Science.gov

Sample records for dimerization initiation site

  1. Conformational analysis of the 5' leader and the gag initiation site of Mo-MuLV RNA and allosteric transitions induced by dimerization.

    PubMed Central

    Mougel, M; Tounekti, N; Darlix, J L; Paoletti, J; Ehresmann, B; Ehresmann, C

    1993-01-01

    Dimerization of genomic RNA is a key step in the retroviral life cycle and has been postulated to be involved in the regulation of translation, encapsidation and reverse transcription. Here, we have derived a secondary structure model of nucleotides upstream from psi and of the gag initiation region of Mo-MuLV RNA in monomeric and dimeric forms, using chemical probing, sequence comparison and computer prediction. The 5' domain is extensively base-paired and interactions take place between U5 and 5' leader sequences. The U5-PBS subdomain can fold in two mutually exclusive conformations: a very stable and extended helical structure (E form) in which 17 of the 18 nucleotides of the PBS are paired, or an irregular three-branch structure (B form) in which 10 nucleotides of the PBS are paired. The dimeric RNA adopts the B conformation. The monomeric RNA can switch from the E to the B conformation by a thermal treatment. If the E to B transition is associated to dimerization, it may facilitate annealing of the primer tRNAPro to the PBS by lowering the free energy required for melting the PBS. Furthermore, dimerization induces allosteric rearrangements around the SD site and the gag initiation region. Images PMID:8233816

  2. NMR detection of intermolecular interaction sites in the dimeric 5'-leader of the HIV-1 genome.

    PubMed

    Keane, Sarah C; Van, Verna; Frank, Heather M; Sciandra, Carly A; McCowin, Sayo; Santos, Justin; Heng, Xiao; Summers, Michael F

    2016-11-15

    HIV type-1 (HIV-1) contains a pseudodiploid RNA genome that is selected for packaging and maintained in virions as a noncovalently linked dimer. Genome dimerization is mediated by conserved elements within the 5'-leader of the RNA, including a palindromic dimer initiation signal (DIS) that has been proposed to form kissing hairpin and/or extended duplex intermolecular contacts. Here, we have applied a (2)H-edited NMR approach to directly probe for intermolecular interactions in the full-length, dimeric HIV-1 5'-leader (688 nucleotides; 230 kDa). The interface is extensive and includes DIS:DIS base pairing in an extended duplex state as well as intermolecular pairing between elements of the upstream Unique-5' (U5) sequence and those near the gag start site (AUG). Other pseudopalindromic regions of the leader, including the transcription activation (TAR), polyadenylation (PolyA), and primer binding (PBS) elements, do not participate in intermolecular base pairing. Using a (2)H-edited one-dimensional NMR approach, we also show that the extended interface structure forms on a time scale similar to that of overall RNA dimerization. Our studies indicate that a kissing dimer-mediated structure, if formed, exists only transiently and readily converts to the extended interface structure, even in the absence of the HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein or other RNA chaperones.

  3. Dimer site-bond percolation on a triangular lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez, L. S.; De la Cruz Félix, N.; Centres, P. M.; Ramirez-Pastor, A. J.

    2017-02-01

    A generalization of the site-percolation problem, in which pairs of neighbor sites (site dimers) and bonds are independently and randomly occupied on a triangular lattice, has been studied by means of numerical simulations. Motivated by considerations of cluster connectivity, two distinct schemes (denoted as S{\\cap}B and S{\\cup}B ) have been considered. In S{\\cap}B (S{\\cup}B ), two points are said to be connected if a sequence of occupied sites and (or) bonds joins them. Numerical data, supplemented by analysis using finite-size scaling theory, were used to determine (i) the complete phase diagram of the system (phase boundary between the percolating and nonpercolating regions), and (ii) the values of the critical exponents (and universality) characterizing the phase transition occurring in the system.

  4. HIV-2 genome dimerization is required for the correct processing of Gag: a second-site reversion in matrix can restore both processes in dimerization-impaired mutant viruses.

    PubMed

    L'Hernault, Anne; Weiss, Eva U; Greatorex, Jane S; Lever, Andrew M

    2012-05-01

    A unique feature of retroviruses is the packaging of two copies of their genome, noncovalently linked at their 5' ends. In vitro, dimerization of human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2) RNA occurs by interaction of a self-complementary sequence exposed in the loop of stem-loop 1 (SL-1), also termed the dimer initiation site (DIS). However, in virions, HIV-2 genome dimerization does not depend on the DIS. Instead, a palindrome located within the packaging signal (Psi) is the essential motif for genome dimerization. We reported previously that a mutation within Psi decreasing genome dimerization and packaging also resulted in a reduced proportion of mature particles (A. L'Hernault, J. S. Greatorex, R. A. Crowther, and A. M. Lever, Retrovirology 4:90, 2007). In this study, we investigated further the relationship between HIV-2 genome dimerization, particle maturation, and infectivity by using a series of targeted mutations in SL-1. Our results show that disruption of a purine-rich ((392)-GGAG-(395)) motif within Psi causes a severe reduction in genome dimerization and a replication defect. Maintaining the extended SL-1 structure in combination with the (392)-GGAG-(395) motif enhanced packaging. Unlike that of HIV-1, which can replicate despite mutation of the DIS, HIV-2 replication depends critically on genome dimerization rather than just packaging efficiency. Gag processing was altered in the HIV-2 dimerization mutants, resulting in the accumulation of the MA-CA-p2 processing intermediate and suggesting a link between genome dimerization and particle assembly. Analysis of revertant SL-1 mutant viruses revealed that a compensatory mutation in matrix (70TI) could rescue viral replication and partially restore genome dimerization and Gag processing. Our results are consistent with interdependence between HIV-2 RNA dimerization and the correct proteolytic cleavage of the Gag polyprotein.

  5. NMR detection of intermolecular interaction sites in the dimeric 5′-leader of the HIV-1 genome

    PubMed Central

    Keane, Sarah C.; Van, Verna; Frank, Heather M.; Sciandra, Carly A.; McCowin, Sayo; Santos, Justin; Heng, Xiao; Summers, Michael F.

    2016-01-01

    HIV type-1 (HIV-1) contains a pseudodiploid RNA genome that is selected for packaging and maintained in virions as a noncovalently linked dimer. Genome dimerization is mediated by conserved elements within the 5′-leader of the RNA, including a palindromic dimer initiation signal (DIS) that has been proposed to form kissing hairpin and/or extended duplex intermolecular contacts. Here, we have applied a 2H-edited NMR approach to directly probe for intermolecular interactions in the full-length, dimeric HIV-1 5′-leader (688 nucleotides; 230 kDa). The interface is extensive and includes DIS:DIS base pairing in an extended duplex state as well as intermolecular pairing between elements of the upstream Unique-5′ (U5) sequence and those near the gag start site (AUG). Other pseudopalindromic regions of the leader, including the transcription activation (TAR), polyadenylation (PolyA), and primer binding (PBS) elements, do not participate in intermolecular base pairing. Using a 2H-edited one-dimensional NMR approach, we also show that the extended interface structure forms on a time scale similar to that of overall RNA dimerization. Our studies indicate that a kissing dimer-mediated structure, if formed, exists only transiently and readily converts to the extended interface structure, even in the absence of the HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein or other RNA chaperones. PMID:27791166

  6. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) dimerization is the initial step in the ACE inhibitor-induced ACE signaling cascade in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kohlstedt, Karin; Gershome, Cynthia; Friedrich, Matthias; Müller-Esterl, Werner; Alhenc-Gelas, François; Busse, Rudi; Fleming, Ingrid

    2006-05-01

    The binding of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors to ACE initiates a signaling cascade that involves the phosphorylation of the enzyme on Ser1270 as well as activation of the c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) and leads to alterations in gene expression. To clarify how ACE inhibitors activate this pathway, we determined their effect on the ability of the enzyme to dimerize and the role of ACE dimerization in the initiation of the ACE signaling cascade. In endothelial cells, ACE was detected as a monomer as well as a dimer in native gel electrophoresis and dimerization/oligomerization was confirmed using the split-ubiquitin assay in yeast. ACE inhibitors elicited a rapid, concentration-dependent increase in the dimer/monomer ratio that correlated with that of the ACE inhibitorinduced phosphorylation of ACE. Cell treatment with galactose and glucose to prevent the putative lectin-mediated self-association of ACE or with specific antibodies shielding the N terminus of ACE failed to affect either the basal or the ACE inhibitor-induced dimerization of the enzyme. In ACE-expressing Chinese hamster ovary cells, ACE inhibitors elicited ACE dimerization and phosphorylation as well as the activation of JNK with similar kinetics to those observed in endothelial cells. However, these effects were prevented by the mutation of the essential Zn2+-complexing histidines in the C-terminal active site of the enzyme. Mutation of the N-terminal active site of ACE was without effect. Together, our data suggest that ACE inhibitors can initiate the ACE signaling pathway by inducing ACE dimerization, most probably via the C-terminal active site of the enzyme.

  7. Cholesterol modulates the dimer interface of the β₂-adrenergic receptor via cholesterol occupancy sites.

    PubMed

    Prasanna, Xavier; Chattopadhyay, Amitabha; Sengupta, Durba

    2014-03-18

    The β2-adrenergic receptor is an important member of the G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) superfamily, whose stability and function are modulated by membrane cholesterol. The recent high-resolution crystal structure of the β2-adrenergic receptor revealed the presence of possible cholesterol-binding sites in the receptor. However, the functional relevance of cholesterol binding to the receptor remains unexplored. We used MARTINI coarse-grained molecular-dynamics simulations to explore dimerization of the β2-adrenergic receptor in lipid bilayers containing cholesterol. A novel (to our knowledge) aspect of our results is that receptor dimerization is modulated by membrane cholesterol. We show that cholesterol binds to transmembrane helix IV, and cholesterol occupancy at this site restricts its involvement at the dimer interface. With increasing cholesterol concentration, an increased presence of transmembrane helices I and II, but a reduced presence of transmembrane helix IV, is observed at the dimer interface. To our knowledge, this study is one of the first to explore the correlation between cholesterol occupancy and GPCR organization. Our results indicate that dimer plasticity is relevant not just as an organizational principle but also as a subtle regulatory principle for GPCR function. We believe these results constitute an important step toward designing better drugs for GPCR dimer targets.

  8. Hanford Site sustainable development initiatives

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, C.T.

    1994-05-01

    Since the days of the Manhattan Project of World War II, the economic well being of the Tri-Cities (Pasco, Kennewick, and Richland) of Washington State has been tied to the US Department of Energy missions at the nearby Hanford Site. As missions at the Site changed, so did the economic vitality of the region. The Hanford Site is now poised to complete its final mission, that of environmental restoration. When restoration is completed, the Site may be closed and the effect on the local economy will be devastating if action is not taken now. To that end, economic diversification and transition are being planned. To facilitate the process, the Hanford Site will become a sustainable development demonstration project.

  9. Structure and dimerization of translation initiation factor aIF5B in solution

    SciTech Connect

    Carø VohlanderRasmussen, Louise; Oliveira, Cristiano Luis Pinto; Byron, Olwyn; Jensen, Janni Mosgaard; Pedersen, Jan Skov; Sperling-Petersen, Hans Uffe; Mortensen, Kim Kusk

    2012-02-07

    Translation initiation factor 5B (IF5B) is required for initiation of protein synthesis. The solution structure of archaeal IF5B (aIF5B) was analysed by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) and was indicated to be in both monomeric and dimeric form. Sedimentation equilibrium (SE) analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC) of aIF5B indicated that aIF5B forms irreversible dimers in solution but only to a maximum of 5.0-6.8% dimer. Sedimentation velocity (SV) AUC at higher speed also indicated the presence of two species, and the sedimentation coefficients s{sub 20,w}{sup 0} were determined to be 3.64 and 5.51 {+-} 0.29 S for monomer and dimer, respectively. The atomic resolution (crystallographic) structure of aIF5B (Roll-Mecak et al. [6]) was used to model monomer and dimer, and theoretical sedimentation coefficients for these models were computed (3.89 and 5.63 S, respectively) in good agreement with the sedimentation coefficients obtained from SV analysis. Thus, the structure of aIF5B in solution must be very similar to the atomic resolution structure of aIF5B. SAXS data were acquired in the same buffer with the addition of 2% glycerol to inhibit dimerization, and the resultant monomeric aIF5B in solution did indeed adopt a structure very similar to the one reported earlier for the protein in crystalline form. The p(r) function indicated an elongated conformation supported by a radius of gyration of 37.5 {+-} 0.2 {angstrom} and a maximum dimension of {approx}130 {angstrom}. The effects of glycerol on the formation of dimers are discussed. This new model of aIF5B in solution shows that there are universal structural differences between aIF5B and the homologous protein IF2 from Escherichia coli.

  10. Molecular Interplay between the Dimer Interface and the Substrate-Binding Site of Human Peptidylarginine Deiminase 4

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chien-Yun; Lin, Chu-Cheng; Liu, Yi-Liang; Liu, Guang-Yaw; Liu, Jyung-Hurng; Hung, Hui-Chih

    2017-01-01

    Our previous studies suggest that the fully active form of Peptidylarginine deiminase 4 (PAD4) should be a dimer and not a monomer. This paper provides a plausible mechanism for the control of PAD4 catalysis by molecular interplay between its dimer-interface loop (I-loop) and its substrate-binding loop (S-loop). Mutagenesis studies revealed that two hydrophobic residues, W347 and V469, are critical for substrate binding at the active site; mutating these two residues led to a severe reduction in the catalytic activity. We also identified several hydrophobic amino acid residues (L6, L279 and V283) at the dimer interface. Ultracentrifugation analysis revealed that interruption of the hydrophobicity of this region decreases dimer formation and, consequently, enzyme activity. Molecular dynamic simulations and mutagenesis studies suggested that the dimer interface and the substrate-binding site of PAD4, which consist of the I-loop and the S-loop, respectively, are responsible for substrate binding and dimer stabilization. We identified five residues with crucial roles in PAD4 catalysis and dimerization: Y435 and R441 in the I-loop, D465 and V469 in the S-loop, and W548, which stabilizes the I-loop via van der Waals interactions with C434 and Y435. The molecular interplay between the S-loop and the I-loop is crucial for PAD4 catalysis. PMID:28209966

  11. Initiating Molecular Growth in the Interstellar Medium via Dimeric Complexes of Observed Ions and Molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bera, Partha P.; Head-Gordon, Martin; Lee, Timothy J.

    2011-01-01

    A feasible initiation step for particle growth in the interstellar medium (ISM) is simulated by means of ab quantum chemistry methods. The systems studied are dimer ions formed by pairing nitrogen containing small molecules known to exist in the ISM with ions of unsaturated hydrocarbons or vice versa. Complexation energies, structures of ensuing complexes and electronic excitation spectra of the encounter complexes are estimated using various quantum chemistry methods. Moller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2, Z-averaged perturbation theory (ZAP2), coupled cluster singles and doubles with perturbative triples corrections (CCSD(T)), and density functional theory (DFT) methods (B3LYP) were employed along with the correlation consistent cc-pVTZ and aug-cc-pVTZ basis sets. Two types of complexes are predicted. One type of complex has electrostatic binding with moderate (7-20 kcal per mol) binding energies, that are nonetheless significantly stronger than typical van der Waals interactions between molecules of this size. The other type of complex develops strong covalent bonds between the fragments. Cyclic isomers of the nitrogen containing complexes are produced very easily by ion-molecule reactions. Some of these complexes show intense ultraviolet visible spectra for electronic transitions with large oscillator strengths at the B3LYP, omegaB97, and equations of motion coupled cluster (EOM-CCSD) levels. The open shell nitrogen containing carbonaceous complexes especially exhibit a large oscillator strength electronic transition in the visible region of the electromagnetic spectrum.

  12. Polyhydroxylated [60]fullerene binds specifically to functional recognition sites on a monomeric and a dimeric ubiquitin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanzoni, Serena; Ceccon, Alberto; Assfalg, Michael; Singh, Rajesh K.; Fushman, David; D'Onofrio, Mariapina

    2015-04-01

    The use of nanoparticles (NPs) in biomedical applications requires an in-depth understanding of the mechanisms by which NPs interact with biomolecules. NPs associating with proteins may interfere with protein-protein interactions and affect cellular communication pathways, however the impact of NPs on biomolecular recognition remains poorly characterized. In this respect, particularly relevant is the study of NP-induced functional perturbations of proteins implicated in the regulation of key biochemical pathways. Ubiquitin (Ub) is a prototypical protein post-translational modifier playing a central role in numerous essential biological processes. To contribute to the understanding of the interactions between this universally distributed biomacromolecule and NPs, we investigated the adsorption of polyhydroxylated [60]fullerene on monomeric Ub and on a minimal polyubiquitin chain in vitro at atomic resolution. Site-resolved chemical shift and intensity perturbations of Ub's NMR signals, together with 15N spin relaxation rate changes, exchange saturation transfer effects, and fluorescence quenching data were consistent with the reversible formation of soluble aggregates incorporating fullerenol clusters. The specific interaction epitopes were identified, coincident with functional recognition sites in a monomeric and lysine48-linked dimeric Ub. Fullerenol appeared to target the open state of the dynamic structure of a dimeric Ub according to a conformational selection mechanism. Importantly, the protein-NP association prevented the enzyme-catalyzed synthesis of polyubiquitin chains. Our findings provide an experiment-based insight into protein/fullerenol recognition, with implications in functional biomolecular communication, including regulatory protein turnover, and for the opportunity of therapeutic intervention in Ub-dependent cellular pathways.The use of nanoparticles (NPs) in biomedical applications requires an in-depth understanding of the mechanisms by which

  13. Dynamics of the Active Sites of Dimeric Seryl tRNA Synthetase from Methanopyrus kandleri.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Saheb; Nandi, Nilashis

    2015-08-27

    Aminoacyl tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) carry out the first step of protein biosynthesis. Several aaRSs are multimeric, and coordination between the dynamics of active sites present in each monomer is a prerequisite for the fast and accurate aminoacylation. However, important lacunae of understanding exist concerning the conformational dynamics of multimeric aaRSs. Questions remained unanswered pertaining to the dynamics of the active site. Little is known concerning the conformational dynamics of the active sites in response to the substrate binding, reorganization of the catalytic residues around reactants, time-dependent changes at the reaction center, which are essential for facilitating the nucleophilic attack, and interactions at the interface of neighboring monomers. In the present work, we carried out all-atom molecular dynamics simulation of dimeric (mk)SerRS from Methanopyrus kandleri bound with tRNA using an explicit solvent system. Two dimeric states of seryl tRNA synthetase (open, substrate bound, and adenylate bound) and two monomeric states (open and substrate bound) are simulated with bound tRNA. The aim is to understand the conformational dynamics of (mk)SerRS during its reaction cycle. While the present results provide a clear dynamical perspective of the active sites of (mk)SerRS, they corroborate with the results from the time-averaged experimental data such as crystallographic and mutation analysis of methanogenic SerRS from M. kandleri and M. barkeri. It is observed from the present simulation that the motif 2 loop gates the active site and its Glu351 and Arg360 stabilizes ATP in a bent state favorable for nucleophilic attack. The flexibility of the walls of the active site gradually reduces near reaction center, which is a more organized region compared to the lid region. The motif 2 loop anchors Ser and ATP using Arg349 in a hydrogen bonded geometry crucial for nucleophilic attack and favorably influences the electrostatic potential at the

  14. Initial results from MARmara SuperSITE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meral Ozel, Nurcan; Necmioglu, Ocal; Favali, Paolo; Douglas, John; Mathieu, Pierre-Philippe; Geli, Louis; Ergintav, Semih; Oguz Ozel, Asım; Tan, Onur; Gurbuz, Cemil; Erdik, Mustafa

    2014-05-01

    shaking measurements, has been prepared by INERIS to be set up on the field to be also set up as an early warning system prototype to be progressively parameterized and tested on near to real time condition. Slip rate on the Main Marmara Fault from 3D seismic data has been estimated and extremely young age of the North Anatolian Fault in the Sea of Marmara has been determined. Seismic risk study for IGDAS Natural Gas Network including pipelines and its components has been carried out with several earthquake scenarios in Marmara Sea. An automatic shut-off algorithm has been developed for the automatic shut-off of the gas flow at the IGDAS district regulators during an extreme event. All the European and international initiatives and projects that could have links with MARsite were identified as the initial step for the integration of data management practices and coordination with ongoing research infrastructures. EPOS and EMSO are considered to be crucial links that could provide sustainability of MARsite's developments beyond the project's lifetime. Concerning EMSO, Marmara is one of the nodes of the research infrastructure, in which a permanent installation at sea is being integrated with land-based networks. In the context of EPOS, MARsite will be a thematic core service. In addition, the data collection and dissemination in MARsite is carried out according to the data management principles of EMSO and EPOS. Dissemination activities reached a certain level of maturity through the relesea of Public Annual Report, quarterly newsletter, ID card and poster, social media interaction, dedicated web sites, videos and several conferences and workhops participated, such as GEO European Projects' Workshop, Supersites Coordination Workshop and GEO-X Plenary & Geneva Ministerial Summit .

  15. Structure of BRCA1-BRCT/Abraxas Complex Reveals Phosphorylation-Dependent BRCT Dimerization at DNA Damage Sites

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Qian; Paul, Atanu; Su, Dan; Mehmood, Shahid; Foo, Tzeh Keong; Ochi, Takashi; Bunting, Emma L.; Xia, Bing; Robinson, Carol V.; Wang, Bin; Blundell, Tom L.

    2016-01-01

    Summary BRCA1 accumulation at DNA damage sites is an important step for its function in the DNA damage response and in DNA repair. BRCA1-BRCT domains bind to proteins containing the phosphorylated serine-proline-x-phenylalanine (pSPxF) motif including Abraxas, Bach1/FancJ, and CtIP. In this study, we demonstrate that ionizing radiation (IR)-induces ATM-dependent phosphorylation of serine 404 (S404) next to the pSPxF motif. Crystal structures of BRCT/Abraxas show that phosphorylation of S404 is important for extensive interactions through the N-terminal sequence outside the pSPxF motif and leads to formation of a stable dimer. Mutation of S404 leads to deficiency in BRCA1 accumulation at DNA damage sites and cellular sensitivity to IR. In addition, two germline mutations of BRCA1 are found to disrupt the dimer interface and dimer formation. Thus, we demonstrate a mechanism involving IR-induced phosphorylation and dimerization of the BRCT/Abraxas complex for regulating Abraxas-mediated recruitment of BRCA1 in response to IR. PMID:26778126

  16. Structure of BRCA1-BRCT/Abraxas Complex Reveals Phosphorylation-Dependent BRCT Dimerization at DNA Damage Sites.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qian; Paul, Atanu; Su, Dan; Mehmood, Shahid; Foo, Tzeh Keong; Ochi, Takashi; Bunting, Emma L; Xia, Bing; Robinson, Carol V; Wang, Bin; Blundell, Tom L

    2016-02-04

    BRCA1 accumulation at DNA damage sites is an important step for its function in the DNA damage response and in DNA repair. BRCA1-BRCT domains bind to proteins containing the phosphorylated serine-proline-x-phenylalanine (pSPxF) motif including Abraxas, Bach1/FancJ, and CtIP. In this study, we demonstrate that ionizing radiation (IR)-induces ATM-dependent phosphorylation of serine 404 (S404) next to the pSPxF motif. Crystal structures of BRCT/Abraxas show that phosphorylation of S404 is important for extensive interactions through the N-terminal sequence outside the pSPxF motif and leads to formation of a stable dimer. Mutation of S404 leads to deficiency in BRCA1 accumulation at DNA damage sites and cellular sensitivity to IR. In addition, two germline mutations of BRCA1 are found to disrupt the dimer interface and dimer formation. Thus, we demonstrate a mechanism involving IR-induced phosphorylation and dimerization of the BRCT/Abraxas complex for regulating Abraxas-mediated recruitment of BRCA1 in response to IR.

  17. Specificity of DNA binding of the c-Myc/Max and ARNT/ARNT dimers at the CACGTG recognition site.

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, H I; Yang, J H

    1999-01-01

    Basic helix-loop-helix proteins that interact with the DNA recognition site CACGTG include the c-Myc/Max heterodimer and the ARNT (Ahreceptornucleartranslocator) homodimer. We have utilized a PCR-based protocol to identify high affinity binding sites of either the c-Myc/Max or ARNT/ARNT dimers and analyzed the ability of these dimers to interact with their derived consensus sequences and activate genes. chi(2)analysis of the selected DNA recognition sites revealed that DNA binding of the ARNT homodimer is symmetric, resulting in the consensus sequence RTCACGTGAY. Gel shift analysis demonstrated that the flanking nucleotides play an important role in dictating DNA binding affinity of the ARNT homodimer. These flanking sequences also regulate the ability of ARNT to competitively displace the c-Myc/Max heterodimer from a CACGTG-containing sequence. However, transient transfection analyses in CV-1 cells revealed that ARNT and c-Myc/Max exhibited similar abilities to activate transcription through each other's consensus sequences. Taken together, these results indicate that although binding affinity of these dimers for the CACGTG core sequences may be differentially influenced by flanking nucleotides, transcriptional activity may also be determined by other factors, such as cellular concentrations of these proteins and their co-activators. PMID:10454619

  18. Hydrolysis at One of the Two Nucleotide-binding Sites Drives the Dissociation of ATP-binding Cassette Nucleotide-binding Domain Dimers

    SciTech Connect

    Zoghbi, M. E.; Altenberg, G. A.

    2013-10-15

    The functional unit of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters consists of two transmembrane domains and two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs). ATP binding elicits association of the two NBDs, forming a dimer in a head-to-tail arrangement, with two nucleotides “sandwiched” at the dimer interface. Each of the two nucleotide-binding sites is formed by residues from the two NBDs. We recently found that the prototypical NBD MJ0796 from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii dimerizes in response to ATP binding and dissociates completely following ATP hydrolysis. However, it is still unknown whether dissociation of NBD dimers follows ATP hydrolysis at one or both nucleotide-binding sites. Here, we used luminescence resonance energy transfer to study heterodimers formed by one active (donor-labeled) and one catalytically defective (acceptor-labeled) NBD. Rapid mixing experiments in a stop-flow chamber showed that NBD heterodimers with one functional and one inactive site dissociated at a rate indistinguishable from that of dimers with two hydrolysis-competent sites. Comparison of the rates of NBD dimer dissociation and ATP hydrolysis indicated that dissociation followed hydrolysis of one ATP. We conclude that ATP hydrolysis at one nucleotide-binding site drives NBD dimer dissociation.

  19. Guidance on Initial Site Assessment at Corrective Action Sites

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Guidance to be used to conduct Corrective Action site assessment efforts. Informs Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permit writers and enforcement officials of procedures to be used in conducting RCRA Facility Assessments.

  20. BIOREMEDIATION FIELD INITIATIVE SITE PROFILE: ESCAMBIA WOOD PRESERVING SITE - BROOKHAVEN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Escambia Wood Preserving Site—Brookhaven in Brookhaven, Mississippi, is a former wood preserving facility that used pentachlo- rophenol (PCP) and creosote to treat wooden poles. The site contains two pressure treatment cylinders, a wastewater treatment system, five bulk pr...

  1. Definition and prediction of the full range of transcription factor binding sites—the hepatocyte nuclear factor 1 dimeric site

    PubMed Central

    Locker, Joseph; Ghosh, David; Luc, Phuong-Van; Zheng, Jianhua

    2002-01-01

    In animals, transcription factor binding sites are hard to recognize because of their extensive variation. We therefore characterized the general relationship between a specific protein-binding site and its DNA sequence and used this relationship to generate a predictive algorithm for searching other DNA sequences. The experimental process was defined by studying hepatocyte nuclear factor 1 (HNF1), which binds DNA as a dimer on two inverted-repeat 7-bp half sites separated by one base. The binding model was based on the equivalence of the two half sites, which was confirmed in examples where specific modified sites were compared. Binding competition analysis was used to determine the effects of substitution of all four bases at each position in the half site. From these data, a weighted half-site matrix was generated and the full site was evaluated as the sum of two half-site scores. This process accurately predicted even weak binding sites that were significantly different from the consensus sequence. The predictions also showed a direct correlation with measured protein binding. PMID:12202766

  2. Genome-Wide Profiling of Alternative Translation Initiation Sites.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiangwei; Wan, Ji; Qian, Shu-Bing

    2016-01-01

    Regulation of translation initiation is a central control point in protein synthesis. Variations of start codon selection contribute to protein diversity and complexity. Systemic mapping of start codon positions and precise measurement of the corresponding initiation rate would transform our understanding of translational control. Here we describe a ribosome profiling approach that enables identification of translation initiation sites on a genome-wide scale. By capturing initiating ribosomes using lactimidomycin, this approach permits qualitative and quantitative analysis of alternative translation initiation.

  3. Tyrosine and tryptophan act through the same binding site at the dimer interface of yeast chorismate mutase.

    PubMed

    Schnappauf, G; Krappmann, S; Braus, G H

    1998-07-03

    Tyrosine and tryptophan are the regulators of the dimeric yeast chorismate mutase. Biochemical studies reveal two binding sites per molecule for both effectors, tyrosine or tryptophan. A single binding site is built up by helix 8 and helices 4 and 5 of two different subunits. The binding sites have been analyzed in the active enzyme by site directed mutagenesis of critical codons of the coding gene, ARO7. Gly-141 and Ser-142, which both reside on helix 8, are involved in the binding of tyrosine or tryptophan presumably by interacting specifically with the amino- and carboxylate-groups of these amino acid effectors. Interaction with Thr-145 of helix 8 is required for a strong tyrosine binding to the allosteric site. Replacement of Arg-75, which connects helices 4 and 5 or of Arg-76, which is part of helix 5 by alanine residues, resulted in unregulated enzymes. These two residues are bonded to the carboxylate group and phenolic hydroxyl group of tyrosine, respectively, but do not interact with tryptophan by hydrogen bonding in the crystal structures. Phenylalanine, which has low binding affinity slightly activated the chorismate mutase. A T145V mutant chorismate mutase, however, showed increased activation by phenylalanine. Our results support a mechanism by which tyrosine contracts the allosteric site by interacting with its phenolic hydroxyl group. Tryptophan works in an inverse way by opening the allosteric site through the steric size of its side chain.

  4. RNA Dimerization Promotes PKR Dimerization and Activation

    PubMed Central

    Heinicke, Laurie A.; Wong, C. Jason; Lary, Jeffrey; Nallagatla, Subba Rao; Diegelman-Parente, Amy; Zheng, Xiaofeng; Cole, James L.; Bevilacqua, Philip C.

    2009-01-01

    The double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-activated protein kinase (PKR) plays a major role in the innate immune response in humans. PKR binds dsRNA non-sequence specifically and requires a minimum of 15 bp dsRNA for one protein to bind and 30 bp dsRNA to induce protein dimerization and activation by autophosphorylation. PKR phosphorylates eIF2α, a translation initiation factor, resulting in the inhibition of protein synthesis. We investigated the mechanism of PKR activation by an RNA hairpin with a number of base pairs intermediate between these 15 to 30 bp limits: HIV-I TAR RNA, a 23 bp hairpin with three bulges that is known to dimerize. To test whether RNA dimerization affects PKR dimerization and activation, TAR monomers and dimers were isolated from native gels and assayed for RNA and protein dimerization. To modulate the extent of dimerization, we included TAR mutants with different secondary features. Native gel mixing experiments and analytical ultracentrifugation indicate that TAR monomers bind one PKR monomer and that TAR dimers bind two or three PKRs, demonstrating that RNA dimerization drives the binding of multiple PKR molecules. Consistent with functional dimerization of PKR, TAR dimers activated PKR while TAR monomers did not, and RNA dimers with fewer asymmetrical secondary structure defects, as determined by enzymatic structure mapping, were more potent activators. Thus, the secondary structure defects in the TAR RNA stem function as antideterminants to PKR binding and activation. Our studies support that dimerization of a 15–30 bp hairpin RNA, which effectively doubles its length, is a key step in driving activation of PKR and provide a model for how RNA folding can be related to human disease. PMID:19445956

  5. Communication between the Zinc and Nickel Sites in Dimeric HypA: Metal Recognition and pH Sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Herbst, R.; Perovic, I; Martin-Diaconescu, V; O’Brien, K; Chivers, P; Sondej Pochapsky, S; Pochapsky, T; Maroney, M

    2010-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori, a pathogen that colonizes the human stomach, requires the nickel-containing metalloenzymes urease and NiFe-hydrogenase to survive this low pH environment. The maturation of both enzymes depends on the metallochaperone, HypA. HypA contains two metal sites, an intrinsic zinc site and a low-affinity nickel binding site. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) shows that the structure of the intrinsic zinc site of HypA is dynamic and able to sense both nickel loading and pH changes. At pH 6.3, an internal pH that occurs during acid shock, the zinc site undergoes unprecedented ligand substitutions to convert from a Zn(Cys){sub 4} site to a Zn(His){sub 2}(Cys){sub 2} site. NMR spectroscopy shows that binding of Ni(II) to HypA results in paramagnetic broadening of resonances near the N-terminus. NOEs between the {beta}-CH{sub 2} protons of Zn cysteinyl ligands are consistent with a strand-swapped HypA dimer. Addition of nickel causes resonances from the zinc binding motif and other regions to double, indicating more than one conformation can exist in solution. Although the structure of the high-spin, 5-6 coordinate Ni(II) site is relatively unaffected by pH, the nickel binding stoichiometry is decreased from one per monomer to one per dimer at pH = 6.3. Mutation of any cysteine residue in the zinc binding motif results in a zinc site structure similar to that found for holo-WT-HypA at low pH and is unperturbed by the addition of nickel. Mutation of the histidines that flank the CXXC motifs results in a zinc site structure that is similar to holo-WT-HypA at neutral pH (Zn(Cys){sub 4}) and is no longer responsive to nickel binding or pH changes. Using an in vitro urease activity assay, it is shown that the recombinant protein is sufficient for recovery of urease activity in cell lysate from a HypA deletion mutant, and that mutations in the zinc-binding motif result in a decrease in recovered urease activity. The results are interpreted in terms of a model

  6. Persistence of magnons in a site-diluted dimerized frustrated antiferromagnet

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, Matthew B; Podlesnyak, Andrey A; Ehlers, Georg; Huq, Ashfia; Samulon, Eric C; Shapiro, Max C; Fisher, Ian R

    2011-01-01

    We present inelastic neutron scattering and thermodynamic measurements characterizing the magnetic excitations in a disordered non-magnetic substituted spin-liquid antiferromagnet. The parent compound Ba3Mn2O8 is a dimerized, quasi-two-dimensional geometrically frustrated quantum disordered antiferromagnet. We substitute this compound with non-magnetic vanadium for the S = 1 manganese atoms, Ba3(Mn1-xVx)2O8, and find that the singlet-triplet excitations which dominate the spectrum of the parent compound persist for the full range of substitution examined, x = 0.02 to 0.3. We also observe additional low-energy magnetic fluctuations which are enhanced at the greatest substitution values. These excitations may be a precursor to a low-temperature random singlet phase which may exist in Ba3(Mn1-xVx)2O8.

  7. Site-selective ionization of ethanol dimer under the tunable synchrotron VUV radiation and its subsequent fragmentation.

    PubMed

    Li, Weixing; Hu, Yongjun; Guan, Jiwen; Liu, Fuyi; Shan, Xiaobin; Sheng, Liusi

    2013-07-14

    Site-selective ionization of ethanol dimer and the subsequent fragmentation were studied by synchrotron vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization mass spectrometry. With photoionization efficiency spectra measurements and theoretical calculations, the detailed mechanisms of the ionization-dissociation processes of ethanol dimer under VUV irradiation were explored. In 9.49-10.89 eV photon energy range, it was found that the ejection of the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) electron from hydrogen bond donor induces a rapid barrierless proton-transfer process followed by two competitive dissociation channels, generating (C2H5OH)[middle dot]H(+) and CH2O[middle dot](C2H5OH)H(+), respectively. The latter comes from a carbon-carbon bond cleavage in the donor. While the photon energy is 10.9-11.58 eV, the electron of HOMO-1 of the hydrogen bond acceptor, is removed. Besides the dissociation channel to produce C2H5OH and C2H5OH(+), a new channel to generate (C2H5OH)[middle dot]CH2OH(+) is opened, where the cleavage of the carbon-carbon bond occurs in the acceptor. When the photon energy increases to 11.58 eV, the electron from HOMO-2 is ejected.

  8. A structural study of the K adsorption site on a Si(001)2 × 1 surface: Dimer, caves or both

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asensio, M. C.; Michel, E. G.; Alvarez, J.; Ocal, C.; Miranda, R.; Ferrer, S.

    1989-04-01

    The atomic structure of the clean Si(100) and K covered surfaces has been investigated by Auger electron diffraction (AED) monitoring the intensities along polar scans. This technique is sensitive to the asymmetric-dimer nature of the 2 × 1 reconstruction of the Si(001) surface. Data taken at room temperature for submonolayer coverages are consistent with adsorption of K on the troughs (cave position) existing between two consecutive dimer chains along the [110] direction. At 110 K both dimer and cave sites are occupied. A mild annealing to 300 K produces an overlayer redistribution in favor of the "cave" site further indicating that this site is energetically favoured as found in some recent calculations.

  9. Rapid deamination of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer photoproducts at TCG sites in a translationally and rotationally positioned nucleosome in vivo.

    PubMed

    Cannistraro, Vincent J; Pondugula, Santhi; Song, Qian; Taylor, John-Stephen

    2015-10-30

    Sunlight-induced C to T mutation hot spots in skin cancers occur primarily at methylated CpG sites that coincide with sites of UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) formation. The C and 5-methyl-C in CPDs are not stable and deaminate to U and T, respectively, which leads to the insertion of A by the DNA damage bypass polymerase η, thereby defining a probable mechanism for the origin of UV-induced C to T mutations. Deamination rates for T(m)CG CPDs have been found to vary 12-fold with rotational position in a nucleosome in vitro. To determine the influence of nucleosome structure on deamination rates in vivo, we determined the deamination rates of CPDs at TCG sites in a stably positioned nucleosome within the FOS promoter in HeLa cells. A procedure for in vivo hydroxyl radical footprinting with Fe-EDTA was developed, and, together with results from a cytosine methylation protection assay, we determined the translational and rotational positions of the TCG sites. Consistent with the in vitro observations, deamination was slower for one CPD located at an intermediate rotational position compared with two other sites located at outside positions, and all were much faster than for CPDs at non-TCG sites. Photoproduct formation was also highly suppressed at one site, possibly due to its interaction with a histone tail. Thus, it was shown that CPDs of TCG sites deaminate the fastest in vivo and that nucleosomes can modulate both their formation and deamination, which could contribute to the UV mutation hot spots and cold spots.

  10. Young Adult Capacity Initiative Cross-Site Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Academy for Educational Development, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This cross-site analysis presents findings about the implementation, impact, and outcomes of the Young Adult Capacity Initiative (YACI), at 13 community-based organizations in New York City. These agencies received technical assistance and small incentive grants from the Fund for the City of New York Youth Development Institute (YDI) to build…

  11. AB-type lectin (toxin/agglutinin) from mistletoe: differences in affinity of the two galactoside-binding Trp/Tyr-sites and regulation of their functionality by monomer/dimer equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Marta; André, Sabine; Siebert, Hans-C; Gabius, Hans-J; Solís, Dolores

    2006-10-01

    Viscumin of mistletoe (Viscum album L.) has a concentration-dependent activity profile unique to plant AB-toxins. It starts with lectin-dependent mitogenicity and then covers toxicity and cell agglutination, associated with shifts in the monomer/dimer equilibrium. Each lectin subunit harbors two sections for ligand contact. In the dimer, the B-chain sites in subdomain 2 gamma (designated as the Tyr-sites) appear fully accessible, whereas Trp-sites in subdomain 1 alpha are close to the dimer interface. It is unclear whether both types of sites operate similarly in binding glycoligands in solution. By systematically covering a broad range of lactose/lectin ratio in isothermal titration calorimetry, we obtained evidence for two sites showing dissimilar binding affinity. Intriguingly, the site with higher affinity was only partially occupied. To assign the observed properties to the Trp/Tyr-sites, we next performed chemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization measurements of Trp and Tyr accessibility. A Tyr signal, but not distinct Trp peaks, was recorded when testing the dimer. Lactose-quenchable Trp peaks became visible on the destabilization of the dimer by citraconylation, intimating Trp involvement in ligand contact in the monomer. Fittingly, Tyr acetylation but not mild Trp oxidation reduced the dimer hemagglutination activity and the extent of binding to asialofetuin-Sepharose 4B. Altogether, the results attribute lectin activity in the dimer primarily to Tyr-sites. Full access to Trp-sites is gained on dimer dissociation. Thus, the monomer/dimer equilibrium of viscumin regulates the operativity of these sites. Their structural divergence affords the possibility for differences in ligand selection when comparing monomers (Tyr- and Trp-sites) with dimers (primarily Tyr-sites).

  12. Wall shear stress at the initiation site of cerebral aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Geers, A J; Morales, H G; Larrabide, I; Butakoff, C; Bijlenga, P; Frangi, A F

    2017-02-01

    Hemodynamics are believed to play an important role in the initiation of cerebral aneurysms. In particular, studies have focused on wall shear stress (WSS), which is a key regulator of vascular biology and pathology. In line with the observation that aneurysms predominantly occur at regions of high WSS, such as bifurcation apices or outer walls of vascular bends, correlations have been found between the aneurysm initiation site and high WSS. The aim of our study was to analyze the WSS field at an aneurysm initiation site that was neither a bifurcation apex nor the outer wall of a vascular bend. Ten cases with aneurysms on the A1 segment of the anterior cerebral artery were analyzed and compared with ten controls. Aneurysms were virtually removed from the vascular models of the cases to mimic the pre-aneurysm geometry. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations were created to assess the magnitude, gradient, multidirectionality, and pulsatility of the WSS. To aid the inter-subject comparison of hemodynamic variables, we mapped the branch surfaces onto a two-dimensional parametric space. This approach made it possible to view the whole branch at once for qualitative evaluation. It also allowed us to empirically define a patch for quantitative analysis, which was consistent among subjects and encapsulated the aneurysm initiation sites in our dataset. To test the sensitivity of our results, CFD simulations were repeated with a second independent observer virtually removing the aneurysms and with a 20 % higher flow rate at the inlet. We found that branches harboring aneurysms were characterized by high WSS and high WSS gradients. Among all assessed variables, the aneurysm initiation site most consistently coincided with peaks of temporal variation in the WSS magnitude.

  13. Sites of preferential induction of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers in the nontranscribed strand of lacI correspond with sites of UV-induced mutation in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Koehler, D.R.; Awadallah, S.S.; Glickman, B.W. )

    1991-06-25

    An approach utilizing fluorescence-activated DNA sequencing technology was used to study the position and frequency of UV-induced lesions in the lacI gene of Escherichia coli. The spectrum of sites of UV damage in the NC+ region of the gene was compared with a published spectrum of UV-induced mutation in lacI . On average, the frequency of UV-induced lesions in the nontranscribed strand was higher than that in the transcribed strand in the region analyzed. A large fraction of mutations occurs at sites of UV-induced lesions in the nontranscribed strand, but not in the transcribed strand. This bias is reduced in an excision repair deficient (UvrB-) strain. In addition, mutations occur overwhelmingly at sites where a dipyrimidine sequence is present in the nontranscribed strand. This bias is also markedly reduced in the UvrB- strain. In light of recent work Mellon and Hanawalt describing the preferential removal of cyclobutane dimers from the transcribed strand of the expressed lacZ gene in E. coli, our data suggest that preferential strand repair may have a significant effect on mutagenesis.

  14. Translation from unconventional 5′ start sites drives tumour initiation

    PubMed Central

    Sendoel, Ataman; Dunn, Joshua G.; Rodriguez, Edwin H.; Naik, Shruti; Gomez, Nicholas C.; Hurwitz, Brian; Levorse, John; Dill, Brian D.; Schramek, Daniel; Molina, Henrik; Weissman, Jonathan S.; Fuchs, Elaine

    2017-01-01

    We are just beginning to understand how translational control affects tumour initiation and malignancy. Here we use an epidermis-specific, in vivo ribosome profiling strategy to investigate the translational landscape during the transition from normal homeostasis to malignancy. Using a mouse model of inducible SOX2, which is broadly expressed in oncogenic RAS-associated cancers, we show that despite widespread reductions in translation and protein synthesis, certain oncogenic mRNAs are spared. During tumour initiation, the translational apparatus is redirected towards unconventional upstream initiation sites, enhancing the translational efficiency of oncogenic mRNAs. An in vivo RNA interference screen of translational regulators revealed that depletion of conventional eIF2 complexes has adverse effects on normal but not oncogenic growth. Conversely, the alternative initiation factor eIF2A is essential for cancer progression, during which it mediates initiation at these upstream sites, differentially skewing translation and protein expression. Our findings unveil a role for the translation of 5′ untranslated regions in cancer, and expose new targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:28077873

  15. BAX Activation is Initiated at a Novel Interaction Site

    PubMed Central

    Gavathiotis, Evripidis; Suzuki, Motoshi; Davis, Marguerite L.; Pitter, Kenneth; Bird, Gregory H.; Katz, Samuel G.; Tu, Ho-Chou; Kim, Hyungjin; Cheng, Emily H.-Y.; Tjandra, Nico; Walensky, Loren D.

    2008-01-01

    BAX is a pro-apoptotic protein of the BCL-2 family stationed in the cytosol until activated by a diversity of stress stimuli to induce cell death. Anti-apoptotic proteins such as BCL-2 counteract BAX-mediated cell death. Although an interaction site that confers survival functionality has been defined for anti-apoptotic proteins, an activation site has not been identified for BAX, rendering its explicit trigger mechanism unknown. We previously developed Stabilized Alpha-Helix of BCL-2 domains (SAHBs) that directly initiate BAX-mediated mitochondrial apoptosis. Here we demonstrate by NMR analysis that BIM SAHB binds BAX at an interaction site that is distinct from the canonical binding groove characterized for anti-apoptotic proteins. The specificity of the BIM SAHB-BAX interaction is highlighted by point mutagenesis that abrogates functional activity, confirming that BAX activation is initiated at this novel structural location. Thus, we have now defined a BAX interaction site for direct activation, establishing a new target for therapeutic modulation of apoptosis. PMID:18948948

  16. Increased Stability and DNA Site Discrimination of Single Chain Variants of the Dimeric beta-Barrel DNA Binding Domain of the Human Papillomavirus E2 Transcriptional Regulator

    SciTech Connect

    Dellarole,M.; Sanchez, I.; Freire, E.; de Prat-Gay, G.

    2007-01-01

    Human papillomavirus infects millions of people worldwide and is a causal agent of cervical cancer in women. The HPV E2 protein controls the expression of all viral genes through binding of its dimeric C-terminal domain (E2C) to its target DNA site. We engineered monomeric versions of the HPV16 E2C, in order to probe the link of the dimeric {beta}-barrel fold to stability, dimerization, and DNA binding. Two single-chain variants, with 6 and 12 residue linkers (scE2C-6 and scE2C-12), were purified and characterized. Spectroscopy and crystallography show that the native structure is unperturbed in scE2C-12. The single chain variants are stabilized with respect to E2C, with effective concentrations of 0.6 to 6 mM. The early folding events of the E2C dimer and scE2C-12 are very similar and include formation of a compact species in the submillisecond time scale and a non-native monomeric intermediate with a half-life of 25 ms. However, monomerization changes the unfolding mechanism of the linked species from two-state to three-state, with a high-energy intermediate. Binding to the specific target site is up to 5-fold tighter in the single chain variants. Nonspecific DNA binding is up to 7-fold weaker in the single chain variants, leading to an overall 10-fold increased site discrimination capacity, the largest described so far for linked DNA binding domains. Titration calorimetric binding analysis, however, shows almost identical behavior for dimer and single-chain species, suggesting very subtle changes behind the increased specificity. Global analysis of the mechanisms probed suggests that the dynamics of the E2C domain, rather than the structure, are responsible for the differential properties. Thus, the plastic and dimeric nature of the domain did not evolve for a maximum affinity, specificity, and stability of the quaternary structure, likely because of regulatory reasons and for roles other than DNA binding played by partly folded dimeric or monomeric conformers.

  17. Evidence for dimerization of dimers in K+ channel assembly.

    PubMed Central

    Tu, L; Deutsch, C

    1999-01-01

    Voltage-gated K+ channels are tetrameric, but how the four subunits assemble is not known. We analyzed inactivation kinetics and peak current levels elicited for a variety of wild-type and mutant Kv1.3 subunits, expressed singly, in combination, and as tandem constructs, to show that 1) the dominant pathway involves a dimerization of dimers, and 2) dimer-dimer interaction may involve interaction sites that differ from those involved in monomer-monomer association. Moreover, using nondenaturing gel electrophoresis, we detected dimers and tetramers, but not trimers, in the translation reaction of Kv1.3 monomers. PMID:10096897

  18. Initial CRISM Observations of the Candidate 2007 Phoenix Landing Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seelos, K. D.; Murchie, S.; Arvidson, R. E.; Seelos, F. P.

    2006-12-01

    The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) will acquire multispectral and targeted hyperspectral visible and near infrared data of the candidate Phoenix landing sites during the first few months of primary mission operations (beginning early November). Three 150 x 75 km candidate Phoenix landing sites are located in the high northern plains of Mars within a region from 65-72° N and 120-140° E. Geomorphologic characterization of this region indicates a relatively homogeneous terrain primarily composed of multiple kilometer-scale polygonal plains with superposed degraded craters. At decameter spatial scales, the area is ubiquitously covered by patterned ground in the form of basketball terrain, stripes, and small polygons. Spectral variation of these different types of landforms and materials that are detected by CRISM at 100- or 200-meter scales (multispectral) or ~20-meter scales (targeted hyperspectral) will be analyzed and initial results presented. Implications for Phoenix landing site selection and in situ measurements will also be discussed. CRISM observations along with other MRO data will be critical to the selection of the final landing site prior to launch in August of 2007.

  19. Measurement of dimeric inhibin using a modified two-site immunoradiometric assay specific for oxidized (Met O) inhibin.

    PubMed

    Knight, P G; Muttukrishna, S

    1994-06-01

    Several years ago we developed a novel two-site immunoradiometric assay (IRMA) for dimeric inhibin. However, relative to the purified 32 kDa bovine inhibin standard used at that time, the immunopotencies of crude inhibin-containing samples were much less than their biopotencies estimated by pituitary cell bioassay. In attempting to improve assay performance and resolve this discrepancy we recently discovered that introduction of a preassay oxidation step to the IRMA results in a dramatic increase in the immunopotencies of inhibin-containing test samples (e.g.: bovine, human, porcine follicular fluid (FF)) and of a new (purified in 1993) 32 kDa bovine inhibin standard. However, the oxidation step did not affect the immunopotency of our original standard (purified in 1987), indicating that this material had undergone spontaneous oxidation during long-term storage, thus accounting for its higher immunopotency in our original IRMA and providing an explanation for the discrepancy between immunoactivity and bioactivity referred to above. These findings, together with other observations on the behaviour of oxidized and non-oxidized samples of inhibin, related peptide fragments and inhibin-containing samples in the IRMA and alpha subunit radioimmunoassay (RIA), indicate that the anti-beta A82-114 monoclonal antibody (E4) used as tracer in the IRMA binds selectively to the oxidized (Met O89,91,108) form of the peptide. This property of the antibody can be exploited to advantage by incorporating simple modifications to existing inhibin/activin immunoassays to ensure that all samples and standards are fully oxidized before antibody addition.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Equilibrium unfolding studies of the rat liver methionine adenosyltransferase III, a dimeric enzyme with intersubunit active sites.

    PubMed Central

    Gasset, María; Alfonso, Carlos; Neira, José L; Rivas, Germán; Pajares, María A

    2002-01-01

    The reversible unfolding of rat liver methionine adenosyltransferase dimer by urea under equilibrium conditions has been monitored by fluorescence spectroscopy, CD, size-exclusion chromatography, analytical ultracentrifugation and enzyme activity measurements. The results obtained indicate that unfolding takes place through a three-state mechanism, involving an inactive monomeric intermediate. This intermediate has a 70% native secondary structure, binds less 8-anilinonaphthalene-1-sulphonic acid than the native dimer and has a sedimentation coefficient of 4.24+/-0.15. The variations of free energy in the absence of denaturant [DeltaG(H(2)O)] and its coefficients of urea dependence (m), calculated by the linear extrapolation model, were 36.15+/-2.3 kJ.mol(-1) and 19.87+/-0.71 kJ.mol(-1).M(-1) for the dissociation of the native dimer and 14.77+/-1.63 kJ.mol(-1) and 5.23+/-0.21 kJ.mol(-1).M(-1) for the unfolding of the monomeric intermediate respectively. Thus the global free energy change in the absence of denaturant and the m coefficient were calculated to be 65.69 kJ.mol(-1) and 30.33 kJ.mol(-1).M(-1) respectively. Analysis of the calculated thermodynamical parameters indicate the instability of the dimer in the presence of denaturant, and that the major exposure to the solvent is due to dimer dissociation. Finally, a minimum-folding mechanism for methionine adenosyltransferase III is established. PMID:11772402

  1. Photoionization-induced π↔ H site switching dynamics in phenol(+)-Rg (Rg = Ar, Kr) dimers probed by picosecond time-resolved infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Mitsuhiko; Sakata, Yuri; Schütz, Markus; Dopfer, Otto; Fujii, Masaaki

    2016-09-21

    The ionization-induced π↔ H site switching reaction in phenol(+)-Rg (PhOH(+)-Rg) dimers with Rg = Ar and Kr is traced in real time by picosecond time-resolved infrared (ps-TRIR) spectroscopy. The ps-TRIR spectra show the prompt appearance of the non-vanishing free OH stretching band upon resonant photoionization of the π-bound neutral clusters, and the delayed appearance of the hydrogen-bonded (H-bonded) OH stretching band. This result directly proves that the Rg ligand switches from the π-bound site on the aromatic ring to the H-bonded site at the OH group by ionization. The subsequent H →π back reaction converges the dimer to a π↔ H equilibrium. This result is in sharp contrast to the single-step π→ H forward reaction in the PhOH(+)-Ar2 trimer with 100% yield. The reaction mechanism and yield strongly depend on intracluster vibrational energy redistribution. A classical rate equation analysis for the time evolutions of the band intensities of the two vibrations results in similar estimates for the time constants of the π→ H forward reaction of τ+ = 122 and 73 ps and the H →π back reaction of τ- = 155 and 188 ps for PhOH(+)-Ar and PhOH(+)-Kr, respectively. The one order of magnitude slower time constant in comparison to the PhOH(+)-Ar2 trimer (τ+ = 7 ps) is attributed to the decrease in density of states due to the absence of the second Ar in the dimer. The similar time constants for both PhOH(+)-Rg dimers are well rationalized by a classical interpretation based on the comparable potential energy surfaces, reaction pathways, and density of states arising from their similar intermolecular vibrational frequencies.

  2. Half-site reactivity with p-nitrophenylhydrazine and subunit separation of the dimeric copper-containing amine oxidase from Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    Frébort, I; Toyama, H; Matsushita, K; Adachi, O

    1995-08-01

    Structural properties of dimeric (2 x 75 kDa) copper-containing amine oxidase (EC 1.4.3.6) from Aspergillus niger were studied. The enzyme treated with SDS was dissociated into subunits which showed different mobility on polyacrylamide gel without SDS. The separated subunits had no activity but a quinone moiety was detected in both by a redox-cyclic quinone staining. After titration of the enzyme with p-nitrophenylhydrazine, which showed half-site reactivity (1 mole per dimer), and SDS treatment both p-nitro-phenylhydrazone and a remaining quinone moiety were detected in each subunit. It is suggested that the half-site reactivity with phenylhydrazine is caused by conformational changes after binding of the inhibitor to any one of the active sites leading to inaccessibility of the second active site for the inhibitor. The difference in electrophoretic mobility of the separated subunits originates probably from their structural difference likely to occur outside the active site, even if the amino acid sequences of the subunits appear to be identical.

  3. Gene and translation initiation site prediction in metagenomic sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Hyatt, Philip Douglas; LoCascio, Philip F; Hauser, Loren John; Uberbacher, Edward C

    2012-01-01

    Gene prediction in metagenomic sequences remains a difficult problem. Current sequencing technologies do not achieve sufficient coverage to assemble the individual genomes in a typical sample; consequently, sequencing runs produce a large number of short sequences whose exact origin is unknown. Since these sequences are usually smaller than the average length of a gene, algorithms must make predictions based on very little data. We present MetaProdigal, a metagenomic version of the gene prediction program Prodigal, that can identify genes in short, anonymous coding sequences with a high degree of accuracy. The novel value of the method consists of enhanced translation initiation site identification, ability to identify sequences that use alternate genetic codes and confidence values for each gene call. We compare the results of MetaProdigal with other methods and conclude with a discussion of future improvements.

  4. Identification of the initiation site of poliovirus polyprotein synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Dorner, A.J.; Dorner, L.F.; Larsen, G.R.; Wimmer, E.; Anderson, C.W.

    1982-06-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of poliovirus RNA has a long open reading frame capable of encoding the precursor polyprotein NCVPOO. The first AUG codon in this reading frame is located 743 nucleotides from the 5' end of the RNA and is preceded by eight AUG codons in all three reading frames. Because all proteins that map at the amino terminus of the polyprotein (P1-1a, VPO, and VP4) are blocked at their amino termini and previous studies of ribosome binding have been inconclusive, direct identification of the initiation site of protein synthesis was difficult. We separated and identified all of the tryptic peptides of capsid protein VP4 and correlated these peptides with the amino acid sequence predicted to follow the AUG codon at nucleotide 743. Our data indicate that VP4 begins with a blocked glycine that is encoded immediately after the AUG codon at nucleotide 743. An S1 nuclease analysis of poliovirus mRNA failed to reveal a splice in the 5' region. We concluded that synthesis of poliovirus polyprotein is initiated at nucleotide 743, the first AUG codon in the long open reading frame.

  5. Collective motion of dimers.

    PubMed

    Penington, Catherine J; Korvasová, Karolína; Hughes, Barry D; Landman, Kerry A

    2012-11-01

    We consider a discrete agent-based model on a one-dimensional lattice and a two-dimensional square lattice, where each agent is a dimer occupying two sites. Agents move by vacating one occupied site in favor of a nearest-neighbor site and obey either a strict simple exclusion rule or a weaker constraint that permits partial overlaps between dimers. Using indicator variables and careful probability arguments, a discrete-time master equation for these processes is derived systematically within a mean-field approximation. In the continuum limit, nonlinear diffusion equations that describe the average agent occupancy of the dimer population are obtained. In addition, we show that multiple species of interacting subpopulations give rise to advection-diffusion equations. Averaged discrete simulation data compares very well with the solution to the continuum partial differential equation models. Since many cell types are elongated rather than circular, this work offers insight into population-level behavior of collective cellular motion.

  6. Initiatives to Develop Web Sites Including Information about Brownfields Properties

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This web site was created to assist in planning, designing, and operating web sites that include information about individual brownfields properties. The report is of value to parties designing or managing such sites.

  7. Crystal structure of native and Cd/Cd-substituted Dioclea guianensis seed lectin. A novel manganese-binding site and structural basis of dimer-tetramer association.

    PubMed

    Wah, D A; Romero, A; Gallego del Sol, F; Cavada, B S; Ramos, M V; Grangeiro, T B; Sampaio, A H; Calvete, J J

    2001-07-20

    Diocleinae legume lectins are a group of oligomeric proteins whose subunits display a high degree of primary structure and tertiary fold conservation but exhibit considerable diversity in their oligomerisation modes. To elucidate the structural determinants underlaying Diocleinae lectin oligomerisation, we have determined the crystal structures of native and cadmium-substituted Dioclea guianensis (Dguia) seed lectin. These structures have been solved by molecular replacement using concanavalin (ConA) coordinates as the starting model, and refined against data to 2.0 A resolution. In the native (Mn/Ca-Dguia) crystal form (P4(3)2(1)2), the asymmetric unit contains two monomers arranged into a canonical legume lectin dimer, and the tetramer is formed with a symmetry-related dimer. In the Cd/Cd-substituted form (I4(1)22), the asymmetric unit is occupied by a monomer. In both crystal forms, the tetrameric association is achieved by the corresponding symmetry operators. Like other legume lectins, native D. guianensis lectin contains manganese and calcium ions bound in the vicinity of the saccharide-combining site. The architecture of these metal-binding sites (S1 and S2) changed only slightly in the cadmium/cadmium-substituted form. A highly ordered calcium (native lectin) or cadmium (Cd/Cd-substituted lectin) ion is coordinated at the interface between dimers that are not tetrameric partners in a similar manner as the previously identified Cd(2+) in site S3 of a Cd/Ca-ConA. An additional Mn(2+) coordination site (called S5), whose presence has not been reported in crystal structures of any other homologous lectin, is present in both, the Mn/Ca and the Cd/Cd-substituted D. guianensis lectin forms. On the other hand, comparison of the primary and quaternary crystal structures of seed lectins from D. guianensis and Dioclea grandiflora (1DGL) indicates that the loop comprising residues 117-123 is ordered to make interdimer contacts in the D. grandiflora lectin structure

  8. Selective synthesis and characterization of single-site HY zeolite-supported rhodium complexes and their use as catalysts for ethylene hydrogenation and dimerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khivantsev, Konstantin

    Single-site Rh(CO)2, Rh(C2H4)2 and Rh(NO)2 complexes anchored on various dealuminated HY zeolites can be used as precursors for the selective surface mediated synthesis of well-defined site-isolated Rh(CO)(H)x complexes. DFT calculations and D 2 isotope exchange experiments provide strong evidence for the formation of a family of site isolated mononuclear rhodium carbonyl hydride complexes (including the first examples of RhH complexes with undissociated H2 ligands): Rh(CO)(H2), Rh(CO)(H)2, and Rh(CO)(H). The fraction of each individual complex formed varies significantly with the Si/Al ratio of the zeolite and the nature of the precursor used. HY zeolite-supported mononuclear Rh(CO)2 complexes are very active in ethylene hydrogenation and ethylene dimerization under ambient conditions. There is strong evidence for the cooperation mechanism between mononuclear rhodium complexes and Bronsted acid sites of the zeolite support in C-C bond formation process, as well as ethane formation. Finally, it is shown that the dimerization pathway selectivity can be progressively tuned (and completely switched off) by modifying the number of Bronsted acid sites on the zeolite surface. HY zeolite-supported mononuclear Rh(NO)2 complexes can be selectively formed upon exposure of Rh(CO)2/HY to the gas phase NO/He. They are structurally similar to Rh(CO)2/HY with Rh(I) retaining square planar geometry and nitrosyl ligands adopting a linear configuration. Rh(NO)2/HY30 is active in ethylene hydrogenation and ethylene dimerization under ambient conditions. This is the first unprecedented example of a supported transition-metal nitrosyl complex capable of performing a catalytic reaction. Moreover, this is the first example of a site-isolated Rh complex with ligands other than ethylene or carbonyl, which can catalyze both ethylene hydrogenation and dimerization. Unlike its dicarbonyl counterpart, dinitrosyl rhodium complex has a uniquely different reactivity towards ethylene and hydrogen

  9. Characterization of mAb dimers reveals predominant dimer forms common in therapeutic mAbs

    PubMed Central

    Plath, Friederike; Ringler, Philippe; Graff-Meyer, Alexandra; Stahlberg, Henning; Lauer, Matthias E.; Rufer, Arne C.; Graewert, Melissa A.; Svergun, Dmitri; Gellermann, Gerald; Finkler, Christof; Stracke, Jan O.; Koulov, Atanas; Schnaible, Volker

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The formation of undesired high molecular weight species such as dimers is an important quality attribute for therapeutic monoclonal antibody formulations. Therefore, the thorough understanding of mAb dimerization and the detailed characterization mAb dimers is of great interest for future pharmaceutical development of therapeutic antibodies. In this work, we focused on the analyses of different mAb dimers regarding size, surface properties, chemical identity, overall structure and localization of possible dimerization sites. Dimer fractions of different mAbs were isolated to a satisfactory purity from bulk material and revealed 2 predominant overall structures, namely elongated and compact dimer forms. The elongated dimers displayed one dimerization site involving the tip of the Fab domain. Depending on the stress applied, these elongated dimers are connected either covalently or non-covalently. In contrast, the compact dimers exhibited non-covalent association. Several interaction points were detected for the compact dimers involving the hinge region or the base of the Fab domain. These results indicate that mAb dimer fractions are rather complex and may contain more than one kind of dimer. Nevertheless, the overall appearance of mAb dimers suggests the existence of 2 predominant dimeric structures, elongated and compact, which are commonly present in preparations of therapeutic mAbs. PMID:27031922

  10. Heat capacity of the site-diluted spin dimer system Ba₃(Mn1-xVx)₂O₈

    DOE PAGES

    Samulon, E. C.; Shapiro, M. C.; Fisher, I. R.

    2011-08-05

    Heat-capacity and susceptibility measurements have been performed on the diluted spin dimer compound Ba₃(Mn1-xVx)₂O₈. The parent compound Ba₃Mn₂O₈ is a spin dimer system based on pairs of antiferromagnetically coupled S=1, 3d² Mn⁵⁺ ions such that the zero-field ground state is a product of singlets. Substitution of nonmagnetic S=0, 3d⁰ V⁵⁺ ions leads to an interacting network of unpaired Mn moments, the low-temperature properties of which are explored in the limit of small concentrations 0≤x≤0.05. The zero-field heat capacity of this diluted system reveals a progressive removal of magnetic entropy over an extended range of temperatures, with no evidence for amore » phase transition. The concentration dependence does not conform to expectations for a spin-glass state. Rather, the data suggest a low-temperature random singlet phase, reflecting the hierarchy of exchange energies found in this system.« less

  11. Global Structure of a Three-Way Junction in a Phi29 Packaging RNA Dimer Determined Using Site-Directed Spin Labeling

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xiaojun; Tung, Chang-Shung; Sowa, Glenna; Hatmal, Ma'mon M.; Haworth, Ian S.; Qin, Peter Z.

    2012-02-08

    The condensation of bacteriophage phi29 genomic DNA into its preformed procapsid requires the DNA packaging motor, which is the strongest known biological motor. The packaging motor is an intricate ring-shaped protein/RNA complex, and its function requires an RNA component called packaging RNA (pRNA). Current structural information on pRNA is limited, which hinders studies of motor function. Here, we used site-directed spin labeling to map the conformation of a pRNA three-way junction that bridges binding sites for the motor ATPase and the procapsid. The studies were carried out on a pRNA dimer, which is the simplest ring-shaped pRNA complex and serves as a functional intermediate during motor assembly. Using a nucleotide-independent labeling scheme, stable nitroxide radicals were attached to eight specific pRNA sites without perturbing RNA folding and dimer formation, and a total of 17 internitroxide distances spanning the three-way junction were measured using Double Electron-Electron Resonance spectroscopy. The measured distances, together with steric chemical constraints, were used to select 3662 viable three-way junction models from a pool of 65 billion. The results reveal a similar conformation among the viable models, with two of the helices (HT and HL) adopting an acute bend. This is in contrast to a recently reported pRNA tetramer crystal structure, in which HT and HL stack onto each other linearly. The studies establish a new method for mapping global structures of complex RNA molecules, and provide information on pRNA conformation that aids investigations of phi29 packaging motor and developments of pRNA-based nanomedicine and nanomaterial.

  12. Global Structure of a Three-Way Junction in a Phi29 Packaging RNA Dimer Determined Using Site-Directed Spin Labeling

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaojun; Tung, Chang-Shung; Sowa, Glenna Z.; Hatmal, Ma’mon M.; Haworth, Ian S.; Qin, Peter Z.

    2012-01-01

    The condensation of bacteriophage phi29 genomic DNA into its preformed procapsid requires the DNA packaging motor, which is the strongest known biological motor. The packaging motor is an intricate ring-shaped protein/ RNA complex, and its function requires an RNA component called packaging RNA (pRNA). Current structural information on pRNA is limited, which hinders studies of motor function. Here, we used site-directed spin labeling to map the conformation of a pRNA three-way junction that bridges binding sites for the motor ATPase and the procapsid. The studies were carried out on a pRNA dimer, which is the simplest ring-shaped pRNA complex and serves as a functional intermediate during motor assembly. Using a nucleotide-independent labeling scheme, stable nitroxide radicals were attached to eight specific pRNA sites without perturbing RNA folding and dimer formation, and a total of 17 internitroxide distances spanning the three-way junction were measured using Double Electron–Electron Resonance spectroscopy. The measured distances, together with steric chemical constraints, were used to select 3662 viable three-way junction models from a pool of 65 billion. The results reveal a similar conformation among the viable models, with two of the helices (HT and HL) adopting an acute bend. This is in contrast to a recently reported pRNA tetramer crystal structure, in which HT and HL stack onto each other linearly. The studies establish a new method for mapping global structures of complex RNA molecules, and provide information on pRNA conformation that aids investigations of phi29 packaging motor and developments of pRNA-based nanomedicine and nanomaterial. PMID:22229766

  13. Tumor-Specific D-Dimer Concentration Ranges and Influencing Factors: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Dansheng; Yuan, Feng; Pei, Feng; Zhang, Huifeng; Yu, Anming; Wang, Kun; Chen, Hu; Chen, Liang; Wu, Xianglei; Tong, Xianli; Wang, Yefu

    2016-01-01

    D-dimer level in cancer patients is associated with risk of venous thromboembolism and deep venous thrombosis. Most cancer patients have “abnormal” D-dimer levels based on the current normal reference range. To investigate tumor-specific D-dimer reference range, we compared D-dimer levels for nine different tumour types with healthy controls by using simultaneous quantile regression and constructing a median, 5th percentile, and 95th percentile model of normal tumour D-dimer concentration. Associations with tumour primary site, stage, pathological type, and treatment were also explored. Additionally, 190 patients were tracked to reveal the relevance of initial D-dimer levels to cancer prognosis. D-dimer ranges (median, 5th, 95th) in various cancers (mg/L) were: liver 1.12, 0.27, 5.25; pancreatic 0.96, 0.23, 4.81; breast 0.44, 0.2, 2.17; gastric 0.65, 0.22, 5.03; colorectal 0.73, 0.22, 4.45; lung 0.7, 0.25, 4.0; gynaecological 0.61, 0.22, 3.98; oesophageal 0.23, 0.7, 3.45; and head and neck 0.22, 0.44, 2.19. All were significantly higher than that of healthy controls (0.18, 0.07, 0.57). D-dimer peaked 1–2 days postoperatively but had decreased to the normal range by 1 week. Additionally, cancer patients with high initial D-dimer were shown a tendency of poor prognosis in survival rate. In conclusion, D-dimer levels in cancer depend on patient age, tumour primary site, and tumour stage. Thrombosis prevention is necessary if D-dimer has not decreased to the tumor-specific baseline a week after surgery. PMID:27835633

  14. Initiating Events for Multi-Reactor Plant Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Muhlheim, Michael David; Flanagan, George F.; Poore, III, Willis P.

    2014-09-01

    Inherent in the design of modular reactors is the increased likelihood of events that initiate at a single reactor affecting another reactor. Because of the increased level of interactions between reactors, it is apparent that the Probabilistic Risk Assessments (PRAs) for modular reactor designs need to specifically address the increased interactions and dependencies.

  15. Initiation binding repressor, a factor that binds to the transcription initiation site of the histone h5 gene, is a glycosylated member of a family of cell growth regulators [corrected

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Cuadrado, A; Martín, M; Noël, M; Ruiz-Carrillo, A

    1995-01-01

    Initiation binding repressor [corrected] (IBR) is a chicken erythrocyte factor (apparent molecular mass, 70 to 73 kDa) that binds to the sequences spanning the transcription initiation site of the histone h5 gene, repressing its transcription. A variety of other cells, including transformed erythroid precursors, do not have IBR but a factor referred to as IBF (68 to 70 kDa) that recognizes the same IBR sites. We have cloned the IBR cDNA and studied the relationship of IBR and IBF. IBR is a 503-amino-acid-long acidic protein which is 99.0% identical to the recently reported human NRF-1/alpha-Pal factor and highly related to the invertebrate transcription factors P3A2 and erected wing gene product (EWG). We present evidence that IBR and IBF are most likely identical proteins, differing in their degree of glycosylation. We have analyzed several molecular aspects of IBR/F and shown that the factor associates as stable homodimers and that the dimer is the relevant DNA-binding species. The evolutionarily conserved N-terminal half of IBR/F harbors the DNA-binding/dimerization domain (outer limits, 127 to 283), one or several casein kinase II sites (37 to 67), and a bipartite nuclear localization signal (89 to 106) which appears to be necessary for nuclear targeting. Binding site selection revealed that the alternating RCGCRYGCGY consensus constitutes high-affinity IBR/F binding sites and that the direct-repeat palindrome TGCGCATGCGCA is the optimal site. A survey of genes potentially regulated by this family of factors primarily revealed genes involved in growth-related metabolism. PMID:8524232

  16. Integrable oscillator type and Schrödinger type dimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khare, Avinash; Saxena, Avadh

    2017-02-01

    A PT-symmetric dimer is a two-site nonlinear oscillator dimer or a two-site nonlinear Schrödinger dimer where one site loses and the other site gains energy at the same rate. We present a wide class of integrable oscillator type dimers whose Hamiltonian is of arbitrary even order. Further, we also present a wide class of integrable nonlinear Schrödinger type dimers where again the Hamiltonian is of arbitrary even order. Finally, we consider a recently discussed complex dimer model and point out a few integrable cases in that model.

