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Sample records for dimensional nuclear magnetic

  1. Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance of quadrupolar systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shuanhu

    1997-09-01

    This dissertation describes two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance theory and experiments which have been developed to study quadruples in the solid state. The technique of multiple-quantum magic-angle spinning (MQMAS) is extensively reviewed and expanded upon in this thesis. Specifically, MQMAS is first compared with another technique, dynamic-angle spinning (DAS). The similarity between the two techniques allows us to extend much of the DAS work to the MQMAS case. Application of MQMAS to a series of aluminum containing materials is then presented. The superior resolution enhancement through MQMAS is exploited to detect the five- and six-coordinated aluminum in many aluminosilicate glasses. Combining the MQMAS method with other experiments, such as HETCOR, greatly expands the possibility of the use of MQMAS to study a large range of problems and is demonstrated in Chapter 5. Finally, the technique switching-angle spinning (SAS) is applied to quadrupolar nuclei to fully characterize a quadrupolar spin system in which all of the 8 NMR parameters are accurately determined. This dissertation is meant to demonstrate that with the combination of two-dimensional NMR concepts and new advanced spinning technologies, a series of multiple-dimensional NMR techniques can be designed to allow a detailed study of quadrupolar nuclei in the solid state.

  2. Matrix decompositions of two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectra.

    PubMed

    Havel, T F; Najfeld, I; Yang, J X

    1994-08-16

    Two-dimensional NMR spectra are rectangular arrays of real numbers, which are commonly regarded as digitized images to be analyzed visually. If one treats them instead as mathematical matrices, linear algebra techniques can also be used to extract valuable information from them. This matrix approach is greatly facilitated by means of a physically significant decomposition of these spectra into a product of matrices--namely, S = PAPT. Here, P denotes a matrix whose columns contain the digitized contours of each individual peak or multiple in the one-dimensional spectrum, PT is its transpose, and A is an interaction matrix specific to the experiment in question. The practical applications of this decomposition are considered in detail for two important types of two-dimensional NMR spectra, double quantum-filtered correlated spectroscopy and nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy, both in the weak-coupling approximation. The elements of A are the signed intensities of the cross-peaks in a double quantum-filtered correlated spectrum, or the integrated cross-peak intensities in the case of a nuclear Overhauser effect spectrum. This decomposition not only permits these spectra to be efficiently simulated but also permits the corresponding inverse problems to be given an elegant mathematical formulation to which standard numerical methods are applicable. Finally, the extension of this decomposition to the case of strong coupling is given.

  3. One-dimensional and two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance studies of the reaction of phenyldichloroarsine with glutathione

    SciTech Connect

    Dill, K.; Adams, E.R.; O'Connor, R.J.; Chong, S.; McGown, E.L.

    1987-09-01

    /sup 14/C-labeled phenyldichloroarsine (PDA) enters the red blood cell and forms a 1:2 adduct with intracellular glutathione. Upon gel filtration of the hemolysate, (/sup 14/C)PDA was recovered with the glutathione-containing fractions. One-dimensional and two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy were used to confirm the structure of the adduct and elucidate its stereochemistry, stability, and reactivity.

  4. A conformational study of the opioid peptide dermorphin by one-dimensional and two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Pastore, A; Temussi, P A; Salvadori, S; Tomatis, R; Mascagni, P

    1985-01-01

    Dermorphin, a natural peptide opioid containing a D-Ala2 residue, has been studied in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) solution by means of several one-dimensional and two-dimensional 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods at various fields from 80 to 600 MHz. The combined use of conventional NMR parameters and of nuclear Overhauser effect effects points to an essentially extended structure. This conformation may be, in part, the result of strong interaction of the amide groups with DMSO molecules. PMID:4052557

  5. Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance studies of molecular structure in liquids and liquid crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Rucker, S.P.

    1991-07-01

    Magnetic couplings between protons, such as through-space dipole couplings, and scalar J-couplings depend sensitively on the structure of the molecule. Two dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance experiments provide a powerful tool for measuring these couplings, correlating them to specific pairs of protons within the molecule, and calculating the structure. This work discusses the development of NMR methods for examining two such classes of problems -- determination of the secondary structure of flexible molecules in anisotropic solutions, and primary structure of large biomolecules in aqueous solutions. 201 refs., 84 figs., 19 tabs.

  6. Magnetization transfer modes in scalar-coupled spin systems investigated by selective two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance exchange experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Bari, Lorenzo; Kowalewski, Jozef; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey

    1990-12-01

    Longitudinal nuclear magnetic relaxation in coupled two-spin systems is discussed in terms of magnetization transfer modes, a generalization of the magnetization modes commonly used in the discussion of one-dimensional NMR relaxation experiments. The symmetry properties of the transfer modes and their relationship to the elements of the usual Redfield relaxation matrix are discussed. Experimental strategies for measuring the amplitudes of the transfer modes are discussed and various selective two-dimensional exchange (``soft-NOESY'') methods are proposed. Experimental data are presented for Exifone, a small organic molecule, and the auto- and cross-correlation spectral densities, the magnitudes of the proton chemical shift anisotropies, and the strengths of the dipolar interaction are derived from the spectra.

  7. Accelerating two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance correlation spectroscopy via selective coherence transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Qimiao; Chen, Lin; Qiu, Wenqi; Lin, Liangjie; Sun, Huijun; Cai, Shuhui; Wei, Zhiliang; Chen, Zhong

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy serves as an important tool for both qualitative and quantitative analyses of various systems in chemistry, biology, and medicine. However, applications of one-dimensional 1H NMR are often restrained by the presence of severe overlap among different resonances. The advent of two-dimensional (2D) 1H NMR constitutes a promising alternative by extending the crowded resonances into a plane and thereby alleviating the spectral congestions. However, the enhanced ability in discriminating resonances is achieved at the cost of extended experimental duration due to necessity of various scans with progressive delays to construct the indirect dimension. Therefore, in this study, we propose a selective coherence transfer (SECOT) method to accelerate acquisitions of 2D correlation spectroscopy by converting chemical shifts into spatial positions within the effective sample length and then performing an echo planar spectroscopic imaging module to record the spatial and spectral information, which generates 2D correlation spectrum after 2D Fourier transformation. The feasibility and effectiveness of SECOT have been verified by a set of experiments under both homogeneous and inhomogeneous magnetic fields. Moreover, evaluations of SECOT for quantitative analyses are carried out on samples with a series of different concentrations. Based on these experimental results, the SECOT may open important perspectives for fast, accurate, and stable investigations of various chemical systems both qualitatively and quantitatively.

  8. Accelerating two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance correlation spectroscopy via selective coherence transfer.

    PubMed

    Ye, Qimiao; Chen, Lin; Qiu, Wenqi; Lin, Liangjie; Sun, Huijun; Cai, Shuhui; Wei, Zhiliang; Chen, Zhong

    2017-01-07

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy serves as an important tool for both qualitative and quantitative analyses of various systems in chemistry, biology, and medicine. However, applications of one-dimensional (1)H NMR are often restrained by the presence of severe overlap among different resonances. The advent of two-dimensional (2D) (1)H NMR constitutes a promising alternative by extending the crowded resonances into a plane and thereby alleviating the spectral congestions. However, the enhanced ability in discriminating resonances is achieved at the cost of extended experimental duration due to necessity of various scans with progressive delays to construct the indirect dimension. Therefore, in this study, we propose a selective coherence transfer (SECOT) method to accelerate acquisitions of 2D correlation spectroscopy by converting chemical shifts into spatial positions within the effective sample length and then performing an echo planar spectroscopic imaging module to record the spatial and spectral information, which generates 2D correlation spectrum after 2D Fourier transformation. The feasibility and effectiveness of SECOT have been verified by a set of experiments under both homogeneous and inhomogeneous magnetic fields. Moreover, evaluations of SECOT for quantitative analyses are carried out on samples with a series of different concentrations. Based on these experimental results, the SECOT may open important perspectives for fast, accurate, and stable investigations of various chemical systems both qualitatively and quantitatively.

  9. Spectral implementation of some quantum algorithms by one- and two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Ranabir; Kumar, Anil

    2004-10-01

    Quantum information processing has been effectively demonstrated on a small number of qubits by nuclear magnetic resonance. An important subroutine in any computing is the readout of the output. "Spectral implementation" originally suggested by Z. L. Madi, R. Bruschweiler, and R. R. Ernst [J. Chem. Phys. 109, 10603 (1999)], provides an elegant method of readout with the use of an extra "observer" qubit. At the end of computation, detection of the observer qubit provides the output via the multiplet structure of its spectrum. In spectral implementation by two-dimensional experiment the observer qubit retains the memory of input state during computation, thereby providing correlated information on input and output, in the same spectrum. Spectral implementation of Grover's search algorithm, approximate quantum counting, a modified version of Berstein-Vazirani problem, and Hogg's algorithm are demonstrated here in three- and four-qubit systems.

  10. Rotational diffusion measurements of suspended colloidal particles using two-dimensional exchange nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Barrall, G.A.; Schmidt-Rohr, K.; Lee, Y.K.; Landfester, K.; Zimmermann, H.; Chingas, G.C.; Pines, A. |

    1996-01-01

    We present here an experimental and theoretical study of the application of two-dimensional exchange nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) to the investigation of the rotational diffusion of colloidal particles. The theoretical discussion includes the nature of the NMR frequency time-correlation function where the NMR interaction is represented by the chemical shift anisotropy (CSA). Time-correlation functions for the isotropic rotational diffusion of a suspension of colloidal particles containing single and multiple sites are derived in addition to time-correlation functions for the rotational diffusion of a suspension of symmetric top particles containing an isotropic distribution of a single CSA interaction. Simulations of two-dimensional exchange spectra for particles undergoing isotropic rotational diffusion are presented. We performed two-dimensional exchange NMR experiments on a colloidal suspension of spherical poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) particles which were synthesized with a 20{percent} enrichment in {sup 13}C at the carbonyl site. Rotational diffusion time-correlation functions determined from the experimental exchange spectra are consistent with the composition of the colloidal suspension. Detailed explanations of the syntheses of the enriched methyl {sup 13}C-(carbonyl)-methacrylate monomer and the small quantities of 20{percent} enriched {sup 13}C-(carbonyl)-poly(methyl methacrylate) microspheres used for this study are presented. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  11. High-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance measurements in inhomogeneous magnetic fields: A fast two-dimensional J-resolved experiment.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuqing; Lin, Yung-Ya; Cai, Shuhui; Yang, Yu; Sun, Huijun; Lin, Yanqin; Chen, Zhong

    2016-03-14

    High spectral resolution in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a prerequisite for achieving accurate information relevant to molecular structures and composition assignments. The continuous development of superconducting magnets guarantees strong and homogeneous static magnetic fields for satisfactory spectral resolution. However, there exist circumstances, such as measurements on biological tissues and heterogeneous chemical samples, where the field homogeneity is degraded and spectral line broadening seems inevitable. Here we propose an NMR method, named intermolecular zero-quantum coherence J-resolved spectroscopy (iZQC-JRES), to face the challenge of field inhomogeneity and obtain desired high-resolution two-dimensional J-resolved spectra with fast acquisition. Theoretical analyses for this method are given according to the intermolecular multiple-quantum coherence treatment. Experiments on (a) a simple chemical solution and (b) an aqueous solution of mixed metabolites under externally deshimmed fields, and on (c) a table grape sample with intrinsic field inhomogeneity from magnetic susceptibility variations demonstrate the feasibility and applicability of the iZQC-JRES method. The application of this method to inhomogeneous chemical and biological samples, maybe in vivo samples, appears promising.

  12. High-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance measurements in inhomogeneous magnetic fields: A fast two-dimensional J-resolved experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yuqing; Lin, Yung-Ya; Cai, Shuhui; Yang, Yu; Sun, Huijun; Lin, Yanqin; Chen, Zhong

    2016-03-01

    High spectral resolution in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a prerequisite for achieving accurate information relevant to molecular structures and composition assignments. The continuous development of superconducting magnets guarantees strong and homogeneous static magnetic fields for satisfactory spectral resolution. However, there exist circumstances, such as measurements on biological tissues and heterogeneous chemical samples, where the field homogeneity is degraded and spectral line broadening seems inevitable. Here we propose an NMR method, named intermolecular zero-quantum coherence J-resolved spectroscopy (iZQC-JRES), to face the challenge of field inhomogeneity and obtain desired high-resolution two-dimensional J-resolved spectra with fast acquisition. Theoretical analyses for this method are given according to the intermolecular multiple-quantum coherence treatment. Experiments on (a) a simple chemical solution and (b) an aqueous solution of mixed metabolites under externally deshimmed fields, and on (c) a table grape sample with intrinsic field inhomogeneity from magnetic susceptibility variations demonstrate the feasibility and applicability of the iZQC-JRES method. The application of this method to inhomogeneous chemical and biological samples, maybe in vivo samples, appears promising.

  13. Two-Dimensional Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Structure Determination Module for Introductory Biochemistry: Synthesis and Structural Characterization of Lyso-Glycerophospholipids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrett, Teresa A.; Rose, Rebecca L.; Bell, Sidney M.

    2013-01-01

    In this laboratory module, introductory biochemistry students are exposed to two-dimensional [superscript 1]H-nuclear magnetic resonance of glycerophospholipids (GPLs). Working in groups of three, students enzymatically synthesized and purified a variety of 2-acyl lyso GPLs. The structure of the 2-acyl lyso GPL was verified using [superscript…

  14. Two-Dimensional Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Structure Determination Module for Introductory Biochemistry: Synthesis and Structural Characterization of Lyso-Glycerophospholipids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrett, Teresa A.; Rose, Rebecca L.; Bell, Sidney M.

    2013-01-01

    In this laboratory module, introductory biochemistry students are exposed to two-dimensional [superscript 1]H-nuclear magnetic resonance of glycerophospholipids (GPLs). Working in groups of three, students enzymatically synthesized and purified a variety of 2-acyl lyso GPLs. The structure of the 2-acyl lyso GPL was verified using [superscript…

  15. (13)C-Decoupled J-Coupling Spectroscopy Using Two-Dimensional Nuclear Magnetic Resonance at Zero-Field.

    PubMed

    Sjolander, Tobias F; Tayler, Michael C D; Kentner, Arne; Budker, Dmitry; Pines, Alexander

    2017-04-06

    We present a two-dimensional method for obtaining (13)C-decoupled, (1)H-coupled nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra in zero magnetic field using coherent spin-decoupling. The result is a spectrum determined only by the proton-proton J-coupling network. Detection of NMR signals in zero magnetic field requires at least two different nuclear spin species, but the proton J-spectrum is independent of isotopomer, thus potentially simplifying spectra and thereby improving the analytical capabilities of zero-field NMR. The protocol does not rely on a difference in Larmor frequency between the coupled nuclei, allowing for the direct determination of J-coupling constants between chemically equivalent spins. We obtain the (13)C-decoupled zero-field spectrum of [1-(13)C]-propionic acid and identify conserved quantum numbers governing the appearance of cross peaks in the two-dimensional spectrum.

  16. Two-dimensional spatially selective spin inversion and spin-echo refocusing with a single nuclear magnetic resonance pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottomley, Paul A.; Hardy, Christopher J.

    1987-11-01

    A new class of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) pulses that provides simultaneous spatially selective inversion of nuclear spins in two dimensions following a single pulse application is described and demonstrated. The two-dimensional selective pulses consist of a single square- or amplitude-modulated π rf pulse applied in the presence of an amplitude-modulated magnetic field gradient that reorients through the two dimensions during the rf pulse. For example, square and Gaussian rf pulses produce sharply peaked sombrero-, egg-carton-, and stalagmite-shaped profiles of spin inversion in the xz plane when applied in the presence of a gradient that rotates or describes a figure eight in the xz plane. The theoretical profiles, computed by numerical integration of the Bloch equation, are in good agreement with experimental results obtained by incorporating the pulses into a conventional NMR imaging sequence. The pulses are directly applicable to restricted field-of-view high-resolution imaging for the amelioration of aliasing signal artifacts, and when combined with one-dimensional localized phosphorus (31P) chemical shift spectroscopy techniques that employ surface detection coils, should permit complete three-dimensionally localized 31P NMR spectroscopy. The π pulses provide similar two-dimensional spatial selectivity of the transverse nuclear magnetization when used for refocusing Hahn spin echoes.

  17. Complete Proton and Carbon Assignment of Triclosan via One- and Two- Dimensional Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Analysis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Students from an upper-division undergraduate spectroscopy class analyzed one- and two-dimensional 400 MHz NMR spectroscopic data from triclosan in CDCl3. Guided assignment of all proton and carbon signals was completed via 1D proton and carbon, nuclear Overhauser effect (nOe), distortionless enhanc...

  18. An Accessible Two-Dimensional Solution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Experiment on Human Ubiquitin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rovnyak, David; Thompson, Laura E.

    2005-01-01

    Solution-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is an invaluable tool in structural and molecular biology research, but may be underutilized in undergraduate laboratories because instrumentation for performing structural studies of macromolecules in aqueous solutions is not yet widely available for use in undergraduate laboratories. We have…

  19. An Accessible Two-Dimensional Solution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Experiment on Human Ubiquitin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rovnyak, David; Thompson, Laura E.

    2005-01-01

    Solution-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is an invaluable tool in structural and molecular biology research, but may be underutilized in undergraduate laboratories because instrumentation for performing structural studies of macromolecules in aqueous solutions is not yet widely available for use in undergraduate laboratories. We have…

  20. Three dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging of sodium ions using stochastic excitation and oscillating gradients

    SciTech Connect

    Frederick, Blaise deBonneval

    1994-12-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic imaging of 23Na holds promise as a non-invasive method of mapping Na{sup +} distributions, and for differentiating pools of Na+ ions in biological tissues. However, due to NMR relaxation properties of 23Na in vivo, a large fraction of Na+ is not visible with conventional NMR imaging methods. An alternate imaging method, based on stochastic excitation and oscillating gradients, has been developed which is well adapted to measuring nuclei with short T2. Contemporary NMR imaging techniques have dead times of up to several hundred microseconds between excitation and sampling, comparable to the shortest in vivo 23Na T2 values, causing significant signal loss. An imaging strategy based on stochastic excitation has been developed which greatly reduces experiment dead time by reducing peak radiofrequency (RF) excitation power and using a novel RF circuit to speed probe recovery. Continuously oscillating gradients are used to eliminate transient eddy currents. Stochastic 1H and 23Na spectroscopic imaging experiments have been performed on a small animal system with dead times as low as 25μs, permitting spectroscopic imaging with 100% visibility in vivo. As an additional benefit, the encoding time for a 32x32x32 spectroscopic image is under 30 seconds. The development and analysis of stochastic NMR imaging has been hampered by limitations of the existing phase demodulation reconstruction technique. Three dimensional imaging was impractical due to reconstruction time, and design and analysis of proposed experiments was limited by the mathematical intractability of the reconstruction method. A new reconstruction method for stochastic NMR based on Fourier interpolation has been formulated combining the advantage of a several hundredfold reduction in reconstruction time with a straightforward mathematical form.

  1. Tunnel-diode resonator and nuclear magnetic resonance studies of low-dimensional magnetic and superconducting systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeninas, Steven Lee

    This thesis emphasizes two frequency-domain techniques which uniquely employ radio frequency (RF) excitations to investigate the static and dynamic properties of novel magnetic and superconducting materials. The first technique is a tunnel-diode resonator (TDR) which detects bulk changes in the dynamic susceptibility, chi = dM/dH. The capability of TDR to operate at low temperatures (less than 100 mK) and high fields (up to 65 T in pulsed fields) was critical for investigations of the antiferromagnetically correlated magnetic molecules Cr12Cu2 and Cr12 Ln4 (Ln = Y, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Yb), and the superconductor SrFe2(As1--xPx) 2 (x = 0.35). Investigations of Cr12Cu 2 and Cr12Ln4 demonstrates the first implementation of TDR to experimentally investigate the lowlying energy spectra of magnetic molecules in pulsed magnetic fields. Zeeman splitting of the quantum spin states results in transitions between field-dependent ground state energy levels observed as peaks in dM/dH at 600 mK, and demonstrate good agreement with theoretical calculations using a isotropic Heisenberg spin Hamiltonian. Increasing temperature to 2.5 K, TDR reveals a rich spectrum of frequency-dependent level crossings from thermally populated excited states which cannot be observed by conventional static magnetometry techniques. The last study presented uses TDR in pulsed fields to determine the temperature-dependent upper-critical field Hc2 to investigate the effects of columnar defects arising from heavy ion irradiation of SrFe2(As 1--xPx)2. Results suggest irradiation uniformly suppresses Tc and Hc2, and does not introduce additional features on H c2(T) and the shapes of the anisotropic Hc2 curves indicates a nodal superconducting gap. The second technique is nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) which yields site specific magnetic and electronic information arising from hyperfine interactions for select magnetic nuclei. NMR spectra and nuclear spin-lattice relaxation measurements are reported

  2. One- and Two-Dimensional Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy with a Diamond Quantum Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boss, J. M.; Chang, K.; Armijo, J.; Cujia, K.; Rosskopf, T.; Maze, J. R.; Degen, C. L.

    2016-05-01

    We report on Fourier spectroscopy experiments performed with near-surface nitrogen-vacancy centers in a diamond chip. By detecting the free precession of nuclear spins rather than applying a multipulse quantum sensing protocol, we are able to unambiguously identify the NMR species devoid of harmonics. We further show that, by engineering different Hamiltonians during free precession, the hyperfine coupling parameters as well as the nuclear Larmor frequency can be selectively measured with up to five digits of precision. The protocols can be combined to demonstrate two-dimensional Fourier spectroscopy. Presented techniques will be useful for mapping nuclear coordinates in molecules deposited on diamond sensor chips, en route to imaging their atomic structure.

  3. Applications of two-dimensional solid state nuclear magnetic resonance in silicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhi

    1998-10-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a powerful technique and has been routinely applied in many fields. In this study, we have used high resolution two-dimensional (2D) solid state NMR techniques to study the dynamic process of Li diffusion, the kinetic process of oxygen isotope exchange, and the structural characterization of hydrous and anhydrous silicate glasses at atomic level. In the Li diffusion study, we first established the correlation between the sp6Li chemical shifts and the lithium coordination environments in lithium containing silicates. Then, we assigned the sp6Li magic angle spinning (MAS) spectrum and applied 1D, 2D variable temperature exchange NMR to observe Lisp+ diffusion in lithium orthosilicate. For the first time, our result revealed a detailed picture of the hopping rates of Lisp+ ions among structurally distinct sites and helped to define the diffusion pathway. We have shown that Lisp+ ions hopping rates and activation energies depend on site geometry. NMR measurements on Li ionic hopping frequencies was used to accurately predict the bulk conductivity. In the site-specific oxygen isotope exchange study, we first developed a method to obtain quantitative sp{17}O NMR spectra. Then, we applied the method to stilbite, a natural zeolite. We have shown for the first time that framework oxygens in Al-O-Si sites react faster with oxygens in the channel water than oxygens in Si-O-Si sites. Such an observation has partially proved the quantum ab initio calculation on water adsorption onto silicates. Our measured kinetics results agreed well with bulk isotopic measurements. Water dissolution mechanism in silicates glasses, especially aluminosilicate glasses, has been a long-standing controversy. We have used the sp{17}O spectra for hydrous and anhydrous sodium tetrasilicate glasses and albite glasses to study the structural role of hydrogen-containing species. For the first time, we have observed the oxygen peak for SiOH in hydrous sodium

  4. Detection of nuclear overhauser effects between degenerate amide proton resonances by heteronuclear three-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ikura, Mitsuhiko; Bax, A.; Clore, G.M.; Gronenborn, A.M. )

    1990-11-21

    The key to protein structure determination by NMR lies in the identification of as many {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H nuclear Overhauser effects (NOEs) as possible in order to obtain a large set of approximate interproton distance restraints. With the advent of a range of heteronuclear three-dimensional (3D) NMR experiments, it has now become possible to obtain complete {sup 1}H, {sup 15}N, and {sup 13}C assignments and to determine the 3D structures of proteins in the 15-25-kDa molecular weight range. Despite these advances, it has remained impossible to observe NOEs between protons with degenerate chemical shifts. Such interactions occur repeatedly, both among aliphatic or aromatic protons and between sequential amide protons in helical proteins. Here the authors describe a 3D heteronuclear experiment that allows the observation of these NOEs and demonstrate its applicability for calmodulin, a protein of 148 residues and molecular weight 16.7 kDa.

  5. Three-dimensional structure of phoratoxin in solution: combined use of nuclear magnetic resonance, distance geometry, and restrained molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Clore, G.M.; Sukumaran, D.K.; Nilges, M.; Gronenborn, A.M.

    1987-03-24

    The solution conformation of phoratoxin, a 46-residue plant protein, has been investigated by /sup 1/H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The spectrum is assigned in a sequential manner by a combination of two-dimensional NMR techniques to demonstrate through-bond and through-space (< 5 A) connectivities. A set of 331 approximate interproton distance restraints and six phi backbone torsion angle restraints is derived from the two-dimensional nuclear Overhauser enhancement and double quantum filtered homonuclear correlated spectra, respectively. These restraints are used as the basis of a structure determination with a metric matrix distance geometry algorithm. A total of eight structures are computed in this manner and subjected to refinement by restrained molecular dynamics in which the experimental restraints are incorporated into the total energy function of the system in the form of square well effective potentials. The overall shape of phoratoxin is that of the capital letter L, similar to that of crambin and ..cap alpha../sub 1/-purothionin, with the longer arm comprising two ..cap alpha..-helices at an angle of approx. 140/sup 0/ to each other and the shorter arm a mini-antiparallel ..beta..-sheet and a loop made up of two turns and a strand.

  6. Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance structure determination module for introductory biochemistry: synthesis and structural characterization of lyso-glycerophospholipids.

    PubMed

    Garrett, Teresa A; Rose, Rebecca L; Bell, Sidney M

    2013-01-01

    In this laboratory module, introductory biochemistry students are exposed to two-dimensional (1) H-nuclear magnetic resonance of glycerophospholipids (GPLs). Working in groups of three, students enzymatically synthesized and purified a variety of 2-acyl lyso GPLs. The structure of the 2-acyl lyso GPL was verified using (1) H-correlation spectroscopy. Students scored significantly higher on an assessment of NMR knowledge after having participated in this lab module and in comparison to a similar cohort who did not participate. Inaddition, student confidence in their NMR knowledge and abilities increased 62% following the module and correlated with their ability to apply their NMR knowledge. Based on these results, the laboratory module was very effective at providing students with a more extensive understanding of the underlying concepts of NMR as a tool for structural determination. Copyright © 2013 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. Two-dimensional 1H-13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based comprehensive analysis of roasted coffee bean extract.

    PubMed

    Wei, Feifei; Furihata, Kazuo; Hu, Fangyu; Miyakawa, Takuya; Tanokura, Masaru

    2011-09-14

    Coffee was characterized by proton and carbon nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. To identify the coffee components, a detailed and approximately 90% signal assignment was carried out using various two-dimensional NMR spectra and a spiking method, in which authentic compounds were added to the roasted coffee bean extract (RCBE) sample. A total of 24 coffee components, including 5 polysaccharide units, 3 stereoisomers of chlorogenic acids, and 2 stereoisomers of quinic acids, were identified with the NMR spectra of RCBE. On the basis of the signal assignment, state analyses were further launched for the metal ion-citrate complexes and caffeine-chlorogenate complexes. On the basis of the signal integration, the coffee components were successfully quantified. This NMR methodology yielded detailed information on RCBE using only a single observation and provides a systemic approach for the analysis of other complex mixtures.

  8. Nuclear magnetic resonance study of the magnetism in the two dimensional frustrated quantum Heisenberg antiferromagnet carbon disulfide copper(II) chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vachon, Marc-Andre

    The experimental realization of a two dimensional quantum spin liquid has been eagerly sought since first proposed by Anderson in 1973. Recently, Cs2CuCl4, a frustrated 2D quantum antiferromagnet (QAF), has shown potential in this regard triggering immense interest, both experimentally and theoretically. Amongst these studies, different scenarios on the nature of the spin liquid phase were proposed and the presence of "exotic" magnetic phases in the ground state was noticed. To this date, many of these phases are still obscured and the nature of the spin liquid state remains unsettled. To investigate the above, we present 133Cs Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) measurements on Cs2CuCl4 at temperature down to 50mK and applied magnetic field up to 15 T. We first demonstrate that Cs NMR is an effective probe of the magnetism in the compound through experiments in the paramagnetic phase. Lower temperature NMR measurements as a function of the strength and orientation of the applied magnetic field provide the most complete picture of the different phases stabilized in Cs2CuCl 4. The magnetic character of these phases is discussed in the context of the interplay between quantum fluctuations, frustration and the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya (DM) interaction. Furthermore, we find evidence of three new phase transitions, as well as an unexpected angular dependence of the saturation field. These findings suggest that the accepted Hamiltonian requires modifications, such as additional DM interactions. In order to probe the nature of the spin-liquid state, local magnetization and spin-lattice relaxation rate measurements were performed. A comparison with the result of a variational calculation using Gutzwiller-projected mean-field theory demonstrates the 2D magnetic behavior of the local magnetization. In addition, both temperature and magnetic field dependence of the spin-lattice relaxation rate suggests that the relevant low energy quasiparticle excitations obey fermionic statistics.

  9. Nuclear-magnetic-resonance relaxation due to the translational diffusion of fluid confined to quasi-two-dimensional pores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faux, D. A.; McDonald, P. J.; Howlett, N. C.

    2017-03-01

    Nuclear-magnetic-resonance (NMR) relaxation experimentation is an effective technique for nondestructively probing the dynamics of proton-bearing fluids in porous media. The frequency-dependent relaxation rate T1-1 can yield a wealth of information on the fluid dynamics within the pore provided data can be fit to a suitable spin diffusion model. A spin diffusion model yields the dipolar correlation function G (t ) describing the relative translational motion of pairs of 1H spins which then can be Fourier transformed to yield T1-1. G (t ) for spins confined to a quasi-two-dimensional (Q2D) pore of thickness h is determined using theoretical and Monte Carlo techniques. G (t ) shows a transition from three- to two-dimensional motion with the transition time proportional to h2. T1-1 is found to be independent of frequency over the range 0.01-100 MHz provided h ≳5 nm and increases with decreasing frequency and decreasing h for pores of thickness h <3 nm. T1-1 increases linearly with the bulk water diffusion correlation time τb allowing a simple and direct estimate of the bulk water diffusion coefficient from the high-frequency limit of T1-1 dispersion measurements in systems where the influence of paramagnetic impurities is negligible. Monte Carlo simulations of hydrated Q2D pores are executed for a range of surface-to-bulk desorption rates for a thin pore. G (t ) is found to decorrelate when spins move from the surface to the bulk, display three-dimensional properties at intermediate times, and finally show a bulk-mediated surface diffusion (Lévy) mechanism at longer times. The results may be used to interpret NMR relaxation rates in hydrated porous systems in which the paramagnetic impurity density is negligible.

  10. Shiftless nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chin H; Opella, Stanley J

    2008-02-07

    The acquisition and analysis of high resolution one- and two-dimensional solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra without chemical shift frequencies are described. Many variations of shiftless NMR spectroscopy are feasible. A two-dimensional experiment that correlates the dipole-dipole and dipole-dipole couplings in the model peptide , (15)N labeled N-acetyl-leucine is demonstrated. In addition to the resolution of resonances from individual sites in a single crystal sample, the bond lengths and angles are characterized by the two-dimensional powder pattern obtained from a polycrystalline sample.

  11. Application of 1-Dimensional and 2-Dimensional Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy to the Characterization of Morphine, Morphine Hydrochloride, and Their Hydrates.

    PubMed

    Romañuk, Carolina B; Garro-Linck, Yamila; Alves de Santana, M Silmara; Manzo, Ruben H; Ayala, Alejandro P; Monti, Gustavo A; Chattah, Ana K; Olivera, Maria E

    2017-10-01

    The detailed knowledge of the solid forms of a drug is a key element in pharmaceutical development. Morphine (MOR) is an opiate alkaloid widely used to treat severe acute and chronic pain. Much of the available information on its solid state dates from several decades ago. In order to obtain updated and reliable information, 1-dimensional (1D) and 2-dimensional solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy were used and complemented with powder X-ray diffraction, FTIR, and Raman spectroscopy and thermal analysis. (13)C cross-polarization with magic angle spinning 1D spectra accomplish a complete identification of the related forms of MOR. Remarkably, (1)H-(13)C heteronuclear correlation spectra together with FTIR results gave clear evidence that neither MOR nor its hydrate crystallizes as a zwitterion. Our results indicate that the hydrogen bonds in the anhydrate forms have a different nature or strength than in their respective hydrates. The unique information obtained would be useful for the characterization of MOR as a bulk drug, dosage forms, and future developments. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Tunnel-diode resonator and nuclear magnetic resonance studies of low-dimensional magnetic and superconducting systems

    SciTech Connect

    Yeninas, Steven Lee

    2013-01-01

    This thesis emphasizes two frequency-domain techniques which uniquely employ radio frequency (RF) excitations to investigate the static and dynamic properties of novel magnetic and superconducting materials.

  13. Monitoring water transport between pores and voids in aerated gypsum using two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance exchange measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Kyung-Min; Mitchell, Jonathan; Jaffel, Hamouda; Gladden, Lynn F.

    2012-03-01

    We investigate the connectivity between aeration voids (radius 200-300 µm) and pores (radius 20 µm) in aerated gypsum plaster using two-dimensional (2D) nuclear magnetic resonance T2-T2 relaxation time exchange experiments. These measurements provide an estimate of diffusive exchange rates for water molecules moving between environments differentiated by relaxation time. Aerated gypsum is a lightweight material manufactured by the inclusion of voids to reduce the bulk density. Such materials exhibit a multi-modal distribution of pore and void sizes and are associated with novel water imbibition processes. Here, we use T2-T2 exchange experiments to characterize the extent of fluid communication between the voids and pores to better understand the structure-transport relationships in these systems. In turn, this will aid the design of gypsum plasters with improved physical and mechanical properties. Utilizing an analytical model based on diffusion-driven exchange, we extract exchange times and hence diffusive length-scales, which are equivalent to the pore diameter. Overall, we conclude that the voids and pores are well connected. This confirms our previous hypothesis that water uptake occurs via capillary-driven imbibition through a continuum of voids and pores in aerated gypsum.

  14. Nuclear magnetic resonance gyroscope

    SciTech Connect

    Grover, B.C.

    1984-02-07

    A nuclear magnetic resonance gyro using two nuclear magnetic resonance gases, preferably xenon 129 and xenon 131, together with two alkaline metal vapors, preferably rubidium, potassium or cesium, one of the two alkaline metal vapors being pumped by light which has the wavelength of that alkaline metal vapor, and the other alkaline vapor being illuminated by light which has the wavelength of that other alkaline vapor.

  15. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulatowicz, Michael; Griffith, Robert; Larsen, Michael

    2014-03-01

    The navigation grade micro Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope (micro-NMRG) being developed by the Northrop Grumman Corporation (NGC) has concluded the fourth and final phase of the DARPA Navigation Grade Integrated Micro Gyro (NGIMG) program. Traditional MEMS gyros utilize springs as an inherent part of the sensing mechanism, leading to bias and scale factor sensitivity to acceleration and vibration. As a result, they have not met performance expectations in real world environments and to date have been limited to tactical grade applications. The Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope (NMRG) utilizes the fixed precession rate of a nuclear spin in a constant magnetic field as an inertial reference for determining rotation. The nuclear spin precession rate sensitivity to acceleration and vibration is negligible for most applications. Therefore, the application of new micro and batch fabrication methods to NMRG technology holds great promise for navigation grade performance in a low cost and compact gyro. This poster will describe the history, operational principles, design, and demonstrated performance of the NMRG including an overview of the NGC designs developed and demonstrated in the DARPA gyro development program.

  16. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulatowicz, Michael; Clark, Philip; Griffith, Robert; Larsen, Michael; Mirijanian, James

    2012-06-01

    The navigation grade micro Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope (micro-NMRG) being developed by the Northrop Grumman Corporation is concluding the fourth and final phase of the DARPA Navigation Grade Integrated Micro Gyro (NGIMG) program. Traditional MEMS gyros utilize springs as an inherent part of the sensing mechanism, leading to bias and scale factor sensitivity to acceleration and vibration. As a result, they have not met performance expectations in real world environments and to date have been limited to tactical grade applications. The Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope (NMRG) utilizes the fixed precession rate of a nuclear spin in a constant magnetic field as an inertial reference for determining rotation. The nuclear spin precession rate sensitivity to acceleration and vibration is negligible for most applications. Therefore, the application of new micro and batch fabrication methods to NMRG technology holds great promise for navigation grade performance in a low cost and compact gyro. This poster will describe the history, operational principles, and design basics of the NMRG including an overview of the NSD designs developed and demonstrated in the DARPA gyro development program. General performance results from phases 3 and 4 will also be presented.

  17. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Michael; Griffith, Robert; Bulatowicz, Michael

    2014-03-01

    The navigation grade micro Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope (micro-NMRG) being developed by the Northrop Grumman Corporation (NGC) has concluded the fourth and final phase of the DARPA Navigation Grade Integrated Micro Gyro (NGIMG) program. Traditional MEMS gyros utilize springs as an inherent part of the sensing mechanism, leading to bias and scale factor sensitivity to acceleration and vibration. As a result, they have not met performance expectations in real world environments and to date have been limited to tactical grade applications. The Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope (NMRG) utilizes the fixed precession rate of a nuclear spin in a constant magnetic field as an inertial reference for determining rotation. The nuclear spin precession rate sensitivity to acceleration and vibration is negligible for most applications. Therefore, the application of new micro and batch fabrication methods to NMRG technology holds great promise for navigation grade performance in a low cost and compact gyro. This presentation will describe the operational principles, design basics, and demonstrated performance of the NMRG including an overview of the NGC designs developed and demonstrated in the DARPA gyro development program.

  18. Amide proton exchange in the. cap alpha. -amylase polypeptide inhibitor tendamistat studied by two-dimensional /sup 1/H nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, O.; Kline, A.D.; Wuethrich, K.

    1987-10-06

    The individual amide proton exchange rates in Tendamistat at pH 3.0 and 50/sup 0/C were measured by using two-dimensional ..cap alpha..H nuclear magnetic resonance. Overall, it was found that the distribution of exchange rates along the sequence is dominated by the interstrand hydrogen bonds of the ..beta..-sheet structures. The slowly exchanging protons in the core of the two ..beta..-sheets were shown to exchange via an EX2 mechanism. Further analysis of the data indicates that different large-scale structure fluctuations are responsible for the exchange from the two ..beta..-sheets, even though the three-dimensional structure of Tendamistat appears to consist of a single structural domain.

  19. Three-dimensional structure of porcine C5a sub desArg from sup 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance data

    SciTech Connect

    Williamson, M.P. ); Madison, V.C. )

    1990-03-27

    Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of porcine C5a{sub desArg} (73 residues) have been used to construct a list of 34 hydrogen bonds, 27 dihedral angle constraints, and 151 distance constraints, derived from nuclear Overhauser effect data. These constraints were used in restrained molecular dynamics calculations on residues 1-65 of C5a, starting from a folded structure modeled on the crystal structure of a homologous protein, C3a. Forty-one structures have been calculated, which fall into three similar families with few violations of the imposed constraints. Structures in the most populated family have a root-mean-square deviation from the average structure of 1.02 {angstrom} for the C{sup {alpha}} atoms, with good definition of the internal residues. There is good agreement between the calculated structures and other nuclear magnetic resonance data. The structure is very similar to that recently reported for human C5a. Some biological implications of these structures are discussed.

  20. Nuclear magnetic resonance blood flowmeter

    SciTech Connect

    Battocletti, J.H.; Halbach, R.E.; Antonich, F.J.; Sances, A. Jr.; Knox, T.A.

    1986-09-23

    An improved nuclear magnetic resonance blood flowmeter is described for non-invasively measuring blood flow in a human limb comprising; polarizing magnet means for generating a substantially uniform magnetic field; a limb receiving lumen for supporting a human limb within the field generated by the polarizing magnet means so that blood molecules within the limb are magnetically polarized thereby; transmitter means located adjacent the lumen for inducing a nuclear magnetic resonance response in the blood molecules of the human limb disposed within the lumen; scanning means including: first means for generating a first pair of opposing magnetic fields within the lumen for cancelling the nuclear magnetic resonance response induced by the transmitter means everywhere except within a first null plane along which the first opposing magnetic fields cancel each other; second means for generating a second pair of opposing magnetic fields; and control means coupled to the first and second means for generating the first and second pair of opposing magnetic fields.

  1. Structural studies on Desulfovibrio gigas cytochrome c3 by two-dimensional 1H-nuclear-magnetic-resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Piçarra-Pereira, M A; Turner, D L; LeGall, J; Xavier, A V

    1993-09-15

    Several aromatic amino acid residues and haem resonances in the fully reduced form of Desulfovibrio gigas cytochrome c3 are assigned, using two-dimensional 1H n.m.r., on the basis of the interactions between the protons of the aromatic amino acids and the haem protons as well as the intrahaem distances known from the X-ray structure [Kissinger (1989) Ph.D. Thesis, Washington State University]. The interhaem interactions observed in the n.m.r. spectra are in full agreement with the D. gigas X-ray structure and also with the n.m.r. data from Desulfovibrio vulgaris (Hildenborough) [Turner, Salgueiro, LeGall and Xavier (1992) Eur. J. Biochem. 210, 931-936]. The good correlation between the calculated ring-current shifts and the observed chemical shifts strongly supports the present assignments. Observation of the two-dimensional nuclear-Overhauser-enhancement spectra of the protein in the reduced, intermediate and fully oxidized stages led to the ordering of the haems in terms of their midpoint redox potentials and their identification in the X-ray structure. The first haem to oxidize is haem I, followed by haems II, III and IV, numbered according to the Cys ligand positions in the amino acid sequences [Mathews (1985) Prog. Biophys. Mol. Biol. 54, 1-56]. Although the haem core architecture is the same for the different Desulfovibrio cytochromes c3, the order of redox potentials is different.

  2. Structural studies on Desulfovibrio gigas cytochrome c3 by two-dimensional 1H-nuclear-magnetic-resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Piçarra-Pereira, M A; Turner, D L; LeGall, J; Xavier, A V

    1993-01-01

    Several aromatic amino acid residues and haem resonances in the fully reduced form of Desulfovibrio gigas cytochrome c3 are assigned, using two-dimensional 1H n.m.r., on the basis of the interactions between the protons of the aromatic amino acids and the haem protons as well as the intrahaem distances known from the X-ray structure [Kissinger (1989) Ph.D. Thesis, Washington State University]. The interhaem interactions observed in the n.m.r. spectra are in full agreement with the D. gigas X-ray structure and also with the n.m.r. data from Desulfovibrio vulgaris (Hildenborough) [Turner, Salgueiro, LeGall and Xavier (1992) Eur. J. Biochem. 210, 931-936]. The good correlation between the calculated ring-current shifts and the observed chemical shifts strongly supports the present assignments. Observation of the two-dimensional nuclear-Overhauser-enhancement spectra of the protein in the reduced, intermediate and fully oxidized stages led to the ordering of the haems in terms of their midpoint redox potentials and their identification in the X-ray structure. The first haem to oxidize is haem I, followed by haems II, III and IV, numbered according to the Cys ligand positions in the amino acid sequences [Mathews (1985) Prog. Biophys. Mol. Biol. 54, 1-56]. Although the haem core architecture is the same for the different Desulfovibrio cytochromes c3, the order of redox potentials is different. PMID:8397514

  3. nuclear magnetic resonance gyroscope

    SciTech Connect

    Karwacki, F. A.; Griffin, J.

    1985-04-02

    A nuclear magnetic resonance gyroscope which derives angular rotation thereof from the phases of precessing nuclear moments utilizes a single-resonance cell situated in the center of a uniform DC magnetic field. The field is generated by current flow through a circular array of coils between parallel plates. It also utilizes a pump and read-out beam and associated electronics for signal processing and control. Encapsulated in the cell for sensing rotation are odd isotopes of Mercury Hg/sup 199/ and Hg/sup 201/. Unpolarized intensity modulated light from a pump lamp is directed by lenses to a linear polarizer, quarter wave plate combination producing circularly polarized light. The circularly polarized light is reflected by a mirror to the cell transverse to the field for optical pumping of the isotopes. Unpolarized light from a readout lamp is directed by lenses to another linear polarizer. The linearly polarized light is reflected by another mirror to the cell transverse to the field and orthogonal to the pump lamp light. The linear light after transversing the cell strikes an analyzer where it is converted to an intensity-modulated light. The modulated light is detected by a photodiode processed and utilized as feedback to control the field and pump lamp excitation and readout of angular displacement.

  4. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Michael; Bulatowicz, Michael; Clark, Philip; Griffith, Robert; Mirijanian, James; Pavell, James

    2015-05-01

    The Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope (NMRG) is being developed by the Northrop Grumman Corporation (NGC). Cold and hot atom interferometer based gyroscopes have suffered from Size, Weight, and Power (SWaP) challenges and limits in bandwidth, scale factor stability, dead time, high rotation rate, vibration, and acceleration. NMRG utilizes the fixed precession rate of a nuclear spin in a constant magnetic field as a reference for determining rotation, providing continuous measurement, high bandwidth, stable scale factor, high rotation rate measurement, and low sensitivity to vibration and acceleration in a low SWaP package. The sensitivity to vibration has been partially tested and demonstrates no measured sensitivity within error bars. Real time closed loop implementation of the sensor significantly decreases environmental and systematic sensitivities and supports a compact and low power digital signal processing and control system. Therefore, the NMRG technology holds great promise for navigation grade performance in a low cost SWaP package. The poster will describe the history, operation, and design of the NMRG. General performance results will also be presented along with recent vibration test results.

  5. Conformational studies of d-(AAAAATTTTT) sub 2 using constraints from nuclear Overhauser effects and from quantitative analysis of the cross-peak fine structures in two-dimensional H nuclear magnetic resonance spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Celda, B.; Widmer, H.; Leupin, W.; Chazin, W.J.; Denny, W.A.; Wuethrich, K. )

    1989-02-21

    The conformation at the dA-dT junction in k-(AAAAATTTTT){sub 2} was investigated by using a variety of phase-sensitive two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance experiments at 500 MHz for detailed studies of the deoxyribose ring puckers. Conformational constraints were collected from two-dimensional nuclear Overhauser enhancement spectra recorded with short mixing times and from quantitative simulations of the cross-peaks in two-dimensional correlated spectra. Overall, the decamer duplex adopts a conformation of the B-DNA type, and for dA{sub 4} and dA{sub 5} the pseudorotation phase angle P is in the standard range 150-180{degree}. The deoxyribose puckers for the other nucleotides deviate significantly from the standard B-DNA structure. Spectrum simulations assuming either static deviations from standard B-DNA or a simple two-state dynamic equilibrium between the C2'-endo and C3'-endo forms of the deoxyribose were used to analyze the experimental data. In agreement with recent papers on related duplexes containing (dA){sub n} tracts, the authors observed prominent nuclear Overhauser effects between adenine-2H and deoxyribose-1'H, which could be largely due to pronounced propeller twisting as observed in the crystal structures of (dA){sub n}-containing compounds.

  6. Three dimensional structure prediction and proton nuclear magnetic resonance analysis of toxic pesticides in human blood plasma.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Amit Kumar; Tiwari, Rajeev Kumar; Gaur, Mulayam Singh

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) assignments of hydrolyzed products extracted from human blood plasma. The correlations between chemical, functional and structural properties of highly toxic pesticides were investigated using the PreADME analysis. We observed that toxic pesticides possessed higher molecular weight and, more hydrogen bond donors and acceptors when compared with less toxic pesticides. The occurrence of functional groups and structural properties was analyzed using (1)H-NMR. The (1)H-NMR spectra of the phosphomethoxy class of pesticides were characterized by methyl resonances at 3.7-3.9 ppm (δ) with the coupling constants of 11-16 Hz (JP-CH3 ). In phosphoethoxy pesticides, the methyl resonance was about 1.4 ppm (δ) with the coupling constant of 10 Hz (JP-CH2 ) and the methylene resonances was 4.2-4.4 ppm (δ) with the coupling constant of 0.8 Hz (JP-CH3 ), respectively. Our study shows that the values of four parameters such as chemical shift, coupling constant, integration and relaxation time correlated with the concentration of toxic pesticides, and can be used to characterise the proton groups in the molecular structures of toxic pesticides.

  7. Two-dimensional longitudinal and transverse relaxation time correlation as a low-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance characterization of ancient ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casieri, Cinzia; Terenzi, Camilla; De Luca, Francesco

    2009-02-01

    Longitudinal and transverse relaxation time correlation (T1-T2) is employed as a nuclear magnetic resonance noninvasive characterization tool for archeological ceramics. This paper is aimed at investigating whether the most relevant firing-induced changes in ceramics, including those involving pore space properties and paramagnetic mineral structures, could be used as markers of the firing process and therefore of ceramics themselves. Ancient ceramics are made up of naturally available clays, often rich in iron impurities, which undergo relevant modifications of pore distribution upon firing. The firing process also assists chemical and physical rearrangement of iron-bearing species, yielding mineral structures with different magnetic properties. That being so, T1-T2 maps are expected to show the interdependence between ceramic structure and firing technology. T1 and T2 distributions are basically proportional to pore-size distribution, but T2, which is also sensitive to magnetic susceptibility effects, may give information on the porous matrix composition as well. Such a methodology has first been employed on laboratory-prepared ceramic samples, with different paramagnetic compositions and controlled firing temperatures, in order to tackle the problem of model-ceramic selection. Then, the T1-T2 correlation approach has been used on medieval ceramic findings in order to get information about their thermal and compositional history. The information obtained by means of two-dimensional correlation maps proves coherent with archeological dating, thus illustrating the capabilities of this method.

  8. Development of a three-dimensional cell culture system based on microfluidics for nuclear magnetic resonance and optical monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Esteve, Vicent; Monge, Rosa; Celda, Bernardo

    2014-01-01

    A new microfluidic cell culture device compatible with real-time nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is presented here. The intended application is the long-term monitoring of 3D cell cultures by several techniques. The system has been designed to fit inside commercially available NMR equipment to obtain maximum readout resolution when working with small samples. Moreover, the microfluidic device integrates a fibre-optic-based sensor to monitor parameters such as oxygen, pH, or temperature during NMR monitoring, and it also allows the use of optical microscopy techniques such as confocal fluorescence microscopy. This manuscript reports the initial trials culturing neurospheres inside the microchamber of this device and the preliminary images and spatially localised spectra obtained by NMR. The images show the presence of a necrotic area in the interior of the neurospheres, as is frequently observed in histological preparations; this phenomenon appears whenever the distance between the cells and fresh nutrients impairs the diffusion of oxygen. Moreover, the spectra acquired in a volume of 8 nl inside the neurosphere show an accumulation of lactate and lipids, which are indicative of anoxic conditions. Additionally, a basis for general temperature control and monitoring and a graphical control software have been developed and are also described. The complete platform will allow biomedical assays of therapeutic agents to be performed in the early phases of therapeutic development. Thus, small quantities of drugs or advanced nanodevices may be studied long-term under simulated living conditions that mimic the flow and distribution of nutrients. PMID:25553182

  9. Introduction to nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Mlynárik, Vladimír

    2016-05-19

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is a useful tool for studying normal and pathological biochemical processes in tissues. In this review, the principles of nuclear magnetic resonance and methods of obtaining nuclear magnetic resonance spectra are briefly outlined. The origin of the most important spectroscopic parameters-chemical shifts, coupling constants, longitudinal and transverse relaxation times, and spectroscopic line intensities-is explained, and the role of these parameters in interpretation of spectra is addressed. Basic methodological concepts of localized spectroscopy and spectroscopic imaging for the study of tissue metabolism in vivo are also described.

  10. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuhs, Bradley L.; Simsek, Senay

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a powerful analytical technique with a wide variety of applications. It may be used for complex structural studies, for protocol or process development, or as a simple quality assay for which structural information is important. It is nondestructive, and high-quality data may be obtained from milligram, even microgram, quantities of sample. Whereas other spectroscopy techniques may be used to determine the nature of the functional groups present in a sample, only NMR spectroscopy can provide the data necessary to determine the complete structure of a molecule. The applicability of NMR to food analysis has increased over the last three decades. In addition to improved instrumentation and much lower costs, very complex and specialized NMR techniques can now be routinely performed by a student or technician. These experiments can be set up with the click of a button/icon, as all the basic parameters are embedded into default experiment files listed in the data/work station software, and the results are obtained in a short time.

  11. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Study on Low-Dimensional Antiferromagnetic Oxides: VOMoO4 and (V0.56Mo0.44)2O5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takata, Shohei; Wada, Shinji; Shiozaki, Ikuyo

    2001-04-01

    We have carried out the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) of 51V in VOMoO4, which contains linear chains of distorted VO6 octahedra. The temperature dependence of the resonance shift K shows a small extremum around 100 K, that can reasonably be compared with the Bonner-Fisher-type behavior of the susceptibility χ. 51V relaxation rate T1-1, on the other hand, has a complex temperature dependence: an exponential decrease down to ˜100 K, a near plateau between ˜100 and ˜34 K, and a monotonous decrease below ˜34 K. These are interpreted in terms of thermal-excitations between split t2g orbitals in energy (ΔE˜680 K) due to the local distortion of VO6 octahedra at high temperatures, one-dimensional d-spin fluctuations, and a short-range magnetic ordering at low temperatures, respectively. It is noted that the change in the a-axis length must be taken into consideration to adequately describe the broad maximum observed in both K and χ around 100 K. The 51V NMR in the related oxide (V0.56Mo0.44)2O5 was also carried out, in which the VO6 and MoO6 octahedra form a planer network sharing the corner oxygen atoms.

  12. Probing the molecular architecture of Arabidopsis thaliana secondary cell walls using two- and three-dimensional (13)C solid state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Dupree, Ray; Simmons, Thomas J; Mortimer, Jennifer C; Patel, Dharmesh; Iuga, Dinu; Brown, Steven P; Dupree, Paul

    2015-04-14

    The plant secondary cell wall is a thickened polysaccharide and phenolic structure, providing mechanical strength to cells, particularly in woody tissues. It is the main feedstock for the developing bioenergy and green chemistry industries. Despite the role that molecular architecture (the arrangement of biopolymers relative to each other, and their conformations) plays in dictating biomass properties, such as recalcitrance to breakdown, it is poorly understood. Here, unprocessed dry (13)C-labeled stems from the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana were analyzed by a variety of (13)C solid state magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance methods, such as one-dimensional cross-polarization and direct polarization, two-dimensional refocused INADEQUATE, RFDR, PDSD, and three-dimensional DARR, demonstrating their viability for the study of native polymer arrangements in intact secondary cell walls. All carbon sites of the two main glucose environments in cellulose (previously assigned to microfibril surface and interior residues) are clearly resolved, as are carbon sites of the other major components of the secondary cell wall: xylan and lignin. The xylan carbon 4 chemical shift is markedly different from that reported previously for solution or primary cell wall xylan, indicating significant changes in the helical conformation in these dried stems. Furthermore, the shift span indicates that xylan adopts a wide range of conformations in this material, with very little in the 31 conformation typical of xylan in solution. Additionally, spatial connections of noncarbohydrate species were observed with both cellulose peaks conventionally assigned as "surface" and as "interior" cellulose environments, raising questions about the origin of these two cellulose signals.

  13. One- and two-dimensional chemical exchange nuclear magnetic resonance studies of the creatine kinase catalyzed reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Gober, J.R.

    1988-01-01

    The equilibrium chemical exchange dynamics of the creatine kinase enzyme system were studied by one- and two-dimensional {sup 31}P NMR techniques. Pseudo-first-order reaction rate constants were measured by the saturation transfer method under an array of experimental conditions of pH and temperature. Quantitative one-dimensional spectra were collected under the same conditions in order to calculate the forward and reverse reaction rates, the K{sub eq}, the hydrogen ion stoichiometry, and the standard thermodynamic functions. The pure absorption mode in four quadrant two-dimensional chemical exchange experiment was employed so that the complete kinetic matrix showing all of the chemical exchange process could be realized.

  14. GHz nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Cross, T.A.; Drobny, G.; Trewhella, J.

    1994-12-01

    For the past dozen years, 500- and 600-MHz spectrometers have become available in many laboratories. The first 600-MHz NMR spectrometer (at Carnegie Mellon University) was commissioned more than 15 years ago and, until 1994, represented the highest field available for high-resolution NMR. This year, we have witnessed unprecedented progress in the development of very high field magnets for NMR spectroscopy, including the delivery of the first commercial 750-MHz NMR spectrometers. In addition, NMR signals have been obtained from 20-Tesla magnets (850 MHz for {sup 1}H`s) at both Los Alamos National Laboratory and Florida State University in the NHMFL (National High Magnetic Field Laboratory). These preliminary experiments have been performed in magnets with 100-ppm homogeneity, but a 20-Tesla magnet developed for the NHMFL will be brought to field this year with a projected homogeneity of 0.1 ppm over a 1-cm-diam spherical volume.

  15. Three-dimensional structure of the neurotoxin ATX Ia from Anemonia sulcata in aqueous solution determined by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Widmer, H; Billeter, M; Wüthrich, K

    1989-01-01

    With the aid of 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, the three-dimensional structure in aqueous solution was determined for ATX Ia, which is a 46 residue polypeptide neurotoxin of the sea anemone Anemonia sulcata. The input for the structure calculations consisted of 263 distance constraints from nuclear Overhauser effects (NOE) and 76 vicinal coupling constants. For the structure calculation several new or ammended programs were used in a revised strategy consisting of five successive computational steps. First, the program HABAS was used for a complete search of all backbone and chi 1 conformations that are compatible with the intraresidual and sequential NMR constraints. Second, using the program DISMAN, we extended this approach to pentapeptides by extensive sampling of all conformations that are consistent with the local and medium-range NMR constraints. Both steps resulted in the definition of additional dihedral angle constraints and in stereospecific assignments for a number of beta-methylene groups. In the next two steps DISMAN was used to obtain a group of eight conformers that contain no significant residual violations of the NMR constraints or van der Waals contacts. Finally, these structures were subjected to restrained energy refinement with a modified version of the molecular mechanics module of AMBER, which in addition to the energy force field includes potentials for the NOE distance constraints and the dihedral angle constraints. The average of the pairwise minimal RMS distances between the resulting refined conformers calculated for the well defined molecular core, which contains the backbone atoms of 35 residues and 20 interior side chains, is 1.5 +/- 0.3 A. This core is formed by a four-stranded beta-sheet connected by two well-defined loops, and there is an additional flexible loop consisting of the eleven residues 8-18. The core of the protein is stabilized by three disulfide bridges, which are surrounded by hydrophobic residues

  16. Nuclear magnetic resonance scanners

    SciTech Connect

    Danby, G.T.; Hsieh, H.C.H.; Jackson, J.W.; Damadian, R.V.

    1988-08-23

    This patent describes a medical NMR scanner comprising a primary field magnet assembly including: (a) a ferromagnetic frame defining a patient-receiving space adapted to receive a human body, the frame having a pair of opposed polar regions aligned on a polar axis and disposed on opposite sides of the patient-receiving space, and the frame including a substantially continuous ferro-magnetic flux return path extending between the polar regions remote from the patient-receiving space; (b) flux-generating means including superconductive windings and cryostat means for maintaining the windings at superconducting temperatures; and (c) support means for maintaining the windings in proximity to the frame so that when a current passes through the windings magnetic flux emanating from the windings produces a magnetic field within the patient-receiving space and at least a portion of the flux passes into the patient-receiving space by way of the polar regions.

  17. Magnetism in low dimensionality.

    SciTech Connect

    Bader, S. D.; Materials Science Division

    2002-03-10

    The collective creativity of those working in the field of surface magnetism has stimulated an impressive range of advances. Once wary, theorists are now eager to enter the field. The present article attempts to take a snapshot of where the field has been, with an eye to the more speculative issue of where it is going. Selective examples are used to highlight three general areas of interest (1) characterization techniques, (2) materials properties, and (3) theoretical/simulational advances. Emerging directions are identified and discussed, including laterally confined nanomagnetism and spintronics.

  18. Theory of nuclear magnetic relaxation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcconnell, J.

    1983-01-01

    A theory of nuclear magnetic interaction is based on the study of the stochastic rotation operator. The theory is applied explicitly to relaxation by anisotropic chemical shift and to spin-rotational interactions. It is applicable also to dipole-dipole and quadrupole interactions.

  19. Low dimensional magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjall, Jonas Alexander

    With the rapid development of experimental techniques for ultracold gases in optical traps a new approach to investigate magnetic properties that are hard achieve or control in the solid state has emerged. We first study the ground-state phase diagram of a spin-1 condensate trapped in an optical trap when the magnetic dipole interaction between the atoms is taken into account along with confinement and spin precession. The boundaries between the regions of ferromagnetic and polar phases move as the dipole strength is varied and the ferromagnetic phases can be modulated. The magnetization of the ferromagnetic phase perpendicular to the field becomes modulated as a helix winding around the magnetic field direction, with a wavelength inversely proportional to the dipole strength. This modulation should be observable for current experimental parameters in 87Rb. Hence the much-sought supersolid state, with broken continuous translation invariance in one direction and broken global U(1) invariance, occurs generically as a metastable state in this system as a result of dipole interaction. The ferromagnetic state parallel to the applied magnetic field becomes striped in a finite system at strong dipolar coupling. The development of artificial gauge fields, that can mimic magnetic fields, in ultracold gases suggests that atomic realization of fractional quantum Hall physics will become experimentally practical in the near future. While it is known that bosons on lattices can support quantum Hall states, the universal edge excitations that provide the most likely experimental probe of the topological order have not been obtained. We find that the edge excitations of an interacting boson lattice model are surprisingly sensitive to interedge hybridization and edge-bulk mixing for some confining potentials. With properly chosen potentials and fluxes, the edge spectrum is surprisingly clear even for small systems with strong lattice effects such as bandwidth. Various fractional

  20. Direct Analysis of Free and Sulfite-Bound Carbonyl Compounds in Wine by Two-Dimensional Quantitative Proton and Carbon Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nikolantonaki, Maria; Magiatis, Prokopios; Waterhouse, Andrew L

    2015-11-03

    Recent developments that have accelerated 2D NMR methods and improved quantitation have made these methods accessible analytical procedures, and the large signal dispersion allows for the analysis of complex samples. Few natural samples are as complex as wine, so the application to challenges in wine analysis look promising. The analysis of carbonyl compounds in wine, key oxidation products, is complicated by a multitude of kinetically reversible adducts, such as acetals and sulfonates, so that sample preparation steps can generate complex interferences. These challenges could be overcome if the compounds could be quantified in situ. Here, two-dimensional ((1)H-(1)H) homonuclear and heteronuclear ((13)C-(1)H) single quantum correlations (correlation spectroscopy, COSY, and heteronuclear single quantum coherence, HSQC) nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of undiluted wine samples were observed at natural abundance. These techniques achieve simultaneous direct identification and quantitation of acetaldehyde, pyruvic acid, acetoin, methylglyoxal, and α-ketoglutaric acid in wine with only a small addition of D2O. It was also possible to observe and sometimes quantify the sulfite, hydrate, and acetal forms of the carbonyl compounds. The accuracy of the method was tested in wine samples by spiking with a mixture of all analytes at different concentrations. The method was applied to 15 wine samples of various vintages and grape varieties. The application of this method could provide a powerful tool to better understand the development, evolution, and perception of wine oxidation and insight into the impact of these sulfite bound carbonyls on antimicrobial and antioxidant action by SO2.

