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Sample records for dimerization sequence influence

  1. Transmembrane helix dimerization: beyond the search for sequence motifs.

    PubMed

    Li, Edwin; Wimley, William C; Hristova, Kalina

    2012-02-01

    Studies of the dimerization of transmembrane (TM) helices have been ongoing for many years now, and have provided clues to the fundamental principles behind membrane protein (MP) folding. Our understanding of TM helix dimerization has been dominated by the idea that sequence motifs, simple recognizable amino acid sequences that drive lateral interaction, can be used to explain and predict the lateral interactions between TM helices in membrane proteins. But as more and more unique interacting helices are characterized, it is becoming clear that the sequence motif paradigm is incomplete. Experimental evidence suggests that the search for sequence motifs, as mediators of TM helix dimerization, cannot solve the membrane protein folding problem alone. Here we review the current understanding in the field, as it has evolved from the paradigm of sequence motifs into a view in which the interactions between TM helices are much more complex. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane protein structure and function.

  2. Sequence-Specific DNA Binding by a Short Peptide Dimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talanian, Robert V.; McKnight, C. James; Kim, Peter S.

    1990-08-01

    A recently described class of DNA binding proteins is characterized by the "bZIP" motif, which consists of a basic region that contacts DNA and an adjacent "leucine zipper" that mediates protein dimerization. A peptide model for the basic region of the yeast transcriptional activator GCN4 has been developed in which the leucine zipper has been replaced by a disulfide bond. The 34-residue peptide dimer, but not the reduced monomer, binds DNA with nanomolar affinity at 4^circC. DNA binding is sequence-specific as judged by deoxyribonuclease I footprinting. Circular dichroism spectroscopy suggests that the peptide adopts a helical structure when bound to DNA. These results demonstrate directly that the GCN4 basic region is sufficient for sequence-specific DNA binding and suggest that a major function of the GCN4 leucine zipper is simply to mediate protein dimerization. Our approach provides a strategy for the design of short sequence-specific DNA binding peptides.

  3. Amino-acid sequence of a cooperative, dimeric myoglobin from the gastropod mollusc, Buccinum undatum L.

    PubMed

    Wen, D; Laursen, R A

    1994-10-19

    The complete amino-acid sequence of a dimeric myoglobin from the radular mussel of the gastropod mollusc, Buccinum undatum L. has been determined. The globin, which shows cooperative binding of oxygen, contains 146 amino acids, is N-terminal aminoacetylated, and has histidine residues at position 65 and 97, corresponding to the heme-binding histidines seen in mammalian myoglobins. It shows about 75% and 50% homology, respectively, with the dimeric molluscan myoglobins from Busycon canaliculatum and Cerithidea rhizophorarum, the former of which also shows weak cooperatively, but much less similarity to other species of myoglobin and hemoglobin.

  4. The influence of the ``hot''-dimer adsorption mechanism on the kinetics of a monomer-dimer surface reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereyra, V. D.; Albano, E. V.

    1993-09-01

    “Hot” dimers are molecules which after adsorption dissociate and each of the remaining “hot” monomers fly apart up to a maximum distance R from the original adsorption site. The influence of the “hot”-dimer adsorption mechanism on relevant aspects of the bimolecular catalyzed reaction of the type A - (1/2) B 2(“hot”) → AB is studied by means of the Monte-Carlo simulation technique. The temporal evolution of both the reactant's coverages as well as the rate of AB-production is evaluated and discussed. Due to the enhanced probability of “hot” species for encounters with other adsorbed particles, the rate of AB-production becomes faster when increasing R. This behavior may be relevant in the dynamic of some catalyzed reactions such as for example the oxidation of carbon monoxide on transition metal surfaces, i.e. A≡CO, B 2≡O2, and AB≡CO2. Also the sticking coefficient of “hot” dimers and the average distance traveled by the “hot” monomers are evaluated and discussed.

  5. Chromomycin dimer-DNA oligomer complexes. Sequence selectivity and divalent cation specificity.

    PubMed

    Gao, X L; Patel, D J

    1990-12-11

    This paper reports on a solution NMR characterization of the sequence selectivity and metal ion specificity in chromomycin-DNA oligomer complexes in the presence of divalent cations. The sequence selectivity studies have focused on chromomycin complexes with the self-complementary d(A1-A2-G3-G4-C5-C6-T7-T8) duplex containing a pair of adjacent (G3-G4).(C5-C6) steps and the self-complementary d(A1-G2-G3-A4-T5-C6-C7-T8) duplex containing a pair of separated (G2-G3).(C6-C7) steps in aqueous solution. The antitumor agent (chromomycin) and nucleic acid protons have been assigned following analysis of distance connectivities in NOESY spectra and coupling connectivities in DQF-COSY spectra for both complexes in H2O and D2O solution. The observed intermolecular NOEs establish that chromomycin binds as a Mg(II)-coordinated dimer [1 Mg(II) per complex] and contacts the minor-groove edge with retention of 2-fold symmetry centered about the (G3-G4-C5-C6).(G3-G4-C5-C6) segment of the d(A2G2C2T2) duplex. By contrast, complex formation is centered about the (G2-G3-A4-T5).(A4-T5-C6-C7) segment and results in removal of the two fold symmetry of the d(AG2ATC2T) duplex. Thus, the binding of one subunit of the chromomycin dimer at its preferred (G-G).(C-C) site assists in the binding of the second subunit to the less preferred adjacent (A-T).(A-T) site. These observations suggest a hierarchy of chromomycin binding sites, with a strong site detected at the (G-G) step due to the hydrogen-bonding potential of acceptor N3 and donor NH2 groups of guanosine that line the minor groove. The divalent cation specificity has been investigated by studies on the symmetric chromomycin-d(A2G2C2T2) complex in the presence of diamagnetic Mg(II), Zn(II), and Cd(II) cations and paramagnetic Ni(II) and Co(II) cations. A comparative NOESY study of the Mg(II) and Ni(II) symmetric complexes suggests that a single tightly bound divalent cation aligns the two chromomycins in the dimer through coordination to

  6. Conformationally constrained sequence designs to bias monomer-dimer equilibriums in TASP systems.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Jon O; Sherman, John C

    2011-12-01

    We have designed template-assembled synthetic proteins (TASPs) with the intent of controlling their oligomeric state by stabilizing specific helical tertiary structures via histidine metal ion chelation or disulfide incorporation. In solution, cavitein Q4 was previously determined to interconvert between a four-helix bundle monomer and an eight-helix bundle dimer. In this paper, we show that judicious mutation of cavitein Q4 can stabilize either the monomeric parallel four-helix bundle or the dimeric antiparallel eight-helix bundle structure. Cavitein Q4-E3H, designed to be dimeric, is indeed biased toward dimerization as a result of incorporation of histidines. Moreover, the addition of nickel was found to further increase the association constant of dimerization. Similarly, a cavitein designed to stabilize the monomeric structure via histidine metal ion chelation (Q4-H) was found to favor a monomer in solution upon addition of nickel. Lastly, a cavitein intended to stabilize a monomeric structure via disulfide incorporation (Q4-C2) is reported. Surprisingly, this disulfide cavitein yielded two products upon oxidation suggesting disulfide formation both above the cavitand template and below may be possible. Nevertheless, the two disulfide caviteins were shown to exist as monomers as per their design. PMID:22095703

  7. Detergent properties influence the stability of the glycophorin A transmembrane helix dimer in lysophosphatidylcholine micelles.

    PubMed

    Stangl, Michael; Veerappan, Anbazhagan; Kroeger, Anja; Vogel, Peter; Schneider, Dirk

    2012-12-19

    Detergents might affect membrane protein structures by promoting intramolecular interactions that are different from those found in native membrane bilayers, and fine-tuning detergent properties can be crucial for obtaining structural information of intact and functional transmembrane proteins. To systematically investigate the influence of the detergent concentration and acyl-chain length on the stability of a transmembrane protein structure, the stability of the human glycophorin A transmembrane helix dimer has been analyzed in lyso-phosphatidylcholine micelles of different acyl-chain length. While our results indicate that the transmembrane protein is destabilized in detergents with increasing chain-length, the diameter of the hydrophobic micelle core was found to be less crucial. Thus, hydrophobic mismatch appears to be less important in detergent micelles than in lipid bilayers and individual detergent molecules appear to be able to stretch within a micelle to match the hydrophobic thickness of the peptide. However, the stability of the GpA TM helix dimer linearly depends on the aggregation number of the lyso-PC detergents, indicating that not only is the chemistry of the detergent headgroup and acyl-chain region central for classifying a detergent as harsh or mild, but the detergent aggregation number might also be important.

  8. A Short Sequence Motif in the 5′ Leader of the HIV-1 Genome Modulates Extended RNA Dimer Formation and Virus Replication*

    PubMed Central

    van Bel, Nikki; Das, Atze T.; Cornelissen, Marion; Abbink, Truus E. M.; Berkhout, Ben

    2014-01-01

    The 5′ leader of the HIV-1 RNA genome encodes signals that control various steps in the replication cycle, including the dimerization initiation signal (DIS) that triggers RNA dimerization. The DIS folds a hairpin structure with a palindromic sequence in the loop that allows RNA dimerization via intermolecular kissing loop (KL) base pairing. The KL dimer can be stabilized by including the DIS stem nucleotides in the intermolecular base pairing, forming an extended dimer (ED). The role of the ED RNA dimer in HIV-1 replication has hardly been addressed because of technical challenges. We analyzed a set of leader mutants with a stabilized DIS hairpin for in vitro RNA dimerization and virus replication in T cells. In agreement with previous observations, DIS hairpin stability modulated KL and ED dimerization. An unexpected previous finding was that mutation of three nucleotides immediately upstream of the DIS hairpin significantly reduced in vitro ED formation. In this study, we tested such mutants in vivo for the importance of the ED in HIV-1 biology. Mutants with a stabilized DIS hairpin replicated less efficiently than WT HIV-1. This defect was most severe when the upstream sequence motif was altered. Virus evolution experiments with the defective mutants yielded fast replicating HIV-1 variants with second site mutations that (partially) restored the WT hairpin stability. Characterization of the mutant and revertant RNA molecules and the corresponding viruses confirmed the correlation between in vitro ED RNA dimer formation and efficient virus replication, thus indicating that the ED structure is important for HIV-1 replication. PMID:25368321

  9. Nucleosome adaptability conferred by sequence and structural variations in histone H2A-H2B dimers.

    PubMed

    Shaytan, Alexey K; Landsman, David; Panchenko, Anna R

    2015-06-01

    Nucleosome variability is essential for their functions in compacting the chromatin structure and regulation of transcription, replication and cell reprogramming. The DNA molecule in nucleosomes is wrapped around an octamer composed of four types of core histones (H3, H4, H2A, H2B). Nucleosomes represent dynamic entities and may change their conformation, stability and binding properties by employing different sets of histone variants or by becoming post-translationally modified. There are many variants of histones H2A and H2B. Specific H2A and H2B variants may preferentially associate with each other resulting in different combinations of variants and leading to the increased combinatorial complexity of nucleosomes. In addition, the H2A-H2B dimer can be recognized and substituted by chaperones/remodelers as a distinct unit, can assemble independently and is stable during nucleosome unwinding. In this review we discuss how sequence and structural variations in H2A-H2B dimers may provide necessary complexity and confer the nucleosome functional variability.

  10. Nucleosome adaptability conferred by sequence and structural variations in histone H2A-H2B dimers

    PubMed Central

    Shaytan, Alexey K.; Landsman, David

    2015-01-01

    Nucleosome variability is essential for their functions in compacting the chromatin structure and regulation of transcription, replication and cell reprogramming. The DNA molecule in nucleosomes is wrapped around an octamer composed of four types of core histones (H3, H4, H2A, H2B). Nucleosomes represent dynamic entities and may change their conformation, stability and binding properties by employing different sets of histone variants or by becoming post-translationally modified. There are many variants of histones H2A and H2B. Specific H2A and H2B variants may preferentially associate with each other resulting in different combinations of variants and leading to the increased combinatorial complexity of nucleosomes. In addition, the H2A-H2B dimer can be recognized and substituted by chaperones/remodelers as a distinct unit, can assemble independently and is stable during nucleosome unwinding. In this review we discuss how sequence and structural variations in H2A-H2B dimers may provide necessary complexity and confer the nucleosome functional variability. PMID:25731851

  11. Dimer interface of bovine cytochrome c oxidase is influenced by local posttranslational modifications and lipid binding

    PubMed Central

    Liko, Idlir; Degiacomi, Matteo T.; Mohammed, Shabaz; Yoshikawa, Shinya; Schmidt, Carla; Robinson, Carol V.

    2016-01-01

    Bovine cytochrome c oxidase is an integral membrane protein complex comprising 13 protein subunits and associated lipids. Dimerization of the complex has been proposed; however, definitive evidence for the dimer is lacking. We used advanced mass spectrometry methods to investigate the oligomeric state of cytochrome c oxidase and the potential role of lipids and posttranslational modifications in its subunit interfaces. Mass spectrometry of the intact protein complex revealed that both the monomer and the dimer are stabilized by large lipid entities. We identified these lipid species from the purified protein complex, thus implying that they interact specifically with the enzyme. We further identified phosphorylation and acetylation sites of cytochrome c oxidase, located in the peripheral subunits and in the dimer interface, respectively. Comparing our phosphorylation and acetylation sites with those found in previous studies of bovine, mouse, rat, and human cytochrome c oxidase, we found that whereas some acetylation sites within the dimer interface are conserved, suggesting a role for regulation and stabilization of the dimer, phosphorylation sites were less conserved and more transient. Our results therefore provide insights into the locations and interactions of lipids with acetylated residues within the dimer interface of this enzyme, and thereby contribute to a better understanding of its structure in the natural membrane. Moreover dimeric cytochrome c oxidase, comprising 20 transmembrane, six extramembrane subunits, and associated lipids, represents the largest integral membrane protein complex that has been transferred via electrospray intact into the gas phase of a mass spectrometer, representing a significant technological advance. PMID:27364008

  12. Application of systematic sequences of wave functions to the water dimer

    SciTech Connect

    Feller, D. )

    1992-04-15

    A systematic series of calculations encompassing a wide range of basis sets and correlated methods has been used to estimate the complete basis set, full CI hydrogen bond strength in the water dimer system. The largest basis set included up through {ital h} polarization functions on oxygen and {ital g} functions on hydrogen. The complete basis set limit for the self-consistent-field (SCF) interaction energy is estimated to be {minus}3.55 kcal/mol with an accompanying correlation contribution of {similar to}{minus}1.5 kcal/mol. This leads to an interaction energy of {minus}5.1 kcal/mol, exclusive of vibrational zero-point considerations, and is in good agreement with experimental measurements of {minus}5.4{plus minus}0.7 kcal/mol. Inclusion of an approximate adjustment for the basis set superposition error via the Boys/Bernardi counterpoise correction was found to substantially improve agreement with {Delta}{ital E}{sub {infinity}}, our estimate of the complete basis set interaction energy, at the both the SCF and correlated levels for basis sets that were lacking in sufficient near-valence diffuse functions. For diffuse-function-augmented basis sets, application of the CP correction was found to sometimes worsen agreement with {Delta}{ital E}{sub {infinity}}.

  13. Influence of linker length and composition on enzymatic activity and ribosomal binding of neomycin dimers.

    PubMed

    Watkins, Derrick; Kumar, Sunil; Green, Keith D; Arya, Dev P; Garneau-Tsodikova, Sylvie

    2015-07-01

    The human and bacterial A site rRNA binding as well as the aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme (AME) activity against a series of neomycin B (NEO) dimers is presented. The data indicate that by simple modifications of linker length and composition, substantial differences in rRNA selectivity and AME activity can be obtained. We tested five different AMEs with dimeric NEO dimers that were tethered via triazole, urea, and thiourea linkages. We show that triazole-linked dimers were the worst substrates for most AMEs, with those containing the longer linkers showing the largest decrease in activity. Thiourea-linked dimers that showed a decrease in activity by AMEs also showed increased bacterial A site binding, with one compound (compound 14) even showing substantially reduced human A site binding. The urea-linked dimers showed a substantial decrease in activity by AMEs when a conformationally restrictive phenyl linker was introduced. The information learned herein advances our understanding of the importance of the linker length and composition for the generation of dimeric aminoglycoside antibiotics capable of avoiding the action of AMEs and selective binding to the bacterial rRNA over binding to the human rRNA.

  14. Single-Molecule Analysis of Thymine Dimer-Containing G-Quadruplexes Formed from the Human Telomere Sequence

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The human telomere plays crucial roles in maintaining genome stability. In the presence of suitable cations, the repetitive 5′-TTAGGG-3′ human telomere sequence can fold into G-quadruplexes that adopt the hybrid, basket, or propeller fold. The telomere sequence is hypersensitive to UV-induced thymine dimer (T=T) formation, yet it does not cause telomere shortening. In this work, the potential structural disruption and thermodynamic stability of the T=T-containing natural telomere sequences were studied to understand why this damage is tolerated in telomeres. First, established methods, such as thermal melting measurements, electrophoretic mobility shift assays, and circular dichroism spectroscopy, were utilized to determine the effects of the damage on these structures. Second, a single-molecule ion channel recording technique using α-hemolysin (α-HL) was employed to examine further the structural differences between the damaged sequences. It was observed that the damage caused slightly lower thermal stabilities and subtle changes in the circular dichroism spectra for hybrid and basket folds. The α-HL experiments determined that T=Ts disrupt double-chain reversal loop formation but are tolerated in edgewise and diagonal loops. The largest change was observed for the T=T-containing natural telomere sequence when the propeller fold (all double-chain reversal loops) was studied. On the basis of the α-HL experiments, it was determined that a triplexlike structure exists under conditions that favor a propeller structure. The biological significance of these observations is discussed. PMID:25407781

  15. Influence of cyclic dimer formation on the phase behavior of carboxylic acids.

    PubMed

    Janecek, Jiri; Paricaud, Patrice

    2012-07-12

    A new thermodynamic approach based on the Sear and Jackson association theory for doubly bonded dimers [Mol. Phys.1994, 82, 1033] is proposed to describe the thermodynamic properties of carboxylic acids. The new model is able to simultaneously represent the vapor pressures, saturated densities, and vaporization enthalpies of the shortest acids and is in a much better agreement with experimental data than other approaches that do no consider the formation of cyclic dimers. The new model is applied to mixtures of carboxylic acids with nonassociating compounds, and a very good description of the vapor-liquid equilibria in mixtures of alkanes + carboxylic acids is obtained.

  16. Single Point Mutation in Bin/Amphiphysin/Rvs (BAR) Sequence of Endophilin Impairs Dimerization, Membrane Shaping, and Src Homology 3 Domain-mediated Partnership*

    PubMed Central

    Gortat, Anna; San-Roman, Mabel Jouve; Vannier, Christian; Schmidt, Anne A.

    2012-01-01

    Bin/Amphiphysin/Rvs (BAR) domain-containing proteins are essential players in the dynamics of intracellular compartments. The BAR domain is an evolutionarily conserved dimeric module characterized by a crescent-shaped structure whose intrinsic curvature, flexibility, and ability to assemble into highly ordered oligomers contribute to inducing the curvature of target membranes. Endophilins, diverging into A and B subgroups, are BAR and SH3 domain-containing proteins. They exert activities in membrane dynamic processes such as endocytosis, autophagy, mitochondrial dynamics, and permeabilization during apoptosis. Here, we report on the involvement of the third α-helix of the endophilin A BAR sequence in dimerization and identify leucine 215 as a key residue within a network of hydrophobic interactions stabilizing the entire BAR dimer interface. With the combination of N-terminal truncation retaining the high dimerization capacity of the third α-helices of endophilin A and leucine 215 substitution by aspartate (L215D), we demonstrate the essential role of BAR sequence-mediated dimerization on SH3 domain partnership. In comparison with wild type, full-length endophilin A2 heterodimers with one protomer bearing the L215D substitution exhibit very significant changes in membrane binding and shaping activities as well as a dramatic decrease of SH3 domain partnership. This suggests that subtle changes in the conformation and/or rigidity of the BAR domain impact both the control of membrane curvature and downstream binding to effectors. Finally, we show that expression, in mammalian cells, of endophilin A2 bearing the L215D substitution impairs the endocytic recycling of transferrin receptors. PMID:22167186

  17. Interactions at the Dimer Interface Influence the Relative Efficiencies for Purine Nucleotide Synthesis and Pyrophosphorolysis in a Phosphoribosyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Canyuk, Bhutorn; Medrano, Francisco J.; Wenck, MaryAnne; Focia, Pamela J.; Eakin, Ann E.; Craig III, Sydney P.

    2010-03-05

    Enzymes that salvage 6-oxopurines, including hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferases (HPRTs), are potential targets for drugs in the treatment of diseases caused by protozoan parasites. For this reason, a number of high-resolution X-ray crystal structures of the HPRTs from protozoa have been reported. Although these structures did not reveal why HPRTs need to form dimers for catalysis, they revealed the existence of potentially relevant interactions involving residues in a loop of amino acid residues adjacent to the dimer interface, but the contributions of these interactions to catalysis remained poorly understood. The loop, referred to as active-site loop I, contains an unusual non-proline cis-peptide and is composed of residues that are structurally analogous with Leu67, Lys68, and Gly69 in the human HPRT. Functional analyses of site-directed mutations (K68D, K68E, K68N, K68P, and K68R) in the HPRT from Trypanosoma cruzi, etiologic agent of Chagas disease, show that the side-chain at position 68 can differentially influence the K{sub m} values for all four substrates as well as the k{sub cat} values for both IMP formation and pyrophosphorolysis. Also, the results for the K68P mutant are inconsistent with a cis-trans peptide isomerization-assisted catalytic mechanism. These data, together with the results of structural studies of the K68R mutant, reveal that the side-chain of residue 68 does not participate directly in reaction chemistry, but it strongly influences the relative efficiencies for IMP formation and pyrophosphorolysis, and the prevalence of lysine at position 68 in the HPRT of the majority of eukaryotes is consistent with there being a biological role for nucleotide pyrophosphorolysis.

  18. Blue light-induced LOV domain dimerization enhances the affinity of Aureochrome 1a for its target DNA sequence

    PubMed Central

    Heintz, Udo; Schlichting, Ilme

    2016-01-01

    The design of synthetic optogenetic tools that allow precise spatiotemporal control of biological processes previously inaccessible to optogenetic control has developed rapidly over the last years. Rational design of such tools requires detailed knowledge of allosteric light signaling in natural photoreceptors. To understand allosteric communication between sensor and effector domains, characterization of all relevant signaling states is required. Here, we describe the mechanism of light-dependent DNA binding of the light-oxygen-voltage (LOV) transcription factor Aureochrome 1a from Phaeodactylum tricornutum (PtAu1a) and present crystal structures of a dark state LOV monomer and a fully light-adapted LOV dimer. In combination with hydrogen/deuterium-exchange, solution scattering data and DNA-binding experiments, our studies reveal a light-sensitive interaction between the LOV and basic region leucine zipper DNA-binding domain that together with LOV dimerization results in modulation of the DNA affinity of PtAu1a. We discuss the implications of these results for the design of synthetic LOV-based photosensors with application in optogenetics. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11860.001 PMID:26754770

  19. Molecular Insight from DFT Computations and Kinetic Measurements into the Steric Factors Influencing Peptide Bond Hydrolysis Catalyzed by a Dimeric Zr(IV)-Substituted Keggin Type Polyoxometalate.

    PubMed

    Mihaylov, Tzvetan T; Ly, Hong Giang T; Pierloot, Kristine; Parac-Vogt, Tatjana N

    2016-09-19

    Peptide bond hydrolysis of several peptides with a Gly-X sequence (X = Gly, Ala, Val, Leu, Ile, Phe) catalyzed by a dimeric Zr(IV)-substituted Keggin type polyoxometalate (POM), (Et2NH2)8[{α-PW11O39Zr(μ-OH)(H2O)}2]·7H2O (1), was studied by means of kinetic experiments and (1)H NMR spectroscopy. The observed rate of peptide bond hydrolysis was found to decrease with increase of the side chain bulkiness, from 4.44 × 10(-7) s(-1) for Gly-Gly to 0.81 × 10(-7) s(-1) for Gly-Ile. A thorough DFT investigation was performed to elucidate (a) the nature of the hydrolytically active species in solution, (b) the mechanism of peptide bond hydrolysis, and (c) the influence of the aliphatic residues on the rate of hydrolysis. Formation of substrate-catalyst complexes of the dimeric POM 1 was predicted as thermodynamically unlikely. Instead, the substrates prefer to bind to the monomerization product of 1, [α-PW11O39Zr(OH)(H2O)](4-) (2), which is also present in solution. In the hydrolytically active complex two dipeptide ligands are coordinated to the Zr(IV) center of 2. The first ligand is bidentate-bound through its amino nitrogen and amide oxygen atoms, while the second ligand is monodentate-bound through a carboxylic oxygen atom. The mechanism of hydrolysis involves nucleophilic attack by a solvent water molecule on the amide carbon atom of the bidentate-bound ligand. In this process the uncoordinated carboxylic group of the same ligand acts as a general base to abstract a proton from the attacking water molecule. The decrease of the hydrolysis rate with an increase in the side chain bulkiness is mostly due to the increased ligand conformational strain in the rate-limiting transition state, which elevates the reaction activation energy. The conformational strain increases first upon substitution of Hα in Gly-Gly with the aliphatic α substituent and second with the β branching of the α substituent. PMID:27570876

  20. Binding of 12-s-12 dimeric surfactants to calf thymus DNA: Evaluation of the spacer length influence.

    PubMed

    Sarrión, Beatriz; Bernal, Eva; Martín, Victoria Isabel; López-López, Manuel; López-Cornejo, Pilar; García-Calderón, Margarita; Moyá, María Luisa

    2016-08-01

    Several cationic dimeric surfactants have shown high affinity towards DNA. Bis-quaternary ammonium salts (m-s-m) have been the most common type of dimeric surfactants investigated and it is generally admitted that those that posses a short spacer (s≤3) show better efficiency to bind or compact DNA. However, experimental results in this work show that 12-s-12 surfactants with long spacers make the surfactant/ctDNA complexation more favorable than those with short spacers. A larger contribution of the hydrophobic interactions, which control the binding Gibbs energy, as well as a higher average charge of the surfactant molecules bound to the nucleic acid, which favors the electrostatic attractions, could explain the experimental observations. Dimeric surfactants with intermediate spacer length seem to be the less efficient for DNA binding.

  1. Influence of the Conjugation Length on the Optical Spectra of Single Ladder-Type (p-Phenylene) Dimers and Polymers.

    PubMed

    Baderschneider, Sebastian; Scherf, Uli; Köhler, Jürgen; Hildner, Richard

    2016-01-21

    We employ low-temperature single-molecule photoluminescence spectroscopy on a π-conjugated ladder-type (p-phenylene) dimer and the corresponding polymer methyl-substituted ladder-type poly(p-phenylene), MeLPPP, to study the impact of the conjugation length (π-electron delocalization) on their optical properties on a molecular scale. Our data show that the linear electron-phonon coupling to intramolecular vibrational modes is very sensitive to the conjugation length, a well-known behavior of organic (macro-) molecules. In particular, the photoluminescence spectra of single dimers feature a rather strong low-energy (150 cm(-1)) skeletal mode of the backbone, which does not appear in the spectra of individual chromophores on single MeLPPP chains. We attribute this finding to a strongly reduced electron-phonon coupling strength and/or vibrational energy of this mode for MeLPPP with its more delocalized π-electron system as compared to the dimer. In contrast, the line widths of the purely electronic zero-phonon lines (ZPL) in single-molecule spectra do not show differences between the dimer and MeLPPP; for both systems the ZPLs are apparently broadened by fast unresolved spectral diffusion. Finally, we demonstrate that the low-temperature ensemble photoluminescence spectrum of the dimer cannot be reproduced by the distribution of spectral positions of the ZPLs. The dimer's bulk spectrum is rather apparently broadened by electron-phonon coupling to the low-energy skeletal mode, whereas for MeLPPP the inhomogeneous bulk line shape resembles the distribution of spectral positions of the ZPLs of single chromophores. PMID:26696134

  2. Influence of point mutations on the stability, dimerization, and oligomerization of human cystatin C and its L68Q variant.

    PubMed

    Szymańska, Aneta; Jankowska, Elżbieta; Orlikowska, Marta; Behrendt, Izabela; Czaplewska, Paulina; Rodziewicz-Motowidło, Sylwia

    2012-01-01

    Human cystatin C (hCC) is a small but very intriguing protein. Produced by all nucleated cells is found in almost all tissues and body fluids where, at physiological conditions, plays a role of a very potent inhibitor of cysteine proteases. Biologically active hCC is a monomeric protein but during cellular trafficking it forms dimers, transiently losing its inhibitory activity. In vitro, dimerization of cystatin C was observed for the mature protein during crystallization trials, revealing that the mechanism of this process is based on the three dimensional swapping of the protein domains. In our work we have focused on the impact of two proposed "hot spots" in cystatin C structure on its conformational stability. Encouraged by promising results of the theoretical calculations, we designed and produced several hCC hinge region point mutation variants that display a variety of conformational stability and propensity for dimerization and aggregation. A similar approach, i.e., rational mutagenesis, has been also applied to study the amyloidogenic L68Q variant to determine the contribution of hydrophobic interactions and steric effect on the stability of monomeric cystatin C. In this overview we would like to summarize the results of our studies. The impact of a particular mutation on the properties of the studied proteins will be presented in the context of their thermal and mechanical stability, in vitro dimerization tendency as well as the outcome of crystallization. Better understanding of the mechanism and, especially, factors affecting conformational stability of cystatin C and access to stable monomeric and dimeric versions of the protein opens new perspectives in explaining the role of dimers and the domain swapping process in hCC oligomerization, as well as designing potential inhibitors of this process.

  3. RecA-binding pilE G4 sequence essential for pilin antigenic variation forms monomeric and 5' end-stacked dimeric parallel G-quadruplexes.

    PubMed

    Kuryavyi, Vitaly; Cahoon, Laty A; Seifert, H Steven; Patel, Dinshaw J

    2012-12-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae is an obligate human pathogen that can escape immune surveillance through antigenic variation of surface structures such as pili. A G-quadruplex-forming (G4) sequence (5'-G(3)TG(3)TTG(3)TG(3)) located upstream of the N. gonorrhoeae pilin expression locus (pilE) is necessary for initiation of pilin antigenic variation, a recombination-based, high-frequency, diversity-generation system. We have determined NMR-based structures of the all parallel-stranded monomeric and 5' end-stacked dimeric pilE G-quadruplexes in monovalent cation-containing solutions. We demonstrate that the three-layered all parallel-stranded monomeric pilE G-quadruplex containing single-residue double-chain reversal loops, which can be modeled without steric clashes into the 3 nt DNA-binding site of RecA, binds and promotes E. coli RecA-mediated strand exchange in vitro. We discuss how interactions between RecA and monomeric pilE G-quadruplex could facilitate the specialized recombination reactions leading to pilin diversification.

  4. Influence of cyclic dimer formation on the phase behavior of carboxylic acids. II. Cross-associating systems.

    PubMed

    Janeček, Jiří; Paricaud, Patrice

    2013-08-15

    The doubly bonded dimer association scheme (DBD) proposed by Sear and Jackson is extended to mixtures exhibiting both self- and cross-associations. The PC-SAFT equation of state is combined with the new DBD association contribution to describe the vapor-liquid equilibria of binary mixtures of carboxylic acids + associating compounds (water, alcohols, and carboxylic acids). The effect of doubly bonded dimers on the phase behavior in such systems is less important than in mixtures of carboxylic acids with nonassociating compounds, due to the cross-associations that compete with the formation of DBDs. Nevertheless, a clear improvement in the description of vapor-liquid coexistence curves is achieved over the classical 2B association model, particularly for the dew point curves.

  5. Colon cancer-derived oncogenic EGFR G724S mutant identified by whole genome sequence analysis is dependent on asymmetric dimerization and sensitive to cetuximab

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Inhibition of the activated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) with either enzymatic kinase inhibitors or anti-EGFR antibodies such as cetuximab, is an effective modality of treatment for multiple human cancers. Enzymatic EGFR inhibitors are effective for lung adenocarcinomas with somatic kinase domain EGFR mutations while, paradoxically, anti-EGFR antibodies are more effective in colon and head and neck cancers where EGFR mutations occur less frequently. In colorectal cancer, anti-EGFR antibodies are routinely used as second-line therapy of KRAS wild-type tumors. However, detailed mechanisms and genomic predictors for pharmacological response to these antibodies in colon cancer remain unclear. Findings We describe a case of colorectal adenocarcinoma, which was found to harbor a kinase domain mutation, G724S, in EGFR through whole genome sequencing. We show that G724S mutant EGFR is oncogenic and that it differs from classic lung cancer derived EGFR mutants in that it is cetuximab responsive in vitro, yet relatively insensitive to small molecule kinase inhibitors. Through biochemical and cellular pharmacologic studies, we have determined that cells harboring the colon cancer-derived G719S and G724S mutants are responsive to cetuximab therapy in vitro and found that the requirement for asymmetric dimerization of these mutant EGFR to promote cellular transformation may explain their greater inhibition by cetuximab than small-molecule kinase inhibitors. Conclusion The colon-cancer derived G719S and G724S mutants are oncogenic and sensitive in vitro to cetuximab. These data suggest that patients with these mutations may benefit from the use of anti-EGFR antibodies as part of the first-line therapy. PMID:24894453

  6. Biofilm formation and antibiotic production in Ruegeria mobilis are influenced by intracellular concentrations of cyclic dimeric guanosinmonophosphate.

    PubMed

    D'Alvise, Paul W; Magdenoska, Olivera; Melchiorsen, Jette; Nielsen, Kristian F; Gram, Lone

    2014-05-01

    In many species of the marine Roseobacter clade, periods of attached life, in association with phytoplankton or particles, are interspersed with planktonic phases. The purpose of this study was to determine whether shifts between motile and sessile life in the globally abundant Roseobacter clade species Ruegeria mobilis are associated with intracellular concentrations of the signal compound cyclic dimeric guanosinmonophosphate (c-di-GMP), which in bacteria regulates transitions between motile and sessile life stages. Genes for diguanylate cyclases and phosphodiesterases, which are involved in c-di-GMP signalling, were found in the genome of R. mobilis strain F1926. Ion pair chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry revealed 20-fold higher c-di-GMP concentrations per cell in biofilm-containing cultures than in planktonic cells. An introduced diguanylate cyclase gene increased c-di-GMP and enhanced biofilm formation and production of the potent antibiotic tropodithietic acid (TDA). An introduced phosphodiesterase gene decreased c-di-GMP and reduced biofilm formation and TDA production. tdaC, a key gene for TDA biosynthesis, was expressed only in attached or biofilm-forming cells, and expression was induced immediately after initial attachment. In conclusion, c-di-GMP signalling controls biofilm formation and biofilm-associated traits in R. mobilis and, as suggested by presence of GGDEF and EAL domain protein genes, also in other Roseobacter clade species.

  7. Influence of softening sequencing on electrocoagulation treatment of produced water.

    PubMed

    Esmaeilirad, Nasim; Carlson, Ken; Omur Ozbek, Pinar

    2015-01-01

    Electrocoagulation has been used to remove solids and some metals from both water and wastewater sources for decades. Additionally, chemical softening is commonly employed in water treatment systems to remove hardness. This paper assesses the combination and sequence of softening and EC methods to treat hydraulic fracturing flowback and produced water from shale oil and gas operations. EC is one of the available technologies to treat produced water for reuse in frac fluids, eliminating not only the need to transport more water but also the costs of providing fresh water. In this paper, the influence of chemical softening on EC was studied. In the softening process, pH was raised to 9.5 and 10.2 before and after EC, respectively. Softening, when practiced before EC was more effective for removing turbidity with samples from wells older than one month (99% versus 88%). However, neither method was successful in treating samples collected from early flowback (1-day and 2-day samples), likely due to the high concentration of organic matter. For total organic carbon, hardness, Ba, Sr, and B removal, application of softening before EC appeared to be the most efficient approach, likely due to the formation of solids before the coagulation process.

  8. Influence of softening sequencing on electrocoagulation treatment of produced water.

    PubMed

    Esmaeilirad, Nasim; Carlson, Ken; Omur Ozbek, Pinar

    2015-01-01

    Electrocoagulation has been used to remove solids and some metals from both water and wastewater sources for decades. Additionally, chemical softening is commonly employed in water treatment systems to remove hardness. This paper assesses the combination and sequence of softening and EC methods to treat hydraulic fracturing flowback and produced water from shale oil and gas operations. EC is one of the available technologies to treat produced water for reuse in frac fluids, eliminating not only the need to transport more water but also the costs of providing fresh water. In this paper, the influence of chemical softening on EC was studied. In the softening process, pH was raised to 9.5 and 10.2 before and after EC, respectively. Softening, when practiced before EC was more effective for removing turbidity with samples from wells older than one month (99% versus 88%). However, neither method was successful in treating samples collected from early flowback (1-day and 2-day samples), likely due to the high concentration of organic matter. For total organic carbon, hardness, Ba, Sr, and B removal, application of softening before EC appeared to be the most efficient approach, likely due to the formation of solids before the coagulation process. PMID:25464315

  9. D-dimer test

    MedlinePlus

    D-dimer tests are used to check for blood clotting problems. Blood clots can cause health problems, such ... that you probably do not have problems with blood clotting. If you are getting the D-dimer test ...

  10. An Analysis of Stimuli that Influence Compliance during the High-Probability Instruction Sequence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Normand, Matthew P.; Kestner, Kathryn; Jessel, Joshua

    2010-01-01

    When we evaluated variables that influence the effectiveness of the high-probability (high-p) instruction sequence, the sequence was associated with a precipitous decrease in compliance with high-"p" instructions for 1 participant, thereby precluding continued use of the sequence. We investigated the reasons for this decrease. Stimuli associated…

  11. Evidence for involvement of the C-terminal domain in the dimerization of the CopY repressor protein from Enterococcus hirae

    SciTech Connect

    Pazehoski, Kristina O.; Cobine, Paul A.; Winzor, Donald J.; Dameron, Charles T.

    2011-03-11

    Research highlights: {yields} A metal-binding protein domain is directly involved in protein dimerization. {yields} Fusing the metal-binding domain to a monomeric protein induces dimerization. {yields} Frontal size-exclusion chromatography measures the strength of dimer interaction. {yields} Ultracentrifugation studies confirm the influence of metal binding on dimerization. -- Abstract: Metal binding to the C-terminal region of the copper-responsive repressor protein CopY is responsible for homodimerization and the regulation of the copper homeostasis pathway in Enterococcus hirae. Specific involvement of the 38 C-terminal residues of CopY in dimerization is indicated by zonal and frontal (large zone) size-exclusion chromatography studies. The studies demonstrate that the attachment of these CopY residues to the immunoglobulin-binding domain of streptococcal protein G (GB1) promotes dimerization of the monomeric protein. Although sensitivity of dimerization to removal of metal from the fusion protein is smaller than that found for CopY (as measured by ultracentrifugation studies), the demonstration that an unrelated protein (GB1) can be induced to dimerize by extending its sequence with the C-terminal portion of CopY confirms the involvement of this region in CopY homodimerization.

  12. Dimeric Cinchona alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Boratyński, Przemysław J

    2015-05-01

    Nature is full of dimeric alkaloids of various types from many plant families, some of them with interesting biological properties. However, dimeric Cinchona alkaloids were not isolated from any species but were products of designed partial chemical synthesis. Although the Cinchona bark is amongst the sources of oldest efficient medicines, the synthetic dimers found most use in the field of asymmetric synthesis. Prominent examples include the Sharpless dihydroxylation and aminohydroxylation ligands, and dimeric phase transfer catalysts. In this article the syntheses of Cinchona alkaloid dimers and oligomers are reviewed, and their structure and applications are outlined. Various synthetic routes exploit reactivity of the alkaloids at the central 9-hydroxyl group, quinuclidine, and quinoline rings, as well as 3-vinyl group. This availability of reactive sites, in combination with a plethora of linker molecules, contributes to the diversity of the products obtained.

  13. Clinical study on the influence of phloroglucinol on plasma angiotensin II and D-Dimer index in patients with severe pregnancy-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ai, Liang; Lan, Xinzhi; Wang, Limin; Xu, Yanjie; Zhang, Bin

    2016-07-01

    To observe the effect of phloroglucinol on plasma angiotensin II and D-dimer index when it was applied to patients with severe pregnancy-induced hypertension. 212 cases of severe pregnancy-induced hypertension patients diagnosed clinically were selected to be randomly divided into the research group and the control group. The research groups were given phloroglucinol, while the control groups were given magnesium sulfate. The plasma angiotensin II and D-dimer index in patients were detected before treatment and after 7 days respectively with statistical analysis of results. The diffidence after treatment was statistically significant (P<0.05). Compared within the same group, the difference of each index before and after treatment in the research group was statistically significant (P<0.05), while the control group was not statistically significant (P>0.05). It showed that the research group could reduce the plasma D-dimer and angiotensin II index in severe pregnancy-induced hypertension patients, and its effect was significantly better than the control group according to the plasma D-dimer and angiotensin II index changes in patients, it indicated that it was effective of phloroglucinol treatment for patients with pregnancy-induced hypertension disease and superior to the western medicine conventional treatment, worth clinical promotion.

  14. Clinical study on the influence of phloroglucinol on plasma angiotensin II and D-Dimer index in patients with severe pregnancy-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ai, Liang; Lan, Xinzhi; Wang, Limin; Xu, Yanjie; Zhang, Bin

    2016-07-01

    To observe the effect of phloroglucinol on plasma angiotensin II and D-dimer index when it was applied to patients with severe pregnancy-induced hypertension. 212 cases of severe pregnancy-induced hypertension patients diagnosed clinically were selected to be randomly divided into the research group and the control group. The research groups were given phloroglucinol, while the control groups were given magnesium sulfate. The plasma angiotensin II and D-dimer index in patients were detected before treatment and after 7 days respectively with statistical analysis of results. The diffidence after treatment was statistically significant (P<0.05). Compared within the same group, the difference of each index before and after treatment in the research group was statistically significant (P<0.05), while the control group was not statistically significant (P>0.05). It showed that the research group could reduce the plasma D-dimer and angiotensin II index in severe pregnancy-induced hypertension patients, and its effect was significantly better than the control group according to the plasma D-dimer and angiotensin II index changes in patients, it indicated that it was effective of phloroglucinol treatment for patients with pregnancy-induced hypertension disease and superior to the western medicine conventional treatment, worth clinical promotion. PMID:27592487

  15. Peptides Interfering 3A Protein Dimerization Decrease FMDV Multiplication

    PubMed Central

    de la Torre, Beatriz G.; Valle, Javier; Andreu, David; Sobrino, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Nonstructural protein 3A is involved in relevant functions in foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) replication. FMDV 3A can form homodimers and preservation of the two hydrophobic α-helices (α1 and α2) that stabilize the dimer interface is essential for virus replication. In this work, small peptides mimicking residues involved in the dimer interface were used to interfere with dimerization and thus gain insight on its biological function. The dimer interface peptides α1, α2 and that spanning the two hydrophobic α-helices, α12, impaired in vitro dimer formation of a peptide containing the two α-helices, this effect being higher with peptide α12. To assess the effect of dimer inhibition in cultured cells, the interfering peptides were N-terminally fused to a heptaarginine (R7) sequence to favor their intracellular translocation. Thus, when fused to R7, interference peptides (100 μM) were able to inhibit dimerization of transiently expressed 3A, the higher inhibitions being found with peptides α1 and α12. The 3A dimerization impairment exerted by the peptides correlated with significant, specific reductions in the viral yield recovered from peptide-treated FMDV infected cells. In this case, α2 was the only peptide producing significant reductions at concentrations lower than 100 μM. Thus, dimer interface peptides constitute a tool to understand the structure-function relationship of this viral protein and point to 3A dimerization as a potential antiviral target. PMID:26505190

  16. Dimerization of lipocalin allergens

    PubMed Central

    Niemi, Merja H.; Rytkönen-Nissinen, Marja; Miettinen, Ilja; Jänis, Janne; Virtanen, Tuomas; Rouvinen, Juha

    2015-01-01

    Lipocalins are one of the most important groups of inhalant animal allergens. The analysis of structural features of these proteins is important to get insights into their allergenicity. We have determined two different dimeric crystal structures for bovine dander lipocalin Bos d 2, which was earlier described as a monomeric allergen. The crystal structure analysis of all other determined lipocalin allergens also revealed oligomeric structures which broadly utilize inherent structural features of the β-sheet in dimer formation. According to the moderate size of monomer-monomer interfaces, most of these dimers would be transient in solution. Native mass spectrometry was employed to characterize quantitatively transient dimerization of two lipocalin allergens, Bos d 2 and Bos d 5, in solution. PMID:26346541

  17. Dimeric 3-phosphoglycerate kinases from hyperthermophilic Archaea. Cloning, sequencing and expression of the 3-phosphoglycerate kinase gene of Pyrococcus woesei in Escherichia coli and characterization of the protein. Structural and functional comparison with the 3-phosphoglycerate kinase of Methanothermus fervidus.

    PubMed

    Hess, D; Krüger, K; Knappik, A; Palm, P; Hensel, R

    1995-10-01

    The gene coding for the 3-phosphoglycerate kinase (EC 2.7.2.3) of Pyrococcus woesei was cloned and sequenced. The gene sequence comprises 1230 bp coding for a polypeptide with the theoretical M(r) of 46,195. The deduced protein sequence exhibits a high similarity (46.1% and 46.6% identity) to the other known archaeal 3-phosphoglycerate kinases of Methanobacterium bryantii and Methanothermus fervidus [Fabry, S., Heppner, P., Dietmaier, W. & Hensel, R. (1990) Gene 91, 19-25]. By comparing the 3-phosphoglycerate kinase sequences of the mesophilic and the two thermophilic Archaea, trends in thermoadaptation were confirmed that could be deduced from comparisons of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase sequences from the same organisms [Zwickl, P., Fabry, S., Bogedain, C., Haas, A. & Hensel, R. (1990) J. Bacteriol. 172, 4329-4338]. With increasing temperature the average hydrophobicity and the portion of aromatic residues increases, whereas the chain flexibility as well as the content in chemically labile residues (Asn, Cys) decreases. To study the phenotypic properties of the 3-phosphoglycerate kinases from thermophilic Archaea in more detail, the 3-phosphoglycerate kinase genes from P. woesei and M. fervidus were expressed in Escherichia coli. Comparisons of kinetic and molecular properties of the enzymes from the original organisms and from E. coli indicate that the proteins expressed in the mesophilic host are folded correctly. Besides their higher thermostability according to their origin from hyperthermophilic organisms, both enzymes differ from their bacterial and eucaryotic homologues mainly in two respects. (a) The 3-phosphoglycerate kinases from P. woesei and M. fervidus are homomeric dimers in their native state contrary to all other known 3-phosphoglycerate kinases, which are monomers including the enzyme from the mesophilic Archaeum M. bryantii. (b) Monovalent cations are essential for the activity of both archaeal enzymes with K+ being significantly more

  18. Dimeric 3-phosphoglycerate kinases from hyperthermophilic Archaea. Cloning, sequencing and expression of the 3-phosphoglycerate kinase gene of Pyrococcus woesei in Escherichia coli and characterization of the protein. Structural and functional comparison with the 3-phosphoglycerate kinase of Methanothermus fervidus.

    PubMed

    Hess, D; Krüger, K; Knappik, A; Palm, P; Hensel, R

    1995-10-01

    The gene coding for the 3-phosphoglycerate kinase (EC 2.7.2.3) of Pyrococcus woesei was cloned and sequenced. The gene sequence comprises 1230 bp coding for a polypeptide with the theoretical M(r) of 46,195. The deduced protein sequence exhibits a high similarity (46.1% and 46.6% identity) to the other known archaeal 3-phosphoglycerate kinases of Methanobacterium bryantii and Methanothermus fervidus [Fabry, S., Heppner, P., Dietmaier, W. & Hensel, R. (1990) Gene 91, 19-25]. By comparing the 3-phosphoglycerate kinase sequences of the mesophilic and the two thermophilic Archaea, trends in thermoadaptation were confirmed that could be deduced from comparisons of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase sequences from the same organisms [Zwickl, P., Fabry, S., Bogedain, C., Haas, A. & Hensel, R. (1990) J. Bacteriol. 172, 4329-4338]. With increasing temperature the average hydrophobicity and the portion of aromatic residues increases, whereas the chain flexibility as well as the content in chemically labile residues (Asn, Cys) decreases. To study the phenotypic properties of the 3-phosphoglycerate kinases from thermophilic Archaea in more detail, the 3-phosphoglycerate kinase genes from P. woesei and M. fervidus were expressed in Escherichia coli. Comparisons of kinetic and molecular properties of the enzymes from the original organisms and from E. coli indicate that the proteins expressed in the mesophilic host are folded correctly. Besides their higher thermostability according to their origin from hyperthermophilic organisms, both enzymes differ from their bacterial and eucaryotic homologues mainly in two respects. (a) The 3-phosphoglycerate kinases from P. woesei and M. fervidus are homomeric dimers in their native state contrary to all other known 3-phosphoglycerate kinases, which are monomers including the enzyme from the mesophilic Archaeum M. bryantii. (b) Monovalent cations are essential for the activity of both archaeal enzymes with K+ being significantly more

  19. Analysis of SecA Dimerization in Solution

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The Sec pathway mediates translocation of protein across the inner membrane of bacteria. SecA is a motor protein that drives translocation of preprotein through the SecYEG channel. SecA reversibly dimerizes under physiological conditions, but different dimer interfaces have been observed in SecA crystal structures. Here, we have used biophysical approaches to address the nature of the SecA dimer that exists in solution. We have taken advantage of the extreme salt sensitivity of SecA dimerization to compare the rates of hydrogen–deuterium exchange of the monomer and dimer and have analyzed the effects of single-alanine substitutions on dimerization affinity. Our results support the antiparallel dimer arrangement observed in one of the crystal structures of Bacillus subtilis SecA. Additional residues lying within the preprotein binding domain and the C-terminus are also protected from exchange upon dimerization, indicating linkage to a conformational transition of the preprotein binding domain from an open to a closed state. In agreement with this interpretation, normal mode analysis demonstrates that the SecA dimer interface influences the global dynamics of SecA such that dimerization stabilizes the closed conformation. PMID:24786965

  20. Regional association analysis delineates a sequenced chromosome region influencing antinutritive seed meal compounds in oilseed rape.

    PubMed

    Snowdon, R J; Wittkop, B; Rezaidad, A; Hasan, M; Lipsa, F; Stein, A; Friedt, W

    2010-11-01

    This study describes the use of regional association analyses to delineate a sequenced region of a Brassica napus chromosome with a significant effect on antinutritive seed meal compounds in oilseed rape. A major quantitative trait locus (QTL) influencing seed colour, fibre content, and phenolic compounds was mapped to the same position on B. napus chromosome A9 in biparental mapping populations from two different yellow-seeded × black-seeded B. napus crosses. Sequences of markers spanning the QTL region identified synteny to a sequence contig from the corresponding chromosome A9 in Brassica rapa. Remapping of sequence-derived markers originating from the B. rapa sequence contig confirmed their position within the QTL. One of these markers also mapped to a seed colour and fibre QTL on the same chromosome in a black-seeded × black-seeded B. napus cross. Consequently, regional association analysis was performed in a genetically diverse panel of dark-seeded, winter-type oilseed rape accessions. For this we used closely spaced simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers spanning the sequence contig covering the QTL region. Correction for population structure was performed using a set of genome-wide SSR markers. The identification of QTL-derived markers with significant associations to seed colour, fibre content, and phenolic compounds in the association panel enabled the identification of positional and functional candidate genes for B. napus seed meal quality within a small segment of the B. rapa genome sequence.

  1. Sequence and Temperature Influence on Kinetics of DNA Strand Displacement at Gold Electrode Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Biala, Katarzyna; Sedova, Ada; Flechsig, Gerd-Uwe

    2015-09-16

    Understanding complex contributions of surface environment to tethered nucleic acid sensing experiments has proven challenging, yet it is important because it is essential for interpretation and calibration of indispensable methods, such as microarrays. We investigate the effects of DNA sequence and solution temperature gradients on the kinetics of strand displacement at heated gold wire electrodes, and at gold disc electrodes in a heated solution. Addition of a terminal double mismatch (toehold) provides a reduction in strand displacement energy barriers sufficient to probe the secondary mechanisms involved in the hybridization process. In four different DNA capture probe sequences (relevant for the identification of genetically modified maize MON810), all but one revealed a high activation energy up to 200 kJ/mol during hybridization, that we attribute to displacement of protective strands by capture probes. Protective strands contain 4 to 5 mismatches to ease their displacement by the surface-confined probes at the gold electrodes. A low activation energy (30 kJ/mol) was observed for the sequence whose protective strand contained a toehold and one central mismatch, its kinetic curves displayed significantly different shapes, and we observed a reduced maximum signal intensity as compared to other sequences. These findings point to potential sequence-related contributions to oligonucleotide diffusion influencing kinetics. Additionally, for all sequences studied with heated wire electrodes, we observed a 23 K lower optimal hybridization temperature in comparison with disc electrodes in heated solution, and greatly reduced voltammetric signals after taking into account electrode surface area. We propose that thermodiffusion due to temperature gradients may influence both hybridization and strand displacement kinetics at heated microelectrodes, an explanation supported by computational fluid dynamics. DNA assays with surface-confined capture probes and temperature

  2. Superbackscattering nanoparticle dimers.

    PubMed

    Liberal, Iñigo; Ederra, Iñigo; Gonzalo, Ramón; Ziolkowski, Richard W

    2015-07-10

    The theory and design of superbackscattering nanoparticle dimers are presented. We analytically derive the optimal configurations and the upper bound of their backscattering cross-sections. In particular, it is demonstrated that electrically small nanoparticle dimers can enhance the backscattering by a factor of 6.25 with respect to single dipolar particles. We demonstrate that optimal designs approaching this theoretical limit can be found by using a simple circuit model. The study of practical implementations based on plasmonic and high-permittivity particles has been also addressed. Moreover, the numerical examples reveal that the dimers can attain close to a fourfold enhancement of the single nanoparticle response even in the presence of high losses.

  3. Superbackscattering nanoparticle dimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liberal, Iñigo; Ederra, Iñigo; Gonzalo, Ramón; Ziolkowski, Richard W.

    2015-07-01

    The theory and design of superbackscattering nanoparticle dimers are presented. We analytically derive the optimal configurations and the upper bound of their backscattering cross-sections. In particular, it is demonstrated that electrically small nanoparticle dimers can enhance the backscattering by a factor of 6.25 with respect to single dipolar particles. We demonstrate that optimal designs approaching this theoretical limit can be found by using a simple circuit model. The study of practical implementations based on plasmonic and high-permittivity particles has been also addressed. Moreover, the numerical examples reveal that the dimers can attain close to a fourfold enhancement of the single nanoparticle response even in the presence of high losses.

  4. Momentum sequence and environmental climate influence levels of perceived psychological momentum within a sport competition.

    PubMed

    Briki, Walid; Markman, Keith D; Coudevylle, Guillaume; Sinnapah, Stéphane; Hue, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    The present study examined the influence of momentum sequence (positive vs. negative) and environmental climate (hot-wet vs. neutral) on supporters' (i.e. virtual observers') reported levels of perceived psychological momentum (PM) during a simulated cycling competition. Participants supported one of two competing cyclists involved in a race that was displayed on a screen in a lecture hall. The race scenario was manipulated so that the supported cyclist appeared to undergo either a positive or negative momentum sequence. In addition, participants were either exposed to a hot-wet environmental climate or to a neutral environmental climate while observing the race scenario. According to the results, reported levels of PM were higher in the positive momentum sequence condition than in the negative momentum sequence condition, consistent with the notion that supporters' PM is influenced by a positivity bias, and reported levels of PM were also found to be higher in the hot-wet climate condition than in the neutral climate condition, consistent with the notion that environmental climate is a contextual factor that influences PM through the operation of a causal augmenting mechanism.

  5. Quantum Dimer Model: Phase Diagrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, Garry; Chamon, Claudio; Castelnovo, Claudio

    We present new theoretical analysis of the Quantum Dimer Model. We study dimer models on square, cubic and triangular lattices and we reproduce their phase diagrams (which were previously known only numerically). We show that there are several types of dimer liquids and solids. We present preliminary analysis of several other models including doped dimers and planar spin ice, and some results on the Kagome and hexagonal lattices.

  6. Factors influencing success of clinical genome sequencing across a broad spectrum of disorders

    PubMed Central

    Lise, Stefano; Broxholme, John; Cazier, Jean-Baptiste; Rimmer, Andy; Kanapin, Alexander; Lunter, Gerton; Fiddy, Simon; Allan, Chris; Aricescu, A. Radu; Attar, Moustafa; Babbs, Christian; Becq, Jennifer; Beeson, David; Bento, Celeste; Bignell, Patricia; Blair, Edward; Buckle, Veronica J; Bull, Katherine; Cais, Ondrej; Cario, Holger; Chapel, Helen; Copley, Richard R; Cornall, Richard; Craft, Jude; Dahan, Karin; Davenport, Emma E; Dendrou, Calliope; Devuyst, Olivier; Fenwick, Aimée L; Flint, Jonathan; Fugger, Lars; Gilbert, Rodney D; Goriely, Anne; Green, Angie; Greger, Ingo H.; Grocock, Russell; Gruszczyk, Anja V; Hastings, Robert; Hatton, Edouard; Higgs, Doug; Hill, Adrian; Holmes, Chris; Howard, Malcolm; Hughes, Linda; Humburg, Peter; Johnson, David; Karpe, Fredrik; Kingsbury, Zoya; Kini, Usha; Knight, Julian C; Krohn, Jonathan; Lamble, Sarah; Langman, Craig; Lonie, Lorne; Luck, Joshua; McCarthy, Davis; McGowan, Simon J; McMullin, Mary Frances; Miller, Kerry A; Murray, Lisa; Németh, Andrea H; Nesbit, M Andrew; Nutt, David; Ormondroyd, Elizabeth; Oturai, Annette Bang; Pagnamenta, Alistair; Patel, Smita Y; Percy, Melanie; Petousi, Nayia; Piazza, Paolo; Piret, Sian E; Polanco-Echeverry, Guadalupe; Popitsch, Niko; Powrie, Fiona; Pugh, Chris; Quek, Lynn; Robbins, Peter A; Robson, Kathryn; Russo, Alexandra; Sahgal, Natasha; van Schouwenburg, Pauline A; Schuh, Anna; Silverman, Earl; Simmons, Alison; Sørensen, Per Soelberg; Sweeney, Elizabeth; Taylor, John; Thakker, Rajesh V; Tomlinson, Ian; Trebes, Amy; Twigg, Stephen RF; Uhlig, Holm H; Vyas, Paresh; Vyse, Tim; Wall, Steven A; Watkins, Hugh; Whyte, Michael P; Witty, Lorna; Wright, Ben; Yau, Chris; Buck, David; Humphray, Sean; Ratcliffe, Peter J; Bell, John I; Wilkie, Andrew OM; Bentley, David; Donnelly, Peter; McVean, Gilean

    2015-01-01

    To assess factors influencing the success of whole genome sequencing for mainstream clinical diagnosis, we sequenced 217 individuals from 156 independent cases across a broad spectrum of disorders in whom prior screening had identified no pathogenic variants. We quantified the number of candidate variants identified using different strategies for variant calling, filtering, annotation and prioritisation. We found that jointly calling variants across samples, filtering against both local and external databases, deploying multiple annotation tools and using familial transmission above biological plausibility contributed to accuracy. Overall, we identified disease causing variants in 21% of cases, rising to 34% (23/68) for Mendelian disorders and 57% (8/14) in trios. We also discovered 32 potentially clinically actionable variants in 18 genes unrelated to the referral disorder, though only four were ultimately considered reportable. Our results demonstrate the value of genome sequencing for routine clinical diagnosis, but also highlight many outstanding challenges. PMID:25985138

  7. Redesigning the procaspase-8 dimer interface for improved dimerization

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Chunxiao; MacKenzie, Sarah H; Clay Clark, A

    2014-01-01

    Caspase-8 is a cysteine directed aspartate-specific protease that is activated at the cytosolic face of the cell membrane upon receptor ligation. A key step in the activation of caspase-8 depends on adaptor-induced dimerization of procaspase-8 monomers. Dimerization is followed by limited autoproteolysis within the intersubunit linker (IL), which separates the large and small subunits of the catalytic domain. Although cleavage of the IL stabilizes the dimer, the uncleaved procaspase-8 dimer is sufficiently active to initiate apoptosis, so dimerization of the zymogen is an important mechanism to control apoptosis. In contrast, the effector caspase-3 is a stable dimer under physiological conditions but exhibits little enzymatic activity. The catalytic domains of caspases are structurally similar, but it is not known why procaspase-8 is a monomer while procaspase-3 is a dimer. To define the role of the dimer interface in assembly and activation of procaspase-8, we generated mutants that mimic the dimer interface of effector caspases. We show that procaspase-8 with a mutated dimer interface more readily forms dimers. Time course studies of refolding also show that the mutations accelerate dimerization. Transfection of HEK293A cells with the procaspase-8 variants, however, did not result in a significant increase in apoptosis, indicating that other factors are required in vivo. Overall, we show that redesigning the interface of procaspase-8 to remove negative design elements results in increased dimerization and activity in vitro, but increased dimerization, by itself, is not sufficient for robust activation of apoptosis. PMID:24442640

  8. Calcium-dependent Dimerization of Human Soluble Calcium Activated Nucleotidase: Characterization of the Dimer Interface

    SciTech Connect

    Yang,M.; Horii, K.; Herr, A.; Kirley, T.

    2006-01-01

    Mammals express a protein homologous to soluble nucleotidases used by blood-sucking insects to inhibit host blood clotting. These vertebrate nucleotidases may play a role in protein glycosylation. The activity of this enzyme family is strictly dependent on calcium, which induces a conformational change in the secreted, soluble human nucleotidase. The crystal structure of this human enzyme was recently solved; however, the mechanism of calcium activation and the basis for the calcium-induced changes remain unclear. In this study, using analytical ultracentrifugation and chemical cross-linking, we show that calcium or strontium induce noncovalent dimerization of the soluble human enzyme. The location and nature of the dimer interface was elucidated using a combination of site-directed mutagenesis and chemical cross-linking, coupled with crystallographic analyses. Replacement of Ile{sup 170}, Ser{sup 172}, and Ser{sup 226} with cysteine residues resulted in calcium-dependent, sulfhydryl-specific intermolecular cross-linking, which was not observed after cysteine introduction at other surface locations. Analysis of a super-active mutant, E130Y, revealed that this mutant dimerized more readily than the wild-type enzyme. The crystal structure of the E130Y mutant revealed that the mutated residue is found in the dimer interface. In addition, expression of the full-length nucleotidase revealed that this membrane-bound form can also dimerize and that these dimers are stabilized by spontaneous oxidative cross-linking of Cys{sup 30}, located between the single transmembrane helix and the start of the soluble sequence. Thus, calcium-mediated dimerization may also represent a mechanism for regulation of the activity of this nucleotidase in the physiological setting of the endoplasmic reticulum or Golgi.

  9. Spectroscopy of dimers.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, H. B.

    1972-01-01

    The method of Stogryn and Hirschfelder, which divides two-particle phase space into bound, metastable, and free particle parts, is applied to the statistical averages which determine the first three spectroscopic moments of 'collision-induced' far-infrared and Raman spectra. Numerical results are presented for a number of models of noble gas systems. It is shown that for some systems, but not all, dimers make important, although not necessarily well-separated, contributions to the spectrum.

  10. Influence of processing sequence on the tribological properties of VGCF-X/PA6/SEBS composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osada, Yu; Nishitani, Yosuke; Kitano, Takeshi

    2016-03-01

    In order to develop the new tribomaterials for mechanical sliding parts with sufficient balance of mechanical and tribological properties, we investigated the influence of processing sequence on the tribological properties of the ternary nanocomposites: the polymer blends of polyamide 6 (PA6) and styrene-ethylene/butylene-styrene copolymer (SEBS) filled with vapor grown carbon fiber (VGCF-X), which is one of carbon nanofiber (CNF) and has 15nm diameter and 3μm length. Five different processing sequences: (1) VGCF-X, PA6 and SEBS were mixed simultaneously (Process A), (2) Re-mixing (Second compounding) of the materials prepared by Process A (Process AR),(3) SEBS was blended with PA6 (PA6/SEBS blends) and then these blends were mixed with VGCF-X (Process B), (4) VGCF-X was mixed with PA6 (VGCF-X/PA6 composites) and then these composites were blended with SEBS (Process C), and (5) VGCF-X were mixed with SEBS (VGCF-X/SEBS composites) and then these composites were blended with PA6 (Process D) were attempted for preparing of the ternary nanocomposites (VGCF-X/PA6/SEBS composites). These ternary polymer nanocomposites were extruded by a twin screw extruder and injection-molded. Their tribological properties were evaluated by using a ring-on-plate type sliding wear tester under dry condition. The tribological properties such as the frictional coefficient and the specific wear rate were influenced by the processing sequence. These results may be attributed to the change of internal structure formation, which is a dispersibility of SEBS particle and VGCF-X in ternary nanocomposites (VGCF-X/PA6/SEBS) by different processing sequences. In particular, the processing sequences of AR, B and D, which are those of re-mixing of VGCF-X, have a good dispersibility of VGCF-X for the improvement of tribological properties.

  11. Metalloporphines: Dimers and Trimers.

    PubMed

    Jentzen, Walter; Shelnutt, John A; Scheidt, W Robert

    2016-06-20

    Procedures for the purification and subsequent crystallization of the slightly soluble four-coordinate metallporphines, the simplest possible porphyrin derivatives, are described. Crystals of the porphine derivatives of cobalt(II), copper(II), platinum(II), and two polymorphs of zinc(II) were obtained. Analysis of the crystal and molecular structures shows that all except the platinum(II) derivative form an unusual trimeric species in the solid state. The isomorphous cobalt(II), copper(II), and one zinc(II) polymorph pack in the unit cell to form dimers as well as the trimers. Interplanar spacings between porphine rings are similar in both the dimers and trimers and range between 3.24 and 3.37 Å. Porphine rings are strongly overlapped with lateral shifts between ring centers in both the dimers and trimers with values between 1.52 and 1.70 Å or in Category S as originally defined by Scheidt and Lee. Periodic trends in the M-Np bond distances parallel those observed previously for tetraphenyl- and octaethylporphyrin derivatives. PMID:27276239

  12. Binary mixtures with novel monomeric and dimeric surfactants: influence of the head group nature and number of hydrophobic chains on non-ideality.

    PubMed

    Martín, Victoria Isabel; Rodríguez, Amalia; del Mar Graciani, María; Moyá, María Luisa

    2012-02-15

    The micellization and micellar growth in the mixtures of N,N-dimethyl, N-phenyl,N-dodecylammonium bromide, PH12, N,N-dimethyl,N-ciclohexylmethyl,N-dodecylammonium bromide, CH12, and their two dimeric counterparts m-dimethylphenyl-α-ω-bis(dodecyldimethylammonium) bromide, 12PH12, and m-dimethylciclohexyl-α-ω-bis(dodecyldimethylammonium) bromide, 12CH12, with dodecyltrimethylammoniumbromide, DTAB, and with N-decanoyl N-methylglucamide, MEGA10, were investigated at 303 K. Circular dichroism, CD, experiments showed the formation of mixed micelles. Two-dimensional, 2D, rotating frame nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (ROESY) experiments indicated that the arrangement of the rings in the pure and mixed micelles is similar, with the rings bent into the micelle interior avoiding contact with water. Application of different theoretical approaches shows that PH12 and CH12 mixtures with DTAB and with MEGA10 behave almost ideally. The binary systems of 12PH12 and 12CH12 with DTAB and with MEGA10 show a non-ideal behavior. An increment in the solution mole fraction of MEGA10 and DTAB diminishes the tendency of the micellar aggregates to grow.

  13. Influence of Aqueous-Salt Conditions on the Structure and Dynamics of the Monomeric and Novel Dimeric forms of the Alzheimer s ABeta21-30 protein fragment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Micholas Dean

    The behavior of the Alzheimer's related peptide Abeta is the subject of much study. In typical computational studies the environment local to the peptide is assumed to be pure water; however, in vivo the peptide is found in the extracellular space near the plasma membrane which is rich in ionic species. In this thesis, the hypothesis that the presence of group I/IIA salts will result in increased sampling of disordered structures as well as modify the dynamics of meta-stable structural motifs in the small folding nucleus of the Abeta peptide (Abeta21-30) is examined under a variety of ionic environments and was shown that of the tested salts, CaCl2 (and MgCl2, to a much lesser degree) did increase the propensity for disordered states; while, the group IA salts, KCl and NaCl, had little effect on the secondary structure of the peptide. Further, study of three familial mutations of this peptide region is also performed under aqueous salt-environments to elucidate further mechanistic details of how aqueous salts modify the region's behavior. Finally, as experimental results have highlighted that aggregation rates of the full-length peptide are modified by the presence of CaCl2, this work examines novel dimers states of Abeta21-30 and their stabilities when exposed to CaCl2.

  14. Influence of sequence mismatches on the specificity of recombinase polymerase amplification technology.

    PubMed

    Daher, Rana K; Stewart, Gale; Boissinot, Maurice; Boudreau, Dominique K; Bergeron, Michel G

    2015-04-01

    Recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) technology relies on three major proteins, recombinase proteins, single-strand binding proteins, and polymerases, to specifically amplify nucleic acid sequences in an isothermal format. The performance of RPA with respect to sequence mismatches of closely-related non-target molecules is not well documented and the influence of the number and distribution of mismatches in DNA sequences on RPA amplification reaction is not well understood. We investigated the specificity of RPA by testing closely-related species bearing naturally occurring mismatches for the tuf gene sequence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and/or Mycobacterium tuberculosis and for the cfb gene sequence of Streptococcus agalactiae. In addition, the impact of the number and distribution of mismatches on RPA efficiency was assessed by synthetically generating 14 types of mismatched forward primers for detecting five bacterial species of high diagnostic relevance such as Clostridium difficile, Staphylococcus aureus, S. agalactiae, P. aeruginosa, and M. tuberculosis as well as Bacillus atropheus subsp. globigii for which we use the spores as internal control in diagnostic assays. A total of 87 mismatched primers were tested in this study. We observed that target specific RPA primers with mismatches (n > 1) at their 3'extrimity hampered RPA reaction. In addition, 3 mismatches covering both extremities and the center of the primer sequence negatively affected RPA yield. We demonstrated that the specificity of RPA was multifactorial. Therefore its application in clinical settings must be selected and validated a priori. We recommend that the selection of a target gene must consider the presence of closely-related non-target genes. It is advisable to choose target regions with a high number of mismatches (≥36%, relative to the size of amplicon) with respect to closely-related species and the best case scenario would be by choosing a unique target gene.

  15. Sequence and domain arrangements influence mechanical properties of elastin-like polymeric elastomers.

    PubMed

    Miao, Ming; Sitarz, Eva; Bellingham, Catherine M; Won, Emily; Muiznieks, Lisa D; Keeley, Fred W

    2013-06-01

    Elastin is the polymeric, extracellular matrix protein that provides properties of extensibility and elastic recoil to large arteries, lung parenchyma, and other tissues. Elastin assembles by crosslinking through lysine residues of its monomeric precursor, tropoelastin. Tropoelastin, as well as polypeptides based on tropoelastin sequences, undergo a process of self-assembly that aligns lysine residues for crosslinking. As a result, both the full-length monomer as well as elastin-like polypeptides (ELPs) can be made into biomaterials whose properties resemble those of native polymeric elastin. Using both full-length human tropoelastin (hTE) as well as ELPs, we and others have previously reported on the influence of sequence and domain arrangements on self-assembly properties. Here we investigate the role of domain sequence and organization on the tensile mechanical properties of crosslinked biomaterials fabricated from ELP variants. In general, substitutions in ELPs involving similiar domain types (hydrophobic or crosslinking) had little effect on mechanical properties. However, modifications altering either the structure or the characteristic sequence style of these domains had significant effects on such properties. In addition, using a series of deletion and replacement constructs for full-length hTE, we provide new insights into the role of conserved domains of tropoelastin in determining mechanical properties. PMID:23529691

  16. A flexible method for estimating the fraction of fitness influencing mutations from large sequencing data sets.

    PubMed

    Moon, Sunjin; Akey, Joshua M

    2016-06-01

    A continuing challenge in the analysis of massively large sequencing data sets is quantifying and interpreting non-neutrally evolving mutations. Here, we describe a flexible and robust approach based on the site frequency spectrum to estimate the fraction of deleterious and adaptive variants from large-scale sequencing data sets. We applied our method to approximately 1 million single nucleotide variants (SNVs) identified in high-coverage exome sequences of 6515 individuals. We estimate that the fraction of deleterious nonsynonymous SNVs is higher than previously reported; quantify the effects of genomic context, codon bias, chromatin accessibility, and number of protein-protein interactions on deleterious protein-coding SNVs; and identify pathways and networks that have likely been influenced by positive selection. Furthermore, we show that the fraction of deleterious nonsynonymous SNVs is significantly higher for Mendelian versus complex disease loci and in exons harboring dominant versus recessive Mendelian mutations. In summary, as genome-scale sequencing data accumulate in progressively larger sample sizes, our method will enable increasingly high-resolution inferences into the characteristics and determinants of non-neutral variation.

  17. Adsorption of dimeric surfactants in lamellar silicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerzak, Mateusz; Pietralik, Zuzanna; Domka, Ludwik; Skrzypczak, Andrzej; Kozak, Maciej

    2015-12-01

    The adsorption of different types of cationic surfactants in lamellar silicates changes their surface character from hydrophilic to hydrophobic. This study was undertaken to obtain lamellar silicates modified by a series of novel dimeric (gemini) surfactants of different length alkyl chains and to characterise these organophilised materials. Synthetic sodium montmorillonite SOMASIF® ME 100 (M) and enriched bentonite of natural origin (Nanoclay - hydrophilic bentonite®) were organophilised with dimeric (gemini) surfactants (1,1‧-(1,4-butanediyl)bis(alkoxymethyl)imidazolium dichlorides). As a result of surfactant molecule adsorption in interlamellar space, the d-spacing (d001) increased from 0.97 nm (for the anhydrous structure) to 2.04 nm. A Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis of the modified systems reveals bands assigned to the stretching vibrations of the CH2 and CH3 groups and the scissoring vibrations of the NH group from the structure of the dimeric surfactants. Thermogravimetric (TG) and derivative thermogravimetric (DTG) studies imply a four-stage process of surfactant decomposition. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images provide information on the influence of dimeric surfactant intercalation into the silicate structures. Particles of the modified systems show a tendency toward the formation of irregularly shaped agglomerates.

  18. The d'--d--d' vertical triad is less discriminating than the a'--a--a' vertical triad in the antiparallel coiled-coil dimer motif.

    PubMed

    Steinkruger, Jay D; Bartlett, Gail J; Hadley, Erik B; Fay, Lindsay; Woolfson, Derek N; Gellman, Samuel H

    2012-02-01

    Elucidating relationships between the amino-acid sequences of proteins and their three-dimensional structures, and uncovering non-covalent interactions that underlie polypeptide folding, are major goals in protein science. One approach toward these goals is to study interactions between selected residues, or among constellations of residues, in small folding motifs. The α-helical coiled coil has served as a platform for such studies because this folding unit is relatively simple in terms of both sequence and structure. Amino acid side chains at the helix-helix interface of a coiled coil participate in so-called "knobs-into-holes" (KIH) packing whereby a side chain (the knob) on one helix inserts into a space (the hole) generated by four side chains on a partner helix. The vast majority of sequence-stability studies on coiled-coil dimers have focused on lateral interactions within these KIH arrangements, for example, between an a position on one helix and an a' position of the partner in a parallel coiled-coil dimer, or between a--d' pairs in an antiparallel dimer. More recently, it has been shown that vertical triads (specifically, a'--a--a' triads) in antiparallel dimers exert a significant impact on pairing preferences. This observation provides impetus for analysis of other complex networks of side-chain interactions at the helix-helix interface. Here, we describe a combination of experimental and bioinformatics studies that show that d'--d--d' triads have much less impact on pairing preference than do a'--a--a' triads in a small, designed antiparallel coiled-coil dimer. However, the influence of the d'--d--d' triad depends on the lateral a'--d interaction. Taken together, these results strengthen the emerging understanding that simple pairwise interactions are not sufficient to describe side-chain interactions and overall stability in antiparallel coiled-coil dimers; higher-order interactions must be considered as well.

