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Sample records for dimensional nuclear magnetic

  1. Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance petrophysics.

    PubMed

    Sun, Boqin; Dunn, Keh-Jim

    2005-02-01

    Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (2D NMR) opens a wide area for exploration in petrophysics and has significant impact to petroleum logging technology. When there are multiple fluids with different diffusion coefficients saturated in a porous medium, this information can be extracted and clearly delineated from CPMG measurements of such a system either using regular pulsing sequences or modified two window sequences. The 2D NMR plot with independent variables of T2 relaxation time and diffusion coefficient allows clear separation of oil and water signals in the rocks. This 2D concept can be extended to general studies of fluid-saturated porous media involving other combinations of two or more independent variables, such as chemical shift and T1/T2 relaxation time (reflecting pore size), proton population and diffusion contrast, etc. PMID:15833623

  2. Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance of quadrupolar systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shuanhu

    1997-09-17

    This dissertation describes two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance theory and experiments which have been developed to study quadruples in the solid state. The technique of multiple-quantum magic-angle spinning (MQMAS) is extensively reviewed and expanded upon in this thesis. Specifically, MQMAS is first compared with another technique, dynamic-angle spinning (DAS). The similarity between the two techniques allows us to extend much of the DAS work to the MQMAS case. Application of MQMAS to a series of aluminum containing materials is then presented. The superior resolution enhancement through MQMAS is exploited to detect the five- and six-coordinated aluminum in many aluminosilicate glasses. Combining the MQMAS method with other experiments, such as HETCOR, greatly expands the possibility of the use of MQMAS to study a large range of problems and is demonstrated in Chapter 5. Finally, the technique switching-angle spinning (SAS) is applied to quadrupolar nuclei to fully characterize a quadrupolar spin system in which all of the 8 NMR parameters are accurately determined. This dissertation is meant to demonstrate that with the combination of two-dimensional NMR concepts and new advanced spinning technologies, a series of multiple-dimensional NMR techniques can be designed to allow a detailed study of quadrupolar nuclei in the solid state.

  3. One-dimensional and two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance studies of the reaction of phenyldichloroarsine with glutathione

    SciTech Connect

    Dill, K.; Adams, E.R.; O'Connor, R.J.; Chong, S.; McGown, E.L.

    1987-09-01

    /sup 14/C-labeled phenyldichloroarsine (PDA) enters the red blood cell and forms a 1:2 adduct with intracellular glutathione. Upon gel filtration of the hemolysate, (/sup 14/C)PDA was recovered with the glutathione-containing fractions. One-dimensional and two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy were used to confirm the structure of the adduct and elucidate its stereochemistry, stability, and reactivity.

  4. Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance studies of molecular structure in liquids and liquid crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Rucker, S.P.

    1991-07-01

    Magnetic couplings between protons, such as through-space dipole couplings, and scalar J-couplings depend sensitively on the structure of the molecule. Two dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance experiments provide a powerful tool for measuring these couplings, correlating them to specific pairs of protons within the molecule, and calculating the structure. This work discusses the development of NMR methods for examining two such classes of problems -- determination of the secondary structure of flexible molecules in anisotropic solutions, and primary structure of large biomolecules in aqueous solutions. 201 refs., 84 figs., 19 tabs.

  5. Protein structure determination in solution by two-dimensional and three-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Gronenborn, A M; Clore, G M

    1990-01-01

    Over the last decade, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has evolved into a powerful method for determining structures of biological macromolecules. This has opened a unique opportunity for obtaining high-resolution three-dimensional structures in solution, in contrast to the well-established methods of X-ray diffraction, which are applicable only to solids and in particular single crystals. This rapid development has been spurred by several key advances in the field, especially the introduction of two- and three-dimensional NMR experiments, high field spectrometers (500 and 600 MHz), and computational algorithms for converting NMR derived restraints into three-dimensional structures. This review outlines the methodology employed for solving protein structures in solution, describing the basic NMR experiments necessary as well as introducing the concepts upon which the computational algorithms are founded. A variety of examples is discussed, illustrating the present state of the art, and future possibilities are indicated.

  6. Protein carbon-13 spin systems by a single two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, B.H.; Westler, W.M.; Darba, P.; Markley, J.L.

    1988-05-13

    By applying a two-dimensional double-quantum carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance experiment to a protein uniformly enriched to 26% carbon-13, networks of directly bonded carbon atoms were identified by virtue of their one-bond spin-spin couplings and were classified by amino acid type according to their particular single- and double-quantum chemical shift patterns. Spin systems of 75 of the 98 amino acid residues in a protein, oxidized Anabaena 7120 ferredoxin (molecular weight 11,000), were identified by this approach, which represents a key step in an improved methodology for assigning protein nuclear magnetic resonance spectra. Missing spin systems corresponded primarily to residues located adjacent to the paramagnetic iron-sulfur cluster. 25 references, 2 figures.

  7. Stimulated echoes and two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectra for solids with simple line shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geil, Burkhard; Diezemann, Gregor; Böhmer, Roland

    2008-03-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments on ion conductors often yield rather unstructured spectra, which are hard to interpret if the relation between the actual translational motion of the mobile species and the changes of the NMR frequencies is not known. In order to facilitate a general analysis of experiments on solids with such spectra, different models for the stochastic evolution of the NMR frequencies are considered. The treated models involve random frequency jumps, diffusive evolutions, or approximately fixed frequency jumps. Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectra as well as stimulated-echo functions for the study of slow and ultraslow translational dynamics are calculated for Gaussian equilibrium line shapes. The results are compared with corresponding ones from rotational models and with experimental data.

  8. A Whole Body Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Imaging System With Full Three-Dimensional Capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Howard E.

    1981-07-01

    A description of the nuclear magnetic resonance imaging system at Stony Brook with whole body capabilities based on a .1 Tesla air-core magnet with a 62 cm bore will be given. Important considerations for full three-dimensional (3D) imaging from projections include static field homogeneity, linear field gradient strength and uniformity, adequate trans-mitter and receiver capabilities and rapid data collection and processing. Preliminary results of our efforts to achieve a flexible system with potential clinical applications will be shown along with images of the head and breast from living human subjects. Since the 3D image has isotropic resolution, the image may be viewed from any desired direction.

  9. Determination of three-dimensional structures of proteins and nucleic acids in solution by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Clore, G M; Gronenborn, A M

    1989-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has evolved over the last decade into a powerful method for determining three-dimensional structures of biological macromolecules in solution. Key advances have been the introduction of two-dimensional experiments, high-field superconducting magnets, and computational procedures for converting the NMR-derived interproton distances and torsion angles into three-dimensional structures. This article outlines the methodology employed, describes the major NMR experiments necessary for the spectral analysis of macromolecules, and discusses the computational approaches employed to date. The present state of the art is illustrated using a variety of examples, and future developments are indicated.

  10. High-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance measurements in inhomogeneous magnetic fields: A fast two-dimensional J-resolved experiment.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuqing; Lin, Yung-Ya; Cai, Shuhui; Yang, Yu; Sun, Huijun; Lin, Yanqin; Chen, Zhong

    2016-03-14

    High spectral resolution in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a prerequisite for achieving accurate information relevant to molecular structures and composition assignments. The continuous development of superconducting magnets guarantees strong and homogeneous static magnetic fields for satisfactory spectral resolution. However, there exist circumstances, such as measurements on biological tissues and heterogeneous chemical samples, where the field homogeneity is degraded and spectral line broadening seems inevitable. Here we propose an NMR method, named intermolecular zero-quantum coherence J-resolved spectroscopy (iZQC-JRES), to face the challenge of field inhomogeneity and obtain desired high-resolution two-dimensional J-resolved spectra with fast acquisition. Theoretical analyses for this method are given according to the intermolecular multiple-quantum coherence treatment. Experiments on (a) a simple chemical solution and (b) an aqueous solution of mixed metabolites under externally deshimmed fields, and on (c) a table grape sample with intrinsic field inhomogeneity from magnetic susceptibility variations demonstrate the feasibility and applicability of the iZQC-JRES method. The application of this method to inhomogeneous chemical and biological samples, maybe in vivo samples, appears promising. PMID:26979686

  11. High-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance measurements in inhomogeneous magnetic fields: A fast two-dimensional J-resolved experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yuqing; Lin, Yung-Ya; Cai, Shuhui; Yang, Yu; Sun, Huijun; Lin, Yanqin; Chen, Zhong

    2016-03-01

    High spectral resolution in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a prerequisite for achieving accurate information relevant to molecular structures and composition assignments. The continuous development of superconducting magnets guarantees strong and homogeneous static magnetic fields for satisfactory spectral resolution. However, there exist circumstances, such as measurements on biological tissues and heterogeneous chemical samples, where the field homogeneity is degraded and spectral line broadening seems inevitable. Here we propose an NMR method, named intermolecular zero-quantum coherence J-resolved spectroscopy (iZQC-JRES), to face the challenge of field inhomogeneity and obtain desired high-resolution two-dimensional J-resolved spectra with fast acquisition. Theoretical analyses for this method are given according to the intermolecular multiple-quantum coherence treatment. Experiments on (a) a simple chemical solution and (b) an aqueous solution of mixed metabolites under externally deshimmed fields, and on (c) a table grape sample with intrinsic field inhomogeneity from magnetic susceptibility variations demonstrate the feasibility and applicability of the iZQC-JRES method. The application of this method to inhomogeneous chemical and biological samples, maybe in vivo samples, appears promising.

  12. High-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance measurements in inhomogeneous magnetic fields: A fast two-dimensional J-resolved experiment.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuqing; Lin, Yung-Ya; Cai, Shuhui; Yang, Yu; Sun, Huijun; Lin, Yanqin; Chen, Zhong

    2016-03-14

    High spectral resolution in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a prerequisite for achieving accurate information relevant to molecular structures and composition assignments. The continuous development of superconducting magnets guarantees strong and homogeneous static magnetic fields for satisfactory spectral resolution. However, there exist circumstances, such as measurements on biological tissues and heterogeneous chemical samples, where the field homogeneity is degraded and spectral line broadening seems inevitable. Here we propose an NMR method, named intermolecular zero-quantum coherence J-resolved spectroscopy (iZQC-JRES), to face the challenge of field inhomogeneity and obtain desired high-resolution two-dimensional J-resolved spectra with fast acquisition. Theoretical analyses for this method are given according to the intermolecular multiple-quantum coherence treatment. Experiments on (a) a simple chemical solution and (b) an aqueous solution of mixed metabolites under externally deshimmed fields, and on (c) a table grape sample with intrinsic field inhomogeneity from magnetic susceptibility variations demonstrate the feasibility and applicability of the iZQC-JRES method. The application of this method to inhomogeneous chemical and biological samples, maybe in vivo samples, appears promising.

  13. Two-Dimensional Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Structure Determination Module for Introductory Biochemistry: Synthesis and Structural Characterization of Lyso-Glycerophospholipids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrett, Teresa A.; Rose, Rebecca L.; Bell, Sidney M.

    2013-01-01

    In this laboratory module, introductory biochemistry students are exposed to two-dimensional [superscript 1]H-nuclear magnetic resonance of glycerophospholipids (GPLs). Working in groups of three, students enzymatically synthesized and purified a variety of 2-acyl lyso GPLs. The structure of the 2-acyl lyso GPL was verified using [superscript…

  14. Partial-Homogeneity-Based Two-Dimensional High-Resolution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy under Inhomogeneous Magnetic Fields.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Wenqi; Wei, Zhiliang; Ding, Nan; Yang, Yu; Ye, Qimiao; Lin, Yulan; Chen, Zhong

    2016-05-18

    High-resolution multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy serves as an irreplaceable and versatile tool in various chemical investigations. In this study, a method based on the concept of partial homogeneity is developed to offer two-dimensional (2D) high-resolution NMR spectra under inhomogeneous fields. Oscillating gradients are exerted to encode the high-resolution information, and a field-inhomogeneity correction algorithm based on pattern recognition is designed to recover high-resolution spectra. Under fields where inhomogeneity primarily distributes along a single orientation, the proposed method will improve performances of 2D NMR spectroscopy without increasing the experimental duration or significant loss in sensitivity, and thus may open important perspectives for studies of inhomogeneous chemical systems.

  15. Three-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of green-state ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Dieckman, S.L.; Gopalsami, N.; Ford, J.M.; Raptis, A.C.; Ellingson, W.A.; Rizo, P.; Tracey, D.M.; Pujari, V.K.

    1991-09-01

    Objective is the development of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging techniques and technology applicable to the nondestructive characterization of green-state ceramics. To this end, a three-dimensional (3-D) NMR imaging technique has been developed, based on a back-projection acquisition protocol in combination with image reconstruction techniques that are based on 3-D Radon transform inversion. The method incorporates the experimental flexibility to overcome many of the difficulties associated with imaging of solid and semisolid broad-line materials, and also provides contiguously sampled data in three dimensions. This technique has been evaluated as a nondestructive characterizauon method for determining the spatial distribution of organic additves in green-state injection-molded cylindrical Si{sub 3}N{sup 4} tensile specimens. The technique has been evaluated on the basis of providing moderate image resolution over large sample volumes, high resolution over smaller specimen volumes, and sensitivity to variations in the concentration of organics. Resolution of 200{mu}m has been obtained with excellent sensitivity to concentration. A detailed account of the 3-D imaging results obtained from the study, a discussion of the difficulties and limitations of the imaging technique, and suggestions for technique and system improvements are included.

  16. Complete Proton and Carbon Assignment of Triclosan via One- and Two- Dimensional Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Students from an upper-division undergraduate spectroscopy class analyzed one- and two-dimensional 400 MHz NMR spectroscopic data from triclosan in CDCl3. Guided assignment of all proton and carbon signals was completed via 1D proton and carbon, nuclear Overhauser effect (nOe), distortionless enhanc...

  17. Tunnel-diode resonator and nuclear magnetic resonance studies of low-dimensional magnetic and superconducting systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeninas, Steven Lee

    This thesis emphasizes two frequency-domain techniques which uniquely employ radio frequency (RF) excitations to investigate the static and dynamic properties of novel magnetic and superconducting materials. The first technique is a tunnel-diode resonator (TDR) which detects bulk changes in the dynamic susceptibility, chi = dM/dH. The capability of TDR to operate at low temperatures (less than 100 mK) and high fields (up to 65 T in pulsed fields) was critical for investigations of the antiferromagnetically correlated magnetic molecules Cr12Cu2 and Cr12 Ln4 (Ln = Y, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Yb), and the superconductor SrFe2(As1--xPx) 2 (x = 0.35). Investigations of Cr12Cu 2 and Cr12Ln4 demonstrates the first implementation of TDR to experimentally investigate the lowlying energy spectra of magnetic molecules in pulsed magnetic fields. Zeeman splitting of the quantum spin states results in transitions between field-dependent ground state energy levels observed as peaks in dM/dH at 600 mK, and demonstrate good agreement with theoretical calculations using a isotropic Heisenberg spin Hamiltonian. Increasing temperature to 2.5 K, TDR reveals a rich spectrum of frequency-dependent level crossings from thermally populated excited states which cannot be observed by conventional static magnetometry techniques. The last study presented uses TDR in pulsed fields to determine the temperature-dependent upper-critical field Hc2 to investigate the effects of columnar defects arising from heavy ion irradiation of SrFe2(As 1--xPx)2. Results suggest irradiation uniformly suppresses Tc and Hc2, and does not introduce additional features on H c2(T) and the shapes of the anisotropic Hc2 curves indicates a nodal superconducting gap. The second technique is nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) which yields site specific magnetic and electronic information arising from hyperfine interactions for select magnetic nuclei. NMR spectra and nuclear spin-lattice relaxation measurements are reported

  18. Three dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging of sodium ions using stochastic excitation and oscillating gradients

    SciTech Connect

    Frederick, B.deB. |

    1994-12-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic imaging of {sup 23}Na holds promise as a non-invasive method of mapping Na{sup +} distributions, and for differentiating pools of Na{sup +} ions in biological tissues. However, due to NMR relaxation properties of {sup 23}Na in vivo, a large fraction of Na{sup +} is not visible with conventional NMR imaging methods. An alternate imaging method, based on stochastic excitation and oscillating gradients, has been developed which is well adapted to measuring nuclei with short T{sub 2}. Contemporary NMR imaging techniques have dead times of up to several hundred microseconds between excitation and sampling, comparable to the shortest in vivo {sup 23}Na T{sub 2} values, causing significant signal loss. An imaging strategy based on stochastic excitation has been developed which greatly reduces experiment dead time by reducing peak radiofrequency (RF) excitation power and using a novel RF circuit to speed probe recovery. Continuously oscillating gradients are used to eliminate transient eddy currents. Stochastic {sup 1}H and {sup 23}Na spectroscopic imaging experiments have been performed on a small animal system with dead times as low as 25{mu}s, permitting spectroscopic imaging with 100% visibility in vivo. As an additional benefit, the encoding time for a 32x32x32 spectroscopic image is under 30 seconds. The development and analysis of stochastic NMR imaging has been hampered by limitations of the existing phase demodulation reconstruction technique. Three dimensional imaging was impractical due to reconstruction time, and design and analysis of proposed experiments was limited by the mathematical intractability of the reconstruction method. A new reconstruction method for stochastic NMR based on Fourier interpolation has been formulated combining the advantage of a several hundredfold reduction in reconstruction time with a straightforward mathematical form.

  19. An Accessible Two-Dimensional Solution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Experiment on Human Ubiquitin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rovnyak, David; Thompson, Laura E.

    2005-01-01

    Solution-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is an invaluable tool in structural and molecular biology research, but may be underutilized in undergraduate laboratories because instrumentation for performing structural studies of macromolecules in aqueous solutions is not yet widely available for use in undergraduate laboratories. We have…

  20. One- and Two-Dimensional Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy with a Diamond Quantum Sensor.

    PubMed

    Boss, J M; Chang, K; Armijo, J; Cujia, K; Rosskopf, T; Maze, J R; Degen, C L

    2016-05-13

    We report on Fourier spectroscopy experiments performed with near-surface nitrogen-vacancy centers in a diamond chip. By detecting the free precession of nuclear spins rather than applying a multipulse quantum sensing protocol, we are able to unambiguously identify the NMR species devoid of harmonics. We further show that, by engineering different Hamiltonians during free precession, the hyperfine coupling parameters as well as the nuclear Larmor frequency can be selectively measured with up to five digits of precision. The protocols can be combined to demonstrate two-dimensional Fourier spectroscopy. Presented techniques will be useful for mapping nuclear coordinates in molecules deposited on diamond sensor chips, en route to imaging their atomic structure.

  1. One- and Two-Dimensional Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy with a Diamond Quantum Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boss, J. M.; Chang, K.; Armijo, J.; Cujia, K.; Rosskopf, T.; Maze, J. R.; Degen, C. L.

    2016-05-01

    We report on Fourier spectroscopy experiments performed with near-surface nitrogen-vacancy centers in a diamond chip. By detecting the free precession of nuclear spins rather than applying a multipulse quantum sensing protocol, we are able to unambiguously identify the NMR species devoid of harmonics. We further show that, by engineering different Hamiltonians during free precession, the hyperfine coupling parameters as well as the nuclear Larmor frequency can be selectively measured with up to five digits of precision. The protocols can be combined to demonstrate two-dimensional Fourier spectroscopy. Presented techniques will be useful for mapping nuclear coordinates in molecules deposited on diamond sensor chips, en route to imaging their atomic structure.

  2. Applications of two-dimensional solid state nuclear magnetic resonance in silicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhi

    1998-10-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a powerful technique and has been routinely applied in many fields. In this study, we have used high resolution two-dimensional (2D) solid state NMR techniques to study the dynamic process of Li diffusion, the kinetic process of oxygen isotope exchange, and the structural characterization of hydrous and anhydrous silicate glasses at atomic level. In the Li diffusion study, we first established the correlation between the sp6Li chemical shifts and the lithium coordination environments in lithium containing silicates. Then, we assigned the sp6Li magic angle spinning (MAS) spectrum and applied 1D, 2D variable temperature exchange NMR to observe Lisp+ diffusion in lithium orthosilicate. For the first time, our result revealed a detailed picture of the hopping rates of Lisp+ ions among structurally distinct sites and helped to define the diffusion pathway. We have shown that Lisp+ ions hopping rates and activation energies depend on site geometry. NMR measurements on Li ionic hopping frequencies was used to accurately predict the bulk conductivity. In the site-specific oxygen isotope exchange study, we first developed a method to obtain quantitative sp{17}O NMR spectra. Then, we applied the method to stilbite, a natural zeolite. We have shown for the first time that framework oxygens in Al-O-Si sites react faster with oxygens in the channel water than oxygens in Si-O-Si sites. Such an observation has partially proved the quantum ab initio calculation on water adsorption onto silicates. Our measured kinetics results agreed well with bulk isotopic measurements. Water dissolution mechanism in silicates glasses, especially aluminosilicate glasses, has been a long-standing controversy. We have used the sp{17}O spectra for hydrous and anhydrous sodium tetrasilicate glasses and albite glasses to study the structural role of hydrogen-containing species. For the first time, we have observed the oxygen peak for SiOH in hydrous sodium

  3. Metabolomic differentiation of Brassica rapa following herbivory by different insect instars using two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Widarto, Heru Tri; Van Der Meijden, Ed; Lefeber, Alfons W M; Erkelens, Cornelis; Kim, Hye Kyong; Choi, Young Hae; Verpoorte, Robert

    2006-11-01

    The metabolic alterations of Brassica rapa (L.) leaves attacked by larvae of the specialist Plutella xylostella L. (Lepidoptera: Yponomeutidae) and the generalist Spodoptera exigua Hubner (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) were investigated with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, followed by a multivariate data analysis. The principal component analysis (PCA) of (1)H NMR spectra showed that metabolic changes in B. rapa leaves induced by the 2nd and the 4th instars were different from each other. However, the congestion of the one-dimensional (1)H NMR spectrum made it difficult to identify discriminating metabolites. To overcome the spectral complexity, several two-dimensional NMR techniques were applied. Of those evaluated, J-resolved spectroscopy, which affords an additional coupling constant, provided a wide range of structure information on differentiating the metabolites. Based on the J-resolved spectra combined with PCA, the major signals contributing to the discrimination were alanine, threonine, glucose, sucrose, feruloyl malate, sinapoyl malate, and gluconapin.

  4. Three-state analytic theory of two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance in systems with coupled macro- and micropores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, David Linton; Schwartz, Lawrence M.

    2015-06-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments involve a sequence of longitudinal (T1) and transverse (T2) measurements. In a previous paper we showed that if each of these 1D measurements can be represented by two exponential decays then there can be an accurate analytic solution for the 2D measurements with no additional information. In this paper we extend the theory to the case where there are three decay channels for the 1D measurements. The resulting analytic theory introduces a single free parameter, which is a rotation angle in the vector space spanned by the normal modes. Our predictions agree quite well with numerical results based on the microporous grain consolidation (μ GC ) model. The theory allows one to deduce information about decay modes in situations in which they may not be measurable in a conventional 1D measurement because the amplitude of that mode is too small.

  5. Three-state analytic theory of two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance in systems with coupled macro- and micropores.

    PubMed

    Johnson, David Linton; Schwartz, Lawrence M

    2015-06-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments involve a sequence of longitudinal (T(1)) and transverse (T(2)) measurements. In a previous paper we showed that if each of these 1D measurements can be represented by two exponential decays then there can be an accurate analytic solution for the 2D measurements with no additional information. In this paper we extend the theory to the case where there are three decay channels for the 1D measurements. The resulting analytic theory introduces a single free parameter, which is a rotation angle in the vector space spanned by the normal modes. Our predictions agree quite well with numerical results based on the microporous grain consolidation (μGC) model. The theory allows one to deduce information about decay modes in situations in which they may not be measurable in a conventional 1D measurement because the amplitude of that mode is too small. PMID:26172724

  6. Tunnel-diode resonator and nuclear magnetic resonance studies of low-dimensional magnetic and superconducting systems

    SciTech Connect

    Yeninas, Steven Lee

    2013-01-01

    This thesis emphasizes two frequency-domain techniques which uniquely employ radio frequency (RF) excitations to investigate the static and dynamic properties of novel magnetic and superconducting materials.

  7. Nuclear magnetic resonance gyroscope

    SciTech Connect

    Grover, B.C.

    1984-02-07

    A nuclear magnetic resonance gyro using two nuclear magnetic resonance gases, preferably xenon 129 and xenon 131, together with two alkaline metal vapors, preferably rubidium, potassium or cesium, one of the two alkaline metal vapors being pumped by light which has the wavelength of that alkaline metal vapor, and the other alkaline vapor being illuminated by light which has the wavelength of that other alkaline vapor.

  8. Amide proton exchange in the. cap alpha. -amylase polypeptide inhibitor tendamistat studied by two-dimensional /sup 1/H nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, O.; Kline, A.D.; Wuethrich, K.

    1987-10-06

    The individual amide proton exchange rates in Tendamistat at pH 3.0 and 50/sup 0/C were measured by using two-dimensional ..cap alpha..H nuclear magnetic resonance. Overall, it was found that the distribution of exchange rates along the sequence is dominated by the interstrand hydrogen bonds of the ..beta..-sheet structures. The slowly exchanging protons in the core of the two ..beta..-sheets were shown to exchange via an EX2 mechanism. Further analysis of the data indicates that different large-scale structure fluctuations are responsible for the exchange from the two ..beta..-sheets, even though the three-dimensional structure of Tendamistat appears to consist of a single structural domain.

  9. Structural studies on Desulfovibrio gigas cytochrome c3 by two-dimensional 1H-nuclear-magnetic-resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Piçarra-Pereira, M A; Turner, D L; LeGall, J; Xavier, A V

    1993-01-01

    Several aromatic amino acid residues and haem resonances in the fully reduced form of Desulfovibrio gigas cytochrome c3 are assigned, using two-dimensional 1H n.m.r., on the basis of the interactions between the protons of the aromatic amino acids and the haem protons as well as the intrahaem distances known from the X-ray structure [Kissinger (1989) Ph.D. Thesis, Washington State University]. The interhaem interactions observed in the n.m.r. spectra are in full agreement with the D. gigas X-ray structure and also with the n.m.r. data from Desulfovibrio vulgaris (Hildenborough) [Turner, Salgueiro, LeGall and Xavier (1992) Eur. J. Biochem. 210, 931-936]. The good correlation between the calculated ring-current shifts and the observed chemical shifts strongly supports the present assignments. Observation of the two-dimensional nuclear-Overhauser-enhancement spectra of the protein in the reduced, intermediate and fully oxidized stages led to the ordering of the haems in terms of their midpoint redox potentials and their identification in the X-ray structure. The first haem to oxidize is haem I, followed by haems II, III and IV, numbered according to the Cys ligand positions in the amino acid sequences [Mathews (1985) Prog. Biophys. Mol. Biol. 54, 1-56]. Although the haem core architecture is the same for the different Desulfovibrio cytochromes c3, the order of redox potentials is different. PMID:8397514

  10. Nuclear magics at explosive magnetization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondratyev, V. N.

    2016-05-01

    Effects of ultra-strong magnetization in creation of iron group nuclides are considered by employing arguments of nuclear statistical equilibrium. Nuclear magnetic reactivity is demonstrated to enhance the portion of titanium product due to magnetic modification of nuclear structure. The results are corroborated with an excess of 44Ti revealed from the Integral mission data.

  11. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Michael; Griffith, Robert; Bulatowicz, Michael

    2014-03-01

    The navigation grade micro Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope (micro-NMRG) being developed by the Northrop Grumman Corporation (NGC) has concluded the fourth and final phase of the DARPA Navigation Grade Integrated Micro Gyro (NGIMG) program. Traditional MEMS gyros utilize springs as an inherent part of the sensing mechanism, leading to bias and scale factor sensitivity to acceleration and vibration. As a result, they have not met performance expectations in real world environments and to date have been limited to tactical grade applications. The Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope (NMRG) utilizes the fixed precession rate of a nuclear spin in a constant magnetic field as an inertial reference for determining rotation. The nuclear spin precession rate sensitivity to acceleration and vibration is negligible for most applications. Therefore, the application of new micro and batch fabrication methods to NMRG technology holds great promise for navigation grade performance in a low cost and compact gyro. This presentation will describe the operational principles, design basics, and demonstrated performance of the NMRG including an overview of the NGC designs developed and demonstrated in the DARPA gyro development program.

  12. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulatowicz, Michael; Griffith, Robert; Larsen, Michael

    2014-03-01

    The navigation grade micro Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope (micro-NMRG) being developed by the Northrop Grumman Corporation (NGC) has concluded the fourth and final phase of the DARPA Navigation Grade Integrated Micro Gyro (NGIMG) program. Traditional MEMS gyros utilize springs as an inherent part of the sensing mechanism, leading to bias and scale factor sensitivity to acceleration and vibration. As a result, they have not met performance expectations in real world environments and to date have been limited to tactical grade applications. The Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope (NMRG) utilizes the fixed precession rate of a nuclear spin in a constant magnetic field as an inertial reference for determining rotation. The nuclear spin precession rate sensitivity to acceleration and vibration is negligible for most applications. Therefore, the application of new micro and batch fabrication methods to NMRG technology holds great promise for navigation grade performance in a low cost and compact gyro. This poster will describe the history, operational principles, design, and demonstrated performance of the NMRG including an overview of the NGC designs developed and demonstrated in the DARPA gyro development program.

  13. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulatowicz, Michael; Clark, Philip; Griffith, Robert; Larsen, Michael; Mirijanian, James

    2012-06-01

    The navigation grade micro Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope (micro-NMRG) being developed by the Northrop Grumman Corporation is concluding the fourth and final phase of the DARPA Navigation Grade Integrated Micro Gyro (NGIMG) program. Traditional MEMS gyros utilize springs as an inherent part of the sensing mechanism, leading to bias and scale factor sensitivity to acceleration and vibration. As a result, they have not met performance expectations in real world environments and to date have been limited to tactical grade applications. The Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope (NMRG) utilizes the fixed precession rate of a nuclear spin in a constant magnetic field as an inertial reference for determining rotation. The nuclear spin precession rate sensitivity to acceleration and vibration is negligible for most applications. Therefore, the application of new micro and batch fabrication methods to NMRG technology holds great promise for navigation grade performance in a low cost and compact gyro. This poster will describe the history, operational principles, and design basics of the NMRG including an overview of the NSD designs developed and demonstrated in the DARPA gyro development program. General performance results from phases 3 and 4 will also be presented.

  14. Nuclear Magnetic Conduits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desantis, Rich

    2008-10-01

    Point charges are not conduits of magnetism. Vacuum gaps between charges prevent superconductivity. Magnetism occurs w/o charge velocity. A changing magnetic field can add magnetism, w/o magnetism's centripetal force adding speed. Voltage is not charge repulsion energy. Passing electrons through a stationary electron's field cannot reduce its field. Passing the external electrons through a charged capacitor's field discharges the capacitor. Chemical bonds extend between atoms. A superconductive magnet contains a superconductive molecule, the length of its wire. Superconductivity dictates that chemical bonding material is non-vacuum and non-point charge. Its unit is an electron/proton fusion called an ABION. Unpaired abions attract all other unpaired abions within or between atoms. Paired abions have reduced attraction for other abions. Helium is inert because its abions are paired. A lithium atom includes an unpaired abion. Superconductive abions are nuclear magnetic conduits. Equality of transference numbers in electrochemistry is evidence of conduits. In fuel cells and semiconductors, paired voltage-induced redox reactions convert lines of abions into conduits. This temporarily converts bulk insulators to conductors.

  15. Separation of quadrupolar and chemical/paramagnetic shift interactions in two-dimensional 2H (I=1) nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonijevic, Sasa; Wimperis, Stephen

    2005-01-01

    A novel two-dimensional 2H (spin I=1) nuclear magnetic resonance technique is introduced for determination of both quadrupole and chemical/paramagnetic shift tensors and their relative orientation. The new method is based upon the well-known quadrupolar-echo experiment and is designed to refocus the quadrupolar interaction at the end of the t1 evolution period while retaining the modulation introduced by the shift interaction. As a result, a projection of the resulting two-dimensional spectrum onto its F1 dimension yields a shift anisotropy powder lineshape free from any quadrupolar broadening. The chemical/paramagnetic shifts appear in both F1 and F2 dimensions and are thus spread along a +1 frequency gradient; hence, a projection orthogonal to this gradient yields the pure quadrupolar powder lineshape, free from all shift interaction effects. The relative orientation of the quadrupole and shift tensors can be obtained by analysis of the full two-dimensional correlation lineshape. Unlike the well-known double-quantum experiment, the new method is, in principle, equally effective for all values of the quadrupolar splitting, including zero. The properties of the new technique are demonstrated using computer simulation and methods for the extraction of quadrupole and shift tensor parameters are described. The new technique is applied to (diamagnetic) benzoic acid-d1 (C6H5CO2D) and (paramagnetic) copper(II) chloride dihydrate-d4 (CuCl2ṡ2D2O).

  16. Separation of quadrupolar and chemical/paramagnetic shift interactions in two-dimensional 2H (I=1) nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Antonijevic, Sasa; Wimperis, Stephen

    2005-01-22

    A novel two-dimensional (2)H (spin I=1) nuclear magnetic resonance technique is introduced for determination of both quadrupole and chemical/paramagnetic shift tensors and their relative orientation. The new method is based upon the well-known quadrupolar-echo experiment and is designed to refocus the quadrupolar interaction at the end of the t(1) evolution period while retaining the modulation introduced by the shift interaction. As a result, a projection of the resulting two-dimensional spectrum onto its F(1) dimension yields a shift anisotropy powder lineshape free from any quadrupolar broadening. The chemical/paramagnetic shifts appear in both F(1) and F(2) dimensions and are thus spread along a +1 frequency gradient; hence, a projection orthogonal to this gradient yields the pure quadrupolar powder lineshape, free from all shift interaction effects. The relative orientation of the quadrupole and shift tensors can be obtained by analysis of the full two-dimensional correlation lineshape. Unlike the well-known double-quantum experiment, the new method is, in principle, equally effective for all values of the quadrupolar splitting, including zero. The properties of the new technique are demonstrated using computer simulation and methods for the extraction of quadrupole and shift tensor parameters are described. The new technique is applied to (diamagnetic) benzoic acid-d(1) (C(6)H(5)CO(2)D) and (paramagnetic) copper(II) chloride dihydrate-d(4) (CuCl(2).2D(2)O). PMID:15740253

  17. Low dimensional magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjall, Jonas Alexander

    With the rapid development of experimental techniques for ultracold gases in optical traps a new approach to investigate magnetic properties that are hard achieve or control in the solid state has emerged. We first study the ground-state phase diagram of a spin-1 condensate trapped in an optical trap when the magnetic dipole interaction between the atoms is taken into account along with confinement and spin precession. The boundaries between the regions of ferromagnetic and polar phases move as the dipole strength is varied and the ferromagnetic phases can be modulated. The magnetization of the ferromagnetic phase perpendicular to the field becomes modulated as a helix winding around the magnetic field direction, with a wavelength inversely proportional to the dipole strength. This modulation should be observable for current experimental parameters in 87Rb. Hence the much-sought supersolid state, with broken continuous translation invariance in one direction and broken global U(1) invariance, occurs generically as a metastable state in this system as a result of dipole interaction. The ferromagnetic state parallel to the applied magnetic field becomes striped in a finite system at strong dipolar coupling. The development of artificial gauge fields, that can mimic magnetic fields, in ultracold gases suggests that atomic realization of fractional quantum Hall physics will become experimentally practical in the near future. While it is known that bosons on lattices can support quantum Hall states, the universal edge excitations that provide the most likely experimental probe of the topological order have not been obtained. We find that the edge excitations of an interacting boson lattice model are surprisingly sensitive to interedge hybridization and edge-bulk mixing for some confining potentials. With properly chosen potentials and fluxes, the edge spectrum is surprisingly clear even for small systems with strong lattice effects such as bandwidth. Various fractional

  18. Magnetism in low dimensionality.

    SciTech Connect

    Bader, S. D.; Materials Science Division

    2002-03-10

    The collective creativity of those working in the field of surface magnetism has stimulated an impressive range of advances. Once wary, theorists are now eager to enter the field. The present article attempts to take a snapshot of where the field has been, with an eye to the more speculative issue of where it is going. Selective examples are used to highlight three general areas of interest (1) characterization techniques, (2) materials properties, and (3) theoretical/simulational advances. Emerging directions are identified and discussed, including laterally confined nanomagnetism and spintronics.

  19. Magnetism in low dimensionality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bader, S. D.

    2002-03-01

    The collective creativity of those working in the field of surface magnetism has stimulated an impressive range of advances. Once wary, theorists are now eager to enter the field. The present article attempts to take a snapshot of where the field has been, with an eye to the more speculative issue of where it is going. Selective examples are used to highlight three general areas of interest: (i) characterization techniques, (ii) materials properties, and (iii) theoretical/simulational advances. Emerging directions are identified and discussed, including laterally confined nanomagnetism and spintronics.

  20. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Michael

    2011-05-01

    The navigation grade micro Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope (micro-NMRG) being developed by the Northrop Grumman Corporation is currently in phase 4 of the DARPA Navigation Grade Integrated Micro Gyro (NGIMG) program. The micro-NMRG technology is pushing the boundaries of size, weight, power, and performance allowing new small platform applications of navigation grade Inertial Navigation System (INS) technology. Information on the historical development of the technology, basics of operation, task performance goals, application opportunities, and a phase 2 sample of earth rate measurement data will be presented. Funding Provided by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA)

  1. Three dimensional magnetic abacus memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shilei; Zhang, Jingyan; Baker, Alexander A.; Wang, Shouguo; Yu, Guanghua; Hesjedal, Thorsten

    2014-08-01

    Stacking nonvolatile memory cells into a three-dimensional matrix represents a powerful solution for the future of magnetic memory. However, it is technologically challenging to access the data in the storage medium if large numbers of bits are stacked on top of each other. Here we introduce a new type of multilevel, nonvolatile magnetic memory concept, the magnetic abacus. Instead of storing information in individual magnetic layers, thereby having to read out each magnetic layer separately, the magnetic abacus adopts a new encoding scheme. It is inspired by the idea of second quantisation, dealing with the memory state of the entire stack simultaneously. Direct read operations are implemented by measuring the artificially engineered `quantised' Hall voltage, each representing a count of the spin-up and spin-down layers in the stack. This new memory system further allows for both flexible scaling of the system and fast communication among cells. The magnetic abacus provides a promising approach for future nonvolatile 3D magnetic random access memory.

  2. Three dimensional magnetic abacus memory.

    PubMed

    Zhang, ShiLei; Zhang, JingYan; Baker, Alexander A; Wang, ShouGuo; Yu, GuangHua; Hesjedal, Thorsten

    2014-08-22

    Stacking nonvolatile memory cells into a three-dimensional matrix represents a powerful solution for the future of magnetic memory. However, it is technologically challenging to access the data in the storage medium if large numbers of bits are stacked on top of each other. Here we introduce a new type of multilevel, nonvolatile magnetic memory concept, the magnetic abacus. Instead of storing information in individual magnetic layers, thereby having to read out each magnetic layer separately, the magnetic abacus adopts a new encoding scheme. It is inspired by the idea of second quantisation, dealing with the memory state of the entire stack simultaneously. Direct read operations are implemented by measuring the artificially engineered 'quantised' Hall voltage, each representing a count of the spin-up and spin-down layers in the stack. This new memory system further allows for both flexible scaling of the system and fast communication among cells. The magnetic abacus provides a promising approach for future nonvolatile 3D magnetic random access memory.

  3. Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance analysis of a labeled peptide bound to a class II major histocompatibility complex molecule.

    PubMed

    Driscoll, P C; Altman, J D; Boniface, J J; Sakaguchi, K; Reay, P A; Omichinski, J G; Appella, E; Davis, M M

    1993-07-20

    The formation of peptide/major histocompatibility complex (MHC) complexes and their subsequent recognition by T cells is a pivotal event in the initiation of an immune response. While X-ray crystal structures are now available for class I MHC/peptide complexes, little detailed structural information is known about the class II MHC equivalent, and there are no solution structure data for either. A 16 amino acid residue moth cytochrome c peptide (residues 88 to 103) was 13C-labeled for two-dimensional isotope-edited NMR analysis. The peptide was labeled either selectively in the methyl groups of alanine residues or uniformly at every carbon position, and bound to unlabeled soluble mouse I-Ek class II MHC molecules. Although alpha-helical in the native cytochrome c protein and with no uniform structure in solution, the peptide is bound to the I-Ek molecule with the alpha-carbon atoms of the 11 C-terminal residues held in the binding groove. This indicates that the class II MHC peptide binding site is somewhat larger than that of class I MHC molecules (> or = 11 amino acid residues versus 8 to 10 amino acid residues), consistent with recent data on eluted peptides. Despite the large size of the complex (approximately 70 kDa), nuclear Overhauser effects are clearly detectable between peptide side-chains and the MHC molecule. Indications of the buried or exposed nature of particular side-chains within the bound peptide are derived from the NMR data and these are used together with information from previous biological studies to propose a crude model of the interaction of the peptide with the groove of the MHC molecule. We find no evidence for a conformational change in the peptide/MHC complex in the spectra at pH 5.0 versus pH 7.0, despite a 40-fold faster on-rate for the peptide at the lower pH value. PMID:8393933

  4. nuclear magnetic resonance gyroscope

    SciTech Connect

    Karwacki, F. A.; Griffin, J.

    1985-04-02

    A nuclear magnetic resonance gyroscope which derives angular rotation thereof from the phases of precessing nuclear moments utilizes a single-resonance cell situated in the center of a uniform DC magnetic field. The field is generated by current flow through a circular array of coils between parallel plates. It also utilizes a pump and read-out beam and associated electronics for signal processing and control. Encapsulated in the cell for sensing rotation are odd isotopes of Mercury Hg/sup 199/ and Hg/sup 201/. Unpolarized intensity modulated light from a pump lamp is directed by lenses to a linear polarizer, quarter wave plate combination producing circularly polarized light. The circularly polarized light is reflected by a mirror to the cell transverse to the field for optical pumping of the isotopes. Unpolarized light from a readout lamp is directed by lenses to another linear polarizer. The linearly polarized light is reflected by another mirror to the cell transverse to the field and orthogonal to the pump lamp light. The linear light after transversing the cell strikes an analyzer where it is converted to an intensity-modulated light. The modulated light is detected by a photodiode processed and utilized as feedback to control the field and pump lamp excitation and readout of angular displacement.

  5. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Michael; Bulatowicz, Michael; Clark, Philip; Griffith, Robert; Mirijanian, James; Pavell, James

    2015-05-01

    The Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope (NMRG) is being developed by the Northrop Grumman Corporation (NGC). Cold and hot atom interferometer based gyroscopes have suffered from Size, Weight, and Power (SWaP) challenges and limits in bandwidth, scale factor stability, dead time, high rotation rate, vibration, and acceleration. NMRG utilizes the fixed precession rate of a nuclear spin in a constant magnetic field as a reference for determining rotation, providing continuous measurement, high bandwidth, stable scale factor, high rotation rate measurement, and low sensitivity to vibration and acceleration in a low SWaP package. The sensitivity to vibration has been partially tested and demonstrates no measured sensitivity within error bars. Real time closed loop implementation of the sensor significantly decreases environmental and systematic sensitivities and supports a compact and low power digital signal processing and control system. Therefore, the NMRG technology holds great promise for navigation grade performance in a low cost SWaP package. The poster will describe the history, operation, and design of the NMRG. General performance results will also be presented along with recent vibration test results.

  6. Three dimensional magnetic abacus memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shilei; Zhang, Jingyan; Baker, Alexander; Wang, Shouguo; Yu, Guanghua; Hesjedal, Thorsten

    2015-03-01

    Stacking nonvolatile memory cells into a three-dimensional matrix represents a powerful solution for the future of magnetic memory. However, it is technologically challenging to access the individual data in the storage medium if large numbers of bits are stacked on top of each other. Here we introduce a new type of multilevel, nonvolatile magnetic memory concept, the magnetic abacus. Instead of storing information in individual magnetic layers, thereby having to read out each magnetic layer separately, the magnetic abacus adopts a new encoding scheme which envisages a classical abacus with the beads operated by electron spins. It is inspired by the idea of second quantization, dealing with the memory state of the entire stack simultaneously. Direct read operations are implemented by measuring the artificially engineered `quantized' Hall voltage, representing a count of the spin-up and spin-down layers in the stack. This concept of `second quantization of memory' realizes the 3D memory architecture with superior reading and operation efficiency, thus is a promising approach for future nonvolatile magnetic random access memory.

  7. One- and two-dimensional chemical exchange nuclear magnetic resonance studies of the creatine kinase catalyzed reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Gober, J.R.

    1988-01-01

    The equilibrium chemical exchange dynamics of the creatine kinase enzyme system were studied by one- and two-dimensional {sup 31}P NMR techniques. Pseudo-first-order reaction rate constants were measured by the saturation transfer method under an array of experimental conditions of pH and temperature. Quantitative one-dimensional spectra were collected under the same conditions in order to calculate the forward and reverse reaction rates, the K{sub eq}, the hydrogen ion stoichiometry, and the standard thermodynamic functions. The pure absorption mode in four quadrant two-dimensional chemical exchange experiment was employed so that the complete kinetic matrix showing all of the chemical exchange process could be realized.

  8. Three-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance structures of mouse epidermal growth factor in acidic and physiological pH solutions.

    PubMed

    Kohda, D; Inagaki, F

    1992-12-01

    The three-dimensional structures of epidermal growth factors (EGF) previously reported were all in acidic solutions (pH 2.0-3.2), at which pHs EGF cannot bind to the receptor. Here we studied the structure of mouse EGF at pH 6.8, where EGF is physiologically active, and compared it with the structure at pH 2.0 by CD and NMR. From pH dependence of CD spectra and a comparison between the chemical shifts of the proton resonances at pH 6.8 and 2.0, the conformations at two pHs were found to be nearly identical except for the C-terminal tail region. The three-dimensional structures at pH 6.8 and 2.0 were determined independently by a combination of two-dimensional 1H NMR and stimulated annealing calculations using the program XPLOR. The calculations were based on 261 distance constraints at pH 6.8 and 355 distance and 24 torsion angle constraints at pH 2.0. The conformational difference of the C-terminal domain (residues 33-50) was detected between the two structures, which were supported by CD and the chemical shift comparison. The positions of the side chains of Leu47, Arg48, Trp49, and Trp50 are changed probably by the effect of the deprotonation of Asp46. Considering the fact that Leu47 is essential in EGF binding to the receptor, this conformational difference may be important in receptor recognition.

  9. Atomic resolution protein structure determination by three-dimensional transferred echo double resonance solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieuwkoop, Andrew J.; Wylie, Benjamin J.; Franks, W. Trent; Shah, Gautam J.; Rienstra, Chad M.

    2009-09-01

    We show that quantitative internuclear N15-C13 distances can be obtained in sufficient quantity to determine a complete, high-resolution structure of a moderately sized protein by magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy. The three-dimensional ZF-TEDOR pulse sequence is employed in combination with sparse labeling of C13 sites in the β1 domain of the immunoglobulin binding protein G (GB1), as obtained by bacterial expression with 1,3-C13 or 2-C13-glycerol as the C13 source. Quantitative dipolar trajectories are extracted from two-dimensional N15-C13 planes, in which ˜750 cross peaks are resolved. The experimental data are fit to exact theoretical trajectories for spin clusters (consisting of one C13 and several N15 each), yielding quantitative precision as good as 0.1 Å for ˜350 sites, better than 0.3 Å for another 150, and ˜1.0 Å for 150 distances in the range of 5-8 Å. Along with isotropic chemical shift-based (TALOS) dihedral angle restraints, the distance restraints are incorporated into simulated annealing calculations to yield a highly precise structure (backbone RMSD of 0.25±0.09 Å), which also demonstrates excellent agreement with the most closely related crystal structure of GB1 (2QMT, bbRMSD 0.79±0.03 Å). Moreover, side chain heavy atoms are well restrained (0.76±0.06 Å total heavy atom RMSD). These results demonstrate for the first time that quantitative internuclear distances can be measured throughout an entire solid protein to yield an atomic-resolution structure.

  10. Determination of the three-dimensional solution structure of ragweed allergen Amb t V by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Metzler, W J; Valentine, K; Roebber, M; Friedrichs, M S; Marsh, D G; Mueller, L

    1992-06-01

    Analysis of two-dimensional NMR experiments has afforded essentially complete assignment of all proton resonances in the allergenic protein Amb t V. Conformational constraints were obtained from the NMR data in three forms: interproton distances derived from NOE cross-peak intensities of NOESY spectra, torsion angle constraints derived from J-coupling constants of COSY and PE-COSY spectra, and hydrogen bond constraints derived from hydrogen-exchange experiments. Conformations of Amb t V with low constraint violations were generated using dynamic simulated annealing in the program XPLOR. The refined structures are comprised of a C-terminal alpha-helix, a short stretch of triple-stranded antiparallel beta-sheet, and several loops. In addition, the cystine partners of the four disulfide linkages (for which there are no biochemical data) have been assigned. The refined structures of Amb t V will allow us to suggest surface substructures for the Amb V allergens that are likely to participate in B cell epitopes and will assist us in defining the Ia/T cell epitopes that interact with the MHC class II (or Ia) molecule and the T cell receptor leading to the induction of the immune response to Amb t V.

  11. Direct Analysis of Free and Sulfite-Bound Carbonyl Compounds in Wine by Two-Dimensional Quantitative Proton and Carbon Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nikolantonaki, Maria; Magiatis, Prokopios; Waterhouse, Andrew L

    2015-11-01

    Recent developments that have accelerated 2D NMR methods and improved quantitation have made these methods accessible analytical procedures, and the large signal dispersion allows for the analysis of complex samples. Few natural samples are as complex as wine, so the application to challenges in wine analysis look promising. The analysis of carbonyl compounds in wine, key oxidation products, is complicated by a multitude of kinetically reversible adducts, such as acetals and sulfonates, so that sample preparation steps can generate complex interferences. These challenges could be overcome if the compounds could be quantified in situ. Here, two-dimensional ((1)H-(1)H) homonuclear and heteronuclear ((13)C-(1)H) single quantum correlations (correlation spectroscopy, COSY, and heteronuclear single quantum coherence, HSQC) nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of undiluted wine samples were observed at natural abundance. These techniques achieve simultaneous direct identification and quantitation of acetaldehyde, pyruvic acid, acetoin, methylglyoxal, and α-ketoglutaric acid in wine with only a small addition of D2O. It was also possible to observe and sometimes quantify the sulfite, hydrate, and acetal forms of the carbonyl compounds. The accuracy of the method was tested in wine samples by spiking with a mixture of all analytes at different concentrations. The method was applied to 15 wine samples of various vintages and grape varieties. The application of this method could provide a powerful tool to better understand the development, evolution, and perception of wine oxidation and insight into the impact of these sulfite bound carbonyls on antimicrobial and antioxidant action by SO2.

  12. Structure and Dynamics of Brachypodium Primary Cell Wall Polysaccharides from Two-Dimensional 13C Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Tuo; Salazar, Andre; Zabotina, Olga A.; Hong, Mei

    2014-04-10

    The polysaccharide structure and dynamics in the primary cell wall of the model grass Brachypodium distachyon are investigated for the first time using solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). While both grass and non-grass cell walls contain cellulose as the main structural scaffold, the former contains xylan with arabinose and glucuronic acid substitutions as the main hemicellulose, with a small amount of xyloglucan (XyG) and pectins, while the latter contains XyG as the main hemicellulose and significant amounts of pectins. We labeled the Brachypodium cell wall with 13C to allow two-dimensional (2D) 13C correlation NMR experiments under magic-angle spinning. Well-resolved 2D spectra are obtained in which the 13C signals of cellulose, glucuronoarabinoxylan (GAX), and other matrix polysaccharides can be assigned. The assigned 13C chemical shifts indicate that there are a large number of arabinose and xylose linkages in the wall, and GAX is significantly branched at the developmental stage of 2 weeks. 2D 13C–13C correlation spectra measured with long spin diffusion mixing times indicate that the branched GAX approaches cellulose microfibrils on the nanometer scale, contrary to the conventional model in which only unbranched GAX can bind cellulose. The GAX chains are highly dynamic, with average order parameters of 0.4. Biexponential 13C T1 and 1H T relaxation indicates that there are two dynamically distinct domains in GAX: the more rigid domain may be responsible for cross-linking cellulose microfibrils, while the more mobile domain may fill the interfibrillar space. This dynamic heterogeneity is more pronounced than that of the non-grass hemicellulose, XyG, suggesting that GAX adopts the mixed characteristics of XyG and pectins. Moderate differences in cellulose rigidity are observed between the Brachypodium and Arabidopsis cell walls

  13. GHz nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Cross, T.A.; Drobny, G.; Trewhella, J.

    1994-12-01

    For the past dozen years, 500- and 600-MHz spectrometers have become available in many laboratories. The first 600-MHz NMR spectrometer (at Carnegie Mellon University) was commissioned more than 15 years ago and, until 1994, represented the highest field available for high-resolution NMR. This year, we have witnessed unprecedented progress in the development of very high field magnets for NMR spectroscopy, including the delivery of the first commercial 750-MHz NMR spectrometers. In addition, NMR signals have been obtained from 20-Tesla magnets (850 MHz for {sup 1}H`s) at both Los Alamos National Laboratory and Florida State University in the NHMFL (National High Magnetic Field Laboratory). These preliminary experiments have been performed in magnets with 100-ppm homogeneity, but a 20-Tesla magnet developed for the NHMFL will be brought to field this year with a projected homogeneity of 0.1 ppm over a 1-cm-diam spherical volume.

  14. Two-Dimensional Turbulence in Magnetized Plasmas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kendl, A.

    2008-01-01

    In an inhomogeneous magnetized plasma the transport of energy and particles perpendicular to the magnetic field is in general mainly caused by quasi two-dimensional turbulent fluid mixing. The physics of turbulence and structure formation is of ubiquitous importance to every magnetically confined laboratory plasma for experimental or industrial…

  15. Theory of nuclear magnetic relaxation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcconnell, J.

    1983-01-01

    A theory of nuclear magnetic interaction is based on the study of the stochastic rotation operator. The theory is applied explicitly to relaxation by anisotropic chemical shift and to spin-rotational interactions. It is applicable also to dipole-dipole and quadrupole interactions.

  16. Dimensionality switching in molecule-based magnets.

    SciTech Connect

    Goddard, P. A.; Manson, J. L.; Singleton, J.; Franke, I.; Lancaster, T.; Steele, A. J.; Blundell, S. J.; Baines, C.; Pratt, F.; McDonald, R. D.; Valenzuela, O. A.; Sengupta, P.; Corbeyl, J. F.; Southerland, H. I.; Schlueter, J. A.

    2012-01-01

    Gaining control of the building blocks of magnetic materials and thereby achieving particular characteristics will make possible the design and growth of bespoke magnetic devices. While progress in the synthesis of molecular materials, and especially coordination polymers, represents a significant step towards this goal, the ability to tune the magnetic interactions within a particular framework remains in its infancy. Here we demonstrate a chemical method which achieves dimensionality selection via preferential inhibition of the magnetic exchange in an S=1/2 antiferromagnet along one crystal direction, switching the system from being quasi-two- to quasi-one-dimensional while effectively maintaining the nearest-neighbor coupling strength.

  17. Effects of time and temperature of firing on Fe-rich ceramics studied by Moessbauer spectroscopy and two-dimensional {sup 1}H-nuclear magnetic resonance relaxometry

    SciTech Connect

    Casieri, Cinzia; De Luca, Francesco; Nodari, Luca; Russo, Umberto; Terenzi, Camilla; Tudisca, Valentina

    2012-10-15

    The combined effects of firing temperature and soaking time on the microstructure of iron-rich porous ceramics have been studied by {sup 57}Fe-Moessbauer spectroscopy and 2D {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry using a single-sided probe. Examining water-saturated ceramics using the relaxation correlation method, where longitudinal (T{sub 1}) and transverse (T{sub 2}) relaxation times are measured concurrently, provides information about firing-induced changes in both porosity (related to T{sub 1}) and magnetic properties (related to T{sub 2}). Comparing the information obtained from {sup 1}H-NMR analyses with that obtained from Moessbauer spectroscopy (which characterizes changes in iron-bearing species) shows that the T{sub 1}-T{sub 2} NMR correlation technique is very sensitive to even subtle modifications in the magnetic behavior of Fe-bearing species. Moreover, the single-sided NMR approach allows us to perform millimeter-scale depth-resolved measurements, which can be used to non-invasively study the microstructural heterogeneities associated with non-uniform firing effects inside ceramics. This is in contrast to Moessbauer spectroscopy, which requires that the ceramic samples be ground.

  18. Three-dimensional structure of potato carboxypeptidase inhibitor in solution. A study using nuclear magnetic resonance, distance geometry, and restrained molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Clore, G.M.; Gronenborn, A.M.; Nilges, M.; Ryan, C.A.

    1987-12-01

    The solution conformation of potato carboxypeptidase inhibitor (CPI) has been investigated by /sup 1/H NMR spectroscopy. The spectrum is assigned in a sequential manner by using two-dimensional NMR techniques to identify through-bond and through-space (<5 A) connectivities. A set of 309 approximate interproton distance restraints is derived from the two-dimensional nuclear Overhauser enhancement spectra and used as the basis of a three-dimensional structure determination by a combination of metric matrix distance geometry and restrained molecular dynamics calculations. A total of 11 converged distance geometry structures were computed and refined by using restrained molecular dynamics. The average atomic root mean square (rms) difference between the final 11 structures and the mean structure obtained by averaging their coordinates is 1.4 +/- 0.3 A for residues 2-39 and 0.9 +/- 0.2 A for residues 5-37. The corresponding values for all atoms are 1.9 +/- 0.3 and 1.4 +/- 0.2 A, respectively. The computed structures are very close to the X-ray structure of CPI in its complex with carboxypeptidase, and the backbone atomic rms difference between the mean of the computed structures and the X-ray structure is only 1.2 A. Nevertheless, there are some real differences present which are evidenced by significant deviations between the experimental upper interproton distance limits and the corresponding interproton distances derived from the X-ray structure. These principally occur in two regions, residues 18-20 and residues 28-30, the latter comprising part of the region of secondary contact between CPI and carboxypeptidase in the X-ray structure.

  19. Multi-dimensionally encoded magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Fa-Hsuan

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging typically achieves spatial encoding by measuring the projection of a q-dimensional object over q-dimensional spatial bases created by linear spatial encoding magnetic fields (SEMs). Recently, imaging strategies using nonlinear SEMs have demonstrated potential advantages for reconstructing images with higher spatiotemporal resolution and reducing peripheral nerve stimulation. In practice, nonlinear SEMs and linear SEMs can be used jointly to further improve the image reconstruction performance. Here we propose the multi-dimensionally encoded (MDE) MRI to map a q-dimensional object onto a p-dimensional encoding space where p > q. MDE MRI is a theoretical framework linking imaging strategies using linear and nonlinear SEMs. Using a system of eight surface SEM coils with an eight-channel RF coil array, we demonstrate the five-dimensional MDE MRI for a two-dimensional object as a further generalization of PatLoc imaging and O-space imaging. We also present a method of optimizing spatial bases in MDE MRI. Results show that MDE MRI with a higher dimensional encoding space can reconstruct images more efficiently and with a smaller reconstruction error when the k-space sampling distribution and the number of samples are controlled. PMID:22926830

  20. Wide-range nuclear magnetic resonance detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturman, J. C.; Jirberg, R. J.

    1972-01-01

    Compact and easy to use solid state nuclear magnetic resonance detector is designed for measuring field strength to 20 teslas in cryogenically cooled magnets. Extremely low noise and high sensitivity make detector applicable to nearly all types of analytical nuclear magnetic resonance measurements and can be used in high temperature and radiation environments.

  1. Introduction to Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manatt, Stanley L.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to try to give a short overview of what the status is on nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). It's a subject where one really has to spend some time to look at the physics in detail to develop a proper working understanding. I feel it's not appropriate to present to you density matrices, Hamiltonians of all sorts, and differential equations representing the motion of spins. I'm really going to present some history and status, and show a few very simple concepts involved in NMR. It is a form of radio frequency spectroscopy and there are a great number of nuclei that can be studied very usefully with the technique. NMR requires a magnet, a r.f. transmitter/receiver system, and a data acquisition system.

  2. Evanescent Waves Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Halidi, El Mohamed; Nativel, Eric; Akel, Mohamad; Kenouche, Samir; Coillot, Christophe; Alibert, Eric; Jabakhanji, Bilal; Schimpf, Remy; Zanca, Michel; Stein, Paul; Goze-Bac, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy and imaging can be classified as inductive techniques working in the near- to far-field regimes. We investigate an alternative capacitive detection with the use of micrometer sized probes positioned at sub wavelength distances of the sample in order to characterize and model evanescent electromagnetic fields originating from NMR phenomenon. We report that in this experimental configuration the available NMR signal is one order of magnitude larger and follows an exponential decay inversely proportional to the size of the emitters. Those investigations open a new road to a better understanding of the evanescent waves component in NMR with the opportunity to perform localized spectroscopy and imaging. PMID:26751800

  3. Evanescent Waves Nuclear Magnetic Resonance.

    PubMed

    Halidi, El Mohamed; Nativel, Eric; Akel, Mohamad; Kenouche, Samir; Coillot, Christophe; Alibert, Eric; Jabakhanji, Bilal; Schimpf, Remy; Zanca, Michel; Stein, Paul; Goze-Bac, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy and imaging can be classified as inductive techniques working in the near- to far-field regimes. We investigate an alternative capacitive detection with the use of micrometer sized probes positioned at sub wavelength distances of the sample in order to characterize and model evanescent electromagnetic fields originating from NMR phenomenon. We report that in this experimental configuration the available NMR signal is one order of magnitude larger and follows an exponential decay inversely proportional to the size of the emitters. Those investigations open a new road to a better understanding of the evanescent waves component in NMR with the opportunity to perform localized spectroscopy and imaging.

  4. Protein dynamics from nuclear magnetic relaxation.

    PubMed

    Charlier, Cyril; Cousin, Samuel F; Ferrage, Fabien

    2016-05-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance is a ubiquitous spectroscopic tool to explore molecules with atomic resolution. Nuclear magnetic relaxation is intimately connected to molecular motions. Many methods and models have been developed to measure and interpret the characteristic rates of nuclear magnetic relaxation in proteins. These approaches shed light on a rich and diverse range of motions covering timescales from picoseconds to seconds. Here, we introduce some of the basic concepts upon which these approaches are built and provide a series of illustrations.

  5. Three-Dimensional Magnetic Reconnection Through A Moving Magnetic Null.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukin, Vyacheslav; Linton, M. G.

    2011-05-01

    We model the dynamics of three-dimensional (3D) magnetic reconnection in a system where magnetic fields are observed to evolve from an unstable force-free equilibrium to a minimum energy state by way of global rearrangement of the magnetic topology. The process conserves total magnetic helicity and reconnection through a magnetic null is the dominant magnetic energy loss mechanism. During the period of most intense reconnection, the 3D localized reconnection region is observed to follow the magnetic null moving at a substantial fraction of the Alfven speed (up to 0.2 vAlf). Here, we will explore the qualitative effects of a moving 3D reconnection region on the rate of change of magnetic topology and the associated non-ideal electric fields. The quantitative impact of background plasma beta and ion inertia (the Hall effect) on the measured correlation between the motion of the magnetic null and the reconnection region will also be demonstrated. This research is supported by the Office of Naval Research.

  6. Synchronously pumped nuclear magnetic oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korver, Anna; Thrasher, Daniel; Bulatowicz, Michael; Walker, Thad

    2015-05-01

    We present progress towards a synchronously pumped nuclear magnetic oscillator. Alkali frequency shifts and quadrupole shifts are the dominant systematic effects in dual Xe isotope co-magnetometers. By synchronously pumping the Xe nuclei using spin-exchange with an oscillating Rb polarization, the Rb and Xe spins precess transverse to the longitudinal bias field. This configuration is predicted to be insensitive to first order quadrupole interactions and alkali spin-exchange frequency shifts. A key feature that allows co-precession of the Rb and Xe spins, despite a ~ 1000 fold ratio of their gyromagnetic ratios, is to apply the bias field in the form of a sequence of Rb 2 π pulses whose repetition frequency is equal to the Rb Larmor frequency. The 2 π pulses result in an effective Rb magnetic moment of zero, while the Xe precession depends only on the time average of the pulsed field amplitude. Polarization modulation of the pumping light at the Xe NMR frequency allows co-precession of the Rb and Xe spins. We will present our preliminary experimental studies of this new approach to NMR of spin-exchange pumped Xe. Support by the NSF and Northrop Grumman Co.

