrodynamic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaki, T.; Inoue, T.; Yabe, H.

    2016-12-01

    Dynamics of bedforms in rivers have been extensively studied in the last decades, however, the three-dimensionality of the river bedforms have been poorly understood because of the lack of experimental, theoretical and numerical works. Understanding the three-dimensional river bedorms is therefore one of challenging research topic in the engineering and the geomorphological research communities. Here, we propose a modeling of the three-dimensional river antidunes using a reduced horizontal two-dimensional morphodynamic model, which consists of a horizontal two-dimensional depth-integrated hydrodynamic model and a non-equilibrium bedload transport model. We use a simple submodel, which describes a phase lag of bed shear stress, into a depth-integrated shallow water flow model. First, a linear stability analysis is performed to understand the linear response of the morphodynamic model to a three-dimensional wavy bed perturbation. The analysis shows that the model could explain both the three-dimensional antidune instability and free bar instability. The dominant streamwise wavelength and spanwise mode of the antidunes obtained by the linear analysis are consistent with the results of experimental flumes. We then carried out numerical simulations to replicate the nonlinear dynamics of the three-dimensional antidunes and associated water surface deformation in straight channels. The numerical simulations show that the model is able to capture the formation and development of upstream-migrating antidunes and a co-evolution of the antidunes and alternate bars.

  6. Hydrodynamics for a model of a confined quasi-two-dimensional granular gas.

    PubMed

    Brey, J Javier; Buzón, V; Maynar, P; García de Soria, M I

    2015-05-01

    The hydrodynamic equations for a model of a confined quasi-two-dimensional gas of smooth inelastic hard spheres are derived from the Boltzmann equation for the model, using a generalization of the Chapman-Enskog method. The heat and momentum fluxes are calculated to Navier-Stokes order, and the associated transport coefficients are explicitly determined as functions of the coefficient of normal restitution and the velocity parameter involved in the definition of the model. Also an Euler transport term contributing to the energy transport equation is considered. This term arises from the gradient expansion of the rate of change of the temperature due to the inelasticity of collisions, and it vanishes for elastic systems. The hydrodynamic equations are particularized for the relevant case of a system in the homogeneous steady state. The relationship with previous works is analyzed.

  7. Hydrodynamic Mixing of Ablator Material into the Compressed Fuel and Hot Spot of Direct-Drive DT Cryogenic Implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regan, S. P.; Goncharov, V. N.; Epstein, R.; Betti, R.; Bonino, M. J.; Cao, D.; Collins, T. J. B.; Campbell, E. M.; Forrest, C. J.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Harding, D. R.; Marozas, J. A.; Marshall, F. J.; McKenty, P. W.; Sangster, T. C.; Stoeckl, C.; Luo, R. W.; Schoff, M. E.; Farrell, M.

    2016-10-01

    Hydrodynamic mixing of ablator material into the compressed fuel and hot spot of direct-drive DT cryogenic implosions is diagnosed using time-integrated, spatially resolved xray spectroscopy. The laser drive ablates most of the 8- μm-thick CH ablator, which is doped with trace amounts of Ge ( 0.5 at.) and surrounds the cryogenic DT layer. A small fraction of the ablator material is mixed into the compressed shell and the hot spot by the ablation-front Rayleigh-Taylor hydrodynamic instability seeded by laser imprint, the target mounting stalk, and surface debris. The amount of mix mass inferred from spectroscopic analysis of the Ge K-shell emission will be presented. This material is based upon work supported by the Department Of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944. Part of this work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  8. A 3+1 dimensional viscous hydrodynamic code for relativistic heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpenko, Iu.; Huovinen, P.; Bleicher, M.

    2014-11-01

    We describe the details of 3+1 dimensional relativistic hydrodynamic code for the simulations of quark-gluon/hadron matter expansion in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions. The code solves the equations of relativistic viscous hydrodynamics in the Israel-Stewart framework. With the help of ideal-viscous splitting, we keep the ability to solve the equations of ideal hydrodynamics in the limit of zero viscosities using a Godunov-type algorithm. Milne coordinates are used to treat the predominant expansion in longitudinal (beam) direction effectively. The results are successfully tested against known analytical relativistic inviscid and viscous solutions, as well as against existing 2+1D relativistic viscous code. Catalogue identifier: AETZ_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AETZ_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 13 825 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 92 750 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++. Computer: any with a C++ compiler and the CERN ROOT libraries. Operating system: tested on GNU/Linux Ubuntu 12.04 x64 (gcc 4.6.3), GNU/Linux Ubuntu 13.10 (gcc 4.8.2), Red Hat Linux 6 (gcc 4.4.7). RAM: scales with the number of cells in hydrodynamic grid; 1900 Mbytes for 3D 160×160×100 grid. Classification: 1.5, 4.3, 12. External routines: CERN ROOT (http://root.cern.ch), Gnuplot (http://www.gnuplot.info/) for plotting the results. Nature of problem: relativistic hydrodynamical description of the 3-dimensional quark-gluon/hadron matter expansion in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions. Solution method: finite volume Godunov-type method. Running time: scales with the number of hydrodynamic cells; typical running times on Intel(R) Core(TM) i7-3770 CPU @ 3.40 GHz, single thread mode, 160

  9. The onset of thermalization in finite-dimensional equations of hydrodynamics: insights from the Burgers equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkataraman, Divya; Sankar Ray, Samriddhi

    2017-01-01

    Solutions to finite-dimensional (all spatial Fourier modes set to zero beyond a finite wavenumber KG ), inviscid equations of hydrodynamics at long times are known to be at variance with those obtained for the original infinite dimensional partial differential equations or their viscous counterparts. Surprisingly, the solutions to such Galerkin-truncated equations develop sharp localized structures, called tygers (Ray et al. 2011 Phys. Rev. E 84, 016301 (doi:10.1103/PhysRevE.84.016301)), which eventually lead to completely thermalized states associated with an equipartition energy spectrum. We now obtain, by using the analytically tractable Burgers equation, precise estimates, theoretically and via direct numerical simulations, of the time τc at which thermalization is triggered and show that τc∼KGξ, with ξ =-4/9 . Our results have several implications, including for the analyticity strip method, to numerically obtain evidence for or against blow-ups of the three-dimensional incompressible Euler equations.

  10. Spherical-shell boundaries for two-dimensional compressible convection in a star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratt, J.; Baraffe, I.; Goffrey, T.; Geroux, C.; Viallet, M.; Folini, D.; Constantino, T.; Popov, M.; Walder, R.

    2016-10-01

    Context. Studies of stellar convection typically use a spherical-shell geometry. The radial extent of the shell and the boundary conditions applied are based on the model of the star investigated. We study the impact of different two-dimensional spherical shells on compressible convection. Realistic profiles for density and temperature from an established one-dimensional stellar evolution code are used to produce a model of a large stellar convection zone representative of a young low-mass star, like our sun at 106 years of age. Aims: We analyze how the radial extent of the spherical shell changes the convective dynamics that result in the deep interior of the young sun model, far from the surface. In the near-surface layers, simple small-scale convection develops from the profiles of temperature and density. A central radiative zone below the convection zone provides a lower boundary on the convection zone. The inclusion of either of these physically distinct layers in the spherical shell can potentially affect the characteristics of deep convection. Methods: We perform hydrodynamic implicit large eddy simulations of compressible convection using the MUltidimensional Stellar Implicit Code (MUSIC). Because MUSIC has been designed to use realistic stellar models produced from one-dimensional stellar evolution calculations, MUSIC simulations are capable of seamlessly modeling a whole star. Simulations in two-dimensional spherical shells that have different radial extents are performed over tens or even hundreds of convective turnover times, permitting the collection of well-converged statistics. Results: To measure the impact of the spherical-shell geometry and our treatment of boundaries, we evaluate basic statistics of the convective turnover time, the convective velocity, and the overshooting layer. These quantities are selected for their relevance to one-dimensional stellar evolution calculations, so that our results are focused toward studies exploiting the so

  11. Macroinvertebrate response to flow changes in a subalpine stream: predictions from two-dimensional hydrodynamic models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waddle, T.J.; Holmquist, J.G.

    2013-01-01

    Two-dimensional hydrodynamic models are being used increasingly as alternatives to traditional one-dimensional instream flow methodologies for assessing adequacy of flow and associated faunal habitat. Two-dimensional modelling of habitat has focused primarily on fishes, but fish-based assessments may not model benthic macroinvertebrate habitat effectively. We extend two-dimensional techniques to a macroinvertebrate assemblage in a high-elevation stream in the Sierra Nevada (Dana Fork of the Tuolumne River, Yosemite National Park, CA, USA). This stream frequently flows at less than 0.03?m3?s?1 in late summer and is representative of a common water abstraction scenario: maximum water abstraction coinciding with seasonally low flows. We used two-dimensional modelling to predict invertebrate responses to reduced flows that might result from increased abstraction. We collected site-specific field data on the macroinvertebrate assemblage, bed topography and flow conditions and then coupled a two-dimensional hydrodynamic model with macroinvertebrate indices to evaluate habitat across a range of low flows. Macroinvertebrate indices were calculated for the wetted area at each flow. A surrogate flow record based on an adjacent watershed was used to evaluate frequency and duration of low flow events. Using surrogate historical records, we estimated that flow should fall below 0.071?m3?s?1 at least 1?day in 82 of 95?years and below 0.028?m3?s?1 in 48 of 95?years. Invertebrate metric means indicated minor losses in response to modelled discharge reductions, but wetted area decreased substantially. Responses of invertebrates to water abstraction will likely be a function of changing habitat quantity rather than quality.

  12. The Hydrodynamic Study of the Swimming Gliding: a Two-Dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Analysis.

    PubMed

    Marinho, Daniel A; Barbosa, Tiago M; Rouboa, Abel I; Silva, António J

    2011-09-01

    Nowadays the underwater gliding after the starts and the turns plays a major role in the overall swimming performance. Hence, minimizing hydrodynamic drag during the underwater phases should be a main aim during swimming. Indeed, there are several postures that swimmers can assume during the underwater gliding, although experimental results were not conclusive concerning the best body position to accomplish this aim. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to analyse the effect in hydrodynamic drag forces of using different body positions during gliding through computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methodology. For this purpose, two-dimensional models of the human body in steady flow conditions were studied. Two-dimensional virtual models had been created: (i) a prone position with the arms extended at the front of the body; (ii) a prone position with the arms placed alongside the trunk; (iii) a lateral position with the arms extended at the front and; (iv) a dorsal position with the arms extended at the front. The drag forces were computed between speeds of 1.6 m/s and 2 m/s in a two-dimensional Fluent(®) analysis. The positions with the arms extended at the front presented lower drag values than the position with the arms aside the trunk. The lateral position was the one in which the drag was lower and seems to be the one that should be adopted during the gliding after starts and turns.

  13. The Hydrodynamic Study of the Swimming Gliding: a Two-Dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Marinho, Daniel A.; Barbosa, Tiago M.; Rouboa, Abel I.; Silva, António J.

    2011-01-01

    Nowadays the underwater gliding after the starts and the turns plays a major role in the overall swimming performance. Hence, minimizing hydrodynamic drag during the underwater phases should be a main aim during swimming. Indeed, there are several postures that swimmers can assume during the underwater gliding, although experimental results were not conclusive concerning the best body position to accomplish this aim. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to analyse the effect in hydrodynamic drag forces of using different body positions during gliding through computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methodology. For this purpose, two-dimensional models of the human body in steady flow conditions were studied. Two-dimensional virtual models had been created: (i) a prone position with the arms extended at the front of the body; (ii) a prone position with the arms placed alongside the trunk; (iii) a lateral position with the arms extended at the front and; (iv) a dorsal position with the arms extended at the front. The drag forces were computed between speeds of 1.6 m/s and 2 m/s in a two-dimensional Fluent® analysis. The positions with the arms extended at the front presented lower drag values than the position with the arms aside the trunk. The lateral position was the one in which the drag was lower and seems to be the one that should be adopted during the gliding after starts and turns. PMID:23486656

  14. Stability of a compressible two-dimensional vortex under a three-dimensional perturbation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broadbent, E. G.

    1984-04-01

    It was shown by Kelvin that a two-dimensional vortex under a two-dimensional disturbance in incompressible flow responds at a discrete set of eigenvalues. These were found by Broadbent and Moore (1979) to become unstable in a compressible fluid. Three-dimensional perturbations are shown here also to be unstable, provided that the wavelength is greater than some critical value that depends on the Mach number of the vortex. A definition is given of a critical boundary dividing stable from unstable modes. Whereas the results for the most part relate to a Rankine vortex, some are also given for a vortex with a different velocity profile within the core; qualitatively, the same type of behavior is observed.

  15. Downconversion of terahertz radiation due to intrinsic hydrodynamic nonlinearity of a two-dimensional electron plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giliberti, Valeria; Di Gaspare, Alessandra; Giovine, Ennio; Ortolani, Michele; Sorba, Lucia; Biasiol, Giorgio; Popov, Vyacheslav V.; Fateev, Denis V.; Evangelisti, Florestano

    2015-04-01

    We have measured the electric signal downconverted from a terahertz frequency by an unbiased high mobility two-dimensional electron-gas (2DEG) device. The 2DEG was confined in an asymmetric plasmonic microcavity, and the radiation frequency was continuously tuned in the 0.2-0.4 THz range. The presence of resonant peaks at three frequencies corresponding to three plasma oscillation modes of the ungated 2DEG clearly points to the intrinsic nature of the hydrodynamic nonlinearity responsible for the downconversion as opposed to previously proposed plasmonic cavity configurations where the 2DEG oscillates under the metal gate that also acts as the source of the nonlinearity.

  16. High Strain Lagrangian Hydrodynamics. A Three-Dimensional SPH Code for Dynamic Material Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Libersky, Larry D.; Petschek, Albert G.; Carney, Theodore C.; Hipp, Jim R.; Allahdadi, Firooz A.

    1993-11-01

    MAGI, a three-dimensional shock and material response code which is based on smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) is described. Calculations are presented and compared with experimental results. The SPH method is unique in that it employs no spatial mesh. The absence of a grid leads to some nice features such as the ability to handle large distortions in a pure Lagrangian frame and a natural treatment of voids. Both of these features are important in the tracking of debris clouds produced by hypervelocity impact—a difficult problem for which SPH seems ideally suited. We believe this is the first application of SPH to the dynamics of elastic-plastic solids.

  17. Sub-micrometer-precision, three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamic focusing via "microfluidic drifting".

    PubMed

    Nawaz, Ahmad Ahsan; Zhang, Xiangjun; Mao, Xiaole; Rufo, Joseph; Lin, Sz-Chin Steven; Guo, Feng; Zhao, Yanhui; Lapsley, Michael; Li, Peng; McCoy, J Philip; Levine, Stewart J; Huang, Tony Jun

    2014-01-21

    In this article, we demonstrate single-layered, "microfluidic drifting" based three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamic focusing devices with particle/cell focal positioning approaching submicron precision along both lateral and vertical directions. By systematically optimizing channel geometries and sample/sheath flow rates, a series of "microfluidic drifting" based 3D hydrodynamic focusing devices with different curvature angles are designed and fabricated. Their performances are then evaluated using confocal microscopy, fast camera imaging, and side-view imaging techniques. Using a device with a curvature angle of 180°, we have achieved a standard deviation of ±0.45 μm in particle focal position and a coefficient of variation (CV) of 2.37% in flow cytometric measurements. To the best of our knowledge, this is the best CV that has been achieved using a microfluidic flow cytometry device. Moreover, the device showed the capability to distinguish 8 peaks when subjected to a stringent 8-peak rainbow calibration test, signifying the ability to perform sensitive, accurate tests similar to commercial flow cytometers. We have further tested and validated our device by detection of HEK-293 cells. With its advantages in simple fabrication (i.e., single-layered device), precise 3D hydrodynamic focusing (i.e., submicrometer precision along both lateral and vertical directions), and high detection resolution (i.e., low CV), our method could serve as an important basis for high-performance, mass-producible microfluidic flow cytometry.

  18. High-energy Particle Transport in Three-dimensional Hydrodynamic Models of Colliding-wind Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reitberger, K.; Kissmann, R.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Dubus, G.

    2014-02-01

    Massive stars in binary systems (such as WR 140, WR 147, or η Carinae) have long been regarded as potential sources of high-energy γ-rays. The emission is thought to arise in the region where the stellar winds collide and produce relativistic particles that subsequently might be able to emit γ-rays. Detailed numerical hydrodynamic simulations have already offered insight into the complex dynamics of the wind collision region (WCR), while independent analytical studies, albeit with simplified descriptions of the WCR, have shed light on the spectra of charged particles. In this paper, we describe a combination of these two approaches. We present a three-dimensional hydrodynamical model for colliding stellar winds and compute spectral energy distributions of relativistic particles for the resulting structure of the WCR. The hydrodynamic part of our model incorporates the line-driven acceleration of the winds, gravity, orbital motion, and the radiative cooling of the shocked plasma. In our treatment of charged particles, we consider diffusive shock acceleration in the WCR and the subsequent cooling via inverse Compton losses (including Klein-Nishina effects), bremsstrahlung, collisions, and other energy loss mechanisms.

  19. Development of a Three-Dimensional PSE Code for Compressible Flows: Stability of Three-Dimensional Compressible Boundary Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakumar, P.; Jeyasingham, Samarasingham

    1999-01-01

    A program is developed to investigate the linear stability of three-dimensional compressible boundary layer flows over bodies of revolutions. The problem is formulated as a two dimensional (2D) eigenvalue problem incorporating the meanflow variations in the normal and azimuthal directions. Normal mode solutions are sought in the whole plane rather than in a line normal to the wall as is done in the classical one dimensional (1D) stability theory. The stability characteristics of a supersonic boundary layer over a sharp cone with 50 half-angle at 2 degrees angle of attack is investigated. The 1D eigenvalue computations showed that the most amplified disturbances occur around x(sub 2) = 90 degrees and the azimuthal mode number for the most amplified disturbances range between m = -30 to -40. The frequencies of the most amplified waves are smaller in the middle region where the crossflow dominates the instability than the most amplified frequencies near the windward and leeward planes. The 2D eigenvalue computations showed that due to the variations in the azimuthal direction, the eigenmodes are clustered into isolated confined regions. For some eigenvalues, the eigenfunctions are clustered in two regions. Due to the nonparallel effect in the azimuthal direction, the eigenmodes are clustered into isolated confined regions. For some eigenvalues, the eigenfunctions are clustered in two regions. Due to the nonparallel effect in the azimuthal direction, the most amplified disturbances are shifted to 120 degrees compared to 90 degrees for the parallel theory. It is also observed that the nonparallel amplification rates are smaller than that is obtained from the parallel theory.

  20. RICH: Numerical simulation of compressible hydrodynamics on a moving Voronoi mesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yalinewich, Almog; Steinberg, Elad; Sari, Re'em

    2014-10-01

    RICH (Racah Institute Computational Hydrodynamics) is a 2D hydrodynamic code based on Godunov's method. The code, largely based on AREPO, acts on an unstructured moving mesh. It differs from AREPO in the interpolation and time advancement scheme as well as a novel parallelization scheme based on Voronoi tessellation. Though not universally true, in many cases a moving mesh gives better results than a static mesh: where matter moves one way and a sound wave is traveling in the other way (such that relative to the grid the wave is not moving), a static mesh gives better results than a moving mesh. RICH is designed in an object oriented, user friendly way that facilitates incorporation of new algorithms and physical processes.

  1. Contribution to the nonlinear theory of sound and hydrodynamic turbulence of a compressible liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    L'vov, Victor S.; Mikhailov, Alexandr V.

    1981-01-01

    The interaction of sound with hydrodynamic turbulence has been studied in detail. The sound absorption decrement, the correlation time and length and the frequency diffusion coefficient for the acoustic wave packet are calculated. The spectral composition of the sound radiated by a unit, turbulent volume and the spectral energy density of sound in equilibrium with the turbulence are studied. The region of applicability of the kinetic equation for sound with a linear dispersion low is found.

  2. One-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamic simulations of imploding spherical plasma liners with detailed equation-of-state modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, J. S.; Hsu, S. C.; Golovkin, I. E.; MacFarlane, J. J.; Cassibry, J. T.

    2012-10-15

    This work extends the one-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamic imploding spherical argon plasma liner simulations of Awe et al.[Phys. Plasmas 18, 072705 (2011)] by using a detailed tabular equation-of-state (EOS) model, whereas Awe et al. used a polytropic EOS model. Results using the tabular EOS model give lower stagnation pressures by a factor of 3.9-8.6 and lower peak ion temperatures compared to the polytropic EOS results. Both local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) and non-LTE EOS models were used in this work, giving similar results on stagnation pressure. The lower stagnation pressures using a tabular EOS model are attributed to a reduction in the liner's ability to compress arising from the energy sink introduced by ionization and electron excitation, which are not accounted for in a polytropic EOS model. Variation of the plasma liner species for the same initial liner geometry, mass density, and velocity was also explored using the LTE tabular EOS model, showing that the highest stagnation pressure is achieved with the highest atomic mass species for the constraints imposed.

  3. Unstable shear flows in two dimensional strongly correlated liquids - a hydrodynamic and molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Akanksha; Ganesh, Rajaraman; Joy, Ashwin

    2016-11-01

    In Navier-Stokes fluids, shear flows are known to become unstable leading to instability and eventually to turbulence. A class of flow namely, Kolmogorov Flows (K-Flows) exhibit such transition at low Reynolds number. Using fluid and molecular dynamics, we address the physics of transition from laminar to turbulent regime in strongly correlated-liquids such as in multi-species plasmas and also in naturally occurring plasmas with K-Flows as initial condition. A 2D phenomenological generalized hydrodynamic model is invoked wherein the effect of strong correlations is incorporated via a viscoelastic memory. To study the stability of K-Flows or in general any shear flow, a generalized eigenvalue solver has been developed along with a spectral solver for the full nonlinear set of fluid equations. A study of the linear and nonlinear features of K-Flow in incompressible and compressible limit exhibits cyclicity and nonlinear pattern formation in vorticity. A first principles based molecular dynamics simulation of particles interacting via Yukawa potential is performed with features such as configurational and kinetic thermostats for K-Flows. This work reveals several interesting similarities and differences between hydrodynamics and molecular dynamics studies.

  4. Three-dimensional Hybrid Continuum-Atomistic Simulations for Multiscale Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Wijesinghe, S; Hornung, R; Garcia, A; Hadjiconstantinou, N

    2004-04-15

    We present an adaptive mesh and algorithmic refinement (AMAR) scheme for modeling multi-scale hydrodynamics. The AMAR approach extends standard conservative adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) algorithms by providing a robust flux-based method for coupling an atomistic fluid representation to a continuum model. The atomistic model is applied locally in regions where the continuum description is invalid or inaccurate, such as near strong flow gradients and at fluid interfaces, or when the continuum grid is refined to the molecular scale. The need for such ''hybrid'' methods arises from the fact that hydrodynamics modeled by continuum representations are often under-resolved or inaccurate while solutions generated using molecular resolution globally are not feasible. In the implementation described herein, Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) provides an atomistic description of the flow and the compressible two-fluid Euler equations serve as our continuum-scale model. The AMR methodology provides local grid refinement while the algorithm refinement feature allows the transition to DSMC where needed. The continuum and atomistic representations are coupled by matching fluxes at the continuum-atomistic interfaces and by proper averaging and interpolation of data between scales. Our AMAR application code is implemented in C++ and is built upon the SAMRAI (Structured Adaptive Mesh Refinement Application Infrastructure) framework developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. SAMRAI provides the parallel adaptive gridding algorithm and enables the coupling between the continuum and atomistic methods.

  5. Compression of digital hologram for three-dimensional object using Wavelet-Bandelets transform.

    PubMed

    Bang, Le Thanh; Ali, Zulfiqar; Quang, Pham Duc; Park, Jae-Hyeung; Kim, Nam

    2011-04-25

    In the transformation based compression algorithms of digital hologram for three-dimensional object, the balance between compression ratio and normalized root mean square (NRMS) error is always the core of algorithm development. The Wavelet transform method is efficient to achieve high compression ratio but NRMS error is also high. In order to solve this issue, we propose a hologram compression method using Wavelet-Bandelets transform. Our simulation and experimental results show that the Wavelet-Bandelets method has a higher compression ratio than Wavelet methods and all the other methods investigated in this paper, while it still maintains low NRMS error.

  6. Three-dimensional hydrodynamic modeling of a neck cutoffs on an elongate meander loop.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turnipseed, C.; Willson, C. S.; Richards, D.; Konsoer, K. M.

    2016-12-01

    Neck cutoffs are a common morphodynamic feature of meandering rivers. However, their occurrence on natural rivers is often sporadic with fairly rapid initial morphologic adjustment, making detailed field investigations of the interactions between flow and form challenging. A recent neck cutoff event on the White River in central Arkansas has provided a rare opportunity to collect field measurements of velocity and channel bathymetry during the first two years following initial cutoff. These datasets were used to perform detailed three-dimensional numerical modeling of the hydrodynamics at different stages in morphologic evolution of the cutoff. The simulations were performed using the MIKE 3 Flexible Mesh (FM) by DHI, which utilizes an unstructured mesh and the finite volume method to solve the three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations. The model was calibrated against the field measurements of three-dimensional velocity, and various discharge conditions were simulated for each time period. The modeling results reveal complex patterns of three-dimensional flow field, including strong vertical velocity gradients through the initial cutoff and multiple regions of flow separation and recirculation related to strong redirection of the flow nearly 180 degrees through the cutoff. These regions of recirculation are also shown to vary depending on discharge conditions and affect hydrologic connectivity between the main channel and abandoned loop. The findings from this investigation are used to develop improved conceptual models of neck cutoffs on elongate meander loops.

  7. Three-dimensional hydrodynamic Bondi-Hoyle accretion. 1: Code validation and stationary accretors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruffert, Maximilian

    1994-01-01

    We investigate the hydrodynamics of three-dimensional classical Bondi-Hoyle accretion. Totally absorbing stationary spheres of varying sizes (from 10.0 down to 0.02 Bondi radii) accrete matter from a homogeneous and slightly perturbed medium, which is taken to be an ideal gas (gamma = 5/3 or 1.2). To accommodate the long-range gravitational forces, the extent of the computational volume is typically a factor of 100 larger than the radius of the accretor. We compare the numerical mass accretion rates with the theoretical predictions of Bondi, to assess the validity of the code. The hydrodynamics is modeled by the piecewise parabolic method. No energy sources (nuclear burning) or sinks (radiation, conduction) are included. The resolution in the vicinity of the accretor is increased by multiply nesting several (6-8) grids around the stationary sphere, each finer grid being a factor of 2 smaller spatially than the next coarser grid. This allows us to include a coarse model for the surface of the accretor (vacuum sphere) on the finest grid while at the same time evolving the gas on the coarser grids. The accretion rates derived numerically are in in very good agreement (to about 10% over several orders of magnitude) with the values given by Bondi for a stationary accretor within a hydrodynamic medium. However, the equations have to be changed in order to include the finite size of the accretor (in some cases very large compared to the sonic point or even to the Bondi radius).

  8. Time-dependent two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics of accreting matter onto highly magnetized neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, R.I. . Dept. of Astronomy Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA ); Arons, J. . Dept. of Astronomy California Univ., Berkeley, CA . Dept. of Physics)

    1990-11-20

    We present for the first time, the self-consistent solution of the two-dimensional, time-dependent equations of radiation-hydrodynamics governing the accretion of matter onto the highly magnetized polar caps of luminous x-ray pulsars. The calculations show a structure in the accretion column very different from previous one-zone uniform models. We have included all the relevant magnetic field corrections to both the hydrodynamics and the radiative transport. We include a new theory for the diffusion and advection of both radiation energy density and photon number density. For initially uniformly accreting models with super-Eddington flows, we have uncovered evidence of strong radiation-driven outflowing optically thin radiation filled regions of the accretion column embedded in optically-thick inflowing plasma. We follow the evolution of these photon bubbles for several dynamical timescales. The development of these photon bubbles'' indicates growth times on the order of a millisecond and show fluctuations on sub-millisecond timescales in agreement with a linear stability analysis. The photon bubbles are a consequence of the effect of radiative heat flux on the internal gravity waves in the strongly magnetized atmosphere and may result in observable fluctuations in the emitted luminosity leading to luminosity dependent changes in the pulse profile. This may provide important new diagnostics for conditions in accreting x-ray pulsars. 19 refs., 13 figs.

  9. Time-dependent two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics of accreting matter onto highly magnetized neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, R.I. . Dept. of Astronomy Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA California Univ., Los Angeles, CA . Inst. of Geophysics and Planetary Physics); Arons, J. . Dept. of Astronomy California Univ., Los Angeles, CA . Inst. of Geophysics and Planetary Physics CEA Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, 91 -

    1989-11-24

    We present for the first time, the self-consistent solution of the two-dimensional, time-dependent equations of radiation-hydrodynamics governing the accretion of matter onto the highly magnetized polar caps of luminous x-ray pulsars. The calculations show a structure in the accretion column very different from previous one-zone uniform models. We have included all the relevant magnetic field corrections to both the hydrodynamics and the radiative transport. We include a new theory for the diffusion and advection of both radiation energy density and photon number density. For initially uniformly accreting models with super-Eddington flows, we have uncovered evidence of strong radiation-driven outflowing optically thin radiation filled regions of the accretion column embedded in optically-thick inflowing plasma. The development of these photon bubbles'' have growth times on the order of a millisecond and show fluctuations on sub-millisecond timescales. The photon bubbles are likely to be a consequence of convective over-stability and may result in observable fluctuations in the emitted luminosity leading to luminosity dependent changes in the pulse profile. This may provide important new diagnostics for conditions in accreting x-ray pulsars. 13 refs., 18 figs.

  10. Shape-controlled synthesis of hybrid nanomaterials via three-dimensional hydrodynamic focusing.

    PubMed

    Lu, Mengqian; Yang, Shikuan; Ho, Yi-Ping; Grigsby, Christopher L; Leong, Kam W; Huang, Tony Jun

    2014-10-28

    Shape-controlled synthesis of nanomaterials through a simple, continuous, and low-cost method is essential to nanomaterials research toward practical applications. Hydrodynamic focusing, with its advantages of simplicity, low-cost, and precise control over reaction conditions, has been used for nanomaterial synthesis. While most studies have focused on improving the uniformity and size control, few have addressed the potential of tuning the shape of the synthesized nanomaterials. Here we demonstrate a facile method to synthesize hybrid materials by three-dimensional hydrodynamic focusing (3D-HF). While keeping the flow rates of the reagents constant and changing only the flow rate of the buffer solution, the molar ratio of two reactants (i.e., tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) and HAuCl4) within the reaction zone varies. The synthesized TTF-Au hybrid materials possess very different and predictable morphologies. The reaction conditions at different buffer flow rates are studied through computational simulation, and the formation mechanisms of different structures are discussed. This simple one-step method to achieve continuous shape-tunable synthesis highlights the potential of 3D-HF in nanomaterials research.

  11. Three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamic focusing for continuous sampling and analysis of adherent cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chunxiu; Wang, Min; Yin, Xuefeng

    2011-10-07

    A simple three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamic focusing microfluidic device integrated with continuous sampling, rapid dynamic lysis, capillary electrophoretic (CE) separation and detection of intracellular content is presented. One of the major difficulties in microfluidic cell analysis for adherent cells is that the cells are prone to attaching to the channel surface. To solve this problem, a cross microfluidic chip with three sheath-flow channels located on both sides of and below the sampling channel was developed. With the three sheath flows around the sample solution-containing cells, the formed soft fluid wall prevents the cells from adhering to the channel surface. Labeled cells were 3D hydrodynamically focused by the sheath-flow streams and smoothly introduced into the cross-section one by one. The introduction of sheath-flow streams not only ensured single-cell sampling but avoided blockage of the sampling channel by adherent cells as well. The maximum rate for introduction of individual cells into the separation channel was about 151 cells min(-1). With electric field applied on the separation channel, the aligned cells were driven into the separation channel and rapidly lysed within 400 ms at the entry of the channel by sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS) added in the sheath-flow solution. The microfluidic system was evaluated by analysis of reduced glutathione (GSH) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) in single HepG2 cells. The average analysis throughput of ROS and GSH in single cells was 16-18 cells min(-1).

  12. Colloid-colloid hydrodynamic interaction around a bend in a quasi-one-dimensional channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liepold, Christopher; Zarcone, Ryan; Heumann, Tibor; Rice, Stuart A.; Lin, Binhua

    2017-07-01

    We report a study of how a bend in a quasi-one-dimensional (q1D) channel containing a colloid suspension at equilibrium that exhibits single-file particle motion affects the hydrodynamic coupling between colloid particles. We observe both structural and dynamical responses as the bend angle becomes more acute. The structural response is an increasing depletion of particles in the vicinity of the bend and an increase in the nearest-neighbor separation in the pair correlation function for particles on opposite sides of the bend. The dynamical response monitored by the change in the self-diffusion [D11(x )] and coupling [D12(x )] terms of the pair diffusion tensor reveals that the pair separation dependence of D12 mimics that of the pair correlation function just as in a straight q1D channel. We show that the observed behavior is a consequence of the boundary conditions imposed on the q1D channel: both the single-file motion and the hydrodynamic flow must follow the channel around the bend.

  13. An integrated, multiparametric flow cytometry chip using "microfluidic drifting" based three-dimensional hydrodynamic focusing.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xiaole; Nawaz, Ahmad Ahsan; Lin, Sz-Chin Steven; Lapsley, Michael Ian; Zhao, Yanhui; McCoy, J Philip; El-Deiry, Wafik S; Huang, Tony Jun

    2012-06-01

    In this work, we demonstrate an integrated, single-layer, miniature flow cytometry device that is capable of multi-parametric particle analysis. The device integrates both particle focusing and detection components on-chip, including a "microfluidic drifting" based three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamic focusing component and a series of optical fibers integrated into the microfluidic architecture to facilitate on-chip detection. With this design, multiple optical signals (i.e., forward scatter, side scatter, and fluorescence) from individual particles can be simultaneously detected. Experimental results indicate that the performance of our flow cytometry chip is comparable to its bulky, expensive desktop counterpart. The integration of on-chip 3D particle focusing with on-chip multi-parametric optical detection in a single-layer, mass-producible microfluidic device presents a major step towards low-cost flow cytometry chips for point-of-care clinical diagnostics.

  14. Hydrodynamic study of terahertz three-dimensional plasma resonances in InGaAs diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziadé, P.; Marinchio, H.; Laurent, T.; Sabatini, G.; Kallassy, Z.; Palermo, C.; Varani, L.

    2010-07-01

    Using a hydrodynamic model self-consistently coupled to a Poisson solver, we investigate the time and frequency response of InGaAs diodes excited at room temperature by an optical photoexcitation presenting a beating in the terahertz frequency domain. The analysis of the main physical quantities, such as the local electric field and the conduction current density, evidences the presence of strong resonances that are interpreted as three-dimensional plasma oscillations excited by the optical beating. By studying the influence of the geometry and doping of the diode, it is shown that, in most cases, the highly doped contacts mainly control the frequency of the plasma mode while the diode length is a crucial parameter to evidence a second resonance related to the diode active region. Moreover, the amplitude of the plasma resonances can be enhanced at high doping levels and by increasing the level of the optical photoexcitation.

  15. Multidimensional upwind hydrodynamics on unstructured meshes using graphics processing units - I. Two-dimensional uniform meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paardekooper, S.-J.

    2017-08-01

    We present a new method for numerical hydrodynamics which uses a multidimensional generalization of the Roe solver and operates on an unstructured triangular mesh. The main advantage over traditional methods based on Riemann solvers, which commonly use one-dimensional flux estimates as building blocks for a multidimensional integration, is its inherently multidimensional nature, and as a consequence its ability to recognize multidimensional stationary states that are not hydrostatic. A second novelty is the focus on graphics processing units (GPUs). By tailoring the algorithms specifically to GPUs, we are able to get speedups of 100-250 compared to a desktop machine. We compare the multidimensional upwind scheme to a traditional, dimensionally split implementation of the Roe solver on several test problems, and we find that the new method significantly outperforms the Roe solver in almost all cases. This comes with increased computational costs per time-step, which makes the new method approximately a factor of 2 slower than a dimensionally split scheme acting on a structured grid.

  16. Single-layer planar on-chip flow cytometer using microfluidic drifting based three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamic focusing.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xiaole; Lin, Sz-Chin Steven; Dong, Cheng; Huang, Tony Jun

    2009-06-07

    In this work, we demonstrate an on-chip microfluidic flow cytometry system based on a three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamic focusing technique, microfluidic drifting. By inducing Dean flow in a curved microfluidic channel, microfluidic drifting can be used to hydrodynamically focus cells or particles in the vertical direction and enables the 3D hydrodynamic focusing in a single-layer planar microfluidic device. Through theoretical calculation, numerical simulation, and experimental characterization, we found that the microfluidic drifting technique can be effectively applied to three-dimensionally focus microparticles with density and size equivalent to those of human CD4+ T lymphocytes. In addition, we developed a flow cytometry platform by integrating the 3D focusing device with a laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) detection system. The system was shown to provide effective high-throughput flow cytometry measurements at a rate of greater than 1700 cells s(-1).

  17. Finite-temperature hydrodynamics for one-dimensional Bose gases: Breathing-mode oscillations as a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchoule, I.; Szigeti, S. S.; Davis, M. J.; Kheruntsyan, K. V.

    2016-11-01

    We develop a finite-temperature hydrodynamic approach for a harmonically trapped one-dimensional quasicondensate and apply it to describe the phenomenon of frequency doubling in the breathing-mode oscillations of the quasicondensate momentum distribution. The doubling here refers to the oscillation frequency relative to the oscillations of the real-space density distribution, invoked by a sudden confinement quench. By constructing a nonequilibrium phase diagram that characterizes the regime of frequency doubling and its gradual disappearance, we find that this crossover is governed by the quench strength and the initial temperature rather than by the equilibrium-state crossover from the quasicondensate to the ideal Bose gas regime. The hydrodynamic predictions are supported by the results of numerical simulations based on a finite-temperature c -field approach and extend the utility of the hydrodynamic theory for low-dimensional quantum gases to the description of finite-temperature systems and their dynamics in momentum space.

  18. Escaping Flatland: three-dimensional kinematics and hydrodynamics of median fins in fishes.

    PubMed

    Tytell, Eric D; Standen, Emily M; Lauder, George V

    2008-01-01

    Fish swimming has often been simplified into the motions of a two-dimensional slice through the horizontal midline, as though fishes live in a flat world devoid of a third dimension. While fish bodies do undulate primarily horizontally, this motion has important three-dimensional components, and fish fins can move in a complex three-dimensional manner. Recent results suggest that an understanding of the three-dimensional body shape and fin motions is vital for explaining the mechanics of swimming, and that two-dimensional representations of fish locomotion are misleading. In this study, we first examine axial swimming from the two-dimensional viewpoint, detailing the limitations of this view. Then we present data on the kinematics and hydrodynamics of the dorsal fin, the anal fin and the caudal fin during steady swimming and maneuvering in brook trout, Salvelinus fontinalis, bluegill sunfish, Lepomis macrochirus, and yellow perch, Perca flavescens. These fishes actively move the dorsal and anal fins during swimming, resulting in curvature along both anterio-posterior and dorso-ventral axes. The momentum imparted to the fluid by these fins comprises a substantial portion of total swimming force, adding to thrust and contributing to roll stability. While swimming, the caudal fin also actively curves dorso-ventrally, producing vortices separately from both its upper and lower lobes. This functional separation of the lobes may allow additional control of three-dimensional orientation, but probably reduces swimming efficiency. In contrast, fish may boost the caudal fin's efficiency by taking advantage of the flow from the dorsal and anal fins as it interacts with the flow around the caudal fin itself. During maneuvering, fish readily use their fins outside of the normal planes of motion. For example, the dorsal fin can flick laterally, orienting its surface perpendicular to the body, to help in turning and braking. These data demonstrate that, while fish do move

  19. On multigrid solution of the implicit equations of hydrodynamics. Experiments for the compressible Euler equations in general coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kifonidis, K.; Müller, E.

    2012-08-01

    Aims: We describe and study a family of new multigrid iterative solvers for the multidimensional, implicitly discretized equations of hydrodynamics. Schemes of this class are free of the Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy condition. They are intended for simulations in which widely differing wave propagation timescales are present. A preferred solver in this class is identified. Applications to some simple stiff test problems that are governed by the compressible Euler equations, are presented to evaluate the convergence behavior, and the stability properties of this solver. Algorithmic areas are determined where further work is required to make the method sufficiently efficient and robust for future application to difficult astrophysical flow problems. Methods: The basic equations are formulated and discretized on non-orthogonal, structured curvilinear meshes. Roe's approximate Riemann solver and a second-order accurate reconstruction scheme are used for spatial discretization. Implicit Runge-Kutta (ESDIRK) schemes are employed for temporal discretization. The resulting discrete equations are solved with a full-coarsening, non-linear multigrid method. Smoothing is performed with multistage-implicit smoothers. These are applied here to the time-dependent equations by means of dual time stepping. Results: For steady-state problems, our results show that the efficiency of the present approach is comparable to the best implicit solvers for conservative discretizations of the compressible Euler equations that can be found in the literature. The use of red-black as opposed to symmetric Gauss-Seidel iteration in the multistage-smoother is found to have only a minor impact on multigrid convergence. This should enable scalable parallelization without having to seriously compromise the method's algorithmic efficiency. For time-dependent test problems, our results reveal that the multigrid convergence rate degrades with increasing Courant numbers (i.e. time step sizes). Beyond a

  20. Calculation of three-dimensional compressible laminar and turbulent boundary layers. Calculation of three-dimensional compressible boundary layers on arbitrary wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cebeci, T.; Kaups, K.; Ramsey, J.; Moser, A.

    1975-01-01

    A very general method for calculating compressible three-dimensional laminar and turbulent boundary layers on arbitrary wings is described. The method utilizes a nonorthogonal coordinate system for the boundary-layer calculations and includes a geometry package that represents the wing analytically. In the calculations all the geometric parameters of the coordinate system are accounted for. The Reynolds shear-stress terms are modeled by an eddy-viscosity formulation developed by Cebeci. The governing equations are solved by a very efficient two-point finite-difference method used earlier by Keller and Cebeci for two-dimensional flows and later by Cebeci for three-dimensional flows.

  1. Center-to-Limb Variation of Solar Three-dimensional Hydrodynamical Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koesterke, L.; Allende Prieto, C.; Lambert, D. L.

    2008-06-01

    We examine closely the solar center-to-limb variation of continua and lines and compare observations with predictions from both a three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamic simulation of the solar surface (provided by M. Asplund and collaborators) and one-dimensional (1D) model atmospheres. Intensities from the 3D time series are derived by means of the new synthesis code ASSepsilonT, which overcomes limitations of previously available codes by including a consistent treatment of scattering and allowing for arbitrarily complex line and continuum opacities. In the continuum, we find very similar discrepancies between synthesis and observation for both types of model atmospheres. This is in contrast to previous studies that used a "horizontal" and time-averaged representation of the 3D model and found a significantly larger disagreement with observations. The presence of temperature and velocity fields in the 3D simulation provides a significant advantage when it comes to reproducing solar spectral line shapes. Nonetheless, a comparison of observed and synthetic equivalent widths reveals that the 3D model also predicts more uniform abundances as a function of position angle on the disk. We conclude that the 3D simulation provides not only a more realistic description of the gas dynamics, but despite its simplified treatment of the radiation transport, it also predicts reasonably well the observed center-to-limb variation, which is indicative of a thermal structure free from significant systematic errors.

  2. Two-dimensional hydrodynamic flood modelling for populated valley areas of Russian rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belikov, V. V.; Krylenko, I. N.; Alabyan, A. M.; Sazonov, A. A.; Glotko, A. V.

    2015-06-01

    Results of flood modelling for three cities located in different parts of Russia: (1) Veliky Ustyug at the Northern Dvina river (Europe); (2) Mezhdurechensk at the Tom river (Siberia); and (3) Blagoveschensk at the Amur river (Far East) are presented. The two-dimensional hydrodynamic model of flow in channels and on floodplain STREAM_2D on the basis of the numerical solution of two-dimensional Saint-Venant equations on a hybrid curvilinear quadrangular and rectangular mesh was used for the simulations. Verification of the model through a comparison of simulated inundated areas with outlines of flooded zones from satellite images for known hydrologic situations demonstrate close correspondence (relative errors of 7-12% in terms of the area for peaks of the analysed floods). Analyses of embankment influence of large-scale levees on the water flow demonstrate that, in some cases, water levels could rise by more than 1 m and the patterns of the flooding zones could significantly differ.

  3. A two-dimensional Segmented Boundary Algorithm for complex moving solid boundaries in Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khorasanizade, Sh.; Sousa, J. M. M.

    2016-03-01

    A Segmented Boundary Algorithm (SBA) is proposed to deal with complex boundaries and moving bodies in Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH). Boundaries are formed in this algorithm with chains of lines obtained from the decomposition of two-dimensional objects, based on simple line geometry. Various two-dimensional, viscous fluid flow cases have been studied here using a truly incompressible SPH method with the aim of assessing the capabilities of the SBA. Firstly, the flow over a stationary circular cylinder in a plane channel was analyzed at steady and unsteady regimes, for a single value of blockage ratio. Subsequently, the flow produced by a moving circular cylinder with a prescribed acceleration inside a plane channel was investigated as well. Next, the simulation of the flow generated by the impulsive start of a flat plate, again inside a plane channel, has been carried out. This was followed by the study of confined sedimentation of an elliptic body subjected to gravity, for various density ratios. The set of test cases was completed with the simulation of periodic flow around a sunflower-shaped object. Extensive comparisons of the results obtained here with published data have demonstrated the accuracy and effectiveness of the proposed algorithms, namely in cases involving complex geometries and moving bodies.

  4. Three-dimensional compression scheme based on wavelet transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wu; Xu, Hui; Liao, Mengyang

    1999-03-01

    In this paper, a 3D compression method based on separable wavelet transform is discussed in detail. The most commonly used digital modalities generate multiple slices in a single examination, which are normally anatomically or physiologically correlated to each other. 3D wavelet compression methods can achieve more efficient compression by exploring the correlation between slices. The first step is based on a separable 3D wavelet transform. Considering the difference between pixel distances within a slice and those between slices, one biorthogonal Antoninin filter bank is applied within 2D slices and a second biorthogonal Villa4 filter bank on the slice direction. Then, S+P transform is applied in the low-resolution wavelet components and an optimal quantizer is presented after analysis of the quantization noise. We use an optimal bit allocation algorithm, which, instead of eliminating the coefficients of high-resolution components in smooth areas, minimizes the system reconstruction distortion at a given bit-rate. Finally, to remain high coding efficiency and adapt to different properties of each component, a comprehensive entropy coding method is proposed, in which arithmetic coding method is applied in high-resolution components and adaptive Huffman coding method in low-resolution components. Our experimental results are evaluated by several image measures and our 3D wavelet compression scheme is proved to be more efficient than 2D wavelet compression.

  5. A variational principle for compressible fluid mechanics: Discussion of the multi-dimensional theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prozan, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    The variational principle for compressible fluid mechanics previously introduced is extended to two dimensional flow. The analysis is stable, exactly conservative, adaptable to coarse or fine grids, and very fast. Solutions for two dimensional problems are included. The excellent behavior and results lend further credence to the variational concept and its applicability to the numerical analysis of complex flow fields.

  6. Cascade of kinetic energy in three-dimensional compressible turbulence.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianchun; Yang, Yantao; Shi, Yipeng; Xiao, Zuoli; He, X T; Chen, Shiyi

    2013-05-24

    The conservative cascade of kinetic energy is established using both Fourier analysis and a new exact physical-space flux relation in a simulated compressible turbulence. The subgrid scale (SGS) kinetic energy flux of the compressive mode is found to be significantly larger than that of the solenoidal mode in the inertial range, which is the main physical origin for the occurrence of Kolmogorov's -5/3 scaling of the energy spectrum in compressible turbulence. The perfect antiparallel alignment between the large-scale strain and the SGS stress leads to highly efficient kinetic energy transfer in shock regions, which is a distinctive feature of shock structures in comparison with vortex structures. The rescaled probability distribution functions of SGS kinetic energy flux collapse in the inertial range, indicating a statistical self-similarity of kinetic energy cascades.

  7. Compression and Progressive Retrieval of Multi-Dimensional Sensor Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorkowski, P.; Brinkhoff, T.

    2016-06-01

    Since the emergence of sensor data streams, increasing amounts of observations have to be transmitted, stored and retrieved. Performing these tasks at the granularity of single points would mean an inappropriate waste of resources. Thus, we propose a concept that performs a partitioning of observations by spatial, temporal or other criteria (or a combination of them) into data segments. We exploit the resulting proximity (according to the partitioning dimension(s)) within each data segment for compression and efficient data retrieval. While in principle allowing lossless compression, it can also be used for progressive transmission with increasing accuracy wherever incremental data transfer is reasonable. In a first feasibility study, we apply the proposed method to a dataset of ARGO drifting buoys covering large spatio-temporal regions of the world's oceans and compare the achieved compression ratio to other formats.

  8. Efficient three-dimensional reconstruction of aquatic vegetation geometry: Estimating morphological parameters influencing hydrodynamic drag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liénard, Jean; Lynn, Kendra; Strigul, Nikolay; Norris, Benjamin K.; Gatziolis, Demetrios; Mullarney, Julia C.; Bryan, Karin, R.; Henderson, Stephen M.

    2016-09-01

    Aquatic vegetation can shelter coastlines from energetic waves and tidal currents, sometimes enabling accretion of fine sediments. Simulation of flow and sediment transport within submerged canopies requires quantification of vegetation geometry. However, field surveys used to determine vegetation geometry can be limited by the time required to obtain conventional caliper and ruler measurements. Building on recent progress in photogrammetry and computer vision, we present a method for reconstructing three-dimensional canopy geometry. The method was used to survey a dense canopy of aerial mangrove roots, called pneumatophores, in Vietnam's Mekong River Delta. Photogrammetric estimation of geometry required 1) taking numerous photographs at low tide from multiple viewpoints around 1 m2 quadrats, 2) computing relative camera locations and orientations by triangulation of key features present in multiple images and reconstructing a dense 3D point cloud, and 3) extracting pneumatophore locations and diameters from the point cloud data. Step 3) was accomplished by a new 'sector-slice' algorithm, yielding geometric parameters every 5 mm along a vertical profile. Photogrammetric analysis was compared with manual caliper measurements. In all 5 quadrats considered, agreement was found between manual and photogrammetric estimates of stem number, and of number × mean diameter, which is a key parameter appearing in hydrodynamic models. In two quadrats, pneumatophores were encrusted with numerous barnacles, generating a complex geometry not resolved by hand measurements. In remaining cases, moderate agreement between manual and photogrammetric estimates of stem diameter and solid volume fraction was found. By substantially reducing measurement time in the field while capturing in greater detail the 3D structure, photogrammetry has potential to improve input to hydrodynamic models, particularly for simulations of flow through large-scale, heterogenous canopies.

  9. Examination of the three-dimensional geometry of cetacean flukes using computed tomography scans: hydrodynamic implications.

    PubMed

    Fish, Frank E; Beneski, John T; Ketten, Darlene R

    2007-06-01

    The flukes of cetaceans function in the hydrodynamic generation of forces for thrust, stability, and maneuverability. The three-dimensional geometry of flukes is associated with production of lift and drag. Data on fluke geometry were collected from 19 cetacean specimens representing eight odontocete genera (Delphinus, Globicephala, Grampus, Kogia, Lagenorhynchus, Phocoena, Stenella, Tursiops). Flukes were imaged as 1 mm thickness cross-sections using X-ray computer-assisted tomography. Fluke shapes were characterized quantitatively by dimensions of the chord, maximum thickness, and position of maximum thickness from the leading edge. Sections were symmetrical about the chordline and had a rounded leading edge and highly tapered trailing edge. The thickness ratio (maximum thickness/chord) among species increased from insertion on the tailstock to a maximum at 20% of span and then decreasing steadily to the tip. Thickness ratio ranged from 0.139 to 0.232. These low values indicate reduced drag while moving at high speed. The position of maximum thickness from the leading edge remained constant over the fluke span at an average for all species of 0.285 chord. The displacement of the maximum thickness reduces the tendency of the flow to separate from the fluke surface, potentially affecting stall patterns. Similarly, the relatively large leading edge radius allows greater lift generation and delays stall. Computational analysis of fluke profiles at 50% of span showed that flukes were generally comparable or better for lift generation than engineered foils. Tursiops had the highest lift coefficients, which were superior to engineered foils by 12-19%. Variation in the structure of cetacean flukes reflects different hydrodynamic characteristics that could influence swimming performance.

  10. Blowup phenomena for the \\varvec{N}-dimensional compressible Euler equations with damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Ka Luen

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we extend the finite propagation speed property for the compressible Euler equations with damping from the three-dimensional case to the general N-dimensional case. Subsequently, blowup results of the N-dimensional compressible Euler equations with damping are obtained. More precisely, we show that if the initial data int limits _0^∞f(r)V(0,r) {d}r are sufficiently large, then blowup phenomena occurs and the finite blowup time can be estimated, where f is a general test function with mild conditions and V represents the speed of the fluid in radial symmetry.

  11. One-Dimensional Lagrangian Code for Plasma Hydrodynamic Analysis of a Fusion Pellet Driven by Ion Beams.

    SciTech Connect

    1986-12-01

    Version 00 The MEDUSA-IB code performs implosion and thermonuclear burn calculations of an ion beam driven ICF target, based on one-dimensional plasma hydrodynamics and transport theory. It can calculate the following values in spherical geometry through the progress of implosion and fuel burnup of a multi-layered target. (1) Hydrodynamic velocities, density, ion, electron and radiation temperature, radiation energy density, Rs and burn rate of target as a function of coordinates and time, (2) Fusion gain as a function of time, (3) Ionization degree, (4) Temperature dependent ion beam energy deposition, (5) Radiation, -particle and neutron spectra as a function of time.

  12. Six-dimensional supersymmetric gauge theories, quantum cohomology of instanton moduli spaces and gl( N) Quantum Intermediate Long Wave Hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonelli, Giulio; Sciarappa, Antonio; Tanzini, Alessandro; Vasko, Petr

    2014-07-01

    We show that the exact partition function of U( N) six-dimensional gauge theory with eight supercharges on ℂ2 × S 2 provides the quantization of the integrable system of hydrodynamic type known as gl( N) periodic Intermediate Long Wave (ILW). We characterize this system as the hydrodynamic limit of elliptic Calogero-Moser integrable system. We compute the Bethe equations from the effective gauged linear sigma model on S 2 with target space the ADHM instanton moduli space, whose mirror computes the Yang-Yang function of gl( N) ILW. The quantum Hamiltonians are given by the local chiral ring observables of the six-dimensional gauge theory. As particular cases, these provide the gl( N) Benjamin-Ono and Korteweg-de Vries quantum Hamiltonians. In the four dimensional limit, we identify the local chiral ring observables with the conserved charges of Heisenberg plus W N algebrae, thus providing a gauge theoretical proof of AGT correspondence.

  13. Gaseous Laser Targets and Optical Dignostics for Studying Compressible Turbulent Hydrodynamic Instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, M J; Hansen, J; Miles, A R; Froula, D; Gregori, G; Glenzer, S; Edens, A; Dittmire, T

    2005-02-08

    The possibility of studying compressible turbulent flows using gas targets driven by high power lasers and diagnosed with optical techniques is investigated. The potential advantage over typical laser experiments that use solid targets and x-ray diagnostics is more detailed information over a larger range of spatial scales. An experimental system is described to study shock - jet interactions at high Mach number. This consists of a mini-chamber full of nitrogen at a pressure {approx} 1 atms. The mini-chamber is situated inside a much larger vacuum chamber. An intense laser pulse ({approx}100J in {approx} 5ns) is focused on to a thin {approx} 0.3{micro}m thick silicon nitride window at one end of the mini-chamber. The window acts both as a vacuum barrier, and laser entrance hole. The ''explosion'' caused by the deposition of the laser energy just inside the window drives a strong blast wave out into the nitrogen atmosphere. The spherical shock expands and interacts with a jet of xenon introduced though the top of the mini-chamber. The Mach number of the interaction is controlled by the separation of the jet from the explosion. The resulting flow is visualized using an optical schlieren system using a pulsed laser source at a wavelength of 0.53 {micro}m. The technical path leading up to the design of this experiment is presented, and future prospects briefly considered. Lack of laser time in the final year of the project severely limited experimental results obtained using the new apparatus.

  14. Three-dimensional wave packets in a compressible boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forgoston, Eric; Tumin, Anatoli

    2006-10-01

    A three-dimensional wave packet generated by a local disturbance in a two-dimensional hypersonic boundary layer flow is studied with the aid of the previously solved initial-value problem. The solution to this problem can be expanded in a biorthogonal eigenfunction system as a sum of modes consisting of continuous and discrete spectra of temporal stability theory. A specific disturbance consisting of an initial temperature spot is considered, and the receptivity to this initial temperature spot is computed for both the two-dimensional and three-dimensional cases. Using previous analysis of the discrete and continuous spectrum, the inverse Fourier transform is computed numerically. The two-dimensional inverse Fourier transform is calculated for two discrete modes: Mode F and Mode S. The Mode S result is compared with an asymptotic approximation of the Fourier integral, which is obtained using the Gaussian model as well as the method of steepest descent. It is shown that the method of steepest descent provides an excellent approximation to the more computationally intensive numerical evaluation of the inverse Fourier transform. Additionally, the three-dimensional inverse Fourier transform is found using an asymptotic approximation of the Fourier integral. A main feature of the resulting three-dimensional wave packet is its two-dimensional nature, which arises from an association of Mode S with Mack's second mode.

  15. Hydrodynamic simulations of clumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldmeier, Achim; Hamann, Wolf-Rainer; Rätzel, D.; Oskinova, Lidia M.

    2008-04-01

    Clumps in hot star winds can originate from shock compression due to the line driven instability. One-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations reveal a radial wind structure consisting of highly compressed shells separated by voids, and colliding with fast clouds. Two-dimensional simulations are still largely missing, despite first attempts. Clumpiness dramatically affects the radiative transfer and thus all wind diagnostics in the UV, optical, and in X-rays. The microturbulence approximation applied hitherto is currently superseded by a more sophisticated radiative transfer in stochastic media. Besides clumps, i.e. jumps in the density stratification, so-called kinks in the velocity law, i.e. jumps in dv/dr, play an eminent role in hot star winds. Kinks are a new type of radiative-acoustic shock, and propagate at super-Abbottic speed.

  16. MULTI2D - a computer code for two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramis, R.; Meyer-ter-Vehn, J.; Ramírez, J.

    2009-06-01

    required. Nature of problem: In inertial confinement fusion and related experiments with lasers and particle beams, energy transport by thermal radiation becomes important. Under these conditions, the radiation field strongly interacts with the hydrodynamic motion through emission and absorption processes. Solution method: The equations of radiation transfer coupled with Lagrangian hydrodynamics, heat diffusion and beam tracing (laser or ions) are solved, in two-dimensional axial-symmetric geometry ( R-Z coordinates) using a fractional step scheme. Radiation transfer is solved with angular resolution. Matter properties are either interpolated from tables (equations-of-state and opacities) or computed by user routines (conductivities and beam attenuation). Restrictions: The code has been designed for typical conditions prevailing in inertial confinement fusion (ns time scale, matter states close to local thermodynamical equilibrium, negligible radiation pressure, …). Although a wider range of situations can be treated, extrapolations to regions beyond this design range need special care. Unusual features: A special computer language, called r94, is used at top levels of the code. These parts have to be converted to standard C by a translation program (supplied as part of the package). Due to the complexity of code (hydro-code, grid generation, user interface, graphic post-processor, translator program, installation scripts) extensive manuals are supplied as part of the package. Running time: 567 seconds for the example supplied.

  17. Three dimensional hydrodynamic calculations with adaptive mesh refinement of the evolution of Rayleigh Taylor and Richtmyer Meshkov instabilities in converging geometry: Multi-mode perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, R.I. |; Bell, J.; Pember, R.; Kelleher, T.

    1993-04-01

    The authors present results for high resolution hydrodynamic calculations of the growth and development of instabilities in shock driven imploding spherical geometries in both 2D and 3D. They solve the Eulerian equations of hydrodynamics with a high order Godunov approach using local adaptive mesh refinement to study the temporal and spatial development of the turbulent mixing layer resulting from both Richtmyer Meshkov and Rayleigh Taylor instabilities. The use of a high resolution Eulerian discretization with adaptive mesh refinement permits them to study the detailed three-dimensional growth of multi-mode perturbations far into the non-linear regime for converging geometries. They discuss convergence properties of the simulations by calculating global properties of the flow. They discuss the time evolution of the turbulent mixing layer and compare its development to a simple theory for a turbulent mix model in spherical geometry based on Plesset`s equation. Their 3D calculations show that the constant found in the planar incompressible experiments of Read and Young`s may not be universal for converging compressible flow. They show the 3D time trace of transitional onset to a mixing state using the temporal evolution of volume rendered imaging. Their preliminary results suggest that the turbulent mixing layer loses memory of its initial perturbations for classical Richtmyer Meshkov and Rayleigh Taylor instabilities in spherically imploding shells. They discuss the time evolution of mixed volume fraction and the role of vorticity in converging 3D flows in enhancing the growth of a turbulent mixing layer.