  19. The influence of nucleotide sequence and temperature on the activity of thermostable DNA polymerases.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Jesse L; Rejali, Nick; Wittwer, Carl T

    2014-05-01

    Extension rates of a thermostable, deletion-mutant polymerase were measured from 50°C to 90°C using a fluorescence activity assay adapted for real-time PCR instruments. Substrates with a common hairpin (6-base loop and a 14-bp stem) were synthesized with different 10-base homopolymer tails. Rates for A, C, G, T, and 7-deaza-G incorporation at 75°C were 81, 150, 214, 46, and 120 seconds(-1). Rates for U were half as fast as T and did not increase with increasing concentration. Hairpin substrates with 25-base tails from 0% to 100% GC content had maximal extension rates near 60% GC and were predicted from the template sequence and mononucleotide incorporation rates to within 30% for most sequences. Addition of dimethyl sulfoxide at 7.5% increased rates to within 1% to 17% of prediction for templates with 40% to 90% GC. When secondary structure was designed into the template region, extension rates decreased. Oligonucleotide probes reduced extension rates by 65% (5'-3' exo-) and 70% (5'-3' exo+). When using a separate primer and a linear template to form a polymerase substrate, rates were dependent on both the primer melting temperature (Tm) and the annealing/extension temperature. Maximum rates were observed from Tm to Tm - 5°C with little extension by Tm + 5°C. Defining the influence of sequence and temperature on polymerase extension will enable more rapid and efficient PCR. PMID:24607271

  20. Atomic force microscopy of crystalline insulins: the influence of sequence variation on crystallization and interfacial structure.

    PubMed Central

    Yip, C M; Brader, M L; DeFelippis, M R; Ward, M D

    1998-01-01

    The self-association of proteins is influenced by amino acid sequence, molecular conformation, and the presence of molecular additives. In the presence of phenolic additives, LysB28ProB29 insulin, in which the C-terminal prolyl and lysyl residues of wild-type human insulin have been inverted, can be crystallized into forms resembling those of wild-type insulins in which the protein exists as zinc-complexed hexamers organized into well-defined layers. We describe herein tapping-mode atomic force microscopy (TMAFM) studies of single crystals of rhombohedral (R3) LysB28ProB29 that reveal the influence of sequence variation on hexamer-hexamer association at the surface of actively growing crystals. Molecular scale lattice images of these crystals were acquired in situ under growth conditions, enabling simultaneous identification of the rhombohedral LysB28ProB29 crystal form, its orientation, and its dynamic growth characteristics. The ability to obtain crystallographic parameters on multiple crystal faces with TMAFM confirmed that bovine and porcine insulins grown under these conditions crystallized into the same space group as LysB28ProB29 (R3), enabling direct comparison of crystal growth behavior and the influence of sequence variation. Real-time TMAFM revealed hexamer vacancies on the (001) terraces of LysB28ProB29, and more rounded dislocation noses and larger terrace widths for actively growing screw dislocations compared to wild-type bovine and porcine insulin crystals under identical conditions. This behavior is consistent with weaker interhexamer attachment energies for LysB28ProB29 at active growth sites. Comparison of the single crystal x-ray structures of wild-type insulins and LysB28ProB29 suggests that differences in protein conformation at the hexamer-hexamer interface and accompanying changes in interhexamer bonding are responsible for this behavior. These studies demonstrate that subtle changes in molecular conformation due to a single sequence

  1. HIV-1 gp140 epitope recognition is influenced by immunoglobulin DH gene segment sequence.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuge; Kapoor, Pratibha; Parks, Robert; Silva-Sanchez, Aaron; Alam, S Munir; Verkoczy, Laurent; Liao, Hua-Xin; Zhuang, Yingxin; Burrows, Peter; Levinson, Michael; Elgavish, Ada; Cui, Xiangqin; Haynes, Barton F; Schroeder, Harry

    2016-02-01

    Complementarity Determining Region 3 of the immunoglobulin (Ig) H chain (CDR-H3) lies at the center of the antigen-binding site where it often plays a decisive role in antigen recognition and binding. Amino acids encoded by the diversity (DH) gene segment are the main component of CDR-H3. Each DH has the potential to rearrange into one of six DH reading frames (RFs), each of which exhibits a characteristic amino acid hydrophobicity signature that has been conserved among jawed vertebrates by natural selection. A preference for use of RF1 promotes the incorporation of tyrosine into CDR-H3 while suppressing the inclusion of hydrophobic or charged amino acids. To test the hypothesis that these evolutionary constraints on DH sequence influence epitope recognition, we used mice with a single DH that has been altered to preferentially use RF2 or inverted RF1. B cells in these mice produce a CDR-H3 repertoire that is enriched for valine or arginine in place of tyrosine. We serially immunized this panel of mice with gp140 from HIV-1 JR-FL isolate and then used enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) or peptide microarray to assess antibody binding to key or overlapping HIV-1 envelope epitopes. By ELISA, serum reactivity to key epitopes varied by DH sequence. By microarray, sera with Ig CDR-H3s enriched for arginine bound to linear peptides with a greater range of hydrophobicity but had a lower intensity of binding than sera containing Ig CDR-H3s enriched for tyrosine or valine. We conclude that patterns of epitope recognition and binding can be heavily influenced by DH germ line sequence. This may help explain why antibodies in HIV-infected patients must undergo extensive somatic mutation in order to bind to specific viral epitopes and achieve neutralization. PMID:26687685

  2. Dryland Soil Greenhouse Gas Emissions Influenced by Tillage, Cropping Sequence, and Nitrogen Fertilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sainju, U. M.; Biogeosciences

    2011-12-01

    Management practices are needed to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from dryland agroecosystems. The effect of tillage, cropping sequence, and N fertilization on soil CO2, N2O, and CH4 fluxes was evaluated on a dryland loam soil from March to November, 2008 to 2010 in eastern Montana. Treatments were three cropping sequences [no-tilled continuous malt barley (NTCB), no-tilled malt barley-pea (NTB-P), and conventional-tilled malt barley-fallow (CTB-F)] and two N fertilization rates (0 and 80 kg N ha-1). The CO2 and N2O fluxes increased immediately following substantial precipitation during increased temperature in the summer from May to August. During this period, CO2 flux was greater in NTCB and NTB-P than in CTB-F and greater with 80 than with 0 kg N ha-1. The N2O flux varied with tillage and cropping sequence but was greater with 80 than with 0 kg N ha-1. Total CO2 flux from March to November was greater in NTCB than in CTB-F in all years and greater with 80 than with 0 kg N ha-1 in 2009 and 2010. Total N2O flux was not influenced by tillage, cropping sequence, and N fertilization. Both CO2 and N2O fluxes were greater in 2008 than in 2010. The CH4 flux remained negative at most measurement dates in all years. Increased root respiration and biomass production due to continuous cropping and N fertilization probably increased CO2 emissions under dryland cropping systems. Similarly, increased N availability probably increased N2O emissions during active crop growth. Increased soil water content due to greater rainfall probably increased CO2 and N2O emissions in 2008 than in 2010.

  3. Ligation of oligonucleotides by pyrimidine dimers--a missing 'link' in the origin of life?

    PubMed

    Lewis, R J; Hanawalt, P C

    1982-07-22

    One of the principal photochemical reactions of DNA on exposure to UV is the formation of intrastrand cyclobutane-type pyrimidine dimers. The efficiency of this reaction depends on both the wavelength of the UV2 and the specific nucleotide sequence in the DNA. The formation of the pyrimidine dimer and its repair in living cells have been studied extensively. We have examined the possibility that pyrimidines at the ends of DNA strands may be adequately juxtaposed for dimer formation by the presence of a complementary strand, even when no phosphodiester linkage joins their sugars. In these conditions the formation of a dimer will 'ligate' two DNA strands end-to-end. We report here that thymidine oligonucleotides annealed to polydeoxyadenylate can be ligated end-to-end by UV irradiation, via thymine dimerization of the terminal nucleotides in adjacent oligonucleotides. The linkages are susceptible to direct photoreversal by 254 nm UV, as expected for cyclobutane-type thymine dimers, but they are not cleaved by the bacteriophage T4 endonuclease V, a dimer-specific DNA repair enzyme. We demonstrate that the ligating dimers are also resistant to photolyase from Escherichia coli. Although the phosphodiester backbone is not required for dimer formation, it is required for recognition of dimers by these DNA repair enzymes. We discuss the possibility that high molecular weight polynucleotides in primordial seas might have been generated from oligonucleotides by pyrimidine dimerization under the intense solar UV flux unattenuated by an ozone layer.

  4. Final report on the amended safety assessment of diisopropyl dimer dilinoleate, dicetearyl dimer dilinoleate, diisostearyl dimer dilinoleate, dioctyl dimer dilinoleate, dioctyldodecyl dimer dilinoleate, and ditridecyl dimer dilinoleate.

    PubMed

    Fiume, Monice Zondlo

    2003-01-01

    Diisopropyl Dimer Dilinoleate, Dicetearyl Dimer Dilinoleate, Diisostearyl Dimer Dilinoleate, Dioctyl Dimer Dilinoleate, Dioctyldodecyl Dimer Dilinoleate, and Ditridecyl Dimer Dilinoleate are diesters of their respective alcohols and dilinoleic acid. They function as skin-conditioning agents in a variety of cosmetic products at concentrations around 10%, but may be used at concentrations up to 53% in lipsticks. These ingredients do not absorb radiation in the ultraviolet (UV) UVA or UVB range and the only impurities expected are <0.5% dilinoleic acid, <0.1% isopropyl alcohol or <1% isostearyl alcohol, and/or small amounts of dilinoleic acid and cetearyl alcohol or octyldodecanol, depending on which diester is used. The potential skin penetration of these ingredients was evaluated using an estimate of the octanol/water partition coefficient (logP of 17.7) based on the structure of Diisopropyl Dimer Dilinoleate. This is consistent with the insolubility of these ingredients in water. Safety test data on dilinoleic acid (no adverse effects) were considered relevant because dilinoleic acid is a component of these diesters and a likely breakdown product. The acute oral and dermal LD(50) values for rats of Diisopropyl, Diisostearyl, and Dioctyldodecyl Dimer Dilinoleate were >5.0 g/kg. In a subchronic feeding study, macrophage aggregation was seen in the mesenteric lymph node at the lowest dose level (0.1% in the diet). These ingredients did not produce skin or ocular irritation in animal tests, nor were they comedogenic. Ames testing, clastogenesis in human lymphocytes in culture, and L5178Y mouse lymphoma cell forward mutations were all negative, indicating no dilinoleic acid genotoxicity. No carcinogenicity or reproductive/developmental toxicity data were available; however, structural alerts that would suggest a mutagenic or carcinogenic risk are absent. Significant reproductive/developmental toxicity or other systemic toxicity is not expected with these ingredients

  5. Quantification of loading in biomechanical testing: the influence of dissection sequence.

    PubMed

    Funabashi, Martha; El-Rich, Marwan; Prasad, Narasimha; Kawchuk, Gregory N

    2015-09-18

    Sequential dissection is a technique used to investigate loads experienced by articular tissues. When the joint of interest is tested in an unconstrained manner, its kinematics change with each tissue removal. To address this limitation, sufficiently rigid robots are used to constrain joint kinematics. While this approach can quantify loads experienced by each tissue, it does not assure similar results when removal order is changed. Specifically, structure loading is assumed to be independent of removal order if the structure behaves linearly (i.e. principle of superposition applies), but dependent on removal order when response is affected by material and/or geometry nonlinearities and/or viscoelasticiy (e.g. biological tissues). Therefore, this experiment was conducted to evaluate if structure loading created through robotic testing is dependent on the order in which connectors are removed. Six identical models were 3D printed. Each model was composed of 2 rigid bodies and 3 connecting structures with nonlinear time-dependent behavior. To these models, pure rotations were applied about a predefined static center of rotation using a parallel robot. A unique dissection sequence was used for each of the six models and the same movements applied robotically after each dissection. When comparing the moments experienced by each structure between different removal sequences, a statistically significant difference (p<0.05) was observed. These results suggest that even in an optimized environment, the sequence in which nonlinear viscoelastic structures are removed influence model loading. These findings support prior work suggesting that tissue loads obtained from robotic testing are specific to removal order.

  6. Acoustic markers of prominence influence infants' and adults' segmentation of speech sequences.

    PubMed

    Bion, Ricardo A H; Benavides-Varela, Silvia; Nespor, Marina

    2011-03-01

    Two experiments investigated the way acoustic markers of prominence influence the grouping of speech sequences by adults and 7-month-old infants. In the first experiment, adults were familiarized with and asked to memorize sequences of adjacent syllables that alternated in either pitch or duration. During the test phase, participants heard pairs of syllables with constant pitch and duration and were asked whether the syllables had appeared adjacently during familiarization. Adults were better at remembering pairs of syllables that during familiarization had short syllables preceding long syllables, or high-pitched syllables preceding low-pitched syllables. In the second experiment, infants were familiarized and tested with similar stimuli as in the first experiment, and their preference for pairs of syllables was accessed using the head-turn preference paradigm.When familiarized with syllables alternating in pitch, infants showed a preference to listen to pairs of syllables that had high pitch in the first syllable. However, no preference was found when the familiarization stream alternated in duration. It is proposed that these perceptual biases help infants and adults find linguistic units in the continuous speech stream.While the bias for grouping based on pitch appears early in development, biases for durational grouping might rely on more extensive linguistic experience. PMID:21524015

  7. Radiation-induced tetramer-to-dimer transition of Escherichia coli lactose repressor

    SciTech Connect

    Goffinont, S.; Davidkova, M.

    2009-08-21

    The wild type lactose repressor of Escherichia coli is a tetrameric protein formed by two identical dimers. They are associated via a C-terminal 4-helix bundle (called tetramerization domain) whose stability is ensured by the interaction of leucine zipper motifs. Upon in vitro {gamma}-irradiation the repressor losses its ability to bind the operator DNA sequence due to damage of its DNA-binding domains. Using an engineered dimeric repressor for comparison, we show here that irradiation induces also the change of repressor oligomerisation state from tetramer to dimer. The splitting of the tetramer into dimers can result from the oxidation of the leucine residues of the tetramerization domain.

  8. Influence of seasonal cycles in Martian atmosphere on entry, descent and landing sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marčeta, Dušan; Šegan, Stevo; Rašuo, Boško

    2014-05-01

    The phenomena like high eccentricity of Martian orbit, obliquity of the orbital plane and close alignment of the winter solstice and the orbital perihelion, separately or together can significantly alter not only the level of some Martian atmospheric parameters but also the characteristics of its diurnal and seasonal cycle. Considering that entry, descent and landing (EDL) sequence is mainly driven by the density profile of the atmosphere and aerodynamic characteristic of the entry vehicle. We have performed the analysis of the influence of the seasonal cycles of the atmospheric parameters on EDL profiles by using Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM). Since the height of the deployment of the parachute and the time passed from the deployment to propulsion firing (descent time) are of crucial importance for safe landing and the achievable landing site elevation we paid special attention to the influence of the areocentric longitude of the Sun (Ls) on these variables. We have found that these variables have periodic variability with respect to Ls and can be very well approximated with a sine wave function whose mean value depends only on the landing site elevation while the amplitudes and phases depend only on the landing site latitude. The amplitudes exhibit behavior which is symmetric with respect to the latitude but the symmetry is shifted from the equator to the northern mid-tropics. We have also noticed that the strong temperature inversions which are usual for middle and higher northern latitudes while Mars is around its orbital perihelion significantly alter the descent time without influencing the height of the parachute deployment. At last, we applied our model to determine the dependence of the accessible landing region on Ls and found that this region reaches maximum when Mars is around the orbital perihelion and can vary 50° in latitude throughout the Martian year.

  9. Role of bulk and of interface contacts in the behavior of lattice model dimeric proteins.

    PubMed

    Tiana, G; Provasi, D; Broglia, R A

    2003-05-01

    Some dimeric proteins first fold and then dimerize (three-state dimers) while others first dimerize and then fold (two-state dimers). Within the framework of a minimal lattice model, we can distinguish between sequences following one or the other mechanism on the basis of the distribution of the ground state energy between bulk and interface contacts. The topology of contacts is very different for the bulk than for the interface: while the bulk displays a rich network of interactions, the dimer interface is built up of a set of essentially independent contacts. Consequently, the two sets of interactions play very different roles both, in the folding and in the evolutionary history of the protein. Three-state dimers, where a large fraction of energy is concentrated in few contacts buried in the bulk, and where the relative contact energy of interface contacts is considerably smaller than that associated with bulk contacts, fold according to a hierarchical pathway controlled by local elementary structures, as also happens in the folding of single-domain monomeric proteins. On the other hand, two-state dimers display a relative contact energy of interface contacts, which is larger than the corresponding quantity associated with the bulk. In this case, the assembly of the interface stabilizes the system and leads the two chains to fold. The specific properties of three-state dimers acquired through evolution are expected to be more robust than those of two-state dimers; a fact that has consequences on proteins connected with viral diseases.

  10. Benefits of order: the influence of item sequencing on metacognition in moderate and severe traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Chiou, Kathy S; Hillary, Frank G

    2012-03-01

    The ability to appraise one's own ability has been found to have an important role in the recovery and quality of life of clinical populations. Examinee and task variables have been found to influence metacognition in healthy students; however the effect of these variables on the metacognitive accuracy of adults with neurological insult, such as traumatic brain injury (TBI), remains unknown. Twenty-two adults with moderate and severe TBI and a matched sample of healthy adults participated in this study examining the influence of item sequencing on metacognitive functioning. Retrospective confidence judgments were collected while participants completed a modified version of the Matrix Reasoning subtest. Significant influence of item sequence order was found, revealing better metacognitive abilities and performance when participants completed tasks where item difficulty progressed in order from easy to difficult. We interpret these findings to suggest that the sequencing of item difficulty offers "anchors" for gauging and adjusting to task demands.

  11. Plasmon hybridization in nanoparticle dimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordlander, Peter; Prodan, Emil; Oubre, Chris

    2004-03-01

    We apply the recently developed plasmon hybridization method (Science 302(2003)419-422) to solid sphere and nanoshell dimers. The results provide a simple and intuitive description of how the energy and excitation cross sections of the dimer plasmons depend on nanoparticle separation, D. We show that the dimer plasmons can be viewed as bonding and antibonding combinations, i.e. hybridization of the individual nanoparticle plasmons. For large D, the shifts of the dipolar dimer plasmons essentially follow the interaction energy between two classical dipoles (1/D^3). As D becomes smaller, the shifts of the dipolar dimer plasmons becomes much stronger and varies much faster with D due to the interaction of the dipolar plasmon of an individual particle with higher energy multipolar plasmons of the other particle. For the heterodimer, the hybridization between the individual nanoparticle plasmons on the different particles result in dimer plasmons whose energies as a function of D exhibit avoided crossings and other interesting effects. The results are compared with FDTD calculations. Work supported by ARO, TATP and the Robert A. Welch Foundation

  12. Influence of laminate sequence and fabric type on the inherent acoustic nonlinearity in carbon fiber reinforced composites.

    PubMed

    Chakrapani, Sunil Kishore; Barnard, Daniel J; Dayal, Vinay

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents the study of influence of laminate sequence and fabric type on the baseline acoustic nonlinearity of fiber-reinforced composites. Nonlinear elastic wave techniques are increasingly becoming popular in detecting damage in composite materials. It was earlier observed by the authors that the non-classical nonlinear response of fiber-reinforced composite is influenced by the fiber orientation [Chakrapani, Barnard, and Dayal, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 137(2), 617-624 (2015)]. The current study expands this effort to investigate the effect of laminate sequence and fabric type on the non-classical nonlinear response. Two hypotheses were developed using the previous results, and the theory of interlaminar stresses to investigate the influence of laminate sequence and fabric type. Each hypothesis was tested by capturing the nonlinear response by performing nonlinear resonance spectroscopy and measuring frequency shifts, loss factors, and higher harmonics. It was observed that the laminate sequence can either increase or decrease the nonlinear response based on the stacking sequence. Similarly, tests were performed to compare unidirectional fabric and woven fabric and it was observed that woven fabric exhibited a lower nonlinear response compared to the unidirectional fabric. Conjectures based on the matrix properties and interlaminar stresses were used in an attempt to explain the observed nonlinear responses for different configurations.

  13. Understanding near/far-field engineering of optical dimer antennas through geometry modification.

    PubMed

    Ding, W; Bachelot, R; Espiau de Lamaestre, R; Macias, D; Baudrion, A-L; Royer, P

    2009-11-01

    Numerical investigations based on the boundary element method (BEM) have been carried out to two-dimensional (2-D) silver dimer nano-antennas of various geometries. The near-field and far-field properties are mainly determined by the local geometry at the gap and the global shape of the antenna shafts respectively. A hybrid dimer antenna, which mixes the geometry ingredients of the rod dimer and the bowtie, benefits in both near and far field. Using a microcavity representation, the resonance in dimer nano-antennas is explained in a common and semi-analytical manner. The plasmonic enhancement and the wavelength mismatching in the optical dimer antenna are naturally embodied in this model. The quality factor of the resonance, which can be influenced by the wavelength and the geometry, is discussed intuitively. The understanding presented in this work could guide the future engineering of the optical dimer antenna.

  14. The Ammonia Dimer Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawes, Richard; Van Der Avoird, Ad

    2012-06-01

    The conclusion from microwave spectra by Nelson, Fraser, and Klemperer that the ammonia dimer has a nearly cyclic structure led to much debate about the issue of whether (NH_3)_2 is hydrogen bonded. This structure was surprising because most {ab initio} calculations led to a classical, nearly linear, hydrogen-bonded structure. An obvious explanation of the discrepancy between the outcome of these calculations and the microwave data which led Nelson {et al.} to their ``surprising structure'' might be the effect of vibrational averaging: the electronic structure calculations focus on finding the minimum of the intermolecular potential, the experiment gives a vibrationally averaged structure. Isotope substitution studies seemed to indicate, however, that the complex is nearly rigid. Additional data became available from high-resolution molecular beam far-infrared spectroscopy in the Saykally group. These spectra, displaying large tunneling splittings, indicate that the complex is very floppy. The seemingly contradictory experimental data were explained when it became possible to calculate the vibration-rotation-tunneling (VRT) states of the complex on a six-dimensional intermolecular potential surface. The potential used was a simple model potential, with parameters fitted to the far-infrared data. Now, for the first time, a six-dimensional potential was computed by high level {ab initio} methods and this potential will be used in calculations of the VRT states of (NH_3)_2 and (ND_3)_2. So, we will finally be able to answer the question whether the conclusions from the model calculations are indeed a valid explanation of the experimental data. D. Nelson, G. T. Fraser, and W. Klemperer J. Chem. Phys. 83 6201 (1985) J. G. Loeser, C. A. Schmuttenmaer, R. C. Cohen, M. J. Elrod, D. W. Steyert, R. J. Saykally, R. E. Bumgarner, and G. A. Blake J. Chem. Phys. 97 4727 (1992) E. H. T. Olthof, A. van der Avoird, and P. E. S. Wormer J. Chem. Phys. 101 8430 (1994) E. H. T. Olthof

  15. Mechanically Stabilized Tetrathiafulvalene Radical Dimers

    SciTech Connect

    Coskun, Ali; Spruell, Jason M.; Barin, Gokhan; Fahrenbach, Albert C.; Forgan, Ross S.; Colvin, Michael T.; Carmieli, Raanan; Benitez, Diego; Tkatchouk, Ekaterina; Friedman, Douglas C.; Sarjeant, Amy A.; Wasielewski, Michael R.; Goddard, William A.; Stoddart, J. Fraser

    2011-01-01

    Two donor-acceptor [3]catenanes—composed of a tetracationic molecular square, cyclobis(paraquat-4,4'-biphenylene), as the π-electron deficient ring and either two tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) and 1,5-dioxynaphthalene (DNP) containing macrocycles or two TTF-butadiyne-containing macrocycles as the π-electron rich components—have been investigated in order to study their ability to form TTF radical dimers. It has been proven that the mechanically interlocked nature of the [3]catenanes facilitates the formation of the TTF radical dimers under redox control, allowing an investigation to be performed on these intermolecular interactions in a so-called “molecular flask” under ambient conditions in considerable detail. In addition, it has also been shown that the stability of the TTF radical-cation dimers can be tuned by varying the secondary binding motifs in the [3]catenanes. By replacing the DNP station with a butadiyne group, the distribution of the TTF radical-cation dimer can be changed from 60% to 100%. These findings have been established by several techniques including cyclic voltammetry, spectroelectrochemistry and UV-vis-NIR and EPR spectroscopies, as well as with X-ray diffraction analysis which has provided a range of solid-state crystal structures. The experimental data are also supported by high-level DFT calculations. The results contribute significantly to our fundamental understanding of the interactions within the TTF radical dimers.

  16. Adventures in Holographic Dimer Models

    SciTech Connect

    Kachru, Shamit; Karch, Andreas; Yaida, Sho; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2011-08-12

    We abstract the essential features of holographic dimer models, and develop several new applications of these models. Firstly, semi-holographically coupling free band fermions to holographic dimers, we uncover novel phase transitions between conventional Fermi liquids and non-Fermi liquids, accompanied by a change in the structure of the Fermi surface. Secondly, we make dimer vibrations propagate through the whole crystal by way of double trace deformations, obtaining nontrivial band structure. In a simple toy model, the topology of the band structure experiences an interesting reorganization as we vary the strength of the double trace deformations. Finally, we develop tools that would allow one to build, in a bottom-up fashion, a holographic avatar of the Hubbard model.

  17. Benchmarking of Optical Dimerizer Systems

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Optical dimerizers are a powerful new class of optogenetic tools that allow light-inducible control of protein–protein interactions. Such tools have been useful for regulating cellular pathways and processes with high spatiotemporal resolution in live cells, and a growing number of dimerizer systems are available. As these systems have been characterized by different groups using different methods, it has been difficult for users to compare their properties. Here, we set about to systematically benchmark the properties of four optical dimerizer systems, CRY2/CIB1, TULIPs, phyB/PIF3, and phyB/PIF6. Using a yeast transcriptional assay, we find significant differences in light sensitivity and fold-activation levels between the red light regulated systems but similar responses between the CRY2/CIB and TULIP systems. Further comparison of the ability of the CRY2/CIB1 and TULIP systems to regulate a yeast MAPK signaling pathway also showed similar responses, with slightly less background activity in the dark observed with CRY2/CIB. In the process of developing this work, we also generated an improved blue-light-regulated transcriptional system using CRY2/CIB in yeast. In addition, we demonstrate successful application of the CRY2/CIB dimerizers using a membrane-tethered CRY2, which may allow for better local control of protein interactions. Taken together, this work allows for a better understanding of the capacities of these different dimerization systems and demonstrates new uses of these dimerizers to control signaling and transcription in yeast. PMID:25350266

  18. Benchmarking of optical dimerizer systems.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Gopal P; Strickland, Devin; Vrana, Justin D; Tucker, Chandra L

    2014-11-21

    Optical dimerizers are a powerful new class of optogenetic tools that allow light-inducible control of protein-protein interactions. Such tools have been useful for regulating cellular pathways and processes with high spatiotemporal resolution in live cells, and a growing number of dimerizer systems are available. As these systems have been characterized by different groups using different methods, it has been difficult for users to compare their properties. Here, we set about to systematically benchmark the properties of four optical dimerizer systems, CRY2/CIB1, TULIPs, phyB/PIF3, and phyB/PIF6. Using a yeast transcriptional assay, we find significant differences in light sensitivity and fold-activation levels between the red light regulated systems but similar responses between the CRY2/CIB and TULIP systems. Further comparison of the ability of the CRY2/CIB1 and TULIP systems to regulate a yeast MAPK signaling pathway also showed similar responses, with slightly less background activity in the dark observed with CRY2/CIB. In the process of developing this work, we also generated an improved blue-light-regulated transcriptional system using CRY2/CIB in yeast. In addition, we demonstrate successful application of the CRY2/CIB dimerizers using a membrane-tethered CRY2, which may allow for better local control of protein interactions. Taken together, this work allows for a better understanding of the capacities of these different dimerization systems and demonstrates new uses of these dimerizers to control signaling and transcription in yeast. PMID:25350266

  19. Theoretical studies on the dimerization of substituted paraphenylenediamine radical cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punyain, Kraiwan; Kelterer, Anne-Marie; Grampp, Günter

    2011-12-01

    Organic radical cations form dicationic dimers in solution, observed experimentally as diamagnetic species in temperature-dependent EPR and low temperature UV/Vis spectroscopy. Dimerization of paraphenylenediamine, N,N-dimethyl-paraphenylenediamine and 2,3,5,6-tetramethyl-paraphenylenediamine radical cation in ethanol/diethylether mixture was investigated theoretically according to geometry, energetics and UV/Vis spectroscopy. Density Functional Theory including dispersion correction describes stable dimers after geometry optimization with conductor-like screening model of solvation and inclusion of the counter-ion. Energy corrections were done on double-hybrid Density Functional Theory with perturbative second-order correlation (B2PLYP-D) including basis set superposition error (BSSE), and multireference Møller-Plesset second-order perturbation theory method (MRMP2) based on complete active space method (CASSCF(2,2)) single point calculation, respectively. All three dication π-dimers exhibit long multicenter π-bonds around 2.9 ± 0.1 Å with strongly interacting orbitals. Substitution with methyl groups does not influence the dimerization process substantially. Dispersion interaction and electrostatic attraction from counter-ion play an important role to stabilize the dication dimers in solution. Dispersion-corrected double hybrid functional B2PLYP-D and CASSCF(2,2) can describe the interaction energetics properly. Vertical excitations were computed with Tamm-Dancoff approximation for time-dependent Density Functional Theory (TDA-DFT) at the B3LYP level with the cc-pVTZ basis set including ethanol solvent molecules explicitly. A strong interaction of the counter-ion and the solvent ethanol with the monomeric species is observed, whereas in the dimers the strong interaction of both radical cation species is the dominating factor for the additional peak in UV/Vis spectra.

  20. Immortal coils: conserved dimerization motifs of the Drosophila ovulation prohormone ovulin.

    PubMed

    Wong, Alex; Christopher, Adam B; Buehner, Norene A; Wolfner, Mariana F

    2010-04-01

    Dimerization is an important feature of the function of some proteins, including prohormones. For proteins whose amino acid sequences evolve rapidly, it is unclear how such structural characteristics are retained biochemically. Here we address this question by focusing on ovulin, a prohormone that induces ovulation in Drosophila melanogaster females after mating. Ovulin is known to dimerize, and is one of the most rapidly evolving proteins encoded by the Drosophila genome. We show that residues within a previously hypothesized conserved dimerization domain (a coiled-coil) and a newly identified conserved dimerization domain (YxxxY) within ovulin are necessary for the formation of ovulin dimers. Moreover, dimerization is conserved in ovulin proteins from non-melanogaster species of Drosophila despite up to 80% sequence divergence. We show that heterospecific ovulin dimers can be formed in interspecies hybrid animals and in two-hybrid assays between ovulin proteins that are 15% diverged, indicating conservation of tertiary structure amidst a background of rapid sequence evolution. Our results suggest that because ovulin's self-interaction requires only small conserved domains, the rest of the molecule can be relatively tolerant to mutations. Consistent with this view, in comparisons of 8510 proteins across 6 species of Drosophila we find that rates of amino acid divergence are higher for proteins with coiled-coil protein-interaction domains than for non-coiled-coil proteins.

  1. Temperature influences on the expression of GFP promoted by the upstream sequence of cpcB from Arthrospira platensis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yongzhong; Zhang, Xuecheng

    2007-07-01

    In order to investigate the regulation mechanism of the phycocyanin gene, a series of functional analyses of the upstream sequence of cpcB gene from Arthrospira platensis were conducted in E. coli with green fluorescent protein encoding gene (gfp) as the reporter. Results showed that the gfp gene could express at a high level under the promotion of the upstream sequence, suggesting the existence of some strong promoter elements in it. The expression of GFP was influenced by temperature. Higher temperature led to higher expression level. The bioinformatics analyses followed by mutation analyses on the secondary structure of translation initiation region (TIR) revealed that RNA thermosensor might account for the temperature regulation.

  2. Alkali dimers on the surface of liquid helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerner, Peter B.; Cole, Milton W.; Cheng, E.

    1995-09-01

    A recent paper by Ancilotto et al. (Zeitschrift für Physik B, in press), presented calculations of adsorption energies and the geometry of a surface dimple for alkali atoms bound to the surfaces of quantum liquids (4He,3He, H2). Here we present a study of the adsorption of two alkali dimers (Li2, Na2) on the surface of liquid helium. The calculations employ a model of an abrupt interface formulated by Ancilotto et al. as well as one using a diffuse interface. Our conclusion its that the dimers are bound to the surface more strongly than their respective monomers. In the case of dimers there is an additional degree of freedom-the orientation of the molecular axis relative to the surface. We study the influence of molecular anisotropy on adsorption by comparing the cases of “erect” and “spinning flat” orientations and conclude that the latter is energetically favored.

  3. Microwave Spectrum of the Isopropanol-Water Dimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mead, Griffin; Finneran, Ian A.; Carroll, Brandon; Blake, Geoffrey

    2016-06-01

    Microwave spectroscopy provides a unique opportunity to study model non-covalent interactions. Of particular interest is the hydrogen bonding of water, whose various molecular properties are influenced by both strong and weak intermolecular forces. More specifically, measuring the hydrogen bonded structures of water-alcohol dimers investigates both strong (OH ··· OH) and weak (CH ··· OH) hydrogen bond interactions. Recently, we have measured the pure rotational spectrum of the isopropanol-water dimer using chirped-pulse Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy (CP-FTMW) between 8-18 GHz. Here, we present the spectrum of this dimer and elaborate on the structure's strong and weak hydrogen bonding.

  4. Gold(I) and silver(I) complexes containing a tripodal tetraphosphine ligand: influence of the halogen and stoichiometry on the properties. The X-ray crystal structure of two gold(I) dimeric aggregates.

    PubMed

    Fernández, D; García-Seijo, M I; Bardají, M; Laguna, A; García-Fernández, M E

    2008-05-21

    Complexes of the type [Au2(micro-PP3)2]X2 [X=Cl (), Br (), I ()], [Ag2(micro-PP3)2](NO3)2 (), Ag(PP3)Cl (), M3(micro-PP3)X3 [M=Au, X=Cl (), Br (), I (); M=Ag, X=NO3 ()] and Au4(micro-PP3)X4 [X=Cl (), Br (), I ()] have been prepared by interaction between gold(I) or silver(I) salts and the ligand tris[2-(diphenylphosphino)ethyl]phosphine (PP3) in the appropriate molar ratio. Microanalysis, mass spectrometry, IR and NMR spectroscopies and conductivity measurements were used for characterization. and are ionic dinuclear species containing four-coordinate gold(i) and four/three coordinate silver(i), respectively. Solutions of behave as mixtures of complexes in a 2:1 [Au2(micro-PP3)X2; X=Cl(), Br(), I()] and 4:1 () metal to ligand ratio. and react with free PP(3) in solution to generate the ionic compounds and , respectively. Complexes and , with four linear PAuX fragments per molecule, were shown by X-ray diffraction to consist of dimeric aggregates via close intermolecular gold(I)gold(I) contacts of 3.270 A () and 3.184 A (). The resultant octanuclear systems have an inversion center with two symmetry-related gold(I) atoms being totally out of the aurophilic area and represent a new form of aggregation compared to that found in other halo complexes of gold(I) containing polyphosphines. The luminescence properties of the ligand and complexes, in the solid state, have been studied. Most of the gold systems display intense luminescent emission at room and low temperature. The influence of the halogen on the aurophilic contacts of compounds with a 4:1 metal to ligand ratio results in different photophysical properties, while and are luminescent complex is nonemissive. The luminescence increases with increasing the phosphine/metal ratio affording for complexes , without aurophilic contacts, the stronger emissions. Silver complexes and are nonemissive at room temperature and show weaker emissions than gold(I) species at 77 K. PMID:18443708

  5. Photochemical dimerization of organic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Crabtree, R.H.; Brown, S.H.; Muedas, C.A.; Ferguson, R.R.

    1992-04-14

    This patent describes improvement in a Group IIb photosensitized vapor phase dimerization of an organic compound in which a gaseous mixture of a Group IIB metal and the organic compound is irradiated in a reaction zone with a photosensitizing amount of radiant energy. The improvement comprises: a continuous stream of the gaseous mixture is passed as a vapor phase in a single pass through the reaction zone at a temperature at which the thus-produced dimer condenses immediately upon the formation thereof; the starting gaseous mixture comprises hydrogen and two ethylenically unsaturated compounds selected from the group consisting of alkenes of at least six carbon atoms, unsaturated nitriles, unsaturated epoxides, unsaturated silanes, unsaturated amines, unsaturated phosphines, and fluorinated alkenes; the gaseous mixture comprises nitrous oxide and the organic compound is a saturated compound with C-H bond strengths greater than 100 kcal/mol or a mixture of the saturated compound and an alkene; or the starting gaseous comprises an activating amount of hydrogen and the dimerization is a dehydrodimerization or cross-dimerization of a saturated hydrocarbon.

  6. Conformations of intrinsically disordered proteins are influenced by linear sequence distributions of oppositely charged residues

    PubMed Central

    Das, Rahul K.; Pappu, Rohit V.

    2013-01-01

    The functions of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are governed by relationships between information encoded in their amino acid sequences and the ensembles of conformations that they sample as autonomous units. Most IDPs are polyampholytes, with sequences that include both positively and negatively charged residues. Accordingly, we focus here on the sequence–ensemble relationships of polyampholytic IDPs. The fraction of charged residues discriminates between weak and strong polyampholytes. Using atomistic simulations, we show that weak polyampholytes form globules, whereas the conformational preferences of strong polyampholytes are determined by a combination of fraction of charged residues values and the linear sequence distributions of oppositely charged residues. We quantify the latter using a patterning parameter κ that lies between zero and one. The value of κ is low for well-mixed sequences, and in these sequences, intrachain electrostatic repulsions and attractions are counterbalanced, leading to the unmasking of preferences for conformations that resemble either self-avoiding random walks or generic Flory random coils. Segregation of oppositely charged residues within linear sequences leads to high κ-values and preferences for hairpin-like conformations caused by long-range electrostatic attractions induced by conformational fluctuations. We propose a scaling theory to explain the sequence-encoded conformational properties of strong polyampholytes. We show that naturally occurring strong polyampholytes have low κ-values, and this feature implies a selection for random coil ensembles. The design of sequences with different κ-values demonstrably alters the conformational preferences of polyampholytic IDPs, and this ability could become a useful tool for enabling direct inquiries into connections between sequence–ensemble relationships and functions of IDPs. PMID:23901099

  7. Cyclist drag in team pursuit: influence of cyclist sequence, stature, and arm spacing.

    PubMed

    Defraeye, Thijs; Blocken, Bert; Koninckx, Erwin; Hespel, Peter; Verboven, Pieter; Nicolai, Bart; Carmeliet, Jan

    2014-01-01

    In team pursuit, the drag of a group of cyclists riding in a pace line is dependent on several factors, such as anthropometric characteristics (stature) and position of each cyclist as well as the sequence in which they ride. To increase insight in drag reduction mechanisms, the aerodynamic drag of four cyclists riding in a pace line was investigated, using four different cyclists, and for four different sequences. In addition, each sequence was evaluated for two arm spacings. Instead of conventional field or wind tunnel experiments, a validated numerical approach (computational fluid dynamics) was used to evaluate cyclist drag, where the bicycles were not included in the model. The cyclist drag was clearly dependent on his position in the pace line, where second and subsequent positions experienced a drag reduction up to 40%, compared to an individual cyclist. Individual differences in stature and position on the bicycle led to an intercyclist variation of this drag reduction at a specific position in the sequence, but also to a variation of the total drag of the group for different sequences. A larger drag area for the group was found when riding with wider arm spacing. Such numerical studies on cyclists in a pace line are useful for determining the optimal cyclist sequence for team pursuit.

  8. A Model for Dimerization of the SOX Group E Transcription Factor Family

    PubMed Central

    Ramsook, Sarah N.; Ni, Joyce; Shahangian, Shokofeh; Vakiloroayaei, Ana; Khan, Naveen; Kwan, Jamie J.

    2016-01-01

    Group E members of the SOX transcription factor family include SOX8, SOX9, and SOX10. Preceding the high mobility group (HMG) domain in each of these proteins is a thirty-eight amino acid region that supports the formation of dimers on promoters containing tandemly inverted sites. The purpose of this study was to obtain new structural insights into how the dimerization region functions with the HMG domain. From a mutagenic scan of the dimerization region, the most essential amino acids of the dimerization region were clustered on the hydrophobic face of a single, predicted amphipathic helix. Consistent with our hypothesis that the dimerization region directly contacts the HMG domain, a peptide corresponding to the dimerization region bound a preassembled HMG-DNA complex. Sequence conservation among Group E members served as a basis to identify two surface exposed amino acids in the HMG domain of SOX9 that were necessary for dimerization. These data were combined to make a molecular model that places the dimerization region of one SOX9 protein onto the HMG domain of another SOX9 protein situated at the opposing site of a tandem promoter. The model provides a detailed foundation for assessing the impact of mutations on SOX Group E transcription factors. PMID:27532129

  9. Monitoring Retroviral RNA Dimerization In Vivo via Hammerhead Ribozyme Cleavage

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Bijay K.; Scherer, Lisa; Zelby, Laurie; Bertrand, Edouard; Rossi, John J.

    1998-01-01

    We have used a strategy for colocalization of Psi (Ψ)-tethered ribozymes and targets to demonstrate that Ψ sequences are capable of specific interaction in the cytoplasm of both packaging and nonpackaging cells. These results indicate that current in vitro dimerization models may have in vivo counterparts. The methodology used may be applied to further genetic analyses on Ψ domain interactions in vivo. PMID:9733882

  10. A Strategy for Complex Dimer Formation When Biomimicry Fails: Total Synthesis of Ten Coccinellid Alkaloids

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Although dimeric natural products can often be synthesized in the laboratory by directly merging advanced monomers, these approaches sometimes fail, leading instead to non-natural architectures via incorrect unions. Such a situation arose during our studies of the coccinellid alkaloids, when attempts to directly dimerize Nature’s presumed monomeric precursors in a putative biomimetic sequence afforded only a non-natural analogue through improper regiocontrol. Herein, we outline a unique strategy for dimer formation that obviates these difficulties, one which rapidly constructs the coccinellid dimers psylloborine A and isopsylloborine A through a terminating sequence of two reaction cascades that generate five bonds, five rings, and four stereocenters. In addition, a common synthetic intermediate is identified which allows for the rapid, asymmetric formal or complete total syntheses of eight monomeric members of the class. PMID:24959981

  11. A strategy for complex dimer formation when biomimicry fails: total synthesis of ten coccinellid alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Sherwood, Trevor C; Trotta, Adam H; Snyder, Scott A

    2014-07-01

    Although dimeric natural products can often be synthesized in the laboratory by directly merging advanced monomers, these approaches sometimes fail, leading instead to non-natural architectures via incorrect unions. Such a situation arose during our studies of the coccinellid alkaloids, when attempts to directly dimerize Nature's presumed monomeric precursors in a putative biomimetic sequence afforded only a non-natural analogue through improper regiocontrol. Herein, we outline a unique strategy for dimer formation that obviates these difficulties, one which rapidly constructs the coccinellid dimers psylloborine A and isopsylloborine A through a terminating sequence of two reaction cascades that generate five bonds, five rings, and four stereocenters. In addition, a common synthetic intermediate is identified which allows for the rapid, asymmetric formal or complete total syntheses of eight monomeric members of the class.

  12. A strategy for complex dimer formation when biomimicry fails: total synthesis of ten coccinellid alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Sherwood, Trevor C; Trotta, Adam H; Snyder, Scott A

    2014-07-01

    Although dimeric natural products can often be synthesized in the laboratory by directly merging advanced monomers, these approaches sometimes fail, leading instead to non-natural architectures via incorrect unions. Such a situation arose during our studies of the coccinellid alkaloids, when attempts to directly dimerize Nature's presumed monomeric precursors in a putative biomimetic sequence afforded only a non-natural analogue through improper regiocontrol. Herein, we outline a unique strategy for dimer formation that obviates these difficulties, one which rapidly constructs the coccinellid dimers psylloborine A and isopsylloborine A through a terminating sequence of two reaction cascades that generate five bonds, five rings, and four stereocenters. In addition, a common synthetic intermediate is identified which allows for the rapid, asymmetric formal or complete total syntheses of eight monomeric members of the class. PMID:24959981

  13. Rubidium dimers in paraffin-coated cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acosta, V. M.; Jarmola, A.; Windes, D.; Corsini, E.; Ledbetter, M. P.; Karaulanov, T.; Auzinsh, M.; Rangwala, S. A.; Kimball, D. F. Jackson; Budker, D.

    2010-08-01

    Measurements were made to determine the density of rubidium dimer vapor in paraffin-coated cells. The number density of dimers and atoms in similar paraffin-coated and uncoated cells was measured by optical spectroscopy. Due to the relatively low melting point of paraffin, a limited temperature range of 43-80 °C was explored, with the lower end corresponding to a dimer density of less than 107 cm- 3. With 1 min integration time, a sensitivity to dimer number density of better than 106 cm- 3 was achieved. No significant difference in dimer density between the cells was observed.

  14. Consolidating behavioral and neurophysiologic findings to explain the influence of contextual interference during motor sequence learning.

    PubMed

    Wright, David; Verwey, Willem; Buchanen, John; Chen, Jing; Rhee, Joohyun; Immink, Maarten

    2016-02-01

    Motor sequence learning under high levels of contextual interference (CI) disrupts initial performance but supports delayed test and transfer performance when compared to learning under low CI. Integrating findings from early behavioral work and more recent experimental efforts that incorporated neurophysiologic measures led to a novel account of the role of CI during motor sequence learning. This account focuses on important contributions from two neural regions-the dorsal premotor area and the SMA complex-that are recruited earlier and more extensively during the planning of a motor sequence in a high CI context. It is proposed that activation of these regions is critical to early adaptation of sequence structure amenable to long-term storage. Moreover, greater CI enhances access to newly acquired motor sequence knowledge through (1) the emergence of temporary functional connectivity between neural sites previously described as crucial to successful long-term performance of sequential behaviors, and (2) heightened excitability of M1-a key constituent of the temporary coupled neural circuits, and the primary candidate for storage of motor memory.

  15. Mechanism of FGF receptor dimerization and activation

    PubMed Central

    Sarabipour, Sarvenaz; Hristova, Kalina

    2016-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (fgfs) are widely believed to activate their receptors by mediating receptor dimerization. Here we show, however, that the FGF receptors form dimers in the absence of ligand, and that these unliganded dimers are phosphorylated. We further show that ligand binding triggers structural changes in the FGFR dimers, which increase FGFR phosphorylation. The observed effects due to the ligands fgf1 and fgf2 are very different. The fgf2-bound dimer structure ensures the smallest separation between the transmembrane (TM) domains and the highest possible phosphorylation, a conclusion that is supported by a strong correlation between TM helix separation in the dimer and kinase phosphorylation. The pathogenic A391E mutation in FGFR3 TM domain emulates the action of fgf2, trapping the FGFR3 dimer in its most active state. This study establishes the existence of multiple active ligand-bound states, and uncovers a novel molecular mechanism through which FGFR-linked pathologies can arise. PMID:26725515

  16. Influence of pH and sequence in peptide aggregation via molecular simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Enciso, Marta; Schütte, Christof; Delle Site, Luigi

    2015-12-28

    We employ a recently developed coarse-grained model for peptides and proteins where the effect of pH is automatically included. We explore the effect of pH in the aggregation process of the amyloidogenic peptide KTVIIE and two related sequences, using three different pH environments. Simulations using large systems (24 peptides chains per box) allow us to describe the formation of realistic peptide aggregates. We evaluate the thermodynamic and kinetic implications of changes in sequence and pH upon peptide aggregation, and we discuss how a minimalistic coarse-grained model can account for these details.

  17. Dimerization, trimerization and quantum pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Huaiming

    2014-03-01

    We study one-dimensional topological models with dimerization and trimerization and show that these models can be generated using interaction or optical superlattice. The topological properties of these models are demonstrated by the appearance of edge states and the mechanism of dimerization and trimerization is analyzed. Then we show that a quantum pumping process can be constructed based on each one-dimensional topological model. The quantum pumping process is explicitly demonstrated by the instantaneous energy spectrum and local current. The result shows that the pumping is assisted by the gapless states connecting the bands and one charge is pumped during a cycle, which also defines a nonzero Chern number. Our study systematically shows the connection of one-dimensional topological models and quantum pumping, and is useful for the experimental studies on topological phases in optical lattices and photonic quasicrystals.

  18. Dimeric guaianolides from Artemisia absinthium.

    PubMed

    Turak, Ablajan; Shi, She-Po; Jiang, Yong; Tu, Peng-Fei

    2014-09-01

    Five dimeric guaianolides, absinthins A-E, and seven known dimeric guaianolides were isolated from Artemisia absinthium. Their structures were elucidated based on 1D- and 2D-NMR experiments, including (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, DEPT, (1)H-(1)H COSY, HSQC, HMBC, and NOESY, and through HRESIMS data analysis. The absolute configuration of the known compound, anabsinthin, was determined by X-ray crystallographic analysis. The isolated compounds were tested to assess their inhibitory activities on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced nitric oxide (NO) production in BV-2 cells; absinthin C and isoanabsinthin exhibited significant inhibitory effects with IC50 values of 1.52 and 1.98μM, respectively.

  19. Photocyclizable resorcin[4]arene dimers.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Christian; Strübe, Frank; Bringmann, Sebastian; Mattay, Jochen

    2008-12-01

    The synthesis of covalently linked dimers, containing two resorcin[4]arene moieties connected over two 9,10-functionalized anthracene units, is reported. Besides the synthetic route, which involves for example the formation of anthracene-9,10-dialkanols ( and ), and characterization of the compounds, the photochemical properties, introduced through the anthracene groups, were investigated by means of UV/VIS spectroscopy. Both resorcin[4]arene dimers ( and ) were able to undergo an intramolecular [4+4] cycloaddition, therefore changing the size of the inner cavity. Unfortunately, the back reaction, which was expected to take place on irradiation below 300 nm or upon heating, was not observed yet and will be the focus of our future work.

  20. Fiber optic D dimer biosensor

    DOEpatents

    Glass, Robert S.; Grant, Sheila A.

    1999-01-01

    A fiber optic sensor for D dimer (a fibrinolytic product) can be used in vivo (e.g., in catheter-based procedures) for the diagnosis and treatment of stroke-related conditions in humans. Stroke is the third leading cause of death in the United States. It has been estimated that strokes and stroke-related disorders cost Americans between $15-30 billion annually. Relatively recently, new medical procedures have been developed for the treatment of stroke. These endovascular procedures rely upon the use of microcatheters. These procedures could be facilitated with this sensor for D dimer integrated with a microcatheter for the diagnosis of clot type, and as an indicator of the effectiveness, or end-point of thrombolytic therapy.

  1. Fiber optic D dimer biosensor

    DOEpatents

    Glass, R.S.; Grant, S.A.

    1999-08-17

    A fiber optic sensor for D dimer (a fibrinolytic product) can be used in vivo (e.g., in catheter-based procedures) for the diagnosis and treatment of stroke-related conditions in humans. Stroke is the third leading cause of death in the United States. It has been estimated that strokes and stroke-related disorders cost Americans between $15-30 billion annually. Relatively recently, new medical procedures have been developed for the treatment of stroke. These endovascular procedures rely upon the use of microcatheters. These procedures could be facilitated with this sensor for D dimer integrated with a microcatheter for the diagnosis of clot type, and as an indicator of the effectiveness, or end-point of thrombolytic therapy. 4 figs.

  2. Percolation of heteronuclear dimers irreversibly deposited on square lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gimenez, M. C.; Ramirez-Pastor, A. J.

    2016-09-01

    The percolation problem of irreversibly deposited heteronuclear dimers on square lattices is studied. A dimer is composed of two segments, and it occupies two adjacent adsorption sites. Each segment can be either a conductive segment (segment type A ) or a nonconductive segment (segment type B ). Three types of dimers are considered: A A , B B , and A B . The connectivity analysis is carried out by accounting only for the conductive segments (segments type A ). The model offers a simplified representation of the problem of percolation of defective (nonideal) particles, where the presence of defects in the system is simulated by introducing a mixture of conductive and nonconductive segments. Different cases were investigated, according to the sequence of deposition of the particles, the types of dimers involved in the process, and the degree of alignment of the deposited objects. By means of numerical simulations and finite-size scaling analysis, the complete phase diagram separating a percolating from a nonpercolating region was determined for each case. Finally, the consistency of our results was examined by comparing with previous data in the literature for linear k -mers (particles occupying k adjacent sites) with defects.

  3. Synaptobrevin Transmembrane Domain Dimerization Studied by Multiscale Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jing; Pluhackova, Kristyna; Wassenaar, Tsjerk A.; Böckmann, Rainer A.

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic vesicle fusion requires assembly of the SNARE complex composed of SNAP-25, syntaxin-1, and synaptobrevin-2 (sybII) proteins. The SNARE proteins found in vesicle membranes have previously been shown to dimerize via transmembrane (TM) domain interactions. While syntaxin homodimerization is supposed to promote the transition from hemifusion to complete fusion, the role of synaptobrevin’s TM domain association in the fusion process remains poorly understood. Here, we combined coarse-grained and atomistic simulations to model the homodimerization of the sybII transmembrane domain and of selected TM mutants. The wild-type helix is shown to form a stable, right-handed dimer with the most populated helix-helix interface, including key residues predicted in a previous mutagenesis study. In addition, two alternative binding interfaces were discovered, which are essential to explain the experimentally observed higher-order oligomerization of sybII. In contrast, only one dimerization interface was found for a fusion-inactive poly-Leu mutant. Moreover, the association kinetics found for this mutant is lower as compared to the wild-type. These differences in dimerization between the wild-type and the poly-Leu mutant are suggested to be responsible for the reported differences in fusogenic activity between these peptides. This study provides molecular insight into the role of TM sequence specificity for peptide aggregation in membranes. PMID:26287628

  4. Dimerize ethylene to butene-1

    SciTech Connect

    Commereuc, D.; Andrews, J.; Chauvin, Y.; Gillard, J.; Leonard, J.

    1984-11-01

    Institut Francais du Petrole (IFP) has developed a new process, Alphabutol, to dimerize selectively ethylene to butene-1. The Alphabutol process uses a homogeneous catalyst which means that reactants, products and catalyst are all soluble in the same liquid phase. The new catalytic system used in the Alphabutol process avoids isomerization of butene-1 to butene-2. Therefore, there is no need for product superfractionation.

  5. The influence of viral coding sequences on pestivirus IRES activity reveals further parallels with translation initiation in prokaryotes.

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Simon P; Ali, Iraj K; Kaminski, Ann; Digard, Paul; Jackson, Richard J

    2002-01-01

    Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) is a member of the pestivirus family, which shares many features in common with hepatitis C virus (HCV). It is shown here that CSFV has an exceptionally efficient cis-acting internal ribosome entry segment (IRES), which, like that of HCV, is strongly influenced by the sequences immediately downstream of the initiation codon, and is optimal with viral coding sequences in this position. Constructs that retained 17 or more codons of viral coding sequence exhibited full IRES activity, but with only 12 codons, activity was approximately 66% of maximum in vitro (though close to maximum in transfected BHK cells), whereas with just 3 codons or fewer, the activity was only approximately 15% of maximum. The minimal coding region elements required for high activity were exchanged between HCV and CSFV. Although maximum activity was observed in each case with the homologous combination of coding region and 5' UTR, the heterologous combinations were sufficiently active to rule out a highly specific functional interplay between the 5' UTR and coding sequences. On the other hand, inversion of the coding sequences resulted in low IRES activity, particularly with the HCV coding sequences. RNA structure probing showed that the efficiency of internal initiation of these chimeric constructs correlated most closely with the degree of single-strandedness of the region around and immediately downstream of the initiation codon. The low activity IRESs could not be rescued by addition of supplementary eIF4A (the initiation factor with ATP-dependent RNA helicase activity). The extreme sensitivity to secondary structure around the initiation codon is likely to be due to the fact that the eIF4F complex (which has eIF4A as one of its subunits) is not required for and does not participate in initiation on these IRESs. PMID:12515388

  6. Children's Imitation of Causal Action Sequences Is Influenced by Statistical and Pedagogical Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchsbaum, Daphna; Gopnik, Alison; Griffiths, Thomas L.; Shafto, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    Children are ubiquitous imitators, but how do they decide which actions to imitate? One possibility is that children rationally combine multiple sources of information about which actions are necessary to cause a particular outcome. For instance, children might learn from contingencies between action sequences and outcomes across repeated…

  7. Formulaic Sequences and L2 Oral Proficiency: Does the Type of Target Language Influence the Association?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stengers, Helene; Boers, Frank; Housen, Alex; Eyckmans, June

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates the extent to which productive use of formulaic sequences by intermediate students of two typologically different languages, i.e., English and Spanish, is associated with their oral proficiency in these languages. Previous research (e.g., Boers et al., "Language Teaching Research" 10: 245-261, 2006) has shown that…

  8. HLA class II sequence variants influence tuberculosis risk in populations of European ancestry

    PubMed Central

    Sveinbjornsson, Gardar; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F.; Halldorsson, Bjarni V.; Kristinsson, Karl G.; Gottfredsson, Magnus; Barrett, Jeffrey C.; Gudmundsson, Larus J.; Blondal, Kai; Gylfason, Arnaldur; Gudjonsson, Sigurjon Axel; Helgadottir, Hafdis T.; Jonasdottir, Adalbjorg; Jonasdottir, Aslaug; Karason, Ari; Kardum, Ljiljana Bulat; Knežević, Jelena; Kristjansson, Helgi; Kristjansson, Mar; Love, Arthur; Luo, Yang; Magnusson, Olafur T.; Sulem, Patrick; Kong, Augustine; Masson, Gisli; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Dembic, Zlatko; Nejentsev, Sergey; Blondal, Thorsteinn; Jonsdottir, Ingileif; Stefansson, Kari

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) infections cause 9.0 million new tuberculosis (TB) cases and 1.5 million deaths annually1. To search for sequence variants that confer risk of TB we tested 28.3 million variants identified through whole-genome sequencing of 2,636 Icelanders for association with TB (8,162 cases and 277,643 controls), pulmonary TB (PTB), and M. tuberculosis infection. We found association of three sequence variants in the HLA class II region: rs557011[T] (MAF=40.2%) with M. tuberculosis infection (OR =1.14, P=3.1×10-13) and PTB (OR=1.25, P=5.8×10-12) and rs9271378[G] (MAF=32.5%) with PTB (OR=0.78, P=2.5×10-12), both located between HLA-DQA1 and HLA-DRB1. Finally, a missense variant p.Ala210Thr in HLA-DQA1, (MAF=19.1%, rs9272785) shows association with M. tuberculosis infection (P=9.3×10-9, OR=1.14). The association of these variants with PTB was replicated in large samples of European ancestry from Russia and Croatia (P< 5.9×10-4). These findings demonstrate that the HLA class II region contributes to the complex genetic risk of tuberculosis, possibly through reduced presentation of protective M. tuberculosis antigens to T cells. PMID:26829749

  9. CLEC-2 activates Syk through dimerization.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Craig E; Pollitt, Alice Y; Mori, Jun; Eble, Johannes A; Tomlinson, Michael G; Hartwig, John H; O'Callaghan, Christopher A; Fütterer, Klaus; Watson, Steve P

    2010-04-01

    The C-type lectin receptor CLEC-2 activates platelets through Src and Syk tyrosine kinases, leading to tyrosine phosphorylation of downstream adapter proteins and effector enzymes, including phospholipase-C gamma2. Signaling is initiated through phosphorylation of a single conserved tyrosine located in a YxxL sequence in the CLEC-2 cytosolic tail. The signaling pathway used by CLEC-2 shares many similarities with that used by receptors that have 1 or more copies of an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif, defined by the sequence Yxx(L/I)x(6-12)Yxx(L/I), in their cytosolic tails or associated receptor chains. Phosphorylation of the conserved immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif tyrosines promotes Syk binding and activation through binding of the Syk tandem SH2 domains. In this report, we present evidence using peptide pull-down studies, surface plasmon resonance, quantitative Western blotting, tryptophan fluorescence measurements, and competition experiments that Syk activation by CLEC-2 is mediated by the cross-linking through the tandem SH2 domains with a stoichiometry of 2:1. In support of this model, cross-linking and electron microscopy demonstrate that CLEC-2 is present as a dimer in resting platelets and converted to larger complexes on activation. This is a unique mode of activation of Syk by a single YxxL-containing receptor. PMID:20154219

  10. G domain dimerization controls dynamin's assembly-stimulated GTPase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Chappie, Joshua S.; Acharya, Sharmistha; Leonard, Marilyn; Schmid, Sandra L.; Dyda, Fred

    2010-06-14

    Dynamin is an atypical GTPase that catalyses membrane fission during clathrin-mediated endocytosis. The mechanisms of dynamin's basal and assembly-stimulated GTP hydrolysis are unknown, though both are indirectly influenced by the GTPase effector domain (GED). Here we present the 2.0 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of a human dynamin 1-derived minimal GTPase-GED fusion protein, which was dimeric in the presence of the transition state mimic GDP.AlF{sub 4}{sup -}. The structure reveals dynamin's catalytic machinery and explains how assembly-stimulated GTP hydrolysis is achieved through G domain dimerization. A sodium ion present in the active site suggests that dynamin uses a cation to compensate for the developing negative charge in the transition state in the absence of an arginine finger. Structural comparison to the rat dynamin G domain reveals key conformational changes that promote G domain dimerization and stimulated hydrolysis. The structure of the GTPase-GED fusion protein dimer provides insight into the mechanisms underlying dynamin-catalysed membrane fission.

  11. Children's Preference for Sequenced Accompaniments: The Influence of Style and Perceived Tempo.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brittin, Ruth V.

    2000-01-01

    Explores the influence of tempo on musical preference for students in grades 2-6, focusing on the effects of various styles using a MIDI keyboard. Explains that the students listened to 10 musical selections identifying their preferences and perceptions of tempo. Reveals that the preferred styles were Hip-Hop, Heavy Rock Shuffle, Samba, and Funk2.…

  12. Functional Significance of Serotonin Receptor Dimerization

    PubMed Central

    Herrick-Davis, Katharine

    2013-01-01

    The original model of G protein activation by a single G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) is giving way to a new model wherein two protomers of a GPCR dimer interact with a single G protein. This article will review the evidence suggesting that 5-HT receptors form dimers/oligomers and will compare the findings with results obtained from studies with other biogenic amine receptors. Topics to be covered include the origin or biogenesis of dimer formation, potential dimer interface(s), and oligomer size (dimer versus tetramer or higher order). The functional significance will be discussed in terms of G-protein activation following ligand binding to one or two protomers in a dimeric structure, the formation of heterodimers and the development of bivalent ligands. PMID:23811735

  13. STIM1 dimers undergo unimolecular coupling to activate Orai1 channels

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yandong; Wang, Xizhuo; Wang, Xianming; Loktionova, Natalia A.; Cai, Xiangyu; Nwokonko, Robert M.; Vrana, Erin; Wang, Youjun; Rothberg, Brad S.; Gill, Donald L.

    2015-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca2+ sensor, STIM1, becomes activated when ER-stored Ca2+ is depleted and translocates into ER–plasma membrane junctions where it tethers and activates Orai1 Ca2+ entry channels. The dimeric STIM1 protein contains a small STIM-Orai-activating region (SOAR)—the minimal sequence sufficient to activate Orai1 channels. Since SOAR itself is a dimer, we constructed SOAR concatemer–dimers and introduced mutations at F394, which is critical for Orai1 coupling and activation. The F394H mutation in both SOAR monomers completely blocks dimer function, but F394H introduced in only one of the dimeric SOAR monomers has no effect on Orai1 binding or activation. This reveals an unexpected unimolecular coupling between STIM1 and Orai1 and argues against recent evidence suggesting dimeric interaction between STIM1 and two adjacent Orai1 channel subunits. The model predicts that STIM1 dimers may be involved in crosslinking between Orai1 channels with implications for the kinetics and localization of Orai1 channel opening. PMID:26399906

  14. STIM1 dimers undergo unimolecular coupling to activate Orai1 channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yandong; Wang, Xizhuo; Wang, Xianming; Loktionova, Natalia A.; Cai, Xiangyu; Nwokonko, Robert M.; Vrana, Erin; Wang, Youjun; Rothberg, Brad S.; Gill, Donald L.

    2015-09-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca2+ sensor, STIM1, becomes activated when ER-stored Ca2+ is depleted and translocates into ER-plasma membrane junctions where it tethers and activates Orai1 Ca2+ entry channels. The dimeric STIM1 protein contains a small STIM-Orai-activating region (SOAR)--the minimal sequence sufficient to activate Orai1 channels. Since SOAR itself is a dimer, we constructed SOAR concatemer-dimers and introduced mutations at F394, which is critical for Orai1 coupling and activation. The F394H mutation in both SOAR monomers completely blocks dimer function, but F394H introduced in only one of the dimeric SOAR monomers has no effect on Orai1 binding or activation. This reveals an unexpected unimolecular coupling between STIM1 and Orai1 and argues against recent evidence suggesting dimeric interaction between STIM1 and two adjacent Orai1 channel subunits. The model predicts that STIM1 dimers may be involved in crosslinking between Orai1 channels with implications for the kinetics and localization of Orai1 channel opening.

  15. Molecular Mechanisms in the Repair of the Cyclobutane Pyrimidine Dimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassanali, Ali A.; Zhong, Dongping; Singer, Sherwin J.

    2009-06-01

    Exposure to far UV radiation induces DNA damage in the form of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs). Cyclobutane dimer lesions can be repaired by the enzyme photolyase, in which the absorption of a blue light photon initiates a sequence of photochemical events leading to the injection of an electron at the site of the CPD lesion in DNA. The electron catalyzes the repair of the cyclobutane dimer, splitting the CPD to is original pyrimidine units, and is subsequently recaptured by the photolyase protein. In this work we investigate the molecular mechanism of the repair of the cyclobutane dimer radical anion in aqueous solution using ab initio MD simulations. Umbrella sampling is used to determine a two-dimensional free energy surface as a function of the C5-C5-4 and C6-C6-4 distances. The neutral dimer is unable to surmount a large free energy barrier for repair. Upon addition of an electron, the splitting of the C5-C5-4 coordinate is virtually barrier less. Transition state theory predicts that the splitting of the C6-C6-4 bond is complete on a picosecond timescale. The free energy surface suggests that the splitting of the two bonds is asynchronously concerted. Our work is the first to explicitly include the electronic degrees of freedom for both the cyclobutane dimer and the surrounding water pocket. The ab initio simulations show that at least 30% of the electron density is delocalized onto the surrounding solvent during the splitting process. Simulations on the neutral surface show that back electron transfer from the dimer is critical for the completion of splitting: splitting of the C5-C5' and C6-C6' bonds can be reversed or enhanced depending on when electron return occurs. To maximize splitting yield, the back electron transfer should occur beyond the transition state along the splitting coordinate. Non-equilibrium trajectories are also conducted that begin with the electron added to a neutral unrepaired solvated CPD. Our results indicate that there are two

  16. Carboxyl-terminal sequences influence the import of mitochondrial protein precursors in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Ness, S.A.; Weiss, R.L.

    1987-10-01

    The large subunit of carbamoyl phosphate synthase A from Neurospora crassa is encoded by a nuclear gene but is localized in the mitochondrial matrix. The authors have utilized N. crassa strains that produce both normal and carboxyl-terminal-truncated forms of carbamoyl phosphate synthase A to ask whether the carboxyl terminus affects import of the carbamoyl phosphate synthase A precursor. They found that carboxyl-terminal-truncated precursors were directed to mitochondria but that they were imported less efficiently than full-length proteins that were synthesized in the same cytoplasm. The results suggest that effective import of proteins into mitochondria requires appropriate combinations of targeting sequences and three-dimensional structure.

  17. Monomer-dimer problem on some networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ruijuan; Yan, Weigen

    2016-09-01

    Zhang et al. (2012) obtained the exact formula for the number of all possible monomer-dimer arrangements and the asymptotic growth constant on a scale-free small-world network. In this note, we generalize this result and obtain the exact solution on the monomer-dimer model on many networks. Particularly, we prove that these networks have the same asymptotic growth constant of the number of monomer-dimer arrangements.

  18. Intramolecular hydrophobic interactions are critical mediators of STAT5 dimerization

    PubMed Central

    Fahrenkamp, Dirk; Li, Jinyu; Ernst, Sabrina; Schmitz-Van de Leur, Hildegard; Chatain, Nicolas; Küster, Andrea; Koschmieder, Steffen; Lüscher, Bernhard; Rossetti, Giulia; Müller-Newen, Gerhard

    2016-01-01

    STAT5 is an essential transcription factor in hematopoiesis, which is activated through tyrosine phosphorylation in response to cytokine stimulation. Constitutive activation of STAT5 is a hallmark of myeloid and lymphoblastic leukemia. Using homology modeling and molecular dynamics simulations, a model of the STAT5 phosphotyrosine-SH2 domain interface was generated providing first structural information on the activated STAT5 dimer including a sequence, for which no structural information is available for any of the STAT proteins. We identified a novel intramolecular interaction mediated through F706, adjacent to the phosphotyrosine motif, and a unique hydrophobic interface on the surface of the SH2 domain. Analysis of corresponding STAT5 mutants revealed that this interaction is dispensable for Epo receptor-mediated phosphorylation of STAT5 but essential for dimer formation and subsequent nuclear accumulation. Moreover, the herein presented model clarifies molecular mechanisms of recently discovered leukemic STAT5 mutants and will help to guide future drug development. PMID:27752093

  19. Single nucleotide polymorphism analysis using different colored dye dimer probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marmé, Nicole; Friedrich, Achim; Denapaite, Dalia; Hakenbeck, Regine; Knemeyer, Jens-Peter

    2006-09-01

    Fluorescence quenching by dye dimer formation has been utilized to develop hairpin-structured DNA probes for the detection of a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the penicillin target gene pbp2x, which is implicated in the penicillin resistance of Streptococcus pneumoniae. We designed two specific DNA probes for the identification of the pbp2x genes from a penicillin susceptible strain R6 and a resistant strain Streptococcus mitis 661 using green-fluorescent tetramethylrhodamine (TMR) and red-fluorescent DY-636, respectively. Hybridization of each of the probes to its respective target DNA sequence opened the DNA hairpin probes, consequently breaking the nonfluorescent dye dimers into fluorescent species. This hybridization of the target with the hairpin probe achieved single nucleotide specific detection at nanomolar concentrations via increased fluorescence.

  20. Egg laying sequence influences egg mercury concentrations and egg size in three bird species: Implications for contaminant monitoring programs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ackerman, Joshua T.; Eagles-Smith, Collin A.; Herzog, Mark P.; Yee, Julie L.; Hartman, C. Alex

    2016-01-01

    Bird eggs are commonly used in contaminant monitoring programs and toxicological risk assessments, but intra-clutch variation and sampling methodology could influence interpretability. We examined the influence of egg laying sequence on egg mercury concentrations and burdens in American avocets, black-necked stilts, and Forster's terns. The average decline in mercury concentrations between the first and last egg laid was 33% for stilts, 22% for terns, and 11% for avocets, and most of this decline occurred between the first and second eggs laid (24% for stilts, 18% for terns, and 9% for avocets). Trends in egg size with egg laying order were inconsistent among species and overall differences in egg volume, mass, length, and width were <3%. We summarized the literature and, among 17 species studied, mercury concentrations generally declined by 16% between the first and second eggs laid. Despite the strong effect of egg laying sequence, most of the variance in egg mercury concentrations still occurred among clutches (75%-91%) rather than within clutches (9%-25%). Using simulations, we determined that to accurately estimate a population's mean egg mercury concentration using only a single random egg from a subset of nests, it would require sampling >60 nests to represent a large population (10% accuracy) or ≥14 nests to represent a small colony that contained <100 nests (20% accuracy).

  1. T box transcription antitermination riboswitch: Influence of nucleotide sequence and orientation on tRNA binding by the antiterminator element

    PubMed Central

    Fauzi, Hamid; Agyeman, Akwasi; Hines, Jennifer V.

    2008-01-01

    Many bacteria utilize riboswitch transcription regulation to monitor and appropriately respond to cellular levels of important metabolites or effector molecules. The T box transcription antitermination riboswitch responds to cognate uncharged tRNA by specifically stabilizing an antiterminator element in the 5′-untranslated mRNA leader region and precluding formation of a thermodynamically more stable terminator element. Stabilization occurs when the tRNA acceptor end base pairs with the first four nucleotides in the seven nucleotide bulge of the highly conserved antiterminator element. The significance of the conservation of the antiterminator bulge nucleotides that do not base pair with the tRNA is unknown, but they are required for optimal function. In vitro selection was used to determine if the isolated antiterminator bulge context alone dictates the mode in which the tRNA acceptor end binds the bulge nucleotides. No sequence conservation beyond complementarity was observed and the location was not constrained to the first four bases of the bulge. The results indicate that formation of a structure that recognizes the tRNA acceptor end in isolation is not the determinant driving force for the high phylogenetic sequence conservation observed within the antiterminator bulge. Additional factors or T box leader features more likely influenced the phylogenetic sequence conservation. PMID:19152843

  2. Influence of atom termination and stacking sequence on the θ‧/Al interfaces from first-principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Dongqiang; Wang, Yongxin; Lu, Yanli; Chen, Zheng; Rao, Qinglei

    2016-06-01

    First-principles calculations was used to explore the influence of atom termination and stacking sequence on the interface strength and stability between θ‧(Al2Cu) precipitate and Al matrix along experimentally observed orientations, (001)θ‧/(001)Al and (010)θ‧/(010)Al interfaces. Six interfacial structures were modeled, and work of adhesion, bonding characters, number of valence electrons and thermal stability had been studied. Calculated results revealed that the Cu-terminated interface has larger work of adhesion than Al-terminated interface, and hollow site stacking sequence, with stronger bonding, is superior to top site stacking sequence, adhesion strength for coherent (001)θ‧/(001)Al interface is better than that for semi-coherent (010)θ‧/(010)Al interface. These differences are attributed to the bonding feature and number of valence electrons. Among the six interface models, the Cu-terminated (001)θ‧/(001)Al interface with hollow site stacking has the largest work of adhesion and the smallest interface energy, indicating that it has the best mechanical and thermodynamic properties.

  3. Vinculin Tail Dimerization and Paxillin Binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Sharon

    2006-03-01

    Vinculin is a highly conserved cytoskeletal protein that is essential for regulation of cell morphology and migration, and is a critical component of both cell-cell and cell-matrix complexes. The tail domain of vinculin (Vt) was crystallized as a homodimer and is believed to bind F-actin as a dimer. We have characterized Vt dimerization by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Spectroscopy and identified the dimer interface in solution by chemical shift perturbation. The Vt dimer interface in solution is similar to the crystallographic dimer interface. Interestingly, the Vt dimer interface determined by NMR partially overlaps the paxillin binding region previously defined coarsely by deletion mutagenesis and gel-blot assays. To further characterize the paxillin binding site in Vt and probe relationship between paxillin binding and dimerization, we conducted chemical shift perturbations experiments using a paxillin derived peptide, LD2. Our NMR experiments have confirmed that the paxillin binding site and the Vt dimerization site partially overlap, and we have further characterized both of these two binding interfaces. Information derived from these studies was used to identify mutations in Vt that selectively perturb paxillin binding and Vt self-association. These mutants are currently being characterized for their utility in structural and biological analyses to elucidate the role of paxillin binding and Vt dimerization in vinculin function.