  17. The dimeric assembly of Photobacterium leiognathi and Salmonella typhimurium SodC1 Cu,Zn superoxide dismutases is affected differently by active site demetallation and pH: an analytical ultracentrifuge study.

    PubMed

    Catacchio, B; D'Orazio, M; Battistoni, A; Chiancone, E

    2008-03-01

    To establish whether the species-specific variations at the subunit interface of bacterial Cu,Zn superoxide dismutases affect dimer assembly, the association state of the Photobacterium leiognathi (PlSOD) and Salmonella typhimurium (StSOD) enzymes, which differ in 11 out of 19 interface residues, was investigated by analytical ultracentrifugation. The same linkage pattern correlates quaternary assembly, active site metallation, and pH in the two enzymes albeit with quantitative differences. Both holo-enzymes are stable dimers at pH 6.8 and 8.0, although their shape is altered at alkaline pH. In contrast, dimer stability is affected differently by metal removal. Thus, apo-StSOD is a stable dimer at pH 6.8 whereas apo-PlSOD is in reversible monomer-dimer equilibrium. In both apoproteins a pH increase to 8.0 favors monomerization. These effects prove the existence of long-range communication between the active site and the subunit interface and provide a structural explanation for the known functional differences between the two enzymes.

  18. Mars Science Laboratory: Mission, Landing Site, and Initial Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grotzinger, John; Blake, D.; Crisp, J.; Edgett, K.; Gellert, R.; Gomez-Elvira, J.; Hassler, D.; Mahaffy, P.; Malin, M.; Meyer, M.; Mitrofanov, I.; Vasavada, A.; Wiens, R.

    2012-10-01

    Scheduled to land on August 5, 2012, the Mars Science Laboratory rover, Curiosity, will conduct an investigation of modern and ancient environments. Recent mission results will be discussed. Curiosity has a lifetime of at least one Mars year ( 23 months), and drive capability of at least 20 km. The MSL science payload was specifically assembled to assess habitability and includes a gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer and gas analyzer that will search for organic carbon in rocks, regolith fines, and the atmosphere; an x-ray diffractometer that will determine mineralogical diversity; focusable cameras that can image landscapes and rock/regolith textures in natural color; an alpha-particle x-ray spectrometer for in situ determination of rock and soil chemistry; a laser-induced breakdown spectrometer to remotely sense the chemical composition of rocks and minerals; an active neutron spectrometer designed to search for water in rocks/regolith; a weather station to measure modern-day environmental variables; and a sensor designed for continuous monitoring of background solar and cosmic radiation. The 155-km diameter Gale Crater was chosen as Curiosity’s field site based on several attributes: an interior mound of ancient flat-lying strata extending almost 5 km above the elevation of the landing site; the lower few hundred meters of the mound show a progression with relative age from clay-bearing to sulfate-bearing strata, separated by an unconformity from overlying likely anhydrous strata; the landing ellipse is characterized by a mixture of alluvial fan and high thermal inertia/high albedo stratified deposits; and a number of stratigraphically/geomorphically distinct fluvial features. Gale’s regional context and strong evidence for a progression through multiple potentially habitable environments, represented by a stratigraphic record of extraordinary extent, insure preservation of a rich record of the environmental history of early Mars.

  19. Vesicular Stomatitis Virus glycoprotein G carrying a tandem dimer of Foot and Mouth Disease Virus antigenic site A can be used as DNA and peptide vaccine for cattle.

    PubMed

    Capozzo, Alejandra V; Wilda, Maximiliano; Bucafusco, Danilo; de los Ángeles Lavoria, María; Franco-Mahecha, Olga L; Mansilla, Florencia C; Pérez-Filgueira, Daniel M; Grigera, Pablo R

    2011-11-01

    Effective Foot and Mouth Disease Virus (FMDV) peptide vaccines for cattle have two major constraints: resemblance of one or more of the multiple conformations of the major VP1 antigenic sites to induce neutralizing antibodies, and stimulation of T cells despite the variable bovine-MHC polymorphism. To overcome these limitations, a chimeric antigen was developed, using Vesicular Stomatitis Virus glycoprotein (VSV-G) as carrier protein of an in tandem-dimer of FMDV antigenic site A (ASA), the major epitope on the VP1 capsid protein (aa 139-149, FMDV-C3 serotype). The G-ASA construct was expressed in the Baculovirus system to produce a recombinant protein (DEL BAC) (cloned in pCDNA 3.1 plasmid) (Invitrogen Corporation, Carlsbad, CA) and was also prepared as a DNA vaccine (pC DEL). Calves vaccinated with both immunogens elicited antibodies that recognized the ASA in whole virion and were able to neutralize FMDV infectivity in vitro. After two vaccine doses, DEL BAC induced serum neutralizing titers compatible with an "expected percentage of protection" above 90%. Plasmid pC DEL stimulated FMDV specific humoral responses earlier than DEL BAC, though IgG1 to IgG2 ratios were lower than those induced by both DEL BAC and inactivated FMDV-C3 after the second dose. DEL BAC induced FMDV-specific secretion of IFN-γ in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of outbred cattle immunized with commercial FMDV vaccine, suggesting its capacity to recall anamnestic responses mediated by functional T cell epitopes. The results show that exposing FMDV-VP1 major neutralizing antigenic site in the context of N-terminal sequences of the VSV G protein can overcome the immunological limitations of FMDV-VP1 peptides as effective protein and DNA vaccines for cattle.

  20. Mechanism of HIV-1 RNA dimerization in the central region of the genome and significance for viral evolution.

    PubMed

    Piekna-Przybylska, Dorota; Sharma, Gaurav; Bambara, Robert A

    2013-08-16

    The genome of HIV-1 consists of two identical or nearly identical RNA molecules. The RNA genomes are held in the same, parallel orientation by interactions at the dimer initiation site (DIS). Previous studies showed that in addition to interactions at DIS, sequences located 100 nucleotides downstream from the 5' splice site can dimerize in vitro through an intermolecular G-quartet structure. Here we report that the highly conserved G-rich sequence in the middle portion of the HIV-1 genome near the central polypurine tract (cPPT) dimerizes spontaneously under high ionic strength in the absence of protein. The antisense RNA does not dimerize, strongly indicating that RNA dimerization does not exclusively involve A:U and G:C base pairing. The cation-dependent reverse transcriptase pausing profile, CD spectra profile, and cation-dependent association and thermal dissociation characteristics indicate G-quartet structures. Different forms of G-quartets are formed including monomers and, significantly, intermolecular dimers. Our results indicate that RNA genome dimerization and parallel alignment initiated through interactions at DIS may be greatly expanded and stabilized by formation of an intermolecular G-quartet at a distant site near the cPPT. It is likely that formation of G-quartet structure near the cPPT in vivo keeps the RNA genomes in proximity over a long range, promoting genetic recombination in numerous hot spots.

  1. Evaluation of the Jobs Initiative: First Annual/Cross-Site Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abt Associates, Inc., Cambridge, MA.

    In 1995, the Jobs Initiative, an 8-year, six-site demonstration project, was launched to attempt to improve access to family-supporting jobs for disadvantaged young adults in the inner city. The Jobs Initiative is providing seed money to develop and implement job strategies in six cities: Denver (Colorado); Milwaukee (Wisconsin); New Orleans…

  2. The dimers of cyanamide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moffat, J. B.

    Ab initio calculations have been performed on various dimeric forms of cyanamide. The "nondissociative" dimerization of cyanamide leads to cyclic molecules all of which are unstable with respect to cyanamide. However, the molecules produced by "dissociative" dimerization are stable relative to cyanamide. Dicyandiamide is found to be the most stable of nine dimeric configurations.

  3. Translation of encephalomyocarditis virus RNA: parameters influencing the selection of the internal initiation site.

    PubMed Central

    Kaminski, A; Belsham, G J; Jackson, R J

    1994-01-01

    The initiation of encephalomyocarditis virus RNA translation is by internal ribosome entry almost exclusively at the 11th AUG codon from the 5'-end, which is the central of the three AUG codons in the sequence..[sequence: see text].., and is located some 25 nt downstream from an oligopyrimidine tract conserved amongst related viruses. As the sequences between the oligopyrimidine tract and AUG-10/11 are poorly conserved and thus possibly serve only as a spacer, the influence of this spacer length on initiation frequency at the three AUG codons was examined in vitro and in vivo. Deletion of 11 residues resulted in initiation almost exclusively at AUG-12 but at significantly reduced overall efficiency. Insertion of eight residues caused a 15-fold increase in initiation frequency at AUG-10 and a decrease at AUG-11. Longer insertions reduced overall efficiency without changing the initiation site preferences. With the wild-type spacing, complete substitution of the oligopyrimidine tract by purines caused a 30-35% decrease in initiation efficiency, and partial substitution only a 10-15% decrease. Thus the internal initiation mechanism selects the initiation site partly on the basis of its distance from upstream elements, of which the oligopyrimidine tract is not the most critical, but for reasons not yet understood a preference for AUG-11 is superimposed on this selection. Images PMID:8157006

  4. Neuronal Competition for Action Potential Initiation Sites in a Circuit Controlling Simple Learning

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Georgina E.; Sahley, Christie L.; Muller, Kenneth J.

    2007-01-01

    The spatial and temporal patterns of action potential initiations were studied in a behaving leech preparation to determine the basis of increased firing that accompanies sensitization, a form of non-associative learning requiring the S-interneurons. Little is known at the network level about mechanisms of behavioral sensitization. The S-interneurons, one in each ganglion and linked by electrical synapses with both neighbors to form a chain, are interposed between sensory and motor neurons. In sensitized preparations the strength of shortening is related to S-cell firing, which itself is the result of impulses initiating in several S-cells. Because the S-cells, as independent initiation sites, all contribute to activity in the chain, it was hypothesized that during sensitization, increased multi-site activity increased the chain's firing rate. However, it was found that during sensitization, the single site with the largest initiation rate, the S-cell in the stimulated segment, suppressed initiations in adjacent ganglia. Experiments showed this was both because (1) it received the earliest, greatest input and (2) the delayed synaptic input to the adjacent S-cells coincided with the action potential refractory period. A compartmental model of the S-cell and its inputs showed that a simple, intrinsic mechanism of inexcitability after each action potential may account for suppression of impulse initiations. Thus, a non-synaptic competition between neurons alters synaptic integration in the chain. In one mode, inputs to different sites sum independently, whereas in another, synaptic input to a single site precisely specifies the overall pattern of activity. PMID:17644266

  5. Dimer crystallization of chiral proteoids.

    PubMed

    Wang, Po-Yuan; Mason, Thomas G

    2017-03-08

    Proteins can self-assemble into a variety of exquisitely organized structures through hierarchical reaction pathways. To examine how different core shapes of proteins and entropy combine to influence self-assembly, we create systems of lithographically fabricated proteomimetic colloids, or 'proteoids', and explore how Brownian monolayers of mobile proteoids, which have hard interactions, self-assemble as they are slowly crowded. Remarkably, chiral C-shaped proteoids having circular heads on only one side form enantiopure lock-and-key chiral dimers; these dimers have corrugated, shape-complementary perimeters, so they, in turn, form lock-and-key arrangements into chiral dimer crystals. Time-lapse video microscopy reveals the expulsion of monomers from the growing dimer crystals through tautomerization translocation reactions which expedite the crystallization kinetics. By lithographically mutating proteoids, we also tune the types and structures of the resulting dimer crystals. Thus, rational design of sub-particle features in hard-core colloidal shapes can be used to sterically select desired self-assembly pathways without introducing any site-specific attractions, thereby generating a striking degree of hierarchical self-ordering, reminiscent of protein crystallization.

  6. Neuronal adaptation involves rapid expansion of the action potential initiation site

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Ricardo S.; Henneberger, Christian; Padmashri, Ragunathan; Anders, Stefanie; Jensen, Thomas P.; Rusakov, Dmitri A.

    2014-01-01

    Action potential (AP) generation is the key to information-processing in the brain. Although APs are normally initiated in the axonal initial segment, developmental adaptation or prolonged network activity may alter the initiation site geometry thus affecting cell excitability. Here we find that hippocampal dentate granule cells adapt their spiking threshold to the kinetics of the ongoing dendrosomatic excitatory input by expanding the AP-initiation area away from the soma while also decelerating local axonal spikes. Dual-patch soma–axon recordings combined with axonal Na+ and Ca2+ imaging and biophysical modelling show that the underlying mechanism involves distance-dependent inactivation of axonal Na+ channels due to somatic depolarization propagating into the axon. Thus, the ensuing changes in the AP-initiation zone and local AP propagation could provide activity-dependent control of cell excitability and spiking on a relatively rapid timescale. PMID:24851940

  7. 10 CFR 52.83 - Finality of referenced NRC approvals; partial initial decision on site suitability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Finality of referenced NRC approvals; partial initial decision on site suitability. 52.83 Section 52.83 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSES, CERTIFICATIONS, AND APPROVALS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS Combined Licenses § 52.83 Finality of referenced...

  8. 10 CFR 52.83 - Finality of referenced NRC approvals; partial initial decision on site suitability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Finality of referenced NRC approvals; partial initial decision on site suitability. 52.83 Section 52.83 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSES, CERTIFICATIONS, AND APPROVALS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS Combined Licenses § 52.83 Finality of referenced...

  9. 10 CFR 52.83 - Finality of referenced NRC approvals; partial initial decision on site suitability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Finality of referenced NRC approvals; partial initial decision on site suitability. 52.83 Section 52.83 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSES, CERTIFICATIONS, AND APPROVALS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS Combined Licenses § 52.83 Finality of referenced...

  10. 10 CFR 52.83 - Finality of referenced NRC approvals; partial initial decision on site suitability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Finality of referenced NRC approvals; partial initial decision on site suitability. 52.83 Section 52.83 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSES, CERTIFICATIONS, AND APPROVALS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS Combined Licenses § 52.83 Finality of referenced...

  11. 10 CFR 52.83 - Finality of referenced NRC approvals; partial initial decision on site suitability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Finality of referenced NRC approvals; partial initial decision on site suitability. 52.83 Section 52.83 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSES, CERTIFICATIONS, AND APPROVALS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS Combined Licenses § 52.83 Finality of referenced...

  12. Interim Report for Bioventing Field Initiative at Site UST 173, Robins Air Force Base, Georgia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    This report describes the activities conducted at Robins Air Force Base (AFB), Georgia, Site UST 173 as part of the Bioventing Field Initiative for...which includes a soil gas survey, air permeability test, in situ respiration tests, and installation of bioventing systems. The specific objectives of this task are described in the following section.

  13. Identification and sequence of the initiation site for rat 45S ribosomal RNA synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Harrington, C A; Chikaraishi, D M

    1983-01-01

    The transcription initiation site for rat 45S precursor ribosomal RNA synthesis was determined by nuclease protection mapping with two single-strand endonucleases. S1 and mung bean, and one single-strand exonuclease, ExoVII. These experiments were performed with end-labeled ribosomal DNA from double-stranded pBR322 recombinants and from single-stranded M13 recombinants. Results from experiments using both kinds of DNA and all three enzymes showed that the 5' end of 45S RNA mapped to a unique site 125 bases upstream from the Hind III site in the ribosomal DNA gene. The DNA surrounding this site (designated +1) was sequenced from -281 to +641. The entire sequence of this region shows extensive homology to the comparable region of mouse. This includes three stretches of T residues in the non-coding strand between +300 and +630. Two sets of direct repeats adjacent to these T-rich regions are observed. Comparison of the mouse and human ribosomal DNA transcription initiation sites with the rat sequence reported in this paper demonstrates a conserved sequence at +2 to +16, CTGACACGCTGTCCT. This suggests that this region may be important for the initiation of transcription on mammalian ribosomal DNAs. Images PMID:6304628

  14. DNA binding site for a factor(s) required to initiate simian virus 40 DNA replication.

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, M; DePamphilis, M L

    1986-01-01

    Efficient initiation of DNA replication in the absence of nonspecific DNA repair synthesis was obtained by using a modification of the system developed by J.J. Li and T.J. Kelly [(1984) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 81, 6973-6977]. Circular double-stranded DNA plasmids replicated in extracts of CV-1 cells only when the plasmids contained the cis-acting origin sequence for simian virus 40 DNA replication (ori) and the extract contained simian virus 40 large tumor antigen. Competition between plasmids containing ori and plasmids carrying deletions in and about ori served to identify a sequence that binds the rate-limiting factor(s) required to initiate DNA replication. The minimum binding site (nucleotides 72-5243) encompassed one-half of the simian virus 40 ori sequence that is required for initiation of replication (ori-core) plus the contiguous sequence on the late gene side of ori-core containing G + C-rich repeats that facilitates initiation (ori-auxiliary). This initiation factor binding site was specific for the simian virus 40 ori region, even though it excluded the high-affinity large tumor antigen DNA binding sites. Images PMID:3006062

  15. Alternative transcription initiation sites and polyadenylation sites are recruited during Mu suppression at the rf2a locus of maize.

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Xiangqin; Hsia, An-Ping; Liu, Feng; Ashlock, Daniel A; Wise, Roger P; Schnable, Patrick S

    2003-01-01

    Even in the absence of excisional loss of the associated Mu transposons, some Mu-induced mutant alleles of maize can lose their capacity to condition a mutant phenotype. Three of five Mu-derived rf2a alleles are susceptible to such Mu suppression. The suppressible rf2a-m9437 allele has a novel Mu transposon insertion (Mu10) in its 5' untranslated region (UTR). The suppressible rf2a-m9390 allele has a Mu1 insertion in its 5' UTR. During suppression, alternative transcription initiation sites flanking the Mu1 transposon yield functional transcripts. The suppressible rf2a-m8110 allele has an rcy/Mu7 insertion in its 3' UTR. Suppression of this allele occurs via a previously unreported mechanism; sequences in the terminal inverted repeats of rcy/Mu7 function as alternative polyadenylation sites such that the suppressed rf2a-m8110 allele yields functional rf2a transcripts. No significant differences were observed in the nucleotide compositions of these alternative polyadenylation sites as compared with 94 other polyadenylation sites from maize genes. PMID:12618406

  16. Mapping of replication initiation sites in human ribosomal DNA by nascent-strand abundance analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Y; Sanchez, J A; Brun, C; Huberman, J A

    1995-01-01

    New techniques for mapping mammalian DNA replication origins are needed. We have modified the existing nascent-strand size analysis technique (L. Vassilev and E.M. Johnson, Nucleic Acids Res. 17:7693-7705, 1989) to provide an independent means of studying replication initiation sites. We call the new method nascent-strand abundance analysis. We confirmed the validity of this method with replicating simian virus 40 DNA as a model. We then applied nascent-strand abundance and nascent-strand size analyses to mapping of initiation sites in human (HeLa) ribosomal DNA (rDNA), a region previously examined exclusively by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis methods (R.D. Little, T.H.K. Platt, and C.L. Schildkraut, Mol. Cell. Biol. 13:6600-6613, 1993). Our results partly confirm those obtained by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis techniques. Both studies suggest that replication initiates at relatively high frequency a few kilobase pairs upstream of the transcribed region and that many additional low-frequency initiation sites are distributed through most of the remainder of the ribosomal DNA repeat unit. PMID:7739533

  17. The two-state dimer receptor model: a general model for receptor dimers.

    PubMed

    Franco, Rafael; Casadó, Vicent; Mallol, Josefa; Ferrada, Carla; Ferré, Sergi; Fuxe, Kjell; Cortés, Antoni; Ciruela, Francisco; Lluis, Carmen; Canela, Enric I

    2006-06-01

    Nonlinear Scatchard plots are often found for agonist binding to G-protein-coupled receptors. Because there is clear evidence of receptor dimerization, these nonlinear Scatchard plots can reflect cooperativity on agonist binding to the two binding sites in the dimer. According to this, the "two-state dimer receptor model" has been recently derived. In this article, the performance of the model has been analyzed in fitting data of agonist binding to A(1) adenosine receptors, which are an example of receptor displaying concave downward Scatchard plots. Analysis of agonist/antagonist competition data for dopamine D(1) receptors using the two-state dimer receptor model has also been performed. Although fitting to the two-state dimer receptor model was similar to the fitting to the "two-independent-site receptor model", the former is simpler, and a discrimination test selects the two-state dimer receptor model as the best. This model was also very robust in fitting data of estrogen binding to the estrogen receptor, for which Scatchard plots are concave upward. On the one hand, the model would predict the already demonstrated existence of estrogen receptor dimers. On the other hand, the model would predict that concave upward Scatchard plots reflect positive cooperativity, which can be neither predicted nor explained by assuming the existence of two different affinity states. In summary, the two-state dimer receptor model is good for fitting data of binding to dimeric receptors displaying either linear, concave upward, or concave downward Scatchard plots.

  18. NMR structure of dual site binding of mitoxantrone dimer to opposite grooves of parallel stranded G-quadruplex [d-(TTGGGGT)]4.

    PubMed

    Pradeep, Tarikere Palakshan; Barthwal, Ritu

    2016-01-01

    The formation of complex between anti-cancer drug mitoxantrone (MTX) and tetra-molecular parallel G-quadruplex DNA [d-(TTGGGGT)]4 has been studied by solution state one and two dimensional NMR spectroscopy. Mitoxantrone forms a head-to-tail dimer and binds at two opposite grooves of the G-quadruplex. The Job's method of continuous variation and thermal melting studies independently ascertain binding stoichiometry of 4:1 in mitoxantrone:DNA complex. The existence of only four guanine NH peaks corresponding to the four G-quartets during the course of titration shows that C4 symmetry of G-quadruplex is intact upon binding of mitoxantrone. The specific inter molecular short distance contacts between protons of two mitoxantrone molecules of dimer, that is, ring A protons with ring C and side chain methylene protons, confirms the formation of mitoxantrone head-to-tail dimer. The observed 38 Nuclear Overhauser Enhancement (NOE) cross peaks between MTX and G-quadruplex DNA indicate formation of a well-defined complex. The three dimensional structure of 4:1 mitoxantrone:[d-(TTGGGGT)]4 complex computed by using experimental distance restraints followed by restrained Molecular Dynamics (rMD) simulations envisages the critical knowledge of specific molecular interactions within ligand-G-quadruplex complex. The findings are of direct interest in development of anti-cancer therapeutic drug based on G-quadruplex stabilization, resulting in telomerase inhibition.

  19. Histone H3 lysine 4 trimethylation marks meiotic recombination initiation sites.

    PubMed

    Borde, Valérie; Robine, Nicolas; Lin, Waka; Bonfils, Sandrine; Géli, Vincent; Nicolas, Alain

    2009-01-21

    The function of histone modifications in initiating and regulating the chromosomal events of the meiotic prophase remains poorly understood. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we examined the genome-wide localization of histone H3 lysine 4 trimethylation (H3K4me3) along meiosis and its relationship to gene expression and position of the programmed double-strand breaks (DSBs) that initiate interhomologue recombination, essential to yield viable haploid gametes. We find that the level of H3K4me3 is constitutively higher close to DSB sites, independently of local gene expression levels. Without Set1, the H3K4 methylase, 84% of the DSB sites exhibit a severely reduced DSB frequency, the reduction being quantitatively correlated with the local level of H3K4me3 in wild-type cells. Further, we show that this differential histone mark is already established in vegetative cells, being higher in DSB-prone regions than in regions with no or little DSB. Taken together, our results demonstrate that H3K4me3 is a prominent and preexisting mark of active meiotic recombination initiation sites. Novel perspectives to dissect the various layers of the controls of meiotic DSB formation are discussed.

  20. Quantitative analysis of mammalian translation initiation sites by FACS-seq.

    PubMed

    Noderer, William L; Flockhart, Ross J; Bhaduri, Aparna; Diaz de Arce, Alexander J; Zhang, Jiajing; Khavari, Paul A; Wang, Clifford L

    2014-08-28

    An approach combining fluorescence-activated cell sorting and high-throughput DNA sequencing (FACS-seq) was employed to determine the efficiency of start codon recognition for all possible translation initiation sites (TIS) utilizing AUG start codons. Using FACS-seq, we measured translation from a genetic reporter library representing all 65,536 possible TIS sequences spanning the -6 to +5 positions. We found that the motif RYMRMVAUGGC enhanced start codon recognition and translation efficiency. However, dinucleotide interactions, which cannot be conveyed by a single motif, were also important for modeling TIS efficiency. Our dataset combined with modeling allowed us to predict genome-wide translation initiation efficiency for all mRNA transcripts. Additionally, we screened somatic TIS mutations associated with tumorigenesis to identify candidate driver mutations consistent with known tumor expression patterns. Finally, we implemented a quantitative leaky scanning model to predict alternative initiation sites that produce truncated protein isoforms and compared predictions with ribosome footprint profiling data. The comprehensive analysis of the TIS sequence space enables quantitative predictions of translation initiation based on genome sequence.

  1. Site-specific initiation of DNA replication in metazoan chromosomes and the role of nuclear organization.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, D M; Miyazawa, H; Nallaseth, F S; Ortega, J M; Blow, J J; DePamphilis, M L

    1993-01-01

    We have asked whether or not Xenopus eggs or egg extracts, which have previously been shown to replicate essentially any DNA molecule, will preferentially utilize a known mammalian OBR. Our results reveal that Xenopus egg extracts can preferentially initiate DNA replication at sites chosen in vivo by the hamster cell, provided that the DNA substrate is presented to the extract in the form of a nucleus rather than bare DNA. Thus, site-specific initiation of DNA replication in metazoan cell chromosomes appears to be determined by nuclear organization as well as DNA sequence. We have also considered whether or not BPV, which was previously reported to regulate its copy number through negative as well as positive cis-acting sequences, provides a suitable paradigm for cellular origins. The BPV genome was found to contain cis-acting sequences that can suppress DNA replication driven by a lytic virus such as PyV. However, this suppression did not require any BPV protein, did not limit PyV origin activity to one initiation event per S phase, and did not affect BPV origin activity. These results, together with data from other laboratories, strongly suggest that BPV is simply a slow-replicating version of SV40 and PyV and therefore is not an appropriate model to explain how initiation of cellular DNA replication is limited to once per cell cycle.

  2. Dimer monomer transition and dimer re-formation play important role for ATM cellular function during DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Du, Fengxia; Zhang, Minjie; Li, Xiaohua; Yang, Caiyun; Meng, Hao; Wang, Dong; Chang, Shuang; Xu, Ye; Price, Brendan; Sun, Yingli

    2014-10-03

    The ATM protein kinase, is a serine/threonine protein kinase that is recruited and activated by DNA double-strand breaks, mediates responses to ionizing radiation in mammalian cells. Here we show that ATM is held inactive in unirradiated cells as a dimer and phosphorylates the opposite strand of the dimer in response to DNA damage. Cellular irradiation induces rapid intermolecular autophosphorylation of serine 1981 that causes dimer dissociation and initiates cellular ATM kinase activity. ATM cannot phosphorylate the substrates when it could not undergo dimer monomer transition. After DNA repair, the active monomer will undergo dephosphorylation to form dimer again and dephosphorylation is critical for dimer re-formation. Our work reveals novel function of ATM dimer monomer transition and explains why ATM dimer monomer transition plays such important role for ATM cellular activity during DNA repair.

  3. The nucleotide sequence of the putative transcription initiation site of a cloned ribosomal RNA gene of the mouse.

    PubMed Central

    Urano, Y; Kominami, R; Mishima, Y; Muramatsu, M

    1980-01-01

    Approximately one kilobase pairs surrounding and upstream the transcription initiation site of a cloned ribosomal DNA (rDNA) of the mouse were sequenced. The putative transcription initiation site was determined by two independent methods: one nuclease S1 protection and the other reverse transcriptase elongation mapping using isolated 45S ribosomal RNA precursor (45S RNA) and appropriate restriction fragments of rDNA. Both methods gave an identical result; 45S RNA had a structure starting from ACTCTTAG---. Characteristically, mouse rDNA had many T clusters (greater than or equal to 5) upstream the initiation site, the longest being 21 consecutive T's. A pentadecanucleotide, TGCCTCCCGAGTGCA, appeared twice within 260 nucleotides upstream the putative initiation site. No such characteristic sequences were found downstream this site. Little similarity was found in the upstream of the transcription initiation site between the mouse, Xenopus laevis and Saccharomyces cerevisiae rDNA. Images PMID:6162156

  4. Ubiquinone-binding site mutagenesis reveals the role of mitochondrial complex II in cell death initiation.

    PubMed

    Kluckova, K; Sticha, M; Cerny, J; Mracek, T; Dong, L; Drahota, Z; Gottlieb, E; Neuzil, J; Rohlena, J

    2015-05-07

    Respiratory complex II (CII, succinate dehydrogenase, SDH) inhibition can induce cell death, but the mechanistic details need clarification. To elucidate the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation upon the ubiquinone-binding (Qp) site blockade, we substituted CII subunit C (SDHC) residues lining the Qp site by site-directed mutagenesis. Cell lines carrying these mutations were characterized on the bases of CII activity and exposed to Qp site inhibitors MitoVES, thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTFA) and Atpenin A5. We found that I56F and S68A SDHC variants, which support succinate-mediated respiration and maintain low intracellular succinate, were less efficiently inhibited by MitoVES than the wild-type (WT) variant. Importantly, associated ROS generation and cell death induction was also impaired, and cell death in the WT cells was malonate and catalase sensitive. In contrast, the S68A variant was much more susceptible to TTFA inhibition than the I56F variant or the WT CII, which was again reflected by enhanced ROS formation and increased malonate- and catalase-sensitive cell death induction. The R72C variant that accumulates intracellular succinate due to compromised CII activity was resistant to MitoVES and TTFA treatment and did not increase ROS, even though TTFA efficiently generated ROS at low succinate in mitochondria isolated from R72C cells. Similarly, the high-affinity Qp site inhibitor Atpenin A5 rapidly increased intracellular succinate in WT cells but did not induce ROS or cell death, unlike MitoVES and TTFA that upregulated succinate only moderately. These results demonstrate that cell death initiation upon CII inhibition depends on ROS and that the extent of cell death correlates with the potency of inhibition at the Qp site unless intracellular succinate is high. In addition, this validates the Qp site of CII as a target for cell death induction with relevance to cancer therapy.

  5. Ubiquinone-binding site mutagenesis reveals the role of mitochondrial complex II in cell death initiation

    PubMed Central

    Kluckova, K; Sticha, M; Cerny, J; Mracek, T; Dong, L; Drahota, Z; Gottlieb, E; Neuzil, J; Rohlena, J

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory complex II (CII, succinate dehydrogenase, SDH) inhibition can induce cell death, but the mechanistic details need clarification. To elucidate the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation upon the ubiquinone-binding (Qp) site blockade, we substituted CII subunit C (SDHC) residues lining the Qp site by site-directed mutagenesis. Cell lines carrying these mutations were characterized on the bases of CII activity and exposed to Qp site inhibitors MitoVES, thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTFA) and Atpenin A5. We found that I56F and S68A SDHC variants, which support succinate-mediated respiration and maintain low intracellular succinate, were less efficiently inhibited by MitoVES than the wild-type (WT) variant. Importantly, associated ROS generation and cell death induction was also impaired, and cell death in the WT cells was malonate and catalase sensitive. In contrast, the S68A variant was much more susceptible to TTFA inhibition than the I56F variant or the WT CII, which was again reflected by enhanced ROS formation and increased malonate- and catalase-sensitive cell death induction. The R72C variant that accumulates intracellular succinate due to compromised CII activity was resistant to MitoVES and TTFA treatment and did not increase ROS, even though TTFA efficiently generated ROS at low succinate in mitochondria isolated from R72C cells. Similarly, the high-affinity Qp site inhibitor Atpenin A5 rapidly increased intracellular succinate in WT cells but did not induce ROS or cell death, unlike MitoVES and TTFA that upregulated succinate only moderately. These results demonstrate that cell death initiation upon CII inhibition depends on ROS and that the extent of cell death correlates with the potency of inhibition at the Qp site unless intracellular succinate is high. In addition, this validates the Qp site of CII as a target for cell death induction with relevance to cancer therapy. PMID:25950479

  6. A New GLORIA (Global Research Initiative in Alpine Environments Site in Southwestern Montana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apple, M. E.; Warden, J. E.; Apple, C. J.; Pullman, T. Y.; Gallagher, J. H.

    2008-12-01

    Global climate change is predicted to have a major impact on the alpine environments and plants of western North America. Alpine plant species and treelines may migrate upwards due to warmer temperatures. Species composition, vegetation cover, and the phenology of photosynthesis, flowering, pollination, and seed dispersal may change. The Global Research Initiative in Alpine Environments (GLORIA) is a network of alpine sites established with the goal of understanding the interactions between climate change and alpine plants. The Continental Divide traverses Southwestern Montana, where the flora contains representative species from both sides of the divide. In the summer of 2008, we established a GLORIA site in southwestern Montana east of the Continental Divide with the objective of determining whether the temperature changes at the site, and if so, how temperature changes influence alpine plants. We are monitoring soil temperature along with species composition and percent cover of alpine plants at four sub-summits along an ascending altitudinal gradient. We placed the treeline, lower alpine, and upper alpine sites on Mt. Fleecer (45°49'36.06"N, 112°48'08.18"W, 2886.2 m (9469 ft)) and the highest sub-summit on Keokirk Mountain, (45°35'37.94"N, 112°57'03.89"W, 2987.3 m (9801 ft)) in the Pioneer Range. Interesting species on these mountains include Lewisia pygmaea, the Pygmy Bitterroot, Silene acaulis, the Moss Campion, Eritrichium nanum, the Alpine Forget-Me-Not, Lloydia serotina, the Alpine Lily, and Pinus albicaulis, the Whitebark Pine. This new site will remain in place indefinitely. Baseline and subsequent data from this site will be linked with the global network of GLORIA sites with which we will assess changes in alpine flora.

  7. Factors that Determine the Efficiency of HIV-1 Strand Transfer Initiated at a Specific Site

    PubMed Central

    Rigby, Sean T.; Van Nostrand, Keith P.; Rose, April E.; Gorelick, Robert J.; Mathews, David H.; Bambara, Robert A.

    2010-01-01

    Summary HIV-1 employs strand transfer for recombination between the two viral genomes. We previously provided evidence that strand transfer proceeds by an invasion-mediated mechanism, in which a DNA segment on the original RNA template is invaded by a second RNA template at a gap site. The initial RNA-DNA hybrid then expands until the DNA is fully transferred. Ribonuclease H (RNase H) cleavages and nucleocapsid protein (NC) were required for long distance propagation of the hybrid. The evaluation was performed on a unique substrate with a short gap serving as a pre-created invasion site (PCIS). In our current work, this substrate provided the opportunity to test what factors influence a specific invasion site to support transfer, and distinguish factors that influence invasion site creation from those that impact later steps. RNase H can act in a polymerization-dependent or -independent mode. Polymerization-dependent and -independent RNase H were found to be important to create efficiently-used invasion sites in the primer-donor complex, with or without NC. Propagation and terminus transfer steps, emanating from a PCIS in the presence of NC, were stimulated by polymerization-dependent but not -independent RNase H. RNase H can carry out primary and secondary cleavages during synthesis. While both modes of cleavage promoted invasion, only primary cleavage promoted propagation in the presence of NC in our system. These observations suggest that once invasion is initiated at a short gap, it can propagate through an adjacent region interrupted only by nicks, with help by NC. We considered the possibility that propagation solely by strand exchange was a significant contributor to transfers. However, it did not promote transfer, even if synthetic progress of the RT was intentionally slowed, which is consistent with strand exchange by random walk in which rate declines precipitously with distance. PMID:19853618

  8. Initial Presentation Sites as Predictors of Herpes Zoster Complications: A Nationwide Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wen-Yi; Liu, Sing-Huh; Lin, Meng-Yin; Lin, Che-Chen

    2016-01-01

    Herpes zoster (HZ) is associated with complications such as postherpetic neuralgia (PHN) and HZ ophthalmicus (HZO). However, few studies have focused on identifying patients having a high risk of PHN and HZO according to the initial presentation sites. The current study investigated these factors in a nationwide population-based cohort derived from Taiwan’s Longitudinal Health Insurance Database. The results indicate that the initial presentation sites can predict the complication site of HZ. In this study, elderly patients were found to be more susceptible to HZ and were the first to present with neurological signs (HZN). Furthermore, compared with patients with HZO and other signs (HZT), those with HZN had a higher comorbidity risk. Patients with HZN showed a significantly higher visceral complication risk than did those with HZO (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] = 1.47, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.27–1.71). In addition, patients with HZT showed lower risks of ocular and neurological complications than did those with HZN after stratification by age and sex (adjusted HR = 0.46, 95% CI = 0.31–0.68 and HR = 0.73, 95% CI = 0.59–0.91, respectively). PMID:27711168

  9. [Homologue pairing: initiation sites and effects on crossing over and chromosome disjunction in Drosophila melanogaster].

    PubMed

    Chubykin, V L

    1996-01-01

    The role of homologue pairing and chromocentral association of chromosomes in recombination and segregation during cell division is discussed. Peculiarities of mitotic and meiotic chromosome pairing in Drosophila males and females are considered. On the basis of our own and published data, the presence and localization of sites of homologue pairing initiation in euchromatin are substantiated. The effects of transfer of initiation sites along a chromosome (exemplified by inversions) on chromosome pairing (asynapsis), crossing over (intrachromosomal, interchromosomal, and centromeric effects), and segregation are discussed. To record the effects of pairing sites on crossing over, a method of comparing crossing-over frequencies in an inverted region with those in a region of the same size and position with regard to the centromere on cytological maps was proposed. Chromosomes orient toward opposite division poles during paracentromeric heterochromatin pairing. This occurs after successful euchromatin pairing, during which the chromocentral circular structure is reorganized. If heterochromatin pairing is disrupted because of structural or locus mutations, nonexchange bivalents segregate randomly. In this case, chromosome coordination may occur due to proximal chiasmata or chromocentral associations between homologues.

  10. Heat capacity of the site-diluted spin dimer system Ba₃(Mn1-xVx)₂O₈

    SciTech Connect

    Samulon, E. C.; Shapiro, M. C.; Fisher, I. R.

    2011-08-05

    Heat-capacity and susceptibility measurements have been performed on the diluted spin dimer compound Ba₃(Mn1-xVx)₂O₈. The parent compound Ba₃Mn₂O₈ is a spin dimer system based on pairs of antiferromagnetically coupled S=1, 3d² Mn⁵⁺ ions such that the zero-field ground state is a product of singlets. Substitution of nonmagnetic S=0, 3d⁰ V⁵⁺ ions leads to an interacting network of unpaired Mn moments, the low-temperature properties of which are explored in the limit of small concentrations 0≤x≤0.05. The zero-field heat capacity of this diluted system reveals a progressive removal of magnetic entropy over an extended range of temperatures, with no evidence for a phase transition. The concentration dependence does not conform to expectations for a spin-glass state. Rather, the data suggest a low-temperature random singlet phase, reflecting the hierarchy of exchange energies found in this system.

  11. Membrane-associated Ras dimers are isoform-specific: K-Ras dimers differ from H-Ras dimers.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hyunbum; Muratcioglu, Serena; Gursoy, Attila; Keskin, Ozlem; Nussinov, Ruth

    2016-06-15

    Are the dimer structures of active Ras isoforms similar? This question is significant since Ras can activate its effectors as a monomer; however, as a dimer, it promotes Raf's activation and MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) cell signalling. In the present study, we model possible catalytic domain dimer interfaces of membrane-anchored GTP-bound K-Ras4B and H-Ras, and compare their conformations. The active helical dimers formed by the allosteric lobe are isoform-specific: K-Ras4B-GTP favours the α3 and α4 interface; H-Ras-GTP favours α4 and α5. Both isoforms also populate a stable β-sheet dimer interface formed by the effector lobe; a less stable β-sandwich interface is sustained by salt bridges of the β-sheet side chains. Raf's high-affinity β-sheet interaction is promoted by the active helical interface. Collectively, Ras isoforms' dimer conformations are not uniform; instead, the isoform-specific dimers reflect the favoured interactions of the HVRs (hypervariable regions) with cell membrane microdomains, biasing the effector-binding site orientations, thus isoform binding selectivity.

  12. Global Research Initiative in Alpine Environments: A New GLORIA Site in Southwestern Montana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apple, M. E.; Pullman, T. Y.; Mitman, G. G.

    2007-12-01

    Global climate change is expected to have pronounced effects on the alpine environments and thus the alpine plants of western North America. Predicted responses include an upward migration of treelines, altered species compositions, changes in the percentage of land covered by vegetation, and a change in the phenology of alpine plants. To determine the effects of climate change on the alpine flora of southwestern Montana, we are installing a GLORIA (Global Research Initiative in Alpine Environments) site in order to monitor temperature, species composition, and percent cover of vascular plants, lichens, and mosses along an ascending altitudinal gradient. We are including lichens and mosses because of their importance as ecological indicator species. The abundance and spatial distribution of lichens and mosses provides essential baseline data for long-term monitoring of local and global impacts on the environment. Mt. Fleecer (9250 ft.), which is west of the continental divide and semi-isolated from other peaks in the Anaconda-Pintlar Range, is currently the most likely location for the southwestern Montana GLORIA site. Mt. Fleecer is accessible because it does not have the steep and hazardous glaciated talus cirques that characterize many of the neighboring, higher peaks. However, if an accessible and suitable higher summit is found, then it will be included as the highest summit in the GLORIA site. Interesting species at Mt. Fleecer include the whitebark pine, Pinus albicaulis, which is a keystone species in high mountain ecosystems of the western United States and Canada, the green gentian, Frasera speciosa, and the shooting star, Dodecatheon pulchellum. Data from this site will become part of a global network of GLORIA sites with which we will assess changes in alpine flora. Information gained from this GLORIA site can also be used as a link between studies of alpine climate change and related investigations on the timing of snowmelt and its influence on

  13. Initial source and site characterization studies for the U.C. Santa Barbara campus

    SciTech Connect

    Archuleta, R.; Nicholson, C.; Steidl, J.; Gurrola, L.; Alex, C.; Cochran, E.; Ely, G.; Tyler, T.

    1997-12-01

    The University of California Campus-Laboratory Collaboration (CLC) project is an integrated 3 year effort involving Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and four UC campuses - Los Angeles (UCLA), Riverside (UCR), Santa Barbara (UCSB), and San Diego (UCSD) - plus additional collaborators at San Diego State University (SDSU), at Los Alamos National Laboratory and in industry. The primary purpose of the project is to estimate potential ground motions from large earthquakes and to predict site-specific ground motions for one critical structure on each campus. This project thus combines the disciplines of geology, seismology, geodesy, soil dynamics, and earthquake engineering into a fully integrated approach. Once completed, the CLC project will provide a template to evaluate other buildings at each of the four UC campuses, as well as provide a methodology for evaluating seismic hazards at other critical sites in California, including other UC locations at risk from large earthquakes. Another important objective of the CLC project is the education of students and other professional in the application of this integrated, multidisciplinary, state-of-the-art approach to the assessment of earthquake hazard. For each campus targeted by the CLC project, the seismic hazard study will consist of four phases: Phase I - Initial source and site characterization, Phase II - Drilling, logging, seismic monitoring, and laboratory dynamic soil testing, Phase III - Modeling of predicted site-specific earthquake ground motions, and Phase IV - Calculations of 3D building response. This report cover Phase I for the UCSB campus and incudes results up through March 1997.

  14. Elimination of truncated recombinant protein expressed in Escherichia coli by removing cryptic translation initiation site.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Matthew J; Barrios, Adam F; Tan, Song

    2016-05-01

    Undesirable truncated recombinant protein products pose a special expression and purification challenge because such products often share similar chromatographic properties as the desired full length protein. We describe here our observation of both full length and a truncated form of a yeast protein (Gcn5) expressed in Escherichia coli, and the reduction or elimination of the truncated form by mutating a cryptic Shine-Dalgarno or START codon within the Gcn5 coding region. Unsuccessful attempts to engineer in a cryptic translation initiation site into other recombinant proteins suggest that cryptic Shine-Dalgarno or START codon sequences are necessary but not sufficient for cryptic translation in E. coli.

  15. Theoretical model of interactions between ligand-binding sites in a dimeric protein and its application for the analysis of thiamine diphosphate binding to yeast transketolase.

    PubMed

    Ospanov, Ruslan; Kochetov, German; Kurganov, Boris

    2006-11-20

    The binding of thiamin diphosphate (ThDP) to yeast dimeric apotransketolase (apoTK) is accompanied by the appearance of a band in the absorption spectrum with maximum at 320 nm. The saturation function has been analyzed using a scheme that involves binding of ThDP to each subunit followed by the conformational transition of this subunit. It is assumed that the binding of ThDP to one subunit may affect the conformational transition of the other subunit. Rigorous mathematical expressions describing the dependence of the optical absorption on the total concentration of ThDP are first developed. Equilibrium constants and corresponding rate constants for the binding of ThDP to apoTK have been estimated. The negative cooperativity in the ThDP binding has been characterized by the function reflecting the dependence of the conformational change on the saturation of apoTK by ThDP.

  16. Biomarker and histopathologic responses in flatfish following initial site remediation in Eagle Harbor, WA

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, M.S.; Anulacion, B.F.; French, B.; Hom, T.; Collier, T.K.

    1995-12-31

    Eagle Harbor is designated as an EPA Superfund site due to high sediment concentrations of creosote-derived polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) released chronically from a nearby creosoting facility. Previous (1984--86) field and laboratory studies with adult English sole (Pleuronectes vetulus) from this site demonstrated high prevalences of toxicopathic liver lesions including neoplasms in resident sole, and inducibility of several neoplasia-related lesion types by injections of a PAH-rich fraction extracted from Eagle Harbor sediment. Further studies (1986--88) expanded the target species to also include starry flounder (Platichthys stellatus) and rock sole (Lepidopsetta bilineata), and incorporated biomarkers of PAH exposure and effect, including hepatic CYP1A expression and biliary fluorescent aromatic compounds to estimate PAH exposure and metabolism, and bulky hydrophobic DNA adducts to estimate PAHs bound to hepatic DNA. Hepatic lesion prevalences and biomarker values in these three species from Eagle Harbor were among the highest found at Puget Sound sites. In the initial phase of site remediation, a cap of uncontaminated sediment was placed over the most contaminated portions of Eagle Harbor from September `93 to March `94, to provide improved benthic habitat and sequester PAH-contaminated sediments. Lesion prevalences and biomarker values in these three flatfish species just before capping began were generally reduced compared to historical data, possibly as a result of creosoting facility closure and site-based source controls. Similar data from fish collected immediately after and at 3, 6, and 12 months after cap completion are presented to determine the efficacy of the capping in ameliorating PAH exposure and associated effects in resident flatfish species.

  17. Photochemical dimerization of organic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Crabtree, Robert H.; Brown, Stephen H.; Muedas, Cesar A.; Ferguson, Richard R.

    1992-01-01

    At least one of selectivity and reaction rate of photosensitized vapor phase dimerizations, including dehydrodimerizations, hydrodimerizations and cross-dimerizations of saturated and unsaturated organic compounds is improved by conducting the dimerization in the presence of hydrogen or nitrous oxide.

  18. A Model Analysis of Mechanisms for Radial Microtubular Patterns at Root Hair Initiation Sites.

    PubMed

    Krupinski, Pawel; Bozorg, Behruz; Larsson, André; Pietra, Stefano; Grebe, Markus; Jönsson, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Plant cells have two main modes of growth generating anisotropic structures. Diffuse growth where whole cell walls extend in specific directions, guided by anisotropically positioned cellulose fibers, and tip growth, with inhomogeneous addition of new cell wall material at the tip of the structure. Cells are known to regulate these processes via molecular signals and the cytoskeleton. Mechanical stress has been proposed to provide an input to the positioning of the cellulose fibers via cortical microtubules in diffuse growth. In particular, a stress feedback model predicts a circumferential pattern of fibers surrounding apical tissues and growing primordia, guided by the anisotropic curvature in such tissues. In contrast, during the initiation of tip growing root hairs, a star-like radial pattern has recently been observed. Here, we use detailed finite element models to analyze how a change in mechanical properties at the root hair initiation site can lead to star-like stress patterns in order to understand whether a stress-based feedback model can also explain the microtubule patterns seen during root hair initiation. We show that two independent mechanisms, individually or combined, can be sufficient to generate radial patterns. In the first, new material is added locally at the position of the root hair. In the second, increased tension in the initiation area provides a mechanism. Finally, we describe how a molecular model of Rho-of-plant (ROP) GTPases activation driven by auxin can position a patch of activated ROP protein basally along a 2D root epidermal cell plasma membrane, paving the way for models where mechanical and molecular mechanisms cooperate in the initial placement and outgrowth of root hairs.

  19. A Model Analysis of Mechanisms for Radial Microtubular Patterns at Root Hair Initiation Sites

    PubMed Central

    Krupinski, Pawel; Bozorg, Behruz; Larsson, André; Pietra, Stefano; Grebe, Markus; Jönsson, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Plant cells have two main modes of growth generating anisotropic structures. Diffuse growth where whole cell walls extend in specific directions, guided by anisotropically positioned cellulose fibers, and tip growth, with inhomogeneous addition of new cell wall material at the tip of the structure. Cells are known to regulate these processes via molecular signals and the cytoskeleton. Mechanical stress has been proposed to provide an input to the positioning of the cellulose fibers via cortical microtubules in diffuse growth. In particular, a stress feedback model predicts a circumferential pattern of fibers surrounding apical tissues and growing primordia, guided by the anisotropic curvature in such tissues. In contrast, during the initiation of tip growing root hairs, a star-like radial pattern has recently been observed. Here, we use detailed finite element models to analyze how a change in mechanical properties at the root hair initiation site can lead to star-like stress patterns in order to understand whether a stress-based feedback model can also explain the microtubule patterns seen during root hair initiation. We show that two independent mechanisms, individually or combined, can be sufficient to generate radial patterns. In the first, new material is added locally at the position of the root hair. In the second, increased tension in the initiation area provides a mechanism. Finally, we describe how a molecular model of Rho-of-plant (ROP) GTPases activation driven by auxin can position a patch of activated ROP protein basally along a 2D root epidermal cell plasma membrane, paving the way for models where mechanical and molecular mechanisms cooperate in the initial placement and outgrowth of root hairs. PMID:27840629

  20. Site-directed photo-cross-linking of rRNA transcription initiation complexes.

    PubMed Central

    Gong, X; Radebaugh, C A; Geiss, G K; Simon, M N; Paule, M R

    1995-01-01

    Site-specific photo-cross-linking of the rRNA committed transcription complex was carried out by using 5-[N-(p-azidobenzoyl)-3-aminoallyl]-dUMP-derivatized promoter DNA. Putative TAFIs of 145, 99, 96, and 91 kDa, as well as TATA-binding protein (TBP), were found to specifically photo-cross-link to different positions along the promoter. These had been identified as potential subunits of the fundamental transcription initiation factor TIF-IB (also known as SL1, factor D, and TFID) from Acanthamoeba castellanii by purification to apparent homogeneity. No other polypeptides attributable to the rRNA architectural transcription factor UBF were identified, suggesting that this protein is not part of the committed complex. Scanning transmission electron microscopy of the complexes was used to estimate the mass of the complex and the contour length of the DNA in the complex. This showed that a single molecule of TIF-IB is in each committed complex and that the DNA is not looped around the protein, as would be expected if UBF were in the complex. A circular permutation analysis of DNA bending resulting from TIF-IB binding revealed a 45 +/- 3.1 degrees (n = 14) bend centered 23 bp upstream of the transcription initiation site. This degree of bending and the position of the bend relative to the site of TBP photo-cross-linking are consistent with earlier data showing that the TBP TATA box-binding domain is not utilized in the assembly of the rRNA committed complex (C. A. Radebaugh, J. L. Mathews, G. K. Geiss, F. Liu, J. Wong, E. Bateman, S. Camier, A. Sentenac, and M. R. Paule, Mol. Cell. Biol. 14:597-605, 1994). PMID:7651413

  1. Site-directed photo-cross-linking of rRNA transcription initiation complexes.

    PubMed

    Gong, X; Radebaugh, C A; Geiss, G K; Simon, M N; Paule, M R

    1995-09-01

    Site-specific photo-cross-linking of the rRNA committed transcription complex was carried out by using 5-[N-(p-azidobenzoyl)-3-aminoallyl]-dUMP-derivatized promoter DNA. Putative TAFIs of 145, 99, 96, and 91 kDa, as well as TATA-binding protein (TBP), were found to specifically photo-cross-link to different positions along the promoter. These had been identified as potential subunits of the fundamental transcription initiation factor TIF-IB (also known as SL1, factor D, and TFID) from Acanthamoeba castellanii by purification to apparent homogeneity. No other polypeptides attributable to the rRNA architectural transcription factor UBF were identified, suggesting that this protein is not part of the committed complex. Scanning transmission electron microscopy of the complexes was used to estimate the mass of the complex and the contour length of the DNA in the complex. This showed that a single molecule of TIF-IB is in each committed complex and that the DNA is not looped around the protein, as would be expected if UBF were in the complex. A circular permutation analysis of DNA bending resulting from TIF-IB binding revealed a 45 +/- 3.1 degrees (n = 14) bend centered 23 bp upstream of the transcription initiation site. This degree of bending and the position of the bend relative to the site of TBP photo-cross-linking are consistent with earlier data showing that the TBP TATA box-binding domain is not utilized in the assembly of the rRNA committed complex (C. A. Radebaugh, J. L. Mathews, G. K. Geiss, F. Liu, J. Wong, E. Bateman, S. Camier, A. Sentenac, and M. R. Paule, Mol. Cell. Biol. 14:597-605, 1994).

  2. Assessment of Effectiveness of Geologic Isolation Systems: REFERENCE SITE INITIAL ASSESSMENT FOR A SALT DOME REPOSITORY

    SciTech Connect

    Harwell, M. A.; Brandstetter, A.; Benson, G. L.; Raymond, J. R.; Brandley, D. J.; Serne, R. J.; Soldat, J. K.; Cole, C. R.; Deutsch, W. J.; Gupta, S. K.; Harwell, C. C.; Napier, B. A.; Reisenauer, A. E.; Prater, L. S.; Simmons, C. S.; Strenge, D. L.; Washburn, J. F.; Zellmer, J. T.

    1982-06-01

    As a methodology demonstration for the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation (ONWI), the Assessment of Effectiveness of Geologic Isolation Systems (AEGIS) Program conducted an initial reference site analysis of the long-term effectiveness of a salt dome repository. The Hainesville Salt Dome in Texas was chosen to be representative of the Gulf Coast interior salt domes; however, the Hainesville Site has been eliminated as a possible nuclear waste repository site. The data used for this exercise are not adequate for an actual assessment, nor have all the parametric analyses been made that would adequately characterize the response of the geosystem surrounding the repository. Additionally, because this was the first exercise of the complete AEGIS and WASTE Rock Interaction Technology (WRIT) methodology, this report provides the initial opportunity for the methodology, specifically applied to a site, to be reviewed by the community outside the AEGIS. The scenario evaluation, as a part of the methodology demonstration, involved consideration of a large variety of potentially disruptive phenomena, which alone or in concert could lead to a breach in a salt dome repository and to a subsequent transport of the radionuclides to the environment. Without waste- and repository-induced effects, no plausible natural geologic events or processes which would compromise the repository integrity could be envisioned over the one-million-year time frame after closure. Near-field (waste- and repository-induced) effects were excluded from consideration in this analysis, but they can be added in future analyses when that methodology development is more complete. The potential for consequential human intrusion into salt domes within a million-year time frame led to the consideration of a solution mining intrusion scenario. The AEGIS staff developed a specific human intrusion scenario at 100 years and 1000 years post-closure, which is one of a whole suite of possible scenarios. This scenario

  3. Assessment of Effectiveness of Geologic Isolation Systems: REFERENCE SITE INITIAL ASSESSMENT FOR A SALT DOME REPOSITORY

    SciTech Connect

    Harwell, M. A.; Brandstetter, A.; Benson, G. L.; Bradley, D. J.; Serne, R. J.; Soldat, J. K; Cole, C. R.; Deutsch, W. J.; Gupta, S. K.; Harwell, C. C.; Napier, B. A.; Reisenauer, A. E.; Prater, L. S.; Simmons, C. S.; Strenge, D. L.; Washburn, J. F.; Zellmer, J. T.

    1982-06-01

    As a methodology demonstration for the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation (ONWI), the Assessment of Effectiveness of Geologic Isolation Systems (AEGIS) Program conducted an initial reference site analysis of the long-term effectiveness of a salt dome repository. The Hainesville Salt Dome in Texas was chosen to be representative of the Gulf Coast interior salt domes; however, the Hainesville Site has been eliminated as a possible nuclear waste repository site. The data used for this exercise are not adequate for an actual assessment, nor have all the parametric analyses been made that would adequately characterize the response of the geosystem surrounding the repository. Additionally, because this was the first exercise of the complete AEGIS and WASTE Rock Interaction Technology (WRIT) methodology, this report provides the initial opportunity for the methodology, specifically applied to a site, to be reviewed by the community outside the AEGIS. The scenario evaluation, as a part of the methodology demonstration, involved consideration of a large variety of potentially disruptive phenomena, which alone or in concert could lead to a breach in a salt dome repository and to a subsequent transport of the radionuclides to the environment. Without waste- and repository-induced effects, no plausible natural geologic events or processes which would compromise the repository integrity could be envisioned over the one-million-year time frame after closure. Near-field (waste- and repository-induced) effects were excluded from consideration in this analysis, but they can be added in future analyses when that methodology development is more complete. The potential for consequential human intrusion into salt domes within a million-year time frame led to the consideration of a solution mining intrusion scenario. The AEGIS staff developed a specific human intrusion scenario at 100 years and 1000 years post-closure, which is one of a whole suite of possible scenarios. This scenario

  4. GnRH agonist reduces estrogen receptor dimerization in GT1-7 cells: evidence for cross-talk between membrane-initiated estrogen and GnRH signaling.

    PubMed

    Chason, Rebecca J; Kang, Jung-Hoon; Gerkowicz, Sabrina A; Dufau, Maria L; Catt, Kevin J; Segars, James H

    2015-03-15

    17β-estradiol (E2), a key participant on the initiation of the LH surge, exerts both positive and negative feedback on GnRH neurons. We sought to investigate potential interactions between estrogen receptors alpha (ERα) and beta (ERβ) and gonadotropin releasing hormone receptor (GnRH-R) in GT1-7 cells. Radioligand binding studies demonstrated a significant decrease in saturation E2 binding in cells treated with GnRH agonist. Conversely, there was a significant reduction in GnRH binding in GT1-7 cells treated with E2. In BRET(1) experiments, ERα-ERα dimerization was suppressed in GT1-7 cells treated with GnRH agonist (p < 0.05). There was no evidence of direct interaction between ERs and GnRH-R. This study provides the first evidence of reduced ERα homodimerization by GnRH agonist. Collectively, these findings demonstrate significant cross-talk between membrane-initiated GnRH and E2 signaling in GT1-7 cells.

  5. How MCM loading and spreading specify eukaryotic DNA replication initiation sites

    PubMed Central

    Hyrien, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    DNA replication origins strikingly differ between eukaryotic species and cell types. Origins are localized and can be highly efficient in budding yeast, are randomly located in early fly and frog embryos, which do not transcribe their genomes, and are clustered in broad (10-100 kb) non-transcribed zones, frequently abutting transcribed genes, in mammalian cells. Nonetheless, in all cases, origins are established during the G1-phase of the cell cycle by the loading of double hexamers of the Mcm 2-7 proteins (MCM DHs), the core of the replicative helicase. MCM DH activation in S-phase leads to origin unwinding, polymerase recruitment, and initiation of bidirectional DNA synthesis. Although MCM DHs are initially loaded at sites defined by the binding of the origin recognition complex (ORC), they ultimately bind chromatin in much greater numbers than ORC and only a fraction are activated in any one S-phase. Data suggest that the multiplicity and functional redundancy of MCM DHs provide robustness to the replication process and affect replication time and that MCM DHs can slide along the DNA and spread over large distances around the ORC. Recent studies further show that MCM DHs are displaced along the DNA by collision with transcription complexes but remain functional for initiation after displacement. Therefore, eukaryotic DNA replication relies on intrinsically mobile and flexible origins, a strategy fundamentally different from bacteria but conserved from yeast to human. These properties of MCM DHs likely contribute to the establishment of broad, intergenic replication initiation zones in higher eukaryotes. PMID:27635237

  6. Control of Gene Expression by RNA Binding Protein Action on Alternative Translation Initiation Sites

    PubMed Central

    Re, Angela; Waldron, Levi; Quattrone, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Transcript levels do not faithfully predict protein levels, due to post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression mediated by RNA binding proteins (RBPs) and non-coding RNAs. We developed a multivariate linear regression model integrating RBP levels and predicted RBP-mRNA regulatory interactions from matched transcript and protein datasets. RBPs significantly improved the accuracy in predicting protein abundance of a portion of the total modeled mRNAs in three panels of tissues and cells and for different methods employed in the detection of mRNA and protein. The presence of upstream translation initiation sites (uTISs) at the mRNA 5’ untranslated regions was strongly associated with improvement in predictive accuracy. On the basis of these observations, we propose that the recently discovered widespread uTISs in the human genome can be a previously unappreciated substrate of translational control mediated by RBPs. PMID:27923063

  7. Osterix/Sp7 limits cranial bone initiation sites and is required for formation of sutures.

    PubMed

    Kague, Erika; Roy, Paula; Asselin, Garrett; Hu, Gui; Simonet, Jacqueline; Stanley, Alexandra; Albertson, Craig; Fisher, Shannon

    2016-05-15

    During growth, individual skull bones overlap at sutures, where osteoblast differentiation and bone deposition occur. Mutations causing skull malformations have revealed some required genes, but many aspects of suture regulation remain poorly understood. We describe a zebrafish mutation in osterix/sp7, which causes a generalized delay in osteoblast maturation. While most of the skeleton is patterned normally, mutants have specific defects in the anterior skull and upper jaw, and the top of the skull comprises a random mosaic of bones derived from individual initiation sites. Osteoblasts at the edges of the bones are highly proliferative and fail to differentiate, consistent with global changes in gene expression. We propose that signals from the bone itself are required for orderly recruitment of precursor cells and growth along the edges. The delay in bone maturation caused by loss of Sp7 leads to unregulated bone formation, revealing a new mechanism for patterning the skull and sutures.

  8. Initial formulation results for in situ grouting of a waste trench at ORNL Site No. 6

    SciTech Connect

    Tallent, O.K.; McDaniel, E.W.; Spence, R.D.; Godsey, T.T.

    1987-01-01

    An investigation is being conducted by the Chemical Technology Division to assist the Environmental Sciences Division in developing a grout formulation for use in testing in situ grouting in a waste trench at ORNL Site 6. This final report satisfies the milestone of Subtack 12 entitled, ''Low Level Waste (LLW) Trench Grouting Assessment,'' which was initially issued as RAP-86-7, December 31, 1985. Grouts prepared from dry-solid blends containing Type I Portland cement, ASTM Class C or Class F fly ash, and bentonite, mixed water at ratios of 10 to 15 lb/gal, were evaluated. The grouts prepared with ASTM Class C fly ash exhibited significantly better properties than those prepared with ASTM Class F fly ash. The grouts containing ASTM Class C fly ash satisfy tentative performance criteria for the project. 8 refs., 7 tabs.

  9. Uterine cervical cancer with brain metastasis as the initial site of presentation.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yumi; Tanaka, Kei; Kobayashi, Yoichi; Shibuya, Hiromi; Nishigaya, Yoshiko; Momomura, Mai; Matsumoto, Hironori; Iwashita, Mitsutoshi

    2015-07-01

    Brain metastasis from uterine cervical cancer is rare, with an incidence of 0.5%, and usually occurs late in the course of the disease. We report a case of uterine cervical cancer with brain metastasis as the initial site of presentation. A 50-year-old woman with headache, vertigo, amnesia and loss of appetite was admitted for persistent vomiting. Contrast enhanced computed tomography showed a solitary right frontal cerebral lesion with ring enhancement and uterine cervical tumor. She was diagnosed with uterine cervical squamous cell carcinoma with parametrium invasion and no other distant affected organs were detected. The cerebral lesion was surgically removed and pathologically proved to be metastasis of uterine cervical squamous cell carcinoma. The patient underwent concurrent chemoradiotherapy, followed by cerebral radiation therapy, but multiple metastases to the liver and lung developed and the patient died 7 months after diagnosis of brain metastasis.

  10. Dimer monomer transition and dimer re-formation play important role for ATM cellular function during DNA repair

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Fengxia; Zhang, Minjie; Li, Xiaohua; Yang, Caiyun; Meng, Hao; Wang, Dong; Chang, Shuang; Xu, Ye; Price, Brendan; Sun, Yingli

    2014-10-03

    Highlights: • ATM phosphorylates the opposite strand of the dimer in response to DNA damage. • The PETPVFRLT box of ATM plays a key role in its dimer dissociation in DNA repair. • The dephosphorylation of ATM is critical for dimer re-formation after DNA repair. - Abstract: The ATM protein kinase, is a serine/threonine protein kinase that is recruited and activated by DNA double-strand breaks, mediates responses to ionizing radiation in mammalian cells. Here we show that ATM is held inactive in unirradiated cells as a dimer and phosphorylates the opposite strand of the dimer in response to DNA damage. Cellular irradiation induces rapid intermolecular autophosphorylation of serine 1981 that causes dimer dissociation and initiates cellular ATM kinase activity. ATM cannot phosphorylate the substrates when it could not undergo dimer monomer transition. After DNA repair, the active monomer will undergo dephosphorylation to form dimer again and dephosphorylation is critical for dimer re-formation. Our work reveals novel function of ATM dimer monomer transition and explains why ATM dimer monomer transition plays such important role for ATM cellular activity during DNA repair.

  11. U.S. Department of Energy's site screening, site selection, and initial characterization for storage of CO2 in deep geological formations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rodosta, T.D.; Litynski, J.T.; Plasynski, S.I.; Hickman, S.; Frailey, S.; Myer, L.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is the lead Federal agency for the development and deployment of carbon sequestration technologies. As part of its mission to facilitate technology transfer and develop guidelines from lessons learned, DOE is developing a series of best practice manuals (BPMs) for carbon capture and storage (CCS). The "Site Screening, Site Selection, and Initial Characterization for Storage of CO2 in Deep Geological Formations" BPM is a compilation of best practices and includes flowchart diagrams illustrating the general decision making process for Site Screening, Site Selection, and Initial Characterization. The BPM integrates the knowledge gained from various programmatic efforts, with particular emphasis on the Characterization Phase through pilot-scale CO2 injection testing of the Validation Phase of the Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (RCSP) Initiative. Key geologic and surface elements that suitable candidate storage sites should possess are identified, along with example Site Screening, Site Selection, and Initial Characterization protocols for large-scale geologic storage projects located across diverse geologic and regional settings. This manual has been written as a working document, establishing a framework and methodology for proper site selection for CO2 geologic storage. This will be useful for future CO2 emitters, transporters, and storage providers. It will also be of use in informing local, regional, state, and national governmental agencies of best practices in proper sequestration site selection. Furthermore, it will educate the inquisitive general public on options and processes for geologic CO2 storage. In addition to providing best practices, the manual presents a geologic storage resource and capacity classification system. The system provides a "standard" to communicate storage and capacity estimates, uncertainty and project development risk, data guidelines and analyses for adequate site characterization, and

  12. Initiation of Quality Control during Poly(A) Translation Requires Site-Specific Ribosome Ubiquitination.

    PubMed

    Juszkiewicz, Szymon; Hegde, Ramanujan S

    2017-02-16

    Diverse cellular stressors have been observed to trigger site-specific ubiquitination on several ribosomal proteins. However, the ubiquitin ligases, biochemical consequences, and physiologic pathways linked to these modifications are not known. Here, we show in mammalian cells that the ubiquitin ligase ZNF598 is required for ribosomes to terminally stall during translation of poly(A) sequences. ZNF598-mediated stalling initiated the ribosome-associated quality control (RQC) pathway for degradation of nascent truncated proteins. Biochemical ubiquitination reactions identified two sites of mono-ubiquitination on the 40S protein eS10 as the primary ribosomal target of ZNF598. Cells lacking ZNF598 activity or containing ubiquitination-resistant eS10 ribosomes failed to stall efficiently on poly(A) sequences. In the absence of stalling, read-through of poly(A) produces a poly-lysine tag, which might alter the localization and solubility of the associated protein. Thus, ribosome ubiquitination can modulate translation elongation and impacts co-translational quality control to minimize production of aberrant proteins.

  13. Comparative analysis of contextual bias around the translation initiation sites in plant genomes.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Paras; Rangan, Latha; Ramesh, T Venkata; Gupta, Mudit

    2016-09-07

    Nucleotide distribution around translation initiation site (TIS) is thought to play an important role in determining translation efficiency. Kozak in vertebrates and later Joshi et al. in plants identified context sequence having a key role in translation efficiency, but a great variation regarding this context sequence has been observed among different taxa. The present study aims to refine the context sequence around initiation codon in plants and addresses the sampling error problem by using complete genomes of 7 monocots and 7 dicots separately. Besides positions -3 and +4, significant conservation at -2 and +5 positions was also found and nucleotide bias at the latter two positions was shown to directly influence translation efficiency in the taxon studied. About 1.8% (monocots) and 2.4% (dicots) of the total sequences fit the context sequence from positions -3 to +5, which might be indicative of lower number of housekeeping genes in the transcriptome. A three base periodicity was observed in 5' UTR and CDS of monocots and only in CDS of dicots as confirmed against random occurrence and annotation errors. Deterministic enrichment of GCNAUGGC in monocots, AANAUGGC in dicots and GCNAUGGC in plants around TIS was also established (where AUG denotes the start codon), which can serve as an arbiter of putative TIS with efficient translation in plants.

  14. Initial Implementation of the Hanford Site-Wide Groundwater Flow and Uncertainty Analysis Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, C. R.; Vermeul, V. R.; Freedman, V. L.; Bergeron, M. P.

    2002-05-01

    Since Hanford operations began in 1943, large volumes of wastewater have been discharged into the subsurface, creating groundwater mounds (> 20m) and regional-scale contaminant plumes that will require monitoring at least through site closure. Since the cessation of wastewater disposal activities in 1988, many of the ~700 monitoring wells that previously documented mounding and contaminant movement are currently going dry. An initial implementation of the Hanford Site uncertainty methodology presented in this paper and a companion poster, investigates which of the ~700 monitoring wells are likely to go dry between now and 2050. The long-term goals of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory effort at Hanford include the development and implementation of an uncertainty methodology with the site-wide groundwater flow and transport model. Results are presented for two different conceptual models of the base of the unconfined aquifer. Model parameter uncertainty was determined through transient inverse modeling (1943-1996) using UCODE and ~76,000 historical observations of head. Since an analysis of model linearity using Beale's measure indicated that the model was sufficiently linear, the uncertainty in predicted future water levels was determined using linear confidence and prediction intervals. Both a steady-state and a transient case (1996-2050) were investigated in order to determine which of the current monitoring wells are likely to go dry. Results demonstrated that the uncertainty methodology can be used to evaluate the potential loss of existing monitoring wells in strategic locations, and to assist in the development of a long-term strategy for their replacement. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC06-76RL01830.

  15. TbRGG2 facilitates kinetoplastid RNA editing initiation and progression past intrinsic pause sites.

    PubMed

    Ammerman, Michelle L; Presnyak, Vladimir; Fisk, John C; Foda, Bardees M; Read, Laurie K

    2010-11-01

    TbRGG2 is an essential kinetoplastid RNA editing accessory factor that acts specifically on pan-edited RNAs. To understand the mechanism of TbRGG2 action, we undertook an in-depth analysis of edited RNA populations in TbRGG2 knockdown cells and an in vitro examination of the biochemical activities of the protein. We demonstrate that TbRGG2 down-regulation more severely impacts editing at the 5' ends of pan-edited RNAs than at their 3' ends. The initiation of editing is reduced to some extent in TbRGG2 knockdown cells. In addition, TbRGG2 plays a post-initiation role as editing becomes stalled in TbRGG2-depleted cells, resulting in an overall decrease in the 3' to 5' progression of editing. Detailed analyses of edited RNAs from wild-type and TbRGG2-depleted cells reveal that TbRGG2 facilitates progression of editing past intrinsic pause sites that often correspond to the 3' ends of cognate guide RNAs (gRNAs). In addition, noncanonically edited junction regions are either absent or significantly shortened in TbRGG2-depleted cells, consistent with impaired gRNA transitions. Sequence analysis further suggests that TbRGG2 facilitates complete utilization of certain gRNAs. In vitro RNA annealing and in vivo RNA unwinding assays demonstrate that TbRGG2 can modulate RNA-RNA interactions. Collectively, these data are consistent with a model in which TbRGG2 facilitates initiation and 3' to 5' progression of editing through its ability to affect gRNA utilization, both during the transition between specific gRNAs and during usage of certain gRNAs.

  16. TbRGG2 facilitates kinetoplastid RNA editing initiation and progression past intrinsic pause sites

    PubMed Central

    Ammerman, Michelle L.; Presnyak, Vladimir; Fisk, John C.; Foda, Bardees M.; Read, Laurie K.