  7. Dimensional analysis of aqueous magnetic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Răcuciu, M.; Creangă, D. E.; Suliţanu, N.; Bădescu, V.

    2007-11-01

    A comparison of the synthesis and characterization of three aqueous magnetic fluids intended for biomedical applications is presented. Stable colloidal suspensions of iron oxide nanoparticles were prepared by a co-precipitation method with the magnetite cores being coated with β-cyclodextrin, tetramethylammonium hydroxide and citric acid. Rheological properties of the fluids were investigated, i.e. viscosity (capillary method) and surface tension (stalagmometric method) in correlation with their density (picnometric method). The dimensional distributions of the ferrophase particles physical diameter of these three magnetic fluids - revealed on the basis of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) data - as well as the diameter distributions of some other magnetic fluids presented in the literature, were comparatively analyzed using the box-plot statistical method. In order to extract complementary data on the magnetic diameter of an iron oxide core, magnetization measurements as well as X-ray diffraction pattern analysis were carried out. Interpretation of all the measurement data was accomplished by assessing the suitability of the three magnetic fluid samples from the viewpoint of their stability and biocompatibility.

  8. Selective One-Dimensional Total Correlation Spectroscopy Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Experiments for a Rapid Identification of Minor Components in the Lipid Fraction of Milk and Dairy Products: Toward Spin Chromatography?

    PubMed

    Papaemmanouil, Christina; Tsiafoulis, Constantinos G; Alivertis, Dimitrios; Tzamaloukas, Ouranios; Miltiadou, Despoina; Tzakos, Andreas G; Gerothanassis, Ioannis P

    2015-06-10

    We report a rapid, direct, and unequivocal spin-chromatographic separation and identification of minor components in the lipid fraction of milk and common dairy products with the use of selective one-dimensional (1D) total correlation spectroscopy (TOCSY) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments. The method allows for the complete backbone spin-coupling network to be elucidated even in strongly overlapped regions and in the presence of major components from 4 × 10(2) to 3 × 10(3) stronger NMR signal intensities. The proposed spin-chromatography method does not require any derivatization steps for the lipid fraction, is selective with excellent resolution, is sensitive with quantitation capability, and compares favorably to two-dimensional (2D) TOCSY and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) methods of analysis. The results of the present study demonstrated that the 1D TOCSY NMR spin-chromatography method can become a procedure of primary interest in food analysis and generally in complex mixture analysis.

  9. Combining Two-Dimensional Diffusion-Ordered Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, Imaging Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry, and Direct Analysis in Real-Time Mass Spectrometry for the Integral Investigation of Counterfeit Pharmaceuticals

    PubMed Central

    Nyadong, Leonard; Harris, Glenn A.; Balayssac, Stéphane; Galhena, Asiri S.; Malet-Martino, Myriam; Martino, Robert; Parry, R. Mitchell; Wang, May Dongmei; Fernández, Facundo M.; Gilard, Véronique

    2016-01-01

    During the past decade, there has been a marked increase in the number of reported cases involving counterfeit medicines in developing and developed countries. Particularly, artesunate-based antimalarial drugs have been targeted, because of their high demand and cost. Counterfeit antimalarials can cause death and can contribute to the growing problem of drug resistance, particularly in southeast Asia. In this study, the complementarity of two-dimensional diffusion-ordered 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (2D DOSY 1H NMR) with direct analysis in real-time mass spectrometry (DART MS) and desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI MS) was assessed for pharmaceutical forensic purposes. Fourteen different artesunate tablets, representative of what can be purchased from informal sources in southeast Asia, were investigated with these techniques. The expected active pharmaceutical ingredient was detected in only five formulations via both nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and mass spectrometry (MS) methods. Common organic excipients such as sucrose, lactose, stearate, dextrin, and starch were also detected. The graphical representation of DOSY 1H NMR results proved very useful for establishing similarities among groups of samples, enabling counterfeit drug “chemotyping”. In addition to bulk- and surface-average analyses, spatially resolved information on the surface composition of counterfeit and genuine antimalarial formulations was obtained using DESI MS that was performed in the imaging mode, which enabled one to visualize the homogeneity of both genuine and counterfeit drug samples. Overall, this study suggests that 2D DOSY 1H NMR, combined with ambient MS, comprises a powerful suite of instrumental analysis methodologies for the integral characterization of counterfeit antimalarials. PMID:19453162

  10. Low Dimensionality Effects in Complex Magnetic Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, Paula J. Lampen

    Complex magnetic oxides represent a unique intersection of immense technological importance and fascinating physical phenomena originating from interwoven structural, electronic and magnetic degrees of freedom. The resulting energetically close competing orders can be controllably selected through external fields. Competing interactions and disorder represent an additional opportunity to systematically manipulate the properties of pure magnetic systems, leading to frustration, glassiness, and other novel phenomena while finite sample dimension plays a similar role in systems with long-range cooperative effects or large correlation lengths. A rigorous understanding of these effects in strongly correlated oxides is key to manipulating their functionality and device performance, but remains a challenging task. In this dissertation, we examine a number of problems related to intrinsic and extrinsic low dimensionality, disorder, and competing interactions in magnetic oxides by applying a unique combination of standard magnetometry techniques and unconventional magnetocaloric effect and transverse susceptibility measurements. The influence of dimensionality and disorder on the nature and critical properties of phase transitions in manganites is illustrated in La0.7 Ca0.3MnO3, in which both size reduction to the nanoscale and chemically-controlled quenched disorder are observed to induce a progressive weakening of the first-order nature of the transition, despite acting through the distinct mechanisms of surface effects and site dilution. In the second-order material La0.8Ca0.2MnO3, a strong magnetic field is found to drive the system toward its tricritical point as competition between exchange interactions in the inhomogeneous ground state is suppressed. In the presence of large phase separation stabilized by chemical disorder and long-range strain, dimensionality has a profound effect. With the systematic reduction of particle size in microscale-phase-separated (La, Pr

  11. Two-dimensional magnetization exchange spectroscopy of Anabaena 7120 ferredoxin. Nuclear Overhauser effect and electron self-exchange cross peaks from amino acid residues surrounding the Fe-2S* cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Skjeldal, L.; Westler, W.M.; Oh, Byungha; Krezel, A.M.; Markley, J.L.; Holden, H.M.; Jacobson, B.L.; Rayment, I. Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison )

    1991-07-30

    Hyperfine {sup 1}H NMR signals of the 2 Fe-2S* vegetative ferredoxin from Anabaena 7,120 have been studied by two-dimensional (2D) magnetization exchange spectroscopy. The rapid longitudinal relaxation rates of these signals required the use of very short nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) mixing times (0.5-20 ms). The resulting pattern of NOE cross-relaxation peaks when combined with previous 1D NOE results led to elucidation of the carbon-bound proton spin systems from each of the four cysteines ligated to the 2Fe-2S* cluster in the reduced ferredoxin. Additional NOE cross peaks were observed that provide information about other amino acid residues that interact with the iron-sulfur cluster. NOE cross peaks were assigned tentatively to Leu{sup 27}, Arg{sup 42}, and Ala{sup 43} on the basis of the X-ray coordinates of oxidized Anabaena 7,120 ferredoxin. Three chemical exchange cross peaks were detected in magnetization exchange spectra of half-reduced ferredoxin and assigned to the {sup 1}H{sup {alpha}} protons of Cys{sup 49} and Cys{sup 79} (both of whose sulfur atoms are ligated to Fe(III)) and Arg{sup 42} (whose amide nitrogen is hydrogen-bonded to one of the inorganic sulfurs of the 2Fe-2S* cluster). The chemical exchange cross peaks provide a means of extending assignments in the spectrum of reduced ferredoxin to assignments in the spectrum of the oxidized protein. The results suggest that 2D magnetization exchange spectroscopy employing short mixing times will be useful for the assignment and characterization of hyperfine {sup 1}H peaks in a variety of paramagnetic proteins.

  12. An improved nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elleman, D. D.; Manatt, S. L.

    1967-01-01

    Cylindrical sample container provides a high degree of nuclear stabilization to a nuclear magnetic resonance /nmr/ spectrometer. It is placed coaxially about the nmr insert and contains reference sample that gives a signal suitable for locking the field and frequency of an nmr spectrometer with a simple audio modulation system.

  13. Determination of the three-dimensional solution structure of the antihypertensive and antiviral protein BDS-I from the sea anemone Anemonia sulcata: A study using nuclear magnetic resonance and hybrid distance geometry-dynamical simulated annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Driscoll, P.C.; Gronenborn, A.M.; Beress, L.; Clore, G.M. )

    1989-03-07

    The three-dimensional solution structure of the antihypertensive and antiviral protein BDS-I from the sea anemone Anemonia sulcata has been determined on the basis of 489 interproton and 24 hydrogen-bonding distance restraints supplemented by 23 {phi} backbone and 21 {sub {chi}1} side-chain torsion angle restraints derived from nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements. A total of 42 structures is calculated by a hybrid metric matrix distance geometry-dynamical simulated annealing approach. Both the backbone and side-chain atom positions are well defined. The average atomic rms difference between the 42 individual SA structures and the mean structure obtained by averaging their coordinates is 0.67 {plus minus} 0.12 {angstrom} for the backbone atoms and 0.90 {plus minus} 0.17 {angstrom} for all atoms. The core of the protein is formed by a triple-stranded antiparallel {beta}-sheet composed of residues 14-16 (strand 1), 30-34 (strand 2), and 37-41 (strand 3) with an additional mini-antiparallel {beta}-sheet at the N-terminus (residues 6-9). The first and second strands of the triple-stranded antiparallel {beta}-sheet are connected by a long exposed loop. A number of side-chain interactions are discussed in light of the structure.

  14. New structural information on a humic acid from two-dimensional 1H-13C correlation solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Mao, J D; Xing, B; Schmidt-Rohr, K

    2001-05-15

    New information on the chemical structure of a peat humic acid has been obtained using a series of two-dimensional 1H-13C heteronuclear correlation solid-state NMR (HETCOR) experiments with different contact times and with spectral editing by dipolar dephasing and 13C transverse relaxation filtering. Carbon-bonded methyl groups (C-CH3) are found to be near both aliphatic and O-alkyl but not aromatic groups. The spectra prove that most OCH3 groups are connected directly with the aromatic rings, as is typical in lignin. As a result, about one-third of the aromatic C-O groups is not phenolic C-OH but C-OCH3. Both protonated and unprotonated anomeric O-C-O carbons are identified in the one- and two-dimensional spectra. COO groups are found predominantly in OCHn-COO environments, but some are also bonded to aromatic rings and aliphatic groups. All models of humic acids in the literature lack at least some of the features observed here. Compositional heterogeneity was studied by introducing 1H spin diffusion into the HETCOR experiment. Comparison with data for a synthetic polymer, polycarbonate, indicates that the separation between O-alkyl and aromatic groups in the humic acid is less than 1.5 nm. However, transverse 13C relaxation filtering under 1H decoupling reveals heterogeneity on a nanometer scale, with the slow-relaxing component being rich in lignin-like aromatic-C-O-CH3 moieties and poor in COO groups.

  15. Solution structure of a DNA octamer containing the Pribnow box via restrained molecular dynamics simulation with distance and torsion angle constraints derived from two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectral fitting.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, U; Sethson, I; Egan, W M; James, T L

    1992-09-20

    The DNA octamer [d(GTATAATG].[(CATATTAC)], containing the prokaryotic upstream consensus recognition sequence, has been examined via proton homonuclear two-dimensional nuclear Overhauser effect (2D NOE) and double-quantum-filtered correlation (2QF-COSY) spectra. All proton resonances, except those of H5' and H5" protons, were assigned. A temperature dependence study of one-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra, rotating frame 2D NOE spectroscopy (ROESY), and T1 rho measurements revealed an exchange process that apparently is global in scope. Work at lower temperatures enabled a determination of structural constraints that could be employed in determination of a time-averaged structure. Simulations of the 2QF-COSY cross-peaks were compared with experimental data, establishing scalar coupling constant ranges of the individual sugar ring protons and hence pucker parameters for individual deoxyribose rings. The rings exhibit a dynamic equilibrium of N and S-type conformers with 80 to 100% populations of the latter. A program for iterative complete relaxation matrix analysis of 2D NOE spectral intensities, MARDIGRAS, was employed to give interproton distances for each mixing time. According to the accuracy of the distance determination, upper and lower distance bounds were chosen. The distance bounds define the size of a flat-well potential function term, incorporated into the AMBER force-field, which was employed for restrained molecular dynamics calculations. Torsion angle constraints in the form of a flat-well potential were also constructed from the analysis of the sugar pucker data. Several restrained molecular dynamics runs of 25 picoseconds were performed, utilizing 184 experimental distance constraints and 80 torsion angle constraints; three different starting structures were used: energy minimized A-DNA, B-DNA, and wrinkled D-DNA, another member of the B-DNA family. Convergence to similar structures obtained with root-mean-square deviations

  16. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging with 90-nm resolution.

    PubMed

    Mamin, H J; Poggio, M; Degen, C L; Rugar, D

    2007-05-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a powerful imaging technique that typically operates on the scale of millimetres to micrometres. Conventional MRI is based on the manipulation of nuclear spins with radio-frequency fields, and the subsequent detection of spins with induction-based techniques. An alternative approach, magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM), uses force detection to overcome the sensitivity limitations of conventional MRI. Here, we show that the two-dimensional imaging of nuclear spins can be extended to a spatial resolution better than 100 nm using MRFM. The imaging of 19F nuclei in a patterned CaF(2) test object was enabled by a detection sensitivity of roughly 1,200 nuclear spins at a temperature of 600 mK. To achieve this sensitivity, we developed high-moment magnetic tips that produced field gradients up to 1.4 x 10(6) T m(-1), and implemented a measurement protocol based on force-gradient detection of naturally occurring spin fluctuations. The resulting detection volume was less than 650 zeptolitres. This is 60,000 times smaller than the previous smallest volume for nuclear magnetic resonance microscopy, and demonstrates the feasibility of pushing MRI into the nanoscale regime.

  17. Nuclear magnetic resonance contrast agents

    DOEpatents

    Smith, P.H.; Brainard, J.R.; Jarvinen, G.D.; Ryan, R.R.

    1997-12-30

    A family of contrast agents for use in magnetic resonance imaging and a method of enhancing the contrast of magnetic resonance images of an object by incorporating a contrast agent of this invention into the object prior to forming the images or during formation of the images. A contrast agent of this invention is a paramagnetic lanthanide hexaazamacrocyclic molecule, where a basic example has the formula LnC{sub 16}H{sub 14}N{sub 6}. Important applications of the invention are in medical diagnosis, treatment, and research, where images of portions of a human body are formed by means of magnetic resonance techniques. 10 figs.

  18. Nuclear magnetic resonance contrast agents

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Paul H.; Brainard, James R.; Jarvinen, Gordon D.; Ryan, Robert R.

    1997-01-01

    A family of contrast agents for use in magnetic resonance imaging and a method of enhancing the contrast of magnetic resonance images of an object by incorporating a contrast agent of this invention into the object prior to forming the images or during formation of the images. A contrast agent of this invention is a paramagnetic lanthanide hexaazamacrocyclic molecule, where a basic example has the formula LnC.sub.16 H.sub.14 N.sub.6. Important applications of the invention are in medical diagnosis, treatment, and research, where images of portions of a human body are formed by means of magnetic resonance techniques.

  19. Nuclear magnetic moment of sup 106 Rh

    SciTech Connect

    Ohya, S.; Ashworth, C.J.; Nawaz, Z.; Stone, N.J.; Back, P.J. )

    1990-01-01

    Nuclear orientation and nuclear magnetic resonance measurements have been performed for {sup 106}Rh oriented at low temperature in iron and nickel hosts. From the results of the temperature dependence measurements of nuclear orientation, the magnetic moment of {sup 106}Rh was deduced as {vert bar}{mu}({sup 106}Rh,1{sup +}){vert bar}=2.52(5){mu}{sub {ital N}}, which is very different from the value of 3.07(9) {mu}{sub {ital N}} reported previously. From the nuclear magnetic resonance on oriented nuclei measurements of {sup 106}Rh{ital Ni}, the magnetic hyperfine splitting frequency {vert bar}{ital g}{mu}{sub {ital N}}B{sub HF}/h{vert bar} was determined to be 441.5(7) MHz. Using the hyperfine field {ital B}{sub HF} (Rh{ital Ni}) of {minus}22.49(5) T, the precise value of the magnetic moment of {sup 106}Rh was deduced: {vert bar}{mu}({sup 106}Rh,1{sup +}){vert bar} =2.575(7) {mu}{sub {ital N}}. The electric quadrupole interaction has been measured using modulated adiabatic passage on oriented nuclei in a nickel single-crystal host. A broad distribution of the quadrupole splitting {Delta}{nu}{sub {ital Q}} is found, extending from 0 to 300 kHz.

  20. Nuclear magnetic resonance in Kondo lattice systems.

    PubMed

    Curro, Nicholas J

    2016-06-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance has emerged as a vital tool to explore the fundamental physics of Kondo lattice systems. Because nuclear spins experience two different hyperfine couplings to the itinerant conduction electrons and to the local f moments, the Knight shift can probe multiple types of spin correlations that are not accessible via other techniques. The Knight shift provides direct information about the onset of heavy electron coherence and the emergence of the heavy electron fluid.

  1. Photographic observation of magnetic domain structure with three-dimensional local magnetization direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meguro, Sakae; Akahane, Koichi; Saito, Shin

    2016-07-01

    The direction of magnetization of a magnetic material is possibly oriented three-dimensionally because of the presence of magnetic anisotropy field, self-demagnetizing field, and stray field. Therefore, the three-dimensional detection of the direction of magnetization is required. The method of magnetic domain observation by photographic imaging utilizing the Kerr effect is widely used. If the perpendicular magnetization components exist, there is a problem that obliquely incident light has superimposed longitudinal Kerr and polar Kerr effects. To perform the three-dimensional detection of magnetization direction, it is necessary to eliminate the influence of the polar Kerr effect from the Kerr effect of obliquely incident light. We report the photographic observation of the magnetic domain structure and the detection of the three-dimensional local magnetization direction using the Kerr effect, applying only an in-plane saturation magnetic field.

  2. Modeling complexly magnetized two-dimensional bodies of arbitrary shape

    SciTech Connect

    Mariano, J.; Hinze, W.J. . Dept. of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences)

    1993-05-01

    A method has been devised for the forward computation of magnetic anomalies due to two-dimensional (2-D) polygonal bodies with heterogeneously directed magnetization. The calculations are based on the equivalent line source approach wherein the source is subdivided into discrete elements that vary spatially in their magnetic properties. This equivalent dipole line method provides a fast and convenient means of representing and computing magnetic anomalies for bodies possessing complexly varying magnitude and direction of magnetization. The algorithm has been tested and applied to several generalized cases to verify the accuracy of the computation. The technique has also been used to model observed aeromagnetic anomalies associated with the structurally deformed, remanently magnetized Keweenawan volcanic rocks in eastern Lake Superior. This method is also easily adapted to the calculation of anomalies due to two and one-half-dimensional (2.5-D) and three-dimensional (3-D) heterogeneously magnetized sources.

  3. Confinement and Diffusion Effects in Dynamical Nuclear Polarization in Low Dimensional Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henriksen, Dan; Tifrea, Ionel

    2012-02-01

    We investigate the dynamic nuclear polarization as it results from the hyperfine coupling between nonequilibrium electronic spins and nuclear spins in semiconductor nanostructures. The natural confinement provided by low dimensional nanostructures is responsible for an efficient nuclear spin - electron spin hyperfine coupling [1] and for a reduced value of the nuclear spin diffusion constant [2]. In the case of optical pumping, the induced nuclear spin polarization is position dependent even in the presence of nuclear spin diffusion. This effect should be measurable via optically induced nuclear magnetic resonance or time-resolved Faraday rotation experiments. We discuss the implications of our calculations for the case of GaAs quantum well structures.[4pt] [1] I. Tifrea and M. E. Flatt'e, Phys. Rev. B 84, 155319 (2011).[0pt] [2] A. Malinowski and R. T. Harley, Solid State Commun. 114, 419 (2000).

  4. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Technology for Medical Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Budinger, Thomas F.; Lauterbur, Paul C.

    1984-01-01

    Reports on the status of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) from theoretical and clinical perspectives, reviewing NMR theory and relaxation parameters relevant to NMR imaging. Also reviews literature related to modern imaging strategies, signal-to-noise ratio, contrast agents, in vivo spectroscopy, spectroscopic imaging, clinical applications, and…

  5. Sample spinner for nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Stejskal, E.O.

    1984-05-01

    A sample spinner for a nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer having improved operating characteristics is described comprising a rotor supported at both ends by support gas bearings and positioned by a thrust gas bearing. Improved support gas bearings are also described which result in a spinner exhibiting long-term stable operation characteristics.

  6. Phosphonate Based High Nuclearity Magnetic Cages.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, Javeed Ahmad; Jena, Himanshu Sekhar; Clearfield, Abraham; Konar, Sanjit

    2016-06-21

    Transition metal based high nuclearity molecular magnetic cages are a very important class of compounds owing to their potential applications in fabricating new generation molecular magnets such as single molecular magnets, magnetic refrigerants, etc. Most of the reported polynuclear cages contain carboxylates or alkoxides as ligands. However, the binding ability of phosphonates with transition metal ions is stronger than the carboxylates or alkoxides. The presence of three oxygen donor sites enables phosphonates to bridge up to nine metal centers simultaneously. But very few phosphonate based transition metal cages were reported in the literature until recently, mainly because of synthetic difficulties, propensity to result in layered compounds, and also their poor crystalline properties. Accordingly, various synthetic strategies have been followed by several groups in order to overcome such synthetic difficulties. These strategies mainly include use of small preformed metal precursors, proper choice of coligands along with the phosphonate ligands, and use of sterically hindered bulky phosphonate ligands. Currently, the phosphonate system offers a library of high nuclearity transition metal and mixed metal (3d-4f) cages with aesthetically pleasing structures and interesting magnetic properties. This Account is in the form of a research landscape on our efforts to synthesize and characterize new types of phosphonate based high nuclearity paramagnetic transition metal cages. We quite often experienced synthetic difficulties with such versatile systems in assembling high nuclearity metal cages. Few methods have been emphasized for the self-assembly of phosphonate systems with suitable transition metal ions in achieving high nuclearity. We highlighted our journey from 2005 until today for phosphonate based high nuclearity transition metal cages with V(IV/V), Mn(II/III), Fe(III), Co(II), Ni(II), and Cu(II) metal ions and their magnetic properties. We observed that

  7. Three-dimensional mapping of single-atom magnetic anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Yan, Shichao; Choi, Deung-Jang; Burgess, Jacob A J; Rolf-Pissarczyk, Steffen; Loth, Sebastian

    2015-03-11

    Magnetic anisotropy plays a key role in the magnetic stability and spin-related quantum phenomena of surface adatoms. It manifests as angular variations of the atom's magnetic properties. We measure the spin excitations of individual Fe atoms on a copper nitride surface with inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy. Using a three-axis vector magnet we rotate the magnetic field and map out the resulting variations of the spin excitations. We quantitatively determine the three-dimensional distribution of the magnetic anisotropy of single Fe atoms by fitting the spin excitation spectra with a spin Hamiltonian. This experiment demonstrates the feasibility of fully mapping the vector magnetic properties of individual spins and characterizing complex three-dimensional magnetic systems.

  8. Nuclear magnetic resonance in magnets with a helicoidal magnetic structure in an external magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tankeyev, A. P.; Borich, M. A.; Smagin, V. V.

    2014-11-01

    In this review, the static and dynamic properties of a magnet with a helicoidal magnetic structure placed in an external magnetic field are discussed. The results of the investigation of its ground state and spectra, as well as the amplitudes of the spin excitations are presented. The temperature and field dependences of the basic thermodynamic characteristics (heat capacity, magnetization, and magnetic susceptibility) have been calculated in the spin-wave approximation. The results of calculating the local and integral dynamic magnetic susceptibility are given. This set of data represents a methodical basis for constructing a consistent (in the framework of unified approximations) picture of the NMR absorption in the magnet under consideration. Both local NMR characteristics (resonance frequency, line broadening, enhancement coefficient) and integral characteristics (resultant shape of the absorption line with its specific features) have been calculated. The effective Hamiltonian of the Suhl-Nakamura interaction of nuclear spins through spin waves has been constructed. The second moment and the local broadening of the line of the NMR absorption caused by this interaction have been calculated. The role of the basic local inhomogeneities in the formation of the integral line of the NMR absorption has been analyzed. The opportunities for the experimental NMR investigations in magnets with a chiral spin structure are discussed.

  9. Reduced dimensionality and magnetic frustration in KCr3As3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Chao; Jiang, Hao; Feng, Xiao-Yong; Dai, Jianhui

    2015-12-01

    We study the electronic and magnetic structures of the newly discovered compound KCr3As3 . The nonmagnetic state has five Fermi surface sheets involving three quasi-one-dimensional and two three-dimensional energy bands. However, the ground state is magnetic, exhibiting an interlayer antiferromagnetic order where the basic block-spin state of a unit Cr triangle retains a high spin magnitude. Moreover, the magnetic Fermi surface involves three one-dimensional sheets only, manifesting the reduced dimensionality. By fitting a twisted spin tube model, the magnetic frustrations are found to be relaxed, leading to gapless spin excitations. A frustration-induced transition to the disordered low block-spin state is expected upon increasing the intralayer exchange interaction.

  10. Three-dimensional magnetic recording using ferromagnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suto, Hirofumi; Kudo, Kiwamu; Nagasawa, Tazumi; Kanao, Taro; Mizushima, Koichi; Sato, Rie

    2016-07-01

    To meet the ever-increasing demand for data storage, future magnetic recording devices will need to be made three-dimensional by implementing multilayer recording. In this article, we present methods of detecting and manipulating the magnetization direction of a specific layer selectively in a vertically stacked multilayer magnetic system, which enable layer-selective read and write operations in three-dimensional magnetic recording devices. The principle behind the methods is ferromagnetic resonance excitation in a microwave magnetic field. By designing each magnetic recording layer to have a different ferromagnetic resonance frequency, magnetization excitation can be induced individually in each layer by tuning the frequency of an applied microwave magnetic field, and this selective magnetization excitation can be utilized for the layer-selective operations. Regarding media for three-dimensional recording, when layers of a perpendicular magnetic material are vertically stacked, dipolar interaction between multiple recording layers arises and is expected to cause problems, such as degradation of thermal stability and switching field distribution. To solve these problems, we propose the use of an antiferromagnetically coupled structure consisting of hard and soft magnetic layers. Because the stray fields from these two layers cancel each other, antiferromagnetically coupled media can reduce the dipolar interaction.

  11. Magnetic nuclear core restraint and control

    DOEpatents

    Cooper, Martin H.

    1978-01-01

    A lateral restraint and control system for a nuclear reactor core adaptable to provide an inherent decrease of core reactivity in response to abnormally high reactor coolant fluid temperatures. An electromagnet is associated with structure for radially compressing the core during normal reactor conditions. A portion of the structures forming a magnetic circuit are composed of ferromagnetic material having a curie temperature corresponding to a selected coolant fluid temperature. Upon a selected signal, or inherently upon a preselected rise in coolant temperature, the magnetic force is decreased a given amount sufficient to relieve the compression force so as to allow core radial expansion. The expanded core configuration provides a decreased reactivity, tending to shut down the nuclear reaction.

  12. Magnetic nuclear core restraint and control

    DOEpatents

    Cooper, Martin H.

    1979-01-01

    A lateral restraint and control system for a nuclear reactor core adaptable to provide an inherent decrease of core reactivity in response to abnormally high reactor coolant fluid temperatures. An electromagnet is associated with structure for radially compressing the core during normal reactor conditions. A portion of the structures forming a magnetic circuit are composed of ferromagnetic material having a curie temperature corresponding to a selected coolant fluid temperature. Upon a selected signal, or inherently upon a preselected rise in coolant temperature, the magnetic force is decreased a given amount sufficient to relieve the compression force so as to allow core radial expansion. The expanded core configuration provides a decreased reactivity, tending to shut down the nuclear reaction.

  13. Three-dimensional tissue culture based on magnetic cell levitation.

    PubMed

    Souza, Glauco R; Molina, Jennifer R; Raphael, Robert M; Ozawa, Michael G; Stark, Daniel J; Levin, Carly S; Bronk, Lawrence F; Ananta, Jeyarama S; Mandelin, Jami; Georgescu, Maria-Magdalena; Bankson, James A; Gelovani, Juri G; Killian, T C; Arap, Wadih; Pasqualini, Renata

    2010-04-01

    Cell culture is an essential tool in drug discovery, tissue engineering and stem cell research. Conventional tissue culture produces two-dimensional cell growth with gene expression, signalling and morphology that can be different from those found in vivo, and this compromises its clinical relevance. Here, we report a three-dimensional tissue culture based on magnetic levitation of cells in the presence of a hydrogel consisting of gold, magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles and filamentous bacteriophage. By spatially controlling the magnetic field, the geometry of the cell mass can be manipulated, and multicellular clustering of different cell types in co-culture can be achieved. Magnetically levitated human glioblastoma cells showed similar protein expression profiles to those observed in human tumour xenografts. Taken together, these results indicate that levitated three-dimensional culture with magnetized phage-based hydrogels more closely recapitulates in vivo protein expression and may be more feasible for long-term multicellular studies. PMID:20228788

  14. Nuclear magnetic moments and related sum rules

    SciTech Connect

    Bentz, Wolfgang; Arima, Akito

    2011-05-06

    We first review the history and our present understanding of nuclear magnetic moments and Gamow-Teller transitions, with emphasis on the roles of configuration mixing and meson exchange currents. Then we discuss the renormalization of the orbital g-factor in nuclei, and its relation to the E1 sum rule for photoabsorption and the M1 sum rule for the scissors mode of deformed nuclei.

  15. Nuclear magnetic resonance quantum information processing

    PubMed Central

    Serra, R. M.; Oliveira, I. S.

    2012-01-01

    For the past decade, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has been established as a main experimental technique for testing quantum protocols in small systems. This Theme Issue presents recent advances and major challenges of NMR quantum information possessing (QIP), including contributions by researchers from 10 different countries. In this introduction, after a short comment on NMR-QIP basics, we briefly anticipate the contents of this issue. PMID:22946031

  16. Magnetic-field cycling instrumentation for dynamic nuclear polarization-nuclear magnetic resonance using photoexcited triplets.

    PubMed

    Kagawa, Akinori; Negoro, Makoto; Takeda, Kazuyuki; Kitagawa, Masahiro

    2009-04-01

    To advance static solid-state NMR with hyperpolarized nuclear spins, a system has been developed enabling dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) using electron spins in the photoexcited triplet state with X-band microwave apparatus, followed by static solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments using the polarized nuclear-spin system with a goniometer. In order to perform the DNP and NMR procedures in different magnetic fields, the DNP system and the NMR system are spatially separated, between which the sample can be shuttled while its orientation is controlled in a reproducible fashion. We demonstrate that the system developed in this work is operational for solid-state NMR with hyperpolarized nuclear-spin systems in static organic materials, and also discuss the application of our system.

  17. Secondary instability in three-dimensional magnetic reconnection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahlburg, R. B.; Antiochos, S. K.; Zang, T. A.

    1992-01-01

    We consider the transition to turbulence in three-dimensional reconnection of a magnetic neutral sheet. We find that the transition can occur via a three-step process. First, the sheet undergoes the usual tearing instability. Second, the tearing mode saturates to form a two-dimensional quasi-steady state. Third, this secondary equilibrium is itself unstable when it is perturbed by three-dimensional disturbances. Most of this paper is devoted to the analysis and simulation of the three-dimensional linear stability properties of the two-dimensional saturated tearing layer. The numerical simulations are performed with a semi-implicit, pseudospectral-Fourier collocation algorithm. We identify a three-dimensional secondary linear stability which grows on the ideal timescale. An examination of the modal energetics reveals that the largest energy transfer is from the mean field to the three-dimensional field, with the two-dimensional field acting as a catalyst.

  18. Nuclear magnetic resonance properties of lunar samples.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kline, D.; Weeks, R. A.

    1972-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of Na-23, Al-27, and P-31 in fines samples 10084,60 and 14163,168 and in crystalline rock samples 12021,55 and 14321,166, have been recorded over a range of frequencies up to 20 MHz. A shift in the field at which maximum absorption occurs for all of the spectra relative to the field at which maximum absorption occurs for terrestrial analogues is attributed to a sample-dependent magnetic field at the Na, Al, and P sites opposing the laboratory field. The magnitude of these fields internal to the samples is sample dependent and varies from 5 to 10 G. These fields do not correlate with the iron content of the samples. However, the presence of single-domain particles of iron distributed throughout the plagioclase fraction that contains the principal fraction of Na and Al is inferred from electron magnetic resonance spectra shapes.

  19. Stray-field nuclear magnetic resonance imaging in microgravity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrido, Leoncio; Sampayo, José

    2008-03-01

    Magnetic levitation has been proposed as an alternative approach to simulate on Earth microgravity conditions encountered in space, allowing the investigation of weightlessness on materials and biological systems. In general, very strong magnetic fields, 15T or higher, are required to achieve levitation for a majority of diamagnetic substances. Here, we show that it is possible to achieve levitation of these substances in a commercial superconductive magnet operating with a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometer at 9.4T at ambient conditions. Furthermore, stray-field proton NMR imaging is performed in situ at the location where a sample is levitating, showing that it is feasible to obtain the corresponding one-dimensional profile. Considering that water is a diamagnetic substance and the main constituent of living systems, the outlined approach could be useful to investigate alterations in water proton NMR properties induced by low gravity and magnetic forces upon levitating, e.g., seeds, cells, etc. In addition to protons, it would also be possible to observe other nuclei (e.g., F19, P31, etc.) that may be of interest in metabolic and therapeutic investigations.

  20. Three dimensional magnetic resonance imaging by magnetic resonance force microscopy with a sharp magnetic needle.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, S; Yoshinari, Y; Park, H S; Shindo, D

    2006-02-01

    An electropolished magnetic needle made of Nd(2)Fe(14)B permanent magnet was used for obtaining better spatial resolution than that achieved in our previous work. We observed the magnetic field gradient |G(Z)|=80.0G/microm and the field strength B=1250G at Z approximately 8.8 microm from the top of the needle. The use of this needle for three dimensional magnetic resonance force microscopy at room temperature allowed us to achieve the voxel resolution to be 0.6 microm x 0.6 microm x 0.7 microm in the reconstructed image of DPPH phantom. The acquisition time spent for the whole data collection over 64 x 64 x 16 points, including an iterative signal average by six times per point, was about 10 days.

  1. Three-dimensional modelling in magnetotelluric and magnetic variational sounding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, I. K.; Phillips, R. J.; Rankin, D.

    1977-01-01

    The Galerkin finite-element method is used to obtain approximate solutions for the three-dimensional induction problem. A rectangular conductive prism is considered as an example, and solutions are obtained for linear and circularly polarized incident plane-wave fields. Magnetotelluric tensor impedances and magnetic transfer functions are computed. Polar diagrams of the tensor impedances and magnetic transfer functions along with their amplitude contour maps are presented. The dimensionality parameter, skew, is contoured at the surface of the earth. It is shown that the relative amplitudes and shapes of the additional and principal impedance polar diagrams can be used to determine the dimensionality of geoelectrical structures. Stations with skew values greater than 0.2 are significantly influenced by the three-dimensionality of the geoelectric structure. The amplitudes of the magnetic transfer function and the orientations of its polar diagrams exhibit large anomalies in the vicinity of the intersection of the lateral contacts.

  2. Three Dimensional Probability Distributions of the Interplanetary Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podesta, J. J.

    2014-12-01

    Empirical probability density functions (PDFs) of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) have been derived from spacecraft data since the early years of the space age. A survey of the literature shows that past studies have investigated the separate Cartesian components of the magnetic field, the vector magnitude, and the direction of the IMF by means of one-dimensional or two-dimensional PDFs. But, to my knowledge, there exist no studies which investigate the three dimensional nature of the IMF by means of three dimensional PDFs, either in (Bx,By,Bz)(B_x,B_y,B_z)-coordinates or (BR,BT,BN)(B_R,B_T,B_N)-coordinates or some other appropriate system of coordinates. Likewise, there exist no studies which investigate three dimensional PDFs of magnetic field fluctuations, that is, vector differences bmB(t+τ)-bmB(t)bm{B}(t+tau)-bm{B}(t). In this talk, I shall present examples of three dimensional PDFs obtained from spacecraft data that demonstrate the solar wind magnetic field possesses a very interesting spatial structure that, to my knowledge, has not previously been identified. Perhaps because of the well known model of Barnes (1981) in which the magnitude of the IMF remains constant, it may be commonly believed that there is nothing new to learn from a full three dimensional PDF. To the contrary, there is much to learn from the investigation of three dimensional PDFs of the solar wind plasma velocity and the magnetic field, as well as three dimensional PDFs of their fluctuations. Knowledge of these PDFs will not only improve understanding of solar wind physics, it is an essential prerequisite for the construction of realistic models of the stochastic time series measured by a single spacecraft, one of the longstanding goals of space physics research. In addition, three dimensional PDFs contain valuable information about the anisotropy of solar wind fluctuations in three dimensional physical space, information that may help identify the reason why the three

  3. DIMENSIONALLY STABLE, CORROSION RESISTANT NUCLEAR FUEL

    DOEpatents

    Kittel, J.H.

    1963-10-31

    A method of making a uranium alloy of improved corrosion resistance and dimensional stability is described. The alloy contains from 0-9 weight per cent of an additive of zirconium and niobium in the proportions by weight of 5 to 1 1/ 2. The alloy is cold rolled, heated to two different temperatures, air-cooled, heated to a third temperature, and quenched in water. (AEC)

  4. Simple and Inexpensive Classroom Demonstrations of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Joel A.; Nordell, Karen J.; Chesnik, Marla A.; Landis, Clark R.; Ellis, Arthur B.; Rzchowski, M. S.; Condren, S. Michael; Lisensky, George C.

    2000-01-01

    Describes a set of simple, inexpensive, classical demonstrations of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) principles that illustrate the resonance condition associated with magnetic dipoles and the dependence of the resonance frequency on environment. (WRM)

  5. Three-dimensional Tissue Culture Based on Magnetic Cell Levitation

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Glauco R.; Molina, Jennifer R.; Raphael, Robert M.; Ozawa, Michael G.; Stark, Daniel J.; Levin, Carly S.; Bronk, Lawrence F.; Ananta, Jeyarama S.; Mandelin, Jami; Georgescu, Maria-Magdalena; Bankson, James A.; Gelovani, Juri G.

    2015-01-01

    Cell culture is an essential tool for drug discovery, tissue engineering, and stem cell research. Conventional tissue culture produces two-dimensional (2D) cell growth with gene expression, signaling, and morphology that can differ from those in vivo and thus compromise clinical relevancy1–5. Here we report a three-dimensional (3D) culture of cells based on magnetic levitation in the presence of hydrogels containing gold and magnetic iron oxide (MIO) nanoparticles plus filamentous bacteriophage. This methodology allows for control of cell mass geometry and guided, multicellular clustering of different cell types in co-culture through spatial variance of the magnetic field. Moreover, magnetic levitation of human glioblastoma cells demonstrates similar protein expression profiles to those observed in human tumor xenografts. Taken together, these results suggest levitated 3D culture with magnetized phage-based hydrogels more closely recapitulates in vivo protein expression and allows for long-term multi-cellular studies. PMID:20228788

  6. Heat pulse propagation in chaotic three-dimensional magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Del-Castillo-Negrete, Diego; Blazevski, Daniel

    2014-06-01

    Heat pulse propagation in three-dimensional chaotic magnetic fields is studied by numerically solving the parallel heat transport equation using a Lagrangian Green's function (LG) method. The main two problems addressed are: the dependence of the radial transport of heat pulses on the level of magnetic field stochasticity (controlled by the amplitude of the magnetic field perturbation, ε), and the role of reversed shear magnetic field configurations on heat pulse propagation. The role of separatrix reconnection of resonant modes in the shear reversal region, and the role of shearless Cantori in the observed phenomena are also discussed.

  7. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of liver hemangiomas

    SciTech Connect

    Sigal, R.; Lanir, A.; Atlan, H.; Naschitz, J.E.; Simon, J.S.; Enat, R.; Front, D.; Israel, O.; Chisin, R.; Krausz, Y.

    1985-10-01

    Nine patients with cavernous hemangioma of the liver were examined by nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with a 0.5 T superconductive magnet. Spin-echo technique was used with varying time to echo (TE) and repetition times (TR). Results were compared with /sup 99m/Tc red blood cell (RBC) scintigraphy, computed tomography (CT), echography, and arteriography. Four illustrated cases are reported. It was possible to establish a pattern for MRI characteristics of cavernous hemangiomas; rounded or smooth lobulated shape, marked increase in T1 and T2 values as compared with normal liver values. It is concluded that, although more experience is necessary to compare the specificity with that of ultrasound and CT, MRI proved to be very sensitive for the diagnosis of liver hemangioma, especially in the case of small ones which may be missed by /sup 99m/Tc-labeled RBC scintigraphy.

  8. Near-Zero-Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledbetter, M. P.; Theis, T.; Blanchard, J. W.; Ring, H.; Ganssle, P.; Appelt, S.; Blümich, B.; Pines, A.; Budker, D.

    2011-09-01

    We investigate nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) in near zero field, where the Zeeman interaction can be treated as a perturbation to the electron mediated scalar interaction (J coupling). This is in stark contrast to the high-field case, where heteronuclear J couplings are normally treated as a small perturbation. We show that the presence of very small magnetic fields results in splitting of the zero-field NMR lines, imparting considerable additional information to the pure zero-field spectra. Experimental results are in good agreement with first-order perturbation theory and with full numerical simulation when perturbation theory breaks down. We present simple rules for understanding the splitting patterns in near-zero-field NMR, which can be applied to molecules with nontrivial spectra.

  9. Aspects of three-dimensional magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Borgogno, D.; Grasso, D.; Porcelli, F.; Califano, F.; Pegoraro, F.; Farina, D.

    2005-03-01

    The nonlinear behavior of reconnecting modes in three spatial dimensions (3D) is investigated, on the basis of a collisionless fluid model in slab geometry, assuming a strong constant guide field in one direction. Unstable modes in the so-called large {delta}{sup '} regime are considered. Single helicity modes, i.e., modes with the same orientation with respect to the guide field, depending on all three spatial coordinates correspond to 'oblique' modes with, in general, mixed parity around the corresponding resonant magnetic surface, giving rise to a nonlinear drift of the magnetic island X point. The nonlinear coupling of initial perturbations with different helicities introduces additional helicities that evolve in time in agreement with quasilinear estimates, as long as their amplitudes remain relatively small. Magnetic field lines become stochastic when islands with different helicities are present. Basic questions such as the proper definition of the reconnection rate in 3D are addressed.

  10. An introduction to nuclear magnetic resonance in biomedicine.

    PubMed

    Andrew, E R

    1990-02-01

    In this paper the author illustrates the historical aspects of the development, first, of the fundamental principles of nuclear magnetic resonance and, second, the extension of these principles to magnetic resonance imaging and in vivo spectroscopy.

  11. Experiments in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yong; Lu, Wei; Choi, J.-H.; Chia, H. J.; Mirsaidov, U. M.; Guchhait, S.; Cambou, A. D.; Cardenas, R.; Park, K.; Markert, J. T.

    2006-03-01

    We report our group's effort in the construction of an 8-T, ^3 He cryostat based nuclear magnetic resonance force microscope (NMRFM). The probe has two independent 3-D of piezoelectric x-y-z positioners for precise positioning of a fiber optic interferometer and a sample/gradient-producing magnet with respect to a micro-cantilever. The piezoelectric positioners have a very uniform controllable step size with virtually no backlash. A novel RF tuning circuit board design is implemented which allows us to simply swap out one RF component board with another for experiments involving different nuclear species. We successfully fabricated and are characterizing 50μm x50μm x0.2μm double torsional oscillators. We have also been characterizing ultrasoft cantilevers whose spring constant is on the order of 10-4 N/m. We also report NMRFM data for ammonium dihydrogen phosphate(ADP) at room temperature using our 1.2-T system. Observed features include the correct shift of the NMR peak with carrier frequency, increases in signal amplitude with both RF field strength and frequency modulation amplitude, and signal oscillation (spin nutation) as a function of tipping RF pulse length. Experiments in progress on NH4MgF3 (at 1.2 T) and MgB2 (at 8.1 T) will also be briefly reviewed. Robert A. Welch Foundation grant No.F-1191 and the National Science Foundation grant No. DMR-0210383.

  12. Partial homogeneity based high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectra under inhomogeneous magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Zhiliang; Lin, Liangjie; Lin, Yanqin E-mail: chenz@xmu.edu.cn; Chen, Zhong E-mail: chenz@xmu.edu.cn; Chen, Youhe

    2014-09-29

    In nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique, it is of great necessity and importance to obtain high-resolution spectra, especially under inhomogeneous magnetic fields. In this study, a method based on partial homogeneity is proposed for retrieving high-resolution one-dimensional NMR spectra under inhomogeneous fields. Signals from series of small voxels, which characterize high resolution due to small sizes, are recorded simultaneously. Then, an inhomogeneity correction algorithm is developed based on pattern recognition to correct the influence brought by field inhomogeneity automatically, thus yielding high-resolution information. Experiments on chemical solutions and fish spawn were carried out to demonstrate the performance of the proposed method. The proposed method serves as a single radiofrequency pulse high-resolution NMR spectroscopy under inhomogeneous fields and may provide an alternative of obtaining high-resolution spectra of in vivo living systems or chemical-reaction systems, where performances of conventional techniques are usually degenerated by field inhomogeneity.

  13. Three-Dimensional Nuclear Chart--Understanding Nuclear Physics and Nucleosynthesis in Stars

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koura, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) nuclear charts were created using toy blocks, which represent the atomic masses per nucleon number and the total half-lives for each nucleus in the entire region of the nuclear mass. The bulk properties of the nuclei can be easily understood by using these charts. Subsequently, these charts were used in outreach activities…

  14. MAGNETIC FIELD INTENSIFICATION BY THE THREE-DIMENSIONAL 'EXPLOSION' PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    Hotta, H.; Yokoyama, T.; Rempel, M.

    2012-11-01

    We investigate an intensification mechanism for the magnetic field near the base of the solar convection zone that does not rely on differential rotation. Such mechanism in addition to differential rotation has been suggested by studies of flux emergence, which typically require field strength in excess of those provided by differential rotation alone. We study here a process in which potential energy of the superadiabatically stratified convection zone is converted into magnetic energy. This mechanism, known as the 'explosion of magnetic flux tubes', has been previously studied in thin flux tube approximation as well as two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations; here we expand the investigation to three-dimensional MHD simulations. Our main result is that enough intensification can be achieved in a three-dimensional magnetic flux sheet as long as the spatial scale of the imposed perturbation normal to the magnetic field is sufficiently large. When this spatial scale is small, the flux sheet tends to rise toward the surface, resulting in a significant decrease of the magnetic field amplification.

  15. Gradient elution capillary electrochromatography and hyphenation with nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Gfrörer, P; Schewitz, J; Pusecker, K; Tseng, L H; Albert, K; Bayer, E

    1999-01-01

    Coupling of gradient capillary electrochromatography (gradient CEC) and capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) with nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) was performed using a recently developed capillary NMR interface. This technique was applied for the analysis of pharmaceuticals and food. An analgesic was investigated using isocratic and gradient continuous-flow CEC-NMR. Comparison of the results demonstrated the superiority of gradient CEC over isocratic CEC. Aspartame and caffeine, both ingredients of soft beverages, were separated and analyzed by continuous flow CZE-NMR. The order of elution could be reversed by altering the pH. This reversal led to an increased sample concentration in the NMR detection cell, thus allowing the acquisition of a totally correlated spectroscopy (TOCSY) two-dimensional (2-D) spectrum of the synthetic peptide aspartame. PMID:10065951

  16. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectral analysis and molecular properties of berberine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ming-Ju; Lee, Ken S.; Hurley, Sharon J.

    An extensive theoretical study of berberine has been performed at the ab initio HF/6-31G**, HF/6-311G**, and B3LYP/6-311G** levels with and without solvent effects. The optimized structures are compared with X-ray data. We found that the optimized structures with solvent effects are in slightly better agreement with X-ray data than those without solvent effects. The 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts of berberine were calculated by using the gauge-independent atomic orbital (GIAO) (with and without solvent effects), CSGT, and IGAIM methods. The calculated chemical shifts were compared with the two-dimensional NMR experimental data. Overall, the calculated chemical shifts show very good agreement with the experimental results. The harmonic vibrational frequencies for berberine were calculated at the B3LYP/6-311G** level.

  17. Gradient elution capillary electrochromatography and hyphenation with nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Gfrörer, P; Schewitz, J; Pusecker, K; Tseng, L H; Albert, K; Bayer, E

    1999-01-01

    Coupling of gradient capillary electrochromatography (gradient CEC) and capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) with nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) was performed using a recently developed capillary NMR interface. This technique was applied for the analysis of pharmaceuticals and food. An analgesic was investigated using isocratic and gradient continuous-flow CEC-NMR. Comparison of the results demonstrated the superiority of gradient CEC over isocratic CEC. Aspartame and caffeine, both ingredients of soft beverages, were separated and analyzed by continuous flow CZE-NMR. The order of elution could be reversed by altering the pH. This reversal led to an increased sample concentration in the NMR detection cell, thus allowing the acquisition of a totally correlated spectroscopy (TOCSY) two-dimensional (2-D) spectrum of the synthetic peptide aspartame.

  18. Three-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Velopharyngeal Structures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bae, Youkyung; Kuehn, David P.; Sutton, Bradley P.; Conway, Charles A.; Perry, Jamie L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To report the feasibility of using a 3-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol for examining velopharyngeal structures. Using collected 3D MRI data, the authors investigated the effect of sex on the midsagittal velopharyngeal structures and the levator veli palatini (levator) muscle configurations. Method: Ten Caucasian…

  19. Bjorken flow in one-dimensional relativistic magnetohydrodynamics with magnetization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Shi; Roy, Victor; Rezzolla, Luciano; Rischke, Dirk H.

    2016-04-01

    We study the one-dimensional, longitudinally boost-invariant motion of an ideal fluid with infinite conductivity in the presence of a transverse magnetic field, i.e., in the ideal transverse magnetohydrodynamical limit. In an extension of our previous work Roy et al., [Phys. Lett. B 750, 45 (2015)], we consider the fluid to have a nonzero magnetization. First, we assume a constant magnetic susceptibility χm and consider an ultrarelativistic ideal gas equation of state. For a paramagnetic fluid (i.e., with χm>0 ), the decay of the energy density slows down since the fluid gains energy from the magnetic field. For a diamagnetic fluid (i.e., with χm<0 ), the energy density decays faster because it feeds energy into the magnetic field. Furthermore, when the magnetic field is taken to be external and to decay in proper time τ with a power law ˜τ-a, two distinct solutions can be found depending on the values of a and χm. Finally, we also solve the ideal magnetohydrodynamical equations for one-dimensional Bjorken flow with a temperature-dependent magnetic susceptibility and a realistic equation of state given by lattice-QCD data. We find that the temperature and energy density decay more slowly because of the nonvanishing magnetization. For values of the magnetic field typical for heavy-ion collisions, this effect is, however, rather small. It is only for magnetic fields about an order of magnitude larger than expected for heavy-ion collisions that the system is substantially reheated and the lifetime of the quark phase might be extended.

  20. Geochemical Controls on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, Rosemary; Prasad, Manika; Keating, Kristina

    2003-11-11

    OAK-B135 Our research objectives are to determine, through an extensive set of laboratory experiments, the effect of the specific mineralogic form of iron and the effect of the distribution of iron on proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation mechanisms. In the first nine months of this project, we have refined the experimental procedures to be used in the acquisition of the laboratory NMR data; have ordered, and conducted preliminary measurements on, the sand samples to be used in the experimental work; and have revised and completed the theoretical model to use in this project. Over the next year, our focus will be on completing the first phase of the experimental work where the form and distribution of the iron in the sands in varied.

  1. In vivo nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leblanc, A.; Evans, H.; Bryan, R. N.; Johnson, P.; Schonfeld, E.; Jhingran, S. G.

    1984-01-01

    A number of physiological changes have been demonstrated in bone, muscle and blood after exposure of humans and animals to microgravity. Determining mechanisms and the development of effective countermeasures for long duration space missions is an important NASA goal. The advent of tomographic nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMR or MRI) gives NASA a way to greatly extend early studies of this phenomena in ways not previously possible; NMR is also noninvasive and safe. NMR provides both superb anatomical images for volume assessments of individual organs and quantification of chemical/physical changes induced in the examined tissues. The feasibility of NMR as a tool for human physiological research as it is affected by microgravity is demonstrated. The animal studies employed the rear limb suspended rat as a model of mucle atrophy that results from microgravity. And bedrest of normal male subjects was used to simulate the effects of microgravity on bone and muscle.

  2. Musculoskeletal applications of nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, K.L. Jr.; Genant, H.K.; Helms, C.A.; Chafetz, N.I.; Crooks, L.E.; Kaufman, L.

    1983-04-01

    Thirty healthy subjects and 15 patients with a variety of musculoskeletal disorders were examined by conventional radiography, computed tomography (CT), and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). NMR proved capable of demonstrating important anatomic structures in the region of the lumbosacral spine. Lumbar disk protrusion was demonstrated in three patients with CT evidence of the disease. NMR appeared to differentiate annulus fibrosus from nucleus pulposus in intervertebral disk material. Avascular necrosis of the femoral head was demonstrated in two patients. The cruciate ligaments of the knee were well defined by NMR. Musceles, tendons and ligaments, and blood vessels could be reliably differentiated, and the excellent soft-tissue contrast of NMR proved useful in the evaluation of bony and soft-tissue tumors. NMR holds promise in the evaluation of musculoskeletal disorders.

  3. Phosphorus 31 nuclear magnetic resonance examination of female reproductive tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Noyszewski, E.A.; Raman, J.; Trupin, S.R.; McFarlin, B.L.; Dawson, M.J. )

    1989-08-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is a powerful method of investigating the relationship between metabolism and function in living tissues. We present evidence that the phosphorus 31 spectra of myometrium and placenta are functions of physiologic state and gestational age. Specific spectroscopic abnormalities are observed in association with disorders of pregnancy and gynecologic diseases. Our results suggest that noninvasive nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy examinations may sometimes be a useful addition to magnetic resonance imaging examinations, and that nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of biopsy specimens could become a cost-effective method of evaluating certain biochemical abnormalities.

  4. Three-dimensional non-linear instability of spontaneous fast magnetic reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, T.; Kondoh, K.; Ugai, M.

    2009-05-01

    Three-dimensional instability of spontaneous fast magnetic reconnection is studied using MHD (magnetohydro- dynamic) simulation. Previous two-dimensional MHD studies have demonstrated that, if a current-driven anomalous resistivity is assumed, two-dimensional fast magnetic reconnection occurs and two-dimensional largescale magnetic loops, i.e., plasmoids, are ejected from the reconnection region. In most two-dimensional MHD studies, the structure of the current sheet is initially one-dimensinal. On the other hand, in recent space plasma observations, fully three-dimensional magnetic loops frequently appear even in the almost one-dimensional current sheet. This suggests that the classical two-dimensional fast magnetic reconnection may be unstable to any three-dimensional perturbation, resulting in three-dimensional fast magnetic reconnection. In this paper, we show that a three-dimensional resistive perturbation destabilizes two-dimensional fast magnetic reconnection and results in three-dimensional fast magnetic reconnection. The resulting three-dimensional fast reconnection repeatedly ejects three-dimensional magnetic loops downstream. The obtained numerical results are similar to the pulsating downflows observed in solar flares. According to the Fourier analysis of the ejected magnetic loops, the time evolution of this three-dimensional instability is fully non-linear.

  5. BROADBAND EXCITATION IN NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Tycko, R.

    1984-10-01

    Theoretical methods for designing sequences of radio frequency (rf) radiation pulses for broadband excitation of spin systems in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) are described. The sequences excite spins uniformly over large ranges of resonant frequencies arising from static magnetic field inhomogeneity, chemical shift differences, or spin couplings, or over large ranges of rf field amplitudes. Specific sequences for creating a population inversion or transverse magnetization are derived and demonstrated experimentally in liquid and solid state NMR. One approach to broadband excitation is based on principles of coherent averaging theory. A general formalism for deriving pulse sequences is given, along with computational methods for specific cases. This approach leads to sequences that produce strictly constant transformations of a spin system. The importance of this feature in NMR applications is discussed. A second approach to broadband excitation makes use of iterative schemes, i.e. sets of operations that are applied repetitively to a given initial pulse sequences, generating a series of increasingly complex sequences with increasingly desirable properties. A general mathematical framework for analyzing iterative schemes is developed. An iterative scheme is treated as a function that acts on a space of operators corresponding to the transformations produced by all possible pulse sequences. The fixed points of the function and the stability of the fixed points are shown to determine the essential behavior of the scheme. Iterative schemes for broadband population inversion are treated in detail. Algebraic and numerical methods for performing the mathematical analysis are presented. Two additional topics are treated. The first is the construction of sequences for uniform excitation of double-quantum coherence and for uniform polarization transfer over a range of spin couplings. Double-quantum excitation sequences are demonstrated in a liquid crystal system. The

  6. Dynamic nuclear polarization at high magnetic fields

    PubMed Central

    Maly, Thorsten; Debelouchina, Galia T.; Bajaj, Vikram S.; Hu, Kan-Nian; Joo, Chan-Gyu; Mak–Jurkauskas, Melody L.; Sirigiri, Jagadishwar R.; van der Wel, Patrick C. A.; Herzfeld, Judith; Temkin, Richard J.; Griffin, Robert G.

    2009-01-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is a method that permits NMR signal intensities of solids and liquids to be enhanced significantly, and is therefore potentially an important tool in structural and mechanistic studies of biologically relevant molecules. During a DNP experiment, the large polarization of an exogeneous or endogeneous unpaired electron is transferred to the nuclei of interest (I) by microwave (μw) irradiation of the sample. The maximum theoretical enhancement achievable is given by the gyromagnetic ratios (γe/γl), being ∼660 for protons. In the early 1950s, the DNP phenomenon was demonstrated experimentally, and intensively investigated in the following four decades, primarily at low magnetic fields. This review focuses on recent developments in the field of DNP with a special emphasis on work done at high magnetic fields (≥5 T), the regime where contemporary NMR experiments are performed. After a brief historical survey, we present a review of the classical continuous wave (cw) DNP mechanisms—the Overhauser effect, the solid effect, the cross effect, and thermal mixing. A special section is devoted to the theory of coherent polarization transfer mechanisms, since they are potentially more efficient at high fields than classical polarization schemes. The implementation of DNP at high magnetic fields has required the development and improvement of new and existing instrumentation. Therefore, we also review some recent developments in μw and probe technology, followed by an overview of DNP applications in biological solids and liquids. Finally, we outline some possible areas for future developments. PMID:18266416

  7. Quasi-Two-Dimensional Magnetism in Co-Based Shandites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassem, Mohamed A.; Tabata, Yoshikazu; Waki, Takeshi; Nakamura, Hiroyuki

    2016-06-01

    We report quasi-two-dimensional (Q2D) itinerant electron magnetism in the layered Co-based shandites. Comprehensive magnetization measurements were performed using single crystals of Co3Sn2-xInxS2 (0 ≤ x ≤ 2) and Co3-yFeySn2S2 (0 ≤ y ≤ 0.5). The magnetic parameters of both systems; the Curie temperature TC, effective moment peff and spontaneous moment ps; exhibit almost identical variations against the In- and Fe-concentrations, indicating significance of the electron count on the magnetism in the Co-based shandite. The ferromagnetic-nonmagnetic quantum phase transition is found around xc ˜ 0.8. Analysis based on the extended Q2D spin fluctuation theory clearly reveals the highly Q2D itinerant electron character of the ferromagnetism in the Co-based shandites.

  8. Exchange interactions of magnetic surfaces below two-dimensional materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, Rico; Caciuc, Vasile; Atodiresei, Nicolae; Blügel, Stefan

    2016-06-01

    In this theoretical investigation we demonstrate that the adsorption of spatially extended two-dimensional (2D) π systems such as graphene and hexagonal boron nitride on the ferromagnetic fcc Co(111) surface leads to a specific behavior of the in-plane and interlayer Co-Co magnetic exchange interactions. More specifically, for both systems the magnetic exchange coupling within the first Co layer is enhanced, while the one between the first and the second Co layer is not modified, in contrast to the magnetic interlayer softening induced by organic molecules. Importantly, the in-plane magnetic hardening effect is mainly due to the hybridization between the pz states of the 2D π system and the d states of the Co surface.

  9. Electric and magnetic fields from two-dimensional anisotropic bisyncytia.

    PubMed Central

    Sepulveda, N G; Wikswo, J P

    1987-01-01

    Cardiac tissue can be considered macroscopically as a bidomain, anisotropic conductor in which simple depolarization wavefronts produce complex current distributions. Since such distributions may be difficult to measure using electrical techniques, we have developed a mathematical model to determine the feasibility of magnetic localization of these currents. By applying the finite element method to an idealized two-dimensional bisyncytium with anisotropic conductivities, we have calculated the intracellular and extracellular potentials, the current distributions, and the magnetic fields for a circular depolarization wavefront. The calculated magnetic field 1 mm from the tissue is well within the sensitivity of a SQUID magnetometer. Our results show that complex bisyncytial current patterns can be studied magnetically, and these studies should provide valuable insight regarding the electrical anisotropy of cardiac tissue. PMID:3580484

  10. Dynamic nuclear polarization in a magnetic resonance force microscope experiment.

    PubMed

    Issac, Corinne E; Gleave, Christine M; Nasr, Paméla T; Nguyen, Hoang L; Curley, Elizabeth A; Yoder, Jonilyn L; Moore, Eric W; Chen, Lei; Marohn, John A

    2016-04-01

    We report achieving enhanced nuclear magnetization in a magnetic resonance force microscope experiment at 0.6 tesla and 4.2 kelvin using the dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) effect. In our experiments a microwire coplanar waveguide delivered radiowaves to excite nuclear spins and microwaves to excite electron spins in a 250 nm thick nitroxide-doped polystyrene sample. Both electron and proton spin resonance were observed as a change in the mechanical resonance frequency of a nearby cantilever having a micron-scale nickel tip. NMR signal, not observable from Curie-law magnetization at 0.6 T, became observable when microwave irradiation was applied to saturate the electron spins. The resulting NMR signal's size, buildup time, dependence on microwave power, and dependence on irradiation frequency was consistent with a transfer of magnetization from electron spins to nuclear spins. Due to the presence of an inhomogeneous magnetic field introduced by the cantilever's magnetic tip, the electron spins in the sample were saturated in a microwave-resonant slice 10's of nm thick. The spatial distribution of the nuclear polarization enhancement factor ε was mapped by varying the frequency of the applied radiowaves. The observed enhancement factor was zero for spins in the center of the resonant slice, was ε = +10 to +20 for spins proximal to the magnet, and was ε = -10 to -20 for spins distal to the magnet. We show that this bipolar nuclear magnetization profile is consistent with cross-effect DNP in a ∼10(5) T m(-1) magnetic field gradient. Potential challenges associated with generating and using DNP-enhanced nuclear magnetization in a nanometer-resolution magnetic resonance imaging experiment are elucidated and discussed. PMID:26964007

  11. Dynamic nuclear polarization in a magnetic resonance force microscope experiment.

    PubMed

    Issac, Corinne E; Gleave, Christine M; Nasr, Paméla T; Nguyen, Hoang L; Curley, Elizabeth A; Yoder, Jonilyn L; Moore, Eric W; Chen, Lei; Marohn, John A

    2016-04-01

    We report achieving enhanced nuclear magnetization in a magnetic resonance force microscope experiment at 0.6 tesla and 4.2 kelvin using the dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) effect. In our experiments a microwire coplanar waveguide delivered radiowaves to excite nuclear spins and microwaves to excite electron spins in a 250 nm thick nitroxide-doped polystyrene sample. Both electron and proton spin resonance were observed as a change in the mechanical resonance frequency of a nearby cantilever having a micron-scale nickel tip. NMR signal, not observable from Curie-law magnetization at 0.6 T, became observable when microwave irradiation was applied to saturate the electron spins. The resulting NMR signal's size, buildup time, dependence on microwave power, and dependence on irradiation frequency was consistent with a transfer of magnetization from electron spins to nuclear spins. Due to the presence of an inhomogeneous magnetic field introduced by the cantilever's magnetic tip, the electron spins in the sample were saturated in a microwave-resonant slice 10's of nm thick. The spatial distribution of the nuclear polarization enhancement factor ε was mapped by varying the frequency of the applied radiowaves. The observed enhancement factor was zero for spins in the center of the resonant slice, was ε = +10 to +20 for spins proximal to the magnet, and was ε = -10 to -20 for spins distal to the magnet. We show that this bipolar nuclear magnetization profile is consistent with cross-effect DNP in a ∼10(5) T m(-1) magnetic field gradient. Potential challenges associated with generating and using DNP-enhanced nuclear magnetization in a nanometer-resolution magnetic resonance imaging experiment are elucidated and discussed.