  18. Volumetric imaging of shark tail hydrodynamics reveals a three-dimensional dual-ring vortex wake structure.

    PubMed

    Flammang, Brooke E; Lauder, George V; Troolin, Daniel R; Strand, Tyson

    2011-12-22

    Understanding how moving organisms generate locomotor forces is fundamental to the analysis of aerodynamic and hydrodynamic flow patterns that are generated during body and appendage oscillation. In the past, this has been accomplished using two-dimensional planar techniques that require reconstruction of three-dimensional flow patterns. We have applied a new, fully three-dimensional, volumetric imaging technique that allows instantaneous capture of wake flow patterns, to a classic problem in functional vertebrate biology: the function of the asymmetrical (heterocercal) tail of swimming sharks to capture the vorticity field within the volume swept by the tail. These data were used to test a previous three-dimensional reconstruction of the shark vortex wake estimated from two-dimensional flow analyses, and show that the volumetric approach reveals a different vortex wake not previously reconstructed from two-dimensional slices. The hydrodynamic wake consists of one set of dual-linked vortex rings produced per half tail beat. In addition, we use a simple passive shark-tail model under robotic control to show that the three-dimensional wake flows of the robotic tail differ from the active tail motion of a live shark, suggesting that active control of kinematics and tail stiffness plays a substantial role in the production of wake vortical patterns.

  19. Volumetric imaging of shark tail hydrodynamics reveals a three-dimensional dual-ring vortex wake structure

    PubMed Central

    Flammang, Brooke E.; Lauder, George V.; Troolin, Daniel R.; Strand, Tyson

    2011-01-01

    Understanding how moving organisms generate locomotor forces is fundamental to the analysis of aerodynamic and hydrodynamic flow patterns that are generated during body and appendage oscillation. In the past, this has been accomplished using two-dimensional planar techniques that require reconstruction of three-dimensional flow patterns. We have applied a new, fully three-dimensional, volumetric imaging technique that allows instantaneous capture of wake flow patterns, to a classic problem in functional vertebrate biology: the function of the asymmetrical (heterocercal) tail of swimming sharks to capture the vorticity field within the volume swept by the tail. These data were used to test a previous three-dimensional reconstruction of the shark vortex wake estimated from two-dimensional flow analyses, and show that the volumetric approach reveals a different vortex wake not previously reconstructed from two-dimensional slices. The hydrodynamic wake consists of one set of dual-linked vortex rings produced per half tail beat. In addition, we use a simple passive shark-tail model under robotic control to show that the three-dimensional wake flows of the robotic tail differ from the active tail motion of a live shark, suggesting that active control of kinematics and tail stiffness plays a substantial role in the production of wake vortical patterns. PMID:21543357

  20. Chemical evolution during the process of proto-star formation by considering a two dimensional hydrodynamic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Ankan; Majumdar, Liton; Chakrabarti, Sandip K.; Chakrabarti, Sonali

    2013-10-01

    Chemical composition of a molecular cloud is highly sensitive to the physical properties of the cloud. In order to obtain the chemical composition around a star forming region, we carry out a two dimensional hydrodynamical simulation of the collapsing phase of a proto-star. A total variation diminishing scheme (TVD) is used to solve the set of equations governing hydrodynamics. This hydrodynamic code is capable of mimicking evolution of the physical properties during the formation of a proto-star. We couple our reasonably large gas-grain chemical network to study the chemical evolution during the collapsing phase of a proto-star. To have a realistic estimate of the abundances of bio-molecules in the interstellar medium, we include the recently calculated rate coefficients for the formation of several interstellar bio-molecules into our gas phase network. Chemical evolution is studied in detail by keeping grain at the constant temperature throughout the simulation as well as by using the temperature variation obtained from the hydrodynamical model. By considering a large gas-grain network with the sophisticated hydrodynamic model more realistic abundances are predicted. We find that the chemical composition are highly sensitive to the dynamic behavior of the collapsing cloud, specifically on the density and temperature distribution.

  1. Three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of the combustion of a neutron star into a quark star

    SciTech Connect

    Herzog, Matthias; Roepke, Friedrich K.

    2011-10-15

    We present three-dimensional numerical simulations of turbulent combustion converting a neutron star into a quark star. Hadronic matter, described by a microphysical finite-temperature equation of state, is converted into strange quark matter. We assume this phase, represented by a bag-model equation of state, to be absolutely stable. Following the example of thermonuclear burning in white dwarfs leading to type Ia supernovae, we treat the conversion process as a potentially turbulent deflagration. Solving the nonrelativistic Euler equations using established numerical methods we conduct large eddy simulations including an elaborate subgrid scale model, while the propagation of the conversion front is modeled with a level-set method. Our results show that for large parts of the parameter space the conversion becomes turbulent and therefore significantly faster than in the laminar case. Despite assuming absolutely stable strange quark matter, in our hydrodynamic approximation an outer layer remains in the hadronic phase, because the conversion front stops when it reaches conditions under which the combustion is no longer exothermic.

  2. Verification of coronal loop diagnostics using realistic three-dimensional hydrodynamic models

    SciTech Connect

    Winebarger, Amy R.; Lionello, Roberto; Linker, Jon A.; Mikić, Zoran; Mok, Yung E-mail: lionel@predsci.com E-mail: mikicz@predsci.com

    2014-11-10

    Many different techniques have been used to characterize the plasma in the solar corona: density-sensitive spectral line ratios are used to infer the density, the evolution of coronal structures in different passbands is used to infer the temperature evolution, and the simultaneous intensities measured in multiple passbands are used to determine the emission measure distributions. All these analysis techniques assume that the intensity of the structures can be isolated through background subtraction. In this paper, we use simulated observations from a three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulation of a coronal active region to verify these diagnostics. The density and temperature from the simulation are used to generate images in several passbands and spectral lines. We identify loop structures in the simulated images and calculate the background. We then determine the density, temperature, and emission measure distribution as a function of time from the observations and compare these with the true temperature and density of the loop. We find that the overall characteristics of the temperature, density, and emission measure are recovered by the analysis methods, but the details are not. For instance, the emission measure curves calculated from the simulated observations are much broader than the true emission measure distribution, though the average temperature evolution is similar. These differences are due, in part, to a limitation of the analysis methods, but also to inadequate background subtraction.

  3. Effects of using two- versus three-dimensional computational modeling of fluidized beds Part I, hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Nan; Battaglia, Francine; Pannala, Sreekanth

    2008-01-01

    Simulations of fluidized beds are performed to study and determine the effect on the use of coordinate systems and geometrical configurations to model fluidized bed reactors. Computational fluid dynamics is employed for an Eulerian-Eulerian model, which represents each phase as an interspersed continuum. The transport equation for granular temperature is solved and a hyperbolic tangent function is used to provide a smooth transition between the plastic and viscous regimes for the solid phase. The aim of the present work is to show the range of validity for employing simulations based on a 2D Cartesian coordinate system to approximate both cylindrical and rectangular fluidized beds. Three different fluidization regimes, bubbling, slugging and turbulent regimes, are investigated and the results of 2D and 3D simulations are presented for both cylindrical and rectangular domains. The results demonstrate that a 2D Cartesian system can be used to successfully simulate and predict a bubbling regime. However, caution must be exercised when using 2D Cartesian coordinates for other fluidized regimes. A budget analysis that explains all the differences in detail is presented in Part II [N. Xie, F. Battaglia, S. Pannala, Effects of Using Two-Versus Three-Dimensional Computational Modeling of Fluidized Beds: Part II, budget analysis, 182 (1) (2007) 14] to complement the hydrodynamic theory of this paper.

  4. Hydrodynamic instability experiments with three-dimensional modulations at the National Ignition Facility

    DOE PAGES

    Smalyuk, V. A.; Weber, S. V.; Casey, D. T.; ...

    2015-06-18

    The first hydrodynamic instability growth measurements with three-dimensional (3D) surface-roughness modulations were performed on CH shell spherical implosions at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [G. H. Miller, E. I. Moses, and C. R. Wuest, Opt. Eng. 43, 2841 (2004)]. The initial capsule outer-surface amplitudes were increased approximately four times, compared with the standard specifications, to increase the signal-to-noise ratio, helping to qualify a technique for measuring small 3D modulations. The instability growth measurements were performed using x-ray through-foil radiography based on time-resolved pinhole imaging. Averaging over 15 similar images significantly increased the signal-to-noise ratio, making possible a comparison with 3Dmore » simulations. At a convergence ratio of ~2.4, the measured modulation levels were ~3 times larger than those simulated based on the growth of the known imposed initial surface modulations. Several hypotheses are discussed, including increased instability growth due to modulations of the oxygen content in the bulk of the capsule. In conclusion, future experiments will be focused on measurements with standard 3D ‘native-roughness’ capsules as well as with deliberately imposed oxygen modulations.« less

  5. Three-dimensional hydrodynamical models of wind and outburst-related accretion in symbiotic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Val-Borro, M.; Karovska, M.; Sasselov, D. D.; Stone, J. M.

    2017-07-01

    Gravitationally focused wind accretion in binary systems consisting of an evolved star with a gaseous envelope and a compact accreting companion is a possible mechanism to explain mass transfer in symbiotic binaries. We study the mass accretion around the secondary caused by the strong wind from the primary late-type component using global three-dimensional hydrodynamic numerical simulations during quiescence and outburst stages. In particular, the dependence of the mass accretion rate on the mass-loss rate, wind parameters and phases of wind outburst development is considered. For a typical wind from an asymptotic giant branch star with a mass-loss rate of 10-6 M⊙ yr-1 and wind speeds of 20-50 km s-1, the mass transfer through a focused wind results in efficient infall on to the secondary. Accretion rates on to the secondary of 5-20 per cent of the mass-loss from the primary are obtained during quiescence and outburst periods where the wind velocity and mass-loss rates are varied, about 20-50 per cent larger than in the standard Bondi-Hoyle-Lyttleton approximation. This mechanism could be an important method for explaining observed accretion luminosities and periodic modulations in the accretion rates for a broad range of interacting binary systems.

  6. Hydrodynamic instability experiments with three-dimensional modulations at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Smalyuk, V. A.; Weber, S. V.; Casey, D. T.; Clark, D. S.; Field, J. E.; Haan, S. W.; Hamza, A. V.; Hoover, D. E.; Landen, O. L.; Nikroo, A.; Robey, H. F.; Weber, C. R.

    2015-06-18

    The first hydrodynamic instability growth measurements with three-dimensional (3D) surface-roughness modulations were performed on CH shell spherical implosions at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [G. H. Miller, E. I. Moses, and C. R. Wuest, Opt. Eng. 43, 2841 (2004)]. The initial capsule outer-surface amplitudes were increased approximately four times, compared with the standard specifications, to increase the signal-to-noise ratio, helping to qualify a technique for measuring small 3D modulations. The instability growth measurements were performed using x-ray through-foil radiography based on time-resolved pinhole imaging. Averaging over 15 similar images significantly increased the signal-to-noise ratio, making possible a comparison with 3D simulations. At a convergence ratio of ~2.4, the measured modulation levels were ~3 times larger than those simulated based on the growth of the known imposed initial surface modulations. Several hypotheses are discussed, including increased instability growth due to modulations of the oxygen content in the bulk of the capsule. In conclusion, future experiments will be focused on measurements with standard 3D ‘native-roughness’ capsules as well as with deliberately imposed oxygen modulations.

  7. One-dimensional Lagrangian implicit hydrodynamic algorithm for Inertial Confinement Fusion applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramis, Rafael

    2017-02-01

    A new one-dimensional hydrodynamic algorithm, specifically developed for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) applications, is presented. The scheme uses a fully conservative Lagrangian formulation in planar, cylindrical, and spherically symmetric geometries, and supports arbitrary equations of state with separate ion and electron components. Fluid equations are discretized on a staggered grid and stabilized by means of an artificial viscosity formulation. The space discretized equations are advanced in time using an implicit algorithm. The method includes several numerical parameters that can be adjusted locally. In regions with low Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy (CFL) number, where stability is not an issue, they can be adjusted to optimize the accuracy. In typical problems, the truncation error can be reduced by a factor between 2 to 10 in comparison with conventional explicit algorithms. On the other hand, in regions with high CFL numbers, the parameters can be set to guarantee unconditional stability. The method can be integrated into complex ICF codes. This is demonstrated through several examples covering a wide range of situations: from thermonuclear ignition physics, where alpha particles are managed as an additional species, to low intensity laser-matter interaction, where liquid-vapor phase transitions occur.

  8. Galactic scale gas flows in colliding galaxies: 3-dimensional, N-body/hydrodynamics experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamb, Susan A.; Gerber, Richard A.; Balsara, Dinshaw S.

    1994-01-01

    We present some results from three dimensional computer simulations of collisions between models of equal mass galaxies, one of which is a rotating, disk galaxy containing both gas and stars and the other is an elliptical containing stars only. We use fully self consistent models in which the halo mass is 2.5 times that of the disk. In the experiments we have varied the impact parameter between zero (head on) and 0.9R (where R is the radius of the disk), for impacts perpendicular to the disk plane. The calculations were performed on a Cray 2 computer using a combined N-body/smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH) program. The results show the development of complicated flows and shock structures in the direction perpendicular to the plane of the disk and the propagation outwards of a density wave in both the stars and the gas. The collisional nature of the gas results in a sharper ring than obtained for the star particles, and the development of high volume densities and shocks.

  9. Three-dimensional Hydrodynamical Simulations of Mass Transfer in Binary Systems by a Free Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zheng-Wei; Stancliffe, Richard J.; Abate, Carlo; Matrozis, Elvijs

    2017-09-01

    A large fraction of stars in binary systems are expected to undergo mass and angular momentum exchange at some point in their evolution, which can drastically alter the chemical and dynamical properties and fates of the systems. Interaction by stellar wind is an important process in wide binaries. However, the details of wind mass transfer are still not well understood. We perform three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations of wind mass transfer in binary systems to explore mass-accretion efficiencies and geometries of mass outflows, for a range of mass ratios from 0.05 to 1.0. In particular, we focus on the case of a free wind, in which some physical mechanism accelerates the expelled wind material balancing the gravity of the mass-losing star with the wind velocity comparable to the orbital velocity of the system. We find that the mass-accretion efficiency and accreted specific angular momentum increase with the mass ratio of the system. For an adiabatic wind, we obtain that the accretion efficiency onto the secondary star varies from about 0.1% to 8% for mass ratios between 0.05 and 1.0.

  10. Impacts of rotation on three-dimensional hydrodynamics of core-collapse supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Ko; Kuroda, Takami; Kotake, Kei; Takiwaki, Tomoya

    2014-09-20

    We perform a series of simplified numerical experiments to explore how rotation impacts the three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamics of core-collapse supernovae. For our systematic study, we employ a light-bulb scheme to trigger explosions and a three-flavor neutrino leakage scheme to treat deleptonization effects and neutrino losses from the proto-neutron-star interior. Using a 15 M {sub ☉} progenitor, we compute 30 models in 3D with a wide variety of initial angular momentum and light-bulb neutrino luminosity. We find that the rotation can help the onset of neutrino-driven explosions for the models in which the initial angular momentum is matched to that obtained in recent stellar evolutionary calculations (∼0.3-3 rad s{sup –1} at the center). For the models with larger initial angular momentum, the shock surface deforms to be more oblate due to larger centrifugal force. This not only makes the gain region more concentrated around the equatorial plane, but also makes the mass larger in the gain region. As a result, buoyant bubbles tend to be coherently formed and rise in the equatorial region, which pushes the revived shock toward ever larger radii until a global explosion is triggered. We find that these are the main reasons that the preferred direction of the explosion in 3D rotating models is often perpendicular to the spin axis, which is in sharp contrast to the polar explosions around the axis that were obtained in previous two-dimensional simulations.

  11. Ordered quasi-two-dimensional structure of nanoparticles in semiflexible ring polymer brushes under compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Yunfeng; Deng, Zhenyu; Jiang, Yangwei; Zhang, Linxi

    2017-06-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of a coarse-grained bead-spring model of ring polymer brushes under compression are presented. Flexible polymer brushes are always disordered during compression, whereas semiflexible polymer brushes tend to be ordered under sufficiently strong compression. Further, the polymer monomer density of the semiflexible polymer brush is very high near the brush surface, inducing a peak value of the free energy near the surface. Therefore, when nanoparticles are compressed in semiflexible ring polymer brushes, they tend to exhibit a closely packed single-layer structure between the brush surface and the impenetrable wall, and a quasi-two-dimensional ordered structure near the brush surface is formed under strong compression. These findings provide a new approach to designing responsive applications.

  12. Two-dimensional subsonic compressible flow past elliptic cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaplan, Carl

    1938-01-01

    The method of Poggi is used to calculate, for perfect fluids, the effect of compressibility upon the flow on the surface of an elliptic cylinder at zero angle of attack and with no circulation. The result is expressed in a closed form and represents a rigorous determination of the velocity of the fluid at the surface of the obstacle insofar as the second approximation is concerned. Comparison is made with Hooker's treatment of the same problem according to the method of Janzen and Rayleight and it is found that, for thick elliptic cylinders, the two methods agree very well. The labor of computation is considerably reduced by the present solution.

  13. Quasi-three-dimensional analysis for composite cylinder under lateral compressive loading

    SciTech Connect

    Nishiwaki, Tsuyoshi |; Yokoyama, Atsushi; Maekawa, Zenichiro; Hamada, Hiroyuki; Mori, Sadaki

    1995-11-01

    This paper presents a lateral compressive analytical method for CFRP cylinders using a quasi-three-dimensional model. This numerical model was constructed by shell and beam elements which represent fiber and resin respectively. The lateral compressive behaviors of CFRP cylinders with [{theta}/{minus}{theta}]sym ({theta} = 15{degree}, 30{degree}, 45{degree}, 60{degree}) were experimentally evaluated. The damage propagation was simulated using the quasi-three-dimensional model. The transverse cracking and interlaminar delamination were simulated independently. Furthermore comparing the analytical and experimental results, it is confirmed that the proposed analytical method is precise.

  14. Compression Limit of Two-Dimensional Water Constrained in Graphene Nanocapillaries.

    PubMed

    Zhu, YinBo; Wang, FengChao; Bai, Jaeil; Zeng, Xiao Cheng; Wu, HengAn

    2015-12-22

    Evaluation of the tensile/compression limit of a solid under conditions of tension or compression is often performed to provide mechanical properties that are critical for structure design and assessment. Algara-Siller et al. recently demonstrated that when water is constrained between two sheets of graphene, it becomes a two-dimensional (2D) liquid and then is turned into an intriguing monolayer solid with a square pattern under high lateral pressure [ Nature , 2015 , 519 , 443 - 445 ]. From a mechanics point of view, this liquid-to-solid transformation characterizes the compression limit (or metastability limit) of the 2D monolayer water. Here, we perform a simulation study of the compression limit of 2D monolayer, bilayer, and trilayer water constrained in graphene nanocapillaries. At 300 K, a myriad of 2D ice polymorphs (both crystalline-like and amorphous) are formed from the liquid water at different widths of the nanocapillaries, ranging from 6.0 to11.6 Å. For monolayer water, the compression limit is typically a few hundred MPa, while for the bilayer and trilayer water, the compression limit is 1.5 GPa or higher, reflecting the ultrahigh van der Waals pressure within the graphene nanocapillaries. The compression-limit (phase) diagram is obtained at the nanocapillary width versus pressure (h-P) plane, based on the comprehensive molecular dynamics simulations at numerous thermodynamic states as well as on the Clapeyron equation. Interestingly, the compression-limit curves exhibit multiple local minima.

  15. Single channel layer, single sheath-flow inlet microfluidic flow cytometer with three-dimensional hydrodynamic focusing.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shiang-Chi; Yen, Pei-Wen; Peng, Chien-Chung; Tung, Yi-Chung

    2012-09-07

    Flow cytometry is a technique capable of optically characterizing biological particles in a high-throughput manner. In flow cytometry, three dimensional (3D) hydrodynamic focusing is critical for accurate and consistent measurements. Due to the advantages of microfluidic techniques, a number of microfluidic flow cytometers with 3D hydrodynamic focusing have been developed in recent decades. However, the existing devices consist of multiple layers of microfluidic channels and tedious fluidic interconnections. As a result, these devices often require complicated fabrication and professional operation. Consequently, the development of a robust and reliable microfluidic flow cytometer for practical biological applications is desired. This paper develops a microfluidic device with a single channel layer and single sheath-flow inlet capable of achieving 3D hydrodynamic focusing for flow cytometry. The sheath-flow stream is introduced perpendicular to the microfluidic channel to encircle the sample flow. In this paper, the flow fields are simulated using a computational fluidic dynamic (CFD) software, and the results show that the 3D hydrodynamic focusing can be successfully formed in the designed microfluidic device under proper flow conditions. The developed device is further characterized experimentally. First, confocal microscopy is exploited to investigate the flow fields. The resultant Z-stack confocal images show the cross-sectional view of 3D hydrodynamic with flow conditions that agree with the simulated ones. Furthermore, the flow cytometric detections of fluorescence beads are performed using the developed device with various flow rate combinations. The measurement results demonstrate that the device can achieve great detection performances, which are comparable to the conventional flow cytometer. In addition, the enumeration of fluorescence-labelled cells is also performed to show its practicality for biological applications. Consequently, the microfluidic

  16. Chaos in a one-dimensional compressible flow.

    PubMed

    Gerig, Austin; Hübler, Alfred

    2007-04-01

    We study the dynamics of a one-dimensional discrete flow with open boundaries--a series of moving point particles connected by ideal springs. These particles flow towards an inlet at constant velocity, pass into a region where they are free to move according to their nearest neighbor interactions, and then pass an outlet where they travel with a sinusoidally varying velocity. As the amplitude of the outlet oscillations is increased, we find that the resident time of particles in the chamber follows a bifurcating (Feigenbaum) route to chaos. This irregular dynamics may be related to the complex behavior of many particle discrete flows or is possibly a low-dimensional analogue of nonstationary flow in continuous systems.

  17. Verification of the two-dimensional hydrodynamic model based on remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sazonov, Alexey; Mikhailukova, Polina; Krylenko, Inna; Frolova, Natalya; Kireeva, Mariya

    2016-04-01

    Mathematical modeling methods are used more and more actively to evaluate possible damage, identify potential flood zone and the influence of individual factors affecting the river during the passage of the flood. Calculations were performed by means of domestic software complex «STREAM-2D» which is based on the numerical solution of two-dimensional St. Venant equations. One of the major challenges in mathematical modeling is the verification of the model. This is usually made using data on water levels from hydrological stations: the smaller the difference of the actual level and the simulated one, the better the quality of the model used. Data from hydrological stations are not always available, so alternative sources of verification, such as remote sensing, are increasingly used. The aim of this work is to develop a method of verification of hydrodynamic model based on a comparison of actual flood zone area, which in turn is determined on the basis of the automated satellite image interpretation methods for different imaging systems and flooded area obtained in the course of the model. The study areas are Lena River, The North Dvina River, Amur River near Blagoveshchensk. We used satellite images made by optical and radar sensors: SPOT-5/HRG, Resurs-F, Radarsat-2. Flooded area were calculated using unsupervised classification (ISODATA and K-mean) for optical images and segmentation for Radarsat-2. Knowing the flow rate and the water level at a given date for the upper and lower limits of the model, respectively, it is possible to calculate flooded area by means of program STREAM-2D and GIS technology. All the existing vector layers with the boundaries of flooding are included in a GIS project for flood area calculation. This study was supported by the Russian Science Foundation, project no. 14-17-00155.

  18. Three-dimensional hydrodynamic and water quality model for TMDL development of Lake Fuxian, China.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lei; Zhang, Xiaoling; Liu, Yong; He, Bin; Zhu, Xiang; Zou, Rui; Zhu, Yuanguan

    2012-01-01

    Lake Fuxian is the largest deep freshwater lake in China. Although its average water quality meets Class I of the China National Water Quality Standard (CNWQS), i.e., GB3838-2002, monitoring data indicate that the water quality approaches the Class II threshold in some areas. Thus it is urgent to reduce the watershed load through the total maximum daily load (TMDL) program. A three-dimensional hydrodynamic and water quality model was developed for Lake Fuxian, simulating flow circulation and pollutant fate and transport. The model development process consists of several steps, including grid generation, initial and boundary condition configurations, and model calibration processes. The model accurately reproduced the observed water surface elevation, spatiotemporal variations in temperature, and total nitrogen (TN), total phosphorus (TP), and chemical oxygen demand (COD) concentrations, suggesting a reasonable numerical representation of the prototype system for further TMDL analyses. The TMDL was calculated using two interpretations of the water quality standards for Class I of the CNWQS based on the maximum instantaneous surface and annual average surface water concentrations. Analysis of the first scenario indicated that the TN, TP and COD loads should be reduced by 66%, 68% and 57%, respectively. Water quality was the highest priority; however, local economic development and cost feasibility for load reduction can pose significant issues. In the second interpretation, the model results showed that, under the existing conditions, the average water quality meets the Class I standard and therefore load reduction is unnecessary. Future studies are needed to conduct risk and cost assessments for realistic decision-making.

  19. A global three-dimensional radiation magneto-hydrodynamic simulation of super-eddington accretion disks

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Yan-Fei; Stone, James M.; Davis, Shane W.

    2014-12-01

    We study super-Eddington accretion flows onto black holes using a global three-dimensional radiation magneto-hydrodynamical simulation. We solve the time-dependent radiative transfer equation for the specific intensities to accurately calculate the angular distribution of the emitted radiation. Turbulence generated by the magneto-rotational instability provides self-consistent angular momentum transfer. The simulation reaches inflow equilibrium with an accretion rate ∼220 L {sub Edd}/c {sup 2} and forms a radiation-driven outflow along the rotation axis. The mechanical energy flux carried by the outflow is ∼20% of the radiative energy flux. The total mass flux lost in the outflow is about 29% of the net accretion rate. The radiative luminosity of this flow is ∼10 L {sub Edd}. This yields a radiative efficiency ∼4.5%, which is comparable to the value in a standard thin disk model. In our simulation, vertical advection of radiation caused by magnetic buoyancy transports energy faster than photon diffusion, allowing a significant fraction of the photons to escape from the surface of the disk before being advected into the black hole. We contrast our results with the lower radiative efficiencies inferred in most models, such as the slim disk model, which neglect vertical advection. Our inferred radiative efficiencies also exceed published results from previous global numerical simulations, which did not attribute a significant role to vertical advection. We briefly discuss the implications for the growth of supermassive black holes in the early universe and describe how these results provided a basis for explaining the spectrum and population statistics of ultraluminous X-ray sources.

  20. One-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamic scaling studies of imploding spherical plasma liners

    SciTech Connect

    Awe, T. J.; Adams, C. S.; Davis, J. S.; Hanna, D. S.; Hsu, S. C.; Cassibry, J. T.

    2011-07-15

    One-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamic simulations are performed to develop insight into the scaling of stagnation pressure with initial conditions of an imploding spherical plasma shell or ''liner.'' Simulations reveal the evolution of high-Mach-number (M), annular, spherical plasma flows during convergence, stagnation, shock formation, and disassembly, and indicate that cm- and {mu}s-scale plasmas with peak pressures near 1 Mbar can be generated by liners with initial kinetic energy of several hundred kilo-joules. It is shown that radiation transport and thermal conduction must be included to avoid non-physical plasma temperatures at the origin which artificially limit liner convergence and, thus, the peak stagnation pressure. Scalings of the stagnated plasma lifetime ({tau}{sub stag}) and average stagnation pressure (P{sub stag}, the pressure at the origin, averaged over {tau}{sub stag}) are determined by evaluating a wide range of liner initial conditions. For high-M flows, {tau}{sub stag} {approx} {Delta}R/v{sub 0}, where {Delta}R and v{sub 0} are the initial liner thickness and velocity, respectively. Furthermore, for argon liners, P{sub stag} scales approximately as v{sub 0}{sup 15/4} over a wide range of initial densities (n{sub 0}) and as n{sub 0}{sup 1/2} over a wide range of v{sub 0}. The approximate scaling P{sub stag} {approx} M{sup 3/2} is also found for a wide range of liner-plasma initial conditions.

  1. SPIRALING OUT OF CONTROL: THREE-DIMENSIONAL HYDRODYNAMICAL MODELING OF THE COLLIDING WINDS IN {eta} CARINAE

    SciTech Connect

    Parkin, E. R.; Pittard, J. M.; Corcoran, M. F.; Hamaguchi, K.

    2011-01-10

    Three-dimensional adaptive mesh refinement hydrodynamical simulations of the wind-wind collision between the enigmatic supermassive star {eta} Car and its mysterious companion star are presented which include radiative driving of the stellar winds, gravity, optically thin radiative cooling, and orbital motion. Simulations with static stars with a periastron passage separation reveal that the preshock companion star's wind speed is sufficiently reduced so that radiative cooling in the postshock gas becomes important, permitting the runaway growth of nonlinear thin-shell instabilities (NTSIs) which massively distort the wind-wind collision region (WCR). However, large-scale simulations, which include the orbital motion of the stars, show that orbital motion reduces the impact of radiative inhibition and thus increases the acquired preshock velocities. As such, the postshock gas temperature and cooling time see a commensurate increase, and sufficient gas pressure is preserved to stabilize the WCR against catastrophic instability growth. We then compute synthetic X-ray spectra and light curves and find that, compared to previous models, the X-ray spectra agree much better with XMM-Newton observations just prior to periastron. The narrow width of the 2009 X-ray minimum can also be reproduced. However, the models fail to reproduce the extended X-ray minimum from previous cycles. We conclude that the key to explaining the extended X-ray minimum is the rate of cooling of the companion star's postshock wind. If cooling is rapid then powerful NTSIs will heavily disrupt the WCR. Radiative inhibition of the companion star's preshock wind, albeit with a stronger radiation-wind coupling than explored in this work, could be an effective trigger.

  2. A Global Three-dimensional Radiation Magneto-hydrodynamic Simulation of Super-Eddington Accretion Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yan-Fei; Stone, James M.; Davis, Shane W.

    2014-12-01

    We study super-Eddington accretion flows onto black holes using a global three-dimensional radiation magneto-hydrodynamical simulation. We solve the time-dependent radiative transfer equation for the specific intensities to accurately calculate the angular distribution of the emitted radiation. Turbulence generated by the magneto-rotational instability provides self-consistent angular momentum transfer. The simulation reaches inflow equilibrium with an accretion rate ~220 L Edd/c 2 and forms a radiation-driven outflow along the rotation axis. The mechanical energy flux carried by the outflow is ~20% of the radiative energy flux. The total mass flux lost in the outflow is about 29% of the net accretion rate. The radiative luminosity of this flow is ~10 L Edd. This yields a radiative efficiency ~4.5%, which is comparable to the value in a standard thin disk model. In our simulation, vertical advection of radiation caused by magnetic buoyancy transports energy faster than photon diffusion, allowing a significant fraction of the photons to escape from the surface of the disk before being advected into the black hole. We contrast our results with the lower radiative efficiencies inferred in most models, such as the slim disk model, which neglect vertical advection. Our inferred radiative efficiencies also exceed published results from previous global numerical simulations, which did not attribute a significant role to vertical advection. We briefly discuss the implications for the growth of supermassive black holes in the early universe and describe how these results provided a basis for explaining the spectrum and population statistics of ultraluminous X-ray sources.

  3. Self-assembled three-dimensional and compressible interdigitated thin-film supercapacitors and batteries.

    PubMed

    Nyström, Gustav; Marais, Andrew; Karabulut, Erdem; Wågberg, Lars; Cui, Yi; Hamedi, Mahiar M

    2015-05-29

    Traditional thin-film energy-storage devices consist of stacked layers of active films on two-dimensional substrates and do not exploit the third dimension. Fully three-dimensional thin-film devices would allow energy storage in bulk materials with arbitrary form factors and with mechanical properties unique to bulk materials such as compressibility. Here we show three-dimensional energy-storage devices based on layer-by-layer self-assembly of interdigitated thin films on the surface of an open-cell aerogel substrate. We demonstrate a reversibly compressible three-dimensional supercapacitor with carbon nanotube electrodes and a three-dimensional hybrid battery with a copper hexacyanoferrate ion intercalating cathode and a carbon nanotube anode. The three-dimensional supercapacitor shows stable operation over 400 cycles with a capacitance of 25 F g(-1) and is fully functional even at compressions up to 75%. Our results demonstrate that layer-by-layer self-assembly inside aerogels is a rapid, precise and scalable route for building high-surface-area 3D thin-film devices.

  4. Self-assembled three-dimensional and compressible interdigitated thin-film supercapacitors and batteries

    PubMed Central

    Nyström, Gustav; Marais, Andrew; Karabulut, Erdem; Wågberg, Lars; Cui, Yi; Hamedi, Mahiar M.

    2015-01-01

    Traditional thin-film energy-storage devices consist of stacked layers of active films on two-dimensional substrates and do not exploit the third dimension. Fully three-dimensional thin-film devices would allow energy storage in bulk materials with arbitrary form factors and with mechanical properties unique to bulk materials such as compressibility. Here we show three-dimensional energy-storage devices based on layer-by-layer self-assembly of interdigitated thin films on the surface of an open-cell aerogel substrate. We demonstrate a reversibly compressible three-dimensional supercapacitor with carbon nanotube electrodes and a three-dimensional hybrid battery with a copper hexacyanoferrate ion intercalating cathode and a carbon nanotube anode. The three-dimensional supercapacitor shows stable operation over 400 cycles with a capacitance of 25 F g−1 and is fully functional even at compressions up to 75%. Our results demonstrate that layer-by-layer self-assembly inside aerogels is a rapid, precise and scalable route for building high-surface-area 3D thin-film devices. PMID:26021485

  5. Self-assembled three-dimensional and compressible interdigitated thin-film supercapacitors and batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyström, Gustav; Marais, Andrew; Karabulut, Erdem; Wågberg, Lars; Cui, Yi; Hamedi, Mahiar M.

    2015-05-01

    Traditional thin-film energy-storage devices consist of stacked layers of active films on two-dimensional substrates and do not exploit the third dimension. Fully three-dimensional thin-film devices would allow energy storage in bulk materials with arbitrary form factors and with mechanical properties unique to bulk materials such as compressibility. Here we show three-dimensional energy-storage devices based on layer-by-layer self-assembly of interdigitated thin films on the surface of an open-cell aerogel substrate. We demonstrate a reversibly compressible three-dimensional supercapacitor with carbon nanotube electrodes and a three-dimensional hybrid battery with a copper hexacyanoferrate ion intercalating cathode and a carbon nanotube anode. The three-dimensional supercapacitor shows stable operation over 400 cycles with a capacitance of 25 F g-1 and is fully functional even at compressions up to 75%. Our results demonstrate that layer-by-layer self-assembly inside aerogels is a rapid, precise and scalable route for building high-surface-area 3D thin-film devices.

  6. Three-dimensional Hydrodynamic Simulations of Accretion in High-mass X-ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raymer, Eric John

    Wind accretion in high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs) often results in highly variable X-ray behavior, the nature of which is not well understood. Most models of wind accretion are based on the analytical predictions of Hoyle-Lyttleton accretion (HLA), which assumes a steady axisymmetric flow. Surprisingly little is known about the structure, stability, and time-evolution of HLA in three dimensions, particularly in the presence of non-uniform winds. This work describes hydrodynamic simulations of idealized HLA in three-dimensions, then applies these simulations to two HMXB subclasses that exhibit unexplained X-ray behavior. Our idealized HLA models show that the accretion flow remains steady and stable in two-dimensional axisymmetric and three dimensional grid geometries, assuming a uniform upstream flow. We test the stability of the model with linear upstream density gradients and find that they are able to induce rotational flow around the accretor that reduces the mass accretion rate by up to an order of magnitude. We apply our 3D model to accretion in the context of Be/X-ray binaries, in which the accreting neutron star is immersed in the dense decretion disk of the Be donor star. These systems have traditionally been described with 2D models that exhibit the flip-flop instability. This instability results in the formation and destruction of transient accretion disks with accompanying bursts of mass accretion. Our 3D models show no sign of the flip-flop instability, but instead display rotation about the neutron star directed primarily out of the plane of the decretion disk. This rotation generates large-scale asymmetries in the bow shock and suppresses mass accretion by up to two orders of magnitude. The accretion of a clumped stellar wind is one of the primary mechanisms proposed to explain the high-luminosity X-ray flares of supergiant fast X-ray transients. We model clump accretion in 3D to determine whether the impact of a clump can produce flares with a

  7. Three-dimensional range data compression using computer graphics rendering pipeline.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Song

    2012-06-20

    This paper presents the idea of naturally encoding three-dimensional (3D) range data into regular two-dimensional (2D) images utilizing computer graphics rendering pipeline. The computer graphics pipeline provides a means to sample 3D geometry data into regular 2D images, and also to retrieve the depth information for each sampled pixel. The depth information for each pixel is further encoded into red, green, and blue color channels of regular 2D images. The 2D images can further be compressed with existing 2D image compression techniques. By this novel means, 3D geometry data obtained by 3D range scanners can be instantaneously compressed into 2D images, providing a novel way of storing 3D range data into its 2D counterparts. We will present experimental results to verify the performance of this proposed technique.

  8. Analysis and compression of six-dimensional gyrokinetic datasets using higher order singular value decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Hatch, David R.; Del-Castillo-Negrete, Diego B; Terry, P.W.

    2012-01-01

    Higher order singular value decomposition (HOSVD) is explored as a tool for analyzing and compressing gyrokinetic data. An efficient numerical implementation of an HOSVD algorithm is described. HOSVD is used to analyze the full six-dimensional (three spatial, two velocity space, and time dimensions) gyrocenter distribution function from gyrokinetic simulations of ion temperature gradient, electron temperature gradient, and trapped electron mode driven turbulence. The HOSVD eigenvalues for the velocity space coordinates decay very rapidly, indicating that only a few structures in velocity space can capture the most important dynamics. In almost all of the cases studied, HOSVD extracts parallel velocity space structures which are very similar to orthogonal polynomials. HOSVD is also used to compress gyrokinetic datasets, an application in which it is shown to significantly outperform the more commonly used singular value decomposition. It is shown that the effectiveness of the HOSVD compression improves as the dimensionality of the dataset increases. (C) 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Quasi One-Dimensional Unsteady Modeling of External Compression Supersonic Inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopasakis, George; Connolly, Joseph W.; Kratz, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    The AeroServoElasticity task under the NASA Supersonics Project is developing dynamic models of the propulsion system and the vehicle in order to conduct research for integrated vehicle dynamic performance. As part of this effort, a nonlinear quasi 1-dimensional model of an axisymmetric external compression supersonic inlet is being developed. The model utilizes compressible flow computational fluid dynamics to model the internal inlet segment as well as the external inlet portion between the cowl lip and normal shock, and compressible flow relations with flow propagation delay to model the oblique shocks upstream of the normal shock. The external compression portion between the cowl-lip and the normal shock is also modeled with leaking fluxes crossing the sonic boundary, with a moving CFD domain at the normal shock boundary. This model has been verified in steady state against tunnel inlet test data and it s a first attempt towards developing a more comprehensive model for inlet dynamics.

  10. THEHYCO-3DT: Thermal hydrodynamic code for the 3 dimensional transient calculation of advanced LMFBR core

    SciTech Connect

    Vitruk, S.G.; Korsun, A.S.; Ushakov, P.A.

    1995-09-01

    The multilevel mathematical model of neutron thermal hydrodynamic processes in a passive safety core without assemblies duct walls and appropriate computer code SKETCH, consisted of thermal hydrodynamic module THEHYCO-3DT and neutron one, are described. A new effective discretization technique for energy, momentum and mass conservation equations is applied in hexagonal - z geometry. The model adequacy and applicability are presented. The results of the calculations show that the model and the computer code could be used in conceptual design of advanced reactors.

  11. Using two-dimensional hydrodynamic models at scales of ecological importance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowder, D. W.; Diplas, P.

    2000-05-01

    Modeling of flow features that are important in assessing stream habitat conditions has been a long-standing interest of stream biologists. Recently, they have begun examining the usefulness of two-dimensional (2-D) hydrodynamic models in attaining this objective. Current modeling practices consider relatively long channel sections with their bathymetry represented in terms of large, macro-scale, topographic features. Meso-scale topographic features, such as boulders, root-wads and other obstructions are typically not considered in the modeling process. Instead, the overall effects of these flow obstructions are captured through increased values in the channel roughness parameters. Such an approach to 2-D modeling allows one to accurately predict average depth and velocity values; however, it is not capable of providing any information about the flow patterns in the vicinity of these obstructions. Biologists though have known that such meso-scale features and the complex velocity patterns generated by their presence, play an important role in the ecology of streams, and thus cannot be ignored. It is therefore evident that there is a need to develop better tools, capable of modeling flow characteristics at scales of ecological importance. The purpose of this study is to expand the utility of 2-D hydraulic models to capture these flow features that are critical for characterizing stream habitat conditions. There exists a paucity of research addressing what types of topographic features should be included in 2-D model studies and to what extent a boulder or series of exposed boulders can influence predicted flow conditions and traditional useable habitat computations. Moreover, little research has been performed to evaluate the impact mesh refinement has on model results in natural streams. Numerical simulations, based on a natural river channel containing several large boulders, indicate that explicitly modeling local obstructions/boulders can significantly impact

  12. Application of a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model to the Himmerfjärden, Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, Alexander

    2014-05-01

    Himmerfjärden is a coastal fjord-like bay situated in the north-western part of the Baltic Sea. The fjord has a mean depth of 17 m and a maximum depth of 52 m. The water is brackish (6 psu) with small salinity fluctuation (±2 psu). A sewage treatment plant, which serves about 300 000 people, discharges into the inner part of Himmerfjärden. This area is the subject of a long-term monitoring program. We are planning to develop a publicly available modelling system for this area, which will perform short-term forecast predictions of pertinent parameters (e.g., water-levels, currents, salinity, temperature) and disseminate them to users. A key component of the system is a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model. The open source Delft3D Flow system (http://www.deltaressystems.com/hydro) has been applied to model the Himmerfjärden area. Two different curvilinear grids were used to approximate the modelling domain (25 km × 50 km × 60 m). One grid has low horizontal resolution (cell size varies from 250 to 450 m) to perform long-term numerical experiments (modelling period of several months), while another grid has higher resolution (cell size varies from 120 to 250 m) to model short-term situations. In vertical direction both z-level (50 layers) and sigma coordinate (20 layers) were used. Modelling results obtained with different horizontal resolution and vertical discretisation will be presented. This model will be a part of the operational system which provides automated integration of data streams from several information sources: meteorological forecast based on the HIRLAM model from the Finnish Meteorological Institute (https://en.ilmatieteenlaitos.fi/open-data), oceanographic forecast based on the HIROMB-BOOS Model developed within the Baltic community and provided by the MyOcean Project (http://www.myocean.eu), riverine discharge from the HYPE model provided by the Swedish Meteorological Hydrological Institute (http://vattenwebb.smhi.se/modelarea/).

  13. Jet cocoons in rotating Seyfert galaxies: adaptive three-dimensional hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Andrew J.; Steffen, Wolfgang

    2001-03-01

    The narrow-line regions of some Seyfert galaxies show evidence for nuclear jets interacting with the rotating interstellar gas; this is shown by point-symmetric emission-line structures in, for example, Mrk 573 and NGC 3393. We study this situation with numerical simulations of a jet in a sidewind of uniform density but linearly increasing velocity as one moves from the source. We use a new three-dimensional hydrodynamic code on a binary adaptive grid. We consider two different models, one with a cocoon expansion speed higher and one with expansion speed lower than the ISM speed. We find that the model with high cocoon expansion speed is similar to results from previous calculations without a sidewind, except for minor asymmetries. However, model B with the slow expansion speed and fast wind speed shows considerable qualitative differences. The jet hits and bounces off the dense cooling envelope, which is dragged by the sidewind into the straight path of the jet. The path of the jet within the cocoon is straight as long as the extended hot cocoon acts as a shield. Once the jet hits the cold envelope of the cocoon it is bent directly by the ram pressure of the ambient medium and follows a parabola of the third degree, which we derive as an analytical approximation for the path. The region where the jet hits the envelope is the start of strong radio emission. This point moves towards the source with age of the jet and its bending angle. We therefore find a possible observable correlation between the distance of the first strong radio knot and the overall bending of jets in Seyfert galaxies. A comparison of our results with observations of Mrk 573 shows that the essential structural and spectral features can be reproduced by choosing an appropriate viewing angle and evolutionary stage. Looking approximately along the original jet direction a structure is found which strongly resembles an ionization cone. Hence caution should prevail when interpreting these sorts of

  14. Time-of-flight compressed-sensing ultrafast photography for encrypted three-dimensional dynamic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Jinyang; Gao, Liang; Hai, Pengfei; Li, Chiye; Wang, Lihong V.

    2016-02-01

    We applied compressed ultrafast photography (CUP), a computational imaging technique, to acquire three-dimensional (3D) images. The approach unites image encryption, compression, and acquisition in a single measurement, thereby allowing efficient and secure data transmission. By leveraging the time-of-flight (ToF) information of pulsed light reflected by the object, we can reconstruct a volumetric image (150 mm×150 mm×1050 mm, x × y × z) from a single camera snapshot. Furthermore, we demonstrated high-speed 3D videography of a moving object at 75 frames per second using the ToF-CUP camera.

  15. A Beale-Kato-Majda Criterion for Three Dimensional Compressible Viscous Heat-Conductive Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yongzhong; Wang, Chao; Zhang, Zhifei

    2011-08-01

    We prove a blow-up criterion in terms of the upper bound of ( ρ, ρ -1, θ) for a strong solution to three dimensional compressible viscous heat-conductive flows. The main ingredient of the proof is an a priori estimate for a quantity independently introduced in Haspot (Regularity of weak solutions of the compressible isentropic Navier-Stokes equation, arXiv:1001.1581, 2010) and Sun et al. (J Math Pure Appl 95:36-47, 2011), whose divergence can be viewed as the effective viscous flux.

  16. Three-dimensional nonlinear ideal MHD equilibria with field-aligned incompressible and compressible flows

    SciTech Connect

    Moawad, S. M. Ibrahim, D. A.

    2016-08-15

    The equilibrium properties of three-dimensional ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) are investigated. Incompressible and compressible flows are considered. The governing equations are taken in a steady state such that the magnetic field is parallel to the plasma flow. Equations of stationary equilibrium for both of incompressible and compressible MHD flows are derived and described in a mathematical mode. For incompressible MHD flows, Alfvénic and non-Alfvénic flows with constant and variable magnetofluid density are investigated. For Alfvénic incompressible flows, the general three-dimensional solutions are determined with the aid of two potential functions of the velocity field. For non-Alfvénic incompressible flows, the stationary equilibrium equations are reduced to two differential constraints on the potential functions, flow velocity, magnetofluid density, and the static pressure. Some examples which may be of some relevance to axisymmetric confinement systems are presented. For compressible MHD flows, equations of the stationary equilibrium are derived with the aid of a single potential function of the velocity field. The existence of three-dimensional solutions for these MHD flows is investigated. Several classes of three-dimensional exact solutions for several cases of nonlinear equilibrium equations are presented.

  17. Three-dimensional supersonic flow around double compression ramp with finite span

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. H.; Park, G.; Park, S. H.; Byun, Y. H.

    2017-01-01

    Three-dimensional flows of Mach number 3 around a double-compression ramp with finite span have been investigated numerically. Shadowgraph visualisation images obtained in a supersonic wind tunnel are used for comparison. A three-dimensional Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes solver was used to obtain steady numerical solutions. Two-dimensional numerical results are also compared. Four different cases were studied: two different second ramp angles of 30° and 45° in configurations with and without sidewalls, respectively. Results showed that there is a leakage of mass and momentum fluxes heading outwards in the spanwise direction for three-dimensional cases without sidewalls. The leakage changed the flow characteristics of the shock-induced boundary layer and resulted in the discrepancy between the experimental data and two-dimensional numerical results. It is found that suppressing the flow leakage by attaching the sidewalls enhances the two-dimensionality of the experimental data for the double-compression ramp flow.

  18. Design of indirectly driven, high-compression Inertial Confinement Fusion implosions with improved hydrodynamic stability using a 4-shock adiabat-shaped drive

    SciTech Connect

    Milovich, J. L. Robey, H. F.; Clark, D. S.; Baker, K. L.; Casey, D. T.; Cerjan, C.; Field, J.; MacPhee, A. G.; Pak, A.; Patel, P. K.; Peterson, J. L.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Weber, C. R.

    2015-12-15

    Experimental results from indirectly driven ignition implosions during the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) [M. J. Edwards et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 070501 (2013)] achieved a record compression of the central deuterium-tritium fuel layer with measured areal densities up to 1.2 g/cm{sup 2}, but with significantly lower total neutron yields (between 1.5 × 10{sup 14} and 5.5 × 10{sup 14}) than predicted, approximately 10% of the 2D simulated yield. An order of magnitude improvement in the neutron yield was subsequently obtained in the “high-foot” experiments [O. A. Hurricane et al., Nature 506, 343 (2014)]. However, this yield was obtained at the expense of fuel compression due to deliberately higher fuel adiabat. In this paper, the design of an adiabat-shaped implosion is presented, in which the laser pulse is tailored to achieve similar resistance to ablation-front instability growth, but with a low fuel adiabat to achieve high compression. Comparison with measured performance shows a factor of 3–10× improvement in the neutron yield (>40% of predicted simulated yield) over similar NIC implosions, while maintaining a reasonable fuel compression of >1 g/cm{sup 2}. Extension of these designs to higher laser power and energy is discussed to further explore the trade-off between increased implosion velocity and the deleterious effects of hydrodynamic instabilities.

  19. Design of indirectly driven, high-compression Inertial Confinement Fusion implosions with improved hydrodynamic stability using a 4-shock adiabat-shaped drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milovich, J. L.; Robey, H. F.; Clark, D. S.; Baker, K. L.; Casey, D. T.; Cerjan, C.; Field, J.; MacPhee, A. G.; Pak, A.; Patel, P. K.; Peterson, J. L.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Weber, C. R.

    2015-12-01

    Experimental results from indirectly driven ignition implosions during the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) [M. J. Edwards et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 070501 (2013)] achieved a record compression of the central deuterium-tritium fuel layer with measured areal densities up to 1.2 g/cm2, but with significantly lower total neutron yields (between 1.5 × 1014 and 5.5 × 1014) than predicted, approximately 10% of the 2D simulated yield. An order of magnitude improvement in the neutron yield was subsequently obtained in the "high-foot" experiments [O. A. Hurricane et al., Nature 506, 343 (2014)]. However, this yield was obtained at the expense of fuel compression due to deliberately higher fuel adiabat. In this paper, the design of an adiabat-shaped implosion is presented, in which the laser pulse is tailored to achieve similar resistance to ablation-front instability growth, but with a low fuel adiabat to achieve high compression. Comparison with measured performance shows a factor of 3-10× improvement in the neutron yield (>40% of predicted simulated yield) over similar NIC implosions, while maintaining a reasonable fuel compression of >1 g/cm2. Extension of these designs to higher laser power and energy is discussed to further explore the trade-off between increased implosion velocity and the deleterious effects of hydrodynamic instabilities.

  20. A coupled three-dimensional hydrodynamic model for predicting hypolimnetic oxygenation and epilimnetic mixing in a shallow eutrophic reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shengyang; Lei, Chengwang; Carey, Cayelan C.; Gantzer, Paul A.; Little, John C.

    2017-01-01

    Artificial mixing and hypolimnetic oxygenation are two common methods for improving water quality in reservoirs. To examine the effects of their operation on the thermal structure of the water column, we used a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model coupled with a newly developed water-jet model and an existing linear bubble-plume model in conjunction with whole-reservoir in situ mixing experiments in a drinking-water reservoir. This reservoir has a side-stream supersaturation (SSS) hypolimnetic oxygenation system and a bubble-plume epilimnetic mixing (EM) system installed to reduce hypolimnetic hypoxia and algal blooms. The results show that the SSS successfully adds dissolved oxygen to the hypolimnion without destratifying the reservoir, whereas the EM, located at the lower metalimnetic boundary, deepens this boundary and partially mixes the metalimnion and epilimnion. The newly developed water-jet model coupled with the hydrodynamic model can successfully predict the variation of the thermal structure in the reservoir. The extent to which the SSS and EM systems affect the thermal structure of the reservoir is also quantified by further application of the coupled hydrodynamic model.

  1. Simulating hydrodynamics in a spring-fed estuary using a three-dimensional unstructured Cartesian grid model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, XinJian

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents an application of a three-dimensional unstructured Cartesian grid model (Chen, 2011) to a real-world case, namely the Crystal River/Kings Bay system located on the Gulf coast of the Florida peninsula of the United States. Crystal River/Kings Bay is a spring-fed estuarine system which is believed to be the largest natural refuge in the United States for manatees during the coldest days in winter because of the existence of a large amount of discharge out of numerous spring vents at the bottom of Kings Bay. The unstructured Cartesian grid model was used to simulate hydrodynamics, including salinity transport processes and thermodynamics, in the estuary during a 34-month period from April 2007 to February 2010. Although there are some unidentified uncertainties in quantifying flow rates from the spring vents and salinity variations in spring flows, simulated water elevations, salinities, temperatures, and cross-sectional flux all match well or very well with measured real-time field data. This suggests that the unstructured Cartesian grid model can adequately simulate hydrodynamics in a complex shallow water system such as Crystal River/Kings Bay and the numerical theory for the unstructured Cartesian grid model works properly. The successful simulation of hydrodynamics in the estuarine system also suggests that an empirical formula that relates the spring discharge with the water level in Kings Bay and the groundwater level measured in a nearby well is reasonable.

  2. Wavelet compression of three-dimensional time-lapse biological image data.

    PubMed

    Stefansson, H Narfi; Eliceiri, Kevin W; Thomas, Charles F; Ron, Amos; DeVore, Ron; Sharpley, Robert; White, John G

    2005-02-01

    The use of multifocal-plane, time-lapse recordings of living specimens has allowed investigators to visualize dynamic events both within ensembles of cells and individual cells. Recordings of such four-dimensional (4D) data from digital optical sectioning microscopy produce very large data sets. We describe a wavelet-based data compression algorithm that capitalizes on the inherent redunancies within multidimensional data to achieve higher compression levels than can be obtained from single images. The algorithm will permit remote users to roam through large 4D data sets using communication channels of modest bandwidth at high speed. This will allow animation to be used as a powerful aid to visualizing dynamic changes in three-dimensional structures.

  3. Utilizing dimensional analysis with observed data to determine the significance of hydrodynamic solutions in coastal hydrology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swain, Eric D.; Decker, Jeremy D.; Hughes, Joseph D.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the authors present an analysis of the magnitude of the temporal and spatial acceleration (inertial) terms in the surface-water flow equations and determine the conditions under which these inertial terms have sufficient magnitude to be required in the computations. Data from two South Florida field sites are examined and the relative magnitudes of temporal acceleration, spatial acceleration, and the gravity and friction terms are compared. Parameters are derived by using dimensionless numbers and applied to quantify the significance of the hydrodynamic effects. The time series of the ratio of the inertial and gravity terms from field sites are presented and compared with both a simplified indicator parameter and a more complex parameter called the Hydrodynamic Significance Number (HSN). Two test-case models were developed by using the SWIFT2D hydrodynamic simulator to examine flow behavior with and without the inertial terms and compute the HSN. The first model represented one of the previously-mentioned field sites during gate operations of a structure-managed coastal canal. The second model was a synthetic test case illustrating the drainage of water down a sloped surface from an initial stage while under constant flow. The analyses indicate that the times of substantial hydrodynamic effects are sporadic but significant. The simplified indicator parameter correlates much better with the hydrodynamic effect magnitude for a constant width channel such as Miami Canal than at the non-uniform North River. Higher HSN values indicate flow situations where the inertial terms are large and need to be taken into account.

  4. Internal Shock Interactions in Propulsion/Airframe Integrated Three-Dimensional Sidewall Compression Scramjet Inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, Scott D.; Perkins, John N.

    1992-01-01

    The advantages and design requirements of propulsion/airframe integration for high Mach number flight have led to extensive study of the three-dimensional sidewall compression scramjet inlet in recent years. Recent research publications have indicated testing over a broad range of Mach number (2 to 18) in a variety of test gases, such as air, helium, and tetrafluoromethane. Multiple experimental techniques have been employed to obtain detailed internal shock interaction data, performance data, and inlet starting limits. Computational fluid dynamics has been effectively used for preliminary parametric studies as well as in parallel with experiments to aid in the explanation of unusual or unexpected flow phenomena. Inlets of this genre afford a relatively simple, generic geometry while producing a highly complex, three-dimensional flow field dominated by shock/shock and shock/boundary layer interactions. While the importance of the viscous effects in high speed inlet interactions is recognized, the present work addresses in a parametric fashion the inviscid effects of leading edge sweep, sidewall compression, and inflow Mach number on the internal shock structure in terms of inlet compression and mass capture. In the process, the source of the of the Mach number invariance with leading edge sweep for a constant sidewall compression class of inlet is identified, and a previously undocumented spillage phenomenon in a constant effective wedge angle class of inlets is discussed.

  5. Out-of-Core Compression and Decompression of Large n-Dimensional Scalar Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Ibarria, L; Lindstrom, P; Rossignac, J; Szymczak, A

    2003-05-07

    We present a simple method for compressing very large and regularly sampled scalar fields. Our method is particularly attractive when the entire data set does not fit in memory and when the sampling rate is high relative to the feature size of the scalar field in all dimensions. Although we report results for R{sup 3} and R{sup 4} data sets, the proposed approach may be applied to higher dimensions. The method is based on the new Lorenzo predictor, introduced here, which estimates the value of the scalar field at each sample from the values at processed neighbors. The predicted values are exact when the n-dimensional scalar field is an implicit polynomial of degree n-1. Surprisingly, when the residuals (differences between the actual and predicted values) are encoded using arithmetic coding, the proposed method often outperforms wavelet compression in an L{infinity} sense. The proposed approach may be used both for lossy and lossless compression and is well suited for out-of-core compression and decompression, because a trivial implementation, which sweeps through the data set reading it once, requires maintaining only a small buffer in core memory, whose size barely exceeds a single n-1 dimensional slice of the data.

  6. Out-of-core Compression and Decompression of Large n-dimensional Scalar Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Ibarria, L; Lindstrom, P; Rossignac, J; Szymczak, A

    2003-02-03

    We present a simple method for compressing very large and regularly sampled scalar fields. Our method is particularly attractive when the entire data set does not fit in memory and when the sampling rate is high relative to the feature size of the scalar field in all dimensions. Although we report results for R{sup 3} and R{sup 4} data sets, the proposed approach may be applied to higher dimensions. The method is based on the new Lorenzo predictor, introduced here, which estimates the value of the scalar field at each sample from the values at processed neighbors. The predicted values are exact when the n-dimensional scalar field is an implicit polynomial of degree n-1. Surprisingly, when the residuals (differences between the actual and predicted values) are encoded using arithmetic coding, the proposed method often outperforms wavelet compression in an L{infinity} sense. The proposed approach may be used both for lossy and lossless compression and is well suited for out-of-core compression and decompression, because a trivial implementation, which sweeps through the data set reading it once, requires maintaining only a small buffer in core memory, whose size barely exceeds a single n-1 dimensional slice of the data.

  7. Three-Dimensional Inverse Transport Solver Based on Compressive Sensing Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yuxiong; Wu, Hongchun; Cao, Liangzhi; Zheng, Youqi

    2013-09-01

    According to the direct exposure measurements from flash radiographic image, a compressive sensing-based method for three-dimensional inverse transport problem is presented. The linear absorption coefficients and interface locations of objects are reconstructed directly at the same time. It is always very expensive to obtain enough measurements. With limited measurements, compressive sensing sparse reconstruction technique orthogonal matching pursuit is applied to obtain the sparse coefficients by solving an optimization problem. A three-dimensional inverse transport solver is developed based on a compressive sensing-based technique. There are three features in this solver: (1) AutoCAD is employed as a geometry preprocessor due to its powerful capacity in graphic. (2) The forward projection matrix rather than Gauss matrix is constructed by the visualization tool generator. (3) Fourier transform and Daubechies wavelet transform are adopted to convert an underdetermined system to a well-posed system in the algorithm. Simulations are performed and numerical results in pseudo-sine absorption problem, two-cube problem and two-cylinder problem when using compressive sensing-based solver agree well with the reference value.

  8. The CABARET method for a weakly compressible fluid flows in one- and two-dimensional implementations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulikov, Yu M.; Son, E. E.

    2016-11-01

    The CABARET method implementation for a weakly compressible fluid flow is in the focus of present paper. Testing both one-dimensional pressure balancing problem and a classical plane Poiseuille flow, we analyze this method in terms of discontinuity resolution, dispersion and dissipation. The method is proved to have an adequate convergence to an analytical solution for a velocity profile. We also show that a flow formation process represents a set of self-similar solutions under varying pressure differential and sound speed.

  9. Quasi-one-dimensional compressible flow across face seals and narrow slots. 2: Computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuk, J.; Smith, P. J.