  4. Enhanced Chiral Recognition by Cyclodextrin Dimers

    PubMed Central

    Voskuhl, Jens; Schaepe, Kira; Ravoo, Bart Jan

    2011-01-01

    In this article we investigate the effect of multivalency in chiral recognition. To this end, we measured the host-guest interaction of a β-cyclodextrin dimer with divalent chiral guests. We report the synthesis of carbohydrate-based water soluble chiral guests functionalized with two borneol, menthol, or isopinocampheol units in either (+) or (−) configuration. We determined the interaction of these divalent guests with a β-cyclodextrin dimer using isothermal titration calorimetry. It was found that—in spite of a highly unfavorable conformation—the cyclodextrin dimer binds to guest dimers with an increased enantioselectivity, which clearly reflects the effect of multivalency. PMID:21845101

  5. Mechanisms of Monomeric and Dimeric Glycogenin Autoglucosylation*

    PubMed Central

    Issoglio, Federico M.; Carrizo, María E.; Romero, Jorge M.; Curtino, Juan A.

    2012-01-01

    Initiation of glucose polymerization by glycogenin autoglucosylation at Tyr-194 is required to prime de novo biosynthesis of glycogen. It has been proposed that the synthesis of the primer proceeds by intersubunit glucosylation of dimeric glycogenin, even though it has not been demonstrated that this mechanism is responsible for the described polymerization extent of 12 glucoses produced by the dimer. We reported previously the intramonomer glucosylation capability of glycogenin without determining the extent of autoglucopolymerization. Here, we show that the maximum specific autoglucosylation extent (MSAE) produced by the non-glucosylated glycogenin monomer is 13.3 ± 1.9 glucose units, similar to the 12.5 ± 1.4 glucose units measured for the dimer. The mechanism and capacity of the dimeric enzyme to carry out full glucopolymerization were also evaluated by construction of heterodimers able to glucosylate exclusively by intrasubunit or intersubunit reaction mechanisms. The MSAE of non-glucosylated glycogenin produced by dimer intrasubunit glucosylation was 16% of that produced by the monomer. However, partially glucosylated glycogenin was able to almost complete its autoglucosylation by the dimer intrasubunit mechanism. The MSAE produced by heterodimer intersubunit glucosylation was 60% of that produced by the wild-type dimer. We conclude that both intrasubunit and intersubunit reaction mechanisms are necessary for the dimeric enzyme to acquire maximum autoglucosylation. The full glucopolymerization capacity of monomeric glycogenin indicates that the enzyme is able to synthesize the glycogen primer without the need for prior dimerization. PMID:22128147

  6. Radiation-induced tetramer-to-dimer transition of Escherichia coli lactose repressor.

    PubMed

    Goffinont, S; Davidkova, M; Spotheim-Maurizot, M

    2009-08-21

    The wild type lactose repressor of Escherichia coli is a tetrameric protein formed by two identical dimers. They are associated via a C-terminal 4-helix bundle (called tetramerization domain) whose stability is ensured by the interaction of leucine zipper motifs. Upon in vitro gamma-irradiation the repressor losses its ability to bind the operator DNA sequence due to damage of its DNA-binding domains. Using an engineered dimeric repressor for comparison, we show here that irradiation induces also the change of repressor oligomerisation state from tetramer to dimer. The splitting of the tetramer into dimers can result from the oxidation of the leucine residues of the tetramerization domain. PMID:19520056

  7. Nicotinamidase/pyrazinamidase of Mycobacterium tuberculosis forms homo-dimers stabilized by disulfide bonds.

    PubMed

    Rueda, Daniel; Sheen, Patricia; Gilman, Robert H; Bueno, Carlos; Santos, Marco; Pando-Robles, Victoria; Batista, Cesar V; Zimic, Mirko

    2014-12-01

    Recombinant wild-pyrazinamidase from H37Rv Mycobacterium tuberculosis was analyzed by gel electrophoresis under differential reducing conditions to evaluate its quaternary structure. PZAse was fractionated by size exclusion chromatography under non-reducing conditions. PZAse activity was measured and mass spectrometry analysis was performed to determine the identity of proteins by de novo sequencing and to determine the presence of disulfide bonds. This study confirmed that M. tuberculosis wild type PZAse was able to form homo-dimers in vitro. Homo-dimers showed a slightly lower specific PZAse activity compared to monomeric PZAse. PZAse dimers were dissociated into monomers in response to reducing conditions. Mass spectrometry analysis confirmed the existence of disulfide bonds (C72-C138 and C138-C138) stabilizing the quaternary structure of the PZAse homo-dimer.

  8. An apolipoprotein influencing triglycerides in humans and mice revealed by comparative sequencing.

    PubMed

    Pennacchio, L A; Olivier, M; Hubacek, J A; Cohen, J C; Cox, D R; Fruchart, J C; Krauss, R M; Rubin, E M

    2001-10-01

    Comparison of genomic DNA sequences from human and mouse revealed a new apolipoprotein (APO) gene (APOAV) located proximal to the well-characterized APOAI/CIII/AIV gene cluster on human 11q23. Mice expressing a human APOAV transgene showed a decrease in plasma triglyceride concentrations to one-third of those in control mice; conversely, knockout mice lacking Apoav had four times as much plasma triglycerides as controls. In humans, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) across the APOAV locus were found to be significantly associated with plasma triglyceride levels in two independent studies. These findings indicate that APOAV is an important determinant of plasma triglyceride levels, a major risk factor for coronary artery disease.

  9. Polypyrimidine tract sequences direct selection of alternative branch sites and influence protein binding.

    PubMed Central

    Norton, P A

    1994-01-01

    IVS1, an intron derived from the rat fibronectin gene, is spliced inefficiently in vitro, involving the use of three alternative branch sites. Mutation of one branch point site, BP3, so as to increase complementarity to U2 snRNA resulted in exclusive use of that site and improved splicing efficiency, indicating that the wild type BP3 site is one determinant of poor IVS1 splicing. Deletions within the polypyrimidine tract had a variable effect on splicing efficiency and altered the pattern of branch site usage. Selection of each branch site was influenced negatively by purine substitutions ca. 20 nucleotides downstream. It is proposed that all three IVS1 branch sites are pyrimidine tract-dependent. Pyrimidine tract deletions also influenced the crosslinking of PTB (the polypyrimidine tract-binding protein), hnRNP C, and splicing factor U2AF65. All three proteins bound preferentially to distinct regions within the polypyrimidine tract and thus are candidates for mediating pyrimidine tract-dependent branch site selection. The findings indicate the complexity of the IVS1 polypyrimidine tract and suggest a crucial role for this region in modulating branch site selection and IVS1 splicing. Images PMID:7937104

  10. Influences of graphene on microbial community and antibiotic resistance genes in mouse gut as determined by high-throughput sequencing.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yongchao; Wu, Bing; Zhang, Xu-Xiang; Yin, Jinbao; Mao, Liang; Hu, Maojie

    2016-02-01

    Graphene is a promising candidate as an antibacterial material owning to its bacterial toxicity. However, little information on influence of graphene on gut microbiota is available. In this study, mice were exposed to graphene for 4 weeks, and high-throughput sequencing was applied to characterize the changes in microbial community and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in mouse gut. The results showed that graphene exposure increased biodiversity of gut microbiota, and changed their community. The 1 μg/d graphene exposure had higher influences on the gut microbiota than 10 μg/d and 100 μg/d graphene exposures, which might be due to higher aggregation of high-level graphene. The influence of graphene on gut microbiota might attribute to that graphene could induce oxidative stress and damage of cell membrane integrity. The results were verified by the increase of ratio of Gram-negative bacteria. Outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria could reduce the membrane damage induced by graphene and make them more tolerance to graphene. Further, we found that graphene exposure significantly increased the abundance and types of ARGs, indicating a potential health risk of graphene. This study firstly provides new insight to the health effects of graphene on gut microbiota.

  11. Influence of manure age and sunlight on the community structure of cattle fecal bacteria as revealed by Illumina sequencing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, K.; Shaw, T. I.; Oladeinde, A.; Molina, M.

    2013-12-01

    Fecal pollution of environmental waters is a major concern for the general public because exposure to fecal-associated pathogens can have severe impacts on human health. Stream and river impairment due to fecal pollution is largely the result of agricultural activities in the United States. In the last few years, numerous metagenomic studies utilized next generation sequencing to develop microbial community profiles by massively sequencing the 16sRNA hypervariable region. This technology supports the application of water quality assessment such as pathogen detection and fecal source tracking. The bacteria communities of samples in these studies were determined when they were freshly collected; therefore, little is known about how feces age or how environmental stress influences the microbial ecology of fecal materials. In this study we monitored bacteria community changes in cattle feces for 57 days after excretion (day 0, 2, 4 8, 15, 22, 29, 43, 57) by sequencing the 16s variable region 4, using Illumnia MiSeq. Twelve cattle feces were studied; half of the samples were directly exposed to sunlight (unshaded) and half were shaded. Results indicate that the relative abundance (RA) profile in both shaded and unshaded samples rapidly changed from day 0 to 15, but stabilized from day 22 to 57. Firmcutes were the most abundant phylum (~40%) at day 0, but were reduced to <10% by day 57. The RA of Proteobacteria was only 1% at day 0, but increased to ~50% by day 57in both shaded and unshaded samples. By the end of the study, shaded and unshaded samples had a similar RA of Firmcutes and Proteobacteria but the RA of Bacteroidetes and Actinobacteria was, respectively, about 7% lower and 10% higher for unshaded samples. UV intensity, moisture, and temperature were significantly different between shaded and unshaded plots, indicating that these environmental stresses could influence the structure of fecal bacteria community in the natural environment. According to the

  12. Influence of aeration intensity on mature aerobic granules in sequencing batch reactor.

    PubMed

    Gao, Da-Wen; Liu, Lin; Liang, Hong

    2013-05-01

    Aeration intensity is well known as an important factor in the formation of aerobic granules. In this research, two identical lab-scale sequencing batch reactors with aeration intensity of 0.8 (R1) and 0.2 m(3)/h (R2) were operated to investigate the characteristics and kinetics of matured aerobic granules. Results showed that both aeration intensity conditions induced granulation, but they showed different effects on the characteristics of aerobic granules. Compared with the low aeration intensity (R2), the aerobic granules under the higher aeration intensity (R1) had better physical characteristics and settling ability. However, the observed biomass yield (Y obs) in R1 [0.673 kg mixed liquor volatile suspended solids (MLVSS)/kg chemical oxygen demand (COD)] was lower than R2 (0.749 kg MLVSS/kg COD). In addition, the maximum specific COD removal rates (q max) and apparent half rate constant (K) of mature aerobic granular sludge under the two aeration intensities were at a similar level. Therefore, the matured aerobic granule system does not require to be operated in a higher aeration intensity, which will reduce the energy consumption.

  13. HLA class II sequence variants influence tuberculosis risk in populations of European ancestry.

    PubMed

    Sveinbjornsson, Gardar; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F; Halldorsson, Bjarni V; Kristinsson, Karl G; Gottfredsson, Magnus; Barrett, Jeffrey C; Gudmundsson, Larus J; Blondal, Kai; Gylfason, Arnaldur; Gudjonsson, Sigurjon Axel; Helgadottir, Hafdis T; Jonasdottir, Adalbjorg; Jonasdottir, Aslaug; Karason, Ari; Kardum, Ljiljana Bulat; Knežević, Jelena; Kristjansson, Helgi; Kristjansson, Mar; Love, Arthur; Luo, Yang; Magnusson, Olafur T; Sulem, Patrick; Kong, Augustine; Masson, Gisli; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Dembic, Zlatko; Nejentsev, Sergey; Blondal, Thorsteinn; Jonsdottir, Ingileif; Stefansson, Kari

    2016-03-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis infections cause 9 million new tuberculosis cases and 1.5 million deaths annually. To identify variants conferring risk of tuberculosis, we tested 28.3 million variants identified through whole-genome sequencing of 2,636 Icelanders for association with tuberculosis (8,162 cases and 277,643 controls), pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) and M. tuberculosis infection. We found association of three variants in the region harboring genes encoding the class II human leukocyte antigens (HLAs): rs557011[T] (minor allele frequency (MAF) = 40.2%), associated with M. tuberculosis infection (odds ratio (OR) = 1.14, P = 3.1 × 10(-13)) and PTB (OR = 1.25, P = 5.8 × 10(-12)), and rs9271378[G] (MAF = 32.5%), associated with PTB (OR = 0.78, P = 2.5 × 10(-12))--both located between HLA-DQA1 and HLA-DRB1--and a missense variant encoding p.Ala210Thr in HLA-DQA1 (MAF = 19.1%, rs9272785), associated with M. tuberculosis infection (P = 9.3 × 10(-9), OR = 1.14). We replicated association of these variants with PTB in samples of European ancestry from Russia and Croatia (P < 5.9 × 10(-4)). These findings show that the HLA class II region contributes to genetic risk of tuberculosis, possibly through reduced presentation of protective M. tuberculosis antigens to T cells.

  14. Did stresses from the Cerro Prieto Geothermal Field influence the El Mayor-Cucapah rupture sequence?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trugman, Daniel T.; Borsa, Adrian A.; Sandwell, David T.

    2014-12-01

    The Mw 7.2 El Mayor-Cucapah (EMC) earthquake ruptured a complex fault system in northern Baja California that was previously considered inactive. The Cerro Prieto Geothermal Field (CPGF), site of the world's second largest geothermal power plant, is located approximately 15 km to the northeast of the EMC hypocenter. We investigate whether anthropogenic fluid extraction at the CPGF caused a significant perturbation to the stress field in the EMC rupture zone. We use Advanced Land Observing Satellite interferometric synthetic aperture radar data to develop a laterally heterogeneous model of fluid extraction at the CPGF and estimate that this extraction generates positive Coulomb stressing rates of order 15 kPa/yr near the EMC hypocenter, a value which exceeds the local tectonic stressing rate. Although we cannot definitively conclude that production at the CPGF triggered the EMC earthquake, its influence on the local stress field is substantial and should not be neglected in local seismic hazard assessments.

  15. The water dimer I: Experimental characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Anamika; Cole, William T. S.; Saykally, Richard J.

    2015-07-01

    As the archetype of water hydrogen bonding, the water dimer has been studied extensively by both theory and experiment for nearly seven decades. In this article, we present a detailed chronological review of the experimental dimer studies and the insights into the complex nature of water and hydrogen bonding gained from them. A subsequent letter will review the corresponding theoretical advances.

  16. Influence of ACE I/D Polymorphism on Circulating Levels of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor 1, D-Dimer, Ultrasensitive C-Reactive Protein and Transforming Growth Factor β1 in Patients Undergoing Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    de Carvalho, Sara Santos; Simões e Silva, Ana Cristina; Sabino, Adriano de Paula; Evangelista, Fernanda Cristina Gontijo; Gomes, Karina Braga; Dusse, Luci Maria SantAna; Rios, Danyelle Romana Alves

    2016-01-01

    Background There is substantial evidence that chronic renal and cardiovascular diseases are associated with coagulation disorders, endothelial dysfunction, inflammation and fibrosis. Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Insertion/Deletion polymorphism (ACE I/D polymorphism) has also be linked to cardiovascular diseases. Therefore, this study aimed to compare plasma levels of ultrassensible C-reactive protein (usCRP), PAI-1, D-dimer and TGF-β1 in patients undergoing HD with different ACE I/D polymorphisms. Methods The study was performed in 138 patients at ESRD under hemodialysis therapy for more than six months. The patients were divided into three groups according to the genotype. Genomic DNA was extracted from blood cells (leukocytes). ACE I/D polymorphism was investigated by single polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Plasma levels of D-dimer, PAI-1 and TGF-β1 were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and the determination of plasma levels of usCRP was performed by immunonephelometry. Data were analyzed by the software SigmaStat 2.03. Results Clinical characteristics were similar in patients with these three ACE I/D polymorphisms, except for interdialytic weight gain. I allele could be associated with higher interdialytic weight gain (P = 0.017). Patients genotyped as DD and as ID had significantly higher levels of PAI-1 than those with II genotype. Other laboratory parameters did not significantly differ among the three subgroups (P = 0.033). Despite not reaching statistical significance, plasma levels of usCRP were higher in patients carrying the D allele. Conclusion ACE I/D polymorphisms could be associated with changes in the regulation of sodium, fibrinolytic system, and possibly, inflammation. Our data showed that high levels of PAI-1 are detected when D allele is present, whereas greater interdialytic gain is associated with the presence of I allele. However, further studies with different experimental designs are necessary to elucidate the

  17. Free energy calculations of gramicidin dimer dissociation.

    PubMed

    Wanasundara, Surajith N; Krishnamurthy, Vikram; Chung, Shin-Ho

    2011-11-24

    Molecular dynamics simulations, combined with umbrella sampling, is used to study how gramicidin A (gA) dimers dissociate in the lipid bilayer. The potential of mean force and intermolecular potential energy are computed as functions of the distance between center of masses of the two gA monomers in two directions of separation: parallel to the bilayer surface and parallel to the membrane normal. Results from this study show that the dissociation of gA dimers occurs via lateral displacement of gA monomers followed by tilting of dimers with respect to the lipid bilayer normal. It is found that the dissociation energy of gA dimers in the dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine bilayer is 14 kcal mol(-1) (~22 kT), which is approximately equal to the energy of breaking six intermolecular hydrogen bonds that stabilize the gA channel dimer.

  18. Helicobacter pylori cagA Promoter Region Sequences Influence CagA Expression and Interleukin 8 Secretion.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Rui M; Pinto-Ribeiro, Ines; Wen, Xiaogang; Marcos-Pinto, Ricardo; Dinis-Ribeiro, Mário; Carneiro, Fátima; Figueiredo, Ceu

    2016-02-15

    Heterogeneity at the Helicobacter pylori cagA gene promoter region has been linked to variation in CagA expression and gastric histopathology. Here, we characterized the cagA promoter and expression in 46 H. pylori strains from Portugal. Our results confirm the relationship between cagA promoter region variation and protein expression originally observed in strains from Colombia. We observed that individuals with intestinal metaplasia were all infected with H. pylori strains containing a specific cagA motif. Additionally, we provided novel functional evidence that strain-specific sequences in the cagA promoter region and CagA expression levels influence interleukin 8 secretion by the host gastric epithelial cells.

  19. Electronic transitions of palladium dimer

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Yue; Ng, Y. W.; Chen, Zhihua; Cheung, A. S.-C.

    2013-11-21

    The laser induced fluorescence spectrum of palladium dimer (Pd{sub 2}) in the visible region between 480 and 700 nm has been observed and analyzed. The gas-phase Pd{sub 2} molecule was produced by laser ablation of palladium metal rod. Eleven vibrational bands were observed and assigned to the [17.1] {sup 3}II{sub g} - X{sup 3}Σ{sub u}{sup +} transition system. The bond length (r{sub o}) and vibrational frequency (ΔG{sub 1/2}) of the ground X{sup 3}Σ{sub u}{sup +} state were determined to be 2.47(4) Å and 211.4(5) cm{sup −1}, respectively. A molecular orbital energy level diagram was used to understand the observed ground and excited electronic states. This is the first gas-phase experimental investigation of the electronic transitions of Pd{sub 2}.

  20. Minding the gap: Frequency of indels in mtDNA control region sequence data and influence on population genetic analyses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pearce, J.M.

    2006-01-01

    Insertions and deletions (indels) result in sequences of various lengths when homologous gene regions are compared among individuals or species. Although indels are typically phylogenetically informative, occurrence and incorporation of these characters as gaps in intraspecific population genetic data sets are rarely discussed. Moreover, the impact of gaps on estimates of fixation indices, such as FST, has not been reviewed. Here, I summarize the occurrence and population genetic signal of indels among 60 published studies that involved alignments of multiple sequences from the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region of vertebrate taxa. Among 30 studies observing indels, an average of 12% of both variable and parsimony-informative sites were composed of these sites. There was no consistent trend between levels of population differentiation and the number of gap characters in a data block. Across all studies, the average influence on estimates of ??ST was small, explaining only an additional 1.8% of among population variance (range 0.0-8.0%). Studies most likely to observe an increase in ??ST with the inclusion of gap characters were those with < 20 variable sites, but a near equal number of studies with few variable sites did not show an increase. In contrast to studies at interspecific levels, the influence of indels for intraspecific population genetic analyses of control region DNA appears small, dependent upon total number of variable sites in the data block, and related to species-specific characteristics and the spatial distribution of mtDNA lineages that contain indels. ?? 2006 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. A Genome-Scale Investigation of How Sequence, Function, and Tree-Based Gene Properties Influence Phylogenetic Inference

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Xing-Xing; Salichos, Leonidas; Rokas, Antonis

    2016-01-01

    Molecular phylogenetic inference is inherently dependent on choices in both methodology and data. Many insightful studies have shown how choices in methodology, such as the model of sequence evolution or optimality criterion used, can strongly influence inference. In contrast, much less is known about the impact of choices in the properties of the data, typically genes, on phylogenetic inference. We investigated the relationships between 52 gene properties (24 sequence-based, 19 function-based, and 9 tree-based) with each other and with three measures of phylogenetic signal in two assembled data sets of 2,832 yeast and 2,002 mammalian genes. We found that most gene properties, such as evolutionary rate (measured through the percent average of pairwise identity across taxa) and total tree length, were highly correlated with each other. Similarly, several gene properties, such as gene alignment length, Guanine-Cytosine content, and the proportion of tree distance on internal branches divided by relative composition variability (treeness/RCV), were strongly correlated with phylogenetic signal. Analysis of partial correlations between gene properties and phylogenetic signal in which gene evolutionary rate and alignment length were simultaneously controlled, showed similar patterns of correlations, albeit weaker in strength. Examination of the relative importance of each gene property on phylogenetic signal identified gene alignment length, alongside with number of parsimony-informative sites and variable sites, as the most important predictors. Interestingly, the subsets of gene properties that optimally predicted phylogenetic signal differed considerably across our three phylogenetic measures and two data sets; however, gene alignment length and RCV were consistently included as predictors of all three phylogenetic measures in both yeasts and mammals. These results suggest that a handful of sequence-based gene properties are reliable predictors of phylogenetic signal

  2. A Genome-Scale Investigation of How Sequence, Function, and Tree-Based Gene Properties Influence Phylogenetic Inference.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xing-Xing; Salichos, Leonidas; Rokas, Antonis

    2016-01-01

    Molecular phylogenetic inference is inherently dependent on choices in both methodology and data. Many insightful studies have shown how choices in methodology, such as the model of sequence evolution or optimality criterion used, can strongly influence inference. In contrast, much less is known about the impact of choices in the properties of the data, typically genes, on phylogenetic inference. We investigated the relationships between 52 gene properties (24 sequence-based, 19 function-based, and 9 tree-based) with each other and with three measures of phylogenetic signal in two assembled data sets of 2,832 yeast and 2,002 mammalian genes. We found that most gene properties, such as evolutionary rate (measured through the percent average of pairwise identity across taxa) and total tree length, were highly correlated with each other. Similarly, several gene properties, such as gene alignment length, Guanine-Cytosine content, and the proportion of tree distance on internal branches divided by relative composition variability (treeness/RCV), were strongly correlated with phylogenetic signal. Analysis of partial correlations between gene properties and phylogenetic signal in which gene evolutionary rate and alignment length were simultaneously controlled, showed similar patterns of correlations, albeit weaker in strength. Examination of the relative importance of each gene property on phylogenetic signal identified gene alignment length, alongside with number of parsimony-informative sites and variable sites, as the most important predictors. Interestingly, the subsets of gene properties that optimally predicted phylogenetic signal differed considerably across our three phylogenetic measures and two data sets; however, gene alignment length and RCV were consistently included as predictors of all three phylogenetic measures in both yeasts and mammals. These results suggest that a handful of sequence-based gene properties are reliable predictors of phylogenetic signal

  3. Presence of the propeptide on recombinant lysosomal dipeptidase controls both activation and dimerization.

    PubMed

    Dolenc, Iztok; Pain, Roger; Turk, Vito

    2007-01-01

    Lysosomal dipeptidase catalyzes the hydrolysis of dipeptides with unsubstituted terminals. It is a homodimer and binds zinc. Dimerization is an important issue in understanding the enzyme's function. In this study, we investigated the influence of the propeptide on the folding and dimerization of recombinant lysosomal dipeptidase. For this purpose, we separately cloned and overexpressed the mature protein and the proenzyme. The overexpressed proteins were localized exclusively to insoluble inclusion bodies. Refolding of the urea-solubilized inclusion bodies showed that only dipeptidase lacking the propeptide was dimeric. The soluble renatured proenzyme was a monomer, although circular dichroism and fluorescence spectra of the proenzyme indicated the formation of secondary and tertiary structure. The propeptide thus controls dimerization, as well as activation, of lysosomal dipeptidase.

  4. Ratchet rotation of a 3D dimer on a vibrating plate.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiao; Liu, Caishan; Jia, Yan-Bin; Ma, Daolin

    2014-01-01

    This work studies the dynamics of a 3D dimer bouncing upon a horizontal plate undergoing a vertical harmonic vibration. Despite complex interactions within the system due to impacts and friction, numerical simulation shows that, under certain conditions prescribed for the dynamics, the center of mass of the dimer, when projected onto a horizontal plane, will follow a circular orbit. The phenomenon is like a particle under Coulomb friction performing a ratchet motion that rotates around. Investigations further reveal that the dimer dynamics bear some typical characteristics of a nonlinear system, including sensitivity to the initial conditions and bifurcation behaviors related to the physical parameters of the dynamics. Our results indicate that the coefficient of restitution and the plate's vibration intensity play critical roles in exciting the circular orbit, while the dimer's geometry and the vibration frequency mainly influence the trajectory characteristics. These findings may help understand transport mechanisms underlying systems of granular matter with anisotropic particles. PMID:24458553

  5. Comprehensive prediction of chromosome dimer resolution sites in bacterial genomes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background During the replication process of bacteria with circular chromosomes, an odd number of homologous recombination events results in concatenated dimer chromosomes that cannot be partitioned into daughter cells. However, many bacteria harbor a conserved dimer resolution machinery consisting of one or two tyrosine recombinases, XerC and XerD, and their 28-bp target site, dif. Results To study the evolution of the dif/XerCD system and its relationship with replication termination, we report the comprehensive prediction of dif sequences in silico using a phylogenetic prediction approach based on iterated hidden Markov modeling. Using this method, dif sites were identified in 641 organisms among 16 phyla, with a 97.64% identification rate for single-chromosome strains. The dif sequence positions were shown to be strongly correlated with the GC skew shift-point that is induced by replicational mutation/selection pressures, but the difference in the positions of the predicted dif sites and the GC skew shift-points did not correlate with the degree of replicational mutation/selection pressures. Conclusions The sequence of dif sites is widely conserved among many bacterial phyla, and they can be computationally identified using our method. The lack of correlation between dif position and the degree of GC skew suggests that replication termination does not occur strictly at dif sites. PMID:21223577

  6. dimerization and DNA binding alter phosphorylation of Fos and Jun

    SciTech Connect

    Abate, C.; Baker, S.J.; Curran, T. ); Lees-Miller, S.P.; Anderson, C.W. ); Marshak, D.R. )

    1993-07-15

    Fos and Jun form dimeric complexes that bind to activator protein 1 (AP-1) DNA sequences and regulate gene expression. The levels of expression and activities of these proteins are regulated by a variety of extracellular stimuli. They are thought to function in nuclear signal transduction processes in many different cell types. The role of Fos and Jun in gene transcription is complex and may be regulated in several ways including association with different dimerization partners, interactions with other transcription factors, effects on DNA topology, and reduction/oxidation of a conserved cysteine residue in the DNA-binding domain. In addition, phosphorylation has been suggested to control the activity of Fos and Jun. Here the authors show that phosphorylation of Fos and Jun by several protein kinases is affected by dimerization and binding to DNA. Jun homodimers are phosphorylated efficiently by casein kinase II, whereas Fos-Jun heterodimers are not. DNA binding also reduces phosphorylation of Jun by casein kinase II, p34[sup cdc2] (cdc2) kinase, and protein kinase C. Phosphorylation of Fos by cAMP-dependent protein kinase and cdc2 is relatively insensitive to dimerization and DNA binding, whereas phosphorylation of Fos and Jun by DNA-dependent protein kinase is dramatically stimulated by binding to the AP-1 site. These results imply that different protein kinases can distinguish among Fos and Jun proteins in the form of monomers, homodimers, and heterodimers and between DNA-bound and non-DNA-bound proteins. Thus, potentially, these different states of Fos and Jun can be recognized and regulated independently by phosphorylation. 44 refs., 4 figs.

  7. Saccades Influence the Visibility of Targets in Rapid Stimulus Sequences: The Roles of Mislocalization, Retinal Distance and Remapping

    PubMed Central

    Fracasso, Alessio; Melcher, David

    2016-01-01

    Briefly presented targets around the time of a saccade are mislocalized towards the saccadic landing point. This has been taken as evidence for a remapping mechanism that accompanies each eye movement, helping maintain visual stability across large retinal shifts. Previous studies have shown that spatial mislocalization is greatly diminished when trains of brief stimuli are presented at a high frequency rate, which might help to explain why mislocalization is rarely perceived in everyday viewing. Studies in the laboratory have shown that mislocalization can reduce metacontrast masking by causing target stimuli in a masking sequence to be perceived as shifted in space towards the saccadic target and thus more easily discriminated. We investigated the influence of saccades on target discrimination when target and masks were presented in a rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP), as well as with forward masking and with backward masking. In a series of experiments, we found that performance was influenced by the retinal displacement caused by the saccade itself but that an additional component of un-masking occurred even when the retinal location of target and mask was matched. These results speak in favor of a remapping mechanism that begins before the eyes start moving and continues well beyond saccadic termination. PMID:27445718

  8. Saccades Influence the Visibility of Targets in Rapid Stimulus Sequences: The Roles of Mislocalization, Retinal Distance and Remapping.

    PubMed

    Fracasso, Alessio; Melcher, David

    2016-01-01

    Briefly presented targets around the time of a saccade are mislocalized towards the saccadic landing point. This has been taken as evidence for a remapping mechanism that accompanies each eye movement, helping maintain visual stability across large retinal shifts. Previous studies have shown that spatial mislocalization is greatly diminished when trains of brief stimuli are presented at a high frequency rate, which might help to explain why mislocalization is rarely perceived in everyday viewing. Studies in the laboratory have shown that mislocalization can reduce metacontrast masking by causing target stimuli in a masking sequence to be perceived as shifted in space towards the saccadic target and thus more easily discriminated. We investigated the influence of saccades on target discrimination when target and masks were presented in a rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP), as well as with forward masking and with backward masking. In a series of experiments, we found that performance was influenced by the retinal displacement caused by the saccade itself but that an additional component of un-masking occurred even when the retinal location of target and mask was matched. These results speak in favor of a remapping mechanism that begins before the eyes start moving and continues well beyond saccadic termination. PMID:27445718

  9. Replication fork bypass of a pyrimidine dimer blocking leading strand DNA synthesis.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro-Stone, M; Zaritskaya, L S; Price, L K; Kaufmann, W K

    1997-05-23

    We constructed a double-stranded plasmid containing a single cis, syn-cyclobutane thymine dimer (T[c,s]T) 385 base pairs from the center of the SV40 origin of replication. This circular DNA was replicated in vitro by extracts from several types of human cells. The dimer was placed on the leading strand template of the first replication fork to encounter the lesion. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of replication intermediates documented the transient arrest of the replication fork by the dimer. Movement of the replication fork beyond the dimer was recognized by the appearance of a single fork arc in DNA sequences located between the T[c,s]T and the half-way point around the circular template (180 degrees from the origin). Upon completion of plasmid replication, the T[c,s]T was detected by T4 endonuclease V in about one-half (46 +/- 9%) of the closed circular daughter molecules. Our results demonstrate that extracts prepared from HeLa cells and SV40-transformed human fibroblasts (SV80, IDH4), including a cell line defective in nucleotide-excision repair (XPA), were competent for leading strand DNA synthesis opposite the pyrimidine dimer and replication fork bypass. In contrast, dimer bypass was severely impaired in otherwise replication-competent extracts from two different xeroderma pigmentosum variant cell lines.

  10. The in vitro loose dimer structure and rearrangements of the HIV-2 leader RNA

    PubMed Central

    Purzycka, Katarzyna J.; Pachulska-Wieczorek, Katarzyna; Adamiak, Ryszard W.

    2011-01-01

    RNA dimerization is an essential step in the retroviral life cycle. Dimerization and encapsidation signals, closely linked in HIV-2, are located in the leader RNA region. The SL1 motif and nucleocapsid protein are considered important for both processes. In this study, we show the structure of the HIV-2 leader RNA (+1–560) captured as a loose dimer. Potential structural rearrangements within the leader RNA were studied. In the loose dimer form, the HIV-2 leader RNA strand exists in vitro as a single global fold. Two kissing loop interfaces within the loose dimer were identified: SL1/SL1 and TAR/TAR. Evidence for these findings is provided by RNA probing using SHAPE, chemical reagents, enzymes, non-denaturing PAGE mobility assays, antisense oligonucleotides hybridization and analysis of an RNA mutant. Both TAR and SL1 as isolated domains are bound by recombinant NCp8 protein with high affinity, contrary to the hairpins downstream of SL1. Foot-printing of the SL1/NCp8 complex indicates that the major binding site maps to the SL1 upper stem. Taken together, these data suggest a model in which TAR hairpin III, the segment of SL1 proximal to the loop and the PAL palindromic sequence play specific roles in the initiation of dimerization. PMID:21622659

  11. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae Swi/Snf complex can catalyze formation of dimeric nucleosome structures in vitro.

    PubMed

    Krajewski, Wladyslaw A; Vassiliev, Oleg L

    2010-08-10

    The Swi/Snf chromatin-remodeling complexes, human BAF/PBAF and yeast RSC, can catalyze formation of stably altered dimeric forms of nucleosomes. However, the ability to create remodeled dimers has not yet been reported for the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Swi/Snf complex. Despite its similarity with the other Swi/Snf proteins, the yeast Swi/Snf complex features certain structural and functional differences. This raises the question of whether ySwi/Snf can in fact catalyze formation of dimeric nucleosomes. Dimer formation was proposed to have a specific impact on chromatin regulatory effects. Thus, the answer to the above question may be helpful in clarifying the ySwi/Snf functions in vivo and generalizing the notions of the regulatory principles of Swi/Snf family proteins. Here we describe ySwi/Snf-catalyzed formation of nucleosome dimers using mono- and dinucleosome templates assembled from purified histones and DNA of the high-affinity (601) nucleosome positioning sequence. We evaluated effects of nucleosome template geometry on the formation of altered dimers and assayed formation of altered nucleosome pairs on reconstituted dinucleosomes.

  12. Vibrational coupling in carboxylic acid dimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandi, Chayan K.; Hazra, Montu K.; Chakraborty, Tapas

    2005-09-01

    The vibrational level splitting in the ground electronic state of carboxylic acid dimers mediated by the doubly hydrogen-bonded networks are investigated using pure and mixed dimers of benzoic acid with formic acid as molecular prototypes. Within the 0-2000-cm-1 range, the frequencies for the fundamental and combination vibrations of the two dimers are experimentally measured by using dispersed fluorescence spectroscopy in a supersonic jet expansion. Density-functional-theory calculations predict that most of the dimer vibrations are essentially in-phase and out-of-phase combinations of the monomer modes, and many of such combinations show significantly large splitting in vibrational frequencies. The infrared spectrum of the jet-cooled benzoic acid dimer, reported recently by Bakker et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 119, 11180 (2003)], has been used along with the dispersed fluorescence spectra to analyze the coupled g-u vibrational levels. Assignments of the dispersed fluorescence spectra of the mixed dimer are suggested by comparing the vibronic features with those in the homodimer spectrum and the predictions of density-functional-theory calculation. The fluorescence spectra measured by excitations of the low-lying single vibronic levels of the mixed dimer reveal that the hydrogen-bond vibrations are extensively mixed with the ring modes in the S1 surface.

  13. Vibrational coupling in carboxylic acid dimers.

    PubMed

    Nandi, Chayan K; Hazra, Montu K; Chakraborty, Tapas

    2005-09-22

    The vibrational level splitting in the ground electronic state of carboxylic acid dimers mediated by the doubly hydrogen-bonded networks are investigated using pure and mixed dimers of benzoic acid with formic acid as molecular prototypes. Within the 0-2000-cm(-1) range, the frequencies for the fundamental and combination vibrations of the two dimers are experimentally measured by using dispersed fluorescence spectroscopy in a supersonic jet expansion. Density-functional-theory calculations predict that most of the dimer vibrations are essentially in-phase and out-of-phase combinations of the monomer modes, and many of such combinations show significantly large splitting in vibrational frequencies. The infrared spectrum of the jet-cooled benzoic acid dimer, reported recently by Bakker et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 119, 11180 (2003)], has been used along with the dispersed fluorescence spectra to analyze the coupled g-u vibrational levels. Assignments of the dispersed fluorescence spectra of the mixed dimer are suggested by comparing the vibronic features with those in the homodimer spectrum and the predictions of density-functional-theory calculation. The fluorescence spectra measured by excitations of the low-lying single vibronic levels of the mixed dimer reveal that the hydrogen-bond vibrations are extensively mixed with the ring modes in the S1 surface. PMID:16392485

  14. Coiled-Coil–Mediated Dimerization Is Not Required for Myosin VI to Stabilize Actin during Spermatid Individualization in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Noguchi, Tatsuhiko; Frank, Deborah J.; Isaji, Mamiko

    2009-01-01

    Myosin VI is a pointed-end–directed actin motor that is thought to function as both a transporter of cargoes and an anchor, capable of binding cellular components to actin for long periods. Dimerization via a predicted coiled coil was hypothesized to regulate activity and motor properties. However, the importance of the coiled-coil sequence has not been tested in vivo. We used myosin VI's well-defined role in actin stabilization during Drosophila spermatid individualization to test the importance in vivo of the predicted coiled coil. If myosin VI functions as a dimer, a forced dimer should fully rescue myosin VI loss of function defects, including actin stabilization, actin cone movement, and cytoplasmic exclusion by the cones. Conversely, a molecule lacking the coiled coil should not rescue at all. Surprisingly, neither prediction was correct, because each rescued partially and the molecule lacking the coiled coil functioned better than the forced dimer. In extracts, no cross-linking into higher molecular weight forms indicative of dimerization was observed. In addition, a sequence required for altering nucleotide kinetics to make myosin VI dimers processive is not required for myosin VI's actin stabilization function. We conclude that myosin VI does not need to dimerize via the predicted coiled coil to stabilize actin in vivo. PMID:19005209

  15. Spin 3/2 dimer model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rachel, S.

    2009-05-01

    We present a parent Hamiltonian for weakly dimerized valence bond solid states for arbitrary half-integral S. While the model reduces for S=1/2 to the Majumdar-Ghosh Hamiltonian, we discuss this model and its properties for S=3/2. Its degenerate ground state is the most popular toy model state for discussing dimerization in spin 3/2 chains. In particular, it describes the impurity-induced dimer phase in Cr8Ni as proposed recently. We point out that the explicit construction of the Hamiltonian and its main features apply to arbitrary half-integral spin S.

  16. Quantum dimer model for the pseudogap metal

    PubMed Central

    Punk, Matthias; Allais, Andrea; Sachdev, Subir

    2015-01-01

    We propose a quantum dimer model for the metallic state of the hole-doped cuprates at low hole density, p. The Hilbert space is spanned by spinless, neutral, bosonic dimers and spin S=1/2, charge +e fermionic dimers. The model realizes a “fractionalized Fermi liquid” with no symmetry breaking and small hole pocket Fermi surfaces enclosing a total area determined by p. Exact diagonalization, on lattices of sizes up to 8×8, shows anisotropic quasiparticle residue around the pocket Fermi surfaces. We discuss the relationship to experiments. PMID:26195771

  17. Biomimetic synthesis of active isorhapontigenin dimers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xian-Fen; Zhang, Yuan; Lin, Ming-Bao; Hou, Qi; Yao, Chun-Suo; Shi, Jian-Gong

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic isorhapontigenin was treated with several kinds of inorganic reagents and peroxidase so as to prepare active stilbene dimers. Among them, silver acetate in methanol gave two new isorhapontigenin dimers 4 and 5, together with four known natural stilbene dimers 2, 3, 6, and 7. Their structures and relative configurations were determined on the basis of spectral analysis, and their possible formation mechanisms were discussed, respectively. Compounds 2, 6, and 7 were artificially synthesized for the first time. All the products were evaluated for anti-inflammatory activities.

  18. Independent Relationship between Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) Dimerization and γ-Secretase Processivity

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Joo In; Premraj, Sasha; Cruz, Pedro E.; Ladd, Thomas B.; Kwak, Yewon; Koo, Edward H.; Felsenstein, Kevin M.; Golde, Todd E.; Ran, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Altered production of β-amyloid (Aβ) from the amyloid precursor protein (APP) is closely associated with Alzheimer’s disease (AD). APP has a number of homo- and hetero-dimerizing domains, and studies have suggested that dimerization of β-secretase derived APP carboxyl terminal fragment (CTFβ, C99) impairs processive cleavage by γ-secretase increasing production of long Aβs (e.g., Aβ1-42, 43). Other studies report that APP CTFβ dimers are not γ-secretase substrates. We revisited this issue due to observations made with an artificial APP mutant referred to as 3xK-APP, which contains three lysine residues at the border of the APP ectodomain and transmembrane domain (TMD). This mutant, which dramatically increases production of long Aβ, was found to form SDS-stable APP dimers, once again suggesting a mechanistic link between dimerization and increased production of long Aβ. To further evaluate how multimerization of substrate affects both initial γ-secretase cleavage and subsequent processivity, we generated recombinant wild type- (WT) and 3xK-C100 substrates, isolated monomeric, dimeric and trimeric forms of these proteins, and evaluated both ε-cleavage site utilization and Aβ production. These show that multimerization significantly impedes γ-secretase cleavage, irrespective of substrate sequence. Further, the monomeric form of the 3xK-C100 mutant increased long Aβ production without altering the initial ε-cleavage utilization. These data confirm and extend previous studies showing that dimeric substrates are not efficient γ-secretase substrates, and demonstrate that primary sequence determinants within APP substrate alter γ-secretase processivity. PMID:25350374

  19. Loop Sequence Context Influences the Formation and Stability of the i-Motif for DNA Oligomers of Sequence (CCCXXX)4, where X = A and/or T, under Slightly Acidic Conditions.

    PubMed

    McKim, Mikeal; Buxton, Alexander; Johnson, Courtney; Metz, Amanda; Sheardy, Richard D

    2016-08-11

    The structure and stability of DNA is highly dependent upon the sequence context of the bases (A, G, C, and T) and the environment under which the DNA is prepared (e.g., buffer, temperature, pH, ionic strength). Understanding the factors that influence structure and stability of the i-motif conformation can lead to the design of DNA sequences with highly tunable properties. We have been investigating the influence of pH and temperature on the conformations and stabilities for all permutations of the DNA sequence (CCCXXX)4, where X = A and/or T, using spectroscopic approaches. All oligomers undergo transitions from single-stranded structures at pH 7.0 to i-motif conformations at pH 5.0 as evidenced by circular dichroism (CD) studies. These folded structures possess stacked C:CH(+) base pairs joined by loops of 5'-XXX-3'. Although the pH at the midpoint of the transition (pHmp) varies slightly with loop sequence, the linkage between pH and log K for the proton induced transition is highly loop sequence dependent. All oligomers also undergo the thermally induced i-motif to single-strand transition at pH 5.0 as the temperature is increased from 25 to 95 °C. The temperature at the midpoint of this transition (Tm) is also highly dependent on loop sequence context effects. For seven of eight possible permutations, the pH induced, and thermally induced transitions appear to be highly cooperative and two state. Analysis of the CD optical melting profiles via a van't Hoff approach reveals sequence-dependent thermodynamic parameters for the unfolding as well. Together, these data reveal that the i-motif conformation exhibits exquisite sensitivity to loop sequence context with respect to formation and stability. PMID:27438583

  20. Quantitative analysis of cyclic dimer fatty acid content in the dimerization product by proton NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyun Joo; Kim, Minyoung; Seok, Seunghwan; Kim, Young-Wun; Kim, Do Hyun

    2015-01-01

    In this work, (1)H NMR is utilized for the quantitative analysis of a specific cyclic dimer fatty acid in a dimer acid mixture using the pseudo-standard material of mesitylene on the basis of its structural similarity. Mesitylene and cyclic dimer acid levels were determined using the signal of the proton on the cyclic ring (δ=6.8) referenced to the signal of maleic acid (δ=6.2). The content of the cyclic dimer fatty acid was successfully determined through the standard curve of mesitylene and the reported equation. Using the linearity of the mesitylene curve, the cyclic dimer fatty acid in the oil mixture was quantified. The results suggest that the proposed method can be used to quantify cyclic compounds in mixtures to optimize the dimerization process.

  1. Multiple-charge transfer and trapping in DNA dimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tornow, Sabine; Bulla, Ralf; Anders, Frithjof B.; Zwicknagl, Gertrud

    2010-11-01

    We investigate the charge transfer characteristics of one and two excess charges in a DNA base-pair dimer using a model Hamiltonian approach. The electron part comprises diagonal and off-diagonal Coulomb matrix elements such a correlated hopping and the bond-bond interaction, which were recently calculated by Starikov [E. B. Starikov, Philos. Mag. Lett. 83, 699 (2003)10.1080/0950083031000151374] for different DNA dimers. The electronic degrees of freedom are coupled to an ohmic or a superohmic bath serving as dissipative environment. We employ the numerical renormalization group method in the nuclear tunneling regime and compare the results to Marcus theory for the thermal activation regime. For realistic parameters, the rate that at least one charge is transferred from the donor to the acceptor in the subspace of two excess electrons significantly exceeds the rate in the single charge sector. Moreover, the dynamics is strongly influenced by the Coulomb matrix elements. We find sequential and pair transfer as well as a regime where both charges remain self-trapped. The transfer rate reaches its maximum when the difference of the on-site and intersite Coulomb matrix element is equal to the reorganization energy which is the case in a guanine/cytosine (GC)-dimer. Charge transfer is completely suppressed for two excess electrons in adenine/thymine (AT)-dimer in an ohmic bath and replaced by damped coherent electron-pair oscillations in a superohmic bath. A finite bond-bond interaction W alters the transfer rate: it increases as function of W when the effective Coulomb repulsion exceeds the reorganization energy (inverted regime) and decreases for smaller Coulomb repulsion.

  2. Lipid-directed vinculin dimerization.

    PubMed

    Chinthalapudi, Krishna; Patil, Dipak N; Rangarajan, Erumbi S; Rader, Christoph; Izard, Tina

    2015-05-01

    Vinculin localizes to cellular adhesions where it regulates motility, migration, development, wound healing, and response to force. Importantly, vinculin loss results in cancer phenotypes, cardiovascular disease, and embryonic lethality. At the plasma cell membrane, the most abundant phosphoinositide, phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2), binds the vinculin tail domain, Vt, and triggers homotypic and heterotypic interactions that amplify binding of vinculin to the actin network. Binding of PIP2 to Vt is necessary for maintaining optimal focal adhesions, for organizing stress fibers, for cell migration and spreading, and for the control of vinculin dynamics and turnover of focal adhesions. While the recently determined Vt/PIP2 crystal structure revealed the conformational changes occurring upon lipid binding and oligomerization, characterization of PIP2-induced vinculin oligomerization has been challenging in the adhesion biology field. Here, via a series of novel biochemical assays not performed in previous studies that relied on chemical cross-linking, we characterize the PIP2-induced vinculin oligomerization. Our results show that Vt/PIP2 forms a tight dimer with Vt or with the muscle-specific vinculin isoform, metavinculin, at sites of adhesion at the cell membrane. Insight into how PIP2 regulates clustering and into mechanisms that regulate cell adhesion allows the development for a more definite sensor for PIP2, and our developed techniques can be applied generally and thus open the door for the characterization of many other protein/PIP2 complexes under physiological conditions. PMID:25880222

  3. Lipid-directed vinculin dimerization.

    PubMed

    Chinthalapudi, Krishna; Patil, Dipak N; Rangarajan, Erumbi S; Rader, Christoph; Izard, Tina

    2015-05-01

    Vinculin localizes to cellular adhesions where it regulates motility, migration, development, wound healing, and response to force. Importantly, vinculin loss results in cancer phenotypes, cardiovascular disease, and embryonic lethality. At the plasma cell membrane, the most abundant phosphoinositide, phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2), binds the vinculin tail domain, Vt, and triggers homotypic and heterotypic interactions that amplify binding of vinculin to the actin network. Binding of PIP2 to Vt is necessary for maintaining optimal focal adhesions, for organizing stress fibers, for cell migration and spreading, and for the control of vinculin dynamics and turnover of focal adhesions. While the recently determined Vt/PIP2 crystal structure revealed the conformational changes occurring upon lipid binding and oligomerization, characterization of PIP2-induced vinculin oligomerization has been challenging in the adhesion biology field. Here, via a series of novel biochemical assays not performed in previous studies that relied on chemical cross-linking, we characterize the PIP2-induced vinculin oligomerization. Our results show that Vt/PIP2 forms a tight dimer with Vt or with the muscle-specific vinculin isoform, metavinculin, at sites of adhesion at the cell membrane. Insight into how PIP2 regulates clustering and into mechanisms that regulate cell adhesion allows the development for a more definite sensor for PIP2, and our developed techniques can be applied generally and thus open the door for the characterization of many other protein/PIP2 complexes under physiological conditions.

  4. 21 CFR 176.120 - Alkyl ketene dimers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Alkyl ketene dimers. 176.120 Section 176.120 Food... Use Only as Components of Paper and Paperboard § 176.120 Alkyl ketene dimers. Alkyl ketene dimers may... section. (a) The alkyl ketene dimers are manufactured by the dehydrohalogenation of the acyl...

  5. 21 CFR 176.120 - Alkyl ketene dimers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Alkyl ketene dimers. 176.120 Section 176.120 Food... Paperboard § 176.120 Alkyl ketene dimers. Alkyl ketene dimers may be safely used as a component of articles..., transporting, or holding food, subject to the provisions of this section. (a) The alkyl ketene dimers...

  6. 21 CFR 176.120 - Alkyl ketene dimers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Alkyl ketene dimers. 176.120 Section 176.120 Food... Use Only as Components of Paper and Paperboard § 176.120 Alkyl ketene dimers. Alkyl ketene dimers may... section. (a) The alkyl ketene dimers are manufactured by the dehydrohalogenation of the acyl...

  7. 21 CFR 176.120 - Alkyl ketene dimers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Alkyl ketene dimers. 176.120 Section 176.120 Food... Use Only as Components of Paper and Paperboard § 176.120 Alkyl ketene dimers. Alkyl ketene dimers may... section. (a) The alkyl ketene dimers are manufactured by the dehydrohalogenation of the acyl...

  8. 21 CFR 176.120 - Alkyl ketene dimers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Alkyl ketene dimers. 176.120 Section 176.120 Food... Use Only as Components of Paper and Paperboard § 176.120 Alkyl ketene dimers. Alkyl ketene dimers may... section. (a) The alkyl ketene dimers are manufactured by the dehydrohalogenation of the acyl...

  9. The two-state dimer receptor model: a general model for receptor dimers.

    PubMed

    Franco, Rafael; Casadó, Vicent; Mallol, Josefa; Ferrada, Carla; Ferré, Sergi; Fuxe, Kjell; Cortés, Antoni; Ciruela, Francisco; Lluis, Carmen; Canela, Enric I

    2006-06-01

    Nonlinear Scatchard plots are often found for agonist binding to G-protein-coupled receptors. Because there is clear evidence of receptor dimerization, these nonlinear Scatchard plots can reflect cooperativity on agonist binding to the two binding sites in the dimer. According to this, the "two-state dimer receptor model" has been recently derived. In this article, the performance of the model has been analyzed in fitting data of agonist binding to A(1) adenosine receptors, which are an example of receptor displaying concave downward Scatchard plots. Analysis of agonist/antagonist competition data for dopamine D(1) receptors using the two-state dimer receptor model has also been performed. Although fitting to the two-state dimer receptor model was similar to the fitting to the "two-independent-site receptor model", the former is simpler, and a discrimination test selects the two-state dimer receptor model as the best. This model was also very robust in fitting data of estrogen binding to the estrogen receptor, for which Scatchard plots are concave upward. On the one hand, the model would predict the already demonstrated existence of estrogen receptor dimers. On the other hand, the model would predict that concave upward Scatchard plots reflect positive cooperativity, which can be neither predicted nor explained by assuming the existence of two different affinity states. In summary, the two-state dimer receptor model is good for fitting data of binding to dimeric receptors displaying either linear, concave upward, or concave downward Scatchard plots.

  10. DNA targeting and cleavage by an engineered metalloprotein dimer.

    PubMed

    Wong-Deyrup, Siu Wah; Prasannan, Charulata; Dupureur, Cynthia M; Franklin, Sonya J

    2012-03-01

    Nature has illustrated through numerous examples that protein dimerization has structural and functional advantages. We previously reported the design and characterization of an engineered "metallohomeodomain" protein (C2) based on a chimera of the EF-hand Ca-binding motif and the helix-turn-helix motif of homeodomains (Lim and Franklin in Protein Sci. 15:2159-2165, 2004). This small metalloprotein binds the hard metal ions Ca(II) and Ln(III) and interacts with DNA with modest sequence preference and affinity, yet exhibits only residual DNA cleavage activity. Here we have achieved substantial improvement in function by constructing a covalent dimer of this C2 module (F2) to create a larger multidomain protein. As assayed via fluorescence spectroscopy, this F2 protein binds Ca(II) more avidly (25-fold) than C2 on a per-domain basis; in gel shift selection experiments, metallated F2 exhibits a specificity toward 5'-TAATTA-3' sequences. Finally, Ca(2)F2 cleaves plasmid DNA and generates a linear product in a Ca(II)-dependent way, unlike the CaC2 monomer. To the best of our knowledge this activation of Ca(II) in the context of an EF-hand binding motif is unique and represents a significant step forward in the design of artificial metallonucleases by utilizing biologically significant metal ions.

  11. Neonatal Mandibular Distraction Osteogenesis Reduces Cleft Palate Width and Lengthens Soft Palate, Influencing Palatoplasty in Patients With Pierre Robin Sequence.

    PubMed

    Collares, Marcus V M; Duarte, Daniele W; Sobral, Davi S; Portinho, Ciro P; Faller, Gustavo J; Fraga, Mariana M

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of neonatal mandibular distraction osteogenesis (MDO) on cleft dimensions and on early palatoplasty outcomes in patients with Pierre Robin Sequence (PRS). In a prospective cohort study that enrolled 24 nonsyndromic patients with PRS, 12 submitted to the MDO group and 12 patients not treated (non-MDO group), the authors compared patients for cleft palate dimensions through 7 morphometric measurements at the moment of palatoplasty and for early palatoplasty outcomes. At palatoplasty, the MDO group presented a significant shorter distance between the posterior nasal spines (PNS-PNS, P < 0.001) and between uvular bases (UB-UB, P < 0.001), representing a reduction in cleft palate width. They also had significant soft palate lengthening represented by a larger distance between UB and retromolar space (UB-RM, P < 0.001) and UB and PNS (UB-PNS, P = 0.014). Their UB moved away from the posterior wall of the nasopharynx (UB-NPH, P < 0.001). The MDO group had a length of operative time significantly shorter (P < 0.001) and no early palatoplasty complications compared with the non-MDO group. In conclusion, MDO acted as an orthopedic procedure that reduced cleft palate width and elongated the soft palate in patients with PRS. These modifications enabled a reduction of around 11% in the length of operative time of palatoplasty (P < 0.001).

  12. Comparability of D-dimer assays in clinical samples.

    PubMed

    Freyburger, Geneviève; Labrouche, Sylvie

    2005-11-01

    D-dimers (DD) have shown sufficient proof of their efficiency in the last 10 years to play an important role in hemostasis laboratories for excluding thromboembolic events. Numerous reagents are available on the market but their performances differ. This overview takes stock of the methods used to evaluate the performances of DD assays, the results published in the literature, the technical parameters influencing assay performance, the difficulties caused by the lack of harmonization of DD units, and the attempts to tackle this problem. It raises the issue of the potential optimization of their use with regard to better adaptation to multidisciplinary diagnostic strategies and to target patient populations. PMID:16302154

  13. Hydrogen bonding inside and outside carbon nanotubes: HF dimer as a case study.

    PubMed

    Roztoczyńska, Agnieszka; Kozłowska, Justyna; Lipkowski, Paweł; Bartkowiak, Wojciech

    2016-01-28

    In this theoretical work we analyze the noncovalent interactions of molecular complexes formed between the hydrogen bonded HF dimer and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) of different diameters. In particular, the interaction energies of: (i) spatially confined hydrogen fluoride molecules and (ii) HF dimer and the exterior or interior of SWCNTs are investigated. The computations are carried out in a supermolecular manner using the M06-2X exchange-correlation functional. In order to establish the influence of mutual orientation of the hydrogen fluoride dimer and molecular carbon cages on the analyzed energetic parameters energy scans are performed. Furthermore, changes in the charge distribution of the investigated endo- and exohedral complexes are studied employing the Natural Bond Orbital analysis. Among others, the position of the HF dimer with respect to the carbon cages proves to have a significant influence on the analyzed quantities. The results of our study also indicate that the HF dimer interacts stronger with the interior rather than the exterior of SWCNTs. Moreover, a substantial enhancement of the basis set superposition error is disclosed. PMID:26701220

  14. Chiral and Achiral Nanodumbbell Dimers: The Effect of Geometry on Plasmonic Properties.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kyle W; Zhao, Hangqi; Zhang, Hui; Sánchez-Iglesias, Ana; Grzelczak, Marek; Wang, Yumin; Chang, Wei-Shun; Nordlander, Peter; Liz-Marzán, Luis M; Link, Stephan

    2016-06-28

    Metal nanoparticles with a dumbbell-like geometry have plasmonic properties similar to those of their nanorod counterparts, but the unique steric constraints induced by their enlarged tips result in distinct geometries when self-assembled. Here, we investigate gold dumbbells that are assembled into dimers within polymeric micelles. A single-particle approach with correlated scanning electron microscopy and dark-field scattering spectroscopy reveals the effects of dimer geometry variation on the scattering properties. The dimers are prepared using exclusively achiral reagents, and the resulting dimer solution produces no detectable ensemble circular dichroism response. However, single-particle circular differential scattering measurements uncover that this dimer sample is a racemic mixture of individual nanostructures with significant positive and negative chiroptical signals. These measurements are complemented with detailed simulations that confirm the influence of various symmetry elements on the overall peak resonance energy, spectral line shape, and circular differential scattering response. This work expands the current understanding of the influence self-assembled geometries have on plasmonic properties, particularly with regard to chiral and/or racemic samples which may have significant optical activity that may be overlooked when using exclusively ensemble characterization techniques. PMID:27172606

  15. Chiral and Achiral Nanodumbbell Dimers: The Effect of Geometry on Plasmonic Properties.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kyle W; Zhao, Hangqi; Zhang, Hui; Sánchez-Iglesias, Ana; Grzelczak, Marek; Wang, Yumin; Chang, Wei-Shun; Nordlander, Peter; Liz-Marzán, Luis M; Link, Stephan

    2016-06-28

    Metal nanoparticles with a dumbbell-like geometry have plasmonic properties similar to those of their nanorod counterparts, but the unique steric constraints induced by their enlarged tips result in distinct geometries when self-assembled. Here, we investigate gold dumbbells that are assembled into dimers within polymeric micelles. A single-particle approach with correlated scanning electron microscopy and dark-field scattering spectroscopy reveals the effects of dimer geometry variation on the scattering properties. The dimers are prepared using exclusively achiral reagents, and the resulting dimer solution produces no detectable ensemble circular dichroism response. However, single-particle circular differential scattering measurements uncover that this dimer sample is a racemic mixture of individual nanostructures with significant positive and negative chiroptical signals. These measurements are complemented with detailed simulations that confirm the influence of various symmetry elements on the overall peak resonance energy, spectral line shape, and circular differential scattering response. This work expands the current understanding of the influence self-assembled geometries have on plasmonic properties, particularly with regard to chiral and/or racemic samples which may have significant optical activity that may be overlooked when using exclusively ensemble characterization techniques.

  16. Ligand-induced Dimerization of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) Coronavirus nsp5 Protease (3CLpro)

    PubMed Central

    Tomar, Sakshi; Johnston, Melanie L.; St. John, Sarah E.; Osswald, Heather L.; Nyalapatla, Prasanth R.; Paul, Lake N.; Ghosh, Arun K.; Denison, Mark R.; Mesecar, Andrew D.

    2015-01-01

    All coronaviruses, including the recently emerged Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) from the β-CoV subgroup, require the proteolytic activity of the nsp5 protease (also known as 3C-like protease, 3CLpro) during virus replication, making it a high value target for the development of anti-coronavirus therapeutics. Kinetic studies indicate that in contrast to 3CLpro from other β-CoV 2c members, including HKU4 and HKU5, MERS-CoV 3CLpro is less efficient at processing a peptide substrate due to MERS-CoV 3CLpro being a weakly associated dimer. Conversely, HKU4, HKU5, and SARS-CoV 3CLpro enzymes are tightly associated dimers. Analytical ultracentrifugation studies support that MERS-CoV 3CLpro is a weakly associated dimer (Kd ∼52 μm) with a slow off-rate. Peptidomimetic inhibitors of MERS-CoV 3CLpro were synthesized and utilized in analytical ultracentrifugation experiments and demonstrate that MERS-CoV 3CLpro undergoes significant ligand-induced dimerization. Kinetic studies also revealed that designed reversible inhibitors act as activators at a low compound concentration as a result of induced dimerization. Primary sequence comparisons and x-ray structural analyses of two MERS-CoV 3CLpro and inhibitor complexes, determined to 1.6 Å, reveal remarkable structural similarity of the dimer interface with 3CLpro from HKU4-CoV and HKU5-CoV. Despite this structural similarity, substantial differences in the dimerization ability suggest that long range interactions by the nonconserved amino acids distant from the dimer interface may control MERS-CoV 3CLpro dimerization. Activation of MERS-CoV 3CLpro through ligand-induced dimerization appears to be unique within the genogroup 2c and may potentially increase the complexity in the development of MERS-CoV 3CLpro inhibitors as antiviral agents. PMID:26055715

  17. Orphan nuclear receptor NGFI-B forms dimers with nonclassical interface.

    PubMed

    Calgaro, Marcos R; Neto, Mario de Oliveira; Figueira, Ana Carolina M; Santos, Maria A M; Portugal, Rodrigo V; Guzzi, Carolina A; Saidemberg, Daniel M; Bleicher, Lucas; Vernal, Javier; Fernandez, Pablo; Terenzi, Hernán; Palma, Mario Sergio; Polikarpov, Igor

    2007-08-01

    The orphan receptor nerve growth factor-induced B (NGFI-B) is a member of the nuclear receptor's subfamily 4A (Nr4a). NGFI-B was shown to be capable of binding both as a monomer to an extended half-site containing a single AAAGGTCA motif and also as a homodimer to a widely separated everted repeat, as opposed to a large number of nuclear receptors that recognize and bind specific DNA sequences predominantly as homo- and/or heterodimers. To unveil the structural organization of NGFI-B in solution, we determined the quaternary structure of the NGFI-B LBD by a combination of ab initio procedures from small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) data and hydrogen-deuterium exchange followed by mass spectrometry. Here we report that the protein forms dimers in solution with a radius of gyration of 2.9 nm and maximum dimension of 9.0 nm. We also show that the NGFI-B LBD dimer is V-shaped, with the opening angle significantly larger than that of classical dimer's exemplified by estrogen receptor (ER) or retinoid X receptor (RXR). Surprisingly, NGFI-B dimers formation does not occur via the classical nuclear receptor dimerization interface exemplified by ER and RXR, but instead, involves an extended surface area composed of the loop between helices 3 and 4 and C-terminal fraction of the helix 3. Remarkably, the NGFI-B dimer interface is similar to the dimerization interface earlier revealed for glucocorticoid nuclear receptor (GR), which might be relevant to the recognition of cognate DNA response elements by NGFI-B and to antagonism of NGFI-B-dependent transcription exercised by GR in cells.

  18. Neonatal Mandibular Distraction Osteogenesis Reduces Cleft Palate Width and Lengthens Soft Palate, Influencing Palatoplasty in Patients With Pierre Robin Sequence.

    PubMed

    Collares, Marcus V M; Duarte, Daniele W; Sobral, Davi S; Portinho, Ciro P; Faller, Gustavo J; Fraga, Mariana M

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of neonatal mandibular distraction osteogenesis (MDO) on cleft dimensions and on early palatoplasty outcomes in patients with Pierre Robin Sequence (PRS). In a prospective cohort study that enrolled 24 nonsyndromic patients with PRS, 12 submitted to the MDO group and 12 patients not treated (non-MDO group), the authors compared patients for cleft palate dimensions through 7 morphometric measurements at the moment of palatoplasty and for early palatoplasty outcomes. At palatoplasty, the MDO group presented a significant shorter distance between the posterior nasal spines (PNS-PNS, P < 0.001) and between uvular bases (UB-UB, P < 0.001), representing a reduction in cleft palate width. They also had significant soft palate lengthening represented by a larger distance between UB and retromolar space (UB-RM, P < 0.001) and UB and PNS (UB-PNS, P = 0.014). Their UB moved away from the posterior wall of the nasopharynx (UB-NPH, P < 0.001). The MDO group had a length of operative time significantly shorter (P < 0.001) and no early palatoplasty complications compared with the non-MDO group. In conclusion, MDO acted as an orthopedic procedure that reduced cleft palate width and elongated the soft palate in patients with PRS. These modifications enabled a reduction of around 11% in the length of operative time of palatoplasty (P < 0.001). PMID:27315309

  19. Conversion of stable RNA hairpin to a metastable dimer in frozen solution

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xueguang; Li, J. Michael; Wartell, Roger M.

    2007-01-01

    Previous studies employing a 79-nucleotide (nt) RNA indicated that this RNA could form two bands in a native polyacrylamide gel while one band was observed in a denaturing gel. This report describes an investigation on the nature of the two corresponding structures and the segment responsible for forming the slower mobility band. Sedimentation equilibrium of the 79-nt RNA was consistent with the two gel bands corresponding to monomer and dimer forms. The portion of the RNA required for dimer formation was explored using a secondary structure prediction algorithm of two 79-nt RNAs linked in a head-to-tail fashion. The predicted structure suggested that the first 21-nt at the 5′ end of each RNA formed a self-complementary duplex. A ribonuclease H assay carried out with RNA prepared as monomer (M), or a mixture of monomer and dimer (M/D), gave results consistent with the predicted M and D structures. Gel mobility experiments on 5′ and 3′ segments of the 79-nt RNA also indicated that dimer formation was due to the 21-nt 5′ end. Studies on the 21-nt RNA molecule and sequence variants showed that this sequence can form a hairpin and a dimer complex. Unexpectedly, the hairpin to dimer conversion was shown to occur at high efficiency in frozen solution, although little or no conversion was observed above 0°C. The results indicate that a freezing environment can promote formation of intermolecular RNA complexes from stable RNA hairpins, supporting the notion that this environment could have played a role in the evolution of RNA complexity. PMID:17925345

  20. The Diamagnetic Susceptibility of the Tubulin Dimer

    PubMed Central

    Torbet, James; Diakun, Gregory P.; Rikken, Geert L. J. A.; Diaz, J. Fernando

    2014-01-01

    An approximate value of the diamagnetic anisotropy of the tubulin dimer, Δχdimer, has been determined assuming axial symmetry and that only the α-helices and β-sheets contribute to the anisotropy. Two approaches have been utilized: (a) using the value for the Δχα for an α-helical peptide bond given by Pauling (1979) and (b) using the previously determined anisotropy of fibrinogen as a calibration standard. The Δχdimer ≈ 4 × 10−27 JT−2 obtained from these measurements are similar to within 20%. Although Cotton-Mouton measurements alone cannot be used to estimate Δχ directly, the value we measured, CMdimer = (1.41 ± 0.03) × 10−8 T−2cm2mg−1, is consistent with the above estimate for Δχdimer. The method utilized for the determination of the tubulin dimer diamagnetic susceptibility is applicable to other proteins and macromolecular assemblies as well. PMID:24701206

  1. Linking in domain-swapped protein dimers

    PubMed Central

    Baiesi, Marco; Orlandini, Enzo; Trovato, Antonio; Seno, Flavio

    2016-01-01

    The presence of knots has been observed in a small fraction of single-domain proteins and related to their thermodynamic and kinetic properties. The exchanging of identical structural elements, typical of domain-swapped proteins, makes such dimers suitable candidates to validate the possibility that mutual entanglement between chains may play a similar role for protein complexes. We suggest that such entanglement is captured by the linking number. This represents, for two closed curves, the number of times that each curve winds around the other. We show that closing the curves is not necessary, as a novel parameter G′, termed Gaussian entanglement, is strongly correlated with the linking number. Based on 110 non redundant domain-swapped dimers, our analysis evidences a high fraction of chains with a significant intertwining, that is with |G′| > 1. We report that Nature promotes configurations with negative mutual entanglement and surprisingly, it seems to suppress intertwining in long protein dimers. Supported by numerical simulations of dimer dissociation, our results provide a novel topology-based classification of protein-swapped dimers together with some preliminary evidence of its impact on their physical and biological properties. PMID:27659606

  2. Dimerization and Transactivation Domains as Candidates for Functional Modulation and Diversity of Sox9

    PubMed Central

    Geraldo, Marcos Tadeu; Valente, Guilherme Targino; Nakajima, Rafael Takahiro; Martins, Cesar

    2016-01-01

    Sox9 plays an important role in a large variety of developmental pathways in vertebrates. It is composed of three domains: high-mobility group box (HMG box), dimerization (DIM) and transactivation (TAD). One of the main processes for regulation and variability of the pathways involving Sox9 is the self-gene expression regulation of Sox9. However, the subsequent roles of the Sox9 domains can also generate regulatory modulations. Studies have shown that TADs can bind to different types of proteins and its function seems to be influenced by DIM. Therefore, we hypothesized that both domains are directly associated and can be responsible for the functional variability of Sox9. We applied a method based on a broad phylogenetic context, using sequences of the HMG box domain, to ensure the homology of all the Sox9 copies used herein. The data obtained included 4,921 sequences relative to 657 metazoan species. Based on coevolutionary and selective pressure analyses of the Sox9 sequences, we observed coevolutions involving DIM and TADs. These data, along with the experimental data from literature, indicate a functional relationship between these domains. Moreover, DIM and TADs may be responsible for the functional plasticity of Sox9 because they are more tolerant for molecular changes (higher Ka/Ks ratio than the HMG box domain). This tolerance could allow a differential regulation of target genes or promote novel targets during transcriptional activation. In conclusion, we suggest that DIM and TADs functional association may regulate differentially the target genes or even promote novel targets during transcription activation mediated by Sox9 paralogs, contributing to the subfunctionalization of Sox9a and Sox9b in teleosts. PMID:27196604

  3. Dimerization and Transactivation Domains as Candidates for Functional Modulation and Diversity of Sox9.

    PubMed

    Geraldo, Marcos Tadeu; Valente, Guilherme Targino; Nakajima, Rafael Takahiro; Martins, Cesar

    2016-01-01

    Sox9 plays an important role in a large variety of developmental pathways in vertebrates. It is composed of three domains: high-mobility group box (HMG box), dimerization (DIM) and transactivation (TAD). One of the main processes for regulation and variability of the pathways involving Sox9 is the self-gene expression regulation of Sox9. However, the subsequent roles of the Sox9 domains can also generate regulatory modulations. Studies have shown that TADs can bind to different types of proteins and its function seems to be influenced by DIM. Therefore, we hypothesized that both domains are directly associated and can be responsible for the functional variability of Sox9. We applied a method based on a broad phylogenetic context, using sequences of the HMG box domain, to ensure the homology of all the Sox9 copies used herein. The data obtained included 4,921 sequences relative to 657 metazoan species. Based on coevolutionary and selective pressure analyses of the Sox9 sequences, we observed coevolutions involving DIM and TADs. These data, along with the experimental data from literature, indicate a functional relationship between these domains. Moreover, DIM and TADs may be responsible for the functional plasticity of Sox9 because they are more tolerant for molecular changes (higher Ka/Ks ratio than the HMG box domain). This tolerance could allow a differential regulation of target genes or promote novel targets during transcriptional activation. In conclusion, we suggest that DIM and TADs functional association may regulate differentially the target genes or even promote novel targets during transcription activation mediated by Sox9 paralogs, contributing to the subfunctionalization of Sox9a and Sox9b in teleosts. PMID:27196604

  4. Dimerization and DNA recognition rules of mithramycin and its analogues.

    PubMed

    Weidenbach, Stevi; Hou, Caixia; Chen, Jhong-Min; Tsodikov, Oleg V; Rohr, Jürgen

    2016-03-01

    The antineoplastic and antibiotic natural product mithramycin (MTM) is used against cancer-related hypercalcemia and, experimentally, against Ewing sarcoma and lung cancers. MTM exerts its cytotoxic effect by binding DNA as a divalent metal ion (Me(2+))-coordinated dimer and disrupting the function of transcription factors. A precise molecular mechanism of action of MTM, needed to develop MTM analogues selective against desired transcription factors, is lacking. Although it is known that MTM binds G/C-rich DNA, the exact DNA recognition rules that would allow one to map MTM binding sites remain incompletely understood. Towards this goal, we quantitatively investigated dimerization of MTM and several of its analogues, MTM SDK (for Short side chain, DiKeto), MTM SA-Trp (for Short side chain and Acid), MTM SA-Ala, and a biosynthetic precursor premithramycin B (PreMTM B), and measured the binding affinities of these molecules to DNA oligomers of different sequences and structural forms at physiological salt concentrations. We show that MTM and its analogues form stable dimers even in the absence of DNA. All molecules, except for PreMTM B, can bind DNA with the following rank order of affinities (strong to weak): MTM=MTM SDK>MTM SA-Trp>MTM SA-Ala. An X(G/C)(G/C)X motif, where X is any base, is necessary and sufficient for MTM binding to DNA, without a strong dependence on DNA conformation. These recognition rules will aid in mapping MTM sites across different promoters towards development of MTM analogues as useful anticancer agents.

  5. Electromers of the benzene dimer radical cation.

    PubMed

    Błoch-Mechkour, Anna; Bally, Thomas

    2015-04-28

    The well-studied benzene dimer radical cation, which is prototypical for this class of species, has been reinvestigated computationally. Thereby it turned out that both the σ-hemibonded and the half-shifted sandwich structures of the benzene dimer cation, which had been independently proposed, represent stationary points on the B2PLYP-D potential energy surfaces. However, these structures belong to distinct electronic states, both of which are associated with potential surfaces that are very flat with regard to rotation of the two benzene rings in an opposite sense relative to each other. The surfaces of these two "electromers" of the benzene dimer cation are separated by only 3-4 kcal mol(-1) and do not intersect along the rotation coordinate, which represents a rather unique electronic structure situation. When moving on either of the two surfaces the title complex is an extremely fluxional species, in spite of its being bound by over 20 kcal mol(-1).

