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Sample records for dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine dmpc monitored

  1. Kinetics of the barotropic ripple (P beta')/lamellar liquid crystal (L alpha) phase transition in fully hydrated dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) monitored by time-resolved x-ray diffraction.

    PubMed

    Caffrey, M; Hogan, J; Mencke, A

    1991-08-01

    We present here the first study of the use of a pressure-jump to induce the ripple (P beta')/lamellar liquid crystal (L alpha) phase transition in fully hydrated 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC). The transition was monitored by using time-resolved x-ray diffraction (TRXRD). Applying a pressure-jump from atmospheric to 11.3 MPa (1640 psig, 111.6 atm) in 2.5 s induces the L alpha to P beta' phase transition which takes place in two stages. The lamellar repeat spacing initially increases from a value of 66.0 +/- 0.1 A (n = 4) to a maximum value of 70.3 +/- 0.8 A (n = 4) after 10 s and after a further 100-150 s decreases slightly to 68.5 +/- 0.3 A (n = 4). The reverse transition takes place following a pressure jump in 5.5 s from 11.3 MPa to atmospheric pressure. Again, the transition occurs in two stages with the repeat spacing steadily decreasing from an initial value of 68.5 +/- 0.3 A (n = 3) to a minimum value of 66.6 +/- 0.3 A (n = 3) after 50 s and then increasing by approximately 0.5 A over a period of 100 s. The transition temperature increases linearly with pressure up to 14.1 MPa in accordance with the Clapeyron relation, giving a dT/dP value of 0.285 degrees C/MPa (28.5 degrees C/kbar) and an associated volume change of 40 microliters/g. A dynamic compressibility of 0.13 +/- 0.01 A/MPa has been determined for the L alpha phase. This value is compared with the equilibrium compressibilities of bilayer and nonbilayer phases reported in the literature. The results suggest testable mechanisms for the pressure-induced transition involving changes in periodicity, phase hydration, chain order, and orientation. A more complete understanding of the transition mechanism will require improvement in detector spatial resolution and sensitivity, and data on the pressure sensitivity of phase hydration.

  2. Kinetics of the barotropic ripple (P beta')/lamellar liquid crystal (L alpha) phase transition in fully hydrated dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) monitored by time-resolved x-ray diffraction.

    PubMed Central

    Caffrey, M; Hogan, J; Mencke, A

    1991-01-01

    We present here the first study of the use of a pressure-jump to induce the ripple (P beta')/lamellar liquid crystal (L alpha) phase transition in fully hydrated 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC). The transition was monitored by using time-resolved x-ray diffraction (TRXRD). Applying a pressure-jump from atmospheric to 11.3 MPa (1640 psig, 111.6 atm) in 2.5 s induces the L alpha to P beta' phase transition which takes place in two stages. The lamellar repeat spacing initially increases from a value of 66.0 +/- 0.1 A (n = 4) to a maximum value of 70.3 +/- 0.8 A (n = 4) after 10 s and after a further 100-150 s decreases slightly to 68.5 +/- 0.3 A (n = 4). The reverse transition takes place following a pressure jump in 5.5 s from 11.3 MPa to atmospheric pressure. Again, the transition occurs in two stages with the repeat spacing steadily decreasing from an initial value of 68.5 +/- 0.3 A (n = 3) to a minimum value of 66.6 +/- 0.3 A (n = 3) after 50 s and then increasing by approximately 0.5 A over a period of 100 s. The transition temperature increases linearly with pressure up to 14.1 MPa in accordance with the Clapeyron relation, giving a dT/dP value of 0.285 degrees C/MPa (28.5 degrees C/kbar) and an associated volume change of 40 microliters/g. A dynamic compressibility of 0.13 +/- 0.01 A/MPa has been determined for the L alpha phase. This value is compared with the equilibrium compressibilities of bilayer and nonbilayer phases reported in the literature. The results suggest testable mechanisms for the pressure-induced transition involving changes in periodicity, phase hydration, chain order, and orientation. A more complete understanding of the transition mechanism will require improvement in detector spatial resolution and sensitivity, and data on the pressure sensitivity of phase hydration. PMID:1912281

  3. Interfacial interactions of ceramide with dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine: impact of the N-acyl chain.

    PubMed

    Holopainen, J M; Brockman, H L; Brown, R E; Kinnunen, P K

    2001-02-01

    The mixing behavior of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) with either N-palmitoyl-sphingosine (C16:0-ceramide) or N-nervonoyl-sphingosine (C24:1-ceramide) was examined using monomolecular films. While DMPC forms highly elastic liquid-expanded monolayers, both neat C16:0-ceramide and C24:1-ceramide yield stable solid condensed monomolecular films with small areas and low interfacial elasticity. Compression isotherms of mixed C16:0-ceramide/DMPC films exhibit an apparent condensation upon increasing X(cer16:0) at all surface pressures. The average area isobars, coupled with the lack of a liquid-expanded to condensed phase transition as X(cer16:0) is increased, are indicative of immiscibility of the lipids at all surface pressures. In contrast, isobars for C24:1-ceramide/DMPC mixtures show surface pressure-dependent apparent condensation or expansion and surface pressure-area isotherms show a composition and surface pressure-dependent phase transition. This suggests miscibility, albeit non-ideal, of C24:1-ceramide and DMPC in both liquid and condensed surface phases. The above could be verified by fluorescence microscopy of the monolayers and measurements of surface potential, which revealed distinctly different domain morphologies and surface potential values for the DMPC/C16:0- and DMPC/C24:1-ceramide monolayers. Taken together, whereas C16:0-ceramide and DMPC form immiscible pseudo-compounds, C24:1-ceramide and DMPC are partially miscible in both the liquid-expanded and condensed phases, and a composition and lateral pressure-dependent two-phase region is evident between the liquid-expanded and condensed regimes. Our results provide novel understanding of the regulation of membrane properties by ceramides and raise the possibility that ceramides with different acyl groups could serve very different functions in cells, relating to their different physicochemical properties.

  4. Interfacial interactions of ceramide with dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine: impact of the N-acyl chain.

    PubMed Central

    Holopainen, J M; Brockman, H L; Brown, R E; Kinnunen, P K

    2001-01-01

    The mixing behavior of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) with either N-palmitoyl-sphingosine (C16:0-ceramide) or N-nervonoyl-sphingosine (C24:1-ceramide) was examined using monomolecular films. While DMPC forms highly elastic liquid-expanded monolayers, both neat C16:0-ceramide and C24:1-ceramide yield stable solid condensed monomolecular films with small areas and low interfacial elasticity. Compression isotherms of mixed C16:0-ceramide/DMPC films exhibit an apparent condensation upon increasing X(cer16:0) at all surface pressures. The average area isobars, coupled with the lack of a liquid-expanded to condensed phase transition as X(cer16:0) is increased, are indicative of immiscibility of the lipids at all surface pressures. In contrast, isobars for C24:1-ceramide/DMPC mixtures show surface pressure-dependent apparent condensation or expansion and surface pressure-area isotherms show a composition and surface pressure-dependent phase transition. This suggests miscibility, albeit non-ideal, of C24:1-ceramide and DMPC in both liquid and condensed surface phases. The above could be verified by fluorescence microscopy of the monolayers and measurements of surface potential, which revealed distinctly different domain morphologies and surface potential values for the DMPC/C16:0- and DMPC/C24:1-ceramide monolayers. Taken together, whereas C16:0-ceramide and DMPC form immiscible pseudo-compounds, C24:1-ceramide and DMPC are partially miscible in both the liquid-expanded and condensed phases, and a composition and lateral pressure-dependent two-phase region is evident between the liquid-expanded and condensed regimes. Our results provide novel understanding of the regulation of membrane properties by ceramides and raise the possibility that ceramides with different acyl groups could serve very different functions in cells, relating to their different physicochemical properties. PMID:11159444

  5. Investigation of the structure of unilamellar dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine vesicles in aqueous sucrose solutions by small-angle neutron and X-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Kiselev, M. A. Zemlyanaya, E. V.; Zhabitskaya, E. I.; Aksenov, V. L.

    2015-01-15

    The structure of a polydispersed population of unilamellar dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) vesicles in sucrose solutions has been investigated by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Calculations within the model of separated form factors (SFF) show that the structure of the vesicle system depends strongly on the sucrose concentration.

  6. Pretransitional effects in dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine vesicle membranes: optical dynamometry study.

    PubMed Central

    Dimova, R; Pouligny, B; Dietrich, C

    2000-01-01

    We used micron-sized latex spheres to probe the phase state and the viscoelastic properties of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) bilayers as a function of temperature. One or two particles were manipulated and stuck to a DMPC giant vesicle by means of an optical trap. Above the fluid-gel main transition temperature, T(m) congruent with 23.4 degrees C, the particles could move on the surface of the vesicle, spontaneously (Brownian motion) or driven by an external force, either gravity or the laser beam's radiation pressure. From the analysis of the particle motions, we deduced the values of the membrane hydrodynamic shear viscosity, eta(s), and found that it would increase considerably near T(m). Below T(m), the long-distance motion of the particles was blocked. We performed experiments with two particles stuck on the membrane. By optical dynamometry, we measured the elastic resistance of the membrane to a variation in the interparticle distance and found that it would decrease considerably (down to zero) when the temperature was increased to T(m). We propose an interpretation relating the elastic response to the membrane curvature modulus, k(C). In this scheme, the two-bead dynamometry experiments provide a direct measurement of k(C) in the P'(beta) phase of lipid bilayers. PMID:10866960

  7. X-ray structure, thermodynamics, elastic properties and MD simulations of cardiolipin/dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine mixed membranes

    PubMed Central

    Boscia, Alexander L.; Treece, Bradley W.; Mohammadyani, Dariush; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith; Braun, Anthony R.; Wassenaar, Tsjerk A.; Klösgen, Beate; Tristram-Nagle, Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    Cardiolipins (CLs) are important biologically for their unique role in biomembranes that couple phosphorylation and electron transport like bacterial plasma membranes, chromatophores, chloroplasts and mitochondria. CLs are often tightly coupled to proteins involved in oxidative phosphorylation. The first step in understanding the interaction of CL with proteins is to obtain the pure CL structure, and the structure of mixtures of CL with other lipids. In this work we use a variety of techniques to characterize the fluid phase structure, material properties and thermodynamics of mixtures of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) with tetramyristoylcardiolipin (TMCL), both with 14-carbon chains, at several mole percentages. X-ray diffuse scattering was used to determine structure, including bilayer thickness and area/lipid, the bending modulus, KC, and Sxray, a measure of chain orientational order. Our results reveal that TMCL thickens DMPC bilayers at all mole percentages, with a total increase of ~6 Å in pure TMCL, and increases AL from 64 Å2 (DMPC at 35°C) to 109 Å2 (TMCL at 50°C). KC increases by ~50%, indicating that TMCL stiffens DMPC membranes. TMCL also orders DMPC chains by a factor of ~2 for pure TMCL. Coarse grain molecular dynamics simulations confirm the experimental thickening of 2 Å for 20 mol% TMCL and locate the TMCL headgroups near the glycerol-carbonyl region of DMPC; i.e., they are sequestered below the DMPC phosphocholine headgroup. Our results suggest that TMCL plays a role similar to cholesterol in that it thickens and stiffens DMPC membranes, orders chains, and is positioned under the umbrella of the PC headgroup. CL may be necessary for hydrophobic matching to inner mitochondrial membrane proteins. Differential scanning calorimetry, Sxray and CGMD simulations all suggest that TMCL does not form domains within the DMPC bilayers. We also determined the gel phase structure of TMCL, which surprisingly displays diffuse X-ray scattering, like a

  8. Temperature change of the ripple structure in fully hydrated dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine/cholesterol multibilayers.

    PubMed

    Matuoka, S; Kato, S; Hatta, I

    1994-08-01

    The ripple structure was studied as a function of temperature in fully hydrated dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC)/cholesterol multibilayers using synchrotron x-ray small-angle diffraction and freeze-fracture electron microscopy. In the presence of cholesterol, the ripple structure appears below the pretransition temperature of pure DMPC multibilayers. In this temperature range the ripple periodicity is relatively large (25-30 nm) and rapidly decreases with increasing temperature. In this region, defined as region I, we observed coexistence of the P beta' phase and the L beta' phase. The large ripple periodicity is caused by the formation of the P beta' phase region in which cholesterol is concentrated and the L beta' phase region from which cholesterol is excluded. An increase in ripple periodicity also takes place in the narrow temperature range just below the main transition temperature. We define this temperature region as region III, where the ripple periodicity increases dramatically toward the main transition temperature. In region II, between regions I and III, the ripple periodicity decreases gradually with temperature. This behavior is quite similar to that of pure DMPC. Temperature-versus-ripple periodicity curves are parallel among pure DMPC and DMPCs with various cholesterol contents. We explain this behavior in terms of a model proposed by other workers.

  9. Electrostatic effects influence the formation of two-dimensional crystals of bacteriorhodopsin reconstituted into dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine membranes.

    PubMed

    Negishi, Lumi; Mitaku, Shigeki

    2011-07-01

    We examined how electrostatic shielding affects the formation of two-dimensional (2D) crystals of bacteriorhodopsin (bR) in reconstituted dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) membranes by varying the sodium chloride (NaCl) concentration. The 2D crystalline array of bR formed in the gel phase of DMPC membranes was characterized by a symmetric bipolar pattern in visible circular dichroic spectra collected around 560 nm. The amplitude of the bipolar pattern was systematically enhanced by increasing the NaCl concentration. A strong correlation between the amplitude of the bipolar pattern and the Debye constant of small ions indicated that a weakening of electrostatic repulsion by the shielding effect of small ions enhances the order of 2D bR crystals in the gel phase of DMPC membranes. Considering the 3D distribution of charged residues, we propose a model of interaction balance in reconstituted bR membranes in which effective attraction between bR molecules occurs as a result of the phase separation of the DMPC membrane in the gel phase overcoming electrostatic repulsion between bR molecules.

  10. Effect of α-Tocopherol on the Microscopic Dynamics of Dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine Membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, V. K.; Mamontov, E.; Tyagi, M.; Urban, V. S.

    2015-12-16

    Vitamin E behaves as an antioxidant and is well known for its protective properties of the lipid membrane. The most biologically active form of vitamin E in the human organism is α-tocopherol (aToc). Recently (Marquardt, D.; et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2014, 136, 203₋210) it has been shown that aToc resides near the center of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) bilayer, which is in stark contrast with other PC membranes, where aToc is located near the lipid₋water interface. Here we report an unusual effect of this exceptional location of aToc on the dynamical behavior of DMPC membrane probed by incoherent elastic and quasielastic neutron scattering. For pure DMPC vesicles, elastic scan data show two step-like drops in the elastic intensity at 288 and 297 K, which correspond to the pre- and main phase transitions, respectively. However, inclusion of aToc into DMPC membrane inhibits the step-like elastic intensity drops, indicating a significant impact of aToc on the phase behavior of the membrane. This observation is supported by our differential scanning calorimetry data, which shows that inclusion of aToc leads to a significant broadening of the main phase transition peak, whereas the peak corresponding to the pretransition disappears. We have performed quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) measurements on DMPC vesicles with various concentrations of aToc at 280, 293, and 310 K. We have found that aToc affects both the lateral diffusion and the internal motions of the lipid molecules. Below the main phase transition temperature inclusion of aToc accelerates both the lateral and the internal lipid motions. On the other hand, above the main phase transition temperature the addition of aToc restricts only the internal motion, without a significant influence on the lateral motion. To conclude, our results support the finding that the location of aToc in DMPC membrane is deep within the bilayer.

  11. Effect of α-Tocopherol on the Microscopic Dynamics of Dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine Membrane.

    PubMed

    Sharma, V K; Mamontov, E; Tyagi, M; Urban, V S

    2016-01-14

    Vitamin E behaves as an antioxidant and is well known for its protective properties of the lipid membrane. The most biologically active form of vitamin E in the human organism is α-tocopherol (aToc). Very recently (Marquardt, D.; et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2014, 136, 203-210) it has been shown that aToc resides near the center of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) bilayer, which is in stark contrast with other PC membranes, where aToc is located near the lipid-water interface. Here we report an unusual effect of this exceptional location of aToc on the dynamical behavior of DMPC membrane probed by incoherent elastic and quasielastic neutron scattering. For pure DMPC vesicles, elastic scan data show two step-like drops in the elastic intensity at 288 and 297 K, which correspond to the pre- and main phase transitions, respectively. However, inclusion of aToc into DMPC membrane inhibits the step-like elastic intensity drops, indicating a significant impact of aToc on the phase behavior of the membrane. This observation is supported by our differential scanning calorimetry data, which shows that inclusion of aToc leads to a significant broadening of the main phase transition peak, whereas the peak corresponding to the pretransition disappears. We have performed quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) measurements on DMPC vesicles with various concentrations of aToc at 280, 293, and 310 K. We have found that aToc affects both the lateral diffusion and the internal motions of the lipid molecules. Below the main phase transition temperature inclusion of aToc accelerates both the lateral and the internal lipid motions. On the other hand, above the main phase transition temperature the addition of aToc restricts only the internal motion, without a significant influence on the lateral motion. Our results support the finding that the location of aToc in DMPC membrane is deep within the bilayer.

  12. Interaction of melittin with mixed phospholipid membranes composed of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine and dimyristoylphosphatidylserine studied by deuterium NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Dempsey, C.; Bitbol, M.; Watts, A. )

    1989-08-08

    The interaction of bee venom melittin with mixed phospholipid bilayers composed of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine deuterated in the {alpha}- and {beta}-methylenes of the choline head group (DMPC-d{sub 4}) and dimyristoylphosphatidylserine deuterated in the {alpha}-methylene and {beta}-CH positions of the serine head group (DMPS-d{sub 3}) was studied in ternary mixtures by using deuterium NMR spectroscopy. The changes in the deuterium quadrupole splittings of the head-group deuteriomethylenes of DMPC-d{sub 4} induced by DMPS in binary mixtures were systematically reversed by increasing concentrations of melittin, so that at a melittin concentration of 4 mol % relative to total lipid the deuterium NMR spectrum from DMPC-d{sub 4} in the ternary mixture was similar to the spectrum from pure DMPC-d{sub 4} bilayers. The absence of deuterium NMR signals arising from melittin-bound DMPS in ternary mixtures containing DMPS-d{sub 3} indicates that the reversal by melittin of the effects of DMPS on the quadrupole splittings of DMPC-d{sub 4} results from the response of the choline head group to the net surface charge rather than from phase separation of melittin-DMPS complexes. The similarity in the effects of the two cationic but otherwise dissimilar peptides indicates that the DMPS head group responds to the surface charge resulting from the presence in the bilayer of charged amphiphiles, in a manner analogous to the response of the choline head group of phosphatidylcholine to the bilayer surface charge. The presence of DMPS greatly stabilized DMPC bilayers with respect to melittin-induced micellization, indicating that the latter effect of melittin may not be important for the hemolytic activity of the peptide.

  13. Phase diagram of mixed monolayers of stearic acid and dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine. Effect of the acid ionization.

    PubMed

    Mercado, Franco Vega; Maggio, Bruno; Wilke, Natalia

    2011-07-01

    The aim of this work is to study the phase diagram of mixed monolayers composed of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and stearic acid (SA) at different ionic strength and bulk pH of the aqueous subphase. In this way, the effect of ionization of SA on the interaction and thus on phase separation with the DMPC matrix can be analyzed. To this purpose, we first determined the ionization state of pure SA monolayers as a function of the bulk subphase pH. The SA monolayers are nearly fully ionized at pH 10 and essentially neutral at pH 4 and the mixture of DMPC and SA was studied at those two pHs. We found that the DMPC-enriched phase admits more SA if the SA monolayer is in a liquid-expanded state, which is highly related to the acid ionization state, and thus to the bulk pH and ionic strength. At pH 4 the molecules hardly mix while at pH 10 the mixed monolayer with DMPC can admit between 30 and 100% of SA (depending on the lateral pressure) before phase separation is established. The addition of calcium ions to the subphase has a condensing effect on SA monolayers at all pHs and the solubility of SA in the DMPC matrix does not depend on the bulk pH in these conditions. The observed phase diagrams are independent on the manner in which the state of the mixed film is reached and may thus be considered states of apparent equilibrium. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect of tetracaine on DMPC and DMPC+cholesterol biomembrane models: liposomes and monolayers.

    PubMed

    Serro, A P; Galante, R; Kozica, A; Paradiso, P; da Silva, A M P S Gonçalves; Luzyanin, K V; Fernandes, A C; Saramago, B

    2014-04-01

    Different types of lipid bilayers/monolayers have been used to simulate the cellular membranes in the investigation of the interactions between drugs and cells. However, to our knowledge, very few studies focused on the influence of the chosen membrane model upon the obtained results. The main objective of this work is to understand how do the nature and immobilization state of the biomembrane models influence the action of the local anaesthetic tetracaine (TTC) upon the lipid membranes. The interaction of TTC with different biomembrane models of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) with and without cholesterol (CHOL) was investigated through several techniques. A quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) was used to study the effect on immobilized liposomes, while phosphorus nuclear magnetic resonance ((31)P-NMR) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) were applied to liposomes in suspension. The effect of TTC on Langmuir monolayers of lipids was also investigated through surface pressure-area measurements at the air-water interface. The general conclusion was that TTC has a fluidizing effect on the lipid membranes and, above certain concentrations, induces membrane swelling or even solubilization. However, different models led to variable responses to the TTC action. The intensity of the disordering effect caused by TTC increased in the following order: supported liposomes

  15. Formation of Cholesterol Bilayer Domains Precedes Formation of Cholesterol Crystals in Cholesterol/Dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine Membranes: EPR and DSC Studies

    PubMed Central

    Mainali, Laxman; Raguz, Marija; Subczynski, Witold K.

    2013-01-01

    Saturation-recovery EPR along with DSC were used to determine the cholesterol content at which pure cholesterol bilayer domains (CBDs) and cholesterol crystals begin to form in dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) membranes. To preserve compositional homogeneity throughout the membrane suspension, lipid multilamellar dispersions were prepared using a rapid solvent exchange method. The cholesterol content increased from 0 to 75 mol%. With spin-labeled cholesterol analogs it was shown that the CBDs begin to form at ~50 mol% cholesterol. It was confirmed by DSC that the cholesterol solubility threshold for DMPC membranes is detected at ~66 mol% cholesterol. At levels above this cholesterol content, monohydrate cholesterol crystals start to form. The major finding is that formation of CBDs precedes formation of cholesterol crystals. The region of the phase diagram for cholesterol contents between 50 and 66 mol% is described as a structured one-phase region in which CBDs have to be supported by the surrounding DMPC bilayer saturated with cholesterol. Thus, the phase boundary located at 66 mol% cholesterol separates the structured one-phase region (liquid-ordered phase of DMPC with CBDs) from the two-phase region where the structured liquid-ordered phase of DMPC coexists with cholesterol crystals. It is likely that CBDs are precursors of monohydrate cholesterol crystals. PMID:23834375

  16. Comparative effects of cholesterol and cholesterol sulfate on hydration and ordering of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Faure, C; Tranchant, J F; Dufourc, E J

    1996-01-01

    The comparative effect of cholesterol (CH) versus cholesterol sulfate (CS) on dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) membranes has been investigated by optical microscopy, freeze-fracture electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and solid state 2H and 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The sulfate analogue extends the lamellar phase domain toward high water contents, and substitution of 30 mol % CH by CS in DMPC lamellae induces the trapping of 30 wt % additional water. The greater swelling of the CS-containing systems is evidenced by determination of lamellar repeat distances at maximal hydration: 147 +/- 4 A and 64 +/- 2 A in the presence of CS and CH, respectively. 2H-NMR of heavy water demonstrates that CS binds approximately 12 more water molecules at the interface than CH whereas NMR of deuterium-labeled DMPC chains reveals that 30 mol % CS orders the membrane as 15 mol % CH at high temperature and disorders much more than CH at low temperatures. The various effects of CS versus CH are discussed by taking into account attractive Van der Waals forces and repulsive steric/electrostatic interactions of the negatively charged sulfate group. Images FIGURE 2 PMID:8785293

  17. Influence of phytosphingosine-type ceramides on the structure of DMPC membrane.

    PubMed

    Zbytovská, J; Kiselev, M A; Funari, S S; Garamus, V M; Wartewig, S; Neubert, R

    2005-12-01

    The present paper describes the influence of the ceramides with phytosphingosine base, N-stearoylphytosphingosine (Cer[NP]) and alpha-hydroxy-N-stearoylphytosphingosine (Cer[AP]), on the structure and properties of multilamellar (MLVs) and unilamellar vesicles (ULVs) of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC). The lamellar repeat distance, D, has been measured at various temperatures using small angle X-ray diffraction. The incorporation of ceramides into the DMPC membrane causes larger D compared to pure DMPC membrane. For both ceramide types, at 32 degrees C, there is a linear relationship between the D value and the ceramide concentration. However, there is no such dependence at 13 or 60 degrees C. Unlike Cer[AP], Cer[NP] induces a new phase with a repeat distance of 38.5A. The membrane thickness and the vesicle radius of ULVs in water and in sucrose solution were calculated from small angle neutron scattering curves. Phytosphingosine ceramides increase both the membrane thickness and the radius in comparison to pure DMPC ULVs. The stability of ULVs in time was studied by dynamic light scattering. Both ceramides induce an aggregation of the ULVs into micrometer sized non-multilamellar structures in pure water. Presence of sucrose in the environment averts the vesicle aggregation.

  18. Miscibility gap in fluid dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine:cholesterol as "seen" by x rays.

    PubMed

    Richter, F; Rapp, G; Finegold, L

    2001-05-01

    A binary mixture of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and cholesterol displays a fluid miscibility gap under excess water conditions. Effects due to the imperfect miscibility of the two amphiphiles are studied near to and far from thermodynamic equilibrium by time-resolved small angle x-ray diffraction. The experiment discloses that this mixture phase separates when leaving the miscibility gap upon heating, a transition that is not included in current phase diagrams. This transition appears to be reversible and shows a temperature hysteresis of only a few degrees. We suggest a model in which the transition is driven with increasing temperature by a movement of the cholesterol away from the hydrophilic-hydrophobic interface toward the hydrophobic core of the bilayer.

  19. Effect of α-Tocopherol on the Microscopic Dynamics of Dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine Membrane

    DOE PAGES

    Sharma, V. K.; Mamontov, E.; Tyagi, M.; ...

    2015-12-16

    Vitamin E behaves as an antioxidant and is well known for its protective properties of the lipid membrane. The most biologically active form of vitamin E in the human organism is α-tocopherol (aToc). Recently (Marquardt, D.; et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2014, 136, 203₋210) it has been shown that aToc resides near the center of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) bilayer, which is in stark contrast with other PC membranes, where aToc is located near the lipid₋water interface. Here we report an unusual effect of this exceptional location of aToc on the dynamical behavior of DMPC membrane probed by incoherent elastic andmore » quasielastic neutron scattering. For pure DMPC vesicles, elastic scan data show two step-like drops in the elastic intensity at 288 and 297 K, which correspond to the pre- and main phase transitions, respectively. However, inclusion of aToc into DMPC membrane inhibits the step-like elastic intensity drops, indicating a significant impact of aToc on the phase behavior of the membrane. This observation is supported by our differential scanning calorimetry data, which shows that inclusion of aToc leads to a significant broadening of the main phase transition peak, whereas the peak corresponding to the pretransition disappears. We have performed quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) measurements on DMPC vesicles with various concentrations of aToc at 280, 293, and 310 K. We have found that aToc affects both the lateral diffusion and the internal motions of the lipid molecules. Below the main phase transition temperature inclusion of aToc accelerates both the lateral and the internal lipid motions. On the other hand, above the main phase transition temperature the addition of aToc restricts only the internal motion, without a significant influence on the lateral motion. To conclude, our results support the finding that the location of aToc in DMPC membrane is deep within the bilayer.« less

  20. Cholesterol orientation and tilt modulus in DMPC bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Khelashvili, George; Pabst, Georg; Harries, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    We performed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of hydrated bilayers containing mixtures of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and Cholesterol at various ratios, to study the effect of cholesterol concentration on its orientation, and to characterize the link between cholesterol tilt and overall phospholipid membrane organization. The simulations show a substantial probability for cholesterol molecules to transiently orient perpendicular to the bilayer normal, and suggest that cholesterol tilt may be an important factor for inducing membrane ordering. In particular, we find that as cholesterol concentration increases (1%–40% cholesterol) the average cholesterol orientation changes in a manner strongly (anti)correlated with the variation in membrane thickness. Furthermore, cholesterol orientation is found to be determined by the aligning force exerted by other cholesterol molecules. To quantify this aligning field, we analyzed cholesterol orientation using, to our knowledge, the first estimates of the cholesterol tilt modulus χ from MD simulations. Our calculations suggest that the aligning field that determines χ is indeed strongly linked to sterol composition. This empirical parameter (χ) should therefore become a useful quantitative measure to describe cholesterol interaction with other lipids in bilayers, particularly in various coarse-grained force fields. PMID:20518573

  1. Arbutin blocks defects in the ripple phase of DMPC bilayers by changing carbonyl organization.

    PubMed

    Frías, M A; Nicastro, A; Casado, N M C; Gennaro, A M; Díaz, S B; Disalvo, E A

    2007-05-01

    The effect of arbutin, a 4-hydroxyphenyl-beta-glucopyranoside, on dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) bilayers was studied by turbidimetry, EPR and FTIR spectroscopies. The disruption of DMPC multilamellar vesicles (MLV's) with monomyristoylphosphatidylcholine (lysoPC), a product of hydrolysis of phospholipase A(2) (PLA(2)), is more efficient at 18 degrees C, where DMPC MLV's are known to be in the ripple P(beta') phase, than at 10 degrees C (L(beta') flat gel phase). Disruption at 18 degrees C was inhibited by increasing concentrations of arbutin in the solution. This inhibition was correlated with the disappearance of the ripple phase in MLV's when arbutin is present. Shifts in FTIR carbonyl bands caused by arbutin or by temperature changes allow us to propose a model. It is interpreted that the changes in the water-hydrocarbon interface caused by arbutin, forcing a reaccommodation of the carbonyl groups, eliminate the topological defects in the lattice due to mismatches among regions with different area per lipid where lysoPC can insert.

  2. New approach to study fast and slow motions in lipid bilayers: application to dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine-cholesterol interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Le Guernevé, C; Auger, M

    1995-01-01

    Natural abundance 13C solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to investigate the effect of the incorporation of cholesterol on the dynamics of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) bilayers in the liquid-crystalline phase. In particular, the use of a combination of the cross-polarization and magic angle spinning techniques allows one to obtain very high resolution spectra from which can be distinguished several resonances attributed to the polar head group, the glycerol backbone, and the acyl chains of the lipid molecule. To examine both the fast and slow motions of the lipid bilayers, 1H spin-lattice relaxation times as well as proton and carbon spin-lattice relaxation times in the rotating frame were measured for each resolved resonance of DMPC. The use of the newly developed ramped-amplitude cross-polarization technique results in a significant increase in the stability of the cross-polarization conditions, especially for molecular groups undergoing rapid motions. The combination of T1 and T1 rho measurements indicates that the presence of cholesterol significantly decreases the rate and/or amplitude of both the high and low frequency motions in the DMPC bilayers. This effect is particularly important for the lipid acyl chains and the glycerol backbone region. PMID:7612837

  3. The effect of furazolidone on the physico-chemical properties of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine bilayers: Relevance to anti-leishmanial therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, Victor Hugo Giendruczak; Rodrigues, Marisa Raquel; Mascarenhas, Layoan Dantas; de Azambuja, Carla Roberta Lopes; Londoño, Julian Londoño; de Lima, Vânia Rodrigues

    2014-02-01

    In this study, the influence of furazolidone, an anti-leishmanial drug, on dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) liposome hydration degree, mobility and thermodynamics was investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). FTIR results showed that furazolidone was responsible for an increase in the hydrogen bound number and mobility of the lipid phosphate group. Furazolidone also affected the lipid choline group by increasing its motional freedom, as shown by FTIR and 1H NMR spin-lattice relaxation time measurements. At the DMPC interfacial region, FTIR results showed a drug-induced reduction of the carbonyl hydration and order degrees. Very weak interaction among furazolidone and the hydrophobic lipid chains was also observed. However, no furazolidone-induced changes on thermodynamical parameters, such as phase transition temperature (Tm) and enthalpy variation (ΔH), were detected by the DSC technique. Thus, furazolidone seems to interact preferentially with lipid polar and interfacial regions, enhancing the freedom for gauche-trans isomerization of the first methylene groups of DMPC acyl chains. Responses described in this paper may explain the improved activity of furazolidone-encapsulated liposomes by comparison with the effect of the free drug, described in literature. The findings can also improve further strategies for the potential therapeutic application of liposomal furazolidone as a drug delivery system and minimize the risk of drug resistance and collateral effects related to high toxicity.

  4. Effect of ethanol on dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine large unilamellar vesicles investigated by quasi-elastic light scattering and vibrational spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hantz, E; Cao, A; Taillandier, E

    1988-12-01

    The gel-like liquid phase transition of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) large unilamellar vesicles prepared by reverse phase evaporation has been investigated in buffers containing ethanol by quasi-elastic light scattering (QLS) and vibrational (infrared and Raman) spectroscopy. With the QLS technique, the relative change in the vesicles area (which is related to the molecular cross-sectional area of lipid molecules) was followed versus both temperature and ethanol concentration. When the latter was low, the depression of the transition point was a linear function of the alcohol concentration, c, but the vesicles area was practically unmodified. At alcohol concentration 10% v/v, an abrupt change of the vesicles area was observed and for c greater than 10% the depression of the transition point was a non-linear function of c. The infrared and Raman spectra showed a perturbation of the hydrophobic regions, including the terminal methyl groups of the acyl tails.

  5. (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shifts of methacrylate molecules associated with DMPC and/or DPPC liposomes.

    PubMed

    Fujisawa, Seiichiro; Ishihara, Mariko; Kadoma, Yoshinori

    2005-01-01

    In the light of recent developments, changes in (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shifts of methacrylate molecule associated with DMPC (L-alpha dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine) or DPPC (L-alpha-dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine) liposomes as a model for mimic native lipid bilayers were studied at 30, 37, and 52 degrees C. The chemical shifts of 3Ha, 3C, and 4C resonances in methacrylates (see Fig. 2) were greatly shifted higher field, suggesting the methacrylate molecule-lipid bilayer interaction. Comparison of the findings with methyl methacrylate (MMA), ethylene dimethacrylate (EDMA), and triethyleneglycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) revealed that the interaction of dimethacrylates (EDMA, TEGDMA) was greater than monomethacrylate, MMA. Their interaction with DMPC liposomes was also judged by a differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), indicating that the interaction was characterized by decreasing the enthalpy, entropy, and transition co-operativity. The evidence of the upfield NMR-shifts for methacrylate molecules was also judged by the descriptors such as the reactivity (HOMO-LUMO energy) and the electrostatic function (partial charges) between methacrylate molecules and DPPC, calculated by a PM 3 semiempirical MO method. The upfield NMR shifts were considerably well interpreted from the descriptors. NMR screening technique in methacrylates to phospholipid targets would be highly valuable in biomaterial developments. Figure 2 Changes in (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shifts of methacrylate molecule associated with DMPC or DPPC liposomes. DMPC liposomes/MMA (1:1, molar ratio) and DMPC/TEGDMA (1:1) liposomes were measured at 30 degrees C. In DPPC liposome system, the rippled gel phase was measured at 30 degrees C, whereas the liquid crystalline phase for MMA and for both EDMA and TEGDMA were measured at 52 degrees C and 37 degrees C, respectively.

  6. Direct observation and characterization of DMPC/DHPC aggregates under conditions relevant for biological solution NMR.

    PubMed

    van Dam, Lorens; Karlsson, Göran; Edwards, Katarina

    2004-08-30

    We have used cryo-transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) for inspection of aggregates formed by dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and dihexanoylphosphatidylcholine (DHPC) in aqueous solution at total phospholipid concentrations cL < or = 5% and DMPC/DHPC ratios q < or = 4.0. In combination with ocular inspections, we are able to sketch out this part of phase-diagram at T = 14-80 degrees C. The temperature and the ratio q are the dominating variables for changing sample morphology, while cL to a lesser extent affects the aggregate structure. At q = 0.5, small, possibly disc-shaped, aggregates with a diameter of approximately 6 nm are formed. At higher q-values, distorted discoidal micelles that tend to short cylindrical micelles are observed. The more well-shaped discs have a diameter of around 20 nm. Upon increasing q or the temperature, long slightly flattened cylindrical micelles that eventually branch are formed. A holey lamellar phase finally appears upon further elevation of q or temperature. The implications for biological NMR work are two. First, discs prepared as membrane mimics are frequently much smaller than predicted by current "ideal bicelle" models. Second, the q approximately 3 preparations used for aligning water-soluble biomolecules in magnetic fields consist of perforated lamellar sheets. Furthermore, the discovered sequence of morphological transitions may have important implications for the development of bicelle-based membrane protein crystallization methods.

  7. Cholesterol Changes the Mechanisms of Aβ Peptide Binding to the DMPC Bilayer.

    PubMed

    Lockhart, Christopher; Klimov, Dmitri K

    2017-10-02

    Using isobaric-isothermal all-atom replica-exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations, we investigated the equilibrium binding of Aβ10-40 monomers to the zwitterionic dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) bilayer containing cholesterol. Our previous REMD simulations, which studied binding of the same peptide to the cholesterol-free DMPC bilayer, served as a control, against which we measured the impact of cholesterol. Our findings are as follows. First, addition of cholesterol to the DMPC bilayer partially expels the Aβ peptide from the hydrophobic core and promotes its binding to bilayer polar headgroups. Using thermodynamic and energetics analyses, we argued that Aβ partial expulsion is not related to cholesterol-induced changes in lateral pressure within the bilayer but is caused by binding energetics, which favors Aβ binding to the surface of the densely packed cholesterol-rich bilayer. Second, cholesterol has a protective effect on the DMPC bilayer structure against perturbations caused by Aβ binding. More specifically, cholesterol reduces bilayer thinning and overall depletion of bilayer density beneath the Aβ binding footprint. Third, we found that the Aβ peptide contains a single cholesterol binding site, which involves hydrophobic C-terminal amino acids (Ile31-Val36), Phe19, and Phe20 from the central hydrophobic cluster, and cationic Lys28 from the turn region. This binding site accounts for about 76% of all Aβ-cholesterol interactions. Because cholesterol binding site in the Aβ10-40 peptide does not contain the GXXXG motif featured in cholesterol interactions with the transmembrane domain C99 of the β-amyloid precursor protein, we argued that the binding mechanisms for Aβ and C99 are distinct reflecting their different conformations and positions in the lipid bilayer. Fourth, cholesterol sharply reduces the helical propensity in the bound Aβ peptide. As a result, cholesterol largely eliminates the emergence of helical structure observed

  8. Component and state separation in DMPC/DSPC lipid bilayers: a Monte Carlo simulation study.

    PubMed Central

    Michonova-Alexova, Ekaterina I; Sugár, István P

    2002-01-01

    In this paper a two-state, two-component, Ising-type model is used to simulate the lateral distribution of the components and gel/fluid state acyl chains in dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine/distearoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC/DSPC) lipid bilayers. The same model has been successful in calculating the excess heat capacity curves, the fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) threshold temperatures, the most frequent center-to-center distances between DSPC clusters, and the fractal dimensions of gel clusters (Sugar, I. P., T. E. Thompson, and R. L. Biltonen, 1999. Biophys. J. 76:2099-2110). Depending on the temperature and mole fraction the population of the cluster size is either homogeneous or inhomogeneous. In the inhomogeneous population the size of the largest cluster scales with the size of the system, while the rest of the clusters remain small with increasing system size. In a homogeneous population, however, every cluster remains small with increasing system size. For both compositional and fluid/gel state clusters, threshold temperatures-the so-called percolation threshold temperatures-are determined where change in the type of the population takes place. At a given mole fraction, the number of percolation threshold temperatures can be 0, 1, 2, or 3. By plotting these percolation threshold temperatures on the temperature/mole fraction plane, the diagrams of component and state separation of DMPC/DSPC bilayers are constructed. In agreement with the small-angle neutron scattering measurements, the component separation diagram shows nonrandom lateral distribution of the components not only in the gel-fluid mixed phase region, but also in the pure gel and pure fluid regions. A combined diagram of component and state separation is constructed to characterize the lateral distribution of lipid components and gel/fluid state acyl chains in DMPC/DSPC mixtures. While theoretical phase diagrams of two component mixtures can be constructed only in the case of

  9. Atomic detail peptide-membrane interactions: molecular dynamics simulation of gramicidin S in a DMPC bilayer.

    PubMed Central

    Mihailescu, D; Smith, J C

    2000-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed of the sequence-symmetric cyclic decapeptide antibiotic gramicidin S (GS), in interaction with a hydrated dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) bilayer, and the results compared with a "control" simulation of the system in the absence of GS. Following experimental evidence, the GS was initially set in a single antiparallel beta-sheet conformation with two Type II' beta-turns in an amphiphilic interaction with the membrane. This conformation and position remained in the 6.5 ns simulation. Main-chain dihedrals are on average approximately 26 degrees from those determined by NMR experiment on GS in dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) solution. Sequence-symmetric main-chain and side-chain dihedral angle pairs converge to within approximately 5 degrees and approximately 10 degrees, respectively. The area per lipid, lipid tail order parameters, and quadrupole spin-lattice relaxation times of the control simulation are mostly in good agreement with corresponding experiments. The GS has little effect on the membrane dipole potential or water permeability. However, it is found to have a disordering effect (in agreement with experiment) and a fluidifying effect on lipids directly interacting with it, and an ordering effect on those not directly interacting. PMID:11023880

  10. E/M dips. Evidence for lipids regularly distributed into hexagonal super-lattices in pyrene-PC/DMPC binary mixtures at specific concentrations.

    PubMed Central

    Tang, D.; Chong, P. L.

    1992-01-01

    We have examined the effect of 1-palmitoyl-2-(10-pyrenyl)decanoyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphatidylcholine (Pyr-PC) concentration on the ratio of excimer fluorescence to monomer fluorescence (E/M) in L-alpha-dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) multilamellar vesicles at 30 degrees C, with special attention focussed on the smoothness of the curve. We observed a series of dips, in addition to kinks, in the plot of E/M versus the mole fraction of Pyr-PC (XPyrPC). The observation of dips is a new finding, perhaps unique for Pyr-PC in DMPC since only kinks were observed for Pyr-PC in L-alpha-dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and in egg yolk phosphatidylcholine (egg-PC) (Somerharju et al., 1985. Biochemistry. 24: 2773-2781). The dips/kinks observed here are distributed according to a well defined pattern reflecting a lateral order in the membrane, and distributed symmetrically with respect to 50 mol% Pyr-PC. Some of the dips appear at specific concentrations (YPyrPC) according to the hexagonal super-lattice model proposed by Virtanen et al. (1988. J. Mol. Electr. 4: 233-236). However, the observations of dips at XPyrPC > 66.7 mol% and the kink at 33.3 mol% cannot be interpreted by the model of Virtanen et al. (1988). These surprising results can be understood by virtue of an extended hexagonal super-lattice model, in which we have proposed that if the pyrene-containing acyl chains are regularly distributed as a hexagonal super-lattice in the DMPC matrix at a specific concentration YPyrPC, then the acyl chains of DMPC can form a regularly distributed hexagonal super-lattice in the membrane at a critical concentration (1-YPyrPC). The excellent agreement between the calculated and the observed dip/kink positions, except for the dip at 74 mol% and the kink at 40 mol%, provides most compelling evidence that lipids are regularly distributed into hexagonal super-lattices in Pyr-PC/DMPC mixtures at specific concentrations. The physical nature of the dips not only gives us a better

  11. E/M dips. Evidence for lipids regularly distributed into hexagonal super-lattices in pyrene-PC/DMPC binary mixtures at specific concentrations.

    PubMed

    Tang, D; Chong, P L

    1992-10-01

    We have examined the effect of 1-palmitoyl-2-(10-pyrenyl)decanoyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphatidylcholine (Pyr-PC) concentration on the ratio of excimer fluorescence to monomer fluorescence (E/M) in L-alpha-dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) multilamellar vesicles at 30 degrees C, with special attention focussed on the smoothness of the curve. We observed a series of dips, in addition to kinks, in the plot of E/M versus the mole fraction of Pyr-PC (XPyrPC). The observation of dips is a new finding, perhaps unique for Pyr-PC in DMPC since only kinks were observed for Pyr-PC in L-alpha-dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and in egg yolk phosphatidylcholine (egg-PC) (Somerharju et al., 1985. Biochemistry. 24: 2773-2781). The dips/kinks observed here are distributed according to a well defined pattern reflecting a lateral order in the membrane, and distributed symmetrically with respect to 50 mol% Pyr-PC. Some of the dips appear at specific concentrations (YPyrPC) according to the hexagonal super-lattice model proposed by Virtanen et al. (1988. J. Mol. Electr. 4: 233-236). However, the observations of dips at XPyrPC > 66.7 mol% and the kink at 33.3 mol% cannot be interpreted by the model of Virtanen et al. (1988). These surprising results can be understood by virtue of an extended hexagonal super-lattice model, in which we have proposed that if the pyrene-containing acyl chains are regularly distributed as a hexagonal super-lattice in the DMPC matrix at a specific concentration YPyrPC, then the acyl chains of DMPC can form a regularly distributed hexagonal super-lattice in the membrane at a critical concentration (1-YPyrPC). The excellent agreement between the calculated and the observed dip/kink positions, except for the dip at 74 mol% and the kink at 40 mol%, provides most compelling evidence that lipids are regularly distributed into hexagonal super-lattices in Pyr-PC/DMPC mixtures at specific concentrations. The physical nature of the dips not only gives us a better

  12. Self-consistent-field modeling of complex molecules with united atom detail in inhomogeneous systems. Cyclic and branched foreign molecules in dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meijer, L. A.; Leermakers, F. A. M.; Lyklema, J.

    1999-04-01

    We have developed a detailed self-consistent-field model for studying complex molecules in inhomogeneous systems, in which all the molecules are represented in a detailed united atom description. The theory is in the spirit of the approach developed by Scheutjens and co-workers for polymers at interfaces and self-assembly of surfactants and lipids into association colloids. It is applied to lipid membranes composed of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC). In particular, we looked at the incorporation of linear, branched, and cyclic molecules into the lipid bilayers being in the liquid phase. Detailed information on the properties of both the lipids and the additives is presented. For the classes of linear and branched alcohols and phenol derivatives we find good correspondence between calculated partition coefficients for DMPC membranes and experimental data on egg-yolk PC. The calculated partitioning of molecules of isomers, containing a benzene ring, two charged groups (one positive and one negative) and 16 hydrocarbon segments, into DMPC membranes showed variations of the partition coefficient by a factor of 10 depending on the molecular architecture. For zwitterionic additives we find that it is much more difficult to bring the positive charge into the membrane core than the negative one. This result can be rationalized from information on the electrostatic potential profile of the bare membrane, being positive in both the core and on the membrane surface but negative near the position of the phosphate groups. For several tetrahydroxy naftalenes we found that, although the partition coefficient is barely influenced, the average orientation and position of the molecule inside the membrane is strongly dependent on the distribution of the hydroxyl groups on the naphthalene rings. The orientation changes from one where the additive spans the membrane when the hydroxyls are positioned on (2,3,6,7) positions, to an orientation with the rings parallel to the membrane

  13. Morphological effects of ceramide on DMPC/DHPC bicelles.

    PubMed

    Barbosa-Barros, L; De la Maza, A; Walther, P; Estelrich, J; López, O

    2008-04-01

    Freeze fracture electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering were applied to characterize the morphological changes of DMPC/DHPC bicellar systems induced by the addition of ceramides. The results demonstrate a tendency of the DMPC/DHPC aggregates to evolve forming elongated or tubular structures with the increase of the temperature. At 20 degrees C, low concentrations of ceramide promote the appearance of elongated structures with twisted zones. Higher concentrations of this lipid lead to the formation of liposomes along the elongated structures. The increase of the temperature to 40 degrees C induces the growth of the structures containing low concentrations of ceramide forming branched aggregates. In samples with high amounts of ceramide, the increase of temperature causes phase separation and the formation of a mixed system composed by liposomes and multilamellar tubules. The morphological effects induced by ceramides in this new membrane model give new insights for the role played by this lipid in biological membranes.

  14. Comprehensive examination of mesophases formed by DMPC and DHPC mixtures.

    PubMed

    Harroun, Thad A; Koslowsky, Martin; Nieh, Mu-Ping; de Lannoy, Charles-François; Raghunathan, V A; Katsaras, John

    2005-06-07

    Mixtures of long- and short-chain phospholipids, specifically 14:0 and 6:0 phosphatidylcholines (DMPC and DHPC), have been used successfully in NMR studies as magnetically alignable substrates for membrane-associated proteins. However, recent publications have shown that the phase behavior of these mixtures is much more complex than originally thought. Using polarized light microscopy and small-angle neutron scattering, phase diagrams of DMPC/DHPC mixtures at molar ratios of 2, 3.2, and 5 have been determined. Generally, at temperatures below the main-chain melting transition of DMPC (T(M) = 23 degrees C), an isotropic phase of disk-like micelles is found. At high temperatures (T > 50 degrees C), a lamellar phase consisting of either multilamellar vesicles (MLV) or extended lamellae is formed, which at low lipid concentrations (e.g., MLV) coexists with an excess of water. At intermediate temperatures and lipid concentrations, a chiral nematic phase made up of worm-like micelles was observed.

  15. Structure and Conformational Dynamics of DMPC/Dicationic Surfactant and DMPC/Dicationic Surfactant/DNA Systems

    PubMed Central

    Pietralik, Zuzanna; Krzysztoń, Rafał; Kida, Wojciech; Andrzejewska, Weronika; Kozak, Maciej

    2013-01-01

    Amphiphilic dicationic surfactants, known as gemini surfactants, are currently studied for gene delivery purposes. The gemini surfactant molecule is composed of two hydrophilic “head” groups attached to hydrophobic chains and connected via molecular linker between them. The influence of different concentrations of 1,5-bis (1-imidazolilo-3- decyloxymethyl) pentane chloride (gemini surfactant) on the thermotropic phase behaviour of 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) bilayers with and without the presence of DNA was investigated using Fourier transformed infrared (FTIR) and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopies, small angle scattering of synchrotron radiation and differential scanning calorimetry. With increasing concentration of surfactant in DMPC/DNA systems, a disappearance of pretransition and a decrease in the main phase transition enthalpy and temperature were observed. The increasing intensity of diffraction peaks as a function of surfactant concentration also clearly shows the ability of the surfactant to promote the organisation of lipid bilayers in the multilayer lamellar phase. PMID:23571492

  16. Unilamellar DMPC Vesicles in Aqueous Glycerol: Preferential Interactions and Thermochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Westh, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Glycerol is accumulated in response to environmental stresses in a diverse range of organisms. Understanding of favorable in vivo effects of this solute requires insight into its interactions with biological macromolecules, and one access to this information is the quantification of so-called preferential interactions in glycerol-biopolymer solutions. For model membrane systems, preferential interactions have been discussed, but not directly measured. Hence, we have applied a new differential vapor pressure equipment to quantify the isoosmotic preferential binding parameter, Γμ1, for systems of unilamellar vesicles of DMPC in aqueous glycerol. It is found that Γμ1 decreases linearly with the glycerol concentration with a slope of −0.14 ± 0.014 per molal. This implies that glycerol is preferentially excluded from the membrane-solvent interface. Calorimetric investigations of the same systems showed that the glycerol-DMPC interactions are weakly endothermic, and the temperature of the main phase transition increases slightly (0.16°C per molal) with the glycerol concentration. The results are discussed with respect to a molecular picture which takes into account both the partitioning of glycerol into the membrane and the preferential exclusion from the hydration layer, and it is concluded that the latter effect contributes about four times stronger than the former to the net interaction. PMID:12524287

  17. Unilamellar DMPC vesicles in aqueous glycerol: preferential interactions and thermochemistry.

    PubMed

    Westh, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Glycerol is accumulated in response to environmental stresses in a diverse range of organisms. Understanding of favorable in vivo effects of this solute requires insight into its interactions with biological macromolecules, and one access to this information is the quantification of so-called preferential interactions in glycerol-biopolymer solutions. For model membrane systems, preferential interactions have been discussed, but not directly measured. Hence, we have applied a new differential vapor pressure equipment to quantify the isoosmotic preferential binding parameter, Gamma( micro 1), for systems of unilamellar vesicles of DMPC in aqueous glycerol. It is found that Gamma( micro 1) decreases linearly with the glycerol concentration with a slope of -0.14 +/- 0.014 per molal. This implies that glycerol is preferentially excluded from the membrane-solvent interface. Calorimetric investigations of the same systems showed that the glycerol-DMPC interactions are weakly endothermic, and the temperature of the main phase transition increases slightly (0.16 degrees C per molal) with the glycerol concentration. The results are discussed with respect to a molecular picture which takes into account both the partitioning of glycerol into the membrane and the preferential exclusion from the hydration layer, and it is concluded that the latter effect contributes about four times stronger than the former to the net interaction.

  18. Different effects of propofol and nitrosopropofol on DMPC multilamellar liposomes.

    PubMed

    Momo, Federico; Fabris, Sabrina; Bindoli, Alberto; Scutari, Guido; Stevanato, Roberto

    2002-02-19

    The mechanisms of reaction of propofol with nitrosoglutathione lead to the formation of an active species which was identified, and then synthesised, as 2,6-diisopropyl-4-nitrosophenol. In the present work, we demonstrate the in vitro formation of 2,6-diisopropyl-4-nitrosophenol, then we discuss the interaction of propofol and 2,6-diisopropyl-4-nitrosophenol with dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine and egg yolk phosphatidylcholine multilamellar liposomes using differential scanning calorimetry and spin labelling techniques. It was demonstrated that both molecules are highly lipophylic and absorb almost entirely in the lipid phase. The thermotropic profiles showed that these molecules affect the temperature and the co-operativity of the gel-to-fluid state transition of the liposomes differently: the effects of 2,6-diisopropylphenol on the lipid organisation are quite similar to phenol and coherently interpretable in terms of the disorder produced in the membrane by a bulky group; 2,6-diisopropyl-4-nitrosophenol is a stronger perturbing agent, and ESR spectra suggest that this is due to a relative accumulation of the molecule into the interfacial region of the bilayer.

  19. Structure of the DMPC lipid bilayer ripple phase†

    PubMed Central

    Akabori, Kiyotaka; Nagle, John F.