    1972-01-01

    A computer program is presented for compressible fluid flow with friction across face seals and through narrow slots. The computer program carries out a quasi-one-dimensional flow analysis which is valid for laminar and turbulent flows under both subsonic and choked flow conditions for parallel surfaces. The program is written in FORTRAN IV. The input and output variables are in either the International System of Units (SI) or the U.S. customary system.

  10. Nonparallel stability of three-dimensional compressible boundary layers. Part 1: Stability analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Hady, N. M.

    1980-01-01

    A compressible linear stability theory is presented for nonparallel three-dimensional boundary-layer flows, taking into account the normal velocity component as well as the streamwise and spanwise variations of the basic flow. The method of multiple scales is used to account for the nonparallelism of the basic flow, and equations are derived for the spatial evolution of the disturbance amplitude and wavenumber. The numerical procedure for obtaining the solution of the nonparallel problem is outlined.

  11. Full-coverage film cooling: 3-dimensional measurements of turbulence structure and prediction of recovery region hydrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yavuzkurt, S.; Moffat, R. J.; Kays, W. M.

    1979-01-01

    Hydrodynamic measurements were made with a triaxial hot-wire in the full-coverage region and the recovery region following an array of injection holes inclined downstream, at 30 degrees to the surface. The data were taken under isothermal conditions at ambient temperature and pressure for two blowing ratios: M = 0.9 and M = 0.4. Profiles of the three main velocity components and the six Reynolds stresses were obtained at several spanwise positions at each of the five locations down the test plate. A one-equation model of turbulence (using turbulent kinetic energy with an algebraic mixing length) was used in a two-dimensional computer program to predict the mean velocity and turbulent kinetic energy profiles in the recovery region. A new real-time hotwire scheme was developed to make measurements in the three-dimensional turbulent boundary layer over the full-coverage surface.

  12. Testing a one-dimensional prescription of dynamical shear mixing with a two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edelmann, P. V. F.; Röpke, F. K.; Hirschi, R.; Georgy, C.; Jones, S.

    2017-07-01

    Context. The treatment of mixing processes is still one of the major uncertainties in 1D stellar evolution models. This is mostly due to the need to parametrize and approximate aspects of hydrodynamics in hydrostatic codes. In particular, the effect of hydrodynamic instabilities in rotating stars, for example, dynamical shear instability, evades consistent description. Aims: We intend to study the accuracy of the diffusion approximation to dynamical shear in hydrostatic stellar evolution models by comparing 1D models to a first-principle hydrodynamics simulation starting from the same initial conditions. Methods: We chose an initial model calculated with the stellar evolution code GENEC that is just at the onset of a dynamical shear instability but does not show any other instabilities (e.g., convection). This was mapped to the hydrodynamics code SLH to perform a 2D simulation in the equatorial plane. We compare the resulting profiles in the two codes and compute an effective diffusion coefficient for the hydro simulation. Results: Shear instabilities develop in the 2D simulation in the regions predicted by linear theory to become unstable in the 1D stellar evolution model. Angular velocity and chemical composition is redistributed in the unstable region, thereby creating new unstable regions. After a period of time, the system settles in a symmetric, steady state, which is Richardson stable everywhere in the 2D simulation, whereas the instability remains for longer in the 1D model due to the limitations of the current implementation in the 1D code. A spatially resolved diffusion coefficient is extracted by comparing the initial and final profiles of mean atomic mass. Conclusions: The presented simulation gives a first insight on hydrodynamics of shear instabilities in a real stellar environment and even allows us to directly extract an effective diffusion coefficient. We see evidence for a critical Richardson number of 0.25 as regions above this threshold remain

  13. Predicted macroinvertebrate response to water diversion from a montane stream using two-dimensional hydrodynamic models and zero flow approximation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holmquist, Jeffrey G.; Waddle, Terry J.

    2013-01-01

    We used two-dimensional hydrodynamic models for the assessment of water diversion effects on benthic macroinvertebrates and associated habitat in a montane stream in Yosemite National Park, Sierra Nevada Mountains, CA, USA. We sampled the macroinvertebrate assemblage via Surber sampling, recorded detailed measurements of bed topography and flow, and coupled a two-dimensional hydrodynamic model with macroinvertebrate indicators to assess habitat across a range of low flows in 2010 and representative past years. We also made zero flow approximations to assess response of fauna to extreme conditions. The fauna of this montane reach had a higher percentage of Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, and Trichoptera (%EPT) than might be expected given the relatively low faunal diversity of the study reach. The modeled responses of wetted area and area-weighted macroinvertebrate metrics to decreasing discharge indicated precipitous declines in metrics as flows approached zero. Changes in area-weighted metrics closely approximated patterns observed for wetted area, i.e., area-weighted invertebrate metrics contributed relatively little additional information above that yielded by wetted area alone. Loss of habitat area in this montane stream appears to be a greater threat than reductions in velocity and depth or changes in substrate, and the modeled patterns observed across years support this conclusion. Our models suggest that step function losses of wetted area may begin when discharge in the Merced falls to 0.02 m3/s; proportionally reducing diversions when this threshold is reached will likely reduce impacts in low flow years.

  14. Three-dimensional hydrodynamic focusing with a single sheath flow in a single-layer microfluidic device.

    PubMed

    Lee, Myung Gwon; Choi, Sungyoung; Park, Je-Kyun

    2009-11-07

    We report a contraction-expansion array (CEA) microchannel that allows three-dimensional hydrodynamic focusing with a single sheath flow in a single-layer device. The CEA microchannel exploits centrifugal forces acting on fluids travelling along the contraction and expansion regions of the microchannel. Around an entrance of the contraction region, the centrifugal forces induce a secondary flow field where two counter-rotating vortices enable to envelop a sample flow with a sheath flow in three dimensions. We herein describe an underlying principle and a design of the CEA microchannel and demonstrate complete sheathing of a sample fluid (water and human red blood cells) in three dimensions. The focusing characteristics of the CEA microchannel are investigated in terms of the number of the rectangular structures, flow rate, and flow ratio between sample and sheath flows. This microfluidic channel for three-dimensional hydrodynamic focusing is easy to fabricate in a single-layer fabrication process and simple to operate with a single sheath flow.

  15. Three-dimensional hydrodynamic focusing microfluidic emitter: a strategy to inhibit sample ion expansion in nanoelectrospray ionization.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Bo; Wang, Lingling; Wang, Yujiao; Bao, Yajing; Jiang, Shichang; Ye, Mingyue

    2016-01-07

    A microfluidic emitter based on three-dimensional hydrodynamic focusing was developed to generate a wrapped charged aerosol plume, in which the distribution of the sample ion in the nanoelectrospray could be regulated. Deposition patterns of the wrapped spray from the proposed three-dimensional hydrodynamic focusing nanoelectrospray emitter (3D HFNE) were collected under different conditions to ensure the wrapped configuration. Moreover, sample ion intensities as well as their ratios to a focusing background ion were studied as a function of different displacements from the center of the wrapped electrospray to confirm the inhibition of ion expansion. Furthermore, the proposed 3D HFNE indicated improved sensitivities compared with a reported nanoelectropray emitter as well as its commercial ESI counterpart, and this demonstrated its capacity for determining samples with low concentrations and infusion rates. In addition, the proposed 3D HFNE was compatible with various sample flow compositions (from 100% methanol to 100% water) and a broad infusion rate range (from 10 nL min(-1) to 15 μL min(-1)). Finally, its stability and durability were indicated to be acceptable for various determinations. Therefore, the 3D HFNE is a potential option to achieve on-line nanoelectrospray MS determinations using microfluidics with conventional mass spectrometers, considering its low cost and user-friendly properties.

  16. Existence and Stability of Compressible Current-Vortex Sheets in Three-Dimensional Magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Gui-Qiang; Wang, Ya-Guang

    2008-03-01

    Compressible vortex sheets are fundamental waves, along with shocks and rarefaction waves, in entropy solutions to multidimensional hyperbolic systems of conservation laws. Understanding the behavior of compressible vortex sheets is an important step towards our full understanding of fluid motions and the behavior of entropy solutions. For the Euler equations in two-dimensional gas dynamics, the classical linearized stability analysis on compressible vortex sheets predicts stability when the Mach number M > sqrt{2} and instability when M < sqrt{2} ; and Artola and Majda’s analysis reveals that the nonlinear instability may occur if planar vortex sheets are perturbed by highly oscillatory waves even when M > sqrt{2} . For the Euler equations in three dimensions, every compressible vortex sheet is violently unstable and this instability is the analogue of the Kelvin Helmholtz instability for incompressible fluids. The purpose of this paper is to understand whether compressible vortex sheets in three dimensions, which are unstable in the regime of pure gas dynamics, become stable under the magnetic effect in three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). One of the main features is that the stability problem is equivalent to a free-boundary problem whose free boundary is a characteristic surface, which is more delicate than noncharacteristic free-boundary problems. Another feature is that the linearized problem for current-vortex sheets in MHD does not meet the uniform Kreiss Lopatinskii condition. These features cause additional analytical difficulties and especially prevent a direct use of the standard Picard iteration to the nonlinear problem. In this paper, we develop a nonlinear approach to deal with these difficulties in three-dimensional MHD. We first carefully formulate the linearized problem for the current-vortex sheets to show rigorously that the magnetic effect makes the problem weakly stable and establish energy estimates, especially high-order energy

  17. Anomalies and time reversal invariance in relativistic hydrodynamics: The second order and higher dimensional formulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharzeev, Dmitri E.; Yee, Ho-Ung

    2011-08-01

    We present two new results on relativistic hydrodynamics with anomalies and external electromagnetic fields, “chiral magnetohydrodynamics” (CMHD). First, we study CMHD in four dimensions at second order in the derivative expansion assuming the conformal/Weyl invariance. We classify all possible independent conformal second order viscous corrections to the energy-momentum tensor and to the U(1) current in the presence of external electric and/or magnetic fields, and identify 18 terms that originate from the triangle anomaly. We then propose and motivate the following guiding principle to constrain the CMHD: the anomaly-induced terms that are even under the time-reversal invariance should not contribute to the local entropy production rate. This allows us to fix 13 out of the 18 transport coefficients that enter the second order formulation of CMHD. We also relate one of our second order transport coefficients to the chiral shear waves. Our second subject is hydrodynamics with (N+1)-gon anomaly in an arbitrary 2N dimensions. The effects from the (N+1)-gon anomaly appear in hydrodynamics at (N-1)th order in the derivative expansion, and we identify precisely N such corrections to the U(1) current. The time-reversal constraint is powerful enough to allow us to find the analytic expressions for all transport coefficients. We confirm the validity of our results (and of the proposed guiding principle) by an explicit fluid/gravity computation within the AdS/CFT correspondence.

  18. Anomalies and time reversal invariance in relativistic hydrodynamics: The second order and higher dimensional formulations

    SciTech Connect

    Kharzeev, D.E.; Yee, H.-U.

    2011-08-25

    We present two new results on relativistic hydrodynamics with anomalies and external electromagnetic fields, 'chiral magnetohydrodynamics' (CMHD). First, we study CMHD in four dimensions at second order in the derivative expansion assuming the conformal/Weyl invariance. We classify all possible independent conformal second order viscous corrections to the energy-momentum tensor and to the U(1) current in the presence of external electric and/or magnetic fields, and identify 18 terms that originate from the triangle anomaly. We then propose and motivate the following guiding principle to constrain the CMHD: the anomaly-induced terms that are even under the time-reversal invariance should not contribute to the local entropy production rate. This allows us to fix 13 out of the 18 transport coefficients that enter the second order formulation of CMHD. We also relate one of our second order transport coefficients to the chiral shear waves. Our second subject is hydrodynamics with (N+1)-gon anomaly in an arbitrary 2N dimensions. The effects from the (N+1)-gon anomaly appear in hydrodynamics at (N-1)th order in the derivative expansion, and we identify precisely N such corrections to the U(1) current. The time-reversal constraint is powerful enough to allow us to find the analytic expressions for all transport coefficients. We confirm the validity of our results (and of the proposed guiding principle) by an explicit fluid/gravity computation within the AdS/CFT correspondence.

  19. Thermal compression and characterization of three-dimensional nonwoven PET matrices as tissue engineering scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Ma, T; Yang, S T; Kniss, D A

    2001-03-01

    Nonwoven fibrous matrices have been widely used as scaffolds in tissue engineering, and modification of microstructure of these matrices is needed to organize cells in three-dimensional space with spatially balanced proliferation and differentiation required for functional tissue development. The method of thermal compression of nonwoven polyethylene terephthalate (PET) fabrics was developed and key parameters of temperature, pressure, and compression duration were evaluated in this study. The permanent deformation was obtained at elevated temperature under pressure and the viscoelastic compressional behaviors were observed, characterized by a distinct apparent modulus change in glass transition temperature region. A liquid extrusion method was further employed to analyze both pore size and its distribution for matrices with porosity ranging from 84 to 93%. It is also found that a more uniformly distributed pore size was resulted from thermal compression and the isotropic nature of nonwoven fabrics was preserved because of the proportional reduction of the pore by compression. The thermally compressed fabric matrices with two different pore sizes (15 and 20 microm in pore radius) were used to culture human trophoblast ED27 and NIH 3T3 cells. It was found that cells cultured in the different pore-size PET matrices had different cell spatial organization and proliferation rates. The smaller pores in the matrix allowed cells to spread better and proliferate faster, while cells in the larger pores tended to form large aggregates and had lower proliferation rate. The thermal compression technique also can be applied to other synthetic fibrous matrices including biodegradable polymers used in tissue engineering to modify the microstructure according to their viscoelastic properties.

  20. Compressive sensing for single-shot two-dimensional coherent spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harel, E.; Spencer, A.; Spokoyny, B.

    2017-02-01

    In this work, we explore the use of compressive sensing for the rapid acquisition of two-dimensional optical spectra that encodes the electronic structure and ultrafast dynamics of condensed-phase molecular species. Specifically, we have developed a means to combine multiplexed single-element detection and single-shot and phase-resolved two-dimensional coherent spectroscopy. The method described, which we call Single Point Array Reconstruction by Spatial Encoding (SPARSE) eliminates the need for costly array detectors while speeding up acquisition by several orders of magnitude compared to scanning methods. Physical implementation of SPARSE is facilitated by combining spatiotemporal encoding of the nonlinear optical response and signal modulation by a high-speed digital micromirror device. We demonstrate the approach by investigating a well-characterized cyanine molecule and a photosynthetic pigment-protein complex. Hadamard and compressive sensing algorithms are demonstrated, with the latter achieving compression factors as high as ten. Both show good agreement with directly detected spectra. We envision a myriad of applications in nonlinear spectroscopy using SPARSE with broadband femtosecond light sources in so-far unexplored regions of the electromagnetic spectrum.

  1. Lossy to lossless compressions of hyperspectral images using three-dimensional set partitioning algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jiaji; Wu, Zhensen; Wu, Chengke

    2006-02-01

    We present a three-dimensional (3-D) hyperspectral image compression algorithm based on zero-block coding and wavelet transforms. An efficient asymmetric 3-D wavelet transform (AT) based on the lifting technique and packet transform is used to reduce redundancies in both the spectral and spatial dimensions. The implementation via 3-D integer lifting scheme enables us to map integer-to-integer values, enabling lossy and lossless decompression from the same bit stream. To encode these coefficients after the AT, a modified 3DSPECK algorithm-asymmetric transform 3-D set-partitioning embedded block (AT-3DSPECK) is proposed. According to the distribution of energy of the transformed coefficients, the 3DSPECK's 3-D set partitioning block algorithm and the 3-D octave band partitioning scheme are efficiently combined in the proposed AT-3DSPECK algorithm. Several AVIRIS (Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer) images are used to evaluate the compression performance. Compared with the JPEG2000, AT-3DSPIHT, and 3DSPECK lossless compression techniques, the AT-3DSPECK achieves the best lossless performance. In lossy mode, the AT-3DSPECK algorithm outperforms AT-3DSPIHT and 3DSPECK at all rates. Besides the high compression performance, AT-3DSPECK supports progressive transmission. Clearly, the proposed AT-3DSPECK algorithm is a better candidate than several conventional methods.

  2. Lossy to lossless compressions of hyperspectral images using three-dimensional set partitioning algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jiaji; Wu, Zhensen; Wu, Chengke

    2005-02-01

    In this paper, we present a three-dimensional (3D) hyperspectral image compression algorithm based on zeroblock coding and wavelet transforms. An efficient Asymmetric 3D wavelet Transform (AT) based on the lifting technique and packet transform is used to reduce redundancies in both the spectral and spatial dimensions. The implementation via 3D integer lifting scheme allows to map integer-to-integer values, enabling lossy and lossless decompression from the same bit stream. To encode these coefficients after Asymmetric 3D wavelet transform, a modified 3DSPECK algorithm - Asymmetric Transform 3D Set Partitioning Embedded bloCK (AT-3DSPECK) is proposed. According to the distribution of energy of the transformed coefficients, the 3DSPECK's 3D set partitioning block algorithm and the 3D octave band partitioning scheme are efficiently combined in the proposed AT-3DSPECK algorithm. Several AVIRIS images are used to evaluate the compression performance. Compared with the JPEG2000, AT-3DSPIHT and 3DSPECK lossless compression techniques, the AT-3DSPECK achieves the best lossless performance. In lossy mode, the AT-3DSPECK algorithm outperforms AT-3DSPIHT and 3DSPECK at all rates. Besides the high compression performance, AT-3DSPECK supports progressive transmission. Clearly, the proposed AT-3DSPECK algorithm is a better candidate than several conventional methods.

  3. Two Phase Compressible Flow Fields in One Dimensional and Eulerian Grid Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sungsu; Park, Chan Wook

    2008-11-01

    Numerical investigation for two phase compressible flow fields of air-water in one dimensional tube are performed in the fixed Eulerian grid framework. Using an equation of states of Tait's type for a multiphase cell, the two phase compressible flow is modeled as equivalent single phase which is discretized using the Roe`s approximate Riemann solver, while the phase interface is captured via volume fractions of each phase. The most common problem found in the computational approaches in compressible multiphase flow is occurrence of the pressure oscillation at the phase interface. In order to suppress that phenomenon, tried are two approaches; a passive advection of volume fraction and a direct pressure relaxation with the compressible form of volume fraction equation. The results show that the direct pressure equalizing method suppresses pressure oscillation successfully and generates sharp discontinuities, transmitting and reflecting acoustic waves naturally at the phase interface. This work was supported by a research fund granted from Agency for Defense Development, South Korea

  4. Large-eddy simulation of a three-dimensional compressible tornado vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Jianjun

    Large-Eddy simulation (LES) has become a very useful tool for investigating tornadoes, one of the more spectacular and destructive phenomena of nature. A new three-dimensional, unsteady, compressible model is generated to determine how significant the differences between compressible and incompressible LES simulations may be in some extremely violent tornadoes. In particular, this study seeks to determine how high the Mach number within the tornado may become before significant changes occur due to compressibility, and what the major effects of these changes may be expected to be. After developing and verifying the compressible LES model, three different patterns of tornadic corner flows cataloged by local swirl ratio are simulated under quasisteady conditions for different Mach numbers. Simulation comparisons have demonstrated that the compressibility effects are different for different corner flow structures. At peak average Mach numbers less than approximately 0.5, the compressibility effects are not very significant and may be accounted for to leading order by an appropriate isentropic transformation applied to the incompressible results. As the maximum Mach number is increased to more than 1.0, the compressibility effects for low-swirl-ratio corner flows are dramatic, with significant increase in peak vertical velocity and the height of the vortex breakdown above the surface. The effects are much weaker for medium swirl conditions, and expected to be still weaker for high swirl corner flow where the effects are essentially limited to influencing the secondary vortices. In general, compressibility effects would not change the basic dynamics of tornadic corner flows even if Mach numbers greater than one are achieved. This study also shows that during the sharp temporal overshoot in near-surface intensity that can sometimes occur during a tornado's evolution, the maximum pressure drop will tend to be restricted by supersonic velocities, and thus limit the

  5. Hydrodynamic theory of surface excitations of three-dimensional topological insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vildanov, N. M.

    2011-03-01

    Edge excitations of a fractional quantum Hall system can be derived as surface excitations of an incompressible quantum droplet using one-dimensional chiral bosonization. Here we show that an analogous approach can be developed to characterize surface states of three-dimensional time-reversal invariant topological insulators. The key ingredient of our theory is the Luther’s multidimensional bosonization construction.

  6. Study of Two-Dimensional Compressible Non-Acoustic Modeling of Stirling Machine Type Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tew, Roy C., Jr.; Ibrahim, Mounir B.

    2001-01-01

    A two-dimensional (2-D) computer code was developed for modeling enclosed volumes of gas with oscillating boundaries, such as Stirling machine components. An existing 2-D incompressible flow computer code, CAST, was used as the starting point for the project. CAST was modified to use the compressible non-acoustic Navier-Stokes equations to model an enclosed volume including an oscillating piston. The devices modeled have low Mach numbers and are sufficiently small that the time required for acoustics to propagate across them is negligible. Therefore, acoustics were excluded to enable more time efficient computation. Background information about the project is presented. The compressible non-acoustic flow assumptions are discussed. The governing equations used in the model are presented in transport equation format. A brief description is given of the numerical methods used. Comparisons of code predictions with experimental data are then discussed.

  7. Encrypted Three-dimensional Dynamic Imaging using Snapshot Time-of-flight Compressed Ultrafast Photography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Jinyang; Gao, Liang; Hai, Pengfei; Li, Chiye; Wang, Lihong V.

    2015-10-01

    Compressed ultrafast photography (CUP), a computational imaging technique, is synchronized with short-pulsed laser illumination to enable dynamic three-dimensional (3D) imaging. By leveraging the time-of-flight (ToF) information of pulsed light backscattered by the object, ToF-CUP can reconstruct a volumetric image from a single camera snapshot. In addition, the approach unites the encryption of depth data with the compressed acquisition of 3D data in a single snapshot measurement, thereby allowing efficient and secure data storage and transmission. We demonstrated high-speed 3D videography of moving objects at up to 75 volumes per second. The ToF-CUP camera was applied to track the 3D position of a live comet goldfish. We have also imaged a moving object obscured by a scattering medium.

  8. Two-dimensional compressible flow in turbomachines with conic flow surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanitz, John D

    1949-01-01

    A general method of analysis is developed for two-dimensional, steady, compressible flow in stators or rotors of radial and mixed flow turbomachines with conic flow surfaces (surfaces of right circular cones generated by center line of flow passage in the axial-radial plane). The variables taken into account are: (1) tip speed of the rotor, (2) flow rate, (3) blade shape, (4) variation in passage height with radius, (5) number of blades, and (6) cone angle of the flow surface. Relaxation methods are used to solve the nonlinear differential equation for the stream function. Two numerical examples are presented; one for compressible and the other for incompressible flow in a centrifugal compressor with thin, straight blades. The results of these examples are given by plots of the streamlines, constant velocity-ratio lines, and constant pressure-ratio line.

  9. Encrypted Three-dimensional Dynamic Imaging using Snapshot Time-of-flight Compressed Ultrafast Photography.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jinyang; Gao, Liang; Hai, Pengfei; Li, Chiye; Wang, Lihong V

    2015-10-27

    Compressed ultrafast photography (CUP), a computational imaging technique, is synchronized with short-pulsed laser illumination to enable dynamic three-dimensional (3D) imaging. By leveraging the time-of-flight (ToF) information of pulsed light backscattered by the object, ToF-CUP can reconstruct a volumetric image from a single camera snapshot. In addition, the approach unites the encryption of depth data with the compressed acquisition of 3D data in a single snapshot measurement, thereby allowing efficient and secure data storage and transmission. We demonstrated high-speed 3D videography of moving objects at up to 75 volumes per second. The ToF-CUP camera was applied to track the 3D position of a live comet goldfish. We have also imaged a moving object obscured by a scattering medium.

  10. A variational principle for compressible fluid mechanics. Discussion of the one-dimensional theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prozan, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    The second law of thermodynamics is used as a variational statement to derive a numerical procedure to satisfy the governing equations of motion. The procedure, based on numerical experimentation, appears to be stable provided the CFL condition is satisfied. This stability is manifested no matter how severe the gradients (compression or expansion) are in the flow field. For reasons of simplicity only one dimensional inviscid compressible unsteady flow is discussed here; however, the concepts and techniques are not restricted to one dimension nor are they restricted to inviscid non-reacting flow. The solution here is explicit in time. Further study is required to determine the impact of the variational principle on implicit algorithms.

  11. Compression of digital holograms for three-dimensional object reconstruction and recognition.

    PubMed

    Naughton, Thomas J; Frauel, Yann; Javidi, Bahram; Tajahuerce, Enrique

    2002-07-10

    We present the results of applying lossless and lossy data compression to a three-dimensional object reconstruction and recognition technique based on phase-shift digital holography. We find that the best lossless (Lempel-Ziv, Lempel-Ziv-Welch, Huffman, Burrows-Wheeler) compression rates can be expected when the digital hologram is stored in an intermediate coding of separate data streams for real and imaginary components. The lossy techniques are based on subsampling, quantization, and discrete Fourier transformation. For various degrees of speckle reduction, we quantify the number of Fourier coefficients that can be removed from the hologram domain, and the lowest level of quantization achievable, without incurring significant loss in correlation performance or significant error in the reconstructed object domain.

  12. Encrypted Three-dimensional Dynamic Imaging using Snapshot Time-of-flight Compressed Ultrafast Photography

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Jinyang; Gao, Liang; Hai, Pengfei; Li, Chiye; Wang, Lihong V.

    2015-01-01

    Compressed ultrafast photography (CUP), a computational imaging technique, is synchronized with short-pulsed laser illumination to enable dynamic three-dimensional (3D) imaging. By leveraging the time-of-flight (ToF) information of pulsed light backscattered by the object, ToF-CUP can reconstruct a volumetric image from a single camera snapshot. In addition, the approach unites the encryption of depth data with the compressed acquisition of 3D data in a single snapshot measurement, thereby allowing efficient and secure data storage and transmission. We demonstrated high-speed 3D videography of moving objects at up to 75 volumes per second. The ToF-CUP camera was applied to track the 3D position of a live comet goldfish. We have also imaged a moving object obscured by a scattering medium. PMID:26503834

  13. Microfluidic three-dimensional hydrodynamic flow focusing for the rapid protein concentration analysis.

    PubMed

    Hong, Sungmin; Tsou, Pei-Hsiang; Chou, Chao-Kai; Yamaguchi, Hirohito; Su, Chin B; Hung, Mien-Chie; Kameoka, Jun

    2012-06-01

    A simple microfluidic 3D hydrodynamic flow focusing device has been developed and demonstrated quantitative determinations of quantum dot 525 with antibody (QD525-antibody) and hemagglutinin epitope tagged MAX (HA-MAX) protein concentrations. This device had a step depth cross junction structure at a hydrodynamic flow focusing point at which the analyte stream was flowed into a main detection channel and pinched not only horizontally but also vertically by two sheath streams. As a result, a triangular cross-sectional flow profile of the analyte stream was formed and the laser was focused on the top of the triangular shaped analyte stream. Since the detection volume was smaller than the radius of laser spot, a photon burst histogram showed Gaussian distribution, which was necessary for the quantitative analysis of protein concentration. By using this approach, a linear concentration curve of QD525-antibody down to 10 pM was demonstrated. In addition, the concentration of HA-MAX protein in HEK293 cell lysate was determined as 0.283 ± 0.015 nM. This approach requires for only 1 min determining protein concentration. As the best of our knowledge, this is the first time to determinate protein concentration by using single molecule detection techniques.

  14. APSARA: A multi-dimensional unsplit fourth-order explicit Eulerian hydrodynamics code for arbitrary curvilinear grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wongwathanarat, A.; Grimm-Strele, H.; Müller, E.

    2016-10-01

    We present a new fourth-order, finite-volume hydrodynamics code named Apsara. The code employs a high-order, finite-volume method for mapped coordinates with extensions for nonlinear hyperbolic conservation laws. Apsara can handle arbitrary structured curvilinear meshes in three spatial dimensions. The code has successfully passed several hydrodynamic test problems, including the advection of a Gaussian density profile and a nonlinear vortex and the propagation of linear acoustic waves. For these test problems, Apsara produces fourth-order accurate results in case of smooth grid mappings. The order of accuracy is reduced to first-order when using the nonsmooth circular grid mapping. When applying the high-order method to simulations of low-Mach number flows, for example, the Gresho vortex and the Taylor-Green vortex, we discover that Apsara delivers superior results to codes based on the dimensionally split, piecewise parabolic method (PPM) widely used in astrophysics. Hence, Apsara is a suitable tool for simulating highly subsonic flows in astrophysics. In the first astrophysical application, we perform implicit large eddy simulations (ILES) of anisotropic turbulence in the context of core collapse supernova (CCSN) and obtain results similar to those previously reported.

  15. Spatial heterogeneity in geothermally-influenced lakes derived from atmospherically corrected Landsat thermal imagery and three-dimensional hydrodynamic modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allan, Mathew G.; Hamilton, David P.; Trolle, Dennis; Muraoka, Kohji; McBride, Christopher

    2016-08-01

    Atmospheric correction of Landsat 7 thermal data was carried out for the purpose of retrieval of lake skin water temperature in Rotorua lakes, and Lake Taupo, North Island, New Zealand. The effect of the atmosphere was modelled using four sources of atmospheric profile data as input to the MODerate resolution atmospheric TRANsmission (MODTRAN) radiative transfer model. The retrieved skin water temperatures were validated using a high-frequency temperature sensor deployed from a monitoring buoy at the water surface of Lake Rotorua. The most accurate atmospheric correction method was with Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) atmospheric profile data (root-mean-square-error, RMSE, 0.48 K), followed by radiosonde (0.52 K), Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) Level 3 (0.54 K), and the NASA atmospheric correction parameter calculator (0.94 K). Retrieved water temperature was used for assessing spatial heterogeneity and accuracy of surface water temperature simulated with a three-dimensional (3-D) hydrodynamic model of Lake Rotoehu, located approximately 20 km east of Lake Rotorua. This comparison indicated that the model was suitable for reproducing the dominant horizontal variations in surface water temperature in the lake. This study demonstrated the potential of accurate satellite-based thermal monitoring to validate temperature outputs from 3-D hydrodynamic model simulations. It also provided atmospheric correction options for local and global applications of Landsat thermal data.

  16. Three-dimensional numerical simulation of hydrodynamic interactions between pectoral-fin vortices and body undulation in a swimming fish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Cheng-Lun; Ting, Shang-Chieh; Yeh, Meng-Kao; Yang, Jing-Tang

    2011-09-01

    We investigated numerically the hydrodynamic interactions between pectoral-fin vortices and body undulation in a fish swimming with carangiform locomotion at a Reynolds number of 3.3 × 104; the three-dimensional, viscous, incompressible, Navier-Stokes equations were solved with a finite-volume method. For a fish swimming with the pectoral fins abducted, we characterized the wake flow structures, forces, and power consumption with respect to various Strouhal numbers. The numerical results reveal that a pair of vortices is formed immediately behind the abducted pectoral fins of a swimming fish. There exist hydrodynamic interactions between the pectoral-fin vortices and the undulating fish body. For Strouhal numbers in a range 0.2-0.8, the body undulation impedes the shedding of pectoral-fin vortices, resulting in vortices closely attached to the pectoral fins. In contrast, for Strouhal number = 0.1, the pectoral-fin vortices are shed from the pectoral fins and drift downstream. The low-pressure suction forces arising from the shed pectoral-fin vortices facilitate lateral movements of the fish body, decreasing the power consumption. This phenomenon indicates the possibility for an actual fish to harvest energy from the shed pectoral-fin vortices.

  17. Calibration and validation of a two-dimensional hydrodynamic model of the Ohio River, Jefferson County, Kentucky

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wagner, C.R.; Mueller, D.S.

    2001-01-01

    The quantification of current patterns is an essential component of a Water Quality Analysis Simulation Program (WASP) application in a riverine environment. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) provided a field validated two-dimensional Resource Management Associates-2 (RMA-2) hydrodynamic model capable of quantifying the steady-flowpatterns in the Ohio River extending from river mile 590 to 630 for the Ohio River Valley Water Sanitation Commission (ORSANCO) water-quality modeling efforts on that reach. Because of the hydrodynamic complexities induced by McAlpine Locks and Dam (Ohio River mile 607), the model was split into two segments: an upstream reach, which extended from the dam upstream to the upper terminus of the study reach at Ohio River mile 590; and a downstream reach, which extended from the dam downstream to a lower terminus at Ohio River mile 636. The model was calibrated to a low-flow hydraulic survey (approximately 35,000 cubic feet per second (ft3/s)) and verified with data collected during a high-flow survey (approximately 390,000 ft3/s). The model calibration and validation process included matching water-surface elevations at 10 locations and velocity profiles at 30 cross sections throughout the study reach. Based on the calibration and validation results, the model is a representative simulation of the Ohio River steady-flow patterns below discharges of approximately 400,000 ft3/s.

  18. Hydrodynamic Hunters.

    PubMed

    Jashnsaz, Hossein; Al Juboori, Mohammed; Weistuch, Corey; Miller, Nicholas; Nguyen, Tyler; Meyerhoff, Viktoria; McCoy, Bryan; Perkins, Stephanie; Wallgren, Ross; Ray, Bruce D; Tsekouras, Konstantinos; Anderson, Gregory G; Pressé, Steve

    2017-03-28

    The Gram-negative Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus (BV) is a model bacterial predator that hunts other bacteria and may serve as a living antibiotic. Despite over 50 years since its discovery, it is suggested that BV probably collides into its prey at random. It remains unclear to what degree, if any, BV uses chemical cues to target its prey. The targeted search problem by the predator for its prey in three dimensions is a difficult problem: it requires the predator to sensitively detect prey and forecast its mobile prey's future position on the basis of previously detected signal. Here instead we find that rather than chemically detecting prey, hydrodynamics forces BV into regions high in prey density, thereby improving its odds of a chance collision with prey and ultimately reducing BV's search space for prey. We do so by showing that BV's dynamics are strongly influenced by self-generated hydrodynamic flow fields forcing BV onto surfaces and, for large enough defects on surfaces, forcing BV in orbital motion around these defects. Key experimental controls and calculations recapitulate the hydrodynamic origin of these behaviors. While BV's prey (Escherichia coli) are too small to trap BV in hydrodynamic orbit, the prey are also susceptible to their own hydrodynamic fields, substantially confining them to surfaces and defects where mobile predator and prey density is now dramatically enhanced. Colocalization, driven by hydrodynamics, ultimately reduces BV's search space for prey from three to two dimensions (on surfaces) even down to a single dimension (around defects). We conclude that BV's search for individual prey remains random, as suggested in the literature, but confined, however-by generic hydrodynamic forces-to reduced dimensionality.

  19. Two-dimensional electromagnetic quantum-hydrodynamic simulations of isochoric heating of a solid target by proton beams

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Ya; Jiang, Wei; Song, Yuan-Hong; Wang, You-Nian

    2015-02-15

    Isochoric heating of an aluminum target by proton beams has been studied with a two-dimensional self-consistent electromagnetic quantum-hydrodynamic model, including the nonlinear quantum effects. It is shown that most protons deposit their energy within several micrometers near the surface, and the aluminum metal target is heated up to several electron volts in tens of Mbar pressure regime within one picosecond. Comparison between electrostatic and electromagnetic cases shows that the strength of electromagnetic field is much smaller than that of the electrostatic field at initial stage but increases more rapidly and becomes larger at later time. The results show that the time evolution of electric field has a significant influence on the interaction of intense beams with a solid target, while the effect of the self-magnetic field is small for non-relativistic beams considered here.

  20. Three-dimensional smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulation for injection molding flow of short fiber-reinforced polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Liping; Lu, Gang; Chen, Dachuan; Li, Wenjun; Lu, Chunsheng

    2017-07-01

    This paper investigates the three-dimensional (3D) injection molding flow of short fiber-reinforced polymer composites using a smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulation method. The polymer melt was modeled as a power law fluid and the fibers were considered as rigid cylindrical bodies. The filling details and fiber orientation in the injection-molding process were studied. The results indicated that the SPH method could effectively predict the order of filling, fiber accumulation, and heterogeneous distribution of fibers. The SPH simulation also showed that fibers were mainly aligned to the flow direction in the skin layer and inclined to the flow direction in the core layer. Additionally, the fiber-orientation state in the simulation was quantitatively analyzed and found to be consistent with the results calculated by conventional tensor methods.

  1. Multi-dimensional modeling of the application of catalytic combustion to homogeneous charge compression ignition engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Wen; Xie, Maozhao

    2006-12-01

    The detailed surface reaction mechanism of methane on rhodium catalyst was analyzed. Comparisons between numerical simulation and experiments showed a basic agreement. The combustion process of homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine whose piston surface has been coated with catalyst (rhodium and platinum) was numerically investigated. A multi-dimensional model with detailed chemical kinetics was built. The effects of catalytic combustion on the ignition timing, the temperature and CO concentration fields, and HC, CO and NOx emissions of the HCCI engine were discussed. The results showed the ignition timing of the HCCI engine was advanced and the emissions of HC and CO were decreased by the catalysis.

  2. Quasiconservation laws for compressible three-dimensional Navier-Stokes flow.

    PubMed

    Gibbon, J D; Holm, D D

    2012-10-01

    We formulate the quasi-Lagrangian fluid transport dynamics of mass density ρ and the projection q=ω·∇ρ of the vorticity ω onto the density gradient, as determined by the three-dimensional compressible Navier-Stokes equations for an ideal gas, although the results apply for an arbitrary equation of state. It turns out that the quasi-Lagrangian transport of q cannot cross a level set of ρ. That is, in this formulation, level sets of ρ (isopycnals) are impermeable to the transport of the projection q.

  3. Three-Dimensional Simulation of Tsunami Run Up Around Conical Island Using Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buruchenko, Sergey K.

    2016-10-01

    The large-scale laboratory experiments were performed in a 30 m-wide, 25 m-long, and 60 cm-deep wave basin. Waves were realistically created in the tank by a horizontal wave generator with 60 different paddles each 46 cm-wide and moving independently. These experiments provided run-up observations for validating numerical models and supplemented comparisons with analytical results. Smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) is a popular meshfree, Lagrangian method with attractive features in modelling fluid dynamics. The SPH method is capable of dealing with problems with free surface, deformable boundary, moving interface, wave propagation and solid simulation. A weakly incompressible fluid flow SPH model was employed in this paper to investigate the run-up heights of nearshore tsunamis in the vicinity of a circular island. The predicted numerical results have been verified by comparing to available laboratory measurements. A good agreement has been observed.

  4. Three-dimensional hydrodynamic Bondi-Hoyle accretion. 2: Homogeneous medium at Mach 3 with gamma = 5/3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruffert, Maximilian; Arnett, David

    1994-01-01

    We investigate the hydrodynamics of three-dimensional classical Bondi-Hoyle accretion. Totally absorbing spheres of varying sizes (from 10 down to 0.01 accretion radii) move at Mach 3 relative to a homogeneous and slightly perturbed medium, which is taken to be an ideal gas (gamma = 5/3). To accommodate the long-range gravitational forces, the extent of the computational volume is 32(exp 3) accretion radii. We examine the influence of numerical procedure on physical behavior. The hydrodynamics is modeled by the 'piecewise parabolic method.' No energy sources (nuclear burning) or sinks (radiation, conduction) are included. The resolution in the vicinity of the accretor is increased by multiply nesting several (5-10) grids around the sphere, each finer grid being a factor of 2 smaller in zone dimension that the next coarser grid. The largest dynamic range (ratio of size of the largest grid to size of the finest zone) is 16,384. This allows us to include a coarse model for the surface of the accretor (vacuum sphere) on the finest grid, while at the same time evolving the gas on the coarser grids. Initially (at time t = 0-10), a shock front is set up, a Mach cone develops, and the accretion column is observable. Eventually the flow becomes unstable, destroying axisymmetry. This happens approximately when the mass accretion rate reaches the values (+/- 10%) predicted by the Bondi-Hoyle accretion formula (factor of 2 included). However, our three-dimensional models do not show the highly dynamic flip-flop flow so prominent in two-dimensional calculations performed by other authors. The flow, and thus the accretion rate of all quantities, shows quasi-periodic (P approximately equals 5) cycles between quiescent and active states. The interpolation formula proposed in an accompanying paper is found to follow the collected numerical data to within approximately 30%. The specific angular momentum accreted is of the same order of magnitude as the values previously found for

  5. Three-dimensional hydrodynamic Bondi-Hoyle accretion. 2: Homogeneous medium at Mach 3 with gamma = 5/3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruffert, Maximilian; Arnett, David

    1994-01-01

    We investigate the hydrodynamics of three-dimensional classical Bondi-Hoyle accretion. Totally absorbing spheres of varying sizes (from 10 down to 0.01 accretion radii) move at Mach 3 relative to a homogeneous and slightly perturbed medium, which is taken to be an ideal gas (gamma = 5/3). To accommodate the long-range gravitational forces, the extent of the computational volume is 32(exp 3) accretion radii. We examine the influence of numerical procedure on physical behavior. The hydrodynamics is modeled by the 'piecewise parabolic method.' No energy sources (nuclear burning) or sinks (radiation, conduction) are included. The resolution in the vicinity of the accretor is increased by multiply nesting several (5-10) grids around the sphere, each finer grid being a factor of 2 smaller in zone dimension that the next coarser grid. The largest dynamic range (ratio of size of the largest grid to size of the finest zone) is 16,384. This allows us to include a coarse model for the surface of the accretor (vacuum sphere) on the finest grid, while at the same time evolving the gas on the coarser grids. Initially (at time t = 0-10), a shock front is set up, a Mach cone develops, and the accretion column is observable. Eventually the flow becomes unstable, destroying axisymmetry. This happens approximately when the mass accretion rate reaches the values (+/- 10%) predicted by the Bondi-Hoyle accretion formula (factor of 2 included). However, our three-dimensional models do not show the highly dynamic flip-flop flow so prominent in two-dimensional calculations performed by other authors. The flow, and thus the accretion rate of all quantities, shows quasi-periodic (P approximately equals 5) cycles between quiescent and active states. The interpolation formula proposed in an accompanying paper is found to follow the collected numerical data to within approximately 30%. The specific angular momentum accreted is of the same order of magnitude as the values previously found for

  6. WIND: Computer program for calculation of three dimensional potential compressible flow about wind turbine rotor blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dulikravich, D. S.

    1980-01-01

    A computer program is presented which numerically solves an exact, full potential equation (FPE) for three dimensional, steady, inviscid flow through an isolated wind turbine rotor. The program automatically generates a three dimensional, boundary conforming grid and iteratively solves the FPE while fully accounting for both the rotating cascade and Coriolis effects. The numerical techniques incorporated involve rotated, type dependent finite differencing, a finite volume method, artificial viscosity in conservative form, and a successive line overrelaxation combined with the sequential grid refinement procedure to accelerate the iterative convergence rate. Consequently, the WIND program is capable of accurately analyzing incompressible and compressible flows, including those that are locally transonic and terminated by weak shocks. The program can also be used to analyze the flow around isolated aircraft propellers and helicopter rotors in hover as long as the total relative Mach number of the oncoming flow is subsonic.

  7. Entropy Stable Wall Boundary Conditions for the Three-Dimensional Compressible Navier-Stokes Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsani, Matteo; Carpenter, Mark H.; Nielsen, Eric J.

    2015-01-01

    Non-linear entropy stability and a summation-by-parts framework are used to derive entropy stable wall boundary conditions for the three-dimensional compressible Navier-Stokes equations. A semi-discrete entropy estimate for the entire domain is achieved when the new boundary conditions are coupled with an entropy stable discrete interior operator. The data at the boundary are weakly imposed using a penalty flux approach and a simultaneous-approximation-term penalty technique. Although discontinuous spectral collocation operators on unstructured grids are used herein for the purpose of demonstrating their robustness and efficacy, the new boundary conditions are compatible with any diagonal norm summation-by-parts spatial operator, including finite element, finite difference, finite volume, discontinuous Galerkin, and flux reconstruction/correction procedure via reconstruction schemes. The proposed boundary treatment is tested for three-dimensional subsonic and supersonic flows. The numerical computations corroborate the non-linear stability (entropy stability) and accuracy of the boundary conditions.

  8. Analysis of the one-dimensional transient compressible vapor flow in heat pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jang, Jong H.; Faghri, Amir; Chang, Won S.

    1991-01-01

    The transient compressible one-dimensional vapor flow dynamics in a heat pipe is modeled. The numerical results are obtained by using the implicit non-iterative Beam-Warming finite difference method. The model is tested for simulated heat pipe vapor flow and actual vapor flow in cylindrical heat pipes. A good comparison of the present transient results for the simulated heat pipe vapor flow with the previous results of a two-dimensional numerical model is achieved and the steady state results are in agreement with the existing experimental data. The transient behavior of the vapor flow under subsonic, sonic, and supersonic speeds as well as high mass flow rates are successfully predicted.

  9. EFDC1D - A ONE DIMENSIONAL HYDRODYNAMIC AND SEDIMENT TRANSPORT MODEL FOR RIVER AND STREAM NETWORKS: MODEL THEORY AND USERS GUIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This technical report describes the new one-dimensional (1D) hydrodynamic and sediment transport model EFDC1D. This model that can be applied to stream networks. The model code and two sample data sets are included on the distribution CD. EFDC1D can simulate bi-directional unstea...

  10. EFDC1D - A ONE DIMENSIONAL HYDRODYNAMIC AND SEDIMENT TRANSPORT MODEL FOR RIVER AND STREAM NETWORKS: MODEL THEORY AND USERS GUIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This technical report describes the new one-dimensional (1D) hydrodynamic and sediment transport model EFDC1D. This model that can be applied to stream networks. The model code and two sample data sets are included on the distribution CD. EFDC1D can simulate bi-directional unstea...

  11. Turbulence models and Reynolds analogy for two-dimensional supersonic compression ramp flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Chi R.; Bidek, Maleina C.

    1994-01-01

    Results of the application of turbulence models and the Reynolds analogy to the Navier-Stokes computations of Mach 2.9 two-dimensional compression ramp flows are presented. The Baldwin-Lomax eddy viscosity model and the kappa-epsilon turbulence transport equations for the turbulent momentum flux modeling in the Navier-Stokes equations are studied. The Reynolds analogy for the turbulent heat flux modeling in the energy equation was also studied. The Navier-Stokes equations and the energy equation were numerically solved for the flow properties. The Reynolds shear stress, the skin friction factor, and the surface heat transfer rate were calculated and compared with their measurements. It was concluded that with a hybrid kappa-epsilon turbulence model for turbulence modeling, the present computations predicted the skin friction factors of the 8 deg and 16 deg compression ramp flows and with the turbulent Prandtl number Pr(sub t) = 0.93 and the ratio of the turbulent thermal and momentum transport coefficients mu(sub q)/mu(sub t) = 2/Prt, the present computations also predicted the surface heat transfer rates beneath the boundary layer flow of the 16 compression ramp.

  12. Low-dimensional-structure self-learning and thresholding: regularization beyond compressed sensing for MRI reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Akçakaya, Mehmet; Basha, Tamer A; Goddu, Beth; Goepfert, Lois A; Kissinger, Kraig V; Tarokh, Vahid; Manning, Warren J; Nezafat, Reza

    2011-09-01

    An improved image reconstruction method from undersampled k-space data, low-dimensional-structure self-learning and thresholding (LOST), which utilizes the structure from the underlying image is presented. A low-resolution image from the fully sampled k-space center is reconstructed to learn image patches of similar anatomical characteristics. These patches are arranged into "similarity clusters," which are subsequently processed for dealiasing and artifact removal, using underlying low-dimensional properties. The efficacy of the proposed method in scan time reduction was assessed in a pilot coronary MRI study. Initially, in a retrospective study on 10 healthy adult subjects, we evaluated retrospective undersampling and reconstruction using LOST, wavelet-based l(1)-norm minimization, and total variation compressed sensing. Quantitative measures of vessel sharpness and mean square error, and qualitative image scores were used to compare reconstruction for rates of 2, 3, and 4. Subsequently, in a prospective study, coronary MRI data were acquired using these rates, and LOST-reconstructed images were compared with an accelerated data acquisition using uniform undersampling and sensitivity encoding reconstruction. Subjective image quality and sharpness data indicate that LOST outperforms the alternative techniques for all rates. The prospective LOST yields images with superior quality compared with sensitivity encoding or l(1)-minimization compressed sensing. The proposed LOST technique greatly improves image reconstruction for accelerated coronary MRI acquisitions. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Geothermal well behaviour prediction after air compress stimulation using one-dimensional transient numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusman, W.; Viridi, S.; Rachmat, S.

    2016-01-01

    The non-discharges geothermal wells have been a main problem in geothermal development stages and well discharge stimulation is required to initiate a flow. Air compress stimulation is one of the methods to trigger a fluid flow from the geothermal reservoir. The result of this process can be predicted by using by the Af / Ac method, but sometimes this method shows uncertainty result in several geothermal wells and also this prediction method does not take into account the flowing time of geothermal fluid to discharge after opening the well head. This paper presents a simulation of non-discharges well under air compress stimulation to predict well behavior and time process required. The component of this model consists of geothermal well data during heating-up process such as pressure, temperature and mass flow in the water column and main feed zone level. The one-dimensional transient numerical model is run based on the Single Fluid Volume Element (SFVE) method. According to the simulation result, the geothermal well behavior prediction after air compress stimulation will be valid under two specific circumstances, such as single phase fluid density between 1 - 28 kg/m3 and above 28.5 kg/m3. The first condition shows that successful well discharge and the last condition represent failed well discharge after air compress stimulation (only for two wells data). The comparison of pf values between simulation and field observation shows the different result according to the success discharge well. Time required for flow to occur as observed in well head by using the SFVE method is different with the actual field condition. This model needs to improve by updating more geothermal well data and modified fluid phase condition inside the wellbore.

  14. A comparison of two- and three-dimensional neutrino-hydrodynamics simulations of core-collapse supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Takiwaki, Tomoya; Kotake, Kei; Suwa, Yudai

    2014-05-10

    We present numerical results on two- (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamic core-collapse simulations of an 11.2 M {sub ☉} star. By changing numerical resolutions and seed perturbations systematically, we study how the postbounce dynamics are different in 2D and 3D. The calculations were performed with an energy-dependent treatment of the neutrino transport based on the isotropic diffusion source approximation scheme, which we have updated to achieve a very high computational efficiency. All of the computed models in this work, including nine 3D models and fifteen 2D models, exhibit the revival of the stalled bounce shock, leading to the possibility of explosion. All of them are driven by the neutrino-heating mechanism, which is fostered by neutrino-driven convection and the standing-accretion-shock instability. Reflecting the stochastic nature of multi-dimensional (multi-D) neutrino-driven explosions, the blast morphology changes from model to model. However, we find that the final fate of the multi-D models, whether an explosion is obtained or not, is little affected by the explosion stochasticity. In agreement with some previous studies, higher numerical resolutions lead to slower onset of the shock revival in both 2D and 3D. Based on the self-consistent supernova models leading to the possibility of explosions, our results systematically show that the revived shock expands more energetically in 2D than in 3D.

  15. A two-dimensional hydrodynamic model of the St. Clair-Detroit River waterway in the Great Lakes basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holtschlag, David J.; Koschik, John A.

    2002-01-01

    The St. Clair–Detroit River Waterway connects Lake Huron with Lake Erie in the Great Lakes basin to form part of the international boundary between the United States and Canada. A two-dimensional hydrodynamic model is developed to compute flow velocities and water levels as part of a source-water assessment of public water intakes. The model, which uses the generalized finite-element code RMA2, discretizes the waterway into a mesh formed by 13,783 quadratic elements defined by 42,936 nodes. Seven steadystate scenarios are used to calibrate the model by adjusting parameters associated with channel roughness in 25 material zones in sub-areas of the waterway. An inverse modeling code is used to systematically adjust model parameters and to determine their associated uncertainty by use of nonlinear regression. Calibration results show close agreement between simulated and expected flows in major channels and water levels at gaging stations. Sensitivity analyses describe the amount of information available to estimate individual model parameters, and quantify the utility of flow measurements at selected cross sections and water-level measurements at gaging stations. Further data collection, model calibration analysis, and grid refinements are planned to assess and enhance two-dimensional flow simulation capabilities describing the horizontal flow distributions in St. Clair and Detroit Rivers and circulation patterns in Lake St. Clair.

  16. A numerical study of the Navier-Stokes transport coefficients for two-dimensional granular hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almazán, Lidia; Carrillo, José A.; Salueña, Clara; Garzó, Vicente; Pöschel, Thorsten

    2013-04-01

    A numerical study that aims to analyze the thermal mechanisms of unsteady, supersonic granular flow by means of hydrodynamic simulations of the Navier-Stokes granular equation is reported in this paper. For this purpose, a paradigmatic problem in granular dynamics such as the Faraday instability is selected. Two different approaches for the Navier-Stokes transport coefficients for granular materials are considered, namely the traditional Jenkins-Richman theory for moderately dense quasi-elastic grains and the improved Garzó-Dufty-Lutsko theory for arbitrary inelasticity, which we also present here. Both the solutions are compared with event-driven simulations of the same system under the same conditions, by analyzing the density, temperature and velocity field. Important differences are found between the two approaches, leading to interesting implications. In particular, the heat transfer mechanism coupled to the density gradient, which is a distinctive feature of inelastic granular gases, is responsible for a major discrepancy in the temperature field and hence in the diffusion mechanisms.

  17. Postcollapse hydrodynamics of SN 1987A - Two-dimensional simulations of the early evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herant, Marc; Benz, Willy; Colgate, Stirling

    1992-01-01

    The first few seconds of the explosion of SN 1987A are modeled here using a 2D cylindrical geometry smooth particle hydrodynamics code. The success of the explosion is determined to be sensitive to the duration of the infall, the timing of the bounce, and the subsequent neutrino heating. A semianalytical model for the initial structure of the collapsed object is used to present two simulations that differ by the mass that has been allowed to collapse into a neutron star prior to the bounce. In the case of a short initial infall, the explosion fails due to excessive cooling. For a longer initial infall, the cooling is less and the explosion is successful although relatively weak. It is shown that in this case, a successful explosion is brought about by the presence of an entropy gradient which, combined with the gravitational pull of the neutron star, leads to extremely strong instabilities. The critical importance of the global circulation for the success of the explosion is demonstrated.

  18. Postcollapse hydrodynamics of SN 1987A - Two-dimensional simulations of the early evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Herant, M.; Benz, W.; Colgate, S. Steward Observatory, Tucson, AZ Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM )

    1992-08-01

    The first few seconds of the explosion of SN 1987A are modeled here using a 2D cylindrical geometry smooth particle hydrodynamics code. The success of the explosion is determined to be sensitive to the duration of the infall, the timing of the bounce, and the subsequent neutrino heating. A semianalytical model for the initial structure of the collapsed object is used to present two simulations that differ by the mass that has been allowed to collapse into a neutron star prior to the bounce. In the case of a short initial infall, the explosion fails due to excessive cooling. For a longer initial infall, the cooling is less and the explosion is successful although relatively weak. It is shown that in this case, a successful explosion is brought about by the presence of an entropy gradient which, combined with the gravitational pull of the neutron star, leads to extremely strong instabilities. The critical importance of the global circulation for the success of the explosion is demonstrated. 43 refs.

  19. Three-dimensional hydrodynamic modeling of saltwater intrusion and circulation in Lake Pontchartrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiou, Ioannis Y.

    Saltwater intrusion has been observed in the vicinity of the Inner Harbor Navigation Canal (IHNC). Although periodic, the density gradients are sometimes strong enough to propagate the saltwater plume over a large area at the bottom of Lake Pontchartrain. During strong stratification, density gradients form a stable interface, which at low wind conditions limits water column mixing above the interface. As a result of low mixing conditions in the bottom waters, dissolved oxygen below the interface may become hypoxic. Wind waves and wind-induced circulation currents in the Lake can produce conditions that can mix or re-distribute and expand this high saline and low oxygen plume. A Freeport McMoRan and Environmental Protection Agency supported study was initiated at the University of New Orleans, to study the dynamics of saltwater intrusion from the IHNC, and investigate conditions and circulation patterns that might produce favorable conditions for mixing of this plume. A Hydrodynamic and Transport model has been developed, calibrated and verified for Lakes Pontchartrain and Maurepas. Freshwater inputs from the major tributaries, as well as saltwater inputs from the IHNC and Pass Rigolets have been included. The model predicted a two-gyre wind driven circulation pattern in Lakes Pontchartrain and Maurepas with low currents in the center of the Lake counter to the wind direction and higher currents along the Lake periphery following the direction of the wind. The model also predicted significant interaction between bottom currents and density currents.

  20. Improved non-local electron thermal transport model for two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Duc; Moses, Gregory; Delettrez, Jacques

    2015-08-15

    An implicit, non-local thermal conduction algorithm based on the algorithm developed by Schurtz, Nicolai, and Busquet (SNB) [Schurtz et al., Phys. Plasmas 7, 4238 (2000)] for non-local electron transport is presented and has been implemented in the radiation-hydrodynamics code DRACO. To study the model's effect on DRACO's predictive capability, simulations of shot 60 303 from OMEGA are completed using the iSNB model, and the computed shock speed vs. time is compared to experiment. Temperature outputs from the iSNB model are compared with the non-local transport model of Goncharov et al. [Phys. Plasmas 13, 012702 (2006)]. Effects on adiabat are also examined in a polar drive surrogate simulation. Results show that the iSNB model is not only capable of flux-limitation but also preheat prediction while remaining numerically robust and sacrificing little computational speed. Additionally, the results provide strong incentive to further modify key parameters within the SNB theory, namely, the newly introduced non-local mean free path. This research was supported by the Laboratory for Laser Energetics of the University of Rochester.

  1. An implicit method for two-dimensional hydrodynamics. [in stellar evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livne, Eli

    1993-01-01

    An implicit method for compressible multidimensional flows is presented. The method, which is strongly oriented toward astrophysical applications, enables one to simulate very subsonic flows by removing the Courant condition upon time steps. It consists of an implicit purely Lagrangian step, followed by an explicit and second-order accurate (at least in one dimension) remapping step, which is optional. When the remapping step is performed the time step is limited by the 'particle crossing time' and otherwise it is limited only by accuracy considerations. The suggested method, which results from a compromise between accuracy and efficiency, is very efficient relative to other methods. It enables the computation of many multidimensional problems in stellar evolution, such as those governed by very subsonic flows, which were not calculable with existing explicit methods.

  2. An implicit method for two-dimensional hydrodynamics. [in stellar evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livne, Eli

    1993-01-01

    An implicit method for compressible multidimensional flows is presented. The method, which is strongly oriented toward astrophysical applications, enables one to simulate very subsonic flows by removing the Courant condition upon time steps. It consists of an implicit purely Lagrangian step, followed by an explicit and second-order accurate (at least in one dimension) remapping step, which is optional. When the remapping step is performed the time step is limited by the 'particle crossing time' and otherwise it is limited only by accuracy considerations. The suggested method, which results from a compromise between accuracy and efficiency, is very efficient relative to other methods. It enables the computation of many multidimensional problems in stellar evolution, such as those governed by very subsonic flows, which were not calculable with existing explicit methods.

  3. Three-dimensional modelling of the hydrodynamics of the Southern Bight of the North Sea: first results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Evgeny; Capet, Arthur; Barth, Alexander; Delhez, Eric; Soetaert, Karline; Grégoire, Marilaure

    2017-04-01

    In the frame of the Belgian research project FaCE-It (Functional biodiversity in a Changing sedimentary Environment: Implications for biogeochemistry and food webs in a managerial setting), the impact of dredging activities and offshore wind farm installation on the spatial distribution of sediment grain size, biodiversity and biogeochemistry will be estimated in the Southern Bight of the North Sea (SBNS) with a focus on the Belgian Coastal Zone (BCZ). To reach this goal, the three-dimensional hydrodynamical model ROMS-COAWST is implemented in the SBNS in order to simulate the complex hydrodynamics and sediment transport. Two levels of nesting are used to reach a resolution of 250 m in the BCZ. The model is forced at the air-sea interface by the 6-hourly ECMWF ERA-interim atmospheric dataset and at the open boundaries by the coarse resolution model results available from CMEMS (Copernicus Marine Environment Monitoring Service), and also considers tides and 4 main rivers (Scheldt, Rhine with Maas, Thames and Seine). Two types of simulations have been performed: a 10-years climatological simulation and a simulation over 2003-2013 to investigate the interannual dynamics. The model skills are evaluated by comparing its outputs to historical data (e.g. salinity, temperature and currents) from remote sensing and in-situ. The sediment transport module will then be implemented and its outputs compared to historical and newly collected (in the frame of FaCE-iT) observations on grain size distribution as well as with satellite Suspended Particulate Matter (SPM) images. This will allow assessing the impact of substrate modification due to offshore human activities at local and regional scales.

  4. Hydrodynamical comparison test of solar models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bach, K.; Kim, Y.-C.

    2012-12-01

    We present three dimensional radiation-hydrodynamical (RHD) simulations for solar surface convection based on three most recent solar mixtures: Grevesse & Sauval (1998), Asplund, Grevesse & Sauval (2005), and Asplund, Grevesse, Sauval & Scott (2009). The outer convection zone of the Sun is an extremely turbulent region composed of partly ionized compressible gases at high temperature. The super-adiabatic layer (SAL) is the transition region where the transport of energy changes drastically from convection to radiation. In order to describe physical processes accurately, a realistic treatment of radiation should be considered as well as convection. However, newly updated solar mixtures that are established from radiation-hydrodynamics do not generate properly internal structures estimated by helioseismology. In order to address this fundamental problem, solar models are constructed consistently based on each mixture and used as initial configurations for radiation-hydrodynamical simulations. From our simulations, we find that the turbulent flows in each model are statistically similar in the SAL.