  6. Structure of the human dimeric ATM kinase

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Wilson C. Y.; Li, Yinyin; Liu, Zhe; Gao, Yuanzhu; Zhang, Qinfen; Huen, Michael S. Y.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT DNA-double strand breaks activate the serine/threonine protein kinase ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) to initiate DNA damage signal transduction. This activation process involves autophosphorylation and dissociation of inert ATM dimers into monomers that are catalytically active. Using single-particle electron microscopy (EM), we determined the structure of dimeric ATM in its resting state. The EM map could accommodate the crystal structure of the N-terminal truncated mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a closely related enzyme of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-related protein kinase (PIKK) family, allowing for the localization of the N- and the C-terminal regions of ATM. In the dimeric structure, the actives sites are buried, restricting the access of the substrates to these sites. The unanticipated domain organization of ATM provides a basis for understanding its mechanism of inhibition. PMID:27097373

  7. Structure of the human dimeric ATM kinase.

    PubMed

    Lau, Wilson C Y; Li, Yinyin; Liu, Zhe; Gao, Yuanzhu; Zhang, Qinfen; Huen, Michael S Y

    2016-01-01

    DNA-double strand breaks activate the serine/threonine protein kinase ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) to initiate DNA damage signal transduction. This activation process involves autophosphorylation and dissociation of inert ATM dimers into monomers that are catalytically active. Using single-particle electron microscopy (EM), we determined the structure of dimeric ATM in its resting state. The EM map could accommodate the crystal structure of the N-terminal truncated mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a closely related enzyme of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-related protein kinase (PIKK) family, allowing for the localization of the N- and the C-terminal regions of ATM. In the dimeric structure, the actives sites are buried, restricting the access of the substrates to these sites. The unanticipated domain organization of ATM provides a basis for understanding its mechanism of inhibition. PMID:27097373

  8. Slab photonic crystals with dimer colloid bases

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Erin K.; Liddell Watson, Chekesha M.

    2014-06-14

    The photonic band gap properties for centered rectangular monolayers of asymmetric dimers are reported. Colloids in suspension have been organized into the phase under confinement. The theoretical model is inspired by the range of asymmetric dimers synthesized via seeded emulsion polymerization and explores, in particular, the band structures as a function of degree of lobe symmetry and degree of lobe fusion. These parameters are varied incrementally from spheres to lobe-tangent dimers over morphologies yielding physically realizable particles. The work addresses the relative scarcity of theoretical studies on photonic crystal slabs with vertical variation that is consistent with colloidal self-assembly. Odd, even and polarization independent gaps in the guided modes are determined for direct slab structures. A wide range of lobe symmetry and degree of lobe fusion combinations having Brillouin zones with moderate to high isotropy support gaps between odd mode band indices 3-4 and even mode band indices 1-2 and 2-3.

  9. Dimer liquid state in the quantum dimer-pentamer model on the square lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, Owen; Herdman, C. M.

    2015-03-01

    We study the ground state of the quantum dimer-pentamer model (QDPM) on the square lattice. This model is a generalization of the square lattice quantum dimer model (QDM) as its configuration space comprises fully-packed hard-core dimer coverings as well as configurations containing pentamers, where four dimers touch a vertex. Thus in the QDPM, the fully-packed, hard-core constraint of the QDM is relaxed such that the local dimer number at each vertex is fixed modulo 3; correspondingly, the local U (1) gauge symmetry of the QDM Hilbert space is reduced to a local Z3 gauge symmetry in the QDPM. We construct a local Hamiltonian for which the Rokhsar-Kivelson (RK) state (the equal superposition of all configurations in a topological sector) is the exact ground state and has a 9-fold topological degeneracy on the torus. Using Monte Carlo calculations, we find no spontaneous symmetry breaking in the RK wavefunction and that its dimer-dimer correlation function decays exponentially. Additionally, we discuss the possibility of Z3 topological order in the ground state of the QDPM.

  10. Rubidium dimer destruction by a diode laser

    SciTech Connect

    Ban, T.; Aumiler, D.; Pichler, G.

    2005-02-01

    We observed rubidium dimer destruction by excitation of rubidium vapor with diode laser light tuned across the Rb D{sub 2} resonance line in a 2400 GHz tuning interval. The destruction was measured for rubidium atom concentrations in the (1-9)x10{sup 16} cm{sup -3} range, pump beam power up to 43 mW, and with a 5 Torr of the helium buffer gas. We discuss the physical mechanisms involved and specify the molecular pathways which may effectively lead to the observed dimer destruction.

  11. Dimeric Structure of the Bacterial Extracellular Foldase PrsA*

    PubMed Central

    Jakob, Roman P.; Koch, Johanna R.; Burmann, Björn M.; Schmidpeter, Philipp A. M.; Hunkeler, Moritz; Hiller, Sebastian; Schmid, Franz X.; Maier, Timm

    2015-01-01

    Secretion of proteins into the membrane-cell wall space is essential for cell wall biosynthesis and pathogenicity in Gram-positive bacteria. Folding and maturation of many secreted proteins depend on a single extracellular foldase, the PrsA protein. PrsA is a 30-kDa protein, lipid anchored to the outer leaflet of the cell membrane. The crystal structure of Bacillus subtilis PrsA reveals a central catalytic parvulin-type prolyl isomerase domain, which is inserted into a larger composite NC domain formed by the N- and C-terminal regions. This domain architecture resembles, despite a lack of sequence conservation, both trigger factor, a ribosome-binding bacterial chaperone, and SurA, a periplasmic chaperone in Gram-negative bacteria. Two main structural differences are observed in that the N-terminal arm of PrsA is substantially shortened relative to the trigger factor and SurA and in that PrsA is found to dimerize in a unique fashion via its NC domain. Dimerization leads to a large, bowl-shaped crevice, which might be involved in vivo in protecting substrate proteins from aggregation. NMR experiments reveal a direct, dynamic interaction of both the parvulin and the NC domain with secretion propeptides, which have been implicated in substrate targeting to PrsA. PMID:25525259

  12. Regulation of UVR8 photoreceptor dimer/monomer photo-equilibrium in Arabidopsis plants grown under photoperiodic conditions.

    PubMed

    Findlay, Kirsten M W; Jenkins, Gareth I

    2016-08-01

    The UV RESISTANCE LOCUS 8 (UVR8) photoreceptor specifically mediates photomorphogenic responses to UV-B. Photoreception induces dissociation of dimeric UVR8 into monomers to initiate responses. However, the regulation of dimer/monomer status in plants growing under photoperiodic conditions has not been examined. Here we show that UVR8 establishes a dimer/monomer photo-equilibrium in plants growing in diurnal photoperiods in both controlled environments and natural daylight. The photo-equilibrium is determined by the relative rates of photoreception and dark-reversion to the dimer. Experiments with mutants in REPRESSOR OF UV-B PHOTOMORPHOGENESIS 1 (RUP1) and RUP2 show that these proteins are crucial in regulating the photo-equilibrium because they promote reversion to the dimer. In plants growing in daylight, the UVR8 photo-equilibrium is most strongly correlated with low ambient fluence rates of UV-B (up to 1.5 μmol m(-2) s(-1) ), rather than higher fluence rates or the amount of photosynthetically active radiation. In addition, the rate of reversion of monomer to dimer is reduced at lower temperatures, promoting an increase in the relative level of monomer at approximately 8-10 °C. Thus, UVR8 does not behave like a simple UV-B switch under photoperiodic growth conditions but establishes a dimer/monomer photo-equilibrium that is regulated by UV-B and also influenced by temperature.

  13. Synthesis and biological properties of caffeic acid-PNA dimers containing guanine.

    PubMed

    Gaglione, Maria; Malgieri, Gaetano; Pacifico, Severina; Severino, Valeria; D'Abrosca, Brigida; Russo, Luigi; Fiorentino, Antonio; Messere, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Caffeic acid (CA; 3,4-dihydroxycinnamic acid) is endowed with high antioxidant activity. CA derivatives (such as amides) have gained a lot of attention due to their antioxidative, antitumor and antimicrobial properties as well as stable characteristics. Caffeoyl-peptide derivatives showed different antioxidant activity depending on the type and the sequence of amino acid used. For these reasons, we decided to combine CA with Peptide Nucleic Acid (PNA) to test whether the new PNA-CA amide derivatives would result in an improvement or gain of CA's biological (i.e., antioxidant, cytotoxic, cytoprotective) properties. We performed the synthesis and characterization of seven dimer conjugates with various combinations of nucleic acid bases and focused NMR studies on the model compound ga-CA dimer. We demonstrate that PNA dimers containing guanine conjugated to CA exhibited different biological activities depending on composition and sequence of the nucleobases. The dimer ag-CA protected HepG2, SK-B-NE(2), and C6 cells from a cytotoxic dose of hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂). PMID:23912270

  14. Identification of the dimer interface of a bacterial Ca(2+)/H(+) antiporter.

    PubMed

    Ridilla, Marc; Narayanan, Anoop; Bolin, Jeffrey T; Yernool, Dinesh A

    2012-12-01

    Members of the calcium/cation antiporter superfamily, including the cardiac sodium/calcium exchangers, are secondary active transporters that play an essential role in cellular Ca(2+) homeostasis. A notable feature of this group of transporters is the high levels of sequence similarity in relatively short sequences constituting the functionally important α-1 and α-2 regions in contrast to relatively lower degrees of similarity in the extended adjoining sequences. This suggests a similar structure and function of core transport machinery but possible differences in topology and/or oligomerization, a topic that has not been adequately addressed. Here we present the first example of purification of a bacterial member of this superfamily (CAX(CK31)) and analyze its quaternary structure. Purification of CAX(CK31) required the presence of a choline headgroup-containing detergent or lipid to yield stable preparations of the monomeric transporter. H(+)-driven Ca(2+) transport was demonstrated by reconstituting purified CAX(CK31) into liposomes. Dimeric CAX(CK31) could be isolated by manipulation of detergent micelles. Dimer formation was shown to be dependent on micelle composition as well as protein concentration. Furthermore, we establish that CAX(CK31) forms dimers in the membrane by analysis of cross-linked proteins. Using a dimeric homology model derived from the monomeric structure of the archaeal NCX homologue (Protein Data Bank entry 3V5U ), we introduced cysteine residues and through cross-linking experiments established the role of transmembrane helices 2 and 6 in the putative dimer interface.

  15. DNA-Directed Assembly of Nanogold Dimers: A Unique Dynamic Light Scattering Sensing Probe for Transcription Factor Detection

    PubMed Central

    Seow, Nianjia; Tan, Yen Nee; Yung, Lin-Yue Lanry; Su, Xiaodi

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a unique DNA-assembled gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) dimer for dynamic light scattering (DLS) sensing of transcription factors, exemplified by estrogen receptor (ER) that binds specifically to a double-stranded (ds) DNA sequence containing estrogen response element (ERE). Here, ERE sequence is incorporated into the DNA linkers to bridge the AuNPs dimer for ER binding. Coupled with DLS, this AuNP dimer-based DLS detection system gave distinct readout of a single ‘complex peak’ in the presence of the target molecule (i.e., ER). This unique signature marked the first time that such nanostructures can be used to study transcription factor-DNA interactions, which DLS alone cannot do. This was also unlike previously reported AuNP-DLS assays that gave random and broad distribution of particles size upon target binding. In addition, the ERE-containing AuNP dimers could also suppress the light-scattering signal from the unbound proteins and other interfering factors (e.g., buffer background), and has potential for sensitive detection of target proteins in complex biological samples such as cell lysates. In short, the as-developed AuNP dimer probe coupled with DLS is a simple (mix and test), rapid (readout in ~5 min) and sensitive (low nM levels of ER) platform to detect sequence-specific protein-DNA binding event. PMID:26678946

  16. DNA-Directed Assembly of Nanogold Dimers: A Unique Dynamic Light Scattering Sensing Probe for Transcription Factor Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seow, Nianjia; Tan, Yen Nee; Yung, Lin-Yue Lanry; Su, Xiaodi

    2015-12-01

    We have developed a unique DNA-assembled gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) dimer for dynamic light scattering (DLS) sensing of transcription factors, exemplified by estrogen receptor (ER) that binds specifically to a double-stranded (ds) DNA sequence containing estrogen response element (ERE). Here, ERE sequence is incorporated into the DNA linkers to bridge the AuNPs dimer for ER binding. Coupled with DLS, this AuNP dimer-based DLS detection system gave distinct readout of a single ‘complex peak’ in the presence of the target molecule (i.e., ER). This unique signature marked the first time that such nanostructures can be used to study transcription factor-DNA interactions, which DLS alone cannot do. This was also unlike previously reported AuNP-DLS assays that gave random and broad distribution of particles size upon target binding. In addition, the ERE-containing AuNP dimers could also suppress the light-scattering signal from the unbound proteins and other interfering factors (e.g., buffer background), and has potential for sensitive detection of target proteins in complex biological samples such as cell lysates. In short, the as-developed AuNP dimer probe coupled with DLS is a simple (mix and test), rapid (readout in ~5 min) and sensitive (low nM levels of ER) platform to detect sequence-specific protein-DNA binding event.

  17. DNA-Directed Assembly of Nanogold Dimers: A Unique Dynamic Light Scattering Sensing Probe for Transcription Factor Detection.

    PubMed

    Seow, Nianjia; Tan, Yen Nee; Yung, Lin-Yue Lanry; Su, Xiaodi

    2015-12-18

    We have developed a unique DNA-assembled gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) dimer for dynamic light scattering (DLS) sensing of transcription factors, exemplified by estrogen receptor (ER) that binds specifically to a double-stranded (ds) DNA sequence containing estrogen response element (ERE). Here, ERE sequence is incorporated into the DNA linkers to bridge the AuNPs dimer for ER binding. Coupled with DLS, this AuNP dimer-based DLS detection system gave distinct readout of a single 'complex peak' in the presence of the target molecule (i.e., ER). This unique signature marked the first time that such nanostructures can be used to study transcription factor-DNA interactions, which DLS alone cannot do. This was also unlike previously reported AuNP-DLS assays that gave random and broad distribution of particles size upon target binding. In addition, the ERE-containing AuNP dimers could also suppress the light-scattering signal from the unbound proteins and other interfering factors (e.g., buffer background), and has potential for sensitive detection of target proteins in complex biological samples such as cell lysates. In short, the as-developed AuNP dimer probe coupled with DLS is a simple (mix and test), rapid (readout in ~5 min) and sensitive (low nM levels of ER) platform to detect sequence-specific protein-DNA binding event.

  18. Properties of the Lennard-Jones dimeric fluid in two dimensions: An integral equation study

    PubMed Central

    Urbic, Tomaz; Dias, Cristiano L.

    2014-01-01

    The thermodynamic and structural properties of the planar soft-sites dumbbell fluid are examined by Monte Carlo simulations and integral equation theory. The dimers are built of two Lennard-Jones segments. Site-site integral equation theory in two dimensions is used to calculate the site-site radial distribution functions for a range of elongations and densities and the results are compared with Monte Carlo simulations. The critical parameters for selected types of dimers were also estimated. We analyze the influence of the bond length on critical point as well as tested correctness of site-site integral equation theory with different closures. The integral equations can be used to predict the phase diagram of dimers whose molecular parameters are known. PMID:24606372

  19. Drug Resistance Resulting from Kinase Dimerization Is Rationalized by Thermodynamic Factors Describing Allosteric Inhibitor Effects.

    PubMed

    Kholodenko, Boris N

    2015-09-22

    Treatment of cancer patients with ATP-competitive inhibitors of BRAF/CRAF kinases surprisingly increases total kinase activity, especially in wild-type BRAF cells, subverting the desired clinical outcome. Similar inhibition resistance is observed for numerous kinases involving homo/heterodimerization in their activation cycles. Here, I demonstrate that drug resistance resulting from kinase dimerization can be explained using thermodynamic principles. I show that allosteric regulation by inhibitors is described by thermodynamic factors that quantify inhibitor-induced changes in kinase dimerization and the difference in the drug affinity for a free monomer versus a dimer harboring one drug molecule. The analysis extends to kinase homo- and heterodimers, allows for their symmetric and asymmetric conformations, and predicts how thermodynamic factors influence dose-response dependencies. I show how two inhibitors, ineffective on their own, when combined can abolish drug resistance at lower doses than either inhibitor applied alone. Thus, the mechanistic models suggest ways to overcome resistance to kinase inhibitors.

  20. Properties of the Lennard-Jones dimeric fluid in two dimensions: An integral equation study

    SciTech Connect

    Urbic, Tomaz; Dias, Cristiano L.

    2014-03-07

    The thermodynamic and structural properties of the planar soft-sites dumbbell fluid are examined by Monte Carlo simulations and integral equation theory. The dimers are built of two Lennard-Jones segments. Site-site integral equation theory in two dimensions is used to calculate the site-site radial distribution functions for a range of elongations and densities and the results are compared with Monte Carlo simulations. The critical parameters for selected types of dimers were also estimated. We analyze the influence of the bond length on critical point as well as tested correctness of site-site integral equation theory with different closures. The integral equations can be used to predict the phase diagram of dimers whose molecular parameters are known.

  1. The influence of action possibility and end-state comfort on motor imagery of manual action sequences.

    PubMed

    Seegelke, Christian; Hughes, Charmayne M L

    2015-12-01

    It has been proposed that the preparation of goal-direct actions involves internal movement simulation, or motor imagery. Evidence suggests that motor imagery is critically involved in the prediction of action consequences and contributes heavily to movement planning processes. The present study examined whether the sensitivity towards end-state comfort and the possibility/impossibility to perform an action sequence are considered during motor imagery. Participants performed a mental rotation task in which two images were simultaneously presented. The image on the left depicted the start posture of a right hand when grasping a bar, while the right image depicted the hand posture at the end of the action sequence. The right image displayed the bar in a vertical orientation with the hand in a comfortable (thumb-up) or in an uncomfortable (thumb-down) posture, while the bar in the left image was rotated in picture plane in steps of 45°. Crucially, the two images formed either a physically possible or physically impossible to perform action sequence. Results revealed strikingly different response time patterns for the two action sequence conditions. In general, response times increased almost monotonically with increasing angular disparity for the possible to perform action sequences. However, slight deviations from this monotonicity were apparent when the sequences contained an uncomfortable as opposed to a comfortable final posture. In contrast, for the impossible sequences, response times did not follow a typical mental rotation function, but instead were uniformly very slow. These findings suggest that both biomechanical constraints (i.e., end-state comfort) and the awareness of the possibility/impossibility to perform an action sequence are considered during motor imagery. We conclude that motor representations contain information about the spatiotemporal movement organization and the possibility of performing an action, which are crucially involved in

  2. Alkyl hydroxybenzoic acid derivatives that inhibit HIV-1 protease dimerization.

    PubMed

    Flausino, O A; Dufau, L; Regasini, L O; Petrônio, M S; Silva, D H S; Rose, T; Bolzani, V S; Reboud-Ravaux, M

    2012-01-01

    The therapeutic potential of gallic acid and its derivatives as anti-cancer, antimicrobial and antiviral agents is well known. We have examined the mechanism by which natural gallic acid and newly synthesized gallic acid alkyl esters and related protocatechuic acid alkyl esters inhibit HIV-1 protease to compare the influence of the aromatic ring substitutions on inhibition. We used Zhang-Poorman's kinetic analysis and fluorescent probe binding to demonstrate that several gallic and protecatechuic acid alkyl esters inhibited HIV-1 protease by preventing the dimerization of this obligate homodimeric aspartic protease rather than targeting the active site. The tri-hydroxy substituted benzoic moiety in gallates was more favorable than the di-substituted one in protocatechuates. In both series, the type of inhibition, its mechanism and the inhibitory efficiency dramatically depended on the length of the alkyl chain: no inhibition with alkyl chains less than 8 carbon atoms long. Molecular dynamics simulations corroborated the kinetic data and propose that gallic esters are intercalated between the two N- and C-monomer ends. They complete the β-sheet and disrupt the dimeric enzyme. The best gallic ester (14 carbon atoms, K(id) of 320 nM) also inhibited the multi-mutated protease MDR-HM. These results will aid the rational design of future generations of non-peptide inhibitors of HIV-1 protease dimerization that inhibit multi-mutated proteases. Finally, our work suggests the wide use of gallic and protocatechuic alkyl esters to dissociate intermolecular β-sheets involved in protein-protein interactions.

  3. Transport properties of the H2O@C60-dimer-based junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Chengbo; Wang, Xiaolin

    2015-09-01

    Theoretical predictions play an important role in finding potential applications in molecular electronics. Fullerenes have a number of potential applications, and the charge flow from a single C60 molecule to another becomes more versatile and more interesting after doping. Here, we report the conductance of two H2O@C60 molecules in series order and how the number of encapsulated water molecules influences the transport properties of the junction. Encapsulating an H2O molecule into one of the C60 cages increases the conductance of the dimer. Negative differential resistance is found in the dimer systems, and its peak-to-valley current ratio depends on the number of encapsulated H2O molecules. The conductance of the C60 dimer and the H2O@C60 dimer is two orders of magnitude smaller than that of the C60 monomer. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the conductance of the molecular junctions based on the H2O@C60 dimer can be tuned by moving the encapsulated H2O molecules. The conductance is H2O-position dependent. Our findings indicate that H2O@C60 can be used as a building block in C60-based molecular electronic devices and sensors.

  4. A new isoleucine substitution of Val-20 in transthyretin tetramers selectively impairs dimer-dimer contacts and causes systemic amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Jenne, D E; Denzel, K; Blätzinger, P; Winter, P; Obermaier, B; Linke, R P; Altland, K

    1996-06-25

    The most frequent form of inherited amyloidoses is associated with mutations in the transthyretin (TTR) gene coding for 127-amino acid residues of four identical, noncovalently linked subunits that form a pair of dimers in the plasma protein complex. Amyloid fibrils containing the variant and to a lesser extent the wild-type form of the TTR molecule are deposited in various organs, including peripheral nerves and the myocardium, with polyneuropathy and cardiomyopathy as major clinical manifestations. So far, more than 40 distinct amino acid substitutions distributed throughout the TTR sequence over 30 positions have been found to be correlated with an increased amyloidogenicity of TTR. Most of these amyloidogenic amino acid substitutions are suspected to alter the conformation and stability of the monomer. Here we identify and characterize by protein and DNA analysis a novel amyloidogenic Val-20 to Ile mutation in a German three-generation family. The index patient suffered from severe amyloid cardiomyopathy at the age of 60. Conformational stability and unfolding behavior of the Ile-20 monomer in urea gradients was found to be almost indistinguishable from that of wild-type TTR. In contrast, tetramer stability was significantly reduced in agreement with the expected change in the interactions between the two opposing dimers via the side chain of Ile-20. Our observations provide strong evidence for the view that amyloidogenic amino acid substitutions in TTR facilitate the conversion of tetrameric TTR complexes into those conformational intermediates of the TTR folding pathway that have an intrinsic amyloidogenic potential.

  5. Analysis of the DNA-binding and dimerization activities of Neurospora crassa transcription factor NUC-1.

    PubMed

    Peleg, Y; Metzenberg, R L

    1994-12-01

    NUC-1, a positive regulatory protein of Neurospora crassa, controls the expression of several unlinked target genes involved in phosphorus acquisition. The carboxy-terminal end of the NUC-1 protein has sequence similarity to the helix-loop-helix family of transcription factors. Bacterially expressed and in vitro-synthesized proteins, which consist of the carboxy-terminal portion of NUC-1, bind specifically to upstream sequences of two of its target genes, pho2+ and pho-4+. These upstream sequences contain the core sequence, CACGTG, a target for many helix-loop-helix proteins. A large loop region (47 amino acids) separates the helix I and helix II domains. Mutations and deletion within the loop region did not interfere with the in vitro or in vivo functions of the protein. Immediately carboxy-proximal to the helix II domain, the NUC-1 protein contains an atypical zipper domain which is essential for function. This domain consists of a heptad repeat of alanine and methionine rather than leucine residues. Analysis of mutant NUC-1 proteins suggests that the helix II and the zipper domains are essential for the protein dimerization, whereas the basic and the helix I domains are involved in DNA binding. The helix I domain, even though likely to participate in dimer formation while NUC-1 is bound to DNA, is not essential for in vitro dimerization.

  6. Ligand regulation of a constitutively dimeric EGF receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freed, Daniel M.; Alvarado, Diego; Lemmon, Mark A.

    2015-06-01

    Ligand-induced receptor dimerization has traditionally been viewed as the key event in transmembrane signalling by epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFRs). Here we show that the Caenorhabditis elegans EGFR orthologue LET-23 is constitutively dimeric, yet responds to its ligand LIN-3 without changing oligomerization state. SAXS and mutational analyses further reveal that the preformed dimer of the LET-23 extracellular region is mediated by its domain II dimerization arm and resembles other EGFR extracellular dimers seen in structural studies. Binding of LIN-3 induces only minor structural rearrangements in the LET-23 dimer to promote signalling. Our results therefore argue that EGFR can be regulated by allosteric changes within an existing receptor dimer--resembling signalling by insulin receptor family members, which share similar extracellular domain compositions but form covalent dimers.

  7. A p-quinodimethane-bridged porphyrin dimer.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Wangdong; Ishida, Masatoshi; Lee, Sangsu; Sung, Young Mo; Zeng, Zebing; Ni, Yong; Chi, Chunyan; Kim, Dongho; Wu, Jishan

    2013-12-01

    A p-quinodimethane (p-QDM)-bridged porphyrin dimer 1 has been prepared for the first time. An unexpected Michael addition reaction took place when we attempted to synthesize compound 1 by reaction of the cross-conjugated keto-linked porphyrin dimers 8a and 8b with alkynyl/aryl Grignard reagents. Alternatively, compound 1 could be successfully prepared by intramolecular Friedel-Crafts alkylation of the diol-linked porphyrin dimer 14 with concomitant oxidation in air. Compound 1 shows intense one-photon absorption (OPA, λ(max)=955 nm, ε=45400 M(-1) cm(-1)) and a large two-photon absorption (TPA) cross-section (σ((2))(max)=2080 GM at 1800 nm) in the near-infrared (NIR) region due to its extended π-conjugation and quinoidal character. It also exhibits a short singlet excited-state lifetime of 25 ps. The cyclic voltammogram of 1 displays multiple redox waves with a small electrochemical energy gap of 0.86 eV. The ground-state geometry, electronic structure, and optical properties of 1 have been further studied by density functional theory (DFT) calculations and compared with those of the keto-linked dimer 8b. This research has revealed that incorporation of a p-QDM unit into the porphyrin framework had a significant impact on its optical and electronic properties, leading to a novel NIR OPA and TPA chromophore.

  8. Nonrandom behavior of amphiphilic dimers in solution

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, D.-W.; Aranovich, G. L.; Donohue, M. D.

    2000-08-22

    A simple lattice theory is developed for amphiphilic dimers. An analytical solution is derived by taking into account the most important configurations of nearest neighbors. Numerical calculations and Monte Carlo simulations were performed to compare with analytical solutions. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  9. Stability and Formation of Isobutylene Dimers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldsmith, Robert H.

    1983-01-01

    Isobutylene is an important bulk chemical for the petroleum industry. Dimerization and hydrogenation reactions produce the standard fuel octane rating comparison. This classic chemistry is often misrepresented in modern texts, however, and this paper attempts to correlate the physical organic principles that apply. (Author)

  10. Dimers on the 33 .42 lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shuli; Yan, Weigen

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we obtain explicit expression of the number of close-packed dimers (perfect matchings) of the 33 .42 lattice with cylindrical boundary condition. Particularly, we show that the entropy of 33 .42 lattice is the same for cylindrical and toroidal boundary conditions.

  11. Transcription termination at the Escherichia coli thra terminator by spinach chloroplast RNA polymerase in vitro is influenced by downstream DNA sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, L J; Liang, Y J; Jeng, S T; Orozco, E M; Gumport, R I; Lin, C H; Yang, M T

    1995-01-01

    We have investigated the mechanism of transcription termination in vitro by spinach chloroplast RNA polymerase using templates encoding variants of the transcription-termination structure (attenuator) of the regulatory region of the threonine (thr) operon of Escherichia coli. Fourteen sequence variants located within its d(G+C) stem-loop and d(A+T)-rich regions were studied. We found that the helix integrity in the stem-loop structure is necessary for termination but that its stability is not directly correlated with termination efficiency. The sequence of the G+C stem-loop itself also influences termination. Moreover, the dA template stretch at the 3' end of the terminator plays a major role in termination efficiency, but base pairing between the A and U tract of the transcript does not. From the studies using deletion variants and a series of mutants that alter the sequences immediately downstream from the transcription termination site, we found that termination of transcription by spinach chloroplast RNA polymerase was also modulated by downstream DNA sequences in a sequence-specific manner. The second base immediately following the poly(T) tract is crucial for determining the termination efficiency by chloroplast RNA polymerase, but not of the T7 or E.coli enzymes. Images PMID:8524662

  12. Dimerization of visual pigments in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Cao, Li-Hui; Kumar, Sandeep; Enemchukwu, Nduka O; Zhang, Ning; Lambert, Alyssia; Zhao, Xuchen; Jones, Alex; Wang, Shixian; Dennis, Emily M; Fnu, Amrita; Ham, Sam; Rainier, Jon; Yau, King-Wai; Fu, Yingbin

    2016-08-01

    It is a deeply engrained notion that the visual pigment rhodopsin signals light as a monomer, even though many G protein-coupled receptors are now known to exist and function as dimers. Nonetheless, recent studies (albeit all in vitro) have suggested that rhodopsin and its chromophore-free apoprotein, R-opsin, may indeed exist as a homodimer in rod disk membranes. Given the overwhelmingly strong historical context, the crucial remaining question, therefore, is whether pigment dimerization truly exists naturally and what function this dimerization may serve. We addressed this question in vivo with a unique mouse line (S-opsin(+)Lrat(-/-)) expressing, transgenically, short-wavelength-sensitive cone opsin (S-opsin) in rods and also lacking chromophore to exploit the fact that cone opsins, but not R-opsin, require chromophore for proper folding and trafficking to the photoreceptor's outer segment. In R-opsin's absence, S-opsin in these transgenic rods without chromophore was mislocalized; in R-opsin's presence, however, S-opsin trafficked normally to the rod outer segment and produced functional S-pigment upon subsequent chromophore restoration. Introducing a competing R-opsin transmembrane helix H1 or helix H8 peptide, but not helix H4 or helix H5 peptide, into these transgenic rods caused mislocalization of R-opsin and S-opsin to the perinuclear endoplasmic reticulum. Importantly, a similar peptide-competition effect was observed even in WT rods. Our work provides convincing evidence for visual pigment dimerization in vivo under physiological conditions and for its role in pigment maturation and targeting. Our work raises new questions regarding a potential mechanistic role of dimerization in rhodopsin signaling. PMID:27462111

  13. Antistaphylococcal activity of DNA-interactive pyrrolobenzodiazepine (PBD) dimers and PBD-biaryl conjugates

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Khondaker M.; Rosado, Helena; Moreira, Joao B.; Feuerbaum, Eva-Anne; Fox, Keith R.; Stecher, Eva; Howard, Philip W.; Gregson, Stephen J.; James, Colin H.; de la Fuente, Maria; Waldron, Denise E.; Thurston, David E.; Taylor, Peter W.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Pyrrolobenzodiazepine (PBD) dimers, tethered through inert propyldioxy or pentyldioxy linkers, possess potent bactericidal activity against a range of Gram-positive bacteria by virtue of their capacity to cross-link duplex DNA in sequence-selective fashion. Here we attempt to improve the antibacterial activity and cytotoxicity profile of PBD-containing conjugates by extension of dimer linkers and replacement of one PBD unit with phenyl-substituted or benzo-fused heterocycles that facilitate non-covalent interactions with duplex DNA. Methods DNase I footprinting was used to identify high-affinity DNA binding sites. A staphylococcal gene microarray was used to assess epidemic methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus 16 phenotypes induced by PBD conjugates. Molecular dynamics simulations were employed to investigate the accommodation of compounds within the DNA helix. Results Increasing the length of the linker in PBD dimers led to a progressive reduction in antibacterial activity, but not in their cytotoxic capacity. Complex patterns of DNA binding were noted for extended PBD dimers. Modelling of DNA strand cross-linking by PBD dimers indicated distortion of the helix. A majority (26 of 43) of PBD-biaryl conjugates possessed potent antibacterial activity with little or no helical distortion and a more favourable cytotoxicity profile. Bactericidal activity of PBD-biaryl conjugates was determined by inability to excise covalently bound drug molecules from bacterial duplex DNA. Conclusions PBD-biaryl conjugates have a superior antibacterial profile compared with PBD dimers such as ELB-21. We have identified six PBD-biaryl conjugates as potential drug development candidates. PMID:22547662

  14. Ultraviolet Spectrum And Chemical Reactivity Of CIO Dimer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demore, William B.; Tschuikow-Roux, E.

    1992-01-01

    Report describes experimental study of ultraviolet spectrum and chemical reactivity of dimer of chlorine monoxide (CIO). Objectives are to measure absorption cross sections of dimer at near-ultraviolet wavelengths; determine whether asymmetrical isomer (CIOCIO) exists at temperatures relevant to Antarctic stratosphere; and test for certain chemical reactions of dimer. Important in photochemistry of Antarctic stratosphere.

  15. A murine host cell factor required for nicking of the dimer bridge of MVM recognizes two CG nucleotides displaced by 10 basepairs.

    PubMed

    Liu, Q; Astell, C R

    1996-10-01

    During replication of the minute virus of mice (MVM) genome, a dimer replicative form (RF) intermediate is resolved into two monomer RF molecules in such a way as to retain a unique sequence within the left hand hairpin terminus of the viral genome. Although the proposed mechanism for resolution of the dimer RF remains uncertain, it likely involves site-specific nicking of the dimer bridge. The RF contains two double-stranded copies of the viral genome joined by the extended 3' hairpin. Minor sequence asymmetries within the 3' hairpin allow the two halves of the dimer bridge to be distinguished. The A half contains the sequence [sequence: see text], whereas the B half contains the sequence [sequence: see text]. Using an in vitro assay, we show that only the B half of the MVM dimer bridge is nicked site-specifically when incubated with crude NS-1 protein (expressed in insect cells) and mouse LA9 cellular extract. When highly purified NS-1, the major nonstructural protein of MVM, is used in this nicking reaction, there is an absolute requirement for the LA9 cellular extract, suggesting a cellular factor (or factors) is (are) required. A series of mutations were created in the putative host factor binding region (HFBR) on the B half of the MVM dimer bridge adjacent to the NS-1 binding site. Nicking assays of these B half mutants showed that two CG motifs displaced by 10 nucleotides are important for nicking. Gel mobility shift assays demonstrated that a host factor(s) can bind to the HFBR of the B half of the dimer bridge and efficient binding depends on the presence of both CG motifs. Competitor DNA containing the wild-type HFBR sequence is able to specifically inhibit nicking of the B half, indicating that the host factor(s) bound to the HFBR is(are) essential for site-specific nicking to occur.

  16. The Structure of the Poxvirus A33 Protein Reveals a Dimer of Unique C-Type Lectin-Like Domains

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Hua-Poo; Singh, Kavita; Gittis, Apostolos G.; Garboczi, David N.

    2010-11-03

    The current vaccine against smallpox is an infectious form of vaccinia virus that has significant side effects. Alternative vaccine approaches using recombinant viral proteins are being developed. A target of subunit vaccine strategies is the poxvirus protein A33, a conserved protein in the Chordopoxvirinae subfamily of Poxviridae that is expressed on the outer viral envelope. Here we have determined the structure of the A33 ectodomain of vaccinia virus. The structure revealed C-type lectin-like domains (CTLDs) that occur as dimers in A33 crystals with five different crystal lattices. Comparison of the A33 dimer models shows that the A33 monomers have a degree of flexibility in position within the dimer. Structural comparisons show that the A33 monomer is a close match to the Link module class of CTLDs but that the A33 dimer is most similar to the natural killer (NK)-cell receptor class of CTLDs. Structural data on Link modules and NK-cell receptor-ligand complexes suggest a surface of A33 that could interact with viral or host ligands. The dimer interface is well conserved in all known A33 sequences, indicating an important role for the A33 dimer. The structure indicates how previously described A33 mutations disrupt protein folding and locates the positions of N-linked glycosylations and the epitope of a protective antibody.

  17. Rotationally resolved water dimer spectra in atmospheric air and pure water vapour in the 188-258 GHz range.

    PubMed

    Serov, E A; Koshelev, M A; Odintsova, T A; Parshin, V V; Tretyakov, M Yu

    2014-12-21

    New experimental results regarding "warm" water dimer spectra under equilibrium conditions are presented. An almost equidistant series of six peaks corresponding to the merged individual lines of the bound dimer with consecutive rotational quantum numbers is studied in the 188-258 GHz frequency range in water vapour over a broad range of pressures and temperatures relevant to the Earth's atmosphere. The series is a continuation of the sequence detected earlier at lower frequencies at room temperature. The signal-to-noise ratio of the observed spectra allowed investigating their evolution, when water vapour was diluted by atmospheric air with partial pressure from 0 up to 540 Torr. Analysis of the obtained spectra permitted determining the dimerization constant as well as the hydrogen bond dissociation energy and the dimer spectral parameters, including the average coefficient of collisional broadening of individual lines by water vapour and air. The manifestation of metastable states of the dimer in the observed spectra is assessed. The contribution of three possible pair states of water molecules to the second virial coefficient is evaluated over the broad range of temperatures. The work supports the significant role of the water dimer in atmospheric absorption and related processes.

  18. Chiroptical properties, binding affinity, and photostability of a conjugated zinc porphyrin dimer complexed with left-handed Z-DNA and right-handed B-DNA.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jung Kyu; Reed, Aisha; Balaz, Milan

    2014-01-14

    We have studied the UV-vis absorption and chiroptical properties, binding affinity and photostability of a conjugated positively charged butadiyne-linked Zn(ii) porphyrin dimer bound to DNA sequence poly(dG-dC)2. Right-handed B-DNA, spermine-induced Z-DNA and Co(iii)-induced Z-DNA have been explored. Resonance light scattering (RLS) spectra showed formation of porphyrin aggregates in the presence of all DNA forms with the largest aggregates formed with B-DNA. The porphyrin dimer gave rise to induced bisignate circular dichroism (CD) signals in the presence of the left-handed Z-DNA conformations. On the other hand, the dimer stayed nearly chiroptically silent when complexed with the B-form of poly(dG-dC)2. Our results indicated that the conjugated Zn(ii) porphyrin dimer can be used as a sensor for the chiroptical detection of Z-DNA in the visible (400-500 nm) and near-infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum (700-800 nm). The helicity of DNA had little effect on the dimer binding affinities. The photostability of the porphyrin dimer complexed with any form of DNA was higher than that of the free molecule. The porphyrin dimer bound to Z-DNA exhibited slower photobleaching than the B-DNA dimer complex.

  19. Influence of the sequence on the ab initio band structures of single and double stranded DNA models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogár, Ferenc; Bende, Attila; Ladik, János

    2014-06-01

    The solid state physical approach is widely used for the characterization of electronic properties of DNA. In the simplest case the helical symmetry is explicitly utilized with a repeat unit containing only a single nucleotide or nucleotide pair. This model provides a band structure that is easily interpretable and reflects the main characteristic features of the single nucleotide or a nucleotide pair chain, respectively. The chemical variability of the different DNA chains is, however, almost completely neglected in this way. In the present work we have investigated the effect of the different sequences on the band structure of periodic DNA models. For this purpose we have applied the Hartree-Fock crystal orbital method for single and double stranded DNA chains with two different subsequent nucleotides in the repeat unit of former and two different nucleotide pairs in the latter case, respectively. These results are compared to simple helical models with uniform sequences. The valence and conduction bands related to the stacked nucleotide bases of single stranded DNA built up only from guanidine as well as of double stranded DNA built up only from guanidine-cytidine pairs showed special properties different from the other cases. Namely, they had higher conduction and lower valence band positions and this way larger band gaps and smaller widths of these bands. With the introduction of non-uniform guanidine containing sequences band structures became more similar to each other and to the band structures of other sequences without guanidine. The maximal bandwidths of the non-uniform sequences are considerably smaller than in the case of uniform sequences implying smaller charge carrier mobilities both in the conduction and valence bands.

  20. Targeted next-generation sequencing in steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome: mutations in multiple glomerular genes may influence disease severity

    PubMed Central

    Bullich, Gemma; Trujillano, Daniel; Santín, Sheila; Ossowski, Stephan; Mendizábal, Santiago; Fraga, Gloria; Madrid, Álvaro; Ariceta, Gema; Ballarín, José; Torra, Roser; Estivill, Xavier; Ars, Elisabet

    2015-01-01

    Genetic diagnosis of steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome (SRNS) using Sanger sequencing is complicated by the high genetic heterogeneity and phenotypic variability of this disease. We aimed to improve the genetic diagnosis of SRNS by simultaneously sequencing 26 glomerular genes using massive parallel sequencing and to study whether mutations in multiple genes increase disease severity. High-throughput mutation analysis was performed in 50 SRNS and/or focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) patients, a validation cohort of 25 patients with known pathogenic mutations, and a discovery cohort of 25 uncharacterized patients with probable genetic etiology. In the validation cohort, we identified the 42 previously known pathogenic mutations across NPHS1, NPHS2, WT1, TRPC6, and INF2 genes. In the discovery cohort, disease-causing mutations in SRNS/FSGS genes were found in nine patients. We detected three patients with mutations in an SRNS/FSGS gene and COL4A3. Two of them were familial cases and presented a more severe phenotype than family members with mutation in only one gene. In conclusion, our results show that massive parallel sequencing is feasible and robust for genetic diagnosis of SRNS/FSGS. Our results indicate that patients carrying mutations in an SRNS/FSGS gene and also in COL4A3 gene have increased disease severity. PMID:25407002

  1. Structure-function studies of HIV-1: influence of long terminal repeat U3 region sequences on virus production.

    PubMed

    Velpandi, A; Nagashunmugam, T; Otsuka, T; Cartas, M; Srinivasan, A

    1992-06-01

    DNA sequence analyses of several human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) isolates revealed extensive genetic diversity in the env gene and, to a lesser extent, in other regions of the viral genome, including the long terminal repeat (LTR) sequences. Since the LTRs contain elements responsible for the control of transcription, the difference in the LTR region may play a crucial role in the overall replication rate of HIV. To evaluate the role of the LTR, we have constructed a number of infectious hybrid HIV molecular clones containing LTRs from different proviral DNAs linked to the body of the viral genome, and analyzed them in a transient expression system. Both parental and hybrid proviral DNAs were transfected into human rhabdomyosarcoma cells for monitoring virus production. Proviral DNA designate pZ6 (HIVZr6) showed a high level of virus in the medium of the transfected culture in comparison to the pHXB2 (HIVHTLV-III) and pARV (HIVSF-2) DNAs. Hybrid proviral DNAs containing viral genes from pZ6, linked to LTR U3 sequences of pHXB2 and pARV at the 5' end, showed virus production similar to the levels observed with pZ6. These results indicate that the extent of virus production does not correlate with the LTR U3 sequences, and may involve other regions of the viral genome.

  2. Synthesis and biological evaluation of 2-benzoylpyridine thiosemicarbazones in a dimeric system: structure-activity relationship studies on their anti-proliferative and iron chelation efficacy.

    PubMed

    Lukmantara, Adeline Y; Kalinowski, Danuta S; Kumar, Naresh; Richardson, Des R

    2014-12-01

    Thiosemicarbazone chelators represent an exciting class of biologically active compounds that show great potential as anti-tumor agents. Our previous studies demonstrated the potent anti-tumor activity of the 2'-benzoylpyridine thiosemicarbazone series. While extensive studies have been performed on monomeric thiosemicarbazone compounds, dimeric thiosemicarbazone chelators have received comparatively less attention. Thus, it was of interest to investigate the anti-proliferative activity and iron chelation efficacy of dimeric thiosemicarbazones. Two classes of dimeric thiosemicarbazones were designed and synthesized. The first class consisted of two benzoylpyridine-based thiosemicarbazone units connected via a hexane or dodecane alkyl bridge, while the second class of dimer consisted of two thiosemicarbazones attached to a 2,6-dibenzoylpyridine core. These dimeric ligands demonstrated greater anti-proliferative activity than the clinically used iron chelator, desferrioxamine. This study highlights the importance of optimal lipophilicity as a factor influencing the cytotoxicity and iron chelation efficacy of these chelators.

  3. Small molecule and peptide-mediated inhibition of Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 1 dimerization

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sun Young; Song, Kyung-A; Kieff, Elliott; Kang, Myung-Soo

    2012-07-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Evidence that targeting EBNA1 dimer, an EBV onco-antigen, can be achievable. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A small molecule and a peptide as EBNA1 dimerization inhibitors identified. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both inhibitors associated with EBNA1 and blocked EBNA1 DNA binding activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Also, prevented its dimerization, and repressed viral gene transcription. -- Abstract: Latent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection is associated with human B cell lymphomas and certain carcinomas. EBV episome persistence, replication, and gene expression are dependent on EBV-encoded nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1)'s DNA binding domain (DBD)/dimerization domain (DD)-mediated sequence-specific DNA binding activity. Homodimerization of EBNA1 is essential for EBNA1 DNA binding and transactivation. In this study, we characterized a novel small molecule EBNA1 inhibitor EiK1, screened from the previous high throughput screening (HTS). The EiK1 compound specifically inhibited the EBNA1-dependent, OriP-enhanced transcription, but not EBNA1-independent transcription. A Surface Plasmon Resonance Biacore assay revealed that EiK1 associates with EBNA1 amino acid 459-607 DBD/DD. Consistent with the SPR data, in vitro gel shift assays showed that EiK1 suppressed the activity of EBNA1 binding to the cognate familial repeats (FR) sequence, but not control RBP-J{kappa} binding to the J{kappa} site. Subsequently, a cross-linker-mediated in vitro multimerization assay and EBNA1 homodimerization-dependent yeast two-hybrid assay showed that EiK1 significantly inhibited EBNA1 dimerization. In an attempt to identify more highly specific peptide inhibitors, small peptides encompassing the EBNA1 DBD/DD were screened for inhibition of EBNA1 DBD-mediated DNA binding function. The small peptide P85, covering EBNA1 a.a. 560-574, significantly blocked EBNA1 DNA binding activity in vitro, prevented dimerization in vitro and in vivo, associated with

  4. Fibrillar dimer formation of islet amyloid polypeptides

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, Chi -cheng; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2015-05-08

    Amyloid deposits of human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP), a 37-residue hormone co-produced with insulin, have been implicated in the development of type 2 diabetes. Residues 20 – 29 of hIAPP have been proposed to constitute the amyloidogenic core for the aggregation process, yet the segment is mostly unstructured in the mature fibril, according to solid-state NMR data. Here we use molecular simulations combined with bias-exchange metadynamics to characterize the conformational free energies of hIAPP fibrillar dimer and its derivative, pramlintide. We show that residues 20 – 29 are involved in an intermediate that exhibits transient β-sheets, consistent with recent experimental and simulation results. By comparing the aggregation of hIAPP and pramlintide, we illustrate the effects of proline residues on inhibition of the dimerization of IAPP. The mechanistic insights presented here could be useful for development of therapeutic inhibitors of hIAPP amyloid formation.

  5. Fibrillar dimer formation of islet amyloid polypeptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Chi-cheng; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2015-09-01

    Amyloid deposits of human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP), a 37-residue hormone co-produced with insulin, have been implicated in the development of type 2 diabetes. Residues 20 - 29 of hIAPP have been proposed to constitute the amyloidogenic core for the aggregation process, yet the segment is mostly unstructured in the mature fibril, according to solid-state NMR data. Here we use molecular simulations combined with bias-exchange metadynamics to characterize the conformational free energies of hIAPP fibrillar dimer and its derivative, pramlintide. We show that residues 20 - 29 are involved in an intermediate that exhibits transient β-sheets, consistent with recent experimental and simulation results. By comparing the aggregation of hIAPP and pramlintide, we illustrate the effects of proline residues on inhibition of the dimerization of IAPP. The mechanistic insights presented here could be useful for development of therapeutic inhibitors of hIAPP amyloid formation.

  6. Theoretical studies of transition metal dimers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, Stephen P.; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The CASSCF approach was used to perform the MCSCF calculations for a number of transition metal dimers, including the Sc2, Ti2, Cr2, Cu2, TiV, Y2, Nb2, and Mo2 molecules; in addition, CASSCF/CI calculations were carried out for Sc2, Ti2, Cu2, and Y2. The CASSCF procedure is shown to provide a consistent set of calculations for these molecules, from which trends and a simple qualitative picture of the electronic structure may be derived. In particular, the calculations confirmed the ground states of the Sc2 and the TiV, and led to predictions for other molecules in this series. In addition to specific predictions, the study provides a simple qualitative picture of the bonding in these dimers.

  7. The structure of the catalytic domain of a plant cellulose synthase and its assembly into dimers

    SciTech Connect

    Olek, Anna T.; Rayon, Catherine; Makowski, Lee; Kim, Hyung Rae; Ciesielski, Peter; Badger, John; Paul, Lake N.; Ghosh, Subhangi; Kihara, Daisuke; Crowley, Michael; Himmel, Michael E.; Bolin, Jeffrey T.; Carpita, Nicholas C.

    2014-07-10

    Cellulose microfibrils are para-crystalline arrays of several dozen linear (1→4)-β-d-glucan chains synthesized at the surface of the cell membrane by large, multimeric complexes of synthase proteins. Recombinant catalytic domains of rice (Oryza sativa) CesA8 cellulose synthase form dimers reversibly as the fundamental scaffold units of architecture in the synthase complex. Specificity of binding to UDP and UDP-Glc indicates a properly folded protein, and binding kinetics indicate that each monomer independently synthesizes single glucan chains of cellulose, i.e., two chains per dimer pair. In contrast to structure modeling predictions, solution x-ray scattering studies demonstrate that the monomer is a two-domain, elongated structure, with the smaller domain coupling two monomers into a dimer. The catalytic core of the monomer is accommodated only near its center, with the plant-specific sequences occupying the small domain and an extension distal to the catalytic domain. This configuration is in stark contrast to the domain organization obtained in predicted structures of plant CesA. As a result, the arrangement of the catalytic domain within the CesA monomer and dimer provides a foundation for constructing structural models of the synthase complex and defining the relationship between the rosette structure and the cellulose microfibrils they synthesize.

  8. The structure of the catalytic domain of a plant cellulose synthase and its assembly into dimers

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Olek, Anna T.; Rayon, Catherine; Makowski, Lee; Kim, Hyung Rae; Ciesielski, Peter; Badger, John; Paul, Lake N.; Ghosh, Subhangi; Kihara, Daisuke; Crowley, Michael; et al

    2014-07-10

    Cellulose microfibrils are para-crystalline arrays of several dozen linear (1→4)-β-d-glucan chains synthesized at the surface of the cell membrane by large, multimeric complexes of synthase proteins. Recombinant catalytic domains of rice (Oryza sativa) CesA8 cellulose synthase form dimers reversibly as the fundamental scaffold units of architecture in the synthase complex. Specificity of binding to UDP and UDP-Glc indicates a properly folded protein, and binding kinetics indicate that each monomer independently synthesizes single glucan chains of cellulose, i.e., two chains per dimer pair. In contrast to structure modeling predictions, solution x-ray scattering studies demonstrate that the monomer is a two-domain, elongatedmore » structure, with the smaller domain coupling two monomers into a dimer. The catalytic core of the monomer is accommodated only near its center, with the plant-specific sequences occupying the small domain and an extension distal to the catalytic domain. This configuration is in stark contrast to the domain organization obtained in predicted structures of plant CesA. As a result, the arrangement of the catalytic domain within the CesA monomer and dimer provides a foundation for constructing structural models of the synthase complex and defining the relationship between the rosette structure and the cellulose microfibrils they synthesize.« less

  9. The structure of the catalytic domain of a plant cellulose synthase and its assembly into dimers.

    PubMed

    Olek, Anna T; Rayon, Catherine; Makowski, Lee; Kim, Hyung Rae; Ciesielski, Peter; Badger, John; Paul, Lake N; Ghosh, Subhangi; Kihara, Daisuke; Crowley, Michael; Himmel, Michael E; Bolin, Jeffrey T; Carpita, Nicholas C

    2014-07-01

    Cellulose microfibrils are para-crystalline arrays of several dozen linear (1→4)-β-d-glucan chains synthesized at the surface of the cell membrane by large, multimeric complexes of synthase proteins. Recombinant catalytic domains of rice (Oryza sativa) CesA8 cellulose synthase form dimers reversibly as the fundamental scaffold units of architecture in the synthase complex. Specificity of binding to UDP and UDP-Glc indicates a properly folded protein, and binding kinetics indicate that each monomer independently synthesizes single glucan chains of cellulose, i.e., two chains per dimer pair. In contrast to structure modeling predictions, solution x-ray scattering studies demonstrate that the monomer is a two-domain, elongated structure, with the smaller domain coupling two monomers into a dimer. The catalytic core of the monomer is accommodated only near its center, with the plant-specific sequences occupying the small domain and an extension distal to the catalytic domain. This configuration is in stark contrast to the domain organization obtained in predicted structures of plant CesA. The arrangement of the catalytic domain within the CesA monomer and dimer provides a foundation for constructing structural models of the synthase complex and defining the relationship between the rosette structure and the cellulose microfibrils they synthesize. PMID:25012190

  10. The structure of the catalytic domain of a plant cellulose synthase and its assembly into dimers.

    PubMed

    Olek, Anna T; Rayon, Catherine; Makowski, Lee; Kim, Hyung Rae; Ciesielski, Peter; Badger, John; Paul, Lake N; Ghosh, Subhangi; Kihara, Daisuke; Crowley, Michael; Himmel, Michael E; Bolin, Jeffrey T; Carpita, Nicholas C

    2014-07-01

    Cellulose microfibrils are para-crystalline arrays of several dozen linear (1→4)-β-d-glucan chains synthesized at the surface of the cell membrane by large, multimeric complexes of synthase proteins. Recombinant catalytic domains of rice (Oryza sativa) CesA8 cellulose synthase form dimers reversibly as the fundamental scaffold units of architecture in the synthase complex. Specificity of binding to UDP and UDP-Glc indicates a properly folded protein, and binding kinetics indicate that each monomer independently synthesizes single glucan chains of cellulose, i.e., two chains per dimer pair. In contrast to structure modeling predictions, solution x-ray scattering studies demonstrate that the monomer is a two-domain, elongated structure, with the smaller domain coupling two monomers into a dimer. The catalytic core of the monomer is accommodated only near its center, with the plant-specific sequences occupying the small domain and an extension distal to the catalytic domain. This configuration is in stark contrast to the domain organization obtained in predicted structures of plant CesA. The arrangement of the catalytic domain within the CesA monomer and dimer provides a foundation for constructing structural models of the synthase complex and defining the relationship between the rosette structure and the cellulose microfibrils they synthesize.

  11. Blocking cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer formation by steric hindrance.

    PubMed

    Vendrell-Criado, Victoria; Lhiaubet-Vallet, Virginie; Yamaji, Minoru; Cuquerella, M Consuelo; Miranda, Miguel A

    2016-04-26

    The efficiency of thymine (Thy) and uracil (Ura) to form cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) in solution, upon UV irradiation differs by one order of magnitude. This could to be partially related to the steric hindrance induced by the methyl at C5 in thymine. The aim of the present work is to establish the influence of a bulky moiety at this position on the photoreactivity of pyrimidines. With this purpose, photosensitization with benzophenone and acetone of a 5-tert-butyl uracil derivative () and the equivalent Thy () has been compared. Introduction of the tert-butyl group completely blocks CPD formation. Moreover, the mechanistic insight obtained by laser flash photolysis is in accordance with the observed photoreactivity. PMID:27112630

  12. Intermolecular dimerization with pillared layered clay templates.

    SciTech Connect

    Wiederrecht, G. P.; Sandi, G.; Carrado, K. A.; Seifert, S.; Chemistry

    2001-11-19

    Solutions of pyrene in the presence of a pillared, layered montmorillonite clay produce hybrid organic-inorganic materials with substantial molecular loading in the gallery regions between the clay layers. The results are in sharp contrast to other aromatics, such as benzene, naphthalene, or perylene, which show minimal incorporation of the molecules into the gallery regions of the clay. We present evidence that the unusual affinity for pyrene to form intermolecular dimers is the reason for the high loading. Pyrene monomers are easily introduced to the layers. Through steric hindrance, subsequent intermolecular dimer formation is allowed, and they are captured by the pillared, layered structure. CW and time-resolved emission spectra strongly indicate the presence of face-to-face intermolecular dimers (excimers) within the clay galleries. The combination of the ease of high molecular loading into an inorganic, high aspect ratio template and the collective optical properties of the organic layer may be useful as a new means to create hybrid structures.

  13. Multiphoton ionization spectroscopy of the sodium dimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, John; Weiner, John

    1984-07-01

    We report an investigation of the role of molecular multiphoton ionization in the production of Na+2 when sodium vapor is subjected to intense optical radiation. Previous authors attribute the source of much of the ion dimer signal to laser-induced associative ionization of atom sodium. In this experiment, we distinguish the molecular process from atomic collisional mechanisms by producing an intense molecular beam created through free-jet expansion of the metal vapor. The beam of nearly 50% dimers cooled to their low rotational and vibrational states allow us to obtain a simplified three-photon ionization spectrum. We find that the spectrum displays two-photon resonances corresponding to known Rydberg level transitions and that the A state, acting as virtual intermediate, plays a crucial role in the large peak-to-peak intensity variations. We employ a simple model of multiphoton ionization which uses a rate-equation approach to generate a calculated spectrum. Based on the experimental results and the success of the model in reflecting them, we conclude that much of the highly structured component of the dimer ion signal reported previously under different experimental conditions is probably due to molecular multiphoton ionization but that this structure rides on a slowly varying broad signal envelope due to laser-induced associative ionization.

  14. Dimer monomer transition and dimer re-formation play important role for ATM cellular function during DNA repair

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Fengxia; Zhang, Minjie; Li, Xiaohua; Yang, Caiyun; Meng, Hao; Wang, Dong; Chang, Shuang; Xu, Ye; Price, Brendan; Sun, Yingli

    2014-10-03

    Highlights: • ATM phosphorylates the opposite strand of the dimer in response to DNA damage. • The PETPVFRLT box of ATM plays a key role in its dimer dissociation in DNA repair. • The dephosphorylation of ATM is critical for dimer re-formation after DNA repair. - Abstract: The ATM protein kinase, is a serine/threonine protein kinase that is recruited and activated by DNA double-strand breaks, mediates responses to ionizing radiation in mammalian cells. Here we show that ATM is held inactive in unirradiated cells as a dimer and phosphorylates the opposite strand of the dimer in response to DNA damage. Cellular irradiation induces rapid intermolecular autophosphorylation of serine 1981 that causes dimer dissociation and initiates cellular ATM kinase activity. ATM cannot phosphorylate the substrates when it could not undergo dimer monomer transition. After DNA repair, the active monomer will undergo dephosphorylation to form dimer again and dephosphorylation is critical for dimer re-formation. Our work reveals novel function of ATM dimer monomer transition and explains why ATM dimer monomer transition plays such important role for ATM cellular activity during DNA repair.

  15. Adsorption behaviors of monomer and dimer of formic acid on Pt(111) in the absence and presence of water.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yuanyuan; Zhu, Rongxiu; Zhang, Dongju

    2014-06-01

    By performing density functional theory (DFT) theory calculations, we studied the adsorption behaviors of the monomer and dimer of formic acid (HCOOH, FA) on the Pt(111) surface with and without the presence of water molecules. The monomer prefers to stand on the surface of Pt(111), and in the most stable adsorption configuration the carbonyl O of HCOOH binds to the atop site of a Pt atom and the hydroxyl H points asymmetrically to two neighboring Pt atoms. The dimer of HCOOH not only exists in the gas-phase but also on Pt(111) surface, and the eight-membered ring dimer is identified as the energetically most favorable dimeric structure of HCOOH both in gas-phase and on Pt(111) surface. With the presence of water molecules, both the monomer and dimer of HCOOH prefer to lie parallel to the surface so as to maximize the number of H-bonds to adjacent water molecules. These results indicate that water molecules significantly influence the initial adsorption manner of HCOOH and further its decomposition reactivity on Pt(111) surface. The present work shows the adsorption behavior of HCOOH dimer on Pt(111) for the first time and also gives several new adsorption configurations of the monomer that are not reported in literature. The theoretical results are expected to provide a valuable input to understand the reactivity of HCOOH on Pt(111). PMID:24827612

  16. Onion-like glycodendrimersomes from sequence-defined Janus glycodendrimers and influence of architecture on reactivity to a lectin

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Qi; Zhang, Shaodong; Wang, Zhichun; Sherman, Samuel E.; Moussodia, Ralph-Olivier; Peterca, Mihai; Muncan, Adam; Williams, Dewight R.; Hammer, Daniel A.; Vértesy, Sabine; André, Sabine; Gabius, Hans-Joachim; Klein, Michael L.; Percec, Virgil

    2016-01-01

    A library of eight amphiphilic Janus glycodendrimers (GDs) with d-mannose (Man) headgroups, a known routing signal for lectin-mediated transport processes, was constructed via an iterative modular methodology. Sequence-defined variations of the Janus GD modulate the surface density and sequence of Man after self-assembly into multilamellar glycodendrimersomes (GDSs). The spatial mode of Man presentation is decisive for formation of either unilamellar or onion-like GDS vesicles. Man presentation and Janus GD concentration determine GDS size and number of bilayers. Beyond vesicle architecture, Man topological display affects kinetics and plateau level of GDS aggregation by a tetravalent model lectin: the leguminous agglutinin Con A, which is structurally related to endogenous cargo transporters. The agglutination process was rapid, efficient, and readily reversible for onion-like GDSs, demonstrating their value as versatile tools to explore the nature of physiologically relevant glycan/lectin pairing. PMID:26787853

  17. RNA sequencing as a powerful tool in searching for genes influencing health and performance traits of horses.

    PubMed

    Stefaniuk, Monika; Ropka-Molik, Katarzyna

    2016-05-01

    RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) by next-generation technology is a powerful tool which creates new possibilities in whole-transcriptome analysis. In recent years, with the use of the RNA-seq method, several studies expanded transcriptional gene profiles to understand interactions between genotype and phenotype, supremely contributing to the field of equine biology. To date, in horses, massive parallel sequencing of cDNA has been successfully used to identify and quantify mRNA levels in several normal tissues, as well as to annotate genes. Moreover, the RNA-seq method has been applied to identify the genetic basis of several diseases or to investigate organism adaptation processes to the training conditions. The use of the RNA-seq approach has also confirmed that horses can be useful as a large animal model for human disease, especially in the field of immune response. The presented review summarizes the achievements of profiling gene expression in horses (Equus caballus).

  18. DNA topology influences p53 sequence-specific DNA binding through structural transitions within the target sites.

    PubMed

    Jagelská, Eva B; Brázda, Václav; Pecinka, Petr; Palecek, Emil; Fojta, Miroslav

    2008-05-15

    The tumour suppressor protein p53 is one of the most important factors regulating cell proliferation, differentiation and programmed cell death in response to a variety of cellular stress signals. P53 is a nuclear phosphoprotein and its biochemical function is closely associated with its ability to bind DNA in a sequence-specific manner and operate as a transcription factor. Using a competition assay, we investigated the effect of DNA topology on the DNA binding of human wild-type p53 protein. We prepared sets of topoisomers of plasmid DNA with and without p53 target sequences, differing in their internal symmetry. Binding of p53 to DNA increased with increasing negative superhelix density (-sigma). At -sigma < or = 0.03, the relative effect of DNA supercoiling on protein-DNA binding was similar for DNA containing both symmetrical and non-symmetrical target sites. On the other hand, at higher -sigma, target sites with a perfect inverted repeat sequence exhibited a more significant enhancement of p53 binding as a result of increasing levels of negative DNA supercoiling. For -sigma = 0.07, an approx. 3-fold additional increase in binding was observed for a symmetrical target site compared with a non-symmetrical target site. The p53 target sequences possessing the inverted repeat symmetry were shown to form a cruciform structure in sufficiently negative supercoiled DNA. We show that formation of cruciforms in DNA topoisomers at -sigma > or = 0.05 correlates with the extra enhancement of p53-DNA binding. PMID:18271758

  19. High throughput sequencing analysis of RNA libraries reveals the influences of initial library and PCR methods on SELEX efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Mayumi; Wu, Xiwei; Ho, Michelle; Chomchan, Pritsana; Rossi, John J.; Burnett, John C.; Zhou, Jiehua

    2016-01-01

    The systemic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) technique is a powerful and effective aptamer-selection procedure. However, modifications to the process can dramatically improve selection efficiency and aptamer performance. For example, droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) has been recently incorporated into SELEX selection protocols to putatively reduce the propagation of byproducts and avoid selection bias that result from differences in PCR efficiency of sequences within the random library. However, a detailed, parallel comparison of the efficacy of conventional solution PCR versus the ddPCR modification in the RNA aptamer-selection process is needed to understand effects on overall SELEX performance. In the present study, we took advantage of powerful high throughput sequencing technology and bioinformatics analysis coupled with SELEX (HT-SELEX) to thoroughly investigate the effects of initial library and PCR methods in the RNA aptamer identification. Our analysis revealed that distinct “biased sequences” and nucleotide composition existed in the initial, unselected libraries purchased from two different manufacturers and that the fate of the “biased sequences” was target-dependent during selection. Our comparison of solution PCR- and ddPCR-driven HT-SELEX demonstrated that PCR method affected not only the nucleotide composition of the enriched sequences, but also the overall SELEX efficiency and aptamer efficacy. PMID:27652575

  20. Diagnosing Lung Nodules on Oncologic MR/PET Imaging: Comparison of Fast T1-Weighted Sequences and Influence of Image Acquisition in Inspiration and Expiration Breath-Hold

    PubMed Central

    Schwenzer, Nina F.; Seith, Ferdinand; Gatidis, Sergios; Brendle, Cornelia; Schmidt, Holger; Pfannenberg, Christina A.; laFougère, Christian; Nikolaou, Konstantin

    2016-01-01

    Objective First, to investigate the diagnostic performance of fast T1-weighted sequences for lung nodule evaluation in oncologic magnetic resonance (MR)/positron emission tomography (PET). Second, to evaluate the influence of image acquisition in inspiration and expiration breath-hold on diagnostic performance. Materials and Methods The study was approved by the local Institutional Review Board. PET/CT and MR/PET of 44 cancer patients were evaluated by 2 readers. PET/CT included lung computed tomography (CT) scans in inspiration and expiration (CTin, CTex). MR/PET included Dixon sequence for attenuation correction and fast T1-weighted volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination (VIBE) sequences (volume interpolated breath-hold examination acquired in inspiration [VIBEin], volume interpolated breath-hold examination acquired in expiration [VIBEex]). Diagnostic performance was analyzed for lesion-, lobe-, and size-dependence. Diagnostic confidence was evaluated (4-point Likert-scale; 1 = high). Jackknife alternative free-response receiver-operating characteristic (JAFROC) analysis was performed. Results Seventy-six pulmonary lesions were evaluated. Lesion-based detection rates were: CTex, 77.6%; VIBEin, 53.3%; VIBEex, 51.3%; and Dixon, 22.4%. Lobe-based detection rates were: CTex, 89.6%; VIBEin, 58.3%; VIBEex, 60.4%; and Dixon, 31.3%. In contrast to CT, inspiration versus expiration did not alter diagnostic performance in VIBE sequences. Diagnostic confidence was best for VIBEin and CTex and decreased in VIBEex and Dixon (1.2 ± 0.6; 1.2 ± 0.7; 1.5 ± 0.9; 1.7 ± 1.1, respectively). The JAFROC figure-of-merit of Dixon was significantly lower. All patients with malignant lesions were identified by CTex, VIBEin, and VIBEex, while 3 patients were false-negative in Dixon. Conclusion Fast T1-weighted VIBE sequences allow for identification of patients with malignant pulmonary lesions. The Dixon sequence is not recommended for lung nodule evaluation in oncologic MR

  1. Influence of 63Ser phosphorylation and dephosphorylation on the structure of the stathmin helical nucleation sequence: a molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Missimer, John H; Steinmetz, Michel O; van Gunsteren, Wilfred F; Dolenc, Jožica

    2012-10-23

    Phosphorylation is an important mechanism regulating protein-protein interactions involving intrinsically disordered protein regions. Stathmin, an archetypical example of an intrinsically disordered protein, is a key regulator of microtubule dynamics in which phosphorylation of 63Ser within the helical nucleation sequence strongly down-regulates the tubulin binding and microtubule destabilizing activities of the protein. Experimental studies on a peptide encompassing the 19-residue helical nucleation sequence of stathmin (residues 55-73) indicate that phosphorylation of 63Ser destabilizes the peptide's secondary structure by disrupting the salt bridges supporting its helical conformation. In order to investigate this hypothesis at atomic resolution, we performed molecular dynamics simulations of nonphosphorylated and phosphorylated stathmin-[55-73] at room temperature and pressure, neutral pH, and explicit solvation using the recently released GROMOS force field 54A7. In the simulations of nonphosphorylated stathmin-[55-73] emerged salt bridges associated with helical configurations. In the simulations of 63Ser phosphorylated stathmin-[55-73] these configurations dispersed and were replaced by a proliferation of salt bridges yielding disordered configurations. The transformation of the salt bridges was accompanied by emergence of numerous interactions between main and side chains, involving notably the oxygen atoms of the phosphorylated 63Ser. The loss of helical structure induced by phosphorylation is reversible, however, as a final simulation showed. The results extend the hypothesis of salt bridge derangement suggested by experimental observations of the stathmin nucleation sequence, providing new insights into regulation of intrinsically disordered protein systems mediated by phosphorylation. PMID:22978582

  2. Gene-Based Sequencing Identifies Lipid-Influencing Variants with Ethnicity-Specific Effects in African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Bentley, Amy R.; Chen, Guanjie; Shriner, Daniel; Doumatey, Ayo P.; Zhou, Jie; Huang, Hanxia; Mullikin, James C.; Blakesley, Robert W.; Hansen, Nancy F.; Bouffard, Gerard G.; Cherukuri, Praveen F.; Maskeri, Baishali; Young, Alice C.; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Rotimi, Charles N.

    2014-01-01

    Although a considerable proportion of serum lipids loci identified in European ancestry individuals (EA) replicate in African Americans (AA), interethnic differences in the distribution of serum lipids suggest that some genetic determinants differ by ethnicity. We conducted a comprehensive evaluation of five lipid candidate genes to identify variants with ethnicity-specific effects. We sequenced ABCA1, LCAT, LPL, PON1, and SERPINE1 in 48 AA individuals with extreme serum lipid concentrations (high HDLC/low TG or low HDLC/high TG). Identified variants were genotyped in the full population-based sample of AA (n = 1694) and tested for an association with serum lipids. rs328 (LPL) and correlated variants were associated with higher HDLC and lower TG. Interestingly, a stronger effect was observed on a “European” vs. “African” genetic background at this locus. To investigate this effect, we evaluated the region among West Africans (WA). For TG, the effect size among WA was the same in AA with only African local ancestry (2–3% lower TG), while the larger association among AA with local European ancestry matched previous reports in EA (10%). For HDLC, there was no association with rs328 in AA with only African local ancestry or in WA, while the association among AA with European local ancestry was much greater than what has been observed for EA (15 vs. ∼5 mg/dl), suggesting an interaction with an environmental or genetic factor that differs by ethnicity. Beyond this ancestry effect, the importance of African ancestry-focused, sequence-based work was also highlighted by serum lipid associations of variants that were in higher frequency (or present only) among those of African ancestry. By beginning our study with the sequence variation present in AA individuals, investigating local ancestry effects, and seeking replication in WA, we were able to comprehensively evaluate the role of a set of candidate genes in serum lipids in AA. PMID:24603370

  3. Gene-based sequencing identifies lipid-influencing variants with ethnicity-specific effects in African Americans.

    PubMed

    Bentley, Amy R; Chen, Guanjie; Shriner, Daniel; Doumatey, Ayo P; Zhou, Jie; Huang, Hanxia; Mullikin, James C; Blakesley, Robert W; Hansen, Nancy F; Bouffard, Gerard G; Cherukuri, Praveen F; Maskeri, Baishali; Young, Alice C; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Rotimi, Charles N

    2014-03-01

    Although a considerable proportion of serum lipids loci identified in European ancestry individuals (EA) replicate in African Americans (AA), interethnic differences in the distribution of serum lipids suggest that some genetic determinants differ by ethnicity. We conducted a comprehensive evaluation of five lipid candidate genes to identify variants with ethnicity-specific effects. We sequenced ABCA1, LCAT, LPL, PON1, and SERPINE1 in 48 AA individuals with extreme serum lipid concentrations (high HDLC/low TG or low HDLC/high TG). Identified variants were genotyped in the full population-based sample of AA (n = 1694) and tested for an association with serum lipids. rs328 (LPL) and correlated variants were associated with higher HDLC and lower TG. Interestingly, a stronger effect was observed on a "European" vs. "African" genetic background at this locus. To investigate this effect, we evaluated the region among West Africans (WA). For TG, the effect size among WA was the same in AA with only African local ancestry (2-3% lower TG), while the larger association among AA with local European ancestry matched previous reports in EA (10%). For HDLC, there was no association with rs328 in AA with only African local ancestry or in WA, while the association among AA with European local ancestry was much greater than what has been observed for EA (15 vs. ∼ 5 mg/dl), suggesting an interaction with an environmental or genetic factor that differs by ethnicity. Beyond this ancestry effect, the importance of African ancestry-focused, sequence-based work was also highlighted by serum lipid associations of variants that were in higher frequency (or present only) among those of African ancestry. By beginning our study with the sequence variation present in AA individuals, investigating local ancestry effects, and seeking replication in WA, we were able to comprehensively evaluate the role of a set of candidate genes in serum lipids in AA. PMID:24603370

  4. Gene-based sequencing identifies lipid-influencing variants with ethnicity-specific effects in African Americans.

    PubMed

    Bentley, Amy R; Chen, Guanjie; Shriner, Daniel; Doumatey, Ayo P; Zhou, Jie; Huang, Hanxia; Mullikin, James C; Blakesley, Robert W; Hansen, Nancy F; Bouffard, Gerard G; Cherukuri, Praveen F; Maskeri, Baishali; Young, Alice C; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Rotimi, Charles N

    2014-03-01

    Although a considerable proportion of serum lipids loci identified in European ancestry individuals (EA) replicate in African Americans (AA), interethnic differences in the distribution of serum lipids suggest that some genetic determinants differ by ethnicity. We conducted a comprehensive evaluation of five lipid candidate genes to identify variants with ethnicity-specific effects. We sequenced ABCA1, LCAT, LPL, PON1, and SERPINE1 in 48 AA individuals with extreme serum lipid concentrations (high HDLC/low TG or low HDLC/high TG). Identified variants were genotyped in the full population-based sample of AA (n = 1694) and tested for an association with serum lipids. rs328 (LPL) and correlated variants were associated with higher HDLC and lower TG. Interestingly, a stronger effect was observed on a "European" vs. "African" genetic background at this locus. To investigate this effect, we evaluated the region among West Africans (WA). For TG, the effect size among WA was the same in AA with only African local ancestry (2-3% lower TG), while the larger association among AA with local European ancestry matched previous reports in EA (10%). For HDLC, there was no association with rs328 in AA with only African local ancestry or in WA, while the association among AA with European local ancestry was much greater than what has been observed for EA (15 vs. ∼ 5 mg/dl), suggesting an interaction with an environmental or genetic factor that differs by ethnicity. Beyond this ancestry effect, the importance of African ancestry-focused, sequence-based work was also highlighted by serum lipid associations of variants that were in higher frequency (or present only) among those of African ancestry. By beginning our study with the sequence variation present in AA individuals, investigating local ancestry effects, and seeking replication in WA, we were able to comprehensively evaluate the role of a set of candidate genes in serum lipids in AA.

  5. A new isoleucine substitution of Val-20 in transthyretin tetramers selectively impairs dimer-dimer contacts and causes systemic amyloidosis.