    2014-01-01

    High resolution structure is presented for the ripple (Pβ′) phase of the phospholipid dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine. Low angle X-ray scattering from oriented samples yielded 57 orders, more than twice as many as recorded previously. The determined electron density map has a sawtooth profile similar to the result from lower resolution data, but the features are sharper allowing better estimates for the modulated bilayer profile and the distribution of headgroups along the aqueous interface. Analysis of high resolution wide angle X-ray data shows that the hydrocarbon chains in the longer, major side of the asymmetric sawtooth are packed similarly to the LβF gel phase, with chains in both monolayers coupled and tilted by 18° in the same direction. The absence of Bragg rods that could be associated with the minor side is consistent with disordered chains, as often suggested in the literature. However, the new high resolution bilayer profile strongly suggests that the chains in the two monolayers in the minor side and the curved region are not in registry. This staggered monolayer modulated melting suggests a direction for improving theories of the ripple phase. PMID:25503248

  20. Thyroid hormone interactions with DMPC bilayers. A molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Petruk, Ariel A; Marti, Marcelo A; Alvarez, Rosa María S

    2009-10-08

    The structure and dynamics of thyroxine (T4), distal and proximal conformers of 3',3,5-triiodo-l-thyronine (T3d and T3p), and 3,5-diiodo-l-thyronine (T2) upon interaction with DMPC membranes were analyzed by means of molecular dynamics simulations. The locations, the more stable orientations, and the structural changes adopted by the hormones in the lipid medium evidence that the progressive iodine substitution on the beta ring lowers both the possibility of penetration and the transversal mobility in the membrane. However, the results obtained for T3d show that the number of iodine atoms in the molecule is not the only relevant factor in the hormone behavior but also the orientation of the single iodine substitution. The electrostatic interactions between the zwitterion group of the hormones with specific groups in the hydrophilic region of the membrane as well as the organization of the alkyl chains around the aromatic beta ring of the hormone were evaluated in terms of several radial distribution functions.

  1. Dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine/C16:0-ceramide binary liposomes studied by differential scanning calorimetry and wide- and small-angle x-ray scattering.

    PubMed Central

    Holopainen, J M; Lemmich, J; Richter, F; Mouritsen, O G; Rapp, G; Kinnunen, P K

    2000-01-01

    Ceramide has recently been established as a central messenger in the signaling cascades controlling cell behavior. Physicochemical studies have revealed a strong tendency of this lipid toward phase separation in mixtures with phosphatidylcholines. The thermal phase behavior and structure of fully hydrated binary membranes composed of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and N-palmitoyl-ceramide (C16:0-ceramide, up to a mole fraction X(cer) = 0.35) were resolved in further detail by high-sensitivity differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and x-ray diffraction. Both methods reveal very strong hysteresis in the thermal phase behavior of ceramide-containing membranes. A partial phase diagram was constructed based on results from a combination of these two methods. DSC heating scans show that with increased X(cer) the pretransition temperature T(p) first increases, whereafter at X(cer) > 0.06 it can no longer be resolved. The main transition enthalpy DeltaH remains practically unaltered while its width increases significantly, and the upper phase boundary temperature of the mixture shifts to approximately 63 degrees C at X(cer) = 0.30. Upon cooling, profound phase separation is evident, and for all of the studied compositions there is an endotherm in the region close to the T(m) for DMPC. At X(cer) >/= 0.03 a second endotherm is evident at higher temperatures, starting at 32.1 degrees C and reaching 54.6 degrees C at X(cer) = 0.30. X-ray small-angle reflection heating scans reveal a lamellar phase within the temperature range of 15-60 degrees C, regardless of composition. The pretransition is observed up to X(cer) < 0.18, together with an increase in T(p). In the gel phase the lamellar repeat distance d increases from approximately 61 A at X(cer) = 0. 03, to 67 A at X(cer) = 0.35. In the fluid phase increasing X(cer) from 0.06 to 0.35 augments d from 61 A to 64 A. An L(beta')/L(alpha) (ripple/fluid) phase coexistence region is observed at high temperatures (from 31 to

  2. Molecular dynamics simulations of a fully hydrated dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine membrane in liquid-crystalline phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubrzycki, Igor Z.; Xu, Yan; Madrid, Marcela; Tang, Pei

    2000-02-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed to investigate the structure of a fully hydrated 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) bilayer in liquid-crystalline (fluid) phase at 30 °C. The bilayer consists of 200 DMPC lipid molecules with nw=27.4 water molecules per lipid. The membrane was built with reference to the coordinates of a previously published 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) membrane patch. A four-step dynamic procedure (110 ps) with Berendsen pressure rescaling (P=0 and 1 bar), applied in all three directions, was used to rapidly prepare the bilayer. This system was then subjected to two separate constant pressure and temperature simulations at 1 bar and 30 °C for ˜380 ps, using the Nosé-Hoover NPT method with periodical boundaries and Berendsen temperature and pressure rescaling method, respectively. The resultant bilayer has an area per lipid of 59.2 Å2 and a head-to-head thickness (DHH) of 36.3 Å. These values are in good agreement with the x-ray diffraction data of 59.7 Å2 and 34.4 Å, respectively, for DMPC at 30 °C with nw of 25.7 [H. I. Petrache, S. Tristram-Nagle, and J. F. Nagle, Chem. Phys. Lipids 95, 83 (1998)]. The fractions of trans and gauche bonds in the hydrocarbon chains, averaged for the last 94 ps of simulation, are 81.7% and 18.3%, respectively, suggesting a fluid phase of the membrane. The electron density profile resembles closely that measured by x-ray diffraction. Water density profile suggests a significant penetration of water molecules into the bilayer head region to as deep as the carbonyl groups, with phosphate groups being strongly hydrated.

  3. Thermotropic Behavior of Membranes Containing DMPC and Chemically and Stereochemically Pure Sphingomyelin upon Cholesterol Addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibakami, Motonari; Sonoyama, Masashi; Goto, Rie; Mori, Michiko; Suzuki, Hikokazu; Mitaku, Shigeki

    2004-12-01

    High sensitivity differential scanning calorimetry is applied to the problem of interaction between phospholipids and cholesterol in bilayers, i.e., whether or not cholesterol shows a preferential interaction with sphingomyelins over glycerophospholipids. The simplest system yet used for exploring this problem is designed—one composed of 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (DMPC), chemically and stereochemically pure N-palmitoyl-sphingomyelin (pure-C16:0-SM), and cholesterol, based on a belief that chemically and stereochemically purity excludes chain length mismatch and chiral interaction that may affect the interaction from this system. Incremental addition of cholesterol to mixtures of DMPC and pure-C16:0-SM with a ratio of 6:4 or 4:6 leads to a continuous shift in endotherm due to DMPC toward a lower temperature. Such results indicate that cholesterol favors pure-C16:0-SM.

  4. Molecular dynamics simulations of individual alpha-helices of bacteriorhodopsin in dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine. II. Interaction energy analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Woolf, T B

    1998-01-01

    The concepts of hydrophobicity and hydrophobic moments have been applied in attempts to predict membrane protein secondary and tertiary structure. The current paper uses molecular dynamics computer calculations of individual bacteriorhodopsin helices in explicit dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine bilayers to examine the atomic basis of these approaches. The results suggest that the types of interactions between a particular amino acid and the surrounding bilayer depend on the position and type of the amino acid. In particular, aromatic residues are seen to interact favorably at the interface region. Analysis of the trajectories in terms of hydrophobic moments suggests the presence of a particular face that prefers lipid. The results of these simulations may be used to improve secondary structure prediction methods and to provide further insights into the two-stage model of protein folding. PMID:9449316

  5. Bilayer structure and physical dynamics of the cytochrome b5 dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine interaction.

    PubMed Central

    Chester, D W; Skita, V; Young, H S; Mavromoustakos, T; Strittmatter, P

    1992-01-01

    Cytochrome b5 is a microsomal membrane protein which provides reducing potential to delta 5-, delta 6-, and delta 9-fatty acid desaturases through its interaction with cytochrome b5 reductase. Low angle x-ray diffraction has been used to determine the structure of an asymmetrically reconstituted cytochrome b5:DMPC model membrane system. Differential scanning calorimetry and fluorescence anisotropy studies were performed to examine the bilayer physical dynamics of this reconstituted system. These latter studies allow us to constrain structural models to those which are consistent with physical dynamics data. Additionally, because the nonpolar peptide secondary structure remains unclear, we tested the sensitivity of our model to different nonpolar peptide domain configurations. In this modeling approach, the nonpolar peptide moiety was arranged in the membrane to meet such chemically determined criteria as protease susceptibility of carboxyl- and amino-termini, tyrosine availability for pH titration and tryptophan 109 location, et cetera. In these studies, we have obtained a reconstituted cytochrome b5:DMPC bilayer structure at approximately 6.3 A resolution and conclude that the nonpolar peptide does not penetrate beyond the bilayer midplane. Structural correlations with calorimetry, fluorescence anisotropy and acyl chain packing data suggest that asymmetric cytochrome b5 incorporation into the bilayer increases acyl chain order. Additionally, we suggest that the heme peptide:bilayer interaction facilitates a discreet heme peptide orientation which would be dependent upon phospholipid headgroup composition. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 7 PMID:1600082

  6. Free energy landscapes of sodium ions bound to DMPC-cholesterol membrane surfaces at infinite dilution.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Bonomi, Massimiliano; Calero, Carles; Martí, Jordi

    2016-04-07

    Exploring the free energy landscapes of metal cations on phospholipid membrane surfaces is important for the understanding of chemical and biological processes in cellular environments. Using metadynamics simulations we have performed systematic free energy calculations of sodium cations bound to DMPC phospholipid membranes with cholesterol concentration varying between 0% (cholesterol-free) and 50% (cholesterol-rich) at infinite dilution. The resulting free energy landscapes reveal the competition between binding of sodium to water and to lipid head groups. Moreover, the binding competitiveness of lipid head groups is diminished by cholesterol contents. As cholesterol concentration increases, the ionic affinity to membranes decreases. When cholesterol concentration is greater than 30%, the ionic binding is significantly reduced, which coincides with the phase transition point of DMPC-cholesterol membranes from a liquid-disordered phase to a liquid-ordered phase. We have also evaluated the contributions of different lipid head groups to the binding free energy separately. The DMPC's carbonyl group is the most favorable binding site for sodium, followed by DMPC's phosphate group and then the hydroxyl group of cholesterol.

  7. Use of DMPC and DSPC lipids for verapamil and naproxen permeability studies by PAMPA.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Figueroa, M J; Contreras-Garrido, B C; Soto-Arriaza, M A

    2015-04-01

    Verapamil and naproxen Parallel Artificial Membrane Permeability Assay (PAMPA) permeability was studied using lipids not yet reported for this model in order to facilitate the quantification of drug permeability. These lipids are 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (DSPC), 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) and an equimolar mixture of DMPC/DSPC, both in the absence and in the presence of 33.3 mol% of cholesterol. PAMPA drug permeability using the lipids mentioned above was compared with lecithin-PC. The results show that verapamil permeability depends on the kind of lipid used, in the order DMPC > DMPC/DSPC > DSPC. The permeability of the drugs was between 1.3 and 3.5-times larger than those obtained in lecithin-PC for all the concentrations of the drug used. Naproxen shows similar permeability than verapamil; however, the permeability increased with respect to lecithin-PC only when DMPC and DMPC/DSPC were used. This behavior could be explained by a difference between the drug net charge at pH 7.4. On the other hand, in the presence of cholesterol, verapamil permeability increases in all lipid systems; however, the relative verapamil permeability respect to lecithin-PC did not show any significant increase. This result is likely due to the promoting effect of cholesterol, which is not able to compensate for the large increase in verapamil permeability observed in lecithin-PC. With respect to naproxen, its permeability value and relative permeability respect lecithin-PC not always increased in the presence of cholesterol. This result is probably attributed to the negative charge of naproxen rather than its molecular weight. The lipid systems studied have an advantage in drug permeability quantification, which is mainly related to the charge of the molecule and not to its molecular weight or to cholesterol used as an absorption promoter.

  8. Interaction of linear mono- and diamines with dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine and dimyristoylphosphatidylglycerol multilamellar liposomes.

    PubMed

    Momo, F; Fabris, S; Stevanato, R

    2000-10-15

    The effect of linear monoamines on dimyristoylphosphatidylglycerol and dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine multilamellar liposomes was studied as a function of their length and compared with the behavior of linear carboxylic acids. The role of the hydrophobic interactions was demonstrated and the free energy of the binding for each interacting carbon atom was determined. The thermotropic behavior of the liposomes was characterized by differential scanning calorimetry and it was shown that these molecules affect the temperature and the cooperativity of the gel to fluid state transition of the membrane differently. In particular, it appeared that membrane perturbation was maximum when the chain length of the amphipathic molecules ranged between 7 and 9 carbon atoms, with more pronounced effects in the case of monoamines. Molecules shorter than 3-4 carbon atoms did not produce any observable change in the transition temperature. The study was extended to linear alpha,omega-diamines to investigate the amphipathic character of long diamines and to investigate the role of bridging bonds established with neighboring phospholipids.

  9. Structure of an adsorbed dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine bilayer measured with specular reflection of neutrons.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, S J; Bayerl, T M; McDermott, D C; Adam, G W; Rennie, A R; Thomas, R K; Sackmann, E

    1991-01-01

    Using specular reflection of neutrons, we investigate for the first time the structure of a single dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine bilayer adsorbed to a planar quartz surface in an aqueous environment. We demonstrate that the bilayer is strongly adsorbed to the quartz surface and is stable to phase state changes as well as exchange of the bulk aqueous phase. Our results show that the main phase transition is between the L alpha phase and the metastable L beta'* phase, with formation of the P beta' ripple phase prevented by lateral stress on the adsorbed bilayer. By performing contrast variation experiments, we are able to elucidate substantial detail in the interfacial structure. We measure a bilayer thickness of 43.0 +/- 1.5 A in the L alpha phase (T = 31 degrees C) and 46.0 +/- 1.5 A in the L beta'* phase (T = 20 degrees C). The polar head group is 8.0 +/- 1.5 A thick in the L alpha phase. The water layer between the quartz and bilayer is 30 +/- 10 A for the lipid in both the L alpha and L'* phase. Our results agree well with those previously reported from experiments using lipid vesicles and monolayers, thus establishing the feasibility of our experimental methods. PMID:2009353

  10. Hydration and hydrogen bonding of carbonyls in dimyristoyl-phosphatidylcholine bilayer.

    PubMed

    Volkov, Victor V; Nuti, Francesca; Takaoka, Yuji; Chelli, Riccardo; Papini, Anna Maria; Righini, Roberto

    2006-07-26

    We combine two-color ultrafast infrared spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulation to investigate the hydration of carbonyl moieties in a dimyristoyl-phosphatidylcholine bilayer. Excitation with femtosecond infrared pulses of the OD stretching mode of heavy water produces a time dependent change of the absorption band of the phospholipid carbonyl groups. This intermolecular vibrational coupling affects the entire C=O band, thus suggesting that the optical inhomogeneity of the infrared response of carbonyl in phospholipid membranes cannot be attributed to the variance in hydration. Both the experimental and the theoretical results demonstrate that sn-1 carbonyl has a higher propensity to form hydrogen bonds with water in comparison to sn-2. The time-resolved experiment allows following the evolution of the system from a nonequilibrium localization of energy in the OD stretching mode to a thermally equilibrated condition and provides the characteristic time constants of the process. The approach opens a new opportunity for investigation of intermolecular structural relations in complex systems, like membranes, polymers, proteins, and glasses.

  11. Interactions between DMPC liposomes and the serum blood proteins HSA and IgG.

    PubMed

    Sabín, Juan; Prieto, Gerardo; Ruso, Juan M; Messina, Paula V; Salgado, Francisco J; Nogueira, Montserrat; Costas, Miguel; Sarmiento, Félix

    2009-02-12

    The interaction between two serum blood proteins, namely human serum albumin (HSA) and human immunoglobulin G (IgG), with 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (DMPC) liposomes has been studied in detail using dynamic light scattering, flow cytometry, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), electrophoretic mobility, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and surface tension measurements. HSA and IgG interact with liposomes forming molecular aggregates that remain stable at protein concentrations beyond those of total liposome coverage. Both HSA and IgG penetrate into the liposome bilayer. An ELISA assay indicates that the Fc region of IgG is the one that is immersed in the DMPC membrane. The liposome-protein interaction is mainly of electrostatic nature, but an important hydrophobic contribution is also present.

  12. Analysing DHPC/DMPC bicelles by diffusion NMR and multivariate decomposition.

    PubMed

    Björnerås, Johannes; Nilsson, Mathias; Mäler, Lena

    2015-11-01

    Mixtures of lipids and detergents are known to form bicelles at certain parameter ranges, but many uncertainties remain concerning the details of the phase behaviour of these mixtures and the morphology of the formed lipid assemblies. Here we used nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) diffusion data in combination with the multivariate processing method speedy component resolution (SCORE) to analyse mixtures of 1,2-dihexanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DHPC) and 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) with the relative concentration q=[DMPC]/[DHPC]=0.5 at total lipid concentrations ranging from 15 to 300 mM. With this approach we were able to resolve the heavily overlapping mixture spectra into component spectra and obtained reliable diffusion coefficients for lipid concentrations in the range 15 to 300 mM, although at high concentrations (250-300 mM), non-negativity constraints or overfactoring was required to successfully decompose the data. At 50-300 mM total lipid concentration, the radii estimated from the diffusion coefficient of DMPC indicate assemblies of the appropriate bicelle size, although small size variations exist, while at lower concentrations the morphology appears to change to larger assemblies. Taken together, the results suggest that for q=0.5 DMPC/DHPC mixtures there is a relatively broad concentration range above 50 mM where bicelles may reliably be assumed to adopt the 'classical' bicelle morphology. The study clearly demonstrates the usefulness of our approach for accurately determining physical properties of complex mixtures such as bicelles. Both reliable diffusion coefficients and chemical shifts can be derived from overlapping data. This should prove useful for analysing the behaviour of other, more complex, lipid mixtures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Morphology of magnetically aligning DMPC/DHPC aggregates-perforated sheets, not disks.

    PubMed

    van Dam, Lorens; Karlsson, Göran; Edwards, Katarina

    2006-03-28

    The morphology of DMPC/DHPC mixtures at total lipid concentration cL = 5% (w/w) and DMPC/DHPC ratio q approximately 3, doped with small amounts of DMPG or CTAB, was investigated. 31P NMR was used to identify the magnetically aligning phase, and cryo-transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) was employed for structural characterization. Magnetic alignment was found to occur between approximately 30 and approximately 45 degrees C, and cryo-TEM showed that the magnetically aligning phase consisted of extended sheets with a lacelike structure. The aggregates are best described as intermediates between two-dimensional networks of flattened, highly branched, cylindrical micelles and lamellar sheets perforated by large irregular holes. DHPC most likely covers the edges of the holes, while DMPC makes up the bilayer bulk of the aggregates. However, 20-43% of the DHPC takes part in the bilayer, corresponding to 6-12% of the bilayer being made up of DHPC. This fraction increases with increasing temperature. At temperatures above 45 degrees C, the aligning phase collapses.

  14. Interfacial behavior of Myristic acid in mixtures with DMPC and Cholesterol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khattari, Z.; Sayyed, M. I.; Qashou, S. I.; Fasfous, I.; Al-Abdullah, T.; Maghrabi, M.

    2017-06-01

    Binary mixture monolayers of Myristic acid (MA) with the same length of saturated acyl chain lipid viz 1,2-myristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) and Cholesterol (Chol), were investigated under different experimental conditions using Langmuir monolayers (LMs). The interfacial pressure-area (π-A) isotherms, excess molecular area, excess free energy and fluorescence microscopy (FM) images were recorded at the air/water interface. Monolayers of both systems (e.g. MA/DMPC, MA/Chol) reach the closest acyl hydrophobic chain packing in the range 0.20 < xMA < 0.70. Thermodynamic analysis indicates miscibility of the binary mixtures when spread at the air/water interface with negative deviation from the ideal behavior. Morphological features of MA/DMPC systems were found to depend strongly on MA mole fraction and pressures by showing two extreme minima in Gibbs free energy of mixing, while MA/Chol systems showed only an effective condensing effect at xMA = 0.90. In the whole range of compositions studied here, the liquid-expanded (LE) to liquid-condensed (LC) phase transition occurs at increasing xAM as it accomplished by a huge increase in the inverse compressibility modulus. FM observations confirmed the phase-transition and condensing effects of both mixture monolayers as evidenced by Gibbs free energy of mixing in a limited range of compositions.

  15. Diffusion and spectroscopy of water and lipids in fully hydrated dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine bilayer membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, J.; Calero, C.; Martí, J.

    2014-03-01

    Microscopic structure and dynamics of water and lipids in a fully hydrated dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine phospholipid lipid bilayer membrane in the liquid-crystalline phase have been analyzed with all-atom molecular dynamics simulations based on the recently parameterized CHARMM36 force field. The diffusive dynamics of the membrane lipids and of its hydration water, their reorientational motions as well as their corresponding spectral densities, related to the absorption of radiation, have been considered for the first time using the present force field. In addition, structural properties such as density and pressure profiles, a deuterium-order parameter, surface tension, and the extent of water penetration in the membrane have been analyzed. Molecular self-diffusion, reorientational motions, and spectral densities of atomic species reveal a variety of time scales playing a role in membrane dynamics. The mechanisms of lipid motion strongly depend on the time scale considered, from fast ballistic translation at the scale of picoseconds (effective diffusion coefficients of the order of 10-5 cm2/s) to diffusive flow of a few lipids forming nanodomains at the scale of hundreds of nanoseconds (diffusion coefficients of the order of 10-8 cm2/s). In the intermediate regime of sub-diffusion, collisions with nearest neighbors prevent the lipids to achieve full diffusion. Lipid reorientations along selected directions agree well with reported nuclear magnetic resonance data and indicate two different time scales, one about 1 ns and a second one in the range of 2-8 ns. We associated the two time scales of reorientational motions with angular distributions of selected vectors. Calculated spectral densities corresponding to lipid and water reveal an overall good qualitative agreement with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy experiments. Our simulations indicate a blue-shift of the low frequency spectral bands of hydration water as a result of its interaction with lipids

  16. Diffusion and spectroscopy of water and lipids in fully hydrated dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine bilayer membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, J.; Martí, J.; Calero, C.

    2014-03-14

    Microscopic structure and dynamics of water and lipids in a fully hydrated dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine phospholipid lipid bilayer membrane in the liquid-crystalline phase have been analyzed with all-atom molecular dynamics simulations based on the recently parameterized CHARMM36 force field. The diffusive dynamics of the membrane lipids and of its hydration water, their reorientational motions as well as their corresponding spectral densities, related to the absorption of radiation, have been considered for the first time using the present force field. In addition, structural properties such as density and pressure profiles, a deuterium-order parameter, surface tension, and the extent of water penetration in the membrane have been analyzed. Molecular self-diffusion, reorientational motions, and spectral densities of atomic species reveal a variety of time scales playing a role in membrane dynamics. The mechanisms of lipid motion strongly depend on the time scale considered, from fast ballistic translation at the scale of picoseconds (effective diffusion coefficients of the order of 10{sup −5} cm{sup 2}/s) to diffusive flow of a few lipids forming nanodomains at the scale of hundreds of nanoseconds (diffusion coefficients of the order of 10{sup −8} cm{sup 2}/s). In the intermediate regime of sub-diffusion, collisions with nearest neighbors prevent the lipids to achieve full diffusion. Lipid reorientations along selected directions agree well with reported nuclear magnetic resonance data and indicate two different time scales, one about 1 ns and a second one in the range of 2–8 ns. We associated the two time scales of reorientational motions with angular distributions of selected vectors. Calculated spectral densities corresponding to lipid and water reveal an overall good qualitative agreement with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy experiments. Our simulations indicate a blue-shift of the low frequency spectral bands of hydration water as a result of

  17. Thermal stabilization of DMPC/DHPC bicelles by addition of cholesterol sulfate

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, Rebecca A.; Brindley, Amanda J.; Martin, Rachel W.

    2010-01-01

    Doping DMPC/DHPC bicelles with cholesterol sulfate broadens the temperature range over which stable alignment occurs, forming an aligned phase at lower temperatures even with high lipid concentrations. Cholesterol sulfate appears to combine the advantages of cholesterol with those of charged amphiphiles, stabilizing the aligned phase and preventing precipitation. This allows NMR data for RDC and CSA protein structure constraints to be acquired at or below room temperature, an obvious advantage for solid-state and solution studies of heat-sensitive proteins. PMID:20684512

  18. Thermal stabilization of DMPC/DHPC bicelles by addition of cholesterol sulfate.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Rebecca A; Brindley, Amanda J; Martin, Rachel W

    2010-08-25

    Doping DMPC/DHPC bicelles with cholesterol sulfate broadens the temperature range over which stable alignment occurs, forming an aligned phase at lower temperatures even with high lipid concentrations. Cholesterol sulfate appears to combine the advantages of cholesterol with those of charged amphiphiles, stabilizing the aligned phase and preventing precipitation. This allows NMR data for RDC and CSA protein structure constraints to be acquired at or below room temperature, an obvious advantage for solid-state and solution studies of heat-sensitive proteins.

  19. Simulated biophysical experimental techniques for chlorhexidine in dmpc/cholesterol systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Oosten, Brad; Harroun, Thad

    We have investigated the use of molecular dynamic simulations and the MARTINI force field to simulate isothermal titration calorimetry and differential scanning calorimetry techniques. The goal of these simulations was to observe how well they can reproduce the concentration effects of the addition of the small molecule chlorhexidine (CHX) into a model DMPC membrane containing varying concentrations of cholesterol. We constructed a coarse grained model for CHX compatible with the MARTINI force field. We were able to mimic an isothermal titration calorimetry experiment by repeatedly adding CHX into a DMPC membrane. With the increased concentration, we observed a decreasing affinity between CHX and the membrane as well as a resulting increase in the reaction time before the system was equilibrated. We then performed a controlled cooling of the membrane with various CHX concentrations to mimic a differential scanning calorimetry experiment. A change in membrane structure accompanied by a spike in the specific heat was measured at specific temperature Tm signaling a phase transition. We then varied the concentration of CHX as well as the addition of varying concentrations of cholesterol to observe trends in the change to Tm due to the addition of CHX and cholesterol.

  20. Interfacial Behavior of Cholesterol, Ergosterol, and Lanosterol in Mixtures with DPPC and DMPC

    PubMed Central

    Sabatini, Karen; Mattila, Juha-Pekka; Kinnunen, Paavo K. J.

    2008-01-01

    Binary mixtures of cholesterol, ergosterol, and lanosterol with phosphatidylcholines differing in the length of the saturated acyl chains, viz 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) and 1-palmitoyl-2-myristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC), were analyzed using a Langmuir balance for recording force-area (π-A) and surface potential-area (ψ-A) isotherms. A progressive disappearance of the liquid expanded–liquid condensed transition was observed in mixed monolayers with DPPC after the increase in the content of all three sterols. For fluid DMPC matrix, no modulation of the monolayer phase behavior due to the sterols was evident with the exception of lanosterol, for which a pronounced discontinuity between mole fractions of X = 0.3 and X = 0.75 was discernible in the compression isotherms. Condensing and expanding effects in force-area (π-Ā) isotherms due to varying Xsterols and differences in the monolayer physical state were assessed from the values for the interfacial compression moduli. Surface potential measurements support the notion that cholesterol and ergosterol, but not lanosterol, reduce the penetration of water into the lipid monolayers. Examination of the excess free energy of mixing revealed an enhanced stability of binary monolayers containing cholesterol compared to those with ergosterol or lanosterol; the differences are emphasized in the range of surface pressure values found in natural membranes. PMID:18515391

  1. Structure and phase transitions of the multilamellar DMPC membranes in presence of the DMSO and DESO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorshkova, Yu E.; Ivankov, O. I.

    2017-05-01

    The structure and phase transitions of the prepared and formed spontaneously multilamellar vesicles (MLVs) of 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and diethyl sulfoxide (DESO) were investigated using small angle neutron scattering (SANS). The both polar aprotic solvents increase the temperature of the main phase transition (Tm ). The pre-transition does not observed at sulfoxides mole fraction X = 0.2. The transition of the MLVs DMPC in the presence DMSO from gel to liquid-crystalline phase occurs at lower temperature. The method of the MLVs preparation has directly effects on the temperature of the main phase transition and its structure. The value of Tm is higher with ∼ 4.6 ºC in case of the spontaneous forming MLVs from extruded ULVs. The thickness of the solvent layer for prepared MLVs is less by 4.0 Å in gel phase and by 5.6 Å in liquid-crystalline phase than the thickness of the solvent layer for spontaneously formed MLVs.

  2. Diffusion of water and selected atoms in DMPC lipid bilayer membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, F. Y.; Peters, G. H.; Taub, H.; Miskowiec, A.

    2012-11-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been used to determine the diffusion of water molecules as a function of their position in a fully hydrated freestanding 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphorylcholine (DMPC) bilayer membrane at 303 K and 1 atm. The diffusion rate of water in a ˜10 Å thick layer just outside the membrane surface is reduced on average by a factor of ˜2 relative to bulk. For water molecules penetrating deeper into the membrane, there is an increasing reduction in the average diffusion rate with up to one order of magnitude decrease for those deepest in the membrane. A comparison with the diffusion rate of selected atoms in the lipid molecules shows that ˜6 water molecules per lipid molecule move on the same time scale as the lipids and may therefore be considered to be tightly bound to them. The quasielastic neutron scattering functions for water and selected atoms in the lipid molecule have been simulated and compared to observed quasielastic neutron scattering spectra from single-supported bilayer DMPC membranes.

  3. Structure of gel phase DMPC determined by X-ray diffraction.

    PubMed Central

    Tristram-Nagle, Stephanie; Liu, Yufeng; Legleiter, Justin; Nagle, John F

    2002-01-01

    The structure of fully hydrated gel phase dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine lipid bilayers was obtained at 10 degrees C. Oriented lipid multilayers were used to obtain high signal-to-noise intensity data. The chain tilt angle and an estimate of the methylene electron density were obtained from wide angle reflections. The chain tilt angle is measured to be 32.3 +/- 0.6 degrees near full hydration, and it does not change as the sample is mildly dehydrated from a repeat spacing of D = 59.9 A to D = 56.5 A. Low angle diffraction peaks were obtained up to the tenth order for 17 samples with variable D and prepared by three different methods with different geometries. In addition to the usual Fourier reconstructions of the electron density profiles, model electron density profiles were fit to all the low angle data simultaneously while constraining the model to include the wide-angle data and the measured lipid volume. Results are obtained for area/lipid (A = 47.2 +/- 0.5 A(2)), the compressibility modulus (K(A) = 500 +/- 100 dyn/cm), various thicknesses, such as the hydrocarbon thickness (2D(C) = 30.3 +/- 0.2 A), and the head-to-head spacing (D(HH) = 40.1 +/- 0.1 A). PMID:12496100

  4. Temperature dependence of the ripple structure in dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine studied by synchrotron X-ray small-angle diffraction.

    PubMed

    Matuoka, S; Kato, S; Akiyama, M; Amemiya, Y; Hatta, I

    1990-10-05

    The ripple structure of 1,2-dimyristoyl-L-phosphatidylcholine (DMPC) multibilayer containing excess water (60 wt%) was studied by synchrotron X-ray small-angle diffraction. The (0,1) spacing which corresponds to the ripple repeat distance depends on temperature: At 13 degrees C the (0,1) spacing is 14.15 nm, the spacing decreases at higher temperatures and reaches 12.1 nm at 23.5 degrees C, just below the main transition temperature. The spacing is in good agreement between heating process and cooling process except for the supercooling region. The result suggests that the rearrangement of the ripple structure takes place during temperature change successively. The Landau-de Gennes free energy equation explains well the temperature dependence of the ripple repeat distance.

  5. The effect of selected surfactants on the structure of a bicellar system (DMPC/DHPC) studied by SAXS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozak, Maciej; Domka, Ludwik; Jurga, Stefan

    2007-11-01

    The stabilizing or disturbing effect of different surfactants on the bicellar phase of phospholipids significantly depends on their type. The effect of different surfactants on the bicellar structure made of a mixture of phospholipids 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine and 1,2-dihexanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-choline (DMPC/DHPC) has been studied by the small angle scattering of synchrotron radiation. The study has been performed for three surfactants: dodecyldimethyl-(hexyloxymethyl)ammonium chloride, n-undecylammonium chloride and t-octylphenoxypolyethoxyethanol (Triton X-100) introduced into a bicellar solution of DMPC/DHPC (2.8:1). The bicellar phase has been disturbed in the shortest time in the presence of dodecyldimethyl-(hexyloxymethyl)ammonium chloride in this system a transition from the bicellar to lamellar structure has been directly visible. The changes have been less pronounced in the presence of undecylammonium chloride and practically not noted in the presence of Triton X-100.

  6. Morphological Characterization of DMPC/CHAPSO Bicellar Mixtures: A Combined SANS and NMR Study

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ming; Morales, Hannah H.; Katsaras, John; Kučerka, Norbert; Yang, Yongkun; Macdonald, Peter M.; Nieh, Mu-Ping

    2013-12-23

    Spontaneously forming structures of a system composed of dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and 3-[(3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio]-2-hydroxy-1-propanesulfonate (CHAPSO) were studied by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), 31P NMR, and stimulated echo (STE) pulsed field gradient (PFG) 1H NMR diffusion measurements. Charged lipid dimyristoyl phosphatidylglycerol (DMPG) was used to induce different surface charge densities. The structures adopted were investigated as a function of temperature and lipid concentration for samples with a constant molar ratio of long-chain to short-chain lipids (=3). In the absence of DMPG, zwitterionic bicellar mixtures exhibited a phase transition from discoidal bicelles, or ribbons, to multilamellar vesicles either upon dilution or with increased temperature. CHAPSO-containing mixtures showed a higher thermal stability in morphology than DHPC-containing mixtures at the corresponding lipid concentrations. In the presence of DMPG, discoidal bicelles (or ribbons) were also found at low temperature and lower lipid concentration mixtures. At high temperature, perforated lamellae were observed in high concentration mixtures ( ≥ 7.5 wt %) whereas uniform unilamellar vesicles and bicelles formed in low-concentration mixtures ( ≤ 2.5 wt %), respectively, when the mixtures were moderately and highly charged. Lastly, from the results, spontaneous structural diagrams of the zwitterionic and charged systems were constructed.

  7. Effect of divalent cations on DMPC/DHPC bicelle formation and alignment.

    PubMed

    Brindley, Amanda J; Martin, Rachel W

    2012-05-22

    Many important classes of biomolecules require divalent cations for optimal activity, making these ions essential for biologically relevant structural studies. Bicelle mixtures composed of short-chain and long-chain lipids are often used in solution- and solid-state NMR structure determination; however, the phase diagrams of these useful orienting media and membrane mimetics are sensitive to other solution components. Therefore, we have investigated the effect of varying concentrations of four divalent cations, Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Zn(2+), and Cd(2+), on cholesterol sulfate-stabilized DMPC/DHPC bicelles. We found that low concentrations of all the divalent ions are tolerated with minimal perturbation. At higher concentrations Zn(2+) and Cd(2+) disrupt the magnetically aligned phase while Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) produce more strongly oriented phases. This result indicates that divalent cations are not only required to maintain the biological activity of proteins and nucleic acids; they may also be used to manipulate the behavior of the magnetically aligned phase.

  8. Constant-pH MD Simulations of DMPA/DMPC Lipid Bilayers.

    PubMed

    Santos, Hugo A F; Vila-Viçosa, Diogo; Teixeira, Vitor H; Baptista, António M; Machuqueiro, Miguel

    2015-12-08

    Current constant-pH molecular dynamics (CpHMD) simulations provide a proper treatment of pH effects on the structure and dynamics of soluble biomolecules like peptides and proteins. However, addressing such effects on lipid membrane assemblies has remained problematic until now, despite the important role played by lipid ionization at physiological pH in a plethora of biological processes. Modeling (de)protonation events in these systems requires a proper consideration of the physicochemical features of the membrane environment, including a sound treatment of solution ions. Here, we apply our recent CpHMD-L method to the study of pH effects on a 25% DMPA/DMPC bilayer membrane model, closely reproducing the correct lipid phases of this system, namely, gel-fluid coexistence at pH 4 and a fluid phase at pH 7. A significant transition is observed for the membrane ionization and mechanical properties at physiological pH, providing a molecular basis for the well-established role of phosphatidic acid (PA) as a key player in the regulation of many cellular events. Also, as reported experimentally, we observed pH-induced PA-PA lipid aggregation at acidic pH. By including the titration of anionic phospholipids, the current methodology makes possible to simulate lipid bilayers with increased realism. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first simulation study dealing with a continuous phospholipid bilayer with pH titration of all constituent lipids.

  9. Experimental and theoretical studies of emodin interacting with a lipid bilayer of DMPC.

    PubMed

    da Cunha, Antonio R; Duarte, Evandro L; Stassen, Hubert; Lamy, M Teresa; Coutinho, Kaline

    2017-09-22

    Emodin is one of the most abundant anthraquinone derivatives found in nature. It is the active principle of some traditional herbal medicines with known biological activities. In this work, we combined experimental and theoretical studies to reveal information about location, orientation, interaction and perturbing effects of Emodin on lipid bilayers, where we have taken into account the neutral form of the Emodin (EMH) and its anionic/deprotonated form (EM(-)). Using both UV/Visible spectrophotometric techniques and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we showed that both EMH and EM(-) are located in a lipid membrane. Additionally, using MD simulations, we revealed that both forms of Emodin are very close to glycerol groups of the lipid molecules, with the EMH inserted more deeply into the bilayer and more disoriented relative to the normal of the membrane when compared with the EM(-), which is more exposed to interfacial water. Analysis of several structural properties of acyl chains of the lipids in a hydrated pure DMPC bilayer and in the presence of Emodin revealed that both EMH and EM(-) affect the lipid bilayer, resulting in a remarkable disorder of the bilayer in the vicinity of the Emodin. However, the disorder caused by EMH is weaker than that caused by EM(-). Our results suggest that these disorders caused by Emodin might lead to distinct effects on lipid bilayers including its disruption which are reported in the literature.

  10. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of a DMPC Bilayer Using Nonadditive Interaction Models

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Joseph E.; Rahaman, Obaidur; Patel, Sandeep

    2009-01-01

    Abstract We present a polarizable force field based on the charge-equilibration formalism for molecular dynamics simulations of phospholipid bilayers. We discuss refinement of headgroup dihedral potential parameters to reproduce ab initio conformational energies of dimethylphosphate calculated at the MP2/cc-pVTZ level of theory. We also address the refinement of electrostatic and Lennard-Jones (van der Waals) parameters to reproduce ab initio polarizabilities and water interaction energies of dimethylphosphate and tetramethylammonium. We present results of molecular dynamics simulations of a solvated dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine bilayer using this polarizable force field as well as the nonpolarizable, fixed-charge CHARMM27 and CHARMM27r force fields for comparison. Calculated atomic and electron-density profiles, deuterium order parameters, and headgroup orientations are found to be consistent with previous simulations and with experiment. Polarizable interaction models for solvent and lipid exhibit greater water penetration into the lipid interior; this is due to the variation of water molecular dipole moment from a bulk value of 2.6 Debye to a value of 1.9 Debye in the membrane interior. The reduction in the electrostatic component of the desolvation free-energy penalty allows for greater water density. The surface dipole potential predicted by the polarizable model is 0.95 V compared to the value of 0.8 V based on nonpolarizable force-field calculations. Effects of inclusion of explicit polarization are discussed in relation to water dipole moment and varying charge distributions. Dielectric permittivity profiles for polarizable and nonpolarizable interactions exhibit subtle differences arising from the nature of the individual component parameterizations; for the polarizable force field, we obtain a bulk dielectric permittivity of 79, whereas the nonpolarizable force field plateaus at 97 (the value for pure TIP3P water). In the membrane interior, both models

  11. Direct comparison of elastic incoherent neutron scattering experiments with molecular dynamics simulations of DMPC phase transitions.

    PubMed

    Aoun, Bachir; Pellegrini, Eric; Trapp, Marcus; Natali, Francesca; Cantù, Laura; Brocca, Paola; Gerelli, Yuri; Demé, Bruno; Marek Koza, Michael; Johnson, Mark; Peters, Judith

    2016-04-01

    Neutron scattering techniques have been employed to investigate 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn -glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) membranes in the form of multilamellar vesicles (MLVs) and deposited, stacked multilamellar-bilayers (MLBs), covering transitions from the gel to the liquid phase. Neutron diffraction was used to characterise the samples in terms of transition temperatures, whereas elastic incoherent neutron scattering (EINS) demonstrates that the dynamics on the sub-macromolecular length-scale and pico- to nano-second time-scale are correlated with the structural transitions through a discontinuity in the observed elastic intensities and the derived mean square displacements. Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed in parallel focussing on the length-, time- and temperature-scales of the neutron experiments. They correctly reproduce the structural features of the main gel-liquid phase transition. Particular emphasis is placed on the dynamical amplitudes derived from experiment and simulations. Two methods are used to analyse the experimental data and mean square displacements. They agree within a factor of 2 irrespective of the probed time-scale, i.e. the instrument utilized. Mean square displacements computed from simulations show a comparable level of agreement with the experimental values, albeit, the best match with the two methods varies for the two instruments. Consequently, experiments and simulations together give a consistent picture of the structural and dynamical aspects of the main lipid transition and provide a basis for future, theoretical modelling of dynamics and phase behaviour in membranes. The need for more detailed analytical models is pointed out by the remaining variation of the dynamical amplitudes derived in two different ways from experiments on the one hand and simulations on the other.

  12. Direct comparison of elastic incoherent neutron scattering experiments with molecular dynamics simulations of DMPC phase transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Aoun, Bachir; Pellegrini, Eric; Trapp, Marcus; Natali, Francesca; Cantù, Laura; Brocca, Paola; Gerelli, Yuri; Demé, Bruno; Koza, Michael Marek; Johnson, Mark; Peters, Judith

    2016-04-01

    Neutron scattering techniques have been employed to investigate 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3- phosphocholine (DMPC) membranes in the form of multilamellar vesicles (MLVs) and deposited, stacked multilamellar-bilayers (MLBs), covering transitions from the gel to the liquid phase. Neutron diffraction was used to characterise the samples in terms of transition temperatures, whereas elastic incoherent neutron scattering (EINS) demonstrates that the dynamics on the sub-macromolecular length-scale and pico- to nano-second time-scale are correlated with the structural transitions through a discontinuity in the observed elastic intensities and the derived mean square displacements. Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed in parallel focussing on the length-, time- and temperature-scales of the neutron experiments. They correctly reproduce the structural features of the main gel-liquid phase transition. Particular emphasis is placed on the dynamical amplitudes derived from experiment and simulations. Two methods are used to analyse the experimental data and mean square displacements. They agree within a factor of 2 irrespective of the probed time-scale, i.e. the instrument utilized. Mean square displacements computed from simulations show a comparable level of agreement with the experimental values, albeit, the best match with the two methods varies for the two instruments. Consequently, experiments and simulations together give a consistent picture of the structural and dynamical aspects of the main lipid transition and provide a basis for future, theoretical modelling of dynamics and phase behaviour in membranes. The need for more detailed analytical models is pointed out by the remaining variation of the dynamical amplitudes derived in two different ways from experiments on the one hand and simulations on the other.

  13. Strong Static Magnetic Fields Increase the Gel Signal in Partially Hydrated DPPC/DMPC Membranes.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jennifer; Alsop, Richard J; Schmalzl, Karin; Epand, Richard M; Rheinstädter, Maikel C

    2015-09-29

    NIt was recently reported that static magnetic fields increase lipid order in the hydrophobic membrane core of dehydrated native plant plasma membranes [Poinapen, Soft Matter 9:6804-6813, 2013]. As plasma membranes are multicomponent, highly complex structures, in order to elucidate the origin of this effect, we prepared model membranes consisting of a lipid species with low and high melting temperature. By controlling the temperature, bilayers coexisting of small gel and fluid domains were prepared as a basic model for the plasma membrane core. We studied molecular order in mixed lipid membranes made of dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) and dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) using neutron diffraction in the presence of strong static magnetic fields up to 3.5 T. The contribution of the hydrophobic membrane core was highlighted through deuterium labeling the lipid acyl chains. There was no observable effect on lipid organization in fluid or gel domains at high hydration of the membranes. However, lipid order was found to be enhanced at a reduced relative humidity of 43%: a magnetic field of 3.5 T led to an increase of the gel signal in the diffraction patterns of 5%. While all biological materials have weak diamagnetic properties, the corresponding energy is too small to compete against thermal disorder or viscous effects in the case of lipid molecules. We tentatively propose that the interaction between the fatty acid chains' electric moment and the external magnetic field is driving the lipid tails in the hydrophobic membrane core into a better ordered state.

  14. Molecular dynamics simulations predict a tilted orientation for the helical region of dynorphin A(1-17) in dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine bilayers.

    PubMed Central

    Sankararamakrishnan, R; Weinstein, H

    2000-01-01

    The structural properties of the endogenous opioid peptide dynorphin A(1-17) (DynA), a potential analgesic, were studied with molecular dynamics simulations in dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine bilayers. Starting with the known NMR structure of the peptide in dodecylphosphocholine micelles, the N-terminal helical segment of DynA (encompassing residues 1-10) was initially inserted in the bilayer in a perpendicular orientation with respect to the membrane plane. Parallel simulations were carried out from two starting structures, systems A and B, that differ by 4 A in the vertical positioning of the peptide helix. The complex consisted of approximately 26,400 atoms (dynorphin + 86 lipids + approximately 5300 waters). After >2 ns of simulation, which included >1 ns of equilibration, the orientation of the helical segment of DynA had undergone a transition from parallel to tilted with respect to the bilayer normal in both the A and B systems. When the helix axis achieved a approximately 50 degrees angle with the bilayer normal, it remained stable for the next 1 ns of simulation. The two simulations with different starting points converged to the same final structure, with the helix inserted in the bilayer throughout the simulations. Analysis shows that the tilted orientation adopted by the N-terminal helix is due to specific interactions of residues in the DynA sequence with phospholipid headgroups, water, and the hydrocarbon chains. Key elements are the "snorkel model"-type interactions of arginine side chains, the stabilization of the N-terminal hydrophobic sequence in the lipid environment, and the specific interactions of the first residue, Tyr. Water penetration within the bilayer is facilitated by the immersed DynA, but it is not uniform around the surface of the helix. Many water molecules surround the arginine side chains, while water penetration near the helical surface formed by hydrophobic residues is negligible. A mechanism of receptor interaction is proposed

  15. Temperature-dependent neutron diffraction measurements from D2O hydrating single-supported lipid bilayers of DMPC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buck, Z. N.; Torres, J.; Mazza, A.; Kaiser, H.; Taub, H.; Hansen, F. Y.; Miskowiec, A.; Tyagi, M.

    The freezing point depression of water associated with biological membranes, studied principally by NMR, has been of interest for decades. Here we have used neutron diffraction measurements at the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) to investigate the freezing behavior of water associated with single-supported zwitterionic lipid bilayers composed of DMPC. Diffraction patterns obtained as a function of temperature reveal that water freezes abruptly into its hexagonal phase at 270 K with no evidence of amorphous ice. Following the initial crystallization of the membrane-associated water there is a region of continuous hexagonal crystal growth, which is believed to occur in the interfacial water closest to the membrane. The temperature-dependent intensity of the observed Bragg peaks have been compared with that of incoherently elastically-scattered neutrons collected on the High-Flux Backscattering Spectrometer at NIST from an identical sample hydrated with H2O [2]. We find excellent agreement between the two data sets, suggesting the absence of amorphous solid water and that all the water hydrating a DMPC membrane eventually freezes into the hexagonal crystalline phase. 2 M. Bai et al., Europhys. Lett. 98, 48006 (2012). Supported by NSF Grant Nos. DMR-0944772 and DGE-1069091.

  16. Single Molecule Lateral Mobility and Membrane Organization in DMPC/Cholesterol Mixtures at the Air-Water Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaikh, Saame; Stillwell, William; Naumann, Christoph

    2002-03-01

    To better understand the lipid heterogeneity of biological membranes, we have studied the lateral mobility and membrane organization of DMPC and cholesterol (Chol) mixtures at the air-water interface using single molecule fluorescence imaging and epifluorescence microscopy. The single molecule imaging technique was used to track the lateral diffusion of single molecules of TRITC-DPPE or cholesteryl Bodipy. In the absence of Chol, mean square displacement histograms obtained from single molecule tracking of TRITC-DPPE show unobstructed diffusion. Including Chol at low levels of Chol (<10 moldiffusion at intermediate levels ( 30 molof Chol (>40 molmacroscopic phase separations. Data obtained from tracking experiments of cholesteryl-Bodipy also show complementary changes in diffusion. Our results indicate that our techniques provide insight into the micro and macro organization of lipid domains at the air-water interface.

  17. Molecular dynamics simulations and experimental studies of binding and mobility of 7-tert-butyldimethylsilyl-10-hydroxycamptothecin and its 20(S)-4-aminobutyrate ester in DMPC membranes.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Tian-Xiang; Jiang, Zhi-Qiang; Song, Lin; Anderson, Bradley D

    2006-01-01

    The enhanced permeability and retention of liposomes in solid tumors makes liposomal formulations attractive for the targeting of various antitumor agents. This study explores the binding, orientation, and dynamic properties of a potent topoisomerase I inhibitor, 7-tert-butyldimethylsilyl-10-hydroxycamptothecin (DB-67), and its 20(S)-4-aminobutyrate ester prodrug (DB-67-AB) in DMPC liposomes by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and experimental studies. MD simulations of an all-atom and fully hydrated liquid-crystalline bilayer (2 x 36 DMPC lipids) containing single molecules of DB-67 and DB-67-AB were conducted for up to 50 ns. Membrane/water partition coefficients for DB-67 and DB-67-AB vs pH were determined by ultracentrifugation. Fluorescence spectra and/or steady-state anisotropies were measured in various solvents and in DMPC liposomes. Kinetics for the reversible DB-67 lactone ring-opening in the presence and absence of DMPC liposomes were determined by HPLC with fluorescence detection. During the entire simulation time both DB-67 and DB-67-AB were located on the bilayer membrane near the polar ester groups of DMPC. The average depth of penetration for DB-67 and DB-67-AB was similar (12.4-13.2 A) with the prodrug's protonated amino group strongly solvated by surface water and lipid phosphate groups. Binding and fluorescence experiments revealed only a modest reduction in the binding affinity upon attachment of the ionized 4-aminobutyrate group onto DB-67. The binding microenvironment polarity resembles that of a polar solvent such as EtOH and DMSO. Kinetics experiments confirmed that DB-67 lactone hydrolysis is inhibited in the presence of DMPC liposomes, consistent with the reduced exposure of its lactone ring to water, as observed in the simulations. Both bound DB-67 and bound DB-67-AB have nonrandom orientations and reduced mobility in the membrane, especially for diffusion normal to the bilayer surface, and rotational relaxation, both of which are > or

  18. Ionic strength and composition govern the elasticity of biological membranes. A study of model DMPC bilayers by force- and transmission IR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Šegota, Suzana; Vojta, Danijela; Pletikapić, Galja; Baranović, Goran

    2015-02-01

    Infrared (IR) spectroscopy was used to quantify the ion mixture effect of seawater (SW), particularly the contribution of Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) as dominant divalent cations, on the thermotropic phase behaviour of 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-posphocholine (DMPC) bilayers. The changed character of the main transition at 24 °C from sharp to gradual in films and the 1 °C shift of the main transition temperature in dispersions reflect the interactions of lipid headgroups with the ions in SW. Force spectroscopy was used to quantify the nanomechanical hardness of a DMPC supported lipid bilayer (SLB). Considering the electrostatic and ion binding equilibrium contributions while systematically probing the SLB in various salt solutions, we showed that ionic strength had a decisive influence on its nanomechanics. The mechanical hardness of DMPC SLBs in the liquid crystalline phase linearly increases with the increasing fraction of all ion-bound lipids in a series of monovalent salt solutions. It also linearly increases in the gel phase but almost three times faster (the corresponding slopes are 4.9 nN/100 mM and 13.32 nN/100 mM, respectively). We also showed that in the presence of divalent ions (Ca(2+) and Mg(2+)) the bilayer mechanical hardness was unproportionally increased, and that was accompanied with the decrease of Na(+) ion and increase of Cl(-) ion bound lipids. The underlying process is a cooperative and competitive ion binding in both the gel and the liquid crystalline phase. Bilayer hardness thus turned out to be very sensitive to ionic strength as well as to ionic composition of the surrounding medium. In particular, the indicated correlation helped us to emphasize the colligative properties of SW as a naturally occurring complex ion mixture.

  19. The low-resolution structure of nHDL reconstituted with DMPC with and without cholesterol reveals a mechanism for particle expansion[S

    PubMed Central

    Gogonea, Valentin; Gerstenecker, Gary S.; Wu, Zhiping; Lee, Xavier; Topbas, Celalettin; Wagner, Matthew A.; Tallant, Thomas C.; Smith, Jonathan D.; Callow, Philip; Pipich, Vitaliy; Malet, Hélène; Schoehn, Guy; DiDonato, Joseph A.; Hazen, Stanley L.

    2013-01-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) with contrast variation was used to obtain the low-resolution structure of nascent HDL (nHDL) reconstituted with dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine (DMPC) in the absence and presence of cholesterol, [apoA1:DMPC (1:80, mol:mol) and apoA1:DMPC:cholesterol (1:86:9, mol:mol:mol)]. The overall shape of both particles is discoidal with the low-resolution structure of apoA1 visualized as an open, contorted, and out of plane conformation with three arms in nascent HDL/dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine without cholesterol (nHDLDMPC) and two arms in nascent HDL/dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine with cholesterol (nHDLDMPC+Chol). The low-resolution shape of the lipid phase in both nHDLDMPC and nHDLDMPC+Chol were oblate ellipsoids, and fit well within their respective protein shapes. Modeling studies indicate that apoA1 is folded onto itself in nHDLDMPC, making a large hairpin, which was also confirmed independently by both cross-linking mass spectrometry and hydrogen-deuterium exchange (HDX) mass spectrometry analyses. In nHDLDMPC+Chol, the lipid was expanded and no hairpin was visible. Importantly, despite the overall discoidal shape of the whole particle in both nHDLDMPC and nHDLDMPC+Chol, an open conformation (i.e., not a closed belt) of apoA1 is observed. Collectively, these data show that full length apoA1 retains an open architecture that is dictated by its lipid cargo. The lipid is likely predominantly organized as a bilayer with a micelle domain between the open apoA1 arms. The apoA1 configuration observed suggests a mechanism for accommodating changing lipid cargo by quantized expansion of hairpin structures. PMID:23349207

  20. Glycerosomes: Investigation of role of 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidycholine (DMPC) on the assembling and skin delivery performances.