  5. SOLA-STAR: a one-dimensional ICED-ALE hydrodynamics program for spherically symmetric flows

    SciTech Connect

    Cloutman, L.D.

    1980-07-01

    This report describes a simple, general-purpose, and efficient algorithm for solving one-dimensional spherically symmetric, transient fluid-dynamics problems using a variation of the ICED-ALE technique. Included are the finite difference equations, three test problems that illustrate various capabilities of the program, and a complete code description, including a listing, sample data decks and output, a summary of important variable names, and hints for conversion to other operating systems.

  6. Application of Short-Crested Wave Theory in the Design of Three Dimensional Coastal Hydrodynamic Models.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-09-01

    zone; third an inter- action of longshore stresses with crest normal stresses may provide a longshore forcing function in three-dimensional space...producing two interesting results. First it showed that the principal radiation stress parallel to the wave crest is underestimated. This underestimation...results are additions to the original recognition by Battjes (1972) of the overestimation in the principal radiation stress normal to the wave crest

  7. Scaling Theory of a Compressibility-Driven Metal-Insulator Transition in a Two-Dimensional Electron Fluid.

    PubMed

    Belitz, D; Kirkpatrick, T R

    2016-12-02

    We present a scaling description of a metal-insulator transition in two-dimensional electron systems that is driven by a vanishing compressibility rather than a vanishing diffusion coefficient. A small set of basic assumptions leads to a consistent theoretical framework that is compatible with existing transport and compressibility measurements, and allows us to make predictions for other observables. We also discuss connections between these ideas and other theories of transitions to an incompressible quantum fluid.

  8. Three-dimensional simulations of ablative hydrodynamic instabilities in indirectly driven targets

    SciTech Connect

    Marinak, M.M.; Tipton, R.E.; Remington, B.A.

    1996-06-01

    To model ignition in a National Ignition Facility (NIF) capsule implosion, the authors must understand the behavior of instabilities that can cause breakup of the pellet shell. During a capsule implosion, shocks that transit the shell cause growth of perturbations at the surface or at an interface because of a Richtmyer-Meshkov type of instability. Following shock breakout, or earlier for a shaped pulse, the low-density ablated plasma accelerates the pusher, and the ablation front is Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) unstable. Ablation and finite density gradients have the effect of stabilizing the short wavelength modes. Unstable modes present on the outer surface grow and feed through to the inner surface. Once the shell encounters the rebounding shock from the capsule center, it decelerates and the inner surface becomes RT unstable. If perturbations grow large enough, pusher material mixes into the core, degrading implosion performance. Capsule designs for the NIF depend on ablative stabilization and saturation to prevent perturbations initially present on the capsule surface from growing large enough to quench ignition. Here, the authors examine the first simulations and experiments to study the effect of 3-D perturbation shape on instability growth and saturation in indirectly driven targets. The first section discusses HYDRA, the radiation hydrodynamics code developed for these simulations. The subsequent section examines 3-D shape effects in single-mode perturbations in planar foil simulations and experiments. A discussion of the evolution of multimode perturbations on planar foils is followed by a discussion of 3-D simulations of instability growth in Nova capsule implosions.

  9. CHEMISTRY IN THE FIRST HYDROSTATIC CORE STAGE BY ADOPTING THREE-DIMENSIONAL RADIATION HYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Furuya, Kenji; Aikawa, Yuri; Tomida, Kengo; Tomisaka, Kohji; Matsumoto, Tomoaki; Saigo, Kazuya; Hersant, Franck; Wakelam, Valentine

    2012-10-20

    We investigate molecular evolution from a molecular cloud core to a first hydrostatic core in three spatial dimensions. We perform a radiation hydrodynamic simulation in order to trace fluid parcels, in which molecular evolution is investigated, using a gas-phase and grain-surface chemical reaction network. We derive spatial distributions of molecular abundances and column densities in the molecular cloud core harboring the first core. We find that the total gas and ice abundances of many species in a cold era (10 K) remain unaltered until the temperature reaches {approx}500 K. The gas abundances in the warm envelope and the outer layer of the first core (T {approx}< 500 K) are mainly determined via the sublimation of ice-mantle species. Above 500 K, the abundant molecules, such as H{sub 2}CO, start to be destroyed, and simple molecules, such as CO, H{sub 2}O, and N{sub 2}, are reformed. On the other hand, some molecules are effectively formed at high temperature; carbon chains, such as C{sub 2}H{sub 2} and cyanopolyynes, are formed at temperatures >700 K. We also find that large organic molecules, such as CH{sub 3}OH and HCOOCH{sub 3}, are associated with the first core (r {approx}< 10 AU). Although the abundances of these molecules in the first core stage are comparable to or less than in the protostellar stage (hot corino), reflecting the lower luminosity of the central object, their column densities in our model are comparable to the observed values toward the prototypical hot corino, IRAS 16293-2422. We propose that these large organic molecules can be good tracers of the first cores.

  10. Two-dimensional simulations of thermonuclear burn in ignition-scale inertial confinement fusion targets under compressed axial magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, L. J.; Logan, B. G.; Zimmerman, G. B.; Werner, C. J.

    2013-07-15

    We report for the first time on full 2-D radiation-hydrodynamic implosion simulations that explore the impact of highly compressed imposed magnetic fields on the ignition and burn of perturbed spherical implosions of ignition-scale cryogenic capsules. Using perturbations that highly convolute the cold fuel boundary of the hotspot and prevent ignition without applied fields, we impose initial axial seed fields of 20–100 T (potentially attainable using present experimental methods) that compress to greater than 4 × 10{sup 4} T (400 MG) under implosion, thereby relaxing hotspot areal densities and pressures required for ignition and propagating burn by ∼50%. The compressed field is high enough to suppress transverse electron heat conduction, and to allow alphas to couple energy into the hotspot even when highly deformed by large low-mode amplitudes. This might permit the recovery of ignition, or at least significant alpha particle heating, in submarginal capsules that would otherwise fail because of adverse hydrodynamic instabilities.

  11. Mach 6 testing of two generic three-dimensional sidewall compression scramjet inlets in tetrafluoromethane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, Scott D.; Perkins, John N.

    1990-01-01

    Three-dimensional sidewall compression scramjet inlets with leading edge sweeps of 30 and 70 degrees have been tested in the Langley Hypersonic CF4 Tunnel at Mach 6 and a ratio of specific heats of 1.2. The effects of cowl position, contraction ratio, and Reynolds number were investigated. The models were instrumented with 42 static pressure orifices distributed on the sidewalls, baseplate, and cowl. Schlieren movies were made of each test for flow visualization of the entrance plane and cowl region. In order to obtain an approximate characterization of the flow field, a modification to two-dimensional inviscid oblique shock theory was derived to accommodate the three-dimensional effects of leading edge sweep. This theory qualitatively predicted the reflected shock structure/sidewall impingement locations and the observed increase in spillage (flow upturning) with increasing leading edge sweep. The primary effect of moving the cowl forward is capturing the flow which would have otherwise spilled out ahead of the cowl. Increasing the contraction ratio (moving the sidewalls closer together) increases the number of internal shock reflections and hence incrementally increases the sidewall pressure distribution. Significant Reynolds number effects were noted over a small range of Reynolds number.

  12. SASI Activity in Three-dimensional Neutrino-hydrodynamics Simulations of Supernova Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanke, Florian; Müller, Bernhard; Wongwathanarat, Annop; Marek, Andreas; Janka, Hans-Thomas

    2013-06-01

    The relevance of the standing accretion shock instability (SASI) compared to neutrino-driven convection in three-dimensional (3D) supernova-core environments is still highly controversial. Studying a 27 M ⊙ progenitor, we demonstrate, for the first time, that violent SASI activity can develop in 3D simulations with detailed neutrino transport despite the presence of convection. This result was obtained with the PROMETHEUS-VERTEX code with the same sophisticated neutrino treatment so far used only in one-dimensional and two-dimensional (2D) models. While buoyant plumes initially determine the nonradial mass motions in the postshock layer, bipolar shock sloshing with growing amplitude sets in during a phase of shock retraction and turns into a violent spiral mode whose growth is only quenched when the infall of the Si/SiO interface leads to strong shock expansion in response to a dramatic decrease of the mass accretion rate. In the phase of large-amplitude SASI sloshing and spiral motions, the postshock layer exhibits nonradial deformation dominated by the lowest-order spherical harmonics (l = 1, m = 0, ±1) in distinct contrast to the higher multipole structures associated with neutrino-driven convection. We find that the SASI amplitudes, shock asymmetry, and nonradial kinetic energy in three dimensions can exceed those of the corresponding 2D case during extended periods of the evolution. We also perform parameterized 3D simulations of a 25 M ⊙ progenitor, using a simplified, gray neutrino transport scheme, an axis-free Yin-Yang grid, and different amplitudes of random seed perturbations. They confirm the importance of the SASI for another progenitor, its independence of the choice of spherical grid, and its preferred growth for fast accretion flows connected to small shock radii and compact proto-neutron stars as previously found in 2D setups.

  13. SASI ACTIVITY IN THREE-DIMENSIONAL NEUTRINO-HYDRODYNAMICS SIMULATIONS OF SUPERNOVA CORES

    SciTech Connect

    Hanke, Florian; Mueller, Bernhard; Wongwathanarat, Annop; Marek, Andreas; Janka, Hans-Thomas E-mail: bjmuellr@mpa-garching.mpg.de E-mail: amarek@mpa-garching.mpg.de

    2013-06-10

    The relevance of the standing accretion shock instability (SASI) compared to neutrino-driven convection in three-dimensional (3D) supernova-core environments is still highly controversial. Studying a 27 M{sub Sun} progenitor, we demonstrate, for the first time, that violent SASI activity can develop in 3D simulations with detailed neutrino transport despite the presence of convection. This result was obtained with the PROMETHEUS-VERTEX code with the same sophisticated neutrino treatment so far used only in one-dimensional and two-dimensional (2D) models. While buoyant plumes initially determine the nonradial mass motions in the postshock layer, bipolar shock sloshing with growing amplitude sets in during a phase of shock retraction and turns into a violent spiral mode whose growth is only quenched when the infall of the Si/SiO interface leads to strong shock expansion in response to a dramatic decrease of the mass accretion rate. In the phase of large-amplitude SASI sloshing and spiral motions, the postshock layer exhibits nonradial deformation dominated by the lowest-order spherical harmonics (l = 1, m = 0, {+-}1) in distinct contrast to the higher multipole structures associated with neutrino-driven convection. We find that the SASI amplitudes, shock asymmetry, and nonradial kinetic energy in three dimensions can exceed those of the corresponding 2D case during extended periods of the evolution. We also perform parameterized 3D simulations of a 25 M{sub Sun} progenitor, using a simplified, gray neutrino transport scheme, an axis-free Yin-Yang grid, and different amplitudes of random seed perturbations. They confirm the importance of the SASI for another progenitor, its independence of the choice of spherical grid, and its preferred growth for fast accretion flows connected to small shock radii and compact proto-neutron stars as previously found in 2D setups.

  14. Magnetic dynamo action in two-dimensional turbulent magneto-hydrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fyfe, D.; Joyce, G.; Montgomery, D.

    1977-01-01

    Two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic turbulence is explored by means of numerical simulation. Previous analytical theory, based on non-dissipative constants of the motion in a truncated Fourier representation, is verified by following the evolution of highly non-equilibrium initial conditions numerically. Dynamo action (conversion of a significant fraction of turbulent kinetic energy into long-wavelength magnetic field energy) is observed. It is conjectured that in the presence of dissipation and external forcing, a dual cascade will be observed for zero-helicity situations. Energy will cascade to higher wavenumbers simultaneously with a cascade of mean square vector potential to lower wavenumbers, leading to an omni-directional magnetic energy spectrum.

  15. Magnetic dynamo action in two-dimensional turbulent magneto-hydrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fyfe, D.; Joyce, G.; Montgomery, D.

    1977-01-01

    Two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic turbulence is explored by means of numerical simulation. Previous analytical theory, based on non-dissipative constants of the motion in a truncated Fourier representation, is verified by following the evolution of highly non-equilibrium initial conditions numerically. Dynamo action (conversion of a significant fraction of turbulent kinetic energy into long-wavelength magnetic field energy) is observed. It is conjectured that in the presence of dissipation and external forcing, a dual cascade will be observed for zero-helicity situations. Energy will cascade to higher wavenumbers simultaneously with a cascade of mean square vector potential to lower wavenumbers, leading to an omni-directional magnetic energy spectrum.

  16. Three-dimensional hydrodynamics of the deceleration stage in inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, C. R. Clark, D. S.; Cook, A. W.; Eder, D. C.; Haan, S. W.; Hammel, B. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Jones, O. S.; Marinak, M. M.; Milovich, J. L.; Patel, P. K.; Robey, H. F.; Salmonson, J. D.; Sepke, S. M.; Thomas, C. A.

    2015-03-15

    The deceleration stage of inertial confinement fusion implosions is modeled in detail using three-dimensional simulations designed to match experiments at the National Ignition Facility. In this final stage of the implosion, shocks rebound from the center of the capsule, forming the high-temperature, low-density hot spot and slowing the incoming fuel. The flow field that results from this process is highly three-dimensional and influences many aspects of the implosion. The interior of the capsule has high-velocity motion, but viscous effects limit the range of scales that develop. The bulk motion of the hot spot shows qualitative agreement with experimental velocity measurements, while the variance of the hot spot velocity would broaden the DT neutron spectrum, increasing the inferred temperature by 400–800 eV. Jets of ablator material are broken apart and redirected as they enter this dynamic hot spot. Deceleration stage simulations using two fundamentally different rad-hydro codes are compared and the flow field is found to be in good agreement.

  17. A compatible, energy and symmetry preserving Lagrangian hydrodynamics algorithm in three-dimensional Cartesian geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Caramana, E.J.; Rousculp, C.L.; Burton, D.E.

    2000-01-01

    This work presents a numerical algorithm for the solution of fluid dynamics problems with moderate to high speed flow in three dimensions. Cartesian geometry is chosen owing to the fact that in this coordinate system no curvature terms are present that break the conservation law structure of the fluid equations. Written in Lagrangian form, these equations are discretized utilizing compatible, control volume differencing with a staggered-grid placement of the spatial variables. The concept of compatibility means that the forces used in the momentum equation to advance velocity are also incorporated into the internal energy equation so that these equations together define the total energy as a quantity that is exactly conserved in time in discrete form. Multiple pressures are utilized in each zone; they produce forces that resist spurious vorticity generation. This difficulty can severely limit the utility of the Lagrangian formulation in two dimensions and make this representation otherwise virtually useless in three dimensions. An edge-centered artificial viscosity whose magnitude is regulated by local velocity gradients is used to capture shocks. The particular difficulty of exactly preserving one-dimensional spherical symmetry in three-dimensional geometry is solved. This problem has both practical and pedagogical significance. The algorithm is suitable for both structured and unstructured grids. Limitations that symmetry preservation imposes on the latter type of grids are delineated.

  18. An Exact, Compressible One-Dimensional Riemann Solver for General, Convex Equations of State

    SciTech Connect

    Kamm, James Russell

    2015-03-05

    This note describes an algorithm with which to compute numerical solutions to the one- dimensional, Cartesian Riemann problem for compressible flow with general, convex equations of state. While high-level descriptions of this approach are to be found in the literature, this note contains most of the necessary details required to write software for this problem. This explanation corresponds to the approach used in the source code that evaluates solutions for the 1D, Cartesian Riemann problem with a JWL equation of state in the ExactPack package [16, 29]. Numerical examples are given with the proposed computational approach for a polytropic equation of state and for the JWL equation of state.

  19. Two-dimensional descent through a compressible atmosphere: Sequential deceleration of an unpowered load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silverman, M. P.

    2010-02-01

    Equations, based on Rayleigh's drag law valid for high Reynolds number, are derived for two-dimensional motion through a compressible atmosphere in isentropic equilibrium, such as characterizes the Earth's troposphere. Solutions yield horizontal and vertical displacement, velocity, and acceleration as a function of altitude and ground-level temperature. An exact analytical solution to the equations linearized in the aero-thermodynamic parameter is given; in general the equations must be solved numerically. The theory, applied to the unpowered fall of a large aircraft stabilized to flat descent by symmetrical, sequential deployment of horizontal and vertical decelerators, shows that such an aircraft can be brought down with mean peak deployment and impact decelerations below 10g.

  20. Numerical solutions of supersonic and hypersonic laminar flows over a two-dimensional compression corner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, C. M.; Maccormack, R. W.

    1975-01-01

    An efficient time-splitting, second-order accurate, numerical scheme is used to solve the complete Navier-Stokes equations for supersonic and hypersonic laminar flow over a two-dimensional compression corner. A fine, exponentially stretched mesh spacing is used in the region near the wall for resolving the viscous layer. Good agreement is obtained between the present computed results and experimental measurement for a Mach number of 14.1, a Reynolds number of 104,000, and wedge angles of 15, 18, and 24 deg. The details of the pressure variation across the boundary layer are given, and a correlation between the leading edge shock and the peaks in surface pressure and heat transfer is observed.

  1. Three-dimensional numerical simulation of a compressible, spatially evolving mixing layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinstein, Fernando F.; Oran, Elaine S.; Hussain, Fazle

    1988-01-01

    The results from three-dimensional finite-difference simulations of a subsonic, spatially evolving mixing layer are presented. The numerical model solves the compressible time-dependent conservation equations for mass, momentum and energy density using the Flux-Corrected Transport algorithm and direction and timestep splitting. The mixing layer was found to be very sensitive to spanwise perturbations of the cross-stream velocity. Streamwise vortices, appearing in counter-rotating pairs, occurred in the region of the braids in response to sinusoidal coherent spanwise perturbations. These vortices are observed as identifiable coherent structures superimposed on the primary spanwise rolls and affecting considerably the vorticity distribution within their cores. Mass-density drops associated with the maxima of spanwise vorticity, were due to the formation and interaction of coherent structures. The growth rate of the mixing layer was observed to be much faster when streamwise vortical structures are present.

  2. Materials science. Assembly of micro/nanomaterials into complex, three-dimensional architectures by compressive buckling.

    PubMed

    Xu, Sheng; Yan, Zheng; Jang, Kyung-In; Huang, Wen; Fu, Haoran; Kim, Jeonghyun; Wei, Zijun; Flavin, Matthew; McCracken, Joselle; Wang, Renhan; Badea, Adina; Liu, Yuhao; Xiao, Dongqing; Zhou, Guoyan; Lee, Jungwoo; Chung, Ha Uk; Cheng, Huanyu; Ren, Wen; Banks, Anthony; Li, Xiuling; Paik, Ungyu; Nuzzo, Ralph G; Huang, Yonggang; Zhang, Yihui; Rogers, John A

    2015-01-09

    Complex three-dimensional (3D) structures in biology (e.g., cytoskeletal webs, neural circuits, and vasculature networks) form naturally to provide essential functions in even the most basic forms of life. Compelling opportunities exist for analogous 3D architectures in human-made devices, but design options are constrained by existing capabilities in materials growth and assembly. We report routes to previously inaccessible classes of 3D constructs in advanced materials, including device-grade silicon. The schemes involve geometric transformation of 2D micro/nanostructures into extended 3D layouts by compressive buckling. Demonstrations include experimental and theoretical studies of more than 40 representative geometries, from single and multiple helices, toroids, and conical spirals to structures that resemble spherical baskets, cuboid cages, starbursts, flowers, scaffolds, fences, and frameworks, each with single- and/or multiple-level configurations. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  3. An experimental investigation of compressible three-dimensional boundary layer flow in annular diffusers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Om, Deepak; Childs, Morris E.

    1987-01-01

    An experimental study is described in which detailed wall pressure measurements have been obtained for compressible three-dimensional unseparated boundary layer flow in annular diffusers with and without normal shock waves. Detailed mean flow-field data were also obtained for the diffuser flow without a shock wave. Two diffuser flows with shock waves were investigated. In one case, the normal shock existed over the complete annulus whereas in the second case, the shock existed over a part of the annulus. The data obtained can be used to validate computational codes for predicting such flow fields. The details of the flow field without the shock wave show flow reversal in the circumferential direction on both inner and outer surfaces. However, there is a lag in the flow reversal between the inner nad the outer surfaces. This is an interesting feature of this flow and should be a good test for the computational codes.

  4. Assembly of micro/nanomaterials into complex, three-dimensional architectures by compressive buckling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Sheng; Yan, Zheng; Jang, Kyung-In; Huang, Wen; Fu, Haoran; Kim, Jeonghyun; Wei, Zijun; Flavin, Matthew; McCracken, Joselle; Wang, Renhan; Badea, Adina; Liu, Yuhao; Xiao, Dongqing; Zhou, Guoyan; Lee, Jungwoo; Chung, Ha Uk; Cheng, Huanyu; Ren, Wen; Banks, Anthony; Li, Xiuling; Paik, Ungyu; Nuzzo, Ralph G.; Huang, Yonggang; Zhang, Yihui; Rogers, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Complex three-dimensional (3D) structures in biology (e.g., cytoskeletal webs, neural circuits, and vasculature networks) form naturally to provide essential functions in even the most basic forms of life. Compelling opportunities exist for analogous 3D architectures in human-made devices, but design options are constrained by existing capabilities in materials growth and assembly. We report routes to previously inaccessible classes of 3D constructs in advanced materials, including device-grade silicon. The schemes involve geometric transformation of 2D micro/nanostructures into extended 3D layouts by compressive buckling. Demonstrations include experimental and theoretical studies of more than 40 representative geometries, from single and multiple helices, toroids, and conical spirals to structures that resemble spherical baskets, cuboid cages, starbursts, flowers, scaffolds, fences, and frameworks, each with single- and/or multiple-level configurations.

  5. A computational parametric study of three-dimensional sidewall compression scramjet inlets at Mach 10

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, Scott D.; Perkins, John N.

    1990-01-01

    A computational parametric study of three-dimensional sidewall compression scramjet inlets has been performed. The parameters considered for the study include the leading edge sweep angle, varied between 30 and 60 degrees, and the cowl position, located at the throat and at two forward positions. Additionally, the effects of laminar and turbulent boundary layers as well as adiabatic and cold wall boundary conditions are assessed. The parametric study is performed for a Mach number of 10 and a unit freestream Reynolds number of 2 x 10 to the 6th/ft at a geometric contraction ratio of 5. Comparisons among the various configurations are made in terms of the gross parameters of mass capture, throat Mach number, total pressure recovery, and area weighted internal pressure ratios, as well as more detailed flow field phenomena comparisons. The inclusion of one 0-deg sweep computation indicates that the leading edge may be swept by up to 30 deg before significant changes in the gross flow field parameters occur. It is found that a 45-deg sweep configuration provides a good compromise of mass capture, total pressure recovery, and internal compression.

  6. Compressed sampling for boundary measurements in three-dimensional electrical impedance tomography.

    PubMed

    Javaherian, Ashkan; Soleimani, Manuchehr

    2013-09-01

    Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) utilizes electrodes on a medium's surface to produce measured data from which the conductivity distribution inside the medium is estimated. For the cases that relocation of electrodes is impractical or no a priori assumptions can be made to optimize the electrodes placement, a large number of electrodes may be needed to cover all possible imaging volume. This may occur in dynamically varying conductivity distribution in 3D EIT. Three-dimensional EIT then requires inverting very large linear systems to calculate the conductivity field, which causes significant problems regarding storage space and reconstruction time in addition to that data acquisition for a large number of electrodes will reduce the achievable frame rate, which is considered as major advantage of EIT imaging. This study proposes an idea to reduce the reconstruction complexity based on the well-known compressed sampling theory. By applying the so-called model-based CoSaMP algorithm to large size data collected by a 256 channel system, the size of forward operator and data acquisition time is reduced to those of a 32 channel system, while accuracy of reconstruction is significantly improved. The results demonstrate great capability of compressed sampling for overriding the challenges arising in 3D EIT.

  7. A head-mounted compressive three-dimensional display system with polarization-dependent focus switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chang-Kun; Moon, Seokil; Lee, Byounghyo; Jeong, Youngmo; Lee, Byoungho

    2016-10-01

    A head-mounted compressive three-dimensional (3D) display system is proposed by combining polarization beam splitter (PBS), fast switching polarization rotator and micro display with high pixel density. According to the polarization state of the image controlled by polarization rotator, optical path of image in the PBS can be divided into transmitted and reflected components. Since optical paths of each image are spatially separated, it is possible to independently focus both images at different depth positions. Transmitted p-polarized and reflected s-polarized images can be focused by convex lens and mirror, respectively. When the focal lengths of the convex lens and mirror are properly determined, two image planes can be located in intended positions. The geometrical relationship is easily modulated by replacement of the components. The fast switching of polarization realizes the real-time operation of multi-focal image planes with a single display panel. Since it is possible to conserve the device characteristic of single panel, the high image quality, reliability and uniformity can be retained. For generating 3D images, layer images for compressive light field display between two image planes are calculated. Since the display panel with high pixel density is adopted, high quality 3D images are reconstructed. In addition, image degradation by diffraction between physically stacked display panels can be mitigated. Simple optical configuration of the proposed system is implemented and the feasibility of the proposed method is verified through experiments.

  8. Biomechanical Property of a Newly Designed Assembly Locking Compression Plate: Three-Dimensional Finite Element Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Da

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we developed and validated a refined three-dimensional finite element model of middle femoral comminuted fracture to compare the biomechanical stability after two kinds of plate fixation: a newly designed assembly locking compression plate (NALCP) and a locking compression plate (LCP). CT data of a male volunteer was converted to middle femoral comminuted fracture finite element analysis model. The fracture was fixated by NALCP and LCP. Stress distributions were observed. Under slow walking load and torsion load, the stress distribution tendency of the two plates was roughly uniform. The anterolateral femur was the tension stress area, and the bone block shifted toward the anterolateral femur. Maximum stress was found on the lateral border of the number 5 countersink of the plate. Under a slow walking load, the NALCP maximum stress was 2.160e+03 MPa and the LCP was 8.561e+02 MPa. Under torsion load, the NALCP maximum stress was 2.260e+03 MPa and the LCP was 6.813e+02 MPa. Based on those results of finite element analysis, the NALCP can provide adequate mechanical stability for comminuted fractures, which would help fixate the bone block and promote bone healing.

  9. On the use of wall functions as boundary conditions for two-dimensional separated compressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viegas, J. R.; Rubesin, M. W.; Horstman, C. C.

    1985-01-01

    A new and improved wall function method for compressible turbulent flows has been developed and tested. This method is applicable to attached and separated flows, to both high- and low-Reynolds number flows, and to flows with adiabatic and nonadiabatic surfaces. This wall function method has been applied to the Launder-Spalding k-epsilon two-equation model of turbulence. The tests consist of comparisons of calculated and experimental results for: (1) an axisymmetrical transonic shock-wave/boundary-wave interaction flow at low Reynolds number in an adiabatic tube, (2) an axisymmetrical high-Reynolds number transonic flow over a nonadiabatic bump, and (3) a two-dimensional supersonic high-Reynolds number flow on a nonadiabatic deflected flap. Each of these experiments had significant regions of flow separation. The calculations are performed with an implicit algorithm that solves the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations. It is shown that the results obtained agree very well with the data for the complex compressible flows tested.

  10. Magnetic dynamo action in two-dimensional turbulent magneto-hydrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fyfe, D.; Joyce, G.; Montgomery, D.

    1976-01-01

    Two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic turbulence is explored by means of numerical simulation. Previous analytical theory, based on non-dissipative constants of the motion in a truncated Fourier representation, is verified by following the evolution of highly non-equilibrium initial conditions numerically. Dynamo action (conversion of a significant fraction of turbulent kinetic energy into long-wavelength magnetic field energy) is observed. It is conjectured that in the presence of dissipation and external forcing, a dual cascade will be observed for zero-helicity situations. Energy will cascade to higher wave numbers simultaneously with a cascade of mean square vector potential to lower wave numbers, leading to an omni-directional magnetic energy spectrum which varies as 1/k 3 at lower wave numbers, simultaneously with a buildup of magnetic excitation at the lowest wave number of the system. Equipartition of kinetic and magnetic energies is expected at the highest wave numbers in the system.

  11. GENESIS: A High-Resolution Code for Three-dimensional Relativistic Hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aloy, M. A.; Ibáñez, J. M.; Martí, J. M.; Müller, E.

    1999-05-01

    The main features of a three-dimensional, high-resolution special relativistic hydro code based on relativistic Riemann solvers are described. The capabilities and performance of the code are discussed. In particular, we present the results of extensive test calculations that demonstrate that the code can accurately and efficiently handle strong shocks in three spatial dimensions. Results of the performance of the code on single and multiprocessor machines are given. Simulations (in double precision) with <=7×106 computational cells require less than 1 Gbyte of RAM memory and ~7×10-5 CPU s per zone and time step (on a SCI Cray-Origin 2000 with a R10000 processor). Currently, a version of the numerical code is under development, which is suited for massively parallel computers with distributed memory architecture (such as, e.g., Cray T3E).

  12. Smoothed particle hydrodynamics method applied to pulsatile flow inside a rigid two-dimensional model of left heart cavity.

    PubMed

    Shahriari, S; Kadem, L; Rogers, B D; Hassan, I

    2012-11-01

    This paper aims to extend the application of smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), a meshfree particle method, to simulate flow inside a model of the heart's left ventricle (LV). This work is considered the first attempt to simulate flow inside a heart cavity using a meshfree particle method. Simulating this kind of flow, characterized by high pulsatility and moderate Reynolds number using SPH is challenging. As a consequence, validation of the computational code using benchmark cases is required prior to simulating the flow inside a model of the LV. In this work, this is accomplished by simulating an unsteady oscillating flow (pressure amplitude: A = 2500 N ∕ m(3) and Womersley number: W(o)  = 16) and the steady lid-driven cavity flow (Re = 3200, 5000). The results are compared against analytical solutions and reference data to assess convergence. Then, both benchmark cases are combined and a pulsatile jet in a cavity is simulated and the results are compared with the finite volume method. Here, an approach to deal with inflow and outflow boundary conditions is introduced. Finally, pulsatile inlet flow in a rigid model of the LV is simulated. The results demonstrate the ability of SPH to model complex cardiovascular flows and to track the history of fluid properties. Some interesting features of SPH are also demonstrated in this study, including the relation between particle resolution and sound speed to control compressibility effects and also order of convergence in SPH simulations, which is consistently demonstrated to be between first-order and second-order at the moderate Reynolds numbers investigated.

  13. Radiation hydrodynamics modeling of the highest compression inertial confinement fusion ignition experiment from the National Ignition Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, D. S.; Marinak, M. M.; Weber, C. R.; Eder, D. C.; Haan, S. W.; Hammel, B. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Jones, O. S.; Milovich, J. L.; Patel, P. K.; Robey, H. F.; Salmonson, J. D.; Sepke, S. M.; Thomas, C. A.

    2015-02-01

    The recently completed National Ignition Campaign (NIC) on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) showed significant discrepancies between post-shot simulations of implosion performance and experimentally measured performance, particularly in thermonuclear yield. This discrepancy between simulation and observation persisted despite concerted efforts to include all of the known sources of performance degradation within a reasonable two-dimensional (2-D), and even three-dimensional (3-D), simulation model, e.g., using measured surface imperfections and radiation drives adjusted to reproduce observed implosion trajectories [Clark et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 056318 (2013)]. Since the completion of the NIC, several effects have been identified that could explain these discrepancies and that were omitted in previous simulations. In particular, there is now clear evidence for larger than anticipated long-wavelength radiation drive asymmetries and a larger than expected perturbation seeded by the capsule support tent. This paper describes an updated suite of one-dimensional (1-D), 2-D, and 3-D simulations that include the current best understanding of these effects identified since the NIC, as applied to a specific NIC shot. The relative importance of each effect on the experimental observables is compared. In combination, these effects reduce the simulated-to-measured yield ratio from 125:1 in 1-D to 1.5:1 in 3-D, as compared to 15:1 in the best 2-D simulations published previously. While the agreement with the experimental data remains imperfect, the comparison to the data is significantly improved and suggests that the largest sources for the previous discrepancies between simulation and experiment are now being included.

  14. Two-dimensional hydrodynamic calculations of the nonlinear development of the Goldreich-Schubert-Fricke instability in a rotating annulus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korycansky, D. G.

    1991-01-01

    Two-dimensional nonlinear hydrodynamic calculations are presented which may help assess the effectiveness of the instability in transporting angular momentum in the equatorial zones of stars and planets which are stably stratified with respect to convection. The calculations were made by numerically integrating the 2D axisymmetric Navier-Stokes equations, including viscosity and heat conduction. The instability was followed into the nonlinear regime. The maximum rms velocity amplitude was found to correlate well with the product of the linear growth rate and radial length scale of the instability, consistent with the idea that the instability grows to an amplitude such that an eddy turnover time becomes equal to the growth time defined by the inverse of the growth rate. The time scale for angular momentum to be redistributed to a state of marginal stability was consistent with this picture. The results suggest that in physical situations a state of marginal stability will be maintained, since departures from such a state will be rapidly corrected.

  15. General-Relativistic Three-Dimensional Multi-group Neutrino Radiation-Hydrodynamics Simulations of Core-Collapse Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Luke F.; Ott, Christian D.; Haas, Roland; O'Connor, Evan P.; Diener, Peter; Schnetter, Erik

    2016-11-01

    We report on a set of long-term general-relativistic three-dimensional (3D) multi-group (energy-dependent) neutrino radiation-hydrodynamics simulations of core-collapse supernovae. We employ a full 3D two-moment scheme with the local M1 closure, three neutrino species, and 12 energy groups per species. With this, we follow the post-core-bounce evolution of the core of a nonrotating 27 - {M}⊙ progenitor in full unconstrained 3D and in octant symmetry for ≳380 ms. We find the development of an asymmetric runaway explosion in our unconstrained simulation. We test the resolution dependence of our results and, in agreement with previous work, find that low resolution artificially aids explosion and leads to an earlier runaway expansion of the shock. At low resolution, the octant and full 3D dynamics are qualitatively very similar, but at high resolution, only the full 3D simulation exhibits the onset of explosion.

  16. Two-dimensional hydrodynamic calculations of the nonlinear development of the Goldreich-Schubert-Fricke instability in a rotating annulus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korycansky, D. G.

    1991-01-01

    Two-dimensional nonlinear hydrodynamic calculations are presented which may help assess the effectiveness of the instability in transporting angular momentum in the equatorial zones of stars and planets which are stably stratified with respect to convection. The calculations were made by numerically integrating the 2D axisymmetric Navier-Stokes equations, including viscosity and heat conduction. The instability was followed into the nonlinear regime. The maximum rms velocity amplitude was found to correlate well with the product of the linear growth rate and radial length scale of the instability, consistent with the idea that the instability grows to an amplitude such that an eddy turnover time becomes equal to the growth time defined by the inverse of the growth rate. The time scale for angular momentum to be redistributed to a state of marginal stability was consistent with this picture. The results suggest that in physical situations a state of marginal stability will be maintained, since departures from such a state will be rapidly corrected.

  17. Three-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamics calculations of the envelopes of young planets embedded in protoplanetary disks

    SciTech Connect

    D'Angelo, Gennaro; Bodenheimer, Peter E-mail: peter@ucolick.org

    2013-11-20

    We perform global three-dimensional (3D) radiation-hydrodynamics calculations of the envelopes surrounding young planetary cores of 5, 10, and 15 Earth masses, located in a protoplanetary disk at 5 and 10 AU from a solar-mass star. We apply a nested-grid technique to resolve the thermodynamics of the disk at the orbital-radius length scale and that of the envelope at the core-radius length scale. The gas is modeled as a solar mixture of molecular and atomic hydrogen, helium, and their ions. The equation of state accounts for both gas and radiation, and gas energy includes contributions from rotational and vibrational states of molecular hydrogen and from ionization of atomic species. Dust opacities are computed from first principles, applying the full Mie theory. One-dimensional (1D) calculations of planet formation are used to supplement the 3D calculations by providing energy deposition rates in the envelope due to solids accretion. We compare 1D and 3D envelopes and find that masses and gas accretion rates agree within factors of 2, and so do envelope temperatures. The trajectories of passive tracers are used to define the size of 3D envelopes, resulting in radii much smaller than the Hill radius and smaller than the Bondi radius. The moments of inertia and angular momentum of the envelopes are determined and the rotation rates are derived from the rigid-body approximation, resulting in slow bulk rotation. We find that the polar flattening is ≲ 0.05. The dynamics of the accretion flow are examined by tracking the motion of tracers that move into the envelope. The anisotropy of this flow is characterized in terms of both its origin and impact site at the envelope surface. Gas merges with the envelope preferentially at mid- to high latitudes.

  18. Assessing factors affecting the thermal properties of a passive thermal refuge using three-dimensional hydrodynamic flow and transport modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Decker, Jeremy D.; Swain, Eric D.; Stith, Bradley M.; Langtimm, Catherine A.

    2013-01-01

    Everglades restoration activities may cause changes to temperature and salinity stratification at the Port of the Islands (POI) marina, which could affect its suitability as a cold weather refuge for manatees. To better understand how the Picayune Strand Restoration Project (PSRP) may alter this important resource in Collier County in southwestern Florida, the USGS has developed a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model for the marina and canal system at POI. Empirical data suggest that manatees aggregate at the site during winter because of thermal inversions that provide warmer water near the bottom that appears to only occur in the presence of salinity stratification. To study these phenomena, the environmental fluid dynamics code simulator was used to represent temperature and salinity transport within POI. Boundary inputs were generated using a larger two-dimensional model constructed with the flow and transport in a linked overland-aquifer density-dependent system simulator. Model results for a representative winter period match observed trends in salinity and temperature fluctuations and produce temperature inversions similar to observed values. Modified boundary conditions, representing proposed PSRP alterations, were also tested to examine the possible effect on the salinity stratification and temperature inversion within POI. Results show that during some periods, salinity stratification is reduced resulting in a subsequent reduction in temperature inversion compared with the existing conditions simulation. This may have an effect on POI’s suitability as a passive thermal refuge for manatees and other temperature-sensitive species. Additional testing was completed to determine the important physical relationships affecting POI’s suitability as a refuge.

  19. Numerical study of one-dimensional compression of granular materials. II. Elastic moduli, stresses, and microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalili, Mohamed Hassan; Roux, Jean-Noël; Pereira, Jean-Michel; Brisard, Sébastien; Bornert, Michel

    2017-03-01

    The elastic moduli of a transversely isotropic model granular material, made of slightly polydisperse elastic-frictional spherical beads, in equilibrium along a one-dimensional (oedometric) compression path, as described in the companion paper [M. H. Khalili et al., Phys. Rev. E 95, 032907 (2017)], 10.1103/PhysRevE.95.032907, are investigated by numerical simulations. The relations of the five independent moduli to stresses, density, coordination number, fabric and force anisotropies are studied for different internal material states along the oedometric loading path. It is observed that elastic moduli, as in isotropic packs, are primarily determined by the coordination number, with anomalously small shear moduli in poorly coordinated systems, whatever their density. Such states also exhibit faster increasing moduli in compression, and larger off-diagonal moduli and Poisson ratios. Anisotropy affects the longitudinal moduli C11 in the axial direction and C22 in the transverse directions, and the shear modulus in the transverse plane C44, more than the shear modulus in a plane containing the axial direction C55. The results are compared to available experiments on anisotropic bead packs, revealing, despite likely differences in internal states, a very similar range of stiffness level (linked to coordination), and semiquantitative agreement as regards the influence of anisotropy. Effective medium theory (the Voigt approach) provides quite inaccurate predictions of the moduli. It also significantly underestimates ratios C11/C22 (varying between 1 and 2.2) and C55/C44 (varying from 1 to 1.6), which characterize elastic anisotropy, except in relatively weakly anisotropic states. The bulk modulus for isotropic compression and the compliance corresponding to stress increments proportional to the previous stress values are the only elastic coefficients to be correctly estimated by available predictive relations. We discuss the influences of fabric and force anisotropies

  20. Compressed-Sensing Accelerated 3-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Cholangiopancreatography: Application in Suspected Pancreatic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Liang; Wu, Xi; Sun, Zhaoyong; Jin, Zhengyu; Weiland, Elisabeth; Raithel, Esther; Qian, Tianyi; Xue, Huadan

    2017-09-26

    The aims of this study were to prospectively evaluate image quality, duct visibility, and diagnostic performance in duct-related pathologies of compressed-sensing (CS) accelerated 3-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) prototype protocols and compare these with those of conventional 3D MRCP protocol in patients with suspected pancreatic diseases. The institutional review board approved this prospective study and all patients provided written informed consent. A total of 80 patients (47 men and 33 women; median age, 57 years; age range, 24-87 years) underwent 3D MRCP at 3.0 T. Three protocols were performed in each patient in random order: CS breath-hold (BH) protocol, CS navigator-triggered (NT) protocol, and conventional NT protocol. The acquisition time of each protocol was recorded. Image quality and duct visibility were independently rated in random order on a 5-point scale by 2 radiologists, who were blinded to the protocols. Receiver operating characteristic curves were generated, and area under the curve (Az value) was used to compare the diagnostic performance of each protocol in duct-related pathologies. Acquisition time was 17 seconds for the CS-BH and 134.1 ± 33.5 seconds for the CS-NT protocol, both being significantly shorter than the conventional NT protocol (364.7 ± 78.4 seconds; both P < 0.01). The CS-BH MRCP protocol showed significantly less artifacts compared with the CS-NT and conventional NT protocols (both P < 0.01). Visualization of bile ducts was comparable in all 3 protocols, whereas CS-NT and conventional NT MRCP depicted pancreatic duct better than CS-BH MRCP did (for proximal, middle, and distal segment; all P < 0.05). Compressed-sensing-NT MRCP had the highest diagnostic performance for detecting ductal anomalies, long-segment duct stenosis, abnormal branch ducts, and communication between cystic lesion and pancreatic duct (mean Az value, 0.943-0.983). Compressed-sensing MRCP is feasible in patients with

  1. A multi-dimensional finite volume cell-centered direct ALE solver for hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clair, G.; Ghidaglia, J.-M.; Perlat, J.-P.

    2016-12-01

    In this paper we describe a second order multi-dimensional scheme, belonging to the class of direct Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) methods, for the solution of non-linear hyperbolic systems of conservation law. The scheme is constructed upon a cell-centered explicit Lagrangian solver completed with an edge-based upwinded formulation of the numerical fluxes, computed from the MUSCL-Hancock method, to obtain a full ALE formulation. Numerical fluxes depend on nodal grid velocities which are either set or computed to avoid most of the mesh problems typically encountered in purely Lagrangian simulations. In order to assess the robustness of the scheme, most results proposed in this paper have been obtained by computing the grid velocities as a fraction of the Lagrangian nodal velocities, the ratio being set before running the test case. The last part of the paper describes preliminary results about the triple point test case run in the ALE framework by computing the grid velocities with the fully adaptive Large Eddy Limitation (L.E.L.) method proposed in [1]. Such a method automatically computes the grid velocities at each node defining the mesh from the local characteristics of the flow. We eventually discuss the advantages and the drawback of the coupling.

  2. On one-dimensional compressible Navier-Stokes equations for a reacting mixture in unbounded domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Siran

    2017-10-01

    In this paper we consider the one-dimensional Navier-Stokes system for a heat-conducting, compressible reacting mixture which describes the dynamic combustion of fluids of mixed kinds on unbounded domains. This model has been discussed on bounded domains by Chen (SIAM J Math Anal 23:609-634, 1992) and Chen-Hoff-Trivisa (Arch Ration Mech Anal 166:321-358, 2003), among others, in which the reaction rate function is a discontinuous function obeying the Arrhenius' law of thermodynamics. We prove the global existence of weak solutions to this model on one-dimensional unbounded domains with large initial data in H^1. Moreover, the large-time behaviour of the weak solution is identified. In particular, the uniform-in-time bounds for the temperature and specific volume have been established via energy estimates. For this purpose we utilise techniques developed by Kazhikhov-Shelukhin (cf. Kazhikhov in Siber Math J 23:44-49, 1982; Solonnikov and Kazhikhov in Annu Rev Fluid Mech 13:79-95, 1981) and refined by Jiang (Commun Math Phys 200:181-193, 1999, Proc R Soc Edinb Sect A 132:627-638, 2002), as well as a crucial estimate in the recent work by Li-Liang (Arch Ration Mech Anal 220:1195-1208, 2016). Several new estimates are also established, in order to treat the unbounded domain and the reacting terms.

  3. Hyperspectral image compression using low complexity integer KLT and three-dimensional asymmetric significance tree

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jing; Zhu, Rihong

    2009-08-01

    A lossy to lossless three-dimensional (3D) compression of hyperspectral images is presented. On the spectral dimension, a low complexity reversible integer Karhunen-Loève transform (KLT) is used to fully exploit the spectral redundancy, while two-dimensional spatial combinative lifting algorithm (SCLA)-based integer wavelet transform is applied on the spatial dimension. At the low complexity KLT, the calculation processing of covariance matrix is carried out on a subset of vectors that is pseudorandomly selected from the complete set of spectral vectors. The transform matrix is factorized into triangular elementary reversible matrices (TERM) for reversible integer mapping and the lifting scheme is applied to implement integer KLT. The 3D asymmetric significance tree structure is then constructed from the 3D asymmetric orientation tree in 3D transformed domain. Each coefficient is then encoded by the significance test of the 3D asymmetric significance tree node at each bitplane instead of ordered lists to track the significance status of the tree or block sets and coefficients. This algorithm has low complexity and can be applied to lossy to lossless progressive transmission.

  4. Calibration of a two-dimensional hydrodynamic model for parts of the Allegheny, Monongahela, and Ohio Rivers, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fulton, John W.; Wagner, Chad R.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Allegheny County Sanitary Authority, developed a validated two-dimensional Resource Management Associates2 (RMA2) hydrodynamic model of parts of the Allegheny, Monongahela, and Ohio Rivers (Three Rivers) to help assess the effects of combined sewer overflows (CSOs) and sanitary sewer overflows (SSOs) on the rivers. The hydrodynamic model was used to drive a water-quality model of the study area that was capable of simulating the transport and fate of fecal-indicator bacteria and chemical constituents under open-water conditions. The study area includes 14 tributary streams and parts of the Three Rivers where they enter and exit Allegheny County, an area of approximately 730 square miles (mi2). The city of Pittsburgh is near the center of the county, where the Allegheny and Monongahela Rivers join to form the headwaters of the Ohio River. The Three Rivers are regulated by a series of fixed-crest dams, gated dams, and radial (tainter) gates and serve as the receiving waters for tributary streams, CSOs, and SSOs. The RMA2 model was separated into four individual segments on the basis of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers navigational pools in the study area (Dashields; Emsworth; Allegheny River, Pool 2; and Braddock), which were calibrated individually using measured water-surface slope, velocity, and discharge during high- and low-flow conditions. The model calibration process included the comparison of water-surface elevations at five locations and velocity profiles at more than 80 cross sections in the study area. On the basis of the calibration and validation results that included water-surface elevations and velocities, the model is a representative simulation of the Three Rivers flow patterns for discharges ranging from 4,050 to 47,400 cubic feet per second (ft3/s) on the Allegheny River, 2,550 to 40,000 ft3/s on the Monongahela River, and 10,900 to 99,000 ft3/s on the Ohio River. The Monongahela River was

  5. Weighted Iterative Bayesian Compressive Sensing (WIBCS) for High Dimensional Polynomial Surrogate Construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargsyan, K.; Ricciuto, D. M.; Safta, C.; Debusschere, B.; Najm, H. N.; Thornton, P. E.

    2016-12-01

    Surrogate construction has become a routine procedure when facing computationally intensive studies requiring multiple evaluations of complex models. In particular, surrogate models, otherwise called emulators or response surfaces, replace complex models in uncertainty quantification (UQ) studies, including uncertainty propagation (forward UQ) and parameter estimation (inverse UQ). Further, surrogates based on Polynomial Chaos (PC) expansions are especially convenient for forward UQ and global sensitivity analysis, also known as variance-based decomposition. However, the PC surrogate construction strongly suffers from the curse of dimensionality. With a large number of input parameters, the number of model simulations required for accurate surrogate construction is prohibitively large. Relatedly, non-adaptive PC expansions typically include infeasibly large number of basis terms far exceeding the number of available model evaluations. We develop Weighted Iterative Bayesian Compressive Sensing (WIBCS) algorithm for adaptive basis growth and PC surrogate construction leading to a sparse, high-dimensional PC surrogate with a very few model evaluations. The surrogate is then readily employed for global sensitivity analysis leading to further dimensionality reduction. Besides numerical tests, we demonstrate the construction on the example of Accelerated Climate Model for Energy (ACME) Land Model for several output QoIs at nearly 100 FLUXNET sites covering multiple plant functional types and climates, varying 65 input parameters over broad ranges of possible values. This work is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Biological and Environmental Research, Accelerated Climate Modeling for Energy (ACME) project. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration

  6. Code Development of Three-Dimensional General Relativistic Hydrodynamics with AMR (Adaptive-Mesh Refinement) and Results from Special and General Relativistic Hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dönmez, Orhan

    2004-09-01

    In this paper, the general procedure to solve the general relativistic hydrodynamical (GRH) equations with adaptive-mesh refinement (AMR) is presented. In order to achieve, the GRH equations are written in the conservation form to exploit their hyperbolic character. The numerical solutions of GRH equations are obtained by high resolution shock Capturing schemes (HRSC), specifically designed to solve nonlinear hyperbolic systems of conservation laws. These schemes depend on the characteristic information of the system. The Marquina fluxes with MUSCL left and right states are used to solve GRH equations. First, different test problems with uniform and AMR grids on the special relativistic hydrodynamics equations are carried out to verify the second-order convergence of the code in one, two and three dimensions. Results from uniform and AMR grid are compared. It is found that adaptive grid does a better job when the number of resolution is increased. Second, the GRH equations are tested using two different test problems which are Geodesic flow and Circular motion of particle In order to do this, the flux part of GRH equations is coupled with source part using Strang splitting. The coupling of the GRH equations is carried out in a treatment which gives second order accurate solutions in space and time.

  7. Classification of neurovascular compression in glossopharyngeal neuralgia: Three-dimensional visualization of the glossopharyngeal nerve

    PubMed Central

    Tanrikulu, Levent; Hastreiter, Peter; Dörfler, Arnd; Buchfelder, Michael; Naraghi, Ramin

    2015-01-01

    Background: We introduce a method of noninvasive topographical analysis of the neurovascular relationships of the glossopharyngeal nerve (CN IX) by three-dimensional (3D) visualization. Patients with glossopharyngeal neuralgia (GN) resulting from neurovascular compression (NVC) were studied. Methods: 15 patients with GN were prospectively examined with 3D visualization using high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging with constructive interference in steady state (MR-CISS). The datasets were segmented and visualized with the real, individual neurovascular relationships by direct volume rendering. Segmentation and 3D visualization of the CN IX and corresponding blood vessels were performed. The 3D visualizations were interactively compared with the intraoperative setup during microvascular decompression (MVD) in order to verify the results by the observed surgical-anatomical findings. Results: 15 patients (female/male: 5/10) were examined. All of them underwent MVD (100%). Microvascular details were documented. The posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) was the most common causative vessel in 12 of 15 patients (80%), the vertebral artery (VA) alone in one case (6.7%), and the combination of compression by the VA and PICA in 3 patients (13.3%). We identified three distinct types of NVC within the root entry zone of CN IX. Conclusion: 3D visualization by direct volume rendering of MR-CISS data offers the opportunity of noninvasive exploration and anatomical categorization of the CN IX. It proves to be advantageous in supporting to establish the diagnosis and microneurosurgical interventions by representing original, individual patient data in a 3D fashion. It provides an excellent global individual view over the entire neurovascular relationships of the brainstem and corresponding nerves in each case. PMID:26759734

  8. Enhancement of four-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography by compressed sensing with Bregman iteration.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kihwan; Fahimian, Benjamin P; Li, Tianfang; Suh, Tae-Suk; Lei, Xing

    2013-01-01

    In four-dimensional (4D) cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT), there is a spatio-temporal tradeoff that currently limits the accuracy. The aim of this study is to develop a Bregman iteration based formalism for high quality 4D CBCT image reconstruction from a limited number of low-dose projections. The 4D CBCT problem is first divided into multiple 3D CBCT subproblems by grouping the projection images corresponding to the phases. To maximally utilize the information from the under-sampled projection data, a compressed sensing (CS) method with Bregman iterations is employed for solving each subproblem. We formulate an unconstrained optimization problem based on least-square criterion regularized by total-variation. The least-square criterion reflects the inconsistency between the measured and the estimated line integrals. Furthermore, the unconstrained problem is updated and solved repeatedly by Bregman iterations. The performance of the proposed algorithm is demonstrated through a series of simulation studies and phantom experiments, and the results are compared to those of previously implemented compressed sensing technique using other gradient-based methods as well as conventional filtered back-projection (FBP) results. The simulation and experimental studies have shown that artifact suppressed images can be obtained with as small as 41 projections per phase, which is adequate for clinical 4D CBCT reconstruction. With such small number of projections, the conventional FDK failed to yield meaningful 4D CBCT images, and CS technique using conjugate gradient was not able to recover sharp edges. The proposed method significantly reduces the radiation dose and scanning time to achieve the high quality images compared to the 4D CBCT imaging based on the conventional FDK technique and the existing CS techniques.

  9. X-ray radiographic imaging of hydrodynamic phenomena in radiation driven materials -- shock propagation, material compression and shear flow. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Hammel, B.A.; Kilkenny, J.D.; Munro, D.; Remington, B.A.; Kornblum, H.N.; Perry, T.S.; Phillion, D.W.; Wallace, R.J.

    1994-02-01

    One- and two-dimensional, time resolved x-ray radiographic imaging at high photon energy (5-7 keV) is used to study shock propagation, material motion and compression, and the effects of shear flow in solid density samples which are driven by x-ray ablation with the Nova laser. By backlighting the samples with x-rays and observing the increase in sample areal density due to shock compression, the authors directly measure the trajectory of strong shocks ({approx}40 Mbar) in flight, in solid density plastic samples. Doping a section of the samples with high-Z material (Br) provides radiographic contrast, allowing the measurement of the shock induced particle motion. Instability growth due to shear flow at an interface is investigated by imbedding a metal wire in a cylindrical plastic sample and launching a shock in the axial direction. Time resolved radiographic measurements are made with either a slit-imager coupled to an x-ray streak camera or a pinhole camera coupled to a gated microchannel plate detector, providing {approx} 10-{mu}m spatial and {approx} 100-ps temporal resolution.

  10. THREE-DIMENSIONAL HYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS OF MULTIPHASE GALACTIC DISKS WITH STAR FORMATION FEEDBACK. I. REGULATION OF STAR FORMATION RATES

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Chang-Goo; Ostriker, Eve C.; Kim, Woong-Tae E-mail: eco@astro.princeton.edu

    2013-10-10

    The energy and momentum feedback from young stars has a profound impact on the interstellar medium (ISM), including heating and driving turbulence in the neutral gas that fuels future star formation. Recent theory has argued that this leads to a quasi-equilibrium self-regulated state, and for outer atomic-dominated disks results in the surface density of star formation Σ{sub SFR} varying approximately linearly with the weight of the ISM (or midplane turbulent + thermal pressure). We use three-dimensional numerical hydrodynamic simulations to test the theoretical predictions for thermal, turbulent, and vertical dynamical equilibrium, and the implied functional dependence of Σ{sub SFR} on local disk properties. Our models demonstrate that all equilibria are established rapidly, and that the expected proportionalities between mean thermal and turbulent pressures and Σ{sub SFR} apply. For outer disk regions, this results in Σ{sub SFR}∝Σ√(ρ{sub sd}), where Σ is the total gas surface density and ρ{sub sd} is the midplane density of the stellar disk (plus dark matter). This scaling law arises because ρ{sub sd} sets the vertical dynamical time in our models (and outer disk regions generally). The coefficient in the star formation law varies inversely with the specific energy and momentum yield from massive stars. We find proportions of warm and cold atomic gas, turbulent-to-thermal pressure, and mean velocity dispersions that are consistent with solar-neighborhood and other outer disk observations. This study confirms the conclusions of a previous set of simulations, which incorporated the same physics treatment but was restricted to radial-vertical slices through the ISM.

  11. Three-dimensional hydrodynamic modeling of SN 1987A from the supernova explosion till the Athena era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlando, Salvatore

    2016-06-01

    The proximity of SN 1987A and the wealth of observations collected at all wavelenght bands since its outburst allow us to study in details the evolution of a supernova remnant (SNR) from the immediate aftermath of the SN explosion till its expansion through the highly inhomogeneous circumstellar medium (CSM). We investigate the interaction between SN 1987A and the surrounding CSM through three-dimensional hydrodynamic modeling. The aim is to determine the contribution of shocked ejecta and shocked CSM to the detected X-ray flux and to derive the density structure of the inhomogeneous CSM and clues on the early structure of ejecta. We show that the physical model reproducing the main observables of SN 1987A reproduces also the X-ray emission of the subsequent expanding remnant, thus bridging the gap between supernovae and supernova remnants. By comparing model results with observations, we constrain the explosion energy in the range 1.2 - 1.4 × 10^(51) erg and the envelope mass in the range 15 - 17 M_{⊙}) . We find that the shape of X-ray lightcurves and spectra at early epochs (< 15 years) reflect the structure of outer ejecta. At later epochs, the shape of X-ray lightcurves and spectra reflect the density structure of the nebula around SN 1987A. This enabled us to ascertain the origin of the multi-thermal X-ray emission, to disentangle the imprint of the supernova on the remnant emission from the effects of the remnant interaction with the environment, and to constrain the pre-supernova structure of the nebula. Finally the remnant evolution is followed for 40 years, providing predictions on the future of SN 1987A until the adventof Athena.

  12. WIND- THREE DIMENSIONAL POTENTIAL COMPRESSIBLE FLOW ABOUT WIND TURBINE ROTOR BLADES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dulikravich, D. S.

    1994-01-01

    This computer program, WIND, was developed to numerically solve the exact, full-potential equation for three-dimensional, steady, inviscid flow through an isolated wind turbine rotor. The program automatically generates a three-dimensional, boundary-conforming grid and iteratively solves the full-potential equation while fully accounting for both the rotating and Coriolis effects. WIND is capable of numerically analyzing the flow field about a given blade shape of the horizontal-axis type wind turbine. The rotor hub is assumed representable by a doubly infinite circular cylinder. An arbitrary number of blades may be attached to the hub and these blades may have arbitrary spanwise distributions of taper and of the twist, sweep, and dihedral angles. An arbitrary number of different airfoil section shapes may be used along the span as long as the spanwise variation of all the geometeric parameters is reasonably smooth. The numerical techniques employed in WIND involve rotated, type-dependent finite differencing, a finite volume method, artificial viscosity in conservative form, and a successive overrelaxation combined with the sequential grid refinement procedure to accelerate the iterative convergence rate. Consequently, WIND is cabable of accurately analyzing incompressible and compressible flows, including those that are locally transonic and terminated by weak shocks. Along with the three-dimensional results, WIND provides the results of the two-dimensional calculations to aid the user in locating areas of possible improvement in the aerodynamic design of the blade. Output from WIND includes the chordwise distribution of the coefficient of pressure, the Mach number, the density, and the relative velocity components at spanwise stations along the blade. In addition, the results specify local values of the lift coefficient and the tangent and axial aerodynamic force components. These are also given in integrated form expressing the total torque and the total axial

  13. A three-dimensional hydrodynamical line profile analysis of iron lines and barium isotopes in HD 140283

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, A. J.; Ludwig, H.-G.; Ryan, S. G.; Aoki, W.

    2015-07-01

    Context. Heavy-elements, i.e. those beyond the iron peak, mostly form via two neutron capture processes: the slow (s-) and the rapid (r-) process. Metal-poor stars should contain fewer isotopes that form via the s-process, according to currently accepted theory. It has been shown in several investigations that theory and observation do not agree well, raising questions on the validity of either the methodology or the theory. Aims: We analyse the metal-poor star HD 140283, for which we have a high quality spectrum. We test whether a three-dimensional (3D) local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) stellar atmosphere and spectrum synthesis code permits a more reliable analysis of the iron abundance and barium isotope ratio than a one-dimensional (1D) LTE analysis. Methods: Using 3D hydrodynamical model atmospheres, we examine 91 iron lines of varying strength and formation depth. This provides us with the star's rotational speed. With this, we model the barium isotope ratio by exploiting the hyperfine structure of the singly ionised 4554 Å resonance line, and study the impact of the uncertainties in the stellar parameters. Results: The star's rotational speed was found to be 1.65 ± 0.05 km s-1. Barium isotopes under the 3D paradigm show a dominant r-process signature as 77 ± 6 ± 17% (fodd = 0.38 ± 0.02 ± 0.06) of barium isotopes form via the r-process, where errors represent the assigned random and systematic errors, respectively. We find that 3D LTE fits reproduce iron line profiles better than those in 1D, but do not provide a unique abundance (within the uncertainties). However, we demonstrate that the isotopic ratio is robust against this shortcoming. Conclusions: Our barium isotope result agrees well with currently accepted theory regarding the formation of the heavy-elements during the early Galaxy. The improved fit to the asymmetric iron line profiles suggests that the current state of 3D LTE modelling provides excellent simulations of fluid flows. However

  14. Application of the Analogy Between Water Flow with a Free Surface and Two-Dimensional Compressible Gas Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orlin, W James; Lindner, Norman J; Butterly, Jack G

    1947-01-01

    The theory of the hydraulic analogy -- that is, the analogy between water flow with a free surface and two-dimensional compressible gas flow -- and the limitations and conditions of the analogy are discussed. A test was run using the hydraulic analogy as applied to the flow about circular cylinders of various diameters at subsonic velocities extending into the supercritical range. The apparatus and techniques used in this application are described and criticized. Reasonably satisfactory agreement of pressure distributions and flow fields existed between water and air flow about corresponding bodies. This agreement indicated the possibility of extending experimental compressibility research by new methods.