  1. Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Characterization of Voltage-Dependent Anion Channel Gating in Two-Dimensional Lipid Crystalline Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The N-terminus of the voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC) has been proposed to contain the mechanistically important gating helices that modulate channel opening and closing. In this study, we utilize magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR) to determine the location and structure of the N-terminus for functional channels in lipid bilayers by measuring long-range 13C–13C distances between residues in the N-terminus and other domains of VDAC reconstituted into DMPC lipid bilayers. Our structural studies show that the distance between A14 Cβ in the N-terminal helix and S193 Cβ is ∼4–6 Å. Furthermore, VDAC phosphorylation by a mitochondrial kinase at residue S193 has been claimed to delay mitochondrial cell death by causing a conformational change that closes the channel, and a VDAC-Ser193Glu mutant has been reported to show properties very similar to those of phosphorylated VDAC in a cellular context. We expressed VDAC-S193E and reconstituted it into DMPC lipid bilayers. Two-dimensional 13C–13C correlation experiments showed chemical shift perturbations for residues located in the N-terminus, indicating possible structural perturbations to that region. However, electrophysiological data recorded on VDAC-S193E showed that channel characteristics were identical to those of wild type samples, indicating that phosphorylation of S193 does not directly affect channel gating. The combination of NMR and electrophysiological results allows us to discuss the validity of proposed gating models. PMID:25545271

  2. Simplification of DNA proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectra by homonuclear Hartmann-Hahn edited two-dimensional nuclear overhauser enhancement spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Sklenar, V.; Feigon, J. )

    1990-07-04

    Two-dimensional {sup 1}H NMR spectra of DNA fragments in solution supply a wealth of structural information. The first step in establishing the molecular structure using NMR spectroscopy is the assignment of protons to a particular nucleotide residue. Sequential assignment procedures using a combination of NOESY and COSY have been developed which allow straightforward assignment of the base and most of the sugar protons in short DNA oligonucleotides which adopt a right-handed A- or B-DNA type structure. In order to simplify the NOESY spectra of DNA oligonucleotides for assignment purposes, the authors present an experiment that enables one to selectively trace the NOE connectivities of cytidine H6 resonances. This approach substantially simplifies the analysis of a 2D NOE spectrum in the base to sugar proton regions and allows straightforward identification of corresponding resonances.

  3. Three dimensional magnetic abacus memory

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, ShiLei; Zhang, JingYan; Baker, Alexander A.; Wang, ShouGuo; Yu, GuangHua; Hesjedal, Thorsten

    2014-01-01

    Stacking nonvolatile memory cells into a three-dimensional matrix represents a powerful solution for the future of magnetic memory. However, it is technologically challenging to access the data in the storage medium if large numbers of bits are stacked on top of each other. Here we introduce a new type of multilevel, nonvolatile magnetic memory concept, the magnetic abacus. Instead of storing information in individual magnetic layers, thereby having to read out each magnetic layer separately, the magnetic abacus adopts a new encoding scheme. It is inspired by the idea of second quantisation, dealing with the memory state of the entire stack simultaneously. Direct read operations are implemented by measuring the artificially engineered ‘quantised' Hall voltage, each representing a count of the spin-up and spin-down layers in the stack. This new memory system further allows for both flexible scaling of the system and fast communication among cells. The magnetic abacus provides a promising approach for future nonvolatile 3D magnetic random access memory. PMID:25146338

  4. Structure and Dynamics of Brachypodium Primary Cell Wall Polysaccharides from Two-Dimensional 13C Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Tuo; Salazar, Andre; Zabotina, Olga A.; Hong, Mei

    2014-04-10

    The polysaccharide structure and dynamics in the primary cell wall of the model grass Brachypodium distachyon are investigated for the first time using solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). While both grass and non-grass cell walls contain cellulose as the main structural scaffold, the former contains xylan with arabinose and glucuronic acid substitutions as the main hemicellulose, with a small amount of xyloglucan (XyG) and pectins, while the latter contains XyG as the main hemicellulose and significant amounts of pectins. We labeled the Brachypodium cell wall with 13C to allow two-dimensional (2D) 13C correlation NMR experiments under magic-angle spinning. Well-resolved 2D spectra are obtained in which the 13C signals of cellulose, glucuronoarabinoxylan (GAX), and other matrix polysaccharides can be assigned. The assigned 13C chemical shifts indicate that there are a large number of arabinose and xylose linkages in the wall, and GAX is significantly branched at the developmental stage of 2 weeks. 2D 13C–13C correlation spectra measured with long spin diffusion mixing times indicate that the branched GAX approaches cellulose microfibrils on the nanometer scale, contrary to the conventional model in which only unbranched GAX can bind cellulose. The GAX chains are highly dynamic, with average order parameters of 0.4. Biexponential 13C T1 and 1H T relaxation indicates that there are two dynamically distinct domains in GAX: the more rigid domain may be responsible for cross-linking cellulose microfibrils, while the more mobile domain may fill the interfibrillar space. This dynamic heterogeneity is more pronounced than that of the non-grass hemicellulose, XyG, suggesting that GAX adopts the mixed characteristics of XyG and pectins. Moderate differences in cellulose rigidity are observed between the Brachypodium and Arabidopsis cell walls

  5. Structure and dynamics of Brachypodium primary cell wall polysaccharides from two-dimensional (13)C solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tuo; Salazar, Andre; Zabotina, Olga A; Hong, Mei

    2014-05-06

    The polysaccharide structure and dynamics in the primary cell wall of the model grass Brachypodium distachyon are investigated for the first time using solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). While both grass and non-grass cell walls contain cellulose as the main structural scaffold, the former contains xylan with arabinose and glucuronic acid substitutions as the main hemicellulose, with a small amount of xyloglucan (XyG) and pectins, while the latter contains XyG as the main hemicellulose and significant amounts of pectins. We labeled the Brachypodium cell wall with (13)C to allow two-dimensional (2D) (13)C correlation NMR experiments under magic-angle spinning. Well-resolved 2D spectra are obtained in which the (13)C signals of cellulose, glucuronoarabinoxylan (GAX), and other matrix polysaccharides can be assigned. The assigned (13)C chemical shifts indicate that there are a large number of arabinose and xylose linkages in the wall, and GAX is significantly branched at the developmental stage of 2 weeks. 2D (13)C-(13)C correlation spectra measured with long spin diffusion mixing times indicate that the branched GAX approaches cellulose microfibrils on the nanometer scale, contrary to the conventional model in which only unbranched GAX can bind cellulose. The GAX chains are highly dynamic, with average order parameters of ~0.4. Biexponential (13)C T1 and (1)H T1ρ relaxation indicates that there are two dynamically distinct domains in GAX: the more rigid domain may be responsible for cross-linking cellulose microfibrils, while the more mobile domain may fill the interfibrillar space. This dynamic heterogeneity is more pronounced than that of the non-grass hemicellulose, XyG, suggesting that GAX adopts the mixed characteristics of XyG and pectins. Moderate differences in cellulose rigidity are observed between the Brachypodium and Arabidopsis cell walls, suggesting different effects of the matrix polysaccharides on cellulose. These data provide the first

  6. Wide-range nuclear magnetic resonance detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturman, J. C.; Jirberg, R. J.

    1972-01-01

    Compact and easy to use solid state nuclear magnetic resonance detector is designed for measuring field strength to 20 teslas in cryogenically cooled magnets. Extremely low noise and high sensitivity make detector applicable to nearly all types of analytical nuclear magnetic resonance measurements and can be used in high temperature and radiation environments.

  7. NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RELAXATION IN LIQUID METALS, ALLOYS, AND SALTS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE, *ALKALI METAL ALLOYS, *LIQUID METALS, * SALTS , NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE, NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE, RELAXATION TIME... SODIUM , GALLIUM, SODIUM ALLOYS, THALLIUM, THALLIUM COMPOUNDS, MELTING, NUCLEAR SPINS, QUANTUM THEORY, OPERATORS(MATHEMATICS), BIBLIOGRAPHIES, INTEGRAL EQUATIONS, TEST EQUIPMENT, MATHEMATICAL ANALYSIS.

  8. Evanescent Waves Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Halidi, El Mohamed; Nativel, Eric; Akel, Mohamad; Kenouche, Samir; Coillot, Christophe; Alibert, Eric; Jabakhanji, Bilal; Schimpf, Remy; Zanca, Michel; Stein, Paul; Goze-Bac, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy and imaging can be classified as inductive techniques working in the near- to far-field regimes. We investigate an alternative capacitive detection with the use of micrometer sized probes positioned at sub wavelength distances of the sample in order to characterize and model evanescent electromagnetic fields originating from NMR phenomenon. We report that in this experimental configuration the available NMR signal is one order of magnitude larger and follows an exponential decay inversely proportional to the size of the emitters. Those investigations open a new road to a better understanding of the evanescent waves component in NMR with the opportunity to perform localized spectroscopy and imaging. PMID:26751800

  9. Introduction to Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manatt, Stanley L.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to try to give a short overview of what the status is on nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). It's a subject where one really has to spend some time to look at the physics in detail to develop a proper working understanding. I feel it's not appropriate to present to you density matrices, Hamiltonians of all sorts, and differential equations representing the motion of spins. I'm really going to present some history and status, and show a few very simple concepts involved in NMR. It is a form of radio frequency spectroscopy and there are a great number of nuclei that can be studied very usefully with the technique. NMR requires a magnet, a r.f. transmitter/receiver system, and a data acquisition system.

  10. Microcoil nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Webb, A G

    2005-08-10

    In comparison with most analytical chemistry techniques, nuclear magnetic resonance has an intrinsically low sensitivity, and many potential applications are therefore precluded by the limited available quantity of certain types of sample. In recent years, there has been a trend, both commercial and academic, towards miniaturization of the receiver coil in order to increase the mass sensitivity of NMR measurements. These small coils have also proved very useful in coupling NMR detection with commonly used microseparation techniques. A further development enabled by small detectors is parallel data acquisition from many samples simultaneously, made possible by incorporating multiple receiver coils into a single NMR probehead. This review article summarizes recent developments and applications of "microcoil" NMR spectroscopy.

  11. Modern Technologies of Solution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy for Three-dimensional Structure Determination of Proteins Open Avenues for Life Scientists.

    PubMed

    Sugiki, Toshihiko; Kobayashi, Naohiro; Fujiwara, Toshimichi

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a powerful technique for structural studies of chemical compounds and biomolecules such as DNA and proteins. Since the NMR signal sensitively reflects the chemical environment and the dynamics of a nuclear spin, NMR experiments provide a wealth of structural and dynamic information about the molecule of interest at atomic resolution. In general, structural biology studies using NMR spectroscopy still require a reasonable understanding of the theory behind the technique and experience on how to recorded NMR data. Owing to the remarkable progress in the past decade, we can easily access suitable and popular analytical resources for NMR structure determination of proteins with high accuracy. Here, we describe the practical aspects, workflow and key points of modern NMR techniques used for solution structure determination of proteins. This review should aid NMR specialists aiming to develop new methods that accelerate the structure determination process, and open avenues for non-specialist and life scientists interested in using NMR spectroscopy to solve protein structures.

  12. [Three Dimensional Display in Nuclear Medicine].

    PubMed

    Teraoka, Satomi; Souma, Tsutomu

    2015-01-01

    Imaging techniques to obtain a tomographic image in nuclear medicine such as PET and SPECT are widely used. It is necessary to interpreting all of the tomographic images obtained in order to accurately evaluate the individual lesion, whereas three dimensional display is often useful in order to overview and evaluate the feature of the entire lesion or disease such as the position, size and abnormal pattern. In Japan, the use of three dimensional image analysis workstation with an application of the co-registration and image fusion between the functional images such as PET or SPECT and anatomical images such as CT or MRI has been generalized. In addition, multimodality imaging system such as a PET/CT and SPECT/CT has been widespread. Therefore, it is expected to improve the diagnostic accuracy using three dimensionally image fusion to functional images with poor anatomical information. In this commentary, as an example of a three dimensional display that are commonly used in nuclear medicine examination in Japan, brain regions, cardiac region and bone and tumor region will be introduced separately.

  13. Two-Dimensional Turbulence in Magnetized Plasmas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kendl, A.

    2008-01-01

    In an inhomogeneous magnetized plasma the transport of energy and particles perpendicular to the magnetic field is in general mainly caused by quasi two-dimensional turbulent fluid mixing. The physics of turbulence and structure formation is of ubiquitous importance to every magnetically confined laboratory plasma for experimental or industrial…

  14. Two-Dimensional Turbulence in Magnetized Plasmas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kendl, A.

    2008-01-01

    In an inhomogeneous magnetized plasma the transport of energy and particles perpendicular to the magnetic field is in general mainly caused by quasi two-dimensional turbulent fluid mixing. The physics of turbulence and structure formation is of ubiquitous importance to every magnetically confined laboratory plasma for experimental or industrial…

  15. Dimensionality switching in molecule-based magnets.

    SciTech Connect

    Goddard, P. A.; Manson, J. L.; Singleton, J.; Franke, I.; Lancaster, T.; Steele, A. J.; Blundell, S. J.; Baines, C.; Pratt, F.; McDonald, R. D.; Valenzuela, O. A.; Sengupta, P.; Corbeyl, J. F.; Southerland, H. I.; Schlueter, J. A.

    2012-01-01

    Gaining control of the building blocks of magnetic materials and thereby achieving particular characteristics will make possible the design and growth of bespoke magnetic devices. While progress in the synthesis of molecular materials, and especially coordination polymers, represents a significant step towards this goal, the ability to tune the magnetic interactions within a particular framework remains in its infancy. Here we demonstrate a chemical method which achieves dimensionality selection via preferential inhibition of the magnetic exchange in an S=1/2 antiferromagnet along one crystal direction, switching the system from being quasi-two- to quasi-one-dimensional while effectively maintaining the nearest-neighbor coupling strength.

  16. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Structure of an 8 × 8 Nucleotide RNA Internal Loop Flanked on Each Side by Three Watson-Crick Pairs and Comparison to Three-Dimensional Predictions.

    PubMed

    Kauffmann, Andrew D; Kennedy, Scott D; Zhao, Jianbo; Turner, Douglas H

    2017-07-25

    The prediction of RNA three-dimensional structure from sequence alone has been a long-standing goal. High-resolution, experimentally determined structures of simple noncanonical pairings and motifs are critical to the development of prediction programs. Here, we present the nuclear magnetic resonance structure of the (5'CCAGAAACGGAUGGA)2 duplex, which contains an 8 × 8 nucleotide internal loop flanked by three Watson-Crick pairs on each side. The loop is comprised of a central 5'AC/3'CA nearest neighbor flanked by two 3RRs motifs, a known stable motif consisting of three consecutive sheared GA pairs. Hydrogen bonding patterns between base pairs in the loop, the all-atom root-mean-square deviation for the loop, and the deformation index were used to compare the structure to automated predictions by MC-sym, RNA FARFAR, and RNAComposer.

  17. An improved nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elleman, D. D.; Manatt, S. L.

    1967-01-01

    Cylindrical sample container provides a high degree of nuclear stabilization to a nuclear magnetic resonance /nmr/ spectrometer. It is placed coaxially about the nmr insert and contains reference sample that gives a signal suitable for locking the field and frequency of an nmr spectrometer with a simple audio modulation system.

  18. [Nuclear magnetic resonance in psychiatry].

    PubMed

    Hamad, H

    1993-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a more recent technique than computerized tomography (CT), with which morphological, high quality, three-dimensional images can be obtained, it is capable of differentiating gray/white matter without patients' exposure to radiation. Clinical investigation studies demonstrate the following findings: In Schizophrenics: Enlargement of lateral ventricles volume in 67-73%, in naive patients 21-33%. The increase of the third ventricle varies from 19 to 73%, whose patients have significant flat affect. The temporal lobe gray matter is reduced, including amygdala-hippocampal complex, and parahippocampal gyrus. No specific corpus callosum results are concluded. There is cortical atrophy, specially of bilateral prefrontal regions. Basal ganglia (lenticular and caudate nuclei) are increased. The prefrontal, temporal and limbic dysfunction supports the abnormal connection hypothesis in schizophrenics. Basal ganglia also are involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. Clinical cortical atrophy symptoms are demonstrated by neuropsychological tests, although some cognitive deficits are remediable. Perinatal complications are more frequent, in children who will be schizophrenics, than their siblings (23.6% vs 12.8%); those of special interest are: toxemia, prematurity, long labor, jaundice and bleeding during pregnancy. In affective Bipolar Disorders: There is increase (19-50%) in the number of focal signal hyperintensities at the lateral limits of ventricles and in both hemispheres, and a trend towards larger ventricular size. The temporal lobe is smaller bilaterally, but the right side is 15% larger; its volume correlates negatively with long-term illness in males. In Unipolar Disorder an increase of frontal white matter T1 values is registered.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Nuclear magnetic resonance and nuclear spin relaxation in AlAs quantum well probed by ESR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shchepetilnikov, A. V.; Frolov, D. D.; Nefyodov, Yu. A.; Kukushkin, I. V.; Smirnov, D. S.; Tiemann, L.; Reichl, C.; Dietsche, W.; Wegscheider, W.

    2016-12-01

    The study of nuclear magnetic resonance and nuclear spin-lattice relaxation was conducted in an asymmetrically doped to n ˜1.8 ×1011cm-2 16 nm AlAs quantum well grown in the [001 ] direction. The dynamic polarization of nuclear spins due to a hyperfine interaction resulted in the so-called Overhauser shift of two-dimensional conduction electron spin resonance. The maximum shifts achieved in the experiments are several orders of magnitude smaller than in GaAs-based heterostructures, indicating that the hyperfine interaction is weak. The nuclear spin-lattice relaxation time extracted from the decay of the Overhauser shift over time turned out to depend on the filling factor of the two-dimensional electron system. This observation indicates that nuclear spin-lattice relaxation is mostly due to the interaction between electron and nuclear spins. The Overhauser shift diminishes resonantly when the rf radiation of certain frequencies was applied to the sample. This effect served as an indirect, yet powerful, method for nuclear magnetic resonance detection: NMR quadrupole splitting of 75As nuclei was clearly resolved. Theoretical calculations performed describe well these experimental findings.

  20. Vortices in Low-Dimensional Magnetic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, B. V.

    2011-05-01

    Vortices are objects that are important to describe several physical phenomena. There are many examples of such objects in nature as in a large variety of physical situations like in fluid dynamics, superconductivity, magnetism, and biology. Historically, the interest in magnetic vortex-like excitations begun in the 1960s. That interest was mainly associated with an unusual phase-transition phenomenon in two-dimensional magnetic systems. More recently, direct experimental evidence for the existence of magnetic vortex states in nano-disks was found. The interest in such model was renewed due to the possibility of the use of magnetic nano-disks as bit elements in nano-scale memory devices. The goal of this study is to review some key points for the understanding of the vortex behavior and the progress that have been done in the study of vortices in low-dimensional magnetic systems.

  1. Three-dimensional magnetic bubble memory system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stadler, Henry L. (Inventor); Katti, Romney R. (Inventor); Wu, Jiin-Chuan (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A compact memory uses magnetic bubble technology for providing data storage. A three-dimensional arrangement, in the form of stacks of magnetic bubble layers, is used to achieve high volumetric storage density. Output tracks are used within each layer to allow data to be accessed uniquely and unambiguously. Storage can be achieved using either current access or field access magnetic bubble technology. Optical sensing via the Faraday effect is used to detect data. Optical sensing facilitates the accessing of data from within the three-dimensional package and lends itself to parallel operation for supporting high data rates and vector and parallel processing.

  2. Homochiral magnetism in low-dimensional magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blugel, Stefan; Heide, Marcus; Bihlmayer, Gustav

    2007-03-01

    Spin structures observed in nanomagnets are commonly explained on the basis of the Heisenberg exchange and the magnetic anisotropy. Electrons propagating in the vicinity of inversion-asymmetric environments such as of surfaces, interfaces or in ultrathin films can give rise to the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya (DM) interaction, typically unimportant for metals. Surprisingly, there is no hard number known from theory about its strength, as this requires supercomputing at the cutting edge. One deals with long-ranged complex magnetic structures in low-dimensions. Since the DM interaction arises from spin-orbit coupling, each atom of the long range structure has a different electronic environment and previous strategies, e.g. applying the generalized Bloch theorem, fail. But if DM is important, the so-far anticipated collinear magnetism become unstable, and homochiral spin structures occur. We developed a perturbative strategy implemented into the FLAPW code FLEUR which can cope with this challenge. We show by first-principles calculations based on the vector-spin density formulation of the DFT that the DM interaction is indeed sufficiently strong to compete with the interactions that favor collinear spin alignment. We predict new magnetic phases in thin films which had been overlooked during the past 20 years.

  3. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Technology for Medical Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budinger, Thomas F.; Lauterbur, Paul C.

    1984-10-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance proton imaging provides anatomical definition of normal and abnormal tissues with a contrast and detection sensitivity superior to those of x-ray computed tomography in the human head and pelvis and parts of the cardiovascular and musculoskeletal systems. Recent improvements in technology should lead to advances in diagnostic imaging of the breast and regions of the abdomen. Selected-region nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of protons, carbon-13, and phosphorus-31 has developed into a basic science tool for in vivo studies on man and a unique tool for clinical diagnoses of metabolic disorders. At present, nuclear magnetic resonance is considered safe if access to the magnet environment is controlled. Technological advances employing field strengths over 2 teslas will require biophysical studies of heating and static field effects.

  4. Selective One-Dimensional Total Correlation Spectroscopy Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Experiments for a Rapid Identification of Minor Components in the Lipid Fraction of Milk and Dairy Products: Toward Spin Chromatography?

    PubMed

    Papaemmanouil, Christina; Tsiafoulis, Constantinos G; Alivertis, Dimitrios; Tzamaloukas, Ouranios; Miltiadou, Despoina; Tzakos, Andreas G; Gerothanassis, Ioannis P

    2015-06-10

    We report a rapid, direct, and unequivocal spin-chromatographic separation and identification of minor components in the lipid fraction of milk and common dairy products with the use of selective one-dimensional (1D) total correlation spectroscopy (TOCSY) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments. The method allows for the complete backbone spin-coupling network to be elucidated even in strongly overlapped regions and in the presence of major components from 4 × 10(2) to 3 × 10(3) stronger NMR signal intensities. The proposed spin-chromatography method does not require any derivatization steps for the lipid fraction, is selective with excellent resolution, is sensitive with quantitation capability, and compares favorably to two-dimensional (2D) TOCSY and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) methods of analysis. The results of the present study demonstrated that the 1D TOCSY NMR spin-chromatography method can become a procedure of primary interest in food analysis and generally in complex mixture analysis.

  5. Combining two-dimensional diffusion-ordered nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, imaging desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, and direct analysis in real-time mass spectrometry for the integral investigation of counterfeit pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Nyadong, Leonard; Harris, Glenn A; Balayssac, Stéphane; Galhena, Asiri S; Malet-Martino, Myriam; Martino, Robert; Parry, R Mitchell; Wang, May Dongmei; Fernández, Facundo M; Gilard, Véronique

    2009-06-15

    During the past decade, there has been a marked increase in the number of reported cases involving counterfeit medicines in developing and developed countries. Particularly, artesunate-based antimalarial drugs have been targeted, because of their high demand and cost. Counterfeit antimalarials can cause death and can contribute to the growing problem of drug resistance, particularly in southeast Asia. In this study, the complementarity of two-dimensional diffusion-ordered (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (2D DOSY (1)H NMR) with direct analysis in real-time mass spectrometry (DART MS) and desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI MS) was assessed for pharmaceutical forensic purposes. Fourteen different artesunate tablets, representative of what can be purchased from informal sources in southeast Asia, were investigated with these techniques. The expected active pharmaceutical ingredient was detected in only five formulations via both nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and mass spectrometry (MS) methods. Common organic excipients such as sucrose, lactose, stearate, dextrin, and starch were also detected. The graphical representation of DOSY (1)H NMR results proved very useful for establishing similarities among groups of samples, enabling counterfeit drug "chemotyping". In addition to bulk- and surface-average analyses, spatially resolved information on the surface composition of counterfeit and genuine antimalarial formulations was obtained using DESI MS that was performed in the imaging mode, which enabled one to visualize the homogeneity of both genuine and counterfeit drug samples. Overall, this study suggests that 2D DOSY (1)H NMR, combined with ambient MS, comprises a powerful suite of instrumental analysis methodologies for the integral characterization of counterfeit antimalarials.

  6. Nuclear magnetic resonance contrast agents

    DOEpatents

    Smith, P.H.; Brainard, J.R.; Jarvinen, G.D.; Ryan, R.R.

    1997-12-30

    A family of contrast agents for use in magnetic resonance imaging and a method of enhancing the contrast of magnetic resonance images of an object by incorporating a contrast agent of this invention into the object prior to forming the images or during formation of the images. A contrast agent of this invention is a paramagnetic lanthanide hexaazamacrocyclic molecule, where a basic example has the formula LnC{sub 16}H{sub 14}N{sub 6}. Important applications of the invention are in medical diagnosis, treatment, and research, where images of portions of a human body are formed by means of magnetic resonance techniques. 10 figs.

  7. Nuclear magnetic resonance contrast agents

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Paul H.; Brainard, James R.; Jarvinen, Gordon D.; Ryan, Robert R.

    1997-01-01

    A family of contrast agents for use in magnetic resonance imaging and a method of enhancing the contrast of magnetic resonance images of an object by incorporating a contrast agent of this invention into the object prior to forming the images or during formation of the images. A contrast agent of this invention is a paramagnetic lanthanide hexaazamacrocyclic molecule, where a basic example has the formula LnC.sub.16 H.sub.14 N.sub.6. Important applications of the invention are in medical diagnosis, treatment, and research, where images of portions of a human body are formed by means of magnetic resonance techniques.

  8. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Identification of Military Nerve Agents and Related Compounds by Two-Dimensional 31P-1H Heteronuclear Overhauser Effect Spectroscopy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    IDENTIFICATION OF MILITARY NERVE AGENTS AND RELATED COMPOUNDS BY TWO-DIMENSIONAL 31P-1H HETERONUCLEAR OVERHAUSER EFFECT SPECTROSCOPY Terry J...Agents and 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Related Compounds by Two-Dimensional Overhauser Effect Spectroscopy 31 P- H Heteronuclear 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c...heteronuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (HOESY) spectrum correlating phosphorus nuclei to their ./-coupled protons. An analogous heteronuclear

  9. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging with 90-nm resolution.

    PubMed

    Mamin, H J; Poggio, M; Degen, C L; Rugar, D

    2007-05-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a powerful imaging technique that typically operates on the scale of millimetres to micrometres. Conventional MRI is based on the manipulation of nuclear spins with radio-frequency fields, and the subsequent detection of spins with induction-based techniques. An alternative approach, magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM), uses force detection to overcome the sensitivity limitations of conventional MRI. Here, we show that the two-dimensional imaging of nuclear spins can be extended to a spatial resolution better than 100 nm using MRFM. The imaging of 19F nuclei in a patterned CaF(2) test object was enabled by a detection sensitivity of roughly 1,200 nuclear spins at a temperature of 600 mK. To achieve this sensitivity, we developed high-moment magnetic tips that produced field gradients up to 1.4 x 10(6) T m(-1), and implemented a measurement protocol based on force-gradient detection of naturally occurring spin fluctuations. The resulting detection volume was less than 650 zeptolitres. This is 60,000 times smaller than the previous smallest volume for nuclear magnetic resonance microscopy, and demonstrates the feasibility of pushing MRI into the nanoscale regime.

  10. Two dimensional magnetic particle spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graeser, M.; von Gladiss, A.; Weber, M.; Buzug, T. M.

    2017-05-01

    Magnetic particle spectrometry (MPS) is an excellent and straight forward method to determine the response of magnetic nanoparticles to an oscillating magnetic field. Such fields are applied in magnetic particle imaging (MPI). However, state of the art MPS devices lack the ability to excite particles in multidimensional field sequences that are present in MPI devices. Especially the particle behavior caused by Lissajous sequences cannot be measured with only one excitation direction. This work presents a new kind of MPS which features two excitation directions to overcome this limitation. Both field coils can drive AC as well as DC currents and are thereby able to emulate the field sequences for arbitrary spatial positions inside an MPI device. Since the DC currents can be switched very fast, the device can be used as system calibration unit and acquire system matrices in very short time. These are crucial for MPI image reconstruction. As the signal-to-noise-ratio provided by the MPS is approximately 1000 times higher than that of actual imaging devices, the time space analysis of particle signals is more precise and easier done. Four system matrices are presented in this paper which have been measured with the realized multidimensional MPS. Additionally, a time space comparison of the particle signal for Lissajous, radial and spiral trajectories is given.

  11. Two dimensional magnetic particle spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Graeser, M; von Gladiss, A; Weber, M; Buzug, T M

    2017-05-07

    Magnetic particle spectrometry (MPS) is an excellent and straight forward method to determine the response of magnetic nanoparticles to an oscillating magnetic field. Such fields are applied in magnetic particle imaging (MPI). However, state of the art MPS devices lack the ability to excite particles in multidimensional field sequences that are present in MPI devices. Especially the particle behavior caused by Lissajous sequences cannot be measured with only one excitation direction. This work presents a new kind of MPS which features two excitation directions to overcome this limitation. Both field coils can drive AC as well as DC currents and are thereby able to emulate the field sequences for arbitrary spatial positions inside an MPI device. Since the DC currents can be switched very fast, the device can be used as system calibration unit and acquire system matrices in very short time. These are crucial for MPI image reconstruction. As the signal-to-noise-ratio provided by the MPS is approximately 1000 times higher than that of actual imaging devices, the time space analysis of particle signals is more precise and easier done. Four system matrices are presented in this paper which have been measured with the realized multidimensional MPS. Additionally, a time space comparison of the particle signal for Lissajous, radial and spiral trajectories is given.

  12. Two-dimensional magnetization exchange spectroscopy of Anabaena 7120 ferredoxin. Nuclear Overhauser effect and electron self-exchange cross peaks from amino acid residues surrounding the Fe-2S* cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Skjeldal, L.; Westler, W.M.; Oh, Byungha; Krezel, A.M.; Markley, J.L.; Holden, H.M.; Jacobson, B.L.; Rayment, I. Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison )

    1991-07-30

    Hyperfine {sup 1}H NMR signals of the 2 Fe-2S* vegetative ferredoxin from Anabaena 7,120 have been studied by two-dimensional (2D) magnetization exchange spectroscopy. The rapid longitudinal relaxation rates of these signals required the use of very short nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) mixing times (0.5-20 ms). The resulting pattern of NOE cross-relaxation peaks when combined with previous 1D NOE results led to elucidation of the carbon-bound proton spin systems from each of the four cysteines ligated to the 2Fe-2S* cluster in the reduced ferredoxin. Additional NOE cross peaks were observed that provide information about other amino acid residues that interact with the iron-sulfur cluster. NOE cross peaks were assigned tentatively to Leu{sup 27}, Arg{sup 42}, and Ala{sup 43} on the basis of the X-ray coordinates of oxidized Anabaena 7,120 ferredoxin. Three chemical exchange cross peaks were detected in magnetization exchange spectra of half-reduced ferredoxin and assigned to the {sup 1}H{sup {alpha}} protons of Cys{sup 49} and Cys{sup 79} (both of whose sulfur atoms are ligated to Fe(III)) and Arg{sup 42} (whose amide nitrogen is hydrogen-bonded to one of the inorganic sulfurs of the 2Fe-2S* cluster). The chemical exchange cross peaks provide a means of extending assignments in the spectrum of reduced ferredoxin to assignments in the spectrum of the oxidized protein. The results suggest that 2D magnetization exchange spectroscopy employing short mixing times will be useful for the assignment and characterization of hyperfine {sup 1}H peaks in a variety of paramagnetic proteins.

  13. Magnetic fusion driventransmutation of nuclear waste (FTW)

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Yueng Kay Martin; Cheng, E.T.

    1993-01-01

    The possibility of magnetic Fusion driven Transmutation of Waste (FTW) was revisted and discussed recently. Nuclear wastes include all transuranium elements: Pu isotopes, minor actinides separated from the spent fission fuel, and fissile products. Elimination of thse long-life nuclear wastes is necessary for the long-term viability of fission power. A Small Business Innovative Research program has been initiated under the leadership of TSI Research to examine the efficacy of fusion transmutation of waste utilizing small fusion drivers.

  14. A one-dimensional tunable magnetic metamaterial.

    PubMed

    Butz, S; Jung, P; Filippenko, L V; Koshelets, V P; Ustinov, A V

    2013-09-23

    We present experimental data on a one-dimensional super-conducting metamaterial that is tunable over a broad frequency band. The basic building block of this magnetic thin-film medium is a single-junction (rf-) superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). Due to the nonlinear inductance of such an element, its resonance frequency is tunable in situ by applying a dc magnetic field. We demonstrate that this results in tunable effective parameters of our metamaterial consisting of 54 rf-SQUIDs. In order to obtain the effective magnetic permeability μr,eff from the measured data, we employ a technique that uses only the complex transmission coefficient S₂₁.

  15. Three-dimensional magnetic field annihilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jardine, M.; Allen, H. R.; Grundy, R. E.

    1993-11-01

    We present a family of three-dimensional nonlinear solutions for magnetic field annihilation in a current sheet, including the effects of resistivity and viscosity. The different members of the family are characterized by the imposed vorticity of the flow that brings the field lines together. Since in a three- dimensional flow the vorticity can be increased by the stretching of vortex lines (an effect that is absent in two dimensions), we find some striking differences to our previous two-dimensional analysis. In both the two-dimensional and three-dimensional analyses, above a certain critical imposed vorticity omegacrit, the flow breaks up into cells with current sheet is completely altered. In the two-dimensional analysis, omegacrit is a steeply increasing function of the viscous Reynolds number R, whereas in the three-dimensional case, it quickly asymptotes to only omegacrit = 2v0/L where v0 and L are the characteristic velocity and length scale of the flow, respectively. The width of the current sheet, which depends on the speed at which field lines are carried into it, also responds differently to an increase in R. In two dimensions, the current sheet narrows for all vorticities, but three dimensions, it narrows when the imposed vorticity is negative and widens when it is positive. Also we find that the current density within the current sheet varies as the nature of the flow is changed, rather than being constant as in the the two-dimensional case. Finally, we find that there is a minimum value of the plasma beta betamin below which the plasma pressure is negative. For the nonsheared (neutral current sheet) case, betamin increases rapidly with the magnetic Reynolds number Rm such that this type of annihilation is only possible for a high-beta plasma. For a sheared magnetic field, however, betamin is much lower, making this type of annihilation more relevant to the sonar corona.

  16. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Technology for Medical Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Budinger, Thomas F.; Lauterbur, Paul C.

    1984-01-01

    Reports on the status of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) from theoretical and clinical perspectives, reviewing NMR theory and relaxation parameters relevant to NMR imaging. Also reviews literature related to modern imaging strategies, signal-to-noise ratio, contrast agents, in vivo spectroscopy, spectroscopic imaging, clinical applications, and…

  17. Sample spinner for nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Stejskal, E.O.

    1984-05-01

    A sample spinner for a nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer having improved operating characteristics is described comprising a rotor supported at both ends by support gas bearings and positioned by a thrust gas bearing. Improved support gas bearings are also described which result in a spinner exhibiting long-term stable operation characteristics.

  18. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Technology for Medical Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Budinger, Thomas F.; Lauterbur, Paul C.

    1984-01-01

    Reports on the status of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) from theoretical and clinical perspectives, reviewing NMR theory and relaxation parameters relevant to NMR imaging. Also reviews literature related to modern imaging strategies, signal-to-noise ratio, contrast agents, in vivo spectroscopy, spectroscopic imaging, clinical applications, and…

  19. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging. South Carolina Health Service Area 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-12-01

    Contents include: Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging (NMRI); (Clinical applications, Magnet types, Comparisons with other systems, Manpower, Manufacturers, Contraindications); Analysis of systems; (Availability, Accessibility, Cost, Quality, Continuity, Acceptability).

  20. Dimensional crossover in dipolar magnetic layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulenda, M.; Täuber, U. C.; Schwabl, F.

    2000-01-01

    We investigate the static critical behaviour of a uniaxial magnetic layer, with finite thickness L in one direction, yet infinitely extended in the remaining d dimensions. The magnetic dipole-dipole interaction is taken into account. We apply a variant of Wilson's momentum shell renormalization group approach to describe the crossover between the critical behaviour of the 3D Ising, 2D Ising, 3D uniaxial dipolar, and the 2D uniaxial dipolar universality classes. The corresponding renormalization group fixed points are in addition to different effective dimensionalities characterized by distinct analytic structures of the propagator, and are consequently associated with varying upper critical dimensions. While the limiting cases can be discussed by means of dimensional icons/Journals/Common/epsilon" ALT="epsilon" ALIGN="TOP"/> expansions with respect to the appropriate upper critical dimensions, respectively, the crossover features must be addressed in terms of the renormalization group flow trajectories at fixed dimensionality d .

  1. Determination of the three-dimensional solution structure of the antihypertensive and antiviral protein BDS-I from the sea anemone Anemonia sulcata: a study using nuclear magnetic resonance and hybrid distance geometry-dynamical simulated annealing.

    PubMed

    Driscoll, P C; Gronenborn, A M; Beress, L; Clore, G M

    1989-03-07

    The three-dimensional solution structure of the antihypertensive and antiviral protein BDS-I from the sea anemone Anemonia sulcata has been determined on the basis of 489 interproton and 24 hydrogen-bonding distance restraints supplemented by 23 phi backbone and 21 chi 1 side-chain torsion angle restraints derived from nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements. A total of 42 structures is calculated by a hybrid metric matrix distance geometry-dynamical simulated annealing approach. Both the backbone and side-chain atom positions are well defined. The average atomic rms difference between the 42 individual SA structures and the mean structure obtained by averaging their coordinates is 0.67 +/- 0.12 A for the backbone atoms and 0.90 +/- 0.17 A for all atoms. The core of the protein is formed by a triple-stranded antiparallel beta-sheet composed of residues 14-16 (strand 1), 30-34 (strand 2), and 37-41 (strand 3) with an additional mini-antiparallel beta-sheet at the N-terminus (residues 6-9). The first and second strands of the triple-stranded antiparallel beta-sheet are connected by a long exposed loop (residues 17-30). A number of side-chain interactions are discussed in light of the structure.

  2. Magnetization study of two dimensional helium three

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Lei

    This dissertation discusses a magnetization study of a two dimensional Fermi system. Our group developed a SQUID NMR system to study the magnetization of two dimensional 3He on both GTA grafoil and ZYX Graphite substrates. Benefiting from SQUID technology, our NMR experiments were performed at very low applied magnetic field thus avoid the masking of ordering by strong external field. Monolayer 3He films adsorbed on crystalline graphite are considered a nearly ideal example of a two dimensional system of highly correlated fermions. By controlling the 3He areal density, adsorbed films exhibit a wide range of structures with different temperature- dependent magnetic properties and heat capacities. Our recent experiments on two dimensional 3He adsorbed on ZYX graphite focused on the anti-ferromagnetic 4/7 phase and the ferromagnetic incommensurate solid state of a second 3He monolayer. Ferromagnetic order was observed in two dimensional 3He films on both Grafoil and highly oriented ZYX grade exfoliated graphite. The dipolar field plays an important role in magnetic ordering in two dimensional spin systems. The dipole-dipole interaction leads to a frequency shift of the NMR absorption line. The resulting 3He NMR lineshape on Grafoil was a broad peak shifted towards lower frequency with a background from the randomly oriented regions extending to positive frequencies. Compared to Grafoil, ZYX graphite has a much greater structural coherence and is more highly oriented. When studying magnetism of 3He films on ZYX substrate we found that the features we observed in our original Grafoil experiment were much more pronounced on ZYX graphite. In addition, we observed some multi-peak structure on the 3He NMR lineshape, which suggest a series of spin wave resonances. We also studied the magnetic properties of the second layer of 3He films on ZYX substrate at density around 4/7 phase. To eliminate the paramagnetic signal of the first layer solid, we pre-plated a 4He layer on the

  3. Confinement and Diffusion Effects in Dynamical Nuclear Polarization in Low Dimensional Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henriksen, Dan; Tifrea, Ionel

    2012-02-01

    We investigate the dynamic nuclear polarization as it results from the hyperfine coupling between nonequilibrium electronic spins and nuclear spins in semiconductor nanostructures. The natural confinement provided by low dimensional nanostructures is responsible for an efficient nuclear spin - electron spin hyperfine coupling [1] and for a reduced value of the nuclear spin diffusion constant [2]. In the case of optical pumping, the induced nuclear spin polarization is position dependent even in the presence of nuclear spin diffusion. This effect should be measurable via optically induced nuclear magnetic resonance or time-resolved Faraday rotation experiments. We discuss the implications of our calculations for the case of GaAs quantum well structures.[4pt] [1] I. Tifrea and M. E. Flatt'e, Phys. Rev. B 84, 155319 (2011).[0pt] [2] A. Malinowski and R. T. Harley, Solid State Commun. 114, 419 (2000).

  4. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of lens transparency

    SciTech Connect

    Beaulieu, C.F.

    1989-01-01

    Transparency of normal lens cytoplasm and loss of transparency in cataract were studied by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods. Phosphorus ({sup 31}P) NMR spectroscopy was used to measure the {sup 31}P constituents and pH of calf lens cortical and nuclear homogenates and intact lenses as a function of time after lens enucleation and in opacification produced by calcium. Transparency was measured with laser spectroscopy. Despite complete loss of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) within 18 hrs of enucleation, the homogenates and lenses remained 100% transparent. Additions of calcium to ATP-depleted cortical homogenates produced opacification as well as concentration-dependent changes in inorganic phosphate, sugar phosphates, glycerol phosphorylcholine and pH. {sup 1}H relaxation measurements of lens water at 200 MHz proton Larmor frequency studied temperature-dependent phase separation of lens nuclear homogenates. Preliminary measurements of T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} with non-equilibrium temperature changes showed a change in the slope of the temperature dependence of T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} at the phase separation temperature. Subsequent studies with equilibrium temperature changes showed no effect of phase separation on T{sub 1} or T{sub 2}, consistent with the phase separation being a low-energy process. {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion (NMRD) studies (measurements of the magnetic field dependence of the water proton 1/T{sub 1} relaxation rates) were performed on (1) calf lens nuclear and cortical homogenates (2) chicken lens homogenates, (3) native and heat-denatured egg white and (4) pure proteins including bovine {gamma}-II crystallin bovine serum albumin (BSA) and myoglobin. The NMRD profiles of all samples exhibited decreases in 1/T{sub 1} with increasing magnetic field.

  5. Optically pumped nuclear magnetic resonance of semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Sophia E; Mui, Stacy; Ramaswamy, Kannan

    2008-02-07

    Optically pumped NMR (OPNMR) of direct gap and indirect gap semiconductors has been an area of active research interest, motivated by both basic science and technological perspectives. Proposals to enhance and to spatially localize nuclear polarization have stimulated interest in this area. Recent progress in OPNMR has focused on exploring the experimental parameter space in order to elucidate details of the underlying photophysics of optical pumping phenomena. The focus of this review is on recent studies of bulk samples of GaAs and InP, namely, the photon energy dependence, the magnetic field dependence, and the phase dependence of OPNMR resonances. Models for the development of nuclear polarization are discussed.

  6. Magnetic nuclear core restraint and control

    DOEpatents

    Cooper, Martin H.

    1979-01-01

    A lateral restraint and control system for a nuclear reactor core adaptable to provide an inherent decrease of core reactivity in response to abnormally high reactor coolant fluid temperatures. An electromagnet is associated with structure for radially compressing the core during normal reactor conditions. A portion of the structures forming a magnetic circuit are composed of ferromagnetic material having a curie temperature corresponding to a selected coolant fluid temperature. Upon a selected signal, or inherently upon a preselected rise in coolant temperature, the magnetic force is decreased a given amount sufficient to relieve the compression force so as to allow core radial expansion. The expanded core configuration provides a decreased reactivity, tending to shut down the nuclear reaction.

  7. Magnetic nuclear core restraint and control

    DOEpatents

    Cooper, Martin H.

    1978-01-01

    A lateral restraint and control system for a nuclear reactor core adaptable to provide an inherent decrease of core reactivity in response to abnormally high reactor coolant fluid temperatures. An electromagnet is associated with structure for radially compressing the core during normal reactor conditions. A portion of the structures forming a magnetic circuit are composed of ferromagnetic material having a curie temperature corresponding to a selected coolant fluid temperature. Upon a selected signal, or inherently upon a preselected rise in coolant temperature, the magnetic force is decreased a given amount sufficient to relieve the compression force so as to allow core radial expansion. The expanded core configuration provides a decreased reactivity, tending to shut down the nuclear reaction.

  8. Magnetic-field cycling instrumentation for dynamic nuclear polarization-nuclear magnetic resonance using photoexcited triplets.

    PubMed

    Kagawa, Akinori; Negoro, Makoto; Takeda, Kazuyuki; Kitagawa, Masahiro

    2009-04-01

    To advance static solid-state NMR with hyperpolarized nuclear spins, a system has been developed enabling dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) using electron spins in the photoexcited triplet state with X-band microwave apparatus, followed by static solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments using the polarized nuclear-spin system with a goniometer. In order to perform the DNP and NMR procedures in different magnetic fields, the DNP system and the NMR system are spatially separated, between which the sample can be shuttled while its orientation is controlled in a reproducible fashion. We demonstrate that the system developed in this work is operational for solid-state NMR with hyperpolarized nuclear-spin systems in static organic materials, and also discuss the application of our system.

  9. Nuclear magnetic moments and related sum rules

    SciTech Connect

    Bentz, Wolfgang; Arima, Akito

    2011-05-06

    We first review the history and our present understanding of nuclear magnetic moments and Gamow-Teller transitions, with emphasis on the roles of configuration mixing and meson exchange currents. Then we discuss the renormalization of the orbital g-factor in nuclei, and its relation to the E1 sum rule for photoabsorption and the M1 sum rule for the scissors mode of deformed nuclei.

  10. Dimensional analysis of aqueous magnetic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Răcuciu, M.; Creangă, D. E.; Suliţanu, N.; Bădescu, V.

    2007-11-01

    A comparison of the synthesis and characterization of three aqueous magnetic fluids intended for biomedical applications is presented. Stable colloidal suspensions of iron oxide nanoparticles were prepared by a co-precipitation method with the magnetite cores being coated with β-cyclodextrin, tetramethylammonium hydroxide and citric acid. Rheological properties of the fluids were investigated, i.e. viscosity (capillary method) and surface tension (stalagmometric method) in correlation with their density (picnometric method). The dimensional distributions of the ferrophase particles physical diameter of these three magnetic fluids - revealed on the basis of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) data - as well as the diameter distributions of some other magnetic fluids presented in the literature, were comparatively analyzed using the box-plot statistical method. In order to extract complementary data on the magnetic diameter of an iron oxide core, magnetization measurements as well as X-ray diffraction pattern analysis were carried out. Interpretation of all the measurement data was accomplished by assessing the suitability of the three magnetic fluid samples from the viewpoint of their stability and biocompatibility.

  11. Nonequilibrium nuclear polarization and induced hyperfine and dipolar magnetic fields in semiconductor nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ţifrea, Ionel; Flatté, Michael E.

    2011-10-01

    We investigate the dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) caused by hyperfine coupling between nonequilibrium electronic spins and nuclear spins in semiconductor nanostructures. We derive the time and position dependence of the resulting hyperfine and dipolar magnetic fields. In GaAs quantum wells the induced nuclear spin polarization greatly exceeds the polarization of the electronic system that causes the DNP. The induced magnetic fields vary between tens of tesla for the electronic hyperfine field acting on nuclei, to hundreds of gauss for the nuclear hyperfine field acting on electrons, to a few gauss for the induced nuclear dipolar fields that act on both nuclei and electrons. The field strengths should be measurable via optically induced nuclear magnetic resonance or time-resolved Faraday rotation experiments. We discuss the implications of our calculations for low-dimensional semiconductor nanostructures.

  12. Hot magnetized nuclear matter: Thermodynamic and saturation properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaei, Z.; Bordbar, G. H.

    2017-03-01

    We have used a realistic nuclear potential, AV_{18}, and a many-body technique, the lowest-order constraint variational (LOCV) approach, to calculate the properties of hot magnetized nuclear matter. By investigating the free energy, spin polarization parameter, and symmetry energy, we have studied the temperature and magnetic field dependence of the saturation properties of magnetized nuclear matter. In addition, we have calculated the equation of state of magnetized nuclear matter at different temperatures and magnetic fields. It was found that the flashing temperature of nuclear matter decreases by increasing the magnetic field. In addition, we have studied the effect of the magnetic field on liquid gas phase transition of nuclear matter. The liquid gas coexistence curves, the order parameter of the liquid gas phase transition, and the properties of critical point at different magnetic fields have been calculated.

  13. Unusual (+/-)-electrospray ionization induced fragmentation: Structural elucidation of an in-process synthetic intermediate of doravirine (MK-1439) using liquid chromatography/high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry and two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Huaming; Lexa, Katrina W; Zhang, Li-Kang; Yang, Rong-Sheng; Wright, Timothy J; Sherry, Benjamin D; Helmy, Roy; Martin, Gary E

    2017-04-30

    During the development of a novel synthetic route to doravirine (1), a human immunodeficiency type 1 virus (HIV-1) nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI), an unanticipated reaction intermediate, methyl (Z)-2-(3-chloro-5-cyanophenoxy)-5-(3-(3-chloro-5-cyanophenoxy)-2-oxo-4-(trifluoromethyl)pyridin-1(2H)-yl)-5-ethoxy-3-(trifluoromethyl)pent-2-enoate (2), was isolated. Moreover, an unusual electrospray ionization (ESI)-induced fragmentation was observed for 2. Hence, efforts were made towards the understanding of the structure of 2, which was crucial for the understanding of the reaction mechanism. The isolated impurity was fully characterized by liquid chromatography coupled with high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry (LC/HRMS/MS), hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange, and an ensemble of two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (2D-NMR) techniques. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were also conducted. An unusual ESI-induced fragmentation was observed for intermediate 2, giving an ion for half of the molecule in the positive ion mode, with the other half of the molecule affording an ion in the negative ion mode. To the best of our knowledge, this unique ESI-induced fragmentation has not been previously reported in the literature. The underlying mechanism was explored and is supported by DFT calculations, which could greatly help the structural characterization of unknown impurities with similar structural features using ESI-MS in the future. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Nuclear magnetic resonance properties of lunar samples.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kline, D.; Weeks, R. A.

    1972-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of Na-23, Al-27, and P-31 in fines samples 10084,60 and 14163,168 and in crystalline rock samples 12021,55 and 14321,166, have been recorded over a range of frequencies up to 20 MHz. A shift in the field at which maximum absorption occurs for all of the spectra relative to the field at which maximum absorption occurs for terrestrial analogues is attributed to a sample-dependent magnetic field at the Na, Al, and P sites opposing the laboratory field. The magnitude of these fields internal to the samples is sample dependent and varies from 5 to 10 G. These fields do not correlate with the iron content of the samples. However, the presence of single-domain particles of iron distributed throughout the plagioclase fraction that contains the principal fraction of Na and Al is inferred from electron magnetic resonance spectra shapes.

  15. Nanoscale nuclear magnetic resonance with chemical resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslam, Nabeel; Pfender, Matthias; Neumann, Philipp; Reuter, Rolf; Zappe, Andrea; Fávaro de Oliveira, Felipe; Denisenko, Andrej; Sumiya, Hitoshi; Onoda, Shinobu; Isoya, Junichi; Wrachtrup, Jörg

    2017-07-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a key analytical technique in chemistry, biology, and medicine. However, conventional NMR spectroscopy requires an at least nanoliter-sized sample volume to achieve sufficient signal. We combined the use of a quantum memory and high magnetic fields with a dedicated quantum sensor based on nitrogen vacancy centers in diamond to achieve chemical shift resolution in 1H and 19F NMR spectroscopy of 20-zeptoliter sample volumes. We demonstrate the application of NMR pulse sequences to achieve homonuclear decoupling and spin diffusion measurements. The best measured NMR linewidth of a liquid sample was ~1 part per million, mainly limited by molecular diffusion. To mitigate the influence of diffusion, we performed high-resolution solid-state NMR by applying homonuclear decoupling and achieved a 20-fold narrowing of the NMR linewidth.

  16. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of liver hemangiomas

    SciTech Connect

    Sigal, R.; Lanir, A.; Atlan, H.; Naschitz, J.E.; Simon, J.S.; Enat, R.; Front, D.; Israel, O.; Chisin, R.; Krausz, Y.

    1985-10-01

    Nine patients with cavernous hemangioma of the liver were examined by nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with a 0.5 T superconductive magnet. Spin-echo technique was used with varying time to echo (TE) and repetition times (TR). Results were compared with /sup 99m/Tc red blood cell (RBC) scintigraphy, computed tomography (CT), echography, and arteriography. Four illustrated cases are reported. It was possible to establish a pattern for MRI characteristics of cavernous hemangiomas; rounded or smooth lobulated shape, marked increase in T1 and T2 values as compared with normal liver values. It is concluded that, although more experience is necessary to compare the specificity with that of ultrasound and CT, MRI proved to be very sensitive for the diagnosis of liver hemangioma, especially in the case of small ones which may be missed by /sup 99m/Tc-labeled RBC scintigraphy.

  17. QED theory of the nuclear magnetic shielding in hydrogenlike ions.

    PubMed

    Yerokhin, V A; Pachucki, K; Harman, Z; Keitel, C H

    2011-07-22

    The shielding of the nuclear magnetic moment by the bound electron in hydrogenlike ions is calculated ab initio with inclusion of relativistic, nuclear, and quantum electrodynamics (QED) effects. The QED correction is evaluated to all orders in the nuclear binding strength parameter and, independently, to the first order in the expansion in this parameter. The results obtained lay the basis for the high-precision determination of nuclear magnetic dipole moments from measurements of the g factor of hydrogenlike ions.

  18. The Design and Testing of Magnets for Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, P. R.

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Recently, images of the inside of the human body have been produced non-invasively using nuclear magnetic resonance (nmr). The technique involves placing the patient in a strong, homogeneous magnetic field. The heart of any nmr imaging system is the magnet that produces this field and this thesis is concerned with the design and testing of such magnets. Various computer programs have been written that allow the designer to model a magnet either in terms of axisymmetric coils, or in terms of the discrete conductors that simulate the actual form of the winding. The axisymmetric program automatically optimises the design so as to produce a uniform field, and the data from this program may be used directly to generate an appropriate helical or spiral winding. These programs not only allow the designer to produce a suitable design, but also to put tolerances on the dimensions of the conductors and formers that support the winding. The problem of removing imhomogeneities produced by dimensional inaccuracies and surrounding ferromagnetic materials is also considered. A nmr probe system has been developed that allows the homogeneity of a magnet to be assessed independently of the stability of its power supply. The probe has been used for field measurements in a magnet designed using the above techniques, and the results are presented.

  19. An introduction to nuclear magnetic resonance in biomedicine.

    PubMed

    Andrew, E R

    1990-02-01

    In this paper the author illustrates the historical aspects of the development, first, of the fundamental principles of nuclear magnetic resonance and, second, the extension of these principles to magnetic resonance imaging and in vivo spectroscopy.

  20. Three-Dimensional Nuclear Chart--Understanding Nuclear Physics and Nucleosynthesis in Stars

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koura, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) nuclear charts were created using toy blocks, which represent the atomic masses per nucleon number and the total half-lives for each nucleus in the entire region of the nuclear mass. The bulk properties of the nuclei can be easily understood by using these charts. Subsequently, these charts were used in outreach activities…

  1. Three-Dimensional Nuclear Chart--Understanding Nuclear Physics and Nucleosynthesis in Stars

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koura, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) nuclear charts were created using toy blocks, which represent the atomic masses per nucleon number and the total half-lives for each nucleus in the entire region of the nuclear mass. The bulk properties of the nuclei can be easily understood by using these charts. Subsequently, these charts were used in outreach activities…

  2. DIMENSIONALLY STABLE, CORROSION RESISTANT NUCLEAR FUEL

    DOEpatents

    Kittel, J.H.

    1963-10-31

    A method of making a uranium alloy of improved corrosion resistance and dimensional stability is described. The alloy contains from 0-9 weight per cent of an additive of zirconium and niobium in the proportions by weight of 5 to 1 1/ 2. The alloy is cold rolled, heated to two different temperatures, air-cooled, heated to a third temperature, and quenched in water. (AEC)

  3. Simple and Inexpensive Classroom Demonstrations of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Joel A.; Nordell, Karen J.; Chesnik, Marla A.; Landis, Clark R.; Ellis, Arthur B.; Rzchowski, M. S.; Condren, S. Michael; Lisensky, George C.

    2000-01-01

    Describes a set of simple, inexpensive, classical demonstrations of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) principles that illustrate the resonance condition associated with magnetic dipoles and the dependence of the resonance frequency on environment. (WRM)

  4. Simple and Inexpensive Classroom Demonstrations of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Joel A.; Nordell, Karen J.; Chesnik, Marla A.; Landis, Clark R.; Ellis, Arthur B.; Rzchowski, M. S.; Condren, S. Michael; Lisensky, George C.

    2000-01-01

    Describes a set of simple, inexpensive, classical demonstrations of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) principles that illustrate the resonance condition associated with magnetic dipoles and the dependence of the resonance frequency on environment. (WRM)

  5. Spatial localization in nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Keevil, Stephen F

    2006-08-21

    The ability to select a discrete region within the body for signal acquisition is a fundamental requirement of in vivo NMR spectroscopy. Ideally, it should be possible to tailor the selected volume to coincide exactly with the lesion or tissue of interest, without loss of signal from within this volume or contamination with extraneous signals. Many techniques have been developed over the past 25 years employing a combination of RF coil properties, static magnetic field gradients and pulse sequence design in an attempt to meet these goals. This review presents a comprehensive survey of these techniques, their various advantages and disadvantages, and implications for clinical applications. Particular emphasis is placed on the reliability of the techniques in terms of signal loss, contamination and the effect of nuclear relaxation and J-coupling. The survey includes techniques based on RF coil and pulse design alone, those using static magnetic field gradients, and magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging. Although there is an emphasis on techniques currently in widespread use (PRESS, STEAM, ISIS and MRSI), the review also includes earlier techniques, in order to provide historical context, and techniques that are promising for future use in clinical and biomedical applications.

  6. Small-Volume Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fratila, Raluca M.; Velders, Aldrik H.

    2011-07-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is one of the most information-rich analytical techniques available. However, it is also inherently insensitive, and this drawback precludes the application of NMR spectroscopy to mass- and volume-limited samples. We review a particular approach to increase the sensitivity of NMR experiments, namely the use of miniaturized coils. When the size of the coil is reduced, the sample volume can be brought down to the nanoliter range. We compare the main coil geometries (solenoidal, planar, and microslot/stripline) and discuss their applications to the analysis of mass-limited samples. We also provide an overview of the hyphenation of microcoil NMR spectroscopy to separation techniques and of the integration with lab-on-a-chip devices and microreactors.

  7. In vivo nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leblanc, A.; Evans, H.; Bryan, R. N.; Johnson, P.; Schonfeld, E.; Jhingran, S. G.

    1984-01-01

    A number of physiological changes have been demonstrated in bone, muscle and blood after exposure of humans and animals to microgravity. Determining mechanisms and the development of effective countermeasures for long duration space missions is an important NASA goal. The advent of tomographic nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMR or MRI) gives NASA a way to greatly extend early studies of this phenomena in ways not previously possible; NMR is also noninvasive and safe. NMR provides both superb anatomical images for volume assessments of individual organs and quantification of chemical/physical changes induced in the examined tissues. The feasibility of NMR as a tool for human physiological research as it is affected by microgravity is demonstrated. The animal studies employed the rear limb suspended rat as a model of mucle atrophy that results from microgravity. And bedrest of normal male subjects was used to simulate the effects of microgravity on bone and muscle.

  8. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of the spine

    SciTech Connect

    Modic, M.T.; Weinstein, M.A.; Pavlicek, W.; Starnes, D.L.; Duchesneau, P.M.; Boumphrey, F.; Hardy, R.J. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Forty subjects were examined to determine the accuracy and clinical usefulness of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) examination of the spine. The NMR images were compared with plain radiographs, high-resolution computed tomograms, and myelograms. The study included 15 patients with normal spinal cord anatomy and 25 patients whose pathological conditions included canal stenosis, herniated discs, metastatic tumors, primary cord tumor, trauma, Chiari malformations, syringomyelia, and developmental disorders. Saturation recovery images were best in differentiating between soft tissue and cerebrospinal fluid. NMR was excellent for the evaluation of the foramen magnum region and is presently the modality of choice for the diagnosis of syringomyelia and Chiari malformation. NMR was accurate in diagnosing spinal cord trauma and spinal canal block.

  9. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer and method

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, P.E.; Vidrine, D.W.

    1981-08-18

    A nuclear magnetic resonance techniis described that allows simultaneous temperature determination and spectral acquisition. The technique employs a modification of the lock circuit of a varian xl-100 spectrometer which permits accurate measurement of the difference in resonance frequency between a primary lock nucleus and another , secondary, nucleus. The field stabilization function of the main lock circuit is not compromised. A feedback signal having a frequency equal to the frequency difference is substituted for the normal power supply in the spectrometer's existing radio frequency transmitter to modulate that transmitter. Thus, the transmitter's radio frequency signal is enhanced in a frequency corresponding to the resonance peak of the secondary nucleus. Determination of the frequency difference allows the determination of temperature without interference with the observed spectrum. The feedback character of the circuit and the presence of noise make the circuit self-activating.