    PubMed Central

    Jenne, D E; Denzel, K; Blätzinger, P; Winter, P; Obermaier, B; Linke, R P; Altland, K

    1996-01-01

    The most frequent form of inherited amyloidoses is associated with mutations in the transthyretin (TTR) gene coding for 127-amino acid residues of four identical, noncovalently linked subunits that form a pair of dimers in the plasma protein complex. Amyloid fibrils containing the variant and to a lesser extent the wild-type form of the TTR molecule are deposited in various organs, including peripheral nerves and the myocardium, with polyneuropathy and cardiomyopathy as major clinical manifestations. So far, more than 40 distinct amino acid substitutions distributed throughout the TTR sequence over 30 positions have been found to be correlated with an increased amyloidogenicity of TTR. Most of these amyloidogenic amino acid substitutions are suspected to alter the conformation and stability of the monomer. Here we identify and characterize by protein and DNA analysis a novel amyloidogenic Val-20 to Ile mutation in a German three-generation family. The index patient suffered from severe amyloid cardiomyopathy at the age of 60. Conformational stability and unfolding behavior of the Ile-20 monomer in urea gradients was found to be almost indistinguishable from that of wild-type TTR. In contrast, tetramer stability was significantly reduced in agreement with the expected change in the interactions between the two opposing dimers via the side chain of Ile-20. Our observations provide strong evidence for the view that amyloidogenic amino acid substitutions in TTR facilitate the conversion of tetrameric TTR complexes into those conformational intermediates of the TTR folding pathway that have an intrinsic amyloidogenic potential. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:8692810

  6. NMR insights into dynamics regulated target binding of DLC8 dimer

    SciTech Connect

    Krishna Mohan, P.M.; Hosur, Ramakrishna V. . E-mail: hosur@tifr.res.in

    2007-04-20

    Conformational dynamics play a crucial role in biological function. Dynein light chain protein (DLC8) acts as a cargo adaptor, and exists as a dimer under physiological conditions and dissociates into monomer below pH 4. In the present NMR study, we identified some dynamic residues in the dimer using chemical shift perturbation approach by applying small pH change. As evidenced by gel filtration and CD studies, this small pH change does not alter the globular structural features of the protein. In fact, these changes result in small local stability perturbations as monitored using temperature dependence of amide proton chemical shifts, and influence the dynamics of the dimer substantially. Further, interaction studies of the protein with a peptide containing the recognition motif of cargo indicated that the efficacy of peptide binding decreases when the pH is reduced from 7 to 6. These observations taken together support the conception that dynamics can regulate cargo binding/trafficking by the DLC8 dimer.

  7. UV light-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers are mutagenic in mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Protic-Sabljic, M.; Tuteja, N.; Munson, P.J.; Hauser, J.; Kraemer, K.H.; Dixon, K.

    1986-10-01

    We used a simian virus 40-based shuttle vector plasmid, pZ189, to determine the role of pyrimidine cyclobutane dimers in UV light-induced mutagenesis in monkey cells. The vector DNA was UV irradiated and then introduced into monkey cells by transfection. After replication, vector DNA was recovered from the cells and tested for mutations in its supF suppressor tRNA marker gene by transformation of Escherichia coli carrying a nonsense mutation in the beta-galactosidase gene. When the irradiated vector was treated with E. coli photolyase prior to transfection, pyrimidine cyclobutane dimers were removed selectively. Removal of approximately 90% of the pyrimidine cyclobutane dimers increased the biological activity of the vector by 75% and reduced its mutation frequency by 80%. Sequence analysis of 72 mutants recovered indicated that there were significantly fewer tandem double-base changes and G X C----A X T transitions (particularly at CC sites) after photoreactivation of the DNA. UV-induced photoproducts remained (although at greatly reduced levels) at all pyr-pyr sites after photoreactivation, but there was a relative increase in photoproducts at CC and TC sites and a relative decrease at TT and CT sites, presumably due to a persistence of (6-4) photoproducts at some CC and TC sites. These observations are consistent with the fact that mutations were found after photoreactivation at many sites at which only cyclobutane dimers would be expected to occur. From these results we conclude that UV-induced pyrimidine cyclobutane dimers are mutagenic in DNA replicated in monkey cells.

  8. Influence of dosing sequence and film thickness on structure and resistivity of Al-ZnO films grown by atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Pollock, Evan B. Lad, Robert J.

    2014-07-01

    Aluminum-doped zinc oxide (AZO) films were deposited onto amorphous silica substrates using an atomic layer deposition process with diethyl zinc (DEZ), trimethyl aluminum (TMA), and deionized water at 200 °C. Three different Al doping sequences were used at a ZnO:Al ratio of 11:1 within the films. A minimum film resistivity of 1.6 × 10{sup −3} Ω cm was produced using sequential dosing of DEZ, TMA, DEZ, followed by H{sub 2}O for the Al doping step. This “ZAZW” sequence yielded an AZO film resistivity that is independent of film thickness, crystallographic texture, and grain size, as determined by high resolution x-ray diffraction (XRD). A pseudo-Voigt analysis method yields values for grain sizes that are smaller than those calculated using other XRD methods. Anisotropic grain sizes or variations in crystallographic texture have minimal influence on film resistivity, which suggests that factors other than film texture, such as intragrain scattering, may be important in influencing film resistivity.

  9. Long terminal repeat (LTR) sequences, env, and a region near the 5' LTR influence the pathogenic potential of recombinants between Rous-associated virus types 0 and 1.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, D W; Blais, B P; Robinson, H L

    1988-01-01

    A series of recombinants between Rous-associated virus type 0 (RAV-0), RAV-1, and a replication-competent avian leukosis virus vector (RCAN) have been tested for disease potential in day-old inoculated K28 chicks. RAV-0 is a benign virus, whereas RAV-1 and RCAN induce lymphoma and a low incidence of a variety of other neoplasms. The results of the oncogenicity tests indicate that (i) the long terminal repeat regions of RAV-1 and RCAN play a major role in disease potential, (ii) subgroup A envelope glycoproteins are associated with a two- to fourfold higher incidence of lymphoma than subgroup E glycoproteins, and (iii) certain combinations of 5' viral and env sequences cause osteopetrosis in a highly context-dependent manner. Long terminal repeat and env sequences appeared to influence lymphomogenic potential by determining the extent of bursal infection within the first 2 to 3 weeks of life. This would suggest that bursal but not postbursal stem cells are targets for avian leukosis virus-induced lymphomogenesis. The induction of neutralizing antibody had no obvious influence on the incidence of lymphoma. PMID:2841495

  10. Influence of nucleotides flanking the ggaa core sequence on ets1 and ets2 DNA-binding activity and the mechanism of ets1 autoregulation.

    PubMed

    Ascione, R; Thompson, D; Thomas, R; Panayiotakis, A; Ramsay, R; Tymms, M; Kola, I; Seth, A

    1992-11-01

    The Ets family of genes encode nuclear proteins that activate transcription by binding to a specific purine-rich (GGAA) ets binding sequence (EBS) present in promoters/enhancers of various genes. We have previously shown that over-expression of ets1 via transfection of ets1 expression vectors into NIH3T3 cells induced the expression of the endogenous Ets1 gene. Here we report that the autoregulation occurs as a result of the ets1 protein binding to the EBS-core located in its own promoter. In the present study, we have also identified Ets binding sites in the IL-4, G-CSF (granulocyte colony stimulating factor), and the 2'5' OAS (oligoadenylate synthetase) promoters by binding with Ets1 and Ets2 proteins using electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Interestingly, we have found that the EBS containing T nucleotides on either side of the GGAA core sequence, does not bind Ets1 or Ets2 proteins. Our findings demonstrate that the sequences surrounding the purine core - GGAA- have a profound influence on the binding of Ets proteins. PMID:21584592

  11. Influence of Quasi-Specific Sites on Kinetics of Target DNA Search by a Sequence-Specific DNA-Binding Protein

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Functions of transcription factors require formation of specific complexes at particular sites in cis-regulatory elements of genes. However, chromosomal DNA contains numerous sites that are similar to the target sequences recognized by transcription factors. The influence of such “quasi-specific” sites on functions of the transcription factors is not well understood at present by experimental means. In this work, using fluorescence methods, we have investigated the influence of quasi-specific DNA sites on the efficiency of target location by the zinc finger DNA-binding domain of the inducible transcription factor Egr-1, which recognizes a 9 bp sequence. By stopped-flow assays, we measured the kinetics of Egr-1’s association with a target site on 143 bp DNA in the presence of various competitor DNAs, including nonspecific and quasi-specific sites. The presence of quasi-specific sites on competitor DNA significantly decelerated the target association by the Egr-1 protein. The impact of the quasi-specific sites depended strongly on their affinity, their concentration, and the degree of their binding to the protein. To quantitatively describe the kinetic impact of the quasi-specific sites, we derived an analytical form of the apparent kinetic rate constant for the target association and used it for fitting to the experimental data. Our kinetic data with calf thymus DNA as a competitor suggested that there are millions of high-affinity quasi-specific sites for Egr-1 among the 3 billion bp of genomic DNA. This study quantitatively demonstrates that naturally abundant quasi-specific sites on DNA can considerably impede the target search processes of sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins. PMID:26502071

  12. Caffeine dimerization: effects of sugar, salts, and water structure.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Seishi

    2015-10-01

    Sugars and salts strongly affect the dimerization of caffeine in water. Such a change of dimerization, considered to be crucial for bitter taste suppression, has long been rationalized by the change of "water structure" induced by the additives; "kosmotropic" (water structure enhancing) salts and sugars promote dimerization, whereas "chaotropic" (water structure breaking) salts suppress dimerization. Based on statistical thermodynamics, here we challenge this consensus; we combine the rigorous Kirkwood-Buff theory of solution with the classical isodesmic model of caffeine association. Instead of the change of water structure, we show that the enhancement of caffeine dimerization is due to the exclusion of additives from caffeine, and that the weakening of dimerization is due to the binding of additives on caffeine.

  13. Graded-index optical dimer formed by optical force.

    PubMed

    Akbarzadeh, Alireza; Koschny, Thomas; Kafesaki, Maria; Economou, Eleftherios N; Soukoulis, Costas M

    2016-05-30

    We propose an optical dimer formed from two spherical lenses bound by the pressure that light exerts on matter. With the help of the method of force tracing, we find the required graded-index profiles of the lenses for the existence of the dimer. We study the dynamics of the opto-mechanical interaction of lenses under the illumination of collimated light beams and quantitatively validate the performance of proposed dimer. We also examine the stability of dimer due to the lateral misalignments and we show how restoring forces bring the dimer into lateral equilibrium. The dimer can be employed in various practical applications such as optical manipulation, sensing and imaging. PMID:27410066

  14. Cytochrome P450 as dimerization catalyst in diketopiperazine alkaloid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Saruwatari, Takayoshi; Yagishita, Fumitoshi; Mino, Takashi; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Hotta, Kinya; Watanabe, Kenji

    2014-03-21

    As dimeric natural products frequently exhibit useful biological activities, identifying and understanding their mechanisms of dimerization is of great interest. One such compound is (−)-ditryptophenaline, isolated from Aspergillus flavus, which inhibits substance P receptor for potential analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity. Through targeted gene knockout in A. flavus and heterologous yeast gene expression, we determined for the first time the gene cluster and pathway for the biosynthesis of a dimeric diketopiperazine alkaloid. We also determined that a single cytochrome P450, DtpC, is responsible not only for pyrroloindole ring formation but also for concurrent dimerization of N-methylphenylalanyltryptophanyl diketopiperazine monomers into a homodimeric product. Furthermore, DtpC exhibits relaxed substrate specificity, allowing the formation of two new dimeric compounds from a non-native monomeric precursor, brevianamide F. A radical-mediated mechanism of dimerization is proposed.

  15. Crystal structure of dihydropyrimidinase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1: Insights into the molecular basis of formation of a dimer.

    PubMed

    Tzeng, Ching-Ting; Huang, Yen-Hua; Huang, Cheng-Yang

    2016-09-23

    Dihydropyrimidinase, a tetrameric metalloenzyme, is a member of the cyclic amidohydrolase family, which also includes allantoinase, dihydroorotase, hydantoinase, and imidase. In this paper, we report the crystal structure of dihydropyrimidinase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 at 2.1 Å resolution. The structure of P. aeruginosa dihydropyrimidinase reveals a classic (β/α)8-barrel structure core embedding the catalytic dimetal center and a β-sandwich domain, which is commonly found in the architecture of dihydropyrimidinases. In contrast to all dihydropyrimidinases, P. aeruginosa dihydropyrimidinase forms a dimer, rather than a tetramer, both in the crystalline state and in the solution. Basing on sequence analysis and structural comparison of the C-terminal region and the dimer-dimer interface between P. aeruginosa dihydropyrimidinase and Thermus sp. dihydropyrimidinase, we propose a working model to explain why this enzyme cannot be a tetramer.

  16. Crystal structure of dihydropyrimidinase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1: Insights into the molecular basis of formation of a dimer.

    PubMed

    Tzeng, Ching-Ting; Huang, Yen-Hua; Huang, Cheng-Yang

    2016-09-23

    Dihydropyrimidinase, a tetrameric metalloenzyme, is a member of the cyclic amidohydrolase family, which also includes allantoinase, dihydroorotase, hydantoinase, and imidase. In this paper, we report the crystal structure of dihydropyrimidinase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 at 2.1 Å resolution. The structure of P. aeruginosa dihydropyrimidinase reveals a classic (β/α)8-barrel structure core embedding the catalytic dimetal center and a β-sandwich domain, which is commonly found in the architecture of dihydropyrimidinases. In contrast to all dihydropyrimidinases, P. aeruginosa dihydropyrimidinase forms a dimer, rather than a tetramer, both in the crystalline state and in the solution. Basing on sequence analysis and structural comparison of the C-terminal region and the dimer-dimer interface between P. aeruginosa dihydropyrimidinase and Thermus sp. dihydropyrimidinase, we propose a working model to explain why this enzyme cannot be a tetramer. PMID:27576201

  17. Insights into Strand Exchange in BTB Domain Dimers from the Crystal Structures of FAZF and Miz1

    SciTech Connect

    Stogios, Peter J.; Cuesta-Seijo, Jose Antonio; Chen, Lu; Pomroy, Neil C.; Privé, Gilbert G.

    2010-09-22

    The BTB domain is a widely distributed protein-protein interaction motif that is often found at the N-terminus of zinc finger transcription factors. Previous crystal structures of BTB domains have revealed tightly interwound homodimers, with the N-terminus from one chain forming a two-stranded anti-parallel {beta}-sheet with a strand from the other chain. We have solved the crystal structures of the BTB domains from Fanconi anemia zinc finger (FAZF) and Miz1 (Myc-interacting zinc finger 1) to resolutions of 2.0 {angstrom} and 2.6 {angstrom}, respectively. Unlike previous examples of BTB domain structures, the FAZF BTB domain is a nonswapped dimer, with each N-terminal {beta}-strand associated with its own chain. As a result, the dimerization interface in the FAZF BTB domain is about half as large as in the domain-swapped dimers. The Miz1 BTB domain resembles a typical swapped BTB dimer, although it has a shorter N-terminus that is not able to form the interchain sheet. Using cysteine cross-linking, we confirmed that the promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger (PLZF) BTB dimer is strand exchanged in solution, while the FAZF BTB dimer is not. A phylogenic tree of the BTB fold based on both sequence and structural features shows that the common ancestor of the BTB domain in BTB-ZF (bric a brac, tramtrack, broad-complex zinc finger) proteins was a domain-swapped dimer. The differences in the N-termini seen in the FAZF and Miz1 BTB domains appear to be more recent developments in the structural evolution of the domain.

  18. Porphyrin dimers as photosensitizers in photodynamic therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, R.K.; Smith, K.M.; Dougherty, T.J. )

    1990-07-01

    Porphyrin dimers 9 with either linkages and possible isomers bis(1-(6,7-bis(2-(methoxycarbonyl)ethyl)-1,3,5,8-tetramethyl-2- vinylporphin-4-yl)ethyl) ether (10) bis(1-(6,7-bis(2-(methoxycarbonyl)ethyl)-1,3,5,8-tetramethyl-4- vinylporphin-2-yl)ethyl) ether (11), and 1-(6,7-bis(2-(methoxycarbonyl)ethyl)-1,3,5,8-tetramethyl-2-vinylporph in- 4-yl)ethyl 1-(6,7-bis(2-(methoxycarbonyl)ethyl)-1,3,5,8-tetramethyl-4-vinylporph in- 2-yl)ethyl ether (12) were synthesized from the corresponding (1-hydroxyethyl)vinyldeuteroporphyrin IX dimethyl esters (Hvd). The pure Hvd isomers 2-(1-hydroxyethyl)-4-vinyldeuteroporphyrin IX dimethyl ester (7) and 4-(1-hydroxyethyl)-2-vinyldeuteroporphyrin IX dimethyl ester (8) were obtained from 2-acetyl-4-(1-hydroxyethyl) deuteroporphyrin IX dimethyl ester (3) and 4-acetyl-2-(1-hydroxyethyl)deuteroporphyrin IX dimethyl ester (4). Porphyrins 3 and 4 were prepared either by partial reduction of 2,4-diacetyldeuteroporphyrin IX dimethyl ester (2) or by oxidation of hematoporphyrin IX dimethyl ester (1) by using tetra-n-propylammonium perruthenate (Prn4N)(RuO4) with N-methylmorpholine N-oxide as an oxidizing agent. The in vivo photosensitizing ability and therapeutic ratios of dimers 9-12 were compared with that of Photofrin II in the SMT-F tumor growing subcutaneously in DBA/2 Ha mice. These dimers were found to have better tumoricidal activity than Photofrin II with reduced skin phototoxicity.

  19. RING DOMAIN DIMERIZATION IS ESSENTIAL FOR RNF4 FUNCTION

    PubMed Central

    Liew, Chu Wai; Sun, Huaiyu; Hunter, Tony; Day, Catherine L.

    2011-01-01

    SYNOPSIS RNF4 family ubiquitin ligases are RING E3 ligases that regulate the homeostasis of SUMOylated proteins by promoting their ubiquitylation. Here we report that the RING domain of RNF4 forms a stable dimer, and that dimerization is required for ubiquitin transfer. Our data suggests that the stability of the E2~ubiquitin thioester bond is regulated by RING domain dimerization. PMID:20681948

  20. The properties of dimers confined between two charged plates.

    PubMed

    Hatlo, Marius M; Bohinc, Klemen; Lue, Leo

    2010-03-21

    We consider two like-charged planar surfaces immersed in solution of oppositely charged dimer counterions with a bond length l. To analyze this system, we extend and employ a self-consistent field theory that has been shown to be accurate from the weak to the intermediate through to the strong coupling regimes. In the limit of very short dimers, the results converge to the results for pointlike divalent ions. Near the surfaces, the dimers lie parallel to the charged plates. In the intermediate coupling regime, the dimers are aligned perpendicularly to the surface when they are a distance l from a surface. In the weak coupling regime, the interactions are only repulsive. At slightly higher couplings, there is a minimum in the variation of the free energy with distance at approximately the bond length of the dimers, which arises from bridging conformations of the dimers. In the intermediate coupling regime, an additional minimum in the free energy is observed at much smaller distances, which is due to the correlations between the dimers. For large dimer bond lengths, this minimum is metastable with respect to the previous minimum. However, as the bond length decreases, this minimum becomes the stable, while the minimum associated with the dimer bond length becomes metastable and eventually disappears. For shorter dimer bond length the attractive interaction is the result of correlations between counterions and charges on the surfaces. We find that dimers can mediate attractive interaction between like-charged surfaces in the intermediate coupling regime. The analysis of orientations confirms the bridging mechanism for sufficiently long dimers, whereas at high electrostatic couplings charge correlations contribute to the attraction. PMID:20331276

  1. The properties of dimers confined between two charged plates.

    PubMed

    Hatlo, Marius M; Bohinc, Klemen; Lue, Leo

    2010-03-21

    We consider two like-charged planar surfaces immersed in solution of oppositely charged dimer counterions with a bond length l. To analyze this system, we extend and employ a self-consistent field theory that has been shown to be accurate from the weak to the intermediate through to the strong coupling regimes. In the limit of very short dimers, the results converge to the results for pointlike divalent ions. Near the surfaces, the dimers lie parallel to the charged plates. In the intermediate coupling regime, the dimers are aligned perpendicularly to the surface when they are a distance l from a surface. In the weak coupling regime, the interactions are only repulsive. At slightly higher couplings, there is a minimum in the variation of the free energy with distance at approximately the bond length of the dimers, which arises from bridging conformations of the dimers. In the intermediate coupling regime, an additional minimum in the free energy is observed at much smaller distances, which is due to the correlations between the dimers. For large dimer bond lengths, this minimum is metastable with respect to the previous minimum. However, as the bond length decreases, this minimum becomes the stable, while the minimum associated with the dimer bond length becomes metastable and eventually disappears. For shorter dimer bond length the attractive interaction is the result of correlations between counterions and charges on the surfaces. We find that dimers can mediate attractive interaction between like-charged surfaces in the intermediate coupling regime. The analysis of orientations confirms the bridging mechanism for sufficiently long dimers, whereas at high electrostatic couplings charge correlations contribute to the attraction.

  2. Dynamic combinatorial enrichment of polyconformational D-/L-peptide dimers.

    PubMed

    Jadhav, Kirtikumar B; Lichtenecker, Roman J; Bullach, Anke; Mandal, Bhubaneswar; Arndt, Hans-Dieter

    2015-04-01

    D-/L-peptides such as gramicidin A (gA) adopt unique dimeric β-helical structures of different topologies. To overcome their conformational promiscuity and enrich individual components, a dynamic combinatorial approach assisted by thiol tags was developed. This method led to identification of the preferential formation of antiparallel dimers under a broad range of conditions, which was independent of peptide side-chain polarity. Exclusive formation of an antiparallel cyclic dimer was achieved in the presence of cesium ions.

  3. Oligomerization of deoxynucleoside-bisphosphate dimers: template and linkage specificity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Visscher, J.; van der Woerd, R.; Bakker, C. G.; Schwartz, A. W.; Orgel, L. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1989-01-01

    Evidence is presented that a poly(U) template selectively favors the oligomerization of the activated, 3'-5' pyrophosphate-linked dimer pdAppdAp, in comparison with the 3'-3' and 5'-5' linked dimers. In the absence of poly(U), the 5'-5' linked dimer is the most reactive, and chains are formed which are more than 60 monomer units in length.

  4. VUV photofragmentation of protonated leucine-enkephalin peptide dimer below ionization energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milosavljević, Aleksandar R.; Cerovski, Viktor Z.; Ranković, Miloš Lj.; Canon, Francis; Nahon, Laurent; Giuliani, Alexandre

    2014-03-01

    The experimental investigation of 5-8 eV photons induced dissociation of the leucine-enkephalin (Leu-Enk) peptide dimer, performed by coupling a linear ion trap with a synchrotron beamline, in combination with the tandem mass spectrometry, has been reported. The present work extends the existing results on Leu-Enk VUV-induced dissociation to lower sub-ionization photon energy range. The measured tandem mass spectra show that even at the photon energies below the ionization threshold, VUV irradiation of the protonated Leu-Enk dimer precursor can lead to a rich fragmentation pattern, including peptide sequence ions and neutral losses. The photodissociation yields of selected ionic fragments reveal the absorption bands at about 6.7-7.1 eV (185-175 nm). The experimental results have been supported by theoretical description of the [2Leu-Enk + H]+ precursors, optimized at B3LYP/6-31+G( d, p) level of DFT.

  5. N-Terminal Peptide Sequence Repetition Influences the Kinetics of Backbone Fragmentation: A Manifestation of the Jahn-Teller Effect?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Good, David M.; Yang, Hongqian; Zubarev, Roman A.

    2013-11-01

    Analysis of large (>10,000 entries) databases consisting of high-resolution tandem mass spectra of peptide dications revealed with high statistical significance ( P < 1ṡ10-3) that peptides with non-identical first two N-terminal amino acids undergo cleavages of the second peptide bond at higher rates than repetitive sequences composed of the same amino acids (i.e., in general AB- and BA- bonds cleave more often than AA- and BB- bonds). This effect seems to depend upon the collisional energy, being stronger at lower energies. The phenomenon is likely to indicate the presence of the diketopiperazine structure for at least some b2 + ions. When consisting of two identical amino acids, these species should form through intermediates that have a symmetric geometry and, thus, must be subject to the Jahn-Teller effect that reduces the stability of such systems.

  6. Equivalence between XY and dimerized models

    SciTech Connect

    Campos Venuti, Lorenzo; Roncaglia, Marco

    2010-06-15

    The spin-1/2 chain with XY anisotropic coupling in the plane and the XX isotropic dimerized chain are shown to be equivalent in the bulk. For finite systems, we prove that the equivalence is exact in given parity sectors, after taking care of the precise boundary conditions. The proof is given constructively by finding unitary transformations that map the models onto each other. Moreover, we considerably generalized our mapping and showed that even in the case of fully site-dependent couplings the XY chain can be mapped onto an XX model. This result has potential application in the study of disordered systems.

  7. A high-power xenon dimer excilamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomaev, M. I.; Skakun, V. S.; Tarasenko, V. F.; Shitts, D. V.

    2006-06-01

    A high-power sealed-off excilamp operating on xenon dimers excited by a barrier discharge and emitting in the vacuum ultraviolet spectral range (λ ˜ 172 nm) has been designed, constructed, and tested. The lamp comprises six quartz tubes (emitters) and has a total radiating surface area of 20 × 20 = 400 cm2. The average output power density radiated from the surface of each emitter exceeds 120 mW/cm2. The total output power of the excilamp immediately upon discharge ignition exceeds 50 W.

  8. Absolute Ligand Discrimination by Dimeric Signaling Receptors.

    PubMed

    Fathi, Sepehr; Nayak, Chitra R; Feld, Jordan J; Zilman, Anton G

    2016-09-01

    Many signaling pathways act through shared components, where different ligand molecules bind the same receptors or activate overlapping sets of response regulators downstream. Nevertheless, different ligands acting through cross-wired pathways often lead to different outcomes in terms of the target cell behavior and function. Although a number of mechanisms have been proposed, it still largely remains unclear how cells can reliably discriminate different molecular ligands under such circumstances. Here we show that signaling via ligand-induced receptor dimerization-a very common motif in cellular signaling-naturally incorporates a mechanism for the discrimination of ligands acting through the same receptor. PMID:27602720

  9. Mechanisms underlying strong-field double ionization of argon dimers

    SciTech Connect

    Manschwetus, B.; Rottke, H.; Steinmeyer, G.; Sandner, W.; Foucar, L.; Czasch, A.; Schmidt-Boecking, H.

    2010-07-15

    We investigate double ionization of argon dimers in high-intensity ultrashort Ti:sapphire laser pulses. We are able to identify several strong-field excitation pathways of the dimer that terminate in atomic ion pairs from a Coulomb explosion. The explosion starts from two-site double-ionized dimers and from one-site double-ionized ones after radiative charge transfer at small internuclear separation. One-site double ionization is accomplished by laser-induced charge transfer in the high-intensity laser pulse following two-site double ionization. The highest energy ion pairs we observed can be attributed to ''frustrated triple ionization'' of the argon dimer.

  10. Oligomerization of deoxynucleoside-biphosphate dimers - Template and linkage specificity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Visscher, J.; Van Der Woerd, R.; Bakker, C. G.; Schwartz, Alan W.

    1989-01-01

    The oligomerization of the activated 3-prime-5-prime pyrophosphate-linked dimer, pdAppdAp, is presently noted to be selectively favored by a poly(U) template over the 3-prime-3-prime and 5-prime-5-prime linked dimers. Both overall yields and the production of the longest oligomers were markedly stimulated by poly(U)'s presence; in its absence, the 5-prime-5-prime linked dimer became the most reactive, yielding chains of the order of 60 monomer-unit lengths. Remarkable self-organization properties are noted for the 5-prime-5-prime dimer of pdAp.

  11. Rotational spectra of propargyl alcohol dimer: A dimer bound with three different types of hydrogen bonds

    SciTech Connect

    Mani, Devendra; Arunan, E.

    2014-10-28

    Pure rotational spectra of the propargyl alcohol dimer and its three deuterium isotopologues have been observed in the 4 to 13 GHz range using a pulsed-nozzle Fourier transform microwave spectrometer. For the parent dimer, a total of 51 transitions could be observed and fitted within experimental uncertainty. For two mono-substituted and one bi-substituted deuterium isotopologues, a total of 14, 17, and 19 transitions were observed, respectively. The observed rotational constants for the parent dimer [A = 2321.8335(4) MHz, B = 1150.4774(2) MHz, and C = 1124.8898(2) MHz] are close to those of the most stable structure predicted by ab initio calculations. Spectra of the three deuterated isotopologues and Kraitchman analysis positively confirm this structure. Geometrical parameters and “Atoms in Molecules” analysis on the observed structure reveal that the two propargyl alcohol units in the dimer are bound by three different types of hydrogen bonds: O–H⋯O, O–H⋯π, and C–H⋯π. To the best of our knowledge, propargyl alcohol seems to be the smallest molecule forming a homodimer with three different points of contact.

  12. Structure of the Response Regulator PhoP from Mycobacterium tuberculosis Reveals a Dimer Through the Receiver Domain

    SciTech Connect

    S Menon; S Wang

    2011-12-31

    The PhoP protein from Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a response regulator of the OmpR/PhoB subfamily, whose structure consists of an N-terminal receiver domain and a C-terminal DNA-binding domain. How the DNA-binding activities are regulated by phosphorylation of the receiver domain remains unclear due to a lack of structural information on the full-length proteins. Here we report the crystal structure of the full-length PhoP of M. tuberculosis. Unlike other known structures of full-length proteins of the same subfamily, PhoP forms a dimer through its receiver domain with the dimer interface involving {alpha}4-{beta}5-{alpha}5, a common interface for activated receiver domain dimers. However, the switch residues, Thr99 and Tyr118, are in a conformation resembling those of nonactivated receiver domains. The Tyr118 side chain is involved in the dimer interface interactions. The receiver domain is tethered to the DNA-binding domain through a flexible linker and does not impose structural constraints on the DNA-binding domain. This structure suggests that phosphorylation likely facilitates/stabilizes receiver domain dimerization, bringing the DNA-binding domains to close proximity, thereby increasing their binding affinity for direct repeat DNA sequences.

  13. Modeling Membrane Deformations and Lipid Demixing upon Protein-Membrane Interaction: The BAR Dimer Adsorption

    PubMed Central

    Khelashvili, George; Harries, Daniel; Weinstein, Harel

    2009-01-01

    We use a self-consistent mean-field theory, designed to investigate membrane reshaping and lipid demixing upon interaction with proteins, to explore BAR domains interacting with large patches of lipid membranes of heterogeneous compositions. The computational model includes contributions to the system free energy from electrostatic interactions and elastic energies of the membrane, as well as salt and lipid mixing entropies. The results from our simulation of a single adsorbing Amphiphysin BAR dimer indicate that it is capable of stabilizing a significantly curved membrane. However, we predict that such deformations will occur only for membrane patches that have the inherent propensity for high curvature, reflected in the tendency to create local distortions that closely match the curvature of the BAR dimer itself. Such favorable preconditioning for BAR-membrane interaction may be the result of perturbations such as local lipid demixing induced by the interaction, or of a prior insertion of the BAR domain's amphiphatic N-helix. From our simulations it appears that local segregation of charged lipids under the influence of the BAR dimer cannot produce high enough asymmetry between bilayer leaflets to induce significant bending. In the absence of additional energy contributions that favor membrane asymmetry, the membrane will remain nearly flat upon single BAR dimer adsorption, relative to the undulation expected from thermal fluctuations. Thus, we conclude that the N-helix insertions have a critical mechanistic role in the local perturbation and curving of the membrane, which is then stabilized by the electrostatic interaction with the BAR dimer. We discuss how these results can be used to estimate the tendency of BARs to bend membranes in terms of a spatially nonisotropic spontaneous curvature. PMID:19751667

  14. CO dimer: the infrared spectrum revisited.

    PubMed

    Rezaei, Mojtaba; Sheybani-Deloui, S; Moazzen-Ahmadi, N; Michaelian, K H; McKellar, A R W

    2013-10-01

    A broad-band (2135-2200 cm(-1)) infrared spectrum of the CO dimer is recorded using a tunable quantum cascade laser to probe a supersonic jet expansion with an effective rotational temperature of about 2.5 K. Analysis of the spectrum reveals the first known levels of the excited state (vCO = 1) with A(+) symmetry and establishes that resonant vibrational splittings are small (<0.2 cm(-1)) for both the C-bonded and O-bonded dimer isomers. The spectrum extends over a surprisingly large range, with somewhat reduced intensity above 2150 cm(-1). A total of 28 new "stacks" of rotational levels having A(-) symmetry are assigned for vCO = 1 on the basis of combination differences, adding to the 8 stacks previously known, and extending up to 51 cm(-1) above the vCO = 1 origin. Assignments are given for the first 13 stacks of vCO = 1 in terms of the very low frequency geared bending intermolecular vibration. PMID:23413960

  15. Rotational Spectrum of Propargyl Alcohol Dimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mani, Devendra; Arunan, E.

    2013-06-01

    Propargyl alcohol is a molecule of interest to astrophysics as well as combustion studies. Rotational-tunneling spectra of propargyl alcohol monomer is well known and shows that the molecule exists in gauche form. Recently we reported microwave spectra of Ar...propargyl alcohol complex. Propargyl alcochol exists in gauche form in the complex as well. In this study we have recorded pure rotational spectra of propargyl alcohol dimer between 4-13 GHz range.A total of 47 transitions, 24 a-type, 16 b-type and 7 c-type, have been observed and fitted with semi rigid rotor asymmetric top hamiltonian. The fitted rotational constants are: A = 2321.83323(47) MHz, B = 1150.47726(24) MHz and C = 1124.89000(20) MHz. The standard deviation for the fit is 2.5 kHz. The experimental rotational constants are very close to the structure predicted by ab-initio calculations in which two gauche-propargyl alcohol moieties are in three point contact stabilized by O-H...O, O-H...pi and C-H...pi interactions. Few transitions for duterated isotopologues of the dimer have also been observed and search for the remaining transitions is in progress. Details will be presented in the talk. E. Hirota,J. Mol. Spectrosc. 26 (1968) 335-350. J.C. Pearson, B.J. Drouin, J. Mol. Spectrosc. 234 (2005) 149-156. D. Mani, E. Arunan, ChemPhysChem 14 (2013) 754-763.

  16. Fibrillar dimer formation of islet amyloid polypeptides

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chiu, Chi -cheng; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2015-05-08

    Amyloid deposits of human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP), a 37-residue hormone co-produced with insulin, have been implicated in the development of type 2 diabetes. Residues 20 – 29 of hIAPP have been proposed to constitute the amyloidogenic core for the aggregation process, yet the segment is mostly unstructured in the mature fibril, according to solid-state NMR data. Here we use molecular simulations combined with bias-exchange metadynamics to characterize the conformational free energies of hIAPP fibrillar dimer and its derivative, pramlintide. We show that residues 20 – 29 are involved in an intermediate that exhibits transient β-sheets, consistent with recent experimentalmore » and simulation results. By comparing the aggregation of hIAPP and pramlintide, we illustrate the effects of proline residues on inhibition of the dimerization of IAPP. The mechanistic insights presented here could be useful for development of therapeutic inhibitors of hIAPP amyloid formation.« less

  17. Dimeric uranyl complexes with bridging perrhenates.

    PubMed

    John, Gordon H; May, Iain; Sarsfield, Mark J; Collison, David; Helliwell, Madeleine

    2007-04-28

    The reaction between [UO2(ReO4)2.H(2)O] and two equivalents of either tri-n-butyl phosphine oxide (TBPO) or tri-iso-butyl phosphate (TiBP) results in the formation of [UO2(mu2-ReO4)(ReO4)(TBPO)2]2 (1) and [UO2(mu2-ReO4)(ReO4)(TiBP)2]2 (2) respectively. Both complexes crystallise as two structurally similar centrosymmetric dimers, the cores containing two uranyl moieties linked by bridging perrhenates. Two P=O donor ligands and one monodenatate perrhenate complete the pentagonal bipyramidal coordination sphere at each metal centre. Both complexes have also been characterised in the solid state by vibrational and absorption spectroscopy. Solution spectroscopic characterisation indicates that both perrhenate and phosphine oxide (1) or phosphate (2) remain coordinated, although it is not possible to state conclusively that the dimeric species remain intact. A low resolution structural study of a minor product from the reaction that yielded revealed a monomeric complex with only monodentate perrhenate coordination, [UO2(ReO4)2(H2O)(TiBP)2] (2'). These results represent the first structural evidence for the bridging coordination mode of perrhenate on coordination to an actinide and yields further insight into the possible solvent phase pertechnetate complexes that may exist in PUREX process phosphate rich solvent.

  18. CO dimer: the infrared spectrum revisited.

    PubMed

    Rezaei, Mojtaba; Sheybani-Deloui, S; Moazzen-Ahmadi, N; Michaelian, K H; McKellar, A R W

    2013-10-01

    A broad-band (2135-2200 cm(-1)) infrared spectrum of the CO dimer is recorded using a tunable quantum cascade laser to probe a supersonic jet expansion with an effective rotational temperature of about 2.5 K. Analysis of the spectrum reveals the first known levels of the excited state (vCO = 1) with A(+) symmetry and establishes that resonant vibrational splittings are small (<0.2 cm(-1)) for both the C-bonded and O-bonded dimer isomers. The spectrum extends over a surprisingly large range, with somewhat reduced intensity above 2150 cm(-1). A total of 28 new "stacks" of rotational levels having A(-) symmetry are assigned for vCO = 1 on the basis of combination differences, adding to the 8 stacks previously known, and extending up to 51 cm(-1) above the vCO = 1 origin. Assignments are given for the first 13 stacks of vCO = 1 in terms of the very low frequency geared bending intermolecular vibration.

  19. Trans-dimer D, a novel dimeric sesquiterpene with a bis-bisabolene skeleton from a Hainan sponge Axinyssa variabilis.

    PubMed

    Mao, Shui-Chun; Guo, Yue-Wei; van Soest, Rob; Cimino, Guido

    2011-08-01

    A novel bisabolene sesquiterpene dimer named trans-dimer D (1) and its diastereoisomer trans-dimer C (2) reported in our previous work have been isolated as an inseparable mixture in a ratio of 1.5:1 from the South China Sea sponge Axinyssa variabilis. The structure of 1 was determined on the basis of extensive spectroscopic analysis and by comparison of its NMR spectral data with those of structurally related compounds. Compound 1 represents the fourth example of a sesquiterpene dimer with a bis-bisabolene skeleton.

  20. How knowledge of the song influences the matching of "melodies" to rhythm sequences tapped in the right and left palms.

    PubMed

    O'Boyle, M W; Bormann, L; Harts, K

    1990-12-01

    Previous work by O'Boyle and Sanford (1988) has demonstrated that the right hemisphere (RH) is superior to the left hemisphere (LH) in the matching of tape-recorded melodies to rhythm sequences tapped in the palms of the hands. This asymmetrical advantage was attributed to a RH superiority in the perceptual processing of intonation as compared to the rhythm component of these musical stimuli. In the present study, subjects were taught that the monotone sound of two wooden drumsticks struck together in a specified rhythm actually represented non-melodic translations of songs with identifiable melodies. After such mental associations had been formed, these non-melodic stimuli (which produced no asymmetric performance in Exp. 2 of the O'Boyle and Sanford study), now produced a RH advantage that was comparable to that induced by the original melodies. This finding suggests that the physical presence of intonation and its subsequent perceptual analysis, are not necessarily critical to the RH advantage reported by O'Boyle and Sanford (1988). Rather, the asymmetry may be related to a superior ability of the RH to generate and/or manipulate echoic images in memory. PMID:2081400

  1. Sequence Variation in Amplification Target Genes and Standards Influences Interlaboratory Comparison of BK Virus DNA Load Measurement.

    PubMed

    Solis, Morgane; Meddeb, Mariam; Sueur, Charlotte; Domingo-Calap, Pilar; Soulier, Eric; Chabaud, Angeline; Perrin, Peggy; Moulin, Bruno; Bahram, Seiamak; Stoll-Keller, Françoise; Caillard, Sophie; Barth, Heidi; Fafi-Kremer, Samira

    2015-12-01

    International guidelines define a BK virus (BKV) load of ≥4 log10 copies/ml as presumptive of BKV-associated nephropathy (BKVN) and a cutoff for therapeutic intervention. To investigate whether BKV DNA loads (BKVL) are comparable between laboratories, 2 panels of 15 and 8 clinical specimens (urine, whole blood, and plasma) harboring different BKV genotypes were distributed to 20 and 27 French hospital centers in 2013 and 2014, respectively. Although 68% of the reported results fell within the acceptable range of the expected result ±0.5 log10, the interlaboratory variation ranged from 1.32 to 5.55 log10. Polymorphisms specific to BKV genotypes II and IV, namely, the number and position of mutations in amplification target genes and/or deletion in standards, arose as major sources of interlaboratory disagreements. The diversity of DNA purification methods also contributed to the interlaboratory variability, in particular for urine samples. Our data strongly suggest that (i) commercial external quality controls for BKVL assessment should include all major BKV genotypes to allow a correct evaluation of BKV assays, and (ii) the BKV sequence of commercial standards should be provided to users to verify the absence of mismatches with the primers and probes of their BKV assays. Finally, the optimization of primer and probe design and standardization of DNA extraction methods may substantially decrease interlaboratory variability and allow interinstitutional studies to define a universal cutoff for presumptive BKVN and, ultimately, ensure adequate patient care. PMID:26468499

  2. Detecting possibly saturated positions in 18S and 28S sequences and their influence on phylogenetic reconstruction of Annelida (Lophotrochozoa).

    PubMed

    Struck, Torsten H; Nesnidal, Maximilian P; Purschke, Günter; Halanych, Kenneth M

    2008-08-01

    Phylogenetic reconstructions may be hampered by multiple substitutions in nucleotide positions obliterating signal, a phenomenon called saturation. Traditionally, plotting ti/tv ratios against genetic distances has been used to reveal saturation by assessing when ti/tv stabilizes at 1. However, interpretation of results and assessment of comparability between different data sets or partitions are rather subjective. Herein, we present the new C factor, which quantifies convergence of ti/tv ratios, thus allowing comparability. Furthermore, we introduce a comparative value for homoplasy, the O/E ratio, based on alterations of tree length. Simulation studies and an empirical example, based on annelid rRNA-gene sequences, show that the C factor correlates with noise, tree length and genetic distance and therefore is a proxy for saturation. The O/E ratio correlates with the C factor, which does not provide an intrinsic threshold of exclusion, and thus both together can objectively guide decisions to exclude saturated nucleotide positions. However, analyses also showed that, for reconstructing annelid phylogeny using Maximum Likelihood, an increase in numbers of positions improves tree reconstruction more than does the exclusion of saturated positions.

  3. THE INFLUENCE OF SHORT-RANGE INTERACTIONS ON PROTEIN CONFORMATION, III. DIPEPTIDE DISTRIBUTIONS IN PROTEINS OF KNOWN SEQUENCE AND STRUCTURE*

    PubMed Central

    Kotelchuck, D.; Dygert, M.; Scheraga, H. A.

    1969-01-01

    A statistical analysis is made of the distribution into α-helical and non-α-helical regions of the various dipeptide types appearing in a sample of seven proteins of known sequence and structure. By considering as a group all dipeptide types occurring at a given location relative to the reported helix-coil boundaries and examining the percentage of cases in which these appear in non-α-helical regions throughout the protein sample, we find a sharp change in the nature of the observed dipeptide types when the helix-coil boundary is crossed. Furthermore, we find that dipeptide types which occur in the coil region near the C-terminal end of helical segments are non-α-helical in almost 90 per cent of the cases in which they appear throughout the sample. No similar effect is found in the coil region near the N-terminal end of helical segments. These results give evidence for the importance of short-range interactions in determining protein conformation. They are also consistent with predictions based on a model for helix formation given in the second paper of this series.1 PMID:5259754

  4. Dual RNA-Sequencing of Eucalyptus nitens during Phytophthora cinnamomi Challenge Reveals Pathogen and Host Factors Influencing Compatibility

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Febé E.; Shuey, Louise S.; Naidoo, Sitha; Mamni, Thandekile; Berger, Dave K.; Myburg, Alexander A.; van den Berg, Noëlani; Naidoo, Sanushka

    2016-01-01

    Damage caused by Phytophthora cinnamomi Rands remains an important concern on forest tree species. The pathogen causes root and collar rot, stem cankers, and dieback of various economically important Eucalyptus spp. In South Africa, susceptible cold tolerant Eucalyptus plantations have been affected by various Phytophthora spp. with P. cinnamomi considered one of the most virulent. The molecular basis of this compatible interaction is poorly understood. In this study, susceptible Eucalyptus nitens plants were stem inoculated with P. cinnamomi and tissue was harvested five days post inoculation. Dual RNA-sequencing, a technique which allows the concurrent detection of both pathogen and host transcripts during infection, was performed. Approximately 1% of the reads mapped to the draft genome of P. cinnamomi while 78% of the reads mapped to the Eucalyptus grandis genome. The highest expressed P. cinnamomi gene in planta was a putative crinkler effector (CRN1). Phylogenetic analysis indicated the high similarity of this P. cinnamomi CRN1 to that of Phytophthora infestans. Some CRN effectors are known to target host nuclei to suppress defense. In the host, over 1400 genes were significantly differentially expressed in comparison to mock inoculated trees, including suites of pathogenesis related (PR) genes. In particular, a PR-9 peroxidase gene with a high similarity to a Carica papaya PR-9 ortholog previously shown to be suppressed upon infection by Phytophthora palmivora was down-regulated two-fold. This PR-9 gene may represent a cross-species effector target during P. cinnamomi infection. This study identified pathogenicity factors, potential manipulation targets, and attempted host defense mechanisms activated by E. nitens that contributed to the susceptible outcome of the interaction. PMID:26973660

  5. Dual RNA-Sequencing of Eucalyptus nitens during Phytophthora cinnamomi Challenge Reveals Pathogen and Host Factors Influencing Compatibility.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Febé E; Shuey, Louise S; Naidoo, Sitha; Mamni, Thandekile; Berger, Dave K; Myburg, Alexander A; van den Berg, Noëlani; Naidoo, Sanushka

    2016-01-01

    Damage caused by Phytophthora cinnamomi Rands remains an important concern on forest tree species. The pathogen causes root and collar rot, stem cankers, and dieback of various economically important Eucalyptus spp. In South Africa, susceptible cold tolerant Eucalyptus plantations have been affected by various Phytophthora spp. with P. cinnamomi considered one of the most virulent. The molecular basis of this compatible interaction is poorly understood. In this study, susceptible Eucalyptus nitens plants were stem inoculated with P. cinnamomi and tissue was harvested five days post inoculation. Dual RNA-sequencing, a technique which allows the concurrent detection of both pathogen and host transcripts during infection, was performed. Approximately 1% of the reads mapped to the draft genome of P. cinnamomi while 78% of the reads mapped to the Eucalyptus grandis genome. The highest expressed P. cinnamomi gene in planta was a putative crinkler effector (CRN1). Phylogenetic analysis indicated the high similarity of this P. cinnamomi CRN1 to that of Phytophthora infestans. Some CRN effectors are known to target host nuclei to suppress defense. In the host, over 1400 genes were significantly differentially expressed in comparison to mock inoculated trees, including suites of pathogenesis related (PR) genes. In particular, a PR-9 peroxidase gene with a high similarity to a Carica papaya PR-9 ortholog previously shown to be suppressed upon infection by Phytophthora palmivora was down-regulated two-fold. This PR-9 gene may represent a cross-species effector target during P. cinnamomi infection. This study identified pathogenicity factors, potential manipulation targets, and attempted host defense mechanisms activated by E. nitens that contributed to the susceptible outcome of the interaction. PMID:26973660

  6. The New Jersey Core Curriculum Content Science Standards influence on the scope and sequence of the high school science curriculum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Tena R.

    This study describes changes to the secondary science curriculum for college preparatory students as a consequence of the implementation of the New Jersey Core Content Curriculum Standards (NJCCCS) in Science. The study compares curriculum changes by the district's socio-economic status (DFG) and participation in the New Jersey Statewide Systemic Initiative (NJSSI), a systemic science reform effort of the National Science Foundation. A 26-question survey was mailed to 285 secondary school districts in New Jersey. A total of 132 districts returned the survey, resulting in a response rate of 48%. The study finds that some curriculum changes have taken place since the inception of the NJCCS Science standards; although few were found to be statistically significant certain trends did appear. One trend suggested by the data is that more curricular change took place in Grade 9 than in any other grade. Another trend indicates that the Biology/Chemistry sequence remains intact, with many districts now offering Biology in Grade 9 and Chemistry in Grade 10; this is particularly common in upper-income districts. While the state mandates a third year of science for graduation, Physics is not a requirement. Forty-four districts reported no changes to their curriculum. The most frequently reported change was a change in text. The second most frequent change reported was creating a new Grade 9 course; moving Biology to Grade 9 was the third most commonly reported change. Chemistry and physics were added to courses in Grades 9 and 10. Participation in NJSSI did not appear to be significant. Overall, upper-income districts reported making the greatest change, while middle-income districts reported the greatest change in Grade 9. Very few districts reported changes in the scope of Chemistry and Physics. The changes reported by the school districts reflect the conservative nature of high school education and the perseverance of the "layer-cake" curriculum indigenous to American high

  7. Influence of the type and source of inoculum on the start-up of anammox sequencing batch reactors (SBRs).

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Lorna; Van Diest, Federico; Barahona, Andrea; Montalvo, Silvio; Borja, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Anammox (anaerobic ammonium oxidation) is an attractive option for the treatment of wastewaters with a low carbon/nitrogen ratio. This is due to its low operating costs when compared to the classical nitrification-denitrification processes. However, one of the main disadvantages of the Anammox process is slow biomass growth, meaning a relatively slow reactor start-up. This becomes even more complicated when Anammox microorganisms are not present in the inoculum. Four inocula were studied for the start-up of Anammox sequencing batch reactors (SBRs) 2 L in volume agitated at 100 rpm, one of them using zeolite as a microbial support. Two inocula were taken from UASB reactors and two from aerobic reactors (activated sludge and SBR). The Anammox SBRs studied were operated at 36 ± 0.5°C. The results showed that the only inoculum that enabled the enrichment of the Anammox biomass came from an activated sludge plant treating wastewaters from a poultry slaughterhouse. This plant was designed for organic matter degradation and nitrogen removal (nitrification). This could explain the presence of Anammox microorganisms. This SBR operated without zeolite and achieved nitrite and ammonium removals of 96.3% and 68.4% respectively, at a nitrogen loading rate (NLR) of 0.1 kg N/m(3)/d in both cases. The lower ammonium removal was due to the fact that a sub-stoichiometric amount of nitrite (1 molar ratio) was fed. The specific Anammox activity (SAA) achieved was 0.18 g N/g VSS/d. PMID:23647121

  8. Isolation site influences virulence phenotype of serotype 14 Streptococcus pneumoniae strains belonging to multilocus sequence type 15.

    PubMed

    Amin, Zarina; Harvey, Richard M; Wang, Hui; Hughes, Catherine E; Paton, Adrienne W; Paton, James C; Trappetti, Claudia

    2015-12-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a diverse species causing invasive as well as localized infections that result in massive global morbidity and mortality. Strains vary markedly in pathogenic potential, but the molecular basis is obscured by the diversity and plasticity of the pneumococcal genome. We have previously reported that S. pneumoniae serotype 3 isolates belonging to the same multilocus sequence type (MLST) differed markedly in in vitro and in vivo phenotypes, in accordance with the clinical site of isolation, suggesting stable niche adaptation within a clonal lineage. In the present study, we have extended our analysis to serotype 14 clinical isolates from cases of sepsis or otitis media that belong to the same MLST (ST15). In a murine intranasal challenge model, five ST15 isolates (three from blood and two from ears) colonized the nasopharynx to similar extents. However, blood and ear isolates exhibited significant differences in bacterial loads in other host niches (lungs, ear, and brain) at both 24 and 72 h postchallenge. In spite of these differences, blood and ear isolates were present in the lungs at similar levels at 6 h postchallenge, suggesting that early immune responses may underpin the distinct virulence phenotypes. Transcriptional analysis of lung tissue from mice infected for 6 h with blood isolates versus ear isolates revealed 8 differentially expressed genes. Two of these were exclusively expressed in response to infection with the ear isolate. These results suggest a link between the differential capacities to elicit early innate immune responses and the distinct virulence phenotypes of clonally related S. pneumoniae strains.

  9. Targeted Next-Generation Sequencing of Plasma DNA from Cancer Patients: Factors Influencing Consistency with Tumour DNA and Prospective Investigation of Its Utility for Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Kaisaki, Pamela J.; Cutts, Anthony; Popitsch, Niko; Camps, Carme; Pentony, Melissa M.; Wilson, Gareth; Page, Suzanne; Kaur, Kulvinder; Vavoulis, Dimitris; Henderson, Shirley; Gupta, Avinash; Middleton, Mark R.; Karydis, Ioannis; Talbot, Denis C.; Schuh, Anna; Taylor, Jenny C.

    2016-01-01

    Use of circulating tumour DNA (ctDNA) as a liquid biopsy has been proposed for potential identification and monitoring of solid tumours. We investigate a next-generation sequencing approach for mutation detection in ctDNA in two related studies using a targeted panel. The first study was retrospective, using blood samples taken from melanoma patients at diverse timepoints before or after treatment, aiming to evaluate correlation between mutations identified in biopsy and ctDNA, and to acquire a first impression of influencing factors. We found good concordance between ctDNA and tumour mutations of melanoma patients when blood samples were collected within one year of biopsy or before treatment. In contrast, when ctDNA was sequenced after targeted treatment in melanoma, mutations were no longer found in 9 out of 10 patients, suggesting the method might be useful for detecting treatment response. Building on these findings, we focused the second study on ctDNA obtained before biopsy in lung patients, i.e. when a tentative diagnosis of lung cancer had been made, but no treatment had started. The main objective of this prospective study was to evaluate use of ctDNA in diagnosis, investigating the concordance of biopsy and ctDNA-derived mutation detection. Here we also found positive correlation between diagnostic lung biopsy results and pre-biopsy ctDNA sequencing, providing support for using ctDNA as a cost-effective, non-invasive solution when the tumour is inaccessible or when biopsy poses significant risk to the patient. PMID:27626278

  10. Targeted Next-Generation Sequencing of Plasma DNA from Cancer Patients: Factors Influencing Consistency with Tumour DNA and Prospective Investigation of Its Utility for Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Kaisaki, Pamela J; Cutts, Anthony; Popitsch, Niko; Camps, Carme; Pentony, Melissa M; Wilson, Gareth; Page, Suzanne; Kaur, Kulvinder; Vavoulis, Dimitris; Henderson, Shirley; Gupta, Avinash; Middleton, Mark R; Karydis, Ioannis; Talbot, Denis C; Schuh, Anna; Taylor, Jenny C

    2016-01-01

    Use of circulating tumour DNA (ctDNA) as a liquid biopsy has been proposed for potential identification and monitoring of solid tumours. We investigate a next-generation sequencing approach for mutation detection in ctDNA in two related studies using a targeted panel. The first study was retrospective, using blood samples taken from melanoma patients at diverse timepoints before or after treatment, aiming to evaluate correlation between mutations identified in biopsy and ctDNA, and to acquire a first impression of influencing factors. We found good concordance between ctDNA and tumour mutations of melanoma patients when blood samples were collected within one year of biopsy or before treatment. In contrast, when ctDNA was sequenced after targeted treatment in melanoma, mutations were no longer found in 9 out of 10 patients, suggesting the method might be useful for detecting treatment response. Building on these findings, we focused the second study on ctDNA obtained before biopsy in lung patients, i.e. when a tentative diagnosis of lung cancer had been made, but no treatment had started. The main objective of this prospective study was to evaluate use of ctDNA in diagnosis, investigating the concordance of biopsy and ctDNA-derived mutation detection. Here we also found positive correlation between diagnostic lung biopsy results and pre-biopsy ctDNA sequencing, providing support for using ctDNA as a cost-effective, non-invasive solution when the tumour is inaccessible or when biopsy poses significant risk to the patient. PMID:27626278

  11. Salt bridge residues between I-Ak dimer of dimers alpha-chains modulate antigen presentation.

    PubMed

    Yadati, S; Nydam, T; Demian, D; Wade, T K; Gabriel, J L; Barisas, B G; Wade, W F

    1999-03-15

    Class II dimers of dimers are predicted to have functional significance in antigen presentation. The putative contact amino acids of the I-Ak class II dimer of dimers have been identified by molecular modeling based on the DR1 crystal structure (Nydam et al., Int. Immunol. 10, 1237,1998). We have previously reported the role in antigen presentation of dimer of dimers contact amino acids located in the C-terminal domains of the alpha- and beta-chains of class II. Our calculations show that residues Ealpha89 and Ralpha145 in the alpha2-domain form an inter alpha-chain salt bridge between pairs of alphabeta-heterodimers. Other residues, Qalpha92 and Nalpha115, may be involved in close association in that part of the alpha-chain. We investigated the role of these amino acids on class II expression and antigen presentation. Class II composed of an Ealpha89K substituted alpha-chain paired with a wt beta-chain exhibited inhibited antigen presentation and expression of alpha-chain serologic epitopes. In contrast, mutation of Ralpha145E had less affect on antigen presentation and did not affect I-Ak serologic epitopes. Interchanging charges of the salt bridge residues by expressing both Ralpha145E and Ealpha89K on the same chain obviated the large negative effect of the Ealpha89K mutation on antigen presentation but not on the serologic epitopes. Our results are similar for those reported for mutation of DR3's inter-chain salt bridge with the exception that double mutants did not moderate the DR3 defect. Interestingly, the amino acids differences between I-A and DR change the location of the inter-chain salt bridges. In DR1 these residues are located at positions Ealpha88 and Kalpha111; in I-Ak these residues are located at position Ealpha89 and Ralpha145. Inter alpha-chain salt bridges are thus maintained in various class II molecules by amino acids located in different parts of the alpha2-domain. This conservation of structure suggests that considerable functional

  12. Nickel, Manganese, Cobalt, and Iron-Catalyzed Deprotonative Arene Dimerization

    PubMed Central

    Truong, Thanh; Alvarado, Joseph; Tran, Ly Dieu; Daugulis, Olafs

    2010-01-01

    A number of first-row transition metal salts catalyze deprotonative dimerization of acidic arenes. Under the atmosphere of oxygen, nickel, manganese, cobalt, and iron chlorides have been shown to dimerize five- and six-membered ring heterocycles as well as electron-poor arenes. Both tetramethylpiperidide and dicyclohexylamide bases can be employed; however, the former afford slightly higher yields. PMID:20192197

  13. Sr(2+) induces unusually stable d(GGGTGGGTGGGTGGG) quadruplex dimers.

    PubMed

    Lomidze, Levan; Kelley, Sean; Gogichaishvili, Shota; Metreveli, Nunu; Musier-Forsyth, Karin; Kankia, Besik

    2016-11-01

    Guanine-rich sequences are able to form quadruplexes consisting of G-quartet structural units. Quadruplexes play an important role in the regulation of gene expression and have therapeutic and biotechnological potential. The HIV-1 integrase inhibitor, (GGGT)4 , and its variants demonstrate unusually high thermal stability. This property has been exploited in the use of quadruplex formation to drive various endergonic reactions of nucleic acids such as isothermal DNA amplification. Quadruplex stability is mainly determined by cations, which specifically bind into the inner core of the structure. In the present work, we report a systematic study of a variant of the HIV-1 integrase inhibitor, GGGTGGGTGGGTGGG (G3T), in the presence of alkali and alkaline-earth cations. We show that Sr(2+) -G3T is characterized by the highest thermal stability and that quadruplex formation requires only one Sr(2+) ion that binds with low micromolar affinity. These concentrations are sufficient to drive robust isothermal quadruplex priming DNA amplification reaction. The Sr(2+) -quadruplexes are also able to form unusually stable dimers through end-to-end stacking. The multimerization can be induced by a combination of quadruplex forming cations (i.e., K(+) or Sr(2+) ) and non-specific Mg(2+) . PMID:27416320

  14. Dimer vacancy interactions on the Si(0 0 1) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Jianlin; Stott, M. J.

    1998-07-01

    Dimer vacancy (DV) interactions on the Si(0 0 1) surface are studied using ab initio total energy calculations. Two kinds of DVs are considered: single DV (1-DV) and a DV cluster composed of two single DVs in the nearest-neighbor positions on the same dimer row (2-DV). Calculation of the total energy as a function of DV separation gives the DV interaction energy. Attractive interactions between 1-DVs on the same dimer row and 2-DVs on neighboring dimer rows are found which provide an explanation of the experimentally observed formation of 2-DVs, the aligning of 2-DVs in the direction perpendicular to the dimer row to form long extended DV lines, and subsequently, the formation of 2× n periodic structures on the surface.

  15. Condensation in CO2 free jet expansions. I - Dimer formation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorfeld, W. G.; Hudson, J. B.

    1973-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental investigation of the kinetics of CO2 dimer formation in the adiabatically expanding core of a free jet expansion has been carried out. The theoretical analysis is based on dimer formation by an efficient termolecular process and dimer destruction by bimolecular collisions. Account is taken of the expected variation of the specific heat ratio during the expansion and of the effective increase in the termolecular collision rate at low temperatures due to the presence of loosely bound orbiting pairs. Experimental dimer concentrations were measured mass spectrometrically by forming a molecular beam from the expanded gas mixture after the onset of molecular flow. Observed dimer concentrations, for a range of pre-expansion conditions of 400 to 900 torr pressure and room temperature, are in good agreement with the theoretical analysis, provided that account is taken of the effect of loosely bound orbiting pairs at low temperatures.

  16. Vertically-oriented nanoparticle dimer based on focused plasmonic trapping.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zhe; Su, Lei; Shen, Yao-Chun

    2016-07-11

    We proposed a vertically-oriented dimer structure based on focused plasmonic trapping of metallic nanoparticle. Quantitative FDTD calculations and qualitative analysis by simplified dipole approximation revealed that localized surface plasmon coupling dominates in the plasmon hybridization, and the vertically-oriented dimer can effectively make use of the dominant longitudinal component of the surface plasmon virtual probe thus providing much stronger electric field in the gap. Furthermore, for practical application the top nanoparticle of the dimer can be replaced with an atomic force microscope tip which enables the precise control of the gap distance of the dimer. Therefore the proposed vertically-oriented dimer structure provides both the scanning capability and the extremely-high electrical field necessary for the high sensitivity Raman imaging. PMID:27410874

  17. Dimer Involvement and Origin of Crossover in Nickel-Catalyzed Aldehyde–Alkyne Reductive Couplings

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism of nickel(0)-catalyzed reductive coupling of aldehydes and alkynes has been studied. Extensive double-labeling crossover studies have been conducted. While previous studies illustrated that phosphine- and N-heterocyclic carbene-derived catalysts exhibited differing behavior, the origin of these effects has now been evaluated in detail. Many variables, including ligand class, sterics of the ligand and alkyne, temperature, and ring size being formed in intramolecular versions, all influence the extent of crossover observed. A computational evaluation of these effects suggests that dimerization of a key metallacyclic intermediate provides the origin of crossover. Protocols that proceed with crossover are typically less efficient than those without crossover given the thermodynamic stability and low reactivity of the dimeric metallacycles involved in crossover pathways. PMID:25401337

  18. Toward an Enhancement of the Photoactivity of Multiphotochromic Dimers Using Plasmon Resonance: A Theoretical Study.

    PubMed

    Fihey, Arnaud; Le Guennic, Boris; Jacquemin, Denis

    2015-08-01

    Building dimers of organic photochromic compounds paves the way to multifunctional switches, but such architectures often undergo partial photoreactivity only. Combining photochromism of molecules and plasmon resonance of gold nanoparticles (NPs) is known to affect the photochromism of monomers, yet the impact on multimers remains unknown. Here we propose a theoretical study of dimers of dithienylethenes by the mean of a hybrid calculation scheme (discrete-interaction model/quantum mechanics). We aim to assess how the optical properties of multiphotochromes are tuned by the influence of the plasmon resonances. We show that, for a typical chemisorption orientation on the NP, the absorption bands responsible for the photochromism are significantly enhanced for both the doubly open and mixed closed-open isomers of the dyad, hinting that plasmon resonance could be used to boost the generally poor photoactivity of dithienylethene dyads. PMID:26267018

  19. Dimerization of complement factor H-related proteins modulates complement activation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Goicoechea de Jorge, Elena; Caesar, Joseph J E; Malik, Talat H; Patel, Mitali; Colledge, Matthew; Johnson, Steven; Hakobyan, Svetlana; Morgan, B Paul; Harris, Claire L; Pickering, Matthew C; Lea, Susan M

    2013-03-19

    The complement system is a key component regulation influences susceptibility to age-related macular degeneration, meningitis, and kidney disease. Variation includes genomic rearrangements within the complement factor H-related (CFHR) locus. Elucidating the mechanism underlying these associations has been hindered by the lack of understanding of the biological role of CFHR proteins. Here we present unique structural data demonstrating that three of the CFHR proteins contain a shared dimerization motif and that this hitherto unrecognized structural property enables formation of both homodimers and heterodimers. Dimerization confers avidity for tissue-bound complement fragments and enables these proteins to efficiently compete with the physiological complement inhibitor, complement factor H (CFH), for ligand binding. Our data demonstrate that these CFHR proteins function as competitive antagonists of CFH to modulate complement activation in vivo and explain why variation in the CFHRs predisposes to disease.

  20. Edge Magnon Excitation in Spin Dimer Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaguchi, Ryo; Matsumoto, Masashige

    2016-10-01

    Magnetic excitation in a spin dimer system on a bilayer honeycomb lattice is investigated in the presence of a zigzag edge, where disordered and ordered phases can be controlled by a quantum phase transition. In analogy with the case of graphene with a zigzag edge, a flat edge magnon mode appears in the disordered phase. In an ordered phase, a finite magnetic moment generates a mean-field potential to the magnon. Since the potential is nonuniform on the edge and bulk sites, it affects the excitation, and the dispersion of the edge mode deviates from the flat shape. We investigate how the edge magnon mode evolves when the phase changes through the quantum phase transition and discuss the similarities to ordered spin systems on a monolayer honeycomb lattice.

  1. Dimerization transitions in spin-1 chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chepiga, Natalia; Affleck, Ian; Mila, Frédéric

    2016-06-01

    We study spontaneous dimerization transitions in a Heisenberg spin-1 chain with additional next-nearest-neighbor and three-site interactions using extensive numerical simulations and a conformal field-theory analysis. We show that the transition can be second order in the Wess-Zumino-Witten (WZW) SU (2) 2 or Ising universality class, or first order. We argue that these features are generic because of a marginal operator in the WZW SU (2) 2 model and because of two topologically distinct nondimerized phases with or without edge states. We also provide explicit numerical evidence of conformal towers of singlets inside the spin gap at the Ising transition. Implications for other models are briefly discussed.

  2. Rovibrationally Inelastic Collisions of Ultracold Lithium Dimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasmine, William; Stewart, Brian

    2016-05-01

    We have calculated cross sections for rovibrationally inelastic collisions of Li2 A(1) 1Σu+ colliding with neon and xenon on ab initio potentials. We find that the inelastic cross section can be very large and increasing at low collision velocity. This behavior is very well modeled as a Langevin process. The total inelastic cross section is a sizable fraction of the total capture cross section, typically about a third. For Li2 - Xe, the total inelastic rate constants are several thousand square angstroms, and level-to-level rate constants are several hundred square angstroms at collision speeds below 1000 cm/s, implying that such collisions might be observable in photoassociated lithium dimer.

  3. Integrability of PT-symmetric dimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickton, J.; Susanto, H.

    2013-12-01

    The coupled discrete linear and Kerr nonlinear Schrödinger equations with gain and loss describing transport on dimers with parity-time (PT)-symmetric potentials are considered. The model is relevant among others to experiments in optical couplers and proposals on Bose-Einstein condensates in PT-symmetric double-well potentials. It is known that the models are integrable. Here, the integrability is exploited further to construct the phase portraits of the system. A pendulum equation with a linear potential and a constant force for the phase difference between the fields is obtained, which explains the presence of unbounded solutions above a critical threshold parameter. The behavior of all solutions of the system, including changes in the topological structure of the phase plane, is then discussed.

  4. A phthalocyanine-subphthalocyanine heterodinuclear dimer: comparison of spectroscopic properties with those of homodinuclear dimers of constituting units.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Norio; Mori, Satoru; Hayashi, Masamichi; Umeda, Masashi; Tokunaga, Etsuko; Shiro, Motoo; Sato, Hiroyasu; Hoshi, Tomonori; Kobayashi, Nagao

    2014-03-21

    A phthalocyanine-subphthalocyanine heterodinuclear dimer has been disclosed for the first time with its unique flat-bowl-shaped structure revealed by X-ray crystallography. Its spectroscopic properties were compared with those of homodinuclear dimers of constituting units, as well as those of constituting monomeric units. PMID:24510209

  5. Dimeric CRISPR RNA-guided FokI nucleases for highly specific genome editing.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Shengdar Q; Wyvekens, Nicolas; Khayter, Cyd; Foden, Jennifer A; Thapar, Vishal; Reyon, Deepak; Goodwin, Mathew J; Aryee, Martin J; Joung, J Keith

    2014-06-01

    Monomeric CRISPR-Cas9 nucleases are widely used for targeted genome editing but can induce unwanted off-target mutations with high frequencies. Here we describe dimeric RNA-guided FokI nucleases (RFNs) that can recognize extended sequences and edit endogenous genes with high efficiencies in human cells. RFN cleavage activity depends strictly on the binding of two guide RNAs (gRNAs) to DNA with a defined spacing and orientation substantially reducing the likelihood that a suitable target site will occur more than once in the genome and therefore improving specificities relative to wild-type Cas9 monomers. RFNs guided by a single gRNA generally induce lower levels of unwanted mutations than matched monomeric Cas9 nickases. In addition, we describe a simple method for expressing multiple gRNAs bearing any 5' end nucleotide, which gives dimeric RFNs a broad targeting range. RFNs combine the ease of RNA-based targeting with the specificity enhancement inherent to dimerization and are likely to be useful in applications that require highly precise genome editing.

  6. Formation of cyclobutane thymine dimers photosensitized by pyridopsoralens: Quantitative and qualitative distribution within DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Moysan, A.; Viari, A.; Vigny, P. ); Voituriez, L.; Cadet J. ); Moustacchi, E.; Sage, E. )

    1991-07-23

    As after irradiation with 254-nm UV light, exposure of thymidine and three isomeric pyridopsoralen derivatives to UVA radiation, in the dry state, leads to the formation of the six diastereomers of cyclobutadithymidine as the predominant reaction. This unexpected photosensitized reaction, which also gives rise to both 5R* and 5S* diastereomers of 5,6-dihydro-5-({alpha}-thymidylyl)thymidine (or spore photoproduct), is selective since (2+2) dimerization of 2{prime}-deoxycytidine was not detected under the same experimental conditions. The cis-syn isomer of cyclobutadithymine was also found to be produced within isolated DNA following UVA irradiation in aqueous solutions containing 7-methylpyrido (3,4-c)psoralen. Quantitatively, this photoproduct represents about one-fifth of the overall yield of the furan-side pyridopsoralen (2+2) photocycloadducts the thymine. DNA sequencing methodology was used to demonstrate that pyridopsoralen-photosensitized DNA is a substrate for T4 endonuclease V and Escherichia coli photoreactivating enzyme, two enzymes acting specifically on cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers. The formation of cyclobutane thymine dimers concomitant to that of thymine-furocoumarin photoadducts and their eventual implication in the photobiological effects of the pyridopsoralens are discussed.

  7. CENPT bridges adjacent CENPA nucleosomes on young human α-satellite dimers

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Jitendra; Henikoff, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Nucleosomes containing the CenH3 (CENPA or CENP-A) histone variant replace H3 nucleosomes at centromeres to provide a foundation for kinetochore assembly. CENPA nucleosomes are part of the constitutive centromere associated network (CCAN) that forms the inner kinetochore on which outer kinetochore proteins assemble. Two components of the CCAN, CENPC and the histone-fold protein CENPT, provide independent connections from the ∼171-bp centromeric α-satellite repeat units to the outer kinetochore. However, the spatial relationship between CENPA nucleosomes and these two branches remains unclear. To address this issue, we use a base-pair resolution genomic readout of protein–protein interactions, comparative chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) with sequencing, together with sequential ChIP, to infer the in vivo molecular architecture of the human CCAN. In contrast to the currently accepted model in which CENPT associates with H3 nucleosomes, we find that CENPT is centered over the CENPB box between two well-positioned CENPA nucleosomes on the most abundant centromeric young α-satellite dimers and interacts with the CENPB/CENPC complex. Upon cross-linking, the entire CENPA/CENPB/CENPC/CENPT complex is nuclease-protected over an α-satellite dimer that comprises the fundamental unit of centromeric chromatin. We conclude that CENPA/CENPC and CENPT pathways for kinetochore assembly are physically integrated over young α-satellite dimers. PMID:27384170

  8. Crystal structure of the arcelin-1 dimer from Phaseolus vulgaris at 1.9-A resolution.

    PubMed

    Mourey, L; Pédelacq, J D; Birck, C; Fabre, C; Rougé, P; Samama, J P

    1998-05-22

    Arcelin-1 is a glycoprotein from kidney beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) which displays insecticidal properties and protects the seeds from predation by larvae of various bruchids. This lectin-like protein is devoid of monosaccharide binding properties and belongs to the phytohemagglutinin protein family. The x-ray structure determination at 1.9-A resolution of native arcelin-1 dimers, which correspond to the functional state of the protein in solution, was solved using multiple isomorphous replacement and refined to a crystallographic R factor of 0.208. The three glycosylation sites on each monomer are all covalently modified. One of these oligosaccharide chains provides interactions with protein atoms at the dimer interface, and another one may act by preventing the formation of higher oligomeric species in the arcelin variants. The dimeric structure and the severe alteration of the monosaccharide binding site in arcelin-1 correlate with the hemagglutinating properties of the protein, which are unaffected by simple sugars and sugar derivatives. Sequence analysis and structure comparisons of arcelin-1 with the other insecticidal proteins from kidney beans, arcelin-5, and alpha-amylase inhibitor and with legume lectins, yield insights into the molecular basis of the different biological functions of these proteins. PMID:9582323

  9. Dimeric CRISPR RNA-guided FokI nucleases for highly specific genome editing.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Shengdar Q; Wyvekens, Nicolas; Khayter, Cyd; Foden, Jennifer A; Thapar, Vishal; Reyon, Deepak; Goodwin, Mathew J; Aryee, Martin J; Joung, J Keith

    2014-06-01

    Monomeric CRISPR-Cas9 nucleases are widely used for targeted genome editing but can induce unwanted off-target mutations with high frequencies. Here we describe dimeric RNA-guided FokI nucleases (RFNs) that can recognize extended sequences and edit endogenous genes with high efficiencies in human cells. RFN cleavage activity depends strictly on the binding of two guide RNAs (gRNAs) to DNA with a defined spacing and orientation substantially reducing the likelihood that a suitable target site will occur more than once in the genome and therefore improving specificities relative to wild-type Cas9 monomers. RFNs guided by a single gRNA generally induce lower levels of unwanted mutations than matched monomeric Cas9 nickases. In addition, we describe a simple method for expressing multiple gRNAs bearing any 5' end nucleotide, which gives dimeric RFNs a broad targeting range. RFNs combine the ease of RNA-based targeting with the specificity enhancement inherent to dimerization and are likely to be useful in applications that require highly precise genome editing. PMID:24770325

  10. Pentapeptide-repeat proteins that act as topoisomerase poison resistance factors have a common dimer interface

    PubMed Central

    Vetting, Matthew W.; Hegde, Subray S.; Zhang, Yong; Blanchard, John S.