  15. A Computer Program for Calculating Three-Dimensional Compressible Laminar and Turbulent Boundary Layers on Arbitrary Wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cebeci, T.; Kaups, K.; Ramsey, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    A computer program for calculating three dimensional compressible laminar and turbulent boundary layers on arbitrary wings is described and presented. The computer program consists of three separate programs, namely, a geometry program to represent the wing analytically, a velocity program to compute the external velocity components from a given experimental pressure distribution and a finite difference boundary layer method to solve the governing equations for compressible flows. To illustrate the usage of the computer program, three different test cases are presented and the preparation of the input data as well as the computed output data is discussed in some detail.

  16. COSAL: A black-box compressible stability analysis code for transition prediction in three-dimensional boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malik, M. R.

    1982-01-01

    A fast computer code COSAL for transition prediction in three dimensional boundary layers using compressible stability analysis is described. The compressible stability eigenvalue problem is solved using a finite difference method, and the code is a black box in the sense that no guess of the eigenvalue is required from the user. Several optimization procedures were incorporated into COSAL to calculate integrated growth rates (N factor) for transition correlation for swept and tapered laminar flow control wings using the well known e to the Nth power method. A user's guide to the program is provided.

  17. Application of the Analogy Between Water Flow with a Free Surface and Two-dimensional Compressible Gas Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orlin, W James; Lindner, Norman J; Bitterly, Jack G

    1947-01-01

    The theory of hydraulic analogy, that is, the analogy between water flow with a free surface and two-dimensional compressible gas flow and the limitations and conditions of the analogy are discussed. A test run was made using the hydraulic analogy as applied to the flow about circular cylinders at various diameters at subsonic velocities extending to the super critical range. The apparatus and techniques used in this application are described and criticized. Reasonably satisfactory agreement of pressure distributions and flow fields existed between water and airflow about corresponding bodies. This agreement indicated the possibility of extending experimental compressibility research by new methods.

  18. Virtual viewpoint generation for three-dimensional display based on the compressive light field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Qiao; Sang, Xinzhu; Chen, Duo; Guo, Nan; Yan, Binbin; Yu, Chongxiu; Dou, Wenhua; Xiao, Liquan

    2016-10-01

    Virtual view-point generation is one of the key technologies the three-dimensional (3D) display, which renders the new scene image perspective with the existing viewpoints. The three-dimensional scene information can be effectively recovered at different viewing angles to allow users to switch between different views. However, in the process of multiple viewpoints matching, when N free viewpoints are received, we need to match N viewpoints each other, namely matching C 2N = N(N-1)/2 times, and even in the process of matching different baselines errors can occur. To address the problem of great complexity of the traditional virtual view point generation process, a novel and rapid virtual view point generation algorithm is presented in this paper, and actual light field information is used rather than the geometric information. Moreover, for better making the data actual meaning, we mainly use nonnegative tensor factorization(NTF). A tensor representation is introduced for virtual multilayer displays. The light field emitted by an N-layer, M-frame display is represented by a sparse set of non-zero elements restricted to a plane within an Nth-order, rank-M tensor. The tensor representation allows for optimal decomposition of a light field into time-multiplexed, light-attenuating layers using NTF. Finally, the compressive light field of multilayer displays information synthesis is used to obtain virtual view-point by multiple multiplication. Experimental results show that the approach not only the original light field is restored with the high image quality, whose PSNR is 25.6dB, but also the deficiency of traditional matching is made up and any viewpoint can obtained from N free viewpoints.

  19. Minimally-compressive, three- and four-dimensional ultrasound imaging of the clitoris: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Deng, Jing; Crouch, Naomi S; Creighton, Sarah M; Linney, Alfred D; Todd-Pokropek, Andrew; Rodeck, Charles H

    2006-10-01

    There has been no objective means for imaging the three-dimensional (3D) morphology of the clitoris-a poorly understood, complex structure. A Live 3D ultrasound system with a matrix-array transducer was used for data acquisition from eight women. The transducer was positioned in front of and about 3 cm away from the clitoris, with a gel pad or water pad being placed in between. The pads allowed the delicate structures to be imaged without noticeable deformation. Quality images could be obtained with use of a water pad in all patients. The imaging volume was big enough to cover the clitoral glans and body simultaneously, allowing real-time 3D visualisation. To cover the entire clitoris, the probe was moved from one side of the crus to the other, or a four subvolume scan was performed. 3D clitoral anatomy was depicted from 71% of 51 water pad data-sets. The study demonstrates the feasibility of obtaining 3D clitoral ultrasound images. This will improve scientific and clinical understanding of the clitoral role in sexual activity. The minimally-compressive scanning offers an opportunity to visualise dynamic 3D (4D) morphology of other deformable body parts.

  20. Vortex Generators in a Two-Dimensional, External-Compression Supersonic Inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baydar, Ezgihan; Lu, Frank K.; Slater, John W.

    2016-01-01

    Vortex generators within a two-dimensional, external-compression supersonic inlet for Mach 1.6 were investigated to determine their ability to increase total pressure recovery, reduce total pressure distortion, and improve the boundary layer. The vortex generators studied included vanes and ramps. The geometric factors of the vortex generators studied included height, length, spacing, and positions upstream and downstream of the inlet terminal shock. The flow through the inlet was simulated through the computational solution of the steady-state Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations on multi-block, structured grids. The vortex generators were simulated by either gridding the geometry of the vortex generators or modeling the vortices generated by the vortex generators. The inlet performance was characterized by the inlet total pressure recovery, total pressure distortion, and incompressible shape factor of the boundary-layer at the engine face. The results suggested that downstream vanes reduced the distortion and improved the boundary layer. The height of the vortex generators had the greatest effect of the geometric factors.

  1. Three-dimensional acoustic imaging with planar microphone arrays and compressive sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Fangli; Wei, Jingang; Qiu, Lianfang; Shi, Hongbing; Li, Xiaofan

    2016-10-01

    For obtaining super-resolution source maps, we extend compressive sensing (CS) to three-dimensional acoustic imaging. Source maps are simulated with a planar microphone array and a CS algorithm. Comparing the source maps of the CS algorithm with those of the conventional beamformer (CBF) and Tikhonov Regularization (TIKR), we find that the CS algorithm is computationally more effective and can obtain much higher resolution source maps than the CBF and TIKR. The effectiveness of the CS algorithm is analyzed. The CS algorithm can locate the sound sources exactly when the frequency is above 4000 Hz and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is above 12 dB. The location error of the CS algorithm increases as the frequency drops below the threshold, and the errors in location and power increase as SNR decreases. The further from the array the source is, the larger the location error is. The lateral resolution of the CS algorithm is much better than the range resolution. Finally, experimental measurements are conducted in a semi-anechoic room. Two mobile phones are served as sound sources. The results show that the CS algorithm can reconstruct two sound sources near the bottom of the two mobile phones where the speakers are located. The feasibility of the CS algorithm is also validated with the experiment.

  2. THE FORMATION OF ROTATIONAL DISCONTINUITIES IN COMPRESSIVE THREE-DIMENSIONAL MHD TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Liping; Feng, Xueshang; Zhang, Lei; He, Jiansen; Tu, Chuanyi; Wang, Linghua; Wang, Xin; Marsch, Eckart; Zhang, Shaohua

    2015-08-20

    Measurements of solar wind turbulence reveal the ubiquity of discontinuities. In this study we investigate how the discontinuities, especially rotational discontinuities (RDs), are formed in MHD turbulence. In a simulation of the decaying compressive three-dimensional (3D) MHD turbulence with an imposed uniform background magnetic field, we detect RDs with sharp field rotations and little variations of magnetic field intensity, as well as mass density. At the same time, in the de Hoffman–Teller frame, the plasma velocity is nearly in agreement with the Alfvén speed, and is field-aligned on both sides of the discontinuity. We take one of the identified RDs to analyze its 3D structure and temporal evolution in detail. By checking the magnetic field and plasma parameters, we find that the identified RD evolves from the steepening of the Alfvén wave with moderate amplitude, and that steepening is caused by the nonuniformity of the Alfvén speed in the ambient turbulence.

  3. Nonstandard Analysis and Shock Wave Jump Conditions in a One-Dimensional Compressible Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baty, Roy S.; Farassat, Fereidoun; Hargreaves, John

    2007-01-01

    Nonstandard analysis is a relatively new area of mathematics in which infinitesimal numbers can be defined and manipulated rigorously like real numbers. This report presents a fairly comprehensive tutorial on nonstandard analysis for physicists and engineers with many examples applicable to generalized functions. To demonstrate the power of the subject, the problem of shock wave jump conditions is studied for a one-dimensional compressible gas. It is assumed that the shock thickness occurs on an infinitesimal interval and the jump functions in the thermodynamic and fluid dynamic parameters occur smoothly across this interval. To use conservations laws, smooth pre-distributions of the Dirac delta measure are applied whose supports are contained within the shock thickness. Furthermore, smooth pre-distributions of the Heaviside function are applied which vary from zero to one across the shock wave. It is shown that if the equations of motion are expressed in nonconservative form then the relationships between the jump functions for the flow parameters may be found unambiguously. The analysis yields the classical Rankine-Hugoniot jump conditions for an inviscid shock wave. Moreover, non-monotonic entropy jump conditions are obtained for both inviscid and viscous flows. The report shows that products of generalized functions may be defined consistently using nonstandard analysis; however, physically meaningful products of generalized functions must be determined from the physics of the problem and not the mathematical form of the governing equations.

  4. Smooth solutions of the one-dimensional compressible Euler equation with gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Cheng-Hsiung; Lin, Song-Sun; Yang, Chi-Ru

    2016-01-01

    We study one-dimensional motions of polytropic gas governed by the compressible Euler equations. The problem on the half space under a constant gravity gives an equilibrium which has free boundary touching the vacuum and the linearized approximation at this equilibrium gives time periodic solutions. But it is difficult to justify the existence of long-time true solutions for which this time periodic solution is the first approximation. The situation is in contrast to the problem of free motions without gravity. The reason is that the usual iteration method for quasilinear hyperbolic problem cannot be used because of the loss of regularities which causes from the touch with the vacuum. Due to this reason, we try to find a family of solutions expanded by a small parameter and apply the Nash-Moser Theorem to justify this expansion. Note that the application of Nash-Moser Theorem is necessary for the sake of conquest of the trouble with loss of regularities, and the justification of the applicability requires a very delicate analysis of the problem.

  5. Nonstandard Analysis and Shock Wave Jump Conditions in a One-Dimensional Compressible Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Roy S. Baty, F. Farassat, John A. Hargreaves

    2007-05-25

    Nonstandard analysis is a relatively new area of mathematics in which infinitesimal numbers can be defined and manipulated rigorously like real numbers. This report presents a fairly comprehensive tutorial on nonstandard analysis for physicists and engineers with many examples applicable to generalized functions. To demonstrate the power of the subject, the problem of shock wave jump conditions is studied for a one-dimensional compressible gas. It is assumed that the shock thickness occurs on an infinitesimal interval and the jump functions in the thermodynamic and fluid dynamic parameters occur smoothly across this interval. To use conservations laws, smooth pre-distributions of the Dirac delta measure are applied whose supports are contained within the shock thickness. Furthermore, smooth pre-distributions of the Heaviside function are applied which vary from zero to one across the shock wave. It is shown that if the equations of motion are expressed in nonconservative form then the relationships between the jump functions for the flow parameters may be found unambiguously. The analysis yields the classical Rankine-Hugoniot jump conditions for an inviscid shock wave. Moreover, non-monotonic entropy jump conditions are obtained for both inviscid and viscous flows. The report shows that products of generalized functions may be defined consistently using nonstandard analysis; however, physically meaningful products of generalized functions must be determined from the physics of the problem and not the mathematical form of the governing equations.

  6. Two-dimensional compressible flow in centrifugal compressors with straight blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanitz, John D; Ellis, Gaylord O

    1950-01-01

    Six numerical examples are presented for steady, two-dimensional, compressible, nonviscous flow in centrifugal compressors with thin straight blades, the center lines of which generate the surface of a right circular cone when rotated about the axis of the compressor. A seventh example is presented for incompressible flow. The solutions were obtained in a region of the compressors, including the impeller tip, that was considered to be unaffected by the diffuser vanes or by the impeller-inlet configuration. Each solution applies to radial and mixed flow compressors with various cone angles but with the same angle between blades on the conic flow surface. The solution also apply to radial and mixed flow turbines with the rotation and the flow direction reversed. The effects of variations in the following parameters were investigated: (1) flow rate, (2) impeller-tip speed, (3) variation of passage height with radius, and (4) angle between blades on conic flow surface. The numerical results are presented in plots of the streamlines and constant Mach number lines. Correlation equations are developed whereby the flow conditions in any impeller with straight blades can be determined (in the region investigated by this analysis) for all operating conditions.

  7. Synthetic aperture radar imaging based on blind efficient two-dimensional compressed sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Wentao; Wang, Junfeng; Yu, Wenxian

    2014-01-01

    An algorithm is presented for synthetic aperture radar imaging. This algorithm uses compressed sensing (CS) to reconstruct the image from the signal with low sampling rates in fast and slow times. First, a conventional algorithm is used to obtain the complex image of the target scene. Then, a greedy algorithm is applied to this complex image. It involves the peak search, the estimation of the scattering coefficient, and the removal of the complex image of the target point in each iteration. This algorithm, based on two-dimensional CS, fully utilizes the sparsity of the target scene. By applying the greedy algorithm to the complex image rather than the original signal and by limiting the peak search to a small set of pixels, this algorithm also greatly improves the computational efficiency. In addition, this algorithm is based on blind CS, that is the point spread function is estimated from the signal. This means that this algorithm applies even if the radar parameters are unknown.

  8. Pore-water extraction from unsaturated tuff by triaxial and one-dimensional compression methods, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mower, Timothy E.; Higgins, Jerry D.; Yang, In C.; Peters, Charles A.

    1994-01-01

    Study of the hydrologic system at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, requires the extraction of pore-water samples from welded and nonwelded, unsaturated tuffs. Two compression methods (triaxial compression and one-dimensional compression) were examined to develop a repeatable extraction technique and to investigate the effects of the extraction method on the original pore-fluid composition. A commercially available triaxial cell was modified to collect pore water expelled from tuff cores. The triaxial cell applied a maximum axial stress of 193 MPa and a maximum confining stress of 68 MPa. Results obtained from triaxial compression testing indicated that pore-water samples could be obtained from nonwelded tuff cores that had initial moisture contents as small as 13 percent (by weight of dry soil). Injection of nitrogen gas while the test core was held at the maximum axial stress caused expulsion of additional pore water and reduced the required initial moisture content from 13 to 11 percent. Experimental calculations, together with experience gained from testing moderately welded tuff cores, indicated that the triaxial cell used in this study could not apply adequate axial or confining stress to expel pore water from cores of densely welded tuffs. This concern led to the design, fabrication, and testing of a one-dimensional compression cell. The one-dimensional compression cell used in this study was constructed from hardened 4340-alloy and nickel-alloy steels and could apply a maximum axial stress of 552 MPa. The major components of the device include a corpus ring and sample sleeve to confine the sample, a piston and base platen to apply axial load, and drainage plates to transmit expelled water from the test core out of the cell. One-dimensional compression extracted pore water from nonwelded tuff cores that had initial moisture contents as small as 7.6 percent; pore water was expelled from densely welded tuff cores that had initial moisture contents as small as 7

  9. Simulation of Wave-Current Interaction Using a Three-Dimensional Hydrodynamic Model Coupled With a Phase Averaged Wave Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsooli, R.; Orton, P. M.; Georgas, N.; Blumberg, A. F.

    2016-02-01

    The Stevens Institute of Technology Estuarine and Coastal Ocean Model (sECOM) has been coupled with a more advanced surface wave model to simulate wave‒current interaction, and results have been validated in estuarine and nearshore waters. sECOM is a three‒dimensional, hydrostatic, free surface, primitive equation model. It solves the Navier‒Stokes equations and the conservation equations for temperature and salinity using a finite‒difference method on an Arakawa C‒grid with a terrain‒following (sigma) vertical coordinate and orthogonal curvilinear horizontal coordinate system. The model is coupled with the surface wave model developed by Mellor et al. (2008), which solves the spectral equation and takes into account depth and current refraction, and deep and shallow water. The wave model parameterizes the energy distribution in frequency space and the wave‒wave interaction process by using a specified spectrum shape. The coupled wave‒hydrodynamic model considers the wave‒current interaction through wave‒induced bottom stress, depth‒dependent radiation stress, and wave effects on wind‒induced surface stress. The model is validated using the data collected at a natural sandy beach at Duck, North Carolina, during the DUCK94 experiment. This test case reveals the capability of the model to simulate the wave‒current interaction in nearshore coastal systems. The model is further validated using the data collected in Jamaica Bay, a semi‒enclosed body of water located in New York City region. This test reveals the applicability of the model to estuarine systems. These validations of the model and comparisons to its prior wave model, the Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory (GLERL) wave model (Donelan 1977), are presented and discussed. ReferencesG.L. Mellor, M.A. Donelan, and L‒Y. Oey, 2008, A Surface Wave Model for Coupling with Numerical Ocean Circulation Models. J. Atmos. Oceanic Technol., 25, 1785‒1807.Donelan, M. A 1977. A

  10. Spectroscopic evidence for negative electronic compressibility in a quasi-three-dimensional spin–orbit correlated metal

    SciTech Connect

    He, Junfeng; Hogan, T.; Mion, Thomas R.; Hafiz, H.; He, Y.; Denlinger, J. D.; Mo, S-K.; Dhital, C.; Chen, X.; Lin, Qisen; Zhang, Y.; Hashimoto, M.; Pan, H.; Lu, D. H.; Arita, M.; Shimada, K.; Markiewicz, R. S.; Wang, Z.; Kempa, K.; Naughton, M. J.; Bansil, A.; Wilson, S. D.; He, Rui-Hua

    2015-04-27

    Negative compressibility is a sign of thermodynamic instability of open1, 2, 3 or non-equilibrium4, 5 systems. In quantum materials consisting of multiple mutually coupled subsystems, the compressibility of one subsystem can be negative if it is countered by positive compressibility of the others. Manifestations of this effect have so far been limited to low-dimensional dilute electron systems6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11. Here, we present evidence from angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) for negative electronic compressibility (NEC) in the quasi-three-dimensional (3D) spin–orbit correlated metal (Sr1-xLax)3Ir2O7. Increased electron filling accompanies an anomalous decrease of the chemical potential, as indicated by the overall movement of the deep valence bands. Such anomaly, suggestive of NEC, is shown to be primarily driven by the lowering in energy of the conduction band as the correlated bandgap reduces. Our finding points to a distinct pathway towards an uncharted territory of NEC featuring bulk correlated metals with unique potential for applications in low-power nanoelectronics and novel metamaterials.

  11. Spectroscopic evidence for negative electronic compressibility in a quasi-three-dimensional spin-orbit correlated metal.

    PubMed

    He, Junfeng; Hogan, T; Mion, Thomas R; Hafiz, H; He, Y; Denlinger, J D; Mo, S-K; Dhital, C; Chen, X; Lin, Qisen; Zhang, Y; Hashimoto, M; Pan, H; Lu, D H; Arita, M; Shimada, K; Markiewicz, R S; Wang, Z; Kempa, K; Naughton, M J; Bansil, A; Wilson, S D; He, Rui-Hua

    2015-06-01

    Negative compressibility is a sign of thermodynamic instability of open or non-equilibrium systems. In quantum materials consisting of multiple mutually coupled subsystems, the compressibility of one subsystem can be negative if it is countered by positive compressibility of the others. Manifestations of this effect have so far been limited to low-dimensional dilute electron systems. Here, we present evidence from angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) for negative electronic compressibility (NEC) in the quasi-three-dimensional (3D) spin-orbit correlated metal (Sr1-xLax)3Ir2O7. Increased electron filling accompanies an anomalous decrease of the chemical potential, as indicated by the overall movement of the deep valence bands. Such anomaly, suggestive of NEC, is shown to be primarily driven by the lowering in energy of the conduction band as the correlated bandgap reduces. Our finding points to a distinct pathway towards an uncharted territory of NEC featuring bulk correlated metals with unique potential for applications in low-power nanoelectronics and novel metamaterials.

  12. A similarity rule for compressibility and sidewall-boundary-layer effects in two-dimensional wind tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnwell, R. W.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of the sidewall boundary layer on flow in two-dimensional wind tunnels is determined. The small-disturbance and isentropic approximations are made, and the sidewall-boundary-layer dynamics are modeled with the von Karman momentum-integral equation. The effects of the edge-velocity-gradient term in the sidewall momentum integral, which is usually dominant near the model, and the compressibility term are shown to be similar. It is shown that the effect of sidewall suction around the model is not similar to two-dimensional flow. Comparisons with experiment are made to verify the similarity rule.

  13. Electrically induced charge-density waves in a two-dimensional electron liquid: Effects of negative electronic compressibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hroblak, Erica E.; Principi, Alessandro; Zhao, Hui; Vignale, Giovanni

    2017-08-01

    We show that the negative electronic compressibility of two-dimensional electronic systems at sufficiently low density enables the generation of charge-density waves through the application of a uniform force field, provided no current is allowed to flow. The wavelength of the density oscillations is controlled by the magnitude of the (negative) screening length, and their amplitude is proportional to the applied force. Both are electrically tunable.

  14. A three-dimensional, compressible, laminar boundary-layer method for general fuselages. Volume 2: User's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wie, Yong-Sun

    1990-01-01

    This user's manual contains a complete description of the computer programs developed to calculate three-dimensional, compressible, laminar boundary layers for perfect gas flow on general fuselage shapes. These programs include the 3-D boundary layer program (3DBLC), the body-oriented coordinate program (BCC), and the streamline coordinate program (SCC). Subroutine description, input, output and sample case are discussed. The complete FORTRAN listings of the computer programs are given.

  15. One-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics of a cylindrical liner imploded by an azimuthal magnetic field and compressing an axial field

    SciTech Connect

    Hamann, F. Combis, P.; Videau, L.

    2015-08-15

    The one-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics of a plasma cylindrical liner is addressed in the case of a two components magnetic field. The azimuthal component is responsible for the implosion of the liner and the axial field is compressed inside the liner. A complete set of analytical profiles for the magnetic field components, the density, and the local velocity are proposed at the scale of the liner thickness. Numerical simulations are also presented to test the validity of the analytical formulas.

  16. Possible flow regimes of adiabatic one-dimensional compressible fluid flow with friction in convergent and divergent ducts.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shouman, A. R.; Garcia, C. E.

    1971-01-01

    An analytical solution for the compressible one-dimensional flow in convergent and divergent ducts with friction is obtained. It is found that a nondimensional parameter, N, can be formed using the friction factor, duct half-angle and the ratio of specific heats of the gas. Seven flow regimes are describable with the solution, based on certain bounds on the magnitude of N. The regimes are discussed and corollary data are presented graphically.

  17. General formulation of transverse hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Ryblewski, Radoslaw; Florkowski, Wojciech

    2008-06-15

    General formulation of hydrodynamics describing transversally thermalized matter created at the early stages of ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions is presented. Similarities and differences with the standard three-dimensionally thermalized relativistic hydrodynamics are discussed. The role of the conservation laws as well as the thermodynamic consistency of two-dimensional thermodynamic variables characterizing transversally thermalized matter is emphasized.

  18. Internal shock interactions in propulsion/airframe integrated three-dimensional sidewall compression scramjet inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, Scott D.; Perkins, John N.

    1992-01-01

    The advantages and design requirements of propulsion/airframe integration for high Mach number flight are studied in terms of the 3D sidewall compression scramjet inlet. The present work addresses in a parametric fashion the inviscid effects of leading edge sweep, sidewall compression, and inflow Mach number on the internal shock structure in terms of inlet compression and mass capture. The source of the Mach number invariance with leading edge sweep for a constant sidewall compression class of inlet is identified, and a previously undocumented spillage phenomenon in a constant effective wedge angle class of inlets is discussed.

  19. Relaxation enhanced compressed sensing three-dimensional black-blood vessel wall MR imaging: Preliminary studies.

    PubMed

    Li, Bo; Li, Hao; Li, Jun; Zhang, Yuchen; Wang, Xiaoying; Zhang, Jue; Dong, Li; Fang, Jing

    2015-09-01

    In this study, we sought to investigate the feasibility of a new technique termed relaxation enhanced compressed sensing three-dimensional motion-sensitizing driven equilibrium prepared 3D rapid gradient echo sequence (RECS-3D MERGE). The RECS-3D MERGE sequence consisted of a 3D MERGE sequence for imaging, a period of delay time (TD) for relaxation enhancement, and a pseudo-centric phase encoding order used for under-sampling acquisition to maintain scan efficiency. Seven healthy volunteers and six patients with 40% to 75% carotid artery stenosis were recruited in this study. Healthy subjects underwent 3D MERGE, RECS-3D MERGE and two-dimensional (2D) T1-weighted double inversion recovery fast spin echo (T1W DIR-FSE) scans. The signal ratio (SR) values of 21 RECS-3D MERGE scans were compared in order to determine the optimal scan parameter set of acceleration factor (AF) and delay time (TD) for RECS-3D MERGE sequence. Patients then underwent 3D MERGE, RECS-3D MERGE using the aforementioned optimal scan parameter set and 2D T1W DIR-FSE scans. Two radiologists, blinded to the imaging technique, qualitatively graded each image on a six-point ordinal scale. The highest value of SR occurred with the scan parameter set of 3-fold AF and 800ms TD. Compared to 3D MERGE, RECS-3D MERGE with the parameter set significantly improved the image quality for both healthy subjects and patients experiments, while the scan efficiency was not sacrificed. And no significant differences were observed in the subjective scores of RECS-3D MERGE and 2D T1W DIR-FSE image qualities. RECS-3D MERGE technique achieved significant improvement in black-blood image quality compared with 3D MERGE. And the image quality of this 3D rapid carotid black-blood imaging technique is comparable to 2D T1W DIR-FSE while it has much higher scan efficiency. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Three dimensional numerical modeling of Hydrodynamics and sediment transport in the Mississippi River Diversion at West Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadid, K. M.; Meselhe, E. A.; Roth, B.; Allison, M. A.

    2013-12-01

    The coastal wetlands of Louisiana have been experiencing high rates of land subsidence and erosion for decades. Anthropogenic alterations to the hydrology and geology, powerful hurricanes, and relative sea level rise have caused major coastal land loss in Louisiana. After years of research and discussions, the use of sediment diversions from the Mississippi River to adjacent embayment areas were proposed and further authorized as a solution for land building. To this end, the West Bay diversion (WBD) was constructed in 2003 to restore approximately 9,831 acres of wetlands in the West Bay area under the Coastal Wetlands Planning, Protection, and Restoration Act (CWPPRA). The WBD is located along the right-descending bank of the Mississippi River south of Venice, LA near River Mile (RM) 4.7. The initial size of the channel post-construction was designed to convey 20,000 cubic feet per second (cfs), and over time it was anticipated to support a maximum of 50,000 cfs. This sediment diversion provides an opportunity to examine and analyze the impact of such diversion on the morphology of the river channel, and the retention characteristics and rate of delta growth in the receiving basin. Additionally, the WBD serve as analogue to fully validate morphologic models that could consequently be used to model proposed land building sediment diversions in the Lower Mississippi River. In this study a three-dimensional numerical model is developed for the WBD which includes the main channel of the Mississippi River as well as the receiving basin. The model is being calibrated and validated for hydrodynamics and morphology using detailed field observations. Since 2003 regular monitoring has taken place as per the CWPPRA project guidelines. This includes bathymetric surveys of the receiving basin from 2002 (pre-construction), 2003, 2006, and 2009. A recent monitoring survey has been completed and will be available in the near future. In addition to this monitoring data, the U

  1. Geometric and Hydrodynamic Characteristics of Three-dimensional Saturated Prefractal Porous Media Determined with Lattice Boltzmann Modeling

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fractal and prefractal geometric models have substantial potential of contributing to the analysis of flow and transport in porous media such as soils and reservoir rocks. In this study, geometric and hydrodynamic parameters of saturated 3D mass and pore-solid prefractal porous media were characteri...

  2. Turbo fast three-dimensional carotid artery black-blood MRI by combining three-dimensional MERGE sequence with compressed sensing.

    PubMed

    Li, Bo; Dong, Li; Chen, Bin; Ji, Shuangxi; Cai, Wenchao; Wang, Ye; Zhang, Jue; Zhang, Zhaoqi; Wang, Xiaoying; Fang, Jing

    2013-11-01

    In this study, we sought to investigate the feasibility of turbo fast three-dimensional (3D) black-blood imaging by combining a 3D motion-sensitizing driven equilibrium rapid gradient echo sequence with compressed sensing. A pseudo-centric phase encoding order was developed for compressed sensing-3D motion-sensitizing driven equilibrium rapid gradient echo to suppress flow signal in undersampled 3D k-space. Nine healthy volunteers were recruited for this study. Signal-to-tissue ratio, contrast-to-tissue ratio (CTR) and CTR efficiency (CTReff ) between fully sampled and undersampled images were calculated and compared in seven subjects. Moreover, isotropic high resolution images using different compressed sensing acceleration factors were evaluated in two other subjects. Wall-lumen signal-to-tissue ratio or CTR were comparable between the undersampled and the fully sampled images, while significant improvement of CTReff was achieved in the undersampled images. At an isotropic high spatial resolution of 0.7 × 0.7 × 0.7 mm(3) , all undersampled images exhibited similar level of the flow suppression efficiency and the capability of delineating outer vessel wall boundary and lumen-wall interface, when compared with the fully sampled images. The proposed turbo fast compressed sensing 3D black-blood imaging technique improves scan efficiency without sacrificing flow suppression efficiency and vessel wall image quality. It could be a valuable tool for rapid 3D vessel wall imaging. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. A Navier-Stokes solution of the three-dimensional viscous compressible flow in a centrifugal compressor impeller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harp, J. L., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    A two-dimensional time-dependent computer code was utilized to calculate the three-dimensional steady flow within the impeller blading. The numerical method is an explicit time marching scheme in two spatial dimensions. Initially, an inviscid solution is generated on the hub blade-to-blade surface by the method of Katsanis and McNally (1973). Starting with the known inviscid solution, the viscous effects are calculated through iteration. The approach makes it possible to take into account principal impeller fluid-mechanical effects. It is pointed out that the second iterate provides a complete solution to the three-dimensional, compressible, Navier-Stokes equations for flow in a centrifugal impeller. The problems investigated are related to the study of a radial impeller and a backswept impeller.

  4. Three dimensional CSCM method for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations with application to a multi-nozzle exhaust flowfield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bardina, J.; Lombard, C. K.

    1985-01-01

    The effective design of three-dimensional flow systems such as a clustered multinozzle shrouded exhaust system requires detailed analysis of the internal flowfield. It is pointed out that new numerical techniques on the most modern vector computers are making these analyses practicable. In this paper, the upwind differenced implicit conservative supracharacteristics method (CSCM) for three-dimensional viscous flow is presented. The new method is an implicit 'method of planes' symmetric Gauss-Seidel relaxation scheme. The data is conveniently stored on successive planes along the streamwise coordinate, and the system of equations is solved twice in each successive plane of the streamwise coordinate. The developed new three-dimensional compressible Navier-Stokes algorithm combines the best features of the storage and computationally efficient space marching procedures with the generality of time dependent techniques to solve flows with elliptic and streamwise separated flows.

  5. Analysis of fluid instabilities in core collapse supernova progenitors by a semi-analytical methodology and by two dimensional radiation-hydrodynamical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raley, Elizabeth

    2004-12-01

    We have performed an analysis of fluid instabilities below the neutrinospheres of the collapsed cores of supernova progenitors using a methodology introduced by Bruenn and Dineva [28, 29, 31]. In an extensive survey we found that the rate of lepton diffusion always exceeds the rate of thermal diffusion and as a result we do not anywhere see the neutron finger instability as described by the Livermore group [16, 17]. A new instability, lepto-entropy fingers, extending from a radius of 10 15 km out to the vicinity of the neutrinosphere, driven by the cross-response functions (i.e. the dependence of lepton transport on entropy perturbations and vice versa) was discovered. This instability has a maximum growth rate of the order of 100 s-1 with a scale of approximately 1/20 the distance of a perturbed fluid element from the core center [18]. This instability has probably already been seen in some multi-dimensional core collapse calculations. To test our results predicting the presence of doubly diffusive instabilities below the neutrinosphere of a proto-supernova, we have performed two dimensional hydrodynamic simulations with radial ray neutrino transport. This entailed rewriting RadHyd, which is the merger of EVH-1 hydrodynamics and MGFLD neutrino transport developed by Bruenn and DiNisco [43], for two dimensions. In particular, hydrodynamic evolution along angular arrays was included, as was MPI message passing capabilities, in order to utilize massively parallel computer platform such as FAU's BOCA4 Beowulf cluster. This work was partially funded by a grant from the DOE Office of Science, Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing Program.

  6. Three-dimensional characteristics of solar coronal shocks determined from observations; Geometry, Kinematics, and Compression ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Ryun Young; Vourlidas, Angelos

    2017-08-01

    We investigate the three-dimensional (3D) characteristics of coronal shocks associated with Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs), in terms of geometry, kinematics, and density compression ratio, employing a new method we have developed. The method uses multi-viewpoint observations from the STEREO-A, -B and SOHO coronagraphs. The 3D structure and kinematics of coronal shock waves and the driving CMEs are derived separately using a forward modeling method. We analyze two CMEs that are observed as halos by the three spacecraft, and the peak speeds are over 2000 km s-1. From the 3D modeling, we find (1) the coronal shock waves are spherical apparently enclosing the Sun, in which the angular widths are much wider than those of CMEs (92° and 252° versus 58° and 91°), indicating shock waves are propagating away from the CMEs in the azimuthal directions, and (2) the speeds of the shock waves around the CME noses are comparable to those of the CME noses, but the speeds at the lateral flanks seem to be limited to the local fast magnetosonic speed. Applying our new method, we determine electron densities in the shock sheaths, the downstream-upstream density ratios, and the Mach numbers. We find (1) the sheath electron densities decrease with height in general but have the maximum near the CME noses, (2) the density ratios and Mach numbers also seem to depend on the position angle from the CME nose to the far-flank but are more or less constant in time, while the sheath electron densities and speeds decrease with time, because of the reduced local Alfven speed with height, and (3) the shocks could be supercritical in a wider spatial range, and it lasts longer, than those of what have been reported in the past. We conclude that the shock wave associated with an energetic CME is a phenomenon that is becoming a non-driven (blast-type), nearly freely propagating wave at the flank from a driven (bow- and/or piston-type) wave near the CME nose.

  7. Knee imaging: Rapid three-dimensional fast spin-echo using compressed sensing.

    PubMed

    Kijowski, Richard; Rosas, Humberto; Samsonov, Alexey; King, Kevin; Peters, Rob; Liu, Fang

    2017-06-01

    To investigate the feasibility of using compressed sensing (CS) to accelerate three-dimensional fast spin-echo (3D-FSE) imaging of the knee. A 3D-FSE sequence was performed at 3T with CS (CUBE-CS with 3:16-minute scan time) and without CS (CUBE with 4:44-minute scan time) twice on the knees of 10 healthy volunteers to assess signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) using the addition-subtraction method and once on the knees of 50 symptomatic patients to assess diagnostic performance. SNR of cartilage, muscle, synovial fluid, and bone marrow on CUBE and CUBE-CS images were measured in the 10 healthy volunteers. The CUBE and CUBE-CS sequences of all 50 symptomatic patients were independently reviewed twice by two musculoskeletal radiologists. The radiologists used CUBE and CUBE-CS during each individual review to determine the presence or absence of knee joint pathology. Student's t-tests were used to compare SNR values between sequences, while the kappa statistic was used to determine agreement between sequences for detecting knee joint pathology. Sensitivity and specificity of CUBE and CUBE-CS for detecting knee joint pathology was also calculated in the 18 symptomatic patients who underwent subsequent arthroscopic knee surgery. CUBE and CUBE-CS had similar SNR (P = 0.15-0.67) of cartilage, muscle, synovial fluid, and bone marrow. There was near-perfect to perfect agreement between CUBE and CUBE-CS for both radiologists for detecting cartilage and bone marrow edema lesions, medial and lateral meniscus tears, anterior cruciate ligament tears, effusions, and intra-articular bodies. CUBE and CUBE-CS had similar sensitivity (75.0-100%) and specificity (87.5-100%) for detecting 60 cartilage lesions, 20 meniscus tears, four anterior cruciate ligament tears, and four intra-articular bodies confirmed at surgery. CS provided a 30% reduction in scan time for 3D-FSE imaging of the knee without a corresponding decrease in SNR or diagnostic performance. 1 J. MAGN. RESON. IMAGING 2017

  8. Treatment of mandibular angle fracture with a 2mm, 3 dimensional rectangular grid compression miniplates: A prospective clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Mansuri, Samir; Abdulkhayum, Abdul Mujeeb; Gazal, Giath; Hussain, Mohammed Abid Zahir

    2013-01-01

    Background: Surgical treatment of fracture mandible using an internal fixation has changed in the last decades to achieve the required rigidity, stability and immediate restoration of function. The aim of the study was to do a Prospective study of 10 patients to determine the efficacy of rectangular grid compression miniplates in mandibular fractures. Materials & Methods: This study was carried out using 2.0 rectangular grid compression miniplates and 8 mm multidirectional screws as a rigid internal fixation in 10 patients without post operative intermaxillary fixation (IMF). Follow up was done for period of 6 months. Results: All fractures were healed with an absolute stability in post operative period. None of the patient complained of post operative difficulty in occlusion. Conclusion: Within the limits of this study, it can be concluded that rectangular grid compression miniplates was rigid, reliable and thus can be recommended for the treatment of mandibular angle fractures. How to cite this article: Mansuri S, Abdulkhayum AM, Gazal G, Hussain MA. Treatment of mandibular angle fracture with a 2mm, 3 dimensional rectangular grid compression miniplates: A prospective clinical study. J Int Oral Health 2013;5(6):93-100 . PMID:24453452

  9. Photonic band-gap and defect modes of a one-dimensional photonic crystal under localized compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, A.; Porta, A. V.; Orozco, S.

    2017-05-01

    The rupture of periodicity caused by one defect (defect layer) in a one-dimensional photonic crystal (1DPhC) results in a narrow transmission spectral line in the photonic band-gap, and the field distribution shows a strong confinement in the proximity of the defect layer. In this work, we present a theoretical model to calculate the frequency of defect modes caused by defect layers induced by localized mechanical stress. Two periodical arrangements were studied: one with layers of poly(methyl-methacrylate) (PMMA) and polystyrene (PS), PMMA-PS; the other with layers of PMMA and fused silica (SiO2), PMMA-SiO2. The defect layers were induced by localized compression (tension). The frequencies of the defect modes were calculated using elasto-optical theory and plane wave expansion and perturbation methods. Numerical results show that the frequency of the defect mode increases (decreases) when the compression (tension) increases. Based on the theoretical model developed, we show that compression of n layers of a 1DPhC induces n defect modes whose frequencies depend on the compression magnitude in the case of normal incidence of electromagnetic waves, in accordance with the results reported for other types of defect layers. The methodology shows the feasibility of the plane wave expansion and perturbation methods to study the frequency of the defect modes. Both periodical arrangements are suitable for designing mechanically tunable (1DPhC)-based narrow pass band filters and narrow reflectors in the (60, 65) THz range.

  10. Three-dimensional late gadolinium enhancement imaging of the left atrium with a hybrid radial acquisition and compressed sensing.

    PubMed

    Adluru, Ganesh; Chen, Liyong; Kim, Seong-Eun; Burgon, Nathan; Kholmovski, Eugene G; Marrouche, Nassir F; Dibella, Edward V R

    2011-12-01

    To develop and test a hybrid radial (stack of stars) acquisition and compressed sensing reconstruction for efficient late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) imaging of the left atrium. Two hybrid radial acquisition schemes, kx-ky-first and kz-first, are tested using the signal equation for an inversion recovery sequence with simulated data. Undersampled data reconstructions are then performed using a compressed sensing approach with a three-dimensional total variation constraint. The data acquisition and reconstruction framework is tested on five atrial fibrillation patients after treatment by radio-frequency ablation. The hybrid radial data are acquired with free breathing without respiratory navigation. The kz-first radial acquisition gave improved image quality as compared to a kx-ky-first scheme. Compressed sensing reconstructions improved the overall quality of undersampled radial LGE images. An image quality metric that takes into account the signal, noise, artifact, and blur for the radial images was 35% (±17%) higher than the corresponding Cartesian acquisitions. Total acquisition time for 36 slices with 1.25 × 1.25 × 2.5 mm(3) resolution was under 3 min for the proposed scheme. Hybrid radial LGE imaging of the LA with compressed sensing is a promising approach for obtaining images efficiently and offers more robust image quality than Cartesian acquisitions that were acquired without a respiratory navigator signal. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Turbulent Friction in the Boundary Layer of a Flat Plate in a Two-Dimensional Compressible Flow at High Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frankl, F.; Voishel, V.

    1943-01-01

    In the present report an investigation is made on a flat plate in a two-dimensional compressible flow of the effect of compressibility and heating on the turbulent frictional drag coefficient in the boundary layer of an airfoil or wing radiator. The analysis is based on the Prandtl-Karman theory of the turbulent boundary later and the Stodola-Crocco, theorem on the linear relation between the total energy of the flow and its velocity. Formulas are obtained for the velocity distribution and the frictional drag law in a turbulent boundary later with the compressibility effect and heat transfer taken into account. It is found that with increase of compressibility and temperature at full retardation of the flow (the temperature when the velocity of the flow at a given point is reduced to zero in case of an adiabatic process in the gas) at a constant R (sub x), the frictional drag coefficient C (sub f) decreased, both of these factors acting in the same sense.

  12. Shear and Compression Bioreactor for Cartilage Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Shahin, Kifah; Doran, Pauline M

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical forces, including hydrodynamic shear, hydrostatic pressure, compression, tension, and friction, can have stimulatory effects on cartilage synthesis in tissue engineering systems. Bioreactors capable of exerting forces on cells and tissue constructs within a controlled culture environment are needed to provide appropriate mechanical stimuli. In this chapter, we describe the construction, assembly, and operation of a mechanobioreactor providing simultaneous dynamic shear and compressive loading on developing cartilage tissues to mimic the rolling and squeezing action of articular joints. The device is suitable for studying the effects of mechanical treatment on stem cells and chondrocytes seeded into three-dimensional scaffolds.

  13. Nanoparticle Analysis by Online Comprehensive Two-Dimensional Liquid Chromatography combining Hydrodynamic Chromatography and Size-Exclusion Chromatography with Intermediate Sample Transformation

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Polymeric nanoparticles have become indispensable in modern society with a wide array of applications ranging from waterborne coatings to drug-carrier-delivery systems. While a large range of techniques exist to determine a multitude of properties of these particles, relating physicochemical properties of the particle to the chemical structure of the intrinsic polymers is still challenging. A novel, highly orthogonal separation system based on comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatography (LC × LC) has been developed. The system combines hydrodynamic chromatography (HDC) in the first-dimension to separate the particles based on their size, with ultrahigh-performance size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) in the second dimension to separate the constituting polymer molecules according to their hydrodynamic radius for each of 80 to 100 separated fractions. A chip-based mixer is incorporated to transform the sample by dissolving the separated nanoparticles from the first-dimension online in tetrahydrofuran. The polymer bands are then focused using stationary-phase-assisted modulation to enhance sensitivity, and the water from the first-dimension eluent is largely eliminated to allow interaction-free SEC. Using the developed system, the combined two-dimensional distribution of the particle-size and the molecular-size of a mixture of various polystyrene (PS) and polyacrylate (PACR) nanoparticles has been obtained within 60 min. PMID:28745485

  14. Full-coverage film cooling. I - Three-dimensional measurements of turbulence structure. II - Prediction of the recovery-region hydrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yavuzkurt, S.; Moffat, R. J.; Kays, W. M.

    1980-01-01

    Hydrodynamic measurements of turbulence structure were performed with a triaxial hot wire in the full coverage and the recovery regions following an array of injection holes under isothermal conditions at ambient temperature and pressure for blowing ratios of 0.9 and 0.4. High levels of turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) were determined for low blowing, and low TKE levels were found for the high blowing levels; in the recovery region, the flow can be represented by a model with an outer boundary layer and a 2-dimensional inner boundary layer. Recovery region hydrodynamics can be modelled by considering that a new boundary layer started to grow immediately after the end of blowing; the Prandtl mixing length distributions calculated from the values of mean velocity and turbulent shear stresses were consistent with the presence of a dual boundary layer structure in the recovery region. The program used here contains a one-equation model of turbulence, using turbulence kinetic energy with an algebraic mixing length; this 2-dimensional, finite difference program can predict the mean velocity and turbulence kinetic energy profiles based on initial values, boundary conditions, and a closure condition.

  15. Full-coverage film cooling. I - Three-dimensional measurements of turbulence structure. II - Prediction of the recovery-region hydrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yavuzkurt, S.; Moffat, R. J.; Kays, W. M.

    1980-01-01

    Hydrodynamic measurements of turbulence structure were performed with a triaxial hot wire in the full coverage and the recovery regions following an array of injection holes under isothermal conditions at ambient temperature and pressure for blowing ratios of 0.9 and 0.4. High levels of turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) were determined for low blowing, and low TKE levels were found for the high blowing levels; in the recovery region, the flow can be represented by a model with an outer boundary layer and a 2-dimensional inner boundary layer. Recovery region hydrodynamics can be modelled by considering that a new boundary layer started to grow immediately after the end of blowing; the Prandtl mixing length distributions calculated from the values of mean velocity and turbulent shear stresses were consistent with the presence of a dual boundary layer structure in the recovery region. The program used here contains a one-equation model of turbulence, using turbulence kinetic energy with an algebraic mixing length; this 2-dimensional, finite difference program can predict the mean velocity and turbulence kinetic energy profiles based on initial values, boundary conditions, and a closure condition.

  16. A splitting scheme based on the space-time CE/SE method for solving multi-dimensional hydrodynamical models of semiconductor devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nisar, Ubaid Ahmed; Ashraf, Waqas; Qamar, Shamsul

    2016-08-01

    Numerical solutions of the hydrodynamical model of semiconductor devices are presented in one and two-space dimension. The model describes the charge transport in semiconductor devices. Mathematically, the models can be written as a convection-diffusion type system with a right hand side describing the relaxation effects and interaction with a self consistent electric field. The proposed numerical scheme is a splitting scheme based on the conservation element and solution element (CE/SE) method for hyperbolic step, and a semi-implicit scheme for the relaxation step. The numerical results of the suggested scheme are compared with the splitting scheme based on Nessyahu-Tadmor (NT) central scheme for convection step and the same semi-implicit scheme for the relaxation step. The effects of various parameters such as low field mobility, device length, lattice temperature and voltages for one-space dimensional hydrodynamic model are explored to further validate the generic applicability of the CE/SE method for the current model equations. A two dimensional simulation is also performed by CE/SE method for a MESFET device, producing results in good agreement with those obtained by NT-central scheme.

  17. Full-coverage film cooling. I - Three-dimensional measurements of turbulence structure. II - Prediction of the recovery-region hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yavuzkurt, S.; Moffat, R. J.; Kays, W. M.

    1980-11-01

    Hydrodynamic measurements of turbulence structure were performed with a triaxial hot wire in the full coverage and the recovery regions following an array of injection holes under isothermal conditions at ambient temperature and pressure for blowing ratios of 0.9 and 0.4. High levels of turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) were determined for low blowing, and low TKE levels were found for the high blowing levels; in the recovery region, the flow can be represented by a model with an outer boundary layer and a 2-dimensional inner boundary layer. Recovery region hydrodynamics can be modelled by considering that a new boundary layer started to grow immediately after the end of blowing; the Prandtl mixing length distributions calculated from the values of mean velocity and turbulent shear stresses were consistent with the presence of a dual boundary layer structure in the recovery region. The program used here contains a one-equation model of turbulence, using turbulence kinetic energy with an algebraic mixing length; this 2-dimensional, finite difference program can predict the mean velocity and turbulence kinetic energy profiles based on initial values, boundary conditions, and a closure condition.

  18. Three-dimensionally bonded spongy graphene material with super compressive elasticity and near-zero Poisson’s ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yingpeng; Yi, Ningbo; Huang, Lu; Zhang, Tengfei; Fang, Shaoli; Chang, Huicong; Li, Na; Oh, Jiyoung; Lee, Jae Ah; Kozlov, Mikhail; Chipara, Alin C.; Terrones, Humberto; Xiao, Peishuang; Long, Guankui; Huang, Yi; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, Long; Lepró, Xavier; Haines, Carter; Lima, Márcio Dias; Lopez, Nestor Perea; Rajukumar, Lakshmy P.; Elias, Ana L.; Feng, Simin; Kim, Seon Jeong; Narayanan, N. T.; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Terrones, Mauricio; Aliev, Ali; Chu, Pengfei; Zhang, Zhong; Baughman, Ray H.; Chen, Yongsheng

    2015-01-01

    It is a challenge to fabricate graphene bulk materials with properties arising from the nature of individual graphene sheets, and which assemble into monolithic three-dimensional structures. Here we report the scalable self-assembly of randomly oriented graphene sheets into additive-free, essentially homogenous graphene sponge materials that provide a combination of both cork-like and rubber-like properties. These graphene sponges, with densities similar to air, display Poisson’s ratios in all directions that are near-zero and largely strain-independent during reversible compression to giant strains. And at the same time, they function as enthalpic rubbers, which can recover up to 98% compression in air and 90% in liquids, and operate between -196 and 900 °C. Furthermore, these sponges provide reversible liquid absorption for hundreds of cycles and then discharge it within seconds, while still providing an effective near-zero Poisson’s ratio.

  19. On the non-resistive limit and the magnetic boundary-layer for one-dimensional compressible magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Song; Zhang, Jianwen

    2017-09-01

    We consider an initial-boundary value problem for the one-dimensional equations of compressible isentropic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flows. The non-resistive limit of the global solutions with large data is justified. As a by-product, the global well-posedness of the compressible non-resistive MHD equations is established. Moreover, the thickness of the magnetic boundary-layer of the value O(ν^α) with 0<α<1/2 is proved, where ν>0 is the resistivity coefficient. The proofs of these results are based on a full use of the so-called ‘effective viscous flux’, the material derivative and the structure of the equations.

  20. Calculation of compressible flows about complex moving geometries using a three-dimensional Cartesian cut cell method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, G.; Causon, D. M.; Ingram, D. M.

    2000-08-01

    A three-dimensional Cartesian cut cell method is described for modelling compressible flows around complex geometries, which may be either static or in relative motion. A background Cartesian mesh is generated and any solid bodies cut out of it. Accurate representation of the geometry is achieved by employing different types of cut cell. A modified finite volume solver is used to deal with boundaries that are moving with respect to the stationary background mesh. The current flow solver is an unsplit MUSCL-Hancock method of the Godunov type, which is implemented in conjunction with a cell-merging technique to maintain numerical stability in the presence of arbitrarily small cut cells and to retain strict conservation at moving boundaries. The method is applied to some steady and unsteady compressible flows involving both static and moving bodies in three dimensions. Copyright

  1. Interpenetrating graphene networks: Three-dimensional node-line semimetals with massive negative linear compressibilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yangzheng; Zhao, Zhisheng; Strobel, Timothy A.; Cohen, R. E.

    2016-12-01

    We investigated the stability and mechanical and electronic properties of 15 metastable mixed s p2-s p3 carbon allotropes in the family of interpenetrating graphene networks (IGNs) using density functional theory (DFT). IGN allotropes exhibit nonmonotonic bulk and linear compressibilities before their structures irreversibly transform into new configurations under large hydrostatic compression. The maximum bulk compressibilities vary widely between structures and range from 3.6 to 306 TPa-1. We find all the IGN allotropes have negative linear compressibilities with maximum values varying from -0.74 to -133 TPa-1. The maximal negative linear compressibility of Z33 (-133 TPa-1 at 3.4 GPa) exceeds previously reported values at pressures higher than 1.0 GPa. IGN allotropes can be classified as either armchair or zigzag type, and these two types of IGNs exhibit different electronic properties. Zigzag-type IGNs are node-line semimetals, while armchair-type IGNs are either semiconductors or node-loop or node-line semimetals. Experimental synthesis of these IGN allotropes might be realized since their formation enthalpies relative to graphite are only 0.1-0.5 eV/atom (that of C60 fullerene is about 0.4 eV/atom), and energetically feasible binary compound pathways are possible.

  2. Computer program for quasi-one-dimensional compressible flow with area change and friction - Application to gas film seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuk, J.; Smith, P. J.

    1974-01-01

    A computer program is presented for compressible fluid flow with friction and area change. The program carries out a quasi-one-dimensional flow analysis which is valid for laminar and turbulent flows under both subsonic and choked flow conditions. The program was written to be applied to gas film seals. The area-change analysis should prove useful for choked flow conditions with small mean thickness, as well as for face seals where radial area change is significant. The program is written in FORTRAN 4.

  3. Blockage corrections for three-dimensional-flow closed-throat wind tunnels, with consideration of the effect of compressibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herriot, John G

    1950-01-01

    Theoretical blockage corrections are presented for a body of revolution and for a three-dimensional unswept wing in a circular or rectangular wind tunnel. The theory takes account of the effects of the wake and of the compressibility of the fluid, and is based on the assumption that the dimensions of the model are small in comparison with those of the tunnel throat. Formulas are given for correcting a number of the quantities, such as dynamic pressure and Mach number, measured in wing-tunnel tests. The report presents a summary and unification of the existing literature on the subject.

  4. Blockage corrections for three-dimensional-flow closed-throat wind tunnels, with consideration of the effect of compressibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herriot, John G

    1947-01-01

    Theoretical blockage corrections are presented for a body of revolution and for a three-dimensional unswept wing in a circular or rectangular wind tunnel. The theory takes account of the effects of the wake and of the compressibility of the fluid, and is based on the assumption that the dimensions of the model are small in comparison with those of the tunnel throat. Formulas are given for correcting a number of the quantities, such as dynamic pressure and Mach number, measured in wind-tunnel tests. The report presents a summary and unification of the existing literature on the subject.

  5. Blockage Corrections for Three-Dimensional-Flow Closed-Throat Wind Tunnels, with Consideration of the Effect of Compressibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herriot, J. G.

    1951-01-01

    Theoretical blockage corrections are presented for a body of revolution and for a three-dimensional, unswept wing in a circular or rectangular wind tunnel. The theory takes account of the effects of the wake and of the compressibility of the fluid, and is based on the assumption that the dimensions of the model are small in comparison with those of the tunnel throat. Formulas are given for correcting a number of the quantities, such as dynamic pressure and Mach number, measured in wind tunnel tests. The report presents a summary and unification of the existing literature on the subject

  6. Usefulness of two- and three-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography in the assessment of proximal left coronary system compression by a paraprosthetic aortic valve abscess.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Amier; McElwee, Samuel K; Jiang, Amy Z; Barssoum, Kirolos N; Elkaryoni, Ahmed E; Arisha, Mohammed J; Srialluri, Swetha; Seghatol, Frank; Nanda, Navin C

    2017-02-01

    Paraprosthetic aortic valve abscess represents a rare, but lethal complication of infective endocarditis. We report a case of proximal left coronary system compression by a paraprosthetic aortic valve abscess whose detection was augmented using live/real time three-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography. Our case illustrates the usefulness of combined two- and three-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography in detecting this finding.

  7. Considerations on the effect of wind-tunnel walls on oscillating air forces for two-dimensional subsonic compressible flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Runyan, Harry L; Watkins, Charles E

    1953-01-01

    This report treats the effect of wind-tunnel walls on the oscillating two-dimensional air forces in a compressible medium. The walls are simulated by the usual method of placing images at appropriate distances above and below the wing. An important result shown is that, for certain conditions of wing frequency, tunnel height, and Mach number, the tunnel and wing may form a resonant system so that the forces on the wing are greatly changed from the condition of no tunnel walls. It is pointed out that similar conditions exist for three-dimensional flow in circular and rectangular tunnels and apparently, within certain Mach number ranges, in tunnels of nonuniform cross section or even in open tunnels or jets.

  8. Compressible Astrophysics Simulation Code

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, L.; Singer, M.

    2007-07-18

    This is an astrophysics simulation code involving a radiation diffusion module developed at LLNL coupled to compressible hydrodynamics and adaptive mesh infrastructure developed at LBNL. One intended application is to neutrino diffusion in core collapse supernovae.

  9. Postbuckling behavior of longitudinally compressed orthotropic plates with three-dimensional flexibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, M.; Bains, N. J. C.

    1986-01-01

    Postbuckling results for the average longitudinal compressive stress vs applied displacement are obtained for aluminum (isotropic), aluminum/epoxy (quasi-isotropic), and 45-deg graphite/epoxy (orthotropic) plates using classical (Kirchhoff) and conventional transverse shearing theories. An analysis of the results obtained shows that, in the postbuckling range, the classical theory cannot provide reasonably accurate results even for thin plates.

  10. Three-Dimensional Crystal Plasticity Finite Element Simulation of Hot Compressive Deformation Behaviors of 7075 Al Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lei-Ting; Lin, Y. C.; Li, Ling; Shen, Lu-Ming; Wen, Dong-Xu

    2015-03-01

    Three-dimensional crystal plasticity finite element (CPFE) method is used to investigate the hot compressive deformation behaviors of 7075 aluminum alloy. Based on the grain morphology and crystallographic texture of 7075 aluminum alloy, the microstructure-based representative volume element (RVE) model was established by the pole figure inversion approach. In order to study the macroscopic stress-strain response and microstructural evolution, the CPFE simulations are performed on the established microstructure-based RVE model. It is found that the simulated stress-strain curves and deformation texture well agree with the measured results of 7075 aluminum alloy. With the increasing deformation degree, the remained initial weak Goss texture component tends to be strong and stable, which may result in the steady flow stress. The grain orientation and grain misorientation have significant effects on the deformation heterogeneity during hot compressive deformation. In the rolling-normal plane, the continuity of strain and misorientation can maintain across the low-angle grain boundaries, while the discontinuity of strain and misorientation is observed at the high-angle grain boundaries. The simulated results demonstrate that the developed CPFE model can well describe the hot compressive deformation behaviors of 7075 aluminum alloy under elevated temperatures.

  11. Three-dimensional evaluation of the compression and recovery behavior in a flexible graphite sheet by synchrotron radiation microtomography

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, M.; Toda, H.; Takeuchi, A.; Uesugi, K.; Suzuki, Y.

    2012-07-15

    The compression and unloading behavior of flexible graphite sheets was investigated using synchrotron radiation microtomography with 1 {mu}m voxel size. The recovery ratio of the flexible graphite sheet was measured accurately by in-situ observation. The three-dimensional strain distribution in the interior of the specimen was obtained using the microstructural tracking method. The inner strain distribution with micrometer scale indicated inhomogeneous deformation. The microstructural tracking analysis revealed that deformation units exist in the flexible graphite sheet. The units seem to deform, affecting the neighboring units with each other. The units had a similar size and shape with compacted exfoliated graphite worms that constitute the flexible graphite sheet. Microscopic deformations during compression and unloading are surely affected by the microstructure of the sheet. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The compression and recovery behavior was investigated using microtomography. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The tracking analysis revealed that deformation units exist in the specimen. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Each unit deforms in relation to the neighboring unit.

  12. CS2-Collector: A New Approach for Data Collection in Wireless Sensor Networks Based on Two-Dimensional Compressive Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong; Yang, Zhuoshi; Zhang, Jianpei; Li, Feng; Wen, Hongkai; Shen, Yiran

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the problem of reconstructing the temporal and spatial profile of some physical phenomena monitored by large-scale Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) in an energy efficient manner. Compressive sensing is one of the popular choices to reduce the energy consumption of the data collection in WSNs. The existing solutions only consider sparsity of sensors’ data from either temporal or spatial dimensions. In this paper, we propose a novel data collection strategy, CS2-collector, for WSNs based on the theory of Two Dimensional Compressive Sensing (2DCS). It exploits both temporal and spatial sparsity, i.e., 2D-sparsity of WSNs and achieves significant gain on the tradeoff between the compression ratio and reconstruction accuracy as the numerical simulations and evaluations on different types of sensors’ data. More intuitively, with the same given energy budget, CS2-collector provides significantly more accurate reconstruction of the profile of the physical phenomena that are temporal-spatially sparse. PMID:27548180

  13. Numerical solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations for the supersonic laminar flow over a two-dimensional compression corner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, J. E.