  10. Geochemical Controls on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, Rosemary; Prasad, Manika; Keating, Kristina

    2003-11-11

    OAK-B135 Our research objectives are to determine, through an extensive set of laboratory experiments, the effect of the specific mineralogic form of iron and the effect of the distribution of iron on proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation mechanisms. In the first nine months of this project, we have refined the experimental procedures to be used in the acquisition of the laboratory NMR data; have ordered, and conducted preliminary measurements on, the sand samples to be used in the experimental work; and have revised and completed the theoretical model to use in this project. Over the next year, our focus will be on completing the first phase of the experimental work where the form and distribution of the iron in the sands in varied.

  11. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging in medicine

    PubMed Central

    McKinstry, C S

    1986-01-01

    Using the technique of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR, MR, MRI), the first images displaying pathology in humans were published in 1980.1 Since then, there has been a rapid extension in the use of the technique, with an estimated 225 machines in use in the USA at the end of 1985.2 Considerable enthusiasm has been expressed for this new imaging technique,3 although awareness of its high cost in the present economic climate has led to reservations being expressed in other quarters.2 The aim of this article is to give an outline of the present state of NMR, and indicate some possible future developments. ImagesFig 1Fig 2Fig 3(a)Fig 3 (b)Fig 4Fig 5Fig 6Fig 7 (a)Fig 7 (b)Fig 8Fig 9Fig 10 PMID:3811023

  12. Three-dimensional Spontaneous Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beresnyak, Andrey

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic reconnection is best known from observations of the Sun where it causes solar flares. Observations estimate the reconnection rate as a small, but non-negligible fraction of the Alfvén speed, so-called fast reconnection. Until recently, the prevailing pictures of reconnection were either of resistivity or plasma microscopic effects, which was contradictory to the observed rates. Alternative pictures were either of reconnection due to the stochasticity of magnetic field lines in turbulence or the tearing instability of the thin current sheet. In this paper we simulate long-term three-dimensional nonlinear evolution of a thin, planar current sheet subject to a fast oblique tearing instability using direct numerical simulations of resistive-viscous magnetohydrodynamics. The late-time evolution resembles generic turbulence with a ‑5/3 power spectrum and scale-dependent anisotropy, so we conclude that the tearing-driven reconnection becomes turbulent reconnection. The turbulence is local in scale, so microscopic diffusivity should not affect large-scale quantities. This is confirmed by convergence of the reconnection rate toward ∼ 0.015{v}{{A}} with increasing Lundquist number. In this spontaneous reconnection, with mean field and without driving, the dissipation rate per unit area also converges to ∼ 0.006ρ {v}{{A}}3, and the dimensionless constants 0.015 and 0.006 are governed only by self-driven nonlinear dynamics of the sheared magnetic field. Remarkably, this also means that a thin current sheet has a universal fluid resistance depending only on its length to width ratio and to {v}{{A}}/c.

  13. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectral analysis and molecular properties of berberine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ming-Ju; Lee, Ken S.; Hurley, Sharon J.

    An extensive theoretical study of berberine has been performed at the ab initio HF/6-31G**, HF/6-311G**, and B3LYP/6-311G** levels with and without solvent effects. The optimized structures are compared with X-ray data. We found that the optimized structures with solvent effects are in slightly better agreement with X-ray data than those without solvent effects. The 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts of berberine were calculated by using the gauge-independent atomic orbital (GIAO) (with and without solvent effects), CSGT, and IGAIM methods. The calculated chemical shifts were compared with the two-dimensional NMR experimental data. Overall, the calculated chemical shifts show very good agreement with the experimental results. The harmonic vibrational frequencies for berberine were calculated at the B3LYP/6-311G** level.

  14. Nuclear magnetic resonance techniques in medicine.

    PubMed

    Bradbury, E M; Radda, G K; Allen, P S

    1983-04-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques are now finding exciting new noninvasive applications in medicine. There are two major approaches. The first is as an analytical technique using 31P NMR spectroscopy for the identification and quantitation of the more abundant phosphate metabolites in various tissues. Changes in the levels of these metabolites and in intracellular cytoplasmic pH can be followed in various ischemic and hypoxic conditions to monitor metabolic response to stress situations and to diagnose inborn errors of metabolism. The second major approach is an entirely different application of NMR techniques and uses 1H, the nucleus most abundant in biological tissues, largely in water and fats, to produce NMR images of any section of the body. By applying non-uniform magnetic fields across a section of the body, hydrogen nuclei in different elemental volumes in the section are tagged with different frequencies and their signals can be processed to give an image of the section. In contrast to computed tomographic scanning, NMR has particularly powerful application in the imaging of soft tissues.

  15. Partial homogeneity based high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectra under inhomogeneous magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Zhiliang; Lin, Liangjie; Lin, Yanqin E-mail: chenz@xmu.edu.cn; Chen, Zhong E-mail: chenz@xmu.edu.cn; Chen, Youhe

    2014-09-29

    In nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique, it is of great necessity and importance to obtain high-resolution spectra, especially under inhomogeneous magnetic fields. In this study, a method based on partial homogeneity is proposed for retrieving high-resolution one-dimensional NMR spectra under inhomogeneous fields. Signals from series of small voxels, which characterize high resolution due to small sizes, are recorded simultaneously. Then, an inhomogeneity correction algorithm is developed based on pattern recognition to correct the influence brought by field inhomogeneity automatically, thus yielding high-resolution information. Experiments on chemical solutions and fish spawn were carried out to demonstrate the performance of the proposed method. The proposed method serves as a single radiofrequency pulse high-resolution NMR spectroscopy under inhomogeneous fields and may provide an alternative of obtaining high-resolution spectra of in vivo living systems or chemical-reaction systems, where performances of conventional techniques are usually degenerated by field inhomogeneity.

  16. Dynamic nuclear polarization at high magnetic fields

    PubMed Central

    Maly, Thorsten; Debelouchina, Galia T.; Bajaj, Vikram S.; Hu, Kan-Nian; Joo, Chan-Gyu; Mak–Jurkauskas, Melody L.; Sirigiri, Jagadishwar R.; van der Wel, Patrick C. A.; Herzfeld, Judith; Temkin, Richard J.; Griffin, Robert G.

    2009-01-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is a method that permits NMR signal intensities of solids and liquids to be enhanced significantly, and is therefore potentially an important tool in structural and mechanistic studies of biologically relevant molecules. During a DNP experiment, the large polarization of an exogeneous or endogeneous unpaired electron is transferred to the nuclei of interest (I) by microwave (μw) irradiation of the sample. The maximum theoretical enhancement achievable is given by the gyromagnetic ratios (γe/γl), being ∼660 for protons. In the early 1950s, the DNP phenomenon was demonstrated experimentally, and intensively investigated in the following four decades, primarily at low magnetic fields. This review focuses on recent developments in the field of DNP with a special emphasis on work done at high magnetic fields (≥5 T), the regime where contemporary NMR experiments are performed. After a brief historical survey, we present a review of the classical continuous wave (cw) DNP mechanisms—the Overhauser effect, the solid effect, the cross effect, and thermal mixing. A special section is devoted to the theory of coherent polarization transfer mechanisms, since they are potentially more efficient at high fields than classical polarization schemes. The implementation of DNP at high magnetic fields has required the development and improvement of new and existing instrumentation. Therefore, we also review some recent developments in μw and probe technology, followed by an overview of DNP applications in biological solids and liquids. Finally, we outline some possible areas for future developments. PMID:18266416

  17. BROADBAND EXCITATION IN NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Tycko, R.

    1984-10-01

    Theoretical methods for designing sequences of radio frequency (rf) radiation pulses for broadband excitation of spin systems in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) are described. The sequences excite spins uniformly over large ranges of resonant frequencies arising from static magnetic field inhomogeneity, chemical shift differences, or spin couplings, or over large ranges of rf field amplitudes. Specific sequences for creating a population inversion or transverse magnetization are derived and demonstrated experimentally in liquid and solid state NMR. One approach to broadband excitation is based on principles of coherent averaging theory. A general formalism for deriving pulse sequences is given, along with computational methods for specific cases. This approach leads to sequences that produce strictly constant transformations of a spin system. The importance of this feature in NMR applications is discussed. A second approach to broadband excitation makes use of iterative schemes, i.e. sets of operations that are applied repetitively to a given initial pulse sequences, generating a series of increasingly complex sequences with increasingly desirable properties. A general mathematical framework for analyzing iterative schemes is developed. An iterative scheme is treated as a function that acts on a space of operators corresponding to the transformations produced by all possible pulse sequences. The fixed points of the function and the stability of the fixed points are shown to determine the essential behavior of the scheme. Iterative schemes for broadband population inversion are treated in detail. Algebraic and numerical methods for performing the mathematical analysis are presented. Two additional topics are treated. The first is the construction of sequences for uniform excitation of double-quantum coherence and for uniform polarization transfer over a range of spin couplings. Double-quantum excitation sequences are demonstrated in a liquid crystal system. The

  18. Chiral discrimination in nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lazzeretti, Paolo

    2017-08-08

    Chirality is a fundamental property of molecules whose spatial symmetry is characterized by the absence of improper rotations, making them not superimposable to their mirror image. Chiral molecules constitute the elementary building blocks of living species and one enantiomer is in general favoured (e.g., L-aminoacids and D-sugars pervade terrestrial homochiral biochemistry), because most chemical reactions producing natural substances are enantioselective. Since the effect of chiral chemicals and drugs on living beings can be markedly different between enantiomers, the quest for practical spectroscopical methods to scrutinize chirality is an issue of great importance and interest. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a topmost analytical technique, but spectrometers currently used are ``blind'' to chirality, i.e., %%In fact, spectrometers presently used in NMR are unable to discriminate the two mirror-image forms of a chiral molecule, because, in the absence of a chiral solvent, the spectral parameters, chemical shifts and spin-spin coupling constants, are identical for enantiomers. Therefore, the development of new procedures for routine chiral recognition would offer basic support to scientists. However, in the presence of magnetic fields, a distinction between {\\em true} and {\\em false} chirality is mandatory. The former epitomizes natural optical activity, which is rationalized by a time-even pseudoscalar, i.e., the trace of a second-rank tensor, the mixed electric dipole/mag\\-net\\-ic dipole polarizability. The Faraday effect, magnetic circular dichroism and magnetic optical activity are instead related to a time-odd axial vector. The present review summarizes recent theoretical and experimental efforts to discriminate enantiomers via NMR spectroscopy, with the focus on the deep connection between chirality

  19. Effects of time and temperature of firing on Fe-rich ceramics studied by Mössbauer spectroscopy and two-dimensional 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance relaxometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casieri, Cinzia; De Luca, Francesco; Nodari, Luca; Russo, Umberto; Terenzi, Camilla; Tudisca, Valentina

    2012-10-01

    The combined effects of firing temperature and soaking time on the microstructure of iron-rich porous ceramics have been studied by 57Fe-Mössbauer spectroscopy and 2D 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry using a single-sided probe. Examining water-saturated ceramics using the relaxation correlation method, where longitudinal (T1) and transverse (T2) relaxation times are measured concurrently, provides information about firing-induced changes in both porosity (related to T1) and magnetic properties (related to T2). Comparing the information obtained from 1H-NMR analyses with that obtained from Mössbauer spectroscopy (which characterizes changes in iron-bearing species) shows that the T1-T2 NMR correlation technique is very sensitive to even subtle modifications in the magnetic behavior of Fe-bearing species. Moreover, the single-sided NMR approach allows us to perform millimeter-scale depth-resolved measurements, which can be used to non-invasively study the microstructural heterogeneities associated with non-uniform firing effects inside ceramics. This is in contrast to Mössbauer spectroscopy, which requires that the ceramic samples be ground.

  20. Dynamic nuclear polarization in a magnetic resonance force microscope experiment.

    PubMed

    Issac, Corinne E; Gleave, Christine M; Nasr, Paméla T; Nguyen, Hoang L; Curley, Elizabeth A; Yoder, Jonilyn L; Moore, Eric W; Chen, Lei; Marohn, John A

    2016-04-07

    We report achieving enhanced nuclear magnetization in a magnetic resonance force microscope experiment at 0.6 tesla and 4.2 kelvin using the dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) effect. In our experiments a microwire coplanar waveguide delivered radiowaves to excite nuclear spins and microwaves to excite electron spins in a 250 nm thick nitroxide-doped polystyrene sample. Both electron and proton spin resonance were observed as a change in the mechanical resonance frequency of a nearby cantilever having a micron-scale nickel tip. NMR signal, not observable from Curie-law magnetization at 0.6 T, became observable when microwave irradiation was applied to saturate the electron spins. The resulting NMR signal's size, buildup time, dependence on microwave power, and dependence on irradiation frequency was consistent with a transfer of magnetization from electron spins to nuclear spins. Due to the presence of an inhomogeneous magnetic field introduced by the cantilever's magnetic tip, the electron spins in the sample were saturated in a microwave-resonant slice 10's of nm thick. The spatial distribution of the nuclear polarization enhancement factor ε was mapped by varying the frequency of the applied radiowaves. The observed enhancement factor was zero for spins in the center of the resonant slice, was ε = +10 to +20 for spins proximal to the magnet, and was ε = -10 to -20 for spins distal to the magnet. We show that this bipolar nuclear magnetization profile is consistent with cross-effect DNP in a ∼10(5) T m(-1) magnetic field gradient. Potential challenges associated with generating and using DNP-enhanced nuclear magnetization in a nanometer-resolution magnetic resonance imaging experiment are elucidated and discussed.

  1. Nuclear magnetic resonance for cultural heritage.

    PubMed

    Brai, Maria; Camaiti, Mara; Casieri, Cinzia; De Luca, Francesco; Fantazzini, Paola

    2007-05-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) portable devices are now being used for nondestructive in situ analysis of water content, pore space structure and protective treatment performance in porous media in the field of cultural heritage. It is a standard procedure to invert T(1) and T(2) relaxation data of fully water-saturated samples to get "pore size" distributions, but the use of T(2) requires great caution. It is well known that dephasing effects due to water molecule diffusion in a magnetic field gradient can affect transverse relaxation data, even if the smallest experimentally available half echo time tau is used in Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill experiments. When a portable single-sided NMR apparatus is used, large field gradients due to the instrument, at the scale of the sample, are thought to be the dominant dephasing cause. In this paper, T(1) and T(2) (at different tau values) distributions were measured in natural (Lecce stone) and artificial (brick samples coming from the Greek-Roman Theatre of Taormina) porous media of interest for cultural heritage by a standard laboratory instrument and a portable device. While T(1) distributions do not show any appreciable effect from inhomogeneous fields, T(2) distributions can show strong effects, and a procedure is presented based on the dependence of 1/T(2) on tau to separate pore-scale gradient effects from sample-scale gradient effects. Unexpectedly, the gradient at the pore scale can be, in some cases, strong enough to make negligible the effects of gradients at the sample scale of the single-sided device.

  2. Burn injury by nuclear magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Eising, Ernst G; Hughes, Justin; Nolte, Frank; Jentzen, Walter; Bockisch, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging has become a standard diagnostic procedure in clinical medicine and is well known to have hazards for patients with pacemaker or metallic foreign bodies. Compared to CT, the frequency of MRI examinations is increasing due to the missing exposure of the patients by X-rays. Furthermore, high-field magnetic resonance tomograph (MRT) with 3 T has entered clinical practice, and 7-T systems are installed in multiple scientific institutions. On the other hand, the possibility of burn injuries has been reported only in very few cases. Based on a clinical finding of a burn injury in a 31-year-old male patient during a routine MRI of the lumbar spine with standard protocol, the MR scanner was checked and the examination was simulated in an animal model. The patient received a third-degree burn injury of the skin of the right hand and pelvis in a small region of skin contact. The subsequent control of the MRI scanner indicated no abnormal values for radiofrequency (RF) and power. In the subsequent animal experiment, comparable injuries could only be obtained by high RF power in a microwave stove. It is concluded that 'tissue loops' resulting from a contact between hand and pelvis must be avoided. With regard to forensic aspects, the need to inform patients of such a minimal risk can be avoided if the patients are adequately positioned using an isolating material between the hands and pelvis. These facts must be emphasized more in the future, if high-field MRI with stronger RF gradients is available in routine imaging. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Two-dimensional magnetostriction under vector magnetic characteristic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakabayashi, D.; Enokizono, M.

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents two-dimensional magnetostriction of electrical steel sheet under vector magnetic characteristic. In conventional measurement method using Single Sheet Tester, the magnetic flux density, the magnetic field strength, and the magnetostriction have been measured in one direction. However, an angle between the magnetic flux density vector and the magnetic field strength vector exists because the magnetic property is vector quantity. An angle between the magnetic flux density vector and the direction of maximum magnetostriction also exists. We developed a new measurement method, which enables measurement of these angles. The vector magnetic characteristic and the two-dimensional magnetostriction have been measured using the new measurement method. The BH and Bλ curves considering the angles are shown in this paper. The analyzed results considering the angles are also made clear.

  4. Selectivity in multiple quantum nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, W.S.

    1980-11-01

    The observation of multiple-quantum nuclear magnetic resonance transitions in isotropic or anisotropic liquids is shown to give readily interpretable information on molecular configurations, rates of motional processes, and intramolecular interactions. However, the observed intensity of high multiple-quantum transitions falls off dramatically as the number of coupled spins increases. The theory of multiple-quantum NMR is developed through the density matrix formalism, and exact intensities are derived for several cases (isotropic first-order systems and anisotropic systems with high symmetry) to shown that this intensity decrease is expected if standard multiple-quantum pulse sequences are used. New pulse sequences are developed which excite coherences and produce population inversions only between selected states, even though other transitions are simultaneously resonant. One type of selective excitation presented only allows molecules to absorb and emit photons in groups of n. Coherent averaging theory is extended to describe these selective sequences, and to design sequences which are selective to arbitrarily high order in the Magnus expansion. This theory and computer calculations both show that extremely good selectivity and large signal enhancements are possible.

  5. Nuclear magnetic resonance data of C10H15

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalinowski, H.-O.; Kumar, M.; Gupta, V.; Gupta, R.

    This document is part of Part 1 `Aliphatic Compounds' of Subvolume D 'Chemical Shifts and Coupling Constants for Carbon-13' of Landolt-Börnstein III/35 'Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Data', Group III 'Condensed Matter'.

  6. Nuclear magnetic resonance data of C9H20OSi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhova, B. M.

    This document is part of Part 6 `Organic Metalloid Compounds' of Subvolume D 'Chemical Shifts and Coupling Constants for Carbon-13' of Landolt-Börnstein III/35 'Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Data', Group III 'Condensed Matter'.

  7. Nuclear magnetic resonance data of C8H18OSi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhova, B. M.

    This document is part of Part 6 `Organic Metalloid Compounds' of Subvolume D 'Chemical Shifts and Coupling Constants for Carbon-13' of Landolt-Börnstein III/35 'Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Data', Group III 'Condensed Matter'.

  8. Nuclear Magnetic Double Resonance Using Weak Perturbing RF Fields

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, G. Fredric

    1977-01-01

    Describes a nuclear magnetic resonance experimental example of spin tickling; also discusses a direct approach for verifying the relative signs of coupling constants in three-spin cyclopropyl systems. (SL)

  9. Nuclear Magnetic Double Resonance Using Weak Perturbing RF Fields

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, G. Fredric

    1977-01-01

    Describes a nuclear magnetic resonance experimental example of spin tickling; also discusses a direct approach for verifying the relative signs of coupling constants in three-spin cyclopropyl systems. (SL)

  10. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy with single spin sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Müller, C.; Kong, X.; Cai, J.-M.; Melentijević, K.; Stacey, A.; Markham, M.; Twitchen, D.; Isoya, J.; Pezzagna, S.; Meijer, J.; Du, J. F.; Plenio, M. B.; Naydenov, B.; McGuinness, L. P.; Jelezko, F.

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging at the ultimate sensitivity limit of single molecules or single nuclear spins requires fundamentally new detection strategies. The strong coupling regime, when interaction between sensor and sample spins dominates all other interactions, is one such strategy. In this regime, classically forbidden detection of completely unpolarized nuclei is allowed, going beyond statistical fluctuations in magnetization. Here we realize strong coupling between an atomic (nitrogen–vacancy) sensor and sample nuclei to perform nuclear magnetic resonance on four 29Si spins. We exploit the field gradient created by the diamond atomic sensor, in concert with compressed sensing, to realize imaging protocols, enabling individual nuclei to be located with Angstrom precision. The achieved signal-to-noise ratio under ambient conditions allows single nuclear spin sensitivity to be achieved within seconds. PMID:25146503

  11. Three-dimensional magnetic recording using ferromagnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suto, Hirofumi; Kudo, Kiwamu; Nagasawa, Tazumi; Kanao, Taro; Mizushima, Koichi; Sato, Rie

    2016-07-01

    To meet the ever-increasing demand for data storage, future magnetic recording devices will need to be made three-dimensional by implementing multilayer recording. In this article, we present methods of detecting and manipulating the magnetization direction of a specific layer selectively in a vertically stacked multilayer magnetic system, which enable layer-selective read and write operations in three-dimensional magnetic recording devices. The principle behind the methods is ferromagnetic resonance excitation in a microwave magnetic field. By designing each magnetic recording layer to have a different ferromagnetic resonance frequency, magnetization excitation can be induced individually in each layer by tuning the frequency of an applied microwave magnetic field, and this selective magnetization excitation can be utilized for the layer-selective operations. Regarding media for three-dimensional recording, when layers of a perpendicular magnetic material are vertically stacked, dipolar interaction between multiple recording layers arises and is expected to cause problems, such as degradation of thermal stability and switching field distribution. To solve these problems, we propose the use of an antiferromagnetically coupled structure consisting of hard and soft magnetic layers. Because the stray fields from these two layers cancel each other, antiferromagnetically coupled media can reduce the dipolar interaction.

  12. Force-detected nuclear magnetic resonance: recent advances and future challenges.

    PubMed

    Poggio, M; Degen, C L

    2010-08-27

    We review recent efforts to detect small numbers of nuclear spins using magnetic resonance force microscopy. Magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM) is a scanning probe technique that relies on the mechanical measurement of the weak magnetic force between a microscopic magnet and the magnetic moments in a sample. Spurred by the recent progress in fabricating ultrasensitive force detectors, MRFM has rapidly improved its capability over the last decade. Today it boasts a spin sensitivity that surpasses conventional, inductive nuclear magnetic resonance detectors by about eight orders of magnitude. In this review we touch on the origins of this technique and focus on its recent application to nanoscale nuclear spin ensembles, in particular on the imaging of nanoscale objects with a three-dimensional (3D) spatial resolution better than 10 nm. We consider the experimental advances driving this work and highlight the underlying physical principles and limitations of the method. Finally, we discuss the challenges that must be met in order to advance the technique towards single nuclear spin sensitivity-and perhaps-to 3D microscopy of molecules with atomic resolution.

  13. Three-dimensional magnetic reconnection in Earth's magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorelli, John

    2007-11-01

    Magnetic reconnection is thought to be the primary mode by which the solar wind couples to the terrestrial magnetosphere, driving phenomena such as magnetic storms and aurorae. While the theory of two-dimensional reconnection is well developed, and has been applied with great success to axisymmetric and toroidal systems such as laboratory plasma experiments and fusion devices, it is difficult to justify the application of two-dimensional theory to nontoroidal plasma systems such as Earth's magnetosphere. Unfortunately, the theory of three-dimensional magnetic reconnection is much less well developed, and even defining magnetic reconnection has turned out to be problematic. In this talk, we review recent progress in the use of MHD to address the physics of three-dimensional reconnection in Earth's magnetosphere. The talk consists of two parts. In the first part, we review the various definitions of three-dimensional reconnection which have appeared in the literature in the last twenty years. Our goal here is to map these definitions to sets of physical phenomena which have been identified as ``reconnection'' in various three-dimensional contexts. In the second part of the talk, we present our latest magnetosphere MHD simulation results and indentify two qualitatively distinct types of reconnection phenomena (organized by the orientation of the Interplanetary Magnetic Field): 1) steady separator reconnection under generic northward IMF conditions, involving plasma flow across magnetic separatrix boundaries, and 2) time-dependent reconnection under generic southward IMF conditions, involving a global change in the topology of the magnetic field. While neither of these types of reconnection is well described by two-dimensional theory (indeed, we argue that attempts to apply two-dimensional ideas to the magnetopause have resulted in more confusion than clarification), both can be easily categorized according to existing definitions of three-dimensional reconnection.

  14. Three-dimensional tissue culture based on magnetic cell levitation.

    PubMed

    Souza, Glauco R; Molina, Jennifer R; Raphael, Robert M; Ozawa, Michael G; Stark, Daniel J; Levin, Carly S; Bronk, Lawrence F; Ananta, Jeyarama S; Mandelin, Jami; Georgescu, Maria-Magdalena; Bankson, James A; Gelovani, Juri G; Killian, T C; Arap, Wadih; Pasqualini, Renata

    2010-04-01

    Cell culture is an essential tool in drug discovery, tissue engineering and stem cell research. Conventional tissue culture produces two-dimensional cell growth with gene expression, signalling and morphology that can be different from those found in vivo, and this compromises its clinical relevance. Here, we report a three-dimensional tissue culture based on magnetic levitation of cells in the presence of a hydrogel consisting of gold, magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles and filamentous bacteriophage. By spatially controlling the magnetic field, the geometry of the cell mass can be manipulated, and multicellular clustering of different cell types in co-culture can be achieved. Magnetically levitated human glioblastoma cells showed similar protein expression profiles to those observed in human tumour xenografts. Taken together, these results indicate that levitated three-dimensional culture with magnetized phage-based hydrogels more closely recapitulates in vivo protein expression and may be more feasible for long-term multicellular studies.

  15. Three-dimensional tissue culture based on magnetic cell levitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, Glauco R.; Molina, Jennifer R.; Raphael, Robert M.; Ozawa, Michael G.; Stark, Daniel J.; Levin, Carly S.; Bronk, Lawrence F.; Ananta, Jeyarama S.; Mandelin, Jami; Georgescu, Maria-Magdalena; Bankson, James A.; Gelovani, Juri G.; Killian, T. C.; Arap, Wadih; Pasqualini, Renata

    2010-04-01

    Cell culture is an essential tool in drug discovery, tissue engineering and stem cell research. Conventional tissue culture produces two-dimensional cell growth with gene expression, signalling and morphology that can be different from those found in vivo, and this compromises its clinical relevance. Here, we report a three-dimensional tissue culture based on magnetic levitation of cells in the presence of a hydrogel consisting of gold, magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles and filamentous bacteriophage. By spatially controlling the magnetic field, the geometry of the cell mass can be manipulated, and multicellular clustering of different cell types in co-culture can be achieved. Magnetically levitated human glioblastoma cells showed similar protein expression profiles to those observed in human tumour xenografts. Taken together, these results indicate that levitated three-dimensional culture with magnetized phage-based hydrogels more closely recapitulates in vivo protein expression and may be more feasible for long-term multicellular studies.

  16. Comparison of nuclear electric resonance and nuclear magnetic resonance in integer and fractional quantum Hall states

    SciTech Connect

    Tomimatsu, Toru Shirai, Shota; Hashimoto, Katsushi Sato, Ken; Hirayama, Yoshiro

    2015-08-15

    Electric-field-induced nuclear resonance (NER: nuclear electric resonance) involving quantum Hall states (QHSs) was studied at various filling factors by exploiting changes in nuclear spins polarized at quantum Hall breakdown. Distinct from the magnetic dipole interaction in nuclear magnetic resonance, the interaction of the electric-field gradient with the electric quadrupole moment plays the dominant role in the NER mechanism. The magnitude of the NER signal strongly depends on whether electronic states are localized or extended. This indicates that NER is sensitive to the screening capability of the electric field associated with QHSs.

  17. Nuclear magnetization in gallium arsenide quantum dots at zero magnetic field

    PubMed Central

    Sallen, G.; Kunz, S.; Amand, T.; Bouet, L.; Kuroda, T.; Mano, T.; Paget, D.; Krebs, O.; Marie, X.; Sakoda, K.; Urbaszek, B.

    2014-01-01

    Optical and electrical control of the nuclear spin system allows enhancing the sensitivity of NMR applications and spin-based information storage and processing. Dynamic nuclear polarization in semiconductors is commonly achieved in the presence of a stabilizing external magnetic field. Here we report efficient optical pumping of nuclear spins at zero magnetic field in strain-free GaAs quantum dots. The strong interaction of a single, optically injected electron spin with the nuclear spins acts as a stabilizing, effective magnetic field (Knight field) on the nuclei. We optically tune the Knight field amplitude and direction. In combination with a small transverse magnetic field, we are able to control the longitudinal and transverse components of the nuclear spin polarization in the absence of lattice strain—that is, in dots with strongly reduced static nuclear quadrupole effects, as reproduced by our model calculations. PMID:24500329

  18. Nuclear magnetization in gallium arsenide quantum dots at zero magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Sallen, G; Kunz, S; Amand, T; Bouet, L; Kuroda, T; Mano, T; Paget, D; Krebs, O; Marie, X; Sakoda, K; Urbaszek, B

    2014-01-01

    Optical and electrical control of the nuclear spin system allows enhancing the sensitivity of NMR applications and spin-based information storage and processing. Dynamic nuclear polarization in semiconductors is commonly achieved in the presence of a stabilizing external magnetic field. Here we report efficient optical pumping of nuclear spins at zero magnetic field in strain-free GaAs quantum dots. The strong interaction of a single, optically injected electron spin with the nuclear spins acts as a stabilizing, effective magnetic field (Knight field) on the nuclei. We optically tune the Knight field amplitude and direction. In combination with a small transverse magnetic field, we are able to control the longitudinal and transverse components of the nuclear spin polarization in the absence of lattice strain--that is, in dots with strongly reduced static nuclear quadrupole effects, as reproduced by our model calculations.

  19. High-Resolution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance of Solids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maciel, Gary E.

    1984-01-01

    Examines recent developments in techniques for obtaining high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra on solid samples, discussing the kinds of applications for which these techniques are well suited. Also discusses the characteristics of NMR of solids and generating magnetization for NMR in solids. (JN)

  20. High-Resolution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance of Solids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maciel, Gary E.

    1984-01-01

    Examines recent developments in techniques for obtaining high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra on solid samples, discussing the kinds of applications for which these techniques are well suited. Also discusses the characteristics of NMR of solids and generating magnetization for NMR in solids. (JN)

  1. Fractional impurity moments in two-dimensional noncollinear magnets.

    PubMed

    Wollny, Alexander; Fritz, Lars; Vojta, Matthias

    2011-09-23

    We study dilute magnetic impurities and vacancies in two-dimensional frustrated magnets with noncollinear order. Taking the triangular-lattice Heisenberg model as an example, we use quasiclassical methods to determine the impurity contributions to the magnetization and susceptibility. Most importantly, each impurity moment is not quantized but receives nonuniversal screening corrections due to local relief of frustration. At finite temperatures, where bulk long-range order is absent, this implies an impurity-induced magnetic response of Curie form, with a prefactor corresponding to a fractional moment per impurity. We also discuss the behavior in an applied magnetic field, where we find a singular linear-response limit for overcompensated impurities.

  2. Two-dimensional sup 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance study of AaH IT, an anti-insect toxin from the scorpion Androctonus australis Hector. Sequential resonance assignments and folding of the polypeptide chain

    SciTech Connect

    Darbon, H. ); Weber, C.; Braun, W. )

    1991-02-19

    Sequence-specific nuclear magnetic resonance assignments for the polypeptide backbone and for most of the amino acid side-chain protons, as well as the general folding of AaH IT, are described. AaH IT is a neurotoxin purified from the venom of the scorpion Androctonus australis Hector and is specifically active on the insect nervous system. The secondary structure and the hydrogen-bonding patterns in the regular secondary structure elements are deduced from nuclear Overhauser effects and the sequence locations of the slowly exchanging amide protons. The backbone folding is determined by distance geometry calculations with the DISMAN program. The regular secondary structure includes two and a half turns of {alpha}-helix running from residues 21 to 30 and a three-stranded antiparallel {beta}-sheet including peptides 3-5, 34-38, and 41-46. Two tight turns are present, one connecting the end of the {alpha}-helix to an external strand of the {beta}-sheet, i.e., turn 31-34, and another connecting this same strand to the central one, i.e., turn 38-41. The differences in the specificity of these related proteins, which are able to discriminate between mammalian and insect voltage-dependent sodium channels of excitable tissues, are most probably brought about by the position of the C-terminal peptide with regard to a hydrophobic surface common to all scorpion toxins examined thus far. Thus, the interaction of a given scorpion toxin with its receptor might well be governed by the presence of this solvent-exposed hydrophobic surface, whereas adjacent areas modulate the specificity of the interaction.

  3. Electron transport through nuclear pasta in magnetized neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakovlev, D. G.

    2015-10-01

    We present a simple model for electron transport in a possible layer of exotic nuclear clusters (in the so-called nuclear pasta layer) between the crust and liquid core of a strongly magnetized neutron star. The electron transport there can be strongly anisotropic and gyrotropic. The anisotropy is produced by different electron effective collision frequencies along and across local symmetry axis in domains of exotic ordered nuclear clusters and by complicated effects of the magnetic field. We also calculate averaged kinetic coefficients in case local domains are freely oriented. Possible applications of the obtained results and open problems are outlined.

  4. Producing Three Dimensional Nanostructured Magnetic Materials for Novel Magnetic Devices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-22

    Hc) and remanance magnetization (Mr). A review of our processing technique was published in Annual Review of Materials Research [2]. (c...crystallographic magnetic directions can have higher coercivities, remanences , and/or exchange coupling. We produced preferentially ordered magnetic iron

  5. Determination of bound and unbound water in dental alginate irreversible hydrocolloid by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fellows, C M; Thomas, G A

    2009-04-01

    Alginate materials are considered unsuitable for precise fixed prosthetic rehabilitation due to their tendency to undergo spontaneous syneresis. Commercial alginate impression materials were investigated using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Spectroscopy to probe the relation between changes in the microscopic water environment and dimensional change to obtain a better understanding of spontaneous syneresis. NMR was used to measure the spin-lattice relaxation times (T(1)) of (1)H nuclei in water in alginate matrices to characterize changes in gel structure over time. These results were related to the dimensional stabilities of the alginate impression materials, their chemical compositions, and the Moisture Sorption Isotherms (MSI) obtained by incubation at fixed relative humidities. The rate of change of T(1) with time was found to be a better predictor of dimensional stability than MSI. The greatest dimensional stability for the alginate powders investigated was associated with a high filler:alginate ratio and a high Ca:Na ratio. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy may used to measure changes in alginate impression materials under conditions where no dimensional change can be observed directly. Changes occurred rapidly even at 100% humidity, suggesting the dimensional stability of alginate impression materials is partially independent of the rate of dehydration. The results may open a way to formulate alginate impression materials more suitable for precise fabrication of dental prostheses.

  6. Theory of two-dimensional ESR with nuclear modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamliel, Dan; Freed, Jack H.

    A formalism for computing 2D ESR lineshapes with nuclear modulation is developed in a form which is useful for planning phase cycles for particular purposes. A simple method of processing spectra, utilizing quadrature detection, is shown to enhance the selectivity of the phase cycling techniques. Computed ESR-COSY, ESR-SECSY, and 2D ELDOR lineshapes are presented for several kinds of polycrystalline and single-crystal samples which exhibit nuclear modulation, due to one or several nuclei. The two-dimensional methods are found to give more detailed structural information than the corresponding ESEEM spectra. New phase cycles are found to eliminate completely all transverse and axial peaks in 2D ELDOR and in ESR-COSY, and at the same time eliminate all artifacts arising from incomplete image rejection. Other phase cycles are presented for selecting in those experiments only axial peaks, for measuring T1. It is also shown how selective phase cycles may help to distinguish between coherent and exchange cross peaks. In the special case of nitroxides in typical Zeeman fields, there are no significant nuclear modulation effects from the 14N nuclear spin interaction, but those from the protons (or deuterons) will, in general, be significant.

  7. Need for remeasurements of nuclear magnetic dipole moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustavsson, Martin G.; Mårtensson-Pendrill, Ann-Marie

    1998-11-01

    The need for a reassessment of nuclear magnetic dipole moments is prompted by recent experiments on the ground-state hyperfine structure in highly charged hydrogenlike systems which are sufficiently sensitive to probe QED effects. This work gives an overview of the magnetic dipole moments for the nuclei of interest, i.e., 165Ho, 185,187Re, 203,205Tl, 207Pb, and 209Bi. It is found that the present uncertainties in the nuclear magnetic dipole moment limit the interpretation of the accurate experimental hyperfine structures for these systems.

  8. The nuclear spin relaxation rate for clean quasi-two-dimensional superconductors in the vicinity of ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biéri, J. B.; Lederer, P.

    1996-04-01

    We calculate the nuclear spin relaxation rate of clean quasi-two-dimensional (2D) superconductors with s-wave pairing in high magnetic fields using the BCS model and the Brandt, Pesch and Tewordt approximation for the single-particle propagator. The calculation is valid in the vicinity of 0953-8984/8/15/011/img2. Thermal fluctuations of vortices are not taken into account. We evaluate numerically our results in the case of high-0953-8984/8/15/011/img3 materials and organic superconductors. In a perpendicular field the Hebel - Slichter coherence peak is suppressed depending on the variation of the quasi-particle lifetime below 0953-8984/8/15/011/img3. We also describe the magnetic field dependence of the nuclear spin relaxation rate. Using the experimentally determined value of the quasi-particle lifetime, the model reproduces the experimental initial variations of 0953-8984/8/15/011/img5 versus 0953-8984/8/15/011/img6 at different magnetic fields. However, the Hebel - Slichter peak is conserved in the low-field limit, or when the applied magnetic field is parallel to the superconducting planes.

  9. Three-dimensional modelling in magnetotelluric and magnetic variational sounding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, I. K.; Phillips, R. J.; Rankin, D.

    1977-01-01

    The Galerkin finite-element method is used to obtain approximate solutions for the three-dimensional induction problem. A rectangular conductive prism is considered as an example, and solutions are obtained for linear and circularly polarized incident plane-wave fields. Magnetotelluric tensor impedances and magnetic transfer functions are computed. Polar diagrams of the tensor impedances and magnetic transfer functions along with their amplitude contour maps are presented. The dimensionality parameter, skew, is contoured at the surface of the earth. It is shown that the relative amplitudes and shapes of the additional and principal impedance polar diagrams can be used to determine the dimensionality of geoelectrical structures. Stations with skew values greater than 0.2 are significantly influenced by the three-dimensionality of the geoelectric structure. The amplitudes of the magnetic transfer function and the orientations of its polar diagrams exhibit large anomalies in the vicinity of the intersection of the lateral contacts.

  10. The Fourier Transform in Chemistry. Part 1. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance: Introduction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Roy W.; Williams, Kathryn R.

    1989-01-01

    Using fourier transformation methods in nuclear magnetic resonance has made possible increased sensitivity in chemical analysis. This article describes these methods as they relate to magnetization, the RF magnetic field, nuclear relaxation, the RF pulse, and free induction decay. (CW)

  11. The Fourier Transform in Chemistry. Part 1. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance: Introduction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Roy W.; Williams, Kathryn R.

    1989-01-01

    Using fourier transformation methods in nuclear magnetic resonance has made possible increased sensitivity in chemical analysis. This article describes these methods as they relate to magnetization, the RF magnetic field, nuclear relaxation, the RF pulse, and free induction decay. (CW)

  12. Lignin modification during Eucalyptus globulus kraft pulping followed by totally chlorine-free bleaching: a two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance, Fourier transform infrared, and pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry study.

    PubMed

    Ibarra, David; Chávez, María Isabel; Rencoret, Jorge; Del Río, José Carlos; Gutiérrez, Ana; Romero, Javier; Camarero, Susana; Martínez, María Jesús; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús; Martínez, Angel T

    2007-05-02

    Chemical modification of eucalypt lignin was investigated during kraft pulping and chlorine-free bleaching by comparing milled wood lignin, kraft lignin, and pulp enzymatic residual lignins. The syringyl-to-guaiacyl ratio (S/G) from analytical pyrolysis slightly changed during pulping and bleaching (S/G, 3-4) but was higher in the kraft lignin. Semiquantitative heteronuclear single quantum correlation (HSQC) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) showed that the relative amount of beta-O-4' (around 80% side chains) and resinol type substructures (15%) was slightly modified during pulping and oxygen delignification. However, a decrease of resinol substructures (to only 6%) was found after alkaline peroxide bleaching. The relative amount of surviving linkages in the highly phenolic kraft lignin was dramatically modified; resinols were predominant. Oxygen delignification did not change interunit linkages, but a relative increase of oxidized units was found in the HSQC aromatic region, in agreement with the small increase of pyrolysis markers with oxidized side chains. NMR heteronuclear multiple bond correlations showed that the oxidized units after oxygen delignification bore conjugated ketone groups.

  13. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation. Characterization of coal-derived materials by field desorption mass spectrometry, two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance, supercritical fluid extraction, and supercritical fluid chromatography/mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, J.A.; Linehan, J.C.; Robins, W.H.

    1992-07-01

    Under contract from the DOE , and in association with CONSOL Inc., Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) evaluated four principal and several complementary techniques for the analysis of non-distillable direct coal liquefaction materials in support of process development. Field desorption mass spectrometry (FDMS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic methods were examined for potential usefulness as techniques to elucidate the chemical structure of residual (nondistillable) direct coal liquefaction derived materials. Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) and supercritical fluid chromatography/mass spectrometry (SFC/MS) were evaluated for effectiveness in compound-class separation and identification of residual materials. Liquid chromatography (including microcolumn) separation techniques, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (MS/MS), and GC/Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy methods were applied to supercritical fluid extracts. The full report authored by the PNL researchers is presented here. The following assessment briefly highlights the major findings of the project, and evaluates the potential of the methods for application to coal liquefaction materials. These results will be incorporated by CONSOL into a general overview of the application of novel analytical techniques to coal-derived materials at the conclusion of CONSOL`s contract.

  14. Electrically detected nuclear magnetic resonance in GaAs/AlGaAs-based quantum point contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keane, Zachary; Godfrey, Matthew; Burke, Adam; Chen, Jason; Fricke, Sebastian; Klochan, Oleh; Micolich, Adam; Beere, Harvey; Ritchie, Dave; Trunov, Kirill; Reuter, Dirk; Wieck, Andreas; Hamilton, Alex

    2011-03-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a well-known technique with widespread applications in physics, chemistry and medicine. Conventional NMR studies use inductive coils to detect the magnetic field produced by precessing nuclear spins; this approach requires on the order of 1012 spins for detection. Recently, resistive detection of NMR through the hyperfine interaction has been demonstrated with electrons in mesoscopic 2- and 1-dimensional devices based on high-quality GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructures. These studies are typically sensitive to 108 spins, enabling NMR on much smaller sample volumes. Holes are predicted to have much weaker nuclear spin coupling than electrons, which could be relevant to the emerging fields of spintronics and quantum information processing. We present a preliminary comparison between the magnitude of the NMR signal in electron and hole quantum point contacts.

  15. Least Squares Magnetic-Field Optimization for Portable Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Magnet Design

    SciTech Connect

    Paulsen, Jeffrey L; Franck, John; Demas, Vasiliki; Bouchard, Louis-S.

    2008-03-27

    Single-sided and mobile nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) sensors have the advantages of portability, low cost, and low power consumption compared to conventional high-field NMR and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems. We present fast, flexible, and easy-to-implement target field algorithms for mobile NMR and MRI magnet design. The optimization finds a global optimum ina cost function that minimizes the error in the target magnetic field in the sense of least squares. When the technique is tested on a ring array of permanent-magnet elements, the solution matches the classical dipole Halbach solution. For a single-sided handheld NMR sensor, the algorithm yields a 640 G field homogeneous to 16 100 ppm across a 1.9 cc volume located 1.5 cm above the top of the magnets and homogeneous to 32 200 ppm over a 7.6 cc volume. This regime is adequate for MRI applications. We demonstrate that the homogeneous region can be continuously moved away from the sensor by rotating magnet rod elements, opening the way for NMR sensors with adjustable"sensitive volumes."

  16. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance study of hirudin: resonance assignment and secondary structure

    SciTech Connect

    Sukumaran, D.K.; Clore, G.M.; Preuss, A.; Zarbock, J.; Gronenbron, A.M.

    1987-01-27

    The /sup 1/H NMR spectrum of the 65-residue protein hirudin is assigned in a sequential manner by using a combination of two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance techniques to demonstrate through-bond and through space (<5-A) connectives. The secondary structure of hirudin is deduced from a qualitative interpretation of the nuclear Overhauser effects involving the backbone NH, C/sup ..cap alpha../H, and C/sup ..beta../H protons. It is shown that hirudin has two ..beta..-sheets and no ..cap alpha..-helices.

  17. Three-dimensional Tissue Culture Based on Magnetic Cell Levitation

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Glauco R.; Molina, Jennifer R.; Raphael, Robert M.; Ozawa, Michael G.; Stark, Daniel J.; Levin, Carly S.; Bronk, Lawrence F.; Ananta, Jeyarama S.; Mandelin, Jami; Georgescu, Maria-Magdalena; Bankson, James A.; Gelovani, Juri G.

    2015-01-01

    Cell culture is an essential tool for drug discovery, tissue engineering, and stem cell research. Conventional tissue culture produces two-dimensional (2D) cell growth with gene expression, signaling, and morphology that can differ from those in vivo and thus compromise clinical relevancy1–5. Here we report a three-dimensional (3D) culture of cells based on magnetic levitation in the presence of hydrogels containing gold and magnetic iron oxide (MIO) nanoparticles plus filamentous bacteriophage. This methodology allows for control of cell mass geometry and guided, multicellular clustering of different cell types in co-culture through spatial variance of the magnetic field. Moreover, magnetic levitation of human glioblastoma cells demonstrates similar protein expression profiles to those observed in human tumor xenografts. Taken together, these results suggest levitated 3D culture with magnetized phage-based hydrogels more closely recapitulates in vivo protein expression and allows for long-term multi-cellular studies. PMID:20228788

  18. Discrete decoding based ultrafast multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Zhiliang; Lin, Liangjie; Ye, Qimiao; Li, Jing; Cai, Shuhui; Chen, Zhong

    2015-07-14

    The three-dimensional (3D) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy constitutes an important and powerful tool in analyzing chemical and biological systems. However, the abundant 3D information arrives at the expense of long acquisition times lasting hours or even days. Therefore, there has been a continuous interest in developing techniques to accelerate recordings of 3D NMR spectra, among which the ultrafast spatiotemporal encoding technique supplies impressive acquisition speed by compressing a multidimensional spectrum in a single scan. However, it tends to suffer from tradeoffs among spectral widths in different dimensions, which deteriorates in cases of NMR spectroscopy with more dimensions. In this study, the discrete decoding is proposed to liberate the ultrafast technique from tradeoffs among spectral widths in different dimensions by focusing decoding on signal-bearing sites. For verifying its feasibility and effectiveness, we utilized the method to generate two different types of 3D spectra. The proposed method is also applicable to cases with more than three dimensions, which, based on the experimental results, may widen applications of the ultrafast technique.

  19. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of bovine γB-crystallin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurston, George; Mills, Jeffrey; Michel, Lea; Mathews, Kaylee; Zanet, John; Payan, Angel; van Nostrand, Keith; Kotlarchyk, Michael; Ross, David; Wahle, Christopher; Hamilton, John

    Anisotropy of shape and/or interactions play an important role in determining the properties of concentrated solutions of the eye lens protein, γB-crystallin, including its liquid-liquid phase transition. We are studying γB anisotropic interactions with use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) concentration- and temperature-dependent chemical shift perturbations (CSPs). We analyze two-dimensional heteronuclear spin quantum coherence (HSQC) spectra on backbone nitrogen and attached hydrogen nuclei for CSPs, up to 3 percent volume fraction. Cumulative distribution functions of the CSPs show a concentration and temperature-dependent spread. Many peaks that are highly shifted with either concentration or temperature are close (i) crystal intermolecular contacts (ii) locations of cataractogenic point mutations of a homologous human protein, human γD-crystallin, and (iii) charged amino-acid residues. We also discuss the concentration- and temperature-dependence of NMR and quasielastic light scattering measurements of rotational and translational diffusion of γB crystallin in solution, affected by interprotein attractions. Supported by NIH EY018249.

  20. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and the BCS Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slichter, Charles P.

    The author describes the inspiration for the experiment by Hebel and Slichter to measure the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation time in super-conductors, the design considerations for the experiment, the surprising experimental results, their theoretical treatment using the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory, and how comparing the nuclear relaxation results with those for ultrasound absorption confirmed the central idea of the BCS theory, the BCS pair wave function.

  1. Advances in Theory of Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Mananga, Eugene S.; Moghaddasi, Jalil; Sana, Ajaz; Akinmoladun, Andrew; Sadoqi, Mostafa

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in theory of solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) such as Floquet-Magnus expansion and Fer expansion, address alternative methods for solving a time-dependent linear differential equation which is a central problem in quantum physics in general and solid-state NMR in particular. The power and the salient features of these theoretical approaches that are helpful to describe the time evolution of the spin system at all times are presented. This review article presents a broad view of manipulations of spin systems in solid-state NMR, based on milestones theories including the average Hamiltonian theory and the Floquet theory, and the approaches currently developing such as the Floquet-Magnus expansion and the Fer expansion. All these approaches provide procedures to control and describe the spin dynamics in solid-state NMR. Applications of these theoretical methods to stroboscopic and synchronized manipulations, non-synchronized experiments, multiple incommensurated frequencies, magic-angle spinning samples, are illustrated. We also reviewed the propagators of these theories and discussed their convergences. Note that the FME is an extension of the popular Magnus Expansion and Average Hamiltonian Theory. It aims is to bridge the AHT to the Floquet Theorem but in a more concise and efficient formalism. Calculations can then be performed in a finite-dimensional Hilbert space instead of an infinite dimensional space within the so-called Floquet theory. We expected that the FME will provide means for more accurate and efficient spin dynamics simulation and for devising new RF pulse sequence. PMID:26878063

  2. Advances in Theory of Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance.

    PubMed

    Mananga, Eugene S; Moghaddasi, Jalil; Sana, Ajaz; Akinmoladun, Andrew; Sadoqi, Mostafa

    Recent advances in theory of solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) such as Floquet-Magnus expansion and Fer expansion, address alternative methods for solving a time-dependent linear differential equation which is a central problem in quantum physics in general and solid-state NMR in particular. The power and the salient features of these theoretical approaches that are helpful to describe the time evolution of the spin system at all times are presented. This review article presents a broad view of manipulations of spin systems in solid-state NMR, based on milestones theories including the average Hamiltonian theory and the Floquet theory, and the approaches currently developing such as the Floquet-Magnus expansion and the Fer expansion. All these approaches provide procedures to control and describe the spin dynamics in solid-state NMR. Applications of these theoretical methods to stroboscopic and synchronized manipulations, non-synchronized experiments, multiple incommensurated frequencies, magic-angle spinning samples, are illustrated. We also reviewed the propagators of these theories and discussed their convergences. Note that the FME is an extension of the popular Magnus Expansion and Average Hamiltonian Theory. It aims is to bridge the AHT to the Floquet Theorem but in a more concise and efficient formalism. Calculations can then be performed in a finite-dimensional Hilbert space instead of an infinite dimensional space within the so-called Floquet theory. We expected that the FME will provide means for more accurate and efficient spin dynamics simulation and for devising new RF pulse sequence.

  3. Capacitor-based detection of nuclear magnetization: nuclear quadrupole resonance of surfaces.

    PubMed

    Gregorovič, Alan; Apih, Tomaž; Kvasić, Ivan; Lužnik, Janko; Pirnat, Janez; Trontelj, Zvonko; Strle, Drago; Muševič, Igor

    2011-03-01

    We demonstrate excitation and detection of nuclear magnetization in a nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) experiment with a parallel plate capacitor, where the sample is located between the two capacitor plates and not in a coil as usually. While the sensitivity of this capacitor-based detection is found lower compared to an optimal coil-based detection of the same amount of sample, it becomes comparable in the case of very thin samples and even advantageous in the proximity of conducting bodies. This capacitor-based setup may find its application in acquisition of NQR signals from the surface layers on conducting bodies or in a portable tightly integrated nuclear magnetic resonance sensor.

  4. Effective Giromagnetic Ratios in Artifical Nuclear Magnetization Pumping of the Noble Gases Mix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, E. N.; Barantsev, K. A.; Litvinov, A. N.

    2015-09-01

    Dynamic of the nuclear magnetization of the two noble gases mix was studied in this research. Nuclear magnetization pumped along the induction of external magnetic field. Vector of nuclear magnetization is given a tilt by the week rotational magnetic field, which makes NMR for noble gases. Interaction between the nuclear magnetic moments of the different noble gases adducted to shifts at the frequency of nuclear moments precession in external magnetic field. Effective gyromagnetic ratios of the nuclear of noble gases is defined and it different from the tabulated value. There is theoretical calculation of effective gyromagnetic ratios in this research.

  5. Nuclear composition of magnetized gamma-ray burst jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Sanshiro; Tominaga, Nozomu

    2015-06-01

    We investigate the fraction of metal nuclei in the relativistic jets of gamma-ray bursts associated with core-collapse supernovae. We simulate the fallback in jet-induced explosions with two-dimensional relativistic hydrodynamics calculations and the jet acceleration with steady, radial, relativistic magnetohydrodynamics calculations, and derive the detailed nuclear composition of the jet by post-processing calculation. We found that if the temperature at the jet launch site is above 4.7 × 109 K, quasi-statistical equilibrium is established and heavy nuclei are dissociated into light particles such as 4He during the acceleration of the jets. The criterion for the survival of metal nuclei is written in terms of the isotropic jet luminosity as L_j^iso ≲ 3.9 × 10^{50} ( R_i/107 cm)^2(1 + σi) erg s-1, where Ri and σi are the initial radius of the jets and the initial magnetization parameter, respectively. If the jet is initially dominated by radiation field (i.e., σi ≪ 1) and the isotropic luminosity is relatively high (L_j^iso ≳ 4 × 10^{52} erg s-1), the metal nuclei cannot survive in the jet. On the other hand, if the jet is mainly accelerated by magnetic field (i.e., σi ≫ 1), metal nuclei initially contained in the jet can survive without serious dissociation even in the case of a high-luminosity jet. If the jet contains metal nuclei, the dominant nuclei are 28Si, 16O, and 32S and the mean mass number can be ˜ 25.

  6. A dynamic nuclear polarization strategy for multi-dimensional Earth's field NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Halse, Meghan E; Callaghan, Paul T

    2008-12-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is introduced as a powerful tool for polarization enhancement in multi-dimensional Earth's field NMR spectroscopy. Maximum polarization enhancements, relative to thermal equilibrium in the Earth's magnetic field, are calculated theoretically and compared to the more traditional prepolarization approach for NMR sensitivity enhancement at ultra-low fields. Signal enhancement factors on the order of 3000 are demonstrated experimentally using DNP with a nitroxide free radical, TEMPO, which contains an unpaired electron which is strongly coupled to a neighboring (14)N nucleus via the hyperfine interaction. A high-quality 2D (19)F-(1)H COSY spectrum acquired in the Earth's magnetic field with DNP enhancement is presented and compared to simulation.

  7. Heat pulse propagation in chaotic three-dimensional magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Del-Castillo-Negrete, Diego; Blazevski, Daniel

    2014-06-01

    Heat pulse propagation in three-dimensional chaotic magnetic fields is studied by numerically solving the parallel heat transport equation using a Lagrangian Green's function (LG) method. The main two problems addressed are: the dependence of the radial transport of heat pulses on the level of magnetic field stochasticity (controlled by the amplitude of the magnetic field perturbation, ε), and the role of reversed shear magnetic field configurations on heat pulse propagation. The role of separatrix reconnection of resonant modes in the shear reversal region, and the role of shearless Cantori in the observed phenomena are also discussed.

  8. Invited Review Article: Instrumentation for nuclear magnetic resonance in zero and ultralow magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Tayler, Michael C D; Theis, Thomas; Sjolander, Tobias F; Blanchard, John W; Kentner, Arne; Pustelny, Szymon; Pines, Alexander; Budker, Dmitry

    2017-09-01

    We review experimental techniques in our laboratory for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) in zero and ultralow magnetic field (below 0.1 μT) where detection is based on a low-cost, non-cryogenic, spin-exchange relaxation free (87)Rb atomic magnetometer. The typical sensitivity is 20-30 fT/Hz(1/2) for signal frequencies below 1 kHz and NMR linewidths range from Hz all the way down to tens of mHz. These features enable precision measurements of chemically informative nuclear spin-spin couplings as well as nuclear spin precession in ultralow magnetic fields.

  9. Polywater: proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum.

    PubMed

    Page, T F; Jakobsen, R J; Lippincott, E R

    1970-01-02

    In the presence of water, the resonance of the strongly hydrogenbonded protons characteristic of polywater appears at 5 parts per million lower applied magnetic field than water. Polywater made by a new method confirms the infrared spectrum reported originally.

  10. Single Nuclear Spin Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-02

    Lab. In work not directly supported by this grant, these projects advanced MRFM detected Ferromagnetic Resonance ( FMR ) to enable studies of...directly supported by this grant, these projects advanced MRFM detected Ferromagnetic Resonance ( FMR ) to enable studies of submicron magnetic structures...our earlier NMR detection of 19F spins in CaF2 we have conducted 65Cu, 63Cu NMR stud- ies for studies of interface phenomena in multilayered magnetic

  11. Magnet design considerations for Fusion Nuclear Science Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Zhai, Yuhu; Kessel, Chuck; El-guebaly, Laila; Titus, Peter

    2016-02-25

    The Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF) is a nuclear confinement facility to provide a fusion environment with components of the reactor integrated together to bridge the technical gaps of burning plasma and nuclear science between ITER and the demonstration power plant (DEMO). Compared to ITER, the FNSF is smaller in size but generates much higher magnetic field, 30 times higher neutron fluence with 3 orders of magnitude longer plasma operation at higher operating temperatures for structures surrounding the plasma. Input parameters to the magnet design from system code analysis include magnetic field of 7.5 T at the plasma center with plasma major radius of 4.8 m and minor radius of 1.2 m, and a peak field of 15.5 T on the TF coils for FNSF. Both low temperature superconductor (LTS) and high temperature superconductor (HTS) are considered for the FNSF magnet design based on the state-of-the-art fusion magnet technology. The higher magnetic field can be achieved by using the high performance ternary Restack Rod Process (RRP) Nb3Sn strands for toroidal field (TF) magnets. The circular cable-in-conduit conductor (CICC) design similar to ITER magnets and a high aspect ratio rectangular CICC design are evaluated for FNSF magnets but low activation jacket materials may need to be selected. The conductor design concept and TF coil winding pack composition and dimension based on the horizontal maintenance schemes are discussed. Neutron radiation limits for the LTS and HTS superconductors and electrical insulation materials are also reviewed based on the available materials previously tested. As a result, the material radiation limits for FNSF magnets are defined as part of the conceptual design studies for FNSF magnets.

  12. Magnet Design Considerations for Fusion Nuclear Science Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Zhai, Y.; Kessel, C.; El-Guebaly, L.; Titus, P.

    2016-06-01

    The Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF) is a nuclear confinement facility that provides a fusion environment with components of the reactor integrated together to bridge the technical gaps of burning plasma and nuclear science between the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and the demonstration power plant (DEMO). Compared with ITER, the FNSF is smaller in size but generates much higher magnetic field, i.e., 30 times higher neutron fluence with three orders of magnitude longer plasma operation at higher operating temperatures for structures surrounding the plasma. Input parameters to the magnet design from system code analysis include magnetic field of 7.5 T at the plasma center with a plasma major radius of 4.8 m and a minor radius of 1.2 m and a peak field of 15.5 T on the toroidal field (TF) coils for the FNSF. Both low-temperature superconductors (LTS) and high-temperature superconductors (HTS) are considered for the FNSF magnet design based on the state-of-the-art fusion magnet technology. The higher magnetic field can be achieved by using the high-performance ternary restacked-rod process Nb3Sn strands for TF magnets. The circular cable-in-conduit conductor (CICC) design similar to ITER magnets and a high-aspect-ratio rectangular CICC design are evaluated for FNSF magnets, but low-activation-jacket materials may need to be selected. The conductor design concept and TF coil winding pack composition and dimension based on the horizontal maintenance schemes are discussed. Neutron radiation limits for the LTS and HTS superconductors and electrical insulation materials are also reviewed based on the available materials previously tested. The material radiation limits for FNSF magnets are defined as part of the conceptual design studies for FNSF magnets.

  13. Magnet design considerations for Fusion Nuclear Science Facility

    DOE PAGES

    Zhai, Yuhu; Kessel, Chuck; El-guebaly, Laila; ...

    2016-02-25

    The Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF) is a nuclear confinement facility to provide a fusion environment with components of the reactor integrated together to bridge the technical gaps of burning plasma and nuclear science between ITER and the demonstration power plant (DEMO). Compared to ITER, the FNSF is smaller in size but generates much higher magnetic field, 30 times higher neutron fluence with 3 orders of magnitude longer plasma operation at higher operating temperatures for structures surrounding the plasma. Input parameters to the magnet design from system code analysis include magnetic field of 7.5 T at the plasma center withmore » plasma major radius of 4.8 m and minor radius of 1.2 m, and a peak field of 15.5 T on the TF coils for FNSF. Both low temperature superconductor (LTS) and high temperature superconductor (HTS) are considered for the FNSF magnet design based on the state-of-the-art fusion magnet technology. The higher magnetic field can be achieved by using the high performance ternary Restack Rod Process (RRP) Nb3Sn strands for toroidal field (TF) magnets. The circular cable-in-conduit conductor (CICC) design similar to ITER magnets and a high aspect ratio rectangular CICC design are evaluated for FNSF magnets but low activation jacket materials may need to be selected. The conductor design concept and TF coil winding pack composition and dimension based on the horizontal maintenance schemes are discussed. Neutron radiation limits for the LTS and HTS superconductors and electrical insulation materials are also reviewed based on the available materials previously tested. As a result, the material radiation limits for FNSF magnets are defined as part of the conceptual design studies for FNSF magnets.« less

  14. Enhancement of nuclear magnetic resonance in microtesla magnetic field with prepolarization field detected with high-Tc superconducting quantum interference device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hong-Chang; Liao, Shu-Hsien; Horng, Herng-Er; Kuo, Shing-Ling; Chen, Hsin-Hsien; Yang, S. Y.