    2011-01-01

    The protein AlbG is a self-resistance factor against albicidin, a nonribosomally encoded hybrid polyketide-peptide with antibiotic and phytotoxic properties produced by Xanthomonas albilineans. Primary-sequence analysis indicates that AlbG is a member of the pentapeptide-repeat family of proteins (PRP). The structure of AlbG from X. albilineans was determined at 2.0 Å resolution by SAD phasing using data collected from a single trimethyllead acetate derivative on a home source. AlbG folds into a right-handed quadrilateral β-helix composed of approximately eight semi-regular coils. The regularity of the β-­helix is blemished by a large loop/deviation in the β-helix between coils 4 and 5. The C-terminus of the β-helix is capped by a dimerization module, yielding a dimer with a 110 Å semi-collinear β-helical axis. This method of dimer formation appears to be common to all PRP proteins that confer resistance to topoisomerase poisons and contrasts with most PRP proteins, which are typically monomeric. PMID:21393830

  11. Homing endonuclease I-TevIII: dimerization as a means to a double-strand break

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, Justin B.; Stapleton, Michelle; Stanger, Matthew J.; Smith, Dorie; Dansereau, John T.; Derbyshire, Victoria; Belfort, Marlene

    2007-01-01

    Homing endonucleases are unusual enzymes, capable of recognizing lengthy DNA sequences and cleaving site-specifically within genomes. Many homing endonucleases are encoded within group I introns, and such enzymes promote the mobility reactions of these introns. Phage T4 has three group I introns, within the td, nrdB and nrdD genes. The td and nrdD introns are mobile, whereas the nrdB intron is not. Phage RB3 is a close relative of T4 and has a lengthier nrdB intron. Here, we describe I-TevIII, the H–N–H endonuclease encoded by the RB3 nrdB intron. In contrast to previous reports, we demonstrate that this intron is mobile, and that this mobility is dependent on I-TevIII, which generates 2-nt 3′ extensions. The enzyme has a distinct catalytic domain, which contains the H–N–H motif, and DNA-binding domain, which contains two zinc fingers required for interaction with the DNA substrate. Most importantly, I-TevIII, unlike the H–N–H endonucleases described so far, makes a double-strand break on the DNA homing site by acting as a dimer. Through deletion analysis, the dimerization interface was mapped to the DNA-binding domain. The unusual propensity of I-TevIII to dimerize to achieve cleavage of both DNA strands underscores the versatility of the H–N–H enzyme family. PMID:17289754

  12. The position of the Gly-xxx-Gly motif in transmembrane segments modulates dimer affinity.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Rachel M; Rath, Arianna; Deber, Charles M

    2006-12-01

    Although the intrinsic low solubility of membrane proteins presents challenges to their high-resolution structure determination, insight into the amino acid sequence features and forces that stabilize their folds has been provided through study of sequence-dependent helix-helix interactions between single transmembrane (TM) helices. While the stability of helix-helix partnerships mediated by the Gly-xxx-Gly (GG4) motif is known to be generally modulated by distal interfacial residues, it has not been established whether the position of this motif, with respect to the ends of a given TM segment, affects dimer affinity. Here we examine the relationship between motif position and affinity in the homodimers of 2 single-spanning membrane protein TM sequences: glycophorin A (GpA) and bacteriophage M13 coat protein (MCP). Using the TOXCAT assay for dimer affinity on a series of GpA and MCP TM segments that have been modified with either 4 Leu residues at each end or with 8 Leu residues at the N-terminal end, we show that in each protein, centrally located GG4 motifs are capable of stronger helix-helix interactions than those proximal to TM helix ends, even when surrounding interfacial residues are maintained. The relative importance of GG4 motifs in stabilizing helix-helix interactions therefore must be considered not only in its specific residue context but also in terms of the location of the interactive surface relative to the N and C termini of alpha-helical TM segments.

  13. Structural characterization suggests models for monomeric and dimeric forms of full-length ezrin.

    PubMed

    Phang, Juanita M; Harrop, Stephen J; Duff, Anthony P; Sokolova, Anna V; Crossett, Ben; Walsh, James C; Beckham, Simone A; Nguyen, Cuong D; Davies, Roberta B; Glöckner, Carina; Bromley, Elizabeth H C; Wilk, Krystyna E; Curmi, Paul M G

    2016-09-15

    Ezrin is a member of the ERM (ezrin-radixin-moesin) family of proteins that have been conserved through metazoan evolution. These proteins have dormant and active forms, where the latter links the actin cytoskeleton to membranes. ERM proteins have three domains: an N-terminal FERM [band Four-point-one (4.1) ERM] domain comprising three subdomains (F1, F2, and F3); a helical domain; and a C-terminal actin-binding domain. In the dormant form, FERM and C-terminal domains form a stable complex. We have determined crystal structures of the active FERM domain and the dormant FERM:C-terminal domain complex of human ezrin. We observe a bistable array of phenylalanine residues in the core of subdomain F3 that is mobile in the active form and locked in the dormant form. As subdomain F3 is pivotal in binding membrane proteins and phospholipids, these transitions may facilitate activation and signaling. Full-length ezrin forms stable monomers and dimers. We used small-angle X-ray scattering to determine the solution structures of these species. As expected, the monomer shows a globular domain with a protruding helical coiled coil. The dimer shows an elongated dumbbell structure that is twice as long as the monomer. By aligning ERM sequences spanning metazoan evolution, we show that the central helical region is conserved, preserving the heptad repeat. Using this, we have built a dimer model where each monomer forms half of an elongated antiparallel coiled coil with domain-swapped FERM:C-terminal domain complexes at each end. The model suggests that ERM dimers may bind to actin in a parallel fashion.

  14. Structural characterization suggests models for monomeric and dimeric forms of full-length ezrin.

    PubMed

    Phang, Juanita M; Harrop, Stephen J; Duff, Anthony P; Sokolova, Anna V; Crossett, Ben; Walsh, James C; Beckham, Simone A; Nguyen, Cuong D; Davies, Roberta B; Glöckner, Carina; Bromley, Elizabeth H C; Wilk, Krystyna E; Curmi, Paul M G

    2016-09-15

    Ezrin is a member of the ERM (ezrin-radixin-moesin) family of proteins that have been conserved through metazoan evolution. These proteins have dormant and active forms, where the latter links the actin cytoskeleton to membranes. ERM proteins have three domains: an N-terminal FERM [band Four-point-one (4.1) ERM] domain comprising three subdomains (F1, F2, and F3); a helical domain; and a C-terminal actin-binding domain. In the dormant form, FERM and C-terminal domains form a stable complex. We have determined crystal structures of the active FERM domain and the dormant FERM:C-terminal domain complex of human ezrin. We observe a bistable array of phenylalanine residues in the core of subdomain F3 that is mobile in the active form and locked in the dormant form. As subdomain F3 is pivotal in binding membrane proteins and phospholipids, these transitions may facilitate activation and signaling. Full-length ezrin forms stable monomers and dimers. We used small-angle X-ray scattering to determine the solution structures of these species. As expected, the monomer shows a globular domain with a protruding helical coiled coil. The dimer shows an elongated dumbbell structure that is twice as long as the monomer. By aligning ERM sequences spanning metazoan evolution, we show that the central helical region is conserved, preserving the heptad repeat. Using this, we have built a dimer model where each monomer forms half of an elongated antiparallel coiled coil with domain-swapped FERM:C-terminal domain complexes at each end. The model suggests that ERM dimers may bind to actin in a parallel fashion. PMID:27364155

  15. Diagnostic Value of Elevated D-Dimer Level in Venous Thromboembolism in Patients With Acute or Subacute Brain Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yeon Jin; Im, Sun; Jang, Yong Jun; Park, So Young; Sohn, Dong Gyun

    2015-01-01

    Objective To define the risk factors that influence the occurrence of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in patients with acute or subacute brain lesions and to determine the usefulness of D-dimer levels for VTE screening of these patients. Methods Medical data from January 2012 to December 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. Mean D-dimer levels in those with VTE versus those without VTE were compared. Factors associated with VTE were analyzed and the odds ratios (ORs) were calculated. The D-dimer cutoff value for patients with hemiplegia was defined using a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. Results Of 117 patients with acute or subacute brain lesions, 65 patients with elevated D-dimer levels (mean, 5.1±5.8 mg/L; positive result >0.55 mg/L) were identified. Logistic regression analysis showed that the risk of VTE was 3.9 times higher in those with urinary tract infections (UTIs) (p=0.0255). The risk of VTE was 4.5 times higher in those who had recently undergone surgery (p=0.0151). Analysis of the ROC showed 3.95 mg/L to be the appropriate D-dimer cutoff value for screening for VTE (area under the curve [AUC], 0.63; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.5-0.8) in patients with acute or subacute brain lesions. This differs greatly from the conventional D-dimer cutoff value of 0.55 mg/L. D-dimer levels less than 3.95 mg/L in the absence of surgery showed a negative predictive value of 95.8% (95% CI, 78.8-99.8). Conclusion Elevated D-dimer levels alone have some value in VTE diagnosis. However, the concomitant presence of UTI or a history of recent surgery significantly increased the risk of VTE in patients with acute or subacute brain lesions. Therefore, a different D-dimer cutoff value should be applied in these cases. PMID:26798616

  16. Hydrolytic polymerization of chromium(III). I. Two dimeric species

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, M.; Connick, R.E.

    1981-07-01

    In addition to the well-known doubly bridged chromium(III) dimer ((H/sub 2/O)/sub 4/Cr(OH)/sub 2/Cr(H/sub 2/O)/sub 4/)/sup 4 +/, a second dimer of formula ((H/sub 2/O)/sub 5/CrOHCr(H/sub 2/O)/sub 5/)/sup 5 +/ has been found. The formula of the latter was established through equilibrium measurements and freezing point depression. The equilibrium between Cr/sup 3 +/ and the doubly bridged dimer was measured at various ionic strengths and temperatures. The equilibrium between the doubly bridged and singly bridged dimers is shifted strongly toward the latter only at high acidities, with roughly equal concentrations at 2 M acid. Electron spin resonance spectra were taken for both dimers in order to obtain g values. The latter were used with magnetic susceptibility measurements to calculate the spin-spin coupling constants between the two chromiums of these species. Comparison is made with the coupling constants of other bridged chromium(III) compounds, and the results are shown to be in reasonable agreement. The striking difference in magnetic susceptibility between the doubly bridged chromium dimer and the iron(III) dimer of empirical formula Fe/sub 2/(OH)/sub 2//sup 4 +/ is discussed in terms of possible structures and electronic interactions.

  17. Human IgG2 can form covalent dimers.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Esther M; Wims, Letitia A; Chan, Lisa A; Morrison, Sherie L

    2003-03-15

    Unlike IgA and IgM, IgG has not yet been shown to form covalent polymers. However in the presence of specific Ag, murine IgG3 has been shown to polymerize through noncovalent interactions. In contrast to the noncovalent oligomers found with murine IgG3, we have detected covalent dimers in three different recombinant human IgG2 Abs produced in myeloma cells. Both IgG2,kappa and IgG2,lambda can form dimers. In addition, analysis of pooled human gamma globulin and several normal sera revealed the presence of IgG2 dimers. The IgG2 dimers are in contrast to the noncovalent IgG dimers found in pooled sera of multiple donors resulting from idiotype/anti-idiotype (Id/anti-Id) interactions. Cyanogen bromide cleavage analysis suggests that one or more Cys residues in the gamma 2 hinge are involved in dimer assembly. The potential role of IgG2 dimers in immunity against carbohydrate Ags is discussed.

  18. New Insights into Poly(Lactic-co-glycolic acid) Microstructure: Using Repeating Sequence Copolymers to Decipher Complex NMR and Thermal Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Stayshich, Ryan M.; Meyer, Tara Y.

    2012-01-01

    Sequence, which Nature uses to spectacular advantage, has not been fully exploited in synthetic copolymers. To investigate the effect of sequence and stereosequence on the physical properties of copolymers a family of complex isotactic, syndiotactic and atactic repeating sequence poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) copolymers (RSC PLGAs) were prepared and their NMR and thermal behavior was studied. The unique suitability of polymers prepared from the bioassimilable lactic and glycolic acid monomers for biomedical applications makes them ideal candidates for this type of sequence engineering. Polymers with repeating units of LG, GLG and LLG (L = lactic, G = glycolic) with controlled and varied tacticities were synthesized by assembly of sequence specific, stereopure dimeric, trimeric and hexameric segmer units. Specifically labeled deuterated lactic and glycolic acid segmers were likewise prepared and polymerized. Molecular weights for the copolymers ranged from Mn = 12-40 kDa by size exclusion chromatography in THF. Although the effects of sequence-influenced solution conformation were visible in all resonances of the 1H and 13C NMR spectra, the diastereotopic methylene resonances in the 1H NMR (CDCl3) for the glycolic units of the copolymers proved most sensitive. An octad level of resolution, which corresponds to an astounding 31-atom distance between the most separated stereocenters, was observed in some mixed sequence polymers. Importantly, the level of sensitivity of a particular NMR resonance to small differences in sequence was found to depend on the sequence itself. Thermal properties were also correlated with sequence. PMID:20681726

  19. Biomimetic Total Syntheses of (−)-Leucoridines A and C through the Dimerization of (−)-Dihydrovalparicine

    PubMed Central

    Kokkonda, Praveen; Brown, Keaon R.; Seguin, Trevor J.; Wheeler, Steven E.; Vaddypally, Shivaiah; Zdilla, Michael J.; Andrade, Rodrigo B.

    2016-01-01

    Concise biomimetic syntheses of the Strychnos-Strychnos-type bis-indole alkaloids (−)-leucoridine A (1) and C (2) were accomplished through the biomimetic dimerization of (−)-dihydrovalparicine (3). En route to 3, the known alkaloids (+)-geissoschizoline (8) and (−)-dehydrogeissoschizoline (10) were also prepared. DFT calculations were employed to elucidate the mechanism, which favors a stepwise aza-Michael/spirocyclization sequence over the alternate hetero-Diels–Alder cycloaddition reaction. PMID:26315453

  20. One Sequence, Two Folds: A Metastable Structure of CD2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Alison J.; Lewis, Sally J.; Barclay, A. Neil; Brady, R. Leo

    1995-08-01

    When expressed as part of a glutathione S-transferase fusion protein the NH_2-terminal domain of the lymphocyte cell adhesion molecule CD2 is shown to adopt two different folds. The immunoglobulin superfamily structure of the major (85%) monomeric component has previously been determined by both x-ray crystallography and NMR spectroscopy. We now describe the structure of a second, dimeric, form present in about 15% of recombinant CD2 molecules. After denaturation and refolding in the absence of the fusion partner, dimeric CD2 is converted to monomer, illustrating that the dimeric form represents a metastable folded state. The crystal structure of this dimeric form, refined to 2.0-Å resolution, reveals two domains with overall similarity to the IgSF fold found in the monomer. However, in the dimer each domain is formed by the intercalation of two polypeptide chains. Hence each domain represents a distinct folding unit that can assemble in two different ways. In the dimer the two domains fold around a hydrophilic interface believed to mimic the cell adhesion interaction at the cell surface, and the formation of dimer can be regulated by mutating single residues at this interface. This unusual misfolded form of the protein, which appears to result from inter- rather than intramolecular interactions being favored by an intermediate structure formed during the folding process, illustrates that evolution of protein oligomers is possible from the sequence for a single protein domain.

  1. Proton conduction in gramicidin A and in its dioxolane-linked dimer in different lipid bilayers.

    PubMed Central

    Cukierman, S; Quigley, E P; Crumrine, D S

    1997-01-01

    concentration was linear at low bulk concentrations of H+ (0.01-2 M) and saturated at concentrations of more than 3 M. It is concluded that 1) The mobility of protons in gramicidin A channels in different lipid bilayers is remarkably similar to proton mobilities in aqueous solutions. In particular, at high concentrations of HCl, proton mobilities in gramicidin A channel and in solution differ by only 25%. 2) Differences between proton conductances in gramicidin A channels in GMO and PEPC cannot be explained by surface charge effects on PEPC membranes. It is proposed that protonated phospholipids adjacent to the mouth of the pore act as an additional source of protons for conduction through gA channels in relation to GMO bilayers. 3) Some experimental results cannot be reconciled with simple alterations in access resistance to proton flow in gA channels. Said differences could be explained if the structure and/or dynamics of water molecules inside gramicidin A channels is modulated by the lipid environment and by modifications in the structure of gA channels. 4) The dioxolane ring is probably responsible for the closing flickers seen in the dimer channel. However, other factors can also influence closing flickers. PMID:9370442

  2. Proton conduction in gramicidin A and in its dioxolane-linked dimer in different lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Cukierman, S; Quigley, E P; Crumrine, D S

    1997-11-01

    concentration was linear at low bulk concentrations of H+ (0.01-2 M) and saturated at concentrations of more than 3 M. It is concluded that 1) The mobility of protons in gramicidin A channels in different lipid bilayers is remarkably similar to proton mobilities in aqueous solutions. In particular, at high concentrations of HCl, proton mobilities in gramicidin A channel and in solution differ by only 25%. 2) Differences between proton conductances in gramicidin A channels in GMO and PEPC cannot be explained by surface charge effects on PEPC membranes. It is proposed that protonated phospholipids adjacent to the mouth of the pore act as an additional source of protons for conduction through gA channels in relation to GMO bilayers. 3) Some experimental results cannot be reconciled with simple alterations in access resistance to proton flow in gA channels. Said differences could be explained if the structure and/or dynamics of water molecules inside gramicidin A channels is modulated by the lipid environment and by modifications in the structure of gA channels. 4) The dioxolane ring is probably responsible for the closing flickers seen in the dimer channel. However, other factors can also influence closing flickers.

  3. Adsorption of silver dimer on graphene - A DFT study

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, Gagandeep; Gupta, Shuchi; Rani, Pooja; Dharamvir, Keya

    2014-04-24

    We performed a systematic density functional theory (DFT) study of the adsorption of silver dimer (Ag{sub 2}) on graphene using SIESTA (Spanish Initiative for Electronic Simulations with Thousands of Atoms) package, in the generalized gradient approximation (GGA). The adsorption energy, geometry, and charge transfer of Ag2-graphene system are calculated. The minimum energy configuration for a silver dimer is parallel to the graphene sheet with its two atoms directly above the centre of carbon-carbon bond. The negligible charge transfer between the dimer and the surface is also indicative of a weak bond. The methodology demonstrated in this paper may be applied to larger silver clusters on graphene sheet.

  4. [Dichotomizing method applied to calculating equilibrium constant of dimerization system].

    PubMed

    Cheng, Guo-zhong; Ye, Zhi-xiang

    2002-06-01

    The arbitrary trivariate algebraic equations are formed based on the combination principle. The univariata algebraic equation of equilibrium constant kappa for dimerization system is obtained through a series of algebraic transformation, and it depends on the properties of monotonic functions whether the equation is solvable or not. If the equation is solvable, equilibrium constant of dimerization system is obtained by dichotomy and its final equilibrium constant of dimerization system is determined according to the principle of error of fitting. The equilibrium constants of trisulfophthalocyanine and biosulfophthalocyanine obtained with this method are 47,973.4 and 30,271.8 respectively. The results are much better than those reported previously.

  5. Role of sequence and membrane composition in structure of transmembrane domain of Amyloid Precursor Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straub, John

    2013-03-01

    Aggregation of proteins of known sequence is linked to a variety of neurodegenerative disorders. The amyloid β (A β) protein associated with Alzheimer's Disease (AD) is derived from cleavage of the 99 amino acid C-terminal fragment of Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP-C99) by γ-secretase. Certain familial mutations of APP-C99 have been shown to lead to altered production of A β protein and the early onset of AD. We describe simulation studies exploring the structure of APP-C99 in micelle and membrane environments. Our studies explore how changes in sequence and membrane composition influence (1) the structure of monomeric APP-C99 and (2) APP-C99 homodimer structure and stability. Comparison of simulation results with recent NMR studies of APP-C99 monomers and dimers in micelle and bicelle environments provide insight into how critical aspects of APP-C99 structure and dimerization correlate with secretase processing, an essential component of the A β protein aggregation pathway and AD.

  6. The R35 residue of the influenza A virus NS1 protein has minimal effects on nuclear localization but alters virus replication through disrupting protein dimerization

    SciTech Connect

    Lalime, Erin N.; Pekosz, Andrew

    2014-06-15

    The influenza A virus NS1 protein has a nuclear localization sequence (NLS) in the amino terminal region. This NLS overlaps sequences that are important for RNA binding as well as protein dimerization. To assess the significance of the NS1 NLS on influenza virus replication, the NLS amino acids were individually mutated to alanines and recombinant viruses encoding these mutations were rescued. Viruses containing NS1 proteins with mutations at R37, R38 and K41 displayed minimal changes in replication or NS1 protein nuclear localization. Recombinant viruses encoding NS1 R35A were not recovered but viruses containing second site mutations at position D39 in addition to the R35A mutation were isolated. The mutations at position 39 were shown to partially restore NS1 protein dimerization but had minimal effects on nuclear localization. These data indicate that the amino acids in the NS1 NLS region play a more important role in protein dimerization compared to nuclear localization. - Highlights: • Mutations were introduced into influenza NS1 NLS1. • NS1 R37A, R38A, K41A viruses had minimal changes in replication and NS1 localization. • Viruses from NS1 R35A rescue all contained additional mutations at D39. • NS1 R35A D39X mutations recover dimerization lost in NS1 R35A mutations. • These results reaffirm the importance of dimerization for NS1 protein function.

  7. Structural role of the conserved cysteines in the dimerization of the viral transmembrane oncoprotein E5.

    PubMed

    Windisch, Dirk; Hoffmann, Silke; Afonin, Sergii; Vollmer, Stefanie; Benamira, Soraya; Langer, Birgid; Bürck, Jochen; Muhle-Goll, Claudia; Ulrich, Anne S

    2010-09-22

    The E5 oncoprotein is the major transforming protein of bovine papillomavirus type 1. This 44-residue transmembrane protein can interact with the platelet-derived growth factor receptor β, leading to ligand-independent activation and cell transformation. For productive interaction, E5 needs to dimerize via a C-terminal pair of cysteines, though a recent study suggested that its truncated transmembrane segment can dimerize on its own. To analyze the structure of the full protein in a membrane environment and elucidate the role of the Cys-Ser-Cys motif, we produced recombinantly the wild-type protein and four cysteine mutants. Comparison by circular dichroism in detergent micelles and lipid vesicular dispersion and by NMR in trifluoroethanol demonstrates that the absence of one or both cysteines does not influence the highly α-helical secondary structure, nor does it impair the ability of E5 to dimerize, observations that are further supported by sodium dodecylsulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. We also observed assemblies of higher order. Oriented circular dichroism in lipid bilayers shows that E5 is aligned as a transmembrane helix with a slight tilt angle, and that this membrane alignment is also independent of any cysteines. We conclude that the Cys-containing motif represents a disordered region of the protein that serves as an extra covalent connection for stabilization.

  8. Dimerization of FIR Upon FUSE DNA Binding Suggests Mechanism of c-myc Inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Crichlow,G.; Zhou, H.; Hsiao, H.; Frederick, K.; Debrosse, M.; Yang, Y.; Folta-Stogniew, E.; Chung, H.; Fan, C.; et al

    2008-01-01

    c-myc is essential for cell homeostasis and growth but lethal if improperly regulated. Transcription of this oncogene is governed by the counterbalancing forces of two proteins on TFIIH--the FUSE binding protein (FBP) and the FBP-interacting repressor (FIR). FBP and FIR recognize single-stranded DNA upstream of the P1 promoter, known as FUSE, and influence transcription by oppositely regulating TFIIH at the promoter site. Size exclusion chromatography coupled with light scattering reveals that an FIR dimer binds one molecule of single-stranded DNA. The crystal structure confirms that FIR binds FUSE as a dimer, and only the N-terminal RRM domain participates in nucleic acid recognition. Site-directed mutations of conserved residues in the first RRM domain reduce FIR's affinity for FUSE, while analogous mutations in the second RRM domain either destabilize the protein or have no effect on DNA binding. Oppositely oriented DNA on parallel binding sites of the FIR dimer results in spooling of a single strand of bound DNA, and suggests a mechanism for c-myc transcriptional control.

  9. Self-aggregation of cationic dimeric surfactants in water-ionic liquid binary mixtures.

    PubMed

    Martín, Victoria Isabel; Rodríguez, Amalia; Laschewsky, André; Moyá, María Luisa

    2014-09-15

    The micellization of four dimeric cationic surfactants ("gemini surfactants") derived from N-dodecyl-N,N,N-trimethylammonium chloride was studied in pure water and in water-ionic liquid (IL) solutions by a wide range of techniques. The dimeric surfactants are distinguished by their rigid spacer groups separating the two surfactant motifs, which range from C3 to C5 in length. In order to minimize organic ion pairing effects as well as the role of the ionic liquids as potential co-surfactants, ILs with inorganic hydrophilic anions and organic cations of limited hydrophobicity were chosen, namely ethyl, butyl, and hexyl-3-imidazolium chlorides. (1)H NMR two-dimensional, 2D, rotating frame nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy measurements, ROESY, supported this premise. The spacer nature hardly affects the micellization process, neither in water nor in water-IL solutions. However, it does influence the tendency of the dimeric surfactants to form elongated micelles when surfactant concentration increases. In order to have a better understanding of the ternary water-IL surfactant systems, the micellization of the surfactants was also studied in aqueous NaCl solutions, in water-ethylene glycol and in water-formamide binary mixtures. The combined results show that the ionic liquids play a double role in the mixed systems, operating simultaneously as background electrolytes and as polar organic solvents. The IL role as organic co-solvent becomes more dominant when its concentration increases, and when the IL alkyl chain length augments.

  10. Influences of diurnal sampling bias on fixed-point monitoring of plankton biodiversity determined using a massively parallel sequencing-based technique.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Satoshi; Hida, Kohsuke; Urushizaki, Shingo; Onitsuka, Goh; Yasuike, Motoshige; Nakamura, Yoji; Fujiwara, Atushi; Tajimi, Seisuke; Kimoto, Katsunori; Kobayashi, Takanori; Gojobori, Takashi; Ototake, Mitsuru

    2016-02-01

    In this study, we investigated the influence of diurnal sampling bias on the community structure of plankton by comparing the biodiversity among seawater samples (n=9) obtained every 3h for 24h by using massively parallel sequencing (MPS)-based plankton monitoring at a fixed point conducted at Himedo seaport in Yatsushiro Sea, Japan. The number of raw operational taxonomy units (OTUs) and OTUs after re-sampling was 507-658 (558 ± 104, mean ± standard deviation) and 448-544 (467 ± 81), respectively, indicating high plankton biodiversity at the sampling location. The relative abundance of the top 20 OTUs in the samples from Himedo seaport was 48.8-67.7% (58.0 ± 5.8%), and the highest-ranked OTU was Pseudo-nitzschia species (Bacillariophyta) with a relative abundance of 17.3-39.2%, followed by Oithona sp. 1 and Oithona sp. 2 (Arthropoda). During seawater sampling, the semidiurnal tidal current having an amplitude of 0.3ms(-1) was dominant, and the westward residual current driven by the northeasterly wind was continuously observed during the 24-h monitoring. Therefore, the relative abundance of plankton species apparently fluctuated among the samples, but no significant difference was noted according to G-test (p>0.05). Significant differences were observed between the samples obtained from a different locality (Kusuura in Yatsushiro Sea) and at different dates, suggesting that the influence of diurnal sampling bias on plankton diversity, determined using the MPS-based survey, was not significant and acceptable.

  11. Structural basis underlying CAC RNA recognition by the RRM domain of dimeric RNA-binding protein RBPMS

    PubMed Central

    Teplova, Marianna; Farazi, Thalia A.; Tuschl, Thomas; Patel, Dinshaw J.

    2015-01-01

    RNA-binding protein with multiple splicing (designated RBPMS) is a higher vertebrate mRNA-binding protein containing a single RNA recognition motif (RRM). RBPMS has been shown to be involved in mRNA transport, localization and stability, with key roles in axon guidance, smooth muscle plasticity, as well as regulation of cancer cell proliferation and migration. We report on structure-function studies of the RRM domain of RBPMS bound to a CAC-containing single-stranded RNA. These results provide insights into potential topologies of complexes formed by the RBPMS RRM domain and the tandem CAC repeat binding sites as detected by photoactivatable-ribonucleoside-enhanced crosslinking and immunoprecipitation. These studies establish that the RRM domain of RBPMS forms a symmetrical dimer in the free state, with each monomer binding sequence-specifically to all three nucleotides of a CAC segment in the RNA bound state. Structure-guided mutations within the dimerization and RNA-binding interfaces of RBPMS RRM on RNA complex formation resulted in both disruption of dimerization and a decrease in RNA-binding affinity as observed by size exclusion chromatography and isothermal titration calorimetry. As anticipated from biochemical binding studies, over-expression of dimerization or RNA-binding mutants of Flag-HA-tagged RBPMS were no longer able to track with stress granules in HEK293 cells, thereby documenting the deleterious effects of such mutations in vivo. PMID:26347403

  12. Structure of BRCA1-BRCT/Abraxas Complex Reveals Phosphorylation-Dependent BRCT Dimerization at DNA Damage Sites

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Qian; Paul, Atanu; Su, Dan; Mehmood, Shahid; Foo, Tzeh Keong; Ochi, Takashi; Bunting, Emma L.; Xia, Bing; Robinson, Carol V.; Wang, Bin; Blundell, Tom L.

    2016-01-01

    Summary BRCA1 accumulation at DNA damage sites is an important step for its function in the DNA damage response and in DNA repair. BRCA1-BRCT domains bind to proteins containing the phosphorylated serine-proline-x-phenylalanine (pSPxF) motif including Abraxas, Bach1/FancJ, and CtIP. In this study, we demonstrate that ionizing radiation (IR)-induces ATM-dependent phosphorylation of serine 404 (S404) next to the pSPxF motif. Crystal structures of BRCT/Abraxas show that phosphorylation of S404 is important for extensive interactions through the N-terminal sequence outside the pSPxF motif and leads to formation of a stable dimer. Mutation of S404 leads to deficiency in BRCA1 accumulation at DNA damage sites and cellular sensitivity to IR. In addition, two germline mutations of BRCA1 are found to disrupt the dimer interface and dimer formation. Thus, we demonstrate a mechanism involving IR-induced phosphorylation and dimerization of the BRCT/Abraxas complex for regulating Abraxas-mediated recruitment of BRCA1 in response to IR. PMID:26778126

  13. The Structure of the Catalytic Domain of a Plant Cellulose Synthase and Its Assembly into Dimers[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Olek, Anna T.; Rayon, Catherine; Makowski, Lee; Kim, Hyung Rae; Ciesielski, Peter; Badger, John; Paul, Lake N.; Ghosh, Subhangi; Kihara, Daisuke; Crowley, Michael; Himmel, Michael E.; Bolin, Jeffrey T.; Carpita, Nicholas C.

    2014-01-01

    Cellulose microfibrils are para-crystalline arrays of several dozen linear (1→4)-β-d-glucan chains synthesized at the surface of the cell membrane by large, multimeric complexes of synthase proteins. Recombinant catalytic domains of rice (Oryza sativa) CesA8 cellulose synthase form dimers reversibly as the fundamental scaffold units of architecture in the synthase complex. Specificity of binding to UDP and UDP-Glc indicates a properly folded protein, and binding kinetics indicate that each monomer independently synthesizes single glucan chains of cellulose, i.e., two chains per dimer pair. In contrast to structure modeling predictions, solution x-ray scattering studies demonstrate that the monomer is a two-domain, elongated structure, with the smaller domain coupling two monomers into a dimer. The catalytic core of the monomer is accommodated only near its center, with the plant-specific sequences occupying the small domain and an extension distal to the catalytic domain. This configuration is in stark contrast to the domain organization obtained in predicted structures of plant CesA. The arrangement of the catalytic domain within the CesA monomer and dimer provides a foundation for constructing structural models of the synthase complex and defining the relationship between the rosette structure and the cellulose microfibrils they synthesize. PMID:25012190

  14. Ab initio calculations of nitramine dimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koh-Fallet, Sharon; Schweigert, Igor

    2015-06-01

    Elevated temperatures and pressures are typically thought to have opposing effects on the reaction channels of nitramine decomposition. These high temperatures promote reactions with loose transition structures (positive activation entropies and volumes), such as N-N bond homolysis. Elevated pressures promote reactions with tight transition structures (negative activation entropies and volumes), such as intramolecular and intermolecular H transfer. However, no quantitative data exists regarding the range of temperatures and pressures at which these effects become pronounced. We are pursuing ab initio calculations of the corresponding unimolecular and bimolecular transition structures with the objective of estimating the relevant thermochemical parameters and quantifying the effects of elevated temperature and pressures on the corresponding rate constants. Here, we present density functional theory and complete active space calculations of gas-phase molecular dimers of nitramines as an intermediate step toward modeling transition structures directly in the condensed phase. This work was supported by the Naval Research Laboratory via the American Society for Engineering and Education and by the Office of Naval Research, both directly and through the Naval Research Laboratory.

  15. Smectic Phase Formed by DNA Dimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salamonczyk, Miroslaw; Gleeson, James; Jakli, Antal; Sprunt, Samuel; Dhont, Jan; Stiakakis, Emmanuel

    The rapidly expanding bio market is driving the development and characterization of new multifunctional materials. In particular, nucleic acids are under intense study for gene therapy, drug delivery and other bio-safe applications [1,2,3]. DNA is well-known to form a cholesteric nematic liquid crystal in its native form; however, much recent research has focused on self-assembly and mesomorphic behavior in concentrated solutions of short DNA helices [4]. Our work focuses on DNA dimers, consisting of 48 base-pair double-stranded helices connected by a 5 to 20 base flexible single strand, and suspended in a natural buffer. Depending on temperature, concentration and length of the flexible spacer, polarizing optical microscopy and small angle x-ray scattering reveal cholesteric nematic and, remarkably, smectic liquid crystalline phases. A model for smectic phase formation in this system will be presented. 1] J.-L. Lim et al., Int. J. of. Pharm. 490 (2015) 2652] D.-H. Kim et al., Nature Biotech. 23 (2005) 2223] K. Liu et al., Chem. Eur. J. 21 (2015) 48984] M. Nakata et al., Science 318 (2007) 1276 NSF DMR 1307674.

  16. Vibrations of the carbon dioxide dimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hua; Light, J. C.

    2000-03-01

    Fully coupled four-dimensional quantum-mechanical calculations are presented for intermolecular vibrational states of rigid carbon dioxide dimer for J=0. The Hamiltonian operator is given in collision coordinates. The Hamiltonian matrix elements are evaluated using symmetrized products of spherical harmonics for angles and a potential optimized discrete variable representation (PO-DVR) for the intermolecular distance. The lowest ten or so states of each symmetry are reported for the potential energy surface (PES) given by Bukowski et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 110, 3785 (1999)]. Due to symmetries, there is no interconversion tunneling splitting for the ground state. Our calculations show that there is no tunneling shift of the ground state within our computation precision (0.01 cm-1). Analysis of the wave functions shows that only the ground states of each symmetry are nearly harmonic. The van der Waals frequencies and symmetry adapted force constants are found and compared to available experimental values. Strong coupling between the stretching coordinates and the bending coordinates are found for vibrationally excited states. The interconversion tunneling shifts are discussed for the vibrationally excited states.

  17. Spin Dimers: from BEC to Luttinger liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giamarchi, Thierry

    2011-03-01

    Localized spin systems, and in particular dimer systems, provide a fantastic laboratory to study the interplay between quantum effects and the interaction between excitations. Magnetic field and temperature allow an excellent control on the density of excitations and various very efficient probes such as neutrons and NMR are available. They can thus be used as ``quantum simulators'' to tackle with great success questions that one would normally search in itinerant interacting quantum systems. In particular they have provided excellent realizations of Bose-Einstein condensates [1,2]. This allowed not only to probe the properties of interacting bosons in a variety of dimensions but also to study in a controlled way additional effects such as disorder. If the dimensionality is reduced they also allow to test in a quantitative way Luttinger liquid physics [3,4,5]. I will discuss these various cases, and show that we have now good theoretical tools to make quantitative comparisons with the experiments. Finally, how to go from this low dimensional case where the spins behave essentially as fermions, to the higher dimensional case where they behave as (essentially free) bosons, is a very challenging, and experimentally relevant issue. This work was supported in part by the Swiss SNF under MaNEP and division II.

  18. Vibrational conical intersections in the water dimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamm, Peter; Stock, Gerhard

    2013-08-01

    A recent paper by Hamm and Stock [Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 173201 (2012)] has introduced the concept of vibrational conical intersections as a potential source of ultrafast vibrational relaxation, using the coupling between high-frequency OH modes and low-frequency intramolecular hydrogen bonding modes of malonaldehyde as an example. Here, the question is addressed whether such conical intersections may also appear for intermolecular hydrogen bonds. To that end, the water dimer [(H2O)2] is studied as a minimal model for the hydrogen bonding in liquid water. Although a significant separation of time scales between intramolecular and intermolecular degrees of freedom exists in (H2O)2, a standard normal-mode description is found to lead to a complete breakdown of the adiabatic ansatz. This is due to strong nonlinear couplings between high- and low-frequency normal modes, which in turn give rise to large overall non-adiabatic couplings. A valid adiabatic picture is obtained, on the other hand, when internal coordinates are employed. The resulting adiabatic potential energy surfaces indeed exhibit low-lying conical intersections, whose possible relevance for ultrafast relaxation and energy transfer in water is discussed.

  19. Influence of the cycle length on the production of PHA and polyglucose from glycerol by bacterial enrichments in sequencing batch reactors.

    PubMed

    Moralejo-Gárate, Helena; Palmeiro-Sánchez, Tania; Kleerebezem, Robbert; Mosquera-Corral, Anuska; Campos, José Luis; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M

    2013-12-01

    PHA, a naturally occurring biopolymer produced by a wide range of microorganisms, is known for its applications as bioplastic. In recent years the use of agro-industrial wastewater as substrate for PHA production by bacterial enrichments has attracted considerable research attention. Crude glycerol as generated during biodiesel production is a waste stream that due to its high organic matter content and low price could be an interesting substrate for PHA production. Previously we have demonstrated that when glycerol is used as substrate in a feast-famine regime, PHA and polyglucose are simultaneously produced as storage polymers. The work described in this paper aimed at understanding the effect of the cycle length on the bacterial enrichment process with emphasis on the distribution of glycerol towards PHA and polyglucose. Two sequencing batch reactors where operated with the same hydraulic and biomass retention time. A short cycle length (6 h) favored polyglucose production over PHA, whereas at long cycle length (24 h) PHA was more favored. In both communities the same microorganism appeared dominating, suggesting a metabolic rather than a microbial competition response. Moreover, the presence of ammonium during polymer accumulation did not influence the maximum amount of PHA that was attained.

  20. Influence of the cycle length on the production of PHA and polyglucose from glycerol by bacterial enrichments in sequencing batch reactors.

    PubMed

    Moralejo-Gárate, Helena; Palmeiro-Sánchez, Tania; Kleerebezem, Robbert; Mosquera-Corral, Anuska; Campos, José Luis; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M

    2013-12-01

    PHA, a naturally occurring biopolymer produced by a wide range of microorganisms, is known for its applications as bioplastic. In recent years the use of agro-industrial wastewater as substrate for PHA production by bacterial enrichments has attracted considerable research attention. Crude glycerol as generated during biodiesel production is a waste stream that due to its high organic matter content and low price could be an interesting substrate for PHA production. Previously we have demonstrated that when glycerol is used as substrate in a feast-famine regime, PHA and polyglucose are simultaneously produced as storage polymers. The work described in this paper aimed at understanding the effect of the cycle length on the bacterial enrichment process with emphasis on the distribution of glycerol towards PHA and polyglucose. Two sequencing batch reactors where operated with the same hydraulic and biomass retention time. A short cycle length (6 h) favored polyglucose production over PHA, whereas at long cycle length (24 h) PHA was more favored. In both communities the same microorganism appeared dominating, suggesting a metabolic rather than a microbial competition response. Moreover, the presence of ammonium during polymer accumulation did not influence the maximum amount of PHA that was attained. PMID:23835920

  1. Influence of carbon sources and C/N ratio on EPS production in anaerobic sequencing batch biofilm reactors for wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Miqueleto, A P; Dolosic, C C; Pozzi, E; Foresti, E; Zaiat, M

    2010-02-01

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the influence of different carbon sources and the carbon/nitrogen ratio (C/N) on the production and main composition of insoluble extracellular polymers (EPS) produced in an anaerobic sequencing batch biofilm reactor (ASBBR) with immobilized biomass in polyurethane foam. The yield of EPS was 23.6 mg/g carbon, 13.3 mg/g carbon, 9.0 mg/g carbon and 1.4 mg/g carbon when the reactor was fed with glucose, soybean oil, fat acids, and meat extract, respectively. The yield of EPS decreased from 23.6 to 2.6 mg/g carbon as the C/N ratio was decreased from 13.6 to 3.4 gC/gN, using glucose as carbon source. EPS production was not observed under strict anaerobic conditions. The results suggest that the carbon source, microaerophilic conditions and high C/N ratio favor EPS production in the ASBBR used for wastewater treatment. Cellulose was the main exopolysaccharide observed in all experimental conditions. PMID:19783138

  2. [Antioxidant and antibacterial activities of dimeric phenol compounds].

    PubMed

    Ogata, Masahiro

    2008-08-01

    We studied the antioxidant and antibacterial activities of monomeric and dimeric phenol compounds. Dimeric compounds had higher antioxidant activities than monomeric compounds. Electron spin resonance spin-trapping experiments showed that phenol compounds with an allyl substituent on their aromatic rings directly scavenged superoxide, and that only eugenol trapped hydroxyl radicals. We developed a generation system of the hydroxyl radical without using any metals by adding L-DOPA and DMPO to PBS or MiliQ water in vitro. We found that eugenol trapped hydroxyl radicals directly and is metabolized to a dimer. On the other hand, dipropofol, a dimer of propofol, has strong antibacterial activity against Gram-positive bacteria. However, it lacks solubility in water and this property is assumed to limit its efficacy. We tried to improve the solubility and found a new solubilization method of dipropofol in water with the addition of a monosaccharide or ascorbic acid.

  3. Tensor renormalization group approach to classical dimer models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roychowdhury, Krishanu; Huang, Ching-Yu

    2015-05-01

    We analyze classical dimer models on a square and a triangular lattice using a tensor network representation of the dimers. The correlation functions are numerically calculated using the recently developed "tensor renormalization group" (TRG) technique. The partition function for the dimer problem can be calculated exactly by the Pfaffian method, which is used here as a platform for comparing the numerical results. The TRG approach turns out to be a powerful tool for describing gapped systems with exponentially decaying correlations very efficiently due to its fast convergence. This is the case for the dimer model on the triangular lattice. However, the convergence becomes very slow and unstable in the case of the square lattice where the model has algebraically decaying correlations. We highlight these aspects with numerical simulations and critically appraise the robustness of the TRG approach by contrasting the results for small and large system sizes against the exact calculations. Furthermore, we benchmark our TRG results with the classical Monte Carlo method.

  4. Sodium dimers on the surface of liquid {sup 4}He

    SciTech Connect

    Ancilotto, F.; DeToffol, G.; Toigo, F.

    1995-12-01

    We have studied the structure of a sodium dimer interacting with liquid {sup 4}He. We calculated the equilibrium configuration and binding energy of a Na{sub 2} molecule solvated in a bulk liquid {sup 4}He ``bubble`` and near the liquid-vapor interface ``dimple`` by using a density-functional approach. We find that the solvated molecule is a metastable state, while the the lowest energy bound state occurs when the molecule lies flat on the surface of the liquid. The binding energy for the ``erect`` dimer is only {similar_to}1 K higher than the flat dimer, with no potential energy barrier between the two orientations, implying relatively free rotations of the molecule on the surface. The small effects of the liquid environment on the vibrational properties of the dimer are investigated.

  5. Dimer model for Tau proteins bound in microtubule bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Natalie; Kluber, Alexander; Hayre, N. Robert; Singh, Rajiv; Cox, Daniel

    2013-03-01

    The microtubule associated protein tau is important in nucleating and maintaining microtubule spacing and structure in neuronal axons. Modification of tau is implicated as a later stage process in Alzheimer's disease, but little is known about the structure of tau in microtubule bundles. We present preliminary work on a proposed model for tau dimers in microtubule bundles (dimers are the minimal units since there is one microtubule binding domain per tau). First, a model of tau monomer was created and its characteristics explored using implicit solvent molecular dynamics simulation. Multiple simulations yield a partially collapsed form with separate positively/negatively charged clumps, but which are a factor of two smaller than required by observed microtubule spacing. We argue that this will elongate in dimer form to lower electrostatic energy at a cost of entropic ``spring'' energy. We will present preliminary results on steered molecular dynamics runs on tau dimers to estimate the actual force constant. Supported by US NSF Grant DMR 1207624.

  6. Non-stripe charge order in dimerized organic conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Takehiko

    2016-06-01

    This paper demonstrates charge order is important in dimerized β - and κ -phase organic conductors similar to the uniform θ - and α -phase conductors. Here the magnitude of the dimerization represents the deviation from the ideal triangular lattice in analogy with the anisotropy in the θ phase. Since the ratio of the intradimer transfer integral to the interdimer transfer integral is as large as ˜2.6 , these dimerized phases lead to a dimer Mott insulator, whereas the Coulomb repulsion is closer to the triangular lattice because the ratio of the intradimer Coulomb repulsion to the interdimer Coulomb repulsion is comparatively small (˜1.7 ). Accordingly, in the static-limit calculation, non-stripe charge order with threefold periodicity appears between the uniform and the stripe phases, and the analogy with the θ phase suggests the first-order nature of the metal-insulator transition.

  7. Dynamics of Azobenzene Dimer Photoisomerization: Electronic and Steric Effects.

    PubMed

    Titov, Evgenii; Granucci, Giovanni; Götze, Jan Philipp; Persico, Maurizio; Saalfrank, Peter

    2016-09-15

    While azobenzenes readily photoswitch in solution, their photoisomerization in densely packed self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) can be suppressed. Reasons for this can be steric hindrance and/or electronic quenching, e.g., by exciton coupling. We address these possibilities by means of nonadiabatic molecular dynamics with trajectory surface hopping calculations, investigating the trans → cis isomerization of azobenzene after excitation into the ππ* absorption band. We consider a free monomer, an isolated dimer and a dimer embedded in a SAM-like environment of additional azobenzene molecules, imitating in this way the gradual transition from an unconstrained over an electronically coupled to an electronically coupled and sterically hindered, molecular switch. Our simulations reveal that in comparison to the single molecule the quantum yield of the trans → cis photoisomerization is similar for the isolated dimer, but greatly reduced in the sterically constrained situation. Other implications of dimerization and steric constraints are also discussed. PMID:27542538

  8. DNA Minor Groove Induced Dimerization of Heterocyclic Cations: Compound Structure, Binding Affinity and Specificity for a TTAA Site

    PubMed Central

    Munde, Manoj; Kumar, Arvind; Nhili, Raja; Depauw, Sabine; David-Cordonnier, Marie-Hélène; Ismail, Mohamed A.; Stephens, Chad E.; Farahat, Abdelbasset A.; Batista-Parra, Adalgisa; Boykin, David W.; Wilson, W. David

    2010-01-01

    With the increasing number and variations of genome sequences available control of gene expression with synthetic, cell permeable molecules is within reach. The variety of sequence-specific-binding agents is, however, still quite limited. Many minor groove binding agents selectivity recognize AT over GC sequences but have less ability to distinguish among different AT sequences. The goal with this paper is to develop compounds that can bind selectively to different AT sequences. A number of studies indicate that AATT and TTAA sequences have significantly different physical and interaction properties and different requirements for minor groove recognition. Although it has been difficult to get minor groove binding at TTAA, DB293, a phenyl-furan-benzimidazole-diamidine, was found to bind as a strong, cooperative dimer at TTAA but with no selectivity over AATT. In order to improve selectivity, modifications were made to each unit of DB293. Binding affinities and stoichiometries obtained from biosensor-surface plasmon resonance experiments show that DB1003, a furan-furan-benzimidazole diamidine binds strongly to TTAA as a dimer and has selectivity (KTTAA/KAATT = 6). CD and DNAse I footprinting studies confirmed the preference of this compound for TTAA. In summary (i) a favorable stacking surface provided by the pi system, (ii) H-bond donors to interact with TA base pairs at the floor of the groove provided by a benzimidazole (or indole) –NH and amidines, and (iii) appropriate curvature of the dimer complex to match the curvature of the minor groove play important roles in differentiating the TTAA and AATT minor grooves. PMID:20713062

  9. Electrokinetic characteristics of HSA dimer and its monolayers at mica.

    PubMed

    Kujda, Marta; Adamczyk, Zbigniew; Zapotoczny, Szczepan; Kowalska, Ewa

    2015-12-01

    Human serum albumin (HSA) dimer was synthesized in a reaction of the monomer with 1,6-bis(maleimido)hexane (BMH) cross-linker. Thorough physicochemical characteristics of the dimer were performed. They comprised the diffusion coefficient, hydrodynamic diameter, electrophoretic mobility as a function of pH, isoelectric point and electrokinetic charge. The adsorption of the dimer molecules at mica was studied using the atomic force microscopy (AFM) and in situ streaming potential measurements. The kinetics of adsorption was determined by a direct AFM imaging of single molecules over various substrate areas and interpreted in terms of the random sequential adsorption model. These results were consistent with streaming potential measurements carried out for the parallel-plate channel flow. It was also shown by these measurements that the desorption of the monomer under flow conditions was negligible. In this way, the amount of irreversibly bound dimer was quantitatively evaluated to be 0.5 mgm(-2) for ionic strength of 0.01 and pH 3.5 that is similar that to previous result obtained for the albumin monomer. This indicates that the dimer adsorption occurs mostly in the side-on orientation. Finally, the electrokinetic characteristics of the dimer monolayers on mica were performed by the streaming potential method. It was observed that for lower pHs the zeta potential of monolayers is much lower than the bulk zeta potential of the dimer molecules. This was attributed to a heterogeneous charge distribution. It was concluded that the well-characterized HSA dimer monolayers can be used for quantitatively determining ligand and drug binding that has an essential practical significance. PMID:26613862

  10. Absorption cross sections of the ClO dimer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huder, K. J.; DeMore, W. B.

    1995-01-01

    The absorption cross sections of the ClO dimer, ClOOCl, are important to the photochemistry of ozone depletion in the Antarctic. In this work, new measurements were made of the dimer cross sections at 195 K. the results yield somewhat lower values in the long wavelength region, compared to those currently recommended in the NASA data evaluation (JPL 94-26). The corresponding solar photodissociation rates in the Antarctic are reduced by about 40%.

  11. Electrokinetic characteristics of HSA dimer and its monolayers at mica.

    PubMed

    Kujda, Marta; Adamczyk, Zbigniew; Zapotoczny, Szczepan; Kowalska, Ewa

    2015-12-01

    Human serum albumin (HSA) dimer was synthesized in a reaction of the monomer with 1,6-bis(maleimido)hexane (BMH) cross-linker. Thorough physicochemical characteristics of the dimer were performed. They comprised the diffusion coefficient, hydrodynamic diameter, electrophoretic mobility as a function of pH, isoelectric point and electrokinetic charge. The adsorption of the dimer molecules at mica was studied using the atomic force microscopy (AFM) and in situ streaming potential measurements. The kinetics of adsorption was determined by a direct AFM imaging of single molecules over various substrate areas and interpreted in terms of the random sequential adsorption model. These results were consistent with streaming potential measurements carried out for the parallel-plate channel flow. It was also shown by these measurements that the desorption of the monomer under flow conditions was negligible. In this way, the amount of irreversibly bound dimer was quantitatively evaluated to be 0.5 mgm(-2) for ionic strength of 0.01 and pH 3.5 that is similar that to previous result obtained for the albumin monomer. This indicates that the dimer adsorption occurs mostly in the side-on orientation. Finally, the electrokinetic characteristics of the dimer monolayers on mica were performed by the streaming potential method. It was observed that for lower pHs the zeta potential of monolayers is much lower than the bulk zeta potential of the dimer molecules. This was attributed to a heterogeneous charge distribution. It was concluded that the well-characterized HSA dimer monolayers can be used for quantitatively determining ligand and drug binding that has an essential practical significance.

  12. Superlinearly converging dimer method for transition state search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kästner, Johannes; Sherwood, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Algorithmic improvements of the dimer method [G. Henkelman and H. Jónsson, J. Chem. Phys. 111, 7010 (1999)] are described in this paper. Using the limited memory Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno (L-BFGS) optimizer for the dimer translation greatly improves the convergence compared to the previously used conjugate gradient algorithm. It also saves one energy and gradient calculation per dimer iteration. Extrapolation of the gradient during repeated dimer rotations reduces the computational cost to one gradient calculation per dimer rotation. The L-BFGS algorithm also improves convergence of the rotation. Thus, three to four energy and gradient evaluations are needed per iteration at the beginning of a transition state search, while only two are required close to convergence. Moreover, we apply the dimer method in internal coordinates to reduce coupling between the degrees of freedom. Weighting the coordinates can be used to apply chemical knowledge about the system and restrict the transition state search to only part of the system while minimizing the remainder. These improvements led to an efficient method for the location of transition states without the need to calculate the Hessian. Thus, it is especially useful in large systems with expensive gradient evaluations.

  13. Mechanism of dimerization of the human melanocortin 1 receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Zanna, Paola T.; Sanchez-Laorden, Berta L.; Perez-Oliva, Ana B.; Turpin, Maria C.; Herraiz, Cecilia; Jimenez-Cervantes, Celia; Garcia-Borron, Jose C.

    2008-04-04

    The melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) is a dimeric G protein-coupled receptor expressed in melanocytes, where it regulates the amount and type of melanins produced and determines the tanning response to ultraviolet radiation. We have studied the mechanisms of MC1R dimerization. Normal dimerization of a deleted mutant lacking the seventh transmembrane fragment and the C-terminal cytosolic extension excluded coiled-coil interactions as the basis of dimerization. Conversely, the electrophoretic pattern of wild type receptor and several Cys {yields} Ala mutants showed that four disulfide bonds are established between the monomers. Disruption of any of these bonds abolished MC1R function, but only the one involving Cys35 was essential for traffic to the plasma membrane. A quadruple Cys35-267-273-275Ala mutant migrating as a monomer in SDS-PAGE in the absence of reducing agents was able to dimerize with WT, suggesting that in addition to disulfide bond formation, dimerization involves non-covalent interactions, likely of domain swap type.

  14. Specific dimerization of the light chains of human immunoglobulin.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, G T; Straus, D

    1968-07-01

    1. The light chains of human immunoglobulin were allowed to dimerize in vitro on removal of the dispersing agents acetic acid or urea. 2. On electrophoresis in polyacrylamide gel at pH8.8 the dimers yielded up to nine regularly spaced bands. This approximates to the number of electrophoretic components known to occur among the monomers. 3. Single electrophoretic components of the dimers were isolated from the gel, dissociated into monomers, and subjected as such to electrophoresis in urea-containing gels. Each gave two adjacent bands. 4. Similarly, after all the light chains as monomers had been subjected to electrophoresis in urea-containing gels, single electrophoretic components were isolated and allowed to dimerize. When examined now as dimers in the absence of urea, each component gave two adjacent bands. 5. These findings are explicable on the following basis. (a) The dimerization of the light chains is specific, at least inasmuch as it occurs between monomers of the same electrophoretic mobilities. (b) With the buffer constant, different light chains undergo different changes in net charge on being transferred from urea-containing to urea-free solution; in this way two different chains of the same initial charge can acquire a charge difference of 1. 6. Experiments with Bence-Jones proteins and other homogeneous light chains gave results substantiating the conclusions (a) and (b). PMID:4174431

  15. Cholesterol-dependent Conformational Plasticity in GPCR Dimers

    PubMed Central

    Prasanna, Xavier; Sengupta, Durba; Chattopadhyay, Amitabha

    2016-01-01

    The organization and function of the serotonin1A receptor, an important member of the GPCR family, have been shown to be cholesterol-dependent, although the molecular mechanism is not clear. We performed a comprehensive structural and dynamic analysis of dimerization of the serotonin1A receptor by coarse-grain molecular dynamics simulations totaling 3.6 ms to explore the molecular details of its cholesterol-dependent association. A major finding is that the plasticity and flexibility of the receptor dimers increase with increased cholesterol concentration. In particular, a dimer interface formed by transmembrane helices I-I was found to be sensitive to cholesterol. The modulation of dimer interface appears to arise from a combination of direct cholesterol occupancy and indirect membrane effects. Interestingly, the presence of cholesterol at the dimer interface is correlated with increased dimer plasticity and flexibility. These results represent an important step in characterizing the molecular interactions in GPCR organization with potential relevance to therapeutic interventions. PMID:27535203

  16. Photodissociation pathways and lifetimes of protonated peptides and their dimers

    SciTech Connect

    Aravind, G.; Klaerke, B.; Rajput, J.; Toker, Y.; Andersen, L. H.; Bochenkova, A. V.; Antoine, R.; Racaud, A.; Dugourd, P.; Lemoine, J.

    2012-01-07

    Photodissociation lifetimes and fragment channels of gas-phase, protonated YA{sub n} (n = 1,2) peptides and their dimers were measured with 266 nm photons. The protonated monomers were found to have a fast dissociation channel with an exponential lifetime of {approx}200 ns while the protonated dimers show an additional slow dissociation component with a lifetime of {approx}2 {mu}s. Laser power dependence measurements enabled us to ascribe the fast channel in the monomer and the slow channel in the dimer to a one-photon process, whereas the fast dimer channel is from a two-photon process. The slow (1 photon) dissociation channel in the dimer was found to result in cleavage of the H-bonds after energy transfer through these H-bonds. In general, the dissociation of these protonated peptides is non-prompt and the decay time was found to increase with the size of the peptides. Quantum RRKM calculations of the microcanonical rate constants also confirmed a statistical nature of the photodissociation processes in the dipeptide monomers and dimers. The classical RRKM expression gives a rate constant as an analytical function of the number of active vibrational modes in the system, estimated separately on the basis of the equipartition theorem. It demonstrates encouraging results in predicting fragmentation lifetimes of protonated peptides. Finally, we present the first experimental evidence for a photo-induced conversion of tyrosine-containing peptides into monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbon along with a formamide molecule both found in space.

  17. Dimerization of mammalian kinesin-3 motors results in superprocessive motion.

    PubMed

    Soppina, Virupakshi; Norris, Stephen R; Dizaji, Aslan S; Kortus, Matt; Veatch, Sarah; Peckham, Michelle; Verhey, Kristen J

    2014-04-15

    The kinesin-3 family is one of the largest among the kinesin superfamily and its members play important roles in a wide range of cellular transport activities, yet the molecular mechanisms of kinesin-3 regulation and cargo transport are largely unknown. We performed a comprehensive analysis of mammalian kinesin-3 motors from three different subfamilies (KIF1, KIF13, and KIF16). Using Forster resonance energy transfer microscopy in live cells, we show for the first time to our knowledge that KIF16B motors undergo cargo-mediated dimerization. The molecular mechanisms that regulate the monomer-to-dimer transition center around the neck coil (NC) segment and its ability to undergo intramolecular interactions in the monomer state versus intermolecular interactions in the dimer state. Regulation of NC dimerization is unique to the kinesin-3 family and in the case of KIF13A and KIF13B requires the release of a proline-induced kink between the NC and subsequent coiled-coil 1 segments. We show that dimerization of kinesin-3 motors results in superprocessive motion, with average run lengths of ∼10 μm, and that this property is intrinsic to the dimeric kinesin-3 motor domain. This finding opens up studies on the mechanistic basis of motor processivity. Such high processivity has not been observed for any other motor protein and suggests that kinesin-3 motors are evolutionarily adapted to serve as the marathon runners of the cellular world.

  18. Human Erythropoietin Dimers with Markedly Enhanced in vivo Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sytkowski, Arthur J.; Dotimas Lunn, Elizabeth; Davis, Kerry Lynn; Feldman, Laurie; Siekman, Suvia

    1998-02-01

    Human erythropoietin, a widely used and important therapeutic glycoprotein, has a relatively short plasma half-life due to clearance by glomerular filtration as well as by other mechanisms. We hypothesized that an erythropoietin species with a larger molecular size would exhibit an increased plasma half-life and, potentially, an enhanced biological activity. We now report the production of biologically active erythropoietin dimers and trimers by chemical crosslinking of the conventional monomeric form. We imparted free sulfhydryl residues to a pool of erythropoietin monomer by chemical modification. A second pool was reacted with another modifying reagent to yield monomer with male-imido groups. Upon mixing these two pools, covalently linked dimers and trimers were formed that were biologically active in vitro. The plasma half-life of erythropoietin dimers in rabbits was >24 h compared with 4 h for the monomers. Importantly, erythropoietin dimers were biologically active in vivo as shown by their ability to increase the hematocrits of mice when injected subcutaneously. In addition, the dimers exhibited >26-fold higher activity in vivo than did the monomers and were very effective after only one dose. Dimeric and other oligomeric forms of Epo may have an important role in therapy.

  19. Cholesterol-dependent Conformational Plasticity in GPCR Dimers.

    PubMed

    Prasanna, Xavier; Sengupta, Durba; Chattopadhyay, Amitabha

    2016-01-01

    The organization and function of the serotonin1A receptor, an important member of the GPCR family, have been shown to be cholesterol-dependent, although the molecular mechanism is not clear. We performed a comprehensive structural and dynamic analysis of dimerization of the serotonin1A receptor by coarse-grain molecular dynamics simulations totaling 3.6 ms to explore the molecular details of its cholesterol-dependent association. A major finding is that the plasticity and flexibility of the receptor dimers increase with increased cholesterol concentration. In particular, a dimer interface formed by transmembrane helices I-I was found to be sensitive to cholesterol. The modulation of dimer interface appears to arise from a combination of direct cholesterol occupancy and indirect membrane effects. Interestingly, the presence of cholesterol at the dimer interface is correlated with increased dimer plasticity and flexibility. These results represent an important step in characterizing the molecular interactions in GPCR organization with potential relevance to therapeutic interventions. PMID:27535203

  20. DNA excision repair: where do all the dimers go?

    PubMed

    Kemp, Michael G; Sancar, Aziz

    2012-08-15

    Exposure of cells to UV light from the sun causes the formation of pyrimidine dimers in DNA that have the potential to lead to mutation and cancer. In humans, pyrimidine dimers are removed from the genome in the form of ~30 nt-long oligomers by concerted dual incisions. Though nearly 50 y of excision repair research has uncovered many details of UV photoproduct damage recognition and removal, the fate of the excised oligonucleotides and, in particular, the ultimate fate of the chemically very stable pyrimidine dimers remain unknown. Physiologically relevant UV doses introduce hundreds of thousands of pyrimidine dimers in diploid human cells, which are excised from the genome within ~24 h. Once removed from the genome, "where do all the dimers go?" In a recent study we addressed this question. Although our study did not determine the fate of the dimer itself, it revealed that the excised ~30-mer is released from the duplex in a tight complex with the transcription/repair factor TFIIH. This finding combined with recent reports that base and oligonucleotide products of the base and double-strand break repair pathways also make stable complexes with the cognate repair enzymes, and that these complexes activate the MAP kinase and checkpoint signaling pathways, respectively, raises the possibility that TFIIH-30-mer excision complexes may play a role in signaling reactions in response to UV damage.

  1. Design of peptoid analogue dimers and measure of their affinity for Grb2 SH3 domains.

    PubMed

    Vidal, M; Liu, W-Q; Lenoir, C; Salzmann, J; Gresh, N; Garbay, C

    2004-06-15

    This paper describes the design of the highest affinity ligands for Grb2 SH3 domains reported so far. These compounds were designed by combining N-alkyl amino acid incorporation in a proline-rich sequence with subsequent dimerization of the peptoid sequence based on structural data and molecular modeling. Optimization of the linker size is discussed, and the N-alkyl amino acid incorporation into both monomeric halves is reported. Because the affinity for Grb2 of the optimized compounds was too high to be measured using the fluorescent modifications that they induce on the Grb2 emission spectrum, a competition assay was developed. In this test, Grb2 is pulled down from a cellular extract by the initial VPPPVPPRRR peptide bound to Sepharose beads. In the presence of competitors, the test quantifies the amount of Grb2 displaced from the beads. It has enabled us to determine a K(i) value in the 10(-10) M range for the highest affinity Grb2 peptoid analogue dimer.

  2. Anabaena sp. DyP-type peroxidase is a tetramer consisting of two asymmetric dimers.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Toru; Ogola, Henry Joseph Oduor; Amano, Yoshimi; Hisabori, Toru; Ashida, Hiroyuki; Sawa, Yoshihiro; Tsuge, Hideaki; Sugano, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    DyP-type peroxidases are a newly discovered family of heme peroxidases distributed from prokaryotes to eukaryotes. Recently, using a structure-based sequence alignment, we proposed the new classes, P, I and V, as substitutes for classes A, B, C, and D [Arch Biochem Biophys 2015;574:49-55]. Although many class V enzymes from eukaryotes have been characterized, only two from prokaryotes have been reported. Here, we show the crystal structure of one of these two enzymes, Anabaena sp. DyP-type peroxidase (AnaPX). AnaPX is tetramer formed from Cys224-Cys224 disulfide-linked dimers. The tetramer of wild-type AnaPX was stable at all salt concentrations tested. In contrast, the C224A mutant showed salt concentration-dependent oligomeric states: in 600 mM NaCl, it maintained a tetrameric structure, whereas in the absence of salt, it dissociated into monomers, leading to a reduction in thermostability. Although the tetramer exhibits non-crystallographic, 2-fold symmetry in the asymmetric unit, two subunits forming the Cys224-Cys224 disulfide-linked dimer are related by 165° rotation. This asymmetry creates an opening to cavities facing the inside of the tetramer, providing a pathway for hydrogen peroxide access. Finally, a phylogenetic analysis using structure-based sequence alignments showed that class V enzymes from prokaryotes, including AnaPX, are phylogenetically closely related to class V enzymes from eukaryotes.

  3. Ultrapotent vinblastines in which added molecular complexity further disrupts the target tubulin dimer-dimer interface.

    PubMed

    Carney, Daniel W; Lukesh, John C; Brody, Daniel M; Brütsch, Manuela M; Boger, Dale L

    2016-08-30

    Approaches to improving the biological properties of natural products typically strive to modify their structures to identify the essential pharmacophore, or make functional group changes to improve biological target affinity or functional activity, change physical properties, enhance stability, or introduce conformational constraints. Aside from accessible semisynthetic modifications of existing functional groups, rarely does one consider using chemical synthesis to add molecular complexity to the natural product. In part, this may be attributed to the added challenge intrinsic in the synthesis of an even more complex compound. Herein, we report synthetically derived, structurally more complex vinblastines inaccessible from the natural product itself that are a stunning 100-fold more active (IC50 values, 50-75 pM vs. 7 nM; HCT116), and that are now accessible because of advances in the total synthesis of the natural product. The newly discovered ultrapotent vinblastines, which may look highly unusual upon first inspection, bind tubulin with much higher affinity and likely further disrupt the tubulin head-to-tail α/β dimer-dimer interaction by virtue of the strategic placement of an added conformationally well-defined, rigid, and extended C20' urea along the adjacent continuing protein-protein interface. In this case, the added molecular complexity was used to markedly enhance target binding and functional biological activity (100-fold), and likely represents a general approach to improving the properties of other natural products targeting a protein-protein interaction. PMID:27512044

  4. Layer Thinning in Freely-Suspended Thin Liquid Films of a Symmetric Liquid Crystal Dimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardaev, Shokir; Parsouzi, Zeinab; Gleeson, James; Jakli, Antal; Sprunt, Samuel

    We report optical reflectivity and dynamic light scattering (DLS) studies on freely suspended smectic films of a symmetric liquid crystal dimer, which exhibits the phase sequence isotropic--nematic--twist-bend nematic--smectic in cooling. In sufficiently thin films the reflectivity R is expected to scale as the square of the number of smectic layers (N2) while the frequency f of underdamped layer fluctuations scales as N - 1 / 2. On heating thin films drawn in the smectic phase, we observe a sequence of layer thinning transitions, with R and f following the expected scaling relations, provided the stepwise melting involves double rather than single layers. We will describe a model to explain the unusual layer thinning process. We thank M. G. Tamba and G. Mehl for providing the liquid crystal compound: NSF grant DMR-1307674.

  5. Mass Analyzed Threshold Ionization of Lutetium Dimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Lu; Roudjane, Mourad; Liu, Yang; Yang, Dong-Sheng

    2013-06-01

    Lu_2 is produced in a pulsed laser-vaporization metal-cluster source and studied by mass-analyzed threshold ionization (MATI) spectroscopy. The MATI spectrum displays several long progressions from the transitions between various vibrational levels of the neutral and ion electronic states. From the spectrum, the upper limit of the ionization energy of the dimer is determined to be 43996 cm^{-1}, and the vibrational frequencies are measured to be 121 cm^{-1} in the neutral state and 90 cm^{-1} in the ion state. By combining with ab initio calculations at CASPT2 level, the ground state of Lu_2 is identified as ^3Σ_g^-. The ^3Σ_g^- state has an electron configuration of 6sσ_g^25dπ_u^15dπ_u^16sσ_u^2, which is formed by the interactions of two Lu atoms in the ^2D(5d6s^2) ground state. Ionization of the neutral state removes a 5dπ_u bonding electron and yields a ion state with a considerably longer bond distance. Lu_2 has a very different bonding feature from La_2, for which a ^1Σ_g^+ ground state was previously identified with an electron configuration of 5dπ_u^46sσ_g^2 formed by the interactions of two La atoms in the ^4F(5d^26s) excited state. Yang Liu, Lu Wu, Chang-Hua Zhang, Serge A. Krasnokutski, and Dong-Sheng Yang, J. Chem. Phys. 135, 034309 (2011).

  6. Investigating the Influence of Ribavirin on Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus RNA Synthesis by Using a High-Resolution Transcriptome Sequencing Approach

    PubMed Central

    Aljabr, Waleed; Touzelet, Olivier; Pollakis, Georgios; Wu, Weining; Munday, Diane C.; Hughes, Margaret; Hertz-Fowler, Christiane; Kenny, John; Fearns, Rachel; Barr, John N.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) is a major cause of serious respiratory tract infection. Treatment options include administration of ribavirin, a purine analog, although the mechanism of its anti-HRSV activity is unknown. We used transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) to investigate the genome mutation frequency and viral mRNA accumulation in HRSV-infected cells that were left untreated or treated with ribavirin. In the absence of ribavirin, HRSV-specific transcripts accounted for up to one-third of total RNA reads from the infected-cell RNA population. Ribavirin treatment resulted in a >90% reduction in abundance of viral mRNA reads, while at the same time no such reduction was detected for the abundance of cellular transcripts. The presented data reveal that ribavirin significantly increases the frequency of HRSV-specific RNA mutations, suggesting a direct influence on the fidelity of the HRSV polymerase. The presented data show that transitions and transversions occur during HRSV replication and that these changes occur in hot spots along the HRSV genome. Examination of nucleotide substitution rates in the viral genome indicated an increase in the frequency of transition but not transversion mutations in the presence of ribavirin. In addition, our data indicate that in the continuous cell types used and at the time points analyzed, the abundances of some HRSV mRNAs do not reflect the order in which the mRNAs are transcribed. IMPORTANCE Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) is a major pediatric pathogen. Ribavirin can be used in children who are extremely ill to reduce the amount of virus and to lower the burden of disease. Ribavirin is used as an experimental therapy with other viruses. The mechanism of action of ribavirin against HRSV is not well understood, although it is thought to increase the mutation rate of the viral polymerase during replication. To investigate this hypothesis, we used a high-resolution approach that allowed us to

  7. How does unusually strong crust influence stress build-up and release on faults? Lessons from the Canterbury earthquake sequence, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, S. M.; Williams, C. A.; Reyners, M.; Eberhart-Phillips, D.; Beavan, R. J.; Buiter, S.

    2012-12-01

    The recent Canterbury earthquake sequence in the South Island of New Zealand occurred in what is believed to be unusually strong crust. We have investigated the link between crustal structure and rheology (as inferred from seismic tomography), orientation of the faults with respect to regional loading, and tectonics for north Canterbury prior to and after the Mw 7.1 Darfield earthquake of September 2010 that ruptured the Greendale Fault. By combining these different data within a three-dimensional numerical model, we can compare regions inferred to slip in the unstable brittle field (as determined from the pattern of seismicity before and after the earthquake) with the inferred distribution of brittle and ductile rocks in the crust. The models predict the transition between brittle and ductile deformation where yield strengths from Byerlee's law (brittle, both stable and unstable) and thermally-activated power-law creep (ductile) are equal. Creep parameters are determined from laboratory experiments assuming dominant creep mineralogy based on tomographically-derived density. Results help to explain the following observations: (1) The 90 percentile cutoff-depth for seismicity prior to the Darfield event was deep (> 30 km) but shallowed dramatically after the earthquake to 10 km. This can be explained in terms of the maximum depth of rupture (ca. 10 km), with isolation of fault-induced stress perturbations in the uppermost brittle layer from deeper brittle layers via ductilely-deforming patches that can sustain only low stresses; (2) The stress field and aftershocks appear to have been perturbed by Banks Peninsula, a dense and strong volcanic center located near to Christchurch city. Models suggest that a strong, rigid block that pinches out ductile layers can influence stress distribution with depth, while having little effect on maximum horizontal stress orientations in the brittle layers; (3) The aftershock decay sequence is unusually long, and postseismic creep

  8. Correlation effects and collective excitations in bosonic bilayers: Role of quantum statistics, superfluidity, and the dimerization transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filinov, A.

    2016-07-01

    A two-component, two-dimensional (2D) dipolar bosonic system in the bilayer geometry is considered. By performing quantum Monte Carlo simulations in a wide range of layer spacings we analyze in detail the pair correlation functions, the static response function, and the kinetic and interaction energies. By reducing the layer spacing we observe a transition from weakly to strongly bound dimer states. The transition is accompanied by the onset of short-range correlations, suppression of the superfluid response, and rotonization of the excitation spectrum. A dispersion law and a dynamic structure factor for the in-phase (symmetric) and out-of-phase (antisymmetric) collective modes during the dimerization is studied in detail with the stochastic reconstruction method and the method of moments. The antisymmetric mode spectrum is most strongly influenced by suppression of the inlayer superfluidity (specified by the superfluid fraction γs=ρs/ρ ). In a pure superfluid (normal fluid) phase, only an acoustic [optical (gapped)] mode is recovered. In a partially superfluid phase, both are present simultaneously, and the dispersion splits into two branches corresponding to a normal and a superfluid component. The spectral weight of the acoustic mode scales linearly with γs. This weight transfers to the optical branch when γs is reduced due to formation of dimer states. In summary, we demonstrate how the interlayer dimerization in dipolar bilayers can be uniquely identified by static and dynamic properties.

  9. Structural basis of RNA recognition and dimerization by the STAR proteins T-STAR and Sam68.

    PubMed

    Feracci, Mikael; Foot, Jaelle N; Grellscheid, Sushma N; Danilenko, Marina; Stehle, Ralf; Gonchar, Oksana; Kang, Hyun-Seo; Dalgliesh, Caroline; Meyer, N Helge; Liu, Yilei; Lahat, Albert; Sattler, Michael; Eperon, Ian C; Elliott, David J; Dominguez, Cyril

    2016-01-13

    Sam68 and T-STAR are members of the STAR family of proteins that directly link signal transduction with post-transcriptional gene regulation. Sam68 controls the alternative splicing of many oncogenic proteins. T-STAR is a tissue-specific paralogue that regulates the alternative splicing of neuronal pre-mRNAs. STAR proteins differ from most splicing factors, in that they contain a single RNA-binding domain. Their specificity of RNA recognition is thought to arise from their property to homodimerize, but how dimerization influences their function remains unknown. Here, we establish at atomic resolution how T-STAR and Sam68 bind to RNA, revealing an unexpected mode of dimerization different from other members of the STAR family. We further demonstrate that this unique dimerization interface is crucial for their biological activity in splicing regulation, and suggest that the increased RNA affinity through dimer formation is a crucial parameter enabling these proteins to select their functional targets within the transcriptome.