    1972-01-01

    Numerical solutions have been obtained for the supersonic, laminar flow over a two-dimensional compression corner. These solutions were obtained as steady-state solutions to the unsteady Navier-Stokes equations using the finite difference method of Brailovskaya, which has second-order accuracy in the spatial coordinates. Good agreement was obtained between the computed results and wall pressure distributions measured experimentally for Mach numbers of 4 and 6.06, and respective Reynolds numbers, based on free-stream conditions and the distance from the leading edge to the corner. In those calculations, as well as in others, sufficient resolution was obtained to show the streamline pattern in the separation bubble. Upstream boundary conditions to the compression corner flow were provided by numerically solving the unsteady Navier-Stokes equations for the flat plate flow field, beginning at the leading edge. The compression corner flow field was enclosed by a computational boundary with the unknown boundary conditions supplied by extrapolation from internally computed points.

  14. Two-Dimensional Modeling of Time-Varying Hydrodynamics and Juvenile Chinook Salmon Habitat in the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, William A.; Richmond, Marshall C.; McMichael, Geoffrey A.

    2007-10-10

    The Hanford Reach is the only remaining unimpounded reach of the Columbia River in the United States above Bonneville Dam. Discharge in the Hanford Reach is regulated by several dams and is often subject to rapid changes. Sharp flow reductions have led to the stranding or entrapment, and subsequent mortality, of juvenile chinook salmon (Oncorynchus tshawytscha) and other important fish species within the Hanford Reach. A multi-block two-dimensional depth-averaged hydrodynamic model was used to simulate time-varying river velocity and stage in a 37~km portion of the Hanford Reach. Simulation results were used to estimate time-varying juvenile chinook salmon habitat area, and the part of that habitat affected by discharge fluctuations. Affected habitat area estimates were made for the chinook salmon rearing period of four years. These estimates were used, along with other important factors, to establish a statistical relationship between discharge fluctuation and juvenile chinook salmon mortality.

  15. Three-dimensional hydrodynamical CO5BOLD model atmospheres of red giant stars. VI. First chromosphere model of a late-type giant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wedemeyer, Sven; Kučinskas, Arūnas; Klevas, Jonas; Ludwig, Hans-Günter

    2017-10-01

    Aims: Although observational data unequivocally point to the presence of chromospheres in red giant stars, no attempts have been made so far to model them using 3D hydrodynamical model atmospheres. We therefore compute an exploratory 3D hydrodynamical model atmosphere for a cool red giant in order to study the dynamical and thermodynamic properties of its chromosphere, as well as the influence of the chromosphere on its observable properties. Methods: Three-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics simulations are carried out with the CO5BOLD model atmosphere code for a star with the atmospheric parameters (Teff ≈ 4010 K, log g = 1.5, [ M / H ] = 0.0), which are similar to those of the K-type giant star Aldebaran (α Tau). The computational domain extends from the upper convection zone into the chromosphere (7.4 ≥ log τRoss ≥ - 12.8) and covers several granules in each horizontal direction. Using this model atmosphere, we compute the emergent continuum intensity maps at different wavelengths, spectral line profiles of Ca ii K, the Ca ii infrared triplet line at 854.2 nm, and Hα, as well as the spectral energy distribution (SED) of the emergent radiative flux. Results: The initial model quickly develops a dynamical chromosphere that is characterised by propagating and interacting shock waves. The peak temperatures in the chromospheric shock fronts reach values of up to 5000 K, although the shock fronts remain quite narrow. Similar to the Sun, the gas temperature distribution in the upper layers of red giant stars is composed of a cool component due to adiabatic cooling in the expanding post-shock regions and a hot component due to shock waves. For this red giant model, the hot component is a rather flat high-temperature tail, which nevertheless affects the resulting average temperatures significantly. Conclusions: The simulations show that the atmospheres of red giant stars are dynamic and intermittent. Consequently, many observable properties cannot be reproduced

  16. A NEW MULTI-DIMENSIONAL GENERAL RELATIVISTIC NEUTRINO HYDRODYNAMICS CODE FOR CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE. II. RELATIVISTIC EXPLOSION MODELS OF CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Bernhard; Janka, Hans-Thomas; Marek, Andreas E-mail: thj@mpa-garching.mpg.de

    2012-09-01

    We present the first two-dimensional general relativistic (GR) simulations of stellar core collapse and explosion with the COCONUT hydrodynamics code in combination with the VERTEX solver for energy-dependent, three-flavor neutrino transport, using the extended conformal flatness condition for approximating the space-time metric and a ray-by-ray-plus ansatz to tackle the multi-dimensionality of the transport. For both of the investigated 11.2 and 15 M{sub Sun} progenitors we obtain successful, though seemingly marginal, neutrino-driven supernova explosions. This outcome and the time evolution of the models basically agree with results previously obtained with the PROMETHEUS hydro solver including an approximative treatment of relativistic effects by a modified Newtonian potential. However, GR models exhibit subtle differences in the neutrinospheric conditions compared with Newtonian and pseudo-Newtonian simulations. These differences lead to significantly higher luminosities and mean energies of the radiated electron neutrinos and antineutrinos and therefore to larger energy-deposition rates and heating efficiencies in the gain layer with favorable consequences for strong nonradial mass motions and ultimately for an explosion. Moreover, energy transfer to the stellar medium around the neutrinospheres through nucleon recoil in scattering reactions of heavy-lepton neutrinos also enhances the mentioned effects. Together with previous pseudo-Newtonian models, the presented relativistic calculations suggest that the treatment of gravity and energy-exchanging neutrino interactions can make differences of even 50%-100% in some quantities and is likely to contribute to a finally successful explosion mechanism on no minor level than hydrodynamical differences between different dimensions.

  17. Hydrodynamic instability growth of three-dimensional modulations in radiation-driven implosions with "low-foot" and "high-foot" drives at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smalyuk, V. A.; Weber, C. R.; Robey, H. F.; Casey, D. T.; Chen, K.-C.; Clark, D. S.; Farrell, M.; Felker, S.; Field, J. E.; Haan, S. W.; Hammel, B. A.; Hamza, A. V.; Hoover, D.; Kroll, J. J.; Landen, O. L.; MacPhee, A. G.; Martinez, D.; Nikroo, A.; Rice, N.

    2017-04-01

    Hydrodynamic instability growth has been studied using three-dimensional (3-D) broadband modulations by comparing "high-foot" and "low-foot" spherical plastic (CH) capsule implosions at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [E. M. Campbell et al., AIP Conf. Proc. 429, 3 (1998)]. The initial perturbations included capsule outer-surface roughness and capsule-mounting membranes ("tents") that were similar to those used in a majority of implosions on NIF. The tents with thicknesses of 31-nm, 46-nm, and 109-nm were used in the experiments. The outer-surface roughness in the "low-foot" experiment was similar to the standard specification, while it was increased by ˜4 times in the "high-foot" experiment to compensate for the reduced growth. The ablation-front instability growth was measured using a Hydrodynamic Growth Radiography platform at a convergence ratio of ˜3. The dominant capsule perturbations, generated by the tent mountings, had measured perturbation amplitudes comparable to the capsule thickness with the "low-foot" drive. These tent perturbations were reduced by ˜3 to 10 times in implosions with the "high-foot" drive. Unexpectedly, the measured perturbations with initially thinner tents were either larger or similar to the measured perturbations with thicker tents for both "high-foot" and "low-foot" drives. While the measured instability growth of 3-D broadband perturbations was also significantly reduced by ˜5 to 10 times with the "high-foot" drive, compared to the "low-foot" drive, the growth mitigation was stronger than expected based on previous "growth-factor" results measured with two-dimensional modulations [D. T. Casey et al., Phys. Rev. E 90, 011102 (2014)]. One of the hypotheses to explain the results is based on the 3-D modulations of the oxygen content in the bulk of the capsule having a stronger effect on the overall growth of capsule perturbations than the outer-surface capsule roughness.

  18. A New Multi-dimensional General Relativistic Neutrino Hydrodynamics Code for Core-collapse Supernovae. II. Relativistic Explosion Models of Core-collapse Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Bernhard; Janka, Hans-Thomas; Marek, Andreas

    2012-09-01

    We present the first two-dimensional general relativistic (GR) simulations of stellar core collapse and explosion with the COCONUT hydrodynamics code in combination with the VERTEX solver for energy-dependent, three-flavor neutrino transport, using the extended conformal flatness condition for approximating the space-time metric and a ray-by-ray-plus ansatz to tackle the multi-dimensionality of the transport. For both of the investigated 11.2 and 15 M ⊙ progenitors we obtain successful, though seemingly marginal, neutrino-driven supernova explosions. This outcome and the time evolution of the models basically agree with results previously obtained with the PROMETHEUS hydro solver including an approximative treatment of relativistic effects by a modified Newtonian potential. However, GR models exhibit subtle differences in the neutrinospheric conditions compared with Newtonian and pseudo-Newtonian simulations. These differences lead to significantly higher luminosities and mean energies of the radiated electron neutrinos and antineutrinos and therefore to larger energy-deposition rates and heating efficiencies in the gain layer with favorable consequences for strong nonradial mass motions and ultimately for an explosion. Moreover, energy transfer to the stellar medium around the neutrinospheres through nucleon recoil in scattering reactions of heavy-lepton neutrinos also enhances the mentioned effects. Together with previous pseudo-Newtonian models, the presented relativistic calculations suggest that the treatment of gravity and energy-exchanging neutrino interactions can make differences of even 50%-100% in some quantities and is likely to contribute to a finally successful explosion mechanism on no minor level than hydrodynamical differences between different dimensions.

  19. Density measurement of shock compressed foam using two-dimensional x-ray radiography.

    PubMed

    Le Pape, Sebastien; Macphee, Andrew; Hey, Daniel; Patel, Pravesh; Mackinnon, Andrew; Key, Mike; Pasley, John; Wei, Mingsheng; Chen, Sophia; Ma, Tammy; Beg, Farhat; Alexander, N; Stephens, Rich; Offerman, Dustin; Link, A; Van-Woerkom, Lynn; Freeman, R

    2008-10-01

    We have used spherically bent quartz crystal to image a laser-generated shock in a foam medium. The foam targets had a density of 0.16 g/cm(3) and thickness of 150 microm, an aluminum/copper pusher drove the shock. The experiment was performed at the Titan facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory using a 2 ns, 250 J laser pulse to compress the foam target, and a short pulse (10 ps, 350 J) to generate a bright Ti K alpha x-ray source at 4.5 keV to radiograph the shocked target. The crystal used gives a high resolution (approximately 20 microm) monochromatic image of the shock compressed foam.

  20. Leading edge sweep effects in generic three-dimensional sidewall compression scramjet inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cozart, Aaron B.; Holland, Scott D.; Trexler, Carl A.; Perkins, John N.

    1992-01-01

    A computational and experimental study of generic 3D sidewall compression inlets is conducted to examine the effects of fore and aft leading edge sweep on the internal shock structure. Inlets with leading edge sweeps of +30 deg and -30 deg with sidewall compression angles of 6 deg were tested in the NASA Langley Mach 4 air tunnel at a geometric contraction ratio of 1.87. The principal difference in performance was determined to be in the mass capture. Spillage was identified as having two components: a pressure induced component and a sweep induced component. It was found that while the direction of the leading edge sweep had a large influence on the spillage, the pressure effects were more important.

  1. Density measurement of shock compressed foam using two-dimensional x-ray radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Le Pape, Sebastien; Macphee, Andrew; Hey, Daniel; Patel, Pravesh; Mackinnon, Andrew; Key, Mike; Pasley, John; Wei, Mingsheng; Chen, Sophia; Ma, Tammy; Beg, Farhat; Alexander, N.; Stephens, Rich; Offerman, Dustin; Link, A.; Van-Woerkom, Lynn; Freeman, R.

    2008-10-15

    We have used spherically bent quartz crystal to image a laser-generated shock in a foam medium. The foam targets had a density of 0.16 g/cm{sup 3} and thickness of 150 {mu}m, an aluminum/copper pusher drove the shock. The experiment was performed at the Titan facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory using a 2 ns, 250 J laser pulse to compress the foam target, and a short pulse (10 ps, 350 J) to generate a bright Ti K{alpha} x-ray source at 4.5 keV to radiograph the shocked target. The crystal used gives a high resolution ({approx}20 {mu}m) monochromatic image of the shock compressed foam.

  2. Finite element analysis of aerodynamic heating in three dimensional viscous high speed compressible flow: An assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, K.; Thornton, E. A.

    1982-01-01

    The current capability of the finite element method for solving problems of viscous flow is reviewed. Much work has been directed to the simulation of incompressible flows and the relevant features are described. The methods available for, and the problems associated with, the finite element solution of high speed viscous compressible flows are analyzed. A plan for developing finite element research in this area with experimental support is presented.

  3. A Genuinely Two-Dimensional Scheme for the Compressible Euler Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sidilkover, David

    1996-01-01

    We present a new genuinely multidimensional discretization for the compressible Euler equations. It is the only high-resolution scheme known to us where Gauss-Seidel relaxation is stable when applied as a smoother directly to the resulting high-resolution scheme. This allows us to construct a very simple and highly efficient multigrid steady-state solver. The scheme is formulated on triangular (possibly unstructured) meshes.

  4. FE analysis of the sensitivity of friction calibration curves to dimensional changes in a ring compression test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noh, Jeong Hoon; Seo, Jeong Min; Hwang, Beong Bok

    2011-04-01

    This paper is concerned with an analysis of the sensitivity of friction calibration curves to the frictional shear factor in a ring compression test. The main objective of this study is to examine the sensitivity of the FEA calibration curves of a ring compression test to the frictional shear factor. Different calibration curves were investigated by measuring dimensional changes at different positions of a ring specimen, including changes in the internal diameter at the middle and top section of the specimen, the outer diameter at the middle and top section, and the degree of surface expansion at the top surface. The initial ring geometries employed in the analysis maintain a fixed ratio of 6:3:2, i.e., the outer diameter: inner diameter: thickness ratio of the ring specimen, which is generally known as a `standard' specimen, in order only to determine the sensitivity of the calibration curves for the measurement of dimensional changes at different positions to the frictional shear factor. A perfectly plastic material was modeled for the simulations using rigid-plastic finite element code. Analyses were performed within a definite range of friction as well as over the entire range of friction to uncover the different sensitivities of calibration curves to interfacial friction given different ranges of friction. The results of this investigation are summarized in terms of a dimensionless gradient. It was determined from the results that the friction calibration curves according to measurements of the dimensional changes at different positions of a ring specimen show different degrees of linearity and sensitivity to the frictional condition on the contact surface. Among these differences, the friction calibration curve upon changes in the degree of surface expansion at the contact boundary was found to be relatively linear and sensitive to the frictional condition over the entire range of friction.

  5. Experimental dynamic response of a two-dimensional, Mach 2.7, mixed compression inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumbick, R. J.; Neiner, G. H.; Cole, G. L.

    1972-01-01

    A test program was conducted on a two-dimensional supersonic inlet. Internal disturbances in diffuser exit mass flow were produced by oscillating overboard bypass doors. Open-loop dynamic responses of shock position, throat exit and diffuser exit static pressures are presented. The steady-state and dynamic coupling between ducts were also obtained. The experimental results from the two-dimensional inlet are compared to results from a similar size axisymmetric inlet and also to a transfer function synthesis program.

  6. Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography Scan Analysis of Tumor and Organ Motion at Varying Levels of Abdominal Compression During Stereotactic Treatment of Lung and Liver

    SciTech Connect

    Heinzerling, John H.; Anderson, John F.; Papiez, Lech; Boike, Thomas; Chien, Stanley; Zhang, Geoffrey; Abdulrahman, Ramzi; Timmerman, Robert

    2008-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effectiveness of different abdominal compression levels on tumor and organ motion during stereotactic body radiotherapy of lower lobe lung and liver tumors using four-dimensional (4D)-CT scan analysis. Methods and Materials: Three 4D-CT scans were acquired for 10 patients first using with no compression and then compared with two different levels of abdominal compression. The position of the tumor and various organs were defined at the peak inspiratory and expiratory phases and compared to determine the maximum motion. Results: Mean ({+-}SD) medium compression force (MC) and high compression force (HC) were 47.6 {+-} 16.0 N and 90.7 {+-} 27.1 N, respectively. Mean overall tumor motion was 13.6 mm (2{sigma} [2 sigma] 11.5-15.6), 8.3 mm (2{sigma} 6.0-10.5), and 7.2 mm (2{sigma} 5.4-9.0) for no compression, MC, and HC, respectively. A significant difference in the control of both superior-inferior (SI) and overall motion of tumors was seen with the application of MC and HC when compared with no compression (p < 0.0001 for both). High compression force improved SI and overall tumor motion compared with MC, but this was only significant for SI motion (p = 0.04 and p = 0.06). Significant control of organ motion was only seen in the pancreas (p = 0.01). Conclusions: Four-dimensional CT shows significant control of both lower lobe lung and liver tumors using abdominal compression. High levels of compression improve SI tumor motion when compared with MC.

  7. Aspects of causal viscous hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Bhalerao, R. S.; Gupta, Sourendu

    2008-01-15

    We investigate the phenomenology of freely expanding fluids, with different material properties, evolving through the Israel-Stewart (IS) causal viscous hydrodynamics, and compare our results with those obtained in the relativistic Eckart-Landau-Navier-Stokes (ELNS) acausal viscous hydrodynamics. Through the analysis of scaling invariants we give a definition of thermalization time that can be self-consistently determined in viscous hydrodynamics. Next we construct the solutions for one-dimensional boost-invariant flows. Expansion of viscous fluids is slower than that of one-dimensional ideal fluids, resulting in entropy production. At late times, these flows are reasonably well approximated by solutions obtained in ELNS hydrodynamics. Estimates of initial energy densities from observed final values are strongly dependent on the dynamics one chooses. For the same material, and the same final state, IS hydrodynamics gives the smallest initial energy density. We also study fluctuations about these one-dimensional boost-invariant backgrounds; they are damped in ELNS hydrodynamics but can become sound waves in IS hydrodynamics. The difference is obvious in power spectra due to clear signals of wave-interference in IS hydrodynamics, which is completely absent in ELNS dynamics.

  8. Particle Mesh Hydrodynamics for Astrophysics Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatelain, Philippe; Cottet, Georges-Henri; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    We present a particle method for the simulation of three dimensional compressible hydrodynamics based on a hybrid Particle-Mesh discretization of the governing equations. The method is rooted on the regularization of particle locations as in remeshed Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (rSPH). The rSPH method was recently introduced to remedy problems associated with the distortion of computational elements in SPH, by periodically re-initializing the particle positions and by using high order interpolation kernels. In the PMH formulation, the particles solely handle the convective part of the compressible Euler equations. The particle quantities are then interpolated onto a mesh, where the pressure terms are computed. PMH, like SPH, is free of the convection CFL condition while at the same time it is more efficient as derivatives are computed on a mesh rather than particle-particle interactions. PMH does not detract from the adaptive character of SPH and allows for control of its accuracy. We present simulations of a benchmark astrophysics problem demonstrating the capabilities of this approach.

  9. A strategy for reducing stagnation phase hydrodynamic instability growth in inertial confinement fusion implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, D. S.; Robey, H. F.; Smalyuk, V. A.

    2015-05-01

    Encouraging progress is being made in demonstrating control of ablation front hydrodynamic instability growth in inertial confinement fusion implosion experiments on the National Ignition Facility [E. I. Moses, R. N. Boyd, B. A. Remington, C. J. Keane, and R. Al-Ayat, Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)]. Even once ablation front stabilities are controlled, however, instability during the stagnation phase of the implosion can still quench ignition. A scheme is proposed to reduce the growth of stagnation phase instabilities through the reverse of the "adiabat shaping" mechanism proposed to control ablation front growth. Two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics simulations confirm that improved stagnation phase stability should be possible without compromising fuel compression.

  10. Experimental investigation of generic three-dimensional sidewall-compression scramjet inlets at Mach 6 in tetrafluoromethane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, Scott D.

    1993-01-01

    Three-dimensional sidewall-compression scramjet inlets with leading-edge sweeps of 30 deg and 70 deg were tested in the Langley Hypersonic CF4 Tunnel at Mach 6 and with a ratio of specific heats of 1.2. The parametric effects of leading-edge sweep, cowl position, contraction ratio, and Reynolds number were investigated. The models were instrumented with 42 static pressure orifices that were distributed on the sidewalls, base plate, and cowl. Schlieren movies were made of each test for flow visualization of the effects of the internal flow spillage on the external flow field. To obtain an approximate characterization of the flow field, a modification to two-dimensional, inviscid, oblique shock theory was derived to accommodate the three-dimensional effects of leading-edge sweep. This theory qualitatively predicted the reflected shock structure (i.e., sidewall impingement locations) and the observed increase in spillage with increasing leading-edge sweep. The primary effect of moving the cowl forward was capturing the flow that would have otherwise spilled out ahead of the cowl. Increasing the contraction ratio increases the number of internal shock reflections and hence incrementally increases the sidewall pressure distribution. Significant Reynolds number effects were noted over a small range of Reynolds number.

  11. Three-dimensional bending, torsion and axial compression of the femoropopliteal artery during limb flexion.

    PubMed

    MacTaggart, Jason N; Phillips, Nicholas Y; Lomneth, Carol S; Pipinos, Iraklis I; Bowen, Robert; Baxter, B Timothy; Johanning, Jason; Longo, G Matthew; Desyatova, Anastasia S; Moulton, Michael J; Dzenis, Yuris A; Kamenskiy, Alexey V

    2014-07-18

    High failure rates of femoropopliteal artery reconstruction are commonly attributed to complex 3D arterial deformations that occur with limb movement. The purpose of this study was to develop a method for accurate assessment of these deformations. Custom-made stainless-steel markers were deployed into 5 in situ cadaveric femoropopliteal arteries using fluoroscopy. Thin-section CT images were acquired with each limb in the straight and acutely bent states. Image segmentation and 3D reconstruction allowed comparison of the relative locations of each intra-arterial marker position for determination of the artery's bending, torsion and axial compression. After imaging, each artery was excised for histological analysis using Verhoeff-Van Gieson staining. Femoropopliteal arteries deformed non-uniformly with highly localized deformations in the proximal superficial femoral artery, and between the adductor hiatus and distal popliteal artery. The largest bending (11±3-6±1 mm radius of curvature), twisting (28±9-77±27°/cm) and axial compression (19±10-30±8%) were registered at the adductor hiatus and the below knee popliteal artery. These deformations were 3.7, 19 and 2.5 fold more severe than values currently reported in the literature. Histology demonstrated a distinct sub-adventitial layer of longitudinally oriented elastin fibers with intimal thickening in the segments with the largest deformations. This endovascular intra-arterial marker technique can quantify the non-uniform 3D deformations of the femoropopliteal artery during knee flexion without disturbing surrounding structures. We demonstrate that 3D arterial bending, torsion and compression in the flexed lower limb are highly localized and are substantially more severe than previously reported. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Hydrodynamic Efficiency of Ablation Propulsion with Pulsed Ion Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Buttapeng, Chainarong; Yazawa, Masaru; Harada, Nobuhiro; Suematsu, Hisayuki; Jiang Weihua; Yatsui, Kiyoshi

    2006-05-02

    This paper presents the hydrodynamic efficiency of ablation plasma produced by pulsed ion beam on the basis of the ion beam-target interaction. We used a one-dimensional hydrodynamic fluid compressible to study the physics involved namely an ablation acceleration behavior and analyzed it as a rocketlike model in order to investigate its hydrodynamic variables for propulsion applications. These variables were estimated by the concept of ablation driven implosion in terms of ablated mass fraction, implosion efficiency, and hydrodynamic energy conversion. Herein, the energy conversion efficiency of 17.5% was achieved. In addition, the results show maximum energy efficiency of the ablation process (ablation efficiency) of 67% meaning the efficiency with which pulsed ion beam energy-ablation plasma conversion. The effects of ion beam energy deposition depth to hydrodynamic efficiency were briefly discussed. Further, an evaluation of propulsive force with high specific impulse of 4000s, total impulse of 34mN and momentum to energy ratio in the range of {mu}N/W was also analyzed.

  13. High-order ENO schemes applied to two- and three-dimensional compressible flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shu, Chi-Wang; Erlebacher, Gordon; Zang, Thomas A.; Whitaker, David; Osher, Stanley

    1991-01-01

    High order essentially non-oscillatory (ENO) finite difference schemes are applied to the 2-D and 3-D compressible Euler and Navier-Stokes equations. Practical issues, such as vectorization, efficiency of coding, cost comparison with other numerical methods, and accuracy degeneracy effects, are discussed. Numerical examples are provided which are representative of computational problems of current interest in transition and turbulence physics. These require both nonoscillatory shock capturing and high resolution for detailed structures in the smooth regions and demonstrate the advantage of ENO schemes.

  14. Analytical approximations for flow in compressible, saturated, one-dimensional porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barry, D. A.; Lockington, D. A.; Jeng, D.-S.; Parlange, J.-Y.; Li, L.; Stagnitti, F.

    2007-04-01

    A nonlinear model for single-phase fluid flow in slightly compressible porous media is presented and solved approximately. The model assumes state equations for density, porosity, viscosity and permeability that are exponential functions of the fluid (either gas or liquid) pressure. The governing equation is transformed into a nonlinear diffusion equation. It is solved for a semi-infinite domain for either constant pressure or constant flux boundary conditions at the surface. The solutions obtained, although approximate, are extremely accurate as demonstrated by comparisons with numerical results. Predictions for the surface pressure resulting from a constant flux into a porous medium are compared with published experimental data.

  15. Solution of the two-dimensional compressible Navier-Stokes equations on embedded structured multiblock meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szmelter, J.; Marchant, M. J.; Evans, A.; Weatherill, N. P.

    A cell vertex finite volume Jameson scheme is used to solve the 2D compressible, laminar, viscous fluid flow equations on locally embedded multiblock meshes. The proposed algorithm is applicable to both the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations. It is concluded that the adaptivity method is very successful in efficiently improving the accuracy of the solution. Both the mesh generator and the flow equation solver which are based on a quadtree data structure offer good flexibility in the treatment of interfaces. It is concluded that methods under consideration lead to accurate flow solutions.

  16. Compressively Characterizing High-Dimensional Entangled States with Complementary, Random Filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howland, Gregory A.; Knarr, Samuel H.; Schneeloch, James; Lum, Daniel J.; Howell, John C.

    2016-04-01

    The resources needed to conventionally characterize a quantum system are overwhelmingly large for high-dimensional systems. This obstacle may be overcome by abandoning traditional cornerstones of quantum measurement, such as general quantum states, strong projective measurement, and assumption-free characterization. Following this reasoning, we demonstrate an efficient technique for characterizing high-dimensional, spatial entanglement with one set of measurements. We recover sharp distributions with local, random filtering of the same ensemble in momentum followed by position—something the uncertainty principle forbids for projective measurements. Exploiting the expectation that entangled signals are highly correlated, we use fewer than 5000 measurements to characterize a 65,536-dimensional state. Finally, we use entropic inequalities to witness entanglement without a density matrix. Our method represents the sea change unfolding in quantum measurement, where methods influenced by the information theory and signal-processing communities replace unscalable, brute-force techniques—a progression previously followed by classical sensing.

  17. Constraining relativistic viscous hydrodynamical evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, Mauricio; Strickland, Michael

    2009-04-15

    We show that by requiring positivity of the longitudinal pressure it is possible to constrain the initial conditions one can use in second-order viscous hydrodynamical simulations of ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions. We demonstrate this explicitly for (0+1)-dimensional viscous hydrodynamics and discuss how the constraint extends to higher dimensions. Additionally, we present an analytic approximation to the solution of (0+1)-dimensional second-order viscous hydrodynamical evolution equations appropriate to describe the evolution of matter in an ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collision.

  18. Two-dimensional orthogonal DCT expansion in trapezoid and triangular blocks and modified JPEG image compression.

    PubMed

    Ding, Jian-Jiun; Huang, Ying-Wun; Lin, Pao-Yen; Pei, Soo-Chang; Chen, Hsin-Hui; Wang, Yu-Hsiang

    2013-09-01

    In the conventional JPEG algorithm, an image is divided into eight by eight blocks and then the 2-D DCT is applied to encode each block. In this paper, we find that, in addition to rectangular blocks, the 2-D DCT is also orthogonal in the trapezoid and triangular blocks. Therefore, instead of eight by eight blocks, we can generalize the JPEG algorithm and divide an image into trapezoid and triangular blocks according to the shapes of objects and achieve higher compression ratio. Compared with the existing shape adaptive compression algorithms, as we do not try to match the shape of each object exactly, the number of bytes used for encoding the edges can be less and the error caused from the high frequency component at the boundary can be avoided. The simulations show that, when the bit rate is fixed, our proposed algorithm can achieve higher PSNR than the JPEG algorithm and other shape adaptive algorithms. Furthermore, in addition to the 2-D DCT, we can also use our proposed method to generate the 2-D complete and orthogonal sine basis, Hartley basis, Walsh basis, and discrete polynomial basis in a trapezoid or a triangular block.

  19. Numerical study of heavy-ion stopping in foam targets with one-dimensional subcell-scale hydrodynamic motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oguri, Y.; Kondo, K.; Hasegawa, J.

    2014-01-01

    Heavy-ion stopping in foam targets with subcell-scale hydro motions was numerically investigated in relation to ion-driven warm dense matter experiments. To simulate porous foam targets, we employed a simple 1D periodic multilayer model consisting of thin solid slabs and gaps between them. The averaged pore diameter and cell-wall thickness of the foam were represented by the gap width between the slabs and the slab thickness, respectively. The density- and temperature-dependent projectile stopping cross-sections were evaluated using a binary encounter model taking into account the electronic state of target atoms during heating and expansion. We employed a combination of 11Na projectiles and subrange 13Al foam targets with ρ=0.05ρsolid. The hydrodynamic motion of the target was calculated with a 1D code. During homogenization, hot dense spots appeared at the original gap positions, owing to stagnation of the jets. As a result, even after the pores were filled with blow-off materials, the initial inhomogeneity was not completely smeared out, and the total energy loss was still not equal to that in the homogeneous equivalent, especially for large pore sizes.

  20. A pressure relaxation closure model for one-dimensional, two-material Lagrangian hydrodynamics based on the Riemann problem

    SciTech Connect

    Kamm, James R; Shashkov, Mikhail J

    2009-01-01

    Despite decades of development, Lagrangian hydrodynamics of strengthfree materials presents numerous open issues, even in one dimension. We focus on the problem of closing a system of equations for a two-material cell under the assumption of a single velocity model. There are several existing models and approaches, each possessing different levels of fidelity to the underlying physics and each exhibiting unique features in the computed solutions. We consider the case in which the change in heat in the constituent materials in the mixed cell is assumed equal. An instantaneous pressure equilibration model for a mixed cell can be cast as four equations in four unknowns, comprised of the updated values of the specific internal energy and the specific volume for each of the two materials in the mixed cell. The unique contribution of our approach is a physics-inspired, geometry-based model in which the updated values of the sub-cell, relaxing-toward-equilibrium constituent pressures are related to a local Riemann problem through an optimization principle. This approach couples the modeling problem of assigning sub-cell pressures to the physics associated with the local, dynamic evolution. We package our approach in the framework of a standard predictor-corrector time integration scheme. We evaluate our model using idealized, two material problems using either ideal-gas or stiffened-gas equations of state and compare these results to those computed with the method of Tipton and with corresponding pure-material calculations.

  1. Vortex Generators in a Two-Dimensional, External-Compression Supersonic Inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baydar, Ezgihan; Lu, Frank K.; Slater, John W.

    2016-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics simulations are performed as part of a process to design a vortex generator array for a two-dimensional inlet for Mach 1.6. The objective is to improve total pressure recovery a on at the engine face of the inlet. Both vane-type and ramp-type vortex generators are examined.

  2. Wall interference in a two-dimensional-flow wind tunnel, with consideration of the effect of compressibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, H Julian; Vincenti, Walter G

    1944-01-01

    Theoretical tunnel-wall corrections are derived for an airfoil of finite thickness and camber in a two-dimensional-flow wind tunnel. The theory takes account of the effects of the wake of the airfoil and of the compressibility of the fluid, and is based upon the assumption that the chord of the airfoil is small in comparison with the height of the tunnel. Consideration is given to the phenomenon of choking at high speeds and its relation to the tunnel-wall corrections. The theoretical results are compared with the small amount of low-speed experimental data available and the agreement is seen to be satisfactory, even for relatively large values of the chord-height ratio.

  3. Terminal shock position and restart control of a Mach 2.7, two-dimensional, twin duct mixed compression inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, G. L.; Neiner, G. H.; Baumbick, R. J.

    1973-01-01

    Experimental results of terminal shock and restart control system tests of a two-dimensional, twin-duct mixed compression inlet are presented. High-response (110-Hz bandwidth) overboard bypass doors were used, both as the variable to control shock position and as the means of disturbing the inlet airflow. An inherent instability in inlet shock position resulted in noisy feedback signals and thus restricted the terminal shock position control performance that was achieved. Proportional-plus-integral type controllers using either throat exit static pressure or shock position sensor feedback gave adequate low-frequency control. The inlet restart control system kept the terminal shock control loop closed throughout the unstart-restart transient. The capability to restart the inlet was non limited by the inlet instability.

  4. Amplifying and compressing optical filter based on one-dimensional ternary photonic crystal structure containing gain medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamshidi-Ghaleh, Kazem; Ebrahimpour, Zeinab; Moslemi, Fatemeh

    2015-07-01

    The transmission spectrum properties of the one-dimensional ternary photonic crystal (1DTPC) structure, composed of dielectric (D), metal (M) and gain (G) materials, with three different arrangements of (DGM)N, (GDM)N and (DMG)N, where N is the number of periodicity, were investigated. Two full photonic band gaps and N-1 resonant peaks, localized between them, were observed on transmittance spectra on near-UV spectrum region. When the gained layer was placed in front of the metal, the peaks appeared with higher resolution. There is a peak, localized on the higher band-edge of the first gap, which shows very interesting property than the other peaks. Thus, it amplifies and compresses faster with increase in the N and strength of the gain coefficient. The effects of the gain coefficient and periodicity number are graphically illustrated. This communication presents a PC structure that can be a good candidate to design an amplifying and compressing single or multi-channel optical filter in the UV region.

  5. Compound chondrule formation in the shock-wave heating model: Three-dimensional hydrodynamics simulation of the disruption of a partially-molten dust particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, Seiji; Miura, Hitoshi; Nakamoto, Taishi

    2009-11-01

    We carried out three-dimensional hydrodynamics simulations of the disruption of a partially-molten dust particle exposed to high-speed gas flow to examine the compound chondrule formation due to mutual collisions between the fragments (fragment-collision model; [Miura, H., Yasuda, S., Nakamoto, T., 2008a. Icarus194, 811-821]). In the shock-wave heating model, which is one of the most plausible models for chondrule formation, the gas friction heats and melts the surface of the cm-sized dust particle (parent particle) and then the strong gas ram pressure causes the disruption of the molten surface layer. The hydrodynamics simulation shows details of the disruptive motion of the molten surface, production of many fragments and their trajectories parting from the parent particle, and mutual collisions among them. In our simulation, we identified 32 isolated fragments extracted from the parent particle. The size distribution of the fragments was similar to that obtained from the aerodynamic experiment in which a liquid layer was attached to a solid core and it was exposed to a gas flow. We detected 12 collisions between the fragments, which may result in the compound chondrule formation. We also analyzed the paths of all the fragments in detail and found the importance of the shadow effect in which a fragment extracted later blocks the gas flow toward a fragment extracted earlier. We examined the collision velocity and impact parameter of each collision and found that 11 collisions should result in coalescence. It means that the ratio of coalescent bodies to single bodies formed in this disruption of a parent particle is R=11/(32-11)=0.52. We concluded that compound chondrule formation can occur just after the disruption of a cm-sized molten dust particle in shock-wave heating.

  6. Two-dimensional hydrodynamic modeling to quantify effects of peak-flow management on channel morphology and salmon-spawning habitat in the Cedar River, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Czuba, Christiana; Czuba, Jonathan A.; Gendaszek, Andrew S.; Magirl, Christopher S.

    2010-01-01

    The Cedar River in Washington State originates on the western slope of the Cascade Range and provides the City of Seattle with most of its drinking water, while also supporting a productive salmon habitat. Water-resource managers require detailed information on how best to manage high-flow releases from Chester Morse Lake, a large reservoir on the Cedar River, during periods of heavy precipitation to minimize flooding, while mitigating negative effects on fish populations. Instream flow-management practices include provisions for adaptive management to promote and maintain healthy aquatic habitat in the river system. The current study is designed to understand the linkages between peak flow characteristics, geomorphic processes, riverine habitat, and biological responses. Specifically, two-dimensional hydrodynamic modeling is used to simulate and quantify the effects of the peak-flow magnitude, duration, and frequency on the channel morphology and salmon-spawning habitat. Two study reaches, representative of the typical geomorphic and ecologic characteristics of the Cedar River, were selected for the modeling. Detailed bathymetric data, collected with a real-time kinematic global positioning system and an acoustic Doppler current profiler, were combined with a LiDAR-derived digital elevation model in the overbank area to develop a computational mesh. The model is used to simulate water velocity, benthic shear stress, flood inundation, and morphologic changes in the gravel-bedded river under the current and alternative flood-release strategies. Simulations of morphologic change and salmon-redd scour by floods of differing magnitude and duration enable water-resource managers to incorporate model simulation results into adaptive management of peak flows in the Cedar River. PDF version of a presentation on hydrodynamic modelling in the Cedar River in Washington state. Presented at the American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting 2010.

  7. Hydrodynamic instability growth of three-dimensional, “native-roughness” modulations in x-ray driven, spherical implosions at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Smalyuk, V. A.; Weber, S. V.; Casey, D. T.; Clark, D. S.; Field, J. E.; Haan, S. W.; Hammel, B. A.; Hamza, A. V.; Landen, O. L.; Robey, H. F.; Weber, C. R.; Hoover, D. E.; Nikroo, A.

    2015-07-15

    Hydrodynamic instability growth experiments with three-dimensional (3-D) surface-roughness modulations were performed on plastic (CH) shell spherical implosions at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [E. M. Campbell, R. Cauble, and B. A. Remington, AIP Conf. Proc. 429, 3 (1998)]. The initial capsule outer-surface roughness was similar to the standard specifications (“native roughness”) used in a majority of implosions on NIF. The experiments included instability growth measurements of the perturbations seeded by the thin membranes (or tents) used to hold the capsules inside the hohlraums. In addition, initial modulations included two divots used as spatial fiducials to determine the convergence in the experiments and to check the accuracy of 3D simulations in calculating growth of known initial perturbations. The instability growth measurements were performed using x-ray, through-foil radiography of one side of the imploding shell, based on time-resolved pinhole imaging. Averaging over 30 similar images significantly increases the signal-to-noise ratio, making possible a comparison with 3-D simulations. At a convergence ratio of ∼3, the measured tent and divot modulations were close to those predicted by 3-D simulations (within ∼15%–20%), while measured 3-D, broadband modulations were ∼3–4 times larger than those simulated based on the growth of the known imposed initial surface modulations. In addition, some of the measured 3-D features in x-ray radiographs did not resemble those characterized on the outer capsule surface before the experiments. One of the hypotheses to explain the results is based on the increased instability amplitudes due to modulations of the oxygen content in the bulk of the capsule. As the target assembly and handling procedures involve exposure to UV light, this can increase the uptake of the oxygen into the capsule, with irregularities in the oxygen seeding hydrodynamic instabilities. These new experimental results have

  8. Hydrodynamic instability growth of three-dimensional, "native-roughness" modulations in x-ray driven, spherical implosions at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smalyuk, V. A.; Weber, S. V.; Casey, D. T.; Clark, D. S.; Field, J. E.; Haan, S. W.; Hammel, B. A.; Hamza, A. V.; Hoover, D. E.; Landen, O. L.; Nikroo, A.; Robey, H. F.; Weber, C. R.

    2015-07-01

    Hydrodynamic instability growth experiments with three-dimensional (3-D) surface-roughness modulations were performed on plastic (CH) shell spherical implosions at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [E. M. Campbell, R. Cauble, and B. A. Remington, AIP Conf. Proc. 429, 3 (1998)]. The initial capsule outer-surface roughness was similar to the standard specifications ("native roughness") used in a majority of implosions on NIF. The experiments included instability growth measurements of the perturbations seeded by the thin membranes (or tents) used to hold the capsules inside the hohlraums. In addition, initial modulations included two divots used as spatial fiducials to determine the convergence in the experiments and to check the accuracy of 3D simulations in calculating growth of known initial perturbations. The instability growth measurements were performed using x-ray, through-foil radiography of one side of the imploding shell, based on time-resolved pinhole imaging. Averaging over 30 similar images significantly increases the signal-to-noise ratio, making possible a comparison with 3-D simulations. At a convergence ratio of ˜3, the measured tent and divot modulations were close to those predicted by 3-D simulations (within ˜15%-20%), while measured 3-D, broadband modulations were ˜3-4 times larger than those simulated based on the growth of the known imposed initial surface modulations. In addition, some of the measured 3-D features in x-ray radiographs did not resemble those characterized on the outer capsule surface before the experiments. One of the hypotheses to explain the results is based on the increased instability amplitudes due to modulations of the oxygen content in the bulk of the capsule. As the target assembly and handling procedures involve exposure to UV light, this can increase the uptake of the oxygen into the capsule, with irregularities in the oxygen seeding hydrodynamic instabilities. These new experimental results have prompted

  9. DETECTION OF THE COMPRESSED PRIMARY STELLAR WIND IN {eta} CARINAE

    SciTech Connect

    Teodoro, M.; Madura, T. I.; Gull, T. R.; Corcoran, M. F.; Hamaguchi, K.

    2013-08-10

    A series of three Hubble Space Telescope/Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph spectroscopic mappings, spaced approximately one year apart, reveal three partial arcs in [Fe II] and [Ni II] emissions moving outward from {eta} Carinae. We identify these arcs with the shell-like structures, seen in the three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations, formed by compression of the primary wind by the secondary wind during periastron passages.

  10. Universality in one-dimensional fermions at finite temperature: Density, pressure, compressibility, and contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, M. D.; Javernick, P. D.; Loheac, A. C.; Porter, W. J.; Anderson, E. R.; Drut, J. E.

    2015-03-01

    We present finite-temperature, lattice Monte Carlo calculations of the particle number density, compressibility, pressure, and Tan's contact of an unpolarized system of short-range, attractively interacting spin-1/2 fermions in one spatial dimension, i.e., the Gaudin-Yang model. In addition, we compute the second-order virial coefficients for the pressure and the contact, both of which are in excellent agreement with the lattice results in the low-fugacity regime. Our calculations yield universal predictions for ultracold atomic systems with broad resonances in highly constrained traps. We cover a wide range of couplings and temperatures and find results that support the existence of a strong-coupling regime in which the thermodynamics of the system is markedly different from the noninteracting case. We compare and contrast our results with identical systems in higher dimensions.

  11. Two-dimensional lattice Boltzmann model for compressible flows with high Mach number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Yanbiao; Xu, Aiguo; Zhang, Guangcai; Yu, Xijun; Li, Yingjun

    2008-03-01

    In this paper we present an improved lattice Boltzmann model for compressible Navier-Stokes system with high Mach number. The model is composed of three components: (i) the discrete-velocity-model by M. Watari and M. Tsutahara [Phys. Rev. E 67 (2003) 036306], (ii) a modified Lax-Wendroff finite difference scheme where reasonable dissipation and dispersion are naturally included, (iii) artificial viscosity. The improved model is convenient to compromise the high accuracy and stability. The included dispersion term can effectively reduce the numerical oscillation at discontinuity. The added artificial viscosity helps the scheme to satisfy the von Neumann stability condition. Shock tubes and shock reflections are used to validate the new scheme. In our numerical tests the Mach numbers are successfully increased up to 20 or higher. The flexibility of the new model makes it suitable for tracking shock waves with high accuracy and for investigating nonlinear nonequilibrium complex systems.

  12. The one-dimensional compression method for extraction of pore water from unsaturated tuff and effects on pore-water chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, J.D.; Burger, P.A.; Yang, L.C.

    1997-12-31

    Study of the hydrologic system at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, requires extraction of pore-water samples from unsaturated tuff bedrock. Two generations of compression cells have been designed and tested for extracting representative, unaltered pore-water samples from unsaturated tuff cores. The one-dimensional compression cell has a maximum compressive stress rating of 552 MPa. Results from 86 tests show that the minimum degree of saturation for successful extraction of pore water was about 14% for non welded tuff and about 61% for densely welded tuff. The high-pressure, one-dimensional compression cell has a maximum compressive stress rating of 827 MPa. Results from 109 tests show that the minimum degree of saturation for successful extraction of pore water was about 7.5% for non welded tuff and about 34% for densely welded tuff. Geochemical analyses show that, in general, there is a decrease in ion concentration of pore waters as extraction pressures increase. Only small changes in pore-water composition occur during the one-dimensional extraction test.

  13. A New Multi-dimensional General Relativistic Neutrino Hydrodynamics Code for Core-collapse Supernovae. IV. The Neutrino Signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Bernhard; Janka, Hans-Thomas

    2014-06-01

    Considering six general relativistic, two-dimensional (2D) supernova (SN) explosion models of progenitor stars between 8.1 and 27 M ⊙, we systematically analyze the properties of the neutrino emission from core collapse and bounce to the post-explosion phase. The models were computed with the VERTEX-COCONUT code, using three-flavor, energy-dependent neutrino transport in the ray-by-ray-plus approximation. Our results confirm the close similarity of the mean energies, langErang, of \\bar{\

  14. On the global existence and blowup of smooth solutions to the multi-dimensional compressible Euler equations with time-depending damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Fei; Yin, Huicheng

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, we are concerned with the global existence and blowup of smooth solutions to the multi-dimensional compressible Euler equations with time-depending damping \\begin{align*} ≤ft\\{\\begin{array}{l} \\partial_tρ+div~(ρ u)=0,\

  15. Ptosis as partial oculomotor nerve palsy due to compression by infundibular dilatation of posterior communicating artery, visualized with three-dimensional computer graphics: case report.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Yuta; Imai, Hideaki; Yoshino, Masanori; Kin, Taichi; Takasago, Megumi; Saito, Kuniaki; Nakatomi, Hirofumi; Saito, Nobuhito

    2014-01-01

    Oculomotor nerve palsy (ONP) due to internal carotid-posterior communicating artery (PcomA) aneurysm generally manifests as partial nerve palsy including pupillary dysfunction. In contrast, infundibular dilatation (ID) of the PcomA has no pathogenic significance, and mechanical compression of the cranial nerve is extremely rare. We describe a 60-year-old woman who presented with progressive ptosis due to mechanical compression of the oculomotor nerve by an ID of the PcomA. Three-dimensional computer graphics (3DCG) accurately visualized the mechanical compression by the ID, and her ptosis was improved after clipping of the ID. ID of the PcomA may cause ONP by mechanical compression and is treatable surgically. 3DCG are effective for the diagnosis and preoperative simulation.

  16. Skew resisting hydrodynamic seal

    DOEpatents

    Conroy, William T.; Dietle, Lannie L.; Gobeli, Jeffrey D.; Kalsi, Manmohan S.

    2001-01-01

    A novel hydrodynamically lubricated compression type rotary seal that is suitable for lubricant retention and environmental exclusion. Particularly, the seal geometry ensures constraint of a hydrodynamic seal in a manner preventing skew-induced wear and provides adequate room within the seal gland to accommodate thermal expansion. The seal accommodates large as-manufactured variations in the coefficient of thermal expansion of the sealing material, provides a relatively stiff integral spring effect to minimize pressure-induced shuttling of the seal within the gland, and also maintains interfacial contact pressure within the dynamic sealing interface in an optimum range for efficient hydrodynamic lubrication and environment exclusion. The seal geometry also provides for complete support about the circumference of the seal to receive environmental pressure, as compared the interrupted character of seal support set forth in U.S. Pat. Nos. 5,873,576 and 6,036,192 and provides a hydrodynamic seal which is suitable for use with non-Newtonian lubricants.

  17. A three-dimensional neural recording microsystem with implantable data compression circuitry.

    SciTech Connect

    Olsson, Roy H., III; Wise, Kensall D.

    2005-01-01

    A 256-site, fully implantable, 3-D neural recording microsystem has been developed. The microsystem incorporates four active neural probes with integrated circuitry for site selection, amplification, and multiplexing. The probes drive an embedded data-compression ASIC that successfully detects neural spikes in the presence of neural and circuit noise. The spike detection ASIC achieves a factor of 12 bandwidth reduction while preserving the key features of the action potential waveshape necessary for spike discrimination. This work extends the total number of neural channels that can be recorded across a transcutaneous inductively coupled wireless link from 25 to 312. When a spike is detected, this ASIC serially shifts the 5-bit amplitude and 5-bit address of the spike off of the chip over a single 2.5 Mb/s wired or wireless line. The spike detection ASIC occupies 6 mm{sup 2} in 0.5 {micro}m features and consumes 2.6 mW while the entire microsystem consumes 5.4 mW of power from a 3-V supply.

  18. Finite-Difference Lattice Boltzmann Scheme for High-Speed Compressible Flow: Two-Dimensional Case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Yan-Biao; Xu, Ai-Guo; Zhang, Guang-Cai; Zhang, Ping; Zhang, Lei; Li, Ying-Jun

    2008-07-01

    Lattice Boltzmann (LB) modeling of high-speed compressible flows has long been attempted by various authors. One common weakness of most of previous models is the instability problem when the Mach number of the flow is large. In this paper we present a finite-difference LB model, which works for flows with flexible ratios of specific heats and a wide range of Mach number, from 0 to 30 or higher. Besides the discrete-velocity-model by Watari [Physica A 382 (2007) 502], a modified Lax Wendroff finite difference scheme and an artificial viscosity are introduced. The combination of the finite-difference scheme and the adding of artificial viscosity must find a balance of numerical stability versus accuracy. The proposed model is validated by recovering results of some well-known benchmark tests: shock tubes and shock reflections. The new model may be used to track shock waves and/or to study the non-equilibrium procedure in the transition between the regular and Mach reflections of shock waves, etc.

  19. Accelerated three-dimensional cine phase contrast imaging using randomly undersampled echo planar imaging with compressed sensing reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Basha, Tamer A; Akçakaya, Mehmet; Goddu, Beth; Berg, Sophie; Nezafat, Reza

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to implement and evaluate an accelerated three-dimensional (3D) cine phase contrast MRI sequence by combining a randomly sampled 3D k-space acquisition sequence with an echo planar imaging (EPI) readout. An accelerated 3D cine phase contrast MRI sequence was implemented by combining EPI readout with randomly undersampled 3D k-space data suitable for compressed sensing (CS) reconstruction. The undersampled data were then reconstructed using low-dimensional structural self-learning and thresholding (LOST). 3D phase contrast MRI was acquired in 11 healthy adults using an overall acceleration of 7 (EPI factor of 3 and CS rate of 3). For comparison, a single two-dimensional (2D) cine phase contrast scan was also performed with sensitivity encoding (SENSE) rate 2 and approximately at the level of the pulmonary artery bifurcation. The stroke volume and mean velocity in both the ascending and descending aorta were measured and compared between two sequences using Bland-Altman plots. An average scan time of 3 min and 30 s, corresponding to an acceleration rate of 7, was achieved for 3D cine phase contrast scan with one direction flow encoding, voxel size of 2 × 2 × 3 mm(3) , foot-head coverage of 6 cm and temporal resolution of 30 ms. The mean velocity and stroke volume in both the ascending and descending aorta were statistically equivalent between the proposed 3D sequence and the standard 2D cine phase contrast sequence. The combination of EPI with a randomly undersampled 3D k-space sampling sequence using LOST reconstruction allows a seven-fold reduction in scan time of 3D cine phase contrast MRI without compromising blood flow quantification.

  20. THREE-DIMENSIONAL HYDRODYNAMIC CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVA SIMULATIONS FOR AN 11.2 M{sub Sun} STAR WITH SPECTRAL NEUTRINO TRANSPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Takiwaki, Tomoya; Kotake, Kei; Suwa, Yudai

    2012-04-20

    We present numerical results on three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamic core-collapse simulations of an 11.2 M{sub Sun} star. By comparing one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) results with those of 3D, we study how the increasing spacial multi-dimensionality affects the postbounce supernova dynamics. The calculations were performed with an energy-dependent treatment of the neutrino transport that is solved by the isotropic diffusion source approximation scheme. In agreement with previous study, our 1D model does not produce explosions for the 11.2 M{sub Sun} star, while the neutrino-driven revival of the stalled bounce shock is obtained in both the 2D and 3D models. The standing accretion-shock instability (SASI) is observed in the 3D models, in which the dominant mode of the SASI is bipolar (l = 2) with its saturation amplitudes being slightly smaller than 2D. By performing a tracer-particle analysis, we show that the maximum residency time of material in the gain region becomes longer in 3D than in 2D due to non-axisymmetric flow motions, which is one of advantageous aspects of 3D models to obtain neutrino-driven explosions. Our results show that convective matter motions below the gain radius become much more violent in 3D than in 2D, making the neutrino luminosity larger for 3D. Nevertheless, the emitted neutrino energies are made smaller due to the enhanced cooling. Our results indicate whether these advantages for driving 3D explosions could or could not overwhelm the disadvantages is sensitive to the employed numerical resolutions. An encouraging finding is that the shock expansion tends to become more energetic for models with finer resolutions. To draw a robust conclusion, 3D simulations with much higher numerical resolutions and with more advanced treatment of neutrino transport and of gravity are needed, which could be practicable by utilizing forthcoming Petaflops-class supercomputers.

  1. A three-dimensional turbulent compressible flow model for ejector and fluted mixers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rushmore, W. L.; Zelazny, S. W.

    1978-01-01

    A three dimensional finite element computer code was developed to analyze ejector and axisymmetric fluted mixer systems whose flow fields are not significantly influenced by streamwise diffusion effects. A two equation turbulence model was used to make comparisons between theory and data for various flow fields which are components of the ejector system, i.e., (1) turbulent boundary layer in a duct; (2) rectangular nozzle (free jet); (3) axisymmetric nozzle (free jet); (4) hypermixing nozzle (free jet); and (5) plane wall jet. Likewise, comparisons of the code with analytical results and/or other numerical solutions were made for components of the axisymmetric fluted mixer system. These included: (1) developing pipe flow; (2) developing flow in an annular pipe; (3) developing flow in an axisymmetric pipe with conical center body and no fluting and (4) developing fluted pipe flow. Finally, two demonstration cases are presented which show the code's ability to analyze both the ejector and axisymmetric fluted mixers.

  2. A three-dimensional turbulent compressible subsonic duct flow analysis for use with constructed coordinate systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, R.; Mcdonald, H.; Briley, W. R.; Kreskovsky, J. P.

    1980-01-01

    An approximate analysis, applicable to nonorthogonal coordinate systems having a curved centerline and planar transverse coordinate surfaces normal to the centerline, is presented for computation of three-dimensional subsonic flow in straight and curved diffusers. The formulation is intended to facilitate the use of constructed coordinates in circumstances where it is difficult to maintain smooth behavior in higher derivatives; the use of local Cartesian variables and fluxes leads to governing equations which require only first derivatives of the coordinate transformation. The analysis is applied to a particular family of duct and diffuser geometries having curved centerlines and superelliptic cross sections. Qualitative agreement with experimental measurements is observed with regard to streamwise vortices and distortion of the primary flow.

  3. Loading and compression of a single two-dimensional Bose gas in an optical accordion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ville, J. L.; Bienaimé, T.; Saint-Jalm, R.; Corman, L.; Aidelsburger, M.; Chomaz, L.; Kleinlein, K.; Perconte, D.; Nascimbène, S.; Dalibard, J.; Beugnon, J.

    2017-01-01

    The experimental realization of two-dimensional (2D) Bose gases with a tunable interaction strength is an important challenge for the study of ultracold quantum matter. Here we report on the realization of an optical accordion creating a lattice potential with a spacing that can be dynamically tuned between 11 and 2 μ m . We show that we can load ultracold 87Rb atoms into a single node of this optical lattice in the large spacing configuration and then decrease nearly adiabatically the spacing to reach a strong harmonic confinement with frequencies larger than ωz/2 π =10 kHz. Atoms are trapped in an additional flat-bottom in-plane potential that is shaped with a high resolution. By combining these tools we create custom-shaped uniform 2D Bose gases with tunable confinement along the transverse direction and hence with a tunable interaction strength.

  4. Probing the equation of state in Au+Au at 11 GeV/nucleon with (3+1)-dimensional hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbex, N.; Ornik, U.; Plümer, M.; Weiner, R. M.

    1997-02-01

    The effect of (i) the phase transition between a quark gluon plasma (QGP) and a hadron gas and (ii) the number of resonance degrees of freedom in the hadronic phase on the single inclusive distributions of 16 different types of produced hadrons for Au+Au collisions at the Brookhaven Alternating Gradient Synchroton (AGS) energies is studied. We have used an exact numerical solution of the relativistic hydrodynamical equations without free parameters which, because of its (3+1)-dimensional character, constitutes a considerable improvement over the classical Landau solution. We assume chemical equilibration and we use two different equations of state (EOS): one describing a phase transition from QGP to the hadronic phase and two versions of a purely hadronic EOS; we find that the first one gives an overall better description of the Au+Au experimental data at AGS energies. We reproduce and analyze measured meson and proton spectra and also make predictions for antiprotons, deltas, antideltas, and hyperons. The low mt enhancement in π- spectra is explained by baryon number conservation and strangeness equilibration. The sensitivity of various production channels to the EOS is analyzed.

  5. Three-dimensional three-phase model for simulation of hydrodynamics, oxygen mass transfer, carbon oxidation, nitrification and denitrification in an oxidation ditch.

    PubMed

    Lei, Li; Ni, Jinren

    2014-04-15

    A three-dimensional three-phase fluid model, supplemented by laboratory data, was developed to simulate the hydrodynamics, oxygen mass transfer, carbon oxidation, nitrification and denitrification processes in an oxidation ditch. The model provided detailed phase information on the liquid flow field, gas hold-up distribution and sludge sedimentation. The three-phase model described water-gas, water-sludge and gas-sludge interactions. Activated sludge was taken to be in a pseudo-solid phase, comprising an initially separated solid phase that was transported and later underwent biological reactions with the surrounding liquidmedia. Floc parameters were modified to improve the sludge viscosity, sludge density, oxygen mass transfer rate, and carbon substrate uptake due to adsorption onto the activated sludge. The validation test results were in very satisfactory agreement with laboratory data on the behavior of activated sludge in an oxidation ditch. By coupling species transport and biological process models, reasonable predictions are made of: (1) the biochemical kinetics of dissolved oxygen, chemical oxygen demand (COD) and nitrogen variation, and (2) the physical kinematics of sludge sedimentation.

  6. Optimizing the parameterization of deep mixing and internal seiches in one-dimensional hydrodynamic models: a case study with Simstrat v1.3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaudard, Adrien; Schwefel, Robert; Råman Vinnå, Love; Schmid, Martin; Wüest, Alfred; Bouffard, Damien

    2017-09-01

    This paper presents an improvement of a one-dimensional lake hydrodynamic model (Simstrat) to characterize the vertical thermal structure of deep lakes. Using physically based arguments, we refine the transfer of wind energy to basin-scale internal waves (BSIWs). We consider the properties of the basin, the characteristics of the wind time series and the stability of the water column to filter and thereby optimize the magnitude of wind energy transferred to BSIWs. We show that this filtering procedure can significantly improve the accuracy of modelled temperatures, especially in the deep water of lakes such as Lake Geneva, for which the root mean square error between observed and simulated temperatures was reduced by up to 40 %. The modification, tested on four different lakes, increases model accuracy and contributes to a significantly better reproduction of seasonal deep convective mixing, a fundamental parameter for biogeochemical processes such as oxygen depletion. It also improves modelling over long time series for the purpose of climate change studies.

  7. Origin of three-dimensional shapes of chondrules. I. Hydrodynamics simulations of rotating droplet exposed to high-velocity rarefied gas flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Hitoshi; Nakamoto, Taishi; Doi, Masao

    2008-09-01

    The origin of three-dimensional shapes of chondrules is an important information to identify their formation mechanism in the early solar nebula. The measurement of their shapes by using X-ray computed topography suggested that they are usually close to perfect spheres, however, some of them have rugby-ball-like (prolate) shapes [Tsuchiyama, A., Shigeyoshi, R., Kawabata, T., Nakano, T., Uesugi, K., Shirono, S., 2003. Lunar Planet. Sci. 34, 1271-1272]. We considered that the prolate shapes reflect the deformations of chondrule precursor dust particles when they are heated and melted in the high velocity gas flow. In order to reveal the origin of chondrule shapes, we carried out the three-dimensional hydrodynamics simulations of a rotating molten chondrule exposed to the gas flow in the framework of the shock-wave heating model for chondrule formation. We adopted the gas ram pressure acting on the chondrule surface of p=10 dyncm in a typical shock wave. Considering that the chondrule precursor dust particle has an irregular shape before melting, the ram pressure causes a net torque to rotate the particle. The estimated angular velocity is ω=140 rads for the precursor radius of r=1 mm, though it has a different value depending on the irregularity of the shape. In addition, the rotation axis is likely to be perpendicular to the direction of the gas flow. Our calculations showed that the rotating molten chondrule elongates along the rotation axis, in contrast, shrinks perpendicularly to it. It is a prolate shape. The reason why the molten chondrule is deformed to a prolate shape was clearly discussed. Our study gives a complementary constraint for chondrule formation mechanisms, comparing with conventional chemical analyses and dynamic crystallization experiments that have mainly constrained the thermal evolutions of chondrules.