    2006-06-01

    We applied prepolarization field and high-Tc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) detector to enhance nuclear magnetic resonance signal in a microtesla magnetic field. The minimum measuring magnetic field is 8.9μT at which the proton resonance frequency is 380Hz. The specificity instrumentation and the difficulty of using a high-Tc SQUID with prepolarization field were investigated. We applied gradient field to perform one-dimensional proton imaging in a microtesla magnetic field. Additionally, low field high-Tc SQUID-based NMR systems are promising in biomagnetic research due to its use, for example, in imaging with hyperpolarized noble gas.

  15. Magnetic field correlations in kinematic two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumacher, Jörg; Eckhardt, Bruno

    1999-09-01

    The scaling properties of the second order magnetic structure function D2(B)(r) and the corresponding magnetic correlation function C2(B)(r) are derived for two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in the kinematic regime where the ratio of kinetic energy to magnetic energy is much larger than one. In this regime the magnetic flux function ψ can be treated as a passive scalar advected in a two-dimensional turbulent flow. Its structure function D2(ψ)(r) and the one for the magnetic field D2(B)(r) are connected by an exact relation. We calculate D2(ψ)(r) and thus D2(B)(r) within geometric measure theory over a wide range of scales r and magnetic Prandtl numbers Prm. The magnetic field correlations follow a r-4/3-scaling law and show an anticorrelation at the beginning of the Batchelor regime indicative of the formation of strongly filamented current sheets. Differences to the full dynamic regime, where the ratio of kinetic to magnetic energies is smaller than in the kinematic case, are discussed.

  16. Method and apparatus for measuring nuclear magnetic properties

    DOEpatents

    Weitekamp, D.P.; Bielecki, A.; Zax, D.B.; Zilm, K.W.; Pines, A.

    1987-12-01

    A method for studying the chemical and structural characteristics of materials is disclosed. The method includes placement of a sample material in a high strength polarizing magnetic field to order the sample nuclei. The condition used to order the sample is then removed abruptly and the ordering of the sample allowed to evolve for a time interval. At the end of the time interval, the ordering of the sample is measured by conventional nuclear magnetic resonance techniques. 5 figs.

  17. Nuclear magnetic resonance in environmental engineering: principles and applications.

    PubMed

    Lens, P N; Hemminga, M A

    1998-01-01

    This paper gives an introduction to nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in relation to applications in the field of environmental science and engineering. The underlying principles of high resolution solution and solid state NMR, relaxation time measurements and imaging are presented. Then, the use of NMR is illustrated and reviewed in studies of biodegradation and biotransformation of soluble and solid organic matter, removal of nutrients and xenobiotics, fate of heavy metal ions, and transport processes in bioreactor systems.

  18. Method and apparatus for measuring nuclear magnetic properties

    DOEpatents

    Weitekamp, Daniel P.; Bielecki, Anthony; Zax, David B.; Zilm, Kurt W.; Pines, Alexander

    1987-01-01

    A method for studying the chemical and structural characteristics of materials is disclosed. The method includes placement of a sample material in a high strength polarizing magnetic field to order the sample nucleii. The condition used to order the sample is then removed abruptly and the ordering of the sample allowed to evolve for a time interval. At the end of the time interval, the ordering of the sample is measured by conventional nuclear magnetic resonance techniques.

  19. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance in the Earth's Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollos, Stefan; Hollos, Richard

    2002-10-01

    We will address the challenges of doing NMR in the Earth's magnetic field. The design of an Earth's field proton precession magnetometer will be presented along with some preliminary attempts to do spectroscopy with this device.

  20. Magnetic Stimulation of One-Dimensional Neuronal Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Rotem, Assaf; Moses, Elisha

    2008-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation is a remarkable tool for neuroscience research, with a multitude of diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Surprisingly, application of the same magnetic stimulation directly to neurons that are dissected from the brain and grown in vitro was not reported to activate them to date. Here we report that central nervous system neurons patterned on large enough one-dimensional rings can be magnetically stimulated in vitro. In contrast, two-dimensional cultures with comparable size do not respond to excitation. This happens because the one-dimensional pattern enforces an ordering of the axons along the ring, which is designed to follow the lines of the magnetically induced electric field. A small group of sensitive (i.e., initiating) neurons respond even when the network is disconnected, and are presumed to excite the entire network when it is connected. This implies that morphological and electrophysiological properties of single neurons are crucial for magnetic stimulation. We conjecture that the existence of a select group of neurons with higher sensitivity may occur in the brain in vivo as well, with consequences for transcranial magnetic stimulation. PMID:18326634

  1. MAGNETIC FIELD INTENSIFICATION BY THE THREE-DIMENSIONAL 'EXPLOSION' PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    Hotta, H.; Yokoyama, T.; Rempel, M.

    2012-11-01

    We investigate an intensification mechanism for the magnetic field near the base of the solar convection zone that does not rely on differential rotation. Such mechanism in addition to differential rotation has been suggested by studies of flux emergence, which typically require field strength in excess of those provided by differential rotation alone. We study here a process in which potential energy of the superadiabatically stratified convection zone is converted into magnetic energy. This mechanism, known as the 'explosion of magnetic flux tubes', has been previously studied in thin flux tube approximation as well as two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations; here we expand the investigation to three-dimensional MHD simulations. Our main result is that enough intensification can be achieved in a three-dimensional magnetic flux sheet as long as the spatial scale of the imposed perturbation normal to the magnetic field is sufficiently large. When this spatial scale is small, the flux sheet tends to rise toward the surface, resulting in a significant decrease of the magnetic field amplification.

  2. Saturated symmetric nuclear matter in strong magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diener, J. P. W.; Scholtz, F. G.

    2013-06-01

    Strongly magnetized symmetric nuclear matter is investigated within the context of effective baryon-meson exchange models. The magnetic field is coupled to the charge as well as the dipole moment of the baryons by including the appropriate terms in the Lagrangian density. The saturation density of magnetized, symmetric nuclear matter ρ0(B) was calculated for magnetic fields of the order of 1017 gauss. For the calculated range of ρ0(B) the binding energy, symmetry energy coefficient a4, and compressibility K of nuclear matter were also calculated. It is found that with an increasing magnetic field ρ0(B) increases, while the system becomes less bound. Furthermore, the depopulation of proton Landau levels leaves a distinct fluctuating imprint on K and a4. The calculations were also performed for increased values of the baryon magnetic dipole moment. By increasing the dipole moment strength ρ0(B) is found to decrease, but the system becomes more tightly bound while the fluctuations in K and a4 persist.

  3. High Radiation Environment Nuclear Fragment Separator Magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Kahn, Stephen; Gupta, Ramesh

    2016-01-31

    Superconducting coils wound with HTS conductor can be used in magnets located in a high radiation environment. NbTi and Nb3Sn superconductors must operate at 4.5 K or below where removal of heat is less efficient. The HTS conductor can carry significant current at higher temperatures where the Carnot efficiency is significantly more favorable and where the coolant heat capacity is much larger. Using the HTS conductor the magnet can be operated at 40 K. This project examines the use of HTS conductor for the Michigan State University Facility For Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) fragment separator dipole magnet which bends the beam by 30° and is located in a high radiation region that will not be easily accessible. Two of these magnets are needed to select the chosen isotope. There are a number of technical challenges to be addressed in the design of this magnet. The separator dipole is 2 m long and subtends a large angle. The magnet should keep a constant transverse field profile along its beam reference path. Winding coils with a curved inner segment is difficult as the conductor will tend to unwind during the process. In the Phase I project two approaches to winding the conductor were examined. The first was to wind the coils with curved sections on the inner and outer segments with the inner segment wound with negative curvature. The alternate approach was to use a straight segment on the inner segment to avoid negative curvature. In Phase I coils with a limited number of turns were successfully wound and tested at 77 K for both coil configurations. The Phase II program concentrated on the design, coil winding procedures, structural analysis, prototyping and testing of an HTS curved dipole coil at 40 K with a heat load representative of the radiation environment. One of the key criteria of the design of this magnet is to avoid the use of organic materials that would degrade rapidly in radiation. The Lorentz forces expected from the coils interacting with the

  4. Magnetic quantum dot in two-dimensional topological insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guo; Zhu, Jia-Lin; Yang, Ning

    2017-03-01

    Magnetic quantum dots in two-dimensional band and topological insulators are studied by solving the modified Dirac model under nonuniform magnetic fields. The Landau levels split into discrete states with certain angular momentum. The states splitting from the zero Landau levels lie in the energy gap for topological insulators but are out of the gap for band insulators. It is found that the ground states oscillate between the spin-up and spin-down states when the magnetic field or the dot size changes. The oscillation manifests itself as changes of sign and strength of charge currents near the dot's edge.

  5. DC SQUID Spectrometers for Nuclear Quadrupole and Low-Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    TonThat, Dinh M.

    1998-04-01

    The dc Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUJD) is a very sensitive detector of magnetic flux, with a typical flux noise of the order of 1 μΦ0Hz-1/2 at liquid helium temperature (Φ0=h/2e). This inherent flux sensitivity of the SQUID is used in a spectrometer for the detection of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR.)and nuclear quadruple resonance (NQR). The processing magnetic field from the nuclear spins is coupled to the SQUID by mean of a flux transformer. The SQUID NMR spectrometer is used to measure the longitudinal relaxation time T1 of solid 129Xe at 4.2 K down to 0.1 mT.

  6. In vivo nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leblanc, A.

    1986-01-01

    During the past year the Woodlands Baylor Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) facility became fully operational. A detailed description of this facility is given. One significant instrument addition this year was the 100 MHz, 40cm bore superconducting imaging spectrometer. This instrument gives researchers the capability to acquire high energy phosphate spectra. This will be used to investigate ATP, phosphocreatinine and inorganic phosphate changes in normal and atrophied muscle before, during and after exercise. An exercise device for use within the bore of the imaging magnet is under design/construction. The results of a study of T sub 1 and T sub 2 changes in atrophied muscle in animals and human subjects are given. The imaging and analysis of the lower leg of 15 research subjects before and after 5 weeks of complete bedrest was completed. A compilation of these results are attached.

  7. In vivo nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leblanc, A.

    1986-05-01

    During the past year the Woodlands Baylor Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) facility became fully operational. A detailed description of this facility is given. One significant instrument addition this year was the 100 MHz, 40cm bore superconducting imaging spectrometer. This instrument gives researchers the capability to acquire high energy phosphate spectra. This will be used to investigate ATP, phosphocreatinine and inorganic phosphate changes in normal and atrophied muscle before, during and after exercise. An exercise device for use within the bore of the imaging magnet is under design/construction. The results of a study of T sub 1 and T sub 2 changes in atrophied muscle in animals and human subjects are given. The imaging and analysis of the lower leg of 15 research subjects before and after 5 weeks of complete bedrest was completed. A compilation of these results are attached.

  8. Using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy for Measuring Ternary Phase Diagrams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodworth, Jennifer K.; Terrance, Jacob C.; Hoffmann, Markus M.

    2006-01-01

    A laboratory experiment is presented for the upper-level undergraduate physical chemistry curriculum in which the ternary phase diagram of water, 1-propanol and n-heptane is measured using proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The experiment builds upon basic concepts of NMR spectral analysis, typically taught in the undergraduate…

  9. Concepts in Biochemistry: Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy in Biochemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheatham, Steve

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the nature of a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiment, the techniques used, the types of structural and dynamic information obtained, and how one can view and refine structures using computer graphics techniques in combination with NMR data. Provides several spectra and a computer graphics image from B-form DNA. (MVL)

  10. C-13 nuclear magnetic resonance in organic geochemistry.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balogh, B.; Wilson, D. M.; Burlingame, A. L.

    1972-01-01

    Study of C-13 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of polycyclic fused systems. The fingerprint qualities of the natural abundance in C-13 NMR spectra permitting unequivocal identification of these compounds is discussed. The principle of structural additivity of C-13 NMR information is exemplified on alpha and beta androstanes, alpha and beta cholestanes, ergostanes, sitostanes, and isodecanes.

  11. Using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy for Measuring Ternary Phase Diagrams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodworth, Jennifer K.; Terrance, Jacob C.; Hoffmann, Markus M.

    2006-01-01

    A laboratory experiment is presented for the upper-level undergraduate physical chemistry curriculum in which the ternary phase diagram of water, 1-propanol and n-heptane is measured using proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The experiment builds upon basic concepts of NMR spectral analysis, typically taught in the undergraduate…

  12. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Coupling Constants and Electronic Structure in Molecules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Venanzi, Thomas J.

    1982-01-01

    Theory of nuclear magnetic resonance spin-spin coupling constants and nature of the three types of coupling mechanisms contributing to the overall spin-spin coupling constant are reviewed, including carbon-carbon coupling (neither containing a lone pair of electrons) and carbon-nitrogen coupling (one containing a lone pair of electrons).…

  13. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Coupling Constants and Electronic Structure in Molecules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Venanzi, Thomas J.

    1982-01-01

    Theory of nuclear magnetic resonance spin-spin coupling constants and nature of the three types of coupling mechanisms contributing to the overall spin-spin coupling constant are reviewed, including carbon-carbon coupling (neither containing a lone pair of electrons) and carbon-nitrogen coupling (one containing a lone pair of electrons).…

  14. Concepts in Biochemistry: Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy in Biochemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheatham, Steve

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the nature of a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiment, the techniques used, the types of structural and dynamic information obtained, and how one can view and refine structures using computer graphics techniques in combination with NMR data. Provides several spectra and a computer graphics image from B-form DNA. (MVL)

  15. Real or imaginary? Human metabolism through nuclear magnetism.

    PubMed

    Ross, B D

    2000-09-01

    This account of the beginnings and later applications of the use of nuclear magnetic resonance for noninvasive medical diagnosis was presented at a Symposium held in Oxford, UK, during September 13-15, 2000 to mark the centenary of the birth of Hans Krebs, on August 25, 1900.

  16. Three-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Velopharyngeal Structures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bae, Youkyung; Kuehn, David P.; Sutton, Bradley P.; Conway, Charles A.; Perry, Jamie L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To report the feasibility of using a 3-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol for examining velopharyngeal structures. Using collected 3D MRI data, the authors investigated the effect of sex on the midsagittal velopharyngeal structures and the levator veli palatini (levator) muscle configurations. Method: Ten Caucasian…

  17. Three-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Velopharyngeal Structures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bae, Youkyung; Kuehn, David P.; Sutton, Bradley P.; Conway, Charles A.; Perry, Jamie L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To report the feasibility of using a 3-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol for examining velopharyngeal structures. Using collected 3D MRI data, the authors investigated the effect of sex on the midsagittal velopharyngeal structures and the levator veli palatini (levator) muscle configurations. Method: Ten Caucasian…

  18. Three-dimensional Oscillatory Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurgood, Jonathan O.; Pontin, David I.; McLaughlin, James A.

    2017-07-01

    Here we detail the dynamic evolution of localized reconnection regions about 3D magnetic null points using numerical simulation. We demonstrate for the first time that reconnection triggered by the localized collapse of a 3D null point that is due to an external magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) wave involves a self-generated oscillation, whereby the current sheet and outflow jets undergo a reconnection reversal process during which back-pressure formation at the jet heads acts to prise open the collapsed field before overshooting the equilibrium into an opposite-polarity configuration. The discovery that reconnection at fully 3D nulls can proceed naturally in a time-dependent and periodic fashion suggests that oscillatory reconnection mechanisms may play a role in explaining periodicity in astrophysical phenomena associated with magnetic reconnection, such as the observed quasi-periodicity of solar and stellar flare emission. Furthermore, we find that a consequence of oscillatory reconnection is the generation of a plethora of freely propagating MHD waves that escape the vicinity of the reconnection region.

  19. Mobile high resolution xenon nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in the earth's magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Appelt, Stephan; Häsing, F Wolfgang; Kühn, Holger; Perlo, Juan; Blümich, Bernhard

    2005-05-20

    Conventional high resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra are usually measured in homogeneous, high magnetic fields (>1 T), which are produced by expensive and immobile superconducting magnets. We show that chemically resolved xenon (Xe) NMR spectroscopy of liquid samples can be measured in the Earth's magnetic field (5 x 10(-5) T) with a continuous flow of hyperpolarized Xe gas. It was found that the measured normalized Xe frequency shifts are significantly modified by the Xe polarization density, which causes different dipolar magnetic fields in the liquid and in the gas phases.

  20. Bjorken flow in one-dimensional relativistic magnetohydrodynamics with magnetization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Shi; Roy, Victor; Rezzolla, Luciano; Rischke, Dirk H.

    2016-04-01

    We study the one-dimensional, longitudinally boost-invariant motion of an ideal fluid with infinite conductivity in the presence of a transverse magnetic field, i.e., in the ideal transverse magnetohydrodynamical limit. In an extension of our previous work Roy et al., [Phys. Lett. B 750, 45 (2015)], we consider the fluid to have a nonzero magnetization. First, we assume a constant magnetic susceptibility χm and consider an ultrarelativistic ideal gas equation of state. For a paramagnetic fluid (i.e., with χm>0 ), the decay of the energy density slows down since the fluid gains energy from the magnetic field. For a diamagnetic fluid (i.e., with χm<0 ), the energy density decays faster because it feeds energy into the magnetic field. Furthermore, when the magnetic field is taken to be external and to decay in proper time τ with a power law ˜τ-a, two distinct solutions can be found depending on the values of a and χm. Finally, we also solve the ideal magnetohydrodynamical equations for one-dimensional Bjorken flow with a temperature-dependent magnetic susceptibility and a realistic equation of state given by lattice-QCD data. We find that the temperature and energy density decay more slowly because of the nonvanishing magnetization. For values of the magnetic field typical for heavy-ion collisions, this effect is, however, rather small. It is only for magnetic fields about an order of magnitude larger than expected for heavy-ion collisions that the system is substantially reheated and the lifetime of the quark phase might be extended.

  1. General Method for Describing Three-Dimensional Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titov, Viacheslav; Forbes, Terry; Priest, Eric; Mikic, Zoran; Linker, Jon

    2009-11-01

    A general method for describing magnetic reconnection in arbitrary three-dimensional magnetic configurations is proposed. The method is based on the field-line mapping technique previously used only for the analysis of magnetic structure at a given time. This technique is extended here so as to analyze the evolution of magnetic structure. Such a generalization is made with the help of new dimensionless quantities called ``slip-squashing factors''. Their large values define the surfaces that border the reconnected or to-be-reconnected magnetic flux tubes for a given period of time during the magnetic evolution. The proposed method is universal, since it assumes only that the time sequence of evolving magnetic field and the tangential boundary flows are known. We illustrate our method for several examples and compare it with the general magnetic reconnection theory, proposed previously by Hesse and coworkers. The new method admits a straightforward numerical implementation and provides a powerful tool for the diagnostics of numerical data obtained in theoretical or experimental studies of magnetic reconnection in space and laboratory plasmas.

  2. Radiofrequency Coil Designs For Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Zeuciviatographic Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardo, M. L.; Cohen, A. J.; Lauterbur, P. C.

    1982-11-01

    The requirements for spatial uniformity of the radio-frequency magnetic field used in three-dimensional MAR imaging are discussed and an improved winding distribution for a saddle-shaped single transmitter-receiver coil has been developed and tested by computer simulation of the rf mag-netic field pattern. The use of flat local or "surface" coils for NMR imaging is also proposed. A. method for correcting such images for the apparent spin density differences caused by the extreme rf magnetic field nonuniformity has been developed and tested with phantoms and images of the human back.

  3. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of macroscopic morphology and dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Barrall, Geoffrey Alden

    1995-09-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance techniques are traditionally used to study molecular level structure and dynamics with a noted exception in medically applied NMR imaging (MRI). In this work, new experimental methods and theory are presented relevant to the study of macroscopic morphology and dynamics using NMR field gradient techniques and solid state two-dimensional exchange NMR. The goal in this work is not to take some particular system and study it in great detail, rather it is to show the utility of a number of new and novel techniques using ideal systems primarily as a proof of principle. By taking advantage of the analogy between NMR imaging and diffraction, one may simplify the experiments necessary for characterizing the statistical properties of the sample morphology. For a sample composed of many small features, e.g. a porous medium, the NMR diffraction techniques take advantage of both the narrow spatial range and spatial isotropy of the sample`s density autocorrelation function to obtain high resolution structural information in considerably less time than that required by conventional NMR imaging approaches. The time savings of the technique indicates that NMR diffraction is capable of finer spatial resolution than conventional NMR imaging techniques. Radio frequency NMR imaging with a coaxial resonator represents the first use of cylindrically symmetric field gradients in imaging. The apparatus as built has achieved resolution at the micron level for water samples, and has the potential to be very useful in the imaging of circularly symmetric systems. The study of displacement probability densities in flow through a random porous medium has revealed the presence of features related to the interconnectedness of the void volumes. The pulsed gradient techniques used have proven successful at measuring flow properties for time and length scales considerably shorter than those studied by more conventional techniques.

  4. Three-dimensional magnetic interactions in quasi-two-dimensional PdAs2O6

    DOE PAGES

    Zhao, Zhiying Y.; Wu, Yan; Cao, Huibo B.; ...

    2017-04-26

    Millimeter-sized PdAs2O6 single crystals are grown using the vapor transport technique. The magnetic order at TN = 140 K is studied by measuring magnetic properties, specific heat, and neutron single crystal diffraction. The anisotropic magnetic susceptibility and a metamagnetic transition observed in magnetic fields above 20 kOe suggest that the magnetic moment lies in the ab plane, consistent with the magnetic structure determined by neutron single crystal diffraction. Below 140 K, Pd2+ ions order ferromagnetically in the ab plane but antiferromagnetically along the crystallographic c axis. The ordered moment is refined to be 2.09(2) μB/Pd2+ using the fitted magnetic form factor of Pd2+. A weak λ-type anomaly around TN was observed in specific heat and the magnetic entropy change across TN is 1.72 J mol-1 K. This small entropy change and the temperature dependence of the magnetic susceptibility support the presence of short range correlations in a wide temperature range TN 2O6 suggests that the magnetic interactions in PdAs2O6 are dominated by Pd-(O-more » $$As\\atop{As}$$-O)-Pd super-superexchange and three dimensional despite the quasi-two-dimensional arrangement of magnetic ions. Finally, the comparison with NiAs2O6 suggests that increasing covalency of isostructural compounds is an effective approach to design and to discover new materials with higher magnetic order temperatures in the localized regime.« less

  5. Universal quantum control in zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Ji; Jiang, Min; Cui, Jiangyu; Liu, Xiaomei; Chen, Botao; Ji, Yunlan; Zhang, Bo; Blanchard, John; Peng, Xinhua; Du, Jiangfeng

    2017-05-01

    This paper describes a general method for the manipulation of nuclear spins in zero magnetic field. In the absence of magnetic fields, the spins lose the individual information on chemical shifts and inequivalent spins can only be distinguished by nuclear gyromagnetic ratios and spin-spin couplings. For spin-1/2 nuclei with different gyromagnetic ratios (i.e., different species) in zero magnetic field, we describe the scheme to realize a set of universal quantum logic gates, e.g., arbitrary single-qubit gates and a two-qubit controlled-not gate. This method allows for universal quantum control in systems which might provide promising applications in materials science, chemistry, biology, quantum information processing, and fundamental physics.

  6. Novel nuclear magnetic resonance techniques for studying biological molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Laws, David Douglas

    2000-06-01

    Over the fifty-five year history of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), considerable progress has been made in the development of techniques for studying the structure, function, and dynamics of biological molecules. The majority of this research has involved the development of multi-dimensional NMR experiments for studying molecules in solution, although in recent years a number of groups have begun to explore NMR methods for studying biological systems in the solid-state. Despite this new effort, a need still exists for the development of techniques that improve sensitivity, maximize information, and take advantage of all the NMR interactions available in biological molecules. In this dissertation, a variety of novel NMR techniques for studying biomolecules are discussed. A method for determining backbone (Φ/Ψ) dihedral angles by comparing experimentally determined 13Ca, chemical-shift anisotropies with theoretical calculations is presented, along with a brief description of the theory behind chemical-shift computation in proteins and peptides. The utility of the Spin-Polarization Induced Nuclear Overhauser Effect (SPINOE) to selectively enhance NMR signals in solution is examined in a variety of systems, as are methods for extracting structural information from cross-relaxation rates that can be measured in SPINOE experiments. Techniques for the production of supercritical and liquid laser-polarized xenon are discussed, as well as the prospects for using optically pumped xenon as a polarizing solvent. In addition, a detailed study of the structure of PrP 89-143 is presented. PrP 89-143 is a 54 residue fragment of the prion proteins which, upon mutation and aggregation, can induce prion diseases in transgenic mice. Whereas the structure of the wild-type PrP 89-143 is a generally unstructured mixture of α-helical and β-sheet conformers in the solid state, the aggregates formed from the PrP 89-143 mutants appear to be mostly β-sheet.

  7. EFFECTS OF MAGNETIC FIELDS ON THE PROPAGATION OF NUCLEAR FLAMES IN MAGNETIC WHITE DWARFS

    SciTech Connect

    Kutsuna, Masamichi; Shigeyama, Toshikazu

    2012-04-10

    We investigate the effects of the magnetic field on the propagation of laminar flames of nuclear reactions taking place in white dwarfs with masses close to the Chandrasekhar limit. We calculate the velocities of laminar flames parallel and perpendicular to uniform magnetic fields as eigenvalues of steady solutions for magnetic hydrodynamical equations. As a result, we find that even when the magnetic pressure does not dominate the entire pressure it is possible for the magnetic field to suppress the flame propagation through the thermal conduction. Above the critical magnetic field, the flame velocity decreases with increasing magnetic field strength as v {approx} B{sup -1}. In media with densities of 10{sup 7}, 10{sup 8}, and 10{sup 9} g cm{sup -3}, the critical magnetic fields are orders of {approx}10{sup 10}, 10{sup 11}, and 10{sup 12} G, respectively.

  8. 73Ge-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance/Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance Investigation of Magnetic Properties of URhGe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotegawa, Hisashi; Fukumoto, Kenta; Toyama, Toshihiro; Tou, Hideki; Harima, Hisatomo; Harada, Atsushi; Kitaoka, Yoshio; Haga, Yoshinori; Yamamoto, Etsuji; Ōnuki, Yoshichika; Itoh, Kohei M.; Haller, Eugene E.

    2015-05-01

    We report on the 73Ge-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)/nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) results for the ferromagnetic (FM) superconductor URhGe. The magnitude and direction of the internal field, Hint, and the parameters of the electric field gradient at the Ge site were determined experimentally. By using powdered polycrystalline samples oriented by different methods, the field dependences of NMR shift and nuclear spin relaxation rates for H0 || c (easy axis) and H0 || b were obtained. From the NMR shifts for H0 || b, we confirmed a gradual suppression of the Curie temperature and observed a phase separation near the spin reorientation. The observation of the phase separation gives microscopic evidence that the spin reorientation under H0 || b is of first order at low temperatures. The nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate 1/T1 indicates that the magnetic fluctuations are suppressed for H0 || c, whereas the fluctuations remain strongly for H0 || b. The enhancements of both 1/T1T and the nuclear spin-spin relaxation rate 1/T2 for H0 || b toward the spin reorientation field suggest that the field-induced superconductivity in URhGe emerges under the magnetic fluctuations along the b- and c-axes.

  9. Dimensional analysis, spin freezing and magnetization in spin ice.

    PubMed

    Bramwell, Steven T

    2011-03-23

    Dimensional analysis is shown to give an insight into the non-ergodic behaviour of spin ice below its apparent 'spin freezing' temperature. Expressions are derived for the temperature-dependent magnetic susceptibility that are found to be highly consistent with the previously reported field cooled and zero field cooled magnetization of the spin ice dysprosium titanate, Dy(2)Ti(2)O(7), as well as with the theory of a 'magnetolyte', including Debye-Hückel screening and Wien dissociation. The spin freezing is inferred to reflect the inability of the quasi-free magnetic charges or 'monopoles' that comprise the magnetolyte to fully screen an applied magnetic field on the timescale of an experiment. The apparent freezing temperature (T(f)≈0.65 K) is identified as the point where the Debye screening length becomes greater than the Bjerrum association distance for charge pairs. Combining these dimensional arguments with Onsager's theory of the Wien effect, it is shown that magnetization data at relatively high field (Snyder et al 2004 Phys. Rev. B 69 064414) may be used to estimate the elementary magnetic charge of spin ice, as well as the temperature-dependent monopole density. Evidence is presented of a non-equilibrium population of monopoles below T≈0.2 K. It is also shown how Onsager's microscopic theory of field-induced monopole pair separation naturally suggests the 'magnetization jumps' in Dy(2)Ti(2)O(7) observed at applied fields of the order of ∼ 0.1 T. It is concluded that the results of dimensional analysis, when combined with Onsager's theory, provide an accurate, albeit approximate, description of the properties of Dy(2)Ti(2)O(7), that could be improved by the development of a lattice theory of the Wien effect, or tested on other spin ice materials.

  10. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of biological systems

    SciTech Connect

    Antypas, W.G. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The difference between intracellular and extracellular proton relaxation rates provides the basis for the determination of the mean hemoglobin concentration (MHC) in red blood cells. The observed water T{sub 1} relaxation data from red blood cell samples under various conditions were fit to the complete equation for the time-dependent decay of magnetization for a two-compartment system including chemical exchange. The MHC for each sample was calculated from the hematocrit and the intracellular water fraction as determined by NMR. The binding of the phosphorylcholine (PC) analogue, 2-(trimethylphosphonio)-ethylphosphate (phosphoryl-phosphocholine, PPC) to the PC binding myeloma proteins TEPC-15, McPC 603, and MOPC 167 was studied by {sup 31}P NMR.

  11. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging at microscopic resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, G. Allan; Thompson, Morrow B.; Gewalt, Sally L.; Hayes, Cecil E.

    Resolution limits in NMR imaging are imposed by bandwidth considerations, available magnetic gradients for spatial encoding, and signal to noise. This work reports modification of a clinical NMR imaging device with picture elements of 500 × 500 × 5000 μm to yield picture elements of 50 × 50 × 1000 μm. Resolution has been increased by using smaller gradient coils permitting gradient fields >0.4 mT/cm. Significant improvements in signal to noise are achieved with smaller rf coils, close attention to choice of bandwidth, and signal averaging. These improvements permit visualization of anatomical structures in the rat brain with an effective diameter of 1 cm with the same definition as is seen in human imaging. The techniques and instrumentation should open a number of basic sciences such as embryology, plant sciences, and teratology to the potentials of NMR imaging.

  12. Investigation of the Possibility of Using Nuclear Magnetic Spin Alignment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dent, William V., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    The goal of the program to investigate a "Gasdynamic fusion propulsion system for space exploration" is to develop a fusion propulsion system for a manned mission to the planet mars. A study using Deuterium and Tritium atoms are currently in progress. When these atoms under-go fusion, the resulting neutrons and alpha particles are emitted in random directions (isotropically). The probable direction of emission is equal for all directions, thus resulting in wasted energy, massive shielding and cooling requirements, and serious problems with the physics of achieving fusion. If the nuclear magnetic spin moments of the deuterium and tritium nuclei could be precisely aligned at the moment of fusion, the stream of emitted neutrons could be directed out the rear of the spacecraft for thrust and the alpha particles directed forward into an electromagnet ot produce electricity to continue operating the fusion engine. The following supporting topics are discussed: nuclear magnetic moments and spin precession in magnetic field, nuclear spin quantum mechanics, kinematics of nuclear reactions, and angular distribution of particles.

  13. Interface between heavy fermions and normal electrons investigated by spatially resolved nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanaka, Takayoshi; Shimozawa, Masaaki; Endo, Ryota; Mizukami, Yuta; Shishido, Hiroaki; Terashima, Takahito; Shibauchi, Takasada; Matsuda, Yuji; Ishida, Kenji

    2015-12-01

    We have studied the superlattices with alternating block layers (BLs) of heavy-fermion superconductor CeCoIn5 and conventional-metal YbCoIn5 by site-selective nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, which uniquely offers spatially resolved dynamical magnetic information. We find that the presence of antiferromagnetic fluctuations is confined to the Ce BLs, indicating that magnetic degrees of freedom of f electrons are quenched inside the Yb BLs. Contrary to simple expectations that the two dimensionalization enhances fluctuations, we observe that antiferromagnetic fluctuations are rapidly suppressed with decreasing Ce BL thickness. Moreover, the suppression is more prominent near the interfaces between the BLs. These results imply significant effects of local inversion symmetry breaking at the interfaces.

  14. High-resolution two-field nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cousin, Samuel F; Charlier, Cyril; Kadeřávek, Pavel; Marquardsen, Thorsten; Tyburn, Jean-Max; Bovier, Pierre-Alain; Ulzega, Simone; Speck, Thomas; Wilhelm, Dirk; Engelke, Frank; Maas, Werner; Sakellariou, Dimitrios; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey; Pelupessy, Philippe; Ferrage, Fabien

    2016-12-07

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a ubiquitous branch of spectroscopy that can explore matter at the scale of an atom. Significant improvements in sensitivity and resolution have been driven by a steady increase of static magnetic field strengths. However, some properties of nuclei may be more favourable at low magnetic fields. For example, transverse relaxation due to chemical shift anisotropy increases sharply at higher magnetic fields leading to line-broadening and inefficient coherence transfers. Here, we present a two-field NMR spectrometer that permits the application of rf-pulses and acquisition of NMR signals in two magnetic centres. Our prototype operates at 14.1 T and 0.33 T. The main features of this system are demonstrated by novel NMR experiments, in particular a proof-of-concept correlation between zero-quantum coherences at low magnetic field and single quantum coherences at high magnetic field, so that high resolution can be achieved in both dimensions, despite a ca. 10 ppm inhomogeneity of the low-field centre. Two-field NMR spectroscopy offers the possibility to circumvent the limits of high magnetic fields, while benefiting from their exceptional sensitivity and resolution. This approach opens new avenues for NMR above 1 GHz.

  15. Unconventional nuclear magnetic resonance techniques using nanostructured diamond surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acosta, Victor; Jarmola, Andrey; Budker, Dmitry; Santori, Charles; Huang, Zhihong; Beausoleil, Raymond

    2014-03-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technologies rely on obtaining high nuclear magnetization, motivating low operating temperatures and high magnetic fields. Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) techniques traditionally require another superconducting magnet and THz optics. We seek to use chip-scale devices to polarize nuclei in liquids at room temperature. The technique relies on optical pumping of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers and subsequent transfer of polarization to nuclei via hyperfine interaction, spin diffusion, and heteronuclear polarization transfer. We expect efficient polarization transfer will be realized by maximizing the diamond surface area. We have fabricated densely-packed (50 % packing fraction), high-aspect-ratio (10+) nanopillars over mm2 regions of the diamond surface. Pillars designed to have a few-hundred-nanometer diameter act as optical antennas, reducing saturation intensity. We also report progress in using nanopillar arrays as sensitive optical detectors of nano-scale NMR by measuring NV center Zeeman shifts produced by nearby external nuclei. The enhanced surface area increases the effective density of NV centers which couple to external nuclei. Combining these techniques may enable, e.g., identification of trace analytes and molecular imaging.

  16. Principles of nuclear magnetic resonance for medical application.

    PubMed

    Rosen, B R; Brady, T J

    1983-10-01

    Several important components must be combined to create an effective nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging system. The most imposing component is the magnet itself, which is most often either resistive or superconducting. In addition, the magnetic field gradient, radiofrequency (RF) coil, spectrometer, computer, and display system are critical factors that require special consideration before selecting an NMR system for a particular clinical usage. Although nuclear magnetic resonance and nuclear decay share a common object of interest (the nucleus), a number of differences between resonance and decay phenomena relating to information content and imaging techniques can be discussed. First, in NMR the frequency, and hence energy, of the detected electromagnetic radiation from a given nuclear type is dependent critically on the magnetic and molecular environment of the stimulated nuclei. This is contrasted to the situation in nuclear decay reactions, where the energy of gamma or positron emission is only weakly dependent on local factors. Thus in NMR, molecular information can be acquired without the use of external tracer molecules. In NMR energy exchange mechanisms (relaxation) take place on a microscopic scale, and hence local information is acquired by measuring relaxation times. Furthermore, the frequency output of an NMR experiment is transmitted to the detector with little change from its surroundings. This again differs from nuclear decay, where the observed spread of detected energies is a complex function of numerous interactions among the emitted radiation, the surrounding matter, and the detector, and energy exchange processes are spread in a random fashion over a large volume. However, this relative lack of interaction with matter in NMRs (RF) output comes at a price of sensitivity, since the energy level is orders of magnitude lower than that of gamma photons. In addition, the much longer wavelengths associated with such low energy radiation (on the

  17. Simple and Inexpensive Classroom Demonstrations of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Joel A.; Nordell, Karen J.; Chesnik, Marla A.; Landis, Clark R.; Ellis, Arthur B.; Rzchowski, M. S.; Condren, S. Michael; Lisensky, George C.

    2000-07-01

    Several demonstrations of resonance phenomena associated with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are described. The demonstrations comprise common orienteering compasses, whose needles represent magnetic dipoles, along with three collinear permanent magnets and a magnetic stir plate or pulseable electromagnets. The trio of permanent magnets provides a laterally uniform magnetic field, whose strength decreases with distance from the magnets. Resonance can be observed by adjusting the frequency of the magnetic stirrer to match the resonant frequency of the compass needle, which is shown to depend on magnetic field strength, that is, the needle's position relative to the permanent magnets. Another demonstration involves pulsing electromagnets that apply a perpendicular magnetic field that causes the compass needles to oscillate. The effects of shielding, spin-spin coupling, magnetogyric ratio, and free induction decay can also be demonstrated. By moving the trio of permanent magnets relative to the compasses, the MRI experiment can be mimicked. Complete instructions for the construction of the demonstrations, which can be used on an overhead projector, are included.

  18. Three Dimensional Simulation of the Baneberry Nuclear Event

    SciTech Connect

    Lomov, I

    2003-07-16

    Baneberry, a 10-kiloton nuclear event, was detonated at a depth of 278 m at the Nevada Test Site on December 18, 1970. Shortly after detonation, radioactive gases emanating from the cavity were released into the atmosphere through a shock-induced fissure near surface ground zero. Extensive geophysical investigations, coupled with a series of 1D and 2D computational studies were used to reconstruct the sequence of events that led to the catastrophic failure. However, the geological profile of the Baneberry site is complex and inherently three-dimensional, which meant that some geological features had to be simplified or ignored in the 2D simulations. This left open the possibility that features unaccounted for in the 2D simulations could have had an important influence on the eventual containment failure of the Baneberry event. This paper presents results from a high-fidelity 3D Baneberry simulation based on the most accurate geologic and geophysical data available. The results are compared with available data, and contrasted against the results of the previous 2D computational studies.

  19. Dimensionality reduction for uncertainty quantification of nuclear engineering models.

    SciTech Connect

    Roderick, O.; Wang, Z.; Anitescu, M.

    2011-01-01

    The task of uncertainty quantification consists of relating the available information on uncertainties in the model setup to the resulting variation in the outputs of the model. Uncertainty quantification plays an important role in complex simulation models of nuclear engineering, where better understanding of uncertainty results in greater confidence in the model and in the improved safety and efficiency of engineering projects. In our previous work, we have shown that the effect of uncertainty can be approximated by polynomial regression with derivatives (PRD): a hybrid regression method that uses first-order derivatives of the model output as additional fitting conditions for a polynomial expansion. Numerical experiments have demonstrated the advantage of this approach over classical methods of uncertainty analysis: in precision, computational efficiency, or both. To obtain derivatives, we used automatic differentiation (AD) on the simulation code; hand-coded derivatives are acceptable for simpler models. We now present improvements on the method. We use a tuned version of the method of snapshots, a technique based on proper orthogonal decomposition (POD), to set up the reduced order representation of essential information on uncertainty in the model inputs. The automatically obtained sensitivity information is required to set up the method. Dimensionality reduction in combination with PRD allows analysis on a larger dimension of the uncertainty space (>100), at modest computational cost.

  20. New Versions of Terahertz Radiation Sources for Dynamic Nuclear Polarization in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bratman, V. L.; Kalynov, Yu. K.; Makhalov, P. B.; Fedotov, A. E.

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization in strong-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy requires terahertz radiation with moderate power levels. Nowadays, conventional gyrotrons are used almost exclusively to generate such radiation. In this review paper, we consider alternative variants of electronic microwave oscillators which require much weaker magnetic fields for their operation, namely, large-orbit gyrotrons operated at high cyclotron-frequency harmonics and Čerenkov-type devices, such as a backward-wave oscillator and a klystron frequency multiplier with tubular electron beams. Additionally, we consider the possibility to use the magnetic field created directly by the solenoid of an NMR spectrometer for operation of both the gyrotron and the backward-wave oscillator. Location of the oscillator in the spectrometer magnet makes it superfluous to use an additional superconducting magnet creating a strong field, significantly reduces the length of the radiation transmission line, and, in the case of Čerenkov-type devices, allows one to increase considerably the output-signal power. According to our calculations, all the electronic devices considered are capable of ensuring the power required for dynamic nuclear polarization (10 W or more) at a frequency of 260 GHz, whereas the gyrotrons, including their versions proposed in this paper, remain a single option at higher frequencies.

  1. Nuclear heating, radiation damage, and waste management options for the HYLIFE-II final focus magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Latkowski, J F; Moir, R W; House, P A

    1999-08-09

    Heavy-ion fusion (HIF) designs for inertial fusion energy (XFE) power plants typically require final focusing magnets just outside the reaction chamber and blanket. Due to penetrations within the chamber and blanket, the magnets are exposed to a radiation environment. Although the magnet bores would be sized to avoid line-of-sight irradiation, the magnets still would be susceptible to nuclear heating and radiation damage from neutrons and y-rays. Additionally, the magnets must be included in waste management considerations due to neutron activation. Modified versions of the HYLIFE-II IFE power plant featuring two-sided illumination by arrays of 32 or 96 beams from each side are presented. A simple, point-of-departure quadrupole magnet design is assumed, and a three-dimensional neutronics model is created for the Flibe pocket, first wall, blanket, shield, and final two focusing magnets. This work details state-of-the-art neutronics calculations and shows that the final focus system needs to be included in the economic and environmental considerations for the driver-chamber interface of any HIF IFE power plant design.

  2. Up and down cascades: three-dimensional magnetic field model.

    PubMed

    Blanter, E M; Shnirman, M G; Le Mouël, J L

    2002-06-01

    In our previous works we already have proposed a two-dimensional model of geodynamo. Now we use the same approach to build a three-dimensional self-excited geodynamo model that generates a large scale magnetic field from whatever small initial field, using the up and down cascade effects of a multiscale turbulent system of cyclones. The multiscale system of turbulent cyclones evolves in six domains of an equatorial cylindrical layer of the core. The appearance of new cyclones is realized by two cascades: a turbulent direct cascade and an inverse cascade of coupling of similar cyclones. The interaction between the different domains is effected through a direct cascade parameter which is essential for the statistics of the long-life symmetry breaking. Generation of the secondary magnetic field results from the interaction of the components of the primary magnetic field with the turbulent cyclones. The amplification of the magnetic field is due to the transfer of energy from the turbulent helical motion to the generated magnetic field. The model demonstrates a phase transition through the parameter characterizing this energy transfer. In the supercritical domain we obtain long-term intervals of constant polarity (chrons) and quick reversals; relevant time constants agree with paleomagnetic observations. Possible application of the model to the study of the geometrical structure of the geomagnetic field (and briefly other planetary fields) is discussed.

  3. Two-dimensional supersonic plasma acceleration in a magnetic nozzle

    SciTech Connect

    Ahedo, E.; Merino, M.

    2010-07-15

    A two-dimensional model of the expansion of a collisionless, electron-magnetized, low-beta, current-free plasma in a divergent magnetic nozzle is presented. The plasma response is investigated in terms of the nozzle/plasma divergence rate, the magnetic strength on ions, and the Hall current at the nozzle throat. Axial acceleration profiles agree well with those estimated from simple one-dimensional models. A strong radial nonuniformity develops downstream. There is a separation between ion and electron/magnetic streamtubes which leads to the formation of, first, a longitudinal electric current density, which indicates that current ambipolarity is not fulfilled, and, second, a small ion azimuthal current that competes negatively with the electron azimuthal (Hall) current. The analysis of the mechanisms driving thrust, ion momentum, and ion energy unveils the dual electrothermal/electromagnetic character of the magnetic nozzle. In general, the thrust includes the contributions of volumetric and surface Hall currents, this last one formed at the plasma-vacuum interface. Plume efficiency, based on radial expansion losses, is computed. Plasma detachment and the transonic matching with the upstream plasma are not addressed.

  4. Magnetism, dimensional changes, and magnetic transitions in hydrated cesium manganese chloride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woollam, J. A.; Aron, P. R.

    1972-01-01

    Dimensional changes (strain) along the three principal crystal axes of the antiferromagnet CsMnCl3-2H2O are studied as a function of magnetic field and temperature in the antiferromagnetic, spin flopped, and paramagnetic phases. Changes in dimensions through the phase transitions between the magnetic states are examined. By applying the molecular field model and utilizing all available information, magnetic properties of CsMnCl3-2H2O are determined. The possible usefulness of this material in a magnetic refrigeration cycle is evaluated.

  5. Magnetic field simulation of magnetic phase detection sensor for steam generator tube in nuclear power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Kwon-sang; Son, Derac; Park, Duck-gun; Kim, Yong-il

    2010-05-01

    Magnetic phases and defects are partly produced in steam generator tubes by stress and heat, because steam generator tubes in nuclear power plants are used under high temperature, high pressure, and radioactivity. The magnetic phases induce an error in the detection of the defects in steam generator tubes by the conventional eddy current method. So a new method is needed for detecting the magnetic phases in the steam generator tubes. We designed a new U-type yoke which has two kinds of coils and simulated the signal by the magnetic phases and defects in the Inconnel 600 tube.

  6. Quantum skyrmions in two-dimensional chiral magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takashima, Rina; Ishizuka, Hiroaki; Balents, Leon

    2016-10-01

    We study the quantum mechanics of magnetic skyrmions in the vicinity of the skyrmion-crystal to ferromagnet phase boundary in two-dimensional magnets. We show that the skyrmion excitation has an energy dispersion that splits into multiple bands due to the combination of magnus force and the underlying lattice. Condensation of the skyrmions can give rise to an intermediate phase between the skyrmion crystal and ferromagnet: a quantum liquid, in which skyrmions are not spatially localized. We show that the critical behavior depends on the spin size S and the topological number of the skyrmion. Experimental signatures of quantum skyrmions in inelastic neutron-scattering measurements are also discussed.

  7. Electrified magnetic catalysis in three-dimensional topological insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbar, E. V.; Miransky, V. A.; Shovkovy, I. A.; Sukhachov, P. O.

    2016-09-01

    The gap equations for the surface quasiparticle propagators in a slab of three-dimensional topological insulator in external electric and magnetic fields perpendicular to the slab surfaces are analyzed and solved. A different type of magnetic catalysis is revealed with the dynamical generation of both Haldane and Dirac gaps. Its characteristic feature manifests itself in the crucial role that the electric field plays in dynamical symmetry breaking and the generation of a Dirac gap in the slab. It is argued that, for a sufficiently large external electric field, the ground state of the system is a phase with a homogeneous surface charge density.

  8. Stochastic Dipolar Recoupling in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance of Solids

    SciTech Connect

    Tycko, Robert

    2007-11-02

    I describe a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique, called stochastic dipolar recoupling (SDR), that permits continuous experimental control of the character of spin dynamics between coherent and incoherent limits in a system of magnetic dipole-coupled nuclei. In the fully incoherent limit of SDR, spin polarization transfers occur at distance-dependent rates without the quantum mechanical interferences among pairwise dipole-dipole couplings that often limit the feasibility or precision of structural studies of solids by NMR. In addition to facilitating structural studies, SDR represents a possible route to experimental studies of effects of decoherence on the dynamics of quantum many-body system000.

  9. Flat RF coils in static field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Stork, H; Gädke, A; Nestle, N; Fujara, F

    2009-10-01

    The use of flat RF coils allows considerable gains in the sensitivity of static field gradient (SFG) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments. In this article, this effect is studied theoretically as well as experimentally. Additionally, the flat coil geometry has been studied theoretically depending on magnetic field gradient, pulse sequence and amplifier power. Moreover, detecting the signal directly from the free induction decay (FID) turned out to be quite attractive for STRAFI-like microimaging experiments, especially when using flat coils. In addition to wound rectangular flat coils also spiral flat coils have been developed which can be manufactured by photolithography from printed circuit boards.

  10. Stochastic dipolar recoupling in nuclear magnetic resonance of solids.

    PubMed

    Tycko, Robert

    2007-11-02

    I describe a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique, called stochastic dipolar recoupling (SDR), that permits continuous experimental control of the character of spin dynamics between coherent and incoherent limits in a system of magnetic dipole-coupled nuclei. In the fully incoherent limit of SDR, spin polarization transfers occur at distance-dependent rates without the quantum mechanical interferences among pairwise dipole-dipole couplings that often limit the feasibility or precision of structural studies of solids by NMR. In addition to facilitating structural studies, SDR represents a possible route to experimental studies of effects of decoherence on the dynamics of quantum many-body systems.

  11. Stochastic dipolar recoupling in nuclear magnetic resonance of solids

    PubMed Central

    Tycko, Robert

    2008-01-01

    I describe a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique, called stochastic dipolar recoupling (SDR), that permits continuous experimental control of the character of spin dynamics between coherent and incoherent limits in a system of magnetic dipole-coupled nuclei. In the fully incoherent limit of SDR, spin polarization transfers occur at distance-dependent rates without the quantum mechanical interferences among pairwise dipole-dipole couplings that often limit the feasibility or precision of structural studies of solids by NMR. In addition to facilitating structural studies, SDR represents a possible route to experimental studies of effects of decoherence on the dynamics of quantum many-body systems. PMID:17995438

  12. Algorithmic cooling in liquid-state nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atia, Yosi; Elias, Yuval; Mor, Tal; Weinstein, Yossi

    2016-01-01

    Algorithmic cooling is a method that employs thermalization to increase qubit purification level; namely, it reduces the qubit system's entropy. We utilized gradient ascent pulse engineering, an optimal control algorithm, to implement algorithmic cooling in liquid-state nuclear magnetic resonance. Various cooling algorithms were applied onto the three qubits of C132-trichloroethylene, cooling the system beyond Shannon's entropy bound in several different ways. In particular, in one experiment a carbon qubit was cooled by a factor of 4.61. This work is a step towards potentially integrating tools of NMR quantum computing into in vivo magnetic-resonance spectroscopy.

  13. Recent advances in computational methods for nuclear magnetic resonance data processing.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xin

    2013-02-01

    Although three-dimensional protein structure determination using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a computationally costly and tedious process that would benefit from advanced computational techniques, it has not garnered much research attention from specialists in bioinformatics and computational biology. In this paper, we review recent advances in computational methods for NMR protein structure determination. We summarize the advantages of and bottlenecks in the existing methods and outline some open problems in the field. We also discuss current trends in NMR technology development and suggest directions for research on future computational methods for NMR.

  14. Coaxial probe for nuclear magnetic resonance diffusion and relaxation correlation experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Yiqiao; Hürlimann, Martin; Mandal, Soumyajit; Paulsen, Jeffrey; Song, Yi-Qiao

    2014-02-21

    A coaxial nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) probe is built to measure diffusion and relaxation properties of liquid samples. In particular, we demonstrate the acquisition of two-dimensional (2D) distribution functions (T{sub 1}-T{sub 2} and diffusion–T{sub 2}), essential for fluids characterization. The compact design holds promise for miniaturization, thus enabling the measurement of molecular diffusion that is inaccessible to conventional micro-NMR setups. Potential applications range from crude oil characterization to biomolecular screening and detections.

  15. High-resolution proton nuclear magnetic resonance characterization of seminolipid from bovine spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, J G; Storey, B T; Hemling, M L; Grob, R L

    1990-06-01

    The high-resolution one- and two-dimensional proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) characterization of seminolipid from bovine spermatozoa is presented. The 1H-NMR data was confirmed by gas-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometric analysis of the partially methylated alditol acetates of the sugar unit, mild alkaline methanolysis of the glyceryl ester, mobility on normal phase and diphasic thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC), and fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry (FAB-MS). The structure of the molecule corresponds to 1-O-hexadecyl-2-O-hexadecanoyl-3-O-beta-D-(3'-sulfo)-galactopyranosyl- sn-glycerol.

  16. Mechanically detected nuclear magnetic resonance image of a multilayer system at normal pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Schaff, A.; Veeman, W.S.

    1997-05-01

    Magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM) is a new microscopy technique that combines the spin selective detection of nuclear or electron spin resonance with the high spatial resolution of atomic force microscopy. In this letter we present MRFM measurements on a three-layer system in the micron range. We detected the one-dimensional distribution of proton spins in a sample that consisted of two-ammonium sulphate layers and an intermediate layer of sodium chloride. The experiments were done at room temperature and normal pressure, in contrast to earlier MRFM measurements that have been carried out in vacuum at room temperature or low temperatures. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  17. Experimental study of quantum simulation for quantum chemistry with a nuclear magnetic resonance simulator.

    PubMed

    Lu, Dawei; Xu, Nanyang; Xu, Boruo; Li, Zhaokai; Chen, Hongwei; Peng, Xinhua; Xu, Ruixue; Du, Jiangfeng

    2012-10-13

    Quantum computers have been proved to be able to mimic quantum systems efficiently in polynomial time. Quantum chemistry problems, such as static molecular energy calculations and dynamical chemical reaction simulations, become very intractable on classical computers with scaling up of the system. Therefore, quantum simulation is a feasible and effective approach to tackle quantum chemistry problems. Proof-of-principle experiments have been implemented on the calculation of the hydrogen molecular energies and one-dimensional chemical isomerization reaction dynamics using nuclear magnetic resonance systems. We conclude that quantum simulation will surpass classical computers for quantum chemistry in the near future.

  18. Storage of nuclear magnetization as long-lived singlet order in low magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Pileio, Giuseppe; Carravetta, Marina; Levitt, Malcolm H

    2010-10-05

    Hyperpolarized nuclear states provide NMR signals enhanced by many orders of magnitude, with numerous potential applications to analytical NMR, in vivo NMR, and NMR imaging. However, the lifetime of hyperpolarized magnetization is normally limited by the relaxation time constant T(1), which lies in the range of milliseconds to minutes, apart from in exceptional cases. In many cases, the lifetime of the hyperpolarized state may be enhanced by converting the magnetization into nuclear singlet order, where it is protected against many common relaxation mechanisms. However, all current methods for converting magnetization into singlet order require the use of a high-field, high-homogeneity NMR magnet, which is incompatible with most hyperpolarization procedures. We demonstrate a new method for converting magnetization into singlet order and back again. The new technique is suitable for magnetically inequivalent spin-pair systems in weak and inhomogeneous magnetic fields, and is compatible with known hyperpolarization technology. The method involves audio-frequency pulsed irradiation at the low-field nuclear Larmor frequency, employing coupling-synchronized trains of 180° pulses to induce singlet-triplet transitions. The echo trains are used as building blocks for a pulse sequence called M2S that transforms longitudinal magnetization into long-lived singlet order. The time-reverse of the pulse sequence, called S2M, converts singlet order back into longitudinal magnetization. The method is demonstrated on a solution of (15)N-labeled nitrous oxide. The magnetization is stored in low magnetic field for over 30 min, even though the T(1) is less than 3 min under the same conditions.

  19. Storage of nuclear magnetization as long-lived singlet order in low magnetic field

    PubMed Central

    Pileio, Giuseppe; Carravetta, Marina; Levitt, Malcolm H.

    2010-01-01

    Hyperpolarized nuclear states provide NMR signals enhanced by many orders of magnitude, with numerous potential applications to analytical NMR, in vivo NMR, and NMR imaging. However, the lifetime of hyperpolarized magnetization is normally limited by the relaxation time constant T1, which lies in the range of milliseconds to minutes, apart from in exceptional cases. In many cases, the lifetime of the hyperpolarized state may be enhanced by converting the magnetization into nuclear singlet order, where it is protected against many common relaxation mechanisms. However, all current methods for converting magnetization into singlet order require the use of a high-field, high-homogeneity NMR magnet, which is incompatible with most hyperpolarization procedures. We demonstrate a new method for converting magnetization into singlet order and back again. The new technique is suitable for magnetically inequivalent spin-pair systems in weak and inhomogeneous magnetic fields, and is compatible with known hyperpolarization technology. The method involves audio-frequency pulsed irradiation at the low-field nuclear Larmor frequency, employing coupling-synchronized trains of 180° pulses to induce singlet–triplet transitions. The echo trains are used as building blocks for a pulse sequence called M2S that transforms longitudinal magnetization into long-lived singlet order. The time-reverse of the pulse sequence, called S2M, converts singlet order back into longitudinal magnetization. The method is demonstrated on a solution of 15N-labeled nitrous oxide. The magnetization is stored in low magnetic field for over 30 min, even though the T1 is less than 3 min under the same conditions. PMID:20855584

  20. Three-Dimensional Modeling of Guide-Field Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hesse, Michael

    2005-01-01

    The dissipation mechanism of guide field magnetic reconnection remains a subject of intense scientific interest. On one hand, one set of recent studies have shown that particle inertia-based processes, which include thermal and bulk inertial effects, provide the reconnection electric field in the diffusion region. On the other hand, a second set of studies emphasizes the role of wave-particle interactions in providing anomalous resistivity in the diffusion region. In this presentation, we analyze three-dimensional PIC simulations of guide-field magnetic reconnection. Specific emphasis will be on the question whether thermal-inertia processes, mediated by the electron pressure tensor, remain a viable dissipation mechanism in fully three-dimensional systems.

  1. Strong localization effect in magnetic two-dimensional hole systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wurstbauer, U.; Knott, S.; Zolotaryov, A.; Hansen, W.; Schuh, D.; Wegscheider, W.

    2010-01-11

    We report an extensive study of the magnetotransport properties of magnetically doped two-dimensional hole systems. Inverted manganese modulation doped InAs quantum wells with localized manganese ions providing a magnetic moment of S=5/2 were grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Strong localization effect found in low-field magnetotransport measurements on these structures can either be modified by the manganese doping density or by tuning the two-dimensional hole density p via field effect. The data reveal that the ratio between p and manganese ions inside or in close vicinity to the channel enlarges the strong localization effect. Moreover, asymmetric broadening of the doping layer due to manganese segregation is significantly influenced by strain in the heterostructure.

  2. Strong localization effect in magnetic two-dimensional hole systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wurstbauer, U.; Knott, S.; Zolotaryov, A.; Schuh, D.; Hansen, W.; Wegscheider, W.

    2010-01-01

    We report an extensive study of the magnetotransport properties of magnetically doped two-dimensional hole systems. Inverted manganese modulation doped InAs quantum wells with localized manganese ions providing a magnetic moment of S=5/2 were grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Strong localization effect found in low-field magnetotransport measurements on these structures can either be modified by the manganese doping density or by tuning the two-dimensional hole density p via field effect. The data reveal that the ratio between p and manganese ions inside or in close vicinity to the channel enlarges the strong localization effect. Moreover, asymmetric broadening of the doping layer due to manganese segregation is significantly influenced by strain in the heterostructure.

  3. Fast magnetic reconnection in three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Pang Bijia; Pen, U.-L.; Vishniac, Ethan T.

    2010-10-15

    A constructive numerical example of fast magnetic reconnection in a three-dimensional periodic box is presented. Reconnection is initiated by a strong, localized perturbation to the field lines. The solution is intrinsically three-dimensional and its gross properties do not depend on the details of the simulations. {approx}30% of the magnetic energy is released in an event which lasts about one Alfven time, but only after a delay during which the field lines evolve into a critical configuration. The physical picture of the process is presented. The reconnection regions are dynamical and mutually interacting. In the comoving frame of these regions, reconnection occurs through a x-like point, analogous to Petschek reconnection. The dynamics appear to be driven by global flows, not local processes.

  4. The origins and future of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Wehrli, F.W. )

    1992-06-01

    What began as a curiosity of physics has become the preeminent method of diagnostic medical imaging and may displace x-ray-based techniques in the 21st century. During the past two decades nuclear magnetic resonance has revolutionized chemistry, biochemistry, biology and, more recently, diagnostic medicine. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging, (MRI) as it is commonly called, is fundamentally different from x-ray-based techniques in terms of the principles of spatial encoding and mechanisms of signal and contrast generation involved. MRI has a far richer ultimate potential than any other imaging technique known today, and its technology and applications are still far from maturation, which may not occur until early in the 21st century. 23 refs., 6 figs.

  5. Nuclear chiral and magnetic rotation in covariant density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Jie; Zhao, Pengwei

    2016-05-01

    Excitations of chiral rotation observed in triaxial nuclei and magnetic and/or antimagnetic rotations (AMR) seen in near-spherical nuclei have attracted a lot of attention. Unlike conventional rotation in well-deformed or superdeformed nuclei, here the rotational axis is not necessary coinciding with any principal axis of the nuclear density distribution. Thus, tilted axis cranking (TAC) is mandatory to describe these excitations self-consistently in the framework of covariant density functional theory (CDFT). We will briefly introduce the formalism of TAC-CDFT and its application for magnetic and AMR phenomena. Configuration-fixed CDFT and its predictions for nuclear chiral configurations and for favorable triaxial deformation parameters are also presented, and the discoveries of the multiple chiral doublets in 133Ce and 103Rh are discussed.