  10. Structural basis of RNA recognition and dimerization by the STAR proteins T-STAR and Sam68.

    PubMed

    Feracci, Mikael; Foot, Jaelle N; Grellscheid, Sushma N; Danilenko, Marina; Stehle, Ralf; Gonchar, Oksana; Kang, Hyun-Seo; Dalgliesh, Caroline; Meyer, N Helge; Liu, Yilei; Lahat, Albert; Sattler, Michael; Eperon, Ian C; Elliott, David J; Dominguez, Cyril

    2016-01-01

    Sam68 and T-STAR are members of the STAR family of proteins that directly link signal transduction with post-transcriptional gene regulation. Sam68 controls the alternative splicing of many oncogenic proteins. T-STAR is a tissue-specific paralogue that regulates the alternative splicing of neuronal pre-mRNAs. STAR proteins differ from most splicing factors, in that they contain a single RNA-binding domain. Their specificity of RNA recognition is thought to arise from their property to homodimerize, but how dimerization influences their function remains unknown. Here, we establish at atomic resolution how T-STAR and Sam68 bind to RNA, revealing an unexpected mode of dimerization different from other members of the STAR family. We further demonstrate that this unique dimerization interface is crucial for their biological activity in splicing regulation, and suggest that the increased RNA affinity through dimer formation is a crucial parameter enabling these proteins to select their functional targets within the transcriptome. PMID:26758068

  11. Structural basis of RNA recognition and dimerization by the STAR proteins T-STAR and Sam68

    PubMed Central

    Feracci, Mikael; Foot, Jaelle N.; Grellscheid, Sushma N.; Danilenko, Marina; Stehle, Ralf; Gonchar, Oksana; Kang, Hyun-Seo; Dalgliesh, Caroline; Meyer, N. Helge; Liu, Yilei; Lahat, Albert; Sattler, Michael; Eperon, Ian C.; Elliott, David J.; Dominguez, Cyril

    2016-01-01

    Sam68 and T-STAR are members of the STAR family of proteins that directly link signal transduction with post-transcriptional gene regulation. Sam68 controls the alternative splicing of many oncogenic proteins. T-STAR is a tissue-specific paralogue that regulates the alternative splicing of neuronal pre-mRNAs. STAR proteins differ from most splicing factors, in that they contain a single RNA-binding domain. Their specificity of RNA recognition is thought to arise from their property to homodimerize, but how dimerization influences their function remains unknown. Here, we establish at atomic resolution how T-STAR and Sam68 bind to RNA, revealing an unexpected mode of dimerization different from other members of the STAR family. We further demonstrate that this unique dimerization interface is crucial for their biological activity in splicing regulation, and suggest that the increased RNA affinity through dimer formation is a crucial parameter enabling these proteins to select their functional targets within the transcriptome. PMID:26758068

  12. Designer interface peptide grafts target estrogen receptor alpha dimerization.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, S; Asare, B K; Biswas, P K; Rajnarayanan, R V

    2016-09-01

    The nuclear transcription factor estrogen receptor alpha (ERα), triggered by its cognate ligand estrogen, regulates a variety of cellular signaling events. ERα is expressed in 70% of breast cancers and is a widely validated target for anti-breast cancer drug discovery. Administration of anti-estrogen to block estrogen receptor activation is still a viable anti-breast cancer treatment option but anti-estrogen resistance has been a significant bottle-neck. Dimerization of estrogen receptor is required for ER activation. Blocking ERα dimerization is therefore a complementary and alternative strategy to combat anti-estrogen resistance. Dimer interface peptide "I-box" derived from ER residues 503-518 specifically blocks ER dimerization. Recently using a comprehensive molecular simulation we studied the interaction dynamics of ERα LBDs in a homo-dimer. Based on this study, we identified three interface recognition peptide motifs LDKITDT (ERα residues 479-485), LQQQHQRLAQ (residues 497-506), and LSHIRHMSNK (residues 511-520) and reported the suitability of using LQQQHQRLAQ (ER 497-506) as a template to design inhibitors of ERα dimerization. Stability and self-aggregation of peptide based therapeutics poses a significant bottle-neck to proceed further. In this study utilizing peptide grafted to preserve their pharmacophoric recognition motif and assessed their stability and potential to block ERα mediated activity in silico and in vitro. The Grafted peptides blocked ERα mediated cell proliferation and viability of breast cancer cells but did not alter their apoptotic fate. We believe the structural clues identified in this study can be used to identify novel peptidometics and small molecules that specifically target ER dimer interface generating a new breed of anti-cancer agents. PMID:27462021

  13. Dimerization in Highly Concentrated Solutions of Phosphoimidazolide Activated Mononucleotides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanavarioti, Anastassia

    1997-01-01

    Phosphoimidazolide activated ribomononucleotides (*pN) are useful substrates for the non-enzymatic synthesis of polynucleotides. However, dilute neutral aqueous solutions of *pN typically yield small amounts of dimers and traces of polymers; most of *pN hydrolyzes to yield nucleoside 5'-monophosphate. Here we report the self-condensation of nucleoside 5'-phosphate 2- methylimidazolide (2-MeImpN with N = cytidine, uridine or guanosine) in the presence of Mg2(+) in concentrated solutions, such as might have been found in an evaporating lagoon on prebiotic Earth. The product distribution indicates that oligomerization is favored at the expense of hydrolysis. At 1.0 M, 2-MelmpU and 2-MelmpC produce about 65% of oligomers including 4% of the 3',5'-Iinked dimer. Examination of the product distribution of the three isomeric dimers in a self-condensation allows identification of reaction pathways that lead to dimer formation. Condensations in a concentrated mixture of all three nucleotides (U,C,G mixtures) is made possible by the enhanced solubility of 2-MeImpG in such mixtures. Although percent yield of intemucleotide linked dimers is enhanced as a function of initial monomer concentration, pyrophosphate dimer yields remain practically unchanged at about 20% for 2-MelmpU, 16% for 2-MeImpC and 25% of the total pyrophosphate in the U,C,G mixtures. The efficiency by which oligomers are produced in these concentrated solutions makes the evaporating lagoon scenario a potentially interesting medium for the prebiotic synthesis of dimers and short RNAs.

  14. Basin constrained κ-dimer method for saddle point finding.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Penghao; Wu, Qiliang; Henkelman, Graeme

    2014-10-28

    Within the harmonic approximation to transition state theory, the rate of escape from a reactant is calculated from local information at saddle points on the boundary of the state. The dimer minimum-mode following method can be used to find such saddle points. But as we show, dimer searches that are initiated from a reactant state of interest can converge to saddles that are not on the boundary of the reactant state. These disconnected saddles are not directly useful for calculating the escape rate. Additionally, the ratio of disconnected saddles can be large, especially when the dimer searches are initiated far from the reactant minimum. The reason that the method finds disconnected saddles is a result of the fact that the dimer method tracks local ridges, defined as the set of points where the force is perpendicular to the negative curvature mode, and not the true ridge, defined as the boundary of the set of points which minimize to the reactant. The local ridges tend to deviate from the true ridge away from saddle points. Furthermore, the local ridge can be discontinuous and have holes which allow the dimer to cross the true ridge and escape the initial state. To solve this problem, we employ an alternative definition of a local ridge based upon the minimum directional curvature of the isopotential hyperplane, κ, which provides additional local information to tune the dimer dynamics. We find that hyperplanes of κ = 0 pass through all saddle points but rarely intersect with the true ridge elsewhere. By restraining the dimer within the κ < 0 region, the probability of converging to disconnected saddles is significantly reduced and the efficiency of finding connected saddles is increased.

  15. Integrability and conformal data of the dimer model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morin-Duchesne, Alexi; Rasmussen, Jørgen; Ruelle, Philippe

    2016-04-01

    The central charge of the dimer model on the square lattice is still being debated in the literature. In this paper, we provide evidence supporting the consistency of a c=-2 description. Using Lieb’s transfer matrix and its description in terms of the Temperley-Lieb algebra {{TL}}n at β =0, we provide a new solution of the dimer model in terms of the model of critical dense polymers on a tilted lattice and offer an understanding of the lattice integrability of the dimer model. The dimer transfer matrix is analyzed in the scaling limit, and the result for {L}0-\\frac{c}{24} is expressed in terms of fermions. Higher Virasoro modes are likewise constructed as limits of elements of {{TL}}n and are found to yield a c=-2 realization of the Virasoro algebra, familiar from fermionic bc ghost systems. In this realization, the dimer Fock spaces are shown to decompose, as Virasoro modules, into direct sums of Feigin-Fuchs modules, themselves exhibiting reducible yet indecomposable structures. In the scaling limit, the eigenvalues of the lattice integrals of motion are found to agree exactly with those of the c=-2 conformal integrals of motion. Consistent with the expression for {L}0-\\frac{c}{24} obtained from the transfer matrix, we also construct higher Virasoro modes with c = 1 and find that the dimer Fock space is completely reducible under their action. However, the transfer matrix is found not to be a generating function for the c = 1 integrals of motion. Although this indicates that Lieb’s transfer matrix description is incompatible with the c = 1 interpretation, it does not rule out the existence of an alternative, c = 1 compatible, transfer matrix description of the dimer model.

  16. Inhibition of alanine:glyoxylate aminotransferase 1 dimerization is a prerequisite for its peroxisome-to-mitochondrion mistargeting in primary hyperoxaluria type 1

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Peroxisome-to-mitochondrion mistargeting of the homodimeric enzyme alanine:glyoxylate aminotransferase 1 (AGT) in the autosomal recessive disease primary hyperoxaluria type 1 (PH1) is associated with the combined presence of a normally occurring Pro(11)Leu polymorphism and a PH1-specific Gly170Arg mutation. The former leads to the formation of a novel NH2-terminal mitochondrial targeting sequence (MTS), which although sufficient to direct the import of in vitro-translated AGT into isolated mitochondria, requires the additional presence of the Gly170Arg mutation to function efficiently in whole cells. The role of this mutation in the mistargeting phenomenon has remained elusive. It does not interfere with the peroxisomal targeting or import of AGT. In the present study, we have investigated the role of the Gly170Arg mutation in AGT mistargeting. In addition, our studies have led us to examine the relationship between the oligomeric status of AGT and the peroxisomal and mitochondrial import processes. The results obtained show that in vitro-translated AGT rapidly forms dimers that do not readily exchange subunits. Although the presence of the Pro(11)Leu or Gly170Arg substitutions alone had no effect on dimerization, their combined presence abolished homodimerization in vitro. However, AGT containing both substitutions was still able to form heterodimers in vitro with either normal AGT or AGT containing either substitution alone. Expression of various combinations of normal and mutant, as well as epitope-tagged and untagged forms of AGT in whole cells showed that normal AGT rapidly dimerizes in the cytosol and is imported into peroxisomes as a dimer. This dimerization prevents mitochondrial import, even when the AGT possesses an MTS generated by the Pro(11)Leu substitution. The additional presence of the Gly170Arg substitution impairs dimerization sufficiently to allow mitochondrial import. Pharmacological inhibition of mitochondrial import allows AGT containing both

  17. Cofactoring and Dimerization of Proteinase-Activated Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Huilan; Liu, Allen P.; Smith, Thomas H.

    2013-01-01

    Proteinase-activated receptors (PARs) are G protein–coupled receptors that transmit cellular responses to extracellular proteases and have important functions in vascular physiology, development, inflammation, and cancer progression. The established paradigm for PAR activation involves proteolytic cleavage of the extracellular N terminus, which reveals a new N terminus that functions as a tethered ligand by binding intramolecularly to the receptor to trigger transmembrane signaling. Most cells express more than one PAR, which can influence the mode of PAR activation and signaling. Clear examples include murine PAR3 cofactoring of PAR4 and transactivation of PAR2 by PAR1. Thrombin binds to and cleaves murine PAR3, which facilitates PAR4 cleavage and activation. This process is essential for thrombin signaling and platelet activation, since murine PAR3 cannot signal alone. Although PAR1 and PAR4 are both competent to signal, PAR1 is able to act as a cofactor for PAR4, facilitating more rapid cleavage and activation by thrombin. PAR1 can also facilitate PAR2 activation through a different mechanism. Cleavage of the PAR1 N terminus by thrombin generates a tethered ligand domain that can bind intermolecularly to PAR2 to activate signaling. Thus, PARs can regulate each other’s activity by localizing thrombin when in complex with PAR3 and PAR4 or by cleaved PAR1, providing its tethered ligand domain for PAR2 activation. The ability of PARs to cofactor or transactivate other PARs would necessitate that the two receptors be in close proximity, likely in the form of a heterodimer. Here, we discuss the cofactoring and dimerization of PARs and the functional consequences on signaling. PMID:24064459

  18. Fractal analysis of DNA sequence data

    SciTech Connect

    Berthelsen, C.L.

    1993-01-01

    DNA sequence databases are growing at an almost exponential rate. New analysis methods are needed to extract knowledge about the organization of nucleotides from this vast amount of data. Fractal analysis is a new scientific paradigm that has been used successfully in many domains including the biological and physical sciences. Biological growth is a nonlinear dynamic process and some have suggested that to consider fractal geometry as a biological design principle may be most productive. This research is an exploratory study of the application of fractal analysis to DNA sequence data. A simple random fractal, the random walk, is used to represent DNA sequences. The fractal dimension of these walks is then estimated using the [open quote]sandbox method[close quote]. Analysis of 164 human DNA sequences compared to three types of control sequences (random, base-content matched, and dimer-content matched) reveals that long-range correlations are present in DNA that are not explained by base or dimer frequencies. The study also revealed that the fractal dimension of coding sequences was significantly lower than sequences that were primarily noncoding, indicating the presence of longer-range correlations in functional sequences. The multifractal spectrum is used to analyze fractals that are heterogeneous and have a different fractal dimension for subsets with different scalings. The multifractal spectrum of the random walks of twelve mitochondrial genome sequences was estimated. Eight vertebrate mtDNA sequences had uniformly lower spectra values than did four invertebrate mtDNA sequences. Thus, vertebrate mitochondria show significantly longer-range correlations than to invertebrate mitochondria. The higher multifractal spectra values for invertebrate mitochondria suggest a more random organization of the sequences. This research also includes considerable theoretical work on the effects of finite size, embedding dimension, and scaling ranges.

  19. Fractal Analysis of DNA Sequence Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berthelsen, Cheryl Lynn

    DNA sequence databases are growing at an almost exponential rate. New analysis methods are needed to extract knowledge about the organization of nucleotides from this vast amount of data. Fractal analysis is a new scientific paradigm that has been used successfully in many domains including the biological and physical sciences. Biological growth is a nonlinear dynamic process and some have suggested that to consider fractal geometry as a biological design principle may be most productive. This research is an exploratory study of the application of fractal analysis to DNA sequence data. A simple random fractal, the random walk, is used to represent DNA sequences. The fractal dimension of these walks is then estimated using the "sandbox method." Analysis of 164 human DNA sequences compared to three types of control sequences (random, base -content matched, and dimer-content matched) reveals that long-range correlations are present in DNA that are not explained by base or dimer frequencies. The study also revealed that the fractal dimension of coding sequences was significantly lower than sequences that were primarily noncoding, indicating the presence of longer-range correlations in functional sequences. The multifractal spectrum is used to analyze fractals that are heterogeneous and have a different fractal dimension for subsets with different scalings. The multifractal spectrum of the random walks of twelve mitochondrial genome sequences was estimated. Eight vertebrate mtDNA sequences had uniformly lower spectra values than did four invertebrate mtDNA sequences. Thus, vertebrate mitochondria show significantly longer-range correlations than do invertebrate mitochondria. The higher multifractal spectra values for invertebrate mitochondria suggest a more random organization of the sequences. This research also includes considerable theoretical work on the effects of finite size, embedding dimension, and scaling ranges.

  20. Synthesis and Applications of Non-spherical Dimer Colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Kisun

    Colloids are promising building blocks in material synthesis because of their controllability of size and surface properties. The synthesis of chemically and/or geometrically anisotropic colloidal particles has received attentions with the expectation of building blocks for complex structures. However, the synthesis of anisotropic colloidal particles is by far more difficult than the synthesis of spherical colloidal particles. Lack of monodispersity and productivity of many anisotropic particles often limits their applications as a building block for complex structures. Thus, it is highly desirable to develop methods which can produce a large amount of monodisperse non-spherical particles with controllable asymmetric surface properties. This dissertation details the work for developing such a method. The major result of this dissertation is a synthetic method to produce monodisperse non-spherical colloids with anisotropic surface property in a large quantity. The anisotropic colloid, which we call it as Dimer particle, has two fused lobes like a dumbbell and each lobe's size can be independently controlled. We present a novel method to synthesize sub-micron size Dimer particles. This method can produce a large amount of submicron-sized Dimer particles with good monodispersity and well-controlled shape. Submicron-sized Dimer particles have been highly desired since they can be used as a building block for self assembly using Brownian motion, colloidal surfactant for Pickering emulsion, and photonic materials. To fully take advantage of the anisotropy of the particles, we develop a facile method to tailor the surface property of each lobe independently by asymmetrically coating the particles with gold nanoparticles. This method doesn't need the arrangement of particles onto any type of interfaces. Asymmetric coating of gold nanoparticles can be carried out simply by mixing Dimer particles with gold nanoparticles. The formation mechanism of the submicron-sized Dimer

  1. Effect of D23N mutation on the dimer conformation of amyloid β-proteins: ab initio molecular simulations in water.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Akisumi; Yano, Atsushi; Nomura, Kazuya; Higai, Shin'ichi; Kurita, Noriyuki

    2014-05-01

    The molecular pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is deeply involved in aggregations of amyloid β-proteins (Aβ) in a diseased brain. The recent experimental studies indicated that the mutation of Asp23 by Asn (D23N) within the coding sequence of Aβ increases the risk for the pathogeny of cerebral amyloid angiopathy and early-onset familial ADs. Fibrils of the D23N mutated Aβs can form both parallel and antiparallel structures, and the parallel one is considered to be associated with the pathogeny. However, the structure and the aggregation mechanism of the mutated Aβ fibrils are not elucidated at atomic and electronic levels. We here investigated solvated structures of the two types of Aβ dimers, each of which is composed of the wild-type or the D23N mutated Aβ, using classical molecular mechanics and ab initio fragment molecular orbital (FMO) methods, in order to reveal the effect of the D23N mutation on the structure of Aβ dimer as well as the specific interactions between the Aβ monomers. The results elucidate that the effect of the D23N mutation is significant for the parallel structure of Aβ dimer and that the solvating water molecules around the Aβ dimer have significant contribution to the stability of Aβ dimer.

  2. Metal ion determinants of conantokin dimerization as revealed in the X-ray crystallographic structure of the Cd(2+)/Mg (2+)-con-T[K7gamma] complex.

    PubMed

    Cnudde, Sara E; Prorok, Mary; Castellino, Francis J; Geiger, James H

    2010-06-01

    Predatory sea snails from the Conus family produce a variety of venomous small helical peptides called conantokins that are rich in gamma-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla) residues. As potent and selective antagonists of the N-methyl-D: -aspartate receptor, these peptides are potential therapeutic agents for a variety of neurological conditions. The two most studied members of this family of peptides are con-G and con-T. Con-G has Gla residues at sequence positions 3, 4, 7, 10, and 14, and requires divalent cation binding to adopt a helical conformation. Although both Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) can fulfill this role, Ca(2+) induces dimerization of con-G, whereas the Mg(2+)-complexed peptide remains monomeric. A variant of con-T, con-T[K7gamma] (gamma is Gla), contains Gla residues at the same five positions as in con-G and behaves very similarly with respect to metal ion binding and dimerization; each peptide binds two Ca(2+) ions and two Mg(2+) ions per helix. To understand the difference in metal ion selectivity, affinity, and the dependence on Ca(2+) for dimer formation, we report here the structure of the monomeric Cd(2+)/Mg(2+)-con-T[K7gamma] complex, and, by comparison with the previously published con-T[K7gamma]/Ca(2+) dimer structure, we suggest explanations for both metal ion binding site specificity and metal-ion-dependent dimerization.

  3. Specificity of mutation by UV light and delayed photoreversal in umuC-defective Escherichia coli K-12: a targeting intermediate at pyrimidine dimers

    SciTech Connect

    Bockrath, R.; Ruiz-Rubio, M.; Bridges, B.A.

    1987-04-01

    Prototrophic mutants produced by UV light in Escherichia coli K-12 strains with argE3(Oc) and hisG4(Oc) defects are distinguished as backmutations and specific nonsense suppressor mutations. In strains carrying a umuC defect, mutants are not produced unless irradiated cells are incubated and then exposed to photoreversing light (delayed photoreversal mutagenesis). The mutants thus produced are found to be specifically suppressor mutations and not backmutations. The suppressor mutations are primarily glutamine tRNA ochre suppressor mutations, which have been attributed previously to mutation targeted at T = C pyrimidine dimers. In a lexA51 recA441 strain, where the SOS mutagenesis functions are constitutive, targeting at dimers is confirmed by demonstrating that the induction of glutamine tRNA suppressor mutations is susceptible to photoreversal. In the same strain induction of backmutations is not susceptible to photoreversal. Thus delayed photoreversal mutagenesis produces suppressor mutations that can be targeted at pyrimidine dimers and does not produce backmutations that are not targeted at pyrimidine dimers. This correlation supports the idea that delayed photoreversal mutagenesis in umuC defective cells reflects a mutation process arrested at a targeting pyrimidine dimer photoproduct, which is the immediate cause of both the alteration in DNA sequence and the obstruction (unless repaired) to mutation fixation and ultimate expression.

  4. Synthesis, characterization, and computational studies of cycloparaphenylene dimers.

    PubMed

    Xia, Jianlong; Golder, Matthew R; Foster, Michael E; Wong, Bryan M; Jasti, Ramesh

    2012-12-01

    Two novel arene-bridged cycloparaphenylene dimers (1 and 2) were prepared using a functionalized precursor, bromo-substituted macrocycle 7. The preferred conformations of these dimeric structures were evaluated computationally in the solid state, as well as in the gas and solution phases. In the solid state, the trans configuration of 1 is preferred by 34 kcal/mol due to the denser crystal packing structure that is achieved. In contrast, in the gas phase and in solution, the cis conformation is favored by 7 kcal/mol (dimer 1) and 10 kcal/mol (dimer 2), with a cis to trans activation barrier of 20 kcal/mol. The stabilization seen in the cis conformations is attributed to the increased van der Waals interactions between the two cycloparaphenylene rings. These calculations indicate that the cis conformation is accessible in solution, which is promising for future efforts toward the synthesis of short carbon nanotubes (CNTs) via cycloparaphenylene monomers. In addition, the optoelectronic properties of these dimeric cycloparaphenylenes were characterized both experimentally and computationally for the first time. PMID:23130993

  5. Recognition of HIV TAR RNA by triazole linked neomycin dimers.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sunil; Arya, Dev P

    2011-08-15

    A series of neomycin dimers have been synthesized using 'click chemistry' with varying linker functionality and length to target the TAR RNA region of HIV virus. TAR (trans activation response) RNA region, a 59 base pair stem loop structure located at 5'-end of all nascent HIV-1 transcripts interacts with a key regulatory protein, Tat, and necessitates the replication of HIV-1 virus. Neomycin, an aminosugar, has been shown to exhibit more than one binding site with HIV TAR RNA. Multiple TAR binding sites of neomycin prompted us to design and synthesize a small library of neomycin dimers using click chemistry. The binding between neomycin dimers and HIV TAR RNA was characterized using spectroscopic techniques including FID (Fluorescent Intercalator Displacement) titration and UV-thermal denaturation. UV thermal denaturation studies demonstrate that neomycin dimer binding increase the melting temperature (T(m)) of the HIV TAR RNA up to 10°C. Ethidium bromide displacement titrations revealed nanomolar IC(50) between neomycin dimers and HIV TAR RNA, whereas with neomycin, a much higher IC(50) in the micromolar range is observed.

  6. Altered Dimer Interface Decreases Stability in an Amyloidogenic Protein

    SciTech Connect

    Baden, Elizabeth M.; Owen, Barbara A.L.; Peterson, Francis C.; Volkman, Brian F.; Ramirez-Alvarado, Marina; Thompson, James R.

    2008-07-21

    Amyloidoses are devastating and currently incurable diseases in which the process of amyloid formation causes fatal cellular and organ damage. The molecular mechanisms underlying amyloidoses are not well known. In this study, we address the structural basis of immunoglobulin light chain amyloidosis, which results from deposition of light chains produced by clonal plasma cells. We compare light chain amyloidosis protein AL-09 to its wild-type counterpart, the kl O18/O8 light chain germline. Crystallographic studies indicate that both proteins form dimers. However, AL-09 has an altered dimer interface that is rotated 90 degrees from the kl O18/O8 dimer interface. The three non-conservative mutations in AL-09 are located within the dimer interface, consistent with their role in the decreased stability of this amyloidogenic protein. Moreover, AL-09 forms amyloid fibrils more quickly than kl O18/O8 in vitro. These results support the notion that the increased stability of the monomer and delayed fibril formation, together with a properly formed dimer, may be protective against amyloidogenesis. This could open a new direction into rational drug design for amyloidogenic proteins.

  7. The Cockayne syndrome group B protein is a functional dimer.

    PubMed

    Christiansen, Mette; Thorslund, Tina; Jochimsen, Bjarne; Bohr, Vilhelm A; Stevnsner, Tinna

    2005-09-01

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a rare inherited human genetic disorder characterized by developmental abnormalities, UV sensitivity, and premature aging. The CS group B (CSB) protein belongs to the SNF2-family of DNA-dependent ATPases and is implicated in transcription elongation, transcription coupled repair, and base excision repair. It is a DNA stimulated ATPase and remodels chromatin in vitro. We demonstrate for the first time that full-length CSB positively cooperates in ATP hydrolysis as a function of protein concentration. We have investigated the quaternary structure of CSB using a combination of protein-protein complex trapping experiments and gel filtration, and found that CSB forms a dimer in solution. Chromatography studies revealed that enzymatically active CSB has an apparent molecular mass of approximately 360 kDa, consistent with dimerization of CSB. Importantly, in vivo protein cross-linking showed the presence of the CSB dimer in the nucleus of HeLa cells. We further show that dimerization occurs through the central ATPase domain of the protein. These results have implications for the mechanism of action of CSB, and suggest that other SNF2-family members might also function as dimers. PMID:16128801

  8. Palladium dimers adsorbed on graphene: A DFT study

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, Gagandeep; Gupta, Shuchi; Dharamvir, Keya

    2015-05-15

    The 2D structure of graphene shows a great promise for enhanced catalytic activity when adsorbed with palladium. We performed a systematic density functional theory (DFT) study of the adsorption of palladium dimer (Pd{sub 2}) on graphene using SIESTA package, in the generalized gradient approximation (GGA). The adsorption energy, geometry, and charge transfer of Pd{sub 2}-graphene system are calculated. Both horizontal and vertical orientations of Pd{sub 2} on graphene are studied. Our calculations revealed that the minimum energy configuration for Pd dimer is parallel to the graphene sheet with its two atoms occupying centre of adjacent hexagonal rings of graphene sheet. Magnetic moment is induced for Pd dimer adsorbed on graphene in vertical orientation while horizontal orientation of Pd dimer on graphene do not exhibit magnetism. Insignificant energy differences among adsorption sites means that dimer mobility on the graphene sheet is high. There is imperceptible distortion of graphene sheet perpendicular to its plane. However, some lateral displacements are seen.

  9. Synthesis of a distinct water dimer inside fullerene C70

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rui; Murata, Michihisa; Aharen, Tomoko; Wakamiya, Atsushi; Shimoaka, Takafumi; Hasegawa, Takeshi; Murata, Yasujiro

    2016-05-01

    The water dimer is an ideal chemical species with which to study hydrogen bonds. Owing to the equilibrium between the monomer and oligomer structure, however, selective generation and separation of a genuine water dimer has not yet been achieved. Here, we report a synthetic strategy that leads to the successful encapsulation of one or two water molecules inside fullerene C70. These endohedral C70 compounds offer the opportunity to study the intrinsic properties of a single water molecule without any hydrogen bonding, as well as an isolated water dimer with a single hydrogen bond between the two molecules. The unambiguously determined off-centre position of water in (H2O)2@C70 by X-ray diffraction provides insights into the formation of (H2O)2@C70. Subsequently, the 1H NMR spectroscopic measurements for (H2O)2@C70 confirmed the formation of a single hydrogen bond rapidly interchanging between the encapsulated water dimer. Our theoretical calculations revealed a peculiar cis-linear conformation of the dimer resulting from confinement effects inside C70.

  10. High-Pressure Effects in Benzoic Acid Dimers: Vibrational Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Yuchuan; Dreger, Zbigniew; Gupta, Yogendra

    2013-06-01

    To understand pressure effects on dimer structure stability, Raman and FTIR spectroscopy were used to examine changes in hydrogen bonded dimers of benzoic acid crystals up to 31 GPa. Raman measurements indicated a phase transition around 7-8 GPa. It is proposed that this transition is caused by a rearrangement of molecules within the dimer leading to a symmetry change from C2h to likely C2 or Cs. This change was reversible upon pressure release from 15 GPa. Pressures above 15 GPa, induced gradual changes in luminescence and a color change in the crystal from white to brownish. FTIR measurements at 31 GPa revealed the formation of a new broad band centered around 3250 cm-1, which was attributed to the stretching vibrations of the O -H bond. It is proposed that hydrogen bonded dimers of benzoic acid transform partially to a covalently bonded compound composed of benzoic anhydride-like molecules and H2O. This study demonstrates that application of high pressure can lead to significant changes in the H-bonded dimer structure, including formation of chemical bonding. Work supported by DOE/NNSA and ONR/MURI.

  11. Regulation of receptor protein-tyrosine phosphatase dimerization.

    PubMed

    van der Wijk, Thea; Blanchetot, Christophe; den Hertog, Jeroen

    2005-01-01

    Receptor protein-tyrosine phosphatases (RPTPs) are single membrane spanning proteins belonging to the family of PTPs that, together with the antagonistically acting protein-tyrosine kinases (PTKs), regulate the protein phosphotyrosine levels in cells. Protein-tyrosine phosphorylation is an important post-translational modification that has a major role in cell signaling by affecting protein-protein interactions and enzymatic activities. Increasing evidence indicates that RPTPs, like RPTKs, are regulated by dimerization. For RPTPalpha, we have shown that rotational coupling of the constitutive dimers in the cell membrane determines enzyme activity. Furthermore, oxidative stress, identified as an important second messenger during the past decade, is a regulator of rotational coupling of RPTPalpha dimers. In this review, we discuss the biochemical and cell biological techniques that we use to study the regulation of RPTPs by dimerization. These techniques include (co-) immunoprecipitation, RPTP activity assays, chemical and genetic cross-linking, detection of cell surface proteins by biotinylation, and analysis of RPTPalpha dimers, using conformation-sensitive antibody binding.

  12. Density and structural anomalies in soft-repulsive dimeric fluids.

    PubMed

    Munaó, Gianmarco; Saija, Franz

    2016-04-14

    We report Monte Carlo results for the fluid structure of a system of dimeric particles interacting via a core-softened potential. More specifically, dimers interact through a repulsive pair potential of an inverse-power form, modified in such a way that the repulsion strength is softened for a given range of distances. The aim of such a study is to investigate how both the elongation of the dimers and the softness of the potential affect some features of the model. Our results show that the dimeric fluid exhibits both density and structural anomalies, even if the interaction is not characterized by two length scales. Upon increasing the aspect ratio of the dimers, such anomalies are progressively hindered, with the structural anomaly surviving even after the disappearance of the density anomaly. These results shed light on the peculiar behaviour of molecular systems of non-spherical shape, showing how geometrical and interaction parameters play a fundamental role in determining the presence of anomalies.

  13. Effects of Dimerization of Serratia marcescens Endonuclease on Water Dynamics.

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chuanying; Beck, Brian W.; Krause, Kurt; Weksberg, Tiffany E.; Pettitt, Bernard M.

    2007-02-15

    The research described in this product was performed in part in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The dynamics and structure of Serratia marcescens endonuclease and its neighboring solvent are investigated by molecular dynamics (MD). Comparisons are made with structural and biochemical experiments. The dimer form is physiologic and functions more processively than the monomer. We previously found a channel formed by connected clusters of waters from the active site to the dimer interface. Here, we show that dimerization clearly changes correlations in the water structure and dynamics in the active site not seen in the monomer. Our results indicate that water at the active sites of the dimer is less affected compared with bulk solvent than in the monomer where it has much slower characteristic relaxation times. Given that water is a required participant in the reaction, this gives a clear advantage to dimerization in the absence of an apparent ability to use both active sites simultaneously.

  14. Hydrogenated fullerenes dimer, peanut and capsule: An atomic comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    EL-Barbary, A. A.

    2016-04-01

    Hydrogenated fullerenes are detected in the Universe in space but their identification is still unsolved task. Therefore, this paper provides useful information about hydrogenated fullerenes (dimer, peanut and capsule) using DFT method at the B3LYP/6-31G(d) level of theory. The stability, geometric structures, hydrogen adsorption energies and NMR chemical shifts are calculated. The results show that the energy of most stable isomer of C118 dimer is lower than the energies sum of C60 and C58 cages by 1.77 eV and the energy per carbon atom of C144 capsule is more stable than C60 cage by 126.98 meV. Also, endohedral Ti-doped C118 dimer and C128 peanut are found to be most stable structures than exohedral Ti-doped C118 dimer and C128 peanut by 2.19 eV/Ti and 3.52 eV/Ti, respectively. The hydrogenation process is found to be enhanced (especially at the caps) for endohedral Ti-doped C118 dimer and C128 peanut through electronic surface modifications. The most active hydrogenation sites are selected and it is found that the most stable hydrogenation sites are Houts1 and Houts3 for fullerenes and endohedral Ti-doped fullerenes, respectively.

  15. Chemistry of the CO dimer at low temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demore, W. B.; Roux, E. T.

    1988-01-01

    Researchers conducted a series of experiments on the chlorine-catalyzed photodecomposition of O sub 3 both in the gas and in inert solvents such as CF sub 4 and CO sub 2 in the temperature range about 190 to 225 K. The liquid medium was chosen in order to minimize possible surface loss of long-lived ClO dimer, and to aid in the stabilization of transient excited intermediates. The mechanism of dimer formation was as follows: (1) Cl sub 2 + hv yields Cl + Cl; (2) Cl + O sub 3 yields ClO + O sub 2; (3) ClO + ClO yields Cl sub 2 O sub 2. The experiments were done in cooled low temperature cells, with irradiation from an Osram high pressure mercury arc, filtered to remove radiation below 325 nm. Spectral analysis was by means of a Cary Model 2200 UV spectrometer. The principal objectives were: (1) to determine the lifetime of the dimer as a function of temperature; (2) to observe spectral changes in the mixtures which could be attributed to dimer or related products; and (3) to observe chemical or photochemical reactions of the dimer.

  16. Recognition of HIV TAR RNA by triazole linked neomycin dimers

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sunil

    2013-01-01

    A series of neomycin dimers have been synthesized using “click chemistry” with varying linker functionality and length to target the TAR RNA region of HIV virus. TAR (Trans Activation Response) RNA region, a 59 base pair stem loop structure located at 5′-end of all nascent HIV-1 transcripts interacts with a key regulatory protein, Tat, and necessitates the replication of HIV-1 virus. Neomycin, an aminosugar, has been shown to exhibit more than one binding site with HIV TAR RNA. Multiple TAR binding sites of neomycin prompted us to design and synthesize a small library of neomycin dimers using click chemistry. The binding between neomycin dimers and HIV TAR RNA was characterized using spectroscopic techniques including FID (Fluorescent Intercalator Displacement) titration and UV-thermal denaturation. UV thermal denaturation studies demonstrate that neomycin dimer binding increase the melting temperature (Tm) of the HIV TAR RNA up to 10 °C. Ethidium bromide displacement titrations revealed nanomolar IC50 between neomycin dimers and HIV TAR RNA, whereas with neomycin, a much higher IC50 in the micromolar range is observed. PMID:21757341

  17. Finite-difference time-domain studies of the optical properties of nanoshell dimers.

    PubMed

    Oubre, C; Nordlander, P

    2005-05-26

    The optical properties of metallic nanoshell dimers are investigated using the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method. We discuss issues of numerical convergence specific for the dimer system. We present results for both homodimers and heterodimers. The results show that retardation effects must be taken into account for an accurate description of realistic size nanoparticle dimers. The optical properties of the nanoshell dimer are found to be strongly polarization dependent. Maximal coupling between the nanoshells in a dimer occurs when the electric field of the incident pulse is aligned parallel to the dimer axis. The wavelengths of the peaks in the extinction cross section of the dimer are shown to vary by more than 100 nm, depending on the incident electric field polarization. The calculations show that electric field enhancements in the dimer junctions depend strongly on dimer separation. The maximum field enhancements occur in the dimer junction and at the expense of a reduced electric field enhancement in other regions of space. We investigate the usefulness of nanoshell dimers substrates for SERS by integrating the fourth power of the electric field enhancements around the surfaces of the nanoparticles as a function of dimer separation and wavelength. The SERS efficiency is shown to depend strongly on dimer separation but much weaker than the fourth power of the maximum electric field enhancement at a particular point. The SERS efficiency is also found to depend strongly on the wavelength of the incident light. Maximum SERS efficiency occurs for resonant excitation of the dimer plasmons. PMID:16852215

  18. Structure and Stability of the Dimeric Triosephosphate Isomerase from the Thermophilic Archaeon Thermoplasma acidophilum.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang Ho; Kim, Hyoun Sook; Park, Mi Seul; Moon, Sojin; Song, Mi Kyung; Park, Han Su; Hahn, Hyunggu; Kim, Soon-Jong; Bae, Euiyoung; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Han, Byung Woo

    2015-01-01

    Thermoplasma acidophilum is a thermophilic archaeon that uses both non-phosphorylative Entner-Doudoroff (ED) pathway and Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas (EMP) pathway for glucose degradation. While triosephosphate isomerase (TPI), a well-known glycolytic enzyme, is not involved in the ED pathway in T. acidophilum, it has been considered to play an important role in the EMP pathway. Here, we report crystal structures of apo- and glycerol-3-phosphate-bound TPI from T. acidophilum (TaTPI). TaTPI adopts the canonical TIM-barrel fold with eight α-helices and parallel eight β-strands. Although TaTPI shares ~30% sequence identity to other TPIs from thermophilic species that adopt tetrameric conformation for enzymatic activity in their harsh physiological environments, TaTPI exists as a dimer in solution. We confirmed the dimeric conformation of TaTPI by analytical ultracentrifugation and size-exclusion chromatography. Helix 5 as well as helix 4 of thermostable tetrameric TPIs have been known to play crucial roles in oligomerization, forming a hydrophobic interface. However, TaTPI contains unique charged-amino acid residues in the helix 5 and adopts dimer conformation. TaTPI exhibits the apparent Td value of 74.6°C and maintains its overall structure with some changes in the secondary structure contents at extremely acidic conditions (pH 1-2). Based on our structural and biophysical analyses of TaTPI, more compact structure of the protomer with reduced length of loops and certain patches on the surface could account for the robust nature of Thermoplasma acidophilum TPI.

  19. Engineering of Helicobacter pylori Dimeric Oxidoreductase DsbK (HP0231)

    PubMed Central

    Bocian-Ostrzycka, Katarzyna M.; Grzeszczuk, Magdalena J.; Banaś, Anna M.; Jastrząb, Katarzyna; Pisarczyk, Karolina; Kolarzyk, Anna; Łasica, Anna M.; Collet, Jean-François; Jagusztyn-Krynicka, Elżbieta K.

    2016-01-01

    The formation of disulfide bonds that are catalyzed by proteins of the Dsb (disulfide bond) family is crucial for the correct folding of many extracytoplasmic proteins. Thus, this formation plays an essential, pivotal role in the assembly of many virulence factors. The Helicobacter pylori disulfide bond-forming system is uncomplicated compared to the best-characterized Escherichia coli Dsb pathways. It possesses only two extracytoplasmic Dsb proteins named HP0377 and HP0231. As previously shown, HP0377 is a reductase involved in the process of cytochrome c maturation. Additionally, it also possesses disulfide isomerase activity. HP0231 was the first periplasmic dimeric oxidoreductase involved in disulfide generation to be described. Although HP0231 function is critical for oxidative protein folding, its structure resembles that of dimeric EcDsbG, which does not confer this activity. However, the HP0231 catalytic motifs (CXXC and the so-called cis-Pro loop) are identical to that of monomeric EcDsbA. To understand the functioning of HP0231, we decided to study the relations between its sequence, structure and activity through an extensive analysis of various HP0231 point mutants, using in vivo and in vitro strategies. Our work shows the crucial role of the cis-Pro loop, as changing valine to threonine in this motif completely abolishes the protein function in vivo. Functioning of HP0231 is conditioned by the combination of CXXC and the cis-Pro loop, as replacing the HP0231 CXXC motif by the motif from EcDsbG or EcDsbC results in bifunctional protein, at least in E. coli. We also showed that the dimerization domain of HP0231 ensures contact with its substrates. Moreover, the activity of this oxidase is independent on the structure of the catalytic domain. Finally, we showed that HP0231 chaperone activity is independent of its redox function. PMID:27507968

  20. Structure and Stability of the Dimeric Triosephosphate Isomerase from the Thermophilic Archaeon Thermoplasma acidophilum

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang Ho; Kim, Hyoun Sook; Park, Mi Seul; Moon, Sojin; Song, Mi Kyung; Park, Han Su; Hahn, Hyunggu; Kim, Soon-Jong; Bae, Euiyoung; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Han, Byung Woo

    2015-01-01

    Thermoplasma acidophilum is a thermophilic archaeon that uses both non-phosphorylative Entner-Doudoroff (ED) pathway and Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas (EMP) pathway for glucose degradation. While triosephosphate isomerase (TPI), a well-known glycolytic enzyme, is not involved in the ED pathway in T. acidophilum, it has been considered to play an important role in the EMP pathway. Here, we report crystal structures of apo- and glycerol-3-phosphate-bound TPI from T. acidophilum (TaTPI). TaTPI adopts the canonical TIM-barrel fold with eight α-helices and parallel eight β-strands. Although TaTPI shares ~30% sequence identity to other TPIs from thermophilic species that adopt tetrameric conformation for enzymatic activity in their harsh physiological environments, TaTPI exists as a dimer in solution. We confirmed the dimeric conformation of TaTPI by analytical ultracentrifugation and size-exclusion chromatography. Helix 5 as well as helix 4 of thermostable tetrameric TPIs have been known to play crucial roles in oligomerization, forming a hydrophobic interface. However, TaTPI contains unique charged-amino acid residues in the helix 5 and adopts dimer conformation. TaTPI exhibits the apparent Td value of 74.6°C and maintains its overall structure with some changes in the secondary structure contents at extremely acidic conditions (pH 1–2). Based on our structural and biophysical analyses of TaTPI, more compact structure of the protomer with reduced length of loops and certain patches on the surface could account for the robust nature of Thermoplasma acidophilum TPI. PMID:26709515

  1. Structure and Stability of the Dimeric Triosephosphate Isomerase from the Thermophilic Archaeon Thermoplasma acidophilum.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang Ho; Kim, Hyoun Sook; Park, Mi Seul; Moon, Sojin; Song, Mi Kyung; Park, Han Su; Hahn, Hyunggu; Kim, Soon-Jong; Bae, Euiyoung; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Han, Byung Woo

    2015-01-01

    Thermoplasma acidophilum is a thermophilic archaeon that uses both non-phosphorylative Entner-Doudoroff (ED) pathway and Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas (EMP) pathway for glucose degradation. While triosephosphate isomerase (TPI), a well-known glycolytic enzyme, is not involved in the ED pathway in T. acidophilum, it has been considered to play an important role in the EMP pathway. Here, we report crystal structures of apo- and glycerol-3-phosphate-bound TPI from T. acidophilum (TaTPI). TaTPI adopts the canonical TIM-barrel fold with eight α-helices and parallel eight β-strands. Although TaTPI shares ~30% sequence identity to other TPIs from thermophilic species that adopt tetrameric conformation for enzymatic activity in their harsh physiological environments, TaTPI exists as a dimer in solution. We confirmed the dimeric conformation of TaTPI by analytical ultracentrifugation and size-exclusion chromatography. Helix 5 as well as helix 4 of thermostable tetrameric TPIs have been known to play crucial roles in oligomerization, forming a hydrophobic interface. However, TaTPI contains unique charged-amino acid residues in the helix 5 and adopts dimer conformation. TaTPI exhibits the apparent Td value of 74.6°C and maintains its overall structure with some changes in the secondary structure contents at extremely acidic conditions (pH 1-2). Based on our structural and biophysical analyses of TaTPI, more compact structure of the protomer with reduced length of loops and certain patches on the surface could account for the robust nature of Thermoplasma acidophilum TPI. PMID:26709515

  2. Engineering of Helicobacter pylori Dimeric Oxidoreductase DsbK (HP0231).

    PubMed

    Bocian-Ostrzycka, Katarzyna M; Grzeszczuk, Magdalena J; Banaś, Anna M; Jastrząb, Katarzyna; Pisarczyk, Karolina; Kolarzyk, Anna; Łasica, Anna M; Collet, Jean-François; Jagusztyn-Krynicka, Elżbieta K

    2016-01-01

    The formation of disulfide bonds that are catalyzed by proteins of the Dsb (disulfide bond) family is crucial for the correct folding of many extracytoplasmic proteins. Thus, this formation plays an essential, pivotal role in the assembly of many virulence factors. The Helicobacter pylori disulfide bond-forming system is uncomplicated compared to the best-characterized Escherichia coli Dsb pathways. It possesses only two extracytoplasmic Dsb proteins named HP0377 and HP0231. As previously shown, HP0377 is a reductase involved in the process of cytochrome c maturation. Additionally, it also possesses disulfide isomerase activity. HP0231 was the first periplasmic dimeric oxidoreductase involved in disulfide generation to be described. Although HP0231 function is critical for oxidative protein folding, its structure resembles that of dimeric EcDsbG, which does not confer this activity. However, the HP0231 catalytic motifs (CXXC and the so-called cis-Pro loop) are identical to that of monomeric EcDsbA. To understand the functioning of HP0231, we decided to study the relations between its sequence, structure and activity through an extensive analysis of various HP0231 point mutants, using in vivo and in vitro strategies. Our work shows the crucial role of the cis-Pro loop, as changing valine to threonine in this motif completely abolishes the protein function in vivo. Functioning of HP0231 is conditioned by the combination of CXXC and the cis-Pro loop, as replacing the HP0231 CXXC motif by the motif from EcDsbG or EcDsbC results in bifunctional protein, at least in E. coli. We also showed that the dimerization domain of HP0231 ensures contact with its substrates. Moreover, the activity of this oxidase is independent on the structure of the catalytic domain. Finally, we showed that HP0231 chaperone activity is independent of its redox function. PMID:27507968

  3. Molecular Models of STAT5A Tetramers Complexed to DNA Predict Relative Genome-Wide Frequencies of the Spacing between the Two Dimer Binding Motifs of the Tetramer Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    Sathyanarayana, Bangalore K.; Li, Peng; Lin, Jian-Xin; Leonard, Warren J.

    2016-01-01

    STAT proteins bind DNA as dimers and tetramers to control cellular development, differentiation, survival, and expansion. The tetramer binding sites are comprised of two dimer-binding sites repeated in tandem. The genome-wide distribution of the spacings between the dimer binding sites shows a distinctive, non-random pattern. Here, we report on estimating the feasibility of building possible molecular models of STAT5A tetramers bound to a DNA double helix with all possible spacings between the dimer binding sites. We found that the calculated feasibility estimates correlated well with the experimentally measured frequency of tetramer-binding sites. This suggests that the feasibility of forming the tetramer complex was a major factor in the evolution of this DNA sequence variation. PMID:27537504

  4. Molecular Models of STAT5A Tetramers Complexed to DNA Predict Relative Genome-Wide Frequencies of the Spacing between the Two Dimer Binding Motifs of the Tetramer Binding Sites.

    PubMed

    Sathyanarayana, Bangalore K; Li, Peng; Lin, Jian-Xin; Leonard, Warren J; Lee, Byungkook

    2016-01-01

    STAT proteins bind DNA as dimers and tetramers to control cellular development, differentiation, survival, and expansion. The tetramer binding sites are comprised of two dimer-binding sites repeated in tandem. The genome-wide distribution of the spacings between the dimer binding sites shows a distinctive, non-random pattern. Here, we report on estimating the feasibility of building possible molecular models of STAT5A tetramers bound to a DNA double helix with all possible spacings between the dimer binding sites. We found that the calculated feasibility estimates correlated well with the experimentally measured frequency of tetramer-binding sites. This suggests that the feasibility of forming the tetramer complex was a major factor in the evolution of this DNA sequence variation. PMID:27537504

  5. An exploration of the ozone dimer potential energy surface

    SciTech Connect

    Azofra, Luis Miguel; Alkorta, Ibon; Scheiner, Steve

    2014-06-28

    The (O{sub 3}){sub 2} dimer potential energy surface is thoroughly explored at the ab initio CCSD(T) computational level. Five minima are characterized with binding energies between 0.35 and 2.24 kcal/mol. The most stable may be characterized as slipped parallel, with the two O{sub 3} monomers situated in parallel planes. Partitioning of the interaction energy points to dispersion and exchange as the prime contributors to the stability, with varying contributions from electrostatic energy, which is repulsive in one case. Atoms in Molecules analysis of the wavefunction presents specific O⋯O bonding interactions, whose number is related to the overall stability of each dimer. All internal vibrational frequencies are shifted to the red by dimerization, particularly the antisymmetric stretching mode whose shift is as high as 111 cm{sup −1}. In addition to the five minima, 11 higher-order stationary points are identified.

  6. Antiferromagnetic Spin-S Chains with Exactly Dimerized Ground States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaud, Frédéric; Vernay, François; Manmana, Salvatore R.; Mila, Frédéric

    2012-03-01

    We show that spin S Heisenberg spin chains with an additional three-body interaction of the form (Si-1·Si)(Si·Si+1)+H.c. possess fully dimerized ground states if the ratio of the three-body interaction to the bilinear one is equal to 1/[4S(S+1)-2]. This result generalizes the Majumdar-Ghosh point of the J1-J2 chain, to which the present model reduces for S=1/2. For S=1, we use the density matrix renormalization group method to show that the transition between the Haldane and the dimerized phases is continuous with a central charge c=3/2. Finally, we show that such a three-body interaction appears naturally in a strong-coupling expansion of the Hubbard model, and we discuss the consequences for the dimerization of actual antiferromagnetic chains.

  7. Optofluidic taming of a colloidal dimer with a silicon nanocavity

    SciTech Connect

    Pin, C.; Renaut, C.; Cluzel, B. Fornel, F. de; Peyrade, D.; Picard, E.; Hadji, E.

    2014-10-27

    We report here the optical trapping of a heterogeneous colloidal dimer above a photonic crystal nanocavity used as an on-chip optical tweezer. The trapped dimer consists of a cluster of two dielectric microbeads of different sizes linked by van der Waals forces. The smallest bead, 1 μm in diameter, is observed to be preferentially trapped by the nanotweezer, leaving the second bead untrapped. The rotational nature of the trapped dimer Brownian motion is first evidenced. Then, in the presence of a fluid flow, control of its orientation and rotation is achieved. The whole system is found to show high rotational degrees of freedom, thereby acting as an effective flow-sensitive microscopic optical ball joint.

  8. Self-deactivation of water vapor - Role of the dimer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, A. J.

    1984-01-01

    A phenomenological multiple-relaxation theory of the deactivation rate constant for the nu-2 (1 - 0) bending mode of water vapor is presented which incorporates the role not only of the excited monomer but also of the bound molecular complex, in particular the dimer. The deactivation takes place by means of three parallel processes: (1) collisional deexcitation of the excited monomer, (2) a two-step reaction involving association and spontaneous redissociation of an H2O collision complex, and (3) spontaneous dissociation of the stably bound H2O dimer. Oxygen, but not nitrogen or argon, serves as an effective chaperon for the formation of the activated complex. This observation explains the impurity dependence of the self-deactivation rate constant of water vapor. Analysis of an ultrasonic absorption peak based on the third process yields values for the standard entropy and enthalpy of dissociation of the stably bound H2O dimer.

  9. Oxidation of the dihydrochalcone aspalathin leads to dimerization.

    PubMed

    Krafczyk, Nicole; Heinrich, Theres; Porzel, Andrea; Glomb, Marcus A

    2009-08-12

    Aspalathin and nothofagin are typical ingredients of unfermented rooibos (Krafczyk, N.; Glomb, M. A. J. Agric. Food Chem. 2008, 56, 3368). During oxidation these dihydrochalcones were degraded to higher molecular weight browning products under aerated and nonenzymatic conditions. In the early stages of browning reactions aspalathin formed two dimers. These two compounds were unequivocally established as atropisomers stemming from oxidative A to B ring coupling. Multilayer countercurrent chromatography (MLCCC) and preparative high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) were applied to obtain pure substances. The purity and identity of isolated dimers were confirmed by different NMR experiments, HPLC-DAD-MS, and HR-MS. In parallel to the formation of chromophores during the fermentation of black tea, the formation of aspalathin dimers implies an important mechanistic channel for the generation of color during the processing of rooibos. PMID:19601579

  10. Dimer-monomer model on the Towers of Hanoi graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hanlin; Wu, Renfang; Huang, Guihua; Deng, Hanyuan

    2015-07-01

    The number of dimer-monomers (matchings) of a graph G is an important graph parameter in statistical physics. Following recent research, we study the asymptotic behavior of the number of dimer-monomers m(G) on the Towers of Hanoi graphs and another variation of the Sierpiński graphs which is similar to the Towers of Hanoi graphs, and derive the recursion relations for the numbers of dimer-monomers. Upper and lower bounds for the entropy per site, defined as μG = limv(G)→∞(lnm(G)/v(G)), where v(G) is the number of vertices in a graph G, on these Sierpiński graphs are derived in terms of the numbers at a certain stage. As the difference between these bounds converges quickly to zero as the calculated stage increases, the numerical value of the entropy can be evaluated with more than a hundred significant figures accuracy.

  11. Optofluidic taming of a colloidal dimer with a silicon nanocavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pin, C.; Cluzel, B.; Renaut, C.; Peyrade, D.; Picard, E.; Hadji, E.; de Fornel, F.

    2014-10-01

    We report here the optical trapping of a heterogeneous colloidal dimer above a photonic crystal nanocavity used as an on-chip optical tweezer. The trapped dimer consists of a cluster of two dielectric microbeads of different sizes linked by van der Waals forces. The smallest bead, 1 μm in diameter, is observed to be preferentially trapped by the nanotweezer, leaving the second bead untrapped. The rotational nature of the trapped dimer Brownian motion is first evidenced. Then, in the presence of a fluid flow, control of its orientation and rotation is achieved. The whole system is found to show high rotational degrees of freedom, thereby acting as an effective flow-sensitive microscopic optical ball joint.

  12. Covalent intermolecular interaction of the nitric oxide dimer (NO)2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hui; Zheng, Gui-Li; Lv, Gang; Geng, Yi-Zhao; Ji, Qing

    2015-09-01

    Covalent bonds arise from the overlap of the electronic clouds in the internucleus region, which is a pure quantum effect and cannot be obtained in any classical way. If the intermolecular interaction is of covalent character, the result from direct applications of classical simulation methods to the molecular system would be questionable. Here, we analyze the special intermolecular interaction between two NO molecules based on quantum chemical calculation. This weak intermolecular interaction, which is of covalent character, is responsible for the formation of the NO dimer, (NO)2, in its most stable conformation, a cis conformation. The natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis gives an intuitive illustration of the formation of the dimer bonding and antibonding orbitals concomitant with the breaking of the π bonds with bond order 0.5 of the monomers. The dimer bonding is counteracted by partially filling the antibonding dimer orbital and the repulsion between those fully or nearly fully occupied nonbonding dimer orbitals that make the dimer binding rather weak. The direct molecular mechanics (MM) calculation with the UFF force fields predicts a trans conformation as the most stable state, which contradicts the result of quantum mechanics (QM). The lesson from the investigation of this special system is that for the case where intermolecular interaction is of covalent character, a specific modification of the force fields of the molecular simulation method is necessary. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 90403007 and 10975044), the Key Subject Construction Project of Hebei Provincial Universities, China, the Research Project of Hebei Education Department, China (Grant Nos. Z2012067 and Z2011133), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11147103), and the Open Project Program of State Key Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China (Grant No. Y5

  13. A Pfaffian Formula for Monomer-Dimer Partition Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuliani, Alessandro; Jauslin, Ian; Lieb, Elliott H.

    2016-04-01

    We consider the monomer-dimer partition function on arbitrary finite planar graphs and arbitrary monomer and dimer weights, with the restriction that the only non-zero monomer weights are those on the boundary. We prove a Pfaffian formula for the corresponding partition function. As a consequence of this result, multipoint boundary monomer correlation functions at close packing are shown to satisfy fermionic statistics. Our proof is based on the celebrated Kasteleyn theorem, combined with a theorem on Pfaffians proved by one of the authors, and a careful labeling and directing procedure of the vertices and edges of the graph.

  14. Atomic-force microscopy: Rhodopsin dimers in native disc membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fotiadis, Dimitrios; Liang, Yan; Filipek, Slawomir; Saperstein, David A.; Engel, Andreas; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2003-01-01

    In vertebrate retinal photoreceptors, the rod outer-segment disc membranes contain densely packed rhodopsin molecules for optimal light absorption and subsequent amplification by the visual signalling cascade, but how these photon receptors are organized with respect to each other is not known. Here we use infrared-laser atomic-force microscopy to reveal the native arrangement of rhodopsin, which forms paracrystalline arrays of dimers in mouse disc membranes. The visualization of these closely packed rhodopsin dimers in native membranes gives experimental support to earlier inferences about their supramolecular structure and provides insight into how light signalling is controlled.

  15. Geometric Frustration of Colloidal Dimers on a Honeycomb Magnetic Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tierno, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    We study the phase behavior and the collective dynamics of interacting paramagnetic colloids assembled above a honeycomb lattice of triangular shaped magnetic minima. A frustrated colloidal molecular crystal is realized when filling these potential minima with exactly two particles per pinning site. External in-plane rotating fields are used to anneal the system into different phases, including long range ordered stripes, random fully packed loops, labyrinth and disordered states. At a higher amplitude of the annealing field, the dimer lattice displays a two-step melting transition where the initially immobile dimers perform first localized rotations and later break up by exchanging particles across consecutive lattice minima.

  16. Ultraviolet-induced dimerization of non-adjacent pyrimidines in poly[d(A-T)].

    PubMed

    Love, J D; Minton, K W

    1992-12-15

    The DNA photoproduct responsible for the ultraviolet (UV) light-induced -1 frameshift mutation remains unknown. We recently identified a UV photoproduct consisting of a cyclobutane dimer occurring between non-adjacent thymine residues in the same strand, [sequence: see text] and proposed that replication across this unrepaired photoproduct might result in a -1 frameshift mutation since the intervening base is extrahelical. Until now this novel photoproduct has only been identified in single-stranded DNA polymers and does not occur in UV-irradiated double-stranded polymers due to conformational restraint. This observation suggested that this photoproduct could only occur in vivo in chromosomal sites that were single-stranded. In the current work the cis-syn dithymine cyclobutane dimer has been identified in the self-complementary polymer poly[d(A-T)] when UV irradiated in solution conditions (concentrated manganese chloride or 60% ethanol plus trace salts) wherein this polymer remains double-stranded but the double-helix is partially destabilized. Taken together, the current findings suggest that dipyrimidine photoproducts between non-adjacent residues on the same strand could occur in vivo in double-stranded, but partially destabilized, DNA.

  17. The export receptor Crm1 forms a dimer to promote nuclear export of HIV RNA

    PubMed Central

    Booth, David S; Cheng, Yifan; Frankel, Alan D

    2014-01-01

    The HIV Rev protein routes viral RNAs containing the Rev Response Element (RRE) through the Crm1 nuclear export pathway to the cytoplasm where viral proteins are expressed and genomic RNA is delivered to assembling virions. The RRE assembles a Rev oligomer that displays nuclear export sequences (NESs) for recognition by the Crm1-RanGTP nuclear receptor complex. Here we provide the first view of an assembled HIV-host nuclear export complex using single-particle electron microscopy. Unexpectedly, Crm1 forms a dimer with an extensive interface that enhances association with Rev-RRE and poises NES binding sites to interact with a Rev oligomer. The interface between Crm1 monomers explains differences between Crm1 orthologs that alter nuclear export and determine cellular tropism for viral replication. The arrangement of the export complex identifies a novel binding surface to possibly target an HIV inhibitor and may point to a broader role for Crm1 dimerization in regulating host gene expression. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04121.001 PMID:25486595

  18. Activation of PKR by RNA misfolding: HDV ribozyme dimers activate PKR

    PubMed Central

    Heinicke, Laurie A.; Bevilacqua, Philip C.

    2012-01-01

    Protein Kinase R (PKR), the double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-activated protein kinase, plays important roles in innate immunity. Previous studies have shown that PKR is activated by long stretches of dsRNA, RNA pseudoknots, and certain single-stranded RNAs; however, regulation of PKR by RNAs with globular tertiary structure has not been reported. In this study, the HDV ribozyme is used as a model of a mostly globular RNA. In addition to a catalytic core, the ribozyme contains a peripheral 13-bp pairing region (P4), which, upon shortening, affects neither the catalytic activity of the ribozyme nor its ability to crystallize. We report that the HDV ribozyme sequence alone can activate PKR. To elucidate the RNA structural basis for this, we prepared a number of HDV variants, including those with shortened or lengthened P4 pairing regions, with the anticipation that lengthening the P4 extension would yield a more potent activator since it would offer more base pairs of dsRNA. Surprisingly, the variant with a shortened P4 was the most potent activator. Through native gel mobility and enzymatic structure mapping experiments we implicate misfolded HDV ribozyme dimers as the PKR-activating species, and show that the shortened P4 leads to enhanced occupancy of the RNA dimer. These observations have implications for how RNA misfolding relates to innate immune response and human disease. PMID:23105000

  19. Structure of an RNA dimer of a regulatory element from human thymidylate synthase mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Dibrov, Sergey; McLean, Jaime; Hermann, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    A sequence around the start codon of the mRNA of human thymidylate synthase (TS) folds into a secondary-structure motif in which the initiation site is sequestered in a metastable hairpin. Binding of the protein to its own mRNA at the hairpin prevents the production of TS through a translation-repression feedback mechanism. Stabilization of the mRNA hairpin by other ligands has been proposed as a strategy to reduce TS levels in anticancer therapy. Rapidly proliferating cells require high TS activity to maintain the production of thymidine as a building block for DNA synthesis. The crystal structure of a model oligonucleotide (TS1) that represents the TS-binding site of the mRNA has been determined. While fluorescence studies showed that the TS1 RNA preferentially adopts a hairpin structure in solution, even at high RNA concentrations, an asymmetric dimer of two hybridized TS1 strands was obtained in the crystal. The TS1 dimer contains an unusual S-­turn motif that also occurs in the ‘off’ state of the human ribosomal decoding site RNA. PMID:21245530

  20. The export receptor Crm1 forms a dimer to promote nuclear export of HIV RNA.

    PubMed

    Booth, David S; Cheng, Yifan; Frankel, Alan D

    2014-12-08

    The HIV Rev protein routes viral RNAs containing the Rev Response Element (RRE) through the Crm1 nuclear export pathway to the cytoplasm where viral proteins are expressed and genomic RNA is delivered to assembling virions. The RRE assembles a Rev oligomer that displays nuclear export sequences (NESs) for recognition by the Crm1-Ran(GTP) nuclear receptor complex. Here we provide the first view of an assembled HIV-host nuclear export complex using single-particle electron microscopy. Unexpectedly, Crm1 forms a dimer with an extensive interface that enhances association with Rev-RRE and poises NES binding sites to interact with a Rev oligomer. The interface between Crm1 monomers explains differences between Crm1 orthologs that alter nuclear export and determine cellular tropism for viral replication. The arrangement of the export complex identifies a novel binding surface to possibly target an HIV inhibitor and may point to a broader role for Crm1 dimerization in regulating host gene expression.

  1. Intravirion display of a peptide corresponding to the dimer structure of protease attenuates HIV-1 replication.

    PubMed

    Cartas, M; Singh, S P; Serio, D; Rizvi, T A; Kalyanaraman, V S; Goldsmith, C S; Zaki, S R; Weber, I T; Srinivasan, A

    2001-12-01

    Current treatment of HIV-1-infected individuals involves the administration of several drugs, all of which target either the reverse transcriptase or the protease activity of the virus. Unfortunately, the benefits of such treatments are compromised by the emergence of viruses exhibiting resistance to the drugs. This situation warrants new approaches for interfering with virus replication. Considering the activation of protease in the virus particles, a novel strategy to inhibit HIV-1 replication was tested targeting the dimerization domain of the protease. To test this idea, we have selected four residues from the C terminus of HIV-1 protease that map to the dimer interface region of the enzyme. We have exploited Vpr to display the peptides in the virus particles. The chimeric Vpr exhibited expression and virion incorporation similar to wildtype Vpr. The virus derived from the HIV-1 proviral DNA containing chimeric Vpr sequences registered a reduced level of replication in CEM and CEM X 174 cells in comparison with viruses containing wildtype Vpr. Similar results were observed in a single-round replication assay. These results suggest that the intravirion display of peptides targeting viral proteins is a powerful approach for developing antiviral agents and for dissecting the dynamic interactions between structural proteins during virus assembly and disassembly.

  2. Structural and mechanistic insights into cooperative assembly of dimeric Notch transcription complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Arnett, Kelly L.; Hass, Matthew; McArthur, Debbie G.; Ilagan, Ma Xenia G.; Aster, Jon C.; Kopan, Raphael; Blacklow, Stephen C.

    2010-11-12

    Ligand-induced proteolysis of Notch produces an intracellular effector domain that transduces essential signals by regulating the transcription of target genes. This function relies on the formation of transcriptional activation complexes that include intracellular Notch, a Mastermind co-activator and the transcription factor CSL bound to cognate DNA. These complexes form higher-order assemblies on paired, head-to-head CSL recognition sites. Here we report the X-ray structure of a dimeric human Notch1 transcription complex loaded on the paired site from the human HES1 promoter. The small interface between the Notch ankyrin domains could accommodate DNA bending and untwisting to allow a range of spacer lengths between the two sites. Cooperative dimerization occurred on the human and mouse Hes5 promoters at a sequence that diverged from the CSL-binding consensus at one of the sites. These studies reveal how promoter organizational features control cooperativity and, thus, the responsiveness of different promoters to Notch signaling.

  3. SpDamID: Marking DNA Bound by Protein Complexes Identifies Notch-Dimer Responsive Enhancers

    PubMed Central

    Hass, Matthew R.; Liow, Hien-haw; Chen, Xiaoting; Sharma, Ankur; Inoue, Yukiko U.; Inoue, Takayoshi; Reeb, Ashley; Martens, Andrew; Fulbright, Mary; Raju, Saravanan; Stevens, Michael; Boyle, Scott; Park, Joo-Seop; Weirauch, Matthew T.; Brent, Michael; Kopan, Raphael

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY We developed Split DamID (SpDamID), a protein complementation version of DamID, to mark genomic DNA bound in vivo by interacting or juxtapositioned transcription factors. Inactive halves of DAM (DNA Adenine Methyltransferase) were fused to protein pairs to be queried Interaction or proximity enabled DAM reconstitution and methylation of adenine in GATC. Inducible SpDamID was used to analyze Notch-mediated transcriptional activation. We demonstrate that Notch complexes label RBP sites broadly across the genome, and show that a subset of these complexes that recruit MAML and p300 undergo changes in chromatin accessibility in response to Notch signaling. SpDamID differentiates between monomeric and dimeric binding thereby allowing for identification of half-site motifs used by Notch dimers. Motif enrichment of Notch enhancers coupled with SpDamID reveals co-targeting of regulatory sequences by Notch and Runx1. SpDamID represents a sensitive and powerful tool that enables dynamic analysis of combinatorial protein-DNA transactions at a genome-wide level. PMID:26257285

  4. Structure of an RNA dimer of a regulatory element from human thymidylate synthase mRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Dibrov, Sergey; McLean, Jaime; Hermann, Thomas

    2011-09-27

    A sequence around the start codon of the mRNA of human thymidylate synthase (TS) folds into a secondary-structure motif in which the initiation site is sequestered in a metastable hairpin. Binding of the protein to its own mRNA at the hairpin prevents the production of TS through a translation-repression feedback mechanism. Stabilization of the mRNA hairpin by other ligands has been proposed as a strategy to reduce TS levels in anticancer therapy. Rapidly proliferating cells require high TS activity to maintain the production of thymidine as a building block for DNA synthesis. The crystal structure of a model oligonucleotide (TS1) that represents the TS-binding site of the mRNA has been determined. While fluorescence studies showed that the TS1 RNA preferentially adopts a hairpin structure in solution, even at high RNA concentrations, an asymmetric dimer of two hybridized TS1 strands was obtained in the crystal. The TS1 dimer contains an unusual S-turn motif that also occurs in the 'off' state of the human ribosomal decoding site RNA.

  5. High-Resolution Rotational Spectroscopy Study of the Smallest Sugar Dimer: Interplay of Hydrogen Bonds in the Glycolaldehyde Dimer.

    PubMed

    Zinn, Sabrina; Medcraft, Chris; Betz, Thomas; Schnell, Melanie

    2016-05-10

    Molecular recognition of carbohydrates plays an important role in nature. The aggregation of the smallest sugar, glycolaldehyde, was studied in a conformer-selective manner using high-resolution rotational spectroscopy. Two different dimer structures were observed. The most stable conformer reveals C2 -symmetry by forming two intermolecular hydrogen bonds, giving up the strong intramolecular hydrogen bonds of the monomers and thus showing high hydrogen bond selectivity. By analyzing the spectra of the (13) C and (18) O isotopologues of the dimer in natural abundance, we could precisely determine the heavy backbone structure of the dimer. Comparison to the monomer structure and the complex with water provides insight into intermolecular interactions. Despite hydrogen bonding being the dominant interaction, precise predictions from quantum-chemical calculations highly rely on the consideration of dispersion.

  6. High-Resolution Rotational Spectroscopy Study of the Smallest Sugar Dimer: Interplay of Hydrogen Bonds in the Glycolaldehyde Dimer.

    PubMed

    Zinn, Sabrina; Medcraft, Chris; Betz, Thomas; Schnell, Melanie

    2016-05-10

    Molecular recognition of carbohydrates plays an important role in nature. The aggregation of the smallest sugar, glycolaldehyde, was studied in a conformer-selective manner using high-resolution rotational spectroscopy. Two different dimer structures were observed. The most stable conformer reveals C2 -symmetry by forming two intermolecular hydrogen bonds, giving up the strong intramolecular hydrogen bonds of the monomers and thus showing high hydrogen bond selectivity. By analyzing the spectra of the (13) C and (18) O isotopologues of the dimer in natural abundance, we could precisely determine the heavy backbone structure of the dimer. Comparison to the monomer structure and the complex with water provides insight into intermolecular interactions. Despite hydrogen bonding being the dominant interaction, precise predictions from quantum-chemical calculations highly rely on the consideration of dispersion. PMID:27060475

  7. Modified-live infectious bovine rhinotracheitis virus vaccine expressing monomer and dimer forms of foot-and-mouth disease capsid protein epitopes on surface of hybrid virus particles.

    PubMed

    Kit, S; Kit, M; DiMarchi, R D; Little, S P; Gale, C

    1991-01-01

    Modified-live, attenuated infectious bovine rhinotracheitis (IBR) hybrid virus vaccines have been constructed by inserting in the major IBRV glycoprotein gIII gene chemically synthesized deoxyribonucleotide sequences encoding the bovine growth hormone signal sequence and monomeric or dimeric forms of the foot and mouth disease virus (FMDV) VP 1 epitope sequences. The foreign DNA sequences were inserted at the N-terminal end of the IBRV gIII coding sequence and were driven by the IBRV gIII promoter. The sequences encoding the first 38 and the first 21 amino acids of the IBRV gIII were deleted from the hybrid viruses containing inserts of the monomeric and dimeric FMDV epitope sequences, respectively, to avoid redundant signal sequences. Plaque immunoassay experiments with guinea pig and bovine anti-FMDV peptide antisera, and with anti-IBRV gIII monoclonal antibodies demonstrated that IBRV-FMDV fusion proteins were expressed in virus-infected MDBK cells. Immunoelectron microscopy analyses demonstrated that the IBRV-FMDV fusion proteins were expressed as repeated structures on the surface of virus particles. Experiments showed that the recombinant IBRV-FMDV viruses protected cattle from IBRV (Cooper) challenge and induced anti-FMDV peptide antibodies, thereby demonstrating that the FMDV epitopes were expressed in vivo. PMID:1718244

  8. Abrogation of Glucocorticoid Receptor Dimerization Correlates with Dissociated Glucocorticoid Behavior of Compound A*

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Steven; Allie-Reid, Fatima; Berghe, Wim Vanden; Visser, Koch; Binder, Anke; Africander, Donita; Vismer, Michael; De Bosscher, Karolien; Hapgood, Janet; Haegeman, Guy; Louw, Ann

    2010-01-01

    Compound A (CpdA), a dissociated glucocorticoid receptor modulator, decreases corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG), adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), and luteneinizing hormone levels in rats. Whether this is due to transcriptional regulation by CpdA is not known. Using promoter reporter assays we show that CpdA, like dexamethasone (Dex), directly transrepresses these genes. Results using a rat Cbg proximal-promoter reporter construct in BWTG3 and HepG2 cell lines support a glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-dependent transrepression mechanism for CpdA. However, CpdA, unlike Dex, does not result in transactivation via glucocorticoid-responsive elements within a promoter reporter construct even when GR is co-transfected. The inability of CpdA to result in transactivation via glucocorticoid-responsive elements is confirmed on the endogenous tyrosine aminotransferase gene, whereas transrepression ability is confirmed on the endogenous CBG gene. Consistent with a role for CpdA in modulating GR activity, whole cell binding assays revealed that CpdA binds reversibly to the GR, but with lower affinity than Dex, and influences association of [3H]Dex, but has no effect on dissociation. In addition, like Dex, CpdA causes nuclear translocation of the GR, albeit to a lesser degree. Several lines of evidence, including fluorescence resonance energy transfer, co-immunoprecipitation, and nuclear immunofluorescence studies of nuclear localization-deficient GR show that CpdA, unlike Dex, does not elicit ligand-induced GR dimerization. Comparison of the behavior of CpdA in the presence of wild type GR to that of Dex with a dimerization-deficient GR mutant (GRdim) strongly supports the conclusion that loss of dimerization is responsible for the dissociated behavior of CpdA. PMID:20037160

  9. Dimer asymmetry and the catalytic cycle of alkaline phosphatase from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Orhanović, Stjepan; Pavela-Vrancic, Maja

    2003-11-01

    Although alkaline phosphatase (APase) from Escherichia coli crystallizes as a symmetric dimer, it displays deviations from Michaelis-Menten kinetics, supported by a model describing a dimeric enzyme with unequal subunits [Orhanović S., Pavela-Vrancic M. and Flogel-Mrsić M. (1994) Acta. Pharm.44, 87-95]. The possibility, that the observed asymmetry could be attributed to negative cooperativity in Mg2+ binding, has been examined. The influence of the metal ion content on the catalytic properties of APase from E. coli has been examined by kinetic analyses. An activation study has indicated that Mg2+ enhances APase activity by a mechanism that involves interactions between subunits. The observed deviations from Michaelis-Menten kinetics are independent of saturation with Zn2+ or Mg2+ ions, suggesting that asymmetry is an intrinsic property of the dimeric enzyme. In accordance with the experimental data, a model describing the mechanism of substrate hydrolysis by APase has been proposed. The release of the product is enhanced by a conformational change generating a subunit with lower affinity for both the substrate and the product. In the course of the catalytic cycle the conformation of the subunits alternates between two states in order to enable substrate binding and product release. APase displays higher activity in the presence of Mg2+, as binding of Mg2+ increases the rate of conformational change. A conformationally controlled and Mg2+-assisted dissociation of the reaction product (Pi) could serve as a kinetic switch preventing loss of Pi into the environment. PMID:14622301

  10. Commonly-occurring polymorphisms in the COMT, DRD1 and DRD2 genes influence different aspects of motor sequence learning in humans.