    2010-01-01

    TbRGG2 is an essential kinetoplastid RNA editing accessory factor that acts specifically on pan-edited RNAs. To understand the mechanism of TbRGG2 action, we undertook an in-depth analysis of edited RNA populations in TbRGG2 knockdown cells and an in vitro examination of the biochemical activities of the protein. We demonstrate that TbRGG2 down-regulation more severely impacts editing at the 5′ ends of pan-edited RNAs than at their 3′ ends. The initiation of editing is reduced to some extent in TbRGG2 knockdown cells. In addition, TbRGG2 plays a post-initiation role as editing becomes stalled in TbRGG2-depleted cells, resulting in an overall decrease in the 3′ to 5′ progression of editing. Detailed analyses of edited RNAs from wild-type and TbRGG2-depleted cells reveal that TbRGG2 facilitates progression of editing past intrinsic pause sites that often correspond to the 3′ ends of cognate guide RNAs (gRNAs). In addition, noncanonically edited junction regions are either absent or significantly shortened in TbRGG2-depleted cells, consistent with impaired gRNA transitions. Sequence analysis further suggests that TbRGG2 facilitates complete utilization of certain gRNAs. In vitro RNA annealing and in vivo RNA unwinding assays demonstrate that TbRGG2 can modulate RNA–RNA interactions. Collectively, these data are consistent with a model in which TbRGG2 facilitates initiation and 3′ to 5′ progression of editing through its ability to affect gRNA utilization, both during the transition between specific gRNAs and during usage of certain gRNAs. PMID:20855539

  17. Inactivation of Individual SeqA Binding Sites of the E. coli Origin Reveals Robustness of Replication Initiation Synchrony

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Jyoti K.

    2016-01-01

    The Escherichia coli origin of replication, oriC, comprises mostly binding sites of two proteins: DnaA, a positive regulator, and SeqA, a negative regulator. SeqA, although not essential, is required for timely initiation, and during rapid growth, synchronous initiation from multiple origins. Unlike DnaA, details of SeqA binding to oriC are limited. Here we have determined that SeqA binds to all its sites tested (9/11) and with variable efficiency. Titration of DnaA alters SeqA binding to two sites, both of which have overlapping DnaA sites. The altered SeqA binding, however, does not affect initiation synchrony. Synchrony is also unaffected when individual SeqA sites are mutated. An apparent exception was one mutant where the mutation also changed an overlapping DnaA site. In this mutant, the observed asynchrony could be from altered DnaA binding, as selectively mutating this SeqA site did not cause asynchrony. These results reveal robust initiation synchrony against alterations of individual SeqA binding sites. The redundancy apparently ensures SeqA function in controlling replication in E. coli. PMID:27930658

  18. Dimers in nucleating vapors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lushnikov, A. A.; Kulmala, M.

    1998-09-01

    The dimer stage of nucleation may affect considerably the rate of the nucleation process at high supersaturation of the nucleating vapor. Assuming that the dimer formation limits the nucleation rate, the kinetics of the particle formation-growth process is studied starting with the definition of dimers as bound states of two associating molecules. The partition function of dimer states is calculated by summing the Boltzmann factor over all classical bound states, and the equilibrium population of dimers is found for two types of intermolecular forces: the Lennard-Jones (LJ) and rectangular well+hard core (RW) potentials. The principle of detailed balance is used for calculating the evaporation rate of dimers. The kinetics of the particle formation-growth process is then investigated under the assumption that the trimers are stable with respect to evaporation and that the condensation rate is a power function of the particle mass. If the power exponent λ=n/(n+1) (n is a non-negative integer), the kinetics of the process is described by a finite set of moments of particle mass distribution. When the characteristic time of the particle formation by nucleation is much shorter than that of the condensational growth, n+2 universal functions of a nondimensional time define the kinetic process. These functions are calculated for λ=2/3 (gas-to-particle conversion in the free molecular regime) and λ=1/2 (formation of islands on surfaces).

  19. INITIAL SINGLE SHELL TANK (SST) SYSTEM PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT OF THE HANFORD SITE

    SciTech Connect

    JARAYSI, M.N.

    2007-01-08

    The ''Initial Single-Shell Tank System Performance Assessment for the Hanford Site [1] (SST PA) presents the analysis of the long-term impacts of residual wastes assumed to remain after retrieval of tank waste and closure of the SST farms at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site. The SST PA supports key elements of the closure process agreed upon in 2004 by DOE, the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology), and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The SST PA element is defined in Appendix I of the ''Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (HFFACO) (Ecology et al. 1989) [2], the document that establishes the overall closure process for the SST and double-shell tank (DST) systems. The approach incorporated in the SST PA integrates substantive features of both hazardous and radioactive waste management regulations into a single analysis. The defense-in-depth approach used in this analysis defined two major engineering barriers (a surface barrier and the grouted tank structure) and one natural barrier (the vadose zone) that will be relied on to control waste release into the accessible environment and attain expected performance metrics. The analysis evaluates specific barrier characteristics and other site features that influence contaminant migration by the various pathways. A ''reference'' case and a suite of sensitivity/uncertainty cases are considered. The ''reference case'' evaluates environmental impacts assuming central tendency estimates of site conditions. ''Reference'' case analysis results show residual tank waste impacts on nearby groundwater, air resources; or inadvertent intruders to be well below most important performance objectives. Conversely, past releases to the soil, from previous tank farm operations, are shown to have groundwater impacts that re significantly above most performance objectives. Sensitivity/uncertainty cases examine single and multiple parameter variability along with plausible alternatives

  20. Initial basalt target site selection evaluation for the Mars penetrator drop test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bunch, T. E.; Quaide, W. L.; Polkowski, G.

    1976-01-01

    Potential basalt target sites for an air drop penetrator test were described and the criteria involved in site selection were discussed. A summary of the background field geology and recommendations for optimum sites are also presented.

  1. Initial results from seismic monitoring at the Aquistore CO2 storage site, Saskatchewan, Canada

    DOE PAGES

    White, D. J.; Roach, L. A.N.; Roberts, B.; ...

    2014-12-31

    from 2012 shows excellent repeatability (NRMS less than 10%) which will provide enhanced monitoring sensitivity to smaller amounts of CO2. The permanent array also provides continuous passive monitoring for injection-related microseismicity. Passive monitoring has been ongoing since the summer of 2012 in order to establish levels of background seismicity before CO2 injection starts in 2014. Microseismic monitoring was augmented in 2013 by the installation of 3 broadband seismograph stations surrounding the Aquistore site. These surface installations should provide a detection capability of seismic events with magnitudes as low as ~0. Downhole seismic methods are also being utilized for CO2 monitoring at the Aquistore site. Baseline crosswell tomographic images depict details (meters-scale) of the reservoir in the 150-m interval between the observation and injection wells. This level of resolution is designed to track the CO2 migration between the wells during the initial injection period. A baseline 3D vertical seismic profile (VSP) was acquired in the fall of 2013 to provide seismic images with resolution on a scale between that provided by the surface seismic array and the downhole tomography. The 3D VSP was recorded simultaneously using both a conventional array of downhole geophones (60-levels) and an optical fibre system. The latter utilized an optical fiber cable deployed on the outside of the monitor well casing and cemented in place. A direct comparison of these two methodologies will determine the suitability of using the fiber cable for ongoing time-lapse VSP monitoring.« less

  2. Initial Field Trials of the Site Characterization and Analysis Penetrometer System (SCAPS). Reconnaissance of Jacksonville Naval Air Station Waste Oil and Solvents Disposal Site

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-12-01

    Engineers Waterways Experiment Station DTIC Initial Field Trials of the Site ELECTF Characterization and Analysis JAN2 5 1994D Penetrometer System...038Prepared f NlFclitie 24En g m Prepared for Naval Facilities Engineering Command The contents of this report are not to be used for advertising. publication...Characterization and Analysis Penetrometer Sysstem (SCAPS) Reconnaissance of Jacksonville Naval Air Station Waste Oil and Solvents Disposal Site by Stafford S

  3. A replicator-specific binding protein essential for site-specific initiation of DNA replication in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ya; Huang, Liang; Fu, Haiqing; Smith, Owen K.; Lin, Chii Mei; Utani, Koichi; Rao, Mishal; Reinhold, William C.; Redon, Christophe E.; Ryan, Michael; Kim, RyangGuk; You, Yang; Hanna, Harlington; Boisclair, Yves; Long, Qiaoming; Aladjem, Mirit I.

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian chromosome replication starts from distinct sites; however, the principles governing initiation site selection are unclear because proteins essential for DNA replication do not exhibit sequence-specific DNA binding. Here we identify a replication-initiation determinant (RepID) protein that binds a subset of replication-initiation sites. A large fraction of RepID-binding sites share a common G-rich motif and exhibit elevated replication initiation. RepID is required for initiation of DNA replication from RepID-bound replication origins, including the origin at the human beta-globin (HBB) locus. At HBB, RepID is involved in an interaction between the replication origin (Rep-P) and the locus control region. RepID-depleted murine embryonic fibroblasts exhibit abnormal replication fork progression and fewer replication-initiation events. These observations are consistent with a model, suggesting that RepID facilitates replication initiation at a distinct group of human replication origins. PMID:27272143

  4. Establishing a health demographic surveillance site in Bhaktapur district, Nepal: initial experiences and findings

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background A health demographic surveillance system (HDSS) provides longitudinal data regarding health and demography in countries with coverage error and poor quality data on vital registration systems due to lack of public awareness, inadequate legal basis and limited use of data in health planning. The health system in Nepal, a low-income country, does not focus primarily on health registration, and does not conduct regular health data collection. This study aimed to initiate and establish the first HDSS in Nepal. Results We conducted a baseline survey in Jhaukhel and Duwakot, two villages in Bhaktapur district. The study surveyed 2,712 households comprising a total population of 13,669. The sex ratio in the study area was 101 males per 100 females and the average household size was 5. The crude birth and death rates were 9.7 and 3.9/1,000 population/year, respectively. About 11% of births occurred at home, and we found no mortality in infants and children less than 5 years of age. Various health problems were found commonly and some of them include respiratory problems (41.9%); headache, vertigo and dizziness (16.7%); bone and joint pain (14.4%); gastrointestinal problems (13.9%); heart disease, including hypertension (8.8%); accidents and injuries (2.9%); and diabetes mellitus (2.6%). The prevalence of non-communicable disease (NCD) was 4.3% (95% CI: 3.83; 4.86) among individuals older than 30 years. Age-adjusted odds ratios showed that risk factors, such as sex, ethnic group, occupation and education, associated with NCD. Conclusion Our baseline survey demonstrated that it is possible to collect accurate and reliable data in a village setting in Nepal, and this study successfully established an HDSS site. We determined that both maternal and child health are better in the surveillance site compared to the entire country. Risk factors associated with NCDs dominated morbidity and mortality patterns. PMID:22950751

  5. Initialization of a spin qubit in a site-controlled nanowire quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagoudakis, Konstantinos G.; McMahon, Peter L.; Fischer, Kevin A.; Puri, Shruti; Müller, Kai; Dalacu, Dan; Poole, Philip J.; Reimer, Michael E.; Zwiller, Val; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa; Vučković, Jelena

    2016-05-01

    A fault-tolerant quantum repeater or quantum computer using solid-state spin-based quantum bits will likely require a physical implementation with many spins arranged in a grid. Self-assembled quantum dots (QDs) have been established as attractive candidates for building spin-based quantum information processing devices, but such QDs are randomly positioned, which makes them unsuitable for constructing large-scale processors. Recent efforts have shown that QDs embedded in nanowires can be deterministically positioned in regular arrays, can store single charges, and have excellent optical properties, but so far there have been no demonstrations of spin qubit operations using nanowire QDs. Here we demonstrate optical pumping of individual spins trapped in site-controlled nanowire QDs, resulting in high-fidelity spin-qubit initialization. This represents the next step towards establishing spins in nanowire QDs as quantum memories suitable for use in a large-scale, fault-tolerant quantum computer or repeater based on all-optical control of the spin qubits.

  6. Succession on regraded placer mine spoil in Alaska, USA, in relation to initial site characteristics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Densmore, R.V.

    1994-01-01

    This study evaluated the rate and pattern of natural succession on regraded placer mine spoil in relation to initial substrate characteristics. The study site was the Glen Creek watershed of the Kantishna mining area of Denali National Park and Preserve, Alaska. After regrading, twelve 0.01-ha plots were established and substrate characteristics were measured. Natural plant succession was evaluated after five growing seasons. Three successional patterns were identified on the basis of plant community characteristics using cluster analysis, and were related to substrate characteristics. First, a riparian plant community with vigorous Salix alaxensis and Alnus crispa grew rapidly on topsoil that had been spread over the regraded spoil. Second, a similar plant community with less vigorous S. alaxensis developed more slowly on unprocessed spoil and spoil amended with a small amount of topsoil. Third, processed spoil remained almost bare of vegetation, although S. alaxensis was able to establish and persist in a stunted growth form. In contrast, Alnus crispa had difficulty establishing on processed spoil, but the few established seedlings grew well. Several substrate variables, including the proportion of silt and clay vs. sand, total nitrogen, and water retention capacity, were good predictors of the rate and pattern of succession. Total nitrogen was the best single predictor for the number of vigorous S. alaxensis.

  7. A Novel Quality Measure and Correction Procedure for the Annotation of Microbial Translation Initiation Sites

    PubMed Central

    Overmars, Lex; Siezen, Roland J.; Francke, Christof

    2015-01-01

    The identification of translation initiation sites (TISs) constitutes an important aspect of sequence-based genome analysis. An erroneous TIS annotation can impair the identification of regulatory elements and N-terminal signal peptides, and also may flaw the determination of descent, for any particular gene. We have formulated a reference-free method to score the TIS annotation quality. The method is based on a comparison of the observed and expected distribution of all TISs in a particular genome given prior gene-calling. We have assessed the TIS annotations for all available NCBI RefSeq microbial genomes and found that approximately 87% is of appropriate quality, whereas 13% needs substantial improvement. We have analyzed a number of factors that could affect TIS annotation quality such as GC-content, taxonomy, the fraction of genes with a Shine-Dalgarno sequence and the year of publication. The analysis showed that only the first factor has a clear effect. We have then formulated a straightforward Principle Component Analysis-based TIS identification strategy to self-organize and score potential TISs. The strategy is independent of reference data and a priori calculations. A representative set of 277 genomes was subjected to the analysis and we found a clear increase in TIS annotation quality for the genomes with a low quality score. The PCA-based annotation was also compared with annotation with the current tool of reference, Prodigal. The comparison for the model genome of Escherichia coli K12 showed that both methods supplement each other and that prediction agreement can be used as an indicator of a correct TIS annotation. Importantly, the data suggest that the addition of a PCA-based strategy to a Prodigal prediction can be used to ‘flag’ TIS annotations for re-evaluation and in addition can be used to evaluate a given annotation in case a Prodigal annotation is lacking. PMID:26204119

  8. Laparoendoscopic single site surgery for extravesical repair of vesicovaginal fistula using conventional instruments: Our initial experience

    PubMed Central

    Mahadevappa, Nagabhushana; Gudage, Swathi; Senguttavan, Karthikeyan V.; Mallya, Ashwin; Dharwadkar, Sachin

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Vesicovaginal fistula (VVF) is a major complication with psychosocial ramifications. In literature, few VVF cases have been managed by laparoendoscopic single site surgery (LESS) and for the 1st time we report VVF repair by LESS using conventional laparoscopic instruments. We present our initial experience and to assess its feasibility, safety and outcome. Patients and Methods: From March 2012 to September 2015, LESS VVF repair was done for ten patients aged between 30 and 65 (45.6 ± 10.15) years, who presented with supratrigonal VVF. LESS was performed by modified O’Conor technique using regular trocars with conventional instruments. Data were collected regarding feasibility, intra- or post-operative pain, analgesic requirement, complication, and recovery. Results: All 10 cases were completed successfully, without conversion to a standard laparoscopic or open approach. The mean operative time was 182.5 ± 32.25 (150–250) min. The mean blood loss was 100 mL. The respective mean visual analog score for pain on day 1, 2, and 3 was 9.2 ± 1, 5 ± 1, and 1.4 ± 2.3. The analgesic requirement in the form of intravenous tramadol on days 1, 2, and 3 was 160 ± 51.6, 80 ± 63.2, and 30 ± 48.3, mgs respectively. No major intra- or post-operative complications were observed. The mean hospital stay was 2.6 ± 0.7 (2–4) days. Conclusion: In select patients, LESS extravesical repair of VVF using conventional laparoscopic instruments is safe, feasible with all the advantages of single port surgery at no added cost. Additional experience and comparative studies with conventional laparoscopy are warranted. PMID:27453652

  9. PreTIS: A Tool to Predict Non-canonical 5’ UTR Translational Initiation Sites in Human and Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Reuter, Kerstin; Helms, Volkhard

    2016-01-01

    Translation of mRNA sequences into proteins typically starts at an AUG triplet. In rare cases, translation may also start at alternative non–AUG codons located in the annotated 5’ UTR which leads to an increased regulatory complexity. Since ribosome profiling detects translational start sites at the nucleotide level, the properties of these start sites can then be used for the statistical evaluation of functional open reading frames. We developed a linear regression approach to predict in–frame and out–of–frame translational start sites within the 5’ UTR from mRNA sequence information together with their translation initiation confidence. Predicted start codons comprise AUG as well as near–cognate codons. The underlying datasets are based on published translational start sites for human HEK293 and mouse embryonic stem cells that were derived by the original authors from ribosome profiling data. The average prediction accuracy of true vs. false start sites for HEK293 cells was 80%. When applied to mouse mRNA sequences, the same model predicted translation initiation sites observed in mouse ES cells with an accuracy of 76%. Moreover, we illustrate the effect of in silico mutations in the flanking sequence context of a start site on the predicted initiation confidence. Our new webservice PreTIS visualizes alternative start sites and their respective ORFs and predicts their ability to initiate translation. Solely, the mRNA sequence is required as input. PreTIS is accessible at http://service.bioinformatik.uni-saarland.de/pretis. PMID:27768687

  10. Action potentials in retinal ganglion cells are initiated at the site of maximal curvature of the extracellular potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eickenscheidt, Max; Zeck, Günther

    2014-06-01

    Objective. The initiation of an action potential by extracellular stimulation occurs after local depolarization of the neuronal membrane above threshold. Although the technique shows remarkable clinical success, the site of action and the relevant stimulation parameters are not completely understood. Approach. Here we identify the site of action potential initiation in rabbit retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) interfaced to an array of extracellular capacitive stimulation electrodes. We determine which feature of the extracellular potential governs action potential initiation by simultaneous stimulation and recording RGCs interfaced in epiretinal configuration. Stimulation electrodes were combined to areas of different size and were presented at different positions with respect to the RGC. Main results. Based on stimulation by electrodes beneath the RGC soma and simultaneous sub-millisecond latency measurement we infer axonal initiation at the site of maximal curvature of the extracellular potential. Stimulation by electrodes at different positions along the axon reveals a nearly constant threshold current density except for a narrow region close to the cell soma. These findings are explained by the concept of the activating function modified to consider a region of lower excitability close to the cell soma. Significance. We present a framework how to estimate the site of action potential initiation and the stimulus required to cross threshold in neurons tightly interfaced to capacitive stimulation electrodes. Our results underscore the necessity of rigorous electrical characterization of the stimulation electrodes and of the interfaced neural tissue.

  11. Quantum Dimer Model: Phase Diagrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, Garry; Chamon, Claudio; Castelnovo, Claudio

    We present new theoretical analysis of the Quantum Dimer Model. We study dimer models on square, cubic and triangular lattices and we reproduce their phase diagrams (which were previously known only numerically). We show that there are several types of dimer liquids and solids. We present preliminary analysis of several other models including doped dimers and planar spin ice, and some results on the Kagome and hexagonal lattices.

  12. A short sequence motif in the 5' leader of the HIV-1 genome modulates extended RNA dimer formation and virus replication.

    PubMed

    van Bel, Nikki; Das, Atze T; Cornelissen, Marion; Abbink, Truus E M; Berkhout, Ben

    2014-12-19

    The 5' leader of the HIV-1 RNA genome encodes signals that control various steps in the replication cycle, including the dimerization initiation signal (DIS) that triggers RNA dimerization. The DIS folds a hairpin structure with a palindromic sequence in the loop that allows RNA dimerization via intermolecular kissing loop (KL) base pairing. The KL dimer can be stabilized by including the DIS stem nucleotides in the intermolecular base pairing, forming an extended dimer (ED). The role of the ED RNA dimer in HIV-1 replication has hardly been addressed because of technical challenges. We analyzed a set of leader mutants with a stabilized DIS hairpin for in vitro RNA dimerization and virus replication in T cells. In agreement with previous observations, DIS hairpin stability modulated KL and ED dimerization. An unexpected previous finding was that mutation of three nucleotides immediately upstream of the DIS hairpin significantly reduced in vitro ED formation. In this study, we tested such mutants in vivo for the importance of the ED in HIV-1 biology. Mutants with a stabilized DIS hairpin replicated less efficiently than WT HIV-1. This defect was most severe when the upstream sequence motif was altered. Virus evolution experiments with the defective mutants yielded fast replicating HIV-1 variants with second site mutations that (partially) restored the WT hairpin stability. Characterization of the mutant and revertant RNA molecules and the corresponding viruses confirmed the correlation between in vitro ED RNA dimer formation and efficient virus replication, thus indicating that the ED structure is important for HIV-1 replication.

  13. TECHNICAL APPROACHES TO CHARACTERIZING AND CLEANING UP AUTOMOTIVE REPAIR SITES UNDER THE BROWNFIELDS INITIATIVE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The document provides brownfields planners with an overview of the technical methods that can be used to achieve successful site assessment and cleanup which are two key components of the brownfields redevelopment process. No two brownfields sites are identical and planners will...

  14. TECHNICAL APPROACHES TO CHARACTERIZING AND CLEANING UP METAL FINISHING SITES UNDER THE BROWNFIELDS INITIATIVE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The document provides brownfields planners with an overview of the technical methods that can be used to achieve successful site assessment and cleanup which are two key components of the brownfields redevelopment process. No two brownfields sites are identical and planners will...

  15. TECHNICAL APPROACHES TO CHARACTERIZING AND CLEANING UP IRON AND STEEL MILL SITES UNDER THE BROWNFIELDS INITIATIVE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document provides brownfields planners with an overview of the technical methods that can be used to achieve successful site assessment and cleanup which are two key components of the brownfields redevelopment process. No two brownfields sites are identical and planners will...

  16. Genome-wide identification and characterisation of human DNA replication origins by initiation site sequencing (ini-seq)

    PubMed Central

    Langley, Alexander R.; Gräf, Stefan; Smith, James C.; Krude, Torsten

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing has enabled the genome-wide identification of human DNA replication origins. However, different approaches to mapping replication origins, namely (i) sequencing isolated small nascent DNA strands (SNS-seq); (ii) sequencing replication bubbles (bubble-seq) and (iii) sequencing Okazaki fragments (OK-seq), show only limited concordance. To address this controversy, we describe here an independent high-resolution origin mapping technique that we call initiation site sequencing (ini-seq). In this approach, newly replicated DNA is directly labelled with digoxigenin-dUTP near the sites of its initiation in a cell-free system. The labelled DNA is then immunoprecipitated and genomic locations are determined by DNA sequencing. Using this technique we identify >25,000 discrete origin sites at sub-kilobase resolution on the human genome, with high concordance between biological replicates. Most activated origins identified by ini-seq are found at transcriptional start sites and contain G-quadruplex (G4) motifs. They tend to cluster in early-replicating domains, providing a correlation between early replication timing and local density of activated origins. Origins identified by ini-seq show highest concordance with sites identified by SNS-seq, followed by OK-seq and bubble-seq. Furthermore, germline origins identified by positive nucleotide distribution skew jumps overlap with origins identified by ini-seq and OK-seq more frequently and more specifically than do sites identified by either SNS-seq or bubble-seq. PMID:27587586

  17. GE23077 binds to the RNA polymerase 'i' and 'i+1' sites and prevents the binding of initiating nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Degen, David; Ho, Mary X; Sineva, Elena; Ebright, Katherine Y; Ebright, Yon W; Mekler, Vladimir; Vahedian-Movahed, Hanif; Feng, Yu; Yin, Ruiheng; Tuske, Steve; Irschik, Herbert; Jansen, Rolf; Maffioli, Sonia; Donadio, Stefano; Arnold, Eddy; Ebright, Richard H

    2014-04-22

    Using a combination of genetic, biochemical, and structural approaches, we show that the cyclic-peptide antibiotic GE23077 (GE) binds directly to the bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP) active-center 'i' and 'i+1' nucleotide binding sites, preventing the binding of initiating nucleotides, and thereby preventing transcription initiation. The target-based resistance spectrum for GE is unusually small, reflecting the fact that the GE binding site on RNAP includes residues of the RNAP active center that cannot be substituted without loss of RNAP activity. The GE binding site on RNAP is different from the rifamycin binding site. Accordingly, GE and rifamycins do not exhibit cross-resistance, and GE and a rifamycin can bind simultaneously to RNAP. The GE binding site on RNAP is immediately adjacent to the rifamycin binding site. Accordingly, covalent linkage of GE to a rifamycin provides a bipartite inhibitor having very high potency and very low susceptibility to target-based resistance. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02450.001.

  18. Recombination Can Initiate and Terminate at a Large Number of Sites within the Rosy Locus of Drosophila Melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Clark, S. H.; Hilliker, A. J.; Chovnick, A.

    1988-01-01

    This report presents the results of a recombination experiment designed to question the existence of special sites for the initiation or termination of a recombination heteroduplex within the region of the rosy locus. Intragenic recombination events were monitored between two physically separated rosy mutant alleles ry(301) and ry(2) utilizing DNA restriction site polymorphisms as genetic markers. Both ry(301) and ry(2) are known from previous studies to be associated with gene conversion frequencies an order of magnitude lower than single site mutations. The mutations are associated with large, well defined insertions located as internal sites within the locus in prior intragenic mapping studies. On the molecular map, they represent large insertions approximately 2.7 kb apart in the second and third exons, respectively, of the XDH coding region. The present study monitors intragenic recombination in a mutant heterozygous genotype in which DNA homology is disrupted by these large discontinuities, greater than the region of DNA homology and flanking both sides of the locus. If initiation/or termination requires separate sites at either end of the locus, then intragenic recombination within the rosy locus of the heterozygote should be eliminated. Contrary to expectation, significant recombination between these sites is seen. PMID:2834266

  19. Single-molecule force measurements of the polymerizing dimeric subunit of von Willebrand factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijeratne, Sithara S.; Li, Jingqiang; Yeh, Hui-Chun; Nolasco, Leticia; Zhou, Zhou; Bergeron, Angela; Frey, Eric W.; Moake, Joel L.; Dong, Jing-fei; Kiang, Ching-Hwa

    2016-01-01

    Von Willebrand factor (VWF) multimers are large adhesive proteins that are essential to the initiation of hemostatic plugs at sites of vascular injury. The binding of VWF multimers to platelets, as well as VWF proteolysis, is regulated by shear stresses that alter VWF multimeric conformation. We used single molecule manipulation with atomic force microscopy (AFM) to investigate the effect of high fluid shear stress on soluble dimeric and multimeric forms of VWF. VWF dimers are the smallest unit that polymerizes to construct large VWF multimers. The resistance to mechanical unfolding with or without exposure to shear stress was used to evaluate VWF conformational forms. Our data indicate that, unlike recombinant VWF multimers (RVWF), recombinant dimeric VWF (RDVWF) unfolding force is not altered by high shear stress (100 dynes/cm2 for 3 min at 37°C ). We conclude that under the shear conditions used (100 dynes/cm2 for 3 min at 37°C ) , VWF dimers do not self-associate into a conformation analogous to that attained by sheared large VWF multimers.

  20. Initial field trials of the site characterization and analysis penetrometer system (SCAPS). Reconnaissance of Jacksonville Naval Air Station waste oil and solvents disposal site. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, S.S.; Douglas, D.H.; Sharp, M.K.; Olsen, R.A.; Comes, G.D.

    1993-12-01

    At the request of the Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC), Southern Division, Charleston, SC, the U.S. Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station (WES) conducted the initial field trial of the Site Characterization and Analysis Penetrometer System (SCAPS) at Jacksonville Naval Air Station (NAS), Jacksonville FL. This work was carried out by a field crew consisting of personnel from WES and the Naval Ocean Systems Center during the period of 16 July 1990 to 14 August 1990. The SCAPS investigation at the Jacksonville NAS has two primary objectives: (a) to provide data that could be useful in formulating remediation plans for the facility and (b) to provide for the initial field trial of the SCAPS currently under development by WES for the U.S. Army Toxic and Hazardous Materials Agency (USATHAMA), now the U.S. Army Environmental Center. The original concepts for the SCAPS was to develop an integrated site screening characterization system whose capabilities would include (a) surface mapping, (b) geophysical surveys using magnetic, induced electromagnetic, and radar instruments, (c) measurements of soil strength, soil electrical resistivity, and laser-induced soil fluorometry Cone penetrometer, Site Characterization and Analysis Laser Induced Fluorescence(LIF), Penetrometer System(SCAPS) POL Contamination, using screening instrumentation mounted in a soil penetrometer, (d) soil and fluid samplers, and (e) computerized data acquisition, interpretation, and visualization. The goal of the SCAPS program is to provide detailed, rapid, and cost-effective surface and subsurface data for input to site assessment/remediation efforts.

  1. Palladium dimers adsorbed on graphene: A DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Gagandeep; Gupta, Shuchi; Dharamvir, Keya

    2015-05-01

    The 2D structure of graphene shows a great promise for enhanced catalytic activity when adsorbed with palladium. We performed a systematic density functional theory (DFT) study of the adsorption of palladium dimer (Pd2) on graphene using SIESTA package, in the generalized gradient approximation (GGA). The adsorption energy, geometry, and charge transfer of Pd2-graphene system are calculated. Both horizontal and vertical orientations of Pd2 on graphene are studied. Our calculations revealed that the minimum energy configuration for Pd dimer is parallel to the graphene sheet with its two atoms occupying centre of adjacent hexagonal rings of graphene sheet. Magnetic moment is induced for Pd dimer adsorbed on graphene in vertical orientation while horizontal orientation of Pd dimer on graphene do not exhibit magnetism. Insignificant energy differences among adsorption sites means that dimer mobility on the graphene sheet is high. There is imperceptible distortion of graphene sheet perpendicular to its plane. However, some lateral displacements are seen.

  2. COST ESTIMATING TOOLS AND RESOURCES FOR ADDRESSING SITES UNDER THE BROWNFIELDS INITIATIVE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Brownfields redevelopment contributes to the revitalization of communities across the U.S. Reuse of these abandoned, contaminated sites spurs economic growth, builds community pride, protects public health, and helps maintain our nation's "greenfields," often at a relatively low ...

  3. An Initial Evaluation of Siting Considerations on Current and Future Wind Deployment

    SciTech Connect

    Tegen, Suzanne; Lantz, Eric; Mai, Trieu; Heimiller, Donna; Hand, Maureen; Ibanez, Eduardo

    2016-07-01

    This report provides a deeper understanding of the wind project development process, from desktop studies to a successful project in the ground. It examines three siting consideration categories that wind project sponsors must include in the development process: wildlife (species that live in, near, or migrate through the area where wind development is possible), radar (wind turbines can cause interference with radar signals), and public engagement (representing communities and stakeholders who live near wind power projects). The research shows that although this country's abundant wind resource provides numerous options for addressing siting considerations, actually siting individual projects is becoming more difficult because of regulatory and other uncertainties. Model results are based on the premise that developers will be able to site, permit, and build successful projects, which is not always the case in reality.

  4. Human cap methyltransferase (RNMT) N-terminal non-catalytic domain mediates recruitment to transcription initiation sites

    PubMed Central

    Aregger, Michael; Cowling, Victoria H.

    2013-01-01

    Gene expression in eukaryotes is dependent on the mRNA methyl cap which mediates mRNA processing and translation initiation. Synthesis of the methyl cap initiates with the addition of 7-methylguanosine to the initiating nucleotide of RNA pol II (polymerase II) transcripts, which occurs predominantly during transcription and in mammals is catalysed by RNGTT (RNA guanylyltransferase and 5′ phosphatase) and RNMT (RNA guanine-7 methyltransferase). RNMT has a methyltransferase domain and an N-terminal domain whose function is unclear; it is conserved in mammals, but not required for cap methyltransferase activity. In the present study we report that the N-terminal domain is necessary and sufficient for RNMT recruitment to transcription initiation sites and that recruitment occurs in a DRB (5,6-dichloro-1-β-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole)-dependent manner. The RNMT-activating subunit, RAM (RNMT-activating miniprotein), is also recruited to transcription initiation sites via an interaction with RNMT. The RNMT N-terminal domain is required for transcript expression, translation and cell proliferation. PMID:23863084

  5. Identification of a RNA Polymerase II Initiation Site in the Long Terminal Repeat of Moloney Murine Leukemia Viral DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuhrman, Shella A.; van Beveren, Charles; Verma, Inder M.

    1981-09-01

    We have used a soluble in vitro RNA polymerase II transcription system to define the site of initiation of Moloney murine leukemia viral RNA synthesis. Molecularly cloned integrated and unintegrated Moloney murine leukemia virus DNAs were used as templates. The 5' ends of in vitro transcripts and virion RNA of Moloney murine leukemia virus were compared by nuclease S1 protection experiments. Our results indicate that viral sequences upstream of the in vivo cap site are implicated in the transcription of viral RNA and that the 5' end of an in vitro transcript derived from an integrated Moloney murine leukemia virus clone corresponds to the 5' end of viral genomic RNA.

  6. Artificial genetic selection for an efficient translation initiation site for expression of human RACK1 gene in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Zhelyabovskaya, Olga B; Berlin, Yuri A; Birikh, Klara R

    2004-03-19

    In bacterial expression systems, translation initiation is usually the rate limiting and the least predictable stage of protein synthesis. Efficiency of a translation initiation site can vary dramatically depending on the sequence context. This is why many standard expression vectors provide very poor expression levels of some genes. This notion persuaded us to develop an artificial genetic selection protocol, which allows one to find for a given target gene an individual efficient ribosome binding site from a random pool. In order to create Darwinian pressure necessary for the genetic selection, we designed a system based on translational coupling, in which microorganism survival in the presence of antibiotic depends on expression of the target gene, while putting no special requirements on this gene. Using this system we obtained superproducing constructs for the human protein RACK1 (receptor for activated C kinase).

  7. Calcium-dependent Dimerization of Human Soluble Calcium Activated Nucleotidase: Characterization of the Dimer Interface

    SciTech Connect

    Yang,M.; Horii, K.; Herr, A.; Kirley, T.

    2006-01-01

    Mammals express a protein homologous to soluble nucleotidases used by blood-sucking insects to inhibit host blood clotting. These vertebrate nucleotidases may play a role in protein glycosylation. The activity of this enzyme family is strictly dependent on calcium, which induces a conformational change in the secreted, soluble human nucleotidase. The crystal structure of this human enzyme was recently solved; however, the mechanism of calcium activation and the basis for the calcium-induced changes remain unclear. In this study, using analytical ultracentrifugation and chemical cross-linking, we show that calcium or strontium induce noncovalent dimerization of the soluble human enzyme. The location and nature of the dimer interface was elucidated using a combination of site-directed mutagenesis and chemical cross-linking, coupled with crystallographic analyses. Replacement of Ile{sup 170}, Ser{sup 172}, and Ser{sup 226} with cysteine residues resulted in calcium-dependent, sulfhydryl-specific intermolecular cross-linking, which was not observed after cysteine introduction at other surface locations. Analysis of a super-active mutant, E130Y, revealed that this mutant dimerized more readily than the wild-type enzyme. The crystal structure of the E130Y mutant revealed that the mutated residue is found in the dimer interface. In addition, expression of the full-length nucleotidase revealed that this membrane-bound form can also dimerize and that these dimers are stabilized by spontaneous oxidative cross-linking of Cys{sup 30}, located between the single transmembrane helix and the start of the soluble sequence. Thus, calcium-mediated dimerization may also represent a mechanism for regulation of the activity of this nucleotidase in the physiological setting of the endoplasmic reticulum or Golgi.

  8. Perform Initial Measurements to Investigate Microwave Detection for Location of Hemorrhage Sites Within the Body

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-08-01

    ISSUES Intracranial hemorrhage can present itself in many different contexts, from the 85 year old woman on anticoagulation to the infant shaken...etiology for intracranial bleeds. Individuals with high blood pressure, atherosclerotic disease, atrial fibrillation, and a myriad other medical conditions...suffered an intracranial bleed involves many members of the medical community, including paramedics on site, emergency room physicians, neurologists

  9. Parental Involvement in Active Transport to School Initiatives: A Multi-Site Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eyler, Amy; Baldwin, Julie; Carnoske, Cheryl; Nickelson, Jan; Troped, Philip; Steinman, Lesley; Pluto, Delores; Litt, Jill; Evenson, Kelly; Terpstra, Jennifer; Brownson, Ross; Schmid, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Background: Increasing physical activity in youth is a recommended approach to curbing the childhood obesity epidemic. One way to help increase children's daily activity is to promote active transportation to and from school (ATS). Purpose: The purpose of this case study was to explore parental perception of, and participation in, ATS initiatives.…

  10. Molecular view of 43 S complex formation and start site selection in eukaryotic translation initiation.

    PubMed

    Lorsch, Jon R; Dever, Thomas E

    2010-07-09

    A central step to high fidelity protein synthesis is selection of the proper start codon. Recent structural, biochemical, and genetic analyses have provided molecular insights into the coordinated activities of the initiation factors in start codon selection. A molecular model is emerging in which start codon recognition is linked to dynamic reorganization of factors on the ribosome and structural changes in the ribosome itself.

  11. Dynamical dimer-dimer correlation functions from exact diagonalization

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, Ralph

    2001-05-01

    A regularization method is presented to deduce dynamic correlation functions from exact diagonalization calculations. It is applied to dimer-dimer correlation functions in quantum spin chains relevant for the description of spin-Peierls systems. Exact results for the XY model are presented. The analysis draws into doubt that the dimer-dimer correlation functions show the same scale invariance as spin-spin correlation functions. The results are applied to describe the quasielastic scattering in CuGeO{sub 3} and the hardening of the Peierls-active phonons.

  12. Adsorption of silver dimer on graphene - A DFT study

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, Gagandeep; Gupta, Shuchi; Rani, Pooja; Dharamvir, Keya

    2014-04-24

    We performed a systematic density functional theory (DFT) study of the adsorption of silver dimer (Ag{sub 2}) on graphene using SIESTA (Spanish Initiative for Electronic Simulations with Thousands of Atoms) package, in the generalized gradient approximation (GGA). The adsorption energy, geometry, and charge transfer of Ag2-graphene system are calculated. The minimum energy configuration for a silver dimer is parallel to the graphene sheet with its two atoms directly above the centre of carbon-carbon bond. The negligible charge transfer between the dimer and the surface is also indicative of a weak bond. The methodology demonstrated in this paper may be applied to larger silver clusters on graphene sheet.

  13. Controlled synthesis of biodegradable lactide polymers and copolymers using novel in situ generated or single-site stereoselective polymerization initiators.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Zhiyuan; Dijkstra, Pieter J; Feijen, Jan

    2004-01-01

    Polylactides and their copolymers are key biodegradable polymers used widely in biomedical, pharmaceutical and ecological applications. The development of synthetic pathways and catalyst/initiator systems to produce pre-designed polylactides, as well as the fundamental understanding of the polymerization reactions, has continuously been an important topic. Here, we will address the recent advances in the ring-opening polymerization of lactides, with an emphasis on the highly versatile in situ generated initiator systems and single-site stereoselective initiators. The in situ generated initiators including in situ formed yttrium, calcium and zinc alkoxides all have been shown to bring about a rapid and living polymerization of lactides under mild conditions, which facilitated the preparation of a variety of advanced lactide-based biomaterials. For example, well-defined di- and tri-block copolymers consisting of hydrophilic poly(ethylene glycol) blocks and hydrophobic polyester blocks, which form novel biodegradable polymersomes or biodegradable thermosensitive hydrogels, have been prepared. In the past few years, significant progress has also been made in the area of stereoselective polymerization of lactides. This new generation of initiators has enabled the production of polylactide materials with novel microstructures and/or properties, such as heterotactic (--RRSSRRSSRRSS--) polylactide, crystalline syndiotactic (--RSRSRSRSRSRS--) polylactide and isotactic stereoblock (--Rn Sn Rn Sn--) polylactide, exhibiting a high melting temperature. The recently developed polymerizations using in situ generated initiators and stereoselective polymerizations have no doubt opened a brand-new avenue for the design and exploration of polylactides and their copolymers.

  14. Alteration of the major phosphorylation site of eukaryotic protein synthesis initiation factor 4E prevents its association with the 48 S initiation complex.

    PubMed

    Joshi-Barve, S; Rychlik, W; Rhoads, R E

    1990-02-15

    Site-directed mutagenesis was used to replace the serine residue at the primary phosphorylation site of human eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF) 4E with an alanine residue. The mutated cDNA was transcribed in vitro, and the transcript was used to direct protein synthesis in a reticulocyte lysate system. The variant protein (eIF-4EAla) was retained on a 7-methylguanosine 5'-triphosphate (m7GTP)-Sepharose affinity column and was specifically eluted by m7GTP. Examination of eIF-4EAla by isoelectric focusing revealed two species which had the same pI values as the phosphorylated and nonphosphorylated forms of unaltered eIF-4E (here designated eIF-4ESer). However, conversion of unphosphorylated eIF-4EAla to the putative phosphorylated eIF-4EAla in the reticulocyte lysate system was slower than the corresponding conversion of eIF-4ESer. The possibility that the more acidic form of eIF-4EAla was due to NH2-terminal acetylation was ruled out by an experiment in which the acetyl-CoA pool of the reticulocyte lysate system was depleted with oxaloacetate and citrate synthase. The more acidic form of eIF-4EAla was, however, eliminated by treatment with calf intestine alkaline phosphatase, suggesting that it results from a second-site phosphorylation. When translation reaction mixtures were resolved on sucrose density gradients, the 35S-labeled eIF-4ESer was found on the 48 S initiation complex in the presence of guanylyl imidodiphosphate, as reported earlier (Hiremath, L.S., Hiremath, S.T., Rychlik, W., Joshi, S., Domier, L.L., and Rhoads, R.E. (1989) J. Biol. Chem. 264, 1132-1138). eIF-4EAla, by contrast, was not found on the 48 S complex, suggesting that phosphorylation of eIF-4E is necessary for it to carry out its role of transferring mRNA to the 48 S complex. Supporting this interpretation was the finding that eIF-4ESer isolated from 48 S initiation complexes consisted predominantly of the phosphorylated form.

  15. Department of the Navy Explosives Safety Site Approval Process Improvement Initiative

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-01

    software deployment and sustainment within the DON for: • Automated Site Planning Tool ( ASPT )—ESSv6 • WebSAR • Explosives Safety Database The...Measures  Administrative Record for ESA  Configuration/Data Control of facility-related ES data for ASPT The NOSSA level roll-up of the...the DDESB by 30 December 2010. At this point, the following principles are guiding the development of the implementation plan:  Use DDESB ASPT

  16. di-EOS - "distributed EOS": Initial experience with split-site persistency in a production service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, A. J.; Mascetti, L.; Iven, J.; Espinal Curull, X.

    2014-06-01

    In order to accommodate growing demand for storage and computing capacity from the LHC experiments, in 2012 CERN tendered for a remote computer centre. The potential negative performance implications of the geographical distance (aka network latency) within the same "site" and storage service on physics computing have been investigated. Overall impact should be acceptable, but for some access patterns might be significant. Recent EOS changes should help to mitigate the effects, but experiments may need to adjust their job parameters.

  17. The acrylonitrile dimer ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ervasti, Henri K.; Jobst, Karl J.; Burgers, Peter C.; Ruttink, Paul J. Ae; Terlouw, Johan K.

    2007-04-01

    Large energy barriers prohibit the rearrangement of solitary acrylonitrile ions, CH2CHCN+, into their more stable hydrogen-shift isomers CH2CCNH+ or CHCH-CNH+. This prompted us to examine if these isomerizations occur by self-catalysis in acrylonitrile dimer ions. Such ions, generated by chemical ionization experiments of acrylonitrile with an excess of carbon dioxide, undergo five dissociations in the [mu]s time frame, as witnessed by peaks at m/z 53, 54, 79, 80 and 105 in their metastable ion mass spectrum. Collision experiments on these product ions, deuterium labeling, and a detailed computational analysis using the CBS-QB3 model chemistry lead to the following conclusions: (i) the m/z 54 ions are ions CH2CHCNH+ generated by self-protonation in ion-dipole stabilized hydrogen-bridged dimer ions [CH2CHCN...H-C(CN)CH2]+ and [CH2CHCN...H-C(H)C(H)CN]+; the proton shifts in these ions are associated with a small reverse barrier; (ii) dissociation of the H-bridged ions into CH2CCNH+ or CHCH-CNH+ by self-catalysis is energetically feasible but kinetically improbable: experiment shows that the m/z 53 ions are CH2CHCN+ ions, generated by back dissociation; (iii) the peaks at m/z 79, 80 and 105 correspond with the losses of HCN, C2H2 and H, respectively. The calculations indicate that these ions are generated from dimer ions that have adopted the (much more stable) covalently bound "head-to-tail" structure [CH2CHCN-C(H2)C(H)CN]+; experiments indicate that the m/z 79 (C5H5N) and m/z 105 (C6H6N2) ions have linear structures but the m/z 80 (C4H4N2) ions consist of ionized pyrimidine in admixture with its stable pyrimidine-2-ylidene isomer. Acrylonitrile is a confirmed species in interstellar space and our study provides experimental and computational evidence that its dimer radical cation yields the ionized prebiotic pyrimidine molecule.

  18. Initial stages of Ba adsorption on the Si(100)-(2×1) surface at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, X.; Hu, Xiaoming; Sarid, D.; Yu, Z.; Wang, J.; Marshall, D. S.; Droopad, R.; Abrokwah, J. K.; Hallmark, J. A.; Ooms, W. J.

    1999-02-01

    Scanning tunneling microscopy has been used to study the initial stages of room-temperature adsorption of Ba atoms on a clean Si(100)-(2×1) surface. It is found that most Ba atoms are located at type C defects, which stabilizes the dimer buckling in their vicinity, while the rest are located at single dimer sites on top of the Si dimer rows. Analysis of the images reveals that the Ba-Si(100) interactions are mediated by a partial charge transfer from the adsorbate to the substrate.

  19. D Dimer in acute care

    PubMed Central

    Sathe, Prachee M.; Patwa, Urvil D.

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism, Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT) and Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) are important sources of mortality and morbidity in intensive care unit (ICU). And every time D-dimer remains the the commonest investigation. Many times D-dimer is erroneously considered as a diagnostic test in above mentioned conditions. Its interpretation requires cautions. To circumvent this source of error it is necessary to understand D-dimer test and its significance in various disorder. This article review some basic details of D-dimer, condition associated with its increased level and some prognostic value in intracranial hemorrhage and gastrointestinal (GI) bleed. PMID:25337485

  20. Two translational initiation sites in the infB gene are used to express initiation factor IF2 alpha and IF2 beta in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Plumbridge, J A; Deville, F; Sacerdot, C; Petersen, H U; Cenatiempo, Y; Cozzone, A; Grunberg-Manago, M; Hershey, J W

    1985-01-01

    The gene infB codes for the two forms of translational initiation factor IF2: IF2 alpha (97 300 daltons) and IF2 beta (79 700 daltons). To determine whether the two forms differ at their N terminus, purified IF2 alpha and IF2 beta were subjected to 11 or more steps of Edman degradation. The N-terminal amino acid sequences are completely different, but match perfectly the DNA sequences at the beginning of the infB open reading frame and an in-phase region 471 bp downstream. A fusion was constructed between the proximal half of the infB gene and the lacZ gene lacking the region coding for the first eight amino acids. The fused gene expresses two products of 170 000 and 150 000 daltons, corresponding to the fused proteins IF2 alpha-beta-galactosidase and IF2 beta-beta-galactosidase, which confirms in vivo that the IF2 forms differ at their N terminus. A deletion of the 5'-non-translated region of the fused gene, including the Shine/Dalgarno ribosomal binding site, results in the expression of IF2 beta-beta-galactosidase but not IF2 alpha-beta-galactosidase. This strongly suggests that IF2 beta results from independent translation rather than from a precise proteolytic cleavage of IF2 alpha. Further evidence for initiation of protein synthesis at the putative IF2 alpha and IF2 beta start sites was sought by using an in vitro dipeptide synthesis assay. A DNA fragment containing the entire infB gene was cloned into three plasmid vectors and the resulting recombinant DNAs were used as templates in assays containing fMet-tRNA and various labelled aminoacyl-tRNAs.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Fig. 2. PMID:3894004

  1. Initial source and site characterization studies for the U. C. San Diego campus

    SciTech Connect

    Day, S.; Erick, F.; Heuze, F.E.; Mellors, R.; Minster, B.; Park, S.; Wagoner, J.

    1999-07-01

    The basic approach of the Campus Laboratory Collaboration (CLC) project is to combine the substantial expertise that exists within the University of California (UC) system in geology, seismology, geotechnical engineering, and structural engineering to evaluate the effects of large earthquakes on UC facilities. These estimates draw upon recent advances in hazard assessment, seismic wave propagation modeling in rocks and soils, dynamic soil testing, and structural dynamics. The UC campuses currently chosen for applications of our integrated methodology are Riverside, San Diego, and Santa Barbara. The basic procedure is first to identify possible earthquake source regions and local campus site conditions that may affect estimates of strong ground motion. Combined geological , geophysical, and geotechnical studies are conducted to characterize each campus with specific focus on the location of particular target buildings of special interest to the campus administrators. The project will then drill and log deep boreholes next to the target structure, to provide direct in-situ measurements of subsurface material properties and to install uphole and downhole 3-component seismic sensors capable of recording both weak and strong motions. The boreholes provide access to deeper materials, below the soil layers, that have relatively high seismic shear-wave velocities. Analysis of conjugate downhole and uphole records provides a basis for optimizing the representation of the low-strain response of the sites. Earthquake rupture scenarios of identified causative faults are combined with the earthquake records and nonlinear soil models to provide site-specific estimates of strong motions at the selected target locations. The predicted ground motions are then used as input to the dynamic analysis of the buildings.

  2. Occlusion of the Ribosome Binding Site Connects the Translational Initiation Frequency, mRNA Stability and Premature Transcription Termination

    PubMed Central

    Eriksen, Mette; Sneppen, Kim; Pedersen, Steen; Mitarai, Namiko

    2017-01-01

    Protein production is controlled by ribosome binding to the messenger RNA (mRNA), quantified in part by the binding affinity between the ribosome and the ribosome binding sequence on the mRNA. Using the E. coli lac operon as model, Ringquist et al. (1992) found a more than 1,000-fold difference in protein yield when varying the Shine-Dalgarno sequence and its distance to the translation start site. Their proposed model accounted for this large variation by only a variation in the binding affinity and the subsequent initiation rate. Here we demonstrate that the decrease in protein yield with weaker ribosome binding sites in addition is caused by a decreased mRNA stability, and by an increased rate of premature transcription termination. Using different ribosome binding site sequences of the E. coli lacZ gene, we found that an approximately 100-fold span in protein expression could be subdivided into three mechanisms that each affected expression 3- to 6-fold. Our experiments is consistent with a two-step ribosome initiation model, in which occlusion of the initial part of the mRNA by a ribosome simultaneously protects the mRNA from both premature transcription termination and degradation: The premature termination we suggest is coupled to the absence of occlusion that allows binding of transcription termination factor, possibly Rho. The mRNA stability is explained by occlusion that prevents binding of the degrading enzymes. In our proposed scenario, a mRNA with lower translation initiation rate would at the same time be “hit” by an increased premature termination and a shorter life-time. Our model further suggests that the transcription from most if not all natural promoters is substantially influenced by premature termination. PMID:28382022

  3. Diffusional kinetics of SiGe Dimers on Si(100) using atom-tracking scanning tunneling microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    QIN,X.R.; SWARTZENTRUBER,BRIAN S.; LAGALLY,M.G.

    2000-06-14

    Quantitative measurements of the diffusion of adsorbed mixed Ge-Si dimers on the Si(100) surface have been made as a function of temperature using atom-tracking scanning tunneling microscopy. These mixed dimers are distinguishable from pure Si-Si dimers by their characteristic kinetics--a 180-degree rotation between two highly buckled configurations. At temperatures at which the mixed dimers diffuse, atomic-exchange events occur, in which the Ge atom in the adsorbed dimer exchanges with a substrate Si atom. Re-exchange can also occur when the diffusing Si-Si dimer revisits the original site of exchange.

  4. Transcription Start Site Scanning and the Requirement for ATP during Transcription Initiation by RNA Polymerase II.

    PubMed

    Fishburn, James; Galburt, Eric; Hahn, Steven

    2016-06-17

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae RNA polymerase (Pol) II locates transcription start sites (TSS) at TATA-containing promoters by scanning sequences downstream from the site of preinitiation complex formation, a process that involves the translocation of downstream promoter DNA toward Pol II. To investigate a potential role of yeast Pol II transcription in TSS scanning, HIS4 promoter derivatives were generated that limited transcripts in the 30-bp scanned region to two nucleotides in length. Although we found that TSS scanning does not require RNA synthesis, our results revealed that transcription in the purified yeast basal system is largely ATP-independent despite a requirement for the TFIIH DNA translocase subunit Ssl2. This result is rationalized by our finding that, although they are poorer substrates, UTP and GTP can also be utilized by Ssl2. ATPγS is a strong inhibitor of rNTP-fueled translocation, and high concentrations of ATPγS make transcription completely dependent on added dATP. Limiting Pol II function with low ATP concentrations shifted the TSS position downstream. Combined with prior work, our results show that Pol II transcription plays an important role in TSS selection but is not required for the scanning reaction.

  5. The Field Lysimeter Test Facility (FLTF) at the Hanford Site: Installation and initial tests

    SciTech Connect

    Gee, G.W.; Kirkham, R.R.; Downs, J.L.; Campbell, M.D.

    1989-02-01

    The objectives of this program are to test barrier design concepts and to demonstrate a barrier design that meets established performance criteria for use in isolating wastes disposed of near-surface at the Hanford Site. Specifically, the program is designed to assess how well the barriers perform in controlling biointrusion, water infiltration, and erosion, as well as evaluating interactions between environmental variables and design factors of the barriers. To assess barrier performance and design with respect to infiltration control, field lysimeters and small- and large-scale field plots are planned to test the performance of specific barrier designs under actual and modified (enhanced precipitation) climatic conditions. The Field Lysimeter Test Facility (FLTF) is located in the 600 Area of the Hanford Site just east of the 200 West Area and adjacent to the Hanford Meteorological Station. The FLTF data will be used to assess the effectiveness of selected protective barrier configurations in controlling water infiltration. The facility consists of 14 drainage lysimeters (2 m dia x 3 m deep) and four precision weighing lysimeters (1.5 m x 1.5 m x 1.7 m deep). The lysimeters are buried at grade and aligned in a parallel configuration, with nine lysimeters on each side of an underground instrument chamber. The lysimeters were filled with materials to simulate a multilayer protective barrier system. Data gathered from the FLTF will be used to compare key barrier components and to calibrate and test models for predicting long-term barrier performance.

  6. GliaSite Brachytherapy Boost as Part of Initial Treatment of Glioblastoma Multiforme: A Retrospective Multi-Institutional Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect

    Welsh, James; Sanan, Abhay; Gabayan, Arash J.; Green, Sylvan B.; Lustig, Robert; Burri, Stuart; Kwong, Edmund; Stea, Baldassarre . E-mail: bstea@email.ariozna.edu

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: To report on a retrospective analysis of the cumulative experience from eight institutions using the GliaSite Radiotherapy System as a brachytherapy boost in the initial management of glioblastoma multiforme. Methods and Materials: Eight institutions provided data on 20 patients with histologically proven glioblastoma multiforme with a median age of 59 years (range, 39-76) and median Karnofsky performance scale of 80 (range, 50-100). After maximal surgical debulking, patients were treated with GliaSite brachytherapy to a median dose of 50 Gy, followed by external beam radiotherapy to a median dose of 60 Gy (range, 46-60 Gy), for a cumulative dose escalation of 110 Gy (range, 84-130 Gy). Results: The average survival for this study population was 11.4 months (range, 4-29). When the patients' survival was compared with that of historical controls according to their Radiation Therapy Oncology Group recursive partitioning analysis class, the average survival was increased by 3 months (95% confidence interval, 0.23-4.9) corresponding to a 43% increase (p = 0.033). Three patients (14%) experienced Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 3 central nervous system toxicity. Of the treatment failures, 50% were >2 cm from the edge of the balloon. Conclusion: The results of this analysis have demonstrated that dose escalation (>100 Gy) with GliaSite is well tolerated and associated with minimal toxicity. Local control improved with the use of GliaSite brachytherapy. The putative survival advantage seen in this study needs to be interpreted with caution; nevertheless, the data provide sufficient justification to investigate the potential role of radiation dose escalation in conjunction with GliaSite in the initial treatment of glioblastoma multiforme.

  7. Atomic-scale dynamics of atoms and dimers on the Si(001) surface

    SciTech Connect

    Swartzentruber, B.S.

    1996-12-31

    The kinetics of adsorbed Si monomers and dimers, at submonolayer coverage, are measured using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Si monomers are observed in empty-state STM images acquired between room temperature and 115 C. The monomers are trapped at the ends of rebonded-SB type dimer rows. When monomers thermally escape from the traps, they rapidly diffuse along the substrate dimer row until they find another unoccupied trap or return to their original trap. The binding activation barrier at isolated traps is {approximately}1.0 eV. A slightly lower barrier exists for monomers to hop between the ends of neighboring dimer rows - a process facilitating diffusion along segments of SB type steps. In addition to monomers, the interactions of adsorbed Si dimers with steps and islands on Si(001) are quantified using atom-tracking STM. Diffusing dimers are reflected from steps, sides of islands, and certain surface defect structures. Site-specific free energies are extracted from measurements of lattice-site occupation probabilities of dimers trapped between these reflecting barriers. Relative to the free energy of isolated dimers on a terrace, dimers located at the first lattice site next to SA steps and the sides of islands are bound by {approximately}0.03-0.06 eV. The binding decreases to half that at the second lattice site, and is indistinguishable from the free-terrace value at a distance of three or more lattice sites.

  8. Minimization of a Protein–DNA Dimerizer

    PubMed Central

    Stafford, Ryan L.; Arndt, Hans-Dieter; Brezinski, Mary L.; Ansari, Aseem Z.; Dervan, Peter B.

    2011-01-01

    A protein–DNA dimerizer constructed from a DNA-binding polyamide and the peptide FYPWMKG facilitates the binding of a natural transcription factor Exd to an adjacent DNA site. The Exd binding domain can be reduced to a dipeptide WM attached to the polyamide through an ε-aminohexanoic acid linker with retention of protein–DNA dimerizer activity. Screening a library of analogues indicated that the tryptophan indole moiety is more important than methionine’s side chain or the N-terminal acetamide. Remarkably, switching the stereochemistry of the tryptophan residue (l to d) stabilizes the dimerizer•Exd•DNA ternary complex at 37 °C. These observations provide design principles for artificial transcription factors that may function in concert with the cellular regulatory circuitry. PMID:17290996

  9. Conformational Heterogeneity of Bax Helix 9 Dimer for Apoptotic Pore Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Chenyi; Zhang, Zhi; Kale, Justin; Andrews, David W.; Lin, Jialing; Li, Jianing

    2016-07-01

    Helix α9 of Bax protein can dimerize in the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM) and lead to apoptotic pores. However, it remains unclear how different conformations of the dimer contribute to the pore formation on the molecular level. Thus we have investigated various conformational states of the α9 dimer in a MOM model — using computer simulations supplemented with site-specific mutagenesis and crosslinking of the α9 helices. Our data not only confirmed the critical membrane environment for the α9 stability and dimerization, but also revealed the distinct lipid-binding preference of the dimer in different conformational states. In our proposed pathway, a crucial iso-parallel dimer that mediates the conformational transition was discovered computationally and validated experimentally. The corroborating evidence from simulations and experiments suggests that, helix α9 assists Bax activation via the dimer heterogeneity and interactions with specific MOM lipids, which eventually facilitate proteolipidic pore formation in apoptosis regulation.

  10. Slimhole drilling and directional drilling for on-site inspections under a Comprehensive Test Ban: An initial assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Heuze, F. E.

    1995-07-01

    On Site-Inspection (OSI), under the Comprehensive Test Ban being negotiated in the Conference on Disarmament in Geneva, may include drilling at the site of a suspected clandestine underground nuclear explosion to recover radioactive samples. It is in the interest of the drilling party to operate as light and compact a system as possible because it is likely that the drilling equipment will first be airlifted to the country being inspected, and then will be carried by air or surface to the inspection site. It will be necessary for the inspection party to have the capability for more than vertical drilling since there may not be a drilling site available vertically above the suspected nuclear cavity location. This means having, the ability to perform directional drilling and to obtain accurate positioning of the drilling tool. Consequently, several directions may be explored from a single surface drilling pad. If the target depth is expected to be at or less than 600 m (2000 ft), slant drilling may be required to a length well in excess of 600 m. Clearly, the operation must be designed with health and safety features to prevent radioactive exposure if the drilling encounters a nuclear source region. The DOE/LLNL community has developed a strong expertise in this regard. In this initial assessment we focus on the portability and directionality of drilling systems.

  11. Initial computational fluid dynamics modeling of the Giant Magellan Telescope site and enclosure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danks, Ryan; Smeaton, William; Bigelow, Bruce; Burgett, William

    2016-08-01

    In the era of extremely large telescopes (ELTs), with telescope apertures growing in size and tighter image quality requirements, maintaining a controlled observation environment is critical. Image quality is directly influenced by thermal gradients, the level of turbulence in the incoming air flow and the wind forces acting on the telescope. Thus any ELT enclosure must be able to modulate the speed and direction of the incoming air and limit the inflow of disturbed ground-layer air. However, gaining an a priori understanding of the wind environment's impacts on a proposed telescope is complicated by the fact that telescopes are usually located in remote, mountainous areas, which often do not have high quality historic records of the wind conditions, and can be subjected to highly complex flow patterns that may not be well represented by the traditional analytic approaches used in typical building design. As part of the design process for the Giant Magellan Telescope at Cerro Las Campanas, Chile; the authors conducted a parametric design study using computational fluid dynamics which assessed how the telescope's position on the mesa, its ventilation configuration and the design of the enclosure and windscreens could be optimized to minimize the infiltration of ground-layer air. These simulations yielded an understanding of how the enclosure and the natural wind flows at the site could best work together to provide a consistent, well controlled observation environment. Future work will seek to quantify the aerothermal environment in terms of image quality.

  12. NASA's Beachside Corrosion Test Site and Current Environmentally Friendly Corrosion Control Initiatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Richard W.; Calle, Luz Marina; Johnston, Frederick; Montgomery, Eliza L.; Curran, Jerome P.; Kolody, Mark R.

    2013-01-01

    NASA began corrosion studies at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in 1966 during the Gemini/Apollo Programs with the evaluation of long-term corrosion protective coatings for carbon steel. KSC's Beachside Corrosion Test Site (BCTS), which has been documented by the American Society of Materials (ASM) as one of the most corrosive, naturally occurring, environments in the world, was established at that time. With the introduction of the Space Shuttle in 1981, the already highly corrosive conditions at the launch pad were rendered even more severe by the acid ic exhaust from the solid rocket boosters. In the years that followed, numerous studies have identified materials, coatings, and maintenance procedures for launch hardware and equipment exposed to the highly corrosive environment at the launch pad. This paper presents a historical overview of over 45 years of corrosion and coating evaluation studies and a description of the BCTS's current capabilities. Additionally, current research and testing programs involving chromium free coatings, environmentally friendly corrosion preventative compounds, and alternates to nitric acid passivation will be discussed.

  13. Sequences at the 3' ends of yeast viral dsRNAs: proposed transcriptase and replicase initiation sites.

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, V E; Field, L; Cizdziel, P; Bruenn, J A

    1981-01-01

    ScV is a double-stranded RNA virus of yeast consisting of two separately encapsidated dsRNAs (L and M). ScV-1 and ScV-2 are two dsRNA viruses present in two different yeast killer strains, K1 and K2. Our 3' end sequence analysis shows that the two sets of viral dsRNAs from ScV-1 and ScV-2 are very similar. Consensus sequences for transcriptase and replicase initiation are proposed. A stem and loop structure with a 3' terminal AUGC sequence, like that of several plant virus plus strand RNAs, is present at the putative replicase initiation site of one of the yeast viral RNA plus strands. Images PMID:7029463

  14. Final report on the amended safety assessment of diisopropyl dimer dilinoleate, dicetearyl dimer dilinoleate, diisostearyl dimer dilinoleate, dioctyl dimer dilinoleate, dioctyldodecyl dimer dilinoleate, and ditridecyl dimer dilinoleate.

    PubMed

    Fiume, Monice Zondlo

    2003-01-01

    Diisopropyl Dimer Dilinoleate, Dicetearyl Dimer Dilinoleate, Diisostearyl Dimer Dilinoleate, Dioctyl Dimer Dilinoleate, Dioctyldodecyl Dimer Dilinoleate, and Ditridecyl Dimer Dilinoleate are diesters of their respective alcohols and dilinoleic acid. They function as skin-conditioning agents in a variety of cosmetic products at concentrations around 10%, but may be used at concentrations up to 53% in lipsticks. These ingredients do not absorb radiation in the ultraviolet (UV) UVA or UVB range and the only impurities expected are <0.5% dilinoleic acid, <0.1% isopropyl alcohol or <1% isostearyl alcohol, and/or small amounts of dilinoleic acid and cetearyl alcohol or octyldodecanol, depending on which diester is used. The potential skin penetration of these ingredients was evaluated using an estimate of the octanol/water partition coefficient (logP of 17.7) based on the structure of Diisopropyl Dimer Dilinoleate. This is consistent with the insolubility of these ingredients in water. Safety test data on dilinoleic acid (no adverse effects) were considered relevant because dilinoleic acid is a component of these diesters and a likely breakdown product. The acute oral and dermal LD(50) values for rats of Diisopropyl, Diisostearyl, and Dioctyldodecyl Dimer Dilinoleate were >5.0 g/kg. In a subchronic feeding study, macrophage aggregation was seen in the mesenteric lymph node at the lowest dose level (0.1% in the diet). These ingredients did not produce skin or ocular irritation in animal tests, nor were they comedogenic. Ames testing, clastogenesis in human lymphocytes in culture, and L5178Y mouse lymphoma cell forward mutations were all negative, indicating no dilinoleic acid genotoxicity. No carcinogenicity or reproductive/developmental toxicity data were available; however, structural alerts that would suggest a mutagenic or carcinogenic risk are absent. Significant reproductive/developmental toxicity or other systemic toxicity is not expected with these ingredients

  15. Prediction of Initiation Site of Destruction of Flat Braided Carbon Fiber Composites Using HTS-SQUID Gradiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinyama, Y.; Hatsukade, Y.; Tanaka, S.; Takai, Y.; Aly-Hassan, M. S.; Nakai, A.; Hamada, H.

    Carbon fiber reinforced polymers (CFRPs) are composite materials with lightweight and high specific strength. As the braided CFRPs have continuous carbon-fiber bundles in their longitudinal direction, they are stronger than conventional CFRPs. In this study, we applied a current-injection-based NDE method using a HTS-SQUID gradiometer to the flat braided CFRPs with and without carbon nanotubes (CNTs), and estimated conditions of the carbon fibers while applying a step-by-step tensile load to the CFRPs. From the results, a possibility to predict an initiation site of the destruction in the braided CFRPs was demonstrated.

  16. Savannah River Site waste vitrification projects initiated throughout the United States: Disposal and recycle options

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C.M.

    2000-04-10

    A vitrification process was developed and successfully implemented by the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) and at the West Valley Nuclear Services (WVNS) to convert high-level liquid nuclear wastes (HLLW) to a solid borosilicate glass for safe long term geologic disposal. Over the last decade, SRS has successfully completed two additional vitrification projects to safely dispose of mixed low level wastes (MLLW) (radioactive and hazardous) at the SRS and at the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). The SRS, in conjunction with other laboratories, has also demonstrated that vitrification can be used to dispose of a wide variety of MLLW and low-level wastes (LLW) at the SRS, at ORR, at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), at Rocky Flats (RF), at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP), and at the Hanford Waste Vitrification Project (HWVP). The SRS, in conjunction with the Electric Power Research Institute and the National Atomic Energy Commission of Argentina (CNEA), have demonstrated that vitrification can also be used to safely dispose of ion-exchange (IEX) resins and sludges from commercial nuclear reactors. In addition, the SRS has successfully demonstrated that numerous wastes declared hazardous by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) can be vitrified, e.g. mining industry wastes, contaminated harbor sludges, asbestos containing material (ACM), Pb-paint on army tanks and bridges. Once these EPA hazardous wastes are vitrified, the waste glass is rendered non-hazardous allowing these materials to be recycled as glassphalt (glass impregnated asphalt for roads and runways), roofing shingles, glasscrete (glass used as aggregate in concrete), or other uses. Glass is also being used as a medium to transport SRS americium (Am) and curium (Cm) to the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) for recycle in the ORR medical source program and use in smoke detectors at an estimated value of $1.5 billion to the general public.

  17. Effects of Dimerization of Serratia marcescens Endonuclease on Water Dynamics.

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chuanying; Beck, Brian W.; Krause, Kurt; Weksberg, Tiffany E.; Pettitt, Bernard M.

    2007-02-15

    The research described in this product was performed in part in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The dynamics and structure of Serratia marcescens endonuclease and its neighboring solvent are investigated by molecular dynamics (MD). Comparisons are made with structural and biochemical experiments. The dimer form is physiologic and functions more processively than the monomer. We previously found a channel formed by connected clusters of waters from the active site to the dimer interface. Here, we show that dimerization clearly changes correlations in the water structure and dynamics in the active site not seen in the monomer. Our results indicate that water at the active sites of the dimer is less affected compared with bulk solvent than in the monomer where it has much slower characteristic relaxation times. Given that water is a required participant in the reaction, this gives a clear advantage to dimerization in the absence of an apparent ability to use both active sites simultaneously.

  18. Site of impulse initiation in tendon organs of cat soleus muscle.

    PubMed

    Gregory, J E; Morgan, D L; Proske, U

    1985-12-01

    A continuing controversy surrounds the question of whether Golgi tendon organs are examples of receptors in which impulses may be generated at more than one site. This paper reports a systematic examination of a number of models incorporating single or multiple impulse generators and of the compatibility of their predictions with experimental observations. Two phenomena, in particular, that must be accounted for are nonlinear summation and cross-adaptation. When two motor units each with a direct effect on the tendon organ are stimulated together, the rate of discharge is greater than either individual rate but is less than their sum. In cross-adaptation a conditioning response elicited by one motor unit contraction produces adaptation of the discharge associated with stimulation of a second motor unit. A model with a central impulse generator can be modified to account for nonlinear summation by postulating a nonlinear transformation in the generator current-to-impulse rate conversion. Experiments measuring summation of responses to stimulation of three inputs produced results that did not support this model. Another variation of the model, which had a nonlinearity in the tension-to-current step and cross-connections (mechanical or neural) between tendon strands stressed by contracting muscle fibers, was able to account for the observations. A second model that provided the right predictions was a multiple impulse generator with cross-connections. Which of the two models best fits the experimental observations can be decided by comparing the calculated summation coefficients and cross-adaptation coefficients. A central impulse generator predicts a negative correlation, the multiple impulse generator a positive correlation. All of the observations were made using tendon organs of cat soleus muscle. Responses were recorded to stimulation of filaments of ventral root. In a comparison between 20 pairs of responses from six tendon organs the correlation between

  19. Field persistence of the edible ectomycorrhizal fungus Lactarius deliciosus: effects of inoculation strain, initial colonization level, and site characteristics.

    PubMed

    Hortal, Sara; Pera, Joan; Parladé, Javier

    2009-03-01

    Pinus pinea plants were inoculated with different strains of the edible ectomycorrhizal fungus Lactarius deliciosus. The inoculated plants were established in six experimental plantations in two sites located in the Mediterranean area to determine the effect of the initial colonization level and the inoculated strain on fungal persistence in the field. Ectomycorrhizal root colonization was determined at transplantation time and monitored at different times from uprooted plants. Extraradical soil mycelium biomass was determined from soil samples by TaqMan(R) real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The results obtained indicate that the field site played a decisive role in the persistence of L. deliciosus after outplanting. The initial colonization level and the selection of the suitable strain were also significant factors but their effect on the persistence and spread of L. deliciosus was conditioned by the physical-chemical and biotic characteristics of the plantation soil and, possibly, by their influence in root growth. Molecular techniques based on real-time PCR allowed a precise quantification of extraradical mycelium of L. deliciosus in the field. The technique is promising for non-destructive assessment of fungal persistence since soil mycelium may be a good indicator of root colonization. However, the accuracy of the technique will ultimately depend on the development of appropriate soil sampling methods because of the high variability observed.