  6. Solid state nuclear magnetic resonance with magic-angle spinning and dynamic nuclear polarization below 25 K.

    PubMed

    Thurber, Kent R; Potapov, Alexey; Yau, Wai-Ming; Tycko, Robert

    2013-01-01

    We describe an apparatus for solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) with dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) and magic-angle spinning (MAS) at 20-25 K and 9.4 Tesla. The MAS NMR probe uses helium to cool the sample space and nitrogen gas for MAS drive and bearings, as described earlier, but also includes a corrugated waveguide for transmission of microwaves from below the probe to the sample. With a 30 mW circularly polarized microwave source at 264 GHz, MAS at 6.8 kHz, and 21 K sample temperature, greater than 25-fold enhancements of cross-polarized (13)C NMR signals are observed in spectra of frozen glycerol/water solutions containing the triradical dopant DOTOPA-TEMPO when microwaves are applied. As demonstrations, we present DNP-enhanced one-dimensional and two-dimensional (13)C MAS NMR spectra of frozen solutions of uniformly (13)C-labeled l-alanine and melittin, a 26-residue helical peptide that we have synthesized with four uniformly (13)C-labeled amino acids. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Solid state nuclear magnetic resonance with magic-angle spinning and dynamic nuclear polarization below 25 K

    PubMed Central

    Thurber, Kent R.; Potapov, Alexey; Yau, Wai-Ming; Tycko, Robert

    2012-01-01

    We describe an apparatus for solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) with dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) and magic-angle spinning (MAS) at 20–25 K and 9.4 Tesla. The MAS NMR probe uses helium to cool the sample space and nitrogen gas for MAS drive and bearings, as described earlier (Thurber et al., J. Magn. Reson. 2008) [1], but also includes a corrugated waveguide for transmission of microwaves from below the probe to the sample. With a 30 mW circularly polarized microwave source at 264 GHz, MAS at 6.8 kHz, and 21 K sample temperature, greater than 25-fold enhancements of cross-polarized 13C NMR signals are observed in spectra of frozen glycerol/water solutions containing the triradical dopant DOTOPA-TEMPO when microwaves are applied. As demonstrations, we present DNP-enhanced one-dimensional and two-dimensional 13C MAS NMR spectra of frozen solutions of uniformly 13C-labeled L-alanine and melittin, a 26-residue helical peptide that we have synthesized with four uniformly 13C-labeled amino acids. PMID:23238592

  8. Magnons in disordered nonstoichiometric low-dimensional magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buczek, Paweł; Sandratskii, Leonid M.; Buczek, Nadine; Thomas, Stefan; Vignale, Giovanni; Ernst, Arthur

    2016-08-01

    We study spin excitation spectra of one-, two-, and three-dimensional magnets featuring nonmagnetic defects at a wide range of concentrations. Taking the Heisenberg model as the starting point, we tackle the problem by both direct numerical simulations in large supercells and using a semianalytic coherent-potential approximation. We consider the properties of the excitations in both direct and reciprocal spaces. In the limits of the concentration c of the magnetic atoms tending to 0 or 1 the properties of the spin excitations are similar in all three dimensions. In the case of a low concentration of magnetic atoms the spin excitation spectra are dominated by the modes confined in the real space to single atoms or small clusters and delocalized in the reciprocal space. In the limit of c tending to 1, we obtain the spin-wave excitations delocalized in the real space and localized in the reciprocal space. However, for the intermediate concentrations the properties of the spin excitations are strongly dimensionality dependent. We pay particular attention to the formation, with increase of c , of the Lorentzian-shaped peaks in the spectral densities of the spin excitations, which can be regarded as magnon states with a finite lifetime given by the width of the peaks. In general, low-dimensional magnets are more strongly affected by the presence of nonmagnetic impurities than their bulk counterparts. The details of the electronic structure, varying with the dimensionality and the concentration, substantially influence the spin excitation spectra of real materials, as we show in the example of the FeAl alloy.

  9. Two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy in Earth's magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Jeremy N; Coy, Andrew; Dykstra, Robin; Eccles, Craig D; Hunter, Mark W; Callaghan, Paul T

    2006-10-01

    We demonstrate the first two-dimensional correlation NMR (COSY) spectra obtained at ultra low frequencies (ULF) using the Earth's magnetic field. Using a specially developed spectrometer with multiple audio-frequency pulses under controlled pulse phase, we observe magnetisation transfer arising from heteronuclear J-couplings in trifluoroethanol and para-difluorobenzene. The 2D COSY spectra exhibit all diagonal and off-diagonal multiplets consistent with known J-couplings in these molecules.

  10. Chemometric Analysis of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Data

    SciTech Connect

    ALAM,TODD M.; ALAM,M. KATHLEEN

    2000-07-20

    Chemometric analysis of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has increased dramatically in recent years. A variety of different chemometric techniques have been applied to a wide range of problems in food, agricultural, medical, process and industrial systems. This article gives a brief review of chemometric analysis of NMR spectral data, including a summary of the types of mixtures and experiments analyzed with chemometric techniques. Common experimental problems encountered during the chemometric analysis of NMR data are also discussed.

  11. Analysis of the transient response of nuclear spins in GaAs with/without nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Rasly, Mahmoud; Lin, Zhichao; Yamamoto, Masafumi; Uemura, Tetsuya

    2016-05-15

    As an alternative to studying the steady-state responses of nuclear spins in solid state systems, working within a transient-state framework can reveal interesting phenomena. The response of nuclear spins in GaAs to a changing magnetic field was analyzed based on the time evolution of nuclear spin temperature. Simulation results well reproduced our experimental results for the transient oblique Hanle signals observed in an all-electrical spin injection device. The analysis showed that the so called dynamic nuclear polarization can be treated as a cooling tool for the nuclear spins: It works as a provider to exchange spin angular momentum between polarized electron spins and nuclear spins through the hyperfine interaction, leading to an increase in the nuclear polarization. In addition, a time-delay of the nuclear spin temperature with a fast sweep of the external magnetic field produces a possible transient state for the nuclear spin polarization. On the other hand, the nuclear magnetic resonance acts as a heating tool for a nuclear spin system. This causes the nuclear spin temperature to jump to infinity: i.e., the average nuclear spins along with the nuclear field vanish at resonant fields of {sup 75}As, {sup 69}Ga and {sup 71}Ga, showing an interesting step-dip structure in the oblique Hanle signals. These analyses provide a quantitative understanding of nuclear spin dynamics in semiconductors for application in future computation processing.

  12. Three-dimensional magnetic trap lattice on an atom chip with an optically induced fictitious magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Yan Hui

    2010-05-15

    A robust type of three-dimensional magnetic trap lattice on an atom chip combining optically induced fictitious magnetic field with microcurrent-carrying wires is proposed. Compared to the regular optical lattice, the individual trap in this three-dimensional magnetic trap lattice can be easily addressed and manipulated.

  13. Three-dimensional magnetic trap lattice on an atom chip with an optically induced fictitious magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Hui

    2010-05-01

    A robust type of three-dimensional magnetic trap lattice on an atom chip combining optically induced fictitious magnetic field with microcurrent-carrying wires is proposed. Compared to the regular optical lattice, the individual trap in this three-dimensional magnetic trap lattice can be easily addressed and manipulated.

  14. Synthesis and characterization of low-dimensional molecular magnetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chen

    This dissertation presents experimental results from the synthesis and structural, magnetic characterization of representative low-dimensional molecule-based magnetic materials. Most of the materials reported in this dissertation, both coordination polymers and cuprate, are obtained as the result of synthesizing and characterizing spin ladder systems; except the material studied in Chapter 2, ferricenyl(III)trisferrocenyl(II)borate, which is not related to the spin ladder project. The interest in spin ladder systems is due to the discovery of high-temperature superconductivity in doped cuprates possessing ladder-like structures, and it is hoped that investigation of the magnetic behavior of ladder-like structures will help us understand the mechanism of high-temperature superconductivity. Chapter 1 reviews fundamental knowledge of molecular magnetism, general synthetic strategies for low-dimensional coordination polymers, and a brief introduction to the current status of research on spin ladder systems. Chapter 2 presents a modified synthetic procedure of a previously known monomeric complex, ferricenyl(III)trisferrocenyl(II)borate, 1. Its magnetic properties were characterized and previous results have been disproved. Chapter 3 investigates the magnetism of [CuCl2(CH3CN)] 2, 2, a cuprate whose structure consists of isolated noninterpenetrating ladders formed by the stacking of Cu(II) dimers. This material presents an unexpected ferromagnetic interaction both within the dimeric units and between the dimers, and this behavior has been rationalized based on the effect of its terminal nonbridging ligands. In Chapter 4, the synthesis and magnetism of two ladder-like coordination polymers, [Co(NO3)2(4,4'-bipyridine) 1.5(MeCN)]n, 3, and Ni2(2,6-pyridinedicarboxylic acid)2(H2O)4(pyrazine), 4, are reported. Compound 3 possesses a covalent one-dimensional ladder structure in which Co(II) ions are bridged through bipyridine molecules. Compared to the materials discussed in

  15. Three-dimensional model of magnetized capacitively coupled plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauf, Shahid; Kenney, Jason; Collins, Ken

    2009-05-01

    A three-dimensional plasma model is used to understand the characteristics of magnetized capacitively coupled plasma discharges. The simulations consider plasmas generated using high frequency (13.5 MHz) and very high frequency (162 MHz) sources, electropositive (Ar) and electronegative (O2) gases, and spatially uniform and nonuniform magnetic fields. Application of a magnetic field parallel to the electrodes is found to enhance the plasma density due to improved electron confinement and shift the plasma due to the E ×B drift. The plasma is electrically symmetric at 162 MHz so it drifts in opposite directions adjacent to the two electrodes due to the E ×B drift. On the other hand, the 13.5 MHz plasma is electrically asymmetric and it predominantly moves in one direction under the influence of the E ×B drift. The E ×B drift focuses the plasma into a smaller volume in regions with convex magnetic field lines. Conversely, the E ×B drift spreads out the plasma in regions with concave magnetic field lines. In a magnetized O2 plasma, the overall plasma is found to move in one direction due to the E ×B drift while the plasma interior moves in the opposite direction. This behavior is linked to the propensity of negative ions to reside in regions of peak plasma potential, which moves closer to the chamber center opposite to the E ×B drift direction.

  16. Three-dimensional model of magnetized capacitively coupled plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Rauf, Shahid; Kenney, Jason; Collins, Ken

    2009-05-15

    A three-dimensional plasma model is used to understand the characteristics of magnetized capacitively coupled plasma discharges. The simulations consider plasmas generated using high frequency (13.5 MHz) and very high frequency (162 MHz) sources, electropositive (Ar) and electronegative (O{sub 2}) gases, and spatially uniform and nonuniform magnetic fields. Application of a magnetic field parallel to the electrodes is found to enhance the plasma density due to improved electron confinement and shift the plasma due to the ExB drift. The plasma is electrically symmetric at 162 MHz so it drifts in opposite directions adjacent to the two electrodes due to the ExB drift. On the other hand, the 13.5 MHz plasma is electrically asymmetric and it predominantly moves in one direction under the influence of the ExB drift. The ExB drift focuses the plasma into a smaller volume in regions with convex magnetic field lines. Conversely, the ExB drift spreads out the plasma in regions with concave magnetic field lines. In a magnetized O{sub 2} plasma, the overall plasma is found to move in one direction due to the ExB drift while the plasma interior moves in the opposite direction. This behavior is linked to the propensity of negative ions to reside in regions of peak plasma potential, which moves closer to the chamber center opposite to the ExB drift direction.

  17. Interlayer coupling through a dimensionality-induced magnetic state.

    PubMed

    Gibert, M; Viret, M; Zubko, P; Jaouen, N; Tonnerre, J-M; Torres-Pardo, A; Catalano, S; Gloter, A; Stéphan, O; Triscone, J-M

    2016-04-15

    Dimensionality is known to play an important role in many compounds for which ultrathin layers can behave very differently from the bulk. This is especially true for the paramagnetic metal LaNiO3, which can become insulating and magnetic when only a few monolayers thick. We show here that an induced antiferromagnetic order can be stabilized in the [111] direction by interfacial coupling to the insulating ferromagnet LaMnO3, and used to generate interlayer magnetic coupling of a nature that depends on the exact number of LaNiO3 monolayers. For 7-monolayer-thick LaNiO3/LaMnO3 superlattices, negative and positive exchange bias, as well as antiferromagnetic interlayer coupling are observed in different temperature windows. All three behaviours are explained based on the emergence of a (¼,¼,¼)-wavevector antiferromagnetic structure in LaNiO3 and the presence of interface asymmetry with LaMnO3. This dimensionality-induced magnetic order can be used to tailor a broad range of magnetic properties in well-designed superlattice-based devices.

  18. Interlayer coupling through a dimensionality-induced magnetic state

    PubMed Central

    Gibert, M.; Viret, M.; Zubko, P.; Jaouen, N.; Tonnerre, J.-M.; Torres-Pardo, A.; Catalano, S.; Gloter, A.; Stéphan, O.; Triscone, J.-M.

    2016-01-01

    Dimensionality is known to play an important role in many compounds for which ultrathin layers can behave very differently from the bulk. This is especially true for the paramagnetic metal LaNiO3, which can become insulating and magnetic when only a few monolayers thick. We show here that an induced antiferromagnetic order can be stabilized in the [111] direction by interfacial coupling to the insulating ferromagnet LaMnO3, and used to generate interlayer magnetic coupling of a nature that depends on the exact number of LaNiO3 monolayers. For 7-monolayer-thick LaNiO3/LaMnO3 superlattices, negative and positive exchange bias, as well as antiferromagnetic interlayer coupling are observed in different temperature windows. All three behaviours are explained based on the emergence of a (¼,¼,¼)-wavevector antiferromagnetic structure in LaNiO3 and the presence of interface asymmetry with LaMnO3. This dimensionality-induced magnetic order can be used to tailor a broad range of magnetic properties in well-designed superlattice-based devices. PMID:27079668

  19. Normal Modes of Magnetized Finite Two-Dimensional Yukawa Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marleau, Gabriel-Dominique; Kaehlert, Hanno; Bonitz, Michael

    2009-11-01

    The normal modes of a finite two-dimensional dusty plasma in an isotropic parabolic confinement, including the simultaneous effects of friction and an external magnetic field, are studied. The ground states are found from molecular dynamics simulations with simulated annealing, and the influence of screening, friction, and magnetic field on the mode frequencies is investigated in detail. The two-particle problem is solved analytically and the limiting cases of weak and strong magnetic fields are discussed.[4pt] [1] C. Henning, H. K"ahlert, P. Ludwig, A. Melzer, and M.Bonitz. J. Phys. A 42, 214023 (2009)[2] B. Farokhi, M. Shahmansouri, and P. K. Shukla. Phys.Plasmas 16, 063703 (2009)[3] L. Cândido, J.-P. Rino, N. Studart, and F. M. Peeters. J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 10, 11627--11644 (1998)

  20. Perpendicular magnetic anisotropy of two-dimensional Rashba ferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyoung-Whan; Lee, Kyung-Jin; Lee, Hyun-Woo; Stiles, M. D.

    2016-11-01

    We compute the magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy within two-dimensional Rashba models. For a ferromagnetic free-electron Rashba model, the magnetic anisotropy is exactly zero regardless of the strength of the Rashba coupling, unless only the lowest band is occupied. For this latter case, the model predicts in-plane anisotropy. For a more realistic Rashba model with finite band width, the magnetic anisotropy evolves from in-plane to perpendicular and back to in-plane as bands are progressively filled. This evolution agrees with first-principles calculations on the interfacial anisotropy, suggesting that the Rashba model captures energetics leading to anisotropy originating from the interface provided that the model takes account of the finite Brillouin zone. The results show that the electron density modulation by doping or an external voltage is more important for voltage-controlled magnetic anisotropy than the modulation of the Rashba parameter.

  1. Photonic band gaps in one-dimensional magnetized plasma photonic crystals with arbitrary magnetic declination

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Haifeng; Liu Shaobin; Kong Xiangkun

    2012-12-15

    In this paper, the properties of photonic band gaps and dispersion relations of one-dimensional magnetized plasma photonic crystals composed of dielectric and magnetized plasma layers with arbitrary magnetic declination are theoretically investigated for TM polarized wave based on transfer matrix method. As TM wave propagates in one-dimensional magnetized plasma photonic crystals, the electromagnetic wave can be divided into two modes due to the influence of Lorentz force. The equations for effective dielectric functions of such two modes are theoretically deduced, and the transfer matrix equation and dispersion relations for TM wave are calculated. The influences of relative dielectric constant, plasma collision frequency, incidence angle, plasma filling factor, the angle between external magnetic field and +z axis, external magnetic field and plasma frequency on transmission, and dispersion relation are investigated, respectively, and some corresponding physical explanations are also given. From the numerical results, it has been shown that plasma collision frequency cannot change the locations of photonic band gaps for both modes, and also does not affect the reflection and transmission magnitudes. The characteristics of photonic band gaps for both modes can be obviously tuned by relative dielectric constant, incidence angle, plasma filling factor, the angle between external magnetic field and +z axis, external magnetic field and plasma frequency, respectively. These results would provide theoretical instructions for designing filters, microcavities, and fibers, etc.

  2. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Spectroscopic Characterization of Nanomaterials and Biopolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Chengchen

    Nanomaterials have attracted considerable attention in recent research due to their wide applications in various fields such as material science, physical science, electrical engineering, and biomedical engineering. Researchers have developed many methods for synthesizing different types of nanostructures and have further applied them in various applications. However, in many cases, a molecular level understanding of nanoparticles and their associated surface chemistry is lacking investigation. Understanding the surface chemistry of nanomaterials is of great significance for obtaining a better understanding of the properties and functions of the nanomaterials. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy can provide a familiar means of looking at the molecular structure of molecules bound to surfaces of nanomaterials as well as a method to determine the size of nanoparticles in solution. Here, a combination of NMR spectroscopic techniques including one- and two-dimensional NMR spectroscopies was used to investigate the surface chemistry and physical properties of some common nanomaterials, including for example, thiol-protected gold nanostructures and biomolecule-capped silica nanoparticles. Silk is a natural protein fiber that features unique properties such as excellent mechanical properties, biocompatibility, and non-linear optical properties. These appealing physical properties originate from the silk structure, and therefore, the structural analysis of silk is of great importance for revealing the mystery of these impressive properties and developing novel silk-based biomaterials as well. Here, solid-state NMR spectroscopy was used to elucidate the secondary structure of silk proteins in N. clavipes spider dragline silk and B. mori silkworm silk. It is found that the Gly-Gly-X (X=Leu, Tyr, Gln) motif in spider dragline silk is not in a beta-sheet or alpha-helix structure and is very likely to be present in a disordered structure with evidence for 31-helix

  3. Magnetic Flux Compression Concept for Nuclear Pulse Propulsion and Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, Ronald J.

    2000-01-01

    The desire for fast, efficient interplanetary transport requires propulsion systems having short acceleration times and very high specific impulse attributes. Unfortunately, most highly efficient propulsion systems which are within the capabilities of present day technologies are either very heavy or yield very low impulse such that the acceleration time to final velocity is too long to be of lasting interest, One exception, the nuclear thermal thruster, could achieve the desired acceleration but it would require inordinately large mass ratios to reach the range of desired final velocities. An alternative approach, among several competing concepts that are beyond our modern technical capabilities, is a pulsed thermonuclear device utilizing microfusion detonations. In this paper, we examine the feasibility of an innovative magnetic flux compression concept for utilizing microfusion detonations, assuming that such low yield nuclear bursts can be realized in practice. In this concept, a magnetic field is compressed between an expanding detonation driven diamagnetic plasma and a stationary structure formed from a high temperature superconductor (HTSC). In general, we are interested in accomplishing two important functions: (1) collimation of a hot diamagnetic plasma for direct thrust production; and (2) pulse power generation for dense plasma ignition. For the purposes of this research, it is assumed that rnicrofusion detonation technology may become available within a few decades, and that this approach could capitalize on recent advances in inertial confinement fusion ICF) technologies including magnetized target concepts and antimatter initiated nuclear detonations. The charged particle expansion velocity in these detonations can be on the order of 10 (exp 6)- 10 (exp 7) meters per second, and, if effectively collimated by a magnetic nozzle, can yield the Isp and the acceleration levels needed for practical interplanetary spaceflight. The ability to ignite pure

  4. Magnetic Flux Compression Concept for Nuclear Pulse Propulsion and Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, Ronald J.

    2000-01-01

    The desire for fast, efficient interplanetary transport requires propulsion systems having short acceleration times and very high specific impulse attributes. Unfortunately, most highly efficient propulsion systems which are within the capabilities of present day technologies are either very heavy or yield very low impulse such that the acceleration time to final velocity is too long to be of lasting interest, One exception, the nuclear thermal thruster, could achieve the desired acceleration but it would require inordinately large mass ratios to reach the range of desired final velocities. An alternative approach, among several competing concepts that are beyond our modern technical capabilities, is a pulsed thermonuclear device utilizing microfusion detonations. In this paper, we examine the feasibility of an innovative magnetic flux compression concept for utilizing microfusion detonations, assuming that such low yield nuclear bursts can be realized in practice. In this concept, a magnetic field is compressed between an expanding detonation driven diamagnetic plasma and a stationary structure formed from a high temperature superconductor (HTSC). In general, we are interested in accomplishing two important functions: (1) collimation of a hot diamagnetic plasma for direct thrust production; and (2) pulse power generation for dense plasma ignition. For the purposes of this research, it is assumed that rnicrofusion detonation technology may become available within a few decades, and that this approach could capitalize on recent advances in inertial confinement fusion ICF) technologies including magnetized target concepts and antimatter initiated nuclear detonations. The charged particle expansion velocity in these detonations can be on the order of 10 (exp 6)- 10 (exp 7) meters per second, and, if effectively collimated by a magnetic nozzle, can yield the Isp and the acceleration levels needed for practical interplanetary spaceflight. The ability to ignite pure

  5. Quantitative velocity distributions via nuclear magnetic resonance flow metering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Neill, Keelan T.; Fridjonsson, Einar O.; Stanwix, Paul L.; Johns, Michael L.

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate the use of Tikhonov regularisation as a data inversion technique to determine the velocity distributions of flowing liquid streams. Regularisation is applied to the signal produced by a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) flow measurement system consisting of a pre-polarising permanent magnet located upstream of an Earth's magnetic field NMR detection coil. A simple free induction decay (FID) NMR signal is measured for the flowing stream in what is effectively a 'time-of-flight' measurement. The FID signal is then modelled as a function of fluid velocity and acquisition time, enabling determination of the velocity probability distributions via regularisation. The mean values of these velocity distributions were successfully validated against in-line rotameters. The ability to quantify multi-modal velocity distributions was also demonstrated using a two-pipe system.

  6. DC superconducting quantum interference device usable in nuclear quadrupole resonance and zero field nuclear magnetic spectrometers

    DOEpatents

    Fan, Non Q.; Clarke, John

    1993-01-01

    A spectrometer for measuring the nuclear quadrupole resonance spectra or the zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance spectra generated by a sample is disclosed. The spectrometer uses an amplifier having a dc SQUID operating in a flux-locked loop for generating an amplified output as a function of the intensity of the signal generated by the sample. The flux-locked loop circuit includes an integrator. The amplifier also includes means for preventing the integrator from being driven into saturation. As a result, the time for the flux-locked loop to recover from the excitation pulses generated by the spectrometer is reduced.

  7. DC superconducting quantum interference device usable in nuclear quadrupole resonance and zero field nuclear magnetic spectrometers

    DOEpatents

    Fan, N.Q.; Clarke, J.

    1993-10-19

    A spectrometer for measuring the nuclear quadrupole resonance spectra or the zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance spectra generated by a sample is disclosed. The spectrometer uses an amplifier having a dc SQUID operating in a flux-locked loop for generating an amplified output as a function of the intensity of the signal generated by the sample. The flux-locked loop circuit includes an integrator. The amplifier also includes means for preventing the integrator from being driven into saturation. As a result, the time for the flux-locked loop to recover from the excitation pulses generated by the spectrometer is reduced. 7 figures.

  8. Self-assembled magnetic nanospheres with three-dimensional magnetic vortex

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Min-Kwan; Dhak, Prasanta; Lee, Ha-Youn; Lee, Jae-Hyeok; Yoo, Myoung-Woo; Lee, Jehyun; Kim, Sang-Koog; Jin, Kyoungsuk; Chu, Arim; Nam, Ki Tae; Kim, Miyoung; Park, Hyun Soon; Aizawa, Shinji; Tanigaki, Toshiaki; Shindo, Daisuke

    2014-12-08

    We report the electron holography images of spin configurations in peculiar assemblies of soft magnetic nanoparticles in single-, double-, triple-, or quadruple-sphere geometrical arrangements, in which each particle has a three-dimensional (3D) magnetic-vortex structure. Micromagnetic numerical calculations reveal that the uniqueness of the nanoparticles' 3D vortex structure plays a crucial role in their assembly, especially in terms of the contrasting contributions of the exchange and dipolar interactions to their binding energies. The results represent physical insights into the assembly of 3D-vortex-structure magnetic nanoparticles in different geometrical configurations and offer a practical means of controlling those assemblies.

  9. Decoherence and fluctuation dynamics of the quantum dot nuclear spin bath probed by nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chekhovich, Evgeny A.

    2017-06-01

    Dynamics of nuclear spin decoherence and nuclear spin flip-flops in self-assembled InGaAs/GaAs quantum dots are studied experimentally using optically detected nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Nuclear spin-echo decay times are found to be in the range 1-4 ms. This is a factor of ~3 longer than in strain-free GaAs/AlGaAs structures and is shown to result from strain-induced quadrupolar effects that suppress nuclear spin flip-flops. The correlation times of the flip-flops are examined using a novel frequency-comb NMR technique and are found to exceed 1 s, a factor of ~1000 longer than in strain-free structures. These findings complement recent studies of electron spin coherence and reveal the paradoxical dual role of the quadrupolar effects in self-assembled quantum dots: large increase of the nuclear spin bath coherence and at the same time significant reduction of the electron spin-qubit coherence. Approaches to increasing electron spin coherence are discussed. In particular the nanohole filled GaAs/AlGaAs quantum dots are an attractive option: while their optical quality matches the self-assembled dots the quadrupolar effects measured in NMR spectra are a factor of 1000 smaller.

  10. Complex Three-Dimensional Magnetic Ordering in Segmented Nanowire Arrays.

    PubMed

    Grutter, Alexander J; Krycka, Kathryn L; Tartakovskaya, Elena V; Borchers, Julie A; Reddy, K Sai Madhukar; Ortega, Eduardo; Ponce, Arturo; Stadler, Bethanie J H

    2017-08-22

    A comprehensive three-dimensional picture of magnetic ordering in high-density arrays of segmented FeGa/Cu nanowires is experimentally realized through the application of polarized small-angle neutron scattering. The competing energetics of dipolar interactions, shape anisotropy, and Zeeman energy in concert stabilize a highly tunable spin structure that depends heavily on the applied field and sample geometry. Consequently, we observe ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic interactions both among wires and between segments within individual wires. The resulting magnetic structure for our nanowire sample in a low field is a fan with magnetization perpendicular to the wire axis that aligns nearly antiparallel from one segment to the next along the wire axis. Additionally, while the low-field interwire coupling is ferromagnetic, application of a field tips the moments toward the nanowire axis, resulting in highly frustrated antiferromagnetic stripe patterns in the hexagonal nanowire lattice. Theoretical calculations confirm these observations, providing insight into the competing interactions and resulting stability windows for a variety of ordered magnetic structures. These results provide a roadmap for designing high-density magnetic nanowire arrays for spintronic device applications.

  11. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for determining the functional content of organic aerosols: a review.

    PubMed

    Chalbot, Marie-Cecile G; Kavouras, Ilias G

    2014-08-01

    The knowledge deficit of organic aerosol (OA) composition has been identified as the most important factor limiting our understanding of the atmospheric fate and implications of aerosol. The efforts to chemically characterize OA include the increasing utilization of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). Since 1998, the functional composition of different types, sizes and fractions of OA has been studied with one-dimensional, two-dimensional and solid state proton and carbon-13 NMR. This led to the use of functional group ratios to reconcile the most important sources of OA, including secondary organic aerosol and initial source apportionment using positive matrix factorization. Future research efforts may be directed towards the optimization of experimental parameters, detailed NMR experiments and analysis by pattern recognition methods to identify the chemical components, determination of the NMR fingerprints of OA sources and solid state NMR to study the content of OA as a whole.

  12. Investigation of enzymatic C-P bond formation using multiple quantum HCP nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hu, Kaifeng; Werner, Williard J; Allen, Kylie D; Wang, Susan C

    2015-04-01

    The biochemical mechanism for the formation of the C-P-C bond sequence found in l-phosphinothricin, a natural product with antibiotic and herbicidal activity, remains unclear. To obtain further insight into the catalytic mechanism of PhpK, the P-methyltransferase responsible for the formation of the second C-P bond in l-phosphinothricin, we utilized a combination of stable isotopes and two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Exploiting the newly emerged Bruker QCI probe (Bruker Corp.), we specifically designed and ran a (13) C-(31) P multiple quantum (1) H-(13) C-(31) P (HCP) experiment in (1) H-(31) P two-dimensional mode directly on a PhpK-catalyzed reaction mixture using (13) CH3 -labeled methylcobalamin as the methyl group donor. This method is particularly advantageous because minimal sample purification is needed to maximize product visualization. The observed 3:1:1:3 multiplet specifically and unequivocally illustrates direct bond formation between (13) CH3 and (31) P. Related nuclear magnetic resonance experiments based upon these principles may be designed for the study of enzymatic and/or synthetic chemical reaction mechanisms.

  13. Sub-nanoliter nuclear magnetic resonance coils fabricated with multilayer soft lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Matthew H. C.; Homenuke, Mark A.; Michal, Carl A.; Hansen, Carl L.

    2009-09-01

    We describe the fabrication and characterization of sub-nanoliter volume nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) transceiver coils that are easily amenable to integration within PDMS-based microfluidics. NMR coils were constructed by the injection of liquid metal into solenoidal cavities created around a microchannel using consecutive replica molding and bonding of PDMS layers. This construction technique permits the integration of NMR coils with solenoidal, toroidal or other three-dimensional geometries within highly integrated microfluidic systems and are one step toward NMR-based chemical screening and analysis on chip. The current proof-of-principle implementation displays limited sensitivity and resolution due to the conductivity and magnetic susceptibilities of the construction materials. However, NMR measurements and finite-element simulations made with the current device geometry indicate that optimization of these materials will allow for the collection of spectra from sub-millimolar concentration samples in less than 1 nL of solution.

  14. Tunable electronic and magnetic properties of two‐dimensional materials and their one‐dimensional derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhuhua; Liu, Xiaofei; Yu, Jin; Hang, Yang; Li, Yao; Guo, Yufeng; Xu, Ying; Sun, Xu; Zhou, Jianxin

    2016-01-01

    Low‐dimensional materials exhibit many exceptional properties and functionalities which can be efficiently tuned by externally applied force or fields. Here we review the current status of research on tuning the electronic and magnetic properties of low‐dimensional carbon, boron nitride, metal‐dichalcogenides, phosphorene nanomaterials by applied engineering strain, external electric field and interaction with substrates, etc, with particular focus on the progress of computational methods and studies. We highlight the similarities and differences of the property modulation among one‐ and two‐dimensional nanomaterials. Recent breakthroughs in experimental demonstration of the tunable functionalities in typical nanostructures are also presented. Finally, prospective and challenges for applying the tunable properties into functional devices are discussed. WIREs Comput Mol Sci 2016, 6:324–350. doi: 10.1002/wcms.1251 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. Conflict of interest: The authors have declared no conflicts of interest for this article. PMID:27818710

  15. Line broadening interference for high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectra under inhomogeneous magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Zhiliang; Yang, Jian; Lin, Yanqin E-mail: chenz@xmu.edu.cn; Chen, Zhong E-mail: chenz@xmu.edu.cn; Chen, Youhe

    2015-04-07

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy serves as an important tool for analyzing chemicals and biological metabolites. However, its performance is subject to the magnetic-field homogeneity. Under inhomogeneous fields, peaks are broadened to overlap each other, introducing difficulties for assignments. Here, we propose a method termed as line broadening interference (LBI) to provide high-resolution information under inhomogeneous magnetic fields by employing certain gradients in the indirect dimension to interfere the magnetic-field inhomogeneity. The conventional spectral-line broadening is thus interfered to be non-diagonal, avoiding the overlapping among adjacent resonances. Furthermore, an inhomogeneity correction algorithm is developed based on pattern recognition to recover the high-resolution information from LBI spectra. Theoretical deductions are performed to offer systematic and detailed analyses on the proposed method. Moreover, experiments are conducted to prove the feasibility of the proposed method for yielding high-resolution spectra in inhomogeneous magnetic fields.

  16. Line broadening interference for high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectra under inhomogeneous magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zhiliang; Yang, Jian; Chen, Youhe; Lin, Yanqin; Chen, Zhong

    2015-04-07

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy serves as an important tool for analyzing chemicals and biological metabolites. However, its performance is subject to the magnetic-field homogeneity. Under inhomogeneous fields, peaks are broadened to overlap each other, introducing difficulties for assignments. Here, we propose a method termed as line broadening interference (LBI) to provide high-resolution information under inhomogeneous magnetic fields by employing certain gradients in the indirect dimension to interfere the magnetic-field inhomogeneity. The conventional spectral-line broadening is thus interfered to be non-diagonal, avoiding the overlapping among adjacent resonances. Furthermore, an inhomogeneity correction algorithm is developed based on pattern recognition to recover the high-resolution information from LBI spectra. Theoretical deductions are performed to offer systematic and detailed analyses on the proposed method. Moreover, experiments are conducted to prove the feasibility of the proposed method for yielding high-resolution spectra in inhomogeneous magnetic fields.

  17. Detection and estimation of magnetization induced resonances in unilateral nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhu Gaunkar, N.; Bulu, I.; Song, Y. Q.; Mina, M.; Jiles, D. C.

    2017-05-01

    In this work a systematic identification of factors contributing to signal ringing in unilateral nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) sensors is conducted. Resonant peaks that originate due to multiple factors such as NMR, electrical, magneto-acoustic, core material response, eddy currents and other factors were observed. The peaks caused by the measurement system or electrical resonances and induced magnet vibrations are further analyzed. They appear in every measurement and are considered as interference to signals received from the magnetic core. Forming a distinction between different peaks is essential in identifying the primary contribution to the captured resonant signal. The measurements for the magnetic core indicate that the magnetization induced resonant peaks of the core have relatively higher amplitudes and shorter decay times at low frequencies.

  18. Nuclear-Targeted Multifunctional Magnetic Nanoparticles for Photothermal Therapy.

    PubMed

    Peng, Haibao; Tang, Jing; Zheng, Rui; Guo, Guannan; Dong, Angang; Wang, Yajun; Yang, Wuli

    2017-01-27

    The pursuit of multifunctional, innovative, more efficient, and safer cancer treatment has gained increasing interest in the research of preclinical nanoparticle-mediated photothermal therapy (PTT). Cell nucleus is recognized as the ideal target for cancer treatment because it plays a central role in genetic information and the transcription machinery reside. In this work, an efficient nuclear-targeted PTT strategy is proposed using transferrin and TAT peptide (TAT: YGRKKRRQRRR) conjugated monodisperse magnetic nanoparticles, which can be readily functionalized and stabilized for potential diagnostic and therapeutic applications. The monodisperse magnetic nanoparticles exhibit high photothermal conversion efficiency (≈37%) and considerable photothermal stability. They also show a high magnetization value and transverse relaxivity (207.1 mm(-1) s(-1) ), which could be applied for magnetic resonance imaging. The monodisperse magnetic nanoparticles conjugated with TAT peptides can efficiently target the nucleus and achieve the imaging-guided function, efficient cancer cells killing ability. Therefore, this work may present a practicable strategy to develop subcellular organelle targeted PTT agents for simultaneous cancer targeting, imaging, and therapy.

  19. Three-dimensional solidification and melting using magnetic field control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dulikravich, George S.; Ahuja, Vineet

    1993-01-01

    A new two-fluid mathematical model for fully three dimensional steady solidification under the influence of an arbitrary acceleration vector and with or without an arbitrary externally applied steady magnetic field have been formulated and integrated numerically. The model includes Joule heating and allows for separate temperature dependent physical properties within the melt and the solid. Latent heat of phase change during melting/solidification was incorporated using an enthalpy method. Mushy region was automatically captured by varying viscosity orders of magnitude between liquidus and solidus temperature. Computational results were obtained for silicon melt solidification in a parallelepiped container cooled from above and from a side. The results confirm that the magnetic field has a profound influence on the solidifying melt flow field thus changing convective heat transfer through the boundaries and the amount and shape of the solid accrued. This suggests that development of a quick-response algorithm for active control of three dimensional solidification is feasible since it would require low strength magnetic fields.

  20. Two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy: correlated, homonuclear-correlated, and nuclear Overhauser spectroscopy. January 1975-December 1988 (Citations from the INSPEC: Information Services for the Physics and Engineering Communities data base). Report for January 1975-December 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-12-01

    This bibliography contains citations concerning the enhanced analytical techniques of two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (2-D NMR). Applications to specific molecules, biomolecules, and compounds as well as comparisons of three 2-D NMR techniques: correlated spectroscopy (COSY), nuclear Overhauser (NOSEY), and homonuclear-correlated spectroscopy (HOMCOR). (Contains 190 citations fully indexed and including a title list.)

  1. Heat pulse propagation in chaotic three-dimensional magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del-Castillo-Negrete, Diego; Blazevski, Daniel

    2014-06-01

    Heat pulse propagation in three-dimensional chaotic magnetic fields is studied by solving numerically the parallel heat transport equation using a Lagrangian Green's function (LG) method. The LG method provides an efficient and accurate technique that circumvents known limitations of finite elements and finite difference methods. The main two problems addressed are (i) the dependence of the radial transport of heat pulses on the level of magnetic field stochasticity (controlled by the amplitude of the magnetic field perturbation, ɛ), and (ii) the role of reversed shear magnetic field configurations on heat pulse propagation. In all the cases considered there are no magnetic flux surfaces. However, the radial transport of heat pulses is observed to depend strongly on ɛ due to the presence of high-order magnetic islands and Cantori. These structures act as quasi-transport barriers which can actually preclude the radial penetration of heat pulses within physically relevant time scales. The dependence of the magnetic field connection length, ℓB, on ɛ is studied in detail. Regions where ℓB is large, correlate with regions where the radial propagation of the heat pulse slows down or stops. The decay rate of the temperature maximum, max(t), the time delay of the temperature response as function of the radius, τ, and the radial heat flux \\langle {{\\bit q}\\cdot {\\hat e}_\\psi} \\rangle , are also studied as functions of the magnetic field stochasticity and ℓB. In all cases it is observed that the scaling of max with t transitions from sub-diffusive, max ˜ t-1/4, at short times (χ∥t < 105) to a significantly slower, almost flat scaling at longer times (χ∥t > 105). A strong dependence on ɛ is also observed on τ and \\langle {{\\bit q}\\cdot {\\hat e}_\\psi} \\rangle . Even in the case when there are no flux surfaces nor magnetic field islands, reversed shear magnetic field configurations exhibit unique transport properties. The radial

  2. Three-dimensional magnetic engineering: The programs magnus and epilog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Mingwu; Pissanetzky, Sergio

    1988-10-01

    We present the post-processor EPILOG for the well established finite element program MAGNUS for three-dimensional magnetic engineering. MAGNUS solves problems of magnetostatics with nonlinear magnetic materials, permanent magnets and electric currents, for any 3-D geometry. The two-scalar-potentials formulation of magnetostatics used by MAGNUS combines numerical accuracy and computational efficiency, and is considered state of the art. The well known program KUBIK is used as a pre-processor to describe the geometry and finite element mesh. KUBIK is highly interactive and allows the user to effectively control all geometric details. The needs of magnetic engineers, however, go far beyond the simple availability of a mathematical solution. Once the solution has been obtained by MAGNUS in the form of a continuous magnetic scalar potential function defined at every point in the solution domain, those needs are met by EPILOG. EPILOG is command operated. Commands are independent of each other and can be used in any order, or not used at all. The purpose of each command is to use the solution for the calculation of a derived quantity or the production of a plot or table. The following derived quantities can be obtained: the magnetic energy in specific regions, the magnetic force on specified conductors in space, the magnetic torque on specified conductors, the magnetic flux across a given surface in space, the inductance of a circuit, and a variety of line integrals for specified lines in space. A useful facility is the automatic calculation of harmonic multipoles averaged along the beam direction for accelerator magnets, essential for end analysis and the integral effect of the magnetic field on the beam. Graphical facilities include color plots of the shapes of the conductors, the geometry, field lines and surfaces of constant magnetic scalar potential in specified regions of space. EPILOG produces a device independent graphical metafile, which can be seen on any device

  3. Highly sensitive detection of protein biomarkers via nuclear magnetic resonance biosensor with magnetically engineered nanoferrite particles.

    PubMed

    Jeun, Minhong; Park, Sungwook; Lee, Hakho; Lee, Kwan Hyi

    Magnetic-based biosensors are attractive for on-site detection of biomarkers due to the low magnetic susceptibility of biological samples. Here, we report a highly sensitive magnetic-based biosensing system that is composed of a miniaturized nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) device and magnetically engineered nanoferrite particles (NFPs). The sensing performance, also identified as the transverse relaxation (R2) rate, of the NMR device is directly related to the magnetic properties of the NFPs. Therefore, we developed magnetically engineered NFPs (MnMg-NFP) and used them as NMR agents to exhibit a significantly improved R2 rate. The magnetization of the MnMg-NFPs was increased by controlling the Mn and Mg cation concentration and distribution during the synthesis process. This modification of the Mn and Mg cation directly contributed to improving the R2 rate. The miniaturized NMR system, combined with the magnetically engineered MnMg-NFPs, successfully detected a small amount of infectious influenza A H1N1 nucleoprotein with high sensitivity and stability.

  4. Magnetism and nuclear magnetic resonance of hectorite and montmorillonite layered silicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, E. M.; Hou, S.-S.; Bud'ko, S. L.; Schmidt-Rohr, K.

    2004-11-01

    The temperature and magnetic-field (H) dependencies of the bulk dc magnetization (M) and the M /H ratio of montmorillonite (MMT), hectorite (HCT), and synthetic mica-montmorillonite (SMMT) clays have been measured and compared with the signal intensity of H1 and Si29 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra. MMT exhibits Langevin paramagnetism with an effective magnetic moment of 5.5±0.1μB per Fe ion whereas SMMT has diamagnetic properties. At 300K, M /H of HCT measured in a magnetic field of H ⩽1kOe is larger than that of MMT, whereas in a field of 50kOe, the inverse situation is observed. The difference arises because the magnetization of HCT is dominated by a contribution from ferromagneticlike impurities. The H1 and Si29 NMR signals of MMT are broadened beyond detectability due to the paramagnetic effect. Although HCT contains ferromagneticlike components that result in a large M /H in low field, it yields H1 and Si29 NMR spectra with signal intensities similar to those of diamagnetic SMMT. Our data highlight that the quality of the NMR spectra is not related to the low-field magnetic susceptibility but to the bulk magnetization in the high magnetic field used for NMR.

  5. Highly sensitive detection of protein biomarkers via nuclear magnetic resonance biosensor with magnetically engineered nanoferrite particles

    PubMed Central

    Jeun, Minhong; Park, Sungwook; Lee, Hakho; Lee, Kwan Hyi

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic-based biosensors are attractive for on-site detection of biomarkers due to the low magnetic susceptibility of biological samples. Here, we report a highly sensitive magnetic-based biosensing system that is composed of a miniaturized nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) device and magnetically engineered nanoferrite particles (NFPs). The sensing performance, also identified as the transverse relaxation (R2) rate, of the NMR device is directly related to the magnetic properties of the NFPs. Therefore, we developed magnetically engineered NFPs (MnMg-NFP) and used them as NMR agents to exhibit a significantly improved R2 rate. The magnetization of the MnMg-NFPs was increased by controlling the Mn and Mg cation concentration and distribution during the synthesis process. This modification of the Mn and Mg cation directly contributed to improving the R2 rate. The miniaturized NMR system, combined with the magnetically engineered MnMg-NFPs, successfully detected a small amount of infectious influenza A H1N1 nucleoprotein with high sensitivity and stability. PMID:27799772

  6. Mechanism of dynamic nuclear polarization in high magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrar, C. T.; Hall, D. A.; Gerfen, G. J.; Inati, S. J.; Griffin, R. G.

    2001-03-01

    Solid-state NMR signal enhancements of about two orders of magnitude (100-400) have been observed in dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) experiments performed at high magnetic field (5 T) and low temperature (10 K) using the nitroxide radical 4-amino TEMPO as the source of electron polarization. Since the breadth of the 4-amino TEMPO EPR spectrum is large compared to the nuclear Larmor frequency, it has been assumed that thermal mixing (TM) is the dominate mechanism by which polarization is transferred from electron to nuclear spins. However, theoretical explanations of TM generally assume a homogeneously broadened EPR line and, since the 4-amino TEMPO line at 5 T is inhomogeneously broadened, they do not explain the observed DNP enhancements. Accordingly, we have developed a treatment of DNP that explicitly uses electron-electron cross-relaxation to mediate electron-nuclear polarization transfer. The process proceeds via spin flip-flops between pairs of electronic spin packets whose Zeeman temperatures differ from one another. To confirm the essential features of the model we have studied the field dependence of electron-electron double resonance (ELDOR) data and DNP enhancement data. Both are well simulated using a simple model of electron cross-relaxation in the inhomogeneously broadened 4-amino TEMPO EPR line.

  7. A two-dimensional kinematic dynamo model of the ionospheric magnetic field at Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cravens, T. E.; Wu, D.; Shinagawa, H.

    1990-01-01

    The results of a high-resolution, two-dimensional, time dependent, kinematic dynamo model of the ionospheric magnetic field of Venus are presented. Various one-dimensional models are considered and the two-dimensional model is then detailed. In this model, the two-dimensional magnetic induction equation, the magnetic diffusion-convection equation, is numerically solved using specified plasma velocities. Origins of the vertical velocity profile and of the horizontal velocities are discussed. It is argued that the basic features of the vertical magnetic field profile remain unaltered by horizontal flow effects and also that horizontal plasma flow can strongly affect the magnetic field for altitudes above 300 km.

  8. Nuclear-magnetic-resonance quantum calculations of the Jones polynomial

    PubMed Central

    Marx, Raimund; Fahmy, Amr; Kauffman, Louis; Lomonaco, Samuel; Spörl, Andreas; Pomplun, Nikolas; Schulte-Herbrüggen, Thomas; Myers, John M.; Glaser, Steffen J.

    2011-01-01

    The repertoire of problems theoretically solvable by a quantum computer recently expanded to include the approximate evaluation of knot invariants, specifically the Jones polynomial. The experimental implementation of this evaluation, however, involves many known experimental challenges. Here we present experimental results for small-scale approximate evaluation of the Jones polynomial by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR); in addition, we show how to escape from the limitations of NMR approaches that employ pseudopure states. Specifically, we use two spin-1/2 nuclei of natural abundance chloroform and apply a sequence of unitary transforms representing the trefoil knot, the figure-eight knot, and the Borromean rings. After measuring the nuclear spin state of the molecule in each case, we are able to estimate the value of the Jones polynomial for each of the knots. PMID:21461143

  9. Magnetic Imaging: a New Tool for UK National Nuclear Security

    PubMed Central

    Darrer, Brendan J.; Watson, Joe C.; Bartlett, Paul; Renzoni, Ferruccio

    2015-01-01

    Combating illicit trafficking of Special Nuclear Material may require the ability to image through electromagnetic shields. This is the case when the trafficking involves cargo containers. Thus, suitable detection techniques are required to penetrate a ferromagnetic enclosure. The present study considers techniques that employ an electromagnetic based principle of detection. It is generally assumed that a ferromagnetic metallic enclosure will effectively act as a Faraday cage to electromagnetic radiation and therefore screen any form of interrogating electromagnetic radiation from penetrating, thus denying the detection of any eventual hidden material. In contrast, we demonstrate that it is actually possible to capture magnetic images of a conductive object through a set of metallic ferromagnetic enclosures. This validates electromagnetic interrogation techniques as a potential detection tool for National Nuclear Security applications. PMID:25608957

  10. [Recent progress in nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum for drug research and development].

    PubMed

    Zhong, Jun; Jiang, Xue-mei

    2015-01-01

    In the process of modern drug research, the new methods and technologies which can detect drug molecules' chemical composition, structure and interaction with biomolecules are always the key scientific problems people care about. Spectra (including IR, UV and NMR) are the most common analytical methods, of which NMR can obtain detailed parameter about the nucleus of organic molecules through researching the laws of nuclear transition in the impact of surrounding chemical environment. The parameter contains rich information about the chemical composition, structure and interaction with other molecules of organic molecules. In many complex environments, such as liquid, solid or gas state, even biological in situ environment, NMR can provide molecules' chemical composition, atomic-resolution three-dimensional structure, information of interaction with each other and dynamic process, especially the information about drug interacting with biomacromolecules. In recent years, the applications of nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum in drug research and development are more and more widespread. This paper reviewed its recent progress in structure and dynamic of targeted biological macromolecules, drug design and screening and drug metabolism in drug research and development. In the first part, we gave a brief introduction of nuclear magnetic resonance technology and its applications in drug research. In the second part, we explained the basic principles briefly and summarized progress in methods and techniques for drug research. In the third part, we discussed applications of nuclear magnetic resonance ir structure and dynamic of targeted biological macromolecules, drug design and screening and drug metabolism in detail. The conclusions were stated in the last part.

  11. Two-dimensional colloidal mixtures in magnetic and gravitational fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löwen, H.; Horn, T.; Neuhaus, T.; ten Hagen, B.

    2013-11-01

    This mini-review is concerned with two-dimensional colloidal mixtures exposed to various kinds of external fields. By a magnetic field perpendicular to the plane, dipole moments are induced in paramagnetic particles which give rise to repulsive interactions leading to complex crystalline alloys in the composition-asymmetry diagram. A quench in the magnetic field induces complex crystal nucleation scenarios. If exposed to a gravitational field, these mixtures exhibit a brazil-nut effect and show a boundary layering which is explained in terms of a depletion bubble picture. The latter persists for time-dependent gravity ("colloidal shaking"). Finally, we summarize crystallization effects when the second species is frozen in a disordered matrix which provides obstacles for the crystallizing component.

  12. Three-dimensional outflow jets generated in collisionless magnetic reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, Keizo

    2016-10-01

    The present study proposes a new theoretical model generating three-dimensional (3-D) outflow jets in collisionless magnetic reconnection by means of a large-scale particle-in-cell simulation. The key mechanism is the formation of 3-D flux ropes arising in the turbulent electron current layer formed around the magnetic x line. The scale of the flux ropes along the current density is determined by the wavelength of an electron flow shear mode which is a macroscopic scale larger than the typical kinetic scales. The 3-D flux ropes are intermittently ejected from the current layer and regulates the outflow jets into three dimensions. The gross reconnection rate is sufficiently large, since reconnection takes place almost uniformly along the x line.

  13. Numerical solution of three-dimensional magnetic differential equations

    SciTech Connect

    Reiman, A.H.; Greenside, H.S.

    1987-02-01

    A computer code is described that solves differential equations of the form B . del f = h for a single-valued solution f, given a toroidal three-dimensional divergence-free field B and a single-valued function h. The code uses a new algorithm that Fourier decomposes a given function in a set of flux coordinates in which the field lines are straight. The algorithm automatically adjusts the required integration lengths to compensate for proximity to low order rational surfaces. Applying this algorithm to the Cartesian coordinates defines a transformation to magnetic coordinates, in which the magnetic differential equation can be accurately solved. Our method is illustrated by calculating the Pfirsch-Schlueter currents for a stellarator.

  14. Optimized Fourier representations for three-dimensional magnetic surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Hirshman, S.P.; Meier, H.K.

    1984-11-01

    The selection of an optimal parametric angle theta describing a closed magnetic flux surface is considered with regard to accelerating the convergence rate of the Fourier series for the Cartesian coordinates x(theta,phi) identical with R - R/sub 0/ and y(theta,phi) identical with Z - Z/sub 0/. Geometric criteria are developed based on the Hamiltonian invariants of Keplerian orbits. These criteria relate the rate of curve traversal (tangential speed) to the curvature (normal acceleration) so as to provide increased angular resolution in regions of largest curvature. They are, however, limited to either convex or starlike domains and do not provide rapid convergence for complex domains with alternating convex and concave regions. A generally applicable constraint criterion, based directly on minimizing the width of the x and y Fourier spectra, is also derived. A variational principle is given for implementing these constraints numerically. Application to the representation of three-dimensional magnetic flux surfaces is discussed.

  15. On two-dimensional magnetic reconnection with nonuniform resistivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malyshkin, Leonid M.; Kulsrud, Russell M.

    2010-12-01

    In this paper, two theoretical approaches for the calculation of the rate of quasi-stationary, two-dimensional magnetic reconnection with nonuniform anomalous resistivity are considered in the framework of incompressible magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). In the first, 'global' equations approach, the MHD equations are approximately solved for a whole reconnection layer, including the upstream and downstream regions and the layer center. In the second, 'local' equations approach, the equations are solved across the reconnection layer, including only the upstream region and the layer center. Both approaches give the same approximate answer for the reconnection rate. Our theoretical model is in agreement with the results of recent simulations of reconnection with spatially nonuniform resistivity.

  16. A highly integrated FPGA-based nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Kazuyuki

    2007-03-01

    The digital circuits required for a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometer, including a pulse programmer, a direct digital synthesizer, a digital receiver, and a PC interface, have been built inside a single chip of the field-programmable gate-array (FPGA). By combining the FPGA chip with peripheral analog components, a compact, laptop-sized homebuilt spectrometer has been developed, which is capable of a rf output of up to 400 MHz with amplitude-, phase-, frequency-, and pulse-modulation. The number of rf channels is extendable up to three without further increase in size.

  17. A highly integrated FPGA-based nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Kazuyuki

    2007-03-01

    The digital circuits required for a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometer, including a pulse programmer, a direct digital synthesizer, a digital receiver, and a PC interface, have been built inside a single chip of the field-programmable gate-array (FPGA). By combining the FPGA chip with peripheral analog components, a compact, laptop-sized homebuilt spectrometer has been developed, which is capable of a rf output of up to 400 MHz with amplitude-, phase-, frequency-, and pulse-modulation. The number of rf channels is extendable up to three without further increase in size.

  18. Applications of nuclear magnetic resonance sensors to cultural heritage.

    PubMed

    Proietti, Noemi; Capitani, Donatella; Di Tullio, Valeria

    2014-04-21

    In recent years nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) sensors have been increasingly applied to investigate, characterize and monitor objects of cultural heritage interest. NMR is not confined to a few specific applications, but rather its use can be successfully extended to a wide number of different cultural heritage issues. A breakthrough has surely been the recent development of portable NMR sensors which can be applied in situ for non-destructive and non-invasive investigations. In this paper three studies illustrating the potential of NMR sensors in this field of research are reported.

  19. Resonantly Detecting Axion-Mediated Forces with Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arvanitaki, Asimina; Geraci, Andrew A.

    2014-10-01

    We describe a method based on precision magnetometry that can extend the search for axion-mediated spin-dependent forces by several orders of magnitude. By combining techniques used in nuclear magnetic resonance and short-distance tests of gravity, our approach can substantially improve upon current experimental limits set by astrophysics, and probe deep into the theoretically interesting regime for the Peccei-Quinn (PQ) axion. Our method is sensitive to PQ axion decay constants between 109 and 1012 GeV or axion masses between 10-6 and 10-3 eV, independent of the cosmic axion abundance.

  20. Applications of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Sensors to Cultural Heritage

    PubMed Central

    Proietti, Noemi; Capitani, Donatella; Di Tullio, Valeria

    2014-01-01

    In recent years nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) sensors have been increasingly applied to investigate, characterize and monitor objects of cultural heritage interest. NMR is not confined to a few specific applications, but rather its use can be successfully extended to a wide number of different cultural heritage issues. A breakthrough has surely been the recent development of portable NMR sensors which can be applied in situ for non-destructive and non-invasive investigations. In this paper three studies illustrating the potential of NMR sensors in this field of research are reported. PMID:24755519

  1. A versatile pulse programmer for pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarr, C. E.; Nickerson, M. A.

    1972-01-01

    A digital pulse programmer producing the standard pulse sequences required for pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is described. In addition, a 'saturation burst' sequence, useful in the measurement of long relaxation times in solids, is provided. Both positive and negative 4 V trigger pulses are produced that are fully synchronous with a crystal-controlled time base, and the pulse programmer may be phase-locked with a maximum pulse jitter of 3 ns to the oscillator of a coherent pulse spectrometer. Medium speed TTL integrated circuits are used throughout.

  2. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Applications to Unconventional Fossil Fuel Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinberg, R. L.; Leu, G.

    2008-12-01

    Technical and economic projections strongly suggest that fossil fuels will continue to play a dominant role in the global energy market through at least the mid twenty-first century. However, low-cost conventional oil and gas will be depleted in that time frame. Therefore new sources of energy will be needed. We discuss two relatively untapped unconventional fossil fuels: heavy oil and gas hydrate. In both cases, nuclear magnetic resonance plays a key role in appraising the resource and providing information needed for designing production processes.

  3. Nuclear magnetic resonance: principles of blood flow imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, C.M.; Brant-Zawadzki, M.; Crooks, L.E.; Kaufman, L.; Sheldon, P.; Norman, D.; Bank, W.; Newton, T.H.

    1984-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging with spin-echo techniques defines vascular structures with superb anatomic detail. Contrast agents are not necessary as there is intrinsic contrast between flowing blood and the vascular wall. The signal intensity from blood within the vessel lumen varies with the sequence of gradient and radiofrequency pulses used to generate the image as well as with the velocity of blood flow. Appropriate imaging techniques can optimize anatomic detail, distinguish slow from rapidly flowing blood, and serve to identify marked impairment or complete obstruction of flow in an artery or vein. Some examples of these principles in the intracranial circulation are illustrated.

  4. Random matrix theory in biological nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Lacelle, S

    1984-01-01

    The statistical theory of energy levels or random matrix theory is presented in the context of the analysis of chemical shifts of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of large biological systems. Distribution functions for the spacing between nearest-neighbor energy levels are discussed for uncorrelated, correlated, and random superposition of correlated energy levels. Application of this approach to the NMR spectra of a vitamin, an antibiotic, and a protein demonstrates the state of correlation of an ensemble of energy levels that characterizes each system. The detection of coherent and dissipative structures in proteins becomes feasible with this statistical spectroscopic technique. PMID:6478032

  5. Nuclear magnetic resonance-based quantification of organic diphosphates.

    PubMed

    Lenevich, Stepan; Distefano, Mark D

    2011-01-15

    Phosphorylated compounds are ubiquitous in life. Given their central role, many such substrates and analogs have been prepared for subsequent evaluation. Prior to biological experiments, it is typically necessary to determine the concentration of the target molecule in solution. Here we describe a method where concentrations of stock solutions of organic diphosphates and bisphosphonates are quantified using (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy with standard instrumentation using a capillary tube with a secondary standard. The method is specific and is applicable down to a concentration of 200 μM. The capillary tube provides the reference peak for quantification and deuterated solvent for locking.

  6. Development of Metallic Magnetic Calorimeters for Nuclear Safeguards Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, Cameron Russell

    2015-03-11

    Many nuclear safeguards applications could benefit from high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy achievable with metallic magnetic calorimeters. This dissertation covers the development of a system for these applications based on gamma-ray detectors developed at the University of Heidelberg. It demonstrates new calorimeters of this type, which achieved an energy resolution of 45.5 eV full-width at half-maximum at 59.54 keV, roughly ten times better than current state of the art high purity germanium detectors. This is the best energy resolution achieved with a gamma-ray metallic magnetic calorimeter at this energy to date. In addition to demonstrating a new benchmark in energy resolution, an experimental system for measuring samples with metallic magnetic calorimeters was constructed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This system achieved an energy resolution of 91.3 eV full-width at half-maximum at 59.54 keV under optimal conditions. Using this system it was possible to characterize the linearity of the response, the count-rate limitations, and the energy resolution as a function of temperature of the new calorimeter. With this characterization it was determined that it would be feasible to measure 242Pu in a mixed isotope plutonium sample. A measurement of a mixed isotope plutonium sample was performed over the course of 12 days with a single two-pixel metallic magnetic calorimeter. The relative concentration of 242Pu in comparison to other plutonium isotopes was determined by direct measurement to less than half a percent accuracy. This is comparable with the accuracy of the best-case scenario using traditional indirect methods. The ability to directly measure the relative concentration of 242Pu in a sample could enable more accurate accounting and detection of indications of undeclared activities in nuclear safeguards, a better constraint on source material in forensic samples containing plutonium, and improvements in verification in a future plutonium

  7. A personal computer-based nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Job, Constantin; Pearson, Robert M.; Brown, Michael F.

    1994-11-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy using personal computer-based hardware has the potential of enabling the application of NMR methods to fields where conventional state of the art equipment is either impractical or too costly. With such a strategy for data acquisition and processing, disciplines including civil engineering, agriculture, geology, archaeology, and others have the possibility of utilizing magnetic resonance techniques within the laboratory or conducting applications directly in the field. Another aspect is the possibility of utilizing existing NMR magnets which may be in good condition but unused because of outdated or nonrepairable electronics. Moreover, NMR applications based on personal computer technology may open up teaching possibilities at the college or even secondary school level. The goal of developing such a personal computer (PC)-based NMR standard is facilitated by existing technologies including logic cell arrays, direct digital frequency synthesis, use of PC-based electrical engineering software tools to fabricate electronic circuits, and the use of permanent magnets based on neodymium-iron-boron alloy. Utilizing such an approach, we have been able to place essentially an entire NMR spectrometer console on two printed circuit boards, with the exception of the receiver and radio frequency power amplifier. Future upgrades to include the deuterium lock and the decoupler unit are readily envisioned. The continued development of such PC-based NMR spectrometers is expected to benefit from the fast growing, practical, and low cost personal computer market.

  8. Nuclear conversion theory: molecular hydrogen in non-magnetic insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilisca, Ernest; Ghiglieno, Filippo

    2016-09-01

    The hydrogen conversion patterns on non-magnetic solids sensitively depend upon the degree of singlet/triplet mixing in the intermediates of the catalytic reaction. Three main `symmetry-breaking' interactions are brought together. In a typical channel, the electron spin-orbit (SO) couplings introduce some magnetic excitations in the non-magnetic solid ground state. The electron spin is exchanged with a molecular one by the electric molecule-solid electron repulsion, mixing the bonding and antibonding states and affecting the molecule rotation. Finally, the magnetic hyperfine contact transfers the electron spin angular momentum to the nuclei. Two families of channels are considered and a simple criterion based on the SO coupling strength is proposed to select the most efficient one. The denoted `electronic' conversion path involves an emission of excitons that propagate and disintegrate in the bulk. In the other denoted `nuclear', the excited electron states are transients of a loop, and the electron system returns to its fundamental ground state. The described model enlarges previous studies by extending the electron basis to charge-transfer states and `continui' of band states, and focuses on the broadening of the antibonding molecular excited state by the solid conduction band that provides efficient tunnelling paths for the hydrogen conversion. After working out the general conversion algebra, the conversion rates of hydrogen on insulating and semiconductor solids are related to a few molecule-solid parameters (gap width, ionization and affinity potentials) and compared with experimental measures.