  12. Two-dimensional sup 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance study of AaH IT, an anti-insect toxin from the scorpion Androctonus australis Hector. Sequential resonance assignments and folding of the polypeptide chain

    SciTech Connect

    Darbon, H. ); Weber, C.; Braun, W. )

    1991-02-19

    Sequence-specific nuclear magnetic resonance assignments for the polypeptide backbone and for most of the amino acid side-chain protons, as well as the general folding of AaH IT, are described. AaH IT is a neurotoxin purified from the venom of the scorpion Androctonus australis Hector and is specifically active on the insect nervous system. The secondary structure and the hydrogen-bonding patterns in the regular secondary structure elements are deduced from nuclear Overhauser effects and the sequence locations of the slowly exchanging amide protons. The backbone folding is determined by distance geometry calculations with the DISMAN program. The regular secondary structure includes two and a half turns of {alpha}-helix running from residues 21 to 30 and a three-stranded antiparallel {beta}-sheet including peptides 3-5, 34-38, and 41-46. Two tight turns are present, one connecting the end of the {alpha}-helix to an external strand of the {beta}-sheet, i.e., turn 31-34, and another connecting this same strand to the central one, i.e., turn 38-41. The differences in the specificity of these related proteins, which are able to discriminate between mammalian and insect voltage-dependent sodium channels of excitable tissues, are most probably brought about by the position of the C-terminal peptide with regard to a hydrophobic surface common to all scorpion toxins examined thus far. Thus, the interaction of a given scorpion toxin with its receptor might well be governed by the presence of this solvent-exposed hydrophobic surface, whereas adjacent areas modulate the specificity of the interaction.

  13. Electrified magnetic catalysis in three-dimensional topological insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbar, E. V.; Miransky, V. A.; Shovkovy, I. A.; Sukhachov, P. O.

    2016-09-01

    The gap equations for the surface quasiparticle propagators in a slab of three-dimensional topological insulator in external electric and magnetic fields perpendicular to the slab surfaces are analyzed and solved. A different type of magnetic catalysis is revealed with the dynamical generation of both Haldane and Dirac gaps. Its characteristic feature manifests itself in the crucial role that the electric field plays in dynamical symmetry breaking and the generation of a Dirac gap in the slab. It is argued that, for a sufficiently large external electric field, the ground state of the system is a phase with a homogeneous surface charge density.

  14. Magnetism, dimensional changes, and magnetic transitions in hydrated cesium manganese chloride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woollam, J. A.; Aron, P. R.

    1972-01-01

    Dimensional changes (strain) along the three principal crystal axes of the antiferromagnet CsMnCl3-2H2O are studied as a function of magnetic field and temperature in the antiferromagnetic, spin flopped, and paramagnetic phases. Changes in dimensions through the phase transitions between the magnetic states are examined. By applying the molecular field model and utilizing all available information, magnetic properties of CsMnCl3-2H2O are determined. The possible usefulness of this material in a magnetic refrigeration cycle is evaluated.

  15. Nuclear magnetic resonance for cultural heritage.

    PubMed

    Brai, Maria; Camaiti, Mara; Casieri, Cinzia; De Luca, Francesco; Fantazzini, Paola

    2007-05-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) portable devices are now being used for nondestructive in situ analysis of water content, pore space structure and protective treatment performance in porous media in the field of cultural heritage. It is a standard procedure to invert T(1) and T(2) relaxation data of fully water-saturated samples to get "pore size" distributions, but the use of T(2) requires great caution. It is well known that dephasing effects due to water molecule diffusion in a magnetic field gradient can affect transverse relaxation data, even if the smallest experimentally available half echo time tau is used in Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill experiments. When a portable single-sided NMR apparatus is used, large field gradients due to the instrument, at the scale of the sample, are thought to be the dominant dephasing cause. In this paper, T(1) and T(2) (at different tau values) distributions were measured in natural (Lecce stone) and artificial (brick samples coming from the Greek-Roman Theatre of Taormina) porous media of interest for cultural heritage by a standard laboratory instrument and a portable device. While T(1) distributions do not show any appreciable effect from inhomogeneous fields, T(2) distributions can show strong effects, and a procedure is presented based on the dependence of 1/T(2) on tau to separate pore-scale gradient effects from sample-scale gradient effects. Unexpectedly, the gradient at the pore scale can be, in some cases, strong enough to make negligible the effects of gradients at the sample scale of the single-sided device.

  16. Burn injury by nuclear magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Eising, Ernst G; Hughes, Justin; Nolte, Frank; Jentzen, Walter; Bockisch, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging has become a standard diagnostic procedure in clinical medicine and is well known to have hazards for patients with pacemaker or metallic foreign bodies. Compared to CT, the frequency of MRI examinations is increasing due to the missing exposure of the patients by X-rays. Furthermore, high-field magnetic resonance tomograph (MRT) with 3 T has entered clinical practice, and 7-T systems are installed in multiple scientific institutions. On the other hand, the possibility of burn injuries has been reported only in very few cases. Based on a clinical finding of a burn injury in a 31-year-old male patient during a routine MRI of the lumbar spine with standard protocol, the MR scanner was checked and the examination was simulated in an animal model. The patient received a third-degree burn injury of the skin of the right hand and pelvis in a small region of skin contact. The subsequent control of the MRI scanner indicated no abnormal values for radiofrequency (RF) and power. In the subsequent animal experiment, comparable injuries could only be obtained by high RF power in a microwave stove. It is concluded that 'tissue loops' resulting from a contact between hand and pelvis must be avoided. With regard to forensic aspects, the need to inform patients of such a minimal risk can be avoided if the patients are adequately positioned using an isolating material between the hands and pelvis. These facts must be emphasized more in the future, if high-field MRI with stronger RF gradients is available in routine imaging. PMID:20630342

  17. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation. Characterization of coal-derived materials by field desorption mass spectrometry, two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance, supercritical fluid extraction, and supercritical fluid chromatography/mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, J.A.; Linehan, J.C.; Robins, W.H.

    1992-07-01

    Under contract from the DOE , and in association with CONSOL Inc., Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) evaluated four principal and several complementary techniques for the analysis of non-distillable direct coal liquefaction materials in support of process development. Field desorption mass spectrometry (FDMS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic methods were examined for potential usefulness as techniques to elucidate the chemical structure of residual (nondistillable) direct coal liquefaction derived materials. Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) and supercritical fluid chromatography/mass spectrometry (SFC/MS) were evaluated for effectiveness in compound-class separation and identification of residual materials. Liquid chromatography (including microcolumn) separation techniques, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (MS/MS), and GC/Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy methods were applied to supercritical fluid extracts. The full report authored by the PNL researchers is presented here. The following assessment briefly highlights the major findings of the project, and evaluates the potential of the methods for application to coal liquefaction materials. These results will be incorporated by CONSOL into a general overview of the application of novel analytical techniques to coal-derived materials at the conclusion of CONSOL`s contract.

  18. Magnons in disordered nonstoichiometric low-dimensional magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buczek, Paweł; Sandratskii, Leonid M.; Buczek, Nadine; Thomas, Stefan; Vignale, Giovanni; Ernst, Arthur

    2016-08-01

    We study spin excitation spectra of one-, two-, and three-dimensional magnets featuring nonmagnetic defects at a wide range of concentrations. Taking the Heisenberg model as the starting point, we tackle the problem by both direct numerical simulations in large supercells and using a semianalytic coherent-potential approximation. We consider the properties of the excitations in both direct and reciprocal spaces. In the limits of the concentration c of the magnetic atoms tending to 0 or 1 the properties of the spin excitations are similar in all three dimensions. In the case of a low concentration of magnetic atoms the spin excitation spectra are dominated by the modes confined in the real space to single atoms or small clusters and delocalized in the reciprocal space. In the limit of c tending to 1, we obtain the spin-wave excitations delocalized in the real space and localized in the reciprocal space. However, for the intermediate concentrations the properties of the spin excitations are strongly dimensionality dependent. We pay particular attention to the formation, with increase of c , of the Lorentzian-shaped peaks in the spectral densities of the spin excitations, which can be regarded as magnon states with a finite lifetime given by the width of the peaks. In general, low-dimensional magnets are more strongly affected by the presence of nonmagnetic impurities than their bulk counterparts. The details of the electronic structure, varying with the dimensionality and the concentration, substantially influence the spin excitation spectra of real materials, as we show in the example of the FeAl alloy.

  19. Three-dimensional evolution of magnetic and velocity shear driven instabilities in a compressible magnetized jet

    SciTech Connect

    Bettarini, Lapo; Landi, Simone; Velli, Marco; Londrillo, Pasquale

    2009-06-15

    The problem of three-dimensional combined magnetic and velocity shear driven instabilities of a compressible magnetized jet modeled as a plane neutral/current double vortex sheet in the framework of the resistive magnetohydrodynamics is addressed. The resulting dynamics given by the stream+current sheet interaction is analyzed and the effects of a variable geometry of the basic fields are considered. Depending on the basic asymptotic magnetic field configuration, a selection rule of the linear instability modes can be obtained. Hence, the system follows a two-stage path developing either through a fully three-dimensional dynamics with a rapid evolution of kink modes leading to a final turbulent state, or rather through a driving two-dimensional instability pattern that develops on parallel planes on which a reconnection+coalescence process takes place.

  20. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of the kidney

    SciTech Connect

    Hricak, H.; Crooks, L.; Sheldon, P.; Kaufman, L.

    1983-02-01

    The role of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging of the kidney was analyzed in 18 persons (6 normal volunteers, 3 patients with pelvocaliectasis, 2 with peripelvic cysts, 1 with renal sinus lipomatosis, 3 with renal failure, 1 with glycogen storage disease, and 2 with polycystic kidney disease). Ultrasound and/or computed tomography (CT) studies were available for comparison in every case. In the normal kidney distinct anatomical structures were clearly differentiated by NMR. The best anatomical detail ws obtained with spin echo (SE) imaging, using a pulse sequence interval of 1,000 msec and an echo delay time of 28 msec. However, in the evaluation of normal and pathological conditions, all four intensity images (SE 500/28, SE 500/56, SE 1,000/28, and SE 1,000/56) have to be analyzed. No definite advantage was found in using SE imaging with a pulse sequence interval of 1,500 msec. Inversion recovery imaging enhanced the differences between the cortex and medulla, but it had a low signal-to-noise level and, therefore, a suboptimal overall resolution. The advantages of NMR compared with CT and ultrasound are discussed, and it is concluded that NMR imaging will prove to be a useful modality in the evaluation of renal disease.

  1. Selectivity in multiple quantum nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, W.S.

    1980-11-01

    The observation of multiple-quantum nuclear magnetic resonance transitions in isotropic or anisotropic liquids is shown to give readily interpretable information on molecular configurations, rates of motional processes, and intramolecular interactions. However, the observed intensity of high multiple-quantum transitions falls off dramatically as the number of coupled spins increases. The theory of multiple-quantum NMR is developed through the density matrix formalism, and exact intensities are derived for several cases (isotropic first-order systems and anisotropic systems with high symmetry) to shown that this intensity decrease is expected if standard multiple-quantum pulse sequences are used. New pulse sequences are developed which excite coherences and produce population inversions only between selected states, even though other transitions are simultaneously resonant. One type of selective excitation presented only allows molecules to absorb and emit photons in groups of n. Coherent averaging theory is extended to describe these selective sequences, and to design sequences which are selective to arbitrarily high order in the Magnus expansion. This theory and computer calculations both show that extremely good selectivity and large signal enhancements are possible.

  2. Studies of magnetism using nuclear orientation and related NMR techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pond, James F.

    2001-09-01

    Nuclear Orientation and related NMR techniques have been used to study three magnetic insulators: Mn(COOCH3)2·4H2O, MnCl2·4H2O and CoCl2·6H 2O. Continuous wave NMR thermally detected by Nuclear Orientation has been used to investigate the magnetic properties and spin dynamics of the quasi-2-dimensional ferromagnet 54Mn-Mn(COOCH3)2·4H 2O. The system exhibits a frequency pulling effect due to the indirect Suhl-Nakamura interaction between nuclear spins and the electronic spin excitation spectrum is related to the coupling strength of the nuclear spins. The temperature dependence of the frequency pulling effect was measured for the two crystalline sublattices Mn1 and Mn2 in low magnetic field. The spectra show a structure not predicted theoretically. The current theory is valid only for I = 1/2 with uniaxial crystalline anisotropy fields. The theory of frequency pulling has been extended here to the case of I ≥ 1/2 and non-uniaxial crystalline anisotropy fields and the resonant frequencies and linewidths have been calculated as a function of temperature. The new theory and data agree well in terms of the magnitude and temperature dependence of the frequency pulling. Discrepancies are likely due to simplifying assumptions when calculating the electronic magnon spectrum. Classical and quantum numerical simulations confirm qualitatively the predictions of the model. The first Low Temperature Nuclear Orientation experiments on isotopes implanted into insulators is reported. Radioactive 56Mn ions have been implanted into insulating, antiferromagnetic crystals of MnCl 2·4H2O and CoCl2·6H2O. In MnCl2·4H2O, comparison of the gamma-ray anisotropy of the 56Mn nuclei with that of 54Mn, doped into the sample during growth, showed that both the 56Mn and 54Mn spins felt a very similar hyperfine field. The site occupancy factor in a simple, two site model was deduced to be 0.96+0.04-0.07 . In CoCl2·6H2O, the average hyperfine field for the implanted 56Mn was significantly

  3. Synthesis and characterization of low-dimensional molecular magnetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chen

    This dissertation presents experimental results from the synthesis and structural, magnetic characterization of representative low-dimensional molecule-based magnetic materials. Most of the materials reported in this dissertation, both coordination polymers and cuprate, are obtained as the result of synthesizing and characterizing spin ladder systems; except the material studied in Chapter 2, ferricenyl(III)trisferrocenyl(II)borate, which is not related to the spin ladder project. The interest in spin ladder systems is due to the discovery of high-temperature superconductivity in doped cuprates possessing ladder-like structures, and it is hoped that investigation of the magnetic behavior of ladder-like structures will help us understand the mechanism of high-temperature superconductivity. Chapter 1 reviews fundamental knowledge of molecular magnetism, general synthetic strategies for low-dimensional coordination polymers, and a brief introduction to the current status of research on spin ladder systems. Chapter 2 presents a modified synthetic procedure of a previously known monomeric complex, ferricenyl(III)trisferrocenyl(II)borate, 1. Its magnetic properties were characterized and previous results have been disproved. Chapter 3 investigates the magnetism of [CuCl2(CH3CN)] 2, 2, a cuprate whose structure consists of isolated noninterpenetrating ladders formed by the stacking of Cu(II) dimers. This material presents an unexpected ferromagnetic interaction both within the dimeric units and between the dimers, and this behavior has been rationalized based on the effect of its terminal nonbridging ligands. In Chapter 4, the synthesis and magnetism of two ladder-like coordination polymers, [Co(NO3)2(4,4'-bipyridine) 1.5(MeCN)]n, 3, and Ni2(2,6-pyridinedicarboxylic acid)2(H2O)4(pyrazine), 4, are reported. Compound 3 possesses a covalent one-dimensional ladder structure in which Co(II) ions are bridged through bipyridine molecules. Compared to the materials discussed in

  4. Interlayer coupling through a dimensionality-induced magnetic state.

    PubMed

    Gibert, M; Viret, M; Zubko, P; Jaouen, N; Tonnerre, J-M; Torres-Pardo, A; Catalano, S; Gloter, A; Stéphan, O; Triscone, J-M

    2016-04-15

    Dimensionality is known to play an important role in many compounds for which ultrathin layers can behave very differently from the bulk. This is especially true for the paramagnetic metal LaNiO3, which can become insulating and magnetic when only a few monolayers thick. We show here that an induced antiferromagnetic order can be stabilized in the [111] direction by interfacial coupling to the insulating ferromagnet LaMnO3, and used to generate interlayer magnetic coupling of a nature that depends on the exact number of LaNiO3 monolayers. For 7-monolayer-thick LaNiO3/LaMnO3 superlattices, negative and positive exchange bias, as well as antiferromagnetic interlayer coupling are observed in different temperature windows. All three behaviours are explained based on the emergence of a (¼,¼,¼)-wavevector antiferromagnetic structure in LaNiO3 and the presence of interface asymmetry with LaMnO3. This dimensionality-induced magnetic order can be used to tailor a broad range of magnetic properties in well-designed superlattice-based devices.

  5. Interlayer coupling through a dimensionality-induced magnetic state

    PubMed Central

    Gibert, M.; Viret, M.; Zubko, P.; Jaouen, N.; Tonnerre, J.-M.; Torres-Pardo, A.; Catalano, S.; Gloter, A.; Stéphan, O.; Triscone, J.-M.

    2016-01-01

    Dimensionality is known to play an important role in many compounds for which ultrathin layers can behave very differently from the bulk. This is especially true for the paramagnetic metal LaNiO3, which can become insulating and magnetic when only a few monolayers thick. We show here that an induced antiferromagnetic order can be stabilized in the [111] direction by interfacial coupling to the insulating ferromagnet LaMnO3, and used to generate interlayer magnetic coupling of a nature that depends on the exact number of LaNiO3 monolayers. For 7-monolayer-thick LaNiO3/LaMnO3 superlattices, negative and positive exchange bias, as well as antiferromagnetic interlayer coupling are observed in different temperature windows. All three behaviours are explained based on the emergence of a (¼,¼,¼)-wavevector antiferromagnetic structure in LaNiO3 and the presence of interface asymmetry with LaMnO3. This dimensionality-induced magnetic order can be used to tailor a broad range of magnetic properties in well-designed superlattice-based devices. PMID:27079668

  6. Three-Dimensional Magnetic Assembly of Microscale Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Feng; Wu, Chung-an Max; Rengarajan, Venkatakrishnan; Finley, Thomas Dylan; Keles, Hasan Onur; Sung, Yuree; Li, Baoqiang; Gurkan, Umut Atakan

    2012-01-01

    Directed assembly of nano and microscale particles is of great interest and has widespread applications in various fields including electronics, nanomaterials and tissue engineering. Bottom-up tissue engineering is motivated by the occurrence of repeating functional units in vivo. The bottom-up approach requires novel techniques to assemble engineered functional units as building blocks at a high speed with spatial control over three-dimensional (3D) micro-architecture. Here, we report a magnetic assembler that utilizes nanoparticles and microscale hydrogels as building blocks to create 3D complex multi-layer constructs via external magnetic fields using different concentrations of magnetic nanoparticles. This approach holds potential for 3D assembly processes that could be utilized in various tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. PMID:21830240

  7. Two-dimensional 1H nuclear magnetic resonance study of AaH IT, an anti-insect toxin from the scorpion Androctonus australis Hector. Sequential resonance assignments and folding of the polypeptide chain.

    PubMed

    Darbon, H; Weber, C; Braun, W

    1991-02-19

    Sequence-specific nuclear magnetic resonance assignments for the polypeptide backbone and for most of the amino acid side-chain protons, as well as the general folding of AaH IT, are described. AaH IT is a neurotoxin purified from the venom of the scorpion Androctonus australis Hector and is specifically active on the insect nervous system. The secondary structure and the hydrogen-bonding patterns in the regular secondary structure elements are deduced from nuclear Overhauser effects and the sequence locations of the slowly exchanging amide protons. The backbone folding is determined by distance geometry calculations with the DISMAN program. The regular secondary structure includes two and a half turns of alpha-helix running from residues 21 to 30 and a three-stranded antiparallel beta-sheet including peptides 3-5, 34-38, and 41-46. Two tight turns are present, one connecting the end of the alpha-helix to an external strand of the beta-sheet, i.e., turn 31-34, and another connecting this same strand to the central one, i.e., turn 38-41. These structure elements are very similar to the secondary structure reported in single crystals for either variant 3 from the scorpion Centruroides sculpturatus Ewing (CsE V3) or toxin II from the scorpion A. australis Hector (AaH II). The differences in the specificity of these related proteins, which are able to discriminate between mammalian and insect voltage-dependent sodium channels of excitable tissues, are most probably brought about by the position of the C-terminal peptide with regard to a hydrophobic surface common to all scorpion toxins examined thus far. This surface is made of an aromatic cluster that is surrounded by long hydrophobic side-chain residues, as well as the loops protruding out of it. Thus, the interaction of a given scorpion toxin with its receptor might well be governed by the presence of this solvent-exposed hydrophobic surface, whereas adjacent areas modulate the specificity of the interaction.

  8. Investigation of the backbone dynamics of the IgG-binding domain of streptococcal protein G by heteronuclear two-dimensional 1H-15N nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Barchi, J J; Grasberger, B; Gronenborn, A M; Clore, G M

    1994-01-01

    The backbone dynamics of the immunoglobulin-binding domain (B1) of streptococcal protein G, uniformly labeled with 15N, have been investigated by two-dimensional inverse detected heteronuclear 1H-15N NMR spectroscopy at 500 and 600 MHz. 15N T1, T2, and nuclear Overhauser enhancement data were obtained for all 55 backbone NH vectors of the B1 domain at both field strengths. The overall correlation time obtained from an analysis of the T1/T2 ratios was 3.3 ns at 26 degrees C. Overall, the B1 domain is a relatively rigid protein, consistent with the fact that over 95% of the residues participate in secondary structure, comprising a four-stranded sheet arranged in a -1, +3x, -1 topology, on top of which lies a single helix. Residues in the turns and loops connecting the elements of secondary structure tend to exhibit a higher degree of mobility on the picosecond time scale, as manifested by lower values of the overall order parameter. A number of residues at the ends of the secondary structure elements display two distinct internal motions that are faster than the overall rotational correlation time: one is fast (< 20 ps) and lies in the extreme narrowing limit, whereas the other is one to two orders of magnitude slower (1-3 ns) and lies outside the extreme narrowing limit. The slower motion can be explained by large-amplitude (20-40 degrees) jumps in the N-H vectors between states with well-defined orientations that are stabilized by hydrogen bonds.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Least Squares Magnetic-Field Optimization for Portable Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Magnet Design

    SciTech Connect

    Paulsen, Jeffrey L; Franck, John; Demas, Vasiliki; Bouchard, Louis-S.

    2008-03-27

    Single-sided and mobile nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) sensors have the advantages of portability, low cost, and low power consumption compared to conventional high-field NMR and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems. We present fast, flexible, and easy-to-implement target field algorithms for mobile NMR and MRI magnet design. The optimization finds a global optimum ina cost function that minimizes the error in the target magnetic field in the sense of least squares. When the technique is tested on a ring array of permanent-magnet elements, the solution matches the classical dipole Halbach solution. For a single-sided handheld NMR sensor, the algorithm yields a 640 G field homogeneous to 16 100 ppm across a 1.9 cc volume located 1.5 cm above the top of the magnets and homogeneous to 32 200 ppm over a 7.6 cc volume. This regime is adequate for MRI applications. We demonstrate that the homogeneous region can be continuously moved away from the sensor by rotating magnet rod elements, opening the way for NMR sensors with adjustable"sensitive volumes."

  10. Photonic band gaps in one-dimensional magnetized plasma photonic crystals with arbitrary magnetic declination

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Haifeng; Liu Shaobin; Kong Xiangkun

    2012-12-15

    In this paper, the properties of photonic band gaps and dispersion relations of one-dimensional magnetized plasma photonic crystals composed of dielectric and magnetized plasma layers with arbitrary magnetic declination are theoretically investigated for TM polarized wave based on transfer matrix method. As TM wave propagates in one-dimensional magnetized plasma photonic crystals, the electromagnetic wave can be divided into two modes due to the influence of Lorentz force. The equations for effective dielectric functions of such two modes are theoretically deduced, and the transfer matrix equation and dispersion relations for TM wave are calculated. The influences of relative dielectric constant, plasma collision frequency, incidence angle, plasma filling factor, the angle between external magnetic field and +z axis, external magnetic field and plasma frequency on transmission, and dispersion relation are investigated, respectively, and some corresponding physical explanations are also given. From the numerical results, it has been shown that plasma collision frequency cannot change the locations of photonic band gaps for both modes, and also does not affect the reflection and transmission magnitudes. The characteristics of photonic band gaps for both modes can be obviously tuned by relative dielectric constant, incidence angle, plasma filling factor, the angle between external magnetic field and +z axis, external magnetic field and plasma frequency, respectively. These results would provide theoretical instructions for designing filters, microcavities, and fibers, etc.

  11. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy with single spin sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Müller, C; Kong, X; Cai, J-M; Melentijević, K; Stacey, A; Markham, M; Twitchen, D; Isoya, J; Pezzagna, S; Meijer, J; Du, J F; Plenio, M B; Naydenov, B; McGuinness, L P; Jelezko, F

    2014-08-22

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging at the ultimate sensitivity limit of single molecules or single nuclear spins requires fundamentally new detection strategies. The strong coupling regime, when interaction between sensor and sample spins dominates all other interactions, is one such strategy. In this regime, classically forbidden detection of completely unpolarized nuclei is allowed, going beyond statistical fluctuations in magnetization. Here we realize strong coupling between an atomic (nitrogen-vacancy) sensor and sample nuclei to perform nuclear magnetic resonance on four (29)Si spins. We exploit the field gradient created by the diamond atomic sensor, in concert with compressed sensing, to realize imaging protocols, enabling individual nuclei to be located with Angstrom precision. The achieved signal-to-noise ratio under ambient conditions allows single nuclear spin sensitivity to be achieved within seconds.

  12. Nuclear Magnetic Double Resonance Using Weak Perturbing RF Fields

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, G. Fredric

    1977-01-01

    Describes a nuclear magnetic resonance experimental example of spin tickling; also discusses a direct approach for verifying the relative signs of coupling constants in three-spin cyclopropyl systems. (SL)

  13. Nuclear magnetic resonance data of C10H13ITe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhova, B. M.

    This document is part of Part 6 `Organic Metalloid Compounds' of Subvolume D 'Chemical Shifts and Coupling Constants for Carbon-13' of Landolt-Börnstein III/35 'Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Data', Group III 'Condensed Matter'.

  14. Nuclear magnetic resonance data of C9H11ITe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhova, B. M.

    This document is part of Part 6 `Organic Metalloid Compounds' of Subvolume D 'Chemical Shifts and Coupling Constants for Carbon-13' of Landolt-Börnstein III/35 'Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Data', Group III 'Condensed Matter'.

  15. Nuclear magnetization in gallium arsenide quantum dots at zero magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Sallen, G; Kunz, S; Amand, T; Bouet, L; Kuroda, T; Mano, T; Paget, D; Krebs, O; Marie, X; Sakoda, K; Urbaszek, B

    2014-01-01

    Optical and electrical control of the nuclear spin system allows enhancing the sensitivity of NMR applications and spin-based information storage and processing. Dynamic nuclear polarization in semiconductors is commonly achieved in the presence of a stabilizing external magnetic field. Here we report efficient optical pumping of nuclear spins at zero magnetic field in strain-free GaAs quantum dots. The strong interaction of a single, optically injected electron spin with the nuclear spins acts as a stabilizing, effective magnetic field (Knight field) on the nuclei. We optically tune the Knight field amplitude and direction. In combination with a small transverse magnetic field, we are able to control the longitudinal and transverse components of the nuclear spin polarization in the absence of lattice strain--that is, in dots with strongly reduced static nuclear quadrupole effects, as reproduced by our model calculations.

  16. Coaxial probe for nuclear magnetic resonance diffusion and relaxation correlation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yiqiao; Hürlimann, Martin; Mandal, Soumyajit; Paulsen, Jeffrey; Song, Yi-Qiao

    2014-02-01

    A coaxial nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) probe is built to measure diffusion and relaxation properties of liquid samples. In particular, we demonstrate the acquisition of two-dimensional (2D) distribution functions (T1-T2 and diffusion-T2), essential for fluids characterization. The compact design holds promise for miniaturization, thus enabling the measurement of molecular diffusion that is inaccessible to conventional micro-NMR setups. Potential applications range from crude oil characterization to biomolecular screening and detections.

  17. Magnetic properties of manganese based one-dimensional spin chains.

    PubMed

    Asha, K S; Ranjith, K M; Yogi, Arvind; Nath, R; Mandal, Sukhendu

    2015-12-14

    We have correlated the structure-property relationship of three manganese-based inorganic-organic hybrid structures. Compound 1, [Mn2(OH-BDC)2(DMF)3] (where BDC = 1,4-benzene dicarboxylic acid and DMF = N,N'-dimethylformamide), contains Mn2O11 dimers as secondary building units (SBUs), which are connected by carboxylate anions forming Mn-O-C-O-Mn chains. Compound 2, [Mn2(BDC)2(DMF)2], contains Mn4O20 clusters as SBUs, which also form Mn-O-C-O-Mn chains. In compound 3, [Mn3(BDC)3(DEF)2] (where DEF = N,N'-diethylformamide), the distorted MnO6 octahedra are linked to form a one-dimensional chain with Mn-O-Mn connectivity. The magnetic properties were investigated by means of magnetization and heat capacity measurements. The temperature dependent magnetic susceptibility of all the three compounds could be nicely fitted using a one-dimensional S = 5/2 Heisenberg antiferromagnetic chain model and the value of intra-chain exchange coupling (J/k(B)) between Mn(2+) ions was estimated to be ∼1.1 K, ∼0.7 K, and ∼0.46 K for compounds 1, 2, and 3, respectively. Compound 1 does not undergo any magnetic long-range-order down to 2 K while compounds 2 and 3 undergo long-range magnetic order at T(N) ≈ 4.2 K and ≈4.3 K, respectively, which are of spin-glass type. From the values of J/k(B) and T(N) the inter-chain coupling (J(⊥)/k(B)) was calculated to be about 0.1J/k(B) for both compounds 2 and 3, respectively.

  18. Magnetic properties of manganese based one-dimensional spin chains.

    PubMed

    Asha, K S; Ranjith, K M; Yogi, Arvind; Nath, R; Mandal, Sukhendu

    2015-12-14

    We have correlated the structure-property relationship of three manganese-based inorganic-organic hybrid structures. Compound 1, [Mn2(OH-BDC)2(DMF)3] (where BDC = 1,4-benzene dicarboxylic acid and DMF = N,N'-dimethylformamide), contains Mn2O11 dimers as secondary building units (SBUs), which are connected by carboxylate anions forming Mn-O-C-O-Mn chains. Compound 2, [Mn2(BDC)2(DMF)2], contains Mn4O20 clusters as SBUs, which also form Mn-O-C-O-Mn chains. In compound 3, [Mn3(BDC)3(DEF)2] (where DEF = N,N'-diethylformamide), the distorted MnO6 octahedra are linked to form a one-dimensional chain with Mn-O-Mn connectivity. The magnetic properties were investigated by means of magnetization and heat capacity measurements. The temperature dependent magnetic susceptibility of all the three compounds could be nicely fitted using a one-dimensional S = 5/2 Heisenberg antiferromagnetic chain model and the value of intra-chain exchange coupling (J/k(B)) between Mn(2+) ions was estimated to be ∼1.1 K, ∼0.7 K, and ∼0.46 K for compounds 1, 2, and 3, respectively. Compound 1 does not undergo any magnetic long-range-order down to 2 K while compounds 2 and 3 undergo long-range magnetic order at T(N) ≈ 4.2 K and ≈4.3 K, respectively, which are of spin-glass type. From the values of J/k(B) and T(N) the inter-chain coupling (J(⊥)/k(B)) was calculated to be about 0.1J/k(B) for both compounds 2 and 3, respectively. PMID:26455515

  19. High-Resolution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance of Solids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maciel, Gary E.

    1984-01-01

    Examines recent developments in techniques for obtaining high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra on solid samples, discussing the kinds of applications for which these techniques are well suited. Also discusses the characteristics of NMR of solids and generating magnetization for NMR in solids. (JN)

  20. Tunable electronic and magnetic properties of two‐dimensional materials and their one‐dimensional derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhuhua; Liu, Xiaofei; Yu, Jin; Hang, Yang; Li, Yao; Guo, Yufeng; Xu, Ying; Sun, Xu; Zhou, Jianxin

    2016-01-01

    Low‐dimensional materials exhibit many exceptional properties and functionalities which can be efficiently tuned by externally applied force or fields. Here we review the current status of research on tuning the electronic and magnetic properties of low‐dimensional carbon, boron nitride, metal‐dichalcogenides, phosphorene nanomaterials by applied engineering strain, external electric field and interaction with substrates, etc, with particular focus on the progress of computational methods and studies. We highlight the similarities and differences of the property modulation among one‐ and two‐dimensional nanomaterials. Recent breakthroughs in experimental demonstration of the tunable functionalities in typical nanostructures are also presented. Finally, prospective and challenges for applying the tunable properties into functional devices are discussed. WIREs Comput Mol Sci 2016, 6:324–350. doi: 10.1002/wcms.1251 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. Conflict of interest: The authors have declared no conflicts of interest for this article.

  1. Three-dimensional solidification and melting using magnetic field control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dulikravich, George S.; Ahuja, Vineet

    1993-01-01

    A new two-fluid mathematical model for fully three dimensional steady solidification under the influence of an arbitrary acceleration vector and with or without an arbitrary externally applied steady magnetic field have been formulated and integrated numerically. The model includes Joule heating and allows for separate temperature dependent physical properties within the melt and the solid. Latent heat of phase change during melting/solidification was incorporated using an enthalpy method. Mushy region was automatically captured by varying viscosity orders of magnitude between liquidus and solidus temperature. Computational results were obtained for silicon melt solidification in a parallelepiped container cooled from above and from a side. The results confirm that the magnetic field has a profound influence on the solidifying melt flow field thus changing convective heat transfer through the boundaries and the amount and shape of the solid accrued. This suggests that development of a quick-response algorithm for active control of three dimensional solidification is feasible since it would require low strength magnetic fields.

  2. Two-dimensional magnetic sensitivity to asymmetric and symmetric deviations for SSC quadrupole magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Minfeng; Waynert, Joseph A.

    1994-07-01

    The magnetic multipole sensitivity to asymmetric and symmetric deviations is analyzed in the two-dimensional cross-section of SSC quadrupole magnets. Deviations in the 2-D cross-section caused by variations in the superconducting cable locations due to changes in the thickness of the pole sheet, mid plane insulation, inter-layer spacer, backing sheet, and copper wedges have direct impact on the magnetic field gradient and multipoles in the straight section of the magnets. Asymmetric deviations due to different coil sizes in a cross-section are also analyzed. The analyses are performed mainly with the software package AHARM(1). SSCMAG(1) and finite element software PE2D(2) were also used to obtain baselines and to verify the results. The results provide information essential to an understanding of the deviations of the multipoles resulting from manufacturing processes, and suggest possibilities for tuning the multipoles to meet the magnetic requirements.

  3. Recovery of nuclear magnetization under extreme inhomogeneous broadening

    SciTech Connect

    Bodart, J.R.; Bork, V.P.; Cull, T.; Ma, H.; Fedders, P.A.; Leopold, D.J.; Norberg, R.E.

    1996-12-01

    A quantitative model is presented for the transient recovery of nuclear magnetization under conditions where nuclear spin dipolar relaxation to dilute relaxation centers proceeds without the intermediary of nuclear spin diffusion. The model is developed for rigid arrays in three, two, and one dimensions. Comparison with experimental results yields measures of effective relaxation rates and relaxation center concentrations. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  4. Electrically detected nuclear magnetic resonance in GaAs/AlGaAs-based quantum point contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keane, Zachary; Godfrey, Matthew; Burke, Adam; Chen, Jason; Fricke, Sebastian; Klochan, Oleh; Micolich, Adam; Beere, Harvey; Ritchie, Dave; Trunov, Kirill; Reuter, Dirk; Wieck, Andreas; Hamilton, Alex

    2011-03-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a well-known technique with widespread applications in physics, chemistry and medicine. Conventional NMR studies use inductive coils to detect the magnetic field produced by precessing nuclear spins; this approach requires on the order of 1012 spins for detection. Recently, resistive detection of NMR through the hyperfine interaction has been demonstrated with electrons in mesoscopic 2- and 1-dimensional devices based on high-quality GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructures. These studies are typically sensitive to 108 spins, enabling NMR on much smaller sample volumes. Holes are predicted to have much weaker nuclear spin coupling than electrons, which could be relevant to the emerging fields of spintronics and quantum information processing. We present a preliminary comparison between the magnitude of the NMR signal in electron and hole quantum point contacts.

  5. Slow dynamics of the magnetization in one-dimensional coordination polymers: single-chain magnets.

    PubMed

    Miyasaka, Hitoshi; Julve, Miguel; Yamashita, Masahiro; Clérac, Rodolphe

    2009-04-20

    Slow relaxation of the magnetization (i.e., "magnet-like" behavior) in materials composed of magnetically isolated chains was observed for the first time in 2001. This type of behavior was predicted in the 1960s by Glauber in a chain of ferromagnetically coupled Ising spins (the so-called Glauber dynamics). In 2002, this new class of nanomagnets was named single-chain magnets (SCMs) by analogy to single-molecule magnets that are isolated molecules displaying related superparamagnetic properties. A long-range order occurs only at T = 0 K in any pure one-dimensional (1D) system, and thus such systems remain in their paramagnetic state at any finite temperature. Nevertheless, the combined action of large uniaxial anisotropy and intrachain magnetic interactions between high-spin magnetic units of the 1D arrangement promotes long relaxation times for the magnetization reversal with decreasing temperature, and finally at significantly low temperatures, the material can behave as a magnet. In this Forum Article, we summarize simple theoretical approaches used for understanding typical SCM behavior and some rational synthetic strategies to obtain SCM materials together with representative examples of SCMs previously reported.

  6. The Fourier Transform in Chemistry. Part 1. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance: Introduction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Roy W.; Williams, Kathryn R.

    1989-01-01

    Using fourier transformation methods in nuclear magnetic resonance has made possible increased sensitivity in chemical analysis. This article describes these methods as they relate to magnetization, the RF magnetic field, nuclear relaxation, the RF pulse, and free induction decay. (CW)

  7. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance -- Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Three Axis Vector Magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulatowicz, Michael; Clark, Philip; Griffith, Robert; Larsen, Michael; Mirijanian, James

    2012-06-01

    The Northrop Grumman Corporation is leveraging the technology developed for the Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope (NMRG) to build a combined Electron Paramagnetic Resonance -- Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (EPR-NMR) magnetometer. The EPR-NMR approach provides a high bandwidth and high sensitivity simultaneous measurement of all three vector components of the magnetic field averaged over the small volume of the sensor's one vapor cell. This poster will describe the history, operational principles, and design basics of the EPR-NMR magnetometer including an overview of the NSD designs developed and demonstrated to date. General performance results will also be presented.

  8. Electron transport through nuclear pasta in magnetized neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakovlev, D. G.

    2015-10-01

    We present a simple model for electron transport in a possible layer of exotic nuclear clusters (in the so-called nuclear pasta layer) between the crust and liquid core of a strongly magnetized neutron star. The electron transport there can be strongly anisotropic and gyrotropic. The anisotropy is produced by different electron effective collision frequencies along and across local symmetry axis in domains of exotic ordered nuclear clusters and by complicated effects of the magnetic field. We also calculate averaged kinetic coefficients in case local domains are freely oriented. Possible applications of the obtained results and open problems are outlined.

  9. Studies of magnetism by nuclear orientation and NMRON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turrell, B. G.

    1999-09-01

    Low temperature nuclear orientation (NO) and nuclear magnetic resonance on oriented nuclei (NMRON) are used to investigate the magnetic properties of solids, and are especially useful when high sensitivity is required, for example in the study of small or dilute systems. Measurement of the static hyperfine interaction and the nuclear spin-lattice and spin-spin relaxation times T 1 and T 2 yield information about the electronic magnetization and spin dynamics, respectively. A number of NMRON techniques are available and their application to the study of magnetism will be briefly discussed. In particular, the pulsed technique has been shown to be effective for studying insulators. Recent NO and NMRON measurements, primarily on insulating magnets and magnetic multilayers, will be reviewed. Spins of stable isotopes can also be investigated using NMR thermally detected by NO (NMR-TDNO), and this method, in combination with NMRON, has been recently applied in both metals and insulators to obtain information about nuclear spin-spin couplings, “frequency pulling” and nuclear magnons.

  10. A two-dimensional kinematic dynamo model of the ionospheric magnetic field at Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cravens, T. E.; Wu, D.; Shinagawa, H.

    1990-01-01

    The results of a high-resolution, two-dimensional, time dependent, kinematic dynamo model of the ionospheric magnetic field of Venus are presented. Various one-dimensional models are considered and the two-dimensional model is then detailed. In this model, the two-dimensional magnetic induction equation, the magnetic diffusion-convection equation, is numerically solved using specified plasma velocities. Origins of the vertical velocity profile and of the horizontal velocities are discussed. It is argued that the basic features of the vertical magnetic field profile remain unaltered by horizontal flow effects and also that horizontal plasma flow can strongly affect the magnetic field for altitudes above 300 km.

  11. Three-dimensional control of crystal growth using magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dulikravich, George S.; Ahuja, Vineet; Lee, Seungsoo

    1993-07-01

    Two coupled systems of partial differential equations governing three-dimensional laminar viscous flow undergoing solidification or melting under the influence of arbitrarily oriented externally applied magnetic fields have been formulated. The model accounts for arbitrary temperature dependence of physical properties including latent heat release, effects of Joule heating, magnetic field forces, and mushy region existence. On the basis of this model a numerical algorithm has been developed and implemented using central differencing on a curvilinear boundary-conforming grid and Runge-Kutta explicit time-stepping. The numerical results clearly demonstrate possibilities for active and practically instantaneous control of melt/solid interface shape, the solidification/melting front propagation speed, and the amount and location of solid accrued.

  12. Two-dimensional colloidal mixtures in magnetic and gravitational fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löwen, H.; Horn, T.; Neuhaus, T.; ten Hagen, B.

    2013-11-01

    This mini-review is concerned with two-dimensional colloidal mixtures exposed to various kinds of external fields. By a magnetic field perpendicular to the plane, dipole moments are induced in paramagnetic particles which give rise to repulsive interactions leading to complex crystalline alloys in the composition-asymmetry diagram. A quench in the magnetic field induces complex crystal nucleation scenarios. If exposed to a gravitational field, these mixtures exhibit a brazil-nut effect and show a boundary layering which is explained in terms of a depletion bubble picture. The latter persists for time-dependent gravity ("colloidal shaking"). Finally, we summarize crystallization effects when the second species is frozen in a disordered matrix which provides obstacles for the crystallizing component.

  13. Numerical solution of three-dimensional magnetic differential equations

    SciTech Connect

    Reiman, A.H.; Greenside, H.S.

    1987-02-01

    A computer code is described that solves differential equations of the form B . del f = h for a single-valued solution f, given a toroidal three-dimensional divergence-free field B and a single-valued function h. The code uses a new algorithm that Fourier decomposes a given function in a set of flux coordinates in which the field lines are straight. The algorithm automatically adjusts the required integration lengths to compensate for proximity to low order rational surfaces. Applying this algorithm to the Cartesian coordinates defines a transformation to magnetic coordinates, in which the magnetic differential equation can be accurately solved. Our method is illustrated by calculating the Pfirsch-Schlueter currents for a stellarator.

  14. Three-dimensional magnetic resonance microscopy of materials.

    PubMed

    Botto, R E; Cody, G D; Dieckman, S L; French, D C; Gopalsami, N; Rizo, P

    1996-07-01

    Several aspects of magnetic resonance microscopy are examined employing three-dimensional (3D) back-projection reconstruction techniques in combination with either simple Bloch-decay methods or MREV-8 multiple-pulse line narrowing techniques in the presence of static field gradients. Applications to the areas of ceramic processing, catalyst porosity measurements and the characterization of polymeric materials are presented. The focus of the discussion centers on issues of sensitivity and resolution using this approach compared with other methods. Advantages and limitations of 3D microscopy over more commonly employed slice selection protocols are discussed, as well as potential remedies to some of the inherent limitations of the technique. PMID:8902960

  15. Comparison of nuclear electric resonance and nuclear magnetic resonance in integer and fractional quantum Hall states

    SciTech Connect

    Tomimatsu, Toru Shirai, Shota; Hashimoto, Katsushi Sato, Ken; Hirayama, Yoshiro

    2015-08-15

    Electric-field-induced nuclear resonance (NER: nuclear electric resonance) involving quantum Hall states (QHSs) was studied at various filling factors by exploiting changes in nuclear spins polarized at quantum Hall breakdown. Distinct from the magnetic dipole interaction in nuclear magnetic resonance, the interaction of the electric-field gradient with the electric quadrupole moment plays the dominant role in the NER mechanism. The magnitude of the NER signal strongly depends on whether electronic states are localized or extended. This indicates that NER is sensitive to the screening capability of the electric field associated with QHSs.

  16. Two-dimensional magnetic liquid froth: Coarsening and topological correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elias, Florence; Flament, Cyrille; Bacri, Jean-Claude; Cardoso, Olivier; Graner, François

    1997-09-01

    We present an experimental study of a cellular system which may be formed in a two-dimensional (2D) layer made of an immiscible mixture of a magnetic fluid and an oil. We obtain a wet or a dry 2D froth, the characteristics of which are determined by the strength of an externally applied magnetic field. The froth is formed in an equilibrium state; the topological and geometrical features of the froth are fixed by the value of the applied field. The cellular pattern of the froth is stable in time, and a coarseninglike behavior is observed on decreasing the amplitude of the field. This cellular system can be used as a model to study topological processes in the equilibrium state, contrary to soap froths which are nonequilibrium systems because gas diffusion occurs. We show that the topological characteristics are statistically reversible after a magnetic-field cycle, and we present a statistical study of the froth features as a function of the amplitude of the field. The topological correlations between neighboring cells are well described by the Aboav-Weaire law. Finally, we consider the area of an n-sided cell, and show that its growth rate (magnetic field dependent) is, in a surprising manner, proportional to n-6, similarly to the Von Neumann law.

  17. Magnetic coupling of vortices in a two dimensional lattice.

    PubMed

    Nissen, D; Mitin, D; Klein, O; Arekapudi, S S P K; Thomas, S; Im, M-Y; Fischer, P; Albrecht, M

    2015-11-20

    We investigated the magnetization reversal of magnetic vortex structures in a two-dimensional lattice. The structures were formed by permalloy (Py) film deposition onto large arrays of self assembled spherical SiO(2)-particles with a diameter of 330 nm. We present the dependence of the nucleation and annihilation field of the vortex structures as a function of the Py layer thickness(aspect ratio) and temperature. By increasing the Py thickness up to 90 nm or alternatively by lowering the temperature the vortex structure becomes more stable as expected. However, the increase of the Py thickness results in the onset of strong exchange coupling between neighboring Py caps due to the emergence of Py bridges connecting them. In particular, we studied the influence of magnetic coupling locally by in-field scanning magne to-resistive microscopy and full-field magnetic soft x-ray microscopy, revealing a domain-like nucleation process of vortex states, which arises via domain wall propagation due to exchange coupling of the closely packed structures. By analyzing the rotation sense of the reversed areas, large connected domains are present with the same circulation sense. Furthermore, the lateral core displacements when an in-plane field is applied were investigated, revealing spatially enlarged vortex cores and a broader distribution with increasing Py layer thickness. In addition, the presence of some mixed states, vortices and c-states, is indicated for the array with the thickest Py layer. PMID:26511585

  18. Advances in Theory of Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Mananga, Eugene S.; Moghaddasi, Jalil; Sana, Ajaz; Akinmoladun, Andrew; Sadoqi, Mostafa

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in theory of solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) such as Floquet-Magnus expansion and Fer expansion, address alternative methods for solving a time-dependent linear differential equation which is a central problem in quantum physics in general and solid-state NMR in particular. The power and the salient features of these theoretical approaches that are helpful to describe the time evolution of the spin system at all times are presented. This review article presents a broad view of manipulations of spin systems in solid-state NMR, based on milestones theories including the average Hamiltonian theory and the Floquet theory, and the approaches currently developing such as the Floquet-Magnus expansion and the Fer expansion. All these approaches provide procedures to control and describe the spin dynamics in solid-state NMR. Applications of these theoretical methods to stroboscopic and synchronized manipulations, non-synchronized experiments, multiple incommensurated frequencies, magic-angle spinning samples, are illustrated. We also reviewed the propagators of these theories and discussed their convergences. Note that the FME is an extension of the popular Magnus Expansion and Average Hamiltonian Theory. It aims is to bridge the AHT to the Floquet Theorem but in a more concise and efficient formalism. Calculations can then be performed in a finite-dimensional Hilbert space instead of an infinite dimensional space within the so-called Floquet theory. We expected that the FME will provide means for more accurate and efficient spin dynamics simulation and for devising new RF pulse sequence. PMID:26878063

  19. Discrete decoding based ultrafast multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Zhiliang; Lin, Liangjie; Ye, Qimiao; Li, Jing; Cai, Shuhui; Chen, Zhong

    2015-07-14

    The three-dimensional (3D) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy constitutes an important and powerful tool in analyzing chemical and biological systems. However, the abundant 3D information arrives at the expense of long acquisition times lasting hours or even days. Therefore, there has been a continuous interest in developing techniques to accelerate recordings of 3D NMR spectra, among which the ultrafast spatiotemporal encoding technique supplies impressive acquisition speed by compressing a multidimensional spectrum in a single scan. However, it tends to suffer from tradeoffs among spectral widths in different dimensions, which deteriorates in cases of NMR spectroscopy with more dimensions. In this study, the discrete decoding is proposed to liberate the ultrafast technique from tradeoffs among spectral widths in different dimensions by focusing decoding on signal-bearing sites. For verifying its feasibility and effectiveness, we utilized the method to generate two different types of 3D spectra. The proposed method is also applicable to cases with more than three dimensions, which, based on the experimental results, may widen applications of the ultrafast technique.

  20. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of bovine γB-crystallin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurston, George; Mills, Jeffrey; Michel, Lea; Mathews, Kaylee; Zanet, John; Payan, Angel; van Nostrand, Keith; Kotlarchyk, Michael; Ross, David; Wahle, Christopher; Hamilton, John

    Anisotropy of shape and/or interactions play an important role in determining the properties of concentrated solutions of the eye lens protein, γB-crystallin, including its liquid-liquid phase transition. We are studying γB anisotropic interactions with use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) concentration- and temperature-dependent chemical shift perturbations (CSPs). We analyze two-dimensional heteronuclear spin quantum coherence (HSQC) spectra on backbone nitrogen and attached hydrogen nuclei for CSPs, up to 3 percent volume fraction. Cumulative distribution functions of the CSPs show a concentration and temperature-dependent spread. Many peaks that are highly shifted with either concentration or temperature are close (i) crystal intermolecular contacts (ii) locations of cataractogenic point mutations of a homologous human protein, human γD-crystallin, and (iii) charged amino-acid residues. We also discuss the concentration- and temperature-dependence of NMR and quasielastic light scattering measurements of rotational and translational diffusion of γB crystallin in solution, affected by interprotein attractions. Supported by NIH EY018249.

  1. Discrete decoding based ultrafast multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Zhiliang; Lin, Liangjie; Ye, Qimiao; Li, Jing; Cai, Shuhui; Chen, Zhong

    2015-07-01

    The three-dimensional (3D) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy constitutes an important and powerful tool in analyzing chemical and biological systems. However, the abundant 3D information arrives at the expense of long acquisition times lasting hours or even days. Therefore, there has been a continuous interest in developing techniques to accelerate recordings of 3D NMR spectra, among which the ultrafast spatiotemporal encoding technique supplies impressive acquisition speed by compressing a multidimensional spectrum in a single scan. However, it tends to suffer from tradeoffs among spectral widths in different dimensions, which deteriorates in cases of NMR spectroscopy with more dimensions. In this study, the discrete decoding is proposed to liberate the ultrafast technique from tradeoffs among spectral widths in different dimensions by focusing decoding on signal-bearing sites. For verifying its feasibility and effectiveness, we utilized the method to generate two different types of 3D spectra. The proposed method is also applicable to cases with more than three dimensions, which, based on the experimental results, may widen applications of the ultrafast technique.

  2. Novel nuclear magnetic resonance techniques for studying biological molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Laws, David D.

    2000-06-01

    Over the fifty-five year history of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), considerable progress has been made in the development of techniques for studying the structure, function, and dynamics of biological molecules. The majority of this research has involved the development of multi-dimensional NMR experiments for studying molecules in solution, although in recent years a number of groups have begun to explore NMR methods for studying biological systems in the solid-state. Despite this new effort, a need still exists for the development of techniques that improve sensitivity, maximize information, and take advantage of all the NMR interactions available in biological molecules. In this dissertation, a variety of novel NMR techniques for studying biomolecules are discussed. A method for determining backbone ({phi}/{psi}) dihedral angles by comparing experimentally determined {sup 13}C{sub a}, chemical-shift anisotropies with theoretical calculations is presented, along with a brief description of the theory behind chemical-shift computation in proteins and peptides. The utility of the Spin-Polarization Induced Nuclear Overhauser Effect (SPINOE) to selectively enhance NMR signals in solution is examined in a variety of systems, as are methods for extracting structural information from cross-relaxation rates that can be measured in SPINOE experiments. Techniques for the production of supercritical and liquid laser-polarized xenon are discussed, as well as the prospects for using optically pumped xenon as a polarizing solvent. In addition, a detailed study of the structure of PrP 89-143 is presented. PrP 89-143 is a 54 residue fragment of the prion proteins which, upon mutation and aggregation, can induce prion diseases in transgenic mice. Whereas the structure of the wild-type PrP 89-143 is a generally unstructured mixture of {alpha}-helical and {beta}-sheet conformers in the solid state, the aggregates formed from the PrP 89-143 mutants appear to be mostly {beta}-sheet.

  3. Desktop fast-field cycling nuclear magnetic resonance relaxometer.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Duarte Mesquita; Marques, Gil Domingos; Cascais, José Manuel; Sebastião, Pedro José

    2010-07-01

    In this paper a new type of Fast Field Cycling (FFC) Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) relaxometer with low power consumption (200W) and cycle to cycle field stability better than 10(-4) is described. The new high-permeability magnet was designed to allow for good magnetic field homogeneity and allows for the sample rotation around an axis perpendicular to magnetic field, operating with magnetic fields between 0 and 0.21T. The power supply of the new relaxometer was specially developed in order to have steady state accurate currents and allow for magnetic field switching times less than 3ms. Additional control circuits were developed and included to compensate the Earth magnetic field component parallel to the field axis and to compensate for parasitic currents. The main aspects of the developed circuits together with some calibrating experimental results using the liquid crystal compounds 5CB and 8CB are presented and discussed.

  4. Three-dimensional magnetic field analysis of superconducting 180 degrees bending magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Nakata, J.; Nakajima, M.; Hosokawa, T.; Kitayama, T. )

    1990-03-01

    To design the superconducting 180{degrees} bending magnets for compact electron storage rings used in SOR lithography, large-scale 3-dimensional (3-D) magnetic field analyses were performed. Three types of magnets, -- air core, iron yoke, and iron pole -- were minutely computed. Optimizing the coil positions and iron yoke configurations, were found the proper parameters for obtaining wide good field regions along the electron orbit, for all three types. This paper discusses how the iron yoke type was minutely studied an very low liquid helium consumption, wide good field regions that were not changed from low to high field, very low stray fields around the magnet and good tracking controllability could be obtained.

  5. Magnet design considerations for Fusion Nuclear Science Facility

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhai, Yuhu; Kessel, Chuck; El-guebaly, Laila; Titus, Peter

    2016-02-25

    The Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF) is a nuclear confinement facility to provide a fusion environment with components of the reactor integrated together to bridge the technical gaps of burning plasma and nuclear science between ITER and the demonstration power plant (DEMO). Compared to ITER, the FNSF is smaller in size but generates much higher magnetic field, 30 times higher neutron fluence with 3 orders of magnitude longer plasma operation at higher operating temperatures for structures surrounding the plasma. Input parameters to the magnet design from system code analysis include magnetic field of 7.5 T at the plasma center withmore » plasma major radius of 4.8 m and minor radius of 1.2 m, and a peak field of 15.5 T on the TF coils for FNSF. Both low temperature superconductor (LTS) and high temperature superconductor (HTS) are considered for the FNSF magnet design based on the state-of-the-art fusion magnet technology. The higher magnetic field can be achieved by using the high performance ternary Restack Rod Process (RRP) Nb3Sn strands for toroidal field (TF) magnets. The circular cable-in-conduit conductor (CICC) design similar to ITER magnets and a high aspect ratio rectangular CICC design are evaluated for FNSF magnets but low activation jacket materials may need to be selected. The conductor design concept and TF coil winding pack composition and dimension based on the horizontal maintenance schemes are discussed. Neutron radiation limits for the LTS and HTS superconductors and electrical insulation materials are also reviewed based on the available materials previously tested. As a result, the material radiation limits for FNSF magnets are defined as part of the conceptual design studies for FNSF magnets.« less

  6. Three-dimensional prominence-hosting magnetic configurations: Creating a helical magnetic flux rope

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, C.; Keppens, R.; Guo, Y.

    2014-01-10

    The magnetic configuration hosting prominences and their surrounding coronal structure is a key research topic in solar physics. Recent theoretical and observational studies strongly suggest that a helical magnetic flux rope is an essential ingredient to fulfill most of the theoretical and observational requirements for hosting prominences. To understand flux rope formation details and obtain magnetic configurations suitable for future prominence formation studies, we here report on three-dimensional isothermal magnetohydrodynamic simulations including finite gas pressure and gravity. Starting from a magnetohydrostatic corona with a linear force-free bipolar magnetic field, we follow its evolution when introducing vortex flows around the main polarities and converging flows toward the polarity inversion line near the bottom of the corona. The converging flows bring the feet of different loops together at the polarity inversion line, where magnetic reconnection and flux cancellation happen. Inflow and outflow signatures of the magnetic reconnection process are identified, and thereby the newly formed helical loops wind around preexisting ones so that a complete flux rope grows and ascends. When a macroscopic flux rope is formed, we switch off the driving flows and find that the system relaxes to a stable state containing a helical magnetic flux rope embedded in an overlying arcade structure. A major part of the formed flux rope is threaded by dipped field lines that can stably support prominence matter, while the total mass of the flux rope is in the order of 4-5× 10{sup 14} g.

  7. THREE-DIMENSIONAL RECONNECTION INVOLVING MAGNETIC FLUX ROPES

    SciTech Connect

    Gekelman, W.; Van Compernolle, B.; Lawrence, E.

    2012-07-10

    Two and three magnetic flux ropes are created and studied in a well-diagnosed laboratory experiment. The twisted helical bundles of field lines rotate and collide with each other over time. In the two rope case, reverse current layers indicative of reconnection are observed. Using a high spatial and temporal resolution three-dimensional volume data set in both cases, quasi-separatrix layers (QSLs) are identified in the magnetic field. Originally developed in the context of solar magnetic reconnection, QSLs are thought to be preferred sites for reconnection. This is verified in these studies. In the case of three flux ropes there are multiple QSLs, which come and go in time. The divergence of the field lines within the QSLs and the field line motion is presented. In all cases, it is observed that the reconnection is patchy in space and bursty in time. Although it occurs at localized positions it is the result of the nonlocal behavior of the flux ropes.

  8. Magnetically driven three-dimensional manipulation and inductive heating of magnetic-dispersion containing metal alloys

    PubMed Central

    Calabro, Joshua D.; Huang, Xu; Lewis, Brian G.; Ramirez, Ainissa G.

    2010-01-01

    Fundamental to the development of three-dimensional microelectronic fabrication is a material that enables vertical geometries. Here we show low-melting-point metal alloys containing iron dispersions that can be remotely manipulated by magnetic fields to create vertical geometries and thus enable novel three-dimensional assemblies. These iron dispersions enhance the mechanical properties needed for strong, reliable interconnects without significantly altering the electrical properties of the alloys. Additionally, these iron dispersions act as susceptors for magnetic induction heating, allowing the rapid melting of these novel alloys at temperatures lower than those usually reported for conventional metal alloys. By localizing high temperatures and by reducing temperature excursions, the materials and methods described have potential in a variety of device fabrication applications. PMID:20194786

  9. The anomalous nuclear component in the three-dimensional heliosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, J. A.

    1995-01-01

    The anomalous nuclear component is neither of solar nor galactic cosmic ray origin. Its presence in the heliosphere is an independent probe for both interplanetary electrodynamical investigations--especially solar modulation--and probably the most direct means for determining the elemental and isotopic composition of those neutral atoms in the local interstellar medium that have high first ionization potentials (e.g., He, N, O, Ne, Ar, etc.). This report is a brief account of the evolution of our knowledge of this component for readers not specializing in the subject. Included are the initial discoveries of the component, its composition, spectra, heliospheric radial and latitudinal intensity gradients, modulation over the approximately 22 year solar magnetic cycle, trapping in the magnetosphere and its use for estimating the location of a heliospheric termination shock. Recent measurements from the ULYSSES spacecraft have provided conclusive evidence that incoming neutral atoms, after photoionization by solar uv, are picked up by the solar wind, thus lending support for the concept that after their acceleration--probably at a termination shock--they return to the inner heliosphere as pseudo-cosmic rays. ULYSSES spacecraft investigations extending to approximately 56 deg south latitude reveal, for both the anomalous nuclear component and the galactic cosmic rays, that there is a surprisingly small latitudinal intensity gradient. Thus, for the current phase of the solar cycle, modulation is much more spherically symmetric in the inner solar system than had generally been believed. A further surprise is the continual presence of approximately 26 day recurrent modulation at hight latitudes, without corresponding magnetic field compressions. These results are changing our ideas and requiring modification of our models for solar modulation in three dimensions.

  10. Parahydrogen-enhanced zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theis, T.; Ganssle, P.; Kervern, G.; Knappe, S.; Kitching, J.; Ledbetter, M. P.; Budker, D.; Pines, A.

    2011-07-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance, conventionally detected in magnetic fields of several tesla, is a powerful analytical tool for the determination of molecular identity, structure and function. With the advent of prepolarization methods and detection schemes using atomic magnetometers or superconducting quantum interference devices, interest in NMR in fields comparable to the Earth's magnetic field and below (down to zero field) has been revived. Despite the use of superconducting quantum interference devices or atomic magnetometers, low-field NMR typically suffers from low sensitivity compared with conventional high-field NMR. Here we demonstrate direct detection of zero-field NMR signals generated through parahydrogen-induced polarization, enabling high-resolution NMR without the use of any magnets. The sensitivity is sufficient to observe spectra exhibiting 13C-1H scalar nuclear spin-spin couplings (known as J couplings) in compounds with 13C in natural abundance, without the need for signal averaging. The resulting spectra show distinct features that aid chemical fingerprinting.

  11. Magnetic topologies of coronal mass ejection events: Effects of 3-dimensional reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Gosling, J.T.

    1995-09-01

    New magnetic loops formed in the corona following coronal mass ejection, CME, liftoffs provide strong evidence that magnetic reconnection commonly occurs within the magnetic ``legs`` of the departing CMEs. Such reconnection is inherently 3-dimensional and naturally produces CMEs having magnetic flux rope topologies. Sustained reconnection behind CMEs can produce a mixture of open and disconnected field lines threading the CMES. In contrast to the results of 2-dimensional reconnection. the disconnected field lines are attached to the outer heliosphere at both ends. A variety of solar and solar wind observations are consistent with the concept of sustained 3-dimensional reconnection within the magnetic legs of CMEs close to the Sun.