  20. Initial recommendations for restricting gamma-ray spectrometry measurements of radionuclides for on-site inspections

    SciTech Connect

    Buckley, W F; Kreek, S A; Wild, J F

    1998-11-06

    The US paper "Radionuclide Sampling, Sample Handling and Analytical Laboratory Equipment for Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty On-Site Inspections," CTBT/PC/V/OSI/WSII/PR/29 identified the radionuclides of interest to an OS1 as 144Ce, 147Nd, 141Ce, 149Ba140La), 95 Zr(95Nb), 131mXe, 133mXe, 133gXe, 135gXe, and 37Ar. All of these nuclides (except 37Ar) can be measured via some form of conventional or coincidence-based gamma-ray spectrometry. The non-gaseous radionuclides [144Ce, 147Nd, 141Ce, 140Ba(140La), and 95Zr(95Nb)] can be measured via conventional high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry using a shielded, high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector. The gaseous radionuclides 131mXe, 133mXe, 133gXe, and 135gXe are best measured (after separation from their homologous elements) via a gamma & beta/electron coincidence technique such as that described in CTBT/WGB/TL-11/5 which could utilize either a HPGe or low-resolution (NaI(TI)) gamma-ray spectrometer to detect the gamma-ray/x-ray and a plastic scintillator to detect the beta particle/electron from the decay of the various Xe isotopes. The US paper CTBT/PC/V/IOSI/WSII/PR/29 (and other papers) identified a need to limit the information that can be extracted from high-resolution gamma-ray spectra to ensure that only information relevant to an OSI is accessible. The term "blinding" has been used to describe the need to limit the information available to the Inspection Team from the high-resolution gamma-ray measurement. A better term is "measurement restriction"; the need for restricting the information is particularly relevant to conventional high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry measurements, but not to the gamma & beta/electron coincidence-type measurements

  1. Initial Observations and Activities of Curiosity's Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) at the Gale Field Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aileen Yingst, R.; Edgett, Kenneth; MSL Science Team

    2013-04-01

    The Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) is a 2-megapixel focusable macro lens color camera on the turret on the Mars Science Laboratory rover, Curiosity's, robotic arm. The investigation centers on stratigraphy, grain-scale texture, structure, mineralogy, and morphology. MAHLI acquires focused images at working distances of 2.1 cm to infinity; at 2.1 cm the scale is 14 µm/pixel; at 6.9 cm it is 31 µm/pixel, like the Spirit and Opportunity Microscopic Imagers (MI). Most MAHLI use during the first 100 Martian days (sols) was focused on instrument, rover, and robotic arm engineering check-outs and risk reduction, including (1) interrogation of an eolian sand shadow for suitability for scooping, decontamination of the sample collection and processing system (CHIMRA, Collection and Handling for In-Situ Martian Rock Analysis), and first solid sample delivery to the Chemistry and Mineralogy (CheMin) and Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instruments; (2) documentation of the nature of this sand; (3) verification that samples were delivered to SAM and passed through a 150 µm mesh and a 2 mm funnel throat in the CheMin inlet; (4) development of methods for future precision robotic arm positioning of MAHLI and the Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer (APXS); and (5) use of MAHLI autofocus for range-finding to determine locations to position the scoop before each scooping event. Most Sol 0-100 MAHLI images were obtained at scales of 31-110 µm/pixel; some geologic targets were imaged at 21-31 µm/pixel. No opportunities to position the camera close enough to obtain 14-20 µm/pixel images were available during this initial period. Only two rocks, named Jake Matijevic and Bathurst Inlet, were imaged at a resolution higher than MI. Both were dark gray and mantled with dust and fine/very fine sand. In both cases, the highest resolution images of these rocks show no obvious, indisputable grains, suggesting that grain sizes (as expressed at the rock surfaces) are < 80 µm. However, because of

  2. Paleomagnetic results from IODP Expedition 344 Site U1381 and implications for the initial subduction of the Cocos Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yong-Xiang; Zhao, Xixi; Jovane, Luigi; Petronotis, Katerina; Gong, Zheng; Xie, Siyi

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the processes that govern the strength, nature, and distribution of slip along subduction zones is a fundamental and societally relevant goal of modern earth science. The Costa Rica Seismogenesis Project (CRISP) is specially designed to understand the processes that control nucleation and seismic rupture of large earthquakes at erosional subduction zones. Drilling directly on the Cocos Ridge (CR) during International Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 344 discovered a sedimentary hiatus in Site U1381 cores. In this study, we conducted a magnetostratigraphic and rock magnetic study on the Cenozoic sedimentary sequences of site U1381. Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility data from sediments above and below the hiatus show oblate fabrcis, but the Kmin axes of the AMS data from sediments below the hiatus are more dispersed than those from sediments above the hiatus, implying that formation of hiatus may have affected AMS. Paleomagnetic results of the U1381 core, together with available Ar-Ar dates of ash layers from sediments below the hiatus, allow us to establish a geomagnetic polarity timescale that brackets the hiatus between ca. 9.61 and 1.52 Ma. Analyses of sedimentary records from ODP/IODP cores in the vicinity reveal that the hiatus appears to be regional, spanning the northeastern end of the CR. Also, the hiatus appears to occur only at certain locations. Its regional occurrence at unique locations implies a link to the initial shallow subduction of the Cocos Ridge. The hiatus was probably produced by either bottom current erosion or the CR buckling upon its initial collision with the Middle American trench (MAT). Thus, the initial subduction of the CR must have taken place on or before 1.52 Ma.

  3. Mechanistic link between PKR dimerization, autophosphorylation, and eIF2alpha substrate recognition.

    PubMed

    Dey, Madhusudan; Cao, Chune; Dar, Arvin C; Tamura, Tomohiko; Ozato, Keiko; Sicheri, Frank; Dever, Thomas E

    2005-09-23

    The antiviral protein kinase PKR inhibits protein synthesis by phosphorylating the translation initiation factor eIF2alpha on Ser51. Binding of double-stranded RNA to the regulatory domains of PKR promotes dimerization, autophosphorylation, and the functional activation of the kinase. Herein, we identify mutations that activate PKR in the absence of its regulatory domains and map the mutations to a recently identified dimerization surface on the kinase catalytic domain. Mutations of other residues on this surface block PKR autophosphorylation and eIF2alpha phosphorylation, while mutating Thr446, an autophosphorylation site within the catalytic-domain activation segment, impairs eIF2alpha phosphorylation and viral pseudosubstrate binding. Mutational analysis of catalytic-domain residues preferentially conserved in the eIF2alpha kinase family identifies helix alphaG as critical for the specific recognition of eIF2alpha. We propose an ordered mechanism of PKR activation in which catalytic-domain dimerization triggers Thr446 autophosphorylation and specific eIF2alpha substrate recognition.

  4. Replication initiates at multiple dispersed sites in the ribosomal DNA plasmid of the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed Central

    Dhar, S K; Choudhury, N R; Mittal, V; Bhattacharya, A; Bhattacharya, S

    1996-01-01

    In the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica (which causes amoebiasis in humans), the rRNA genes (rDNA) in the nucleus are carried on an extrachromosomal circular plasmid. For strain HM-1:IMSS, the size of the rDNA plasmid is 24.5 kb, and 200 copies per genome are present. Each circle contains two rRNA transcription units as inverted repeats separated by upstream and downstream spacers. We have studied the replication of this molecule by neutral/neutral two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and by electron microscopy. All restriction fragments analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis gave signals corresponding to simple Y's and bubbles. This showed that replication initiated in this plasmid at multiple, dispersed locations spread throughout the plasmid. On the basis of the intensity of the bubble arcs, initiations from the rRNA transcription units seemed to occur more frequently than those from intergenic spacers. Multiple, dispersed initiation sites were also seen in the rDNA plasmid of strain HK-9 when it was analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Electron microscopic visualization of replicating plasmid molecules in strain HM-1:IMISS showed multiple replication bubbles in the same molecule. The location of bubbles on the rDNA circle was mapped by digesting with PvuI or BsaHI, which linearize the molecule, and with SacII, which cuts the circle twice. The distance of the bubbles from one end of the molecule was measured by electron microscopy. The data corroborated those from two-dimensional gels and showed that replication bubbles were distributed throughout the molecule and that they appeared more frequently in rRNA transcription units. The same interpretation was drawn from electron microscopic analysis of the HK-9 plasmid. Direct demonstration of more than one bubble in the same molecule is clear evidence that replication of this plasmid initiates at multiple sites. Potential replication origins are distributed throughout the plasmid. Such a

  5. Completion Report for Multi-Site Incentive MRT 2779 Implement ASC Tripod Initiative by 30SEP08

    SciTech Connect

    East, D; Cerutti, J; Noe, J; Cupps, K; Loncaric, J; Sturtevant, J

    2008-09-22

    This report provides documentation and evidence for the completion of the deployment of the Tripod common operating system (TripodOS, also known as and generally referred to below as TOSS). Background documents for TOSS are provided in Appendices A and B, including the initial TOSS proposal accepted by ASC HQ and Executives in July 2007 and a Governance Model defined by a Tri-Lab working group in September 2007. Appendix C contains a document that clarifies the intent and requirements for the completion criteria associated with MRT 2779. The deployment of TOSS is a Multi-Site Incentive from the ASC FY08-09 Implementation Plan due at the end of Quarter 4 in FY08.

  6. Active RNAP pre-initiation sites are highly mutated by cytidine deaminases in yeast, with AID targeting small RNA genes

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Benjamin JM; Wu, Yee Ling; Rada, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Cytidine deaminases are single stranded DNA mutators diversifying antibodies and restricting viral infection. Improper access to the genome leads to translocations and mutations in B cells and contributes to the mutation landscape in cancer, such as kataegis. It remains unclear how deaminases access double stranded genomes and whether off-target mutations favor certain loci, although transcription and opportunistic access during DNA repair are thought to play a role. In yeast, AID and the catalytic domain of APOBEC3G preferentially mutate transcriptionally active genes within narrow regions, 110 base pairs in width, fixed at RNA polymerase initiation sites. Unlike APOBEC3G, AID shows enhanced mutational preference for small RNA genes (tRNAs, snoRNAs and snRNAs) suggesting a putative role for RNA in its recruitment. We uncover the high affinity of the deaminases for the single stranded DNA exposed by initiating RNA polymerases (a DNA configuration reproduced at stalled polymerases) without a requirement for specific cofactors. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03553.001 PMID:25237741

  7. Dimer interface of bovine cytochrome c oxidase is influenced by local posttranslational modifications and lipid binding.

    PubMed

    Liko, Idlir; Degiacomi, Matteo T; Mohammed, Shabaz; Yoshikawa, Shinya; Schmidt, Carla; Robinson, Carol V

    2016-07-19

    Bovine cytochrome c oxidase is an integral membrane protein complex comprising 13 protein subunits and associated lipids. Dimerization of the complex has been proposed; however, definitive evidence for the dimer is lacking. We used advanced mass spectrometry methods to investigate the oligomeric state of cytochrome c oxidase and the potential role of lipids and posttranslational modifications in its subunit interfaces. Mass spectrometry of the intact protein complex revealed that both the monomer and the dimer are stabilized by large lipid entities. We identified these lipid species from the purified protein complex, thus implying that they interact specifically with the enzyme. We further identified phosphorylation and acetylation sites of cytochrome c oxidase, located in the peripheral subunits and in the dimer interface, respectively. Comparing our phosphorylation and acetylation sites with those found in previous studies of bovine, mouse, rat, and human cytochrome c oxidase, we found that whereas some acetylation sites within the dimer interface are conserved, suggesting a role for regulation and stabilization of the dimer, phosphorylation sites were less conserved and more transient. Our results therefore provide insights into the locations and interactions of lipids with acetylated residues within the dimer interface of this enzyme, and thereby contribute to a better understanding of its structure in the natural membrane. Moreover dimeric cytochrome c oxidase, comprising 20 transmembrane, six extramembrane subunits, and associated lipids, represents the largest integral membrane protein complex that has been transferred via electrospray intact into the gas phase of a mass spectrometer, representing a significant technological advance.

  8. Hydrogenated fullerenes dimer, peanut and capsule: An atomic comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    EL-Barbary, A. A.

    2016-04-01

    Hydrogenated fullerenes are detected in the Universe in space but their identification is still unsolved task. Therefore, this paper provides useful information about hydrogenated fullerenes (dimer, peanut and capsule) using DFT method at the B3LYP/6-31G(d) level of theory. The stability, geometric structures, hydrogen adsorption energies and NMR chemical shifts are calculated. The results show that the energy of most stable isomer of C118 dimer is lower than the energies sum of C60 and C58 cages by 1.77 eV and the energy per carbon atom of C144 capsule is more stable than C60 cage by 126.98 meV. Also, endohedral Ti-doped C118 dimer and C128 peanut are found to be most stable structures than exohedral Ti-doped C118 dimer and C128 peanut by 2.19 eV/Ti and 3.52 eV/Ti, respectively. The hydrogenation process is found to be enhanced (especially at the caps) for endohedral Ti-doped C118 dimer and C128 peanut through electronic surface modifications. The most active hydrogenation sites are selected and it is found that the most stable hydrogenation sites are Houts1 and Houts3 for fullerenes and endohedral Ti-doped fullerenes, respectively.

  9. Structure of an RNA dimer of a regulatory element from human thymidylate synthase mRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Dibrov, Sergey; McLean, Jaime; Hermann, Thomas

    2011-09-27

    A sequence around the start codon of the mRNA of human thymidylate synthase (TS) folds into a secondary-structure motif in which the initiation site is sequestered in a metastable hairpin. Binding of the protein to its own mRNA at the hairpin prevents the production of TS through a translation-repression feedback mechanism. Stabilization of the mRNA hairpin by other ligands has been proposed as a strategy to reduce TS levels in anticancer therapy. Rapidly proliferating cells require high TS activity to maintain the production of thymidine as a building block for DNA synthesis. The crystal structure of a model oligonucleotide (TS1) that represents the TS-binding site of the mRNA has been determined. While fluorescence studies showed that the TS1 RNA preferentially adopts a hairpin structure in solution, even at high RNA concentrations, an asymmetric dimer of two hybridized TS1 strands was obtained in the crystal. The TS1 dimer contains an unusual S-turn motif that also occurs in the 'off' state of the human ribosomal decoding site RNA.

  10. Adatom-dimer interaction on the Si(001)-2 × 1 surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toh, C. P.; Ong, C. K.

    1994-02-01

    We use a modified form of the Stillinger-Weber potential to obtain the binding sites and diffusion barriers of a Si adatom in the vicinity of single F and B type dimers on the Si(001)-2 × 1 surface. We find that both kinds of dimer provide good sinks for adatoms and are therefore ideal nucleation sites, provided the temperature is not too high as to induce dimer breaking. Our results also show that adatoms can be trapped in non-lattice sites surrounding the F type dimer, leading to a disordering of the growing epitaxial film. Monte Carlo simulated annealing indicates that adatoms at these "defect" sites are vertically displaced with respect to those adsorbed on the epitaxial sites, giving rise to step structures that closely resemble those proposed by Falta and Henzler [Surf. Sci 269/270 (1992) 14] to account for their SPA-LEED results.

  11. Initial results from seismic monitoring at the Aquistore CO2 storage site, Saskatchewan, Canada

    SciTech Connect

    White, D. J.; Roach, L. A.N.; Roberts, B.; Daley, T. M.

    2014-12-31

    of 2013. Comparison of the data from these surveys relative to the baseline 3D survey data from 2012 shows excellent repeatability (NRMS less than 10%) which will provide enhanced monitoring sensitivity to smaller amounts of CO2. The permanent array also provides continuous passive monitoring for injection-related microseismicity. Passive monitoring has been ongoing since the summer of 2012 in order to establish levels of background seismicity before CO2 injection starts in 2014. Microseismic monitoring was augmented in 2013 by the installation of 3 broadband seismograph stations surrounding the Aquistore site. These surface installations should provide a detection capability of seismic events with magnitudes as low as ~0. Downhole seismic methods are also being utilized for CO2 monitoring at the Aquistore site. Baseline crosswell tomographic images depict details (meters-scale) of the reservoir in the 150-m interval between the observation and injection wells. This level of resolution is designed to track the CO2 migration between the wells during the initial injection period. A baseline 3D vertical seismic profile (VSP) was acquired in the fall of 2013 to provide seismic images with resolution on a scale between that provided by the surface seismic array and the downhole tomography. The 3D VSP was recorded simultaneously using both a conventional array of downhole geophones (60-levels) and an optical fibre system. The latter utilized an optical fiber cable deployed on the outside of the monitor well casing and cemented in place. A direct comparison of these two methodologies will determine the suitability of using the fiber cable for ongoing time-lapse VSP monitoring.

  12. Initial geochemistry data of the Lake Ohrid (Macedonia, Albania) "DEEP" site sediment record: The ICDP SCOPSCO drilling project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francke, Alexander; Wagner, Bernd; Krastel, Sebastian; Lindhorst, Katja; Mantke, Nicole; Klinghardt, Dorothea

    2014-05-01

    Lake Ohrid, located at the border of Macedonia and Albania is about 30 km long, 15 km wide and up to 290 m deep. Formed within a tectonic graben, Lake Ohrid is considered to be the oldest lake in Europe. The ICDP SCOPSCO (Scientific Collaboration of Past Speciation Conditions in Lake Ohrid) deep drilling campaign at Lake Ohrid in spring 2013 aimed (a) to obtain more precise information about the age and origin of the lake, (b) to unravel the seismotectonic history of the lake area including effects of major earthquakes and associated mass wasting events, (c) to obtain a continuous record containing information on volcanic activities and climate changes in the central northern Mediterranean region, and (d) to better understand the impact of major geological/environmental events on general evolutionary patterns and shaping an extraordinary degree of endemic biodiversity as a matter of global significance. Drilling was carried out by DOSECC (Salt Lake City, USA) using the DLDS (Deep Lake Drilling System) with a hydraulic piston corer for surface sediments and rotation drilling for harder, deeper sediments. Overall, about 2,100 m of sediment were recovered from 4 drill sites. At the "DEEP" site in the center of the lake, seismic data indicated a maximum sediment fill of ca. 700 m, of which the uppermost 568 m sediment were recovered. Initial data from core catcher samples and on-site susceptibility measurements indicate that the sediment sequence covers more than 1.2 million years and provides a continuous archive of environmental and climatological variability in the area. Currently, core opening, core description, XRF and MSCL -scanning, core correlation, and sub-sampling of the sediment cores from the "DEEP" site is conducted at the University of Cologne. High-resolution geochemical data obtained from XRF-scanning imply that the sediments from the "DEEP" site are highly sensitive to climate and environmental variations in the Balkan area over the last few glacial

  13. Haldane relation for interacting dimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuliani, Alessandro; Mastropietro, Vieri; Lucio Toninelli, Fabio

    2017-03-01

    We consider a model of weakly interacting close-packed dimers on the two-dimensional square lattice. In a previous paper, we computed both the multi-point dimer correlations, which display non-trivial critical exponents, continuously varying with the interaction strength; and the height fluctuations, which, after proper coarse graining and rescaling, converge to a massless Gaussian field with a suitable interaction-dependent pre-factor (‘amplitude’). In this paper, we prove the identity between the critical exponent of the two-point dimer correlation and the amplitude of this massless Gaussian field. This identity is the restatement, in the context of interacting dimers, of one of the Haldane universality relations, part of his Luttinger-liquid conjecture, originally formulated in the context of one-dimensional interacting Fermi systems. Its validity is a strong confirmation of the effective massless Gaussian field description of the interacting dimer model, which was proposed on the basis of formal bosonization arguments. We also conjecture that a certain discrete curve defined at the lattice level via the Temperley bijection converges in the scaling limit to an SLE κ process, with κ depending non-trivially on the interaction and related in a simple way to the amplitude of the limiting Gaussian field.

  14. Inhibition of translation initiation complex formation by GE81112 unravels a 16S rRNA structural switch involved in P-site decoding

    PubMed Central

    Fabbretti, Attilio; Schedlbauer, Andreas; Brandi, Letizia; Kaminishi, Tatsuya; Giuliodori, Anna Maria; Garofalo, Raffaella; Ochoa-Lizarralde, Borja; Takemoto, Chie; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Connell, Sean R.; Gualerzi, Claudio O.

    2016-01-01

    In prokaryotic systems, the initiation phase of protein synthesis is governed by the presence of initiation factors that guide the transition of the small ribosomal subunit (30S) from an unlocked preinitiation complex (30S preIC) to a locked initiation complex (30SIC) upon the formation of a correct codon–anticodon interaction in the peptidyl (P) site. Biochemical and structural characterization of GE81112, a translational inhibitor specific for the initiation phase, indicates that the main mechanism of action of this antibiotic is to prevent P-site decoding by stabilizing the anticodon stem loop of the initiator tRNA in a distorted conformation. This distortion stalls initiation in the unlocked 30S preIC state characterized by tighter IF3 binding and a reduced association rate for the 50S subunit. At the structural level we observe that in the presence of GE81112 the h44/h45/h24a interface, which is part of the IF3 binding site and forms ribosomal intersubunit bridges, preferentially adopts a disengaged conformation. Accordingly, the findings reveal that the dynamic equilibrium between the disengaged and engaged conformations of the h44/h45/h24a interface regulates the progression of protein synthesis, acting as a molecular switch that senses and couples the 30S P-site decoding step of translation initiation to the transition from an unlocked preIC to a locked 30SIC state. PMID:27071098

  15. A tertiary structure model of the internal ribosome entry site (IRES) for methionine-independent initiation of translation.

    PubMed Central

    Kanamori, Y; Nakashima, N

    2001-01-01

    Cricket paralysis-like viruses have a dicistronic positive-strand RNA genome. These viruses produce capsid proteins through internal ribosome entry site (IRES)-mediated translation. The IRES element of one of these viruses, Plautia stall intestine virus (PSIV), forms a pseudoknot immediately upstream from the capsid coding sequence, and initiates translation from other than methionine. Previously, we estimated that the IRES element of PSIV consists of seven stem-loops using the program MFOLD; however, experimental evidence of the predicted structures was not shown, except for stem-loop VI, which was responsible for formation of the pseudoknot. To determine the whole structure of the PSIV-IRES element, we introduced compensatory mutations into the upstream MFOLD-predicted helical segments. Mutation analysis showed that stem-loop V exists as predicted, but stem-loop IV is shorter than predicted. The structure of stem-loop III is different from predicted, and stem-loops I and II are not necessary for IRES activity. In addition, we identified two new pseudoknots in the IRES element of PSIV. The complementary sequence segments that are responsible for formation of the two pseudoknots are also observed in cricket paralysis virus (CrPV) and CrPV-like viruses such as Drosophila C virus (DCV), Rhopalosiphum padi virus (RhPV), himetobi P virus (HiPV), Triatoma virus (TrV), and black queen-cell virus (BQCV), although each sequence is distinct in each virus. Considering the three pseudoknots, we constructed a tertiary structure model of the PSIV-IRES element. This structural model is applicable to other CrPV-like viruses, indicating that other CrPV-like viruses can also initiate translation from other than methionine. PMID:11233983

  16. Adventures in holographic dimer models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kachru, Shamit; Karch, Andreas; Yaida, Sho

    2011-03-01

    We abstract the essential features of holographic dimer models, and develop several new applications of these models. Firstly, semi-holographically coupling free band fermions to holographic dimers, we uncover novel phase transitions between conventional Fermi liquids and non-Fermi liquids, accompanied by a change in the structure of the Fermi surface. Secondly, we make dimer vibrations propagate through the whole crystal by way of double trace deformations, obtaining nontrivial band structure. In a simple toy model, the topology of the band structure experiences an interesting reorganization as we vary the strength of the double trace deformations. Finally, we develop tools that would allow one to build, in a bottom-up fashion, a holographic avatar of the Hubbard model.

  17. Dimerization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in soot nucleation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong-Bo; You, Xiaoqing; Wang, Hongmiao; Law, Chung K

    2014-02-27

    A possible pathway of soot nucleation, in which localized π electrons play an important role in binding the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules having multiradical characteristics to form stable polymer molecules through covalent bonds, is studied using density functional and semiempirical methods. Results show that the number of covalent bonds formed in the dimerization of two identical PAHs is determined by the radical character, and the sites to form bonds are related to the aromaticity of individual six-membered ring structure. It is further shown that the binding energy of dimerization increases linearly with the diradical character in the range relevant to soot nucleation.

  18. Is Dimerization Required for the Catalytic Activity of Bacterial Biotin Carboxylase?

    SciTech Connect

    Shen,Y.; Chou, C.; Chang, G.; Tong, L.

    2006-01-01

    Acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylases (ACCs) have crucial roles in fatty acid metabolism. The biotin carboxylase (BC) subunit of Escherichia coli ACC is believed to be active only as a dimer, although the crystal structure shows that the active site of each monomer is 25 Angstroms from the dimer interface. We report here biochemical, biophysical, and structural characterizations of BC carrying single-site mutations in the dimer interface. Our studies demonstrate that two of the mutants, R19E and E23R, are monomeric in solution but have only a 3-fold loss in catalytic activity. The crystal structures of the E23R and F363A mutants show that they can still form the correct dimer at high concentrations. Our data suggest that dimerization is not an absolute requirement for the catalytic activity of the E. coli BC subunit, and we propose a new model for the molecular mechanism of action for BC in multisubunit and multidomain ACCs.

  19. Products and mechanism of acene dimerization. A computational study.

    PubMed

    Zade, Sanjio S; Zamoshchik, Natalia; Reddy, A Ravikumar; Fridman-Marueli, Galit; Sheberla, Dennis; Bendikov, Michael

    2011-07-20

    The high reactivity of acenes can reduce their potential applications in the field of molecular electronics. Although pentacene is an important material for use in organic field-effect transistors because of its high charge mobility, its reactivity is a major disadvantage hindering the development of pentacene applications. In this study, several reaction pathways for the thermal dimerization of acenes were considered computationally. The formation of acene dimers via a central benzene ring and the formation of acene-based polymers were found to be the preferred pathways, depending on the length of the monomer. Interestingly, starting from hexacene, acene dimers are thermodynamically disfavored products, and the reaction pathway is predicted to proceed instead via a double cycloaddition reaction (polymerization) to yield acene-based polymers. A concerted asynchronous reaction mechanism was found for benzene and naphthalene dimerization, while a stepwise biradical mechanism was predicted for the dimerization of anthracene, pentacene, and heptacene. The biradical mechanism for dimerization of anthracene and pentacene proceeds via syn or anti transition states and biradical minima through stepwise biradical pathways, while dimerization of heptacene proceeds via asynchronous ring closure of the complex formed by two heptacene molecules. The activation barriers for thermal dimerization decrease rapidly with increasing acene chain length and are calculated (at M06-2X/6-31G(d)+ZPVE) to be 77.9, 57.1, 33.3, -0.3, and -12.1 kcal/mol vs two isolated acene molecules for benzene, naphthalene, anthracene, pentacene, and heptacene, respectively. If activation energy is calculated vs the initially formed complex of two acene molecules, then the calculated barriers are 80.5, 63.2, 43.7, 16.7, and 12.3 kcal/mol. Dimerization is exothermic from anthracene onward, but it is endothermic at the terminal rings, even for heptacene. Phenyl substitution at the most reactive meso

  20. An initiation site of DNA replication with transcriptional enhancer activity present upstream of the c-myc gene.

    PubMed Central

    Iguchi-Ariga, S M; Okazaki, T; Itani, T; Ogata, M; Sato, Y; Ariga, H

    1988-01-01

    We have previously reported that c-myc protein may promote cellular DNA replication by binding to initiation sites of replication. Here we report that a putative origin of human cellular DNA replication (ori) is present at approximately 2 kb upstream of the coding region of the c-myc gene itself. The c-myc protein, or protein(s) complexed with c-myc protein, bind to the upstream region (approximately 200 bp in length) which has transcriptional enhancer activity as well as autonomously replicating activity in human cells, suggesting that the c-myc protein may be an enhancer binding protein as well as a DNA replication protein. Results with deletion mutants suggest that the sequence essential to the origin of DNA replication may be adjacent to, but cannot be clearly separated from, the sequence responsible for enhancer activity. Furthermore, when cloned DNA containing putative c-myc protein binding sequences was transfected as competitor into HL-60 cells, expression of c-myc was inhibited, suggesting that c-myc protein itself may be necessary for c-myc expression. Images PMID:3053161

  1. Dimerization in Highly Concentrated Solutions of Phosphoimidazolide Activated Monomucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanavarioti, Anastassia

    1997-08-01

    Phosphoimidazolide activated ribomononucleotides (*pN) are useful substrates for the non-enzymatic synthesis of polynucleotides. However, dilute neutral aqueous solutions of *pN typically yield small amounts of dimers and traces of polymers; most of *pN hydrolyzes to yield nucleoside 5'-monophosphate. Here we report the self-condensation of nucleoside 5'-phosphate 2-methylimidazolide (2-MeImpN with N = cytidine, uridine or guanosine) in the presence of Mg2+ in concentrated solutions, such as might have been found in an evaporating lagoon on prebiotic Earth. The product distribution indicates that oligomerization is favored at the expense of hydrolysis. At 1.0 M, 2-MeImpU and 2-MeImpC produce about 65% of oligomers including 4% of the 3',5'-linked dimer. Examination of the product distribution of the three isomeric dimers in a self-condensation allows identification of reaction pathways that lead to dimer formation. Condensations in a concentrated mixture of all three nucleotides (U,C,G mixtures) is made possible by the enhanced solubility of 2-MeImpG in such mixtures. Although percent yield of internucleotide linked dimers is enhanced as a function of initial monomer concentration, pyrophosphate dimer yields remain practically unchanged at about 20% for 2-MeImpU, 16% for 2-MeImpC and 25% of the total pyrophosphate in the U,C,G mixtures. The efficiency by which oligomers are produced in these concentrated solutions makes the evaporating lagoon scenario a potentially interesting medium for the prebiotic synthesis of dimers and short RNAs.

  2. Dimerization in Highly Concentrated Solutions of Phosphoimidazolide Activated Mononucleotides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanavarioti, Anastassia

    1997-01-01

    Phosphoimidazolide activated ribomononucleotides (*pN) are useful substrates for the non-enzymatic synthesis of polynucleotides. However, dilute neutral aqueous solutions of *pN typically yield small amounts of dimers and traces of polymers; most of *pN hydrolyzes to yield nucleoside 5'-monophosphate. Here we report the self-condensation of nucleoside 5'-phosphate 2- methylimidazolide (2-MeImpN with N = cytidine, uridine or guanosine) in the presence of Mg2(+) in concentrated solutions, such as might have been found in an evaporating lagoon on prebiotic Earth. The product distribution indicates that oligomerization is favored at the expense of hydrolysis. At 1.0 M, 2-MelmpU and 2-MelmpC produce about 65% of oligomers including 4% of the 3',5'-Iinked dimer. Examination of the product distribution of the three isomeric dimers in a self-condensation allows identification of reaction pathways that lead to dimer formation. Condensations in a concentrated mixture of all three nucleotides (U,C,G mixtures) is made possible by the enhanced solubility of 2-MeImpG in such mixtures. Although percent yield of intemucleotide linked dimers is enhanced as a function of initial monomer concentration, pyrophosphate dimer yields remain practically unchanged at about 20% for 2-MelmpU, 16% for 2-MeImpC and 25% of the total pyrophosphate in the U,C,G mixtures. The efficiency by which oligomers are produced in these concentrated solutions makes the evaporating lagoon scenario a potentially interesting medium for the prebiotic synthesis of dimers and short RNAs.

  3. Properties of the two-dimensional heterogeneous Lennard-Jones dimers: An integral equation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbic, Tomaz

    2016-11-01

    Structural and thermodynamic properties of a planar heterogeneous soft dumbbell fluid are examined using Monte Carlo simulations and integral equation theory. Lennard-Jones particles of different sizes are the building blocks of the dimers. The site-site integral equation theory in two dimensions is used to calculate the site-site radial distribution functions and the thermodynamic properties. Obtained results are compared to Monte Carlo simulation data. The critical parameters for selected types of dimers were also estimated and the influence of the Lennard-Jones parameters was studied. We have also tested the correctness of the site-site integral equation theory using different closures.

  4. Properties of the two-dimensional heterogeneous Lennard-Jones dimers: An integral equation study.

    PubMed

    Urbic, Tomaz

    2016-11-21

    Structural and thermodynamic properties of a planar heterogeneous soft dumbbell fluid are examined using Monte Carlo simulations and integral equation theory. Lennard-Jones particles of different sizes are the building blocks of the dimers. The site-site integral equation theory in two dimensions is used to calculate the site-site radial distribution functions and the thermodynamic properties. Obtained results are compared to Monte Carlo simulation data. The critical parameters for selected types of dimers were also estimated and the influence of the Lennard-Jones parameters was studied. We have also tested the correctness of the site-site integral equation theory using different closures.

  5. Palladium dimers adsorbed on graphene: A DFT study

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, Gagandeep; Gupta, Shuchi; Dharamvir, Keya

    2015-05-15

    The 2D structure of graphene shows a great promise for enhanced catalytic activity when adsorbed with palladium. We performed a systematic density functional theory (DFT) study of the adsorption of palladium dimer (Pd{sub 2}) on graphene using SIESTA package, in the generalized gradient approximation (GGA). The adsorption energy, geometry, and charge transfer of Pd{sub 2}-graphene system are calculated. Both horizontal and vertical orientations of Pd{sub 2} on graphene are studied. Our calculations revealed that the minimum energy configuration for Pd dimer is parallel to the graphene sheet with its two atoms occupying centre of adjacent hexagonal rings of graphene sheet. Magnetic moment is induced for Pd dimer adsorbed on graphene in vertical orientation while horizontal orientation of Pd dimer on graphene do not exhibit magnetism. Insignificant energy differences among adsorption sites means that dimer mobility on the graphene sheet is high. There is imperceptible distortion of graphene sheet perpendicular to its plane. However, some lateral displacements are seen.

  6. Decreasing D-dimer after recent negative computed tomographic pulmonary angiogram does not rule out pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Lo, Bruce M

    2013-06-01

    An algorithmic approach to testing utilizing risk stratification and quantitative D-dimer has been considered an acceptable approach to ruling out pulmonary embolism (PE). When D-dimer is elevated, further testing for PE is indicated. However, no evidence exists to guide practitioners when patients return after a recent negative workup for PE who previously had an elevated D-dimer. This case describes a patient who initially had an elevated D-dimer with negative workup for PE who, on repeat visit, had a decreasing D-dimer but was diagnosed with a PE. When evaluating patients after a negative workup for PE after an elevated D-dimer, a decrease in D-dimer cannot be used to rule out PE.

  7. Kinetics of DNA tile dimerization.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shuoxing; Yan, Hao; Liu, Yan

    2014-06-24

    Investigating how individual molecular components interact with one another within DNA nanoarchitectures, both in terms of their spatial and temporal interactions, is fundamentally important for a better understanding of their physical behaviors. This will provide researchers with valuable insight for designing more complex higher-order structures that can be assembled more efficiently. In this report, we examined several spatial factors that affect the kinetics of bivalent, double-helical (DH) tile dimerization, including the orientation and number of sticky ends (SEs), the flexibility of the double helical domains, and the size of the tiles. The rate constants we obtained confirm our hypothesis that increased nucleation opportunities and well-aligned SEs accelerate tile-tile dimerization. Increased flexibility in the tiles causes slower dimerization rates, an effect that can be reversed by introducing restrictions to the tile flexibility. The higher dimerization rates of more rigid tiles results from the opposing effects of higher activation energies and higher pre-exponential factors from the Arrhenius equation, where the pre-exponential factor dominates. We believe that the results presented here will assist in improved implementation of DNA tile based algorithmic self-assembly, DNA based molecular robotics, and other specific nucleic acid systems, and will provide guidance to design and assembly processes to improve overall yield and efficiency.

  8. Kinetics of DNA Tile Dimerization

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Investigating how individual molecular components interact with one another within DNA nanoarchitectures, both in terms of their spatial and temporal interactions, is fundamentally important for a better understanding of their physical behaviors. This will provide researchers with valuable insight for designing more complex higher-order structures that can be assembled more efficiently. In this report, we examined several spatial factors that affect the kinetics of bivalent, double-helical (DH) tile dimerization, including the orientation and number of sticky ends (SEs), the flexibility of the double helical domains, and the size of the tiles. The rate constants we obtained confirm our hypothesis that increased nucleation opportunities and well-aligned SEs accelerate tile–tile dimerization. Increased flexibility in the tiles causes slower dimerization rates, an effect that can be reversed by introducing restrictions to the tile flexibility. The higher dimerization rates of more rigid tiles results from the opposing effects of higher activation energies and higher pre-exponential factors from the Arrhenius equation, where the pre-exponential factor dominates. We believe that the results presented here will assist in improved implementation of DNA tile based algorithmic self-assembly, DNA based molecular robotics, and other specific nucleic acid systems, and will provide guidance to design and assembly processes to improve overall yield and efficiency. PMID:24794259

  9. Plasma D-dimer may predict poor functional outcomes through systemic complications after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Hitoshi; Lo, Benjamin; Yamamoto, Yu; Handa, Akira; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu; Kurosaki, Yoshitaka; Yamagata, Sen

    2016-08-12

    OBJECTIVE Plasma D-dimer levels elevate during acute stages of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and are associated with poor functional outcomes. However, the mechanism in which D-dimer elevation on admission affects functional outcomes remains unknown. The aim of this study is to clarify whether D-dimer levels on admission are correlated with systemic complications after aneurysmal SAH, and to investigate their additive predictive value on conventional risk factors for poor functional outcomes. METHODS A total of 187 patients with aneurysmal SAH were retrospectively analyzed from a single-center, observational cohort database. Correlations of plasma D-dimer levels on admission with patient characteristics, initial presentation, neurological complications, and systemic complications were identified. The authors also evaluated the additive value of D-dimer elevation on admission for poor functional outcomes by comparing predictive models with and without D-dimer. RESULTS D-dimer elevation on admission was associated with increasing age, female sex, and severity of SAH. Patients with higher D-dimer levels had increased likelihood of nosocomial infections (OR 1.22 [95% CI 1.07-1.39], p = 0.004), serum sodium disorders (OR 1.11 [95% CI 1.01-1.23], p = 0.033), and cardiopulmonary complications (OR 1.20 [95% CI 1.04-1.37], p = 0.01) on multivariable analysis. D-dimer elevation was an independent risk factor of poor functional outcome (modified Rankin Scale Score 3-6, OR 1.50 [95% CI 1.15-1.95], p = 0.003). A novel prediction model with D-dimer had significantly better discrimination ability for poor outcomes than conventional models without D-dimer. CONCLUSIONS Elevated D-dimer levels on admission were independently correlated with systemic complication, and had an additive value for outcome prediction on conventional risk factors after aneurysmal SAH.

  10. Cold-active alkaline phosphatase is irreversibly transformed into an inactive dimer by low urea concentrations.

    PubMed

    Hjörleifsson, Jens Guðmundur; Ásgeirsson, Bjarni

    2016-07-01

    Alkaline phosphatase is a homodimeric metallo-hydrolase where both Zn(2+) and Mg(2+) are important for catalysis and stability. Cold-adapted alkaline phosphatase variants have high activity at low temperatures and lower thermal stability compared with variants from mesophilic hosts. The instability, and thus inactivation, could be due to loose association of the dimers and/or loosely bound Mg(2)(+) in the active site, but this has not been studied in detail for the cold-adapted variants. Here, we focus on using the intrinsic fluorescence of Trp in alkaline phosphatase from the marine bacterium Vibrio splendidus (VAP) to probe for dimerization. Trp→Phe substitutions showed that two out of the five native Trp residues contributed mostly to the fluorescence emission. One residue, 15Å away from the active site (W460) and highly solvent excluded, was phosphorescent and had a distant role in substrate binding. An additional Trp residue was introduced to the dimer interface to act as a possible probe for dimerization. Urea denaturation curves indicated that an inactive dimer intermediate, structurally equivalent to the native state, was formed before dimer dissociation took place. This is the first example of the transition of a native dimer to an inactive dimer intermediate for alkaline phosphatase without using mutagenesis, ligands, or competitive inhibition.

  11. Properties of the Lennard-Jones dimeric fluid in two dimensions: an integral equation study.

    PubMed

    Urbic, Tomaz; Dias, Cristiano L

    2014-03-07

    The thermodynamic and structural properties of the planar soft-sites dumbbell fluid are examined by Monte Carlo simulations and integral equation theory. The dimers are built of two Lennard-Jones segments. Site-site integral equation theory in two dimensions is used to calculate the site-site radial distribution functions for a range of elongations and densities and the results are compared with Monte Carlo simulations. The critical parameters for selected types of dimers were also estimated. We analyze the influence of the bond length on critical point as well as tested correctness of site-site integral equation theory with different closures. The integral equations can be used to predict the phase diagram of dimers whose molecular parameters are known.

  12. Properties of the Lennard-Jones dimeric fluid in two dimensions: An integral equation study

    SciTech Connect

    Urbic, Tomaz; Dias, Cristiano L.

    2014-03-07

    The thermodynamic and structural properties of the planar soft-sites dumbbell fluid are examined by Monte Carlo simulations and integral equation theory. The dimers are built of two Lennard-Jones segments. Site-site integral equation theory in two dimensions is used to calculate the site-site radial distribution functions for a range of elongations and densities and the results are compared with Monte Carlo simulations. The critical parameters for selected types of dimers were also estimated. We analyze the influence of the bond length on critical point as well as tested correctness of site-site integral equation theory with different closures. The integral equations can be used to predict the phase diagram of dimers whose molecular parameters are known.

  13. Water dimer equilibrium constant of saturated vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malomuzh, N. P.; Mahlaichuk, V. N.; Khrapatyi, S. V.

    2014-08-01

    The value and temperature dependence of the dimerization constant for saturated water vapor are determined. A general expression that links the second virial coefficient and the dimerization constant is obtained. It is shown that the attraction between water monomers and dimers is fundamental, especially at T > 350 K. The range of application for the obtained results is determined.

  14. Feasibility Study of Biopower in East Helena, Montana. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Moriarty, K.

    2013-02-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) developed the RE-Powering America's Land initiative to reuse contaminated sites for renewable energy generation when aligned with the community's vision for the site. The former American Smelting and Refining Company (Asarco) smelter in East Helena, Montana, was selected for a feasibility study under the initiative. Biomass was chosen as the renewable energy resource based on the wood products industry in the area. Biopower was selected as the technology based on Montana's renewable portfolio standard (RPS) requiring utilities to purchase renewable power.

  15. Percolation of heteronuclear dimers irreversibly deposited on square lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gimenez, M. C.; Ramirez-Pastor, A. J.

    2016-09-01

    The percolation problem of irreversibly deposited heteronuclear dimers on square lattices is studied. A dimer is composed of two segments, and it occupies two adjacent adsorption sites. Each segment can be either a conductive segment (segment type A ) or a nonconductive segment (segment type B ). Three types of dimers are considered: A A , B B , and A B . The connectivity analysis is carried out by accounting only for the conductive segments (segments type A ). The model offers a simplified representation of the problem of percolation of defective (nonideal) particles, where the presence of defects in the system is simulated by introducing a mixture of conductive and nonconductive segments. Different cases were investigated, according to the sequence of deposition of the particles, the types of dimers involved in the process, and the degree of alignment of the deposited objects. By means of numerical simulations and finite-size scaling analysis, the complete phase diagram separating a percolating from a nonpercolating region was determined for each case. Finally, the consistency of our results was examined by comparing with previous data in the literature for linear k -mers (particles occupying k adjacent sites) with defects.

  16. Percolation of heteronuclear dimers irreversibly deposited on square lattices.

    PubMed

    Gimenez, M C; Ramirez-Pastor, A J

    2016-09-01

    The percolation problem of irreversibly deposited heteronuclear dimers on square lattices is studied. A dimer is composed of two segments, and it occupies two adjacent adsorption sites. Each segment can be either a conductive segment (segment type A) or a nonconductive segment (segment type B). Three types of dimers are considered: AA, BB, and AB. The connectivity analysis is carried out by accounting only for the conductive segments (segments type A). The model offers a simplified representation of the problem of percolation of defective (nonideal) particles, where the presence of defects in the system is simulated by introducing a mixture of conductive and nonconductive segments. Different cases were investigated, according to the sequence of deposition of the particles, the types of dimers involved in the process, and the degree of alignment of the deposited objects. By means of numerical simulations and finite-size scaling analysis, the complete phase diagram separating a percolating from a nonpercolating region was determined for each case. Finally, the consistency of our results was examined by comparing with previous data in the literature for linear k-mers (particles occupying k adjacent sites) with defects.

  17. Influence of Linker Length and Composition on Enzymatic Activity and Ribosomal Binding of Neomycin Dimers

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, Derrick; Kumar, Sunil; Green, Keith D.

    2015-01-01

    The human and bacterial A site rRNA binding as well as the aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme (AME) activity against a series of neomycin B (NEO) dimers is presented. The data indicate that by simple modifications of linker length and composition, substantial differences in rRNA selectivity and AME activity can be obtained. We tested five different AMEs with dimeric NEO dimers that were tethered via triazole, urea, and thiourea linkages. We show that triazole-linked dimers were the worst substrates for most AMEs, with those containing the longer linkers showing the largest decrease in activity. Thiourea-linked dimers that showed a decrease in activity by AMEs also showed increased bacterial A site binding, with one compound (compound 14) even showing substantially reduced human A site binding. The urea-linked dimers showed a substantial decrease in activity by AMEs when a conformationally restrictive phenyl linker was introduced. The information learned herein advances our understanding of the importance of the linker length and composition for the generation of dimeric aminoglycoside antibiotics capable of avoiding the action of AMEs and selective binding to the bacterial rRNA over binding to the human rRNA. PMID:25896697

  18. Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover initial Mastcam geomorphologic and multispectral characterization of the Gale crater field site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, J. F.; Malin, M.; Maki, J.; Dietrich, W. E.; Edgett, K. S.; Edwards, L.; Garvin, J. B.; Hallet, B.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Heydari, E.; Johnson, J. R.; Kah, L. C.; Lemmon, M. T.; Minitti, M.; Olson, T. S.; Parker, T. J.; Rice, M. S.; Rowland, S. K.; Schieber, J.; Sletten, R. S.; Sullivan, R. J.; Sumner, D. Y.; Thomas, P. C.; Yingst, R.; Team, M.

    2013-12-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover landed in Gale crater on August 6, 2012 and has been enabling the exploration of a variety of geologic terrains between the rover's landing site at Bradbury Rise and the nearby topographic low point known as Yellowknife Bay. Curiosity carries a multispectral imaging system known as Mastcam, which consists of two boresighted CCD cameras, one of which acquires relatively wide field images (34-mm focal length, 18.4x15 degree FOV) and the other of which obtains narrower-angle telephoto images (100-mm focal length, 6.3x5.1 degree FOV). Each of these cameras has an 8-position filter wheel to enable imaging through broadband RGB Bayer filtes, nine specific narrowband filters in the 445 to 1012 nm region to enabled limited detectability of certain ferric, ferrous, and hydrated minerals, and neutral density solar filters for monitoring of atmospheric opacity. The Mastcams acquire images designed primarily to address specific scientific goals in geology, mineralogy, and atmospheric science, but also to support operational decisions related to rover driving, arm instrument placement, and rover subsystems status. Here we provide an overview of the initial scientific imaging results from the Mastcam investigation, from sol 0 (landing sol) through the end of the drilling campaign in Yellowknife Bay and the beginning of the long drive from there to the base of Mt. Sharp. A diversity of materials exposed at the surface have been encountered. This includes angular to sub-angular rock fragments scattered across the surface, boulder to fine gravel in size, variably dusty, and commonly fine grained. Thin outcrops of pebble to gravel conglomerate have been encountered across Bradbury rise. Granular ripples and other fine grained deposits were periodically encountered. In the wind-eroded Yellowknife Bay area, extensive polygonally fractured outcrops of sandstone and mudstone (with light-toned fracture fills) were discovered. The occurrence of

  19. Polyhomologation based on in situ generated boron-thexyl-silaboracyclic initiating sites: a novel strategy towards the synthesis of polyethylene-based complex architectures.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhen; Zhang, Hefeng; Gnanou, Yves; Hadjichristidis, Nikos

    2015-06-21

    A novel strategy, based on the in situ generated boron-thexyl-silaboracyclic initiating sites for the polyhomologation of dimethylsulfoxonium methylide, has been developed for the synthesis of complex polyethylene-based architectures. As examples, the synthesis of a 4-arm polyethylene star, three (polystyrene)(polyethylene)2 3-miktoarm stars and a PE-branched double graft copolymer is given.

  20. Fiber optic D dimer biosensor

    DOEpatents

    Glass, R.S.; Grant, S.A.

    1999-08-17

    A fiber optic sensor for D dimer (a fibrinolytic product) can be used in vivo (e.g., in catheter-based procedures) for the diagnosis and treatment of stroke-related conditions in humans. Stroke is the third leading cause of death in the United States. It has been estimated that strokes and stroke-related disorders cost Americans between $15-30 billion annually. Relatively recently, new medical procedures have been developed for the treatment of stroke. These endovascular procedures rely upon the use of microcatheters. These procedures could be facilitated with this sensor for D dimer integrated with a microcatheter for the diagnosis of clot type, and as an indicator of the effectiveness, or end-point of thrombolytic therapy. 4 figs.

  1. Fiber optic D dimer biosensor

    DOEpatents

    Glass, Robert S.; Grant, Sheila A.

    1999-01-01

    A fiber optic sensor for D dimer (a fibrinolytic product) can be used in vivo (e.g., in catheter-based procedures) for the diagnosis and treatment of stroke-related conditions in humans. Stroke is the third leading cause of death in the United States. It has been estimated that strokes and stroke-related disorders cost Americans between $15-30 billion annually. Relatively recently, new medical procedures have been developed for the treatment of stroke. These endovascular procedures rely upon the use of microcatheters. These procedures could be facilitated with this sensor for D dimer integrated with a microcatheter for the diagnosis of clot type, and as an indicator of the effectiveness, or end-point of thrombolytic therapy.

  2. Replication in the amplified dihydrofolate reductase domain in CHO cells may initiate at two distinct sites, one of which is a repetitive sequence element.

    PubMed

    Anachkova, B; Hamlin, J L

    1989-02-01

    To study initiation of DNA replication in mammalian chromosomes, we have established a methotrexate-resistant Chinese hamster ovary cell line (CHOC 400) that contains approximately 1,000 copies of the early replicating dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) domain. We have previously shown that DNA replication in the prevalent 243-kilobase (kb) amplicon type in this cell line initiates somewhere within a 28-kb region located downstream from the DHFR gene. In an attempt to localize the origin of replication with more precision, we blocked the progress of replication forks emanating from origins at the beginning of the S phase by the introduction of trioxsalen cross-links at 1- to 5-kb intervals in the parental double-stranded DNA. The small DNA fragments synthesized under these conditions (which should be centered around replication origins) were then used as hybridization probes on digests of cosmids and plasmids from the DHFR domain. These studies suggested that in cells synchronized by this regimen, DNA replication initiates at two separate sites within the previously defined 28-kb replication initiation locus, in general agreement with results described in the accompanying paper (T.-H. Leu and J. L. Hamlin, Mol. Cell. Biol. 9:523-531, 1989). One of these sites contains a repeated DNA sequence element that is found at or near many other initiation sites in the genome, since it was also highly enriched in the early replicating DNA isolated from cross-linked CHO cells that contain only two copies of the DHFR domain.

  3. Tumor-derived mesenchymal stem cells and orthotopic site increase the tumor initiation potential of putative mouse mammary cancer stem cells derived from MMTV-PyMT mice.

    PubMed

    Lanza, Denise Grant; Ma, Jun; Guest, Ian; Uk-Lim, Chang; Glinskii, Anna; Glinsky, Gennadi; Sell, Stewart

    2012-12-01

    The ability to transplant mammary cancer stem cells, identified by the phenotype CD24(+)CD29(+)CD49f(+)Sca-1(low), is dependent on the microenvironment in which the cells are placed. Using the MMTV-PyMT mouse model of mammary cancer, we now report two methods of tumor growth enhancement: contributions of tumor stroma in the form of tumor-derived mesenchymal stem cells and orthotopic vs. heterotopic transplantation sites. To support evidence of stem cell function, tumor-derived mesenchymal stem cells differentiated into adipocyte- and osteocyte-like cells after culture in specific medium. Co-injection of tumor-initiating cells with tumor-derived mesenchymal stem cells significantly increased tumor initiation compared to subcutaneous injection of TICs alone; co-injection also allowed tumor initiation with a single TIC. Interestingly, we observed the formation of sarcomas after co-injections of tumor-derived mesenchymal stem cells or mouse embryonic fibroblasts with TICs; sarcomas are not observed in spontaneous MMTV-PyMT tumors and rarely observed in injections of TICs alone. Tumor initiation was also significantly increased in the orthotopic injection site compared to heterotopic injections. We conclude that tumor stroma and orthotopic sites both enhance tumor initiation by mammary cancer stem cells.

  4. Mechanism of FGF receptor dimerization and activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarabipour, Sarvenaz; Hristova, Kalina

    2016-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (fgfs) are widely believed to activate their receptors by mediating receptor dimerization. Here we show, however, that the FGF receptors form dimers in the absence of ligand, and that these unliganded dimers are phosphorylated. We further show that ligand binding triggers structural changes in the FGFR dimers, which increase FGFR phosphorylation. The observed effects due to the ligands fgf1 and fgf2 are very different. The fgf2-bound dimer structure ensures the smallest separation between the transmembrane (TM) domains and the highest possible phosphorylation, a conclusion that is supported by a strong correlation between TM helix separation in the dimer and kinase phosphorylation. The pathogenic A391E mutation in FGFR3 TM domain emulates the action of fgf2, trapping the FGFR3 dimer in its most active state. This study establishes the existence of multiple active ligand-bound states, and uncovers a novel molecular mechanism through which FGFR-linked pathologies can arise.

  5. Changing Transcriptional Initiation Sites and Alternative 5'- and 3'-Splice Site Selection of the First Intron Deploys the Arabidopsis Protein Isoaspartyl Methyltransferase2 Variants to Different Subcellular Compartments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. possesses two PROTEIN-L-ISOASPARTATE METHYLTRANSFERASE (PIMT), genes encoding an enzyme (EC 2.1.1.77) capable of converting uncoded, L-isoaspartyl residues, arising spontaneously at L-asparaginyl and L-aspartyl sites in proteins, to L-aspartate. PIMT2 produces at lea...

  6. Cryptic protein priming sites in two different domains of duck hepatitis B virus reverse transcriptase for initiating DNA synthesis in vitro.

    PubMed

    Boregowda, Rajeev K; Lin, Li; Zhu, Qin; Tian, Fang; Hu, Jianming

    2011-08-01

    Initiation of reverse transcription in hepadnaviruses is accomplished by a unique protein-priming mechanism whereby a specific Y residue in the terminal protein (TP) domain of the viral reverse transcriptase (RT) acts as a primer to initiate DNA synthesis, which is carried out by the RT domain of the same protein. When separate TP and RT domains from the duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) RT protein were tested in a trans-complementation assay in vitro, the RT domain could also serve, unexpectedly, as a protein primer for DNA synthesis, as could a TP mutant lacking the authentic primer Y (Y96) residue. Priming at these other, so-called cryptic, priming sites in both the RT and TP domains shared the same requirements as those at Y96. A mini RT protein with both the TP and RT domains linked in cis, as well as the full-length RT protein, could also initiate DNA synthesis using cryptic priming sites. The cryptic priming site(s) in TP was found to be S/T, while those in the RT domain were Y and S/T. As with the authentic TP Y96 priming site, the cryptic priming sites in the TP and RT domains could support DNA polymerization subsequent to the initial covalent linkage of the first nucleotide to the priming amino acid residue. These results provide new insights into the complex mechanisms of protein priming in hepadnaviruses, including the selection of the primer residue and the interactions between the TP and RT domains that is essential for protein priming.

  7. GE23077 binds to the RNA polymerase ‘i’ and ‘i+1’ sites and prevents the binding of initiating nucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; Degen, David; Ho, Mary X; Sineva, Elena; Ebright, Katherine Y; Ebright, Yon W; Mekler, Vladimir; Vahedian-Movahed, Hanif; Feng, Yu; Yin, Ruiheng; Tuske, Steve; Irschik, Herbert; Jansen, Rolf; Maffioli, Sonia; Donadio, Stefano; Arnold, Eddy; Ebright, Richard H

    2014-01-01

    Using a combination of genetic, biochemical, and structural approaches, we show that the cyclic-peptide antibiotic GE23077 (GE) binds directly to the bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP) active-center ‘i’ and ‘i+1’ nucleotide binding sites, preventing the binding of initiating nucleotides, and thereby preventing transcription initiation. The target-based resistance spectrum for GE is unusually small, reflecting the fact that the GE binding site on RNAP includes residues of the RNAP active center that cannot be substituted without loss of RNAP activity. The GE binding site on RNAP is different from the rifamycin binding site. Accordingly, GE and rifamycins do not exhibit cross-resistance, and GE and a rifamycin can bind simultaneously to RNAP. The GE binding site on RNAP is immediately adjacent to the rifamycin binding site. Accordingly, covalent linkage of GE to a rifamycin provides a bipartite inhibitor having very high potency and very low susceptibility to target-based resistance. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02450.001 PMID:24755292

  8. Trans-dimerization of JAM-A regulates Rap2 and is mediated by a domain that is distinct from the cis-dimerization interface.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Ana C; Luissint, Anny-Claude; Sumagin, Ronen; Lai, Caroline; Vielmuth, Franziska; Wolf, Mattie F; Laur, Oskar; Reiss, Kerstin; Spindler, Volker; Stehle, Thilo; Dermody, Terence S; Nusrat, Asma; Parkos, Charles A

    2014-05-01

    Junctional adhesion molecule-A (JAM-A) is a tight junction-associated signaling protein that regulates epithelial cell proliferation, migration, and barrier function. JAM-A dimerization on a common cell surface (in cis) has been shown to regulate cell migration, and evidence suggests that JAM-A may form homodimers between cells (in trans). Indeed, transfection experiments revealed accumulation of JAM-A at sites between transfected cells, which was lost in cells expressing cis- or predicted trans-dimerization null mutants. Of importance, microspheres coated with JAM-A containing alanine substitutions to residues 43NNP45 (NNP-JAM-A) within the predicted trans-dimerization site did not aggregate. In contrast, beads coated with cis-null JAM-A demonstrated enhanced clustering similar to that observed with wild-type (WT) JAM-A. In addition, atomic force microscopy revealed decreased association forces in NNP-JAM-A compared with WT and cis-null JAM-A. Assessment of effects of JAM-A dimerization on cell signaling revealed that expression of trans- but not cis-null JAM-A mutants decreased Rap2 activity. Furthermore, confluent cells, which enable trans-dimerization, had enhanced Rap2 activity. Taken together, these results suggest that trans-dimerization of JAM-A occurs at a unique site and with different affinity compared with dimerization in cis. Trans-dimerization of JAM-A may thus act as a barrier-inducing molecular switch that is activated when cells become confluent.

  9. Oxaliplatin Binding to Human Copper Chaperone Atox1 and Protein Dimerization.

    PubMed

    Belviso, Benny D; Galliani, Angela; Lasorsa, Alessia; Mirabelli, Valentina; Caliandro, Rocco; Arnesano, Fabio; Natile, Giovanni

    2016-07-05

    Copper trafficking proteins have been implicated in the cellular response to platinum anticancer drugs. We investigated the reaction of the chaperone Atox1 with an activated form of oxaliplatin, the third platinum drug to reach worldwide approval. Unlike cisplatin, which contains monodentate ammines, oxaliplatin contains chelated 1,2-diaminocyclohexane (DACH), which is more resistant to displacement by nucleophiles. In solution, one or two {Pt(DACH)(2+)} moieties bind to the conserved CXXC metal-binding motif of Atox1; in the latter case the two sulfur atoms likely bridging the two platinum units. At longer reaction times, a dimeric species is formed whose composition, Atox12·Pt(2+)2, indicates complete loss of the diamine ligands. Such a dimerization process is accompanied by partial unfolding of the protein. Crystallization experiments aiming at the characterization of the monomeric species have afforded, instead, a dimeric species resembling that already obtained by Boal and Rosenzweig in a similar reaction performed with cisplatin. However, while in the latter case there was only one Pt-binding site (0.4 occupancy) made of four sulfur atoms of the CXXC motifs of the two Atox1 chains in a tetrahedral arrangement, we found, in addition, a secondary Pt-binding site involving Cys41 of the B chain (0.25 occupancy). Moreover, both platinum atoms have lost their diamines. Thus, there appears to be little relationship between what is observed in solution and what is formed in the solid state. Since full occupancy of the tetrahedral cavity is a common feature of all Atox1 dimeric structures obtained with other metal ions (Cu(+), Cd(2+), and Hg(2+)), we propose that in the case of platinum, where the occupancy is only 0.4, the remaining cavities are occupied by Cu(+) ions. Experimental evidence is reported in support of the latter hypothesis. Our proposal represents a meeting point between the initial proposal of Boal and Rosenzweig (0.4 Pt occupancy) and the

  10. G domain dimerization controls dynamin's assembly-stimulated GTPase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Chappie, Joshua S.; Acharya, Sharmistha; Leonard, Marilyn; Schmid, Sandra L.; Dyda, Fred

    2010-06-14

    Dynamin is an atypical GTPase that catalyses membrane fission during clathrin-mediated endocytosis. The mechanisms of dynamin's basal and assembly-stimulated GTP hydrolysis are unknown, though both are indirectly influenced by the GTPase effector domain (GED). Here we present the 2.0 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of a human dynamin 1-derived minimal GTPase-GED fusion protein, which was dimeric in the presence of the transition state mimic GDP.AlF{sub 4}{sup -}. The structure reveals dynamin's catalytic machinery and explains how assembly-stimulated GTP hydrolysis is achieved through G domain dimerization. A sodium ion present in the active site suggests that dynamin uses a cation to compensate for the developing negative charge in the transition state in the absence of an arginine finger. Structural comparison to the rat dynamin G domain reveals key conformational changes that promote G domain dimerization and stimulated hydrolysis. The structure of the GTPase-GED fusion protein dimer provides insight into the mechanisms underlying dynamin-catalysed membrane fission.

  11. Ising anyons in frustration-free Majorana-dimer models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ware, Brayden; Son, Jun Ho; Cheng, Meng; Mishmash, Ryan V.; Alicea, Jason; Bauer, Bela

    2016-09-01

    Dimer models have long been a fruitful playground for understanding topological physics. Here, we introduce a class, termed Majorana-dimer models, wherein bosonic dimers are decorated with pairs of Majorana modes. We find that the simplest examples of such systems realize an intriguing, intrinsically fermionic phase of matter that can be viewed as the product of a chiral Ising theory, which hosts deconfined non-Abelian quasiparticles, and a topological px-i py superconductor. While the bulk anyons are described by a single copy of the Ising theory, the edge remains fully gapped. Consequently, this phase can arise in exactly solvable, frustration-free models. We describe two parent Hamiltonians: one generalizes the well-known dimer model on the triangular lattice, while the other is most naturally understood as a model of decorated fluctuating loops on a honeycomb lattice. Using modular transformations, we show that the ground-state manifold of the latter model unambiguously exhibits all properties of the Ising×(px-i py) theory. We also discuss generalizations with more than one Majorana mode per site, which realize phases related to Kitaev's 16-fold way in a similar fashion.

  12. Phosphorylation of Ser8 promotes zinc-induced dimerization of the amyloid-β metal-binding domain.

    PubMed

    Kulikova, Alexandra A; Tsvetkov, Philipp O; Indeykina, Maria I; Popov, Igor A; Zhokhov, Sergey S; Golovin, Andrey V; Polshakov, Vladimir I; Kozin, Sergey A; Nudler, Evgeny; Makarov, Alexander A

    2014-10-01

    Zinc-induced aggregation of the amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) is a hallmark molecular feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Recently it was shown that phosphorylation of Aβ at Ser8 promotes the formation of toxic aggregates. In this work, we have studied the impact of Ser8 phosphorylation on the mode of zinc interaction with the Aβ metal-binding domain 1-16 using isothermal titration calorimetry, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and NMR spectroscopy. We have discovered a novel zinc binding site ((6)HDpS(8)) in the phosphorylated peptide, in which the zinc ion is coordinated by the imidazole ring of His6, the phosphate group attached to Ser8 and a backbone carbonyl group of His6 or Asp7. Interaction of the zinc ion with this site involves His6, thereby withdrawing it from the interaction pattern observed in the non-modified peptide. This event was found to stimulate dimerization of peptide chains through the (11)EVHH(14) site, where the zinc ion is coordinated by the two pairs of Glu11 and His14 in the two peptide subunits. The proposed molecular mechanism of zinc-induced dimerization could contribute to the understanding of initiation of pathological Aβ aggregation, and the (11)EVHH(14) tetrapeptide can be considered as a promising drug target for the prevention of amyloidogenesis.

  13. Distinct DNA binding preferences for the c-Myc/Max and Max/Max dimers.

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, D L; Amati, B; Land, H

    1993-01-01

    The transcription factor c-Myc and its dimerisation partner Max are members of the basic/helix-loop-helix/leucine-zipper (bHLH-Z) family and bind to the DNA core sequence CACGTG. Using a site-selection protocol, we determined the complete 12 base pair consensus binding sites of c-Myc/Max (RACCACGTGGTY) and Max/Max (RANCACGTGNTY) dimers. We find that the c-Myc/Max dimer fails to bind the core when it is flanked by a 5'T or a 3'A, while the Max/Max dimer readily binds such sequences. Furthermore we show that inappropriate flanking sequences preclude transactivation by c-Myc in vivo. In conclusion, Max/Max dimers are less discriminatory than c-Myc/Max and may regulate other genes in addition to c-Myc/Max targets. PMID:8265351

  14. Debatable aspects of initial human colonization of Siberia and age of the Karama site in the Altai Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zykin, V. S.; Zykina, V. S.; Smolyaninova, L. G.

    2016-05-01

    Debatable aspects of age, stratigraphic position, and natural conditions of the oldest stratified Early Paleolithic Karama site in the Altai Mountains are critically revised. The extensive geological, stratigraphic, and paleontological data allow the sufficiently well-substantiated assumption that accumulation of the Karama Formation and existence of the Early Paleolithic Karama site correspond to a long period of climate warming in the Early Pleistocene correlated with the Tiglian of northwestern Europe lasting from 2.23 to 1.59 Ma. The age model proposed for the formation of the Quaternary sequence in the Anui River valley, which includes the artifact-containing deposits of the Karama site, seems to be the most probable one proceeding from interpretation of available data on the geological structure, stratigraphy, paleomagnetism, and paleontological and lithological properties of Upper Cenozoic sequences observable both in the Anui River valley and in Siberian areas adjacent to the Altai mountainous region.

  15. D-Dimer elevation and adverse outcomes.

    PubMed

    Halaby, Rim; Popma, Christopher J; Cohen, Ander; Chi, Gerald; Zacarkim, Marcelo Rodrigues; Romero, Gonzalo; Goldhaber, Samuel Z; Hull, Russell; Hernandez, Adrian; Mentz, Robert; Harrington, Robert; Lip, Gregory; Peacock, Frank; Welker, James; Martin-Loeches, Ignacio; Daaboul, Yazan; Korjian, Serge; Gibson, C Michael

    2015-01-01

    D-Dimer is a biomarker of fibrin formation and degradation. While a D-dimer within normal limits is used to rule out the diagnosis of deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism among patients with a low clinical probability of venous thromboembolism (VTE), the prognostic association of an elevated D-dimer with adverse outcomes has received far less emphasis. An elevated D-dimer is independently associated with an increased risk for incident VTE, recurrent VTE, and mortality. An elevated D-dimer is an independent correlate of increased mortality and subsequent VTE across a broad variety of disease states. Therefore, medically ill subjects in whom the D-dimer is elevated constitute a high risk subgroup in which the prospective evaluation of the efficacy and safety of antithrombotic therapy is warranted.

  16. Solitary waves in dimer binary collision model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahsan, Zaid; Jayaprakash, K. R.

    2017-01-01

    Solitary wave propagation in nonlinear diatomic (dimer) chains is a very interesting topic of research in the study of nonlinear lattices. Such waves were recently found to be supported by the essentially nonlinear granular lattice and Toda lattice. An interesting aspect of this discovery is attributed to the realization of a spectrum of the mass ratio (the only system parameter governing the dynamics) that supports the propagation of such waves corresponding to the considered interaction potential. The objective of this exposition is to explore solitary wave propagation in the dimer binary collision (BC) model. Interestingly, the dimer BC model supports solitary wave propagation at a discrete spectrum of mass ratios similar to those observed in granular and Toda dimers. Further, we report a qualitative and one-to-one correspondence between the spectrum of the mass ratio corresponding to the dimer BC model and those corresponding to granular and Toda dimer chains.

  17. Dimerization of Human Growth Hormone by Zinc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, Brian C.; Mulkerrin, Michael G.; Wells, James A.

    1991-08-01

    Size-exclusion chromatography and sedimentation equilibrium studies demonstrated that zinc ion (Zn2+) induced the dimerization of human growth hormone (hGH). Scatchard analysis of 65Zn2+ binding to hGH showed that two Zn2+ ions associate per dimer of hGH in a cooperative fashion. Cobalt (II) can substitute for Zn2+ in the hormone dimer and gives a visible spectrum characteristic of cobalt coordinated in a tetrahedral fashion by oxygen- and nitrogen-containing ligands. Replacement of potential Zn2+ ligands (His18, His21, and Glu174) in hGH with alanine weakened both Zn2+ binding and hGH dimer formation. The Zn2+-hGH dimer was more stable than monomeric hGH to denaturation in guanidine-HCl. Formation of a Zn2+-hGH dimeric complex may be important for storage of hGH in secretory granules.

  18. Feasibility Study of Anaerobic Digestion of Food Waste in St. Bernard, Louisiana. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Moriarty, K.

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) developed the RE-Powering America's Land initiative to re-use contaminated sites for renewable energy generation when aligned with the community's vision for the site. The former Kaiser Aluminum Landfill in St. Bernard Parish, Louisiana, was selected for a feasibility study under the program. Preliminary work focused on selecting a biomass feedstock. Discussions with area experts, universities, and the project team identified food wastes as the feedstock and anaerobic digestion (AD) as the technology.

  19. Monomer-dimer problem on some networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ruijuan; Yan, Weigen

    2016-09-01

    Zhang et al. (2012) obtained the exact formula for the number of all possible monomer-dimer arrangements and the asymptotic growth constant on a scale-free small-world network. In this note, we generalize this result and obtain the exact solution on the monomer-dimer model on many networks. Particularly, we prove that these networks have the same asymptotic growth constant of the number of monomer-dimer arrangements.

  20. Structural insights into lipid-dependent reversible dimerization of human GLTP

    SciTech Connect

    Samygina, Valeria R.; Ochoa-Lizarralde, Borja; Popov, Alexander N.; Cabo-Bilbao, Aintzane; Goni-de-Cerio, Felipe; Molotkovsky, Julian G.; Patel, Dinshaw J.; Brown, Rhoderick E.; Malinina, Lucy

    2013-04-01

    It is shown that dimerization is promoted by glycolipid binding to human GLTP. The importance of dimer flexibility in wild-type protein is manifested by point mutation that ‘locks’ the dimer while diversifying ligand/protein adaptations. Human glycolipid transfer protein (hsGLTP) forms the prototypical GLTP fold and is characterized by a broad transfer selectivity for glycosphingolipids (GSLs). The GLTP mutation D48V near the ‘portal entrance’ of the glycolipid binding site has recently been shown to enhance selectivity for sulfatides (SFs) containing a long acyl chain. Here, nine novel crystal structures of hsGLTP and the SF-selective mutant complexed with short-acyl-chain monoSF and diSF in different crystal forms are reported in order to elucidate the potential functional roles of lipid-mediated homodimerization. In all crystal forms, the hsGLTP–SF complexes displayed homodimeric structures supported by similarly organized intermolecular interactions. The dimerization interface always involved the lipid sphingosine chain, the protein C-terminus (C-end) and α-helices 6 and 2, but the D48V mutant displayed a ‘locked’ dimer conformation compared with the hinge-like flexibility of wild-type dimers. Differences in contact angles, areas and residues at the dimer interfaces in the ‘flexible’ and ‘locked’ dimers revealed a potentially important role of the dimeric structure in the C-end conformation of hsGLTP and in the precise positioning of the key residue of the glycolipid recognition centre, His140. ΔY207 and ΔC-end deletion mutants, in which the C-end is shifted or truncated, showed an almost complete loss of transfer activity. The new structural insights suggest that ligand-dependent reversible dimerization plays a role in the function of human GLTP.