  9. Nuclear conversion theory: molecular hydrogen in non-magnetic insulators.

    PubMed

    Ilisca, Ernest; Ghiglieno, Filippo

    2016-09-01

    The hydrogen conversion patterns on non-magnetic solids sensitively depend upon the degree of singlet/triplet mixing in the intermediates of the catalytic reaction. Three main 'symmetry-breaking' interactions are brought together. In a typical channel, the electron spin-orbit (SO) couplings introduce some magnetic excitations in the non-magnetic solid ground state. The electron spin is exchanged with a molecular one by the electric molecule-solid electron repulsion, mixing the bonding and antibonding states and affecting the molecule rotation. Finally, the magnetic hyperfine contact transfers the electron spin angular momentum to the nuclei. Two families of channels are considered and a simple criterion based on the SO coupling strength is proposed to select the most efficient one. The denoted 'electronic' conversion path involves an emission of excitons that propagate and disintegrate in the bulk. In the other denoted 'nuclear', the excited electron states are transients of a loop, and the electron system returns to its fundamental ground state. The described model enlarges previous studies by extending the electron basis to charge-transfer states and 'continui' of band states, and focuses on the broadening of the antibonding molecular excited state by the solid conduction band that provides efficient tunnelling paths for the hydrogen conversion. After working out the general conversion algebra, the conversion rates of hydrogen on insulating and semiconductor solids are related to a few molecule-solid parameters (gap width, ionization and affinity potentials) and compared with experimental measures.

  10. Nuclear conversion theory: molecular hydrogen in non-magnetic insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilisca, Ernest; Ghiglieno, Filippo

    2016-09-01

    The hydrogen conversion patterns on non-magnetic solids sensitively depend upon the degree of singlet/triplet mixing in the intermediates of the catalytic reaction. Three main `symmetry-breaking' interactions are brought together. In a typical channel, the electron spin-orbit (SO) couplings introduce some magnetic excitations in the non-magnetic solid ground state. The electron spin is exchanged with a molecular one by the electric molecule-solid electron repulsion, mixing the bonding and antibonding states and affecting the molecule rotation. Finally, the magnetic hyperfine contact transfers the electron spin angular momentum to the nuclei. Two families of channels are considered and a simple criterion based on the SO coupling strength is proposed to select the most efficient one. The denoted `electronic' conversion path involves an emission of excitons that propagate and disintegrate in the bulk. In the other denoted `nuclear', the excited electron states are transients of a loop, and the electron system returns to its fundamental ground state. The described model enlarges previous studies by extending the electron basis to charge-transfer states and `continui' of band states, and focuses on the broadening of the antibonding molecular excited state by the solid conduction band that provides efficient tunnelling paths for the hydrogen conversion. After working out the general conversion algebra, the conversion rates of hydrogen on insulating and semiconductor solids are related to a few molecule-solid parameters (gap width, ionization and affinity potentials) and compared with experimental measures.

  11. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of lipid in living plants.

    PubMed

    Borisjuk, Ljudmilla; Rolletschek, Hardy; Neuberger, Thomas

    2013-10-01

    This review highlights technological developments in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which are creating opportunities for the three dimensional visualization and quantification of lipids in plant materials. A major feature of MRI is that it is a non-invasive platform, and thus can be used for the analysis of living organisms. An overview of the theoretical aspects of MRI is provided, followed by a description of the various analytical modes available, and an explanation of how MRI can be applied to plant samples and what it can achieve. Various lipid maps and three dimensional models of seeds and fruits are included to demonstrate the potential of MRI and to exemplify recent cutting-edge advances in the field. The importance and prospects of the imaging of lipids in living plants, as well as the integration of lipid imaging with other emerging techniques, are outlined to provide impetus for future plant lipid research. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Three-dimensional magnetic field determination in magnetic nanoparticles using iterative reconstruction techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphrey, Emma Margaret

    Improving processing methods have consistently decreased the length scales of many magnetic devices. Methods to quantify the physical and magnetic domain structure of magnetic materials are needed to optimize their performance. However, magnetic characterization methods typically only measure one or two components of the magnetic properties. For instance, Lorentz microscopy is used to construct a two-dimensional projection of the magnetic induction. The vector field electron tomography (VFET) method uses Lorentz microscopy and tomography techniques to reconstruct the three-dimensional magnetic induction and magnetic vector potential of a sample. However, these reconstructions suffer from errors due to factors such as missing wedge information due to the nature of the samples and the physical constraints of the transmission electron microscope. Iterative tomographic techniques and the use of prior knowledge have been used in the literature to compensate for missing wedge data. In this work, we present several tools to construct iterative VFET (IVFET) algorithms. The iterative tomography algorithms Simultaneous Iterative Reconstruction Technique (SIRT), Discrete Algebraic Reconstruction Technique (DART), and Model-Based Iterative Reconstruction (MBIR) are summarized, and their relative merits are discussed. A novel approach to solving the Transport of Intensity Equation (TIE) that incorporates phase separation is presented, along with a comparison to the standard method. A model for simulating VFET images of a chain of nanoparticles and tomographic reconstructions using the model are shown. A spherical voxel forward projection model that can be used to update a single voxel of a VFET reconstruction and its projections is presented as a method for updating the reconstruction during iterative tomography.

  13. Two-dimensional modeling of magnetically imploded liners

    SciTech Connect

    Atchison, W.L.; Bowers, R.L.; Brownell, J.H.; Lee, H.

    1996-11-01

    Magnetically imploded massive cylindrical liner drivers have been studied in two-dimensions for low, intermediate and high energy pulsed power systems. The simulations have been carried out using a resistive Eulerian magnetohydrodynamics computational model which includes material strength, and models the interactions between the imploding liner and the electrode walls. The computations simulate the generation of perturbations and their subsequent growth during the implosion. At low energies a solid liner remains in the plastic regime, reaching an inner cylindrical target with velocities of a few mm per {mu}s. At higher energies (where one-dimensional models predict implosion velocities of order 1 cm/{mu}s or more) resistive heating of the liner results in melting, and the effects of magnetically driven instabilities become important. We discuss the two-dimensional issues which arise in these systems. These include: the onset of perturbations associated with the motion of the liner along the electrodes; the growth of instabilities in liquid layers; and the suppression of instability growth during the implosion by maintaining a solid inner layer. Studies have been made of liners designed for the Pegasus capacitor bank facility (currents in the 5 - 12 MA regime), and for the Procyon high explosive system (currents in the 20 MA regime). This work focus on the design and performance of the first Pegasus composite megabar liner experiment.

  14. Rotating-frame gradient fields for magnetic resonance imaging and nuclear magnetic resonance in low fields

    SciTech Connect

    Bouchard, Louis-Serge; Pines, Alexander; Demas, Vasiliki

    2014-01-21

    A system and method for Fourier encoding a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signal is disclosed. A static magnetic field B.sub.0 is provided along a first direction. An NMR signal from the sample is Fourier encoded by applying a rotating-frame gradient field B.sub.G superimposed on the B.sub.0, where the B.sub.G comprises a vector component rotating in a plane perpendicular to the first direction at an angular frequency .omega.in a laboratory frame. The Fourier-encoded NMR signal is detected.

  15. Three-dimensional prominence-hosting magnetic configurations: Creating a helical magnetic flux rope

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, C.; Keppens, R.; Guo, Y.

    2014-01-10

    The magnetic configuration hosting prominences and their surrounding coronal structure is a key research topic in solar physics. Recent theoretical and observational studies strongly suggest that a helical magnetic flux rope is an essential ingredient to fulfill most of the theoretical and observational requirements for hosting prominences. To understand flux rope formation details and obtain magnetic configurations suitable for future prominence formation studies, we here report on three-dimensional isothermal magnetohydrodynamic simulations including finite gas pressure and gravity. Starting from a magnetohydrostatic corona with a linear force-free bipolar magnetic field, we follow its evolution when introducing vortex flows around the main polarities and converging flows toward the polarity inversion line near the bottom of the corona. The converging flows bring the feet of different loops together at the polarity inversion line, where magnetic reconnection and flux cancellation happen. Inflow and outflow signatures of the magnetic reconnection process are identified, and thereby the newly formed helical loops wind around preexisting ones so that a complete flux rope grows and ascends. When a macroscopic flux rope is formed, we switch off the driving flows and find that the system relaxes to a stable state containing a helical magnetic flux rope embedded in an overlying arcade structure. A major part of the formed flux rope is threaded by dipped field lines that can stably support prominence matter, while the total mass of the flux rope is in the order of 4-5× 10{sup 14} g.

  16. Low-Dimensional Systems: Structures of Interfaces and Magnetic Chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Qing

    The solid-solid metal oxide(MO) interface in (100) orientation was modeled and its properties were investigated by molecular Dynamics(MD). MD was used to model temperature dependent geometry in the interface region, using standard interatomic potentials. The lattice structure across the MO-MO interface is found to change continually from one crystal to another. The radial distribution function, average potential energy for each layer, the average interplanar spacing, mean square displacement of the ions and spectrum of the autocorrelation function of velocity were calculated. Results for (100) MgO-CoO and NiO-CoO interfaces are compared with solid-solution and pure-phase data. The solid-solid metal oxide interface of rock -salt structure in (100) orientation was modeled and its properties were investigated by Local Density(LD) theory. Starting with molecular dynamics determined time-average atomic configurations at the interface, self-consistent LD calculations were made to determine electronic structure, spectroscopic and energetic properties of interface atoms. Spectral distributions, bonding mechanisms, charge densities and consequences for the optical band gap were determined. Results are given for (100) MgO-CoO interfaces, rm Mg_{x}Co_{1-x}O alloy and NiO-CoO interface. The magnetic properties of transition-metal based quasi-one dimensional molecular metals show unusual concentration and temperature dependence. Ion magnetization in the one dimensional rm Cu_{1-c}Ni _{c} chain of rm Cu_{1-c}Ni_{c}(pc)I was modeled by Monte Carlo methods, using indirect exchange interaction potentials of variable range. The effects of dilution of Cu spin moments by diamagnetic Ni ions and impurity scattering effects on the electron gas polarization are determined. Results are compared with NMR T-dependent magnetization data for this molecular metal.

  17. Nuclear-spin-induced localization of edge states in two-dimensional topological insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Chen-Hsuan; Stano, Peter; Klinovaja, Jelena; Loss, Daniel

    2017-08-01

    We investigate the influence of nuclear spins on the resistance of helical edge states of two-dimensional topological insulators (2DTIs). Via the hyperfine interaction, nuclear spins allow electron backscattering, otherwise forbidden by time-reversal symmetry. We identify two backscattering mechanisms, depending on whether the nuclear spins are ordered or not. Their temperature dependence is distinct but both give resistance, which increases with the edge length, decreasing temperature, and increasing strength of the electron-electron interaction. Overall, we find that the nuclear spins will typically shut down the conductance of the 2DTI edges at zero temperature.

  18. Magnetism and nuclear magnetic resonance of smectite clays and their polymer nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, E. M.; Rawal, A.; Hou, S. S.; Budko, S. L.; Schmidt-Rohr, K.

    2004-03-01

    In an effort to understand the magnetic properties of polymer-clay nanocomposites and improve their nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, we have measured the "bulk" magnetization and magnetic susceptibility of three smectite clays (2:1 layered silicates), namely natural montmorillonite (MMT), synthetic mica-montmorillonite (SMMT), and natural hectorite (HCT), and correlated these data with the ^1H and ^29Si NMR signal intensities. As observed before, HCT provides much better NMR spectra than does MMT, even though its low-field magnetic susceptibility is larger than that of MMT. The reason is that the magnetization of HCT at ambient temperature is dominated by a contribution from ferromagnetic-like impurities, while MMT exhibits Langevin paramagnetism. Based on this insight, we have improved the HCT purification procedure, introducing magnetic separation and also avoiding centrifugation which enriches the sample with carbonates. This has increased the NMR signal intensity of HCT 4-fold. The resulting improvement in the quality of ^1H-^29Si NMR spectra of HCT dispersed in a polymer matrix is demonstrated.

  19. Detection of molecules and cells using nuclear magnetic resonance with magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rümenapp, Christine; Gleich, Bernhard; Mannherz, Hans Georg; Haase, Axel

    2015-04-01

    For the detection of small molecules, proteins or even cells in vitro, functionalised magnetic nanoparticles and nuclear magnetic resonance measurements can be applied. In this work, magnetic nanoparticles with the size of 5-7 nm were functionalised with antibodies to detect two model systems of different sizes, the protein avidin and Saccharomyces cerevisiae as the model organism. The synthesised magnetic nanoparticles showed a narrow size distribution, which was determined using transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. The magnetic nanoparticles were functionalised with the according antibodies via EDC/NHS chemistry. The binding of the antigen to magnetic nanoparticles was detected through the change in the NMR T2 relaxation time at 0.5 T (≈21.7 MHz). In case of a specific binding the particles cluster and the T2 relaxation time of the sample changes. The detection limit in buffer for FITC-avidin was determined to be 1.35 nM and 107 cells/ml for S. cerevisiae. For fluorescent microscopy the avidin molecules were labelled with FITC and for the detection of S. cerevisiae the magnetic nanoparticles were additionally functionalised with rhodamine. The binding of the particles to S. cerevisiae and the resulting clustering was also seen by transmission electron microscopy.

  20. Defect-induced magnetism in SiC probed by nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Z. T.; Dmytriieva, D.; Molatta, S.; Wosnitza, J.; Wang, Yutian; Helm, M.; Zhou, Shengqiang; Kühne, H.

    2017-02-01

    We give evidence for intrinsic defect-induced bulk paramagnetism in SiC by means of 13C and 29Si nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The temperature dependence of the internal dipole-field distribution, probed by the spin part of the NMR Knight shift and the spectral linewidth, follows the Curie law and scales very well with the macroscopic dc susceptibility. In order to quantitatively analyze the NMR spectra, a microscopic model based on dipole-dipole interactions was developed. The very good agreement between these simulations and the NMR data establishes a direct relation between the frequency distribution of the spectral intensity and the corresponding real-space volumes of nuclear spins. The presented approach by NMR can be applied to a variety of similar materials and, thus, opens a new avenue for the microscopic exploration and exploitation of diluted bulk magnetism in semiconductors.

  1. Magnetically driven three-dimensional manipulation and inductive heating of magnetic-dispersion containing metal alloys

    PubMed Central

    Calabro, Joshua D.; Huang, Xu; Lewis, Brian G.; Ramirez, Ainissa G.

    2010-01-01

    Fundamental to the development of three-dimensional microelectronic fabrication is a material that enables vertical geometries. Here we show low-melting-point metal alloys containing iron dispersions that can be remotely manipulated by magnetic fields to create vertical geometries and thus enable novel three-dimensional assemblies. These iron dispersions enhance the mechanical properties needed for strong, reliable interconnects without significantly altering the electrical properties of the alloys. Additionally, these iron dispersions act as susceptors for magnetic induction heating, allowing the rapid melting of these novel alloys at temperatures lower than those usually reported for conventional metal alloys. By localizing high temperatures and by reducing temperature excursions, the materials and methods described have potential in a variety of device fabrication applications. PMID:20194786

  2. Nuclear Magnetic Moment of the {sup 57}Cu Ground State

    SciTech Connect

    Minamisono, K.; Mertzimekis, T.J.; Pereira, J.; Mantica, P.F.; Pinter, J.S.; Stoker, J.B.; Tomlin, B.E.; Weerasiri, R.R.; Davies, A.D.; Hass, M.; Rogers, W.F.

    2006-03-17

    The nuclear magnetic moment of the ground state of {sup 57}Cu(I{sup {pi}}=3/2{sup -},T{sub 1/2}=196.3 ms) has been measured to be vertical bar {mu}({sup 57}Cu) vertical bar =(2.00{+-}0.05){mu}{sub N} using the {beta}-NMR technique. Together with the known magnetic moment of the mirror partner {sup 57}Ni, the spin expectation value was extracted as <{sigma}{sigma}{sub z}>=-0.78{+-}0.13. This is the heaviest isospin T=1/2 mirror pair above the {sup 40}Ca region for which both ground state magnetic moments have been determined. The discrepancy between the present results and shell-model calculations in the full fp shell giving {mu}({sup 57}Cu){approx}2.4{mu}{sub N} and <{sigma}{sigma}{sub z}>{approx}0.5 implies significant shell breaking at {sup 56}Ni with the neutron number N=28.

  3. TOPICAL REVIEW: Spatial localization in nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keevil, Stephen F.

    2006-08-01

    The ability to select a discrete region within the body for signal acquisition is a fundamental requirement of in vivo NMR spectroscopy. Ideally, it should be possible to tailor the selected volume to coincide exactly with the lesion or tissue of interest, without loss of signal from within this volume or contamination with extraneous signals. Many techniques have been developed over the past 25 years employing a combination of RF coil properties, static magnetic field gradients and pulse sequence design in an attempt to meet these goals. This review presents a comprehensive survey of these techniques, their various advantages and disadvantages, and implications for clinical applications. Particular emphasis is placed on the reliability of the techniques in terms of signal loss, contamination and the effect of nuclear relaxation and J-coupling. The survey includes techniques based on RF coil and pulse design alone, those using static magnetic field gradients, and magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging. Although there is an emphasis on techniques currently in widespread use (PRESS, STEAM, ISIS and MRSI), the review also includes earlier techniques, in order to provide historical context, and techniques that are promising for future use in clinical and biomedical applications.

  4. Magnetic topologies of coronal mass ejection events: Effects of 3-dimensional reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Gosling, J.T.

    1995-09-01

    New magnetic loops formed in the corona following coronal mass ejection, CME, liftoffs provide strong evidence that magnetic reconnection commonly occurs within the magnetic ``legs`` of the departing CMEs. Such reconnection is inherently 3-dimensional and naturally produces CMEs having magnetic flux rope topologies. Sustained reconnection behind CMEs can produce a mixture of open and disconnected field lines threading the CMES. In contrast to the results of 2-dimensional reconnection. the disconnected field lines are attached to the outer heliosphere at both ends. A variety of solar and solar wind observations are consistent with the concept of sustained 3-dimensional reconnection within the magnetic legs of CMEs close to the Sun.

  5. Three-dimensional magnetization vector inversion for high-susceptibility magnetic anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shuang; Hu, Xiangyun

    2016-04-01

    It was meaningful to recover the distributions of total magnetization vector (TMV) since of which the intensity and direction are distorted by the self-demagnetization. We evaluated and compared three approaches of three-dimensional magnetization vector inversion (MVI): (1) simultaneously inverting the TMV's three orthogonal components (MMM); (2) the magnitude, inclination and declination (MID); (3) orderly inverting the magnetization intensity, inclination and declination based on the transformed magnitude magnetic anomaly (M-ID). The primary implementation of MVI was to establish the symmetric positive definite matrix equations on the corrections of the model parameters and observed data sets. Then the optimal solutions were iteratively computed by use of the preconditioned conjugate gradient algorithm. We used the synthetic and real data sets to test these methods and the tests revealed that the isochronous MMM inversion aggravated the geophysical non-uniqueness problem and MID performed low stability of convergence due to the strong dependence on the starting models. While the sequential M-ID showed superior stability and precision of inverting the magnetization intensity and direction by making successive use of the amplitude and phase information of the magnetic anomaly. Finally, the achieved TMV distributions were used to investigate the influence of self-demagnetization and to recover the high susceptibility distributions when the self-demagnetization effect was not negligible.

  6. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Studies in Heavy Fermion Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirer, Kent Robert

    29Si, 31P, and 115In nuclear magnetic resonance studies of heavy fermion materials URu2Si 2, CeRhIn5, and URu2Si2- xPx were conducted as a function of temperature, pressure, and, in the case of URu2Si2- xPx, doping. Knight shift measurements in these systems probe the hybridization between conduction and local f-electrons which is described by the heavy fermion coherence temperature, T*, and can be captured by a two fluid model. This model takes the dual nature of the local moments and the heavy electron fluid into account. In URu2Si2 in a pressure range from 0-9.1 kbar, spin-lattice-relaxation data were taken and suggest a partial suppression of the density of states below 30 K. The data are analyzed in terms of a two component spin-fermion model. The spin-lattice-relaxation behavior is then compared to other materials that demonstrate precursor fluctuations in a pseudogap regime above a ground state with long-range order. Nuclear magnetic resonance data in CeRhIn5 for both the In(1) and In(2) sites are also taken under hydrostatic pressure. The Knight shift data reveal a suppression of the hyperfine coupling to the In(1) site as a function of pressure, and the electric field gradient at the In(2) site exhibits a change of slope. These changes to these coupling constants reflect alterations to the electronic structure at the quantum critical point. Finally, we report 31P nuclear magnetic resonance measurements in single crystals of URu2Si2-xP x with x = 0.09, 0.33. In the case of the x = 0.09 doping, we find no evidence for a phase transition, though the material still exhibits heavy fermion coherence. In the x = 0.33 doping, we find that it undergoes an antiferromagnetic (AFM) phase transition. When we include the pure compound in our analysis, we find that the hyperfine couplings and coherence temperatures evolve with doping. We compare this evolution with the trends seen in other compounds.

  7. Ultrahigh-Resolution Magnetic Resonance in Inhomogeneous Magnetic Fields: Two-Dimensional Long-Lived-Coherence Correlation Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chinthalapalli, Srinivas; Bornet, Aurélien; Segawa, Takuya F.; Sarkar, Riddhiman; Jannin, Sami; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey

    2012-07-01

    A half-century quest for improving resolution in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has enabled the study of molecular structures, biological interactions, and fine details of anatomy. This progress largely relied on the advent of sophisticated superconducting magnets that can provide stable and homogeneous fields with temporal and spatial variations below ΔB0/B0<0.01ppm. In many cases however, inherent properties of the objects under investigation, pulsating arteries, breathing lungs, tissue-air interfaces, surgical implants, etc., lead to fluctuations and losses of local homogeneity. A new method dubbed “long-lived-coherence correlation spectroscopy” (LLC-COSY) opens the way to overcome both inhomogeneous and homogeneous broadening, which arise from local variations in static fields and fluctuating dipole-dipole interactions, respectively. LLC-COSY makes it possible to obtain ultrahigh resolution two-dimensional spectra, with linewidths on the order of Δν=0.1 to 1 Hz, even in very inhomogeneous fields (ΔB0/B0>10ppm or 5000 Hz at 9.7 T), and can improve resolution by a factor up to 9 when the homogeneous linewidths are determined by dipole-dipole interactions. The resulting LLC-COSY spectra display chemical shift differences and scalar couplings in two orthogonal dimensions, like in “J spectroscopy.” LLC-COSY does not require any sophisticated gradient switching or frequency-modulated pulses. Applications to in-cell NMR and to magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) of selected volume elements in MRI appear promising, particularly when susceptibility variations tend to preclude high resolution.

  8. Analysis of ringing effects due to magnetic core materials in pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Prabhu Gaunkar, N. Bouda, N. R. Y.; Nlebedim, I. C.; Hadimani, R. L.; Mina, M.; Jiles, D. C.; Bulu, I.; Ganesan, K.; Song, Y. Q.

    2015-05-07

    This work presents investigations and detailed analysis of ringing in a non-resonant pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) circuit. Ringing is a commonly observed phenomenon in high power switching circuits. The oscillations described as ringing impede measurements in pulsed NMR systems. It is therefore desirable that those oscillations decay fast. It is often assumed that one of the causes behind ringing is the role of the magnetic core used in the antenna (acting as an inductive load). We will demonstrate that an LRC subcircuit is also set-up due to the inductive load and needs to be considered due to its parasitic effects. It is observed that the parasitics associated with the inductive load become important at certain frequencies. The output response can be related to the response of an under-damped circuit and to the magnetic core material. This research work demonstrates and discusses ways of controlling ringing by considering interrelationships between different contributing factors.

  9. Nanoscale β-nuclear magnetic resonance depth imaging of topological insulators

    PubMed Central

    Koumoulis, Dimitrios; Morris, Gerald D.; He, Liang; Kou, Xufeng; King, Danny; Wang, Dong; Hossain, Masrur D.; Wang, Kang L.; Fiete, Gregory A.; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G.; Bouchard, Louis-S.

    2015-01-01

    Considerable evidence suggests that variations in the properties of topological insulators (TIs) at the nanoscale and at interfaces can strongly affect the physics of topological materials. Therefore, a detailed understanding of surface states and interface coupling is crucial to the search for and applications of new topological phases of matter. Currently, no methods can provide depth profiling near surfaces or at interfaces of topologically inequivalent materials. Such a method could advance the study of interactions. Herein, we present a noninvasive depth-profiling technique based on β-detected NMR (β-NMR) spectroscopy of radioactive 8Li+ ions that can provide “one-dimensional imaging” in films of fixed thickness and generates nanoscale views of the electronic wavefunctions and magnetic order at topological surfaces and interfaces. By mapping the 8Li nuclear resonance near the surface and 10-nm deep into the bulk of pure and Cr-doped bismuth antimony telluride films, we provide signatures related to the TI properties and their topological nontrivial characteristics that affect the electron–nuclear hyperfine field, the metallic shift, and magnetic order. These nanoscale variations in β-NMR parameters reflect the unconventional properties of the topological materials under study, and understanding the role of heterogeneities is expected to lead to the discovery of novel phenomena involving quantum materials. PMID:26124141

  10. Routine screening for the presence of adulteration in raw materials using automated nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Meriage, David; Rogers, Gary; Phillips, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    In an effort to increase the security of the supply chain for raw materials used in the manufacture of human therapeutics, a routine screen to detect the presence of adulteration using fully automated nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy has been developed and qualified for use in quality control laboratories. The method involves the collection of one-dimensional (1)H and (13)C spectra, which are subsequently processed to identify and quantitate raw material constituents by comparison to a spectral database. The resulting method is an easy-to-use limit test that can automatically determine the integrity of incoming raw materials. The method is intended to be used in good manufacturing practice production facilities and is suitable for excipients and aqueous soluble raw materials used in biopharmaceutical processes. In an effort to increase the security of the supply chain for raw materials used in the manufacture of human therapeutics, a routine screen to detect the presence of adulteration using fully automated nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been developed and qualified for use in quality control laboratories. The method involves the collection of NMR spectra, which are subsequently processed to identify and quantitate raw material constituents by comparison to a spectral database. The resulting method is an easy-to-use limit test that can automatically determine the integrity of incoming raw materials. The method is intended to be used in good manufacturing practice production facilities and is suitable for excipients and aqueous soluble raw materials used in biopharmaceutical processes.

  11. Nanoscale β-nuclear magnetic resonance depth imaging of topological insulators.

    PubMed

    Koumoulis, Dimitrios; Morris, Gerald D; He, Liang; Kou, Xufeng; King, Danny; Wang, Dong; Hossain, Masrur D; Wang, Kang L; Fiete, Gregory A; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G; Bouchard, Louis-S

    2015-07-14

    Considerable evidence suggests that variations in the properties of topological insulators (TIs) at the nanoscale and at interfaces can strongly affect the physics of topological materials. Therefore, a detailed understanding of surface states and interface coupling is crucial to the search for and applications of new topological phases of matter. Currently, no methods can provide depth profiling near surfaces or at interfaces of topologically inequivalent materials. Such a method could advance the study of interactions. Herein, we present a noninvasive depth-profiling technique based on β-detected NMR (β-NMR) spectroscopy of radioactive (8)Li(+) ions that can provide "one-dimensional imaging" in films of fixed thickness and generates nanoscale views of the electronic wavefunctions and magnetic order at topological surfaces and interfaces. By mapping the (8)Li nuclear resonance near the surface and 10-nm deep into the bulk of pure and Cr-doped bismuth antimony telluride films, we provide signatures related to the TI properties and their topological nontrivial characteristics that affect the electron-nuclear hyperfine field, the metallic shift, and magnetic order. These nanoscale variations in β-NMR parameters reflect the unconventional properties of the topological materials under study, and understanding the role of heterogeneities is expected to lead to the discovery of novel phenomena involving quantum materials.

  12. Unravelling cardiovascular disease using four dimensional flow cardiovascular magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Kamphuis, Vivian P; Westenberg, Jos J M; van der Palen, Roel L F; Blom, Nico A; de Roos, Albert; van der Geest, Rob; Elbaz, Mohammed S M; Roest, Arno A W

    2016-11-25

    Knowledge of normal and abnormal flow patterns in the human cardiovascular system increases our understanding of normal physiology and may help unravel the complex pathophysiological mechanisms leading to cardiovascular disease. Four-dimensional (4D) flow cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) has emerged as a suitable technique that enables visualization of in vivo blood flow patterns and quantification of parameters that could potentially be of prognostic value in the disease process. In this review, current image processing tools that are used for comprehensive visualization and quantification of blood flow and energy distribution in the heart and great vessels will be discussed. Also, imaging biomarkers extracted from 4D flow CMR will be reviewed that have been shown to distinguish between normal and abnormal flow patterns. Furthermore, current applications of 4D flow CMR in the heart and great vessels will be discussed, showing its potential as an additional diagnostic modality which could aid in disease management and timing of surgical intervention.

  13. Three-dimensional magnetic resonance cardiac imaging shows initial promise

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-04-15

    Three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging (3-D MRI) of the heart is already receiving encouraging reviews from heart surgeons, says Michael Vannier, MD, an associate professor of radiology at Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis. In fact, the demand for his group's 3-D images is becoming overwhelming, Vannier says. So far, the group has used 3-D MRI to evaluate congenital heart disease. The advantage of the 3-D system is that, even to an untrained eye, anomalies are apparent and the images can even be animated. Many of the patients are infants, who are sedated while the images are acquired. When the information is combined, the averaged image produced represents a slice about 5 mm thick. The computer then stacks a number of those images together to make the 3-D image. Total scanning takes about one hour.

  14. The magnetic order of two-dimensional anisotropic antiferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Ai-Yuan; Wang, Qin

    2011-01-01

    We study the two-dimensional quantum Heisenberg antiferromagnet on the square lattice with easy-axis exchange anisotropy by means of Green's function approach within random phase and Callen's approximations. The Néel temperature TN, energy gap w0 and staggered magnetization m are calculated. The theoretical predictions of TN and w0 for K2NiF4, Rb2MnF4, K2MnF4, Rb2MnCl4 and (CH3NH3)2MnCl4 fit well to the measured values. The power law behavior of w(T)/w(0)=β[ is also investigated. The exponents β and ν for K2NiF4 are in excellent agreement with the experimental results.

  15. Magnetic susceptibility in three-dimensional nodal semimetals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koshino, Mikito; Hizbullah, Intan Fatimah

    2016-01-01

    We study the magnetic susceptibility in various three-dimensional gapless systems, including Dirac and Weyl semimetals, and a line-node semimetal. The susceptibility is decomposed into the orbital term, the spin term and also the spin-orbit cross term, which is caused by the spin-orbit interaction. We show that the orbital susceptibility logarithmically diverges at the band touching energy in the point-node case, while it exhibits a stronger δ -function singularity in the line node case. The spin-orbit cross term is shown to be paramagnetic in the electron side while diamagnetic in the hole side, in contrast with other two terms which are both even functions in Fermi energy. The spin-orbit cross term in the nodal semimetal is found to be directly related to the chiral surface current induced by the topological surface modes.

  16. Magnetic response in three-dimensional nodal semimetals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koshino, Mikito; Hizbullah, Intan Fatimah

    We study the magnetic response in various three-dimensional gapless systems, including Dirac and Weyl semimetals and a line-node semimetal. We show that the susceptibility is decomposed into the orbital term, the spin term and also the spin-orbit cross term which is caused by the spin-orbit interaction. We show that the orbital susceptibility logarithmically diverges at the band touching energy in the point-node case, while it exhibits a stronger delta-function singularity in the line node case. The spin-orbit cross term is shown to be paramagnetic in the electron side while diamagnetic in the hole side, in contrast with other two terms which are both even functions in Fermi energy. The spin-orbit cross term in the nodal semimetal is found to be directly related to the chiral surface current induced by the topological surface modes.

  17. Kinetic theory of a two-dimensional magnetized plasma.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vahala, G.; Montgomery, D.

    1971-01-01

    Several features of the equilibrium and nonequilibrium statistical mechanics of a two-dimensional plasma in a uniform dc magnetic field are investigated. The charges are assumed to interact only through electrostatic potentials. The problem is considered both with and without the guiding-center approximation. With the guiding-center approximation, an appropriate Liouville equation and BBGKY hierarchy predict no approach to thermal equilibrium for the spatially uniform case. For the spatially nonuniform situation, a guiding-center Vlasov equation is discussed and solved in special cases. For the nonequilibrium, nonguiding-center case, a Boltzmann equation, and a Fokker-Planck equation are derived in the appropriate limits. The latter is more tractable than the former, and can be shown to obey conservation laws and an H-theorem, but contains a divergent integral which must be cut off on physical grounds. Several unsolved problems are posed.

  18. Dual-domain denoising in three dimensional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jing; Zhou, Jiliu; Wu, Xi

    2016-08-01

    Denoising is a crucial preprocessing procedure for three dimensional magnetic resonance imaging (3D MRI). Existing denoising methods are predominantly implemented in a single domain, ignoring information in other domains. However, denoising methods are becoming increasingly complex, making analysis and implementation challenging. The present study aimed to develop a dual-domain image denoising (DDID) algorithm for 3D MRI that encapsulates information from the spatial and transform domains. In the present study, the DDID method was used to distinguish signal from noise in the spatial and frequency domains, after which robust accurate noise estimation was introduced for iterative filtering, which is simple and beneficial for computation. In addition, the proposed method was compared quantitatively and qualitatively with existing methods for synthetic and in vivo MRI datasets. The results of the present study suggested that the novel DDID algorithm performed well and provided competitive results, as compared with existing MRI denoising filters.

  19. Kinetic theory of a two-dimensional magnetized plasma.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vahala, G.; Montgomery, D.

    1971-01-01

    Several features of the equilibrium and nonequilibrium statistical mechanics of a two-dimensional plasma in a uniform dc magnetic field are investigated. The charges are assumed to interact only through electrostatic potentials. The problem is considered both with and without the guiding-center approximation. With the guiding-center approximation, an appropriate Liouville equation and BBGKY hierarchy predict no approach to thermal equilibrium for the spatially uniform case. For the spatially nonuniform situation, a guiding-center Vlasov equation is discussed and solved in special cases. For the nonequilibrium, nonguiding-center case, a Boltzmann equation, and a Fokker-Planck equation are derived in the appropriate limits. The latter is more tractable than the former, and can be shown to obey conservation laws and an H-theorem, but contains a divergent integral which must be cut off on physical grounds. Several unsolved problems are posed.

  20. A novel power amplification scheme for nuclear magnetic resonance/nuclear quadrupole resonance systems.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinwang; Schemm, Nathan; Balkır, Sina

    2011-03-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR)-based chemical analysis systems have been widely utilized in various areas such as medicine, security, and academic research. In these applications, the power amplifier stage plays a key role in generating the required oscillating magnetic fields within a radio frequency coil that serves as the probe. However, the bulky size and relatively low efficiency of the traditional power amplification schemes employed present a bottleneck for the realization of compact sized and portable NMR and NQR systems. To address this problem, this work presents a class D voltage-switching power amplification scheme with novel fast-start and fast-stop functions that are suitable for generating ideal NMR and NQR excitation signals. Compared to the traditional analog power amplifiers (PAs), the proposed switched-mode PA can achieve significant improvement on the power efficiency as well as the physical volume. A PA circuit for portable NQR-based explosive detection systems has been designed and built using the proposed scheme with 1 kW possible maximum output power and 10 MHz maximum operating frequency. Test results show that the presented PA achieves more than 60% measured efficiency within a highly compact volume while sustaining fast start and stop of excitation signals in the order of microseconds.

  1. Development of a micro nuclear magnetic resonance system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goloshevsky, Artem

    Application of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) to on-line/in-line control of industrial processes is currently limited by equipment costs and requirements for installation. A superconducting magnet generating strong fields is the most expensive part of a typical NMR instrument. In industrial environments, fringe magnetic fields make accommodation of NMR instruments difficult. However, a portable, low-cost and low-field magnetic resonance system can be used in virtually any environment. Development of a number of hardware components for a portable, low-cost NMR instrument is reported in this dissertation. Chapter one provides a discussion on a miniaturized Helmholtz spiral radio-frequency (RF) coil (average diameter equal to 3.5 mm) and an NMR probe built around a capillary (outer diameter = 1.59 mm and inner diameter = 1.02 mm) for flow imaging. Experiments of NMR spectroscopy, static and dynamic (flow) imaging, conducted with the use of the miniaturized coil, are described. Chapter two presents a microfabricated package of two biaxial gradient coils and a Helmholtz RF coil. Planar configuration of discrete wires was used to create magnetic field gradients. Performance of the microfabricated gradient coils while imaging water flow compared well with a commercial gradient set of much larger size. Chapter three reports on flow imaging experiments with power law fluids (aqueous solutions of sodium salt of carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC)) of different viscosities, carried out in the NMR probe with the miniaturized RF coil and capillary. Viscosities of the CMC solutions were determined based on the curve fits of the velocity profiles and simultaneous measurements of the flow rates. The curve fits were carried out according to the power law model equations. The NMR viscosity measurements compared well with measurements of the same CMC samples, performed on a conventional rotational rheometer. A portable, home-built transceiver, designed for NMR applications utilizing a

  2. Phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of toad retina.

    PubMed Central

    Apte, D V; Koutalos, Y; McFarlane, D K; Dawson, M J; Ebrey, T G

    1989-01-01

    Phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance (31P-NMR) spectra were obtained from living toad retinae and toad retinal extracts at 4 degrees C. Several phosphorus metabolites--nucleoside di- and triphosphates (NTP), phosphocreatine, phosphodiesters, inorganic phosphate, and phosphomonoesters--were identified from the spectra of whole retinae. The intracellular pH was determined to be 7.27 +/- 0.06 at 4 degrees C and the intracellular MgNTP/NTP ratio was at least 0.77. These results are consistent with those reported by other techniques, and they show that 31P-NMR spectroscopy can be used for noninvasively and quantitatively studying the metabolism of living toad retinae, and for monitoring its changes over time. PMID:2506940

  3. Blood species discrimination using proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zailer, Elina; Diehl, Bernd W K; Monakhova, Yulia B

    2017-05-01

    Blood species identification is an important challenge in forensic science. Conventional methods used for blood species analysis are destructive and associated with time-consuming sample preparation steps. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is known for its nondestructive properties and fast results. This research study presents a proton ((1)H) NMR method to discriminate blood species including human, cat, dog, elephant, and bison. Characteristic signals acting as markers are observed for each species. Moreover, the data are evaluated by principle component analysis (PCA) and support vector machines (SVM). A 100% correct species recognition between human and nonhuman species is achieved using radial basis kernel function (RBF) and standardized data. The research study shows that (1)H NMR spectroscopy is a powerful tool for differentiating human and nonhuman blood showing a great significance to forensic science.

  4. First principles nuclear magnetic resonance signatures of graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ning; Huang, Ying; Li, Hai-bei; Li, Zhenyu; Yang, Jinlong

    2010-07-21

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has been widely used in graphene oxide (GO) structure studies. However, the detailed relationship between its spectroscopic features and the GO structural configuration remains elusive. Based on first principles (13)C chemical shift calculations using the gauge including projector augmented waves method, we provide a reliable spectrum-structure connection. The (13)C chemical shift in GO is found to be very sensitive to the atomic environment, even for the same type of oxidation groups. Factors determining the chemical shifts of epoxy and hydroxy groups have been discussed. GO structures previously reported in the literature have been checked from the NMR point of view. The energetically favorable hydroxy chain structure is not expected to be widely existed in real GO samples according to our NMR simulations. The epoxy pair species we proposed previously is also supported by chemical shift calculations.

  5. First principles nuclear magnetic resonance signatures of graphene oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Ning; Huang, Ying; Li, Hai-bei; Li, Zhenyu; Yang, Jinlong

    2010-07-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has been widely used in graphene oxide (GO) structure studies. However, the detailed relationship between its spectroscopic features and the GO structural configuration remains elusive. Based on first principles C13 chemical shift calculations using the gauge including projector augmented waves method, we provide a reliable spectrum-structure connection. The C13 chemical shift in GO is found to be very sensitive to the atomic environment, even for the same type of oxidation groups. Factors determining the chemical shifts of epoxy and hydroxy groups have been discussed. GO structures previously reported in the literature have been checked from the NMR point of view. The energetically favorable hydroxy chain structure is not expected to be widely existed in real GO samples according to our NMR simulations. The epoxy pair species we proposed previously is also supported by chemical shift calculations.

  6. Applications of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging in process engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladden, Lynn F.; Alexander, Paul

    1996-03-01

    During the past decade, the application of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging techniques to problems of relevance to the process industries has been identified. The particular strengths of NMR techniques are their ability to distinguish between different chemical species and to yield information simultaneously on the structure, concentration distribution and flow processes occurring within a given process unit. In this paper, examples of specific applications in the areas of materials and food processing, transport in reactors and two-phase flow are discussed. One specific study, that of the internal structure of a packed column, is considered in detail. This example is reported to illustrate the extent of new, quantitative information of generic importance to many processing operations that can be obtained using NMR imaging in combination with image analysis.

  7. Nuclear magnetic resonance of iron and copper disease states

    SciTech Connect

    Runge, V.M.; Clanton, J.A.; Smith, F.W.; Hutchison, J.; Mallard, J.; Partain, C.L.; James, A.E. Jr.

    1983-11-01

    The tissue levels of paramagnetic ions are an important factor in the determination of T/sub 1/ values as observed by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging. The increased levels of iron present in human disease states such as hemochromatosis lead to decreased T/sub 1/ values. The mean liver T/sub 1/ of three patients with iron storage disease was determined to be 130 msec, significantly different from the value of 154 msec, the mean for 14 normal controls. Whether NMR will be able to detect the increased copper levels in liver and brain in Wilson disease remains for further clinical trials to evaluate. NMR imaging, however, does serve as a noninvasive method for the diagnosis of states of iron overload and as a technique to follow progression of disease or response to medical therapy.

  8. Microwave-free nuclear magnetic resonance at molecular scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, James D. A.; Tetienne, Jean-Philippe; Broadway, David A.; Hall, Liam T.; Simpson, David A.; Stacey, Alastair; Hollenberg, Lloyd C. L.

    2017-07-01

    The implementation of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) at the nanoscale is a major challenge, as the resolution of conventional methods is limited to mesoscopic scales. Approaches based on quantum spin probes, such as the nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centre in diamond, have achieved nano-NMR under ambient conditions. However, the measurement protocols require application of complex microwave pulse sequences of high precision and relatively high power, placing limitations on the design and scalability of these techniques. Here we demonstrate NMR on a nanoscale organic environment of proton spins using the NV centre while eliminating the need for microwave manipulation of either the NV or the environmental spin states. We also show that the sensitivity of our significantly simplified approach matches that of existing techniques using the NV centre. Removing the requirement for coherent manipulation while maintaining measurement sensitivity represents a significant step towards the development of robust, non-invasive nanoscale NMR probes.

  9. Serum metabonomics of acute leukemia using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Musharraf, Syed Ghulam; Siddiqui, Amna Jabbar; Shamsi, Tahir; Choudhary, M. Iqbal; Rahman, Atta-ur

    2016-01-01

    Acute leukemia is a critical neoplasm of white blood cells. In order to differentiate between the metabolic alterations associated with two subtypes of acute leukemia, acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML), we investigated the serum of ALL and AML patients and compared with two controls (healthy and aplastic anemia) using 1H NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) spectroscopy. Thirty-seven putative metabolites were identified using Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) sequence. The use of PLS-DA and OPLS-DA models gave results with 84.38% and 90.63% classification rate, respectively. The metabolites responsible for classification are mainly lipids, lactate and glucose. Compared with controls, ALL and AML patients showed serum metabonomic differences involving aberrant metabolism pathways including glycolysis, TCA cycle, lipoprotein changes, choline and fatty acid metabolisms. PMID:27480133

  10. Microwave-free nuclear magnetic resonance at molecular scales.

    PubMed

    Wood, James D A; Tetienne, Jean-Philippe; Broadway, David A; Hall, Liam T; Simpson, David A; Stacey, Alastair; Hollenberg, Lloyd C L

    2017-07-03

    The implementation of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) at the nanoscale is a major challenge, as the resolution of conventional methods is limited to mesoscopic scales. Approaches based on quantum spin probes, such as the nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centre in diamond, have achieved nano-NMR under ambient conditions. However, the measurement protocols require application of complex microwave pulse sequences of high precision and relatively high power, placing limitations on the design and scalability of these techniques. Here we demonstrate NMR on a nanoscale organic environment of proton spins using the NV centre while eliminating the need for microwave manipulation of either the NV or the environmental spin states. We also show that the sensitivity of our significantly simplified approach matches that of existing techniques using the NV centre. Removing the requirement for coherent manipulation while maintaining measurement sensitivity represents a significant step towards the development of robust, non-invasive nanoscale NMR probes.

  11. Microwave-free nuclear magnetic resonance at molecular scales

    PubMed Central

    Wood, James D. A.; Tetienne, Jean-Philippe; Broadway, David A.; Hall, Liam T.; Simpson, David A.; Stacey, Alastair

    2017-01-01

    The implementation of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) at the nanoscale is a major challenge, as the resolution of conventional methods is limited to mesoscopic scales. Approaches based on quantum spin probes, such as the nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centre in diamond, have achieved nano-NMR under ambient conditions. However, the measurement protocols require application of complex microwave pulse sequences of high precision and relatively high power, placing limitations on the design and scalability of these techniques. Here we demonstrate NMR on a nanoscale organic environment of proton spins using the NV centre while eliminating the need for microwave manipulation of either the NV or the environmental spin states. We also show that the sensitivity of our significantly simplified approach matches that of existing techniques using the NV centre. Removing the requirement for coherent manipulation while maintaining measurement sensitivity represents a significant step towards the development of robust, non-invasive nanoscale NMR probes. PMID:28671183

  12. State interrogation in nuclear magnetic resonance quantum-information processing

    SciTech Connect

    Leskowitz, Garett M.; Mueller, Leonard J.

    2004-05-01

    Reconstruction of a reduced density operator for weakly coupled systems of spins (1/2) from fits to nuclear magnetic resonance spectra is described in detail. Particular emphasis is placed on data treatment procedures that specify fewer than the 3{sup n} complete spectra that are implicitly prescribed in published references to state tomography on n-spin systems. It is shown that if the density operator is expanded in the so-called product-operator basis, it is always possible to estimate a desired coefficient in the expansion by measuring a single spectral multiplet. This simple observation can substantially reduce the experimental effort required for either complete density-matrix reconstruction or estimation of subsets of the coefficients in the product-operator expansion. A simple iterative algorithm can be used to produce reduced measurement procedures for experiments involving small numbers of qubits.

  13. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of induced renal lesions

    SciTech Connect

    London, D.A.; Davis, P.L.; Williams, R.D.; Crooks, L.E.; Sheldon, P.E.; Gooding, C.A.

    1983-07-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) images obtained after unilateral ligation of the ureter, renal artery, or renal vein in the rat were analyzed and compared with NMR images of the normal rat kidney. Anatomic and functional correlation of the induced renal lesions was made by concurrent CT and by gross examination of the excised kidneys. Many normal anatomic structures at the level of the renal hilum can be identified by high resolution NMR imaging. Differentiation of urine from renal parenchyma permits detection of gross changes both in renal function and in the mass of the renal parenchyma. NMR imaging is capable of diagnosing hydronephrosis, acute renal ischemia, and acute venous congestion in this rat model. In addition, a trend toward prolongation of the relaxation times T1 and T2 for abnormal renal parenchyma is demonstrated.

  14. Effect of a strong magnetic field on the energy yield of nuclear reactions in dense nuclear matter

    SciTech Connect

    Sekerzhitskii, V.S.

    1995-01-01

    According to modern concepts, the electron-neutron-nuclear (Aen) phase of dense highly degenerate matter can be realized in the shells of neutron stars. This phase has relatively stable and absolutely stable states of thermodynamic equilibrium. Strong magnetic fields can exist in neutron stars. For this reason, analysis of their effect on the characteristics of the Aen phase is of great interest. It is specially important to study the influence of strong magnetic fields on the energy yield of nuclear reactions in dense nuclear matter because the transition to the absolute equilibrium state proceeds through these reactions.

  15. The two-dimensional magnetic change process of grain-oriented silicon steel under tensile stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Akihiko; Nakata, Kumi; Murashige, Shinichi

    1996-07-01

    The effect of tensile stress on the magnetization properties of silicon steel samples declined from the rolling direction has been investigated. The locus for the two-dimensional magnetization change was measured. The locus of magnetization due to magnetic field without stress was different from that under tension. The locus of magnetization with tension has two knees which correspond to the two knees of the hysteresis curve with tension. These results indicate the essential importance of investigations of the two-dimensional magnetization process.

  16. Three-Dimensional Magnetic Field Line Reconnection involving Magnetic Flux Ropes (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gekelman, W. N.; van Compernolle, B.; Lawrence, E.; Vincena, S. T.

    2010-12-01

    We report on two experiments in which three dimensional magnetic field line reconnection plays a role. Magnetic field line reconnection is a processes in which the magnetic field energy is converted to particle energy and heating accompanied by changes in the magnetic topology. In the first experiment two magnetic flux ropes are generated from initially adjacent pulsed current channels in a background magnetoplasma in the LAPD device at UCLA. The currents exert mutual jXB forces causing them to twist about each other and merge. The currents are not static but move towards or away from each other in time. In addition the currents are observed to filament after merging. Volumetric space-time data show multiple reconnection sites with time-dependent locations. The quasi-separatrix layer (QSL) is a narrow region between the flux ropes. Two field lines on either side of the QSL will have closely spaced foot-points at on end of the flux ropes, but a very different separation at the other end. Outside the QSL, neighboring field lines do not diverge. The QSL has been measured, for the first time in this experiment [1] and its three dimensional development will be shown in movies made from the data. A system involving the reconnection of three flux ropes will also be presented. Three flux ropes are generated by drawing currents through apertures in a carbon shield located in front of a 10 cm diameter cathode immersed in the background magnetoplasma. The currents are observed to twist about themselves, writhe about each other and thrash about due to kink the kink instability. Multiple reconnection regions (which are three dimensional) and a complex QSL are observed. The magnetic helicity is evaluated from volumetric data in both cases and its rate of change is used to estimate the plasma resistivity. These measurements lead one to suspect that magnetic field line reconnection is not an independent topic, which can be studied in isolation, but part of the phenomena associated

  17. Two-Dimensional Isotope Imaging of Radiation Shielded Materials Using Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyokawa, Hiroyuki; Ohgaki, Hideaki; Hayakawa, Takehito; Kii, Toshiteru; Shizuma, Toshiyuki; Hajima, Ryoichi; Kikuzawa, Nobuhiro; Masuda, Kai; Kitatani, Fumito; Harada, Hideo

    2011-10-01

    A novel method for two-dimensional (2D) imaging of a specific isotope in a material, which is hidden by a thick radiation shield is presented. Nuclear resonance fluorescence and the laser Compton scattering are used in the present method. We measured γ-rays of 5512 keV from the nuclear resonance fluorescence of 208Pb at several points, and obtained a 2D image of isotope distribution.

  18. Three-dimensional lattice Boltzmann model for magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Mendoza, M.; Munoz, J. D.

    2008-02-15

    We develop a three-dimensional (3D) lattice Boltzmann model that recovers in the continuous limit the two-fluids theory for plasmas, and consequently includes the generalized Ohm's law. The model reproduces the magnetic reconnection process just by giving the right initial equilibrium conditions in the magnetotail, without any assumption on the resistivity in the diffusive region. In this model, the plasma is handled similar to two fluids with an interaction term, each one with distribution functions associated to a cubic lattice with 19 velocities (D3Q19). The electromagnetic fields are considered as a third fluid with an external force on a cubic lattice with 13 velocities (D3Q13). The model can simulate either viscous fluids in the incompressible limit or nonviscous compressible fluids, and successfully reproduces both the Hartmann flow and the magnetic reconnection in the magnetotail. The reconnection rate in the magnetotail obtained with this model lies between R=0.062 and R=0.073, in good agreement with the observations.

  19. Nuclear magnetic resonance probes of membrane biophysics: Structure and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leftin, Avigdor

    The phospholipid membrane is a self-assembled, dynamic molecular system that may exist alone in association with only water, or in complex systems comprised of multiple lipid types and proteins. In this dissertation the intra- and inter-molecular forces responsible for the atomistic, molecular and collective equilibrium structure and dynamics are studied by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). The multinuclear NMR measurements and various experimental techniques are able to provide data that enable the characterization of the hierarchical spatio-temporal organization of the phospholipid membrane. The experimental and theoretical studies conducted target membrane interactions ranging from model systems composed of only water and lipids, to multiple component domain forming membranes that are in association with peripheral and trans-membrane proteins. These measurements consisit of frequency spectrum lineshapes and nuclear-spin relaxation rates obtained using 2H NMR, 13C NMR, 31P NMR and 1H NMR. The changes of these experimental observables are interpreted within a statistical thermodynamic framework that allows the membrane structure, activation energies, and correlation times of motion to be determined. The cases presented demonstrate how fundamental principles of NMR spectroscopy may be applied to a host of membranes, leading to the biophysical characterization of membrane structure and dynamics.

  20. Single crystal nuclear magnetic resonance in spinning powders.

    PubMed

    Pell, Andrew J; Pintacuda, Guido; Emsley, Lyndon

    2011-10-14

    We present a method for selectively exciting nuclear magnetic resonances (NMRs) from well-defined subsets of crystallites from a powdered sample under magic angle spinning. Magic angle spinning induces a time dependence in the anisotropic interactions, which results in a time variation of the resonance frequencies which is different for different crystallite orientations. The proposed method exploits this by applying selective pulses, which we refer to as XS (for crystallite-selective) pulses, that follow the resonance frequencies of nuclear species within particular crystallites, resulting in the induced flip angle being orientation dependent. By selecting the radiofrequency field to deliver a 180° pulse for the target orientation and employing a train of such pulses combined with cogwheel phase cycling, we obtain a high degree of orientational selectivity with the resulting spectrum containing only contributions from orientations close to the target. Typically, this leads to the selection of between 0.1% and 10% of the crystallites, and in extreme cases to the excitation of a single orientation resulting in single crystal spectra of spinning powders. Two formulations of this method are described and demonstrated with experimental examples on [1-(13)C]-alanine and the paramagnetic compound Sm(2)Sn(2)O(7).

  1. Single crystal nuclear magnetic resonance in spinning powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pell, Andrew J.; Pintacuda, Guido; Emsley, Lyndon

    2011-10-01

    We present a method for selectively exciting nuclear magnetic resonances (NMRs) from well-defined subsets of crystallites from a powdered sample under magic angle spinning. Magic angle spinning induces a time dependence in the anisotropic interactions, which results in a time variation of the resonance frequencies which is different for different crystallite orientations. The proposed method exploits this by applying selective pulses, which we refer to as XS (for crystallite-selective) pulses, that follow the resonance frequencies of nuclear species within particular crystallites, resulting in the induced flip angle being orientation dependent. By selecting the radiofrequency field to deliver a 180 ○ pulse for the target orientation and employing a train of such pulses combined with cogwheel phase cycling, we obtain a high degree of orientational selectivity with the resulting spectrum containing only contributions from orientations close to the target. Typically, this leads to the selection of between 0.1% and 10% of the crystallites, and in extreme cases to the excitation of a single orientation resulting in single crystal spectra of spinning powders. Two formulations of this method are described and demonstrated with experimental examples on [1 - 13C]-alanine and the paramagnetic compound Sm2Sn2O7.

  2. Nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of velocity distributions in an ultrasonically vibrated granular bed

    PubMed Central

    Huntley, J. M.; Tarvaz, T.; Mantle, M. D.; Sederman, A. J.; Gladden, L. F.; Sheikh, N. A.; Wildman, R. D.

    2014-01-01

    We report the results of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging experiments on granular beds of mustard grains fluidized by vertical vibration at ultrasonic frequencies. The variation of both granular temperature and packing fraction with height was measured within the three-dimensional cell for a range of vibration frequencies, amplitudes and numbers of grains. Small increases in vibration frequency were found—contrary to the predictions of classical ‘hard-sphere’ expressions for the energy flux through a vibrating boundary—to result in dramatic reductions in granular temperature. Numerical simulations of the grain–wall interactions, using experimentally determined Hertzian contact stiffness coefficients, showed that energy flux drops significantly as the vibration period approaches the grain–wall contact time. The experiments thus demonstrate the need for new models for ‘soft-sphere’ boundary conditions at ultrasonic frequencies. PMID:24711488

  3. Nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of velocity distributions in an ultrasonically vibrated granular bed.

    PubMed

    Huntley, J M; Tarvaz, T; Mantle, M D; Sederman, A J; Gladden, L F; Sheikh, N A; Wildman, R D

    2014-05-13

    We report the results of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging experiments on granular beds of mustard grains fluidized by vertical vibration at ultrasonic frequencies. The variation of both granular temperature and packing fraction with height was measured within the three-dimensional cell for a range of vibration frequencies, amplitudes and numbers of grains. Small increases in vibration frequency were found--contrary to the predictions of classical 'hard-sphere' expressions for the energy flux through a vibrating boundary--to result in dramatic reductions in granular temperature. Numerical simulations of the grain-wall interactions, using experimentally determined Hertzian contact stiffness coefficients, showed that energy flux drops significantly as the vibration period approaches the grain-wall contact time. The experiments thus demonstrate the need for new models for 'soft-sphere' boundary conditions at ultrasonic frequencies.

  4. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic analysis of homoallylic and bis homoallylic substituted methyl fatty ester derivatives.

    PubMed

    Jie, M S; Cheng, K L

    1995-02-01

    Using a combination of selective irradiation 1H nuclear magnetic resonance experiments and two-dimensional 1H-13C correlation spectroscopy spectral analysis of homoallylic and bis homoallylic substituted (azido, acetoxy, chloro and oxo) fatty ester derivatives, the carbon shifts of the ethylenic carbon atoms were determined. In the case of methyl 12-azido-9Z-octadecenoate (homoallylic), the carbon chemical shifts of the ethylenic C-9 and C-10 carbon nuclei are 133.092 and 124.596 ppm, respectively. In methyl 9-azido-12Z-octadecenoate (bis homoallylic), the carbon chemical shift of the ethylenic C-12 and C-13 carbon nuclei are 128.118 and 131.243 ppm, respectively.

  5. Low-frequency nuclear magnetic resonance and nuclear quadrupole resonance spectrometer based on a dc superconducting quantum interference device

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, N.Q.; Clarke, J. )

    1991-06-01

    A sensitive spectrometer, based on a dc superconducting quantum interference device, for the direct detection of low-frequency pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR), is described. The frequency response extends from about 10 to 200 kHz, and the recovery time after the magnetic pulse is removed is typically 50 {mu}s. As examples, NMR spectra are shown from Pt and Cu metal powders in a magnetic field of 6 mT, and NQR spectra are shown from {sup 2}D in a tunneling methyl group and {sup 14}N in NH{sub 4}ClO{sub 4}.

  6. Three-Dimensional Charge Density Wave Order in YBa2Cu3O6.67 at High Magnetic Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, S.; Jang, H.; Nojiri, H.; Matsuzawa, S.; Yasumura, H.; Bonn, D. A.; Liang, R.; Hardy, W.; Islam, Z.; Lee, W. -S.; Zhu, D.; Lee, J. -S.

    2015-11-20

    Charge density wave (CDW) correlations have been shown to universally exist in cuprate superconductors. However, their nature at high fields inferred from nuclear magnetic resonance is distinct from that measured by x-ray scattering at zero and low fields. Here we combine a pulsed magnet with an x-ray free electron laser to characterize the CDW in YBa2Cu3O6.67 via x-ray scattering in fields up to 28 Tesla. While the zero-field CDW order, which develops below T ~ 150 K, is essentially two-dimensional, at lower temperature and beyond 15 Tesla, another three-dimensionally ordered CDW emerges. The field-induced CDW onsets around the zero-field superconducting transition temperature, yet the incommensurate inplane ordering vector is field-independent. This implies that the two forms of CDW and hightemperature superconductivity are intimately linked.

  7. Three-dimensional charge density wave order in YBa2Cu3O6.67 at high magnetic fields

    DOE PAGES

    Gerber, S.; Jang, H.; Nojiri, H.; ...

    2015-11-20

    In this study, charge density wave (CDW) correlations have recently been shown to universally exist in cuprate superconductors. However, their nature at high fields inferred from nuclear magnetic resonance is distinct from that measured by x-ray scattering at zero and low fields. Here we combine a pulsed magnet with an x-ray free electron laser to characterize the CDW in YBa2Cu3O6.67 via x-ray scattering in fields up to 28 Tesla. While the zero-field CDW order, which develops below T ~ 150 K, is essentially two-dimensional, at lower temperature and beyond 15 Tesla, another three-dimensionally ordered CDW emerges. The field-induced CDW onsetsmore » around the zero-field superconducting transition temperature, yet the incommensurate in-plane ordering vector is field-independent. This implies that the two forms of CDW and high-temperature superconductivity are intimately linked.« less

  8. Internetwork magnetic field as revealed by two-dimensional inversions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilovic, S.; van Noort, M.; Rempel, M.

    2016-09-01

    Context. Properties of magnetic field in the internetwork regions are still fairly unknown because of rather weak spectropolarimetric signals. Aims: We address the matter by using the two-dimensional (2D) inversion code, which is able to retrieve the information on smallest spatial scales up to the diffraction limit, while being less susceptible to noise than most of the previous methods used. Methods: Performance of the code and the impact of various effects on the retrieved field distribution is tested first on the realistic magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) simulations. The best inversion scenario is then applied to the real data obtained by Spectropolarimeter (SP) on board Hinode. Results: Tests on simulations show that: (1) the best choice of node position ensures a decent retrieval of all parameters; (2) the code performs well for different configurations of magnetic field; (3) slightly different noise levels or slightly different defocus included in the spatial point spread function (PSF) produces no significant effect on the results; and (4) temporal integration shifts the field distribution to a stronger, more horizontally inclined field. Conclusions: Although the contribution of the weak field is slightly overestimated owing to noise, 2D inversions are able to recover well the overall distribution of the magnetic field strength. Application of the 2D inversion code on the Hinode SP internetwork observations reveals a monotonic field strength distribution. The mean field strength at optical depth unity is ~ 130 G. At higher layers, field strength drops as the field becomes more horizontal. Regarding the distribution of the field inclination, tests show that we cannot directly retrieve it with the observations and tools at hand, however, the obtained distributions are consistent with those expected from simulations with a quasi-isotropic field inclination after accounting for observational effects.

  9. Magnetic order in quasi-two-dimensional molecular magnets investigated with muon-spin relaxation.

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, A. J.; Lancaster, T.; Blundell, S. J.; Baker, P. J.; Pratt, F. L.; Baines, C.; Conner, M. M.; Southerland, H. I.; Manson, J. L.; Schlueter, J. A.