    PubMed

    Manca, Maria Letizia; Manconi, Maria; Zaru, Marco; Valenti, Donatella; Peris, Jose Esteban; Matricardi, Pietro; Maccioni, Anna Maria; Fadda, Anna Maria

    2017-10-30

    Glycerosomes were formulated using 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidycholine (DMPC), diclofenac sodium salt and 10, 20 or 30% glycerol in the water phase, while corresponding liposomes were prepared with the same amount of DMPC and diclofenac, without glycerol. The aim of the present work was to evaluate the effect of the used phospholipid on vesicle features and ability to favour diclofenac skin deposition by comparing these results with those found in previous works performed using hydrogenated soy phosphatidylcholine (P90H) and dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC). Liposomes and glycerosomes were multilamellar, liposomes being smaller (72±6nm). Interactions among glycerol, phospholipids and drug led to the formation of a non-rigid bilayer structure and a variation of the main transition temperature, which shifted to lower temperature. The addition of glycerol led to the formation of more viscous systems (from ∼2.5mPa/s for basic liposomes to ∼5mPa/s for glycerosomes), which improved spread ability of the formulations on the skin.Results obtained in vitro were promising using glycerosomes, irrespective of the amount of glycerol used: the amount of drug, which accumulated into and permeated through the different skin strata, was high and comparable with that obtained using P90H, suggesting that glycerosomes may represent an efficient carrier for both local effect or systemic absorption. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Monitors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, David

    1984-01-01

    Provides guidelines for selecting a monitor to suit specific applications, explains the process by which graphics images are produced on a CRT monitor, and describes four types of flat-panel displays being used in the newest lap-sized portable computers. A comparison chart provides prices and specifications for over 80 monitors. (MBR)

  2. Incorporation of antimicrobial peptides into membranes: a combined liquid-state NMR and molecular dynamics study of alamethicin in DMPC/DHPC bicelles.

    PubMed

    Dittmer, Jens; Thøgersen, Lea; Underhaug, Jarl; Bertelsen, Kresten; Vosegaard, Thomas; Pedersen, Jan M; Schiøtt, Birgit; Tajkhorshid, Emad; Skrydstrup, Troels; Nielsen, Niels Chr

    2009-05-14

    Detailed insight into the interplay between antimicrobial peptides and biological membranes is fundamental to our understanding of the mechanism of bacterial ion channels and the action of these in biological host-defense systems. To explore this interplay, we have studied the incorporation, membrane-bound structure, and conformation of the antimicrobial peptide alamethicin in lipid bilayers using a combination of 1H liquid-state NMR spectroscopy and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. On the basis of experimental NMR data, we evaluate simple in-plane and transmembrane incorporation models as well as pore formation for alamethicin in DMPC/DHPC (1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine/1,2-dihexanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine) bicelles. Peptide-lipid nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) and paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) data support a transmembrane configuration of the peptide in the bilayers, but they also reveal that the system cannot be described by a single simple conformational model because there is a very high degree of dynamics and heterogeneity in the three-component system. To explore the origin of this heterogeneity and dynamics, we have compared the NOE and PRE data with MD simulations of an ensemble of alamethicin peptides in a DMPC bilayer. From all-atom MD simulations, the contacts between peptide, lipid, and water protons are quantified over a time interval up to 95 ns. The MD simulations provide a statistical base that reflects our NMR data and even can explain some initially surprising NMR results concerning specific interactions between alamethicin and the lipids.

  3. Use of a biomimetic chromatographic stationary phase for study of the interactions occurring between inorganic anions and phosphatidylcholine membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Wenzhi; Haddad, Paul R; Hasebe, Kiyoshi; Mori, Masanobu; Tanaka, Kazuhiko; Ohno, Masako; Kamo, Naoki

    2002-01-01

    A liquid chromatographic method for the study of ion-membrane interactions is reported. A phosphatidylcholine biomimetic stationary phase was established by loading dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) onto a reversed-phase octadecylsilica packed column. This column was then used to study the interaction of some inorganic anions with the stationary phase by UV and conductivity detection. Ten inorganic anions were selected as model ions and were analyzed with the proposed chromatographic system. Anion-DMPC interactions of differing magnitudes were observed for all of the model anions. Perchlorate-DMPC interactions were strongest, followed by thiocyanate-DMPC, iodide-DMPC, chlorate-DMPC, nitrate-DMPC, bromide-DMPC, chloride-DMPC, fluoride-DMPC, and then sulfate-DMPC. Cations in the eluent, especially H(+) ions and divalent cations such as Ca(2+), showed strong effects on anion-DMPC interactions. The chromatographic data suggest that DMPC interacts with both the anions and the cations. Anion-DMPC interactions were dependent on the surface potential of the stationary phase: at low surface potentials anion-DMPC interactions were predominantly solvation dependent in nature whereas at more positive surface potentials anion-DMPC interactions were predominantly electrostatic in nature. Cation-DMPC interactions served to raise the surface potential, causing the anion-DMPC interactions to vary from solvation dependent to electrostatic. The chromatographic data were used to provide quantitative estimates of the enthalpies of the anion-DMPC interactions. PMID:12496102

  4. Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Orr, Christopher Henry; Luff, Craig Janson; Dockray, Thomas; Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore

    2004-11-23

    The invention provides apparatus and methods which facilitate movement of an instrument relative to an item or location being monitored and/or the item or location relative to the instrument, whilst successfully excluding extraneous ions from the detection location. Thus, ions generated by emissions from the item or location can successfully be monitored during movement. The technique employs sealing to exclude such ions, for instance, through an electro-field which attracts and discharges the ions prior to their entering the detecting location and/or using a magnetic field configured to repel the ions away from the detecting location.

  5. Interaction between soluble and membrane-embedded potassium channel peptides monitored by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Geoffrey W; Ramesh, Bala; Srai, Surjit K

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have explored the utility of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) in dynamic monitoring of soluble protein-protein interactions. Here, we investigated the applicability of FTIR to detect interaction between synthetic soluble and phospholipid-embedded peptides corresponding to, respectively, a voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channel inactivation domain (ID) and S4-S6 of the Shaker Kv channel (KV1; including the S4-S5 linker "pre-inactivation" ID binding site). KV1 was predominantly α-helical at 30°C when incorporated into dimyristoyl-l-α-phosphatidylcholine (DMPC) bilayers. Cooling to induce a shift in DMPC from liquid crystalline to gel phase reversibly decreased KV1 helicity, and was previously shown to partially extrude a synthetic S4 peptide. While no interaction was detected in liquid crystalline DMPC, upon cooling to induce the DMPC gel phase a reversible amide I peak (1633 cm(-1)) consistent with novel hydrogen bond formation was detected. This spectral shift was not observed for KV1 in the absence of ID (or vice versa), nor when the non-inactivating mutant V7E ID was applied to KV1 under similar conditions. Alteration of salt or redox conditions affected KV1-ID hydrogen bonding in a manner suggesting electrostatic KV1-ID interaction favored by a hairpin conformation for the ID and requiring extrusion of one or more KV1 domains from DMPC, consistent with ID binding to S4-S5. These findings support the utility of FTIR in detecting reversible interactions between soluble and membrane-embedded proteins, with lipid state-sensitivity of the conformation of the latter facilitating control of the interaction.

  6. Interaction between Soluble and Membrane-Embedded Potassium Channel Peptides Monitored by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, Geoffrey W.; Ramesh, Bala; Srai, Surjit K.

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have explored the utility of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) in dynamic monitoring of soluble protein-protein interactions. Here, we investigated the applicability of FTIR to detect interaction between synthetic soluble and phospholipid-embedded peptides corresponding to, respectively, a voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channel inactivation domain (ID) and S4–S6 of the Shaker Kv channel (KV1; including the S4–S5 linker “pre-inactivation” ID binding site). KV1 was predominantly α-helical at 30°C when incorporated into dimyristoyl-l-α-phosphatidylcholine (DMPC) bilayers. Cooling to induce a shift in DMPC from liquid crystalline to gel phase reversibly decreased KV1 helicity, and was previously shown to partially extrude a synthetic S4 peptide. While no interaction was detected in liquid crystalline DMPC, upon cooling to induce the DMPC gel phase a reversible amide I peak (1633 cm−1) consistent with novel hydrogen bond formation was detected. This spectral shift was not observed for KV1 in the absence of ID (or vice versa), nor when the non-inactivating mutant V7E ID was applied to KV1 under similar conditions. Alteration of salt or redox conditions affected KV1-ID hydrogen bonding in a manner suggesting electrostatic KV1-ID interaction favored by a hairpin conformation for the ID and requiring extrusion of one or more KV1 domains from DMPC, consistent with ID binding to S4–S5. These findings support the utility of FTIR in detecting reversible interactions between soluble and membrane-embedded proteins, with lipid state-sensitivity of the conformation of the latter facilitating control of the interaction. PMID:23145073

  7. Measurement of the Membrane Dipole Electric Field in DMPC Vesicles Using Vibrational Shifts of p-Cyanophenylalanine and Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Rebika; Cardenas, Alfredo E.; Elber, Ron; Webb, Lauren J.

    2015-01-01

    The magnitude of the membrane dipole field was measured using vibrational Stark effect (VSE) shifts of nitrile oscillators placed on the unnatural amino acid p-cyanophenylalanine (p-CN-Phe) added to a peptide sequence at four unique positions. These peptides, which were based on a repeating alanine-leucine motif, intercalated into small unilamellar DMPC vesicles which formed an α-helix as confirmed by circular dichroic (CD) spectroscopy. Molecular dynamics simulations of the membrane-intercalated helix containing two of the nitrile probes, one near the head-group region of the lipid (αLAX(25)) and one buried in the interior of the bilayer (αLAX(16)), were used to examine the structure of the nitrile with respect to the membrane normal, the assumed direction the dipole field, by quantifying both a small tilt of the helix in the bilayer and conformational rotation of the p-CN-Phe side chain at steady-state. Vibrational absorption energies of the nitrile oscillator at each position showed a systematic blue shift as the nitrile was stepped towards the membrane interior; for several different concentrations of peptide, the absorption energy of the nitrile located in the middle of the bilayer was ~3 cm−1 greater than that of the nitrile closest to the surface of the membrane. Taken together, the measured VSE shifts and nitrile orientations within the membrane resulted in a value of 8 – 11 MV/cm for the dipole field, at the high end of the range of possible values that have been accumulated from a variety of indirect measurements. Implications for this are discussed. PMID:25602635

  8. Reconciling structural and thermodynamic predictions using all-atom and coarse-grain force fields: the case of charged oligo-arginine translocation into DMPC bilayers.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yuan; Sinha, Sudipta Kumar; Patel, Sandeep

    2014-10-16

    Using the translocation of short, charged cationic oligo-arginine peptides (mono-, di-, and triarginine) from bulk aqueous solution into model DMPC bilayers, we explore the question of the similarity of thermodynamic and structural predictions obtained from molecular dynamics simulations using all-atom and Martini coarse-grain force fields. Specifically, we estimate potentials of mean force associated with translocation using standard all-atom (CHARMM36 lipid) and polarizable and nonpolarizable Martini force fields, as well as a series of modified Martini-based parameter sets. We find that we are able to reproduce qualitative features of potentials of mean force of single amino acid side chain analogues into model bilayers. In particular, modifications of peptide-water and peptide-membrane interactions allow prediction of free energy minima at the bilayer-water interface as obtained with all-atom force fields. In the case of oligo-arginine peptides, the modified parameter sets predict interfacial free energy minima as well as free energy barriers in almost quantitative agreement with all-atom force field based simulations. Interfacial free energy minima predicted by a modified coarse-grained parameter set are -2.51, -4.28, and -5.42 for mono-, di-, and triarginine; corresponding values from all-atom simulations are -0.83, -3.33, and -3.29, respectively, all in units of kcal/mol. We found that a stronger interaction between oligo-arginine and the membrane components and a weaker interaction between oligo-arginine and water are crucial for producing such minima in PMFs using the polarizable CG model. The difference between bulk aqueous and bilayer center states predicted by the modified coarse-grain force field are 11.71, 14.14, and 16.53 kcal/mol, and those by the all-atom model are 6.94, 8.64, and 12.80 kcal/mol; those are of almost the same order of magnitude. Our simulations also demonstrate a remarkable similarity in the structural aspects of the ensemble of

  9. Reconciling Structural and Thermodynamic Predictions Using All-Atom and Coarse-Grain Force Fields: The Case of Charged Oligo-Arginine Translocation into DMPC Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Using the translocation of short, charged cationic oligo-arginine peptides (mono-, di-, and triarginine) from bulk aqueous solution into model DMPC bilayers, we explore the question of the similarity of thermodynamic and structural predictions obtained from molecular dynamics simulations using all-atom and Martini coarse-grain force fields. Specifically, we estimate potentials of mean force associated with translocation using standard all-atom (CHARMM36 lipid) and polarizable and nonpolarizable Martini force fields, as well as a series of modified Martini-based parameter sets. We find that we are able to reproduce qualitative features of potentials of mean force of single amino acid side chain analogues into model bilayers. In particular, modifications of peptide–water and peptide–membrane interactions allow prediction of free energy minima at the bilayer–water interface as obtained with all-atom force fields. In the case of oligo-arginine peptides, the modified parameter sets predict interfacial free energy minima as well as free energy barriers in almost quantitative agreement with all-atom force field based simulations. Interfacial free energy minima predicted by a modified coarse-grained parameter set are −2.51, −4.28, and −5.42 for mono-, di-, and triarginine; corresponding values from all-atom simulations are −0.83, −3.33, and −3.29, respectively, all in units of kcal/mol. We found that a stronger interaction between oligo-arginine and the membrane components and a weaker interaction between oligo-arginine and water are crucial for producing such minima in PMFs using the polarizable CG model. The difference between bulk aqueous and bilayer center states predicted by the modified coarse-grain force field are 11.71, 14.14, and 16.53 kcal/mol, and those by the all-atom model are 6.94, 8.64, and 12.80 kcal/mol; those are of almost the same order of magnitude. Our simulations also demonstrate a remarkable similarity in the structural aspects of

  10. Determination of the Dynamics, Structure, and Orientation of the Transmembrane Segment of ErbB2 in Model Membranes Using Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    spectroscopic techniques. The unlabeled peptide will be incorporated into aligned dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine/dihexanoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC/ DHPC ...analyzed by circular dichroism spectsciopy. 2H Solid-State NMR spectroscopic studies of the HER2 peptides was also conducted in (DMPC/ DHPC ) bicelles...HER2/neu indicate stable secondary structural characteristics in DMPC/ DHPC bicelles. (B) 2H order parameters indicate that both HER2/neu peptides

  11. Factors affecting the stability and conformation of Locusta migratoria apolipophorin III.

    PubMed

    Weers, P M; Kay, C M; Oikawa, K; Wientzek, M; Van der Horst, D J; Ryan, R O

    1994-03-29

    Apolipophorin III (apoLp-III) from the migratory locust, Locusta migratoria, represents the only full-length apolipoprotein whose three-dimensional structure has been solved. In the present study, spectroscopic methods have been employed to investigate the effects of deglycosylation (via endoglycosidase F treatment) and complexation with lipid on the stability and conformation of this protein. Addition of isolated lipid-free apoLp-III to sonicated vesicles of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) resulted in the formation of relatively uniform disklike complexes with an average Strokes diameter of 13.5 nm. Flotation equilibrium experiments conducted in the analytical ultracentrifuge revealed a particle molecular mass of 588 500 Da. Chemical cross-linking and compositional analysis of apoLp-III.DMPC complexes indicated five apoLp-III molecules per disk and an overall DMPC:apoLp-III molar ratio of 122:1. Circular dichroism (CD) spectra of apoLp-III samples suggested a loss of alpha-helical structure upon deglycosylation, while complexation with DMPC did not significantly alter the helix content (estimated to be > 75%). Fluorescence spectroscopy revealed that the apoLp-III tryptophan fluorescence emission maximum was blue-shifted from 347 to 332 and 321 nm upon deglycosylation and complexation with DMPC, respectively. In quenching experiments with native apoLp-III, tryptophan residues were shielded from the positively charged quencher, CsCl. Increased exposure to KI, CsCl, and acrylamide was observed upon deglycosylation, whereas complexation with DMPC yielded lower Ksv values for KI and acrylamide and an increased value for CsCl versus native lipid-free apoLp-III. In guanidine hydrochloride denaturation studies monitored by CD or fluorescence, native, lipid-free apoLp-III displayed a denaturation midpoint of 0.60 M, and delta GDH2O = 5.37 kcal/mol was calculated.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Multivariate Analysis of Mixed Lipid Aggregate Phase Transitions Monitored Using Raman Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Neal, Sharon L

    2017-01-01

    The phase behavior of aqueous 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphorylcholine (DMPC)/1,2-dihexanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DHPC) mixtures between 8.0 ℃ and 41.0 ℃ were monitored using Raman spectroscopy. Temperature-dependent Raman matrices were assembled from series of spectra and subjected to multivariate analysis. The consensus of pseudo-rank estimation results is that seven to eight components account for the temperature-dependent changes observed in the spectra. The spectra and temperature response profiles of the mixture components were resolved by applying a variant of the non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) algorithm described by Lee and Seung (1999). The rotational ambiguity of the data matrix was reduced by augmenting the original temperature-dependent spectral matrix with its cumulative counterpart, i.e., the matrix formed by successive integration of the spectra across the temperature index (columns). Successive rounds of constrained NMF were used to isolate component spectra from a significant fluorescence background. Five major components exhibiting varying degrees of gel and liquid crystalline lipid character were resolved. Hydrogen-bonded water networks exhibiting varying degrees of organization are associated with the lipid components. Spectral parameters were computed to compare the chain conformation, packing, and hydration indicated by the resolved spectra. Based on spectral features and relative amounts of the components observed, four components reflect long chain lipid response. The fifth component could reflect the response of the short chain lipid, DHPC, but there were no definitive spectral features confirming this assignment. A minor component of uncertain assignment that exhibits a striking response to the DMPC pre-transition and chain melting transition also was recovered. While none of the spectra resolved exhibit features unequivocally attributable to a specific aggregate morphology or step in the gelation process

  13. Charge pairing of headgroups in phosphatidylcholine membranes: A molecular dynamics simulation study.

    PubMed Central

    Pasenkiewicz-Gierula, M; Takaoka, Y; Miyagawa, H; Kitamura, K; Kusumi, A

    1999-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation of the hydrated dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) bilayer membrane in the liquid-crystalline phase was carried out for 5 ns to study the interaction among DMPC headgroups in the membrane/water interface region. The phosphatidylcholine headgroup contains a positively charged choline group and negatively charged phosphate and carbonyl groups, although it is a neutral molecule as a whole. Our previous study (Pasenkiewicz-Gierula, M., Y. Takaoka, H. Miyagawa, K. Kitamura, and A. Kusumi. 1997. J. Phys. Chem. 101:3677-3691) showed the formation of water cross-bridges between negatively charged groups in which a water molecule is simultaneously hydrogen bonded to two DMPC molecules. Water bridges link 76% of DMPC molecules in the membrane. In the present study we show that relatively stable charge associations (charge pairs) are formed between the positively and negatively charged groups of two DMPC molecules. Charge pairs link 93% of DMPC molecules in the membrane. Water bridges and charge pairs together form an extended network of interactions among DMPC headgroups linking 98% of all membrane phospholipids. The average lifetimes of DMPC-DMPC associations via charge pairs, water bridges and both, are at least 730, 1400, and over 1500 ps, respectively. However, these associations are dynamic states and they break and re-form several times during their lifetime. PMID:10049307

  14. The membrane insertion of helical antimicrobial peptides from the N-terminus of Helicobacter pylori ribosomal protein L1.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tzong-Hsien; Hall, Kristopher N; Swann, Marcus J; Popplewell, Jonathan F; Unabia, Sharon; Park, Yoonkyung; Hahm, Kyung-Soo; Aguilar, Marie-Isabel

    2010-03-01

    The interaction of two helical antimicrobial peptides, HPA3 and HPA3P with planar supported lipid membranes was quantitatively analysed using two complementary optical biosensors. The peptides are analogues of Hp(2-20) derived from the N-terminus of Helicobacter pylori ribosomal protein L1 (RpL1). The binding of these two peptide analogues to zwitterionic dimyristoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and negatively charged membranes composed of DMPC/dimyristoylphosphatidylglycerol (DMPG) (4:1) was determined using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and dual polarisation interferometry (DPI). Using SPR analysis, it was shown that the proline substitution in HPA3P resulted in much lower binding for both zwitterionic and anionic membranes than HPA3. Structural changes in the planar DMPC and DMPC/DMPG (4:1) bilayers induced by the binding of both Hp(2-20) analogues were then resolved in real-time with DPI. The overall process of peptide-induced changes in membrane structure was analysed by the real-time changes in bound peptide mass as a function of bilayer birefringence. The insertion of both HPA3 and HPA3P into the supported lipid bilayers resulted in a decrease in birefringence with increasing amounts of bound peptide which reflects a decrease in the order of the bilayer. The binding of HPA3 to each membrane was associated with a higher level of bound peptide and greater membrane lipid disordering and a faster and higher degree of insertion into the membrane than HPA3P. Furthermore, the binding of both HPA3 and HPA3P to negatively charged DMPC/DMPG bilayers also leads to a greater disruption of the lipid ordering. These results demonstrate the geometrical changes in the membrane upon peptide insertion and the extent of membrane structural changes can be obtained quantitatively. Moreover, monitoring the effect of peptides on a structurally characterised bilayer has provided further insight into the role of membrane structure changes in the molecular basis of peptide

  15. Monitoring materials

    DOEpatents

    Orr, Christopher Henry; Luff, Craig Janson; Dockray, Thomas; Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore

    2002-01-01

    The apparatus and method provide techniques for effectively implementing alpha and/or beta and/or gamma monitoring of items or locations as desired. Indirect alpha monitoring by detecting ions generated by alpha emissions, in conjunction with beta and/or gamma monitoring is provided. The invention additionally provides for screening of items prior to alpha monitoring using beta and/or gamma monitoring, so as to ensure that the alpha monitoring apparatus is not contaminated by proceeding direct to alpha monitoring of a heavily contaminated item or location. The invention provides additional versatility in the emission forms which can be monitored, whilst maintaining accuracy and avoiding inadvertent contamination.

  16. Interaction study between maltose-modified PPI dendrimers and lipidic model membranes.

    PubMed

    Wrobel, Dominika; Appelhans, Dietmar; Signorelli, Marco; Wiesner, Brigitte; Fessas, Dimitrios; Scheler, Ulrich; Voit, Brigitte; Maly, Jan

    2015-07-01

    The influence of maltose-modified poly(propylene imine) (PPI) dendrimers on dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) or dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine/dimyristoylphosphatidylglycerol (DMPC/DMPG) (3%) liposomes was studied. Fourth generation (G4) PPI dendrimers with primary amino surface groups were partially (open shell glycodendrimers - OS) or completely (dense shell glycodendrimers - DS) modified with maltose residues. As a model membrane, two types of 100nm diameter liposomes were used to observe differences in the interactions between neutral DMPC and negatively charged DMPC/DMPG bilayers. Interactions were studied using fluorescence spectroscopy to evaluate the membrane fluidity of both the hydrophobic and hydrophilic parts of the lipid bilayer and using differential scanning calorimetry to investigate thermodynamic parameter changes. Pulsed-filed gradient NMR experiments were carried out to evaluate common diffusion coefficient of DMPG and DS PPI in D2O when using below critical micelle concentration of DMPG. Both OS and DS PPI G4 dendrimers show interactions with liposomes. Neutral DS dendrimers exhibit stronger changes in membrane fluidity compared to OS dendrimers. The bilayer structure seems more rigid in the case of anionic DMPC/DMPG liposomes in comparison to pure and neutral DMPC liposomes. Generally, interactions of dendrimers with anionic DMPC/DMPG and neutral DMPC liposomes were at the same level. Higher concentrations of positively charged OS dendrimers induced the aggregation process with negatively charged liposomes. For all types of experiments, the presence of NaCl decreased the strength of the interactions between glycodendrimers and liposomes. Based on NMR diffusion experiments we suggest that apart from electrostatic interactions for OS PPI hydrogen bonds play a major role in maltose-modified PPI dendrimer interactions with anionic and neutral model membranes where a contact surface is needed for undergoing multiple H-bond interactions between

  17. Single-protein study of photoresistance of pigment-protein complex in lipid bilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchiyama, Daisuke; Hoshino, Hajime; Otomo, Kohei; Kato, Taro; Onda, Ken-ichi; Watanabe, Akira; Oikawa, Hiroyuki; Fujiyoshi, Satoru; Matsushita, Michio; Nango, Mamoru; Watanabe, Natsuko; Sumino, Ayumi; Dewa, Takehisa

    2011-07-01

    Photoresistance of a pigment-binding membrane protein, light-harvesting 2 (LH2) complex from the photosynthetic bacterium, Rhodopseudomonas acidophila, was investigated by fluorescence of single LH2 complexes at a temperature of 296 K. Before irreversibly stopping fluorescence, a single LH2 complex in phospholipid bilayer of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) emitted on average 4 times more fluorescence photons than a complex in detergent micelle of octylglucopyranoside (OG). Fluorescence-excitation spectrum of single LH2 complexes taken at 5 K showed that the LH2 complex is structurally less perturbed in DMPC bilayer than in OG micelle, suggesting that structural instability reduces photoresistance of LH2.

  18. Interactions between magnetic nanoparticles and model lipid bilayers—Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) studies of the molecular basis of nanotoxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krecisz, M.; Rybka, J. D.; Strugała, A. J.; Skalski, B.; Figlerowicz, M.; Kozak, M.; Giersig, M.

    2016-09-01

    The toxicity of nanoparticles (nanotoxicity) is often associated with their interruption of biological membranes. The effect of polymer-coated magnetic nanoparticles (with different Fe3O4 core sizes and different polymeric coatings) on a model biological membrane system of vesicles formed by dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) was studied. Selected magnetic nanoparticles with core sizes ranging from 3 to 13 nm (in diameter) were characterised by transmission electron microscopy. Samples with 10% DMPC and different nanoparticle concentrations were studied by attenuated total reflectance—Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy to establish the influence of nanoparticles on the phase behaviour of model phospholipid systems.

  19. Lipid lateral heterogeneity in phosphatidylcholine/phosphatidylserine/diacylglycerol vesicles and its influence on protein kinase C activation.

    PubMed Central

    Dibble, A R; Hinderliter, A K; Sando, J J; Biltonen, R L

    1996-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that the activation of protein kinase C (PKC) is influenced by lateral heterogeneities of the components of the lipid bilayer, the thermotropic phase behavior of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC)/dimyristoylphosphatidylserine (DMPS)/dioleoylglycerol (DO) vesicles was compared with the activation of PKC by this system. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy were used to monitor the main transition (i.e., the gel-to-fluid phase transition) as a function of mole fraction DO (chi(DO)) in DMPC/DO, DMPS/DO, and [DMPC/DMPS (1:1, mol/mol)]/DO multilamellar vesicles (MLVs). In each case, when chi(DO) < or approximately 0.3, DO significantly broadened the main transition and shifted it to lower temperatures; but when chi(DO) > approximately 0.3, the main transition became highly cooperative, i.e., narrow, again. The coexistence of overlapping narrow and broad transitions was clearly evident in DSC thermograms from chi(DO) approximately 0.1 to chi(DO) approximately 0.3, with the more cooperative transition growing at the expense of the broader one as chi(DO) increased. FTIR spectroscopy, using analogs of DMPC and DMPS with perdeuterated acyl chains, showed that the melting profiles of all three lipid components in [DMPC/DMPS (1:1, mol/mol)]/DO MLVs virtually overlay when chi(DO) = 0.33, suggesting that a new type of phase, with a phospholipid/DO mole ratio near 2:1, is formed in this system. Collectively, the results are consistent with the coexistence of DO-poor and DO-rich domains throughout the compositions chi(DO) approximately 0.1 to chi(DO) approximately 0.3, even at temperatures above the main transition. Comparison of the phase behavior of the binary mixtures with that of the ternary mixtures suggests that DMPS/DO interactions may be more favorable than DMPC/DO interactions in the ternary system, especially in the gel state. PKC activity was measured using [DMPC/DMPS (1:1, mol/mol)]/DO MLVs

  20. Bladder Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Diagnostic Ultrasound Corporation's Bladder Scan Monitor continuously records and monitors bladder fullness and alerts the wearer or caretaker when voiding is required. The sensor is held against the lower abdomen by a belt and connected to the monitor by a cable. The sensor obtains bladder volume data from sound waves reflecting off the bladder wall. The device was developed by Langley Research Center, the Ames Research Center and the NASA Technology Applications Team. It utilizes Langley's advanced ultrasound technology. It is licensed to the ARC for medical applications, and sublicensed to Diagnostics Ultrasound. Central monitoring systems are planned for the future.

  1. Monitoring your baby before labor

    MedlinePlus

    Prenatal care - monitoring; Pregnancy care - monitoring; Non-stress test - monitoring; NST- monitoring; Contraction stress test - monitoring; CST- monitoring; Biophysical profile - monitoring; BPP - monitoring

  2. Ion Monitoring

    DOEpatents

    Orr, Christopher Henry; Luff, Craig Janson; Dockray, Thomas; Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore

    2003-11-18

    The apparatus and method provide a technique for significantly reducing capacitance effects in detector electrodes arising due to movement of the instrument relative to the item/location being monitored in ion detection based techniques. The capacitance variations are rendered less significant by placing an electrically conducting element between the detector electrodes and the monitored location/item. Improved sensitivity and reduced noise signals arise as a result. The technique also provides apparatus and method suitable for monitoring elongate items which are unsuited to complete enclosure in one go within a chamber. The items are monitored part by part as the pass through the instrument, so increasing the range of items or locations which can be successfully monitored.

  3. Modeling DMPC lipid membranes with SIRAH force-field.

    PubMed

    Barrera, Exequiel E; Frigini, Ezequiel N; Porasso, Rodolfo D; Pantano, Sergio

    2017-08-10

    Coarse-grained simulation schemes are increasingly gaining popularity in the scientific community because of the significant speed up granted, allowing a considerable expansion of the accessible time and size scales accessible to molecular simulations. However, the number of compatible force fields capable of representing ensembles containing different molecular species (i.e., Protein, DNA, etc) is still limited. Here, we present a set of parameters and simplified representation for lipids compatible with the SIRAH force field for coarse-grained simulations ( http://www.sirahff.com ). We show that the present model not only achieves a correct reproduction of structural parameters as area per lipid and thickness, but also dynamic descriptors such as diffusion coefficient, order parameters, and proper temperature driven variations. Adding phospholipid membranes to the existing aqueous solution, protein and DNA representations of the SIRAH force field permit considering the most common problems tackled by the biomolecular simulation community.

  4. Electrostatic monitoring

    DOEpatents

    Orr, Christopher Henry; Luff, Craig Janson; Dockray, Thomas; Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore

    2001-01-01

    The apparatus and method provide a technique for more simply measuring alpha and/or beta emissions arising from items or locations. The technique uses indirect monitoring of the emissions by detecting ions generated by the emissions, the ions being attracted electrostatically to electrodes for discharge of collection. The apparatus and method employ a chamber which is sealed around the item or location during monitoring with no air being drawn into or expelled from the chamber during the monitoring process. A simplified structure and operations arises as a result, but without impairing the efficiency and accuracy of the detection technique.

  5. Environment Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Viking landers touched down on Mars equipped with a variety of systems to conduct automated research, each carrying a compact but highly sophisticated instrument for analyzing Martian soil and atmosphere. Instrument called a Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometer (GC/MS) had to be small, lightweight, shock resistant, highly automated and extremely sensitive, yet require minimal electrical power. Viking Instruments Corporation commercialized this technology and targeted their primary market as environmental monitoring, especially toxic and hazardous waste site monitoring. Waste sites often contain chemicals in complex mixtures, and the conventional method of site characterization, taking samples on-site and sending them to a laboratory for analysis is time consuming and expensive. Other terrestrial applications are explosive detection in airports, drug detection, industrial air monitoring, medical metabolic monitoring and for military, chemical warfare agents.

  6. Biological monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, M.H.; Dillon, H.K.

    1986-02-01

    Biological monitoring is defined as the measurement and assessment of workplace agents or their metabolites in tissues, secreta, excreta, expired air, or any combination of these to evaluate exposure and health risk compared to an appropriate reference. Biological monitoring offers several advantages: it takes into account individual variability in biological activity resulting from a chemical insult. It takes into account the effects of personal physical activity and individual life styles. It is a valuable adjunct to ambient monitoring and health surveillance. The importance of chemical speciation in the toxicity of pollutants is discussed. Basic protocols for lead, aluminum, cadmium, mercury, selenium, and nickel are presented. Basic criteria for biological monitoring methods are presented. 11 references, 1 table.

  7. The antimicrobial peptide aurein 1.2 disrupts model membranes via the carpet mechanism.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, David I; Le Brun, Anton P; Whitwell, Thomas C; Sani, Marc-Antoine; James, Michael; Separovic, Frances

    2012-12-05

    The membrane interactions of the antimicrobial peptide aurein 1.2 were studied using a range of biophysical techniques to determine the location and the mechanism of action in DMPC (dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine) and DMPC/DMPG (dimyristoylphosphatidylglycerol) model membranes that mimic characteristics of eukaryotic and prokaryotic membranes, respectively. Neutron reflectometry and solid-state NMR revealed subtle changes in membrane structure caused by the peptide. Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation, vesicle dye leakage and atomic force microscopy measurements were used to investigate the global mode of peptide interaction. Aurein 1.2 displayed an enhanced interaction with the anionic DMPC/DMPG membrane while exhibiting primarily a surface interaction with both types of model membranes, which led to bilayer disruption and membrane lysis. The antimicrobial peptide interaction is consistent with the carpet mechanism for aurein 1.2 with discrete structural changes depending on the type of phospholipid membrane.

  8. Effects of Nanoparticle Morphology and Acyl Chain Length on Spontaneous Lipid Transfer Rates

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Yan; Li, Ming; Charubin, Kamil; Liu, Ying; Heberle, Frederick A.; Katsaras, John; Jing, Benxin; Zhu, Yingxi; Nieh, Mu-Ping

    2015-11-05

    In this paper, we report on studies of lipid transfer rates between different morphology nanoparticles and lipids with different length acyl chains. The lipid transfer rate of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (di-C14, DMPC) in discoidal “bicelles” (0.156 h–1) is 2 orders of magnitude greater than that of DMPC vesicles (ULVs) (1.1 × 10–3 h–1). For both bicellar and ULV morphologies, increasing the acyl chain length by two carbons [going from di-C14 DMPC to di-C16, dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC)] causes lipid transfer rates to decrease by more than 2 orders of magnitude. Results from small angle neutron scattering (SANS), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) are in good agreement. Finally, the present studies highlight the importance of lipid dynamic processes taking place in different morphology biomimetic membranes.

  9. Dynamical and phase behavior of a phospholipid membrane altered by an antimicrobial peptide at low concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Mamontov, Eugene; Tyagi, M.; Qian, Shuo; Rai, Durgesh K.; Urban, Volker S.; Sharma, V. K.

    2016-05-27

    Here we discuss that the mechanism of action of antimicrobial peptides is traditionally attributed to the formation of pores in the lipid cell membranes of pathogens, which requires a substantial peptide to lipid ratio. However, using incoherent neutron scattering, we show that even at a concentration too low for pore formation, an archetypal antimicrobial peptide, melittin, disrupts the regular phase behavior of the microscopic dynamics in a phospholipid membrane, dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC). At the same time, another antimicrobial peptide, alamethicin, does not exert a similar effect on the DMPC microscopic dynamics. The melittin-altered lateral motion of DMPC at physiological temperature no longer resembles the fluid-phase behavior characteristic of functional membranes of the living cells. The disruptive effect demonstrated by melittin even at low concentrations reveals a new mechanism of antimicrobial action relevant in more realistic scenarios, when peptide concentration is not as high as would be required for pore formation, which may facilitate treatment with antimicrobial peptides.

  10. Effects of Nanoparticle Morphology and Acyl Chain Length on Spontaneous Lipid Transfer Rates

    DOE PAGES

    Xia, Yan; Li, Ming; Charubin, Kamil; ...

    2015-11-05

    In this paper, we report on studies of lipid transfer rates between different morphology nanoparticles and lipids with different length acyl chains. The lipid transfer rate of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (di-C14, DMPC) in discoidal “bicelles” (0.156 h–1) is 2 orders of magnitude greater than that of DMPC vesicles (ULVs) (1.1 × 10–3 h–1). For both bicellar and ULV morphologies, increasing the acyl chain length by two carbons [going from di-C14 DMPC to di-C16, dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC)] causes lipid transfer rates to decrease by more than 2 orders of magnitude. Results from small angle neutron scattering (SANS), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and fluorescence correlationmore » spectroscopy (FCS) are in good agreement. Finally, the present studies highlight the importance of lipid dynamic processes taking place in different morphology biomimetic membranes.« less

  11. Interactions of the antiviral and antiparkinson agent amantadine with lipid membranes and human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Suwalsky, Mario; Jemiola-Rzeminska, Malgorzata; Altamirano, Mariella; Villena, Fernando; Dukes, Nathan; Strzalka, Kazimierz

    2015-07-01

    Aimed to better understand the molecular mechanisms of its interactions with cell membranes, human erythrocyte and molecular models of the red cell membrane were utilized. The latter consisted of bilayers of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DMPE), representative of phospholipid classes located in the outer and inner monolayers of the human erythrocyte membrane, respectively. The capacity of amantadine to perturb the bilayer structures of DMPC and DMPE was evaluated by X-ray diffraction, fluorescence spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). In an attempt to further elucidate its effects on cell membranes, the present work also examined amantadine influence on the morphology of intact human erythrocytes by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results indicated that amantadine induced morphological changes to human erythrocytes and interacted in a concentration-dependent manner with DMPC bilayers in contrast to DMPE that was hardly affected by the presence of the drug.

  12. Dynamical and phase behavior of a phospholipid membrane altered by an antimicrobial peptide at low concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Mamontov, Eugene; Tyagi, M.; Qian, Shuo; Rai, Durgesh K.; Urban, Volker S.; Sharma, V. K.

    2016-05-27

    Here we discuss that the mechanism of action of antimicrobial peptides is traditionally attributed to the formation of pores in the lipid cell membranes of pathogens, which requires a substantial peptide to lipid ratio. However, using incoherent neutron scattering, we show that even at a concentration too low for pore formation, an archetypal antimicrobial peptide, melittin, disrupts the regular phase behavior of the microscopic dynamics in a phospholipid membrane, dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC). At the same time, another antimicrobial peptide, alamethicin, does not exert a similar effect on the DMPC microscopic dynamics. The melittin-altered lateral motion of DMPC at physiological temperature no longer resembles the fluid-phase behavior characteristic of functional membranes of the living cells. The disruptive effect demonstrated by melittin even at low concentrations reveals a new mechanism of antimicrobial action relevant in more realistic scenarios, when peptide concentration is not as high as would be required for pore formation, which may facilitate treatment with antimicrobial peptides.

  13. Effects of the antimalarial drug primaquine on the dynamic structure of lipid model membranes.

    PubMed

    Basso, Luis G M; Rodrigues, Renata Z; Naal, Rose M Z G; Costa-Filho, Antonio J

    2011-01-01

    Primaquine (PQ) is a potent therapeutic agent used in the treatment of malaria and its mechanism of action still lacks a more detailed understanding at a molecular level. In this context, we used differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), pressure perturbation calorimetry (PPC), and electron spin resonance (ESR) to investigate the effects of PQ on the lipid phase transition, acyl chain dynamics, and on volumetric properties of lipid model membranes. DSC thermograms revealed that PQ stabilizes the fluid phase of the lipid model membranes and interacts mainly with the lipid headgroups. This result was revealed by the great effect on the pretransition of phosphatidylcholines and the destabilization of the inverted hexagonal phase of a phosphatidylethanolamine bilayer. Spin probes located at different positions along the lipid chain were used to monitor different membrane regions. ESR results indicated that PQ is effective in changing the acyl chain ordering and dynamics of the whole chain of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) phospholipid in the rippled gel phase. The combined ESR and PPC results revealed that the slight DMPC volume changes at the main phase transition induced by the presence of PQ is probably due to a less dense lipid gel phase. At physiological pH, the cationic amphiphilic PQ strongly interacts with the lipid headgroup region of the bilayers, causing considerable disorganization in the hydrophobic core. These results shed light on the molecular mechanism of primaquine-lipid interaction, which may be useful in the understanding of the complex mechanism of action and/or the adverse effects of this antimalarial drug. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Interaction of beta-lactoglobulin with phospholipid bilayers: a molecular level elucidation as revealed by infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lefèvre, T; Subirade, M

    2000-10-10

    Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy has been used to study, at a molecular level, the interactions between beta-lactoglobulin (BLG), the most abundant globular protein in milk, and some lipids (sphingomyelin, SM; dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine, DMPC; dipalmytoylphosphatidylcholine, DPPC; dimyristoylphosphatidylserine-sodium salt, DMPS; dipalmitoylphosphatidylserine-sodium salt, DPPS) constituting the milk fat globule membrane (MFGM). The interactions were monitored with respect to alteration in the secondary structure of BLG, as registered by the amide I' band, and phospholipid conformation, as revealed by the acyl chain and carbonyl bands. The results show that neither the conformation nor the thermotropism of neutral bilayers containing DMPC or DPPC is affected by BLG. Reciprocally, the secondary structure and thermal behaviour of pure BLG remain the same in the presence of PC. These results suggest that no interaction occurs between PC and BLG, in agreement with previous studies. However, it is found that BLG interacts with neutral bilayers constituted by milk SM lipids, increasing gauche conformers and thus conformational disorder of the lipid acyl chains. This perturbing effect has been attributed to a partial penetration of BLG into the hydrophobic core of the bilayer, which allows hydrophobic interactions between BLG and SM. Moreover, the fact that SM possesses the same headgroup of PC implies that the head group does not prevent the occurrence of BLG-lipid interactions and other lipid regions can control the binding of BLG to lipids. Furthermore, BLG was found to interact electrostatically with charged bilayers containing PS, leading to a rigidification of the lipid hydrocarbon chains and a dehydration of the interfacial region. This last effect suggests that the protein limits the accessibility of water molecules to the interfacial region of the phospholipids by its presence at the membrane surface.

  15. Monitoring well

    DOEpatents

    Hubbell, Joel M.; Sisson, James B.

    2002-01-01

    The present invention relates to a monitoring well which includes an enclosure defining a cavity and a water reservoir enclosed within the cavity and wherein the reservoir has an inlet and an outlet. The monitoring well further includes a porous housing borne by the enclosure and which defines a fluid chamber which is oriented in fluid communication with the outlet of the reservoir, and wherein the porous housing is positioned in an earthen soil location below-grade. A geophysical monitoring device is provided and mounted in sensing relation relative to the fluid chamber of the porous housing; and a coupler is selectively moveable relative to the outlet of reservoir to couple the porous housing and water reservoir in fluid communication. An actuator is coupled in force transmitting relation relative to the coupler to selectively position the coupler in a location to allow fluid communication between the reservoir and the fluid chamber defined by the porous housing.

  16. Recreation monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    DiGennaro, B.; Merklein, G.H.

    1995-12-31

    Recreational use and recreational facilities are common features at hydropower projects. In fact, the hydropower industry is a major supplier of recreational opportunities contributing to tourism and rural economic growth in many communities across the country, As demands for public recreation have grown, pressure on the hydropower industry to provide more public access and more facilities has increased. This paper looks at recent developments in the FERC licensing and compliance arenas with regard to planning for and monitoring recreation at hydropower facilities. The paper highlights the increased occurrence of recreation monitoring requirements in license articles and discusses methods for complying with such requirements. The paper also looks at how monitoring data can be used to avoid unnecessary developments and to better plan for future recreation use.

  17. Monitoring technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevenson, William A. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A process for infrared spectroscopic monitoring of insitu compositional changes in a polymeric material comprises the steps of providing an elongated infrared radiation transmitting fiber that has a transmission portion and a sensor portion, embedding the sensor portion in the polymeric material to be monitored, subjecting the polymeric material to a processing sequence, applying a beam of infrared radiation to the fiber for transmission through the transmitting portion to the sensor portion for modification as a function of properties of the polymeric material, monitoring the modified infrared radiation spectra as the polymeric material is being subjected to the processing sequence to obtain kinetic data on changes in the polymeric material during the processing sequence, and adjusting the processing sequence as a function of the kinetic data provided by the modified infrared radiation spectra information.

  18. Monitoring technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevenson, William A. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A process for infrared spectroscopic monitoring of insitu compositional changes in a polymeric material comprises the steps of providing an elongated infrared radiation transmitting fiber that has a transmission portion and a sensor portion, embedding the sensor portion in the polymeric material to be monitored, subjecting the polymeric material to a processing sequence, applying a beam of infrared radiation to the fiber for transmission through the transmitting portion to the sensor portion for modification as a function of properties of the polymeric material, monitoring the modified infrared radiation spectra as the polymeric material is being subjected to the processing sequence to obtain kinetic data on changes in the polymeric material during the processing sequence, and adjusting the processing sequence as a function of the kinetic data provided by the modified infrared radiation spectra information.

  19. Monitoring well

    DOEpatents

    Hubbell, Joel M.; Sisson, James B.

    1999-01-01

    A monitoring well including a conduit defining a passageway, the conduit having a proximal and opposite, distal end; a coupler connected in fluid flowing relationship with the passageway; and a porous housing borne by the coupler and connected in fluid flowing relation thereto.

  20. Monitoring well

    DOEpatents

    Hubbell, J.M.; Sisson, J.B.

    1999-06-29

    A monitoring well is described which includes: a conduit defining a passageway, the conduit having a proximal and opposite, distal end; a coupler connected in fluid flowing relationship with the passageway; and a porous housing borne by the coupler and connected in fluid flowing relation thereto. 8 figs.

  1. Parental Monitoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shillington, Audrey M.; Lehman, Stephanie; Clapp, John; Hovell, Melbourne; Sipan, Carol; Blumberg, Elaine

    2005-01-01

    Adolescence is a developmental period during which many youth experiment with risk practices. This paper examined the association of parental monitoring with a range of alcohol and other drug (AOD) use behaviors among high-risk youth, while controlling for other demographic and environmental variables previously found to be associated with AOD…

  2. Parental Monitoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shillington, Audrey M.; Lehman, Stephanie; Clapp, John; Hovell, Melbourne; Sipan, Carol; Blumberg, Elaine

    2005-01-01

    Adolescence is a developmental period during which many youth experiment with risk practices. This paper examined the association of parental monitoring with a range of alcohol and other drug (AOD) use behaviors among high-risk youth, while controlling for other demographic and environmental variables previously found to be associated with AOD…

  3. Tritium monitor

    DOEpatents

    Chastagner, Philippe

    1994-01-01

    A system for continuously monitoring the concentration of tritium in an aqueous stream. The system pumps a sample of the stream to magnesium-filled combustion tube which reduces the sample to extract hydrogen gas. The hydrogen gas is then sent to an isotope separation device where it is separated into two groups of isotopes: a first group of isotopes containing concentrations of deuterium and tritium, and a second group of isotopes having substantially no deuterium and tritium. The first group of isotopes containing concentrations of deuterium and tritium is then passed through a tritium detector that produces an output proportional to the concentration of tritium detected. Preferably, the detection system also includes the necessary automation and data collection equipment and instrumentation for continuously monitoring an aqueous stream.

  4. Sewage Monitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Every U.S. municipality must determine how much waste water it is processing and more importantly, how much is going unprocessed into lakes and streams either because of leaks in the sewer system or because the city's sewage facilities were getting more sewer flow than they were designed to handle. ADS Environmental Services, Inc.'s development of the Quadrascan Flow Monitoring System met the need for an accurate method of data collection. The system consists of a series of monitoring sensors and microcomputers that continually measure water depth at particular sewer locations and report their findings to a central computer. This provides precise information to city managers on overall flow, flow in any section of the city, location and severity of leaks and warnings of potential overload. The core technology has been expanded upon in terms of both technical improvements, and functionality for new applications, including event alarming and control for critical collection system management problems.

  5. Tritium monitor

    DOEpatents

    Chastagner, P.

    1994-06-14

    A system is described for continuously monitoring the concentration of tritium in an aqueous stream. The system pumps a sample of the stream to magnesium-filled combustion tube which reduces the sample to extract hydrogen gas. The hydrogen gas is then sent to an isotope separation device where it is separated into two groups of isotopes: a first group of isotopes containing concentrations of deuterium and tritium, and a second group of isotopes having substantially no deuterium and tritium. The first group of isotopes containing concentrations of deuterium and tritium is then passed through a tritium detector that produces an output proportional to the concentration of tritium detected. Preferably, the detection system also includes the necessary automation and data collection equipment and instrumentation for continuously monitoring an aqueous stream. 1 fig.

  6. Patient Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    In photo above, the electrocardiogram of a hospitalized patient is being transmitted by telemetry. Widely employed in space operations, telemetry is a process wherein instrument data is converted to electrical signals and sent to a receiver where the signals are reconverted to usable information. In this instance, heart readings are picked up by the electrode attached to the patient's body and delivered by wire to the small box shown, which is a telemetry transmitter. The signals are relayed wirelessly to the console in the background, which converts them to EKG data. The data is displayed visually and recorded on a printout; at the same time, it is transmitted to a central control station (upper photo) where a nurse can monitor the condition of several patients simultaneously. The Patient Monitoring System was developed by SCI Systems, Inc., Huntsville, Alabama, in conjunction with Abbott Medical Electronics, Houston, Texas. In developing the system, SCI drew upon its extensive experience as a NASA contractor. The company applied telemetry technology developed for the Saturn launch vehicle and the Apollo spacecraft; instrumentation technology developed for heart, blood pressure and sleep monitoring of astronauts aboard NASA's Skylab long duration space station; and communications technology developed for the Space Shuttle.

  7. Fluorescent molecular probes based on excited state prototropism in lipid bilayer membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohapatra, Monalisa; Mishra, Ashok K.

    2012-03-01

    Excited state prototropism (ESPT) is observed in molecules having one or more ionizable protons, whose proton transfer efficiency is different in ground and excited states. The interaction of various ESPT molecules like naphthols and intramolecular ESPT (ESIPT) molecules like hydroxyflavones etc. with different microheterogeneous media have been studied in detail and excited state prototropism as a probe concept has been gaining ground. The fluorescence of different prototropic forms of such molecules, on partitioning to an organized medium like lipid bilayer membrane, often show sensitive response to the local environment with respect to the local structure, physical properties and dynamics. Our recent work using 1-naphthol as an ESPT fluorescent molecular probe has shown that the incorporation of monomeric bile salt molecules into lipid bilayer membranes composed from dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC, a lung surfactant) and dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC), in solid gel and liquid crystalline phases, induce appreciable wetting of the bilayer up to the hydrocarbon core region, even at very low (<= 1 mM) concentrations of the bile salts. The incorporation and location of fisetin, an ESIPT molecule having antioxidant properties, in lipid bilayer membrane has been sensitively monitored from its intrinsic fluorescence behaviour.

  8. Ammonia Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sauer, Richard L. (Inventor); Akse, James R. (Inventor); Thompson, John O. (Inventor); Atwater, James E. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    Ammonia monitor and method of use are disclosed. A continuous, real-time determination of the concentration of ammonia in an aqueous process stream is possible over a wide dynamic range of concentrations. No reagents are required because pH is controlled by an in-line solid-phase base. Ammonia is selectively transported across a membrane from the process stream to an analytical stream to an analytical stream under pH control. The specific electrical conductance of the analytical stream is measured and used to determine the concentration of ammonia.

  9. Monitoring microcirculation.

    PubMed

    Ocak, Işık; Kara, Atila; Ince, Can

    2016-12-01

    The clinical relevance of microcirculation and its bedside observation started gaining importance in the 1990s since the introduction of hand-held video microscopes. From then, this technology has been continuously developed, and its clinical relevance has been established in more than 400 studies. In this paper, we review the different types of video microscopes, their application techniques, the microcirculation of different organ systems, the analysis methods, and the software and scoring systems. The main focus of this review will be on the state-of-art technique, CytoCam-incident dark-field imaging, and the most recent technological and technical updates concerning microcirculation monitoring.

  10. Machine Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    When a printing press jams, damage is extensive, repairs are costly, and time and production loss can be expensive. James River Corporation requested G.W. Shelton, a design engineer with Logical Control Systems to solve this problem. Shelton found the solution in a NASA Tech Brief article describing a system of pulley and belt drives. This led to the design of a system that monitors drive components for changes in relative speed that would indicate belt slippage and jam probability. When a combination of variables is not met, an emergency "stop" signal is sent to the press and an alarm is triggered.

  11. Traffic Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Mestech's X-15 "Eye in the Sky," a traffic monitoring system, incorporates NASA imaging and robotic vision technology. A camera or "sensor box" is mounted in a housing. The sensor detects vehicles approaching an intersection and sends the information to a computer, which controls the traffic light according to the traffic rate. Jet Propulsion Laboratory technical support packages aided in the company's development of the system. The X-15's "smart highway" can also be used to count vehicles on a highway and compute the number in each lane and their speeds, important information for freeway control engineers. Additional applications are in airport and railroad operations. The system is intended to replace loop-type traffic detectors.

  12. Smokestack Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Environmental Protection Agency monitors emissions from industrial smokestacks to obtain such information as how much pollutant material is being discharged into the atmosphere, how rapidly it is being discharged, and how the smoke plume disperses after leaving the stack. Raytheon's invisible laser beam, adapted from NASA's laser doppler technology, measures emission from one of the stacks. Aimed from a van's interior, the beam is projected from the roof mounted scanning pod near the rear of the vehicle. Particles in the smoke coming out of the stack reflect the beam back to light-detecting equipment in the van. The frequency of the returned beam is different from that of outgoing beam; analysis of the difference in frequencies, called "doppler shift" allows determination of the velocity.

  13. Document Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The charters of Freedom Monitoring System will periodically assess the physical condition of the U.S. Constitution, Declaration of Independence and Bill of Rights. Although protected in helium filled glass cases, the documents are subject to damage from light vibration and humidity. The photometer is a CCD detector used as the electronic film for the camera system's scanning camera which mechanically scans the document line by line and acquires a series of images, each representing a one square inch portion of the document. Perkin-Elmer Corporation's photometer is capable of detecting changes in contrast, shape or other indicators of degradation with 5 to 10 times the sensitivity of the human eye. A Vicom image processing computer receives the data from the photometer stores it and manipulates it, allowing comparison of electronic images over time to detect changes.

  14. Blowout Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    C Language Integrated Production System (CLIPS), a NASA-developed software shell for developing expert systems, has been embedded in a PC-based expert system for training oil rig personnel in monitoring oil drilling. Oil drilling rigs if not properly maintained for possible blowouts pose hazards to human life, property and the environment may be destroyed. CLIPS is designed to permit the delivery of artificial intelligence on computer. A collection of rules is set up and, as facts become known, these rules are applied. In the Well Site Advisor, CLIPS provides the capability to accurately process, predict and interpret well data in a real time mode. CLIPS was provided to INTEQ by COSMIC.