  1. Functional Roles of the Dimer-Interface Residues in Human Ornithine Decarboxylase

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chien-Yun; Liu, Yi-Liang; Lin, Chih-Li; Liu, Guang-Yaw; Hung, Hui-Chih

    2014-01-01

    Ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) catalyzes the decarboxylation of ornithine to putrescine and is the rate-limiting enzyme in the polyamine biosynthesis pathway. ODC is a dimeric enzyme, and the active sites of this enzyme reside at the dimer interface. Once the enzyme dissociates, the enzyme activity is lost. In this paper, we investigated the roles of amino acid residues at the dimer interface regarding the dimerization, protein stability and/or enzyme activity of ODC. A multiple sequence alignment of ODC and its homologous protein antizyme inhibitor revealed that 5 of 9 residues (residues 165, 277, 331, 332 and 389) are divergent, whereas 4 (134, 169, 294 and 322) are conserved. Analytical ultracentrifugation analysis suggested that some dimer-interface amino acid residues contribute to formation of the dimer of ODC and that this dimerization results from the cooperativity of these interface residues. The quaternary structure of the sextuple mutant Y331S/Y389D/R277S/D332E/V322D/D134A was changed to a monomer rather than a dimer, and the Kd value of the mutant was 52.8 µM, which is over 500-fold greater than that of the wild-type ODC (ODC_WT). In addition, most interface mutants showed low but detectable or negligible enzyme activity. Therefore, the protein stability of these interface mutants was measured by differential scanning calorimetry. These results indicate that these dimer-interface residues are important for dimer formation and, as a consequence, are critical for enzyme catalysis. PMID:25140796

  2. Initial Geochemistry Data of the Lake Ohrid (Macedonia, Albania) DEEP -Site Sediment Record: The ICDP Scopsco Drilling Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francke, A.; Wagner, B.; Sulpizio, R.; Zanchetta, G.; Leicher, N.; Gromig, R.; Krastel, S.; Lindhorst, K.; Wilke, T.

    2014-12-01

    Ancient lakes, with sediment records spanning >1 million years, are very rare. The UNESCO World Heritage site of Lake Ohrid on the Balkans is thought to be the oldest lake in Europe. With 212 endemic species described to date, it is also a hotspot of evolution. In order to unravel the geological and evolutionary history of the lake, an international group of scientists, conducted a deep drilling campaign in spring 2013 under the umbrella of the ICDP SCOPSCO project (Scientific Collaboration on Past Speciation Conditions in Lake Ohrid). Overall, about 2,100 m of sediments were recovered from four drill sites. At the main drill site (DEEP-site) in central parts of the lake where seismic data indicated a maximum sediment fill of ca. 700 m, a total of more than 1,500 m of sediments were recovered until a penetration depth of 569 m. Currently, core opening, core description, XRF and MSCL scanning, sub-sampling (16 cm resolution), and inorganic and organic geochemical as well as sedimentological analyses of the sediment cores from the DEEP site are in progress at the University of Cologne. Previous studies at Lake Ohrid have shown that interglacial periods are characterized by high TIC and TOC contents, likely associated with high contents of calcite and organic matter in the sediments. In contrast, during glacial periods negligible TIC and low TOC contents correspond to high K counts indicating enhanced supply of clastic material. Similar patterns can be observed in the biogeochemical analyses of the subsamples and in the XRF data of the DEEP site record. Following these variations on a glacial-interglacial time scale, TIC and TOC data obtained from the subsamples and from core catcher samples indicate that the DEEP site sequence provides a 1.2 million year old continuous record of environmental and climatological variability in the Balkan Region. The age control can be further improved by first findings of macroscopic tephra horizons. Peaks in K, Sr, Zr, and magnetic

  3. Fate of HIV-1 cDNA intermediates during reverse transcription is dictated by transcription initiation site of virus genomic RNA

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Takao; Sato, Yoko; Huang, Yu-Lun; Koi, Satoshi; Takahata, Tatsuro; Hasegawa, Atsuhiko; Kawai, Gota; Kannagi, Mari

    2015-01-01

    Retroviral reverse transcription is accomplished by sequential strand-transfers of partial cDNA intermediates copied from viral genomic RNA. Here, we revealed an unprecedented role of 5′-end guanosine (G) of HIV-1 genomic RNA for reverse transcription. Based on current consensus for HIV-1 transcription initiation site, HIV-1 transcripts possess a single G at 5′-ends (G1-form). However, we found that HIV-1 transcripts with additional Gs at 5′-ends (G2- and G3-forms) were abundantly expressed in infected cells by using alternative transcription initiation sites. The G2- and G3-forms were also detected in the virus particle, although the G1-form predominated. To address biological impact of the 5′-G number, we generated HIV clone DNA to express the G1-form exclusively by deleting the alternative initiation sites. Virus produced from the clone showed significantly higher strand-transfer of minus strong-stop cDNA (-sscDNA). The in vitro assay using synthetic HIV-1 RNAs revealed that the abortive forms of -sscDNA were abundantly generated from the G3-form RNA, but dramatically reduced from the G1-form. Moreover, the strand-transfer of -sscDNA from the G1-form was prominently stimulated by HIV-1 nucleocapsid. Taken together, our results demonstrated that the 5′-G number that corresponds to HIV-1 transcription initiation site was critical for successful strand-transfer of -sscDNA during reverse transcription. PMID:26631448

  4. Thermalization of a dimerized antiferromagnetic spin chain.

    PubMed

    Konstantinidis, N P

    2016-01-20

    Thermalization is investigated for the one-dimensional anisotropic antiferromagnetic Heisenberg model with dimerized nearest-neighbor interactions that break integrability. For this purpose the time evolution of local operator expectation values after an interacting quench is calculated directly with the Chebyshev polynomial expansion, and the deviation of the diagonal from the canonical thermal ensemble value is calculated for increasing system size for these operators. The spatial and spin symmetries of the Hamiltonian are taken into account to divide it into symmetry subsectors. The rate of thermalization is found to weaken with the dimerization parameter as the Hamiltonian evolves between two integrable limits, the non-dimerized and the fully dimerized where the chain breaks up into isolated dimers. This conclusion is supported by the distribution of the local operator off-diagonal elements between the eigenstates of the Hamiltonian with respect to their energy difference, which determines the strength of temporal fluctuations. The off-diagonal elements have a low-energy peak for small dimerization which facilitates thermalization, and originates in the reduction of spatial symmetry with respect to the non-dimerized limit. For increasing dimerization their distribution changes and develops a single low-energy maximum that relates to the fully dimerized limit and slows down thermalization.

  5. Texas Study of Students at Risk: Case Studies of Initiatives Supporting Ninth Graders' Success. Cross-Site Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapley, Kelly; Vicknair, Keven; Sheehan, Daniel; Pieper, Amy; Jepson, Dana; Sturges, Keith; Bush, Joan; Vandiver, Sherrie

    2004-01-01

    Researchers conducted case studies of Ninth Grade Success Initiative (NGSI) grants to gain a greater understanding of issues facing large numbers of at-risk students, many of whom, despite potentially receiving services as early as kindergarten, still reach ninth grade unprepared to succeed academically in high school. Case studies focused on NGSI…

  6. Footprinting studies of specific complexes formed by RepA, a replication initiator of plasmid pCU1, and its binding site.

    PubMed

    Papp, P P; Elö, P; Semsey, S; Orosz, L

    2000-10-01

    The basic replicon of plasmid pCU1 contains three different replication origins. Replication initiated from the oriB origin requires pCU1-encoded protein RepA. Previously, information analysis of 19 natural RepA binding sequences predicted a 20-bp sequence as a RepA binding site. Guanines contacting RepA in the major groove of DNA have also been determined. In this study, we used the missing-nucleoside method to determine all of the bases relevant to RepA binding. The importance of some thymine bases was also confirmed by a missing-thymine site interference assay. Participation of the 5-methyl groups of two thymines (at positions -6 and 7) in RepA binding was pointed out by a missing-thymine methyl site interference assay. Phosphate groups of the DNA backbone which strongly interfered with RepA binding upon ethylation were also identified. The pattern of contacting positions mapped by hydroxyl radical protection footprinting indicates that RepA binds to one face of B-form DNA. The length of the binding site was found to be 20 bp by dissociation rate measurement of complexes formed between RepA and a variety of binding sequences. The symmetry of the binding site and that of the contacting bases, particularly the reacting 5-methyl groups of two thymines, suggest that pCU1-encoded RepA may contact its site as a homodimer.

  7. Dimerization kinetics of the IgE-class antibodies by divalent haptens. I. The Fab-hapten interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Schweitzer-Stenner, R; Licht, A; Pecht, I

    1992-01-01

    The binding of divalent haptens to IgE-class antibodies leads predominantly to their oligomerization into open and closed dimers. Kinetics of the open dimer formation was investigated by fluorescence titrations of Fab fragments of monoclonal DNP-specific IgE antibodies with divalent haptens having different spacer length (gamma = 14-130 A). Binding was monitored by quenching of intrinsic tryptophan emission of the Fab. Addition of divalent haptens with short spacers (gamma = 14-21 A) to the Fabs at rates larger than a distinct threshold value caused a significant decrease of Fab-binding site occupation in the initial phase of the titration. This finding was interpreted to reflect a nonequilibrium state of hapten-Fab-binding. Such nonequilibrium titrations were analyzed by inserting a kinetic model into a theory of antibody aggregation as presented by Dembo and Golstein (Histamine release due to bivalent penicilloyl haptens. 1978. J. Immunol. 121, 345). Fitting of this model to the fluorescence titrations yielded dissociation rate constants of 7.8 x 10(-3) s-1 and 6 x 10(-3) s-1 for the Fab dimers formed by the flexible divalent haptens N alpha, N epsilon-di(dinitrophenyl)-L-lysine (gamma = 16 A) and bis(N beta-2,4-dinitrophenyl-alanyl)-meso-diamino-succinate (gamma = 21 A). Making the simplifying assumption that a single step binding equilibrium prevails, the corresponding dimer formation rate constants were calculated to be 1.9 x 10(5) M-1 s-1 and 1.1 x 10(4) M-1 s-1, respectively. In contrast, all haptens with spacers longer than 40 A (i.e., bis(N alpha-2,4-dinitrophenyl-tri-D-alanyl)-1,7-diamino-heptane, and di(N epsilon-2,4-dinitrophenyl)-6-aminohexanoate-aspartyl-(prolyl)n-L-l ysyl (n = 24, 27, 33) exhibit a relative fast dimerization rate of the Fab fragments (greater than 7 x 10(6) M-1 s-1). These observations were interpreted as being caused by orientational constraints set by the limited solid angle of the reaction between the macromolecular reactants

  8. A mutation creating an out-of-frame alternative translation initiation site in the GRHPR 5'UTR causing primary hyperoxaluria type II.

    PubMed

    Fu, Y; Rope, R; Fargue, S; Cohen, H T; Holmes, R P; Cohen, D M

    2015-11-01

    Primary hyperoxaluria type II is a recessive genetic disorder caused by mutations in the GRHPR gene. Although several dozen mutations have been described, all affect coding or transcript splicing. A man suspected of having primary hyperoxaluria type II was heterozygous for a novel single-nucleotide deletion (c.694delC) in GRHPR affecting Gln(232) , which introduced a pre-mature termination (p.Gln232Argfs*3). Two 5'untranslated region (UTR) variants of unknown significance were also noted. We show that these two variants occur in cis, on the opposite allele, and introduce - immediately upstream of the canonical translation initiation site - a novel out-of-frame translational start site. In vitro studies using the GRHPR 5'UTR fused to a luciferase reporter show that the variant start site pre-empted initiation at the canonical translational start site, and this was corroborated within the broader context of 1.3 kb of the GRHPR proximal promoter. This latter mechanism may be underappreciated in general; reports of clinically significant functional variation of this type are extremely rare.

  9. Initial success of native grasses is contingent on multiple interactions among exotic grass competition, temporal priority, rainfall and site effects.

    PubMed

    Young, Truman P; Zefferman, Emily P; Vaughn, Kurt J; Fick, Stephen

    2014-12-05

    Ecological communities are increasingly being recognized as the products of contemporary drivers and historical legacies that are both biotic and abiotic. In an attempt to unravel multiple layers of ecological contingency, we manipulated (i) competition with exotic annual grasses, (ii) the timing of this competition (temporal priority in arrival/seeding times) and (iii) watering (simulated rainfall) in a restoration-style planting of native perennial grasses. In addition, we replicated this experiment simultaneously at three sites in north-central California. Native perennial grasses had 73-99 % less cover when planted with exotic annuals than when planted alone, but this reduction was greatly ameliorated by planting the natives 2 weeks prior to the exotics. In a drought year, irrigation significantly reduced benefits of early planting so that these benefits resembled those observed in a non-drought year. There were significant differences across the three sites (site effects and interactions) in (i) overall native cover, (ii) the response of natives to competition, (iii) the strength of the temporal priority effect and (iv) the degree to which supplemental watering reduced priority effects. These results reveal the strong multi-layered contingency that underlies even relatively simple communities.

  10. Initial success of native grasses is contingent on multiple interactions among exotic grass competition, temporal priority, rainfall and site effects

    PubMed Central

    Young, Truman P.; Zefferman, Emily P.; Vaughn, Kurt J.; Fick, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Ecological communities are increasingly being recognized as the products of contemporary drivers and historical legacies that are both biotic and abiotic. In an attempt to unravel multiple layers of ecological contingency, we manipulated (i) competition with exotic annual grasses, (ii) the timing of this competition (temporal priority in arrival/seeding times) and (iii) watering (simulated rainfall) in a restoration-style planting of native perennial grasses. In addition, we replicated this experiment simultaneously at three sites in north-central California. Native perennial grasses had 73–99 % less cover when planted with exotic annuals than when planted alone, but this reduction was greatly ameliorated by planting the natives 2 weeks prior to the exotics. In a drought year, irrigation significantly reduced benefits of early planting so that these benefits resembled those observed in a non-drought year. There were significant differences across the three sites (site effects and interactions) in (i) overall native cover, (ii) the response of natives to competition, (iii) the strength of the temporal priority effect and (iv) the degree to which supplemental watering reduced priority effects. These results reveal the strong multi-layered contingency that underlies even relatively simple communities. PMID:25480888

  11. Evidence that dimers remaining in preinduced Escherichia coli B/r Hcr+ become insensitive after DNA replication to the extract from Micrococcus luteus.

    PubMed Central

    Sedliaková, M; Brozmanová, J; Masek, F; Kleibl, K

    1981-01-01

    In Escherichia coli B/r Her+ irradiated with two separate fluences, dimer excision is prematurely interrupted. The present study was designed to follow tha fate of dimers remaining unexcised. The results imply that these dimers (or distortions containing dimers) are transformed on replication from the state of sensitivity to the state of insensitivity to endonuclease from Micrococcus luteus. This conclusion is based on the following findings: (a) dimers were radiochromatographically detectable in DNA replicated after UV, which indicated that they were tolerated on replication. (b) Similar amounts of dimers were detected radiochromatographically both in DNA remaining unreplicated and DNA twice replicated after UV, This along with the low transfer of parental label into daughter DNA, indicated that dimers remained in situ in parental chains. (c) Immediately after UV, all parental DNA contained numerous sites sensitive to the extract from M. luteus. 2 h after UV, a portion of parental DNA still contained a number of endonuclease-sensitive (Es) sites, while another portion of parental DNA and all daughter DNA were free of Es sites. (d) The occurrence of parental DNA free of Es sites was not temporally correlated with dimer excision, but with the first round of DNA replication. (e) The amount of DNA free of Es sites corresponded to the amount of replicated DNA. (f) Separation of replicated and unreplicated DNA, and detection of Es sites in both portions separately showed that the replicated DNA was almost free of Es sites, whereas unreplicated DNA contained a number of such sites. PMID:7030422

  12. Combining bulk sediment OSL and meteoric 10Be fingerprinting techniques to identify gully initiation sites and erosion depths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portenga, E. W.; Bishop, P.; Rood, D. H.; Bierman, P. R.

    2017-02-01

    Deep erosional gullies dissect landscapes around the world. Existing erosion models focus on predicting where gullies might begin to erode, but identifying where existing gullies were initiated and under what conditions is difficult, especially when historical records are unavailable. Here we outline a new approach for fingerprinting alluvium and tracing it back to its source by combining bulk sediment optically stimulated luminescence (bulk OSL) and meteoric 10Be (10Bem) measurements made on gully-derived alluvium samples. In doing so, we identify where gully erosion was initiated and infer the conditions under which such erosion occurred. As both 10Bem and bulk OSL data have distinctive depth profiles in different uneroded and depositional settings, we are able to identify the likely incision depths in potential alluvium source areas. We demonstrate our technique at Birchams Creek in the southeastern Australian Tablelands—a well-studied and recent example of gully incision that exemplifies a regional landscape transition from unchanneled swampy meadow wetlands to gully incision and subsequent wetland burial by post-European settlement alluvium. We find that such historic alluvium was derived from a shallow erosion of valley fill upstream of former swampy meadows and was deposited down the center of the valley. Incision likely followed catchment deforestation and the introduction of livestock, which overgrazed and congregated in valley bottoms in the early 20th century during a period of drought. As a result, severe gully erosion was likely initiated in localized, compacted, and oversteepened reaches of the valley bottom.

  13. Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Solar Photovoltaics at the Tower Road Site in Aurora, Colorado. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Van Geet, O.; Mosey, G.

    2013-03-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in accordance with the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, selected the Tower Road site in Aurora, Colorado, for a feasibility study of renewable energy production. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) provided technical assistance for this project. The purpose of this report is to assess the site for a possible photovoltaic (PV) system installation and estimate the cost, performance, and site impacts of different PV options. In addition, the report recommends financing options that could assist in the implementation of a PV system at the site. This study did not assess environmental conditions at the site.

  14. Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Solar Photovoltaics at the Price Landfill Site in Pleasantville, New Jersey. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Salasovich, J.; Geiger, J.; Mosey, G.; Healey, V.

    2013-05-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in accordance with the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, selected the Price Landfill site in Pleasantville, New Jersey, for a feasibility study of renewable energy production. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) provided technical assistance for this project. The purpose of this report is to assess the site for a possible photovoltaic (PV) system installation and estimate the cost, performance, and site impacts of different PV options. In addition, the report recommends financing options that could assist in the implementation of a PV system at the site. This study did not assess environmental conditions at the site.

  15. Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Solar Photovoltaics at the Former Chicago, Milwaukee, and St. Paul Rail Yard Company Site in Perry, Iowa. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Salasovich, J.; Geiger, J.; Healey, V.; Mosey, G.

    2013-03-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in accordance with the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, selected the Former Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Rail Yard Company site in Perry, Iowa, for a feasibility study of renewable energy production. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) provided technical assistance for this project. The purpose of this report is to assess the site for a photovoltaic (PV) system installation and estimate the cost, performance, and site impacts of different PV options. In addition, the report recommends financing options that could assist in the implementation of a PV system at the site. This study did not assess environmental conditions at the site.

  16. Mechanism for Controlling the Dimer-Monomer Switch and Coupling Dimerization to Catalysis of the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 3C-Like Protease

    SciTech Connect

    Shi,J.; Sivaraman, J.; Song, J.

    2008-01-01

    Unlike 3C protease, the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) 3C-like protease (3CLpro) is only enzymatically active as a homodimer and its catalysis is under extensive regulation by the unique extra domain. Despite intense studies, two puzzles still remain: (i) how the dimer-monomer switch is controlled and (ii) why dimerization is absolutely required for catalysis. Here we report the monomeric crystal structure of the SARS-CoV 3CLpro mutant R298A at a resolution of 1.75 Angstroms . Detailed analysis reveals that Arg298 serves as a key component for maintaining dimerization, and consequently, its mutation will trigger a cooperative switch from a dimer to a monomer. The monomeric enzyme is irreversibly inactivated because its catalytic machinery is frozen in the collapsed state, characteristic of the formation of a short 310-helix from an active-site loop. Remarkably, dimerization appears to be coupled to catalysis in 3CLpro through the use of overlapped residues for two networks, one for dimerization and another for the catalysis.

  17. Barite chimneys from two hydrothermal sites along the slow-spreading Arctic Ridge system: Initial isotope and mineralogical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eickmann, B.; van Zuilen, M. A.; Thorseth, I. H.; Pedersen, R.

    2010-12-01

    Two hydrothermal sites along the slow-spreading Arctic Ridge systems, the Jan Mayen vent fields (JMVFs) and the recently discovered Loki’s Castle hydrothermal field (LCHF) contains numerous barite chimneys partially covered by microbial mats. The JMVFs are located at 71°N on the south-western Mohns Ridge, approximately 50 km north of the Jan Mayen fracture zone. The LCHF is located at 73.5°N on an axial volcanic ridge where the Mohns Ridge transitions into the Knipovich Ridge and consists of two venting areas. Active hydrothermal venting at both sites is confirmed by elevated hydrogen sulphide concentrations and discharge of high-temperature fluids, reaching 270°C in the JMVFs and 317°C in the LCHF. Barite chimneys from the JMVFs are composed of barite, silica and abundant pyrite-dominated sulphide minerals that display a conspicuous concentric morphology. Raman spectroscopic analysis of the central regions of these concentric sulphide minerals points to the existence of mackinawite (FeS). Furthermore, the existence of greigite (Fe3S4) surrounding the mackinawite is suggested. This observation confirms the general conclusion of earlier experimental studies that these phases act as the metastable precursors of pyrite. In contrast, the barite chimneys of the LCHF consist mainly of pure barite with lesser amounts of sulphide minerals. The difference in the mineralogical composition between the two sites is also expressed in its sulphur isotopic composition. δ34Ssulphate values of the barite chimneys from the JMVFs are lower than δ34S of seawater sulphate (δ34S = +21‰) and δ34Ssulphide values point to a magmatic sulphur source (δ34S = 0‰). This implies that the JMHFs barite chimneys have been formed by a mixture of seawater and hydrothermal fluids, similar to the origin of black smokers. In contrast to the JMVFs, the δ34Ssulphate values from the LCHF barite chimneys are higher than δ34S values for seawater sulphate, but show remarkable differences

  18. Direct visualization of a cycloaddition reaction on frozen asymmetric Si dimers at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baik, Jaeyoon; Ihm, Kyuwook; Ha, Taekyun; An, Ki-Seok; Ahn, Joung Real; Park, Chong-Yun

    2016-07-01

    We firstly report an experimental visualization of a cycloaddition reaction on RT frozen asymmetric Si dimers. The frozen Si dimers with a local c(4 × 2) order were prepared by pinning flip-flopping Si dimers by using molecules. This RT pristine c(4 × 2) structure was used to determine what Si atom of an asymmetric Si dimer bonds to a molecule at the initial stage of the RT cycloaddition reaction, which has been a long-standing puzzling issue. This made it possible to compare directly experimental cycloaddition reactions with theoretical ones. As a prototype for the experiment, a 1,3-butadiene molecule adsorbed between Si dimer rows was used. The 1,3-butadiene molecule was found to prefer a symmetric Si pair on the frozen Si dimers, i.e., two electrophilic lower atoms of asymmetric Si dimers. This result is consistent with the theoretical prediction that a 1,3-diene molecule prefers a symmetric Si pair on the Si(001)c(4 × 2) surface. This experimental approach can also be applied to other studies for the adsorption of a molecule on a Si(001) surface at room temperature.

  19. Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Biomass Power Generation at the Former Farmland Industries Site in Lawrence, Kansas. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Tomberlin, G.; Mosey, G.

    2013-03-01

    Under the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) provided funding to the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to support a feasibility study of biomass renewable energy generation at the former Farmland Industries site in Lawrence, Kansas. Feasibility assessment team members conducted a site assessment to gather information integral to this feasibility study. Information such as biomass resources, transmission availability, on-site uses for heat and power, community acceptance, and ground conditions were considered.

  20. TSPA 1991: An initial total-system performance assessment for Yucca Mountain; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect

    Barnard, R.W.; Wilson, M.L.; Dockery, H.A.; Kaplan, P.G.; Eaton, R.R.; Bingham, F.W.; Gauthier, J.H.; Robey, T.H.

    1992-07-01

    This report describes an assessment of the long-term performance of a repository system that contains deeply buried highly radioactive waste; the system is assumed to be located at the potential site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The study includes an identification of features, events, and processes that might affect the potential repository, a construction of scenarios based on this identification, a selection of models describing these scenarios (including abstraction of appropriate models from detailed models), a selection of probability distributions for the parameters in the models, a stochastic calculation of radionuclide releases for the scenarios, and a derivation of complementary cumulative distribution functions (CCDFs) for the releases. Releases and CCDFs are calculated for four categories of scenarios: aqueous flow (modeling primarily the existing conditions at the site, with allowances for climate change), gaseous flow, basaltic igneous activity, and human intrusion. The study shows that models of complex processes can be abstracted into more simplified representations that preserve the understanding of the processes and produce results consistent with those of more complex models.

  1. Shared Skies Partnership: A Dual-Site All-Sky Live Remote Observing Initiative for Research and Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kielkopf, John F.; Hart, R.; Carter, B.; Collins, K. A.; Brown, C.; Hay, J.; Hons, A.; Marsden, S.

    2014-01-01

    The University of Southern Queensland's Mt. Kent Observatory in Queensland, Australia, and the University of Louisville's Moore Observatory in Kentucky, USA, are collaborating in the development of live remote observing for research, student training, and education. With a focus on flexible operation assisted by semi-autonomous controllers, rather than completely robotic data acquisition, the partnership provides interactive hands-on experience to students at all levels, optimized performance based on real-time observations, and flexible scheduling for transient events and targets of opportunity. Two sites on opposites sides of the globe cover the entire sky, and for equatorial regions allow nearly continuous coverage. The facilites include 0.5-m corrected Dall-Kirkham (CDK) telescopes at both sites, a 0.6 m Ritchie-Chretien telescope at Moore, and a new Nasmyth design 0.7-meter CDK at Mt. Kent instrumented for milli-magnitude precision photometry and wide field imaging, with spectrographs under development. We will describe the operational and data acquisition software, recent research results, and how remote access is being made available to students and observers.

  2. Environmental Impacts of Petroleum Production: Initial Results from the Osage-Skiatook Petroleum Environmental Research Sites, Osage County, Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kharaka, Yousif K.; Otton, James K.

    2003-01-01

    Exploration for and production of petroleum have caused major detrimental impacts to soils, surface and ground waters, and the local ecosystems in the United States. These impacts arise primarily from the improper disposal of large volumes of saline water produced with oil and gas, from accidental hydrocarbon and produced water releases, and from abandoned oil wells that were not correctly sealed. It is important to understand the long-term and short-term effects of produced water and hydrocarbon releases from these sites in order to develop risk-based remediation plans. Remediation is particularly needed in aging and depleted fields where land use is changing from petroleum production to residential, agricultural or recreational uses. About 20 scientists from the USGS and other governmental agencies and academia are involved in a multidisciplinary investigation to study the transport, fate, and natural attenuation of inorganic salts, trace metals, organic compounds and radionuclides present in produced water, and their impacts at the Osage-Skiatook Petroleum Environmental Research (OSPER) 'A' and 'B' sites, located on the Osage Reservation in Osage County, Oklahoma. Stakeholders in the project include the Osage Nation, which holds the mineral rights, the Bureau of Indian Affairs with trust responsibility, and the Army Corps of Engineers, which owns the surface rights at these sites and manages adjacent Skiatook Lake. The 4250-hectare Skiatook Lake provides drinking water to local Tulsa suburban communities and a rural water district, and offers recreational fishing and boating opportunities to tens of thousands of visitors each year. Approximately 1.5 and 1.0 hectare of land at the OSPER 'A' (depleted Lester lease) and 'B' (active Branstetter lease) sites, respectively, are affected by salt scarring, tree kills, soil salinization and brine and petroleum contamination due to the leakage of produced water and associated hydrocarbons from brine pits and accidental

  3. An Inter-Comparison of Two Independent Site Test Interferometers Located in Goldstone, California: Initial Study Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morabito, David; D'Addario, Larry; Acosta, Roberto J.; Nessel, James A.

    2012-01-01

    Site Test Interferometers (STIs) have been deployed at two different locations at the NASA Deep Space Network (DSN) tracking complex in Goldstone, California. An STI measures the difference in path length between a geostationary satellite and two antennas on the Earth, producing a measure of atmospheric phase fluctuations over spatial distances comparable to those between elements of possible microwave phased arrays. The purposes of the Goldstone STIs are to assess the suitability of Goldstone as an array site and to statistically characterize atmospheric induced delay fluctuations for application to future array scenarios.The two STI's are separated by 13 km across the Goldstone complex. Each instrument is composed of two small-diameter antennas and associated electronics separated by approx. 200 meters in a principally east-west configuration. The antennas continuously observe signals emitted by geo-stationary satellites and produce data that contain information on the phase difference between signals received by both antennas. The fluctuation in delay (or path length difference) statistics derived from these data sets can be used to infer power loss for particular array configurations.We report on a comparison of the root mean square (RMS) phase delay statistics estimated over 10-minute intervals between the two Goldstone STIs. We have achieved good statistical agreement between the data acquired from the two STIs, given that each instrument is observing different satellites, at different frequencies, over different baseline lengths, with very different implementations, and are located 13 km apart in widely separated terrain at different geodetic altitudes.

  4. Potassium Hexacyanoferrate (III)-Catalyzed Dimerization of Hydroxystilbene: Biomimetic Synthesis of Indane Stilbene Dimers.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jing-Shan; Wen, Jin; Wang, Xian-Fen; Zhang, Jian-Qiao; Zhang, Ji-Fa; Kang, Yu-Long; Hui, You-Wei; Zheng, Wen-Sheng; Yao, Chun-Suo

    2015-12-18

    Using potassium hexacyanoferrate (III)-sodium acetate as oxidant, the oxidative coupling reaction of isorhapontigenin and resveratrol in aqueous acetone resulted in the isolation of three new indane dimers 4, 6, and 7, together with six known stilbene dimers. Indane dimer 5 was obtained for the first time by direct transformation from isorhapontigenin. The structures and relative configurations of the dimers were elucidated using spectral analysis, and their possible formation mechanisms were discussed. The results indicate that this reaction could be used as a convenient method for the semi-synthesis of indane dimers because of the mild conditions and simple reaction products.

  5. CsrA Inhibits Translation Initiation of Escherichia coli hfq by Binding to a Single Site Overlapping the Shine-Dalgarno Sequence▿

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Carol S.; Eöry, Lél A.; Yakhnin, Helen; Mercante, Jeffrey; Romeo, Tony; Babitzke, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Csr (carbon storage regulation) of Escherichia coli is a global regulatory system that consists of CsrA, a homodimeric RNA binding protein, two noncoding small RNAs (sRNAs; CsrB and CsrC) that function as CsrA antagonists by sequestering this protein, and CsrD, a specificity factor that targets CsrB and CsrC for degradation by RNase E. CsrA inhibits translation initiation of glgC, cstA, and pgaA by binding to their leader transcripts and preventing ribosome binding. Translation inhibition is thought to contribute to the observed mRNA destabilization. Each of the previously known target transcripts contains multiple CsrA binding sites. A position-specific weight matrix search program was developed using known CsrA binding sites in mRNA. This search tool identified a potential CsrA binding site that overlaps the Shine-Dalgarno sequence of hfq, a gene that encodes an RNA chaperone that mediates sRNA-mRNA interactions. This putative CsrA binding site matched the SELEX-derived binding site consensus sequence in 8 out of 12 positions. Results from gel mobility shift and footprint assays demonstrated that CsrA binds specifically to this site in the hfq leader transcript. Toeprint and cell-free translation results indicated that bound CsrA inhibits Hfq synthesis by competitively blocking ribosome binding. Disruption of csrA caused elevated expression of an hfq′-′lacZ translational fusion, while overexpression of csrA inhibited expression of this fusion. We also found that hfq mRNA is stabilized upon entry into stationary-phase growth by a CsrA-independent mechanism. The interaction of CsrA with hfq mRNA is the first example of a CsrA-regulated gene that contains only one CsrA binding site. PMID:17526692

  6. Electronic transitions of palladium dimer

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Yue; Ng, Y. W.; Chen, Zhihua; Cheung, A. S.-C.

    2013-11-21

    The laser induced fluorescence spectrum of palladium dimer (Pd{sub 2}) in the visible region between 480 and 700 nm has been observed and analyzed. The gas-phase Pd{sub 2} molecule was produced by laser ablation of palladium metal rod. Eleven vibrational bands were observed and assigned to the [17.1] {sup 3}II{sub g} - X{sup 3}Σ{sub u}{sup +} transition system. The bond length (r{sub o}) and vibrational frequency (ΔG{sub 1/2}) of the ground X{sup 3}Σ{sub u}{sup +} state were determined to be 2.47(4) Å and 211.4(5) cm{sup −1}, respectively. A molecular orbital energy level diagram was used to understand the observed ground and excited electronic states. This is the first gas-phase experimental investigation of the electronic transitions of Pd{sub 2}.

  7. Structural characterization of dimeric murine aminoacylase III.

    PubMed

    Ryazantsev, Sergey; Abuladze, Natalia; Newman, Debra; Bondar, Galyna; Kurtz, Ira; Pushkin, Alexander

    2007-05-01

    Aminoacylase III (AAIII) plays an important role in deacetylation of acetylated amino acids and N-acetylated S-cysteine conjugates of halogenated alkenes and alkanes. AAIII, recently cloned from mouse kidney and partially characterized, is a mixture of tetramers and dimers. In the present work, AAIII dimers were purified and shown to be enzymatically active. Limited trypsinolysis showed two domains of approximately 9 and 25 kDa. The three-dimensional structure of the dimer was studied by electron microscopy of negative stained samples and by single-particle reconstruction. A 16A resolution model of the AAIII dimer was created. It has an unusual, cage-like, structure. A realistic AAIII tetramer model was built from two dimers.

  8. Universal four-Boson states in ultracold molecular gases: resonant effects in dimer-dimer collisions.

    PubMed

    D'Incao, J P; von Stecher, J; Greene, Chris H

    2009-07-17

    We study the manifestations of universal four-body physics in ultracold dimer-dimer collisions. We show that resonant features associated with three-body Efimov physics and dimer-dimer scattering lengths are universally related. The emergence of universal four-boson states allows for the tunability of the dimer-dimer interaction, thus enabling the future study of ultracold molecular gases with both attractive and repulsive interactions. Moreover, our study of the interconversion between dimers and Efimov trimers shows that B2+B2-->B3+B rearrangement reactions can provide an efficient trimer formation mechanism. Our analysis of the temperature dependence of this reaction provides an interpretation of the available experimental data and sheds light on the possible experimental realization of rearrangement processes in ultracold gases.

  9. UVA Generates Pyrimidine Dimers in DNA Directly

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yong; Rabbi, Mahir; Kim, Minkyu; Ke, Changhong; Lee, Whasil; Clark, Robert L.; Mieczkowski, Piotr A.; Marszalek, Piotr E.

    2009-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that UVA radiation, which makes up ∼95% of the solar UV light reaching the Earth's surface and is also commonly used for cosmetic purposes, is genotoxic. However, in contrast to UVC and UVB, the mechanisms by which UVA produces various DNA lesions are still unclear. In addition, the relative amounts of various types of UVA lesions and their mutagenic significance are also a subject of debate. Here, we exploit atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging of individual DNA molecules, alone and in complexes with a suite of DNA repair enzymes and antibodies, to directly quantify UVA damage and reexamine its basic mechanisms at a single-molecule level. By combining the activity of endonuclease IV and T4 endonuclease V on highly purified and UVA-irradiated pUC18 plasmids, we show by direct AFM imaging that UVA produces a significant amount of abasic sites and cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs). However, we find that only ∼60% of the T4 endonuclease V-sensitive sites, which are commonly counted as CPDs, are true CPDs; the other 40% are abasic sites. Most importantly, our results obtained by AFM imaging of highly purified native and synthetic DNA using T4 endonuclease V, photolyase, and anti-CPD antibodies strongly suggest that CPDs are produced by UVA directly. Thus, our observations contradict the predominant view that as-yet-unidentified photosensitizers are required to transfer the energy of UVA to DNA to produce CPDs. Our results may help to resolve the long-standing controversy about the origin of UVA-produced CPDs in DNA. PMID:19186150

  10. Initial excavation and dating of Ngalue Cave: a Middle Stone Age site along the Niassa Rift, Mozambique.

    PubMed

    Mercader, Julio; Asmerom, Yemane; Bennett, Tim; Raja, Mussa; Skinner, Anne

    2009-07-01

    Direct evidence for a systematic occupation of the African tropics during the early late Pleistocene is lacking. Here, we report a record of human occupation between 105-42ka, based on results from a radiometrically-dated cave section from the Mozambican segment of the Niassa (Malawi/Nyasa) Rift called Ngalue. The sedimentary sequence from bottom to top has five units. We concentrate on the so-called "Middle Beds," which contain a Middle Stone Age industry characterized by the use of the discoidal reduction technique. A significant typological feature is the presence of formal types such as points, scrapers, awls, and microliths. Special objects consist of grinders/core-axes covered by ochre. Ngalue is one of the few directly-dated Pleistocene sites located along the biogeographical corridor for modern human dispersals that links east, central, and southern Africa, and, with further study, may shed new light on hominin cave habitats during the late Pleistocene.

  11. RecQ4 promotes the conversion of the pre-initiation complex at a site-specific origin for DNA unwinding in Xenopus egg extracts.

    PubMed

    Sanuki, Yosuke; Kubota, Yumiko; Kanemaki, Masato T; Takahashi, Tatsuro S; Mimura, Satoru; Takisawa, Haruhiko

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic DNA replication is initiated through stepwise assembly of evolutionarily conserved replication proteins onto replication origins, but how the origin DNA is unwound during the assembly process remains elusive. Here, we established a site-specific origin on a plasmid DNA, using in vitro replication systems derived from Xenopus egg extracts. We found that the pre-replicative complex (pre-RC) was preferentially assembled in the vicinity of GAL4 DNA-binding sites of the plasmid, depending on the binding of Cdc6 fused with a GAL4 DNA-binding domain in Cdc6-depleted extracts. Subsequent addition of nucleoplasmic S-phase extracts to the GAL4-dependent pre-RC promoted initiation of DNA replication from the origin, and components of the pre-initiation complex (pre-IC) and the replisome were recruited to the origin concomitant with origin unwinding. In this replication system, RecQ4 is dispensable for both recruitment of Cdc45 onto the origin and stable binding of Cdc45 and GINS to the pre-RC assembled plasmid. However, both origin binding of DNA polymerase α and unwinding of DNA were diminished upon depletion of RecQ4 from the extracts. These results suggest that RecQ4 plays an important role in the conversion of pre-ICs into active replisomes requiring the unwinding of origin DNA in vertebrates.

  12. MOD5 translation initiation sites determine N6-isopentenyladenosine modification of mitochondrial and cytoplasmic tRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Gillman, E C; Slusher, L B; Martin, N C; Hopper, A K

    1991-01-01

    MOD5 is one of several genes that code for enzymes found in mitochondria and another cellular compartment. Like other such genes, it contains two in-frame ATGs that could be used to produce two proteins, differing from each other by an amino-terminal extension. Certain other genes produce heterogeneous mRNAs with some 5' ends falling upstream of the longest open reading frame and some 5' ends falling between the first and second ATGs. In these cases, selection of transcription start sites appears to play a significant role in translation start site selection. MOD5, in contrast, produces mRNAs with 5' ends that all fall upstream of both ATGs. To determine how MOD5 encodes isozymes that are located in different cellular compartments and to determine whether they differ in structure, we constructed MOD5 and MOD5-COXIV fusions with mutations of the first, second, or both ATGs. The effect of these alterations on protein production, tRNA modification, and cellular location was assessed. Both the first and second ATGs are used to produce MOD5 protein in vivo, but only the long form of the protein is imported into mitochondria. Thus, the first 11 amino acids present on the amino-terminal extended protein are necessary for mitochondrial import. Surprisingly, this extension does not promote complete import of the long form of the protein, but rather a functional pool of the extended protein remains in the cytoplasm. The amino-terminal extension is also unusual because it is probably not proteolytically removed upon import and therefore does not constitute part of a mitochondrial presequence. Images PMID:1850093

  13. A New Internal Ribosomal Entry Site 5′ Boundary Is Required for Poliovirus Translation Initiation in a Mouse System

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Toshihiko; Shiroki, Kazuko; Hong, Duck-Hee; Aoki, Takahiro; Ohta, Yoshihiro; Abe, Shinobu; Hashizume, So; Nomoto, Akio

    1998-01-01

    Four mutants of the virulent Mahoney strain of poliovirus were generated by introducing mutations in nucleotides (nt) 128 to 134 of the genome, a region that contains a part of the stem-loop II (SLII) structure located within the internal ribosomal entry site (IRES; nt 120 to 590) (K. Shiroki, T. Ishii, T. Aoki, Y. Ota, W.-X. Yang, T. Komatsu, Y. Ami, M. Arita, S. Abe, S. Hashizume, and A. Nomoto, J. Virol. 71:1–8, 1997). These mutants (SLII mutants) replicated well in human HeLa cells but not in mouse TgSVA cells that had been established from the kidney of a poliovirus-sensitive transgenic mouse. Their neurovirulence in mice was also greatly attenuated compared to that of the parental virus. The poor replication activity of the SLII mutants in TgSVA cells appeared to be attributable to reduced activity of the IRES. Two and three naturally occurring revertants that replicated well in TgSVA cells were isolated from mutants SLII-1 and SLII-5, respectively. The revertants recovered IRES activity in a cell-free translation system from TgSVA cells and returned to a neurovirulent phenotype like that of the Mahoney strain in mice. Two of the revertant sites that affected the phenotype were identified as being at nt 107 and within a region from nt 120 to 161. A mutation at nt 107, specifically a change from uridine to adenine, was observed in all the revertant genomes and exerted a significant effect on the revertant phenotype. Exhibition of the full revertant phenotype required mutations in both regions. These results suggested that nt 107 of poliovirus RNA is involved in structures required for the IRES activity in mouse cells. PMID:9499100

  14. Structure of a Rabbit Muscle Fructose-1,6-Bisphosphate Aldolase A Dimer Variant

    SciTech Connect

    Sherawat,M.; Tolan, D.; Allen, K.

    2008-01-01

    Fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase (aldolase) is an essential enzyme in glycolysis and gluconeogenesis. In addition to this primary function, aldolase is also known to bind to a variety of other proteins, a property that may allow it to perform 'moonlighting' roles in the cell. Although monomeric and dimeric aldolases possess full catalytic activity, the enzyme occurs as an unusually stable tetramer, suggesting a possible link between the oligomeric state and these noncatalytic cellular roles. Here, the first high-resolution X-ray crystal structure of rabbit muscle D128V aldolase, a dimeric form of aldolase mimicking the clinically important D128G mutation in humans associated with hemolytic anemia, is presented. The structure of the dimer was determined to 1.7 Angstroms resolution with the product DHAP bound in the active site. The turnover of substrate to produce the product ligand demonstrates the retention of catalytic activity by the dimeric aldolase. The D128V mutation causes aldolase to lose intermolecular contacts with the neighboring subunit at one of the two interfaces of the tetramer. The tertiary structure of the dimer does not significantly differ from the structure of half of the tetramer. Analytical ultracentrifugation confirms the occurrence of the enzyme as a dimer in solution. The highly stable structure of aldolase with an independent active site is consistent with a model in which aldolase has evolved as a multimeric scaffold to perform other noncatalytic functions.

  15. Hydrogen bond induced HF elimination from photoionized fluorophenol dimers in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Piyali; Ghosh, Arup K.; Chakraborty, Tapas

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we report finding of a remarkable chemical effect of hydrogen bonding, elimination of hydrogen fluoride (HF) from the hydrogen bonded dimers of 2-fluorophenol (2-FP) and 3-fluorophenol (3-FP), in a supersonic jet expansion upon multi-photon ionization using 4th harmonic wavelength (266 nm) of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser, and the reaction has been probed by time-of-flight mass spectrometry. No HF elimination is observed to occur by such means from the monomer of 3-FP, but it occurs with a small yield from the monomer of 2-FP. On the other hand, upon dimerization the reaction is triggered on for 3-FP, and for 2-FP it becomes so facile that no intact dimer cation survives and only the HF eliminated product ion appears in the mass spectra. Electronic structure calculation shows that in the cationic ground (D0) state, although the reaction for 2-FP dimer is exothermic, the associated barrier is significantly high (2.75 eV) and for its occurrence, absorption of three photons (2+1 type) is required. However, the reaction is predicted barrierless in the intermediate S1 state of this dimer, and HF loss dimer cation mass peak could appear in the mass spectrum due to an effective two-photon (1+1) ionization process. In the case of 3-FP dimer, the energy barriers both in S1 (neutral) and D0 (ionic) states are high, and it is suggested that for occurrence of HF elimination, dimer cation needs to absorb an additional photon. For facilitation of HF loss from this dimer cation, a rearrangement of the geometry and formation of an intermediate adduct have been suggested, and it is argued that the latter could be produced by nucleophilic attack of the neutral moiety at the ortho site of the cationic counterpart.

  16. Dimeric human sulfotransferase 1B1 displays cofactor-dependent subunit communication

    PubMed Central

    Tibbs, Zachary E; Falany, Charles N

    2015-01-01

    The cytosolic sulfotransferases (SULTs) are dimeric enzymes that catalyze the transformation of hydrophobic drugs and hormones into hydrophilic sulfate esters thereby providing the body with an important pathway for regulating small molecule activity and excretion. While SULT dimerization is highly conserved, the necessity for the interaction has not been established. To perform its function, a SULT must efficiently bind the universal sulfate donor, 3′-phosphoadenosine-5′-phosphosulfate (PAPS), and release the byproduct, 3′, 5′-diphosphoadenosine (PAP), following catalysis. We hypothesize this efficient binding and release of PAPS/PAP may be connected to SULT dimerization. To allow for the visualization of dynamic protein interactions critical for addressing this hypothesis and to generate kinetically testable hypotheses, molecular dynamic simulations (MDS) of hSULT1B1 were performed with PAPS and PAP bound to each dimer subunit in various combinations. The results suggest the dimer subunits may possess the capability of communicating with one another in a manner dependent on the presence of the cofactor. PAP or PAPS binding to a single side of the dimer results in decreased backbone flexibility of both the bound and unbound subunits, implying the dimer subunits may not act independently. Further, binding of PAP to one subunit of the dimer and PAPS to the other caused increased flexibility in the subunit bound to the inactive cofactor (PAP). These results suggest SULT dimerization may be important in maintaining cofactor binding/release properties of SULTs and provide hypothetical explanations for SULT half-site reactivity and substrate inhibition, which can be analyzed in vitro. PMID:26236487

  17. Hydrogen bond induced HF elimination from photoionized fluorophenol dimers in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Piyali; Ghosh, Arup K; Chakraborty, Tapas

    2017-02-28

    In this paper, we report finding of a remarkable chemical effect of hydrogen bonding, elimination of hydrogen fluoride (HF) from the hydrogen bonded dimers of 2-fluorophenol (2-FP) and 3-fluorophenol (3-FP), in a supersonic jet expansion upon multi-photon ionization using 4th harmonic wavelength (266 nm) of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser, and the reaction has been probed by time-of-flight mass spectrometry. No HF elimination is observed to occur by such means from the monomer of 3-FP, but it occurs with a small yield from the monomer of 2-FP. On the other hand, upon dimerization the reaction is triggered on for 3-FP, and for 2-FP it becomes so facile that no intact dimer cation survives and only the HF eliminated product ion appears in the mass spectra. Electronic structure calculation shows that in the cationic ground (D0) state, although the reaction for 2-FP dimer is exothermic, the associated barrier is significantly high (2.75 eV) and for its occurrence, absorption of three photons (2+1 type) is required. However, the reaction is predicted barrierless in the intermediate S1 state of this dimer, and HF loss dimer cation mass peak could appear in the mass spectrum due to an effective two-photon (1+1) ionization process. In the case of 3-FP dimer, the energy barriers both in S1 (neutral) and D0 (ionic) states are high, and it is suggested that for occurrence of HF elimination, dimer cation needs to absorb an additional photon. For facilitation of HF loss from this dimer cation, a rearrangement of the geometry and formation of an intermediate adduct have been suggested, and it is argued that the latter could be produced by nucleophilic attack of the neutral moiety at the ortho site of the cationic counterpart.

  18. Spontaneous dimerization, critical lines, and short-range correlations in a frustrated spin-1 chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chepiga, Natalia; Affleck, Ian; Mila, Frédéric

    2016-11-01

    We report on a detailed investigation of the spin-1 J1-J2-J3 Heisenberg model, a frustrated model with nearest-neighbor coupling J1, next-nearest neighbor coupling J2, and a three-site interaction J3[(Si -1.Si) (Si.Si +1) +H .c . ] previously studied in [Phys. Rev. B 93, 241108(R) (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevB.93.241108]. Using density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) and exact diagonalizations, we show that the phase boundaries between the Haldane phase, the next-nearest neighbor Haldane phase, and the dimerized phase can be very accurately determined by combining the information deduced from the dimerization, the ground-state energy, the entanglement spectrum and the Berry phase. By a careful investigation of the finite-size spectrum, we also show that the transition between the next-nearest neighbor Haldane phase and the dimerized phase is in the Ising universality class all along the critical line. Furthermore, we justify the conformal embedding of the SU (2) 2 Wess-Zumino-Witten conformal field theory in terms of a boson and an Ising field, and we explicitly derive a number of consequences of this embedding for the spectrum along the SU (2) 2 transition line between the Haldane phase and the dimerized phase. We also show that the solitons along the first-order transition line between the Haldane phase and the dimerized phase carry a spin-1/2, while the domain walls between different dimerization domains inside the dimerized phase carry a spin 1. Finally, we show that short-range correlations change character in the Haldane and dimerized phases through disorder and Lifshitz lines, as well as through the development of short-range dimer correlations in the Haldane phase, leading to a remarkably rich phase diagram.

  19. Best Practices for Siting Solar Photovoltaics on Municipal Solid Waste Landfills. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Kiatreungwattana, K.; Mosey, G.; Jones-Johnson, S.; Dufficy, C.; Bourg, J.; Conroy, A.; Keenan, M.; Michaud, W.; Brown, K.

    2013-04-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory developed this best practices document to address common technical challenges for siting solar photovoltaics (PV) on municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills. The purpose of this document is to promote the use of MSW landfills for solar energy systems. Closed landfills and portions of active landfills with closed cells represent thousands of acres of property that may be suitable for siting solar photovoltaics (PV). These closed landfills may be suitable for near-term construction, making these sites strong candidate to take advantage of the 30% Federal Business Energy Investment Tax Credit. It was prepared in response to the increasing interest in siting renewable energy on landfills from solar developers; landfill owners; and federal, state, and local governments. It contains examples of solar PV projects on landfills and technical considerations and best practices that were gathered from examining the implementation of several of these projects.

  20. An MSC2 Promoter-lacZ Fusion Gene Reveals Zinc-Responsive Changes in Sites of Transcription Initiation That Occur across the Yeast Genome

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yi-Hsuan; Taggart, Janet; Song, Pamela Xiyao; MacDiarmid, Colin; Eide, David J.

    2016-01-01

    The Msc2 and Zrg17 proteins of Saccharomyces cerevisiae form a complex to transport zinc into the endoplasmic reticulum. ZRG17 is transcriptionally induced in zinc-limited cells by the Zap1 transcription factor. In this report, we show that MSC2 mRNA also increases (~1.5 fold) in zinc-limited cells. The MSC2 gene has two in-frame ATG codons at its 5’ end, ATG1 and ATG2; ATG2 is the predicted initiation codon. When the MSC2 promoter was fused at ATG2 to the lacZ gene, we found that unlike the chromosomal gene this reporter showed a 4-fold decrease in lacZ mRNA in zinc-limited cells. Surprisingly, β-galactosidase activity generated by this fusion gene increased ~7 fold during zinc deficiency suggesting the influence of post-transcriptional factors. Transcription of MSC2ATG2-lacZ was found to start upstream of ATG1 in zinc-replete cells. In zinc-limited cells, transcription initiation shifted to sites just upstream of ATG2. From the results of mutational and polysome profile analyses, we propose the following explanation for these effects. In zinc-replete cells, MSC2ATG2-lacZ mRNA with long 5’ UTRs fold into secondary structures that inhibit translation. In zinc-limited cells, transcripts with shorter unstructured 5’ UTRs are generated that are more efficiently translated. Surprisingly, chromosomal MSC2 did not show start site shifts in response to zinc status and only shorter 5’ UTRs were observed. However, the shifts that occur in the MSC2ATG2-lacZ construct led us to identify significant transcription start site changes affecting the expression of ~3% of all genes. Therefore, zinc status can profoundly alter transcription initiation across the yeast genome. PMID:27657924

  1. Initial field testing definition of subsurface sealing and backfilling tests in unsaturated tuff; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, J.A.; Case, J.B.; Tyburski, J.R.

    1993-05-01

    This report contains an initial definition of the field tests proposed for the Yucca Mountain Project repository sealing program. The tests are intended to resolve various performance and emplacement concerns. Examples of concerns to be addressed include achieving selected hydrologic and structural requirements for seals, removing portions of the shaft liner, excavating keyways, emplacing cementitious and earthen seals, reducing the impact of fines on the hydraulic conductivity of fractures, efficient grouting of fracture zones, sealing of exploratory boreholes, and controlling the flow of water by using engineered designs. Ten discrete tests are proposed to address these and other concerns. These tests are divided into two groups: Seal component tests and performance confirmation tests. The seal component tests are thorough small-scale in situ tests, the intermediate-scale borehole seal tests, the fracture grouting tests, the surface backfill tests, and the grouted rock mass tests. The seal system tests are the seepage control tests, the backfill tests, the bulkhead test in the Calico Hills unit, the large-scale shaft seal and shaft fill tests, and the remote borehole sealing tests. The tests are proposed to be performed in six discrete areas, including welded and non-welded environments, primarily located outside the potential repository area. The final selection of sealing tests will depend on the nature of the geologic and hydrologic conditions encountered during the development of the Exploratory Studies Facility and detailed numerical analyses. Tests are likely to be performed both before and after License Application.

  2. Improvement in the prediction of the translation initiation site through balancing methods, inclusion of acquired knowledge and addition of features to sequences of mRNA

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The accurate prediction of the initiation of translation in sequences of mRNA is an important activity for genome annotation. However, obtaining an accurate prediction is not always a simple task and can be modeled as a problem of classification between positive sequences (protein codifiers) and negative sequences (non-codifiers). The problem is highly imbalanced because each molecule of mRNA has a unique translation initiation site and various others that are not initiators. Therefore, this study focuses on the problem from the perspective of balancing classes and we present an undersampling balancing method, M-clus, which is based on clustering. The method also adds features to sequences and improves the performance of the classifier through the inclusion of knowledge obtained by the model, called InAKnow. Results Through this methodology, the measures of performance used (accuracy, sensitivity, specificity and adjusted accuracy) are greater than 93% for the Mus musculus and Rattus norvegicus organisms, and varied between 72.97% and 97.43% for the other organisms evaluated: Arabidopsis thaliana, Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila melanogaster, Homo sapiens, Nasonia vitripennis. The precision increases significantly by 39% and 22.9% for Mus musculus and Rattus norvegicus, respectively, when the knowledge obtained by the model is included. For the other organisms, the precision increases by between 37.10% and 59.49%. The inclusion of certain features during training, for example, the presence of ATG in the upstream region of the Translation Initiation Site, improves the rate of sensitivity by approximately 7%. Using the M-Clus balancing method generates a significant increase in the rate of sensitivity from 51.39% to 91.55% (Mus musculus) and from 47.45% to 88.09% (Rattus norvegicus). Conclusions In order to solve the problem of TIS prediction, the results indicate that the methodology proposed in this work is adequate, particularly when using the

  3. Exocyst SEC3 and Phosphoinositides Define Sites of Exocytosis in Pollen Tube Initiation and Growth1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Bloch, Daria; Pleskot, Roman; Vukašinović, Nemanja

    2016-01-01

    Polarized exocytosis is critical for pollen tube growth, but its localization and function are still under debate. The exocyst vesicle-tethering complex functions in polarized exocytosis. Here, we show that a sec3a exocyst subunit null mutant cannot be transmitted through the male gametophyte due to a defect in pollen tube growth. The green fluorescent protein (GFP)-SEC3a fusion protein is functional and accumulates at or proximal to the pollen tube tip plasma membrane. Partial complementation of sec3a resulted in the development of pollen with multiple tips, indicating that SEC3 is required to determine the site of pollen germination pore formation. Time-lapse imaging demonstrated that SEC3a and SEC8 were highly dynamic and that SEC3a localization on the apical plasma membrane predicts the direction of growth. At the tip, polar SEC3a domains coincided with cell wall deposition. Labeling of GFP-SEC3a-expressing pollen with the endocytic marker FM4-64 revealed the presence of subdomains on the apical membrane characterized by extensive exocytosis. In steady-state growing tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) pollen tubes, SEC3a displayed amino-terminal Pleckstrin homology-like domain (SEC3a-N)-dependent subapical membrane localization. In agreement, SEC3a-N interacted with phosphoinositides in vitro and colocalized with a phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) marker in pollen tubes. Correspondingly, molecular dynamics simulations indicated that SEC3a-N associates with the membrane by interacting with PIP2. However, the interaction with PIP2 is not required for polar localization and the function of SEC3a in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Taken together, our findings indicate that SEC3a is a critical determinant of polar exocytosis during tip growth and suggest differential regulation of the exocytotic machinery depending on pollen tube growth modes. PMID:27516531

  4. Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Solar Photovoltaics at the VAG Mine Site in Eden and Lowell, Vermont. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, J.; Mosey, G.

    2013-04-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in accordance with the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, selected the Vermont Asbestos Group (VAG) Mine site in Eden, Vermont, and Lowell, Vermont, for a feasibility study of renewable energy production. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) provided technical assistance for this project. The purpose of this report is to assess the site for a possible photovoltaic (PV) system installation and estimate the cost, performance, and site impacts of different PV options. In addition, the report recommends financing options that could assist in the implementation of a PV system at the site.

  5. Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Solar Photovoltaics at the Brisbane Baylands Brownfield Site in Brisbane, California. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Salasovich, J.; Geiger, J.; Healey, V.; Mosey, G.

    2013-04-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in accordance with the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, selected the Brisbane Baylands site in Brisbane, California, for a feasibility study of renewable energy production. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) provided technical assistance for this project. The purpose of this report is to assess the site for a possible photovoltaic (PV) system installation and estimate the cost, performance, and site impacts of different PV options. In addition, the report recommends financing options that could assist in the implementation of a PV system at the site.

  6. Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Solar Photovoltaics at the Former Bethlehem Steel Plant Brownfield Site in Lackawanna, New York. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Salasovich, J.; Geiger, J.; Mosey, G.; Healey, V.

    2013-04-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in accordance with the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, selected the Former Bethlehem Steel Plant site in Lackawanna, New York, for a feasibility study of renewable energy production. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) provided technical assistance for this project. The purpose of this report is to assess the site for a possible photovoltaic (PV) system installation and estimate the cost, performance, and site impacts of different PV options. In addition, the report recommends financing options that could assist in the implementation of a PV system at the site.

  7. Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Solar Photovoltaics at the Standard Chlorine of Delaware Superfund Site in Delaware City, Delaware. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Salasovich, J.; Geiger, J.; Mosey, G.; Healey, V.

    2013-06-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in accordance with the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, selected the Standard Chlorine of Delaware site in Delaware City, Delaware, for a feasibility study of renewable energy production. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) provided technical assistance for this project. The purpose of this report is to assess the site for a possible photovoltaic (PV) system installation and estimate the cost, performance, and site impacts of different PV options. In addition, the report recommends financing options that could assist in the implementation of a PV system at the site.

  8. Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Solar Photovoltaics at the Sky Park Landfill Site in Eau Claire, Wisconsin. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, J.; Mosey, G.

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in accordance with the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, selected the Sky Park Landfill site in Eau Claire, Wisconsin, for a feasibility study of renewable energy production. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) provided technical assistance for this project. The purpose of this report is to assess the site for a possible photovoltaic (PV) system installation and estimate the cost, performance, and site impacts of different PV options. In addition, the report recommends financing options that could assist in the implementation of a PV system at the site.

  9. Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Solar Photovoltaics at the Snohomish County Cathcart Landfill Site in Snohomish County, Washington. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Olis, D.; Salasovich, J.; Mosey, G.; Healey, V.

    2013-04-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in accordance with the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, selected the Snohomish County Cathcart Landfill Site in Snohomish County, Washington, for a feasibility study of renewable energy production. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) provided technical assistance for this project. The purpose of this report is to assess the site for a photovoltaic (PV) system installation and estimate the cost, performance, and site impacts of different PV options. In addition, the report recommends financing options that could assist in the implementation of a PV system at the site.

  10. Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Solar Photovoltaics at the TechCity East Campus Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Site in Kingston, New York. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Salasovich, J.; Geiger, J. W.; Mosey, G.; Healey, V.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in accordance with the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, selected the TechCity East Campus site in Kingston, New York, for a feasibility study of renewable energy production. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) provided technical assistance for this project. The purpose of this study is to assess the site for a possible photovoltaic (PV) system installation and estimate the cost, performance, and site impacts of different PV options. In addition, the report recommends financing options that could assist in the implementation of a PV system at the site.

  11. Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Geothermal Power Generation at the Lakeview Uranium Mill Site in Lakeview, Oregon. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Hillesheim, M.; Mosey, G.

    2013-11-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in accordance with the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, selected the Lakeview Uranium Mill site in Lakeview, Oregon, for a feasibility study of renewable energy production. The EPA contracted with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to provide technical assistance for the project. The purpose of this report is to describe an assessment of the site for possible development of a geothermal power generation facility and to estimate the cost, performance, and site impacts for the facility. In addition, the report recommends development pathways that could assist in the implementation of a geothermal power system at the site.

  12. Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Solar Photovoltaics at the Former Fort Ord Army Base Site in Marina, California. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Stoltenberg, B.; Konz, C.; Mosey, G.

    2013-05-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in accordance with the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, selected the Former Fort Ord Army Base (FOAB) site in Marina, California, for a feasibility study of renewable energy production. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) provided technical assistance for this project. The purpose of this report is to assess the site for a possible photovoltaic (PV) system installation and estimate the cost, performance, and site impacts of different PV options. In addition, the report recommends financing options that could assist in the implementation of a PV system at the site.

  13. Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Solar Photovoltaics at the Kerr McGee Site in Columbus, Mississippi. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, J.; Mosey, G.

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in accordance with the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, selected the Kerr McGee site in Columbus, Mississippi, for a feasibility study of renewable energy production. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) provided technical assistance for this project. The purpose of this report is to assess the site for a possible photovoltaic (PV) system installation and estimate the cost, performance, and site impacts of different PV options. In addition, the report recommends financing options that could assist in the implementation of a PV system at the site.

  14. Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Solar Photovoltaics at the Crazy Horse Landfill Site in Salinas, California. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Stoltenberg, B.; Konz, C.; Mosey, G.

    2013-03-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in accordance with the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, selected the Crazy Horse Landfill site in Salinas, California, for a feasibility study of renewable energy production. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) was contacted to provide technical assistance for this project. The purpose of this report is to assess the site for a possible photovoltaic (PV) system installation and estimate the cost, performance, operation and maintenance requirements, and site impacts of different PV options. In addition, the report recommends financing options that could assist in the implementation of a PV system at the site.

  15. Energetic Coupling between Ligand Binding and Dimerization in Escherichia coli Phosphoglycerate Mutase.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Nathan W; Monroe, Lyman K; Kihara, Daisuke; Park, Chiwook

    2016-03-29

    Energetic coupling of two molecular events in a protein molecule is ubiquitous in biochemical reactions mediated by proteins, such as catalysis and signal transduction. Here, we investigate energetic coupling between ligand binding and folding of a dimer using a model system that shows three-state equilibrium unfolding of an exceptional quality. The homodimeric Escherichia coli cofactor-dependent phosphoglycerate mutase (dPGM) was found to be stabilized by ATP in a proteome-wide screen, although dPGM does not require or utilize ATP for enzymatic function. We investigated the effect of ATP on the thermodynamic stability of dPGM using equilibrium unfolding. We found that, in the absence of ATP, dPGM populates a partially unfolded, monomeric intermediate during equilibrium unfolding. However, addition of 1.0 mM ATP drastically reduces the population of the intermediate by selectively stabilizing the native dimer. Using a computational ligand docking method, we predicted ATP binds to the active site of the enzyme using the triphosphate group. By performing equilibrium unfolding and isothermal titration calorimetry with active-site variants of dPGM, we confirmed that active-site residues are involved in ATP binding. Our findings show that ATP promotes dimerization of the protein by binding to the active site, which is distal from the dimer interface. This cooperativity suggests an energetic coupling between the active site and the dimer interface. We also propose a structural link to explain how ligand binding to the active site is energetically coupled with dimerization.

  16. Energetic Coupling between Ligand Binding and Dimerization in E. coli Phosphoglycerate Mutase

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Nathan W.; Monroe, Lyman K.; Kihara, Daisuke; Park, Chiwook

    2016-01-01

    Energetic coupling of two molecular events in a protein molecule is ubiquitous in biochemical reactions mediated by proteins, such as catalysis and signal transduction. Here, we investigate energetic coupling between ligand binding and folding of a dimer using a model system that shows three-state equilibrium unfolding in an exceptional quality. The homodimeric E. coli cofactor-dependent phosphoglycerate mutase (dPGM) was found to be stabilized by ATP in a proteome-wide screen, although dPGM does not require or utilize ATP for enzymatic function. We investigated the effect of ATP on the thermodynamic stability of dPGM using equilibrium unfolding. In the absence of ATP, dPGM populates a partially unfolded, monomeric intermediate during equilibrium unfolding. However, addition of 1.0 mM ATP drastically reduces the population of the intermediate by selectively stabilizing the native dimer. Using a computational ligand docking method, we predicted ATP binds to the active site of the enzyme using the triphosphate group. By performing equilibrium unfolding and isothermal titration calorimetry with active-site variants of dPGM, we confirmed that active-site residues are involved in ATP binding. Our findings show that ATP promotes dimerization of the protein by binding to the active site, which is distal from the dimer interface. This cooperativity suggests an energetic coupling between the active-site and the dimer interface. We also propose a structural link to explain how ligand binding to the active site is energetically coupled with dimerization. PMID:26919584

  17. Sequences downstream of the RNA initiation site regulate human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I basal gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Kashanchi, F; Duvall, J F; Lindholm, P F; Radonovich, M F; Brady, J N

    1993-01-01

    Sequences which control basal human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) transcription probably play an important role in initiation and maintenance of virus replication. We have identified and analyzed a 45-nucleotide sequence (downstream regulatory element 1 [DRE 1]) at the boundary of the R/U5 region of the long terminal repeat which is required for HTLV-I basal transcription. The basal promoter strength of constructs that contained deletions in the R/U5 region of the HTLV-I long terminal repeat were analyzed by chloramphenicol acetyltransferase assays following transfection of Jurkat T cells. We consistently observed a 10-fold decrease in basal promoter activity when sequences between +202 to +246 were deleted. By reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction RNA analysis, we confirmed that the drop in chloramphenicol acetyltransferase activity was paralleled by a decrease in the level of steady-state RNA. DRE 1 did not affect the level of Tax1 transactivation. Using a gel shift assay, we have purified a highly enriched fraction that could specifically bind DRE 1. This DNA affinity column fraction contained four detectable proteins on sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis: p37, p50, p60, and p100. The affinity column fraction stimulated HTLV-I transcription approximately 12-fold in vitro. No effect was observed with the human immunodeficiency virus or adenovirus major late promoters. Following renaturation of the proteins isolated from an SDS-containing gel, p37, but not the other protein fractions, was able to specifically bind to DRE 1. Images PMID:8474178

  18. An Initial Evaluation Of Characterization And Closure Options For Underground Pipelines Within A Hanford Site Single-Shell Tank Farm

    SciTech Connect

    Badden, Janet W.; Connelly, Michael P.; Seeley, Paul N.; Hendrickson, Michelle L.

    2013-01-10

    The Hanford Site includes 149 single-shell tanks, organized in 12 'tank farms,' with contents managed as high-level mixed waste. The Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order requires that one tank farm, the Waste Management Area C, be closed by June 30, 2019. A challenge to this project is the disposition and closure of Waste Management Area C underground pipelines. Waste Management Area C contains nearly seven miles of pipelines and 200 separate pipe segments. The pipelines were taken out of service decades ago and contain unknown volumes and concentrations of tank waste residuals from past operations. To understand the scope of activities that may be required for these pipelines, an evaluation was performed. The purpose of the evaluation was to identify what, if any, characterization methods and/or closure actions may be implemented at Waste Management Area C for closure of Waste Management Area C by 2019. Physical and analytical data do not exist for Waste Management Area C pipeline waste residuals. To develop estimates of residual volumes and inventories of contamination, an extensive search of available information on pipelines was conducted. The search included evaluating historical operation and occurrence records, physical attributes, schematics and drawings, and contaminant inventories associated with the process history of plutonium separations facilities and waste separations and stabilization operations. Scoping analyses of impacts to human health and the environment using three separate methodologies were then developed based on the waste residual estimates. All analyses resulted in preliminary assessments, indicating that pipeline waste residuals presented a comparably low long-term impact to groundwater with respect to soil, tank and other ancillary equipment residuals, but exceeded Washington State cleanup requirement values. In addition to performing the impact analyses, the assessment evaluated available sampling technologies and

  19. Vibrationally resolved emission of thiophosgene dimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berrios, Eduardo; Hui, Ho Yee; Gruebele, Martin

    2010-09-01

    During a study of thiophosgene electronic spectra, Fujiwara and co-workers observed a broad electronic transition peaked at 37 000 cm -1, attributed to thiophosgene dimer. Our dispersed fluorescence spectra of a thiophosgene molecular beam excited at 36 000 cm -1 reveal several vibrational modes too low in frequency for thiophosgene. We assign them to modes of thiophosgene dimer or their combination bands. MP2 calculations support the vibrational assignment. TD-DFT, CASSCF, and coupled cluster calculations suggest that the bright electronic state of thiophosgene dimer is the B 2u symmetry fifth excited singlet state. Two additional transitions are assigned to a thiophosgene synthesis impurity, trichloromethanesulfenyl chloride.

  20. Quantum dimer model for the pseudogap metal

    PubMed Central

    Punk, Matthias; Allais, Andrea; Sachdev, Subir

    2015-01-01

    We propose a quantum dimer model for the metallic state of the hole-doped cuprates at low hole density, p. The Hilbert space is spanned by spinless, neutral, bosonic dimers and spin S=1/2, charge +e fermionic dimers. The model realizes a “fractionalized Fermi liquid” with no symmetry breaking and small hole pocket Fermi surfaces enclosing a total area determined by p. Exact diagonalization, on lattices of sizes up to 8×8, shows anisotropic quasiparticle residue around the pocket Fermi surfaces. We discuss the relationship to experiments. PMID:26195771

  1. Quantum dimer model for the pseudogap metal.

    PubMed

    Punk, Matthias; Allais, Andrea; Sachdev, Subir

    2015-08-04

    We propose a quantum dimer model for the metallic state of the hole-doped cuprates at low hole density, p. The Hilbert space is spanned by spinless, neutral, bosonic dimers and spin S = 1/2, charge +e fermionic dimers. The model realizes a "fractionalized Fermi liquid" with no symmetry breaking and small hole pocket Fermi surfaces enclosing a total area determined by p. Exact diagonalization, on lattices of sizes up to 8 × 8, shows anisotropic quasiparticle residue around the pocket Fermi surfaces. We discuss the relationship to experiments.

  2. Multiple-charge transfer and trapping in DNA dimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tornow, Sabine; Bulla, Ralf; Anders, Frithjof B.; Zwicknagl, Gertrud

    2010-11-01

    We investigate the charge transfer characteristics of one and two excess charges in a DNA base-pair dimer using a model Hamiltonian approach. The electron part comprises diagonal and off-diagonal Coulomb matrix elements such a correlated hopping and the bond-bond interaction, which were recently calculated by Starikov [E. B. Starikov, Philos. Mag. Lett. 83, 699 (2003)10.1080/0950083031000151374] for different DNA dimers. The electronic degrees of freedom are coupled to an ohmic or a superohmic bath serving as dissipative environment. We employ the numerical renormalization group method in the nuclear tunneling regime and compare the results to Marcus theory for the thermal activation regime. For realistic parameters, the rate that at least one charge is transferred from the donor to the acceptor in the subspace of two excess electrons significantly exceeds the rate in the single charge sector. Moreover, the dynamics is strongly influenced by the Coulomb matrix elements. We find sequential and pair transfer as well as a regime where both charges remain self-trapped. The transfer rate reaches its maximum when the difference of the on-site and intersite Coulomb matrix element is equal to the reorganization energy which is the case in a guanine/cytosine (GC)-dimer. Charge transfer is completely suppressed for two excess electrons in adenine/thymine (AT)-dimer in an ohmic bath and replaced by damped coherent electron-pair oscillations in a superohmic bath. A finite bond-bond interaction W alters the transfer rate: it increases as function of W when the effective Coulomb repulsion exceeds the reorganization energy (inverted regime) and decreases for smaller Coulomb repulsion.

  3. Subunit interface mutants of rabbit muscle aldolase form active dimers.

    PubMed Central

    Beernink, P. T.; Tolan, D. R.