    2011-01-01

    We present the results of a muon-spin relaxation ({mu}+SR) investigation into magnetic ordering in several families of layered quasi-two-dimensional molecular antiferromagnets based on transition-metal ions such as S = 1/2 Cu{sup 2+} bridged with organic ligands such as pyrazine. In many of these materials magnetic ordering is difficult to detect with conventional magnetic probes. In contrast, {mu}{sup +}SR allows us to identify ordering temperatures and study the critical behavior close to TN. Combining this with measurements of in-plane magnetic exchange J and predictions from quantum Monte Carlo simulations we may assess the degree of isolation of the 2D layers through estimates of the effective inter-layer exchange coupling and in-layer correlation lengths at TN. We also identify the likely metal-ion moment sizes and muon stopping sites in these materials, based on probabilistic analysis of the magnetic structures and of muon-fluorine dipole-dipole coupling in fluorinated materials.

  10. Magnetic order in quasi-two-dimensional molecular magnets investigated with muon-spin relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steele, A. J.; Lancaster, T.; Blundell, S. J.; Baker, P. J.; Pratt, F. L.; Baines, C.; Conner, M. M.; Southerland, H. I.; Manson, J. L.; Schlueter, J. A.

    2011-08-01

    We present the results of a muon-spin relaxation (μ+SR) investigation into magnetic ordering in several families of layered quasi-two-dimensional molecular antiferromagnets based on transition-metal ions such as S=(1)/(2) Cu2+ bridged with organic ligands such as pyrazine. In many of these materials magnetic ordering is difficult to detect with conventional magnetic probes. In contrast, μ+SR allows us to identify ordering temperatures and study the critical behavior close to TN. Combining this with measurements of in-plane magnetic exchange J and predictions from quantum Monte Carlo simulations we may assess the degree of isolation of the 2D layers through estimates of the effective inter-layer exchange coupling and in-layer correlation lengths at TN. We also identify the likely metal-ion moment sizes and muon stopping sites in these materials, based on probabilistic analysis of the magnetic structures and of muon-fluorine dipole-dipole coupling in fluorinated materials.

  11. Optically Pumped Nuclear Magnetic Resonance in the Quantum Hall Regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, S. E.; Khandelwal, P.; Kuzma, N. N.; Pfeiffer, L. N.; West, K. W.

    1997-03-01

    Optical pumping enables the direct detection of the nuclear magnetic resonance signal of ^71Ga nuclei located in an electron doped GaAs quantum well.footnote S. E. Barrett et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 72, 1368 (1994) Using this technique, measurements of the Knight shift (K_S)footnote S. E. Barrett et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 74, 5112 (1995) and spin-lattice relaxation time (T_1)footnote R. Tycko et al., Science 268, 1460 (1995) have been carried out in the Quantum Hall regimes. This talk will focus on our latest measurements of KS and T1 near Landau level filling ν=1, which extend our earlier results to higher magnetic fields (B=12 Tesla) and lower temperatures (T < 1 Kelvin). We will compare these results to the theoretical predictionsfootnote S. L. Sondhi et al., Phys. Rev. B 47, 16419 (1993); H. A. Fertig et al., Phys. Rev. B 50, 11018 (1994) that the charged excitations of the ν = 1 ground state are novel spin textures called skyrmions. The current status of this picture will be discussed.

  12. Observation of the Nuclear Magnetic Octupole Moment of 137Ba+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, Matthew

    Single trapped ions are ideal systems in which to test atomic physics at high precision, which can in turn be used for searches for violations of fundamental symmetries and physics beyond the standard model, in addition to quantum computation and a number of other applications. The ion is confined in ultra-high vacuum, is laser cooled to mK temperatures, and kept well isolated from the environment which allows these experimental efforts. In this thesis, a few diagnostic techniques will be discussed, covering a method to measure the linewidth of a narrowband laser in the presence of magnetic field noise, as well as a procedure to measure the ion's temperature using such a narrowband laser. This work has led to two precision experiments to measure atomic structure in 138Ba+, and 137Ba+ discussed here. First, employing laser and radio frequency spectroscopy techniques in 138Ba+, we measured the Lande- gJ factor of the 5D5/2 level at the part-per-million level, the highest precision to date. Later, the development of apparatus to efficiently trap and laser cool 137Ba+ has enabled a measurement of the hyperfine splittings of the 5D3/2 manifold, culminating in the observation of the nuclear magnetic octupole moment of 137Ba+.

  13. Nuclear Magnetic Shieldings of Stacked Aromatic and Antiaromatic Molecules.

    PubMed

    Sundholm, Dage; Rauhalahti, Markus; Özcan, Nergiz; Mera-Adasme, Raúl; Kussmann, Jörg; Luenser, Arne; Ochsenfeld, Christian

    2017-04-04

    Nuclear magnetic shieldings have been calculated at the density functional theory (DFT) level for stacks of benzene, hexadehydro[12]annulene, dodecadehydro[18]annulene, and hexabenzocoronene. The magnetic shieldings due to the ring currents in the adjacent molecules have been estimated by calculating nucleus independent molecular shieldings for the monomer in the atomic positions of neighbor molecules. The calculations show that the independent shielding model works reasonably well for the (1)H NMR shieldings of benzene and hexadehydro[12]annulene, whereas for the larger molecules and for the (13)C NMR shieldings the interaction between the molecules leads to shielding effects that are at least of the same size as the ring current contributions from the adjacent molecules. A better agreement is obtained when the nearest neighbors are also considered at full quantum mechanical (QM) level. The calculations suggest that the nearest solvent molecules must be included in the quantum mechanical system, at least when estimating solvent shifts at the molecular mechanics (MM) level. Current density calculations show that the stacking does not significantly affect the ring current strengths of the individual molecules, whereas the shape of the ring current for a single molecule differs from that of the stacked molecules.

  14. Phosphorus nuclear magnetic resonance in isolated perfused rat pancreas

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Takehisa; Kanno, Tomio; Seo, Yoshiteru; Murakami, Masataka; Watari, Hiroshi National Institute for Physiological Sciences, Okazaki )

    1988-04-01

    Phosphorus nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was applied to measure phosphorus energy metabolites in isolated perfused rat pancreas. The gland was perfused with a modified Krebs-Henseleit solution at room temperature (25{degree}C). {sup 31}P resonances of creatine phosphate (PCr), ATP, ADP, inorganic phosphate (P{sub i}) and phosphomonoesters (PMEs) were observed in all the preparations of pancreas. In different individual preparations, the resonance of PCr varied, but those of ATP were almost the same. The initial levels of PCr and ATP in individual preparations, however, remained almost unchanged during perfusion with the standard solution for 2 h. When the perfusion was stopped, the levels of ATP and PCr decreased, while the levels of PME and P{sub i} increased. At that time, the P{sub i} resonance shfted to a higher magnetic field, indicating that the tissue pH decreased. On reperfusion, the tissue levels of phosphorus compounds and the tissue pH were restored to their initial resting levels. Continuous infusion of 0.1 {mu}M acetylcholine caused marked and sustained increases in the flow of pancreatic juice and protein output. During the stimulation the tissue levels of phosphorus compounds remained unchanged, while the tissue pH was decreased slightly.

  15. Nuclear magnetic resonance study of the crystallization kinetics in soft magnetic nanocrystalline materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbatti, C. F.; Sinnecker, E. H. C. P.; Sarthour, R. S.; Guimarães, A. P.

    2002-05-01

    We used the nuclear magnetic resonance technique to study the evolution of the structural and magnetic properties of Fe-based melt-spun ribbons of Fe73.5Cu1Nb3Si13.5B9, Fe73.5Cu1Nb3Si18.5B4, and Fe86Zr7Cu1B6, as-cast and annealed at 500, 540, and 430 °C, respectively. Experiments were carried out at 4.2 K and zero-applied magnetic field, and in a controlled radio-frequency (rf) field. This type of measurement allows us to observe B and Nb sites, and makes it possible to distinguish signals associated with regions of different magnetic hardnesses. The results exhibit a high dependence of the spectra on rf power. For Fe-Si-based alloys, we observe well-defined 93Nb resonance signals from three distinct sites according to the concentration of Fe atoms in their neighborhood. In the Fe73.5Cu1Nb3Si18.5B4 spectra we also observe a peak around 34 MHz, connected to the 11B resonance in different Fe-B compounds, which remains as the rf power decreases, suggesting that the signals come from atoms inside a soft magnetic region. As for the Fe-Zr alloy, we also observe a peak around 36 MHz, identified as the 11B resonance, and a broad line around 62 MHz.

  16. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Study of High Temperature Superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mounce, Andrew M.

    The high temperature superconductors HgBa2CuO 4+delta (Hg1201) and Bi2SrCa2Cu2O 8+delta (Bi2212) have been treated with 17O for both nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) sensitivity and various electronic properties. Subsequently, NMR experiments were performed on Hg1201 and Bi2212 to reveal the nature of the pseudogap, in the normal state, and vortex phases, in the superconducting state. NMR has been performed on 17O in an underdoped Hg1201 crystal with a superconducting transition transition temperature of 74 K to look for circulating orbital currents proposed theoretically and inferred from neutron scattering. The measurements reveal narrow spectra which preclude static local fields in the pseudogap phase at the apical site, suggesting that the moments observed with neutrons are fluctuating or the orbital current ordering is not the correct model for the neutron scattering observation. The fine detail of the NMR frequency shifts at the apical oxygen site are consistent with a dipolar field from the Cu+2 site and diamagnetism below the superconducting transition. It has been predicted that superconducting vortices should be electrically charged and that this effect is particularly enhanced for high temperature superconductors. Here it is shown that the Abrikosov vortex lattice, characteristic of the mixed state of superconductors, will become unstable at sufficiently high magnetic field if there is charge trapped on the vortex core for highly anisotropic superconductors. NMR measurements of the magnetic fields generated by vortices in Bi2212 single crystals provide evidence for an electro-statically driven vortex lattice reconstruction with the magnitude of charge on each vortex pancake of 2x10-3e, depending on doping, in line with theoretical estimates. Competition with magnetism is at the heart of high temperature superconductivity, most intensely felt near a vortex core. To investigate vortex magnetism spatially resolved NMR has been used, finding a strongly non

  17. High temperature spin dynamics in linear magnetic chains, molecular rings, and segments by nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Adelnia, Fatemeh; Lascialfari, Alessandro; Mariani, Manuel; Ammannato, Luca; Caneschi, Andrea; Rovai, Donella; Winpenny, Richard; Timco, Grigore; Corti, Maurizio Borsa, Ferdinando

    2015-05-07

    We present the room temperature proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate (NSLR) results in two 1D spin chains: the Heisenberg antiferromagnetic (AFM) Eu(hfac){sub 3}NITEt and the magnetically frustrated Gd(hfac){sub 3}NITEt. The NSLR as a function of external magnetic field can be interpreted very well in terms of high temperature spin dynamics dominated by a long time persistence of the decay of the two-spin correlation function due to the conservation of the total spin value for isotropic Heisenberg chains. The high temperature spin dynamics are also investigated in Heisenberg AFM molecular rings. In both Cr{sub 8} closed ring and in Cr{sub 7}Cd and Cr{sub 8}Zn open rings, i.e., model systems for a finite spin segment, an enhancement of the low frequency spectral density is found consistent with spin diffusion but the high cut-off frequency due to intermolecular anisotropic interactions prevents a detailed analysis of the spin diffusion regime.

  18. Rotatable Small Permanent Magnet Array for Ultra-Low Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Instrumentation: A Concept Study

    PubMed Central

    Vegh, Viktor; Reutens, David C.

    2016-01-01

    Object We studied the feasibility of generating the variable magnetic fields required for ultra-low field nuclear magnetic resonance relaxometry with dynamically adjustable permanent magnets. Our motivation was to substitute traditional electromagnets by distributed permanent magnets, increasing system portability. Materials and Methods The finite element method (COMSOL®) was employed for the numerical study of a small permanent magnet array to calculate achievable magnetic field strength, homogeneity, switching time and magnetic forces. A manually operated prototype was simulated and constructed to validate the numerical approach and to verify the generated magnetic field. Results A concentric small permanent magnet array can be used to generate strong sample pre-polarisation and variable measurement fields for ultra-low field relaxometry via simple prescribed magnet rotations. Using the array, it is possible to achieve a pre-polarisation field strength above 100 mT and variable measurement fields ranging from 20–50 μT with 200 ppm absolute field homogeneity within a field-of-view of 5 x 5 x 5 cubic centimetres. Conclusions A dynamic small permanent magnet array can generate multiple highly homogeneous magnetic fields required in ultra-low field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) instruments. This design can significantly reduce the volume and energy requirements of traditional systems based on electromagnets, improving portability considerably. PMID:27271886

  19. Rotatable Small Permanent Magnet Array for Ultra-Low Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Instrumentation: A Concept Study.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Michael W; Giorni, Andrea; Vegh, Viktor; Pellicer-Guridi, Ruben; Reutens, David C

    2016-01-01

    We studied the feasibility of generating the variable magnetic fields required for ultra-low field nuclear magnetic resonance relaxometry with dynamically adjustable permanent magnets. Our motivation was to substitute traditional electromagnets by distributed permanent magnets, increasing system portability. The finite element method (COMSOL®) was employed for the numerical study of a small permanent magnet array to calculate achievable magnetic field strength, homogeneity, switching time and magnetic forces. A manually operated prototype was simulated and constructed to validate the numerical approach and to verify the generated magnetic field. A concentric small permanent magnet array can be used to generate strong sample pre-polarisation and variable measurement fields for ultra-low field relaxometry via simple prescribed magnet rotations. Using the array, it is possible to achieve a pre-polarisation field strength above 100 mT and variable measurement fields ranging from 20-50 μT with 200 ppm absolute field homogeneity within a field-of-view of 5 x 5 x 5 cubic centimetres. A dynamic small permanent magnet array can generate multiple highly homogeneous magnetic fields required in ultra-low field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) instruments. This design can significantly reduce the volume and energy requirements of traditional systems based on electromagnets, improving portability considerably.

  20. Three-dimensional optical metamaterials as model systems for longitudinal and transverse magnetic coupling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Na; Giessen, Harald

    2008-12-22

    In this paper, we demonstrate that metamaterials represent model systems for longitudinal and transverse magnetic coupling in the optical domain. In particular, such coupling can lead to fully parallel or antiparallel alignment of the magnetic dipoles at the lowest frequency resonance. Also, we present the design scheme for constructing three-dimensional metamaterials with solely magnetic interaction. Our concept could pave the way for achieving rather complicated magnetic materials with desired arrangements of magnetic dipoles at optical frequencies.

  1. Superconductivity and magnetic fluctuations in Cd(2))Re(2)O(7) via Cd nuclear magnetic resonance and re nuclear quadrupole resonance.

    PubMed

    Vyaselev, O; Arai, K; Kobayashi, K; Yamazaki, J; Kodama, K; Takigawa, M; Hanawa, M; Hiroi, Z

    2002-07-01

    We report Cd nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and Re nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) studies on Cd(2)Re(2)O(7), the first superconductor among pyrochlore oxides (T(c) approximately 1 K). The Re NQR spectrum at zero magnetic field below 100 K rules out any magnetic or charge order. The spin-lattice relaxation rate below T(c) exhibits a pronounced coherence peak and follows the weak-coupling BCS theory with nearly isotropic energy gap. The results of Cd NMR point to a moderate ferromagnetic enhancement at high temperatures followed by a rapid decrease of the density of states below the structural transition temperature of 200 K.

  2. Complete assignment of the 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum of French bean plastocyanin. Application of an integrated approach to spin system identification in proteins.

    PubMed

    Chazin, W J; Rance, M; Wright, P E

    1988-08-05

    The identification of the spin systems that comprise the 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum of French bean Cu(I) plastocyanin (Mr 10,600) has been made using an approach that integrates a wide range of two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance experiments. A very large percentage of these assignments has been obtained in spectra acquired from 1H2O solution using a backbone amide-based strategy. The spin systems of 91 of the 99 residues have been assigned to the appropriate amino acid, thereby providing an ample basis for obtaining sequence-specific assignments, as described in the accompanying paper.

  3. Nuclear magnetic resonance dephasing effects in a spherical pore with a magnetic dipolar field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valckenborg, R. M. E.; Huinink, H. P.; Kopinga, K.

    2003-02-01

    The NMR dephasing behavior of the nuclear spins of a fluid confined in a porous material can be investigated by Hahn spin echoes. Previous experimental results on water in a magnetically doped clay have shown a nonmonoexponentially decaying magnetization, which can be understood neither by the known dephasing rate of freely diffusing spins in a uniform gradient nor by spins diffusing in a restricted geometry. For a better understanding of NMR measurements on these systems, a systematic survey was performed of the various length scales that are involved. The standard length scales for the situation of a uniform gradient are diffusing length, structure length, and dephasing length. We show that for a nonuniform gradient, a new length scale has to be introduced: the magnetic-field curvature length. When a particle diffuses less than this length scale, it experiences a local uniform gradient. In that case the spin-echo decay can be described by the so-called local gradient approximation (LGA). When a particle diffuses over a longer distance than the structure length, the spin-echo decay can be described by the motional averaging regime. For both regimes, scaling laws are derived. In this paper, a random-walk model is used to simulate the dephasing effect of diffusing spins in a spherical pore in the presence of a magnetic dipole field. By varying the dipole magnitude, situations can be created in which the dephasing behavior scales according to the motional averaging regime or according to the LGA regime, for certain ranges of echo times. Two model systems are investigated: a spherical pore in the vicinity of a magnetic point dipole and a spherical pore adjacent to a magnetic dipolar grain of the same size as the pore. The simulated magnetization decay curves of both model systems confirm the scaling laws. The LGA, characterized by a nonmonoexponential magnetization decay, is also investigated by calculating the spatially resolved magnetization in the pore. For this

  4. Nuclear forward scattering of synchrotron radiation in pulsed high magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Strohm, C; Van der Linden, P; Rüffer, R

    2010-02-26

    We report the demonstration of nuclear forward scattering of synchrotron radiation from 57Fe in ferromagnetic alpha iron in pulsed high magnetic fields up to 30 T. The observed magnetic hyperfine field follows the calculated high field bulk magnetization within 1%, establishing the technique as a precise tool for the study of magnetic solids in very high magnetic fields. To perform these experiments in pulsed fields, we have developed a detection scheme for fully time resolved nuclear forward scattering applicable to other pump probe experiments.

  5. Integrated Geophysical Measurements for Bioremediation Monitoring: Combining Spectral Induced Polarization, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Magnetic Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Keating, Kristina; Slater, Lee; Ntarlagiannis, Dimitris; Williams, Kenneth H.

    2015-02-24

    This documents contains the final report for the project "Integrated Geophysical Measurements for Bioremediation Monitoring: Combining Spectral Induced Polarization, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Magnetic Methods" (DE-SC0007049) Executive Summary: Our research aimed to develop borehole measurement techniques capable of monitoring subsurface processes, such as changes in pore geometry and iron/sulfur geochemistry, associated with remediation of heavy metals and radionuclides. Previous work has demonstrated that geophysical method spectral induced polarization (SIP) can be used to assess subsurface contaminant remediation; however, SIP signals can be generated from multiple sources limiting their interpretation value. Integrating multiple geophysical methods, such as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic susceptibility (MS), with SIP, could reduce the ambiguity of interpretation that might result from a single method. Our research efforts entails combining measurements from these methods, each sensitive to different mineral forms and/or mineral-fluid interfaces, providing better constraints on changes in subsurface biogeochemical processes and pore geometries significantly improving our understanding of processes impacting contaminant remediation. The Rifle Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site was used as a test location for our measurements. The Rifle IFRC site is located at a former uranium ore-processing facility in Rifle, Colorado. Leachate from spent mill tailings has resulted in residual uranium contamination of both groundwater and sediments within the local aquifer. Studies at the site include an ongoing acetate amendment strategy, native microbial populations are stimulated by introduction of carbon intended to alter redox conditions and immobilize uranium. To test the geophysical methods in the field, NMR and MS logging measurements were collected before, during, and after acetate amendment. Next, laboratory NMR, MS, and SIP measurements

  6. Correlated biofilm imaging, transport and metabolism measurements via combined nuclear magnetic resonance and confocal microscopy

    PubMed Central

    McLean, Jeffrey S; Ona, Ositadinma N; Majors, Paul D

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms are complex, three-dimensional communities found nearly everywhere in nature and are also associated with many human diseases. Detailed metabolic information is critical to understand and exploit beneficial biofilms as well as combat antibiotic-resistant, disease-associated forms. However, most current techniques used to measure temporal and spatial metabolite profiles in these delicate structures are invasive or destructive. Here, we describe imaging, transport and metabolite measurement methods and their correlation for live, non-invasive monitoring of biofilm processes. This novel combination of measurements is enabled by the use of an integrated nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM). NMR methods provide macroscopic structure, metabolic pathway and rate data, spatially resolved metabolite concentrations and water diffusion profiles within the biofilm. In particular, current depth-resolved spectroscopy methods are applied to detect metabolites in 140–190 nl volumes within biofilms of the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 and the oral bacterium implicated in caries disease, Streptococcus mutans strain UA159. The perfused sample chamber also contains a transparent optical window allowing for the collection of complementary fluorescence information using a unique, in-magnet CLSM. In this example, the entire three-dimensional biofilm structure was imaged using magnetic resonance imaging. This was then correlated to a fluorescent CLSM image by employing a green fluorescent protein reporter construct of S. oneidensis. Non-invasive techniques such as described here, which enable measurements of dynamic metabolic processes, especially in a depth-resolved fashion, are expected to advance our understanding of processes occurring within biofilm communities. PMID:18253132

  7. Nuclear spin conversion of water inside fullerene cages detected by low-temperature nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Mamone, Salvatore Concistrè, Maria; Carignani, Elisa; Meier, Benno; Krachmalnicoff, Andrea; Johannessen, Ole G.; Denning, Mark; Carravetta, Marina; Whitby, Richard J.; Levitt, Malcolm H.; Lei, Xuegong; Li, Yongjun; Goh, Kelvin; Horsewill, Anthony J.

    2014-05-21

    The water-endofullerene H{sub 2}O@C{sub 60} provides a unique chemical system in which freely rotating water molecules are confined inside homogeneous and symmetrical carbon cages. The spin conversion between the ortho and para species of the endohedral H{sub 2}O was studied in the solid phase by low-temperature nuclear magnetic resonance. The experimental data are consistent with a second-order kinetics, indicating a bimolecular spin conversion process. Numerical simulations suggest the simultaneous presence of a spin diffusion process allowing neighbouring ortho and para molecules to exchange their angular momenta. Cross-polarization experiments found no evidence that the spin conversion of the endohedral H{sub 2}O molecules is catalysed by {sup 13}C nuclei present in the cages.

  8. Nuclear spin conversion of water inside fullerene cages detected by low-temperature nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamone, Salvatore; Concistrè, Maria; Carignani, Elisa; Meier, Benno; Krachmalnicoff, Andrea; Johannessen, Ole G.; Lei, Xuegong; Li, Yongjun; Denning, Mark; Carravetta, Marina; Goh, Kelvin; Horsewill, Anthony J.; Whitby, Richard J.; Levitt, Malcolm H.

    2014-05-01

    The water-endofullerene H2O@C60 provides a unique chemical system in which freely rotating water molecules are confined inside homogeneous and symmetrical carbon cages. The spin conversion between the ortho and para species of the endohedral H2O was studied in the solid phase by low-temperature nuclear magnetic resonance. The experimental data are consistent with a second-order kinetics, indicating a bimolecular spin conversion process. Numerical simulations suggest the simultaneous presence of a spin diffusion process allowing neighbouring ortho and para molecules to exchange their angular momenta. Cross-polarization experiments found no evidence that the spin conversion of the endohedral H2O molecules is catalysed by 13C nuclei present in the cages.

  9. Four-dimensional flow magnetic resonance imaging in cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Stankovic, Zoran

    2016-01-01

    Since its introduction in the 1970’s, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become a standard imaging modality. With its broad and standardized application, it is firmly established in the clinical routine and an essential element in cardiovascular and abdominal imaging. In addition to sonography and computer tomography, MRI is a valuable tool for diagnosing cardiovascular and abdominal diseases, for determining disease severity, and for assessing therapeutic success. MRI techniques have improved over the last few decades, revealing not just morphologic information, but functional information about perfusion, diffusion and hemodynamics as well. Four-dimensional (4D) flow MRI, a time-resolved phase contrast-MRI with three-dimensional (3D) anatomic coverage and velocity encoding along all three flow directions has been used to comprehensively assess complex cardiovascular hemodynamics in multiple regions of the body. The technique enables visualization of 3D blood flow patterns and retrospective quantification of blood flow parameters in a region of interest. Over the last few years, 4D flow MRI has been increasingly performed in the abdominal region. By applying different acceleration techniques, taking 4D flow MRI measurements has dropped to a reasonable scanning time of 8 to 12 min. These new developments have encouraged a growing number of patient studies in the literature validating the technique’s potential for enhanced evaluation of blood flow parameters within the liver’s complex vascular system. The purpose of this review article is to broaden our understanding of 4D flow MRI for the assessment of liver hemodynamics by providing insights into acquisition, data analysis, visualization and quantification. Furthermore, in this article we highlight its development, focussing on the clinical application of the technique. PMID:26755862

  10. Four-dimensional flow magnetic resonance imaging in cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Stankovic, Zoran

    2016-01-07

    Since its introduction in the 1970's, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become a standard imaging modality. With its broad and standardized application, it is firmly established in the clinical routine and an essential element in cardiovascular and abdominal imaging. In addition to sonography and computer tomography, MRI is a valuable tool for diagnosing cardiovascular and abdominal diseases, for determining disease severity, and for assessing therapeutic success. MRI techniques have improved over the last few decades, revealing not just morphologic information, but functional information about perfusion, diffusion and hemodynamics as well. Four-dimensional (4D) flow MRI, a time-resolved phase contrast-MRI with three-dimensional (3D) anatomic coverage and velocity encoding along all three flow directions has been used to comprehensively assess complex cardiovascular hemodynamics in multiple regions of the body. The technique enables visualization of 3D blood flow patterns and retrospective quantification of blood flow parameters in a region of interest. Over the last few years, 4D flow MRI has been increasingly performed in the abdominal region. By applying different acceleration techniques, taking 4D flow MRI measurements has dropped to a reasonable scanning time of 8 to 12 min. These new developments have encouraged a growing number of patient studies in the literature validating the technique's potential for enhanced evaluation of blood flow parameters within the liver's complex vascular system. The purpose of this review article is to broaden our understanding of 4D flow MRI for the assessment of liver hemodynamics by providing insights into acquisition, data analysis, visualization and quantification. Furthermore, in this article we highlight its development, focussing on the clinical application of the technique.

  11. Towards a beyond 1 GHz solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance: External lock operation in an external current mode for a 500 MHz nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Masato; Ebisawa, Yusuke; Tennmei, Konosuke; Yanagisawa, Yoshinori; Hosono, Masami; Takasugi, Kenji; Hase, Takashi; Miyazaki, Takayoshi; Fujito, Teruaki; Nakagome, Hideki; Kiyoshi, Tsukasa; Yamazaki, Toshio; Maeda, Hideaki

    2012-10-01

    Achieving a higher magnetic field is important for solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). But a conventional low temperature superconducting (LTS) magnet cannot exceed 1 GHz (23.5 T) due to the critical magnetic field. Thus, we started a project to replace the Nb3Sn innermost coil of an existing 920 MHz NMR (21.6 T) with a Bi-2223 high temperature superconducting (HTS) innermost coil. Unfortunately, the HTS magnet cannot be operated in persistent current mode; an external dc power supply is required to operate the NMR magnet, causing magnetic field fluctuations. These fluctuations can be stabilized by a field-frequency lock system based on an external NMR detection coil. We demonstrate here such a field-frequency lock system in a 500 MHz LTS NMR magnet operated in an external current mode. The system uses a 7Li sample in a microcoil as external NMR detection system. The required field compensation is calculated from the frequency of the FID as measured with a frequency counter. The system detects the FID signal, determining the FID frequency, and calculates the required compensation coil current to stabilize the sample magnetic field. The magnetic field was stabilized at 0.05 ppm/3 h for magnetic field fluctuations of around 10 ppm. This method is especially effective for a magnet with large magnetic field fluctuations. The magnetic field of the compensation coil is relatively inhomogeneous in these cases and the inhomogeneity of the compensation coil can be taken into account.

  12. Study of natural diamonds by dynamic nuclear polarization-enhanced 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhou, J; Li, L; Hu, H; Yang, B; Dan, Z; Qiu, J; Guo, J; Chen, F; Ye, C

    1994-11-01

    The results of a study of two types of natural-diamond crystals by dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP)-enhanced high-resolution solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) are reported. The home-built DNP magic-angle spinning (MAS) 13C NMR spectrometer operates at 54 GHz for electrons and 20.2 MHz for carbons. The power of the microwave source was about 30 W and the highest DNP enhancement factor came near to 10(3). It was shown that in the MAS spectra the 13C NMR linewidths of the Ib-type diamond were broader than those of IaB3-type diamond. From the hyperfine structure of the DNP enhancement as a function of frequency, four kinds of nitrogen-centred and one kind of carbon-centred free radicals could be identified in the Ib-type diamond. The hyperfine structures of the DNP enhancement curve that originated from the anisotropic hyperfine interaction between electron and nuclei could be partially averaged out by MAS. The 13C polarization time of DNP was rather long, i.e. 1500 s, and the spin-lattice relaxation time (without microwave irradiation) was about 300 s, which was somewhat shorter than anticipated. Discussions on these experimental results have been made in this report.

  13. Nuclear magnetic resonance experiments with dc SQUID amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Heaney, M.B. . Dept. of Physics Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA )

    1990-11-01

    The development and fabrication of dc SQUIDs (Superconducting QUantum Interference Devices) with Nb/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Nb Josephson junctions is described. A theory of the dc SQUID as a radio-frequency amplifier is presented, with an optimization strategy that accounts for the loading and noise contributions of the postamplifier and maximizes the signal-to-noise ratio of the total system. The high sensitivity of the dc SQUID is extended to high field NMR. A dc SQUID is used as a tuned radio-frequency amplifier to detect pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance at 32 MHz from a metal film in a 3.5 Tesla static field. A total system noise temperature of 11 K has been achieved, at a bath temperature of 4.2 K. The minimum number of nuclear Bohr magnetons observable from a free precession signal after a single pulse is about 2 {times} 10{sup 17} in a bandwidth of 25 kHz. In a separate experiment, a dc SQUID is used as a rf amplifier in a NQR experiment to observe a new resonance response mechanism. The net electric polarization of a NaClO{sub 3} crystal due to the precessing electric quadrupole moments of the Cl nuclei is detected at 30 MHz. The sensitivity of NMR and NQR spectrometers using dc SQUID amplifiers is compared to the sensitivity of spectrometers using conventional rf amplifiers. A SQUID-based spectrometer has a voltage sensitivity which is comparable to the best achieved by a FET-based spectrometer, at these temperatures and operating frequencies.

  14. /sup 13/C nuclear magnetic resonance studies of cardiac metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Seeholzer, S.H.

    1985-01-01

    The last decade has witnessed the increasing use of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) techniques for following the metabolic fate of compounds specifically labeled with /sup 13/C. The goals of the present study are: (1) to develop reliable quantitative procedures for measuring the /sup 13/C enrichment of specific carbon sites in compounds enriched by the metabolism of /sup 13/C-labeled substrates in rat heart, and (2) to use these quantitative measurements of fractional /sup 13/C enrichment within the context of a mathematical flux model describing the carbon flow through the TCA cycle and ancillary pathways, as a means for obtaining unknown flux parameters. Rat hearts have been perfused in vitro with various combinations of glucose, acetate, pyruvate, and propionate to achieve steady state flux conditions, followed by perfusion with the same substrates labeled with /sup 13/C in specific carbon sites. The hearts were frozen at different times after addition of /sup 13/C-labeled substrates and neutralized perchloric acid extracts were used to obtain high resolution proton-decoupled /sup 13/C NMR spectra at 90.55 MHz. The fractional /sup 13/C enrichment (F.E.) of individual carbon sites in different metabolites was calculated from the area of the resolved resonances after correction for saturation and nuclear Overhauser effects. These F.E. measurements by /sup 13/C NMR were validated by the analysis of /sup 13/C-/sup 1/H scalar coupling patterns observed in /sup 1/H NMR spectra of the extracted metabolites. The results obtained from perfusion of hearts glucose plus either (2-/sup 13/C) acetate or (3-/sup 13/C) pyruvate are similar to those obtained by previous investigators using /sup 14/C-labeled substrates.

  15. Low-temperature nuclear magnetic resonance investigation of systems frustrated by competing exchange interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Beas

    This doctoral thesis emphasizes on the study of frustrated systems which form a very interesting class of compounds in physics. The technique used for the investigation of the magnetic properties of the frustrated materials is Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR). NMR is a very novel tool for the microscopic study of the spin systems. NMR enables us to investigate the local magnetic properties of any system exclusively. The NMR experiments on the different systems yield us knowledge of the static as well as the dynamic behavior of the electronic spins. Frustrated systems bear great possibilities of revelation of new physics through the new ground states they exhibit. The vandates AA'VO(PO4)2 [AA' ≡ Zn2 and BaCd] are great prototypes of the J1-J2 model which consists of magnetic ions sitting on the corners of a square lattice. Frustration is caused by the competing nearest-neighbor (NN) and next-nearest neighbor (NNN) exchange interactions. The NMR investigation concludes a columnar antiferromagnetic (AFM) state for both the compounds from the sharp peak of the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate (1/T1) and a sudden broadening of the 31P-NMR spectrum. The important conclusion from our study is the establishment of the first H-P-T phase diagram of BaCdVO(PO4)2. Application of high pressure reduces the saturation field (HS) in BaCdVO(PO4)2 and decreases the ratio J2/J1, pushing the system more towards a questionable boundary (a disordered ground state) between the columnar AFM and a ferromagnetic ground state. A pressure up to 2.4 GPa will completely suppress HS. The Fe ions in the `122' iron-arsenide superconductors also sit on a square lattice thus closely resembling the J1-J2 model. The 75As-NMR and Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) experiments are conducted in the compound CaFe2As2 prepared by two different heat treatment methods (`as-grown' and `annealed'). Interestingly the two samples show two different ground states. While the ground state of the `as

  16. Limestones distinguished by magnetic hysteresis in three-dimensional projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borradaile, G. J.; Hamilton, Tom

    2003-09-01

    Magnetic hysteresis data determine the suitability of rocks for paleomagnetic work, provide clues to paleo-environment and paleo-climate and they may characterize depositional environments for limestones. However, the variables chosen for conventional two-dimensional hysteresis plots, such as that of Day et al. [1977], are not always suitable to discriminate between samples. Distinguishing samples by their regression surfaces in 3D hysteresis space may be more successful in some cases [Borradaile and Lagroix, 2000] but a 2D projection with a less arbitrary viewing axis is preferable for routine reporting. We show that limestone samples are simply discriminated in a new 2D projection produced by projecting hysteresis data from three dimensions (x, y, z = Mr/Ms, Bcr, Bc) onto a plane containing the Mr/Ms axis. The orientation of the plane is controlled by its x-axis that is defined by a suitably selected Bcr/Bc ratio, most often in the magnetite PSD range, 2< (Bcr/Bc) < 4.

  17. Magnetic excitations of a doped two-dimensional antiferromagnet

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, A. ); Schreiber, M. )

    1993-09-01

    Magnetic excitations of the two-dimensional (2D) [ital t]-[ital J] model are considered in the presence of a small concentration of holes [ital c]. The spin-wave approximation used implies long-range antiferromagnetic ordering from the beginning. Migdal's theorem is shown to be valid for the model considered. The energy spectrum of the magnons is determined with the help of the one-pole approximation for the hole Green's function. If the concentration of mobile holes is larger than a critical value an additional branch of overdamped magnons arises near the [Gamma] and [ital M] points of the Brillouin zone. This is connected with the generation of electron-hole pairs (the Stoner excitations) by magnons. The appearance of such excitations means the destruction of the long-range antiferromagnetic order. For parameters presumably realized in cuprate perovskites this happens for several percent of holes per site. The relation between the critical concentration and the hole concentration destroying the 3D long-range ordering in La[sub 2[minus][ital x

  18. Advances in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance for Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Powers, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Background Drug discovery is a complex and unpredictable endeavor with a high failure rate. Current trends in the pharmaceutical industry have exasperated these challenges and are contributing to the dramatic decline in productivity observed over the last decade. The industrialization of science by forcing the drug discovery process to adhere to assembly-line protocols is imposing unnecessary restrictions, such as short project time-lines. Recent advances in nuclear magnetic resonance are responding to these self-imposed limitations and are providing opportunities to increase the success rate of drug discovery. Objective/Method A review of recent advancements in NMR technology that have the potential of significantly impacting and benefiting the drug discovery process will be presented. These include fast NMR data collection protocols and high-throughput protein structure determination, rapid protein-ligand co-structure determination, lead discovery using fragment-based NMR affinity screens, NMR metabolomics to monitor in vivo efficacy and toxicity for lead compounds, and the identification of new therapeutic targets through the functional annotation of proteins by FAST-NMR. Conclusion NMR is a critical component of the drug discovery process, where the versatility of the technique enables it to continually expand and evolve its role. NMR is expected to maintain this growth over the next decade with advancements in automation, speed of structure calculation, in-cell imaging techniques, and the expansion of NMR amenable targets. PMID:20333269

  19. Updated methodology for nuclear magnetic resonance characterization of shales

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Washburn, Kathryn E.; Birdwell, Justin E.

    2013-01-01

    Unconventional petroleum resources, particularly in shales, are expected to play an increasingly important role in the world’s energy portfolio in the coming years. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), particularly at low-field, provides important information in the evaluation of shale resources. Most of the low-field NMR analyses performed on shale samples rely heavily on standard T1 and T2 measurements. We present a new approach using solid echoes in the measurement of T1 and T1–T2 correlations that addresses some of the challenges encountered when making NMR measurements on shale samples compared to conventional reservoir rocks. Combining these techniques with standard T1 and T2 measurements provides a more complete assessment of the hydrogen-bearing constituents (e.g., bitumen, kerogen, clay-bound water) in shale samples. These methods are applied to immature and pyrolyzed oil shale samples to examine the solid and highly viscous organic phases present during the petroleum generation process. The solid echo measurements produce additional signal in the oil shale samples compared to the standard methodologies, indicating the presence of components undergoing homonuclear dipolar coupling. The results presented here include the first low-field NMR measurements performed on kerogen as well as detailed NMR analysis of highly viscous thermally generated bitumen present in pyrolyzed oil shale.

  20. Water Permeability of Chlorella Cell Membranes by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Stout, Darryl G.; Steponkus, Peter L.; Bustard, Larry D.; Cotts, Robert M.

    1978-01-01

    Measurement by two nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques of the mean residence time τa of water molecules inside Chlorella vulgaris (Beijerinck) var. “viridis” (Chodot) is reported. The first is the Conlon and Outhred (1972 Biochim Biophys Acta 288: 354-361) technique in which extracellular water is doped with paramagnetic Mn2+ ions. Some complications in application of this technique are identified as being caused by the affinity of Chlorella cell walls for Mn2+ ions which shortens the NMR relaxation times of intra- and extracellular water. The second is based upon observations of effects of diffusion on the spin echo of intra- and extracellular water. Echo attenuation of intracellular water is distinguished from that of extracellular water by the extent to which diffusive motion is restricted. Intracellular water, being restricted to the cell volume, suffers less echo attenuation. From the dependence of echo amplitude upon gradient strength at several values of echo time, the mean residence time of intracellular water can be determined. From the mean residence time of intracellular water, the diffusional water permeability coefficient of the Chlorella membrane is calculated to be 2.1 ± 0.4 × 10−3 cm sec−1. PMID:16660456

  1. Updated methodology for nuclear magnetic resonance characterization of shales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washburn, Kathryn E.; Birdwell, Justin E.

    2013-08-01

    Unconventional petroleum resources, particularly in shales, are expected to play an increasingly important role in the world's energy portfolio in the coming years. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), particularly at low-field, provides important information in the evaluation of shale resources. Most of the low-field NMR analyses performed on shale samples rely heavily on standard T1 and T2 measurements. We present a new approach using solid echoes in the measurement of T1 and T1-T2 correlations that addresses some of the challenges encountered when making NMR measurements on shale samples compared to conventional reservoir rocks. Combining these techniques with standard T1 and T2 measurements provides a more complete assessment of the hydrogen-bearing constituents (e.g., bitumen, kerogen, clay-bound water) in shale samples. These methods are applied to immature and pyrolyzed oil shale samples to examine the solid and highly viscous organic phases present during the petroleum generation process. The solid echo measurements produce additional signal in the oil shale samples compared to the standard methodologies, indicating the presence of components undergoing homonuclear dipolar coupling. The results presented here include the first low-field NMR measurements performed on kerogen as well as detailed NMR analysis of highly viscous thermally generated bitumen present in pyrolyzed oil shale.

  2. Distinguishing Carbonate Reservoir Pore Facies with Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Genty, Coralie; Jensen, Jerry L. Ahr, Wayne M.

    2007-03-15

    Characterization of carbonate rocks may involve identifying the important pore types which are present. In the past, this task has required detailed petrographic analysis of many core samples. Here, we describe a method which uses nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements to reduce the amount of petrographic analysis needed for porosity typing of carbonate reservoir rocks.For a rock sample which has been measured with NMR, our method decomposes the log(T{sub 2}) spectrum into at most three Gaussian-shaped components and gives a set of nine parameters. Two characteristic quantities having geological significance are extracted from the nine parameters. Values of the two quantities are compared with a reference set, established from samples having both NMR and petrographic evaluations of porosity types. We use a Bayesian approach to the classification of the dominant porosity type.Tests of our method on 103 samples show a correct prediction in 60 to 90 percent of the samples. The lower success rate was obtained for samples with five porosity types from three fields; the higher success rate obtained with samples with three porosity types from one well. The use of geologically significant quantities extracted from the decomposition gives comparable success rate to those obtained using a standard, non-geological approach such as canonical variates.

  3. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy-Based Identification of Yeast.

    PubMed

    Himmelreich, Uwe; Sorrell, Tania C; Daniel, Heide-Marie

    2017-01-01

    Rapid and robust high-throughput identification of environmental, industrial, or clinical yeast isolates is important whenever relatively large numbers of samples need to be processed in a cost-efficient way. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy generates complex data based on metabolite profiles, chemical composition and possibly on medium consumption, which can not only be used for the assessment of metabolic pathways but also for accurate identification of yeast down to the subspecies level. Initial results on NMR based yeast identification where comparable with conventional and DNA-based identification. Potential advantages of NMR spectroscopy in mycological laboratories include not only accurate identification but also the potential of automated sample delivery, automated analysis using computer-based methods, rapid turnaround time, high throughput, and low running costs.We describe here the sample preparation, data acquisition and analysis for NMR-based yeast identification. In addition, a roadmap for the development of classification strategies is given that will result in the acquisition of a database and analysis algorithms for yeast identification in different environments.

  4. Nuclear magnetic resonance proton imaging of bone pathology

    SciTech Connect

    Atlan, H.; Sigal, R.; Hadar, H.; Chisin, R.; Cohen, I.; Lanir, A.; Soudry, M.; Machtey, Y.; Schreiber, R.; Benmair, J.

    1986-02-01

    Thirty-two patients with diversified pathology were examined with a supraconductive NMR imager using spin echo with different TR and TE to obtain T1 and T2 weighted images. They included 20 tumors (12 primary, eight metastasis), six osteomyelitis, three fractures, two osteonecrosis, and one diffuse metabolic (Gaucher) disease. In all cases except for the stress fractures, the bone pathology was clearly visualized in spite of the normal lack of signal from the compact cortical bone. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging proved to be at least as sensitive as radionuclide scintigraphy but much more accurate than all other imaging procedures including computed tomography (CT) and angiography to assess the extension of the lesions, especially in tumors extended to soft tissue. This is due both to easy acquisition of sagittal and coronal sections and to different patterns of pathologic modifications of T1 and T2 which are beginning to be defined. It is hoped that more experience in clinical use of these patterns will help to discriminate between tumor extension and soft-tissue edema. We conclude that while radionuclide scintigraphy will probably remain the most sensitive and easy to perform screening test for bone pathology, NMR imaging, among noninvasive diagnostic procedures, appears to be at least as specific as CT. In addition, where the extension of the lesions is concerned, NMR imaging is much more informative than CT. In pathology of the spine, the easy visualization of the spinal cord should decrease the need for myelography.

  5. Nuclear magnetic resonance metabolomics of iron deficiency in soybean leaves.

    PubMed

    Lima, Marta R M; Diaz, Sílvia O; Lamego, Inês; Grusak, Michael A; Vasconcelos, Marta W; Gil, Ana M

    2014-06-06

    Iron (Fe) deficiency is an important agricultural concern that leads to lower yields and crop quality. A better understanding of the condition at the metabolome level could contribute to the design of strategies to ameliorate Fe-deficiency problems. Fe-sufficient and Fe-deficient soybean leaf extracts and whole leaves were analyzed by liquid (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and high-resolution magic-angle spinning NMR spectroscopy, respectively. Overall, 30 compounds were measurable and identifiable (comprising amino and organic acids, fatty acids, carbohydrates, alcohols, polyphenols, and others), along with 22 additional spin systems (still unassigned). Thus, metabolite differences between treatment conditions could be evaluated for different compound families simultaneously. Statistically relevant metabolite changes upon Fe deficiency included higher levels of alanine, asparagine/aspartate, threonine, valine, GABA, acetate, choline, ethanolamine, hypoxanthine, trigonelline, and polyphenols and lower levels of citrate, malate, ethanol, methanol, chlorogenate, and 3-methyl-2-oxovalerate. The data indicate that the main metabolic impacts of Fe deficiency in soybean include enhanced tricarboxylic acid cycle activity, enhanced activation of oxidative stress protection mechanisms and enhanced amino acid accumulation. Metabolites showing accumulation differences in Fe-starved but visually asymptomatic leaves could serve as biomarkers for early detection of Fe-deficiency stress.

  6. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of water content in the subsurface

    SciTech Connect

    J. Hendricks; T. Yao; A. Kearns

    1999-01-21

    Previous theoretical and experimental studies indicated that surface nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has the potential to provide cost-effective water content measurements in the subsurface and is a technology ripe for exploitation in practice. The objectives of this investigation are (a) to test the technique under a wide range of hydrogeological conditions and (b) to generalize existing NMR theories in order to correctly model NMR response from conductive ground and to assess properties of the inverse problem. Twenty-four sites with different hydrogeologic settings were selected in New Mexico and Colorado for testing. The greatest limitation of surface NMR technology appears to be the lack of understanding in which manner the NMR signal is influenced by soil-water factors such as pore size distribution, surface-to-volume ratio, paramagnetic ions dissolved in the ground water, and the presence of ferromagnetic minerals. Although the theoretical basis is found to be sound, several advances need to be made to make surface NMR a viable technology for hydrological investigations. There is a research need to investigate, under controlled laboratory conditions, how the complex factors of soil-water systems affect NMR relaxation times.

  7. Work in progress: nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of the gallbladder

    SciTech Connect

    Hricak, H.; Filly, R.A.; Margulis, A.R.; Moon, K.L.; Crooks, L.E.; Kaufman, L.

    1983-05-01

    A preliminary study of the relation between food intake and intensity of gallbladder bile on nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) images was made. Twelve subjects (seven volunteers, five patients) were imaged following a minimum of 14 hours of fasting. Six of seven volunteers were reimaged one hour after stimulation by either a fatty meal or an alcoholic beverage. An additional seven patients were imaged two hours after a hospital breakfast. It was found that concentrated bile emits a high-intensity spin echo signal (SE), while hepatic bile in the gallbladder produces a low-intensity SE signal. Following ingestion of cholecystogogue, dilute hepatic bile settles on top of the concentrated bile, each emitting SE signals of different intensity. The average T1 value of concentrated bile was 594 msec, while the T1 vaue of dilute hepatic bile was 2,646 msec. The average T2 values were 104 msec for concentrated bile and 126 msec for dilute bile. The most likely cause for the different SE intensities of bile is the higher water content, and therefore longer T1 or T2 relaxation times, of hepatic bile. It is suggested that NMR imaging has the ability to provide physiological information about the gallbladder and that it may prove to be a simple and safe clinical test of gallbladder function.

  8. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance studies on brain edema

    SciTech Connect

    Naruse, S.; Horikawa, Y.; Tanaka, C.; Hirakawa, K.; Nishikawa, H.; Yoshizaki, K.

    1982-06-01

    The water in normal and edematous brain tissues of rats was studied by the pulse nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique, measuring the longitudinal relaxation time (T1) and the transverse relaxation time (T2). In the normal brain, T1 and T2 were single components, both shorter than in pure water. Prolongation and separation of T2 into two components, one fast and one slow, were the characteristic findings in brain edema induced by both cold injury and triethyl tin (TET), although some differences between the two types of edema existed in the content of the lesion and in the degree of changes in T1 and T2 values. Quantitative analysis of T1 and T2 values in their time course relating to water content demonstrated that prolongation of T1 referred to the volume of increased water in tissues examined, and that two phases of T2 reflected the distribution and the content of the edema fluid. From the analysis of the slow component of T2 versus water content during edema formation, it was demonstrated that the increase in edema fluid was steady, and its content was constant during formation of TET-induced edema. On the contrary, during the formation of cold-injury edema, water-rich edema fluid increased during the initial few hours, and protein-rich edema fluid increased thereafter. It was concluded that proton NMR relaxation time measurements may provide new understanding in the field of brain edema research.

  9. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of the kidney: renal masses

    SciTech Connect

    Hricak, H.; Williams, R.D.; Moon, K.L. Jr.; Moss, A.A.; Alpers, C.; Crooks, L.E.; Kaufman, L.

    1983-06-01

    Fifteen patients with a variety of renal masses were examined by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), computed tomography, ultrasound, and intravenous urography. NMR clearly differentiated between simple renal cysts and other renal masses. On spin echo images, the simple renal cyst appeared as a round or slightly oval, homogeneous low-intensity mass with characteristically long T1 and T2 values. The thickness of the cyst wall was not measurable. The cyst had a smooth outer margin and a distict, sharp interface with normal parenchyma. Hemorrhagic cysts were seen as high-intensity lesions. Renal cell carcinomas displayed a wide range of intensity. The T1 and T2 values of the tumors were always different from those of the surrounding renal parenchyma. Tumor pseudocapsule was identified in four of five patients examined. All carcinomas were accurately staged by NMR and extension of the tumor thrombus into the inferior vena cava was demonstrated. The authors predict that if these preliminary results are confirmed by data from a larger number of patients, NMR will play a significant role in renal imaging.

  10. Monitoring iron mineralization processes using nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keating, Kristina

    Proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements can be used to probe the molecular-scale physical and chemical environment of water in the pore space of geological materials. In geophysics, NMR relaxation measurements are used in to measure water content and estimate permeability in the top 100 m of Earth's surface. The goal of the research presented in this thesis is to determine if NMR can also be used in geophysical applications to monitor iron mineralization processes associated with contaminant remediation. The first part of the research presented in this thesis focuses on understanding the effect of iron mineral form and redox state on the NMR relaxation response of water in geologic material. Laboratory NMR measurements were made on Fe(III)-bearing minerals (ferrihydrite, lepidocrocite, goethite, and hematite), Fe(II)-bearing minerals (siderite, pyrite, and troilite), and a mixed valence iron-bearing mineral (magnetite). The results of these measurements show that the relaxation rate of water is strongly dependent on the mineral form of iron. Shown in the final section of this thesis are results from an experiment exploring temporal changes in the measured NMR relaxation rates during the reaction of ferrihydrite with aqueous Fe(II). These results show that NMR can be used to monitor temporal chemical changes in iron minerals. I conclude that this research shows that NMR indeed has the potential to be used as a tool for monitoring geochemical reactions associated with contaminant remediation.

  11. Conformational characterization of ceramides by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Tang, Xiaoping; Taylor, K Grant; DuPré, Donald B; Yappert, M Cecilia

    2002-01-01

    Ceramide (Cer) has been identified as an active lipid second messenger in the regulation of cell growth, differentiation, and apoptosis. Its analog, dihydroceramide, without the 4 to 5 trans double bond in the sphingoid backbone lacks these biological effects. To establish the conformational features that distinguish ceramide from its analogs, nuclear magnetic resonance spectral data were acquired for diluted samples of ceramides (C2- and C18-Cer), dihydroceramide (C16-DHCer), and deoxydihydroceramide (C18-DODHCer). Our results suggest that in both C2- and C18-Cer, an H-bond network is formed in which the amide proton NH is donated to the OH groups on carbons C1 and C3 of the sphingosine backbone. Two tightly bound water molecules appear to stabilize this network by participating in flip-flop interactions with the hydroxyl groups. In DHCer, the lack of the trans double bond leads to a conformational distortion of this H-bonding motif. Without the critical double bond, the degree with which water molecules stabilize the H bonds between the two OH groups of the sphingolipid is reduced. This structural alteration might preclude the participation of DHCer in signaling-related interactions with cellular targets. PMID:11916863

  12. Multinuclear nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic study of cartilage proteoglycans

    SciTech Connect

    Lerner, L.

    1985-01-01

    Hyaline cartilage is a composite material whose major function is to withstand compression while retaining flexibility. Its mechanical properties are affected by tissue hydration and ionic composition. Models of the mechanical behavior of cartilage have incorporated certain assumptions about the interactions of the major components of cartilage: collagen, proteoglycans, water, and cations. To determine the validity of these assumption, the authors have used nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). Two approaches have been used: (a) natural abundance carbon-13 NMR; and (b) NMR of sodium-23, potassium-39, magnesium-25, and calcium-43. Evidence from studies in intact tissues are reinforced by extensive measurements on solutions of proteoglycans and other relevant macromolecules. Based on the measurements of NMR relaxation rates and lineshapes reported here, it is concluded that neither sodium nor potassium interact strongly with bovine nasal proteoglycan aggregates or their substituent glycosaminoglycan chains in solution. Proteoglycans do bind magnesium and calcium. Therefore there is a qualitative difference between monovalent and divalent cations, which is not taken into account by polyelectrolyte models or models for the ionic dependence of mechanical properties. Cation binding to heparin, which has a higher charge density than cartilage proteoglycans, was also studied. The results presented here establish that heparin binds sodium, magnesium, and calcium.

  13. Segmental Isotopic Labeling of Proteins for Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Dongsheng, Liu; Xu, Rong; Cowburn, David

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has emerged as one of the principle techniques of structural biology. It is not only a powerful method for elucidating the 3D structures under near physiological conditions, but also a convenient method for studying protein-ligand interactions and protein dynamics. A major drawback of macromolecular NMR is its size limitation caused by slower tumbling rates and greater complexity of the spectra as size increases. Segmental isotopic labeling allows specific segment(s) within a protein to be selectively examined by NMR thus significantly reducing the spectral complexity for large proteins and allowing a variety of solution-based NMR strategies to be applied. Two related approaches are generally used in the segmental isotopic labeling of proteins: expressed protein ligation and protein trans-splicing. Here we describe the methodology and recent application of expressed protein ligation and protein trans-splicing for NMR structural studies of proteins and protein complexes. We also describe the protocol used in our lab for the segmental isotopic labeling of a 50 kDa protein Csk (C-terminal Src Kinase) using expressed protein ligation methods. PMID:19632474

  14. Theoretical and experimental studies in nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roehrich, Adrienne M.

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a tool used to probe the physical and chemical environments of specific atoms in molecules. This research explored small molecule analogues to biological materials to determine NMR parameters using ab initio computations, comparing the results with solid-state NMR measurements. Models, such as dimethyl phosphate (DMP) for oligonucleotides or CuCl for the active site of the protein azurin, represented computationally unwieldy macromolecules. 31P chemical shielding tensors were calculated for DMP as a function of torsion angles, as well as for the phosphate salts, ammonium dihydrogen phosphate (ADHP), diammonium hydrogen phosphate, and magnesium dihydrogen phosphate. The computational DMP work indicated a problem with the current standard 31P reference of 85% H3PO 4(aq.). Comparison of the calculations and experimental spectra for the phosphate salts indicated ADHP might be a preferable alternative as a solid state NMR reference for 31P. Experimental work included magic angle spinning experiments on powder samples using the UNL chemistry department's Bruker Avance 600 MHz NMR to collect data to determine chemical shielding anisotropies. For the quadrupolar nuclei of copper and scandium, the electric field gradient was calculated in diatomic univalent metal halides, allowing determination of the minimal level of theory necessary to compute NMR parameters for these nuclei.

  15. Updated methodology for nuclear magnetic resonance characterization of shales.

    PubMed

    Washburn, Kathryn E; Birdwell, Justin E

    2013-08-01

    Unconventional petroleum resources, particularly in shales, are expected to play an increasingly important role in the world's energy portfolio in the coming years. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), particularly at low-field, provides important information in the evaluation of shale resources. Most of the low-field NMR analyses performed on shale samples rely heavily on standard T1 and T2 measurements. We present a new approach using solid echoes in the measurement of T1 and T1-T2 correlations that addresses some of the challenges encountered when making NMR measurements on shale samples compared to conventional reservoir rocks. Combining these techniques with standard T1 and T2 measurements provides a more complete assessment of the hydrogen-bearing constituents (e.g., bitumen, kerogen, clay-bound water) in shale samples. These methods are applied to immature and pyrolyzed oil shale samples to examine the solid and highly viscous organic phases present during the petroleum generation process. The solid echo measurements produce additional signal in the oil shale samples compared to the standard methodologies, indicating the presence of components undergoing homonuclear dipolar coupling. The results presented here include the first low-field NMR measurements performed on kerogen as well as detailed NMR analysis of highly viscous thermally generated bitumen present in pyrolyzed oil shale.

  16. A discussion of Bl conservation on a two dimensional magnetic field plane in watt balances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shisong; Zhao, Wei; Huang, Songling

    2016-05-01

    The watt balance is an experiment being pursued in national metrology institutes for precision determination of the Planck constant h. In watt balances, the 1/r magnetic field, expected to generate a geometrical factor Bl independent to any coil horizontal displacement, can be created by a strict two dimensional, symmetric (horizontal r and vertical z) construction of the magnet system. In this paper, we present an analytical understanding of magnetic field distribution when the r symmetry of the magnet is broken and the establishment of the Bl conservation is shown. By using either Gauss’s law on magnetism with monopoles or conformal transformations, we extend the Bl conservation to arbitrary two dimensional magnetic planes where the vertical magnetic field component equals zero. The generalized Bl conservation allows a relaxed physical alignment criteria for watt balance magnet systems.

  17. Changes of magnetization and entropy across the melting curve for a classical two-dimensional plasma in a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    March, N. H.; Capuzzi, P.; Tosi, M. P.

    2004-06-01

    Dubey and Gumbs have reported molecular-dynamics simulations for a two-dimensional, classical one-component plasma in the presence of a transverse magnetic field B. Here we combine their melting ( m) curve for temperature Tm vs. B with thermodynamics to gain insight into the changes in magnetization M and entropy S across the melting line as functions of applied field B. The magnetization of the Coulomb liquid plays a central role, and yet is entirely due to particle repulsions.

  18. Dynamic nuclear magnetic resonance field sensing with part-per-trillion resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, Simon; Barmet, Christoph; Dietrich, Benjamin E.; Brunner, David O.; Schmid, Thomas; Pruessmann, Klaas P.

    2016-12-01

    High-field magnets of up to tens of teslas in strength advance applications in physics, chemistry and the life sciences. However, progress in generating such high fields has not been matched by corresponding advances in magnetic field measurement. Based mostly on nuclear magnetic resonance, dynamic high-field magnetometry is currently limited to resolutions in the nanotesla range. Here we report a concerted approach involving tailored materials, magnetostatics and detection electronics to enhance the resolution of nuclear magnetic resonance sensing by three orders of magnitude. The relative sensitivity thus achieved amounts to 1 part per trillion (10-12). To exemplify this capability we demonstrate the direct detection and relaxometry of nuclear polarization and real-time recording of dynamic susceptibility effects related to human heart function. Enhanced high-field magnetometry will generally permit a fresh look at magnetic phenomena that scale with field strength. It also promises to facilitate the development and operation of high-field magnets.

  19. Dynamic nuclear magnetic resonance field sensing with part-per-trillion resolution.

    PubMed

    Gross, Simon; Barmet, Christoph; Dietrich, Benjamin E; Brunner, David O; Schmid, Thomas; Pruessmann, Klaas P

    2016-12-02

    High-field magnets of up to tens of teslas in strength advance applications in physics, chemistry and the life sciences. However, progress in generating such high fields has not been matched by corresponding advances in magnetic field measurement. Based mostly on nuclear magnetic resonance, dynamic high-field magnetometry is currently limited to resolutions in the nanotesla range. Here we report a concerted approach involving tailored materials, magnetostatics and detection electronics to enhance the resolution of nuclear magnetic resonance sensing by three orders of magnitude. The relative sensitivity thus achieved amounts to 1 part per trillion (10(-12)). To exemplify this capability we demonstrate the direct detection and relaxometry of nuclear polarization and real-time recording of dynamic susceptibility effects related to human heart function. Enhanced high-field magnetometry will generally permit a fresh look at magnetic phenomena that scale with field strength. It also promises to facilitate the development and operation of high-field magnets.

  20. Dynamic nuclear magnetic resonance field sensing with part-per-trillion resolution

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Simon; Barmet, Christoph; Dietrich, Benjamin E.; Brunner, David O.; Schmid, Thomas; Pruessmann, Klaas P.