  15. Characterization of magnetically oriented phospholipid micelles for measurement of dipolar couplings in macromolecules.

    PubMed

    Ottiger, M; Bax, A

    1998-10-01

    Weak alignment of solute molecules with the magnetic field can be achieved in a dilute liquid crystalline medium, consisting of an aqueous mixture of dimyristoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and dihexanoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DHPC). For a certain range of molar ratios, DMPC and DHPC can form large, disc-shaped particles, commonly referred to as bicelles (Sanders and Schwonek, 1992), which cooperatively align in the magnetic field and induce a small degree of alignment on asymmetrically shaped solute molecules. As a result, dipolar couplings between pairs of 1H, 13C or 15N nuclei are no longer averaged to zero by rotational diffusion and they can be readily measured, providing valuable structural information. The stability of these liquid crystals and the degree of alignment of the solute molecules depend strongly on experimental variables such as the DMPC:DHPC ratio and concentration, the preparation protocol of the DMPC/DHPC mixtures, as well as salt, temperature, and pH. The lower temperature limit for which the liquid crystalline phase is stable can be reduced to 20 degrees C by using a ternary mixture of DHPC, DMPC, and 1-myristoyl-2-myristoleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, or a binary mixture of DHPC and ditridecanoyl-phosphatidylcholine. These issues are discussed, with an emphasis on the use of the medium for obtaining weak alignment of biological macromolecules.

  16. QF monitoring. [Qualifying Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwald, S. ); Hoffman, B. )

    1991-10-01

    This article examines the effects on project financing of independent power projects of the California Public Utilities Commission decision to grant authority to California utilities to monitor and enforce compliance with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Qualifying Facility standards. The topics of the article include monitoring proposals, monitoring guidelines, the effects of monitoring, minimizing status loss and monitoring requirements.

  17. Application of glucosylceramide-based liposomes increased the ceramide content in a three-dimensional cultured skin epidermis.

    PubMed

    Tokudome, Y; Endo, M; Hashimoto, F

    2014-01-01

    Ceramide is an intercellular lipid of the stratum corneum and is one of the most important components of the epidermal permeability barrier. Glucosylceramide (GlcCer), a ceramide precursor, was applied to three-dimensional skin culture to regulate ceramide. GlcCer/dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) = 4/4 (molar ratio and GlcCer/DMPC/dimyristoylphosphatidylglycerol (DMPG) = 4/4/1(molar ratio) liposomes were prepared by the thin-layer method. The particle diameters of GlcCer/DMPC and GlcCer/DMPC/DMPG liposomes were 124.0 ± 0.6 and 119.3 ± 18.9 nm, and the zeta potentials were 1.3 ± 0.3 and -19.9 ± 0.3 mV, respectively. Stability of these GlcCer liposomes was measured by transmission light scattering. Transmission light scattering of neutrally charged GlcCer (GlcCer/DMPC) liposomes increased in a time dependent manner. In contrast, negatively charged GlcCer (GlcCer/DMPC/DMPG) liposomes were not changed. β-Glucocerebrosidase activity was measured in a cultured human skin model. Results confirmed that the cultured human skin model has β-glucocerebrosidase activity. GlcCer/DMPC/DMPG liposomes were applied to the three-dimensional cultured human skin model, and ceramide NS, NP, AS, and AP were extracted from it. The various extracted ceramides were separated by high-performance thin-layer chromatography and quantified by a densitometer. The amount of ceramide AS only in the cultured skin model was significantly higher with the application of GlcCer-based liposomes than that of the nonapplication group, and was also dose dependent. Thus, GlcCer-based liposomes are useful for enriching the ceramide AS levels in a three-dimensional cultured skin model. © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Source Water Quality Monitoring

    EPA Science Inventory

    Presentation will provide background information on continuous source water monitoring using online toxicity monitors and cover various tools available. Conceptual and practical aspects of source water quality monitoring will be discussed.

  19. Source Water Quality Monitoring

    EPA Science Inventory

    Presentation will provide background information on continuous source water monitoring using online toxicity monitors and cover various tools available. Conceptual and practical aspects of source water quality monitoring will be discussed.

  20. Holter and Event Monitors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Share this page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Holter and Event Monitors Also known as ambulatory EKG; continuous EKG; EKG event monitors. Holter and event monitors are small, portable electrocardiogram devices ...

  1. Molecular dynamics simulation of the structure of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine bilayers with cholesterol, ergosterol, and lanosterol.

    PubMed Central

    Smondyrev, A M; Berkowitz, M L

    2001-01-01

    Five molecular dynamics computer simulations were performed on different phospholipid:sterol membrane systems in order to study the influence of sterol structure on membrane properties. Three of these simulated bilayer systems were composed of a 1:8 sterol:phospholipid ratio, each of which employed one of the sterol molecules: cholesterol, ergosterol, and lanosterol. The two other simulations were of a bilayer with a 1:1 sterol:phospholipid ratio. These simulations employed cholesterol and lanosterol, respectively, as their sterol components. The observed differences in simulations with cholesterol and lanosterol may have their implication on the form of the phospholipid/sterol phase diagram. PMID:11259280

  2. Building Air Monitoring Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Science and Technology, 1977

    1977-01-01

    The different components of air monitoring networks, the status of air monitoring in the United States, and the services and activities of the three major American network builders are detailed. International air monitoring networks and alert systems are identified, with emphasis on the Dutch air monitoring network. (BT)

  3. Effect of Alcohol on Interaction of Model Biological Membrane with Steroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinna, Marco; Mura, Manuela; Famili, Marjan; Zhou, Yuhua; Zvelindovsky, Andrei

    2014-03-01

    The effect of alcohol in the lipid bilayer changes the gel-phase structure of the lipid bilayer. Interactions between the alcohol molecules and the lipid bilayer were investigated using molecular dynamics. Alcohols such as ethanol and methanol are often used in drug delivery application. Ethanol is used to dissolve hydrophobic steroidal drugs such as Beclamethasone dipropionate, Fluticasone propionate and Prednisone. All the systems considered were equilibrated at 310K and ran for 100ns in the presence of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) lipid bilayer. In addition the simulations were performed to investigate the behaviour of anti-asthma drugs such as Beclamethasone dipropionate in the water environment and 2.5% of ethanol.

  4. Highly selective fusion and accumulation of hybrid liposomes into primary effusion lymphoma cells along with induction of apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Towata, Tomomi; Komizu, Yuji; Suzu, Shinya; Ueoka, Ryuichi; Okada, Seiji

    2010-03-12

    Primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) is an aggressive neoplasm caused by human herpes virus-8 infection, and is generally resistant to chemotherapy. Hybrid liposomes, composed of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and polyoxyethylene (21) dodecyl ether (C{sub 12}(EO){sub 21}) (HL-21), were rapidly accumulated in the membrane of PEL cells. HL-21 also increased membrane fluidity of PEL cells, and induced caspase-3 activation along with cell death. These results suggest that HL-21 should be an effective and attractive regent for PEL treatment.

  5. Small angle X-ray scattering and 31P NMR studies on the phase behavior of phospholipid bilayered mixed micelles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolze, Jörg; Fujisawa, Tetsuro; Nagao, Takashi; Norisada, Kazushi; Saitô, Hazime; Naito, Akira

    2000-10-01

    The phase behavior of lipid bilayered micelles (`bicelles') (dimyristoyl-phosphatidylcholine, DMPC/dihexanoyl-phosphatidyl-choline, DHPC 2.6/1) has been studied by small angle X-ray scattering and 31P NMR. Below 3% w/v the bilayers are arranged in tightly packed stacks. At intermediate concentrations single units are observed, whereas at 24% w/v and higher, weak stacking occurs again. The DMPC/DHPC ratio in the bicelles strongly increases at low concentration, which is correlated with an increase in the bicelle size and stacking. The increase of the order parameter in a magnetic field is related to the stack formation. Below 297 K there is no stacking at any concentration and no magnetic alignment.

  6. Delta-opiate DPDPE in magnetically oriented phospholipid micelles: binding and arrangement of aromatic pharmacophores.

    PubMed Central

    Rinaldi, F; Lin, M; Shapiro, M J; Petersheim, M

    1997-01-01

    D-Penicillamine(2,5)-enkephalin (DPDPE) is a potent opioid peptide that exhibits a high selectivity for the delta-opiate receptors. This zwitterionic peptide has been shown, by pulsed-field gradient 1H NMR diffusion studies, to have significant affinity for a zwitterionic phospholipid bilayer. The bilayer lipid is in the form of micelles composed of dihexanoylphosphatidylcholine (DHPC) and dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) mixtures, where the DMPC forms the bilayer structure. At high lipid concentration (25% w/w) these micelles orient in the magnetic field of an NMR spectrometer. The resulting 1H-13C dipolar couplings and chemical shift changes in the natural abundance 13C resonances for the Tyr and Phe aromatic rings were used to characterize the orientations in the bilayer micelles of these two key pharmacophores. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 8 PMID:9414244

  7. Polydopamine-Supported Lipid Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Nirasay, Souryvanh; Badia, Antonella; Leclair, Grégoire; Claverie, Jerome P.; Marcotte, Isabelle

    2012-01-01

    We report the formation of lipid membranes supported by a soft polymeric cushion of polydopamine. First, 20 nm thick polydopamine films were formed on mica substrates. Atomic force microscopy imaging indicated that these films were also soft with a surface roughness of 2 nm under hydrated conditions. A zwitterionic phospholipid bilayer was then deposited on the polydopamine cushion by fusion of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC) vesicles. Polydopamine films preserved the lateral mobility of the phospholipids as shown by fluorescence microscopy recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) experiments. Diffusion coefficients of ~5.9 and 7.2 µm2 s−1 were respectively determined for DMPC and DOPC at room temperature, values which are characteristic of lipids in a free standing bilayer system.

  8. Interaction of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) with cell and model membranes.

    PubMed

    Suwalsky, M; Benites, M; Villena, F; Aguilar, F; Sotomayor, C P

    1996-12-04

    2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), a widely used herbicide, is a component of the "agent orange' whose toxicity has been extensively studied without definite conclusions. In order to evaluate its perturbing effect upon cell membranes, 2,4-D was made to interact with human erythrocytes and molecular models. These studies were performed by scanning electron microscopy on red cells, fluorescence spectroscopy on dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) large unilamellar vesicles and X-ray diffraction on multilayers of DMPC and dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DMPE). It was observed that 2,4-D induced a pronounced shape change to the erythrocytes. This effect is explained by the herbicide interaction with the outer monolayer of the red cell membrane.

  9. Interfacing molecular dynamics and macro-scale simulations for lipid bilayer vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Ayton, Gary; Smondyrev, Alexander M; Bardenhagen, Scott G; McMurtry, Patrick; Voth, Gregory A

    2002-01-01

    A continuum-level model for a giant unilamellar vesicle (GUV) is bridged to a corresponding atomistic model of a dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) bilayer at various cholesterol concentrations via computation of the bulk modulus. The bulk modulus and other microscopically determined parameters are passed to a continuum-level model operating in time- and length-scales orders of magnitude beyond that which is accessible by atomistic-level simulation. The continuum-level simulation method used is the material point method (MPM), and the particular variation used here takes advantage of the spherical nature of many GUVs. An osmotic pressure gradient due to a solvent concentration change is incorporated into the continuum-level simulation, resulting in osmotic swelling of the vesicle. The model is then extended to treat mixtures of DMPC and cholesterol, where small domains of different composition are considered. PMID:12124284

  10. Integrated Exposure Assessment Monitoring.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behar, Joseph V.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Integrated Exposure Assessment Monitoring is the coordination of environmental (air, water, land, and crops) monitoring networks to collect systematically pollutant exposure data for a specific receptor, usually man. (Author/BB)

  11. Fugitive emissions monitoring trends

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, K.H.

    1997-02-01

    New Clean Air Act requirements are pushing facilities to reevaluate their monitoring programs. A description of the fugitive emission guidelines is included in this article, along with ideas about monitoring.

  12. Noninvasive respiratory monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Nochomovitz, M.L.; Cherniack, N.S.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains 10 selections. Some of the titles are: Transcutaneous Monitoring of Respiratory Gases; Computed Tomography of the Chest; Measurement and Monitoring of Exhaled Carbon Dioxide; Oximetry; and Ultrasonic Evaluation of the Chest Wall and Pleura.

  13. Historical Radiological Event Monitoring

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    During and after radiological events EPA's RadNet monitors the environment for radiation. EPA monitored environmental radiation levels during and after Chernobyl, Fukushima and other international and domestic radiological incidents.

  14. Intracranial pressure monitoring

    MedlinePlus

    ... head. The monitor senses the pressure inside the skull and sends measurements to a recording device. ... are 3 ways to monitor pressure in the skull (intracranial pressure). INTRAVENTRICULAR CATHETER The intraventricular catheter is ...

  15. Nosepiece respiration monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lavery, A. L.; Long, L. E.; Rice, N. E.

    1968-01-01

    Comfortable, inexpensive nosepiece respiration monitor produces rapid response signals to most conventional high impedance medical signal conditioners. The monitor measures respiration in a manner that produces a large signal with minimum delay.

  16. Portal radiation monitor

    DOEpatents

    Kruse, L.W.

    1982-03-23

    A portal radiation monitor combines .1% FAR with high sensitivity to special nuclear material. The monitor utilizes pulse shape discrimination, dynamic compression of the photomultiplier output and scintillators sized to maintain efficiency over the entire portal area.

  17. Portal radiation monitor

    DOEpatents

    Kruse, Lyle W.

    1985-01-01

    A portal radiation monitor combines 0.1% FAR with high sensitivity to special nuclear material. The monitor utilizes pulse shape discrimination, dynamic compression of the photomultiplier output and scintillators sized to maintain efficiency over the entire portal area.

  18. Integrated Exposure Assessment Monitoring.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behar, Joseph V.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Integrated Exposure Assessment Monitoring is the coordination of environmental (air, water, land, and crops) monitoring networks to collect systematically pollutant exposure data for a specific receptor, usually man. (Author/BB)

  19. MONITORING FLORIDA'S WATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    GIS plays an important role as a management tool for the multi-dimensional Status Monitoring Network (SMN) program to monitor Florida's freshwater resources. By pulling together basin assessments, statistical analysis, surface water and groundwater analytical data, background is...

  20. Site Characterization and Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, Alex S.; Oostrom, Mart

    2005-12-20

    Common observations associated with monitoring and assessment of NAPL-contaminated sites are discussed. The focus is on observations in monitoring wells and soil samples and observations of NAPLs dissolved in groundwater.

  1. EMC Compliance Assurance Monitoring

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Compliance Assurance Monitoring, or CAM, rule is designed to satisfy the requirements for monitoring and compliance certification in the Part 70 operating permits program and Title VII of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments

  2. National environmental monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    Findings of the Council of Environmental Quality's interagency task force on environmental data and monitoring are summarized and the degree of followup on its recommendations is assessed. The quality of the data, coordination of environmental monitoring and data activities, and major issues that need to be addressed regarding monitoring of air and water quality are examined. Participation of the private sector in toxic monitoring is considered.

  3. Reinvestigation by phosphorus NMR of lipid distribution in bicelles.

    PubMed

    Triba, Mohamed N; Warschawski, Dror E; Devaux, Philippe F

    2005-03-01

    Mixtures of dimyristoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and dihexanoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DHPC) in water form disks also called bicelles and different bilayer organizations when the mol ratio of the two lipids and the temperature are varied. The spontaneous alignment in a magnetic field of these bilayers above the transition temperature T(m) of DMPC is an attractive property that was successfully used to investigate protein structure by NMR. In this article, we have attempted to give an overview of all structural transformations of DMPC/DHPC mixtures that can be inferred from broad band (31)P-NMR spectroscopy between 5 and 60 degrees C. We show that above a critical temperature, T(v), perforated vesicles progressively replace alignable structures. The holes in these vesicles disappear above a new temperature threshold, T(h). The driving force for these temperature-dependent transformations that has been overlooked in previous studies is the increase of DHPC miscibility in the bilayer domain above T(m). Accordingly, we propose a new model (the "mixed bicelle" model) that emphasizes the consequence of the mixing. This investigation shows that the various structures of DMPC in the presence of increasing mol ratios of the short-chain DHPC is reminiscent of the observation put forward by several laboratories investigating solubilization and reconstitution of biological membranes.

  4. Reinvestigation by Phosphorus NMR of Lipid Distribution in Bicelles

    PubMed Central

    Triba, Mohamed N.; Warschawski, Dror E.; Devaux, Philippe F.

    2005-01-01

    Mixtures of dimyristoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and dihexanoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DHPC) in water form disks also called bicelles and different bilayer organizations when the mol ratio of the two lipids and the temperature are varied. The spontaneous alignment in a magnetic field of these bilayers above the transition temperature Tm of DMPC is an attractive property that was successfully used to investigate protein structure by NMR. In this article, we have attempted to give an overview of all structural transformations of DMPC/DHPC mixtures that can be inferred from broad band 31P-NMR spectroscopy between 5 and 60°C. We show that above a critical temperature, Tv, perforated vesicles progressively replace alignable structures. The holes in these vesicles disappear above a new temperature threshold, Th. The driving force for these temperature-dependent transformations that has been overlooked in previous studies is the increase of DHPC miscibility in the bilayer domain above Tm. Accordingly, we propose a new model (the “mixed bicelle” model) that emphasizes the consequence of the mixing. This investigation shows that the various structures of DMPC in the presence of increasing mol ratios of the short-chain DHPC is reminiscent of the observation put forward by several laboratories investigating solubilization and reconstitution of biological membranes. PMID:15626702

  5. Impact on lipid membrane organization by free branched-chain fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Lindström, Fredrick; Thurnhofer, Saskia; Vetter, Walter; Gröbner, Gerhard

    2006-11-07

    Here, we exploit the non-invasive techniques of solid-state NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) to study the effect of free iso and ante-iso branched chain fatty acids (BCFAs) on the physicochemical properties of lipid membranes. Free fatty acids are present in biological membranes at low abundance, but can influence the cellular function by modulating the membrane organization. Solid state NMR spectra of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) lipid membranes containing either free 12-methyltetradecanoic acid (a15:0) or free 13-methyltetradecanoic acid (i15:0), show significant differences in their impact on the lipid bilayer. Chain order profiles obtained by deuterium NMR on fully deuterated DMPC-d(67) bilayers revealed an ordering effect induced by both fatty acids on the hydrophobic membrane core. This behavior was also visible in the corresponding DSC thermograms where the main phase transition of DMPC bilayers-indicative of the hydrophobic membrane region-was shifted to higher temperatures, with the iso isomer triggering more pronounced changes as compared to the ante-iso isomer. This is probably due to a higher packing density in the core of the lipid bilayer, which causes reduced diffusion across membranes. By utilizing the naturally occurring spin reporters nitrogen-14 and phosphorus-31 present in the hydrophilic DMPC headgroup region, even fatty acid induced changes at the membrane interface could be detected, an observation reflecting changes in the lipid headgroup dynamics.

  6. Physicochemical studies of bacteriorhodopsin reconstituted in partially fluorinated phosphatidylcholine bilayers.

    PubMed

    Yoshino, Masaru; Kikukawa, Takashi; Takahashi, Hiroshi; Takagi, Toshiyuki; Yokoyama, Yasunori; Amii, Hideki; Baba, Teruhiko; Kanamori, Toshiyuki; Sonoyama, Masashi

    2013-05-09

    A membrane protein bacteriorhodopsin (bR) that is successfully reconstituted in liposome of a novel partially fluorinated analog of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) with the perfluorobutyl segments in the myristoyl groups, diF4H10-PC, has been investigated by some spectroscopic and X-ray diffraction techniques to clarify effects of substitution of nine hydrogen atoms by fluorine atoms on structural and physical properties of the membrane protein by comparison with the previous results on proteoliposome of bR and DMPC. Below the gel-to-liquid crystalline phase transition of diF4H10-PC bilayer, bR molecules adopt the two-dimensional lattice structure of trimers as the structural unit and show a photocycle very similar to that of native purple membrane like reconstituted bR in DMPC liposome in the gel phase. Even upon heating up to temperatures well above the phase transition, the nativelike functional reconstitution and higher structural stability of bR molecules in diF4H10-PC liposome are retained, which strikingly contrasts with lipid phase transition-induced disaggregation of protein molecules and light-induced denaturation in DMPC liposome. Greater membrane rigidity and low affinity between bR and fluorinated lipid molecules are proposed as a driving force for keeping nativelike properties of bR molecules in diF4H10-PC liposome even in the fluid phase.

  7. Effects of oxygen on EPR spectra of nitroxide spin-label probes of model membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popp, Carol A.; Hyde, James S.

    The use of a methylpentene polymer, TPX, for construction of sample containers that allow easy equilibration of electron paramagnetic resonance samples with nitrogen is described. The effects of oxygen-dependent shortening of the electron spin relaxation times of nitroxide spin labels were studied in dispersions of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and dipalmitoylphosphatidylchohne (DPPC). First-harmonic, in-phase, absorption spectra of deoxygenated samples of 2-(14-carboxytetradecyl)-2-ethyl-4,4-dimethyl-3-oxazolidinyloxyl (16SASL) in DMPC display decreased linewidths and increased peak-to-peak heigths and resolution of 13C splittings. Continuous-wave (cw) saturation studies of 16SASL/DMPC and both lipid- and aqueous-phase components of 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-piperidinooxyl (Tempo) partitioned into DPPC show that the rf field at which the signal intensity is maximized decreases when aerated samples are equilibrated with nitrogen. Second-harmonic, out-of-phase, absorption (saturation transfer) spectra of deoxygenated samples of 16SASUDMPC at -22°C and 2-(3-carboxypropyl)-4,4-dimethyl-2-tridecyl-3-oxazolidinyloxyl (5SASL) in DPPC at 35°C display increased signal intensity and lineshape changes. Electron-electron double resonance (ELDOR) spectra display much greater ELDOR reduction in signal intensity when a deoxygenated sample of 16SASL/DMPC is used. Our results indicate that the routine use of deoxygenated samples in biologically relevant studies using spin-label probes should be considered.

  8. Determining the mode of action involved in the antimicrobial activity of synthetic peptides: a solid-state NMR and FTIR study.

    PubMed

    Lorin, Aurélien; Noël, Mathieu; Provencher, Marie-Ève; Turcotte, Vanessa; Cardinal, Sébastien; Lagüe, Patrick; Voyer, Normand; Auger, Michèle

    2012-10-03

    We have previously shown that leucine to lysine substitution(s) in neutral synthetic crown ether containing 14-mer peptide affect the peptide structure and its ability to permeabilize bilayers. Depending on the substitution position, the peptides adopt mainly either a α-helical structure able to permeabilize dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and dimyristoylphosphatidylglycerol (DMPG) vesicles (nonselective peptides) or an intermolecular β-sheet structure only able to permeabilize DMPG vesicles (selective peptides). In this study, we have used a combination of solid-state NMR and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy to investigate the effects of nonselective α-helical and selective intermolecular β-sheet peptides on both types of bilayers. (31)P NMR results indicate that both types of peptides interact with the headgroups of DMPC and DMPG bilayers. (2)H NMR and Fourier transform infrared results reveal an ordering of the hydrophobic core of bilayers when leakage is noted, i.e., for DMPG vesicles in the presence of both types of peptides and DMPC vesicles in the presence of nonselective peptides. However, selective peptides have no significant effect on the ordering of DMPC acyl chains. The ability of these 14-mer peptides to permeabilize lipid vesicles therefore appears to be related to their ability to increase the order of the bilayer hydrophobic core. Copyright © 2012 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Determining the Mode of Action Involved in the Antimicrobial Activity of Synthetic Peptides: A Solid-State NMR and FTIR Study

    PubMed Central

    Lorin, Aurélien; Noël, Mathieu; Provencher, Marie-Ève; Turcotte, Vanessa; Cardinal, Sébastien; Lagüe, Patrick; Voyer, Normand; Auger, Michèle

    2012-01-01

    We have previously shown that leucine to lysine substitution(s) in neutral synthetic crown ether containing 14-mer peptide affect the peptide structure and its ability to permeabilize bilayers. Depending on the substitution position, the peptides adopt mainly either a α-helical structure able to permeabilize dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and dimyristoylphosphatidylglycerol (DMPG) vesicles (nonselective peptides) or an intermolecular β-sheet structure only able to permeabilize DMPG vesicles (selective peptides). In this study, we have used a combination of solid-state NMR and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy to investigate the effects of nonselective α-helical and selective intermolecular β-sheet peptides on both types of bilayers. 31P NMR results indicate that both types of peptides interact with the headgroups of DMPC and DMPG bilayers. 2H NMR and Fourier transform infrared results reveal an ordering of the hydrophobic core of bilayers when leakage is noted, i.e., for DMPG vesicles in the presence of both types of peptides and DMPC vesicles in the presence of nonselective peptides. However, selective peptides have no significant effect on the ordering of DMPC acyl chains. The ability of these 14-mer peptides to permeabilize lipid vesicles therefore appears to be related to their ability to increase the order of the bilayer hydrophobic core. PMID:23062339

  10. Inhibition of HDL binding by tetranitromethane is not related to cross-linking of phospholipids to apoproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Chacko, G.K.; Lund-Katz, S.; Johnson, W.J.; Karlin, J.B.

    1986-05-01

    The authors have shown that treatment of human HDL with tetranitromethane (TNM) inhibits the lipoprotein specific binding to rat liver plasma membranes and to cultured rat hepatoma cells. In addition to the expected nitration of tyrosine residues, cross-linking of lipids to apoproteins and apoproteins to one another occurred during treatment of HDL with TNM. In order to determine the role of cross-linking of phospholipids to apoproteins they prepared a reconstituted HDL in which the native phospholipids were replaced with dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC), which has no double bonds in the acyl chains. The reconstituted HDL (DMPC-HDL) has properties, including the ability to bind to HDL binding sites, similar to those of native HDL. On nitration with TNM, DMPC-HDL, like native HDL, lost its ability to bind to the HDL binding sites of isolated rat liver and rat testes plasma membranes as determined by competitive binding with /sup 125/I-HDL. Nitrated DMPC-HDL contained only traces of phospholipids covalently linked to apoproteins, whereas 21% of phospholipids were linked to apoproteins of nitrated native HDL; cross-linking of apoproteins to themselves was detected in both nitrated HDL's. These results show that covalent cross-linking of phospholipids to apoproteins is not responsible for the inhibition of HDL binding by TNM.

  11. Interaction of local and general anaesthetics with liposomal membrane models: a QCM-D and DSC study.

    PubMed

    Paiva, José Gabriel; Paradiso, Patrizia; Serro, Ana Paula; Fernandes, Anabela; Saramago, Benilde

    2012-06-15

    The behaviour of four local anaesthetics (lidocaine, levobupivacaine, ropivacaine and tetracaine) and one general anaesthetic (propofol) is compared when interacting with two types of model membranes: supported layers of liposomes and liposomes in solution. Several liposomal compositions were tested: dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC), binary mixtures of DMPC with cholesterol (CHOL), and ternary mixtures of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), DMPC, and CHOL. A quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation, QCM-D, was used to assess changes in the properties of supported layers of liposomes. The effect of the anaesthetics on the phase behaviour of the liposomes in suspension was determined by differential scanning calorimetry. Both techniques show that all anaesthetics have a fluidizing effect on the model membranes but, apparently, the solid supported liposomes are less affected by the anaesthetics than the liposomes in solution. Although the different anaesthetics were compared at different concentrations, tetracaine and propofol seem to induce the strongest perturbation on the liposome membrane. The resistance of the liposomes to the anaesthetic action was found to increase with the presence of cholesterol, while adding DPPC to the binary mixture DMPC+CHOL does not change its behaviour. The novelty of the present work resides upon three points: (1) the use of supported layers of liposomes as model membranes to study interactions with anaesthetics; (2) application of QCM-D to assess changes of the adsorbed liposomes; (3) a comparison of the effect of local and general anaesthetics interacting with various model membranes in similar experimental conditions.

  12. Monitoring Knowledge Base (MKB)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Monitoring Knowledge Base (MKB) is a compilation of emissions measurement and monitoring techniques associated with air pollution control devices, industrial process descriptions, and permitting techniques, including flexible permit development. Using MKB, one can gain a comprehensive understanding of emissions sources, control devices, and monitoring techniques, enabling one to determine appropriate permit terms and conditions.

  13. Global Atmospheric Monitoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallen, Carl C.

    1975-01-01

    The global atmospheric monitoring plans of the World Meteorological Organization are detailed. Single and multipurpose basic monitoring systems and the monitoring of chemical properties are discussed. The relationship of the World Meteorological Organization with the United Nations environment program is discussed. A map of the World…

  14. Global Atmospheric Monitoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallen, Carl C.

    1975-01-01

    The global atmospheric monitoring plans of the World Meteorological Organization are detailed. Single and multipurpose basic monitoring systems and the monitoring of chemical properties are discussed. The relationship of the World Meteorological Organization with the United Nations environment program is discussed. A map of the World…

  15. Monitoring Local Comprehension Monitoring in Sentence Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vorstius, Christian; Radach, Ralph; Mayer, Michael B.; Lonigan, Christopher J.

    2013-01-01

    on ways to improve children's reading comprehension. However, processes and mechanisms underlying this skill are currently not well understood. This article describes one of the first attempts to study comprehension monitoring using eye-tracking methodology. Students in fifth…

  16. Monitoring Local Comprehension Monitoring in Sentence Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vorstius, Christian; Radach, Ralph; Mayer, Michael B.; Lonigan, Christopher J.

    2013-01-01

    on ways to improve children's reading comprehension. However, processes and mechanisms underlying this skill are currently not well understood. This article describes one of the first attempts to study comprehension monitoring using eye-tracking methodology. Students in fifth…

  17. Seismic Imaging and Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Lianjie

    2012-07-09

    I give an overview of LANL's capability in seismic imaging and monitoring. I present some seismic imaging and monitoring results, including imaging of complex structures, subsalt imaging of Gulf of Mexico, fault/fracture zone imaging for geothermal exploration at the Jemez pueblo, time-lapse imaging of a walkway vertical seismic profiling data for monitoring CO{sub 2} inject at SACROC, and microseismic event locations for monitoring CO{sub 2} injection at Aneth. These examples demonstrate LANL's high-resolution and high-fidelity seismic imaging and monitoring capabilities.

  18. Nuclear reactor effluent monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Minns, J.L.; Essig, T.H.

    1993-12-31

    Radiological environmental monitoring and effluent monitoring at nuclear power plants is important both for normal operations, as well as in the event of an accident. During normal operations, environmental monitoring verifies the effectiveness of in-plant measures for controlling the release of radioactive materials in the plant. Following an accident, it would be an additional mechanism for estimating doses to members of the general public. This paper identifies the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulatory basis for requiring radiological environmental and effluent monitoring, licensee conditions for effluent and environmental monitoring, NRC independent oversight activities, and NRC`s program results.

  19. Dopant Cylinder Lifetime Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, Steve; Wodjenski, Michael; Kaim, Robert; Lurcott, Steve; McManus, Jim; Smith, Gordon

    2006-11-01

    The cost of consumable materials is a significant component in the cost of implanter operation. With the higher cost of sub-atmospheric gas alternatives it is increasingly important to accurately monitor its usage. The ATMI® SDS® GasGauge™ monitoring system accurately monitors gas level in four cylinders simultaneously, throughout their lifetime, in order to optimize usage of gas and related implanter productivity. This paper displays how the GasGauge monitoring system accurately monitors the cylinder contents in SDS®, VAC® and high pressure gas cylinders. Internal and customer test data is also presented to verify these claims.

  20. Environmental Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, R.C.

    1993-07-01

    This Environmental Monitoring Plan was written to fulfill the requirements of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 and DOE Environmental Regulatory Guide DOE/EH 0173T. This Plan documents the background, organizational structure, and methods used for effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance at Sandia National Laboratories/California. The design, rationale, and historical results of the environmental monitoring system are discussed in detail. Throughout the Plan, recommendations for improvements to the monitoring system are made. This revision to the Environmental Monitoring Plan was written to document the changes made to the Monitoring Program during 1992. Some of the data (most notably the statistical analyses of past monitoring data) has not been changed.

  1. Comprehensive air monitoring plan: general monitoring report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-03-31

    Recommendations are provided for general monitoring of hydrogen sulfide (H/sub 2/S) in ambient air in parts of Colusa, Lake, Mendocino, Napa, and Sonoma counties potentially impacted by emissions from geothermal development projects in the Geysers-Calistoga Known Geothermal Resource Area. Recommendations for types, placement, performance guidelines, and criteria and procedure for triggering establishment and termination of CAMP monitoring equipment were determined after examination of four factors: population location; emission sources; meteorological considerations; and data needs of permitting agencies and applicants. Three alternate financial plans were developed. Locations and equipment for immediate installation are recommended for: two air quality stations in communities where the State ambient air quality standard for H/sub 2/S has been exceeded; three air quality trend stations to monitor progress in reduction of H/sub 2/S emissions; two meteorological observation stations to monitor synoptic wind flow over the area; and one acoustic radar and one rawinsonde station to monitor air inversions which limit the depth of the mixing layer.

  2. Power consumption monitoring using additional monitoring device

    SciTech Connect

    Truşcă, M. R. C. Albert, Ş. Tudoran, C. Soran, M. L. Fărcaş, F.; Abrudean, M.

    2013-11-13

    Today, emphasis is placed on reducing power consumption. Computers are large consumers; therefore it is important to know the total consumption of computing systems. Since their optimal functioning requires quite strict environmental conditions, without much variation in temperature and humidity, reducing energy consumption cannot be made without monitoring environmental parameters. Thus, the present work uses a multifunctional electric meter UPT 210 for power consumption monitoring. Two applications were developed: software which carries meter readings provided by electronic and programming facilitates remote device and a device for temperature monitoring and control. Following temperature variations that occur both in the cooling system, as well as the ambient, can reduce energy consumption. For this purpose, some air conditioning units or some computers are stopped in different time slots. These intervals were set so that the economy is high, but the work's Datacenter is not disturbed.

  3. Solvent effect on phosphatidylcholine headgroup dynamics as revealed by the energetics and dynamics of two gel-state bilayer headgroup structures at subzero temperatures.

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, C. H.; Wu, W. G.

    1995-01-01

    The packing and dynamics of lipid bilayers at the phosphocholine headgroup region within the temperature range of -40 to -110 degrees C have been investigated by solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements of selectively deuterium-labeled H2O/dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) bilayers. Two coexisting signals with 2H NMR quadrupolar, splittings of 36.1 and 9.3 (or smaller) kHz were detected from the -CD3 of choline methyl group. These two signals have been assigned to two coexisting gel-state headgroup structures with fast rotational motion of -CD3 and -N(CD3)3 group, respectively, with a threefold symmetry. The largest quadrupolar splitting of the NMR signal detected from the -CD2 of C alpha and C beta methylene segment was found to be 115.2 kHz, which is 10% lower than its static value of 128.2 kHz. Thus, there are extensive motions of the entire choline group of gel-state phosphatidylcholine bilayers even at a subzero temperature of -110 degrees C. These results strongly support the previous suggestion (E. J. Dufourc, C. Mayer, J. Stohrer, G. Althoff, and G. Kothe, 1992, Biophys. J. 61:42-57) that 31P chemical shift tensor elements of DMPC determined under similar conditions are not the rigid static values. The free energy difference between the two gel-state headgroup structures was determined to be 26.3 +/- 0.9 kJ/mol for fully hydrated bilayers. Furthermore, two structures with similar free energy difference were also detected for "frozen" phosphorylcholine chloride solution in a control experiment, leading to the conclusion that the two structures may be governed solely by the energetics of fully hydrated phosphocholine headgroup. The intermolecular interactions among lipids, however, stabilize the static headgroup structure as evidenced by the apparently lower free energy difference between the two structures for partially hydrated lipid bilayers. Evidence is also presented to suggest that one of the headgroup structures with

  4. Remote Monitor Alarm System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stute, Robert A. (Inventor); Galloway, F. Houston (Inventor); Medelius, Pedro J. (Inventor); Swindle, Robert W. (Inventor); Bierman, Tracy A. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A remote monitor alarm system monitors discrete alarm and analog power supply voltage conditions at remotely located communications terminal equipment. A central monitoring unit (CMU) is connected via serial data links to each of a plurality of remote terminal units (RTUS) that monitor the alarm and power supply conditions of the remote terminal equipment. Each RTU can monitor and store condition information of both discrete alarm points and analog power supply voltage points in its associated communications terminal equipment. The stored alarm information is periodically transmitted to the CMU in response to sequential polling of the RTUS. The number of monitored alarm inputs and permissible voltage ranges for the analog inputs can be remotely configured at the CMU and downloaded into programmable memory at each RTU. The CMU includes a video display, a hard disk memory, a line printer and an audio alarm for communicating and storing the alarm information received from each RTU.

  5. [Patient monitoring during anesthesia].

    PubMed

    Pasch, T

    1986-12-01

    Three functional levels are monitored during anaesthesia: vital functions such as cardiovascular and respiratory systems; metabolic functions; and organs such as brain and muscle. These three levels interact with each other and with the anaesthesia system. Basic monitoring systems include the ECG, noninvasive blood pressure measurement, inspired O2 concentration, tidal volume, airway pressure, and alarm systems for stenosis and disconnection. Other monitors are added to this list, including pulse oximetry, capnography, temperature, and neuromuscular transmission. The type of surgery and anaesthetic risk will determine the extent of the monitoring used during surgery. New and expensive noninvasive monitoring techniques such as transesophageal Doppler echocardiography and somatosensory evoked potentials will increasingly be added. The high costs and the rising number of monitoring systems necessitate a better definition of what is essential and what is optional for each individual case.

  6. Advanced dive monitoring system.

    PubMed

    Sternberger, W I; Goemmer, S A

    1999-01-01

    The US Navy supports deep diving operations with a variety of mixed-gas life support systems. A systems engineering study was conducted for the Naval Experimental Dive Unit (Panama City, FL) to develop a concept design for an advanced dive monitoring system. The monitoring system is intended primarily to enhance diver safety and secondarily to support diving medicine research. Distinct monitoring categories of diver physiology, life support system, and environment are integrated in the monitoring system. A system concept is proposed that accommodates real-time and quantitative measurements, noninvasive physiological monitoring, and a flexible and expandable implementation architecture. Human factors and ergonomic design considerations have been emphasized to assure that there is no impact on the diver's primary mission. The Navy has accepted the resultant system requirements and the basic design concept. A number of monitoring components have been implemented and successfully support deep diving operations.

  7. Monitoring Exhaled Carbon Dioxide.

    PubMed

    Siobal, Mark S

    2016-10-01

    In the past few decades, assessment of exhaled CO2 in both intubated and non-intubated patients has evolved into an essential component in many aspects of patient monitoring. Besides the basic assessment of ventilation, exhaled CO2 monitoring can provide valuable patient safety information and critical physiologic data in regard to the ventilation and perfusion matching in the lungs, cardiac output, and metabolic rate. Despite these important clinical monitoring benefits and widespread availability, exhaled CO2 monitoring is often underutilized. The purpose of this paper is to review the importance and present the extensive body of knowledge to support the use of exhaled CO2 monitoring in various areas of clinical practice. Advanced application concepts and the future development of exhaled CO2 monitoring will also be discussed.

  8. Sky monitoring with LOBSTER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudec, R.; Tichy, V.

    2014-12-01

    The X--ray sky monitoring represents valuable energy spectral extension to optical sky monitoring. Lobster--Eye all--sky monitors are able to provide relatively high sensitivity and good time resolution in the soft X--ray energy range up to 10 keV. The fine time resolution can be used to alert optical robotic telescopes for follow--up and multispectral analyzes in the visible light.

  9. Military Vital Sign Monitor.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-09-30

    agreement, however, are of a nonspecific nature, and neither discuss vital sign monitors or other technology based life support equipment, nor...evacuations. STANAG 2126, "Medical First-Aid Equipment and Supplies," does not discuss vital sign monitors or other life support equipment. No...1 safety of any life support equipment and ,therefore, do not affect vital sign monitors selected as a result of this investigation. However, they do

  10. Monitoring equine anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Riebold, T W

    1990-12-01

    In conclusion, monitoring the depth of anesthesia plays an integral role in the anesthetic regimen. Although the use of sophisticated monitoring equipment has replaced some of the art of anesthesia and made assessment of depth of anesthesia more precise, a vigilant clinician still needs to serve as the animal's advocate. He or she must gather the data that are generated by machines, acquire data that monitoring equipment cannot obtain, assimilate all the facts, and make appropriate changes in anesthetic management.

  11. Radiation monitor for liquids

    DOEpatents

    Koster, James E.; Bolton, Richard D.

    1999-01-01

    A radiation monitor for use with liquids that utilizes air ions created by alpha radiation emitted by the liquids as its detectable element. A signal plane, held at an electrical potential with respect to ground, collects these air ions. A guard plane or guard rings is used to limit leakage currents. In one embodiment, the monitor is used for monitoring liquids retained in a tank. Other embodiments monitor liquids flowing through a tank, and bodies of liquids, such as ponds, lakes, rivers and oceans.

  12. Radiation monitor for liquids

    DOEpatents

    Koster, J.E.; Bolton, R.D.

    1999-03-02

    A radiation monitor for use with liquids that utilizes air ions created by alpha radiation emitted by the liquids as its detectable element. A signal plane, held at an electrical potential with respect to ground, collects these air ions. A guard plane or guard rings is used to limit leakage currents. In one embodiment, the monitor is used for monitoring liquids retained in a tank. Other embodiments monitor liquids flowing through a tank, and bodies of liquids, such as ponds, lakes, rivers and oceans. 4 figs.

  13. Extended Monitoring during Endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Mahmud, Nadim; Berzin, Tyler M

    2016-07-01

    Gastrointestinal endoscopic sedation has improved procedural and patient outcomes but is associated with attendant risks of oversedation and hemodynamic compromise. Therefore, close monitoring during endoscopic procedures using sedation is critical. This monitoring begins with appropriate staff trained in visual assessment of patients and analysis of basic physiologic parameters. It also mandates an array of devices widely used in practice to evaluate hemodynamics, oxygenation, ventilation, and depth of sedation. The authors review the evidence behind monitoring practices and current society recommendations and discuss forthcoming technologies and techniques that are poised to improve noninvasive monitoring of patients under endoscopic sedation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Functional hemodynamic monitoring.

    PubMed

    Pinsky, Michael R

    2015-01-01

    Functional hemodynamic monitoring is the assessment of the dynamic interactions of hemodynamic variables in response to a defined perturbation. Recent interest in functional hemodynamic monitoring for the bedside assessment of cardiovascular insufficiency has heightened with the documentation of its accuracy in predicting volume responsiveness using a wide variety of monitoring devices, both invasive and noninvasive, and across multiple patient groups and clinical conditions. However, volume responsiveness, though important, reflects only part of the overall spectrum of functional physiologic variables that can be measured to define the physiologic state and monitor response to therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Loran-C monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, Jamie

    1987-01-01

    The Loran-C monitor developed by Ohio University will collect Loran signal data for storage on magnetic tape. Stationed at the Ohio University Airport, Athens, Ohio, the monitor will provide valuable information concerning the daily and seasonal variation of the Loran-C signals for use in non-precision approach studies. With the aid of a second monitor, located in Gallion, Ohio, it can be determined if the errors found at a particular geographic location correlate with those found at another location. This will give some indication as to how far apart monitors can be positioned to obtain accurate non-precision approach data for various airports.

  16. Environmental monitoring plan

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, R.C.

    1997-02-01

    This Environmental Monitoring Plan was written to fulfill the requirements of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 and DOE Environmental Regulatory Guide DOE/EH 0173T. This Plan documents the background, organizational structure, and methods used for effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance at Sandia National Laboratories/California. The design, rationale, and historical results of the environmental monitoring system are discussed in detail. Throughout the Plan, recommendations for improvements to the monitoring system are made. 52 refs., 10 figs., 12 tabs.

  17. Nonpoint Source Monitoring

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Water quality monitoring for nonpoint sources of pollution includes the important element of relating the physical, chemical, and biological characteristics of receiving waters to land use characteristics.

  18. Acyl chain length and charge effect on Tamoxifen-lipid model membrane interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilge, Duygu; Kazanci, Nadide; Severcan, Feride

    2013-05-01

    Tamoxifen (TAM), which is an antiestrogenic agent, is widely used during chemotherapy of breast, pancreas, brain and liver cancers. In this study, TAM and model membrane interactions in the form of multilamellar vesicles (MLVs) were studied for lipids containing different acyl chain length and different charge status as a function of different TAM (1, 6, 9 and 15 mol%) concentrations. Zwitterionic lipids namely dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC), and dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) lipids were used to see the acyl chain length effect and anionic dipalmitoyl phosphtidylglycerol (DPPG) lipid was used to see the charge effect. For this purpose Fourier transform-infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic and differential scanning calorimetric (DSC) techniques have been conducted. For zwitterionic lipid, concentration dependent different action of TAM was observed both in the gel and liquid crystalline phases by significantly increasing the lipid order and decreasing the dynamics for 1 mol% TAM, while decreasing the lipid order and increasing the dynamics of the lipids for higher concentrations (6, 9 and 15 mol%). However, different than neutral lipids, the dynamics and disorder of DPPG liposome increased for all TAM concentrations. The interactions between TAM and head group of multilamellar liposomes was monitored by analyzing the Cdbnd O stretching and PO2- antisymmetric double bond stretching bands. Increasing Tamoxifen concentrations led to a dehydration around these functional groups in the polar part of the lipids. DSC studies showed that for all types of lipids, TAM eliminates the pre-transition, shifts the main phase transition to lower temperatures and broadened the phase transition curve. The results indicate that not the acyl chain length but the charge status of the polar head group induces different effects on lipid membranes order and dynamics.

  19. Ballast Water Self Monitoring

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-11-01

    Coagulation ( flocculent ) Coagulant Chemical analysis and treatment monitoring -Treatment chemical concentration at injection -Treatment chemical dosage...and usage - Treatment chemical sample concentration -Treatment chemical dosage and usage Turbidity Turbidity sensor Coagulation effluent...turbidity Coagulation effluent turbidities Deoxygenation Dose of inert gas (if used) Treatment monitoring Deoxygenation gas dosage and usage Deoxygenation

  20. Transmission Line Security Monitor

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    The Transmission Line Security Monitor is a multi-sensor monitor that mounts directly on high-voltage transmission lines to detect, characterize and communicate terrorist activity, human tampering and threatening conditions around support towers. For more information about INL's critical infrastructure protection research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  1. Transmission Line Security Monitor

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-01

    The Transmission Line Security Monitor is a multi-sensor monitor that mounts directly on high-voltage transmission lines to detect, characterize and communicate terrorist activity, human tampering and threatening conditions around support towers. For more information about INL's critical infrastructure protection research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  2. Facility effluent monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Gleckler, B.P.

    1995-06-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the facility effluent monitoring programs and provides an evaluation of effluent monitoring data. These evaluations are useful in assessing the effectiveness of effluent treatment and control systems, as well as management practices.

  3. Monitoring Process Effectiveness

    EPA Science Inventory

    Treatment of municipal sludges to produce biosolids which meet federal and/or state requirements for land application requires process monitoring. The goal of process monitoring is to produce biosolids of consistent and reliable quality. In its simplest form, for Class B treatme...

  4. Water Quality Monitoring Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Fred J.; Houdart, Joseph F.

    This manual is designed for students involved in environmental education programs dealing with water pollution problems. By establishing a network of Environmental Monitoring Stations within the educational system, four steps toward the prevention, control, and abatement of water pollution are proposed. (1) Train students to recognize, monitor,…

  5. MONITORING GRAZING LANDS

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    An important step in developing a ranch or allotment management plan for grazing lands is defining a rangeland monitoring program to evaluate progress toward achieving management objectives. A monitoring program can: 1) help determine the benefits gained from changes in grazing management or invest...

  6. Monitoring Process Effectiveness

    EPA Science Inventory

    Treatment of municipal sludges to produce biosolids which meet federal and/or state requirements for land application requires process monitoring. The goal of process monitoring is to produce biosolids of consistent and reliable quality. In its simplest form, for Class B treatme...

  7. Improved Marine Waters Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palazov, Atanas; Yakushev, Evgeniy; Milkova, Tanya; Slabakova, Violeta; Hristova, Ognyana

    2017-04-01

    IMAMO - Improved Marine Waters Monitoring is a project under the Programme BG02: Improved monitoring of marine waters, managed by Bulgarian Ministry of environment and waters and co-financed by the Financial Mechanism of the European Economic Area (EEA FM) 2009 - 2014. Project Beneficiary is the Institute of oceanology - Bulgarian Academy of Sciences with two partners: Norwegian Institute for Water Research and Bulgarian Black Sea Basin Directorate. The Project aims to improve the monitoring capacity and expertise of the organizations responsible for marine waters monitoring in Bulgaria to meet the requirements of EU and national legislation. The main outcomes are to fill the gaps in information from the Initial assessment of the marine environment and to collect data to assess the current ecological status of marine waters including information as a base for revision of ecological targets established by the monitoring programme prepared in 2014 under Art. 11 of MSFD. Project activities are targeted to ensure data for Descriptors 5, 8 and 9. IMAMO aims to increase the institutional capacity of the Bulgarian partners related to the monitoring and assessment of the Black Sea environment. The main outputs are: establishment of real time monitoring and set up of accredited laboratory facilities for marine waters and sediments chemical analysis to ensure the ability of Bulgarian partners to monitor progress of subsequent measures undertaken.

  8. Strategic Tutor Monitoring.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chee-kwong, Kenneth Chao

    1996-01-01

    Discusses effective tutor monitoring strategies based on experiences at the Open Learning Institute of Hong Kong. Highlights include key performance and strategic control points; situational factors, including tutor expectations and relevant culture; Theory X versus Theory Y leadership theories; and monitoring relationships with tutors. (LRW)

  9. Capillary blood glucose monitoring.

    PubMed

    Wallymahmed, M

    This article, the first in a series of articles relating to clinical skills in nursing, outlines the procedure of capillary blood glucose monitoring. This is a convenient way of monitoring blood glucose patterns and can be a useful aid in guiding treatment changes in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes, especially during periods of illness or frequent hypoglycaemia.

  10. HABs Monitoring and Prediction

    EPA Science Inventory

    Monitoring techniques for harmful algal blooms (HABs) vary across temporal and spatial domains. Remote satellite imagery provides information on water quality at relatively broad spatial and lengthy temporal scales. At the other end of the spectrum, local in-situ monitoring tec...

  11. Monitoring wilderness stream ecosystems

    Treesearch

    Jeffrey C. Davis; G. Wayne Minshall; Christopher T. Robinson; Peter Landres

    2001-01-01

    A protocol and methods for monitoring the major physical, chemical, and biological components of stream ecosystems are presented. The monitoring protocol is organized into four stages. At stage 1 information is obtained on a basic set of parameters that describe stream ecosystems. Each following stage builds upon stage 1 by increasing the number of parameters and the...

  12. Monitoring watersheds and streams

    Treesearch

    Robert R. Ziemer

    1998-01-01

    Regulations increasingly require monitoring to detect changes caused by land management activities. Successful monitoring requires that objectives be clearly stated. Once objectives are clearly identified, it is important to map out all of the components and links that might affect the issues of concern. For each issue and each component that affects that issue, there...

  13. Sulfur Dioxide Pollution Monitor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Bureau of Standards (DOC), Washington, DC.

    The sulfur dioxide pollution monitor described in this document is a government-owed invention that is available for licensing. The background of the invention is outlined, and drawings of the monitor together with a detailed description of its function are provided. A sample stream of air, smokestack gas or the like is flowed through a…

  14. Simple beam profile monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Gelbart, W.; Johnson, R. R.; Abeysekera, B.

    2012-12-19

    An inexpensive beam profile monitor is based on the well proven rotating wire method. The monitor can display beam position and shape in real time for particle beams of most energies and beam currents up to 200{mu}A. Beam shape, position cross-section and other parameters are displayed on a computer screen.

  15. Pasture monitoring with Landsat

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    While Landsat data has been used to monitor primary production in range and pasture areas, such monitoring has generally been intended to track broad changes across multiple years. With an 8-day return time and 30m resolution, Landsat data can be used to assess intra-annual changes, even within rota...

  16. HABs Monitoring and Prediction

    EPA Science Inventory

    Monitoring techniques for harmful algal blooms (HABs) vary across temporal and spatial domains. Remote satellite imagery provides information on water quality at relatively broad spatial and lengthy temporal scales. At the other end of the spectrum, local in-situ monitoring tec...

  17. Sulfur Dioxide Pollution Monitor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Bureau of Standards (DOC), Washington, DC.

    The sulfur dioxide pollution monitor described in this document is a government-owed invention that is available for licensing. The background of the invention is outlined, and drawings of the monitor together with a detailed description of its function are provided. A sample stream of air, smokestack gas or the like is flowed through a…

  18. Monitoring for conservation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nichols, J.D.; Williams, B.K.

    2006-01-01

    Human-mediated environmental changes have resulted in appropriate concern for the conservation of ecological systems and have led to the development of many ecological monitoring programs worldwide. Many programs that are identified with the purpose of `surveillance? represent an inefficient use of conservation funds and effort. Here, we revisit the 1964 paper by Platt and argue that his recommendations about the conduct of science are equally relevant to the conduct of ecological monitoring programs. In particular, we argue that monitoring should not be viewed as a stand-alone activity, but instead as a component of a larger process of either conservation-oriented science or management. Corresponding changes in monitoring focus and design would lead to substantial increases in the efficiency and usefulness of monitoring results in conservation.

  19. Monitoring Cray Cooling Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, Don E; Ezell, Matthew A; Becklehimer, Jeff; Donovan, Matthew J; Layton, Christopher C

    2014-01-01

    While sites generally have systems in place to monitor the health of Cray computers themselves, often the cooling systems are ignored until a computer failure requires investigation into the source of the failure. The Liebert XDP units used to cool the Cray XE/XK models as well as the Cray proprietary cooling system used for the Cray XC30 models provide data useful for health monitoring. Unfortunately, this valuable information is often available only to custom solutions not accessible by a center-wide monitoring system or is simply ignored entirely. In this paper, methods and tools used to harvest the monitoring data available are discussed, and the implementation needed to integrate the data into a center-wide monitoring system at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory is provided.

  20. Monitoring on the Move

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The MyoMonitor EMG system was developed by Delsys, Inc. under SBIR funding from Johnson Space Center. It is a wearable four-channel device that can monitor muscle performance. Presently, its application include rehabilitative therapy, injury prevention, sports medicine, exercise training, and various other muscle monitoring activities. The MyoMonitor uses a two-bar single differential electrode. Due to the electrode-skin interface in traditional EMG equipment, during rigorous muscular activity, the movement of the skin causes the electrode detection surfaces to become compromised. The MyoMonitor eliminates this problem, enabling a wide array of applications and experiments during intense muscular activity. The ability to make such recordings, for example, enables novel experiments aboard the International Space Station for investigating the effect of microgravity on muscle performance. Product still commercially available as of March 2002.