    1994-01-01

    We report the construction of subunit interface mutants of rabbit muscle aldolase A with altered quaternary structure. A mutation has been described that causes nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia and produces a thermolabile aldolase (Kishi H et al., 1987, Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 84:8623-8627). The disease arises from substitution of Gly for Asp-128, a residue at the subunit interface of human aldolase A. To elucidate the role of this residue in the highly homologous rabbit aldolase A, site-directed mutagenesis is used to replace Asp-128 with Gly, Ala, Asn, Gln, or Val. Rabbit aldolase D128G purified from Escherichia coli is found to be similar to human D128G by kinetic analysis, CD, and thermal inactivation assays. All of the mutant rabbit aldolases are similar to the wild-type rabbit enzyme in secondary structure and kinetic properties. In contrast, whereas the wild-type enzyme is a tetramer, chemical crosslinking and gel filtration indicate that a new dimeric species exists for the mutants. In sedimentation velocity experiments, the mutant enzymes as mixtures of dimer and tetramer at 4 degrees C. Sedimentation at 20 degrees C shows that the mutant enzymes are > 99.5% dimeric and, in the presence of substrate, that the dimeric species is active. Differential scanning calorimetry demonstrates that Tm values of the mutant enzymes are decreased by 12 degrees C compared to wild-type enzyme. The results indicate that Asp-128 is important for interface stability and suggest that 1 role of the quaternary structure of aldolase is to provide thermostability. PMID:7833800

  4. Theoretical investigation of structures and energetics of sodium adatom and its dimer on graphene: DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Gagandeep; Gupta, Shuchi; Rani, Pooja; Dharamvir, Keya

    2015-11-01

    Extensive ab initio calculations have been performed to study the energetics of a sodium (Na) atom and its dimer adsorbed on graphene using the SIESTA package Soler et al. (2002) [1] which works within a DFT(density functional theory)-GGA (generalized gradient approximation) pseudopotential framework. The adsorption energy, geometry, charge transfer, ionization potential and density of states (DOS), partial density states (PDOS) of adatom/dimer-graphene system have been calculated. After considering various sites for adsorption of Na on graphene, the center of a hexagonal ring of carbon atoms is found to be the preferred site of adsorption while the Na2 dimer prefers to rest parallel to the graphene sheet. We find insignificant energy differences among adsorption configurations involving different possible sites in parallel orientation, which implies high mobility of the dimer on the graphene sheet. We also notice only a slight distortion of the graphene sheet perpendicular to its plane upon adatom adsorption. However, some lateral displacements seen are more perceptible. Summary The adsorption energy, geometry, charge transfer, ionization potential and density of states (DOS) and PDOS of adatom/dimer-graphene system have been calculated using SIESTA package Soler et al. (2002) [1] which works within a DFT(density functional theory)-GGA (generalized gradient approximation) pseudopotential framework. Preferred site for adsorption of a sodium atom on graphene is the hollow site. For the Na dimer adsorption, we found that horizontal orientation is favored over the vertical one. From DOS plots, it is clear that graphene's states are nearly unaffected by the adsorption of Na adatom and Interaction between sodium and graphene is predominantly ionic

  5. Generalized Fibonacci Numbers and Dimer Statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, W. T.; Wu, F. Y.

    2003-04-01

    We establish new product identities involving the q-analogue of the Fibonacci numbers. We show that the identities lead to alternate expressions of generating functions for close-packed dimers on non-orientable surfaces.

  6. Generalized Fibonacci Numbers and Dimer Statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, W. T.; Wu, F. Y.

    We establish new product identities involving the q-analogue of the Fibonacci numbers. We show that the identities lead to alternate expressions of generating functions for close-packed dimers on non-orientable surfaces.

  7. The elongation factor RfaH and the initiation factor σ bind to the same site on the transcription elongation complex

    PubMed Central

    Sevostyanova, Anastasiya; Svetlov, Vladimir; Vassylyev, Dmitry G.; Artsimovitch, Irina

    2008-01-01

    RNA polymerase is a target for numerous regulatory events in all living cells. Recent studies identified a few “hot spots” on the surface of bacterial RNA polymerase that mediate its interactions with diverse accessory proteins. Prominent among these hot spots, the β′ subunit clamp helices serve as a major binding site for the initiation factor σ and for the elongation factor RfaH. Furthermore, the two proteins interact with the nontemplate DNA strand in transcription complexes and thus may interfere with each other's activity. We show that RfaH does not inhibit transcription initiation but, once recruited to RNA polymerase, abolishes σ-dependent pausing. We argue that this apparent competition is due to a steric exclusion of σ by RfaH that is stably bound to the nontemplate DNA and clamp helices, both of which are necessary for the σ recruitment to the transcription complex. Our findings highlight the key regulatory role played by the clamp helices during both initiation and elongation stages of transcription. PMID:18195372

  8. Synthesis and characterization of multi-active site grafting starch copolymer initiated by KMnO4 and HIO4/H2SO4 systems.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qiaoxia; Wang, Yanqing; Fan, Ya; Liu, Xiwen; Ren, Shenyong; Wen, Yuanzhen; Shen, Baojian

    2015-03-06

    A novel initiator system containing KMO4, HIO4, and H2SO4 for synthesizing grafting starch copolymers is reported. In this system, KMnO4 was used to oxidize the primary hydroxyl group to aldehyde group of glucose in the starch, and the formed aldehyde group reacted with Mn(4+), Mn(3+) to afford starch free radical. At the same time HIO4 perform as the oxidant to open the C2C3 bond of glucose ring in starch to form two more aldehyde groups, and then two more free radicals are generated. As a result one glucose unit could provide ultimately three active sites for starch grafting reaction. Graft copolymers with a higher grafting ratio and grafting efficiency could be obtained by using the composite initiation system than the KMnO4/H2SO4 initiation system. The grafting of polyacrylamide onto the corn starch backbone was confirmed by viscometry, elemental analysis, infrared spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy.

  9. Dimerization of Plant Defensin NaD1 Enhances Its Antifungal Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Lay, Fung T.; Mills, Grant D.; Poon, Ivan K. H.; Cowieson, Nathan P.; Kirby, Nigel; Baxter, Amy A.; van der Weerden, Nicole L.; Dogovski, Con; Perugini, Matthew A.; Anderson, Marilyn A.; Kvansakul, Marc; Hulett, Mark D.

    2012-01-01

    The plant defensin, NaD1, from the flowers of Nicotiana alata, is a member of a family of cationic peptides that displays growth inhibitory activity against several filamentous fungi, including Fusarium oxysporum. The antifungal activity of NaD1 has been attributed to its ability to permeabilize membranes; however, the molecular basis of this function remains poorly defined. In this study, we have solved the structure of NaD1 from two crystal forms to high resolution (1.4 and 1.58 Å, respectively), both of which contain NaD1 in a dimeric configuration. Using protein cross-linking experiments as well as small angle x-ray scattering analysis and analytical ultracentrifugation, we show that NaD1 forms dimers in solution. The structural studies identified Lys4 as critical in formation of the NaD1 dimer. This was confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis of Lys4 that resulted in substantially reduced dimer formation. Significantly, the reduced ability of the Lys4 mutant to dimerize correlated with diminished antifungal activity. These data demonstrate the importance of dimerization in NaD1 function and have implications for the use of defensins in agribiotechnology applications such as enhancing plant crop protection against fungal pathogens. PMID:22511788

  10. Role of Human DNA Polymerase kappa in Extension Opposite from a cis-syn Thymine Dimer

    SciTech Connect

    R Vasquez-Del Carpio; T Silverstein; S Lone; R Johnson; L Prakash; S Prakash; A Aggarwal

    2011-12-31

    Exposure of DNA to UV radiation causes covalent linkages between adjacent pyrimidines. The most common lesion found in DNA from these UV-induced linkages is the cis-syn cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer. Human DNA polymerase {Kappa} (Pol{Kappa}), a member of the Y-family of DNA polymerases, is unable to insert nucleotides opposite the 3'T of a cis-syn T-T dimer, but it can efficiently extend from a nucleotide inserted opposite the 3'T of the dimer by another DNA polymerase. We present here the structure of human Pol{Kappa} in the act of inserting a nucleotide opposite the 5'T of the cis-syn T-T dimer. The structure reveals a constrained active-site cleft that is unable to accommodate the 3'T of a cis-syn T-T dimer but is remarkably well adapted to accommodate the 5'T via Watson-Crick base pairing, in accord with a proposed role for Pol{Kappa} in the extension reaction opposite from cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers in vivo.

  11. Pfaffian Correlation Functions of Planar Dimer Covers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aizenman, Michael; Valcázar, Manuel Laínz; Warzel, Simone

    2017-01-01

    The Pfaffian structure of the boundary monomer correlation functions in the dimer-covering planar graph models is rederived through a combinatorial/topological argument. These functions are then extended into a larger family of order-disorder correlation functions which are shown to exhibit Pfaffian structure throughout the bulk. Key tools involve combinatorial switching symmetries which are identified through the loop-gas representation of the double dimer model, and topological implications of planarity.

  12. Role of Rydberg states in the photostability of heterocyclic dimers: the case of pyrazole dimer.

    PubMed

    Zilberg, Shmuel; Haas, Yehuda

    2012-11-26

    A new route for the nonradiative decay of photoexcited, H-bonded, nitrogen-containing, heterocyclic dimers is offered and exemplified by a study of the pyrazole dimer. In some of these systems the N(3s) Rydberg state is the lowest excited singlet state. This state is formed by direct light absorption or by nonradiative transition from the allowed ππ* state. An isomer of this Rydberg state is formed by H atom transfer to the other component of the dimer. The newly formed H-bonded radical pair is composed of two radicals (a H-adduct of pyrazole, a heterocyclic analogue of the NH(4) radical) and the pyrazolium π-radical. It is calculated to have a shallow local minimum and is the lowest point on the PES of the H-pyrazole/pyrazolium radical pair. This species can cross back to the ground state of the original dimer through a relatively small energy gap and compete with the H-atom loss channel, known for the monomer. In both Rydberg dimers, an electron occupies a Rydberg orbital centered mostly on one of the two components of the dimer. This Rydberg Center Shift (RCS) mechanism, proposed earlier (Zilberg, S.; Kahan, A.; Haas, Y. Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 2012, 14, 8836), leads to deactivation of the electronically excited dimer while keeping it intact. It, thus, may explain the high photostability of the pyrazole dimer as well as other heterocyclic dimers.

  13. Determination of pyrimidine dimers in Escherichia coli and Cryptosporidium parvum during UV light inactivation, photoreactivation, and dark repair.

    PubMed

    Oguma, K; Katayama, H; Mitani, H; Morita, S; Hirata, T; Ohgaki, S

    2001-10-01

    UV inactivation, photoreactivation, and dark repair of Escherichia coli and Cryptosporidium parvum were investigated with the endonuclease sensitive site (ESS) assay, which can determine UV-induced pyrimidine dimers in the genomic DNA of microorganisms. In a 99.9% inactivation of E. coli, high correlation was observed between the dose of UV irradiation and the number of pyrimidine dimers induced in the DNA of E. coli. The colony-forming ability of E. coli also correlated highly with the number of pyrimidine dimers in the DNA, indicating that the ESS assay is comparable to the method conventionally used to measure colony-forming ability. When E. coli were exposed to fluorescent light after a 99.9% inactivation by UV irradiation, UV-induced pyrimidine dimers in the DNA were continuously repaired and the colony-forming ability recovered gradually. When kept in darkness after the UV inactivation, however, E. coli showed neither repair of pyrimidine dimers nor recovery of colony-forming ability. When C. parvum were exposed to fluorescent light after UV inactivation, UV-induced pyrimidine dimers in the DNA were continuously repaired, while no recovery of animal infectivity was observed. When kept in darkness after UV inactivation, C. parvum also showed no recovery of infectivity in spite of the repair of pyrimidine dimers. It was suggested, therefore, that the infectivity of C. parvum would not recover either by photoreactivation or by dark repair even after the repair of pyrimidine dimers in the genomic DNA.

  14. Analysis by a highly sensitive split luciferase assay of the regions involved in APP dimerization and its impact on processing.

    PubMed

    Decock, Marie; El Haylani, Laetitia; Stanga, Serena; Dewachter, Ilse; Octave, Jean-Noël; Smith, Steven O; Constantinescu, Stefan N; Kienlen-Campard, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease that causes progressive loss of cognitive functions, leading to dementia. Two types of lesions are found in AD brains: neurofibrillary tangles and senile plaques. The latter are composed mainly of the β-amyloid peptide (Aβ) generated by amyloidogenic processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP). Several studies have suggested that dimerization of APP is closely linked to Aβ production. Nevertheless, the mechanisms controlling APP dimerization and their role in APP function are not known. Here we used a new luciferase complementation assay to analyze APP dimerization and unravel the involvement of its three major domains: the ectodomain, the transmembrane domain and the intracellular domain. Our results indicate that within cells full-length APP dimerizes more than its α and β C-terminal fragments, confirming the pivotal role of the ectodomain in this process. Dimerization of the APP transmembrane (TM) domain has been reported to regulate processing at the γ-cleavage site. We show that both non-familial and familial AD mutations in the TM GXXXG motifs strongly modulate Aβ production, but do not consistently change dimerization of the C-terminal fragments. Finally, we found for the first time that removal of intracellular domain strongly increases APP dimerization. Increased APP dimerization is linked to increased non-amyloidogenic processing.

  15. 21 CFR 176.120 - Alkyl ketene dimers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Alkyl ketene dimers. 176.120 Section 176.120 Food... Use Only as Components of Paper and Paperboard § 176.120 Alkyl ketene dimers. Alkyl ketene dimers may... section. (a) The alkyl ketene dimers are manufactured by the dehydrohalogenation of the acyl...

  16. 21 CFR 176.120 - Alkyl ketene dimers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Alkyl ketene dimers. 176.120 Section 176.120 Food... Use Only as Components of Paper and Paperboard § 176.120 Alkyl ketene dimers. Alkyl ketene dimers may... section. (a) The alkyl ketene dimers are manufactured by the dehydrohalogenation of the acyl...

  17. Dimerization of a Viral SET Protein Endows its Function

    SciTech Connect

    H Wei; M Zhou

    2011-12-31

    Histone modifications are regarded as the most indispensible phenomena in epigenetics. Of these modifications, lysine methylation is of the greatest complexity and importance as site- and state-specific lysine methylation exerts a plethora of effects on chromatin structure and gene transcription. Notably, paramecium bursaria chlorella viruses encode a conserved SET domain methyltransferase, termed vSET, that functions to suppress host transcription by methylating histone H3 at lysine 27 (H3K27), a mark for eukaryotic gene silencing. Unlike mammalian lysine methyltransferases (KMTs), vSET functions only as a dimer, but the underlying mechanism has remained elusive. In this study, we demonstrate that dimeric vSET operates with negative cooperativity between the two active sites and engages in H3K27 methylation one site at a time. New atomic structures of vSET in the free form and a ternary complex with S-adenosyl homocysteine and a histone H3 peptide and biochemical analyses reveal the molecular origin for the negative cooperativity and explain the substrate specificity of H3K27 methyltransferases. Our study suggests a 'walking' mechanism, by which vSET acts all by itself to globally methylate host H3K27, which is accomplished by the mammalian EZH2 KMT only in the context of the Polycomb repressive complex.

  18. Adsorption, Dissociation, and Dehydrogenation of Water Monomer and Water Dimer on the Smallest 3D Aluminum Particle. The O-H Dissociation Barrier Disappears for the Dimer.

    PubMed

    Moc, Jerzy

    2016-11-03

    We present a detailed mechanistic study on the interaction and reaction of water monomer and water dimer with the smallest 3D aluminum particle (Al6) by employing density functional and explicitly correlated coupled cluster CCSD(T)-F12 theories. Water adsorption, dissociation, and dehydrogenation are considered. For the monomer reaction, where core-valence correlation and an extrapolation to the complete basis set limit is allowed for, our coupled cluster calculations predict the O-H dissociation barrier of about 2 kcal/mol. For the dimer reaction, two distinct reaction paths are identified, initiated by forming separate dimer complexes wherein (H2O)2 adsorbs mainly via the oxygen atom of the donor H2O molecule. The key O-H dissociation transition states of the dimer reaction involve a concerted migration of two H atoms resulting in the dissociation of the donor molecule and formation of the OH-water complex adsorbed on the metal cluster's surface. The most remarkable feature of both dimer reaction energy profiles is the lack of the overall energy barrier for the (rate-determining) O-H dissociation. The hydrogen bond acceptor molecule is suggested to have an extra catalytic effect on the O-H dissociation barrier of the hydrogen bond donor molecule by removing this barrier. A similar effect on the dehydrogenation step is indicated.

  19. d-dimer testing as an adjunct to ultrasonography in patients with clinically suspected deep vein thrombosis: prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Bernardi, Enrico; Prandoni, Paolo; Lensing, Anthonie W A; Agnelli, Giancarlo; Guazzaloca, Giuliana; Scannapieco, Gianluigi; Piovella, Franco; Verlato, Fabio; Tomasi, Cristina; Moia, Marco; Scarano, Luigi; Girolami, Antonio

    1998-01-01

    Objective To investigate the efficacy of using a rapid plasma d-dimer test as an adjunct to compression ultrasound for diagnosing clinically suspected deep vein thrombosis. Design d-dimer concentrations were determined in all patients with a normal ultrasonogram at presentation. Repeat ultrasonography was performed 1 week later only in patients with abnormal d-dimer test results. Main outcome measure Patients with normal ultrasonograms were not treated with anticoagulants and were followed for 3 months for thromboembolic complications. Setting University research and affiliated centres. Subjects 946 patients with clinically suspected deep vein thrombosis. Results Ultrasonograms were abnormal at presentation in 260 (27.5%) patients. Of the remaining 686 patients tested for d-dimer, 88 (12.8%) had abnormal concentrations. During follow up venous thromboembolic complications occurred in one of the 598 patients who were not treated with anticoagulants and who had an initial normal ultrasonogram and d-dimer concentration, whereas thromboembolic complications occurred in two of the 83 untreated patients who had abnormal d-dimer concentrations but a normal repeat ultrasonogram. The cumulative incidence of venous thromboembolic complications during follow up was 0.4% (95% confidence interval 0% to 0.9%). The rapid plasma d-dimer test used as an adjunct to compression ultrasonography resulted in a reduction in the mean number of repeat ultrasound examinations and additional hospital visits from 0.7 to 0.1 per patient. Conclusions Testing for d-dimer as an adjunct to a normal baseline ultrasound examination decreased the number of subsequent ultrasound examinations considerably without any increased risk of venous thromboembolic complications in patients not receiving anticoagulants. The use of ultrasound and testing for d-dimer enabled treatment decisions to be made at the time of presentation in most patients. Key messagesPatients with clinically suspected deep vein

  20. Structure of a rabbit muscle fructose-1, 6-bisphosphate aldolase A dimer variant

    SciTech Connect

    Sherawat, Manashi; Tolan, Dean R.; Allen, Karen N.

    2008-05-01

    The X-ray crystallographic structure of a dimer variant of fructose-1, 6-bisphosphate aldolase demonstrates a stable oligomer that mirrors half of the native tetramer. The presence of product demonstrates that this is an active form. Fructose-1, 6-bisphosphate aldolase (aldolase) is an essential enzyme in glycolysis and gluconeogenesis. In addition to this primary function, aldolase is also known to bind to a variety of other proteins, a property that may allow it to perform ‘moonlighting’ roles in the cell. Although monomeric and dimeric aldolases possess full catalytic activity, the enzyme occurs as an unusually stable tetramer, suggesting a possible link between the oligomeric state and these noncatalytic cellular roles. Here, the first high-resolution X-ray crystal structure of rabbit muscle D128V aldolase, a dimeric form of aldolase mimicking the clinically important D128G mutation in humans associated with hemolytic anemia, is presented. The structure of the dimer was determined to 1.7 Å resolution with the product DHAP bound in the active site. The turnover of substrate to produce the product ligand demonstrates the retention of catalytic activity by the dimeric aldolase. The D128V mutation causes aldolase to lose intermolecular contacts with the neighboring subunit at one of the two interfaces of the tetramer. The tertiary structure of the dimer does not significantly differ from the structure of half of the tetramer. Analytical ultracentrifugation confirms the occurrence of the enzyme as a dimer in solution. The highly stable structure of aldolase with an independent active site is consistent with a model in which aldolase has evolved as a multimeric scaffold to perform other noncatalytic functions.

  1. Probing the HIV-1 genomic RNA trafficking pathway and dimerization by genetic recombination and single virion analyses.

    PubMed

    Moore, Michael D; Nikolaitchik, Olga A; Chen, Jianbo; Hammarskjöld, Marie-Louise; Rekosh, David; Hu, Wei-Shau

    2009-10-01

    Once transcribed, the nascent full-length RNA of HIV-1 must travel to the appropriate host cell sites to be translated or to find a partner RNA for copackaging to form newly generated viruses. In this report, we sought to delineate the location where HIV-1 RNA initiates dimerization and the influence of the RNA transport pathway used by the virus on downstream events essential to viral replication. Using a cell-fusion-dependent recombination assay, we demonstrate that the two RNAs destined for copackaging into the same virion select each other mostly within the cytoplasm. Moreover, by manipulating the RNA export element in the viral genome, we show that the export pathway taken is important for the ability of RNA molecules derived from two viruses to interact and be copackaged. These results further illustrate that at the point of dimerization the two main cellular export pathways are partially distinct. Lastly, by providing Gag in trans, we have demonstrated that Gag is able to package RNA from either export pathway, irrespective of the transport pathway used by the gag mRNA. These findings provide unique insights into the process of RNA export in general, and more specifically, of HIV-1 genomic RNA trafficking.

  2. Molecular theory of dielectric relaxation in nematic dimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stocchero, M.; Ferrarini, A.; Moro, G. J.; Dunmur, D. A.; Luckhurst, G. R.

    2004-10-01

    This paper reports a theory for the dielectric relaxation of dimeric mesogenic molecules in a nematic liquid crystal phase. Liquid crystal dimers consist of two mesogenic groups linked by a flexible chain. Recent experimental studies [D. A. Dunmur, G. R. Luckhurst, M. R. de la Fuente, S. Diez, and M. A. Perez Jubindo, J. Chem. Phys. 115, 8681 (2001)] of the dielectric properties of polar liquid crystal dimers have found unexpected results for both the static (low frequency) and variable frequency dielectric response of these materials. The theory developed in this paper provides a quantitative model with which to understand the observed experimental results. The mean-square dipole moments of α,ω-bis[(4-cyanobiphenyl-4'-yl]alkanes in a nematic phase have been calculated using both the rotational isomeric state model and a full torsional potential for the carbon-carbon bonds of the flexible chain. The orienting effect of the nematic phase is taken into account by a parametrized potential of mean torque acting on the mesogenic groups and the segments in the flexible chain. Results of calculations using the full torsional potential are in excellent agreement with experimental results for comparable systems. The probability density peq(βA,βB) for the orientation of the mesogenic groups (A,B) along the nematic director is also calculated. The resultant potential of mean torque is a surface characterized by four deep energy wells or sites equivalent to alignment of the terminal groups A and B approximately parallel and antiparallel to the director; of course, the reversal of the director leads to equivalent sites. This potential energy surface provides the basis for a kinetic model of dielectric relaxation in nematic dimers. Solution of the Fokker-Planck equation corresponding to this four-site model gives the time dependence of the site populations, and hence the time-correlation functions for the total dipole moment along the director. In this model the end

  3. Cross-talk between free and bound spermatozoa to modulate initial sperm:egg ratios at the site of fertilization in the mammalian oviduct.

    PubMed

    Hunter, R H F; Gadea, J

    2014-08-01

    This essay proposes that highly localized communication between free and bound spermatozoa in the caudal portion of the oviduct acts to regulate the numbers detaching from the epithelium and progressing to the site of fertilization close to the time of ovulation. Low initial sperm:egg ratios are essential for monospermic fertilization. Liberation of surface macromolecules and metabolic prompting from activated spermatozoa, together with altered patterns of sperm movement and dynamic differences in intracellular Ca(2+) ion status between neighboring sperm cells, would influence the progressive release of spermatozoa from the reservoir in the oviduct isthmus. Different intensities of preovulatory epithelial binding, reflecting a range of states in the sperm surface membranes and associated proteins, would provide a further explanation for a chronologically staggered periovulatory detachment of spermatozoa. Intimate sperm-sperm interactions within the confines of the oviduct isthmus offer a sensitive means of fine-tuning the vanguard of competent male gametes reaching the isthmo-ampullary junction.

  4. Effects of rotation on the nonlinear friction of a damped dimer sliding on a periodic substrate.

    PubMed

    Neide, I G; Kenkre, V M; Gonçalves, S

    2010-10-01

    Rotational effects on the nonlinear sliding friction of a damped dimer moving over a substrate are studied within a largely one-dimensional model. The model consists of two masses connected rigidly, internally damped, and sliding over a sinusoidal (substrate) potential while being free to rotate in the plane containing the masses and the direction of sliding. Numerical simulations of the dynamics performed by throwing the dimer with an initial center of mass velocity along the substrate direction show a richness of phenomena including the appearance of three separate regimes of motion. The orientation of the dimer performs tiny oscillations around values that are essentially constant in each regime. The constant orientations form an intricate pattern determined by the ratio of the dimer length to the substrate wavelength as well as by the initial orientations chosen. Corresponding evolution of the center of mass velocity consists, respectively, of regular oscillations in the first and the third regimes, but a power law decay in the second regime; the center of mass motion is effectively damped in this regime because of the coupling to the rotation. Depending on the initial orientation of the dimer, there is considerable variation in the overall behavior. For small initial angles to the vertical, an interesting formal connection can be established to earlier results known in the literature for a vibrating, rather than rotating, dimer. But for large angles, on which we focus in the present paper, quite different evolution occurs. Some of the numerical observations are explained successfully on the basis of approximate analytical arguments but others pose puzzling problems.

  5. D-dimer is not elevated in asymptomatic high altitude climbers after descent to 5340 m: the Mount Everest Deep Venous Thrombosis Study (Ev-DVT).

    PubMed

    Zafren, Ken; Feldman, Joanne; Becker, Robert J; Williams, Sarah R; Weiss, Eric A; Deloughery, Tom

    2011-01-01

    We performed this study to determine the prevalence of elevated D-dimer, a marker for deep venous thrombosis (DVT), in asymptomatic high altitude climbers. On-site personnel enrolled a convenience sample of climbers at Mt. Everest Base Camp (Nepal), elevation 5340 m (17,500 ft), during a single spring climbing season. Subjects were enrolled after descent to base camp from higher elevation. The subjects completed a questionnaire to evaluate their risk factors for DVT. We then performed a D-dimer test in asymptomatic individuals. If the D-dimer test was negative, DVT was considered ruled out. Ultrasound was available to perform lower-extremity compression ultrasounds to evaluate for DVT in case the D-dimer was positive. We enrolled 76 high altitude climbers. None had a positive D-dimer test. The absence of positive D-dimer tests suggests a low prevalence of DVT in asymptomatic high altitude climbers.

  6. Dimerization and DNA recognition rules of mithramycin and its analogues

    PubMed Central

    Weidenbach, Stevi; Hou, Caixia; Chen, Jhong-Min; Tsodikov, Oleg V.; Rohr, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    The antineoplastic and antibiotic natural product mithramycin (MTM) is used against cancer-related hypercalcemia and, experimentally, against Ewing sarcoma and lung cancers. MTM exerts its cytotoxic effect by binding DNA as a divalent metal ion (Me2+)-coordinated dimer and disrupting the function of transcription factors. A precise molecular mechanism of action of MTM, needed to develop MTM analogues selective against desired transcription factors, is lacking. Although it is known that MTM binds G/C-rich DNA, the exact DNA recognition rules that would allow one to map MTM binding sites remain incompletely understood. Towards this goal, we quantitatively investigated dimerization of MTM and several of its analogues, MTM SDK (for Short side chain, DiKeto), MTM SA-Trp (for Short side chain and Acid), MTM SA-Ala, and a biosynthetic precursor premithramycin B (PreMTM B), and measured the binding affinities of these molecules to DNA oligomers of different sequences and structural forms at physiological salt concentrations. We show that MTM and its analogues form stable dimers even in the absence of DNA. All molecules, except for PreMTM B, can bind DNA with the following rank order of affinities (strong to weak): MTM = MTM SDK > MTM SA-Trp > MTM SA-Ala. An X(G/C)(G/C)X motif, where X is any base, is necessary and sufficient for MTM binding to DNA, without a strong dependence on DNA conformation. These recognition rules will aid in mapping MTM sites across different promoters towards development of MTM analogues as useful anticancer agents. PMID:26760230

  7. Evaluation of the boron tolerant grass, Puccinellia distans, as an initial vegetative cover for the Phytorestoration of a boron-contaminated mining site in Southern California.

    PubMed

    Stiles, Amanda R; Liu, Chunguang; Kayama, Yuriko; Wong, Josephine; Doner, Harvey; Funston, Roger; Terry, Norman

    2011-10-15

    Land damaged by boron (B) mining should be restored to its natural state with a zero net impact on biodiversity. In an earlier study (Environ. Sci. Technol.2010,44, 7089-7095), we characterized a Turkish ecotype of the grass, Puccinellia distans, which exhibited extreme tolerance to B. Here we evaluated the use of a US ecotype of P. distans as an initial vegetative cover for the phytorestoration of a B mine in southern California. Hydroponic studies revealed that this P. distans ecotype tolerated B concentrations >100 mg B/L and could be germinated and grown in B-contaminated soils taken from the sites to be restored. P. distans grew well in moderately B-contaminated soil (∼88 mg B/L saturated extract) amended with added organic matter (peat moss); other soil treatments such as gypsum addition or pH correction were not needed. P. distans also grew in severely B-contaminated soil (∼1506 mg B/L) provided that toxic levels of soil B were diluted by the addition of sand and/or organic matter. Our results provide evidence in support of the concept of using the US ecotype of P. distans as an initial vegetative cover for the phytorestoration of B-contaminated soil.

  8. UV light-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers are mutagenic in mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Protic-Sabljic, M.; Tuteja, N.; Munson, P.J.; Hauser, J.; Kraemer, K.H.; Dixon, K.

    1986-10-01

    We used a simian virus 40-based shuttle vector plasmid, pZ189, to determine the role of pyrimidine cyclobutane dimers in UV light-induced mutagenesis in monkey cells. The vector DNA was UV irradiated and then introduced into monkey cells by transfection. After replication, vector DNA was recovered from the cells and tested for mutations in its supF suppressor tRNA marker gene by transformation of Escherichia coli carrying a nonsense mutation in the beta-galactosidase gene. When the irradiated vector was treated with E. coli photolyase prior to transfection, pyrimidine cyclobutane dimers were removed selectively. Removal of approximately 90% of the pyrimidine cyclobutane dimers increased the biological activity of the vector by 75% and reduced its mutation frequency by 80%. Sequence analysis of 72 mutants recovered indicated that there were significantly fewer tandem double-base changes and G X C----A X T transitions (particularly at CC sites) after photoreactivation of the DNA. UV-induced photoproducts remained (although at greatly reduced levels) at all pyr-pyr sites after photoreactivation, but there was a relative increase in photoproducts at CC and TC sites and a relative decrease at TT and CT sites, presumably due to a persistence of (6-4) photoproducts at some CC and TC sites. These observations are consistent with the fact that mutations were found after photoreactivation at many sites at which only cyclobutane dimers would be expected to occur. From these results we conclude that UV-induced pyrimidine cyclobutane dimers are mutagenic in DNA replicated in monkey cells.

  9. Atomic resolution crystal structure of VcLMWPTP-1 from Vibrio cholerae O395: Insights into a novel mode of dimerization in the low molecular weight protein tyrosine phosphatase family

    SciTech Connect

    Nath, Seema; Banerjee, Ramanuj; Sen, Udayaditya

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • VcLMWPTP-1 forms dimer in solution. • The dimer is catalytically active unlike other reported dimeric LMWPTPs. • The formation of extended dimeric surface excludes the active site pocket. • The surface bears closer resemblance to eukaryotic LMWPTPs. - Abstract: Low molecular weight protein tyrosine phosphatase (LMWPTP) is a group of phosphotyrosine phosphatase ubiquitously found in a wide range of organisms ranging from bacteria to mammals. Dimerization in the LMWPTP family has been reported earlier which follows a common mechanism involving active site residues leading to an enzymatically inactive species. Here we report a novel form of dimerization in a LMWPTP from Vibrio cholera 0395 (VcLMWPTP-1). Studies in solution reveal the existence of the dimer in solution while kinetic study depicts the active form of the enzyme. This indicates that the mode of dimerization in VcLMWPTP-1 is different from others where active site residues are not involved in the process. A high resolution (1.45 Å) crystal structure of VcLMWPTP-1 confirms a different mode of dimerization where the active site is catalytically accessible as evident by a tightly bound substrate mimicking ligand, MOPS at the active site pocket. Although being a member of a prokaryotic protein family, VcLMWPTP-1 structure resembles very closely to LMWPTP from a eukaryote, Entamoeba histolytica. It also delineates the diverse surface properties around the active site of the enzyme.

  10. Multiply charged monopoles in cubic dimer model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesh Jaya, Sreejith; Powell, Stephen

    2015-03-01

    The classical cubic dimer model is a 3D statistical mechanical system whose degrees of freedom are dimers that occupy the edges between nearest neighbour vertices of a cubic lattice. Dimer occupancies are subject to the local constraint that every vertex is associated with exactly one dimer. In the presence of an aligning interaction, it is known that the system exhibits an unconventional continuous thermal phase transition from a symmetry broken columnar phase to a Coulomb-phase. The transition is in the NCCP1 universality class, which also describes the Neel-VBS transition in the JQ model and the S =1/2 Heisenberg model with suppression of hedgehog defects. Using Monte-Carlo simulations of a pair of defects in a background of fluctuating dimers, we calculate the scaling exponents for fugacities of monopole defects of charge Q = 2 and 3 at this critical point. Our estimates suggest that Q = 3 monopoles are relevant and could therefore drive the JQ model away from the NCCP1 critical point on a hexagonal lattice.

  11. A dimeric state for PRC2

    PubMed Central

    Davidovich, Chen; Goodrich, Karen J.; Gooding, Anne R.; Cech, Thomas R.

    2014-01-01

    Polycomb repressive complex-2 (PRC2) is a histone methyltransferase required for epigenetic silencing during development and cancer. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) can recruit PRC2 to chromatin. Previous studies identified PRC2 subunits in a complex with the apparent molecular weight of a dimer, which might be accounted for by the incorporation of additional protein subunits or RNA rather than PRC2 dimerization. Here we show that reconstituted human PRC2 is in fact a dimer, using multiple independent approaches including analytical size exclusion chromatography (SEC), SEC combined with multi-angle light scattering and co-immunoprecipitation of differentially tagged subunits. Even though it contains at least two RNA-binding subunits, each PRC2 dimer binds only one RNA molecule. Yet, multiple PRC2 dimers bind a single RNA molecule cooperatively. These observations suggest a model in which the first RNA binding event promotes the recruitment of multiple PRC2 complexes to chromatin, thereby nucleating repression. PMID:24992961

  12. The diamagnetic susceptibility of the tubulin dimer.

    PubMed

    Bras, Wim; Torbet, James; Diakun, Gregory P; Rikken, Geert L J A; Diaz, J Fernando

    2014-01-01

    An approximate value of the diamagnetic anisotropy of the tubulin dimer, Δχ dimer, has been determined assuming axial symmetry and that only the α -helices and β -sheets contribute to the anisotropy. Two approaches have been utilized: (a) using the value for the Δχ α for an α -helical peptide bond given by Pauling (1979) and (b) using the previously determined anisotropy of fibrinogen as a calibration standard. The Δχ dimer ≈ 4 × 10(-27) JT(-2) obtained from these measurements are similar to within 20%. Although Cotton-Mouton measurements alone cannot be used to estimate Δχ directly, the value we measured, CMdimer = (1.41 ± 0.03) × 10(-8) T(-2)cm(2)mg(-1), is consistent with the above estimate for Δχ dimer. The method utilized for the determination of the tubulin dimer diamagnetic susceptibility is applicable to other proteins and macromolecular assemblies as well.

  13. Linking in domain-swapped protein dimers

    PubMed Central

    Baiesi, Marco; Orlandini, Enzo; Trovato, Antonio; Seno, Flavio

    2016-01-01

    The presence of knots has been observed in a small fraction of single-domain proteins and related to their thermodynamic and kinetic properties. The exchanging of identical structural elements, typical of domain-swapped proteins, makes such dimers suitable candidates to validate the possibility that mutual entanglement between chains may play a similar role for protein complexes. We suggest that such entanglement is captured by the linking number. This represents, for two closed curves, the number of times that each curve winds around the other. We show that closing the curves is not necessary, as a novel parameter G′, termed Gaussian entanglement, is strongly correlated with the linking number. Based on 110 non redundant domain-swapped dimers, our analysis evidences a high fraction of chains with a significant intertwining, that is with |G′| > 1. We report that Nature promotes configurations with negative mutual entanglement and surprisingly, it seems to suppress intertwining in long protein dimers. Supported by numerical simulations of dimer dissociation, our results provide a novel topology-based classification of protein-swapped dimers together with some preliminary evidence of its impact on their physical and biological properties. PMID:27659606

  14. Effects of Cd{sup 2+} on cis-dimer structure of E-cadherin in living cells

    SciTech Connect

    Takeda, Hiroshi

    2014-02-21

    Highlights: • The effects of Cd on the dimer of cadherin in living cells was analyzed. • Cd induced cadherin dimer formation was not detected in living cell with low Ca. • Ca mediated structural cooperativity and allostery in the native cadherin. • Ca concentration-dependent competitive displacement of Cd from cadherin is proposed. - Abstract: E-cadherin, a calcium (Ca{sup 2+})-dependent cell–cell adhesion molecule, plays a key role in the maintenance of tissue integrity. We have previously demonstrated that E-cadherin functions in vivo as a cis-dimer through chemical cross-linking reagents. Ca{sup 2+} plays an important role in the cis-dimer formation of cadherin. However, the molecular mechanisms by which Ca{sup 2+} interacts with the binding sites that regulate cis-dimer structures have not been completely elucidated. As expected for a Ca{sup 2+} antagonist, cadmium (Cd{sup 2+}) disrupts cadherin function by displacing Ca{sup 2+} from its binding sites on the cadherin molecules. We used Cd{sup 2+} as a probe for investigating the role of Ca{sup 2+} in the dynamics of the E-cadherin extracellular region that involve cis-dimer formation and adhesion. While cell–cell adhesion assembly was completely disrupted in the presence of Cd{sup 2+}, the amount of cis-dimers of E-cadherin that formed at the cell surface was not affected. In our “Cd{sup 2+}-switch” experiments, we did not find that Cd{sup 2+}-induced E-cadherin cis-dimer formation in EL cells when they were incubated in low-Ca{sup 2+} medium. In the present study, we demonstrated for the first time the effects of Cd{sup 2+} on the cis-dimer structure of E-cadherin in living cells using a chemical cross-link analysis.

  15. Biochemical, Mutational and In Silico Structural Evidence for a Functional Dimeric Form of the Ornithine Decarboxylase from Entamoeba histolytica

    PubMed Central

    Preeti; Tapas, Satya; Kumar, Pravindra; Madhubala, Rentala; Tomar, Shailly

    2012-01-01

    Background Entamoeba histolytica is responsible for causing amoebiasis. Polyamine biosynthesis pathway enzymes are potential drug targets in parasitic protozoan diseases. The first and rate-limiting step of this pathway is catalyzed by ornithine decarboxylase (ODC). ODC enzyme functions as an obligate dimer. However, partially purified ODC from E. histolytica (EhODC) is reported to exist in a pentameric state. Methodology and Results In present study, the oligomeric state of EhODC was re-investigated. The enzyme was over-expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. Pure protein was used for determination of secondary structure content using circular dichroism spectroscopy. The percentages of α-helix, β-sheets and random coils in EhODC were estimated to be 39%, 25% and 36% respectively. Size-exclusion chromatography and mass spectrophotometry analysis revealed that EhODC enzyme exists in dimeric form. Further, computational model of EhODC dimer was generated. The homodimer contains two separate active sites at the dimer interface with Lys57 and Cys334 residues of opposite monomers contributing to each active site. Molecular dynamic simulations were performed and the dimeric structure was found to be very stable with RMSD value ∼0.327 nm. To gain insight into the functional role, the interface residues critical for dimerization and active site formation were identified and mutated. Mutation of Lys57Ala or Cys334Ala completely abolished enzyme activity. Interestingly, partial restoration of the enzyme activity was observed when inactive Lys57Ala and Cys334Ala mutants were mixed confirming that the dimer is the active form. Furthermore, Gly361Tyr and Lys157Ala mutations at the dimer interface were found to abolish the enzyme activity and destabilize the dimer. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first report which demonstrates that EhODC is functional in the dimeric form. These findings and availability of 3D structure model of EhODC dimer opens up

  16. Effects of microinjected photoreactivating enzyme on thymine dimer removal and DNA repair synthesis in normal human and xeroderma pigmentosum fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Roza, L.; Vermeulen, W.; Bergen Henegouwen, J.B.; Eker, A.P.; Jaspers, N.G.; Lohman, P.H.; Hoeijmakers, J.H. )

    1990-03-15

    UV-induced thymine dimers (10 J/m2 of UV-C) were assayed in normal human and xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) fibroblasts with a monoclonal antibody against these dimers and quantitative fluorescence microscopy. In repair-proficient cells dimer-specific immunofluorescence gradually decreased with time, reaching about 25% of the initial fluorescence after 27 h. Rapid disappearance of dimers was observed in cells which had been microinjected with yeast photoreactivating enzyme prior to UV irradiation. This photoreactivation (PHR) was light dependent and (virtually) complete within 15 min of PHR illumination. In general, PHR of dimers strongly reduces UV-induced unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS). However, when PHR was applied immediately after UV irradiation, UDS remained unchanged initially; the decrease set in only after 30 min. When PHR was performed 2 h after UV exposure, UDS dropped without delay. An explanation for this difference is preferential removal of some type(s) of nondimer lesions, which is responsible for the PHR-resistant UDS immediately following UV irradiation. After the rapid removal of these photoproducts, the bulk of UDS is due to dimer repair. From the rapid effect of dimer removal by PHR on UDS it can be deduced that the excision of dimers up to the repair synthesis step takes considerably less than 30 min. Also in XP fibroblasts of various complementation groups the effect of PHR was investigated. The immunochemical dimer assay showed rapid PHR-dependent removal comparable to that in normal cells. However, the decrease of (residual) UDS due to PHR was absent (in XP-D) or much delayed (in XP-A and -E) compared to normal cells. This supports the idea that in these XP cells preferential repair of nondimer lesions does occur, but at a much lower rate.

  17. Partition-DFT on the water dimer.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Sara; Nafziger, Jonathan; Restrepo, Albeiro; Wasserman, Adam

    2017-02-21

    As is well known, the ground-state symmetry group of the water dimer switches from its equilibrium Cs-character to C2h-character as the distance between the two oxygen atoms of the dimer decreases below RO-O∼2.5 Å. For a range of RO-O between 1 and 5 Å, and for both symmetries, we apply Partition Density Functional Theory (PDFT) to find the unique monomer densities that sum to the correct dimer densities while minimizing the sum of the monomer energies. We calculate the work involved in deforming the isolated monomer densities and find that it is slightly larger for the Cs geometry for all RO-O. We discuss how the PDFT densities and the corresponding partition potentials support the orbital-interaction picture of hydrogen-bond formation.

  18. Slab photonic crystals with dimer colloid bases

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Erin K.; Liddell Watson, Chekesha M.

    2014-06-14

    The photonic band gap properties for centered rectangular monolayers of asymmetric dimers are reported. Colloids in suspension have been organized into the phase under confinement. The theoretical model is inspired by the range of asymmetric dimers synthesized via seeded emulsion polymerization and explores, in particular, the band structures as a function of degree of lobe symmetry and degree of lobe fusion. These parameters are varied incrementally from spheres to lobe-tangent dimers over morphologies yielding physically realizable particles. The work addresses the relative scarcity of theoretical studies on photonic crystal slabs with vertical variation that is consistent with colloidal self-assembly. Odd, even and polarization independent gaps in the guided modes are determined for direct slab structures. A wide range of lobe symmetry and degree of lobe fusion combinations having Brillouin zones with moderate to high isotropy support gaps between odd mode band indices 3-4 and even mode band indices 1-2 and 2-3.

  19. Structure of dimeric, recombinant Sulfolobus solfataricus phosphoribosyl diphosphate synthase: a bent dimer defining the adenine specificity of the substrate ATP.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Rune W; Leggio, Leila Lo; Hove-Jensen, Bjarne; Kadziola, Anders

    2015-03-01

    The enzyme 5-phosphoribosyl-1-α-diphosphate (PRPP) synthase (EC 2.7.6.1) catalyses the Mg(2+)-dependent transfer of a diphosphoryl group from ATP to the C1 hydroxyl group of ribose 5-phosphate resulting in the production of PRPP and AMP. A nucleotide sequence specifying Sulfolobus solfataricus PRPP synthase was synthesised in vitro with optimised codon usage for expression in Escherichia coli. Following expression of the gene in E. coli PRPP synthase was purified by heat treatment and ammonium sulphate precipitation and the structure of S. solfataricus PRPP synthase was determined at 2.8 Å resolution. A bent dimer oligomerisation was revealed, which seems to be an abundant feature among PRPP synthases for defining the adenine specificity of the substrate ATP. Molecular replacement was used to determine the S. solfataricus PRPP synthase structure with a monomer subunit of Methanocaldococcus jannaschii PRPP synthase as a search model. The two amino acid sequences share 35 % identity. The resulting asymmetric unit consists of three separated dimers. The protein was co-crystallised in the presence of AMP and ribose 5-phosphate, but in the electron density map of the active site only AMP and a sulphate ion were observed. Sulphate ion, reminiscent of the ammonium sulphate precipitation step of the purification, seems to bind tightly and, therefore, presumably occupies and blocks the ribose 5-phosphate binding site. The activity of S. solfataricus PRPP synthase is independent of phosphate ion.

  20. Graded-index optical dimer formed by optical force.

    PubMed

    Akbarzadeh, Alireza; Koschny, Thomas; Kafesaki, Maria; Economou, Eleftherios N; Soukoulis, Costas M

    2016-05-30

    We propose an optical dimer formed from two spherical lenses bound by the pressure that light exerts on matter. With the help of the method of force tracing, we find the required graded-index profiles of the lenses for the existence of the dimer. We study the dynamics of the opto-mechanical interaction of lenses under the illumination of collimated light beams and quantitatively validate the performance of proposed dimer. We also examine the stability of dimer due to the lateral misalignments and we show how restoring forces bring the dimer into lateral equilibrium. The dimer can be employed in various practical applications such as optical manipulation, sensing and imaging.

  1. Orphan nuclear receptor NGFI-B forms dimers with nonclassical interface

    PubMed Central

    Calgaro, Marcos R.; Neto, Mario de Oliveira; Figueira, Ana Carolina M.; Santos, Maria A.M.; Portugal, Rodrigo V.; Guzzi, Carolina A.; Saidemberg, Daniel M.; Bleicher, Lucas; Vernal, Javier; Fernandez, Pablo; Terenzi, Hernán; Palma, Mario Sergio; Polikarpov, Igor

    2007-01-01

    The orphan receptor nerve growth factor-induced B (NGFI-B) is a member of the nuclear receptor's subfamily 4A (Nr4a). NGFI-B was shown to be capable of binding both as a monomer to an extended half-site containing a single AAAGGTCA motif and also as a homodimer to a widely separated everted repeat, as opposed to a large number of nuclear receptors that recognize and bind specific DNA sequences predominantly as homo- and/or heterodimers. To unveil the structural organization of NGFI-B in solution, we determined the quaternary structure of the NGFI-B LBD by a combination of ab initio procedures from small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) data and hydrogen–deuterium exchange followed by mass spectrometry. Here we report that the protein forms dimers in solution with a radius of gyration of 2.9 nm and maximum dimension of 9.0 nm. We also show that the NGFI-B LBD dimer is V-shaped, with the opening angle significantly larger than that of classical dimer's exemplified by estrogen receptor (ER) or retinoid X receptor (RXR). Surprisingly, NGFI-B dimers formation does not occur via the classical nuclear receptor dimerization interface exemplified by ER and RXR, but instead, involves an extended surface area composed of the loop between helices 3 and 4 and C-terminal fraction of the helix 3. Remarkably, the NGFI-B dimer interface is similar to the dimerization interface earlier revealed for glucocorticoid nuclear receptor (GR), which might be relevant to the recognition of cognate DNA response elements by NGFI-B and to antagonism of NGFI-B–dependent transcription exercised by GR in cells. PMID:17600153

  2. Mutation of Asn28 Disrupts the Dimerization and Enzymatic Activity of SARS 3CL

    SciTech Connect

    Barrila, J.; Gabelli, S; Bacha, U; Amzel, M; Freire, E

    2010-01-01

    Coronaviruses are responsible for a significant proportion of annual respiratory and enteric infections in humans and other mammals. The most prominent of these viruses is the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) which causes acute respiratory and gastrointestinal infection in humans. The coronavirus main protease, 3CL{sup pro}, is a key target for broad-spectrum antiviral development because of its critical role in viral maturation and high degree of structural conservation among coronaviruses. Dimerization is an indispensable requirement for the function of SARS 3CL{sup pro} and is regulated through mechanisms involving both direct and long-range interactions in the enzyme. While many of the binding interactions at the dimerization interface have been extensively studied, those that are important for long-range control are not well-understood. Characterization of these dimerization mechanisms is important for the structure-based design of new treatments targeting coronavirus-based infections. Here we report that Asn28, a residue 11 {angstrom} from the closest residue in the opposing monomer, is essential for the enzymatic activity and dimerization of SARS 3CLpro. Mutation of this residue to alanine almost completely inactivates the enzyme and results in a 19.2-fold decrease in the dimerization K{sub d}. The crystallographic structure of the N28A mutant determined at 2.35 {angstrom} resolution reveals the critical role of Asn28 in maintaining the structural integrity of the active site and in orienting key residues involved in binding at the dimer interface and substrate catalysis. These findings provide deeper insight into complex mechanisms regulating the activity and dimerization of SARS 3CL{sup pro}.

  3. Rubidium dimer destruction by a diode laser

    SciTech Connect

    Ban, T.; Aumiler, D.; Pichler, G.

    2005-02-01

    We observed rubidium dimer destruction by excitation of rubidium vapor with diode laser light tuned across the Rb D{sub 2} resonance line in a 2400 GHz tuning interval. The destruction was measured for rubidium atom concentrations in the (1-9)x10{sup 16} cm{sup -3} range, pump beam power up to 43 mW, and with a 5 Torr of the helium buffer gas. We discuss the physical mechanisms involved and specify the molecular pathways which may effectively lead to the observed dimer destruction.

  4. A Dimerization-Dependent Mechanism Drives the Endoribonuclease Function of Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus nsp11

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yuejun; Li, Youwen; Lei, Yingying; Ye, Gang; Shen, Zhou; Sun, Limeng; Luo, Rui; Wang, Dang; Fu, Zhen F.; Xiao, Shaobo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) RNA endoribonuclease nsp11 belongs to the XendoU superfamily and plays a crucial role in arterivirus replication. Here, we report the first crystal structure of the arterivirus nsp11 protein from PRRSV, which exhibits a unique structure and assembles into an asymmetric dimer whose structure is completely different from the hexameric structure of coronavirus nsp15. However, the structures of the PRRSV nsp11 and coronavirus nsp15 catalytic domains were perfectly superimposed, especially in the “active site loop” (His129 to His144) and “supporting loop” (Val162 to Thr179) regions. Importantly, our biochemical data demonstrated that PRRSV nsp11 exists mainly as a dimer in solution. Mutations of the major dimerization site determinants (Ser74 and Phe76) in the dimerization interface destabilized the dimer in solution and severely diminished endoribonuclease activity, indicating that the dimer is the biologically functional unit. In the dimeric structure, the active site loop and supporting loop are packed against one another and stabilized by monomer-monomer interactions. These findings may help elucidate the mechanism underlying arterivirus replication and may represent great potential for the development of antiviral drugs. IMPORTANCE Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is a member of the family Arteriviridae, order Nidovirales. PRRSV is a major agent of respiratory diseases in pigs, causing tremendous economic losses to the swine industry worldwide. The PRRSV nsp11 endoribonuclease plays a vital role in arterivirus replication, but its precise roles and mechanisms of action are poorly understood. Here, we report the first dimeric structure of the arterivirus nsp11 from PRRSV at 2.75-Å resolution. Structural and biochemical experiments demonstrated that nsp11 exists mainly as a dimer in solution and that nsp11 may be fully active as a dimer. Mutagenesis and

  5. A Novel Allosteric Mechanism of NF-κB Dimerization and DNA Binding Targeted by an Anti-Inflammatory Drug

    PubMed Central

    Ashkenazi, Shaked; Plotnikov, Alexander; Bahat, Anat; Ben-Zeev, Efrat; Warszawski, Shira

    2016-01-01

    The NF-κB family plays key roles in immune and stress responses, and its deregulation contributes to several diseases. Therefore its modulation has become an important therapeutic target. Here, we used a high-throughput screen for small molecules that directly inhibit dimerization of the NF-κB protein p65. One of the identified inhibitors is withaferin A (WFA), a documented anticancer and anti-inflammatory compound. Computational modeling suggests that WFA contacts the dimerization interface on one subunit and surface residues E285 and Q287 on the other. Despite their locations far from the dimerization site, E285 and Q287 substitutions diminished both dimerization and the WFA effect. Further investigation revealed that their effects on dimerization are associated with their proximity to a conserved hydrophobic core domain (HCD) that is crucial for dimerization and DNA binding. Our findings established NF-κB dimerization as a drug target and uncovered an allosteric domain as a target of WFA action. PMID:26830231

  6. The N-terminal octapeptide acts as a dimerization inhibitor of SARS coronavirus 3C-like proteinase.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ping; Fan, Keqiang; Chen, Hao; Ma, Liang; Huang, Changkang; Tan, Lei; Xi, Dong; Li, Chunmei; Liu, Ying; Cao, Aoneng; Lai, Luhua

    2006-01-20

    The 3C-like proteinase of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus has been proposed to be a key target for structural-based drug design against SARS. Accurate determination of the dimer dissociation constant and the role of the N-finger (residues 1-7) will provide more insights into the enzyme catalytic mechanism of SARS 3CL proteinase. The dimer dissociation constant of the wild-type protein was determined to be 14.0microM by analytical ultracentrifugation method. The N-finger fragment of the enzyme plays an important role in enzyme dimerization as shown in the crystal structure. Key residues in the N-finger have been studied by site-directed mutagenesis, enzyme assay, and analytical ultracentrifugation. A single mutation of M6A was found to be critical to maintain the dimer structure of the enzyme. The N-terminal octapeptide N8 and its mutants were also synthesized and tested for their potency as dimerization inhibitors. Peptide cleavage assay confirms that peptide N8 is a dimerization inhibitor with a K(i) of 2.20mM. The comparison of the inhibitory activities of N8 and its mutants indicates that the hydrophobic interaction of Met-6 and the electrostatic interaction of Arg-4 contribute most for inhibitor binding. This study describes the first example of inhibitors targeting the dimeric interface of SARS 3CL proteinase, providing a novel strategy for drug design against SARS and other coronaviruses.

  7. Structure and Mechanism of the Influenza A M218-60 Dimer of Dimers.

    PubMed

    Andreas, Loren B; Reese, Marcel; Eddy, Matthew T; Gelev, Vladimir; Ni, Qing Zhe; Miller, Eric A; Emsley, Lyndon; Pintacuda, Guido; Chou, James J; Griffin, Robert G

    2015-12-02

    We report a magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR structure of the drug-resistant S31N mutation of M218-60 from Influenza A. The protein was dispersed in diphytanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine lipid bilayers, and the spectra and an extensive set of constraints indicate that M218-60 consists of a dimer of dimers. In particular, ∼280 structural constraints were obtained using dipole recoupling experiments that yielded well-resolved (13)C-(15)N, (13)C-(13)C, and (1)H-(15)N 2D, 3D, and 4D MAS spectra, all of which show cross-peak doubling. Interhelical distances were measured using mixed (15)N/(13)C labeling and with deuterated protein, MAS at ωr/2π = 60 kHz, ω0H/2π = 1000 MHz, and (1)H detection of methyl-methyl contacts. The experiments reveal a compact structure consisting of a tetramer composed of four transmembrane helices, in which two opposing helices are displaced and rotated in the direction of the membrane normal relative to a four-fold symmetric arrangement, yielding a two-fold symmetric structure. Side chain conformations of the important gating and pH-sensing residues W41 and H37 are found to differ markedly from four-fold symmetry. The rmsd of the structure is 0.7 Å for backbone heavy atoms and 1.1 Å for all heavy atoms. This two-fold symmetric structure is different from all of the previous structures of M2, many of which were determined in detergent and/or with shorter constructs that are not fully active. The structure has implications for the mechanism of H(+) transport since the distance between His and Trp residues on different helices is found to be short. The structure also exhibits two-fold symmetry in the vicinity of the binding site of adamantyl inhibitors, and steric constraints may explain the mechanism of the drug-resistant S31N mutation.

  8. EGFR oligomerization organizes kinase-active dimers into competent signalling platforms

    PubMed Central

    Needham, Sarah R.; Roberts, Selene K.; Arkhipov, Anton; Mysore, Venkatesh P.; Tynan, Christopher J.; Zanetti-Domingues, Laura C.; Kim, Eric T.; Losasso, Valeria; Korovesis, Dimitrios; Hirsch, Michael; Rolfe, Daniel J.; Clarke, David T.; Winn, Martyn D.; Lajevardipour, Alireza; Clayton, Andrew H. A.; Pike, Linda J.; Perani, Michela; Parker, Peter J.; Shan, Yibing; Shaw, David E.; Martin-Fernandez, Marisa L.

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signalling is activated by ligand-induced receptor dimerization. Notably, ligand binding also induces EGFR oligomerization, but the structures and functions of the oligomers are poorly understood. Here, we use fluorophore localization imaging with photobleaching to probe the structure of EGFR oligomers. We find that at physiological epidermal growth factor (EGF) concentrations, EGFR assembles into oligomers, as indicated by pairwise distances of receptor-bound fluorophore-conjugated EGF ligands. The pairwise ligand distances correspond well with the predictions of our structural model of the oligomers constructed from molecular dynamics simulations. The model suggests that oligomerization is mediated extracellularly by unoccupied ligand-binding sites and that oligomerization organizes kinase-active dimers in ways optimal for auto-phosphorylation in trans between neighbouring dimers. We argue that ligand-induced oligomerization is essential to the regulation of EGFR signalling. PMID:27796308

  9. Molecular Design Principles Underlying beta-strand Swapping in the Adhesive Dimerization of Cadherins

    SciTech Connect

    J Vendome; S Posy; X Jin; F Bahna; G Ahlsen; L Shapiro; B Honig

    2011-12-31

    Cell adhesion by classical cadherins is mediated by dimerization of their EC1 domains through the 'swapping' of N-terminal {beta}-strands. We use molecular simulations, measurements of binding affinities and X-ray crystallography to provide a detailed picture of the structural and energetic factors that control the adhesive dimerization of cadherins. We show that strand swapping in EC1 is driven by conformational strain in cadherin monomers that arises from the anchoring of their short N-terminal strand at one end by the conserved Trp2 and at the other by ligation to Ca{sup 2+} ions. We also demonstrate that a conserved proline-proline motif functions to avoid the formation of an overly tight interface where affinity differences between different cadherins, crucial at the cellular level, are lost. We use these findings to design site-directed mutations that transform a monomeric EC2-EC3 domain cadherin construct into a strand-swapped dimer.

  10. Structure, domain organization, and different conformational states of stem cell factor-induced intact KIT dimers

    PubMed Central

    Opatowsky, Yarden; Lax, Irit; Tomé, Francisco; Bleichert, Franziska; Unger, Vinzenz M.; Schlessinger, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Using electron microscopy and fitting of crystal structures, we present the 3D reconstruction of ligand-induced dimers of intact receptor tyrosine kinase, KIT. We observe that KIT protomers form close contacts throughout the entire structure of ligand-bound receptor dimers, and that the dimeric receptors adopt multiple, defined conformational states. Interestingly, the homotypic interactions in the membrane proximal Ig-like domain of the extracellular region differ from those observed in the crystal structure of the unconstrained extracellular regions. We observe two prevalent conformations in which the tyrosine kinase domains interact asymmetrically. The asymmetric arrangement of the cytoplasmic regions may represent snapshots of molecular interactions occurring during trans autophosphorylation. Moreover, the asymmetric arrangements may facilitate specific intermolecular interactions necessary for trans phosphorylation of different KIT autophosphorylation sites that are required for stimulation of kinase activity and recruitment of signaling proteins by activated KIT. PMID:24449920

  11. The insulin and IGF1 receptor kinase domains are functional dimers in the activated state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabail, M. Zulema; Li, Shiqing; Lemmon, Eric; Bowen, Mark E.; Hubbard, Stevan R.; Miller, W. Todd

    2015-03-01

    The insulin receptor (IR) and insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF1R) are highly related receptor tyrosine kinases with a disulfide-linked homodimeric architecture. Ligand binding to the receptor ectodomain triggers tyrosine autophosphorylation of the cytoplasmic domains, which stimulates catalytic activity and creates recruitment sites for downstream signalling proteins. Whether the two phosphorylated tyrosine kinase domains within the receptor dimer function independently or cooperatively to phosphorylate protein substrates is not known. Here we provide crystallographic, biophysical and biochemical evidence demonstrating that the phosphorylated kinase domains of IR and IGF1R form a specific dimeric arrangement involving an exchange of the juxtamembrane region proximal to the kinase domain. In this dimer, the active position of α-helix C in the kinase N lobe is stabilized, which promotes downstream substrate phosphorylation. These studies afford a novel strategy for the design of small-molecule IR agonists as potential therapeutic agents for type 2 diabetes.

  12. Model for growth hormone receptor activation based on subunit rotation within a receptor dimer

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Richard J.; Adams, Julian J.; Pelekanos, Rebecca A.; Wan, Yu; McKinstry, William J.; Palethorpe, Kathryn; Seeber, Ruth M.; Monks, Thea A.; Eidne, Karin A.; Parker, Michael W.; Waters, Michael J.

    2010-07-13

    Growth hormone is believed to activate the growth hormone receptor (GHR) by dimerizing two identical receptor subunits, leading to activation of JAK2 kinase associated with the cytoplasmic domain. However, we have reported previously that dimerization alone is insufficient to activate full-length GHR. By comparing the crystal structure of the liganded and unliganded human GHR extracellular domain, we show here that there is no substantial change in its conformation on ligand binding. However, the receptor can be activated by rotation without ligand by inserting a defined number of alanine residues within the transmembrane domain. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) and coimmunoprecipitation studies suggest that receptor subunits undergo specific transmembrane interactions independent of hormone binding. We propose an activation mechanism involving a relative rotation of subunits within a dimeric receptor as a result of asymmetric placement of the receptor-binding sites on the ligand.

  13. Structural basis for ligand-dependent dimerization of phenylalanine hydroxylase regulatory domain.

    PubMed

    Patel, Dipali; Kopec, Jolanta; Fitzpatrick, Fiona; McCorvie, Thomas J; Yue, Wyatt W

    2016-04-06

    The multi-domain enzyme phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) catalyzes the hydroxylation of dietary I-phenylalanine (Phe) to I-tyrosine. Inherited mutations that result in PAH enzyme deficiency are the genetic cause of the autosomal recessive disorder phenylketonuria. Phe is the substrate for the PAH active site, but also an allosteric ligand that increases enzyme activity. Phe has been proposed to bind, in addition to the catalytic domain, a site at the PAH N-terminal regulatory domain (PAH-RD), to activate the enzyme via an unclear mechanism. Here we report the crystal structure of human PAH-RD bound with Phe at 1.8 Å resolution, revealing a homodimer of ACT folds with Phe bound at the dimer interface. This work delivers the structural evidence to support previous solution studies that a binding site exists in the RD for Phe, and that Phe binding results in dimerization of PAH-RD. Consistent with our structural observation, a disease-associated PAH mutant impaired in Phe binding disrupts the monomer:dimer equilibrium of PAH-RD. Our data therefore support an emerging model of PAH allosteric regulation, whereby Phe binds to PAH-RD and mediates the dimerization of regulatory modules that would bring about conformational changes to activate the enzyme.

  14. Structural basis for ligand-dependent dimerization of phenylalanine hydroxylase regulatory domain

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Dipali; Kopec, Jolanta; Fitzpatrick, Fiona; McCorvie, Thomas J.; Yue, Wyatt W.

    2016-01-01

    The multi-domain enzyme phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) catalyzes the hydroxylation of dietary I-phenylalanine (Phe) to I-tyrosine. Inherited mutations that result in PAH enzyme deficiency are the genetic cause of the autosomal recessive disorder phenylketonuria. Phe is the substrate for the PAH active site, but also an allosteric ligand that increases enzyme activity. Phe has been proposed to bind, in addition to the catalytic domain, a site at the PAH N-terminal regulatory domain (PAH-RD), to activate the enzyme via an unclear mechanism. Here we report the crystal structure of human PAH-RD bound with Phe at 1.8 Å resolution, revealing a homodimer of ACT folds with Phe bound at the dimer interface. This work delivers the structural evidence to support previous solution studies that a binding site exists in the RD for Phe, and that Phe binding results in dimerization of PAH-RD. Consistent with our structural observation, a disease-associated PAH mutant impaired in Phe binding disrupts the monomer:dimer equilibrium of PAH-RD. Our data therefore support an emerging model of PAH allosteric regulation, whereby Phe binds to PAH-RD and mediates the dimerization of regulatory modules that would bring about conformational changes to activate the enzyme. PMID:27049649

  15. Quantitation of ultraviolet radiation-induced cyclobutyl pyrimidine dimers in DNA by video and photographic densitometry

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, S.E.; Thompson, B.D. )

    1990-05-01

    We have compared video and photographic methods for calculating the number of ultraviolet radiation (uv)-induced pyrimidine dimers in DNA from the bacteriophage T7 exposed to uv (0 to 800 J/m2) from an FS40 sunlamp. DNA was incubated with a pyrimidine dimer-specific Micrococcus luteus uv endonuclease, subjected to alkaline agarose gel electrophoresis, neutralized, and stained with ethidium bromide, and the DNA fluorescence was recorded either with a video camera or on photographic film. The slopes of the dose-response curves for the number of uv-endonuclease-sensitive sites per 10(3) bases (pyrimidine dimers) was 1.2 (+/- 0.1) X 10(-4) uv-endonuclease-sensitive sites per J/m2 for the video analysis and 1.3 (+/- 0.04) X 10(-4) uv-endonuclease-sensitive sites per J/m2 for the photographic analysis. Results for pyrimidine dimer determination by either method were statistically comparable.

  16. Integral equation study of soft-repulsive dimeric fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munaò, Gianmarco; Saija, Franz

    2017-03-01

    We study fluid structure and water-like anomalies of a system constituted by dimeric particles interacting via a purely repulsive core-softened potential by means of integral equation theories. In our model, dimers interact through a repulsive pair potential of inverse-power form with a softened repulsion strength. By employing the Ornstein–Zernike approach and the reference interaction site model (RISM) theory, we study the behavior of water-like anomalies upon progressively increasing the elongation λ of the dimers from the monomeric case (λ =0 ) to the tangent configuration (λ =1 ). For each value of the elongation we consider two different values of the interaction potential, corresponding to one and two length scales, with the aim to provide a comprehensive description of the possible fluid scenarios of this model. Our theoretical results are systematically compared with already existing or newly generated Monte Carlo data: we find that theories and simulations agree in providing the picture of a fluid exhibiting density and structural anomalies for low values of λ and for both the two values of the interaction potential. Integral equation theories give accurate predictions for pressure and radial distribution functions, whereas the temperatures where anomalies occur are underestimated. Upon increasing the elongation, the RISM theory still predicts the existence of anomalies; the latter are no longer observed in simulations, since their development is likely precluded by the onset of crystallization. We discuss our results in terms of the reliability of integral equation theories in predicting the existence of water-like anomalies in core-softened fluids.

  17. Integral equation study of soft-repulsive dimeric fluids.

    PubMed

    Munaò, Gianmarco; Saija, Franz

    2017-03-22

    We study fluid structure and water-like anomalies of a system constituted by dimeric particles interacting via a purely repulsive core-softened potential by means of integral equation theories. In our model, dimers interact through a repulsive pair potential of inverse-power form with a softened repulsion strength. By employing the Ornstein-Zernike approach and the reference interaction site model (RISM) theory, we study the behavior of water-like anomalies upon progressively increasing the elongation λ of the dimers from the monomeric case ([Formula: see text]) to the tangent configuration ([Formula: see text]). For each value of the elongation we consider two different values of the interaction potential, corresponding to one and two length scales, with the aim to provide a comprehensive description of the possible fluid scenarios of this model. Our theoretical results are systematically compared with already existing or newly generated Monte Carlo data: we find that theories and simulations agree in providing the picture of a fluid exhibiting density and structural anomalies for low values of λ and for both the two values of the interaction potential. Integral equation theories give accurate predictions for pressure and radial distribution functions, whereas the temperatures where anomalies occur are underestimated. Upon increasing the elongation, the RISM theory still predicts the existence of anomalies; the latter are no longer observed in simulations, since their development is likely precluded by the onset of crystallization. We discuss our results in terms of the reliability of integral equation theories in predicting the existence of water-like anomalies in core-softened fluids.

  18. Regulation of UVR8 photoreceptor dimer/monomer photo-equilibrium in Arabidopsis plants grown under photoperiodic conditions.

    PubMed

    Findlay, Kirsten M W; Jenkins, Gareth I

    2016-08-01

    The UV RESISTANCE LOCUS 8 (UVR8) photoreceptor specifically mediates photomorphogenic responses to UV-B. Photoreception induces dissociation of dimeric UVR8 into monomers to initiate responses. However, the regulation of dimer/monomer status in plants growing under photoperiodic conditions has not been examined. Here we show that UVR8 establishes a dimer/monomer photo-equilibrium in plants growing in diurnal photoperiods in both controlled environments and natural daylight. The photo-equilibrium is determined by the relative rates of photoreception and dark-reversion to the dimer. Experiments with mutants in REPRESSOR OF UV-B PHOTOMORPHOGENESIS 1 (RUP1) and RUP2 show that these proteins are crucial in regulating the photo-equilibrium because they promote reversion to the dimer. In plants growing in daylight, the UVR8 photo-equilibrium is most strongly correlated with low ambient fluence rates of UV-B (up to 1.5 μmol m(-2) s(-1) ), rather than higher fluence rates or the amount of photosynthetically active radiation. In addition, the rate of reversion of monomer to dimer is reduced at lower temperatures, promoting an increase in the relative level of monomer at approximately 8-10 °C. Thus, UVR8 does not behave like a simple UV-B switch under photoperiodic growth conditions but establishes a dimer/monomer photo-equilibrium that is regulated by UV-B and also influenced by temperature.

  19. Haem-dependent dimerization of PGRMC1/Sigma-2 receptor facilitates cancer proliferation and chemoresistance

    PubMed Central

    Kabe, Yasuaki; Nakane, Takanori; Koike, Ikko; Yamamoto, Tatsuya; Sugiura, Yuki; Harada, Erisa; Sugase, Kenji; Shimamura, Tatsuro; Ohmura, Mitsuyo; Muraoka, Kazumi; Yamamoto, Ayumi; Uchida, Takeshi; Iwata, So; Yamaguchi, Yuki; Krayukhina, Elena; Noda, Masanori; Handa, Hiroshi; Ishimori, Koichiro; Uchiyama, Susumu; Kobayashi, Takuya; Suematsu, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Progesterone-receptor membrane component 1 (PGRMC1/Sigma-2 receptor) is a haem-containing protein that interacts with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and cytochromes P450 to regulate cancer proliferation and chemoresistance; its structural basis remains unknown. Here crystallographic analyses of the PGRMC1 cytosolic domain at 1.95 Å resolution reveal that it forms a stable dimer through stacking interactions of two protruding haem molecules. The haem iron is five-coordinated by Tyr113, and the open surface of the haem mediates dimerization. Carbon monoxide (CO) interferes with PGRMC1 dimerization by binding to the sixth coordination site of the haem. Haem-mediated PGRMC1 dimerization is required for interactions with EGFR and cytochromes P450, cancer proliferation and chemoresistance against anti-cancer drugs; these events are attenuated by either CO or haem deprivation in cancer cells. This study demonstrates protein dimerization via haem–haem stacking, which has not been seen in eukaryotes, and provides insights into its functional significance in cancer. PMID:26988023

  20. On the intermolecular Coulombic decay of singly and doubly ionized states of water dimer.

    PubMed

    Stoychev, Spas D; Kuleff, Alexander I; Cederbaum, Lorenz S

    2010-10-21

    A semiquantitative study of the intermolecular Coulombic decay (ICD) of singly and doubly ionized water dimer has been carried out with the help of ab initio computed ionization spectra and potential energy curves (PECs). These PECs are particular cuts through the (H(2)O)(2), (H(2)O)(2) (+), and (H(2)O)(2) (++) hypersurfaces along the distance between the two oxygen atoms. A comparison with the recently published experimental data for the ICD in singly ionized water dimers [T. Jahnke, H. Sann, T. Havermeier et al., Nat. Phys. 6, 139 (2010)] and in large water clusters [M. Mucke, M. Braune, S. Barth et al., Nat. Phys. 6, 143 (2010)] shows that such a simplified description in which the internal degrees of freedom of the water molecules are frozen gives surprisingly useful results. Other possible decay channels of the singly ionized water dimer are also investigated and the influence of the H-atom participating in the hydrogen bond on the spectra of the proton-donor and proton-acceptor molecules in the dimer is discussed. Importantly, the decay processes of one-site dicationic states of water dimer are discussed and an estimate of the ICD-electron spectra is made. More than 33% of the dications produced by Auger decay are found to undergo ICD. The qualitative results show that the ICD following Auger decay in water is also expected to be an additional source of low-energy electrons proven to be extremely important for causing damages to living tissues.