    2016-01-01

    High-field magnets of up to tens of teslas in strength advance applications in physics, chemistry and the life sciences. However, progress in generating such high fields has not been matched by corresponding advances in magnetic field measurement. Based mostly on nuclear magnetic resonance, dynamic high-field magnetometry is currently limited to resolutions in the nanotesla range. Here we report a concerted approach involving tailored materials, magnetostatics and detection electronics to enhance the resolution of nuclear magnetic resonance sensing by three orders of magnitude. The relative sensitivity thus achieved amounts to 1 part per trillion (10−12). To exemplify this capability we demonstrate the direct detection and relaxometry of nuclear polarization and real-time recording of dynamic susceptibility effects related to human heart function. Enhanced high-field magnetometry will generally permit a fresh look at magnetic phenomena that scale with field strength. It also promises to facilitate the development and operation of high-field magnets. PMID:27910860

  1. New Approaches to Quantum Computing using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Colvin, M; Krishnan, V V

    2003-02-07

    The power of a quantum computer (QC) relies on the fundamental concept of the superposition in quantum mechanics and thus allowing an inherent large-scale parallelization of computation. In a QC, binary information embodied in a quantum system, such as spin degrees of freedom of a spin-1/2 particle forms the qubits (quantum mechanical bits), over which appropriate logical gates perform the computation. In classical computers, the basic unit of information is the bit, which can take a value of either 0 or 1. Bits are connected together by logic gates to form logic circuits to implement complex logical operations. The expansion of modern computers has been driven by the developments of faster, smaller and cheaper logic gates. As the size of the logic gates become smaller toward the level of atomic dimensions, the performance of such a system is no longer considered classical but is rather governed by quantum mechanics. Quantum computers offer the potentially superior prospect of solving computational problems that are intractable to classical computers such as efficient database searches and cryptography. A variety of algorithms have been developed recently, most notably Shor's algorithm for factorizing long numbers into prime factors in polynomial time and Grover's quantum search algorithm. The algorithms that were of only theoretical interest as recently, until several methods were proposed to build an experimental QC. These methods include, trapped ions, cavity-QED, coupled quantum dots, Josephson junctions, spin resonance transistors, linear optics and nuclear magnetic resonance. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is uniquely capable of constructing small QCs and several algorithms have been implemented successfully. NMR-QC differs from other implementations in one important way that it is not a single QC, but a statistical ensemble of them. Thus, quantum computing based on NMR is considered as ensemble quantum computing. In NMR quantum computing, the spins with

  2. Advances and applications of dynamic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Baltisberger, Jay Harvey

    1993-06-01

    This dissertation describes nuclear magnetic resonance experiments and theory which have been developed to study quadrupolar nuclei (those nuclei with spin greater than one-half) in the solid state. Primarily, the technique of dynamic-angle spinning (DAS) is extensively reviewed and expanded upon in this thesis. Specifically, the improvement in both the resolution (two-dimensional pure-absorptive phase methods and DAS angle choice) and sensitivity (pulse-sequence development), along with effective spinning speed enhancement (again through choice of DAS conditions or alternative multiple pulse schemes) of dynamic-angle spinning experiment was realized with both theory and experimental examples. The application of DAS to new types of nuclei (specifically the {sup 87}Rb and {sup 85}Rb nuclear spins) and materials (specifically amorphous solids) has also greatly expanded the possibilities of the use of DAS to study a larger range of materials. This dissertation is meant to demonstrate both recent advances and applications of the DAS technique, and by no means represents a comprehensive study of any particular chemical problem.

  3. Nuclear magnetic resonance zeugmatographic imaging of the heart: application to the study of ventricular septal defect. [Lambs

    SciTech Connect

    Heneghan, M.A.; Biancaniello, T.M.; Heidel, E.; Peterson, S.B.; Marsh, M.J.; Lauterbur, P.C.

    1982-04-01

    The present work was undertaken to determine the applicability of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging to the study of congenital heart disease. Three-dimensional proton density images of preserved lamb hearts with and without an artificially created ventricular septal defect were reconstructed and displayed in multiple planes. Sections obtained in the sagittal plane through the ventricular septum clearly showed the size, shape, and location of the defect. Results of these experiments suggest that NMR zeugmatography will become a valuable addition to existing imaging techniques for the study of congenital heart disease.

  4. Coexistence of Incommensurate Magnetism and Superconductivity in the Two-Dimensional Hubbard Model.

    PubMed

    Yamase, Hiroyuki; Eberlein, Andreas; Metzner, Walter

    2016-03-04

    We analyze the competition of magnetism and superconductivity in the two-dimensional Hubbard model with a moderate interaction strength, including the possibility of incommensurate spiral magnetic order. Using an unbiased renormalization group approach, we compute magnetic and superconducting order parameters in the ground state. In addition to previously established regions of Néel order coexisting with d-wave superconductivity, the calculations reveal further coexistence regions where superconductivity is accompanied by incommensurate magnetic order.

  5. Three-dimensional dynamics of relativistic flows in pair plasmas with force-free magnetic configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Jun-Ichi; Matsuo, Akira

    2004-06-01

    Dynamics of the relativistic flow in pair plasmas with force-free magnetic configuration is investigated by using a three-dimensional fully relativistic electromagnetic particle-in-cell code. This study is an extension of the work by Haruki and Sakai [Phys. Plasmas 8, 1538 (2001)] that was done in a two-dimensional force-free magnetic configuration. They found that during the early stage of the interaction there occurs the streaming instability, which induces the electromagnetic perturbations associated with generation of quasi-static magnetic field. In the nonlinear stage the force-free magnetic field becomes unstable against the firehose instability and then magnetic islands are formed through magnetic reconnection. The dissipated magnetic field energy is converted to the plasma heating as well as the high-energy particle production. It is found that the three-dimensional configuration could result in completely different dynamics, except for the initial phase where the streaming instability develops. It is also found that the dynamical interaction between the force-free magnetic configuration and the relativistic plasma flows develops sequentially through four different physical processes: (I) The phase of streaming instability, (II) the phase of magnetic reconnection triggered by the first streaming instability, (III) the phase of Alfvén wave excitation through the magnetic reconnection process, and (IV) the phase of dissipation of the Alfvén waves through the magnetic reconnection. It is shown that three-dimensional Alfvén waves with helical magnetic structures can be excited through complicated three-dimensional tearing instability triggered from the streaming instability. During these dynamical processes the pair plasma can be heated through the magnetic reconnection and also the high-energy particles are generated. The interaction process between the force-free collisionless plasmas and the relativistic plasma flows may play an important role for the

  6. Self-association of cromolyn sodium in aqueous solution characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xuan; Stringfellow, Thomas C; Robinson, Joseph R

    2004-05-01

    The major objective of this study was to investigate and characterize the solution properties of cromolyn sodium (in D(2)O or D(2)O/H(2)O phosphate buffer at pH 7.5) using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The self-association of cromolyn molecules was examined primarily via one-dimensional (1)H and (13)C, and two-dimensional homonuclear NOESY NMR. Significant spectral shifts were observed for a majority of cromolyn (1)H and (13)C resonances, and are attributed to inter-molecular ring-stacking association accompanied by intra-molecular conformational changes. The critical self-association concentration was determined to be 10 mg/mL at pH 7.5 and 25 degrees C by measuring the chemical shift of a specific cromolyn (1)H resonance. The observed magnitude and sign changes of NOESY correlations indicate the formation of cromolyn aggregates with restricted molecular mobility. Mesomorphic liquid crystal formation is suggested by uniformly pronounced line broadening in concentrated cromolyn solutions; the transition concentration was approximately 60 mg/mL at 25 degrees C, which is consistent with literature findings based on other techniques. A stronger tendency toward association was observed at lower temperature but aggregation appeared to be independent of pH. Lastly, it was concluded that self-association of cromolyn is promoted by the presence of monovalent cations as a result of reduced electrostatic repulsive forces.

  7. Two-dimensional stress—magnetization effects of grain-oriented silicon steel sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Akihiko; Murashige, Shinichi; Uehara, Yuji

    1994-05-01

    Changes in the magnetization vector due to tensile stress under a constant magnetic field for grain-oriented silicon-iron sheet strip samples cut at various angles from the rolling direction have been investigated. In a low magnetic field, where the magnetization is less than 1.5 T, the magnetization vector lies in the direction of the sample length and the magnetization decreases with the application of tension. Beyond that magnetic field, the magnetization vector showed a two-dimensional hysteresis loop due to the application of tension. The maximum transverse magnetization change appeared in a 10° sample, where the rotation angle of the magnetization vector was 2.5°.

  8. Development of a two-dimensional scanning micro-mirror utilizing magnetic polymer composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Junya; Onishi, Yoshiyuki; Terao, Kyohei; Takao, Hidekuni; Shimokawa, Fusao; Oohira, Fumikazu; Miyagawa, Hayato; Namazu, Takahiro; Suzuki, Takaaki

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we propose a magnetically driven micro-mirror, constructed using negative photoresist SU-8 containing magnetic particles, as a magnetic actuator and torsion bar structure. Because the magnetic polymer composite uses thick negative photoresist SU-8 as the main material, the micro-mirror is simply fabricated in just a few steps by conventional photolithography and deep reactive ion etching. A fabricated prototype of the micro-mirror, which is magnetically driven by using an external magnetic field, is shown to deflect with two-dimensional optical deflection angles of 6.5 and 12.5°. Moreover, Lissajous scanning motion of the fabricated mirror is achieved.

  9. Two-dimensional force-free magnetic fields described by some nonlinear equations

    SciTech Connect

    Khater, A. H.; Abdelkawy, M. A.; Callebaut, D. K.

    2010-12-15

    A force-free magnetic field arises as a special case in the magnetostatic equation in plasmas when only the magnetic energy density is relevant while all other energy densities are negligible and so only the magnetic pressure is considered. In this article, we find the exact solutions of two-dimensional force-free magnetic fields described by Liouville, sine, double sine, sinh-Poisson, and power force-free magnetic equations. We use the generalized tanh method. In all those cases, the ratio of the current density and the magnetic field is not constant as it happens, e.g., in the solar atmosphere.

  10. Three-dimensional finite element modeling of a magnet array spinning above a conductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorimer, W. L.; Lieu, D. K.; Hull, J. R.; Mulcahy, T. M.; Rossing, T. D.

    Drag forces due to eddy currents induced by the relative motion of a conductor and a magnetic field occur in many practical devices: motors, brakes, magnetic bearings, and magnetically levitated vehicles. Recently, finite element codes have included solvers for three dimensional eddy current geometries and have the potential to be very useful in the design and analysis of these devices. In this paper, numerical results from three dimensional modeling of a magnet array spinning above a conductor are compared to experimental results in order to assess the capabilities of these codes.

  11. Studies of Energy-Relevant Materials by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Jinfang

    In this thesis, we have used nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) as a local probe to microscopically study three different families of energy-relevant complex materials, namely the 122 Fe-based superconductors Ca(Fe1-xCox)2As2, GeTe-based thermoelectric tellurides GeTe and detonation nanodiamond. In Chapter 3 and Chapter 4, we investigated the Co substitution effects on static and dynamic magnetic properties of the single-crystalline Ca(Fe 1-xCox)2As2 (x = 0, 0.023, 0.028, 0.033, 0.059) via 75As NMR and resistivity measurements. Robustness of the Fe magnetic moments was evidenced by only slight decreases of Hint, although T N is strongly suppressed with Co substitution in antiferromagnetic (AFM) state. In the paramagnetic (PM) state, the temperature dependence of Knight shift K for all crystals shows similar T-dependence of magnetic susceptibility chi. The spin fluctuations with the q = 0 components are suppressed with Delta/k B. On the other hand, the growth of the stripe-type AFM fluctuations with q = (pi, 0) or (0, pi) upon cooling in the PM state for all samples is evidenced by the T-dependence of (1/ T1Tchi). A pseudogap-like phenomenon, i.e., suppression of the AFM spin fluctuations, was discovered with decreasing temperature below a x-independent characteristic temperature T* ( 100 K) in samples with x ≥ 0.028. In addition, clear evidence for the coexistence and competition of the stripe-type antiferromagnetic and ferromagnetic (FM) spin correlations was given by modified Korringa ratio analysis in Chapter 4. In Chapter 5, we have carried out 125Te NMR measurements to study the electronic properties of Ge50Te50, Ag 2Ge48Te50 and Sb2Ge48Te 50. NMR shift K and 1/T1T of Ge50Te50 are nearly temperature independent at T < 50 K and both increase slightly with increasing temperature at high temperatures. A two-band model, where one band overlaps the Fermi level and the other band is separated from the Fermi level by an energy gap, has been used to explain these

  12. Engineered water-soluble two-dimensional magnetic nanocomposites: towards highly magnetic relaxometric properties.

    PubMed

    Peng, Erwin; Wang, Fenghe; Zheng, Bingwen; Li, Sam Fong Yau; Xue, Jun Min

    2015-05-07

    Water dispersible two-dimensional magnetic nanocomposites are formed by phase-transferring hydrophobic manganese-doped ferrite nanoparticles (MFPs) into aqueous solvent using a one-step simple approach involving only graphene oxide (GO) as the phase transfer agent. The resultant hydrophilic magnetic nanocomposites (MFNs) are surprisingly stable in the aqueous phase despite its large hydrodynamic size (dhyd). Because of its unique construct that promotes water accessibility towards the MFP core, large MFNs loaded with an 18 nm MFP core (MFN-18; dhyd = 577.9 nm) exhibits transverse relaxivity (r2) up to ∼6.8 times (r2 = 800.8 mM [Mn + Fe](-1) s(-1)) higher than the typical individually coated MFP-18 with amphiphilic brush copolymers (r2 = 117.3 mM [Mn + Fe](-1) s(-1)). Meanwhile, the overall nanocomposites dhyd can be further reduced by employing a smaller pre-sonicated GO sheet phase transfer agent. As a result of using small GO sheets with enhanced hydrophilicity, the r2 of small MFN-18* nanocomposites (dhyd = 224.9 nm) increases by approximately 37% (r2 = 1097.4 mM [Mn + Fe](-1) s(-1)) as compared to larger MFN-18. From a simple comparative study among various magnetic nanocomposites involving a MFP-18 core, the high MFN-18 r2 relaxivity value can be attributed to enhanced water diffusion and exchange due to the GO sheet, allowing better interaction between magnetic the MFP core and water protons. The proposed method can be readily extended to convert other types of hydrophobic nanoparticles into water-dispersible nanocomposites.

  13. Nuclear magnetic resonance data of C2H10OSi2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhova, B. M.

    This document is part of Part 6 `Organic Metalloid Compounds' of Subvolume D 'Chemical Shifts and Coupling Constants for Carbon-13' of Landolt-Börnstein III/35 'Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Data', Group III 'Condensed Matter'.

  14. Nuclear magnetic resonance data of C8H24OSi4Te

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhova, B. M.

    This document is part of Part 6 `Organic Metalloid Compounds' of Subvolume D 'Chemical Shifts and Coupling Constants for Carbon-13' of Landolt-Börnstein III/35 'Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Data', Group III 'Condensed Matter'.

  15. Nuclear magnetic resonance of laser-polarized noble gases in molecules, materials and organisms

    SciTech Connect

    Goodson, Boyd McLean

    1999-12-01

    Conventional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are fundamentally challenged by the insensitivity that stems from the ordinarily low spin polarization achievable in even the strongest NMR magnets. However, by transferring angular momentum from laser light to electronic and nuclear spins, optical pumping methods can increase the nuclear spin polarization of noble gases by several orders of magnitude, thereby greatly enhancing their NMR sensitivity. This dissertation is primarily concerned with the principles and practice of optically pumped nuclear magnetic resonance (OPNMR). The enormous sensitivity enhancement afforded by optical pumping noble gases can be exploited to permit a variety of novel NMR experiments across many disciplines. Many such experiments are reviewed, including the void-space imaging of organisms and materials, NMR and MRI of living tissues, probing structure and dynamics of molecules in solution and on surfaces, and zero-field NMR and MRI.

  16. Respiratory Amplitude Guided 4-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Yanle; Caruthers, Shelton D.; Low, Daniel A.; Parikh, Parag J.; Mutic, Sasa

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of prospectively guiding 4-dimensional (4D) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) image acquisition using triggers at preselected respiratory amplitudes to achieve T{sub 2} weighting for abdominal motion tracking. Methods and Materials: A respiratory amplitude-based triggering system was developed and integrated into a commercial turbo spin echo MRI sequence. Initial feasibility tests were performed on healthy human study participants. Four respiratory states, the middle and the end of inhalation and exhalation, were used to trigger 4D MRI image acquisition of the liver. To achieve T{sub 2} weighting, the echo time and repetition time were set to 75 milliseconds and 4108 milliseconds, respectively. Single-shot acquisition, together with parallel imaging and partial k-space imaging techniques, was used to improve image acquisition efficiency. 4D MRI image sets composed of axial or sagittal slices were acquired. Results: Respiratory data measured and logged by the MRI scanner showed that the triggers occurred at the appropriate respiratory levels. Liver motion could be easily observed on both 4D MRI image datasets by sensing either the change of liver in size and shape (axial) or diaphragm motion (sagittal). Both 4D MRI image datasets were T{sub 2}-weighted as expected. Conclusions: This study demonstrated the feasibility of achieving T{sub 2}-weighted 4D MRI images using amplitude-based respiratory triggers. With the aid of the respiratory amplitude-based triggering system, the proposed method is compatible with most MRI sequences and therefore has the potential to improve tumor-tissue contrast in abdominal tumor motion imaging.

  17. Developing hyperpolarized krypton-83 for nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleveland, Zackary I.

    This dissertation discusses the production of highly nonequilibrium nuclear spin polarization, referred to as hyperpolarization or hp, in the nuclear spin I = 9/2 noble gas isotope krypton-83 using spin exchange optical pumping (SEOP). This nonequilibrium polarization yields nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals that are enhanced three or more orders of magnitude above those of thermally polarized krypton and enables experiments that would otherwise be impossible. Krypton-83 possesses a nuclear electric quadrupole moment that dominates the longitudinal (T1) relaxation due to coupling of the quadrupole moment to fluctuating electric field gradients generated by distortions to the spherical symmetry of the electronic environment. Relaxation slows polarization buildup and limits the maximum signal intensity but makes krypton-83 a sensitive probe of its environment. The gas-phase krypton-83 longitudinal relaxation rate increases linearly with total gas density due to binary collisions. Density independent relaxation, caused by the formation of krypton-krypton van der Waals molecules and surface adsorption, also contributes to the observed rate. Buffer gases suppress van der Waals molecule mediated relaxation by breaking apart the weakly bound krypton dimers. Surface relaxation is gas composition independent and therefore more difficult to suppress. However, this relaxation mechanism makes hp krypton-83 sensitive to important surface properties including surface-to-volume ratio, surface chemistry, and surface temperature. The presence of surfaces with high krypton adsorption affinities (i.e. hydrophobic surfaces) accelerates the relaxation times and can produce T1 contrast in hp krypton-83 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Tobacco smoke deposited on surfaces generates strong T1 contrast allowing the observation of smoke deposition with spatial resolution. Conversely, water adsorption on surfaces significantly lengths the T1 times due competitive surface adsorption

  18. Magnetic susceptibility and neutron diffraction experiments on nuclear ordering in copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jyrkkio, Teppo

    Experimental curves of entropy and susceptibility versus temperature for copper nuclear spins down to the ordered state were obtained. Impurities and anomalous spin-lattice relaxation in copper at submilli-Kelvin temperatures were observed. Phase diagrams for spontaneous nuclear ordering in copper were derived. Nuclear antiferromagnetic ordering in copper was investigated. The feasibility of neutron diffraction experiments on ordered copper nuclei at nano-Kelvin temperature was studied. Neutron scattering experiments on nuclear magnets were carried out. Calibration and applications of polarized neutron thermometry at milli- and micro-Kelvin temperatures is described.Observation of nuclear antiferromagnetic order in copper by neutron diffraction at nano-Kelvin temparatures is reported.

  19. Three-dimensional photogrammetric measurement of magnetic field lines in the WEGA stellarator.

    PubMed

    Drewelow, Peter; Bräuer, Torsten; Otte, Matthias; Wagner, Friedrich; Werner, Andreas

    2009-12-01

    The magnetic confinement of plasmas in fusion experiments can significantly degrade due to perturbations of the magnetic field. A precise analysis of the magnetic field in a stellarator-type experiment utilizes electrons as test particles following the magnetic field line. The usual fluorescent detector for this electron beam limits the provided information to two-dimensional cut views at certain toroidal positions. However, the technique described in this article allows measuring the three-dimensional structure of the magnetic field by means of close-range photogrammetry. After testing and optimizing the main diagnostic components, measurements of the magnetic field lines were accomplished with a spatial resolution of 5 mm. The results agree with numeric calculations, qualifying this technique as an additional tool to investigate magnetic field configurations in a stellarator. For a possible future application, ways are indicated on how to reduce experimental error sources.

  20. Nuclear Spin Maser at Highly Stabilized Low Magnetic Field and Search for Atomic EDM

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshimi, A.; Asahi, K.; Inoue, T.; Uchida, M.; Hatakeyama, N.; Tsuchiya, M.; Kagami, S.

    2009-08-04

    A nuclear spin maser is operated at a low static field through an active feedback scheme based on an optical nuclear spin detection and succeeding spin control by a transverse field application. The frequency stability of this optical-coupling spin maser is improved by installation of a low-noise current source for a solenoid magnet producing a static magnetic field in the maser operation. Experimental devices for application of the maser to EDM experiment are being developed.

  1. 3-dimensional modeling of transcranial magnetic stimulation: Design and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salinas, Felipe Santiago

    Over the past three decades, transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) has emerged as an effective tool for many research, diagnostic and therapeutic applications in humans. TMS delivers highly localized brain stimulations via non-invasive externally applied magnetic fields. This non-invasive, painless technique provides researchers and clinicians a unique tool capable of stimulating both the central and peripheral nervous systems. However, a complete analysis of the macroscopic electric fields produced by TMS has not yet been performed. In this dissertation, we present a thorough examination of the total electric field induced by TMS in air and a realistic head model with clinically relevant coil poses. In the first chapter, a detailed account of TMS coil wiring geometry was shown to provide significant improvements in the accuracy of primary E-field calculations. Three-dimensional models which accounted for the TMS coil's wire width, height, shape and number of turns clearly improved the fit of calculated-to-measured E-fields near the coil body. Detailed primary E-field models were accurate up to the surface of the coil body (within 0.5% of measured values) whereas simple models were often inadequate (up to 32% different from measured). In the second chapter, we addressed the importance of the secondary E-field created by surface charge accumulation during TMS using the boundary element method (BEM). 3-D models were developed using simple head geometries in order to test the model and compare it with measured values. The effects of tissue geometry, size and conductivity were also investigated. Finally, a realistic head model was used to assess the effect of multiple surfaces on the total E-field. We found that secondary E-fields have the greatest impact at areas in close proximity to each tissue layer. Throughout the head, the secondary E-field magnitudes were predominantly between 25% and 45% of the primary E-fields magnitude. The direction of the secondary E

  2. Electronic and magnetic properties of Fe and Mn doped two dimensional hexagonal germanium sheets

    SciTech Connect

    Soni, Himadri R. Jha, Prafulla K.

    2014-04-24

    Using first principles density functional theory calculations, the present paper reports systematic total energy calculations of the electronic properties such as density of states and magnetic moment of pristine and iron and manganese doped two dimensional hexagonal germanium sheets.

  3. Optically Pumped Nuclear Magnetic Resonance in the Quantum Hall Regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Sean E.

    1998-03-01

    Optical pumping enables the direct detection of the nuclear magnetic resonance signal of ^71Ga nuclei located in an electron doped GaAs quantum well.footnote S. E. Barrett et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 72, 1368 (1994) This OPNMR technique was previously used to measure the Knight shift (K_S)footnote S. E. Barrett et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 74, 5112 (1995) and spin-lattice relaxation time (T_1)footnote R. Tycko et al., Science 268, 1460 (1995) near Landau level filling ν=1, which provided the first experimental support for the theoretical predictionsfootnote S. L. Sondhi et al., Phys. Rev. B 47, 16419 (1993); H. A. Fertig et al., Phys. Rev. B 50, 11018 (1994) that the charged excitations of the ν = 1 ground state are novel spin textures called skyrmions. We have recently demonstrated that OPNMR is possible in fields up to B=12 Tesla, and temperatures down to T= 0.3 K, making it a viable new probe of the Fractional Quantum Hall Regime. In this talk we will present our latest OPNMR measurements near Landau level filling ν=1/3, which include the first direct measurement of the electron spin polarization at ν=1/3. The spin polarization drops as the filling factor is varied away from ν=1/3, indicating that the quasiparticles and quasiholes are not fully spin-polarized. We will also show how the NMR lineshape away from ν=1/3 changes dramatically at low temperatures, which is due to slowing of the electron dynamics, and a reduction in the motional narrowing of the NMR line. The current understanding of these results will be discussed.

  4. A Multidisciplinary Approach to High Throughput Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Pourmodheji, Hossein; Ghafar-Zadeh, Ebrahim; Magierowski, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is a non-contact, powerful structure-elucidation technique for biochemical analysis. NMR spectroscopy is used extensively in a variety of life science applications including drug discovery. However, existing NMR technology is limited in that it cannot run a large number of experiments simultaneously in one unit. Recent advances in micro-fabrication technologies have attracted the attention of researchers to overcome these limitations and significantly accelerate the drug discovery process by developing the next generation of high-throughput NMR spectrometers using Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS). In this paper, we examine this paradigm shift and explore new design strategies for the development of the next generation of high-throughput NMR spectrometers using CMOS technology. A CMOS NMR system consists of an array of high sensitivity micro-coils integrated with interfacing radio-frequency circuits on the same chip. Herein, we first discuss the key challenges and recent advances in the field of CMOS NMR technology, and then a new design strategy is put forward for the design and implementation of highly sensitive and high-throughput CMOS NMR spectrometers. We thereafter discuss the functionality and applicability of the proposed techniques by demonstrating the results. For microelectronic researchers starting to work in the field of CMOS NMR technology, this paper serves as a tutorial with comprehensive review of state-of-the-art technologies and their performance levels. Based on these levels, the CMOS NMR approach offers unique advantages for high resolution, time-sensitive and high-throughput bimolecular analysis required in a variety of life science applications including drug discovery. PMID:27294925

  5. A Multidisciplinary Approach to High Throughput Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pourmodheji, Hossein; Ghafar-Zadeh, Ebrahim; Magierowski, Sebastian

    2016-06-09

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is a non-contact, powerful structure-elucidation technique for biochemical analysis. NMR spectroscopy is used extensively in a variety of life science applications including drug discovery. However, existing NMR technology is limited in that it cannot run a large number of experiments simultaneously in one unit. Recent advances in micro-fabrication technologies have attracted the attention of researchers to overcome these limitations and significantly accelerate the drug discovery process by developing the next generation of high-throughput NMR spectrometers using Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS). In this paper, we examine this paradigm shift and explore new design strategies for the development of the next generation of high-throughput NMR spectrometers using CMOS technology. A CMOS NMR system consists of an array of high sensitivity micro-coils integrated with interfacing radio-frequency circuits on the same chip. Herein, we first discuss the key challenges and recent advances in the field of CMOS NMR technology, and then a new design strategy is put forward for the design and implementation of highly sensitive and high-throughput CMOS NMR spectrometers. We thereafter discuss the functionality and applicability of the proposed techniques by demonstrating the results. For microelectronic researchers starting to work in the field of CMOS NMR technology, this paper serves as a tutorial with comprehensive review of state-of-the-art technologies and their performance levels. Based on these levels, the CMOS NMR approach offers unique advantages for high resolution, time-sensitive and high-throughput bimolecular analysis required in a variety of life science applications including drug discovery.

  6. Magnetostatic interaction mechanisms in a two-dimensional composite magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sievers, Sibylle; Schnittger, Sven; Norpoth, Jonas; Hu, Xiukun; Siegner, Uwe; Schumacher, Hans Werner; Jooss, Christian

    2011-08-01

    The magnetization structure and the mechanisms of magnetic interaction in an artificial two-phase magnet are analyzed with magnetic force microscopy and magnetooptics. A model system built up of arrays of hard magnetic CoPt squares (5 μm edge length) embedded in a soft magnetic permalloy matrix is investigated. Special emphasis is put on the characterization of the matrix magnetization and on the interaction between the matrix and the CoPt squares. Different effects on different length scales are observed. At large distances to the hard magnetic dots, the magnetization of the matrix relaxes and is dominated by the characteristic pattern of an antidot array. The stability of this pattern with respect to magnetic fields and its dependence on the magnetic history of the system is analyzed. Nearby the dots, the magnetostatic coupling between the matrix and the CoPt induces a fine scale modulation of the magnetization of the matrix. At inter-dot distances up to 1 μm, the dot matrix interaction is prevalent and the matrix contributes essentially to the dot-dot interaction. We have studied the characteristics of this modulation, particularly considering their decay length and the interaction transfer mediated by the modulation.

  7. Universal scaling of the magnetic anisotropy in two-dimensional rare-earth layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benito, L.; Ward, R. C. C.

    2015-07-01

    Unraveling the influence that low dimensionality has upon the spin's stability in two-dimensional (2D) systems is instrumental for the efficient engineering of energy barriers in ultrathin magnetic layers. Taking rare-earth-based ultrathin multilayered nanostructures as a model system, we have investigated the dissimilar impact that low dimensionality and finite-size effects have upon the magnetic anisotropy energy (MAE) at the nanoscale. We conclusively show that the reduced dimensionality of the spin's system in 2D ferromagnetic layers imprints on the MAE constants a universal temperature decay as a quadratic power law of the reduced magnetization. This result is in agreement with predictions, although in marked contrast to the rank-dependent, thereby faster, decay of the MAE constants observed in three-dimensional nanostructures.

  8. THE ANGULAR MOMENTUM OF MAGNETIZED MOLECULAR CLOUD CORES: A TWO-DIMENSIONAL-THREE-DIMENSIONAL COMPARISON

    SciTech Connect

    Dib, Sami; Csengeri, Timea; Audit, Edouard; Pineda, Jaime E.; Goodman, Alyssa A.; Bontemps, Sylvain

    2010-11-01

    In this work, we present a detailed study of the rotational properties of magnetized and self-gravitating dense molecular cloud (MC) cores formed in a set of two very high resolution three-dimensional (3D) MC simulations with decaying turbulence. The simulations have been performed using the adaptative mesh refinement code RAMSES with an effective resolution of 4096{sup 3} grid cells. One simulation represents a mildly magnetically supercritical cloud and the other a strongly magnetically supercritical cloud. We identify dense cores at a number of selected epochs in the simulations at two density thresholds which roughly mimic the excitation densities of the NH{sub 3} (J - K) = (1,1) transition and the N{sub 2}H{sup +} (1-0) emission line. A noticeable global difference between the two simulations is the core formation efficiency (CFE) of the high-density cores. In the strongly supercritical simulations, the CFE is 33% per unit free-fall time of the cloud (t{sub ff,cl}), whereas in the mildly supercritical simulations this value goes down to {approx}6 per unit t{sub ff,cl}. A comparison of the intrinsic specific angular momentum (j{sub 3D}) distributions of the cores with the specific angular momentum derived using synthetic two-dimensional (2D) velocity maps of the cores (j{sub 2D}) shows that the synthetic observations tend to overestimate the true value of the specific angular momentum by a factor of {approx}8-10. We find that the distribution of the ratio j{sub 3D}/j{sub 2D} of the cores peaks at around {approx}0.1. The origin of this discrepancy lies in the fact that contrary to the intrinsic determination of j which sums up the individual gas parcels' contributions to the angular momentum, the determination of the specific angular momentum using the standard observational procedure which is based on a measurement on the global velocity gradient under the hypothesis of uniform rotation smoothes out the complex fluctuations present in the 3D velocity field. Our

  9. One-dimensional magnetic order in the metal-organic framework Tb(HCOO ) 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harcombe, Daniel R.; Welch, Philip G.; Manuel, Pascal; Saines, Paul J.; Goodwin, Andrew L.

    2016-11-01

    Variable-temperature neutron scattering measurements, reverse Monte Carlo analysis, and direct Monte Carlo simulation are used to characterize magnetic order in the metal-organic framework (MOF) Tb (HCOO) 3 over the temperature range 100 to 1.6 K =TN . The magnetic transition at TN is shown to involve one-dimensional ferromagnetic ordering to a partially ordered state related to the triangular Ising antiferromagnet and distinct from the canonical partially disordered antiferromagnet model. In this phase, the direction of magnetization of ferromagnetic chains tends to alternate between neighboring chains but this alternation is frustrated and is not itself ordered. We suggest the existence of low-dimensional magnetic order in Tb (HCOO) 3 is stabilized by the contrasting strength of inter- and intrachain magnetic coupling, itself a consequence of the underlying MOF architecture. Our results demonstrate how MOFs may provide an attractive if as yet underexplored platform for the realization and investigation of low-dimensional physics.

  10. Magnetic flux ropes in 3-dimensional MHD simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogino, Tatsuki; Walker, Raymond J.; Ashour-Abdalla, Maha

    1990-01-01

    The interaction of the solar wind and the earth's magnetosphere is presently simulated by a 3D, time-dependent, global MHD method in order to model the magnetopause and magnetotail generation of magnetic flux ropes. It is noted that strongly twisted and localized magnetic flux tubes simular to magnetic flux ropes appear at the subpolar magnetopause when the IMF has a large azimuthal component, as well as a southward component. Plasmoids are generated in the magnetotail after the formation of a near-earth magnetic neutral line; the magnetic field lines have a helical structure that is connected from dawn to dusk.

  11. Magnetic flux ropes in 3-dimensional MHD simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogino, Tatsuki; Walker, Raymond J.; Ashour-Abdalla, Maha

    1990-01-01

    The interaction of the solar wind and the earth's magnetosphere is presently simulated by a 3D, time-dependent, global MHD method in order to model the magnetopause and magnetotail generation of magnetic flux ropes. It is noted that strongly twisted and localized magnetic flux tubes simular to magnetic flux ropes appear at the subpolar magnetopause when the IMF has a large azimuthal component, as well as a southward component. Plasmoids are generated in the magnetotail after the formation of a near-earth magnetic neutral line; the magnetic field lines have a helical structure that is connected from dawn to dusk.

  12. Three-dimensional dose evaluation system using real-time wind field information for nuclear accidents in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jay; Lu, Chung-Hsin; Chang, Shu-Jun; Yang, Yung-Muh; Chang, Bor-Jing; Teng, Jen-Hsin

    2006-09-01

    In Taiwan, the three operating nuclear power plants are all built along the coast over complex terrain. Dose estimates after a nuclear accident with releases of radioactive materials, therefore, cannot be accurately calculated using simple dispersion models. We developed a three-dimensional dose evaluation system, which incorporates real-time prognostic wind field information with three-dimensional numerical models to predict dose results. The proposed system consists of three models: a three-dimensional mesoscale atmospheric model (HOTMAC), a three-dimensional transport and diffusion model (RAPTAD), and a dose calculation model (DOSE). The whole-body dose and thyroid dose as well as dose rates can be rapidly estimated and displayed on the three-dimensional terrain model constructed by satellite images. The developed three-dimensional dose evaluation system could accurately forecast the dose results and has been used in the annual nuclear emergency response exercise to provide suggestions for protective measures.

  13. Effects of magnetic barriers on transport and magnetoresistance in a two-dimensional electronic device

    SciTech Connect

    He, H. L.; Zhang, X. W. Dai, B.; Ren, Y.; Wang, Z. P.

    2016-05-15

    We study theoretically the giant magnetoresistance (GMR) effect of 2-dimensional electron system (2DES) by the transfer matrix method. To produce the inhomogeneous magnetic field, two magnetic strips are pre-deposited on the surface of 2DES. In our work, we fix the magnetization M in one magnetic strip and adjust the tilting angle θ of magnetization in the other. The result shows that the electronic transmission and conductance vary significantly for different θ. The minimum conductance can be obtained at θ = π which corresponds to the magnetization anti-parallel alignment. The magnetoresistance ratio (MRR) calculation also indicates we would get the maximum in that case. Furthermore, we consider the magnetization M dependence of MRR in this work. When M increases, MRR peaks get higher and broader and more numbers of peaks can be observed. These results offer an alternative to get a tunable GMR device which can be controlled by adjusting the magnetization M and the magnetized angle θ.

  14. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance assignments and secondary structure determination of the Co1E1 rop (rom) protein

    SciTech Connect

    Eberle, W. European Molecular Biology Lab., Heidelberg ); Klaus, W. ); Cesareni, G. ); Sander, C. ); Roesch, P. )

    1990-08-14

    The complete resonance assignment of the Co1E1 rop (rom) protein at pH 2.3 was obtained by two-dimensional (2D) proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ({sup 1}H NMR) at 500 and 600 MHz using through-bond and through-space connectivities. Sequential assignments and elements of regular secondary structure were deduced by analysis of nuclear Overhauser enhancement spectroscopy (NOESY) experiments and {sup 3}J{sub HN{alpha}} coupling constants. One 7.2-kDa monomer of the homodimer consists of two antiparallel helices connected by a hairpin loop at residue 31. The C-terminal peptide consisting of amino acids 59-63 shows no stable conformation. The dimer forms a four-helix bundle with opposite polarization of neighboring elements in agreement with the x-ray structure.

  15. New Methodology For Use in Rotating Field Nuclear MagneticResonance

    SciTech Connect

    Jachmann, Rebecca C.

    2007-01-01

    High-resolution NMR spectra of samples with anisotropicbroadening are simplified to their isotropic spectra by fast rotation ofthe sample at the magic angle 54.7 circ. This dissertation concerns thedevelopment of novel Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) methodologies basedwhich would rotate the magnetic field instead of the sample, rotatingfield NMR. It provides an over of the NMR concepts, procedures, andexperiments needed to understand the methodologies that will be used forrotating field NMR. A simple two-dimensional shimming method based onharmonic corrector rings which can provide arbitrary multiple ordershimming corrections were developed for rotating field systems, but couldbe used in shimming other systems as well. Those results demonstrate, forexample, that quadrupolar order shimming improves the linewidth by up toan order of magnitude. An additional order of magnitude reduction is inprinciple achievable by utilizing this shimming method for z-gradientcorrection and higher order xy gradients. A specialized pulse sequencefor the rotating field NMR experiment is under development. The pulsesequence allows for spinning away from the magic angle and spinningslower than the anisotropic broadening. This pulse sequence is acombination of the projected magic angle spinning (p-MAS) and magic angleturning (MAT) pulse sequences. This will be useful to rotating field NMRbecause there are limits on how fast a field can be spun and spin at themagic angle is difficult. One of the goals of this project is forrotating field NMR to be used on biological systems. The p-MAS pulsesequence was successfully tested on bovine tissue samples which suggeststhat it will be a viable methodology to use in a rotating field set up. Aside experiment on steering magnetic particle by MRI gradients was alsocarried out. Some movement was seen in these experiment, but for totalcontrol over steering further experiments would need to bedone.

  16. New Methodology For Use in Rotating Field Nuclear MagneticResonance

    SciTech Connect

    Jachmann, Rebecca C.

    2007-05-18

    High-resolution NMR spectra of samples with anisotropicbroadening are simplified to their isotropic spectra by fast rotation ofthe sample at the magic angle 54.7 circ. This dissertation concerns thedevelopment of novel Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) methodologies basedwhich would rotate the magnetic field instead of the sample, rotatingfield NMR. It provides an over of the NMR concepts, procedures, andexperiments needed to understand the methodologies that will be used forrotating field NMR. A simple two-dimensional shimming method based onharmonic corrector rings which can provide arbitrary multiple ordershimming corrections were developed for rotating field systems, but couldbe used in shimming other systems as well. Those results demonstrate, forexample, that quadrupolar order shimming improves the linewidth by up toan order of magnitude. An additional order of magnitude reduction is inprinciple achievable by utilizing this shimming method for z-gradientcorrection and higher order xy gradients. A specialized pulse sequencefor the rotating field NMR experiment is under development. The pulsesequence allows for spinning away from the magic angle and spinningslower than the anisotropic broadening. This pulse sequence is acombination of the projected magic angle spinning (p-MAS) and magic angleturning (MAT) pulse sequences. This will be useful to rotating field NMRbecause there are limits on how fast a field can be spun and spin at themagic angle is difficult. One of the goals of this project is forrotating field NMR to be used on biological systems. The p-MAS pulsesequence was successfully tested on bovine tissue samples which suggeststhat it will be a viable methodology to use in a rotating field set up. Aside experiment on steering magnetic particle by MRI gradients was alsocarried out. Some movement was seen in these experiment, but for totalcontrol over steering further experiments would need to bedone.

  17. Fast Transient And Spatially Non-Homogenous Accident Analysis Of Two-Dimensional Cylindrical Nuclear Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Yulianti, Yanti; Su'ud, Zaki; Waris, Abdul; Khotimah, S. N.; Shafii, M. Ali

    2010-12-23

    The research about fast transient and spatially non-homogenous nuclear reactor accident analysis of two-dimensional nuclear reactor has been done. This research is about prediction of reactor behavior is during accident. In the present study, space-time diffusion equation is solved by using direct methods which consider spatial factor in detail during nuclear reactor accident simulation. Set of equations that obtained from full implicit finite-difference discretization method is solved by using iterative methods ADI (Alternating Direct Implicit). The indication of accident is decreasing macroscopic absorption cross-section that results large external reactivity. The power reactor has a peak value before reactor has new balance condition. Changing of temperature reactor produce a negative Doppler feedback reactivity. The reactivity will reduce excess positive reactivity. Temperature reactor during accident is still in below fuel melting point which is in secure condition.

  18. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance-Based Metabolic Comparative Analysis of Two Apple Varieties with Different Resistances to Apple Scab Attacks.

    PubMed

    Sciubba, Fabio; Di Cocco, Maria Enrica; Gianferri, Raffaella; Capuani, Giorgio; De Salvador, Flavio Roberto; Fontanari, Marco; Gorietti, Daniela; Delfini, Maurizio

    2015-09-23

    Apple scab, caused by the fungus Venturia inaequalis, is the most serious disease of the apple worldwide. Two cultivars (Malus domestica), having different degrees of resistance against fungi attacks, were analyzed by (1)H and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Aqueous and organic extracts of both apple flesh and skin were studied, and over 30 metabolites, classified as organic acids, amino acids, carbohydrates, phenolic compounds, lipids, sterols, and other metabolites, were quantified by means of one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) NMR experiments. The metabolic profiles of the two apple cultivars were compared, and the differences were correlated with the different degrees of resistance to apple scab by means of univariate analysis. Levels of metabolites with known antifungal activity were observed not only to be higher in the Almagold cultivar but also to show different correlation patterns in comparison to Golden Delicious, implying a difference in the metabolic network involved in their biosynthesis.

  19. Two-dimensional temperature analysis of nuclear fireballs using digitized film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slaughter, Robert C.; Peery, Tyler R.; McClory, John W.

    2015-01-01

    Researchers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory have begun digitizing technical films spanning the atmospheric nuclear testing operations conducted by the United States from 1945 through 1962. Each atmospheric nuclear test was filmed by Edgerton, Germeshausen, and Grier, Inc., using between 20 to 40 cameras per test. These technical film test data represent a primary source for advancing the knowledge of nuclear weapon output as well as the understanding of nonnuclear high-temperature gases. This manuscript outlines the procedures followed in order to perform two-dimensional temperature calculations for early time nuclear fireballs using digitized film. The digitized optical densities of the film were converted into irradiance on the film that was then used to determine an effective power temperature. The events Wasp Prime and Tesla of Operation Teapot were analyzed using this technique. Film temperature results agreed within uncertainties with historic data collected by calorimeters. Results were also validated by comparison to a thermal heat flux solution that utilizes historic thermal yield values to normalize radiant flux. Additionally, digital imaging and remote sensing image generation was used to demonstrate that the two-dimensional temperature calculation was self-consistent.

  20. Anisotropic magnetic coupling with a two-dimensional characteristic in noncentrosymmetric Cr11Ge19

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Hui; Zhang, Lei; Zhu, Xiangde; Du, Haifeng; Ge, Min; Ling, Langsheng; Pi, Li; Zhang, Changjin; Zhang, Yuheng

    2016-12-01

    In this work, we successfully synthesize the single crystal Cr11Ge19. The magnetism of the noncentrosymmetric Cr11Ge19 with itinerant ferromagnetic ground state is thoroughly investigated on the single crystal. Based on the variation measurements including the angular rotation, temperature, and magnetic field dependence of magnetization, we find that this material exhibits strong magnetic anisotropy along the c-axis. To clearly reveal the magnetic interactions, the critical behavior is studied using the modified Arrott plot, the Kouvel-Fisher method, and the critical isotherm technique. Combining these different methods, three main critical exponents (β, γ, and δ) are obtained. The critical exponent β is close to the theoretical prediction of a three-dimensional XY model with spin-dimensionality n = 2, indicating two-dimensional magnetic coupling. Meanwhile, the critical exponent γ suggests that the magnetic interaction is of long-range type with magnetic exchange distance decaying as J(r) ≈ r‑4.61. We propose that the ferromagnetic ground state of Cr11Ge19 is formed by the polarized magnetic moments along the c-axis, while the long-range magnetic coupling is established within the ab plane.

  1. Anisotropic magnetic coupling with a two-dimensional characteristic in noncentrosymmetric Cr11Ge19

    PubMed Central

    Han, Hui; Zhang, Lei; Zhu, Xiangde; Du, Haifeng; Ge, Min; Ling, Langsheng; Pi, Li; Zhang, Changjin; Zhang, Yuheng

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we successfully synthesize the single crystal Cr11Ge19. The magnetism of the noncentrosymmetric Cr11Ge19 with itinerant ferromagnetic ground state is thoroughly investigated on the single crystal. Based on the variation measurements including the angular rotation, temperature, and magnetic field dependence of magnetization, we find that this material exhibits strong magnetic anisotropy along the c-axis. To clearly reveal the magnetic interactions, the critical behavior is studied using the modified Arrott plot, the Kouvel-Fisher method, and the critical isotherm technique. Combining these different methods, three main critical exponents (β, γ, and δ) are obtained. The critical exponent β is close to the theoretical prediction of a three-dimensional XY model with spin-dimensionality n = 2, indicating two-dimensional magnetic coupling. Meanwhile, the critical exponent γ suggests that the magnetic interaction is of long-range type with magnetic exchange distance decaying as J(r) ≈ r−4.61. We propose that the ferromagnetic ground state of Cr11Ge19 is formed by the polarized magnetic moments along the c-axis, while the long-range magnetic coupling is established within the ab plane. PMID:27996053

  2. Three-dimensional magnetization structures revealed with X-ray vector nanotomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, Claire; Guizar-Sicairos, Manuel; Scagnoli, Valerio; Gliga, Sebastian; Holler, Mirko; Raabe, Jörg; Heyderman, Laura J.

    2017-07-01

    In soft ferromagnetic materials, the smoothly varying magnetization leads to the formation of fundamental patterns such as domains, vortices and domain walls. These have been studied extensively in thin films of thicknesses up to around 200 nanometres, in which the magnetization is accessible with current transmission imaging methods that make use of electrons or soft X-rays. In thicker samples, however, in which the magnetization structure varies throughout the thickness and is intrinsically three dimensional, determining the complex magnetic structure directly still represents a challenge. We have developed hard-X-ray vector nanotomography with which to determine the three-dimensional magnetic configuration at the nanoscale within micrometre-sized samples. We imaged the structure of the magnetization within a soft magnetic pillar of diameter 5 micrometres with a spatial resolution of 100 nanometres and, within the bulk, observed a complex magnetic configuration that consists of vortices and antivortices that form cross-tie walls and vortex walls along intersecting planes. At the intersections of these structures, magnetic singularities—Bloch points—occur. These were predicted more than fifty years ago but have so far not been directly observed. Here we image the three-dimensional magnetic structure in the vicinity of the Bloch points, which until now has been accessible only through micromagnetic simulations, and identify two possible magnetization configurations: a circulating magnetization structure and a twisted state that appears to correspond to an ‘anti-Bloch point’. Our imaging method enables the nanoscale study of topological magnetic structures in systems with sizes of the order of tens of micrometres. Knowledge of internal nanomagnetic textures is critical for understanding macroscopic magnetic properties and for designing bulk magnets for technological applications.

  3. Double-tuned single coil probe for nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    McKay, R.A.

    1984-05-01

    A double-tuned single coil probe for a nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer having improved sensitivity is described comprising a double-tuned circuit means in which the low frequency irradiation is fed to a transmission line through an inductor means. The double-tuned circuit means of the invention may be remotely disposed from the magnetic field which results in greater sensitivity.

  4. Numerical Simulation of Plasma Behavior in a Magnetic Nozzle of a Laser-plasma Driven Nuclear Electric Propulsion System

    SciTech Connect

    Kajimura, Y.; Matsuda, N.; Hayashida, K.; Maeno, A.; Nakashima, H.

    2008-12-31

    Numerical simulations of plasma behavior in a magnetic nozzle of a Laser-Plasma Driven Nuclear Electric Propulsion System are conducted. The propellant is heated and accelerated by the laser and expanded isotropically. The magnetic nozzle is a combination of solenoidal coils and used to collimate and guide the plasma to produce thrust. Simulation calculations by a three-dimensional hybrid code are conducted to examine the plasma behaviors in the nozzle and to estimate the thrust efficiency. We also estimate a fraction ({alpha}) of plasma particles leaking in the forward (spacecraft) direction. By a combination of a few coils, we could decrease {alpha} value without degrading the thrust efficiency. Finally, the shaped propellant is proposed to increase the thrust efficiency.

  5. Electronic and nuclear motion and their couplings in the presence of a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmelcher, P.; Cederbaum, L. S.; Meyer, H.-D.

    1988-12-01

    The performance of an adiabatic separation of electronic and nuclear motion in the presence of a magnetic field is examined, and it is shown that the diagonal term of the nonadiabatic coupling elements must be added to the nuclear equation of motion in the Born-Oppenheimer (BO) approximation. The screened BO approximation is described which is particularly suited to describe the adiabatic separation of electronic and nuclear degrees of freedom in a magnetic field. A new interpretation of the well-known gauge-centering is presented. The results are of interest in connection with the studies of white dwarfs and neutron stars.

  6. MEMS-Based Force-Detected Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (FDNMR) Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Choonsup; Butler, Mark C.; Elgammal, Ramez A.; George, Thomas; Hunt, Brian; Weitekamp, Daniel P.

    2006-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy allows assignment of molecular structure by acquiring the energy spectrum of nuclear spins in a molecule, and by interpreting the symmetry and positions of resonance lines in the spectrum. As such, NMR has become one of the most versatile and ubiquitous spectroscopic methods. Despite these tremendous successes, NMR experiments suffer from inherent low sensitivity due to the relatively low energy of photons in the radio frequency (rt) region of the electromagnetic spectrum. Here, we describe a high-resolution spectroscopy in samples with diameters in the micron range and below. We have reported design and fabrication of force-detected nuclear magnetic resonance (FDNMR).

  7. MEMS-Based Force-Detected Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (FDNMR) Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Choonsup; Butler, Mark C.; Elgammal, Ramez A.; George, Thomas; Hunt, Brian; Weitekamp, Daniel P.

    2006-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy allows assignment of molecular structure by acquiring the energy spectrum of nuclear spins in a molecule, and by interpreting the symmetry and positions of resonance lines in the spectrum. As such, NMR has become one of the most versatile and ubiquitous spectroscopic methods. Despite these tremendous successes, NMR experiments suffer from inherent low sensitivity due to the relatively low energy of photons in the radio frequency (rt) region of the electromagnetic spectrum. Here, we describe a high-resolution spectroscopy in samples with diameters in the micron range and below. We have reported design and fabrication of force-detected nuclear magnetic resonance (FDNMR).

  8. Stationary solutions in five-dimensional gravity with a magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Becerril, R. ); Matos, T. )

    1992-08-15

    Using the potential formalism, six new stationary axisymmetric solutions of the five-dimensional Kaluza-Klein field equations are constructed. It is supposed that each potential depends only on one parameter which satisfies the Laplace equation. All the solutions have a scalar potential and some of them possess magnetic fields which represent a magnetic monopole, dipole, and quadrupole.

  9. Quasi-One-Dimensional Particle-in-Cell Simulation of Magnetic Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebersohn, Frans H.; Sheehan, J. P.; Gallimore, Alec D.; Shebalin, John V.

    2015-01-01

    A method for the quasi-one-dimensional simulation of magnetic nozzles is presented and simulations of a magnetic nozzle are performed. The effects of the density variation due to plasma expansion and the magnetic field forces on ion acceleration are investigated. Magnetic field forces acting on the electrons are found to be responsible for the formation of potential structures which accelerate ions. The effects of the plasma density variation alone are found to only weakly affect ion acceleration. Strongly diverging magnetic fields drive more rapid potential drops.

  10. Three-dimensional magnetic correlations in multiferroic LuFe2O4

    SciTech Connect

    Christianson, Andrew D; Lumsden, Mark D; Angst, Manuel; Yamani, Z.; Tian, Wei; Jin, Rongying; Payzant, E Andrew; Nagler, Stephen E; Sales, Brian C; Mandrus, David

    2008-01-01

    We present single crystal neutron diffraction measurements on multiferroic LuFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}. Magnetic reflections are observed below transitions at 240 and 175 K indicating that the magnetic interactions in LuFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} are three-dimensional in character. The magnetic structure is refined as a ferrimagnetic spin configuration below the 240 K transition. Below 175 K a significant broadening of the magnetic peaks is observed along with the buildup of a diffuse component to the magnetic scattering.

  11. Magnetic levitating polymeric nano/microparticular substrates for three-dimensional tumor cell culture.

    PubMed

    Lee, Woong Ryeol; Oh, Kyung Taek; Park, So Young; Yoo, Na Young; Ahn, Yong Sik; Lee, Don Haeng; Youn, Yu Seok; Lee, Deok-Keun; Cha, Kyung-Hoi; Lee, Eun Seong

    2011-07-01

    Herein, we describe magnetic cell levitation models using conventional polymeric microparticles or nanoparticles as a substrate for the three-dimensional tumor cell culture. When the magnetic force originating from the ring-shaped magnets overcame the gravitational force, the magnetic field-levitated KB tumor cells adhered to the surface area of magnetic iron oxide (Fe(3)O(4))-encapsulated nano/microparticles and concentrated clusters of levitated cells, ultimately developing tumor cells to tumor spheroids. These simple cell culture models may prove useful for the screening of anticancer drugs and their formulations.

  12. [Measurement of left atrial and ventricular volumes in real-time 3D echocardiography. Validation by nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, F.; Shiota, T.; Qin, J. X.; White, R. D.; Thomas, J. D.

    2001-01-01

    The measurement of the left ventricular ejection fraction is important for the evaluation of cardiomyopathy and depends on the measurement of left ventricular volumes. There are no existing conventional echocardiographic means of measuring the true left atrial and ventricular volumes without mathematical approximations. The aim of this study was to test anew real time 3-dimensional echocardiographic system of calculating left atrial and ventricular volumes in 40 patients after in vitro validation. The volumes of the left atrium and ventricle acquired from real time 3-D echocardiography in the apical view, were calculated in 7 sections parallel to the surface of the probe and compared with atrial (10 patients) and ventricular (30 patients) volumes calculated by nuclear magnetic resonance with the simpson method and with volumes of water in balloons placed in a cistern. Linear regression analysis showed an excellent correlation between the real volume of water in the balloons and volumes given in real time 3-dimensional echocardiography (y = 0.94x + 5.5, r = 0.99, p < 0.001, D = -10 +/- 4.5 ml). A good correlation was observed between real time 3-dimensional echocardiography and nuclear magnetic resonance for the measurement of left atrial and ventricular volumes (y = 0.95x - 10, r = 0.91, p < 0.001, D = -14.8 +/- 19.5 ml and y = 0.87x + 10, r = 0.98, P < 0.001, D = -8.3 +/- 18.7 ml, respectively. The authors conclude that real time three-dimensional echocardiography allows accurate measurement of left heart volumes underlying the clinical potential of this new 3-D method.

  13. [Measurement of left atrial and ventricular volumes in real-time 3D echocardiography. Validation by nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, F.; Shiota, T.; Qin, J. X.; White, R. D.; Thomas, J. D.

    2001-01-01

    The measurement of the left ventricular ejection fraction is important for the evaluation of cardiomyopathy and depends on the measurement of left ventricular volumes. There are no existing conventional echocardiographic means of measuring the true left atrial and ventricular volumes without mathematical approximations. The aim of this study was to test anew real time 3-dimensional echocardiographic system of calculating left atrial and ventricular volumes in 40 patients after in vitro validation. The volumes of the left atrium and ventricle acquired from real time 3-D echocardiography in the apical view, were calculated in 7 sections parallel to the surface of the probe and compared with atrial (10 patients) and ventricular (30 patients) volumes calculated by nuclear magnetic resonance with the simpson method and with volumes of water in balloons placed in a cistern. Linear regression analysis showed an excellent correlation between the real volume of water in the balloons and volumes given in real time 3-dimensional echocardiography (y = 0.94x + 5.5, r = 0.99, p < 0.001, D = -10 +/- 4.5 ml). A good correlation was observed between real time 3-dimensional echocardiography and nuclear magnetic resonance for the measurement of left atrial and ventricular volumes (y = 0.95x - 10, r = 0.91, p < 0.001, D = -14.8 +/- 19.5 ml and y = 0.87x + 10, r = 0.98, P < 0.001, D = -8.3 +/- 18.7 ml, respectively. The authors conclude that real time three-dimensional echocardiography allows accurate measurement of left heart volumes underlying the clinical potential of this new 3-D method.

  14. Two-dimensional chiral asymmetry in unidirectional magnetic anisotropy structures

    SciTech Connect

    Perna, P. Guerrero, R.; Niño, M. A.; Muñoz, M.; Prieto, J. L.; Miranda, R.; Camarero, J.

    2016-05-15

    We investigate the symmetry-breaking effects of magnetic nanostructures that present unidirectional (one-fold) magnetic anisotropy. Angular and field dependent transport and magnetic properties have been studied in two different exchange-biased systems, i.e. ferromagnetic (FM)/ antiferromagnetic (AFM) bilayer and spin-valve structures. We experimentally show the direct relationships between the magnetoresistance (MR) response and the magnetization reversal pathways for any field value and direction. We demonstrate that even though the MR signals are related to different transport phenomena, namely anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) and giant magnetoresistance (GMR), chiral asymmetries are found around the magnetization hard-axis direction, in both cases originated from the one-fold symmetry of the interfacial exchange coupling. Our results indicate that the chiral asymmetry of transport and magnetic behaviors are intrinsic of systems with an unidirectional contribution.

  15. A method for finding three-dimensional magnetic skeletons

    SciTech Connect

    Haynes, A. L.; Parnell, C. E.

    2010-09-15

    Magnetic fields are an essential component of a plasma. In many astrophysical, solar, magnetospheric, and laboratory situations the magnetic field in the plasma can be very dynamic and form highly complex structures. One approach to unraveling these structures is to determine the magnetic skeleton of the field, a set of topological features that divide the magnetic field into topologically distinct domains. In general, the features of the magnetic skeleton are difficult to locate, in particular those given by numerical experiments. In this paper, we propose a new set of tools to find the skeleton of general magnetic fields including null points, spines, separatrix surfaces, and separators. This set of tools is found to be considerably better at finding the skeleton than the currently favored methods used in magnetohydrodynamics.

  16. Two-dimensional chiral asymmetry in unidirectional magnetic anisotropy structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perna, P.; Ajejas, F.; Maccariello, D.; Cuñado, J. L.; Guerrero, R.; Niño, M. A.; Muñoz, M.; Prieto, J. L.; Miranda, R.; Camarero, J.

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the symmetry-breaking effects of magnetic nanostructures that present unidirectional (one-fold) magnetic anisotropy. Angular and field dependent transport and magnetic properties have been studied in two different exchange-biased systems, i.e. ferromagnetic (FM)/ antiferromagnetic (AFM) bilayer and spin-valve structures. We experimentally show the direct relationships between the magnetoresistance (MR) response and the magnetization reversal pathways for any field value and direction. We demonstrate that even though the MR signals are related to different transport phenomena, namely anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) and giant magnetoresistance (GMR), chiral asymmetries are found around the magnetization hard-axis direction, in both cases originated from the one-fold symmetry of the interfacial exchange coupling. Our results indicate that the chiral asymmetry of transport and magnetic behaviors are intrinsic of systems with an unidirectional contribution.

  17. Giant perpendicular magnetic anisotropy of an individual atom on two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odkhuu, Dorj

    2016-08-01

    Exploring magnetism and magnetic anisotropy in otherwise nonmagnetic two-dimensional materials, such as graphene and transition metal dichalcogenides, is at the heart of spintronics research. Herein, using first-principles calculations we explore the possibility of reaching an atomic-scale perpendicular magnetic anisotropy by carefully exploring the large spin-orbit coupling, orbital magnetism, and ligand field in a suitable choice of a two-dimensional structure with transition metal adatoms. More specifically, we demonstrate perpendicular magnetic anisotropy energies up to an order of 100 meV per atom in individual ruthenium and osmium adatoms at a monosulfur vacancy in molybdenum disulfide. We further propose a phenomenological model where a spin state transition that involves hybridization between molybdenum a1 and adatomic e' orbitals is a possible mechanism for magnetization reversal from an in-plane to perpendicular orientation.

  18. Novel detection schemes of nuclear magnetic resonance and magnetic resonance imaging: applications from analytical chemistry to molecular sensors.

    PubMed

    Harel, Elad; Schröder, Leif; Xu, Shoujun

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a well-established analytical technique in chemistry. The ability to precisely control the nuclear spin interactions that give rise to the NMR phenomenon has led to revolutionary advances in fields as diverse as protein structure determination and medical diagnosis. Here, we discuss methods for increasing the sensitivity of magnetic resonance experiments, moving away from the paradigm of traditional NMR by separating the encoding and detection steps of the experiment. This added flexibility allows for diverse applications ranging from lab-on-a-chip flow imaging and biological sensors to optical detection of magnetic resonance imaging at low magnetic fields. We aim to compare and discuss various approaches for a host of problems in material science, biology, and physics that differ from the high-field methods routinely used in analytical chemistry and medical imaging.

  19. Two-dimensional polaron in a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiaoguang, Wu; Peeters, F. M.; Devreese, J. T.

    1985-12-01

    The ground-state energy of a Fröhlich optical polaron confined to two dimensions, placed in a perpendicular magnetic field is calculated within the Feynman path-integral approach. The Feynman-model mass, the magnetization and the susceptibility are calculated as a function of the magnetic field strength for different values of the electron-phonon coupling. We find that within the generalized Feynman approximation the polaron exhibits a discontinuous transition from a dressed state to a stripped state if the electron-phonon constant α is larger than 1.60. For α<1.60, the transition occurs continuously with increasing magnetic field.

  20. Noncyclic geometric quantum computation in a nuclear-magnetic-resonance system

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Z. S.; Liu, G. Q.; Ji, Y. H.

    2009-05-15

    A scheme is proposed to include both cyclic and noncyclic geometric quantum computations in nuclear-magnetic-resonance system by the invariant theory. By controlling magnetic field and arbitrary parameters in the invariant operator, the phases accumulated in the entangling quantum gates for single- and two-qubit systems are pure geometric phases. Thus, fault tolerance may occur in some critical magnetic field parameters for either cyclic or noncyclic evolution by differently choosing for gate time.