  12. Capacitor-based detection of nuclear magnetization: nuclear quadrupole resonance of surfaces.

    PubMed

    Gregorovič, Alan; Apih, Tomaž; Kvasić, Ivan; Lužnik, Janko; Pirnat, Janez; Trontelj, Zvonko; Strle, Drago; Muševič, Igor

    2011-03-01

    We demonstrate excitation and detection of nuclear magnetization in a nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) experiment with a parallel plate capacitor, where the sample is located between the two capacitor plates and not in a coil as usually. While the sensitivity of this capacitor-based detection is found lower compared to an optimal coil-based detection of the same amount of sample, it becomes comparable in the case of very thin samples and even advantageous in the proximity of conducting bodies. This capacitor-based setup may find its application in acquisition of NQR signals from the surface layers on conducting bodies or in a portable tightly integrated nuclear magnetic resonance sensor.

  13. Nuclear magnetic resonance in environmental engineering: principles and applications.

    PubMed

    Lens, P N; Hemminga, M A

    1998-01-01

    This paper gives an introduction to nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in relation to applications in the field of environmental science and engineering. The underlying principles of high resolution solution and solid state NMR, relaxation time measurements and imaging are presented. Then, the use of NMR is illustrated and reviewed in studies of biodegradation and biotransformation of soluble and solid organic matter, removal of nutrients and xenobiotics, fate of heavy metal ions, and transport processes in bioreactor systems.

  14. Method and apparatus for measuring nuclear magnetic properties

    DOEpatents

    Weitekamp, D.P.; Bielecki, A.; Zax, D.B.; Zilm, K.W.; Pines, A.

    1987-12-01

    A method for studying the chemical and structural characteristics of materials is disclosed. The method includes placement of a sample material in a high strength polarizing magnetic field to order the sample nuclei. The condition used to order the sample is then removed abruptly and the ordering of the sample allowed to evolve for a time interval. At the end of the time interval, the ordering of the sample is measured by conventional nuclear magnetic resonance techniques. 5 figs.

  15. Development of a miniature permanent magnetic circuit for nuclear magnetic resonance chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Rongsheng; Yi, Hong; Wu, Weiping; Ni, Zhonghua

    2013-07-01

    The existing researches of miniature magnetic circuits focus on the single-sided permanent magnetic circuits and the Halbach permanent magnetic circuits. In the single-sided permanent magnetic circuits, the magnetic flux density is always very low in the work region. In the Halbach permanent magnetic circuits, there are always great difficulties in the manufacturing and assembly process. The static magnetic flux density required for nuclear magnetic resonance(NMR) chip is analyzed based on the signal noise ratio(SNR) calculation model, and then a miniature C-shaped permanent magnetic circuit is designed as the required magnetic flux density. Based on Kirchhoff's law and magnetic flux refraction principle, the concept of a single shimming ring is proposed to improve the performance of the designed magnetic circuit. Using the finite element method, a comparative calculation is conducted. The calculation results demonstrate that the magnetic circuit improved with a single shimming has higher magnetic flux density and better magnetic field homogeneity than the one improved with no shimming ring or double shimming rings. The proposed magnetic circuit is manufactured and its experimental test platform is also built. The magnetic flux density measured in the work region is 0.7 T, which is well coincided with the theoretical design. The spatial variation of the magnetic field is within the range of the instrument error. At last, the temperature dependence of the magnetic flux density produced by the proposed magnetic circuit is investigated through both theoretical analysis and experimental study, and a linear functional model is obtained. The proposed research is crucial for solving the problem in the application of NMR-chip under different environmental temperatures.

  16. EFFECTS OF MAGNETIC FIELDS ON THE PROPAGATION OF NUCLEAR FLAMES IN MAGNETIC WHITE DWARFS

    SciTech Connect

    Kutsuna, Masamichi; Shigeyama, Toshikazu

    2012-04-10

    We investigate the effects of the magnetic field on the propagation of laminar flames of nuclear reactions taking place in white dwarfs with masses close to the Chandrasekhar limit. We calculate the velocities of laminar flames parallel and perpendicular to uniform magnetic fields as eigenvalues of steady solutions for magnetic hydrodynamical equations. As a result, we find that even when the magnetic pressure does not dominate the entire pressure it is possible for the magnetic field to suppress the flame propagation through the thermal conduction. Above the critical magnetic field, the flame velocity decreases with increasing magnetic field strength as v {approx} B{sup -1}. In media with densities of 10{sup 7}, 10{sup 8}, and 10{sup 9} g cm{sup -3}, the critical magnetic fields are orders of {approx}10{sup 10}, 10{sup 11}, and 10{sup 12} G, respectively.

  17. Magnetic response in three-dimensional nodal semimetals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koshino, Mikito; Hizbullah, Intan Fatimah

    We study the magnetic response in various three-dimensional gapless systems, including Dirac and Weyl semimetals and a line-node semimetal. We show that the susceptibility is decomposed into the orbital term, the spin term and also the spin-orbit cross term which is caused by the spin-orbit interaction. We show that the orbital susceptibility logarithmically diverges at the band touching energy in the point-node case, while it exhibits a stronger delta-function singularity in the line node case. The spin-orbit cross term is shown to be paramagnetic in the electron side while diamagnetic in the hole side, in contrast with other two terms which are both even functions in Fermi energy. The spin-orbit cross term in the nodal semimetal is found to be directly related to the chiral surface current induced by the topological surface modes.

  18. Magnetic susceptibility in three-dimensional nodal semimetals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koshino, Mikito; Hizbullah, Intan Fatimah

    2016-01-01

    We study the magnetic susceptibility in various three-dimensional gapless systems, including Dirac and Weyl semimetals, and a line-node semimetal. The susceptibility is decomposed into the orbital term, the spin term and also the spin-orbit cross term, which is caused by the spin-orbit interaction. We show that the orbital susceptibility logarithmically diverges at the band touching energy in the point-node case, while it exhibits a stronger δ -function singularity in the line node case. The spin-orbit cross term is shown to be paramagnetic in the electron side while diamagnetic in the hole side, in contrast with other two terms which are both even functions in Fermi energy. The spin-orbit cross term in the nodal semimetal is found to be directly related to the chiral surface current induced by the topological surface modes.

  19. Three-dimensional magnetic resonance cardiac imaging shows initial promise

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-04-15

    Three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging (3-D MRI) of the heart is already receiving encouraging reviews from heart surgeons, says Michael Vannier, MD, an associate professor of radiology at Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis. In fact, the demand for his group's 3-D images is becoming overwhelming, Vannier says. So far, the group has used 3-D MRI to evaluate congenital heart disease. The advantage of the 3-D system is that, even to an untrained eye, anomalies are apparent and the images can even be animated. Many of the patients are infants, who are sedated while the images are acquired. When the information is combined, the averaged image produced represents a slice about 5 mm thick. The computer then stacks a number of those images together to make the 3-D image. Total scanning takes about one hour.

  20. Kinetic theory of a two-dimensional magnetized plasma.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vahala, G.; Montgomery, D.

    1971-01-01

    Several features of the equilibrium and nonequilibrium statistical mechanics of a two-dimensional plasma in a uniform dc magnetic field are investigated. The charges are assumed to interact only through electrostatic potentials. The problem is considered both with and without the guiding-center approximation. With the guiding-center approximation, an appropriate Liouville equation and BBGKY hierarchy predict no approach to thermal equilibrium for the spatially uniform case. For the spatially nonuniform situation, a guiding-center Vlasov equation is discussed and solved in special cases. For the nonequilibrium, nonguiding-center case, a Boltzmann equation, and a Fokker-Planck equation are derived in the appropriate limits. The latter is more tractable than the former, and can be shown to obey conservation laws and an H-theorem, but contains a divergent integral which must be cut off on physical grounds. Several unsolved problems are posed.

  1. Two-dimensional aperture coding for magnetic sector mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Russell, Zachary E; Chen, Evan X; Amsden, Jason J; Wolter, Scott D; Danell, Ryan M; Parker, Charles B; Stoner, Brian R; Gehm, Michael E; Brady, David J; Glass, Jeffrey T

    2015-02-01

    In mass spectrometer design, there has been a historic belief that there exists a fundamental trade-off between instrument size, throughput, and resolution. When miniaturizing a traditional system, performance loss in either resolution or throughput would be expected. However, in optical spectroscopy, both one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) aperture coding have been used for many years to break a similar trade-off. To provide a viable path to miniaturization for harsh environment field applications, we are investigating similar concepts in sector mass spectrometry. Recently, we demonstrated the viability of 1D aperture coding and here we provide a first investigation of 2D coding. In coded optical spectroscopy, 2D coding is preferred because of increased measurement diversity for improved conditioning and robustness of the result. To investigate its viability in mass spectrometry, analytes of argon, acetone, and ethanol were detected using a custom 90-degree magnetic sector mass spectrometer incorporating 2D coded apertures. We developed a mathematical forward model and reconstruction algorithm to successfully reconstruct the mass spectra from the 2D spatially coded ion positions. This 2D coding enabled a 3.5× throughput increase with minimal decrease in resolution. Several challenges were overcome in the mass spectrometer design to enable this coding, including the need for large uniform ion flux, a wide gap magnetic sector that maintains field uniformity, and a high resolution 2D detection system for ion imaging. Furthermore, micro-fabricated 2D coded apertures incorporating support structures were developed to provide a viable design that allowed ion transmission through the open elements of the code. PMID:25510933

  2. Three-dimensional lattice Boltzmann model for magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Mendoza, M.; Munoz, J. D.

    2008-02-15

    We develop a three-dimensional (3D) lattice Boltzmann model that recovers in the continuous limit the two-fluids theory for plasmas, and consequently includes the generalized Ohm's law. The model reproduces the magnetic reconnection process just by giving the right initial equilibrium conditions in the magnetotail, without any assumption on the resistivity in the diffusive region. In this model, the plasma is handled similar to two fluids with an interaction term, each one with distribution functions associated to a cubic lattice with 19 velocities (D3Q19). The electromagnetic fields are considered as a third fluid with an external force on a cubic lattice with 13 velocities (D3Q13). The model can simulate either viscous fluids in the incompressible limit or nonviscous compressible fluids, and successfully reproduces both the Hartmann flow and the magnetic reconnection in the magnetotail. The reconnection rate in the magnetotail obtained with this model lies between R=0.062 and R=0.073, in good agreement with the observations.

  3. Three-dimensional lattice Boltzmann model for magnetic reconnection.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, M; Muñoz, J D

    2008-02-01

    We develop a three-dimensional (3D) lattice Boltzmann model that recovers in the continuous limit the two-fluids theory for plasmas, and consequently includes the generalized Ohm's law. The model reproduces the magnetic reconnection process just by giving the right initial equilibrium conditions in the magnetotail, without any assumption on the resistivity in the diffusive region. In this model, the plasma is handled similar to two fluids with an interaction term, each one with distribution functions associated to a cubic lattice with 19 velocities (D3Q19). The electromagnetic fields are considered as a third fluid with an external force on a cubic lattice with 13 velocities (D3Q13). The model can simulate either viscous fluids in the incompressible limit or nonviscous compressible fluids, and successfully reproduces both the Hartmann flow and the magnetic reconnection in the magnetotail. The reconnection rate in the magnetotail obtained with this model lies between R=0.062 and R=0.073, in good agreement with the observations.

  4. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of macroscopic morphology and dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Barrall, G A

    1995-09-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance techniques are traditionally used to study molecular level structure and dynamics with a noted exception in medically applied NMR imaging (MRI). In this work, new experimental methods and theory are presented relevant to the study of macroscopic morphology and dynamics using NMR field gradient techniques and solid state two-dimensional exchange NMR. The goal in this work is not to take some particular system and study it in great detail, rather it is to show the utility of a number of new and novel techniques using ideal systems primarily as a proof of principle. By taking advantage of the analogy between NMR imaging and diffraction, one may simplify the experiments necessary for characterizing the statistical properties of the sample morphology. For a sample composed of many small features, e.g. a porous medium, the NMR diffraction techniques take advantage of both the narrow spatial range and spatial isotropy of the sample`s density autocorrelation function to obtain high resolution structural information in considerably less time than that required by conventional NMR imaging approaches. The time savings of the technique indicates that NMR diffraction is capable of finer spatial resolution than conventional NMR imaging techniques. Radio frequency NMR imaging with a coaxial resonator represents the first use of cylindrically symmetric field gradients in imaging. The apparatus as built has achieved resolution at the micron level for water samples, and has the potential to be very useful in the imaging of circularly symmetric systems. The study of displacement probability densities in flow through a random porous medium has revealed the presence of features related to the interconnectedness of the void volumes. The pulsed gradient techniques used have proven successful at measuring flow properties for time and length scales considerably shorter than those studied by more conventional techniques.

  5. In vivo nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leblanc, A.

    1986-01-01

    During the past year the Woodlands Baylor Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) facility became fully operational. A detailed description of this facility is given. One significant instrument addition this year was the 100 MHz, 40cm bore superconducting imaging spectrometer. This instrument gives researchers the capability to acquire high energy phosphate spectra. This will be used to investigate ATP, phosphocreatinine and inorganic phosphate changes in normal and atrophied muscle before, during and after exercise. An exercise device for use within the bore of the imaging magnet is under design/construction. The results of a study of T sub 1 and T sub 2 changes in atrophied muscle in animals and human subjects are given. The imaging and analysis of the lower leg of 15 research subjects before and after 5 weeks of complete bedrest was completed. A compilation of these results are attached.

  6. Internetwork magnetic field as revealed by two-dimensional inversions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilovic, S.; van Noort, M.; Rempel, M.

    2016-09-01

    Context. Properties of magnetic field in the internetwork regions are still fairly unknown because of rather weak spectropolarimetric signals. Aims: We address the matter by using the two-dimensional (2D) inversion code, which is able to retrieve the information on smallest spatial scales up to the diffraction limit, while being less susceptible to noise than most of the previous methods used. Methods: Performance of the code and the impact of various effects on the retrieved field distribution is tested first on the realistic magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) simulations. The best inversion scenario is then applied to the real data obtained by Spectropolarimeter (SP) on board Hinode. Results: Tests on simulations show that: (1) the best choice of node position ensures a decent retrieval of all parameters; (2) the code performs well for different configurations of magnetic field; (3) slightly different noise levels or slightly different defocus included in the spatial point spread function (PSF) produces no significant effect on the results; and (4) temporal integration shifts the field distribution to a stronger, more horizontally inclined field. Conclusions: Although the contribution of the weak field is slightly overestimated owing to noise, 2D inversions are able to recover well the overall distribution of the magnetic field strength. Application of the 2D inversion code on the Hinode SP internetwork observations reveals a monotonic field strength distribution. The mean field strength at optical depth unity is ~ 130 G. At higher layers, field strength drops as the field becomes more horizontal. Regarding the distribution of the field inclination, tests show that we cannot directly retrieve it with the observations and tools at hand, however, the obtained distributions are consistent with those expected from simulations with a quasi-isotropic field inclination after accounting for observational effects.

  7. C-13 nuclear magnetic resonance in organic geochemistry.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balogh, B.; Wilson, D. M.; Burlingame, A. L.

    1972-01-01

    Study of C-13 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of polycyclic fused systems. The fingerprint qualities of the natural abundance in C-13 NMR spectra permitting unequivocal identification of these compounds is discussed. The principle of structural additivity of C-13 NMR information is exemplified on alpha and beta androstanes, alpha and beta cholestanes, ergostanes, sitostanes, and isodecanes.

  8. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Coupling Constants and Electronic Structure in Molecules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Venanzi, Thomas J.

    1982-01-01

    Theory of nuclear magnetic resonance spin-spin coupling constants and nature of the three types of coupling mechanisms contributing to the overall spin-spin coupling constant are reviewed, including carbon-carbon coupling (neither containing a lone pair of electrons) and carbon-nitrogen coupling (one containing a lone pair of electrons).…

  9. Concepts in Biochemistry: Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy in Biochemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheatham, Steve

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the nature of a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiment, the techniques used, the types of structural and dynamic information obtained, and how one can view and refine structures using computer graphics techniques in combination with NMR data. Provides several spectra and a computer graphics image from B-form DNA. (MVL)

  10. Using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy for Measuring Ternary Phase Diagrams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodworth, Jennifer K.; Terrance, Jacob C.; Hoffmann, Markus M.

    2006-01-01

    A laboratory experiment is presented for the upper-level undergraduate physical chemistry curriculum in which the ternary phase diagram of water, 1-propanol and n-heptane is measured using proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The experiment builds upon basic concepts of NMR spectral analysis, typically taught in the undergraduate…

  11. Detection of Defect-Induced Magnetism in Low-Dimensional ZnO Structures by Magnetophotocurrent.

    PubMed

    Lorite, Israel; Kumar, Yogesh; Esquinazi, Pablo; Zandalazini, Carlos; de Heluani, Silvia Perez

    2015-09-01

    The detection of defect-induced magnetic order in single low-dimensional oxide structures is in general difficult because of the relatively small yield of magnetically ordered regions. In this work, the effect of an external magnetic field on the transient photocurrent measured after light irradiation on different ZnO samples at room temperature is studied. It has been found that a magnetic field produces a change in the relaxation rate of the transient photocurrent only in magnetically ordered ZnO samples. This rate can decrease or increase with field, depending on whether the magnetically ordered region is in the bulk or only at the surface of the ZnO sample. The phenomenon reported here is of importance for the development of magneto-optical low-dimensional oxides devices and provides a new guideline for the detection of magnetic order in low-dimensional magnetic semiconductors.

  12. Ultrahigh-Resolution Magnetic Resonance in Inhomogeneous Magnetic Fields: Two-Dimensional Long-Lived-Coherence Correlation Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chinthalapalli, Srinivas; Bornet, Aurélien; Segawa, Takuya F.; Sarkar, Riddhiman; Jannin, Sami; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey

    2012-07-01

    A half-century quest for improving resolution in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has enabled the study of molecular structures, biological interactions, and fine details of anatomy. This progress largely relied on the advent of sophisticated superconducting magnets that can provide stable and homogeneous fields with temporal and spatial variations below ΔB0/B0<0.01ppm. In many cases however, inherent properties of the objects under investigation, pulsating arteries, breathing lungs, tissue-air interfaces, surgical implants, etc., lead to fluctuations and losses of local homogeneity. A new method dubbed “long-lived-coherence correlation spectroscopy” (LLC-COSY) opens the way to overcome both inhomogeneous and homogeneous broadening, which arise from local variations in static fields and fluctuating dipole-dipole interactions, respectively. LLC-COSY makes it possible to obtain ultrahigh resolution two-dimensional spectra, with linewidths on the order of Δν=0.1 to 1 Hz, even in very inhomogeneous fields (ΔB0/B0>10ppm or 5000 Hz at 9.7 T), and can improve resolution by a factor up to 9 when the homogeneous linewidths are determined by dipole-dipole interactions. The resulting LLC-COSY spectra display chemical shift differences and scalar couplings in two orthogonal dimensions, like in “J spectroscopy.” LLC-COSY does not require any sophisticated gradient switching or frequency-modulated pulses. Applications to in-cell NMR and to magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) of selected volume elements in MRI appear promising, particularly when susceptibility variations tend to preclude high resolution.

  13. Nuclear heating, radiation damage, and waste management options for the HYLIFE-II final focus magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Latkowski, J F; Moir, R W; House, P A

    1999-08-09

    Heavy-ion fusion (HIF) designs for inertial fusion energy (XFE) power plants typically require final focusing magnets just outside the reaction chamber and blanket. Due to penetrations within the chamber and blanket, the magnets are exposed to a radiation environment. Although the magnet bores would be sized to avoid line-of-sight irradiation, the magnets still would be susceptible to nuclear heating and radiation damage from neutrons and y-rays. Additionally, the magnets must be included in waste management considerations due to neutron activation. Modified versions of the HYLIFE-II IFE power plant featuring two-sided illumination by arrays of 32 or 96 beams from each side are presented. A simple, point-of-departure quadrupole magnet design is assumed, and a three-dimensional neutronics model is created for the Flibe pocket, first wall, blanket, shield, and final two focusing magnets. This work details state-of-the-art neutronics calculations and shows that the final focus system needs to be included in the economic and environmental considerations for the driver-chamber interface of any HIF IFE power plant design.

  14. Two- and three-dimensional magnetic order in the layered cobalt oxychloride Sr2CoO3Cl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knee, Christopher S.; Price, Daniel J.; Lees, Martin R.; Weller, Mark T.

    2003-11-01

    The temperature dependence of the nuclear and magnetic structure of the cobalt oxychloride Sr2CoO3Cl has been studied using neutron powder diffraction. The material crystallizes with a structure related to K2NiF4 and contains two-dimensional (2D) layers of CoO5 square pyramids that are segregated along z by alternate rocksalt SrCl and SrO blocks. The development of magnetic Bragg scattering indicates that the compound orders antiferromagnetically with a TN=330(5) K. The phase adopts a collinear magnetic structure related to the nuclear cell by the propagation vector k=(1/2, 1/2, 0) with the cobalt spins aligned along the a axis of the magnetic cell. The ordered moment μ=2.82(3)μB, refined at 3 K, is consistent with a high-spin (t42ge2g) electron configuration for the Co(III) ions. The onset of long-range magnetic order is characterized by a three-dimensional transition and is accompanied by anomalous behavior in the Co environment with distinct magnetostriction effects observed in the interlayer Co to Co exchange pathways. The transition is preceded by diffuse magnetic scattering arising from short-range in-plane correlations, with significant diffuse intensity observed up to the maximum temperature studied of 378 K. Magnetic susceptibility measurements indicate that the onset of significant 2D interactions occurs at T≈500 K. The diffuse intensity can be fitted using the Warren function to give a maximum in the 2D correlation length ξ of 40(4) Å just above TN. Below TN diffuse scattering coexists with magnetic Bragg scattering, indicating that the transition to long-range order is hindered most probably due to the presence of stacking disorder between the antiferromagnetic sheets.

  15. Three Dimensional Simulation of the Baneberry Nuclear Event

    SciTech Connect

    Lomov, I

    2003-07-16

    Baneberry, a 10-kiloton nuclear event, was detonated at a depth of 278 m at the Nevada Test Site on December 18, 1970. Shortly after detonation, radioactive gases emanating from the cavity were released into the atmosphere through a shock-induced fissure near surface ground zero. Extensive geophysical investigations, coupled with a series of 1D and 2D computational studies were used to reconstruct the sequence of events that led to the catastrophic failure. However, the geological profile of the Baneberry site is complex and inherently three-dimensional, which meant that some geological features had to be simplified or ignored in the 2D simulations. This left open the possibility that features unaccounted for in the 2D simulations could have had an important influence on the eventual containment failure of the Baneberry event. This paper presents results from a high-fidelity 3D Baneberry simulation based on the most accurate geologic and geophysical data available. The results are compared with available data, and contrasted against the results of the previous 2D computational studies.

  16. Storage of nuclear magnetization as long-lived singlet order in low magnetic field

    PubMed Central

    Pileio, Giuseppe; Carravetta, Marina; Levitt, Malcolm H.

    2010-01-01

    Hyperpolarized nuclear states provide NMR signals enhanced by many orders of magnitude, with numerous potential applications to analytical NMR, in vivo NMR, and NMR imaging. However, the lifetime of hyperpolarized magnetization is normally limited by the relaxation time constant T1, which lies in the range of milliseconds to minutes, apart from in exceptional cases. In many cases, the lifetime of the hyperpolarized state may be enhanced by converting the magnetization into nuclear singlet order, where it is protected against many common relaxation mechanisms. However, all current methods for converting magnetization into singlet order require the use of a high-field, high-homogeneity NMR magnet, which is incompatible with most hyperpolarization procedures. We demonstrate a new method for converting magnetization into singlet order and back again. The new technique is suitable for magnetically inequivalent spin-pair systems in weak and inhomogeneous magnetic fields, and is compatible with known hyperpolarization technology. The method involves audio-frequency pulsed irradiation at the low-field nuclear Larmor frequency, employing coupling-synchronized trains of 180° pulses to induce singlet–triplet transitions. The echo trains are used as building blocks for a pulse sequence called M2S that transforms longitudinal magnetization into long-lived singlet order. The time-reverse of the pulse sequence, called S2M, converts singlet order back into longitudinal magnetization. The method is demonstrated on a solution of 15N-labeled nitrous oxide. The magnetization is stored in low magnetic field for over 30 min, even though the T1 is less than 3 min under the same conditions. PMID:20855584

  17. Storage of nuclear magnetization as long-lived singlet order in low magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Pileio, Giuseppe; Carravetta, Marina; Levitt, Malcolm H

    2010-10-01

    Hyperpolarized nuclear states provide NMR signals enhanced by many orders of magnitude, with numerous potential applications to analytical NMR, in vivo NMR, and NMR imaging. However, the lifetime of hyperpolarized magnetization is normally limited by the relaxation time constant T(1), which lies in the range of milliseconds to minutes, apart from in exceptional cases. In many cases, the lifetime of the hyperpolarized state may be enhanced by converting the magnetization into nuclear singlet order, where it is protected against many common relaxation mechanisms. However, all current methods for converting magnetization into singlet order require the use of a high-field, high-homogeneity NMR magnet, which is incompatible with most hyperpolarization procedures. We demonstrate a new method for converting magnetization into singlet order and back again. The new technique is suitable for magnetically inequivalent spin-pair systems in weak and inhomogeneous magnetic fields, and is compatible with known hyperpolarization technology. The method involves audio-frequency pulsed irradiation at the low-field nuclear Larmor frequency, employing coupling-synchronized trains of 180° pulses to induce singlet-triplet transitions. The echo trains are used as building blocks for a pulse sequence called M2S that transforms longitudinal magnetization into long-lived singlet order. The time-reverse of the pulse sequence, called S2M, converts singlet order back into longitudinal magnetization. The method is demonstrated on a solution of (15)N-labeled nitrous oxide. The magnetization is stored in low magnetic field for over 30 min, even though the T(1) is less than 3 min under the same conditions.

  18. Influence of nuclear spin on chemical reactions: Magnetic isotope and magnetic field effects (A Review)

    PubMed Central

    Turro, Nicholas J.

    1983-01-01

    The course of chemical reactions involving radical pairs may depend on occurrence and orientation of nuclear spins in the pairs. The influence of nuclear spins is maximized when the radical pairs are confined to a space that serves as a cage that allows a certain degree of independent diffusional and rotational motion of the partners of the pair but that also encourages reencounters of the partners within a period which allows the nuclear spins to operate on the odd electron spins of the pair. Under the proper conditions, the nuclear spins can induce intersystem crossing between triplet and singlet states of radical pairs. It is shown that this dependence of intersystem crossing on nuclear spin leads to a magnetic isotope effect on the chemistry of radical pairs which provides a means of separating isotopes on the basis of nuclear spins rather than nuclear masses and also leads to a magnetic field effect on the chemistry of radical pairs which provides a means of influencing the course of polymerization by the application of weak magnetic fields. PMID:16593273

  19. High-resolution proton nuclear magnetic resonance characterization of seminolipid from bovine spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, J G; Storey, B T; Hemling, M L; Grob, R L

    1990-06-01

    The high-resolution one- and two-dimensional proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) characterization of seminolipid from bovine spermatozoa is presented. The 1H-NMR data was confirmed by gas-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometric analysis of the partially methylated alditol acetates of the sugar unit, mild alkaline methanolysis of the glyceryl ester, mobility on normal phase and diphasic thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC), and fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry (FAB-MS). The structure of the molecule corresponds to 1-O-hexadecyl-2-O-hexadecanoyl-3-O-beta-D-(3'-sulfo)-galactopyranosyl- sn-glycerol. PMID:2373957

  20. Coaxial probe for nuclear magnetic resonance diffusion and relaxation correlation experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Yiqiao; Hürlimann, Martin; Mandal, Soumyajit; Paulsen, Jeffrey; Song, Yi-Qiao

    2014-02-21

    A coaxial nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) probe is built to measure diffusion and relaxation properties of liquid samples. In particular, we demonstrate the acquisition of two-dimensional (2D) distribution functions (T{sub 1}-T{sub 2} and diffusion–T{sub 2}), essential for fluids characterization. The compact design holds promise for miniaturization, thus enabling the measurement of molecular diffusion that is inaccessible to conventional micro-NMR setups. Potential applications range from crude oil characterization to biomolecular screening and detections.

  1. High-resolution proton nuclear magnetic resonance characterization of seminolipid from bovine spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, J G; Storey, B T; Hemling, M L; Grob, R L

    1990-06-01

    The high-resolution one- and two-dimensional proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) characterization of seminolipid from bovine spermatozoa is presented. The 1H-NMR data was confirmed by gas-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometric analysis of the partially methylated alditol acetates of the sugar unit, mild alkaline methanolysis of the glyceryl ester, mobility on normal phase and diphasic thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC), and fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry (FAB-MS). The structure of the molecule corresponds to 1-O-hexadecyl-2-O-hexadecanoyl-3-O-beta-D-(3'-sulfo)-galactopyranosyl- sn-glycerol.

  2. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging at microscopic resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, G. Allan; Thompson, Morrow B.; Gewalt, Sally L.; Hayes, Cecil E.

    Resolution limits in NMR imaging are imposed by bandwidth considerations, available magnetic gradients for spatial encoding, and signal to noise. This work reports modification of a clinical NMR imaging device with picture elements of 500 × 500 × 5000 μm to yield picture elements of 50 × 50 × 1000 μm. Resolution has been increased by using smaller gradient coils permitting gradient fields >0.4 mT/cm. Significant improvements in signal to noise are achieved with smaller rf coils, close attention to choice of bandwidth, and signal averaging. These improvements permit visualization of anatomical structures in the rat brain with an effective diameter of 1 cm with the same definition as is seen in human imaging. The techniques and instrumentation should open a number of basic sciences such as embryology, plant sciences, and teratology to the potentials of NMR imaging.

  3. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging in patients with cardiac pacing devices.

    PubMed

    Buendía, Francisco; Sánchez-Gómez, Juan M; Sancho-Tello, María J; Olagüe, José; Osca, Joaquín; Cano, Oscar; Arnau, Miguel A; Igual, Begoña

    2010-06-01

    Currently, nuclear magnetic resonance imaging is contraindicated in patients with a pacemaker or implantable cardioverter-defibrillator. This study was carried out because the potential risks in this situation need to be clearly defined. This prospective study evaluated clinical and electrical parameters before and after magnetic resonance imaging was performed in 33 patients (five with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators and 28 with pacemakers). In these patients, magnetic resonance imaging was considered clinically essential. There were no clinical complications. There was a temporary communication failure in two cases, sensing errors during imaging in two cases, and a safety signal was generated in one pacemaker at the maximum magnetic resonance frequency and output level. There were no technical restrictions on imaging nor were there any permanent changes in the performance of the cardiac pacing device. PMID:20515632

  4. Four-dimensional flow magnetic resonance imaging in cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Stankovic, Zoran

    2016-01-01

    Since its introduction in the 1970’s, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become a standard imaging modality. With its broad and standardized application, it is firmly established in the clinical routine and an essential element in cardiovascular and abdominal imaging. In addition to sonography and computer tomography, MRI is a valuable tool for diagnosing cardiovascular and abdominal diseases, for determining disease severity, and for assessing therapeutic success. MRI techniques have improved over the last few decades, revealing not just morphologic information, but functional information about perfusion, diffusion and hemodynamics as well. Four-dimensional (4D) flow MRI, a time-resolved phase contrast-MRI with three-dimensional (3D) anatomic coverage and velocity encoding along all three flow directions has been used to comprehensively assess complex cardiovascular hemodynamics in multiple regions of the body. The technique enables visualization of 3D blood flow patterns and retrospective quantification of blood flow parameters in a region of interest. Over the last few years, 4D flow MRI has been increasingly performed in the abdominal region. By applying different acceleration techniques, taking 4D flow MRI measurements has dropped to a reasonable scanning time of 8 to 12 min. These new developments have encouraged a growing number of patient studies in the literature validating the technique’s potential for enhanced evaluation of blood flow parameters within the liver’s complex vascular system. The purpose of this review article is to broaden our understanding of 4D flow MRI for the assessment of liver hemodynamics by providing insights into acquisition, data analysis, visualization and quantification. Furthermore, in this article we highlight its development, focussing on the clinical application of the technique. PMID:26755862

  5. Three-dimensional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of fossils across taxa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mietchen, D.; Aberhan, M.; Manz, B.; Hampe, O.; Mohr, B.; Neumann, C.; Volke, F.

    2008-01-01

    The frequency of life forms in the fossil record is largely determined by the extent to which they were mineralised at the time of their death. In addition to mineral structures, many fossils nonetheless contain detectable amounts of residual water or organic molecules, the analysis of which has become an integral part of current palaeontological research. The methods available for this sort of investigations, though, typically require dissolution or ionisation of the fossil sample or parts thereof, which is an issue with rare taxa and outstanding materials like pathological or type specimens. In such cases, non-destructive techniques could provide a valuable methodological alternative. While Computed Tomography has long been used to study palaeontological specimens, a number of complementary approaches have recently gained ground. These include Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) which had previously been employed to obtain three-dimensional images of pathological belemnites non-invasively on the basis of intrinsic contrast. The present study was undertaken to investigate whether 1H MRI can likewise provide anatomical information about non-pathological belemnites and specimens of other fossil taxa. To this end, three-dimensional MR image series were acquired from intact non-pathological invertebrate, vertebrate and plant fossils. At routine voxel resolutions in the range of several dozens to some hundreds of micrometers, these images reveal a host of anatomical details and thus highlight the potential of MR techniques to effectively complement existing methodological approaches for palaeontological investigations in a wide range of taxa. As for the origin of the MR signal, relaxation and diffusion measurements as well as 1H and 13C MR spectra acquired from a belemnite suggest intracrystalline water or hydroxyl groups, rather than organic residues.

  6. Three-dimensional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of fossils across taxa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mietchen, D.; Aberhan, M.; Manz, B.; Hampe, O.; Mohr, B.; Neumann, C.; Volke, F.

    2007-08-01

    The visibility of life forms in the fossil record is largely determined by the extent to which they were mineralised at the time of their death. In addition to mineral structures, many fossils nonetheless contain detectable amounts of residual water or organic molecules, the analysis of which has become an integral part of current palaeontological research. The methods available for this sort of investigations, though, typically require dissolution or ionisation of the fossil sample or parts thereof, which is an issue with rare taxa and outstanding materials like pathological or type specimens. In such cases, non-destructive techniques could provide an interesting methodological alternative. While Computed Tomography has long been used to study palaeontological specimens, a number of complementary approaches have recently gained ground. These include Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) which had previously been employed to obtain three-dimensional images of pathological belemnites non-invasively on the basis of intrinsic contrast. The present study was undertaken to investigate whether 1H MRI can likewise provide anatomical information about non-pathological belemnites and specimens of other fossil taxa. To this end, three-dimensional MR image series were acquired from intact non-pathological invertebrate, vertebrate and plant fossils. At routine voxel resolutions in the range of several dozens to some hundreds of micrometers, these images reveal a host of anatomical details and thus highlight the potential of MR techniques to effectively complement existing methodological approaches for palaeontological investigations in a wide range of taxa. As for the origin of the MR signal, relaxation and diffusion measurements as well as 1H and 13C MR spectra acquired from a belemnite suggest intracrystalline water or hydroxyl groups, rather than organic residues.

  7. Three-dimensional charge density wave order in YBa2Cu3O6.67 at high magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Gerber, S; Jang, H; Nojiri, H; Matsuzawa, S; Yasumura, H; Bonn, D A; Liang, R; Hardy, W N; Islam, Z; Mehta, A; Song, S; Sikorski, M; Stefanescu, D; Feng, Y; Kivelson, S A; Devereaux, T P; Shen, Z-X; Kao, C-C; Lee, W-S; Zhu, D; Lee, J-S

    2015-11-20

    Charge density wave (CDW) correlations have been shown to universally exist in cuprate superconductors. However, their nature at high fields inferred from nuclear magnetic resonance is distinct from that measured with x-ray scattering at zero and low fields. We combined a pulsed magnet with an x-ray free-electron laser to characterize the CDW in YBa2Cu3O6.67 via x-ray scattering in fields of up to 28 tesla. While the zero-field CDW order, which develops at temperatures below ~150 kelvin, is essentially two dimensional, at lower temperature and beyond 15 tesla, another three-dimensionally ordered CDW emerges. The field-induced CDW appears around the zero-field superconducting transition temperature; in contrast, the incommensurate in-plane ordering vector is field-independent. This implies that the two forms of CDW and high-temperature superconductivity are intimately linked. PMID:26541608

  8. Three-Dimensional Charge Density Wave Order in YBa2Cu3O6.67 at High Magnetic Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, S.; Jang, H.; Nojiri, H.; Matsuzawa, S.; Yasumura, H.; Bonn, D. A.; Liang, R.; Hardy, W.; Islam, Z.; Lee, W. -S.; Zhu, D.; Lee, J. -S.

    2015-11-20

    Charge density wave (CDW) correlations have been shown to universally exist in cuprate superconductors. However, their nature at high fields inferred from nuclear magnetic resonance is distinct from that measured by x-ray scattering at zero and low fields. Here we combine a pulsed magnet with an x-ray free electron laser to characterize the CDW in YBa2Cu3O6.67 via x-ray scattering in fields up to 28 Tesla. While the zero-field CDW order, which develops below T ~ 150 K, is essentially two-dimensional, at lower temperature and beyond 15 Tesla, another three-dimensionally ordered CDW emerges. The field-induced CDW onsets around the zero-field superconducting transition temperature, yet the incommensurate inplane ordering vector is field-independent. This implies that the two forms of CDW and hightemperature superconductivity are intimately linked.

  9. Three-dimensional charge density wave order in YBa2Cu3O6.67 at high magnetic fields

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gerber, S.; Jang, H.; Nojiri, H.; Matsuzawa, S.; Yasumura, H.; Bonn, D. A.; Liang, R.; Hardy, W. N.; Islam, Z.; Mehta, A.; et al

    2015-11-20

    In this study, charge density wave (CDW) correlations have recently been shown to universally exist in cuprate superconductors. However, their nature at high fields inferred from nuclear magnetic resonance is distinct from that measured by x-ray scattering at zero and low fields. Here we combine a pulsed magnet with an x-ray free electron laser to characterize the CDW in YBa2Cu3O6.67 via x-ray scattering in fields up to 28 Tesla. While the zero-field CDW order, which develops below T ~ 150 K, is essentially two-dimensional, at lower temperature and beyond 15 Tesla, another three-dimensionally ordered CDW emerges. The field-induced CDW onsetsmore » around the zero-field superconducting transition temperature, yet the incommensurate in-plane ordering vector is field-independent. This implies that the two forms of CDW and high-temperature superconductivity are intimately linked.« less

  10. Investigation of the Possibility of Using Nuclear Magnetic Spin Alignment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dent, William V., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    The goal of the program to investigate a "Gasdynamic fusion propulsion system for space exploration" is to develop a fusion propulsion system for a manned mission to the planet mars. A study using Deuterium and Tritium atoms are currently in progress. When these atoms under-go fusion, the resulting neutrons and alpha particles are emitted in random directions (isotropically). The probable direction of emission is equal for all directions, thus resulting in wasted energy, massive shielding and cooling requirements, and serious problems with the physics of achieving fusion. If the nuclear magnetic spin moments of the deuterium and tritium nuclei could be precisely aligned at the moment of fusion, the stream of emitted neutrons could be directed out the rear of the spacecraft for thrust and the alpha particles directed forward into an electromagnet ot produce electricity to continue operating the fusion engine. The following supporting topics are discussed: nuclear magnetic moments and spin precession in magnetic field, nuclear spin quantum mechanics, kinematics of nuclear reactions, and angular distribution of particles.

  11. Quantification of compartmented metabolic fluxes in developing soybean embryos by employing biosynthetically directed fractional (13)C labeling, two-dimensional [(13)C, (1)H] nuclear magnetic resonance, and comprehensive isotopomer balancing.

    PubMed

    Sriram, Ganesh; Fulton, D Bruce; Iyer, Vidya V; Peterson, Joan Marie; Zhou, Ruilian; Westgate, Mark E; Spalding, Martin H; Shanks, Jacqueline V

    2004-10-01

    Metabolic flux quantification in plants is instrumental in the detailed understanding of metabolism but is difficult to perform on a systemic level. Toward this aim, we report the development and application of a computer-aided metabolic flux analysis tool that enables the concurrent evaluation of fluxes in several primary metabolic pathways. Labeling experiments were performed by feeding a mixture of U-(13)C Suc, naturally abundant Suc, and Gln to developing soybean (Glycine max) embryos. Two-dimensional [(13)C, (1)H] NMR spectra of seed storage protein and starch hydrolysates were acquired and yielded a labeling data set consisting of 155 (13)C isotopomer abundances. We developed a computer program to automatically calculate fluxes from this data. This program accepts a user-defined metabolic network model and incorporates recent mathematical advances toward accurate and efficient flux evaluation. Fluxes were calculated and statistical analysis was performed to obtain sds. A high flux was found through the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (19.99 +/- 4.39 micromol d(-1) cotyledon(-1), or 104.2 carbon mol +/- 23.0 carbon mol per 100 carbon mol of Suc uptake). Separate transketolase and transaldolase fluxes could be distinguished in the plastid and the cytosol, and those in the plastid were found to be at least 6-fold higher. The backflux from triose to hexose phosphate was also found to be substantial in the plastid (21.72 +/- 5.00 micromol d(-1) cotyledon(-1), or 113.2 carbon mol +/-26.0 carbon mol per 100 carbon mol of Suc uptake). Forward and backward directions of anaplerotic fluxes could be distinguished. The glyoxylate shunt flux was found to be negligible. Such a generic flux analysis tool can serve as a quantitative tool for metabolic studies and phenotype comparisons and can be extended to other plant systems.

  12. Influence of external magnetic field and magnetic-site dilution on the magnetic dynamics of a one-dimensional Tb(III)-radical complex.

    PubMed

    Li, Leilei; Liu, Shuang; Li, Han; Shi, Wei; Cheng, Peng

    2015-07-11

    A new Tb(III)-radical chain complex was synthesized and characterized, which exhibited two separate relaxation processes. The influence of external magnetic field and magnetic-site dilution on the magnetic dynamics of a one-dimensional Tb(III)-radical complex was studied.

  13. Two-dimensional quantum walk under artificial magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yalcinkaya, Iskender; Gedik, Zafer

    We introduce the Peierls substitution to a two-dimensional discrete-time quantum walk on a square lattice to examine the spreading dynamics and the coin-position entanglement in the presence of an artificial gauge field. We use the ratio of the magnetic flux through the unit cell to the flux quantum as a control parameter. For a given flux ratio, we obtain faster spreading for a small number of steps and the walker tends to be highly localized around the origin. Moreover, the spreading of the walk can be suppressed and decreased within a limited time interval for specific rational values of flux ratio. When the flux ratio is an irrational number, even for a large number of steps, the spreading exhibit diffusive behavior rather than the well-known ballistic one as in the classical random walk and there is a significant probability of finding the walker at the origin. We also analyze the coin-position entanglement and show that the asymptotic behavior vanishes when the flux ratio is different from zero and the coin-position entanglement become nearly maximal in a periodic manner in a long time range.

  14. Dimensionality-dependent magnetic behavior in transition metal films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilman, Nathaniel; Zhang, Renjun; Hochstrasser, Michael; Willis, Roy F.

    2002-03-01

    The critical temperatures of itinerant magnets shift to lower temperatures than that of the bulk with decreasing film thickness (n monolayers). This `finite-size effect' is modified when the film thickness begins to approach an intrinsic spin-spin correlation length characteristic of the material [1]. The shift of the Curie temperature t(n) = 1 - Tc(n)/Tc(bulk) follows a power law dependence crossing over to linear behavior. This crossover thickness varies from material to material. In this paper, we monitor this behavior for a range of alloys in which the density of d-hole states is varied linearly. A corresponding linear dependence is observed in this crossover behavior. A second crossover is observed in ultrathin films corresponding to a change in dimensionality from 3D to 2D behavior. This behavior is a consequence of quantization of states in the diminishing dimension and correlates with the changing dimensions of the Fermi surfaces of a range of fcc [2] and bcc alloys. [1] R. Zhang and R. F. Willis, Phys. Rev. Lett., 86(12), 2665 (2001). [2] M. Hochstrasser, N. Gilman, R. F. Willis, F. O. Schumann, J. G. Tobin and E. Rotenberg, Phys. Rev. B 60(24), 17030 (1999).

  15. Flat RF coils in static field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Stork, H; Gädke, A; Nestle, N; Fujara, F

    2009-10-01

    The use of flat RF coils allows considerable gains in the sensitivity of static field gradient (SFG) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments. In this article, this effect is studied theoretically as well as experimentally. Additionally, the flat coil geometry has been studied theoretically depending on magnetic field gradient, pulse sequence and amplifier power. Moreover, detecting the signal directly from the free induction decay (FID) turned out to be quite attractive for STRAFI-like microimaging experiments, especially when using flat coils. In addition to wound rectangular flat coils also spiral flat coils have been developed which can be manufactured by photolithography from printed circuit boards.

  16. Stochastic dipolar recoupling in nuclear magnetic resonance of solids.

    PubMed

    Tycko, Robert

    2007-11-01

    I describe a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique, called stochastic dipolar recoupling (SDR), that permits continuous experimental control of the character of spin dynamics between coherent and incoherent limits in a system of magnetic dipole-coupled nuclei. In the fully incoherent limit of SDR, spin polarization transfers occur at distance-dependent rates without the quantum mechanical interferences among pairwise dipole-dipole couplings that often limit the feasibility or precision of structural studies of solids by NMR. In addition to facilitating structural studies, SDR represents a possible route to experimental studies of effects of decoherence on the dynamics of quantum many-body systems.

  17. Algorithmic cooling in liquid-state nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atia, Yosi; Elias, Yuval; Mor, Tal; Weinstein, Yossi

    2016-01-01

    Algorithmic cooling is a method that employs thermalization to increase qubit purification level; namely, it reduces the qubit system's entropy. We utilized gradient ascent pulse engineering, an optimal control algorithm, to implement algorithmic cooling in liquid-state nuclear magnetic resonance. Various cooling algorithms were applied onto the three qubits of C132-trichloroethylene, cooling the system beyond Shannon's entropy bound in several different ways. In particular, in one experiment a carbon qubit was cooled by a factor of 4.61. This work is a step towards potentially integrating tools of NMR quantum computing into in vivo magnetic-resonance spectroscopy.

  18. Stochastic Dipolar Recoupling in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance of Solids

    SciTech Connect

    Tycko, Robert

    2007-11-02

    I describe a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique, called stochastic dipolar recoupling (SDR), that permits continuous experimental control of the character of spin dynamics between coherent and incoherent limits in a system of magnetic dipole-coupled nuclei. In the fully incoherent limit of SDR, spin polarization transfers occur at distance-dependent rates without the quantum mechanical interferences among pairwise dipole-dipole couplings that often limit the feasibility or precision of structural studies of solids by NMR. In addition to facilitating structural studies, SDR represents a possible route to experimental studies of effects of decoherence on the dynamics of quantum many-body system000.

  19. Stochastic dipolar recoupling in nuclear magnetic resonance of solids

    PubMed Central

    Tycko, Robert

    2008-01-01

    I describe a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique, called stochastic dipolar recoupling (SDR), that permits continuous experimental control of the character of spin dynamics between coherent and incoherent limits in a system of magnetic dipole-coupled nuclei. In the fully incoherent limit of SDR, spin polarization transfers occur at distance-dependent rates without the quantum mechanical interferences among pairwise dipole-dipole couplings that often limit the feasibility or precision of structural studies of solids by NMR. In addition to facilitating structural studies, SDR represents a possible route to experimental studies of effects of decoherence on the dynamics of quantum many-body systems. PMID:17995438

  20. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the circadian clock of cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yong-Gang; Tseng, Roger; Kuo, Nai-Wei; LiWang, Andy

    2013-07-01

    The most well-understood circadian clock at the level of molecular mechanisms is that of cyanobacteria. This overview is on how solution-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has contributed to this understanding. By exciting atomic spin-½ nuclei in a strong magnetic field, NMR obtains information on their chemical environments, inter-nuclear distances, orientations, and motions. NMR protein samples are typically aqueous, often at near-physiological pH, ionic strength, and temperature. The level of information obtainable by NMR depends on the quality of the NMR sample, by which we mean the solubility and stability of proteins. Here, we use examples from our laboratory to illustrate the advantages and limitations of the technique. PMID:23667047

  1. Probing soil and aquifer material porosity with nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinedi, Z. R.; Kabala, Z. J.; Skaggs, T. H.; Borchardt, D. B.; Lee, R. W. K.; Chang, A. C.

    1993-12-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation measurements were used to identify different characteristic porosity domains in soil and aquifer materials. The porosity distribution can be inferred from these measurements by a regularization method applicable to any nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation, or by an analytic method applicable only to multiexponential relaxations (D. Orazio et al., 1989). The porosity distribution obtained from NMR relaxation measurements strongly depends on the pore shape factor. For the Borden aquifer material, both the regularized and the analytic pore size distribution obtained from NMR relaxation measurements are consistent with those obtained by Ball et al. (1990) using Hg porosimetry and N2 adsorption. For the Eustis and the Webster soils, the measured porosity domains are qualitatively consistent with those expected based on their respective composition. Our findings suggest that due to the long time required to saturate fine pores, NMR measurements of porosity distribution that are collected at short saturation times are biased toward larger pore sizes.

  2. Nuclear chiral and magnetic rotation in covariant density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Jie; Zhao, Pengwei

    2016-05-01

    Excitations of chiral rotation observed in triaxial nuclei and magnetic and/or antimagnetic rotations (AMR) seen in near-spherical nuclei have attracted a lot of attention. Unlike conventional rotation in well-deformed or superdeformed nuclei, here the rotational axis is not necessary coinciding with any principal axis of the nuclear density distribution. Thus, tilted axis cranking (TAC) is mandatory to describe these excitations self-consistently in the framework of covariant density functional theory (CDFT). We will briefly introduce the formalism of TAC-CDFT and its application for magnetic and AMR phenomena. Configuration-fixed CDFT and its predictions for nuclear chiral configurations and for favorable triaxial deformation parameters are also presented, and the discoveries of the multiple chiral doublets in 133Ce and 103Rh are discussed.

  3. A discussion of Bl conservation on a two dimensional magnetic field plane in watt balances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shisong; Zhao, Wei; Huang, Songling

    2016-05-01

    The watt balance is an experiment being pursued in national metrology institutes for precision determination of the Planck constant h. In watt balances, the 1/r magnetic field, expected to generate a geometrical factor Bl independent to any coil horizontal displacement, can be created by a strict two dimensional, symmetric (horizontal r and vertical z) construction of the magnet system. In this paper, we present an analytical understanding of magnetic field distribution when the r symmetry of the magnet is broken and the establishment of the Bl conservation is shown. By using either Gauss’s law on magnetism with monopoles or conformal transformations, we extend the Bl conservation to arbitrary two dimensional magnetic planes where the vertical magnetic field component equals zero. The generalized Bl conservation allows a relaxed physical alignment criteria for watt balance magnet systems.

  4. Chemometric Analysis of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Data

    SciTech Connect

    ALAM,TODD M.; ALAM,M. KATHLEEN

    2000-07-20

    Chemometric analysis of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has increased dramatically in recent years. A variety of different chemometric techniques have been applied to a wide range of problems in food, agricultural, medical, process and industrial systems. This article gives a brief review of chemometric analysis of NMR spectral data, including a summary of the types of mixtures and experiments analyzed with chemometric techniques. Common experimental problems encountered during the chemometric analysis of NMR data are also discussed.

  5. Solid state nuclear magnetic resonance with magic-angle spinning and dynamic nuclear polarization below 25 K.

    PubMed

    Thurber, Kent R; Potapov, Alexey; Yau, Wai-Ming; Tycko, Robert

    2013-01-01

    We describe an apparatus for solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) with dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) and magic-angle spinning (MAS) at 20-25 K and 9.4 Tesla. The MAS NMR probe uses helium to cool the sample space and nitrogen gas for MAS drive and bearings, as described earlier, but also includes a corrugated waveguide for transmission of microwaves from below the probe to the sample. With a 30 mW circularly polarized microwave source at 264 GHz, MAS at 6.8 kHz, and 21 K sample temperature, greater than 25-fold enhancements of cross-polarized (13)C NMR signals are observed in spectra of frozen glycerol/water solutions containing the triradical dopant DOTOPA-TEMPO when microwaves are applied. As demonstrations, we present DNP-enhanced one-dimensional and two-dimensional (13)C MAS NMR spectra of frozen solutions of uniformly (13)C-labeled l-alanine and melittin, a 26-residue helical peptide that we have synthesized with four uniformly (13)C-labeled amino acids. PMID:23238592

  6. Solid state nuclear magnetic resonance with magic-angle spinning and dynamic nuclear polarization below 25 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurber, Kent R.; Potapov, Alexey; Yau, Wai-Ming; Tycko, Robert

    2013-01-01

    We describe an apparatus for solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) with dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) and magic-angle spinning (MAS) at 20-25 K and 9.4 Tesla. The MAS NMR probe uses helium to cool the sample space and nitrogen gas for MAS drive and bearings, as described earlier [1], but also includes a corrugated waveguide for transmission of microwaves from below the probe to the sample. With a 30 mW circularly polarized microwave source at 264 GHz, MAS at 6.8 kHz, and 21 K sample temperature, greater than 25-fold enhancements of cross-polarized 13C NMR signals are observed in spectra of frozen glycerol/water solutions containing the triradical dopant DOTOPA-TEMPO when microwaves are applied. As demonstrations, we present DNP-enhanced one-dimensional and two-dimensional 13C MAS NMR spectra of frozen solutions of uniformly 13C-labeled L-alanine and melittin, a 26-residue helical peptide that we have synthesized with four uniformly 13C-labeled amino acids.

  7. Solid state nuclear magnetic resonance with magic-angle spinning and dynamic nuclear polarization below 25 K

    PubMed Central

    Thurber, Kent R.; Potapov, Alexey; Yau, Wai-Ming; Tycko, Robert

    2012-01-01

    We describe an apparatus for solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) with dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) and magic-angle spinning (MAS) at 20–25 K and 9.4 Tesla. The MAS NMR probe uses helium to cool the sample space and nitrogen gas for MAS drive and bearings, as described earlier (Thurber et al., J. Magn. Reson. 2008) [1], but also includes a corrugated waveguide for transmission of microwaves from below the probe to the sample. With a 30 mW circularly polarized microwave source at 264 GHz, MAS at 6.8 kHz, and 21 K sample temperature, greater than 25-fold enhancements of cross-polarized 13C NMR signals are observed in spectra of frozen glycerol/water solutions containing the triradical dopant DOTOPA-TEMPO when microwaves are applied. As demonstrations, we present DNP-enhanced one-dimensional and two-dimensional 13C MAS NMR spectra of frozen solutions of uniformly 13C-labeled L-alanine and melittin, a 26-residue helical peptide that we have synthesized with four uniformly 13C-labeled amino acids. PMID:23238592

  8. Coexistence of Incommensurate Magnetism and Superconductivity in the Two-Dimensional Hubbard Model.

    PubMed

    Yamase, Hiroyuki; Eberlein, Andreas; Metzner, Walter

    2016-03-01

    We analyze the competition of magnetism and superconductivity in the two-dimensional Hubbard model with a moderate interaction strength, including the possibility of incommensurate spiral magnetic order. Using an unbiased renormalization group approach, we compute magnetic and superconducting order parameters in the ground state. In addition to previously established regions of Néel order coexisting with d-wave superconductivity, the calculations reveal further coexistence regions where superconductivity is accompanied by incommensurate magnetic order.

  9. Electronic Magnetization of a Quantum Point Contact Measured by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Minoru; Ono, Keiji; Stano, Peter; Kono, Kimitoshi; Aono, Tomosuke

    2015-07-17

    We report an electronic magnetization measurement of a quantum point contact (QPC) based on nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. We find that NMR signals can be detected by measuring the QPC conductance under in-plane magnetic fields. This makes it possible to measure, from Knight shifts of the NMR spectra, the electronic magnetization of a QPC containing only a few electron spins. The magnetization changes smoothly with the QPC potential barrier height and peaks at the conductance plateau of 0.5×2e^{2}/h. The observed features are well captured by a model calculation assuming a smooth potential barrier, supporting a no bound state origin of the 0.7 structure.

  10. Line broadening interference for high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectra under inhomogeneous magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Zhiliang; Yang, Jian; Lin, Yanqin E-mail: chenz@xmu.edu.cn; Chen, Zhong E-mail: chenz@xmu.edu.cn; Chen, Youhe

    2015-04-07

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy serves as an important tool for analyzing chemicals and biological metabolites. However, its performance is subject to the magnetic-field homogeneity. Under inhomogeneous fields, peaks are broadened to overlap each other, introducing difficulties for assignments. Here, we propose a method termed as line broadening interference (LBI) to provide high-resolution information under inhomogeneous magnetic fields by employing certain gradients in the indirect dimension to interfere the magnetic-field inhomogeneity. The conventional spectral-line broadening is thus interfered to be non-diagonal, avoiding the overlapping among adjacent resonances. Furthermore, an inhomogeneity correction algorithm is developed based on pattern recognition to recover the high-resolution information from LBI spectra. Theoretical deductions are performed to offer systematic and detailed analyses on the proposed method. Moreover, experiments are conducted to prove the feasibility of the proposed method for yielding high-resolution spectra in inhomogeneous magnetic fields.

  11. Line broadening interference for high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectra under inhomogeneous magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zhiliang; Yang, Jian; Chen, Youhe; Lin, Yanqin; Chen, Zhong

    2015-04-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy serves as an important tool for analyzing chemicals and biological metabolites. However, its performance is subject to the magnetic-field homogeneity. Under inhomogeneous fields, peaks are broadened to overlap each other, introducing difficulties for assignments. Here, we propose a method termed as line broadening interference (LBI) to provide high-resolution information under inhomogeneous magnetic fields by employing certain gradients in the indirect dimension to interfere the magnetic-field inhomogeneity. The conventional spectral-line broadening is thus interfered to be non-diagonal, avoiding the overlapping among adjacent resonances. Furthermore, an inhomogeneity correction algorithm is developed based on pattern recognition to recover the high-resolution information from LBI spectra. Theoretical deductions are performed to offer systematic and detailed analyses on the proposed method. Moreover, experiments are conducted to prove the feasibility of the proposed method for yielding high-resolution spectra in inhomogeneous magnetic fields.

  12. Nuclear magnetic resonance force microscopy at high magnetic field and low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marohn, John A.; Harrell, Lee H.; Thurber, Kent; Fainchtein, Raul; Smith, Doran D.

    2000-03-01

    We will report detection of nuclear magnetic resonance at 6.5 Tesla from a micron-scale sample by magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM) at low-temperature. We will detail a ``bare bones" one-inch diameter probe (including a novel ``string and spring" fiber positioning element, a tuned and matched RF coil, and a heating element) suitable for simple variable-temperature magnetic-resonance force microscopy studies. The compact probe design succeeded in minimizing both deleterious thermal drifts in the positions of probe components and pickup of environmental vibrations. In studying Nd-doped calcium fluoride at a magnetic field higher than has previously been employed in an MRFM experiment, we found that even sample-on-cantilever experiments can be complicated by the cantilever's resonance frequency changing with magnetic field.

  13. Electronic Magnetization of a Quantum Point Contact Measured by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, Minoru; Ono, Keiji; Stano, Peter; Kono, Kimitoshi; Aono, Tomosuke

    2015-07-01

    We report an electronic magnetization measurement of a quantum point contact (QPC) based on nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. We find that NMR signals can be detected by measuring the QPC conductance under in-plane magnetic fields. This makes it possible to measure, from Knight shifts of the NMR spectra, the electronic magnetization of a QPC containing only a few electron spins. The magnetization changes smoothly with the QPC potential barrier height and peaks at the conductance plateau of 0.5 ×2 e2/h . The observed features are well captured by a model calculation assuming a smooth potential barrier, supporting a no bound state origin of the 0.7 structure.

  14. Vacuum modeling of three-dimensional magnetic field topology under resonant magnetic perturbations on EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, M.; Sun, Y.; Zhong, F.; Li, H.; Li, G.; Wang, L.; Gan, K.; Zhang, B.; Qian, J.; Shen, B.

    2016-05-01

    A numerical model using field line tracing for modeling of three-dimensional magnetic field topology under resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) on experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST) is presented. The topological structure is calculated in the vacuum paradigm. The modeling result predicts that the possible strike point splitting on a plasma-facing component and the lobes-like structure on the boundary are observable in the diagnostics at different locations. It is shown that the magnetic perturbations with a resonant dominant spectrum can induce a large footprint splitting effect as well as a wide stochastic layer. This is useful for observations using diagnostics with limited spatial resolution. The impact of RMP fields on marginally disconnected double null configurations is investigated. To avoid the transient heat load on the upper divertor or plasma-facing components near the upper x-point, it is necessary to keep the distance between two separatrices of a near double null configuration larger than a threshold value that depends on the RMP strength and the equilibrium properties. A preliminary RMP experiment on EAST shows that there is a good agreement between the splitting width predicted by the code and that of the particle flux measured by divertor probes. An enhancement of particle flux on the upper divertor during the RMP phase is observed in the lower single null discharge.

  15. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for determining the functional content of organic aerosols: a review.

    PubMed

    Chalbot, Marie-Cecile G; Kavouras, Ilias G

    2014-08-01

    The knowledge deficit of organic aerosol (OA) composition has been identified as the most important factor limiting our understanding of the atmospheric fate and implications of aerosol. The efforts to chemically characterize OA include the increasing utilization of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). Since 1998, the functional composition of different types, sizes and fractions of OA has been studied with one-dimensional, two-dimensional and solid state proton and carbon-13 NMR. This led to the use of functional group ratios to reconcile the most important sources of OA, including secondary organic aerosol and initial source apportionment using positive matrix factorization. Future research efforts may be directed towards the optimization of experimental parameters, detailed NMR experiments and analysis by pattern recognition methods to identify the chemical components, determination of the NMR fingerprints of OA sources and solid state NMR to study the content of OA as a whole.

  16. Structures of peptide families by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and distance geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Pease, J.H.

    1989-12-01

    The three dimensional structures of several small peptides were determined using a combination of {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and distance geometry calculations. These techniques were found to be particularly helpful for analyzing structural differences between related peptides since all of the peptides' {sup 1}H NMR spectra are very similar. The structures of peptides from two separate classes are presented. Peptides in the first class are related to apamin, an 18 amino acid peptide toxin from honey bee venom. The {sup 1}H NMR assignments and secondary structure determination of apamin were done previously. Quantitative NMR measurements and distance geometry calculations were done to calculate apamin's three dimensional structure. Peptides in the second class are 48 amino acid toxins from the sea anemone Radianthus paumotensis. The {sup 1}H NMR assignments of toxin II were done previously. The {sup 1}H NMR assignments of toxin III and the distance geometry calculations for both peptides are presented.

  17. Magnetic Flux Compression Concept for Nuclear Pulse Propulsion and Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, Ronald J.