  1. Dimerization kinetics and products of. alpha. -substituted o-quinodimethanes derived from benzene and furan

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, Man-kit.

    1992-07-20

    Effects of the {alpha}-substitutions on the termini of the reactive diene unit of o-quinodimethanes revealed a non-concerted mechanism for furan-based and benzene-based o-quinodimethane (o-QDM) dimerizations. In section one, the coexistence of the cisoid and transoid transition states in the diradical formation step is evidenced by the stereochemistry of the dimers. In view of the results of the furan-based o-QDM dimerizauons, it is believed that the regioselectivity in the diradical cyclization step is controlled mainly by the interaction between the active sites on the furan moieties in the diradical ring closure step, not by the intemal bond rotations of the carbon chain of the diradical intermediate. In section two, it was found that the trend of the regioselectivity. along the size of the {alpha}-substituents, of benzene-based o-QDM dimerizations is opposite to that of the Diels-Alder reactions. On the basis of the trends, it is suggested that the Diels-Alder reaction mechanism of benzene-based o-QDM's is concerted while the dimerization mechanism of benzene-based o-QDM's is stepwise. Because of their similar activation parameters, it is proposed that the parent o-xylylene and other o-xylylenes dimerize via a similar two step, diradical mechanism.

  2. Ultraviolet B-sensitive rice cultivar deficient in cyclobutyl pyrimidine dimer repair

    SciTech Connect

    Hidema, Jun; Kumagai, Tadashi; Sutherland, J.C.; Sutherland, B.M.

    1997-01-01

    Repair of cyclobutyl pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) in DNA is essential in most organisms to prevent biological damage by ultraviolet (UV) light. In higher plants tested thus far, UV-sensitive strains had higher initial damage levels or deficient repair of nondimer DNA lesions but normal CPD repair. This suggested that CPDs might not be important for biological lesions. The photosynthetic apparatus has also been proposed as a critical target. We have analyzed CPD induction and repair in the UV-sensitive rice (Oryza sativa L.) cultivar Norin 1 and its close relative UV-resistant Sasanishiki using alkaline agarose gel electrophoresis. Norin 1 is deficient in cyclobutyl pyrimidine dimer photoreactivation and excision; thus, UV sensitivity correlates with deficient dimer repair. 38 refs., 3 figs.

  3. Active monomeric and dimeric forms of Pseudomonas putida glyoxalase I: evidence for 3D domain swapping.

    PubMed

    Saint-Jean, A P; Phillips, K R; Creighton, D J; Stone, M J

    1998-07-21

    3D domain swapping of proteins involves the interconversion of a monomer containing a single domain-domain interface and a 2-fold symmetrical dimer containing two equivalent intermolecular interfaces. Human glyoxalase I has the structure of a domain-swapped dimer [Cameron, A. D., Olin, B., Ridderström, M., Mannervik, B., and Jones, T. A. (1997) EMBO J. 16, 3386-3395] but Pseudomonas putida glyoxalase I has been reported to be monomeric [Rhee, H.-I., Murata, K., and Kimura, A. (1986) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 141, 993-999]. We show here that recombinant P. putida glyoxalase I is an active dimer (kcat approximately 500 +/- 100 s-1; KM approximately 0.4 +/- 0.2 mM) with two zinc ions per dimer. The zinc is required for structure and function. However, treatment of the dimer with glutathione yields an active monomer (kcat approximately 115 +/- 40 s-1; KM approximately 1.4 +/- 0.4 mM) containing a single zinc ion. The monomer is metastable and slowly reverts to the active dimer in the absence of glutathione. Thus, glyoxalase I appears to be a novel example of a single protein able to exist in two alternative domain-swapped forms. It is unique among domain-swapped proteins in that the active site and an essential metal binding site are apparently disassembled and reassembled by the process of domain swapping. Furthermore, it is the only example to date in which 3D domain swapping can be regulated by a small organic ligand.

  4. Photoreactivation of ultraviolet radiation-induced pyrimidine dimers in neonatal BALB/c mouse skin

    SciTech Connect

    Ananthaswamy, H.N.; Fisher, M.S.

    1981-05-01

    The numbers of ultraviolet light (uv)-induced pyrimidine dimers in the DNA of neonatal BALB/c mouse skin were measured by assessing the sensitivity of the DNA to Micrococcus luteus uv endonuclease. Irradiation of neonatal BALB/c mice with FS40 sunlamps caused a dose-dependent induction of endonuclease-sensitive sites (pyrimidine dimers) in DNA extracted from back skin. Exposure of these uv-irradiated neonatal mice to photoreactivating (PR) light (cool white fluorescent lamp and incandescent lamp) caused a reduction in the number of pyrimidine dimers in the DNA, as revealed by a shift in low-molecular-weight DNA to high-molecular-weight DNA. In contrast, DNA profiles of the skin of either uv-irradiated mice or uv-irradiated mice kept in the dark for the same duration as those exposed to PR light did not show a loss of uv-induced endonuclease-sensitive sites. Furthermore, reversing the order of treatment, i.e., administering PR light first and then uv, did not produce a reduction in pyrimidine dimers. These results demonstrate that PR or uv-induced pyrimidine dimers occurs in neonatal BALB/c mouse skin. The optimal wavelength range for in vivo PR appears to be in the visible region of the spectrum (greater than 400 nm). Although dimer formation could be detected in both dermis and epidermis, PR occurred only in the dermis. Furthermore, the PR phenomenon could not be detected in the skin of adult mice from the same inbred strain.

  5. Combinatorial bZIP dimers display complex DNA-binding specificity landscapes

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Martínez, José A; Reinke, Aaron W; Bhimsaria, Devesh; Keating, Amy E; Ansari, Aseem Z

    2017-01-01

    How transcription factor dimerization impacts DNA-binding specificity is poorly understood. Guided by protein dimerization properties, we examined DNA binding specificities of 270 human bZIP pairs. DNA interactomes of 80 heterodimers and 22 homodimers revealed that 72% of heterodimer motifs correspond to conjoined half-sites preferred by partnering monomers. Remarkably, the remaining motifs are composed of variably-spaced half-sites (12%) or ‘emergent’ sites (16%) that cannot be readily inferred from half-site preferences of partnering monomers. These binding sites were biochemically validated by EMSA-FRET analysis and validated in vivo by ChIP-seq data from human cell lines. Focusing on ATF3, we observed distinct cognate site preferences conferred by different bZIP partners, and demonstrated that genome-wide binding of ATF3 is best explained by considering many dimers in which it participates. Importantly, our compendium of bZIP-DNA interactomes predicted bZIP binding to 156 disease associated SNPs, of which only 20 were previously annotated with known bZIP motifs. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19272.001 PMID:28186491

  6. Activated levels of rRNA synthesis in fission yeast are driven by an intergenic rDNA region positioned over 2500 nucleotides upstream of the initiation site.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Z; Zhao, A; Chen, L; Pape, L

    1997-01-01

    RNA polymerase I-catalyzed synthesis of the Schizosaccharomyces pombe approximately 37S pre-rRNAs was shown to be sensitive to regulatory sequences located several kilobases upstream of the initiation site for the rRNA gene. An in vitro transcription system for RNA polymerase I-catalyzed RNA synthesis was established that supports correct and activated transcription from templates bearing a full S. pombe rRNA gene promoter. A 780 bp region starting at -2560 significantly stimulates transcription of ac is-located rDNA promoter and competes with an rDNA promoter in trans, thus displaying some of the activities of rDNA transcriptional enhancers in vitro. Deletion of a 30 bp enhancer-homologous domain in this 780 bp far upstream region blocked its cis-stimulatory effect. The sequence of the S. pombe 3.5 kb intergenic spacer was determined and its organization differs from that of vertebrate, Drosophila, Acanthamoeba and plant intergenic rDNA spacers: it does not contain multiple, imperfect copies of the rRNA gene promoter nor repetitive elements of 140 bp, as are found in vertebrate rDNA enhancers. PMID:9016610

  7. The blood-brain barrier in the cerebrum is the initial site for the Japanese encephalitis virus entering the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tsan-Hsiun; Liang, Li-Ching; Wang, Chien-Chih; Liu, Huei-Chung; Chen, Wei-June

    2008-11-01

    Japanese encephalitis (JE) virus is a member of the encephalitic flaviviruses and frequently causes neurological sequelae in a proportion of patients who survive the acute phase of the infection. In the present study, we molecularly identified viral infection in the brain of mice with rigidity of hindlimbs and/or abnormal gait, in which JE virus particles appeared within membrane-bound vacuoles of neurons throughout the central nervous system. Deformation of tight junctions (TJs) shown as dissociation of endothelial cells in capillaries, implying that the integrity of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) has been compromised by JE virus infection. BBB permeability evidently increased in the cerebrum, but not in the cerebellum, of JE virus-infected mice intravenously injected with the tracer of Evans blue dye. This suggests that the permeability of the BBB differentially changed in response to viral infection, leading to the entry of JE virions and/or putatively infected leukocytes from the periphery to the cerebrum as the initial site of infection in the central nervous system (CNS). Theoretically, the virus spread to the cerebellum soon after the cerebrum became infected.

  8. β-lactoglobulin's conformational requirements for ligand binding at the calyx and the dimer interphase: a flexible docking study.

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Ramírez, Lenin; Del Moral-Ramírez, Elizabeth; Cortes-Hernández, Paulina; García-Garibay, Mariano; Jiménez-Guzmán, Judith

    2013-01-01

    β-lactoglobulin (BLG) is an abundant milk protein relevant for industry and biotechnology, due significantly to its ability to bind a wide range of polar and apolar ligands. While hydrophobic ligand sites are known, sites for hydrophilic ligands such as the prevalent milk sugar, lactose, remain undetermined. Through the use of molecular docking we first, analyzed the known fatty acid binding sites in order to dissect their atomistic determinants and second, predicted the interaction sites for lactose with monomeric and dimeric BLG. We validated our approach against BLG structures co-crystallized with ligands and report a computational setup with a reduced number of flexible residues that is able to reproduce experimental results with high precision. Blind dockings with and without flexible side chains on BLG showed that: i) 13 experimentally-determined ligands fit the calyx requiring minimal movement of up to 7 residues out of the 23 that constitute this binding site. ii) Lactose does not bind the calyx despite conformational flexibility, but binds the dimer interface and an alternate Site C. iii) Results point to a probable lactolation site in the BLG dimer interface, at K141, consistent with previous biochemical findings. In contrast, no accessible lysines are found near Site C. iv) lactose forms hydrogen bonds with residues from both monomers stabilizing the dimer through a claw-like structure. Overall, these results improve our understanding of BLG's binding sites, importantly narrowing down the calyx residues that control ligand binding. Moreover, our results emphasize the importance of the dimer interface as an insufficiently explored, biologically relevant binding site of particular importance for hydrophilic ligands. Furthermore our analyses suggest that BLG is a robust scaffold for multiple ligand-binding, suitable for protein design, and advance our molecular understanding of its ligand sites to a point that allows manipulation to control binding.

  9. Adsorption of dimeric surfactants in lamellar silicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerzak, Mateusz; Pietralik, Zuzanna; Domka, Ludwik; Skrzypczak, Andrzej; Kozak, Maciej

    2015-12-01

    The adsorption of different types of cationic surfactants in lamellar silicates changes their surface character from hydrophilic to hydrophobic. This study was undertaken to obtain lamellar silicates modified by a series of novel dimeric (gemini) surfactants of different length alkyl chains and to characterise these organophilised materials. Synthetic sodium montmorillonite SOMASIF® ME 100 (M) and enriched bentonite of natural origin (Nanoclay - hydrophilic bentonite®) were organophilised with dimeric (gemini) surfactants (1,1‧-(1,4-butanediyl)bis(alkoxymethyl)imidazolium dichlorides). As a result of surfactant molecule adsorption in interlamellar space, the d-spacing (d001) increased from 0.97 nm (for the anhydrous structure) to 2.04 nm. A Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis of the modified systems reveals bands assigned to the stretching vibrations of the CH2 and CH3 groups and the scissoring vibrations of the NH group from the structure of the dimeric surfactants. Thermogravimetric (TG) and derivative thermogravimetric (DTG) studies imply a four-stage process of surfactant decomposition. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images provide information on the influence of dimeric surfactant intercalation into the silicate structures. Particles of the modified systems show a tendency toward the formation of irregularly shaped agglomerates.

  10. A new lignan dimer from Mallotus philippensis.

    PubMed

    Mai, Nguyen Thi; Cuong, Nguyen Xuan; Thao, Nguyen Phuong; Nam, Nguyen Hoai; Khoi, Nguyen Huu; Minh, Chau Van; Heyden, Yvan Vander; Thuan, Ngo Thi; Tuyen, Nguyen Van; Quetin-Leclercq, Joëlle; Kiem, Phan Van

    2010-03-01

    A new lignan dimer, bilariciresinol (1), was isolated from the leaves of Mallotus philippensis, along with platanoside (2), isovitexin (3), dihydromyricetin (4), bergenin (5), 4-O-galloylbergenin (6), and pachysandiol A (7). Their structures were elucidated by spectroscopic experiments including 1D and 2D NMR and FTICR-MS.

  11. Functional Asymmetry in Kinesin and Dynein Dimers

    PubMed Central

    Rank, Katherine C.; Rayment, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    Active transport along the microtubule lattice is a complex process that involves both the Kinesin and Dynein superfamily of motors. Transportation requires sophisticated regulation much of which occurs through the motor’s tail domain. However, a significant portion of this regulation also occurs through structural changes that arise in the motor and the microtubule upon binding. The most obvious structural change being the manifestation of asymmetry. To a first approximation in solution, kinesin dimers exhibit two-fold symmetry, and microtubules, helical symmetry. The higher symmetries of both the kinesin dimers and microtubule lattice are lost on formation of the kinesin-microtubule complex. Loss of symmetry has functional consequences such as an asymmetric hand-over-hand mechanism in plus-end directed kinesins, asymmetric microtubule binding in the Kinesin-14 family, spatially biased stepping in dynein, and cooperative binding of additional motors to the microtubule. This review focuses on how the consequences of asymmetry affect regulation of motor heads within a dimer, dimers within an ensemble of motors, and suggests how these asymmetries may affect regulation of active transport within the cell. PMID:23066835

  12. Amplitude enhancement by a gold dimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Xin; Wang, Jingxin; Jin, Zheng

    2016-10-01

    The unique optical properties such as brightness, non-bleaching, good bio-compatibility make gold particles ideal label candidates for molecular probes. Due to the strongly enhanced field, aggregation of gold nanoparticles finds themselves plenty of applications in bio-imaging. But limited by its small cross-section associated with nanometer sized particle, it is a big challenge to employ it in a single molecular detection. The field enhancement results from the effect of plasmonic coupling between two closely attached gold nanoparticle under the right excitation condition. With the aim to apply the gold dimer probe to find the molecules in our recently established optical detection method, we compared of the amplitude enhancement by the dimer relative to a single particle. The amplitude distribution under a highly focused illumination objective was calculated, whose results suggest that at the optimized excitation condition, the local field can be enhanced 190 fold. In consequence, experimental detection was carried out. Gold dimers were linked together by the hybridization of two single chain DNAs. Dimer and single particle probes were mixed together in one detection. Overwhelming contrast between these two kinds of probes were clearly exhibited in the experimental detection image. This method can provide a way to a high specific detection in early diagnosis.

  13. Localized light-induced protein dimerization in living cells using a photocaged dimerizer

    PubMed Central

    Ballister, Edward R.; Aonbangkhen, Chanat; Mayo, Alyssa M.; Lampson, Michael A.; Chenoweth, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Regulated protein localization is critical for many cellular processes. Several techniques have been developed for experimental control over protein localization, including chemically induced and light-induced dimerization, which both provide temporal control. Light-induced dimerization offers the distinct advantage of spatial precision within subcellular length scales. A number of elegant systems have been reported that utilize natural light-sensitive proteins to induce dimerization via direct protein–protein binding interactions, but the application of these systems at cellular locations beyond the plasma membrane has been limited. Here we present a new technique to rapidly and reversibly control protein localization in living cells with subcellular spatial resolution using a cell-permeable, photoactivatable chemical inducer of dimerization. We demonstrate light-induced recruitment of a cytosolic protein to individual centromeres, kinetochores, mitochondria and centrosomes in human cells, indicating that our system is widely applicable to many cellular locations. PMID:25400104

  14. Dimerization of visual pigments in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tao; Cao, Li-Hui; Kumar, Sandeep; Enemchukwu, Nduka O.; Zhang, Ning; Lambert, Alyssia; Zhao, Xuchen; Jones, Alex; Wang, Shixian; Dennis, Emily M.; Fnu, Amrita; Ham, Sam; Rainier, Jon; Yau, King-Wai; Fu, Yingbin

    2016-01-01

    It is a deeply engrained notion that the visual pigment rhodopsin signals light as a monomer, even though many G protein-coupled receptors are now known to exist and function as dimers. Nonetheless, recent studies (albeit all in vitro) have suggested that rhodopsin and its chromophore-free apoprotein, R-opsin, may indeed exist as a homodimer in rod disk membranes. Given the overwhelmingly strong historical context, the crucial remaining question, therefore, is whether pigment dimerization truly exists naturally and what function this dimerization may serve. We addressed this question in vivo with a unique mouse line (S-opsin+Lrat−/−) expressing, transgenically, short-wavelength–sensitive cone opsin (S-opsin) in rods and also lacking chromophore to exploit the fact that cone opsins, but not R-opsin, require chromophore for proper folding and trafficking to the photoreceptor’s outer segment. In R-opsin’s absence, S-opsin in these transgenic rods without chromophore was mislocalized; in R-opsin’s presence, however, S-opsin trafficked normally to the rod outer segment and produced functional S-pigment upon subsequent chromophore restoration. Introducing a competing R-opsin transmembrane helix H1 or helix H8 peptide, but not helix H4 or helix H5 peptide, into these transgenic rods caused mislocalization of R-opsin and S-opsin to the perinuclear endoplasmic reticulum. Importantly, a similar peptide-competition effect was observed even in WT rods. Our work provides convincing evidence for visual pigment dimerization in vivo under physiological conditions and for its role in pigment maturation and targeting. Our work raises new questions regarding a potential mechanistic role of dimerization in rhodopsin signaling. PMID:27462111

  15. Initiation and growth of multiple-site damage in the riveted lap joint of a curved stiffened fuselage panel: An experimental and analytical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Abubaker Ali

    As part of the structural integrity research of the National Aging Aircraft Research Program, a comprehensive study on multiple-site damage (MSD) initiation and growth in a pristine lap-joint fuselage panel has been conducted. The curved stiffened fuselage panel was tested at the Full-Scale Aircraft Structural Test Evaluation and Research (FASTER) facility located at the Federal Aviation Administration William J. Hughes Technical Center. A strain survey test was conducted to verify proper load application. The panel was then subjected to a fatigue test with constant-amplitude cyclic loading. The applied loading spectrum included underload marker cycles so that crack growth history could be reconstructed from post-test fractographic examinations. Crack formation and growth were monitored via nondestructive and high-magnification visual inspections. Strain gage measurements recorded during the strain survey tests indicated that the inner surface of the skin along the upper rivet row of the lap joint experienced high tensile stresses due to local bending. During the fatigue loading, cracks were detected by eddy-current inspections at multiple rivet holes along the upper rivet row. Through-thickness cracks were detected visually after about 80% of the fatigue life. Once MSD cracks from two adjacent rivet holes linked up, there was a quick deterioration in the structural integrity of the lap joint. The linkup resulted in a 2.87" (72.9-mm) lead fatigue crack that rapidly propagated across 12 rivet holes and crossed over into the next skin bay, at which stage the fatigue test was terminated. A post-fatigue residual strength test was then conducted by loading the panel quasi-statically up to final failure. The panel failed catastrophically when the crack extended instantaneously across three additional bays. Post-test fractographic examinations of the fracture surfaces in the lap joint of the fuselage panel were conducted to characterize subsurface crack initiation and

  16. Potential Impacts of Leakage from Black Rock Reservoir on the Hanford Site Unconfined Aquifer: Initial Hypothetical Simulations of Flow and Contaminant Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Freedman, Vicky L.

    2008-01-30

    Initial scoping calculations of the unconfined aquifer at the Hanford Site were carried out for the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation (USBR) to investigate the potential impacts on the Hanford unconfined aquifer that would result from leakage from the proposed Black Rock Reservoir to the west. Although impacts on groundwater flow and contaminant transport were quantified based on numerical simulation results, the investigation represented a qualitative assessment of the potential lateral recharge that could result in adverse effects on the aquifer. Because the magnitude of the potential leakage is unknown, hypothetical bounding calculations were performed. When a quantitative analysis of the magnitude of the potential recharge from Black Rock Reservoir is obtained, the hydrologic impacts analysis will be revisited. The analysis presented in this report represents initial bounding calculations. A maximum lateral recharge (i.e., upland flux) was determined in the first part of this study by executing steady-state flow simulations that raised the water table no higher than the elevation attained in the Central Plateau during the Hanford operational period. This metric was selected because it assumed a maximum remobilization of contaminants that existed under previous fully saturated conditions. Three steady-state flow fields were then used to analyze impacts to transient contaminant transport: a maximum recharge (27,000 acre-ft/yr), a no additional flux (365 acre-ft/yr), and an intermediate recharge case (16,000 acre-ft/yr). The transport behavior of four radionuclides was assessed for a 300 year simulation period with the three flow fields. The four radionuclides are tritium, iodine-129, technetium-99, and uranium-238. Transient flow and transport simulations were used to establish hypothetical concentration distributions in the subsurface. Using the simulated concentration distributions in 2005 as initial conditions for steady-state flow runs, simulations were executed to

  17. Potential Impacts of Leakage from Black Rock Reservoir on the Hanford Site Unconfined Aquifer: Initial Hypothetical Simulations of Flow and Contaminant Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Freedman, Vicky L.

    2007-03-09

    Initial scoping calculations of the unconfined aquifer at the Hanford Site were carried out for the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation (USBR) to investi¬gate the potential impacts on the Hanford unconfined aquifer that would result from leakage from the proposed Black Rock Reservoir to the west. Although impacts on groundwater flow and contaminant transport were quantified based on numerical simulation results, the investigation represented a quali¬tative assessment of the potential lateral recharge that could result in adverse effects on the aquifer. Because the magnitude of the potential leakage is unknown, hypothetical bounding calculations were performed. When a quantitative analysis of the magnitude of the potential recharge from Black Rock Reservoir is obtained, the hydrologic impacts analysis will be revisited. The analysis presented in this report represent initial bounding calculations. A maximum lateral recharge (i.e., upland flux) was determined in the first part of this study by executing steady-state flow simulations that raised the water table no higher than the elevation attained in the Central Plateau during the Hanford operational period. This metric was selected because it assumed a maximum remobilization of contaminants that existed under previous fully saturated conditions. Three steady-state flow fields were then used to analyze impacts to transient contaminant transport: a maximum recharge (27,000 acre-ft/yr), a no additional flux (365 acre-ft/yr), and an intermediate recharge case (16,000 acre-ft/yr). The transport behavior of four radionuclides was assessed for a 300 year simula¬tion period with the three flow fields. The four radionuclides are current contaminants of concern (COCs) in the Central Plateau and include tritium, iodine-129, technetium-99, and uranium-238. Transient flow and transport simulations were used to establish hypothetical concentration distributions in the subsurface. Using the simulated concentration distributions in 2005

  18. Geochemistry of Volcanic Rocks from International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) Site 1438, Amami Sankaku Basin: Implications for Izu-Bonin-Mariana (IBM) Arc Initiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickey-Vargas, R.; Ishizuka, O.; Yogodzinski, G. M.; Bizimis, M.; Savov, I. P.; McCarthy, A. J.; Arculus, R. J.; Bogus, K.

    2015-12-01

    IODP Expedition 351 drilled 150 m of volcanic basement overlain by 1461 m of sedimentary material at Site 1438 in the Amami Sankaku basin, just west of the Kyushu Palau Ridge, the locus of IBM arc initiation. Age interpretations based on biostratigraphy (Arculus et al., Nat. Geosci., in-press) determined that the age of the basement section is between 64 and 51 Ma, encompassing the age of the earliest volcanic products of the IBM arc. The Site 1438 volcanic basement consists of multiple flows of aphyric microcrystalline to finely crystalline basalts containing plagioclase and clinopyroxene with rare olivine pseudomorphs. New XRF major and ICPMS trace element data confirm findings of shipboard analysis that the basalts are moderately differentiated (6-14 % MgO; Mg# = 51-83; 73-490 ppm Cr and 58-350 ppm Ni) with downcore variations related to flow units. Ti/V and Ti/Sc ratios are 16-27 and 75-152, respectively, with lowest values at the base of the core. One prominent characteristic of the basalts is their depletion of immobile highly incompatible elements compared with MORB. Basalts have MORB-normalized La/Nd of 0.5 to 0.9, and most have Th/La < 0.05. Although all basalts are LREE-depleted, La/Nd ratios increase slightly upcore, and Th enrichment compared with LREE occurs in the uppermost 5 meters. Cs, Rb, K, Ba and U are concomitantly enriched relative to LREE in several intervals as a probable result of seawater alteration, but ratios less than those of MORB are found in other areas. In contrast to basement, andesites from three sills in the lowermost sedimentary unit have arc-like trace element patterns with La/Nb > 3 and primitive mantle normalized La/Yb > 1. Our results suggest that mantle melting at the onset of subduction involved exceptionally depleted sources. Enrichment over time may be related to increasing subduction inputs and/or other processes, such as entrainment of fertile asthenosphere during extension of the overriding plate.

  19. Dimers in α-pinene secondary organic aerosol: effect of hydroxyl radical, ozone, relative humidity and aerosol acidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristensen, K.; Cui, T.; Zhang, H.; Gold, A.; Glasius, M.; Surratt, J. D.

    2014-04-01

    The formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from both ozonolysis and hydroxyl radical (OH)-initiated oxidation of α-pinene under conditions of high nitric oxide (NO) concentrations with varying relative humidity (RH) and aerosol acidity was investigated in the University of North Carolina dual outdoor smog chamber facility. SOA formation from ozonolysis of α-pinene was enhanced relative to that from OH-initiated oxidation in the presence of initially high-NO conditions. However, no effect of RH on SOA mass was evident. Ozone (O3)-initiated oxidation of α-pinene in the presence of ammonium sulfate (AS) seed coated with organic aerosol from OH-initiated oxidation of α-pinene showed reduced nucleation compared to ozonolysis in the presence of pure AS seed aerosol. The chemical composition of α-pinene SOA was investigated by ultra-performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization high-resolution quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC/ESI-HR-Q-TOFMS), with a focus on the formation of carboxylic acids and high-molecular weight dimers. A total of eight carboxylic acids and four dimers were identified, constituting between 8 and 12% of the total α-pinene SOA mass. OH-initiated oxidation of α-pinene in the presence of nitrogen oxides (NOx) resulted in the formation of highly oxidized carboxylic acids, such as 3-methyl-1,2,3-butanetricarboxylic acid (MBTCA) and diaterpenylic acid acetate (DTAA). The formation of dimers was observed only in SOA produced from the ozonolysis of α-pinene in the absence of NOx, with increased concentrations by a factor of two at higher RH (50-90%) relative to lower RH (30-50%). The increased formation of dimers correlates with an observed increase in new particle formation at higher RH due to nucleation. Increased aerosol acidity was found to have a negligible effect on the formation of the dimers. SOA mass yield did not influence the chemical composition of SOA formed from α-pinene ozonolysis with respect to

  20. FAK dimerization controls its kinase-dependent functions at focal adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Brami-Cherrier, Karen; Gervasi, Nicolas; Arsenieva, Diana; Walkiewicz, Katarzyna; Boutterin, Marie-Claude; Ortega, Alvaro; Leonard, Paul G; Seantier, Bastien; Gasmi, Laila; Bouceba, Tahar; Kadaré, Gress; Girault, Jean-Antoine; Arold, Stefan T

    2014-01-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) controls adhesion-dependent cell motility, survival, and proliferation. FAK has kinase-dependent and kinase-independent functions, both of which play major roles in embryogenesis and tumor invasiveness. The precise mechanisms of FAK activation are not known. Using x-ray crystallography, small angle x-ray scattering, and biochemical and functional analyses, we show that the key step for activation of FAK's kinase-dependent functions—autophosphorylation of tyrosine-397—requires site-specific dimerization of FAK. The dimers form via the association of the N-terminal FERM domain of FAK and are stabilized by an interaction between FERM and the C-terminal FAT domain. FAT binds to a basic motif on FERM that regulates co-activation and nuclear localization. FAK dimerization requires local enrichment, which occurs specifically at focal adhesions. Paxillin plays a dual role, by recruiting FAK to focal adhesions and by reinforcing the FAT:FERM interaction. Our results provide a structural and mechanistic framework to explain how FAK combines multiple stimuli into a site-specific function. The dimer interfaces we describe are promising targets for blocking FAK activation. PMID:24480479

  1. Brønsted analysis reveals Lys218 as the carboxylase active site base that deprotonates vitamin K hydroquinone to initiate vitamin K-dependent protein carboxylation.

    PubMed

    Rishavy, Mark A; Hallgren, Kevin W; Yakubenko, Anna V; Shtofman, Rebecca L; Runge, Kurt W; Berkner, Kathleen L

    2006-11-07

    The vitamin K-dependent (VKD) carboxylase converts Glu's to carboxylated Glu's in VKD proteins to render them functional in a broad range of physiologies. The carboxylase uses vitamin K hydroquinone (KH(2)) epoxidation to drive Glu carboxylation, and one of its critical roles is to provide a catalytic base that deprotonates KH(2) to allow epoxidation. A long-standing model invoked Cys as the catalytic base but was ruled out by activity retention in a mutant where every Cys is substituted by Ala. Inhibitor analysis of the cysteine-less mutant suggested that the base is an activated amine [Rishavy et al. (2004) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 101, 13732-13737], and in the present study, we used an evolutionary approach to identify candidate amines, which revealed His160, His287, His381, and Lys218. When mutational analysis was performed using an expression system lacking endogenous carboxylase, the His to Ala mutants all showed full epoxidase activity but K218A activity was not detectable. The addition of exogenous amines restored K218A activity while having little effect on wild type carboxylase, and pH studies indicated that rescue was dependent upon the basic form of the amine. Importantly, Brønsted analysis that measured the effect of amines with different pK(a) values showed that K218A activity rescue depended upon the basicity of the amine. The combined results provide strong evidence that Lys218 is the essential base that deprotonates KH(2) to initiate the reaction. The identification of this base is an important advance in defining the carboxylase active site and has implications regarding carboxylase membrane topology and the feedback mechanism by which the Glu substrate regulates KH(2) oxygenation.

  2. Spectrometric study of the folding process of i-motif-forming DNA sequences upstream of the c-kit transcription initiation site.

    PubMed

    Bucek, Pavel; Gargallo, Raimundo; Kudrev, Andrei

    2010-12-17

    The c-kit oncogene shows a cytosine-rich DNA region upstream of the transcription initiation site which forms an i-motif structure at slightly acidic pH values (Bucek et al. [5]). In the present study, the pH-induced formation of i-motif - forming sequences 5'-CCC CTC CCT CGC GCC CGC CCG-3' (ckitC1, native), 5'-CCC TTC CCT TGT GCC CGC CCG-3' (ckitC2) and 5'-CCCTT CCC TTTTT CCC T CCC T-3' (ckitC3) was studied by spectroscopic techniques, such as UV molecular absorption and circular dichroism (CD), in tandem with two multivariate data analysis methods, the hard modelling-based matrix method and the soft modelling-based MCR-ALS approach. Use of the hard chemical modelling enabled us to propose the equilibrium model, which describes spectral changes as functions of solution acidity. Additionally, the intrinsic protonation constant, K(in), and the cooperativity parameters, ω(c), and ω(a), were calculated from the fitting procedure of the coupled CD and molecular absorption spectra. In the case of ckitC2 and ckitC3, the hard model correctly reproduced the spectral variations observed experimentally. The results indicated that folding was accompanied by a cooperative process, i.e. the enhancement of protonated structure stability upon protonation. In contrast, unfolding was accompanied by an anticooperative process. Finally, folding of the native sequence, ckitC1, seemed to follow a more complex mechanism.

  3. Differential lipid binding of vinculin isoforms promotes quasi-equivalent dimerization

    PubMed Central

    Chinthalapudi, Krishna; Rangarajan, Erumbi S.; Brown, David T.; Izard, Tina

    2016-01-01

    The main cause of death globally remains debilitating heart conditions, such as dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), which are often due to mutations of specific components of adhesion complexes. Vinculin regulates these complexes and plays essential roles in intercalated discs that are necessary for muscle cell function and coordinated movement and in the development and function of the heart. Humans bearing familial or sporadic mutations in vinculin suffer from chronic, progressively debilitating DCM that ultimately leads to cardiac failure and death, whereas autosomal dominant mutations in vinculin can also provoke HCM, causing acute cardiac failure. The DCM/HCM-associated mutants of vinculin occur in the 68-residue insert unique to the muscle-specific, alternatively spliced isoform of vinculin, termed metavinculin (MV). Contrary to studies that suggested that phosphoinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) only induces vinculin homodimers, which are asymmetric, we show that phospholipid binding results in a domain-swapped symmetric MV dimer via a quasi-equivalent interface compared with vinculin involving R975. Although one of the two PIP2 binding sites is preserved, the symmetric MV dimer that bridges two PIP2 molecules differs from the asymmetric vinculin dimer that bridges only one PIP2. Unlike vinculin, wild-type MV and the DCM/HCM-associated R975W mutant bind PIP2 in their inactive conformations, and R975W MV fails to dimerize. Mutating selective vinculin residues to their corresponding MV residues, or vice versa, switches the isoform’s dimeric constellation and lipid binding site. Collectively, our data suggest that MV homodimerization modulates microfilament attachment at muscular adhesion sites and furthers our understanding of MV-mediated cardiac remodeling. PMID:27503891

  4. Biopolymer from microbial assisted in situ hydrolysis of triglycerides and dimerization of fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Kavitha, V; Radhakrishnan, N; Madhavacharyulu, E; Sailakshmi, G; Sekaran, G; Reddy, B S R; Rajkumar, G Suseela; Gnanamani, Arumugam

    2010-01-01

    The present study demonstrates biopolymer production by in situ bio-based dimerization of fatty acids by microorganism isolated from marine sediments. Microbial isolate grown in Zobell medium in the presence of triglycerides for the period of 24-240 h at 37 degrees C, hydrolyze the applied triglycerides and sequentially dimerized the hydrolyzed products and subsequently polymerized and transformed to a biopolymer having appreciable adhesive properties. Physical (nature, odour, stickyness and tensile strength), chemical (instrumentation) and biochemical (cell free broth) methods of analyses carried out provided the hypotheses involved in the formation of the product as well as the nature of the product formed. Results revealed, lipolytic enzymes released during initial period of growth and the biosurfactant production during later period, respectively, hydrolyze the applied triglycerides and initiate the dimerization and further accelerated when the incubation period extended. The existence and the non-existence of in situ hydrolysis of various triglycerides followed by dimerization and polymerization and the mechanism of transformation of triglycerides to biopolymer are discussed in detail.

  5. Phosphatidylserine-induced factor Xa dimerization and binding to factor Va are competing processes in solution.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Rinku; Koklic, Tilen; Rezaie, Alireza R; Lentz, Barry R

    2013-01-08

    A soluble, short chain phosphatidylserine, 1,2-dicaproyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-l-serine (C6PS), binds to discrete sites on FXa, FVa, and prothrombin to alter their conformations, to promote FXa dimerization (K(d) ~ 14 nM), and to enhance both the catalytic activity of FXa and the cofactor activity of FVa. In the presence of calcium, C6PS binds to two sites on FXa, one in the epidermal growth factor-like (EGF) domain and one in the catalytic domain; the latter interaction is sensitive to Na(+) binding and probably represents a protein recognition site. Here we ask whether dimerization of FXa and its binding to FVa in the presence of C6PS are competitive processes. We monitored FXa activity at 5, 20, and 50 nM FXa while titrating with FVa in the presence of 400 μM C6PS and 3 or 5 mM Ca(2+) to show that the apparent K(d) of FVa-FXa interaction increased with an increase in FXa concentration at 5 mM Ca(2+), but the K(d) was only slightly affected at 3 mM Ca(2+). A mixture of 50 nM FXa and 50 nM FVa in the presence of 400 μM C6PS yielded both Xa homodimers and Xa·Va heterodimers, but no FXa dimers bound to FVa. A mutant FXa (R165A) that has reduced prothrombinase activity showed both weakened dimerization (K(d) ~ 147 nM) and weakened FVa binding (apparent K(d) values of 58, 92, and 128 nM for 5, 20, and 50 nM R165A FXa, respectively). Native gel electrophoresis showed that the GLA-EGF(NC) fragment of FXa (lacking the catalytic domain) neither dimerized nor formed a complex with FVa in the presence of 400 μM C6PS and 5 mM Ca(2+). Our results demonstrate that the dimerization site and FVa-binding site are both located in the catalytic domain of FXa and that these sites are linked thermodynamically.

  6. On the Pyrazine and Pyrazine-Pyrimidine Dimers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-06-01

    Lennard - Jones -hydrogen-bonding (LJ-HB) potential energy calculations. The pyrazine isotopic hetero- and homo-dimers possess nearly identical spectra with the exception that the perpendicular dimer features are displaced to the red by approx. 11 cm. Exchange or exciton interactions in this system are vanishingly small (less than 1/cm). The geometrics suggested by the isotopically substituted pyrazine dimer spectra are the same as those found for the pyrazine-h sub 4 homo-dimer: a parallel planar hydrogen bonded and a perpendicular dimer. The pyrazine-h sub 4 and pyrazine-h

  7. Pyrimidine dimer formation and repair in human skin

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, B.M.; Harber, L.C.; Kochevar, I.E.

    1980-09-01

    Cyclobutyl pyrimidine dimers have been detected in the DNA of human skin following in vivo irradiation with suberythermal doses of ultraviolet (UV) radiation from FS-20 sun lamp fluorescent tubes. Dimers were assayed by treatment of extracted DNA with Micrococus luteus UV-specific endonuclease, alkaline agarose electrophoresis, and ethidum bromide staining. This technique, in contrast to conventional dimer assays, can be used with nonradioactive DNA and is optimal at low UV light doses. These data suggest that some dimer disappearance by excision repair occurs within 20 min of UV irradiation and that photoreactivation of dimers can make a contribution to the total repair process.

  8. Crystal structure of a dimeric β-diketiminate magnesium complex

    PubMed Central

    MacNeil, Connor S.; Johnson, Kevin R. D.; Hayes, Paul G.; Boeré, René T.

    2016-01-01

    The solid-state structure of a dimeric β-diketiminate magnesium(II) complex is discussed. The compound, di-μ-iodido-bis­[(­{4-amino-1,5-bis­[2,6-bis­(propan-2-yl)phen­yl]pent-3-en-2-yl­idene}aza­nido-κ2 N,N′)magnesium(II)] toluene sesquisolvate, [Mg2(C29H41N2)2I2]·1.5C7H8, crystallizes as two independent mol­ecules, each with 2/m crystallographic site symmetry, located at Wyckoff sites 2c and 2d. These have symmetry-equivalent magnesium atoms bridged by μ-iodide ligands with very similar Mg—I distances. The two Mg atoms are located slightly below (∼0.5 Å) the least-squares plane defined by N–C—C–N atoms in the ligand scaffold, and are approximately tetra­hedrally coordinated. One and one-half toluene solvent mol­ecules are disordered with respect to mirror-site symmetry at Wyckoff sites 4i and 2a, respectively. In the former case, two toluene mol­ecules inter­act in an off-center parallel stacking arrangement; the shortest C to C′ (π–π) distance of 3.72 (1) Å was measured for this inter­action. PMID:27980823

  9. Terminal Interface Conformations Modulate Dimer Stability Prior to Amino Terminal Autoprocessing of HIV-1 Protease

    SciTech Connect

    Agniswamy, Johnson; Sayer, Jane M.; Weber, Irene T.; Louis, John M.

    2012-04-17

    The HIV-1 protease (PR) mediates its own release (autoprocessing) from the polyprotein precursor, Gag-Pol, flanked by the transframe region (TFR) and reverse transcriptase at its N- and C-termini, respectively. Autoprocessing at the N-terminus of PR mediates stable dimer formation essential for catalytic activity, leading to the formation of infectious virus. An antiparallel {beta}-sheet interface formed by the four N- and C-terminal residues of each subunit is important for dimer stability. Here, we present the first high-resolution crystal structures of model protease precursor-clinical inhibitor (PI darunavir or saquinavir) complexes, revealing varying conformations of the N-terminal flanking (S{sup -4}FNF{sup -1}) and interface residues (P{sup 1}QIT{sup 4}). A 180{sup o} rotation of the T{sup 4}-L{sup 5} peptide bond is accompanied by a new Q{sup 2}-L{sup 5} hydrogen bond and complete disengagement of PQIT from the {beta}-sheet dimer interface, which may be a feature for intramolecular autoprocessing. This result is consistent with drastically lower thermal stability by 14-20 C of PI complexes of precursors and the mature PR lacking its PQIT residues (by 18.3 C). Similar to the TFR-PR precursor, this deletion also results in a darunavir dissociation constant (2 x 10{sup 4})-fold higher and a markedly increased dimer dissociation constant relative to the mature PR. The terminal {beta}-sheet perturbations of the dimeric structure likely account for the drastically poorer inhibition of autoprocessing of TFR-PR relative to the mature PR, even though significant differences in active site-PI interactions in these structures were not observed. The novel conformations of the dimer interface may be exploited to target selectively the protease precursor prior to its N-terminal cleavage.

  10. Structural basis for dimerization and RNA binding of avian infectious bronchitis virus nsp9.

    PubMed

    Hu, Tingting; Chen, Cheng; Li, Huiyan; Dou, Yanshu; Zhou, Ming; Lu, Deren; Zong, Qi; Li, Yulei; Yang, Cheng; Zhong, Zhihui; Singh, Namit; Hu, Honggang; Zhang, Rundong; Yang, Haitao; Su, Dan

    2017-03-03

    The potential for infection by coronaviruses (CoVs) has become a serious concern with the recent emergence of Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) and severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in the human population. CoVs encode two large polyproteins, which are then processed into 15-16 nonstructural proteins (nsps) that make significant contributions to viral replication and transcription by assembling the RNA replicase complex. Among them, nsp9 plays an essential role in viral replication by forming a homodimer that binds single-stranded RNA. Thus, disrupting nsp9 dimerization is a potential anti-CoV therapy. However, different nsp9 dimer forms have been reported for alpha- and beta-CoVs, and no structural information is available for gamma-CoVs. Here we determined the crystal structure of nsp9 from the avian infectious bronchitis virus (IBV), a representative gamma-CoV that affects the economy of the poultry industry because it can infect domestic fowl. IBV nsp9 forms a homodimer via interactions across a hydrophobic interface, which consists of two parallel alpha helices near the carboxy terminus of the protein. The IBV nsp9 dimer resembles that of SARS-CoV nsp9, indicating that this type of dimerization is conserved among all CoVs. This makes disruption of the dimeric interface an excellent strategy for developing anti-CoV therapies. To facilitate this effort, we characterized the roles of six conserved residues on this interface using site-directed mutagenesis and a multitude of biochemical and biophysical methods. We found that three residues are critical for nsp9 dimerization and its abitlity to bind RNA. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  11. Xer Site Specific Recombination: Double and Single Recombinase Systems

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, Fabio; Benmohamed, Amal; Szatmari, George

    2017-01-01

    The separation and segregation of newly replicated bacterial chromosomes can be constrained by the formation of circular chromosome dimers caused by crossing over during homologous recombination events. In Escherichia coli and most bacteria, dimers are resolved to monomers by site-specific recombination, a process performed by two Chromosomally Encoded tyrosine Recombinases (XerC and XerD). XerCD recombinases act at a 28 bp recombination site dif, which is located at the replication terminus region of the chromosome. The septal protein FtsK controls the initiation of the dimer resolution reaction, so that recombination occurs at the right time (immediately prior to cell division) and at the right place (cell division septum). XerCD and FtsK have been detected in nearly all sequenced eubacterial genomes including Proteobacteria, Archaea, and Firmicutes. However, in Streptococci and Lactococci, an alternative system has been found, composed of a single recombinase (XerS) genetically linked to an atypical 31 bp recombination site (difSL). A similar recombination system has also been found in 𝜀-proteobacteria such as Campylobacter and Helicobacter, where a single recombinase (XerH) acts at a resolution site called difH. Most Archaea contain a recombinase called XerA that acts on a highly conserved 28 bp sequence dif, which appears to act independently of FtsK. Additionally, several mobile elements have been found to exploit the dif/Xer system to integrate their genomes into the host chromosome in Vibrio cholerae, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and Enterobacter cloacae. This review highlights the versatility of dif/Xer recombinase systems in prokaryotes and summarizes our current understanding of homologs of dif/Xer machineries. PMID:28373867

  12. Excitonic interaction in the fluorene dimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wessel, John; Beck, Steven; Highstrete, Clark

    1994-12-01

    The fluorene van der Waals dimer exhibits a complex origin spectrum. This region has been studied by resonance two-photon ionization and by fluorescence excitation spectroscopies. The spectra can be interpreted on the basis of intermediate strength exciton coupling, in which the electronic interaction is comparable to the van der Waals vibrational energies. The spectra are reasonably well described by two distorted adiabatic potential surfaces, which correspond to the two excitonic components of the origin system. A single Franck-Condon active intermolecular mode provides a reasonable description of the system, however the potentials have significant cubic and quartic contributions. Non-Born-Oppenheimer nuclear momentum coupling is present and intermodal (IVR) interactions are observed, even for intermolecular modes as low as v=1. The results are remarkably different from prior observations of excitonic structure in other systems, providing a detailed picture of coupling between electronic and intermolecular motion in a van der Waals dimer.

  13. Electronic Transitions of Palladium and Vanadium Dimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Yue; Ng, Y. W.; Cheung, A. S.-C.

    2013-06-01

    The laser induced fluorescence (LIF) spectrum of palladium dimer (Pd_{2}) in the visible region between 480 and 700 nm has been studied. Five vibrational bands were recorded and analyzed; they are assigned to a ^{3} Π _{g} - X^{3} Σ _{u} ^{+} system. The vibrational frequency of the ground X^{3} Σ _{u} ^{+} state has been determined to be 211.4 cm^{-1}. This is the first experimental observation of the LIF spectrum of Pd_{2}. In addition, the LIF spectrum of vanadium dimer (V_{2}) has also been studied; several new transition band systems were observed in the wavelength between 480 and 530 nm. The analysis of the spectra recorded for these two molecules will be presented.

  14. Fibrillar dimer formation of islet amyloid polypeptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Chi-cheng; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2015-09-01

    Amyloid deposits of human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP), a 37-residue hormone co-produced with insulin, have been implicated in the development of type 2 diabetes. Residues 20 - 29 of hIAPP have been proposed to constitute the amyloidogenic core for the aggregation process, yet the segment is mostly unstructured in the mature fibril, according to solid-state NMR data. Here we use molecular simulations combined with bias-exchange metadynamics to characterize the conformational free energies of hIAPP fibrillar dimer and its derivative, pramlintide. We show that residues 20 - 29 are involved in an intermediate that exhibits transient β-sheets, consistent with recent experimental and simulation results. By comparing the aggregation of hIAPP and pramlintide, we illustrate the effects of proline residues on inhibition of the dimerization of IAPP. The mechanistic insights presented here could be useful for development of therapeutic inhibitors of hIAPP amyloid formation.

  15. Fibrillar dimer formation of islet amyloid polypeptides

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, Chi -cheng; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2015-05-08

    Amyloid deposits of human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP), a 37-residue hormone co-produced with insulin, have been implicated in the development of type 2 diabetes. Residues 20 – 29 of hIAPP have been proposed to constitute the amyloidogenic core for the aggregation process, yet the segment is mostly unstructured in the mature fibril, according to solid-state NMR data. Here we use molecular simulations combined with bias-exchange metadynamics to characterize the conformational free energies of hIAPP fibrillar dimer and its derivative, pramlintide. We show that residues 20 – 29 are involved in an intermediate that exhibits transient β-sheets, consistent with recent experimental and simulation results. By comparing the aggregation of hIAPP and pramlintide, we illustrate the effects of proline residues on inhibition of the dimerization of IAPP. The mechanistic insights presented here could be useful for development of therapeutic inhibitors of hIAPP amyloid formation.

  16. Theoretical studies of transition metal dimers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, Stephen P.; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The CASSCF approach was used to perform the MCSCF calculations for a number of transition metal dimers, including the Sc2, Ti2, Cr2, Cu2, TiV, Y2, Nb2, and Mo2 molecules; in addition, CASSCF/CI calculations were carried out for Sc2, Ti2, Cu2, and Y2. The CASSCF procedure is shown to provide a consistent set of calculations for these molecules, from which trends and a simple qualitative picture of the electronic structure may be derived. In particular, the calculations confirmed the ground states of the Sc2 and the TiV, and led to predictions for other molecules in this series. In addition to specific predictions, the study provides a simple qualitative picture of the bonding in these dimers.

  17. Dimeric peroxiredoxins are druggable targets in human Burkitt lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Trzeciecka, Anna; Klossowski, Szymon; Bajor, Malgorzata; Zagozdzon, Radoslaw; Gaj, Pawel; Muchowicz, Angelika; Malinowska, Agata; Czerwoniec, Anna; Barankiewicz, Joanna; Domagala, Antoni; Chlebowska, Justyna; Prochorec-Sobieszek, Monika; Winiarska, Magdalena; Ostaszewski, Ryszard; Gwizdalska, Iwonna; Golab, Jakub; Nowis, Dominika; Firczuk, Malgorzata

    2016-01-12

    Burkitt lymphoma is a fast-growing tumor derived from germinal center B cells. It is mainly treated with aggressive chemotherapy, therefore novel therapeutic approaches are needed due to treatment toxicity and developing resistance. Disturbance of red-ox homeostasis has recently emerged as an efficient antitumor strategy. Peroxiredoxins (PRDXs) are thioredoxin-family antioxidant enzymes that scavenge cellular peroxides and contribute to red-ox homeostasis. PRDXs are robustly expressed in various malignancies and critically involved in cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. To elucidate potential role of PRDXs in lymphoma, we studied their expression level in B cell-derived primary lymphoma cells as well as in cell lines. We found that PRDX1 and PRDX2 are upregulated in tumor B cells as compared with normal counterparts. Concomitant knockdown of PRDX1 and PRDX2 significantly attenuated the growth rate of lymphoma cells. Furthermore, in human Burkitt lymphoma cell lines, we isolated dimeric 2-cysteine peroxiredoxins as targets for SK053, a novel thiol-specific small-molecule peptidomimetic with antitumor activity. We observed that treatment of lymphoma cells with SK053 triggers formation of covalent PRDX dimers, accumulation of intracellular reactive oxygen species, phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and AKT and leads to cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Based on site-directed mutagenesis and modeling studies, we propose a mechanism of SK053-mediated PRDX crosslinking, involving double thioalkylation of active site cysteine residues. Altogether, our results suggest that peroxiredoxins are novel therapeutic targets in Burkitt lymphoma and provide the basis for new approaches to the treatment of this disease.

  18. Application of ground-truth for classification and quantification of bird movements on migratory bird habitat initiative sites in southwest Louisiana: final report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barrow, Wylie C.; Baldwin, Michael J.; Randall, Lori A.; Pitre, John; Dudley, Kyle J.

    2013-01-01

    This project was initiated to assess migrating and wintering bird use of lands enrolled in the Natural Resources Conservation Service’s (NRCS) Migratory Bird Habitat Initiative (MBHI). The MBHI program was developed in response to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in 2010, with the goal of improving/creating habitat for waterbirds affected by the spill. In collaboration with the University of Delaware (UDEL), we used weather surveillance radar data (Sieges 2014), portable marine radar data, thermal infrared images, and visual observations to assess bird use of MBHI easements. Migrating and wintering birds routinely make synchronous flights near dusk (e.g., departure during migration, feeding flights during winter). Weather radars readily detect birds at the onset of these flights and have proven to be useful remote sensing tools for assessing bird-habitat relations during migration and determining the response of wintering waterfowl to wetland restoration (e.g., Wetlands Reserve Program lands). However, ground-truthing is required to identify radar echoes to species or species group. We designed a field study to ground-truth a larger-scale, weather radar assessment of bird use of MBHI sites in southwest Louisiana. We examined seasonal bird use of MBHI fields in fall, winter, and spring of 2011-2012. To assess diurnal use, we conducted total area surveys of MBHI sites in the afternoon, collecting data on bird species composition, abundance, behavior, and habitat use. In the evenings, we quantified bird activity at the MBHI easements and described flight behavior (i.e., birds landing in, departing from, circling, or flying over the MBHI tract). Our field sampling captured the onset of evening flights and spanned the period of collection of the weather radar data analyzed. Pre- and post-dusk surveys were conducted using a portable radar system and a thermal infrared camera. Landbirds, shorebirds, and wading birds were commonly found on MBHI fields during diurnal

  19. Dimerization of inositol monophosphatase Mycobacterium tuberculosis SuhB is not constitutive, but induced by binding of the activator Mg2+

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Alistair K; Meng, Guoyu; Ghadbane, Hemza; Scott, David J; Dover, Lynn G; Nigou, Jérôme; Besra, Gurdyal S; Fütterer, Klaus

    2007-01-01

    Background The cell wall of Mycobacterium tuberculosis contains a wide range of phosphatidyl inositol-based glycolipids that play critical structural roles and, in part, govern pathogen-host interactions. Synthesis of phosphatidyl inositol is dependent on free myo-inositol, generated through dephosphorylation of myo-inositol-1-phosphate by inositol monophosphatase (IMPase). Human IMPase, the putative target of lithium therapy, has been studied extensively, but the function of four IMPase-like genes in M. tuberculosis is unclear. Results We determined the crystal structure, to 2.6 Å resolution, of the IMPase M. tuberculosis SuhB in the apo form, and analysed self-assembly by analytical ultracentrifugation. Contrary to the paradigm of constitutive dimerization of IMPases, SuhB is predominantly monomeric in the absence of the physiological activator Mg2+, in spite of a conserved fold and apparent dimerization in the crystal. However, Mg2+ concentrations that result in enzymatic activation of SuhB decisively promote dimerization, with the inhibitor Li+ amplifying the effect of Mg2+, but failing to induce dimerization on its own. Conclusion The correlation of Mg2+-driven enzymatic activity with dimerization suggests that catalytic activity is linked to the dimer form. Current models of lithium inhibition of IMPases posit that Li+ competes for one of three catalytic Mg2+ sites in the active site, stabilized by a mobile loop at the dimer interface. Our data suggest that Mg2+/Li+-induced ordering of this loop may promote dimerization by expanding the dimer interface of SuhB. The dynamic nature of the monomer-dimer equilibrium may also explain the extended concentration range over which Mg2+ maintains SuhB activity. PMID:17725819

  20. Palmitoylated APP Forms Dimers, Cleaved by BACE1.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Raja; Fenn, Rebecca H; Barren, Cory; Tanzi, Rudolph E; Kovacs, Dora M

    2016-01-01

    A major rate-limiting step for Aβ generation and deposition in Alzheimer's disease brains is BACE1-mediated cleavage (β-cleavage) of the amyloid precursor protein (APP). We previously reported that APP undergoes palmitoylation at two cysteine residues (Cys186 and Cys187) in the E1-ectodomain. 8-10% of total APP is palmitoylated in vitro and in vivo. Palmitoylated APP (palAPP) shows greater preference for β-cleavage than total APP in detergent resistant lipid rafts. Protein palmitoylation is known to promote protein dimerization. Since dimerization of APP at its E1-ectodomain results in elevated BACE1-mediated cleavage of APP, we have now investigated whether palmitoylation of APP affects its dimerization and whether this leads to elevated β-cleavage of the protein. Here we report that over 90% of palAPP is dimerized while only ~20% of total APP forms dimers. PalAPP-dimers are predominantly cis-oriented while total APP dimerizes in both cis- and trans-orientation. PalAPP forms dimers 4.5-times more efficiently than total APP. Overexpression of the palmitoylating enzymes DHHC7 and DHHC21 that increase palAPP levels and Aβ release, also increased APP dimerization in cells. Conversely, inhibition of APP palmitoylation by pharmacological inhibitors reduced APP-dimerization in coimmunoprecipitation and FLIM/FRET assays. Finally, in vitro BACE1-activity assays demonstrate that palmitoylation-dependent dimerization of APP promotes β-cleavage of APP in lipid-rich detergent resistant cell membranes (DRMs), when compared to total APP. Most importantly, generation of sAPPβ-sAPPβ dimers is dependent on APP-palmitoylation while total sAPPβ generation is not. Since BACE1 shows preference for palAPP dimers over total APP, palAPP dimers may serve as novel targets for effective β-cleavage inhibitors of APP as opposed to BACE1 inhibitors.

  1. Palmitoylated APP Forms Dimers, Cleaved by BACE1

    PubMed Central

    Fenn, Rebecca H.; Barren, Cory; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Kovacs, Dora M.

    2016-01-01

    A major rate-limiting step for Aβ generation and deposition in Alzheimer’s disease brains is BACE1-mediated cleavage (β-cleavage) of the amyloid precursor protein (APP). We previously reported that APP undergoes palmitoylation at two cysteine residues (Cys186 and Cys187) in the E1-ectodomain. 8–10% of total APP is palmitoylated in vitro and in vivo. Palmitoylated APP (palAPP) shows greater preference for β-cleavage than total APP in detergent resistant lipid rafts. Protein palmitoylation is known to promote protein dimerization. Since dimerization of APP at its E1-ectodomain results in elevated BACE1-mediated cleavage of APP, we have now investigated whether palmitoylation of APP affects its dimerization and whether this leads to elevated β-cleavage of the protein. Here we report that over 90% of palAPP is dimerized while only ~20% of total APP forms dimers. PalAPP-dimers are predominantly cis-oriented while total APP dimerizes in both cis- and trans-orientation. PalAPP forms dimers 4.5-times more efficiently than total APP. Overexpression of the palmitoylating enzymes DHHC7 and DHHC21 that increase palAPP levels and Aβ release, also increased APP dimerization in cells. Conversely, inhibition of APP palmitoylation by pharmacological inhibitors reduced APP-dimerization in coimmunoprecipitation and FLIM/FRET assays. Finally, in vitro BACE1-activity assays demonstrate that palmitoylation-dependent dimerization of APP promotes β-cleavage of APP in lipid-rich detergent resistant cell membranes (DRMs), when compared to total APP. Most importantly, generation of sAPPβ-sAPPβ dimers is dependent on APP-palmitoylation while total sAPPβ generation is not. Since BACE1 shows preference for palAPP dimers over total APP, palAPP dimers may serve as novel targets for effective β-cleavage inhibitors of APP as opposed to BACE1 inhibitors. PMID:27875558

  2. Destabilisation of dimeric 14-3-3 proteins as a novel approach to anti-cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Woodcock, Joanna M; Coolen, Carl; Goodwin, Katy L; Baek, Dong Jae; Bittman, Robert; Samuel, Michael S; Pitson, Stuart M; Lopez, Angel F

    2015-06-10

    14-3-3 proteins play a pivotal role in controlling cell proliferation and survival, two commonly dysregulated hallmarks of cancers. 14-3-3 protein expression is enhanced in many human cancers and correlates with more aggressive tumors and poor prognosis, suggesting a role for 14-3-3 proteins in tumorigenesis and/or progression. We showed previously that the dimeric state of 14-3-3 proteins is regulated by the lipid sphingosine, a physiological inducer of apoptosis. As the functions of 14-3-3 proteins are dependent on their dimeric state, this sphingosine-mediated 14-3-3 regulation provides a possible means to target dimeric 14-3-3 for therapeutic effect. However, sphingosine mimics are needed that are not susceptible to sphingolipid metabolism. We show here the identification and optimization of sphingosine mimetics that render dimeric 14-3-3 susceptible to phosphorylation at a site buried in the dimer interface and induce mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis. Two such compounds, RB-011 and RB-012, disrupt 14-3-3 dimers at low micromolar concentrations and induce rapid down-regulation of Raf-MAPK and PI3K-Akt signaling in Jurkat cells. Importantly, both RB-011 and RB-012 induce apoptosis of human A549 lung cancer cells and RB-012, through disruption of MAPK signaling, reduces xenograft growth in mice. Thus, these compounds provide proof-of-principle for this novel 14-3-3-targeting approach for anti-cancer drug discovery.

  3. A Novel Dimer Interface and Conformational Changes Revealed by an X-ray Structure of B. subtilis SecA

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmer,J.; Li, W.; Rapoport, T.

    2006-01-01

    The SecA ATPase moves polypeptides post-translationally across the plasma membrane of eubacteria, but the mechanism of transport is still unclear. We describe the crystal structure of a novel dimeric form of Bacillus subtilis SecA. Dimerization of SecA occurs at the prominent groove formed by the nucleotide binding domain 2 (nbd2) and the preprotein cross-linking (ppx) domain. The dimer interface is very large, burying approximately 5400 {angstrom}{sup 2} of solvent accessible surface per monomer. Single cysteine disulfide cross-linking shows the presence of this novel SecA dimer in solution. In addition, other dimers also exist in solution, arguing that they all are in equilibrium with monomeric SecA and supporting the idea that the monomer may be the functional species. Dimerization of SecA causes an {alpha}-helix of one subunit to convert to a short {beta}-strand that participates in {beta}-sheet formation with strands in the other subunit. This conversion of secondary structure elements occurs close to the connection between the nbd1 and ppx domains, a potential site of interaction with translocation substrate. Comparing the different X-ray structures of B. subtilis SecA suggests that small changes in the nucleotide binding domains could be amplified via helix 1 of the helical scaffold domain (hsd) to generate larger movements of the domains involved in polypeptide binding.

  4. The replication initiator of the cholera pathogen's second chromosome shows structural similarity to plasmid initiators.

    PubMed

    Orlova, Natalia; Gerding, Matthew; Ivashkiv, Olha; Olinares, Paul Dominic B; Chait, Brian T; Waldor, Matthew K; Jeruzalmi, David

    2016-12-27

    The conserved DnaA-oriC system is used to initiate replication of primary chromosomes throughout the bacterial kingdom; however, bacteria with multipartite genomes evolved distinct systems to initiate replication of secondary chromosomes. In the cholera pathogen, Vibrio cholerae, and in related species, secondary chromosome replication requires the RctB initiator protein. Here, we show that RctB consists of four domains. The structure of its central two domains resembles that of several plasmid replication initiators. RctB contains at least three DNA binding winged-helix-turn-helix motifs, and mutations within any of these severely compromise biological activity. In the structure, RctB adopts a head-to-head dimeric configuration that likely reflects the arrangement in solution. Therefore, major structural reorganization likely accompanies complex formation on the head-to-tail array of binding sites in oriCII Our findings support the hypothesis that the second Vibrionaceae chromosome arose from an ancestral plasmid, and that RctB may have evolved additional regulatory features.

  5. Conformational studies of a peptide corresponding to a region of the C-terminus of ribonuclease A: implications as a potential chain-folding initiation site.

    PubMed

    Beals, J M; Haas, E; Krausz, S; Scheraga, H A

    1991-08-06

    nanosecond time scale, (2) a partially ordered structure of OT-16-DABA exists in solution under typical refolding conditions, and (3) structural constraints (presumably hydrophobic interactions) necessary for the formation of a chain-folding initiation site in RNase A are also present in the OT-16-DABA peptide in the absence of denaturant and are disrupted by Gdn-HCl.

  6. Operation and Maintenance Manual, Record Drawings, and Summary of Initial Results for the Expanded Bioventing System Installed at Site SS-41 (Former Fuel Pumping Station Number 3), Charleston AFB, SC

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    This letter transmits three copies of the Operation and Maintenance (O&M) Manual prepared for the expanded bioventing system recently installed at...ES) at the site from February through June 1997. Included in this report are the initial bioventing system operating parameters and sampling results

  7. Dimerization and enzymatic activity of fungal 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase from the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Kristan, Katja; Deluca, Dominga; Adamski, Jerzy; Stojan, Jure; Rižner, Tea Lanišnik

    2005-01-01

    Background 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase from the fungus Cochliobolus lunatus (17β-HSDcl) is a member of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) superfamily. SDR proteins usually function as dimers or tetramers and 17β-HSDcl is also a homodimer under native conditions. Results We have investigated here which secondary structure elements are involved in the dimerization of 17β-HSDcl and examined the importance of dimerization for the enzyme activity. Sequence similarity with trihydroxynaphthalene reductase from Magnaporthe grisea indicated that Arg129 and His111 from the αE-helices interact with the Asp121, Glu117 and Asp187 residues from the αE and αF-helices of the neighbouring subunit. The Arg129Asp and His111Leu mutations both rendered 17β-HSDcl monomeric, while the mutant 17β-HSDcl-His111Ala was dimeric. Circular dichroism spectroscopy analysis confirmed the conservation of the secondary structure in both monomers. The three mutant proteins all bound coenzyme, as shown by fluorescence quenching in the presence of NADP+, but both monomers showed no enzymatic activity. Conclusion We have shown by site-directed mutagenesis and structure/function analysis that 17β-HSDcl dimerization involves the αE and αF helices of both subunits. Neighbouring subunits are connected through hydrophobic interactions, H-bonds and salt bridges involving amino acid residues His111 and Arg129. Since the substitutions of these two amino acid residues lead to inactive monomers with conserved secondary structure, we suggest dimerization is a prerequisite for catalysis. A detailed understanding of this dimerization could lead to the development of compounds that will specifically prevent dimerization, thereby serving as a new type of inhibitor. PMID:16359545

  8. Dimerization-induced corepressor binding and relaxed DNA-binding specificity are critical for PML/RARA-induced immortalization.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jun; Pérès, Laurent; Honoré, Nicole; Nasr, Rihab; Zhu, Jun; de Thé, Hugues

    2006-06-13

    The pathogenesis of acute promyelocytic leukemia involves the transcriptional repression of master genes of myeloid differentiation by the promyelocytic leukemia-retinoic acid receptor alpha (PML/RARA) oncogene. PML-enforced RARA homodimerization allows the tighter binding of corepressors, silencing RARA target genes. In addition, homodimerization dramatically extends the spectrum of DNA-binding sites of the fusion protein compared with those of normal RARA. Yet, any contribution of these two properties of PML/RARA to differentiation arrest and immortalization of primary mouse hematopoietic progenitors was unknown. We demonstrate that dimerization-induced silencing mediator of retinoid and thyroid receptors (SMRT)-enhanced binding and relaxed DNA-binding site specificity are both required for efficient immortalization. Thus, enforced RARA dimerization is critical not only for triggering transcriptional repression but also for extending the repertoire of target genes. Our studies exemplify how dimerization-induced gain of functions converts an unessential transcription factor into a dominant oncogenic protein.

  9. Structural and Biochemical Studies on the Regulation of Biotin Carboxylase by Substrate Inhibition and Dimerization

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Chi-Yuan; Tong, Liang

    2012-06-19

    Biotin carboxylase (BC) activity is shared among biotin-dependent carboxylases and catalyzes the Mg-ATP-dependent carboxylation of biotin using bicarbonate as the CO{sub 2} donor. BC has been studied extensively over the years by structural, kinetic, and mutagenesis analyses. Here we report three new crystal structures of Escherichia coli BC at up to 1.9 {angstrom} resolution, complexed with different ligands. Two structures are wild-type BC in complex with two ADP molecules and two Ca{sup 2+} ions or two ADP molecules and one Mg{sup 2+} ion. One ADP molecule is in the position normally taken by the ATP substrate, whereas the other ADP molecule occupies the binding sites of bicarbonate and biotin. One Ca{sup 2+} ion and the Mg{sup 2+} ion are associated with the ADP molecule in the active site, and the other Ca{sup 2+} ion is coordinated by Glu-87, Glu-288, and Asn-290. Our kinetic studies confirm that ATP shows substrate inhibition and that this inhibition is competitive against bicarbonate. The third structure is on the R16E mutant in complex with bicarbonate and Mg-ADP. Arg-16 is located near the dimer interface. The R16E mutant has only a 2-fold loss in catalytic activity compared with the wild-type enzyme. Analytical ultracentrifugation experiments showed that the mutation significantly destabilized the dimer, although the presence of substrates can induce dimer formation. The binding modes of bicarbonate and Mg-ADP are essentially the same as those to the wild-type enzyme. However, the mutation greatly disrupted the dimer interface and caused a large re-organization of the dimer. The structures of these new complexes have implications for the catalysis by BC.

  10. Structural and Biochemical Studies on the Regulation of Biotin Carboxylase by Substrate Inhibition and Dimerization

    SciTech Connect

    C Chou; L Tong

    2011-12-31

    Biotin carboxylase (BC) activity is shared among biotin-dependent carboxylases and catalyzes the Mg-ATP-dependent carboxylation of biotin using bicarbonate as the CO{sub 2} donor. BC has been studied extensively over the years by structural, kinetic, and mutagenesis analyses. Here we report three new crystal structures of Escherichia coli BC at up to 1.9 {angstrom} resolution, complexed with different ligands. Two structures are wild-type BC in complex with two ADP molecules and two Ca{sup 2+} ions or two ADP molecules and one Mg{sup 2+} ion. One ADP molecule is in the position normally taken by the ATP substrate, whereas the other ADP molecule occupies the binding sites of bicarbonate and biotin. One Ca{sup 2+} ion and the Mg{sup 2+} ion are associated with the ADP molecule in the active site, and the other Ca{sup 2+} ion is coordinated by Glu-87, Glu-288, and Asn-290. Our kinetic studies confirm that ATP shows substrate inhibition and that this inhibition is competitive against bicarbonate. The third structure is on the R16E mutant in complex with bicarbonate and Mg-ADP. Arg-16 is located near the dimer interface. The R16E mutant has only a 2-fold loss in catalytic activity compared with the wild-type enzyme. Analytical ultracentrifugation experiments showed that the mutation significantly destabilized the dimer, although the presence of substrates can induce dimer formation. The binding modes of bicarbonate and Mg-ADP are essentially the same as those to the wild-type enzyme. However, the mutation greatly disrupted the dimer interface and caused a large re-organization of the dimer. The structures of these new complexes have implications for the catalysis by BC.

  11. Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Solar Photovoltaics at the Peru Mill Industrial Park in the City of Deming, New Mexico. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Kiatreungwattana, K.; Geiger, J.; Healey, V.; Mosey, G.

    2013-04-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in accordance with the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, selected the Peru Mill Industrial Park site in the City of Deming, New Mexico, for a feasibility study of renewable energy production. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) provided technical assistance for this project. The purpose of this report is to assess the site for a possible photovoltaic (PV) system installation and estimate the cost, performance, and site impacts of different PV options. In addition, the report recommends financing options that could assist in the implementation of a PV system at the site.

  12. Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Solar Photovoltaics at the Chino Mine in Silver City, New Mexico. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Kiatreungwattana, K.; Geiger, J.; Healey, V.; Mosey, G.

    2013-04-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in accordance with the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, selected the Chino Mine site in Silver City, New Mexico, for a feasibility study of renewable energy production. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) provided technical assistance for this project. The purpose of this report is to assess the site for a possible photovoltaic (PV) system installation and estimate the cost, performance, and site impacts of different PV options. In addition, the report recommends financing options that could assist in the implementation of a PV system at the site.

  13. Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Solar Photovoltaics at the Kolthoff Landfill in Cleveland, Ohio. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Salasovich, J.; Geiger, J.; Mosey, G.; Healey, V.

    2013-06-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Region 5, in accordance with the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, selected the Kolthoff Landfill site in Cleveland, Ohio, for a feasibility study of renewable energy production. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) provided technical assistance for this project. The purpose of this report is to assess the site for a possible photovoltaic (PV) system installation and estimate the cost, performance, and site impacts of different PV options. In addition, the report recommends financing options that could assist in the implementation of a PV system at the site.

  14. Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Solar Photovoltaics at the Tronox Facility in Savannah, Georgia. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Kiatreungwattana, K.; Geiger, J.; Healey, V.; Mosey, G.

    2013-03-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in accordance with the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, selected the Tronox Facility site in Savannah, Georgia, for a feasibility study of renewable energy production. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) provided technical assistance for this project. The purpose of this report is to assess the site for a possible photovoltaic (PV) system installation and estimate the cost, performance, and site impacts of different PV options. In addition, the report recommends financing options that could assist in the implementation of a PV system at the site.

  15. Pre-Feasibility Analysis of Pellet Manufacturing on the Former Loring Air Force Base Site. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Hunsberger, R.; Mosey, G.