  1. Inductive System Health Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iverson, David L.

    2004-01-01

    The Inductive Monitoring System (IMS) software was developed to provide a technique to automatically produce health monitoring knowledge bases for systems that are either difficult to model (simulate) with a computer or which require computer models that are too complex to use for real time monitoring. IMS uses nominal data sets collected either directly from the system or from simulations to build a knowledge base that can be used to detect anomalous behavior in the system. Machine learning and data mining techniques are used to characterize typical system behavior by extracting general classes of nominal data from archived data sets. IMS is able to monitor the system by comparing real time operational data with these classes. We present a description of learning and monitoring method used by IMS and summarize some recent IMS results.

  2. Cooperative runtime monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallé, Sylvain

    2013-11-01

    Requirements on message-based interactions can be formalised as an interface contract that specifies constraints on the sequence of possible messages that can be exchanged by multiple parties. At runtime, each peer can monitor incoming messages and check that the contract is correctly being followed by their respective senders. We introduce cooperative runtime monitoring, where a recipient 'delegates' its monitoring task to the sender, which is required to provide evidence that the message it sends complies with the contract. In turn, this evidence can be quickly checked by the recipient, which is then guaranteed of the sender's compliance to the contract without doing the monitoring computation by itself. A particular application of this concept is shown on web services, where service providers can monitor and enforce contract compliance of third-party clients at a small cost on the server side, while avoiding to certify or digitally sign them.

  3. Integrated structural health monitoring.

    SciTech Connect

    Farrar, C. R.

    2001-01-01

    Structural health monitoring is the implementation of a damage detection strategy for aerospace, civil and mechanical engineering infrastructure. Typical damage experienced by this infrastructure might be the development of fatigue cracks, degradation of structural connections, or bearing wear in rotating machinery. The goal of the research effort reported herein is to develop a robust and cost-effective structural health monitoring solution by integrating and extending technologies from various engineering and information technology disciplines. It is the authors opinion that all structural health monitoring systems must be application specific. Therefore, a specific application, monitoring welded moment resisting steel frame connections in structures subjected to seismic excitation, is described along with the motivation for choosing this application. The structural health monitoring solution for this application will integrate structural dynamics, wireless data acquisition, local actuation, micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) technology, and statistical pattern recognition algorithms. The proposed system is based on an assessment of the deficiencies associated with many current structural health monitoring technologies including past efforts by the authors. This paper provides an example of the integrated approach to structural health monitoring being undertaken at Los Alamos National Laboratory and summarizes progress to date on various aspects of the technology development.

  4. Monitoring that matters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Douglas H.; Gitzen, Robert A.; Millspaugh, Joshua J.; Cooper, Andrew B.; Licht, Daniel S.

    2012-01-01

    Monitoring is a critically important activity for assessing the status of a system, such as the health of an individual, the balance in one's checking account, profits and losses of a business, the economic activity of a nation, or the size of an animal population. Monitoring is especially vital for evaluating changes in the system associated with specific known impacts occurring to the system. It is also valuable for detecting unanticipated changes in the system and identifying plausible causes of such changes, all in time to take corrective action. Before proceeding, we should define "monitoring." One definition of "monitor" (Microsoft Corporation 2009) is "to check something at regular intervals in order to find out how it is progressing or developing." The key point here is "at regular intervals," suggesting a continuing process. Some definitions do not indicate the repetitive nature of monitoring and are basically synonymous with "observing." Most monitoring, in the strict sense of the word, is intended to persist for long periods of time, perhaps indefinitely or permanently. Similarly, Thompson et al. (1998: 3) referred to the "repeated assessment of status" of something, but noted that the term "monitor" is sometimes used for analogous activities such as collecting baseline information or evaluating projects for either implementation or effectiveness. For their purposes, they restricted the term to involve repeated measurements collected at a specified frequency of time units. Let us adopt that definition, recognizing that repeated measurements imply collecting comparable information on each occasion.

  5. Integrated structural health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrar, Charles R.; Sohn, Hoon; Fugate, Michael L.; Czarnecki, Jerry J.

    2001-07-01

    Structural health monitoring is the implementation of a damage detection strategy for aerospace, civil and mechanical engineering infrastructure. Typical damage experienced by this infrastructure might be the development of fatigue cracks, degradation of structural connections, or bearing wear in rotating machinery. The goal of the research effort reported herein is to develop a robust and cost-effective structural health monitoring solution by integrating and extending technologies from various engineering and information technology disciplines. It is the author's opinion that all structural health monitoring systems must be application specific. Therefore, a specific application, monitoring welded moment resisting steel frame connections in structures subjected to seismic excitation, is described along with the motivation for choosing this application. The structural health monitoring solution for this application will integrate structural dynamics, wireless data acquisition, local actuation, micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) technology, and statistical pattern recognition algorithms. The proposed system is based on an assessment of the deficiencies associated with many current structural health monitoring technologies including past efforts by the authors. This paper provides an example of the integrated approach to structural health monitoring being undertaken at Los Alamos National Laboratory and summarizes progress to date on various aspects of the technology development.

  6. Functional hemodynamic monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Pinsky, Michael R; Payen, Didier

    2005-01-01

    Hemodynamic monitoring is a central component of intensive care. Patterns of hemodynamic variables often suggest cardiogenic, hypovolemic, obstructive, or distributive (septic) etiologies to cardiovascular insufficiency, thus defining the specific treatments required. Monitoring increases in invasiveness, as required, as the risk for cardiovascular instability-induced morbidity increases because of the need to define more accurately the diagnosis and monitor the response to therapy. Monitoring is also context specific: requirements during cardiac surgery will be different from those in the intensive care unit or emergency department. Solitary hemodynamic values are useful as threshold monitors (e.g. hypotension is always pathological, central venous pressure is only elevated in disease). Some hemodynamic values can only be interpreted relative to metabolic demand, whereas others have multiple meanings. Functional hemodynamic monitoring implies a therapeutic application, independent of diagnosis such as a therapeutic trial of fluid challenge to assess preload responsiveness. Newer methods for assessing preload responsiveness include monitoring changes in central venous pressure during spontaneous inspiration, and variations in arterial pulse pressure, systolic pressure, and aortic flow variation in response to vena caval collapse during positive pressure ventilation or passive leg raising. Defining preload responsiveness using these functional measures, coupled to treatment protocols, can improve outcome from critical illness. Potentially, as these and newer, less invasive hemodynamic measures are validated, they could be incorporated into such protocolized care in a cost-effective manner. PMID:16356240

  7. Safety system status monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, J.R.; Morgenstern, M.H.; Rideout, T.H.; Cowley, P.J.

    1984-03-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory has studied the safety aspects of monitoring the preoperational status of safety systems in nuclear power plants. The goals of the study were to assess for the NRC the effectiveness of current monitoring systems and procedures, to develop near-term guidelines for reducing human errors associated with monitoring safety system status, and to recommend a regulatory position on this issue. A review of safety system status monitoring practices indicated that current systems and procedures do not adequately aid control room operators in monitoring safety system status. This is true even of some systems and procedures installed to meet existing regulatory guidelines (Regulatory Guide 1.47). In consequence, this report suggests acceptance criteria for meeting the functional requirements of an adequate system for monitoring safety system status. Also suggested are near-term guidelines that could reduce the likelihood of human errors in specific, high-priority status monitoring tasks. It is recommended that (1) Regulatory Guide 1.47 be revised to address these acceptance criteria, and (2) the revised Regulatory Guide 1.47 be applied to all plants, including those built since the issuance of the original Regulatory Guide.

  8. Remote maintenance monitoring system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpkins, Lorenz G. (Inventor); Owens, Richard C. (Inventor); Rochette, Donn A. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A remote maintenance monitoring system retrofits to a given hardware device with a sensor implant which gathers and captures failure data from the hardware device, without interfering with its operation. Failure data is continuously obtained from predetermined critical points within the hardware device, and is analyzed with a diagnostic expert system, which isolates failure origin to a particular component within the hardware device. For example, monitoring of a computer-based device may include monitoring of parity error data therefrom, as well as monitoring power supply fluctuations therein, so that parity error and power supply anomaly data may be used to trace the failure origin to a particular plane or power supply within the computer-based device. A plurality of sensor implants may be rerofit to corresponding plural devices comprising a distributed large-scale system. Transparent interface of the sensors to the devices precludes operative interference with the distributed network. Retrofit capability of the sensors permits monitoring of even older devices having no built-in testing technology. Continuous real time monitoring of a distributed network of such devices, coupled with diagnostic expert system analysis thereof, permits capture and analysis of even intermittent failures, thereby facilitating maintenance of the monitored large-scale system.

  9. Environmental Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Althouse, P E; Bertoldo, N A; Bowen, B M; Brown, R A; Campbell, C G; Christofferson, E; Gallegos, G M; Grayson, A R; Jones, H E; Larson, J M; Laycak, D; Mathews, S; Peterson, S R; Revelli, M J; Rueppel, D; Williams, R A; Wilson, K; Woods, N

    2005-11-23

    The purpose of the environmental monitoring plan (EMP) is to promote the early identification of, and response to, potential adverse environmental impacts associated with DOE operations. Environmental monitoring supports the Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) to detect, characterize, and respond to releases from DOE activities; assess impacts; estimate dispersal patterns in the environment; characterize the pathways of exposure to members of the public; characterize the exposures and doses to individuals and to the population; and to evaluate the potential impacts to the biota in the vicinity of the DOE activity. In addition, the EMP addresses the analytical work supporting environmental monitoring to ensure the following: (1) A consistent system for collecting, assessing, and documenting environmental data of known and documented quality; (2) A validated and consistent approach for sampling and analysis of radionuclide samples to ensure laboratory data meets program-specific needs and requirements within the framework of a performance-based approach for analytical laboratory work; and (3) An integrated sampling approach to avoid duplicative data collection. Until recently, environmental monitoring at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was required by DOE Order 5400.1, which was canceled in January 2003. LLNL is in the process of adopting the ISO 14001 Environmental Management Systems standard, which contains requirements to perform and document environmental monitoring. The ISO 14001 standard is not as prescriptive as DOE Order 5400.1, which expressly required an EMP. LLNL will continue to prepare the EMP because it provides an organizational framework for ensuring that the work is conducted appropriately. The environmental monitoring addressed by the plan includes preoperational characterization and assessment, and effluent and surveillance monitoring. Additional environmental monitoring is conducted at LLNL as part of the compliance with the

  10. Monitoring in microvascular surgery.

    PubMed

    Furnas, H; Rosen, J M

    1991-03-01

    The importance of monitoring in microvascular surgery is underscored by the high reported salvage rates of failing free flaps and replants. In this overview, we begin by defining the physiology of ischemic tissue with emphasis given to the no-reflow phenomenon and the secondary critical ischemia times. Based on the physiological changes accompanying ischemia, several variables are defined that can be monitored to reflect the vascular state of a free flap or replant. Multifarious monitoring systems are then reviewed, including clinical observation, temperature, isotope clearance, ultrasonic Doppler, laser Doppler, transcutaneous oxygen tension, reflection plethysmography, dermofluorometry, pH, electromagnetic flowmetry, serial hematocrits, interstitial fluid pressure, and magnetic resonance imaging.

  11. Agile Infrastructure Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade, P.; Ascenso, J.; Fedorko, I.; Fiorini, B.; Paladin, M.; Pigueiras, L.; Santos, M.

    2014-06-01

    At the present time, data centres are facing a massive rise in virtualisation and cloud computing. The Agile Infrastructure (AI) project is working to deliver new solutions to ease the management of CERN data centres. Part of the solution consists in a new "shared monitoring architecture" which collects and manages monitoring data from all data centre resources. In this article, we present the building blocks of this new monitoring architecture, the different open source technologies selected for each architecture layer, and how we are building a community around this common effort.

  12. Noninvasive vital signal monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zenan; Chee, Jonny; Chua, Kok Poo; Chen, ZhouDe

    2010-05-01

    Vital signals of patients, such as heart rate, temperature and movement are crucial to monitor patients in hospital. Current heart rate measurement is obtained by using Electrocardiograph, which normally applies electrodes to the patient's body. As electrodes are extremely uncomfortable to ware and hinder patient's movement, a non-invasive vital signal-monitoring device will be a better solution. Similar to Electrocardiograph, the device detects the voltage difference across the heart by using concept of capacitance, which can be obtained by two conductive fiber sewing on the bed sheet. Simultaneous temperature reading can also be detected by using surface mounted temperature sensor. This paper will mainly focus on the heart rate monitoring.

  13. Improve emissions monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Vining, S.K.

    1998-01-01

    Marathon`s Texas City refinery was subject to five separate EPA regulations in addition to a state program for monitoring and repairing fugitive leaks. In this case history, the refinery sought an organizational solution that reduced monitoring costs and kept the facility fully compliant with current state and federal regulations. Equally important, the new monitoring program incorporated flexibility for future emission-reduction requirements. The paper describes the solution, regulatory background, the previous system, leak-threshold consolidation, operator ownership, and projects benefits.

  14. Java online monitoring framework

    SciTech Connect

    Ronan, M.; Kirkby, D.; Johnson, A.S.; Groot, D. de

    1997-10-01

    An online monitoring framework has been written in the Java Language Environment to develop applications for monitoring special purpose detectors during commissioning of the PEP-II Interaction Region. PEP-II machine parameters and signals from several of the commissioning detectors are logged through VxWorks/EPICS and displayed by Java display applications. Remote clients are able to monitor the machine and detector performance using graphical displays and analysis histogram packages. In this paper, the design and implementation of the object-oriented Java framework is described. Illustrations of data acquisition, display and histograming applications are also given.

  15. Noninvasive Heart Rate Monitor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-08-01

    NUMOEN2. GVT ACCESSION NO.2 ReCIPICUTS CATALOG NUMOeaR 14 -A674P ;-FR 4. TITLE (end S.dU. L TYPE OF RgPORT & PCFmOO covgeno Noninvasive Heart Rate monitor...WHNWIM AMINOw3 I& SUPPLEMENTARYV NOTES A9-W A IS. KCY WORDS (Canam. an ,. d" it4 II wooe.p ad IiEEr 6F AAm Heart Raet Monitor; Doppler Detector...of using a handheld, battery operated, cv microwave radar, operating at 2.45 GHs, for use as a heart rate monitor under chemically contaminated

  16. MCO Monitoring activity description

    SciTech Connect

    SEXTON, R.A.

    1998-11-09

    Spent Nuclear Fuel remaining from Hanford's N-Reactor operations in the 1970s has been stored under water in the K-Reactor Basins. This fuel will be repackaged, dried and stored in a new facility in the 200E Area. The safety basis for this process of retrieval, drying, and interim storage of the spent fuel has been established. The monitoring of MCOS in dry storage is a currently identified issue in the SNF Project. This plan outlines the key elements of the proposed monitoring activity. Other fuel stored in the K-Reactor Basins, including SPR fuel, will have other monitoring considerations and is not addressed by this activity description.

  17. Space Station Induced Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spann, James F. (Editor); Torr, Marsha R. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    This report contains the results of a conference convened May 10-11, 1988, to review plans for monitoring the Space Station induced environment, to recommend primary components of an induced environment monitoring package, and to make recommendations pertaining to suggested modifications of the Space Station External Contamination Control Requirements Document JSC 30426. The contents of this report are divided as Follows: Monitoring Induced Environment - Space Station Work Packages Requirements, Neutral Environment, Photon Emission Environment, Particulate Environment, Surface Deposition/Contamination; and Contamination Control Requirements.

  18. Source Monitoring in Alzheimer's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    El Haj, Mohamad; Fasotti, Luciano; Allain, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Source monitoring is the process of making judgments about the origin of memories. There are three categories of source monitoring: reality monitoring (discrimination between self- versus other-generated sources), external monitoring (discrimination between several external sources), and internal monitoring (discrimination between two types of…

  19. Source Monitoring in Alzheimer's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    El Haj, Mohamad; Fasotti, Luciano; Allain, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Source monitoring is the process of making judgments about the origin of memories. There are three categories of source monitoring: reality monitoring (discrimination between self- versus other-generated sources), external monitoring (discrimination between several external sources), and internal monitoring (discrimination between two types of…

  20. Real-time examination of aminoglycoside activity towards bacterial mimetic membranes using Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation monitoring (QCM-D).

    PubMed

    Joshi, Tanmaya; Voo, Zhi Xiang; Graham, Bim; Spiccia, Leone; Martin, Lisandra L

    2015-02-01

    The rapid increase in multi-drug resistant bacteria has resulted in previously discontinued treatments being revisited. Aminoglycosides are effective "old" antibacterial agents that fall within this category. Despite extensive usage and understanding of their intracellular targets, there is limited mechanistic knowledge regarding how aminoglycosides penetrate bacterial membranes. Thus, the activity of two well-known aminoglycosides, kanamycin A and neomycin B, towards a bacterial mimetic membrane (DMPC:DMPG (4:1)) was examined using a Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation monitoring (QCM-D). The macroscopic effect of increasing the aminoglycoside concentration showed that kanamycin A exerts a threshold response, switching from binding to the membrane to disruption of the surface. Neomycin B, however, disrupted the membrane at all concentrations examined. At concentrations above the threshold value observed for kanamycin A, both aminoglycosides revealed similar mechanistic details. That is, they both inserted into the bacterial mimetic lipid bilayer, prior to disruption via loss of materials, presumably aminoglycoside-membrane composites. Depth profile analysis of this membrane interaction was achieved using the overtones of the quartz crystal sensor. The measured data is consistent with a two-stage process in which insertion of the aminoglycoside precedes the 'detergent-like' removal of membranes from the sensor. The results of this study contribute to the insight required for aminoglycosides to be reconsidered as active antimicrobial agents/co-agents by providing details of activity at the bacterial membrane. Kanamycin and neomycin still offer potential as antimicrobial therapeutics for the future and the QCM-D method illustrates great promise for screening new antibacterial or antiviral drug candidates.

  1. Environmental monitoring plan - environmental monitoring section. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Wilt, G.C.; Tate, P.J.; Brigdon, S.L.

    1994-11-01

    This report presents the environmental monitoring plan for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. A site characterization is provided along with monitoring and measurement techniques and quality assurance measures.

  2. Monitor blood glucose - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... Series—Monitoring blood glucose: Using a self-test meter To use the sharing features on this page, ... 5 out of 5 Overview Set up the meter according to the specific directions that come with ...

  3. Landsat Earth Monitor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haggerty, James J.

    1979-01-01

    The uses of NASA's Landsat in the areas of cartography, flood control, agricultural inventory, land use mapping, water runoff, urban planning, erosion, geology, and water quality monitoring are illustrated. (BB)

  4. Electrical-ground monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, T. D.

    1979-01-01

    Instrument for detecting short circuits monitors ground connections and sounds alarm if out-of-limits condition occurs. Circuit includes electronics that prevent false triggering by high-resistance or capacitive paths and other noise.

  5. Good neighbor monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Schukraft, D.F.

    1995-11-01

    Since 1896, when a Unocal 76 products oil refinery was sited overlooking San Pablo bay, urban sprawl has crept up and neighbors now include housing projects, shopping centers and schools. To ensure that the area is a safe and enjoyable place for all to live and work, Unocal is working with local community groups to monitor air quality. The refinery has recently installed a sophisticated air quality and meterological monitoring system designed to provide an early warning should sulfur compounds or hydrocarbons begin to reach unhealthful levels. Siting of the monitoring station was a joint effort by school administrators from the nearby Hillcrest Elementary School and the Bay Area Air Quality Management District. By strategically locating the station adjacent to the school, emission levels coming from the refinery or other local sources can be effectively monitored. A unique part of this program is how closely Unocal, Hillcrest School and BAAQMD work together. All three groups have access to the data.

  6. Compliance Assurance Monitoring

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Compliance assurance monitoring is intended to provide a reasonable assurance of compliance with applicable requirements under the Clean Air Act for large emission units that rely on pollution control device equipment to achieve compliance.

  7. Siting Air Monitoring Stations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ludwig, F. L.

    1978-01-01

    Describes guidelines for consideration in selecting sites for air monitoring systems. Careful selection for spatial scale and specific sources assures that the collected data are accurately representing the situation. (Author/MA)

  8. Lunar Health Monitor (LHM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lisy, Frederick J.

    2015-01-01

    Orbital Research, Inc., has developed a low-profile, wearable sensor suite for monitoring astronaut health in both intravehicular and extravehicular activities. The Lunar Health Monitor measures respiration, body temperature, electrocardiogram (EKG) heart rate, and other cardiac functions. Orbital Research's dry recording electrode is central to the innovation and can be incorporated into garments, eliminating the need for conductive pastes, adhesives, or gels. The patented dry recording electrode has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The LHM is easily worn under flight gear or with civilian clothing, making the system completely versatile for applications where continuous physiological monitoring is needed. During Phase II, Orbital Research developed a second-generation LHM that allows sensor customization for specific monitoring applications and anatomical constraints. Evaluations included graded exercise tests, lunar mission task simulations, functional battery tests, and resting measures. The LHM represents the successful integration of sensors into a wearable platform to capture long-duration and ambulatory physiological markers.

  9. Landsat Earth Monitor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haggerty, James J.

    1979-01-01

    The uses of NASA's Landsat in the areas of cartography, flood control, agricultural inventory, land use mapping, water runoff, urban planning, erosion, geology, and water quality monitoring are illustrated. (BB)

  10. Siting Air Monitoring Stations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ludwig, F. L.

    1978-01-01

    Describes guidelines for consideration in selecting sites for air monitoring systems. Careful selection for spatial scale and specific sources assures that the collected data are accurately representing the situation. (Author/MA)

  11. High Temperature ESP Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Jack Booker; Brindesh Dhruva

    2011-06-20

    The objective of the High Temperature ESP Monitoring project was to develop a downhole monitoring system to be used in wells with bottom hole well temperatures up to 300°C for measuring motor temperature, formation pressure, and formation temperature. These measurements are used to monitor the health of the ESP motor, to track the downhole operating conditions, and to optimize the pump operation. A 220 ºC based High Temperature ESP Monitoring system was commercially released for sale with Schlumberger ESP motors April of 2011 and a 250 ºC system with will be commercially released at the end of Q2 2011. The measurement system is now fully qualified, except for the sensor, at 300 °C.

  12. Valve Health Monitor (VHM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perotti, Jose M.; Delgado, H. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This presentation reports on progress being made on developing a Valve Health Monitor (VHM) Smart Current Signature Sensor. Topics cover include: design needs, target valves, current signatures, VHM design approach and VHM status/conclusions.

  13. Principals of hemodynamic monitoring.

    PubMed

    Polanco, Patricio M; Pinsky, Michael R

    2007-01-01

    Hemodynamic monitoring is the cornerstone of patient management in the intensive care unit. However, to be used effectively its applications and limitations need to be defined and its values applied within the context of proven therapeutic approaches. Review of the physiological basis for monitoring and a review of the literature on its utility in altering patient outcomes. Most forms of monitoring are used to prevent cardiovascular deterioration or restore cardiovascular wellness. However, little data support the generalized use of aggressive resuscitation protocols in all but the most acutely ill prior to the onset of organ injury. Outcomes improve with aggressive resuscitation in some patients presenting with early severe sepsis and in postoperative high-risk surgical patients. Monitoring should be targeted to meet the specific needs of the patient and should not be applied in a broad fashion and whenever possible it should be used as part of a treatment protocol of proven efficacy.

  14. Laser beam monitoring system

    DOEpatents

    Weil, Bradley S.; Wetherington, Jr., Grady R.

    1985-01-01

    Laser beam monitoring systems include laser-transparent plates set at an angle to the laser beam passing therethrough and light sensor for detecting light reflected from an object on which the laser beam impinges.

  15. Ocean Disposal Site Monitoring

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA is responsible for managing all designated ocean disposal sites. Surveys are conducted to identify appropriate locations for ocean disposal sites and to monitor the impacts of regulated dumping at the disposal sites.

  16. Birth defects monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Klingberg, M.A.; Papier, C.M.; Hart, J.

    1983-01-01

    Population monitoring of birth defects provides a means for detecting relative changes in their frequency. Many varied systems have been developed throughout the world since the thalidomide tragedy of the early 1960s. Although it is difficult to pinpoint specific teratogenic agents based on rises in rates of a particular defect or a constellation of defects, monitoring systems can provide clues for hypothesis testing in epidemiological investigations. International coordination of efforts in this area resulted in the founding of the International Clearinghouse for Birth Defects Monitoring Systems (ICBDMS) in 1974. In this paper we will describe the functions and basic requirements of monitoring systems in general, and look at the development and activities of the ICBDMS. A review of known and suspected environmental teratogenic agents (eg, chemical, habitual, biological, physical, and nutritional) is also presented.

  17. Monitoring by Control Technique

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Stationary source emissions monitoring is required to demonstrate that a source is meeting the requirements in Federal or state rules. This page links to different control techniques used to reduce pollutant emissions.

  18. Meteorological Monitoring Program

    SciTech Connect

    Hancock, H.A. Jr.; Parker, M.J.; Addis, R.P.

    1994-09-01

    The purpose of this technical report is to provide a comprehensive, detailed overview of the meteorological monitoring program at the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. The principle function of the program is to provide current, accurate meteorological data as input for calculating the transport and diffusion of any unplanned release of an atmospheric pollutant. The report is recommended for meteorologists, technicians, or any personnel who require an in-depth understanding of the meteorological monitoring program.

  19. Nitinol Temperature Monitoring Devices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-01-09

    AD-A021 578 NITINOL TEMPERATURE MONITORING DEVICES William J. Buehler, et al Naval Surface Weapons Center Silver Spring, Maryland 9 January 1976...LABORATORY S NITINOL TEMPERATURE MONITORING DEVICES 9 JANUARY 1976 NAVAL SURFACE WEAPONS CENTER WHITE OAK LABORATORY SILVER SPRING, MARYLAND 20910 * Approved...GOVT ACCESSION NO. 3. RECIPIIENT’S CATALOG NUMBER NSWC/WOL/TR 75-140 ____ ______ 4 TITLE (and Subtitle) 5. TYPE OF REPCRT & PERIOD COVERED Nitinol

  20. Structure function monitor

    DOEpatents

    McGraw, John T [Placitas, NM; Zimmer, Peter C [Albuquerque, NM; Ackermann, Mark R [Albuquerque, NM

    2012-01-24

    Methods and apparatus for a structure function monitor provide for generation of parameters characterizing a refractive medium. In an embodiment, a structure function monitor acquires images of a pupil plane and an image plane and, from these images, retrieves the phase over an aperture, unwraps the retrieved phase, and analyzes the unwrapped retrieved phase. In an embodiment, analysis yields atmospheric parameters measured at spatial scales from zero to the diameter of a telescope used to collect light from a source.

  1. Fiber optic monitoring device

    DOEpatents

    Samborsky, James K.

    1993-01-01

    A device for the purpose of monitoring light transmissions in optical fibers comprises a fiber optic tap that optically diverts a fraction of a transmitted optical signal without disrupting the integrity of the signal. The diverted signal is carried, preferably by the fiber optic tap, to a lens or lens system that disperses the light over a solid angle that facilitates viewing. The dispersed light indicates whether or not the monitored optical fiber or system of optical fibers is currently transmitting optical information.

  2. Passive fetal monitoring sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, Allan J. (Inventor); Hall, Earl T. (Inventor); Baker, Donald A. (Inventor); Bryant, Timothy D. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    An ambulatory, passive sensor for use in a fetal monitoring system is discussed. The invention is comprised of a piezoelectric polymer film, combined with a metallic mounting plate fastened to a belt, and electrically connected to a signal processing unit by means of a shielded cable. The purpose of the sensor is to receive pressure pulses emitted by a fetus inside an expectant mother. Additionally, the monitor will filter out pressure pulses arising from other sources, such as the maternal heart.

  3. Advanced Environmental Monitoring Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jan, Darrell

    2004-01-01

    Viewgraphs on Advanced Environmental Monitoring Technologies are presented. The topics include: 1) Monitoring & Controlling the Environment; 2) Illustrative Example: Canary 3) Ground-based Commercial Technology; 4) High Capability & Low Mass/Power + Autonomy = Key to Future SpaceFlight; 5) Current Practice: in Flight; 6) Current Practice: Post Flight; 7) Miniature Mass Spectrometer for Planetary Exploration and Long Duration Human Flight; 8) Hardware and Data Acquisition System; 9) 16S rDNA Phylogenetic Tree; and 10) Preview of Porter.

  4. Passive fetal monitoring sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuckerwar, Allan J.; Hall, Earl T.; Baker, Donald A.; Bryant, Timothy D.

    1992-08-01

    An ambulatory, passive sensor for use in a fetal monitoring system is discussed. The invention is comprised of a piezoelectric polymer film, combined with a metallic mounting plate fastened to a belt, and electrically connected to a signal processing unit by means of a shielded cable. The purpose of the sensor is to receive pressure pulses emitted by a fetus inside an expectant mother. Additionally, the monitor will filter out pressure pulses arising from other sources, such as the maternal heart.

  5. Monitoring for airborne allergens

    SciTech Connect

    Burge, H.A. )

    1992-07-01

    Monitoring for allergens can provide some information on the kinds and levels of exposure experienced by local patient populations, providing volumetric methods are used for sample collection and analysis is accurate and consistent. Such data can also be used to develop standards for the specific environment and to begin to develop predictive models. Comparing outdoor allergen aerosols between different monitoring sites requires identical collection and analysis methods and some kind of rational standard, whether arbitrary, or based on recognized health effects.32 references.

  6. IR Linearity Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilbert, Bryan

    2012-10-01

    These observations will be used to monitor the signal non-linearity of the IR channel, as well as to update the IR channel non-linearity calibration reference file. The non-linearity behavior of each pixel in the detector will be investigated through the use of full frame and subarray flat fields, while the photometric behavior of point sources will be studied using observations of 47 Tuc. This is a continuation of the Cycle 19 non-linearity monitor, program 12696.

  7. IR linearity monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilbert, Bryan

    2013-10-01

    These observations will be used to monitor the signal non-linearity of the IR channel, as well as to update the IR channel non-linearity calibration reference file. The non-linearity behavior of each pixel in the detector will be investigated through the use of full frame and subarray flat fields, while the photometric behavior of point sources will be studied using observations of 47 Tuc. This is a continuation of the Cycle 20 non-linearity monitor, program 13079.

  8. Electric Power Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Control center for SAMAC (System Automatic Monitor and Control) is a sophisticated dispatch computer system, developed by Rockwell International and operated by Philadelphia Electric Co. SAMAC monitors and controls the generation and distribution of electric power throughout the Philadelphia electric network. With the assistance of NASA's Apollo computer system technology, it enables human operators to isolate and correct power distribution problems more rapidly than was possible with earlier dispatch systems without centralized computer control.

  9. Free cholesterol determines reassembled high-density lipoprotein phospholipid phase structure and stability.

    PubMed

    Auton, Matthew; Bassett, G Randall; Gillard, Baiba K; Pownall, Henry J

    2013-06-25

    Reassembled high-density lipoproteins (rHDL) of various sizes and compositions containing apo A-I or apo A-II as their sole protein, dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC), and various amounts of free cholesterol (FC) have been isolated and analyzed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and by circular dichroism to determine their stability and the temperature dependence of their helical content. Our data show that the multiple rHDL species obtained at each FC mole percent usually do not have the same FC mole percent as the starting mixture and that the size of the multiple species increases in a quantized way with their respective FC mole percent. DSC studies reveal multiple phases or domains that can be classified as virtual DMPC, which contains a small amount of DMPC that slightly reduces the melting temperature (Tm), a boundary phase that is adjacent to the apo A-I or apo A-II that circumscribes the discoidal rHDL, and a mixed FC/DMPC phase that has a Tm that increases with FC mole percent. Only the large rHDL contain virtual DMPC, whereas all contain boundary phase and various amounts of the mixed FC/DMPC phase according to increasing size and FC mole percent. As reported by others, FC stabilizes the rHDL. For rHDL (apo A-II) compared to rHDL (apo A-I), this occurs in spite of the reduced number of helical regions that mediate binding to the DMPC surface. This effect is attributed to the very high lipophilicity of apo A-II and the reduction in the polarity of the interface between DMPC and the aqueous phase with an increasing FC mole percent, an effect that is expected to increase the strength of the hydrophobic associations with the nonpolar face of the amphipathic helices of apo A-II. These data are relevant to the differential effects of FC and apolipoprotein species on intracellular and plasma membrane nascent HDL assembly and subsequent remodeling by plasma proteins.

  10. Monitoring Evolution at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade, P.; Fiorini, B.; Murphy, S.; Pigueiras, L.; Santos, M.

    2015-12-01

    Over the past two years, the operation of the CERN Data Centres went through significant changes with the introduction of new mechanisms for hardware procurement, new services for cloud provisioning and configuration management, among other improvements. These changes resulted in an increase of resources being operated in a more dynamic environment. Today, the CERN Data Centres provide over 11000 multi-core processor servers, 130 PB disk servers, 100 PB tape robots, and 150 high performance tape drives. To cope with these developments, an evolution of the data centre monitoring tools was also required. This modernisation was based on a number of guiding rules: sustain the increase of resources, adapt to the new dynamic nature of the data centres, make monitoring data easier to share, give more flexibility to Service Managers on how they publish and consume monitoring metrics and logs, establish a common repository of monitoring data, optimise the handling of monitoring notifications, and replace the previous toolset by new open source technologies with large adoption and community support. This contribution describes how these improvements were delivered, present the architecture and technologies of the new monitoring tools, and review the experience of its production deployment.

  11. Lipid Concentration and Molar Ratio Boundaries for the Use of Isotropic Bicelles

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Bicelles are model membranes generally made of long-chain dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and short-chain dihexanoyl-PC (DHPC). They are extensively used in the study of membrane interactions and structure determination of membrane-associated peptides, since their composition and morphology mimic the widespread PC-rich natural eukaryotic membranes. At low DMPC/DHPC (q) molar ratios, fast-tumbling bicelles are formed in which the DMPC bilayer is stabilized by DHPC molecules in the high-curvature rim region. Experimental constraints imposed by techniques such as circular dichroism, dynamic light scattering, or microscopy may require the use of bicelles at high dilutions. Studies have shown that such conditions induce the formation of small aggregates and alter the lipid-to-detergent ratio of the bicelle assemblies. The objectives of this work were to determine the exact composition of those DMPC/DHPC isotropic bicelles and study the lipid miscibility. This was done using 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and exploring a wide range of lipid concentrations (2–400 mM) and q ratios (0.15–2). Our data demonstrate how dilution modifies the actual DMPC/DHPC molar ratio in the bicelles. Care must be taken for samples with a total lipid concentration ≤250 mM and especially at q ∼ 1.5–2, since moderate dilutions could lead to the formation of large and slow-tumbling lipid structures that could hinder the use of solution NMR methods, circular dichroism or dynamic light scattering studies. Our results, supported by infrared spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations, also show that phospholipids in bicelles are largely segregated only when q > 1. Boundaries are presented within which control of the bicelles’ q ratio is possible. This work, thus, intends to guide the choice of q ratio and total phospholipid concentration when using isotropic bicelles. PMID:24797658

  12. Lipid concentration and molar ratio boundaries for the use of isotropic bicelles.

    PubMed

    Beaugrand, Maïwenn; Arnold, Alexandre A; Hénin, Jérôme; Warschawski, Dror E; Williamson, Philip T F; Marcotte, Isabelle

    2014-06-03

    Bicelles are model membranes generally made of long-chain dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and short-chain dihexanoyl-PC (DHPC). They are extensively used in the study of membrane interactions and structure determination of membrane-associated peptides, since their composition and morphology mimic the widespread PC-rich natural eukaryotic membranes. At low DMPC/DHPC (q) molar ratios, fast-tumbling bicelles are formed in which the DMPC bilayer is stabilized by DHPC molecules in the high-curvature rim region. Experimental constraints imposed by techniques such as circular dichroism, dynamic light scattering, or microscopy may require the use of bicelles at high dilutions. Studies have shown that such conditions induce the formation of small aggregates and alter the lipid-to-detergent ratio of the bicelle assemblies. The objectives of this work were to determine the exact composition of those DMPC/DHPC isotropic bicelles and study the lipid miscibility. This was done using (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and exploring a wide range of lipid concentrations (2-400 mM) and q ratios (0.15-2). Our data demonstrate how dilution modifies the actual DMPC/DHPC molar ratio in the bicelles. Care must be taken for samples with a total lipid concentration ≤250 mM and especially at q ∼ 1.5-2, since moderate dilutions could lead to the formation of large and slow-tumbling lipid structures that could hinder the use of solution NMR methods, circular dichroism or dynamic light scattering studies. Our results, supported by infrared spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations, also show that phospholipids in bicelles are largely segregated only when q > 1. Boundaries are presented within which control of the bicelles' q ratio is possible. This work, thus, intends to guide the choice of q ratio and total phospholipid concentration when using isotropic bicelles.

  13. Bicellar systems to modify the phase behaviour of skin stratum corneum lipids.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Gelen; Cócera, Mercedes; Rubio, Laia; Alonso, Cristina; Pons, Ramon; Sandt, Christophe; Dumas, Paul; López-Iglesias, Carmen; de la Maza, Alfons; López, Olga

    2012-11-14

    Bicellar systems are a fascinating category of versatile lipid assemblies that comprise bilayered disk-shaped nanoaggregates formed in water by long and short alkyl chain phospholipids. Bicelles bridge the gap between micelles and lipid vesicles by combining the attractive properties of both systems. These structures have recently been proposed in dermatological, cosmetic and pharmaceutical applications. Two new binary bicellar systems composed of cholesterol sulphate (SCHOL) and long-chain phospholipids (dimyristoyl-phosphatidylcholine, DMPC, or dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylcholine, DPPC) are characterised herein by differential scanning calorimetry, fluorescence spectroscopy, X-ray scattering and microscopy. Additionally, a comparative study on skin treated with the new SCHOL systems (DMPC/SCHOL and DPPC/SCHOL) and classic DHPC systems (DMPC/DHPC and DPPC/DHPC) was performed. These studies were conducted to determinate how deeply bicelles penetrate into the skin and the extension of their effect on the phase behaviour of stratum corneum (SC) lipids using attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy. Our results show that SCHOL modified the typical discoidal morphology and the phase behaviour of the systems, inducing coexistence of two phases, liquid-ordered and ripple phases. The effect of the systems on SC lipids depends on their composition and is related to the fluidity of the SC lipid alkyl chains. Thus, systems with DMPC induced more disorder in SC lipids than systems with DPPC, and SCHOL did not modify the lipid arrangement. Perdeuterated systems in the infrared spectroscopy technique supported a different distribution in the tissue for every system. DMPC systems were primarily at the first layers of the SC, whereas DPPC systems were more widely distributed. Systems with SCHOL had enhanced distribution and penetration of bicellar systems throughout the SC.

  14. Membrane topology of a 14-mer model amphipathic peptide: a solid-state NMR spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Ouellet, Marise; Doucet, Jean-Daniel; Voyer, Normand; Auger, Michèle

    2007-06-05

    We have investigated the interaction between a synthetic amphipathic 14-mer peptide and model membranes by solid-state NMR. The 14-mer peptide is composed of leucines and phenylalanines modified by the addition of crown ethers and forms a helical amphipathic structure in solution and bound to lipid membranes. To shed light on its membrane topology, 31P, 2H, 15N solid-state NMR experiments have been performed on the 14-mer peptide in interaction with mechanically oriented bilayers of dilauroylphosphatidylcholine (DLPC), dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC), and dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC). The 31P, 2H, and 15N NMR results indicate that the 14-mer peptide remains at the surface of the DLPC, DMPC, and DPPC bilayers stacked between glass plates and perturbs the lipid orientation relative to the magnetic field direction. Its membrane topology is similar in DLPC and DMPC bilayers, whereas the peptide seems to be more deeply inserted in DPPC bilayers, as revealed by the greater orientational and motional disorder of the DPPC lipid headgroup and acyl chains. 15N{31P} rotational echo double resonance experiments have also been used to measure the intermolecular dipole-dipole interaction between the 14-mer peptide and the phospholipid headgroup of DMPC multilamellar vesicles, and the results indicate that the 14-mer peptide is in contact with the polar region of the DMPC lipids. On the basis of these studies, the mechanism of membrane perturbation of the 14-mer peptide is associated to the induction of a positive curvature strain induced by the peptide lying on the bilayer surface and seems to be independent of the bilayer hydrophobic thickness.

  15. Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center Monitoring Manual Volume 2, Radiation Monitoring and Sampling

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Aerial Measurement Systems

    2012-07-31

    The FRMAC Monitoring and Sampling Manual, Volume 2 provides standard operating procedures (SOPs) for field radiation monitoring and sample collection activities that are performed by the Monitoring group during a FRMAC response to a radiological emergency.

  16. VME system monitor board

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-01

    Much of the machinery throughout the APS will be controlled by VME based computers. In order to increase the reliability of the system, it is necessary to be able to monitor the status of each VME crate. In order to do this, a VME System Monitor was created. In addition to being able to monitor and report the status (watchdog timer, temperature, CPU (Motorola MVME 167) state (status, run, fail), and the power supply), it includes provisions to remotely reset the CPU and VME crate, digital I/O, and parts of the transition module (serial port and ethernet connector) so that the Motorla MVME 712 is not needed. The standard VME interface was modified on the System Monitor so that in conjunction with the Motorola MVME 167 a message based VXI interrupt handler could is implemented. The System Monitor is a single VME card (6U). It utilizes both the front panel and the P2 connector for I/O. The front panel contains a temperature monitor, watchdog status LED, 4 general status LEDs, input for a TTL interrupt, 8 binary inputs (24 volt, 5 volt, and dry contact sense), 4 binary outputs (dry contact, TTL, and 100 mA), serial port (electrical RS-232 or fiber optic), ethernet transceiver (10 BASE-FO or AUI), and a status link to neighbor crates. The P2 connector is used to provide the serial port and ethernet to the processor. In order to abort and read the status of the CPU, a jumper cable must be connected between the CPU and the System Monitor.

  17. Monitoring: The missing piece

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorkland, Ronald

    2013-11-15

    The U.S. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 heralded in an era of more robust attention to environmental impacts resulting from larger scale federal projects. The number of other countries that have adopted NEPA's framework is evidence of the appeal of this type of environmental legislation. Mandates to review environmental impacts, identify alternatives, and provide mitigation plans before commencement of the project are at the heart of NEPA. Such project reviews have resulted in the development of a vast number of reports and large volumes of project-specific data that potentially can be used to better understand the components and processes of the natural environment and provide guidance for improved and efficient environmental protection. However, the environmental assessment (EA) or the more robust and intensive environmental impact statement (EIS) that are required for most major projects more frequently than not are developed to satisfy the procedural aspects of the NEPA legislation while they fail to provide the needed guidance for improved decision-making. While NEPA legislation recommends monitoring of project activities, this activity is not mandated, and in those situations where it has been incorporated, the monitoring showed that the EIS was inaccurate in direction and/or magnitude of the impact. Many reviews of NEPA have suggested that monitoring all project phases, from the design through the decommissioning, should be incorporated. Information gathered though a well-developed monitoring program can be managed in databases and benefit not only the specific project but would provide guidance how to better design and implement future activities designed to protect and enhance the natural environment. -- Highlights: • NEPA statutes created profound environmental protection legislative framework. • Contrary to intent, NEPA does not provide for definitive project monitoring. • Robust project monitoring is essential for enhanced

  18. Basic Information about Air Emissions Monitoring

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This site is about types of air emissions monitoring and the Clean Air Act regulations, including Ambient Air Quality Monitoring, Stationary Source Emissions Monitoring, and Continuous Monitoring Systems.

  19. Serial Network Flow Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Julie A.; Tate-Brown, Judy M.

    2009-01-01

    Using a commercial software CD and minimal up-mass, SNFM monitors the Payload local area network (LAN) to analyze and troubleshoot LAN data traffic. Validating LAN traffic models may allow for faster and more reliable computer networks to sustain systems and science on future space missions. Research Summary: This experiment studies the function of the computer network onboard the ISS. On-orbit packet statistics are captured and used to validate ground based medium rate data link models and enhance the way that the local area network (LAN) is monitored. This information will allow monitoring and improvement in the data transfer capabilities of on-orbit computer networks. The Serial Network Flow Monitor (SNFM) experiment attempts to characterize the network equivalent of traffic jams on board ISS. The SNFM team is able to specifically target historical problem areas including the SAMS (Space Acceleration Measurement System) communication issues, data transmissions from the ISS to the ground teams, and multiple users on the network at the same time. By looking at how various users interact with each other on the network, conflicts can be identified and work can begin on solutions. SNFM is comprised of a commercial off the shelf software package that monitors packet traffic through the payload Ethernet LANs (local area networks) on board ISS.

  20. Photon beam position monitor

    DOEpatents

    Kuzay, Tuncer M.; Shu, Deming

    1995-01-01

    A photon beam position monitor for use in the front end of a beamline of a high heat flux and high energy photon source such as a synchrotron radiation storage ring detects and measures the position and, when a pair of such monitors are used in tandem, the slope of a photon beam emanating from an insertion device such as a wiggler or an undulator inserted in the straight sections of the ring. The photon beam position monitor includes a plurality of spaced blades for precisely locating the photon beam, with each blade comprised of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond with an outer metal coating of a photon sensitive metal such as tungsten, molybdenum, etc., which combination emits electrons when a high energy photon beam is incident upon the blade. Two such monitors are contemplated for use in the front end of the beamline, with the two monitors having vertically and horizontally offset detector blades to avoid blade "shadowing". Provision is made for aligning the detector blades with the photon beam and limiting detector blade temperature during operation.

  1. Photon beam position monitor

    DOEpatents

    Kuzay, T.M.; Shu, D.

    1995-02-07

    A photon beam position monitor is disclosed for use in the front end of a beamline of a high heat flux and high energy photon source such as a synchrotron radiation storage ring detects and measures the position and, when a pair of such monitors are used in tandem, the slope of a photon beam emanating from an insertion device such as a wiggler or an undulator inserted in the straight sections of the ring. The photon beam position monitor includes a plurality of spaced blades for precisely locating the photon beam, with each blade comprised of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond with an outer metal coating of a photon sensitive metal such as tungsten, molybdenum, etc., which combination emits electrons when a high energy photon beam is incident upon the blade. Two such monitors are contemplated for use in the front end of the beamline, with the two monitors having vertically and horizontally offset detector blades to avoid blade ''shadowing''. Provision is made for aligning the detector blades with the photon beam and limiting detector blade temperature during operation. 18 figs.

  2. Monitoring pesticides in wildlife

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dustman, E.H.; Martin, W.E.; Heath, R.G.; Reichel, W.L.

    1971-01-01

    Early in the development of the wildlife monitoring program, certain criteria were recognized as being important in the selection of species of wild animals suitable for pesticide monitoring purposes. Ideally, the forms selected should be geographically well distributed, and they should be reasonably abundant and readily available for sampling. In addition, animals occurring near the top of food chains have the capacity to reflect residues in organisms occurring at lower levels in the same food chains. Based on these criteria, species chosen for monitoring include the starling (Sturnus vulgaris), mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) and black ducks (Anas rubripes), and the bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus). The black duck is substituted for the mallard in States where suitable numbers of mallards cannot be obtained. The Bureau of Sport Fisheries and Wildlife is held responsible for the execution of the wildlife portion of the National Pesticide Monitoring Program. The primary objective is to ascertain on a nationwide basis and independent of specific treatments the levels and trends of certain pesticidal chemicals and other pollutants in the bodies of selected forms of wildlife. The program was first described by Johnson et al. (4) in 1967. The purpose of this report is to update and redescribe the wildlife monitoring program and briefly review accomplishments.

  3. Monitoring neonatal seizures.

    PubMed

    Boylan, Geraldine B; Stevenson, Nathan J; Vanhatalo, Sampsa

    2013-08-01

    Neonatal seizures are a neurological emergency and prompt treatment is required. Seizure burden in neonates can be very high, status epilepticus a frequent occurrence, and the majority of seizures do not have any clinical correlate. Detection of neonatal seizures is only possible with continuous electroencephalogram (EEG) monitoring. EEG interpretation requires special expertise that is not available in most neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). As a result, a simplified method of EEG recording incorporating an easy-to-interpret compressed trend of the EEG output (amplitude integrated EEG) from one of the EEG output from one or two channels has emerged as a popular way to monitor neurological function in the NICU. This is not without limitations; short duration and low amplitude seizures can be missed, artefacts are problematic and may mimic seizure-like activity and only a restricted area of the brain is monitored. Continuous multichannel EEG is the gold standard for detecting seizures and monitoring response to therapy but expert interpretation of the EEG output is generally not available. Some centres have set up remote access for neurophysiologists to the cot-side EEG, but reliable interpretation is wholly dependent on the 24 h availability of experts, an expensive solution. A more practical solution for the NICU without such expertise is an automated seizure detection system. This review outlines the current state of the art regarding cot-side monitoring of neonatal seizures in the NICU.

  4. Enhanced Raman Monitor Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westenskow, Dwayne

    1996-01-01

    Monitoring of gaseous contaminants stems from the need to ensure a healthy and safe environment. NASA/Ames needs sensors that are able to monitor common atmospheric gas concentrations as well as trace amounts of contaminant gases. To provide an accurate assessment of air quality, a monitoring system would need to be continuous and on-line with full spectrum capabilities, allowing simultaneous detection of all gas components in a sample, including both combustible and non-combustible gases. The system demands a high degree of sensitivity to detect low gas concentrations in the low-ppm and sub-ppm regions. For clean and healthy air ('good' category), criteria established by the EPA requires that contaminant concentrations not exceed 4 ppm of carbon monoxide (CO) in an 8 hour period, 60 ppb of ozone(O3) in a one hour period and 30 ppb of sulfur dioxide (SO2) in a 24 hour period. One step below this is the National Ambient Air Quality Standard ('moderate' category) which requires that contaminant concentrations not exceed 9 ppm of carbon monoxide (CO), 120 ppb of ozone (O3) and 140 ppb of sulfur dioxide (SO2) for their respective time periods. Ideally a monitor should be able to detect the concentrations specified in the 'good' category. To benchmark current abilities of Raman technology in gas phase analysis, laboratory experiments were performed to evaluate the RASCAL II anesthetic gas monitor.

  5. Environmental Monitoring without Borders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Kaseke, K. F.

    2014-12-01

    Continuous monitoring of environmental variables is essential in most environmental projects. However, due to economic constraints, many students from underrepresented groups and developing countries often have limited access to "standardized" data logging and monitoring techniques. We assessed the student's learning in rural settings and worked with student without strong science background to utilize various environmental sensors to conduct innovative projects. We worked with students in Namibia and a minority high school student in Indianapolis to conduct relative humidity monitoring in creative ways. This high school student is from Indianapolis Project Seed program (sponsored by American Chemical Society, http://www.indyprojectseed.org) and worked in Wang's lab for two months in summer 2014. The experience showed us the potential of working with people with minimum exposure to modern scientific instrumentation to carry out innovative projects.

  6. Air Quality Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The Stak-Tracker CEM (Continuous Emission Monitor) Gas Analyzer is an air quality monitor capable of separating the various gases in a bulk exhaust stream and determining the amounts of individual gases present within the stream. The monitor is produced by GE Reuter- Stokes, a subsidiary of GE Corporate Research & Development Center. The Stak-Tracker uses a Langley Research Center software package which measures the concentration of a target gas by determining the degree to which molecules of that gas absorb an infrared beam. The system is environmental-friendly, fast and has relatively low installation and maintenance costs. It is applicable to gas turbines and various industries including glass, paper and cement.

  7. High concentration dust monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lilienfeld, P.

    1981-06-01

    The development, design, fabrication, and testing of a portable, self-contained prototype monitoring instrument capable of detecting and measuring airborne coal dust levels as concentrations in the range of 20 to 500 g/cu m is described. The output of the high concentration dust monitor is essentially independent of particle size and composition, with a response time of 10 seconds. Direct concentration readout as well as internal memory or recording capabilities are incorporated in the device. The operation of the instrument is based on direct sensing of the mass concentration of airborne dust by air-path beta radiation attenuation. The monitor is battery operated and incorporates a microprocessor that controls periodic automatic zero referencing, executes the mass computations, records the data for subsequent playback, and performs internal diagnostic checks.

  8. Wearable Health Monitoring Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, John

    2015-01-01

    The shrinking size and weight of electronic circuitry has given rise to a new generation of smart clothing that enables biological data to be measured and transmitted. As the variation in the number and type of deployable devices and sensors increases, technology must allow their seamless integration so they can be electrically powered, operated, and recharged over a digital pathway. Nyx Illuminated Clothing Company has developed a lightweight health monitoring system that integrates medical sensors, electrodes, electrical connections, circuits, and a power supply into a single wearable assembly. The system is comfortable, bendable in three dimensions, durable, waterproof, and washable. The innovation will allow astronaut health monitoring in a variety of real-time scenarios, with data stored in digital memory for later use in a medical database. Potential commercial uses are numerous, as the technology enables medical personnel to noninvasively monitor patient vital signs in a multitude of health care settings and applications.

  9. Copilot: Monitoring Embedded Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pike, Lee; Wegmann, Nis; Niller, Sebastian; Goodloe, Alwyn

    2012-01-01

    Runtime verification (RV) is a natural fit for ultra-critical systems, where correctness is imperative. In ultra-critical systems, even if the software is fault-free, because of the inherent unreliability of commodity hardware and the adversity of operational environments, processing units (and their hosted software) are replicated, and fault-tolerant algorithms are used to compare the outputs. We investigate both software monitoring in distributed fault-tolerant systems, as well as implementing fault-tolerance mechanisms using RV techniques. We describe the Copilot language and compiler, specifically designed for generating monitors for distributed, hard real-time systems. We also describe two case-studies in which we generated Copilot monitors in avionics systems.

  10. Wildlife monitoring program plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sebesta, P.; Arno, R.

    1979-01-01

    A plan for integrating the various requirements for wildlife monitoring with modern aerospace technology is presented. This plan is responsive to user needs, recognizes legal requirements, and is based on an evolutionary growth from domestic animals and larger animals to smaller, more scarce and remote species. The basis for animal study selection was made from the 1973 Santa Cruz Summer Study on Wildlife Monitoring. As techniques are developed the monitoring and management tasks will be interfaced with and eventually operated by the user agencies. Field efforts, aircraft and satellites, will be supplemented by laboratory investigations. Sixty percent of the effort will be in hardware research and development (satellite technology, microminiaturization) and the rest for gathering and interpreting data.

  11. CMS Space Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratnikova, N.; Huang, C.-H.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Wildish, T.; Zhang, X.