    2000-01-01

    The desire for fast, efficient interplanetary transport requires propulsion systems having short acceleration times and very high specific impulse attributes. Unfortunately, most highly efficient propulsion systems which are within the capabilities of present day technologies are either very heavy or yield very low impulse such that the acceleration time to final velocity is too long to be of lasting interest, One exception, the nuclear thermal thruster, could achieve the desired acceleration but it would require inordinately large mass ratios to reach the range of desired final velocities. An alternative approach, among several competing concepts that are beyond our modern technical capabilities, is a pulsed thermonuclear device utilizing microfusion detonations. In this paper, we examine the feasibility of an innovative magnetic flux compression concept for utilizing microfusion detonations, assuming that such low yield nuclear bursts can be realized in practice. In this concept, a magnetic field is compressed between an expanding detonation driven diamagnetic plasma and a stationary structure formed from a high temperature superconductor (HTSC). In general, we are interested in accomplishing two important functions: (1) collimation of a hot diamagnetic plasma for direct thrust production; and (2) pulse power generation for dense plasma ignition. For the purposes of this research, it is assumed that rnicrofusion detonation technology may become available within a few decades, and that this approach could capitalize on recent advances in inertial confinement fusion ICF) technologies including magnetized target concepts and antimatter initiated nuclear detonations. The charged particle expansion velocity in these detonations can be on the order of 10 (exp 6)- 10 (exp 7) meters per second, and, if effectively collimated by a magnetic nozzle, can yield the Isp and the acceleration levels needed for practical interplanetary spaceflight. The ability to ignite pure

  18. Highly sensitive detection of protein biomarkers via nuclear magnetic resonance biosensor with magnetically engineered nanoferrite particles

    PubMed Central

    Jeun, Minhong; Park, Sungwook; Lee, Hakho; Lee, Kwan Hyi

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic-based biosensors are attractive for on-site detection of biomarkers due to the low magnetic susceptibility of biological samples. Here, we report a highly sensitive magnetic-based biosensing system that is composed of a miniaturized nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) device and magnetically engineered nanoferrite particles (NFPs). The sensing performance, also identified as the transverse relaxation (R2) rate, of the NMR device is directly related to the magnetic properties of the NFPs. Therefore, we developed magnetically engineered NFPs (MnMg-NFP) and used them as NMR agents to exhibit a significantly improved R2 rate. The magnetization of the MnMg-NFPs was increased by controlling the Mn and Mg cation concentration and distribution during the synthesis process. This modification of the Mn and Mg cation directly contributed to improving the R2 rate. The miniaturized NMR system, combined with the magnetically engineered MnMg-NFPs, successfully detected a small amount of infectious influenza A H1N1 nucleoprotein with high sensitivity and stability. PMID:27799772

  19. Quantitative velocity distributions via nuclear magnetic resonance flow metering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Neill, Keelan T.; Fridjonsson, Einar O.; Stanwix, Paul L.; Johns, Michael L.

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate the use of Tikhonov regularisation as a data inversion technique to determine the velocity distributions of flowing liquid streams. Regularisation is applied to the signal produced by a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) flow measurement system consisting of a pre-polarising permanent magnet located upstream of an Earth's magnetic field NMR detection coil. A simple free induction decay (FID) NMR signal is measured for the flowing stream in what is effectively a 'time-of-flight' measurement. The FID signal is then modelled as a function of fluid velocity and acquisition time, enabling determination of the velocity probability distributions via regularisation. The mean values of these velocity distributions were successfully validated against in-line rotameters. The ability to quantify multi-modal velocity distributions was also demonstrated using a two-pipe system.

  20. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging with hyper-polarized noble gases

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, D.M.; George, J.S.; Penttila, S.I.; Caprihan, A.

    1997-10-01

    This is the final report of a six-month, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The nuclei of noble gases can be hyper polarized through a laser-driven spin exchange to a degree many orders of magnitude larger than that attainable by thermal polarization without requiring a strong magnetic field. The increased polarization from the laser pumping enables a good nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signal from a gas. The main goal of this project was to demonstrate diffusion-weighted imaging of such hyper-polarized noble gas with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Possible applications include characterizing porosity of materials and dynamically imaging pressure distributions in biological or acoustical systems.

  1. Quantitative velocity distributions via nuclear magnetic resonance flow metering.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Keelan T; Fridjonsson, Einar O; Stanwix, Paul L; Johns, Michael L

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate the use of Tikhonov regularisation as a data inversion technique to determine the velocity distributions of flowing liquid streams. Regularisation is applied to the signal produced by a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) flow measurement system consisting of a pre-polarising permanent magnet located upstream of an Earth's magnetic field NMR detection coil. A simple free induction decay (FID) NMR signal is measured for the flowing stream in what is effectively a 'time-of-flight' measurement. The FID signal is then modelled as a function of fluid velocity and acquisition time, enabling determination of the velocity probability distributions via regularisation. The mean values of these velocity distributions were successfully validated against in-line rotameters. The ability to quantify multi-modal velocity distributions was also demonstrated using a two-pipe system. PMID:27343484

  2. Quantitative velocity distributions via nuclear magnetic resonance flow metering.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Keelan T; Fridjonsson, Einar O; Stanwix, Paul L; Johns, Michael L

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate the use of Tikhonov regularisation as a data inversion technique to determine the velocity distributions of flowing liquid streams. Regularisation is applied to the signal produced by a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) flow measurement system consisting of a pre-polarising permanent magnet located upstream of an Earth's magnetic field NMR detection coil. A simple free induction decay (FID) NMR signal is measured for the flowing stream in what is effectively a 'time-of-flight' measurement. The FID signal is then modelled as a function of fluid velocity and acquisition time, enabling determination of the velocity probability distributions via regularisation. The mean values of these velocity distributions were successfully validated against in-line rotameters. The ability to quantify multi-modal velocity distributions was also demonstrated using a two-pipe system.

  3. Development of a two-dimensional scanning micro-mirror utilizing magnetic polymer composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Junya; Onishi, Yoshiyuki; Terao, Kyohei; Takao, Hidekuni; Shimokawa, Fusao; Oohira, Fumikazu; Miyagawa, Hayato; Namazu, Takahiro; Suzuki, Takaaki

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we propose a magnetically driven micro-mirror, constructed using negative photoresist SU-8 containing magnetic particles, as a magnetic actuator and torsion bar structure. Because the magnetic polymer composite uses thick negative photoresist SU-8 as the main material, the micro-mirror is simply fabricated in just a few steps by conventional photolithography and deep reactive ion etching. A fabricated prototype of the micro-mirror, which is magnetically driven by using an external magnetic field, is shown to deflect with two-dimensional optical deflection angles of 6.5 and 12.5°. Moreover, Lissajous scanning motion of the fabricated mirror is achieved.

  4. Engineered water-soluble two-dimensional magnetic nanocomposites: towards highly magnetic relaxometric properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Erwin; Wang, Fenghe; Zheng, Bingwen; Li, Sam Fong Yau; Xue, Jun Min

    2015-04-01

    Water dispersible two-dimensional magnetic nanocomposites are formed by phase-transferring hydrophobic manganese-doped ferrite nanoparticles (MFPs) into aqueous solvent using a one-step simple approach involving only graphene oxide (GO) as the phase transfer agent. The resultant hydrophilic magnetic nanocomposites (MFNs) are surprisingly stable in the aqueous phase despite its large hydrodynamic size (dhyd). Because of its unique construct that promotes water accessibility towards the MFP core, large MFNs loaded with an 18 nm MFP core (MFN-18; dhyd = 577.9 nm) exhibits transverse relaxivity (r2) up to ~6.8 times (r2 = 800.8 mM [Mn + Fe]-1 s-1) higher than the typical individually coated MFP-18 with amphiphilic brush copolymers (r2 = 117.3 mM [Mn + Fe]-1 s-1). Meanwhile, the overall nanocomposites dhyd can be further reduced by employing a smaller pre-sonicated GO sheet phase transfer agent. As a result of using small GO sheets with enhanced hydrophilicity, the r2 of small MFN-18* nanocomposites (dhyd = 224.9 nm) increases by approximately 37% (r2 = 1097.4 mM [Mn + Fe]-1 s-1) as compared to larger MFN-18. From a simple comparative study among various magnetic nanocomposites involving a MFP-18 core, the high MFN-18 r2 relaxivity value can be attributed to enhanced water diffusion and exchange due to the GO sheet, allowing better interaction between magnetic the MFP core and water protons. The proposed method can be readily extended to convert other types of hydrophobic nanoparticles into water-dispersible nanocomposites.Water dispersible two-dimensional magnetic nanocomposites are formed by phase-transferring hydrophobic manganese-doped ferrite nanoparticles (MFPs) into aqueous solvent using a one-step simple approach involving only graphene oxide (GO) as the phase transfer agent. The resultant hydrophilic magnetic nanocomposites (MFNs) are surprisingly stable in the aqueous phase despite its large hydrodynamic size (dhyd). Because of its unique construct that

  5. Investigation of enzymatic C-P bond formation using multiple quantum HCP nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hu, Kaifeng; Werner, Williard J; Allen, Kylie D; Wang, Susan C

    2015-04-01

    The biochemical mechanism for the formation of the C-P-C bond sequence found in l-phosphinothricin, a natural product with antibiotic and herbicidal activity, remains unclear. To obtain further insight into the catalytic mechanism of PhpK, the P-methyltransferase responsible for the formation of the second C-P bond in l-phosphinothricin, we utilized a combination of stable isotopes and two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Exploiting the newly emerged Bruker QCI probe (Bruker Corp.), we specifically designed and ran a (13) C-(31) P multiple quantum (1) H-(13) C-(31) P (HCP) experiment in (1) H-(31) P two-dimensional mode directly on a PhpK-catalyzed reaction mixture using (13) CH3 -labeled methylcobalamin as the methyl group donor. This method is particularly advantageous because minimal sample purification is needed to maximize product visualization. The observed 3:1:1:3 multiplet specifically and unequivocally illustrates direct bond formation between (13) CH3 and (31) P. Related nuclear magnetic resonance experiments based upon these principles may be designed for the study of enzymatic and/or synthetic chemical reaction mechanisms.

  6. Respiratory Amplitude Guided 4-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Yanle; Caruthers, Shelton D.; Low, Daniel A.; Parikh, Parag J.; Mutic, Sasa

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of prospectively guiding 4-dimensional (4D) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) image acquisition using triggers at preselected respiratory amplitudes to achieve T{sub 2} weighting for abdominal motion tracking. Methods and Materials: A respiratory amplitude-based triggering system was developed and integrated into a commercial turbo spin echo MRI sequence. Initial feasibility tests were performed on healthy human study participants. Four respiratory states, the middle and the end of inhalation and exhalation, were used to trigger 4D MRI image acquisition of the liver. To achieve T{sub 2} weighting, the echo time and repetition time were set to 75 milliseconds and 4108 milliseconds, respectively. Single-shot acquisition, together with parallel imaging and partial k-space imaging techniques, was used to improve image acquisition efficiency. 4D MRI image sets composed of axial or sagittal slices were acquired. Results: Respiratory data measured and logged by the MRI scanner showed that the triggers occurred at the appropriate respiratory levels. Liver motion could be easily observed on both 4D MRI image datasets by sensing either the change of liver in size and shape (axial) or diaphragm motion (sagittal). Both 4D MRI image datasets were T{sub 2}-weighted as expected. Conclusions: This study demonstrated the feasibility of achieving T{sub 2}-weighted 4D MRI images using amplitude-based respiratory triggers. With the aid of the respiratory amplitude-based triggering system, the proposed method is compatible with most MRI sequences and therefore has the potential to improve tumor-tissue contrast in abdominal tumor motion imaging.

  7. Two-dimensional magnetic property measurement for magneto-rheological elastomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Jianbin; Guo, Youguang; Li, Yancheng; Zhu, Jianguo; Li, Jianchun

    2013-05-01

    Magneto-rheological elastomer (MRE) is a new kind of smart material. Its rheological properties can be altered and controlled in a real time manner when it is applied an external magnetic field. For calculating magnetic properties of MRE material, usually Maxwell-Garnet equation is used to acquire an approximately effective permeability. This equation treats the magnetic property of particles as linear. However, when the applied magnetic field is alternating or rotating, the nonlinearity of magnetic property and magnetic hysteresis cannot be neglected. Hence, the measurement and modelling of the magnetic properties under alternating and rotating magnetic fields are essential to explore new applications of the material. This paper presents the investigation on the magnetic hysteresis properties of MRE material under one-dimensional (1-D) alternating and two-dimensional (2-D) rotating magnetic field excitations. A kind of MRE material, consisting of 70% carbonyl iron particles, 10% silicone oil, and 20% silicone rubber, was used to investigate the magnetic properties. The diameter of carbonyl iron particles is 3-5 μm. The measurement results, such as the relations between magnetic field intensity (H) and magnetic flux density (B) under different magnetic field excitations on the MRE sample, have been obtained and analyzed. These data would be useful for design and analysis of MRE smart structures like MR dampers.

  8. Three-dimensional photogrammetric measurement of magnetic field lines in the WEGA stellarator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drewelow, Peter; Bräuer, Torsten; Otte, Matthias; Wagner, Friedrich; Werner, Andreas

    2009-12-01

    The magnetic confinement of plasmas in fusion experiments can significantly degrade due to perturbations of the magnetic field. A precise analysis of the magnetic field in a stellarator-type experiment utilizes electrons as test particles following the magnetic field line. The usual fluorescent detector for this electron beam limits the provided information to two-dimensional cut views at certain toroidal positions. However, the technique described in this article allows measuring the three-dimensional structure of the magnetic field by means of close-range photogrammetry. After testing and optimizing the main diagnostic components, measurements of the magnetic field lines were accomplished with a spatial resolution of 5 mm. The results agree with numeric calculations, qualifying this technique as an additional tool to investigate magnetic field configurations in a stellarator. For a possible future application, ways are indicated on how to reduce experimental error sources.

  9. 3-dimensional modeling of transcranial magnetic stimulation: Design and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salinas, Felipe Santiago

    Over the past three decades, transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) has emerged as an effective tool for many research, diagnostic and therapeutic applications in humans. TMS delivers highly localized brain stimulations via non-invasive externally applied magnetic fields. This non-invasive, painless technique provides researchers and clinicians a unique tool capable of stimulating both the central and peripheral nervous systems. However, a complete analysis of the macroscopic electric fields produced by TMS has not yet been performed. In this dissertation, we present a thorough examination of the total electric field induced by TMS in air and a realistic head model with clinically relevant coil poses. In the first chapter, a detailed account of TMS coil wiring geometry was shown to provide significant improvements in the accuracy of primary E-field calculations. Three-dimensional models which accounted for the TMS coil's wire width, height, shape and number of turns clearly improved the fit of calculated-to-measured E-fields near the coil body. Detailed primary E-field models were accurate up to the surface of the coil body (within 0.5% of measured values) whereas simple models were often inadequate (up to 32% different from measured). In the second chapter, we addressed the importance of the secondary E-field created by surface charge accumulation during TMS using the boundary element method (BEM). 3-D models were developed using simple head geometries in order to test the model and compare it with measured values. The effects of tissue geometry, size and conductivity were also investigated. Finally, a realistic head model was used to assess the effect of multiple surfaces on the total E-field. We found that secondary E-fields have the greatest impact at areas in close proximity to each tissue layer. Throughout the head, the secondary E-field magnitudes were predominantly between 25% and 45% of the primary E-fields magnitude. The direction of the secondary E

  10. The Angular Momentum of Magnetized Molecular Cloud Cores: A Two-dimensional-Three-dimensional Comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dib, Sami; Hennebelle, Patrick; Pineda, Jaime E.; Csengeri, Timea; Bontemps, Sylvain; Audit, Edouard; Goodman, Alyssa A.

    2010-11-01

    In this work, we present a detailed study of the rotational properties of magnetized and self-gravitating dense molecular cloud (MC) cores formed in a set of two very high resolution three-dimensional (3D) MC simulations with decaying turbulence. The simulations have been performed using the adaptative mesh refinement code RAMSES with an effective resolution of 40963 grid cells. One simulation represents a mildly magnetically supercritical cloud and the other a strongly magnetically supercritical cloud. We identify dense cores at a number of selected epochs in the simulations at two density thresholds which roughly mimic the excitation densities of the NH3 (J - K) = (1,1) transition and the N2H+ (1-0) emission line. A noticeable global difference between the two simulations is the core formation efficiency (CFE) of the high-density cores. In the strongly supercritical simulations, the CFE is 33% per unit free-fall time of the cloud (t ff,cl), whereas in the mildly supercritical simulations this value goes down to ~6 per unit t ff,cl. A comparison of the intrinsic specific angular momentum (j 3D) distributions of the cores with the specific angular momentum derived using synthetic two-dimensional (2D) velocity maps of the cores (j 2D) shows that the synthetic observations tend to overestimate the true value of the specific angular momentum by a factor of ~8-10. We find that the distribution of the ratio j 3D/j 2D of the cores peaks at around ~0.1. The origin of this discrepancy lies in the fact that contrary to the intrinsic determination of j which sums up the individual gas parcels' contributions to the angular momentum, the determination of the specific angular momentum using the standard observational procedure which is based on a measurement on the global velocity gradient under the hypothesis of uniform rotation smoothes out the complex fluctuations present in the 3D velocity field. Our results may well provide a natural explanation for the discrepancy by a

  11. Electronic and magnetic properties of Fe and Mn doped two dimensional hexagonal germanium sheets

    SciTech Connect

    Soni, Himadri R. Jha, Prafulla K.

    2014-04-24

    Using first principles density functional theory calculations, the present paper reports systematic total energy calculations of the electronic properties such as density of states and magnetic moment of pristine and iron and manganese doped two dimensional hexagonal germanium sheets.

  12. Analysis of ringing due to magnetic core materials used in pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhu Gaunkar, Neelam; Nlebedim, Cajetan; Hadimani, Ravi; Bulu, Irfan; Song, Yi-Qiao; Mina, Mani; Jiles, David

    Oil-field well logging instruments employ pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques and use inductive sensors to detect and evaluate the presence of particular fluids in geological formations. Acting as both signal transmitters and receivers most inductive sensors employ magnetic cores to enhance the quality and amplitude of signals recorded during field measurements. It is observed that the magnetic core also responds to the applied input signal thereby generating a signal (`ringing') that interferes with the measurement of the signals from the target formations. This causes significant noise and receiver dead time and it is beneficial to eliminate/suppress the signals received from the magnetic core. In this work a detailed analysis of the magnetic core response and in particular loading of the sensor due to the presence of the magnetic core is presented. Pulsed NMR measurements over a frequency band of 100 kHz to 1MHz are used to determine the amplitude and linewidth of the signals acquired from different magnetic core materials. A lower signal amplitude and a higher linewidth are vital since these would correspond to minimal contributions from the magnetic core to the inductive sensor response and thus leading to minimized receiver dead time.

  13. Analysis of the transient response of nuclear spins in GaAs with/without nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasly, Mahmoud; Lin, Zhichao; Yamamoto, Masafumi; Uemura, Tetsuya

    2016-05-01

    As an alternative to studying the steady-state responses of nuclear spins in solid state systems, working within a transient-state framework can reveal interesting phenomena. The response of nuclear spins in GaAs to a changing magnetic field was analyzed based on the time evolution of nuclear spin temperature. Simulation results well reproduced our experimental results for the transient oblique Hanle signals observed in an all-electrical spin injection device. The analysis showed that the so called dynamic nuclear polarization can be treated as a cooling tool for the nuclear spins: It works as a provider to exchange spin angular momentum between polarized electron spins and nuclear spins through the hyperfine interaction, leading to an increase in the nuclear polarization. In addition, a time-delay of the nuclear spin temperature with a fast sweep of the external magnetic field produces a possible transient state for the nuclear spin polarization. On the other hand, the nuclear magnetic resonance acts as a heating tool for a nuclear spin system. This causes the nuclear spin temperature to jump to infinity: i.e., the average nuclear spins along with the nuclear field vanish at resonant fields of 75As, 69Ga and 71Ga, showing an interesting step-dip structure in the oblique Hanle signals. These analyses provide a quantitative understanding of nuclear spin dynamics in semiconductors for application in future computation processing.

  14. The Decay of a Weak Large-scale Magnetic Field in Two-dimensional Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondić, Todor; Hughes, David W.; Tobias, Steven M.

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the decay of a large-scale magnetic field in the context of incompressible, two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. It is well established that a very weak mean field, of strength significantly below equipartition value, induces a small-scale field strong enough to inhibit the process of turbulent magnetic diffusion. In light of ever-increasing computer power, we revisit this problem to investigate fluids and magnetic Reynolds numbers that were previously inaccessible. Furthermore, by exploiting the relation between the turbulent diffusion of the magnetic potential and that of the magnetic field, we are able to calculate the turbulent magnetic diffusivity extremely accurately through the imposition of a uniform mean magnetic field. We confirm the strong dependence of the turbulent diffusivity on the product of the magnetic Reynolds number and the energy of the large-scale magnetic field. We compare our findings with various theoretical descriptions of this process.

  15. [Recent progress in nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum for drug research and development].

    PubMed

    Zhong, Jun; Jiang, Xue-mei

    2015-01-01

    In the process of modern drug research, the new methods and technologies which can detect drug molecules' chemical composition, structure and interaction with biomolecules are always the key scientific problems people care about. Spectra (including IR, UV and NMR) are the most common analytical methods, of which NMR can obtain detailed parameter about the nucleus of organic molecules through researching the laws of nuclear transition in the impact of surrounding chemical environment. The parameter contains rich information about the chemical composition, structure and interaction with other molecules of organic molecules. In many complex environments, such as liquid, solid or gas state, even biological in situ environment, NMR can provide molecules' chemical composition, atomic-resolution three-dimensional structure, information of interaction with each other and dynamic process, especially the information about drug interacting with biomacromolecules. In recent years, the applications of nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum in drug research and development are more and more widespread. This paper reviewed its recent progress in structure and dynamic of targeted biological macromolecules, drug design and screening and drug metabolism in drug research and development. In the first part, we gave a brief introduction of nuclear magnetic resonance technology and its applications in drug research. In the second part, we explained the basic principles briefly and summarized progress in methods and techniques for drug research. In the third part, we discussed applications of nuclear magnetic resonance ir structure and dynamic of targeted biological macromolecules, drug design and screening and drug metabolism in detail. The conclusions were stated in the last part.

  16. [Recent progress in nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum for drug research and development].

    PubMed

    Zhong, Jun; Jiang, Xue-mei

    2015-01-01

    In the process of modern drug research, the new methods and technologies which can detect drug molecules' chemical composition, structure and interaction with biomolecules are always the key scientific problems people care about. Spectra (including IR, UV and NMR) are the most common analytical methods, of which NMR can obtain detailed parameter about the nucleus of organic molecules through researching the laws of nuclear transition in the impact of surrounding chemical environment. The parameter contains rich information about the chemical composition, structure and interaction with other molecules of organic molecules. In many complex environments, such as liquid, solid or gas state, even biological in situ environment, NMR can provide molecules' chemical composition, atomic-resolution three-dimensional structure, information of interaction with each other and dynamic process, especially the information about drug interacting with biomacromolecules. In recent years, the applications of nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum in drug research and development are more and more widespread. This paper reviewed its recent progress in structure and dynamic of targeted biological macromolecules, drug design and screening and drug metabolism in drug research and development. In the first part, we gave a brief introduction of nuclear magnetic resonance technology and its applications in drug research. In the second part, we explained the basic principles briefly and summarized progress in methods and techniques for drug research. In the third part, we discussed applications of nuclear magnetic resonance ir structure and dynamic of targeted biological macromolecules, drug design and screening and drug metabolism in detail. The conclusions were stated in the last part. PMID:25993865

  17. Measurement of untruncated nuclear spin interactions via zero- to ultralow-field nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanchard, J. W.; Sjolander, T. F.; King, J. P.; Ledbetter, M. P.; Levine, E. H.; Bajaj, V. S.; Budker, D.; Pines, A.

    2015-12-01

    Zero- to ultralow-field nuclear magnetic resonance (ZULF NMR) provides a new regime for the measurement of nuclear spin-spin interactions free from the effects of large magnetic fields, such as truncation of terms that do not commute with the Zeeman Hamiltonian. One such interaction, the magnetic dipole-dipole coupling, is a valuable source of spatial information in NMR, though many terms are unobservable in high-field NMR, and the coupling averages to zero under isotropic molecular tumbling. Under partial alignment, this information is retained in the form of so-called residual dipolar couplings. We report zero- to ultralow-field NMR measurements of residual dipolar couplings in acetonitrile-2-13C aligned in stretched polyvinyl acetate gels. This permits the investigation of dipolar couplings as a perturbation on the indirect spin-spin J coupling in the absence of an applied magnetic field. As a consequence of working at zero magnetic field, we observe terms of the dipole-dipole coupling Hamiltonian that are invisible in conventional high-field NMR. This technique expands the capabilities of zero- to ultralow-field NMR and has potential applications in precision measurement of subtle physical interactions, chemical analysis, and characterization of local mesoscale structure in materials.

  18. Control of a three-dimensional magnetic force generated from a magnetic navigation system to precisely manipulate the locomotion of a magnetic microrobot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, J. K.; Jeon, S. M.; Lee, W. S.; Jang, G. H.

    2015-05-01

    We propose a method to generate a three-dimensional (3D) magnetic force to manipulate a magnetic microrobot in various environments by using a magnetic navigation system. The proposed method is based on the control of the magnetic force with respect to the change in the magnetization direction of the microrobot and an external magnetic flux gradient. We derived the nonlinear constraint equations which can determine the required direction of the uniform magnetic fields and magnetic gradients to generate the 3D magnetic force of a microrobot. The solutions of the equations were calculated using a geometrical analysis of the equations without any singular point. The proposed methodology was verified on 3D planar environments considering gravitational force, and we also conducted an experiment in a 3D water-filled tubular environment to verify the possibility of the clinical application in human blood vessels.

  19. DC superconducting quantum interference device usable in nuclear quadrupole resonance and zero field nuclear magnetic spectrometers

    DOEpatents

    Fan, N.Q.; Clarke, J.

    1993-10-19

    A spectrometer for measuring the nuclear quadrupole resonance spectra or the zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance spectra generated by a sample is disclosed. The spectrometer uses an amplifier having a dc SQUID operating in a flux-locked loop for generating an amplified output as a function of the intensity of the signal generated by the sample. The flux-locked loop circuit includes an integrator. The amplifier also includes means for preventing the integrator from being driven into saturation. As a result, the time for the flux-locked loop to recover from the excitation pulses generated by the spectrometer is reduced. 7 figures.

  20. DC superconducting quantum interference device usable in nuclear quadrupole resonance and zero field nuclear magnetic spectrometers

    DOEpatents

    Fan, Non Q.; Clarke, John

    1993-01-01

    A spectrometer for measuring the nuclear quadrupole resonance spectra or the zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance spectra generated by a sample is disclosed. The spectrometer uses an amplifier having a dc SQUID operating in a flux-locked loop for generating an amplified output as a function of the intensity of the signal generated by the sample. The flux-locked loop circuit includes an integrator. The amplifier also includes means for preventing the integrator from being driven into saturation. As a result, the time for the flux-locked loop to recover from the excitation pulses generated by the spectrometer is reduced.

  1. A two-dimensional kinematic dynamo model of the ionospheric magnetic field at Venus

    SciTech Connect

    Cravens, T.E.; Wu, D. ); Shinagawa, H. )

    1990-11-01

    The ionosphere of Venus was observed by the magnetometer on the Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO) to be permeated by a large-scale magnetic field for conditions of high solar wind dynamic pressure. The ionospheric conductivity is very high above 170 km and magnetic flux is carried by the plasma flow both vertically downward and in an antisunward direction. Ohmic dissipation of the electric current allows the magnetic field to diffuse for altitudes below 150-170 km. A number of one-dimensional kinematic dynamo and MHD models have been developed to explain the observed vertical magnetic field profiles, but did not include the effects of horizontal transport. The authors have constructed a two-dimensional kinematic dynamo model of the dayside ionospheric magnetic field at Venus in which the 2-D magnetic induction equation (i.e., magnetic diffusion-convection equation) is numerically solved using specified plasma velocities. The vertical velocity profile is taken from the one-dimensional MHD model of Shinagawa and Cravens (1988) and the horizontal velocities are adapted from published PVO retarding potential analyzer results (Knudsen et al., 1982). They demonstrate that the basic features of the vertical magnetic field profile, such as the presence of a magnetic layer at 170 km, remain unaltered by horizontal flow effects. However, they also show that horizontal plasma flow can strongly affect the magnetic field for altitudes above 300 km.

  2. Resistively detected NMR spectra of the crystal states of the two-dimensional electron gas in a quantizing magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Côté, R.; Simoneau, Alexandre M.

    2016-02-01

    Transport experiments on the two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) confined into a semiconductor quantum well and subjected to a quantizing magnetic field have uncovered a rich variety of uniform and nonuniform phases such as the Laughlin liquids, the Wigner, bubble, and Skyrme crystals, and the quantum Hall stripe state. Optically pumped nuclear magnetic resonance (OP-NMR) has also been extremely useful in studying the magnetization and dynamics of electron solids with exotic spin textures such as the Skyrme crystal. Recently, it has been demonstrated that a related technique, resistively-detected nuclear magnetic resonance (RD-NMR), could be a good tool to study the topography of the electron solids in the fractional and integer quantum Hall regimes. In this work, we compute theoretically the RD-NMR line shapes of various crystal phases of the 2DEG and study the relation between their spin density and texture and their NMR spectra. This allows us to evaluate the ability of the RD-NMR to discriminate between the various types of crystal states.

  3. A method for finding three-dimensional magnetic skeletons

    SciTech Connect

    Haynes, A. L.; Parnell, C. E.

    2010-09-15

    Magnetic fields are an essential component of a plasma. In many astrophysical, solar, magnetospheric, and laboratory situations the magnetic field in the plasma can be very dynamic and form highly complex structures. One approach to unraveling these structures is to determine the magnetic skeleton of the field, a set of topological features that divide the magnetic field into topologically distinct domains. In general, the features of the magnetic skeleton are difficult to locate, in particular those given by numerical experiments. In this paper, we propose a new set of tools to find the skeleton of general magnetic fields including null points, spines, separatrix surfaces, and separators. This set of tools is found to be considerably better at finding the skeleton than the currently favored methods used in magnetohydrodynamics.

  4. Two-dimensional chiral asymmetry in unidirectional magnetic anisotropy structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perna, P.; Ajejas, F.; Maccariello, D.; Cuñado, J. L.; Guerrero, R.; Niño, M. A.; Muñoz, M.; Prieto, J. L.; Miranda, R.; Camarero, J.

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the symmetry-breaking effects of magnetic nanostructures that present unidirectional (one-fold) magnetic anisotropy. Angular and field dependent transport and magnetic properties have been studied in two different exchange-biased systems, i.e. ferromagnetic (FM)/ antiferromagnetic (AFM) bilayer and spin-valve structures. We experimentally show the direct relationships between the magnetoresistance (MR) response and the magnetization reversal pathways for any field value and direction. We demonstrate that even though the MR signals are related to different transport phenomena, namely anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) and giant magnetoresistance (GMR), chiral asymmetries are found around the magnetization hard-axis direction, in both cases originated from the one-fold symmetry of the interfacial exchange coupling. Our results indicate that the chiral asymmetry of transport and magnetic behaviors are intrinsic of systems with an unidirectional contribution.

  5. Three-dimensional magnetic field analyses on the magnetron sputtering system by using Free Mesh Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ido, Shunji; Hirose, Ryusuke

    2001-12-01

    A code using the 3-dimensional Finite Element Method (FEM) and Free Mesh Method (FMM) has been developed and applied to the magnetic field analyses in the plasma devices, where a ferromagnetic material is used as a target. An adaptive method is applied to the re-distribution of the nodes. It is shown that this method is useful in the magnetic field analyses.

  6. Three-dimensional magnetic correlations in multiferroic LuFe2O4

    SciTech Connect

    Christianson, Andrew D; Lumsden, Mark D; Angst, Manuel; Yamani, Z.; Tian, Wei; Jin, Rongying; Payzant, E Andrew; Nagler, Stephen E; Sales, Brian C; Mandrus, David

    2008-01-01

    We present single crystal neutron diffraction measurements on multiferroic LuFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}. Magnetic reflections are observed below transitions at 240 and 175 K indicating that the magnetic interactions in LuFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} are three-dimensional in character. The magnetic structure is refined as a ferrimagnetic spin configuration below the 240 K transition. Below 175 K a significant broadening of the magnetic peaks is observed along with the buildup of a diffuse component to the magnetic scattering.

  7. Quasi-One-Dimensional Particle-in-Cell Simulation of Magnetic Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebersohn, Frans H.; Sheehan, J. P.; Gallimore, Alec D.; Shebalin, John V.

    2015-01-01

    A method for the quasi-one-dimensional simulation of magnetic nozzles is presented and simulations of a magnetic nozzle are performed. The effects of the density variation due to plasma expansion and the magnetic field forces on ion acceleration are investigated. Magnetic field forces acting on the electrons are found to be responsible for the formation of potential structures which accelerate ions. The effects of the plasma density variation alone are found to only weakly affect ion acceleration. Strongly diverging magnetic fields drive more rapid potential drops.

  8. Magnetic levitating polymeric nano/microparticular substrates for three-dimensional tumor cell culture.

    PubMed

    Lee, Woong Ryeol; Oh, Kyung Taek; Park, So Young; Yoo, Na Young; Ahn, Yong Sik; Lee, Don Haeng; Youn, Yu Seok; Lee, Deok-Keun; Cha, Kyung-Hoi; Lee, Eun Seong

    2011-07-01

    Herein, we describe magnetic cell levitation models using conventional polymeric microparticles or nanoparticles as a substrate for the three-dimensional tumor cell culture. When the magnetic force originating from the ring-shaped magnets overcame the gravitational force, the magnetic field-levitated KB tumor cells adhered to the surface area of magnetic iron oxide (Fe(3)O(4))-encapsulated nano/microparticles and concentrated clusters of levitated cells, ultimately developing tumor cells to tumor spheroids. These simple cell culture models may prove useful for the screening of anticancer drugs and their formulations. PMID:21420837

  9. Magnetic levitating polymeric nano/microparticular substrates for three-dimensional tumor cell culture.

    PubMed

    Lee, Woong Ryeol; Oh, Kyung Taek; Park, So Young; Yoo, Na Young; Ahn, Yong Sik; Lee, Don Haeng; Youn, Yu Seok; Lee, Deok-Keun; Cha, Kyung-Hoi; Lee, Eun Seong

    2011-07-01

    Herein, we describe magnetic cell levitation models using conventional polymeric microparticles or nanoparticles as a substrate for the three-dimensional tumor cell culture. When the magnetic force originating from the ring-shaped magnets overcame the gravitational force, the magnetic field-levitated KB tumor cells adhered to the surface area of magnetic iron oxide (Fe(3)O(4))-encapsulated nano/microparticles and concentrated clusters of levitated cells, ultimately developing tumor cells to tumor spheroids. These simple cell culture models may prove useful for the screening of anticancer drugs and their formulations.

  10. Detection of molecules and cells using nuclear magnetic resonance with magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rümenapp, Christine; Gleich, Bernhard; Mannherz, Hans Georg; Haase, Axel

    2015-04-01

    For the detection of small molecules, proteins or even cells in vitro, functionalised magnetic nanoparticles and nuclear magnetic resonance measurements can be applied. In this work, magnetic nanoparticles with the size of 5-7 nm were functionalised with antibodies to detect two model systems of different sizes, the protein avidin and Saccharomyces cerevisiae as the model organism. The synthesised magnetic nanoparticles showed a narrow size distribution, which was determined using transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. The magnetic nanoparticles were functionalised with the according antibodies via EDC/NHS chemistry. The binding of the antigen to magnetic nanoparticles was detected through the change in the NMR T2 relaxation time at 0.5 T (≈21.7 MHz). In case of a specific binding the particles cluster and the T2 relaxation time of the sample changes. The detection limit in buffer for FITC-avidin was determined to be 1.35 nM and 107 cells/ml for S. cerevisiae. For fluorescent microscopy the avidin molecules were labelled with FITC and for the detection of S. cerevisiae the magnetic nanoparticles were additionally functionalised with rhodamine. The binding of the particles to S. cerevisiae and the resulting clustering was also seen by transmission electron microscopy.

  11. Giant perpendicular magnetic anisotropy of an individual atom on two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odkhuu, Dorj

    2016-08-01

    Exploring magnetism and magnetic anisotropy in otherwise nonmagnetic two-dimensional materials, such as graphene and transition metal dichalcogenides, is at the heart of spintronics research. Herein, using first-principles calculations we explore the possibility of reaching an atomic-scale perpendicular magnetic anisotropy by carefully exploring the large spin-orbit coupling, orbital magnetism, and ligand field in a suitable choice of a two-dimensional structure with transition metal adatoms. More specifically, we demonstrate perpendicular magnetic anisotropy energies up to an order of 100 meV per atom in individual ruthenium and osmium adatoms at a monosulfur vacancy in molybdenum disulfide. We further propose a phenomenological model where a spin state transition that involves hybridization between molybdenum a1 and adatomic e' orbitals is a possible mechanism for magnetization reversal from an in-plane to perpendicular orientation.

  12. Rotating-frame gradient fields for magnetic resonance imaging and nuclear magnetic resonance in low fields

    DOEpatents

    Bouchard, Louis-Serge; Pines, Alexander; Demas, Vasiliki

    2014-01-21

    A system and method for Fourier encoding a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signal is disclosed. A static magnetic field B.sub.0 is provided along a first direction. An NMR signal from the sample is Fourier encoded by applying a rotating-frame gradient field B.sub.G superimposed on the B.sub.0, where the B.sub.G comprises a vector component rotating in a plane perpendicular to the first direction at an angular frequency .omega.in a laboratory frame. The Fourier-encoded NMR signal is detected.

  13. Dimensional modulation of spontaneous magnetic order in quasi-two-dimensional quantum antiferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furuya, Shunsuke C.; Dupont, Maxime; Capponi, Sylvain; Laflorencie, Nicolas; Giamarchi, Thierry

    2016-10-01

    Spontaneous symmetry breaking is deeply related to the dimensionality of a system. The Néel order going with spontaneous breaking of U (1 ) symmetry is safely allowed at any temperature for three-dimensional systems but allowed only at zero temperature for purely two-dimensional systems. We closely investigate how smoothly the ordering process of the three-dimensional system is modulated into that of the two-dimensional one with reduction of dimensionality, considering spatially anisotropic quantum antiferromagnets. We first show that the Néel temperature is kept finite even in the two-dimensional limit although the Néel order is greatly suppressed for low dimensionality. This feature of the Néel temperature is highly nontrivial, which dictates how the order parameter is squashed under the reduction of dimensionality. Next, we investigate this dimensional modulation of the order parameter. We develop our argument taking as an example a coupled spin-ladder system relevant for experimental studies. The ordering process is investigated multidirectionally using theoretical techniques of a mean-field method combined with analytical (exact solutions of quantum field theories) or numerical (density-matrix renormalization-group) methods, a variational method, a renormalization-group study, linear spin-wave theory, and quantum Monte Carlo simulations. We show that these methods independent of each other lead to the same conclusion about the dimensional modulation.

  14. Nuclear magnetic resonance tomography with a toroid cavity detector

    SciTech Connect

    Woelk, K.; Rathke, J.W.; Klingler, R.J.

    1995-02-01

    A new type of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) tomography has been developed at Argonne National Laboratory. The method uses the strong radio frequency field gradient within a cylindrical toroid cavity to provide high-resolution NMR spectral information while simultaneously resolving distances on the micron scale. The toroid cavity imaging technique differs from conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in that NMR structural information is not lost during signal processing. The new technique could find a wide range of applications in the characterization of surface layers and in the production of advanced materials. Potential areas of application include in situ monitoring of growth sites during ceramic formation processes, analysis of the oxygen annealing step for wires coated with high-temperature superconducting films, and investigation of the reaction chemistry as a function of distance within the diffusion layer for electrochemical processes.

  15. Magnetic Imaging: a New Tool for UK National Nuclear Security

    PubMed Central

    Darrer, Brendan J.; Watson, Joe C.; Bartlett, Paul; Renzoni, Ferruccio

    2015-01-01

    Combating illicit trafficking of Special Nuclear Material may require the ability to image through electromagnetic shields. This is the case when the trafficking involves cargo containers. Thus, suitable detection techniques are required to penetrate a ferromagnetic enclosure. The present study considers techniques that employ an electromagnetic based principle of detection. It is generally assumed that a ferromagnetic metallic enclosure will effectively act as a Faraday cage to electromagnetic radiation and therefore screen any form of interrogating electromagnetic radiation from penetrating, thus denying the detection of any eventual hidden material. In contrast, we demonstrate that it is actually possible to capture magnetic images of a conductive object through a set of metallic ferromagnetic enclosures. This validates electromagnetic interrogation techniques as a potential detection tool for National Nuclear Security applications. PMID:25608957

  16. Magnetic imaging: a new tool for UK national nuclear security.

    PubMed

    Darrer, Brendan J; Watson, Joe C; Bartlett, Paul; Renzoni, Ferruccio

    2015-01-01

    Combating illicit trafficking of Special Nuclear Material may require the ability to image through electromagnetic shields. This is the case when the trafficking involves cargo containers. Thus, suitable detection techniques are required to penetrate a ferromagnetic enclosure. The present study considers techniques that employ an electromagnetic based principle of detection. It is generally assumed that a ferromagnetic metallic enclosure will effectively act as a Faraday cage to electromagnetic radiation and therefore screen any form of interrogating electromagnetic radiation from penetrating, thus denying the detection of any eventual hidden material. In contrast, we demonstrate that it is actually possible to capture magnetic images of a conductive object through a set of metallic ferromagnetic enclosures. This validates electromagnetic interrogation techniques as a potential detection tool for National Nuclear Security applications.

  17. Nuclear-magnetic-resonance quantum calculations of the Jones polynomial

    SciTech Connect

    Marx, Raimund; Spoerl, Andreas; Pomplun, Nikolas; Schulte-Herbrueggen, Thomas; Glaser, Steffen J.; Fahmy, Amr; Kauffman, Louis; Lomonaco, Samuel; Myers, John M.

    2010-03-15

    The repertoire of problems theoretically solvable by a quantum computer recently expanded to include the approximate evaluation of knot invariants, specifically the Jones polynomial. The experimental implementation of this evaluation, however, involves many known experimental challenges. Here we present experimental results for a small-scale approximate evaluation of the Jones polynomial by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR); in addition, we show how to escape from the limitations of NMR approaches that employ pseudopure states. Specifically, we use two spin-1/2 nuclei of natural abundance chloroform and apply a sequence of unitary transforms representing the trefoil knot, the figure-eight knot, and the Borromean rings. After measuring the nuclear spin state of the molecule in each case, we are able to estimate the value of the Jones polynomial for each of the knots.

  18. Phase Diagram of a Three-Dimensional Antiferromagnet with Random Magnetic Anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, Felio A.; Borisov, Pavel; Johnson, Trent A.; Stanescu, Tudor D.; Trappen, Robbyn; Holcomb, Mikel B.; Lederman, David; Fitzsimmons, M. R.; Aczel, Adam A.; Hong, Tao

    2015-03-04

    Three-dimensional (3D) antiferromagnets with random magnetic anisotropy (RMA) that were experimentally studied to date have competing two-dimensional and three-dimensional exchange interactions which can obscure the authentic effects of RMA. The magnetic phase diagram of FexNi1-xF2 epitaxial thin films with true random single-ion anisotropy was deduced from magnetometry and neutron scattering measurements and analyzed using mean field theory. Regions with uniaxial, oblique and easy plane anisotropies were identified. A RMA-induced glass region was discovered where a Griffiths-like breakdown of long-range spin order occurs.

  19. Phase Diagram of a Three-Dimensional Antiferromagnet with Random Magnetic Anisotropy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Perez, Felio A.; Borisov, Pavel; Johnson, Trent A.; Stanescu, Tudor D.; Trappen, Robbyn; Holcomb, Mikel B.; Lederman, David; Fitzsimmons, M. R.; Aczel, Adam A.; Hong, Tao

    2015-03-04

    Three-dimensional (3D) antiferromagnets with random magnetic anisotropy (RMA) that were experimentally studied to date have competing two-dimensional and three-dimensional exchange interactions which can obscure the authentic effects of RMA. The magnetic phase diagram of FexNi1-xF2 epitaxial thin films with true random single-ion anisotropy was deduced from magnetometry and neutron scattering measurements and analyzed using mean field theory. Regions with uniaxial, oblique and easy plane anisotropies were identified. A RMA-induced glass region was discovered where a Griffiths-like breakdown of long-range spin order occurs.

  20. Nuclear conversion theory: molecular hydrogen in non-magnetic insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilisca, Ernest; Ghiglieno, Filippo

    2016-09-01

    The hydrogen conversion patterns on non-magnetic solids sensitively depend upon the degree of singlet/triplet mixing in the intermediates of the catalytic reaction. Three main `symmetry-breaking' interactions are brought together. In a typical channel, the electron spin-orbit (SO) couplings introduce some magnetic excitations in the non-magnetic solid ground state. The electron spin is exchanged with a molecular one by the electric molecule-solid electron repulsion, mixing the bonding and antibonding states and affecting the molecule rotation. Finally, the magnetic hyperfine contact transfers the electron spin angular momentum to the nuclei. Two families of channels are considered and a simple criterion based on the SO coupling strength is proposed to select the most efficient one. The denoted `electronic' conversion path involves an emission of excitons that propagate and disintegrate in the bulk. In the other denoted `nuclear', the excited electron states are transients of a loop, and the electron system returns to its fundamental ground state. The described model enlarges previous studies by extending the electron basis to charge-transfer states and `continui' of band states, and focuses on the broadening of the antibonding molecular excited state by the solid conduction band that provides efficient tunnelling paths for the hydrogen conversion. After working out the general conversion algebra, the conversion rates of hydrogen on insulating and semiconductor solids are related to a few molecule-solid parameters (gap width, ionization and affinity potentials) and compared with experimental measures.

  1. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Applications to Unconventional Fossil Fuel Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinberg, R. L.; Leu, G.

    2008-12-01

    Technical and economic projections strongly suggest that fossil fuels will continue to play a dominant role in the global energy market through at least the mid twenty-first century. However, low-cost conventional oil and gas will be depleted in that time frame. Therefore new sources of energy will be needed. We discuss two relatively untapped unconventional fossil fuels: heavy oil and gas hydrate. In both cases, nuclear magnetic resonance plays a key role in appraising the resource and providing information needed for designing production processes.

  2. A versatile pulse programmer for pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarr, C. E.; Nickerson, M. A.

    1972-01-01

    A digital pulse programmer producing the standard pulse sequences required for pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is described. In addition, a 'saturation burst' sequence, useful in the measurement of long relaxation times in solids, is provided. Both positive and negative 4 V trigger pulses are produced that are fully synchronous with a crystal-controlled time base, and the pulse programmer may be phase-locked with a maximum pulse jitter of 3 ns to the oscillator of a coherent pulse spectrometer. Medium speed TTL integrated circuits are used throughout.

  3. In vivo Carbon-13 Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Studies of Mammals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alger, J. R.; Sillerud, L. O.; Behar, K. L.; Gillies, R. J.; Shulman, R. G.; Gordon, R. E.; Shaw, D.; Hanley, P. E.

    1981-11-01

    Natural abundance carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonances (NMR) from human arm and rat tissues have been observed in vivo. These signals arise primarily from triglycerides in fatty tissue. Carbon-13 NMR was also used to follow, in a living rat, the conversion of C-1--labeled glucose, which was introduced into the stomach, to C-1--labeled liver glycogen. The carbon-13 sensitivity and resolution obtained shows that natural abundance carbon-13 NMR will be valuable in the study of disorders in fat metabolism, and that experiments with substrates labeled with carbon-13 can be used to study carbohydrate metabolism in vivo.

  4. Light nuclear charge measurement with Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer Electromagnetic Calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basara, Laurent; Choutko, Vitaly; Li, Qiang

    2016-06-01

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) is a high energy particle detector installed and operating on board of the International Space Station (ISS) since May 2011. So far more than 70 billion cosmic ray events have been recorded by AMS. In the present paper the Electromagnetic Calorimeter (ECAL) detector of AMS is used to measure cosmic ray nuclear charge magnitudes up to Z=10. The obtained charge magnitude resolution is about 0.1 and 0.3 charge unit for Helium and Carbon, respectively. These measurements are important for an accurate determination of the interaction probabilities of various nuclei with the AMS materials. The ECAL charge calibration and measurement procedures are presented.

  5. Applications of nuclear magnetic resonance sensors to cultural heritage.

    PubMed

    Proietti, Noemi; Capitani, Donatella; Di Tullio, Valeria

    2014-04-21

    In recent years nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) sensors have been increasingly applied to investigate, characterize and monitor objects of cultural heritage interest. NMR is not confined to a few specific applications, but rather its use can be successfully extended to a wide number of different cultural heritage issues. A breakthrough has surely been the recent development of portable NMR sensors which can be applied in situ for non-destructive and non-invasive investigations. In this paper three studies illustrating the potential of NMR sensors in this field of research are reported.

  6. Applications of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Sensors to Cultural Heritage

    PubMed Central

    Proietti, Noemi; Capitani, Donatella; Di Tullio, Valeria

    2014-01-01

    In recent years nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) sensors have been increasingly applied to investigate, characterize and monitor objects of cultural heritage interest. NMR is not confined to a few specific applications, but rather its use can be successfully extended to a wide number of different cultural heritage issues. A breakthrough has surely been the recent development of portable NMR sensors which can be applied in situ for non-destructive and non-invasive investigations. In this paper three studies illustrating the potential of NMR sensors in this field of research are reported. PMID:24755519

  7. Nuclear magnetic resonance-based quantification of organic diphosphates.

    PubMed

    Lenevich, Stepan; Distefano, Mark D

    2011-01-15

    Phosphorylated compounds are ubiquitous in life. Given their central role, many such substrates and analogs have been prepared for subsequent evaluation. Prior to biological experiments, it is typically necessary to determine the concentration of the target molecule in solution. Here we describe a method where concentrations of stock solutions of organic diphosphates and bisphosphonates are quantified using (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy with standard instrumentation using a capillary tube with a secondary standard. The method is specific and is applicable down to a concentration of 200 μM. The capillary tube provides the reference peak for quantification and deuterated solvent for locking. PMID:20833124

  8. Development of Metallic Magnetic Calorimeters for Nuclear Safeguards Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, Cameron Russell

    2015-03-11

    Many nuclear safeguards applications could benefit from high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy achievable with metallic magnetic calorimeters. This dissertation covers the development of a system for these applications based on gamma-ray detectors developed at the University of Heidelberg. It demonstrates new calorimeters of this type, which achieved an energy resolution of 45.5 eV full-width at half-maximum at 59.54 keV, roughly ten times better than current state of the art high purity germanium detectors. This is the best energy resolution achieved with a gamma-ray metallic magnetic calorimeter at this energy to date. In addition to demonstrating a new benchmark in energy resolution, an experimental system for measuring samples with metallic magnetic calorimeters was constructed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This system achieved an energy resolution of 91.3 eV full-width at half-maximum at 59.54 keV under optimal conditions. Using this system it was possible to characterize the linearity of the response, the count-rate limitations, and the energy resolution as a function of temperature of the new calorimeter. With this characterization it was determined that it would be feasible to measure 242Pu in a mixed isotope plutonium sample. A measurement of a mixed isotope plutonium sample was performed over the course of 12 days with a single two-pixel metallic magnetic calorimeter. The relative concentration of 242Pu in comparison to other plutonium isotopes was determined by direct measurement to less than half a percent accuracy. This is comparable with the accuracy of the best-case scenario using traditional indirect methods. The ability to directly measure the relative concentration of 242Pu in a sample could enable more accurate accounting and detection of indications of undeclared activities in nuclear safeguards, a better constraint on source material in forensic samples containing plutonium, and improvements in verification in a future plutonium

  9. Development of three-dimensional printing system for magnetic elastomer with control of magnetic anisotropy in the structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsumori, Fujio; Kawanishi, Hidenori; Kudo, Kentaro; Osada, Toshiko; Miura, Hideshi

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we report on a new system of three-dimensional (3D) printing for a magnetic elastomer that contains magnetic particles. Not only can we fabricate a three-dimensional structure, but we can also control the magnetically anisotropic property of each position in the structure using the present technique. Our new system employed photocurable poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) as the base material so that a method similar to a conventional 3D printing process with photolithography can be used. A magnetic powder was mixed with photocurable PDMS, and particle chain clusters were obtained by applying a magnetic field during the curing process. These chain clusters provide an anisotropic property in each part of the printed structure. We show some results of preliminary experiments and 3D printed samples in this paper. If the fabricated structure was placed under an applied magnetic field, each chain cluster will cause the rotational moment to be along the magnetic flux line, which can deform a soft matrix body. This deformation can be used as a magnetic actuator for the structure. Variable deformable structures could be developed using the present method.

  10. The effects of turbulence on three-dimensional magnetic reconnection at the magnetopause

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, L.; Swisdak, M.; Drake, J. F.; Cassak, P. A.; Dahlin, J. T.; Ergun, R. E.

    2016-06-01

    Two- and three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of a recent encounter of the Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission (MMS) with an electron diffusion region at the magnetopause are presented. While the two-dimensional simulation is laminar, turbulence develops at both the X line and along the magnetic separatrices in the three-dimensional simulation. The turbulence is strong enough to make the magnetic field around the reconnection island chaotic and produces both anomalous resistivity and anomalous viscosity. Each contribute significantly to breaking the frozen-in condition in the electron diffusion region. A surprise is that the crescent-shaped features in velocity space seen both in MMS observations and in two-dimensional simulations survive, even in the turbulent environment of the three-dimensional system. This suggests that MMS's measurements of crescent distributions do not exclude the possibility that turbulence plays an important role in magnetopause reconnection.

  11. Analysis of ringing effects due to magnetic core materials in pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Prabhu Gaunkar, N. Bouda, N. R. Y.; Nlebedim, I. C.; Hadimani, R. L.; Mina, M.; Jiles, D. C.; Bulu, I.; Ganesan, K.; Song, Y. Q.

    2015-05-07

    This work presents investigations and detailed analysis of ringing in a non-resonant pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) circuit. Ringing is a commonly observed phenomenon in high power switching circuits. The oscillations described as ringing impede measurements in pulsed NMR systems. It is therefore desirable that those oscillations decay fast. It is often assumed that one of the causes behind ringing is the role of the magnetic core used in the antenna (acting as an inductive load). We will demonstrate that an LRC subcircuit is also set-up due to the inductive load and needs to be considered due to its parasitic effects. It is observed that the parasitics associated with the inductive load become important at certain frequencies. The output response can be related to the response of an under-damped circuit and to the magnetic core material. This research work demonstrates and discusses ways of controlling ringing by considering interrelationships between different contributing factors.

  12. Three-dimensional calculation of inhomogeneous nuclear matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Minoru; Maruyama, Toshiki; Yabana, Kazuhiro; Tatsumi, Toshitaka

    2012-11-01

    We numerically explore the pasta structures and properties of low-density symmetric nuclear matter without any assumption on the geometry. We observe conventional pasta structures, while a mixture of the pasta appears as a meta-stable state at some transient densities. We also analyze the lattice structure of droplets.

  13. Three-dimensional calculation of inhomogeneous nuclear matter

    SciTech Connect

    Okamoto, Minoru; Maruyama, Toshiki; Yabana, Kazuhiro; Tatsumi, Toshitaka

    2012-11-12

    We numerically explore the pasta structures and properties of low-density symmetric nuclear matter without any assumption on the geometry. We observe conventional pasta structures, while a mixture of the pasta appears as a meta-stable state at some transient densities. We also analyze the lattice structure of droplets.

  14. Three-dimensional cell culturing by magnetic levitation.

    PubMed

    Haisler, William L; Timm, David M; Gage, Jacob A; Tseng, Hubert; Killian, T C; Souza, Glauco R

    2013-10-01

    Recently, biomedical research has moved toward cell culture in three dimensions to better recapitulate native cellular environments. This protocol describes one method for 3D culture, the magnetic levitation method (MLM), in which cells bind with a magnetic nanoparticle assembly overnight to render them magnetic. When resuspended in medium, an external magnetic field levitates and concentrates cells at the air-liquid interface, where they aggregate to form larger 3D cultures. The resulting cultures are dense, can synthesize extracellular matrix (ECM) and can be analyzed similarly to the other culture systems using techniques such as immunohistochemical analysis (IHC), western blotting and other biochemical assays. This protocol details the MLM and other associated techniques (cell culture, imaging and IHC) adapted for the MLM. The MLM requires 45 min of working time over 2 d to create 3D cultures that can be cultured in the long term (>7 d). PMID:24030442

  15. Self organized criticality in an one dimensional magnetized grid. Application to GRB X-ray afterglows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harko, Tiberiu; Mocanu, Gabriela; Stroia, Nicoleta

    2015-05-01

    A simplified one dimensional grid is used to model the evolution of magnetized plasma flow. We implement diffusion laws similar to those so-far used to model magnetic reconnection with Cellular Automata. As a novelty, we also explicitly superimpose a background flow. The aim is to numerically investigate the possibility that Self-Organized Criticality appears in a one dimensional magnetized flow. The cellular automaton's cells store information about the parameter relevant to the evolution of the system being modelled. Under the assumption that this parameter stands for the magnetic field, the magnetic energy released by one grid cell during one individual relaxation event is also computed. Our results show that indeed in this system Self-Organized Criticality is established. The possible applications of this model to the study of the X-ray afterglows of GRBs is also briefly considered.

  16. Unexpected Magnetic Semiconductor Behavior in Zigzag Phosphorene Nanoribbons Driven by Half-Filled One Dimensional Band

    PubMed Central

    Du, Yongping; Liu, Huimei; Xu, Bo; Sheng, Li; Yin, Jiang; Duan, Chun-Gang; Wan, Xiangang

    2015-01-01

    Phosphorene, as a novel two-dimensional material, has attracted a great interest due to its novel electronic structure. The pursuit of controlled magnetism in Phosphorene in particular has been persisting goal in this area. In this paper, an antiferromagnetic insulating state has been found in the zigzag phosphorene nanoribbons (ZPNRs) from the comprehensive density functional theory calculations. Comparing with other one-dimensional systems, the magnetism in ZPNRs display several surprising characteristics: (i) the magnetic moments are antiparallel arranged at each zigzag edge; (ii) the magnetism is quite stable in energy (about 29 meV/magnetic-ion) and the band gap is big (about 0.7 eV); (iii) the electronic and magnetic properties is almost independent on the width of nanoribbons; (iv) a moderate compressive strain will induce a magnetic to nonmagnetic as well as semiconductor to metal transition. All of these phenomena arise naturally due to one unique mechanism, namely the electronic instability induced by the half-filled one-dimensional bands which cross the Fermi level at around π/2a. The unusual electronic and magnetic properties in ZPNRs endow them possible potential for the applications in nanoelectronic devices. PMID:25747727

  17. Unexpected magnetic semiconductor behavior in zigzag phosphorene nanoribbons driven by half-filled one dimensional band.

    PubMed

    Du, Yongping; Liu, Huimei; Xu, Bo; Sheng, Li; Yin, Jiang; Duan, Chun-Gang; Wan, Xiangang

    2015-03-09

    Phosphorene, as a novel two-dimensional material, has attracted a great interest due to its novel electronic structure. The pursuit of controlled magnetism in Phosphorene in particular has been persisting goal in this area. In this paper, an antiferromagnetic insulating state has been found in the zigzag phosphorene nanoribbons (ZPNRs) from the comprehensive density functional theory calculations. Comparing with other one-dimensional systems, the magnetism in ZPNRs display several surprising characteristics: (i) the magnetic moments are antiparallel arranged at each zigzag edge; (ii) the magnetism is quite stable in energy (about 29 meV/magnetic-ion) and the band gap is big (about 0.7 eV); (iii) the electronic and magnetic properties is almost independent on the width of nanoribbons; (iv) a moderate compressive strain will induce a magnetic to nonmagnetic as well as semiconductor to metal transition. All of these phenomena arise naturally due to one unique mechanism, namely the electronic instability induced by the half-filled one-dimensional bands which cross the Fermi level at around π/2a. The unusual electronic and magnetic properties in ZPNRs endow them possible potential for the applications in nanoelectronic devices.

  18. Unexpected Magnetic Semiconductor Behavior in Zigzag Phosphorene Nanoribbons Driven by Half-Filled One Dimensional Band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Yongping; Liu, Huimei; Xu, Bo; Sheng, Li; Yin, Jiang; Duan, Chun-Gang; Wan, Xiangang

    2015-03-01

    Phosphorene, as a novel two-dimensional material, has attracted a great interest due to its novel electronic structure. The pursuit of controlled magnetism in Phosphorene in particular has been persisting goal in this area. In this paper, an antiferromagnetic insulating state has been found in the zigzag phosphorene nanoribbons (ZPNRs) from the comprehensive density functional theory calculations. Comparing with other one-dimensional systems, the magnetism in ZPNRs display several surprising characteristics: (i) the magnetic moments are antiparallel arranged at each zigzag edge; (ii) the magnetism is quite stable in energy (about 29 meV/magnetic-ion) and the band gap is big (about 0.7 eV) (iii) the electronic and magnetic properties is almost independent on the width of nanoribbons; (iv) a moderate compressive strain will induce a magnetic to nonmagnetic as well as semiconductor to metal transition. All of these phenomena arise naturally due to one unique mechanism, namely the electronic instability induced by the half-filled one-dimensional bands which cross the Fermi level at around π/2a. The unusual electronic and magnetic properties in ZPNRs endow them possible potential for the applications in nanoelectronic devices.

  19. Unexpected magnetic semiconductor behavior in zigzag phosphorene nanoribbons driven by half-filled one dimensional band.

    PubMed

    Du, Yongping; Liu, Huimei; Xu, Bo; Sheng, Li; Yin, Jiang; Duan, Chun-Gang; Wan, Xiangang

    2015-01-01

    Phosphorene, as a novel two-dimensional material, has attracted a great interest due to its novel electronic structure. The pursuit of controlled magnetism in Phosphorene in particular has been persisting goal in this area. In this paper, an antiferromagnetic insulating state has been found in the zigzag phosphorene nanoribbons (ZPNRs) from the comprehensive density functional theory calculations. Comparing with other one-dimensional systems, the magnetism in ZPNRs display several surprising characteristics: (i) the magnetic moments are antiparallel arranged at each zigzag edge; (ii) the magnetism is quite stable in energy (about 29 meV/magnetic-ion) and the band gap is big (about 0.7 eV); (iii) the electronic and magnetic properties is almost independent on the width of nanoribbons; (iv) a moderate compressive strain will induce a magnetic to nonmagnetic as well as semiconductor to metal transition. All of these phenomena arise naturally due to one unique mechanism, namely the electronic instability induced by the half-filled one-dimensional bands which cross the Fermi level at around π/2a. The unusual electronic and magnetic properties in ZPNRs endow them possible potential for the applications in nanoelectronic devices. PMID:25747727

  20. TOPICAL REVIEW: Spatial localization in nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keevil, Stephen F.

    2006-08-01

    The ability to select a discrete region within the body for signal acquisition is a fundamental requirement of in vivo NMR spectroscopy. Ideally, it should be possible to tailor the selected volume to coincide exactly with the lesion or tissue of interest, without loss of signal from within this volume or contamination with extraneous signals. Many techniques have been developed over the past 25 years employing a combination of RF coil properties, static magnetic field gradients and pulse sequence design in an attempt to meet these goals. This review presents a comprehensive survey of these techniques, their various advantages and disadvantages, and implications for clinical applications. Particular emphasis is placed on the reliability of the techniques in terms of signal loss, contamination and the effect of nuclear relaxation and J-coupling. The survey includes techniques based on RF coil and pulse design alone, those using static magnetic field gradients, and magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging. Although there is an emphasis on techniques currently in widespread use (PRESS, STEAM, ISIS and MRSI), the review also includes earlier techniques, in order to provide historical context, and techniques that are promising for future use in clinical and biomedical applications.

  1. Avalanche dynamics of magnetic flux in a two-dimensional discrete superconductor

    SciTech Connect

    Ginzburg, S. L.; Nakin, A. V.; Savitskaya, N. E.

    2006-11-15

    The critical state of a two-dimensional discrete superconductor in an external magnetic field is studied. This state is found to be self-organized in the generalized sense, i.e., is a set of metastable states that transform to each other by means of avalanches. An avalanche is characterized by the penetration of a magnetic flux to the system. The sizes of the occurring avalanches, i.e., changes in the magnetic flux, exhibit the power-law distribution. It is also shown that the size of the avalanche occurring in the critical state and the external magnetic field causing its change are statistically independent quantities.

  2. Ground State of Magnetic Dipoles on a Two-Dimensional Lattice: Structural Phases in Complex Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Feldmann, J. D.; Kalman, G. J.; Hartmann, P.; Rosenberg, M.

    2008-02-29

    We study analytically and by molecular dynamics simulations the ground state configuration of a system of magnetic dipoles fixed on a two-dimensional lattice. We find different phases, in close agreement with previous results. Building on this result and on the minimum energy requirement we determine the equilibrium lattice configuration, the magnetic order (ferromagnetic versus antiferromagnetic), and the magnetic polarization direction of a system of charged mesoscopic particles with magnetic dipole moments, in the domain where the strong electrostatic coupling leads to a crystalline ground state. Orders of magnitudes of the parameters of the system relevant to possible future dusty plasma experiments are discussed.