  8. A high-order vertex-based central ENO finite-volume scheme for three-dimensional compressible flows

    DOE PAGES

    Charest, Marc R.J.; Canfield, Thomas R.; Morgan, Nathaniel R.; ...

    2015-03-11

    High-order discretization methods offer the potential to reduce the computational cost associated with modeling compressible flows. However, it is difficult to obtain accurate high-order discretizations of conservation laws that do not produce spurious oscillations near discontinuities, especially on multi-dimensional unstructured meshes. A novel, high-order, central essentially non-oscillatory (CENO) finite-volume method that does not have these difficulties is proposed for tetrahedral meshes. The proposed unstructured method is vertex-based, which differs from existing cell-based CENO formulations, and uses a hybrid reconstruction procedure that switches between two different solution representations. It applies a high-order k-exact reconstruction in smooth regions and a limited linearmore » reconstruction when discontinuities are encountered. Both reconstructions use a single, central stencil for all variables, making the application of CENO to arbitrary unstructured meshes relatively straightforward. The new approach was applied to the conservation equations governing compressible flows and assessed in terms of accuracy and computational cost. For all problems considered, which included various function reconstructions and idealized flows, CENO demonstrated excellent reliability and robustness. Up to fifth-order accuracy was achieved in smooth regions and essentially non-oscillatory solutions were obtained near discontinuities. The high-order schemes were also more computationally efficient for high-accuracy solutions, i.e., they took less wall time than the lower-order schemes to achieve a desired level of error. In one particular case, it took a factor of 24 less wall-time to obtain a given level of error with the fourth-order CENO scheme than to obtain the same error with the second-order scheme.« less

  9. A high-order vertex-based central ENO finite-volume scheme for three-dimensional compressible flows

    SciTech Connect

    Charest, Marc R.J.; Canfield, Thomas R.; Morgan, Nathaniel R.; Waltz, Jacob; Wohlbier, John G.

    2015-03-11

    High-order discretization methods offer the potential to reduce the computational cost associated with modeling compressible flows. However, it is difficult to obtain accurate high-order discretizations of conservation laws that do not produce spurious oscillations near discontinuities, especially on multi-dimensional unstructured meshes. A novel, high-order, central essentially non-oscillatory (CENO) finite-volume method that does not have these difficulties is proposed for tetrahedral meshes. The proposed unstructured method is vertex-based, which differs from existing cell-based CENO formulations, and uses a hybrid reconstruction procedure that switches between two different solution representations. It applies a high-order k-exact reconstruction in smooth regions and a limited linear reconstruction when discontinuities are encountered. Both reconstructions use a single, central stencil for all variables, making the application of CENO to arbitrary unstructured meshes relatively straightforward. The new approach was applied to the conservation equations governing compressible flows and assessed in terms of accuracy and computational cost. For all problems considered, which included various function reconstructions and idealized flows, CENO demonstrated excellent reliability and robustness. Up to fifth-order accuracy was achieved in smooth regions and essentially non-oscillatory solutions were obtained near discontinuities. The high-order schemes were also more computationally efficient for high-accuracy solutions, i.e., they took less wall time than the lower-order schemes to achieve a desired level of error. In one particular case, it took a factor of 24 less wall-time to obtain a given level of error with the fourth-order CENO scheme than to obtain the same error with the second-order scheme.

  10. Three-dimensional computations of the hydrodynamics and mass transfer during solution growth of KDP crystal with a planetary motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhitao; Li, Mingwei; Wang, Pengfei; Zhou, Chuan; Yin, Huawei

    2017-09-01

    Computational analysis of the three-dimensional flow and mass transfer involved in the growth of KDP crystal with a planetary motion (PM) was conducted, in which the crystal executes an orbital revolution with a constant revolution rate during its self-rotation together with periodically changing the direction of crystal rotation. Compared with the conventional KDP growth method which conducts centric rotation (CR), this new configuration can avoid the sharp fluctuation of surface supersaturation during the phases of crystal spin down, stalling and spin up, and brings about an oscillatory fluid field during the steady self-rotation phase, all of that being able to promote the morphological stability of the growing crystal. By increasing the self-rotation rate, the frequency of the oscillatory fluid field will increase, and the morphological stability will be enhanced. The time-averaged supersaturation fields of the crystal surfaces are obtained, which are greatly affected by the orbital revolution rate and the orbital radius. For a higher orbital revolution rate or larger orbital radius, higher time-averaged value and better homogeneity of the surface supersaturation could be obtained.

  11. Accelerated two-dimensional cine DENSE cardiovascular magnetic resonance using compressed sensing and parallel imaging.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao; Yang, Yang; Cai, Xiaoying; Auger, Daniel A; Meyer, Craig H; Salerno, Michael; Epstein, Frederick H

    2016-06-14

    Cine Displacement Encoding with Stimulated Echoes (DENSE) provides accurate quantitative imaging of cardiac mechanics with rapid displacement and strain analysis; however, image acquisition times are relatively long. Compressed sensing (CS) with parallel imaging (PI) can generally provide high-quality images recovered from data sampled below the Nyquist rate. The purposes of the present study were to develop CS-PI-accelerated acquisition and reconstruction methods for cine DENSE, to assess their accuracy for cardiac imaging using retrospective undersampling, and to demonstrate their feasibility for prospectively-accelerated 2D cine DENSE imaging in a single breathhold. An accelerated cine DENSE sequence with variable-density spiral k-space sampling and golden angle rotations through time was implemented. A CS method, Block LOw-rank Sparsity with Motion-guidance (BLOSM), was combined with sensitivity encoding (SENSE) for the reconstruction of under-sampled multi-coil spiral data. Seven healthy volunteers and 7 patients underwent 2D cine DENSE imaging with fully-sampled acquisitions (14-26 heartbeats in duration) and with prospectively rate-2 and rate-4 accelerated acquisitions (14 and 8 heartbeats in duration). Retrospectively- and prospectively-accelerated data were reconstructed using BLOSM-SENSE and SENSE. Image quality of retrospectively-undersampled data was quantified using the relative root mean square error (rRMSE). Myocardial displacement and circumferential strain were computed for functional assessment, and linear correlation and Bland-Altman analyses were used to compare accelerated acquisitions to fully-sampled reference datasets. For retrospectively-undersampled data, BLOSM-SENSE provided similar or lower rRMSE at rate-2 and lower rRMSE at rate-4 acceleration compared to SENSE (p < 0.05, ANOVA). Similarly, for retrospective undersampling, BLOSM-SENSE provided similar or better correlation with reference displacement and strain data at rate-2 and

  12. Three-dimensional super Yang-Mills with compressible quark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faedo, Antón F.; Kundu, Arnab; Mateos, David; Pantelidou, Christiana; Tarrío, Javier

    2016-03-01

    We construct the gravity dual of three-dimensional, SU(N c) super Yang-Mills theory with N f flavors of dynamical quarks in the presence of a non-zero quark density N q. The supergravity solutions include the backreaction of N c color D2-branes and N f flavor D6-branes with N q units of electric flux on their worldvolume. For massless quarks, the solutions depend non-trivially only on the dimensionless combination ρ = N c 2 N q/ λ 2 N f 4 , with λ = g YM 2 N c the 't Hooft coupling, and describe renormalization group flows between the super Yang-Mills theory in the ultraviolet and a non-relativistic theory in the infrared. The latter is dual to a hyperscaling-violating, Lifshitz-like geometry with dynamical and hyperscaling-violating exponents z = 5 and θ = 1, respectively. If ρ ≪ 1 then at intermediate energies there is also an approximate AdS4 region, dual to a conformal Chern-Simons-Matter theory, in which the flow exhibits quasi-conformal dynamics. At zero temperature we compute the chemical potential and the equation of state and extract the speed of sound. At low temperature we compute the entropy density and extract the number of low-energy degrees of freedom. For quarks of non-zero mass M q the physics depends non-trivially on ρ and M q N c /λ N f.

  13. A new multi-dimensional general relativistic neutrino hydrodynamics code for core-collapse supernovae. IV. The neutrino signal

    SciTech Connect

    Müller, Bernhard; Janka, Hans-Thomas E-mail: bjmuellr@mpa-garching.mpg.de

    2014-06-10

    Considering six general relativistic, two-dimensional (2D) supernova (SN) explosion models of progenitor stars between 8.1 and 27 M {sub ☉}, we systematically analyze the properties of the neutrino emission from core collapse and bounce to the post-explosion phase. The models were computed with the VERTEX-COCONUT code, using three-flavor, energy-dependent neutrino transport in the ray-by-ray-plus approximation. Our results confirm the close similarity of the mean energies, (E), of ν-bar {sub e} and heavy-lepton neutrinos and even their crossing during the accretion phase for stars with M ≳ 10 M {sub ☉} as observed in previous 1D and 2D simulations with state-of-the-art neutrino transport. We establish a roughly linear scaling of 〈E{sub ν-bar{sub e}}〉 with the proto-neutron star (PNS) mass, which holds in time as well as for different progenitors. Convection inside the PNS affects the neutrino emission on the 10%-20% level, and accretion continuing beyond the onset of the explosion prevents the abrupt drop of the neutrino luminosities seen in artificially exploded 1D models. We demonstrate that a wavelet-based time-frequency analysis of SN neutrino signals in IceCube will offer sensitive diagnostics for the SN core dynamics up to at least ∼10 kpc distance. Strong, narrow-band signal modulations indicate quasi-periodic shock sloshing motions due to the standing accretion shock instability (SASI), and the frequency evolution of such 'SASI neutrino chirps' reveals shock expansion or contraction. The onset of the explosion is accompanied by a shift of the modulation frequency below 40-50 Hz, and post-explosion, episodic accretion downflows will be signaled by activity intervals stretching over an extended frequency range in the wavelet spectrogram.

  14. THREE-DIMENSIONAL HYDRODYNAMICAL SIMULATIONS OF A PROTON INGESTION EPISODE IN A LOW-METALLICITY ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH STAR

    SciTech Connect

    Stancliffe, Richard J.; Lattanzio, John C.; Heap, Stuart A.; Campbell, Simon W.; Dearborn, David S. P.

    2011-12-01

    We use the three-dimensional (3D) stellar structure code DJEHUTY to model the ingestion of protons into the intershell convection zone of a 1 M{sub Sun} asymptotic giant branch star of metallicity Z = 10{sup -4}. We have run two simulations: a low-resolution one of around 300,000 zones and a high-resolution one consisting of 2,000,000 zones. Both simulations have been evolved for about 4 hr of stellar time. We observe the existence of fast, downward flowing plumes that are able to transport hydrogen into close proximity to the helium-burning shell before burning takes place. The intershell in the 3D model is richer in protons than the 1D model by several orders of magnitude and so we obtain substantially higher hydrogen-burning luminosities-over 10{sup 8} L{sub Sun} in the high-resolution simulation-than are found in the 1D model. Convective velocities in these simulations are over ten times greater than the predictions of mixing length theory, though the 3D simulations have greater energy generation due to the enhanced hydrogen burning. We find no evidence of the convective zone splitting into two, though this could be as a result of insufficient spatial resolution or because the models have not been evolved for long enough. We suggest that the 1D mixing length theory and particularly the use of a diffusion algorithm for mixing do not give an accurate picture of these events. An advective mixing scheme may give a better representation of the transport processes seen in the 3D models.

  15. Three Dimensional Compressible Turbulent Flow Computations for a Diffusing S-Duct With/Without Vortex Generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cho, Soo-Yong; Greber, Isaac

    1994-01-01

    Numerical investigations on a diffusing S-duct with/without vortex generators and a straight duct with vortex generators are presented. The investigation consists of solving the full three-dimensional unsteady compressible mass averaged Navier-Stokes equations. An implicit finite volume lower-upper time marching code (RPLUS3D) has been employed and modified. A three-dimensional Baldwin-Lomax turbulence model has been modified in conjunction with the flow physics. A model for the analysis of vortex generators in a fully viscous subsonic internal flow is evaluated. A vortical structure for modeling the shed vortex is used as a source term in the computation domain. The injected vortex paths in the straight duct are compared with the analysis by two kinds of prediction models. The flow structure by the vortex generators are investigated along the duct. Computed results of the flow in a circular diffusing S-duct provide an understanding of the flow structure within a typical engine inlet system. These are compared with the experimental wall static-pressure, static- and total-pressure field, and secondary velocity profiles. Additionally, boundary layer thickness, skin friction values, and velocity profiles in wall coordinates are presented. In order to investigate the effect of vortex generators, various vortex strengths are examined in this study. The total-pressure recovery and distortion coefficients are obtained at the exit of the S-duct. The numerical results clearly depict the interaction between the low velocity flow by the flow separation and the injected vortices.

  16. Hydrodynamic test problems

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, B

    2005-06-02

    We present test problems that can be used to check the hydrodynamic implementation in computer codes designed to model the implosion of a National Ignition Facility (NIF) capsule. The problems are simplified, yet one of them is three-dimensional. It consists of a nearly-spherical incompressible imploding shell subjected to an exponentially decaying pressure on its outer surface. We present a semi-analytic solution for the time-evolution of that shell with arbitrary small three-dimensional perturbations on its inner and outer surfaces. The perturbations on the shell surfaces are intended to model the imperfections that are created during capsule manufacturing.

  17. Wind tunnel blockage study of a generic three-dimensional sidewall compression scramjet inlet at Mach 10

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, Scott D.; Hodge, Jeffrey S.; Perkins, John N.

    1991-01-01

    A large scale model of a generic three-dimensional sidewall compression scramjet inlet has been designed based on the results of a computational parametric study for testing in the 31-inch Mach 10 Hypersonic Wind Tunnel at the NASA Langley Research Center. In order to increase the instrumentation density in interaction regions for a highly instrumented model, it is desirable to make the model as large as possible. When the cross-sectional area of a model becomes large relative to the inviscid core size of the tunnel, the effects of blockage must be considered. In order to assess these effects, a blockage model (an inexpensive, much less densely instrumented version of the configuration) was fabricated for preliminary testing. Since it was desired to determine both the effect of the model on the performance of the wind tunnel and also to determine if the inlet would start, the model possessed a total of 32 static pressure orifices distributed on the forebody plane and sidewalls; seventeen static pressure orifices on the tunnel wall and 3 pitot probes on the model monitored the tunnel performance. This paper presents the design considerations in the development of the wind tunnel model and the blockage aspects of the effects of contraction ratio, cowl location, Reynolds number, and angle of attack.

  18. VNAP2: A Computer Program for Computation of Two-dimensional, Time-dependent, Compressible, Turbulent Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cline, M. C.

    1981-01-01

    A computer program, VNAP2, for calculating turbulent (as well as laminar and inviscid), steady, and unsteady flow is presented. It solves the two dimensional, time dependent, compressible Navier-Stokes equations. The turbulence is modeled with either an algebraic mixing length model, a one equation model, or the Jones-Launder two equation model. The geometry may be a single or a dual flowing stream. The interior grid points are computed using the unsplit MacCormack scheme. Two options to speed up the calculations for high Reynolds number flows are included. The boundary grid points are computed using a reference plane characteristic scheme with the viscous terms treated as source functions. An explicit artificial viscosity is included for shock computations. The fluid is assumed to be a perfect gas. The flow boundaries may be arbitrary curved solid walls, inflow/outflow boundaries, or free jet envelopes. Typical problems that can be solved concern nozzles, inlets, jet powered afterbodies, airfoils, and free jet expansions. The accuracy and efficiency of the program are shown by calculations of several inviscid and turbulent flows. The program and its use are described completely, and six sample cases and a code listing are included.

  19. VNAP2: a computer program for computation of two-dimensional, time-dependent, compressible, turbulent flow

    SciTech Connect

    Cline, M.C.

    1981-08-01

    VNAP2 is a computer program for calculating turbulent (as well as laminar and inviscid), steady, and unsteady flow. VNAP2 solves the two-dimensional, time-dependent, compressible Navier-Stokes equations. The turbulence is modeled with either an algebraic mixing-length model, a one-equation model, or the Jones-Launder two-equation model. The geometry may be a single- or a dual-flowing stream. The interior grid points are computed using the unsplit MacCormack scheme. Two options to speed up the calculations for high Reynolds number flows are included. The boundary grid points are computed using a reference-plane-characteristic scheme with the viscous terms treated as source functions. An explicit artificial viscosity is included for shock computations. The fluid is assumed to be a perfect gas. The flow boundaries may be arbitrary curved solid walls, inflow/outflow boundaries, or free-jet envelopes. Typical problems that can be solved concern nozzles, inlets, jet-powered afterbodies, airfoils, and free-jet expansions. The accuracy and efficiency of the program are shown by calculations of several inviscid and turbulent flows. The program and its use are described completely, and six sample cases and a code listing are included.

  20. Three-dimensional compressible laminar boundary layers on sharp and blunt circular cones at angle of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popinski, Z.; Davis, R. T.

    1973-01-01

    A method for solving the three-dimensional compressible laminar boundary layer equations for the case of a circular cone and a sphere-cone body at an angle of attack is presented. The governing equations are modified by a similarity type transformation and then transformed into a Crocco-type form. The resulting set of equations is solved simultaneously by an iterative method using an implicit finite difference scheme by means of an efficient algorithm for equations of tridiagonal form. The effects of streamline swallowing on a sharp cone are included by introducing the true inviscid edge conditions at the distance from the wall equal to the boundary layer thickness. The validity of the approach was established by comparison of the computational results with similar results by other methods and with experimental data. It was concluded that at sufficiently high Mach number and moderate to large angles of attack, the streamline swallowing effects on a sharp cone result in higher values of skin friction and heat transfer as compared with the classical results for constant entropy.

  1. Compressive Creep Performance and High Temperature Dimensional Stability of Conventional Silica Refractories

    SciTech Connect

    Karakus, M.; Kirkland, T.P.; Liu, K.C.; Moore, R.E.; Pint, B.A.; Wereszczak, A.A.

    1999-03-01

    Industrial Materials program is sponsoring work to conduct creep testing and analysis on refractories of interest to the glass industry. An earlier stage of the project involved identifying which refractories to test and this is described elsewhere. Conventional silica was one such identified refractory category, and the present report describes the creep behavior of this class of refractories. To portray a more complete understanding of how these refractories perform at service temperatures, their fundamental corrosion resistances, dimensional stabilities, and microstructure were characterized as well.

  2. Numerical Simulation of Carbon Simple Cubic by Dynamic Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Kaori; Aoki, Takayuki; Sekine, Toshimori

    2001-02-01

    An impact scheme of a slab target and flyer with a layered structure is proposed to achieve low-entropy dynamic compression of diamond. The thermodynamic state of diamond during compression is examined using one-dimensional Lagrangian hydrodynamic code and the tabulated equation of state library, SESAME@. The use of a material with a small shock impedance for the impact interfaces markedly decreases the strength of the primary shock wave. It is found that a gradient of shock impedance across the thickness of the flyer generates small multiple shock waves into the diamond and is effective for low-entropy compression. The thermodynamic conditions required for carbon simple cubic and low-entropy dynamic compression is achieved.

  3. Ship Hydrodynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lafrance, Pierre

    1978-01-01

    Explores in a non-mathematical treatment some of the hydrodynamical phenomena and forces that affect the operation of ships, especially at high speeds. Discusses the major components of ship resistance such as the different types of drags and ways to reduce them and how to apply those principles for the hovercraft. (GA)

  4. Ship Hydrodynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lafrance, Pierre

    1978-01-01

    Explores in a non-mathematical treatment some of the hydrodynamical phenomena and forces that affect the operation of ships, especially at high speeds. Discusses the major components of ship resistance such as the different types of drags and ways to reduce them and how to apply those principles for the hovercraft. (GA)

  5. Compressed Sensing 3-Dimensional Time-of-Flight Magnetic Resonance Angiography for Cerebral Aneurysms: Optimization and Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Fushimi, Yasutaka; Fujimoto, Koji; Okada, Tomohisa; Yamamoto, Akira; Tanaka, Toshiyuki; Kikuchi, Takayuki; Miyamoto, Susumu; Togashi, Kaori

    2016-04-01

    The aims of this study were to optimize parameters for Nesterov algorithm (NESTA) in reconstruction of 3-dimensional time-of-flight (TOF) magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) at 3 T by performing an exhaustive search and to validate the performance of compressed sensing (CS) by applying it to data from cerebral aneurysms and evaluating diagnostic quality. Three-dimensional TOF-MRA was obtained using a 3 T MR system with a 32-channel head coil for both healthy volunteers and 10 patients (11 aneurysms). No undersampling was applied for imaging parameters, including parallel imaging or other partial Fourier sampling. In the first step, the experimental setup was for healthy subjects to optimize CS parameters of NESTA and the undersampling mask pattern, so 24,696 different reconstruction conditions were surveyed for sampling rates of 8.0X and 5.0X. Mean square error (MSE) was calculated for each image reconstructed with the undersampling pattern and CS parameter sets. Evaluation was by normalized MSE, edge sharpness for MRA reconstructed using fully sampled data (MRA-full), zero-filled MRA (ZF-MRA) with Poisson disk undersampling mask, and CS-MRA (5.0X and 8.0X) with iterations of 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, 45, and 50. CS-MRA (5.0X and 8.0X) with 5, 10, and 50 iterations of the sampling pattern and CS parameter set with the lowest MSE were visually inspected by 2 neuroradiologists to check the diagnostic quality. The sampling pattern and CS parameter set with the lowest MSE were identical for both CS-MRA 5.0X and CS-MRA 8.0X. At the initial 5 to 15 iterations, MSE of both sampling rates greatly decreased from that of ZF-MRA. For subsequent iterations, the decrease in MSE was relatively small. For CS-MRA, sharpness greatly increased from that of ZF-MRA within the initial 5 to 15 iterations, followed by slight increases with further iterations. Two neuroradiologists graded most aneurysms as excellent, with the exception of 1 to 4 aneurysms recognized as good by 1

  6. Individual headless compression screws fixed with three-dimensional image processing technology improves fusion rates of isolated talonavicular arthrodesis.

    PubMed

    Xie, Mei-Ming; Xia, Kang; Zhang, Hong-Xin; Cao, Hong-Hui; Yang, Zhi-Jin; Cui, Hai-Feng; Gao, Shang; Tang, Kang-Lai

    2017-01-23

    Screw fixation is a typical technique for isolated talonavicular arthrodesis (TNA), however, no consensus has been reached on how to select most suitable inserted position and direction. The study aimed to present a new fixation technique and to evaluate the clinical outcome of individual headless compression screws (HCSs) applied with three-dimensional (3D) image processing technology to isolated TNA. From 2007 to 2014, 69 patients underwent isolated TNA by using double Acutrak HCSs. The preoperative three-dimensional (3D) insertion model of double HCSs was applied by Mimics, Catia, and SolidWorks reconstruction software. One HCS oriented antegradely from the edge of dorsal navicular tail where intersected interspace between the first and the second cuneiform into the talus body along the talus axis, and the other one paralleled the first screw oriented from the dorsal-medial navicular where intersected at the medial plane of the first cuneiform. The anteroposterior and lateral X-ray examinations certified that the double HCSs were placed along the longitudinal axis of the talus. Postoperative assessment included the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society hindfoot (AOFAS), the visual analogue scale (VAS) score, satisfaction score, imaging assessments, and complications. At the mean 44-months follow-up, all patients exhibited good articular congruity and solid bone fusion at an average of 11.26 ± 0.85 weeks (range, 10 ~ 13 weeks) without screw loosening, shifting, or breakage. The overall fusion rates were 100%. The average AOFAS score increased from 46.62 ± 4.6 (range, 37 ~ 56) preoperatively to 74.77 ± 5.4 (range, 64-88) at the final follow-up (95% CI: -30.86 ~ -27.34; p < 0.001). The mean VAS score decreased from 7.01 ± 1.2 (range, 4 ~ 9) to 1.93 ± 1.3 (range, 0 ~ 4) (95% CI: 4.69 ~ 5.48; p < 0.001). One cases (1.45%) and three cases (4.35%) experienced wound infection and adjacent arthritis

  7. A NEW MULTI-DIMENSIONAL GENERAL RELATIVISTIC NEUTRINO HYDRODYNAMIC CODE FOR CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE. I. METHOD AND CODE TESTS IN SPHERICAL SYMMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Bernhard; Janka, Hans-Thomas; Dimmelmeier, Harald E-mail: thj@mpa-garching.mpg.d

    2010-07-15

    We present a new general relativistic code for hydrodynamical supernova simulations with neutrino transport in spherical and azimuthal symmetry (one dimension and two dimensions, respectively). The code is a combination of the COCONUT hydro module, which is a Riemann-solver-based, high-resolution shock-capturing method, and the three-flavor, fully energy-dependent VERTEX scheme for the transport of massless neutrinos. VERTEX integrates the coupled neutrino energy and momentum equations with a variable Eddington factor closure computed from a model Boltzmann equation and uses the 'ray-by-ray plus' approximation in two dimensions, assuming the neutrino distribution to be axially symmetric around the radial direction at every point in space, and thus the neutrino flux to be radial. Our spacetime treatment employs the Arnowitt-Deser-Misner 3+1 formalism with the conformal flatness condition for the spatial three metric. This approach is exact for the one-dimensional case and has previously been shown to yield very accurate results for spherical and rotational stellar core collapse. We introduce new formulations of the energy equation to improve total energy conservation in relativistic and Newtonian hydro simulations with grid-based Eulerian finite-volume codes. Moreover, a modified version of the VERTEX scheme is developed that simultaneously conserves energy and lepton number in the neutrino transport with better accuracy and higher numerical stability in the high-energy tail of the spectrum. To verify our code, we conduct a series of tests in spherical symmetry, including a detailed comparison with published results of the collapse, shock formation, shock breakout, and accretion phases. Long-time simulations of proto-neutron star cooling until several seconds after core bounce both demonstrate the robustness of the new COCONUT-VERTEX code and show the approximate treatment of relativistic effects by means of an effective relativistic gravitational potential as in

  8. A New Multi-dimensional General Relativistic Neutrino Hydrodynamic Code for Core-collapse Supernovae. I. Method and Code Tests in Spherical Symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Bernhard; Janka, Hans-Thomas; Dimmelmeier, Harald

    2010-07-01

    We present a new general relativistic code for hydrodynamical supernova simulations with neutrino transport in spherical and azimuthal symmetry (one dimension and two dimensions, respectively). The code is a combination of the COCONUT hydro module, which is a Riemann-solver-based, high-resolution shock-capturing method, and the three-flavor, fully energy-dependent VERTEX scheme for the transport of massless neutrinos. VERTEX integrates the coupled neutrino energy and momentum equations with a variable Eddington factor closure computed from a model Boltzmann equation and uses the "ray-by-ray plus" approximation in two dimensions, assuming the neutrino distribution to be axially symmetric around the radial direction at every point in space, and thus the neutrino flux to be radial. Our spacetime treatment employs the Arnowitt-Deser-Misner 3+1 formalism with the conformal flatness condition for the spatial three metric. This approach is exact for the one-dimensional case and has previously been shown to yield very accurate results for spherical and rotational stellar core collapse. We introduce new formulations of the energy equation to improve total energy conservation in relativistic and Newtonian hydro simulations with grid-based Eulerian finite-volume codes. Moreover, a modified version of the VERTEX scheme is developed that simultaneously conserves energy and lepton number in the neutrino transport with better accuracy and higher numerical stability in the high-energy tail of the spectrum. To verify our code, we conduct a series of tests in spherical symmetry, including a detailed comparison with published results of the collapse, shock formation, shock breakout, and accretion phases. Long-time simulations of proto-neutron star cooling until several seconds after core bounce both demonstrate the robustness of the new COCONUT-VERTEX code and show the approximate treatment of relativistic effects by means of an effective relativistic gravitational potential as in

  9. A NEW MULTI-DIMENSIONAL GENERAL RELATIVISTIC NEUTRINO HYDRODYNAMICS CODE OF CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE. III. GRAVITATIONAL WAVE SIGNALS FROM SUPERNOVA EXPLOSION MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Bernhard; Janka, Hans-Thomas; Marek, Andreas E-mail: thj@mpa-garching.mpg.de

    2013-03-20

    We present a detailed theoretical analysis of the gravitational wave (GW) signal of the post-bounce evolution of core-collapse supernovae (SNe), employing for the first time relativistic, two-dimensional explosion models with multi-group, three-flavor neutrino transport based on the ray-by-ray-plus approximation. The waveforms reflect the accelerated mass motions associated with the characteristic evolutionary stages that were also identified in previous works: a quasi-periodic modulation by prompt post-shock convection is followed by a phase of relative quiescence before growing amplitudes signal violent hydrodynamical activity due to convection and the standing accretion shock instability during the accretion period of the stalled shock. Finally, a high-frequency, low-amplitude variation from proto-neutron star (PNS) convection below the neutrinosphere appears superimposed on the low-frequency trend associated with the aspherical expansion of the SN shock after the onset of the explosion. Relativistic effects in combination with detailed neutrino transport are shown to be essential for quantitative predictions of the GW frequency evolution and energy spectrum, because they determine the structure of the PNS surface layer and its characteristic g-mode frequency. Burst-like high-frequency activity phases, correlated with sudden luminosity increase and spectral hardening of electron (anti-)neutrino emission for some 10 ms, are discovered as new features after the onset of the explosion. They correspond to intermittent episodes of anisotropic accretion by the PNS in the case of fallback SNe. We find stronger signals for more massive progenitors with large accretion rates. The typical frequencies are higher for massive PNSs, though the time-integrated spectrum also strongly depends on the model dynamics.

  10. Detection of conveyance changes in St. Clair River using historical water-level and flow data with inverse one-dimensional hydrodynamic modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holtschlag, David J.; Hoard, C.J.

    2009-01-01

    St. Clair River is a connecting channel that transports water from Lake Huron to the St. Clair River Delta and Lake St. Clair. A negative trend has been detected in differences between water levels on Lake Huron and Lake St. Clair. This trend may indicate a combination of flow and conveyance changes within St. Clair River. To identify where conveyance change may be taking place, eight water-level gaging stations along St. Clair River were selected to delimit seven reaches. Positive trends in water-level fall were detected in two reaches, and negative trends were detected in two other reaches. The presence of both positive and negative trends in water-level fall indicates that changes in conveyance are likely occurring among some reaches because all reaches transmit essentially the same flow. Annual water-level fall in reaches and reach lengths was used to compute conveyance ratios for all pairs of reaches by use of water-level data from 1962 to 2007. Positive and negative trends in conveyance ratios indicate that relative conveyance is changing among some reaches. Inverse one-dimensional (1-D) hydrodynamic modeling was used to estimate a partial annual series of effective channel-roughness parameters in reaches forming the St. Clair River for 21 years when flow measurements were sufficient to support parameter estimation. Monotonic, persistent but non-monotonic, and irregular changes in estimated effective channel roughness with time were interpreted as systematic changes in conveyances in five reaches. Time-varying parameter estimates were used to simulate flow throughout the St. Clair River and compute changes in conveyance with time. Based on the partial annual series of parameters, conveyance in the St. Clair River increased about 10 percent from 1962 to 2002. Conveyance decreased, however, about 4.1 percent from 2003 to 2007, so that conveyance was about 5.9 percent higher in 2007 than in 1962.

  11. Radiation Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Castor, J I

    2003-10-16

    The discipline of radiation hydrodynamics is the branch of hydrodynamics in which the moving fluid absorbs and emits electromagnetic radiation, and in so doing modifies its dynamical behavior. That is, the net gain or loss of energy by parcels of the fluid material through absorption or emission of radiation are sufficient to change the pressure of the material, and therefore change its motion; alternatively, the net momentum exchange between radiation and matter may alter the motion of the matter directly. Ignoring the radiation contributions to energy and momentum will give a wrong prediction of the hydrodynamic motion when the correct description is radiation hydrodynamics. Of course, there are circumstances when a large quantity of radiation is present, yet can be ignored without causing the model to be in error. This happens when radiation from an exterior source streams through the problem, but the latter is so transparent that the energy and momentum coupling is negligible. Everything we say about radiation hydrodynamics applies equally well to neutrinos and photons (apart from the Einstein relations, specific to bosons), but in almost every area of astrophysics neutrino hydrodynamics is ignored, simply because the systems are exceedingly transparent to neutrinos, even though the energy flux in neutrinos may be substantial. Another place where we can do ''radiation hydrodynamics'' without using any sophisticated theory is deep within stars or other bodies, where the material is so opaque to the radiation that the mean free path of photons is entirely negligible compared with the size of the system, the distance over which any fluid quantity varies, and so on. In this case we can suppose that the radiation is in equilibrium with the matter locally, and its energy, pressure and momentum can be lumped in with those of the rest of the fluid. That is, it is no more necessary to distinguish photons from atoms, nuclei and electrons, than it is to distinguish

  12. Calculation of the flow field in supersonic mixed-compression inlets at angle of attack using the three-dimensional method of characteristics with discrete shock wave fitting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vadyak, J.; Hoffman, J. D.

    1978-01-01

    The influence of molecular transport is included in the computation by treating viscous and thermal diffusion terms in the governing partial differential equations as correction terms in the method of characteristics scheme. The development of a production type computer program is reported which is capable of calculating the flow field in a variety of axisymmetric mixed-compression aircraft inlets. The results agreed well with those produced by the two-dimensional method characteristics when axisymmetric flow fields are computed. For three-dimensional flow fields, the results agree well with experimental data except in regions of high viscous interaction and boundary layer removal.

  13. Bacterial Hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauga, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria predate plants and animals by billions of years. Today, they are the world's smallest cells, yet they represent the bulk of the world's biomass and the main reservoir of nutrients for higher organisms. Most bacteria can move on their own, and the majority of motile bacteria are able to swim in viscous fluids using slender helical appendages called flagella. Low-Reynolds number hydrodynamics is at the heart of the ability of flagella to generate propulsion at the micrometer scale. In fact, fluid dynamic forces impact many aspects of bacteriology, ranging from the ability of cells to reorient and search their surroundings to their interactions within mechanically and chemically complex environments. Using hydrodynamics as an organizing framework, I review the biomechanics of bacterial motility and look ahead to future challenges.

  14. Applying Bayesian Compressed Sensing (BCS) for sensitivity analysis ofclimate model outputs that depend on a high-dimensional input space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhary, K.; Guo, Z.; Wang, M.; Lucas, D. D.; Debusschere, B.

    2014-12-01

    High-dimensional parametric uncertainty exists in many parts of atmospheric climatemodels. It is computationally intractable to fully understand their impact on the climatewithout a significant reduction in the number of dimensions. We employ Bayesian CompressedSensing (BCS) to perform adaptive sensitivity analysis in order to determine whichparameters affect the Quantity of Interest (QoI) the most and the least. In short, BCSfits a polynomial to the QoI via a Bayesian framework with an L1 (Laplace) prior. Thus,BCS tries to find the sparsest polynomial representation of the QoI, i.e., the fewestterms, while still trying to retain high accuracy. This procedure is adaptive in the sensethat higher order polynomial terms can be added to the polynomial model when it is likely thatparticular parameters have a significant effect on the QoI. This helps avoid overfitting and is much more computationally efficient. We apply the BCS algorithm to two sets of single column CAM (Community Atmosphere Model)simulations. In the first application, we analyze liquid cloud fraction as modeled byCLUBB (Cloud Layers Unified By Binormals), an atmospheric cloud and turbulence model.This liquid cloud fraction QoI depends on 29 different input parameters. We compare mainSobol sensitivity indices obtained with the BCS algorithm for the liquid cloud fraction in6 cases, with a previous approach to sensitivity analysis using deviance. We show BCS canprovide almost identical sensitivity analysis results. Additionally, BCS can provide animproved, lower-dimensional, higher order model for prediction. In the secondapplication, we study the time averaged ozone concentration, at varying altitudes, as afunction of 95 photochemical parameters, in order to study the sensitivity to theseparameters. To further improve model prediction, we also explore k-fold cross validationto obtain a better model for both liquid cloud fraction in CLUBB and ozone concentrationin CAM. This material is based upon work

  15. Quantum hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsubota, Makoto; Kobayashi, Michikazu; Takeuchi, Hiromitsu

    2013-01-01

    Quantum hydrodynamics in superfluid helium and atomic Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) has been recently one of the most important topics in low temperature physics. In these systems, a macroscopic wave function (order parameter) appears because of Bose-Einstein condensation, which creates quantized vortices. Turbulence consisting of quantized vortices is called quantum turbulence (QT). The study of quantized vortices and QT has increased in intensity for two reasons. The first is that recent studies of QT are considerably advanced over older studies, which were chiefly limited to thermal counterflow in 4He, which has no analog with classical traditional turbulence, whereas new studies on QT are focused on a comparison between QT and classical turbulence. The second reason is the realization of atomic BECs in 1995, for which modern optical techniques enable the direct control and visualization of the condensate and can even change the interaction; such direct control is impossible in other quantum condensates like superfluid helium and superconductors. Our group has made many important theoretical and numerical contributions to the field of quantum hydrodynamics of both superfluid helium and atomic BECs. In this article, we review some of the important topics in detail. The topics of quantum hydrodynamics are diverse, so we have not attempted to cover all these topics in this article. We also ensure that the scope of this article does not overlap with our recent review article (arXiv:1004.5458), “Quantized vortices in superfluid helium and atomic Bose-Einstein condensates”, and other review articles.

  16. Computer program for solving laminar, transitional, or turbulent compressible boundary-layer equations for two-dimensional and axisymmetric flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, J. E.; Blanchard, D. K.

    1982-01-01

    A numerical algorithm and computer program are presented for solving the laminar, transitional, or turbulent two dimensional or axisymmetric compressible boundary-layer equations for perfect-gas flows. The governing equations are solved by an iterative three-point implicit finite-difference procedure. The software, program VGBLP, is a modification of the approach presented in NASA TR R-368 and NASA TM X-2458, respectively. The major modifications are: (1) replacement of the fourth-order Runge-Kutta integration technique with a finite-difference procedure for numerically solving the equations required to initiate the parabolic marching procedure; (2) introduction of the Blottner variable-grid scheme; (3) implementation of an iteration scheme allowing the coupled system of equations to be converged to a specified accuracy level; and (4) inclusion of an iteration scheme for variable-entropy calculations. These modifications to the approach presented in NASA TR R-368 and NASA TM X-2458 yield a software package with high computational efficiency and flexibility. Turbulence-closure options include either two-layer eddy-viscosity or mixing-length models. Eddy conductivity is modeled as a function of eddy viscosity through a static turbulent Prandtl number formulation. Several options are provided for specifying the static turbulent Prandtl number. The transitional boundary layer is treated through a streamwise intermittency function which modifies the turbulence-closure model. This model is based on the probability distribution of turbulent spots and ranges from zero to unity for laminar and turbulent flow, respectively. Several test cases are presented as guides for potential users of the software.

  17. Non-uniformly under-sampled multi-dimensional spectroscopic imaging in vivo: maximum entropy versus compressed sensing reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Burns, Brian; Wilson, Neil E; Furuyama, Jon K; Thomas, M Albert

    2014-02-01

    The four-dimensional (4D) echo-planar correlated spectroscopic imaging (EP-COSI) sequence allows for the simultaneous acquisition of two spatial (ky, kx) and two spectral (t2, t1) dimensions in vivo in a single recording. However, its scan time is directly proportional to the number of increments in the ky and t1 dimensions, and a single scan can take 20–40 min using typical parameters, which is too long to be used for a routine clinical protocol. The present work describes efforts to accelerate EP-COSI data acquisition by application of non-uniform under-sampling (NUS) to the ky–t1 plane of simulated and in vivo EP-COSI datasets then reconstructing missing samples using maximum entropy (MaxEnt) and compressed sensing (CS). Both reconstruction problems were solved using the Cambridge algorithm, which offers many workflow improvements over other l1-norm solvers. Reconstructions of retrospectively under-sampled simulated data demonstrate that the MaxEnt and CS reconstructions successfully restore data fidelity at signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) from 4 to 20 and 5× to 1.25× NUS. Retrospectively and prospectively 4× under-sampled 4D EP-COSI in vivo datasets show that both reconstruction methods successfully remove NUS artifacts; however, MaxEnt provides reconstructions equal to or better than CS. Our results show that NUS combined with iterative reconstruction can reduce 4D EP-COSI scan times by 75% to a clinically viable 5 min in vivo, with MaxEnt being the preferred method. 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Fast carotid artery MR angiography with compressed sensing based three-dimensional time-of-flight sequence.

    PubMed

    Li, Bo; Li, Hao; Dong, Li; Huang, Guofu

    2017-07-20

    In this study, we sought to investigate the feasibility of fast carotid artery MR angiography (MRA) by combining three-dimensional time-of-flight (3D TOF) with compressed sensing method (CS-3D TOF). A pseudo-sequential phase encoding order was developed for CS-3D TOF to generate hyper-intense vessel and suppress background tissues in under-sampled 3D k-space. Seven healthy volunteers and one patient with carotid artery stenosis were recruited for this study. Five sequential CS-3D TOF scans were implemented at 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5-fold acceleration factors for carotid artery MRA. Blood signal-to-tissue ratio (BTR) values for fully-sampled and under-sampled acquisitions were calculated and compared in seven subjects. Blood area (BA) was measured and compared between fully sampled acquisition and each under-sampled one. There were no significant differences between the fully-sampled dataset and each under-sampled in BTR comparisons (P>0.05 for all comparisons). The carotid vessel BAs measured from the images of CS-3D TOF sequences with 2, 3, 4 and 5-fold acceleration scans were all highly correlated with that of the fully-sampled acquisition. The contrast between blood vessels and background tissues of the images at 2 to 5-fold acceleration is comparable to that of fully sampled images. The images at 2× to 5× exhibit the comparable lumen definition to the corresponding images at 1×. By combining the pseudo-sequential phase encoding order, CS reconstruction, and 3D TOF sequence, this technique provides excellent visualizations for carotid vessel and calcifications in a short scan time. It has the potential to be integrated into current multiple blood contrast imaging protocol. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Convective heat transport in compressible fluids.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Akira; Onuki, Akira

    2002-07-01

    We present hydrodynamic equations of compressible fluids in gravity as a generalization of those in the Boussinesq approximation used for nearly incompressible fluids. They account for adiabatic processes taking place throughout the cell (the piston effect) and those taking place within plumes (the adiabatic temperature gradient effect). Performing two-dimensional numerical analysis, we reveal some unique features of plume generation and convection in transient and steady states of compressible fluids. As the critical point is approached, the overall temperature changes induced by plume arrivals at the boundary walls are amplified, giving rise to overshoot behavior in transient states and significant noise in the temperature in steady states. The velocity field is suggested to assume a logarithmic profile within boundary layers. Random reversal of macroscopic shear flow is examined in a cell with unit aspect ratio. We also present a simple scaling theory for moderate Rayleigh numbers.

  20. Comparison between physical variables acquired by a new multiparametric platform, ELFO, and data calculated by a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model in different weather conditions at Tiber River mouth (Latium coast, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonamano, Simone; Piermattei, Viviana; Marcelli, Marco; Peviani, Maximo

    2010-05-01

    The coastal ecosystem is characterized by high variability physical processes, which are strongly influenced by sudden changes in weather conditions. For this reason instruments able to collect data in a short time or mathematical models able to simulate the same phenomena from experimental data are basic. In this study in situ data are compared with data calculated by three-dimensional hydrodynamic model. The multiparametric platform was developed ad hoc by Laboratory of Experimental Oceanology and Marine Ecology (DECOS, Tuscia University) for coastal monitoring by small vessels (ELFO), and integrates temperature, conductivity, dissolved oxygen and suspended solids measures with bio-optical measures like fluorescence, photosynthetic efficiency and PAR. The hydrodynamic model is the three-dimensional coastal hydrodynamic DELFT3D-FLOW simulating processes of temperature and salinity diffusion and the transport of suspended sediment (cohesive and non cohesive) in the water column. This study analyses the area at mouth of Tiber river investigated by two surveys wiht different weather conditions. Data collected during the first survey were used to calibrate the DELFT3D-FLOW model which computational domain extends from the Argentario headland to Capo Anzio. A microscale wind field (resolution of about 7 km), provided by the atmospheric model COSMO-ME (developed by CNMCA of Aeronautica Militare, Italy), was used to reproduce the hydrodynamic field and the distribution of the physical variables of the whole period. In this way the data calculated by the model can be compared with those collected in situ during the second survey. Moreover dynamic phenomena existed between the two monitoring periods can be investigated.

  1. Impact of diffusion on surface clustering in random hydrodynamic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klyatskin, V. I.; Koshel, K. V.

    2017-01-01

    Buoyant material clustering in a stochastic flow, which is homogeneous and isotropic in space and stationary in time, is addressed. The dynamics of buoyant material in three-dimensional hydrodynamic flows can be considered as the motion of passive tracers in a compressible two-dimensional velocity field. The latter is of interest in the present study. It is well known that the clustering of the density of passive tracers occurs in this case. We evaluate the impact of diffusion on the clustering process by using a numerical model. In general, the effect of diffusion is negligible in the very beginning of the evolution of initially uniformly distributed passive tracers. Therefore, the clustering of the density of passive tracers can emerge in accordance with the general theory. We analyze the long time clustering affected by diffusion and show that the emerged cluster structure persists in time in spite of the diffusion effect. However, the clusters split in time.

  2. Partitioning dynamics of gravity-driven preferential flow in unsaturated fractures: Laboratory study and three-dimensional smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordilla, Jannes; Noffz, Torsten; Dentz, Marco; Tartakovsky, Alexandre

    2017-04-01

    Fractures and fracture networks have a high potential to contribute to the formation of preferential flow paths, and thus control important catchment-scale parameters, such as aquifer vulnerability, mass arrival times and dispersion dynamics. Particularly, the unsaturated zone of fractured porous aquifers exhibits highly space- and time-variant coupling of phase saturation and flow (transport) dynamics and remains an extremely challenging aspect of vadose zone research. Non-Darcian and highly non-linear unsaturated flow modes, strongly deviate from the classical laminar and low Capillary number flow regimes and therefore most volume-effective approaches fails to capture important flow and transport characteristics. Here we study unsaturated gravity-driven free-surface flows on a synthetic surface intersected by a horizontal fracture and demonstrate the importance of flow modes (droplet; rivulet) on the partitioning behavior at the fracture intersection. We present (1) laboratory experiments, (2) three-dimensional smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations using a heavily parallelized code, and (3) an analytical solution. The flow-rate-dependent mode switching from droplets to rivulets is reproduced by the SPH model, and the transition ranges agree with the laboratory experiments. We show that flow modes heavily influence the bypass behavior. Flows favoring the formation of droplets exhibit a much stronger bypass capacity compared to rivulet flows, where nearly the whole fluid mass is initially stored within the horizontal fracture. This behavior is demonstrated for a multi-inlet laboratory setup where the inlet-specific flow rate is chosen so that either a droplet or rivulet flow persists. The effect of fluid buffering within the horizontal fracture is presented in terms of dimensionless fracture inflow so that characteristic scaling regimes can be recovered. For both cases (rivulets and droplets), the flow within the horizontal fracture transitions into a

  3. Three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of multiphase galactic disks with star formation feedback. II. Synthetic H I 21 cm line observations

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Chang-Goo; Ostriker, Eve C.; Kim, Woong-Tae E-mail: eco@astro.princeton.edu

    2014-05-01

    We use three-dimensional numerical hydrodynamic simulations of the turbulent, multiphase atomic interstellar medium (ISM) to construct and analyze synthetic H I 21 cm emission and absorption lines. Our analysis provides detailed tests of 21 cm observables as physical diagnostics of the atomic ISM. In particular, we construct (1) the 'observed' spin temperature, T{sub s,obs}(v{sub ch})≡T{sub B}(v{sub ch})/[1−e{sup −τ(v{sub c}{sub h})}], and its optical-depth weighted mean T {sub s,} {sub obs}; (2) the absorption-corrected ''observed'' column density, N{sub H,obs}∝∫dv{sub ch}T{sub B}(v{sub ch})τ(v{sub ch})/[1−e{sup −τ(v{sub c}{sub h})}]; and (3) the 'observed' fraction of cold neutral medium (CNM), f {sub c,} {sub obs} ≡ T{sub c} /T {sub s,} {sub obs} for T{sub c} the CNM temperature; we compare each observed parameter with true values obtained from line-of-sight (LOS) averages in the simulation. Within individual velocity channels, T {sub s,} {sub obs}(v {sub ch}) is within a factor 1.5 of the true value up to τ(v {sub ch}) ∼ 10. As a consequence, N {sub H,} {sub obs} and T{sub s,} {sub obs} are, respectively, within 5% and 12% of the true values for 90% and 99% of LOSs. The optically thin approximation significantly underestimates N {sub H} for τ > 1. Provided that T{sub c} is constrained, an accurate observational estimate of the CNM mass fraction can be obtained down to 20%. We show that T{sub s,} {sub obs} cannot be used to distinguish the relative proportions of warm and thermally unstable atomic gas, although the presence of thermally unstable gas can be discerned from 21 cm lines with 200 K ≲ T{sub s,} {sub obs}(v {sub ch}) ≲ 1000 K. Our mock observations successfully reproduce and explain the observed distribution of the brightness temperature, optical depth, and spin temperature in Roy et al. The threshold column density for CNM seen in observations is also reproduced by our mock observations. We explain this observed threshold

  4. Three-dimensional Hydrodynamic Simulations of Multiphase Galactic Disks with Star Formation Feedback. II. Synthetic H I 21 cm Line Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chang-Goo; Ostriker, Eve C.; Kim, Woong-Tae

    2014-05-01

    We use three-dimensional numerical hydrodynamic simulations of the turbulent, multiphase atomic interstellar medium (ISM) to construct and analyze synthetic H I 21 cm emission and absorption lines. Our analysis provides detailed tests of 21 cm observables as physical diagnostics of the atomic ISM. In particular, we construct (1) the "observed" spin temperature, T_{s, obs}(v_ch)≡ T_B(v_ch)/[1-e^{-τ (v_ch)}], and its optical-depth weighted mean T s, obs; (2) the absorption-corrected "observed" column density, N_H,obs∝ ∫ dv_chT_B(v_ch) τ (v_ch)/[1-e^{-τ (v_ch)}]; and (3) the "observed" fraction of cold neutral medium (CNM), f c, obs ≡ Tc /T s, obs for Tc the CNM temperature; we compare each observed parameter with true values obtained from line-of-sight (LOS) averages in the simulation. Within individual velocity channels, T s, obs(v ch) is within a factor 1.5 of the true value up to τ(v ch) ~ 10. As a consequence, N H, obs and T s, obs are, respectively, within 5% and 12% of the true values for 90% and 99% of LOSs. The optically thin approximation significantly underestimates N H for τ > 1. Provided that Tc is constrained, an accurate observational estimate of the CNM mass fraction can be obtained down to 20%. We show that T s, obs cannot be used to distinguish the relative proportions of warm and thermally unstable atomic gas, although the presence of thermally unstable gas can be discerned from 21 cm lines with 200 K <~ T s, obs(v ch) <~ 1000 K. Our mock observations successfully reproduce and explain the observed distribution of the brightness temperature, optical depth, and spin temperature in Roy et al. The threshold column density for CNM seen in observations is also reproduced by our mock observations. We explain this observed threshold behavior in terms of vertical equilibrium in the local Milky Way's ISM disk.

  5. X-Ray--heated Coronae and Winds from Accretion Disks: Time-dependent Two-dimensional Hydrodynamics with Adaptive Mesh Refinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, D. Tod; Klein, Richard I.; Castor, John I.; McKee, Christopher F.; Bell, John B.

    1996-04-01

    We perform for the first time time-dependent, two-dimensional, axisymmetric hydrodynamic simulations using local adaptive mesh refinement of thermally driven rotating winds from X-ray-irradiated accretion disks. The disk is assumed to flare in height with radius allowing direct exposure from the central X-ray source. The heating and cooling are treated strictly in the optically thin approximation. We adopt two spectra characteristic of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) which have Compton temperatures of TIC ≍ 1.3 x 107 K and 108 K. We have computed a number of models which cover a large range in luminosity (0.002 ≤ L/LEddington < 1) and radius (≲20 Compton radii). Our models enable us to extend and improve on the analytic predictions of Begelman, McKee, & Shields (BMS) for Compton-heated winds by including non-Compton processes such as photoionization heating and line cooling, typical of X-ray-heated winds. These non-Compton processes can be dominant at low temperatures (≲107 K), thus being important in the wind regions of AGNs. Our results agree well with a number of predictions given by BMS, even when non-Compton processes dominate, suggesting that their analytic approximations of the hydrodynamics of disk winds are applicable to the more general area of X-ray-heated winds. In the regime in which Compton processes dominate (i.e., TIC = 108 K spectrum), we have used our results to improve the analytic predictions of BMS, providing a new expression for the mass-loss rate and a modified view of the wind solution topology. We find that beginning from a basically static state, the time-dependent flow which develops eventually settles into a steady wind, without any evidence of hydrodynamic instabilities. The solution topology consists of a corona with an exponentially truncated wind at small radii, and a vigorous wind at large radii which can be impeded by gravity for small luminosities. We have constructed radius-luminosity parameter space plots of our numerical

  6. Compression-induced crystallization of amorphous indomethacin in tablets: characterization of spatial heterogeneity by two-dimensional X-ray diffractometry.

    PubMed

    Thakral, Naveen K; Mohapatra, Sarat; Stephenson, Gregory A; Suryanarayanan, Raj

    2015-01-05

    Tablets of amorphous indomethacin were compressed at 10, 25, 50, or 100 MPa using either an unlubricated or a lubricated die and stored individually at 35 °C in sealed Mylar pouches. At selected time points, tablets were analyzed by two-dimensional X-ray diffractometry (2D-XRD), which enabled us to profile the extent of drug crystallization in tablets, in both the radial and axial directions. To evaluate the role of lubricant, magnesium stearate was used as "internal" and/or "external" lubricant. Indomethacin crystallization propensity increased as a function of compression pressure, with 100 MPa pressure causing crystallization immediately after compression (detected using synchrotron radiation). However, the drug crystallization was not uniform throughout the tablets. In unlubricated systems, pronounced crystallization at the radial surface could be attributed to die wall friction. The tablet core remained substantially amorphous, irrespective of the compression pressure. Lubrication of the die wall with magnesium stearate, as external lubricant, dramatically decreased drug crystallization at the radial surface. The spatial heterogeneity in drug crystallization, as a function of formulation composition and compression pressure, was systematically investigated. When formulating amorphous systems as tablets, the potential for compression induced crystallization warrants careful consideration. Very low levels of crystallization on the tablet surface, while profoundly affecting product performance (decrease in dissolution rate), may not be readily detected by conventional analytical techniques. Early detection of crystallization could be pivotal in the successful design of a dosage form where, in order to obtain the desired bioavailability, the drug may be in a high energy state. Specialized X-ray diffractometric techniques (2D; use of high intensity synchrotron radiation) enabled detection of very low levels of drug crystallization and revealed the heterogeneity in

  7. Clinical Feasibility of 3-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Cholangiopancreatography Using Compressed Sensing: Comparison of Image Quality and Diagnostic Performance.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jeong Hee; Lee, Sang Min; Kang, Hyo-Jin; Weiland, Elisabeth; Raithel, Esther; Son, Yohan; Kiefer, Berthold; Lee, Jeong Min

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical feasibility of fast 3-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) using compressed sensing (CS) in comparison with conventional navigator-triggered 3D-MRCP. This retrospective study was approved by our institutional review board, and the requirement of informed consent was waived. A total of 84 patients (male-to-female ratio, 41:43; mean age, 47.3 ± 18.8 years) who underwent conventional 3D navigator-triggered T2-weighted MRCP using sampling perfection with application optimized contrasts (SPACE) and fast 3D MRCP using SPACE with high undersampling combined with CS reconstruction (CS SPACE; CS-MRCP) on a 3 T scanner were included. Among them, 28 patients additionally underwent 3D breath-hold CS-MRCP (BH-CS-MRCP) with 5.7% k-space sampling. Three board-certified radiologists then independently reviewed the examinations for bile duct and pancreatic duct visualization and overall image quality on a 5-point scale, and image sharpness and background suppression on a 4-point scale, with the higher score indicating better image quality. In addition, diagnostic performance for the detection of anatomic variation and diseases of the bile duct, and pancreatic disease were assessed on a per-patient basis in the subgroup of 28 patients who underwent conventional MRCP, CS-MRCP, and BH-CS-MRCP in the same manner. Mean acquisition times of conventional MRCP, CS-MRCP, and BH-CS-MRCP were 7 minutes (419.7 seconds), 3 minutes 47 seconds (227.0 seconds), and 16 seconds, respectively (P < 0.0001, in all comparisons). In all patients, CS-MRCP showed better image sharpness (3.54 ± 0.60 vs 3.37 ± 0.75, P = 0.04) and visualization of the common bile duct (4.55 ± 0.60 vs 4.39 ± 0.78, P = 0.034) and pancreatic duct (3.47 ± 1.22 vs 3.26 ± 1.32, P = 0.025), but lower background suppression (3.00 ± 0.54 vs 3.37 ± 0.58, P < 0.001) than conventional MRCP. Overall image quality was not significantly different

  8. Linear dimensional change, compressive strength and detail reproduction in type IV dental stone dried at room temperature and in a microwave oven.

    PubMed

    Silva, Marcos Aurélio Bomfim da; Vitti, Rafael Pino; Consani, Simonides; Sinhoreti, Mário Alexandre Coelho; Mesquita, Marcelo Ferraz; Consani, Rafael Leonardo Xediek

    2012-01-01

    The type IV dental stone is widely used for the fabrication of dyes and master casts for fixed and removable partial prostheses. It is typically normal to wait at least 24 hours for the casts to dry prior to beginning the laboratory procedures. The waiting time has been shown to be greatly reduced by using microwave drying. This study evaluated the influence of drying techniques at room temperature and microwave oven on the linear dimensional change, compressive strength and detail reproduction in type IV dental stones. Three type IV dental stone brands were selected; elite Rock, Shera Premium and Durone IV. Two different drying protocols were tested in 4 groups (n=10); G-room temperature (25±4 ºC) dried for 2 hours; G2--room temperature dried for 24 hours; G3-room temperature dried for 7 days and G4--microwave oven dried at 800 W for 5 minutes and after 2 hours at room temperature. After drying, the samples were assayed for dimensional charges. The sample surface was submitted to the ImageTool 3.0 software for compressive strength in a universal testing machine with a cell load of 50 KN at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/minutes and the detail reproduction was analyzed with a stereomicroscope at 25x magnification. The statistical analysis of the linear dimensional change and compressive strength data were conducted by the ANOVA test followed by the Tukey test (p<0.05). Detailed reproduction values were reported in percentages. For the compressive strength test, Elite Rock and Durone IV did not present significant differences between G2 and G4, while Shera Premium did not present differences between G3 and G4. The best reproduction levels were observed for G3. Dental stone microwave oven drying showed a linear dimensional change similar to after room temperature drying for 24 hours and 7 days. The compressive strength of the stone dried in the microwave oven was similar to those dried at room temperature for 24 hours, with the exception of Shera Premium, which had

  9. Linear dimensional change, compressive strength and detail reproduction in type IV dental stone dried at room temperature and in a microwave oven

    PubMed Central

    da SILVA, Marcos Aurélio Bomfim; VITTI, Rafael Pino; CONSANI, Simonides; SINHORETI, Mário Alexandre Coelho; MESQUITA, Marcelo Ferraz; CONSANI, Rafael Leonardo Xediek

    2012-01-01

    The type IV dental stone is widely used for the fabrication of dyes and master casts for fixed and removable partial prostheses. It is typically normal to wait at least 24 hours for the casts to dry prior to beginning the laboratory procedures. The waiting time has been shown to be greatly reduced by using microwave drying. Objective This study evaluated the influence of drying techniques at room temperature and microwave oven on the linear dimensional change, compressive strength and detail reproduction in type IV dental stones. Material and Methods Three type IV dental stone brands were selected; Elite Rock, Shera Premium and Durone IV. Two different drying protocols were tested in 4 groups (n=10); G1 - room temperature (25±4ºC) dried for 2 hours; G2 - room temperature dried for 24 hours; G3 - room temperature dried for 7 days and G4 - microwave oven dried at 800 W for 5 minutes and after 2 hours at room temperature. After drying, the samples were assayed for dimensional charges. The sample surface was submitted to the ImageTool 3.0 software for compressive strength in a universal testing machine with a cell load of 50 KN at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/minutes and the detail reproduction was analyzed with a stereomicroscope at 25x magnification. The statistical analysis of the linear dimensional change and compressive strength data were conducted by the ANOVA test followed by the Tukey test (p<0.05). Detailed reproduction values were reported in percentages. Results For the compressive strength test, Elite Rock and Durone IV did not present significant differences between G2 and G4, while Shera Premium did not present differences between G3 and G4. The best reproduction levels were observed for G3. Conclusions Dental stone microwave oven drying showed a linear dimensional change similar to after room temperature drying for 24 hours and 7 days. The compressive strength of the stone dried in the microwave oven was similar to those dried at room temperature for 24

  10. Simulation of the effects of different inflows on hydrologic conditions in Lake Houston with a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model, Houston, Texas, 2009–10

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rendon, Samuel H.; Lee, Michael T.