    2014-04-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response, in accordance with the RE-Powering America's Lands initiative, engaged the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to conduct feasibility studies to assess the viability of developing renewable energy generating facilities on contaminated sites. This site, in Limestone, Maine -- formerly the location of the Loring Air Force Base but now owned by the Aroostook Band of Micmac -- was selected for the potential to produce heating pellets from woody feedstock. Biomass was chosen as the renewable energy resource to evaluate based on abundant woody-biomass resources available in the area. NREL also evaluates potential savings from converting existing Micmac property from oil-fired heating to pellet heating.

  16. Welfare-to-Work Program Coordination in Texas. Report on the Initial Site Visits. First in a Series of Reports on JTPA/Welfare Coordination Efforts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gula, Annette; King, Christopher T.

    The first round of site visits to welfare-to-work programs in Texas examined the nature and degree of program coordination at three sites: El Paso, Houston, and San Antonio. A brief overview of the growing literature on program coordination paid particular attention to welfare-related studies. At the state level, evidence was found of increasing…

  17. Surface-subsurface model for a dimer-dimer catalytic reaction: a Monte Carlo simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, K. M.; Albano, E. V.

    2002-02-01

    The surface-subsurface model for a dimer-dimer reaction of the type A2 + 2B2→2AB2 has been studied through Monte Carlo simulation via a model based on the lattice gas non-thermal Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism, which involves the precursor motion of the B2 molecule. The motion of precursors is considered on the surface as well as in the subsurface. The most interesting feature of this model is that it yields a steady reactive window, which is separated by continuous and discontinuous irreversible phase transitions. The phase diagram is qualitatively similar to the well known Ziff, Gulari and Barshad (ZGB) model. The width of the window depends upon the mobility of precursors. The continuous transition disappears when the mobility of the surface precursors is extended to the third-nearest neighbourhood. The dependence of production rate on partial pressure of B2 dimer is predicted by simple mathematical equations in our model.

  18. Effects of conventional machining on the high cycle fatigue strength and crack initiation sites of the gamma titanium aluminide alloy Ti-47Al-2Nb-2Cr (at%) at 23 and 760 C

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, P.E.; Eylon, D.

    1999-07-01

    Effects of a deformed surface layer, created by conventional machining, on the high cycle fatigue strength (10e6 cycles) and fatigue initiation sites of Ti-48Al-2Nb-2Cr (at%) were examined above and below the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature. All samples were tested to failure under the same step loading profile. Comparisons were made between samples having the same load history. At room temperature, fatigue strength and initiation sites were equivalent for turned and electropolished surface conditions. At the anticipated service temperature, 760 C, the work hardened layer created by turning quickly recrystallized. This fine recrystallized surface enhanced the fatigue crack initiation resistance of turned specimens when compared to coarse grained electropolished samples which did not recrystallize during the test. The severe surface deformation resulting from conventional machining did not impair the high cycle fatigue behavior of this intermetallic alloy under the conditions evaluated.

  19. Modeling of Manganese Atom and Dimer Isolated in Solid Rare Gases: Structure, Stability, and Effect on Spin Coupling.

    PubMed

    Kleshchina, Nadezhda N; Korchagina, Kseniia A; Bezrukov, Dmitry S; Buchachenko, Alexei A

    2017-03-17

    Structures and energies of the trapping sites of manganese atom and dimer in solid Ar, Kr, and Xe are investigated within the classical model, which balances local distortion and long-range crystal order of the host and provides a means to estimate the relative site stabilities. The model is implemented with the additive pairwise potential field based on the ab initio and best empirical interatomic potential functions. In agreement with experiment, Mn single substitution (SS) and tetrahedral vacancy (TV) occupation are identified as stable for Ar and Kr, whereas the SS site is only found for Xe. Stable trapping sites of the weakly bound Mn2 dimer are shown to be the mergers of SS and/or TV atomic sites. For Ar, (SS + SS) and (TV + TV) sites are close in energy, whereas (SS + TV) site lies higher. The (SS + SS) accommodation is identified as the only stable site in Kr and Xe at low energies. The results are compared with the resonance Raman, electron spin resonance, and absorption spectroscopy data. Reproducing the numbers of stable sites, the calculations tend to underestimate the matrix effect on the dimer vibrational frequency and spin-spin coupling constant. Nonetheless, the level of agreement is found to be informative for tentative assignments of the complex features seen in Mn2 matrix isolation spectroscopy.

  20. Analysis of SecA Dimerization in Solution

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The Sec pathway mediates translocation of protein across the inner membrane of bacteria. SecA is a motor protein that drives translocation of preprotein through the SecYEG channel. SecA reversibly dimerizes under physiological conditions, but different dimer interfaces have been observed in SecA crystal structures. Here, we have used biophysical approaches to address the nature of the SecA dimer that exists in solution. We have taken advantage of the extreme salt sensitivity of SecA dimerization to compare the rates of hydrogen–deuterium exchange of the monomer and dimer and have analyzed the effects of single-alanine substitutions on dimerization affinity. Our results support the antiparallel dimer arrangement observed in one of the crystal structures of Bacillus subtilis SecA. Additional residues lying within the preprotein binding domain and the C-terminus are also protected from exchange upon dimerization, indicating linkage to a conformational transition of the preprotein binding domain from an open to a closed state. In agreement with this interpretation, normal mode analysis demonstrates that the SecA dimer interface influences the global dynamics of SecA such that dimerization stabilizes the closed conformation. PMID:24786965

  1. Stepwise Two-Photon-Induced Fast Photoswitching via Electron Transfer in Higher Excited States of Photochromic Imidazole Dimer.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yoichi; Katayama, Tetsuro; Yamane, Takuya; Setoura, Kenji; Ito, Syoji; Miyasaka, Hiroshi; Abe, Jiro

    2016-05-11

    Stepwise two-photon excitations have been attracting much interest because of their much lower power thresholds compared with simultaneous two-photon processes and because some stepwise two-photon processes can be initiated by a weak incoherent excitation light source. Here we apply stepwise two-photon optical processes to the photochromic bridged imidazole dimer, whose solution instantly changes color upon UV irradiation and quickly reverts to the initial color thermally at room temperature. We synthesized a zinc tetraphenylporphyrin (ZnTPP)-substituted bridged imidazole dimer, and wide ranges of time-resolved spectroscopic studies revealed that a ZnTPP-linked bridged imidazole dimer shows efficient visible stepwise two-photon-induced photochromic reactions upon excitation at the porphyrin moiety. The fast photoswitching property combined with stepwise two-photon processes is important not only for the potential for novel photochromic materials that are sensitive to the incident light intensity but also for fundamental photochemistry using higher excited states.

  2. Solution-state Structure of a DNA Dodecamer Duplex Containing a Cis-syn Thymine Cyclobutane Dimer, the Major UV Photoproduct of DNA.

    SciTech Connect

    McAteer, Kathleen; Jing, Y; Kao, J; Taylor, J S.; Kennedy, Michael A.

    1998-10-09

    The solution structures of a duplex DNA dodecamer containing a cis-syn cyclobutane thymine dimer d(GCACGAAT[cs]TAAG).d(CTTAATTCG TGC) and its native parent sequence were determined using NMR data collected at 750 MHz. The dodecamer sequence corresponds to the section of a site-specific cis-syn dimer containing 49-mer that was found to be the binding site for the dimer-specific T4 denV endonuclease V repair enzyme by chemical and enzymatic footprinting experiments. Structures of both sequences were derived from NOE restrained molecular dynamics/simulated annealing calculations using a fixed outer layer of water and an inner dynamic layer of water with sodium counterions. The resulting structures reveal a subtle distortion to the phosphodiester backbone in the dimer-containing sequence which includes a BII phosphate at the T9pA10 junction immediately 3' to the dimer. The BII phosphate, established experimentally by analysis of the 31P chemical shifts and interpretation of the 3JP-H3' values using an optimized Karplus relationship, enables the DNA helix to accommodate the dimer by destacking the base 3' to the dimer. Furthermore, the structures provide explanations for the unusually shifted T8-N3H imino, A16-H2 and T8-Me proton resonances and T9pA10 (31)P NMR resonance and are consistent with bending, unwinding, and thermodynamic data.

  3. Structural and biochemical studies on Vibrio cholerae Hsp31 reveals a novel dimeric form and Glutathione-independent Glyoxalase activity

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Sanjay

    2017-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae experiences a highly hostile environment at human intestine which triggers the induction of various heat shock genes. The hchA gene product of V. cholerae O395, referred to a hypothetical intracellular protease/amidase VcHsp31, is one such stress-inducible homodimeric protein. Our current study demonstrates that VcHsp31 is endowed with molecular chaperone, amidopeptidase and robust methylglyoxalase activities. Through site directed mutagenesis coupled with biochemical assays on VcHsp31, we have confirmed the role of residues in the vicinity of the active site towards amidopeptidase and methylglyoxalase activities. VcHsp31 suppresses the aggregation of insulin in vitro in a dose dependent manner. Through crystal structures of VcHsp31 and its mutants, grown at various temperatures, we demonstrate that VcHsp31 acquires two (Type-I and Type-II) dimeric forms. Type-I dimer is similar to EcHsp31 where two VcHsp31 monomers associate in eclipsed manner through several intersubunit hydrogen bonds involving their P-domains. Type-II dimer is a novel dimeric organization, where some of the intersubunit hydrogen bonds are abrogated and each monomer swings out in the opposite directions centering at their P-domains, like twisting of wet cloth. Normal mode analysis (NMA) of Type-I dimer shows similar movement of the individual monomers. Upon swinging, a dimeric surface of ~400Å2, mostly hydrophobic in nature, is uncovered which might bind partially unfolded protein substrates. We propose that, in solution, VcHsp31 remains as an equilibrium mixture of both the dimers. With increase in temperature, transformation to Type-II form having more exposed hydrophobic surface, occurs progressively accounting for the temperature dependent increase of chaperone activity of VcHsp31. PMID:28235098

  4. Elevated D-dimer and fibrinogen levels in serum of preoperative bone fracture patients.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chen; Song, Ying; Zhao, Jingzhong; Xu, Qinzhu; Liu, Ning; Zhao, Lei; Lu, Songsong; Wang, Hui

    2016-01-01

    The changes of coagulation parameters in preoperative fracture patients reflect the coagulation status before surgery. We did retrospective assessment of preoperative fracture patients (n = 113) admitted to the hospital between September 2013 and September 2014. The control group were selected from healthy adults (n = 113) with matched age and gender. Platelet, PT INR, APTT, fibrinogen (FIB) and D-dimer values were collected and analyzed. PT INR level was 1.043 ± 0.119, APTT was 31.91 ± 7.56 s, FIB was 320.6 ± 71.8 mg/dl and D-dimer was 1283 ± 1582 ng/ml for the fracture patients. For the control group, PT INR level was 0.9976 ± 0.0602, APTT was 33.22 ± 2.55 s, FIB was 277.3 ± 44.7 mg/dl and D-dimer was 97.53 ± 63.90 ng/ml. Meanwhile, D-dimer levels of different sites of fractures were also measured: Femora 2448 ± 1961 ng/ml; Humerus 792.4 ± 691.2 ng/ml; Ulna/Radius 619.4 ± 843.7 ng/ml; Vertebra 647.7 ± 787.1 ng/ml; Tibia/Fibula 496.3 ± 268.8 ng/ml; Clavicle 260.9 ± 170.9 ng/ml; Ankle 415.4 ± 286.6 ng/ml. To conclude, D-dimer and fibrinogen levels get higher in preoperative fracture patients than controls. Besides, D-dimer levels are significantly different among different locations of fractures, and our data revealed that D-dimer levels of Femora fracture were higher than other sites.

  5. The Dimerization Domain in DapE Enzymes Is required for Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Nocek, Boguslaw; Starus, Anna; Makowska-Grzyska, Magdalena; Gutierrez, Blanca; Sanchez, Stephen; Jedrzejczak, Robert; Mack, Jamey C.; Olsen, Kenneth W.; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Holz, Richard C.

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains underscores the importance of identifying new drug targets and developing new antimicrobial compounds. Lysine and meso-diaminopimelic acid are essential for protein production and bacterial peptidoglycan cell wall remodeling and are synthesized in bacteria by enzymes encoded within dap operon. Therefore dap enzymes may serve as excellent targets for developing a new class of antimicrobial agents. The dapE-encoded N-succinyl-L,L-diaminopimelic acid desuccinylase (DapE) converts N-succinyl-L,L-diaminopimelic acid to L,L-diaminopimelic acid and succinate. The enzyme is composed of catalytic and dimerization domains, and belongs to the M20 peptidase family. To understand the specific role of each domain of the enzyme we engineered dimerization domain deletion mutants of DapEs from Haemophilus influenzae and Vibrio cholerae, and characterized these proteins structurally and biochemically. No activity was observed for all deletion mutants. Structural comparisons of wild-type, inactive monomeric DapE enzymes with other M20 peptidases suggest that the dimerization domain is essential for DapE enzymatic activity. Structural analysis and molecular dynamics simulations indicate that removal of the dimerization domain increased the flexibility of a conserved active site loop that may provide critical interactions with the substrate. PMID:24806882

  6. The dimerization domain in DapE enzymes is required for catalysis.

    PubMed

    Nocek, Boguslaw; Starus, Anna; Makowska-Grzyska, Magdalena; Gutierrez, Blanca; Sanchez, Stephen; Jedrzejczak, Robert; Mack, Jamey C; Olsen, Kenneth W; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Holz, Richard C

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains underscores the importance of identifying new drug targets and developing new antimicrobial compounds. Lysine and meso-diaminopimelic acid are essential for protein production and bacterial peptidoglycan cell wall remodeling and are synthesized in bacteria by enzymes encoded within dap operon. Therefore dap enzymes may serve as excellent targets for developing a new class of antimicrobial agents. The dapE-encoded N-succinyl-L,L-diaminopimelic acid desuccinylase (DapE) converts N-succinyl-L,L-diaminopimelic acid to L,L-diaminopimelic acid and succinate. The enzyme is composed of catalytic and dimerization domains, and belongs to the M20 peptidase family. To understand the specific role of each domain of the enzyme we engineered dimerization domain deletion mutants of DapEs from Haemophilus influenzae and Vibrio cholerae, and characterized these proteins structurally and biochemically. No activity was observed for all deletion mutants. Structural comparisons of wild-type, inactive monomeric DapE enzymes with other M20 peptidases suggest that the dimerization domain is essential for DapE enzymatic activity. Structural analysis and molecular dynamics simulations indicate that removal of the dimerization domain increased the flexibility of a conserved active site loop that may provide critical interactions with the substrate.

  7. The role of tyrosine sulfation in the dimerization of the CXCR4:SDF-1 complex.

    PubMed

    Rapp, Chaya; Snow, Sara; Laufer, Talya; McClendon, Christopher L

    2013-08-01

    Oligomerization of G protein-coupled receptors is a recognized mode of regulation of receptor activities, with alternate oligomeric states resulting in different signaling functions. The CXCR4 chemokine receptor is a G protein-coupled receptor that is post-translationally modified by tyrosine sulfation at three sites on its N-terminus (Y7, Y12, Y21), leading to enhanced affinity for its ligand, stromal cell derived factor (SDF-1, also called CXCL12). The complex has been implicated in cancer metastasis and is a therapeutic target in cancer treatment. Using molecular dynamics simulation of NMR-derived structures of the CXCR4 N-terminus in complex with SDF-1, and calculations of electrostatic binding energies for these complexes, we address the role of tyrosine sulfation in this complex. Our results show that sulfation stabilizes the dimeric state of the CXCR4:SDF-1 complex through hydrogen bonding across the dimer interface, conformational changes in residues at the dimer interface, and an enhancement in electrostatic binding energies associated with dimerization. These findings suggest a mechanism through which post-translational modifications such as tyrosine sulfation might regulate downstream function through modulation of the oligomeric state of the modified system.

  8. The effect of dimerization on the excited state behavior of methylated xanthine derivatives: a computational study.

    PubMed

    Nachtigallová, Dana; Aquino, Adelia J A; Horn, Shawn; Lischka, Hans

    2013-08-01

    The behavior of monomers and dimers of methylated xanthine derivatives in their excited states is investigated by means of the ADC(2), CASSCF, and CASPT2 methods. The results of the calculations of stationary points in the ground and excited states, minima on the S0/S1 crossing seams and the relaxation pathways are used to provide the interpretation of experimental observations of the monomer xanthine derivatives. The effect of dimerization on the excited state properties is studied for various relative orientations of the monomers in the dimer complexes in comparison with the relevant monomer species. A significant stabilization in the excited state minima of dimers is observed. These can act as trapping sites. Various types of conical intersections, with both localized and delocalized characters of wavefunctions, have been found, mainly energetically above the lowest bright excited state in the FC region. In addition, structures with the bonds formed between the two monomers were also found on the crossing seams. The possibility of ultrafast relaxation via these conical intersections is discussed.

  9. Early events in TNFa-p55 receptor interations--experiments with TNF dimers.

    PubMed

    Menart, V; Gaberc-Porekar, V; Jevsevar, S; Pernus, M; Meager, A; Stalc, A

    2000-01-01

    The first essential step in TNF signal transduction is believed to be clustering of the membrane bound receptors around the trimeric TNF molecule. To check if one receptor binding site would be enough to trigger the signal, we tried to prepare several types of TNF dimer. For this purpose, two TNF analogs bearing different cysteine mutations at the inner subunit binding surfaces were designed, expressed in E. coli and prepared in pure form. By mixing equimolar quantities of these analogs under appropriate conditions, two different types of dimer were prepared. The first, Dim/S2, proved to be composed mainly of a disulfide-linked dimer, which was still capable of trapping the third subunit of either of the precursor analogs, thus showing relatively high residual cytotoxicity. To avoid trimeric structures, Dim/S2 was further transformed into Dim/Iaa2 by alkylation of -SH groups of the newly introduced cysteines, allowing binding of only two TNF subunits through native contact surfaces. These dimers showed substantially reduced cytotoxicity on the L929 cell line. In addition, it appears that Dim/Iaa2 is able to competitively inhibit cytotoxicity of native TNF, as assessed on the L-M cell line.

  10. Dimeric c-di-GMP is required for post-translational regulation of alginate production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Whitney, John C; Whitfield, Gregory B; Marmont, Lindsey S; Yip, Patrick; Neculai, A Mirela; Lobsanov, Yuri D; Robinson, Howard; Ohman, Dennis E; Howell, P Lynne

    2015-05-15

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen that secretes the exopolysaccharide alginate during infection of the respiratory tract of individuals afflicted with cystic fibrosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Among the proteins required for alginate production, Alg44 has been identified as an inner membrane protein whose bis-(3',5')-cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) binding activity post-translationally regulates alginate secretion. In this study, we report the 1.8 Å crystal structure of the cytoplasmic region of Alg44 in complex with dimeric self-intercalated c-di-GMP and characterize its dinucleotide-binding site using mutational analysis. The structure shows that the c-di-GMP binding region of Alg44 adopts a PilZ domain fold with a dimerization mode not previously observed for this family of proteins. Calorimetric binding analysis of residues in the c-di-GMP binding site demonstrate that mutation of Arg-17 and Arg-95 alters the binding stoichiometry between c-di-GMP and Alg44 from 2:1 to 1:1. Introduction of these mutant alleles on the P. aeruginosa chromosome show that the residues required for binding of dimeric c-di-GMP in vitro are also required for efficient alginate production in vivo. These results suggest that the dimeric form of c-di-GMP represents the biologically active signaling molecule needed for the secretion of an important virulence factor produced by P. aeruginosa.

  11. Dimeric c-di-GMP Is Required for Post-translational Regulation of Alginate Production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa*

    PubMed Central

    Whitney, John C.; Whitfield, Gregory B.; Marmont, Lindsey S.; Yip, Patrick; Neculai, A. Mirela; Lobsanov, Yuri D.; Robinson, Howard; Ohman, Dennis E.; Howell, P. Lynne

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen that secretes the exopolysaccharide alginate during infection of the respiratory tract of individuals afflicted with cystic fibrosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Among the proteins required for alginate production, Alg44 has been identified as an inner membrane protein whose bis-(3′,5′)-cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) binding activity post-translationally regulates alginate secretion. In this study, we report the 1.8 Å crystal structure of the cytoplasmic region of Alg44 in complex with dimeric self-intercalated c-di-GMP and characterize its dinucleotide-binding site using mutational analysis. The structure shows that the c-di-GMP binding region of Alg44 adopts a PilZ domain fold with a dimerization mode not previously observed for this family of proteins. Calorimetric binding analysis of residues in the c-di-GMP binding site demonstrate that mutation of Arg-17 and Arg-95 alters the binding stoichiometry between c-di-GMP and Alg44 from 2:1 to 1:1. Introduction of these mutant alleles on the P. aeruginosa chromosome show that the residues required for binding of dimeric c-di-GMP in vitro are also required for efficient alginate production in vivo. These results suggest that the dimeric form of c-di-GMP represents the biologically active signaling molecule needed for the secretion of an important virulence factor produced by P. aeruginosa. PMID:25817996

  12. Dimeric c-di-GMP is required for post-translational regulation of alginate production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DOE PAGES

    Whitney, John C.; Robinson, Howard; Whitfield, Gregory B.; ...

    2015-05-15

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen that secretes the exopolysaccharide alginate during infection of the respiratory tract of individuals afflicted with cystic fibrosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Among the proteins required for alginate production, Alg44 has been identified as an inner membrane protein whose bis-(3',5')-cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) binding activity post-translationally regulates alginate secretion. In this study, we report the 1.8 Å crystal structure of the cytoplasmic region of Alg44 in complex with dimeric self-intercalated c-di-GMP and characterize its dinucleotide-binding site using mutational analysis. The structure shows that the c-di-GMP binding region of Alg44 adopts a PilZmore » domain fold with a dimerization mode not previously observed for this family of proteins. Moreover, calorimetric binding analysis of residues in the c-di-GMP binding site demonstrate that mutation of Arg-17 and Arg-95 alters the binding stoichiometry between c-di-GMP and Alg44 from 2:1 to 1:1. Introduction of these mutant alleles on the P. aeruginosa chromosome show that the residues required for binding of dimeric c-di-GMP in vitro are also required for efficient alginate production in vivo. Our results suggest that the dimeric form of c-di-GMP represents the biologically active signaling molecule needed for the secretion of an important virulence factor produced by P. aeruginosa.« less

  13. Dimeric c-di-GMP is required for post-translational regulation of alginate production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    SciTech Connect

    Whitney, John C.; Robinson, Howard; Whitfield, Gregory B.; Marmont, Lindsey S.; Yip, Patrick; Neculai, A. Mirela; Lobsanov, Yuri D.; Ohman, Dennis E.; Howell, P. Lynne

    2015-05-15

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen that secretes the exopolysaccharide alginate during infection of the respiratory tract of individuals afflicted with cystic fibrosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Among the proteins required for alginate production, Alg44 has been identified as an inner membrane protein whose bis-(3',5')-cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) binding activity post-translationally regulates alginate secretion. In this study, we report the 1.8 Å crystal structure of the cytoplasmic region of Alg44 in complex with dimeric self-intercalated c-di-GMP and characterize its dinucleotide-binding site using mutational analysis. The structure shows that the c-di-GMP binding region of Alg44 adopts a PilZ domain fold with a dimerization mode not previously observed for this family of proteins. Moreover, calorimetric binding analysis of residues in the c-di-GMP binding site demonstrate that mutation of Arg-17 and Arg-95 alters the binding stoichiometry between c-di-GMP and Alg44 from 2:1 to 1:1. Introduction of these mutant alleles on the P. aeruginosa chromosome show that the residues required for binding of dimeric c-di-GMP in vitro are also required for efficient alginate production in vivo. Our results suggest that the dimeric form of c-di-GMP represents the biologically active signaling molecule needed for the secretion of an important virulence factor produced by P. aeruginosa.

  14. Enhanced nitrite reductase activity associated with the haptoglobin complexed hemoglobin dimer: functional and antioxidative implications.

    PubMed

    Roche, Camille J; Dantsker, David; Alayash, Abdu I; Friedman, Joel M

    2012-06-30

    The presence of acellular hemoglobin (Hb) within the circulation is generally viewed as a pathological state that can result in toxic consequences. Haptoglobin (Hp), a globular protein found in the plasma, binds with high avidity the αβ dimers derived from the dissociation of Hb tetramer and thus helps clear free Hb. More recently there have been compelling indications that the redox properties of the Hp bound dimer (Hb-Hp) may play a more active role in controlling toxicity by limiting the potential tissue damage caused by propagation of the free-radicals generated within the heme containing globin chains. The present study further examines the potential protective effect of Hp through its impact on the production of nitric oxide (NO) from nitrite through nitrite reductase activity of the Hp bound αβ Hb dimer. The presented results show that the Hb dimer in the Hb-Hp complex has oxygen binding, CO recombination and spectroscopic properties consistent with an Hb species having properties similar to but not exactly the same as the R quaternary state of the Hb tetramer. Consistent with these observations is the finding that the initial nitrite reductase rate for Hb-Hp is approximately ten times that of HbA under the same conditions. These results in conjunction with the earlier redox properties of the Hb-Hp are discussed in terms of limiting the pathophysiological consequences of acellular Hb in the circulation.

  15. Microcrystals engineering using assemblies of di-protonated meso-tetraphenylporphine dimers under Zundel cations operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udal'tsov, Alexander V.

    2015-03-01

    New approach based on the usage of self-organized assemblies of di-protonated meso-tetraphenylporphine (TPP) dimers under Zundel cations action is suggested for the microcrystals engineering. Properties of the assemblies consisting of water and the protonated dimers, as produced in aqueous HCl in the presence of a small concentration of water-soluble organic solvent were investigated by UV-Vis and infrared spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM) in thin films. The self-organized assemblies consisting of water and di-protonated TPP dimers looked like long rods produced green crystals. These crystals were found by light microscopy. The ordered assembled structures crystallized into thin layers at open air at relative humidity of least 60%. Three acts of the microcrystals engineering actions are needed to obtain the green crystals that are (i) self-assembling of protonated TPP dimers under Zundel cations operation; (ii) generation of pure rod precursor in the di-protonated state and (iii) application of gaseous water to initiate the crystallization in order to Zundel cations action in the surface layer could occur. The size of the green crystals produced by the self-organized assemblies varies within 30-35 μm.

  16. Induction of pyrimidine dimers and unscheduled DNA synthesis in cultured mouse epithelial cells exposed to 254-nm- and u. v. -B radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Yotti, L.P.; Ley, R.D.

    1983-01-01

    The induction and fate of pyrimidine dimers and unscheduled DNA synthesis were measured in u.v.-irradiated primary, newborn SENCAR mouse epithelial cells. Unscheduled DNA synthesis was induced in a dose responsive manner by two u.v. sources, a germicidal lamp (254 nm) and an FS40 sunlamp (280--400 nm). Using the endonuclease-sensitive site assay to detect pyrimidine dimer production and excision, we examined the response of the newborn mouse cells to both u.v. sources. We were unable to detect the removal of pyrimidine dimers with either of the two sources of u.v. The speculation is made that primary, newborn mouse epidermal cells excise u.v.-induced pyrimidine dimers to an extent below the level of detection of the endonuclease-sensitive site assay but to an extent sufficient to induce unscheduled DNA synthesis.

  17. Dimer with gain and loss: Integrability and {P}{T}-symmetry restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barashenkov, I. V.; Pelinovsky, D. E.; Dubard, P.

    2015-08-01

    A {P}{T}-symmetric nonlinear Schrödinger dimer is a two-site discrete nonlinear Schrödinger equation with one site losing and the other one gaining energy at the same rate. In this paper, two four-parameter families of cubic {P}{T}-symmetric dimers are constructed as gain-loss extensions of their conservative, Hamiltonian, counterparts. We prove that all these damped-driven equations define completely integrable Hamiltonian systems. The second aim of our study is to identify nonlinearities that give rise to the spontaneous {P}{T}-symmetry restoration. When the symmetry of the underlying linear dimer is broken and an unstable small perturbation starts to grow, the nonlinear coupling of the required type will divert an increasingly large percentage of energy from the gaining to the losing site. As a result, the exponential growth will be saturated and all trajectories remain trapped in a finite part of the phase space regardless of the value of the gain-loss coefficient.

  18. Terpenylic and Related Lactone-Containing Acids: Novel Monoterpene Secondary Organic Aerosol Tracers with Dimer-Forming Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claeys, M.; Iinuma, Y.; Szmigielski, R.; Farhat, Y.; Surratt, J. D.; Blockhuys, F.; van Alsenoy, C.; Böge, O.; Sierau, B.; Gómez-González, Y.; Vermeylen, R.; van der Veken, P.; Shahgholi, M.; Chan, A. W.; Herrmann, H.; Seinfeld, J.; Maenhaut, W.

    2009-12-01

    Blue haze is a natural phenomenon that is observed in forested regions worldwide and is due to the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles. While evidence exists for organic molecular clusters in the size range of < 2 nm, the chemical structures of the nucleating particles have remained unresolved. In the present study, novel SOA products from the monoterpene α-pinene with unique dimer-forming properties have been identified as lactone-containing terpenoic acids, i.e., terpenylic (molecular weight (MW) 172), terebic (MW 158) and 2-hydroxyterpenylic acid (MW 188), and diaterpenylic acid acetate (MW 232). The structural characterizations were based on synthesis of reference compounds and detailed interpretation of negative ion electrospray ionization mass spectral [(-)ESI-MS] data, including accurate mass and MSn ion trap measurements. Terpenylic acid and diaterpenylic acid acetate are early oxidation products formed upon both photooxidation and ozonolysis, and are abundant SOA tracers in ambient fine aerosol from coniferous forest sites (e.g., K-puszta, Hungary). Terebic and 2-hydroxyterpenylic acid can be explained by further oxidation of terpenylic acid, and are also prominent tracers in ambient fine aerosol. Quantum chemical calculations support that non-covalent dimer formation involving double hydrogen bonding interactions between carboxyl groups of the monomers is energetically favorable. Lactone-containing terpenoic acids also form through photooxidation from monoterpenes other than α-pinene, i.e., terebic acid from Δ3-carene, and terpenylic, homoterpenylic (MW 186), and terebic acid from β-pinene. A distinct feature of terpenylic acid and related lactone-containing acids is that they can be selectively detected in positive ion (+)ESI-MS, unlike isobaric dicarboxylic terpenoic acids such as norpinic (MW 172) and pinic acid (MW 186). Interestingly, terpenylic, terebic and homoterpenylic acid were already reported in the early German

  19. Dimerize RACK1 upon transformation with oncogenic ras

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, L.-Y.; Chen, Y.-H.; Chuang, N.-N. . E-mail: zonnc@sinica.edu.tw

    2005-05-06

    From our previous studies, we learned that syndecan-2/p120-GAP complex provided docking site for Src to prosecute tyrosine kinase activity upon transformation with oncogenic ras. And, RACK1 protein was reactive with syndecan-2 to keep Src inactivated, but not when Ras was overexpressed. In the present study, we characterized the reaction between RACK1 protein and Ras. RACK1 was isolated from BALB/3T3 cells transfected with plasmids pcDNA3.1-[S-ras(Q{sub 61}K)] of shrimp Penaeus japonicus and RACK1 was revealed to react with GTP-K{sub B}-Ras(Q{sub 61}K), not GDP-K{sub B}-Ras(Q{sub 61}K). This selective interaction between RACK1 and GTP-K{sub B}-Ras(Q{sub 61}K) was further confirmed with RACK1 of human placenta and mouse RACK1-encoded fusion protein. We found that RACK1 was dimerized upon reaction with GTP-K{sub B}-Ras(Q{sub 61}K), as well as with 14-3-3{beta} and geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate, as revealed by phosphorylation with Src tyrosine kinase. We reported the complex of RACK1/GTP-K{sub B}-Ras(Q{sub 61}K) reacted selectively with p120-GAP. This interaction was sufficient to dissemble RACK1 into monomers, a preferred form to compete for the binding of syndecan-2. These data indicate that the reaction of GTP-K{sub B}-Ras(Q{sub 61}K) with RACK1 in dimers may operate a mechanism to deplete RACK1 from reaction with syndecan-2 upon transformation by oncogenic ras and the RACK1/GTP-Ras complex may provide a route to react with p120-GAP and recycle monomeric RACK1 to syndecan-2.

  20. Modulation of ceramide synthase activity via dimerization.

    PubMed

    Laviad, Elad L; Kelly, Samuel; Merrill, Alfred H; Futerman, Anthony H

    2012-06-15

    Ceramide, the backbone of all sphingolipids, is synthesized by a family of ceramide synthases (CerS) that each use acyl-CoAs of defined chain length for N-acylation of the sphingoid long chain base. CerS mRNA expression and enzymatic activity do not always correlate with the sphingolipid acyl chain composition of a particular tissue, suggesting post-translational mechanism(s) of regulation of CerS activity. We now demonstrate that CerS activity can be modulated by dimer formation. Under suitable conditions, high M(r) CerS complexes can be detected by Western blotting, and various CerS co-immunoprecipitate. CerS5 activity is inhibited in a dominant-negative fashion by co-expression with catalytically inactive CerS5, and CerS2 activity is enhanced by co-expression with a catalytically active form of CerS5 or CerS6. In a constitutive heterodimer comprising CerS5 and CerS2, the activity of CerS2 depends on the catalytic activity of CerS5. Finally, CerS dimers are formed upon rapid stimulation of ceramide synthesis by curcumin. Together, these data demonstrate that ceramide synthesis can be regulated by the formation of CerS dimers and suggest a novel way to generate the acyl chain composition of ceramide (and downstream sphingolipids), which may depend on the interaction of CerS with each other.

  1. Caffeine dimerization: effects of sugar, salts, and water structure.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Seishi

    2015-10-01

    Sugars and salts strongly affect the dimerization of caffeine in water. Such a change of dimerization, considered to be crucial for bitter taste suppression, has long been rationalized by the change of "water structure" induced by the additives; "kosmotropic" (water structure enhancing) salts and sugars promote dimerization, whereas "chaotropic" (water structure breaking) salts suppress dimerization. Based on statistical thermodynamics, here we challenge this consensus; we combine the rigorous Kirkwood-Buff theory of solution with the classical isodesmic model of caffeine association. Instead of the change of water structure, we show that the enhancement of caffeine dimerization is due to the exclusion of additives from caffeine, and that the weakening of dimerization is due to the binding of additives on caffeine.

  2. Metal enhanced fluorescence of Ag-nanoshell dimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liaw, Jiunn-Woei; Chen, Huang-Chih; Chen, Bae-Renn; Kuo, Mao-Kuen

    2014-04-01

    The plasmon modes of Ag-nanoshell dimer on metal enhanced fluorescence (MEF) are studied theoretically. The amplified excitation rate of a dimer (two identical Ag nanoshells) illuminated by a plane wave for exciting a molecule located at the gap center is calculated. Subsequently, the apparent quantum yield of the emission of the excited molecule affected by the dimer is investigated. The multiple multipole method is used for the both simulations. Finally, the enhancement factor of the dimer on the overall photoluminescence of the molecule in terms of the two parameters is evaluated. Our results show that Ag-nanoshell dimer is a dual-band photoluminescence enhancer for MEF at the bonding dipole and quadrupole modes. The former is broadband, and the latter narrowband. Both bands depend on the gap size. Moreover, the average enhancement factor of Ag-nanoshell dimer for MEF with a Stokes shift is discussed.

  3. Molecular recognition at the dimer interface of a class mu glutathione transferase: role of a hydrophobic interaction motif in dimer stability and protein function.

    PubMed

    Hornby, Judith A T; Codreanu, Simona G; Armstrong, Richard N; Dirr, Heini W

    2002-12-03

    Cytosolic glutathione (GSH) transferases (GSTs) exist as stable homo- and heterodimers. Interactions at the subunit interface serve an important role in stabilizing the subunit tertiary structures of all GSH transferases. In addition, the dimer is required to maintain functional conformations at the active site on each subunit and the nonsubstrate ligand binding site at the dimer interface [Dirr, H. W. (2001) Chem.-Biol. Interact. 133, 19-23]. In this study, we report on the contribution of a specific intersubunit hydrophobic motif in rGSTM1-1 to dimer stability and protein function. The motif consists of the side chain of F56 from one subunit intercalated between helices 4 and 5 of the second subunit. Replacement of F56 with the hydrophilic side chains of serine, arginine, and glutamate results in a change in the structure of the active site, a marked diminution in catalytic efficiency, and alterations in the ability to bind nonsubstrate ligands. The mutations also affect the ability of the enzyme to bind GSH and the substrate analogue glutathione sulfonate. The functionality of rGSTM1-1 was disrupted to the greatest extent for the F56E mutant. Though mutations at this position do not alter the three-state equilibrium folding process for rGSTM1-1 (i.e., N(2) <--> 2I <--> 2U), destabilizing mutations at position 56 shift the equilibrium between the folded dimer (N(2)) and the monomeric intermediate (I) toward the latter conformational state. The transition to the unfolded state (U) is not significantly affected. The folded monomeric intermediate is also observed by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. The amount of the intermediate is dependent on protein concentration and the residue at position 56. Mutations at position 56 have little impact on the secondary structure and stability of the monomeric folding intermediate. The dimerization process is proposed to induce a conformational change in the loop containing F56, resulting in improved stability and

  4. Morphinane alkaloid dimers from Sinomenium acutum.

    PubMed

    Jin, Hui-Zi; Wang, Xiao-Ling; Wang, Hong-Bing; Wang, Yu-Bo; Lin, Li-Ping; Ding, Jian; Qin, Guo-Wei

    2008-01-01

    Two new morphinane alkaloid dimers, 2,2'-disinomenine (1) and 7',8'-dihydro-1,1'-disinomenine (2), and known 1, 1'-disinomenine (3), were isolated from ethanol extracts of stems of Sinomenium acutum. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic methods. The absolute configuration of alkaloids 1-3 was determined by direct comparison of their CD spectra with the known alkaloid sinomenine. The isolated alkaloids were tested for cytotoxicity against A549, P388, and HeLa cell lines, and 1 and 3 showed weak inhibition against A549 and Hela cells.

  5. Thermodynamic properties for the sodium dimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Xiao-Qin; Wang, Chao-Wen; Jia, Chun-Sheng

    2017-04-01

    We present a closed-form expression of the classical vibrational partition function for the improved Rosen-Morse potential energy model. We give explicit expressions for the vibrational mean energy, vibrational specific heat, vibrational free energy, and vibrational entropy for diatomic molecule systems. The properties of these thermodynamic functions for the Na2 dimer are discussed in detail. We find that the improved Rosen-Morse potential model is superior to the harmonic oscillator in calculating the heat capacity for the Na2 molecules.

  6. Thermodynamics of acetylene van der Waals dimerization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colussi, A. J.; Sander, S. P.; Friedl, R. R.

    1991-01-01

    Integrated band intensities of the 620/cm absorption in (C2H2)2 are measured by FTIR spectroscopy at constant acetylene pressure between 198 and 273 K. These data, in conjunction with ab initio results for (C2H2)2, are used for the statistical evaluation of the equilibrium constant Kp(T) for acetylene-cluster dimerization. The present results are used to clarify the role of molecular clusters in chemical systems at or near equilibrium, in particular in Titan's stratosphere.

  7. Potential Impacts of Leakage from Black Rock Reservoir on the Hanford Site Unconfined Aquifer: Initial Hypothetical Simulations of Flow and Contaminant Transport - Errata

    SciTech Connect

    Freedman, Vicky L.

    2007-04-30

    Errata for report documenting initial scoping calculations investigating the potential impacts on the Hanford unconfined aquifer resulting from leakage from the proposed Black Rock Reservoir to the west. These calculations were performed for the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation.

  8. Dimerization of thymol blue in solution: Theoretical evidence.

    PubMed

    Balderas-Hernández, Patricia; Vargas, Rubicelia; Rojas-Hernández, Alberto; Ramírez-Silva, Ma Teresa; Galván, Marcelo

    2007-02-28

    The possibility of dimerization of thymol blue was addressed by ab initio and force field calculations. In agreement with experimental information, a dimer forming symmetrical chemical environments for hydrogen bond formation was determined. This dimer is stable in vacuum and aqueous media and corresponds to the same protonated state proposed by the experiment. A comparison of the CVFF and MM3 force fields and ab initio results shows the suitability of CVFF to qualitatively describe this system.

  9. VIDAS D-dimer: fast quantitative ELISA for measuring D-dimer in plasma.

    PubMed

    Pittet, J L; de Moerloose, P; Reber, G; Durand, C; Villard, C; Piga, N; Rolland, D; Comby, S; Dupuy, G

    1996-03-01

    VIDAS D-dimer (bioMérieux) is a new quantitative ELISA for D-dimer determination designed for the VIDAS automated system. The test contains single-dose, ready-to-use reagents and is completed within 35 min. Quantitative results are obtained from a calibration curve stored in the software of the system and expressed as fibrinogen equivalent units. The two-step capture/tag test relies on two complementary monoclonal anti-D-dimer antibodies, the second one being labeled with alkaline phosphatase. The upper limit of the measuring range is 1000 micrograms/L and the lower detection limit is <50 micrograms/L, which is below the lower limit of the reference interval (68-494 micrograms/L). Reproducibility (CV) within and between runs ranges from 5% to 7%. There is no interference from heparin, bilirubin, hemoglobin, fibrinogen degradation products, or plasma turbidity. Comparison with a conventional ELISA (y) gave good correlation (r= 0.91, n= 579) and comparable results (y= 1.35x - 148, S(y/x)= 750), especially for D-dimer concentrations ranging from 0 to 1000 micrograms/L (y= 1.09x - 10.6, r= 0.88, S(y/x)= 170).

  10. Rotational spectra of propargyl alcohol dimer: A dimer bound with three different types of hydrogen bonds

    SciTech Connect

    Mani, Devendra; Arunan, E.

    2014-10-28

    Pure rotational spectra of the propargyl alcohol dimer and its three deuterium isotopologues have been observed in the 4 to 13 GHz range using a pulsed-nozzle Fourier transform microwave spectrometer. For the parent dimer, a total of 51 transitions could be observed and fitted within experimental uncertainty. For two mono-substituted and one bi-substituted deuterium isotopologues, a total of 14, 17, and 19 transitions were observed, respectively. The observed rotational constants for the parent dimer [A = 2321.8335(4) MHz, B = 1150.4774(2) MHz, and C = 1124.8898(2) MHz] are close to those of the most stable structure predicted by ab initio calculations. Spectra of the three deuterated isotopologues and Kraitchman analysis positively confirm this structure. Geometrical parameters and “Atoms in Molecules” analysis on the observed structure reveal that the two propargyl alcohol units in the dimer are bound by three different types of hydrogen bonds: O–H⋯O, O–H⋯π, and C–H⋯π. To the best of our knowledge, propargyl alcohol seems to be the smallest molecule forming a homodimer with three different points of contact.

  11. Transcriptional start site heterogeneity modulates the structure and function of the HIV-1 genome

    PubMed Central

    Kharytonchyk, Siarhei; Monti, Sarah; Smaldino, Philip J.; Van, Verna; Bolden, Nicholas C.; Brown, Joshua D.; Russo, Emily; Swanson, Canessa; Shuey, Alex; Telesnitsky, Alice; Summers, Michael F.

    2016-01-01

    The promoter in HIV type 1 (HIV-1) proviral DNA contains three sequential guanosines at the U3–R boundary that have been proposed to function as sites for transcription initiation. Here we show that all three sites are used in cells infected with HIV-1 and that viral RNAs containing a single 5′ capped guanosine (Cap1G) are specifically selected for packaging in virions, consistent with a recent report [Masuda et al. (2015) Sci Rep 5:17680]. In addition, we now show that transcripts that begin with two or three capped guanosines (Cap2G or Cap3G) are enriched on polysomes, indicating that RNAs synthesized from different transcription start sites have different functions in viral replication. Because genomes are selected for packaging as dimers, we examined the in vitro monomer–dimer equilibrium properties of Cap1G, Cap2G, and Cap3G 5′-leader RNAs in the NL4-3 strain of HIV-1. Strikingly, under physiological-like ionic conditions in which the Cap1G 5′-leader RNA adopts a dimeric structure, the Cap2G and Cap3G 5′-leader RNAs exist predominantly as monomers. Mutagenesis studies designed to probe for base-pairing interactions suggest that the additional guanosines of the 2G and 3G RNAs remodel the base of the PolyA hairpin, resulting in enhanced sequestration of dimer-promoting residues and stabilization of the monomer. Our studies suggest a mechanism through which the structure, function, and fate of the viral genome can be modulated by the transcriptionally controlled presence or absence of a single 5′ guanosine. PMID:27834211

  12. Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of a Hydroelectric Installation at the Jeddo Mine Drainage Tunnel. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, J. O.; Mosey, G.

    2013-02-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in accordance with the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, selected the Jeddo Tunnel discharge site for a feasibility study of renewable energy potential. The purpose of this report is to assess technical and economic viability of the site for hydroelectric and geothermal energy production. In addition, the report outlines financing options that could assist in the implementation of a system.

  13. Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Biopower at the Chanute Air Force Base in Rantoul, Illinois. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Scarlata, C.; Mosey, G.

    2013-05-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in accordance with the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, selected the Former Chanute Air Force Base site in Rantoul, Illinois, for a feasibility study of renewable energy production. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) was contacted to provide technical assistance for this project. The purpose of this study was to assess the site for a possible biopower system installation and estimate the cost, performance, and impacts of different biopower options.

  14. Disordered clusters of Bak dimers rupture mitochondria during apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Uren, Rachel T; O’Hely, Martin; Iyer, Sweta; Bartolo, Ray; Shi, Melissa X; Brouwer, Jason M; Alsop, Amber E; Dewson, Grant; Kluck, Ruth M

    2017-01-01

    During apoptosis, Bak and Bax undergo major conformational change and form symmetric dimers that coalesce to perforate the mitochondrial outer membrane via an unknown mechanism. We have employed cysteine labelling and linkage analysis to the full length of Bak in mitochondria. This comprehensive survey showed that in each Bak dimer the N-termini are fully solvent-exposed and mobile, the core is highly structured, and the C-termini are flexible but restrained by their contact with the membrane. Dimer-dimer interactions were more labile than the BH3:groove interaction within dimers, suggesting there is no extensive protein interface between dimers. In addition, linkage in the mobile Bak N-terminus (V61C) specifically quantified association between dimers, allowing mathematical simulations of dimer arrangement. Together, our data show that Bak dimers form disordered clusters to generate lipidic pores. These findings provide a molecular explanation for the observed structural heterogeneity of the apoptotic pore. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19944.001 PMID:28182867

  15. Assembly of Drosophila centromeric nucleosomes requires CID dimerization.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weiguo; Colmenares, Serafin U; Karpen, Gary H

    2012-01-27

    Centromeres are essential chromosomal regions required for kinetochore assembly and chromosome segregation. The composition and organization of centromeric nucleosomes containing the essential histone H3 variant CENP-A (CID in Drosophila) is a fundamental, unresolved issue. Using immunoprecipitation of CID mononucleosomes and cysteine crosslinking, we demonstrate that centromeric nucleosomes contain CID dimers in vivo. Furthermore, CID dimerization and centromeric targeting require a residue implicated in formation of the four-helix bundle, which mediates intranucleosomal H3 dimerization and nucleosome integrity. Taken together, our findings suggest that CID nucleosomes are octameric in vivo and that CID dimerization is essential for correct centromere assembly.

  16. Assembly of Drosophila Centromeric Nucleosomes Requires CID Dimerization

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weiguo; Colmenares, Serafin U.; Karpen, Gary H.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Centromeres are essential chromosomal regions required for kinetochore assembly and chromosome segregation. The composition and organization of centromeric nucleosomes containing the essential histone H3 variant CENP-A (CID in Drosophila) is a fundamental, unresolved issue. Using immunoprecipitation of CID mononucleosomes and cysteine crosslinking, we demonstrate that centromeric nucleosomes contain CID dimers in vivo. Furthermore, CID dimerization and centromeric targeting require a residue implicated in formation of the four helix bundle, which mediates intra-nucleosomal H3 dimerization and nucleosome integrity. Taken together, our findings suggest that CID nucleosomes are octameric in vivo and that CID dimerization is essential for correct centromere assembly. PMID:22209075

  17. Evolution of a primary pulse in the granular dimers mounted on a linear elastic foundation: An analytical and numerical study.

    PubMed

    Ahsan, Zaid; Jayaprakash, K R

    2016-10-01

    In this exposition we consider the wave dynamics of a one-dimensional periodic granular dimer (diatomic) chain mounted on a damped and an undamped linear elastic foundation (otherwise called the on-site potential). It is very well known that periodic granular dimers support solitary wave propagation (similar to that in the homogeneous granular chains) for a specific discrete set of mass ratios. In this work we present the analytical investigation of the evolution of solitary waves and primary pulses in granular dimers when they are mounted on on-site potential with and without velocity proportional foundation damping. We invoke a methodology based on the multiple time-scale asymptotic analysis and partition the dynamics of the perturbed dimer chain into slow and fast components. The dynamics of the dimer chain in the limit of large mass mismatch (auxiliary chain) mounted on on-site potential and foundation damping is used as the basis for the analysis. A systematic analytical procedure is then developed for the slowly varying response of the beads and in estimating primary pulse amplitude evolution resulting in a nonlinear map relating the relative displacement amplitudes of two adjacent beads. The methodology is applicable for arbitrary mass ratios between the beads. We present several examples to demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed method. It is observed that the amplitude evolution predicted by the described methodology is in good agreement with the numerical simulation of the original system. This work forms a basis for further application of the considered methodology to weakly coupled granular dimers which finds practical relevance in designing shock mitigating granular layers.

  18. Pathogenic Cysteine Removal Mutations in FGFR Extracellular Domains Stabilize Receptor Dimers and Perturb the TM Dimer Structure.

    PubMed

    Sarabipour, Sarvenaz; Hristova, Kalina

    2016-10-09

    Missense mutations that introduce or remove cysteine residues in receptor tyrosine kinases are believed to cause pathologies by stabilizing the active receptor tyrosine kinase dimers. However, the magnitude of this stabilizing effect has not been measured for full-length receptors. Here, we characterize the dimer stabilities of three full-length fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) mutants harboring pathogenic cysteine substitutions: the C178S FGFR1 mutant, the C342R FGFR2 mutant, and the C228R FGFR3 mutant. We find that the three mutations stabilize the FGFR dimers. We further see that the mutations alter the configuration of the FGFR transmembrane dimers. Thus, both aberrant dimerization and perturbed dimer structure likely contribute to the pathological phenotypes arising due to these mutations.

  19. rRNA suppressor of a eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5B/initiation factor 2 mutant reveals a binding site for translational GTPases on the small ribosomal subunit.

    PubMed

    Shin, Byung-Sik; Kim, Joo-Ran; Acker, Michael G; Maher, Kathryn N; Lorsch, Jon R; Dever, Thomas E

    2009-02-01

    The translational GTPases promote initiation, elongation, and termination of protein synthesis by interacting with the ribosome. Mutations that impair GTP hydrolysis by eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5B/initiation factor 2 (eIF5B/IF2) impair yeast cell growth due to failure to dissociate from the ribosome following subunit joining. A mutation in helix h5 of the 18S rRNA in the 40S ribosomal subunit and intragenic mutations in domain II of eIF5B suppress the toxic effects associated with expression of the eIF5B-H480I GTPase-deficient mutant in yeast by lowering the ribosome binding affinity of eIF5B. Hydroxyl radical mapping experiments reveal that the domain II suppressors interface with the body of the 40S subunit in the vicinity of helix h5. As the helix h5 mutation also impairs elongation factor function, the rRNA and eIF5B suppressor mutations provide in vivo evidence supporting a functionally important docking of domain II of the translational GTPases on the body of the small ribosomal subunit.

  20. Rotational Spectrum of Propargyl Alcohol Dimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mani, Devendra; Arunan, E.

    2013-06-01

    Propargyl alcohol is a molecule of interest to astrophysics as well as combustion studies. Rotational-tunneling spectra of propargyl alcohol monomer is well known and shows that the molecule exists in gauche form. Recently we reported microwave spectra of Ar...propargyl alcohol complex. Propargyl alcochol exists in gauche form in the complex as well. In this study we have recorded pure rotational spectra of propargyl alcohol dimer between 4-13 GHz range.A total of 47 transitions, 24 a-type, 16 b-type and 7 c-type, have been observed and fitted with semi rigid rotor asymmetric top hamiltonian. The fitted rotational constants are: A = 2321.83323(47) MHz, B = 1150.47726(24) MHz and C = 1124.89000(20) MHz. The standard deviation for the fit is 2.5 kHz. The experimental rotational constants are very close to the structure predicted by ab-initio calculations in which two gauche-propargyl alcohol moieties are in three point contact stabilized by O-H...O, O-H...pi and C-H...pi interactions. Few transitions for duterated isotopologues of the dimer have also been observed and search for the remaining transitions is in progress. Details will be presented in the talk. E. Hirota,J. Mol. Spectrosc. 26 (1968) 335-350. J.C. Pearson, B.J. Drouin, J. Mol. Spectrosc. 234 (2005) 149-156. D. Mani, E. Arunan, ChemPhysChem 14 (2013) 754-763.

  1. The role of dimerization in prion replication.

    PubMed Central

    Tompa, Peter; Tusnády, Gábor E; Friedrich, Peter; Simon, István

    2002-01-01

    The central theme in prion diseases is the conformational transition of a cellular protein from a physiologic to a pathologic (so-called scrapie) state. Currently, two alternative models exist for the mechanism of this autocatalytic process; in the template assistance model the prion is assumed to be a monomer of the scrapie conformer, whereas in the nucleated polymerization model it is thought to be an amyloid rod. A recent variation on the latter assumes disulfide reshuffling as the mechanism of polymerization. The existence of stable dimers, let alone their mechanistic role, is not taken into account in either of these models. In this paper we review evidence supporting that the dimerization of either the normal or the scrapie state, or both, has a decisive role in prion replication. The contribution of redox changes, i.e., the temporary opening and possible rearrangement of the intramolecular disulfide bridge is also considered. We present a model including these features largely ignored so far and show that it adheres satisfactorily to the observed phenomenology of prion replication. PMID:11916832

  2. Fibrillar dimer formation of islet amyloid polypeptides

    DOE PAGES

    Chiu, Chi -cheng; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2015-05-08

    Amyloid deposits of human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP), a 37-residue hormone co-produced with insulin, have been implicated in the development of type 2 diabetes. Residues 20 – 29 of hIAPP have been proposed to constitute the amyloidogenic core for the aggregation process, yet the segment is mostly unstructured in the mature fibril, according to solid-state NMR data. Here we use molecular simulations combined with bias-exchange metadynamics to characterize the conformational free energies of hIAPP fibrillar dimer and its derivative, pramlintide. We show that residues 20 – 29 are involved in an intermediate that exhibits transient β-sheets, consistent with recent experimentalmore » and simulation results. By comparing the aggregation of hIAPP and pramlintide, we illustrate the effects of proline residues on inhibition of the dimerization of IAPP. The mechanistic insights presented here could be useful for development of therapeutic inhibitors of hIAPP amyloid formation.« less

  3. MDA8 O3 Values at Rural Surface Sites in Nevada, USA: Results from Two Years of the Nevada Rural Ozone Initiative (NVROI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustin, M. S.; Fine, R.; Miller, M. B.; Burley, J. D.; Jaffe, D. A.; Pierce, R. B.; Lin, M.

    2014-12-01

    Local anthropogenic emissions are limited in Nevada (USA); however, data collected at Great Basin National Park (GBNP), which is located in rural eastern Nevada, indicate that ozone (O3) routinely exceeds the threshold proposed for a more stringent National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS). Here, we focused on data collected between July 2011 and June 2013. For this period, the maximum daily 8-h average (MDA8) O3 at GBNP exceeded the current NAAQS threshold (75 ppb) 7 times. Our analyses indicate that a combination of sources including emissions from regional wildfires and urban areas of southern California as well as stratospheric intrusions and long-range transport of Asian pollution contributed to elevated O3 observed at GBNP. Although MDA8 O3 measured at GBNP was well correlated with that measured at 5 other rural Nevada sites during this period, MDA8 O3 was 3.1 to 12.6 ppb greater at GBNP than at these other rural sites which emphasizes the need for spatially detailed measurements particularly in areas of complex terrain. The maximum MDA8 O3 at these 6 rural NV sites ranged from 68 to 80 ppb. GBNP was the only rural site to exceed the current NAAQS threshold during the period considered; however, when lower thresholds were considered the spatial and temporal extent of exceedances in rural Nevada increased indicating that interstate and international cooperation will be necessary to reduce ambient O3 concentrations in rural Nevada. MDA8 O3 at rural Nevada sites were significantly correlated with measurements at urban Nevada (r = 0.64 to 0.82; p < 0.05) and rural California (r = 0.61 to 0.83; p = 0.00) sites suggesting that common mechanisms influence O3 observed throughout the region.

  4. Activation and inhibition of erythropoietin receptor function: role of receptor dimerization.

    PubMed Central

    Watowich, S S; Hilton, D J; Lodish, H F

    1994-01-01

    Members of the cytokine receptor superfamily have structurally similar extracellular ligand-binding domains yet diverse cytoplasmic regions lacking any obvious catalytic domains. Many of these receptors form ligand-induced oligomers which are likely to participate in transmembrane signaling. A constitutively active (factor-independent) mutant of the erythropoietin receptor (EPO-R), R129C in the exoplasmic domain, forms disulfide-linked homodimers, suggesting that the wild-type EPO-R is activated by ligand-induced homodimerization. Here, we have taken two approaches to probe the role EPO-R dimerization plays in signal transduction. First, on the basis of the crystal structure of the ligand-bound, homodimeric growth hormone receptor (GH-R) and sequence alignment between the GH-R and EPO-R, we identified residues of the EPO-R which may be involved in intersubunit contacts in an EPO-R homodimer. Residue 129 of the EPO-R corresponds to a residue localized to the GH-R dimer interface region. Alanine or cysteine substitutions were introduced at four other residues of the EPO-R predicted to be in the dimer interface region. Substitution of residue E-132 or E-133 with cysteine renders the EPO-R constitutively active. Like the arginine-to-cysteine mutation at position 129 in the exoplasmic domain (R129C), E132C and E133C form disulfide-linked homodimers, suggesting that constitutive activity is due to covalent dimerization. In the second approach, we have coexpressed the wild-type EPO-R with inactive mutants of the receptor missing all or part of the cytosolic domain. These truncated receptors have a dominant inhibitory effect on the proliferative action of the wild-type receptor. Taken together, these results strengthen the hypothesis that an initial step in EPO- and EPO-R-mediated signal transduction is ligand-induced receptor dimerization. Images PMID:8196600

  5. Rh-Catalyzed, Regioselective, C-H Bond Functionalization: Access to Quinoline-Branched Amines and Dimers.

    PubMed

    Reddy, M Damoder; Fronczek, Frank R; Watkins, E Blake

    2016-11-04

    Rh-catalyzed, chelation-induced, C-5 regioselective C-H functionalization of 8-amidoquinolines with a range of N-Boc aminals is reported for the first time. The addition of in situ generated imines to C(sp(2))-H bonds afforded branched amines in good to excellent yields. Moreover, this transformation features good functional group compatibility, broad substrate scope, and mild reaction conditions and is suitable for gram-scale synthesis. In addition, an unprecedented, chelation-induced, site-selective, remote dimerization of quinolines led to the formation of dimer frameworks in moderate yields under Rh-catalyzed conditions.

  6. Comparison of the cleavage of pyrimidine dimers by the bacteriophage T4 and Micrococcus luteus uv-specific endonucleases

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, L.K.; Haseltine, W.A.

    1980-12-25

    A comparison was made of the activity of the uv-specific endonucleases of bacteriophage T4 (T4 endonuclease V) and of Micrococcus luteus on ultraviolet light-irradiated DNA substrates of defined sequence. The two enzyms cleave DNA at the site of pyrimidine dimers with the same frequency. The products of the cleavage reaction are the same. The pyrimidine dimer DNA-glycosylase activity of both enzymes is more active on double-stranded DNA than it is on single-stranded DNA.

  7. Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Solar Photovoltaics at the Ft. Hood Military Base Outside Killeen, Texas. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Geiger, J.; Lisell, L.; Mosey, G.

    2013-10-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in accordance with the RE-Powering America's Land initiative through the Region 6 contract, selected Ft. Hood Army Base in Killeen, Texas, for a feasibility study of renewable energy production. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) provided technical assistance for this project. The purpose of this study is to assess the site for possible photovoltaic (PV) system installations and estimate the cost, performance, and site impacts of different PV options. In addition, the report recommends financing options that could assist in the implementation of a PV system at the site.

  8. Small molecule and peptide-mediated inhibition of Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 1 dimerization

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sun Young; Song, Kyung-A; Kieff, Elliott; Kang, Myung-Soo

    2012-07-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Evidence that targeting EBNA1 dimer, an EBV onco-antigen, can be achievable. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A small molecule and a peptide as EBNA1 dimerization inhibitors identified. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both inhibitors associated with EBNA1 and blocked EBNA1 DNA binding activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Also, prevented its dimerization, and repressed viral gene transcription. -- Abstract: Latent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection is associated with human B cell lymphomas and certain carcinomas. EBV episome persistence, replication, and gene expression are dependent on EBV-encoded nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1)'s DNA binding domain (DBD)/dimerization domain (DD)-mediated sequence-specific DNA binding activity. Homodimerization of EBNA1 is essential for EBNA1 DNA binding and transactivation. In this study, we characterized a novel small molecule EBNA1 inhibitor EiK1, screened from the previous high throughput screening (HTS). The EiK1 compound specifically inhibited the EBNA1-dependent, OriP-enhanced transcription, but not EBNA1-independent transcription. A Surface Plasmon Resonance Biacore assay revealed that EiK1 associates with EBNA1 amino acid 459-607 DBD/DD. Consistent with the SPR data, in vitro gel shift assays showed that EiK1 suppressed the activity of EBNA1 binding to the cognate familial repeats (FR) sequence, but not control RBP-J{kappa} binding to the J{kappa} site. Subsequently, a cross-linker-mediated in vitro multimerization assay and EBNA1 homodimerization-dependent yeast two-hybrid assay showed that EiK1 significantly inhibited EBNA1 dimerization. In an attempt to identify more highly specific peptide inhibitors, small peptides encompassing the EBNA1 DBD/DD were screened for inhibition of EBNA1 DBD-mediated DNA binding function. The small peptide P85, covering EBNA1 a.a. 560-574, significantly blocked EBNA1 DNA binding activity in vitro, prevented dimerization in vitro and in vivo, associated with

  9. Photoexcited energy transfer in a weakly coupled dimer

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, Laura Alfonso; Nelson, Tammie; Tretiak, Sergei; Fernandez-Alberti, Sebastian

    2015-01-08

    Nonadiabatic excited-state molecular dynamics (NA-ESMD) simulations have been performed in order to study the time-dependent exciton localization during energy transfer between two chromophore units of the weakly coupled anthracene dimer dithia-anthracenophane (DTA). Simulations are done at both low temperature (10 K) and room temperature (300 K). The initial photoexcitation creates an exciton which is primarily localized on a single monomer unit. Subsequently, the exciton experiences an ultrafast energy transfer becoming localized on either one monomer unit or the other, whereas delocalization between both monomers never occurs. In half of the trajectories, the electronic transition density becomes completely localized on the same monomer as the initial excitation, while in the other half, it becomes completely localized on the opposite monomer. In this article, we present an analysis of the energy transfer dynamics and the effect of thermally induced geometry distortions on the exciton localization. Finally, simulated fluorescence anisotropy decay curves for both DTA and the monomer unit dimethyl anthracene (DMA) are compared. As a result, our analysis reveals that changes in the transition density localization caused by energy transfer between two monomers in DTA is not the only source of depolarization and exciton relaxation within a single DTA monomer unit can also cause reorientation of the transition dipole.

  10. Photoexcited energy transfer in a weakly coupled dimer

    DOE PAGES

    Hernandez, Laura Alfonso; Nelson, Tammie; Tretiak, Sergei; ...

    2015-01-08

    Nonadiabatic excited-state molecular dynamics (NA-ESMD) simulations have been performed in order to study the time-dependent exciton localization during energy transfer between two chromophore units of the weakly coupled anthracene dimer dithia-anthracenophane (DTA). Simulations are done at both low temperature (10 K) and room temperature (300 K). The initial photoexcitation creates an exciton which is primarily localized on a single monomer unit. Subsequently, the exciton experiences an ultrafast energy transfer becoming localized on either one monomer unit or the other, whereas delocalization between both monomers never occurs. In half of the trajectories, the electronic transition density becomes completely localized on themore » same monomer as the initial excitation, while in the other half, it becomes completely localized on the opposite monomer. In this article, we present an analysis of the energy transfer dynamics and the effect of thermally induced geometry distortions on the exciton localization. Finally, simulated fluorescence anisotropy decay curves for both DTA and the monomer unit dimethyl anthracene (DMA) are compared. As a result, our analysis reveals that changes in the transition density localization caused by energy transfer between two monomers in DTA is not the only source of depolarization and exciton relaxation within a single DTA monomer unit can also cause reorientation of the transition dipole.« less

  11. Symmetry restoring and ancilla-driven entanglement for ultra-cold spin-1 atoms in a three-site ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barasiński, Artur; Leoński, Wiesław

    2017-01-01

    The spin-change dynamics of a model with ultra-cold hyperfine-spin-1 atoms confined in an optical superlattice is discussed. First, the disturbance of the two-site dynamics by coupling the dimer to a spin-1 ancilla is analyzed. When the dimer is coupled to the ancilla, even by a weak coupling, the significant changes in the system's time-evolution processes are observed. Next, we show that for the two-particle case the total hyperfine-spin-singlet state is generated by exploiting a quadratic Zeeman shift with realistic values of the strength of external magnetic field and evolution period of time. Moreover, even in a weak coupling regime, the proper choice of the additional ancilla-dimer interaction results in generating the wave function which is characteristic of the homogeneous three-site ring. In consequence, such wave function exhibits translational invariance symmetry despite the strong asymmetry of the lattice. Furthermore, we present our proposal for extracting various kinds of maximally entangled states (MES) for three-site spin-1 systems, starting from initial product states. In particular, we show that the type of generated MES can be unambiguously recognized by the measurement performed on the ancilla.

  12. Dimerization and phosphatase activity of calcyclin-binding protein/Siah-1 interacting protein: the influence of oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Topolska-Woś, Agnieszka M.; Shell, Steven M.; Kilańczyk, Ewa; Szczepanowski, Roman H.; Chazin, Walter J.; Filipek, Anna

    2015-01-01

    CacyBP/SIP [calcyclin-binding protein/Siah-1 [seven in absentia homolog 1 (Siah E3 ubiquitin protein ligase 1)] interacting protein] is a multifunctional protein whose activity includes acting as an ERK1/2 phosphatase. We analyzed dimerization of mouse CacyBP/SIP in vitro and in mouse neuroblastoma cell line (NB2a) cells, as well as the structure of a full-length protein. Moreover, we searched for the CacyBP/SIP domain important for dimerization and dephosphorylation of ERK2, and we analyzed the role of dimerization in ERK1/2 signaling in NB2a cells. Cell-based assays showed that CacyBP/SIP forms a homodimer in NB2a cell lysate, and biophysical methods demonstrated that CacyBP/SIP forms a stable dimer in vitro. Data obtained using small-angle X-ray scattering supported a model in which CacyBP/SIP occupies an anti-parallel orientation mediated by the N-terminal dimerization domain. Site-directed mutagenesis established that the N-terminal domain is indispensable for full phosphatase activity of CacyBP/SIP. We also demonstrated that the oligomerization state of CacyBP/SIP as well as the level of post-translational modifications and subcellular distribution of CacyBP/SIP change after activation of the ERK1/2 pathway in NB2a cells due to oxidative stress. Together, our results suggest that dimerization is important for controlling phosphatase activity of CacyBP/SIP and for regulating the ERK1/2 signaling pathway.—Topolska-Woś, A. M., Shell, S. M., Kilańczyk, E., Szczepanowski, R. H., Chazin, W. J., Filipek, A. Dimerization and phosphatase activity of calcyclin-binding protein/Siah-1 interacting protein: the influence of oxidative stress. PMID:25609429

  13. First principles potential for the acetylene dimer and refinement by fitting to experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leforestier, Claude; Tekin, Adem; Jansen, Georg; Herman, Michel

    2011-12-01

    We report the definition and refinement of a new first principles potential for the acetylene dimer. The ab initio calculations were performed with the DFT-SAPT combination of symmetry-adapted intermolecular perturbation method and density functional theory, and fitted to a model site-site functional form. Comparison of the calculated microwave spectrum with experimental data revealed that the barriers to isomerization were too low. This potential was refined by fitting the model parameters in order to reproduce the observed transitions, an excellent agreement within ˜1 MHz being achieved.

  14. Meeting the Goal of 100% Literacy: The Planning, Implementation, and Progress of the Alabama Reading Initiative at High School Literacy Demonstration Sites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norman, Mary Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    Literacy is a nationwide concern. Although the national spotlight and numerous studies have focused on early literacy, the needs of adolescent readers have just come to the forefront. The Alabama State Department of Education responded to this nationwide concern for K-12 literacy by planning and implementing the Alabama Reading Initiative (ARI).…

  15. Selective Dimerization of Ethylene to 1-Butene with a Porous Catalyst

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Current heterogeneous catalysts lack the fine steric and electronic tuning required for catalyzing the selective dimerization of ethylene to 1-butene, which remains one of the largest industrial processes still catalyzed by homogeneous catalysts. Here, we report that a metal–organic framework catalyzes ethylene dimerization with a combination of activity and selectivity for 1-butene that is premier among heterogeneous catalysts. The capacity for mild cation exchange in the material MFU-4l (MFU-4l = Zn5Cl4(BTDD)3, H2BTDD = bis(1H-1,2,3-triazolo[4,5-b],[4′,5′-i])dibenzo[1,4]dioxin) was leveraged to create a well-defined and site-isolated Ni(II) active site bearing close structural homology to molecular tris-pyrazolylborate complexes. In the presence of ethylene and methylaluminoxane, the material consumes ethylene at a rate of 41,500 mol per mole of Ni per hour with a selectivity for 1-butene of up to 96.2%, exceeding the selectivity reported for the current industrial dimerization process. PMID:27163041

  16. Wire and extended ladder model predict THz oscillations in DNA monomers, dimers and trimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambropoulos, K.; Kaklamanis, K.; Morphis, A.; Tassi, M.; Lopp, R.; Georgiadis, G.; Theodorakou, M.; Chatzieleftheriou, M.; Simserides, C.

    2016-12-01

    We call monomer a B-DNA base pair and study, analytically and numerically, electron or hole oscillations in monomers, dimers and trimers. We employ two tight binding (TB) approaches: (I) at the base-pair level, using the on-site energies of the base pairs and the hopping parameters between successive base pairs i.e. a wire model, and (II) at the single-base level, using the on-site energies of the bases and the hopping parameters between neighbouring bases, specifically between (a) two successive bases in the same strand, (b) complementary bases that define a base pair, and (c) diagonally located bases of successive base pairs, i.e. an extended ladder model since it also includes the diagonal hoppings (c). For monomers, with TB II, we predict periodic carrier oscillations with frequency f≈ 50 -550 THz. For dimers, with TB I, we predict periodic carrier oscillations with f≈ 0.25 -100 THz. For trimers made of identical monomers, with TB I, we predict periodic carrier oscillations with f≈ 0.5 -33 THz. In other cases, either with TB I or TB II, the oscillations may be not strictly periodic, but Fourier analysis shows similar frequency content. For dimers and trimers, TB I and TB II are successfully compared giving complementary aspects of the oscillations.

  17. Homing endonuclease I-TevIII: dimerization as a means to a double-strand break

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, Justin B.; Stapleton, Michelle; Stanger, Matthew J.; Smith, Dorie; Dansereau, John T.; Derbyshire, Victoria; Belfort, Marlene

    2007-01-01

    Homing endonucleases are unusual enzymes, capable of recognizing lengthy DNA sequences and cleaving site-specifically within genomes. Many homing endonucleases are encoded within group I introns, and such enzymes promote the mobility reactions of these introns. Phage T4 has three group I introns, within the td, nrdB and nrdD genes. The td and nrdD introns are mobile, whereas the nrdB intron is not. Phage RB3 is a close relative of T4 and has a lengthier nrdB intron. Here, we describe I-TevIII, the H–N–H endonuclease encoded by the RB3 nrdB intron. In contrast to previous reports, we demonstrate that this intron is mobile, and that this mobility is dependent on I-TevIII, which generates 2-nt 3′ extensions. The enzyme has a distinct catalytic domain, which contains the H–N–H motif, and DNA-binding domain, which contains two zinc fingers required for interaction with the DNA substrate. Most importantly, I-TevIII, unlike the H–N–H endonucleases described so far, makes a double-strand break on the DNA homing site by acting as a dimer. Through deletion analysis, the dimerization interface was mapped to the DNA-binding domain. The unusual propensity of I-TevIII to dimerize to achieve cleavage of both DNA strands underscores the versatility of the H–N–H enzyme family. PMID:17289754

  18. Salt bridge residues between I-Ak dimer of dimers alpha-chains modulate antigen presentation.

    PubMed

    Yadati, S; Nydam, T; Demian, D; Wade, T K; Gabriel, J L; Barisas, B G; Wade, W F

    1999-03-15

    Class II dimers of dim