  3. Nanoscale β-nuclear magnetic resonance depth imaging of topological insulators.

    PubMed

    Koumoulis, Dimitrios; Morris, Gerald D; He, Liang; Kou, Xufeng; King, Danny; Wang, Dong; Hossain, Masrur D; Wang, Kang L; Fiete, Gregory A; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G; Bouchard, Louis-S

    2015-07-14

    Considerable evidence suggests that variations in the properties of topological insulators (TIs) at the nanoscale and at interfaces can strongly affect the physics of topological materials. Therefore, a detailed understanding of surface states and interface coupling is crucial to the search for and applications of new topological phases of matter. Currently, no methods can provide depth profiling near surfaces or at interfaces of topologically inequivalent materials. Such a method could advance the study of interactions. Herein, we present a noninvasive depth-profiling technique based on β-detected NMR (β-NMR) spectroscopy of radioactive (8)Li(+) ions that can provide "one-dimensional imaging" in films of fixed thickness and generates nanoscale views of the electronic wavefunctions and magnetic order at topological surfaces and interfaces. By mapping the (8)Li nuclear resonance near the surface and 10-nm deep into the bulk of pure and Cr-doped bismuth antimony telluride films, we provide signatures related to the TI properties and their topological nontrivial characteristics that affect the electron-nuclear hyperfine field, the metallic shift, and magnetic order. These nanoscale variations in β-NMR parameters reflect the unconventional properties of the topological materials under study, and understanding the role of heterogeneities is expected to lead to the discovery of novel phenomena involving quantum materials.

  4. Nanoscale β-nuclear magnetic resonance depth imaging of topological insulators.

    PubMed

    Koumoulis, Dimitrios; Morris, Gerald D; He, Liang; Kou, Xufeng; King, Danny; Wang, Dong; Hossain, Masrur D; Wang, Kang L; Fiete, Gregory A; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G; Bouchard, Louis-S

    2015-07-14

    Considerable evidence suggests that variations in the properties of topological insulators (TIs) at the nanoscale and at interfaces can strongly affect the physics of topological materials. Therefore, a detailed understanding of surface states and interface coupling is crucial to the search for and applications of new topological phases of matter. Currently, no methods can provide depth profiling near surfaces or at interfaces of topologically inequivalent materials. Such a method could advance the study of interactions. Herein, we present a noninvasive depth-profiling technique based on β-detected NMR (β-NMR) spectroscopy of radioactive (8)Li(+) ions that can provide "one-dimensional imaging" in films of fixed thickness and generates nanoscale views of the electronic wavefunctions and magnetic order at topological surfaces and interfaces. By mapping the (8)Li nuclear resonance near the surface and 10-nm deep into the bulk of pure and Cr-doped bismuth antimony telluride films, we provide signatures related to the TI properties and their topological nontrivial characteristics that affect the electron-nuclear hyperfine field, the metallic shift, and magnetic order. These nanoscale variations in β-NMR parameters reflect the unconventional properties of the topological materials under study, and understanding the role of heterogeneities is expected to lead to the discovery of novel phenomena involving quantum materials. PMID:26124141

  5. Nanoscale β-nuclear magnetic resonance depth imaging of topological insulators

    PubMed Central

    Koumoulis, Dimitrios; Morris, Gerald D.; He, Liang; Kou, Xufeng; King, Danny; Wang, Dong; Hossain, Masrur D.; Wang, Kang L.; Fiete, Gregory A.; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G.; Bouchard, Louis-S.

    2015-01-01

    Considerable evidence suggests that variations in the properties of topological insulators (TIs) at the nanoscale and at interfaces can strongly affect the physics of topological materials. Therefore, a detailed understanding of surface states and interface coupling is crucial to the search for and applications of new topological phases of matter. Currently, no methods can provide depth profiling near surfaces or at interfaces of topologically inequivalent materials. Such a method could advance the study of interactions. Herein, we present a noninvasive depth-profiling technique based on β-detected NMR (β-NMR) spectroscopy of radioactive 8Li+ ions that can provide “one-dimensional imaging” in films of fixed thickness and generates nanoscale views of the electronic wavefunctions and magnetic order at topological surfaces and interfaces. By mapping the 8Li nuclear resonance near the surface and 10-nm deep into the bulk of pure and Cr-doped bismuth antimony telluride films, we provide signatures related to the TI properties and their topological nontrivial characteristics that affect the electron–nuclear hyperfine field, the metallic shift, and magnetic order. These nanoscale variations in β-NMR parameters reflect the unconventional properties of the topological materials under study, and understanding the role of heterogeneities is expected to lead to the discovery of novel phenomena involving quantum materials. PMID:26124141

  6. Three-dimensionality of field-induced magnetism in a high-temperature superconductor.

    PubMed

    Lake, B; Lefmann, K; Christensen, N B; Aeppli, G; McMorrow, D F; Ronnow, H M; Vorderwisch, P; Smeibidl, P; Mangkorntong, N; Sasagawa, T; Nohara, M; Takagi, H

    2005-09-01

    Many physical properties of high-temperature superconductors are two-dimensional phenomena derived from their square-planar CuO2 building blocks. This is especially true of the magnetism from the copper ions. As mobile charge carriers enter the CuO2 layers, the antiferromagnetism of the parent insulators, where each copper spin is antiparallel to its nearest neighbours, evolves into a fluctuating state where the spins show tendencies towards magnetic order of a longer periodicity. For certain charge-carrier densities, quantum fluctuations are sufficiently suppressed to yield static long-period order, and external magnetic fields also induce such order. Here we show that, in contrast to the chemically controlled order in superconducting samples, the field-induced order in these same samples is actually three-dimensional, implying significant magnetic linkage between the CuO2 planes. The results are important because they show that there are three-dimensional magnetic couplings that survive into the superconducting state, and coexist with the crucial inter-layer couplings responsible for three-dimensional superconductivity. Both types of coupling will straighten the vortex lines, implying that we have finally established a direct link between technical superconductivity, which requires zero electrical resistance in an applied magnetic field and depends on vortex dynamics, and the underlying antiferromagnetism of the cuprates. PMID:16100515

  7. Rotatable Small Permanent Magnet Array for Ultra-Low Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Instrumentation: A Concept Study

    PubMed Central

    Vegh, Viktor; Reutens, David C.

    2016-01-01

    Object We studied the feasibility of generating the variable magnetic fields required for ultra-low field nuclear magnetic resonance relaxometry with dynamically adjustable permanent magnets. Our motivation was to substitute traditional electromagnets by distributed permanent magnets, increasing system portability. Materials and Methods The finite element method (COMSOL®) was employed for the numerical study of a small permanent magnet array to calculate achievable magnetic field strength, homogeneity, switching time and magnetic forces. A manually operated prototype was simulated and constructed to validate the numerical approach and to verify the generated magnetic field. Results A concentric small permanent magnet array can be used to generate strong sample pre-polarisation and variable measurement fields for ultra-low field relaxometry via simple prescribed magnet rotations. Using the array, it is possible to achieve a pre-polarisation field strength above 100 mT and variable measurement fields ranging from 20–50 μT with 200 ppm absolute field homogeneity within a field-of-view of 5 x 5 x 5 cubic centimetres. Conclusions A dynamic small permanent magnet array can generate multiple highly homogeneous magnetic fields required in ultra-low field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) instruments. This design can significantly reduce the volume and energy requirements of traditional systems based on electromagnets, improving portability considerably. PMID:27271886

  8. Controlling tokamak geometry with three-dimensional magnetic perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Bird, T. M.; Hegna, C. C.

    2014-10-15

    It is shown that small externally applied magnetic perturbations can significantly alter important geometric properties of magnetic flux surfaces in tokamaks. Through 3D shaping, experimentally relevant perturbation levels are large enough to influence turbulent transport and MHD stability in the pedestal region. It is shown that the dominant pitch-resonant flux surface deformations are primarily induced by non-resonant 3D fields, particularly in the presence of significant axisymmetric shaping. The spectral content of the applied 3D field can be used to control these effects.

  9. Nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of velocity distributions in an ultrasonically vibrated granular bed.

    PubMed

    Huntley, J M; Tarvaz, T; Mantle, M D; Sederman, A J; Gladden, L F; Sheikh, N A; Wildman, R D

    2014-05-13

    We report the results of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging experiments on granular beds of mustard grains fluidized by vertical vibration at ultrasonic frequencies. The variation of both granular temperature and packing fraction with height was measured within the three-dimensional cell for a range of vibration frequencies, amplitudes and numbers of grains. Small increases in vibration frequency were found--contrary to the predictions of classical 'hard-sphere' expressions for the energy flux through a vibrating boundary--to result in dramatic reductions in granular temperature. Numerical simulations of the grain-wall interactions, using experimentally determined Hertzian contact stiffness coefficients, showed that energy flux drops significantly as the vibration period approaches the grain-wall contact time. The experiments thus demonstrate the need for new models for 'soft-sphere' boundary conditions at ultrasonic frequencies.

  10. Nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of velocity distributions in an ultrasonically vibrated granular bed.

    PubMed

    Huntley, J M; Tarvaz, T; Mantle, M D; Sederman, A J; Gladden, L F; Sheikh, N A; Wildman, R D

    2014-05-13

    We report the results of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging experiments on granular beds of mustard grains fluidized by vertical vibration at ultrasonic frequencies. The variation of both granular temperature and packing fraction with height was measured within the three-dimensional cell for a range of vibration frequencies, amplitudes and numbers of grains. Small increases in vibration frequency were found--contrary to the predictions of classical 'hard-sphere' expressions for the energy flux through a vibrating boundary--to result in dramatic reductions in granular temperature. Numerical simulations of the grain-wall interactions, using experimentally determined Hertzian contact stiffness coefficients, showed that energy flux drops significantly as the vibration period approaches the grain-wall contact time. The experiments thus demonstrate the need for new models for 'soft-sphere' boundary conditions at ultrasonic frequencies. PMID:24711488

  11. Structure, Dynamics, and Assembly of Filamentous Bacteriophages by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opella, Stanley J.; Zeri, Ana Carolina; Park, Sang Ho

    2008-05-01

    Filamentous bacteriophages serve as model systems for the development and implementation of spectroscopic methods suitable for biological supramolecular assemblies. Not only are their coat proteins small and readily prepared in the laboratory, but they also have two primary roles as membrane proteins and as the principal structural element of the virus particles. As a bacterial system, they are readily labeled with stable isotopes, and this has opened possibilities for the many nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies described in this review. In particular, solid-state NMR of aligned samples has been used to determine the three-dimensional structures of both the membrane-bound forms of coat proteins in phospholipid bilayers and structural forms in virus particles, which has led to an analysis of the assembly mechanism for virus particles as they are extruded through the cell membrane.

  12. Nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of velocity distributions in an ultrasonically vibrated granular bed

    PubMed Central

    Huntley, J. M.; Tarvaz, T.; Mantle, M. D.; Sederman, A. J.; Gladden, L. F.; Sheikh, N. A.; Wildman, R. D.

    2014-01-01

    We report the results of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging experiments on granular beds of mustard grains fluidized by vertical vibration at ultrasonic frequencies. The variation of both granular temperature and packing fraction with height was measured within the three-dimensional cell for a range of vibration frequencies, amplitudes and numbers of grains. Small increases in vibration frequency were found—contrary to the predictions of classical ‘hard-sphere’ expressions for the energy flux through a vibrating boundary—to result in dramatic reductions in granular temperature. Numerical simulations of the grain–wall interactions, using experimentally determined Hertzian contact stiffness coefficients, showed that energy flux drops significantly as the vibration period approaches the grain–wall contact time. The experiments thus demonstrate the need for new models for ‘soft-sphere’ boundary conditions at ultrasonic frequencies. PMID:24711488

  13. The shape dependency of two-dimensional magnetic field dependence of a Josephson junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Norimichi; Nakayama, Akiyoshi; Abe, Susumu; Kawai, Sho; Nishi, Yohei; Masuda, Koji

    2008-04-01

    Modulation characteristics of a Josephson current are usually measured by applying the external magnetic field parallel to the junction plane from one direction, and uniformity in tunnel barrier is discussed. So far, we have measured two-dimensional magnetic field dependence of a square Josephson junction by independently scanning the magnetic field (Hx,Hy) parallel to the junction plane from two directions. We can get a lot of information about spatial critical current distribution in a Josephson junction by observing the magnetic field dependence of a Josephson junction in two dimensions. This time, we have fabricated the different-shaped Josephson junctions and investigated the shape dependency of two-dimensional magnetic field dependence of a Josephson junction. We observed the Ic-(Hx,Hy) characteristics of triangular, hexagonal, and circular Josephson junctions quite different from the Ic-(Hx,Hy), characteristics of a square Josephson junction. Furthermore, we simulated two-dimensional magnetic field dependence of a Josephson junction by calculating the superconducting current density distribution in each magnetic field. The simulation results agreed well with experimental results.

  14. Photonic band gap of three dimensional magnetized photonic crystal with Voigt configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hai-Feng; Liu, Shao-Bin; Kong, Xiang-Kun; Li, Bing-Xiang

    2013-08-01

    In this paper, the properties of two types of three-dimensional magnetized plasma photonic crystals (MPPCs) composed of homogeneous magnetized plasma and dielectric with simple-cubic lattices are theoretically studied by a modified plane wave expansion (PWE) method, as the magneto-optical Voigt effects of magnetized plasma are considered. The equations for type-1 structures with simple-cubic lattices (dielectric spheres immersed in magnetized plasma background), are theoretically deduced. The influences of dielectric constant of dielectric, plasma collision frequency, filling factor, the external magnetic field and plasma frequency on the properties of photonic band gaps (PBGs) for both types of MPPCs are investigated in detail, respectively, and some corresponding physical explanations are also given. The characteristics of flatbands regions are also discussed. From the numerical results, it has been shown that the PBGs of both types of three-dimensional MPPCs can be manipulated by plasma frequency, filling factor, the external magnetic field and the relative dielectric constant of dielectric, respectively. However, the plasma collision frequency has no effects on the PBGs for two types of three-dimensional MPPCs. The locations of flatbands regions can not be tuned by any parameters except for plasma frequency and the external magnetic field.

  15. Development of a micro nuclear magnetic resonance system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goloshevsky, Artem

    Application of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) to on-line/in-line control of industrial processes is currently limited by equipment costs and requirements for installation. A superconducting magnet generating strong fields is the most expensive part of a typical NMR instrument. In industrial environments, fringe magnetic fields make accommodation of NMR instruments difficult. However, a portable, low-cost and low-field magnetic resonance system can be used in virtually any environment. Development of a number of hardware components for a portable, low-cost NMR instrument is reported in this dissertation. Chapter one provides a discussion on a miniaturized Helmholtz spiral radio-frequency (RF) coil (average diameter equal to 3.5 mm) and an NMR probe built around a capillary (outer diameter = 1.59 mm and inner diameter = 1.02 mm) for flow imaging. Experiments of NMR spectroscopy, static and dynamic (flow) imaging, conducted with the use of the miniaturized coil, are described. Chapter two presents a microfabricated package of two biaxial gradient coils and a Helmholtz RF coil. Planar configuration of discrete wires was used to create magnetic field gradients. Performance of the microfabricated gradient coils while imaging water flow compared well with a commercial gradient set of much larger size. Chapter three reports on flow imaging experiments with power law fluids (aqueous solutions of sodium salt of carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC)) of different viscosities, carried out in the NMR probe with the miniaturized RF coil and capillary. Viscosities of the CMC solutions were determined based on the curve fits of the velocity profiles and simultaneous measurements of the flow rates. The curve fits were carried out according to the power law model equations. The NMR viscosity measurements compared well with measurements of the same CMC samples, performed on a conventional rotational rheometer. A portable, home-built transceiver, designed for NMR applications utilizing a

  16. High temperature spin dynamics in linear magnetic chains, molecular rings, and segments by nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adelnia, Fatemeh; Mariani, Manuel; Ammannato, Luca; Caneschi, Andrea; Rovai, Donella; Winpenny, Richard; Timco, Grigore; Corti, Maurizio; Lascialfari, Alessandro; Borsa, Ferdinando

    2015-05-01

    We present the room temperature proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate (NSLR) results in two 1D spin chains: the Heisenberg antiferromagnetic (AFM) Eu(hfac)3NITEt and the magnetically frustrated Gd(hfac)3NITEt. The NSLR as a function of external magnetic field can be interpreted very well in terms of high temperature spin dynamics dominated by a long time persistence of the decay of the two-spin correlation function due to the conservation of the total spin value for isotropic Heisenberg chains. The high temperature spin dynamics are also investigated in Heisenberg AFM molecular rings. In both Cr8 closed ring and in Cr7Cd and Cr8Zn open rings, i.e., model systems for a finite spin segment, an enhancement of the low frequency spectral density is found consistent with spin diffusion but the high cut-off frequency due to intermolecular anisotropic interactions prevents a detailed analysis of the spin diffusion regime.

  17. High temperature spin dynamics in linear magnetic chains, molecular rings, and segments by nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Adelnia, Fatemeh; Lascialfari, Alessandro; Mariani, Manuel; Ammannato, Luca; Caneschi, Andrea; Rovai, Donella; Winpenny, Richard; Timco, Grigore; Corti, Maurizio Borsa, Ferdinando

    2015-05-07

    We present the room temperature proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate (NSLR) results in two 1D spin chains: the Heisenberg antiferromagnetic (AFM) Eu(hfac){sub 3}NITEt and the magnetically frustrated Gd(hfac){sub 3}NITEt. The NSLR as a function of external magnetic field can be interpreted very well in terms of high temperature spin dynamics dominated by a long time persistence of the decay of the two-spin correlation function due to the conservation of the total spin value for isotropic Heisenberg chains. The high temperature spin dynamics are also investigated in Heisenberg AFM molecular rings. In both Cr{sub 8} closed ring and in Cr{sub 7}Cd and Cr{sub 8}Zn open rings, i.e., model systems for a finite spin segment, an enhancement of the low frequency spectral density is found consistent with spin diffusion but the high cut-off frequency due to intermolecular anisotropic interactions prevents a detailed analysis of the spin diffusion regime.

  18. Three-dimensional magnetic energy harvester applied for locomotive devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, N.-C.; Hsu, S.-L.

    2012-01-01

    An innovative tri-axes micro-power receiver is proposed and studied for wireless magnetic energy transmission. The tri-axes micro-power receiver mainly consists of two sets of 3D micro-solenoids and one set of planar micro-coils in which individually iron core is all embedded. The three sets of micro-coils/micro-solenoids are designed to be orthogonal to each other. Therefore, no matter which direction the input magnetic flux is present along, the supplied magnetic energy can be harvested and transformed into electric power by the proposed micro-power receiver in wireless sense. Not only dead zone of receiving power is greatly reduced, but also transformation efficiency of magnetic energy into electric power can be much enhanced. By Biot-Savart law and Faraday's law, the mathematical description upon power transmission from transmitter to receiver is developed. By employing commercial software, Ansoft Maxwell, based on finite element method, the estimation error on power transmission by mathematical description is revealed. Besides, the preliminary simulation results by Ansoft Maxwell show that the proposed micro-power receiver can efficiently harvest the energy supplied by magnetic power source. The design parameters of tri-axes micro-receiver are hence examined and verified for follow-up fabrication. At last, for the MEMS process, the isotropic etching technique is employed to micro-machine the inverse-trapezoid fillister so that the copper wire can be successfully electroplated. The adhesion between micro-coils and fillister is hence much enhanced as well.

  19. Design and realization of a two-dimensional spatial magnetic field mapping apparatus to measure magnetic fields of metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Quan; Zhou, Xiao Yang; Chin, Jessie Yao; Cui, Tie Jun

    2011-07-01

    The two-dimensional (2D) spatial electric-field mapping apparatus [Opt. Express 14, 8694 (2006)] plays an important role in experiments involving metamaterials, such as the verification of free-space and ground-plane invisibility cloaks. However, such an apparatus is valid only for the transverse-electric (TE) mode and is invalid for the transverse-magnetic (TM) mode, as it requires perfectly magnetic conducting (PMC) planes, which do not exist in nature. In this paper, we propose a 2D spatial magnetic-field mapping apparatus based on artificial magnetic conductor (AMC) plates. The AMC structure is designed using periodically perfectly electrical conducting patches with a sub-wavelength size on a dielectric substrate backed with the ground plane, which can simulate a PMC plane. Using two parallel PMC plates to form a TM-wave planar waveguide, we realize the 2D spatial magnetic-field mapping apparatus in order to measure the external and internal magnetic fields of metamaterials. Two types of excitations, a plane-wave source and a magnetic dipole, are used to feed the system. In order to validate the performance of the magnetic-field mapper, two gradient-index metamaterial lenses are measured, and the experimental results are in good agreement with the full-wave simulations.

  20. Extreme ultraviolet imaging of three-dimensional magnetic reconnection in a solar eruption.

    PubMed

    Sun, J Q; Cheng, X; Ding, M D; Guo, Y; Priest, E R; Parnell, C E; Edwards, S J; Zhang, J; Chen, P F; Fang, C

    2015-06-26

    Magnetic reconnection, a change of magnetic field connectivity, is a fundamental physical process in which magnetic energy is released explosively, and it is responsible for various eruptive phenomena in the universe. However, this process is difficult to observe directly. Here, the magnetic topology associated with a solar reconnection event is studied in three dimensions using the combined perspectives of two spacecraft. The sequence of extreme ultraviolet images clearly shows that two groups of oppositely directed and non-coplanar magnetic loops gradually approach each other, forming a separator or quasi-separator and then reconnecting. The plasma near the reconnection site is subsequently heated from ∼1 to ≥5 MK. Shortly afterwards, warm flare loops (∼3 MK) appear underneath the hot plasma. Other observational signatures of reconnection, including plasma inflows and downflows, are unambiguously revealed and quantitatively measured. These observations provide direct evidence of magnetic reconnection in a three-dimensional configuration and reveal its origin.

  1. Optical and magneto-optical properties of one-dimensional magnetized coupled resonator plasma photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Hamidi, S. M.

    2012-01-15

    In this paper, the optical and magneto-optical properties of one-dimensional magnetized coupled resonator plasma photonic crystals have been investigated. We use transfer matrix method to solve our magnetized coupled resonator plasma photonic crystals consist of dielectric and magnetized plasma layers. The results of the change in the optical and magneto-optical properties of structure as a result of the alteration in the structural properties such as thickness, plasma frequency and collision frequency, plasma filling factor, number of resonators and dielectric constant of dielectric layers and external magnetic field have been reported. The main feature of this structure is a good magneto-optical rotation that takes place at the defect modes and the edge of photonic band gap of our proposed optical magnetized plasma waveguide. Our outcomes demonstrate the potential applications of the device for tunable and adjustable filters or reflectors and active magneto-optic in microwave devices under structural parameter and external magnetic field.

  2. Fundamental limitation of a two-dimensional description of magnetic reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firpo, Marie-Christine

    2014-10-01

    For magnetic reconnection to be possible, the electrons have at some point to ``get free from magnetic slavery,'' according to von Steiger's formulation. Stochasticity may be considered as one possible ingredient through which this may be realized in the magnetic reconnection process. It will be argued that non-ideal effects may be considered as a ``hidden'' way to introduce stochasticity. Then it will be shown that there exists a generic intrinsic stochasticity of magnetic field lines that does not require the invocation of non-ideal effects but cannot show up in effective two-dimensional models of magnetic reconnection. Possible implications will be discussed in the frame of tokamak sawteeth that form a laboratory prototype of magnetic reconnection.

  3. Optical and magneto-optical properties of one-dimensional magnetized coupled resonator plasma photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamidi, S. M.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, the optical and magneto-optical properties of one-dimensional magnetized coupled resonator plasma photonic crystals have been investigated. We use transfer matrix method to solve our magnetized coupled resonator plasma photonic crystals consist of dielectric and magnetized plasma layers. The results of the change in the optical and magneto-optical properties of structure as a result of the alteration in the structural properties such as thickness, plasma frequency and collision frequency, plasma filling factor, number of resonators and dielectric constant of dielectric layers and external magnetic field have been reported. The main feature of this structure is a good magneto-optical rotation that takes place at the defect modes and the edge of photonic band gap of our proposed optical magnetized plasma waveguide. Our outcomes demonstrate the potential applications of the device for tunable and adjustable filters or reflectors and active magneto-optic in microwave devices under structural parameter and external magnetic field.

  4. Serum metabonomics of acute leukemia using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Musharraf, Syed Ghulam; Siddiqui, Amna Jabbar; Shamsi, Tahir; Choudhary, M. Iqbal; Rahman, Atta-ur

    2016-01-01

    Acute leukemia is a critical neoplasm of white blood cells. In order to differentiate between the metabolic alterations associated with two subtypes of acute leukemia, acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML), we investigated the serum of ALL and AML patients and compared with two controls (healthy and aplastic anemia) using 1H NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) spectroscopy. Thirty-seven putative metabolites were identified using Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) sequence. The use of PLS-DA and OPLS-DA models gave results with 84.38% and 90.63% classification rate, respectively. The metabolites responsible for classification are mainly lipids, lactate and glucose. Compared with controls, ALL and AML patients showed serum metabonomic differences involving aberrant metabolism pathways including glycolysis, TCA cycle, lipoprotein changes, choline and fatty acid metabolisms. PMID:27480133

  5. Nuclear magnetic resonance evaluation of stroke: a preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, R.N.; Willcott, M.R.; Schneiders, N.J.; Ford, J.J.; Derman, H.S.

    1983-10-01

    Nine patients who had acute and subacute stroke were examined by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) using a 6-MHz Bruker Instruments proton scanner. A modified Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill pulse sequence was used for signal detection. The resultant string of spin-echoes was Fourier transformed into projections that were subsequently back-projected to a series of spin-echo images. From these images, spin density and T/sub 2/ were calculated for each pixel. The NMR scans revealed stroke in each of the patients, while CT demonstrated only eight of the lesions. T/sub 2/ was prolonged in all of the ischemic regions and is the most sensitive NMR parameter in detecting stroke. These preliminary results suggest that NMR scanning of patients who have acute stroke may be cliniclly useful, and that the T/sub 2/ component of the NRM signal is most important.

  6. Multipole-multimode Floquet theory in nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Ramesh; Griffin, Robert G

    2005-04-22

    In this paper, we present a new analytical approach for describing the spin dynamics of synchronous and asynchronous time-dependent modulations in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance experiments. The approach, based on multimode Floquet theory, employs the multipole operator basis of Sanctuary for spin description and illustrates the time evolution in the Floquet-Liouville space using the effective Hamiltonians obtained from the contact (or van Vleck) transformation procedure. Since the Hamiltonian and the density operator are expressed in terms of irreducible tensor operators, extensions to higher spin magnitudes (I>12) and multiple spins are quite straightforward and permit analytical treatments for many problems. We outline the general underlying principles involved in this approach with a brief mention of its potential application in other branches of spectroscopy. PMID:15945688

  7. Phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of toad retina.

    PubMed Central

    Apte, D V; Koutalos, Y; McFarlane, D K; Dawson, M J; Ebrey, T G

    1989-01-01

    Phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance (31P-NMR) spectra were obtained from living toad retinae and toad retinal extracts at 4 degrees C. Several phosphorus metabolites--nucleoside di- and triphosphates (NTP), phosphocreatine, phosphodiesters, inorganic phosphate, and phosphomonoesters--were identified from the spectra of whole retinae. The intracellular pH was determined to be 7.27 +/- 0.06 at 4 degrees C and the intracellular MgNTP/NTP ratio was at least 0.77. These results are consistent with those reported by other techniques, and they show that 31P-NMR spectroscopy can be used for noninvasively and quantitatively studying the metabolism of living toad retinae, and for monitoring its changes over time. PMID:2506940

  8. Applications of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging in process engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladden, Lynn F.; Alexander, Paul

    1996-03-01

    During the past decade, the application of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging techniques to problems of relevance to the process industries has been identified. The particular strengths of NMR techniques are their ability to distinguish between different chemical species and to yield information simultaneously on the structure, concentration distribution and flow processes occurring within a given process unit. In this paper, examples of specific applications in the areas of materials and food processing, transport in reactors and two-phase flow are discussed. One specific study, that of the internal structure of a packed column, is considered in detail. This example is reported to illustrate the extent of new, quantitative information of generic importance to many processing operations that can be obtained using NMR imaging in combination with image analysis.

  9. Specific features of quantum oscillations of magnetization in quasi-two-dimensional antiferromagnetic semimetals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzebisashvili, D. M.; Khudaiberdyev, A. A.

    2016-06-01

    The specific features of quantum oscillations of the magnetization in quasi-two-dimensional wide-band-gap antiferromagnetic semimetals with a low concentration of charge carriers have been considered theoretically. It has been shown that, in these systems, the Fermi energy determined from the analysis of the frequency of the de Haas-van Alphen oscillations according to the standard procedure can differ significantly from the true value. For the correct determination of the Fermi energy in the canted phase, it has been proposed to analyze quantum oscillations of the magnetization M not as a function of the inverse magnetic field 1/ H, but as a function of 1/cosγ, where the angle γ characterizes the inclination angle of the magnetic field with respect to the plane of the quasi-two-dimensional semimetal.

  10. Control of one-dimensional magnetism in graphene via spontaneous hydrogenation of the grain boundary.

    PubMed

    Yin, Wan-Jian; Wei, Su-Huai; Yan, Yanfa

    2013-06-01

    We propose that control of one-dimensional (1D) magnetism in graphene could be made easier by spontaneous hydrogenation of chemically reactive grain boundaries (GBs) in polycrystalline graphenes. Unlike pristine graphene, where hydrogen adsorption favors the formation of zero-dimensional (0D) clusters, the defect cores (pentagon, heptagon and octagon) at the GBs in polycrystalline graphene promote hydrogenation along the GBs. The hydrogenation in polycrystalline graphene starts at the GBs, proceeds gradually towards the grain interior (GI) and results in smooth 1D graphane-graphene interfaces. Our calculations show that the type (ferro- or antiferro-magnetism) and strength of the magnetism can be controlled by controlling the orientation of GBs. Since GBs in single-layer graphenes can be fabricated in a controllable way in experiments, the hydrogenation of GBs could be a unique method to realize large-area magnetic graphenes for future spintronic applications.

  11. Formation of a topological monopole lattice and its dynamics in three-dimensional chiral magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Seong-Gyu; Liu, Ye-Hua; Han, Jung Hoon

    2016-08-01

    Topologically protected swirl of the magnetic texture known as the skyrmion has become ubiquitous in both metallic and insulating chiral magnets. Meanwhile the existence of its three-dimensional analog, known as the magnetic monopole, has been suggested by various indirect experimental signatures in MnGe compound. Although Ginzburg-Landau arguments in favor of the formation of a three-dimensional crystal of monopoles and antimonopoles have been put forward, no microscopic model Hamiltonian was shown to support such a phase. Here we present strong numerical evidence from Monte Carlo simulations for the formation of a rocksalt crystal structure of monopoles and antimonopoles in short-period chiral magnets. Real-time simulation of the spin dynamics suggests there is only one internal excitation mode in the monopole crystal state in the frequency range of several gigahertz for the material parameters of MnGe.

  12. Integrated Geophysical Measurements for Bioremediation Monitoring: Combining Spectral Induced Polarization, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Magnetic Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Keating, Kristina; Slater, Lee; Ntarlagiannis, Dimitris; Williams, Kenneth H.

    2015-02-24

    This documents contains the final report for the project "Integrated Geophysical Measurements for Bioremediation Monitoring: Combining Spectral Induced Polarization, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Magnetic Methods" (DE-SC0007049) Executive Summary: Our research aimed to develop borehole measurement techniques capable of monitoring subsurface processes, such as changes in pore geometry and iron/sulfur geochemistry, associated with remediation of heavy metals and radionuclides. Previous work has demonstrated that geophysical method spectral induced polarization (SIP) can be used to assess subsurface contaminant remediation; however, SIP signals can be generated from multiple sources limiting their interpretation value. Integrating multiple geophysical methods, such as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic susceptibility (MS), with SIP, could reduce the ambiguity of interpretation that might result from a single method. Our research efforts entails combining measurements from these methods, each sensitive to different mineral forms and/or mineral-fluid interfaces, providing better constraints on changes in subsurface biogeochemical processes and pore geometries significantly improving our understanding of processes impacting contaminant remediation. The Rifle Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site was used as a test location for our measurements. The Rifle IFRC site is located at a former uranium ore-processing facility in Rifle, Colorado. Leachate from spent mill tailings has resulted in residual uranium contamination of both groundwater and sediments within the local aquifer. Studies at the site include an ongoing acetate amendment strategy, native microbial populations are stimulated by introduction of carbon intended to alter redox conditions and immobilize uranium. To test the geophysical methods in the field, NMR and MS logging measurements were collected before, during, and after acetate amendment. Next, laboratory NMR, MS, and SIP measurements

  13. Two- and Three-Dimensional Molecule-Based Magnets with Diruthenium Building Blocks

    SciTech Connect

    Fishman, Randy Scott; Okamoto, Satoshi; Miller, Joel S.

    2009-01-01

    Several molecule-based magnets can be constructed from diruthenium tetracarboxylate building blocks. We study two such materials with antiferromagnetic interactions between Cr(III) ions and diruthenium paddle-wheel complexes. While collinear magnetic ordering in the threedimensional compound is frustrated by the easy-plane anisotropy on the diruthenium species, the two-dimensional compound has a collinear ferrimagnetic ground state because of the dominant coupling between the Cr ions and the in-plane diruthenium species.

  14. Three-dimensional interplanetary stream magnetism and energetic particle motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barouch, E.; Burlaga, L. F.

    1976-01-01

    Cosmic rays interact with mesoscale configurations of the interplanetary magnetic field. A technique is presented for calculating such configurations in the inner solar system, which are due to streams and source conditions near the sun, and maps of magnetic field are constructed for some plausible stream and source conditions. One effect of these mesoscale configurations on galactic cosmic rays is shown to be an out-of-the-ecliptic gradient drift sufficient to explain Forbush decreases. The effects on solar energetic particles include small polar drifts due to the field gradients and a possibly large modification of the time-intensity profiles and anisotropy characteristics due to the formation of mirror configurations in space. If a diffusion model is applicable to solar particles, the true diffusion coefficient will be masked by the effects of streams. A conceptual model which incorporates these ideas and those of several other models is presented.

  15. Correlated biofilm imaging, transport and metabolism measurements via combined nuclear magnetic resonance and confocal microscopy

    PubMed Central

    McLean, Jeffrey S; Ona, Ositadinma N; Majors, Paul D

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms are complex, three-dimensional communities found nearly everywhere in nature and are also associated with many human diseases. Detailed metabolic information is critical to understand and exploit beneficial biofilms as well as combat antibiotic-resistant, disease-associated forms. However, most current techniques used to measure temporal and spatial metabolite profiles in these delicate structures are invasive or destructive. Here, we describe imaging, transport and metabolite measurement methods and their correlation for live, non-invasive monitoring of biofilm processes. This novel combination of measurements is enabled by the use of an integrated nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM). NMR methods provide macroscopic structure, metabolic pathway and rate data, spatially resolved metabolite concentrations and water diffusion profiles within the biofilm. In particular, current depth-resolved spectroscopy methods are applied to detect metabolites in 140–190 nl volumes within biofilms of the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 and the oral bacterium implicated in caries disease, Streptococcus mutans strain UA159. The perfused sample chamber also contains a transparent optical window allowing for the collection of complementary fluorescence information using a unique, in-magnet CLSM. In this example, the entire three-dimensional biofilm structure was imaged using magnetic resonance imaging. This was then correlated to a fluorescent CLSM image by employing a green fluorescent protein reporter construct of S. oneidensis. Non-invasive techniques such as described here, which enable measurements of dynamic metabolic processes, especially in a depth-resolved fashion, are expected to advance our understanding of processes occurring within biofilm communities. PMID:18253132

  16. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Study of High Temperature Superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mounce, Andrew M.

    The high temperature superconductors HgBa2CuO 4+delta (Hg1201) and Bi2SrCa2Cu2O 8+delta (Bi2212) have been treated with 17O for both nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) sensitivity and various electronic properties. Subsequently, NMR experiments were performed on Hg1201 and Bi2212 to reveal the nature of the pseudogap, in the normal state, and vortex phases, in the superconducting state. NMR has been performed on 17O in an underdoped Hg1201 crystal with a superconducting transition transition temperature of 74 K to look for circulating orbital currents proposed theoretically and inferred from neutron scattering. The measurements reveal narrow spectra which preclude static local fields in the pseudogap phase at the apical site, suggesting that the moments observed with neutrons are fluctuating or the orbital current ordering is not the correct model for the neutron scattering observation. The fine detail of the NMR frequency shifts at the apical oxygen site are consistent with a dipolar field from the Cu+2 site and diamagnetism below the superconducting transition. It has been predicted that superconducting vortices should be electrically charged and that this effect is particularly enhanced for high temperature superconductors. Here it is shown that the Abrikosov vortex lattice, characteristic of the mixed state of superconductors, will become unstable at sufficiently high magnetic field if there is charge trapped on the vortex core for highly anisotropic superconductors. NMR measurements of the magnetic fields generated by vortices in Bi2212 single crystals provide evidence for an electro-statically driven vortex lattice reconstruction with the magnitude of charge on each vortex pancake of 2x10-3e, depending on doping, in line with theoretical estimates. Competition with magnetism is at the heart of high temperature superconductivity, most intensely felt near a vortex core. To investigate vortex magnetism spatially resolved NMR has been used, finding a strongly non

  17. Phosphorus nuclear magnetic resonance in isolated perfused rat pancreas

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Takehisa; Kanno, Tomio; Seo, Yoshiteru; Murakami, Masataka; Watari, Hiroshi National Institute for Physiological Sciences, Okazaki )

    1988-04-01

    Phosphorus nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was applied to measure phosphorus energy metabolites in isolated perfused rat pancreas. The gland was perfused with a modified Krebs-Henseleit solution at room temperature (25{degree}C). {sup 31}P resonances of creatine phosphate (PCr), ATP, ADP, inorganic phosphate (P{sub i}) and phosphomonoesters (PMEs) were observed in all the preparations of pancreas. In different individual preparations, the resonance of PCr varied, but those of ATP were almost the same. The initial levels of PCr and ATP in individual preparations, however, remained almost unchanged during perfusion with the standard solution for 2 h. When the perfusion was stopped, the levels of ATP and PCr decreased, while the levels of PME and P{sub i} increased. At that time, the P{sub i} resonance shfted to a higher magnetic field, indicating that the tissue pH decreased. On reperfusion, the tissue levels of phosphorus compounds and the tissue pH were restored to their initial resting levels. Continuous infusion of 0.1 {mu}M acetylcholine caused marked and sustained increases in the flow of pancreatic juice and protein output. During the stimulation the tissue levels of phosphorus compounds remained unchanged, while the tissue pH was decreased slightly.

  18. On the quantumness of correlations in nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Soares-Pinto, D O; Auccaise, R; Maziero, J; Gavini-Viana, A; Serra, R M; Céleri, L C

    2012-10-13

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) was successfully employed to test several protocols and ideas in quantum information science. In most of these implementations, the existence of entanglement was ruled out. This fact introduced concerns and questions about the quantum nature of such bench tests. In this paper, we address some issues related to the non-classical aspects of NMR systems. We discuss some experiments where the quantum aspects of this system are supported by quantum correlations of separable states. Such quantumness, beyond the entanglement-separability paradigm, is revealed via a departure between the quantum and the classical versions of information theory. In this scenario, the concept of quantum discord seems to play an important role. We also present an experimental implementation of an analogue of the single-photon Mach-Zehnder interferometer employing two nuclear spins to encode the interferometric paths. This experiment illustrates how non-classical correlations of separable states may be used to simulate quantum dynamics. The results obtained are completely equivalent to the optical scenario, where entanglement (between two field modes) may be present.

  19. Electric and magnetic excitation of coherent magnetic plasmon waves in a one-dimensional meta-chain.

    PubMed

    Zhu, C; Liu, H; Wang, S M; Li, T; Cao, J X; Zheng, Y J; Li, L; Wang, Y; Zhu, S N; Zhang, X

    2010-12-01

    A one-dimensional diatomic meta-chain with equal-size holes and different-length slits is designed. Broadband coherent magnetic plasmon waves (MPW) are formed in such a system, excited by both the electric resonance in the slits and the magnetic resonance in the holes in a wide range of incidence angles (0°-40°) and broad frequency bands (200-230 THz). The dispersion properties of the MPW measured in our experiments agree with the theoretical calculation based on the Lagrange model. The coherent MPWs reported in this paper may have applications in subwavelength integrated nanocircuits.

  20. Eigenmodes of Three-dimensional Magnetic Arcades in the Sun’s Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hindman, Bradley W.; Jain, Rekha

    2015-12-01

    We develop a model of coronal-loop oscillations that treats the observed bright loops as an integral part of a larger three-dimensional (3D) magnetic structure comprised of the entire magnetic arcade. We demonstrate that magnetic arcades within the solar corona can trap MHD fast waves in a 3D waveguide. This is accomplished through the construction of a cylindrically symmetric model of a magnetic arcade with a potential magnetic field. For a magnetically dominated plasma, we derive a governing equation for MHD fast waves and from this equation we show that the magnetic arcade forms a 3D waveguide if the Alfvén speed increases monotonically beyond a fiducial radius. Both magnetic pressure and tension act as restoring forces, instead of just tension as is generally assumed in 1D models. Since magnetic pressure plays an important role, the eigenmodes involve propagation both parallel and transverse to the magnetic field. Using an analytic solution, we derive the specific eigenfrequencies and eigenfunctions for an arcade possessing a discontinuous density profile. The discontinuity separates a diffuse cylindrical cavity and an overlying shell of denser plasma that corresponds to the bright loops. We emphasize that all of the eigenfunctions have a discontinuous axial velocity at the density interface; hence, the interface can give rise to the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. Further, we find that all modes have elliptical polarization with the degree of polarization changing with height. However, depending on the line of sight, only one polarization may be clearly visible.

  1. EIGENMODES OF THREE-DIMENSIONAL MAGNETIC ARCADES IN THE SUN’S CORONA

    SciTech Connect

    Hindman, Bradley W.; Jain, Rekha

    2015-12-01

    We develop a model of coronal-loop oscillations that treats the observed bright loops as an integral part of a larger three-dimensional (3D) magnetic structure comprised of the entire magnetic arcade. We demonstrate that magnetic arcades within the solar corona can trap MHD fast waves in a 3D waveguide. This is accomplished through the construction of a cylindrically symmetric model of a magnetic arcade with a potential magnetic field. For a magnetically dominated plasma, we derive a governing equation for MHD fast waves and from this equation we show that the magnetic arcade forms a 3D waveguide if the Alfvén speed increases monotonically beyond a fiducial radius. Both magnetic pressure and tension act as restoring forces, instead of just tension as is generally assumed in 1D models. Since magnetic pressure plays an important role, the eigenmodes involve propagation both parallel and transverse to the magnetic field. Using an analytic solution, we derive the specific eigenfrequencies and eigenfunctions for an arcade possessing a discontinuous density profile. The discontinuity separates a diffuse cylindrical cavity and an overlying shell of denser plasma that corresponds to the bright loops. We emphasize that all of the eigenfunctions have a discontinuous axial velocity at the density interface; hence, the interface can give rise to the Kelvin–Helmholtz instability. Further, we find that all modes have elliptical polarization with the degree of polarization changing with height. However, depending on the line of sight, only one polarization may be clearly visible.

  2. A novel power amplification scheme for nuclear magnetic resonance/nuclear quadrupole resonance systems.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinwang; Schemm, Nathan; Balkır, Sina

    2011-03-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR)-based chemical analysis systems have been widely utilized in various areas such as medicine, security, and academic research. In these applications, the power amplifier stage plays a key role in generating the required oscillating magnetic fields within a radio frequency coil that serves as the probe. However, the bulky size and relatively low efficiency of the traditional power amplification schemes employed present a bottleneck for the realization of compact sized and portable NMR and NQR systems. To address this problem, this work presents a class D voltage-switching power amplification scheme with novel fast-start and fast-stop functions that are suitable for generating ideal NMR and NQR excitation signals. Compared to the traditional analog power amplifiers (PAs), the proposed switched-mode PA can achieve significant improvement on the power efficiency as well as the physical volume. A PA circuit for portable NQR-based explosive detection systems has been designed and built using the proposed scheme with 1 kW possible maximum output power and 10 MHz maximum operating frequency. Test results show that the presented PA achieves more than 60% measured efficiency within a highly compact volume while sustaining fast start and stop of excitation signals in the order of microseconds.

  3. Asymmetric magnetic reconnection with out-of-plane shear flows in a two dimensional hybrid model

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lin; Wang, Xiao-Gang; Wang, Xian-Qu; Liu, Yue

    2015-05-15

    Effects of out-of-plane shear flows on asymmetric magnetic reconnect are investigated in a two-dimensional (2D) hybrid model with an initial Harris sheet equilibrium. It is found that the out-of-plane flow with an in-plane shear can significantly change the asymmetric reconnection process as well as the related geometry. The magnetic flux, out-of-plane magnetic field, in-plane flow vorticity, plasma density, and the reconnection rate are discussed in detail. The results are in comparison with the cases without the shear flows to further understand the effect.

  4. Inversion of gravity and magnetic anomalies of two-dimensional polygonal cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radhakrishna Murthy, I. V.; Rama Rao, P.

    1993-10-01

    Two computer programs GPOLYIN and TPOLYIN coded in FORTRAN 77 are presented to invert respectively gravity and magnetic anomalies of two-dimensional (2-D) bodies of polygonal cross section. The computer input consists of the observed anomalies, their distances relative to a convenient reference point and the density contrast or the dip and direction of magnetization, as well as the coordinates of the vertices of the initial model. The programs solve for increments to the initial values of the coordinates using Marquardt's optimization technique. The partial derivatives are calculated by numerical differentiation. The program TPOLYIN is valid for any magnetization and for anomalies in any component.

  5. Two-dimensional solitons on the surface of magnetic fluids.

    PubMed

    Richter, Reinhard; Barashenkov, I V

    2005-05-13

    We report an observation of a stable solitonlike structure on the surface of a ferrofluid, generated by a local perturbation in the hysteretic regime of the Rosensweig instability. Unlike other pattern-forming systems with localized 2D structures, magnetic fluids are characterized by energy conservation; hence their mechanism of soliton stabilization is different from the previously discussed gain-loss balance mechanism. The radioscopic measurements of the soliton's surface profile suggest that locking on the wavelength defined by the nonmonotonic dispersion curve is instrumental in its stabilization. PMID:15904374

  6. Low-temperature nuclear magnetic resonance investigation of systems frustrated by competing exchange interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Beas

    This doctoral thesis emphasizes on the study of frustrated systems which form a very interesting class of compounds in physics. The technique used for the investigation of the magnetic properties of the frustrated materials is Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR). NMR is a very novel tool for the microscopic study of the spin systems. NMR enables us to investigate the local magnetic properties of any system exclusively. The NMR experiments on the different systems yield us knowledge of the static as well as the dynamic behavior of the electronic spins. Frustrated systems bear great possibilities of revelation of new physics through the new ground states they exhibit. The vandates AA'VO(PO4)2 [AA' ≡ Zn2 and BaCd] are great prototypes of the J1-J2 model which consists of magnetic ions sitting on the corners of a square lattice. Frustration is caused by the competing nearest-neighbor (NN) and next-nearest neighbor (NNN) exchange interactions. The NMR investigation concludes a columnar antiferromagnetic (AFM) state for both the compounds from the sharp peak of the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate (1/T1) and a sudden broadening of the 31P-NMR spectrum. The important conclusion from our study is the establishment of the first H-P-T phase diagram of BaCdVO(PO4)2. Application of high pressure reduces the saturation field (HS) in BaCdVO(PO4)2 and decreases the ratio J2/J1, pushing the system more towards a questionable boundary (a disordered ground state) between the columnar AFM and a ferromagnetic ground state. A pressure up to 2.4 GPa will completely suppress HS. The Fe ions in the `122' iron-arsenide superconductors also sit on a square lattice thus closely resembling the J1-J2 model. The 75As-NMR and Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) experiments are conducted in the compound CaFe2As2 prepared by two different heat treatment methods (`as-grown' and `annealed'). Interestingly the two samples show two different ground states. While the ground state of the `as

  7. Two-dimensional Magnetism in Arrays of Superconducting Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reich, Daniel H.

    1996-03-01

    An array of superconducting rings in an applied field corresponding to a flux of Φ0 /2 per ring behaves like a 2D Ising antiferromagnet. Each ring has two energetically equivalent states with equal and opposite magnetic moments due to fluxoid quantization, and the dipolar coupling between rings favors antiparallel alignment of the moments. Using SQUID magnetometry and scanning Hall probe microscopy, we have studied the dynamics and magnetic configurations of micron-size aluminum rings on square, triangular, honeycomb, and kagomé lattices. We have found that there are significant antiferromagnetic correlations between rings, and that effects of geometrical frustration can be observed on the triangular and kagomé lattices. Long range correlations on the other lattices are suppressed by the analog of spin freezing that locks the rings in metastable states at low temperatures, and by quenched disorder due to imperfections in the fabrication. This disorder produces a roughly 1% variation in the rings' areas, which translates into an effective random field on the spins. The ring arrays are thus an extremely good realization of the 2D random-field Ising model. (Performed in collaboration with D. Davidović, S. Kumar, J. Siegel, S. B. Field, R. C. Tiberio, R. Hey, and K. Ploog.) (Supported by NSF grants DMR-9222541, and DMR-9357518, and by the David and Lucile Packard Foundation.)

  8. Two new integrable cases of two-dimensional quantum mechanics with a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marikhin, V. G.

    2016-04-01

    Two integrable cases of two-dimensional Schrödinger equation with a magnetic field are proposed. Using the polar coordinates and the symmetrical gauge, we will obtain solutions of these equations through biconfluent and confluent Heun functions. The quantization rules will be derived for both systems under consideration.

  9. Dimensionality tuning of the electronic structure in Fe3Ga4 magnetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moura, K. O.; de Oliveira, L. A. S.; Rosa, P. F. S.; Jesus, C. B. R.; Saleta, M. E.; Granado, E.; Béron, F.; Pagliuso, P. G.; Pirota, K. R.

    2016-06-01

    This work reports on the dimensionality effects on the magnetic behavior of Fe3Ga4 compounds by means of magnetic susceptibility, electrical resistivity, and specific heat measurements. Our results show that reducing the Fe3Ga4 dimensionality, via nanowire shape, intriguingly modifies its electronic structure. In particular, the bulk system exhibits two transitions, a ferromagnetic (FM) transition temperature at T1 = 50 K and an antiferromagnetic (AFM) one at T2 = 390 K. On the other hand, nanowires shift these transition temperatures, towards higher and lower temperature for T1 and T2, respectively. Moreover, the dimensionality reduction seems to also modify the microscopic nature of the T1 transition. Instead of a FM to AFM transition, as observed in the 3D system, a transition from FM to ferrimagnetic (FERRI) or to coexistence of FM and AFM phases is found for the nanowires. Our results allowed us to propose the magnetic field-temperature phase diagram for Fe3Ga4 in both bulk and nanostructured forms. The interesting microscopic tuning of the magnetic interactions induced by dimensionality in Fe3Ga4 opens a new route to optimize the use of such materials in nanostructured devices.

  10. Dimensionality tuning of the electronic structure in Fe3Ga4 magnetic materials

    PubMed Central

    Moura, K. O.; de Oliveira, L. A. S.; Rosa, P. F. S.; Jesus, C. B. R.; Saleta, M. E.; Granado, E.; Béron, F.; Pagliuso, P. G.; Pirota, K. R.

    2016-01-01

    This work reports on the dimensionality effects on the magnetic behavior of Fe3Ga4 compounds by means of magnetic susceptibility, electrical resistivity, and specific heat measurements. Our results show that reducing the Fe3Ga4 dimensionality, via nanowire shape, intriguingly modifies its electronic structure. In particular, the bulk system exhibits two transitions, a ferromagnetic (FM) transition temperature at T1 = 50 K and an antiferromagnetic (AFM) one at T2 = 390 K. On the other hand, nanowires shift these transition temperatures, towards higher and lower temperature for T1 and T2, respectively. Moreover, the dimensionality reduction seems to also modify the microscopic nature of the T1 transition. Instead of a FM to AFM transition, as observed in the 3D system, a transition from FM to ferrimagnetic (FERRI) or to coexistence of FM and AFM phases is found for the nanowires. Our results allowed us to propose the magnetic field-temperature phase diagram for Fe3Ga4 in both bulk and nanostructured forms. The interesting microscopic tuning of the magnetic interactions induced by dimensionality in Fe3Ga4 opens a new route to optimize the use of such materials in nanostructured devices. PMID:27329581

  11. Interplay between magnetic anisotropy and dipolar interaction in one-dimensional nanomagnets: Optimized magnetocaloric effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serantes, D.; Vega, V.; Rosa, W. O.; Prida, V. M.; Hernando, B.; Pereiro, M.; Baldomir, D.

    2012-09-01

    The magnetocaloric effect (MCE) in one-dimensional (1D) magnetic nanostructures is optimized for a specific value of the magnetic field H* when applied perpendicularly to the longitudinal direction of the system. Our results reveal that H* corresponds to the saturation field, slightly above the transition from a magnetically stable dipolar-coupled configuration to an unstable one. This MCE-optimizing field explicitly depends on the characteristic magnetic parameters of the system, namely, saturation magnetization (MS) and anisotropy constant (K): H* is directly proportional to MS2, and the anisotropy contribution is equal to the anisotropy field of the particles HA=2K/MS. Accordingly, the MCE in 1D nanomagnets can be directly tuned by a proper choice of the characteristic MS and K values of the materials.

  12. Dynamic nuclear polarization and nuclear magnetic resonance in the vicinity of edge states of a 2DES in GaAs quantum wells.

    PubMed

    Bowers, Clifford R; Caldwell, Joshua D; Gusev, Guennadi; Kovalev, Alexey E; Olshanetsky, Eugene; Reno, John L; Simmons, Jerry A; Vitkalov, Sergey A

    2006-02-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance is detected via the in-plane conductivity of a two-dimensional electron system at unity Landau level filling factor in the regime of the quantum Hall effect in narrow and wide quantum wells. The NMR is spatially selective to nuclei with a coupling to electrons in the current carrying edge states at the perimeter of the 2DES. Interpretation of the electron-nuclear double resonance signals is facilitated by numerical simulations. A new RF swept method for conductivity-detected NMR is introduced which offers more efficient signal averaging. The method is applied to the study of electric quadrupole interactions, weakly allowed overtone transitions, and evaluation of the extent of electron wave function delocalization in the wide quantum well.

  13. Nuclear magnetic resonance zeugmatographic imaging of the heart: application to the study of ventricular septal defect. [Lambs

    SciTech Connect

    Heneghan, M.A.; Biancaniello, T.M.; Heidel, E.; Peterson, S.B.; Marsh, M.J.; Lauterbur, P.C.

    1982-04-01

    The present work was undertaken to determine the applicability of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging to the study of congenital heart disease. Three-dimensional proton density images of preserved lamb hearts with and without an artificially created ventricular septal defect were reconstructed and displayed in multiple planes. Sections obtained in the sagittal plane through the ventricular septum clearly showed the size, shape, and location of the defect. Results of these experiments suggest that NMR zeugmatography will become a valuable addition to existing imaging techniques for the study of congenital heart disease.

  14. Three-Dimensional EMHD Simulation Studies of Nonlinear Magnetic Structures in Magnetized Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Eliasson, B.; Shukla, P. K.

    2008-10-15

    We present a numerical study of strongly nonlinear magnetic vortex-like structures, denoted whistler spheromaks, which have recently been observed in laboratory experiments. The whistler spheromaks are excited with a ring antenna immersed in the magnetized plasma, and are propagating away from the antenna with a constant speed along the ambient magnetic field lines. The wave magnetic field of the spheromaks are of the same order or larger than the ambient magnetic field, and consists of two parts, the poloidal field which is strong enough to reverse the magnetic field in the center of the spheromak, and the toroidal field. We demonstrate numerically that the latter is crucial for the propagation speed and direction of the spheromak, and that the whistler spheromaks are long-lived structures.

  15. Three-dimensional, Impulsive Magnetic Reconnection in a Laboratory Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    S Dorfman, et al

    2013-05-03

    Impulsive, local, 3-D reconnection is identified for the first time in a laboratory current sheet. The events observed in the Magnetic Reconnection Experiment (MRX) are characterized by large local gradients in the third direction and cannot be explained by 2-D models. Detailed measurements show that the ejection of flux rope structures from the current sheet plays a key role in these events. By contrast, even though electromagnetic fluctuations in the lower hybrid frequency range are also observed concurrently with the impulsive behavior, they are not the key physics responsible. A qualitative, 3-D, two-fluid model is proposed to explain the observations. The experimental results may be particularly applicable to space and astrophysical plasmas where impulsive reconnection occurs.

  16. Magnetic field analysis of novel spherical actuators with three-dimensional pole arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Liang; Liang, Fengqi; Jiao, Zongxia; Wang, Tianyi

    2016-06-01

    Spherical actuator is an electric device that can achieve multiple degree-of-freedom rotary motions in a single joint. Permanent magnet array is a key factor that influences the output performance of electromagnetic spherical actuators. In this paper, a novel three-dimensional (3D) pole array is proposed to improve the system flux density and thus the output performance. Analysis of magnetic field distribution is extremely important for spherical actuators with 3D magnet arrays. Thus, the investigation of magnetic field is conducted in analytical, numerical, and experimental ways. The general solution of magnetic scalar potential in 3D space is formulated analytically based on Laplace's equations and spherical harmonics, and then specific solutions of the magnetic scalar potential and magnetic flux density are obtained by using boundary conditions. Numerical computation is utilized to validate the analytical model and to facilitate the observation of the magnetic field variation. A research prototype and a testing platform of magnetic field have been developed for experimental study. The testing platform can move the probe to any position around the spherical actuator and measure the flux density automatically. Experiments are conducted to obtain the flux distribution. Both numerical and experimental results validate the analytical model well.

  17. Magnetic field analysis of novel spherical actuators with three-dimensional pole arrays.

    PubMed

    Yan, Liang; Liang, Fengqi; Jiao, Zongxia; Wang, Tianyi

    2016-06-01

    Spherical actuator is an electric device that can achieve multiple degree-of-freedom rotary motions in a single joint. Permanent magnet array is a key factor that influences the output performance of electromagnetic spherical actuators. In this paper, a novel three-dimensional (3D) pole array is proposed to improve the system flux density and thus the output performance. Analysis of magnetic field distribution is extremely important for spherical actuators with 3D magnet arrays. Thus, the investigation of magnetic field is conducted in analytical, numerical, and experimental ways. The general solution of magnetic scalar potential in 3D space is formulated analytically based on Laplace's equations and spherical harmonics, and then specific solutions of the magnetic scalar potential and magnetic flux density are obtained by using boundary conditions. Numerical computation is utilized to validate the analytical model and to facilitate the observation of the magnetic field variation. A research prototype and a testing platform of magnetic field have been developed for experimental study. The testing platform can move the probe to any position around the spherical actuator and measure the flux density automatically. Experiments are conducted to obtain the flux distribution. Both numerical and experimental results validate the analytical model well. PMID:27370488

  18. Preliminary analysis of coil wedge dimensional variation in SSC Prototype Dipole Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Pollock, D.; Brown, G.; Dwyer, S.; Gattu, R.; Warner, D.

    1993-05-01

    The wedges used in SSC Prototype Dipole Magnets determine the relative position of conductor blocks within magnet coils. They serve to compensate partially for the less than full keystoning of the superconductor cable and to adjust current distribution with azimuth to determine the magnetic field shape. The ability to control the size and uniformity of wedges therefore is an important factor influencing magnet quality. This paper presents preliminary results of a Statistical Quality Control study of wedge dimensional variation and predicted field quality. Dimensions of samples from outer wedges for magnet DCA102 have been measured using a programmable optical comparator. The data is used to evaluate wedge manufacturing process capability, wedge uniformity, and to predict changes in conductor block position due to wedge deviation. Expected multipole variation attributable to observed wedge variation is discussed. This work focuses on a Prototype Dipole Magnet being built at the SSCL Magnet Development Laboratory (SSCL MDL) in Waxahachie, Texas. The magnet is of the same design as the DCA3xx series magnets built at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) in 1991--92 and later used in the 1992 Accelerator Systems String Test (ASST).

  19. Magnetic structure of the low-dimensional magnet NaCu{sub 2}O{sub 2}: {sup 63,65}Cu and {sup 23}Na NMR studies

    SciTech Connect

    Sadykov, A. F. Gerashchenko, A. P.; Piskunov, Yu. V.; Ogloblichev, V. V.; Smol’nikov, A. G.; Verkhovskii, S. V.; Buzlukov, A. L.; Arapova, I. Yu.; Furukawa, Y.; Yakubovskii, A. Yu.; Bush, A. A.

    2014-11-15

    The magnetic structure of a quasi-one-dimensional frustrated NaCu{sub 2}O{sub 2} magnet single crystal is studied by NMR. The spatial orientation of the planar spin spirals in the copper-oxygen Cu{sup 2+}-O chains is determined, and its evolution as a function of the applied magnetic field direction is analyzed.

  20. /sup 13/C nuclear magnetic resonance studies of cardiac metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Seeholzer, S.H.

    1985-01-01

    The last decade has witnessed the increasing use of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) techniques for following the metabolic fate of compounds specifically labeled with /sup 13/C. The goals of the present study are: (1) to develop reliable quantitative procedures for measuring the /sup 13/C enrichment of specific carbon sites in compounds enriched by the metabolism of /sup 13/C-labeled substrates in rat heart, and (2) to use these quantitative measurements of fractional /sup 13/C enrichment within the context of a mathematical flux model describing the carbon flow through the TCA cycle and ancillary pathways, as a means for obtaining unknown flux parameters. Rat hearts have been perfused in vitro with various combinations of glucose, acetate, pyruvate, and propionate to achieve steady state flux conditions, followed by perfusion with the same substrates labeled with /sup 13/C in specific carbon sites. The hearts were frozen at different times after addition of /sup 13/C-labeled substrates and neutralized perchloric acid extracts were used to obtain high resolution proton-decoupled /sup 13/C NMR spectra at 90.55 MHz. The fractional /sup 13/C enrichment (F.E.) of individual carbon sites in different metabolites was calculated from the area of the resolved resonances after correction for saturation and nuclear Overhauser effects. These F.E. measurements by /sup 13/C NMR were validated by the analysis of /sup 13/C-/sup 1/H scalar coupling patterns observed in /sup 1/H NMR spectra of the extracted metabolites. The results obtained from perfusion of hearts glucose plus either (2-/sup 13/C) acetate or (3-/sup 13/C) pyruvate are similar to those obtained by previous investigators using /sup 14/C-labeled substrates.

  1. Nuclear magnetic resonance experiments with dc SQUID amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Heaney, M.B. . Dept. of Physics Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA )

    1990-11-01

    The development and fabrication of dc SQUIDs (Superconducting QUantum Interference Devices) with Nb/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Nb Josephson junctions is described. A theory of the dc SQUID as a radio-frequency amplifier is presented, with an optimization strategy that accounts for the loading and noise contributions of the postamplifier and maximizes the signal-to-noise ratio of the total system. The high sensitivity of the dc SQUID is extended to high field NMR. A dc SQUID is used as a tuned radio-frequency amplifier to detect pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance at 32 MHz from a metal film in a 3.5 Tesla static field. A total system noise temperature of 11 K has been achieved, at a bath temperature of 4.2 K. The minimum number of nuclear Bohr magnetons observable from a free precession signal after a single pulse is about 2 {times} 10{sup 17} in a bandwidth of 25 kHz. In a separate experiment, a dc SQUID is used as a rf amplifier in a NQR experiment to observe a new resonance response mechanism. The net electric polarization of a NaClO{sub 3} crystal due to the precessing electric quadrupole moments of the Cl nuclei is detected at 30 MHz. The sensitivity of NMR and NQR spectrometers using dc SQUID amplifiers is compared to the sensitivity of spectrometers using conventional rf amplifiers. A SQUID-based spectrometer has a voltage sensitivity which is comparable to the best achieved by a FET-based spectrometer, at these temperatures and operating frequencies.