    2014-06-01

    During the first LHC run, CMS stored about one hundred petabytes of data. Storage accounting and monitoring help to meet the challenges of storage management, such as efficient space utilization, fair share between users and groups and resource planning. We present a newly developed CMS space monitoring system based on the storage metadata dumps produced at the sites. The information extracted from the storage dumps is aggregated and uploaded to a central database. A web based data service is provided to retrieve the information for a given time interval and a range of sites, so it can be further aggregated and presented in the desired format. The system has been designed based on the analysis of CMS monitoring requirements and experiences of the other LHC experiments. In this paper, we demonstrate how the existing software components of the CMS data placement system, PhEDEx, have been re-used, dramatically reducing the development effort.

  12. Monitoring neonates for ototoxicity.

    PubMed

    Garinis, Angela C; Kemph, Alison; Tharpe, Anne Marie; Weitkamp, Joern-Hendrik; McEvoy, Cynthia; Steyger, Peter S

    2017-06-22

    Neonates admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) are at greater risk of permanent hearing loss compared to infants in well mother and baby units. Several factors have been associated with this increased prevalence of hearing loss, including congenital infections (e.g. cytomegalovirus or syphilis), ototoxic drugs (such as aminoglycoside or glycopeptide antibiotics), low birth weight, hypoxia and length of stay. The aetiology of this increased prevalence of hearing loss remains poorly understood. Here we review current practice and discuss the feasibility of designing improved ototoxicity screening and monitoring protocols to better identify acquired, drug-induced hearing loss in NICU neonates. A review of published literature. We conclude that current audiological screening or monitoring protocols for neonates are not designed to adequately detect early onset of ototoxicity. This paper offers a detailed review of evidence-based research, and offers recommendations for developing and implementing an ototoxicity monitoring protocol for young infants, before and after discharge from the hospital.

  13. Monitoring with Data Automata

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Havelund, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    We present a form of automaton, referred to as data automata, suited for monitoring sequences of data-carrying events, for example emitted by an executing software system. This form of automata allows states to be parameterized with data, forming named records, which are stored in an efficiently indexed data structure, a form of database. This very explicit approach differs from other automaton-based monitoring approaches. Data automata are also characterized by allowing transition conditions to refer to other parameterized states, and by allowing transitions sequences. The presented automaton concept is inspired by rule-based systems, especially the Rete algorithm, which is one of the well-established algorithms for executing rule-based systems. We present an optimized external DSL for data automata, as well as a comparable unoptimized internal DSL (API) in the Scala programming language, in order to compare the two solutions. An evaluation compares these two solutions to several other monitoring systems.

  14. Urine Monitoring System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feedback, Daniel L.; Cibuzar, Branelle R.

    2009-01-01

    The Urine Monitoring System (UMS) is a system designed to collect an individual crewmember's void, gently separate urine from air, accurately measure void volume, allow for void sample acquisition, and discharge remaining urine into the Waste Collector Subsystem (WCS) onboard the International Space Station. The Urine Monitoring System (UMS) is a successor design to the existing Space Shuttle system and will resolve anomalies such as: liquid carry-over, inaccurate void volume measurements, and cross contamination in void samples. The crew will perform an evaluation of airflow at the ISS UMS urinal hose interface, a calibration evaluation, and a full user interface evaluation. o The UMS can be used to facilitate non-invasive methods for monitoring crew health, evaluation of countermeasures, and implementation of a variety of biomedical research protocols on future exploration missions.

  15. Monitoring with Data Automata

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Havelund, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    We present a form of automaton, referred to as data automata, suited for monitoring sequences of data-carrying events, for example emitted by an executing software system. This form of automata allows states to be parameterized with data, forming named records, which are stored in an efficiently indexed data structure, a form of database. This very explicit approach differs from other automaton-based monitoring approaches. Data automata are also characterized by allowing transition conditions to refer to other parameterized states, and by allowing transitions sequences. The presented automaton concept is inspired by rule-based systems, especially the Rete algorithm, which is one of the well-established algorithms for executing rule-based systems. We present an optimized external DSL for data automata, as well as a comparable unoptimized internal DSL (API) in the Scala programming language, in order to compare the two solutions. An evaluation compares these two solutions to several other monitoring systems.

  16. Automatic vehicle monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bravman, J. S.; Durrani, S. H.

    1976-01-01

    Automatic vehicle monitoring systems are discussed. In a baseline system for highway applications, each vehicle obtains position information through a Loran-C receiver in rural areas and through a 'signpost' or 'proximity' type sensor in urban areas; the vehicle transmits this information to a central station via a communication link. In an advance system, the vehicle carries a receiver for signals emitted by satellites in the Global Positioning System and uses a satellite-aided communication link to the central station. An advanced railroad car monitoring system uses car-mounted labels and sensors for car identification and cargo status; the information is collected by electronic interrogators mounted along the track and transmitted to a central station. It is concluded that automatic vehicle monitoring systems are technically feasible but not economically feasible unless a large market develops.

  17. Vital signs monitoring system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffen, Dale A. (Inventor); Sturm, Ronald E. (Inventor); Rinard, George A. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A system is disclosed for monitoring vital physiological signs. Each of the system components utilizes a single hybrid circuit with each component having high accuracy without the necessity of repeated calibration. The system also has low power requirements, provides a digital display, and is of sufficiently small size to be incorporated into a hand-carried case for portable use. Components of the system may also provide independent outputs making the component useful, of itself, for monitoring one or more vital signs. The overall system preferably includes an ECG amplifier and cardiotachometer signal conditioner unit, an impedance pneumograph and respiration rate signal conditioner unit, a heart/breath rate processor unit, a temperature monitoring unit, a selector switch, a clock unit, and an LCD driver unit and associated LCDs, with the system being capable of being expanded as needed or desired, such as, for example, by addition of a systolic/diastolic blood pressure unit.

  18. CMS Space Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Ratnikova, N.; Huang, C.-H.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Wildish, T.; Zhang, X.

    2014-01-01

    During the first LHC run, CMS stored about one hundred petabytes of data. Storage accounting and monitoring help to meet the challenges of storage management, such as efficient space utilization, fair share between users and groups and resource planning. We present a newly developed CMS space monitoring system based on the storage metadata dumps produced at the sites. The information extracted from the storage dumps is aggregated and uploaded to a central database. A web based data service is provided to retrieve the information for a given time interval and a range of sites, so it can be further aggregated and presented in the desired format. The system has been designed based on the analysis of CMS monitoring requirements and experiences of the other LHC experiments. In this paper, we demonstrate how the existing software components of the CMS data placement system, PhEDEx, have been re-used, dramatically reducing the development effort.

  19. Orion Entry Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Kelly M.

    2016-01-01

    NASA is scheduled to launch the Orion spacecraft atop the Space Launch System on Exploration Mission 1 in late 2018. When Orion returns from its lunar sortie, it will encounter Earth's atmosphere with speeds in excess of 11 kilometers per second, and Orion will attempt its first precision-guided skip entry. A suite of flight software algorithms collectively called the Entry Monitor has been developed in order to enhance crew situational awareness and enable high levels of onboard autonomy. The Entry Monitor determines the vehicle capability footprint in real-time, provides manual piloting cues, evaluates landing target feasibility, predicts the ballistic instantaneous impact point, and provides intelligent recommendations for alternative landing sites if the primary landing site is not achievable. The primary engineering challenges of the Entry Monitor is in the algorithmic implementation in making a highly reliable, efficient set of algorithms suitable for onboard applications.

  20. Small Active Radiation Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badhwar, Gautam D.

    2004-01-01

    A device, named small active radiation monitor, allows on-orbit evaluations during periods of increased radiation, after extravehicular activities, or at predesignated times for crews on such long-duration space missions as on the International Space Station. It also permits direct evaluation of biological doses, a task now performed using a combination of measurements and potentially inaccurate simulations. Indeed the new monitor can measure a full array of radiation levels, from soft x-rays to hard galactic cosmic-ray particles. With refinement, it will benefit commercial (nuclear power-plant workers, airline pilots, medical technicians, physicians/dentists, and others) and military personnel as well as the astronauts for whom thermoluminescent dosimeters are inadequate. Civilian and military personnel have long since graduated from film badges to thermoluminescent dosimeters. Once used, most dosimeters must be returned to a central facility for processing, a step that can take days or even weeks. While this suffices for radiation workers for whom exposure levels are typically very low and of brief duration, it does not work for astronauts. Even in emergencies and using express mail, the results can often be delayed by as much as 24 hours. Electronic dosimeters, which are the size of electronic oral thermometers, and tattlers, small electronic dosimeters that sound an alarm when the dose/dose rate exceeds preset values, are also used but suffer disadvantages similar to those of thermoluminescent dosimeters. None of these devices fully answers the need of rapid monitoring during the space missions. Instead, radiation is monitored by passive detectors, which are read out after the missions. Unfortunately, these detectors measure only the absorbed dose and not the biologically relevant dose equivalent. The new monitor provides a real-time readout, a time history of radiation exposures (both absorbed dose and biologically relevant dose equivalent), and a count of the

  1. HyperCard Monitor System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Julian; Maurer, Hermann

    An investigation into high level event monitoring within the scope of a well-known multimedia application, HyperCard--a program on the Macintosh computer, is carried out. A monitoring system is defined as a system which automatically monitors usage of some activity and gathers statistics based on what is has observed. Monitor systems can give the…

  2. Advanced Monitoring systems initiative

    SciTech Connect

    R.J. Venedam; E.O. Hohman; C.F. Lohrstorfer; S.J. Weeks; J.B. Jones; W.J. Haas

    2004-09-30

    The Advanced Monitoring Systems Initiative (AMSI) actively searches for promising technologies and aggressively moves them from the research bench into DOE/NNSA end-user applications. There is a large unfulfilled need for an active element that reaches out to identify and recruit emerging sensor technologies into the test and evaluation function. Sensor research is ubiquitous, with the seeds of many novel concepts originating in the university systems, but at present these novel concepts do not move quickly and efficiently into real test environments. AMSI is a widely recognized, self-sustaining ''business'' accelerating the selection, development, testing, evaluation, and deployment of advanced monitoring systems and components.

  3. Airway Monitoring experiment

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-02-25

    ISS046e048360 (02/25/2016) --- NASA astronaut Tim Kopra prepares to participate in the Airway Monitoring experiment. With dust particles present in the International Space Station atmosphere, Airway Monitoring studies the occurrence and indicators of airway inflammation in crewmembers, using ultra-sensitive gas analyzers to analyze exhaled air. This helps to highlight any health impacts and to maintain crewmember well-being on future human spaceflight missions, especially longer-duration missions to the Moon and Mars for example, where crewmembers will have to be more self-sufficient in highlighting and avoiding such conditions.

  4. Airway Monitoring experiment

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-02-25

    ISS046e047972 (02/25/2016) --- ESA (European Space Agency) astronaut Timothy Peake participates in the Airway Monitoring experiment. With dust particles present in the International Space Station atmosphere, Airway Monitoring studies the occurrence and indicators of airway inflammation in crewmembers, using ultra-sensitive gas analyzers to analyze exhaled air. This helps to highlight any health impacts and to maintain crewmember well-being on future human spaceflight missions, especially longer-duration missions to the Moon and Mars for example, where crewmembers will have to be more self-sufficient in highlighting and avoiding such conditions.

  5. Voltage monitoring system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canicatti, C. L. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of a system for monitoring the voltage at a remote location and determining when the voltage exceeds upper and lower levels. The system includes transmission lines for transmitting the voltage back to a central station and applying such to an amplifier having a pair of outputs. One of the outputs of the amplifier is applied to an oscillograph. The other output is fed through an isolation transformer, a full wave rectifier, to a pair of unijunctional transistor circuits for producing pulses when the voltage exceeds or drops below a predetermined level. These pulses, in turn, energize a relay which turns on the oscillograph for recording the voltages being monitored.

  6. Real time obscuration monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agricola, Koos

    2016-09-01

    Recently a real time particle deposition monitoring system is developed. After discussions with optical system engineers a new feature has been added. This enables the real time monitoring of obscuration of exposed optical components by counting the deposited particles and sizing the obscuration area of each particle. This way the Particle Obscuration Rate (POR) can be determined. The POR can be used to determine the risk of product contamination during exposure. The particle size distribution gives information on the type of potential particle sources. The deposition moments will indicate when these sources were present.

  7. Interstitial Monitoring Technologies.

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, Michael; Torgerson, Mark D.

    2005-12-01

    When developing new hardware for a computer system, bus monitors are invaluable for testing compliance and troubleshooting problems. Bus monitors can be purchased for other common system busses such as the Peripheral Component Interconnect (PCI) bus and the Universal Serial Bus (USB). However, the project team did not find any commercial bus analyzers for the Low Pin Count (LPC) bus. This report will provide a short overview of the LPC interface. Page 3 of 11 This page intentionally left blank.Page 4 of 11

  8. Fiber optic monitoring device

    DOEpatents

    Samborsky, J.K.

    1993-10-05

    A device for the purpose of monitoring light transmissions in optical fibers comprises a fiber optic tap that optically diverts a fraction of a transmitted optical signal without disrupting the integrity of the signal. The diverted signal is carried, preferably by the fiber optic tap, to a lens or lens system that disperses the light over a solid angle that facilitates viewing. The dispersed light indicates whether or not the monitored optical fiber or system of optical fibers is currently transmitting optical information. 4 figures.

  9. Constraint monitoring in TOSCA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, Howard

    1992-01-01

    The Job-Shop Scheduling Problem (JSSP) deals with the allocation of resources over time to factory operations. Allocations are subject to various constraints (e.g., production precedence relationships, factory capacity constraints, and limits on the allowable number of machine setups) which must be satisfied for a schedule to be valid. The identification of constraint violations and the monitoring of constraint threats plays a vital role in schedule generation in terms of the following: (1) directing the scheduling process; and (2) informing scheduling decisions. This paper describes a general mechanism for identifying constraint violations and monitoring threats to the satisfaction of constraints throughout schedule generation.

  10. Heat Stress Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The heavy, cumbersome body protection suits worn by members of hazardous materials response teams cause marked elevation of body temperatures, which can reduce effectiveness and lead to heat stress and injury. The CorTemp System, marketed by Human Technologies, Inc., provides the basis for a body temperature monitoring alarm system. Encased in a three-quarter-inch ingestible capsule, the system includes a mini-thermometer, miniature telemetry system, a microbattery and temperature sensor. It makes its way through the digestive system, continuously monitoring temperature. Findings are sent to the recorder by telemetry, and then displayed and stored for transfer to a computer.

  11. Geothermal monitor report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1982-06-01

    Geothermal Progress Monitor Report No. 6 presents a state-by-state summary of the status of geothermal leasing, exploration, and development in major physiographic regions where geothermal resource potential has been identified. Recent state-specific activities are reported at the end of each state status report, while recent activities of a more general nature are summarized briefly in Part 2 of the report. A list of recent publications of potential interest to the geothermal community and a directory of contributors to the geothermal progress monitoring system are also included.

  12. Fiber optic monitoring device

    SciTech Connect

    Samborsky, J.K.

    1992-12-31

    This invention is comprised of a device for the purpose of monitoring light transmissions in optical fibers comprises a fiber optic tap that optically diverts a fraction of a transmitted optical signal without disrupting the integrity of the signal. The diverted signal is carried, preferably by the fiber optic tap, to a lens or lens system that disperses the light over a solid angle that facilitates viewing. The dispersed light indicates whether or not the monitored optical fiber or system of optical fibers is currently transmitting optical information.

  13. Radio frequency strain monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, Joseph S. (Inventor); Rogowski, Robert S. (Inventor); Holben, Jr., Milford S. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A radio frequency strain monitor includes a voltage controlled oscillator for generating an oscillating signal that is input into a propagation path. The propagation path is preferably bonded to the surface of a structure to be monitored and produces a propagated signal. A phase difference between the oscillating and propagated signals is detected and maintained at a substantially constant value which is preferably a multiple of 90.degree. by changing the frequency of the oscillating signal. Any change in frequency of the oscillating signal provides an indication of strain in the structure to which the propagation path is bonded.

  14. Vapor concentration monitor

    DOEpatents

    Bayly, John G.; Booth, Ronald J.

    1977-01-01

    An apparatus for monitoring the concentration of a vapor, such as heavy water, having at least one narrow bandwidth in its absorption spectrum, in a sample gas such as air. The air is drawn into a chamber in which the vapor content is measured by means of its radiation absorption spectrum. High sensitivity is obtained by modulating the wavelength at a relatively high frequency without changing its optical path, while high stability against zero drift is obtained by the low frequency interchange of the sample gas to be monitored and of a reference sample. The variable HDO background due to natural humidity is automatically corrected.

  15. Improved chromatic dispersion monitoring using single RF monitoring tone.

    PubMed

    Liu, Andrew; Pendock, Graeme J; Tucker, Rodney S

    2006-05-29

    We demonstrate an improved chromatic dispersion monitoring technique using a single RF monitoring tone. Compared to conventional techniques using a single RF monitoring tone, our proposed technique is able to monitor the sign of the residual dispersion and doubles the monitoring range. Our proposed technique utilizes the RF fading caused by chromatic dispersion and a two-detector dispersion monitor setup, where a dispersion offset is inserted before one of the detectors. The observed monitoring error is less than +/-35 ps/nm over a 1300 ps/nm monitoring range. A small power penalty less than 0.5 dB is observed due to the addition of the RF monitoring tone. Our technique is more than twice as accurate as the conventional technique.

  16. Luminosity monitor at PEP

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, J.D.; Franklin, M.E.B.

    1981-02-01

    The luminosity monitor system utilized by the MKII Detector and by the PEP operators is described. This system processes information from 56 photomultipliers and calculates independent luminosities for each of the 3 colliding bunches in PEP. Design considerations, measurement techniques, and sources of error in the luminosity measurement are discussed.

  17. Monitoring Technological Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brinkworth, B. J.; Eckersall, K. E.

    A project was conducted to design and pilot a scheme for monitoring trade/industry/commerce technological changes and reporting them to Technical and Further Education (TAFE) teachers and authorities. A matrix of information categories was used to facilitate the collection and storage of information relative to technological advancements in the…

  18. Tribal Air Quality Monitoring.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wall, Dennis

    2001-01-01

    The Institute for Tribal Environmental Professionals (ITEP) (Flagstaff, Arizona) provides training and support for tribal professionals in the technical job skills needed for air quality monitoring and other environmental management tasks. ITEP also arranges internships, job placements, and hands-on training opportunities and supports an…

  19. Next Generation Air Monitoring

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract. Air pollution measurement technology is advancing rapidly towards smaller-scale and wireless devices, with a potential to significantly change the landscape of air pollution monitoring. The U.S. EPA Office of Research and Development is evaluating and developing a rang...

  20. Monitoring selected arthropods

    Treesearch

    R. Chris Stanton; David J. Horn; Foster F. Purrington; John W. Peacock; Eric H. Metzler

    2003-01-01

    Arthropod populations were sampled in four study areas in southern Ohio in 1995 to document patterns of arthropod diversity and establish a baseline dataset for long-term monitoring in mixed-oak forests. Pitfall, Malaise, and blacklight traps were operated in 12 treatment units from May through September. Several insect groups were selected for detailed study due to...

  1. Vehicle Cabin Atmosphere Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, Ara; Darrach, Muray

    2007-01-01

    Vehicle Cabin Atmosphere Monitor (VCAM) identifies gases that are present in minute quantities in the International Space Station (ISS) breathing air that could harm the crew s health. If successful, instruments like VCAM could accompany crewmembers during long-duration exploration missions to the Moon or traveling to Mars.

  2. Drainage Monitoring and Evaluation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    75 10.18 Lake Wa Con Da...10.17.3 – Full monitoring record at USACE Plattsmouth ..................................... 76 Figure 10.18.1 – Lake Wa Con Da location...78 Figure 10.18.2 – Lake Wa Con Da site and gages

  3. Monitoring of cerebral autoregulation.

    PubMed

    Czosnyka, Marek; Miller, Chad

    2014-12-01

    Pressure autoregulation is an important hemodynamic mechanism that protects the brain against inappropriate fluctuations in cerebral blood flow in the face of changing cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP). Static autoregulation represents how far cerebrovascular resistance changes when CPP varies, and dynamic autoregulation represents how fast these changes happen. Both have been monitored in the setting of neurocritical care to aid prognostication and contribute to individualizing CPP targets in patients. Failure of autoregulation is associated with a worse outcome in various acute neurological diseases. Several studies have used transcranial Doppler ultrasound, intracranial pressure (ICP with vascular reactivity as surrogate measure of autoregulation), and near-infrared spectroscopy to continuously monitor the impact of spontaneous fluctuations in CPP on cerebrovascular physiology and to calculate derived variables of autoregulatory efficiency. Many patients who undergo such monitoring demonstrate a range of CPP in which autoregulatory efficiency is optimal. Management of patients at or near this optimal level of CPP is associated with better outcomes in traumatic brain injury. Many of these studies have utilized the concept of the pressure reactivity index, a correlation coefficient between ICP and mean arterial pressure. While further studies are needed, these data suggest that monitoring of autoregulation could aid prognostication and may help identify optimal CPP levels in individual patients.

  4. AIR RADIOACTIVITY MONITOR

    DOEpatents

    Bradshaw, R.L.; Thomas, J.W.

    1961-04-11

    The monitor is designed to minimize undesirable background buildup. It consists of an elongated column containing peripheral electrodes in a central portion of the column, and conduits directing an axial flow of radioactively contaminated air through the center of the column and pure air through the annular portion of the column about the electrodes. (AEC)

  5. Effective Monitor Display Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrell, William

    1999-01-01

    Describes some of the factors that affect computer monitor display design and provides suggestions and insights into how screen displays can be designed more effectively. Topics include color, font choices, organizational structure of text, space outline, and general principles. (Author/LRW)

  6. Heart Rate Monitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Under a NASA grant, Dr. Robert M. Davis and Dr. William M. Portnoy came up with a new type of electrocardiographic electrode that would enable long term use on astronauts. Their invention was an insulated capacitive electrode constructed of a thin dielectric film. NASA subsequently licensed the electrode technology to Richard Charnitski, inventor of the VersaClimber, who founded Heart Rate, Inc., to further develop and manufacture personal heart monitors and to produce exercise machines using the technology for the physical fitness, medical and home markets. Same technology is on both the Home and Institutional Model VersaClimbers. On the Home Model an infrared heart beat transmitter is worn under exercise clothing. Transmitted heart rate is used to control the work intensity on the VersaClimber using the heart rate as the speedometer of the exercise. This offers advantages to a full range of users from the cardiac rehab patient to the high level physical conditioning of elite athletes. The company manufactures and markets five models of the 1*2*3 HEART RATE monitors that are used wherever people exercise to accurately monitor their heart rate. Company is developing a talking heart rate monitor that works with portable headset radios. A version of the heart beat transmitter will be available to the manufacturers of other aerobic exercise machines.

  7. Rack protection monitor

    DOEpatents

    Orr, Stanley G.

    2000-01-01

    A hardwired, fail-safe rack protection monitor utilizes electromechanical relays to respond to the detection by condition sensors of abnormal or alarm conditions (such as smoke, temperature, wind or water) that might adversely affect or damage equipment being protected. When the monitor is reset, the monitor is in a detection mode with first and second alarm relay coils energized. If one of the condition sensors detects an abnormal condition, the first alarm relay coil will be de-energized, but the second alarm relay coil will remain energized. This results in both a visual and an audible alarm being activated. If a second alarm condition is detected by another one of the condition sensors while the first condition sensor is still detecting the first alarm condition, both the first alarm relay coil and the second alarm relay coil will be de-energized. With both the first and second alarm relay coils de-energized, both a visual and an audible alarm will be activated. In addition, power to the protected equipment will be terminated and an alarm signal will be transmitted to an alarm central control. The monitor can be housed in a separate enclosure so as to provide an interface between a power supply for the protected equipment and the protected equipment.

  8. Picosecond beam monitor

    DOEpatents

    Schutt, D.W.; Beck, G.O.

    1974-01-01

    The current in the beam of a particle accelerator is monitored with picosecond resolution by causing the beam to impinge upon the center conductor of a coaxial line, generating a pulse of electromagnetic energy in response thereto. This pulse is detected by means such as a sampling oscilloscope. (Official Gazette)

  9. Automatic transmission line monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons, W. E.; Richards, L. O.

    1971-01-01

    Monitor improves complex network reliability in computer data links and command transmission lines. System evaluates circuit performance against preselected criteria, identifies and stores data indicating out-of-tolerance conditions, conducts closed loop testing, and provides for operation under command of digital computer that determines restoration priorities.

  10. EMon: Embodied Monitorization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carneiro, Davide; Novais, Paulo; Costa, Ricardo; Gomes, Pedro; Neves, José

    The amount of seniors in need of constant care is rapidly rising: an evident consequence of population ageing. There are already some monitorization environments which aim to monitor these persons while they remain at home. This, however, although better than delocalizing the elder to some kind of institution, may not still be the ideal solution, as it forces them to stay inside the home more than they wished, as going out means lack of accompaniment and a consequent sensation of fear. In this paper we propose EMon: a monitorization device small enough to be worn by its users, although powerful enough to provide the higher level monitorization systems with vital information about the user and the environment around him. We hope to allow the representation of an intelligent environment to move with its users, instead of being static, mandatorily associated to a single physical location. The first prototype of EMon, as presented in this paper, provides environmental data as well as GPS coordinates and pictures that are useful to describe the context of its user.

  11. Next Generation Air Monitoring

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract. Air pollution measurement technology is advancing rapidly towards smaller-scale and wireless devices, with a potential to significantly change the landscape of air pollution monitoring. The U.S. EPA Office of Research and Development is evaluating and developing a rang...

  12. Community noise monitoring program

    Treesearch

    Arnold G. Konheim

    1977-01-01

    There are numerous questions in regard to methods, instrumentation, and human and agency resources for community noise monitoring. The U. S. Environmental Protection Agency is currently in the process of seeking answers to these questions through research within the agency and by cooperation with other organizations, including the Department of Defense and the National...

  13. Bolt Stress Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    In photo, an engineer is using a new Ultrasonic Bolt Stress Monitor developed by NASA's Langley Research Center to determine whether a bolt is properly tightened. A highly accurate device, the monitor is an important tool in construction of such structures as pressure vessels, bridges and power plants, wherein precise measurement of the stress on a tightened bolt is critical. Overtightened or undertightened bolts can fail and cause serious industrial accidents or costly equipment break-downs. There are a number of methods for measuring bolt stress. Most widely used and least costly is the torque wrench, which is inherently inaccurate; it does not take into account the friction between nut and bolt, which has an influence on stress. At the other end of the spectrum, there are accurate stress-measuring systems, but they are expensive and not portable. The battery-powered Langley monitor fills a need; it is inexpensive, lightweight, portable and extremely accurate because it is not subject to friction error. Sound waves are transmitted to the bolt and a return signal is received. As the bolt is tightened, it undergoes changes in resonance due to stress, in the manner that a violin string changes tone when it is tightened. The monitor measures the changes in resonance and provides a reading of real stress on the bolt. The device, patented by NASA, has aroused wide interest and a number of firms have applied for licenses to produce it for the commercial market.

  14. ACS UV Contamination Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avila, Roberto

    2013-10-01

    The observations consist of SBC imaging and spectroscopy of the cluster NGC 6681 in order to monitor the temporal evolution of the UV sensitivity.All six filters and the two prisms will be used. Two SBC dark frames will follow the orbits.

  15. Microbial load monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caplin, R. S.; Royer, E. R.

    1977-01-01

    Design analysis of a microbial load monitor system flight engineering model was presented. Checkout of the card taper and media pump system was fabricated as well as the final two incubating reading heads, the sample receiving and card loading device assembly, related sterility testing, and software. Progress in these areas was summarized.

  16. AMBIENT AIR MONITORING STRATEGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Clean Air Act requires EPA to establish national ambient air quality standards and to regulate as necessary, hazardous air pollutants. EPA uses ambient air monitoring to determine current air quality conditions, and to assess progress toward meeting these standards and relat...

  17. Evaluation of pollution monitors

    SciTech Connect

    Lannes, W.; Richards, G.; Goodman, M.

    1996-03-01

    Pollution monitors have been used primarily for three main tasks. They are: (1) Pollution severity measurement, in which the main aim is to establish the pollution severity in one area; (2) Maintenance, in which the aim is to measure the pollution level in order to initiate maintenance; and (3) Insulator characterization, in which the main aim is to establish a comparative study of the behavior of various insulators at the same testing site. In accomplishing the maintenance task, it is generally recognized that it is difficult to measure only one parameter and make good decisions on when to perform maintenance. This is one of the reasons for the interest in fuzzy logic and neural networks to combine pollution monitor inputs with weather data to improve the accuracy of predicting the need for maintenance. An extension of the maintenance task is to study the possibility of using a pollution monitor as a early warning detector of impending insulator flashover. This study addresses the use of pollution monitors to predict insulator flashover.

  18. Brain Pressure Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A transducer originally used to measure air pressure in aircraft wind tunnel tests is the basis for a development important in diagnosis and treatment of certain types of brain damage. A totally implantable device, tbe intracranial pressure monitor measures and reports brain pressure by telemetry.

  19. Devens 2008 Monitoring Update

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document presents results from site monitoring activities during calendar year 2008 at the EPA/ORD Red Cove Study Area relative to site characterization activities under Operable Units 01 (Shepley's Hill Landfill) and 11 (Plow Shop Pond) at the Fort Devens Superfund site. T...

  20. Children's Rights: Monitoring Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verhellen, Eugeen, Ed.; Spiesschaert, Frans, Ed.

    A number of research seminars were organized to clarify the fundamental principles underlying local, regional, and international efforts to establish a structure for monitoring and promoting children's rights. This book contains papers presented at these seminars by experts on child advocacy, promotion of children's interests by children, and…

  1. Devens 2008 Monitoring Update

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document presents results from site monitoring activities during calendar year 2008 at the EPA/ORD Red Cove Study Area relative to site characterization activities under Operable Units 01 (Shepley's Hill Landfill) and 11 (Plow Shop Pond) at the Fort Devens Superfund site. T...

  2. Cochleotoxicity monitoring protocol.

    PubMed

    Ferreira Penêda, José; Barros Lima, Nuno; Ribeiro, Leandro; Helena, Diamantino; Domingues, Bruno; Condé, Artur

    2017-05-10

    Cochlear damage is frequent in long-term aminoglycosides therapy or chemotherapeutic treatments with platinum-based agents. Despite its prevalence, it is currently underestimated and underdiagnosed. A monitoring protocol is vital to the early detection of cochleotoxicity and its implementation is widely encouraged in every hospital unit. Our aim was to elaborate a cochleotoxicity monitoring protocol for patients treated with platinum compounds or aminoglycosides antibiotics. PubMed® database was searched using terms relevant to drug cochleotoxicity in order to identify the most adequate protocol. Several articles and guidelines influenced our decision. There is no consensus on a universal monitoring protocol. Its formulation and application rely heavily on available resources and personnel. High-frequency audiometry and otoacoustic emissions play an important role on early detection of cochleotoxicity caused by aminoglycoside antibiotics and platinum compounds. A cochleotoxicity monitoring protocol consisting on an initial evaluation, treatment follow-up and post-treatment evaluation is proposed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Cirugía de Cabeza y Cuello. All rights reserved.

  3. Introduction - regional monitoring programs

    Treesearch

    Richard L. Hutto; C. John Ralph

    2005-01-01

    There is increasing interest in the initiation of regional or statewide monitoring programs that are less extensive than national efforts such as the Breeding Bird Survey. A number of regional programs have been in existence for a decade or more, so the papers in this section represented an effort to bring together the collective experience of the people who had...

  4. Tribal Air Quality Monitoring.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wall, Dennis

    2001-01-01

    The Institute for Tribal Environmental Professionals (ITEP) (Flagstaff, Arizona) provides training and support for tribal professionals in the technical job skills needed for air quality monitoring and other environmental management tasks. ITEP also arranges internships, job placements, and hands-on training opportunities and supports an…

  5. Integrated inventory and monitoring

    Treesearch

    George Lightner; Hans T. Schreuder; Barry Bollenbacher; Kerry McMenus

    2001-01-01

    Understanding and inventorying our ecological systems is key to addressing how issues, questions, and management actions will affect the composition, structure, and function of these systems. Taking an ecological systems approach to the inventory and monitoring framework, is one which we feel will allow answers to currently identified management questions and new ones...

  6. Monitoring informs management

    SciTech Connect

    West, Tristram O.

    2011-10-24

    Improved regional monitoring and reporting of greenhouse-gas emissions depends on accurate estimates of emissions from different land-use regimes. An analysis suggests that measuring emissions per crop yield may be an optimum metric for refining land-management decisions.

  7. Formaldehyde surface emission monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, T.G.; Hawthorne, A.R.; Daffron, C.R.; Corey, M.D.; Reed, T.J.; Schrimsher, J.M.

    1984-03-01

    A passive surface emission monitor has been developed for nondestructive measurement of formaldehyde (CH/sub 2/O) emission rates from CH/sub 2/O resin-containing materials such as urea-formaldehyde foam insulation (UFFI) and pressed-wood products. Emitted CH/sub 2/O is sorbed by a planar distribution of 13X molecular sleve supported inside the monitor and analyzed by using a water-rinse desorption, colorimetric analysis procedure. A detection limit of similarly ordered 0.025 mg of CH/sub 2/O/(M/sup 2/ h) is achieved with a 20.3 cm diameter monitor and a 2-h collection period. Measurements of CH/sub 2/O emission rates from pressed-wood products and UFFI encased in simulated wall panels show a strong correlation with reference chamber techniques. The surface monitor has been used to measure the CH/sub 2/O emission rate from interior walls and floors in one UFFI and two non-UFFI homes. By application of a simple single compartment model to predict indoor CH/sub 2/O concentrations from in situ CH/sub 2/O emission rate and tracer gas infiltration rate measurements, a good correlation between the predicted and measured CH/sub 2/O concentrations was achieved. 22 references, 5 figures, 4 tables.

  8. IR gain monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilbert, Bryan

    2013-10-01

    The gain of the IR channel of WFC3 will be measured using a series of internal flat fields. Using knowledge gained from ground testing and previous cycles, we propose to collect flat field ramps which will be used to create photon transfer curves and give a measure of the gain. This continues the strategy of last cycle's gain monitor, in proposal 13080.

  9. Trace Gas Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Space technology is contributing to air pollution control primarily through improved detectors and analysis methods. Miniaturized mass spectrometer is under development to monitor vinyl chloride and other hydrocarbon contaminants in an airborne laboratory. Miniaturized mass spectrometer can be used to protect personnel in naval and medical operations as well as aboard aircraft.

  10. Continuous Glucose Monitoring

    MedlinePlus

    ... to reduce the burden of monitoring and managing blood glucose. An artificial pancreas based on mechanical devices requires at least ... MiniMed Paradigm REAL-Time System—is not an artificial pancreas, but it does ... pricking a fingertip to obtain a blood sample and using a glu cose meter to ...

  11. A network security monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Heberlein, L.T.; Dias, G.V.; Levitt, K.N.; Mukherjee, B.; Wood, J.; Wolber, D. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science)

    1989-11-01

    The study of security in computer networks is a rapidly growing area of interest because of the proliferation of networks and the paucity of security measures in most current networks. Since most networks consist of a collection of inter-connected local area networks (LANs), this paper concentrates on the security-related issues in a single broadcast LAN such as Ethernet. Specifically, we formalize various possible network attacks and outline methods of detecting them. Our basic strategy is to develop profiles of usage of network resources and then compare current usage patterns with the historical profile to determine possible security violations. Thus, our work is similar to the host-based intrusion-detection systems such as SRI's IDES. Different from such systems, however, is our use of a hierarchical model to refine the focus of the intrusion-detection mechanism. We also report on the development of our experimental LAN monitor currently under implementation. Several network attacks have been simulated and results on how the monitor has been able to detect these attacks are also analyzed. Initial results demonstrate that many network attacks are detectable with our monitor, although it can surely be defeated. Current work is focusing on the integration of network monitoring with host-based techniques. 20 refs., 2 figs.

  12. Rack Protection Monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Orr, Stanley G.

    1998-10-21

    A hardwired, fail-safe rack protection monitor utilizes electromechanical relays to respond to the detection by condition sensors of abnormal or alarm conditions (such as smoke, temperature, wind or water) that might adversely affect or damage equipment being protected. When the monitor is reset, the monitor is in a detection mode with first and second alarm relay coils energized. If one of the condition sensors detects an abnormal condition, the first alarm relay coil will be de-energized, but the second alarm relay coil will remain energized. This results in both a visual and an audible alarm being activated. If a second alarm condition is detected by another one of the condition sensors while the first condition sensor is still detecting the first alarm condition, both the first alarm relay coil and the second alarm relay coil will be de-energized. With both the first and second alarm relay coils de-energized, both a visual and an audible alarm will be activated. In addition, power to the protected equipment will be terminated and an alarm signal will be transmitted to an alarm central control. The monitor can be housed in a separate enclosure so as to provide an interface between a power supply for the protected equipment and the protected equipment.

  13. NUV Detector Dark Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Colin

    2011-10-01

    Perform routine monitoring of MAMA detector dark current. The main purpose isto look for evidence of a change in the dark rates, both to track on-orbit timedependence and to check for a detector problem developing. The spatial distribution of dark rates on the detector and the effect of SAA will also be studied.

  14. NUV Detector Dark Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ely, Justin

    2012-10-01

    Perform routine monitoring of MAMA detector dark current. The main purpose isto look for evidence of a change in the dark rates, both to track on-orbit timedependence and to check for a detector problem developing. The spatial distribution of dark rates on the detector and the effect of SAA will also be studied.

  15. NUV Detector Dark Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ely, Justin

    2013-10-01

    Perform routine monitoring of MAMA detector dark current. The main purpose isto look for evidence of a change in the dark rates, both to track on-orbit timedependence and to check for a detector problem developing. The spatial distribution of dark rates on the detector and the effect of SAA will also be studied.

  16. NUV MAMA Dark Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Colin

    2013-10-01

    The basic monitor takes two 1300s TIME-TAG darks bi-weekly.. The pairs of exposures are linked so that they are taken about 6 hours apart in the same SAA free interval. This pairing of exposures will make it easier to separate long and short term temporal variability from temperature dependent changes.

  17. NUV Detector Dark Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Wei

    2010-09-01

    Perform routine monitoring of MAMA detector dark current. The main purpose isto look for evidence of a change in the dark rates, both to track on-orbit timedependence and to check for a detector problem developing. The spatial distribution of dark rates on the detector and the effect of SAA will also be studied.

  18. FUV MAMA Dark Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Colin

    2012-10-01

    The monitor takes six 1300s TIME-TAG darks every six weeks. The exposures are distributed over about six hours from initial turn-on to characterize the rate increase as a function of turn-on time and temperature. The frequency has been reduced from bi-weekly to once every six weeks to stay within a reasonable orbit count.

  19. FUV MAMA Dark Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Colin

    2013-10-01

    The monitor takes six 1300s TIME-TAG darks every six weeks. The exposures are distributed over about six hours from initial turn-on to characterize the rate increase as a function of turn-on time and temperature.

  20. NUV MAMA Dark Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Colin

    2012-10-01

    The basic monitor takes two 1300s TIME-TAG darks bi-weekly.. The pairs of exposures are linked so that they are taken about 6 hours apart in the same SAA free interval. This pairing of exposures will make it easier to separate long and short term temporal variability from temperature dependent changes.

  1. Biological monitors of pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Root, M.

    1990-02-01

    This article discusses the use of biological monitors to assess the biological consequences of toxicants in the environment, such as bioavailability, synergism, and bioaccumulation through the food web. Among the organisms discussed are fly larvae, worms, bees, shellfish, fishes, birds (starlings, owls, hawks, songbirds) and mammals (rabbits, field mice, shrews).

  2. Engine monitoring display study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornsby, Mary E.

    1992-01-01

    The current study is part of a larger NASA effort to develop displays for an engine-monitoring system to enable the crew to monitor engine parameter trends more effectively. The objective was to evaluate the operational utility of adding three types of information to the basic Boeing Engine Indicating and Crew Alerting System (EICAS) display formats: alphanumeric alerting messages for engine parameters whose values exceed caution or warning limits; alphanumeric messages to monitor engine parameters that deviate from expected values; and a graphic depiction of the range of expected values for current conditions. Ten training and line pilots each flew 15 simulated flight scenarios with five variants of the basic EICAS format; these variants included different combinations of the added information. The pilots detected engine problems more quickly when engine alerting messages were included in the display; adding a graphic depiction of the range of expected values did not affect detection speed. The pilots rated both types of alphanumeric messages (alert and monitor parameter) as more useful and easier to interpret than the graphic depiction. Integrating engine parameter messages into the EICAS alerting system appears to be both useful and preferred.

  3. Monitoring tigers with confidence.

    PubMed

    Linkie, Matthew; Guillera-Arroita, Gurutzeta; Smith, Joseph; Rayan, D Mark

    2010-12-01

    With only 5% of the world's wild tigers (Panthera tigris Linnaeus, 1758) remaining since the last century, conservationists urgently need to know whether or not the management strategies currently being employed are effectively protecting these tigers. This knowledge is contingent on the ability to reliably monitor tiger populations, or subsets, over space and time. In the this paper, we focus on the 2 seminal methodologies (camera trap and occupancy surveys) that have enabled the monitoring of tiger populations with greater confidence. Specifically, we: (i) describe their statistical theory and application in the field; (ii) discuss issues associated with their survey designs and state variable modeling; and, (iii) discuss their future directions. These methods have had an unprecedented influence on increasing statistical rigor within tiger surveys and, also, surveys of other carnivore species. Nevertheless, only 2 published camera trap studies have gone beyond single baseline assessments and actually monitored population trends. For low density tiger populations (e.g. <1 adult tiger/100 km(2)) obtaining sufficient precision for state variable estimates from camera trapping remains a challenge because of insufficient detection probabilities and/or sample sizes. Occupancy surveys have overcome this problem by redefining the sampling unit (e.g. grid cells and not individual tigers). Current research is focusing on developing spatially explicit capture-mark-recapture models and estimating abundance indices from landscape-scale occupancy surveys, as well as the use of genetic information for identifying and monitoring tigers. The widespread application of these monitoring methods in the field now enables complementary studies on the impact of the different threats to tiger populations and their response to varying management intervention. © 2010 ISZS, Blackwell Publishing and IOZ/CAS.

  4. Biological monitoring for isocyanates.

    PubMed

    Cocker, John

    2011-03-01

    Isocyanates are reactive chemicals and thousands of workers may be exposed to them during their manufacture and use in a wide range of products. They are classed as sensitizers and are a major cause of occupational asthma in the UK. Workplace exposure limits are low and control of exposure often depends on personal respiratory protection. Biological monitoring is increasingly used to assess exposure and the efficacy of control measures, including the behavioural aspects of controls. Biological monitoring methods are available for the most common isocyanates hexamethylene diisocyanate, toluene diisocyanate, isophorone diisocyanate, and methylenediphenyl diisocyanate. They are based on the analysis of hexamethylene diamine, toluene diamine, isopherone diamine, and methylenediamine released after hydrolysis of isocyanate-protein adducts in urine or blood. Volunteer and occupational studies show good correlations between inhalation exposure to isocyanate monomers and isocyanate-derived diamines in urine or blood. However, occupational exposure to isocyanates is often to a mixture of monomers and oligomers so there is some uncertainty comparing biological monitoring results with airborne exposure to 'total NCO'. Nevertheless, there is a substantial body of work demonstrating the utility of biological monitoring as a tool to assess exposure and the efficacy of controls, including how they are used in practice. Non-health-based biological monitoring guidance values are available to help target when and where further action is required. Occupational hygienists will need to use their knowledge and experience to determine the relative contributions of different routes of exposure and how controls can be improved to reduced the risk of ill health.

  5. Kinetics of amphiphile association with two-phase lipid bilayer vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Pokorny, A; Almeida, P F; Melo, E C; Vaz, W L

    2000-01-01

    We examined the consequences of membrane heterogeneity for the association of a simple amphiphilic molecule with phospholipid vesicles with solid-liquid and liquid-liquid phase coexistence. To address this problem we studied the association of a single-chain, fluorescent amphiphile with dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) vesicles containing varying amounts of cholesterol. DMPC bilayers containing 15 mol% cholesterol show a region of solid-liquid-ordered (s-l(o)) coexistence below the T(m) of pure DMPC (23.9 degrees C) and a region of liquid-disordered-liquid-ordered coexistence (l(d)-l(o)) above the T(m). We first examined equilibrium binding and kinetics of amphiphile insertion into single-phase vesicles (s, l(d), and l(o) phase). The data obtained were then used to predict the behavior of the equivalent process in a two-phase system, taking into account the fractions of phases present. Next, the predicted kinetics were compared to experimental kinetics obtained from a two-phase system. We found that association of the amphiphile with lipid vesicles is not influenced by the existence of l(d)-l(o) phase boundaries but occurs much more slowly in the s-l(o) phase coexistence region than expected on the basis of phase composition. PMID:10620291

  6. Evidence for a regular distribution of cholesterol in phospholipid bilayers from diphenylhexatriene fluorescence.

    PubMed Central

    Tang, D; Wieb van der Meer, B; Chen, S Y

    1995-01-01

    Cholesterol/dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) multilamellar vesicles were studied by steady-state fluorescence using diphenylhexatriene (DPH) as a probe. A series of dips were found in the plot of DPH fluorescence intensity versus cholesterol concentration at certain specific cholesterol concentrations. This observation indicates that there are dominant domains in which cholesterol molecules are regularly distributed on a hexagonal superlattice in the acyl chain matrix of DMPC at critical cholesterol concentrations. These concentrations can be predicted by an equation or a mathematical series, except the one at 33 mol %. These dips of DPH fluorescence intensity are temperature dependent. The excellent agreement between experimental data and calculated values as well as similar previous findings of dips and/or kinks in the excimer-over-monomer fluorescence in pyrenephosphatidylcholine/phospholipid mixtures confirm our conclusion about lateral organizations of cholesterol and acyl lipid chains in cholesterol/phospholipid multilamellar vesicles. The regular distribution model at critical concentration is consistent with the phase diagram of cholesterol/DMPC. Using the model of regular distribution, the physical origin of the liquid-disordered (Ld) phase, liquid-ordered phase (Lo), and coexistence of liquid-disordered phase and Lo phase (Lo + Ld) is discussed on the molecular level. Images FIGURE 5 PMID:7612836

  7. Amiodarone effects on membrane organization evaluated by fluorescence polarization.

    PubMed

    Antunes-Madeira, M C; Videira, R A; Klüppel, M L; Madeira, V V

    1995-03-03

    The effects of amiodarone (0-100 microM) on the physical state of synthetic and native membranes were investigated by fluorescence polarization of 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH), probing the bilayer core, and of its anionic propionic acid derivative (DPH-PA), probing the outer regions of the bilayer. In the gel phase of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) bilayers, amiodarone broadens the transition profile and shifts the phase transition midpoint to lower temperature values, as evaluated by both probes. On the other hand, the drug orders the fluid phase of the lipid either in hydrophobic core or in the outer regions of the bilayer, as detected by DPH and DPH-PA, respectively. The effects of amiodarone on the thermotropic behaviour of DPPC confirm and extend data in DMPC. Cholesterol concentration modulates to a great extent the effects of amiodarone in the fluid phase of DMPC. Thus, both probes, DPH and DPH-PA, detect either ordering effects of amiodarone for low cholesterol concentrations (< or = 20 mol%) or disordering amiodarone effects at higher cholesterol levels (> 20 mol%). In agreement with the results in models of synthetic lipids, the ordering effects of amiodarone in fluid native membranes of mitochondria and brain microsomes are depressed with the increase in intrinsic cholesterol. The ordering effects in mitochondria may induce bioenergetic dysfunctions and consequently disturbances in the electromechanic functioning of myocardium.

  8. Atomistic Simulations of Bicelle Mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yong; Wang, Hao; Kindt, James T.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Mixtures of long- and short-tail phosphatidylcholine lipids are known to self-assemble into a variety of aggregates combining flat bilayerlike and curved micellelike features, commonly called bicelles. Atomistic simulations of bilayer ribbons and perforated bilayers containing dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC, di-C14 tails) and dihexanoylphosphatidylcholine (DHPC, di-C6 tails) have been carried out to investigate the partitioning of these components between flat and curved microenvironments and the stabilization of the bilayer edge by DHPC. To approach equilibrium partitioning of lipids on an achievable simulation timescale, configuration-bias Monte Carlo mutation moves were used to allow individual lipids to change tail length within a semigrand-canonical ensemble. Since acceptance probabilities for direct transitions between DMPC and DHPC were negligible, a third component with intermediate tail length (didecanoylphosphatidylcholine, di-C10 tails) was included at a low concentration to serve as an intermediate for transitions between DMPC and DHPC. Strong enrichment of DHPC is seen at ribbon and pore edges, with an excess linear density of ∼3 nm−1. The simulation model yields estimates for the onset of edge stability with increasing bilayer DHPC content between 5% and 15% DHPC at 300 K and between 7% and 17% DHPC at 323 K, higher than experimental estimates. Local structure and composition at points of close contact between pores suggest a possible mechanism for effective attractions between pores, providing a rationalization for the tendency of bicelle mixtures to aggregate into perforated vesicles and perforated sheets. PMID:20550902

  9. Interaction of PEGylated anti-hypertensive drugs, amlodipine, atenolol and lisinopril with lipid bilayer membrane: A molecular dynamics simulation study.

    PubMed

    Yousefpour, Abbas; Modarress, Hamid; Goharpey, Fatemeh; Amjad-Iranagh, Sepideh

    2015-08-01

    The interaction of PEGylated anti-hypertensive drugs, amlodipine, atenolol and lisinopril with lipid bilayer membrane dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) has been studied in nine different simulation systems consisting of 128 lipid molecules and appropriate number of water molecules by molecular dynamics method and by utilizing GROMACS software. The influences of PEGylation on the mentioned drugs and the differences in application of two types of spacer molecules on the performance of drugs and DMPC membrane have been evaluated and mass density of the components in the simulation box, mean square displacement (MSD), electrostatic potential, hydrogen bonding, radial distribution function (RDF), area per lipid, order parameter, and angle distribution of the component molecules including drug, DMPC and PEG has been investigated. Furthermore, umbrella sampling analysis indicated that, PEGylation of the drugs made amlodipine to behave more hydrophilic, whereas in case of lisinopril and atenolol, PEGylation made these drugs to behave more hydrophobic. In almost all of the simulated systems, PEGylation increased the diffusion coefficient of the drugs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) and salicylic acid interaction with the human erythrocyte membrane bilayer induce in vitro changes in the morphology of erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Suwalsky, Mario; Belmar, Jessica; Villena, Fernando; Gallardo, María José; Jemiola-Rzeminska, Malgorzata; Strzalka, Kazimierz

    2013-11-01

    Despite the well-documented information, there are insufficient reports concerning the effects of salicylate compounds on the structure and functions of cell membranes, particularly those of human erythrocytes. With the aim to better understand the molecular mechanisms of the interaction of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) and salicylic acid (SA) with cell membranes, human erythrocyte membranes and molecular models were utilized. These consisted of bilayers of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DMPE), representative of phospholipid classes located in the outer and inner monolayers of the human erythrocyte membrane, respectively. The capacity of ASA and SA to perturb the multibilayer structures of DMPC and DMPE was evaluated by X-ray diffraction while DMPC unilamellar vesicles (LUV) were studied by fluorescence spectroscopy. Moreover, we took advantage of the capability of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) to detect the changes in the thermotropic phase behavior of lipid bilayers resulting from ASA and SA interaction with PC and PE molecules. In an attempt to further elucidate their effects on cell membranes, the present work also examined their influence on the morphology of intact human erythrocytes by means of defocusing and scanning electron microscopy, while isolated unsealed human erythrocyte membranes (IUM) were studied by fluorescence spectroscopy. Results indicated that both salicylates interact with human erythrocytes and their molecular models in a concentration-dependent manner perturbing their bilayer structures. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Efficient Photoelectrochemical Energy Conversion using Spinach Photosystem II (PSII) in Lipid Multilayer Films.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yun; Magdaong, Nikki M; Shen, Min; Frank, Harry A; Rusling, James F

    2015-04-01

    The need for clean, renewable energy has fostered research into photovoltaic alternatives to silicon solar cells. Pigment-protein complexes in green plants convert light energy into chemical potential using redox processes that produce molecular oxygen. Here, we report the first use of spinach protein photosystem II (PSII) core complex in lipid films in photoelectrochemical devices. Photocurrents were generated from PSII in a ∼2 μm biomimetic dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) film on a pyrolytic graphite (PG) anode with PSII embedded in multiple lipid bilayers. The photocurrent was ∼20 μA cm(-2) under light intensity 40 mW cm(-2). The PSII-DMPC anode was used in a photobiofuel cell with a platinum black mesh cathode in perchloric acid solution to give an output voltage of 0.6 V and a maximum output power of 14 μW cm(-2). Part of this large output is related to a five-unit anode-cathode pH gradient. With catholytes at higher pH or no perchlorate, or using an MnO2 oxygen-reduction cathode, the power output was smaller. The results described raise the possibility of using PSII-DMPC films in small portable power conversion devices.

  12. Wetting properties of phospholipid dispersion on tunable hydrophobic SiO2-glass plates.

    PubMed

    Alexandrova, Lidia; Karakashev, Stoyan I; Grigorov, L; Phan, Chi M; Smoukov, Stoyan K

    2015-06-01

    We study the wetting properties of very small droplets of salty aqueous suspensions of unilamellar liposomes of DMPC (dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine), situated on SiO2-glass surfaces with different levels of hydrophobicity. We evaluated two different measures of hydrophobicity of solid surfaces - receding contact angles and the thickness of wetting films trapped between an air bubble and the solid surface at different levels of hydrophobicity. We established a good correlation between methods which differ significantly in measurement difficulty and experimental setup. We also reveal details of the mechanism of wetting of different surfaces by the DMPC liposome suspension. Hydrophilic surfaces with water contact angles in the range of 0° to 35° are readily hydrophobized by the liposomes and only showed corresponding contact angles in the range 27°-43°. For same range of surface hydrophobicities, there was a clear reduction of the thickness of the wetting films between the surface and a bubble, reaching a minimum in the 35°-40° range. At higher levels of hydrophobicity both pure water and the liposome suspension show similar contact angles, and the thickness of wetting films between a bubble and those surfaces increases in parallel. Our analysis showed that the only force able to stabilize the film under these experimental conditions is steric repulsion. The latter suggests that nanobubbles adsorbed on hydrophobic parts of the surface, and coated with a DMPC layer, may be the cause of the 40-70 nm thickness of wetting films we observe.