    2015-12-08

    Lake Houston, an important water resource for the Houston, Texas, area, receives inflows from seven major tributaries that compose the San Jacinto River Basin upstream from the reservoir. The effects of different inflows from the watersheds drained by these tributaries on the residence time of water in Lake Houston and closely associated physical and chemical properties including lake elevation, salinity, and water temperature are not well known. Accordingly, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the City of Houston, developed a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model of Lake Houston as a tool for evaluating the effects of different inflows on residence time of water in the lake and associated physical and chemical properties. The Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (EFDC), a grid-based, surface-water modeling package for simulating three-dimensional circulation, mass transport, sediments, and biogeochemical processes, was used to develop the model of Lake Houston. The Lake Houston EFDC model was developed and calibrated by using 2009 data and verified by using 2010 data. Three statistics (mean error, root mean square error, and the Nash-Sutcliffe model efficiency coefficient) were used to evaluate how well the Lake Houston EFDC model simulated lake elevation, salinity, and water temperature. The residence time of water in reservoirs is associated with various physical and chemical properties (including lake elevation, salinity, and water temperature). Simulated and measured lake-elevation values were compared at USGS reservoir station 08072000 Lake Houston near Sheldon, Tex. The accuracy of simulated salinity and water temperature values was assessed by using the salinity (computed from measured specific conductance) and water temperature at two USGS monitoring stations: 295826095082200 Lake Houston south Union Pacific Railroad Bridge near Houston, Tex., and 295554095093401 Lake Houston at mouth of Jack’s Ditch near Houston, Tex. Specific conductance

  11. Hydrodynamic supercontinuum.

    PubMed

    Chabchoub, A; Hoffmann, N; Onorato, M; Genty, G; Dudley, J M; Akhmediev, N

    2013-08-02

    We report the experimental observation of multi-bound-soliton solutions of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLS) in the context of hydrodynamic surface gravity waves. Higher-order N-soliton solutions with N=2, 3 are studied in detail and shown to be associated with self-focusing in the wave group dynamics and the generation of a steep localized carrier wave underneath the group envelope. We also show that for larger input soliton numbers, the wave group experiences irreversible spectral broadening, which we refer to as a hydrodynamic supercontinuum by analogy with optics. This process is shown to be associated with the fission of the initial multisoliton into individual fundamental solitons due to higher-order nonlinear perturbations to the NLS. Numerical simulations using an extended NLS model described by the modified nonlinear Schrödinger equation, show excellent agreement with experiment and highlight the universal role that higher-order nonlinear perturbations to the NLS play in supercontinuum generation.

  12. Efficient compression scheme by use of the region division of elemental images on MALT in three-dimensional integral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Ho-Hyun; Lee, Jung-Woo; Shin, Dong-Hak; Kim, Eun-Soo

    2010-02-01

    This paper addresses the efficient compression scheme of elemental image array (EIA) generated from the moving array lenslet technique (MALT) based on MPEG-4. The EIAs are picked-up by MALT controlling the spatial ray sampling of ray and which produces few EIAs that the positions of the lenslet arrays are rapidly vibrated in the lateral directions within the retention time of the afterimage of human eye. To enhance the similarity in each EIA picked-up by MALT, several EIAs obtained from MALT are regenerated by the collection of an elemental image occupied at the same position in each EIA. The newly generated each EIA has high similarity among adjacent elemental images. To illustrate the feasibility of the proposed scheme, some experiments are carried out to show the increased compression efficiency and we obtained the improved compression ratio of 12% compared to the unhandled compression scheme.

  13. Machining of Two-Dimensional Sinusoidal Defects on Ignition-Type Capsules to Study Hydrodynamic Instability at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Giraldez, E. M.; Hoppe Jr., M. L.; Hoover, D. E.; Nguyen, A. Q. L.; Rice, N. G.; Garcia, A. M.; Huang, H.; Mauldin, M. P.; Farrell, M. P.; Nikroo, A.; Smalyuk, V.

    2016-07-07

    Hydrodynamic instability growth and its effects on capsule implosion performance are being studied at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Experimental results have shown that low-mode instabilities are the primary culprit for yield degradation. Ignition type capsules with machined 2D sinusoidal defects were used to measure low-mode hydrodynamic instability growth in the acceleration phase of the capsule implosion. The capsules were imploded using ignition-relevant laser pulses and the ablation-front modulation growth was measured using x-ray radiography. The experimentally measured growth was in good agreement with simulations.

  14. Machining of Two-Dimensional Sinusoidal Defects on Ignition-Type Capsules to Study Hydrodynamic Instability at the National Ignition Facility

    DOE PAGES

    Giraldez, E. M.; Hoppe Jr., M. L.; Hoover, D. E.; ...

    2016-07-07

    Hydrodynamic instability growth and its effects on capsule implosion performance are being studied at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Experimental results have shown that low-mode instabilities are the primary culprit for yield degradation. Ignition type capsules with machined 2D sinusoidal defects were used to measure low-mode hydrodynamic instability growth in the acceleration phase of the capsule implosion. The capsules were imploded using ignition-relevant laser pulses and the ablation-front modulation growth was measured using x-ray radiography. The experimentally measured growth was in good agreement with simulations.

  15. Machining of Two-Dimensional Sinusoidal Defects on Ignition-Type Capsules to Study Hydrodynamic Instability at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Giraldez, E. M.; Hoppe Jr., M. L.; Hoover, D. E.; Nguyen, A. Q. L.

    2016-08-01

    Hydrodynamic instability growth and its effects on capsule implosion performance are being studied at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Experimental results have shown that low-mode instabilities are the primary culprit for yield degradation. Ignition type capsules with machined 2D sinusoidal defects were used to measure low-mode hydrodynamic instability growth in the acceleration phase of the capsule implosion. The capsules were imploded using ignition-relevant laser pulses and the ablation-front modulation growth was measured using x-ray radiography. The experimentally measured growth was in good agreement with simulations.

  16. Vortex force in compressible spin-orbit-coupled Bose-Einstein condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toikka, L. A.

    2017-09-01

    Using a (1+2)-dimensional boson-vortex duality between nonlinear electrodynamics and a two-component compressible Bose-Einstein condensate with spin-orbit (SO) coupling, we obtain hydrodynamic continuity and Euler equations where the phase defect and nondefect degrees of freedom enter separately, and a separate equation encompassing quantization of circulation. We obtain the generalized force on vortices under SO coupling, and associate the linear confinement of vortices due to SO coupling with instanton fluctuations of the dual theory.

  17. Morphing of two-dimensional hole systems at ν =3 /2 in parallel magnetic fields: Compressible, stripe, and fractional quantum Hall phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Mueed, M. A.; Hossain, Md. Shafayat; Hasdermir, S.; Pfeiffer, L. N.; West, K. W.; Baldwin, K. W.; Shayegan, M.

    2016-10-01

    A transport study of two-dimensional (2D) holes confined to wide GaAs quantum wells provides a glimpse of a subtle competition between different many-body phases at a Landau level filling ν =3 /2 in tilted magnetic fields. At large tilt angles (θ ), an anisotropic, stripe (or nematic) phase replaces the isotropic compressible Fermi sea at ν =3 /2 if the quantum well has a symmetric charge distribution. When the charge distribution is made asymmetric, instead of the stripe phase, an even-denominator fractional quantum state appears at ν =3 /2 in a range of large θ , and reverts back to a compressible state at even higher θ . We attribute this remarkable evolution to the significant mixing of the excited and ground-state Landau levels of 2D hole systems in tilted fields.

  18. Hydrodynamic effects on coalescence.

    SciTech Connect

    Dimiduk, Thomas G.; Bourdon, Christopher Jay; Grillet, Anne Mary; Baer, Thomas A.; de Boer, Maarten Pieter; Loewenberg, Michael; Gorby, Allen D.; Brooks, Carlton, F.

    2006-10-01

    The goal of this project was to design, build and test novel diagnostics to probe the effect of hydrodynamic forces on coalescence dynamics. Our investigation focused on how a drop coalesces onto a flat surface which is analogous to two drops coalescing, but more amenable to precise experimental measurements. We designed and built a flow cell to create an axisymmetric compression flow which brings a drop onto a flat surface. A computer-controlled system manipulates the flow to steer the drop and maintain a symmetric flow. Particle image velocimetry was performed to confirm that the control system was delivering a well conditioned flow. To examine the dynamics of the coalescence, we implemented an interferometry capability to measure the drainage of the thin film between the drop and the surface during the coalescence process. A semi-automated analysis routine was developed which converts the dynamic interferogram series into drop shape evolution data.

  19. Enhancing the Capture of Two-dimensional, Shock-Induced Detonation Fronts using Harten's Artificial Compression Method on Underresolved Cartesian Grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouch, Olivier

    2009-09-01

    In the problems of detonation we are going to present here, the capture of shocks is crucial, since from its accuracy depends the very physical relevance of the whole solution. We already obtained some improvements in the capture of detonation fronts on underresolved grids in the one-dimensional case thanks to Harten's artificial compression [1], [2], and we now turn to two-dimensional cartesian grids. In two space dimensions, the complexity of the discontinuity implies not only the location and speed of the front, but also its shape. These three aspects will be explored here, for the ZND detonation model, based on Euler's system. We will use two-dimensional central schemes for main computations, namely the classical "Lax-Friedrichs" first order scheme and the second order "Jiang-Tadmor" scheme [3]. To each of these methods, we will add two different versions of ACM (Artificial Compression Method), one that uses space splitting, and the other based on directional differencing [4]. Finally, as ACM require a good knowledge of the regions of the solution potentially carrying discontinuities, it will be assisted by a DoD (Detector of Discontinuities) based on the entropy production rate.

  20. Numerical study of one-dimensional compression of granular materials. I. Stress-strain behavior, microstructure, and irreversibility.

    PubMed

    Khalili, Mohamed Hassan; Roux, Jean-Noël; Pereira, Jean-Michel; Brisard, Sébastien; Bornert, Michel

    2017-03-01

    The behavior of a model granular material, made of slightly polydisperse beads with Hertz-Mindlin elastic-frictional contacts, in oedometric compression (i.e., compression along one axis, with no lateral strain) is studied by grain-level numerical simulations. We systematically investigate the influence of the (idealized) packing process on the microstructure and stresses in the initial, weakly confined equilibrium state, and prepare both isotropic and anisotropic configurations differing in solid fraction Φ and coordination number z. Φ (ranging from maximally dense to moderately loose), z (which might vary independently of Φ in dense systems), fabric and force anisotropy parameters, and the ratio K_{0} of lateral stresses σ_{2}=σ_{3} to stress σ_{1} in the compression direction are monitored in oedometric compression in which σ_{1} varies by more than three orders of magnitude. K_{0} reflects the anisotropy of the assembling process and may remain nearly constant in further loading if the material is already oedometrically compressed (as a granular gas) in the preparation stage. Otherwise, it tends to decrease steadily over the investigated stress range. It is related to force and fabric anisotropy parameters by a simple formula. Elastic moduli, separately computed with an appropriate matrix method, may express the response to very small stress increments about the transversely isotropic well-equilibrated states along the loading path, although oedometric compression proves an essentially anelastic process, mainly due to friction mobilization, with large irreversible effects apparent upon unloading. While the evolution of axial strain ε_{1} and solid fraction Φ (or of the void ratio e=-1+1/Φ) with axial stress σ_{1} is very nearly reversible, especially in dense samples, z is observed to decrease (as previously observed in isotropic compression) after a compression cycle if its initial value was high. K_{0} relates to the evolution of internal variables

  1. Lift coefficient calculation using a geometric/solution adaptive Navier Stokes solver on two-dimensional cartesian grids for compressible and turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kara, Emre; Kutlar, Ahmet Ihsan; Aksel, Mehmet Haluk

    2017-09-01

    In this study, two-dimensional geometric and solution adaptive refinement/coarsening scheme codes are generated by the use of Cartesian grid generation techniques. In the solution of compressible, turbulent flows one-equation Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model is implemented. The performance of the flow solver is tested on the case of high Reynolds number, steady flow around NACA 0012 airfoil. The lift coefficient solution for the airfoil at a real-life-flight Reynolds number is compared with the experimental study in literature.

  2. On the global solvability and the non-resistive limit of the one-dimensional compressible heat-conductive MHD equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianwen; Zhao, Xiaokui

    2017-03-01

    In general, the resistivity is inversely proportional to the electrical conductivity and is usually taken to be zero when the conducting fluid is of extremely high conductivity (e.g., ideal conductors). In this paper, the global well-posedness of strong solution to the one-dimensional compressible, viscous, heat-conductive, non-resistive magnetohydrodynamics equations with large data, and general heat-conductivity is proved. Moreover, the non-resistive limit is justified and the convergence rates in L2-norm are obtained, provided the heat-conductivity satisfies some growth condition.

  3. Investigation of test methods for measuring compressive strength and modulus of two-dimensional carbon-carbon composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohlhorst, Craig W.; Sawyer, James Wayne; Yamaki, Y. Robert

    1989-01-01

    An experimental evaluation has been conducted to ascertain the the usefulness of two techniques for measuring in-plane compressive failure strength and modulus in coated and uncoated carbon-carbon composites. The techniques involved testing specimens with potted ends as well as testing them in a novel clamping fixture; specimen shape, length, gage width, and thickness were the test parameters investigated for both coated and uncoated 0/90 deg and +/-45 deg laminates. It is found that specimen shape does not have a significant effect on the measured compressive properties. The potting of specimen ends results in slightly higher measured compressive strengths than those obtained with the new clamping fixture. Comparable modulus values are obtained by both techniques.

  4. Study of the hydrodynamics of the formation of flows caused by the interaction of a shock wave with two-dimensional density perturbations on the Iskra-5 laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babanov, A. V.; Barinov, M. A.; Barinov, S. P.; Garanin, R. V.; Zhidkov, N. V.; Kalmykov, N. A.; Kovalenko, V. P.; Kokorin, S. N.; Pinegin, A. V.; Solomatina, E. Yu.; Solomatin, I. I.; Suslov, N. A.

    2017-03-01

    The hydrodynamics of the flow formation due to the interaction of a shock wave with two-dimensional density perturbations is experimentally investigated on the Iskra-5 laser facility. Shadow images of a jet arising as a result of the impact of a shock wave (formed by a soft X-ray pulse from a target-illuminator) on a flat aluminium target with a blind cylindrical cavity are recorded in experiments with point-like X-ray backlighting having a photon energy of ~4.5 keV. The sizes and mass of the jet ejected from the aluminium cavity by this shock wave are estimated. The experimental data are compared with the results of numerical simulation of the jet formation and dynamics according to the two-dimensional MID-ND2D code.

  5. Characterization of a two-dimensional temperature field within a rapid compression machine using a toluene planar laser-induced fluorescence imaging technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strozzi, Camille; Sotton, Julien; Mura, Arnaud; Bellenoue, Marc

    2009-12-01

    The homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) combustion process is an advanced operating mode for automotive engines. The self-ignition mechanisms that occur within the combustion chamber exhibit extreme temperature dependence. Therefore, the thorough understanding of corresponding phenomena requires the use of diagnostic methods featuring a sufficient thermal sensitivity, applicable in severe conditions similar to those encountered within engines. In this respect, toluene planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) is applied to the inert compression flow generated within an optical rapid compression machine (RCM). A relatively simple diagnostic system is retained: a single wavelength excitation device (266 nm) and a single (filtered) collection system. This diagnostic system is associated with an image processing strategy specifically adapted to RCM devices. Despite the severe conditions under consideration (40 bar, 700-950 K), the method allows us to obtain relatively large two-dimensional temperature fields that display a level of description seldom achieved in such devices. In particular the temperature gradients, which play a crucial role in HCCI combustion processes, can be estimated. The present experimental results confirm the good reliability and accuracy of the method. The information gathered with this toluene PLIF method puts in evidence its high potentialities for the study of aero-thermal-reactive processes as they take place in real engine conditions. The retained strategy also brings new possibilities of non-intrusive analysis for flows practically encountered within industrial devices.

  6. Augmenting two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations with measured velocity data to identify flow paths as a function of depth on Upper St. Clair River in the Great Lakes basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holtschlag, D.J.; Koschik, J.A.

    2005-01-01

    Upper St. Clair River, which receives outflow from Lake Huron, is characterized by flow velocities that exceed 7 feet per second and significant channel curvature that creates complex flow patterns downstream from the Blue Water Bridge in the Port Huron, Michigan, and Sarnia, Ontario, area. Discrepancies were detected between depth-averaged velocities previously simulated by a two-dimensional (2D) hydrodynamic model and surface velocities determined from drifting buoy deployments. A detailed ADCP (acoustic Doppler current profiler) survey was done on Upper St. Clair River during July 1–3, 2003, to help resolve these discrepancies. As part of this study, a refined finite-element mesh of the hydrodynamic model used to identify source areas to public water intakes was developed for Upper St. Clair River. In addition, a numerical procedure was used to account for radial accelerations, which cause secondary flow patterns near channel bends. The refined model was recalibrated to better reproduce local velocities measured in the ADCP survey. ADCP data also were used to help resolve the remaining discrepancies between simulated and measured velocities and to describe variations in velocity with depth. Velocity data from ADCP surveys have significant local variability, and statistical processing is needed to compute reliable point estimates. In this study, velocity innovations were computed for seven depth layers posited within the river as the differences between measured and simulated velocities. For each layer, the spatial correlation of velocity innovations was characterized by use of variogram analysis. Results were used with kriging to compute expected innovations within each layer at applicable model nodes. Expected innovations were added to simulated velocities to form integrated velocities, which were used with reverse particle tracking to identify the expected flow path near a sewage outfall as a function of flow depth. Expected particle paths generated by use

  7. Chromatin hydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Bruinsma, Robijn; Grosberg, Alexander Y; Rabin, Yitzhak; Zidovska, Alexandra

    2014-05-06

    Following recent observations of large scale correlated motion of chromatin inside the nuclei of live differentiated cells, we present a hydrodynamic theory-the two-fluid model-in which the content of a nucleus is described as a chromatin solution with the nucleoplasm playing the role of the solvent and the chromatin fiber that of a solute. This system is subject to both passive thermal fluctuations and active scalar and vector events that are associated with free energy consumption, such as ATP hydrolysis. Scalar events drive the longitudinal viscoelastic modes (where the chromatin fiber moves relative to the solvent) while vector events generate the transverse modes (where the chromatin fiber moves together with the solvent). Using linear response methods, we derive explicit expressions for the response functions that connect the chromatin density and velocity correlation functions to the corresponding correlation functions of the active sources and the complex viscoelastic moduli of the chromatin solution. We then derive general expressions for the flow spectral density of the chromatin velocity field. We use the theory to analyze experimental results recently obtained by one of the present authors and her co-workers. We find that the time dependence of the experimental data for both native and ATP-depleted chromatin can be well-fitted using a simple model-the Maxwell fluid-for the complex modulus, although there is some discrepancy in terms of the wavevector dependence. Thermal fluctuations of ATP-depleted cells are predominantly longitudinal. ATP-active cells exhibit intense transverse long wavelength velocity fluctuations driven by force dipoles. Fluctuations with wavenumbers larger than a few inverse microns are dominated by concentration fluctuations with the same spectrum as thermal fluctuations but with increased intensity.

  8. Flash Kα radiography of laser-driven solid sphere compression for fast ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Sawada, H.; Lee, S.; Nagatomo, H.; Arikawa, Y.; Nishimura, H.; Ueda, T.; Shigemori, K.; Fujioka, S.; Shiroto, T.; Ohnishi, N.; Sunahara, A.; Beg, F. N.; Theobald, W.; Pérez, F.; Patel, P. K.

    2016-06-20

    Time-resolved compression of a laser-driven solid deuterated plastic sphere with a cone was measured with flash Kα x-ray radiography. A spherically converging shockwave launched by nanosecond GEKKO XII beams was used for compression while a flash of 4.51 keV Ti Kα x-ray backlighter was produced by a high-intensity, picosecond laser LFEX (Laser for Fast ignition EXperiment) near peak compression for radiography. Areal densities of the compressed core were inferred from two-dimensional backlit x-ray images recorded with a narrow-band spherical crystal imager. The maximum areal density in the experiment was estimated to be 87 ± 26 mg/cm{sup 2}. The temporal evolution of the experimental and simulated areal densities with a 2-D radiation-hydrodynamics code is in good agreement.

  9. Flash Kα radiography of laser-driven solid sphere compression for fast ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawada, H.; Lee, S.; Shiroto, T.; Nagatomo, H.; Arikawa, Y.; Nishimura, H.; Ueda, T.; Shigemori, K.; Sunahara, A.; Ohnishi, N.; Beg, F. N.; Theobald, W.; Pérez, F.; Patel, P. K.; Fujioka, S.

    2016-06-01

    Time-resolved compression of a laser-driven solid deuterated plastic sphere with a cone was measured with flash Kα x-ray radiography. A spherically converging shockwave launched by nanosecond GEKKO XII beams was used for compression while a flash of 4.51 keV Ti Kα x-ray backlighter was produced by a high-intensity, picosecond laser LFEX (Laser for Fast ignition EXperiment) near peak compression for radiography. Areal densities of the compressed core were inferred from two-dimensional backlit x-ray images recorded with a narrow-band spherical crystal imager. The maximum areal density in the experiment was estimated to be 87 ± 26 mg/cm2. The temporal evolution of the experimental and simulated areal densities with a 2-D radiation-hydrodynamics code is in good agreement.

  10. Multi-dimensional flow-preserving compressed sensing (MuFloCoS) for time-resolved velocity-encoded phase contrast MRI.

    PubMed

    Hutter, Jana; Schmitt, Peter; Saake, Marc; Stubinger, Axel; Grimm, Robert; Forman, Christoph; Greiser, Andreas; Hornegger, Joachim; Maier, Andreas

    2015-02-01

    4-D time-resolved velocity-encoded phase-contrast MRI (4-D PCI) is a fully non-invasive technique to assess hemodynamics in vivo with a broad range of potential applications in multiple cardiovascular diseases. It is capable of providing quantitative flow values and anatomical information simultaneously. The long acquisition time, however, still inhibits its wider clinical use. Acceleration is achieved at present using parallel MRI (pMRI) techniques which can lead to substantial loss of image quality for higher acceleration factors. Both the high-dimensionality and the significant degree of spatio-temporal correlation in 4-D PCI render it ideally suited for recently proposed compressed sensing (CS) techniques. We propose the Multi-Dimensional Flow-preserving Compressed Sensing (MuFloCoS) method to exploit these properties. A multi-dimensional iterative reconstruction is combined with an interleaved sampling pattern (I-VT), an adaptive masked and weighted temporal regularization (TMW) and fully automatically obtained vessel-masks. The performance of the novel method was analyzed concerning image quality, feasibility of acceleration factors up to 15, quantitative flow values and diagnostic accuracy in phantom experiments and an in vivo carotid study with 18 volunteers. Comparison with iterative state-of-the-art methods revealed significant improvements using the new method, the temporal normalized root mean square error of the peak velocity was reduced by 45.32% for the novel MuFloCoS method with acceleration factor 9. The method was furthermore applied to two patient cases with diagnosed high-grade stenosis of the ICA, which confirmed the performance of MuFloCoS to produce valuable results in the presence of pathological findings in 56 s instead of over 8 min (full sampling).

  11. A strategy for reducing stagnation phase hydrodynamic instability growth in inertial confinement fusion implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D. S.; Robey, H. F.; Smalyuk, V. A.

    2015-05-15

    Encouraging progress is being made in demonstrating control of ablation front hydrodynamic instability growth in inertial confinement fusion implosion experiments on the National Ignition Facility [E. I. Moses, R. N. Boyd, B. A. Remington, C. J. Keane, and R. Al-Ayat, Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)]. Even once ablation front stabilities are controlled, however, instability during the stagnation phase of the implosion can still quench ignition. A scheme is proposed to reduce the growth of stagnation phase instabilities through the reverse of the “adiabat shaping” mechanism proposed to control ablation front growth. Two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics simulations confirm that improved stagnation phase stability should be possible without compromising fuel compression.

  12. Algorithm refinement for fluctuating hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Sarah A.; Bell, John B.; Garcia, Alejandro L.

    2007-07-03

    This paper introduces an adaptive mesh and algorithmrefinement method for fluctuating hydrodynamics. This particle-continuumhybrid simulates the dynamics of a compressible fluid with thermalfluctuations. The particle algorithm is direct simulation Monte Carlo(DSMC), a molecular-level scheme based on the Boltzmann equation. Thecontinuum algorithm is based on the Landau-Lifshitz Navier-Stokes (LLNS)equations, which incorporate thermal fluctuations into macroscopichydrodynamics by using stochastic fluxes. It uses a recently-developedsolver for LLNS, based on third-order Runge-Kutta. We present numericaltests of systems in and out of equilibrium, including time-dependentsystems, and demonstrate dynamic adaptive refinement by the computationof a moving shock wave. Mean system behavior and second moment statisticsof our simulations match theoretical values and benchmarks well. We findthat particular attention should be paid to the spectrum of the flux atthe interface between the particle and continuum methods, specificallyfor the non-hydrodynamic (kinetic) time scales.

  13. Use of a two-dimensional hydrodynamic model to evaluate extreme flooding and transport of dissolved solids through Devils Lake and Stump Lake, North Dakota, 2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nustad, Rochelle A.; Wood, Tamara M.; Bales, Jerad D.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the North Dakota Department of Transportation, North Dakota State Water Commission, and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, developed a two-dimensional hydrodynamic model of Devils Lake and Stump Lake, North Dakota to be used as a hydrologic tool for evaluating the effects of different inflow scenarios on water levels, circulation, and the transport of dissolved solids through the lake. The numerical model, UnTRIM, and data primarily collected during 2006 were used to develop and calibrate the Devils Lake model. Performance of the Devils Lake model was tested using 2009 data. The Devils Lake model was applied to evaluate the effects of an extreme flooding event on water levels and hydrological modifications within the lake on the transport of dissolved solids through Devils Lake and Stump Lake. For the 2006 calibration, simulated water levels in Devils Lake compared well with measured water levels. The maximum simulated water level at site 1 was within 0.13 feet of the maximum measured water level in the calibration, which gives reasonable confidence that the Devils Lake model is able to accurately simulate the maximum water level at site 1 for the extreme flooding scenario. The timing and direction of winddriven fluctuations in water levels on a short time scale (a few hours to a day) were reproduced well by the Devils Lake model. For this application, the Devils Lake model was not optimized for simulation of the current speed through bridge openings. In future applications, simulation of current speed through bridge openings could be improved by more accurate definition of the bathymetry and geometry of select areas in the model grid. As a test of the performance of the Devils Lake model, a simulation of 2009 conditions from April 1 through September 30, 2009 was performed. Overall, errors in inflow estimates affected the results for the 2009 simulation; however, for the rising phase of the lakes, the Devils Lake model

  14. Application of a two-dimensional hydrodynamic model for calculating the CO_{2} and H_{2}O fluxes over complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhartova, Yulia; Krupenko, Alexandr; Levashova, Natalia; Olchev, Alexandr

    2017-04-01

    Within the framework of the study a two dimensional hydrodynamic model of turbulent transfer of greenhouse gases was developed and applied for calculating the CO2 and H2O turbulent fluxes within the atmospheric surface layer over the heterogeneous land surface with mosaic vegetation and complex topography. The vegetation cover in the model is represented as the two-phase medium containing the elements of vegetation and the air. The model is based on solving the system of averaged Navier-Stokes and continuity equations for the wind velocity components (⃗V = {V1,V2}), using the 1.5-order closure scheme (Wilcox 1998, Wyngaard 2010). The system of the main equations includes also the diffusion and advection equations for turbulent transfer of sensible heat, CO2 concentration (Cs) and specific humidity (q) at soil - vegetation -atmosphere interface (Sogachev, Panferov 2006, Mukhartova et al. 2015, Mamkin et al. 2016): ( ) { ( )} ∂Vi+ ⃗V,∇ V = -1ṡ-∂-δP -∂- 2δ ¯e- K ṡ ∂Vi-+ ∂Vj- +gṡδTv+F , i,j = 1,2, ∂t i ρ0 ∂xi ∂xj 3 ij ∂xj ∂xi T0 i div⃗V = 0, ∂T ( ) Tv γa ∂T 1 ( ) H ∂t-+ ⃗V ,∇ T+ γaṡT-ṡV2 = div (KT ṡ∇T )+ T-ṡKT ṡ∂x-+ρ-c- ⃗V,∇ δP -ρ-c-, 0 0 2 0 p 0 p ∂Cs- (⃗ ) ∂q- (⃗ ) E- ∂t + V ,∇ Cs = div(KC ṡ∇Cs )+FC, ∂t+ V ,∇ q = div(Kv ṡ∇q )+ ρ , where x1,x2 - horizontal and vertical coordinates respectively, ρ0 - the density of dry air, δP - the deviation of mean air pressure from the hydrostatic distribution, ¯e - the turbulent kinetic energy, T - the temperature of the air, δTv = T ṡ(1+ 0.61q) -T0 - the deviation of virtual temperature from the adiabatic temperature T0(x2) for dry air, Fi - the components of the viscous drag forces induced by the presence of vegetation, K,KT,KC,Kv - turbulent exchange coefficients for momentum, sensible heat, CO2and H2O respectively, γa = g/ cp, cp - the specific heat of the air at constant atmospheric pressure, FC - the sources/sinks of CO2in

  15. A three-dimensional, compressible, laminar boundary-layer method for general fuselages. Volume 1: Numerical method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wie, Yong-Sun

    1990-01-01

    A procedure for calculating 3-D, compressible laminar boundary layer flow on general fuselage shapes is described. The boundary layer solutions can be obtained in either nonorthogonal 'body oriented' coordinates or orthogonal streamline coordinates. The numerical procedure is 'second order' accurate, efficient and independent of the cross flow velocity direction. Numerical results are presented for several test cases, including a sharp cone, an ellipsoid of revolution, and a general aircraft fuselage at angle of attack. Comparisons are made between numerical results obtained using nonorthogonal curvilinear 'body oriented' coordinates and streamline coordinates.

  16. Effect of wall suction on the stability of compressible subsonic flows over smooth two-dimensional backward-facing steps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Al-Maaitah, Ayman A.; Nayfeh, Ali H.; Ragab, Saad A.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of suction on the stability of compressible flows over backward-facing steps is investigated. Mach numbers up to 0.8 are considered. The results show that continuous suction stabilizes the flow outside the separation bubble, but it destabilizes the flow inside it. Nevertheless, the overall N factor decreases as the suction level increases due to the considerable reduction of the separation bubble. For the same suction flow rate, properly distributed suction strips stabilize the flow more than continuous suction. The size of the separation bubble, and hence its effect on the instability can be considerably reduced by placing strips with high suction velocities in the separation region.

  17. Four-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging-derived ascending aortic flow eccentricity and flow compression are linked to aneurysm morphology†

    PubMed Central

    Kari, Fabian A.; Kocher, Nadja; Beyersdorf, Friedhelm; Tscheuschler, Anke; Meffert, Philipp; Rylski, Bartosz; Siepe, Matthias; Russe, Maximilian F.; Hope, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The impact of specific blood flow patterns within ascending aortic and/or aortic root aneurysms on aortic morphology is unknown. We investigated the interrelation of ascending aortic flow compression/peripheralization and aneurysm morphology with respect to sinotubuar junction (STJ) definition. METHODS Thirty-one patients (aortic root/ascending aortic aneurysm >45 mm) underwent flow-sensitive 4D magnetic resonance thoracic aortic flow measurement at 3 Tesla (Siemens, Germany) at two different institutions (Freiburg, Germany, and San Francisco, CA, USA). Time-resolved image data post-processing and visualization of mid-systolic, mid-ascending aortic flow were performed using local vector fields. The Flow Compression Index (FCI) was calculated individually as a fraction of the area of high-velocity mid-systolic flow over the complete cross-sectional ascending aortic area. According to aortic aneurysm morphology, patients were grouped as (i) small root, eccentric ascending aortic aneurysm (STJ definition) and (ii) enlarged aortic root, non-eccentric ascending aortic aneurysm with diffuse root and tubular enlargement. RESULTS The mean FCI over all patients was 0.47 ± 0.5 (0.37–0.99). High levels of flow compression/peripheralization (FCI <0.6) were linked to eccentric aneurysm morphology (Group A, n = 11), while low levels or absence of aortic flow compression/peripheralization (FCI >0.8) occurred more often in Group B (n = 20). The FCI was 0.48 ± 0.05 in Group A and 0.78 ± 0.14 in Group B (P < 0.001). Distribution of bicuspid aortic valve (P = 0.6) and type of valve dysfunction (P = 0.22 for aortic stenosis) was not found to be different between groups. CONCLUSIONS Irrespective of aortic valve morphology and function, ascending aortic blood flow patterns are linked to distinct patterns of ascending aortic aneurysm morphology. Implementation of quantitative local blood flow analyses might help to improve aneurysm risk stratification in the future. PMID

  18. Low Mach number fluctuating hydrodynamics of multispecies liquid mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Donev, Aleksandar Bhattacharjee, Amit Kumar; Nonaka, Andy; Bell, John B.; Garcia, Alejandro L.

    2015-03-15

    We develop a low Mach number formulation of the hydrodynamic equations describing transport of mass and momentum in a multispecies mixture of incompressible miscible liquids at specified temperature and pressure, which generalizes our prior work on ideal mixtures of ideal gases [Balakrishnan et al., “Fluctuating hydrodynamics of multispecies nonreactive mixtures,” Phys. Rev. E 89 013017 (2014)] and binary liquid mixtures [Donev et al., “Low mach number fluctuating hydrodynamics of diffusively mixing fluids,” Commun. Appl. Math. Comput. Sci. 9(1), 47-105 (2014)]. In this formulation, we combine and extend a number of existing descriptions of multispecies transport available in the literature. The formulation applies to non-ideal mixtures of arbitrary number of species, without the need to single out a “solvent” species, and includes contributions to the diffusive mass flux due to gradients of composition, temperature, and pressure. Momentum transport and advective mass transport are handled using a low Mach number approach that eliminates fast sound waves (pressure fluctuations) from the full compressible system of equations and leads to a quasi-incompressible formulation. Thermal fluctuations are included in our fluctuating hydrodynamics description following the principles of nonequilibrium thermodynamics. We extend the semi-implicit staggered-grid finite-volume numerical method developed in our prior work on binary liquid mixtures [Nonaka et al., “Low mach number fluctuating hydrodynamics of binary liquid mixtures,” http://arxiv.org/abs/1410.2300 (2015)] and use it to study the development of giant nonequilibrium concentration fluctuations in a ternary mixture subjected to a steady concentration gradient. We also numerically study the development of diffusion-driven gravitational instabilities in a ternary mixture and compare our numerical results to recent experimental measurements [Carballido-Landeira et al., “Mixed-mode instability of a

  19. Hydrodynamics of diatom chains and semiflexible fibres.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hoa; Fauci, Lisa

    2014-07-06

    Diatoms are non-motile, unicellular phytoplankton that have the ability to form colonies in the form of chains. Depending upon the species of diatoms and the linking structures that hold the cells together, these chains can be quite stiff or very flexible. Recently, the bending rigidities of some species of diatom chains have been quantified. In an effort to understand the role of flexibility in nutrient uptake and aggregate formation, we begin by developing a three-dimensional model of the coupled elastic-hydrodynamic system of a diatom chain moving in an incompressible fluid. We find that simple beam theory does a good job of describing diatom chain deformation in a parabolic flow when its ends are tethered, but does not tell the whole story of chain deformations when they are subjected to compressive stresses in shear. While motivated by the fluid dynamics of diatom chains, our computational model of semiflexible fibres illustrates features that apply widely to other systems. The use of an adaptive immersed boundary framework allows us to capture complicated buckling and recovery dynamics of long, semiflexible fibres in shear.

  20. Hydrodynamic instability growth of three-dimensional modulations in radiation-driven implosions with “low-foot” and “high-foot” drives at the National Ignition Facility

    DOE PAGES

    Smalyuk, V. A.; Weber, C. R.; Robey, H. F.; ...

    2017-04-11

    Hydrodynamic instability growth has been studied using three-dimensional (3-D) broadband modulations by comparing “high-foot” and “low-foot” spherical plastic (CH) capsule implosions at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The initial perturbations included capsule outer-surface roughness and capsule-mounting membranes (“tents”) that were similar to those used in a majority of implosions on NIF. The tents with thicknesses of 31-nm, 46-nm, and 109-nm were used in the experiments. The outer-surface roughness in the “low-foot” experiment was similar to the standard specification, while it was increased by ~4 times in the “high-foot” experiment to compensate for the reduced growth. The ablation-front instability growth wasmore » measured using a Hydrodynamic Growth Radiography platform at a convergence ratio of 3. The dominant capsule perturbations, generated by the tent mountings, had measured perturbation amplitudes comparable to the capsule thickness with the “low-foot” drive. These tent perturbations were reduced by ~3 to 10 times in implosions with the “high-foot” drive. Unexpectedly, the measured perturbations with initially thinner tents were either larger or similar to the measured perturbations with thicker tents for both “high-foot” and “low-foot” drives. While the measured instability growth of 3-D broadband perturbations was also significantly reduced by ~5 to 10 times with the “high-foot” drive, compared to the “low-foot” drive, the growth mitigation was stronger than expected based on previous “growth-factor” results measured with two-dimensional modulations. Lastly, one of the hypotheses to explain the results is based on the 3-D modulations of the oxygen content in the bulk of the capsule having a stronger effect on the overall growth of capsule perturbations than the outer-surface capsule roughness.« less

  1. Theoretical and Experimental Investigation of the Effect of Tunnel Walls on the Forces on an Oscillating Airfoil in Two-Dimensional Subsonic Compressible Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Runyan, Harry L; Woolston, Donald S; Rainey, A Gerald

    1956-01-01

    This report presents a theoretical and experimental investigation of the effect of wind-tunnel walls on the air forces on an oscillating wing in two-dimensional subsonic compressible flow. A method of solving an integral equation which relates the downwash on a wing to the unknown loading is given, and some comparisons are made between the theoretical results and the experimental results. A resonance condition, which was predicted by theory in a previous report (NACA report 1150), is shown experimentally to exist. In addition, application of the analysis is made to a number of examples in order to illustrate the influence of walls due to variations in frequency of oscillation, Mach number , and ratio of tunnel height to wing semichord.

  2. Equalizing resolution in smoothed-particle hydrodynamics calculations using self-adaptive sinc kernels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Senz, Domingo; Cabezón, Rubén M.; Escartín, José A.; Ebinger, Kevin

    2014-10-01

    Context. The smoothed-particle hydrodynamics (SPH) technique is a numerical method for solving gas-dynamical problems. It has been applied to simulate the evolution of a wide variety of astrophysical systems. The method has a second-order accuracy, with a resolution that is usually much higher in the compressed regions than in the diluted zones of the fluid. Aims: We propose and check a method to balance and equalize the resolution of SPH between high- and low-density regions. This method relies on the versatility of a family of interpolators called sinc kernels, which allows increasing the interpolation quality by varying only a single parameter (the exponent of the sinc function). Methods: The proposed method was checked and validated through a number of numerical tests, from standard one-dimensional Riemann problems in shock tubes, to multidimensional simulations of explosions, hydrodynamic instabilities, and the collapse of a Sun-like polytrope. Results: The analysis of the hydrodynamical simulations suggests that the scheme devised to equalize the accuracy improves the treatment of the post-shock regions and, in general, of the rarefacted zones of fluids while causing no harm to the growth of hydrodynamic instabilities. The method is robust and easy to implement with a low computational overload. It conserves mass, energy, and momentum and reduces to the standard SPH scheme in regions of the fluid that have smooth density gradients.

  3. Applicability of compressive sensing on three-dimensional terahertz imagery for in-depth object defect detection and recognition using a dedicated semisupervised image processing methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brook, Anna; Cristofani, Edison; Becquaert, Mathias; Lauwens, Ben; Jonuscheit, Joachim; Vandewal, Marijke

    2013-04-01

    The quality control of composite multilayered materials and structures using nondestructive tests is of high interest for numerous applications in the aerospace and aeronautics industry. One of the established nondestructive methods uses microwaves to reveal defects inside a three-dimensional (3-D) object. Recently, there has been a tendency to extrapolate this method to higher frequencies (going to the subterahertz spectrum) which could lead to higher resolutions in the obtained 3-D images. Working at higher frequencies reveals challenges to deal with the increased data rate and to efficiently and effectively process and evaluate the obtained 3-D imagery for defect detection and recognition. To deal with these two challenges, we combine compressive sensing (for data rate reduction) with a dedicated image processing methodology for a fast, accurate, and robust quality evaluation of the object under test. We describe in detail the used methodology and evaluate the obtained results using subterahertz data acquired of two calibration samples with a frequency modulated continuous wave system. The applicability of compressive sensing within this context is discussed as well as the quality of the image processing methodology dealing with the reconstructed images.

  4. FPGA implement method for two-dimensional integer wavelet transform in the space-based on-orbit image compression system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jie; Tian, Yan; Meng, Xiangsheng; Liu, Tong

    2017-02-01

    The image obtained from space-based vision system has increasingly high frame frequency and resolution, and field of view is also growing. Due to the dramatic increase of data scale and the restriction of channel bandwidth between satellite and ground, on-orbit data compression becomes the core of on-satellite data processing. The paper analyzes the new generation static image compression standard JPEG2000 and the key two-dimensional (2D) discrete wavelet transform (DWT) technology. Then an FPGA (Field Programmable Gate Array)implement method for 2D integer wavelet transform is designed. It adopts the spatial combinative lifting algorithm (SCLA), which realizes the simultaneous transformation on rows and columns. On this basis, the paper realizes wavelet decomposition for images with a resolution of 6576*4384 (which is divided into 1024*1024) on the FPGA platform. In particular, the test platform is built in ISE14.7 simulation software, and the device model is xc5vfx100t. The design has passed the FPGA verification. In order to verify the correctness of the algorithm, the results are compared with that obtained by running matlab code. The experimental results show that the design is correct and the resource occupancy rate is low.

  5. A Primer for the Linkage Between Unstructured Water Quality Model CE-QUAL-ICM and Structured Three-Dimensional Hydrodynamic Model CH3D-WES

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-01

    2. If Q=3, two numbers show the k koordinates of boxes beneath and on the face. m . SFC BOX #: number of surface boxes n. NVF: number of faces...T. Cole. 1993. Three-dimensional eutrophication model of Chesapeake Bay. J. Environ. Eng. 119:1006-1025. Cerco, C. F., and M . Noel. 2004. The 2002...F., M . Noel. and S.-C. Kim. 2006. Three-dimensional management model for Lake Washington, Part II: Eutrophication modeling and skill assessment. Lake

  6. Non-boost-invariant dissipative hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florkowski, Wojciech; Ryblewski, Radoslaw; Strickland, Michael; Tinti, Leonardo

    2016-12-01

    The one-dimensional non-boost-invariant evolution of the quark-gluon plasma, presumably produced during the early stages of heavy-ion collisions, is analyzed within the frameworks of viscous and anisotropic hydrodynamics. We neglect transverse dynamics and assume homogeneous conditions in the transverse plane but, differently from Bjorken expansion, we relax longitudinal boost invariance in order to study the rapidity dependence of various hydrodynamical observables. We compare the results obtained using several formulations of second-order viscous hydrodynamics with a recent approach to anisotropic hydrodynamics, which treats the large initial pressure anisotropy in a nonperturbative fashion. The results obtained with second-order viscous hydrodynamics depend on the particular choice of the second-order terms included, which suggests that the latter should be included in the most complete way. The results of anisotropic hydrodynamics and viscous hydrodynamics agree for the central hot part of the system, however, they differ at the edges where the approach of anisotropic hydrodynamics helps to control the undesirable growth of viscous corrections observed in standard frameworks.

  7. Three-dimensional hydrodynamical CO5BOLD model atmospheres of red giant stars. IV. Oxygen diagnostics in extremely metal-poor red giants with infrared OH lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrovolskas, V.; Kučinskas, A.; Bonifacio, P.; Caffau, E.; Ludwig, H.-G.; Steffen, M.; Spite, M.

    2015-04-01

    Context. Although oxygen is an important tracer of Galactic chemical evolution, measurements of its abundance in the atmospheres of the oldest Galactic stars are still scarce and rather imprecise. This is mainly because only a few spectral lines are available for the abundance diagnostics. At the lowest end of the metallicity scale, oxygen can only be measured in giant stars and in most of cases such measurements rely on a single forbidden [O i] 630 nm line that is very weak and frequently blended with telluric lines. Although molecular OH lines located in the ultraviolet and infrared could also be used for the diagnostics, oxygen abundances obtained from the OH lines and the [O i] 630 nm line are usually discrepant to a level of ~ 0.3-0.4 dex. Aims: We study the influence of convection on the formation of the infrared (IR) OH lines and the forbidden [O i] 630 nm line in the atmospheres of extremely metal-poor (EMP) red giant stars. Our ultimate goal is to clarify whether a realistic treatment of convection with state-of-the-art 3D hydrodynamical model atmospheres may help to bring the oxygen abundances obtained using the two indicators into closer agreement. Methods: We used high-resolution (R = 50 000) and high signal-to-noise ratio (S/N ≈ 200-600) spectra of four EMP red giant stars obtained with the VLT CRIRES spectrograph. For each EMP star, 4-14 IR OH vibrational-rotational lines located in the spectral range of 1514-1548 and 1595-1632 nm were used to determine oxygen abundances by employing standard 1D local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) abundance analysis methodology. We then corrected the 1D LTE abundances obtained from each individual OH line for the 3D hydrodynamical effects, which was done by applying 3D-1D LTE abundance corrections that were determined using 3D hydrodynamical CO5BOLD and 1D hydrostatic LHD model atmospheres. Results: We find that the influence of convection on the formation of [O i] 630 nm line in the atmospheres of EMP giants

  8. A general method for calculating three-dimensional compressible laminar and turbulent boundary layers on arbitrary wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cebeci, T.; Kaups, K.; Ramsey, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    The method described utilizes a nonorthogonal coordinate system for boundary-layer calculations. It includes a geometry program that represents the wing analytically, and a velocity program that computes the external velocity components from a given experimental pressure distribution when the external velocity distribution is not computed theoretically. The boundary layer method is general, however, and can also be used for an external velocity distribution computed theoretically. Several test cases were computed by this method and the results were checked with other numerical calculations and with experiments when available. A typical computation time (CPU) on an IBM 370/165 computer for one surface of a wing which roughly consist of 30 spanwise stations and 25 streamwise stations, with 30 points across the boundary layer is less than 30 seconds for an incompressible flow and a little more for a compressible flow.

  9. Computation of three-dimensional compressible boundary layers to fourth-order accuracy on wings and fuselages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iyer, Venkit

    1990-01-01

    A solution method, fourth-order accurate in the body-normal direction and second-order accurate in the stream surface directions, to solve the compressible 3-D boundary layer equations is presented. The transformation used, the discretization details, and the solution procedure are described. Ten validation cases of varying complexity are presented and results of calculation given. The results range from subsonic flow to supersonic flow and involve 2-D or 3-D geometries. Applications to laminar flow past wing and fuselage-type bodies are discussed. An interface procedure is used to solve the surface Euler equations with the inviscid flow pressure field as the input to assure accurate boundary conditions at the boundary layer edge. Complete details of the computer program used and information necessary to run each of the test cases are given in the Appendix.

  10. Modelling the effect of shear strength on isentropic compression experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, Stuart; Howell, Peter; Ockendon, John; Ockendon, Hilary

    2017-01-01

    Isentropic compression experiments (ICE) are a way of obtaining equation of state information for metals undergoing violent plastic deformation. In a typical experiment, millimetre thick metal samples are subjected to pressures on the order of 10 - 102 GPa, while the yield strength of the material can be as low as 10-2 GPa. The analysis of such experiments has so far neglected the effect of shear strength, instead treating the highly plasticised metal as an inviscid compressible fluid. However making this approximation belies the basic elastic nature of a solid object. A more accurate method should strive to incorporate the small but measurable effects of shear strength. Here we present a one-dimensional mathematical model for elastoplasticity at high stress which allows for both compressibility and the shear strength of the material. In the limit of zero yield stress this model reproduces the hydrodynamic models currently used to analyse ICEs. Numerical solutions of the governing equations will then be presented for problems relevant to ICEs in order to investigate the effects of shear strength compared with a model based purely on hydrodynamics.

  11. Three-dimensional hydrodynamical CO5BOLD model atmospheres of red giant stars. V. Oxygen abundance in the metal-poor giant HD 122563 from OH UV lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakapavičius, D.; Kučinskas, A.; Dobrovolskas, V.; Klevas, J.; Steffen, M.; Bonifacio, P.; Ludwig, H.-G.; Spite, M.

    2017-03-01

    Context. Although oxygen is an important tracer of the early Galactic evolution, its abundance trends with metallicity are still relatively poorly known at [Fe/H] ≲ -2.5. This is in part due to a lack of reliable oxygen abundance indicators in the metal-poor stars, and in part due to shortcomings in 1D LTE abundance analyses where different abundance indicators, such as OH lines located in the UV and IR or the forbidden [O I] line at 630 nm, frequently provide inconsistent results. Aims: In this study, we determined the oxygen abundance in the metal-poor halo giant HD 122563 using a 3D hydrodynamical CO5BOLD model atmosphere. Our main goal was to understand whether a 3D LTE analysis can help to improve the reliability of oxygen abundances that are determined from OH UV lines in comparison to those obtained using standard 1D LTE methodology. Methods: The oxygen abundance in HD 122563 was determined using 71 OH UV lines located in the wavelength range between 308-330 nm. The analysis was performed using a high-resolution VLT UVES spectrum with a 1D LTE spectral line synthesis performed using the SYNTHE package and classical ATLAS9 model atmosphere. Subsequently, a 3D hydrodynamical CO5BOLD and 1D hydrostatic LHD model atmospheres were used to compute 3D-1D abundance corrections. For this, the microturbulence velocity used with the 1D LHD model atmosphere was derived from the hydrodynamical CO5BOLD model atmosphere of HD 122563. The obtained abundance corrections were then applied to determine 3D LTE oxygen abundances from each individual OH UV line. Results: As in previous studies, we found trends in the 1D LTE oxygen abundances determined from OH UV lines with line parameters, such as the line excitation potential, χ, and the line equivalent width, W. These trends become significantly less pronounced in 3D LTE. Using OH UV lines, we determined a 3D LTE oxygen abundance in HD 122563 of A(O)3D LTE = 6.23 ± 0.13 ([O/Fe] = 0.07 ± 0.13). This is in fair agreement

  12. Hydrodynamic Simulations of Planetary Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Jacob; Stewart, G. R.; Esposito, L. W.

    2013-10-01

    Simulations of rings have traditionally been done using N-body methods, granting insight into the interactions of individual ring particles on varying scales. However, due to the scale of a typical ring system and the sheer number of particles involved, a global N-body simulation is too computationally expensive, unless particle collisions are replaced by stochastic forces (Bromley & Kenyon, 2013). Rings are extraordinarily flat systems and therefore are well-suited to existing geophysical shallow-water hydrodynamics models with well-established non-linear advection methods. By adopting a general relationship between pressure and surface density such as a polytropic equation of state, we can modify the shallow-water formula to treat a thin, compressible, self-gravitating, shearing fluid. Previous hydrodynamic simulations of planetary rings have been restricted to axisymmetric flows and therefore have not treated the response to nonaxisymmetric perturbations by moons (Schmidt & Tscharnuter 1999, Latter & Ogilvie 2010). We seek to expand on existing hydrodynamic methods and, by comparing our work with complementary N-body simulations and Cassini observations, confirm the veracity of our results at small scales before eventually moving to a global domain size. We will use non-Newtonian, dynamically variable viscosity to model the viscous transport caused by unresolved self-gravity wakes. Self-gravity will be added to model the dynamics of large-scale structures, such as density waves and edge waves. Support from NASA Outer Planets and Planetary Geology and Geophysics programs is gratefully acknowledged.

  13. A dynamic range compression and three-dimensional peptide fractionation analysis platform expands proteome coverage and the diagnostic potential of whole saliva

    PubMed Central

    Bandhakavi, Sricharan; Stone, Matthew D.; Onsongo, Getiria; Van Riper, Susan K.; Griffin, Timothy J.

    2009-01-01

    Comprehensive identification of proteins in whole human saliva is critical for appreciating its full diagnostic potential. However, this is challenged by the large dynamic range of protein abundance within this fluid. To address this problem, we used an analysis platform that coupled hexapeptide libraries for dynamic range compression (DRC) with three-dimensional (3D) peptide fractionation. This approach identified 2340 proteins in whole saliva and represents the largest saliva proteomic dataset generated using a single analysis platform. Three dimensional peptide fractionation involving sequential steps of preparative IEF, strong cation exchange, and capillary reversed phase liquid chromatography was essential for maximizing gains from DRC. Compared to saliva not treated with hexapeptide libraries, DRC substantially increased identified proteins across physicochemical and functional categories. Approximately 20% of total salivary proteins are also seen in plasma, and proteins in both fluids show comparable functional diversity and disease-linkage. However, for a subset of diseases, saliva has higher apparent diagnostic potential. These results expand the potential for whole saliva in health monitoring/diagnostics and provide a general platform for improving proteomic coverage of complex biological samples. PMID:19813771

  14. Supernova hydrodynamics experiments using the Nova laser

    SciTech Connect

    Remington, B.A.; Glendinning, S.G.; Estabrook, K.; Wallace, R.J.; Rubenchik, A.; Kane, J.; Arnett, D.; Drake, R.P.; McCray, R.

    1997-04-01

    We are developing experiments using the Nova laser to investigate two areas of physics relevant to core-collapse supernovae (SN): (1) compressible nonlinear hydrodynamic mixing and (2) radiative shock hydrodynamics. In the former, we are examining the differences between the 2D and 3D evolution of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, an issue critical to the observables emerging from SN in the first year after exploding. In the latter, we are investigating the evolution of a colliding plasma system relevant to the ejecta-stellar wind interactions of the early stages of SN remnant formation. The experiments and astrophysical implications are discussed.

  15. Three-dimensional hydrodynamical CO5BOLD model atmospheres of red giant stars. II. Spectral line formation in the atmosphere of a giant located near the RGB tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kučinskas, A.; Steffen, M.; Ludwig, H.-G.; Dobrovolskas, V.; Ivanauskas, A.; Klevas, J.; Prakapavičius, D.; Caffau, E.; Bonifacio, P.

    2013-01-01

    Aims: We investigate the role of convection in the formation of atomic and molecular lines in the atmosphere of a red giant star. For this purpose we study the formation properties of spectral lines that belong to a number of astrophysically important tracer elements, including neutral and singly ionized atoms (Li I, N I, O I, Na I, Mg I, Al I, Si I, Si II, S I, K I, Ca I, Ca II, Ti I, Ti II, Cr I, Cr II, Mn I, Fe I, Fe II, Co I, Ni I, Zn I, Sr II, Ba II, and Eu II), and molecules (CH, CO, C2, NH, CN, and OH). Methods: We focus our investigation on a prototypical red giant located close to the red giant branch (RGB) tip (Teff = 3660 K, log g = 1.0, [M/H] = 0.0). We used two types of model atmospheres, 3D hydrodynamical and classical 1D, calculated with the CO5BOLD and LHD stellar atmosphere codes, respectively. Both codes share the same atmospheric parameters, chemical composition, equation of state, and opacities, which allowed us to make a strictly differential comparison between the line formation properties predicted in 3D and 1D. The influence of convection on the spectral line formation was assessed with the aid of 3D-1D abundance corrections, which measure the difference between the abundances of chemical species derived with the 3D hydrodynamical and 1D classical model atmospheres. Results: We find that convection plays a significant role in the spectral line formation in this particular red giant. The derived 3D-1D abundance corrections rarely exceed ± 0.1 dex when lines of neutral atoms and molecules are considered, which is in line with the previous findings for solar-metallicity red giants located on the lower RGB. The situation is different with lines that belong to ionized atoms, or to neutral atoms with high ionization potential. In both cases, the corrections for high-excitation lines (χ > 8 eV) may amount to Δ3D-1D ~ -0.4 dex. The 3D-1D abundance corrections generally show a significant wavelength dependence; in most cases they are smaller in

  16. Rapid acquisition of magnetic resonance imaging of the shoulder using three-dimensional fast spin echo sequence with compressed sensing.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Hyun; Lee, Young Han; Song, Ho-Taek; Suh, Jin-Suck

    2017-10-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of 3D fast spin-echo (FSE) imaging with compressed sensing (CS) for the assessment of shoulder. Twenty-nine patients who underwent shoulder MRI including image sets of axial 3D-FSE sequence without CS and with CS, using an acceleration factor of 1.5, were included. Quantitative assessment was performed by calculating the root mean square error (RMSE) and structural similarity index (SSIM). Two musculoskeletal radiologists compared image quality of 3D-FSE sequences without CS and with CS, and scored the qualitative agreement between sequences, using a five-point scale. Diagnostic agreement for pathologic shoulder lesions between the two sequences was evaluated. The acquisition time of 3D-FSE MRI was reduced using CS (3min 23s vs. 2min 22s). Quantitative evaluations showed a significant correlation between the two sequences (r=0.872-0.993, p<0.05) and SSIM was in an acceptable range (0.940-0.993; mean±standard deviation, 0.968±0.018). Qualitative image quality showed good to excellent agreement between 3D-FSE images without CS and with CS. Diagnostic agreement for pathologic shoulder lesions between the two sequences was very good (κ=0.915-1). The 3D-FSE sequence with CS is feasible in evaluating the shoulder joint with reduced scan time compared to 3D-FSE without CS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. A Numerical Gamma-Ray Burst Simulation Using Three-Dimensional Relativistic Hydrodynamics: The Transition from Spherical to Jet-like Expansion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cannizzo, John K.; Gehrels, Neil; Vishniac, Ethan T.

    2003-01-01

    Utilizing 3D relativistic hydrodynamical calculations, we have examined the evolution of an expanding relativistic blob of gas intended to be representative of a jet associated with ejecta from an extremely energetic event such as a hypernova, that produces a gamma-ray burst (Aloy et al. 2000; Tan, Matzner, & McKee 2001; MacFadyen, Woosley, & Heger 2001, Zhang, Woosley, & Heger 2003, Zhang, Woosley, & MacFadyen 2003). Since these are the first such calculations applied to the blob during the time in which the afterglow radiation is produced, we have purposely kept them simple in an effort to concentrate on the most fundamental aspects of the physics. We restrict our attention to the transition from spherical to jetlike expansion that occurs during the time that the Lorentz factor becomes less than the reciprocal of the jet spreading angle. We have not yet attached specific numbers to our results. From the SRHD equations, one sees that the relevant quantities are the ratios of pressure to density, and of distance to time. If we specify either one of these two sets of numbers, the other one is also determined.

  18. Anisotropic decay of the energy spectrum in two-dimensional dense granular flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saitoh, Kuniyasu; Mizuno, Hideyuki

    2017-07-01

    We study anisotropic collective motions of two-dimensional granular particles under simple shear deformations. Employing molecular-dynamics simulations of large system sizes, we find that anisotropic fluidized bands develop in the system yielding under quasistatic deformations, where the spectrum of nonaffine velocities, which is associated with the energy spectrum for turbulent flows, exhibits a quadrupole structure. To explain theoretically the anisotropic spectrum, we derive hydrodynamic modes from a continuum model of dense granular materials, where we find that fluidized bands are caused by long-lived hydrodynamic fluctuations characterized by compressibility.

  19. Data Compression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bookstein, Abraham; Storer, James A.

    1992-01-01

    Introduces this issue, which contains papers from the 1991 Data Compression Conference, and defines data compression. The two primary functions of data compression are described, i.e., storage and communications; types of data using compression technology are discussed; compression methods are explained; and current areas of research are…

  20. Hydrodynamics from Landau initial conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, Abhisek; Gerhard, Jochen; Torrieri, Giorgio; Read jr, Kenneth F.; Wong, Cheuk-Yin

    2015-01-01

    We investigate ideal hydrodynamic evolution, with Landau initial conditions, both in a semi-analytical 1+1D approach and in a numerical code incorporating event-by-event variation with many events and transverse density inhomogeneities. The object of the calculation is to test how fast would a Landau initial condition transition to a commonly used boost-invariant expansion. We show that the transition to boost-invariant flow occurs too late for realistic setups, with corrections of O (20 - 30%) expected at freezeout for most scenarios. Moreover, the deviation from boost-invariance is correlated with both transverse flow and elliptic flow, with the more highly transversely flowing regions also showing the most violation of boost invariance. Therefore, if longitudinal flow is not fully developed at the early stages of heavy ion collisions, 2+1 dimensional hydrodynamics is inadequate to extract transport coefficients of the quark-gluon plasma. Based on [1, 2