  2. Advances and applications of dynamic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Baltisberger, J.H.

    1993-06-01

    This dissertation describes nuclear magnetic resonance experiments and theory which have been developed to study quadrupolar nuclei (those nuclei with spin greater than one-half) in the solid state. Primarily, the technique of dynamic-angle spinning (DAS) is extensively reviewed and expanded upon in this thesis. Specifically, the improvement in both the resolution (two-dimensional pure-absorptive phase methods and DAS angle choice) and sensitivity (pulse-sequence development), along with effective spinning speed enhancement (again through choice of DAS conditions or alternative multiple pulse schemes) of dynamic-angle spinning experiment was realized with both theory and experimental examples. The application of DAS to new types of nuclei (specifically the {sup 87}Rb and {sup 85}Rb nuclear spins) and materials (specifically amorphous solids) has also greatly expanded the possibilities of the use of DAS to study a larger range of materials. This dissertation is meant to demonstrate both recent advances and applications of the DAS technique, and by no means represents a comprehensive study of any particular chemical problem.

  3. Single-coil magnetic induction tomographic three-dimensional imaging.

    PubMed

    Feldkamp, Joseph R

    2015-01-01

    Previously, magnetic induction tomography (MIT) has been considered for noncontact imaging of human tissue electrical properties. Commonly, multiple coils are used, with any one serving as the source while others detect eddy currents generated in the specimen. Here, imaging of low conductivity objects is shown feasible with a single coil acting simultaneously as source and detector, provided that the coil is repeatedly relocated while collecting coil loss data. To enable such "scanning," an analytical coil loss formula is derived in the quasistatic limit for a single coil consisting of several concentric circular wire loops, all within a common plane. Conductivity may vary arbitrarily in space, whereas permittivity and permeability are treated as uniform. The analytical form is used to build an algorithm for imaging electrical conductivity in human tissues. A practical device operating at 12.5 MHz is described and used in a clinical trial that "scans" the region between the scapulae while collecting coil loss data. Inversion of data leads to electrical conductivity distribution images for the thoracic spinal column which are the first of their kind to correctly distinguish such basic features as size and depth of spinal canal, as well as size, depth, and spacing of transverse spinal processes. PMID:26158078

  4. Single-coil magnetic induction tomographic three-dimensional imaging

    PubMed Central

    Feldkamp, Joseph R.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Previously, magnetic induction tomography (MIT) has been considered for noncontact imaging of human tissue electrical properties. Commonly, multiple coils are used, with any one serving as the source while others detect eddy currents generated in the specimen. Here, imaging of low conductivity objects is shown feasible with a single coil acting simultaneously as source and detector, provided that the coil is repeatedly relocated while collecting coil loss data. To enable such “scanning,” an analytical coil loss formula is derived in the quasistatic limit for a single coil consisting of several concentric circular wire loops, all within a common plane. Conductivity may vary arbitrarily in space, whereas permittivity and permeability are treated as uniform. The analytical form is used to build an algorithm for imaging electrical conductivity in human tissues. A practical device operating at 12.5 MHz is described and used in a clinical trial that “scans” the region between the scapulae while collecting coil loss data. Inversion of data leads to electrical conductivity distribution images for the thoracic spinal column which are the first of their kind to correctly distinguish such basic features as size and depth of spinal canal, as well as size, depth, and spacing of transverse spinal processes. PMID:26158078

  5. [Application of nuclear magnetic resonance for the determination of the structure of proteins in solution].

    PubMed

    Charretier, E; Guéron, M

    1991-01-01

    Knowledge of three-dimensional structure is a key factor in protein engineering. It is useful, for example, in predicting and understanding the functional consequences of specific substitution of one or more amino acids of the polypeptide chain. It is also necessary for the design of new effectors or analogs of the substrates of enzymes and receptors. X-ray diffraction by crystals of the biomolecule was for a long time the only method of determining three-dimensional structures. In the last 5 years, it has been joined by a new technique, two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (2D NMR), which can resolve the structure of middle-sized proteins (less than 10 kilodaltons). The technique is applied on solutions whose pH, ionic strength, and temperature can be chosen and changed. The two basic measurements, COSY and NOESY, detect respectively the systems of hydrogen nuclei, or protons, coupled through covalent bonds, and those in which the interproton distances are less than 0.5 nm. A systematic strategy leads from resonance assignments of the two-dimensional spectrum to molecular modeling with constraints and finally to the determination of the molecular structure in the solution. Much sophistication is needed even today for the first task, the assignment of the resonances. Each of the COSY and NOESY spectra is a two-dimensional map, where the diagonal line is the one-dimensional spectrum, and the off-diagonal peaks indicate connectives between protons. Peak assignment to a specific type of amino acid is based on the pattern of scalar couplings observed in the COSY spectrum. Next, the amino acids are positioned in the primary sequence, using the spatial proximities of polypeptide chain protons, as observed in the NOESY spectrum. The principal secondary structures (alpha helix, beta sheets, etc.) are then identified by their specific connectivities. The tertiary structure is detected by NOESY connectivities between protons of different amino acids which are far apart

  6. Structure and magnetic behavior of a new two-dimensional antiferromagnetic manganese(II)-{mu}-1,3-azido system

    SciTech Connect

    Escuer, A.; Vicente, R.; Mautner, F.A.

    1995-11-08

    In this work we present the synthesis, X-ray crystal structure determination, and magnetic behavior of the two-dimensional compound [Mn(4acpy){sub 2}(N{sub 3}){sub 2}]{sub n}, (4acpy = 4-acetylpyridine) in which the coordination mode of the azido ligand is end-to-end. The susceptibility measurements for [Mn(4acpy){sub 2}(N{sub 3}){sub 2}]{sub n} are indicative of a moderate antiferromagnetic coupling. EPR and susceptibility data are indicative of magnetic ordering below 28 K. It is relevant to note that these magnetic measurements are the first ones for the manganese-azido(end-to-end) system. From the point of view of the design of new magnetic systems, the bridging azido ligand shows two key properties: it is a good superexchange pathway (ferromagnetic systems for the end-on coordination and antiferromagnetic for end-to-end coordination) and it frequently leads to nontrivial systems with nuclearity greater than 2. At the present, magnetic studies on the manganese-azido-bridged systems have been performed only for the dinuclear compound ({mu}-1,1-N{sub 3})[Mn(terpy)]{sub 2}{center_dot}H{sub 2}O, which shows ferromagnetic coupling (J/k = + 3.5 K), following the general trends found for analogous Cu(II) and Ni(II) 1,1-azido systems. The structure of the title compound shows that each manganese atom is octahedrally coordinated to four azido ligands and two molecules of 4-acetylpyridine in trans arrangement. Antiferromagnetic interactions were evident from susceptibility data.

  7. Magnetohydrostatic Equilibrium. II. Three-dimensional Multiple Open Magnetic Flux Tubes in the Stratified Solar Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gent, F. A.; Fedun, V.; Erdélyi, R.

    2014-07-01

    A system of multiple open magnetic flux tubes spanning the solar photosphere and lower corona is modeled analytically, within a realistic stratified atmosphere subject to solar gravity. This extends results for a single magnetic flux tube in magnetohydrostatic equilibrium, described in Gent et al. Self-similar magnetic flux tubes are combined to form magnetic structures, which are consistent with high-resolution observations. The observational evidence supports the existence of strands of open flux tubes and loops persisting in a relatively steady state. Self-similar magnetic flux tubes, for which an analytic solution to the plasma density and pressure distribution is possible, are combined. We calculate the appropriate balancing forces, applying to the equations of momentum and energy conservation to preserve equilibrium. Multiplex flux tube configurations are observed to remain relatively stable for up to a day or more, and it is our aim to apply our model as the background condition for numerical studies of energy transport mechanisms from the solar surface to the corona. We apply magnetic field strength, plasma density, pressure, and temperature distributions consistent with observational and theoretical estimates for the lower solar atmosphere. Although each flux tube is identical in construction apart from the location of the radial axis, combinations can be applied to generate a non-axisymmetric magnetic field with multiple non-uniform flux tubes. This is a considerable step forward in modeling the realistic magnetized three-dimensional equilibria of the solar atmosphere.

  8. Magnetohydrostatic equilibrium. II. Three-dimensional multiple open magnetic flux tubes in the stratified solar atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Gent, F. A.; Erdélyi, R.; Fedun, V.

    2014-07-01

    A system of multiple open magnetic flux tubes spanning the solar photosphere and lower corona is modeled analytically, within a realistic stratified atmosphere subject to solar gravity. This extends results for a single magnetic flux tube in magnetohydrostatic equilibrium, described in Gent et al. Self-similar magnetic flux tubes are combined to form magnetic structures, which are consistent with high-resolution observations. The observational evidence supports the existence of strands of open flux tubes and loops persisting in a relatively steady state. Self-similar magnetic flux tubes, for which an analytic solution to the plasma density and pressure distribution is possible, are combined. We calculate the appropriate balancing forces, applying to the equations of momentum and energy conservation to preserve equilibrium. Multiplex flux tube configurations are observed to remain relatively stable for up to a day or more, and it is our aim to apply our model as the background condition for numerical studies of energy transport mechanisms from the solar surface to the corona. We apply magnetic field strength, plasma density, pressure, and temperature distributions consistent with observational and theoretical estimates for the lower solar atmosphere. Although each flux tube is identical in construction apart from the location of the radial axis, combinations can be applied to generate a non-axisymmetric magnetic field with multiple non-uniform flux tubes. This is a considerable step forward in modeling the realistic magnetized three-dimensional equilibria of the solar atmosphere.

  9. Nuclear spin conversion of water inside fullerene cages detected by low-temperature nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Mamone, Salvatore Concistrè, Maria; Carignani, Elisa; Meier, Benno; Krachmalnicoff, Andrea; Johannessen, Ole G.; Denning, Mark; Carravetta, Marina; Whitby, Richard J.; Levitt, Malcolm H.; Lei, Xuegong; Li, Yongjun; Goh, Kelvin; Horsewill, Anthony J.

    2014-05-21

    The water-endofullerene H{sub 2}O@C{sub 60} provides a unique chemical system in which freely rotating water molecules are confined inside homogeneous and symmetrical carbon cages. The spin conversion between the ortho and para species of the endohedral H{sub 2}O was studied in the solid phase by low-temperature nuclear magnetic resonance. The experimental data are consistent with a second-order kinetics, indicating a bimolecular spin conversion process. Numerical simulations suggest the simultaneous presence of a spin diffusion process allowing neighbouring ortho and para molecules to exchange their angular momenta. Cross-polarization experiments found no evidence that the spin conversion of the endohedral H{sub 2}O molecules is catalysed by {sup 13}C nuclei present in the cages.

  10. Three-dimensional dose evaluation system using real-time wind field information for nuclear accidents in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jay; Lu, Chung-Hsin; Chang, Shu-Jun; Yang, Yung-Muh; Chang, Bor-Jing; Teng, Jen-Hsin

    2006-09-01

    In Taiwan, the three operating nuclear power plants are all built along the coast over complex terrain. Dose estimates after a nuclear accident with releases of radioactive materials, therefore, cannot be accurately calculated using simple dispersion models. We developed a three-dimensional dose evaluation system, which incorporates real-time prognostic wind field information with three-dimensional numerical models to predict dose results. The proposed system consists of three models: a three-dimensional mesoscale atmospheric model (HOTMAC), a three-dimensional transport and diffusion model (RAPTAD), and a dose calculation model (DOSE). The whole-body dose and thyroid dose as well as dose rates can be rapidly estimated and displayed on the three-dimensional terrain model constructed by satellite images. The developed three-dimensional dose evaluation system could accurately forecast the dose results and has been used in the annual nuclear emergency response exercise to provide suggestions for protective measures.

  11. Laser-induced nuclear magnetic resonance splitting in hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Ikäläinen, Suvi; Lantto, Perttu; Manninen, Pekka; Vaara, Juha

    2008-09-28

    Irradiation of matter with circularly polarized light (CPL) shifts all nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) lines. The phenomenon arises from the second-order interaction of the electron cloud with the optical field, combined with the orbital hyperfine interaction. The shift occurs in opposite directions for right and left CPL, and rapid switching between them will split the resonance lines into two. We present ab initio and density functional theory predictions of laser-induced NMR splittings for hydrocarbon systems with different sizes: ethene, benzene, coronene, fullerene, and circumcoronene. Due to the computationally challenging nature of the effect, traditional basis sets could not be used for the larger systems. A novel method for generating basis sets, mathematical completeness optimization, was employed. As expected, the magnitude of the spectral splitting increases with the laser beam frequency and polarizability of the system. Massive amplification of the effect is also observed close to the optical excitation energies. A much larger laser-induced splitting is found for the largest of the present molecules than for the previously investigated noble gas atoms or small molecules. The laser intensity required for experimental detection of the effect is discussed.

  12. Updated methodology for nuclear magnetic resonance characterization of shales

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Washburn, Kathryn E.; Birdwell, Justin E.

    2013-01-01

    Unconventional petroleum resources, particularly in shales, are expected to play an increasingly important role in the world’s energy portfolio in the coming years. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), particularly at low-field, provides important information in the evaluation of shale resources. Most of the low-field NMR analyses performed on shale samples rely heavily on standard T1 and T2 measurements. We present a new approach using solid echoes in the measurement of T1 and T1–T2 correlations that addresses some of the challenges encountered when making NMR measurements on shale samples compared to conventional reservoir rocks. Combining these techniques with standard T1 and T2 measurements provides a more complete assessment of the hydrogen-bearing constituents (e.g., bitumen, kerogen, clay-bound water) in shale samples. These methods are applied to immature and pyrolyzed oil shale samples to examine the solid and highly viscous organic phases present during the petroleum generation process. The solid echo measurements produce additional signal in the oil shale samples compared to the standard methodologies, indicating the presence of components undergoing homonuclear dipolar coupling. The results presented here include the first low-field NMR measurements performed on kerogen as well as detailed NMR analysis of highly viscous thermally generated bitumen present in pyrolyzed oil shale.

  13. Nuclear magnetic resonance proton imaging of bone pathology

    SciTech Connect

    Atlan, H.; Sigal, R.; Hadar, H.; Chisin, R.; Cohen, I.; Lanir, A.; Soudry, M.; Machtey, Y.; Schreiber, R.; Benmair, J.

    1986-02-01

    Thirty-two patients with diversified pathology were examined with a supraconductive NMR imager using spin echo with different TR and TE to obtain T1 and T2 weighted images. They included 20 tumors (12 primary, eight metastasis), six osteomyelitis, three fractures, two osteonecrosis, and one diffuse metabolic (Gaucher) disease. In all cases except for the stress fractures, the bone pathology was clearly visualized in spite of the normal lack of signal from the compact cortical bone. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging proved to be at least as sensitive as radionuclide scintigraphy but much more accurate than all other imaging procedures including computed tomography (CT) and angiography to assess the extension of the lesions, especially in tumors extended to soft tissue. This is due both to easy acquisition of sagittal and coronal sections and to different patterns of pathologic modifications of T1 and T2 which are beginning to be defined. It is hoped that more experience in clinical use of these patterns will help to discriminate between tumor extension and soft-tissue edema. We conclude that while radionuclide scintigraphy will probably remain the most sensitive and easy to perform screening test for bone pathology, NMR imaging, among noninvasive diagnostic procedures, appears to be at least as specific as CT. In addition, where the extension of the lesions is concerned, NMR imaging is much more informative than CT. In pathology of the spine, the easy visualization of the spinal cord should decrease the need for myelography.

  14. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance studies on brain edema

    SciTech Connect

    Naruse, S.; Horikawa, Y.; Tanaka, C.; Hirakawa, K.; Nishikawa, H.; Yoshizaki, K.

    1982-06-01

    The water in normal and edematous brain tissues of rats was studied by the pulse nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique, measuring the longitudinal relaxation time (T1) and the transverse relaxation time (T2). In the normal brain, T1 and T2 were single components, both shorter than in pure water. Prolongation and separation of T2 into two components, one fast and one slow, were the characteristic findings in brain edema induced by both cold injury and triethyl tin (TET), although some differences between the two types of edema existed in the content of the lesion and in the degree of changes in T1 and T2 values. Quantitative analysis of T1 and T2 values in their time course relating to water content demonstrated that prolongation of T1 referred to the volume of increased water in tissues examined, and that two phases of T2 reflected the distribution and the content of the edema fluid. From the analysis of the slow component of T2 versus water content during edema formation, it was demonstrated that the increase in edema fluid was steady, and its content was constant during formation of TET-induced edema. On the contrary, during the formation of cold-injury edema, water-rich edema fluid increased during the initial few hours, and protein-rich edema fluid increased thereafter. It was concluded that proton NMR relaxation time measurements may provide new understanding in the field of brain edema research.

  15. Monitoring iron mineralization processes using nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keating, Kristina

    Proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements can be used to probe the molecular-scale physical and chemical environment of water in the pore space of geological materials. In geophysics, NMR relaxation measurements are used in to measure water content and estimate permeability in the top 100 m of Earth's surface. The goal of the research presented in this thesis is to determine if NMR can also be used in geophysical applications to monitor iron mineralization processes associated with contaminant remediation. The first part of the research presented in this thesis focuses on understanding the effect of iron mineral form and redox state on the NMR relaxation response of water in geologic material. Laboratory NMR measurements were made on Fe(III)-bearing minerals (ferrihydrite, lepidocrocite, goethite, and hematite), Fe(II)-bearing minerals (siderite, pyrite, and troilite), and a mixed valence iron-bearing mineral (magnetite). The results of these measurements show that the relaxation rate of water is strongly dependent on the mineral form of iron. Shown in the final section of this thesis are results from an experiment exploring temporal changes in the measured NMR relaxation rates during the reaction of ferrihydrite with aqueous Fe(II). These results show that NMR can be used to monitor temporal chemical changes in iron minerals. I conclude that this research shows that NMR indeed has the potential to be used as a tool for monitoring geochemical reactions associated with contaminant remediation.

  16. Water Permeability of Chlorella Cell Membranes by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Stout, Darryl G.; Steponkus, Peter L.; Bustard, Larry D.; Cotts, Robert M.

    1978-01-01

    Measurement by two nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques of the mean residence time τa of water molecules inside Chlorella vulgaris (Beijerinck) var. “viridis” (Chodot) is reported. The first is the Conlon and Outhred (1972 Biochim Biophys Acta 288: 354-361) technique in which extracellular water is doped with paramagnetic Mn2+ ions. Some complications in application of this technique are identified as being caused by the affinity of Chlorella cell walls for Mn2+ ions which shortens the NMR relaxation times of intra- and extracellular water. The second is based upon observations of effects of diffusion on the spin echo of intra- and extracellular water. Echo attenuation of intracellular water is distinguished from that of extracellular water by the extent to which diffusive motion is restricted. Intracellular water, being restricted to the cell volume, suffers less echo attenuation. From the dependence of echo amplitude upon gradient strength at several values of echo time, the mean residence time of intracellular water can be determined. From the mean residence time of intracellular water, the diffusional water permeability coefficient of the Chlorella membrane is calculated to be 2.1 ± 0.4 × 10−3 cm sec−1. PMID:16660456

  17. Advances in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance for Drug Discovery.

    PubMed

    Powers, Robert

    2009-10-01

    BACKGROUND: Drug discovery is a complex and unpredictable endeavor with a high failure rate. Current trends in the pharmaceutical industry have exasperated these challenges and are contributing to the dramatic decline in productivity observed over the last decade. The industrialization of science by forcing the drug discovery process to adhere to assembly-line protocols is imposing unnecessary restrictions, such as short project time-lines. Recent advances in nuclear magnetic resonance are responding to these self-imposed limitations and are providing opportunities to increase the success rate of drug discovery. OBJECTIVE/METHOD: A review of recent advancements in NMR technology that have the potential of significantly impacting and benefiting the drug discovery process will be presented. These include fast NMR data collection protocols and high-throughput protein structure determination, rapid protein-ligand co-structure determination, lead discovery using fragment-based NMR affinity screens, NMR metabolomics to monitor in vivo efficacy and toxicity for lead compounds, and the identification of new therapeutic targets through the functional annotation of proteins by FAST-NMR. CONCLUSION: NMR is a critical component of the drug discovery process, where the versatility of the technique enables it to continually expand and evolve its role. NMR is expected to maintain this growth over the next decade with advancements in automation, speed of structure calculation, in-cell imaging techniques, and the expansion of NMR amenable targets.

  18. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of the kidney: renal masses

    SciTech Connect

    Hricak, H.; Williams, R.D.; Moon, K.L. Jr.; Moss, A.A.; Alpers, C.; Crooks, L.E.; Kaufman, L.

    1983-06-01

    Fifteen patients with a variety of renal masses were examined by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), computed tomography, ultrasound, and intravenous urography. NMR clearly differentiated between simple renal cysts and other renal masses. On spin echo images, the simple renal cyst appeared as a round or slightly oval, homogeneous low-intensity mass with characteristically long T1 and T2 values. The thickness of the cyst wall was not measurable. The cyst had a smooth outer margin and a distict, sharp interface with normal parenchyma. Hemorrhagic cysts were seen as high-intensity lesions. Renal cell carcinomas displayed a wide range of intensity. The T1 and T2 values of the tumors were always different from those of the surrounding renal parenchyma. Tumor pseudocapsule was identified in four of five patients examined. All carcinomas were accurately staged by NMR and extension of the tumor thrombus into the inferior vena cava was demonstrated. The authors predict that if these preliminary results are confirmed by data from a larger number of patients, NMR will play a significant role in renal imaging.

  19. Spherical tensor analysis of nuclear magnetic resonance signals.

    PubMed

    van Beek, Jacco D; Carravetta, Marina; Antonioli, Gian Carlo; Levitt, Malcolm H

    2005-06-22

    In a nuclear magnetic-resonance (NMR) experiment, the spin density operator may be regarded as a superposition of irreducible spherical tensor operators. Each of these spin operators evolves during the NMR experiment and may give rise to an NMR signal at a later time. The NMR signal at the end of a pulse sequence may, therefore, be regarded as a superposition of spherical components, each derived from a different spherical tensor operator. We describe an experimental method, called spherical tensor analysis (STA), which allows the complete resolution of the NMR signal into its individual spherical components. The method is demonstrated on a powder of a (13)C-labeled amino acid, exposed to a pulse sequence generating a double-quantum effective Hamiltonian. The propagation of spin order through the space of spherical tensor operators is revealed by the STA procedure, both in static and rotating solids. Possible applications of STA to the NMR of liquids, liquid crystals, and solids are discussed. PMID:16035785

  20. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of water content in the subsurface

    SciTech Connect

    J. Hendricks; T. Yao; A. Kearns

    1999-01-21

    Previous theoretical and experimental studies indicated that surface nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has the potential to provide cost-effective water content measurements in the subsurface and is a technology ripe for exploitation in practice. The objectives of this investigation are (a) to test the technique under a wide range of hydrogeological conditions and (b) to generalize existing NMR theories in order to correctly model NMR response from conductive ground and to assess properties of the inverse problem. Twenty-four sites with different hydrogeologic settings were selected in New Mexico and Colorado for testing. The greatest limitation of surface NMR technology appears to be the lack of understanding in which manner the NMR signal is influenced by soil-water factors such as pore size distribution, surface-to-volume ratio, paramagnetic ions dissolved in the ground water, and the presence of ferromagnetic minerals. Although the theoretical basis is found to be sound, several advances need to be made to make surface NMR a viable technology for hydrological investigations. There is a research need to investigate, under controlled laboratory conditions, how the complex factors of soil-water systems affect NMR relaxation times.

  1. A nuclear magnetic resonance study of water in aggrecan solutions

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Richard J.; Damion, Robin A.; Baboolal, Thomas G.; Smye, Stephen W.; Ries, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    Aggrecan, a highly charged macromolecule found in articular cartilage, was investigated in aqueous salt solutions with proton nuclear magnetic resonance. The longitudinal and transverse relaxation rates were determined at two different field strengths, 9.4 T and 0.5 T, for a range of temperatures and aggrecan concentrations. The diffusion coefficients of the water molecules were also measured as a function of temperature and aggrecan concentration, using a pulsed field gradient technique at 9.4 T. Assuming an Arrhenius relationship, the activation energies for the various relaxation processes and the translational motion of the water molecules were determined from temperature dependencies as a function of aggrecan concentration in the range 0–5.3% w/w. The longitudinal relaxation rate and inverse diffusion coefficient were approximately equally dependent on concentration and only increased by upto 20% from that of the salt solution. The transverse relaxation rate at high field demonstrated greatest concentration dependence, changing by an order of magnitude across the concentration range examined. We attribute this primarily to chemical exchange. Activation energies appeared to be approximately independent of aggrecan concentration, except for that of the low-field transverse relaxation rate, which decreased with concentration. PMID:27069663

  2. Work in progress: nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of the gallbladder

    SciTech Connect

    Hricak, H.; Filly, R.A.; Margulis, A.R.; Moon, K.L.; Crooks, L.E.; Kaufman, L.

    1983-05-01

    A preliminary study of the relation between food intake and intensity of gallbladder bile on nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) images was made. Twelve subjects (seven volunteers, five patients) were imaged following a minimum of 14 hours of fasting. Six of seven volunteers were reimaged one hour after stimulation by either a fatty meal or an alcoholic beverage. An additional seven patients were imaged two hours after a hospital breakfast. It was found that concentrated bile emits a high-intensity spin echo signal (SE), while hepatic bile in the gallbladder produces a low-intensity SE signal. Following ingestion of cholecystogogue, dilute hepatic bile settles on top of the concentrated bile, each emitting SE signals of different intensity. The average T1 value of concentrated bile was 594 msec, while the T1 vaue of dilute hepatic bile was 2,646 msec. The average T2 values were 104 msec for concentrated bile and 126 msec for dilute bile. The most likely cause for the different SE intensities of bile is the higher water content, and therefore longer T1 or T2 relaxation times, of hepatic bile. It is suggested that NMR imaging has the ability to provide physiological information about the gallbladder and that it may prove to be a simple and safe clinical test of gallbladder function.

  3. Advances in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance for Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Powers, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Background Drug discovery is a complex and unpredictable endeavor with a high failure rate. Current trends in the pharmaceutical industry have exasperated these challenges and are contributing to the dramatic decline in productivity observed over the last decade. The industrialization of science by forcing the drug discovery process to adhere to assembly-line protocols is imposing unnecessary restrictions, such as short project time-lines. Recent advances in nuclear magnetic resonance are responding to these self-imposed limitations and are providing opportunities to increase the success rate of drug discovery. Objective/Method A review of recent advancements in NMR technology that have the potential of significantly impacting and benefiting the drug discovery process will be presented. These include fast NMR data collection protocols and high-throughput protein structure determination, rapid protein-ligand co-structure determination, lead discovery using fragment-based NMR affinity screens, NMR metabolomics to monitor in vivo efficacy and toxicity for lead compounds, and the identification of new therapeutic targets through the functional annotation of proteins by FAST-NMR. Conclusion NMR is a critical component of the drug discovery process, where the versatility of the technique enables it to continually expand and evolve its role. NMR is expected to maintain this growth over the next decade with advancements in automation, speed of structure calculation, in-cell imaging techniques, and the expansion of NMR amenable targets. PMID:20333269

  4. A metabonomics investigation of multiple sclerosis by nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Mehrpour, Masoud; Kyani, Anahita; Tafazzoli, Mohsen; Fathi, Fariba; Joghataie, Mohammad-Taghi

    2013-02-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a nervous system disease that affects the fatty myelin sheaths around the axons of the brain and spinal cord, leading to demyelination and a broad range of signs and symptoms. MS can be difficult to diagnose because its signs and symptoms may be similar to other medical problems. To find out which metabolites in serum are effective for the diagnosis of MS, we utilized metabolic profiling using proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-NMR). Random forest (RF) was used to classify the MS patients and healthy subjects. Atomic absorption spectroscopy was used to measure the serum levels of selenium. The results showed that the levels of selenium were lower in the MS group, when compared with the control group. RF was used to identify the metabolites that caused selenium changes in people with MS by building a correlation model between these metabolites and serum levels of selenium. For the external test set, the obtained classification model showed a 93% correct classification of MS and healthy subjects. The regression model of levels of selenium and metabolites showed the correlation (R(2)) value of 0.88 for the external test set. The results indicate the suitability of NMR as a screen for identifying MS patients and healthy subjects. A novel model with good prediction outcomes was constructed between serum levels of selenium and NMR data. PMID:23255426

  5. Mathematical modeling of transformation process of structurally unstable magnetic configurations into structurally stable ones in two-dimensional and three-dimensional geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inovenkov, Igor; Echkina, Eugenia; Ponomarenko, Loubov

    Magnetic reconnection is a fundamental process in astrophysical, space and laboratory plasma. In essence, it represents a change of topology of the magnetic field caused by readjustment of the structure of the magnetic field lines. This change leads to release of energy accumulated in the field. We consider transformation process of structurally unstable magnetic configurations into the structurally steady ones from the point of view of the сatastrophe theory. Special attention is paid to modeling of evolution of the structurally unstable three-dimensional magnetic fields.

  6. Magnetic dynamo action in two-dimensional turbulent magneto-hydrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fyfe, D.; Joyce, G.; Montgomery, D.

    1976-01-01

    Two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic turbulence is explored by means of numerical simulation. Previous analytical theory, based on non-dissipative constants of the motion in a truncated Fourier representation, is verified by following the evolution of highly non-equilibrium initial conditions numerically. Dynamo action (conversion of a significant fraction of turbulent kinetic energy into long-wavelength magnetic field energy) is observed. It is conjectured that in the presence of dissipation and external forcing, a dual cascade will be observed for zero-helicity situations. Energy will cascade to higher wave numbers simultaneously with a cascade of mean square vector potential to lower wave numbers, leading to an omni-directional magnetic energy spectrum which varies as 1/k 3 at lower wave numbers, simultaneously with a buildup of magnetic excitation at the lowest wave number of the system. Equipartition of kinetic and magnetic energies is expected at the highest wave numbers in the system.

  7. Experimentally determining the exchange parameters of quasi-two dimensional Heisenbert magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Singleton, John; Sengupta, P; Mcdonald, R D; Cox, S; Harrison, N; Goddard, P A; Lancaster, T; Blundell, S J; Pratt, F L; Manson, J L; Southerland, H I; Schlueter, J A

    2008-01-01

    Though long-range magnetic order cannot occur at temperatures T > 0 in a perfect two-dimensional (2D) Heisenberg magnet, real quasi-2D materials will invariably possess nonzero inter-plane coupling J{sub {perpendicular}} driving the system to order at elevated temperatures. This process can be studied using quantum Monte Carlo calculations. However, it is difficult to test the results of these calculations experimentally since for highly anisotropic materials in which the in-plane coupling is comparable with attainable magnetic fields J{sub {perpendicular}} is necessarily very small and inaccessible directly. In addition, because of the large anisotropy, the Neel temperatures are low and difficult to determine from thermodynamic measurements. Here, we present an elegant method of assessing the calculations via two independent experimental probes: pulsed-field magnetization in fields of up to 85 T, and muon-spin rotation.

  8. Angle-dependent high magnetic field microwave spectroscopy of low dimensional conductors and superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Susumu

    This dissertation presents studies of angle-dependent high-field microwave spectroscopy of low dimensional conductors and superconductors. Over the past 20 years, low dimensional conductors and superconductors have been investigated extensively because of their unusual superconducting, electronic and magnetic ground states. In order to understand these phenomena, it is important to study the topology of the Fermi surface (FS). We employ a novel type of cyclotron resonance to study the FS, the so-called periodic orbit resonance (POR). In Chapter 2, we explain the details of the POR effect using a semiclassical description. An important aspect of this POR effect is that it is applicable not only to a quasi-two-dimensional (Q2D) FS, but also to a quasi-one-dimensional (Q1D) FS. In Chapter 3, our experimental techniques are presented. We outline a rotating cylindrical cavity, which enables angle-dependent cavity perturbation measurements in ultra-high-field magnets, and two-axis rotation capabilities in standard high-field superconducting split-pair magnets. In Chapters 4 and 5, the results of studies of the Q1D conductor (TMTSF) 2ClO4, are shown. Using the POR, we determined the Fermi velocity vF and revealed new information concerning the nature of the so-called Lebed effect in Chapter 4. In Chapter 5, we studied the non-magnetic, impurity effect and its influence on the possible spin-triplet superconductivity in (TMTSF)2ClO4. In Chapter 6, measurements of the POR are performed in the Q2D conductors kappa-(ET)2X [X=Cu(NCS)2 and I3]. In X=I3, POR involving the magnetic breakdown effect was observed for the first time.

  9. Features of influence of dc magnetic field pulses on a nuclear spin echo in magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamniashvili, G. I.; Gegechkori, T. O.; Akhalkatsi, A. M.; Gavasheli, C. A.

    2012-06-01

    Signal intensities of a two-pulse nuclear spin echo as a function of parameters of dc magnetic field pulses are measured in the series of materials: Li0.5Fe2.5-xZnxO4 (x < 0.25) (enriched in 57Fe isotope to 96.8%), NiMnSb, Co2MnSi, La1-хСахMnO3 (x = 0.2; 0.25) and polycrystalline Co. Two types of dependences of these signals on a supplying time of such pulses with respect to the times of the exciting RF pulses are found. The mechanisms of influence of a domain structure and a dynamic frequency shift on the observed features of the investigated signals are discussed.

  10. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance-Based Metabolic Comparative Analysis of Two Apple Varieties with Different Resistances to Apple Scab Attacks.

    PubMed

    Sciubba, Fabio; Di Cocco, Maria Enrica; Gianferri, Raffaella; Capuani, Giorgio; De Salvador, Flavio Roberto; Fontanari, Marco; Gorietti, Daniela; Delfini, Maurizio

    2015-09-23

    Apple scab, caused by the fungus Venturia inaequalis, is the most serious disease of the apple worldwide. Two cultivars (Malus domestica), having different degrees of resistance against fungi attacks, were analyzed by (1)H and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Aqueous and organic extracts of both apple flesh and skin were studied, and over 30 metabolites, classified as organic acids, amino acids, carbohydrates, phenolic compounds, lipids, sterols, and other metabolites, were quantified by means of one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) NMR experiments. The metabolic profiles of the two apple cultivars were compared, and the differences were correlated with the different degrees of resistance to apple scab by means of univariate analysis. Levels of metabolites with known antifungal activity were observed not only to be higher in the Almagold cultivar but also to show different correlation patterns in comparison to Golden Delicious, implying a difference in the metabolic network involved in their biosynthesis. PMID:26345382

  11. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance-Based Metabolic Comparative Analysis of Two Apple Varieties with Different Resistances to Apple Scab Attacks.

    PubMed

    Sciubba, Fabio; Di Cocco, Maria Enrica; Gianferri, Raffaella; Capuani, Giorgio; De Salvador, Flavio Roberto; Fontanari, Marco; Gorietti, Daniela; Delfini, Maurizio

    2015-09-23

    Apple scab, caused by the fungus Venturia inaequalis, is the most serious disease of the apple worldwide. Two cultivars (Malus domestica), having different degrees of resistance against fungi attacks, were analyzed by (1)H and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Aqueous and organic extracts of both apple flesh and skin were studied, and over 30 metabolites, classified as organic acids, amino acids, carbohydrates, phenolic compounds, lipids, sterols, and other metabolites, were quantified by means of one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) NMR experiments. The metabolic profiles of the two apple cultivars were compared, and the differences were correlated with the different degrees of resistance to apple scab by means of univariate analysis. Levels of metabolites with known antifungal activity were observed not only to be higher in the Almagold cultivar but also to show different correlation patterns in comparison to Golden Delicious, implying a difference in the metabolic network involved in their biosynthesis.

  12. Two-dimensional surface magnetism in the bulk paramagnetic intermetallic alloy CoAl(100).

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, V.; Bruggemann, K.; David, R.; Franchy, R.; Center for Nanoscale Materials; Institute for Surfaces and Interfaces .

    2007-01-17

    Utilizing a combination of the in situ magneto-optical Kerr effect and scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy measurements, we show that the (100) surface of the B2 bulk paramagnetic CoAl is an excellent representation of a two-dimensional ferromagnet. The order-parameter critical exponent {beta} = 0.22 {+-} 0.02 is determined, which is the universal signature of a finite-size two-dimensional XY behavior. The Curie temperature is found to be T{sub c} = 90 K. The magnetism can be explained by the appearance of Co antisite atoms at the surface.

  13. Nuclear magnetic resonance of laser-polarized noble gases in molecules, materials and organisms

    SciTech Connect

    Goodson, Boyd M.

    1999-12-01

    Conventional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are fundamentally challenged by the insensitivity that stems from the ordinarily low spin polarization achievable in even the strongest NMR magnets. However, by transferring angular momentum from laser light to electronic and nuclear spins, optical pumping methods can increase the nuclear spin polarization of noble gases by several orders of magnitude, thereby greatly enhancing their NMR sensitivity. This dissertation is primarily concerned with the principles and practice of optically pumped nuclear magnetic resonance (OPNMR). The enormous sensitivity enhancement afforded by optical pumping noble gases can be exploited to permit a variety of novel NMR experiments across many disciplines. Many such experiments are reviewed, including the void-space imaging of organisms and materials, NMR and MRI of living tissues, probing structure and dynamics of molecules in solution and on surfaces, and zero-field NMR and MRI.

  14. Enhanced Stability of Skyrmions in Two-Dimensional Chiral Magnets with Rashba Spin-Orbit Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Sumilan; Rowland, James; Erten, Onur; Randeria, Mohit

    2014-07-01

    Recent developments have led to an explosion of activity on skyrmions in three-dimensional (3D) chiral magnets. Experiments have directly probed these topological spin textures, revealed their nontrivial properties, and led to suggestions for novel applications. However, in 3D the skyrmion crystal phase is observed only in a narrow region of the temperature-field phase diagram. We show here, using a general analysis based on symmetry, that skyrmions are much more readily stabilized in two-dimensional (2D) systems with Rashba spin-orbit coupling. This enhanced stability arises from the competition between field and easy-plane magnetic anisotropy and results in a nontrivial structure in the topological charge density in the core of the skyrmions. We further show that, in a variety of microscopic models for magnetic exchange, the required easy-plane anisotropy naturally arises from the same spin-orbit coupling that is responsible for the chiral Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interactions. Our results are of particular interest for 2D materials like thin films, surfaces, and oxide interfaces, where broken surface-inversion symmetry and Rashba spin-orbit coupling naturally lead to chiral exchange and easy-plane compass anisotropy. Our theory gives a clear direction for experimental studies of 2D magnetic materials to stabilize skyrmions over a large range of magnetic fields down to T=0.

  15. Experimental and Theoretical Electron Density Analysis of Copper Pyrazine Nitrate Quasi-Low-Dimensional Quantum Magnets.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Leonardo H R; Lanza, Arianna; Barton, Alyssa M; Brambleby, Jamie; Blackmore, William J A; Goddard, Paul A; Xiao, Fan; Williams, Robert C; Lancaster, Tom; Pratt, Francis L; Blundell, Stephen J; Singleton, John; Manson, Jamie L; Macchi, Piero

    2016-02-24

    The accurate electron density distribution and magnetic properties of two metal-organic polymeric magnets, the quasi-one-dimensional (1D) Cu(pyz)(NO3)2 and the quasi-two-dimensional (2D) [Cu(pyz)2(NO3)]NO3·H2O, have been investigated by high-resolution single-crystal X-ray diffraction and density functional theory calculations on the whole periodic systems and on selected fragments. Topological analyses, based on quantum theory of atoms in molecules, enabled the characterization of possible magnetic exchange pathways and the establishment of relationships between the electron (charge and spin) densities and the exchange-coupling constants. In both compounds, the experimentally observed antiferromagnetic coupling can be quantitatively explained by the Cu-Cu superexchange pathway mediated by the pyrazine bridging ligands, via a σ-type interaction. From topological analyses of experimental charge-density data, we show for the first time that the pyrazine tilt angle does not play a role in determining the strength of the magnetic interaction. Taken in combination with molecular orbital analysis and spin density calculations, we find a synergistic relationship between spin delocalization and spin polarization mechanisms and that both determine the bulk magnetic behavior of these Cu(II)-pyz coordination polymers.

  16. Confinement effects of magnetic field on two-dimensional hydrogen atom in plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Bahar, M. K.; Soylu, A.

    2015-05-15

    In this study, for the first time, the Schrödinger equation with more general exponential cosine screened Coulomb (MGECSC) potential is solved numerically in the presence and in the absence of an external magnetic field within two-dimensional formalism using the asymptotic iteration method. The MGECSC potential includes four different potential forms when considering different sets of the parameters in the potential. The plasma screening effects in the weak and strong magnetic field regimes as well as the confinement effects of magnetic field on the two-dimensional hydrogen atom in Debye and quantum plasmas are investigated by solving the corresponding equations. It is found that applying a uniform magnetic field on the hydrogen atom embedded in a plasma leads to change in the profile of the total interaction potential. Thus, confinement effects of magnetic field on hydrogen atom embedded in Debye and quantum plasmas modeled by a MGECSC potential lead to shift bound state energies. This effect would be important to isolate the plasma from the external environment in the experimental applications of plasma physics.

  17. Experimental and Theoretical Electron Density Analysis of Copper Pyrazine Nitrate Quasi-Low-Dimensional Quantum Magnets.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Leonardo H R; Lanza, Arianna; Barton, Alyssa M; Brambleby, Jamie; Blackmore, William J A; Goddard, Paul A; Xiao, Fan; Williams, Robert C; Lancaster, Tom; Pratt, Francis L; Blundell, Stephen J; Singleton, John; Manson, Jamie L; Macchi, Piero

    2016-02-24

    The accurate electron density distribution and magnetic properties of two metal-organic polymeric magnets, the quasi-one-dimensional (1D) Cu(pyz)(NO3)2 and the quasi-two-dimensional (2D) [Cu(pyz)2(NO3)]NO3·H2O, have been investigated by high-resolution single-crystal X-ray diffraction and density functional theory calculations on the whole periodic systems and on selected fragments. Topological analyses, based on quantum theory of atoms in molecules, enabled the characterization of possible magnetic exchange pathways and the establishment of relationships between the electron (charge and spin) densities and the exchange-coupling constants. In both compounds, the experimentally observed antiferromagnetic coupling can be quantitatively explained by the Cu-Cu superexchange pathway mediated by the pyrazine bridging ligands, via a σ-type interaction. From topological analyses of experimental charge-density data, we show for the first time that the pyrazine tilt angle does not play a role in determining the strength of the magnetic interaction. Taken in combination with molecular orbital analysis and spin density calculations, we find a synergistic relationship between spin delocalization and spin polarization mechanisms and that both determine the bulk magnetic behavior of these Cu(II)-pyz coordination polymers. PMID:26811927

  18. New Methodology For Use in Rotating Field Nuclear MagneticResonance

    SciTech Connect

    Jachmann, Rebecca C.

    2007-05-18

    High-resolution NMR spectra of samples with anisotropicbroadening are simplified to their isotropic spectra by fast rotation ofthe sample at the magic angle 54.7 circ. This dissertation concerns thedevelopment of novel Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) methodologies basedwhich would rotate the magnetic field instead of the sample, rotatingfield NMR. It provides an over of the NMR concepts, procedures, andexperiments needed to understand the methodologies that will be used forrotating field NMR. A simple two-dimensional shimming method based onharmonic corrector rings which can provide arbitrary multiple ordershimming corrections were developed for rotating field systems, but couldbe used in shimming other systems as well. Those results demonstrate, forexample, that quadrupolar order shimming improves the linewidth by up toan order of magnitude. An additional order of magnitude reduction is inprinciple achievable by utilizing this shimming method for z-gradientcorrection and higher order xy gradients. A specialized pulse sequencefor the rotating field NMR experiment is under development. The pulsesequence allows for spinning away from the magic angle and spinningslower than the anisotropic broadening. This pulse sequence is acombination of the projected magic angle spinning (p-MAS) and magic angleturning (MAT) pulse sequences. This will be useful to rotating field NMRbecause there are limits on how fast a field can be spun and spin at themagic angle is difficult. One of the goals of this project is forrotating field NMR to be used on biological systems. The p-MAS pulsesequence was successfully tested on bovine tissue samples which suggeststhat it will be a viable methodology to use in a rotating field set up. Aside experiment on steering magnetic particle by MRI gradients was alsocarried out. Some movement was seen in these experiment, but for totalcontrol over steering further experiments would need to bedone.

  19. New Methodology For Use in Rotating Field Nuclear MagneticResonance

    SciTech Connect

    Jachmann, Rebecca C.

    2007-01-01

    High-resolution NMR spectra of samples with anisotropicbroadening are simplified to their isotropic spectra by fast rotation ofthe sample at the magic angle 54.7 circ. This dissertation concerns thedevelopment of novel Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) methodologies basedwhich would rotate the magnetic field instead of the sample, rotatingfield NMR. It provides an over of the NMR concepts, procedures, andexperiments needed to understand the methodologies that will be used forrotating field NMR. A simple two-dimensional shimming method based onharmonic corrector rings which can provide arbitrary multiple ordershimming corrections were developed for rotating field systems, but couldbe used in shimming other systems as well. Those results demonstrate, forexample, that quadrupolar order shimming improves the linewidth by up toan order of magnitude. An additional order of magnitude reduction is inprinciple achievable by utilizing this shimming method for z-gradientcorrection and higher order xy gradients. A specialized pulse sequencefor the rotating field NMR experiment is under development. The pulsesequence allows for spinning away from the magic angle and spinningslower than the anisotropic broadening. This pulse sequence is acombination of the projected magic angle spinning (p-MAS) and magic angleturning (MAT) pulse sequences. This will be useful to rotating field NMRbecause there are limits on how fast a field can be spun and spin at themagic angle is difficult. One of the goals of this project is forrotating field NMR to be used on biological systems. The p-MAS pulsesequence was successfully tested on bovine tissue samples which suggeststhat it will be a viable methodology to use in a rotating field set up. Aside experiment on steering magnetic particle by MRI gradients was alsocarried out. Some movement was seen in these experiment, but for totalcontrol over steering further experiments would need to bedone.

  20. Two-dimensional temperature analysis of nuclear fireballs using digitized film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slaughter, Robert C.; Peery, Tyler R.; McClory, John W.

    2015-01-01

    Researchers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory have begun digitizing technical films spanning the atmospheric nuclear testing operations conducted by the United States from 1945 through 1962. Each atmospheric nuclear test was filmed by Edgerton, Germeshausen, and Grier, Inc., using between 20 to 40 cameras per test. These technical film test data represent a primary source for advancing the knowledge of nuclear weapon output as well as the understanding of nonnuclear high-temperature gases. This manuscript outlines the procedures followed in order to perform two-dimensional temperature calculations for early time nuclear fireballs using digitized film. The digitized optical densities of the film were converted into irradiance on the film that was then used to determine an effective power temperature. The events Wasp Prime and Tesla of Operation Teapot were analyzed using this technique. Film temperature results agreed within uncertainties with historic data collected by calorimeters. Results were also validated by comparison to a thermal heat flux solution that utilizes historic thermal yield values to normalize radiant flux. Additionally, digital imaging and remote sensing image generation was used to demonstrate that the two-dimensional temperature calculation was self-consistent.

  1. A One-Dimensional Magnet Based on [Mo(III)(CN)7](4.).

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiao-Qin; Qian, Kun; Wei, Hai-Yan; Wang, Xin-Yi

    2016-06-01

    Self-assembly of the [Mo(III)(CN)7](4-) anion and the Mn(II) unit with a macrocyclic ligand results in the first example of a one-dimensional (1D) chain compound based on the heptacyanomolybdate, [Mn(LN5C10)]2[Mo(CN)7]·2H2O (LN5C10 = 1,4,7,10,13-pentaazacyclopentadecane). Because of the existence of the interchain magnetic coupling, long-rang magnetic ordering was observed in this compound.

  2. A One-Dimensional Magnet Based on [Mo(III)(CN)7](4.).

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiao-Qin; Qian, Kun; Wei, Hai-Yan; Wang, Xin-Yi

    2016-06-01

    Self-assembly of the [Mo(III)(CN)7](4-) anion and the Mn(II) unit with a macrocyclic ligand results in the first example of a one-dimensional (1D) chain compound based on the heptacyanomolybdate, [Mn(LN5C10)]2[Mo(CN)7]·2H2O (LN5C10 = 1,4,7,10,13-pentaazacyclopentadecane). Because of the existence of the interchain magnetic coupling, long-rang magnetic ordering was observed in this compound. PMID:27177390

  3. Gyromap for a two-dimensional Hamiltonian fluid model derived from Braginskii's closure for magnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Izacard, O.; Chandre, C.; Tassi, E.; Ciraolo, G.

    2011-06-15

    We consider a plasma described by means of a two-dimensional fluid model across a constant but non-uniform magnetic field B=B(x,y)z. The dynamical evolution of the density and the vorticity takes into account the interchange instability and magnetic field inhomogeneities. First, in order to describe the finite Larmor radius effects, we apply the gyromap to build a Hamiltonian model with ion temperature from a cold-ion model. Second, we show that the gyromap is justified using Braginskii's closure for the stress tensor as well as an apt ordering on the fluctuating quantities.

  4. Highly accurate analytical energy of a two-dimensional exciton in a constant magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, Ngoc-Tram D.; Nguyen, Duy-Anh P.; Hoang, Van-Hung; Le, Van-Hoang

    2016-08-01

    Explicit expressions are given for analytically describing the dependence of the energy of a two-dimensional exciton on magnetic field intensity. These expressions are highly accurate with the precision of up to three decimal places for the whole range of the magnetic field intensity. The results are shown for the ground state and some excited states; moreover, we have all formulae to obtain similar expressions of any excited state. Analysis of numerical results shows that the precision of three decimal places is maintained for the excited states with the principal quantum number of up to n=100.

  5. Uniaxial magnetic anisotropy of quasi-one-dimensional Fe chains on Pb/Si

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Da-li; Wang, De-yong; Du, Hai-Feng; Ning, Wei; Gao, Jian-Hua; Fang, Ya-Peng; Zhang, Xiang-Qun; Sun, Young; Cheng, Zhao-Hua; Shen, Jian

    2009-01-01

    We fabricated quasi-one-dimensional Fe chains on a 4{sup o} miscut Si (111) substrate with a Pb film as a buffer layer. The magnetic properties and morphology of Fe chains were investigated by means of scanning tunneling microscope (STM) and surface magneto-optical Kerr effect (SMOKE). STM images show that Fe chains are formed by Fe random islands along the steps of the Pb film due to step decoration. SMOKE data indicate that the Fe chains exhibit in-plane uniaxial magnetic anisotropy along the step direction. The effective in-plane uniaxial anisotropy constant at room temperature was determined by means of electron spin resonance.

  6. The influence of dimensionality on the behavior of magnetic dipolar soft spheres: calculation of the pressure.

    PubMed

    Minina, E; Kantorovich, S

    2013-04-17

    We investigate the influence of dimensionality of a sample on the properties of magnetic dipolar soft spheres. Molecular dynamics simulations and diagram expansion are employed to analyze the pressure and microscopic structure of model monodisperse magnetic fluids in a bulk and in a monolayer. We found that, for a broad range of densities and dipolar interaction strengths, strong geometrical confinement weakens the influence of the dipole-dipole interaction on the pressure and, as a result, steric repulsion of dipolar particles provides the main contribution to the thermodynamic properties of ferrofluids in strong confinement. PMID:23515201

  7. Development of a Two-Dimensional Micro-SQUID Array for Investigation of Magnetization Spatial Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakuma, Daisuke; Shinozaki, Tomoya; Nago, Yusuke; Ishiguro, Ryosuke; Kashiwaya, Satoshi; Nomura, Shintaro; Kono, Kimitoshi; Takayanagi, Hideaki

    2016-05-01

    We developed a two-dimensional array of superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) for investigation of fine spatial distribution of magnetization in superconducting Sr2RuO4. Micrometer-sized SQUIDs based on homogeneously formed Al/AlOx/Al tunnel-type Josephson junctions were fabricated using shadow evaporation technique. Unnecessary electrodes formed by the shadow evaporation were removed by inductively coupled plasma reactive ion etching, in order to realize a dense array of SQUIDs. We measured the magnetic modulation of the maximum Josephson current of each SQUID in the array and evaluated the interaction among the SQUIDs.

  8. Double interpenetration in a chiral three-dimensional magnet with a (10,3)-a structure.

    PubMed

    Grancha, Thais; Mon, Marta; Lloret, Francesc; Ferrando-Soria, Jesús; Journaux, Yves; Pasán, Jorge; Pardo, Emilio

    2015-09-21

    A unique chiral three-dimensional magnet with an overall racemic double-interpenetrated (10,3)-a structure of the formula [(S)-(1-PhEt)Me3N]4[Mn4Cu6(Et2pma)12](DMSO)3]·3DMSO·5H2O (1; Et2pma = N-2,6-diethylphenyloxamate) has been synthesized by the self-assembly of a mononuclear copper(II) complex acting as a metalloligand toward Mn(II) ions in the presence of a chiral cationic auxiliary, constituting the first oxamato-based chiral coordination polymer exhibiting long-range magnetic ordering. PMID:26322529

  9. Large anomalous magnetic moment in three-dimensional Dirac and Weyl semimetals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Wurff, E. C. I.; Stoof, H. T. C.

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the effect of Coulomb interactions on the electromagnetic response of three-dimensional Dirac and Weyl semimetals. In a calculation reminiscent of Schwinger's seminal work on quantum electrodynamics, we find three physically distinct effects for the anomalous magnetic moment of the relativisticlike quasiparticles in the semimetal. In the case of nonzero doping, the anomalous magnetic moment is finite at long wavelengths and typically orders of magnitude larger than Schwinger's result. We also find interesting effects of one of the three new Hamiltonian terms on the topological surface states at the interface between vacuum and a Weyl semimetal. We conclude that observation of these effects should be within experimental reach.

  10. Double interpenetration in a chiral three-dimensional magnet with a (10,3)-a structure.

    PubMed

    Grancha, Thais; Mon, Marta; Lloret, Francesc; Ferrando-Soria, Jesús; Journaux, Yves; Pasán, Jorge; Pardo, Emilio

    2015-09-21

    A unique chiral three-dimensional magnet with an overall racemic double-interpenetrated (10,3)-a structure of the formula [(S)-(1-PhEt)Me3N]4[Mn4Cu6(Et2pma)12](DMSO)3]·3DMSO·5H2O (1; Et2pma = N-2,6-diethylphenyloxamate) has been synthesized by the self-assembly of a mononuclear copper(II) complex acting as a metalloligand toward Mn(II) ions in the presence of a chiral cationic auxiliary, constituting the first oxamato-based chiral coordination polymer exhibiting long-range magnetic ordering.

  11. Scaling of transverse nuclear magnetic relaxation due to magnetic nanoparticle aggregation.

    PubMed

    Brown, Keith A; Vassiliou, Christophoros C; Issadore, David; Berezovsky, Jesse; Cima, Michael J; Westervelt, R M

    2010-10-01

    The aggregation of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles decreases the transverse nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation time T2CP of adjacent water molecules measured by a Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) pulse-echo sequence. This effect is commonly used to measure the concentrations of a variety of small molecules. We perform extensive Monte Carlo simulations of water diffusing around SPIO nanoparticle aggregates to determine the relationship between T2CP and details of the aggregate. We find that in the motional averaging regime T2CP scales as a power law with the number N of nanoparticles in an aggregate. The specific scaling is dependent on the fractal dimension d of the aggregates. We find T2CP∝N-0.44 for aggregates with d = 2.2, a value typical of diffusion limited aggregation. We also find that in two-nanoparticle systems, T2CP is strongly dependent on the orientation of the two nanoparticles relative to the external magnetic field, which implies that it may be possible to sense the orientation of a two-nanoparticle aggregate. To optimize the sensitivity of SPIO nanoparticle sensors, we propose that it is best to have aggregates with few nanoparticles, close together, measured with long pulse-echo times. PMID:20689678

  12. Simulations of super-structure domain walls in two dimensional assemblies of magnetic nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Jordanovic, J.; Frandsen, C.; Beleggia, M.; Schiøtz, J.

    2015-07-28

    We simulate the formation of domain walls in two-dimensional assemblies of magnetic nanoparticles. Particle parameters are chosen to match recent electron holography and Lorentz microscopy studies of almost monodisperse cobalt nanoparticles assembled into regular, elongated lattices. As the particles are small enough to consist of a single magnetic domain each, their magnetic interactions can be described by a spin model in which each particle is assigned a macroscopic “superspin.” Thus, the magnetic behaviour of these lattices may be compared to magnetic crystals with nanoparticle superspins taking the role of the atomic spins. The coupling is, however, different. The superspins interact only by dipolar interactions as exchange coupling between individual nanoparticles may be neglected due to interparticle spacing. We observe that it is energetically favorable to introduce domain walls oriented along the long dimension of nanoparticle assemblies rather than along the short dimension. This is unlike what is typically observed in continuous magnetic materials, where the exchange interaction introduces an energetic cost proportional to the area of the domain walls. Structural disorder, which will always be present in realistic assemblies, pins longitudinal domain walls when the external field is reversed, and makes a gradual reversal of the magnetization by migration of longitudinal domain walls possible, in agreement with previous experimental results.

  13. Numerical Simulation of Plasma Behavior in a Magnetic Nozzle of a Laser-plasma Driven Nuclear Electric Propulsion System

    SciTech Connect

    Kajimura, Y.; Matsuda, N.; Hayashida, K.; Maeno, A.; Nakashima, H.

    2008-12-31

    Numerical simulations of plasma behavior in a magnetic nozzle of a Laser-Plasma Driven Nuclear Electric Propulsion System are conducted. The propellant is heated and accelerated by the laser and expanded isotropically. The magnetic nozzle is a combination of solenoidal coils and used to collimate and guide the plasma to produce thrust. Simulation calculations by a three-dimensional hybrid code are conducted to examine the plasma behaviors in the nozzle and to estimate the thrust efficiency. We also estimate a fraction ({alpha}) of plasma particles leaking in the forward (spacecraft) direction. By a combination of a few coils, we could decrease {alpha} value without degrading the thrust efficiency. Finally, the shaped propellant is proposed to increase the thrust efficiency.

  14. Nuclear Spin Maser at Highly Stabilized Low Magnetic Field and Search for Atomic EDM

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshimi, A.; Asahi, K.; Inoue, T.; Uchida, M.; Hatakeyama, N.; Tsuchiya, M.; Kagami, S.

    2009-08-04

    A nuclear spin maser is operated at a low static field through an active feedback scheme based on an optical nuclear spin detection and succeeding spin control by a transverse field application. The frequency stability of this optical-coupling spin maser is improved by installation of a low-noise current source for a solenoid magnet producing a static magnetic field in the maser operation. Experimental devices for application of the maser to EDM experiment are being developed.

  15. [Progress in nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for early cancer diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiu-xiang; Xu, Yi-zhuang; Zhao, Mei-xian; Qi, Jian; Li, Hui-zhen; Wu, Jin-guang

    2008-08-01

    Based on more than 100 references, the present paper reviews the progress in the application of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, an effective method to study the variation in chemical composition and molecular structure in biological samples for early diagnosis of cancer at molecular level. In the past several decades, numerous works have demonstrated that NMR spectroscopy may be developed into a sensitive diagnosis method to detect cancer in early stage. Because of the rapid development of NMR spectroscopic techniques, it becomes possible to record NMR spectra of biological samples in both in-vitro and in-vivo manner. Systematic spectral differences between biological samples from cancer patients and normal controls can be observed from both liquid-state and solid-state 1H, 31P NMR spectra and used to reflect the changes in metabolic behavior of malignant tissues. This paper has summarized NMR spectroscopic investigation on biological fluid, cultured cancerous cells, resected tissues, as well as in-vivo malignant tissues by using various advanced NMR techniques including recently developedhigh-resolution magic angle spinning (HR-MAS)and magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging (MRSI) methods. First, characteristic peaks, which are related to choline, phosphocholine (PC) and glycerophosphocholine, can be observed in both 1H and 31P NMR spectra of biological fluid samples from cancer patients. These results indicate that alternation in the metabolic pattern occurs with the progression of cancer. The research on cultured cells by using NMR spectroscopy showed that the signal of various phospholipids and their metabolites such as PME increased significantly in cultured cancer cells. For resected tissues, two methods can be utilized. The first one is to investigate the tissues directly by using HR-MAS spectroscopy. The second method is to extract various metabolites with various solvents such as CHCl3/methonal mixtures, HClO4 solutions, etc. and then

  16. [Measurement of left atrial and ventricular volumes in real-time 3D echocardiography. Validation by nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, F.; Shiota, T.; Qin, J. X.; White, R. D.; Thomas, J. D.

    2001-01-01

    The measurement of the left ventricular ejection fraction is important for the evaluation of cardiomyopathy and depends on the measurement of left ventricular volumes. There are no existing conventional echocardiographic means of measuring the true left atrial and ventricular volumes without mathematical approximations. The aim of this study was to test anew real time 3-dimensional echocardiographic system of calculating left atrial and ventricular volumes in 40 patients after in vitro validation. The volumes of the left atrium and ventricle acquired from real time 3-D echocardiography in the apical view, were calculated in 7 sections parallel to the surface of the probe and compared with atrial (10 patients) and ventricular (30 patients) volumes calculated by nuclear magnetic resonance with the simpson method and with volumes of water in balloons placed in a cistern. Linear regression analysis showed an excellent correlation between the real volume of water in the balloons and volumes given in real time 3-dimensional echocardiography (y = 0.94x + 5.5, r = 0.99, p < 0.001, D = -10 +/- 4.5 ml). A good correlation was observed between real time 3-dimensional echocardiography and nuclear magnetic resonance for the measurement of left atrial and ventricular volumes (y = 0.95x - 10, r = 0.91, p < 0.001, D = -14.8 +/- 19.5 ml and y = 0.87x + 10, r = 0.98, P < 0.001, D = -8.3 +/- 18.7 ml, respectively. The authors conclude that real time three-dimensional echocardiography allows accurate measurement of left heart volumes underlying the clinical potential of this new 3-D method.

  17. Novel detection schemes of nuclear magnetic resonance and magnetic resonance imaging: applications from analytical chemistry to molecular sensors.

    PubMed

    Harel, Elad; Schröder, Leif; Xu, Shoujun

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a well-established analytical technique in chemistry. The ability to precisely control the nuclear spin interactions that give rise to the NMR phenomenon has led to revolutionary advances in fields as diverse as protein structure determination and medical diagnosis. Here, we discuss methods for increasing the sensitivity of magnetic resonance experiments, moving away from the paradigm of traditional NMR by separating the encoding and detection steps of the experiment. This added flexibility allows for diverse applications ranging from lab-on-a-chip flow imaging and biological sensors to optical detection of magnetic resonance imaging at low magnetic fields. We aim to compare and discuss various approaches for a host of problems in material science, biology, and physics that differ from the high-field methods routinely used in analytical chemistry and medical imaging.

  18. Synthetic magnetic fluxes and topological order in one-dimensional spin systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graß, Tobias; Muschik, Christine; Celi, Alessio; Chhajlany, Ravindra W.; Lewenstein, Maciej

    2015-06-01

    Engineering topological quantum order has become a major field of physics. Many advances have been made by synthesizing gauge fields in cold atomic systems. Here we carry over these developments to other platforms which are extremely well suited for quantum engineering, namely, trapped ions and nano-trapped atoms. Since these systems are typically one-dimensional, the action of artificial magnetic fields has so far received little attention. However, exploiting the long-range nature of interactions, loops with nonvanishing magnetic fluxes become possible even in one-dimensional settings. This gives rise to intriguing phenomena, such as fractal energy spectra, flat bands with localized edge states, and topological many-body states. We elaborate on a simple scheme for generating the required artificial fluxes by periodically driving an XY spin chain. Concrete estimates demonstrating the experimental feasibility for trapped ions and atoms in wave guides are given.

  19. Varied magnetic field, multiple-pulse, and magic-angle spinning proton nuclear magnetic resonance study of muscle water

    SciTech Connect

    Fung, B.M.; Ryan, L.M.; Gerstein, B.C.