  13. Efficient Photoelectrochemical Energy Conversion using Spinach Photosystem II (PSII) in Lipid Multilayer Films

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yun; Magdaong, Nikki M; Shen, Min; Frank, Harry A; Rusling, James F

    2015-01-01

    The need for clean, renewable energy has fostered research into photovoltaic alternatives to silicon solar cells. Pigment–protein complexes in green plants convert light energy into chemical potential using redox processes that produce molecular oxygen. Here, we report the first use of spinach protein photosystem II (PSII) core complex in lipid films in photoelectrochemical devices. Photocurrents were generated from PSII in a ∼2 μm biomimetic dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) film on a pyrolytic graphite (PG) anode with PSII embedded in multiple lipid bilayers. The photocurrent was ∼20 μA cm−2 under light intensity 40 mW cm−2. The PSII–DMPC anode was used in a photobiofuel cell with a platinum black mesh cathode in perchloric acid solution to give an output voltage of 0.6 V and a maximum output power of 14 μW cm−2. Part of this large output is related to a five-unit anode–cathode pH gradient. With catholytes at higher pH or no perchlorate, or using an MnO2 oxygen-reduction cathode, the power output was smaller. The results described raise the possibility of using PSII–DMPC films in small portable power conversion devices. PMID:25969807

  14. Computation of mixed phosphatidylcholine-cholesterol bilayer structures by energy minimization.

    PubMed Central

    Vanderkooi, G

    1994-01-01

    The energetically preferred structures of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC)-cholesterol bilayers were determined at a 1:1 mole ratio. Crystallographic symmetry operations were used to generate planar bilayers of cholesterol and DMPC. Energy minimization was carried out with respect to bond rotations, rigid body motions, and the two-dimensional lattice constants. The lowest energy structures had a hydrogen bond between the cholesterol hydroxyl and the carbonyl oxygen of the sn-2 acyl chain, but the largest contribution to the intermolecular energy was from the nonbonded interactions between the flat alpha surface of cholesterol and the acyl chains of DMPC. Two modes of packing in the bilayer were found; in structure A (the global minimum), unlike molecules are nearest neighbors, whereas in structure B (second lowest energy) like-like intermolecular interactions predominate. Crystallographic close packing of the molecules in the bilayer was achieved, as judged from the molecular areas and the bilayer thickness. These energy-minimized structures are consistent with the available experimental data on mixed bilayers of lecithin and cholesterol, and may be used as starting points for molecular dynamics or other calculations on bilayers. PMID:8061195

  15. Interaction of α-Hexylcinnamaldehyde with a Biomembrane Model: A Possible MDR Reversal Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Sarpietro, Maria Grazia; Di Sotto, Antonella; Accolla, Maria Lorena; Castelli, Francesco

    2015-05-22

    The ability of the naturally derived compound α-hexylcinnamaldehyde (1) to interact with biomembranes and to modulate their permeability has been investigated as a strategy to reverse multidrug resistance (MDR) in cancer cells. Dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) multilamellar vesicles (MLVs) were used as biomembrane models, and differential scanning calorimetry was applied to measure the effect of 1 on the thermotropic behavior of DMPC MLVs. The effect of an aqueous medium or a lipid carrier on the uptake of 1 by the biomembrane was also characterized. Furthermore, taking into account that MDR is strictly regulated by redox signaling, the pro-oxidant and/or antioxidant effects of 1 were evaluated by the crocin-bleaching assay, in both hydrophilic and lipophilic environments. Compound 1 was uniformly distributed in the phospholipid bilayers and deeply interacted with DMPC MLVs, intercalating among the phospholipid acyl chains and thus decreasing their cooperativity. The lipophilic medium allowed the absorption of 1 into the phospholipid membrane. In the crocin-bleaching assay, the substance produced no pro-oxidant effects in both hydrophilic and lipophilic environments; conversely, a significant inhibition of AAPH-induced oxidation was exerted in hydrophilic medium. These results suggest a possible role of 1 as a chemopreventive and chemosensitizing agent for fighting cancer.

  16. Growth Kinetics of Lipid-Based Nanodiscs to Unilamellar Vesicles: A Time-Resolved Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) Study

    SciTech Connect

    Mahabir, Suanne; Small, Darcy; Li, Ming; Wan, Wankei; Kucerka, Norbert; Littrell, Ken; Katsaras, John; Nieh, Mu-Ping

    2013-01-01

    Mixtures of dimyristoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DMPC), dimyristoyl-phosphatidylglycerol (DMPG) and dihexanoylphosphatidylcholine (DHPC) in aqueous solutions spontaneously form monodisperse, bilayered nanodiscs (also known as bicelles ) at or below the melting transition temperature of DMPC (TM ~23 C). In dilute systems above the main transition temperature TM of DMPC, bicelles coalesce (increasing their diameter) and eventually self-fold into unilamellar vesicles (ULVs). Time resolved small angle neutron scattering was used to study the growth kinetics of nanodiscs below and equal to TM over a period of hours as a function of temperature at two lipid concentrations in presence or absence of NaCl salt. Bicelles seem to undergo a sudden initial growth phase with increased temperature, which is then followed by a slower reaction-limited growth phase that depends on ionic strength, lipid concentration and temperature. The bicelle interaction energy was derived from the colloidal theory of Derjaguin and Landau, and Verwey and Overbeek (DLVO). While the calculated total energy between discs is attractive and proportional to their growth rate, a more detailed mechanism is proposed to describe the mechanism of disc coalescence. After annealing at low temperature (low-T), samples were heated to 50 C in order to promote the formation of ULVs. Although the low-T annealing of samples has only a marginal effect on the mean size of end-state ULVs, it does affect their polydispersity, which increases with increased T, presumably driven by the entropy of the system.

  17. In vitro effects of the anti-Alzheimer drug memantine on the human erythrocyte membrane and molecular models.

    PubMed

    Zambrano, Pablo; Suwalsky, Mario; Villena, Fernando; Jemiola-Rzeminska, Malgorzata; Strzalka, Kazimierz

    2017-01-29

    Memantine is a NMDA antagonist receptor clinically used for treating Alzheimer's disease. NMDA receptors are present in the human neurons and erythrocyte membranes. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of memantine on human erythrocytes. With this purpose, the drug was developed to in vitro interact with human red cells and bilayers built-up of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DMPE). The latter represent lipids respectively present in both outer and inner monolayers of the red cell membrane. Results obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed that memantine changed the normal biconcave shape of red cells to cup-shaped stomatocytes. According to the bilayer-couple hypothesis the drug intercalated into the inner monolayer of the erythrocyte membrane. Experimental results obtained by X-ray diffraction on multibilayers of DMPC and DMPE, and by differential scanning calorimetry on multilamellar vesicles indicated that memantine preferentially interacted with DMPC in a concentration-dependent manner. Thus, it can be concluded that in the low therapeutic plasma concentration of circa 1 μM memantine is located in NMDA receptor channel without affecting the erythrocyte shape. However, at higher concentrations, once the receptors became saturated excess of memantine molecules (20 μM) would interact with phosphoinositide lipids present in the inner monolayer of the erythrocyte membrane inducing the formation of stomatocytes. However, 40-50 μM memantine was required to interact with isolated phosphatidylcholine bilayers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Fluorescence studies on the interaction of choline-binding domain B of the major bovine seminal plasma protein, PDC-109 with phospholipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Damai, Rajani S; Anbazhagan, V; Rao, K Babu; Swamy, Musti J

    2009-12-01

    The microenvironment and accessibility of the tryptophan residues in domain B of PDC-109 (PDC-109/B) in the native state and upon ligand binding have been investigated by fluorescence quenching, time-resolved fluorescence and red-edge excitation shift (REES) studies. The increase in the intrinsic fluorescence emission intensity of PDC-109/B upon binding to lysophosphatidylcholine (Lyso-PC) micelles and dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) membranes was considerably less as compared to that observed with the whole PDC-109 protein. The degree of quenching achieved by different quenchers with PDC-109/B bound to Lyso-PC and DMPC membranes was significantly higher as compared to the full PDC-109 protein, indicating that membrane binding afforded considerably lesser protection to the tryptophan residues of domain B as compared to those in the full PDC-109 protein. Finally, changes in red-edge excitation shift (REES) seen with PDC-109/B upon binding to DMPC membranes and Lyso-PC micelles were smaller that the corresponding changes in the REES values observed for the full PDC-109. These results, taken together suggest that intact PDC-109 penetrates deeper into the hydrophobic parts of the membrane as compared to domain B alone, which could be the reason for the inability of PDC-109/B to induce cholesterol efflux, despite its ability to recognize choline phospholipids at the membrane surface.

  19. Dynamical and phase behavior of a phospholipid membrane altered by an antimicrobial peptide at low concentration

    DOE PAGES

    Mamontov, Eugene; Tyagi, M.; Qian, Shuo; ...

    2016-05-27

    Here we discuss that the mechanism of action of antimicrobial peptides is traditionally attributed to the formation of pores in the lipid cell membranes of pathogens, which requires a substantial peptide to lipid ratio. However, using incoherent neutron scattering, we show that even at a concentration too low for pore formation, an archetypal antimicrobial peptide, melittin, disrupts the regular phase behavior of the microscopic dynamics in a phospholipid membrane, dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC). At the same time, another antimicrobial peptide, alamethicin, does not exert a similar effect on the DMPC microscopic dynamics. The melittin-altered lateral motion of DMPC at physiological temperature nomore » longer resembles the fluid-phase behavior characteristic of functional membranes of the living cells. The disruptive effect demonstrated by melittin even at low concentrations reveals a new mechanism of antimicrobial action relevant in more realistic scenarios, when peptide concentration is not as high as would be required for pore formation, which may facilitate treatment with antimicrobial peptides.« less

  20. Towards innovative roadside monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojha, G.; Appel, E.; Magiera, T.

    2012-04-01

    Soil contamination along roadsides is an important factor of anthropogenic point source pollution. Climatic and traffic-specific factors influence the amount and characteristics of pollution emitted and deposited in the roadside soil. In our present study we focus on monitoring typical traffic pollutants (heavy metals HM, platinum group elements, polycyclic hydrocarbons PAH), and investigate the use of magnetic parameters, especially magnetic susceptibility (MS) as proxy. Monitoring plots were installed along roadside in areas with different climatic conditions and different traffic-specific activities (traffic density and speed, vehicle types, abrasion of tires, brake linings, petrol/diesel compounds and road maintenance). For monitoring we removed 10-15 cm of top soil at 1 m distance from the roadside edge and placed 30 plastic boxes there filled with clean quartz sand, to be sampled after regular intervals within two years. Preliminary data from the first year of monitoring are presented. Magnetic results revealed that a coarse grained magnetite-like phase is responsible for the enhancement of magnetic concentration. The mass-specific MS and concentration of pollutants (HM, PAH) all show a significant increase with time, however, there are obviously also seasonal and site-dependent effects which lead to more stable values over several months or even some decrease in the upper few cm due to migration into depth. Source identification indicates that the accumulated PAHs are primarily emissions from traffic. In order to be able to discriminate in between different kinds of transport and deposition (surface run off from the road and neighbouring soil material, splash water, air transport), we additionally established pillars at the roadside with clean quartz sampling boxes at different heights (surface, 0.5 m, 2 m). As a first surprising result we observed that the increase in the boxes at surface is not necessarily higher than at 0.5 m height. The results from our

  1. Rulison Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect

    2010-07-01

    The Project Rulison Monitoring Plan has been developed as part of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management's mission to protect human health and the environment. The purpose of the plan is to monitor fluids from gas wells for radionuclides that would indicate contamination is migrating from the Rulison detonation zone to producing gas wells, allowing action to be taken before the contamination could pose a risk. The Monitoring Plan (1) lists the contaminants present and identifies those that have the greatest potential to migrate from the detonation zone (radionuclide source term), (2) identifies locations that monitor the most likely transport pathways, (3) identifies which fluids will be sampled (gas and liquid) and why, (4) establishes the frequency of sampling, and (5) specifies the most practical analyses and where the analysis results will be reported. The plan does not affect the long-term hydrologic sampling conducted by DOE since 1972, which will continue for the purpose of sampling shallow groundwater and surface water near the site. The Monitoring Plan was developed in anticipation of gas wells being drilled progressively nearer the Rulison site. DOE sampled 10 gas wells in 1997 and 2005 at distances ranging from 2.7 to 7.6 miles from the site to establish background concentrations for radionuclides. In a separate effort, gas industry operators and the Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (COGCC) developed an industry sampling and analysis plan that was implemented in 2007. The industry plan requires the sampling of gas wells within 3 miles of the site, with increased requirements for wells within 1 mile of the site. The DOE plan emphasizes the sampling of wells near the site (Figure 1), specifically those with a bottom-hole location of 1 mile or less from the detonation, depending on the direction relative to the natural fracture trend of the producing formation. Studies indicate that even the most mobile radionuclides

  2. DGPS ground station integrity monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skidmore, Trent A.; Vangraas, Frank

    1995-01-01

    This paper summarizes the development of a unique Differential Global Positioning System (DGPS) ground station integrity monitor which can offer improved availability over conventional code-differential monitoring systems. This monitoring technique, called code/carrier integrity monitoring (CCIM), uses the highly stable integrated Doppler measurement to smooth the relatively noisy code-phase measurements. The pseudorange correction is therefore comprised of the integrated Doppler measurement plus the CCIM offset. The design and operational results of a DGPS ground station integrity monitor are reported. A robust integrity monitor is realized which is optimized for applications such as the Special Category I (SCAT-I) defined in the RTCA Minimum Aviation System Performance Standards.

  3. Self-Configuring Network Monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Goujun, Jin; Berket, Karlo; Lee, Jason; Leres, Craig

    2004-05-01

    Self-Configuring Network Monitor (SCNM) is a passive monitoring that can collect packet headers from any point in a network path. SCNM uses special activation packets to automatically activate monitors deployed at the layer three ingress and egress routers of the wide-area network, and at critical points within the site networks. Monitoring output data is sent back to the application data source or destination host. No modifications are required to the application or network routing infrastructure in order to activate monitoring of traffic for an application. This ensures that the monitoring operation does not add a burden to the networks administrator.

  4. Integrated monitoring plan for the Hanford groundwater monitoring project

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, M.J.; Dresel, P.E.; McDonald, J.P.; Mercer, R.B.; Newcomer, D.R.; Thornton, E.C.

    1998-09-01

    Groundwater is monitored in hundreds of wells at the Hanford Site to fulfill a variety of requirements. Separate monitoring plans are prepared for various requirements, but sampling is coordinated and data are shared among users to avoid duplication of effort. The US Department of Energy (DOE) manages these activities through the Hanford Groundwater Monitoring Project (groundwater project), which is the responsibility of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The groundwater project does not include all of the monitoring to assess performance of groundwater remediation or all monitoring associated with active facilities. This document is the first integrated monitoring plan for the groundwater project and contains: well and constituent lists for monitoring required by the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 and its implementing orders; other, established monitoring plans by reference; and a master well/constituent/frequency matrix for the entire Hanford Site.

  5. New Etch Monitoring Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, Christina; Adamcyk, Martin; Levy, Yuval; Tiedje, Tom; Young, Jeff F.; Kelson, Itzhak

    2000-05-01

    Plasma etching is an important tool for the development of various types of nanostructures. The development of specific plasma etching procedures is often time-consuming. We will describe an new technique for IN-SITU monitoring of the etch rate and sidewall profile of 1D GRATINGS in a remote plasma etcher. The technique involves monitoring the energy loss of alpha particles that propagate through the layer being etched. Samples to be etched are impregnated by a thin near-surface layer of 224Ra nuclei that decay by alpha particle emission. The energy spectrum of the alpha particles is acquired at intervals in the etch process. The etch rate on flat surfaces can be determined quite simply by measuring the change in the peak energy of the transmitted particles. By using a simple geometric model that employs the Bethe Bloch formula for energy loss of charges particles the etch profile of masked samples can also be inferred.

  6. Triple wavelength monitor PDIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Deukhee; Ha, Chang-woo; Shin, Sang-cheol; Kwon, Kyoung-soo; Ko, Joo-yul; Kang, Shin-jae

    2006-08-01

    Recently the demand for high-capacity optical storage systems compatible with CD, DVD, and Blue is growing. We designed the Vertical NIP photodiode with a diameter of 700um and the trans-impedance circuits by using 0.6um BiCMOS process. The measured sensitivity of the photodiode is 0.25, 0.42, and 0.48A/W for 405, 650, and 780nm wavelength lights, respectively. The capacitance of the PD is 4.5pF. Monitor PDIC for detecting triple wavelength lights is presented in this paper. The complete monitor PDIC with the NIP photodiode of 700um in diameter occupies 1900um*1200um. -3dB bandwidth is 110MHz and the temperature drift of output voltage is 3.2%.

  7. Cycle isolation monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Svensen, L.M. III; Zeigler, J.R.; Todd, F.D.; Alder, G.C.

    2009-07-15

    There are many factors to monitor in power plants, but one that is frequently overlooked is cycle isolation. Often this is an area where plant personnel can find 'low hanging fruit' with great return on investment, especially high energy valve leakage. This type of leakage leads to increased heat rate, potential valve damage and lost generation. The fundamental question to ask is 'What is 100 Btu/kW-hr of heat rate worth to your plant? On a 600 MW coal-fired power plant, a 1% leakage can lead to an 81 Btu/kW-hr impact on the main steam cycle and a 64 Btu/kW-hr impact on the hot reheat cycle. The article gives advice on methods to assist in detecting leaking valves and to monitor cycle isolation. A software product, TP. Plus-CIM was designed to estimate flow rates of potentially leaking valves.

  8. Method for radioactivity monitoring

    DOEpatents

    Umbarger, C. John; Cowder, Leo R.

    1976-10-26

    The disclosure relates to a method for analyzing uranium and/or thorium contents of liquid effluents preferably utilizing a sample containing counting chamber. Basically, 185.7-keV gamma rays following .sup.235 U alpha decay to .sup.231 Th which indicate .sup.235 U content and a 63-keV gamma ray doublet found in the nucleus of .sup.234 Pa, a granddaughter of .sup.238 U, are monitored and the ratio thereof taken to derive uranium content and isotopic enrichment .sup.235 U/.sup.235 U + .sup.238 U) in the liquid effluent. Thorium content is determined by monitoring the intensity of 238-keV gamma rays from the nucleus of .sup.212 Bi in the decay chain of .sup.232 Th.

  9. System health monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Reneke, J.A.; Fryer, M.O.

    1995-08-01

    Well designed large systems include many instrument taking data. These data are used in a variety of ways. They are used to control the system and its components, to monitor system and component health, and often for historical or financial purposes. This paper discusses a new method of using data from low level instrumentation to monitor system and component health. The method uses the covariance of instrument outputs to calculate a measure of system change. The method involves no complicated modeling since it is not a parameter estimation algorithm. The method is iterative and can be implemented on a computer in real time. Examples are presented for a metal lathe and a high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter. It is shown that the proposed method is quite sensitive to system changes such as wear out and failure. The method is useful for low level system diagnostics and fault detection.

  10. Tritium monitoring techniques

    SciTech Connect

    DeVore, J.R.; Buckner, M.A.

    1996-05-01

    As part of their operations, the U.S. Navy is required to store or maintain operational nuclear weapons on ships and at shore facilities. Since these weapons contain tritium, there are safety implications relevant to the exposure of personnel to tritium. This is particularly important for shipboard operations since these types of environments can make low-level tritium detection difficult. Some of these ships have closed systems, which can result in exposure to tritium at levels that are below normally acceptable levels but could still cause radiation doses that are higher than necessary or could hamper ship operations. This report describes the state of the art in commercial tritium detection and monitoring and recommends approaches for low-level tritium monitoring in these environments.

  11. Total Energy Monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Friedrich, S

    2008-08-11

    The total energy monitor (TE) is a thermal sensor that determines the total energy of each FEL pulse based on the temperature rise induced in a silicon wafer upon absorption of the FEL. The TE provides a destructive measurement of the FEL pulse energy in real-time on a pulse-by-pulse basis. As a thermal detector, the TE is expected to suffer least from ultra-fast non-linear effects and to be easy to calibrate. It will therefore primarily be used to cross-calibrate other detectors such as the Gas Detector or the Direct Imager during LCLS commissioning. This document describes the design of the TE and summarizes the considerations and calculations that have led to it. This document summarizes the physics behind the operation of the Total Energy Monitor at LCLS and derives associated engineering specifications.

  12. The GLAST Burst Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meegan, C.; Lichti, G.; Briggs, M.; Diehl, R.; Fishman, G.; Kippen, R.; Kouveliotou, C.; von Kienlin, A.; Paciesas, W.; Preece, R.; Schönfelder, V.

    2003-04-01

    The Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST), scheduled for launch in 2006, comprises a Large Area Telescope (LAT) and a GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM). The LAT is a pair telescope with unprecedented sensitivity in the 20 MeV to 300 GeV energy range. The GLAST Burst Monitor consists of an array of NaI and BGO scintillation detectors operating in the 10 keV to 25 MeV range and covering a wide field of view. The GBM will enhance LAT observations of GRBs by extending the spectral coverage into the range of current GRB databases, and will provide a trigger for repointing the spacecraft to observe delayed emission from bursts outside the LAT field of view.

  13. Corrosion Monitoring System

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Russ Braunling

    2004-10-31

    The Corrosion Monitoring System (CMS) program developed and demonstrated a continuously on-line system that provides real-time corrosion information. The program focused on detecting pitting corrosion in its early stages. A new invention called the Intelligent Ultrasonic Probe (IUP) was patented on the program. The IUP uses ultrasonic guided waves to detect small defects and a Synthetic Aperture Focusing Technique (SAFT) algorithm to provide an image of the pits. Testing of the CMS demonstrated the capability to detect pits with dimensionality in the sub-millimeter range. The CMS was tested in both the laboratory and in a pulp and paper industrial plant. The system is capable of monitoring the plant from a remote location using the internet.

  14. Remote lightning monitor system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lennon, C. L.; Britt, T. O. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An apparatus for monitoring, analyzing and accurately determining the value of peak current, the peak rate of change in current with respect to time and the rise time of the electrical currents generated in an electrical conductive mast that is located in the vicinity where lightning is to be monitored is described. The apparatus includes an electrical coil for sensing the change in current flowing through the mast and generating a voltage responsive. An on-site recorder and a recorder control system records the voltages produced responsive to lightning strikes and converts the voltage to digital signals for being transmitted back to the remote command station responsive to command signals. The recorder and the recorder control system are carried within an RFI proof environmental housing into which the command signals are fed by means of a fiber optic cable so as to minimize electrical interference.

  15. NICMOS focus monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Glenn

    1997-07-01

    This proposal is used to determine and monitor the optimal focus and tilt settings for all three NICMOS cameras. It is derived from SM2/NIC 7041, but is structurally quite a bit different. This proposal is built to run NIC1/2 focus sweeps on a weekly basis, and NIC3 focus sweeps twice a week during SMOV {following the "interim" runs of the 7150}. 7043 will run for as long as it is deemed necessary to keep track of the camera focii and to monitor the dewar anomaly. After the discussion on 20/3/96, this proposal is written to run 4 complete 1-week iterations starting 3 days after the last run of the 7150 {NICMOS COARSE OPTICAL ALIGNMENT, PART 2}.

  16. Infant Transport Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The photo sequence illustrates the movement of an ill infant to a special care hospital by means of a new Pediatric Monitoring and Transport System, in which NASA technology and technical assistance are being applied to an urgent medical problem. Development of the system is a collaborative effort involving several organizations, principally, NASA Ames Research Center and Children's Hospital Medical Center, Oakland, California. Key to the system's efficacy is a custom-designed ambulance-to-hospital and hospital-to-hospital communications network, including two-way voice capability and space-derived biotelemetry; it allows a specialist at the destination hospital to monitor continuously the vital signs of the patient during transit.

  17. Wireless device monitoring systems and monitoring devices, and associated methods

    DOEpatents

    McCown, Steven H; Derr, Kurt W; Rohde, Kenneth W

    2014-05-27

    Wireless device monitoring systems and monitoring devices include a communications module for receiving wireless communications of a wireless device. Processing circuitry is coupled with the communications module and configured to process the wireless communications to determine whether the wireless device is authorized or unauthorized to be present at the monitored area based on identification information of the wireless device. Methods of monitoring for the presence and identity of wireless devices are also provided.

  18. Beatty Wind Monitoring Project

    SciTech Connect

    Hurt, Rick

    2009-06-01

    The UNLV Center for Energy Research (CER) and Valley Electric Association (VEA) worked with Kitty Shubert of the Beatty Economic Redevelopment Corporation (BERC) to install two wind monitoring stations outside the town of Beatty, Nevada. The following is a description of the two sites. The information for a proposed third site is also shown. The sites were selected from previous work by the BERC and Idaho National Laboratory. The equipment was provided by the BERC and installed by researchers from the UNLV CER.

  19. Monitoring global vegetation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macdonald, R. B.; Houston, A. G.; Heydorn, R. P.; Botkin, D. B.; Estes, J. E.; Strahler, A. H.

    1981-01-01

    An attempt is made to identify the need for, and the current capability of, a technology which could aid in monitoring the Earth's vegetation resource on a global scale. Vegetation is one of our most critical natural resources, and accurate timely information on its current status and temporal dynamics is essential to understand many basic and applied environmental interrelationships which exist on the small but complex planet Earth.

  20. Yacht Race Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Observer Single-handed Transatlantic Race (OSTAR) participants were aided by a French-American space-based monitoring system which reported the yacht's positions throughout the race, and also served as an emergency locator service. Originating from NASA's Nimbus 6 Satellite, use of this system, called ARGOS made the OSTAR competition the most accurately reported sea race ever conducted. Each boat carried a portable transmitter allowing 88 new sources of oceanographic data available during the race.

  1. Airborne Intercept Monitoring

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-01

    Primary mirror of Zerodur with Pilkington 747 coating • FOV = 0.104 degrees Airborne Intercept Monitoring RTO-MP-SET-105 16 - 3 UNCLASSIFIED...Pointing System (SPS). The STS is a 0.75 meter aperture Mersenne Cassegrain telescope and the SAT is a 0.34 meter aperture 3- mirror anastigmat telescope...UNLIMITED UNCLASSIFIED/UNLIMITED • Air Flow to Mitigate Thermal “Seeing” Effects • Light weighted primary mirror to reduce mass The SAT

  2. Heart Rate Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    In the mid 70's, NASA saw a need for a long term electrocardiographic electrode suitable for use on astronauts. Heart Rate Inc.'s insulated capacitive electrode is constructed of thin dielectric film applied to stainless steel surface, originally developed under a grant by Texas Technical University. HRI, Inc. was awarded NASA license and continued development of heart rate monitor for use on exercise machines for physical fitness and medical markets.

  3. Minicomputer Hardware Monitor Design.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-06-01

    the systems for a variety of distinct reasons (i.e., long - term management planning, individual performance problems), the monitoring "formula" for...services and up to the system throughput level. It will support the generation of long term trending data bdses as well as short- term high resolution data...transfer due to data transfer interlocking. This also allows for the PP to examine and act upon the previous vector before placing it in long term storage

  4. Droplet monitoring probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baughman, J. R.; Thys, P. C.

    1973-01-01

    A droplet monitoring system is disclosed for analysis of mixed-phase fluid flow in development of gas turbines. The system uses a probe comprising two electrical wires spaced a known distance apart and connected at one end to means for establishing a dc potential between the wires. A drop in the fluid stream momentarily contacting both wires simultaneously causes and electrical signal which is amplified, detected and counted.

  5. Benzene Monitor System report

    SciTech Connect

    Livingston, R.R.

    1992-10-12

    Two systems for monitoring benzene in aqueous streams have been designed and assembled by the Savannah River Technology Center, Analytical Development Section (ADS). These systems were used at TNX to support sampling studies of the full-scale {open_quotes}SRAT/SME/PR{close_quotes} and to provide real-time measurements of benzene in Precipitate Hydrolysis Aqueous (PHA) simulant. This report describes the two ADS Benzene Monitor System (BMS) configurations, provides data on system operation, and reviews the results of scoping tests conducted at TNX. These scoping tests will allow comparison with other benzene measurement options being considered for use in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) laboratory. A report detailing the preferred BMS configuration statistical performance during recent tests has been issued under separate title: Statistical Analyses of the At-line Benzene Monitor Study, SCS-ASG-92-066. The current BMS design, called the At-line Benzene Monitor (ALBM), allows remote measurement of benzene in PHA solutions. The authors have demonstrated the ability to calibrate and operate this system using peanut vials from a standard Hydragard{trademark} sampler. The equipment and materials used to construct the ALBM are similar to those already used in other applications by the DWPF lab. The precision of this system ({+-}0.5% Relative Standard Deviation (RSD) at 1 sigma) is better than the purge & trap-gas chromatograpy reference method currently in use. Both BMSs provide a direct measurement of the benzene that can be purged from a solution with no sample pretreatment. Each analysis requires about five minutes per sample, and the system operation requires no special skills or training. The analyzer`s computer software can be tailored to provide desired outputs. Use of this system produces no waste stream other than the samples themselves (i.e. no organic extractants).

  6. The Glast Burst Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meegan, C.; Fishman, G.; Kouveliotou, C.; Paciesas, W.; Kippen, R.; Briggs, M.; Preece, R.; Lichti, G.; von Kienlin, A.; Georgii, R.; Diehl, R.; Schöenfelder, V.

    2002-12-01

    The Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) will include a secondary instrument to augment the observatory's capabilities for GRB studies. The GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) will extend energy coverage from the main instrument's lower limit of ~ 20 MeV down to ~ 10 keV, and will provide an on-board burst trigger and approximate location. The instrument consists of twelve NaI detectors and two BGO detectors.

  7. Passive fetal monitoring sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-07-01

    The invention is an ambulatory, passive sensor for use in a fetal monitoring system. The invention incorporates piezoelectric polymer film combined with a metallic mounting plate fastened to a belt and electrically connected to a signal processing unit by means of a shielded cable. The purpose of the sensor is to receive pressure pulses emitted from a fetus inside an expectant mother and to provide means for filtering out pressure pulses arising from other sources, such as the maternal heart.

  8. MAD - Monitoring ALICE Dataflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chibante Barroso, V.; Costa, F.; Grigoras, C.; Wegrzynek, A.

    2015-12-01

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is the heavy-ion detector designed to study the physics of strongly interacting matter and the quark-gluon plasma at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Following a successful Run 1, which ended in February 2013, the ALICE data acquisition (DAQ) entered a consolidation phase to prepare for Run 2 which will start in the beginning of 2015. A new software tool has been developed by the data acquisition project to improve the monitoring of the experiment's dataflow, from the data readout in the DAQ farm up to its shipment to CERN's main computer centre. This software, called ALICE MAD (Monitoring ALICE Dataflow), uses the MonALISA framework as core module to gather, process, aggregate and distribute monitoring values from the different processes running in the distributed DAQ farm. Data are not only pulled from the data sources to MAD but can also be pushed by dedicated data collectors or the data source processes. A large set of monitored metrics (from the backpressure status on the readout links to event counters in each of the DAQ nodes and aggregated data rates for the whole data acquisition) is needed to provide a comprehensive view of the DAQ status. MAD also injects alarms in the Orthos alarm system whenever abnormal conditions are detected. The MAD web-based GUI uses WebSockets to provide dynamic and on-time status displays for the ALICE shift crew. Designed as a widget-based system, MAD supports an easy integration of new visualization blocks and also customization of the information displayed to the shift crew based on the ALICE activities.

  9. Noninvasive Heart Rate Monitor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-07-31

    plethysmography can be applied to various parts of the body such as finger, toe, ear, forehead, neck, wrist and so on. The choice of location is predicated upon...frequency, hydrostatic, cardiac vibration wave is also explored. 3 2.0 METHODOLOGY The basic methodology and underlying principle of the heart rate monitor...regarding heart rate can be extracted in a number of ways. In the present application, the Doppler effect will be utilized. The principle of

  10. Environmental Monitoring Data System

    SciTech Connect

    Coombs, Jason R.

    2004-04-21

    A set of database management tools, data processing tools, and auxiliary support functionality for processing and handling semi-structured environmental monitoring data. The system provides a flexible description language for describing the data, allowing the database to store disparate data from many different sources without changes to the configuration. The system employs XML to support unlimited named allribute/value pairs for each object defined in the system.

  11. Scalable Node Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Drotar, Alexander P.; Quinn, Erin E.; Sutherland, Landon D.

    2012-07-30

    Project description is: (1) Build a high performance computer; and (2) Create a tool to monitor node applications in Component Based Tool Framework (CBTF) using code from Lightweight Data Metric Service (LDMS). The importance of this project is that: (1) there is a need a scalable, parallel tool to monitor nodes on clusters; and (2) New LDMS plugins need to be able to be easily added to tool. CBTF stands for Component Based Tool Framework. It's scalable and adjusts to different topologies automatically. It uses MRNet (Multicast/Reduction Network) mechanism for information transport. CBTF is flexible and general enough to be used for any tool that needs to do a task on many nodes. Its components are reusable and 'EASILY' added to a new tool. There are three levels of CBTF: (1) frontend node - interacts with users; (2) filter nodes - filters or concatenates information from backend nodes; and (3) backend nodes - where the actual work of the tool is done. LDMS stands for lightweight data metric servies. It's a tool used for monitoring nodes. Ltool is the name of the tool we derived from LDMS. It's dynamically linked and includes the following components: Vmstat, Meminfo, Procinterrupts and more. It works by: Ltool command is run on the frontend node; Ltool collects information from the backend nodes; backend nodes send information to the filter nodes; and filter nodes concatenate information and send to a database on the front end node. Ltool is a useful tool when it comes to monitoring nodes on a cluster because the overhead involved with running the tool is not particularly high and it will automatically scale to any size cluster.

  12. AG Dra monitoring requested

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waagen, Elizabeth O.

    2017-04-01

    Dr. Rudolf Gális (Pavel Jozef Šafárik University) and colleagues have requested AAVSO assistance in observing the symbiotic variable AG Dra. Observations are requested as a follow-up to spectroscopic observations and in order to monitor the system for an anticipated outburst. Gális writes: "AG Dra is one of the best studied symbiotic systems, which undergoes characteristic symbiotic activity with alternating quiescent and active stages. The latter ones consist of several outbursts in intervals of about 1 yr. After seven years of flat quiescence following the 2006-08 major outbursts, in the spring of 2015, AG Dra...[entered the active stage]...with...two minor outbursts (in 2015 and 2016) up to now. Such behaviour is quite unusual in the photometric history of AG Dra, so the further systematic photometric monitoring of this symbiotic binary is highly desirable. We expect the next outburst of AG Dra in the late spring of 2017..." Daily monitoring of AG Dra in UBV(RI) filters is requested beginning at once and continuing until further notice. Visual observations are welcome and are encouraged. When the outburst occurs, revised observing instructions will likely be issued via an AAVSO Special Notice. Finder charts with sequence may be created using the AAVSO Variable Star Plotter (https://www.aavso.org/vsp). Observations should be submitted to the AAVSO International Database. See full Alert Notice for more details.

  13. Monitoring spatial maxima

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogerson, Peter

    2005-05-01

    When assessing maps consisting of comparable regional values, it is of interest to know whether the peak, or maximum value, is higher than it would likely be by chance alone. Peaks on maps of crime or disease might be attributable to random fluctuation, or they might be due to an important deviation from the baseline process that produces the regional values. This paper addresses the situation where a series of such maps are observed over time, and it is of interest to detect statistically significant deviations between the observed and expected peaks as quickly as possible. The Gumbel distribution is used as a model for the statistical distribution of extreme values; this distribution does not require the underlying distributions of regional values to be either normal, known, or identical. Cumulative sum surveillance methods are used to monitor these Gumbel variates, and these methods are also extended for use when monitoring smoothed regional values (where the quantity monitored is a weighted sum of values in the immediate geographical neighborhood). The new methods are illustrated by using data on breast cancer mortality for the 217 counties of the northeastern United States, and prostate cancer mortality for the entire United States, during the period 1968-1998.

  14. Hydrazine monitoring in spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, J. H.; Beck, S. W.; Limero, T. F.; James, J. T.

    1992-01-01

    Hydrazine (HZ) and monomethyl hydrazine (MMH) are highly toxic compounds used as fuels in the Space Shuttle Orbiter Main Engines and in its maneuvering and reaction control system. Satellite refueling during a mission may also result in release of hydrazines. During extravehicular activities, the potential exists for hydrazines to contaminate the suit and to be brought into the internal atmosphere inadvertantly. Because of the high toxicity of hydrazines, a very sensitive, reliable, interference-free, and real-time method of measurement is required. A portable ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) has exhibited a low ppb detection limit for hydrazines suggesting a promising technology for the detection of hydrazines in spacecraft air. The Hydrazine Monitor is a modified airborne vapor monitor (AVM) with a custom-built datalogger. This off-the-shelf IMS was developed for the detection of chemical warfare agents on the battlefield. After early evaluations of the AVM for hydrazine measurements showed a serious interference from ammonia, the AVM was modified to measure HZ and MMH in the ppb concentration range without interference from ammonia in the low ppm range. A description of the Hydrazine Monitor and how it functions is presented.

  15. Monitoring Antiplatelet Therapy.

    PubMed

    Orme, Rachel; Judge, Heather M; Storey, Robert F

    2017-04-01

    The increasing use of antiplatelet therapy, particularly aspirin and oral P2Y12 inhibitors, in the prevention and management of arterial thrombosis, has stimulated extensive pharmacodynamic studies and research into tailored antiplatelet regimens. Many different methodologies have been studied for monitoring antiplatelet drugs and some are now well validated and used in clinical practice. However, clinical studies of tailored antiplatelet therapy have not convincingly demonstrated a benefit of this approach in patients treated with aspirin and clopidogrel, coupled with the fact that more potent antiplatelet therapies have more consistent effects compared with clopidogrel and so may reduce the rationale for monitoring. On the other hand, the optimum timing of urgent surgery after cession of oral antiplatelet therapy may be informed by platelet function testing. This review discusses the different methodologies that have been used to monitor the effects of antiplatelet therapy and highlights the current position of platelet function testing in clinical practice. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  16. The GLAST burst monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Kienlin, Andreas; Meegan, Charles A.; Lichti, Giselher G.; Bhat, Narayana P.; Briggs, Michael S.; Connaughton, Valerie; Diehl, Roland; Fishman, Gerald J.; Greiner, Jochen; Hoover, Andrew S.; Kippen, R. M.; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Paciesas, William S.; Preece, Robert D.; Schönfelder, Volker; Steinle, Helmut; Wilson, Robert B.

    2004-10-01

    The next large NASA mission in the field of gamma-ray astronomy, GLAST, is scheduled for launch in 2007. Aside from the main instrument LAT (Large-Area Telescope), a gamma-ray telescope for the energy range between 20 MeV and > 100GeV, a secondary instrument, the GLAST burst monitor (GBM), is foreseen. With this monitor one of the key scientific objectives of the mission, the determination of the high-energy behaviour of gamma-ray bursts and transients can be ensured. Its task is to increase the detection rate of gamma-ray bursts for the LAT and to extend the energy range to lower energies (from ~10 keV to ~30 MeV). It will provide real-time burst locations over a wide FoV with sufficient accuracy to allow repointing the GLAST spacecraft. Time-resolved spectra of many bursts recorded with LAT and the burst monitor will allow the investigation of the relation between the keV and the MeV-GeV emission from GRBs over unprecedented seven decades of energy. This will help to advance our understanding of the mechanisms by which gamma-rays are generated in gamma-ray bursts

  17. NUV Spectroscopic Sensitivity Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osten, Rachel

    2011-10-01

    Purpose is to monitor sensitivity of each NUV grating mode to detect any change due to contamination or other causes. The same basic strategy as employed in previous cycles is used here, with a few notable exceptions: Two cenwaves of G225M have been dropped {2306 and 2410}, and only the bluest one retained. One cenwave of G285M has been dropped {2739}, and the bluest and reddest have been retained. This is to continue to monitor the wavelength dependence of the G285M sensitivity decline, and monitor the wavelength dependence of the G225M sensitivity decline, which only appears at the shortest wavelengths {stripe A of the 2186 cenwave}. These two gratings are also not used for science exposures in Cycle 19. The G185M grating has the most usage of the NUV gratings, and an additional cenwave is added to ensure the wavelength independence of the sensitivity degradation. For the G230L, the 3360 cenwave is dropped due to the contamination in both stripes B and C from second order light, which does not stretch the wavelength coverage very red compared to the other G230L cenwaves, and this cenwave is costly in terms of exposure time. The exposure time of the G230L/2950 setting was also reduced, since it was apparently overflowing its buffer.

  18. NUV Spectroscopic Sensitivity Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostroem, Azalee

    2013-10-01

    Purpose is to monitor sensitivity of each NUV grating mode to detect any change due to contamination or other causes. The same basic strategy as employed in previous cycles is used here, with a few notable exceptions: Two cenwaves of G225M have been dropped {2306 and 2410}, and only the bluest one retained. One cenwave of G285M has been dropped {2739}, and the bluest and reddest have been retained. This is to continue to monitor the wavelength dependence of the G285M sensitivity decline, and monitor the wavelength dependence of the G225M sensitivity decline, which only appears at the shortest wavelengths {stripe A of the 2186 cenwave}. These two gratings are also not used for science exposures in Cycle 19. The G185M grating has the most usage of the NUV gratings, and an additional cenwave is added to ensure the wavelength independence of the sensitivity degradation. For the G230L, the 3360 cenwave is dropped due to the contamination in both stripes B and C from second order light, which does not stretch the wavelength coverage very red compared to the other G230L cenwaves, and this cenwave is costly in terms of exposure time. The exposure time of the G230L/2950 setting was also reduced, since it was apparently overflowing its buffer.

  19. NUV Spectroscopic Sensitivity Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostroem, Azalee

    2012-10-01

    Purpose is to monitor sensitivity of each NUV grating mode to detect any change due to contamination or other causes. The same basic strategy as employed in previous cycles is used here, with a few notable exceptions: Two cenwaves of G225M have been dropped {2306 and 2410}, and only the bluest one retained. One cenwave of G285M has been dropped {2739}, and the bluest and reddest have been retained. This is to continue to monitor the wavelength dependence of the G285M sensitivity decline, and monitor the wavelength dependence of the G225M sensitivity decline, which only appears at the shortest wavelengths {stripe A of the 2186 cenwave}. These two gratings are also not used for science exposures in Cycle 19. The G185M grating has the most usage of the NUV gratings, and an additional cenwave is added to ensure the wavelength independence of the sensitivity degradation. For the G230L, the 3360 cenwave is dropped due to the contamination in both stripes B and C from second order light, which does not stretch the wavelength coverage very red compared to the other G230L cenwaves, and this cenwave is costly in terms of exposure time. The exposure time of the G230L/2950 setting was also reduced, since it was apparently overflowing its buffer.

  20. Hexavalent chromium monitor

    DOEpatents

    Tao, Shiquan; Winstead, Christopher B.

    2005-04-12

    A monitor is provided for use in measuring the concentration of hexavalent chromium in a liquid, such as water. The monitor includes a sample cell, a light source, and a photodetector. The sample cell is in the form of a liquid-core waveguide, the sample cell defining an interior core and acting as a receiver for the liquid to be analyzed, the interior surface of the sample cell having a refractive index of less than 1.33. The light source is in communication with a first end of the sample cell for emitting radiation having a wavelength of about and between 350 to 390 nm into the interior core of the waveguide. The photodetector is in communication with a second end of the waveguide for measuring the absorption of the radiation emitted by the light source by the liquid in the sample cell. The monitor may also include a processor electronically coupled to the photodetector for receipt of an absorption signal to determine the concentration of hexavalent chromium in the liquid.

  1. Laser schlieren crystal monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, Robert B. (Inventor); Johnston, Mary H. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A system and method for monitoring the state of a crystal which is suspended in a solution is described which includes providing a light source for emitting a beam of light along an optical axis. A collimating lens is arranged along the optical axis for collimating the emitted beam to provide a first collimated light beam consisting of parallel light rays. By passing the first collimated light beam through a transparent container, a number of the parallel light rays are deflected off the surfaces of said crystal being monitored according to the refractive index gradient to provide a deflected beam of deflected light rays. A focusing lens is arranged along optical axis for focusing the deflected rays towards a desired focal point. A knife edge is arranged in a predetermined orientation at the focal point; and a screen is provided. A portion of the deflected beam is blocked with the knife edge to project only a portion of the deflected beam. A band is created at one edge of the image of the crystal which indicates the state of change of the surface of the crystal being monitored.

  2. Transportation monitoring unit qualification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, M.

    1990-01-01

    Transportation monitoring unit (TMU) qualification testing was performed between 3 Mar. and 14 Dec. 1989. The purpose of the testing was to qualify the TMUs to monitor and store temperature and acceleration data on redesigned solid rocket motor segments and exit cones while they are being shipped from Utah's Thiokol Corporation, Space Operations, to Kennedy Space Center. TMUs were subjected to transportation tests that concerned the structural integrity of the TMUs only, and did not involve TMU measuring capability. This testing was terminated prior to completion due to mounting plate failures, high and low temperature shutdown failures, and data collection errors. Corrective actions taken by the vendor to eliminate high temperature shutdowns were ineffective. An evaluation was performed on the TMUs to determine the TMU vibration and temperature measuring accuracy at a variety of temperatures. This test demonstrated that TMU measured shock levels are high, and that TMUs are temperature sensitive because of decreased accuracy at high and low temperatures. It was determined that modifications to the current TMU system, such that it could be qualified for use, would require a complete redesign and remanufacture. Because the cost of redesigning and remanufacturing the present TMU system exceeds the cost of procuring a new system that could be qualified without modification, it is recommended that an alternate transportation monitoring system be qualified.

  3. Magnetic beam position monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Varfolomeev, A.A.; Ivanchenkov, S.N.; Khlebnikov, A.S.

    1995-12-31

    Many nondestructive beam position monitors are known. However, these devices can not be used for DC particle beam diagnostics. We investigated a method of beam diagnostics applicable for the operative control of DC high power e-beam inside closed waveguide. A design of the detector for determination of{open_quote} center of mass {close_quote} position of DC particle beam was developed. It was shown that the monitor can be used as a nondestructive method for the beam position control in resonators. Magnetic field of the particle beam outside a resonator is used. The detector consists of the steel yokes and magnetic field sensors. The sensors measure magnetic fluxes in the steel yokes fixed outside the resonator. When the particle beam changes its position, these magnetic fluxes also change. Beam displacement sensitivity of the monitor depends on the steel yoke dimensions. The detector sensitivity is equal to 1 Gauss/mm for the conditions adequate to the FOM-FEM project.

  4. 1984 environmental monitoring report

    SciTech Connect

    Day, L.E.; Miltenberger, R.P.; Naidu, J.R.

    1985-04-01

    The environmental monitoring program has been designed to ensure that BNL facilities operate such that the applicable environmental standards and effluent control requirements have been met. A listing, as required by DOE Order 5484.1 of BNL facilities, of environmental agencies and permits is provided in the Environmental Program Information Section 3.0, Table B. Since the aquifer underlying Long Island has been designated a ''sole source'' aquifer, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Drinking Water Standards have been used in the assessment of ground water data. However, the limits prescribed in the regulations are not directly applicable to the monitoring well data since (1) the standards apply to a community water supply system, i.e., one serving more than 25 individuals, and (2) the standards represent an annual average concentration. Since the monitoring wells are not components of the Laboratory's water supply system, the EPA drinking water standards are employed as reference criteria to which the surveillance well data is compared. The standards also serve as guidance levels for any appropriate remedial action. 36 refs., 9 figs., 40 tabs.

  5. Induced Seismicity Monitoring System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, S. R.; Jarpe, S.; Harben, P.

    2014-12-01

    There are many seismological aspects associated with monitoring of permanent storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) in geologic formations. Many of these include monitoring underground gas migration through detailed tomographic studies of rock properties, integrity of the cap rock and micro seismicity with time. These types of studies require expensive deployments of surface and borehole sensors in the vicinity of the CO2 injection wells. Another problem that may exist in CO2 sequestration fields is the potential for damaging induced seismicity associated with fluid injection into the geologic reservoir. Seismic hazard monitoring in CO2 sequestration fields requires a seismic network over a spatially larger region possibly having stations in remote settings. Expensive observatory-grade seismic systems are not necessary for seismic hazard deployments or small-scale tomographic studies. Hazard monitoring requires accurate location of induced seismicity to magnitude levels only slightly less than that which can be felt at the surface (e.g. magnitude 1), and the frequencies of interest for tomographic analysis are ~1 Hz and greater. We have developed a seismo/acoustic smart sensor system that can achieve the goals necessary for induced seismicity monitoring in CO2 sequestration fields. The unit is inexpensive, lightweight, easy to deploy, can operate remotely under harsh conditions and features 9 channels of recording (currently 3C 4.5 Hz geophone, MEMS accelerometer and microphone). An on-board processor allows for satellite transmission of parameter data to a processing center. Continuous or event-detected data is kept on two removable flash SD cards of up to 64+ Gbytes each. If available, data can be transmitted via cell phone modem or picked up via site visits. Low-power consumption allows for autonomous operation using only a 10 watt solar panel and a gel-cell battery. The system has been successfully tested for long-term (> 6 months) remote operations over a wide range

  6. Inductive System Monitors Tasks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The Inductive Monitoring System (IMS) software developed at Ames Research Center uses artificial intelligence and data mining techniques to build system-monitoring knowledge bases from archived or simulated sensor data. This information is then used to detect unusual or anomalous behavior that may indicate an impending system failure. Currently helping analyze data from systems that help fly and maintain the space shuttle and the International Space Station (ISS), the IMS has also been employed by data classes are then used to build a monitoring knowledge base. In real time, IMS performs monitoring functions: determining and displaying the degree of deviation from nominal performance. IMS trend analyses can detect conditions that may indicate a failure or required system maintenance. The development of IMS was motivated by the difficulty of producing detailed diagnostic models of some system components due to complexity or unavailability of design information. Successful applications have ranged from real-time monitoring of aircraft engine and control systems to anomaly detection in space shuttle and ISS data. IMS was used on shuttle missions STS-121, STS-115, and STS-116 to search the Wing Leading Edge Impact Detection System (WLEIDS) data for signs of possible damaging impacts during launch. It independently verified findings of the WLEIDS Mission Evaluation Room (MER) analysts and indicated additional points of interest that were subsequently investigated by the MER team. In support of the Exploration Systems Mission Directorate, IMS is being deployed as an anomaly detection tool on ISS mission control consoles in the Johnson Space Center Mission Operations Directorate. IMS has been trained to detect faults in the ISS Control Moment Gyroscope (CMG) systems. In laboratory tests, it has already detected several minor anomalies in real-time CMG data. When tested on archived data, IMS was able to detect precursors of the CMG1 failure nearly 15 hours in advance of

  7. What can we learn about the lipid vesicle structure from the small-angle neutron scattering experiment?

    PubMed

    Kiselev, M A; Zemlyanaya, E V; Aswal, V K; Neubert, R H H

    2006-08-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) on the unilamellar vesicle (ULV) populations (diameter 500 and 1,000 A) in D2O was used to characterize lipid vesicles from dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) at three phases: gel Lbeta', ripple Pbeta' and liquid Lalpha. Parameters of vesicle populations and internal structure of the DMPC bilayer were characterized on the basis of the separated form factor (SFF) model. Vesicle shape changes from nearly spherical in the Lalpha phase to elliptical in the Pbeta' and Lbeta' phases. This is true for vesicles prepared via extrusion through pores with the diameter 500 A. Parameters of the internal bilayer structure (thickness of the membrane and the hydrophobic core, hydration and the surface area of the lipid molecule) were determined on the basis of the hydrophobic-hydrophilic (HH) approximation of neutron scattering length density across the bilayer rhox and of the step function (SF) approximation of rhox. DMPC membrane thickness in the Lalpha phase (T = 30 degrees C) demonstrates a dependence on the membrane curvature for extruded vesicles. Prepared via extrusion through 500 A diameter pores, vesicle population in the Lalpha phase has the following characteristics: average value of minor semi-axis 266 +/- 2 A, ellipse eccentricity 1.11 +/- 0.02, polydispersity 26%, thickness of the membrane 48.9 +/- 0.2 A and of the hydrophobic core 19.9 +/- 0.4 A, surface area 60.7 +/- 0.5 A2 and number of water molecules 12.8 +/- 0.3 per DMPC molecule. Vesicles prepared via extrusion through pores with the diameter 1,000 A have polydispersity of 48% and membrane thickness of 45.5 +/- 0.6 A in the Lalpha phase. SF approximation was used to describe the DMPC membrane structure in Lbeta' (T = 10 degrees C) and Pbeta' (T = 20 degrees C) phases. Extruded DMPC vesicles in D2O have membrane thickness of 49.6 +/- 0.5 A in the Lbeta' phase and 48.3 +/- 0.6 A in the Pbeta' phase. The dependence of the DMPC membrane thickness on temperature was restored

  8. Wilderness monitoring and data management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Riebau, A. R.

    1994-01-01

    In the last decade, increased public interest in natural areas has resulted in increased monitoring activity by federal wilderness managers to assess the status of wilderness values. Wilderness values are those large-scale entities of wilderness which comprise, in sum, wilderness character. Data collected through wilderness monitoring must support the maintenance of wilderness values. Wilderness monitoring must include the development of clear data management strategies and provisions for hypothesis testing. Unfortunately, some monitoring programs do not support the status assessment of wilderness values. Often wilderness monitoring programs have neglected even the most rudimentary principles of data management. This paper presents a model for wilderness monitoring, guidelines for data management, and an overview of a PC-compatible wilderness monitoring data base, the Monitoring Information Data Analysis System (MIDAS).

  9. Printing and Publishing Monitoring Information

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Stationary source emissions monitoring is required to demonstrate that a source is meeting the requirements in Federal or state rules. This page covers monitoring information specific to the printing and publishing industry.

  10. Blood pressure monitors for home

    MedlinePlus

    ... type of blood pressure monitor for home use. DIGITAL BLOOD PRESSURE MONITORS A digital device will also have a cuff that wraps ... on its own. The screen will show a digital readout of your systolic and diastolic blood pressure. ...

  11. Structural Health Monitoring of Repairs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    monitoring, the monitoring system consists of several design elements with defined interfaces. The raw monitoring signals are generated by a sensor with...is directly connected or integrated in the structure or repair. In Figure 2.3-1, the design element 1 is showing a surface mounted sensor. The...aircraft bus system. The monitoring data from the bus system are transferred to the next design element (element 4), where an onboard processing

  12. Audio distribution and Monitoring Circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkland, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    Versatile circuit accepts and distributes TV audio signals. Three-meter audio distribution and monitoring circuit provides flexibility in monitoring, mixing, and distributing audio inputs and outputs at various signal and impedance levels. Program material is simultaneously monitored on three channels, or single-channel version built to monitor transmitted or received signal levels, drive speakers, interface to building communications, and drive long-line circuits.

  13. Handbook for Monitoring Industrial Wastewater.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Associated Water & Air Resources Engineers, Inc., Nashville, TN.

    This manual for industrial wastewater monitoring covers the philosophy of monitoring needs, planning, sampling, measuring, and analysis. Sufficient detail is given for those who wish to explore more deeply some of the practical and theoretical aspects of any of the phases of a monitoring program. A logical procedure is suggested and direction…

  14. A model of security monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, Matt

    1989-01-01

    A model of security monitoring is presented that distinguishes between two types of logging and auditing. Implications for the design and use of security monitoring mechanisms are drawn from this model. The usefulness of the model is then demonstrated by analyzing several different monitoring mechanisms.