    PubMed

    Baetu, Irina; Burns, Nicholas R; Urry, Kristi; Barbante, Girolamo Giovanni; Pitcher, Julia B

    2015-11-01

    Performing sequences of movements is a ubiquitous skill that involves dopamine transmission. However, it is unclear which components of the dopamine system contribute to which aspects of motor sequence learning. Here we used a genetic approach to investigate the relationship between different components of the dopamine system and specific aspects of sequence learning in humans. In particular, we investigated variations in genes that code for the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) enzyme, the dopamine transporter (DAT) and dopamine D1 and D2 receptors (DRD1 and DRD2). COMT and the DAT regulate dopamine availability in the prefrontal cortex and the striatum, respectively, two key regions recruited during learning, whereas dopamine D1 and D2 receptors are thought to be involved in long-term potentiation and depression, respectively. We show that polymorphisms in the COMT, DRD1 and DRD2 genes differentially affect behavioral performance on a sequence learning task in 161 Caucasian participants. The DRD1 polymorphism predicted the ability to learn new sequences, the DRD2 polymorphism predicted the ability to perform a previously learnt sequence after performing interfering random movements, whereas the COMT polymorphism predicted the ability to switch flexibly between two sequences. We used computer simulations to explore potential mechanisms underlying these effects, which revealed that the DRD1 and DRD2 effects are possibly related to neuroplasticity. Our prediction-error algorithm estimated faster rates of connection strengthening in genotype groups with presumably higher D1 receptor densities, and faster rates of connection weakening in genotype groups with presumably higher D2 receptor densities. Consistent with current dopamine theories, these simulations suggest that D1-mediated neuroplasticity contributes to learning to select appropriate actions, whereas D2-mediated neuroplasticity is involved in learning to inhibit incorrect action plans. However, the

  11. Density functional theory study of multiply ionized weakly bound fullerene dimers.

    PubMed

    Zettergren, Henning; Wang, Yang; Lamsabhi, Al Mokhtar; Alcamí, Manuel; Martín, Fernando

    2009-06-14

    Multiply ionized fullerene dimers ([C(60)](2) (q+),q=1-6) have been studied by means of state-of-the-art density functional theory methods. We found that the singly charged dimer is more strongly bound than the corresponding neutral van der Waals dimer at the binding distance of the latter; in contrast, multiply charged dimers (q>or=2) are unstable. For the latter dimers, the calculated kinetic energy release in the binary fission yielding intact fullerenes is lower than those reported in recent experimental work. This implies that, in such experiments, there are significant internal excitations in the separating monomers. We also show that electron transfer within the charged dimers occurs on the subfemtosecond time scale, in accordance with the high charge mobility observed in dimers and larger clusters of fullerenes. This provides an explanation for the even-odd effects in the measured multiple ionization yields of fullerene dimers.

  12. Inhibitors that stabilize a closed RAF kinase domain conformation induce dimerization

    PubMed Central

    Lavoie, Hugo; Thevakumaran, Neroshan; Gavory, Gwenaëlle; Li, John; Padeganeh, Abbas; Guiral, Sébastien; Duchaine, Jean; Mao, Daniel Y. L.; Bouvier, Michel; Sicheri, Frank; Therrien, Marc

    2016-01-01

    RAF kinases play a prominent role in cancer. Their mode of activation is complex, but critically requires dimerization of their kinase domains. Unexpectedly, several ATP-competitive RAF inhibitors were recently found to promote dimerization and transactivation of RAF kinases in a RAS-dependent manner and as a result undesirably stimulate RAS/ERK-mediated cell growth. The mechanism by which these inhibitors induce RAF kinase domain dimerization remains unclear. Here we describe BRET-based biosensors for the extended RAF family enabling the detection of RAF dimerization in living cells. Notably, we demonstrate the utility of these tools for profiling kinase inhibitors that selectively modulate RAF dimerization as well as for probing structural determinants of RAF dimerization in vivo. Our findings, which appear generalizable to other kinase families allosterically regulated by kinase domain dimerization, suggest a model whereby ATP-competitive inhibitors mediate RAF dimerization by stabilizing a rigid closed conformation of the kinase domain. PMID:23685672

  13. Facile synthesis of dimer phase of coronene and its optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayakawa, T.; Song, H.; Ishii, Y.; Kawasaki, S.

    2016-07-01

    We synthesized very pure dimer phase of coronene by simple heat-treatment and subsequent sublimation purification. It was found that the dimer phase emits very bright red light under the irradiation of low energy ultra-violet light.

  14. Nature and possible mechanisms of formation of potential mutations arising at emerging of thymine dimers after irradiation of double-stranded DNA by ultraviolet light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grebneva, H. A.

    2003-01-01

    The mutagenesis under ultraviolet (UV)-irradiation is discussed. It is assumed, that the basic damages resulting in transitions, transversions, mutations of the frameshift and complex mutations are changes of the tautomeric state of the bases. The bases may be a part of dimers or may be not the dimer components. We consider such rare tautomeric states, which may influence the character of base pairing. A model of the formation of the above rare tautomeric forms of nucleotide bases under the UV-irradiation of the DNA is proposed. In the case of a radiation deexcitation of the DNA, which has absorbed the UV-quantum of the triplet energy level, there occur strong forced oscillations. They may result in changes of the lengths of hydrogen bonds between DNA bases. As a result, at H-bond shortening, the hydrogen atom may be almost in the center of H-bond. In the case of H-bond elongation, it may remain near the partner atom. Because of the H-bond breaking, during the formation of dimers, rare tautomeric forms of bases influencing the character of pairing can be realized. If a pair of the bases is not a part of dimer, then the only new stable configuration of the hydrogen atoms is the one that occurred at double-proton phototautomerism. It is shown that only those dimers are mutational, in which the change of a tautomeric state of the DNA bases have taken place. This is one of the differences between the proposed model and the standard one. The latter assumes, that from the point of view of ability of forming the mutations all the dimers are identical, and the DNA-polymerase is sometimes mistaken, incidentally building uncomplementary bases in. The consideration is only of qualitative character, it needs experimental verification, subsequent study by methods of quantum chemistry and theoretical physics. A list of problems to be studied in this respect is given.

  15. Asymptotics of Height Change on Toroidal Temperleyan Dimer Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubédat, Julien; Gheissari, Reza

    2015-04-01

    The dimer model is an exactly solvable model of planar statistical mechanics. In its critical phase, various aspects of its scaling limit are known to be described by the Gaussian free field. For periodic graphs, criticality is an algebraic condition on the spectral curve of the model, determined by the edge weights (Kenyon et al. in Ann Math (2) 163(3):1019-1056, 2006); isoradial graphs provide another class of critical dimer models, in which the edge weights are determined by the local geometry. In the present article, we consider another class of graphs: general Temperleyan graphs, i.e. graphs arising in the (generalized) Temperley bijection between spanning trees and dimer models. Building in particular on Forman's formula and representations of Laplacian determinants in terms of Poisson operators, and under a minimal assumption—viz. that the underlying random walk converges to Brownian motion—we show that the natural topological observable on macroscopic tori converges in law to its universal limit, i.e. the law of the periods of the dimer height function converges to that of the periods of a compactified free field.

  16. Tubulin domains responsible for assembly of dimers and protofilaments.

    PubMed Central

    Kirchner, K; Mandelkow, E M

    1985-01-01

    The protein domains responsible for the dimerization and polymerization of tubulin have been determined using chemical cross-linking and limited proteolysis. The intra-dimer bond is formed by the N-terminal domain of alpha-tubulin and the C-terminal domain of beta-tubulin. Conversely, the inter-dimer bond along protofilaments is formed by the N-terminal domain of beta-tubulin (carrying the exchangeable GTP) and the C-terminal domain of alpha-tubulin. The domains of proteolytically cleaved tubulin remain tightly associated in solution. Apart from the monomer, tubulin shows three levels of assembly: the dimer, oligomer and polymer. Several oligomeric species can be visualized by electron microscopy of rotary shadowed phosphocellulose-tubulin, h.p.l.c. and non-denaturing gel electrophoresis. Tubulin's capacity to form the higher level aggregates is not destroyed by enzymatic nicking. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. PMID:4076170

  17. Plasma D-dimer concentration in patients with systemic sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Volpe, Alessandro; Caramaschi, Paola; Salvagno, Gian Luca; Montagnana, Martina; Guidi, Gian Cesare

    2006-01-01

    Background Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is an autoimmune disorder of the connective tissue characterized by widespread vascular lesions and fibrosis. Little is known so far on the activation of the hemostatic and fibrinolytic systems in SSc, and most preliminary evidences are discordant. Methods To verify whether SSc patients might display a prothrombotic condition, plasma D-dimer was assessed in 28 consecutive SSc patients and in 33 control subjects, matched for age, sex and environmental habit. Results and discussion When compared to healthy controls, geometric mean and 95% confidence interval (IC95%) of plasma D-dimer were significantly increased in SSc patients (362 ng/mL, IC 95%: 361–363 ng/mL vs 229 ng/mL, IC95%: 228–231 ng/mL, p = 0.005). After stratifying SSc patients according to disease subset, no significant differences were observed between those with limited cutaneous pattern and controls, whereas patients with diffuse cutaneous pattern displayed substantially increased values. No correlation was found between plasma D-dimer concentration and age, sex, autoantibody pattern, serum creatinine, erythrosedimentation rate, nailfold videocapillaroscopic pattern and pulmonary involvement. Conclusion We demonstrated that SSc patients with diffuse subset are characterized by increased plasma D-dimer values, reflecting a potential activation of both the hemostatic and fibrinolytic cascades, which might finally predispose these patients to thrombotic complications. PMID:16420700

  18. Cantharimide dimers from the Chinese blister beetle, Mylabris phalerate PALLAS.

    PubMed

    Nakatani, Takafumi; Jinpo, Katsuaki; Noda, Naoki

    2007-01-01

    Five cantharidin-related compounds were isolated from the Chinese blister beetle, Mylabris phalerate PALLAS (Meloidae). Their structures were determined based on spectroscopic and chemical evidence. Three of them were identified as cantharimide dimers, which consist of two units of cantharimide combined with a tri-, tetra-, or penta-methylene group.

  19. UVAI-induced edema and pyrimidine dimers in murine skin.

    PubMed

    Ley, R D; Fourtanier, A

    2000-10-01

    The induction of edema and pyrimidine dimers in epidermal DNA was determined in the skin of SKH:HR1 mice exposed to graded doses of ultraviolet radiation AI (UVAI; 340-400 nm). Exposure to UVAI induced 1.6 +/- 0.08 x 10(-6) (mean +/- standard error of mean) pyrimidine dimers per 10(8) Da of DNA per J/m2. Edema in irradiated animals was determined as an increase in skinfold thickness. A dose of 1.8 x 10(6) J/m2 of UVAI that resulted in a 50% increase in skinfold thickness (SFT50%) would have induced 1.0 x 10(5) dimers per basal cell genome. A similar increase in SFT induced by full spectrum solar ultraviolet radiation (290-400 nm) would accompany the induction of 11.0 x 10(5) pyrimidine dimers per basal cell genome. These results support a hypothesis that UVAI-induced pathological changes of the skin are mediated through the formation of nondimer photoproducts.

  20. Comparative assay of antioxidant packages for dimer of estolide esters

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A series of 26 different antioxidants and commercial antioxidant packages, containing both natural and synthetic-based materials, were evaluated with dimeric coconut-oleic estolide 2-ethylhexyl ester. The different antioxidants were broken down into different classes of materials: phenolic, aminic, ...

  1. Quantum chemical interaction energy surfaces of ethylene and propene dimers.

    PubMed

    Jalkanen, Jukka-Pekka; Pulkkinen, Sallaraisa; Pakkanen, Tapani A; Rowley, Richard L

    2005-03-31

    Ab initio studies of nonbonding interactions for ethylene and propene dimers were conducted at the MP2/6-311+G(2df,2pd) level. The dimers were attractive in all of the orientations studied; however, the attraction was <0.1 kcal/mol for ethylene D2h and C2h dimers, for which the pi-electron clouds or H atoms interact closely. A previously introduced transferable potential model, NIPE [Jalkanen, J.-P.; Pakkanen, T. A.; Yang, Y.; Rowley, R. L. J. Chem. Phys. 2003, 118, 5474], which is based on quantum chemical calculations of small alkane molecules, was tested against the propene and ethylene dimer data. Comparisons of results showed that interaction energies for orientations dominated by interactions between the propene methyl groups or two hydrogens were accurately predicted with the NIPE model. Interactions involving the double bond were not predicted as well, because the original NIPE regression data set did not contain any information about pi-electron systems. An extension of the NIPE model to include pi-electron interactions is proposed. Additional interaction sites are used with the same energy function as atomic interactions. This addition provides a more accurate description of the interaction energies of both ethylene and propene and extends the transferability of the NIPE model to alkenes.

  2. Centrosymmetric dimer of quinuclidine betaine and squaric acid complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dega-Szafran, Z.; Katrusiak, A.; Szafran, M.

    2012-12-01

    The complex of squaric acid (3,4-dihydroxy-3-cyclobuten-1,2-dion, H2SQ) with quinuclidine betaine (1-carboxymethyl-1-azabicyclo[2.2.2]octane inner salt, QNB), 1, has been characterized by single-crystal X-ray analysis, FTIR and NMR spectroscopies and by DFT calculations. In the crystal of 1, monoclinic space group P21/n, one proton from H2SQ is transferred to QNB. QNBH+ and HSQ- are linked together by a Osbnd H⋯O hydrogen bond of 2.553(2) Å. Two such QNBH+·HSQ- complexes form a centrosymmetric dimer bridged by two Osbnd H⋯O bonds of 2.536(2) Å. The FTIR spectrum is consistent with the X-ray results. The structures of monomer QNBH+·HSQ- (1a) and dimer [QNB·H2SQ]2 (2) have been optimized at the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory. Isolated dimer 2 optimized back to a molecular aggregate of H2SQ and QNB. The calculated frequencies for the optimized structure of dimer 2 have been used to explain the frequencies of the experimental FTIR spectrum. The interpretation of 1H and 13C NMR spectra has been based on the calculated GIAO/B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) magnetic isotropic shielding constants for monomer 1a.

  3. The Internal Structure of Nanoparticle Dimers Linked by DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas Lara, Fernando; Cheng, Ching-Jung; Gang, Oleg; Starr, Francis W.

    2012-02-01

    The self-assembly of inorganic units controlled by the interactions of biological molecules, like DNA, has received attention for the possibility to specify higher-order structure, with potential biological, optical and electronic applications. In biology, self-assembly of complex materials (eg. bone, spider silk) frequently occurs in a stepwise, hierarchical fashion. Here, we consider a first step towards a hierarchical approach for synthetic nanostructures of nanoparticles (NPs) linked by DNA. The most basic unit in this multiscale approach is a dimer of NPs linked by DNA. We use a coarse-grained molecular model to explain experimental measurements of the separation of two DNA-coated NPs connected by linking single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). We show that the dimer separation is primarily controlled by the number of DNA links between NPs. If these links are not constrained to lie along the axis between NPs, the separation is limited by off-axis connections that force the NPs to be closer. We also determine how the number of connections alters the effective persistence length of the ssDNA that connects the dimer. We discuss how these dimers might be used for subsequent assembly at larger scales.

  4. Mechanisms of Activation of Receptor Tyrosine Kinases: Monomers or Dimers

    PubMed Central

    Maruyama, Ichiro N.

    2014-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) play essential roles in cellular processes, including metabolism, cell-cycle control, survival, proliferation, motility and differentiation. RTKs are all synthesized as single-pass transmembrane proteins and bind polypeptide ligands, mainly growth factors. It has long been thought that all RTKs, except for the insulin receptor (IR) family, are activated by ligand-induced dimerization of the receptors. An increasing number of diverse studies, however, indicate that RTKs, previously thought to exist as monomers, are present as pre-formed, yet inactive, dimers prior to ligand binding. The non-covalently associated dimeric structures are reminiscent of those of the IR family, which has a disulfide-linked dimeric structure. Furthermore, recent progress in structural studies has provided insight into the underpinnings of conformational changes during the activation of RTKs. In this review, I discuss two mutually exclusive models for the mechanisms of activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor, the neurotrophin receptor and IR families, based on these new insights. PMID:24758840

  5. Gelation by supramolecular dimerization of mono(urea)s.

    PubMed

    Hooper, Abigail E; Kennedy, Stuart R; Jones, Christopher D; Steed, Jonathan W

    2016-01-01

    Mono-ureido salicylic acid derivatives form hydrogen bonded dimers that mimic the gelation behaviour of covalently linked bis(urea)s. The 5-ureido salicylic acid isomers are much more effective gelators because of the lowered conjugation and less planar geometry, resulting in stronger urea···urea α-tape hydrogen bonding interactions.

  6. Vibrational Predissociation Dynamics of the (H_2O)_2 Dimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ch'ng, L. C.; Rocher, B. E.; Mollner, A. K.; Reisler, H.

    2011-06-01

    The state-to-state vibrational predissociation dynamics of the (H_2O)_2 dimer were studied by resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) and velocity-map imaging (VMI) to obtain pair-correlated product energy distributions. The 2+1 REMPI spectra of the H_2O photofragments were recorded via the tilde{C}^1B_1 (000) ← tilde{X}^1A_1 (000 and 010) transition following a vibrational excitation of the dimer's bound-OH stretch fundamental. The fragment' center-of-mass translational energy (c.m. E_T) distributions were determined from VMI of selected rotational states of the detected H_2O photofragments. The c.m. E_T distributions were then converted to pair-correlated H_2O cofragment rotational level distributions. This is the first experiment in which H_2O products with bend (ν_2) excitation were observed by REMPI. The dissociation energy of the dimer was determined from the images with spectroscopic accuracy. The predissociation mechanism of (H_2O)_2 will be discussed and compared with the corresponding hydrogen bonded dimers of an acid (HCl-H_2O) and a base (NH_3-H_2O).

  7. Gnapholide: a new guaiac-dimer from Pulicaria gnaphalodes (Asteraceae).

    PubMed

    Ali, Muhammad Shaiq; Jahangir, Muhammad; Uzair, Syed Shah; Erian, Ayman Wahba; Tareen, Rasool Bakhsh

    2002-06-01

    The ethyl acetate soluble part of the chloroform extract of Pulicaria gnaphalodes belonging to the family Asteraceae afforded a new sesquiterpene-dimer of guaiane class named as gnapholide and anabsinthin of the same skeleton. The structures of both the compounds were elucidated with the aid of spectroscopic techniques including 2D NMR.

  8. Highly sensitive amyloid detection enabled by thioflavin T dimers.

    PubMed

    Qin, Luoheng; Vastl, Julian; Gao, Jianmin

    2010-10-01

    Fluorescent molecules that specifically target amyloid structures are highly desirable for amyloid research. Herein, we show a dimeric design of thioflavin T improves its binding affinity to Abeta amyloid by up to 70 fold, while not sacrificing the specificity and the "light-up" feature upon amyloid binding.

  9. Reversible Adsorption Kinetics of Near Surface Dimer Colloids.

    PubMed

    Salipante, Paul F; Hudson, Steven D

    2016-08-30

    We investigate the effect of shape on reversible adsorption kinetics using colloidal polystyrene dimers near a solid glass surface as a model system. The interaction between colloid and wall is tuned using electrostatic, depletion, and gravity forces to produce a double-well potential. The dwell time in each of the potential wells is measured from long duration particle trajectories. The height of each monomer relative to the glass surface is measured to a resolution of <20 nm by in-line holographic microscopy. The measured transition probability distributions are used in kinetic equations to describe the flux of particles to and from the surface. The dimers are compared to independent isolated monomers to determine the effects of shape on adsorption equilibria and kinetics. To elucidate these differences, we consider both mass and surface coverage and two definitions of surface coverage. The results show that dimers with single coverage produce slower adsorption, lower surface coverage, and higher mass coverage in comparison to those of monomers, while dimers with double coverage adsorb faster and result in higher surface coverage. PMID:27483023

  10. Potential Energy Surface Database of Group II Dimer

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 143 NIST Potential Energy Surface Database of Group II Dimer (Web, free access)   This database provides critical atomic and molecular data needed in order to evaluate the feasibility of using laser cooled and trapped Group II atomic species (Mg, Ca, Sr, and Ba) for ultra-precise optical clocks or quantum information processing devices.

  11. Monomeric and dimeric disulfide complexes of nickel(II).

    PubMed

    Iluc, Vlad M; Laskowski, Carl A; Brozek, Carl K; Harrold, Nicole D; Hillhouse, Gregory L

    2010-08-01

    Elemental sulfur reacts with a bulky bis(phosphine)nickel(0) complex to give a monomeric nickel(II) eta(2)-disulfido complex, oxidation of which results in the elimination of sulfur with dimerization to give an eta(2),eta(2)-disulfidodinickel(II) derivative in which the S-S bond can be reductively cleaved in a redox-reversible fashion. PMID:20586478

  12. Cantharimide dimers from the Chinese blister beetle, Mylabris phalerate PALLAS.

    PubMed

    Nakatani, Takafumi; Jinpo, Katsuaki; Noda, Naoki

    2007-01-01

    Five cantharidin-related compounds were isolated from the Chinese blister beetle, Mylabris phalerate PALLAS (Meloidae). Their structures were determined based on spectroscopic and chemical evidence. Three of them were identified as cantharimide dimers, which consist of two units of cantharimide combined with a tri-, tetra-, or penta-methylene group. PMID:17202708

  13. Assembly requirements of PU.1-Pip (IRF-4) activator complexes: inhibiting function in vivo using fused dimers.

    PubMed Central

    Brass, A L; Zhu, A Q; Singh, H

    1999-01-01

    Gene expression in higher eukaryotes appears to be regulated by specific combinations of transcription factors binding to regulatory sequences. The Ets factor PU.1 and the IRF protein Pip (IRF-4) represent a pair of interacting transcription factors implicated in regulating B cell-specific gene expression. Pip is recruited to its binding site on DNA by phosphorylated PU.1. PU.1-Pip interaction is shown to be template directed and involves two distinct protein-protein interaction surfaces: (i) the ets and IRF DNA-binding domains; and (ii) the phosphorylated PEST region of PU.1 and a lysine-requiring putative alpha-helix in Pip. Thus, a coordinated set of protein-protein and protein-DNA contacts are essential for PU.1-Pip ternary complex assembly. To analyze the function of these factors in vivo, we engineered chimeric repressors containing the ets and IRF DNA-binding domains connected by a flexible POU domain linker. When stably expressed, the wild-type fused dimer strongly repressed the expression of a rearranged immunoglobulin lambda gene, thereby establishing the functional importance of PU.1-Pip complexes in B cell gene expression. Comparative analysis of the wild-type dimer with a series of mutant dimers distinguished a gene regulated by PU.1 and Pip from one regulated by PU.1 alone. This strategy should prove generally useful in analyzing the function of interacting transcription factors in vivo, and for identifying novel genes regulated by such complexes. PMID:10022840

  14. Structural Basis for Ubiquitin-Mediated Dimerization and Activation of the Ubiquitin Protein Ligase Cbl-b

    SciTech Connect

    Peschard,P.; Kozlov, G.; Lin, T.; Mirza, I.; Berghuis, A.; Lipkowitz, S.; Park, M.; Gehring, K.

    2007-01-01

    Cbl proteins are E3 ubiquitin ligases that are negative regulators of many receptor tyrosine kinases. Cbl-b and c-Cbl contain a ubiquitin-associated (UBA) domain, which is present in a variety of proteins involved in ubiquitin-mediated processes. Despite high sequence identity, Cbl UBA domains display remarkably different ubiquitin-binding properties. Here, we report the crystal structure of the UBA domain of Cbl-b in complex with ubiquitin at 1.9 {angstrom} resolution. The structure reveals an atypical mechanism of ubiquitin recognition by the first helix of the UBA. Helices 2 and 3 of the UBA domain form a second binding surface, which mediates UBA dimerization in the crystal and in solution. Site-directed mutagenesis demonstrates that Cbl-b dimerization is regulated by ubiquitin binding and required for tyrosine phosphorylation of Cbl-b and ubiquitination of Cbl-b substrates. These studies demonstrate a role for ubiquitin in regulating biological activity by promoting protein dimerization.

  15. Dimeric structure of the N-terminal domain of PriB protein from Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis solved ab initio.

    PubMed

    Liebschner, Dorothee; Brzezinski, Krzysztof; Dauter, Miroslawa; Dauter, Zbigniew; Nowak, Marta; Kur, Józef; Olszewski, Marcin

    2012-12-01

    PriB is one of the components of the bacterial primosome, which catalyzes the reactivation of stalled replication forks at sites of DNA damage. The N-terminal domain of the PriB protein from the thermophilic bacterium Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis (TtePriB) was expressed and its crystal structure was solved at the atomic resolution of 1.09 Å by direct methods. The protein chain, which encompasses the first 104 residues of the full 220-residue protein, adopts the characteristic oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide-binding (OB) structure consisting of a five-stranded β-barrel filled with hydrophobic residues and equipped with four loops extending from the barrel. In the crystal two protomers dimerize, forming a six-stranded antiparallel β-sheet. The structure of the N-terminal OB domain of T. tengcongensis shows significant differences compared with mesophile PriBs. While in all other known structures of PriB a dimer is formed by two identical OB domains in separate chains, TtePriB contains two consecutive OB domains in one chain. However, sequence comparison of both the N-terminal and the C-terminal domains of TtePriB suggests that they have analogous structures and that the natural protein possesses a structure similar to a dimer of two N-terminal domains.

  16. Dimeric structure of the N-terminal domain of PriB protein from Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis solved ab initio

    PubMed Central

    Liebschner, Dorothee; Brzezinski, Krzysztof; Dauter, Miroslawa; Dauter, Zbigniew; Nowak, Marta; Kur, Józef; Olszewski, Marcin

    2012-01-01

    PriB is one of the components of the bacterial primosome, which catalyzes the reactivation of stalled replication forks at sites of DNA damage. The N-terminal domain of the PriB protein from the thermophilic bacterium Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis (TtePriB) was expressed and its crystal structure was solved at the atomic resolution of 1.09 Å by direct methods. The protein chain, which encompasses the first 104 residues of the full 220-residue protein, adopts the characteristic oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide-binding (OB) structure consisting of a five-stranded β-barrel filled with hydrophobic residues and equipped with four loops extending from the barrel. In the crystal two protomers dimerize, forming a six-stranded antiparallel β-sheet. The structure of the N-terminal OB domain of T. tengcongensis shows significant differences compared with mesophile PriBs. While in all other known structures of PriB a dimer is formed by two identical OB domains in separate chains, TtePriB contains two consecutive OB domains in one chain. However, sequence comparison of both the N-terminal and the C-terminal domains of TtePriB suggests that they have analogous structures and that the natural protein possesses a structure similar to a dimer of two N-terminal domains. PMID:23151633

  17. High homology between 6-aminohexanoate-cyclic-dimer hydrolases of Flavobacterium and Pseudomonas strains.

    PubMed Central

    Tsuchiya, K; Fukuyama, S; Kanzaki, N; Kanagawa, K; Negoro, S; Okada, H

    1989-01-01

    The nucleotide sequences of the genes for 6-aminohexanoate-cyclic-dimer hydrolases of Flavobacterium sp. strain K172 (F-nylA) and Pseudomonas sp. NK87 (P-nylA), enzymes essential for the degradation of a by-product of the nylon-6 industry, were obtained by the dideoxynucleotide chain-termination method. A 1,479-base-pair open reading frame starting at a GTG and terminating at a TGA was found for the both of the genes. The P-nylA and F-nylA genes encoded polypeptides of 493 amino acids and had only 10 base substitutions in the coding region, which caused seven amino acid substitutions. PMID:2722746

  18. The specific amino acid sequence between helices 7 and 8 influences the binding specificity of human apolipoprotein A-I for high density lipoprotein (HDL) subclasses: a potential for HDL preferential generation.

    PubMed

    Carnemolla, Ronald; Ren, Xuefeng; Biswas, Tapan K; Meredith, Stephen C; Reardon, Catherine A; Wang, Jianjun; Getz, Godfrey S

    2008-06-01

    Humans have two major high density lipoprotein (HDL) sub-fractions, HDL(2) and HDL(3), whereas mice have a monodisperse HDL profile. Epidemiological evidence has suggested that HDL(2) is more atheroprotective; however, currently there is no direct experimental evidence to support this postulate. The amino acid sequence of apoA-I is a primary determinant of HDL subclass formation. The majority of the alpha-helical repeats in human apoA-I are proline-punctuated. A notable exception is the boundary between helices 7 and 8, which is located in the transitional segment between the stable N-terminal domain and the C-terminal hydrophobic domain. In this study we ask whether the substitution of a proline-containing sequence (PCS) separating other helices in human apoA-I for the non-proline-containing sequence (NPCS) between helices 7 and 8 (residues 184-190) influences HDL subclass association. The human apoA-I mutant with PCS2 replacing NPCS preferentially bound to HDL(2). In contrast, the mutant where PCS3 replaced NPCS preferentially associated with HDL(3). Thus, the specific amino acid sequence between helices 7 and 8 influences HDL subclass association. The wild-type and mutant proteins exhibited similar physicochemical properties except that the two mutants displayed greater lipid-associated stability versus wild-type human apoA-I. These results focus new attention on the influence of the boundary between helices 7 and 8 on the properties of apoA-I. The expression of these mutants in mice may result in the preferential generation of HDL(2) or HDL(3) and allow us to examine experimentally the anti-atherogenicity of the HDL subclasses.

  19. Extracellular disulfide bridges stabilize TRPC5 dimerization, trafficking, and activity.

    PubMed

    Hong, Chansik; Kwak, Misun; Myeong, Jongyun; Ha, Kotdaji; Wie, Jinhong; Jeon, Ju-Hong; So, Insuk

    2015-04-01

    Crucial cysteine residues can be involved in the modulation of protein activity via the modification of thiol (-SH) groups. Among these reactions, disulfide bonds (S-S) play a key role in the folding, stability, and activity of membrane proteins. However, the regulation of extracellular cysteines in classical transient receptor potential (TRPC) channels remains controversial. Here, we examine the functional importance of the extracellular disulfide bond in TRPC5 in modulating channel gating and trafficking. Specifically, we investigated TRPC5 activity in transiently transfected HEK293 cells with wild-type (WT) or cysteine (C553 and C558) mutants in the pore loop. Using reducing agents, we determined that a disulfide linkage mediates the tetrameric formation of the TRPC5 channel. By measuring the TRPC5 current, we observed that C553S or C558S mutants completely lose channel activity induced by lanthanides or receptor stimulation. Co-expression of TRPC5 (WT) with mutants demonstrated a dominant-negative function in mutants, which inhibited the activity of TRPC5 (WT). We generated TRPC5-TRPC5 dimers and observed reduced activity of WT-mutant (C553S or C558S) dimers compared to WT-WT dimers. When pretreated with reducing agents for 12 h, the TRPC5 current decreased due to a reduction in membrane TRPC5 distribution. In addition, we identified a reduced expression of C553S mutant in plasma membrane. We analyzed a dimeric interaction of wild-type and mutant TRPC5 using co-immunoprecipitation and FRET method, indicating a weak interaction between dimeric partners. These results indicated that the disulfide bond between conserved extracellular cysteines, especially C553, is essential for functional TRPC5 activity by channel multimerization and trafficking.

  20. A Designed “Nested” Dimer of Cyanovirin-N Increases Antiviral Activity

    PubMed Central

    Woodrum, Brian W.; Maxwell, Jason; Allen, Denysia M.; Wilson, Jennifer; Krumpe, Lauren R.H.; Bobkov, Andrey A.; Hill, R. Blake; Kibler, Karen V.; O’Keefe, Barry R.; Ghirlanda, Giovanna

    2016-01-01

    Cyanovirin-N (CV-N) is an antiviral lectin with potent activity against enveloped viruses, including HIV. The mechanism of action involves high affinity binding to mannose-rich glycans that decorate the surface of enveloped viruses. In the case of HIV, antiviral activity of CV-N is postulated to require multivalent interactions with envelope protein gp120, achieved through a pseudo-repeat of sequence that adopts two near-identical glycan-binding sites, and possibly involves a 3D-domain-swapped dimeric form of CV-N. Here, we present a covalent dimer of CV-N that increases the number of active glycan-binding sites, and we characterize its ability to recognize four glycans in solution. A CV-N variant was designed in which two native repeats were separated by the “nested” covalent insertion of two additional repeats of CV-N, resulting in four possible glycan-binding sites. The resulting Nested CV-N folds into a wild-type-like structure as assessed by circular dichroism and NMR spectroscopy, and displays high thermal stability with a Tm of 59 °C, identical to WT. All four glycan-binding domains encompassed by the sequence are functional as demonstrated by isothermal titration calorimetry, which revealed two sets of binding events to dimannose with dissociation constants Kd of 25 μM and 900 μM, assigned to domains B and B’ and domains A and A’ respectively. Nested CV-N displays a slight increase in activity when compared to WT CV-N in both an anti-HIV cellular assay and a fusion assay. This construct conserves the original binding specifityies of domain A and B, thus indicating correct fold of the two CV-N repeats. Thus, rational design can be used to increase multivalency in antiviral lectins in a controlled manner. PMID:27275831

  1. 40 CFR 721.9484 - Dimer acid/rosin amidoamine reaction product (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Dimer acid/rosin amidoamine reaction... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9484 Dimer acid/rosin amidoamine reaction product (generic). (a... generically as Dimer acid/rosin amidoamine reaction product (PMN P-99-0143) is subject to reporting under...

  2. 40 CFR 721.9484 - Dimer acid/rosin amidoamine reaction product (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Dimer acid/rosin amidoamine reaction... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9484 Dimer acid/rosin amidoamine reaction product (generic). (a... generically as Dimer acid/rosin amidoamine reaction product (PMN P-99-0143) is subject to reporting under...

  3. 40 CFR 721.9484 - Dimer acid/rosin amidoamine reaction product (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Dimer acid/rosin amidoamine reaction... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9484 Dimer acid/rosin amidoamine reaction product (generic). (a... generically as Dimer acid/rosin amidoamine reaction product (PMN P-99-0143) is subject to reporting under...

  4. 40 CFR 721.9484 - Dimer acid/rosin amidoamine reaction product (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Dimer acid/rosin amidoamine reaction... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9484 Dimer acid/rosin amidoamine reaction product (generic). (a... generically as Dimer acid/rosin amidoamine reaction product (PMN P-99-0143) is subject to reporting under...

  5. 40 CFR 721.9484 - Dimer acid/rosin amidoamine reaction product (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Dimer acid/rosin amidoamine reaction... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9484 Dimer acid/rosin amidoamine reaction product (generic). (a... generically as Dimer acid/rosin amidoamine reaction product (PMN P-99-0143) is subject to reporting under...

  6. Influence of pulse sequence parameters at 1.5 T and 3.0 T on MRI artefacts produced by metal–ceramic restorations

    PubMed Central

    Abdala-Junior, R; Weber, M; Arita, E S; Ackerman, J L

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Susceptibility artefacts from dental materials may compromise MRI diagnosis. However, little is known regarding MRI artefacts of dental material samples with the clinical shapes used in dentistry. The present phantom study aims to clarify how pulse sequences and sequence parameters affect MRI artefacts caused by metal–ceramic restorations. Methods: A phantom consisting of nickel–chromium metal–ceramic restorations (i.e. dental crowns and fixed bridges) and cylindrical reference specimens immersed in agar gel was imaged in 1.5 and 3.0 T MRI scanners. Gradient echo (GRE), spin echo (SE) and ultrashort echo time (UTE) pulse sequences were used. The artefact area in each image was automatically calculated from the pixel values within a region of interest. Mean values for similar pulse sequences differing in one parameter at a time were compared. A comparison between mean artefact area at 1.5 and 3.0 T, and from GRE and SE was also carried out. In addition, a parametric correlation between echo time (TE) and artefact area was performed. Results: A significant correlation was found between TE and artefact area in GRE images. Higher receiver bandwidth significantly reduced artefact area in SE images. UTE images yielded the smallest artefact area at 1.5 T. In addition, a significant difference in mean artefact area was found between images at 1.5 and 3.0 T field strengths (p = 0.028) and between images from GRE and SE pulse sequences (p = 0.005). Conclusions: It is possible to compensate the effect of higher field strength on MRI artefacts by setting optimized pulse sequences for scanning patients with metal–ceramic restorations. PMID:26084475

  7. Chemical reaction equilibrium in nanoporous materials: NO dimerization reaction in carbon slit nanopores.

    PubMed

    Lísal, Martin; Brennan, John K; Smith, William R

    2006-02-14

    We present a molecular-level simulation study of the effects of confinement on chemical reaction equilibrium in nanoporous materials. We use the reaction ensemble Monte Carlo (RxMC) method to investigate the effects of temperature, nanopore size, bulk pressure, and capillary condensation on the nitric oxide dimerization reaction in a model carbon slit nanopore in equilibrium with a bulk reservoir. In addition to the RxMC simulations, we also utilize the molecular-dynamics method to determine self-diffusion coefficients for confined nonreactive mixtures of nitric oxide monomers and dimers at compositions obtained from the RxMC simulations. We analyze the effects of the temperature, nanopore width, bulk pressure, and capillary condensation on the reaction equilibrium with respect to the reaction conversion, fluid structure, and self-diffusion coefficients. We show that the influence of the temperature, nanopore size, and capillary condensation on the confined reaction equilibrium is quite dramatic while the effect of the bulk pressure on the reaction equilibrium in the carbon slit nanopore is only moderate. This work is an extension of previous work by Turner et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 114, 1851 (2001)] on the confined reactive nitric oxide system.

  8. Ab initio electronic structure study of a model water splitting dimer complex.

    PubMed

    Fernando, Amendra; Aikens, Christine M

    2015-12-28

    A model manganese dimer electrocatalyst bridged by μ-OH ligands is used to investigate changes in spin states that may occur during water oxidation. We have employed restricted open-shell Hartree-Fock (ROHF), second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2), complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF), and multireference second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MRMP2) calculations to investigate this system. Multiconfigurational methods like CASSCF and MRMP2 are appropriate methods to study these systems with antiferromagnetically-coupled electrons. Orbital occupations and distributions have been closely analyzed to understand the electronic details and contributions to the water splitting from manganese and oxygen atoms. The presence of Mn(IV)O˙ radical moieties has been observed in this catalytic pathway. Multiple nearly degenerate excited states were found close to the ground state in all structures. This suggests competing potential energy landscapes near the ground state may influence the reactivity of manganese complexes such as the dimers studied in this work.

  9. [Theoretical study of hydrophobicity and hydrophilicity of uracil and its dimers].

    PubMed

    Ten, G N; Kadrov, D M; Baranov, V I

    2014-01-01

    The influence of hydrophilic and hydrophobic properties of the uracil elementary nucleic acids bases on its solubility and structure in aqueous solution was studied. Complexes of uracil with water molecules (from 1 to 14) were then calculated. The geometrical parameters of the hydrogen bridge of uracil and the changes in the frequency of valence vibrations of the bonds participating directly in hydrogen bond formation were calculated. It is shown that for the hydrogen bonds O(w)...HN(1) and O(w)...HN3 the hydrogen atom can tear, it may lead to tautomeric transformation of uracil. The results obtained having calculated the structure of uracil dimers, formed with the hydrogen bonds, in an isolated state and water solution, energy, dipole moments and the hydrogen bridge parameters made it possible to explain low solubility of uracil in water at room temperature. It is shown that water molecules with increase in their number are located mainly at one side of the plane of a pyrimidine uracil ring, that leads to the formation of stacking. Of two possible variants of stacking formation, the most profitable grouping is when a dipole moment of the formed dimer is equal to zero (anti-parallel stacking). PMID:25707232

  10. Spacer parity dependence of photoinduced effects in liquid-crystalline dimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, S. Krishna; Sandhya, K. L.; Nair, Geetha G.; Hiremath, Uma S.; Yelamaggad, C. V.

    2002-07-01

    Liquid crystals composed of photoactive groups like azobenzene are promising materials for optical switching and image storage applications. When exposed to ultraviolet radiation, such materials are known to induce a transition from a liquid-crystalline nematic phase, in which the azo molecules are in the trans form to an isotropic liquid phase when the azo molecules take the cis form. We report the observation of the influence of the parity and length of the flexible spacer of photoactive liquid-crystalline dimers in a guest host system on the photoinduced nematic-isotropic transition. A remarkable feature observed is that in this system, in which the guest dimers are present only in a small concentration (4.8 weight %) the odd-even parity of the spacer results in a striking alternation of the magnitude of the photoinduced shift in the nematic-isotropic transition temperature. Further, it is demonstrated that the shape of the photoactive molecule in its all-trans configuration can be used as a convenient tool to control the photoinduced shift in the nematic-isotropic transition temperature.

  11. An optimal polymerization process for low mean molecular weight HBOC with lower dimer.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wentao; Li, Shen; Hao, Shasha; Liu, Jiaxin; Wang, Hong; Yang, Chengmin

    2015-06-01

    The new research tried to improve the distribution of molecular weight of Hb-based oxygen carriers (HBOC), a bottleneck of glutaraldehyde (GDA)-polymerization process. The orthogonal experiments were done on the basis of the early study of human placenta Hemoglobin (Hb)-crosslinked-GDA and three factors were selected including the molar ratio of GDA and Hb, Hb concentration, and the rate of the feeding GDA. The optimal match condition of polymerization process prepared for the purpose of lower mean molecular weight, content of super-weight molecule, and the content of dimer. The results showed that the molar ratio of GDA and Hb was the greatest influencing factor on the molecular weight distribution of polymerized-Hb, followed by the Hb concentration, and the last is the rate of feeding GDA. The optimum matching conditions had reached the objective that the mean molecular weight with 155.54 ± 5.79, the content of dimer with 17.23 ± 3.71, and content of super-weight molecule with 0.17 ± 0.09, and the results can be repeated in the 30 times expansion experiments.

  12. Effect of dimer dissociation on activity and thermostability of the alpha-glucuronidase from Geobacillus stearothermophilus: dissecting the different oligomeric forms of family 67 glycoside hydrolases.

    PubMed

    Shallom, Dalia; Golan, Gali; Shoham, Gil; Shoham, Yuval

    2004-10-01

    The oligomeric organization of enzymes plays an important role in many biological processes, such as allosteric regulation, conformational stability and thermal stability. alpha-Glucuronidases are family 67 glycosidases that cleave the alpha-1,2-glycosidic bond between 4-O-methyl-D-glucuronic acid and xylose units as part of an array of hemicellulose-hydrolyzing enzymes. Currently, two crystal structures of alpha-glucuronidases are available, those from Geobacillus stearothermophilus (AguA) and from Cellvibrio japonicus (GlcA67A). Both enzymes are homodimeric, but surprisingly their dimeric organization is different, raising questions regarding the significance of dimerization for the enzymes' activity and stability. Structural comparison of the two enzymes suggests several elements that are responsible for the different dimerization organization. Phylogenetic analysis shows that the alpha-glucuronidases AguA and GlcA67A can be classified into two distinct subfamilies of bacterial alpha-glucuronidases, where the dimer-forming residues of each enzyme are conserved only within its own subfamily. It seems that the different dimeric forms of AguA and GlcA67A represent the two alternative dimeric organizations of these subfamilies. To study the biological significance of the dimerization in alpha-glucuronidases, we have constructed a monomeric form of AguA by mutating three of its interface residues (W328E, R329T, and R665N). The activity of the monomer was significantly lower than the activity of the wild-type dimeric AguA, and the optimal temperature for activity of the monomer was around 35 degrees C, compared to 65 degrees C of the wild-type enzyme. Nevertheless, the melting temperature of the monomeric protein, 72.9 degrees C, was almost identical to that of the wild-type, 73.4 degrees C. It appears that the dimerization of AguA is essential for efficient catalysis and that the dissociation into monomers results in subtle conformational changes in the structure

  13. Effect of Dimer Dissociation on Activity and Thermostability of the α-Glucuronidase from Geobacillus stearothermophilus: Dissecting the Different Oligomeric Forms of Family 67 Glycoside Hydrolases

    PubMed Central

    Shallom, Dalia; Golan, Gali; Shoham, Gil; Shoham, Yuval

    2004-01-01

    The oligomeric organization of enzymes plays an important role in many biological processes, such as allosteric regulation, conformational stability and thermal stability. α-Glucuronidases are family 67 glycosidases that cleave the α-1,2-glycosidic bond between 4-O-methyl-d-glucuronic acid and xylose units as part of an array of hemicellulose-hydrolyzing enzymes. Currently, two crystal structures of α-glucuronidases are available, those from Geobacillus stearothermophilus (AguA) and from Cellvibrio japonicus (GlcA67A). Both enzymes are homodimeric, but surprisingly their dimeric organization is different, raising questions regarding the significance of dimerization for the enzymes' activity and stability. Structural comparison of the two enzymes suggests several elements that are responsible for the different dimerization organization. Phylogenetic analysis shows that the α-glucuronidases AguA and GlcA67A can be classified into two distinct subfamilies of bacterial α-glucuronidases, where the dimer-forming residues of each enzyme are conserved only within its own subfamily. It seems that the different dimeric forms of AguA and GlcA67A represent the two alternative dimeric organizations of these subfamilies. To study the biological significance of the dimerization in α-glucuronidases, we have constructed a monomeric form of AguA by mutating three of its interface residues (W328E, R329T, and R665N). The activity of the monomer was significantly lower than the activity of the wild-type dimeric AguA, and the optimal temperature for activity of the monomer was around 35°C, compared to 65°C of the wild-type enzyme. Nevertheless, the melting temperature of the monomeric protein, 72.9°C, was almost identical to that of the wild-type, 73.4°C. It appears that the dimerization of AguA is essential for efficient catalysis and that the dissociation into monomers results in subtle conformational changes in the structure which indirectly influence the active site region

  14. Twin Mitochondrial Sequence Analysis.

    PubMed

    Bouhlal, Yosr; Martinez, Selena; Gong, Henry; Dumas, Kevin; Shieh, Joseph T C

    2013-09-01

    When applying genome-wide sequencing technologies to disease investigation, it is increasingly important to resolve sequence variation in regions of the genome that may have homologous sequences. The human mitochondrial genome challenges interpretation given the potential for heteroplasmy, somatic variation, and homologous nuclear mitochondrial sequences (numts). Identical twins share the same mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) from early life, but whether the mitochondrial sequence remains similar is unclear. We compared an adult monozygotic twin pair using high throughput-sequencing and evaluated variants with primer extension and mitochondrial pre-enrichment. Thirty-seven variants were shared between the twin individuals, and the variants were verified on the original genomic DNA. These studies support highly identical genetic sequence in this case. Certain low-level variant calls were of high quality and homology to the mitochondrial DNA, and they were further evaluated. When we assessed calls in pre-enriched mitochondrial DNA templates, we found that these may represent numts, which can be differentiated from mtDNA variation. We conclude that twin identity extends to mitochondrial DNA, and it is critical to differentiate between numts and mtDNA in genome sequencing, particularly since significant heteroplasmy could influence genome interpretation. Further studies on mtDNA and numts will aid in understanding how variation occurs and persists. PMID:24040623

  15. Evaluation of stability difference between asymmetric homochiral dimer in (S)-thalidomide crystal and symmetric heterochiral dimer in (RS)-thalidomide crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Toshiya; Tanaka, Masahito; Shiro, Motoo; Shibata, Norio; Osaka, Tetsuya; Asahi, Toru

    2010-03-01

    This article discusses differences in physicochemical properties such as solubility and melting point between (S)-thalidomide and (RS)-thalidomide based on crystal structures determined by X-ray diffraction experiments. Investigation of such differences is of great importance because thalidomide has attracted considerable attention again due to its wide-range bioactivity for intractable diseases. In this article, structures of hydrogen-bonded rings were compared between asymmetric homochiral dimers in (S)-thalidomide crystal and symmetric heterochiral dimers in (RS)-thalidomide crystal. The heterochiral dimer was evaluated to be more stable than the homochiral dimer by the energy calculations for hydrogen-bonded rings in those dimers. These results indicate that differences in physicochemical properties between enantiomeric and racemic thalidomides originate from the difference of structural stability between homochiral and heterochiral dimers.

  16. Following Optogenetic Dimerizers and Quantitative Prospects.

    PubMed

    Niu, Jacqueline; Ben Johny, Manu; Dick, Ivy E; Inoue, Takanari

    2016-09-20

    Optogenetics describes the use of genetically encoded photosensitive proteins to direct intended biological processes with light in recombinant and native systems. While most of these light-responsive proteins were originally discovered in photosynthetic organisms, the past few decades have been punctuated by experiments that not only commandeer but also engineer and enhance these natural tools to explore a wide variety of physiological questions. In addition, the ability to tune dynamic range and kinetic rates of optogenetic actuators is a challenging question that is heavily explored with computational methods devised to facilitate optimization of these systems. Here, we explain the basic mechanisms of a few popular photodimerizing optogenetic systems, discuss applications, compare optogenetic tools against more traditional chemical methods, and propose a simple quantitative understanding of how actuators exert their influence on targeted processes. PMID:27542508

  17. Crystal structure of R120G disease mutant of human αB-crystallin domain dimer shows closure of a groove.

    PubMed

    Clark, A R; Naylor, C E; Bagnéris, C; Keep, N H; Slingsby, C

    2011-04-22

    Small heat shock proteins form large cytosolic assemblies from an "α-crystallin domain" (ACD) flanked by sequence extensions. Mutation of a conserved arginine in the ACD of several human small heat shock protein family members causes many common inherited diseases of the lens and neuromuscular system. The mutation R120G in αB-crystallin causes myopathy, cardiomyopathy and cataract. We have solved the X-ray structure of the excised ACD dimer of human αB R120G close to physiological pH and compared it with several recently determined wild-type vertebrate ACD dimer structures. Wild-type excised ACD dimers have a deep groove at the interface floored by a flat extended "bottom sheet." Solid-state NMR studies of large assemblies of full-length αB-crystallin have shown that the groove is blocked in the ACD dimer by curvature of the bottom sheet. The crystal structure of R120G ACD dimer also reveals a closed groove, but here the bottom sheet is flat. Loss of Arg120 results in rearrangement of an extensive array of charged interactions across this interface. His83 and Asp80 on movable arches on either side of the interface close the groove by forming two new salt bridges. The residues involved in this extended set of ionic interactions are conserved in Hsp27, Hsp20, αA- and αB-crystallin sequences. They are not conserved in Hsp22, where mutation of the equivalent of Arg120 causes neuropathy. We speculate that the αB R120G mutation disturbs oligomer dynamics, causing the growth of large soluble oligomers that are toxic to cells by blocking essential processes. PMID:21329698

  18. A nonconjugated bridge in dimer-sensitized solar cells retards charge recombination without decreasing charge injection efficiency.

    PubMed

    Sunahara, Kenji; Griffith, Matthew J; Uchiyama, Takayuki; Wagner, Pawel; Officer, David L; Wallace, Gordon G; Mozer, Attila J; Mori, Shogo

    2013-11-13

    Dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) employing a dimer porphyrin, which was synthesised with two porphyrin units connected without conjugation, have shown that both porphyrin components can contribute to photocurrent generation, that is, more than 50 % internal quantum efficiency. In addition, the open-circuit voltage (Voc) of the DSSCs was higher than that of DSSCs using monomer porphyrins. In this paper, we first optimized cell structure and fabrication conditions. We obtained more than 80% incident photon to current conversion efficiency from the dimer porphyrin sensitized DSSCs and higher Voc and energy conversion efficiency than monomer porphyrin sensitized solar cells. To examine the origin of the higher Voc, we measured electron lifetime in the DSSCs with various conditions, and found that the dimer system increased the electron lifetime by improving the steric blocking effect of the dye layer, whilst the lack of a conjugated linker prevents an increase in the attractive force between conjugated sensitizers and the acceptor species in the electrolyte. The results support a hypothesis; dispersion force is one of the factors influencing the electron lifetime in DSSCs.

  19. Protective V127 prion variant prevents prion disease by interrupting the formation of dimer and fibril from molecular dynamics simulations

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Shuangyan; Shi, Danfeng; Liu, Xuewei; Liu, Huanxiang; Yao, Xiaojun

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies uncovered a novel protective prion protein variant: V127 variant, which was reported intrinsically resistant to prion conversion and propagation. However, the structural basis of its protective effect is still unknown. To uncover the origin of the protective role of V127 variant, molecular dynamics simulations were performed to explore the influence of G127V mutation on two key processes of prion propagation: dimerization and fibril formation. The simulation results indicate V127 variant is unfavorable to form dimer by reducing the main-chain H-bond interactions. The simulations of formed fibrils consisting of β1 strand prove V127 variant will make the formed fibril become unstable and disorder. The weaker interaction energies between layers and reduced H-bonds number for V127 variant reveal this mutation is unfavorable to the formation of stable fibril. Consequently, we find V127 variant is not only unfavorable to the formation of dimer but also unfavorable to the formation of stable core and fibril, which can explain the mechanism on the protective role of V127 variant from the molecular level. Our findings can deepen the understanding of prion disease and may guide the design of peptide mimetics or small molecule to mimic the protective effect of V127 variant. PMID:26906032

  20. A nonconjugated bridge in dimer-sensitized solar cells retards charge recombination without decreasing charge injection efficiency.

    PubMed

    Sunahara, Kenji; Griffith, Matthew J; Uchiyama, Takayuki; Wagner, Pawel; Officer, David L; Wallace, Gordon G; Mozer, Attila J; Mori, Shogo

    2013-11-13

    Dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) employing a dimer porphyrin, which was synthesised with two porphyrin units connected without conjugation, have shown that both porphyrin components can contribute to photocurrent generation, that is, more than 50 % internal quantum efficiency. In addition, the open-circuit voltage (Voc) of the DSSCs was higher than that of DSSCs using monomer porphyrins. In this paper, we first optimized cell structure and fabrication conditions. We obtained more than 80% incident photon to current conversion efficiency from the dimer porphyrin sensitized DSSCs and higher Voc and energy conversion efficiency than monomer porphyrin sensitized solar cells. To examine the origin of the higher Voc, we measured electron lifetime in the DSSCs with various conditions, and found that the dimer system increased the electron lifetime by improving the steric blocking effect of the dye layer, whilst the lack of a conjugated linker prevents an increase in the attractive force between conjugated sensitizers and the acceptor species in the electrolyte. The results support a hypothesis; dispersion force is one of the factors influencing the electron lifetime in DSSCs. PMID:24188005

  1. Versatile SPR aptasensor for detection of lysozyme dimer in oligomeric and aggregated mixtures.

    PubMed

    Vasilescu, Alina; Purcarea, Cristina; Popa, Elena; Zamfir, Medana; Mihai, Iuliana; Litescu, Simona; David, Sorin; Gaspar, Szilveszter; Gheorghiu, Mihaela; Jean-Louis Marty

    2016-09-15

    A Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) sensor for the quantitation of lysozyme dimer in monomer-dimer mixtures, reaching a detection limit of 1.4nM dimer, has been developed. The sensor is based on an aptamer which, although developed for the monomeric form, binds also the dimeric form but with a strikingly different kinetics. The aptasensor was calibrated using a dimer obtained by cross-linking. Sensorgrams acquired with the aptasensor in monomer-dimer mixtures were analysed using Principal Components Analysis and Multiple Regression to establish correlations with the dimer content in the mixtures. The method allows the detection of 0.1-1% dimer in monomer solutions without any separation. As an application, the aptasensor was used to qualitatively observe the initial stages of aggregation of lysozyme solutions at 60°C and pH 2, through the variations in lysozyme dimer amounts. Several other methods were used to characterize the lysozyme dimer obtained by cross-linking and confirm the SPR results. This work highlights the versatility of the aptasensor, which can be used, by simply tuning the experimental conditions, for the sensitive detection of either the monomer or the dimer and for the observation of the aggregation process of lysozyme.

  2. An algebra of dimerization and its implications for G-protein coupled receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Woolf, Peter J; Linderman, Jennifer J

    2004-07-21

    Many species of receptors form dimers, but how can we use this information to make predictions about signal transduction? This problem is particularly difficult when receptors dimerize with many different species, leading to a combinatoric increase in the possible number of dimer pairs. As an example system, we focus on receptors in the G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) family. GPCRs have been shown to reversibly form dimers, but this dimerization does not directly affect signal transduction. Here we present a new theoretical framework called a dimerization algebra. This algebra provides a systematic and rational way to represent, manipulate, and in some cases simplify large and often complicated networks of dimerization interactions. To compliment this algebra, Monte Carlo simulations are used to predict dimerization's effect on receptor organization on the membrane, signal transduction, and internalization. These simulation results are directly comparable to various experimental measures such as fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), and as such provide a link between the dimerization algebra and experimental data. As an example, we show how the algebra and computational results can be used to predict the effects of dimerization on the dopamine D2 and somatastatin SSTR1 receptors. When these predictions were compared to experimental findings from the literature, good agreement was found, demonstrating the utility of our approach. Applications of this work to the development of a novel class of dimerization-modulating drugs are also discussed.

  3. Structure and NLO properties of halogen (F, Cl) substituted formic acid dimers.

    PubMed

    Umadevi, P; Senthilkumar, L; Gayathri, M; Kolandaivel, P

    2014-11-11

    In this work, using ab initio and density functional theory (DFT) methods halogen substituted formic acid (FA) dimer is studied. The dimer stability is due to the hydrogen bonds, either conventional (OH⋯O, OH⋯F, OH⋯Cl) or non-conventional (CH⋯O, CH⋯F, CH⋯Cl). Among all the dimers, trans-trans form is more stable than the trans-cis, and cis-cis form. Basis set extrapolated counterpoise corrected interaction energy results for the FA dimer are in excellent agreement with BSSE corrected MP2 interaction energy. Symmetry Adopted Perturbation Theory (SAPT) analysis reveals that the electrostatic effect plays a dominant role in stabilization among the dimers with maximum interaction energy. Chlorine substituted FA dimer has high hyperpolarizability, which makes them excellent candidate for nonlinear optical materials (NLO). The halogen substituted formic acid dimers have higher stability and polarizability value than the unsubstituted formic acid dimer. The hyperpolarizability values depend on the geometrical structures of halogenated formic acid dimers than the type of hydrogen bonds. The small excitation energy and HOMO-LUMO gap in the halogenated formic acid dimer has led to the strong nonlinear optical response. The depolarization ratio and Rayleigh scattering increases in formic acid dimer after the halogen atom substitution.

  4. Mechanisms for kinase-mediated dimerization of the epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chafen; Mi, Li-Zhi; Schürpf, Thomas; Walz, Thomas; Springer, Timothy A

    2012-11-01

    We study a mechanism by which dimerization of the EGF receptor (EGFR) cytoplasmic domain is transmitted to the ectodomain. Therapeutic and other small molecule antagonists to the kinase domain that stabilize its active conformation, but not those that stabilize an inactive conformation, stabilize ectodomain dimerization. Inhibitor-induced dimerization requires an asymmetric kinase domain interface associated with activation. EGF and kinase inhibitors stimulate formation of identical dimer interfaces in the EGFR transmembrane domain, as shown by disulfide cross-linking. Disulfide cross-linking at an interface in domain IV in the ectodomain was also stimulated similarly; however, EGF but not inhibitors stimulated cross-linking in domain II. Inhibitors similarly induced noncovalent dimerization in nearly full-length, detergent-solubilized EGFR as shown by gel filtration. EGFR ectodomain deletion resulted in spontaneous dimerization, whereas deletion of exons 2-7, in which extracellular domains III and IV are retained, did not. In EM, kinase inhibitor-induced dimers lacked any well defined orientation between the ectodomain monomers. Fab of the therapeutic antibody cetuximab to domain III confirmed a variable position and orientation of this domain in inhibitor-induced dimers but suggested that the C termini of domain IV of the two monomers were in close proximity, consistent with dimerization in the transmembrane domains. The results provide insights into the relative energetics of intracellular and extracellular dimerization in EGFR and have significance for physiologic dimerization through the asymmetric kinase interface, bidirectional signal transmission in EGFR, and mechanism of action of therapeutics.

  5. Conformational Heterogeneity of Bax Helix 9 Dimer for Apoptotic Pore Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Chenyi; Zhang, Zhi; Kale, Justin; Andrews, David W.; Lin, Jialing; Li, Jianing

    2016-07-01

    Helix α9 of Bax protein can dimerize in the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM) and lead to apoptotic pores. However, it remains unclear how different conformations of the dimer contribute to the pore formation on the molecular level. Thus we have investigated various conformational states of the α9 dimer in a MOM model — using computer simulations supplemented with site-specific mutagenesis and crosslinking of the α9 helices. Our data not only confirmed the critical membrane environment for the α9 stability and dimerization, but also revealed the distinct lipid-binding preference of the dimer in different conformational states. In our proposed pathway, a crucial iso-parallel dimer that mediates the conformational transition was discovered computationally and validated experimentally. The corroborating evidence from simulations and experiments suggests that, helix α9 assists Bax activation via the dimer heterogeneity and interactions with specific MOM lipids, which eventually facilitate proteolipidic pore formation in apoptosis regulation.

  6. Association of atoms into universal dimers using an oscillating magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Langmack, Christian; Smith, D Hudson; Braaten, Eric

    2015-03-13

    In a system of ultracold atoms near a Feshbach resonance, pairs of atoms can be associated into universal dimers by an oscillating magnetic field with a frequency near that determined by the dimer binding energy. We present a simple expression for the transition rate that takes into account many-body effects through a transition matrix element of the contact. In a thermal gas, the width of the peak in the transition rate as a function of the frequency is determined by the temperature. In a dilute Bose-Einstein condensate of atoms, the width is determined by the inelastic scattering rates of a dimer with zero-energy atoms. Near an atom-dimer resonance, there is a dramatic increase in the width from inelastic atom-dimer scattering and from atom-atom-dimer recombination. The recombination contribution provides a signature for universal tetramers that are Efimov states consisting of two atoms and a dimer.

  7. Conformational Heterogeneity of Bax Helix 9 Dimer for Apoptotic Pore Formation

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Chenyi; Zhang, Zhi; Kale, Justin; Andrews, David W.; Lin, Jialing; Li, Jianing

    2016-01-01

    Helix α9 of Bax protein can dimerize in the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM) and lead to apoptotic pores. However, it remains unclear how different conformations of the dimer contribute to the pore formation on the molecular level. Thus we have investigated various conformational states of the α9 dimer in a MOM model — using computer simulations supplemented with site-specific mutagenesis and crosslinking of the α9 helices. Our data not only confirmed the critical membrane environment for the α9 stability and dimerization, but also revealed the distinct lipid-binding preference of the dimer in different conformational states. In our proposed pathway, a crucial iso-parallel dimer that mediates the conformational transition was discovered computationally and validated experimentally. The corroborating evidence from simulations and experiments suggests that, helix α9 assists Bax activation via the dimer heterogeneity and interactions with specific MOM lipids, which eventually facilitate proteolipidic pore formation in apoptosis regulation. PMID:27381287

  8. Conformational Heterogeneity of Bax Helix 9 Dimer for Apoptotic Pore Formation.

    PubMed

    Liao, Chenyi; Zhang, Zhi; Kale, Justin; Andrews, David W; Lin, Jialing; Li, Jianing

    2016-01-01

    Helix α9 of Bax protein can dimerize in the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM) and lead to apoptotic pores. However, it remains unclear how different conformations of the dimer contribute to the pore formation on the molecular level. Thus we have investigated various conformational states of the α9 dimer in a MOM model - using computer simulations supplemented with site-specific mutagenesis and crosslinking of the α9 helices. Our data not only confirmed the critical membrane environment for the α9 stability and dimerization, but also revealed the distinct lipid-binding preference of the dimer in different conformational states. In our proposed pathway, a crucial iso-parallel dimer that mediates the conformational transition was discovered computationally and validated experimentally. The corroborating evidence from simulations and experiments suggests that, helix α9 assists Bax activation via the dimer heterogeneity and interactions with specific MOM lipids, which eventually facilitate proteolipidic pore formation in apoptosis regulation. PMID:27381287

  9. High density genome wide genotyping-by-sequencing and association identifies common and low frequency SNPs, and novel candidate genes influencing cow milk traits

    PubMed Central

    Ibeagha-Awemu, Eveline M.; Peters, Sunday O.; Akwanji, Kingsley A.; Imumorin, Ikhide G.; Zhao, Xin

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing technologies have increased the ability to detect sequence variations for complex trait improvement. A high throughput genome wide genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) method was used to generate 515,787 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), from which 76,355 SNPs with call rates >85% and minor allele frequency ≥1.5% were used in genome wide association study (GWAS) of 44 milk traits in 1,246 Canadian Holstein cows. GWAS was accomplished with a mixed linear model procedure implementing the additive and dominant models. A strong signal within the centromeric region of bovine chromosome 14 was associated with test day fat percentage. Several SNPs were associated with eicosapentaenoic acid, docosapentaenoic acid, arachidonic acid, CLA:9c11t and gamma linolenic acid. Most of the significant SNPs for 44 traits studied are novel and located in intergenic regions or introns of genes. Novel potential candidate genes for milk traits or mammary gland functions include ERCC6, TONSL, NPAS2, ACER3, ITGB4, GGT6, ACOX3, MECR, ADAM12, ACHE, LRRC14, FUK, NPRL3, EVL, SLCO3A1, PSMA4, FTO, ADCK5, PP1R16A and TEP1. Our study further demonstrates the utility of the GBS approach for identifying population-specific SNPs for use in improvement of complex dairy traits. PMID:27506634

  10. High density genome wide genotyping-by-sequencing and association identifies common and low frequency SNPs, and novel candidate genes influencing cow milk traits.

    PubMed

    Ibeagha-Awemu, Eveline M; Peters, Sunday O; Akwanji, Kingsley A; Imumorin, Ikhide G; Zhao, Xin

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing technologies have increased the ability to detect sequence variations for complex trait improvement. A high throughput genome wide genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) method was used to generate 515,787 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), from which 76,355 SNPs with call rates >85% and minor allele frequency ≥1.5% were used in genome wide association study (GWAS) of 44 milk traits in 1,246 Canadian Holstein cows. GWAS was accomplished with a mixed linear model procedure implementing the additive and dominant models. A strong signal within the centromeric region of bovine chromosome 14 was associated with test day fat percentage. Several SNPs were associated with eicosapentaenoic acid, docosapentaenoic acid, arachidonic acid, CLA:9c11t and gamma linolenic acid. Most of the significant SNPs for 44 traits studied are novel and located in intergenic regions or introns of genes. Novel potential candidate genes for milk traits or mammary gland functions include ERCC6, TONSL, NPAS2, ACER3, ITGB4, GGT6, ACOX3, MECR, ADAM12, ACHE, LRRC14, FUK, NPRL3, EVL, SLCO3A1, PSMA4, FTO, ADCK5, PP1R16A and TEP1. Our study further demonstrates the utility of the GBS approach for identifying population-specific SNPs for use in improvement of complex dairy traits. PMID:27506634

  11. Antioxidant Properties of Aminoethylcysteine Ketimine Decarboxylated Dimer: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Macone, Alberto; Fontana, Mario; Barba, Marco; Botta, Bruno; Nardini, Mirella; Ghirga, Francesca; Calcaterra, Andrea; Pecci, Laura; Matarese, Rosa Marina

    2011-01-01

    Aminoethylcysteine ketimine decarboxylated dimer is a natural sulfur-containing compound detected in human plasma and urine, in mammalian brain and in many common edible vegetables. Over the past decade many studies have been undertaken to identify its metabolic role. Attention has been focused on its antioxidant properties and on its reactivity against oxygen and nitrogen reactive species. These properties have been studied in different model systems starting from plasma lipoproteins to specific cellular lines. All these studies report that aminoethylcysteine ketimine decarboxylated dimer is able to interact both with reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (hydrogen peroxide, superoxide anion, hydroxyl radical, peroxynitrite and its derivatives). Its antioxidant activity is similar to that of Vitamin E while higher than other hydrophilic antioxidants, such as trolox and N-acetylcysteine. PMID:21686170

  12. Radiative and rovibrational collisional relaxation of sodium dimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayram, Burcin; Horton, Tim; McFarland, Jacob

    2016-05-01

    Radiative and rovibrational collisional relaxation of sodium dimer of the A1Σu+ (8,30) state have been measured by direct observation of the decay fluorescence. Sodium molecular vapor is created in a heatpipe oven at 600 K and excited using a 6-ns pulsed dye laser pumped by a Nd:YAG, operating at 532 nm. The preliminary lifetime measurement was done by directly acquiring lifetime data through boxcar averager from the stored oscilloscope trace of the fluorescence. Analysis of the exponential decay of the fluorescence allows us to obtain the radiative lifetime. By introducing the argon buffer gas and varying the pressure of the heatpipe, a collisional cross section between excited sodium dimer and ground state argon atom collision can be extracted using Stern-Volmer relation.

  13. Anisotropy Effects on the Plasmonic Response of Nanoparticle Dimers.

    PubMed

    Varas, Alejandro; García-González, Pablo; García-Vidal, F J; Rubio, Angel

    2015-05-21

    We present an ab initio study of the anisotropy and atomic relaxation effects on the optical properties of nanoparticle dimers. Special emphasis is placed on the hybridization process of localized surface plasmons, plasmon-mediated photoinduced currents, and electric-field enhancement in the dimer junction. We show that there is a critical range of separations between the clusters (0.1-0.5 nm) in which the detailed atomic structure in the junction and the relative orientation of the nanoparticles have to be considered to obtain quantitative predictions for realistic nanoplasmonic devices. It is worth noting that this regime is characterized by the emergence of electron tunneling as a response to the driven electromagnetic field. The orientation of the particles not only modifies the attainable electric field enhancement but can lead to qualitative changes in the optical absorption spectrum of the system. PMID:26263265

  14. UV resonance Raman analysis of trishomocubane and diamondoid dimers

    SciTech Connect

    Meinke, Reinhard Thomsen, Christian; Maultzsch, Janina; Richter, Robert; Merli, Andrea; Fokin, Andrey A.; Koso, Tetyana V.; Schreiner, Peter R.; Rodionov, Vladimir N.

    2014-01-21

    We present resonance Raman measurements of crystalline trishomocubane and diamantane dimers containing a C=C double bond. Raman spectra were recorded with excitation energies between 2.33 eV and 5.42 eV. The strongest enhancement is observed for the C=C stretch vibration and a bending mode involving the two carbon atoms of the C=C bond, corresponding to the B{sub 2g} wagging mode of ethylene. This is associated with the localization of the π-HOMO and LUMO and the elongation of the C=C bond length and a pyramidalization of the two sp{sup 2}-hybridized carbon atoms at the optical excitation. The observed Raman resonance energies of the trishomocubane and diamantane dimers are significantly lower than the HOMO-LUMO gaps of the corresponding unmodified diamondoids.

  15. Electronic signatures of dimerization in IrTe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Jixia; Wu, Weida; Oh, Yoon Seok; Cheong, S.-W.; Yang, J. J.

    2014-03-01

    Recently, the mysterious phase transition around Tc ~ 260 K in IrTe2 has been intensively studied. A structural supermodulation with q =1/5 was identified below Tc. A variety of microscopic mechanisms have been proposed to account for this transition, including charge-density wave due to Fermi surface nesting, Te p-orbital driven structure instability, anionic depolymerization, ionic dimerization, and so on. However, there has not been an unified picture on the nature of this transition. To address this issue, we have performed low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy (STM/STS) experiments on IrTe2 and IrTe2-xSex. Our STM data clearly shows a strong bias dependence in both topography and local density of states (STS) maps. High resolution spectroscopic data further confirms the stripe-like electronic states modulation, which provides insight to the ionic dimerization revealed by X-ray diffraction.

  16. Metal Complexes of meso-meso Linked Corrole Dimers.

    PubMed

    Ooi, Shota; Tanaka, Takayuki; Osuka, Atsuhiro

    2016-09-01

    Cobalt, gallium, silver, and copper complexes of 5,5'-linked corrole dimer 1 and 10,10'-linked corrole dimer 2 were synthesized by metalations with Co(OAc)2·4H2O, GaCl3, AgOAc, and Cu(OAc)2·H2O, respectively, in good yields. The structures of cobalt(III), gallium(III), and silver(III) complexes have been unambiguously revealed by X-ray diffraction analysis. Their optical and electrochemical properties have been studied, which revealed different electronic interactions between the two corrole units depending upon the positions of meso-meso linkage and axial-ligand coordination modes. PMID:27533780

  17. Microwave Spectrum of the Ethanol-Methanol Dimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finneran, Ian A.; Carroll, Brandon; Mead, Griffin; Blake, Geoffrey

    2016-06-01

    The hydrogen bond donor/acceptor competition in mixed alcohol clusters remains a fundamental question in physical chemistry. Previous theoretical work on the prototype ethanol-methanol dimer has been inconclusive in predicting the energetically preferred structure. Here, we report the microwave spectrum of the ethanol-methanol dimer between 8-18 GHz, using a chirped pulse Fourier transform microwave spectrometer. With the aid of ab initio calculations, 36 transitions have been fit and assigned to a t-ethanol-acceptor, methanol-donor structure in an argon-backed expansion. In a helium-backed expansion, a second excited conformer has been observed, and tentatively assigned to a g-ethanol-acceptor, methanol-donor structure. No ethanol-donor, methanol-acceptor structures have been found, suggesting such structures are energetically disfavored.

  18. Discontinuous phase transition in a dimer lattice gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickman, Ronald

    2012-05-01

    I study a dimer model on the square lattice with nearest neighbor exclusion as the only interaction. Detailed simulations using tomographic entropic sampling show that as the chemical potential is varied, there is a strongly discontinuous phase transition, at which the particle density jumps by about 18% of its maximum value, 1/4. The transition is accompanied by the onset of orientational order, to an arrangement corresponding to the {1/2, 0, 1/2} structure identified by Phares et al. [Physica B 409, 1096 (2011)] in a dimer model with finite repulsion at fixed density. Using finite-size scaling and Binder's cumulant, the expected scaling behavior at a discontinuous transition is verified in detail. The discontinuous transition can be understood qualitatively given that the model possesses eight equivalent maximum-density configurations, so that its coarse-grained description corresponds to that of the q = 8 Potts model.

  19. New salts of amino acids with dimeric cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghazaryan, V. V.; Fleck, M.; Petrosyan, A. M.

    2010-10-01

    Among salts of amino acids there are compounds with the composition 2A..HX, which consist of dimeric A...A+ cations with short symmetric or asymmetric hydrogen bonds between zwitter-ionic and protonated moieties. These species are materials liable to undergo phase transitions or possess interesting nonlinear optical properties. Here, we report the preparation of 20 new salts with dimeric cations from aqueous solutions, including compounds of glycine, betaine, β- alanine, L-alanine, L-phenylalanine, L-threonine, L-valine, L-leucine and L-proline, with BF4-, ClO4-, Cl-, Br-, HSeO3-, and HC2O4-; as anions. The prepared salts are characterized by IR and Raman spectroscopy. Some of them are grown in form of good quality single crystals, which allowed the determination of their crystal structure.

  20. Bose and Mott glass phases in dimerized quantum antiferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, S. J.; Krüger, F.

    2015-11-01

    We examine the effects of disorder on dimerized quantum antiferromagnets in a magnetic field, using the mapping to a lattice gas of hard-core bosons with finite-range interactions. Combining a strong-coupling expansion, the replica method, and a one-loop renormalization-group analysis, we investigate the nature of the glass phases formed. We find that away from the tips of the Mott lobes, the transition is from a Mott insulator to a compressible Bose glass, however the compressibility at the tips is strongly suppressed. We identify this finding with the presence of a rare Mott glass phase and demonstrate that the inclusion of replica symmetry breaking is vital to correctly describe the glassy phases. This result suggests that the formation of Bose and Mott glass phases is not simply a weak localization phenomenon but is indicative of much richer physics. We discuss our results in the context of both ultracold atomic gases and spin-dimer materials.