    1980-02-01

    The nuclear magnetic resonance linewidth of /sup 1/H in water of frog muscle was studied as a function of magnetic field strength and angle of orientation. The results suggest that the observed spectra are dominated by demagnetization field anisotropy and dispersion, but a small static dipolar interaction of the order of a few hertz may be present. Data from line-narrowing, multiple-pulse experiments also indicate the presence of a small dipolar broadening.

  20. A Multidisciplinary Approach to High Throughput Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Pourmodheji, Hossein; Ghafar-Zadeh, Ebrahim; Magierowski, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is a non-contact, powerful structure-elucidation technique for biochemical analysis. NMR spectroscopy is used extensively in a variety of life science applications including drug discovery. However, existing NMR technology is limited in that it cannot run a large number of experiments simultaneously in one unit. Recent advances in micro-fabrication technologies have attracted the attention of researchers to overcome these limitations and significantly accelerate the drug discovery process by developing the next generation of high-throughput NMR spectrometers using Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS). In this paper, we examine this paradigm shift and explore new design strategies for the development of the next generation of high-throughput NMR spectrometers using CMOS technology. A CMOS NMR system consists of an array of high sensitivity micro-coils integrated with interfacing radio-frequency circuits on the same chip. Herein, we first discuss the key challenges and recent advances in the field of CMOS NMR technology, and then a new design strategy is put forward for the design and implementation of highly sensitive and high-throughput CMOS NMR spectrometers. We thereafter discuss the functionality and applicability of the proposed techniques by demonstrating the results. For microelectronic researchers starting to work in the field of CMOS NMR technology, this paper serves as a tutorial with comprehensive review of state-of-the-art technologies and their performance levels. Based on these levels, the CMOS NMR approach offers unique advantages for high resolution, time-sensitive and high-throughput bimolecular analysis required in a variety of life science applications including drug discovery. PMID:27294925

  1. A Multidisciplinary Approach to High Throughput Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pourmodheji, Hossein; Ghafar-Zadeh, Ebrahim; Magierowski, Sebastian

    2016-06-09

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is a non-contact, powerful structure-elucidation technique for biochemical analysis. NMR spectroscopy is used extensively in a variety of life science applications including drug discovery. However, existing NMR technology is limited in that it cannot run a large number of experiments simultaneously in one unit. Recent advances in micro-fabrication technologies have attracted the attention of researchers to overcome these limitations and significantly accelerate the drug discovery process by developing the next generation of high-throughput NMR spectrometers using Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS). In this paper, we examine this paradigm shift and explore new design strategies for the development of the next generation of high-throughput NMR spectrometers using CMOS technology. A CMOS NMR system consists of an array of high sensitivity micro-coils integrated with interfacing radio-frequency circuits on the same chip. Herein, we first discuss the key challenges and recent advances in the field of CMOS NMR technology, and then a new design strategy is put forward for the design and implementation of highly sensitive and high-throughput CMOS NMR spectrometers. We thereafter discuss the functionality and applicability of the proposed techniques by demonstrating the results. For microelectronic researchers starting to work in the field of CMOS NMR technology, this paper serves as a tutorial with comprehensive review of state-of-the-art technologies and their performance levels. Based on these levels, the CMOS NMR approach offers unique advantages for high resolution, time-sensitive and high-throughput bimolecular analysis required in a variety of life science applications including drug discovery.

  2. Size effects in electrical and magnetic properties of quasi-one-dimensional tin wires in asbestos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernyaev, A. V.; Shamshur, D. V.; Fokin, A. V.; Kalmykov, A. E.; Kumzerov, Yu. A.; Sorokin, L. M.; Parfen'ev, R. V.; Lashkul, A.

    2016-03-01

    Bulk composites have been prepared based on one-dimensional fibers of natural chrisothil-asbestos with various internal diameters ( d = 6-2.5 nm) filled with tin. The electrical and magnetic properties of quasi-one-dimensional Sn wires have been studied at low temperatures. The electrical properties have been measured at T = 300 K at a pressure P = 10 kbar. It has been found that the superconducting (SC) characteristics of the nanocomposites (critical temperature T c and critical magnetic field H c) increase as the Sn filament diameter decreases. The temperature spreading of the resistive SC transition also increases as the Sn filament diameter decreases, which is explained by the SC order parameter fluctuations. The size effects (the increase in critical temperature T c and transition width Δ T c) in Sn nanofilaments are well described by the independent Aslamazov-Larkin and Langer-Ambegaokara fluctuation theories, which makes it possible to find the dependence of T c of the diffuse SC transition on the nanowire diameter. Using the temperature and magnetic-field dependences of the magnetic moment M( T, H), it has been found that the superconductor-normal metal phase diagram of the Sn-asbestos nanocomposite has a wider region of the SC state in T and H as compared to the data for bulk Sn. The magnetic properties of chrisotil-asbestos fibers unfilled with Sn have been studied. It has been found that the Curie law is fulfilled and that the superparamagnetism is absent in such samples. The obtained results indicate the absence of magnetically ordered impurities (magnetite) in the chrisotil-asbestos matrix, which allowed one to not consider the problem of the interaction of the magnetic subsystem of the asbestos matrix and the superconducting subsystem of Sn nanowires.

  3. Three-dimensional magnetic optimization of accelerator magnets using an analytic strip model

    SciTech Connect

    Rochepault, Etienne Aubert, Guy; Vedrine, Pierre

    2014-07-14

    The end design is a critical step in the design of superconducting accelerator magnets. First, the strain energy of the conductors must be minimized, which can be achieved using differential geometry. The end design also requires an optimization of the magnetic field homogeneity. A mechanical and magnetic model for the conductors, using developable strips, is described in this paper. This model can be applied to superconducting Rutherford cables, and it is particularly suitable for High Temperature Superconducting tapes. The great advantage of this approach is analytic simplifications in the field computation, allowing for very fast and accurate computations, which save a considerable computational time during the optimization process. Some 3D designs for dipoles are finally proposed, and it is shown that the harmonic integrals can be easily optimized using this model.

  4. Floating zone growth and magnetic properties of Y2C two-dimensional electride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otani, Shigeki; Hirata, Kazuto; Adachi, Yutaka; Ohashi, Naoki

    2016-11-01

    The floating zone method was used to obtain single crystals several mm in size of the low-temperature rhombohedral form of Y2C rather than its typical rocksalt-type cubic form. This was achieved through optimization of the chemical compositions of the starting materials with the aim of producing a two-dimensional electride material. The crystals obtained exhibited a paramagnetic temperature-dependence at 1.8-300 K, with no trace of any obvious magnetic ordering.

  5. Correlation functions in the two-dimensional Ising model in a magnetic field at T = Tc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delfino, G.; Simonetti, P.

    1996-02-01

    The one- and two-particle form factors of the energy operator in the two-dimensional Ising model in a magnetic field at T = Tc are exactly computed within the form factor bootstrap approach. Together with the matrix elements of the magnetisation operator already computed by G. Delfino and G. Mussardo [Nucl. Phys. B 455 (1995) 724], they are used to write down the large distance expansion for the correlators of the two relevant fields of the model.

  6. Dust Lattice Waves in Two-Dimensional Hexagonal Dust Crystals with an External Magnetic Field

    SciTech Connect

    Farokhi, B.; Shahmansouri, M.

    2008-09-07

    The influence of a constant magnetic field on the propagation of dust-lattice (DL) modes in a two-dimensional hexagonal strongly coupled plasma crystal formed by paramagnetic particles is considered. The expression for the wave dispersion relation clearly shows that high-frequency and low-frequency branches exist as a result of the coupling of longitudinal and transverse modes due to the Lorentz force acting on the dust particles.

  7. Exact solution of the one-dimensional Hubbard model with arbitrary boundary magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuan-Yuan; Cao, Junpeng; Yang, Wen-Li; Shi, Kangjie; Wang, Yupeng

    2014-02-01

    The one-dimensional Hubbard model with arbitrary boundary magnetic fields is solved exactly via the Bethe ansatz methods. With the coordinate Bethe ansatz in the charge sector, the second eigenvalue problem associated with the spin sector is constructed. It is shown that the second eigenvalue problem can be transformed into that of the inhomogeneous XXX spin chain with arbitrary boundary fields which can be solved via the off-diagonal Bethe ansatz method.

  8. Development of a 700 MHz low-/high- temperature superconductor nuclear magnetic resonance magnet: Test results and spatial homogeneity improvement

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, S.; Bascuñán, J.; Lee, H.; Bobrov, E. S.; Kim, W.; Iwasa, Y.

    2010-01-01

    For the first time in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) magnet development, a magnet configuration comprising an insert wound with high-temperature superconductor (HTS) and a background-field magnet wound with low-temperature superconductor (LTS) has been proven viable for NMR magnets. This new LTS/HTS magnet configuration opens the way for development of 1 GHz and above NMR magnets. Specifically, a 700 MHz LTS/HTS NMR magnet (LH700), consisting of a 600 MHz LTS magnet (L600) and a 100 MHz HTS insert (H100), has been designed, built, and successfully tested, and its magnetic field characteristics were measured and analyzed. A field homogeneity of 172 ppm in a cylindrical mapping volume of 17 mm diameter by 30 mm long was measured at 692 MHz and corresponding 1H NMR signal with 1.9 kHz half-width was captured. Two techniques, room-temperature and ferromagnetic shimming, were analytically examined to investigate if they would be effective for further improving spatial field homogeneity of the LH700. PMID:18315337

  9. Development of a 700 MHz low-/high- temperature superconductor nuclear magnetic resonance magnet: test results and spatial homogeneity improvement.

    PubMed

    Hahn, S; Bascuñán, J; Lee, H; Bobrov, E S; Kim, W; Iwasa, Y

    2008-02-01

    For the first time in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) magnet development, a magnet configuration comprising an insert wound with high-temperature superconductor (HTS) and a background-field magnet wound with low-temperature superconductor (LTS) has been proven viable for NMR magnets. This new LTS/HTS magnet configuration opens the way for development of 1 GHz and above NMR magnets. Specifically, a 700 MHz LTS/HTS NMR magnet (LH700), consisting of a 600 MHz LTS magnet (L600) and a 100 MHz HTS insert (H100), has been designed, built, and successfully tested, and its magnetic field characteristics were measured and analyzed. A field homogeneity of 172 ppm in a cylindrical mapping volume of 17 mm diameter by 30 mm long was measured at 692 MHz and corresponding 1H NMR signal with 1.9 kHz half-width was captured. Two techniques, room-temperature and ferromagnetic shimming, were analytically examined to investigate if they would be effective for further improving spatial field homogeneity of the LH700.

  10. Axisymmetric Two-Dimensional Computation of Magnetic Field Dragging in Accretion Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reyes-Ruiz, Mauricio; Stepinski, Tomasz F.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper we model a geometrically thin accretion disk interacting with an externally imposed, uniform, vertical magnetic field. The accretion flow in the disk drags and distorts field lines, amplifying the magnetic field in the process. Inside the disk the radial component of the field is sheared into a toroidal component. The aim of this work is to establish the character of the resultant magnetic field and its dependence on the disk's parameters. We concentrate on alpha-disks driven by turbulent viscosity. Axisymmetric, two-dimensional solutions are obtained without taking into account the back-reaction of the magnetic field on the structure of the disk. The character of the magnetic field depends strongly on the magnitude of the magnetic Prandtl number, P . We present two illustrative examples of viscous disks: a so-called 'standard' steady state model of a disk around a compact star (e.g., cataclysmic variable), and a steady state model of a proto-planetary disk. In both cases, P = 1, P = 10(sup -1), and P = 10(sup -2) scenarios are calculated. Significant bending and magnification of the magnetic field is possible only for disks characterized by P of the order of 10(sup -2). In such a case, the field lines are bent sufficiently to allow the development of a centrifugally driven wind. Inside the disk the field is dominated by its toroidal component. We also investigate the dragging of the magnetic field by a nonviscous protoplanetary disk described by a phenomenological model. This scenario leads to large distortion and magnification of the magnetic field.

  11. Nuclear magnetic resonance at millitesla fields using a zero-field spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Tayler, Michael C D; Sjolander, Tobias F; Pines, Alexander; Budker, Dmitry

    2016-09-01

    We describe new analytical capabilities for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments in which signal detection is performed with chemical resolution (via spin-spin J couplings) in the zero to ultra-low magnetic field region, below 1μT. Using magnetic fields in the 100μT to 1mT range, we demonstrate the implementation of conventional NMR pulse sequences with spin-species selectivity.

  12. Nuclear magnetic resonance at millitesla fields using a zero-field spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tayler, Michael C. D.; Sjolander, Tobias F.; Pines, Alexander; Budker, Dmitry

    2016-09-01

    We describe new analytical capabilities for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments in which signal detection is performed with chemical resolution (via spin-spin J couplings) in the zero to ultra-low magnetic field region, below 1 μT. Using magnetic fields in the 100 μT to 1 mT range, we demonstrate the implementation of conventional NMR pulse sequences with spin-species selectivity.

  13. Extreme ultraviolet imaging of three-dimensional magnetic reconnection in a solar eruption

    PubMed Central

    Sun, J. Q.; Cheng, X.; Ding, M. D.; Guo, Y.; Priest, E. R.; Parnell, C. E.; Edwards, S. J.; Zhang, J.; Chen, P. F.; Fang, C.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic reconnection, a change of magnetic field connectivity, is a fundamental physical process in which magnetic energy is released explosively, and it is responsible for various eruptive phenomena in the universe. However, this process is difficult to observe directly. Here, the magnetic topology associated with a solar reconnection event is studied in three dimensions using the combined perspectives of two spacecraft. The sequence of extreme ultraviolet images clearly shows that two groups of oppositely directed and non-coplanar magnetic loops gradually approach each other, forming a separator or quasi-separator and then reconnecting. The plasma near the reconnection site is subsequently heated from ∼1 to ≥5 MK. Shortly afterwards, warm flare loops (∼3 MK) appear underneath the hot plasma. Other observational signatures of reconnection, including plasma inflows and downflows, are unambiguously revealed and quantitatively measured. These observations provide direct evidence of magnetic reconnection in a three-dimensional configuration and reveal its origin. PMID:26113464

  14. A magnetic micro-manipulator for application of three dimensional forces

    SciTech Connect

    Punyabrahma, P.; Jayanth, G. R.

    2015-02-15

    Magnetic manipulation finds diverse applications in actuation, characterization, and manipulation of micro- and nano-scale samples. This paper presents the design and development of a novel magnetic micro-manipulator for application of three-dimensional forces on a magnetic micro-bead. A simple analytical model is proposed to obtain the forces of interaction between the magnetic micro-manipulator and a magnetic micro-bead. Subsequently, guidelines are proposed to perform systematic design and analysis of the micro-manipulator. The designed micro-manipulator is fabricated and evaluated. The manipulator is experimentally demonstrated to possess an electrical bandwidth of about 1 MHz. The ability of the micro-manipulator to apply both in-plane and out-of-plane forces is demonstrated by actuating permanent-magnet micro-beads attached to micro-cantilever beams. The deformations of the micro-cantilevers are also employed to calibrate the dependence of in-plane and out-of-plane forces on the position of the micro-bead relative to the micro-manipulator. The experimentally obtained dependences are found to agree well with theory.

  15. A magnetic micro-manipulator for application of three dimensional forces.

    PubMed

    Punyabrahma, P; Jayanth, G R

    2015-02-01

    Magnetic manipulation finds diverse applications in actuation, characterization, and manipulation of micro- and nano-scale samples. This paper presents the design and development of a novel magnetic micro-manipulator for application of three-dimensional forces on a magnetic micro-bead. A simple analytical model is proposed to obtain the forces of interaction between the magnetic micro-manipulator and a magnetic micro-bead. Subsequently, guidelines are proposed to perform systematic design and analysis of the micro-manipulator. The designed micro-manipulator is fabricated and evaluated. The manipulator is experimentally demonstrated to possess an electrical bandwidth of about 1 MHz. The ability of the micro-manipulator to apply both in-plane and out-of-plane forces is demonstrated by actuating permanent-magnet micro-beads attached to micro-cantilever beams. The deformations of the micro-cantilevers are also employed to calibrate the dependence of in-plane and out-of-plane forces on the position of the micro-bead relative to the micro-manipulator. The experimentally obtained dependences are found to agree well with theory.

  16. A magnetic micro-manipulator for application of three dimensional forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punyabrahma, P.; Jayanth, G. R.

    2015-02-01

    Magnetic manipulation finds diverse applications in actuation, characterization, and manipulation of micro- and nano-scale samples. This paper presents the design and development of a novel magnetic micro-manipulator for application of three-dimensional forces on a magnetic micro-bead. A simple analytical model is proposed to obtain the forces of interaction between the magnetic micro-manipulator and a magnetic micro-bead. Subsequently, guidelines are proposed to perform systematic design and analysis of the micro-manipulator. The designed micro-manipulator is fabricated and evaluated. The manipulator is experimentally demonstrated to possess an electrical bandwidth of about 1 MHz. The ability of the micro-manipulator to apply both in-plane and out-of-plane forces is demonstrated by actuating permanent-magnet micro-beads attached to micro-cantilever beams. The deformations of the micro-cantilevers are also employed to calibrate the dependence of in-plane and out-of-plane forces on the position of the micro-bead relative to the micro-manipulator. The experimentally obtained dependences are found to agree well with theory.

  17. Extreme ultraviolet imaging of three-dimensional magnetic reconnection in a solar eruption.

    PubMed

    Sun, J Q; Cheng, X; Ding, M D; Guo, Y; Priest, E R; Parnell, C E; Edwards, S J; Zhang, J; Chen, P F; Fang, C

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic reconnection, a change of magnetic field connectivity, is a fundamental physical process in which magnetic energy is released explosively, and it is responsible for various eruptive phenomena in the universe. However, this process is difficult to observe directly. Here, the magnetic topology associated with a solar reconnection event is studied in three dimensions using the combined perspectives of two spacecraft. The sequence of extreme ultraviolet images clearly shows that two groups of oppositely directed and non-coplanar magnetic loops gradually approach each other, forming a separator or quasi-separator and then reconnecting. The plasma near the reconnection site is subsequently heated from ∼1 to ≥5 MK. Shortly afterwards, warm flare loops (∼3 MK) appear underneath the hot plasma. Other observational signatures of reconnection, including plasma inflows and downflows, are unambiguously revealed and quantitatively measured. These observations provide direct evidence of magnetic reconnection in a three-dimensional configuration and reveal its origin. PMID:26113464

  18. Anomalous diffusion and Levy random walk of magnetic field lines in three dimensional turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Zimbardo, G.; Veltri, P.; Basile, G.; Principato, S.

    1995-07-01

    The transport of magnetic field lines is studied numerically where three dimensional (3-D) magnetic fluctuations, with a power law spectrum, and periodic over the simulation box are superimposed on an average uniform magnetic field. The weak and the strong turbulence regime, {delta}{ital B}{similar_to}{ital B}{sub 0}, are investigated. In the weak turbulence case, magnetic flux tubes are separated from each other by percolating layers in which field lines undergo a chaotic motion. In this regime the field lines may exhibit Levy, rather than Gaussian, random walk, changing from Levy flights to trapped motion. The anomalous diffusion laws {l_angle}{Delta}{ital x}{sup 2}{sub {ital i}}{r_angle}{proportional_to}{ital s}{sup {alpha}} with {alpha}{gt}1 and {alpha}{lt}1, are obtained for a number of cases, and the non-Gaussian character of the field line random walk is pointed out by computing the kurtosis. Increasing the fluctuation level, and, therefore stochasticity, normal diffusion ({alpha}{congruent}1) is recovered and the kurtoses reach their Gaussian value. However, the numerical results show that neither the quasi-linear theory nor the two dimensional percolation theory can be safely extrapolated to the considered 3-D strong turbulence regime. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  19. Subnanometre resolution in three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging of individual dark spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinolds, M. S.; Warner, M.; de Greve, K.; Dovzhenko, Y.; Thiel, L.; Walsworth, R. L.; Hong, S.; Maletinsky, P.; Yacoby, A.

    2014-04-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has revolutionized biomedical science by providing non-invasive, three-dimensional biological imaging. However, spatial resolution in conventional MRI systems is limited to tens of micrometres, which is insufficient for imaging on molecular scales. Here, we demonstrate an MRI technique that provides subnanometre spatial resolution in three dimensions, with single electron-spin sensitivity. Our imaging method works under ambient conditions and can measure ubiquitous `dark' spins, which constitute nearly all spin targets of interest. In this technique, the magnetic quantum-projection noise of dark spins is measured using a single nitrogen-vacancy (NV) magnetometer located near the surface of a diamond chip. The distribution of spins surrounding the NV magnetometer is imaged with a scanning magnetic-field gradient. To evaluate the performance of the NV-MRI technique, we image the three-dimensional landscape of electronic spins at the diamond surface and achieve an unprecedented combination of resolution (0.8 nm laterally and 1.5 nm vertically) and single-spin sensitivity. Our measurements uncover electronic spins on the diamond surface that can potentially be used as resources for improved magnetic imaging. This NV-MRI technique is immediately applicable to diverse systems including imaging spin chains, readout of spin-based quantum bits, and determining the location of spin labels in biological systems.

  20. Cosmic ray pressure driven magnetic field amplification: dimensional, radiative and field orientation effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downes, T. P.; Drury, L. O'C.

    2014-10-01

    Observations of non-thermal emission from several supernova remnants suggest that magnetic fields close to the blastwave are much stronger than would be naively expected from simple shock compression of the field permeating the interstellar medium (ISM). We investigate in some detail a simple model based on turbulence generation by cosmic ray pressure gradients. Previously, this model was investigated using 2D magnetohydrodynamic simulations. Motivated by the well-known qualitative differences between 2D and 3D turbulence, we further our investigations of this model using both 2D and 3D simulations to study the influence of the dimensionality of the simulations on the field amplification achieved. Further, since the model implies the formation of shocks which can, in principle, be efficiently cooled by collisional cooling, we include such cooling in our simulations to ascertain whether it could increase the field amplification achieved. Finally, we examine the influence of different orientations of the magnetic field with respect to the normal of the blastwave. We find that dimensionality has a slight influence on the overall amplification achieved, but a significant impact on the morphology of the amplified field. Collisional cooling has surprisingly little impact, primarily due to the short time which any element of the ISM resides in the precursor region for supernova blastwaves. Even allowing for a wide range of orientations of the magnetic field, we find that the magnetic field can be expected to be amplified by, on average, at least an order of magnitude in the precursors of supernova blastwaves.

  1. Tuning Slow Magnetic Relaxation in a Two-Dimensional Dysprosium Layer Compound through Guest Molecules.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qi; Li, Jian; Meng, Yin-Shan; Sun, Hao-Ling; Zhang, Yi-Quan; Sun, Jun-Liang; Gao, Song

    2016-08-15

    A novel two-dimensional dysprosium(III) complex, [Dy(L)(CH3COO)]·0.5DMF·H2O·2CH3OH (1), has been successfully synthesized from a new pyridine-N-oxide (PNO)-containing ligand, namely, N'-(2-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzylidene)pyridine-N-oxidecarbohydrazide (H2L). Single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies reveal that complex 1 is composed of a dinuclear dysprosium subunit, which is further extended by the PNO part of the ligand to form a two-dimensional layer. Magnetic studies indicate that complex 1 shows well-defined temperature- and frequency-dependent signals under a zero direct-current (dc) field, typical of slow magnetic relaxation with an effective energy barrier Ueff of 33.6 K under a zero dc field. Interestingly, powder X-ray diffraction and thermogravimetric analysis reveal that compound 1 undergoes a reversible phase transition that is induced by the desorption and absorption of methanol and water molecules. Moreover, the desolvated sample [Dy(L)(CH3COO)]·0.5DMF (1a) also exhibits slow magnetic relaxation but with a higher anisotropic barrier of 42.0 K, indicating the tuning effect of solvent molecules on slow magnetic relaxation. PMID:27483199

  2. Generation of shear Alfven waves by a rotating magnetic field source: Three-dimensional simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Karavaev, A. V.; Gumerov, N. A.; Papadopoulos, K.; Shao, Xi; Sharma, A. S.; Gekelman, W.; Wang, Y.; Van Compernolle, B.; Pribyl, P.; Vincena, S.

    2011-03-15

    The paper discusses the generation of polarized shear Alfven waves radiated from a rotating magnetic field source created via a phased orthogonal two-loop antenna. A semianalytical three-dimensional cold two-fluid magnetohydrodynamics model was developed and compared with recent experiments in the University of California, Los Angeles large plasma device. Comparison of the simulation results with the experimental measurements and the linear shear Alfven wave properties, namely, spatiotemporal wave structure, a dispersion relation with nonzero transverse wave number, the magnitude of the wave dependences on the wave frequency, show good agreement. From the simulations it was found that the energy of the Alfven wave generated by the rotating magnetic field source is distributed between the kinetic energy of ions and electrons and the electromagnetic energy of the wave as: {approx}1/2 is the energy of the electromagnetic field, {approx}1/2 is the kinetic energy of the ion fluid, and {approx}2.5% is the kinetic energy of electron fluid for the experiment. The wave magnetic field power calculated from the experimental data and using a fluid model differ by {approx}1% and is {approx}250 W for the experimental parameters. In both the experiment and the three-dimensional two-fluid magnetohydrodynamics simulations the rotating magnetic field source was found to be very efficient for generating shear Alfven waves.

  3. Stability of skyrmion lattices and symmetries of quasi-two-dimensional chiral magnets

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gungordu, Utkan; Nepal, Rabindra; Tretiakov, Oleg A.; Belashchenko, Kirill; Kovalev, Alexey A.

    2016-02-24

    Recently there has been substantial interest in realizations of skyrmions, in particular in quasi-two-dimensional (2D) systems due to increased stability resulting from reduced dimensionality. A stable skyrmion, representing the smallest realizable magnetic texture, could be an ideal element for ultradense magnetic memories. Here we use the most general form of the quasi-2D free energy with Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interactions constructed from general symmetry considerations reflecting the underlying system. We predict that the skyrmion phase is robust and it is present even when the system lacks the in-plane rotational symmetry. In fact, the lowered symmetry leads to increased stability of vortex-antivortex lattices withmore » fourfold symmetry and in-plane spirals, in some instances even in the absence of an external magnetic field. Our results relate different hexagonal and square cell phases to the symmetries of materials used for realizations of skyrmions. This will give clear directions for experimental realizations of hexagonal and square cell phases, and will allow engineering of skyrmions with unusual properties. We also predict striking differences in gyrodynamics induced by spin currents for isolated skyrmions and for crystals where spin currents can be induced by charge carriers or by thermal magnons. As a result, we find that under certain conditions, isolated skyrmions can move along the current without a side motion which can have implications for realizations of magnetic memories.« less

  4. Tuning Slow Magnetic Relaxation in a Two-Dimensional Dysprosium Layer Compound through Guest Molecules.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qi; Li, Jian; Meng, Yin-Shan; Sun, Hao-Ling; Zhang, Yi-Quan; Sun, Jun-Liang; Gao, Song

    2016-08-15

    A novel two-dimensional dysprosium(III) complex, [Dy(L)(CH3COO)]·0.5DMF·H2O·2CH3OH (1), has been successfully synthesized from a new pyridine-N-oxide (PNO)-containing ligand, namely, N'-(2-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzylidene)pyridine-N-oxidecarbohydrazide (H2L). Single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies reveal that complex 1 is composed of a dinuclear dysprosium subunit, which is further extended by the PNO part of the ligand to form a two-dimensional layer. Magnetic studies indicate that complex 1 shows well-defined temperature- and frequency-dependent signals under a zero direct-current (dc) field, typical of slow magnetic relaxation with an effective energy barrier Ueff of 33.6 K under a zero dc field. Interestingly, powder X-ray diffraction and thermogravimetric analysis reveal that compound 1 undergoes a reversible phase transition that is induced by the desorption and absorption of methanol and water molecules. Moreover, the desolvated sample [Dy(L)(CH3COO)]·0.5DMF (1a) also exhibits slow magnetic relaxation but with a higher anisotropic barrier of 42.0 K, indicating the tuning effect of solvent molecules on slow magnetic relaxation.

  5. Magnetic field control of the intraband optical absorption in two-dimensional quantum rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olendski, O.; Barakat, T.

    2014-02-01

    Linear and nonlinear optical absorption coefficients of the two-dimensional semiconductor ring in the perpendicular magnetic field B are calculated within independent electron approximation. Characteristic feature of the energy spectrum are crossings of the levels with adjacent nonpositive magnetic quantum numbers as the intensity B changes. It is shown that the absorption coefficient of the associated optical transition is drastically decreased at the fields corresponding to the crossing. Proposed model of the Volcano disc allows to get simple mathematical analytical results, which provide clear physical interpretation. An interplay between positive linear and intensity-dependent negative cubic absorption coefficients is discussed; in particular, critical light intensity at which additional resonances appear in the total absorption dependence on the light frequency is calculated as a function of the magnetic field and levels' broadening.

  6. Magnetic field control of the optical absorption in two-dimensional semiconductor rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olendski, Oleg; Barakat, Thabit

    2014-03-01

    Linear and nonlinear optical absorption coefficients of the two-dimensional semiconductor ring in the perpendicular magnetic field B are calculated within independent electron approximation. Characteristic feature of the energy spectrum are crossings of the levels with adjacent nonpositive magnetic quantum numbers m as the intensity B changes. It is shown that the absorption coefficient of the associated optical transition is drastically decreased at the fields corresponding to the crossing. Proposed model of the Volcano disc allows to get simple mathematical analytical results which allow clear physical interpretation. An interplay between positive linear and intensity-dependent negative cubic absorption coefficients is discussed; in particular, critical light intensity at which additional resonances appear in the total absorption dependence on the light frequency, is calculated as a function of the magnetic field and levels' broadening. Authors extend their appreciation to the Deanship of Scientific Research at King Saud University for funding this work through research group no RGP-VPP-217.

  7. Engineering quantum magnetism in one-dimensional trapped Fermi gases with p -wave interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lijun; Guan, Xiwen; Cui, Xiaoling

    2016-05-01

    The highly controllable ultracold atoms in a one-dimensional (1D) trap provide a new platform for the ultimate simulation of quantum magnetism. In this regard, the Néel antiferromagnetism and the itinerant ferromagnetism are of central importance and great interest. Here we show that these magnetic orders can be achieved in the strongly interacting spin-1/2 trapped Fermi gases with additional p -wave interactions. In this strong-coupling limit, the 1D trapped Fermi gas exhibits an effective Heisenberg spin X X Z chain in the anisotropic p -wave scattering channels. For a particular p -wave attraction or repulsion within the same species of fermionic atoms, the system displays ferromagnetic domains with full spin segregation or the antiferromagnetic spin configuration in the ground state. Such engineered magnetisms are likely to be probed in a quasi-1D trapped Fermi gas of 40K atoms with very close s -wave and p -wave Feshbach resonances.

  8. One-dimensional quantum magnetism in the anhydrous alum KTi(SO4)2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsen, GJ; Raja, A.; Tsirlin, AA; Mutka, H.; Kasinathan, D.; Ritter, C.; Rønnow, HM

    2015-11-01

    The anhydrous alum KTi(SO4)2, where the Ti3+ (d1, S = 1/2) ions form an anisotropic triangular lattice, has been prepared by a new hydrothermal route and characterized by magnetic susceptibility and neutron scattering measurements. Contrary to expectations, fits to the magnetic susceptibility indicate that the spins are isotropic (i.e. Heisenberg) and that the frustrating couplings are weak; indeed, the system is well modelled by nearly isolated chains. The inelastic neutron scattering data furthermore shows excellent agreement with an exact theoretical calculation for the one-dimensional spinon continuum. The unexpected magnetic properties of KTi(SO4)2 are explained in the light of density functional calculations, which reveal an unusual orbital ground state for the Ti3 + ion.

  9. Magnetic order in a frustrated two-dimensional atom lattice at a semiconductor surface.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Höpfner, Philipp; Schäfer, Jörg; Blumenstein, Christian; Meyer, Sebastian; Bostwick, Aaron; Rotenberg, Eli; Claessen, Ralph; Hanke, Werner

    2013-01-01

    Two-dimensional electron systems, as exploited for device applications, can lose their conducting properties because of local Coulomb repulsion, leading to a Mott-insulating state. In triangular geometries, any concomitant antiferromagnetic spin ordering can be prevented by geometric frustration, spurring speculations about 'melted' phases, known as spin liquid. Here we show that for a realization of a triangular electron system by epitaxial atom adsorption on a semiconductor, such spin disorder, however, does not appear. Our study compares the electron excitation spectra obtained from theoretical simulations of the correlated electron lattice with data from high-resolution photoemission. We find that an unusual row-wise antiferromagnetic spin alignment occurs that is reflected in the photoemission spectra as characteristic 'shadow bands' induced by the spin pattern. The magnetic order in a frustrated lattice of otherwise non-magnetic components emerges from longer-range electron hopping between the atoms. This finding can offer new ways of controlling magnetism on surfaces.

  10. Fermionic response from fractionalization in an insulating two-dimensional magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasu, J.; Knolle, J.; Kovrizhin, D. L.; Motome, Y.; Moessner, R.

    2016-10-01

    Conventionally ordered magnets possess bosonic elementary excitations, called magnons. By contrast, no magnetic insulators in more than one dimension are known whose excitations are not bosons but fermions. Theoretically, some quantum spin liquids (QSLs)--new topological phases that can occur when quantum fluctuations preclude an ordered state--are known to exhibit Majorana fermions as quasiparticles arising from fractionalization of spins. Alas, despite much searching, their experimental observation remains elusive. Here, we show that fermionic excitations are remarkably directly evident in experimental Raman scattering data across a broad energy and temperature range in the two-dimensional material α-RuCl3. This shows the importance of magnetic materials as hosts of Majorana fermions. In turn, this first systematic evaluation of the dynamics of a QSL at finite temperature emphasizes the role of excited states for detecting such exotic properties associated with otherwise hard-to-identify topological QSLs.

  11. Magnetic order in a frustrated two-dimensional atom lattice at a semiconductor surface.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Höpfner, Philipp; Schäfer, Jörg; Blumenstein, Christian; Meyer, Sebastian; Bostwick, Aaron; Rotenberg, Eli; Claessen, Ralph; Hanke, Werner

    2013-01-01

    Two-dimensional electron systems, as exploited for device applications, can lose their conducting properties because of local Coulomb repulsion, leading to a Mott-insulating state. In triangular geometries, any concomitant antiferromagnetic spin ordering can be prevented by geometric frustration, spurring speculations about 'melted' phases, known as spin liquid. Here we show that for a realization of a triangular electron system by epitaxial atom adsorption on a semiconductor, such spin disorder, however, does not appear. Our study compares the electron excitation spectra obtained from theoretical simulations of the correlated electron lattice with data from high-resolution photoemission. We find that an unusual row-wise antiferromagnetic spin alignment occurs that is reflected in the photoemission spectra as characteristic 'shadow bands' induced by the spin pattern. The magnetic order in a frustrated lattice of otherwise non-magnetic components emerges from longer-range electron hopping between the atoms. This finding can offer new ways of controlling magnetism on surfaces. PMID:23535641

  12. Lateral characteristic analysis of PMLSM considering overhang effect by 3 dimensional equivalent magnetic circuit network method

    SciTech Connect

    Hur, J.; Jung, I.S.; Hyun, D.S.

    1998-09-01

    PMLSM is used for propulsion device of high speed ground transportation or contactless carrier in factory automation and office automation. This paper represents lateral characteristics of Permanent Magnet Linear Synchronous Motor (PMLSM) according to change of overhang length. In order to analyze overhang effect of PMLSM with large airgap and finite width considering lateral displacement, new 3 dimensional equivalent magnetic circuit network method (3-D EMCN) taking into account movement of the secondary in lateral direction is introduced, which supplements magnetic equivalent circuit by using numerical technique. 3-D EMCN can consider secondary movement without remesh the element because it uses the initial mesh continuously. The authors analyzed characteristics for overhang three type case which must be problems in 3-D. The results are compared with experimental data and shown a reasonable agreement.

  13. Estimating Three-Dimensional Orientation of Human Body Parts by Inertial/Magnetic Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Sabatini, Angelo Maria

    2011-01-01

    User-worn sensing units composed of inertial and magnetic sensors are becoming increasingly popular in various domains, including biomedical engineering, robotics, virtual reality, where they can also be applied for real-time tracking of the orientation of human body parts in the three-dimensional (3D) space. Although they are a promising choice as wearable sensors under many respects, the inertial and magnetic sensors currently in use offer measuring performance that are critical in order to achieve and maintain accurate 3D-orientation estimates, anytime and anywhere. This paper reviews the main sensor fusion and filtering techniques proposed for accurate inertial/magnetic orientation tracking of human body parts; it also gives useful recipes for their actual implementation. PMID:22319365

  14. Three-dimensional magnetic cloak working from d.c. to 250 kHz.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jianfei; Jiang, Wei; Liu, Yichao; Yin, Ge; Yuan, Jun; He, Sailing; Ma, Yungui

    2015-01-01

    Invisible cloaking is one of the major outcomes of the metamaterial research, but the practical potential, in particular for high frequencies (for example, microwave to visible light), is fatally challenged by the complex material properties they usually demand. On the other hand, it will be advantageous and also technologically instrumental to design cloaking devices for applications at low frequencies where electromagnetic components are favourably uncoupled. In this work, we vastly develop the bilayer approach to create a three-dimensional magnetic cloak able to work in both static and dynamic fields. Under the quasi-static approximation, we demonstrate a perfect magnetic cloaking device with a large frequency band from 0 to 250 kHz. The practical potential of our device is experimentally verified by using a commercial metal detector, which may lead us to having a real cloaking application where the dynamic magnetic field can be manipulated in desired ways. PMID:26596641

  15. Magnetic field control of the intraband optical absorption in two-dimensional quantum rings

    SciTech Connect

    Olendski, O.; Barakat, T.

    2014-02-28

    Linear and nonlinear optical absorption coefficients of the two-dimensional semiconductor ring in the perpendicular magnetic field B are calculated within independent electron approximation. Characteristic feature of the energy spectrum are crossings of the levels with adjacent nonpositive magnetic quantum numbers as the intensity B changes. It is shown that the absorption coefficient of the associated optical transition is drastically decreased at the fields corresponding to the crossing. Proposed model of the Volcano disc allows to get simple mathematical analytical results, which provide clear physical interpretation. An interplay between positive linear and intensity-dependent negative cubic absorption coefficients is discussed; in particular, critical light intensity at which additional resonances appear in the total absorption dependence on the light frequency is calculated as a function of the magnetic field and levels' broadening.

  16. Three-dimensional Simulations of Magnetohydrodynamic Waves in Magnetized Solar Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigeesh, G.; Fedun, V.; Hasan, S. S.; Erdélyi, R.

    2012-08-01

    We present results of three-dimensional numerical simulations of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) wave propagation in a solar magnetic flux tube. Our study aims at understanding the properties of a range of MHD wave modes generated by different photospheric motions. We consider two scenarios observed in the lower solar photosphere, namely, granular buffeting and vortex-like motion, among the simplest mechanism for the generation of waves within a strong, localized magnetic flux concentration. We show that granular buffeting is likely to generate stronger slow and fast magnetoacoustic waves as compared to swirly motions. Correspondingly, the energy flux transported differs as a result of the driving motions. We also demonstrate that the waves generated by granular buffeting are likely to manifest in stronger emission in the chromospheric network. We argue that different mechanisms of wave generation are active during the evolution of a magnetic element in the intergranular lane, resulting in temporally varying emission at chromospheric heights.

  17. THREE-DIMENSIONAL SIMULATIONS OF MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC WAVES IN MAGNETIZED SOLAR ATMOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect

    Vigeesh, G.; Fedun, V.; Erdelyi, R.; Hasan, S. S.

    2012-08-10

    We present results of three-dimensional numerical simulations of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) wave propagation in a solar magnetic flux tube. Our study aims at understanding the properties of a range of MHD wave modes generated by different photospheric motions. We consider two scenarios observed in the lower solar photosphere, namely, granular buffeting and vortex-like motion, among the simplest mechanism for the generation of waves within a strong, localized magnetic flux concentration. We show that granular buffeting is likely to generate stronger slow and fast magnetoacoustic waves as compared to swirly motions. Correspondingly, the energy flux transported differs as a result of the driving motions. We also demonstrate that the waves generated by granular buffeting are likely to manifest in stronger emission in the chromospheric network. We argue that different mechanisms of wave generation are active during the evolution of a magnetic element in the intergranular lane, resulting in temporally varying emission at chromospheric heights.

  18. Interacting electrons in a two-dimensional disordered environment: effect of a zeeman magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Denteneer, P J H; Scalettar, R T

    2003-06-20

    The effect of a Zeeman magnetic field coupled to the spin of the electrons on the conducting properties of the disordered Hubbard model is studied. Using the determinant quantum Monte Carlo method, the temperature- and magnetic-field-dependent conductivity is calculated, as well as the degree of spin polarization. We find that the Zeeman magnetic field suppresses the metallic behavior present for certain values of interaction and disorder strength and is able to induce a metal-insulator transition at a critical field strength. It is argued that the qualitative features of magnetoconductance in this microscopic model containing both repulsive interactions and disorder are in agreement with experimental findings in two-dimensional electron and hole gases in semiconductor structures.

  19. Real-time observation of domain fluctuations in a two-dimensional magnetic model system

    PubMed Central

    Kronseder, M.; Meier, T. N. G.; Zimmermann, M.; Buchner, M.; Vogel, M.; Back, C. H.

    2015-01-01

    Domain patterns of perpendicularly magnetized ultra-thin ferromagnetic films are often determined by the competition of the short range but strong exchange interaction favouring ferromagnetic alignment of magnetic moments and the long range but weak antiferromagnetic dipolar interaction. Detailed phase diagrams of the resulting stripe domain patterns have been evaluated in recent years; however, the domain fluctuations in these pattern forming systems have not been studied in great detail so far. Here we show that domain fluctuations can be observed in ultra-thin two-dimensional ferromagnetic Fe/Ni/Cu(001) films with perpendicular magnetization in the stripe domain phase. Non-stroboscopic time-resolved threshold photoemission electron microscopy with high temporal resolution allows analysing the dynamic fingerprint of the topological excitations in the nematic domain phase. Furthermore, proliferation of domain ending defects in the vicinity of the spin reorientation transition is witnessed. PMID:25902073

  20. Estimating three-dimensional orientation of human body parts by inertial/magnetic sensing.

    PubMed

    Sabatini, Angelo Maria

    2011-01-01

    User-worn sensing units composed of inertial and magnetic sensors are becoming increasingly popular in various domains, including biomedical engineering, robotics, virtual reality, where they can also be applied for real-time tracking of the orientation of human body parts in the three-dimensional (3D) space. Although they are a promising choice as wearable sensors under many respects, the inertial and magnetic sensors currently in use offer measuring performance that are critical in order to achieve and maintain accurate 3D-orientation estimates, anytime and anywhere. This paper reviews the main sensor fusion and filtering techniques proposed for accurate inertial/magnetic orientation tracking of human body parts; it also gives useful recipes for their actual implementation.

  1. Three-dimensional magnetic cloak working from d.c. to 250 kHz

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jianfei; Jiang, Wei; Liu, Yichao; Yin, Ge; Yuan, Jun; He, Sailing; Ma, Yungui

    2015-01-01

    Invisible cloaking is one of the major outcomes of the metamaterial research, but the practical potential, in particular for high frequencies (for example, microwave to visible light), is fatally challenged by the complex material properties they usually demand. On the other hand, it will be advantageous and also technologically instrumental to design cloaking devices for applications at low frequencies where electromagnetic components are favourably uncoupled. In this work, we vastly develop the bilayer approach to create a three-dimensional magnetic cloak able to work in both static and dynamic fields. Under the quasi-static approximation, we demonstrate a perfect magnetic cloaking device with a large frequency band from 0 to 250 kHz. The practical potential of our device is experimentally verified by using a commercial metal detector, which may lead us to having a real cloaking application where the dynamic magnetic field can be manipulated in desired ways. PMID:26596641

  2. Low dimensional magnetic solids and single crystal elpasolites: Need for improved crystal growing techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Good, M. L.; Watkins, S.; Schwartz, R. W.

    1979-01-01

    The need for extensive crystal growing experiments to develop techniques for preparing crystals suitable for magnetic anisotropy measurements and detailed X-ray and neutron diffraction studies is rationalized on the basis of the unique magnetic properties of the materials and their hydrogen bonded structures which have many features in common with metalloenzyme and metalloprotein active sites. Single crystals of the single and mixed lanthanide species are prepared by the Bridgeman technique of gradient solidification of molten samples. The effects of crystal imperfections on the optical properties of these materials are an important part of the projected research. A series of a-amido acid complexes of first row transition metals were prepared which crystallize as infinite linear chains and exhibit low dimensional magnetic ordering (one or two) at temperature below 40 K.

  3. Three-dimensional magnetic cloak working from d.c. to 250 kHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jianfei; Jiang, Wei; Liu, Yichao; Yin, Ge; Yuan, Jun; He, Sailing; Ma, Yungui

    2015-11-01

    Invisible cloaking is one of the major outcomes of the metamaterial research, but the practical potential, in particular for high frequencies (for example, microwave to visible light), is fatally challenged by the complex material properties they usually demand. On the other hand, it will be advantageous and also technologically instrumental to design cloaking devices for applications at low frequencies where electromagnetic components are favourably uncoupled. In this work, we vastly develop the bilayer approach to create a three-dimensional magnetic cloak able to work in both static and dynamic fields. Under the quasi-static approximation, we demonstrate a perfect magnetic cloaking device with a large frequency band from 0 to 250 kHz. The practical potential of our device is experimentally verified by using a commercial metal detector, which may lead us to having a real cloaking application where the dynamic magnetic field can be manipulated in desired ways.

  4. Tunability of multichannel optical filter based on magnetized one-dimensional plasma photonic crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Jamshidi-Ghaleh, K. Karami-Garehgeshlagi, F.; Mazloom, A. A.

    2015-10-15

    A one dimensional plasma photonic crystal (1DPPC) structure was proposed to design a tunable compressing/broadening multi-channel optical filter with external controllability. The 1DPPC with arrangement of (AP){sup n}D(PA){sup n}, where A and D are the dielectric materials, P is a magnetized plasma layer and n is the number of the periodicity, was proposed. The well-known transfer matrix method was employed for analysis. In linear transmittance spectrum, n − 1 defect modes were appeared inside the photonic band gap. The results were shown that by increasing the applied magnetic field intensity and its direction, a red-shift and blue-shift were, respectively, observed in defect mode frequencies. On the other hand, the modes were compressed and broadened with increasing the intensity and the direction of the applied magnetic field, respectively. Externally controllable defect modes can be useful in designing a multichannel tunable optical filter.

  5. Three-dimensional magnetic reconnection and the magnetic topology of coronal mass ejection events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosling, J. T.; Birn, J.; Hesse, M.

    1995-01-01

    Measurements of superthermal electron fluxes in the solar wind indicate that field lines within coronal mass ejections, CMEs, near and beyond 1 AU are normally connected to the Sun at both ends. However, on occasion some field lines embedded deep within CMEs appear to be connected to the Sun at only one end. Here we propose an explanation for how such field lines arise in terms of 3-dimensional reconnection close to the Sun. Such reconnection also provides a natural explanation for the flux rope topology characteristic of many CMEs as well as the coronal loops formed during long-duration, solar X-ray events. Our consideration of the field topologies resulting from 3-dimensional reconnection indicates that field lines within and near CMEs may on occasion be connected to the outer heliosphere at both ends.

  6. Electronic and nuclear motion and their couplings in the presence of a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmelcher, P.; Cederbaum, L. S.; Meyer, H.-D.

    1988-12-01

    The performance of an adiabatic separation of electronic and nuclear motion in the presence of a magnetic field is examined, and it is shown that the diagonal term of the nonadiabatic coupling elements must be added to the nuclear equation of motion in the Born-Oppenheimer (BO) approximation. The screened BO approximation is described which is particularly suited to describe the adiabatic separation of electronic and nuclear degrees of freedom in a magnetic field. A new interpretation of the well-known gauge-centering is presented. The results are of interest in connection with the studies of white dwarfs and neutron stars.

  7. MEMS-Based Force-Detected Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (FDNMR) Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Choonsup; Butler, Mark C.; Elgammal, Ramez A.; George, Thomas; Hunt, Brian; Weitekamp, Daniel P.

    2006-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy allows assignment of molecular structure by acquiring the energy spectrum of nuclear spins in a molecule, and by interpreting the symmetry and positions of resonance lines in the spectrum. As such, NMR has become one of the most versatile and ubiquitous spectroscopic methods. Despite these tremendous successes, NMR experiments suffer from inherent low sensitivity due to the relatively low energy of photons in the radio frequency (rt) region of the electromagnetic spectrum. Here, we describe a high-resolution spectroscopy in samples with diameters in the micron range and below. We have reported design and fabrication of force-detected nuclear magnetic resonance (FDNMR).

  8. Nuclear Potential Clustering As a New Tool to Detect Patterns in High Dimensional Datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonkova, V.; Paulus, D.; Neeb, H.

    2013-02-01

    We present a new approach for the clustering of high dimensional data without prior assumptions about the structure of the underlying distribution. The proposed algorithm is based on a concept adapted from nuclear physics. To partition the data, we model the dynamic behaviour of nucleons interacting in an N-dimensional space. An adaptive nuclear potential, comprised of a short-range attractive (strong interaction) and a long-range repulsive term (Coulomb force) is assigned to each data point. By modelling the dynamics, nucleons that are densely distributed in space fuse to build nuclei (clusters) whereas single point clusters repel each other. The formation of clusters is completed when the system reaches the state of minimal potential energy. The data are then grouped according to the particles' final effective potential energy level. The performance of the algorithm is tested with several synthetic datasets showing that the proposed method can robustly identify clusters even when complex configurations are present. Furthermore, quantitative MRI data from 43 multiple sclerosis patients were analyzed, showing a reasonable splitting into subgroups according to the individual patients' disease grade. The good performance of the algorithm on such highly correlated non-spherical datasets, which are typical for MRI derived image features, shows that Nuclear Potential Clustering is a valuable tool for automated data analysis, not only in the MRI domain.

  9. Quantum phase transitions and decoupling of magnetic sublattices in the quasi-two-dimensional Ising magnet Co3V2O8 in a transverse magnetic field

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Fritsch, Katharina; Ehlers, G.; Rule, K. C.; Habicht, Klaus; Ramazanoglu, Mehmet K.; Dabkowska, H. A.; Gaulin, Bruce D.

    2015-11-05

    We study the application of a magnetic field transverse to the easy axis, Ising direction in the quasi-two-dimensional kagome staircase magnet, Co3V2O8, induces three quantum phase transitions at low temperatures, ultimately producing a novel high field polarized state, with two distinct sublattices. New time-of-flight neutron scattering techniques, accompanied by large angular access, high magnetic field infrastructure allow the mapping of a sequence of ferromagnetic and incommensurate phases and their accompanying spin excitations. Also, at least one of the transitions to incommensurate phases at μ0Hc1~6.25 T and μ0Hc2~7 T is discontinuous, while the final quantum critical point at μ0Hc3~13 T ismore » continuous.« less

  10. Quantum phase transitions and decoupling of magnetic sublattices in the quasi-two-dimensional Ising magnet Co3V2O8 in a transverse magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritsch, K.; Ehlers, G.; Rule, K. C.; Habicht, K.; Ramazanoglu, M.; Dabkowska, H. A.; Gaulin, B. D.

    2015-11-01

    The application of a magnetic field transverse to the easy axis, Ising direction in the quasi-two-dimensional kagome staircase magnet, Co3V2O8 , induces three quantum phase transitions at low temperatures, ultimately producing a novel high field polarized state, with two distinct sublattices. New time-of-flight neutron scattering techniques, accompanied by large angular access, high magnetic field infrastructure allow the mapping of a sequence of ferromagnetic and incommensurate phases and their accompanying spin excitations. At least one of the transitions to incommensurate phases at μ0Hc 1˜6.25 T and μ0Hc 2˜7 T is discontinuous, while the final quantum critical point at μ0Hc 3˜13 T is continuous.

  11. Magnetic quantum phase diagram of magnetic impurities in two-dimensional disordered electron systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyun Yong; Kettemann, Stefan

    2014-04-01

    The quantum phase diagram of disordered electron systems as a function of the concentration of magnetic impurities nm and the local exchange coupling J is studied in the dilute limit. We take into account the Anderson localization of the electrons by a nonperturbative numerical treatment of the disorder potential. The competition between Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida (RKKY) interaction JRKKY and the Kondo effect, as governed by the temperature scale TK, is known to give rise to a rich magnetic quantum phase diagram, the Doniach diagram. Our numerical calculations show that in a disordered system both the Kondo temperature TK and JRKKY as well as their ratio JRKKY/TK is widely distributed. However, we find a sharp cutoff of that distribution, which allows us to define a critical density of magnetic impurities nc below which Kondo screening wins at all sites of the system above a critical coupling Jc, forming the Kondo phase [see Fig. 3(b)]. As disorder is increased, Jc increases and a spin coupled phase is found to grow at the expense of the Kondo phase. From these distribution functions we derive the magnetic susceptibility which show anomalous power-law behavior. In the Kondo phase that power is determined by the wide distribution of the Kondo temperature, while in the spin coupled phase it is governed by the distribution of JRKKY. At low densities and small J

  12. Effect of magnetic field on the wave dispersion relation in three-dimensional dusty plasma crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Xuefeng; Wang Zhengxiong

    2012-07-15

    Three-dimensional plasma crystals under microgravity condition are investigated by taking into account an external magnetic field. The wave dispersion relations of dust lattice modes in the body centered cubic (bcc) and the face centered cubic (fcc) plasma crystals are obtained explicitly when the magnetic field is perpendicular to the wave motion. The wave dispersion relations of dust lattice modes in the bcc and fcc plasma crystals are calculated numerically when the magnetic field is in an arbitrary direction. The numerical results show that one longitudinal mode and two transverse modes are coupled due to the Lorentz force in the magnetic field. Moreover, three wave modes, i.e., the high frequency phonon mode, the low frequency phonon mode, and the optical mode, are obtained. The optical mode and at least one phonon mode are hybrid modes. When the magnetic field is neither parallel nor perpendicular to the primitive wave motion, all the three wave modes are hybrid modes and do not have any intersection points. It is also found that with increasing the magnetic field strength, the frequency of the optical mode increases and has a cutoff at the cyclotron frequency of the dust particles in the limit of long wavelength, and the mode mixings for both the optical mode and the high frequency phonon mode increase. The acoustic velocity of the low frequency phonon mode is zero. In addition, the acoustic velocity of the high frequency phonon mode depends on the angle of the magnetic field and the wave motion but does not depend on the magnetic field strength.

  13. Self-shielded gradient coils for nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Roemer, P.B.; Hickey, J.S.

    1988-04-12

    A gradient coil set for an MR apparatus is described comprising radially disposed coils adapted to be placed within a main field magnet. Each of the coils is adapted to provide a respective surface current distribution. The total magnetic field resulting from the coaction of the surface current distribution has a predetermined gradient in a predetermined single dimension within a predetermined area inside the coil set and a substantially zero value outside the coil set. Magnetic forces between the coil set and the field magnet are substantially eliminated.

  14. Microstructure of Wet Cement Pastes: a Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jehng, Jyh-Yuar

    1995-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation analysis has been applied to interpret the evolution of microstructure in a cement paste during hydration. The work in this thesis has yielded a better understanding of the geometric and physical characterization of porous materials, and specifically cement pastes. A basic understanding of the wet-dry and freeze-thaw processes of cement pastes has been developed. The pore structure evolution has been studied by the suppression of the freezing temperature of water and compared with relaxation analysis performed at room temperature. Both methods consistently show that hydrating cement pastes have two principal components in their size distribution. Firstly, in situ measurements have been made of the water consumption, the total specific surface area, and pore water size distribution as a function of hydration time. The amount of evaporable water in the pore space can be determined from the magnitude of the NMR signal, and the NMR relaxation times provide a measure of the characteristic pore sizes. Drying studies have been performed to determine the surface spin-spin relaxation time. The NMR results on evolution of cement pore structure with hydration clearly show five different stages. The water consumption was determined to be a linear function of the logarithm of hydration time over a wide range during which the total surface area of the wet gel remains constant. These experiments support a model of capillary and gel pores in the cement paste and provide strong evidence of a stable dense-gel structure. Secondly, supercooling and thawing point depression of confined water has been studied systematically. The depression of the freezing point of liquid water confined within a pore was found to be dependent on the pore size with capillary pore water freezing at 240 K and the remaining gel pore water freezing over a temperature range extending to as low as 160 K. Finally, an important application of NMR has been developed to monitor

  15. Dynamics of Protein Kinases: Insights from Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yao; Liddle, Jennifer C.; Pardi, Arthur; Ahn, Natalie G.

    2015-01-01

    CONSPECTUS Protein kinases are ubiquitous enzymes with critical roles in cellular processes and pathology. As a result, researchers have studied their activity and regulatory mechanisms extensively. Thousands of X-ray structures give snapshots of the architectures of protein kinases in various states of activation and ligand binding. However, the extent of and manner by which protein motions and conformational dynamics underlie the function and regulation of these important enzymes is not well understood. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods provide complementary information about protein conformation and dynamics in solution. However, until recently, the large size of these enzymes prevented researchers from using these methods with kinases. Developments in transverse relaxation-optimized spectroscopy (TROSY)-based techniques and more efficient isotope labeling strategies are now allowing researchers to carry out NMR studies on full-length protein kinases. In this Account, we describe recent insights into the role of dynamics in protein kinase regulation and catalysis that have been gained from NMR measurements of chemical shift changes and line broadening, residual dipolar couplings, and relaxation. These findings show strong associations between protein motion and events that control kinase activity. Dynamic and conformational changes occurring at ligand binding sites and other regulatory domains of these proteins propagate to conserved kinase core regions that mediate catalytic function. NMR measurements of slow time scale (microsecond to millisecond) motions also reveal that kinases carry out global exchange processes that synchronize multiple residues and allosteric interconversion between conformational states. Activating covalent modifications or ligand binding to form the Michaelis complex can induce these global processes. Inhibitors can also exploit the exchange properties of kinases by using conformational selection to form dynamically quenched

  16. Evidence for coexisting magnetic order in frustrated three-dimensional honeycomb iridates Li2IrO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breznay, Nicholas; Ruiz, Alejandro; Frano, Alex; Analytis, James

    The search for unconventional magnetism has found a fertile hunting ground in 5d iridium oxide (iridate) materials. The competition between coulomb, spin-orbit, and crystal field energy scales in honeycomb iridates leads to a quantum magnetic system with localized spin-1/2 moments communicating through spin-anisotropic Kitaev exchange interactions. Although early and ongoing work has focused on layered two-dimensional honeycomb compounds such as Na2IrO3 and a 4d analog, RuCl3, recently discovered polytypes of Li2IrO3 take on three-dimensional honeycomb structures. Bulk thermodynamic studies, as well as recent resonant x-ray diffraction and absorption spectroscopy experiments, have uncovered a rich phase diagram for these three-dimensional honeycomb iridates. Low temperature incommensurate and commensurate magnetic orders can be stabilized by tuning the applied magnetic field, displaying a delicate coexistence that signals highly frustrated magnetism.

  17. Model for the interpretation of nuclear magnetic resonance relaxometry of hydrated porous silicate materials.

    PubMed

    Faux, D A; Cachia, S-H P; McDonald, P J; Bhatt, J S; Howlett, N C; Churakov, S V

    2015-03-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation experimentation is an effective technique for probing the dynamics of proton spins in porous media, but interpretation requires the application of appropriate spin-diffusion models. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of porous silicate-based systems containing a quasi-two-dimensional water-filled pore are presented. The MD simulations suggest that the residency time of the water on the pore surface is in the range 0.03-12 ns, typically 2-5 orders of magnitude less than values determined from fits to experimental NMR measurements using the established surface-layer (SL) diffusion models of Korb and co-workers [Phys. Rev. E 56, 1934 (1997)]. Instead, MD identifies four distinct water layers in a tobermorite-based pore containing surface Ca2+ ions. Three highly structured water layers exist within 1 nm of the surface and the central region of the pore contains a homogeneous region of bulklike water. These regions are referred to as layer 1 and 2 (L1, L2), transition layer (TL), and bulk (B), respectively. Guided by the MD simulations, a two-layer (2L) spin-diffusion NMR relaxation model is proposed comprising two two-dimensional layers of slow- and fast-moving water associated with L2 and layers TL+B, respectively. The 2L model provides an improved fit to NMR relaxation times obtained from cementitious material compared to the SL model, yields diffusion correlation times in the range 18-75 ns and 28-40 ps in good agreement with MD, and resolves the surface residency time discrepancy. The 2L model, coupled with NMR relaxation experimentation, provides a simple yet powerful method of characterizing the dynamical properties of proton-bearing porous silicate-based systems such as porous glasses, cementitious materials, and oil-bearing rocks. PMID:25871114

  18. Metabolomic alterations in elicitor treated Silybum marianum suspension cultures monitored by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Sampedro, Angeles; Kim, Hye Kyong; Choi, Young Hae; Verpoorte, Robert; Corchete, Purificación

    2007-06-15

    A comprehensive metabolomic profiling of Silybum marianum (L.) Gaernt cell cultures elicited with yeast extract or methyl jasmonate for the production of silymarin was carried out using one- and two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. With these techniques we were able to detect both temporal quantitative variations in the metabolite pool in yeast extract-elicited cultures and qualitative differences in cultures treated with the two types of elicitors. Yeast extract and methyl jasmonate caused a metabolic reprogramming that affected amino acid and carbohydrate metabolism; upon elicitation sucrose decreased and glucose levels increased, these changes being dependent on "de novo" protein synthesis. Also dependent on protein synthesis were the increase seen in alanine and glutamine in elicited cultures. Yeast extract differentially acted on threonine and valine metabolism and promoted accumulation of choline and alpha-linolenic acid in cells thus suggesting its action on membranes and the involvement of the octadecanoid pathway in the induction of silymarin in S. marianum cultures. Phenylpropanoid metabolism was altered by elicitation but, depending on elicitor, different phenylpropanoid profile was produced. The results obtained in this study will permit in the future to identify candidate components of the signalling pathway involved in the stimulation of the constitutive pathway of silymarin.

  19. Correlated Biofilm Imaging, Transport and Metabolism Measurements via Combined Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Confocal Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Mclean, Jeffrey S.; Ona, Ositadinma; Majors, Paul D.

    2008-02-18

    Bacterial biofilms are complex, three-dimensional, communities that are found nearly everywhere in nature1 and are being recognized as the cause of treatment-resistant infections1 2. Advanced methods are required to characterize their collective and spatial patterns of metabolism however most techniques are invasive or destructive. Here we describe the use of a combined confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) microscopy system to monitor structure, mass transport, and metabolism in active biofilms. Non-invasive NMR methods provide macroscopic structure along with spatially-resolved metabolite profiles and diffusion measurements. CLSM enables monitoring of cells by fluorescent protein reporters to investigate biofilm structure and gene expression concurrently. A planar sample chamber design facilitates depth-resolved measurements on 140 nL sample volumes under laminar flow conditions. The techniques and approaches described here are applicable to environmental and medically relevant microbial communities, thus providing key metabolic information for promoting beneficial biofilms and treating associated diseases.

  20. Multidimensional Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance of a Functional Multiprotein Chemoreceptor Array.

    PubMed

    Harris, Michael J; Struppe, Jochem O; Wylie, Benjamin J; McDermott, Ann E; Thompson, Lynmarie K

    2016-07-01

    The bacterial chemoreceptor complex governs signal detection and the upstream elements of chemotactic behavior, but the detailed molecular mechanism is still unclear. We have assembled nativelike functional arrays of an aspartate receptor cytoplasmic fragment (CF) with its two cytoplasmic protein partners (CheA and CheW) for solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies of structural changes involved in signaling. In this initial study of the uniformly (13)C- and (15)N-enriched CF in these >13.8 MDa size arrays, residue-type assignments are made for amino acids that together make up 90% of the protein. We demonstrate that homo- and heteronuclear two-dimensional spectra are consistent with structure-based chemical shift predictions: a number of major assignable correlations are consistent with the predominantly α-helical secondary structure, and minor correlations are consistent with the disordered C-terminal tail. Sub-parts per million line widths and spectral changes upon freezing of samples suggest these arrays are structurally homogeneous and sufficiently immobilized for efficient solid-state NMR. PMID:27295350