  15. A model of security monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, Matt

    1990-01-01

    A model of security monitoring is presented that distinguishes between two types of logging and auditing. Implications for the design and use of security monitoring mechanisms are drawn from this model. The usefulness of the model is then demonstrated by analyzing several different monitoring mechanisms.

  16. Monitoring biodiversity: quantification and interpretation.

    Treesearch

    William L. Gaines; Richy J. Harrod; John F. Lehmkuhl

    1999-01-01

    Monitoring is necessary for an adaptive management approach and the successful implementation of ecosystem management. In this document, we present an approach to monitoring biological diversity at different levels of ecological organization: landscape, community or ecosystem, population or species, and genetic. Our approach involves identifying monitoring questions...

  17. Home apnea monitor use - infants

    MedlinePlus

    ... to stay on the monitor. What are the Risks of an Apnea Monitor? Your baby's skin could get irritated from the stick-on electrodes. This is usually not a major problem. If you lose electrical power or have problems with your electricity, the apnea monitor will not work. This does ...

  18. Beyond Arms-Control Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Jeanloz, Raymond; Fung, Inez; Bowyer, Ted W.; Wofsy, Steven

    2013-02-15

    Expanded monitoring of the environment, everywhere and at all times, can advance arms control around the world, enhancing transparency among nations. In particular, improved characterization of the atmosphere now offers powerful opportunities for global monitoring, with multiple societal benefits. It may be useful to think of environmental monitoring as a long-term objective of arms-control verification.

  19. Final cook temperature monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, John; Matthews, Michael; Glasco, Marc

    2006-04-01

    Fully cooked, ready-to-eat products represent one of the fastest growing markets in the meat and poultry industries. Modern meat cooking facilities typically cook chicken strips and nuggets at rates of 6000 lbs per hour, and it is a critical food safety issue to ensure the products on these lines are indeed fully cooked. Common practice now employs oven technicians to constantly measure final cook temperature with insertion-type thermocouple probes. Prior research has demonstrated that thermal imagery of chicken breasts and other products can be used to predict core temperature of products leaving an oven. In practice, implementation of a system to monitor core temperature can be difficult for several reasons. First, a wide variety of products are typically produced on the same production line and the system must adapt to all products. Second, the products can be often hard to find because they often leave the process in random order and may be touching or even overlapping. Another issue is finite measurement time which is typically only a few seconds. Finally, the system is subjected to a rigorous sanitation cycle and must hold up under wash down conditions. To address these problems, a calibrated 320x240 micro-bolometer camera was used to monitor the temperature of formed, breaded poultry products on a fully cooked production line for a period of one year. The study addressed the installation and operation of the system as well as the development of algorithms used to identify the product on a cluttered conveyor belt. It also compared the oven tech insertion probe measurements to the non-contact monitoring system performance.

  20. Error monitoring in musicians

    PubMed Central

    Maidhof, Clemens

    2013-01-01

    To err is human, and hence even professional musicians make errors occasionally during their performances. This paper summarizes recent work investigating error monitoring in musicians, i.e., the processes and their neural correlates associated with the monitoring of ongoing actions and the detection of deviations from intended sounds. Electroencephalography (EEG) studies reported an early component of the event-related potential (ERP) occurring before the onsets of pitch errors. This component, which can be altered in musicians with focal dystonia, likely reflects processes of error detection and/or error compensation, i.e., attempts to cancel the undesired sensory consequence (a wrong tone) a musician is about to perceive. Thus, auditory feedback seems not to be a prerequisite for error detection, consistent with previous behavioral results. In contrast, when auditory feedback is externally manipulated and thus unexpected, motor performance can be severely distorted, although not all feedback alterations result in performance impairments. Recent studies investigating the neural correlates of feedback processing showed that unexpected feedback elicits an ERP component after note onsets, which shows larger amplitudes during music performance than during mere perception of the same musical sequences. Hence, these results stress the role of motor actions for the processing of auditory information. Furthermore, recent methodological advances like the combination of 3D motion capture techniques with EEG will be discussed. Such combinations of different measures can potentially help to disentangle the roles of different feedback types such as proprioceptive and auditory feedback, and in general to derive at a better understanding of the complex interactions between the motor and auditory domain during error monitoring. Finally, outstanding questions and future directions in this context will be discussed. PMID:23898255

  1. FTS3: Quantitative Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riahi, H.; Salichos, M.; Keeble, O.; Andreeva, J.; Ayllon, A. A.; Di Girolamo, A.; Magini, N.; Roiser, S.; Simon, M. K.

    2015-12-01

    The overall success of LHC data processing depends heavily on stable, reliable and fast data distribution. The Worldwide LHC Computing Grid (WLCG) relies on the File Transfer Service (FTS) as the data movement middleware for moving sets of files from one site to another. This paper describes the components of FTS3 monitoring infrastructure and how they are built to satisfy the common and particular requirements of the LHC experiments. We show how the system provides a complete and detailed cross-virtual organization (VO) picture of transfers for sites, operators and VOs. This information has proven critical due to the shared nature of the infrastructure, allowing a complete view of all transfers on shared network links between various workflows and VOs using the same FTS transfer manager. We also report on the performance of the FTS service itself, using data generated by the aforementioned monitoring infrastructure both during the commissioning and the first phase of production. We also explain how this monitoring information and network metrics produced can be used both as a starting point for troubleshooting data transfer issues, but also as a mechanism to collect information such as transfer efficiency between sites, achieved throughput and its evolution over time, most common errors, etc, and take decision upon them to further optimize transfer workflows. The service setup is subject to sites policies to control the network resource usage, as well as all the VOs making use of the Grid resources at the site to satisfy their requirements. FTS3 is the new version of FTS and has been deployed in production in August 2014.

  2. Multimedia traffic monitoring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Sayegh, Osamah A.; Dashti, Ali E.

    2000-10-01

    Increasing congestion on roads and highways, and the problems associated with conventional traffic monitoring systems have generated an interest in new traffic surveillance systems, such as video image processing. These systems are expected to be more effective and more economical than conventional surveillance systems. In this paper, we describe the design of a traffic surveillance system, called Multimedia traffic Monitoring System. The system is based on a client/server model, with the following main modules: 1) video image capture module (VICM), 2) video image processing module (VIPM), and 3) database module (DBM). The VICM is used to capture the live feed from a digital camera. Depending on the mode of operation, VICM either: 1) sends the video images directly to the VIPM (on the same processing node), or 2) compresses the video images and sends them to the VIPM and/or the DBM on separate processing node(s). The main contribution of this paper is the design of a traffic monitoring system that uses image processing (VIPM) to estimate traffic flow. In the current implementation, VIPM estimates the number of vehicles per kilometer, while using 9 image sequences (at a rate of 4 frames per second). The VIPM algorithm generates a virtual grid and superimposes it on a part of the traffic scene. Motion and vehicle detection operators are carried out within each cell in the grid. Vehicle count is concluded based on the nine images of a sequence. The system is tested against a manual count of more than 40 image sequences (total of more than 365 traffic images) of various traffic situations. The results show that the system is able to determine the traffic flow with a precision of 1.5 vehicles per kilometer.

  3. Continuous Glucose Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Fritschi, Cynthia; Quinn, Laurie; Penckofer, Sue; Surdyk, Patricia M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this descriptive study was to document the experience of wearing a continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) device in women with type 2 diabetes (T2DM). The availability of CGM has provided patients and clinicians with the opportunity to describe the immediate effects of diet, exercise, and medications on blood glucose levels; however, there are few data examining patients’ experiences and acceptability of using CGM. Methods Thirty-five women with T2DM wore a CGM for 3 days. Semistructured interviews were conducted to capture the self-described experience of wearing a CGM. Three open-ended questions were used to guide the participants’ self-reflection. Interviews were transcribed and analyzed. Results The women verbalized both positive and negative aspects of needing to check their blood glucose more frequently and wearing the monitor. After viewing the results, most women were surprised by the magnitude and frequency of blood glucose excursions. They immediately examined their behaviors during the time they wore the CGM. Independent problem-solving skills became apparent as they attempted to identify reasons for hyperglycemia by retracing food intake, physical activity, and stress experiences during the period of CGM. Most important, the majority of women stated they were interested in changing their diabetes-related self-care behaviors, especially eating and exercise behaviors, after reviewing their CGM results. Conclusions CGM is generally acceptable to women with T2DM and offers patients and their health care practitioners a possible alternative to routine glucose monitoring for assessing the effects of real-life events on blood glucose levels. PMID:20016057

  4. Space Derived Air Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    COPAMS, Commonwealth of Pennsylvania Air Monitoring System, derives from technology involved in building unmanned spacecraft. The Nimbus spacecraft carried experimental sensors to measure temperature, pressure, ozone, and water vapor, and instruments for studying solar radiation and telemetry. The process which relayed these findings to Earth formed the basis for COPAMS. The COPAMS system consists of data acquisition units which measure and record pollution level, and sense wind speed and direction, etc. The findings are relayed to a central station where the information is computerized. The system is automatic and supplemented by PAQSS, PA Air Quality Surveillance System.

  5. NASA Lunar Impact Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suggs, Robert M.; Moser, D. E.

    2015-01-01

    The MSFC lunar impact monitoring program began in 2006 in support of environment definition for the Constellation (return to Moon) program. Work continued by the Meteoroid Environment Office after Constellation cancellation. Over 330 impacts have been recorded. A paper published in Icarus reported on the first 5 years of observations and 126 calibrated flashes. Icarus: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0019103514002243; ArXiv: http://arxiv.org/abs/1404.6458 A NASA Technical Memorandum on flash locations is in press

  6. Microbial Load Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, S. F.; Royer, E. R.

    1979-01-01

    The Microbial Load Monitor (MLM) is an automated and computerized system for detection and identification of microorganisms. Additionally, the system is designed to enumerate and provide antimicrobic susceptibility profiles for medically significant bacteria. The system is designed to accomplish these tasks in a time of 13 hours or less versus the traditional time of 24 hours for negatives and 72 hours or more for positives usually required for standard microbiological analysis. The MLM concept differs from other methods of microbial detection in that the system is designed to accept raw untreated clinical samples and to selectively identify each group or species that may be present in a polymicrobic sample.

  7. Monitoring international nuclear activity

    SciTech Connect

    Firestone, R.B.

    2006-05-19

    The LBNL Table of Isotopes website provides primary nuclearinformation to>150,000 different users annually. We have developedthe covert technology to identify users by IP address and country todetermine the kinds of nuclear information they are retrieving. Wepropose to develop pattern recognition software to provide an earlywarning system to identify Unusual nuclear activity by country or regionSpecific nuclear/radioactive material interests We have monitored nuclearinformation for over two years and provide this information to the FBIand LLNL. Intelligence is gleaned from the website log files. Thisproposal would expand our reporting capabilities.

  8. Lithium niobate explosion monitor

    DOEpatents

    Bundy, Charles H.; Graham, Robert A.; Kuehn, Stephen F.; Precit, Richard R.; Rogers, Michael S.

    1990-01-01

    Monitoring explosive devices is accomplished with a substantially z-cut lithium niobate crystal in abutment with the explosive device. Upon impact by a shock wave from detonation of the explosive device, the crystal emits a current pulse prior to destruction of the crystal. The current pulse is detected by a current viewing transformer and recorded as a function of time in nanoseconds. In order to self-check the crystal, the crystal has a chromium film resistor deposited thereon which may be heated by a current pulse prior to detonation. This generates a charge which is detected by a charge amplifier.

  9. Optical wet steam monitor

    DOEpatents

    Maxey, Lonnie C.; Simpson, Marc L.

    1995-01-01

    A wet steam monitor determines steam particle size by using laser doppler velocimeter (LDV) device to produce backscatter light. The backscatter light signal is processed with a spectrum analyzer to produce a visibility waveform in the frequency domain. The visibility waveform includes a primary peak and a plurality of sidebands. The bandwidth of at least the primary frequency peak is correlated to particle size by either visually comparing the bandwidth to those of known particle sizes, or by digitizing the waveform and comparing the waveforms electronically.

  10. Remote Reactor Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, Adam; Dazeley, Steve; Dobie, Doug; Marleau, Peter; Brennan, Jim; Gerling, Mark; Sumner, Matthew; Sweany, Melinda

    2014-10-21

    The overall goal of the WATCHMAN project is to experimentally demonstrate the potential of water Cerenkov antineutrino detectors as a tool for remote monitoring of nuclear reactors. In particular, the project seeks to field a large prototype gadolinium-doped, water-based antineutrino detector to demonstrate sensitivity to a power reactor at ~10 kilometer standoff using a kiloton scale detector. The technology under development, when fully realized at large scale, could provide remote near-real-time information about reactor existence and operational status for small operating nuclear reactors out to distances of many hundreds of kilometers.

  11. Modular biowaste monitoring system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fogal, G. L.

    1975-01-01

    The objective of the Modular Biowaste Monitoring System Program was to generate and evaluate hardware for supporting shuttle life science experimental and diagnostic programs. An initial conceptual design effort established requirements and defined an overall modular system for the collection, measurement, sampling and storage of urine and feces biowastes. This conceptual design effort was followed by the design, fabrication and performance evaluation of a flight prototype model urine collection, volume measurement and sampling capability. No operational or performance deficiencies were uncovered as a result of the performance evaluation tests.

  12. The Glast Burst Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meegan, Charles

    2000-01-01

    The Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) will include a secondary instrument to augment the observatory's capabilities for GRB studies. The GLAST Burst Monitor (GBK is a collaboration between Marshall Space Flight Center, the University of Huntsville, Alabama, and the Max Plank Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics. The purpose of the GBM is to extend energy coverage below the main instrument's lower limit of about 20 MeV, and to provide an on-board burst trigger and approximate location. The instrument consists of twelve NaI detectors and two BGO detectors. This combination provides energy coverage from a few keV up to about 30 MeV.

  13. Storage monitoring system -- 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Mickelsen, B.; Nilsen, C.; Kinzel, R.; Davidson, B.; Pollock, R.

    1997-11-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has several ongoing projects in the area of nuclear materials management. These projects establish a core capability in monitoring stored nuclear materials. The overarching goal of these projects is to get the right sensor information to the right user to enhance the safety, security and to verify the legitimacy of use of stored nuclear materials. An effort has been initiated to merge these projects into a common system. This paper provides an overview of several of these projects and the integration activities between them.

  14. Monitoring of tritium

    DOEpatents

    Corbett, James A.; Meacham, Sterling A.

    1981-01-01

    The fluid from a breeder nuclear reactor, which may be the sodium cooling fluid or the helium reactor-cover-gas, or the helium coolant of a gas-cooled reactor passes over the portion of the enclosure of a gaseous discharge device which is permeable to hydrogen and its isotopes. The tritium diffused into the discharge device is radioactive producing beta rays which ionize the gas (argon) in the discharge device. The tritium is monitored by measuring the ionization current produced when the sodium phase and the gas phase of the hydrogen isotopes within the enclosure are in equilibrium.

  15. Confabulation: motivated reality monitoring.

    PubMed

    Fotopoulou, Aikaterini; Conway, Martin A; Solms, Mark

    2007-06-11

    The study addressed the hypothesis that the content of confabulation is emotionally biased. Confabulating amnesic patients were compared with amnesic non-confabulating patients in a memory recognition experiment that manipulated the valence (pleasant, unpleasant), temporal source (past, present, future) and selection agent (self, other) of the to-be-recognised memories. The results revealed that confabulating patients were more likely than amnesic non-confabulating patients to incorrectly recognise past autobiographical events or thoughts as currently relevant memories, and this was more pronounced for pleasant compared to unpleasant events. These findings suggest that motivational factors, along with defective reality and temporality monitoring, contribute to confabulation.

  16. Environmental Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Althouse, P E; Biermann, A; Brigdon, S L; Brown, R A; Campbell, C G; Christofferson, E; Clark, L M; Folks, K J; Gallegos, G M; Gouveia, F J; Grayson, A; Harrach, R J; Hoppes, W G; Jones, H; Mathews, S; Merrigan, J R; Peterson, S R; Revelli, M; Rueppel, D; Sanchez, L; Tate, P J; Vellinger, R J; Ward, B; Williams, R

    2006-01-10

    Environmental monitoring personnel from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) prepared this ''Environmental Monitoring Plan'' (EMP) to meet the requirements in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) ''Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance'' (DOE 1991) and applicable portions of DOE Orders 5400.1 and 5400.5 (see WSS B93 and B94 in Appendix B). ''Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance'' is followed as a best management practice; under Work Smart Standards, LLNL complies with portions of DOE Orders 5400.1 and 5400.5 as shown in Appendix B. This document is a revision of the May 1999 EMP (Tate et al. 1999) and is current as of March 1, 2002. LLNL is one of the nation's premier applied-science national security laboratories. Its primary mission is to ensure that the nation's nuclear weapons remain safe, secure, and reliable, and to prevent the spread and use of nuclear weapons worldwide. LLNL's programs in advanced technologies, energy, environment, biosciences, and basic science apply LLNL's unique capabilities and enhance the competencies needed for this national security mission. LLNL's mission also involves working with industrial and academic partners to increase national competitiveness and improve science education. LLNL's mission is dynamic and has changed over the years to meet new national needs. In keeping with the Laboratory's mission, the environment, safety, and health (ES&H) have top priority. LLNL's policy is to perform work in a manner that protects the health and safety of employees and the public, preserves the quality of the environment, and prevents property damage. The environment, safety, and health are to be priority considerations in the planning and execution of all work activities at the Laboratory (LLNL 2001). Furthermore, it is the policy of LLNL to comply with applicable ES&H laws, regulations, and requirements

  17. The GLAST Burst Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meegan, Charles; Bhat, Narayana; Connaughton, Valerie; Briggs, Michael; Diehl, Roland; Fishman, Gerald; Greiner, Jochen; Kippen, R. Marc; vonKienlin, Andreas; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Lichti, Giselher; Paciesas, William; Preece, Robert; Steinle, Helmut; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen

    2007-01-01

    The GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) comprises an array of NaI and BGO scintillation detectors designed to enhance the scientific return from GLAST in the study of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). By observing in the 10 keV to 30 MeV energy range, GBM extends the spectral coverage of GRBs more than 3 decades below the LAT energy threshold. GBM computes burst locations on-board, allowing repointing of the GLAST Observatory to place strong bursts within the LAT field-of-view to observe delayed high-energy emission.

  18. Personal continuous air monitor

    DOEpatents

    Morgan, Ronald G.; Salazar, Samuel A.

    2000-01-01

    A personal continuous air monitor capable of giving immediate warning of the presence of radioactivity has a filter/detector head to be worn in the breathing zone of a user, containing a filter mounted adjacent to radiation detectors, and a preamplifier. The filter/detector head is connected to a belt pack to be worn at the waist or on the back of a user. The belt pack contains a signal processor, batteries, a multichannel analyzer, a logic circuit, and an alarm. An air pump also is provided in the belt pack for pulling air through the filter/detector head by way of an air tube.

  19. The Stockpile Monitor Program

    SciTech Connect

    Buntain, G.A.; Fletcher, M.; Rabie, R.

    1994-07-01

    Recent political changes have led to drastic reductions in the number of nuclear warheads in stockpile, as well as increased expectations for warhead-service lives. In order to support and maintain a shrinking and aging nuclear stockpile, weapon scientists and engineers need detailed information describing the environments experienced by weapons in the field. Hence, the Stockpile Monitor Program was initiated in 1991 to develop a comprehensive and accurate database of temperature and humidity conditions experienced by nuclear warheads both in storage and on-alert.

  20. Air monitoring device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tissandier, Michael D. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    An air monitoring device (100) includes an outer casing (101) configured to receive an airflow (102) comprising particulate; a bore (103) located inside the outer casing (101); and a collection probe (104) located inside the outer casing (101), the collection probe (104) being configured such that there is a gap (105) between an exit of the bore (103) and an entrance of the collection probe (104), such that particulate in the airflow (102) having a diameter larger than a threshold flows through an interior of the collection probe (104).

  1. Specifications Physiological Monitoring System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The operation of a physiological monitoring system (PMS) is described. Specifications were established for performance, design, interface, and test requirements. The PMS is a compact, microprocessor-based system, which can be worn in a pack on the body or may be mounted on a Spacelab rack or other appropriate structure. It consists of two modules, the Data Control Unit (DCU) and the Remote Control/Display Unit (RCDU). Its purpose is to collect and distribute data from physiological experiments in the Spacelab and in the Orbiter.

  2. ACS CCDs daily monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirianni, Marco

    2006-07-01

    This program consists of a set of basic tests to monitor, the read noise, thedevelopment of hot pixels and test for any source of noise in ACS CCDdetectors. The files, biases and dark will be used to create referencefiles for science calibration. This programme will be for the entire lifetime of ACS.For cycle 15 the program will cover 18 months 12.1.06->05.31.08and it has been divied into three different proposal each covering six months.The three poroposal are 11041-11042-11043.

  3. Lithium niobate explosion monitor

    DOEpatents

    Bundy, C.H.; Graham, R.A.; Kuehn, S.F.; Precit, R.R.; Rogers, M.S.

    1990-01-09

    Monitoring explosive devices is accomplished with a substantially z-cut lithium niobate crystal in abutment with the explosive device. Upon impact by a shock wave from detonation of the explosive device, the crystal emits a current pulse prior to destruction of the crystal. The current pulse is detected by a current viewing transformer and recorded as a function of time in nanoseconds. In order to self-check the crystal, the crystal has a chromium film resistor deposited thereon which may be heated by a current pulse prior to detonation. This generates a charge which is detected by a charge amplifier. 8 figs.

  4. The GLAST Burst Monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Meegan, Charles; Fishman, Gerald; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen; Bhat, Narayana; Connaughton, Valerie; Briggs, Michael; Paciesas, William; Preece, Robert; Diehl, Roland; Greiner, Jochen; Kienlin, Andreas von; Lichti, Giselher; Steinle, Helmut; Kippen, R. Marc

    2007-07-12

    The GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) comprises an array of NaI and BGO scintillation detectors designed to enhance the scientific return from GLAST in the study of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). By observing in the 10 keV to 30 MeV energy range, GBM extends the spectral coverage of GRBs more than 3 decades below the LAT energy threshold. GBM computes burst locations on-board, allowing repointing of the GLAST Observatory to place strong bursts within the LAT field-of-view to observe delayed high-energy emission.

  5. PERSONAL RADIATION MONITOR

    DOEpatents

    Dilworth, R.H.; Borkowski, C.J.

    1961-12-26

    A transistorized, fountain pen type radiation monitor to be worn on the person is described. Radiation produces both light flashes in a small bulb and an audible warning tone, the frequency of both the tone and light flashes being proportional to radiation intensity. The device is powered by a battery and a blocking oscillator step-up power supply The oscillator frequency- is regulated to be proportional to the radiation intensity, to provide adequate power in high radiation fields, yet minimize battery drain at low operating intensities. (AEC)

  6. Milliwave melter monitoring system

    DOEpatents

    Daniel, William E.; Woskov, Paul P.; Sundaram, Shanmugavelayutham K.

    2011-08-16

    A milliwave melter monitoring system is presented that has a waveguide with a portion capable of contacting a molten material in a melter for use in measuring one or more properties of the molten material in a furnace under extreme environments. A receiver is configured for use in obtaining signals from the melt/material transmitted to appropriate electronics through the waveguide. The receiver is configured for receiving signals from the waveguide when contacting the molten material for use in determining the viscosity of the molten material. Other embodiments exist in which the temperature, emissivity, viscosity and other properties of the molten material are measured.

  7. Optical wet steam monitor

    DOEpatents

    Maxey, L.C.; Simpson, M.L.

    1995-01-17

    A wet steam monitor determines steam particle size by using laser doppler velocimeter (LDV) device to produce backscatter light. The backscatter light signal is processed with a spectrum analyzer to produce a visibility waveform in the frequency domain. The visibility waveform includes a primary peak and a plurality of sidebands. The bandwidth of at least the primary frequency peak is correlated to particle size by either visually comparing the bandwidth to those of known particle sizes, or by digitizing the waveform and comparing the waveforms electronically. 4 figures.

  8. Mitigation Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    The Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Report (SEIR) (September 1992) for the Proposed Renewal of the Contract between the United States Department of Energy and The Regents of the University of California for the Operation and Management of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory identifies the environmental impacts associated with renewing the contract and specifies a series of measures designed to mitigate adverse impacts to the environment. This Mitigation Monitoring Plan describes the procedures the University will use to implement the mitigation measures adopted in connection with the approval of the Contract.

  9. The Future of Fetal Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    J, Adam

    2012-01-01

    Fetal heart rate monitoring is the most common obstetric procedure, and yet it remains a frustrating technology, plagued by false-positive results and miscommunication between providers. A new generation of invasive and noninvasive monitoring technologies is under development and entering the clinic, including the STAN monitor (Neoventa Medical, Mölndal, Sweden), which improves monitoring accuracy by incorporating a proxy of the fetal ST-segment. New noninvasive fetal electrocardiography and uterine contraction monitoring technologies will bring novel metrics and potentially improved safety to obstetrics in coming years. PMID:23483429

  10. Rocket engine condition monitoring system

    SciTech Connect

    Hagar, S.K.; Alcock, J.F.

    1989-01-01

    It is expected that the Rocket Engine Condition Monitoring System (RECMS) program will define engine monitoring technologies and an integration approach which can be applied to engine development in support of advanced launch system objectives. The RECMS program approaches engine monitoring as a system which is fully integrated with the engine controller, vehicle monitoring system, and ground processing systems to ensure mission success in addition to engine reliability. The system components are monitored through health and performance sensors; they are analyzed with the diagnostic and prognostic algorithms and demonstrated by system testing with hardware from other advanced development programs.

  11. Space Technology for Patient Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    A contract for the development of an astronaut monitoring system in the early days of the space program provided Mennen Medical, Inc. with a foundation in telemetry that led to the development of a computerized medical electronic system used by hospitals. Mennen was the first company to adopt solid state design in patient monitoring and to offer multipatient telemetry monitoring. Telemetry converts instrument data to electrical signals and relays them to a remote receiver where they are displayed. From a central station, a nurse can monitor several patients. Company products include VISTA systems and Horizon 2000 Monitor.

  12. Ambient Monitoring Technology Information Center (AMTIC)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This site contains information on ambient air quality monitoring programs, monitoring methods, quality assurance and control procedures, and federal regulations related to ambient air quality monitoring.

  13. Crane hoisting monitoring using smartphone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xuefeng; Jiao, Bo; Zhang, Yang; Gao, Shunde; Yu, Yan

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, smart phone develops very fast, and it has been the most popular tool in daily life of the public. Smart phones, with powerful operating systems, data storage and processing function, varieties of high-performance sensors and easily data transmission when connected to network, are the good choice for structures status monitoring in some occasion. One kind of hoisting monitoring method was proposed in this paper based on smartphone and Monitoring App developed. Firstly, one monitoring App was designed and developed, which can monitor the acceleration and inclination information using MEMS sensors embedded in smartphone. Secondly, typical operation status model of crane hoisting was studied. Then one validation test of hoisting was designed and conducted to monitor the acceleration and inclination of different elements during the operation procedure of one crane. The test results show the feasibility of the crane hoisting safety monitoring method using smartphone.

  14. Remotely Monitored Sealing Array Software

    SciTech Connect

    2012-09-12

    The Remotely Monitored Sealing Array (RMSA) utilizes the Secure Sensor Platform (SSP) framework to establish the fundamental operating capabilities for communication, security, power management, and cryptography. In addition to the SSP framework the RMSA software has unique capabilities to support monitoring a fiber optic seal. Fiber monitoring includes open and closed as well as parametric monitoring to detect tampering attacks. The fiber monitoring techniques, using the SSP power management processes, allow the seals to last for years while maintaining the security requirements of the monitoring application. The seal is enclosed in a tamper resistant housing with software to support active tamper monitoring. New features include LED notification of fiber closure, the ability to retrieve the entire fiber optic history via translator command, separate memory storage for fiber optic events, and a more robust method for tracking and resending failed messages.

  15. Portal monitoring technology control process

    SciTech Connect

    York, R.L.

    1998-12-31

    Portal monitors are an important part of the material protection, control, and accounting (MPC and A) programs in Russia and the US. Although portal monitors are only a part of an integrated MPC and A system, they are an effective means of controlling the unauthorized movement of special nuclear material (SNM). Russian technical experts have gained experience in the use of SNM portal monitors from US experts ad this has allowed them to use the monitors more effectively. Several Russian institutes and companies are designing and manufacturing SNM portal monitors in Russia. Interactions between Russian and US experts have resulted in improvements to the instruments. SNM portal monitor technology has been effectively transferred from the US to Russia and should be a permanent part of the Russian MPC and A Program. Progress in the implementation of the monitors and improvements to how they are used are discussed.

  16. Fallout dosage and monitoring.

    PubMed

    KINSMAN, S

    1960-08-01

    At present there are a large number of people capable of conducting the task of surface and area radiation monitoring including external monitoring of personnel. Once the extent and the intensity of radioactivity in an area is determined, good use of personnel can be made without too much risk. This is fortunate for the medical profession whose personnel can devote their talents to casualty care during or following nuclear warfare. Most individuals who know how to detect and measure the extent of radioactive contamination are also capable of conducting personnel decontamination operations and would do so if necessary. Consequently the spread of contamination can be minimized by adequate decontamination and the medical personnel can treat casualties who are relatively free of external radioactive contamination. The appropriate use of trained manpower and radiation detection equipment which are available in California combined with sufficient rehearsals prior to a nuclear war will greatly reduce any casualty damage due to radioactive fallout.The chances of survival of individuals can be greatly improved with a little knowledge of protection from radioactive contamination and of salvage of food and water.

  17. Advances in intracranial monitoring.

    PubMed

    Blount, Jeffrey P; Cormier, Jason; Kim, Hyunmi; Kankirawatana, Pongkiat; Riley, Kristen O; Knowlton, Robert C

    2008-09-01

    Intracranial monitoring using electroencephalography (IC-EEG) continues to play a critical role in the assessment of patients with medically intractable localization-related epilepsy. There has been minimal change in grid or electrode design in the last 15-20 years, and the surgical approaches for implantation are unchanged. Intracranial monitoring using EEG allows detailed definition of the region of ictal onset and defines the epileptogenic zone, particularly with regard to adjacent potentially eloquent tissue. Recent developments of IC-EEG include the coregistration of functional imaging data such as magnetoencephalography to the frameless navigation systems. Despite significant inherent limitations that are often overlooked, IC-EEG remains the gold standard for localization of the epileptogenic cortex. Intracranial electrodes take a variety of different forms and may be placed either in the subdural (subdural strips and grids, depth electrodes) or extradural spaces (sphenoidal, peg, and epidural electrodes). Each form has its own advantages and shortcomings but extensive subdural implantation of electrodes is most common and is most comprehensively discussed. The indications for intracranial electrodes are reviewed.

  18. TOLEX-ADCP monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanawa, Kimio; Yoshikawa, Yasushi; Taneda, Takeshi

    Since February 1991, the Physical Oceanography Group, Tohoku University has conducted a program to monitor the oceanic current field across the Kuroshio over the Izu Ridge, south of Japan, using the Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) system installed on the ferry Ogasawara Maru. This ferry shuttles 58 times in a usual year between Tokyo and Chichijima in the Ogasawara (Bonin) Islands. This ADCP monitoring is regarded as one component of the Tokyo-Ogasawara Line Experiment (TOLEX). In this paper, we will briefly describe our ADCP system and data processing procedures, and will present several aspects of the current fields using the data obtained through January 1996. During the period, the Kuroshio took the bimodal paths of 34°N and 32°30‧N as mean positions on the ship course. In the sea south of the Kuroshio, many cyclonic and anticyclonic eddies with a scale of 200-400 km in diameter were observed with passing time of two-four months.

  19. Test Data Monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Bosas, Joseph

    2016-02-03

    The National Security Campus (NSC) collects a large amount of test data used to accept high value and high rigor product. The data has been used historically to support root cause analysis when anomalies are detected in down-stream processes. The opportunity to use the data for predictive failure analysis however, had never been exploited. The primary goal of the Test Data Monitor (TDM) software is to provide automated capabilities to analyze data in near-real-time and report trends that foreshadow actual product failures. To date, the aerospace industry as a whole is challenged at utilizing collected data to the degree that modern technology allows. As a result of the innovation behind TDM, Honeywell is able to monitor millions of data points through a multitude of SPC algorithms continuously and autonomously so that our personnel resources can more efficiently and accurately direct their attention to suspect processes or features. TDM’s capabilities have been recognized by our U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) sponsor for potential use at other sites within the NNSA. This activity supports multiple initiatives including expectations of the NNSA and broader corporate goals that center around data-based quality controls on production.

  20. Monitoring Outpatient Care

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Each year, health care costs for managing chronically ill patients increase as the life expectancy of Americans continues to grow. To handle this situation, many hospitals, doctors practices, and home care providers are turning to disease management, a system of coordinated health care interventions and communications, to improve outpatient care. By participating in daily monitoring programs, patients with congestive heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes, and other chronic conditions requiring significant self-care are facing fewer emergency situations and hospitalizations. Cybernet Medical, a division of Ann Arbor, Michigan-based Cybernet Systems Corporation, is using the latest communications technology to augment the ways health care professionals monitor and assess patients with chronic diseases, while at the same time simplifying the patients interaction with technology. Cybernet s newest commercial product for this purpose evolved from research funded by NASA, the National Institute of Mental Health, and the Advanced Research Projects Agency. The research focused on the physiological assessment of astronauts and soldiers, human performance evaluation, and human-computer interaction. Cybernet Medical's MedStar Disease Management Data Collection System is an affordable, widely deployable solution for improving in-home-patient chronic disease management. The system's battery-powered and portable interface device collects physiological data from off-the-shelf instruments.

  1. Acoustic emission monitoring system

    DOEpatents

    Romrell, Delwin M.

    1977-07-05

    Methods and apparatus for identifying the source location of acoustic emissions generated within an acoustically conductive medium. A plurality of acoustic receivers are communicably coupled to the surface of the medium at a corresponding number of spaced locations. The differences in the reception time of the respective sensors in response to a given acoustic event are measured among various sensor combinations prescribed by the monitoring mode employed. Acoustic reception response encountered subsequent to the reception by a predetermined number of the prescribed sensor combinations are inhibited from being communicated to the processing circuitry, while the time measurements obtained from the prescribed sensor combinations are translated into a position measurement representative of the location on the surface most proximate the source of the emission. The apparatus is programmable to function in six separate and five distinct operating modes employing either two, three or four sensory locations. In its preferred arrangement the apparatus of this invention will re-initiate a monitoring interval if the predetermined number of sensors do not respond to a particular emission within a given time period.

  2. Monitoring the Digital Divide

    SciTech Connect

    Cottrell, Les

    2003-05-28

    It is increasingly important to support the large numbers of scientists working in remote areas and having low bandwidth access to the Internet. This will continue to be the case for years to come since there is evidence from PingER performance measurements that the, so-called, digital divide is not decreasing. In this work, we review the collaborative work of The Abdus Salam International Center for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) in Trieste, a leading organization promoting science dissemination in the developing world- and SLAC in Stanford, to monitor by PingER, Universities and Research Institutions all over the developing world following the recent ''Recommendations of Trieste'' to help bridge the digital divide. As a result, PingER's deployment now covers the real-time monitoring of worldwide Internet performance and, in particular, West and Central Africa for the first time. We report on the results from the ICTP sites and quantitatively identify regions with poor performance, identify trends, discuss experiences and future work.

  3. FALLOUT DOSAGE AND MONITORING

    PubMed Central

    Kinsman, Simon

    1960-01-01

    At present there are a large number of people capable of conducting the task of surface and area radiation monitoring including external monitoring of personnel. Once the extent and the intensity of radioactivity in an area is determined, good use of personnel can be made without too much risk. This is fortunate for the medical profession whose personnel can devote their talents to casualty care during or following nuclear warfare. Most individuals who know how to detect and measure the extent of radioactive contamination are also capable of conducting personnel decontamination operations and would do so if necessary. Consequently the spread of contamination can be minimized by adequate decontamination and the medical personnel can treat casualties who are relatively free of external radioactive contamination. The appropriate use of trained manpower and radiation detection equipment which are available in California combined with sufficient rehearsals prior to a nuclear war will greatly reduce any casualty damage due to radioactive fallout. The chances of survival of individuals can be greatly improved with a little knowledge of protection from radioactive contamination and of salvage of food and water. PMID:14409247

  4. Intrapartum fetal monitoring.

    PubMed

    Cahill, Alison G; Spain, Janine

    2015-06-01

    Intrapartum fetal monitoring to assess fetal well-being during the labor and delivery process has been a central component of intrapartum care for decades. Today, electronic fetal monitoring (EFM) is the most common method used to assess the fetus during labor without substantial evidence to suggest a benefit. A Cochrane review of 13 trials, which included over 37,000 women, found that continuous EFM provided no significant improvement in perinatal death rate [risk ratio (RR) 0.86; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.59-1.23] or cerebral palsy rate (RR 1.75; 95% CI, 0.84-3.63) as compared with intermittent auscultation; however, there was a significant decrease in neonatal seizures (RR 0.50; 95% CI, 0.31-0.80). In addition, there was a significant increase in cesarean delivery (RR 1.63; 95% CI, 1.29-2.07) and operative vaginal delivery (RR 1.15; 95% CI, 1.01-1.33). Despite the lack of scientific support to suggest that EFM reduces adverse neonatal outcomes, its use is almost universal in the hospital setting and very likely has contributed to the rise in cesarean rate.

  5. Defibrillator/monitor/pacemakers.

    PubMed

    1998-02-01

    This study updates our May-June 1993 Evaluation of defibrillator/monitor/pacemakers, published in Health Devices 22(5-6), in which we tested eight units from six suppliers. For this Update Evaluation, we tested three additional units, each from a different supplier. We also present update information, including some new ratings, for most of the previously evaluated units. We judged the new units against the same basic criteria and rated and ranked them using the same scheme--with some minor revisions--as in our original Evaluation. We judged the suitability of these units for three primary clinical applications: (1) general crash-cart use, (2) prehospital (emergency medical service [EMS]) use, and (3) in-hospital transport use. Because our criteria have changed slightly since the original study, we have repeated them in this issue. The test methods have not changed significantly and can be found in the original 1993 Evaluation. For more detailed information about this technology, the environments in which these units are used, and the factors to consider when selecting this type of device, we encourage readers to refer to the following sections in the original Evaluation: the Clinical Perspective "The Importance of Early Defibrillation"; the Clinical and Technical Overview; and the Selection and Use Guide for Defibrillator/Monitor/Pacemakers.

  6. 1985 environmental monitoring report

    SciTech Connect

    Day, L.E.; Miltenberger, R.P.; Naidu, J.R.

    1986-04-01

    The environmental monitoring program is designed to determine that BNL facilities operate such that the applicable environmental standards and effluent control requirements have been met. The data were evaluated using the appropriate environmental regulatory criteria. The environmental levels of radioactivity and other pollutants found in the vicinity of BNL during 1985 are summarized in this report. Detailed data are not included in the main body of the report, but are tabulated and presented in Appendix D. The environmental data include external radiation levels; radioactive air particulates; tritium concentrations; the amounts and concentrations of radioactivity in and the water quality of the stream into which liquid effluents are released; the water quality of the potable supply wells; the concentrations of radioactivity in biota from the stream; the concentrations of radioactivity in and the water quality of ground waters underlying the Laboratoy; concentrations of radioactivity in milk samples obtained in the vicinity of the Laboratory; and the 1984 strontium-90 data which was not available for inclusion in the 1984 Environmental Monitoring Report. In 1985, the results of the surveillance program demonstraed that the Laboratory has operated within the applicable environmental standards.

  7. [Remote wireless monitoring].

    PubMed

    Villar-Montini, Alex

    2009-12-01

    The increasing device implantations to treat cardiovascular diseases such as arrhytmias and heart failures, aging of the population, and the growing number of patients with access to new therapies as well as the wider access to health systems are the reasons why the number of new implantations carried out each year is rising. Hence, we should have an equipment that can control these patients at a distance, making the follow-up closer. The answer to this enormous challenge is the remote monitoring of these devices. Biotronik is a pioneer in this task and since 2001 it has been comercializing pacemakers and portable wireless monitors (CardioMessenger). Currently, there are more than 100,000 installed systems. Thanks to the continuous and completely automatized follow-up, as well as the wireless net, the system integrity can be confirmed, and then proceed to adjust the therapies in an optimized manner according to each patient's needs; also take action to prevent the development of some arrhytmias, or even the evolution of a heart failure. Likewise, the system can improve the clynical efficiency of the treatment and help to economize to the Ministry of Healthcare.

  8. Monitoring Oxygen Status.

    PubMed

    Toffaletti, J G; Rackley, C R

    Although part of a common "blood gas" test panel with pH and pCO2, the pO2, %O2Hb, and related parameters are independently used to detect and monitor oxygen deficits from a variety of causes. Measurement of blood gases and cooximetry may be done by laboratory analyzers, point of care testing, noninvasive pulse oximetry, and transcutaneous blood gases. The specimen type and mode of monitoring oxygenation that are chosen may be based on a combination of urgency, practicality, clinical need, and therapeutic objectives. Because oxygen concentrations in blood are extremely labile, there are several highly important preanalytical practices necessary to prevent errors in oxygen and cooximetry results. Effective utilization of oxygen requires binding by hemoglobin in the lungs, transport in the blood, and release to tissues, where cellular respiration occurs. Hydrogen ion (pH), CO2, temperature, and 2,3-DPG all play important roles in these processes. Additional measurements and calculations are often used to interpret and locate the cause and source of an oxygen deficit. These include the Hb concentration, Alveolar-arterial pO2 gradient, pO2:FIO2 ratio, oxygenation index, O2 content and O2 delivery, and pulmonary dead space and intrapulmonary shunting. The causes of hypoxemia will be covered and, to illustrate how the oxygen parameters are used clinically in the diagnosis and management of patients with abnormal oxygenation, two clinical cases will be presented and described.

  9. Earth System Monitoring, Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orcutt, John

    This section provides sensing and data collection methodologies, as well as an understanding of Earth's climate parameters and natural and man-made phenomena, to support a scientific assessment of the Earth system as a whole, and its response to natural and human-induced changes. The coverage ranges from climate change factors and extreme weather and fires to oil spill tracking and volcanic eruptions. This serves as a basis to enable improved prediction and response to climate change, weather, and natural hazards as well as dissemination of the data and conclusions. The data collection systems include satellite remote sensing, aerial surveys, and land- and ocean-based monitoring stations. Our objective in this treatise is to provide a significant portion of the scientific and engineering basis of Earth system monitoring and to provide this in 17 detailed articles or chapters written at a level for use by university students through practicing professionals. The reader is also directed to the closely related sections on Ecological Systems, Introduction and also Climate Change Modeling Methodology, Introduction as well as Climate Change Remediation, Introduction to. For ease of use by students, each article begins with a glossary of terms, while at an average length of 25 print pages each, sufficient detail is presented for use by professionals in government, universities, and industries. The chapters are individually summarized below.

  10. Zebra mussel monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Hennagir, T.

    1994-01-01

    In less than a decade, zebra mussels have become the latest environmental scourge to plague the North American power industry. Infestations in the Great Lakes region have already reached natural disaster proportions. The invasion shows little sign of subsiding; Michigan's inland waters are the next most likely threatened area. In the southern United States, the mussles' migration has extended about 50 miles deeper than experts had originally predicted. By the year 2000, zebra mussel monitoring and control efforts will cost business and industry $5 billion, according to the federal Aquatic Nuisance Prevention and Control Act of 1990. Estimates of more than $1 million to control mussel fouling are projected for the Great Lakes area alone. While small independent hydropower stations are not as susceptible to zebra mussles as coal or nuclear facilities, there is cause for concern. Infestations can quickly foul hydropower plant components, hampering equipment operation and reducing facility efficiency. In extreme cases, leaving the mussels unchecked can result in stoplog gate flow blockage or false water level gauge readings. Advance prevention is often an effective first-line of defense against this troublesome, rapidly spreading and extremely prolific mollusk. Mussel monitoring efforts should begin a year in advance of when zebra mussels are expected to appear in a given location. Hydropower facility components that come into contact or rely exclusively on raw water are at greatest risk, as are other external components such as embayment walls, screens, trashracks and fish ladders.

  11. Environmental monitoring equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Perugini, F.

    1995-12-31

    For over 10 years GEOGUARD has been serving the waste industry with innovative, relevant and high quality products for ground water sampling, remediation pumping, and ground water monitoring. GEOGUARD has four advanced technology products for environmental monitoring. (1) MASTER-FLO{trademark} PUMPS collect accurate ground water samples and standardize field sampling procedures. MASTER-FLO{trademark} PUMPS are based upon a time proven bladder squeeze pump, the most accepted ground water sampling pump available, which can be operated with a flow through cell and low flow rates to minimize sample aeration and turbidity. (2) RELIA-FLO{trademark} PUMPS simplifiy ground water pollution clean ups. Pump and Test Remediation depends upon reliable pumping systems that can operate continually year after year in the most hostile environments. RELIA-FLO{trademark} PUMPS combine simplicity with versatility to satisfy the most demanding ground water pollution clean-up projects. (3) TUBER{trademark} measures and combines the latest sensor technology with a dedicated logger into one integrated unit, which can record well water levels, temperatures, pH and conductivity in two inch or larger wells. (4) TERRAPROBE{trademark} offers a versatile, portable alternative to drilling Wells for shallow ground penetration up to 30 feet. With TERRAPROBE{trademark}, samples for soil gas, water or soil can be easily acquired where vehicle access is not possible.

  12. Unattended Dual Current Monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Newell, Matthew R.; Parker, Robert F.; Jones, David C.

    2016-08-11

    The Unattended Dual Current Monitor (UDCM) is an ideal solution for current measurement needs such as ion chamber gamma measurements. The UDCM has two independent inputs and each input detects currents in two user selectable ranges, -0.2nA to -20nA or -20nA to -2uA. Measurement results can be retrieved via an Ethernet connection or by monitoring the TTL output pulses with a simple counter. Measurement data is also stored on a user accessible micro-SD card and automatically downloaded to a USB flash drive. A programmable negative High Voltage (HV) power supply provides detector bias voltages from 0 to -1,000V. The UDCM is fully compatible with the IAEA Multi Instrument Collect (MIC) software and responds to the existing MiniGRAND commands. The Ethernet port provides an IAEA RAINSTORM compliant data transfer and data security interface. The UDCM produces TTL pulses at a rate proportional to the input current, 100cps/nA. The UDCM can simplify instrumentation needs by enabling the use of a simple pulse counter for both neutron and gamma measurements. The UDCM is a simple instrument, inexpensive to manufacturer and designed for reliability.

  13. Welding monitoring system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babcock, Stephen G. (Inventor); Dyer, Gerald E. (Inventor); Gordon, Stephen S. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    This invention relates to systems for remotely monitoring automatic welding operations, and more particularly to a system wherein the welder is readily positionable, while components of the optical system remain fixed. A welder having an electrode is mounted in an enclosure containing a pair of mirrors. The electrode passes through an opening in the first mirror and a gas cup. The mirror reflects an image of a welding operation taken through the opening of the gas cup to the second mirror. The second mirror then reflects the image through a rotary coupling to a third mirror which, in turn, reflects the image to a receiving lense mounted to a second rotatable coupling. The image is then projected via a fiber optic bundle to a filter unit where selected wavelengths of light are filtered from the welding image. The filter unit is coupled to an enlarger which enlarges the image and passes it to a camera. The camera is connected to an electronic eclipser which selectively darkens the brightest portions of the image. Finally, the image is recorded by a video tape recorder and displayed by a monitor.

  14. OSS-1/contamination monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruger, R.; Triolo, J.; Mcintosh, R.

    1983-01-01

    A 20-cm high, 18-cm wide, and 30-cm long (8x7x12 inch) box weighing about 7 kg (15 lbs) and consuming about 7 watts of power was carried on the OSS-1 pallet to monitor the mass build-up or accretion of condensible, volatile materials on surfaces in the shuttle bay during all phases of ascent, on-orbit, and descent. Passively thermally controlled, the box holds two witness samples and four actively temperature controlled quartz crystal microbalances (TQCM) whose temperature can vary from -60 C to +80 C. Graphs show the accretion indicated by the TQCM during the launch and early orbital phase. Conditions during tail to the Sun, nose to the Sun, and bay to the Sun attitudes of the shuttle during STS-3 are reflected in temperatures indicated by the OSS-1 thermistor. These temperatures influence outgassing rates of various materials as well as measurements made by the contamination monitor package. The parameters that bear on TQCM measurements data are shown in graphs and discussed.

  15. Monitoring The Crab Pulsar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rots, Arnold H.; Swank, Jean (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The monitoring of the X-ray pulses from the Crab pulsar is still ongoing at the time of this writing, and we hope to be able to continue the campaign for the life of the XTE mission. We have established beyond all doubt that: (1) the X-ray main pulse leads the radio pulse by approximately 300 microseconds, (2) this phase lag is constant and not influenced by glitches, (3) this lag does not depend on X-ray energy, (4) the relative phase of the two X-ray pulses does not vary, and (5) the spectral indices of primary, secondary, and inter-pulse are distinct and constant. At this time we are investigating whether the radio timing ephemeris can be replaced by an x-ray ephemeris and whether any long-time timing ephemeris can be established. If so, it would enable use to study variations in pulse arrival times at a longer time scales. Such a study is easier in x-rays than at radio wavelengths since the dispersion measure plays no role. These results were reported at the 2000 HEAD Meeting in Honolulu, HI. Travel was paid partly out of this grant. The remainder was applied toward the acquisition of a laptop computer that allows independent and fast analysis of all monitoring observations.

  16. Packet personal radiation monitor

    DOEpatents

    Phelps, James E.

    1989-01-01

    A personal radiation monitor of the chirper type is provided for detecting ionizing radiation. A battery powered high voltage power supply is used to generate and apply a high voltage bias to a G-M tube radiation sensor. The high voltage is monitored by a low-loss sensing network which generates a feedback signal to control the high voltage power supply such that the high voltage bias is recharged to +500 VDC when the current pulses of the sensor, generated by the detection of ionizing radiation events, discharges the high voltage bias to +450 VDC. During the high voltage recharge period an audio transducer is activated to produce an audible "chirp". The rate of the "chirps" is controlled by the rate at which the high voltage bias is recharged, which is proportional to the radiation field intensity to which the sensor is exposed. The chirp rate sensitivity is set to be approximately 1.5 (chirps/min/MR/hr.). The G-M tube sensor is used in a current sensing mode so that the device does not paralyze in a high radiation field.

  17. Packet personal radiation monitor

    DOEpatents

    Phelps, J.E.

    1988-03-31

    A personal radiation monitor of the chirper type is provided for detecting ionizing radiation. A battery powered high voltage power supply is used to generate and apply a high voltage bias to a G-M tube radiation sensor. The high voltage is monitored by a low-loss sensing network which generates a feedback signal to control the high voltage power supply such that the high voltage bias is recharged to +500 VDC when the current pulses of the sensor, generated by the detection of ionizing radiatonevents, discharges the high voltage bias to +450 VDC. During the high voltage recharge period an audio transducer is activated to produce an audible ''chirp''. The rate of the ''chirps'' is controlled by the rate at which the high voltage bias is recharged, which is proportional to the radiation field intensity to which the sensor is exposed. The chirp rate sensitivity is set to be approximately 1.5 (chirps/min/MR/hr.). The G-M tube sensor is used in a current sensing mode so that the device does not paralyze in a high radiation field. 2 figs.

  18. MAMA Dark Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Colin

    2011-10-01

    This proposal monitors the behavior of the dark current in each of the MAMA detectors, to look for evidence of change in the dark rate, indicative of detector problems developing.The basic monitor takes two 1300s TIME-TAG darks bi-weekly with each detector. The pairs of exposures for each detector are linked so that they are taken at opposite ends of the same SAA free interval. This pairing of exposures will make it easier to separate long and short term temporal variability from temperature dependent changes.For both detectors, additional blocks of exposures are taken once a year. These are groups of three 1314 s TIME-TAG darks for each of the MAMA detectors, distributed over a single SAA free interval. This will give more information on the brightness of the FUV MAMA dark current as a function of the amount of time that the HV has been on, and for the NUV MAMA will give a better measure of the short term temperature dependence.

  19. MAMA Dark Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Wei

    2010-09-01

    This proposal monitors the behavior of the dark current in each of the MAMA detectors, to look for evidence of change in the dark rate, indicative of detector problems developing.The basic monitor takes two 1300s TIME-TAG darks bi-weekly with each detector. The pairs of exposures for each detector are linked so that they are taken at opposite ends of the same SAA free interval. This pairing of exposures will make it easier to separate long and short term temporal variability from temperature dependent changes.For both detectors, additional blocks of exposures are taken once a year. These are groups of three 1314 s TIME-TAG darks for each of the MAMA detectors, distributed over a single SAA free interval. This will give more information on the brightness of the FUV MAMA dark current as a function of the amount of time that the HV has been on, and for the NUV MAMA will give a better measure of the short term temperature dependence.

  20. The German Drought Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marx, Andreas; Zink, Matthias; Pommerencke, Julia; Kumar, Rohini; Thober, Stephan; Samaniego, Luis

    2015-04-01

    Soil moisture droughts reduce the amount of water available to plant growth potentially leading e.g. to crop failure or increased forest fire risk. The threat of human livelihoods in developing countries and large economic losses in developed ones are severe consequences of these events. Monitoring the current state of soil water content allows to improve water management to mitigate the associated damages. Since summer 2014, the German Drought Monitor (GDM, available at: www.ufz.de/droughtmonitor) has been established using an operational hydrological modeling system, which consists of 3 steps: (1) the daily download of meteorological forcing data, consistency check and interpolation of this data, (2) running the mesoscale Hydrologic Model (mHM; Samaniego et al. 2010) and saving the state variables at the end of the model run as restart-file for the next days run, and (3) calculation of the soil moisture index (SMI, Samaniego et al. 2013, JHM) and visualization of the drought data. The hydrological model mHM was used to generate daily soil moisture fields for the period 1954-2013 over the entire area of Germany at a high spatial resolution of 4 x 4 km². The model requires daily precipitation, temperature, and potential evapotranspiration as forcing. A three-layer soil scheme was used to model the soil moisture dynamics over the entire root zone depth. Based on the 60 year simulation of soil moisture, the frequency distributions have been calculated for each grid cell to derive the soil moisture index. In this beta version, we do a monthly online update of the SMI. Furthermore, a trend analysis of drought events for 69 German subregions since 1954 was conducted. It showed that for most parts of Germany, the frequency of abnormally dry conditions increased while the stronger drought situations with SMI<0.2 decreased at the same time. For the coming year, a stakeholder consultation is planned. The aim is to clarify for whom a drought monitor would be useful, what